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Full text of "Building & engineering news"

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S13MMERBELL 
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OAKLAND 

BUILDERS' 

EXCHANGE 

GLcncort 7400 



'PORTLAND 



a Sample Copy 

The NEW 

acificBuilder 

y construction newspaper 
e f~ r ^r^v-o^ro ^f fV,o con- 

;s in Central -thern 

i - r k c Jated, 

5 opened, contrac ward- 

. _., „„ „u...ea and sub-contracts let on 

all types of building construction, bridges, 
dams and harbor works, irrigation projects; 
machinery and equipment; water works 
and supplies business opportunities, build- 
ing permits, building contracts, mechanics' 
liens, acceptances, etc., etc. 

Keep informed on construction develop- 
ments in Central and Northern California 
and the major projects in Southern Califor- 
nia, the states of Oregon, Washington, Ne- 
vada and Arizona. 

The new DAILY PACIFIC BUILDER 
will afford a service that serves — both in 
Quality and Quantity. You, as a member 
of the construction fraternity, should not be 
without it. 

Subscription price $1.50 per month, or 
$15.00 a year, payable in advance. 

Send for free sample copy today. 

DAILY PACIFIC BUILDER 

545-547 Mission St. San Francisco, Calif. 
GArfield 8744-8745-8746 






Building and Engineering News 



B-Jt T" 



Devoted to the Architectural, Building, Engineering and Industrial Activities on the Pacific Coast 



Issued JDvery Saturday 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 3, 1931 



Thirty. First Year, No. 1 



Subscripts 



payable in ad- 



U. S. and Possessions, per year. $5.00 
Canadian and Foreign, per year.. 6.00 

Sinsle Copies 2lc 

Entered as second-class matter at 
San Francisco Post Office under act 
of Congress of March 3, 1S79. 



STARK - RATH PRINTING AND 

PUBLISHING CO., Publishers 

545-547 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfield 8744-8745-8746 

J. P. FARRELL, Editor 

J. E. ODGERS, Advertising Manager 



All communications for publication 
should l,e addressed to the Editor. 

Building and Engineering News will 
be sent to subscribers until ordered 
stopped and all orders to discontinue 
must be sent in writing to this office. 



BOILER-ELEVATOR 

INSPECTORS TO MEET 



Francisco, January 
lion will 



fornla Certified Boiler and Ele 
Inspectors will be held in the 
Auditorium 
6, 7, S. 

The first half of this ( 
be the elevator session. Able speak- 
ers will present interesting and edu- 
cational papers, dealing with new de- 
velopments in elevator construction, 
and also inspection problems in the 
field. 

The last half of the convention, 
commencing Wednesday, January 7 at 
2 P. M., will be the boiler session. 
Several very interesting papers about 
the 1400 pound per square inch boiler 
installation and on new methods of 
welding, will be read. 

The greater part of this session will 
be devoted to practical inspection 
problems in the field, and the applica- 
tion of the new and revised para- 
graphs of both the Boiler Safety Or- 
ders and the Air Pressure Tank Safe- 
ty Orders, or the Unfired Pressure 
Vessel Code. 



COMMITTEE ASKS 

DELAY IN LICENSE 
LAW LEGISLATION 



Postponement of all legislation bear- 
ing upon the registration of architects 
and engineers until after its report is 
submitted is asked by the joint com- 
mittee of architects and engineers set 
up recently to attempt to iron out the 
difficulties which have caused fric- 
tion between the two professions. 
While the points at issue between tho 
two professions are being considered 
by the committee, its members feel 
that no new legislation should be 
passed now which might add fuel to 
the fire. 

The joint cornmittee was set up by 
the American Institute of Architects 
and the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers, the Amercian Institute of 
Electrical Engineers and the Ameri- 
can Society of Merchanical Engineers. 
The architects are represented by J. 
Riely Gordon, C. Herrick Hammond, 
John Hall, Rankin and D. Everett 
Waid. chairman; the engineers by W. 
T. Chevalier, Robert Ridgway, Harry 
A. Kidder and P. A. Molitor, chair- 
man. 



The government has adopted and 
will pursue a policy of maintaining the 
highest prevailing wage scales in con- 
struction contracts, President Hoover 
announces. 

Mr. Hoover points out that the 
policy was first adopted a year ago 
when employers were called here for 
an agreement to maintain the then 
existing wage levels. He said it had 
been followed in every direction both 
as to existing contracts for construc- 
tion of government buildings through- 
out the Nation and as to contracts 
being 1st. 



COURT UPHOLDS 

REGISTRATION LAW 



An important ruling upholding the 
State Department of professional and 
Vocational Standards in enforcement 
of the Contractors' Registration Law 
was made by Judge Walter S. Gates 
in Department 8. Superior Court of 
Los Angeles County. December 17, 
says Southwest Builder and Contrac- 
tor. Two cases were at issue : Bur- 
nett vs. the Department of Profes- 
sional and Vocational Standards and 
Brkich vs. the Department of Profes- 
sional and Vocational Standards. 

Complaints had been filed with Jas. 
P. Collins, director of the department 
and Registrar of Contractors, against 
the plaintiffs in both cases and he had 
summoned them for hearing to show 
cause why their licenses as contrac- 
tors should not be suspended or re- 
voked. Both plaintiffs had applied for 
and obtained a temporary writ of pro- 
hibition to prevent the hearing. The 
cases were assigned for trail Decem- 
ber 17 and when called in court the 
Department of Professional and Vo- 
cational Standards countered with a 
demurrer. 

J. a. Boland, attorney for the plain- 
tiffs, attacked the constitutionality of 
the law, declaring that the legisla- 
ture had no power to confer upon 
any commissioner or board authority 
to conduct hearings for the revoca- 
tion of a state license. However, the 
court, in passing upon the cases, did 
not consider the question of constitu- 
tionality of the act, but sustained the 
demurrer and dissolved the writ of 
prohibition on the ground that the 
plaintiffs' remedy did not lie in such 
a procedure because provision is made 
in the law for appeal to the court 
from any ruling made by the Regis- 
trar of Contractors. Unless stayed by 
appeal to a higher court, the hearing 
ordered by the Registrar of Contrac- 
tors in the cases at issue will pro- 
ceed. 

Because of the great Importance of 
the cases, which are the first in con- 
nection with the Contractors' Regis- 
tration Law to reach the Superior 
Court, the Department of Professional 
and Vocational Standards was repre- 
sented by Attorney L. G. Campbell, 
representing the attorney - general; 
Keith Carlin, attorney for the depart- 
ment, and Attorney J. W. Morin of 
Pasadena, who made the original 
draft of the contractors' law passed 
by the legislature. 



Charles U. Heuser, general engi- 
neering contractor of Glendale, has 
been elected president of the Southern 
California Chapter, Associated Gen- 
eral Contractors of America. K. P. 
Lowell, of K. P. Lowell & Co., Ltd., 
Los Angeles, was elected vice-presi- 
dent. Directors are: Newell Chardee. 
Jams A. Lynch. J. M. Macdonald. W. 
J. Escherich, Geo. R. Wells, Wm. A. 
Johnson, R. A. Wattson, George J. 
Bock, M. S. Ross, and Melville Dozier, 
Junior. 



MATERIAL DEALERS 

TO FINANCE HOMES 



The 



nber 



iated Leaders of 
& Fuel I lealers at I hi. ago ha 
to organize a mortgage corporation to 
finance home building. 

The plan provides for a subscrip- 
tion of {2,500,000 by the lumber man- 
ufacturers to be represented by 6 per 
cent cumulative preferred stock and 
a subscription of a similar amount by 
tin- retailers to be represented by com- 
mon stork, subscriptions to be pay- 
able over a period of three years. 

The plan also contemplates eventual 
bond issues up to $28,333,333, provid- 
ing a total capital of $33,333,33:; Loans 
will be made up to 75 per cent of 
the valuation of the property, 15 per 
cent being allowed for second mort- 
gages and 60 per cent for first mort- 
gages. It is expected the new cor- 
poration will be organized and func- 
tioning by April 1, 1931. 

Dealers participating in the plan 
will each have to subscribe $3000 a 
year for three years and adopt a mer- 
chandising policy of controlled mar- 
keting of complete homes to the con- 



CLAY PRODUCTS 

INSTITUTE ISSUES 
PRODUCTS MANUAL 



The Clay Products Institute of Cali- 
fornia, 611 Architects' Euilding, Los 
Angeles, is distributing complimentary 
copies of the "Clay Products Man- 
ual" to all certificated architects, reg- 
istered engineers and others directly 
connected with the building industry. 
The manual is sent only upon writ- 
ten request. 

The manual, compiled by Norman 
W. Kelch assisted by M. C. Poulsen. 
contains considerable new data which 
have been obtained in connection with 
research work carried on by the In- 
stitute during the past several years, 
together with carefully selected data 
derived fro ma variety of authorities 
on the various subjects. 

It contains complete information re- 
garding the uses and merits of the 
following burnt clay products: Com- 
mon, face, fire, paving, and sewer 
brick, vitrified sewer pipe and liners, 
vitrified segmental blocks, loadbear- 
ing, partition, roof, and drain tile, ter- 
ra cotta. flue lining, fire clay vents, 
chimney pipe, and patent chimneys. 



The Division of Simplified Practice 
of the Bureau of Standards, Depart- 
ment of Commerce recently announced 
that Simplified Practice Recommenda- 
tion Number 57 — Wrought-Iron and 
Wrought-Steel Pipe, Valves, and Fit- 
tings has been reaffirmed by the 
standing committee of the industry, 
without change, for another year. A 
survey of the 1929 production of this 
product, conducted prior to the re- 
vision meeting, indicated the de- 
gree of adherence to the recommenda- 
tion to be approximately 98 per cent. 



Two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, Ja 



STABILIZING AND IMPROVING 

THE EFFECT OF UNEMPLOYMENT 



For many years the General Elec- 
tric Company has been making con- 
stant endeavors, each one a step in a 
comprehensive program, for removing 
fear of the future from the minds of 
the workers in the shops, that is his 
constant fear of not being able to 
provide for and take care of his re- 
sponsibilities, first to his parents, or, 
if he has taken on further responsi- 
bities, to his wife and children. 

The first item to give peace and 
security of mind is provision f)or 
the uncertainty of life. In 1919 Free 
Group Life Insurance was offered by 
the Company, to which later was 
added a participation by the em- 
ployees, so that the life insurance of 
each employee has been increased. 
This has been received very well by all 
the employees, and all new employees 
coming into the organization, after five 
years of service, come under its 
provisions. The maximum life in- 
surance offered free by the Company is 
$1500 and the Additional Insurance, 
paid for by the employee, varies de- 
pending upon his age, service and 
salary, but usually is in the same 
amount or larger than the free in- 
surance offered by the Company. 
This has worked out quite satisfac- 
torily and since the inauguration of 
the plan $6,500,000 has been paid to 
the families of deceased employees. 
The organization of the General Elec- 
tric Company is now so large that 
there are deaths in its "family" each 
day, and each month a roster of those 
departed is published, where it is 
seen that the reaper has taken young 
people as well as old. Life insurance 
In this way does much to ameliorate 
the tragic circumstance of death and 
relieves somewhat the hardship of the 
departure of the family breadwinner, 
either in whole or in part. 

The second matter of importance in 
assuring peace of mind, not only of 
the employee but even more frequent- 
ly of the wife, is the ownership of the 
home. While the General Electric Co. 
has never been in the position of land- 
lord, it does assist the employees in 
acquiring or building homes. In the 
last seven years 2500 homes, worth 
$19,000,000 have been acquired or built 
by the employees, with a payment on 
their part of upwards of $6,000,000. 
the balance being held in the form of 
first and second mortgages by regular 
financial institutions, the Company 
making provisions so the employees 
can borrow this money on a favor- 
able basis. To date there has been no 
loss in connection with this work, 
either to the banks or the Company. 

The third is a plan to enable the 
worker to put something aside for the 
inevitable "rainy day." The General 
Electric Company, like many compan- 
ies, started with the plan of having 
employees subscribe to its common 
stock. But its common stock, of 
course, is subject to the fluctuations 
of all stock* and soon after the sub- 
scription was offered the market price 
went down. Many of the employees 
were frightened and cancelled their 
subscriptions. Later on the price went 
up and many thousands of employees 
saw the opportunity to make a profit 
and sold their stock, so it was not 
effective in promoting saving by the 
employees or having the employees be- 
come financially interested in the 
Company in which they were spend- 
ing their lives. Therefore, a new com- 
pany was organized, known as the G. 
E. Employees Securities Corporation, 



Address 


of Gerard Swope, 


President, 


General Electric Com- 




WGY and the NBC 


network 1 


rom Schenectady, De- 


cember 18 





where the General Electric Company 
takes the stock risk and the employ- 
ees subscribe for its bonds. These 
bonds are not subject to the fluctua- 
tions of the market but are redeem- 
able at cost at any time the employee 
so desires. While these bonds are 
held by the employee and he is in the 
active service of the Company, he re- 
ceives a return of 8%. The employees 
elect directors who represent them on 
the Board and are familiar with the 
transactions taking place, and each 
year a report of its operations is pub- 
lished. This G. E. Employees Securi- 
ties Corporation is the largest single 
holder of General Electric common 
stock and its other funds are diversi- 
fied in investments in public utility 
companies throughout the United 
States. These companies at the same 
time are customers of the General 
Electric Company, so the employees 
are financially interested not only in 
the Company for which they work but 
also its customers. These invest- 
ments have been so diversified that 
the market value even today exceeds 
the cost and the income return has al- 
ways been ample to pay the return 
on the bonds and stock *hat have 
been issued. Upwards of 36,000 em- 
ployees now hold bonds, with a total 
value of 541,000,000. 

The fourth item to give security and 
peace of mind is provision for old age. 
Of course, if each employee made pro- 
vision, along the line of the above, for 
death, a home and savings, old age 
provision, theoretically, might not be 
necessary, but experience has proven 
that it is. The General Electric Com- 
pany in 1912 adopted a Pension Plan 
which gave a pension to every em- 
ployee and this has since been supple- 
mented by what we call an Addition- 
al Pension Plan, whereby the em- 
ployee contributed \Vz% of his earn- 
ings. This will have the effect of in- 
creasing his pension on retirement by 
approximately 50%, so that in some 
cases the employee may retire on a 
pension of three-quarters of the in- 
come he has received while in the ac- 
tive service of the Company, one- 
third of this pension being provided 
by the Additional Pension which he 
has paid for and the balance by the 
Pension provisions of the Company. 
These Pensions are paid from a Trust 
FundJ which has been set aside quite 
separately and apart from the Com- 
pany's operations. The amount the 
employee has put aside in the addi- 
tional Pension Plan is always his; if 
he leaves the Company he receives 
this money plus interest; if he dies, 
his beneficiary receives it and if he 
lives to old age he enjoys it. Since 
the inauguration of the plan, the Pen- 
sions paid to retiring employees have 
amounted to almost $4,000,000 and 
there are approximately 1000 on the 
Pension rolls of the Company at the 
present time. 

The fifth and probably the most 
portant from the standpoint of 
worker, is the recurrent dread i 
fear of unemployment. For years 
General Electric Company has been|fl 
developing methods of stabilizing < 
ployment for its workers. This -\ 
les, of course, with the product. I 
easiest in a standardized line, which! 
does not become obsolescent and doesf 



not deteriorate. One such article is 
the incandescent lamp, where for 
many years we have been able to 
avoid unemployment because of sea- 
sonal fluctuations by making lamps in 
the summer time, when fewer lamps 
are used, storing them and distrib- 
uting them to our customers in the 
fall and winter months when the days 
are shorter. 

The other end of the line, and, of 
course, very much more difficult, is 
our engineering products, such as 
large turbines, where due to the prog- 
ress of the art or the demands of the 
customers, no two turbines ordered 
at different times of the larger sizes 
are alike and very little can be done 
on these engineering products in the 
way of stabilization of employment. 
Notwithstanding, on the smaller en- 
gineering products, in salck times we 
do make parts that are used gener- 
ally and interchangeably and place 
them in stock. The plan has been 
worked out throughout the Company 
to further as far as possible, this 
policy of stabilization of employment. 
Every effort is being made to carry 
out this plan effectively. The plan lays 
down certain principles which the 
management of each works does its 
best to follow, first when business is 
increasing and secondly when work 
begins to fall off. 

But no one company is able to grap- 
ple effectively with this problem of 
cyclical variations in business, so the 
best that can be done is to have a 
plan which will ameliorate the hard- 
ships when they do arise. Five years 
ago a plan of unemployment pensions, 
loans and relief was offered, but at 
that time the employees considered 
unemployment remote and it was not 
accepted. This year it was again pro- 
posed and received immediate accept- 
ance. 

Fundamental in this new plan for 
relief are the following principles: 

1. Joint and equal contributions by 
employees of the Company. 

2. Joint participation in the admin- 
istration of the plan. 

3. Aid through group action to tnose 
workers who are in need or requ're 
temporary loans, or who become un- 
employed, or for whom only part - 
time work is available. 

4. In times of unemployment emerg- 
ency, co-operation and assistance from 
those employees of the Company not 
usually affected by unemployment, 
and assistance by the Company in 
equal amount. 

The plan is adopted by each works 
as a unit, by a majority vote of elig- 
ible employees. It has now been 
adopted or is being considered by the 
employees of all works. It is of fur- 
their interest, that the plan is quite 
generally favored by departments 
which are not usually subject to lay- 
off in periods of unemployment and 
whose members would not make nor- 
mal contributions to the fund, but 
would contribute during the unem- 
ployment emergencies. 

This plan is not final in form or in 
substance and may be modified by 
joint action of the employes and the 
Company. It is an interesting experi- 
ment in which the Company is glad 
to join its employees, first, in endeav- 
oring to find a solution, and, second, 
in ameliorating the tragic effects of 
unemployment on particular employ- 
, who are in no sense responsible 

I for their unemployment. 

Under the original provisions of this 
Ian as announced last June, no em- 

' ployee was eligible for unemployment 



Saturday, Januarj S, 1981 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Three 



i.i .!<• 



benefits una»r it unless ho had 1 
payments .if one per cenl oi wagi i In 

to the fund tor a period i>f six mis. 

This limitation would have il,l:.>"l 

Initial payments In the earliest In- 
stance until next February. In the 
light of the emergency now existing 

II,,. iiavmi'iil of ln-nellts and the ,-\- 
teni Ion ot loans to loyed work- 
ers were oommencei iei r i. and 

tl„. company h siri.-n-.-l> l -raiiii.-il tlrat 
it has found this step possible as a 
means of alleviating the condition of 
those for whom no work is avall- 
.,1,1,., Hrnrlit payments now eorr.-ist. 
of 60% of the wanes of those entirely 
unemployed or a smaller amount suf- 
lleient to afford Sri';, of normal w.r <- 
,,, those on less than half time em- 
pl, -mii. nt. Loans are being made in 

those urgent eases where the - 

parrv feels that the real distress other- 
wise arising must be obviated. 

The comments In regard to this Un- 
employment Emergency Plan from 
the organization have been very grat- 
ifying, indeed, not only from the 
workmen in the shops, even including 
. I. .-, who are not members of the 
plan, who are glad to help their 
brother employees who are not so for- 
tunate as to have work, but also f.om 
people in the c mercial offices, re- 
moved thousands of miles from the 
factories, the main comments we have 
had being "Why was the percentage 
made so low as 1%" and "Why have 
we not begun this earlier." These 
are evidences of how closely the or- 
ganization Is knit together, the plan, 
therefore, tending to improve the 
unity and spirit of the organization 

Trie Company also announced last 
week a further plan for the year 1931 
of guaranteeing fifty weeks work of 
not less than thirty hours each week 
in the Incandescent Lamp Depart- 
ment, which I referred to earlier in 
my talk, where we are dealing with a 
standardized product not subject to 
obsolescence and deterioration. This 
plan is entirely voluntary and will 
not be adopted unless 60% or more 
of the employees in the works are in- 
terested and every employee agrees 
to have a further "anchor to wind- 
' ward" setting aside 1% of his earn- 
ings. The Company guarantees 5% in- 
terest and the money so saved al- 
ways belongs to the employee. He 
takes it with him if he leaves. If he 
dies the accumulation is given to his 
beneficiary and if he remains with the 
Company until he retires on pension, 
it is added to his retirement allow- 
ance. This plan goes into; effect Jan. 
1, 1931. if the employees desire it. It 
will be interesting to see what re- 
action this received. 

These are definite, specific things 
that the Company has done, first to 
stabilize, and second to ameliorate the 
tragic effect of unemployment. We 
are now in a situation where things 
must be done on a broader scale than 
this. The efforts of a constructive 
character that, are being made to re- 
lieve distress and to avoid and ameli- 
orate these things in the future are 
having and should have very general 
support. 



LEGAL DECISIONS AFFECTING 

HIGHWAY CONTRACTORS REVIEWED 



VEHICULAR TUNNEL PROPOSED 
FOR LOS ANGELES 
Tentative plans for a proposed ve- 
hicular tunnel under Cerritos channel, 
connecting Terminal Island with the 
mainland, have been submitted to the 
Los Angeles board of harbor commis- 
sioners. The plans were prepared by 
George F. Nicholson, harbor engineer, 
and provide for a concrete tube 5,375 
ft. long. The estimated cost is $6,250- 
000. The tunnel would relieve motor 
car and truck traffic congestion in the 
harbor area. The height of the tube 
would be 40 ft. and the width 38 ft. 
Plans call for a two-way. 25-ft. drive- 
way in the center, with sidewalks on 
either side. A bascule bridge now 
carries traffic across the channel, and 
tliis bridge would be retained for rail- 
road traffic. 



When the Creator made the 
world he did not stop to equip It 
with highways and Itflgation has 

followed the course of highway 
construction, according to J, F. 
Ingham, professor of constitution- 
al law and evidence at Dickinson 
College, in a report to the Ameri- 
can Road Builders' Association. 
Take, for instance, the seven de- 
cisions published herewith.— Edi- 
tor. 



Surety Bond— A case of great in- 
terest to contractors and material 
men is Greene County vs. Southern 
Surety Company 292 Pa. 304, in which 
the court decided that the surety com- 
pany was not responsible for claims 
made for the labor and material fur- 
nished in the construction of a high- 
way by the county. The decision in 
this case was based principally upon 
the wording of the bond accompany- 
ing the contract, which indicated in 
the opinion of the supreme court that 
there was no intention expressed in 
the bond that it should be for the 
benefit of any other than the county. 
The creditors were regarded as third 
persons, not parties to the contract, 
and the bond could not inure to their 
benefit. 

Misrepresentation — Another case in- 
volving the contract phase of highway 
law is that of Jackson vs. State. 205 
N. T. 658, in which the withholding 
of a material fact, amounting to a 
misrepresentation on the part of the 
state, entitled the contractor to dam- 
ages. 

The state let a contract for the ex- 
cavation of a portion of a canal. Bor- 
ings had been made by the state, and 
in giving the information to the bid- 
ders, the material was stated to be 
of certain kinds and classes, easy to 
excavate. At the time of the mak- 
ing of the contract the state had oth- 
er information classifying the mate- 
rial as being a compacted mass of 
hard-pan. much more expensive to ex- 
cavate. 

The courc said: "A party to a con- 
tract cannot by misrepresentation of 
a material fact, induce the other party 
to the contract to enter into it to his 
damage, and then protect himself 
from the legal effect of such misrep- 
resentation by inserting in the con- 
tract a clause to the effect that he Is 
not to be held liable for the misrep- 
resentation which induced the other 
party to enter into the contract. The 
effect of misrepresentation and fraud 
cannot be thus easily avoided. If it 
could be, the implied covenant of good 
faith and fair dealing, existing in 
every contract, would cease to exist." 

Labor — Matters of great import to 
those interested in the "open shop" 
theory of labor are those treated in 
the report of William M. Cannon. Esq., 
referee, made October 30, 1929, to the 
U. S. District Court for the Southern 
District of New York, in the case *>f 
Levering and Garrigues Co. vs. Paul 
J. Morris. Judge Cannon decreed: 
"That the defendants (members of 
voluntary labor organization) should 
be permanently restrained and en- 
joined from inducing, or attempting to 
induce, owners, architects or general 
contractors to let no subcontract to 
the plaintiffs for the erection of struc- 
tural iron and steel in buildings now 
being or to be erected in the Metro- 
politan District of New York by send- 
ing them circulars or other writing 
stating, threatening, warning or in- 
timating that members of the unions 
associated with the international may 
or will refuse to work on building's 
upon which plaintiffs have subcon- 
tracts or by sympathetic strikes," etc. 

Other cases of interest are: Aeolian 



Company vs. Fisher, 35 Fed. ((2d) 34, 
Collective refusal of i"«-:ii workmen to 
work with non-union workmen em- 
ployed in Installing goods shipped in- 
to state is not a violation of the Sher- 
man Anti-Trust Act. 

Alco-Zanders Company vs. Amalga- 
mated, 35 Fed. (2d) 203: Labor or- 
ganlzatlon procuring strikes in non- 
union plants to stop production and 
prevent competition in other states 
constitutes res trainable violation of 
Sherman Anti-Trust Act, 

Liability for Injuries — Appeal of the 
City of Erie, 147 Atl. 58: City over- 
seeing work of sewer contractor was 
liable for injuries to pedestrian fall- 
ing into open trench which city failed 
to properly safeguard. It can not es- 
cape liability by placing work in 
charge of an independent contractor. 

McCrary Company vs. White Coal 
Power Company, 35 Fed. (2d) 142: 
Contractor constructing water works 
for town on cost plus basis, and hav- 
ing supervision over work, is an inde- 
pendent contractor and the town is 
not liable for his negligence. 

Defects in Design and Workmanship 
— Tooker vs. Lonky, 147, Atl. 445: In- 
dependent contractor is liable in ex- 
oneration of employer only for defects 
in doing work, not for defect in de- 
sign. (Excavation causing collapse of 
adjoining building). 

Falkinburg vs. Venango Township, 
147 Atl. 62; There is a rebuttable pre- 
sumption that the township supervi- 
sors have properly performed their du- 
ties and taken steps necessary to give 
validity to their official acts. 

Power to Contract — Forseman vs. 
Gregg Township, 147 Atl. 64: A town- 
ship contract for the purchase of road 
machinery must be approved by an 
officer of the state highway depart- 
ment before it is actually entered in- 
to. Contract was invalid because ap- 
proval was not obtained and, there- 
fore, could not be enforced. One deal- 
ing with officials of a quasi-municipal- 
ity must take notice of its limited 
powers to contract. 

Strauss and Company vs. Berman, 
147 Atl. 85: One who signs acceptance 
of a proposition submitted to him in- 
dividually by a contractor is held in- 
dividually liable thereof although he 
wrote in the name of the corporation. 
Fidelity and Deposit Company vs. 
Wheeler. 34 Fed. (2d) 892: Agreement 
by creditor to hold surety harmless 
from all claims arising under surety 
bond in consideration of surety pay- 
ing creditor stipulated sum and waiv- 
ing all claims for reimbursement Is 
valid and enforcible, and the one 
promise is consideration for the other. 
Completion Within Specified Time— 
Layne-Bowler Company vs. Glenwood 
34 Fed. (2d) SS9: Where the contract 
set no date for final completion, hut 
the bond stipulated against suit on 
the contract after a date certain in 
the two will be construed together, 
and the contractor who breaches the 
contract is estopped to claim the 
right to continue work after suoh 
date. 



The Division of Simplified Practice 
of the Bureau of Standards, Depart- 
ment of Commerce, announces that 
Simplified Practice Recommendation 
No. 57 — Wrought-Iron and Wrought- 
Steel Pipe, Valves, and Fittings has 
been reaffirmed by the standing com- 
mittee of the industry, without change 
for another year. 

A survey of the 1929 production of 
this product, conducted prior to the 
revision meeting, indicated the de- 
gree of adherence to the recommenda- 
tion to be approximately 9S per cent. 



Four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



THE OBSERVER 
What He Hears and Sees on His Rounds 



Formation 'of a federation seeking 
closer co-operation among the clay 
products industries was suggested at 
the- annual meeting of the American 
Face Brick Association by O. W. 
Renkert of the Metropolitan Paving 
Brick Company of Canton, Ohio. Ren- 
kert urged selection of a strong leader 
at the head of such a federation, but 
with the various groups retaining 
their own organizations to handle 
their special problems. The mem- 
bership committee authorized the 
appointment of a committee to give 
the matter further consideration. 



California continues to hold her own 
In building operations. According to 
figures compiled by S. W. Straus & 
Co., this state continues to hold sec- 
ond place among the twelve leading 
states in the Union. Herewith are 
published statistics from the twelve 
leading states, the figures being based 
on building permits granted: 
N». of Places 

Reported Est. Cost 

New York 48 $48,683,399 

California 67 10,545,583 

Massachusetts 29 7.862,664 

Ohio 37 6.839,252 

Illinois 51 6, 1ST, 300 

New Jersey 36 5,660.327 

Pennsylvania 31 5,552,059 

Michigan 22 5,013,071 

Texas 21 3,914,909 

Washington 12 3.758,815 

Wisconsin 20 3,095,922 

Connecticut 20 2,344,378 

A system of licensing contractors as 
a means of promoting safety on con- 
struction operations was advocated by 
Frances Perkins, Industrial cemmis- 
aloner of New York, at the 14th annual 
safety conference of that state. In 
her address she said: "We have ex- 
cellent results from certain large 
contractors who have organized acci- 
dent prevention and have obtained 
success as great as any industry, but 
the accident rate among the fiy-by- 
night building contractors is so horri- 
fying high as to necessntate some im- 
mediate and vigorous steps to stem 
the toll of life. Irresponsibility is 
rife among certain contractors and 
the only obvious remedy is a system 
of licensing whereby no contractor 
would be allowed to operate without 
showing that he is able to protect 
the lives of his workers adequately. 
The doctor must be licensed, and so 
must the hair dresser, the manicurist, 
the chiropodist. No matter if his 
work only concerns individuals or 
small groups nearly any other ex- 
ecutant must be licensed, and he 
should be. Yet a man is permitted to 
engage in the highly dangerous pro- 
ject of running up skyscrapers, to 
hire dozens or hundreds of workmen, 
and he need have no license at all." 



When dinner time comes around in 
these modern times, does mother put 
on her hat, grab the children and 
meet papa for a table d'hote instead 
of putting the potatoes on to boil at 

Yes, the National Restaurant As- 
sociation is reported as saying. Every- 
one i» eating where a check comes 
with the dessert, and only 20 per cent 
of all apartment buildings have kitch- 
ens or kitchenettes. 

No, says the National Association of 
Real Estate Boards, 20,000 apartments 
in 26 representative cities show only 



36 units without kitchens or kitchen- 
ettes, and if they rent 'em, they use 
"em, because they cost more "with" 
than "without." 



The estimated cost of the Boulder 
dam, reservoir and power house is 
$109,800,000, according to information 
given out by the Department of the 
Interior. This work is to be let in a 
single contract and on account of its 
magnitude, a Washington dispatch 
says, only four or five contracting 
firms in the country can bid on it. It 
will be surprising, however, says 
Southwest Builder and Contractor, if 
a larger number of bids are not re- 
ceived, since a combination of large 
firms interested in different parts of 
the work and capable of qualifying 
may be formed to submit proposals. 
Reports indicate that negotiations for 
a number of such combinations have 
been in progress, with indications 
that they will be successfully ar- 
ranged. 



This California case is probably 
good law in many states. Wm. Doug- 
las, M. D. Haubert and Theodore Cit- 
izen, partners, were engaged in roof- 
ing a dwelling house in San Diego, 
Calif., by use of waterproof paper and 
melted tar. A vat in which the tar 
was heated was left in the street 
against the curb in front of the house 
undergoing construction, with the 
tongue of the vehicle resting on a 
sand pile. Soon after the employees 
left work the plaintiff's son, 7 years 
old. stepped upon the vat platform and 
began stirring the tar with a stick 
which had been left projecting from 
the vat. His weight upset the vehicle, 
causing the tar to be poured over him. 

The California Supreme Court sus- 
tained the jury's decision of the lower 
court: that the vehicle, considering its 
position, was an attractive nuisance 
to children and that the defendants 
were liable for the death of the child. 
Morse v. Douglas, July, 1930, Cali- 
fornia. 



Rejection of bids on laying of water 
mains by the water board of Grant's 
Pass, Ore., so that the contract might 
be awarded to a local contractor, was 
protested by Portland Chapter, Asso- 
ciated General Contractors, as unfair 
to publicly invited outside bidders on 
the ground that they were put to an 
unwarranted expense in making es- 
timates of the cost of the work. While 
the law requires advertising for bids 
on all important public work done by 
contract, and they may not be legally 
restricted to contractors of any lo- 
cality, outside contractors should be 
advised in some way of the situation 
when it is known in advance that 
their bids will not be considered. 



A fight for exclusion of Russian 
goods, including lumber, by legisla- 
tive action during the present short 
session of Congress, continuance of 
the program for extension of big mill 
manufacturing and grading practices 
to small mills and probably formation 
of sales organizations to represent 
various small mill groups and perfec- 
tion of plans for retail cooperation 
involving the establishment and mar- 
keting of a "quality" brand of south- 
ern pine through selected dealers, 
were determined on at the fall meet- 
ing of the Southern Pine Association 
at New Orleans, according to the 
American Lumberman. No definite ac- 
tion on the proposed legislation for 
extension of Interstate Commerce 



ping 

Price of cement, alongside dock. 
New York, was reduced 3c per barrel 
to $2.40 on Nov. 13, the first price 
change in a year. This is the price 
to contractors and dealers. The deal- 
ers' price delivered on the job is $2.10, 
unchanged since July. Mill prices are 
$1.85 at Hudson, N. Y.. and $1.75 at 
Northampton, Pa., unchanged in a 



A smaller increase in unemployment 
of trade union labor than usual in 
the first half of December is reported 
by the American Federation of La- 
in >r, although a general increase in 
tiie number of jobless was recorded. 
The report, made public by William 
Green, president, said the total now 
unemployed with estimated at 5,300,- 
000, and that "suffering from unem- 
ployment is already intense." 



A series of meetings of electrical 
men, representing city inspection de- 
partments, the Industrial Accident 
Commission, contractors, power com- 
panies, and other branches of the in- 
dustry, is being held in a number of 
southern California cities. The object 
of the meetings is to acquaint those 
interested with the requirements of 
the 1930 National Electrical Code and 
with the Electrical Safety Orders of 
the Commission. 

The meetings are usually held in 
schoolhouses where blackboards are 
available, and consist primarily of a 
talk, illustrated by drawings on the 
blackboard, explaining many of the 
more important rules in the National 
Electrical Code and the corresponding 
requirements of the Electrical Safety 
Orders. The talk is given by James 
M. Evans, Electrical Engineer with 
the Board of Fire Underwriters of the 
Pacific. During the address those 
present are urged to ask questions 
regarding the rule under discussion 
at that particular time, and the var- 
iations between the Electrical Safety 
Orders and the Code rules are ex- 
plained. 

The meeting is opened by the local 
Electrical Inspector, who explains the 
purposes and then follows a brief talk 
on first-aid methods and a demonstra- 
tion of the Schaefer, or prone pres- 
sure, method of artificial respiration. 
Mr. Evans is then introduced, and 
gives the illustrated talk on the Code. 

The meetings are being well at- 
tended and are producing good re- 
sults. The number in attendance var- 
ies from 35 to over 100. Meetings have 
been held recently in Riverside, Po- 
mona, San Bernardino, Alhambra and 
Ingle wood. 



When the Board of Education of 
Sacramento City asked the District 
Attorney's office for an opinion as to 
whether it might favor local con- 
tractors in awarding contracts under 
a proposed school bond issue, it was 
advised that under the state law con- 
tracts exceeding $1000 must be let to 
the lowest responsible bidder, whether 
he is a local or outside contractor. 
This is an interpretation of the Cali- 
fornia school law. 



Engineers and architects in Ohio 
have formed an organization to urge 
upon the next session of the legisla- 
ture the enactment of a bill licensing 
persons practicing those professions. 



Orders for the first material to be 
used in the construction of the trans- 
mission line to be erected by the 
Southern Sierras Power Co. to Boul- 
der Dam to furnish power for its con- 
struction have been placed by the 
power company. These orders are for 
5,000,000 lb. of fabricated steel pole 
line structures and deliveries are to be 
made at Torrance, Calif., between De- 
cember 15, 1930, and March 15, 1931. 



Saturday, January 3. 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Five 



a tentative budget of ll.l for 

trade extension work has been set up 
by the executive committee of the Na- 
tional Lumber Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation. The budg< I Is a Rexlbl 

however, and It « 111 be i u rled oul 
only Insofar as actual receipts will 
permit should they fall below the 
mark readjustment will In- made to 

prevent umula tion of a deficit I rn- 

ri,-r the tentative budget allocation of 
funds was made for tin- following ac- 

iv Research, Held promotion 

ducat ional promol ion, architec- 
tural promotion, lumber purchase and 
use specifications, cooperation with 
other agencies, merchandising, build- 
ing code service and publicity. In the 
research tbld provision is made for 
laboratory work on properties of wood 
processing treatments and coatings, 

structural :is-,-mMii- and enu-rccticv 

Investtgations. Nearly three million 
copies of tlie various publications is- 
sued by the association had been dis- 
trlbuted up to October. This covers 
56,000 copies of heavy timber publi- 
catlons, 359.000 on light frame con- 
struction, 25,000 on building and con- 
struction generally, 23,000 on building 
codes, 445.000 architectural, 13,000 on 
fabricated and industrial uses of lum- 
ber, 805,000 copies of educational, gen- 
eral information and wood property 
and treatment publications. 



As a permanent measure of preven- 
tion of unemployment and for tempo- 
rary relief in the present emergency, 
the American Construction Council, in 
a letter to the governor of each state 
and mayors of cities of more than 
100,000 population, urges the rebuild- 
ing of slum or obsolete tenement dis- 
tricts in all cities. The council be- 
lieves that this is one of the greatest 
potential fields of building construc- 
tion for the coming decade and should 
furnish many billions of dollars of new 
construction and e m pi o y m ent to 
thousands of workers, as well as in- 
valuable social benefits. The letters 
carry the warning that certain safe- 
guards and standards must be pro- 
vided, including proper regional plan- 
ning and possible revision of existing 
building codes and enactment of nec- 
essary permissive legislation. 



Two new products have been added 
to line of waterproofings and concrete 
hardeners manufactured by The Mas- 
ter Builders Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Brikron is an admixture for mas- 
onry which minimizes efflorescence, 
waterproofs the joint, protects mortar 
colors from fading and prevents cracks 
and general disintegration of the 
mortar joint. 

Colored Metalicron is a material 
which, when mixed with cement and 
trowelled into freshly floated cement 
finish, colors, slip-proofs and water- 
proofs the floor. This product also 
provides protection from "color cloud- 
ing" by soluble salts due to an in- 
gredient known as "Omicron." 

Omicron is an element discovered 
,in the Master Builders Research Lab- 
oratories. It reduces the ratio of sol- 
uble salts in cement mixes. Omicron 
has been combined with a powerful 
stearate waterproofing to make the 
product Brikron. 



The Pacific Telephone & Telegraph 
Company and associated companies 
report that the East Bay Division of 
the Central Area went through the 
first six months of 19311 with no lost- 
time accidents, and that every division 
has succeeded at one time or another 
during the year in going through a full 
month or longer without a lost-time 
accident. 



R. L. Heck, building inspector of 
Pittsburg, Calif., has become an ac- 
tive member of the Pacific Coast 
Building Officials' Conference. 



HERE— THERE 
EVERYWHERE 



El Segundo, Calif., and El Ccntro, 
Calif., have adopted the Uniform 
Building Code of the Pacific Coast 
Building Officials' Conference. 

Hillsborough, San Mateo County, is 
considering the adoption of the Uni- 
form Building Code of the Pacific 
Coast Building Officials' Conference. 
Application for active participating 
membership in the Conference has 
been made by the town through J. C 
Nowell, town manager. 

Ventura Chapter, Associated Gener- 
al Contractors, has elected the follow- 
ing officers to serve the coming year: 
President. John Crump. Ventura; vice- 
president, Wm. A. Hudson, Santa 
Paula; treasurer, A. Sehroeder, Ox- 
nard; secretary, E. E. Wiker. Ven- 
tura; additional directors, W. R. Guy- 
er, Oxnard; Ed Abplanalp, Oxnard; B. 
Frank Barr, Ventura; A. A. Lowder- 
milk, Ventura. 



The Nail Department of the Amer- 
ican steel and Wire Company at its 
Parrell Works believes that it has 
shattered all safety records. This de- 
partment was continuing a record of 
no lost-time accidents since April 17, 
1924, a six-year period. In that time 
an average force of 170 employees had 
worked a total of 1,506,910 man-hours. 



A large construction program has 
been sanctioned by Austria, which will 
be financed by the International loan 
recently obtained. The program in- 
cludes a hydro-electric power plant on 
the Danube near Persenburg to de- 
velop ultimately 110,000-hp.; a new 
bridge across the Danube near Ybbs, 
and a new electric railway line cross- 
ing Austria from north to south from 
Gemund to Graz, to cost approximate- 
ly $1S,000.000 and including 26 tunnels 
through the Alps. 



Restrictions on the use of water 
have gone into effect in Baltimore, 
Mi, with but 100 days' supply in the 
reservoir. A number of smaller Mary- 
land cities have been restricing con- 
sumption for months, their water sup- 
plies affected by the drought. 



The Chicago city council by a vote 
of 40 to 1, passed the ordinance for 
the construction of a subway in State 
Street to cost $46,000,000. The meas- 
ure was passed over the protest of a 
large number of property owners who 
urged changes in the plans. The coun- 
cil's action will cause a contest in 
the courts, it is expected, bv the 
property owners, who, by the terms 
of the measure, are to pay 65 per cent 
of the cost of the subway. 

In a decision handed down Dec 15 
the U. S. Supreme Court upheld the 
action of the District Court for the 
Western District of Washington in de- 
claring void the patent held by the 
Concrete Mixing and Conveying Co., 
Chicago, 111., covering the conveying 
of concrete by compressed air 
«. 

As an aid in the selection of heavy- 
duty engines and power units, the 
Hercules Motors Corp., Canton, Ohio, 
has issued two new bulletins contain- 
ing advice as to the selection of the 
proper type of Hercules power plant 
for any given requirement. One of 
these contains specifications and illus- 
trations of typical motor applications; 
the second consists of a series of 
charts of motor characteristics. 



ALONG THE LINE 



Hugh R. Davies has been elected 
president of the Long Beach Archi- 
tectural Club; Cecil Schilling, vice- 
president and Joseph H. Roberts, sec- 
retary-treasurer. 

The Long Beach Architectural Club 
has appointed a committee consisting 
of Cecil Schilling. H A. Anderson, 
and Warren Derdlck to consider group 
advertising to inform the public of 
the activities and purposes of the ar- 
chitectural profession. 



D. W. Pontius, president of the Pa- 
cific Electric Railway Company, has 
been appointed controller of the Met- 
ropolitan Water District of Southern 
California. He has accepted the of- 
fice with the understanding that full- 
time salary will be provided as soon 
as the permanent organization of the 
district is effected. 



James P. Collins, director of the De- 
partment of Professional and Voca- 
tional Standards and Registrar of 
Contractors, has tendered his resigna- 
tion to Governor-elect Rolph, effec- 
tive January 5. He expects to resume 
the practice of civil engineering in 
which he was engaged previous to 
his appointment to the position. 



Russell G. Cone, who was resident 
engineer during the construction of 
the Philadelphia - Camden bridge and 
of the Ambassador Bridge at Detroit, 
has been retained as resident engi- 
neer to take charge of work in the 
field when construction of the Gold- 
en Gate Bridge at the mouth of San 
Francisco Bay is started. 



Sta 



ck and Tile Co., Ltd., cap- 
italized for $250,000, has been incor- 
porated in Los Angeles. Directors are 
W. and John and Marion Graniczny, 
all of Los Angeles. 



In future all new read construction 
in Santa Barbara County will be done 
by contract, it was announced by the 
county supervisors, following a con- 
ference with leaders of the Califor- 
nia Branch of the Associated Gener- 
al Contractors of America. Much 
highway work by day labor has been 
done by Santa Barbara county for 
some time and contractors through In- 
vestigations of the cost of the jobs 
and the time required to complete 
them showed that contract work was 
more economical to the public. 

The law in California in regard to 
labor work is that on all jobs costing 
more than $5,000 an accurate cost ac- 
counting must be kept of the day la- 
bor expenses which must be kept and 
filed with the lowest bid received for 
the project for permanent record. In 
the course of its investigations of the 
practices of the Santa Barbara offi- 
cials, the Southern California Chapter 
of the Associated General Contractors 
found that on several jobs no such 
records were kept and that In some 
cases bids were not even asked. Much 
publicity was given to these findings 
and the supervisors requested the. con- 
ference for determining future prac- 
tice in regard to th county's road 
building. 



Intercoastal lumber shipping ratee 
will not be lower. A rate of $11 on 
contract lumber and $13 for non-con- 
tract lumber is announced by the U. 
S. Intercoastal Lumber Conference for 
February on shipments of lumber 
from the Pacific northwest to the At- 
lantic coast. 



Sij 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



OAK FLOORING 

GRADE NAMES ARE 
CHANGED JANUARY 1 



A change in the grade names of 
oak flooring is announced by the Oak 
Flooring Manufacturers' Association 
of the United States, from the execu- 
tive offices in Memphis, to go into ef- 
fect on January 1, 1931. 

The new grade names will be known 
as follows: 

Quarter sawed (three grades), Clear, 
Sap Clear, Select. 

Plain sawed (four grades). Clear Se- 
lect, No. 1 Common, No. 2 Common. 

The change in names was decided 
recently by the entire oak flooring 
industry in view of the trend toward 
designations that will be more fitly 
descriptive of the special qualities and 
particular uses of various grades of 
lumber. The tendency, it is stated, is 
to specify grades which are especial- 
ly adapted for a given purpose, ir- 
respective of a former technical posi- 
tion as "higher" or "lower" grade. 
The grade names of Oak flooring now 
follow this new trend toward simpli- 
fication of practice. 

The Association announces that 
there has been no change in the word- 
ing of the present grading rules oth- 
erwise. A new edition of "Oak Floor- 
ing Grading Rules" is now ready for 
distribution to the trade and to ar- 
chitects. 



CONFERENCE ACTION 
EXPECTED IN JANUARY 



Deferment of the launching of ac- 
tivities by the National Conference on 
Construction till some time In January 
1931 is announced by Julius H. Barnes, 
chairman of its executive committee 
and chairman of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the U. S. Chamber of Com- 
merce. The National Conference on 
Construction was formed in Chicago 
July 30 under the auspices of the U. 
S. Chamber of Commerce and appoint- 
ed its executive committee late In 
October. 

The November and December dates 
contemplated for the first meeting of ' 
the executive committee of the con- 
ference of representatives of all major 
branches of the industry have been 
postponed. It has appeared to Chair- 
man Lamont, Secretary of Commerce, 
and to Mr. Barnes advisable to avoid 
any confusion which a meeting of the 
executive committee might have as 
to the relation of the work of the 
National Conference on Construction 
to the emergency work which is being 
given renewed impetus through the 
President's Emergency Committee for 
Employment. 

The field of usefulness of the Na- 
tional Conference on Construction Is 
seen to lie primarily in activities of 
a continuing character on some of the 
long-time problems of the construc- 
tion industry. A date has been tenta- 
tively suggested for holding the first 
meeting of the executive committee 
during the week of January 12. 



POWDER COMPANY EXPANDS 

An enlarged field for the Giant 
Powder Company near Richmond was 
announced by Manager Richard Strat- 
ton upon his return from Seattle, 
where he went to take over the plant 
of the Puget Sound & Alaska Powder 
Company just purchased by the Atlas 
Powder Company, the parent com- 
pany of the Giant corporation. 

Under the new plan, the plant at 
Everett will be dismantled and the 
northwestern country, formerly 

served by the products of the Everett 
mill, will be supplied from the Rich- 
mond plant of the Atlas-Giant Com- 
pany. 



1930 BUILDING 

IN LOS ANGELES 

NEAR $75,000,000 



Indications are that Los Ange- 
les' building total for the year 
1930 will be close to $74,000,000 as 
compared with $93,016,160 for 1929. 

During the first 17 days of De- 
cember, 1930, the city building de- 
partment issued 1396 permits with 
an estimated valuation of $2,781,- 
101. For the corresponding period 
in December a year ago the num- 
ber of permits issued was 1420 
with an estimated valuation of 
$2,457,707, while for the first 17 
days of November, 1930, the num- 
ber of permits issued was 1284 
with an estimated valuation of 
$2,792,248. For the current year 
up to and including December 17, 
Los Angeles' building total was 
$71,586,591 as compared with $91,- 
481,408 for the corresponding per- 
iod in 1929. Permits for two im- 
portant building projects will 
probably be issued before the close 
of the year and with a fair aver- 
age of minor operations the total 
for the year should be close to 
$74,000,000. 



TIME TO GET UP! 
SIX O'CLOCK 



(By Tony Smith) 



I have stood it for a year. I don't 
want to hear or see any more croak- 
ing, whinning and cowardly gloom 
spreading salesmen reminiscing about 
the "good old times." I have been 
through three or four "panics", as 
they call the mass fear complex and 
one gets bored with "old stuff." If 
you are a salesman beating the sleepy 
field to it. I want to see you. I am 
fed up on last night's night-mares. 
It's time to wake up to realities. So 
come in if you are doing business, but 
stay out if you are lecturing on what's 
wrong with business, life and the uni- 
verse, especially as your judgment is 
not worth a damn. 

Next to the gloom spreading, mi- 
grating salesman, I am sick of the 
timid and play safe buyer, the wise- 
acre buyer who clutches the dollar as 
his last and looks for fools to give 
him more. Dammed streams turn no 
wheels until the water flows. Spend 
bravely and wisely and it will come 
back to you; save foolishly and in fear 
and you will soon get nothing to save. 
I don't want any man's money in bus- 
iness who buys fearfully. I don't like 
to take candy from the baby nor do 1 
trust such a man in credit. Saving in 
fear is miserly, selfish and cowardly. 
Saving a percentage is wise and thrif- 
ty. The greatest saving should be 
done during prosperity, the least dur- 
ing deflation. The best time to buy 
Is at or near the bottom. 

It's about six o'clock in the morning 
now and time to get up. The sales- 
man who gets busy now beats the 
field to it. The buyer now gets in on 
the ground floor. No man should buy 
just to make prosperity, he should buy 
now if he expects to buy later. Buy- 
ing keeps up the exchange of goods 
and makes work. Last night you slept 
well or had bad dreams but it is six 
o'clock now, time to get up and time 
to snap out of the fear complex. 



J. J. Mahony, city clerk of St. Johns 
Newfoundland, has requested the Pa- 
cific Coast Building Officials' Confer- 
ence for a copy of the Uniform Build- 
ing Code. The city, of about 40,000 
population, contemplates a new build- 
ing code and it is possible the Pacific 
Coast code will be adopted. 



BUILDING HEIGHT 
LIMIT IS PLAN OF 

LOS ANGELES CO. 



Terminating a series of public hear- 
ings on the question of limiting the 
height of buildings in unincorporated 
territory of Los Angeles county, the 
Regional Planning Commission at a 
meeting December 17 adopted the fol- 
lowing regulations which will be sub- 
mitted to the board of supervisors in 
an ordinance to be drafted by the 

"No building shall be erected in the 
unincorporated territory of the county 
of Los Angeles which exceeds a height 
of 150 feet from the curb level or 
contains more than thirteen floors, or 
the cubical content of which exceeds 
125 times the area of the site upon 
which the building is to be erected. 

"Provided: 

"(1) That if the owner shall dedi- 
cate for light and air purposes a set- 
back on all sides of the site upon 
which the building is to be erected of 
not less than twenty feet, a building 
of greater height may be erected. 

"(2) That any portion of such build- 
ing erected to a height of greater than 
1G0 feet shall be set-back on all sides 
of the site upon which a building to 
be erected of not less than thirty-five 
feet. 

"(3) That where a dedicated alley 
exists the twenty-foot setback may 
be measured from the center of the 
alley, and that no further setback 
above 160 feet on that side of the 
building facing such alley shall be 
required. 

"(4) That no portion of any build- 
ing site included in the calculations 
of the volume of a building erected 
under the provisions of this ordinance 
and upon which a dedication for light 
and air has been accepted in accord- 
ance with this ordinance may be in- 
cluded as a portion of any other build- 
ing site for the purpose of determin- 
ing the maximum cubical content 
thereof." 



WAGE VIOLATOR 

IS FOUND GUILTY 



Roy E. Andrus, operator of the 
Lorraine Lumber Company, was found 
guilty last week at Tahoe City on 
three counts of violations of the state 
labor laws. On the first count, fail- 
ure to maintain semi-monthly pay- 
days, Andrus was sentenced to pay a 
$50 fine or serve a twenty-day jail 
sentence. 

If Andirus meets the terms the sen- 
tence on the second and third counts 
will be suspended. The second count, 
his failure to post notice of semi- 
monthly paydays, brought a fine of 
$50 or twenty days. Suspension was 
ordered if Andrus abides by the law 
in the future. 

The third count was his failure to 
pay R. Schurman. an employe, his 
wages. He paid the wages, $145, in 
the court. Andrus was given ten days 
in which to pay his fine on the first 



It has been estimated by the Trav- 
elers Insurance Company that indus- 
trial accidents cost five billion dollars 
annually and constitutes a tax of 11 
per cent on the income of the salaried 
worker. 



INCORPORATES 

C. S. Maltby Magnesite Co., Ltd., 
capitalized for $3000 has been In- 
corporated with the principal place of 
business in San Francisco. Directors 
are Mabel P. Maltby, Katherine Percy 
and H. W. Erskine. 



Saturday, Jam 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Seven 



SETTLEMENT OF JURISDICTIONAL 

DISPUTES BY BOARD IS RATIFIED 



Procedure for the Joint settlement 
irlsdictlonai disputes by organ- 
ized building crafts and tin- National 
Association of Building Trades Em- 
ployera was agreed upon and ratified 
in Boston at the meeting of the Build- 
in ii.id.s Department of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, says The 
Constructor. This procedure involves 
the formation of a Board of Trade 
claims organized on a basis which, it 
is believed by its proponents, will aid 
in the settlement of jurisdictional dis- 
putes on both a local and national 
scale. 

Unlike the National Board for Jur- 
isdictional Awards, the Board of 
Trade Claims is to represent only the 
National Association of Building 
Trades Employers and such interna- 
tional unions as subscribe to the new 
board. The contract between these 
bodies which provides for the Board 
of Trade Claims will run until De- 
cember 31, 1H32. 

Among: the outstanding features of 
the procedure which has been agreed 
upon are the following: 

Jurisdictional disputes originating 
in a community may be settled by the 
existing local joint arbitration boards 
that function by agreement between 
local associations of contractors affil- 
iated with the National Association 
of Building Trades Employers and the 
local building trades council. Settle- 
ments reached by such local arbitra- 
tion boards will be binding as con- 
cerns any particular disputes in that 



if a dispute is not settled locally the 
case may la- carried to tile Board of 
Trade Claims which will select a 
special arbitration committee to pass 
on the case and provide a ruling to 
apply to the dispute originating in 
i bat particular community. 

The new agreement, it is understood 
likewise provides that if a local union 
refuses to abide by a decision, the 
international union shall furnish skill- 
ed men within 48 hours to do the 
work. If the international fails to do 
this the employer is at liberty to ml 
the places of such men as have been 
called on jurisdictional strike with 
members of other unions who, in the 
employer's opinion, can perform the 
work. 

While the formation of this board 
is seen by general contractors to be 
an important step toward the eventual 
solution of jurisdictional problems, its 
immediate effect is somewhat in 
doubt. Two important international 
unions, namely, the bricklayers and 
the carpenters, are not now affiliated 
with the Building Trades Department 
and therefore may not at once be par- 
ties to the procedure. In addition, 
the International Brotherhood of Elec- 
trical Workers expressed doubts as to 
the plan for settling jurisdictional 
matters but expects to maintain its 
affiliation with the Building Trades 
Department and postpone judgment 
on the plan until it has had a fair 
trial. 



BRIDGE FRANCHISE PEDDLING 

IS CONDEMNED BY ENGINEERS 



Adoption by Congress of a new- 
bridge law "so framed as to prevent 
the nefarious practice known as 
bridge franchise peddling" is urged 
by the American Engineering Coun- 
cil, acting upon recommendations in 
a report of its Committee on Bridge 
Legislation, of which Herbert S. 
Crocker of Denver, Colo., is chairman. 
Hundreds of millions of dollars are 
invested in toll bridges, and it is now 
no longer uncommon for a bridge to 
cost from $1,000,000 to $50,000,000, the 
Council points out. 

"The present system of granting 
bridge franchises is the outgrowth of 
a haphazard evolution of methods ap- 
plicable before the advent of motor 
transportation and vastly improved 
highways," the report declared. "It 
involves a great waste of time and 
does not in many ways protect either 
the interest of the public or the in- 
vestments of those who build the 
bridges. 

"There are in existence abuses of 
the present system, notably the ob- 
taining from Congress of franchises 
for the sole purpose of their exploita- 
tion and sale at inflated values. The 
processes and restrictions upon re- 
capture should be thoroughly aired 
and reduced to a working basis fair 
to all concerned. 

"There should be a greater and 
more definite measure of cooperation 
than now exists between the various 
agncies of administration. The exist- 
ing bridge laws can be very much 
simplified and made more easily 
workable." 

The Engineering Council opposes all 
pending legislation, which unless rad- 
ically altered, it asserts, would be 
positively injurious. Its opposition 
centers on the Denison bill, introduced 
in Congress by the chairman of the 
subcommittee on Bridges of the House 
Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
Committee. 



This measure, the engineers feel, 
confers too much authority on the 
War Department, and contains a re- 
capture clause which is unusually se- 
vere and which in operation would un- 
doubtedly prevent the financing of 
privately owned toll bridges. 

Private capital should be encour- 
aged to construct toll bridges, says 
the Council in a statement of prin- 
ciples to be considered in framing new 
legislation. A toll bridge, it holds, 
should be permitted only where the 
local authorities are on record as not 
willing to construct a free bridge. 

A clause permitting recapture not 
sooner than twenty years after the 
completion of the bridge is favored, 
and unreasonable limitations upon fi- 
nancing, design, construction and 
maintenance are opposed. 

"It is becoming increasingly difficult 
for states to find ways of financing 
such structures." it is added. "Hence 
privately owned toll bridges are meet- 
ing a great need. However, such 
structures may be considered public 
utilities, and as such ought to be un- 
der public regulation like other pub- 
lic utilities. This is not now gener- 
ally the case. 

"Tolls charged may become a' bur- 
den to interstate commerce. There- 
fore the construction of toll bridges 
must be subject to at least some su- 
pervision and regulation of the Fed- 
eral Government. 

"Under Congressional authorization, 
the owner of a toll bridge is given no 
protection against unfair competition. 
There are examples where competing 
bridges have been constructed which 
were unnecessary and economically 
unjustified. There is something wrong 
with a system which permits toll 
charges based upon inflated valua- 
tion. Toll bridge companies have in 
recapture demanded prices far in ex- 



cese "i' ii" coi i ol the i" Idges buill 
by them. 
"State highway authorities and toll 

hridge ni|ii|.;iiiir:, have cnnie I" CrOSfi 

pui poi ea in reaped to the location <>r 
roads and possible competing free 
bi iii'.-. ■ \ i present, the Engineer 
Corps, U. s. A , cannot ascertain the 
cosi of toll brldg< ■ until nin< I s da . 
after the competion of the bridge tl 
I; then frequently too late to discover 
any dfscrepancle; In cost figures. 

"There are In the United states to- 
day in operation, a pproximately 300 
toll bridges. There are now under 
construction about 58 toll bridges and 
approximately 350 proposed; of these 
latter a very small percentage will 
materialize. This is largely due to 
ih,. | u .: <n I i.M'<>niimir conditions and to 
the difficulties of financing in the face 
of adverse legislation threatened by 
Congress. 

"The American public does not like 
to pay a direct toll for the use of such 
a public convenience as a bridge and 
there are a number "f Congressman 
who try to prevent the authority for 
toll bridges. This attitude is assumed 
in spite of the fact that although our 
roads appear to be free, almost every 
state levies a gasoline tax which is 
used for construction and maintenance 
of roads so that every road user in a 
sense pays about one -half cent per 
mile for the use of the roads. 

"Furthermore, were it not for the 
use of toll bridges in many cases, the 
old inefficient, unsafe and slow fer- 
ries would still be in use for which a 
toll was always charged. In this con- 
nection it may be noted that the ad- 
vocates of free bridges are strangely 
silent in regard to these ferries. 

"There are cases on record of the 
exploitation of permits to build toll 
bridges. The cost of construction and 
financing of such bridges has been in 
some cases watered or inflated. This 
has made the cost excessive to the 
public when it has desired to pur- 
chase such bridges. These circum- 
stances have led to discontent and 
dissatisfaction with the present toll 
bridge situation. This must be cor- 
rected." 

Other members of the Engineering 
Council Committee on Bridge Legis- 
lation are: V. H Cochrane, Tulsa; 
Prof. A. H. Fuller. Iowa State Col- 
lege; A. P. Greensfelder, St. Louis: 
Frank M. Ounby. Boston; John Lyle 
Harrington, Kansas City, Mo.; David 
B. Steinman, New York City. 



The ground-water supply of the 
Mokelumne area. California, has been 
under investigation since 1926 by the 
Geological Survey, United States De- 
partment of the Interior. Lodi, the 
principal town in the area, is said to 
be the Tokay grape center of the 
world. The broad vineyards and or- 
chards of this productive agricultural 
area are supplied chiefly by water 
pumped from wells. A report on this 
Investigation was made available to 
the public in September, 1029, by filing 
a manuscript copy in the Lodi Public 
Library. This report was published 
by the United States Government in 
March, 1930, as "Water-Supply Paper 
619 of the Geological Survey. On ac- 
count of the great value of the ground- 
water supply for this area, the in- 
vestigation is being continued, and 
the results are released to the public 
from time to time in the form of pro- 
gress reports that are filed in the 
Lodi Public Library. In accordance 
with this practice, a summary state- 
ment supplementary to "Water-Supply 
Paper 619 is being filed in that library 
for public consultation. Additional 
data, largely statistical. will be 
similarly filed at frequent intervals, 
as they become available and can be 
prepared for release. 



Eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



METHODS OF ENGINEERING 

TEACHING TO BE CHANGED 

TO FIT THIS "MACHINE AGE" 



A project to increase the standard 
of engineering education to enable it 
to meet better the tremendous de- 
mands which the modern machine age 
is making upon it has been announced 
by H. Hobert Porter, chairman of 
thp Engineering Foundation, writies 
David Dietz, Science Editor for 
Scripps- Howard newspapers. 

The new project unites the ,-npi- 
neeing profession, educational institu- 
tions and industrial organizations. 

Porter has appointed a research 
committee on education, bended by 
Dr. Harvey N. Davis, president of 
Stevens Institute of Technology. The 
objective of this committee, according 
to Porter, will be to frame a program 
n tnest the demand of industry and 
public service for professional educa- 
ton of high quality. 

As a first step, the Engineering 
Foundation has sought the view of en- 
gineers, industrialists and educators 
upon the subject. 

One of the first things which this 
rymtoslum brought out was that 
technical schools were being handi- 
capped by the fact that industries are 
luring away the best men from their 
faculties. 

This was pointed out by Gen R. I. 
Rees, assistant vice-president of the 
American Telephone & Telegraph Co., 
and former president of the Society 
for the Promotion of Engineering Ed- 
ucation. 

Right Selection 

Gen. Rees points out other difficul- 
ties facing the engineering field, 
among them the selection of the right 
material for the future engineers of 
America. 

"The mortality rate during first 
years in college seems to indicate that 
we are faced with a major problem in 
the right selection of candidates for 
the engineering student body," Gen. 
Rees says. 

"In general, the quality of students 
entering the freshman year is good 
on the basis of scholastic achievement 
in secondary schools. On the other 



hand, those interested in employment 
of engineering graduates find large 
numbers surviving the four strenuous 
years of the engineering curriculum 
poorly fitted to become efficient engi- 
neers. 

Continual Complaint. 

"There is continual complaint by 
deans of the lack of good engineering 
teachers, and responsibiltiy is placed 
largely at the door of industry. Can- 
not engineering societies impress 
upon business and industry that it is 
short-sighted to attract good men 
away from engineering facilities and 
that it might be better to co-operate 
in encouraging good men in industry 
to accept positions on engineering 
faculties?" 

Dr. F. L. Bishop, secretary of the 
Society for Promotion of Engineering 
Education, says that engineers are 
trained in an old system which they 
naturally pass on. It is highly im- 
portant, he urges, to break this chain 
and introduce new types of training 
for teachers and new methods of 
teaching. 

Two Facts Learned 

Dr. A . B. Crawford, director of the 
department of personal study at Yale 
University, says that at Yale two 
facts have been learned. First, it is 
possible to determine by aptitude 
tests what students' possibilities are; 
second, many freshmen are debarred 
from courses they would like to pur- 
sue after the first year because not 
soon enough started in that direction, 
due to lack of early information. 

"Engineering educators," Dr. Craw- 
ford says, "are now giving thought 
to the question whom they should 
educate and to the impartial effec- 
tiveness of objective tests. 

"The fact also is being recognized 
that youths of 16 to 19 years, when 
confronted with selection of the 
courses to follow the freshmen year, 
have not ordinarily discovered their 
aptitudes in time to prepare as now 
required for an engineering educa- 



PROPOSED LEGISLATION AIMS 

TO BETTER BUILDING INTERESTS 



By Geo. W. 



ei, Secretary- Manag 



The Southern Conference meeting in 
connection with the following mem- 
bers of the State Legislative Com- 
mittee, T. M. Robinson, Charles Petti- 
fer, Dan Wagner, Wm. T. Loesch (W. 
H. George absent), together with Glen 
Behymer and J, W. Morin, held De- 
cember 13th at the Pasadena Athletic 
Club, was undoubtedly one of the 
most important meetings the Ex- 
changes have ever held. 

At this meeting were representa- 
tives of most of the divisions of the 
building industry, and when the 
following resolution was unanimously 
passed, it means an unprecedented 
get-together of the building industry 
of California, and it means — 

The industry as a whole will go be- 
fore the next Legislature with bills 
which are directly in the interest of 
the building public as well as every 
division of the industry itself, for 
the plans as set forth are backed by 
only clean men and every thought 
profounded is .strictly in the general 



Builders' Exchange of Pa 



benefit of a better condition for the 
much neglected industry and its duty 
of the building public and buyer of 
building paper. 
BE IT RESOLVED 

That the Southern California Con- 
ference of Builders' Exchanges this 
day assembled at Pasadena, Califor- 
nia, hereby endorses the program of 
legislation upon the subject of the 
principle of the proposed amend- 
ments to the Mechanic's Lien Law as 
drafted by Glen Behymer; the prin- 
ciple of the proposed amendments to 
the Contractors* License Law of 1929 
and the principle of the proposed new 
statute for the Legal requirements of 
building finance as suggested by J. 
W. Morin. 

Those referred to as proposed by 
Glen Behymer are as follows: 

1. Giving concurrent jurisdiction in 
the Mechanic's Lien actions under 
S2000 to the Superior and Municipal 
Courts and clearing up doubts as to 
necessary parties defendant where 



they are holders of mortgages or deeds 
of trust. 

2. An obligatory requirement for 
the withholding of building funds 
after the service of the stop notice, 
unless a bond for the protection of the 
laborers and material men has been 
furnished in response thereto. 

3. The provision that bonds ex- 
ecuted by money lenders for faithful 
completion should be required to inure 
to the laborers and material men as 
well. 

4. The enactment of a statute per- 
mitting the financing of the property 
either before or after beginning con- 
struction, by the filing of a bond run- 
ning to the laborers and material 
men in an amount equal to one-half 
of the face principal amount of any 
mortgage or deed of trust which is to 
be a building loan upon the property. 

5. The enactment of legislation 
establishing, so far as possible, the 
principle that a building loan is a 
trust fund applicable to the comple- 
tion of the building and the payment 
of laborers and material men in- 
volved therein, and all building loans 
to maintain priority shall be accom- 
paned by a recorded bond inuring to 
laborers and material men for an 
amount equal to one-half of the face 
of said loan. 

With reference to the proposed 
amendments of the Contra -tors' 
License Law of 1929, by J. W. Morin. 

1. The elimination of the $200 ex- 
emption clause. 

2. The regulation of speculative 
builders by requiring a license as 
builders. 

3. Increasing the license fee to $10. 

4. Providing for the retention of 
the funds on hand at the end of the 
fiscal year in the department. 

5. Defining "contractor" as one 
who bids as well as one who con- 
tracts. 

6. Giving authority to the registrar 
to make available the list of licenses 
at frequent intervals for the infor- 
mation of officials and the public. 

7. Placing under Civil Service regu- 
lations the employees of the depart- 
ment. 

S. Providing for due process of law 
in the hearing of causes by issuance of 
suitable notice to the accused and for 
authority of the registrar to subpoena 
witnesses. 

9. Providing penalty for advertising 
or claiming to be a contractor with a 
license. 

10. providing for the keeping of 
true books of account. 

11. Providing for bringing within 
the terms of the statute, those who 
aid and abet a contractor in violation 
of the law, under the head of con- 
spiracy. 

12. Giving the authority to the 
registrar to accumulate statistical in- 
formation as a preliminary to the is- 
suance of licenses. 

"H" The enactment of the "Notice of 
Intention to Build" Law, requiring 
owners before the beginning of con- 
struction to record a verified state- 
ment of the ownership and encum- 
brances and a statement of proposed 
disposition of the proceeds of the 
encumbrances. 

That this conference go on record 
as endorsing the work of the State 
Builders' Exchange Legislative Com- 
mittee, and recommend that they 
be given full pawer to carry on, in con- 
nction with J. W. Morin and Glen 
Behymer and such other parties in 
interest as may be determined by said 
J. "W. Morin and Glen Behymer In 
bringing the many diversified divisions 
of the building industry into a unified 
legislative program for the next Leg- 
islature. 



January 8, 1981 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Nine 



RESULTS AND BENEFITS OF 

APPLYING SIMPLIFIED PRACTICE 
TO SOFTWOOD LUMBER INDUSTRY 



The application of the 

practice n c mendation on 

lumber la resulting in a re< 
manufacturing costs, and 
tones, and loss warehousing 
;iri . apace is required. Also 



b tor- 
nakes 



iform lumber which min- 
imizes the number of errors made in 
ordering and shipping. Delivei li are 
also expedited. All of which leads to 
more satisfactory business relations 
and to a greater stability of the in- 
dustry, according to an article en- 
titled "Benefits from Simplifying Var- 
ieties of Softwood Lumber." by J. 
K. McNeil of the Division of Simpli- 
fied Practice of the Bureau of Stand- 
ards, Department of Commerce, ap- 
pearlng in the November 1930 issue 

df the Commercial Standards Month- 
ly. This article is based on the find- 
ings of a survey recently conducted 
among the accepters of this recom- 
mendatlon. 

"The manufacture of lumber was 
one of the earliest, if not the first 
industry, to be started in this coun- 
try. The colonists were obliged to 
erect cabins for shelter and stockades 
for protection against onslaughts of 
native marauders. It was also neces- 
sary for them to fell timber before 
they could cultivate the land. Spars, 
masts, and other ship timbers were 
exported even before many of the 
early agricultural products. 

"During the era of colonization and 
on through the formative stage of the 
union, the manufacture of lumber 
was comparatively simple. Trees were 
felled as needed, sawed and hewn by 
hand into rough logs and boards. 
Sawmills began to make their appear- 
ance in the year 1G25 when one was 
erected in Virginia. These mills, how- 
ever, were an unimportant factor un- 
til the advent of steam, early in the 
19th century. 

"As the industry grew not unlike 
many other industries, 't became 
hampered by the accumulation of an 
enormous number of sizes, grades and 
classifications which varied with each 
producing locality. This diversifica- 
tion was corrected locally by regional 
associations which drafted rules gov- 
erning manufacture within specific 
areas. While the work of these asso- 
ciations, in this respect, was com- 
mendable and of much use in its lim- 
ited sphere, nationally, the conflict 
of the sizes, grades and classifica- 
tions became more and more vexa- 
tious, mainly because of the disad- 
vantages encountered in using lum- 
ber which was manufactured in var- 
ious sections of the country. 

"The present national lumber stand- 
ardization movement had its incep- 
tion at the first American Lumber 
Congress, held in April, 1919, where a 
resolution was passed favoring the 
unification of sizes of all softwood 
lumber. In June of that year, and in 
September, 1920, other meetings of 
representatives of the industry were 
held and much discussion was had on 
the subject of standard sizes, grades, 
forms and nomenclature. Plans for 
future work were also outlined. 

"In May, 1922, one hundred and ten 
representatives of organizations of all 
interests met in general conference 
at Washington, D. C., under the aus- 
pices of the division of simplified 
practice of the National Bureau of 
Standards. The principle action of 
this meeting was the appointment of 
sub-committees whose duty it was to 
formulate the necessary standards in 
sizes and grades, and the methods of 
interpreting, applying and enforcing 
them. 



"A second general conference was 
held in Chicago, 111., in July, 1922 
Here, the Central Committee on Lum- 
ber Standards was created, its mem- 
bership being composed of represent- 
atives of lumber manufacturers, 
Wholesalers and retailers associations, 
I he railway associations, the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects, and the 
Association of Wood Using Industries. 
\ consulting committee, to handle the 
technical phases of lumber standard- 
ization, was in turn formed by the 
c hi ml committee. 

"The third general conference, in 
December, 1923, received the report 
of the central committee, and the 
meeting resulted in the approval of a 
simplification and standardization 
program which was instrumental in 
reducing the actual finished yard lum- 
ber items approximately 60 per cent. 

"In accordance with the usual pro- 
cedure of the National Bureau of 
Standards, simplified practice recom- 
mendations are subjected to review 
procedure tends to sustain continued 
periodically, either by the standing 
committee of the industry or by sub- 
sequent general conferences. This 
interest and adherence to the pro- 
gram, and to keep it abreast with cur- 
rent practice. Four such general con- 
ferences have been held since the 
original simplification program on 
lumber was approved and accepted, 
the last taking place on May 3, 1928. 

"The work of the committee at this 
conference marked the completion of 
their original plan concerning the 
simplification and standardization of 
softwood lumber. It now remains to 
keep these recommendations current 
by means of the aforesaid procedure 
of the Bureau. 

"Simplifid Practice Recommendation 
No. R16— Lumber (Fourth Edition), 
includes recommendations for recog- 
nized classifications, nomenclature, 
basic grades, seasoning standards, 
sizes, uniform workings, description, 
measurement, tally, tally cards, ship- 
ping provisions, grade marking, and 
inspection. 

"At the time of the last conference, 
it was estimated by the industry that 
80 per cent of the softwood lumber in 
the United States was being manu- 
factured in accordance with the 
American Lumber Standards. In 1925, 
it was estimated by responsible mem- 
bers of the industry that the waste 
eliminated by this simplification and 
standardization program exceeded 
.f200.000.000 per year. 

"To ascertain the practical effect of 
the application of these recommenda- 
tions, letters of inquiry, recently were 
addressed to all acceptors and to sev- 
eral hundred mills located in all parts 
of the country. The following are ex- 
cerpts from the replies: 

"We have made an appreciable sav- 
ing through grade marking our stock," 
wrote one mid western manufacturer, 
"and this has saved us somewhere be- 
tween $4,000.00 and $5,000.00 per year 
on claims." 

"Another manufacturer in the same 
locality said: 'It increases the pro- 
ductive capacity of employees and 
machines, and reduces warehousing 
and storage space requirements.' 

"The sales manager of a mill on 
the west coast replied: 'As American 
Lumber Standards, as provided in 
(Simplified Practice Recommendation) 
R16-29, have effected economies both 
to the manufacturer and to the dis- 
tributor, without working any hard- 
ship on the consumer, it is highly 
logical to assume that they will soon 
be accepted one hundred per cent. 



This has shown a saving to us, per- 
haps, of $4,000.00 In our operations 
last year.' 

" 'We note a steady Increase in the 
demand for standard Items, which en- 
ables us to reduce our manufacturing 
costs, inventories, etc., considerably,' 
stated the general manager of an- 
other plant. 

" 'Our saving has been chiefly in 
decreasing the amount of degrade 
formerly secured on account of stock 
being too thin to dress to the former 
standard thickness, and also the in- 
creased underweights resulting from 
the thinner net thickness,' said an- 
other manufacturer. He further 
states: 'We would estimate such sav- 
ings as being about $5,000.00 per year. 
We might add that all such saving 
has been passed on to the consumer 
in the way of lower prices.' 

"As to the benefits which accrue to 
consumers, the secretary of a water 
users association replied : 'We have 
found that standard grading rules 
make for more uniform lumber: 
standard nomenclature avoids mis- 
takes in ordering and shipping; simp- 
lified practice gives the buyer know- 
ledge of what he can expect to find 
in stock for immediate shipment; it 
tends to lower prices by requiring a 
smaller amount of equipment to man- 
ufacture and by having to stock few- 
er sizes. We are engaged in catalog- 
ing all of the material which we use, 
and simplified practice recommenda- 
tions certainly simplify cataloging.* 

"A roof contractor engaged in busi- 
ness in the City of New York wrote: 
'We derived the following benefits: 
Better value for the money, and a 
greater protection against unscrup- 
ulous traders.' 

"A member of a firm of engineers 
and architects said: 'We believe that 
this work has been of definite benefit 
through reduction in cost of materials 
and greater speed in deliveries. 

"The interest shown in the fore- 
going replies indicates that much 
benefit, tangible in its nature, is be- 
ing derived alike by the manufactur- 
er, distributor and consumer." 



San Jose's $1,000,000 school building 
program, now well under way, is pro- 
viding employment for a large body of 
local mechanics and laborers. It is 
estimated that perhaps 300 to 400 men 
are being given employment now 
when jobs are scarce. A survey of the 
jobs under way indicate that almost 
without exception the work on every 
school job is being done by local 
workers. In fact, on some of the 
school jobs there is a standing order 
that none but local men shall be em- 
ployed, the preference being given 
married men with families. 

Silver Lake Blvd., in Los Angeles, 
will be paved on a 44-foot roadway 
where there is no existing pavement, 
between Glendale Blvd. and Virgil Ave. 
at no cost to the property owners, ac- 
cording to a condition imposed by the 
city council in ordering proceedings 
for the improvement. This project has 
long been the subject of controversy. 
Opening and widening proceedings for 
this important traffic artery at a cost 
of $521,111 to the property owners are 
now nearing conclusion. Cost of the 
paving is estimated at $207,000. of 
which amount $100,000 will be paid by 
the county and the balance by the 
city of Los Angeles. 

This life is nothing more or less 

Than little acts of kindliness: 

A good word here, a service there, 

To lift from mankind some great care. 

So let us daily, thoughtfully 

Pursue our way rejoicingly; 

For I'll help you and you'll help me 

And this a happy world will be. 

Begin it now and carry on 

So when the year is past and gone 

In Meditation you can smile. 

For Living's really been worth while. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



NEW FORM OF CONSTRUCTION 

FOR APARTMENT HOUSE WALLS 



A radical departure from standard 
construction for apartment partition 
walls, involving a more effective use 
of lumber, has been developed in the 
offices of Schack and Young, archi- 
tects and engineers of Seattle, and is 
being- used for the first time in the 
apartment under construction in Se- 
attle, according to the West Coast 
Lumbermen's Association. 

The interesting departure from 
standard practice lies in the fact that 
the partition lumber is cut to length 
and first used as forms for concrete 
construction. It therefore never leaves 
the location in which it is first car- 
ried as an auxiliary construction ma- 
terial and is finally set up for per- 
manent construction. 

The construction involves the use 
of 2x6 tongued and grooved Douglas 
fir lumber, first using it as shoring, 
bracing, stringers and soffit boards 
for reinforced concrete construction 
and later taken down and built into 
a mill construction partition. The 
great bulk of this material is pre-cut 
to required finished lengths. 

The typical partition consists of the 
2x6 set up vertically, making a solid 
2-inch wall. For sound resistant par- 
titions, this wall is covered with sound 
resisting material on each side and 
plastered. For minor partitions, it 
may be lathed with wood lath- Where 
wood lath is used it is furred out by 
lath strips set vertically at about 16- 
inch centers, and the whole nailed 
through to the 2x6-inch core. 

This construction is extremely fire 
resistant, there being no hollow spaces 
except those occasionally encountered 
for housing pipes or ducts and these 
are cut off by the fireproof floor at 
each floor level. 

The partition is extremely resistant 
to sound transmission. This type of 
wall is thinner than standard hollow 
walls and effects a material saving in 
space. 

The economic feature of this con- 
struction practice is that all of the 
floor formwork is used up in the par- 
titions. .A single 2x6, well braced, sup- 
ports an area of about 15 sq. ft. Stif- 
fening the entire construction a row 
of 2x6's, doubled, is carried down the 
center of the span. 

A great saving is found in the ease 
of erecting forms and taking them 
down with the almost total absence 
of waste and elimination of the labor 
of . removing , and destroying large 
quantities of form lumber. Labor 
costs are very materially reduced. 



In regions where freight rates on 
lumber become a considerable item, 
it would be found economical to use 
the 2x6-inch material for wall forms, 
later using it up in the same type of 
partition. In the average apartment 
construction it will be found that with 
the most extensive use of 2x6-inch in 
formwork, there still will remain a 
small deficiency in the amount of lum- 
ber required for partitions. 

This form of construction is very 
simple. Workmen are able to go thru 
with the various steps in using lum- 
ber with great speed. As shoring, the 
2x6's are first cut to length, then set 
up and braced, each upright resting 
on wedges for adjustment which ap- 
proximate the thickness of the plate 
to be used. The soffit boards largely 
consist in the main part of 2x6's cut 
to partition lengths and put together 
with temporary cleats. 

When the forms are removed, the 
lumber is piled in positions conven- 
ient for installation in the partition 
walls. It has been found that forms 
so constructed are stiff and unyield- 
ing and that the finished soffits and 
ceilings are straight. Records on this 
building show no concrete loss usually 
present at the result of some deflec- 
tion. 

The only waste consists of the cleats 
and possible odd lengths, most of 
which are used up in the partitions 
over doorways and the like. When 
taken apart 2x6's are substantially 
free of nails, making the recondition- 
ing easy and inexpensive. 

When set flush in the wall position, 
the wall is almost air tight even be- 
fore lath and plaster ar a applied. 
Space for electrical outlets and con- 
duit are cut as required. 

This type of building, which in- 
volves concrete floors with all vertical 
openings fireproof, and openings pro- 
tected by fire doors, in conjunction 
with mill partitions, appears to offer 
great range of usefulness. The solid 
partitions are incombustible and a 
fire would be confined to any apart- 
ment in which it started. 

James H. Schack and A. M. Young, 
of the above firm, are members of the 
American Institute of Architects, and 
Mr. Young is also a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 
Both members of the firm have a sub- 
stantial record in constructive work 
in connection with the Building Code 
of the City of Seattle. Mr. Schack is 
at present a member of the Board of 
Appeals of the Building Department. 



FINDINGS PUBLISHED ON 

AIRPLANE HANGAR FIRE TESTS 



A wooden hangar has successfully 
weathered a series of seven fire tests 
made by a special Fact-Finding Com- 
mittee organized by the Aeronautics 
Branch of the U. S. Department of 
Commerce, to determine the effective- 
ness of automatic application of water 
in controlling airplane hangar fires. 
The report of the committee covers 
the circumstances and gives the re- 
sults and conclusions of the tests 
which were conducted in Washington 
last Spring with obsolete airplanes in 
a regulation-size lumber hangar. It is 
amply illustrated with photographs 
and drawings and gives comprehensive 
details for the information of aero- 
nautical engineers and other inter- 
ested persons. 

While these tests were not con- 
sidered exhaustive they covered a 
wide range of likely fire origins, a 



variety of risks respecting plans stor- 
age and inflammable material pres- 
ent. Four types of sprinkler instal- 
lations were used for applying water, 
viz: dry-pipe; wet-pipe; open over- 
head sprinklers of the same type and 
floor spray nozzles with heat-actuated 
water supply valve releasing mechan- 
isms. Every effort was made to set 
up conditions that would make up in 
intensity for any limitations in va- 
riety in character of fire origin or 
hazard increasing circumstances. 

The Committee's conclusions are 
carefully worded to avoid assuming 
more than could be reasonably de- 
duced from the specific tests. Grafic 
Illustrations of the report, on the 
other hand, showing several instances 
in which the interior of the hangar 
was filled with a bank of intense 
flame, give vivid testimony of the ef- 



fectiveness of the sprinklers in these 
specific instances in bringing the fire 
under control without material dam- 
age to the hangar. 

The findings of the Committee, 
eleven in number, read: 

1. Slow-burning fires in well venti- 
lated buildings with high ceilings may 
continue without opening automatic 
sprinklers. 

2. Extremely fast fires in single 
planes may burn themselves out with- 
out opening automatic sprinklers. 

3. Fires in readily ignitable and 
highly combustible materials spread 
over wide areas, such as gasoline on 
the floor or highly inflammable wing 
surfaces, may proceed at first faster 
than the opening of sprinklers and 
thus outrun for a time the applica- 
tion of water to the fire. 

4. Water from overhead sprinklers 
may on some occasions keep the top 
surfaces of an airplane wetted, thus 
preserving a shelter under which a 
fire may spread to various parts of 
the machine. Under this condition, 
supplemental equipment, such as hand 
extinguishers or hose streams, could 
be brought into use effectively. The 
use of floor sprinklers might reduce 
the spread of fire. None of these 
should be permitted to deprive over- 
head sprinklers of the water necessary 
for their effective operation. 

5. Each sprinkler installation should 
be equipped with suitable alarm de- 
vices in order that additional fire- 
fighting appliances may be on hand 
as promptly as possible. 

6. Fires involving large quantities of 
pasoline or similar fuel may not be 
entirely quenched by sprinklers alone, 
but would be kept, usually, in a sub- 
dued condition, making possible close 
approach thereto with other means for 
their subjugation. Suitable additional 
extinguishing devices should be pro- 
vided to supplement sprinkler systems 
for quenching these or similarly per- 
sistent fires. 

7. Fires in which several airplanes 
are ignited simultaneously will usual- 
ly result in the burning of surface 
fabrics and the ruin or destruction of 
some of the structural members of all 
involved, and may damage airplanes 
closely adjacent to them. 

8. Fire igniting a single airplane, 
even under highly favorable conditions 
for quick spread throughout the ma- 
chine, is usually controlled by sprink- 
lers so as to cause little or no dam- 
age to other airplanes stored close to 
the one first ignited. 

9. The automatic application of wat- 
er by sprinklers will generally give 
good protection to airplane hangars 
and contents except such of the con- 
tents as are involved in the outbreak 
of the fire. 

10. The advantages of a heat-actu- 
ated system of open sprinklers, such 
as the one tested are apparent (a) in 
small or slowly spreading fires (b) in 
buildings having high ceilings or con- 
ditions of ventilation causing hori- 
zontal drafts, or (c) in those fires 
where the time required for the open- 
ing of automatic sprinklers permits 
the fire to burn out or to get be- 
yond the range of discharging sprink- 
lers. 

11. These tests have indicated that 
sprinkler systems installed and main- 
tained in accordance with recognized 
good practice for the protection of 
this class of property, and having an 
adequate water supply, can control 
most of the fires likely to occur in 
airplane hangars; therefore serious 
thought, including thorough economic 
consideration should be given to the 
subject of such installations where- 
ever commercial air transport or oth- 
er aerial activities are carried on. 

The tests were naturally of a high- 
ly spectacular character. In one in- 
stance more than three hundred gal- 
lons of gasoline was at risk including 
gasoline spilled on the floor and wings 
of four planes and in fuel tanks. In 



Saturday, Januar 



3, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Eleven 



some of the testa the wings wen Bat- 
orated with gasoline, gasoline was 
spilled "" the floors or allowed to leak 

from t:i nks. gasoline anil nil saturated 
r -ii;s were used to convey flames, and 
.•I hlghlj Inflammable treating "d pi 
was spread over the wings. In one In- 
stance flames leaped through the front 
d..,ir of the hangar to a height of ap- 
proximately 50 feet. Several times the 
was filled with what seemed a 
solid bank of nam,, and on one oc- 
casion flames licked at the ro,,f and 
a roof truss member for a consider- 
able period of time. 

The hangar was of wood construc- 
tion approximately 80 feet by CO feet 
by 2S feet high. It was donated by 
the National Committee on Wood Util- 
ization of the Department of Com- 

rce. The Nati o n a 1 Automatic 

Sprinkler Association furnished both 
overhead and ground sprinkler Instal- 
lations and an elevated water supply 
tank. The Bureau of Standards fur- 
nished technicians and observer- for 
conduct of the tests and scientific in- 
struments for recording data during 
the course of the fires. 

The report, which is available from 
Ui, Public Trinter, at Washington, at 
n nominal charge of fifteen cents per 
copy, covers each test in detail, giv- 
ing conditions precedent, data tables, 
time log of the test and a statement 
of results. It also explains the char- 
acter of sprinkler systems used and 
illustrates their installation. In addi- 
tion it contains reports on volumetric 
capacity tests made on the dry-pipe 
systems subsequent to the fire tests. 

Harry H. Elee, Director of Aero- 
nautic Development, Department of 
Commerce, served as Chairman of the 
Fact-Finding Committee. Included in 
its membership were representatives 
of the Army and Navy air services, 
the U. S. Bureau of Standards, the 
National Advisory Committee for 
Aeronautics, the Aeronatuical Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the National Auto- 
matic Sprinkler Association, the Na- 
tional Board of Fire Underwriters, 
and the Underwriters Laboratories. 



SKYSCRAPERS NOT CAUSE OF 
N. Y. TRAFFIC CONGESTION 



nail 



Separate skyscrapers and 
groups of skyscrapers are exonerated 
as causes of traffic congestion in a re- 
port made public recently by the 
Regional Plan of New York and Its 
Environs under the heading "Building 
Bulks and Uses in Relation to Traffic," 
says Engineering News-Record. Blame 
for New York's traffic congestion is 
placed on the excessive bulks of build- 
ings over large areas permitted by 
the present zoning laws. 

It is pointd out that in midtown 
Manhattan, between 34th and 59th 
Sts., the average story height per unit 
of building plot is seven stories, which 
is likely to rise to between eight 
and nine stories by 1945— a height 
greatly in excess of what can be borne 
by the existing street system. 

Property owners and merchants are 
declared to be the chief sufferers from 
the traffic congestion which they them- 
selves cause by overbuilding. The 
difficulties in the way of automobile 
traffic in the midtown area are driv- 
ing tenants and suctomers to other 
areas. 

The Regional Plan urges as remedial 
measures that property owners should 
be compelled to provide space within 
their property for parking and for 
loading and unloading merchandise; 
the construction of bypass highways 
to eliminate through traffic from the 
streets; and requirement of setbacks 
on the street by stores which are re- 
sponsible for an excessive amount of 
pedestrian traffic. 



HIGH-POWERED FINANCING 

IS CONDEMNED BY BANKER 



(By R. W. Watson, Vice-President of 
the Bank of America of Califor- 
nia, in the California Con- 
structor) 



As the construction industry and 
affiliated lines represent one of the 
major industries of this country, the 
banks are of vital assistance in help- 
ing the various units that go to make 
up this industry. 

Banks art* called upon to finance 
almost every angle of building; are 
called upon to assist contractors in 
carrying cm their jobs; to assist sub- 
contractora, and also to assist mate- 
rial men. In fact they are back of the 
financing of almost every angle of 



the 



of buildings being erected borrow 
temporarily to complete the construc- 
tion thereof, and banks also assist 
materially in the building construc- 
tion by granting of building and real 
estate loans. Banks with ample sav- 
ings funds, loan to a very large ex- 
tent on real estate, for the purpose 
of improving the property. 

The better handling of loan prob- 
lems in the construction industry can 
be materially helped by proper un- 
derstanding of credit fundamentals 
by all concerned. Contractors should 
have a thorough understanding of the 
financing of the jobs they are bidding 
on, especially in this day of high pow- 
ered promotion and high finance, 
where the building industry has suf- 
fered along with other lines through 
under - financing. Contractors should 
investigate the details of financing of 
each project, and this investigation 
should go beyond the first and second 
money encumbrances of record. Where 
securities are to be realized upon ^.t 
a later date — these securities should 
be placed in escrow. Commitments for 
loans should also be checked care- 
fully, verified and ascertained wheth- 
er or not they are still in effect. Num- 
erous losses have been sustained 
through the failure to check commit- 
ments of this type, material being 
furnished under the assumption that 
a commitment for loan was in effect, 
when as a matter of fact the time 
limit had expired, and when request 
was made for the advances this fact 
developed. 

Contractors' Loans Problem 

Loans to contractors present a prob- 
lem to a banker somewhat different 
from regular commercial lines, es- 
pecially in California— where volume 
has been developed by some contrac- 
tors at a very rapid rate. 

The preparation and submission of 
a financial statement, which reflects 
the correct position of the contrac- 
tor, is one of the difficult things to 
do. Accounting practices for contrac- 
tors vary to a great degree, and it is 
exceedingly difficult for some contrac- 
tors to submit a proper statement of 
their actual financial position. A con- 
tractor's questionnaire and financial 
statement form has been prepared by 
the Associated General Contractors of 
America, which when properly filled 
out sets forth the exact position of 
the applicant. The contractor should 
know exactly where he stands on each 
job under way every day. Estimated 
profits on work in process should not 
be anticipated, nor set up on the con- 
tractor's books until the actual com- 
pletion of the job. Contingencies of- 
ten arise that absorb all of the esti- 
mated profits, and often occasion a 
loss rather than a profit. 

Contractors should have a definite 
s, and should endeavor 



to live up to their terms of purchase 
strictly, and not Impose upon the ma- 
terial men in the granting of extra 
time or extra discount, Abuse of good 
credit practice has resulted in many 
cases from this type of unjust treat- 
ment. There Is a tendency in some 
localities to settle past due accounts 
for material by giving trade accept- 
ances, and as a result of the standing 
of the material men with their banks 
these have been discounted without 
question, and the abuse has grown to 
,i quite substantial proportion. In case 
of additional time being necessary, 
creditors should be notified of all of 
the angles, and proper request for ad- 
ditional time submitted. 

In the financing of material men, 
banks are also of great assistance, and 
again a proper accounting system Is 
necessary. There are numerous cases 
where material men have been sub- 
mitting financial statements showing 
a rather easy liquid position, when, 
as a matter of fact, accounts receiv- 
able are being carried that should 
have long ago been charged to losses. 
Material men should furnish a segre- 
gation of these notes and accounts 
receivable by maturities, showing 
those of thirty days and under, sixty 
days and under, and ninety days and 
over. In the proper preparation of 
financial statements to be furnished 
by contractors or material men — to 
banks, creditors, bonding companies 
and others, a correct accounting pro- 
cedure, as above outlined, will ma- 
terially assist all concerned in arriv- 
ing at a proper understanding. Con- 
tractors' statements should show a 
segregation of the jobs, with an ac- 
curate estimate of the material and 
labor necessary to complete the job 
at all times. 

Large Losses* Blame Fixed 
Large losses have been substained 
by the granting of credit promis- 
cuously to irresponsible contractors by 
material houses, who have depended 
to some extent on the possible col- 
lection of the items through the me- 
chanic's lien law. These irresponsible 
contractors frequently underbid the 
legitimate contractor, who is endeav- 
oring to operate and handle work with 
a reasonable profit. The irresponsible 
contractor has nothing to lose, and is 
endeavoring to get by, by not living 
up to the strict terms of the contract, 
cutting the material or labor on the 
job, and trying to make a profit there- 
by. The result of this type of prac- 
tice, as above stated, has- resulted in 
heavy losses to all concerned. Credit 
should be granted only to those justly 
entitled to it, and who have a repu- 
tation for square dealing. The ille- 
gitimate and irresponsible contractor 
has no place in the building game. 

As above outlined, the banks of the 
state have been of great help In th* 
financing of construction — in the 
granting of real estate loans. The 
larger banks through their stock and 
bond affiliations have been instru- 
mental in underwriting some of our 
large building issues, and in that way 
have been helpful to the industry as 
a w.iole. Likewise through the Trust 
Departments the financing of subdi- 
visions has accomplished a lot toward 
the development of the residential 
sections of the larger cities in Cali- 
fornia. 

Banks, through analysis of credit 
problems presented, can be helpful to 
the material men and contractors as 
a whole, by assisting in the elimina- 
tion of high-powered financing, and 
credit losses to all concerned will be 
curtailed. The banks are willing at 
all times to check matters of this 
kind, through their well organized 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 




APARTMENTS 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $30,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Marina District. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (six four-room 

apts.) 
Owner and Builder — Ben. Liebman, 

1555 Francisco St. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets, Call Bldg. 



Planned. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $100,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Flores St. near 
Fountain Ave. 

Four-story and basement brick apart- 
ments (31 apts.) 

Owner— Nathan Kolkey, 150 N. Soto 
St., Los Angeles. 

Architect — Max Maltzman, Los An- 
geles. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost. $40,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. NW Broderick St. 

and North Point St. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (15 apts ) 
Owner— Robinson & Johnson, 871 31st 

Ave., San Francisco. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets, 72 New 

Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



Owner Taking Sub-Bids. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $25,000 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (17 2- and 3- 

room apts.) 
Owner— E. Cobo, 378 N Delaware, San 

Mateo. 
Plans by Grimes & Schoening, Balo- 

vich Bldg., San Mateo. 



Owner Taking Bids. 

APARTMENTS Cost. $15,000 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Broadway near California Drive. 

One-story and mezzanine floor rein- 
forced concrete apartments and 
stores. 

Owner — Peter Lemperopolus, 1212 EI 
Camino, Burlingame. 

Architect — Russell Coleman, 1404 
Broadway, Burlingame. 



Segregated Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $250,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

Third and Dartmouth Sts. 
Six-story and basement Class C steel 

frame, brick and concrete apart-. 

.ments (21 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8- 

room apts.) 
Owner — Irma Downing, 212 S. El 

Camino, San Mateo. 
Architect — Willis Lowe, 354 Hobart 

St., Oakland. 



BONDS 

SAUSALITO, Marin Co., Cal.— On 
January 10 an election will be held to 
vote bonds of $24,000 for the develop- 
ment of playgrounds. 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
—An election will be held in the early 
part of the year to vote bonds to the 
extent of $56,000 by Soquel - Capital 
Sanitary District for the construction 
of pumping and screening plant and 
a main trunk line to serve the dis- 
trict, Wm. H. Oliver, engineer of So- 
quel, prepared plans and specifica- 
tions. 



SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co , Cal.— 
City council contemplates election in 
April to vote bonds of $30,000 for a 
new sub-fire station. 

CHURCHES 

Completing Plans. 

CHURCH Cost, $75,000 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
Lake Avenue. 

Reinforced concrete church. 

Owner — Lake Avenue Congregational 
Church (Rev. James Henry Hut- 
chins. Pastor) 

Architect— Marston & Maybury, 25 S. 
Euclid Ave., Pasadena. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

CHURCH Cost, $75,000 

SANTA MONICA, Los Angeles Co., 

Cal. California and Tenth Sts. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco church and Sunday school. 
Owner— Trinity Baptist Church (Rev. 

Frederick W. Hatch, Pastor). 
Architect— Robert W. Orr, Corporation 

Bldg, Los Angeles. 



Plans Complete. 

CHURCH Cost, $12,000 

TAFT, Kern Co., Calif. 
One-story frame and stucco church 
(70x50-ft) auditorium to seat 250. 
Owner— First Christian Church of Taft 
Architect — Robert H. Orr, Corporation 
Bldg., Los Angeles. 

H. J. Kirschlein is chairman of the 
building committee. 

Composition shingle roof, steel sash, 
gas steam radiators, wood- trusses, 
etc. Plans have been completed and 
forwarded to owners for approval. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Brass & Kuhn. 
1917 Bryant St., submitted lowest bid 
to Architect Arnold Constable, 580 
Market St.. for furnishing oak choir 
stalls and screens and church furni- 
ture. They are to be installed in St. 
Dominic Church, Bush and Steiner 
Streets, for the Roman Catholic Arch- 
bishop of San Francisco. 



Plans Being Figured. 

CHURCH Cost, $65,000 

ALHAMBRA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Third and Jefferson Aves. 
Frame and stucco church (86x124 ft.) 

(to seat 600). 
Owner — St. Paul's Presbyterian Church 

(Dr. A. Breiglieb, Pastor) . 
Architect — Scott Quintin, Medical 

Bldg., Alhambra. 



SKILSAW Portable Electric Hand 
Saws (4 models). 

SKILSAW Portable Electric Sander 

SKILSAW Radial Arm Attach- 
ments. 

SYNTRON Portable Electric Ham- 
mers (4 models, motor- 
less). 

MALL Flexible Shaft Machines (50 
models). 

Electric Drills, Grinders, Buffers, 
Routers, Lock Mortisers. 

PETER H. NELSON 

Labor Saving Portable Electric 
Tools. 

1248 Mission St. UNdarhlll 

San Francisco 76*2 

SALES . SERVICE . RENTALS 



Prospective Bidders. 

CHURCH Cost, $70,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Emer- 
son and Excelsior Avenues. 
Reinforced concrete church. 
Owner — Roman Catholic Archbishop of 
San Francisco, 1100 Franklin St., 
San Francisco. 
Architect— W. E. Schirmer, 700 21st 
St., Oakland. 

Following is a list of contractors 
who will figure the plans: 

Barrett & Hilp, 918 Harrison St., 
San Francisco. 

Thomas Furlong, 460 Jerome Ave., 
Oakland. 

Chas. Heyer, Mills Pldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

W. C. Keating, 354 Hobart St., 
Oakland. 

R. W. Littlefield, 337 17th St., Oak- 
land. 

Leibert & Trobock, Rialto Bldg., San 
Francisco 

B. S. Mclntyre, 468 Crescent St., 
Oakland. 

J. L. McLaughlin Co., 251 Kearny 
St., San Francisco. 

S. Rasori, 74 New Montgomery St., 
San Francisco 

David Paganini, 519 California St., 
San Francisco. 

J. P. Brennan, 354 Hobart St., Oak- 
land. 



FACTORIES AND WARE- 
HOUSES 

Contract Awarded. 

BUILDING Cost, $8500 

SAN FRANCISCO. N Folsom Street 
W Rausch St. 

One-story and mezzanine floor class C 
concrete light industrial building. 

Owner— J. Harband, 1058 Howard St. 

Engineer — A. C. Griewank, 208 Mis- 
sion Street. 

Contractor— Schultz Const. Co.. 1 Hill- 
crest Blvd., Millbrae Highlands. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Until Jan. 5. 4:15 
P. M., bids will be received by G. B. 
Hegardt, Secretary, City Port Com- 
mission. 424 Oakland Bank Building, 
for constructing lean-to addition to 
Hangar No. 2, at the Oakland Mu- 
nicipal Airport. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

ADDITION Cost, $11,800 

SAN FRANCISCO. Eighteenth and 
Carolina Streets. 

Wood and structural steel addition to 
factory. 

Owner — Kaiser Paving Co., 74 New 
Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Engineer— L. H. Nishidan, 525 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Barrett & Hilp, 918 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco. 

Miscellaneous Iron— Fair Mfg. Co., 617 
Bryant St., San Francisco. 

Lumber — Chrlstensen Lumber Co, 5th 
and Hooper Sts.. San Francisco. 



Plans Prepared. 

REFINERY Cost, $2,000,000 

STOCKTON. San Joaquin Co., Calif. 
Six miles northwest of Stockton. 

Sugar refinery. 

Owner— Holly Sugar Co., West Chan- 
nel. Stockton. 

Architect — Not Given. 

More definite information will be 

given at a later date. 



Saturday, .lamia 



3. 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Thirteen 



TRACY, San Joaquin Co., Cal.— Fire 
completely destroyed the warehouse 
of the Holly Sugar Company, three 

mtlea north of Tracy, The loss Is vt id 

at ? 1.0110,000 which Is covered by ln- 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan. 

12th. 
SERVICE BLDG, Cost, $60,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Group of service buildings (concrete 

construction). 
Owner — Pacific Gas & Electric Co., 

245 Market St., San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 



Contract Awarded. 

u A.REHI lUSB Cost, $050,000 

LOS ANGELES, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

No. 1S09 E-Ninth Street. 
Six-story and basement Class A rein- 
forced concrete warehouse (lOOx 
eiS feet). 
Owner— Overland Terminal Warehouse 

Company. 
Architect — Samuel H. Dunford, 5850 

Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles 
Contractor— J. V. McNeil Co., 5850 
Avalon Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Several other units will be erected 
and construction on the second, which 
will cost about $1, 000,000, will prob- 
ably be started during 1931. 



Contract Awarded — Sub-Bids Being 
Taken. 

WAREHOUSE Cont. price. $89,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Sansome and Val- 
lejo Streets. 

Three-story reinforced concrete ware- 
house. 

Owner— Poultry Producers of Central 
California, 700 Front St. 

Architect— H. C. Paumann, 251 Kear- 
ny Street. 

Contractor — Sommarstrom Bros., 2921 
San Pablo Ave., Oakland. 
Sub-Bids are wanted on all portions 

of the work. 



Planned. 

WAREHOUSE Cost, $ 

TRACY, San Joaquin Co.. Calif. 

New sugar warehouse (height and 
type of structure not determined). 

Owner— Holly Sugar Co., West Chan- 
nel, Stockton. 

Architect— Not Selected. 

Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 

10th. 
FACTORY Cost, $200,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 102nd 

Avenue. 
One-story class C concrete factory (to 

cover area of 12,000 sq. ft.) 
Owner— Hammer Bray Co., 26th Ave. 

and E 12th St., Oakland. 
Architect— Clay N. Burrell, American 

Bank Pldg., Oakland. 
Consulting Engineer— W. W. Hanscom 

26th Ave. and E 12th St., Oakland. 
Bids are being taken for a general 
contract. 

FLATS 

Sub-Figures Being Taken. 

FLATS Cost. $7500 

SAN FRANCISCO. E 25th Avenue N 

Taraval St. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco flats (2 flats). 
Owner— P. Vukicevich, 1442 Taraval 

Street. 
Engineer— J. G. Little and Co., 251 

Kearny St. 



To Be Done By Day's Work. 

FLATS Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. E 21st Avenue. N 

Balboa St. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco flats (2 flats). 
Owner and Builder— S. Blaustein, 233 

21st Avenue. 
Plans by P. C. Fisher, 1122 Noe St. 



GARAGES AND SERVICE 
STATIONS 

Preparing Working Drawings 
SALES BLDG. Cost, $25,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 17th Avenue and 

Irving St. 
One - story reinforced concrete auto 

sales and service building. 
Owner— Hirrv Motor Co., ":!.'! Douglass 

Street. 
Architect — James Arnott, 417 Market 

Street. 
Bids will be taken in one week. 



Plans Being Revised. 

SERVICE STATION Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Masonic Ave. and 

Turk Street. 
One-story class C steel frame service 

station. 
Owner— Associated Oil Co., 70 New 

Montgomery St. 
New bids will be called for at a later 
date. 



Contract Awarded. 

STATION Cost, $5500 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. No. 
1950 Oxford Street. 

One-story Class C service station and 
garage. 

Owner — Richfield Oil Co. 

Architect — W. H. Ratcliff Jr., Mer- 
cantile Trust Bldg., Berkeley. 

Contractor— Barrett & Hilp, 918 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco. 



Contract Awarded. 

SERVICE STATION Cost. $9000 

COLMA, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
One-story concrete service station. 
Owner— Standard Oil Co., 225 Bush 

St., San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor — Lindgren and Swinerton, 

Inc., 225 Bush St., San Francisco. 



To Pe Done Bv Dav's Work Bv Owner 
SERVICE STATION, ETC. Cost, $5500 
OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. SW 

Park Blvd. and Hampel St. 
One-story brick service station, shop 

and comfort station. 
Owner and Builder — G. E. Thompson, 

1201 Norwood Ave., Oakland. 
Architect — Not Given. 



Permit Applied For. 

STATION Cost, $3500 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
No. 1216 Fifteenth Street. 

Service station. 

Owner— L. D . Ehret, 1050 38th St., Sac- 
ramento. 

Architect— Not Given. 



Contract Awarded. 

SERVICE STATION Cost, $5000 

SAN FRANCISCO. SW Cole & Fred- 
erick Sts. 

One-story steel frame service station 
and 1 -story steel frame shelter. 

Owner— General Petroleum Corp., 310 
Sansome St. 

Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

Contractor— Reavey & Spivock, Ltd.. 
Shell Bldg. 



Plans Being Completed. 

SERVICE STATION Cost. $7500 

SAN FRANCISCO. SW Pacific and 

Larkin Sts. 
Reinforced concrete service station. 
Owner— E. Dodge, % D. E. Jaekle, 

Call Bldg. 
Architect — Not Given. 

General bids will be taken about 
January 3. 

GOVERNMENT WORK AND 
SUPPLIES 

SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until January 
8, 3 P. M., under Order No. 2S23-1750 
bids will be received by U. S. Engi- 
neer Office. California Fruit Bldg., to 
furnish and deliver, Rio Vista, Solano 
County: 



Three Butchers Steels, ii-m No 
102 page 1185, Thomson-Dlggs Cat. 
No. 26 or equal 

Two Blued Steel Roasters, 14x19%- 
x lo-in.. No. 400, page 710 Thomson- 
Dlggs Cat, Mo. 26, or equal, 

Twenty-four Bakers, double thick 
hotel ware, trade size 9-ln., No. 613, 
page 13, Li irenson Cat. N'o. 6, oi 

Twenty-four Bakers, double thick 
hotel ware, trade size 7 In., No, 611, 
page 13, Levenson Cat, No. 6, or equal 

120 Saucers, double thick hotel ware 
No. 642S page 13, Levenson Cat. No. 

6, or equal, 

Fifteen Platters, double thick hotel 
ware, trade size 12-in. No. 635, page 
13, Levenson I !at No, 6, or equal 

120 Cups, unhandled. double thick 
hotel ware. No. 642C, page 13, Leven- 
son Cat, No. 6, or equal. 

Sixty Table Spoons, Windsor Pat- 
tern Lashar Ware, or equal. 



SACRAMENTO. Cal— Until January 
8, 3 P. IS.., under Order No, 2822-1750, 
bids will be received by U. S. Engi- 
neer Office, California Fruit Bldg.. to 
furnish and deliver, Rio Vista, Solano 
County: 

Twelve Blankets, gray, double, 66x 
80-in. when doubled, 65% wool, 35% 
cotton brand. 

120 Pillow Cases, white. 36x42-in.. 
firm, solid weave, quality equal to 
"Pequot" brand in number of threads 
in warp, filler and weight or size of 
thread. 

120 Towels, face, 18x36-in.. must be 
extra firm, heavy solid weave, best 
quality. 

120 Towels, bath, 22x44-in,, extra 
firm, heavy, solid weave, best qual- 
ity, heavy. 



HAWTHORNE, Nevada— Until Jan- 
uary 6, 10 A. M., bids will be received 
by Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, 
Navy Department, Washington, D. C, 
for furnishing greenhouse unit to 
Naval Ammunition Depot at Haw- 
thorne Plans on file in Navy Purchas- 
ing Office, 100 Harrison St., San Fran- 
csco. 



MARE ISLAND, Cal.— General Elec. 
Co., Schenectady, N. Y.. at $45,523. 
submitted lowest bid to Bureau of 
Yards and Docks, Navy Department. 
Washington, D. C. for Turbo-alter- 
nator, consisting of 2,000-k.w., erected 
on structural steel supports, provided 
by government, changes to existing 
switchboard panel and electrical ap- 
paratus and the services of a super- 
vising erector. 

Allis Chalmers, Milwaukee, at $46.- 
000 submitted second 1 ow bid. and 
Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co., Wash- 
ington, submitted third lowest bid. 
Complete list of bids will be published 
shortly. 



BOULDER CITY, Nevada— Reclama- 
tions commissioner Mead announces 
that work will be started in the near 
future on the construction of Boulder 
City, the new town to be established 
in connection with the Boulder Dam 
project. The estimated cost of im- 
provements is $1,978,000 and work will 
consist of the construction of streets, 
sewers, water system, street lighting 
system, about eighty dwellings, town 
hall, school building, garage, audi- 
torium, and administration building. 
A construction camp will also be con- 
structed near the new city at a cost 
of $1,095,000. Bids for the work will 
be advertised, all matters pertaining 
to the project to be handled by tl>e 
U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, S. O. 
Harper, acting chief engineer, 1441 
Welton St., Denver Walter Young is 
construction engineer on the. site. 
Business buildings and other struc- 
tures will be built by the various con- 
tractors and by those given conces- 
sions. 



Fourteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



Bids Opened. 

CHAPEL $40,000 appropriated 

SAN FRANCISCO. Presidio Reserva- 
tion. 
Two-story reinforced concrete chapel. 
(70x47-feet. seating 200; Mission 
style; Sunday school in basement) 
Owner — United States Government. 
Architect — Constructing Quartermas- 
ter, Fort Mason. 

Tile roof, cast artificial stone and 
terra cotta front, artificial tile floors, 
hot air fan system, oil burners, oil 
tanks, motor and outlet for organ, 3 
lavatories, accoustic plaster interior, 
Spanish Mission texture. Organ not 
included in general contract. 

Following is a complete list of bids; 

Alt. No. 1, general contract; Alt. No. 
2, plumbing; Alt. No. 3, heating; Alt. 
No. 4, electrical work; Alt. No. 5, 
changing thickness of concrete walls; 
Alt. No. 6, deduct or omit stucco; Alt, 
No. 7, add for cast stone; Alt. No. 8, 
deduct for omitting pews; Alt. No. 9, 
add for installing kneelers. 

John Bjorkman (1) $21,918; (5) $275; 
(6) $600; (7) $630; (8) $1100: (9) $75. 

Wm. Spivock (1) $23,640; (5) $530; 
(6) $330; (7) $1000; (8) $1000; (9) $70. 

Frank J. Reillv (1) $24.7S3; (5) $500; 
(6) $150; (7) $1050; (8) $600; (9) $100. 

H. L. Petersen (1) $25,337; (5) $625; 
(6) $350; (7) $325; (8) $510; (9) $125. 

Sullivan & Sullivan (1) $25,935; (5) 
$520; (7) $751; (8) $1300; (9) $200. 

Young & Horstmeyer (1) $26,425; (5) 
$570; (6) $526; (7) $300; (8) $1170; (91 
$70. 

O. H. Johanns (1) $26,445; (2) $1169; 

(5) $600; (6) 700; (7) $660; (8) $650; 
(9) $150. 

Wm. Martin (1) $26,543; (5) $520; 

(6) $271; (7) $586: (8) $870; (9) $213. 
J. H. Johnson (1) $26,568: (5) $640; 

(7) $940; (8) $1000; (9) $240. 

F. H. Fields (1) $26,762; (7) $3300. 
Monson Bros. (1) $26890; (5) $512; 
(6) $112; (7) $590; (8) $900; (9) $85. 
Jacks & Irvine (1) $27,423: (5) $465: 

(6) $442; (7) $498; (8) $1100; (9) $75. 
Albert Nelson (1) $28,392; (2) $885; 

(3) $1750; (5) $670; (6) $575; (7) $1.- 
020; (8) $850; (9) $100. 

F. C. Amoroso & Son (1) $28,842. 

E. K. Nelson (1) $29,500; (2) $1100: 
(3) $1750; (4) $900; (5) $700; (6) $600; 

(7) $600; (8) $S95; (9) $180. 

P. F, Speidel (1) $29,975; (5) $600; 

(6) $640; (7) $800; (8) $1100; (9) $100. 

N. H. Sjoberg & Sons (1) $30.SS6; 

(5) $600; (6) $344; (7) $300; (S) $1300; 
(9) $200. 

S. Rasori (1) $30,963; (5) $640; (6) 
$840; (7) $762; (8) $900; (9) $127. 
Gauley & Yount (1) $32,329; (5) $609 

(6) $515; (7) $998; (8) $1315; (9) $240. 
Oliver S. Almlie (1) $35,967: (5) $684; 

(6) $700; (7) $S50; (8) $900; (9) $130. 
Plumbing, Heating & Electric Work 

Skelly & Kohler, 1344 9th Ave., (2) 
$1,030. 

Frank Davison (2) $1,050. 

Chas. A. Langlais (4) $1,083. 

William Wara (2) $1,090. 

Pence Morf Elec. Co. (3) $1,198; (4) 
$1,274. 

Montague Range & Furnace Co. (3) 
$1,476.85. 

Aladdin Heating Co.. $1,550. 

Henry Ernst & Sons (2) $1,790; (2) 
11,881. 

Electrical Work Only 
Atlas Elec. & Eng. Corp., 343 4th 

Street $ 460 

Johnson Electric Co 789 

Aetna Electric Co 853 

Q. H. Armstrong 940 

Wedel Electric Co 1,040 

Apex Electric Co 1,165 

Bids held under advisement. 



BOULDER CITY. Nev.— Until 2 P. 
M., Jan. 10, bids will be received by 
the U. S Bureau of Reclamation, 
Wilda Bldg., 1441 Welton St., Denver, 
for the fabrication and erection of 2 
arc-welded or riveted plate steel 
tanks for water supply, Boulder City, 
Nevada, Boulder Canyon project. One 
tank will be 100 ft. in diameter and 
34 ft. high, with No. 10 gauge sheet 
Bteel roof of 2,000,000 gallons capacity. 



to be erected in Boulder City. The 
other tank will be 40 ft. in diameter 
and 25 ft. high, without roof, of 235,- 
000 gallon capacity, to be erected at 
the site of the titer plant about 4 
miles east of Boulder City. The tanks 
will be erected on oiled sand founda- 
tions constructed in advance by the 
government. Specifications may be 
obtained from the Bureau of Recla- 
mation, Las Vegas, Nevada, or Den- 
ver, Colorado. Bids received Decem- 
ber 12th rejected. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Cal.— R. E. Mit • 
telstaedt. retiring adjutant general of 
California, announces that the U. S. 
War Department will probably start 
work early next year on additional 
improvements at the National Guard 
training camp here. Program in- 
cludes the construction of 27 new mess 
halls and kitchens, eight bath houses 
and 288 new tent floors; also exten- 
sions to the sewer, water, light and 
heating systems. Cost $150,000. Con- 
tracts will be let for the various parts 
of the work. 



MARE ISLAND, Cal.— Judson Pacific 
Co., 609 Mission St., San Francisco, 
awarded contract by Bureau of Yards 
and Docks at $73,685 for furnishing 
and installing an electric gantry crane 
at the Mare Island navy yard. 



REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., 
Cal.— Until January 6, 3 P. M , bids 
will be received by U. S. Engineer Of- 
fice, Customhouse, San Francisco, for 
dredging in Redwood Creek. Specifi- 
cations obtainable from above office. 



COCO SOLO. C. Z.— Following is a 
partial list of prospective bidders for 
elevator to be installed at Coco Solo 
under Specification No. 6356, bids for 
which will be opened by the Eureau 
of Yards and Docks, January 7: 

Warner Elevator Co., Spring Grove 
Ave.. Cincinnati. 

Moffatt Machinery Mfg. Co., Char- 
lotte, N. C. 

Kimball Bros. Co., Council Bluffs, 
Iowa. 

S. Heller Elevator Co. Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

New Era Elevator & Machine Co., 
611 C St., N. W.. Washington. 

Otis Elevator Co., Washington. 



HAWTHORNE. Nev.— C. F. Dins- 
more, Ogden, Utah, at $333,800 sub- 
mitted lowest bid to Bureau of Yards 
and Docks, Washington, D. C, for a 
mine filling plant to be erected at the 
naval ammunition depot at Hawthorne 
Nevada. The work will include two 



bulk TNT storage buildings, two box 
opening buildings, two filling houses, 
two buildings designated as cooling 
shed and temporary storage buildings, 
crating and painting building, three 
drilling buildings, 29 dugouts with bar- 
ricades, empty mine storage building, 
concrete and earth barricades about 
buildings, standard gauge railroad 
tracks, driveways, roads, walks, etc. 
Following are three lowest bidders: 

C. F. Dinsmore, Ogden $333,800 

Robt. E. McKee. Los Angeles.... 369,000 
Thomas Haverty, Los Angeles.. 380,000 
Complete list of bids will be pub- 
lished shortly. 



SANTA ANA. Orange Co., Cal.— In 
addition to those previously reported, 
following are prospective bidders for 
Santa Ana Postoffice building, bids for 
which will be opened January 12 by 
Supervising Architect, Treasury De- 
partment, Washington, D. C: 

Schuck Const. Co., 1932 W 62nd St., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Sarver & Zoss, 727 W 7th St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Robert E. McKee, 1128 Central Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

W u r s t e r Const. Co., Architects 
Bide.. Los Angeles, Calif. 

R. E. Campbell, 108 W 6th St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

W. J. Shirley, 1351 W Washington 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Harvey A. Nickols, 936 E Slauston 
Ave., Los Angeles. Calif. 

Wm. MacDonald Const. Co., Saint 
Louis. Mo. 

Hallbauer-LaBahn. Inc., Chicago. 

Herbert M. Baruch Corp., .Ltd., 1015 
Lincoln Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 

W. D. Lovell, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Algernon Blair, Montgomery, Ala. 

Anton Johnson Co., 517 El Centro 
St., Los Angeles. Calif. 

Louis A. Geisler, 6212 S Middleton 
Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Henry V. Schlueter. 2421 N Com- 
monwealth Ave.. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Adolph G. Schmid, 412 W Santa 
Clara, Santa Ana. Calif. 

J. W. Jean. 6778 Hollywod Blvd., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO, San Luis Ob- 
ispo Co., Cal. — Adjutant General of 
California, R. E. Mittelstaedt, an- 
nounces a $150,000 building program 
for the National Guard Camp at San 
Luis Obispo for the year 1931. Con- 
struction will include 27 new mess 
halls and kitchens, eight bathhouses 
and 2S8 new tent floors. Extensions 
will be made to the sewer, water, 
light and heating facilities. 



ORNAMENTAL WIRE AND IRON WORK 

wire Fence and Gates 

TENNIS COURT ENCLOSURES 
WIRE SCREENS AND GUARDS 




WEST COAST WIRE & IRON WORKS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Fifte 



SAN DIEGO, Cal— As previously re- 
ported. Fred F. Greenfield Co . 1S0S 
\V. 7th St., Los Angeles, submitted 
low bid "f $103,000 to Bureau of 
Yards and Docks, Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 17, for the 
construction of a shop building at the 
Naval Operating Base (Air Station), 
San Diego. Specification No. 6276. 
Tin- work includes concrete, brick and 
hollow tile work, structural steel, 
metal doors, metal and wire mesh 
partitions, steel windows, dumb 
waiters, roofing and sheet metal 
work, wood block flooring, mastic 
flooring, plastering, gas and air pip- 
ing and heating, plumbing and elec- 
trical work. Following is a complete 
list of bids received: 

Item 1, work complete; 2, add for 
salt water lines as per alt. A: 

Fred F. Greenfield Co., 1S08 W 7th 
St., Los Angeles, item 1, $103,000; 2, 
$720. 

Wurster Constr. Co., San Diego, 
Item 1. $105,000; 2, $775. 

Lynch Construction Co., Los An- 
geles, item 1, $10G,705; 2, $S50. 

Anton Johnson Co , Inc.. South Pasa- 
dena, item 1, $106,790; 2, $738. 

Jarboe Constr. Co., Sail Diego, item 
1, $106,S57; 2, $1000. 

M. H. Golden, San Diego, item 1, 
$107,100; 2, $795. 

Robert E. McKee, Central BIdg., 
Los Angeles, item 1, $107,600; 2, $1400 

Bannister-Field Co., Ltd , Los An- 
geles, item 1, $108,350; 2, $1000. 

Modern Coustr. Co., San Diego, Item 
1, $108,153; 2, $720. 

Andy Sordal, 722 Magnolia St., Long 
Beach, item 1, $108,808; 2, $1000. 

Ova F. Eckles. 711 Sunset Court, 
Mission Beach, item 1, $109,455; 2, $720 

G. F. Campbell Building Co, San 
Diego, item 1, $109,500; 2, $792. 

Van Rensslear & Isham, 4243 Los 
Nietas Drive, Los Angeles, item 1, 
$109,970; 2, $800. 

B. O. Larsen, 1340 E St., San Diego, 
item 1, $110,400; 2, $800. 

Los Angeles Contracting Co., 4816 
W. Pico St , Los Angeles, item 1, $112,- 
250; 2, $S50. 

Union Engineering Co., Ltd., 5905 
Pacific Blvd.. Huntington Park, item 
1, $113,000; 2, $720. 

Wm. MacDonald Construction Co., 
St. Louis, item 1, $113,484; 2, $1200. 

W. E. Kier Construction Co., First 
National Bank Bldg., San Diego, item 
1, $113,520; 2, $1050. 

Pettifer-Hunt Co., 4123 44th St., 
San Diego, item 1, $116,400; 2, $800. 

W. P. Thurston. Richmond, Va., 
item 1, $129, S00; 2, $1800. 



SAN DIEGO. Cal.— Until 11 A. M., 
January 15, bids will be received by 
Public Works Department of Eleventh 
Naval District, San Diego, for re- 
placing elevator enclosure doors and 
new retiring cam mechanisms at the 
Naval Operating Base (Naval Hos- 
pital), San Diego. Specification No. 
6378. The work includes (a) the re- 
moval of six existing elevator en- 
closure doors and the furnishing and 
installing of six new metal covered 
elevator enclosure doors, with neces- 
sary appurtenances, and (b) the fur- 
plete retiring cam mechanisms and 
torque motor on four existing eleva- 
tors, one each in buildings Nos. 2, 5. 
9 and 10. Information obtainable 
from Commandant, Eleventh Naval 
District, San Diego, upon deposit of 
$10. Captain DeWitt C. Webb, public 
works officer. 

HALLS AND SOCIETY 
BUILDINGS 

Contract To Be Awarded. 
COMMUNITY CENTER Cost. $6500 
MODESTO, Stanislaus Co., Cal. 
One-story and basement frame and 



stucco Jewish community center. 
i Iwnei Jewish Community renter. 
Architect— G. N. Hilburn. 1312 I St 

Modesto. 
' tontractoi Harvey Rebman, 91 

St., Modesto. 



Mil 



Work Started. 

CLUB BLDG. Cost, $S000 

ALliA.VY, Alameda Co, Cal. Solano 
and Kaines Streets. 

Two-story frame club building (gym- 
nasium, offices, etc.) 

Owner— Y. M. C. A. (John W. Berger, 
Secretary), 2001 Allston Way, Ber- 
keley. 

Architect— W. H. Ratcliff Jr., Chamber 
of Commerce Bldg , Berkeley. 

Managear of Constr. — F. E. Sherwood, 
Premises. 



Plans Being Completed. 

MEMORIAL BLDG. Cost, $65,000 

HAYWARD. Alameda Co., Cal. (Kolze 
property) Main St. 

One-story reinforced concrete Veter- 
ans' Memorial Building (Spanish 
type). 

Owner — County of Alameda. 

Architect— H. H. Meyers, Kohl Bldg.. 
San Francisco. 
Bids will be taken in about thirty 

days. 



Low Bidder. 

LODGE BLDG. Cost, $90,000 

LAS VEGAS. Nevada. Third and 
Fremont Streets. 

Two-story Class C brick store and 
lodge building (100x130 feet). 

Owner — Las Vegas Masonic Lodge. 

Architect— Gilbert Stanley Underwood 
730 S-Los Angeles St., Los An- 
geles. 

Low Bidder — Los Angeles Contracting 
Co., 4816 W. Pico Blvd., Los An- 
geles. 



Preparing Sketches. 
MEAIORIAL BLDG. Cost, $- 

ALTURAS, Modoc Co., Cal. 
Veterans' Memorial Building. 
Owner — County of Modoc. 
Architect — Ralph Taylor, Alturas. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

CLUB HOUSE Cost, $15,000 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 

Park St. bet. Madison and Com- 
merce Streets. 
One-story brick club house with tile 

roof (68x91 feet). 
Owner — Knights of Pythias, Charter 

Oak Lodge No. 20. 
Architect — Victor Galbraith, Elks 

Bldg., Stockton. 
Contractor— T , E. Williamson, 1859 W. 

Park Ave.. Stockton. 
Masonry — J. A. Silver, Johnson Ferry 

Road, Stockton. 
Heating and Plumbing— W. T. Gibson 

Co., 123 S-Grant St., Stockton. 
Electric Wiring— Collins Electric Co., 

708 E-Market St, Stockton. 



Reinforcing Steel- F. A. Klinger, 1269 

x. Pilgrim si., Stockton. 
Roofing— N. Clark & Son, 116 Natoma 

St., San Francisco. 
Painting— Marcelln & Carrol, 729 N- 

Y.,spiTni.' si , Stockton. 
Plastering— J. Hodge, Country Club 

Blvd . Stockton. 
Tile— H. P. Fischer Tile Co., 744 E- 

Weber St., Stockton. 
Concrete has been poured. Steam 
heating plant, oil burning system, 
maple flooring, steel sash. 



COLUSA. Colusa Co., Cal. — Colusa 
County Board of Supervisors dis- 
cussed the plan to remodel the high 
school in Colusa for a Veterans' Me- 
morial building or remodel the opera 
hall for a memorial building. No 
definite action has been taken at this 
time. Arch Davison is chairman of 
the building committee More definite 
information will be given at a later 
date. 



Commissioned To Prepare Plans. 
MEMORIAL Cost. Approx. $20,000 

VACAVILLE, Solano Co , Cal. 
One-story and basement Veterans' 

Memorial Building. 
Owner — County of Solano. 
Architect— Kent & Hass, 525 Market 

St.. San Francisco. 



WILLOWS. Glenn Co.. Cal —Until 
January 13, 11 A. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by TV. B. Sale, county clerk, to 
furnish and install furniture, draperies 
and equipment to Orland Memorial 
Building at Orland. Certified check of 
10% required with bid. Specifications 
and further information obtainable 
from above. 



HOSPITALS 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Until January 13, 
10:30 A. M., bids will be received by 
Geo. Gross, County Clerk, for hospital 
equipment for use at Tuberculosis 
Hospital building Specifications ob- 
tainable from John M. Sabin, pur- 
chasing agent. Hall of Records, Oak- 
land. Cerftified check of 10% required 
payable to Geo. Gross, Clerk of Board. 



AGNEW, Santa Clara Co., Calif.— 
Until Jan. 9, 2 P. M., informal bids 
will be received by State Department 
of Architecture, Public Works Bldg., 
Sacramento, for reconstruction of two 
elevators in the Agnew State Hospital. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Until Jan. 12. 3 
P. M., bids will be received by Leon- 
ard S. Leavy, city purchasing agent, 
to furnish hospital equipment for San 
Francisco Hospital. Specifications and 
further information obtainable from 
above. 



"Gold Medal" Safety Scaffolding 

for use on steel and concrete frame buildinps, saves 
lives, time and monev 



whenever ascafTol 
always ereat. 



is required. The ris 



merjt 
isk is 



Tke Patent Scaffolding Company 

270— 13th St.. San Francisco Phone Hemlock 4271 

L«»»or of Suspended and Swinging Safety "Gold Medal" Scaffolding. 



Sixteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 

HOSPITAL Cont. price, $69,223 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Calif. 

State Hospital Grounds. 
Two - story and part basement rein- 
forced concrete hospital and two- 
story reinforced concrete indus- 
trial building. 
Owner — State of California. 
Architect— State Department of Pub- 
lic Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, Geo. B. McDougall. State 
Architect, Public Works Building, 
Sacramento. 
Contractor — Sorensen and Haggmark, 
2652 Harrison St., San Francisco. 
Hospital building will be of rein- 
forced concrete with tile and solid 
plaster partitions, wood roof construc- 
tion and tile roof and a total floor 
area of 14,500 square feet. 

The Industrial building will be of 
concrete construction, wood and con- 
crete second floor construction, steel 
roof construction and a total floor 
area of approximately 6150 sq. ft. 

As previously reported plumbing and 
heating awarded to J. C. Plack. 721 W 
Elm St. Stockton, at $14,900; elec- 
trical work to Collins Electric Co., 708 
E Market St., Stockton, at $3881. 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co., Cal.— Un- 
til January 13. 2 P. M.. bids will be 
received by F. M. Kay, clerk of Board 
of Supervisors, to furnish miscel- 
laneous items for County hospital for 
the quarter ending March 31, 1931. 
Specifications and further information 
obtainable from above. 



WILLOWS, Glenn Co., Cal.— County 
Grand Jury, in annual report, recom- 
mends a $3000 expenditure on the 
county hospital for "painting and gen- 
eral renovations." 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY, Calif.— State 
Director of Institutions, Earl E. Jen- 
sen, announces the purchase of a 1060 
acre site in Riverside County on 
which will be erected a new state hos- 
pital for the insane. The land, known 
as the Arlington site, was purchased 
from J. W. Hole of Los Angeles at 
$328,600 or $310 per acre. 

The 1929 Legislature appropriated 
$1,000,000 for the site and buildings 
at the new institution, and from the 
sum remaining after paying for the 
land the following construction is 
planned: Unit to house 400 patients, 
$360,000; laundry building and equip- 
ment, $50,000; bakery, commissary and 
refrigeration unit, $60,000; sewage 
treatment plant and collection sys- 
tem, including storm drains, $33,000; 
administration building, $50,000; do- 
mestic water development, $15,000; fire 
protection, $7500; electrical service, 
$10,000; gas service, $2000. 

The unit for patients will be started 
immediately. Funds already have been 
delivered to the State Division of Ar- 
chitecture and it will be completed 
by next summer. There will also be 
started immediately temporary wood- 
en buildings to house 50 patients and 
20 employes, who will be used to start 
farming activities and aid in the con- 
struction program. 

With the completion of the first 
unit for patients, relief can be af- 
forded other hospitals in the south 
by transferring patients. The con- 
struction program for the next bien- 
nium will provide another unit for 
400 patients as well as employes" quar- 
ters and minor construction items. 

~ HOTELS ~ 

Plans Being Completed. 

HOTEL Cost, $175,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co, Cal. San 

Pablo Ave. near Fortieth St. 
Six-storv steel frame and concrete 

hotel. 
Owner— Withheld. 
Plans by Clay N. Burrell, American 

Bank Bldg., Oakland. 



Contractor — Dyer Constr. Co., Ray 
Bldg., Oakland. 
Structural steel bids will be taken 
about January 15. 

POWER PLANTS 

GRIDLEY. Butte Co , Cal.— Until 
January 12, 8 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by J. L. Lewis, city clerk, to 
furnish one Diesel engine generating 
unit with auxiliary pumps, motors, 
equipment and materials. Certified 
check or surety bond 10% required 
with bid. Specifications on file in the 
office of clerk. 



SANTA ANA, Orange Co., Cal.— 
Construction of a $1,500,000 sub- 
station at Stanton in Orange County, 
has been announced by R. E. Bacon, 
manager of the Santa Ana district for 
the Southern California Edison Co. A 
15-mile transmission line will connect 
the Stanton and Light-hipe sub- 
stations. This line will involve an 
additional $1,500,000. According to Mr. 
Bacon, transformers and switching 
equipment of large capacity will be 
installed at Stanton. The initial in- 
stallation will be 33,523 horse power. 
All will be oil insulated, air-blast self 
cooling and each will weigh 28S.0OO 
lbs., containing 16,133 gallons of oil. 
Each transformer will be 37 ft. in 
height and approximately 21 ft. in 
diameter. There will be 24 oil switches 
weighing 876.000 lbs., each containing 
3400 gallons of oil. The project will 
require approximately 11,792 ft. cop- 
per tubing. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, FIRE 
HOUSES AND JAILS 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Until Ian. 9. 2 
P. M., informal bids will be received 
by State Department of Architecture, 
Public Works Bldg., Sacramento, for 
partition work in the State Building. 
San Francisco. 

Bids Opened. 

AUDITORIUM Cost, $ 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
Class A reinforced concrete municipal 
auditorium (tile and composition 
roofing, steel and wood sash) 
(seating capacity 3000). 
Owner — City of Pasadena. 
Architects — Edwin Bergstrom, 1129 
Citizens National Bank Bldg, Los 
Angeles, and Bennett & Haskell, 
311 First Trust Bldg., Pasadena. 

Following is a complete list of low 
bids received: 

Wm. C. Crowell, 495 S-Broadway, 
Pasadena, general contract, $752,000. 

Coony & Winterbottom, 2425 Hunter 
St., Los Angeles, heating and venti- 
lating, at $54,855. 

R. R. Jones Electric Co.. 1124 Fair 
Daks, South Pasadena, electric wiring 
at $46,445. 

F. B. Jones, 521 N. Hollisten, Pasa- 
dena, plumbing, at $25,564. 

Pearbody Seating Co., 631 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, seats at $23,302.08. 

Beckwith Elevators. Ltd., 1339 Santa 
Fe, Los Angeles, elevators, at $7020. 

D. Zelinsky & Sons, Inc., 687 An- 
tonio St ., Los Angeles, painting at 

EL CERRITO, Contra Costa Co.', 
Cal. — J. E. Scott at $35 awarded con- 
tract by city trustees to paint cells at 
city jail and to M. Darr at $136.50 to 
install bunks in same quarters. 

Bids Opened. 

FIRE HOUSE Cost, $7200 

CORTE MADERA, Marin Co., Calif. 

NE First and Willows Sts. 
One-story frame and stucco fire house 

with tile roof (47x61-ft.) Spanish 

type (heating plant). 
Owner — Corte Madera Fire Dept., Inc. 

Corte Madera. 



Plans by J. C. Oglesby, Freitas Bldg.. 

San Rafael. 
Low Bidder — Wm. Wagner, Larkspur. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

Wm. Wagner, Larkspur $6,952 

A. W. Wheeler 6,970 

L. Miller 7,600 

E. W. Ruhl 7,500 

M. Kahl 7,729 

L. M. Bryan 8,900 

Bids held under advisement. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

ADDITION Cont. Price, $6826 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Cal. 

Addition to city jail and certain al- 
terations in present jail cells. 

Owner— City of Salinas, M. R. Keef, 
City Clerk. 

Architect— Butner & Stranahan, Glik- 
barg Bldg., Salinas. 

Contractor — W. E. Green, Salinas. 

Concrete Aggregates — Central Supply 
Co., Salinas. 

Lumber. Cement., Etc.— Tynan Lum- 
ber Co., Salinas. 

Plumbing and Sheet Metal Work— B. 
E. Underwood, Salinas. 

Electrical Work— Rodeo Electric Co., 
Salinas. 

Ornamental Iron and Cell Work— 
Hellwig Iron Works, 470 Vine St., 
San Jose. 

Reinforcements— W. S. Wetenhall Co., 
17th and Wisconsin Sts, S. F. 

Mill Work— Salinas Planing Mill, Sa- 
linas. 



WILLOWS, Glenn Co., Cal.— 
County Grand Jury, in annual report, 
recommended $10,000 expenditure on 
county courthouse for "badly needed 
repairs," 



RESIDENCES 

Sub-Bids Being Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $5000 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
No. 535 Jeter St. 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner and Builder — Leonard A. Mon- 
roe, 4th Ave., Redwood City. 

Plans by Owner. 

Sub-Bids Being Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $7500 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

No. 441 Hudson St. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence. 
Owner and Builder — James S. Forster, 

1215 Jefferson St., Redwood City. 
Plans by Owner. 

Contract Awarded, 

RESIDENCE Cost, $6000 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
No. 64 Hillview Ave. 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner — J. L. Chiapelone. 718 Roose- 
velt Ave., Redwood City. 

Plans by Owner. 

Contractor— C . S. Baker, 611 9th Ave., 
San Mateo. 

Completing Plans. 

RESIDENCE Cost approx. $20,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (10 rooms). 
Owner— Dr. E. P. Cook, St. Claire 

Bldg., San Jose. 
Architect— Ralph Wyckoff, San Jose 

National Bank Bldg., San Jose. 

To Be Done By Day's Work By Owner 
RESIDENCES Cost each, $5000 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Seneca E De- 
lano St. 
Two 1-story and basement frame and 

stucco residences. 
Owner — Stoneson Bros. & Thorinson, 

279 Yerba Buena Ave. 
Plans by Owners. i 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Seventeen 



Elevator Contract Awarded. 

Al.TKUATb INS Cost, $8000 

PIEDMONT, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Alter two-story frame residence (In- 
stall elevator, etc.) 

Ownei -Anna Miller. 

Architect— Clarence Tantau, 210 Post 
St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Charles Stockholm, Russ 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Elevator— Otis Elevator Co., 1 Beach 
St, San Francisco. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $7000 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 

(6 rooms). 
Owner— H. Kingman. 
Architect — Williams & Wastell, 371 

17th St., Oakland. 



Contract Awarded. 

GATE LODGE Cost, $ 

LOS ALTOS, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Gate Lodge. 

Owner — Milton Haas. 

Architect— Farr & Ward, 6S Post St., 

San Francisco. 
Contractor— Wm. Martin, 6G6 Mission 

St., San Francisco. 
Bids will be taken from a selected 
list of contractors in about 3 weeks 
for a two-story and basement frame 
and stucco residence (12 rooms and :: 
baths), swimming pool, dressing 
rooms, tennis courts and separate ga- 
rage building. Electric and warm air 
heating system. 



Plans Being completed. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $15,000 

MODESTO, Stanislaus Co., Cal. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 



(9 



s). 



Owner— D. P. Boothe, 114 11th Street, 
Modesto. 

Architect— Warren Perry, 200 Califor- 
nia St., San Francisco. 
Bids will be taken in one week. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 21st and Sanchez 
Streets. 

1%-story frame and stucco residence. 

Owner— Burlingame Bldg. Corp. 

Plans by Russell Coleman. 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 

Contractor— G. W. Williams Co., 1404 
Broadway, Burlingame. 



To Be Done By Day's Work By Owner 
RESIDENCES Cost each. $6000 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Kirkham St., W 

31st Ave. 
Two 1-story and basement frame and 

stucco residences. 
Owner and Builder— H. Doelger, 300 

Judah St. 
Plans by Owner. 1 



To Be Done By Day's Work. 
RESIDENCE Cost. $5500 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Ulloa St. E 18th 

Avenue. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence. 
Owner and Builder — A. Sergo, 2239 

26th Avenue. 
Architect— Not Given. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $5000 

SAN FRANCISCO. E 21st Avenue S 

Moraga St. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence. 
Owner— J. Fonti, 93 Prentice St. 
Plans by Owner. 
Contractor — H. H. Isaac, 151 Farragut 

Avenue. 

Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost. $S0O0 

PIEDMONT, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Alterations to two-story frame resi- 
dence. 

Owner— Anna Miller. 

Architect— Clarence Tantau, 210 Post 
St., San Francisco. 



Owner Taking Sub- Bids. 
RESIDENCE Cost. $7500 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin i :o , Cal. 
One-story and basement brick 

residence (7 rooms). 
Owner and Builder— Anton Larson, 123 

W Maple St., Stockton. 
Architect— Glenn Allen, Union Bldg.. 

Stockton. 



Bids opened. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (8 rooms and 3 

baths). 
Owner — D. E. E. Porter, Security 

Bank Bldg., San Jose. 
Architect— Wolfe & Higgins, Realty 

Bldg., San Jose. 
Following is a list of the general 

contract bids ived: 

S. Fiore, San Jose $11,250 

M i:.'. se, s in Jose 11,497 

Calvelll & Cliff, San Jose 11,857 

J. M. Neilsen, San Jose 12,012 

C. Brown, San Jose 12.1G3 

Paul Andrson, San Jose 12,185 

Henry Bolwin, San Jose 12,200 

Guy M. Latta, San Jose 12,700 

Bids held under advisement. Bids 
for painting and mechanical work 
have been opened and are also held 
under advisement. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $15,000 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 1509 
La Loma Avenue. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner— E. J. Krowell, 1928 Los An- 
geles Ave., Berkeley. 

Architect— Masten & Hurd, 21" Post 
St., San Francisco. 

Contractor — H. Papenhausen, 595 Vic- 
toria St., San Francisco. 

Glass and Mill Work— National Mill & 
Lumber Co., 400 High St., Oak- 
land. 

Concrete Work— P. Barale & Co., 123 
E 15th St., Oakland. 

Lumber— E. K. Wood Lumber Co., 
Frederick and Kings Sts., Oak- 
land. 
Sub-bids are wanted on electric 

work, plumbing, plastering, sheet met- 
al, tile work and heating. 



Owner Taking Sub-Bids. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $0000 

HOPLAND, Mendocino Co., Calif. 

One - story and basement frame resi- 
dence (7 rooms: Colonial type). 

Owner— T. J. Geary, Post Office Bldg., 
Hopland. 

Architect— Irvine & Ebbets, Call Bldg. 
San Francisco. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $30,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 10924 
Foothill Blvd. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (11 rooms). 

Owner — Lloyd Dinkelspiel, 2800 Broad- 
way, San Francisco. 

Architect— J. H. Mitchell, 369 Pine St., 
San Francisco. 

Contractor— A. F. & C. W. Mattock. 
212 Clara St.. San Fr: 



Contract Awarded. 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. No. 

4 Mosswood Lane. 
One-story frame and stucco residence 

(4 rooms) 
Owner — Mrs. Ferguson, 1 Orchard 

Lane, Berkeley. 
Architect — W. T. Steilberg, 1 Orchard 

Lane, Berkeley. 
Contractor— C. O. Bradhoff, 911 56th 

St., Oakland. 

To Be Done By Day's "Work. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $6500 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
No. 436 N. Central Avenue. 



One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence. 
Owner and Builder — J. M. Hilterbrand, 

2644 B Main St., Stockton. 
Architect — Not Given. 

Sub-Figures Being Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $0500 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Benton W Gene- 
burn Street. 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner— St. Mary's Park, 3901 Mis- 
sion St , San Francisco. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor — A. R. Johnson, 3901 Mis- 
sion St., San Francisco. 

Plans Being Completed. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. PInelake Park 

(Sloat Blvd.) 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (8 rooms, 3 baths) 
Owner and Builder — H. W. Petersen, 

1 South Hill Blvd., San Francisco. 
Architect— Not Given. 

Sub-Bids will be taken Jan. 29th. 



Sub-Bids BMeing Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $5500 

MILLBRAE HIGHLANDS, San Ma- 
teo Co., Cal. 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (5 rooms). 

Owner and Builder— Castle Bldg. Co.. 
830 Market St., San Francisco. 

Architect — Not Given. 



Contracts Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $7000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. Mc- 

Kendrie Ave. 
Two - story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (2 baths). 
Owner— Chas. McKenzie, Twohy Bldg. 

San Jose. 
Plans by Owner. 
Carpentry Labor— T. Thomas Hersh- 

back, Twohy Bldg., San Jose. 
Concrete and Cement Work — Jos. Alva 

117 S 3rd St., San Jose. 



Sub-Figures Being Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $ 

SAN MATEO PARK, San Mateo Co. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (10 rooms). 
Owner & Builder— H. H. Randies, 249 

Hillcrest Blvd., Burlingame. 
Architect— Ed. Musson Sharpe, 525 

Market St., San Fran 



Construction Postponed Thirty Days. 

RESIDENCE Cost appnjx. $15,000 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Edgewood Park. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (9 rooms and 3 
baths). 

Owner— H. E. Bourquin, 2710 Broad- 
way, Redwood City. 

Plans by J. P. Reinoeh, 218 Cowper 
St., Palo Alto. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan. 
5, 3 P. M. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $16,500 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Margaret Street. 

Two-story and basement brick resi- 
dence with tile roof (9 rooms, 2 
baths). 

Owner— Chas. Gladding, 1215 Yosemite 
St., San Jose. 

Architect — Chas. McKenzie, Twohy 
Bldg., San Jose. 
Hot air heating system. 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $6000 

SAN LEANDRO, Alameda Co., Cal. 

No. 929 Glen Drive. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 



(6 



Owner — Dr. Fox. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor — Nylander Bros., 633 Mont- 
clair St., San Leandro. 



Eighteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



Contract Awarded. 

ESTATE Cost, $ 

LOS ALTOS. Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Estate. 

Owner — Milton Haas. 

Architect— Parr & Ward, 68 Post St., 

San Francisco. 
Contractor— Wm. Martin, 666 Mission 

St., San Francisco, 
bids will be taken from a selected 
list of contractors in about 3 weeks 
for a two-story and basement frame 
and stucco residence (12 rooms, 3 
baths), swimming pool, dressing 
rooms, tennis courts, and separate ga- 
rage building. Electric and warm air 
heating system. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Pinelake Park 

(Sloat Blvd). 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (8 rooms, 3 baths) 
Owner and Builder — H. W. Petersen, 

1 South Hill Blvd., San Francisco. 
Architect — Not Given. 



Plans Being Figured. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Fourteenth Ave. 

near Taraval St. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (7 rooms). 
Owner — J. H. Johnson, % Architect. 
Architect— Chas Strothoff. 2274 15th 

St., San Francisco. 



Plans Being Figured. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $7500 

MILBRAE HIGHLANDS, San Mateo 

Co., Cal. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (5 rooms) 
Owner — A. N. Arneson, 195 Lowell St., 

San Francisco. 
Architect— Chas. Strothoff, 2274 15th 

St., San Francisco. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

ALTERATIONS Cost approx. $15,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Pacific Ave. bet. 
Presidio Ave. and Walnut St. 

Alterations to residence. 

Owner — Ralph Lyon. 

Architect — Warren Perry, 260 Califor- 
nia Street. 
Bids will be taken in about 30 days. 



SCHOOLS 



Plans Beiag Prepared. 

SCHOOL Cost, $200,000 

RENTON, Washington. 

Concrete and brick school (20 class- 
rooms, assembly hall, seating 900; 
2 gymnasiums). 

Owner — Renton City School District. 

Architect— William Mallis, Lyon Bldg., 
Seattle. Wash. 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 
SCHOOL Cost, $S0,000 

TUBA CITY. Sonoma Co., Cal. 
Two-story Class C brick elmentary 

school. 
Owner — Yuba City Elementary School 

District. 
Architect — Davis-Pearce Co., Grant 

and Weber Sts., Stockton. 
Bond election will be called at a 
later date. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
SCHOOL Est. Cost, $180,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Claremont Blvd. 

and Taraval Street. 
Two-story Class B reinforced concrete 

school. 
Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
Architect — Dodge Reidy, Pacific Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Plans will be ready for bids in about 
sixty days. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— George McMullin. 
3223 E 10th St., Oakland, at $9,419 
submitted lowest bid to Board of Ed- 
ucation, 104 Administration Bldg.. 
1025 Second Ave., to construct Max- 
well Park School retaining wall, steps 
and grading at NE corner of Fleming 
and Monticello Aves. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

George McMullin, Oakland, $9,419; 
(1) ded. $2,269. 

J. H. Fitzmaurice, Oakland. $9,535; 
(1) $3,150. 

Lee J. Immel, Oakland, $9,665; (1) 
$4,i'17. 

Geo. Swanstrom, Oakland. $10,373; 
(1) 52.S56. 

T. D. Courtright, Oakland, $11,197; 
(1) $3,100. 

John Kimble, Oakland, $14,878; (1) 
$5,150. 

Bodenhammer Const. Co., $24,S00; 
(1) $7,500. 

Contract will be awarded Jan. 6. 



Bond Election Planned. 
SCHOOL Cost, $20,000 

CASTROVILLE, Monterey Co., Cal. 
Reinforced concrete addition to gram- 
Owner — Castroville Grammar School 

District 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

GYMNASIUM Cont. Price. $97,995 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
State Teachers' College grounds. 

Reinforced concrete men's gymnasium 

Owner — State of California. 

Architect — State Department of Pub- 
lic Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, Public Works Bldg, Sacra- 
mento. 

Contractor — J. J. Grodem & Co., 1028 
San Antonio Ave., Alameda. 

Structural Steel — Schrader Iron Works 
1247 Harrison St., San Francisco. 

Cement — Pacific Portland Cement Co., 
Ill Sutter St., San Francisco. 

Mill Work and Lumber— Pacific Mfg. 
Co., Monadnock Bldg., San Fran- 
Reinforcing Steel — Concrete Engineer- 
ing Co., 12S0 Indiana St., S. F. 
As previously reported, plumbing 

and heating awarded to W. F. Serpa, 

497 N-13th St. San Jose at $15,525; 

electric work to Guilbert Bros. Elec. 

Co., 286 W-Santa Clara St., San Jose, 

at $6355. 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 
SCHOOL Cost, $85,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Uno Drive School 

Site. 
Two-story Class B school. 
Owner — Los Angeles City School Dist. 
Plans by Owner, 
Heating Engineer — Martin T. Hooper, 

Los Angeles. 



Plans Completed. 

SCHOOL Cost, $300,000 

ALTADENA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Lake Ave. near Mendocino St. 
Reinforced concrete Junior High 

School. 
Owner — City of Pasadena School Dist. 
Architect — Marston & Maybury, 25 S. 

Euclid Ave .. Pasadena. 



Plans Being Completed. 

DORMITORY Cost, $300,000 

WEST LOS ANGELES, Cal. Hilgard 
Avenue. 

Three-story and basement Class A re- 
inforced concrete dormitory (160x 
216 feet) (accommodate 125 girls). 

Owner — University of Southern Calif 
at Los Angeles. 

Architect — Douglas H. McLellan, Ar- 
chitects Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Supervising Architect — Geo. Kelham. 

315 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

Bids will be taken about January 

15, 1931. 



Contracts Awarded. 

SCHOOL Cost, $70,000 

CALISTOGA, Napa Co., Cal. 
One-story Class C brick school (eight 

classrooms, assembly room, and 

shop). 
Owner — California Grammar School 

District. *- 

Architect — Davis-Pearce Co., Inc., 

Grant and Weber Sts., Stockton. 
Tile roof, oil burning system, etc. 
General Work 
H. H. Henning, 1751 Berkeley Ave., 

Berkeley, at $47,978. 

Plumbing and Heating 
Ukiah Plumbing & Heating Co., 

Ukiah, at $8541. 

Electrical Work 
Con Franke, 748 E. Weber St., Stock- 
ton, at $3031. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan. 

27, 4:15 P. M. 
SCHOOL Cost approx. $400,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co.. Calif. 45th 

Ave. and Foothill Blvd. (Fremont 

High School Site). 
Three-story and basement steel frame 

and concrete high school with tile 

roof. 
Owner — City of Oakland School Dist. 
Architect— Charles W. McCall, 14 4 

Franklin St., Oakland. 



Plans Being Completed. 

LIBRARY Cost, $100,000 

SANTA CLARA. Santa Clara Co , Cal. 
University of Santa Clara. 

Two-story reinforced library. 

Owner — University of Santa Clara, 
Santa Clara. 

Architect — J. J. Donovan, 1916 Broad- 
way, Oakland. 

Contractor — H. C. Miller, Santa Clara. 
Sub-bids will be taken in three or 

four weeks. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan. 
15, 8 P. M. 

GYMNASIUM Cost, $50,000 

KEXTFIELD, Marin Co., Cal. 

Gymnasium (wood frame, roof trusses 
over gymnasium proper carried on 
steel columns) planting lawns and 
shrubbery, etc., at college grounds 

Owner — Marin Junior College District. 

Architect — A. A Cantin, 544 Market 
St., San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— American Stu- 
dios. Inc., 1060 Folsom St.. at $3,748 
submitted lowest bid to city purchas- 
ing agent, 270 City Hall, to furnish 
and install stage fittings and draper- 
ies for the Presidio Jr. High School. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

American Studios. Inc $3,748 

J. L. Stuart Mfg. Co 3.760 

Armstrong Studios 4,500 

Henceman Scenic Studio 4,850 

Western Scenic Studio 4.908 

Bids held under advisement. 



Preparing Preliminary Plans 
SCHOOL Cost, $250,000 

SEBASTOPOL, Sonoma Co., Cal. 
Two-story Class C brick high school. 
Owner— Analy Union High School Dis- 
trict. 
Architect — Davis-Pearce Co., Grant 
and Weber Sts., Stockton. 
Bond election will be called shortly. 

BANKS, STORES &: OFFICES 

Preparing Plans. 

OFFICES Cost, $25,000 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Broadway. 

Two-story steel frame and concrete 
office and store building. 

Owner — Leo Escloses, 54S6 Mission St., 
San Francisco. 

Plans by Russell Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Nineteen 



To Be Done Bj Day'B Work 
ALTERATIONS Cost, $7500 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Calif. 459 

ISth Street. 
Alterations Co building;. 
Owner— Levy Estate Co., '.' Architect. 
Architect— F. F. Anflandes, 1128 Hearst 

Kldg.. S:in l'r:i,|.| c ■, . 

Wrecking started. 

ADDITION Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 1637 Fill re SI 

i mi. story brick addition to store. 
Owner— National Dollar Stores, prem- 

Archltect -Bernard Joseph, 74 New 
Montgomery St. 
Owners will act as managers of 
construction and actual work will be 
started about Jan. 2. 

Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATION'S Cost. $6500 

SAX FRANCISCO. 533 Sutter St. 
Alterations to store (New front and 

interior work). 
Owner— L. E. Graham. 441 Post St. 
Plans by W. Lamb, 441 Post St. 
Contractor— Braas & Kuhn Co., 1919 

Bryant St. 



1 "I: 



To Be Done Rv Days Work By Owner 
RESTAURANT Cost, $4000 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co.. Cal. NW 

East 12th St. and 3rd Ave. 
One-story frame restaurant. 
Owner— K. E. Bemis, 19G2 San Pablo 

Ave., Oakland. 
Architect — Hardman & Rubs, Berkeley 

Bank Bldg., Berkeley. 



Plumbing and Heating Contracts 

Awarded. 
OFFICES Cost. $30,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. NE Army and 

Missouri Streets. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco offices. 
Owner— Soule Steel Co., 1750 Army St., 

San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor— CTias. Stockholm & Sons, 

Russ Bldg, San Francisco. 
Plumbing and Heating — James H. 

Pinkerton Co., 927 Howard St., 

San Francisco. 
As previously reported. grading 
awarded to Sibley Grading & Teaming 
Co., 165 Landers St., S. F. 



Bids To Be Taken About Jan. 2d. 

BANK Cost, $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. Lo- 
cation not selected. 

One-story and mezzanine steel frame 
and concrete bank. 

Owner — Monterey County Trust & 
Savings Bank. 

Architect — H. H. Winner Co., 580 
Market St., San Francisco. 

Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $8500 

SAN FRANCISCO. N Bush St. bet. 
Kearny St. and Grant Ave. 

Alterations to offices. 

Owner — Pacific Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co.. 140 New Montgomery. 

Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

Contractor— McDonald & Kahn, Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $7500 

SAN FRANCISCO. Second Street near 
Brannan. 

Alterations and additions to present 

building. 

Owner— C. F. Weber & Co., 650 Sec- 
ond Street. 

Architect— John E. Norberg, 580 Mar- 
ket St. 



Preliminary Plans Being Prepared. 
STORE & OFFICES Cost. $50,000 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Two-story frame and stucco store and 

offices (brick exterior walls). 
Owner— Withheld. 
Architect— E. R. Snyder, 2101 Shat- 

tuck Ave., Berkeley. 



REMODELING Cost, $ 

SANTA ROSA, S mi:i I !o , Cal. II h 

Street 
Remodel prei enl stor* i.uilding. 
Owner Investment Properties Corp., 

Alexander Bldg., S:m Francisco 
Plans by Eng. I tepl. of l.c: sec. 
i . i i ■ Penn] I :o 

Work will not 1m- started until 1932. 



Preparing Working Drawings 
NEWSPAPER BLDG. Cost, $15,non 
SOUTH SAX FRANCISCO, San Mat.-., 
Co., Cal. Grand Ave. near Maple 
Street. 
One-story reinforced concrete news- 
paper building (25x140 feet; com- 
position roof.) 
Owner — Peninsular Newspapers, Inc.. 

Palo Alto. 
Architect— John McCool, 3S1 Bush St . 
San Francisco. 
Will be known as "The Enterprise." 



Plans Being Prepared. 
BANK Cost, $25,000 

HOLLISTER. San Benito Co.. Cal 
One-story reinforced concrete bank. 
Owner — Bank of America. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, 525 Market 
St., San Francisco. 



Contract Awarded. 

STUDIO Cost, $7500 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co , Cal. 28th 

St. near Broadway. 
One-story brick and concrete studio. 
Owner— Waters & Hainlin Studios, 372 

11th St.. Oakland. 
Architect — Frederick H. Reimers, 233 

Post St., San Francisco. 
Contractor— J. F. Altermatt 1000 Crag- 

mont, Berkeley. 



Preparing Plans — Contract Awarded. 
ALTERATIONS Cost, Approx. $25,000 
STOCKTON. San Joaquin Co., Cal. 

Main and San Joaquin Sts. 
Alterations to two-story Class C 

store. 
Owner— Bank of America. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, Bank of Italy 

Bldg.. Eddy and Powell Sts., San 

Francisco . 
Contractor — Lewis & Green, Bank of 

Italy Bldg.. Stockton. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
STORE Cost. $10,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 
Two-story frame and stucco, store and 

residence. 
Owner — Delia Maggiore. 
Architect— Wolfe and Higgins, Realty 

Bldg., San Jose. 

To Be Done Ev Day's Work. 
ALTERATIONS Cost, $4000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 746 Folsom St. 
Alterations to offices. 
Owner— Tilly Mfg. Co., Inc., 746 Fol- 
som Street. 
Architect— Not Given. » 



Plans Being Figured. 

STORES Cost approx. $75,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Calif. SW 

19th and Broadway. 
Group of one - story steel frame and 

terra cotta shops and stores. 
Owner— Twentieth & Broadwav Realty 

Co., Oakland. 
Architect— A. J. Evers, 525 Market St., 

San Francisco. 



Preparing Plans. 

STORE BLDG. Cost, $ 

BAKERSFIELD, Kern Co., Cal. I and 

N. Nineteenth Sts. 
One-story and basement Class C brick 

store. 
Owner — Bank of America. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, Bank of Italy 

Bldg., Eddy and Powell Sts., San 

Francisco. 
Lessee — J. J. Newberry Co. 



THEATRES 



Work Under Way. 

REDECORATIONS Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. No. 1 1LT, Market 
St. (Embassy Theatre). 

Redecorate theatre (new marquis, 
signs, etc.) 

nwmr — Warner Bros., Inc., 243 
Golden Gate Ave., Sail Francisco. 

Plans by Eng, Dept of O 

Mgr. of Constr.— J. Agnew, Premises. 

Carpentry— Ralph McLeran and Co.. 
Hearst Bldg.. at $7 

Painting and Decorating— Cliff Heins- 
berger Decorating Co., 7413 Bev- 
erly Blvd., Los Angeles, at ap- 
approximately $15,000. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
THEATRE Cost Approx. $1,000,000 
OAKLAND. Alameda Co. Cal. Broad- 
way near Hobart Street. 
Class A theatre building, 
Owner — Publix Theatres, Inc. 
Architect— Miller & Pflueger, 5S0 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — Geo. Wagner, 161 South 

Park, San Francisco. 
Plumbing— Scott Co., 113 10th St., 

Oakland. 
Electrical Work — Radelfinger Bros., 

234 Fourth St, San Francisco. 
Lumber — E. K. Wood Lumber Co., 
Frederick and King Sts., Oakland 
Cement, Sand and Gravel — Powell 
Bros., Harrison and Pearl Sts., 
Alameda. 
As previously reported, concrete 
piling awarded to Raymond Concrete 
Pile Co., Hunter-Dulin Bldg, S. F.; 
excavation to J. Catucci, 1212 18th 
Ave., Oakland; reinforcing steel to 
Soule Steel Co., Rialto Bldg, S. F. ; 
structural steel to Moore Drydock, Ft. 
of Adeline St., Oakland; sprinkler 
system to James Pinkerton, 927 How- 
ard St., S. F.; heating and ventilating 
to Carriar Eng. Corp., Ltd., 748 E. 
Washington St., Los Angeles. 



Sub-Bids To Be Taken In Two Weeks. 
THEATRE Cost, $100,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Two-story Class C concrete and steel 

theatre and store (to seat 1000; 

contain 4 stores). 
Owner— W. S. Leadley, 207 2nd St., 

San Mateo , 
Architect — S. Charles Lee. 2404 W. 

Seventh St., Los Angeles. 
Contractor — Leadley & Wiseman, 207 

2nd St., San Mateo. 



Excavation & Foundation Bids To Be 
Taken Jan. 5. 

OPERA HOUSE Cost. $2,600,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Block bounded by 
Van Ness Ave., Franklin, Grove 
and Fulton Sts. 

Six-story Class A opera house, seating 
capacity 4000; standing room 500. 

Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
cisco (S. F. War Memorial). 

Architect — G A. Lansburgh, 140 Mont- 
gomery St. and Arthur Brown, 251 
Kearny St., San Francisco. 

Manager, of Constr — Lindgren & 
Swinerton, 225 Bush St., S. F. 



Excavation and Foundation Bids To 
Be Taken January 5. 

LEGION BLDG. Cost, $2,500,000 

SAN FRANCISCO Civic Center. 

Four-story and basement concrete 
Class A Legion Building. 

Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
cisco (S. F. War Memorial). 

Architect — G. A. Lansburgh. 140 Mont- 
gomery St., and Arthur Brown, 251 
Kearny St., Son Francisco. 
A. Wagstaff, 451 Montgomery St , 

is in charge of the memorial drafting 

rooms. 



Twenty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January, 3, 1931 



WHARVES AND DOCKS 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
—Fire destroyed Union Oil Company 
and Associated Oil Company's loading 
docks at Harrison and Lindsey Sts. 
They plan to rebuild immediately. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
CONSTRUCTION 

SACRAMENTO, Cal— J. R. Reeves. 
12th and American River. Sacramento 
at $5,713.34 awarded contract by H. 
G. Denton, city clerk, for grading ami 
leveling off roadway, parking area and 
hangar area at the Municipal Airport. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

J. R. Reeves, Sacramento, $3,997; 
(add for culvert), $1,710. 

M. J. Treaster, Sacramento, $4,404; 
(add for culvert). $1,760. 

A. Teichert & Son, Sacramento, $4,- 



743. 



Low Bidder. 

UNDERTAKING PARLORS $40,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Sacramento Street 
bet. Van Ness Ave. and Polk St. 

Three-story frame and stucco under- 
taking establishment and apart- 

Owner— Jos. Hagan, 178 Sacramento. 
Architect— Henry C. Smith and A. R. 

■Williams, Humboldt Bank Bldg. 
Low Bidder— Reavey & Spivock, Shell 
Oil Bldg. 
Mechanical bids are held under ad- 
visement. 



FRESNO AND KINGS COUNTIES 
— State Railroad Commission au- 
thorized San Joaquin Light & Power 
Company, the Great Western Power 
Company, and the Pacific Gas & Elec- 
tric Co. to proceed with a $7,500,000 in- 
stallation program of additional gas 
and electric facilities. The construc- 
tion will include a new steam and 
electric power plant at Herndon, 50 
miles of natural gas transmission con- 
duit from Kettleman hills to Herndon, 
65 miles of gas transmission line from 
Fresno to Merced, and a new elec- 
tric substation at Merced. 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co.. Cal.— Un- 
til January 13, 2 P. M.. bids will be 
received by F. M. Kay, clerk of Board 
of Supervisors, for moving certain 
buildings in town of Garberville. Cer- 
tified check of 5% required with bid. 
Specifications obtainable from Frank 
Kelly, county surveyor. 



ALAMEDA. Alameda Co., Cal.— Un- 
til Jan. 3, 9:30 A. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by W. Varcoe, City Purchas- 
ing agent, for painting and spraying 
fences at Lincoln Park Nursery on 
Fernside Blvd., pump house at Jack- 
son Park, fence at McKinley Park and 
pump house, etc.. at Washington 
Park. Plans and specifications obtain- 
able at the office of the purchasing 
agent. ' 



MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES 
AND MATERIALS 

SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Following bids 
received by H. G. Denton, city clerk, 
for furnishing three trucks: 
Ellsworth Harrold, Sacramento, 

(Ford) $2,3S8 

Moellfr Auto Sales Co.. Sacto., 

(Ford) 2,432 

Universal Motor Co., Sacto 2,658 

Morrison Chevrolet Co., Sacto., 

2,247 

Emich Winchel Co., Sacramento 

(International) 3,966 

General Motors Truck Co 3,836 



ENGINEERING SOCIETIFS 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
Further information regard- 
ing positions listed in this 
column is obtainable from New- 
ton D. Cook, Room 715, 57 Post 
Street, San Francisoo. (Phone 
SUtter 1664). 



California. Must have operating ex- 
perience. Salary $5000-6000 per year. 
Apply by letter. Headquarters, San 
Francisco. 



R-3444-S ENGINEERS and drafts- 
men, experienced in industrial and 
power plant work, particularly pip- 
ing-; also electrical draftsmen ex- 
perienced in power and lighting in- 
stallations. Salary $225-250 per mo. 
Apply by letter. Location, Southern 
California. 

R-3424-S CHEMIST, technical grad- 
uate, preferably with advanced de- 
gree, to review French and German 
technical literature in connection 
with patent causes. Permanent, 
Salary open. Location, Bay Region. 

R-3446-S PERSONNEL EXECUTIVE 
30-50 years, to have charge of and 
assist in the administration of di- 
vision of personnel and organization 
Must be thoroughly trained and ex- 
perienced in this type of work and 
possessed with tact, good judgment 
and integrity. Will be responsible 
to Chief of Division. Salary $500 a 
month. Apply by wire if outside of 
Bay Region as applications must be 
on file by December 26. 

K-333-W-2071-C-S ASPHALT ENGI- 
NEER, graduate civil engineer, 
single, not over 32, with experience 
on hot mixed type sheet asphalt, 
asphaltum concrete, penetration pre- 
venting by the grouting method, as- 
phalt emulsions, ability to decide 
proper percentages of various grades 
of stone, sand, cement and asphalt 
to secure a road of maximum dens- 
ity, etc. Must be familiar with as- 
phalt literature. Salary $3600-4000 a 
year. Apply only by letter. Loca- 
tion, India. 

R-3429-S ENGINEER, 35 - 45 years 
old, with forceful personality and 
ability to deal with plant executives, 
for production manager of company 
operating several scattered plants in 



The Appellate Division, in a decision 
rendered Nov. 21, sustained the vali- 
dity of the action of the board of esti- 
mate and apportionment of New York 
City in starting plans for the con- 
struction of the Triborough bridge, the 
Brooklyn - Staten Island vehicular 
tunnel, and the midtown tunnel in 
Manhattan and upheld to city's right 
to charge tolls for the use of these 
traffic outlets . 

The majority opinion said: "Not 
only had the city the toll-fixing power 
to provide for the construction of 
revenue-producing public improve- 
ments, such as bridges and tunnels, 
but the exercise of such power in the 
present instance has been ratified and 
confirmed by the legislature." 



Short steel sections of the lamella 
type, which can readily be assembled 
by unskilled labor, are now being dis- 
tributed by the Lamella Roof Syndi- 
cate, Inc.. 45 West 45th St., New York 
City, for use in many types of build- 
ings and for the construction of air- 
plane hangars. For the latter purpose 
the lamella truss, when assembled, -s 
covered with galvanized metal or any 
of a number of other types of sur- 
facing. Advantages claimed for this 
type of hangar include easy transpor- 
tation to the site, simple foundations, 
quick assembly and dismantling, and 
a form which minimizes the effect of 
wind pressure. The hangar is design- 
ed for dead load plus a snow load of 
15 lb. per square foot and a wind 
load of 25 lb. per square foot. In ad- 
dition, a monorail crane can be hung 
from the center of the truss. 



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of the New 

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The only daily construction newspaper affording 
complete coverage of the construction activities in Central 
and Northern California — featuring work contemplated, 
bids wanted, bids opened, contracts awarded, sub-bids 
wanted and sub-contracts let on all types of building con- 
struction; bridges, dams and harbor works, irrigation proj- 
ects; machinery and equipment; water works and supplies; 
business opportunities; building permits; building con- 
tracts, mechanics* liens; acceptances, etc., etc. 

Keep informed on construction developments in Cen- 
tral and Northern California, and the major projects in 
Southern California, the states of Oregon, Washington, 
Nevada and Arizona. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-one 



Engineering News Section 



BRIDGES 



SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. — 
San Jose Paving Co., awarded con- 
tract by Southern Pacific Railroad, 65 
Market St., San Francisco, to con- 
struct Park Avenue Subway; to have 
overhead clearance of 15 feet, with 
roadway width of 30 ft., G ft. side- 
walk on each side; length of barrel 

between approaches to be I 'eel 

Project involves: 
15,500 cu. yds. excavation; 

614 cu. yds. 1-2-4 reinf. concrete; 
130 cu. yds. lM-lyi-lVi do; 
42 cu. yds. reinf. cone, precast ; 
2,337 cu. yds. unreinf. concrete; 
450 cu. yds. cone, paving, l-Vj-3; 
118,000 lbs. reinforcing steel. 

The amount of the bid as yet has 
not been disclosed, though the rail- 
road previously announced Its estimate 
of the cost of the structure was $148,- 
000. There was seventeen other bid- 
ders. 



OROVILLE, Butte Co., Cal.— Board 
of Supervisors deferred action for au- 
thority to build a private bridge over 
Big Chico Creek, on request of R. W. 
Silver, pending a formal decision from 
the state attorney's office. 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
—Until January 7. 2:30 P. M., bids will 
be received by H, E. Miller, County 
Clerk, to construct either a timber 
bridge with reinforced concrete floor 
or steel bridge with reinforced con- 
crete floor near Felton Railroad sta- 
tion across the S. P. tracks, Zayante 
Creek and Zayante Road in San "Lo- 
renzo road district. Plans and speci- 
fications obtainable from L. Bowman, 
County Surveyor, on deposit of $3.00. 
Certified check 10% required with bid. 

See call for bids under official pro- 



SANTA ROSA, Sonoma Co., Cal.— 
Rocca and Coletti. San Rafael, at $173- 
255 awarded contract by Joint High- 
way District No. 16 to construct steel 
bridge over the Russian River, 1%- 
miles above Jenner, involving two 145 
ft. steel deck truss spans and nine 60 
ft. steel girder spans with concrete 
deck and steel H beam piling and two 
concrete abutments, one 40 ft. and an- 
other 30 ft. Project involves: 
58,000 cu. vds. roadwav excav., 32c. 
27.000 sta. yds. overhaul, 2c. 
6,000 ft. property fence, 10c. 
10 gate. $18. 
116 ft. 12-in. corru. pipe, $2. 

70 ft. 24-in. do, $3.75. 
180 ft. 30-in. do, $6. 
17 cu. yds. "A" concrete (culverts) 
$16.10. 
tremie, $10. 

bridge complete, fencing, etc., 
$173,255. 



SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
City Manager C. B. Goodwin ai 
nounces construction of a bridge ovi 
Guadalupe Creek linking West Vi 
ginia and Home Sts. will be unde 
taken during 1931. 



DREDGING, HARBOR 
WORKS A. EXCAVATIONS 

REDWOOD CITY. San Mateo Co., 
Cal.— Until January 6. 3 P. M, bids 
will be received by U. S. Engineer Of- 
fice, Customhouse, San Francisco, for 



SAX FRANCISCO.— Until January 
ir, bids will be received by U. s En- 
gineer's office, Custom House, for re- 
moving existing jetty and construct- 
ing new jetties and dredging in Noyo 
River. Further information obtainable 
from above. 



SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co Cal 
—Until January 5, 3 P. M., bids will 
be received by U. S. Engineer's Of- 
fice, California Fruit BIdg., Sacra- 
mento, to dredge channel, !) feet deep 
and approximately mo feet wide thru 
the shoal in -Middle River, near Mil- 
dred Island. Further information ob- 
tainable from above. 



SAN DIEGO. Cal— Until 3 P. M., 
Jan , 5, bids will be received by the 
U. S. Engineer, 751 S. Figueroa St., 
Los Angeles, for dredging approxi- 
mately S25.000 cu. yds. material in 
San Diego Harbor in an area around 
the municipal wharf, covering about 
185 acres. Plans and specifications 
may be obtained from the U. S. Engi- 
neer, Major W. H. Lanagan, at above 
address, Los Angeles, 



LONG BEACH, Cal.— Until 3 P. M., 
Jan. 7, bids will be received by the U. 
S. Engineer, 751 S. Figueroa St., Los 
Angeles, for dredging approximately 
1,540,000 cu. yds. material in Long 
Beach Harbor and in the Cerritos 
Channel turning basin, in accordance 
with plans and specifications which 
may be obtained at the above address. 
Major W H. Lanagan is the United 
States Engineer. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Until 3 P. M., 
Jan. 6, bids will be received by the 
U. S. Engineer, 751 S. Figueroa St., 
Los Angeles, for dredging approxi- 
mately 1,400,000 cu. yds. material in 
the east basin channel, Los Angeles 
Harbor, and in Cerritos Channel to 
hook up with similar work to be done 
in Long Beach Harbor Plans and 
specifications may be obtained from 
the office of the engineer, Major W. H. 
Lanagan, at above address. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Following is a 
complete list of the bids received bv 
U. S. Engineer's Office, Custom House, 
to dredge Oakland harbor: 

Longview Dredging Co 2025 

United Dredging Co. (per cu. 

yard) $.2629 

San Francisco Bridge Co 28 

Hydraulic Dredging Co 31 

Estimate of $.272 submitted by Gov- 
ernment, using government plant and 
hired labor; 691.075 cu. yds. involved. 

IRRIGATION PROJECTS 

CHELAN, Wash.— Until 1:30 P. M., 
Jan. 9, bids will be received by the 
Howard Flat Irrigation District, Che- 
lan, Wash., for irrigation construction 
as follows: 

Construction of a concrete pump 
house with pumping equipment, in- 
cluding two 700 h. p. centrifugal 
pumps. 

Furnishing and laying: 
5.200 lin. ft. 30-in. steel pipe, U-ln. 
thick; 
22,530 lin. ft. 30-in. steel pipe, 3/16-in. 
thick; 



1,322 lin. ft. 24-in. steel pope, 3/16-in. 

thick; 
1.325 lin. ft. 20-in. steel pipe 3/16-in. 

thick; 
9.519 lin. ft. 16-In. st. -el pipe, 3/16-in. 
thick; 
l:,,-r,s lin. ft. 12-in. 8-gauge (B W.G) 

pipe; 
6,154 lin. ft. 8-in., 8-gauge (B.W.G) 

pipe; 
2,083 lin. ft. 6-in,, 8-gauge (B.W.G) 
pipe; 

30 lin. ft. 4-in., 8-gauge (B.W.G.) 
pipe; 

complete with valves, fittings, hy- 
drant, air valves, blow-off valves 
and appurtenances. 
Plans may be obtained from Willis 
T. Batcheller, Inc., consulting engi- 
neer, 1903 Exchange BIdg., Seattle, 
Wash., upon deposit of $10.00. Chas. 
R. Sargent is secretary. The date 
above has been changed from Dec. 19 
as originally set. 

MACHINERY AND 
EQUIPMENT 

VENTURA. Ventura Co., Cal.— Fol- 
lowing is list of bids opened by city 
council to furnish one vertical dry pit 
sewage pump and motor. The bids 
were: 

Byron-Jackson Co.— Pump complete- 
ly installed, $1765; pump only, $1615. 

DeLaval Steam Turbine Co.— $2750 
installed; $2350, pump only. 

Buffalo Steam Pump Co.— $2290, 
pump installed; $1613, pump only. 

Samuel A. Bray, Ventura— $1600, 
pump installed; $1400, pump only 
(Fairbanks type equipment). 

A. T. Mead— (1) $2146, (2) $2525, (3) 
$2483 (American Well Works equip- 
ment). This bid was not submitted 
on the basis of the others. The items 
are for his own alternate figures, 

Bids held under advisement. 



GRIDLEY, Butte Co., Cal.— Until 
January 12, 9 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by J. L. Lewis, City Clerk, to 
furnish a Diesel engine generating 
unit with auxiliary, pumps, motors and 
equipment and materials. Plans and 
specifications obtainabale from city 
clerk. Certified check of 10% required 
with bid , 



BRAWLEY, Imperial Co., Cal.— 
Until 7:30 P. M., Jan 5, bids will be 
received by the city council for fur- 
nishing one truck of rated capacity 
of from one and one-half to two and 
one-half tons, equipped with dual tires 
on rear, Wood hydraulic hoist, and 
tight body of lawful width and maxi- 
mum length to properly fit truck. 
Depth of body to be four feet. Rear 
end of body to be properly equipped 
for dumping load. On each side of 
the body, at the center, the upper two 
feet is to be provided with a gate for 
loading. If standard frame and wheel 
base is such that a sixteen foot body 
cannot be properly installed thereon, 
alternate bids may be submitted with 
frame and wheel base altered for six- 
teen foot body. O. May Juvenal, city 
clerk. 



COMPTON, Los Angeles Co., Cal. — 
Until 7 P, M., Jan. 6, bids will be re- 
ceived by the city manager, A. B, 
Gridley, for furnishing one 1%-ton 
truck with cab, flat body with stakes 
and full equipment. 



Twenty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 193i 



DENVER, Colo.— Until 2 P. M., Jan. 
S, bids will be received by the Chief 
Engineer, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Denver, Colo ., for one dragline exca- 
vator, capacity 94-cu. yd., gasoline- 
engine driven, 35 ft. boom with 10- 
ft extension, 24-in. caterpillar treads, 
with one % -cu. yd. bucket, complete. 
The bidder shall state the number 
calendar days within which lie agrees 
to deliver excavator and accessories 
f. o. b. cars at factory shipping point 
specified. Further information may 
be obtained from the office of S. O. 
Harper, Acting Chief Eengineer, 1441 
Welton St., Denver, by applying for 
Specifications No. 49S-D. Proposal 
guaranty, 10%. 



RAILROADS 



OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal.— City 
Council has entered into an agreement 
with the Southern Pacific Railway to 
construct underpass at the crossing 
of the S. P. tracks and Seventh St. 
Same to be handled jointly by the city 
and the railroad. 



OAKLAND. Alameda Co., Cab— The 
Southern Pacific Company have com- 
pleted plans for the new $205,000 
Seventh Street Subway and bids will 
be called for immediately. The cost is 
to be borne equally by the city and 
the railroad. 

FIRE EQUIPMENT 

LAGUNA BEACH. Orange Co., Cal. 
—Until 5 P. M., Jan. 7, bids will be 
received by the city council for fur- 
nishing one 500-gallon triple combina- 
tion pumping fire engine. Specifica- 
tions may be obtained from the city 
clerk, G. W. Prior. Bidder must sub- 
mit bis own specifications, however, 
and bids will be received at the same 
time for the purchase of a used Reo 
triple combination pumping fire en - 
gine which may be seen at the fire 
house, Laguna Beach. 



RESERVOIRS AND DAMS 

UKTAH, Mendocino Co., Cal— Until 
January 7, S P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by Fred Bosworth, City Clerk, 
to furnish 2 5000 cu. ft. Rivited Gas 
Tanks. 6" dia x 30' long. %" shell, % 
and %" heads. Equipped with 1 llx 
15 manhole in head, 3 2" forged steel 
flanges, 1 VA" dial pressure' gauge, de- 
signed for 90 lb. per sq. in. working 
pressure and built in accordance with 
A. S. M E. Code for Unfired Pressure 
Vessles. F. o. b. cars, Ukiah, Calif. 

Certified check of 10% required with 
bid. Specifications and further infor- 
mation obtainable from above. 



HOOVER DAM— The Bureau of 
Reclamation has made further an- 
nouncement of the specifications for 
the Hoover Dam for which bids are to 
be received by the department at Den- 
ver. March 4 According to the speci- 
fications, preference will be given do- 
mestic articles and materials, Unless 
otherwise stated in the bid it will be 
understood domestic articles or ma- 
terials will be used and foreign articles 
or materials will not be permitted un- 
less they are of better quality or be- 
ing equal in quality furnished at 
lower cost to the government and 
unless domestic articles or materials 
are not available. 

Among the materials to be furnished 
by the government to the contractor 
f. o. b. at the delivery yard near 
Boulder City are: cement, reinforce- 
ment bars and rails, anchor bars, rods 
and bolts, metal pipe and fittings, con- 
duit castings, plate steel conduit 
linings, copper sheets, grates and 



hoists, needle valves, traveling cranes, 
machinery, structural steel, bridges 
and other structures, sheet piling, all 
doors, windows, metal floor plates and 
stairways, steel partitions, paint, 
plumbing, hardware, hollow tile, roof- 
ing materialsh, corrugated metal pipe, 
thermometers, forms of concrete re- 
lief work and steel pipe forms for 
concrete bulkhead gate supports. 

The materials to be furnished by the 
contractor include: sand, gravel, cob- 
bles, oil, lumber, spikes, nails, liner 
plates for tunnels, wire, water, com- 
pound for cooling pipes and brazing 
and soldering materials. 

The contractor must haul all his ma- 
terials as well as those delivered by the 
government. The contractor will have 
to bear the cost of unloading, hauling, 
and furnishing his own materials. 
These costs are to be included in the 
bid. Sand, gravel and cobbles are to 
be obtained by the contractor from 
natural deposits on the Arizona side 
of the Colorado river about eight miles 
upstream from the damsite. 

Twelve traveling cranes will be re- 
quired for installation of machinery 

The two steel bulkhead stoney 
gates will be 50x50 ft. and will be in- 
stalled at the downstream end of the 
inner diversion tunnels to provide ac- 
cess to the tunnels for inspection and 
repairs. Each gate will be 50 ft. high, 
54 ft. 7%-in. wide, and made up of 
structural steel plate girders 6 ft. 
deep. They must be mounted on cat- 
erpillar roller cranes with counter- 
weight hangers. There will be 56 hy- 
draulic gates. 

There will be four intake concrete 
towers with a total height of 341 ft. 
One cylinder gate will be installed in 
each tower, the outside diameter being 
31 ft. and the height of the gate 10 
feet, 4% in. made of steel casting 
Twelve 8x10 ft. metal shutter gates 
will be provided for each tower and 
are to be used for closing the water 
passages for repairs. Plans now con- 
template that 40 72-in. needle valves 
will be installed. 

According to the specifications the 
contractor must maintain camps at 
Boulder City. Certain blocks will be 
set aside there for his use for office 
and headquarters buildings, ware- 
houses, store, hospital, boarding 
houses and homes for employees. 
There will be on charge for ground 
rental, but reasonable charge will be 
made for services and facilities fur- 
nished by the government for the 
benefit of the contractor, such as 
water and sewerage systems, electri- 
city, and fire and police protection. 



IRVINE, Orange Co, Cal.— H. W. 
Rohl Co., 4351 Alhambra Ave., Los 
Angeles, awarded contract by Irvine 
Co. at about $55,000 for constructing 
an earth fill dam in Peters Canyon, 
about iy> miles southwest of Irvine 
Park. Construction will start about 
Dec. 29. The reservoir created will 



occupy the site of the old Orange 
county golf course, and will im- 
pound about 11,000 acre feet of water. 
Plans were prepared by Roy Brown- 
ing, engineer for the Irvine Co. The 
work will involve steam shovel and 
truck work. 



GLENDALE, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
— The city council has adopted a reso- 
lution asking the county supervisors 
for financial aid in constructing the 
Glorietta reservoir in Verdugo Wood- 
lands, estimated to cost $350,060. The 
plea was made on the grounds that 
the reservoir is virtually a flood con- 
trol measure. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— E. C. Eaton, 
chief engineer of the Los Angeles 
County flood control district, to pre- 
pare plans and specifications for the 
three dams to be built in the San Ga- 
briel Canyon, including check dams, 
spreading grounds and other appur- 
enant works in the project designed 
to supplant the San Gabriel High 
Dam which the state rejected. A 
resolution was also adopted directing 
the issuance of a block of bonds of 
the original $25,000,000 issue, amount- 
ing to $5,000,000. The flood control de- 
partment attorneys will immediately 
institute a friendly suit to compel 
Chairman of the Borad Henry Wright 
to sign the bonds. The plans will be 
prepared concurrently with the suit, 
in order that no time may be lost. 
Vincent is attorney for the flood con- 
trol department, with Roy Dowds of 
the County Commissioner's office, as- 
sociated. 



BOULDER CITY. Nev.— Contractors 
who have applied to the Chief Engi- 
neer of the Bureau of Reclamation at 
Denver. Colo., for plans and speci- 
fications of the Hoover Dam, for 
which bids are to be opened at Den- 
ver on March 4 at 10 A. M., are: 

Lynn S. Atkinson, Jr., Edwards & 
Wildey Bldg., Los Angeles, and 9135 
Russett Ave., Oakland. 

Fisher, Ross. McDonald & Kahn, 
1204 Spring Arcade Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Meritt-Chapman & Scott Corp., P. 
O. Box 698, San Pedro, Calif. 

Utah Const. Co., Phelan Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

W. A. Bechtel Co., 155 Sansome St., 
San Francisco. 

Kaiser Paving Co., Latham Square 
Bldg., Oakland. 

Winston Bros.. 520 Alaska Bldg., Se- 
attle, and Minneapolis. Minn. 

General Const. Co., 552 Colman Bldg. 
Seattle, Wash. 

Bates, Rogers & Foley, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Drundel Corp.. Baltimore, Md. 

The Carleton Co., New York, N. Y. 

The Foundation Co., New York, N. 
Y. 

Hydraulic Engineering Co. 

Plans will be available at the Den- 
ver office or at the Bureau of Recla- 
mation at Washington. D. C, after 
January 10. 



CONTRACTORS' MACHINE WORKS 

SPECIALISTS ON REPAIRING AND REBUILDING OF 

Bunkers, Hoppers, Chuting, Conveyors, Rollers, Mixers, Hoista, 

Shovels, Tractors, Pavers, Crushers, Drag Lines, Elevators, Car 

Unloaders, and other Road and Building Equipments; 

BLACKSMITHING AND WELDING 

Builders of Rosenberg Portable Car Unloaders 

CREAR & BATES 

57 Zoe St., bet. 3rd and 4th, off Brannan St. 
Phone GArfield 4374 San Francisco 



Saturday, Januar] S, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-three 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Calls for bids 
for the driving ..f 500 ft. of untlmbered 
tunnel ami I"" ft. of tiiiil.i-n.-d tunnel 
at each of San Gabriel dams. No. 2 
and No. ;'., issued by the hoard of su- 
pervisors, have been withdrawn l.y 
the board, and the chief engineer, E. 
C. Eaton, authorized to proceed with 
the work by force account, 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Calif.— 
Robert Heaney, 1664 Caplstrano Ave.. 
Oakland, at $1,302.60 submitted low 
hid t.. the city council to construct a 
dam in Cragmont slide Area and drill 

holes to rel.-as.- sill. -surf. water. 

Complete list of bids follows: 

Robert Heaney ...J1.302 

L. J. Immel 2.070 

T D Courtright 2,502 

Ely & Bean 2.750 

~SEWERS AND SEWAGE 
DISPOSAL PLANTS 

OAKLAND, Cal.— As previously re- 
ported, bids will be received by Frank 
C. Merritt, city clerk, until December 
31, 12 noon, to construct sewers in 
portion of Foothill Blvd.. S4th Ave., 
Iris St., Dowling St. and Blanche St. 
Project involves: 

(a) 2S5 lin. ft. 24-inch pipe sewer; 

(b) 606 lin. ft. S-inch pipe sewer; 

(c) 6 manholes. 

Bond of one-fourth the amount of 
the contract price required of the 
successful bidder. Specifications on 
file in office of clerk. Walter N. 

Frickstad, city engineer. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— The city coun- 
cil has before it the matter of order- 
ing the $6,000,000 sewer bond issue, 
defeated at the last election, placed 
on the primary ballot next spring. The 
health commission has proposed the 
issue as an urgent necessity. 



APTOS, Santa Cruz Co . Cal.— An 
election will be held early next year 
to vote bonds of $56,000 for the con- 
struction of a pumping and screening 
plant and main trunk line sewer to 
serve district. William H. Oliver, en- 
gineer Soquel, has already completed 
plans and specifications. 



SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co, Cal.— 
City Engineer Wm. Popp prepares 
plans for sanitary sewer in Delmas 
Ave., bet. Snyder Ave. and Willow 
St., property owners having petitioned 
for the work. 



SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
— City council contemplates election 
in April to vote bonds of $50,000 to fi- 
nance construction of an outfall sewer. 



WATER WORKS 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Engineering 
Board of Review of the Metropolitan 
Water District, composed of three in- 
ternationally famous engineers, has 
indorsed the Parker route for the 
$200,000,000 Colorado river aqueduct, 
which will bring enough domestic 
water to the Los Angeles metropolitan 
area from Boulder dam to supply the 
needs of 6,000,000 people. 



HAWTHORNE, Los Angeles Co., 
Cal — Bids for furnishing cast iron 
pipe received by city council follow: 

(1) 5000 ft. 2-in. cast iron pipe; 

(2) 5000 ft. 4-in. cast iron pipe; 

(3) 5000 ft. 6-in. cast iron pipe; 
The bids were: 

American Cast Iron Pipe Co. — (1) 
19.7c, (2) 41.5c. (3) 61.5c. 

C. G. Claussen & Co.— (1) 20.75c, (2) 
46.25c, (3) 65.75; alternate bid: (2) 
39.5c, (3) 60.5c. 



Crane Co — 6 ft. lengths— (1) $16.95 
per C ft. 

National Cast Iron Pipe Co.— (1) 21c, 
(2) 40.5c, (3) 60.2c. 

Pacific Pipe Co.— (3) flange pipe, $31 
per C ft. 

in Hi.- States Cast Iron Pipe Co. — 5- 
ft lenghts— (1) 19c, (2) 39.5c, (3) 59c; 
lf.-ft. lengths— (1) 20.6c. 

U. S. Pipe & Foundry Co.— (1) 20c, 
DeLavaud pipe; bidding on 15-ft. 
lengths, B & S.— (1) 21.5c, (2) 18-fl. 
lengths, 41.6c, (3) no bid 

Bids taken under advisement. 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co., Cal — 
Until January 6th, 5 P. M., bids will 
be received by city council to con- 
struct wooden water tank to be locat- 
ed on Harris St., between E and F 
Sts. Plans and spepcifications on file 
in office of Superintndent of Public 
Works, 521 D St. Certified check of 
10% required with bid. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— 'Western Pipe 
& Steel Co., 5717 Santa Fe Ave., sub- 
mitted low bid to city purchasing 
agent, Thomas Oughton, Dec. 26, at 
prices shown below, for welded steel 
pipe under Specificationes No. 22S6. 
Bids were taken on the following 
items: 

(1) 1560 ft. laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel pipe; 

(2) 1560 ft. laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel pipe, double dipped in Mc- 
Everlast steel water pipe coating: 

(3) 1560 ft. laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel pipe with not more than two 
girth seams and only one lingi- 
tudinal seam; 

(4) 1560 ft. laying length. 51-in. welded 
steel pipe identical with Proposal 
No. 3, except that the dipping 
shall comply with Proposal No. 2. 

The bids were: 

Western Pipe & Steel Co — Elec. 
welded— (1) $6.55. (2) $6.35, (3) $7.05, 
(4) $6.85: net. Delivery, start Feb. 2, 
complete Feb. 12. 

Consolidated Steel Corp.— (1) $7.75, 
(2) $7 60, (3) and (4) no bids; net; de- 
livery, start 38 days, complete 45 days. 

Standard Boiler & Steel Works- 
Standard acetylene welded — (1) and 
(2) no bids, (3) $8.30, (4) $8; 1% 30 
days after delivery trenchside; de- 
livery to start Jan. 31 and be som- 
pleted April 30. 

L. A. Mfg. Co.— elec. wedled— (1) and 
(2) no bids, (3) $8.60, (4) $8 41; net. 
Delivery to start Feb. 2 and be com- 
pleted Feb. 28. 



REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co.. 
Cal. — United States Pipe & Foundry 
Company, Monadnock Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, awarded contract at $6685 by 
city council to furnish 6000 feet 8-in 
and 3000 feet of 6-in. cast iron water 
Pipe. 



STREETS AND HIGHWAYS 

REDWOOD CITY, Kan Mateo Co., 
Cal.— W. O. Tyson, 42 Jefferson St., 
Redwood .'ii-,-, awarded conti 
(6631 by city council to improve War- 
wick street from Edgewood Road in 
Redwood City to Eaton Avenue in Pan 
Carlos. Western Paving Company, 
San Francisco, next low biddor at 
$6827. 1 



SANTA ANA, Orange Co.. Cal.— 
Until January 5. 7:30 P. M., bids will 
be received by city Council t.. 
Washington Avenue between Baker 
and Artesia Street, involving grading 
and cement concrete walks. Approxi- 
mate quantities are (1) -1878 si|. ft. 
3%-in. walk incl. grading; (2) 10 sq. 
ft. 5^-in. walk including grading. 1911 
Act. C L Jenken, city engineer. 
Further information obtainable from 
above. 

SAN BERNARDINO, San Bernardino 
Co., Cal. — The County Board of Su- 
pervisors has ordered the paving of 
Mt. Vernon Ave. to connect with the 
Riverside-Redlands Highway, being 
an extension of Mt. Vernon Ave. and 
I St., Colton, also known as the Cooley 
Rd. and the Redlands Rd. The pave- 
ment will be 6-in. asphaltic concrete. 
22 ft. wide. James W. Cole, county 
highway commissioner, will supervise 
construction. 



SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara Co., 
Cal. — City Council declares intention 
(22-D) to improve Harrison. Lewis, 
Scott, Reeve, Wistar, Monroe, Jackson 
Washington, Pierce. Benton Sts. and 
Railroad Ave. involving grading; as- 
phaltic concrete pavement laid on a 
layer of quarry waste; Portland ce- 
ment concrete curbs, drop curbs, gut- 
ters, sidewalks and driveways; vit. 
clay pipe, sanitary sewers and Wye 
branches; laterals; sanitary sewer 
manholes. Bond Act 1915. Imp Act 
1911. Hearing January 5. A. J. 
Cronin, city clerk. George Sullivan, 
city engineer. 



MODESTO, Stanislaus Co., Cal.— 
City Council passed an ordinance au- 
thorizing Frank J. Rossi, city engi- 
neer to start work on construction of 
new sewers in the industrial district 
to cost approximately $16,000. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Bureau of En- 
gineering. Department of Public W'ks, 
3rd floor. City Hall, completes speci- 
fications to improve Salinas Avenue 
from Wheat St. easterly, involving: 

(a) 70 lin. ft. armored cone, curb; 

(b) 20 lin. ft. 6-inch V. C. P. side 

(c) 1,400 sq. ft. asph. cone, pavement, 

consisting of 2-in. surface on 
6-in. class F concrete base. 
Estimates cost $550. 



DO NOT RISK AN EXPERIMENT 

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Sold by Representative Dealers Everywhere 



Twenty-four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Bureau of En- 
gineering, Department of Public W'ks, 
3rd floor. City Hall, completes speci- 
fications to improve Santiago Street 
bet. 36th and 37th Aves., involving: 

(a) 224 lin. ft. armored cone, curb; 

(b) 105 lin. ft. 6-inch V.C.P. side 

sewer; 

(c) 4,705 sq. ft. asph. cone, pavement, 

consisting of 2-in. surface on 
6-in. class F concrete base. ^ 
Est. cost 52,300. 



SANTA BARBARA, Cal. — Until 
January 2, 1:30 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by city council to improve 
Calle Poniente, between Valerio St. 
and its north terminus. Project in- 
volves : 

(1) 22,364 sq. ft. 4-in. asph. concr. 
paving, incl. grading; 

(2) 420 ft 6-in. house sewers; 

(3) 548. 3S ft. 6-in. vit. sewer. 
Specifications obtainable from city 

engineer. 



SANTA ANA, Orange Co., Cal.— 
Plans for a grade separation struc- 
ture to be built under the tracks of the 
Southern Pacific Ry. and the Santa 
Fe Ry. at 4th St., have been completed 
by the office of C. L. Jenken, city en- 
gineer. The project is to be built 
under the Mattoon Act, the district 
having been designated as A. & I. D. 
No. 9. Hearing has been continued 
until Jan. 5. The proposed work will 
consist of a reinforced concrete grade 
separation structure with incidental 
curb, walk, paving, surfacing, and 
concrete storm drain. The estimated 
cost is $150,000. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. Calif.— Charles 
Harlowe, 378 Belmont, Oakland, sub- 
mitted low bid to U. S. Bureau of 
Public Roads, San Francisco, to grade 
7.99 miles of Section F, Route 23, 
Quincy - Beckwith National Forest 
Highway in Plumas County, involving 
29 acres clearing, 73,180 cu. yds. un- 
class. excavation, 660 cu. yds. struc. 
excavation, 97,800 sta. yds. overhaul, 
7,01:; miles finishing, 85 M.E.M. treat- 
ed timber in place, 1600 lin. ft. treated 
timber piling in place. 100 cu. yds. 
concrete in place, 1250 lbs. reinf. steel 
in place, 2322 lin. ft. corru. metal pipe 
in place, 655 sq. yds. bit. wearing sur- 
face in place, 102 right of way monu- 
ments. Complete list of bids follows: 

(a) Untreated piling; 

(b) Treated piling. 

Chas. Harlowe, Oakland (a) $64,938 

lb) 64.413 
O. A. Lindberg, Stockton....(a) 67,599 

(b) 67.784 
Isbell Const. Co., Carson 

City, Nevada (a) 69,721 

(b) 70,971 
C. R. Johnson, Portland (a) 75,655 

(b) 75,055 
Finnell Co., Inc., Saeto la) 79,688 

(b) 76,373 
Taken under advisement. 



KERN COUNTY. Calif.— Lilly, Wil- 
lard & Biasotti, Stockton, at $18,096 
submitted low bid Dec. 30 to State 
Highway Commission to grade and 
surface portions of 3.0 miles between 
Harts Station and 3 miles east, in- 
volving 134 sta. grading existing 
shoulders; 28,500 cu. yds. imp. borrow; 
735 sq. yds. subgrade; 1.000 tons brok- 
en stone Iwaterbound mac. base); 700 
tons broken stone (bitum. mac. sur- 
face); 35 tons emulsified asphalt; 5.75 
miles move and reset property fences; 
213 lin. ft. laminated timber guard 
rail; 16 monuments; 156 sta. finishing 
roadway. Complete list of bids fol- 
lows: 

Lilly, Willard & Biasotti $18,696 

Larkin Bros., Gait 19,176 

Valley Paving & Const. Co., 

Visalia 21,929 

A. Teichert & Son, Sacramento 22,737 
Peter McHugh. San Francisco.. 23,030 
Hartmann Const. Co., Bakers- 
field 25.131 

F. W. Nighbert, Bakersfield 25,509 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Bureau of En- 
gineering, Department of Public W'ks, 
3rd floor. City Hall, completes speci- 
fications to improve 38th Avenue bet. 
Noriega and Ortega Sts., involving: 

(a) 593 lin. ft. armored cone, curb; 

(b) 400 lin. ft. 6-inch V.C.P. side 

sewer; 
(e) 11,860 sq. ft. asph. cone, pavement 
consisting of 2-in. surface with 
6-inch class F base. 
Estimated cost $6,000. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Bureau of En- 
gineering. Department of rublic W'ks 
3rd floor. City Hall, completes speci- 
fications to improve Head Street bet 
Shields and Sargeant Aves., involving 
(a) 175 lin. ft. armored cone, curb 
lb) 45 lin. ft. 6-inch V.C.P. side 

(c) 2.625 sq. ft. C-in. class E con- 
crete pavement. 
Estimated cost $2,000. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Bureau of En- 
gineering, Department of Public W'ks, 
3rd floor, City Hall, completes speci- 
fications to improve Santiago St. bet. 
41st and 44th Avenues, involving: 

(a) 347 lin. ft. armored cone, curb; 

(b) 325 lin. ft. 6-inch V. C. P. side 

sewer; 

(c) 8.6S8 sq. ft. asph. cone, pavement. 

2-in. surface on 6-in. class F 
concrete base. 
Estimated cost, $3500. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Bureau of En- 
gineering, Department of Public W'ks, 
3rd floor. City Hall, completes speci- 
fications to improve Goettingen Street 
bet. Harkness and Wilde Aves. involv- 
ing: 

(a) 20 lin. ft. V. C. P. side sewer; 
lb) 720 sq. ft. class F cone. pave. 

Estimated cost $250. 



OAKLAND, Cal— Heafey-Moore Co. 
344 High St., Oakland, at $34,972 
awarded contract by city council to 
improve E 10th St. bet. High St. and 
50th Ave., Russet St. bet. 50th and 
54th Aves., etc. Project involves: 
(1) 156.749 sq. ft. grading, $.02. 
12) 341 lin. ft. cone, curb with steel 
curb guard, $.80. 

(3) 2597 lin. ft. concrete curb with- 

out steel curb guard, $.40. 

(4) 154,790 sq. ft. cone, pave., $.193. 

(5) 93 lin. ft. S-in. by 20-in. corru. 

iron and cone, culvert. $4. 

(6) 14 lin. ft. 10-in. vit pipe conduit, 

$1.50. 

(7) 34 lin. ft. 15-in. do, $2. 
(S) 2 handholes, $15. 

19) 1 storm water inlet (21-in. open- 
ing), $25. 

(10) 1 manhole top, $60. 

(11) 1 manhole top, $35. 

1911 Act. City will pay 29% of cost 
from Treasury. Complete list of bids 
follows: 

Heafey-Moore Co $34,972 

N. M. Ball 36,642 

A. J. Raisch 38.232 

Central California Roads Co 38,957 

M. J. Bevanda 41,319 

Complete list of unit bids received 
on this project were published in our 
issue of December 26. 



PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
—Until January 10. 7:30 P. M., bids 
will be received by E. L. Beach, City 
Clerk, (938) to improve High St., be- 
tween Lytton Ave and Addison St., 
involving vit. san. sewers, cem. cone, 
gutters, driveways, curbs and walks, 
catchbasins, cone, storm sewer pipe, 
electrolier system, resurface roadway 
with asphalt concrete. 

Certified check of 10% required with 
bid. Plans and specifications obtain- 
able from above. J. F. Byxbee, city 
engineer. 

SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara Co., 
Cal. — City Council declares intention 
(21-D) to improve Santa Clara. Mar- 
ket, Poplar, Sherwood. Isabella and 



Main Sts. and The Alameda involving 
grading, asphaltic concrete pavement 
on layer of quarry waste, Portland 
cement concrete curbs, drop curbs, 
gutters, sidewalks and driveways, 
vitrified clay pipe main sanitary 
sewers, vit. clay pipe Wye branches, 
vit. city pipe sewer laterals, brick 
manholes, cast iron frames and 
covers. A. J. Cronin, city clerk. Geo. 
Sullivan, city engineer. Hearing 
January 5. Act 1911. 



December 30, 1930 
SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara Co., 
Cal. — City council declares intention 
(23-D) to improve Bellomy street and 
Campbell Ave., involving grading, as- 
phaltic concrete pavement laid on 
layer of quarry waste, Portland ce- 
ment concrete sidewalks, curbs and 
gutters. Act 1911. Imp. Act 1915. 
Hearing January 5. A. J. Cronin, city 
clerk. George Sullivan, city engineer 



LOS ANGELES. Cal.— Geo. H. Os- 
wald, 366 E 58th St.. submitted low 
bid to board of public works Dec. 24 
at $217,432.24 for improving streets in 
120th St. and Broadway Improvement 
District (center line length 13,059 ft.) 
involving: 

(1) grading (24,579 cu. yds. cut, 6630 

cu. yds. fill, special flooding 
16,200 sq. ft.); 

(2) 3994 sq. ft. 8-in. cone, paving; 

(3) 524,037 sq. ft. 7-in. cone, paving; 

(4) 1233 sq. ft. 6-in. do; 

(5) 2087 sq. ft. 4-in. do; 

16) 6994 sq. ft. 6-in. asph. concrete 
paving; 

(7) 14,075 sq. ft. 4-in. asph. concrete 

wearing surface; 

(8) 68 sq. ft. 1%-in. do; 

(9) 156 sq. ft. class D resurf. ; 

(10) 456 ft. sectional curb armor; 

(11) 11.255 ft. unplas. heavy curb; 

(12) 757 ft. reinf. integral curb, type A 

(13) 430 ft. do, type B: 

(14) 200 ft. integral curb; 

(15) 18,166 sq. ft. 1-course walk; 

(16) 5179 sq. ft. 2-course walk; 

(17) storm drain; 

(18) sanitary sewer; 

(19) 5059 ft. house sewers; 

(20) 2250.6 ft. concrete reinf.; 

(21) water system: 

(22) 102 water services; 

(23) 21 water service stubs; 

(24) ornamental light system. 
Removals: 2115 ft. fence. 3581 sq. ft. 

paving, 10,400 sq. ft. walk, 9256 ft. 
curb, 33 trees, 40 ft. 18-in. culvert and 
2 concrete end walls; reset 14 man- 
holes. 

The unit prices were: (1) $30,000; 
(2) 27.4c, (3) 23.75c, (4) 25c, (5) 17c, 
(6) 19.75c, (7) 13c, (S) lie, (9) 32c. 
(10) $1.00, (11) 60c, (12) 65c, (13) 60c, 
(14) 60c. (15) 14.5c. (16) 15.5c, (17) 
$2200, (18) $21,200 (19) $1.00, (20) 35c, 
(21) $8000, (22) $22, (23) $21, (24) $6,- 
500; total $217,432.24. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Until January 7, 
2:30 P. M.. bids will be received by 
Board of Public Works to improve 
Campbell Avenue, between Alpha and 
Rutland streets, involving armored 
concrete curbs; two course concrete 
sidewalks; vit. clay pipe side sewers; 
asphaltic concrete pavement. Certi- 
fied check of 10% required, payable to 
clerk of the Supervisors. Further in- 
formation obtainable from above. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Until January 7, 
2:30 P. M., bids will be received by 
Board of Public Works to improve 
Duncan St., between Douglass St. and 
Hoffman Ave., involving armored con- 
crete curbs; side sewers; l'/t-in. as- 
phaltic concrete wearing surface and 
6-in. Class F concrete base. Certified 
check of 10% required with bid pay- 
able to Clerk of the Supervisors. Fur- 
ther information obtainable from 
above. 



Saturday, January 3. 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-five 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Until 10 A 
M., Jan. 7, new bids will be received 
by the Board of Public Works for Im- 
proving Rhodes Ave., from Oxnard St. 
to Burbank Blvd., Involving: 

(1) grading C411G cu. yds. cut, 119 cu. 
i.i. lill); 

(2) 54,478 sq. ft. concr, paving, 6-ln. 
thick, dummy and expansion Joints 
and thickened edges; 

(3) 4G.G57 sq. ft. waterbound decom- 
posed granite roadway, 4-in. thick; 

(4) fire hydrants and appurtenances. 
complete. 

Bids received December 17 were re- 
jected December 24. 



approval 



the 



state legislature, The 
instruction 



ills 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Bids were opened 
by city council to improve B Tenth 
St. bet. High St. and BOth Ave., Rus- 
set St. bet. 50th and 54th Aves., etc. 
Project involves; 

(1) 15f,,749 so., ft. grading; 

(2) 341 lin. ft. cone, curb Willi sti i I 

curb guard; 

(3) 2597 lin. ft. concrete curb with- 

out steel curb guard; 

(4) 154,790 sq. ft. cone, pavement; 

(5) 93 lin. ft. S-in. by 20-in. corru. 

iron and concrete culvert; 
(G) 14 lin. ft. 10-in. vit. pipe conduit; 

(7) 34 lin. ft. 15-in. vit. pipe conduit; 

(8) 2 handholes; 

(9) 1 storm water inlet (21-in. open- 

ing); 

(11) 1 manhole top; 

(12) 1 manhole top. 

1911 Act. City will pay 29% of cost 
from Treasury. 

Folowing is a complete list of unit 
bids received: 

(A) A. J. Raisch. San Francisco. 

(B) M. J. Bevanda, Stockton. 

(C) Central Calif. Roads Co., Oakland. 
il)i N. M. Ball. Oakland. 

(E) Heafey-Moore Co., Oakland. 

(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 

(1) | .035 $ .05 $ .04 % .025 $ .02 

(2) 60 .SO .55 .60 .80 

(3) 40 .50 .30 .35 .40 

(4) 20 .20 .20 .20 .193 

(5) 3.00 5.00 4.90 4.00 4.00 

(6) 1.30 2.00 1.60 1.60 1.50 

(7) 2.00 2.50 2.15 2.00 2.00 

(8) 15.00 75.00 13.00 20.00 15.00 

(9) 40.00 50.00 55.00 30.00 25.00 

(10) 50.00 60.00 50.00 35.00 40.00 

(11) 50.00 100.00 65.00 65.00 60.00 

(12) 10.00 25.00 16.00 20.00 35.00 



SALINAS, Monterey Co., Cal.— W. 
A. Dontanville, Salinas, awarded con- 
tract by city council to improve Pa- 
jaro St., bet. Sausal and Lake Sts., 
involving grading, $.05 sq. ft.; cone, 
pave, $.19 sq. ft.; cem. cone, side- 
walks, $.14 sq. ft.; cem. cone, curbs, 
$.30 lin. ft. 






SANTA BARBARA, Cal. — City 
council declares intention (1134) to 
improve Bath Street, bet. Quinto St. 
and Alamar Ave. involving grading, 
asphaltic concrete pavement, com- 
bined cement concrete curb and gut- 
ter, cement concrete cross gutter, ce- 
ment concrete driveways, cement con- 
crete sidewalk, removal of cement 
landing walk, etc.; under 1911 Act. 
Hearing January 15. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY, Cal— Until 
January 21, 2 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by State Highway Commission 
to grade and pave with asphalt con- 
crete, 6.3 miles between Trifolium 
Canal and Kane Springs. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 

SOLANO COUNTY, Cal.— Approval 
by the state highway commission of 
plans to reroute the Sacramento- 
Oakland road through American can- 
yon, Solano county, was announced 
by the department of public works at 
Sacramento Dec. 19. The project, to 
cost approximately $1,500,000, would 
reduce the distance between the two 
cities by five miles. It must have the 



of i i mil. ■ of iwu ro idwaj terminat- 
ing with the present highway at 
points about oik- mile west of Cor- 
delia and es I oi \ all |o. The aban- 
doned portion of the existing highway 
would be turned over to Solano 
county for Inclusion in the iatter'fl 
road system. > 



SAN FRAN) SSCO. Pay imp. Co . 
i helan Bldg , a) $1872 awarded con 

i rael by State Harbor Commiss , 

p©n v Bide . for laj ing asphalt wear- 
ing surface on basalt block pavemem 
in 16th St., involving: 

(1) 270 tons Topeka wearing surface; 

(2) LOO tons asphaltic binder. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 
Fay Imp. Co., (1) $5.20; (2) $4.68; 

Eaton & Smith, (1) $5.65; (2) $1.80; 
$2,005. 

Union Paving Co., (1) $6; (2) $5; 
$2,120. 

L. J. Cohn, (1) $7.00; (2) $6.50; $2,- 
640. 



MARCH FIELD, Riverside Cn.. ral 
—Until January 14. 11 A. M., bids will 
be received by Constructing Quarter- 
master. March Field, to construct 
paved aprons in front of hangars at 
March Field. Plans obtainable from 
above. The work will consist princi- 
pally of concrete paving, the appro- 
priation being $104,t 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 



TAHOE NATIONAL FOREST, Sier- 
ra Co., Cal.— Until January 15, 2 P. 
M., bids will be received by C. H. 
Sweetser, district engineer, 461 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco, for grading 
and surfacing about 4.14 miles in 
length with crushed rock, involving 
approximately 28 acres clearing; 72 cu. 
yds. concrete; 2S2 cu. yds. masonry; 
280 cu. yds. rip-rap; 14S.000 cu. yds. 
excavation; 6700 cu. yds. crushed rock 
surfacing; 3120 lbs. reinf. steel; 1492 
lin. ft. C. M. pipe; 278,320 sta. yds. 
overhaul. Plans and specifications ob- 
tainable from above on deposit of $10, 
returnable. 

KING CITY. Monterey Co.. Cal.— 
Until January 7, S P. M., bids will be 
received by City Council to improve 
portions of Mildred Avenue involving 
grading; hydraulic cement concrete 
curbs; 5- inch hydraulic cement con- 
crete pavement. K. Z. Mansfield, city 
clerk, Howard Cozzens, Salinas, en- 
gineer. Further information obtain- 
able from above. 



SANTA CRUZ. Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
— Petition has been placed before the 
Board of Supervisors to improve Sky- 
land Section, which embraces Skyland, 
Laurel, Hester and Summit District. 
The roads now are regarded as un- 



BENICIA. Solano Co., Cal.— Con- 
struction of a new secondary highway 
to give Benicia direct and convenient 
access to the proposed new trunk 
highway through American -Carquinez 
bridge short cut is the plan of State 
Highway Engineer, C. H. Purcell. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Until January 7, 
2:30 P. M., bids will be received by 
Board of Public Works to imprave 
Bradford St., between Cortland and 
Powhattan Avenues, involving side 
sewers; 6-in. concrete Class E pave- 
ment. Certified check of 10% required 
payable to Clerk of the Supervisors. 
Further information obtainable from 
above. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— J. C. Hickey, 
320 S Palm Ave., Alhambra, submit- 
ted the low bid to the board of pub- 
lic works Dec. 24 at $232,512.29 for 



ing: 

■ i i . anltary sewer; 

(2) 11,691 fl i"". ■ sewers; 

CS) 60,660 M ii cla LA n Burf . 

(-1) 10,841 Bq. ft. class A resurf.; 

I i) 15,816 q. ft. el surf.; 

n;i 22,592 i q ft cla a I > resurf.; 

(7) 10 sq. ft run.' guttei resurl 

The unit pi let a were: < i l 
(2) $1.66; (8) 2c; (4) 20c; (5) 35c; (6) 
30c; (7) 50c; total $232,612.29. 



IMPERIAL I OUNTY— As previously 
reported bids will be received by 
Lte Highway Commission to grade 
and pave with asphalt concrete 6.3 
miles between Trifolium Canal and 
Kane Springs; approximate quanti- 
ties are: 

(1) 33,000 cu. yds rdwy. excav. with- 

out class.; 

(2) 43,000 sta. yds. overhaul; 

(3) 1,300 cu. yds struc. excav.; 

(4) 14,500 sq. yds. subgrade. for pave- 

ment; 

(5) 54,400 sq. yds. asph. paint binder; 

(6) 28,800 tons asphalt concrete; 

(7) 1,292 lin. ft. 24-in. corr. metal 

pipe; 

(8) 132 lin. ft. 36-in. corr. metal 
pipe; 

(9) 900 lin. ft. furnishing treated 
piles; 

(10) 36 each, driving piles; 

(11) 16 M. ft. b. m. redwood tim- 
ber, dense select all -heart 
structural grade; 

(12) 10 M. ft. b. m. redwood tim- 
ber, select all-heart structural 
grade; 

(13) 72 cu. yds. removing and dis- 
posing of Portland cement 
concrete in existing pavement 
and structures; 

(14) 332 stations finishing roadway; 

(15) 120 each, monuments, complete 

in place. 
The state will furnish corrugated 
metal pipe. 



CAREY ELASTIC RAIL 

FILLER PATENT LEGAL 



In a decision recently handed down 
by Judge Cooper in the United States 
District Court in the Northern Dis- 
trict of New York, patent No. 1,171,- 
441, under which the Philip Carey 
Company Elastite rail filler is manu- 
factured, was held to be valid. 

The Philip Carey Manufacturing Co. 
brought suit against Henry Dumary, 
Albany contractor, and the Albany 
Milling Comporation, a dealer. The 
infringing rail filler was manufac- 
tured and the suit was defended by 
Servicised Products Corp., of which 
Mr. Albert C. Fischer is president. 

Judge Cooper's decision stated that 
rail filler as manufactured under the 
patent in question "is a real success 
and a real benefit to the cities and 
street railway companies having the 
problem ever before them of repair- 
ing, paving and repaying paved streets 
containing street railway tracks." 

A decree was awarded in favor of 
the Philip Carey Co. for injunction 
and costs with accounting of profits 
sustaining the patent under which 
that Company manufacturers and 
sells Carey Elastite Rail Filler. 



After many years in Richmond, W. 
H. Verbiscio has moved his roofing 
business to 2445 San Pablo Avenue, 
Berkeley. Verbiscio applies all types 
of asphalt, shingle and roll roofs, felt, 
asphalt and gravel and now handles 
exclusively the paint and shingle 
products of the Parafflne Companies, 



In 



Twenty-six 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



PROPOSE TO SELL 

FACE BRICK ON THE 
SQUARE FOOT BASIS 



The idea of selling face brick by 
the square foot instead of by the 
thousand was suggested at the annual 
get-together meeting of the American 
Face Brick Association by George 
Anderson of the Michigan Clay Pro- 
ducts Corp. 

"A study of the psychology attached 
to face brick sales would reveal that 
the unit price of face brick is not in 
line with the present trend of thought 
which is and has been used in other 
industries successfully," explained Mr 
Anderson. "For instance, the manu- 
facturer of ceramic tile does not 
quota his material, which is a facing 
product, per thousand pieces, but of- 
fers his ware at a price per square 
foot. The result is that the price 
quoted is in the lowest form that can 
intelligently be presented. 

"This study in the psychological as- 
pect attached to the merchandising of 
any product leads us to look into 
other fields and we find many pro- 
ducts offered in this manner, '$5-00 
per month for a period of sixteen 
months,' with deliberate attempt to 
conceal the fact that the total cost of 
purchase will be $S0.00. We therefore 
revert back to face brick and we ask 
you as to what your attitude would 
be if you were purchasing face brick 
for a building and were confronted by 
the following prices: 

First panel submitted, 22c per rfq. 
ft. 

Second panel submitted, 24c per sq. 
ft. 

Third panel submitted, 26c per sq. 
ft. 

Fourth panel submitted, 2Sc p«r sq 
ft. 

"Will you ask yourself this ques- 
tion? Would the difference in these 
prices materially affect your decision, 
or can you not honestly admit that 
you would be more than liable to select 
the product that appealed to you re- 
gardless of the price quoted?" 



Ni 



American Standard values for 
the strength of wood in the form of 
poles are announced by the American 
Standards Association. 29 West 33th 
Street, New York, as follows: Creo- 
soted southern pine, 7400 lbs., chest- 
nut, 6000 lbs., western red cedar, 5600 
lbs., and northern white cedar, 3600 
lbs. per square inch. 

Under the provisions of the Na- 
tional Electrical Safety Code the new 
values automatically replace the old 
figures of 6500 lbs. for dense yellow 
pine, and 5000 lbs. for other yellow 
pine, chestnut and western red cedar, 
that have been in general use by pole 
line engineers. Northern white cedar 
remains unchanged. 

The new standards are the result of 
an extensive study conducted by the 
Association's Sectional Committee on 
Wood Poles. The Committee was or- 
ganized in 1924 under the sponsor- 
ship of the telephone group, embrac- 
ing the Hell System and the United 
States Independent Telephone Associa- 
tion. The chairman of the Committee 
Is Dr. R. L. Jones, Director of Ap- 
paratus Development in Bell Tele- 
phone Laboratories, New York City. 
A partial list of the membership of 
the Committee includes representa- 
tives of the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company, the United 
States Independent Telephone Asso- 
ciation, the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, the Postal Telegraph- 
Cable Company, the National Electric 
Light Association, the American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers, the 
American Railway Association, the 
American Electric Railway Associa- 
tion, the American Society for Testing 
Materials, the U. S. Bureau of Stand- 
ards, the U. S. Forest Products Lab- 
oratory, the American Wood-Preserv- 
ers' Association, the Western Red 
Cedar Association, the Northern 
White Cedar Association, and other 
pole producers. 

The public utilities of this country 
require annually a total of approxi- 
mately 4,000,000 poles, southern pine, 
cedar and chestnut. The agreement 
among the representatives of the 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 

groups mentioned above as to ulti- 
mate fiber stresses for poles marks 
an important step in standardization 
practice in the United States. 



Dallas, Texas, has erected its sec- 
ond welded office building. The first 
one, erected by the Dallas Power & 
Light Company, is 19 stories high and 
is the highest welded building so far 
constructed. Structural work, how- 
ever, has been completed on a welded 
building for the Dallas Gas Company 
designed for 22 stories, 14 of which 
are now erected with provision made 
for the remaining S stories later. The 
Dallas Gas building was entirely field 
welded and about 20% shop welded, 
and about 1000 tons of steel were 
used in the 14-story structure. The 
building was fabricated and erected 
by Austin Erothers, Dallas contrac- 
tors, using five welding machines four 
of which were General Electric, and 
using G. E. welding electrode type L 
in 5/32 and 3/16 inch diameters. 



Towering 3S9 feet above bedrock in 
Diablo Canyon on the upper Skagit 
River in Washington, the Diablo Dam, 
just completed by the City of Seattle 
for power development, now has the 
distinction of being the highest dam 
in the world. It exceeds the Pacoima 
dam in California by 9 feet and the 
U. S. Bureau Reclamation's Arrow- 
rock dam, which for fifteen years 
held the honor, by 40 feet. This honor, 
however, will be shortlived, as the 
Owyhee dam, now under construction 
in Oregon, will be 522 feet high, while 
the Hoover dam of the Boulder Can- 
yon project on the Colorado River will 
be built to a height of more than 
700 feet. 



Twelve California redwood mills re- 
ported a cut of 5,720,000 ft., shipments 
of 5,294,000 ft. and new business 
amounting to 4, 90S, 000 ft. for the week 
ended December 13. 

Unfilled orders reported by 140 West 
Coast mills on December 6 were equal 
to 22 per cent of the stocks of lumber 
on hand. 



FREDRICKSON & WATSON CONST. CO. SUBMIT LOW BID 
TO STATE ENGINEER ON NEVADA CO. HIGHWAY WORK 

NEVADA COUNTY. Calif— Fredrickson 
Highway Engineer, C. H. Purcell, December 
tween one mile west of Washington Road a 
in length, to be graded, involving: 



Watson Const. Co., Oakland, submitted the low bid to the State 
3, at S92.012.00 for constructing highway in Nevada County, be- 
[ one-half mile east of Summit (III-Nev-15-C, D), about 7.4 miles 



and grub right of 



ment concrete (struc.) 



rdwy. exeavati< 



(1) 58 acres cl 

way; 
<2) 219.000 cu. 

without class.; 

(3) 352.000 sta. yds. overhaul; 

(4) 1850 cu. yds. struc. excav. 

(5) 230 cu. yds. class A Portland ce 
The bids were: 

(A) Fredrickson & Watson Const. Co. (E) Larsen Bros., $122, 71S. 

$92,012. (F) Lewis Const. Co., $124,424 

(B) Hemstreet & Bell. $104,452. (G) C. W. Wood, $124,974 



(S) 25,500 lbs 
1(7) 84 lin. ft. 12-ir 

(8) 2240 lin. ft. 18- 

(9) 330 lin. ft. 24-1 

(10) 190 lin. ft. S- 



pipe underdrains; 



(11) 53 cu. yds. rubble 

if. steel (struc); taining wall; 

;orr. metal pipe; (12) 73 lin. ft. rubble masonry para- 
do; pet; 
do; (13) 395 sta. finishing roadway; 

perforated metal (14) 142 each, monuments, complete 



place. 

State will furnish corru. metal pipe. 
(J) Isbell Const. Co., $133,58S.50. 
(K) A. Teichert & Son, $134,356. 
(L) Chigris & Sutsos. $134,476.25. 



(C) 


Morrison-Knudson Co 


. S11S.367. (H) 


C. R. 


Adams, 


$129,389.10 




(M) O. 


A. Lindberg, $1 


57,091. 




(D) 


W. 


H. Haus 


r. $121,535.50. 


(I) 


Finnell 


Co., $132,454.75. 














The 


unit bids 


were- 




























(A) 


(B)' 


(C) 


(D) 


(E) 


(F) 


(G) 


(H) 


(I) 


(J) 


(K) 


(L) 


(M) 


(1) 




.. $225.00 


$250.00 


$350.00 


$300.00 


$220.00 


$400.00 


$260.00 i 


235.00 


$350.00 


2 CM. 00 


$300.00 


$175.00 


$300.00 


(2) 




.29 


.34 


.36 


.38 


.42 


.37 


.42 


.44 


.41 


.45 


.445 


.48 


.55 


(3) 




.005 


.005 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


.01 


(4) 




... 1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


1.50 


1.00 


1.50 


1.00 


1.25 


2.00 


1.00 


1.50 


1.50 


1.50 


(5) 




... 24.00 


25.00 


28.00 


25.00 


24.00 


25.00 


25.00 


30.00 


25.00 


27.00 


23.00 


27.00 


2S.00 


(6) 




.05 


.05 


.06 


.05 


.06 


.06 


.06 


.06 


.0575 


.05 


.06 


.06 


.07 


(7) 




.50 


.50 


.50 


.50 


.50 


1.00 


.75 


.40 


.75 


.50 


.50 


.50 


.50 


(8) 




.50 


.50 


.70 


.50 


.60 


1.00 


.75 


.60 


.75 


.50 


.60 


.60 


.60 


(9) 




.50 


.50 


1.00 


.75 


.70 


1.00 


1.00 


.80 


.90 


.50 


1.00 


1.00 


.60 


(10) 




... 1.50 


1.25 


1.00 


1.50 


2.00 


1.20 


2.50 


2.50 


1.75 


1.65 


1.50 


.50 


1.00 


(11) 




... 14.00 


12.00 


14.00 


15.00 


15.00 


15.00 


10.00 


15.00 


14.00 


15.00 


12.50 


15.00 


15.00 


(12) 




... 4.00 


3.50 


3.00 


10.00 


5.00 


2.00 


5.00 


3.00 


6.00 


4.00 


3.00 


2.25 


2.00 


(13) 




... 5.00 


5.00 


6.00 


10.00 


5.00 


6.00 


5.00 


4.00 


10.00 


10.00 


7.50 


5.00 


4.00 


(14) 




3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-seven 



Contracts Awarded Lie ^ AGC ^ tanees >^ 



BUILDING PERMITS 





San Francisco County 




No. 


Owner 


Contractor 


Amt. 


1683 


Liebman 


Owner 


20000 


1634 


Morales 


BJrickson 


3800 


1635 


Peterson 


( iwner 


3500 


1636 


S F Assn 


Lindgren 


5000 


1637 


Spector 


Young 


2000 


163S 


Ward 


St: ard 


4500 


1639 


Mills Estate 


Owner 


5000 


1640 


F ifil 


Owner 


1000 


1G41 


St Mary's 


Johnson 


5000 


L642 


Warner 


McLeran 


5000 


1G43 


Tilly 


Owner 


2000 


1644 


Vukicevlch 


Little 


5500 


1645 


Pacific 


McDonald 


6000 


1646 


Doelger 


Owner 


8000 


1647 


Blaustein 


Fisher 


7500 


1648 


Sergo 


Owner 


3700 


1469 


Fonti 


Isaac 


3000 



APARTMENTS 

(1633) W FILLMORE ST. 100 North 
Beach; three-story and basement 
frame (6) apartments. 

Owner — B. Leibman, 1555 Francisco 

Street. 
Architect— R. R. Irvine, Call Bldg. 

$20,000 

DWELLING 

(1634) E CAYUGA 25 S Lamartine; 
one - story and basement frame 
and stucco dwelling. 

Owner — Mr. and Mrs. S. Morales, 52 

Santa Rosa Ave. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— H. Erlckson, 972 Chenery. 
J3S00 



DWELLING 

(1635) NW CAYUGA 25 NE Danton; 

one - story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
Owner— A. R. Peterson, 1435 Church 

Street. 
Plans by B. K. Dobkowitz. 

$3500 



TOWERS 

(1638) NE 16th & BRYANT Streets; 

erect six steel towers. 
Owner — San Francisco Baseball Assn., 

14th and Valencia Sts. 
Engineer — H. J. Brunnier, Sharon 

Bldg. 
Contractor — Lindgren & Swinnerton, 

Inc., 625 Standard Oil Bldg. 

$5000 






ALTERATIONS 

(1637) SE LAKE and 2Sth Ave.; al- 
terations and additions to resi- 
dence. 

Owner — D. S. Spector. 

Architect — Bertz, Winter & Maury, 
210 Post St. 

Contractor — Young & Horstmeyer, 461 
Market St. $2000 



DWELLING 

(1638) E VERNON 154 S Randolph; 

one - story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
Owner— T. F. Ward, % contractor. 
Plans by Builder. 
Contractor— Standard Bldg. Co., 2 18 

Castenada. ' $4500 



ALTERATIONS 

(1639) BUSH AND MONTGOMERY 

Sts. Alter offices and basement 

garage. 
Owner— Mills Estate Inc., Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Engineer— A. Toriggino and E. L. 

Cope, Mills Bldg., San Francisco. 
$5000 



ALTERATIONS 

(1640) 52 MARS ST.; alterations to 

front of dwelling. 
Owner— J. Fred, 52 Mars St. 
Architect— Not Given, $1000 



DWELLING 

(1641) S KENTON 254 W Geneburn; 
one - story and basement frame 
dwelling. 

Owner— St. Mary's Park, 3901 Mission. 

Plana by D. E. Jaekle, Call Bldg. 

Contractoi^-A. R. Johnson, 3901 Mis- 
sion St. $5000 



ALTERATIONS 

(1642) 1125 MARKET ST.; alterations 
to theatre. 

Owner — Warner Bros., Hollywood The- 
atre Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— R. McLeran & Co., 718 
Hearst Bldg. $5000 



ALTERATIONS 

(1643) 746 FOLSOM ST.; alterations 

for offices. 
Owner— Tilly Mfg. Co., Inc., 746 Fol- 



Architect — Not Given. 



$2000 



FLATS 

(1644) E 25th AVE. 120 N Taraval; 

two-story and basement frame (2) 

flats. 
Owner— P. Vukicevich, 1442 Taraval 

Street. 
Engineer— J. G. Little and Co., 251 

Kearny St. $5500 



ALTERATIONS 

(1645) N BUSH ST. bet. Kearny and 
Grant Ave.; alterations to office. 

Owner — Pacific Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., 140 New Montgomery. 

Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

Contractor — McDonald & Kahn, Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg. $6000 

DWELLING 

(1646) S KIRKHAM 90 W 31st Ave.; 
two 1-story and basement frame 
dwellings. 

Owner and Builder— H. Doelger, 300 

Judah St. 
Plans by Owner. $8000 



FLATS 

(1647) E 21st AVE. 150 N Balboa St.; 

two-story and basement frame (2) 

fiats. 
Owner and Builder— S. Blaustein, 233 

21st Avenue. 
Plans by P. C. Fisher, 1122 Noe St. 

$7500 



DWELLING 

(1648) S ULLOA 107 E 18th Av 

story and basement frame < 

ing. 



CAPITAL CITY TILE 
COMPANY 

J. C. PALEN 

Manager 

914 Seventh Street 
Sacramento - - - - California 



Ownei and Builder — A. Sergo, 2239 

26th Avenue. 
Architect— Not Given $3700 



DWELLING 

(1649) E 2ist AVENUE 125 s Mor- 

aga; 1-story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
i iwner- .J- Fonti, 93 Prentice St. 
I 'lans bj i iv. ner 
Contractor — H. H. Isaac, 151 FarragUt 

Avenue. $3000 

BUILDING CONTRACTS 
San Francisco County 



Contractor Amt. 

Young 

State Salih 10790 



No. Owner 

257 Spectoi 

258 Golden 



ALTERATIONS 

(251) SE TWENTY-EIGHTH AVE. 
and Lake St. All work for altera- 
tions to residence. 
Owner— David S. Sector, Rialto Bldg, 

San Francisco. 
Architect — Bertz, Winter & Maury, 

210 Post St., San Francisce. 
Contractor — Young & Hostmeyer, 461 

Market St., San Francisco. 
Filed Dec. 23, '30. Dated Dec. 23, '30. 

On 5th of each month 75% 

Usual 35 days 25% 

TOTAL COST, $ 

Bond, $4041. Surety, American Bond- 
ing Co. of Baltimore. Limit, 50 days. 
Forfeit, none. Plans and specifica- 
tions filed. 



ALTERATIONS 

(258) NO. 644 BROADWAY. All work 
for remodeling and altering thea- 
tre . 
Owner— Golden State Theatre & Real- 
ty Co., 25 Taylor St., San Francisco 
(on contract) or North Beach 
Theatres, Inc (on bond). 
Architect— S. Chas. Lee, 2404 W-7th 

St., Los Angeles. 
Contractor— Salih Bros., 25 Taylor St., 

San Francisco. 
Filed Dec. 27, '30. Dated Dec. 2, '30. 

TOTAL COST, $10,790 
Bond, $10,000. Surety, American Bond- 
ing Co. Limit, forfeit, plans and 
specifications, none. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



San Francisco County 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec 19 1930— E STEINER 79-8% N 
California St, 2120 Steiner St. A 
L and Margaret M Marsh to Henry 
Erickson December 17, 1930 

Dec 19, 1930— S PALOU AVE 300 
m or 1 E Newhall E 25 x S 100 m 
or 1. Richard Godfrey to L H 
Stevenson December 19, 1930 

Deo 17, 1930— N MCALLISTER and 
E Laguna Sts N 100 x E 30. Skel- 

ly Estate Co to J J O'Connor 

December 16, 1930 

Dec 17, 1930— S ULLOA ST 32-6 W 
14th Ave W 25x100. G O Stalin 

to whom it may concern 

December ..... 1930 

Dec 16, 1930— LOT 15 ELK J5 Rail- 
road Ave Hd Assn. Wm F Bernell 

to whom it may concern 

December 15, 1930 

Dec 16, 1930— E 25th AVE 175 South 
Taraval S 25 x E 120. Meyer Bros 

to whom it may concern 

December 10. 1930 



Twenty-eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



Dec 16, 1930— NB OAKDALB AVE 
150 NW Phelps NW 25 x NE 100 
bit 292, O'Neil & Haley Tract. 
Robert and Agnes Hanlon to Ern- 
est Lombardi December 11, 1930 

Dec 16. 1930—730 IRVING ST. Mar- 
tin Stalling Jr to V Filippis 

December 11, 19=!0 

Dec 20, 1930— W STOCKTON 27 N 
Jackson 37-6 x 6S-9. George W 

Mensor to De Lucca & Son 

December 19, 1930 

Dec 20. 1930— S MAGNOLIA AVE 55 
E Webster 27-0x120. Ezio Petri 
G Perroni & Sons Dec 20, 1930 

Dec 20, 1930— BLOCK bounded by 
18th, 19th. Polsom and Shotwell 
Sts. Pacific Gas & Electric Co to 
Aristo Painting Co, D N & E 
Walter & Co, H Bosch, J W Ben- 
der Roofing & Paving Co. Otis El- 
evator Co, Gilley-Sehmid Co, J 
Michel and W A Pfefter, S P 
Bowser Co, F W Minkel, Jr and 
W W Lucas, Wise Mfg Co, Mon- 
son Bros, H H Larson Co, J O'- 
Shea, Inc, United Commercial Co, 
OH Mann & Co, Calif Steel Prod 
So, Cyclops Iron Works, Pred W 
Snook & Co, Ace Sheet Metal 
Works - December 10. 1930 

Dec 19, 1930— LOT 25 BLK 2957A 
map Sub No 3, Miraloma Park W 
33rd Ave N 5 N Vicente N 75 x 
W 120. Meyer Bros to whom it 
may concern December 17, 1930 

Dec 19. 1930— N MCALLISTER 100 
E Octavia E 50 x N 137-6. L 
Hoffman to Spivock & Spivock..... 
_ December 19, 1930 

Dec 19. 1930— LOT 16 BLK 22, map 
Crocker Amazon Tract. John Dall 

to whom it may concern 

December IS, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— S VICENTE ST 57-6 
and 82-6 W 16th Ave. 25x100. Carl 
and Fred Gellert to whom it may 

concern (two completions) 

December 22, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— N FRANCE AVE 125 
E Athens 25x100. Gus G Johnson 

to whom it may concern 

December 25, 1930 

Dec 22. 1930— N NORTH POINT ST 
85 E Broderick St N 52-6, 2270 
North Point St. Robinson and 
Johnston to whom it may concern 
December 22, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOTS 1 and 2 BLK 
327S, map Mt Davidson Manor. G 
W Morris to whom it may con- 
cern December 18, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— NE WESTGATE DR 
and Darien Way 119 or Westgate 
Drive x 70 S and 90 W to Da- 
rien Way. S R Anderson to whom 
it may concern December 20, 1930 

Dec 20, 1930— E THIRD AVE 200 N 
Clement St 25x120. A and R H 
Branch to whom it may concern 
December 20. 1930 

D«c 22, 1930— SAN JOSE and Cir- 
cular Aves. Southern Pacific Co 

to A G Raisch 

December 13. 1930 

Dec. 26, 1930— SW LOT 241 and SE 
Cayuga Ave NE 25 SE 87.S42 SW 
25 m or 1 NW SS.177 Ptn Lot 241 
Spring Valley Hd. Lorenzo Besio 

to whom it may concern 

Dec. 26, 1930 

Dec. 26, 1930— SIXTEENTH AND 
Illinois (16th St. plant of Asso- 
ciated Oil Co). Associated Oil Co 
to Jack Walton Dec. 17, 1930 

Dec. 26, 1930— N MORAGA 32-6 and 
57-6 E 21st Ave E 25xN 100. 

Castle Bldg Co to Henry Horn 

Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 26, 1930— N MORAGA 82-6 E 
21st Ave E 25xN 100. Castle Bldg 

Co to Henry Horn Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec 24, 1930— LOT 12 BLK 30 map 
Crocker Estate Tract Sub No 1. 
M Person to whom it may concern 

December 24, 193» 

Dec 23. 1930— W PUNSTON AVE 
192 S Santiago Ave. Jos D Ken- 
nedy to H Erickson 

December 23. 1930 

D«c 23, 1930— S PACIFIC 127-t W 



Sansome W 6S-9 x S 137-6. Tea 
Gardens Products Co to The Aus- 
tin Co of Calif Deo 17, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— SW TARAVAL and 
20th Ave W 60 x S 100 OL 1177. 
Floyd H Steele to whom it may 
concern December 15. 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— N 20th 129-10 West 
Guerrero 25x114. James and Cath- 
erine Monaghan to whom it may 
concern December 23, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— S HANCOCK 160 E 
Sanchez. Fredricka Kolsberg to 
Trygve Kolsberg.. ..December 23. 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— E FRANKLIN 137-6 
S Chestnut S 25 x E 114-9 WA 
100. Giuseppe and Angelina Bru- 
cia to Tony D'Amico Dec 17, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— NW HOWTH 25 NE 
Mt Vernon NE 25 x NW 98. A 
Dockwell to whom it may con- 
tern December 22, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOT 35 BLK 6965A 
Sub No 1 Geneva Terraces. H 
and H Stoneson to whom it may 
concern December 15. 1930 

Dec 22 1930— S LOMBARD 220 W 
Fillmore S 120 x W 27-6. J and A 
Poney to whom it may concern.... 
December 22. 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— S60 HOWARD Street. 
Associated Oil Co to Villadsen 
Bros Inc December 17, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— VICINITY BERNAL 
and Diamond Sts. Southern Pa- 
cific Co to whom it may concern.. 
December 13, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— TRUSCON STEEL Co 
Spur. Southern Pacific Co to 
Granfield, Farrar & Carlin 



LIENS FILED 



San Francisco County 

Dec. 15, 1930— S FILBERT 115 E 
Taylor E 22-6xS 85 Fred How- 
ard vs Emanuel V Maggio $200 

Dec 17, 1930—160 on OCEAN AVE 
100 from Mission St SW to Ruth 
St 136 NE th to S Ocean Avenue. 
H J De Vries vs F Murphy and 
G Logarmarsino $81.07 

Dec 19, 1930— W FIFTH AVE 355 N 
Lake 30x120. A Cook vs M A 

Birdsall and W Knickerbocker 

$327.90 

Dec 19 1930—525 MARKET Street. 
Robt'Fleenor, $72: F Morse, $100.- 
50; J Wallace, $72, vs Crocker Es- 
tate and J D Tucker $244.50 

Dec 19, 1930— W DE HARO 191 S of 
inter NW 20th and De Haro S 
25 x W 100. Hanson Bros vs John 
and Anna Rudomethin $900 

Dec IS, 1930— E NINTH AVE N 
Noriega N 25 x E 120. S F Glass 
Co, $89.21: O G Windell. $123; 
California Concrete Co, $185, vs H 
S Klingspor 

Dec 24. 1930— SW GREEN ST and 
Leavenworth St W 60 x S 87-6, 
easement S Green 60 W Leaven- 
with W G x S S7-6. Carjolee Wall 
Paper Co, $704.44: D Zelinsky & 
Sons. $9888 85; Art Tile & Mantel 
Co. $5174.85. vs Consolidated Prop- 
erties, Ltd and Bellaire 51dg Co.... 

Dec 24, 1930— SW GREEN ST and 
Leavenworth St W 60 x S 87-6. 
Chris Berg vs Consolidated Prop- 
erties, Ltd and Bellaire Bldg Ltd 
$5621 

Dec 24, 1930— SW GREEN ST and 
Leavenworth St W 60 x S 87-6. 
easement S Green 60 W Leaven- 
worth W r, x S S7-6. L H Nish- 
kian, $3591.50; Walwaith Calif, 
$3871.35; U S Metal Products Co, 
$600; V Fassio, $67160.21; Natl 
Lighting Fixture & Supply Co, 
$4750. vs H C Baumann, Bellaire 
Bldg Ltd, Consolidated Properties, 
Ltd 

Dec 23, 1930— SW GREEN ST and 
Leavenworth W 60 x S 87-6, ease- 
ment over S Green 60 W Leav- 
enworth St W 6 x S 87-6. Royal 
Floor Co Ltd vs Bellaire Bldg Ltd 

$59S5.47 

Dec 23. 1930— S GREEN ST and W 



Leavenworth St S 87-6 x W 60. 
A J Ruhlman & Co vs Bellaire 
Bldg Ltd and Consolidated Prop- 
erties, Ltd $474.65 

Dec 23, 1930— N BERNARD ST 107 
W Taylor St W 20 x N 80. G 
Bianco vs R A Pucheu and T R 

Pucheu $50 

Dec 20, 1930— S OCEAN AVE 100 
from Mission St, 160 on S Ocean, 
135 on Ruth St. American Bitum- 

uls Co vs G Lagomarsino $45.10 

Dec 20. 1930— S OCEAN AVE 100 
from Mission St, 160 on S Ocean, 
135 on Ruth St. G M Goldberg vs 
F Murphy & G Lagomarsino.... $60.32 
Dec 20. 1930— S FILBERT ST 65 E 
Taylor St E £7-6 x S 75-6. F 

Howard vs S and R Ludovici $200 

Dec 24. 1930— SW GREEN ST and 
Leavenworth St W 60 x S 87-6, 
easement mentioned in Agt reed 
in 1763 OR 418. Otis Elevator Co, 
$66S3.25; W P Fuller & Co, $983.25; 
Sudden Lumber Co. $5.466.S9; J T 
Conway and H M Seely, $65S.99; 
W S Wetenhall, $2736.88; Max W 
Munder. $670; White & Gloor $874 
Geo Frankel, $7842.72; Judsoii Pa- 
cific Co, $S520; F D Wilson, $5,- 
976.85; E M Hundley, $3092.28; A 
Harper, $4667.50, vs Consolidated 
Bldgs Ltd, Bellaire Bldg, Ltd, V 
Fassio as Mission Concrete Co, 

White Co 

Dec 26, 1930— NW 22nd and Bartlett 
Sts W 125 N 60-8% NE 125-2 S 
68-11% W Bartlett St 68-11% N 
22nd St N 60-7 SE 250-6% S 60-2 
NE 250-5 (A Curtaz owner of 2nd 
parcel; other defendants owners 
of 1st). R P Davis. $200; H S 
Thompson, Inc, $19S.20; Commer- 
cial Carpet Laying Co. $379.20; 
Daly City Lime & Cement Co, 
$609.39, vs J Currie, G Youngman, 
Wm H Woodfield, Jr, E L Wood- 
field, S and E Weinstein and A 

Curtaz 

Dec 26, 1930— LOT 3 BLK 26. map 
St Francis Wood Exten No 2. 
Readymix Concrete Co Ltd vs G 

C Clark, H and J Wellnitz $63.75 

Dec 26, 1930— SW GREEN ST AND 
Leavenworth S 87-6 x W 60 50 v 
B 269. Albatross Steel Equip Co 
vs Bellaire Eldg, Ltd. and Vln- 
cenzo Fassio as Mission Concrete 

Company $7U1.91 

Dec 26, 1930— SW GREEN AND 
Leavenworth W 66xS 87-6 60 v B 
269. Folsom St Iron Works, Inc 
vs Bellaire Bldg Ltd and Consoli- 
dated Properties Ltd and Mission 
Concrete Co $914.74 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



San Francisco County 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 19, 1930— E GILBERT 180 N 
Brannan N 25 x E 80. Golden 
Gate Atlas Materials Co to J M 
Piconi 

Dec 23, 1930—525 MARKET Street. 
Robert Fleenor, F Morse and J 
Wallace to Crocker Estate and J 
D Tucker $244.50 

Dec 20, 1930— W FIFTH AVE 355 N 
Lake 30x120. A Cook to M A 
Birdsall and W Kuickerbocker 

Dec 20, 1930— S FILBERT St 115 E 
Taylor E 22-6 x S S5. F Howard 
to E V Maggio, also known as S 
Cudareico 

BUILDING PERMITS 

ALAMEDA COUNTY 



No. 


Owner 


Contractor 


Amt. 


1539 


Capwell 


Muller 


1000 


1540 


Cross 


Chris^ensen 


5000 


1541 


Oakland 


Kulchar 


5000 


1542 


Rogers 


Wendt 


16400 


1543 


Tulanian 


Yerrick 


2700 


1544 


Warren 


warren 


3000 


1545 


Jacques 


Owner 


6000 


1546 


Eroadway 


Wagner 787144 



Saturday, Januarj S, 198] 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-rime 



Ferguson 

Richfield 

Steele 
Breu 

Dlnkelsplel 

Fox 

Thompson 

I Vn \ 



Sylvester 
Mattock 

Nylander 



3000 
3600 

12500 
3000 

2 "i 

3500 
3000 
1800 



HOBART ST and 
., OAKLAND; al- 



1547 
1548 
1549 
1550 
1551 
1552 
1553 
1554 



ALTERATIONS 

(1539) SE COR 
Telegraph Ai 
terations. 

Owner— Capwell Estate, % Robinson 

& Price. 
Architect -Not Given. 
contra. -tor— K. A. Muller, Syndicate 

Bldg., Oakland. $1000 

ALTERATIONS 

(1540) NE COR. 20th and Broadway. 
OAKLAND; alterations. 

Owner— R. H. Cross. Mills Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Architect— Albert) Froberg, Ray Bldg. 

Oakland. 
Contractor— H. J. Christensen, R a y 

Bldg., Oakland $5000 

ALTERATIONS 

(1541) 51S Kith STREET. OAKLAND; 
alterations. 

Owner— Oakland Remedial Loan Assn. 

514 17th St., Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— S. Kulchar, 731 E 10th St. 

Oakland. «5000 



DWELLING 

(1542) S MANDANA BLVD. 1SS W 
Ashmount Ave., OAKLAND; two- 
story 9-room dwelling and one- 
story garage. 

Owner— Dr. Hobart Rogers, Summit 
Medical Bldg., Oakland. 

Architect— W. E. Schirmer, 700 21st 
St., Oakland. 

Contractor— G. H. Wendt, 2116 Allston 
Way, Berkeley. $17000 



ALTERATIONS 

(1543) 3721 GRAND AVENUE, OAK- 
LAND; alterations. 

Owner— A. Tulanian, 3721 Grand Ave., 
Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor — A. J. Yerrick, 5263 Col- 
lege Ave., Oakland. $2700 



DWELLING 

(1544) 2721 BELLAIRE Place. OAK- 
LAND; one-story 6-room dwelling. 

Owner— Minnie H. Warren, 3502 Foot- 
hill Blvd., Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— W. H. Warren. 3502 Foot- 
hill Blvd., Oakland. $3000 



HOSPITAL 

(15451 5542 TELEGRAPH AVENUE, 
OAKLAND; 1-story 10-room hos- 
pital. 

Owner & Builder— J. G. Jacques, 6101 
Chabot Road, Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $6000 



THEATRE 

(1546) W BROADWAY. 135 S Hobart 
St.. OAKLAND; one-story con- 
crete theatre. 

Owner— Broadway & Twentieth Prop- 
erties, Inc., Alexander Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Architect— Miller & Pflueger. 540 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Geo. Wagnor, 1S1 S Park 
St., San Francisco. $787,144 



RESIDENCE 

(1547) NO. 4 MOSSWOOD LANE, 

BERKELEY. One-story 4-room 1- 

family frame residence. 
Owner — Mrs. Ferguson, 1 Orchard 

Lane, Berkeley. 
Architect — W. T. Steelberg, 1 Orchard 

Lane, Berkeley. 
Contractor— C. O. Bradhoff, 911 56th 

St., Oakland. $3000 



SERVICE STATION 

(1548) NO. 1050 OXFORD ST., BER- 
KELEY. Class C service station 
and garage. 



Owner— Richfield Oil Co., Oakland. 
m, imi, i i W. ii. Ratcliff, Mercantile 

Trust Co., lierkeley. 
Contractor— Barrett & llilp, 9 

rison St.. S. !•". $3000 



BANK 

(1649) NE COR. B 14th STREET and 

Fruitvale Ave., Oakland; 

story concrete bank building;. 
i iwner and Builder Floyd H, St 

inn st. Elmo Way, San Franc 
Architect— Not Given. $1 



le, 



DWELLING 

(1660) s GUNN DRIVE, 60 W Moore 
Drive, OAKLAND; one-story four- 
room dwelling. 

Owner— Anna B Breu, 1510 Franklin 
St., Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor 11. K. Sylve 
Franklin St. 



$3000 



DWELLING 

(1661) 10924 FOOTHILL BLVD. OAK- 
LAND; two-story 11-room dwell- 
ing'. 

Owner— Lloyd I Mnkelspiel. 2S00 Broad- 
Way, San Francisco, 

Architect— J. H. Mitchell, 369 Tin. Si 
San l-'r: is.'.. 

I'm, Ira. tor— A. F. & C. W. Mattocl 
212 Clara St., San Francisco. 

$20,000 



DWELLING 

(1552) No. 929 GLEN DRIVE. SAN 

LEANDRO. Two-story 6-room 

stucco dwelling. 
Owner— Dr. Fox. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— Nylander Bros., 633 Mont- 

clair St., San Leandro. $3500 



SERVICE STATION 

(1553) SW COR. PARK ELVD. and 
Hampel St., OAKLAND; one-story 
brick service station, 1-story brick 
shop and 1 - story brick comfort 
station. 

Owner and Builder— G. E. Thompson. 
1201 Norwood Ave., Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $3000 



DWELLING 

(1554) NE TENTH ST. 125 East 0th 
Ave., OAKLAND; one-story four- 
room dwelling. 

Owner and Builder— W. J. Perry, 1002 
9th Ave., Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $1800 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



Alameda County 



Dec 19, 1930— LOT 20 and ptn Lot 
19 Blk 654, Boulevard Terrace, 
Oakland. Grand - Webster Build- 
ing Corp to Jacobs & Pattiani 

December 18, 1930 

Dec 20, 1930—1635 BLAKE STREET 
Berkeley. Henry M and Barbara 

Takahashi to The Globe Corp 

December 13, 1930 

Dec 20, 1930— LOT 17 BLK 4, Thous- 
and Oaks Heights, Berkeley. Earle 
R and Fraye M Converse to whom 
it may concern December 17, 1930 

Dec 20, 1930— PTN LOTS 3 and 4 
Blk 2, Hayward Acres, Eden Twp. 

William Pruner to Self 

December 19, 1930 



L930— PTN LOT 15 BLK 16, 

a. Sam- 
uel i. ! Clan nee 1 1 Rich 

December 20, 1930 

Dec 19, 1930—3262-64 SCHOOL s'l , 

Oakland. Nick Marl to John 

"I- I 1, L930 

Dec 19, 1930—601 EUCLID Avenue, 

Berkeley. J M Walker to « > It 

may i irn . Di c lei I i 1930 

Dec L9, 1930— LOT 12 BLK F, map 

of Ma.sli.'l I'.-ilk. Alain. '.la 10 I, 

1 . r , -, ton I., I:, ii T I opt Dec 13, 1930 
Dec 19, 1930—729 CENTRAL AVE, 

Alameda. J M Kinl.y to whom it 

may c srn December 11, 1930 

Dec 19. 1930— LOTS 20 and 21 BLK 

2, Brower Tract, Alameda. .1 M 
Klnley to whom it may concern.... 

D. cember io, 1930 
Dec 18, 1930—2514 80th AVE, Oak- 
land. George and Eleanor Dun- 
can, and Folke and A Hi. a- Wallin 

to whom it may concern 

December 17, 1930 

Dec 18, 1930— CROSS CAMPUS Rd, 
' University of California, Berke- 
ley. The Regents of the Univer- 
sity of California to Oakland Pav- 
ing Co December 13, 1930 

Dec 18 1930— E 40 ft LOT 16 BLK 
12 Thousand Oaks Tract, Berk- 
eley. A L Dennison to A B Rein- 

ert'sen December 15, 1930 

Dec 17, 1930— PPTY known as the 
Wiegman Home Ranch, Alvarado. 
Frederick H Weigman to Irwin H 

Reimers December 10, 193a 

Dec 17, 1930— LOT 16S BLK 182, 
Best Manor Tract, San Leandro. 

May Rezendes to John Young 

December 13, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930 — LOT 1, map of Amen- 
ity Court, Oakland. Marianna 
Massone to whom it may concern 

December 20, 1930 

Dec 23 1930— N HARPER ST about 
350 ft W of 35th Ave. Oakland. 
E D Eothwell to Herbert K Hen- 
derson December 22, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— LOT 5 BLK H, Clare- 
mont Pines Tract, Oakland. Eliz- 
abeth F Hunt to Herbert K Hen- 
derson December 20, 19S0 

Dec 22, 1930— NW PARK BLVD and 
St Jame Drive, Piedmont. The 
Roman Catholic Archbishop of San 

Francisco to P H Donnelly 

December 12, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOTS 1 and 2 BLK 
G, map of Pleasanton. Mura W 

Davis to Sullivan & Sullivan 

December 17. 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOTS 11 and 12 BLK 
57, Niles. Niles I O O F Hall Assn 

to whom it may concern 

December 19, 1930 

Dec 22. 1930— LOTS 9 and 10 BLK 
14 Athens Park Tract, Oakland. 

John P Rosa to Guy Taylor 

December 15, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOT 15 BLK 3. Lake- 
shore Highlands, Oakland. Alton 
R Lapham to whom it may con- 
cern December 19. 1930 

Dec 22. 1930—647 SANTA BARBA- 
RA Road, Berkeley. Embree F 

Hockenbeamer to H K Schulz 

December IS. 1930 

Dec. 26, 1930— SW DURANT AVE & 
Fulton St., Berkeley. Delphine 
Ferrier Doyle, Frances Ferrier 
Goss and Elizabeth Ferrier Ross to 
Fred C Stolte, Dec. 26, 1930; Scott 
..Dec. 26, 1930 



i v.. 



Member Insurance Brokers' Exchange 

FRED H. BOGGS 

INSURANCE 

490 GEARY STREET 



Phone FRanklin 9400 



San Francisco 



Thirty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 3, 1931 



Dec 24, 1330— LOT 12 ELK A, Glen- 
wood, Oakland. Mrs Dorothy Gla- 
zier to whom it may concern 

December 20, 1930 

Dec 26, 1930—523 MONTCLAIR Ave 
Oakland. George V Nolan to C M 

Anderson November 25. 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— PTN LOTS 2, 3 AND 
4 Blk C, Map of Town of Pleasan- 
ton. Chris Simonsen to Niels 

Jensen Dec. 17, 1930 

Castro Valley School District bet 
Dublin and Hayward, Alameda 
Dupblin and Hayward. Alameda 
County. Dept. of Public Works 
Division of Highways, State of 
Calif to C S Schwartz....Dec. 22, 1930 
Dec. 24, 1930— LOT 5 BLK 2, Sub- 
division of Fruitvale Heights, 
Oakland. Gottlob Betz to Gaubert 

Bros Dec. 10, 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— NO. 635 TWENTY- 
eighth St , Oakland. Dr. S J Silva 

to Chas Ungaretti Dec. 22 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— NE SIXTH 50 SE C 
St., Hayward. C M Russell to 

C M Russell Dec. 15, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— PTN LOTS 133-134 
and 135. Gansberger Tract, Eden 
Twp. The Prebytery of San' Fran- 
cisco to Julius Hovarritz 

November 15, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LO 145. Unit No 2, 
Avenue Terrace, Oakland. Amile 
A and Josephine Votto to O W 
Johnson December IS. 1930 



LIENS FILED 



Alameda County 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 19, 1930— N LINE E 14th ST 
1S1-21 ft E of 13th Ave. Oakland. 
M Winkenbach vs J R L Jones, 

Melrose Steel Co. Inc $435 

Dec 19. 1930— LOTS 29 and 30 BLK 
13, map No 6 Regents Park Al- 
bany. J A Davis, $426.58; H C 
Hunter. $5S9. 20, vs J A Cantrani 
Dec IS, 1930— SE APGAR and WEST 
Sts, Oakland. Wade Hollings- 
worth vs Sam Brenner, L Veiss 

Brenner, Melrose Steel Co Inc 

— - $290.50 

Dec IS, 1930— S 115 FT LOT 1 BLK 
L, Pioneer Homestead Assn, Ala- 
meda. Melrose Lumber & Supply 
Co Inc vs Marques Wiepcke, A H 

Johnson ?120.99 

Dec IS, 1930— LOT 15 BLK 4, Berk- 
eley Square, Berkeley. Edw W 
Brodrick vs A E Longmate aka 
Arthur E Longmate. Jessie J 

. Longmate, J Harry Smith $130.65 

Dec 18, 1930— LOT 27 BLK 11, 
Amended map of Central Park' 
Berkeley. Herman C Orth vs C G 
Coates aka Clifford G Coates. 
Myrta C Coates, Robert J Hale $51 
Dec 18. 1930— LOT C BLK 55, Ala- 
meda Homestead. Alameda. W F 
Colborn doing business as Pacific 
Coast Roofing Co vs A A Arada 

and Fillmore Arada $50 

Dec 18. 1930— LOT C BLK 55, Ala- 
meda Homestead, Alameda. Tilden 
Lumber & Mill Co vs B and Fill- 
more Arada and A W Schneck 

„ $337.70 

Dec 17. 1930—5452 BOND ST. Oak- 
land. C F Olson vs Chas and An- 
na Blais, Pauline Pellerin, Mrs L 

O Clark _ _ $82 55 

Dec 17. 1930— LOT C BLK 55, Ala" 
meda Park Homestead, Alameda. 
Jessie Bray vs Anna and Filmore 

Arada, A Schneck $394 ?g 

Dec 17, 1930— LOT C BLK 55, Ala- 
meda Park Homestead, Alameda. 
A W Schneck vs A and F Arada 

and A Auslin $1700 

Dec 17. 1930— LOT C BLK 55. Ala- 
meda Park Homestead, Alameda 
E Wangan. $123; K Miller, $260, 

vs A and F Arada 

Dec 22, 1930— NORTH PIGIRER 100- 
28 w Woodland, San Leandro. 
American Lead Co vs H F and E 
O Bruenner, J Franklin $123.54 



Dec 22, 1930— ELK 2. Lakeshore 
Addn. Oakland. Aladdin Heating 
Co vs J Birtordi also known as 
J Bertoldi and J Britley $155 

Dec 22. 1930— LOTS 1 and 2 BLK 6 
Fruitvale Tract, Oakland. Rex 
Floor Co vs F Fisher $212 80 

Dec 22, 1930— G73 14th ST. San Le- 
andro. J Johnstone vs Tony Mel- 
lero and C Graffi $346.05 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 22 BLK G, Clare- 
mont Pines, Oakland. H W Don- 
ovan vs J M Walker $434 37 

Dec. 22, 1930— EAST LENOX AVE 
250.55 S of Montecito Ave., Oak- 
land C E Douglas and G R Wolf 

vs Albert and Emily Kroll $579.35 

Dec. 22, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE & 
Caroline St.. Alameda. Arnold F 
Kramm vs Aileen Marie Roberts 
fmly Aileen Marie Hrubanik and 

M Hrubanik $335.50 

Dec. 24. 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE & 
Caroline St., Alameda. Powell 
Bros, Inc vs Aileen Marie Roberts; 
Mary Dickson and M F Hrubanik 

$778.14 

Dec. 24, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE & 
Caroline St, Alameda. Ever-Ready 
Plumbing Co vs Aileen Marie 
Roberts and M F Hrubanik....$6S3.70 
Dec. 24, 1930— NO. 149 BEACH- 
wood Drive, Oakland. Inlaid Floor 

Co vs J M Walker $489 

Dec. 24, 1930— LOT 22 BLK G, 
Claremont Pines Tract, Alameda! 
H W Hoffman Co vs J M Walker 

$565.55 

Dec 24, 1930— NE LINE EAST 14th 
St 181-21 ft East of 13th Avenue, 
Oakland. C W Roland, $142.10; A 
Casqueiro, $17S.S5, vs J R L Jones. 

Melrose Steel Co 

Dec 23, 1930— SE APGAR and West 
Sts, Oakland. Hutchinson Co vs 
San Brenner, C R Veiss and Mel- 
rose Steel Company $42 63 

Dec 23, 1930—149 BEACHWOOD Dr' 
Oakland. Malott & Peterson vs J 

M Walker j 655 

Dec 23. 1930—2249 TELEGRAPH A.ve 
Berkeley. Chas W Knights vs M 
Forbes, Alma Nemir, c E Waters, 

D J Gordon. W C Gilman $11522 

Dec 23, 1930— SE TENTH AVE 120 
ft NE of East 22nd St. Oakland 
Frank Eytman vs Western Loan 

& Bldg Co, U Cavallo $233 

Dec 23, 1930—702-704 STANNAGE 
Ave, 1132-34 Portland Ave, Al- 
bany. West Bros Roofing Co vs 

Joe Catrini $42.50 

Dec 23, 1930— SE GRAND and Web- 
ster Sts, Oakland. Melrose Bldg 
Materials Co vs Grand - Webster 

Bldg Corp. R M Evans $211 43 

Dec 23, 1930— NE G3rd ST and Tele- 
graph Ave, Oakland. Hutchinson 
Co vs E and S Lanza and Melrose 

Steel Company $27.50 

Dec. 27, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE 
and Caroline St., Alameda. H E 
Rice, $546; Fred Josenhson, $151.25; 
H C Stoeckle Co, $307 40: Oakland 
Sheet Metal Supply Co, $1S8.73 vs 
Aileen Marie Roberts; Mary Dick- 
son and M F Hrubanik 

Dec. 27, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE 
and Caroline St., Alameda. Strom 
Electrical Co vs Mrs. Mary Dick- 
son; Aileen Maria Roberts fmly 
Aileen Maria Hurbanik and Laura 

A Hurbanik $342.70 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOTS 26 AND 27 Map 
of Benton Property, Berkeley. Geo 
R Moren vs Alpha Chapter of 

Theta Upsilon Sorority $1770.40 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOTS 107 AND 108, St. 
James Wood, Piedmont. George 
J Maurer vs Clarence A and Mil- 
dred I Murphy $1596 

Dec 26, 1930— PTN LOT 12 BLK B, 
map of the southern ptn of Blake 
Estate, Berkeley. W P Fuller & 
Co vs Josephine Tripp. R B Gra- 
ham $122.95 

Dec 26. 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE and 
Caroline St, Alameda. T P Ho- 
gan Co vs Aileen Marie Roberts, 
Mary Dickson $759.27 



Dec 26, 1930— LOT 15 BLK 4 Berk- 
eley Square, Berkeley. TP Ho- 
gan Co. JS99.74; Pacific Hardwood 
Flooring Co, $85.35. vs Arthur E 
and Jessie J Longmate, J Harry 



RELEASE OF LIENS 

Alameda County 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 19, 1930— E VALDEZ ST 220 ft 
N of 24th St, Oakland. Maxwell 
Hardware Co, $35.20; B Simon 
Hardware Co, $267.75. to E Flener 
Tillie R Spear 

Dec 19, 1930— INTER SW FLEM*-' 
ING Ave and SE line of High St 
Oakland. F W Parkhurst to Mabei 
B and Walter S Johnson.... $549 19 

Dec 18, 1930— PTN LOTS 29 and 30 
Blk 2. Thousand Oaks Heights, 
Berkeley. Al M Fearey to E R 
Converse $325 

Dec 24, 1930—420 14th ""ST." Oak- 
land. Oliver W Thornton to J C 
and Paula Merrick, Berthold and 
Hannah Altmayer, Greater Oak- 
land Club, Jerry Poncia, E J 
Greenhood, Beatrice M Greenhood 
Martin E and Blanche M Marks, 
Louis and Ruby Scheeline $459 90 

Dec 22. 1930—2339 OREGON Street 
Berkeley. Cliff Gates to Harry C 
Knight S206 



COMPLETION NOTICES 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec 24, 1930— LOT 15 BLK 8, map 
Burhngame Grove. Theo T Ben- 
nett to Ingraid Sorensen 

_ ■■■""■■- December 23, 1930 

Dec 24. 1930— PUMP STATION on 
PPty of M S Costa at or near 
Engineer Station No 292 on State 
Highway bet Redwood City and 
Palo Alto, state of California to 
Herbert D Baker Dec 22 1930 

Dec 26, 1930— LOT 6 BLK 10 East 
San Mateo. J H Clifford to whom 
it may concern December 20. 1930 

Dec 26, 1930— LOT 24 BLK 7, Uni- 
versity Heights. San Mateo Co. 
Holger I Spohr to whom it may 
concern December 26. 1930 

Dec. 20. 1930— LOTS 11 AND 12 BLK 
1. Oakwood Tract, San Mateo. 
R E Stewart to whom it may con- 
cern Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOTS 27 AND 28 BLK 
12, Central Park, San Mateo. Lil- 
lian Edelman to A Newman and R 
E Marshall Dec. 20, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 4 BLK I, San 
Bruno. Axey Boes to whom it may 
concern Dec. 20, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 14. Hillsborough 
Oaks. Jules G Mindnich to whom 
it may concern Dec. 22, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 21 BLK 28, Red- 
wood Heighlands. Victor J Chiap- 
pellone to whom it may concern.... 
.^ Dec. 22 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— LOTS 18 AND ' 19, 
Woodside Glents. Ada Mengler 
to C F Howard Dec. 14, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— S THIRD AVE, San 
Mateo. Martin Stelling et al to 
Clinton-Stephenson Constr Co, 
Ltd Dec. 13. 1930 

LIENS FILED 



SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 26. 1930— LOT 3S BLK 14. Map 
No 2. Central Park. Redwood City. 
F X Schweickert vs John A Man- 
ning, John Quimby $70 

Dec 24, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 15, Bay- 
view Heights. Wm Woolley vs 
Martin Peterson $77 65 

Dec 24, 1930— LOTS' 14 and 15 BLK 
2, Bayview Heights. Wm Woolley 



Saturday, January 3. 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Thirty-one 



vs Martin Peterson, S A Smoot.... 

$174. lr. 

ii. -i, 1980— FTN LOTS 88 and 40 
Map No 2, Sub No 1. Weill Ii 
Park ami pin lot a bik 10. i:iit:> - 

n i Park, k..i» i nity. Mar- 

$662.78, vs Henry M McQullken, 
tin Nelson, $7*; Albln Warden, 
Martin Peterson 

!>,,■ 21. I93u 1--IX l.i its ::^ ami -In 
Map No 2. Sub No l. Wellesley 
Park and iitu lot a blk i". Edge- 
wood Park, Redw 1 city. Win 

Woolley vs Martin Peterson {99.55 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 20 BLK 27, Mil- 
brae Highlands. Herman Ahlgren 
et al vs A M Am, sen et al $295 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 2 BLK I, Duncan 
Park. A Haseltine vs Laverne H 
Booker et al $458 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 1 BLK I, Duncan 
Park. A Haseltine vs Laverne H 
Booker et al $360 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 3 BLK 10, Uni- 
Versitl Heights. Barney Hallson 
vs Albert Bell et al $40 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOTS 38 AND 40 and 
Part Lot A Blk 10, Wellesley Park 
C A Bloomquist vs Martin Peter- 
son et al $265 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



SAN MATEO COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Dec. 20, 1930 — LOCATION NOT 

Given. Geo Trallmon to J L De- 

benedetti 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



MARIN COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Dec 22, 1930— FAIRFAX. Lizzie Al- 

pern to M Linggi.-December 22. 1930 
Dec 22, 1930— NEAR TIBURON. San 
Francisco Yacht Club of Belvedere 
to Clinton - Stephenson Const Co, 
Ltd December 12, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



MARIN COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Dec 19. 1930— SAUSALITO. Marin 
Lumber & Supply Co vs P F 
Frund $517.15 

Dec £2, 1930— SAN ANSELMO. Dal- 
las T Perrenot vs Mr and Mrs 
Fred Fisher and Chas Service. ...$117 

Dec 24, 1930— SAN ANSELMO. Geo 
Wolfe vs C A Service, et al... $40.50 

Dec 24, 1930— SAN ANSELMO. Geo 
Wolfe vs C A Service $90 

Dec 24. 1930— SAN ANSELMO. Geo 
Wolfe vs C A Service and Harold 
E Squire $135 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec 23, 1930— LOT 7 BLK 17, Rich- 
mond Traffic Center. David J and 
Mary K Esola to Norman E An- 
derson December 17, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— LOT 4 BLK 323. City 
of Martinez. Raymon Claeys to 
W Snelgrove December 23, 1930 

Dec 24, 1930— PTN LOT 18. Gram- 
mar School Addn to Concord. F 

T Troutman to W A Riggs 

December 24. 1930 

Dec. 19, 1930— PTN LOT 1 BLK 5, 
Shell Heights, Martinez. L A 
Goree to J F Croll Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec. 19, 1930— SECTION 12 2 N 1 W 
and in Rancho Los Medanos. (con- 
struction of crushed stone road on 
property of Calif. Water Service 
Co.) California Water Service Co 
to Hutchinson Co Dec. 10, 1930 

Dec. 20, 1930— PTN LOTS 3 AND 4 
Blk 39, O. S. Martinez. Martinez 



Masonic Lodge No. 41. F. & A. M. 
to Russell Guerni deLappe and 
Vladimir Oglou Dec. 20, 1930 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 29 BLK 12, 
Pacific Heights. Louise McWorthy 
J L Day to whom it may concern 
Dec. 17, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930 — SUISUN BAT 
Bridge at or near Martinez. South- 
ern Pacific Co to Pacific Bridge 
Painting Co (work on superstruc- 
ture) Dec. 17, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— W M LOT 1 BLK 33, 
Boulevard Gardens No. 1. Bessie 
C Rose to C E Grey and D A 
Arensen Dec. 20, 1930 

LIENS FILED 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. 19, 1930— PTN RANCHO LOS 
Medanos, described. Hutchinson 
Co vs H A Hall, also known as 
Herbert A Hall $220 

Dec. 19, 1930— PTN RANCHO LOS 
Medanos. Hutchinson Co vs J A 
and Mary Junta and Marie Harper 
$718 36 

Dec. 19, 1930— PTN RANCHO LOS 
Medanos. Hutchinson Co vs Annie 
D Holmes and C P Foster $356.15 

COMPLETION NOTICES 

MONTEREY COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 19, 1930— LOT 11, Map showing 
the Carmelito Tract in Blk 114, 
City of Monterey. Anthony Dusek 
to Newman & Halstead..Dec. IS, 1980 

Dec. 19, 1930— LOT 7 BLK B-9 
Stone's Addition to Salinas City. 
W F Sechrest to whom it may 
concern Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 6 of Parcel 8, 
Romie Lane Subdivision. V H 
Sutton to whom it may concern.... 
Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 12 and D % Lot 
13 Blk 5, Map 2, Del Monte 
Heights. C L Houston to W M 
Roach Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— LOTS 1 to 22 inc BLK 
13 map No 1 Hot Spring Tract, 
Del Monte Heights. James W 
Rithoud to whom it may concern 
December 20, 1930 

Dec 23, 1930— LOTS 2 and 4 BLK 39, 
map of Withers Addn, Monterey. 
J C Anthony to whom it may con- 
cern December 22. 1930 

Dec 24, 1930— LOT A in BLK 3, map 
Salinas City. Salinas National 
Corp to H H Larson Co..Dec 20, 1930 

Dec 26, 1930— NLY LINE WEBSTER 
St and Ely line Munras Avenue. 
General Petroleum Corp to John 
Taufner December 15, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



MONTEREY COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. 17, 1930— LOT 12 BLK 174, 
Fifth Addition to Pacific Grove. 
J E Eckett vs Charles Williams 
and Wade O Halstead $320 

Dec. 17, 1930— LOTS 9, 10 AND 11 
Blk 12, Little's Survey of New 
Monterey. J E Eckett vs Wade O 
Halstead and Frank Di Giono....$224 

Dec. 17, 1930— LOTS 9, 10 AND 11 
Blk 12, Little's Survey of New 
Monterey. George D Patrick, 
Victor H Patrick and Patrick The 
Plumber vs Frank Di Gioino and 
Wade O Halstead $249.95 

Dec. 17, 1930— LOT 12 BLK 174, 
Fifth Addition to Pacific Grove. 
George D and Victor H Patrick 
(Patrick the Plumber) vs Charles 
Williams & Wade O Halstead..$307.43 

Dec. 19, 1930— LOTS 9 AND 11 BLK 
12, Little's Survey of New Mon- 



terey. A Marotta, $100; J W 
Shaney, $114. .",5; Tynan Lumber 
Co, $594.57; Roy M Wright, $48.07 
vs Frank DI Giorno and Wade O 

Halstead 

Dec. 19, 1930— LOT 12 BLK 171, Map 
of 6th Addition to Pacific Grove. 

A Marotta, $80; P w Shaney, $ 

Roy M Wright, $74.84 Tynan Lum- 
ber Co, $754.94 vs Wade O Hal- 
stead and Charles Williams 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



SONOMA COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 7 BLK 23, Mc- 
Donald's Addition to Santa Rosa. 

Leo Noonan to Hume Bunijan 

Dec. 11, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



SONOMA COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 1 BLK C, Car- 
ringtons Add to Santa Rosa. E 
U White Lumber Co vs Chris 

Knutsen and Frank Celeri $113.89 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 401 and Part 
Lots 402 and 403 Blk 12, City of 
Santa Rosa. Sterling Lumber Co 
vs J F Kinstone; Mary C Bar- 
nett; Amelia B Burnett; A P 
Sweeney; C B Eames; L A Eames 
and L A Heekman $151.11 



LIENS FILED 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOTS 16 AND 17 BLK 

34, Fair Oaks Tct., Stockton, star 

Lumber Co vs Lily S Morrissetti 

$70.13 

BUILDING PERMITS 



STOCKTON 



RESIDENCE & garage, $4000; No. 436 
N-Central Ave., Stockton: owner 
and contractor, J. M Helterbrand, 
2644 E-Main St., Stockton. 

REMODEL bathrooms, $3500; No. 125 
E. Weber Ave., Stockton; owner, 
Stockton Hotel, Premises; con- 
tractor, O. H Chain, Bank of 
America Bldg., Stockton. 

RESIDENCE and garage, $4400; No. 
440 N. Regent St., Stockton; own- 
er, S. C. Giles, 121 Knowles Way. 
Stockton. 

CLUBHOUSE, brick, $13,700; No. 134 
West Park St., Stockton; owner, 
Knights of Pythias; contractor, T. 
E. Williamson, 1849 W-Park Ave.. 
Stockton. 

BUILDING PERMITS 

SACRAMENTO 

GENERAL repairs, $2500; No. 506 I 
St., Sacramento; owner, Kim- 
brough Estate; contractor, F. 
Maloney, 3172 T St., Sacramento, 

RESIDENCE, 6-room and garage; 
$4500; No. 2723 Land Park Dr.. 
Sacramento; owner, George Law- 
rence, 4S49 10th Ave., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 6-room and garage, 
$5000; No. 741 4Sth St., Sacra- 
mento; owner, O. M. Froling, 1625 
40th St., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE. 5-room, $3000; No. 2925 
F St., Sacramento; owner, Olin 
Barber, 1049 54th St., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE. 7-room, $5000; No. 2685 
Land Park Drive, Sacramento; 
owner, H. M. Dunkel, 420 Santa 
Ynez Way, Sacramento. 



Thirty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, 



iry 



BUILDING CONTRACTS 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

CHURCH 

SOUTH % LOT 5 R S 27 28; all work 
on church. 

Owner — Church of Nazarene, with C. 
F. Crowder, 1824 28th St., Sacra- 
mento. 

Architect^Not Given. 

Filed and Dated 

Payments not given. 

TOTAL, COST, $12,000 

COMPLETION NOTICES 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec £4, 1930— LOT 187 BLOCK 18 
Colonial Hgts, Sacramento. Don- 
ald Agg to whom it may concern.. 
December 20, 1930 

Dec 26, 1930—WEST HALF LOT 6 
and E half lot 7 G H 67. Dan A 
Stanich to whom it may concern.... 
December 22, 1930 

Dec 26, 1930— BET ONE MILE South 
of Arno and Cosumnes river, Sac- 
ramento Co. Dept of Public Wks 
State of California to whom it 
may concern December 19, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



SACRAMENTO 



Recorded Amount 
Dec 26, 1930 — NORTH 100 FT LOT 
5 BLK 8 subdiv S, North Sacra- 
mento. Cutter Mill & Lumber Co 
vs Horace Pierce and Hazel War- 
ren Hill $420. 7S 



BUILDING PERMITS 

FRESNO 

SERVICE station, $1000; No. 2105 
Railroad Ave., Fresno; owner, J. 
R. Van Fleet, T. W. Patterson 
Bldg., Fresno; contractor, Boyle- 
Dayton Co. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



FRESNO COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 24, 1930— FOWLER SWITCH 

Canal and Francher Creek. Dept. 

of Public Works, State of Calif. 

to Peninsula Paving Co.. Dec. 19, 1930 



OFFICIAL PROPOSALS 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 



NOTICC TO CONTRACTORS 



SEALED PROPOSALS will be re- 
ceived at the office of the State High- 
way Engineer, Public Works Build- 
ing, Sacramento, California, until 2 
o'clock P. M. on January 21, 1931, at 
which time they will be publicly 
opened and read, for construction in 
accordance with the specifications 
therefor, to which special reference 
is made, of portions of State Highway, 
as follows: 

Imperial County, between Trifolium 
Canal and Kan.- Springs (VIII-Imp-26- 
B), about six and three-tenths (6.3) 
miles in length, to be graded and 
paved with asphalt concrete. 

Proposal forms will be issued only 
to those Contractors who have fur- 
nished a verified statement of ex- 



perience and financial condition in 
accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 644, Statutes of 1929, and 
whose statements so furnished are 
satisfactory to the Department of 
Public Works. Bids will not be ac- 
cepted from a Contractor to whom a 
proposal form has not been issued by 
the Department of Public Works. 

Plans may be seen, and forms of 
proposal, bonds contract and specifi- 
cations may be obtained at the said 
office, and they may be seen at the 
offices of the District Engineers at 
Los Angeles and San Francisco, and 
at the office of the District Engineer 
of the district in which the work is 
situated. The District Engineers' of- 
fices are located at Eureka, Redding, 
Sacramento, San Francisco, San Luis 
Obispo, Fresno, Los Angeles, San Ber- 
nardino and Bishop. 

A representative from the district 
office will be available to accompany 
prospective bidders for an inspection 
of the work herein contemplated, and 
Contractors are urged to investigate 
the location, character and quantity of 
work to be done, with a representative 
of the Division of Highways. It is 
requested that arrangements for joint 
field inspection be made as far in 
advance as possible. Detailed informa- 
tion concerning the proposed work 
may be obtained from the district 
office. 

No bid will be received unless it is 
made on a blank form furnished by 
the State Highway Engineer. The 
special attention of prospective bid- 
ders is called to the "Proposal Re- 
quirements and Conditions" annexed 
to the blank form of proposal, for 
full directions as to bidding, etc. 

The Department of Public Works 
reserves the right to reject rny or 
all bids or to accept the bid deemed 
for the best interests of the State. 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 
C. H. PURCELL, 
State Highway Engineer. 
Dated December 23, 1930- 



Suggested measures for the preven- 
tion of the four chief types of unem- 
ployment are given in a report of the 
governor's commission on unemploy- 
ment problems for the State of New 
York, issued by Frances Perkins, -state 
industrial commissioner and a mem- 
ber of the special commission. The 
four types are listed as seasonal, 
cyclical, technological and chronic. A 
summary of possible measures of pre- 
venting seasonal unemployment is 
given as follows: stimulating consum- 
er and dealer demand during the off- 
seasons; scheduling production so that 
employment will be fairly evenly dis- 
tributed throughout the year despite 
Eluctuations in sales; developing side- 
line and filler products for slack sea- 
sons; and using a flexible working 
day rather than alternately hiring and 
firing workers. 

According to the report, cyclical de- 
pressions are beyound the powei of 
industry to prevent. As a means of 
affording some relief to cyclical un- 
employment, the commission suggests 
that public works be planned far 
enough ahead and flexible enough to 
be pushed forward in times of depres- 
sion of private industry. Technoligi- 
cal unemployment, or that caused by 
replacing of hand labor with machin- 
ery, can be lessened by the adoption 
of sound plans to take care of those 
released, either by absorption in other 
departments or by providing dismissal 
wages large enough to tide the wovker 
over until other work can be obtained. 
When it is necessary to reduce the 
working force because of changes in 
the plant, it is suggested that it be 
done gradually, not by layoffs, but 
by non-replacement of losses due to 
death or superannuation. Chronic un- 
employment could be relieved by the 
organization ot- competent state and 
national agencies, which could cen- 
tralize application for men and work. 
Such a plan would free workers from 
the high fees charged by private agen- 
cies and would tend to remove Uie 
abuses now prevalent in the private 
agency system of supplying workers. 




A "Pittsburg" Auto- 
matic Water Heater 
installed in the Home 
indicates high quality 

throughout. 

Recommended and speci- 
6ed by all the leading ar- 
chitects, plumbers and 
builders. 

Consider the high merit 
of the Pittsburg coupled 
with 'Pittsburg Perfect 
Service." 

"Hot water quick as a 
wink." 



Pittsburg Water Heater Co. 

Makers of "Pittsbuig Automatic" — "Bungalow Automatic" 

Storage Systems and "Lyon" Tank Water Heaters. 

309 13th Street, Oakland 478 Sutter St., San Francisco 

SEND FOR CATALOGS 



Building 
Engineering 

™_ NEWS —J 









SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., JANUARY 10, 1931 




OAKLAND 



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BUILDERS' 

EXCHANGE 

GLencort 7400 



'PORTLAND 



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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 10, 1931 



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STANDARD OFFICE 

LEASE FORM ISSUED 






Safeguarding and clarifying all 
phases of the agreement entered into 
between the lessor and lessee in rent- 
ing office space are the aims of the 
new standard office lease form issued 
by the National Association of Real 
Estate Boards. The new form was 
prepared by the Association's Proper- 
ty Management Division and approved 
by the Brokers' Division, and has 
been sent to all members of both Di- 
visions. 

Such provisions as have been found 
by long experience to operate most 
satisfactorily for the protection of all 
parties concerned in the transaction of 
leasing office space — the tenant, the 
property manager, and the owner of 
the building — have been included in 
this standard form, which was pre- 
pared' after a careful scrutiny of 
various types of office leases now in 
use by property managers throughout 
the country. 

Optional rider clauses are provided 
with the new standard form to cover 
specific agreements in leasing space in 
typical office buildings planned for 
tenants In some special business or 
profession, as, for instance, a build- 
ing planned for the use of doctors. 
The Division points out that is of 
definite value to the individual tenant 
that such buildings maintain certain 
high standards for all tenants. 

One optional clause for leases in 
buildings for the use of doctors and 
dentists requires the lessee to agree 
not to advertise his profession in any 
manner prohibited by the code of 
ethics of medical and dental pro- 
fessions, and, in case the lessee breaks 
this agreement, makes him liable to 
$500 damages, payable to the lessor. 

Further optional clauses to be in- 
cluded in leasee made to doctors and 
dentists cover provisions for the dis- 
pensation of alcohol and other drugs 
and chemicals, name specifically the 
appliances which the dentist may use 
for gas and compressed air, and re- 
lieve the lessor of responsibility for 
the operation of X-Ray machines and 
other medical and dental office equip- 
ment. 

The following committee, from the 
Property Management Division, in 
co-operation with the Brokers' Di- 
vison of the National Association, 
prepared the standard office lease 
form: Arthur P. Hall, Chicago, Chair- 
man: William H. Ballard, Boston; L. 
V, DuBois, Cincinnati; Clarence Tur- 
ley, St. Louis; Ell Torrence, Minnea- 
polis, and John B. Lear, Philadelphia. 

«) 

Construction of a tunnel under the 
city of Vancouver, B. C, will be be- 
gun soon under a contract awarded to 
the Northern Construction Co. and J. 
W. Stewart by the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. The tunnel will eliminate 
five grade crossings in a busy part of 
the downtown area. Its cost is esti- 
mated at $1,750,000. 



G. G. BRIDGE BIDS 

ABOUT MARCH FIRST 

Bids on the first unit of the Golden 
Gate Bridge, a $35,000,000 project, will 
he opened about March 1, it is an- 
nounced by the Golden Gate Bridge 
and Highway District. 

Plans are now being checked to de- 
termine if (he structure can be built 
for the amount of money voted for its 
construction. At the November 4 
election the district sanctioned a $35.- 
000,000 bond issue to finance the 
bridge. 

The bridge will be constructed be- 
tween Fort Point in the Presidio of 
San Francisco and Lime Point in 
Marin County. 

The brdge proper will be 6400 feet. 
end to end, with a center span of 
4200 feet, two side spans of 110 feet 
each, a 15S2 foot viaduct on the south, 
a 910 foot viaduct on the north and 
approaches. 

The total length of the main bridge 
between plazas is 8943 feet. The clear- 
ances are 410 feet horizontally between 
piers and 220 feet vertically above 
mean high water at the center. 

The bridge will contain 75,000 tons 
of structural steel and the founda- 
tions and anchorages will require 110,- 



000 



yards 



of con 



The 



towers are 740 feet above mean high 
water with glass-enclosed observation 
platforms at the tops, reached by 
elevators. 

The two main steel cables will each 
be 7700 feet long, weighing 43,750.000 
pounds when wrapped. Each main 
cable will contain 27,600 individual 
strands, eyebars being provided at 
the anchorages. 

The sag at the center of the span 
is 475 feet. 



ORANGE COUNTY 

EXCHANGE ELECTS 



Walter F. Sorensen of Santa Ana 
was elected president of the Orange 
County Builders' Exchange at the 
regular annual meeting of that body 
in Santa Ana last week. C M. Gilbert 
was elected first vice-president and 
V. J. Anderson, second vice-president. 

LeRoy M. Strang was elected treas- 
urer and Frederic W. Sanford re- 
elected secretary-manager. 

Directors are H. M. Adams, M. E. 
Beebe, A L. Foster, Allison Honer, 
W. J. Kelly, H. M. Massey, R. C. Mc- 
Millan, C. E. Rutledge, Wm. J. Tway, 
Henry Walters and Geo. W Young. 

The officers were installed at a din- 
ner-meeting held in the American 
Legion Clubhouse at Santa Ana where 
a special program of entertainment 
was featured. 

Speakers at the dinner included J. 
Simon Flour, George R. Wells. O. T. 
Moore, Jules W. Markel, Wm. T. 
Tway, Allison Honer and R. C Mc- 
Millan, all past presidents of the 
Orange County Builders' Exchange. 



VENTURA HARBOR 

ACT HIT BY COURT 



The 



California Supreme Court on 
January 2 ruled that the Ventura Har- 
bor District Act, passed by the 1927 
Legislature, was invalid, inoperative 
and void. 

The harbor district had petitioned 
the Supreme Court for an alternative 
writ of mandate to compel the super- 
visors of Ventura County to call a 
special election on a contemplated $2- 
000,000 bond issue for improvement of 
the 'Ventura harbor. 

Contending the act was unconsti- 
tutional, the supervisors attacked the 
validity of the act on the grounds 
that it conflicted with general laws of 
California which cover all phases of 
harbor improvement. 

The opinion, written by Justice J. 
W. Preston, was unanimous. 

Justice Preston cited two constitu- 
tional provisions, one saying all laws 
must have uniform application and 
tlie nther saying no special law was 
valid where a general law is applic- 
able. 

General laws, in force when the 
Ventura Harbor District Act was 
passed, cited as follows: 

1. The county harbor district act. 

2. A harbor district act enabling 
portions of counties to bond a district, 
for harbor improvement, the county 
board of supervisors having power to 
fix the boundaries. 

Under the Ventura Harbor District 
Act the boundaries were fixed in the 
act itself, not being subject to change. 
It also provided that taxes to support 
the district come from real property. 

Justice Preston's opinion said that 
it was a matter as to whether gen- 
eral acts were applicable, and the 
court ruled that they were and that, 
therefore, the "Ventura Harbor Dis- 
trict Act of 1927 is invalid, inopera- 



The 



null and 



Ventura act included most of 
Ventura County in the harbor dis- 
trict. A point mentioned by Justice 
Preston was that a harbor district, 
formed in accordance with the gener- 
al law applying to portions of coun- 
ties, would permit public hearings at 
which time the inclusion or exclusion 
of certain portions of a county in a 
harbor district could be decided. 



A. E. F. ENGINEERS 

PLAN TO ORGANIZE 



An association for former members 
of the 10th and 20th Engineers, A. E. 
F., is being projected. 

All former members are requested 
to write to D. R. Meredith, 205 East 
42nd Street, New York City, or to F. 
S. MrNally, 5728 Grand Central Ter- 
minal, New York City. 

It is planned to hold a meeting of 
the new association during the North- 
eastern Retail Lumbermen's Associa- 
tion convention to be held at the 
Pennsylvania Hotel, New York City, 
January 27-29. 



Business recovery depends largely 
upon the ability of the salesman to 
point the way, declared Charles F. 
Abbott. Executive Director of the 
American Institute of Steel Construc- 
tion in an address before the National 
Council of Traveling Salesmen's As- 
sociation at the Hotel Victoria. New 
York, Dec. 18. 

Mr. Abbott pointed out that there 
has been an advance in the price of 
steel which marks the turning point 
in the present period of depression. 
His address is published herewith. — 
Editor. 



"This is a very important time to 
talk with salesmen. You are about 
to return to your territories through- 
out the United States, and business 
recovery will depend to a large extent 
upon vour ability to sell," said Mr. 
Abbott. 

"Thousands of employers are now 
looking for the man who can sell. 
Factories and shops are failing lie- 
cause they have not got him. He does 
more than anyone else to make work 
for the unemployed, and he makes 
his firm prosper. He can restore bus- 
iness in all lines. He is the most val- 
uable man in a time of depression and 
he does most of all to prevent over- 
production. 

"The successful salesman frowns 
upon price cutting. He abhors un- 
ethical practices, He is the most 
wanted man in the world today, as he 
alone can bring about business recov- 
ery — the man who knows how to sell- 
"Business is all set to stage a come- 
back. There is plenty of money avail- 
able if it could be released for pur- 
chasing. It has been temporarily held 
in abeyance because those who have 
the money do not like to spend it when 
news is being released from New York 
of bank failures and constant declines 
in the stock market. This has a ten- 
dency to create pessimism as thick as 
a London fog, and has prevented peo- 
ple from buying what they really 
need. We, as salesmen, however, 
should be able to break through that. 
"There are many important mess- 
ages the salesman can convey at this 
time that would have a very bene- 
ficial influence upon the whole situa- 
tion. Among the more important is 
the creation of a nation-wide recog- 
nition of the support that should be 
extended to President Hoover at this 
time when we are passing through the 
worst crisis ever experienced in all 
history. The country is fortunate in 
having a man of the experience, 
knowledge and courage of President 
Hoover. His humanism and his un- 
derstanding of world-wide affairs will 
undoubtedly lead -us through success- 
fully. Disregarding all political faiths 
and preferences, this is the time when 
all of our people throughout the coun- 
try should rally to the support of our 
President and insist .that his pro- 
grams be carried through without in- 
terruption or interference. This is no 
time for delays or procastinations. It 
is a time for cooperation, and it should 
and will be forthcoming. 

"A man of lesser experience as 
President at this time might not have 
been able to meet the perplexing 
problems as effectively, in which event, 
we would have experienced a more 
severe depression and one of longer 
duration. 

"Overproduction has seemingly 
made it necessary for some drastic 
experiments. In the case of copper, 
sugar, coffee, rubber, wheat, cotton 
and other basic commodities efforts 



which have seemingly had their in- 
spiration in price fixing seem to be 
the only practical remedy for the 
emergency. As important as steel is 
to the national existence this indus- 
try has consistently refrained from 
restricting output or depriving the 
public of its products. 

"Recently one of the important 
companies producing steel announced 
an advance of a dollar a ton on a few 
of the products of the mill. Any one 
acquainted with the temper of the 
market will agree that the time was 
ripe for such action. Because some 
of the competing mills also advanced 
their prices on similar steel products, 
the incident has been brought within 
the perview of certain politicians. 

"It seems to me that this is no time 
for our legislators to criticise business 
because of the inauguration of con- 
structive policies. Steel has definite- 
ly marked the turn of the depression. 
That alone is the meaning of the price 
advance and instead of hurling invec- 
tives our legislators in Washington 
should have received the announce- 
ment with hurrahs. 

"As a matter of fact the profits in- 
curred in the operation of the steel 
industry are not in keeping with the 
hazards and risks assumed in this 
great and important industry. It has 
been estimated that less than $5.00 of 
every $100.00 of invested capital rep- 
resents the return. 

"Unless better prices are obtained 
it is evident that the great steel mills 
cannot maintain the present rate of 
employment and wage scales, neither 
of which have been interfered with 
during this depressing period when the 
steel industry has been operating at 
approximately 45 per cent of capacity. 
The employment and wage scales de- 
pend upon reasonable profitable re- 

"Then again, one of the senators 
took the opportunity of calling to the 
attention of the people throughout 
the country to the fact that the cost 
of steel in our bridges and buildings 
might now be increased, and the con- 
sumer might be obliged to assume 
the additional burden. This senator 
possibly did not know that through 
the Standard Specification, sponsored 
by the American Institute of Steel 
Construction, the cost of steel in build- 
ings has been reduced approximately 
$30,000,000 annually. We have brought 
about a standardization and an elim- 
ination of wasted, unnecessary steel. 
Of course, in individual projects the 
steel industry loses tonnage, but these 
reduced costs produce additional mar- 
kets for their product and make larg- 
er sales possible. 

"The salesman has demonstrated the 
benefits to humanity that such con- 
structive policies foster. Industry can- 
not effect the economies essential to 
reduce the costs of commodities un- 
less the businesses engaged in that 
industry are allowed to make a fair 
profit. Bankrupt or near bankrupt 
concerns would never be able to en- 
gage in the research and the pro- 
motional work necessary to bring 
about these beneficial ends. 

"Only a hundred years ago steel 
was a prized commodity. It was 
scarce and dear. Due to man's in- 
genuity and commercial resources we 
have found ways of producing and 
marketing it at a price within the 
reach of the poor man. As a result 
we are selling daily in the United 
States steel to the amount of 3M- lbs. 
for each man. Woman and child. That 
is a decided sales achievement and is 



nt to 



sale 



3, for 
con- 



no other nation in the world 
suming so much steel. 

"It is essential that our political 
representatives understand these 
things. They must be made apprecia- 
tive of the usefulness of our sales 
ability. It constitutes a potent in- 
fluence in the present economic 
emergency. 

"It is just the misunderstanding in 
high places of these things that cre- 
ates unnecessary confusion in the pub- 
lic mind, which the salesmen through- 
out the country can clarify by being 
intelligently informed and by courag- 
eous action in stimulating the neces- 
sary support to our President at this 
time when the employment of our 
workers is so vitally important to 
progress and business recovery. 

"As we look forward, we can find 
much in the way of encouragement. 
Salesmen will be called upon to a 
greater extent than ever before be- 
cause the future problem of Ameri- 
can business is that of distribution. 
We have solved our problems of fi- 
nance and production, but when it 
comes to distribution there is much 
that will command our attention. 
More efficient, aggressive salesman- 
ship will be necessary, and costs must 
be reduced. The price cutting evil 
must be eliminated, and salesmen 
must take the initiative in removing 
all unethical practices in the field of 
salesmanship. 

"In the future sales must be based' 
upon total cost plus a profit, and real 
salesmanship will get that profit. It 
is only the order takers who cut the 
price or sell goods at cost or below 
cost. The salesman's compensation 
depends upon profits, and unless prof- 
its are obtained, the earning capacity 
of the salesman is correspondingly re- 
duced. 

"It is well to bear in mind that in 
the future the attention of salesmen 
will be concentrated upon the follow- 
ing ethical program: 

1. Replace volume sales with hon- 
est, intelligent and aggressive selling 
at a profit. 

2. One price to all without any con- 
cession or discrimination. 

3. Abandon all misrepresentation. 

4. Abolish all secret rebates. 

5. No sales at cost or below cost. 

6. Eliminate all commercial bribery 

7. Maintain standards as established 
by the industry avoiding any substi- 
tution or impairment of quality or 
workmanship. 

8. Cooperative attitude toward com- 
petitors. 

9. Adopt a sales policy that is fair 
to all then vigorously carry it out. 

10. Refuse to indulge in price-cut- 
ting because of some rumor that a 
competitor had submitted a lower 
price. 

11. Insist that every order includes 
a reasonable profit. 

12. Support your trade organization 
to the limit of your ability. 

"As we look forward to the next 
ten years, we anticipate great de- 
velopment of all industry. Greater 
buildings and bridges will be erected, 
and there will be many advances in 
science and invention that would 
stretch the imagination of all of us. 

"The electrical industry is on the 
verge of revolutionizing the whole 
process of manufacturing and distrib- 
uting electricity. 

"The natural gas industry with all 
of its vast pipe lines in bringing na- 
tural gas into remote cities and 
towns. 

"The chemical industry by applied 



Saturday, January LO, 198) 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Th 



r^e 



research Is bringing Into bein§ mans 

in Industries as new proi • 

,i, i : . pi i 

"The coal industry is making prep- 
arations i" utilise waste materials by 

m ting them Into elect] leal energj 

at the mines. 

"The railroad systems at 

in eli ctriflcation programs. 

"The aviation industry is in its In- 
fancy. H may. and probably will, ac- 
celerate the whole syste t trans 



latin 



"The American salesman has al- 
ways ii Invi ntlve, but in the future 

he musl be even H i I 

know science as well as psychology. 

ii.- i have full acquaintance with 

engineering and Invention as well as 
his outlets and his markets. And 
above all the salesman of the future 
must know his politics as well as his 
economics because upon his shoulders 
will rest very largely the forestalling 
cit those obstructive legislative acts 
n hlch might cripple and hurt a mi ri 



SAN FRANCISCO BUILDING 

SLUMPS DURING YEAR 1930 



San Francisco closed the year 1930 
With a total of 6.541 building permits 
issued for improvements involving an 
expenditure of {22,726,994, the lowest 
annual total, both in the number of 
permits granted and money expended, 
since the year 19C1 when the permits 
registered 6.313 for improvements val- 
ued at $22,244,672, according t . . fig- 
ures compiled by John B. Leonard, 
superintendent of the Bureau "f Build- 
ing Inspection of the Department of 
Public Works. 

During the year 1929 a total of 7.120 
building permits were issued for con- 
struction aggregating an expenditure 

of $33,082,025. During 1928, ri ids 

show, B.056 permits granted for work 
costing $37,766,363. 

December activities registered 445 
permits for work costing 52,292,388 as 



compared with 465 permits for the 
corresponding period in Hi20 wlien the 
monej expenditure totaled $1,617,691. 
Following is a segregated report of 
the December, 1930, activities as sum- 
marized by Superintendent Leonard: 
Class No. of Permits Est. Cost 
A 1 $ 80,000 
B ... 



152.000 
490,740 
221,577 
598.071 
750.000 



Alterations 350 

Public Bldgs. 2 

Harbor Bldgs. 1 



Total 445 $£,292,383 

MOTE: A complete tabulation of the 
San Francisco building permit ex- 
penditures, by months, for the past 
eleven years will be found on page 
five of this issue. 



MASTERS OF ARCHITECTURE 

JOIN RANKS OF UNEMPLOYED 



Graduates of the foremost schools of 
architecture here and abroad have 
been thrust into the ranks of the unem- 
ployed, the American Institute of Ar- 
chitects reports. In the region of New 
York it is estimated that there are 3.- 
000 architects and 120.000 architectural 
draftsmen. Investigation indicates 
that at least ten per cent of this num- 
ber are in need. Among them are 
former university teachers, practicing 
architects, and men who have won 
prizes and medals for outstanding 
achievement in their profession. Near- 
ly 500 have registered at the bureau 
set up by the Architects' Emergency 
Employment Committee in New York 
City. 

Many of the registrants evidence 
urgent need. Skilled men who have 
earned more than $5,000 a year are 
now lucky if they can earn the emerg- 
ency stipend of $15 a week, it is said. 
One man "would drive a truck." An- 
other "would gladly do anything how- 
ever menial." More than three-quar- 
ters of the idle draftsmen have from 
one to three presons dependent upon 
them for support. Their ages range 
from 24 to 60, and their length of ex- 
perience from 2 to 41 years. 

Among them are men who have re- 
ceived degrees from New York Uni- 
versity, the College of the City of New 
York. Columbia University, the Yale 
School of Fine Arts, the Beaux Arts 
Institute. The Ecole des Beaux Arts. 
Cornell University. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, and the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. 
Illinois and Michigan. 

The majority have served long ap- 
prenticeships in offices of leading ar- 
chitects in New York, London, and 
the ateliers of Paris. They include 
men who have worked on buildings 
such as Washington cathedral, where 
Admiral Dewey and President Wilson 
are buried, and the Stanford Univer- 
sity buildings. 

The Architects' Committee, in col- 
laboration with the Emergency Work 



Bureau of the Emergency Employment 
Committee, has so far been able to 
give employment to onlv fourteen of 
the most needy draftsmen on the basis 
of $5 a day for a three-day week. 

One of the first draftsmen to work 
at the emergency rate of 515 a week 
is a University of Pennsylvania grad- 
uate with a wife and two boys to sup- 
port. In addition to his university 
training he has studied in Europe and 
has fine New York references. He 
has earned $100 a week, but as he 
has been out of work for a year, his 
resources are exhausted and his plight 
is desperate. 

Anotber draftsmen who has joined 
the long line which forms at four o'- 
clock in the morning outside the head- 
quarters of the Emergency Work Bu- 
reau in Wall Street is a man with a 
wife and three children to support. 
His earnings have been $80 a week. 
Despite his eleven years' experience 
and the beautiful drawings he has to 
show he has no hope of adequate 
earnings to meet expenses. 

These two draftsmen are typical of 
the fourteen men with wives and two 
or three dependent children, who are 
considered fit candidats for relief in 
the lines of destitute men. 

However, the Emergency Work Bu- 
reau has not the facilities to take care 
of such cases as that of the Colum- 
bia University graduate who also stud- 
ied at the Beaux Arts Institute of 
Design, and now has a wife and 
mother to support. He has been out 
of a job for the last six months. 

He is 34 years old, has previously 
been employed for eight years as chief 
designer with three of the foremost 
architects* firms in New York, and his 
work has often illustrated one of the 
leading architectural magazines. He 
now seeks work on a part or full time 
basis as architect's Tenderer. 

The case of the Cornell man who is 
a bachelor, 42 years old, with 17 years' 
experience and first-rate references, 
who has been out of work for the last 



eight months and "will accept any em- 
ploy ment," ha\ Ing Jusl n coi ered from 
two month! ' Illni ss, also falls outside 
iti.' province "f the Emergency u oi 1( 
Committee. 

The 24-year old man who recently 
completed the flve-3 ear <-nui-sr- in 
mural decoral Ion ai i lie Pale s< hool 
ol Fine Arts, whose father Is now out 
of work, whose i""" 1 her and sistei ire 
too young to work, and who had 
earned $4o a week toward thi lr i up- 
port, is another Instance of the calibre 
of the draftsmen seeking placement 

One of the applicants now in urgent 
financial need has been awarded the 
medal of the American Institute of 
Architects for distinguished work. 
One, with a dependent wife, has been 
out of work for the past four months. 
He taught formerly for four years in 
one of America's most prominent uni- 
versities a course in "descriptive ge- 
ometry, perspective, shades and sha- 
dows," and subsequently worked five 
years in one of the leading architect's 
offices in this city. 

Another man now eager to find em- 
ployment as an able architectural 
draftsman is a former member of th^ 
American Institute of Architects and 
of the Beaux Arts Society. He has 
had forty-one years' experience and 
has done brilliant work in New York, 
Chicago and South America. He is 
now about 60 years old, and has a 
wife dependent upon him for support. 

Reasons for unemployment are var- 
ious. Many are traceable to the slow- 
ing up and cessation of building proj- 
ects, and the complete shutdown of 
architectural departments in banks, 
and other institutions. 

In response to the appeal of the Ar- 
ch i lets' Emergency Committee, only 
four organizations requiring the ser- 
vices of architectural draftsmen have 
so far notified the Committee of posi- 
tions that may be open. 



TRADE EXTENSION 

CLASS IS STARTED 

The new Smith-Hughes Trade Ex- 
tension Classes of the Technical De- 
partment of the Humboldt Evening 
High School, Eighteenth and Dolores 
Sts., will be started this week, it is 
announced by A. E. Roberts, chief in- 
structor of the Technical Department 
at the high school. 

These new free public classes are 
conducted for the skilled workmen 
and apprentices engaged in the engi- 
neering and building trades. The 
Smith-Hughes plan of education for 
adults provides extra financial aid 
from the Federal and State govern- 
ment to the San Francisco hoard of 
Education for the maintenance of this 
type of technical education. 

The Trade Instruction includes Me- 
chanical and Building Trades Draft- 
ing, Plan Reading, Industrial Applied 
Science. Industrial Applied Mathe- 
matics, Estimating, Applied Mechan- 
ics, Applied Electricity, Diesel Engine 
Construction and Operation, Turbine 
Construction and Operation, Power 
House Engineering, Telephone Engi- 
neering, Practical Steel Metallurgy. 
Concrete and Steel Construction, Prac- 
tical Advanced Surveying, Oxy-Acety- 
lene Welding, and Advanced Decora- 
tive Painting, Graining, Varnishing, 
etc. 

It is expected that other trade class- 
es will soon be added in compliance 
with public requirements. 



Frank Hatch, Secretary of the 
Building Material Dealers' Associa- 
tion of Northern California, at the 
recent convention of that body in 
San Francisco, reported five new mem- 
bers during the year 1930, there being 
P. C. Hansen Lumber Co., Center- 
ville; Urban Bros., Palo Alto; Steve 
Anderson & Son, Mayfield and the 
San Francisco Materials Company of 
San Francisco. 



Fot 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



THE OBSERVER 
What He Hears and Sees on His Rounds 



San Mateo County Supers - u s pro- 
viding that work on 
jects would be done by residents of 
the county It was refencJ to Dis- 
tric Attorney Swai t for report. 



As a possible measure of relief to 
the unemployed, general contractor* 
affiliated with the Orange County 
Builders' Exchange with headquarters 
at Santa Ana, have decided to put in- 
to effect during the present depres- 
sion a five-day working week. 



Oregon State Association of County 
Commissioners and County Judges in 
annual convention in Portland, Ore., 
last month, voted to resist any changes 
in the present laws governing road 
financing. The action *s a direcl re- 
jection of any proposal io increase the 
gasoline tax. 



Stockton Chapter, California State 
Association of Architects has request- 
ed the U. S. Treasury Department 
that a local architect or firm be em- 
ployed to prepare working plans for 
the proposed new $695,000 federal 
building to be erected in that city. A 
site for the structure has already been 
secured. 

Thirteen Bridgeport. Conn., con- 
tractors, constituting the dwelling and 
miscellaneous construction division jf 
the Builders' Exchange, have agreed 
to enter into a cooperative advertis- 
ing campaign during 1931 to promote 
the building industry in Bridgeport. 
It will consist of 36 quarter-page ad- 
vertisements in local newspapers. 



Oakland city council has passed an 
ordinance creating thirty temporary 
emergency laborer jobs in the street 
department at $5 a day. The work is 
to be staggered, allowing 15 men to 
work th-ee days a week and a second 
group to work the remaining three. 
This is one of the city's steps to re- 
lieve unemployment. 



Directors of the Merced County 
Chamber of Commerce have adopted 
resolutions protesting against employ- 
ment of men from San Francisco and 
Sacramento in connection with the 
Yosemite Highway Cut-off in Mari- 
posa County. Reports indicate that 
108 men were imported from San 
work on the project. 



Cement Reference Laboratory is 
now arranging for a second tour of in- 
spection of cement- testing laborator- 
ies throughout the country. This ser- 
vice, which at present consists of in- 
specting cement-testing apparatus and 
demonstrating test methods, is ren- 
dered without charge. Laboratories 
which desire inspection should make 
prompt application to the Cement 
Reference Laboratory, U. S. Bureau o? 
Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Fresno county's highway mainten- 
ance department, formed as a unit of 
the county government with the vot- 
ing of bonds for a highwav svstem 
went out of existence Dec. 31. Under 
an agreement arrived at bv County 
Surveyor Chris P. Jensen, who heau- 
ed the department, and members of 
the board of supervisors, the plan to 
have the separate department for the 
care of the bonded roads was aban- 
doned. The action came at the sug- 
gestion of Jensen, and was made ef- 
fective at the close of the year 



the 



the 



Portland - n 
of 6043 b 

■ for improvements involving 
.hi expenditure of £12,051,580 as com- 
pared with 7691 permits in 1929 for 
work costing $15,493,310 A tenta- 
tive schedule of projects to be under- 
taken within the next six months, 
both public and private, will involve 
nn expenditure of $8,000,<>0U, it is re- 
ported. 



Theodore Ahrens, president of the 
American Radiator and Standard San- 
itary Corporation, addressing the 
Louisville Board of Trade, advocated 
a five-day working week, with six 
days' pay, as a solution for the un- 
employment problem. 

He said the advent of machinery 
and various labor-saving devices has 
resulted in a serious problem and that 
it may be necessary eventually to 
adopt a six-hour day. He said: 

"I believe we have reached the bot- 
tom of this depression, and while re- 
covery may be slow, it will be steady." 



During the year 1930 the Los 
geles city building department i 
30.612 permits with an estimated 
uation of $74,088,825 as compared 
31,721 permits with an estimated valu- 
ation of $93,016,160 for the year 1929 
For the month of December, 1930, tht 
number of permits issued was 2056 
with an estimated valuation of $5,- 
283,235 as compared with 2201 permits 
with an estimated valuation of $3, 
992.459 for the same month a yeai 
ago. 



ed 



th 



Figures compiled by the census bu- 
reau show the average price paid by 
contractors for Douglas fir (2x4-16 ft.) 
delivered on the job at Los Angeles 
on Oct. 1 was $31.50 and for common 
boards, 1x6, was $30.50. Prices for 
the same lumber at San Francisco 
were $25-00 and $25.00, and at Seattle 
$17.00 and $16.00. The average price 
paid by contractors for No. 2 vertical 
grain fir flooring at Los Angeles was 
$54.50, at San Francisco $50.00, and 
at Seattle, $38.00. 



A revised draft of the proposed 
American Standard for fabrication of 
hangers, supports, anchors, sway 
bracings, and vibration dampeners. 
prepared by the sectional committee 
on pressure piping organized under the 
procedure of the American Standards 
Association, is now being circulated 
for comment and criticism. Copies 
are available through the American 
Standards Association, 29 West 39th 
Street, New York City. The new draft 
includes a number of revisions made 
in the previous draft which was cir- 
culated several months ago. The com- 
mittee which is working on the proj- 
ect is under the sponsorship of the 
American Society of Mechanical En- 



Employes of the Standard Sanitary 
Manufacturing Company at the two 
Richmond, Calif., plants are being put 
on a five-day week basis. Instead of 
a three-day week, according to Frank 
Kales, coast manager of the company. 
The men have been working on a re- 
duced shift for several months, but 
recent increases in business and an- 
ticipation that there will be further 
increases after the first of the year 
has caused more days to be added to 
the schedule. Approximately 425 men 
are employed at the two plants. 



An unusual feature involved in the 
bidding on the Union High school 
building at Florence, Ore., proposals 
for which were received some time 
ago, has attracted some attention. 
Each contractor, according to infor- 
mation received, was furnished a com- 
plete quantity survey together with 
plans and specifications. 

By this means, all bids were com- 
piled on a uniform basis as to quan- 
tity of measurement, thereby remov- 
ing the element of gamble as to quan- 
tities. 

This action was taken at the re- 
quest of Cleo H. Jenkins, Albany, ar- 
chitect for the project, who believes 
the advantages great as derived from 
accurate quantity surveys from the 
architect's and owner's standpoint. 

There was a saving of about $3000 
worth of contractors' and sub-contrac- 
tors' time, by the elimination of dup- 
lication of effort through furnishing 
complete quantities to the respective 
trade, according to Charles Burton, 
quantity surveyor, who furnished the 
surveys on the job. 



Close upon Sears, Roebuck Co.'s an- 
nouncement of instalment financing of 
home modernization, the Security Fi- 
nance Corp., Washington, D- C, en- 
ters the field with a similar plan for 
independent building material sup- 
pliers and contractors, says The Bus- 
iness Week. 

Charges, based on the cash price 
for the job, approximate 1% per 
month. The loan is amortized in equal 
monthly instalments, one of $300, for 
instance, being covered by a note for 
$336, with 12 monthly payments of 
$28. 

The contractor, when submitting 
bids on modernization Jobs, includes 
the finance charge, notifies the com- 
pany when the contract is obtained, 
secures the home-owner's signature to 
a special form of finance company 
note and. when he has endorsed the 
note, secures the money. A fair 
amount of equity in the property, plus 
a good reputation, form the main 
qualifications demanded from the 

Loans have averaged less than $500. 
but jobs in amounts of $800 to $1,000 
are handled in considerable numbers, 
generally on 3-year terms. 



Within five years, or by the end of 
1935, the San Francisco bay bridge 
from Rincon hill via Yerba Buena 
Island to Oakland, should be built and 
open to traffic. 

That was the prediction made by 
Mark L. Requa, chairman of the 
Hoover-Young Bridge Commission, in 
a speech to members of the San Fran- 
cisco Electrical Development League. 

One of those years will be spent in 
getting the necessary bills through 
Congress and in obtaining franchises 
and drawing up contracts, Requa said. 

He cited the estimates of the bridge 
engineer, Ralph Mojeski, that it should 
take about four years to construct 
the bridge after work is started. 



Decrying the "timidity of business 
men and legislators in the recent busi- 
ness crisis", ninety economists meet- 
ing in New York Jan 4, indorsed a 
billion dollar loan program to finance 
construction. The indorsement of the 
plan of the emergency committee for 
Federal public works for building of 
public improvements came from uni- 
versity and college leaders and labor 
officials from all parts of the Nation. 
The economists say the Federal Gov- 
ernment should hasten return of pros- 
perity by large scale expansion in five 
large fields, namely, highway build- 
ing, irrigation, draining and improved 
water transport, reclamation of waste 
lands and flood control and elimina- 
tion of grade crossings. 



Saturday, January 10, 193! 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Students of architecture In the 

United States and Canada are In- 
vited to participate In a competition 
for the design of the most beautiful 
highway bridge In steel. Previous 
competitions "f this nature have been 
held under the auspices of the Beaux- 
Arts institute of Design This year 
the competition will he held directly 

by the \ rlcan Ini I n I Steel 

Construction, which offers the prize 
money of $500 for the first, $250 for 
the second, and $100 fur the thli i besl 
design Judged by a imittee of ar- 
chitects and engi - ..f International 

Importance. The change In proi dure 
was made in order to conform to the 
plans for a similar competition held 
by the Institute among: students of 
engineering. Students of architecture 
who wish to enter this competition are 
Invited to submit to the American In- 
stitute of Steel Construction. 200 
Mndlson Avenue, New Tork, N. Y., 
their preliminary sketches to be placed 
in judgment on April 3. 1931. From 
these the ten best will be selected for 
final development, and the final draw- 
ings will be judged on May 1 next. 
Full information may be had by ad- 
dressing the Institute. 



California and other Western States 
have been seriously handicapped in 
bidding on government contracts to 
meet Western requirements, due to 
the existing ruling of the Treasury 
Department, under which firms seek- 
ing to secure contracts to furnish 
equipment, furniture and supplies for 
use in federal buildings erected or to 
be erected anywhere in the United 
States, must make bids based upon 
factory cost, freight charges from the 
factory to Washington. D. C, ac- 
cording to the California State Cham- 
ber of Commerce. The free the man- 
ufacturers and merchants of the West 
from such laws and regulations which 
exclude them from competitive bid- 
ding on goods which may be used by 
the Federal Government in the West- 
ern States, the State Chamber of 
Commerce has asked the State Repre- 
sentatives in Congress to obtain the 
assistance of Congressional delegates 
of other Western States in requesting 
the Treasury Department to amend 
this ruling, either through zoning, or 
by other means. Chambers of Com- 
merce have also been asked to co- 
operate in an effort to secure a reas- 
onable share of the Western require- 
ments of the Government for Cali- 
fornia and other Western States. 



Increased b u yi n g throughout the 
country has caused the Norge Corpor- 
ation, Detroit, manufacturers of Norge 
Electric Refrigerators, to readjust 
their employment and production 
schedules which now call for the 
doubling of the working force in the 
Detroit and Muskegon factories. Fif- 
teen hundred additional employees will 
go to work in January. There will be 
no cuts in wages, announced H. E. 
Blood, president of the Norge Corpora- 
tion, which is a subsidiary of Borg- 
Warner Corporation. 



America is surpassing all other na- 
tions, modern or ancient in the cre- 
ation of original and artistic archi- 
tectural designs, said Dr. Mario Sol- 
datl, doctor of literature from the 
University of Turin, Italy, and lec- 
turer in Barnard College, Columbia 
University, New York City, lecturing 
In Denver. 

"American architecture combines 
utility with art and beauty," said Dr. 
Soldatl. 

"As sheer art the ancient architects 
have not been surpassed but modern 
American architecture goes beyond art 
to other equally great qualities." 



ALONG THE LINE 



tor, has been elected president of the 
nto 3 el Hub. 

Perley S. Wo lard, 75, Sacn 

building contractor, died in thai 
ell i Dei 30, foil wing an illness of 
several weeks. Hi- was .i native of 
New York. 



Ralph Ray. 51, excavating contrac- 
tor of Oakland, died in that city Dei 
29 following a brief illness. Ray was 
a native of Oregon. He is survived by 
his widow, two daughters, three sons 
and a sister 

Yuba Associated Engineers of San 

Francisco, has 1 n incorporated. Di- 
rectors are X. Cleaveland, Berkeli 
W. C. Haminnn. San Francis,, i; W B. 
McCaulay and G. R. Oliver, Oakland, 
and E. T. Cook, San Rafael. 



Thomas J. Sullivan, 70, for 25 years 
a building contractor in Sonoma 
county, died in Santa Rosa, Dec. 30, 
as the result of injuries incurred in 
an automobile accident. His widow, 
four sons, three brothers and a sister 
survive. 



W. B. Taylor, as assistant in tin- 
county engineer's office of Butte 
County, has resigned to accept a 
position as engineer with the Therma- 
lito Irrigation District. He will he 
succeeded in the county office by 
Claude B. Boynton of Oroville. 



Timothy A. Reardon, for seventeen 
years a member of th» Bo,m-q of Pub- 
lic Works, has been re-elected presi- 
dent of that body. Other members 
are Col. Chas. E Stanton and Fled 
W. Meyer, who will resign to become 
chief of the State Bureau of Pur- 
chases and Supplies. 



Robert L. Jones, chief of flood con- 
trol and reclamation of tin State De- 
partment of Public Works, has been 
elected president of the Board of cli- 
rectors of the Sacramento Munici- 
pal Utility District. Ben Leonard was 
elected vice-president and Raymond 
C. Oakley, retained as secretary. 



Frank B. Rae, for the past seven 
years city electrical engineer for Ber- 
keley, has submitted his resignation 
to City Manager H. R. Thompson. 
The resignation is effective Januarj 
15. The work of the electrical engi- 
neer's department will probably be as- 
sumed by the office of Harry Good- 
ridge, Berkeley city engineer. 

San Jose city council is conferring 
with H. J. Brunnier, consulting struc- 
tural engineer of San Francisco, on 
the advisability of requiring certain 
type of fire prevention apparatus in 
fireproof structures. Petitions have 
been submitted to the council seeking 
to eliminate a provision in the build- 
ing laws requiring the installation of 
automatic sprinkler systems in the 
basements of fireproof structures. 

Substantial progress is reported in 
the work to develop a standard mould- 
ing book which may be used by all 
lumber producing regions of the Unit- 
ed States. It has been decided to em- 
ploy a 7000 series, the sizes of which 
are being reworked to conform to 
American lumber standards sizes. 
Final approval is being sought, which, 
if obtained, will result in publication 
of the book in early 1931. 



TRADE NOTES 



Federal Mail Chute Corp., Ltd., has 
been incorporated in San Francisco, 

Directors ■.<<•■ A. I. ivm-oek, I., i: 
Sti Inl i rg and \ B i lopeland. 



Ss fety Switchboard Manufaci firing 
i'ii., lias been Incorporated in San 
Francisco. Dlrectoi are J C Lan 
shall, W. A. Dold and M. F. Ciielli. 



Lowrie Paving i lo. of San Fi 
ea] lized (oi ha - bci u in- 

i ,i Dii are M. W 

Lowrie, Myrtle Lowrie and I !•'. 
Lowrie. 



American Tractor Equipment Co. of 
Oakland, Calif., announces the ap- 
pointment Of N. G. Livingston as 
Eastern sales manager. Livingston 
will Via ve iiis headi iua rt< rs al the Pe- 
oria, 111., plant of the company. 



Industrial Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation, capitalized for $200,000 has 
filed articles of incorporation in Oak- 
land. Directors are: W. H. Hen- 
dricks, A. J. DeLamare, Purcell Rowe, 
A. M. Gilbert. Edgar H. Rowe, Jr., 
all of San Francisco. 



A. G Wliitfemore of the Frigidaire 
Sales and Service with headquarters 
at 1412 Maec'onald Ave., Richmond, has 
been admitted to membership in the 
Builders' Exchange of Contra Costa 
County, it is announced by W. A. 
Brown, executive secretary 



Minneapolis - Honeywell Regulator 
Distributors have established a di- 
rect factory branch at 557 Market St., 
San Francisco, where they will carry 
a warehouse stock of heat control ap- 
paratus for distribution throughout 
California. Headquarters and the 
main factory is located at Minneap- 
olis with a branch factory at Wabash. 
Indiana. A. F. Erickson is San Fran- 
cisco branch manager. 



Lincoln Electric Co. of Cleveland. 
Ohio, has placed S. H Taylor Jr., in 
charge of the Pacific Coast territory, 
with headquarters in Los Angeles. He 
succeeds W. S. Stewart, recently ap- 
pointed district manager of the Cleve- 
land territory. Appointment of L. P. 
Henderson as manager of the San 
Francisco office is also announced, as 
well as the appointment of E. J. 
Pfister ast district manager of Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 



H. G. Sperry, Call Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, has been appointed Pacific 
Coast representative for the Hitch- 
cock Company, Inc., of Boston, Mass., 
manufacturers of "Covulc," a new 
discovery in rubber chemistry, offer- 
ing a self-vulcanizing rubber com- 
pound which comes in paste form for 
resurfacing belts, hoppers, agitators, 
classifiers and covering pipes, shafts, 
etc. The product is marketed in four 
colors — red, gray, green or black. 



Appointment of R. E. Mittelstaedt. 
retiring adjutant general, as vice- 
president and general manager of the 
newly organized California Lime 
Products Company, Ltd., is announced 
in Sacramento. The company, of 
which Baylies C. Clark, former Sacra- 
mento city engineer, is president, will 
manufacture carbon dioxide or "dry 
ice" and will erect a plant on a 60- 
acre tract of land to be purchased be- 
tween Roseville and Ben Ali. Mittel- 
staedt served as adjutant general for 
eight years in the administrations of 
Governor Young and former Governor 
Richardson. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, Jam 



HERE— THERE 
EVERYWHERE 



Annual banquet- meeting of the 
Portland, Ore.. Builders' Exchange 
will be held next Wednesday evening 
in the Grand Ballroom of the Multno- 
mah Hotel. George C'ornwell, pub- 
lisher of '"The Timberman ', lumber 
magazine of Portland, will be the 
principal speaker. His topic will be 
"Conditions in Russia, and Europe." 



Mayor James M. Curley of Boston, 
Mass., recommends a five-day week for 
all city employes in his annual mes- 
sage to the city. He asks the council 
to study the plan for reduction in 
hours this year so that it might be 
put into effect in L932. 



Standard Gypsum Co., of Canada, 
Ltd., plans immediate construction of 
a $100,000 plant on the Vancouver, B. 
C„ waterfront, it is announced by F, 
R. McRitchie, managing director for 
the company. 



For use with dry, stiff concrete when 
tamping is permitted or specified, the 
Ord finishing machine for concrete 
pavements, manufactured by the 1 Haw 
Knox Co, Pittsburgh, Pa., can now 
be furnished equipped with a tamper. 
The finisher, which runs on wheels 
bearing on the steel forms, can be ob- 
tained with either single or double 
screed, with or without tamper. 



American Standards Association, 29 
West 311th St., Xew York City, has 
approved a standard for track bolts 
and nuts based on a study of different 
types used by railroads and electric 
railways in the United States and 
Canada. Copies can be obtained from 
the headquarters of the association. 



Officers to serve for the ensuing 
year will be elected at a dinner-meet- 
ing of the Washington State Chapter, 
American Institute of Architects, to 
be held at the Washington Athletic 
Club, Seattle, next Saturday evening". 
Officers nominated are: President, R. 
E. Borhek; first vice president, J. L. 
Holmes; second vice president. Earl 
N. Dugan; third vice president, Stan- 
ley A. Smith; fourth vice president. 
John W. Maloney; secretary. Lance E. 
Gowen ; treasurer, Albert M. Allen ; 
executive board, three-year term. G. 
W. Stoddard, and for delegates to the 
institute convention, Lance E. Gowen, 
Sherwood D. Ford and Nelson J. Mor- 



If the states will provide $65,352,801 
to match Federal appropriations. $300- 
736, 67S may be spent in the improve- 
ment of public highways during the 
current year, it is announced by Sec- 
retary Hyde of the Department of 
Agriculture. The Federal government 
has already appropriated $163,568,446 
for roadway construction which will 
be expended regardless of anv addi- 
tional aid from the States. There is a 
balance of $67,000,000 left over for the 
year ending June 30, 1030. Should the 
States now make provisions to match 
what is available to them from the 
unexpended balance from 1030, it 
would add $132,168,232 to the sums al- 
ready authorized. 



Walter L. Morgan has been elected 
president of the Spokane Section, 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 
J. H Robb was elected first vice- 
president; V. H. Greisser, second vice- 
president, and B. J. Garnett, secretary- 
treasurer. 



ENGINEERING SOCIETIFS 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Further information regard- 
ing positions listed In this 
column is obtainable from New- 
ton D. Cook, Room 715, 57 Post 
Street, San Francisco. (Phone 
SUtter 1684). 



R-3444-S ENGINEERS and drafts- 
men, experienced in industrial and 
power plant work, particularly pip- 
ing; also electrical draftsmen ex- 
perienced in power and lighting in- 
stallations. Salary $225-$250 per 
month. Apply by letter. Location, 
Southern California. 

R-3451-S ENGINEER, experienced in 
the operation of kilns for burning 
limestone. Apply by letter. Loca- 
tion, Northwest. 

K-:;3i'-W-2034-C-S PROFESSOR for 
school of industrial engineering at 
mid- western university, to teach 
various phases of printing. Must 
have had broad experience in print- 
ing and be acquainted with the print- 
ing industry. Position is likely to 
lead to development of research. 
Salary $5000 a year. Apply by letter. 
Location, Middle west. 

K-333-W-2071-C-S ASPHALT ENGI- 
N E E R , graduate civil engineer, 
single, not over 32, with experience 
on hot mixed type sheet asphalt, 
asphaltum, concrete, penetration 
preventing by the grouting method. 
asphalt emulsions, ability to decide 
proper percentages of various grades 
of stone, sand, cement and asphalt 
to secure a road of maximum den- 
sity, etc. Must be familiar with as- 
phalt literature. Salary $3600-$4000 
a year. Apply only by letter. Lo- 
cation, India. 

R-3452-SENIOR PERSONNEL EX- 
AMINER for Engineering and Trades 
positions. Should be graduate civil 
or mechanical engineer wtih special 
training and experience to qualify 
for testing of applicants for techni- 
cal positions. Age limits, 25-50 
years. Salary $250-$300 month. Ap- 
ply by letter for full details. Loca- 
tion, California. 

K-355 - W - 2159-C-S MECHANICAL 
ENGINEER, experienced in the de- 
sign and construction of coal tip- 
ples, skips, rotary dumps, conveying 
and preparation machinery. Single 
man preferred. 2 years contract. 
Salary about $7000 a year and trav- 
elling expenses. Apply only by letter. 
Location, Russia. Headquarters, 
Chicago 

K-333-W-2071-C-S ASPHALT ENGI- 
NEER, graduate civil engineer, 
single, not over 32, with experience 
on hot mixed type sheet asphalt, 
asphaltum concrete, penetration pre- 
venting by the grouting method, as- 
phalt emulsions, ability to decide 
proper percentages of various grades 
of stone, sand, cement and asphalt 
to secure a road of maximum dens- 
ity, etc. Must be familiar with as- 
phalt literature. Salary $3600-4000 a 
year. Apply only by letter. Loca- 
tion, India. 

K-334-W-2134-C-S DESIGNER, grad- 
uate. American, of structural steel 
and reinforced concrete on head- 
frames for mine-shafts, conveyor- 
galleries, etc. American staff for 
Russian service. Two year contract. 
Salary $6600 a year <>ut of which liv- 
ing expenses must be paid. Allow- 
ance for travelling expenses. Apply 
only by letter. Location, Russia. 
Hdqtrs., New York. 

ENGINEERS, with or without sales 
experience, who might be interested 
in life insurance selling, are invited 
to take one week preliminary train- 
ing course conducted by aggressive 
San Francisco agency. No obliga- 
tion incurred. 



1930 BUILDING 

OPERATIONS LISTED 



Final tabulation of building permits 
by John B. Leonard, superintendent 
of the Bureau of Building Inspection 
of the San Francisco Department of 
Public Works, show 1714 permits 
granted for new buildings during the 
year 1930 costing $19,581,721, and 4S27 
permits for alterations, repairs and 
additions costing $3,143,273. Follow- 
ing is a segregated report of the 1930 
activities as compiled from official 
records: 

No. of P'mits Est. Cost 
Class A 12 $ 2,562.862 

Class B 23 1,684.974 

Class C 159 2,874,254 

Frame Bldgs. 1494 7,192,298 

Alterations 4827 3,145,273 

Public Bldgs. 15 2,283,656 

Harbor Bldgs. 3 1,345.000 

State Bldgs. 1 260.000 

U. S. Govt. Bldgs. 7 1.378,679 



Total 



541 



$2J,726.994 



ASPHALT ROOFING 

GROUP IS ACCUSED 



The Asphalt Shingle and Roofing In- 
stitute, with numerous affiliated com- 
panies and individuals, is charged by 
the government in federal court with 
violation of anti-trust laws, according 
to word from Xew York, 

The department of justice in a bill 
in equity charged that companies and 
individuals affiliated with the insti- 
tute had entered into agreements to 
fix uniform and non-competitive prices 
for the sale of non-patented asphalt 
and shingle roofing products. 

J. S. Bryant, manager of the insti- 
tute, denied the government's accusa- 
tion and declared the principle in all 
the institute's agreements always had 
been that each manufacturer shall be 
free to fix his own prices or change 



the 



A. I. A. FAVORS 

CAPE SABLE PARK 



The American Institute of Archi- 
tects, it is announced, favors the pro- 
posed Everglades National Park in 
Cape Sable region of Florida. A bill 
to establish the Park is now pending 
in Congress. 

The Board of Directors of the In- 
stitute has adopted a resolution pre- 
sented by Franklin O. Adams of 
Tampa, regional director of the South 
Atlantic Division, declaring that the 
Park "would preserve intact, for the 
education and enjoyment of future 
generations, one of the most beauti- 
ful of the nation's few untouched 
areas." 

The architects warn that this re- 
gion, now abundantly supplied with 
almost limitless varieties of sub-trop- 
ical animal and plant life, is in grave 
danger of being despoiled. 

"If such uncontrolled encroachment 
is allowed, many interesting and val- 
uable species will become extinct and 
great natural beauty destroyed," the 
resolution asserts. "The American In- 
stitute of Architects endorses the 
movement to create and establish the 
Everglades of Florida as a National 
Park and urges Congress to consum- 
mate, as expeditiously as possible, the 
dedication of this region as a Nation- 
al Park to the educational and rec- 
reational betterment of the people of 
the United States." 



James K. James, new county sur- 
veyor of San Mateo County, has 
taken up his official duties succeeding 
George A. Kneese, whom he de- 
feated at the last general election. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



KELHAM HEADS 

INDUSTRIAL BODY 



George W. Kelham, architect, was 
electi .1 president of the Industrial As- 
latlon oi San Francisco n the or- 
ganization meeting of thai body held 
yesterday. 

.1. E. CushinR, vice-president and 
general manager of the American 
Hawaiian Steamship Company, was 
elected vice-president: Chas it Page, 
vice-president of the Fireman's Fund 

insurance C pany was eli cted sec 

retary and J. W. Mailllard, Jr., "f the 
Brm of Mailllard and Schmieden, was 
elected treasurer. 



BOND LIABILITY 
IS NOT AFFECTED BY 
CHANGE IN PROCEDURE 

An amendment to the state law reg- 
ulating; the filing of claims of persons 
employed by contractors on public 
works merely Changed the procedure 
and did nut affect the liability of the 
bond, it was ruled by the Court of 
Appeals, Division One. in a decision 
handed down on appeals by the Sim- 
ons Brick Company and R. G. Bless- 
ing from the judgment of the superior 
court in actions againsl the Kagle In- 
demnity Company, says Southwest 
Builder and Contractor. The appeals 
were taken together and presented on 
the same record. 

The suits arose out of the construc- 
tion of two public schools in the Los 
Angeles city school district, in con- 
nection with which bonds were fur- 
nished, with the indemnity company 
as the executor. The Simons com- 
pany furnished bricks for the two 
schools and Blessing, as a subcontrac- 
tor, constructrd a tile roof on one of 
the structures. The brick concern 
charged that $2392.33 is still owning 
and Blessing declared $375 is due. 

Shortly after the bonds had been 
executed, the act to obtain payment 
of claims was amended, the amend- 
ment becoming effective July 23, 1925. 
The act. prior to the amendment, re- 
quired that before an action could be 
commenced on the bond, the claimant 
must file with the official body by 
whom the contract had been awarded 
a verified statement of his claim 
showing that the sum due had not 
been paid. 

The amendment provided that the 
filing of such claim should no longer 
be a condition precedent to the com- 
mencing of an action on the bond. It 
was stated that in the case before the 
court neither of the appellants had 
filed a statement of its or his respec- 
tive claim with the school district. 

"It is conceded," the court observed, 
"that if the amendment did apply to 
the claims upon which the actions 
were prosecuted, the appellants are 
entitled to judgments for the respec- 
tive amounts." 

The appellants contended that the 
amendment merely changed the pro- 
cedure and the court ruled that their 
contention must be upheld. The court 
reversed the lower court's judgment 
and ordered that court to enter judg- 
ments for the brick company and 
Blessing, with attorney's fees. 



NO HELP WANTED 



According to word from London, a 
new mechanical street sweeper does 
the work of hundreds of men in one- 
tenth of the time. It carries 84 con- 
tainers on a truck body and the dirt 
swept from the street is automatical- 
ly deposited in the cans. When these 
are filled, the truck drives off and 
other containers are placed on the 
machine for filling. 



IRRIGATION DISTRICT 
LEGISLATION PREPARED 
BY STATE ASSOCIATION 



AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 
REVISION IS DESIRED 



Four proposals dealing with [rriga 
tlon district legislation were prepared 
to be i ubmitted ai the next session 
of tin- state legislature by the execu 
tlve committee <>r the Irrigation Dis- 
tricts' Association of California ai a 
two-daj meeting 1 , which concluded in 

Merced last Monday. 

The first proposal deals with partial 
redemption of defaulted lands, in 
cases where land has been deeded to 
the state, the proposed amendment 

VMiiild pr o\ id- thai a person could r.- 

deem part of the land by paying de- 
faulted taxes on that part only. 

An alternative of issuing either 
Sinking fund or serial bonds would be 
offered irrigation districts in another 
proposal. 

Tli.- committee would extend the 
period of bonds from forty to fifty 
j ea ps 

The final proposal would provide for 
refinancing of irrigation districts bj 
the state on 3 Vj per cent loans. 



HIGHER WAGES, 

SHORTER HOURS, 

A. F. OF L. PLAN 



Four principles described as funda- 
mental for restoration of prosperity 
have been set forth by President Wm. 
Green of the American Federation of 
Labor. 

They are: 

1 — High wages to give purchasing 
power to consumers. 

2— Shorter hours, to give employ- 
ment to as many as possible. 

3 — Organization of wage earners to 
keep their incomes advancing with in- 
creased productivity. 

4 — Development of co-ordinated con- 
trol of industries. 

Green listed a number of signs 
which he said were encouraging in 
the light of present depressed eco- 
nomic conditions. They included: 

Indications that the bottom has been 
reached in the deflation of prices. 

Reports from 24 cities showing in- 
creases in unemployment were less 
than in November. 

Evidences of returning confidence in 
the production policies of large com- 
panies. 



ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS 
SHOWS PROFITS GAIN 



Electrical Products Corporation of 
California and Electrical Products 
Corporation of Oregon, operating units 
of <'laude Neon Electrical Corpora- 
tion, Ltd., of Delaware, on Dec. 29 
reported net profits for November, 
after all charges, at $55,656, compared 
with $49,559 for the same month last 
year. 

For eleven months ended November 
30. net profit, after charges, was $571,- 
995. against $490, S47 for the corre- 
sponding period in 1929. 

Profits of the operating subsidiaries, 
which accrue to the holding company, 
do not include figures for the Mexican 
company or miscellaneous income from 
royalties or other sources, which are 
now approximately $20,000 monthly, 
according to President Paul D. Howse. 



Union Building and Loan Associa- 
tion has opened headquarters at 1178 
Market St. Officers and directors of 
the association are George L. Leon- 
ard, president; Joseph A. Leonard, 
vice-president and secretary; John L. 
McNab, director and general council; 
Joseph G. Morrow, director; M. J. 
Con boy, director; John S. Sanford, 
controller, and C. A. Meyers, assist- 
ant secretary. 



Revision of tin- city building code 

Insofar as fire protect! levlces are 

concerned looms as the result of re- 
cent complaints by San Jose property 
owners that certain of the devices 
required by the code are not neces- 
sary. 

Officers of the San Jose Community 
I [otel « !orporation, owners of Hotel 
de Anza. Santa I lara Street and 
Notre Dame Ave., protested to the 
San Jose city council against the re- 
quirement of an automatic sprinkler 
system in Class A building basements 
where there are inconsequential fire 
hazards in the basement. 

It was pointed out that no hazardous 
use of the basement of the new hotel 
is contemplated, the building is of 
fireproof construction and yet the or- 
dinance requires an automatic sprink- 
ler system. 

A similar complaint was made two 
weeks ago by Warren Holmes of the 
San Jose Hardware Company, Holmes 
pointing out that the basement of the 
new hardware company building is 
used only for the storage of non- 
inflammable goods, principally hard- 
ware. 

The council considered the matter 
informally and agreed to secure the 
opinion of competent fire underwriter 
engineers and building experts before 
taking any action on the present code 



A. G. C. AIMS TO 

FURTHER PRIVATE 
BUILDING PROJECTS 



Credit stabilization, prequalification 
of contractors, establishment of stand- 
ard bidding and awarding practices, 
curtailment of day labor on public 
projects and last, but not least, ways 
and means to increase the volume of 
private building construction, are mat- 
ters of importance scheduled for dis- 
cussion at the annual convention of 
the Associated General Contractors of 
America to be held in San Francisco 
January 26 to 30, it is announced by 
Earle G. Lloyd, secretary of the 
Northern California Chapter of the 
organization. 

Headquarters will be maintained at 
the St. Francis Hotel where all busi- 
ness sessions will be held. 

The depressed condition of the con- 
struction industry itself will he a topic 
of much discussion. "With residential 
building of all types pointing the way 
there has been a marked recession in 
work for private owners in all of the 
building sections of the industry dur- 
ing the past year while public con- 
struction in both the building and en- 
gineering fields has somewhat more 
than held up in volume. 

Is it feasible or practical for or- 
ganized contractors to influence or 
promote an increase in volume of pri- 
vate construction? — is a vital ques- 
tion to come before the convention. 

"Much of the decreased volume in 
private building construction," Secre- 
tary Lloyd says, "is in the field of 
speculative building in which organ- 
ized contractors are not primarily in- 
terested. Organized contractors do not 
desire to see a resumption of the 
speculative building fever that was 
so prominent during the past decade. 
They do. however, want to see pri- 
vate construction go ahead. There- 
fore, plans for procedure which will 
stimulate sound construction and 
sound investment and which will not 
let down the bars to wild cat specula- 
tive operations will necessarily be to 
the fore at this convention." 



Eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10. 1931 




APARTMENTS 



Construction Postponed Indefinitely. 
APARTMENTS Cost apprnx $50,000 
SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 

Mariposa and Race Sts. 
Two - story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (8 apts.) 
Owner — W. Hodges. 
Architect— Charles McKenzie, Twohy 

Bldg., San Jose. 



Contract Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cont. price, $11,500 

SAN FRANCISCO. SE Army and Al- 
abama Streets. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco apartments (4 apts.) 

Owner — L. Figone. 

Architect— O. A. Berger, 300 Valencia. 

Contractor— J. L. Cuneo and F. D. 
Martini, care architect. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $60,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. NE Beach and 

Scott Streets. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (12 3- and 4- 

room apts.) 
Owner and Builder — V. Rasmussen. 

2235 North Point St. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets. Call Bldg. 
Electric Wiring— Aetna Electric Co, 

1337 Webster St. 
Sheet Metal— J. J. Delucchi, 152G Pow- 



ell 



eet. 



Lumber — Christensen Lumber Co., 5th 

and Hooper Sts. 
Structural Steel — Golden Gate Iron 

Works. 1541 Howard St. 
Ornamental Work— Michel & Pfeffer 

Iron Works, Harrison and 10th. 
Plastering— M J. King, 2343 Bay St. 
Plumbing and Steam Fitting— Higgins 

& Kraus, 741 Tehama St. 
Mill Work— Hogan Mills, Hearst Bldg 
Painting — Herman Wachter, deYoung 

Bldg. 
Oil Burners — Kay nurlier Co., 401 

Bernal St. 
Hardwood Floors — Carl Stendell. 41 

Cumberland St. 
Refrigeration— Holhrnok. Merrill and 

Stetson, 665 6th St. 
Cabinet — Independent Cabinet Co., 

1892 Folsom St. 
Roofing— James Cantley Roofing Co., 

G66 Mission St. 
Stair Building— Atlas Stair Building 
Co.. 12 Enterprise St. 
Cement Work— Thorson & Kirkevoog, 

640 Edna St. 
Ornamental P aster — George Campbell. 

3443 17th St. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost. $125,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Broadway 1S7 E 
Webster Street. 

Seven - story and basement Class A 
apartments (7 apts.) 

Owner— Wm. Helbing Sr., 1310 Lom- 
bard St.. San Francisco. 

Architect— H. S. Helhing. 1310 Lom- 
bard St., San Francisco. 

Contractor — The Helbing Co., 1310 
Lombard St., San Francisco. 

Structural Steel— Judson Pacific Co., 
609 Mission St., San Francisco. 

Electrical Work— Aetna Elec. Co, 1337 
"Webster St., San Francisco. 

Lumbei — Loop Lumber Co., Central 
Basin. San Francisco. 
Bids are now being taken on mill 

work. 



Completing Plans. 

APARTMENTS Cast, $ 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Wilshire District 
Six-story and basement reinforced 

concrete apartments (59x120 feet). 
Owner— Walter Sant. 
Architect— Leonard L. Jones, 2504 W. 

7th St , Los Angeles. 



To Be Done By Day's Work. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $S5,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. West 

Claremont Ave. S Miranda St. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (84 rooms). 
Owner and Builder — Lewis Graham. 

2327 64th Ave., Oakland. 
Architect — Not Given. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
APARTMENT Cost, $800,000 

SEATTLE, Wash. Sixth Avenue and 

Bell Street. 
Twenty - one-story fireproof bachelor 

apartment-hotel (2- and 3-room 

apts.) 
Owner — Seattle Business Properties 

Co., Fred K. Dent, president. 
Architect — E arl W. Morrison. Lloyd 

Bldg., Seattle. 



Plans Being completed. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $50, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 25th Avenue near 

Fulton Street. 
Three-storv and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (12 2- and 3- 

roora apts.) 
Owner and Builder — Fred. Anderson, 

1320 22nd Ave. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets, Call Bldg. 
Owner will take sub-bids within a 
few days. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $50,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. SW Scott and 

Beach Streets. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (12 2- and t- 

room apts.) 
Owner and Builder — Thomas Quistad. 

2100 North Point St. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets. Call Bldg. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $45,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. NW 30th Avenue 

and Fulton Street. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (15 apts.) 
Owner and Builder— A. T. Morris and 

Sons, 3500 Fulton St. 
Plans by Owner. 



SKILSAW Portable Electric Hand 
Saws (4 models). 

SKILSAW Portable Electric Sander 

SKILSAW Radial Arm Attach- 
ments. 

SYNTRON Portable Electric Ham- 
mers (4 models, motor- 
less) . 

MALL Flexible Shaft Machines (50 
models). 

Electric Drills, Grinders, Buffers, 
Routers, Lock Mortisers. 

PETER H. NELSON 

Labor Saving Portable Electric 
Tools. 



1248 Mission St. 
San Francisco 
SALES . SERVICE 



UNderhlll 

7662 

RENTALS 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $100,000 

SAN MATEO. San Mateo Co., Calif. 

Bayshore Highway near Cypress. 
Three-story and basement reinforced 

concrete rooming house, apts. and 

stores (50xl50-feet; 14 rooms, 22 

apts., 3 stores). 
Owner— Withheld. 
Architect— F. W. Dakin. 625 Market 

St., San Francisco. 
Bids will be taken in about 2 weeks. 



Low Bidder. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, % 

SAN FRANCISCO. 49S Buena Vista 
Avenue. 

Alter residence for apartments. 

Owner — Mrs. J. A. Wilcox, premises. 

Architect— Henry H. Gutterson, 5 2 6 
Powell Street. 

Low Bidder — Clinton Stephenson Con- 
struction Co., Monadnock Bldg. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost. $85,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. West 

Claremont Ave. S Miranda St. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (84 rooms). 
Owner and Builder — Lewis Graham. 

2327 64th Ave., Oakland. 
Plans by Owner. 



Contract Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $15,000 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Broadway near California Drive. 

One - story and mezzanine floor rein- 
forced concrete apartments and 

Owner — Peter Lemperopolus, 12 12 El 
Camino, Burllngame. 

Plans by Russell Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 

Contractor — I. F. Sorensen, 1128 Lin- 
coln Blvd., Burlingame. 



BONDS 



SAN MATEO. San Mateo Co.. Cal. 
—Trustees of the San Mateo Union 
High School District have called a 
meeting of citizens of the district for 
tomorrow night to consider the ad- 
visability of calling an election to vote 
bonds to finance additional school im- 
provements. A tentative program, pre- 
pared by Homer Martin, superinten- 
dent, contemplates the following con- 
struction: 

BURLINGAME HIGH SCHOOL 

Land $17,500 

Cement floor and new 
interior in girls' lock- 
er roof, and other re- 
airs 27.500 

Library, cafeteria and 

music rooms 76,000 

Equipment for new 

buildings 25.000 $146,000 

SAN MATEO HIGH SCHOOL 

Auditorium $97,000 

Furniture and equip- 
ment for auditorium 20,500 
New boiler unit for au- 
ditorium 3.000 

Completion of gym 3,000 

Athletic field & bleach- 
ers 16,000 

Tennis courts and en- 
closures 10.000 

Imp. of grounds 4,000 $145,000 

Total $300,000 



Saturday, January [0, 1981 



pi IRTERVH.LE, Tulare Co Cal 
■. |g mi bond Issue (or the construc- 
tion "f a new Are station In Porter- 
vllle will probably be Included mi the 
ballot at the municipal election next 
April. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



N 



nif 



VISALIA, Tulare Co., Calif.— Until 
February 2, bids will be received by 
county supervisors for purchase of $7- 
imiii bond issue of Lfnwood School Dls- 
in. it Proceeds of the sale to finance 
Bohool Improvements. 



FRESNO, Fresno Co., Cal— County 
supervisors sell $250,000 county hos- 
pital linnd Issue for premium of $14,- 
000. Proceeds of the sale will finance 
erection of additional units at the 
county hospital, plans for which are 
being prepared by Architects Swartz 
and Kyland, Brix Bldg., Fresno, 



CHURCHES 

Contract Awarded. 

CHURCH Cost, $150,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Thirty-fourth 
St. near University Avenue. 

Four-story and basement reinforced 
concrete Class A church (85x130 
feet). 

Owner — University Methodist Church. 

Architect— C Raymond Johnson. Uni- 
versity of Southern California, Los 
Angeles. 

Contractor — Wm. Simpson C'onstr. Co., 
Architects Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Construction will start immediately 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 

CHURCH Cost approx. $10(1.00') 

SANTA BARBARA. Santa Earbara 
Co., Cal. 

One-story reinf. concrete church. 

Owner— First Church of Christ Sci- 
entist. 

Architect— Henry H. Gutterson, 5 2 6 
Powell St., San Francisco. 



Completing Plans. 

CHURCH Cost, $ 

LONG BEACH. Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
1080 Myrtle St. 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco church (30x74-ft.; to seat 
400). 

Owner — Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Architect— Clarence E. Aldrich. Pa- 
cific Southwest Eank Bldg., Los 
Angeles. 



Low Bidders. 

CHURCH Cost, $50.S0O 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Jefferson and 

Third Avenues. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco church (SSxl24 feet) to seat 

600 (Sunday school will seat 800). 
Owner— St. Paul's Presbyterian Church 
Architect — Scott Quintin. Medical 

Bldg., Alhambra. 
Low Bidder— R. S Martin, 522 E. 

Broadway, San Gabriel. 
Low bidders on other portions of 
work as follows: 
Electric Wiring — English Elec. Co., 

Los Angeles, at $2383. 
Plumbing — J. L. Kroger, Los Angeles. 

at $4190. 
Heating — Pacific Gas Radiator Co., at 

$3554. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Trinity Mis- 
sionary Church, Rev E. W. Petticord. 
pastor. 4937 Marathon St., contem- 
plates erecting a new edifice at the 
corner of Lemon Grove Ave. and Ho- 
bart Blvd. The project will not ma- 
ture for at least six months. Archi- 
tect not selected. 



Bids Opened— Held Under Advisement. 
CHURCH Cost. $40,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

San Mateo Drive. 
One-story frame and stucco church 



th tile roof (audit" 
J). 



Owner — First Congregational Church. 

IlT) i -Kent & Hass, 525 Marki I 

St., San Francisco. 
Bids have been turned over to the 
committee for consideration. 



Plans Being Completed. 

CHURCH Cost, $19,000 

s.w FRANCISCO; Thirty-second Ave 
and Ulloa St. 

One- and two-storv frame and stucco 
church with slate roof (to seat 100) 

Owner— Si. Stephens Protestant Epis- 
copal church. 

Architect— Charles Strothoff, 2274 15th 
St., San Francisco. 
Bids will be taken in about two 

Weeks. 



PORTERVILLE, Tulare Co., Cal.— 
Trustees "f the Methodist Episcopal 
church have voted to purchase a pipe 
organ to be installed in edifice which 
will undergo extensive alterations at 
once. 



Plans Being Figured. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL BLDG. Cost. $ 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co., Calif 

Maple St. near Lake Ave. 
Three-story and basement reinforced 

concrete and steel Sunday school 

bldg. (142x49-ft.; 42 classrooms). 
Owner -Lake Avenue Congregational 

Church. 
Architect — Marston & Maybury, 25 S 

Euclid Ave., Pasadena. 



FACTORIES AND WARE- 
HOUSES 

Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 

19, 12 Noon. 
SERVICE BLDG. Cost. $45,000 

REDWOOD CITY. San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Group of service buildings (wood 

frame and tile walls). 
Owner— Pacific Gas and Electric Co., 

245 Market St.. San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

Group includes warehouse, garage, 
service departments, superintendent's 



offlc 



etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Plant of Pacific 
Felt Co.. 700-79S York St., suffers $50- 
000 fire loss, including stored contents. 
American Woodworking Co., adjoining 
suffered slight damage. 



Sub Contract Awardd. 

ADDITION Cost, $12,000 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Ca.. 2029 
Channng Way. 

One-story and basement concrete and 
brick addition to bakery (struc- 
tural steel, steel sash, etc ) 

Owner Langendorf United Bakeries, 
Inc., 2029 Channing Way, Berke- 
ley. 

Engineer— Ellison & Russell, Pacific 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Barrett & Hilp, 918 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco. 

Structural Steel— Industrial Steel 
Products Co., 59th & Doyle Sts„ 
Oakland. 

Excavation— Ariss Knapp Co., 961 41st 
St , Oakland. 

Lumber — Sunset Lumber Co., 400 High 
St., Oakland. 

Brick Work— Victor Devight, 1828 Mil- 
via St.. Oakland. 



AVON, Contra Costa Co., Cal.— C. C. 
Moore Co., Sheldon Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, awarded contract by Associated 
Oil Co., Associated Oil Bldg.. San 
Francisco, to erect boiler plant and 
to the Western Pipe and Steel Co., 
444 Market St., San Francisco, for the 
tanks in connection with the $2,000,- 
000 refining plant at Avon. Founda- 
tions have already been completed. 



Hi Mint Sis . S 'Ynncl CO, has pUr- 

i eB eight blocks of industrial land 
in the Boggs Trad From Senator F 

S. Boggs and plans constructs f a 

pi ml for the manufacl ure of prod 
ui i ■ Imllar to that of the Fibn bbai ' 
Product! ii timi foi 

construction is Indefinite. 

ISELTON. Sacramei v. Calil 

Iselton Cannery, neai S rarnento, 

suffered a . ' lb, Hi i 1": I . including 

stock, Dec. 31. The plant was owned 
and operated by the Isleton Canning 
Company. 



: ub Bids Being Taken. 
MFG. HLDGS. Cost, $200,000 

RIPON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
Group of concrete, hollow tile, brick 
and corrugated iron manufactur- 
ing bldgs. (to manufacture evap- 
orated milk). 
Owner— Meyerberg, Inc.. Solidad Can 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor— H. H. Lars, n & CO., 64 
South Park. San Francisco. 
There will be a pasteurizing plant, 
etc. Sub-bids are wanted on all por- 
tions of the work. 



Sub-Bids Wanted. 

PACKING PLANT Cost. J 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. 3030 E Vernon 
Avenue. 

Two-story and basement reinf. con- 
crete meat packing plant (48x145) 

Owner — Union Packing Co. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— Ted R. Cooper Co., In.; . 
Western Pacific Bldg., Los An- 
geles. 



YREKA, Siskiyou Co., Cal— C. L. 
Noel, Yreka, awarded contract by 
Natural Gas Corp. of Calif., to erect 
structures in connection with gas 
plant for which distributing system is 
now being installed. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

WAREHOUSE Cont. price. $89,6% 

SAN FRANCISCO Sansome and Val- 
lejo Streets. 

Three-story reinforced concrete ware- 
house. 

Owner— Poultry Producers of Central 
California, 700 Front St. 

Architect— H. C. Baumann, 251 Kear- 
ny Street. 

Contractor— Sommarstrom Bros., 2924 
San Pablo Ave., Oakland. 

Concrete Materials— Pacific Coast Ag- 
gregates, 82 2nd St. 

Lumber— Chas. MeCormick Lbr. : Co., 
1401 Army St. 

Steel Windows and Doors— Michel & 
Pfeffer Iron Works, Harrison and 
Tenth Sts. 

Mill Work— Clinton Mill & Lumber Co. 
701 4th Ave., Oakland. 

Plumbing— S. W. -Band. 191 Valencia. 

Electric Work— Baker & CO.. 270 6th 
Street. 
Other awards will be made shortly 

BURBANK.Los Angeles Co., Cal.— 
The United Airport near Burbank plan 
to' erect a new hangar in the near 
future similar to the one recently'built 
by the Austin- Co of California. 7?7 
E. Washington St.. Los Angeles. The 
building covered 72,000 square feet of 
space and cost $150,000. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

SHOP Cost, $ 

RICHMOND, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
One-story steel frame and brick shop 
Owner — Santa Fe Railroad Co. 
Architect— Eng. Dept. of Owner (M. C. 

Blanchard, Chief Engr ). Kerckhoff 

Bldg., Los Angeles. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co.. Cal. 
— Schmidt Lithograph Co., 2nd and 



Plans Being Figured. 

FACTORY Cost. ST'I.ihiii 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Eighty 

first Avenue near 14th St. 
One-story reinforced, concrete factory. 
Owner— Blue Bird Potato Chips, In. 

68th Ave. and Beck Sts.. .Oakland, 
Architect— Charles W. McCall, 14 4 

Franklin St., Oakland. 



[ en 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



OAKLAND, Alameda County, Cal.— 
Sullivan & Sullivan, 2653 Best Ave., 
Oakland, at $2424 awarded contract by 
City Port Commission, 424 Oakland 
Bank Bldg., for constructing lean-to 
addition to Hangar No. 2, at the Oak- 
land Municipal Airport. 

Following is a complete list of bids 
received: 

Sullivan & Sullivan, Oakland $2424 

A. Frederick Anderson, Oakland 2428 

David Nordstrom, Oakland 2449 

Strehlow & La Voie, S. F 2491 

George Swanstrom, Oakland 2493 

Niles W. Place, Oakland 2690 

H. K. Henderson, Oakland 2970 

J B. Bishop, Oakland 3055 



VALLEJO, Solano Co., Cal.— Union 
Oil Co., will locate a $75,000 distribut- 
ing plant on the Vallejo waterfront. 
Storage tanks, wharf ar 
facilities will be provided. 



terminal 



GARAGES AND SERVICE 
STATIONS 



Planned. 

GARAGE 

HOLLISTER, Sal 

Fireproof garage. 

Owner— Gile Tiffany. 325 San Benito. 

Hollister. 
Architect— Not Selected. 

Proposed project is in a very pre- 
liminary stage. 



Preliminary Plans Being Prepared. 
AUTO AGENCY Cost. $40,000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

NE 22nd and Y Sts. (120xl50-ft.) 
One-story Ford automobile agency. 
Owners— Ellsworth Harrold. 7 12 12th 

St.. Sacramento. 
Architect— Chas. F. Dean, California 

State Life Bldg., Sacramento. 



Preliminary Estimates Being Taken. 
GARAGE Cost, $20.0011 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

Highway. 
One-story concrete garage. 
Owner — Withheld. 
Architect— John McCool, 381 Bush St., 

San Francisco. 



Contract Awarded 

STATION 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
tavia Streets. 

One-story Class C service station. 

Owner— Shell Oil Co., 100 Bush St., 
San Francisco. 

Plans by T. L. Longham, 114 San- 
some St., San Francisco. 

Contractor — P. Prom, 114 Sansome St, 
San Francisco. 



Plans Complete. 

GARAGE Cost, $15,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Third Street bet. 
22nd and 23rd Sts. 

One - story and basement reinforced 
concrete garage and service sta- 
tion (150x50-ft.) 

Owner— Samuel Ran, 238 5th St. . 

Plans by D. K. Dobkowitz, 425 Mont- 
erey Blvd. 

GOVERNMENT WORK AND 
SUPPLIES 

Bids To Be Asked In One Week. 

REPAIRS Cost, $1500 

SAN FRANCISCO. Fort Miley. 

Repairs to buildings at Fort Miley 
(new foundations, replastering, 
etc.) 

Owner — U. S. Government. 

Architect— Constructing Quartermas- 
ter, Fort Mason. 



Plans Prepared. 

OFFICERS' QUARTERS Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. Presidio. 

Eighteen double sets of non-commis- 
sioner officers' quarters (each two- 
story and basement, brick con- 
struction). 



Ov 



-U. S. Governn 



General's Of- 



Plans by Quartei 

flee. Washington, D. C. 
Plans are being forwarded to the 
Constructing Quartermaster, Ft. Ma- 
son, for approval. 

HAWTHORNE, Nev. — American 
Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing 
Co., Brooklyn, N. Y., at $1,990 sub- 
mitted low bid to the Bureau of Sup- 
plies and Accounts, Navy Department 
Washington, D. C, for furnishing 
greenhouse unit to Naval Ammuni- 
aion Depot at Hawthorne. Next two 
low bidders: Metropolitan Greenhouse 
Manufacturing Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y.. 
$2,162: Lord & Burnham, Chicago, $2,- 
279. Taken under advisement. 



SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until Jan. 15, 
3 P. M., under Order No. 2819, bids 
will be received by U. S. Engineer 
Office, California Fruit Bldg., to fur- 
nish and deliver: 

LOT NO. 1 

90 lin. ft. 14 gauge, corrugated gal- 
vanized iron culvert pipe, 36-in. dia., 
to be made up in 3 sections each 30 
feet long. 

Six 14 gauge, corrugated galvanized 

iron coupling bands, for 36-in. dia. 

pipe of Item 1. Each band to be 12 J ,*> 

inches wide, complete with bolts, etc. 

LOT NO. 2 

Two 8 gauge, black iron pipe, 24 
ft. long, lap-welded inside and out- 
side, 18-in. inside dia., fabricated as 
shown on drawing No. 50-4-1266, less 
gates. 

It is proposed to obtain three 36-in. 
dia. corrugated galvanized iron pipe 
culverts, each 30 ft. long, to be made 
in 30 ft. sections, and have the nec- 
essary coupling bands 12%-in. wide, 
for each end and also two pieces of 
No. 8 gauge or heavier, black iron 
drainage pipes. This specification is 
only for the furnishing and delivering 
of the material f.o.b. Millar Station, 
on line Sacramento Northern Railway. 
The culvert sections and bands are 
to be close, double riveted (2 rows of 
rivets, close riveted) each section of 
culvert and pipe and also the bands 
shall be hot dipped in an approved 
asphalt dip. 



PACIFIC COAST. — Following con- 
tracts awarded by Bureau of Yards 
and Docks. Navy Department. Wash- 
ington, D. C, in connection with Pa- 
cific Coast developments: 

Spec. 6005. Pearl Harbor. T. H., re- 
frigerating plant, A. Nekomoto, 1805 
S King St., Honolulu, T. H.. $14,398. 

Spec. 6298, San Diego, Calif., con- 
crete road pavement. B. G. Carroll, 
4396 Maryland St.. San Diego, Calif.. 
$3,178.78. 

Spec. 6310, Mare Island, Calif., one 
40-ton electric traveling crane and 
runway, Judson Pacific Co., 609 Mis- 
sion St., San Francisco. $75,685. 200 
days. 

Spec. 6122. San Diego, Calif., im- 
provements to electrical system, Wei- 
mer & Peterson, 844 F St., San Diego, 
Calif., $48,300. 

Spec. 6187, Cavite, P. I., air com- 
pressor, Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co.. 
237 N 12th St.. Philadelphia, $11,483. 



Specifications Being Written 
GATES, ETC. $17,00 Available 

SAN FRANCISCO. Presidio (National 



Ce 



ter 



Granite and bronze gates, urns, etc., 
at entrance to National Cemetery. 
Owner — United States Government. 
Architect— Constructing Quartermas- 
ter, Fort Mason, San Francisco. 
Bids will be advertised for shortly. 

SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until January 
14, 3 P. M., under Order No. 2835, bids 
will be received by U. S. Engineer Of- 
fice, California Fruit Bldg., for re- 
pairs and storage of automobiles. 
Specifications and further information 
obtainable from above. 



SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until January 
15, 3 P. M.. under Order No. 2850- 
1750, bids will be received by U. S. 
Engineer Office, California Fruit Bldg. 
to furnish and deliver Rio Vista, So- 
lano County: 

One Surface Gauge, No. 115 pg. 273, 
Thomson-Diggs Cat. No. 26, or equal. 

One Bit Brace, 12-in. sweep. No. 813 
pg. 167 Thomson-Diggs Cat. No. 26, 
or equal. 

One set Auger Bits No. D. M. pg. 404 
Thomson-Diggs Cat. No. 28. or equal. 

One Taper Bridge Reamer, 2-inch, 
Morse Taper Shank No. 696. pg. 18. 
Marwedel Cat. No. 12, or equal. 

Three Pipe Wrenches, Stillson or 
equal, 24-in., solid steel handles. 

Two Drills, high speed, lV6-in. with 
No. 3, Morse Taper shank. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Severin Electric 
Co., 172 Clara St., at $6569 submitted 
lowest bid to Constructing Quarter- 
master, Ft. Mason, for alterations to 
electric feeder system at Letterman 
General Hospital. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

Severin Electric Co $6,569 

H. S. Tittle Co 7,024 

Brayer Electric Co 7.400 

G. H. Armstrong 7,490 

(Alternate) 8.440 

Weidenthal-Gosliner Elec. Co 7,597 

Globe Electric Co 8,000 

Apex Electric Co 8,560 

Atlas Elec. & Eng. Co 9,836 

Chas. A. Langlais 11,440 

Butte Electric & Mfg. Co 13.900 

Butte Electric & Equip. Co 18,166 

Bids held under advisement. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan 

26, 3 P. M. 

FOUNDATIONS. ETC. Cost, $ 

SEATTLE. Washington. 
Foundations, etc., for postoffice. 
Owner — U. S. Government. 
Architect — Supervising A r c h i t e c ' 

Treasury Dept., Washington, D. C 
See call for bids under official pro 
posal section in this issue. 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co.. Cal.— Cap- 
tain Joseph P. Basler, commanding 
officer of Company I, 184th Infantry. 
National Guard, announces that con- 
struction of a $25,000 armory will be 
started this year. Preliminary plans 
for a structure 100 by 150 -ft., with 
drill hall, locker rooms, gymnasium 
quarters, etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Until Januarv 
13, under Circular No. 15, bids will be 
received by Contracting Officer, Med- 
ical Section, Fort Mason, to furnish 
and install one set radiographic X-ray 
machine. Specifications obtainable 
from above. 



SAN DIEGO. Cal.— Until 11 A. M., 
January 17, bids will be received by 
the Public Works Department of the 
Eleventh Naval District, San Diego, 
for alterations and repairs at the 
Naval Operating Base (Hospital), San 
Diego. Specification No. 6373. The 
work includes: (a) the making of cer- 
tain structural changes, consisting of 
tile masonry work, plastering, car- 
pentry and joinery, alterations to ter- 
razzo, magnesite and tile floors and 
base and-electrical work in connection 
with the alterations: (b) the furring 
out and plastering of certain existing 
damaged plastered walls, including 
modification of electrical work and 
magnesite base in connection there- 
with: and (c) the provision and in- 
stallation of hard wood guard rails in 
corridors of first and second floors of 
ward buildings Nos. 2, 5 and 10. (d) 
painting and miscellaneous work in 
connection with the repairs and al- 
terations. Bidding data may be ob- 
tancd from the Commandant, Eleventh 
Naval District, San Diego, upon de- 
posit of $10. Captain DeWitt C. 
Webb, public works officer. 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



El 



even 



MAKE ISLAND, Cal. — Following Ik 

; lets list of l.ids received hy 

Bureau of yards and Docks, Navy 

1 icpal I in. n(. under S 

to furnish turbo alternator for Mare 
Island Navy Yard: 

it, in i. work, complete; 2, services 
r,.r erection: 

Westinghouse Electric- ,V M Ik Co.. 
Washington, item 1, * 11, Lil'S.Mi ; 2. $23. 

General Electric Co., Schenectady, 
Item 1. $46,528; 2. $25. 

Allis-chalm.-rs Mfg. Co., Milwaukee 
Wis., item 1, $46,000; 2, $16. 

PACIFIC COAST. — Following con- 
tracts awarded by Bureau of yards 
and Docks in connection with the Pa- 
cific Coast improvements: 

Spec. 6276. San Diego, Calif., metal 
aircraft structures shop. Fri d F, 
Greenfield Co., isos 7th St., Los An- 
geles, Calif., items 1 and 2, $103,720. 

Spec. G273. Empire. Ore., 20.000 gals, 
water lank and supply system. T. H. 
Scheumann, 9765 02nd Ave. S., Seat- 
tle. Wash.. $1,574. 

Spec. 6367. San Diego, Calif., re- 
newal of insulation of cold storage 
room. West Coast Gas Engine Co., 
312 W. Market St., San Diego, Calif., 
$770. 

Spec. 6213. Puget Sound. Wash, 
quarters, naval radio station, Mc- 
Donald Building Co., 1517 S Tacoma 
Way, Tacoma, Wash., $11,475. 

Spec. 6122. San Diego, Calif., im- 
provement of electrical system, Wei- 
mer & Peterson, S44 F St., San Diego, 
Calif., $48,300. 

Spec. 6355. San Diego, Calif., paint- 
ing 6 hospital buildings, William Gel- 
fan, 21S5 W Washington St., Los An- 
geles, Calif., $6,965. 

HONOLULU, T. H.— Until March 3, 
under Circular No. 6G, bids will be re- 
ceived by Quartermaster, Hawaiian 
General Depot, T. H.. for printing 
equipment, 1 folder machine, 1 Miller 
platen press feeder. Further infor- 
mation obtainable from above. 



Bids Opened. 

MESS HALL BLDGS. Cost, $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. Pre- 
sidio. 
Seven 1 -story frame mess hall bldgs. 
Owner— United States Government. 
Plans by Construction Quartermaster. 

Presidio, Monterey. 
Low Bidder — Newman & Halsted. Pa- 
cific Grove. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 
Newman and Halsted, Pacific 

Grove J1S.77S 

Hook & Hook, Monterey 18,994 

H. Kohlwes, San Francisco 20,131 

Miles M. Elder. Burlingame 20,400 

Chas. M. Hall, Pacific Grove 20,42" 

Thermotite Const. Co., San Jose 20.453 

Young & Horstmeyer, S. F 20,642 

H. W. Riddle, Los Angeles 20,812 

T. H. Johanns, San Francisco... 20,847 

H. D. Coon, Carmel 20,925 

T. B. Goodwin, San Francisco.. 21,295 

Geo. Honore, San Jose 21.670 

Clinton Stephenson Const. Co., 

San Francisco 21,961 

O. S. Almlie, San Francisco 23,259 

W. P. Sweeney, Pacific Grove... 23,700 
T. E. Wallstrom. Watsonville.... 23,916 

M. J. Murphy, Carmel 24,588 

Albert Nelson. San Francisco .... 21.645 

The Minton Co., Mt. View 24,791 

F. E. Turner. Burlingame £4,833 

A. F. Anderson, Oakland 25,574 

Carl N. Swensen, San Jose 27,049 

Bids held under advisement. 

HAWTHORNE. Nevada— Three low 
bidders previously reported, to erect 
mine filling plant at Hawthorne, bids 
opened by Bureau of Yards & Docks, 
Navy Department. December 26, un- 
der Specification 6125. Following is a 
complete list of bids received: 

C F. Dinsmore & Co., Eccles Bldg., 
Ogden, Utah, $333,800. 

Rnht. E. McKee. Central Bldg. Los 
Angeles, Calif., $369,000. 



Thomas Nav.-rty Co., 310 E 8th St., 
Los Angeles, $880, 

Mittry Bros, Const Co., Di twi ll< i 
Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif., $387,725. 

Harrison-Wright Co., Charlotte, N. 
C, $399,600. 

Barrett & Ililp. 918 Harrison St., 

Son Francisco. $4(10,00. 

C. Dudley He Velbiss, 369 Pine St., 
San Francisco, $415,000. 

Schuler & McDonald, Inc., $1323 
Webster St., Oakland, Calif., $429,000. 

Newport Contracting ,v Engineering 
Co., Lee Hall. Va„ $448,000. 

Campbell Bldg. Co., Salt Lake City, 
Utah, $661,391. 

The work will include two bulk 
TNT storage buildings, two box open- 
ing buildings, two tilling houses, two 
buildings designated as cooling shed 
and temporary storage buildings, crat- 
ing and painting building, three drill- 
ing buildings, 29 dugouts with barri- 
cades, empty mine storage building, 
concrete and earth barricades about 
buildings, standard gauge railroad 
tracks, driveways, roads, walks, etc. 



Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 

E8th. 
BARRACKS & MESS HALL $200,000 
MARE ISLAND Navy Yard, Calif. 
Barracks and Mess Hall at Submarine 

Base (Spec. 6330). 
Owner— U. S. Government. 
Plans by Bureau of Y'ards and Docks, 

Navy Dept., Washington. D. C. 
The work includes the construction 
of a barracks and mess hall building 
having reinforced concrete walls and 
slabs; concrete piles; cement mortar 
finish floors; tile floors; marble work; 
miscellaneous steel and iron work; 
hollow tile work; wood roof framing 
and sheathing: clay tile roofing and 
sheet metal work; metal studing and 
lathing; piaster and stucco work; art- 
ificial stone work; wood doors and 
windows; hollow metal doors; vault 
door; refrigeration; plumbing; heat- 
ing: electrical work, and painting. 

Bids will be received by the Bu- 
reau of Yards and Docks at Wash- 
ington. Plans obtainable from Com- 
mandant, Mare Island Navy Y'ard, on 
deposit of $25, returnable, checks for 
same to be made payable to Chief of 
the Pureau of Y'ards and Docks. 



SACRAMENTO, Cal.— Until January 
12, 3 P. 'M., under Order No. 2837-1750, 
bids will be received by U. S. Engi- 
neer Office, California Fruit Bldg., to 
furnish and deliver Rio Vista, Solano 
County: 7500 lbs. welding rods, %-in. 
by 14-in. long, in 50 lb. bundles. Fur- 
ther information obtainable from 
above. 



Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Feb. 
2. 

QUARTERS Cost. $ 

FORT SHAFTER. T. H. Wheeler 

Field, Schofield Barracks. 
Quarters for married and bachelor of- 
ficers, including all grading and 
utilities. 
Owner — U. S. Government. 
Plans by Department Quartermaster. 
Construction Division, Ft. Shatter. 
Honolulu. T. H. 
Plans obtainable from Department 
Quartermaster on deposit of $100, re- 
turnable. 



SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until January 
13, 3 P. M., under Order No. 2836-78, 
bids will be received by U. S. Engi- 
neer Office, California Fruit Bldg , to 
furnish and deliver Rio Vista, Solano 
county, and Stockton, Calif.: 

1000 ft. wire rope, Seales construc- 
tion, uncoated regular lay, plow steel, 
%" dia., hemp center, 6 strands, 19 
wires to the strand. This rope shall 
be in one piece, on an individual reel 

1500 ft. wire rope, galvanized, regu- 
lar lay, Seales construction, %" dia. 
plow steel, hemp center, 8 strands, 19 
wires to strand. Min. breaking 
strength 8000 lbs. This rope shall be 



i pit , on an individual reel. 

The rope- of Item I to be furnished 
shall be uncoated and that of item 2 
shall be coated or galvanized. They 
shall be regular right lay and con- 
si in, (.,1 with a hemn core or center. 



witli 



Low Bidders 

FOUNDATION W( IRK C 

( iaki.and. Alameda Co., Ci 
Foundation work in connect 

proposed new postoffice. 

c iwner O, 8. Government 
Plans by Supervising Architect, Treas- 
ury Dept., Washington, D. C. 
Low Bidder — Geo. Petersen, San Le- 
andro, $38,480. 
Next lowest hid was submitted by 
R. W. Littlefield, Oakland, at $43,000. 
' 'omplete list of bids will be publli hed 
shortly. 



DENVER, Colo.— Until 2 P. M., Jan. 
16, bids will be received by the U. S. 
Eureau of Reclamation, 1441 Welton 
St., Denver, Colo., for furnishing 
equipment as follows: 

1(a) (Alternative to item Kb). 
Structural steel 60 foot by 12 foot 
spilway ring gate, with leveling de- 
vice, seal seats and other appurte- 
o.i (n.s (except spring brass seals) 
complete. 

Kb) (Alternative to item Kb). 
Structural steel 60 foot by 12 foot 
spillway ring gate, with leveling de- 
vice, seal seats and other appurte- 
nances e(xcept spring brass seals) 
complete. 

Prompt delivery of materials is im- 
portant and delivery is descired with- 
in 69 calendar days after receipt of 
notice of award, and all bids specify- 
ing delivery within said number of 
days will be considered on an equal 
basis as regards time of delivery. 
Where the time of delivery specified 
by the bidder is greater than the said 
number of days, each day in excess 
thereof will be evaluated at $25 and 
bids will be compared on this basis 
for award of contract. Spec. No. 499- 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Feb. 

IS. 

HANGAR Cost, $ 

PEARL HARBOR, T. H. Naval Op- 
Seaplane Hangar (Spec. No. 6215). 
Owner — U. S. Government. 
Plans by Bureau of Yards and Docks, 

Navy Dept.. Washington, D. C. 
The work includes earthwork, con- 
crete piling and foundations, concrete 
block partitions, steel and iron work, 
steel windows, roofing, siding and 
sheet metal work, metal covered 
doors, timber work, glazing and paint- 
ing. Plans obtainable from Bureau 
and from Commandant, Naval Oper- 
ating Base, Pearl Harbor, T. H. 



PHOENIX, Ariz. — See "Machinery 
and Equipment," this issue. Bids 
wanted by U. S. Indian School to fur- 
nish concrete mixer. 



HAWTHORNE, Nev.— C. F. Dins- 
more, Ogden, Utah, at $333,800 award- 
ed contract by Bureau of Y'ards and 
Docks, Washington. D. C. for a mine 
filling plant to be erected at the naval 
ammunition depot at Hawthorne. Ne- 
vada. The work will include two bulk 
TNT storage buildings, two box open- 
ing buildings, two filling houses, two 
buildings designated as cooling shed 
and temporary storage buildings, crat- 
ing and painting building, three drill- 
ing buildings, 29 dugouts with barri- 
cades, empty mine storage building, 
concrete and earth barricades about 
buildings, 'standard gauge railroad 
tracks, driveways, roads, walks, etc. 



PEARL HARBOR. T. H.— Following 
is a partial list of prospective bidders 
to construct seaplane hangar at Pearl 
Harbor. T. H.. bids for which will be 
opened by the Eureau of Y'ards and 
Docks, Navy Department, Washing- 



Twelve 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January- 10, 1931 



ton, D. C, in February, under Speci- 
fication No, 6215: 

Crane Company, Washington. 

Bethlehem Fabricators, Inc., Beth- 
lehem, Pa. 

Newport Contracting & Engineer- 
ing Co., Lee Hall, Va. 

Frank M. Weaver & Co., Inc., Lans- 
dale, Pa. 

Mesker Bros. Iron Co., 421 S 6th St., 
St. Louis. 

Pittsburgh-DesMoines Steel Co., Ne- 
ville Island P. O., Pottsburgh. 

Truscon Steel Co., Hill Bldg., Wash- 
ington. 



San Francisco, l air conditio 
system; sch. 4859. 

San Diego, 1 paint spray outfit; 
4867. 



rids Opened. 

FOUNDATION WORK Cost, $ 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Calif. 
Foundation work in connection with 

proposed new postoffice. 
Owner— U. S. Government. 
Plans by Supervising Architect, Treas- 
ury Dept., Washington. D. C. 
Low Bidder — Geo. Petersen, San Le- 
andro. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

Geo. Petersen. San Leandro $3S.4S0 

Schuler & McDonald. Oakland- 39.421 

R. W. Littlefield, Oakland 43.566 

Barrett & Hilp. San Francisco.. 44,900 
K. E. Parker, San Francisco... 45.000 

E. T Lesure. Oakland 45,563 

M. B. McGowan, San Francisco 46,987 

W. C. Keating, Oakland 47.764 

David Nordstrom, Oakland 47.980 

W. H. Hauser. Oakland 48,798 

S. Rasori, San Francisco 49.892 

W. G. Thornally, Oakland 49.960 

Ralph McLeran. San Francisco.. 54.000 

MacDonald & Kahn, S. F - 55.491 

H. J. Christensen. Oakland 57,323 

A. M. Lundberg. St. Louis 60,900 

Bids held under advisement. 



WASHINGTON, D. C— Bids are be- 
ing received by Bureau of Supplies & 
Accounts, Navy Department, Wash- 
ington, D. C, to furnish and deliver 
miscellaneous supplies and equipment 
as noted in the following schedules, 
further information being available 
from the Navy Department Officer, 
100 Harrison St.. San Francisco: 
Bids Open Jan. 20 
Mare Island, 1 motor driven angle, 
rolling, forming and curving machine; 
sch. 4842. 

Mare Island. 5 electric warming ov- 
ens; sch. 4839. 

San Francisco. 1 motor driven hand 
planer and pointer; sch. 4836. 

Mare Island, 1 motor driven milling 
machine; sch. 4835. 

Western yards, radio direction find- 
ers and spares; sch. 4826. 

Mare Island and Puget Sound, boil- 
er safety valves and spare parts; sch. 
4825. 

Western yards, gauges, planes and 
squares; sch. 4838. 

Mare Island. 4 motor driven brass 
turret lathes; sch. 4845. 

Mare Island, 1 electric muffle fur- 
nace, 1 heating unit and 1 indicating 
pyrometer; sch. 4846. 

Mare Island, 57,000 lbs. rivet steel; 
sch. 4856. 

San Francisco. 1 motor driven auto- 
matic cutoff saw; sch. 4849. 

Mare Island, 1 motor driven vertical 
shaper; sch. 4857. 

Mare Island, 1 motor driven turret 
lathe; sch. 4854. 

Puget Sound, 1 motor driven mill- 
ing machine, with attachments: sch. 
4S53. 

Mare Island. 1 motor driven power 
press; sch. 4843. 

Mare Island, 1 motor driven mill- 
ing machine; sch. 4844. 

Mare Island. 1400 lbs. naval rolled 
brass; Mare Island, 5600 lbs. phosphor 
bronze and 5200 pounds sheet copper; 
sch. 4868. 

Mare Island. 18 chronometric tach- 
ometers, and Puget Sound, 7 do; sch. 
4875. 

Mare Island, 1 motor driven milling 
machine: sch. 4871. 

Mare Island. 120 gals, glycerine; sch. 
4877. 

Bids Open Jan. 27 



POMONA. Cal.— Following is a par- 
tial list of prospective bidders to erect 
post office at Pomona, bids for which 
will be opened by the Supervising Ar- 
chitect, Treasury Department, Wash- 
ington, D. C. January 28: 

William Rohrbacker, Builders' Ex- 
change, Santa Ana, Calif. 

Wm. MacDonald Const. Co., Syndi- 
cate Trust Bldg., St. Louis. 

George Griffiths Const. Co., Arcade 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

A. M. Lundburg. Railway Exchange 
Bldg.. St. Louis. 

MARE ISLAND, Calif.— Following is 
a partial list of prospective bidders 
to erect barracks and mess hall at 
Mare Island Navy Yard, bids for 
which will be opened January 28 by 
the Bureau of Yards and Docks, Wavy 
Department. Washington, D. C, un- 
der Specification No. 6330: 

W. P. Winston Co., Inc., Box 20S9, 
Richmond. Va. 

Jas. L. McLaughlin Co.. 251 Kearny 
St., San Francisco. 

Wm. MacDonald Const. Co., Syndi- 
cate Trust Bldg., St. Louis. 

George Griffiths Const. Co., Arcade 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Crane Company, Washington 

HALLS AND SOCIETY 
BUILDINGS 

January 2, 1931 
Contract Awarded. 

ADDITION Cost, $10,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co , Cal. 

Naglee Tract. 
One-story concrete, plaster and stucco 
addition to building (right wing 
addition). 
Owner — Rosicrucian Order, Naglee. 
Architect— Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor — Paul Anderson, 1210 Lin- 
coln St., San Jose. 
(4291) 16 

CORNING. Tehama C, Cal. — Mt. 
Lassen Post. American Legion, has 
petitioned the county supervisors to 
proceed with construction of the pro- 
posed Corning Veterans' Memorial 
Building, for which the county has 
$25,000 available. Plans have been 
prepared by Architects Starks and 
Flanders, Forum Bldg., Sacramento. 
It is expected that a similar petition 
will be presented to the county by 
members of Raisner Post. American 
Legion, at Cornine 

HOSPITALS 

Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan. 
27. 2 P. M. 

WARD UNIT Cost, $ 

AGNEWS, Santa Clara Co.. Cal. State 
Hospital Grounds. 

Two-story reinforced concrete Ward 
Unit No. 2 (floor area 70,000 sq. 
ft.) 

Owner — State of California. 

Architect— State Department of Pub- 
lie Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, George B. McDougall. State 
Architect. Public Works Building. 
Sacramento. 
Will have tile partitions, wood roof 

construction and tile roof similiar to 

first unit now in course of construc- 



Separate bids will be entertained as 
follows : 

1. General Work. 

2. Electrical Work. 

3. Plumbing, Heating and Venti- 
lation Work. 

4. Complete Mechanical including 
Plumbing, Heating, Ventilating, and 
Electrical Work. 

The "General Work" bid will em- 
brace all branches of work other than 
segregated above. 



rians Being Prepared. 

ADDITION Cost, $200,000 

PORTLAND, Oregon. 

Reinforced concrete wing addition to 
hospital; brick and cast stone ex- 
terior; 80-bed capacity in addition 
to laboratories, surgeries and ser- 
vice rooms. 

Owner — Emanuel Hospital. 

Architect— Sutton & Whitney. Lewis 
Bldg., Portland. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Until January 
13, under Circular No. 15, bids will be 
received by Contracting Officer, Med- 
ical Section, Fort Mason, to furnish 
and install one set radiographic X-ray 
machine. Specifications obtainable 
from above. 

Prospective Bidders. 

HEALTH CENTER Approx. $10,000 
SAN LEANDRO, Alameda Co., Cal. 
One - story frame and stucco health 

center. 
Owner — City of San Leandro. 
Architect— James Narbett, 466 31st St. 
Richmond. 

Following contractors have secured 
plans: 

C. A. Gossett, 327 Davis Court, Oak- 
land. 

A. S. Maria, 2229 Washington St., 
Oakland. 

L. R. Martin. 219 Arroyo, Oakland 

P. J. Haven. San Leandro. Oakland 

U. B. Lee. 888 Rodney, Oakland. 

Bids will be opened Jan. 21, 8 P. M. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY, Cal— State 
director of institutions announces the 
purchase of 1060 acres of land seven 
miles west of Arlington, in Riverside 
county, as a site for the new South- 
ern California state hospital for the 
insane Construction of the new insti- 
tution will be upon the unit plan, 
similar to the farm colony buildings 
at Agnew. Eventually there will be 
eight units, housing 400 patients each 
in addition to the service buildings 
and employees' quarters. Approxi- 
mately $670,000 available for erection 
of first units. Plans will be prepared 
by State Architect George B. Mc- 
Dougall, Public Works Bldg., Sacra- 
mento. 



YOUNTVILLE. Napa Co., Cal.— R. 
G. Meyler Corp., 940 Maple St., Los 
Angeles, at $11,930 submitted lowest 
bid to State Department of Archi- 
tecture for furnishing and installing 
boiler at the Veteran's Home, Yount- 
ville. Following is a complete list of 
the bids received: 

R. G. Meyer Corp., L. A $11,930 

W. E. Leland, S. F 12,184 

C. U Martin, S. F 13,311 

Dorwood Eng. Co., S. F 13,320 

Bids under advisement. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— City Purchasing 
Agent Leonard S. Leavy, 270 City 
Hall, rejects hids received November 
10, under Proposal No. 649, to furnish 
and install lighting fixtures in Ward 
Building F at the Laguna Honda 
Home. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal-— W. Calvin 
Murdock and associates, 2510 S. Cen- 
tral Ave., have purchased 96 acres 
of land in Little Tujunga Canyon as 
a site for a sanitarium. No definite 
time has been set for starting work 
on the project. 

Eids Opened. 

KITCHEN. ETC. Cost, $ 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 

One-story reinforced concrete kitchen 
and commissary building and two- 
story reinforced concrete boys' 
and girls' dormitory. 

Owner — State of California. 

Architect— State Department of Pub- 
lic Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, Geo. B. McDougall, State 
Architect. Public Works Building, 
Sacramento. 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS [hirteatt 

air conditioning room In the Engl- SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA — State 

peering 1. rali.ry on 111.- campus • ■ I" Arch 1 1 eot G ge B, MCDougall, Pub- 

the University of California. lie Works Bldg., Sacramento, furnishes 

following Is a complete list ..f bids 1 1 » • ■ following information regarding 
received: slat.- buildings to be erected In South- 
Cork Insulation Co., S. F 57175 e rn California this year: 

Coast Refrigeration Co., S. F 7019 Pacific Colony— Hospital, admlnla- 

Van Fleet Freear Co., S. K 7724 tratlon building and girls' industrial 

Mundel & s Inc 7865 building to cost (134,000 will be reads 

York Ice Refrigeration Co., S. F. 8157 fnr bids January 10. Ward building to 

Bids lnld under advisement. cost $45,000 will lie ready for bids 

April 1. Dairy building to cost $15,- 

POWER PLANTS 000 will probably be ready for bids 

. April 1. 

Harold Crop, clerk " California Institution for Women, 

BRAWLBT, Imperial Co., Cal.— Un- near Tehachapi — Three cottages, ad- 
til S P. M., January 12, bids will be ministration building and mechanical 
received by the Mulberry school dis- services to cost $324,000 will be ready 
triet for furnishing one automatic for bids January 23. Cottage for in- 
lighting plant, 110-volt, 1500-kilowatt. males to cost $53,000 will be ready for 
bids January 30. 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal— Santa Barbara State Teachers' Col- 

Construction has been started by the lege— Science and Art building to cost 

Pacific Gas and Electric Co. on a 10,- $110,000 will be ready for bids April 1. 

000-kw. sub-station In East Monterey. San Lu j s Obispo— Division of high- 

at Casanova St. and the Castroville ways office bulding to cost $43,000 will 

Highway. be advertised upon receipt of instruc- 
tions from the division of highways. 

Bids Opened. Whittier State School— Employees' 

POWER HOUSE Cost. $40,000 cott age to cost $8500 will be ready fol 

SAN FRANCISCO. Third Avenue and bjds p eDruary j" 

Parnassus Street. ^ s , at j , nsane Hospital, near 

One - story steel frame and concrete Arlington-First Unit for patients to 

power house $320,000 will be ready for bids 

Owner— University of California. " , ' , Second unit for patients 

\r n l.tt Q »l Wm (' M-ivc CrnpL-^r l«t .1.1IU1.11.\ H. .-Mtoilll UI1IL 1U1 p.incui.^ 

ArC Nlnla\kB,d g ^ ' I" C ° St $3 A°'° 00 WU1 ^ ready ' 0r bidS 

Following is a complete list of bids: January ii . 

J. S. Hannah, 268 Market St.. $22.- Norwalk State Hospital-Employees 

990- 120 days quarters to cost $68,000 will be ready 

F J. Rei'llv, San Francisco, $22,444; for bids January 16. 

200 days Patton State Hospital— Unit for ln- 

Barrett & Hilp, San Francisco, $24,- firm patients to cost $45,000 will be 

787; 110 days. started during January, work to be 

Wm. Spivoek, San Francisco, $25,- done by day labor. Additions to in- 

900; 130 days. tirmary for females to cost $50,000 will 

Jacks & Irvine, San Francisco, $20,- be started during February, work to 

000; 90 days. be done by day labor. 

Sullivan & Sullivan. Oakland, $£6,- 

2G2; 120 days. 

E. T. Lesure, Oakland, $26,424; 120 Foundation Eids Wanted — To Be 

days. Opened Jan. 20, 11 A. M. 

A. Nelson, San Francisco, $26,620; OPERA HOUSE Cost, $2,500,000 

150 days. SAN FRANCISCO. Block bounded by 

N. H. Sjoberg & Sons, San Fran- van Ness Ave.. Franklin, Grove 

Cisco, $27,445; 120 days. an a Fulton Sts. 

Villadsen Bros., San Francisco, $27,- Six-story Class A opera house, seating 

900; 120 days. capacity 4000; standing room 500. 

Vogt & Davidson, San Francisco, Owner— City and Countv of San Fran- 

$2,900; 120 days. cjsco (S F , War Memorial). 

Clinton Stephensen Const. Co., San Architect— G. A. Lansburgh, 140 Mont- 
Francisco. $28,487; 110 days. gomery St., and Arthur Brown, 251 

J. W. Cobby & Son, San Francisco. Kearny St San Francisco 

$28,576; 110 days Manager 'of Constr. — Lindgren & 

■HHW^IM rfavs ' Franc ' sco - Swinerton, 225 Bush St.. S. F. 

?28 Ra? P h Mclean & Son, San Fran- See call for bids, under official pro-, 

Cisco, $29,363; 90 days. P osal section i n mis is sue. 

Eids held under advisement. 

Plans Being Completed. 

EUGENE. Oregon.— Hargreaves and LIBRARY Cost. $8000 

Lindsay at $21,312 awarded contract OILDALE, Kern Co., Cal 

by C. A. McClain, superintendent of One-story brick or concrete library, 

city water system, to construct power Owner-Standard School District 

house and service tanks for steam Architect-E. J. Symmes, Haberfelde 

auxiliary plant of Municipal Water Bldg., Baker sfield. 

System. Guy F. Pyle, next low at 

$27 269 OAKLAND, Cal.— City Board of Li- 
brary Directors has requested the city 

council to provide $10,000 to finance 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, FIRE cleaning and painting the main publi t 
u/-»iTer-e «wn i » li c library and branches. Work will in- 
rHJUotb AINU JAILS elude varnishing book stacks, instal- 
lation of new racks, etc. 

SALINAS, Monterey Co.. Calif.— 

County supervisors contemplate re- Foundation Bids Wanted — To Be 

modeling of attic in courthouse for Opened Jan. 20, 11 A. M. 

quarters for the county law library. LEGION BLDG Cost. $2,500,000 

The library is at present housed in the SAN FRANCISCO. Civic Center, 

basement of the courthouse. Four-story and basement concrete 

Class A Legion Building. 

Contract Awarded. Owner— City and County of San Fran- 
JAIL UNIT Cost, $1835 Cisco (S. F. War Memorial). 
PLEASANTON. Alameda Co., Cal. Architect— G. A. Lansburgh, 140 Mont- 
Steel frame jail unit (3 cells) (accom- gomery St., and Arthur Brown, 251 

modate 6 prisoners). Kearny St., San Francisco 

Owner— Citv of Pleosanton (Crawford A. Wagstaff, 451 Montgomery St., 

Letham, City Clerk). is in charge of the memorial drafting 

Contractor— Van Dorn Steel Co. rooms. 

Contract awarded at $1700 f. o. b. See call for bids under official pro- 
Seattle, adding $135 for installation. posal section in this issue. 



Kitchen and dormitory bulldlni will 
have tile partitions, steel and wood 
roof construction and tile roof; tmal 
n .uea 14,000 sq. ft. 

Boys' and Kirls' dormitory will have 
tile partitions, wood roof construction 
.iii.l nl. roof: total floor area 12,7011 
s.|. ft. 

Following Is a complete list of bids: 

Alt. No. 1, add for addition of bakery. 

Alt No •-' add for addition of arcade, 

Alt. Nn. 3, deduct for omission of ele 

valor. 

General Work 

Sorensen & Haggmark, 2652 Hani- 
son St., San Francisco, $154,000; (1) 
$4400; (2) $4270; (3) $4200. 

Monson Bros. San Francisco, $161,- 
940; (1) $4300; (2) $3500; (3) $4250. 

E. T. Lesure, Oalilan, $168,840; (1) 
14800; O $4600; (3) $4295. 

Carl N. Swensen, San Jose. $169,- 
680; (1) $4742; (2) $3905; (3) $4147. 

H. L. Petersen. San Francisco, $171- 
643; (1) $49SG: (2) $56SS; (3) $40011. 

David Nordstrom, Oakland, $176,- 
024; (1) $4988; (2) $4631; (3) $4247. 

Geo. J. Maurer. Oakland, $170,889: 
(1) $3850; (2) $3850; (3) $1450. 

H. Mayson, Long Beach. $179,000; 
(11 $4843; (2) $5200; (3) $4400. 

F, C. Amaroso & Sons, S. F., $188.- 
670; (1) $4600; (2) $5200; (3) $4000. 

E. T. Leiter & Son. Oakland. $1S9.- 
500; (1) $7200: (2) $0000;( 3) $4360. 
Leibert & Trobock. S. F.. $194,822: 

(1) $5718; (2) $4S17; (3) $5888. 
Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating 

Geo. A. Schuster. 3712 Grove St., 
Oakland. $34,968; (1) $73S: (2) $S5. 

Geo. C. Eell. Oakland, $36,690; (1) 
$650: (2) $200. 

W. H. Picard, Oakland, $30,940; (1) 
$G0G; (2) $194. 

Scott Co., Oakland, $37,600; (1) $588; 

(2) $81. 

Carl T. Doell, Oakland, $39,923; (1) 
$672; (2) $194. 

Herman Lawson, San Francisco, $42- 
987: (1) $823; (2) $2S0. 

Electrical Work 

George Woolf, 795 Alcatraz. Oak- 
land $7800; (1) $195; (2) S197. 

T. L. Rosenberg Co.. Oakland. $S199; 
(1) $115: (2) $196. 

Eddy Electric Co., S. F„ $8320; (1) 
$280; (2) $70. 

H. S. Tittle Co., S. F., $8662; (1) 
$166; (2) $183. 

Decker Elec. Co., S. F., $9710; (1) 
$254; (2) $180. 

Bids held under a 



HOTELS 



Segregated Bids Eeing Taken. 

HOTEL Cost, $250,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Pine St. between 
Powell and Stockton Sts. 

Sixteen -storv steel frame and concrete 
hotel. 

Owner— Sheldrake Hotel Co. 

Architect— H. C. Baumann, 251 Kear- 
ny Street. 
As previously reported, structural 

steel awarded to Judson Pacific Co., 

609 Mission St.; excavation to L. De- 

vencenzi, 148 Blake St. 



ICE AND COLD STORAGE 
PLANTS 

OLIVE, Orange Co., Calif . — Olive 

Heights Citrus Assn.. Een. H. Cole, 
manager, Olive, is having plans pre- 
pared for a precooling plant to be 
erected north of its packing house in 
Olive. Bids will be taken early in 
January. It will be a reinforced con- 
crete structure with a capacity for 
icing and storing 63 cars, and will 
cost about $75,000. Ice manufacturing 
equipment may be installed in the 
Iniilding 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal.— 
Cork Insulation Co., Inc., 354 Pine St, 
San Francisco, at $7175 submitted low- 
est bid to the Regents of the Univer- 
sity of California for refrigeration and 



Fourteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



General Contract Awarded. 
AUDITORIUM Cont. Price, $704,850 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co.. Cal. 
Class A reinforced concrete municipal 
auditorium (tile and composition 
roofing, steel and wood sash) 
(seating capacity 3000). 
Owner — City of Pasadena. 
Architects — Edwin Bergstrom, 1129 
Citizens National Bank Bldg., Los 
Angeles, and Bennett & Haskell, 
311 First Trust Bldg., Pasadena. 
Contractor— William C. Crowell, 495 S. 
Broadway, Pasadena. 
Other low bids held under advise- 
ment as follows: 

Coony & Winterbottom, 2425 Hunter 
St., Los Angeles, heating and venti- 
lating, at $54,855. 

R. R. Jones Electric Co., 1124 Fair 
Oaks St , South Pasadena, electric 
wiring, at $46,445. 

F. B. Jones, 521 N. Hollisten St., 
Pasadena, plumbing, at $25,564. 

Peabody Seating Co., 631 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, seats, at $23,302.08. 

Beckwith Elevators, Ltd, 1339 Santa 
Fe St., Los Angeles, elevators, at $7020. 
D. Zelinsky & Sons, Inc., 6S7 An- 
tonio St., Los Angels, painting, at 
$6786. 
Chair bids were rejected. 



Contract To Be Awarded. 

FIRE HOUSE Cont. Price, $0952 

CORTE MADERA. Marin Co., Cal. 

NE First and Willows Sts 
One-story frame and stucco fire house 

with tile roof (47x61 ft.) Spanish 

type (heatng plant). 
Owner — Corte Madera Fire Dept., Inc.. 

Corte Madera. 
Plans by J. C. Oglesby, Freitas Bldg.. 

San Rafael. 
Contractor — William Wegner, 225 

Monte Vista Ave., Larkspur. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA — State 
department of public works announces 
that plans will be ready for contrac- 
tors within the next thirty days for 
the following state building projects: 
First unit of the new Southern Cali- 
fornia State Hospital for the Insane, 
near Arlington, cost $320,000; new 
women's prison near Tehachapi, cost 
$324,000: second unit at Agnew State 
Hospital, cost $320,000; hospital, ad- 
ministration and girls' industrial build- 
ings at Pacific Colony, cost $134,000; 
employees' quarters and physician's 
residence at Norwalk State Hospital, 
cost $76,000. 



January 3, 1931 
Preparing Working Drawings. 
CITY HALL Cost, $450,000 

BEVERLY HILLS. Los Angeles Co 
One and two-story reinforced concrete 

city hall and fire station. 
Owner— City of Beverly Hills. 
Architect— Koener & Gage, 468 North 

Camden Drive, Beverly Hills. 



January 6, 1931 
Contract Awarded. 

COURTHOUSE Cost, $7000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Install elevator in courthouse. 
Owner— County of Santa Clara, Henry 

A Pfister, County Clerk, San Jose. 
Architect— Binder & Curtis, 35 W San 

Carlos St., San Jose. 
Contractor— Otis Elevator Co., 1 Beach 

St., San Fancisco. 
Following is a complete list of bids 
received: 

Otis Elevator Co., S. F $3773 

Thermotite Constr. Co., San Jose 4121 

Spencer Elevator Co., S F 4125 

George Honore, San Jos 4198 

R. O. Summers, San Jose 4378 

MERCED, Merced Co., Cal.— W. E. 
Landram, local businessman, heads a 
group advocating the erection of a 
Hall of Records Building to house 
county offices and for storage of coun- 
ty records. It is probable that the 



matter will be officially considered by 
the supervisors at their January meet- 



RF..«'DFNCE£ 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cont. price. J7.398.50 

PALO ALTO. Santa Clara Co., Calif. 

Hamilton Avenue. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 

with tile roof (6 rooms, 2 baths). 
Owner— E. H. Helm, 419 University 

Ave., Palo Alto. 
Plans by E. Reichel, 303 University 

Ave.'. Palo Alto. 
Contractor— John Hansen, £53 Fulton 

St., Palo Alto. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
RESIDENCE Cost. $30,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 10924 

Foothill Blvd. 
Two-stnrv and basement frame and 

stucco residence (11 rooms). 
Owner — Llovd Dinkelspiel. 2S00 Broad- 
way, San Francisco. 
Architect— J. H. Mitchell, 369 Pine St., 

San Francisco. 
Contractor— A. F. and C. W. Mattock. 

212 Clara St.. San Francisco. 
Mill Work— Lannoni Bros. Mfg. Co., 

5th and Magnolia Sts.. Oakland. 
Electric Work— Kenyon Electric Co., 

526 13th St., Oakland. 
Sheet Metal— Metals Mfg. Co., Ltd.. 

912 Howard St., San Francisco. 
Plumbing— Scott Co., 113 10th Street. 

Oakland. 
Lumber— Sunset Lumber Co.. 400 High 

St., Oakland. 



Sub-Figures Being Taken. 
RESIDENCE Cost. $7000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. West 
Proctor Ave. bet. Julia and Modoc. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 



(G 



Owner and Builder— W. A. Netherby, 

3S53 Lyman Road, Oakland. 
Architect — Not Given. 

Bidts Wanted 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (8 rooms). 

Owner — H. E. Murray, Santa Cruz. 

Plans by Russell Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 

Sub-Figures Being Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $5500 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co.. Cal. 1520 
Havenscourt Blvd. 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (5 rooms and ga- 
rage). 



Owner and Builde 

2607 64th Ave. 

Architect— Not Gi 



on. 



Plans Being Completed. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. St. Francis Woods. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (9 rooms). 
Owner — Dr. S. J. Hunkin, 1155 Bush 

Street. 
Architect— Henry H. Gutterson, 5 2 6 

Powell St. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $7500 

MILBRAE HIGHLANDS, San Mateo 

Co., Cal. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (5 rooms) 
Owner and Builder— A. N. Arneson, 

195 Lowell St., San Francisco. 
Architect— Chas. Strothoff, 2274 15th 

St., San Francisco. 



Sub-Figures Being Taken. 
RESIDENCES Cost each. $6000 

SAN FRANCISCO. E 19th Avenue S 

Lawton St. 
Two 1-story and basement frame an-1 

stucco residences. 
Owner and Builder— A. Halsen, 2427 

25th Avenue. 
Architect— Not Given. 



Sub-Figures Being Ta!:cn. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $7500 

MILLBRAE HIGHLANDS, San Ma- 
teo Co.. Cal. 

Two-story frame and stucco residence 

Owne rand Builder— E. J. Hargrave. 
1106 Laguna, Burlingame. 

Architect— Wolfe and Higgins, Realty 
Bldg.. San Jose. 

Lumber— Burlingame Lbr. Co., Bur- 
Jingame. 



Preparing Preliminary Working Draw- 
ings. 

RESIDENCE Cost approx. $40,000 

MONTEREY', Monterey Co., Cal. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (12 rooms). 

Owner — Withheld. 

Architect— Williams and Wastell, 374 
17th St., Oakland. 



Bids Opened— Held Under Advisement 

RESIDENCE Cost approx. $20,000 

SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co.. Cal. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner— Dr. Percy Phillips, 2S6 Wal- 
nut St., Santa Cruz. 

Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 
St., San Francisco. 
Announcement will be made in a 

few days. 



ORNAMENTAL WIRE AND IRON WORK 



IRON 
WIRE 



Fence and Gates 

TENNIS COURT ENCLOSURES 
WIRE SCREENS AND GUARDS 



WEST COAST WIRE & IRON WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
86-863 Howard Street * ** * 'Phone SUtter 1136, 

Continuous Operation Since 1887 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Fifteen 



Owner Taking Sub-Bids 
RESIDENCE Cost, 15000 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal 
One-ston ;lllli basemenl brick veneer 

residence with wood shingle roof 

(6 rooms). 
Owner and Builder— J. R. Leighton, 

SI 3 Bedford Road, Stockton. 

\ r , i, i -v I o t ,. r Galbraith, Elks 

Bldg., Stockton. 
Hot air furnace, two-car garage. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $7500 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Calif. 706 

Hilldale Avenue. 

li._.-sl.uy and basement frame and 
stucco residence (G rooms; Eng- 
lish type). 

Owner— S. C. Couper. Berkeley. 

rians by Mr. Walker. 

Contractor— J.. M. Walker, 1709 Grove 
St., Berkeley. 
Wood panel walls, shingle roof, gas 

furnace, concrete double garage. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $7500 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co.. Cal. Nor- 

wood Avenue. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (5 rooms). 
Owner— Withheld. 
Architect— Hardman & Russ. Berkeley 

Bank Bldg., Berkeley. 

REDDING. Shasta Co.. Cal— W. H. 
Curtis, formerly of Oakland, has been 
granted a building permit by the city 
council to erect a $10,000 auto court 
at Lincoln and Pine Sts. The court 
will consist of 12 duplex buildings and 
will be operated in connection with 
the service station at that location. 

Contract Awarded 

RESIDENCE Cost. $12,500 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

No. 1508 Thirty-seventh Street. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (9 rooms). 
Owner— Ralph E. Fellows, 2115 I St.. 

Sacramento. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— N. H Lund, 3300 Cutter 

St., Sacramento. 



SCHOOLS 

Preparing Preliminary Plans. 
SCHOOL Cost, $135,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Connecticut Street 
bet. 19th and 20th Sts. (Matt I. 
Sullivan Elementary School 1. 
Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, S. J Hester. Secretary, 
Board of Public Works. 
Architect — G. A. Applegarth. Claus 
Spreckels Bldg., San Francisco. 
This structure will contain 11 stand- 
ard classrooms, 1 kindergarten, 1 as- 
sembly hall and lunch room with 
kitchen, teachers' offic, clinic and 
waiting room, storage rooms, two lav- 
atories, etc. 

Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
SCHOOL Cont. Price, $29,999 

UPPER LAKE, Lake Co., Cal. 
One-story reinforced concrete high 

school (five classrooms and audi- 
torium). 
Owner— Upper Lake Grammar School 

District. 
Architect — Wm. Herbert, Rosenberg 

Bldg., Santa Rosa 
Contractor — Petaluma Constr. Co., 

Petaluma. 
Concrete — General Contractor. 
Lumber— Willits Lumber Co., Willits 

and Upper Lake. 
Millwork— A. F. Stevens Lumber Co., 

Healdsburg and Lakeport. 
Reinforcing Steel— Concrete Eng Co.. 

1280 Indiana St., San Francisco. 
Plumbing— Roy Kynock, Petaluma. 
Sheet Metal— B. F. Shell, Petaluma. 
Painting— H. Kruger, Santa Rosa. 
Roofing— H. C. Gladrow, Santa Rosa, 



Electrical and Heating— Lake County 

Electric Co., Lakeport. 
Glass and Glazing— W. P. Fuller fi Co., 

San Francisco. 
Blackboards — C. F Weber Co., San 

Francisco. 

Steel Sash— Michel & Pfeffer, San 

Francisco. 
Linoleum and Shades— R. E. Ellison. 

Petaluma. 

Preparing Plans. 

SC 1. C.°st, $100,ooo 

ALIIA.MBRA, Los Angeles Co.. Cal. 
Emory Park Grammar School Site. 
Two-story and basement masonry 
school (8 classrooms, library, cafe- 
teria, etc.) 
Owner— Alhambra City School District 
Architect— Richard C. Farrell, 11 S. 
Second St , Alhambra. 
Bids will be called for about Feb 2 



Plans Being Figured. 

GYMNASIUM, ETC. Cost, $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. 

One - story reinforced concrete aca- 
demic building with tile roof. 

Owner— Monterey Union High School 
District. 

Architect— Swartz & Ryland, Spazier 
Bldg., Monterey. 
Bids will be taken in two or three 

weeks. 



SAN JOSE. Santa Clara Co., Cal. — 
Board of Education. Walter Bachrodt. 
Secretary, is inspecting samples of 
school equipment comprising library 
furniture, school furniture, electric 
fixtures, sprinkler systems and lock- 
ers for new school buildings in anti- 
cipation of purchasing $12,000 worth 
of such equipment. 

Prospective Bidders. 
GYMNASIUM Cost, $50,000 

KENTFIELD. Marin Co., Cal. 
Gymnasium (wood frame, roof trusses 
over gymnasium proper carried on 
steel columns) planting lawns and 
shrubbery, etc., at college grounds 
Owner— Marin Junior College District. 
Architect — A. A. Cantin. 544 Market 
St., San Francisco. 

Following contractors have secured 
plans. 

Chas. Vezey & Sons, 3220 Sacra- 
mento St., Oakland. 

Sullivan & Sullivan. 2653 Best Ave., 
Oakland. 

Leibert & Trobock, Rialto Bldg., S, 
F. 

The Minton Co.. Mountain View. 

Young & Horstmeyer, 461 Market 
St., San Francisco. 

J. W. Cobby & Son, 260 Tehama St.. 
San Francisco. 

Wallace Snelgrove, Richmond. 

Gaubert Bros., 4735 Brookdale Ave., 
Oakland 

Carl Nelson, 1421 E Channel Street, 
Stockton. 

Siemer & Kendell, San Anselmo. 

Wm. Dwyer, San Rafael. 

O. H. Smith, San Rafael. 



Ed. Jacks.in, San Rafael. 

Ralph McLeran, Hearst Eldg., San 
Francisco. 

\\ hi Spivock, Hobart Bldg., S. F. 

P. Lamb. VallejO. 

]■' H. Field, 135 Madrone Ave., San 
Francisco. 

i i Is * Irvine, 74 New Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco. 

Clinton Stephenson Const. Co., Mo- 
nadnock Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Jas. L. McLaughlin, 251 Kearny St.. 
San Francisco. 

A. Nelson, 242 Ocean Ave. S. F. 

J. S. Hannah, 26S Market St., San 
Francisco. 

Bids are to he opened Jan. 15, 8 P. 
M. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
ADDITION Cost, $75,000 

MADERA, Madera Co., Cal. 
Class C brick addition to high school. 
Owner — Madera Union High School 

District. 
Architect — Davis-Pearce Co., Grant 
and Weber Sts., Stockton. 
Plans will be ready for bids In 
about 45 days. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Lee J. lmmel. 1031 
Evelyn St.. Oakland, at $5648 awarded 
contract by Board of Education, 104 
Administration Bldg., 1025 Second 
Avenue, to construct Maxwell Park 
School retaining wall, steps and grad- 
ing at NE corner of Fleming and 
Monticello Aves. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Lacking a quo- 
rum of the Board of Supervisors, bids 
scheduled for opening last Monday on 
124 opera chairs for the choral room 
of the Francisco Junior High School 
will not be opened until next Mon- 
day. Jan. 12, it is announced by Leon- 
ard S. Leavy, city purchasing agent. 



Plans Being Completed 

SCHOOL BLDGS. Approx. $300,000 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co., Cal. Pied- 
mont Highlands (Edith St. near 
Morpeth). 

Group of reinforced concrete high 
school buildings (academic build- 
ing, auditorium and gymnasium: 
accommodate 500). 

Owner — Roman Catholic Archbishop of 
San Francisco, 1100 Franklin St., 
San Francisco. 

Architect— H. A. Minton. Bank of 
Italy Bldg , Eddy and Powell Sts.. 
San Francisco. 
Buildings will be constructed for the 

Sister of The Holy Name. 

Bids will be taken in two or three 

weeks. 



BERKELEY, Alameda Co.. Cal — 
Regents of the University of Califor- 
nia announce that approximately $3,- 
000,000 in improvements and buildings 
will be undertaken at the University 
during the current year. 



"Gold Medal" Safety Scaffolding 

for use on steel and concrete frame buildinas, saves 
lives, time and monev 

It pavs to use the best Scaffolding Equipment 
whenever a Scaffold is required. The rilk it 
always ereat. 

The Patent Scaffolding Company 

270— 13th St.. San Francisco Phone Hemlock 4271 

Lesser ef Suspend**! and Swinging Safety "Gold Medal" SeafUHIne. 



Sixteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal 
—Until January 13. 8 P. M., bids will 
be received by C- R. Holbrook, secre- 
tary. Hoard of Education, to furnish 
and install: 

(1) blackboards; 

(2i window shades: 

(3) lighting fixtures; 

(4). miscellaneous other equipment 
for the new Laurel, Gault and Mis- 
sion Hills Schools. Specifications ob- 
tainable from secretary. 



Contracts Awarded. 

SCHOOL BLDG. Cost. $160,000 

SANTA BARBARA, Santa Barbara 

Co., Cal. Jefferson School Site 
Two -story masonry school building 

(classrooms, kindergarten, etc.) 
Owner — Santa Barbara City School 

District. 
Architect— Floyd Brewster, J. C. Aus- 
tin and F. M. Ashley, Chamber of 
Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Contra, tor— Bakker & Robinson, 732 D 
St., San Bernardino, at $109,300 
Plumbing 
Sweeny & Sons, 34 W. Cota St., Santa 
Barbara, at $7117. 
Heating 
Sweeny & Sons, Santa Barbara, at 
$7345. 
Electrical work and painting bids 
held under advisement. 

Following is a complete list of bids 
received: 

General Work 
Bakker & Robinson, $11G,500; Christ 
Thoren, $120. S00; Minton Co.. $122,- 
626; J. F. Kobler, $123,945; Johnson & 
Hansen, $128,374; J. P. Sullivan, $133,- 
930; A L. Vezina, $134,500; W. L. 
Snook, $158,948. 

Plumbing 

Sweeny & Sons, $8367; Kenneth 

Fraser, $S572; Ott Hardware Co, $9998; 

Crowell, Faulding & Osborne, $10,850. 

Heating 

Sweeny .v. Sons, $7795; Ott Hardware 

Co.. $S395; Kenneth Fraser, $8949: Tom 

Windas. $9566.76; F. P. Stuart & Co., 

$9700. 

Electrical Work 

American Electric Constr. Co., $3315; 

California Electric Co., $3436; Nielson- 

Smith Electric Co, $40S3.70; Flynn 

Electric Co., $4362. 

Painting 
Pohl-Brown Co., $2612; Alhambra 
Wall Paper & Paint Co., $3400; Wm. 
R. Morgan Co.. $3450; Becker Decorat- 
ing Co., $4185; P. Christensen, $5600; 
Darrell T. Stuart, $6434. 



Bids Wanted— To Close Jan. 14th. 
AUDITORIUM Cost, $175,000 

SAWTELLE, Los Angeles Co . Calif. 

SE Texas and Westgate Ave. 
Two-story class A reinf. concrete and 

brick school auditorium (10 rooms; 

9Sxl9o-ft.) 
Owner — City of Los Angeles School 

District. 
Architect— A. S. Nibeeker. Jr., Los 

Angeles. 



Plans Completed. 

COMMONS BLDG. Cost, $150,000 

REDLANDS, San Bernardino Co.. Cal. 
One- and twdf-stOrj class A reinforced 

concrete commons bldg. (119x132). 
Owner — University of Redlands (Geo 

Cortner, business manager I. 
Architect— Marsh. Smith & Powell 

Architects' Bldg., Los Angeles. 



Plans Completed. 

EDUCATIONAL UNIT Cost. $18,000 
PORTERVILLE, Tulare Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco educational unit, etc. 
Owner — Porterville Methodist Church. 
Architect — Rollin S. Tuttle, Box C, 

Los Gatos. 
Work comprises new educational 
unit in connection with the churcn 
plant in addition to remodeling the 
church proper. The educational unit 
is to contain 18 classrooms for junior 



and senior departments with facili- 
ties for about 750 pupils. Clark Stand- 
ford, 212 E-Putnam Ave., Porterville. 
is chairman of the Building and Fi- 
nance Committee. 

Owner will call for bids within a 
•few days. 



SAN FRANCISCO— To relieve con- 
gestion in the Lawton School, 13th 
Ave. and Lawton St., and the Park- 
side School, 25th Ave. and Ulloa St., 
school bungalow buildings will be 
erected, on recommendation of J. M. 
Gwinn, city superintendent of schools 



Prospective Bidders. 
SCHOOL, Cost approx. $400,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Calif. 45th 
Ave. and Foothill Blvd. (Fremont 
High School Site). 
Three-story and basement steel frame 
and concrete high school with til- 
roof. 
Owner— City of Oakland School Dist. 
Architect— Charles W. McCall, 14 04 
Franklin St., Oakland. 

Following is a partial list of con- 
tiactors who have secured plans: 

MacDonald & Kahn, Financial Cen- 
ter Bldg., San Francisco. 

G. P. W. Jensen, 320 Market St., 
San Francisco. 

W. G. Thornally, 354 Hobart Street, 
Oakland. 

Schuler & MacDonald, 1723 Webster 
St., Oakland. 

E. T. Lesure, 87 Ross Circle, Oak- 
land. 

David Nordstrom, 15 Nace St., Oak- 
land. 

Frank Barry. 1074 Harvard Road. 
Oakland. 

Alfred Olsen, 631 Viona, Oakland. 

George Petersen, San Leandro. 

Chas. Vezey & Sons, 3220 Sacra- 
mento St., Oakland. 

George J. Maurer, 50 York Drive, 
Oakland. 

Carl N. Swensen, San Jose. 

W. C. Keating, 4209 Mountain Blvd.. 
Oakland. 

Leibert & Trobock, Rialto Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Barrett & Hilp, 91S Harriscn St., 
San Francisco. 

N. H. Sjoberg & Sons, Call Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

H. L. Petersen, 731 Treat Ave. San 
Francisco. 

Bids are to be opened Jan. 27, 4 "5 
P. M. 



Plans Completed. 

EUILDING Cost, $125,000 

REDLANDS, San Bernardino Co.. Cal. 

One- and two-story class A reinforced 
concrete hall of expression build- 
ing (130xlS7-ft.; to seat 400). 

Owner— University of Redlands (Geo. 
Cortner, business manager). 

Architect— Marsh. Smith & Powell, 
Architects' Bldg., Los Angeles. 



BANKS, STORES Ac OFFICES 

Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost Approx. $4050 

SAN FRANCISCO. No 10 Third St. 

Stone fronts and fixtures. 

Owner — Spreckels Estate. 

Architect — G. A. Applegarth, Glaus 

Spreckels Bldg., San Francisco. 
Contractor — A. F. and C. W. Mattock. 

210 Clara St, San Francisco. 



Plans Complete. 

REMODELINC Cost, $15,000 

MODESTO. Stanislaus Co., Calif. 
Remodel building (dance pavilion, etc) 
Owner— P. H. Bottom. 
Architect— G. N. Hilburn, 1312 I St., 
Modesto. 



Completing Plans. 

OFFICES Cost, $SO,000 

POMONA, Los Angeles Co, Cal. SE 

Holt Ave. and Main St- 
Two-story Class A reinforced concrete 

offices. 



Owner— Southern Counites Gas Co., 810 

S. Flower St., Los Angeles. 
Architect — Eng. Dept. of Owner, 



Bids Opened — Held Under Advisement. 
BANK BLDG. Cost, $100,000 

CHICO, Butte Co., Cal. Broadway and 

Second Sts. (95x51 ft.) 
One-story reinforced concrete bank 

(steel trusses, marble work, etc.) 
Owner— Bank of Italy. 
Architect — H. A Minton, Bank of Italy 

Bldg., Eddy and Powell Sts., San 

Francisco. 
There will be a space of 21 feet be- 
tween the ceiling and the floor and 
the genera] interior will be of marble 
and accoustical plaster, with low type 
screens of bronze. The general con- 
struction will be of concrete, with 
steel trusses instead of pillars to sup- 
port the roof. 



Plans Being Figured. 

BANK Cost, $60,000 

LOS GATOS, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Main St. and Santa Cruz Avenue 

(52x100 feet). 
One-story reinforced concrete bank 

with tile roof (ornamental stone 

and accoustical plaster). 
Owner— Bank of Italy. 
Architect — H. A. Minton, Bank of Italy 

Bldg., Eddy and Powell Sts., San 

Francisco. 
There will be two stores, 20x72 feet, 
in connection with the building. Bids 
will be taken in one week or ten days. 



Plans Being Completed. 

NEWSPAPER BLDG. Cost, $15,000 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. San Mateo 
Co., Cal. Grand Ave. near Mapie 
Street. 

One - story reinforced concrete news- 
paper building (25x140 feet; com- 
position roof). 

Owner — Peninsular Newspapers, Inc.. 
Palo Alto. 

Architect— John McCool, 3S1 Bush St., 
San Francisco. 
Wil be known as "The Enterprise." 
Bids will be taken in about two 



Plans Being Figured. 

REMODELING Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Post Street bet. 

Grant Ave. and Kearny St. 
Remodel present building for sporting 

goods house. 
Owner— A. Carlisle Co., Upland and 

Rutledge. 135 Post St. 
Architect— Willis Polk Co., 277 Pine 

Street. 
Lessee — Shreve & Barber, 441 Kearny 

Street. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $6000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 2203 Chestnut St. 

Alterations for restaurant. 

Owner— Foster Lunch System, 986 

Mission St. 
Plans by Mr. Murray. 
Contractor — A. B. Murray, 525 4th St. 



Plans Being Completed. 

BANK! Cost, $50,000 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. SE 

Alvarado and Franklin Sts. 
One - story and basement reinforced 

concrete bank and store building 

(two stores). 
Owner— B. F. Wright. Monterey. 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 
Lessee — Bank of Italy and Palace 

Drug Co. 
H. A. Minton. Bank of Italy Bldg , 
San Francisco, will prepare plans for 
the interior bank fixtures, etc. Bids 
will be taken in about one week. 



WILLIAMS, Colusa Co., Cal.— G. H. 
S. Cash Store and Williams Hardware 
Store destroyed by fire Dec. 30. Loss 
is estimated at $100,000, including 
stock. 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Seventeen 



Plan Being Completed. 

OFFICES Cost, ' I 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co Cal 

Broadway. 
Tu„ storj steel frame and concrete 

office ■""! store building. 
I iwner I Ssclosi s, B486 Mission St., 

San Francisco. 
Plane by Russell Coleman, ii"i Broad 

way, Burllngame. 



Contract Awarded. 

OFFICES Cost, (60, 

SAN FRANCISCO, Post and Srott 

Streets. 
Three-story brick offices. 
Ownei Eureka Benevolent Society, 

436 O'Farrell St. 
Architect— Hyman & Appleton, OS Tost 

Street. 
Contractor— A. F. and C. W. Mattock, 

212 Clara St. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $12. Mill 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. No. 

618 Sixteenth St. 
Alterations to present store. 
Owner — Oakland Remedial Loan Assn., 

514 17th St.. Oakland. 
Plans by S. Kulchar & Son, 731 E. 

Tenth St., Oakland. 
Contractor— S Kulchar & Son, 731 E. 

Tenth St., Oakland. 



Dans Being Completed. 

REMODELING Cost, $ 

SAX FRANCISCO. S Post Street bet. 

Grant Ave. and Kearny St. 
Remodel present building for sporting 

goods house. 
Owner— A. Carlisle Co., Upland and 

Rutledge, 135 Post St. 
Architect— Willis Polk Co., 277 Tine 

Street. 
Lessee— Shreve & Barber, 441 Kearny 

Street. 
Bids will be taken for a general 
contract in one week. 



Plans Being Figured. 

STORE Cost, $ 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. No. 537-41 S. 

Broadway. 
Six-story and basement Class A steel 

and concrete store, (terra cotta 

front) (60x165 feet) . 
Owner— F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, 

Inc. 
Architect— Walker & Eisen, Western 

Pacific BIdg., Los Angeles. 



Construction Under Way. 

STORES Cost. $50,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

Baldwin Ave and B St. 
One-story, concrete store (9 stores) 

80x125 feet. 
Owner and Builder— S. Wisnom, Fifth 

and S-Claremont Sts., San Mateo 
Architect — Edwards and Senary, 605 

Market St., San Francisco. 



Preliminary Plans Being Prepared. 

STORE Cost, $ 

SANTA CLARA. Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Two-story reinforced concrete store 
and offices. 

Owner— Eugene Simas, 675 Washing- 
ton St., Santa Clara. 

Architect — Wolfe & Higgins, Realty 
BIdg., San Jose. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $12,500 

SAN FRANCISCO. 961 Market St. 
Alterations to store front. 
Owner— Steinberg's. 061 Market St. 
Plans by W. Roselyn, 2S00 20th St. 
Contractor — American Woodworking 
Co., 2S00 20th St. 



Plans Being Completed. 
STORE Cost, $10,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 
Two-story frame and stucco store and 

residence. 
Owner— Delia Maggiore. 
Architect— Wolfe and Higgins, Realty 

BIdg., San Jose. 
Bids will be taken in about 10 days. 



Plans Being Completed. 

BANK Cost. $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., cal. Lo- 

catlon not selected. 
One Btory and mezzanine steel frame 

and concrete bank. 
Owner — Monterej County Trust and 

Savings Hank. 
Architect — H. n. Winner Co., 5 8 u 

Market St., San Francisco. 
Bids will be taken In about 2 weeks. 



Contract Awarded, 

PARTITION STORE Cost, $ 

sax FRANCISCO. S Post Street near 

Grant Ave. 
Sni» di\ 'iding partition for store. 
Owner A, Carlisle Co., 135 Post St. 
Engineer- Fred. Whltton, 369 Pine St 
Painting— A. Quandl. 374 Guerrero St. 
Steam Work— O'Mara & Stewart, 218 



i'l.i 



St. 



Electric Co.. 



Electric Work— 1 
588 Bryant St. 

Plastering— Herman Bosch, 449 Ful- 
ton St. 
Fixtures— Mullen Mfg. Co., 64 Rausch 



Str 



THEATRES 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

REDECORATIONS Cost. $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. No. 1125 Market 

St. (Embassy Theatre). 
Redecorate theatre (new marquee, 

signs, etc.) 
Owner — Warner Bros., Inc., 243 

Golden Gate Ave , San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Mgr. of Constr.— J. Agnew, Premises. 

Alterations to face of marguee 
awarded to Electrical Products Corp.. 
255 Golden Gate Ave. 

As previously reported, carpentry 
awarded to Ralph McLeran & Co., 
Hearst BIdg., S F. ; painaing and dec- 
orating to Cliff Heinsberger Decorat- 
ing Co., 7413 Beverly Blvd., Los An- 
geles, at approximately $15,000. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.— Walk- 
er and Eisen. Ltd., and C. A. Balch. 
associated architects, Western Pacific 
BIdg , have entered into an agreement 
with the United Artists Theaters of 
California, Ltd.. for the preparation of 
plans for the first group of theatres 
to be erected in Southern California 
by the United Artists. The architects 
will open offices in the Western Pa- 
cific BIdg.. adjoining the present quar- 
ters of Walker & Eisen, for the pur- 
pose of handling this theater work 
and other work of a similar nature. 
A number of sites for the new build- 
ings are under consideration, two or 
three of which will be announced this 
week. It is expected that construction 
on five to fifteen of the theaters will 
be under way early in the new year. 
Costs will range from $50,000 to $200.- 
000, depending on the capacity and 
location of the structure. 



Excavation Being Completed. 

THEATRE Cost, (200,000 

MARCED. Merced Co., Cal. Seventh 
and J Sts. (150xl50-ft.) 

Two-story class C steel frame and 
reinforced concrete theatre, stores 
and office building (theatre to seat 
1700). 

Owner— Golden State Theatres. Inc.. 
988 Market St., San Francisco. 

Architect— Reid Bros., 105 Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Salih Bros., Golden Gate 
Theatre BIdg., San Francisco. 

Excavation — J. W. Huffman, Merced. 
Sub-bids will be taken in two weeks. 



CALIFORNIA. ^Joseph M. Schenck. 
vice-president and chairman of the 
Board of United Artists' Corporation, 
1966 S Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, on 
a recent visit to San Francisco, an- 
nounced plans for four theatres in 
the San Francisco district, one at 
Berkeley, another in Richmond, a 
third at Palo Alto and a fourth in San 



proximately (150,000 



h 



sax FRANCISCO Paramount The- 
atre, formerly tie' Granada, - 
acquired by the Pox Wi si Coast The- 
atres, will undergo improvements In- 
volvlng an expenditure "i" (150,000, It 
is announced by A. M. Bowles, chtei 
executive of the Fox Interests in this 
territory. The sl ructures will be closed 
several weeks during which new seat- 
ing will ]>e Installed ami sound ap- 
paratus renewed. 

Sub-Bids Wanted. 

Til 10 A 'PRE Cost, $ 

PHOENIX, Arizona. First and Wash- 
ington Streets. 

Two-story Class A reinforced concrete 
theatre and store (150x200 feet); 
to seat 1700, contain 13 stores and 
offices. 

Owner— Fox West Coast Theatrs. 

Architect— C. Charles Lee, 2101 W. 7th 
St, Los Angeles. 

Contractor— Robert E. McKee, Central 
BIdg., Los Angeles. 

WHARVES AND DOCKS 

Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 

SUP-STRUCTURE Cost, $ 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Foot 

of Webster Street. 
Concrete sub - structure for Inland 
Waters Terminal; 152 ft. on har- 
bor side, 2S5 ft. on slip side; also 
concrete viaduct 260 ft. by 33 ft. 
Owner— City of Oakland (Port Com- 
mission, G. B. Hegardt. secretary) 
Oakland Bank BIdg.. Oakland. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of City Port 
Commission, Oakland Bank BIdg., 
Oakland. 
Certified check 10% required with 
bid. Bond in full amount of contract 
price will be required of the success- 
ful bidder. Plans obtainable from sec- 
retary. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
CONSTRUCTION 

Completing Plans 

STORE & LODGE Cost $ 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Gower St. and 

Van Ness Ave. 
Two-story reinf. concrete store and 

lodge (200 ft. frontage; entrance 

structure, tower, etc.) 
Owner— Hollywood Cemetery Assn. 
Architect— Morgan. Walls & Clements, 

Van Nuys BIdg., Los Angeles. 



KENTFIELD, Marin Co., Cal.— Until 
January 15, 8:00 P. M, bids will be 
received by Ada M. Fusselman, sec- 
retary, Marin Union Junior College 
District, to cut eucalyptus trees, 28 
in number, on grounds of the Marin 
Union Junior College at Kentfield. 
Contractor to cut trees, saw and pile 
in cord wood sizes and clean grounds. 
Burning may be done upon author- 
ization of President of the district. 
Specifications obtainable from secre- 
tary at 90S Fourth St., San Rafael. 



Contracts Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cont Price $29,975 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Tele- 
graph Ave. near 29th St. 

Alterations and additions to two-story 
and basement brick veneer resi- 
dence for mortuary and chapel. 

Owner — Grant D. Miller, 2368 E-14th 
St., Oakland. 

Architect — Miller & Warnecke, Fi- 
nancial Center BIdg., Oakland. 

Contractor— Jensen & Pedersen, 3443 
Adeline St., Oakland 

Plumbing— Max Finzel, 2025 Hopkins 
St., Oakland. 

Heating— George Bell, 1926 E-15th St., 
Oakland. 

Electric Work— George Woolf, 795 Al- 
catraz Ave., Oakland. 



Eighteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 

TIlAi'K Cost, $ 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. Uni- 
versity Campus. 
Track in the Stadium Bowl. 
Owner — University of California. 
Architect— Warren C. Perry, 260 Cal- 
ifornia St., San Francisco. 
Proposed project is in a very pre- 
liminary stage. 



the reinforcing steel, B. H. Eurde 
Material Co. the rock and sand, an 
Leebrick & Fisher the cement. 



Bids Opened. 

HANGAR Cost, $35,000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
Freeport Blvd. at Municipal Air- 
Steel frame and wood hangar and air 

terminal station, SOxlOO feet. 
Owner — City of Sacramento (to be 
leased to Boeing Air Transport 
Company). 
Architect — Harry Devine, 1405 Forty- 
first St., Sacramento. 
Structure will be of steel frame and 
wood construction covering an area 
of SO by 100 feet, with an exterior 
covering of corrugated iron 

Following is a complete list of bids 
received: 

Lindgren & Swinerton, Inc., 
California State Life Bldg., 

Sacramento $32,746 

H. W. Robertson, Sacramento.. 33.SSS 

Campbell Constr. Co., Sacto 34,312 

W. C. Keating, Sacramento 34,850 

Azevedo & Sarmento, Sacto. 34,913 

Fred H. Betz, Sacramento 35.36S 

Yoho & Dauger, Sacramento... 35,999 
W. L. Chatterton, Sacramento.. 36,233 
C. J. Hopkinson, Sacramento. ... 36,987 

Chas. Unger, Sacramento 37,639 

Guth & Fox, Sacramento 37,686 

Ralph Hunter, Sacramento 37,700 

Two lowest bids held under advise- 
ment until January 8. 



ALAMEDA, Alameda Co., Cal — Hauck 
& Huber, 1012 Eagle Ave., Alameda, 
at $10S0. submitted lowest bid to City 
Purchasing Agent, for painting and 
spraying fences at Lincoln Park Nur- 
sery on Fernside Blvd., pump house at 
Jackson Park, fence at McKinley Park 
and pump house, etc., at Washington 
Park. 

Following is a complete list of bids 
received: 

Hauck & Huber, Alameda $1080 

J. M. Jensen 1668 

John Heritage & Sons 1850 

East Bay Spraying Co 2482 

H. C. Lovett Co 2575 

Bay City Paint Co 2650 

Bids heud under advisement until 
January 8. 



Contract Awarded. 

ADDITION Cost. $134,S81 

COMPTON. Los Angeles Co., Calif. 

East Main Street. 
Two-story reinforced concrete addi- 
tion to mausoleum (4000 crypts). 
Owner — Angelus Abbey Mausoleum. 
Architect — Clarence N. Aldrich, Pa- 
cific Southwest Bank Bldg., Long 
Beach. 
Contractor— Eeswick Const. Co., 230 
Newport St., Long Beach. 
Other awards as follows: 
Beck Art Stone Co.. on the art stone 
at $2425: Long Beach Marble & Tile 
Co., on the tile at $1998; L. T. Story, 
on the ventilating system at $2889; 
Los Angeles Cement Gun Co., on the 
gunite at $250; A-Bright Electric Co.. 
on the electric wiring at $2066, and 
Chas. Hartsell on the plumbing at 
$S90. Bids for the concrete work are 
as follows: Beswick Const. Co., $134.- 
881; Rvder Nelson Co., $144,000; Chas. 
N. Fink, $163,051; W. G. Reid. $172,- 
210: R. E. Campbell, $181,810; B. D. 
Kronnick Co., $207,750. Bids on the 
remaining work will not be taken for 
several months. This work includes 
the following: elevator, terrazzo and 
marble floors, ornamental bronze work 
leaded glass, roofing and interior mar- 
ble trim. Soule Steel Co. will furnish 



Bids Opened. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $25,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Tele- 
graph Ave. near 29th St. 

Alterations and additions to two- story 
and basement brick veneer resi- 
dence for mortuary and chapel. 

Ownr— Grant D. Miller, 236S E-llth 
St., Oakland. 

Architect — Miller & Warnecke, Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg., Oakland 
Following is a complete list of bids 

received: 

Jensen & Pcdersen, 3443 Adeline St., 
Oakland (1 alt.) $29,975; (2) add 
$280. 

W. C. Keating, Oakland (1) $29,995; (2j 
$300. 

T. D. Courtright, Oakland (1) $30,5S9; 
(2) $170. 

J. B Peterson, Oakland (1) $31,710: 
(2) $431. 

F. C. Stolte, Oakland (1) $32,400; (2) 
$400. 

Fred J. Westlund, Oakland (1) $33,970; 
(2) $270. 

H. J. Christenson, Oakland (1) $34,270 
(2) $250. 

George Petersen, Oakland (1) $34,500; 
(2) $400. 

R W. Littlefield, Oakland (1) $36,695; 
(2) $450. 

T. A. Scott, Oakland (1) $39,539. 

Bids held under advisement. Elec- 
tric, plumbing and heating bids held 

under advisement for a few days. 



Contract Awarded 

UNDERTAKING PARLORS $40,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Sacramento Street 
Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Polk St. 

Three-story frame and stucco under- 
taking establishment and apart- 
ments. 

Owner — Jos. Hagan, 178 Sacramento 
St., San Francisco. 

Architect— Henry C. Smith and A. R 
Williams, Humboldt Bank Bldg.. 
San Francisco. 

Contractor— Reavey & Spivock, Shell 
Oil Bldg., San Francisco. 
Wrecking is now under way and 

construction will be started in about 

two weeks. 

Mechanical bids are held under ad- 
visement. 



MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES 
AND MATERIALS 



UKIAH, Mendocino Co., Cal.— Until 
January 13, 2:30 P. M., bids will be 
received by H M. Burke, county clerk 
to furnish and deliver fuel and stone 
oil to county at Courthouse and De- 
tention Home, for one - year period 
commencing January 15. 1931. Speci- 
fic gravity of fuel oil to be IS degrees 
plus. Bids on price per gallon. Fur- 
ther information obtainable from clerk. 



OAKLAND, Cal. — Bunker Hill and 
Sullivan M. and C. Co., San Francisco, 
and American Smelting and Refining 
Co., San Francisco, at $5100 submitted 
identical bids to the East Bay Mu- 
nicipal Utility District to furnish 50 
tons of pig lead for distribution sys- 
tem. Both bids were subject to ac- 
ceptance on Janary 6. Independent 
Swelting and Refining Co., Oakland, 
at $5340 only other bidder. 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Heafey-Moore Co. 
344 High St., Oakland, at 7%c per gal. 
submitted onlv bid to East Bay Mu- 
nicipal Utility District to furnish and 
deliver 30,000 gals. Grade "E" hot as- 
phalt. Total bid $2550. Taken under 



SACRAMENTO, Cal.— H. G. Denton, 
city clerk, will ask bids shortly to 
furnish 800,000 lbs. of sulphuric acid. 
The material will be used in the man- 
ufacture of sulphate of aluminum with 
which the city's water supply is chem- 
ically treated. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



PITTSBURGH, Pr>, — J. V. Walsh 
Sales Corp. (J. V. Walsh, president), 
705 Wabash Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa., 
desires to secure a reputable repre- 
sentative who comes in personal con- 
tact with the electricians and elec- 
trical engineers in the industrial field. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Candee-Smith 
Governor Co. (Attention Mr. Will D. 
Candee) 215 North Los Angeles St., 
Los Angeles, Calif., manufacturing a 
srxall article which is sold principally 
by mail order desires to secure suit- 
able selling agents. 

NEW YORK, N. Y.— A. V. Smith 
and Associates. 1S5 Madison Avenue. 
New York, desire to represent West- 
ern concerns in New York City. 

CINCINNATI, Ohio—Steel Partition 
Division, The Globe - Wernicke Co., 
(Attention Mr. G. J. Strover), Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, manufacturing high 
grade steel office and factory parti- 
tion, desires to secure agent who Is 
selling to building architects, engi- 
neers and industrial concerns. 



adv 



Names and addresses of persons or 
firms concerned in the following op- 
portunities will be furnished on re- 
quest to Business Opportunity Depart- 
ment, Daily Pacific Euilder. 547 Mis- 
sion St., San Francisco or phone GAr- 
field $744: 

20742 — Onyx. Paris, France. Party 
is anxious to contact firms quarrying 
and exporting onyx. 

20743 — Crystal Glass. Melnik, Czech- 
oslovakia. Exporters of glass prod- 
ucts inquire for names of merchants 
interested in importing high-class Bo- 
hemian crystal glass. 

20744 — Chinaware. Danzig-Langfuhr. 
Party is desirous of being put in touch 
with local importers of chinaware. 

20750 — Sewing Machine Parts. Osa- 
ka, Japan. Manufacturers and expor- 
ters of various sewing machine parts 
and accessories are desirous of open- 
ing business relations witli dealers of 
this line. 

20751 — Representation. Guayaquil, 
Ecuador. Party representing several 
local exporters in Ecuador wishes to 
take on additional lines. First-class 
references available. 

20752— Information Re Argentine. 
Buenos Aires, Arg. Trade lists, sta- 
tistical data, customs rulings, duties 
or any information on Argentine will 
be sent to interested parties. 

20755 — Foreign Investigation. San 
Francisco. Party is desirous of con- 
tacting firms interested in industriil 
and trade investigation in Spanish 
America, on food, lumber or machin- 
ery. 31 



The General Electric Company an- 
nounces a new pendant type push 
button for controlling small floor op- 
erated cranes. This is designed to 
supersede the present rope and chain 
types of control, with the advantages 
of greater safety to the operator, a 
saving In time (only one man being 
necessary to operate the crane) and 
less aisle space required on the fac- 
tory floor. The push button station is 
20^ inches long, 2% inches wide and 
2 9/16 inches deep less the projection 
of the buttons. It is of the proper 
size to be readily grasped and op- 
erated by one hand. The box is cast 
aluminum, thus being both light in 
weight and strong. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Nineteen 




BRIDGES 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY, Cal — Un- 
til Jan. 88, 2 P. M , bids will be re- 
ceived by state Highway Commission 
tor the following bridge work in Los 
Angeles county: 

I Eridge "\ er Tops nga I Jreek, about I 
miles ninth of Santa Monica, to be 
widened by constructing eight 27-foot 
timber spans on pile bents adjoining 
the existing concrete bridge and e,rad- 
i ii l; ami surfacing approaches with as- 
phalt concrete. 

Bridge over I. .as Flores Creek about 
7 miles north of Santa Monica to be 
widened by constructing two 26-foo1 
reinforced concrete girder spans on a 
concrete pier and concrete abutments 
and grading and surfacing approach- 
es with asphalt concrete. 



WILLOWS, Glenn Co., Calif.— Con- 
struction will be started at once by G. 
A. Bondurant, county supervisor, on 
the construction of two bridges at 
Stanton and Logan west of Norman; 
est. cost, $1500 tnd $1800 each. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., 
—County Surveyor Julius B. Man 
will prepare plans for proposed i 
wood Ferry Bridge over the San 
quin river, for which the county 
appropriate $70,000. The sum of 
000 has been set aside to build 
approaches and negotiations for ri 
of way are being completed. The 
span will be located about 1000 
north of the present bridge. 



Cal. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY, Cal.— As 
previously reported, bids will be re- 
ceived by State Highway Commission 
for widening bridge across Topanga 
Creek, about 4 miles north of Santa 
Monica by constructing eight 27-ft. 
timber spans on pile bents adjoining 
the existing concrete bridge and grad- 
ing and surfacing approaches with as- 
phalt concrete; also for widening 
bridge across Las Flores Creek, about 
7 miles north of Santa Monica by con- 
structing two 26-ft. reinforced con- 
crete girder spans on a concrete pier 
and concrete abutments and grading 
and surfacing approaches with asphalt 
concrete. Project involves; 

(1) 375 cu. yds. channel excavation; 

(2) 900 cu. yds. rdwy. excav. without 

class. ; 

(3) 990 cu. yds. struc. excavation; 

(4) 1260 lin. ft. furnishing creosoted 

Douglas fir piles; 

(5) 42 each, drive creosoted Douglas 

fir piles; 

(6) 125 cu. yds. existing concrete to 

be removed; 

(7) 470 cu. yds. class A Portland ce- 

ment concrete; 

(8) 6.25 cu. yds. class E do; 

(9) 54,500 lbs. reinf. steel; 

(10) 9 M. ft. B.M. redwood timber. 

dense select all-heart struc. 
grade; 

(11) 77 M. ft. B.M. untreated Douglas 

fir timber, struc. grade ; 

(12) 12.5 M. ft. B.M. creocoted Doug- 

las fir timber, struc. grade; 

(13) 1380 tons asphalt concrete; 

(14) 1 lot misc. items of work. 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Hearing upon the 
application of the Alameda County Su- 
pervisors to construct a bridge over 
the tidal canal at the north end of 
Park Street, Alameda, will be held in 
the chambers of the Board of Super- 
visors, Courthouse, Oakland. January 
29. it is announced by Major E. H. 



Ropes, U. S. district engineer. Plans 
submitted provide for a double lift 
bascule bridge, having a clear chan- 
nel width of 250-ft. when opened and 
vertical clearances of 12.7 feet and 
15.4 feet above mean high water at 
pier and middle, respectively, when 
closed. The plans were prepared by 
Geo. A Posey, Alameda county sur- 



SANTA BARBARA. Calif.— County 
Surveyor Owen H. O'Neill preparing 
plans for steel bridge over San Roque 
Creek; 500-ft. long, 22-ft. wide; est. 
cost $50,000. t 



OAKLAND, Cal— Until January 15, 
(tentative date), bids will be received 
by Southern Pacific R. R., 65 Market 
St., San Francisco, to construct 7th 
St. Subway; total estimated cost 
$205,000 of which city of Oakland will 
pay one-half. 

Subway will have a grade of 4% in 
east approach and 5% in west. Com- 
plete length will be 755-ft. Level por- 
tion of subway will be 167-ft. long; 
roadway 23 -ft. wide with 6-ft. pedes- 
trian walks on north side. Venti- 
lating system similar to one now in 
use in the George A. Posey Tube of 
Alameda County will be installed. 

Plans obtainable from Engineering 
Department, Southern Pacific Com- 
pany, 65 Market St., San Francisco. 
W. H. Kirkbridge, chief engineer of 
maintenance of way and structures. 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
—Frank Bryant. £911 23rd St., San 
Francisco, at $28,804.72 submitted low 
bid to the county supervisors to con- 
struct a timber bridge with reinforced 
concrete floor over the Southern Pa- 
cific Tracks near Felton Station, Zay- 
ante Creek and Zayante Road in San 
Lorenzo Road District. 

C. C. Gildersleeve, 1508 G St., at 
$33,9S9 submitted low bid for steel 
bridge with reinforced concrete floor. 
Following is a complete list of the bids 
received, the two lowest being taken 
under advisement until January 21: 

(a) timber construction; (b) steel 
bridge. 

Frank Bryant, San Francisco, (a) 
$2S.S04; (b) $34,732. 

M. B. McGowan, San Francisco, (a) 
$29,1S5; (b) $34,982. 

C. C. Gildersleeve (a) $29,538; (b) 
$33,989. 

Lord and Eishop, Oroville (a) $30,- 
249; (b) $36,104. 

Leo Cardwell Const. Co., (a) $31,- 
3S3; (b) $36,662. 

F. M. Bodenhammer (a) $31,537; (b) 
$37,SSS. 

Jas. T. Walsh (a) $32,036; (b) $37,- 
349. 

A. W. Kitchen. San Francisco (a) 
$35,761; (b) $37,290. 

Pacific Const. Co., San Francisco, 
(a) $ ; (b) $37,780. 

Healy-Tibbits Const. Co.. San Fran- 
cisco, (a) $35,920; (b) $39,618. 

B. C. Gerwick, San Francisco, (a) 
$36,3S0; (b) $38,712. 



VISALIA, Tulare Co.. Cal.— County 
Surveyor T. Wayne Switzer instruct- 
ed by supervisors to make survey of 
culverts on permanent highways with 
a view to increasing their widths. 



NAPA, Napa Co., Cal.— City Engi- 
neer H. A. Harrold is completing spec- 
ifications for proposed Brown Street 
bridge and bids will be asked in the 
immediate future. Details of construc- 
tion will be published shortly. 



DREDGING, HARBOR 
WORKS & EXCAVATIONS 

RICHMOND, Contra Costa Co Cal 
— Until Februarj 5, 3 P. M . I. ids will 
be received by U. s. Engineer c ifflce, 
Custom House, San Francisco, for 
dredging in Richmond Harbor. Proj- 
ect involves 523.500 cu. yds. Specifica- 
tions obtainable from above. 

SAN DIEGO. Cal.— Western Dredg- 
ing Co., 611 Security Title Insurance 
Bldg., Los Angeles, submitted low bid 
of 36c per cubic yard to the U. S. 
Engineer at Los Angeles for dredging 
approx. S25.000 cu. yds. of material 
from an area of about 185 acres in the 
NE portion of San Diego Harbor. The 
area lies westerly of the western wat- 
erfront of the city ,,f San Diego, ex- 
tending from Municipal Pier No ' 1 to 
Spreckels Wharf. Other bids were: 
Standard Dredging Co., 37.9c; San 
Francisco Bridge Co., 39c; Morris and 
Cumings Dredging Co., New York 
City, 68c. The engineer's estimate 
was $329,200. 



FORT BRAGG, Mendocino Co., Cal. 
—As previously reported, bids will be 
received January 16, 3 P. M., by U 
S. Engineer Office, Customhouse ' San 
Francisco, to remove old jetty, con- 
struct new jetties and dredging in the 
Noyo river, approximately 1% miles 
from Fort Bragg. Project involves: 

(1) 8.000 tons of rock (remove from 

old jetty); 

(2) 750 cu. yds. concrete (remove 

from old jetty); 

(3) 240 feet sheet pile bulkhead 

(new jetties); 

(4) 25,000 tons to be furnished and 

placed; 

(5) 110,000 cu. yds. dredging of sand, 

gravel, boulders and clabs; 

(6) 1,820 cu. yds. rock to be re- 

moved from river. 
Specifications obtainable from U S 
Engineer Office. Custom House, San 
Francisco. 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co. Calif — 
Until January 22, 3 P. M., bids will be 
received by U. S. Engineer Office. 
Customhouse, San Francisco, for 
dredging in Humboldt Bav. Project 
involves 491,700 cubic yards. Speci- 
fications obtainable from above office. 



SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co.. 
Cal.— Olympian Dredging Co., 249 1st 
St., San Francisco, at $.112 cu. yd., 
submitted only bid to U. S. Engineer 
Office. Sacramento, to dredge chan- 
nel, 9 feet deep and approximately 100 
feet wide through the shoal in Mid- 
dle River, near Mildred Island. Proj- 
ect involves 5,000 cu. yds. 



HONOLULU, T. H.— U. S. Engineer 
Office, Honolulu, rejects lone bid of 
Hawaiian Dredging Co., Ltd 854 
Kashumanu St., Honolulu, at $r.fi. son 
for repairing breakwater at Nawiliwili 
Harbor, Hawaii. Bid received Dec. 4. 

SAN RAFAEL, Marin Co., Calif.— 
Franks Construction Co., 260 Califor- 
nia St., San Francisco, at 31c cu. yd. 
submitted low bid to U. S. Engineer- 
ing Office, Customhouse, for dredging 
in San Rafael Creek, involving 42.115 
cu. yds. Other bids were Pacific Coast 
Dredging Co., 32%c cu. yd. and Dut- 
tnn Dredging Co., 34c cu. yd. Taken 
under advisement. 



Twenty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



PETALUMA, Sonoma Co . Calif. — 
American Dredging Co., 255 California 
St., San Francisco, at 54c cu. yd. sub- 
mitted low bid to U. S. Engineer Of- 
fice, San Francisco, for dredging in 
Petaluma Creek, involving 73,975 cu. 
yds. Benjamin Walters, 555 Howard 
St., San Francisco, only other bidder 
at 55c cu. yd. 1 



SUISUN, Solano Co., Cal.— Hydrau- 
lic Dredging Co., Central Bank Bldg., 
Oakland, at $1399 cu. yd. submitted 
low bid to U. S. Engineer Office, Cus- 
tomhouse, San Francisco, for dredging 
in Suisun Bay, involving 521,240 cu. 
yds. San Francisco Bridge Co.. only 
other bidder at $.1425 cu. yd Taken 
under advisement. .1 

IRRIGATION PROJECTS 



al — Ele 



RICHVALE. Butte Co., 
tion will be held January 24 in Rich- 
vale Irrigation District to vote bonds 
of $500,000 to finance purchase of a 
portion of the Sutter - Butte Canal 
Company's system and a portion of 
that firm's rights in the Feather River. 



TURLOCK. Stanislaus Co., Cal— H. 
Johanson, Turlock, at $2,731.87 award- 
ed contract by Turlock Irrigation Dis- 
trict, under Schedule No. 6 and at 
S11.S7G.90 under Schedule No. 7 for 
2-inch concrete canal lining. 

Lloyd Terrell, Turlock, at $4,953.94 
awarded contract for similar work un- 
der Schedule No. S. 

Bids under Schedules 1 to 5 inclu- 
sive, were rejected, and new bids will 
be considered January 26. £ P. M. 
Specifications obtainable from Anna 
Sorensen, secretary of district, at Tur- 
lock. 



TURLOCK, Stanislaus Co., Calif.— 
Until January 26, 2 P. M.. bids will 
be received by Anna Sorensen, secre- 
tary, Turlock Irrigation District, for 
construction in Improvement Districts 
Nos. 58, 34, 38, 10, 63, 66, 34-3S Joint 
Spilivvav and Chatom Spillway. The 
work is divided into eight schedules 
and amounts in total to about G52.671 
sq. ft. of 2-inch thick concrete canal 
lining and 473 cu. yds. of concrete in 
canal structures and about 6G0 lin. ft. 
of 30-in. and 330 ft. 36-in. diameter 
concrete pipe. Certified check 5% pay- 



able to district rec 
Plans obtainable froi 



ith bid. 



etai 



STREET LIGHTING 

SYSTEMS 

SAN FRANCISCO— Paul J. Ost. city 
electrical engineer, in a report to the 
supervisors declares that from $18,000 
to $28,000 will be saved for the city 
treasury if all concrete standards are 
installed on the city's 19-mile boule- 
vard svstem. It was first proposed to 
install 600 metal standards and 300 
concrete standards. The cost of con- 
crete poles and their installation 
throughout would be $60,453, whereas 
300 concrete and 600 taper tube poles 
would amount to $79,080, and 300 con- 
crete and 600 cast iron standards 
would be $S.8,24S. 



SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co, Cal. 
— City councl will start proceedings 
at once to widen B street from Bald- 
win to Ninth avenues including in- 
stallation of an electrolier system; 
estimated cost $75,000. Street will be 
widened from 46 feet to 52 feet 

MACHINERY AND 
EQUIPMENT 

PHOENIX, Arizona— Until January 
26, 2:00 P. M., bids will be received by 
Phoenix Indian School, Phoenix, to 
furnish one concrete mixer, similar 
and equal to 7S Lakewood, manu- 



factured by The Lakewood Engineer- 
ing Company, Cleveland, Ohio, and 
equipped with 6 to S H.P. 2-cylinder 
gas engine, to be radiator cooled, pow- 
er charging skip, water tank, auto- 
matic, self measuring; mixer to be 
mounted on steel frame with stel 
wheels; approximate capacity, dry ma- 
terial , 10 cubic feet; wet mixed con- 
crete, 7 cubic feet. Bids wanted on 
basis of delivery; f.o b. Phoenix and 
f.o.b. shipping point. t 

WASHINGTON, D. C— See "Gov- 
ernment Work and Supplies." this is- 
sue. Bids wanted by Bureau of Sup- 
plies and Accounts, Navy Department, 
to furnish and deliver miscellaneous 
machinery, equipment and supplies to 
various Pacific Coast Navy Yards. 



SEATTLE, Wash— Buekner-Weath- 
erby Co., Inc., at $50,217 submited low 
bid to Board of Public Works to fur- 
nish one 2-trolley crane for installa- 
tion at Diablo Plant of Skagit hydro- 
electric development for the city light- 
ing department. Complete list of bids 
follows: 

Buckner-Weatherby Co $50,217 

Harnisehfeger Sales Corp 52.173 

Cvclops Iron Works 56,941 

Judson Pacific Co G4.500 

Consolidated Steel Co 64,660 

Cleveland Crane & Eng. Co 65.500 

Whiting Corp 67.345 

H. R. L. Motor Co 71.900 

Morgan Eng. Co 75,250 

BAKERSFIELD, Kern Co.. Cal.— 
Bids will be asked at once by Kern 
County LTnion High School District to 
furnish and deliver one auto truck 
chassis and body for transportation of 
pupils. t 

FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— H. H. Walker, 
1323 Venice Blvd., submitted low bid to 
the city purchasing agent at $66,145, 
with time limit 90 days, for installing 
traffic sgnals at 23 intersections on 
Wilshire Blvd , under Specifications 
No. 2275. Other bids were: Newbery 
Elec Co., $6S,S95: Acme Traffic Signal 
Co., $71,389.50; Eagle Signal Sales 
Corp., $80,480; Underground Constr. 
Co., $81,960; General Electric Co., $143,- 
300. All bids were net. 

RESERVOIRS AND DAMS 

GLENDALE, Los Angeles Co., Cal 
— Mittry Bros. Construction Co., 723 
Detwiler Bldg., Los Angeles, submitted 
the low bid to the city council al 
$499,000 to construct two reservoirs. 
Will be built of rectangular shape, 22 
ft. deep, with an area of 238.322 sq 
ft. The reservoirs will be constructed 
adjoining, providing a total capacity 
of 35,000,000 gallons. They will be of 
th retaining wall type with reinforced 
concrete roof. The construction in- 
volves: 

26,000 cu yds reinforced concrete; 
160,000 cu. yds. excavation; 
10,000 cu. yds. tamped embankment 
22.000 cu. yds. earth placed on con- 
crete roof. 
Other bids were: Martter & Bock. 
$521,000; C. M. Elliott, $522,600; Her- 
bert M. Baruch Corp., $529,587; Car- 
penter Bros , Inc., $539,990; Weymouth 
Crowell, $543,000; Monroe & Westcott, 
$547,000; Western Constr. Co., $549,215; 
General Engr. Co., Ltd., $550,000; H. 
W. Rohl Co.. $550,000; Chas. U. Heu- 
ser, $551,700; Clinton Constr. Co. 
$565,000; Gist & Bell, $572,000. The 
bids were taken under advisement. 



HEALDSBURG, Sonoma Co., Cal.— 
Until January 26, bids will be received 
by city council to raise height of side- 
walls of city reservoir at Fitch Moun- 
tain to increase storage capacity. 
Plans on file n office of city clerk. 



i iWYHEE DAM, Ore. — American 
Locomotive Co., Schenectady, N. Y., 
submitted the low bid to the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Reclamation, Denver, at $18,813 
for furnishing three 4-in. internal dif- 
ferentia] needle valves for the Owyhee 
Dam, Oregon, under Spcifieations No. 
516. The other bids were: 

Joshua Hendy Iron Works, San 
Francisco, $19,500. 

Consolidated Steel Corp., Los An- 
geles, $19,572. 

Steacy-Schmidt Mfg. Co.. York, Pa., 
$19,870. 

Hardie-Tynes Mfg. Co., Birming- 
ham, Ala., $20,565. 

Johnson City Foundry & Machine 
Co , Johnson City, Tenn., $23,700. 

Michigan Valve & Foundry Co., De- 
troit, Mich., $23,970. 

Ogden Iron Works, Ogden, Utah, 
$28,350. 

The Aldrich Pump Co., Allentown, 
Pa., $24,900. 

Foote Bros. Gear & Mach. Co., Chi- 
cago, 111, $26,700 

Rosedale Foundry & Mach. Co., 
Pittsburgh, Pa., $23,145. 

Baash-Ross Tool Co., Los Angeles, 
Calif., $24,834. 

Lake Erie Engr. Corp., Buffalo, N. 
Y.. $29.4S4. 

Treadwell Eng. Co., Easton, Pa., 
$26,769. 

H. R. L. Motor Co., Seattle, Wash., 
$23,400. 

Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island, 
111., S31.950. 



PIPE LINES, WELLS, ETC. 

COALINGA, Fresno Co., Cal.— The 
Associated Oil Co. has announced that 
the Coalinga-Monterey Bay pipe line, 
built 25 years ago, will be rebuilt to 
make it suitable for the transporta- 
tion of light crude oil and casinghead 
gasoline. 



KETTLEMAN HILLS, Kings Co.. 
Cal— Southern California Gas Corp. 
a subsidiary of the Pacific Lighting 
Corp. and the Southern California 
Edison Co., Ltd., will start construc- 
tion shortly on a 30-inch., 200-mile 
pipe line from the Kettleman Hills 
District to Los Angeles at a cost of 
between $8,000,000 and $10,000,000. 



NEVADA CITY, Nevada Co., Cal.— 
Natural Gas Corp. of California, seeks 
franchise from county supervisors to 
install gas pipe lines in roads and 
highways of the county to furnish 
natural gas for the Nevada county 
district. The application will be acted 
upon February 4. 



MARTINEZ, Contra Costa Co.. Cal. 
—Wallace E. Bland at $909 for 200 ft. 
depth, awarded contract by county su- 
pervisors to drill well at Brentwood 
fm Contra Costa County Water Works 
Iiistrict No. 1. For depth of 300 ft.. 
Pland bid $1,426. 



PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co.. Cal 
—Until January 12, 4 P. M., bids will 
be received by E. L. Beach, city clerk, 
to construct gravel envelope well in 
Evergreen Park. Est. cost $5,000 
Specifications obtainable from J. F. 
Byxbee, city engineer. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Until January 12. 
4:30 P. M.. bids will be received by 
G. B. Hegardt. secretary, City Port 
Commission. Oakland Bank Bldg., to 
furnish and deliver fifteen 45-foot 
lengths of 20-in. welded steel dredge 
pipe. Specifications obtainable from 
above. 

~~SEWERS AND SEWAGE 
DISPOSAL PLANTS 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal.— 
City council declares intention (5275) 
to improve portions of 15th St., be- 



Saturday, Jaime 



10. insi 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-or.e 



tween Vestal Ave. and Rosa St., in- 
volving construction of 6-Inch 
sewer; 1 c. I. flushing inlet; 5x6-in. 
wy.- branches; 4-m, vitrified rower 
lateral connection. 1911 .v ' Hear- 
ing January 12 John J. Lynch, city 
clerk. Wni. Popp, city engineer. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal— Until 1:30 P. 

M. Jan. 14, Lids will 1 I : 

County Sanitation District No. 2. 13;i 
N Broadway, room 202. for the con- 
struction of two sludge digestion units 
each consisting "f four sludj 
tlon tanks, a pump and boilei house, 
a gas tank, and all appurtenant struc- 
tures. Plans obtainable at tin 
of the chief engineer, A. K Warren, 
202 Law Bldg., 139 N Broadway. A. 
S. Soule. secretary. Cert, check or 
surety company bond, 10%. 



HAYWAKP, Alameda Co., Calif.— 
City Engineer Jesse B. Holly is mak- 
ing surveys for extensii f sewer 

system into area lying SW of the 
Western Pacific Railroad and C St. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Until January 22. 
21 noon, bids will be received by F 
C. Merritt, city clerk, to construct 
Storm sewers with appurtenances in 
29th Ave. bet. East 12lh St. and the 
U. S. Tidal Canal for which city has 
provided $20,000 from the General 
Fund. Bids will be taken on two prop- 
ositions, as follows: 

Proposition A 
100 lin. ft. 5x5-ft. monolithic concrete 
arch storm sewer (including con- 
crete end wall); 
£10 lin. ft. 3-ft. x 3-in. by 3-ft. 6-in. 
monolithic concrete arch storm 
sewer; 
37 lin. ft. 3-ft. 3-in. by 3-ft. 6-in. 
monolithic concrete arch storm 
sewer; 
1210 lin. ft. 2 ft. 6 in. by 2 ft. 9 in. 
monolithic concrete arch storm 
sewer; 

Proposition B 
100 lin. ft. 00-in. reinf. cone, pipe 
storm sewer (including concrete 
end wall); 
210 lin. ft. 39-in. or 42-in. reinforced 
concrete pipe storm sewer; 
37 lin. ft. 39-in. or 42-in. extra 
strength reinf. cone, pipe storm 
sewer, with concrete saddle; 
1210 lin. ft. 30-in. reinforced concrete 
pipe storm sewer; 

29 lin. ft. 1 ft. 6 in. by 4 ft. concrete 

box storm sewer with reinf. top; 

811 lin. ft. 24-in. plain concrete or 

vit. pipe conduit; 
109 lin. ft. 24-in. extra strength re- 
inforced cone, pipe conduit, with 
concrete saddle, or 24-in. vitrified 
pipe conduit with cone, jacket; 
28 lin. ft. lS-in. plain concrete or 
vitrified pipe conduit; 
300 lin. ft. 15-in. do; 
66 lin. ft. 15-in. extra strength re- 
inforced cone, pipe conduit, with 
concrete saddle, or 15-in. vitrified 
pipe conduit with cone, jacket; 
183 lin. ft. 12-in. plain concrete or 

vitrified pipe conduit; 
138 lin. ft. 10-in. do; 
8 manholes with standard tops on 
concrete shoulders of storm sew- 
er; 
5 manholes with standard tops and 
brick base on pipe conduits; 

2 manholes with inlet tops (34-in. 
opening) ; 

1 concrete junction chamber, with 
handhole; 

4 storm water inlets (21-in. open- 
ing); 

5 storm water inlets (34-in. open- 
ing); 

3 storm water inlets (Type A). 
Certified check 10% payable to city 

required with bid. Plans on file in 
office of clerk. Walter N. Frickstari. 
city engineer. 

LOS ANGELES, Calif.— Until 10 A. 
If., Jan. 21. bids will be received by 
the board of public works to con- 



struct by - pa • i m al Hyperio 
s. wage treatmi nt plant to provide ad- 
ditional safeguard to machinery of 

plan! The proj i by-pass will !"■ 

approximately 600 ft. In length, beh] ; 
constructed of 6 ft and 6 ft. diameter 
prox. 30 ft. of the beach end 
to be eonsl ! ucti & on piling, the other 
end to be in a reinforced conci ete 
tii. ini. 1 ii.m ii ion i hamber. This by- 
pass will he used In connection with 
automatic control | Etti s. 



PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co Ci 
—City Engineer J. F. Byxbee is mak- 
ing surveys for storm water sewer In 
High St. to .Middle- 
Hi hi Road. Estimated cost, $9500. 



WATER WORKS 

OAKLAND, Cal— Bunker Hill and 
Sullivan M. and C. Co., San Fr 
and American Smelting and Refining 
Co., San Francisco, at $51oi) submitted 
Identical bids to the East Bay Mu- 
nicipal Utility District to furnish 60 
tons of pig lead for distribution sys- 
tem. Both bids were subject to ac- 
ceptance on Janary 'i. Independent 
Smelting and Refining Co.. Oakland, 
at $5340 only other bidder. 



OAKLAND, Cal— Art Concrete Co., 
24th and Adeline Sts., Oakland, at 
24.5c each submitted low bid to East 
Bay Municipal Utility District to fur- 
nish 4. '100 concrete meter boxes with- 
out covers. W. H. Larson, Sacramen- 
to, at 69c only other bidder. 

W. H. Larson, 2650 Curtis St.. Sac- 
ramento, at 33c each submitted low 
bid to furnish 6000 concrete meter box 
covers. Art Concrete Co. only other 
bidder at 40c each. 

Taken under advisement. 



OAKLAND, Calif. — Following bids 
taken under advisement by East Bay 
Municipal Utility District to furnish 
and deliver 50.000 ft. 20-in., 16-in„ and 
6-in. cast iron pipe for distributing 
system: 

(a) 1,000 ft. Class B, 20-in.; 

(b) 9.000 ft. Class B, 16-in.; 

(c) 40.000 ft. Class B. 6-in., or 
(di 40,000 ft. Class 250, 6-in. 

C. G. Claussen and Co., Inc., Oak- 
land (a) $3.17; (b) $2.2625; (c) $0,603. 

U. S. Pipe & Foundry Co., S. F.. 
(a) $3.39; (b) $2.42; (d) $0.57. 

American C. I. Pipe Co., S. F., (a) 
$3.42; (b) $2 44; (d) $0.59. 

National C. I. Pipe Co., Los Ange- 
les, (a) $3,675: (b) $2,625; (c) $0.68: 
(d) $0,603. 

R. O. Wood & Co.. Philadelhpia. Pa. 
(a) $3.71; (b) $2.65; (c) $0,706; (d) 
$0,635. 

Pacific States C. I. Pipe Co., (d) 
$0.5S25. 

R. D. Wood & Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
(a) $3,339; (b) $2,385. 



SACRAMENTO. Sacramento Co., 
Cal.— Engineer Henry Dewell. 55 New 
Montgomery St.. San Francisco, has 
been commissioned by the city coun- 
cil to make a study of conditions of 
the sedimentation basin at the Mu- 
nicipal Filtration Plant with a view 
to recommending improvements neces- 
sary to place the plant in condition. 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Bunker Hill and 
Sullivan Mining and Contracting Co.. 
Crocker Eldg.. San Francisco, at $5, ion 
awarded contract by East Bay Mu- 
nicipal Utility District to furnish and 
deliver 50 tons of pig lead for use on 
distributing system. 

OAKLAND. Calif. — Byron Jackson 
Pump Co., 6th and Carlton Streets. 
Berkeley, awarded contract by East 
Bay Municipal Utility District to fur- 
nish and install booster pump unit 
and equipment in El Cerrito Pumping 
Station. 



PORTLAND, Ore. — Following bids 
tni:. n under adv tsi ment by city pur- 
chasing agent t" furnish 6-ln 
in c. i. pipe for Municipal \\ al 
partment: 

C I' W 1 8 Co., tot ii oi 

nit. rnate on sand spun 

- I ' 7 7 ' • T 1 1 

r. s' Tip. & Foundry Co.. (104,143: 
alternate on DeLavaud renirifug.il 
cast Iron pipe, $40,546.96. 

National Cast Iron Pipe Co 
911.511; alternate on I '< 
963.78. 

Pacific States Cast Iron Pipe Co., 
<800 ft. 6-in. pipe, $2,*jiU. 

American Cast Iron l I 
ting 30-in. pipe, $73,002.50; Mono-cast 
casl iron pip,, .ill, unite, $40,983.70. 

FOSTER. Wash.— Until January 17, 

S P. M., bids will be received by S. X. 
Bennett, secretary. Water District No. 
::.".. for water supply system, involving 

(a) 6.000 ft. 6-in. main pipe line ex- 
tending from Beacon Hill to Fos- 
ter; 

(b) distributing system. Involving ap- 
proximately 3% miles of mains 2- 
in. to 6-in. diameter. 

Certified check 5% payable to Treas- 
urer, King County, Wash., required 
with bid. Plans obtainable from Mill- 
er Engineering Co., Burke Bldg.. Se- 
attle, on deposit of ?15, returnable :f 
bid is submitted, otherwise only $10 
will be returnable. 

PLACERVILLE, El Daroda Co., Cal. 
Pelton Water Wheel Co., 2929 19th St., 
San Francisco, at $3500 awarded con- 
tract by El Dorado Irrigation District, 
undear Schedule A, to furnish one 30- 
inch c. i. thimble; one 30-inch butter- 
fly valve, complete, with all appur- 
tenances; two 5-inch air valves, com- 
plete, with connections and under 
Contract B, one needle valve, com- 
plete, with operating machanism and 
special connections. 

Western Pipe & Steel Co., 444 Mar- 
ket St. San Francisco, at $7800 award- 
ed contract to furnish, under Sch- 
edule C, 795 lin. ft. 30-inch single and 
double riveted Vi-inch plate steel pipe, 
complete, installed with connections, 
bends and specials. 

SAN DIEGO, Calif.— U. S. Pipe & 
Foundry Co., 2336 E Sth St., submitted 
the low bid to the city purchasing 
agent. A. V. Goeddel, at $11,690 or 
$1.67 per ft. for furnishing Tumi ft. of 
12-in. class C cast iron pipe. The oth- 
er bids were: 

American Cast Iron Pipe Co., $1.73; 
$12,110. 

R. E. Hazard Const. Co., $1,775; 
612.425. 

The award will probably be made 
to the U. S. Pipe & Foundry Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS, Cal.— Until Jan. 
27, 8 P. M., bids will be received by 
city council for the following improve- 
ments in connection with water sys- 
tem: 
(a) For certain booster pump equip- 



enl : 



deep 



(b) Furnish and install 
turbine pump; 

(c) Drill one well with guaranteed 
production; 

(d) Construct one underground pump 
chamber. 

Specifications obtainable from Salis- 
bury, Bradshaw and Taylor, engineers 
714 W 10th St., Los Angeles. 

MODESTO. Stanislaus Co.. Calif — 
Modesto Irrigation District will in- 
clude in its 1931 construction pro- 
gram the construction of wells and 
installation of pumps to cost $20,000 
and the building of spillways at a cost 
of $4,000. 

PORTLAND, Ore— NePage-McKen- 
ny Co., 45 North Ninth St., Portland, 
at $163,576.50 awarded contract by 
city purchasing agent to construct the 



Twenty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



aturday, January 10, 1931 



Ross Island Bridge mains and con- 
necting lines for the Bureau of Water 
Works. The new lines will consist of 
a 30-in. cast iron main from K Tenth 
and Division Sts. to the east line of 
the Ross Island bridge at Powell Blvd. 
and Grand Ave., where the main will 
lie split into two 24-in. steel lines to 
cross the bridge under the sidewalk 
area and suspended to the bridge. At 
the west end of the bridge the two 
lines again meet in a 3ll-in. cast iron 
main which hooks up at Mill and Wat- 
er Sts. with the 32-inch supply line 
from one of the reservoirs in the city 
park. 



DENVER. Colo.— Until 2 P. M., Jan. 
15. bids will be received by the U. S. 
Bureau of Reclamation, 1441 Welton 
St., Denver, for the fabrication and 
erection of two riveted plate steel 
tanks for water supply, Boulder City, 
Nevada, on the Boulder Canyon proj- 
ect. One tank will be 100 feet in di- 
ameter and 35 ft. high, the other tank 
will be 30 ft. in diameter and 10 ft. 
in. high. Both tanks will be erected 
at the edge of the townsite of Boulder 
City. The city is located about 28 
miles SE of Las Vegas. The estimat- 
ed quantities of metal work involved 

100 ft. x 35 ft. tank, 420,000 lbs. 

30 ft. x 10 ft. 9-in. tank. 26.300 lbs. 

The tanks will be erected on oiled 
sand foundation constructed in ad- 
vance by the government. Plans and 
specifications may be obtained by 
prospective bidders without charge. 
Proposal guarantee, 10%. R. F. Walt- 
er, chief engineer. Plans may be ob- 
tained from the office of the bureau 
at Las Vegas, Nev., or Denver, Colo. 
Spec. No. 500-D. 



WALNUT CREEK. Contra Costa Co. 
Cal.— Election will be held January 7 
to vote bonds of $60,000 to finance 
construction of a water distributing 
system to be served from the mains 
of the California Water Service Corp. 

STREETS AND HIGHWAYS 

SIERRA COUNTY, Cal.— Until Jan. 
20, 2 P. M. (date extended from Jan. 
15). bids will be received by C. H. 
Sweetser, district engineer, U. S. Bu- 
reau of Public Roads, 461 Market St., 
San Francisco, for grading and plac- 
ing crushed rock surfacing on Section 
No. 3. Shady Flat-Downieville Rout? 
26 Yuba Tass National Forest High- 
way. 4.144 miles in length. Project 
involves: 

(1) 28 acres clearing: 

(2) 27S.320 sta. yds. overhaul; 

(3) 72 cu. yds. concrete; 

(4) 2S2 cu. yds. C. R. masonry; 

(5) 280 cu. yds. rip-rap; 

(6) 148,000 cu. yds. excav. unclass.; 

(7) 6700 cu. yds. crushed rock surf.; 

(8) 3120 lbs. reinf. steel; 

(9) 1402 ft. corru. metal pipe; 

(10) 350 cu. vds. hand placed embank- 
ment. 
Plans may be obtained at the office 
of the engineer, C. H. Sweetser, up- 
on deposit of $10. Proposal guaranty, 
5%. 



15, 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Until Janu 
12 noon, bids will be received by F. 
C. Merritt, city clerk, to improve por- 
tions of Sth St., Fallon St. and the 
extension of 10th St. This is a cash 
job. Alternative bids will be received; 

"PROPOSITION A." For grading, 
curbing, guttering, constructing an 
asphaltic concrete pavement, resur- 
facing existing pavement with an as- 
phaltic concrete wearing surface, con- 
structing cement sidewalks, manholes 
with inlet tops, and a wooden culvert, 
and constructing penetration macad- 
am pavements consisting of a ma- 
cadam base, 5-in. in thickness, and a 
hot oil penetration macadam top 



der "Proposition A," except that the 
penetration macadam pavement shall 
have an emulsified road oil penetra- 
tion macadam top course. 

(1) 7,548 cu. yds. fill; 

(2) 1,336 cu. yds. excavation; 

(3) 100 cu. yds. material in ex- 

cavation below subgrade to 
be removed and replaced 
with filling material; 

(4) 322 lin. ft. wood curb; 

(5) 4.779 lin. ft. cone, curb; 

(6) 4.781 sq. ft. cone, gutter; 

(7) 9,225 sq. ft. asphaltic concrete 

pave, (asphaltic concrete 
surf, course, 2-in. thick, 
laid upon a Portland ce- 
ment cone, foundation, 6- 
in. thick); 

(8) 127,088 sq. ft. penetration macad- 

am pavement; 

(9) 2,411 sq. ft. existing pave, to be 

resurfaced with asph. cone. 

(10) 21,662 sq. ft. cem. sidewalk; 

(11) 235 lin. ft. 6-inch by 22-inch 

wooden culvert; 

(12) 2 manholes with inlet tops 

(34-in. opening). 

Certified check 10% payable to city 

required with bid. Plans obtainable 

from office of city clerk. Walter N. 

Frickstad, city engineer. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Heafey-Moore, 344 
High St.. Oakland, at $32,304.94 sub- 
mitted low bid to city council to im- 
prove portions of Hampton Rd.. Lig- 
gett Dr., Estate Dr.. Sims Dr., and 
Pershing Dr. Central-California Roads 
Co., Oakland, only other bidder at 
$34,047.62. Following is a complete 
list of unit bids received: 

(1) 9,874 cu. yds. excavation; 

(2) 6,364 lin. ft. cone, curb; 

(3) 105,693 sq. ft. concrete pavement; 

(4) 14 lin. ft. 8-in. x 24-in. corr. 

iron and concrete culvert; 

(5) 17 lin. ft. 8-in. x 29-in. do; 

(6) 34 lin. ft. 10-in. reinf. cone. 

pipe conduit with concrete 



'ing; 



69 lin. ft. 12-in. do: 
47 lin. ft. 15-in. reinf. cone, 
pipe conduit with concrete 



(7) 



(11) 4 concrete handholes with 



(12) 3 storm water inlets, 34-inch 

openings. 

City will pay one-half the cost of 

the storm water drainage system from 

General Fund. Improvement Act 1913. 

Heafey-Moore Cent'l. Calif. 

(1) $ .62 $ .835 



OAKLAND, Cal.— City council de- 
clares intention to improve Johnston 
Drive from Estates Drive southeaster- 
ly. Project involves: 

(1) 6,246 cu. yds. excavation; 

(2) 1,988 lin. ft. concrete curb; 

(3) 29,780 sq. ft. concrete pavement: 

(4) 4,954 sq. ft. cement sidewalks. 
1911 Act. Hearing January 22 F. 

C. Merritt, city clerk. Walter N. 
Frickstad, city engineer. 



NEVADA COUNTY. Cal— Fredrick- 
son & Watson and Fredrickson Bros., 
354 Hobart St., Oakland, at $92,012 
awarded contract by State Highway 
Commission to grade 7.4 miles be- 
tween 1 mile west of Washington Rd. 
and VS mile east of Summit. 



MENLO PARK, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
— Until January 13, bids will be re- 
ceived by Fannie I. Kurtz, city clerk 
(30-3) to improve College Avenue and 
Cambridge Ave. from Arbor Road to 
El Camino Real; Harvard Ave. bet. 
University Drive and El Camino Real; 
University Drive from Middle Ave. to 
Stanford Ave.; Yale Road bet. Middle 
Avenue and Stanford Ave.; Princeton 
Road bet. College and Stanford Ave., 
including all street intersections. 
Project involves: 

(a) 30,000 cu. yds. grading; 

(b) 670,400 sq. ft. 1%-inch emulsified 

asphalt surface pavement 
on 4-in. macadam base; 

(c) 32,000 lin. ft. concrete curb; 

(d) 220 water service connections. 
1911 Act. Bond Act 1915. Certified 

check 10% payable to city required 
with bid. Plans on file in office of 
clerk and obtainable from Bert J. 
Mehl, city engineer. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
—County Surveyor Julius B. Manthev 
completing plans for 4.7 miles of road 
between Farmington and Bellota and 
for the construction of two small 
bridges; total cost, $40,000. Oil ma- 
cadam pavement will be specified. 

STOCKTON. San Joaquin Co., Cat 
— County Surveyor Julius B. Manthey 
preparing specifications for oil ma- 
cadam paving on 3 miles of Rhoden 
road from Waterloo to Linden and in 
Harney Lane between Lower Sacra- 
mento road and Cherokee Lane; esti- 
mated cost $20,000. 



YREKA. Siskiyou Co., Calif.— City 
council will start proceedings shortly 
for an extensive street paving pro- 
gram. Streets to be paved are east 
of Gold and south of Mine St. 



FRESNO, Fresno Co., Calif.— Asso- 
ciated Oil Co., Associated Oil Bldg., 
San Francisco, at 49c per barrel 
awarded contract by county super- 
visors to furnish from 125.000 to 175.- 
000 barrels of oil for use on county 
highway system during the current 



"PROPOSITION B." For the con- 
struction of the work mentioned un- 



CONTRACTORS' MACHINE WORKS 

SPECIALISTS ON REPAIRING AND REBUILDING OF 

Bunkers, Hoppers, Chuting, Conveyors, Rollers, Mixers, Hoists, 

Shovels, Tractors, Pavers, Crushers, Drag Lines, Elevators, Car 

Unload eis, and other Road and Building Equipments; 

BLACKSMITHING AND WELDING 

Builders of Rosenberg Portable Car Unloaders 

CREAR & BATES 

57 Zoe St., bet. 3rd and 4th, off Brannan St. 
Phone GArfield 4374 San Francisco 



Saturday, January 10, 153) 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-three 



ith steel 



OAKLAND, Calif.— City council do 
olares Intention to improve portions 
!•: siii St, K 10th St., Srd Ave , SI 
Ave., 6th Ave. and 7th, k.ve Involv 
lng: 
(l) 351,339 sci. ft. grading; 
t2) 7.947 Hn. ft. con 
curb guard; 

(3) 293, 'J20 sq. ft. cone, pavement; 

(4) 22,663 sq. ft. cement sidewalk; 

(5) 3,576 so. ft. concrete driveways 

(6) 261 lin. ft. of 8x29-ln. corru. 

iron and cone, culvert: 

(7) 4 cast iron handholes; 

(8) 06 lin. ft. 10-lnch vlt. pipe 

conduit; 

(9) 38 lin. ft. 12-ln, do; 

(10) 1 eatchbasin (34-inch open- 

ing); 

(11) 1 eatchbasin (21-inch ..pin- 

ing); 

(12) 2S0 lin. ft. S-in. vit. pipe sewer 

(13) 1 lamphole. 

City will pay 29% of cost from he 
Treasury. Hearing January 15. Frank 
C. Merritt, city clerk. Waltner N. 
Frickstad, city engineer. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Until Jan. 21, 
2:30 P. M., bids will be received by 
S. J. Hester, secretary. Board of I'ui.- 
lic Works, to improve Montgomery St. 
from Union to Greenwich Sis.; Alia 
St. from Montgomery to point 303 ft. 
easterlv: Filbert St. from Montgomery 
St. to point 16 ft. westerly and from 
Montgomery to point 22 ft. easterly; 
Greenwich St. from Montgomery to 
point 22 ft. westerly, involving: 
2.040 cu. yds. excavation; 
1,285 cu. yds. "B" concrete (retain- 
ing walls, balustrade, stairs, 
fences) ; 
115,000 lbs. reinforcing steel; 
1,540 lin. ft. 4x4-in. reinf. concrete 
fence, single rail; 
23,600 sq. ft. 6-in. "E" concrete pave- 
ment; 
11,200 sq. ft. 8-in. waterbound ma- 
cadam base and oiled surface; 
6 tons asphalt cancrete conform 
pavement; 
2.740 lin. ft. armored concrete curb; 
6,990 sq. ft. 1 -course concrete side- 
walk; 
250 lin. ft. 4xl6-in. redwood curb; 
33 lin. ft. wood guard rail, heavy 

type; 
450 lin. ft. wood fence, light type; 
190 lin. ft. wood bulkhead; 
110 lin. ft. 2-pipe railing concrete 
posts; 
3 9-unit rod warning reflectors; 
810 lin. ft. 8-in. vitrified sewer; 
540 lin. ft. 12-in. do; 
20 lin. ft. class B 8-in. cast iron 

sewer; 
35 lin. ft. class E 12-in. do; 
140 lin. ft. six - inch vitrified side 
sewer; 
32 8x6-in. Y's or T's; 
10 12x6-in. do; 
120 lin. ft. 12-in. vitrified culvert; 
15 brick manholes; 
6 brick catchbasins; 
2 storm water inlets; 
1 lighting system (complete). 
Work under Street Imp. Ordinance 
of 191S. Certified check 10% payable 
to Clerk of the Board of Supervisors 
required with bid. Plans obtainable 
from Bureau of Engineering, 3rd floor, 
City Hall. 



SAN ANSELMO. Marin Co.. Cal — 
Town trustees have started proceed- 
ings to improve Essex St., including 
sewers. The street will be improved 
from the highway to the Ancha Vista 
Hotel. 



OAKLAND. Calif.— City council de- 
clares intention to improve Patterson 
Ave. adjacent to Harbor View Ave., 
involving grading, pave., curbs, gut- 
ters 3nd walks, sewer with manhole, 
lamphole and wye branches. 1911 Act. 
Hearing January 29. Frank C. Mer- 
ritt, city clerk. Walter N. Frickstad, 
city engineer. 



SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara ' ' , 
Cal.— Until February 2, 8:00 P. M., 
bids will be received by A. J. Cornln, 
city clerk, to improve approximately 
so blocks ..f streets, as follows 

(23-D) Bellomy street and Camp- 
bell Ave., involving grading, asphaltic 
concrete pavement laid on layer of 
quarry waste, Portland cement con- 
crete .sidewalks, curbs and gutters. 
Act 1911. Imp. Act 1915. 

(22-D) Harrison, Lewis, Scott, Reeve 
Wist.ir, Monroe, Jackson, Washington 
Pierce, Benton Sts and Railroad Ave. 
involving grading; asphaltic concrete 
pavement laid on a layer of quarry 
waste; Portland cement concrete curbs 
drop curbs, gutters, sidewalks and 
driveways; vit. clay pipe, sanitary 
sewers and Wye branches; laterals; 
sanitary sewer manholes. Bond Act 
1915. Imp. Act 1911. 

(21-D) Santa Clara, Market. Poplar 
Sherwood, Isabella and Main Sts. and 
The Alameda involving grading, as- 
phaltic concrete pavement on layer of 
quarry waste, Portland cement con- 
crete curbs, drop curbs, gutters, side- 
walks add driveways, vitrified clay 
pipe main sanitary sewers, vit. clay 
pipe Wye branches, vit. clay pipe sew- 
er laterals, brick manholes, cast iron 
frames and covers. 1911 Act. 1915 
Bond Act. 

Certified check 10% payable to city 
required with bid Plans on file in 
office of clerk. Geo. Sullivan, city 
engineer. t 



OAKLAND, cal. — Heafey-Moore Co. 
84 1 High si . < lakland, a1 $82,304.94 
awarded contract by citj council I" 

Improve portions of Hampton i: i 

Liggetl Drive. Estate Drive, sin.s Dr. 
an. I Pershing Drive, involving: 

(II 9,874 cu. Jils, excavation, $.62; 

ijj 6,864 lin. ft. .'.me. curb. $.42; 

(3) 105,693 sq. ft. cone. pave.. $.21; 

(4) 14 lin. ft. S-in. x 24-in. corr. 

iron and .one. culvert $4.80 

(5) 17 lin. ft. 8-in. x 29-in. do, 

$4.80; 

(6) 34 lin. ft. 10-in. reinf. cone. 

pipe conduit with concrete 
covering,*2.40; 

(7) 28 lin. ft. 10-in. reinf. cone. 

pipe conduit without cone, 
covering, $1.80; 

(8) 69 lin. ft. 12-in. do, $2.10; 

(9) 47 lin. ft. 15-in n Inf. cone. 

pipe conduit with concrete 

covering, $3.25; 
(10) 208 lin. ft. 15-in. reinf. cone. 

pipe conduit without cone. 

covering, $2.40; 
(111 4 concrete handholes with c. 

i. covers. $18; 
(12) 3 storm water inlets, 34-inch 

openings, $55. 
City will pay one-half the cost of 
the storm water drainage system 
from General Fund. Improvement Act 
1913. A complete list of the unit bids- 
received appeared in issue of Jan. 2. 



WANTED 



TO PURCHASE used Linn Tractor 
Truck. Lidral-Wiley, Inc., 208 Colum- 
bia St., Seattle Washington. 



KERN COUNTY, Cal— Lilly. Wil- 
lard and Biasotti, Stockton, at $18,- 
696 awarded contract by State High- 
way Commission to grade and surface 
3 miles between Harts Station and 3 
miles east, involving 134 sta. grading 
existing shoulders, 28.500 cu. yds. imp. 
borrow, 735 sq. yd. subgrade, 1000 tons 
broken stone (waterbound mac. base), 
700 tons broken stone (bitum. mac. 
surface), 35 tons emulsified asphalt. 
5.75 miles move and reset property 



McHUGH OF SAN FRANCISCO 

AWARDED EAST BAY BRIDGE JOB 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Peter McHugh, 300 Valdez Ave., San Francisco, at 
$9,433 awarded contract by county supervisors to construct reinforced con- 
crete culvert on the Alvarado - Centerville road. Estimated cost $10,000. 
Project involves: 

(1) 570 cu. yds. excavation for structure, complete; 

(2) 340 cu. yds. Portland cement concrete in structure in place; 

(3) 63,000 pounds reinforcing steel in place; 

(4) remove existing bridge. 
Complete list of unit bids follows: 

(A) Peter McHugh, S. F $ 9,433 (F) C. A. Bruce and Sons, 

(B) Lee J. Immel. Eerkeley 9,484 Pleasanton 11,511 

(C) Bodenhamer Const. Co., (G) Scearrino & Sneed Berk- 
Oakland 9,644 eley 12,37 ? 

(D) W B. Lee, San Leandro.... 9,666 (H) Nat Lena, Alameda 13.995 

(E) George Hudson, Oakland... 9,981 (I) O. G. Ritchie, San Jose 14,3o9 

(A) (B) (C) (D) <E) (F) (G) (H) (I) 

(1) $ .57 $ 1.00 $ 1.50 $ 1.15 $ 1.20 $ 1.00 $ 1.50 $ 3.43 $ 2.50 

(2) . 18.35 16.60 17.00 15.30 17.75 19.00 19.20 17.15 22.35 

(3) 04 .04 .043 .043 .0375 .04 .0475 .0481 .045 

(4) 350 00 750.00 300.00 1100.00 900.00 1964.00 2000.00 3179.00 25.00 



DO NOT RISK AN EXPERIMENT 

SPECIFY --USE 

Timpie Hydrated Lime 



STRONG — PURE — PLASTIC 



Year 



High 



of Uniformly Satisfactory Experie 

Class Pacific Coast Construction 

FOR BRICK MORTAR, WHITE COAT AND SAND FLOAT FINISH 

Sold by Representative Dealers Everywhere 



Twenty-four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



finishing roadway. 

fences, 213 lin. ft. laminated timber 

guard rail, 16 monuments. 156 sta. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— City council de- 
clares intention to construct cement 
sidewalks in portions of 92nd Ave. bet. 
A and G Sts. 1911 Act. Hearing Jan. 
22. Frank C. Merritt, city clerk. W. 
N. Frickstad, city engineer. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Heafey-Moore Co. 
344 High St., Oakland, at 7^ 2 c per gal. 
submitted only bid to East Bay Mu- 
nicipal Utility District to furnish and 
deliver 30,000 gals. Grade "E" hot as- 
phalt. Total bid $2550. Taken under 
advisement. 



OAKLAND, Calif.— W. H. Larson, 
2650 Curtis St., Sacramento, at 44.8c 
sq. ft. submitted low bid to East Eay 
Municipal Utility District, for 40,00'J 
sq. ft. asphaltic street paving. Hutch- 
inson <'<>., Oakland, at 50c sq. ft. only 
nther bidder. Taken under advise- 
ment. ] 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co, Cal. 
— City councl will start proceedings 
at once to widen B street from Bald- 
win to Ninth avenues including in- 
stallation of an electrolier system ; 
estimated cost $75,000. Street will be 
widened from 46 feet to 52 feet. 



OFFICIAL PROPOSALS 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 



SEALED PROPOSALS will be re- 
ceived at the office of the State High- 
way Engineer, Public Works Building, 
Sacramento, California, until 2 o'clock 
P. M. on January 28, 1931, at which 
time they will be publicly opened and 
read, for construction in accordance 
with the specifications therefor, to 
which special reference is made, of 
portions of State Highway, as follows: 

Los Angeles County, a bridge across 
Topanga Creek about 4 miles north of 
Santa Monica (VII-L.A-00-B), to be 
widened by constructing eight 27- 
foot timber spans on pile bents ad- 
joining the existing concrete bridge 
and grading and surfacing approaches 
with asphalt concrete, also a bridge 
across Las Flores Creek about 7 miles 
north of Santa Monica (VII-L.A-60- 
A), to be widened by constructing 
two 26-foot reinforced concrete girder 
spans on a concrete pier and concrete 
abutments and grading and surfacing 
approaches with asphalt concrete. 

Plans may be seen, and forms of 
proposal, bonds, contract and speci- 
fications may be obtained at the said 
office, and they may be seen at the of- 
fices of the District Engineers at Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, and at the 
office of the District Engineer of the 
district in which the work is situated. 
The District Engineers" offices are lo- 
cated at Eureka, Redding, Sacramento, 
San Francisco, San Luis Obispo. 
Fresno, Los Angeles, San Bernardino 
and Bishop 

A representative from the district 
office will be available to accompany 
prospective bidders for an inspection 
of the work herein contemplated, and 
Contractors are urged to investigate 
the location, character and quantity 
of work to be done, with a represen- 
tative of the Division of Highways. 
It is requested that arrangements for 
joint field inspection be made as far 
in advance as possible. Detailed in- 
form;, lion concerning the proposed 
work may be obtained from the dis- 
trict office. 



No bid will be received unless it is 
made on a blank form furnished by 
the State Highway Engineer. The 
special attention of prospective bidders 
is called to the "Proposal Require- 
ments and Conditions' annexed to the 
blank form of proposal, for full di- 
rections as to bidding, etc. 

The Department of Public Works re- 
serves the right to reject any or all 
bids or to accept the bid deemed for 
the best interests of the State. 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS. 

C. H. PURCELL. 
State Highway Engineer. 
Dated: December 30, 1930. 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 



SEALED BIDS will be received by 
Geo. B. McDougall, State Architect. 
Public Works Building. 11th and P 
Streets, Sacramento, California, up to 
2 o'clock P. M., Tuesday, February 3, 
1931, said bids thereafter on said day 
to be publicly opened and read for the 
erection and completion of Ward #7, 
Mendocino State Hospital. Talmage, 
California, in accordance with plans 
and specifications therefor. 

The work consists of 6 one-story 
dormitories and connecting arcade, 
the buildings being of reinforced con- 
crete with tile and wood partitions, 
wood roof construction, and tile roof 
similar to the existing buildings. The 
floor area of the buildings is approxi- 
mately 10,000 square feet and of the 
arcade 4000 square feet. 

Separate bids will be entertained as 
follows: 

1. General Work. 

2. Electrical "Work. 

3. Plumbing, Heating and Ventila- 
tion Work. 

4 Complete Mechanical, including 
Plumbing, Heating, Ventilating, and 
Electrical Work. 

The "General Work" bid will em- 
brace all branches of work other 
than segregated above. Contractors 
must state clearly in their applica- 
tion the particular segregation of 
work that they desire plans for. 

Plans and specifications are on file 
for examination in the office of the 
Division of Architecture, Public Works 
Building. Sacramento, and also at 
Room 1025 Associated Realty Building, 
Los Angeles, and at the principal Cali- 
fornia Cities Builders' Exchange of- 
fices. 

Plans, specifications, and proposal 
forms may be secured by licensed 
Contractors who have qualified or who 
will qualify by furnishing a verified 
statement of experience and financial 
condition as required by the provisions 
of Chapter 644, Statutes 1929, and 
whose statements so furnished are 
satisfactory to the Department of 
Public Works. Questionnaire forms 
may be secured from the Division of 
Architecture. 

Bids will not be accepted from a 
Contractor to whom a proposal form 
has not been issued and all bids must 
be on proposal forms supplied by the 
State. 

Requests for plans shall be ac- 
companied by a deposit of twenty- 
five ($25.00) dollars. Check shall be 
made payable to the Department of 
Public Works, Division of Architec- 
ture. Deposit will be returned upon 
receipt of the set in good condition, 
at Sacramento Office of the Division 
within 30 days after opening bids, 
otherwise it will be forfeited to the 
State. 

All bids must be filed at the office 
of the State Architect on or before the 
time heretofore stated and in accord- 



ance with the "Rules for Bidding" ac- 
companying the proposal form. 

No bid will be considered unless 
cash, a bidder's bond made payable 
to the State of California, or a cer- 
tified check made payable to the 
"State Engineer, Department of Pub- 
lic Works," in the sum of at least ten 
per centum (10%) of the amount of 
the bid is enclosed with the bid. 

The Division of Architecture, De- 
partment of Public Works, reserves 
the right to reject any or all bids and 
to waive any informality in any bid 
received. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, 
DIVISION OF ARCHITECTURE 
GEO. B. McDOUGALL, 

State Architect. 
W. E. GARRISON, 
Director of Public Works. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 

NOTICC TO CONTRACTORS 

SEALED PROPOSALS will be re- 
ceived at the office of the State High- 
way Engineer, Public Works Build- 
ing, Sacramento, California, until 2 
o'clock P. M. on January 21, 1931, at 
which time they will be publicly 
opened and read, for construction in 
accordance with the specifications 
therefor, to which special reference 
is made, of portions of State Highway, 
as follows: 

Imperial County, between Trifolium 
Canal and Kane Springs (VIII-Imp-26- 
B), about six and three-tenths (6.3) 
miles in length, to be graded and 
paved with asphalt concrete. 

Proposal forms will be issued only 
to those Contractors who have fur- 
nished a verified statement of ex- 
perience and financial condition in 
accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 644. Statutes of 1929, and 
whose statements so furnished are 
satisfactory to the Department of 
Public Works. Bids will not be ac- 
cepted from a Contractor to whom a 
proposal form has not been issued by 
the Department of Public Works. 

Plans may be seen, and forms of 
proposal, bonds contract and specifi- 
cations may be obtained at the said 
office, and they may be seen at the 
offices of the District Engineers at 
Los Angeles and San Francisco, and 
at the office of the District Engineer 
of the district in which the work is 
situated. The District Engineers' of- 
fices are located at Eureka, Redding, 
Sacramento, San Francisco, San Luis 
Obispo, Fresno. Los Angeles, San Ber- 
nardino and Bishop. 

A representative from the district 
office will be available to accompany 
prospective bidders for an inspection 
of the work herein contemplated, and 
Contractors are urged to investigate 
the location, character and quantity of 
work to be done, with a representative 
of the Division of Highways. It is 
requested that arrangements for joint 
field inspection be made as far in 
advance as possible. Detailed informa- 
tion concerning the proposed work 
may be obtained from the district 

No bid will be received unless it is 
made on a blank form furnished by 
the State Highway Engineer. The 
special attention of prospective bid- 
ders is called to the "Proposal Re- 
quirements and Conditions" annexed 
to the blank form of proposal, for 
full directions as to bidding, etc. 

The Department of Public Works 
reserves the right to reject any or 
all bids or to accept the bid deemed 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



nty-fn 



for the best Interests of the State. 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 
C. H. PURCELL, 
State Highway Engineer. 
Dated December 23, 1930. 



HOME BUILDING 

BOOKLET AVAILABLE 



"Light Frame House Construction," 
Is the title of a 200-page. Illustrated 
bulletin, prepared jointly by the Na- 
tional Committee on Wood Utilization 
of the Department of Commerce and 
the Federal Board for Vocational Ed- 
ucation, and now available for distri- 
bution. 

While this bulletin is intended 
primarily for carpenters interested in 
the technical phases of dwelling con- 
struction, and Is endorsed by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, it contains In usable firm 
Information constantly needed by the 
contractor and builder. 

For instance, the tables in the bulletin 
covering column girder, joist, and. 
rafter sizes for various loads have been 
so simplified as to make Immediately 
available figures which might other- 
wise require hours to compute. 

Floor loads are discussed not only 
as to their effect on the size of joists, 
but also on the size of girders Live 
and dead loads in various parts of the 
house from the first floor to the attic, 
are presented in tabular form. 

The strength and rigidity values of 
various methods of bracing In con- 
struction, from horizontal sheathing, 
cut-in and let-in bracing to diagonal 
sheathing, as determined by experi- 
ment, as given consideration in the 
bulletin. The comparative values of 
Insulating materials, and the air in- 
filtration through different types of 
building paper are also presented. 

Among other subjects of interest 
to contractors and builders, included 
in the publication may be mentioned: 
the effects of cuts in strength of bath- 
room joists, framing over openings, 
the comparative values of edge and 
flat-grained lumber, physical charac- 
teristics of wood including factors de- 
termining strength, unfounded beliefs 
In regard to wood, firestopping, in- 
terior trim, and the latest standards 
for lumber grading. 

This publication, it Is expected, will 
be in demand not only by contractors 
and builders but also by carpenters, 
home owners, and other groups in- 
terested in the various details in- 
volved in dwelling construction. It 
may be obtained at a nominal price 
from branch offices of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce, located In the 
principal cities, or from the Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Government 
printing office, Washington, D. C. 



A. S. C. E. ELECTS 

OFFICERS FOR 1931 

Leon B, Reynolds of the depart- 
ment of civil engineers, Stanford Uni- 
versity, was elected president of the 
San Francisco Section, American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers at the annual 
meeting of that body last month. 

H. H. Hall, chief engineer of the 
Standard Oil Company, was elected 
vice-president and Harold B. Ham- 
mill, consulting engineer, secretary- 
treasurer. 

The section voted to approve the 
action of the San Diego section in con- 
demning the advertising for bids for 
engineering services by the city of San 
Diego. 

Dexter S. Kimball, dean of engi- 
neering, Cornell University, was the 
principal speaker. His subject was 
"Technological Unemployment." 



SEWER BIDS OPENED BY 

OAKLAND CITY COUNCIL 



nplete list of unit bids received by 
tures In portions of E 8th St. and 
lues adjacent thereto. Project In- 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Following is a c 

city council to construct drainage str 

E 10th St., and certain streets and av 

volves: 

(1) 375 ft. 10 In. pipe conduit; (S) 6 manholes, standard tops; 

(2) 652 ft. 12-ln. do; (ID 4 manholes, Inlet top, 34-in.; 

(3) 536 ft. 15-ln. do; (10) 4 catchbaslns, 34-ln.; 

(4) 320 ft. lS-in. do; (11) 2 catchbaslns, 21-in.; 

(5) !I30 ft. 24-hi. do; (121 4 storm water Inlets, 34-in.; 

(6) 300 ft. 15-ln. pipe sewer; (13) 5 storm water Inlets, 21-in. 

(7) 389 ft. 18-ln. do; 

(A) Oakland Sewer Const. Co., Oak- Oakland; 

land; (E) I. T. Cllnck; 

(P.) Robt. R. McNair, Oakland; (F) Frederlckson & Watson, Oakland 

(C) R. H. Downer. Oakland; <G) W. J. Tobin, Oakland; 

(D) I. W. Cahan and Prank Ponte. (H) L. L. Page. 

(A) (P.) (C) (D) (E) (F) (G) (H) 

(1) $1.50 $1.45 $1.90 $1.25 $1.38 $1.50 $1.46 $2.40 

(2) 1.60 1.35 2.00 1.50 1.53 1.50 1.50 2.70 

(3) 2.00 1.55 2.40 2.50 1.94 1.60 1.78 3.40 

(4) 2.31 2.20 2.75 3.25 2.30 4.00 2.48 3.78 

(5) 3.69 3.30 4.46 4.00 3.30 5.00 3.17 5.20 

(6) 1.57 1.55 2.25 3.00 1.94 1.60 1.7S 3.40 

(7) 2.12 2.20 2.70 3 50 2.30 4.00 2.48 3.75 

IS I .65.00 70.00 85.00 75.00 67.00 70.00 70.00 85.00 

(9) 65.00 85.0" 80.00 75.00 67.00 80.00 80.00 85.00 

(10) 50.00 60.00 00.00 39.00 70.00 60.00 80.00 65.00 

(11) 50.00 56.00 60.00 24.00 50.00 50.00 70.00 60.00 

(12) 40.00 41.00 40.00 39.00 60.00 40.00 60.00 50.00 

(13) 38.00 34.50 40.00 24.00 50.00 30.00 40.00 50.00 



OAKLAND CITY COUNCIL OPENS 

BIDS TO IMPROVE EAST 8th ST 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Following is a complete list of unit bids received by 
city council to construct sewers in portion of Foothill Blvd., 84th Ave.. Iris 
St., Dowling St. and Blanche St. Project involves: 



(a) 285 lin. ft. 24- 

(b) 606 lin. ft. S-i 

(1) Geo. G. DeGolye 

(2) T. E. Horan; 

(3) Manuel Costa; 



. pipe sew 
pipe sew 
Oakland; 



(4) Fredrickson & Watson, Oakland; (9) V. B. Lee; 



(6) Calhan & Ponte, Oakland; 

(7) Oakland Sewer Const. Co., Oakland 
8) Robt. B. McNair, Oakland; 



(5) H. H. Dowr 



(10) W. J. Tobin. Oakland. 



$4.00 $4.25 $5.00 $4.75 $3.76 $4.00 $3.54 $3.96 $4.10 $3.60 
.. 1.35 1.50 1.25 1.25 .80 2.00 1.22 1.10 1.62 1.40 
.55.00 70.00 42.00 60.00 75.00 45.00 50.00 60.50 65.00 70.00 



VALVE BIDS OPENED BY EAST 

BAY MUNICIPAL UTILITY DIST. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Following is a complete tabulation of bids received 
by the East Eay Municipal Utility District to furnish and deliver gate 
valves for distribution system, all bids being taken under advisement: 

(1) Rensselaer Valve Co., Troy, N. Y. York 

(2) Tay-Holbrook. Inc.. San Franciso (6) Crane Co.. Oakland (b) 

(a) (7) Calif. Pipe & Supply Co., Los 

(3) Grinnell Co. of the Pacific. San Angeles (c) 

Francisco, (a) (8) Darling Valve & Mfg. Co., Los 

(4) Water Works Supply Co., San Angeles 

Francisco (9) C. G. Claussen Co., Inc.. Oak- 

(5) Kennedy Valve Mfg. Co., New land (d) 

Total Total 

400 Valves 50 Valves 20 Valves 25 Valv's 5 Valves Items All Items 

6-in. dia. 8-in. dia. 10-in. dia. 12. dia. 16-in. dia. 1 to 5 lump sum 

(1) $8800 $1650.00 $ 900.00 $1450.00 $625.00 $13,425.00 $ 8.350.00 

(2) 5476 1069.50 723 20 1:28.50 471.25 8,968.45 8,968.45 

(3) ',476 1069 50 723,20 1228.50 471.25 8,968.45 8,968.45 

(4) 6940 1445.00 766.00 1321.25 737.50 11.209.75 8.984.50 

(5) 5776 1247.50 724.20 1400.00 593.15 9,740.85 9,156.39 

(6) 55S4 1220.00 711.00 1246.75 542.50 9.304.00 9.200 00 

(7) 6380 1275.00 750.00 1187.00 605.00 10.197.50 10.197.50 

(8) 6400 1400.00 840.00 1500.00 600.00 10,740.00 10,740.00 

(9) 8736 1716.00 1040.00 1750.00 860.00 14,102.00 14,102.00 

(a) Prices based on entire order only. 

(b) 2% discount allowed for payment in 20 days. 

(c) 2% discount allowed for payment in 10 days. 

(d) Late delivery condition. 



Twenty-six 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



aturday, January 10, 1931 




BUILDING PERMITS 



San Francisco County 




No. Owner 


Contractor 


Amt. 


1670 Harband 


SehuHz 


6000 


1671 Burlingame 


Williams 


10000 


1672 National 


Owner 


9500 


1673 Graham 


Brass 


4500 


1674 Stoneson 


Owner 


7000 


1675 General 


Reavey 


3000 


1 Johnson 


Owner 


1000 


2 Doelger 


Owner 


4800 


3 Struthers 


Conway 


3500 


4 McElroy 


Owner 


1709 


5 Warner 


Electrical 


1500 


6 Bjorkman 


Owner 


3500 


7 Warner 


Electrical 


1500 


S Anderson 


Owner 


4000 


9 Fay 


Magill 


2000 


10 Suttich 


Burns 


1300 


11 Steinberg 


American 


9000 


12 Ferrando 


Silva 


2000 


13 Sullivan 


Owner 


4000 


14 Harder 


Owner 


3500 


15 Mauerer 


Carson 


3000 


16 Halsen 


Owner 


4000 


17 Grosman 


Owner 


4000 


IS Laguens 


Larsen 


10000 


19 Eggert 


Munster 


4000 


20 Arnott 


Arnott 


8000 


21 Hornung 


Owner 


8000 


22 Johnson 


Owner 


3000 


23 Shell 


Prom 


5000 


24 Eureka 


Mattock 


35000 


25 Foster 


Murray 


3890 


26 McDonough 


Owner 


9000 


27 Pendleton 


Bohr 


1000 


28 Reynolds 


Todhunter 


1000 



INDUSTRIAL BLDG. 

(1670) N FOLSOM 50 W Rausch; one- 
story and mezzanine class C light 
industrial building. 

Owner— J. Harband. 105S Howard St. 

Engineer — A. C. Griewank, 208 Mi! 



Str 



. Co.. 1 Hill- 
Highlands. 
$6000 



RESIDENCE 

(1671) NE 21st and SANCHEZ Sts.; 
two - story and basement frame 
residence. 

Owner — Burlingame Corp., 226 San- 
some St. 

Plans by R. B. Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 

Contractor— G. W. Williams Co., Ltd., 
1404 Broadway, Burlingame. 

$10,000 



ALTERATIONS 

(1672) 1637-39 FILLMORE ST.; a 

terations and additions to store. 

Owner — National Dollar Stores, pren 



ALTERATIONS 

(1673) 533 SUTTER 4T.) alterations 

to store front and interior. 
Owner— L. E. Graham, 441 Post St. 
Plans by W. Lamb, 141 Post St. 
Contractor— Brass & Kuhn Co., 1919 

Bryant St. $4500 



DWELLINGS 

(1674) S SENECA 295 E Delano; two 

one - story and basement frame 

dwellings. 
Owner — Stoneson Bros. & Thorinson, 

279 Yerba Buena Ave. 
Plans by Owners. $7000 



SERVICE STATION 

(1675) SW COLE and Frederick Sts.; 
one-story steel frame service sta- 
tion & 1-story steel frame shelter. 



ns by Eng. Dept. of Owl 
itractor — Reavey & Spiv 
Shell Bldg. 



iHiKI 



ALTERATIONS 

(1) S OAKDALE 300 E Selby. Alter 

for underpinning. 
Owner — A. B. Johnson, 355 Brentwood 

Ave., San Francisco. 
Architect— Not Given. $1000 



DWELLING 

(2) SW THIRTY-FIRST AVE. AND 

Kirkham. One-story and basement 

frame dwelling. 
Owner— H. Doelger, 300 Judah St., 

San Francisco. 
Architect— Not Given. $4800 



DWELLING 

(3) NW TARA 149 SW Niagra. One- 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ing. 

Owner— M. T. Struthers, 2S49 Fillmore 
St., San Francisco. 

Architect — Not Given, 

Contractor— G. J. Conway, 2733 Mis- 
sion St., San Francisco. $3500 



ALTERATIONS 

(4) NO. 1245 EIGHTEENTH AVE. 
Alter flats. 

Owner — Mrs. T. R. Mannng and W. J. 

McElroy, Premises. 
Architect— Not Given. $1709 

ALTERATIONS 

(5) NO. 1125 MARKET. Alterations 
to face of marquee. 

Owner — Warner Bros. Theatre, Prem. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor — Electrical Products Corp., 
255 Golden Gate Ave., San Fran- 
cisco. $1500 



DWELLING 

(6) NE PALOU 125 NW Quint. One- 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ing. 

Owneh — V. Bjorkman, 3845 Mission 
St., San Francisco. 

Architect— Not Given. $3500 



SIGN 

(7) NO. 1125 MARKET ST. Elec- 



sign. 



Owner — Warner Bros. Theatre, Prem. 

Architect — Not Given. 

Contractor — Electrical Products Corp., 
255 Golden Gate Ave., San Fran- 
cisco. $1500 



DWELLING 

(8) E 27th AVE. 200 S Taraval; 
story and basement frame d 



CAPITAL CITY TILE 
COMPANY 

J. C. PALEN 

Manager 

914 Seventh Street 
Sacramento - - - - OM ornia 



Owner— N. W. Ande 


-son, 2 


427 24th 


Avenue. 






Architect — None. 




$4000 


STORE 


(9) S ORTEGA 45 E 


19th A 


ve.; one- 


story frame store. 






Owner— P. B. and K. 


Fay. 




Plans by Builder. 






Contractor— C. T. Mag 


ill, 1S5 


19th Av- 


enue. 




$2000 



OFFICES 

(10) N OAKDALE 125 W Fitch; one- 
story frame offices. 

Owner— N. J. Suttich, 5250 3rd St. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor — R. Burns, Thornton Ave. 
and Lucy St. $1300 



ALTERATIONS 

(11) 961 MARKET ST.; alterations to 

store front. 

Owner— Steinberg's. 961 Market St. 
Plans by W. Roselyn, 2800 20th St. 

Contractor — American Woodworking 

Co., 2800 20th St. $9000 



DWELLING 

(12) N SWEENEY 35 S Boylston; h 

story and basement frame dwell 

ing. 
Owner— E. Ferrando, 2554 San Brum 

Avenue. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor — A. Silv 



DWELLING 

(13) W MONCADA S6 N Palema; 1 

story and basement frame dwell 

ing. 
Owner and Euilder — T. J. Sullivan 
1967 Ocean Ave. 
Plans by E. L. Boldemann, 1967 Ocean 

Avenue. $4000 



DWELLING 

(14) N ARLETA 104 E Rutland; 1- 
story and basement frame dwell- 



REPAIRS 

(15) 2971 CALIFORNIA ST.; repail 

fire damage. 
Owner— Mrs. L. Mauerer, 2921 Cali 

fornia Street. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— O. Carson. 666 Mission St 
$3001 



DWELLINGS 

(16) E 19th AVE. 220 S Lawton St. 

two 1-story and basement frame 

dwellings. 
Owner and Builder — A. Halsen, 

25th Avenue. 
Architect— Not Given. each $400( 



DWELLING 

(17) SE TINGLEY and Alemany; 1 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ing. 

Owner and Builder — W. E. Grosman 
47 Curtis St. 

Architect— Not Given. $4001 



DWELLINGS 

(18) S DARIEN WAY 85 E Manoi 

Drive; two 1-story and basemen 

frame dwellings. 
Owner— Laguens & Larsen, 309 - 36 

Ashton Avenue. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— S. Larsen, 3 6 5 Ashtoi 

Avenue. each $500( 



Salnr.la; 



ry 10. 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-seven 



ALTER vi'i' iNS 

tin) i^ss mission' ST.; alterations 

to repal) Rre damages, 
Ownei H. S II Bggei i. 350 Posl si. 
\ i .i.ii. i i Nol Given. 
.' ra. i"i -I 1 1 M i". itei . 1630 Brod- 

.i Ick St. $-»""•' 



DWELLINGS 

(20) E liUh AVE. 215 N Santiago: 2 

1-story and basement frami dwell 

lngs. 
, m ... i .1 A An. ..it. i;:::: Tars .:.i si 
Plans by I iwner. 
Contractor— J, A. Amott & Son. 033 

Taraval St. each I 



ALTERATIONS 

(£1) 1G5 VALENCIA ST; carpenter, 

plumbing and heating work. 
Owner- . '. Hornung, 295 Fell St. 
Plans by i iwner. $8000 



DWELLING 

ii'L'i W 32nd AVE. 225 N Balboa; 1- 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ing. 

Owner — A. Conrad Johnson, is".". Stl. 
Avenue. 

Architect— Not Given. .-:;< 



SERVICE STATION 

(23) SE FELL and OCTAVIA Sts.; 

one-story class C service si a t.< in 
Owner— Shell nil <'.... 1'*" Hush St. 
Plans by T. L. Longham, 114 Sansome 

Street. 
Contractor — P. Prom, 111 Sansome St. 
$S( 



BUILDING 

CD NE TOST and SCOTT STS.; 3- 
story class C building. 

Owner — Eureka Benevolent Society. 

Architect— S. L. Hyman and A. Apple- 
ton. GS Post St. 

Contractor— A. F. and C. W. Mattock. 
212 Clara St. $35,000 



XLTERATIONS 

(25) 2263 CHESTNUT ST.; altera 

tlons for restaurant. 
Owner — Foster Lunch S y s t 

Mission St. 
Plans by Mr. Murray. 
Contractor— A. B. Murray, 525 4th St. 



986 



STORES 

(26) W 2Sth AVE. 125 N Kirkham; 

two 1-story and basement frame 

stores. 
Owner and Builder — J. J. McDonough, 

1226 17th Ave. 
Plans by Owner. each $4500 



ALTERATIONS 

(27) 1600 VAN NESS AVE.; alter- 
ations to show room. 

Owner— H. A. Pendleton, 16 Van 
Ness Ave. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— A. J. Bohr, 1225 Oak St. 
$1000 



REPAIRS 

(28) 173 12th AVENUE; repair fire 

damage. 
Owner — Mrs. Reynolds, 5754 Geary St. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— G. C. Todhunter, 10 8 8 

Ashbury St. $1000 

BUILDING CONTRACTS 



SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY 



Contractor Amt. 



19 Poultry 
Burlingame 
Figone 



Willis 

Cune 



11500 



OFFICE & WAREHOUSE 

(259) LOCATION OMITTED; all work 

on office and warehouse building. 
Owner— Poultry Producers of Central 

California. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor — Sommarstrom Bros. Co., 

35th and San Pablo Ave.. Oakland. 



, .1 n 



27. 



til. .1 i lee. :!i>. '3 

i. in ir and ce nl paid for $12,1 

Foundation piers poured 12,000 

Walls (.. 2nd floor level up 12,1 

Walls 2nd floor level poured 12,000 

Completed 12. 

Usual 36 days 17. t 

TOTAL COST, $89,000 
Bond, $89,000. Sureties, Pacific lo- 
de in Co. Limit, 120 days. 

1 Boyd Mattock 3638 

ALTERATIONS 

(1) S\V THIRD T.i SE Market SE 25 

x SW 7a; alt. rations and addi- 
tions to building. 
Owin-r— Alexander 11.. yd Ustate. 
Architect— G. A. Applegarth, Claus 

Spreckels Bldg. 
Contractor— A. F. and C. W. Mattock, 

•J12 Clara St. 
Filed Dec. 31, '30. Dated Dec. 26, '31. 

1st and 15th of each month 75% 

Usual 35 days 26 

TOTAL COST, $3,538.50 
Bond, J3.53S.50. Sureties. Indemnity 
Ins. Co. of North America. Plans and 
Spec, filed. 

2 Railway Express Smith 470(1 

3 Wilhelm Lindsay 4950 



LATHING, ETC. 

(2) 635-647 FOLSOM ST.. third floor 

of garage; all work for partition. 

ceiling, lathing and plastering. 
Owner — Railway Express Agency, Inc., 

premises. 
Plans by Jas. H. Humphrey, Supt. of 

Bldgs. for Owner. 
Contractor— Jas. F. Smith, 271 Minna 

Street. 
Filed Jan. 5. '31. Dated Dec. 12, '30. 

Completed and accepted 75% 

Usual 35 days... 25% 

TOTAL COST, $4700 
Forfeit, $40. Limit, 12 days. Plans 
and Spec, filed. 



(3) E GAMBIER 75 N Silliman 2oX 

95; kind of work omitted. 
Owner — A. L. Wilhelm and K. Boyd. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— C. T. Lindsay, 16S3 27th 

Avenue. 
Filed Jan. 5, '31. Dated Dec. IS, '30. 
Begin March 1, as int on bank 

loan $11.25 

Begin May 1. until expiration of 

mortgage 33.75 

Eegin Aug 1, on note of $500.... 20.00 
TOTAL COST, $4950 
Limit, 90 days. 



RESIDENCE 

(4) NE SANCHEZ and 21st Sts. 57x 
105; all work for residence and ga- 
rage. 

Owner — Burlingame Corporation. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— G. W. Williams Co., Ltd., 

1404 Broadway St., Burlingame. 
Filed Jan. 6. '31. Dated Dec. 16, '30. 

Frame work up and roof on $2625 

Interior plastering complete & 

extension brown coated 2625 

Completed — - 2625 

Usual 35 days 2625 

TOTAL COST, $10,500 
Bond. $10,500. Sureties, American 
Eonding Co. Limit, 90 days. Plans 
and Spec, filed. 

APARTMENTS 

(5) SE ARMY and Alabama Sts. S 
85 E 25 N 83-9 W 25-3; all work 
on 2-story, basement and garage 
apartment house except wall beds, 
shades, wall paper, finish hard- 
ware, lighting fixtures, Frigidaire 
and stoves, steam heating and hot 
water. 

Owner— L. Figone, 2003 16th St. 

Architect— G. A. Berger, 309 Valencia. 

Contractor— J. L. Cuneo and F. De 
Martini. 4S1 Church St. 

Filed Jan. 7, '31. Dated Jan. 2, '31. 

Rough frame up and roof on $2875 

Brown coated 2875 

Completed and accepted 2875 

Usual 35 days 2875 

TOTAL COST, $11,500 



Bond. $5750. Sin I, ,1 Aral . and I. 

r. :, [up! Poi i. i. i" Limit, 90 
days. Plana and Spec. Hied. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



San Francisco County 

Recorded Accepted 

Jan, 2. 1931—2670 PIERCE ST. R P 
McCullough to A i . i lorr 

. .. . I. ii i i ,. 19 10 

Jan 2, 1931— W EIGHTEENTH AVE 
2., S Kirkham S 25xW 96, SW 
Kirkham and 18th Ave S 25xW 
96. Michael D and Mary A 
Hardiman to whom it may con- 
cern Jan. 2, 1931 

Due 31, 1930— E 16th AVE 175 S VI- 
ci nte 25x127-6 .1 Michael and C 
Bomerer to wfiom it may - :ern 

31, 1 LOT 6 BLK D map 

plat showing ptn silver Terrace 
Oscar M Gilbert to whom it may 
concern. December 26, 1930 

Dec 31, 193(1— SE 40th AVENUE and 
Balboa Addn to Church of Saint 
Thomas. The Roman Catholic 
Archbishop of San Francisco to 
J A Bryant, Ltd Dec 29, 1930 

Dec 31, 1930— POLK ST and Golden 
Gate Ave, Service Station No 30. 
Associated Oil Co to Dave Camp- 
bell December 22, 1930 

Dec 31, 1930— NE OLNEY Avenue 
153-10 SW 3rd NW 32 x NE 100, 
blk 56, map Paul Tract Hd Assn. 
Peter Demetrak and Wm Chimi- 
nolli to Hanson Eros Dec 13, 1930 

Dec 31, 1930— W 42nd AVE 150 S 
Judah S 25 x W 120. G and E 
Rowan to whom it may concern.. 

Dec 30, 1930— S18 HEAD ST, Ingle- 
side Terrace. Thos F Smith to A 
D Dorr December 1, 1930 

Dec 30, 1930— W 12th AVE 126 N 
Taraval St 31-6 x 120. J Mager 

to whom it may concern 

December 30, 1930 

Dec 30, 1930— S VICENTE 77-6 W 
15th Ave W 25 x S 100. J V W< 3- 
terlund to whom it may concern 
December 30, 1930 

Dec 30. 1930— LOTS 14 to 19 inc Elk 
294SA map Sub No 6, Miraloma 
Park. Meyer Bros to whom it may 
concern Dec 30, 1930 

Dec 29, 1930— E 23rd AVENUE 218 N 
Noriega N 50 x E 120. R F Galli 

to whom it may concern 

December 29, 1930 

Dec 29, 1930— SE MISSION 125 NE 
Excelsior NE 25 x SE S3-6. S and 

V Toracs to M P Jorgenson 

December 29, 1930 

Dec 29, 1930— W 33rd AVE 225 and 
250 S Ulloa S 25 x W 120. F F 
Balliet to whom it mav concern 
December 27, 1930 

Dec 27, 1930— NE MISSION AND 
Virginia Ave. 3339-3349 Mission St. 
H and C Krug to J D Woodside... 
December 22, 1930 

Dec 27, 1930— NE QUESADA AND 
Lane Sts. 25x75. C Fernandez to 
W E Tuomisto December 27, 1930 

Dec 26, 1930— LOT 209 Gift Map No 
2, known as 749 Moultrie St. E 
A Anderson to whom it may con- 
cern December 22, 1930 

Jan. 5, 1931— NW AVILA 137-6 NE 
Cervantes Blvd NE 37-6 NW 92.079 
W 52.52S SE 12S.S61 Geo E and A 
M Pendergast to H W Armburst 
January 5, 1931 

Jan. 5, 1931— NO. 216 STANYAN ST. 

M F O'Brien to J J Irwin 

January 3, 1931 

Jan 5, 1931— W SANCHEZ ST 50 S 
20th 25x80. J F Kennedy to whom 
it may concern January 5, 1931 

Jan 5, 1931— LOT IS BLK E, map 
addns to Castro St Addn and Glen 
Park Terrace. O T Svenson to 
whom it may concern Nov ,4. 1930 

Jan 3, 1931— PTN LOTS 25 AND 26 
Blk 3259 Map Blks 3257,3258 and 
3259 Balboa Terract descd SE 
Santa Ana Way dist 12 SE from 
SW line sd lot 25 NE 53 S 61" 27' 



Twenty-eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



SI" E 100 SW 57.762 m or 1 N 57° 
57' 29.1" W 100 to beg. Castle Bldg 

Co to Henry Horn Dec. 31, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— NW SANTA ANA AVE 
and NE line Lot 17 SW 39 N 60- 
15' 33.2" W 99.973 NE 35.2S4 S 63" 
23' 30" E 100 to beg Ptn Lot 17 Blk 
3258 Map Blk3 3257. 3258 and 3259, 
Balboa Terrace Addition. Castle 
Bldg Co to Henrv Horn .Dec. 31. 1930 
Jan. 3, 1931— LOTS 23 AND 24 BLK 
3279, Map Mt Davidson Manor. 

Castle Bldg Co to Henry Horn 

..Doc. 31, 193'! 



BUILDING PERMITS 



Jan. 3, 1930— N GEARY bet. 23rd 
and 24th Aves. Roman Catholic 
Archbishop of San Francisco to 
whom it may concern.... Jan. 2, 1931 

Jan. 3, 1931 — W TWENTY-SEV- 
enth Ave 150 S Judah 25x120. F E 
Almquist to whom it may concern 

Jan. 2. 1931 



LIENS FILED 



San Francisco County 

Jan. 3, 1931 — LOTS 1 TO 10 INCL 
Blk 4, Heyman Tract No. 2. Ro- 
lando Lumber Co vs Heyman Bros 
C, J, G, B and A Mourgos ....$844.57 

Jan. 3, 1930— LOT 21 BLK 5724, As- 
sessor's Map. Chas R McCormick 
Lumber Co. of Delaware vs H & C 
Schwartz and F Hermann $63.29 

Jan 2, 1931—1685 PATOU AVE bet 
3rd and Newhall Sts. S Patou 100 
from Newhall 25x100. F Quar- 
tiroli vs P and A Finn $79.20 

Jan 2, 1931— E PARIS AND Rus- 
sia Ave NE 75xSE 25. Harry and 
Samuel Ginsberg (as Ginsberg Tile 
Co) vs C E Anderson, Antone and 
T Maffei * 55 

Dec 31, 1930— SE WOOLSEY 90 and 
120 SW Somerset SW 30 x SE 100. 
California Concrete Co vs S Mak- 

aren $350 

Dec 30, 1930— E 39th AVE 200 S 
Balboa 25x120. J Elverson and A 

Roe vs Mrs E A Burke $207 

Dec 27 1930— N WASHINGTON 106- 
3% E Lyon E 24-1114 N 127-8% W 
25 S 25 S 102-8%. A E Springer 
vs J A Lund and C A Pearce....$750 
Correction In Location. 
Jan 5, 1931— NW 22nd and Bartlett 
th alg N 22nd 125 N 60-8% NE 
125-2 S 68-11 VI; W Bartlett 68- 
11% N 22nd N 60-7 SE 250-6% S 
60-2 NE 250-5 to beg. Aristo Paint- 
ing Co vs J Currie, Wm H Wood- 
field Jr. E L Woodfield, S and E 

Weinstein and A Curtaz $155.70 

Jan. 5, 1931— LOTS 1 TO 10 INCL. 
Blk 4, Heyman Tract No. 2. Golden 
Gate Atlas Materials Co vs Hey- 
man Bros; C J, Geo, B and A 

Mourgos $398.55 

Jan. 5, 1931— LOTS 1 TO 10 INCL 
Blk 4, Heyman Tract No. 2. 
Jas R Williamson vs Heyman Bros 
C, J, Geo, B and A Moureo3....S211.35 



RELEASE OF LIENS 



San Francisco County 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 27. 1930— E 11th AVE 250 N 
Ortega N 25 x E 120. W B Jef- 
ferson as The Greater City Lbr 
Co, F M Blessing as New Mis- 
sion Sheet Metal Works, to Paul 
and Dusine AckenheiL.Nov 19, 1930 

Dec 27, 1930— E 11th AVE 250 N 
Ortega N 25 x E 120. Leo Toge. 
J I Meeks, O G Windell. Standard 
Shade Co, Frank Menicucci as 
Arc Electric Co, J D Murphy as 
Standard Bldg Material Co to K 
W Oertel and Paul and Dusine 
Ackenheil November 19, 1930 

Dec 27, 1930— 1S56 11th AVENUE. 
Richard E Giller to whom it may 
concern November 26. 1930 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 




No. Owner 


Contractor 


Ami, 


1555 Reaves 


Wright 


1000 


1556 Bemis 


Owner 


2000 


1557 Levy 




5000 


1 Netherby 


Owner 


4000 


2 Oakland Tribune 


Neon 


3000 


3 Langendorf 


Barrett 


12000 


4 Conlogue 


Owner 


3100 


5 De Nevi 


Waldman 


4750 


6 Netherby 


Owner 


5000 


7 Hink 


Anderson 


1000 


8 Johnson 


Owner 


1200 


9 Duncan 


Owner 


2900 


10 Greene 


Rose 


1500 


11 Rowe 


Owner 


4150 


12 Anderson 


Owner 


3750 


13 Anastasi 


Allen 


1500 


14 Graham 


Owner 


80000 


15 Hertz 


Electrical 


1650 


16 Lodge 


Owner 


3500 


17 Miller 


Jensen 


30000 


18 Carlson 


Owner 


4000 


19 Ellsworth 


Anderson 


1200 



ALTERATIONS 

(1555) NO. 3031 BENVENUE AVE.. 
BERKELEY. Alterations. 

Owner — Mr, Reaves. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— Curtis Wright, 2716 Tele- 
graph Ave.. Berkeley. $1000 



RESTAURANT 

(1556) NW COR. E 12th Street and 

3rd Ave, OAKLAND; one-story 

restaurant. 
Owner and Builder— K. E. Bemis, 1962 

San Pablo Ave., Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given. $2000 



ALTERATIONS 

(1557) 459 12th STREET, OAKLAND 

alterations. 
Owner— Levy Estate Co., % Architect. 
Architect— F. F. Amandes, 1128 Hearst 

Bldg., San Francisco. 

$5000 



DWELLING 

(1) W PROCTOR AVE., bet. Julia 

and Modoc Sts., OAKLAND. Two 

story 6-room dwelling. 
Owner— W. A. Netherby, 3S53 Lyman 

Road, Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given $4000 



SIGNS 

(2) SW THIRTEENTH & FRANK- 
lin Sts.. OAKLAND. Three elec- 
tric signs. 

Owner — Oakland Tribune, Premises. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— Q. R. S. Neon Corp., 306 
7th St., San Francisco, $1000 each 



ALTERATIONS 

(3) 2029 CHANNING WAY, BER- 
KELEY. Alter Class C bakery. 

Owner — Langendorf Baking Co., Mc- 
Allister and Fillmore Sts., San 
Francisco. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— Barrett & Hllp, 918 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco. $12,000 

DWELLING 

(4) 1520 HAVENSCOURT BLVD.. 
OAKLAND; one-story five-room 
dwelling and garage. 

Owner and Builder— F. W. Conlogue. 

2607 64th Ave.. Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given. $3100 

DWELLING 

(5) S 59th ST. 500 W Racine, OAK. 
LAND; one-story 6-room dwelling 
and 1 -story garage. 

Owner— Beatrice De Nevi, 551 59th St., 

Oakland. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— A. E. Waldman. 331 17th 

St , Oakland. $4750 



DWELLING 

(6) N ESTATES DRIVE 190 E Dawes 
Drive. OAKLAND; two-story six- 
room dwelling. 

Owner and Builder— W. A. Netherby, 
3853 Lyman Road. Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $5000 



ALTERATIONS 

(7) 2218 SHATTUCK AVE., BERK- 
ELEY; alterations. 

Owner — Hink & Son. 

Architect — Not Given. 

Contractor— Anderson & AnderBon, 916 
Carmel Ave., Berkeley. 

$1000 



SERVICE STATION 

(8) SE COR. HIGH and Hyacinth, 
OAKLAND; 1-story steel service 
station. 

Owner and Builder— Albert H. John- 
son, 1621 Encinal Ave., Alameda. 

Architect— Not Given. $1200 



DWELLING 

(9) W 80th AVE. 270 N Hillside St., 
OAKLAND; 1-story 5-room dwell- 
ing. 

Owner and Builder— George Duncan, 
2523 78th Ave.. Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $2900 



(10) 7240 CHABOT ROAD, OAK- 
LAND; fire repairs. 

Owner— B. D. Marx Greene, 7240 Cha- 
bot Road. Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— A. H. Rose, 478 25th St.. 
Oakland. $1500 



DWELLING 

(11) S BROCKHURST ST. 210 West 
West St., OAKLAND; one-story 
6-room dwelling and 1-story ga- 
rage. 

Owner and Builder— J. J. and E. A. 
Rowe. 2522 Magnolia St., Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $4150 



DWELLING 

(12) NO. 1611 PEARL ST., ALA- 
MEDA. One-story 5-room frame 
and stucco dwelling. 

Owner — Walter H. Anderson, 1014 
Doris Court, Alameda. 

Architect — Owner. $3750 



ALTERATIONS 

(13) 942 VERMONT ST., OAKLAND; 
alterations. 

Owner — George Anastasi, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— H. F. Allen, 1700 104th 
Ave., Oakland. $1500 

APARTMENTS 

(14) W CLAREMONT AVE. 170 S 
Miranda St., OAKLAND; three- 
story 84-room apartments. 

Owner and Builder — Lewis Graham. 

2327 64th Ave., Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given. $80,000 

SIGNS 

(15) 2046 FRANKLIN ST.. OAK- 
LAND; roof sign and electric sign. 

Owner— Hertz Drive-U-Self Co., 2046 

Franklin St.. Oakland. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor — Electrical Products Corp.. 

950 3t0h St., Oakland. $1650 

DWELLING 

(16) W 80th AVE. 465 N Hillside St.. 
OAKLAND; one-story five-room 

dwelling. 
Owner and Builder— C. F. Lodge, 749 

Collier Drive. San Leandro. 
Architect— Not Given. $3500 

CHAPEL 

(17) 2850 TELEGRAPH AVE., OAK. 
LAND; one-story brick chapel. 

Owner— Grant D. Miller, 2860 Tele- 
graph Ave., Oakland. 

Architect— Miller & Warnecke, Finan- 
cial Center Bldg.. Oakland. 

Contractor— Jensen & Pedersen, 344.1 
Adeline St.. Oakland. $30,000 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 

(18) NO. 21 ROCK LANE, BERKE- 
LEY. One-story 6-room 1 -family 
frame residence. 

, ,„-,,,.,- — F. O. Carlson, 1423 Grove St., 

Berkeley. 
Architect— Not Given. $4000 

(19) NO. 146 HILLSIDE AVE., PIED- 
MONT. Fire repairs. 

Owner— O. Ellsworth, Premises. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— James Anderson, 96 Zlnn 
I nive, Oakland. $1200 

BUILDING CONTRACTS 

ALAMEDA COUNTY 
No. Owner Contraotor Amt. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-nine 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



STORE 

(1) PTN LOT 35 BLK 2128. Fruit- 
vile Blvd., Tract, Oakland; gen- 
eral construction on 1-story frame 
store building. 
Owner— Pearl Regan. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— John D. Wieslander, 4102 

Gilbert St., Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 2, '31. Dated Dec. 23, '30. 
When roof is on and bldg. is en- 
closed $-65 

When completed 250 

Usual 35 days 250 

TOTAL COST, $765 



ALTERATIONS 

(2) 2850 TELEGRAPH AVE., Oak- 
land; alterations and additions to 
residence and new chapel building. 
Owner— Grant D. Miller, 2850 Tele- 
graph Ave., Oakland. 
Architect— Miller and Warnecke. Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg., Oakland. 
Contractor— Jensen & Pedersen, 3443 

Adeline St.. Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 6. '31. Dated Jan. 3, '31. 
When brick walls of chapel are 

up $7500 

When brown coated 7500 

When completed 7500 

Usual 35 days 7475 

TOTAL COST, $29,975 
Bond, $29,975. Sureties, Globe Cas- 
ualty Co. Limit, 90 days. Plans and 
Spec, filed. 



OAKLAND BUILDING SUMMARY 
A. S. Holmes, chief building inspec- 
tor of Oakland, reports the issuance 
of 247 permits during the month of 
December, 1930, for improvements in- 
volving an expenditure of $1,063,546. 
Following is a segregated listing of 
the construction involved: 
Classification of 

BIdgs. No. Permits Cost 

1-story dwellings... 16 $ 48,600 

2-story dwellings.... 8 77,250 

2-st dwlg & store. .. 1 3,750 

1-st stores 3 2,650 

1-st hospital 1 6,000 

1-st restaurant 1 2,000 

1-st studio 1 2,400 

2-st factory 1 5.500 

1-st tile shop 1 800 

1-st cone theatre 1 787,144 

1-st tile garage 1 1,000 

1-st cone, ser sta 1 1,000 

1-st cone restaurant 1 2,000 

1-st cone bank bldg 1 12,500 

1-st cone garage 1 900 

1-st br com sta 2 750 

1-st brick shop 2 7,000 

1-st brick garage.... 1 700 

1-st brick ser sta... 2 2,300 

1-st br dye&cln wks 1 1,200 

Brick addition 2 4.600 

1-st br & tile ser sta 2 5,500 

1-st steel ser sta 1 450 

Cooling tower 1 875 

Billboards 11 1,775 

Electric signs 47 20,854 

Roof sign 1 800 

1-st garages&sheds 42 8,163 

Additions 38 11,65) 

Alters. & repairs... 55 43,435 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 
Jan 6, 1931— MUNICIPAL Corpora- 
tion Yard, Berkeley. City of Berk- 
eley to G A Scott Dec 30, 1930 

Jan 6. 1931—7307 NEY AVE. Oak- 
land. K A Johanson to Self 

January 2, 1931 

Jan 5, 1931— LOT 12, Crocker Ter- 
race, Piedmont. A Walter Beam 

to Axel Cederborg Dec 19. 1930 

Jan 5, 1931— LOT F16. Fraiway Es- 
tates in Oak Knoll, Oakland. Oak- 
land Title Insurance & Guaranty 

Co to Oak Knoll Land Corp 

December 31, 1930 

Jan 5, 1931— SW SHATTUCK Ave 
and Kittredge St. Berkeley. City 

of Berkeley to K E Parker Co 

December 30, 1930 

Jan 3, 1931— ALAMEDA COUNTY. 
East Bay Municipal Utility Dist 

to Art Concrete Works 

December 31. 1930 

Jan 3, 1931— ALAMEDA and CON- 
TRA COSTA COUNTIES. East 
Eav Municipal Utility District to 

Hutchinson Co Dec 31. 1930 

Jan 3, 1931— ALAMEDA and CON- 
TRA COSTA COUNTIES. East 
Eay Municipal Utility District to 
Horace Phillips & John Gonsalves 

December 31, 1939 

Jan 3, 1931— ASSOCIATED OIL CO 
Plant. Alameda. Associated Oil Co 
to Acme Boiler & Machine Works 

December 30. 1939 

Jan 2, 1931— SE VERNON ST 172 
ft NE of Perkins St, Oakland. P 
O Troplong to whom it may con- 
cern January 2, 1931 

Jan 2, 1931— NW PARK BLVD and 
St James Drive, Piedmont. The 
Roman Catholic Archbishop of 
San Francisco to Thos F L Fur- 
long December 23, 1930 

Dec 31, 1930— LOT 4 BLK 23, War- 
ner Tract. Oakland. K Kriletich 

to A C Sharp December 24, 1930 

Dec 31, 1930—3276 SCHOOL Street, 
Oakland. Associated Oil Co to 

The Dyer Const Co Dec £4, 1930 

Dec 31, 1930— LOTS 5 and 6 BLK 5, 
Cragmont, Berkeley. John Merse- 

reau to Irwin H Relmers 

December 30, 1930 

Jan 2, 1931— NW LINE BLAIR Ave 
90 ft NE of Highland Ave, Pied- 
mont. Nolton N Ashley to Leo J 

Dolan T December 26, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— NO. 4024 QUIGLEY 
St., Oakland. E R Cooper to John 

Fleming Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec 30. 1930—975 SANTA Barbara 
Road. Berkeley. Scott and Jean 

E Neilson to R C McBride. Jr 

December 23. 1930 

Dec 30, 1930— LOT 183, Unit No 2 
Avenue Terrace, Oakland. Oscar 
W and Anna E Johnson to whom 

it may concern December 29, 1930 

Dec 30, 1930—1015 KEELER Street, 
Berkeley. Arthur C Lewis to 

whom it may concern 

December 27, 1930 

Dec 29, 1930— LOT 3 PLK J, Es- 
tudillo Estates, San Leandro. H 
and Muriel A Johnson to whom 

it may concern December 23, 1930 

Dec 29, 1930— PTN LOT 35 BLK B, 
Grand Avenue Heights, Piedmont. 



LIENS FILED 

ALAMEDA COUNTY 
Recorded Amount 

Dec. 31, 193(1— INTERSECTION OF 
N line County Road No. 1469 with 
W line of Road leading from 
Mission San Jos.- t" Patterson'a 
Pass, Alameda County. Eureka 
Mill & Lumber Co vs Madam Anna 
Le Pleaux (also known as Anna 
Py); John Doe Py and Hans John- 
sen $235 

Dec. 31, 1930— SE GRAND AVE & 
Webster St., Oakland. Eureka 
Mill & Lumber Co vs Grand- 
Webster Building Corp and R M 

Evans $ 127 8 1 

Dec 30. 1930— LOT 15 BLK 4, Berk- 
ley Square. Berkeley. Americorft- 
Tile & Roofing Co vs L Longmate, 

J Harry Smith $400 

Dec 30, 1930— LOT 15 BLK 4. Berk- 
eley Square, Berkeley. C L Tiss- 
enden vs A E Longmate $49.22 

Dec 30. 1930— LOT 15 BLK 4, Berk- 
eley Square, Berkeley. Bertel Mork 
$183; J H Green. $428.44; F Mc- 
Donald. $75.90, vs Arthur E and 

Jessie J Longmate. J H Smith 

Dec 29, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE 
and Caroline St, Alameda. A G 
Burns vs Aileen Marie Roberts, 
fmly Aileen Marie Hrubanick 
also known as Aileen Mare Hru- 
banik, M F Hrubanik, Mary Dick- 
son $146.50 

Dec 29, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE 
and Caroline St, Alameda. Thos 
O Seffer vs Mary Dickson, L A 

Hrubanick $128 

Dec 29, 1930— NE TAYLOR AVE 
and Caroline St, Alameda. Na- 
tional Lead Co, $288.44; Pacific 
Coast Aggregates, $324.74; Carl- 
strom Bros, $400, vs A and M 

Dickson, M F Hrubanick 

Dec 29, 1930— PTN LOT 15 BLK 18, 
map of blocks 17, IS and 19 Thous- 
and Oaks. Berkeley. George C 
Cofer vs Angela Arecco also known 

as A Angelo, H E Lansinc $64 

Dec 29. 1930—149 BEECHWOOD Dr. 
Oakland. H K Flowers vs J M 

Walker $240 

Dec 29. 1930— S STUART ST 137 ft 
6 inches W of Fulton St, Berkeley. 
N P Lindholm vs John E Peter- 
sen $54.S7 

Jan 2, 1931— LOT 4 BLK 2031E, Tr'ct 
No 1 Blake Tract, Berkeley. S M 
Fleischer vs E M and Marian 

Nortan and H Jones $207.03 

Dec. 31, 1930— LOT 11 BLK 2, Grand 
View Terrace, Berkeley. Aladdin 
Heating Corporation vs Mrs. 
Mabel D Bullis and Frank Appelbe 

$381.50 

Dec 31. 1930— INTERSECTION OF 
N line of County Road No. 1469 
with the W line of Road leading 
from Mission San Jose to Patter- 
son's Pass, Alameda Co. C W Ro- 
land, $200; A Casqueiro, $90 vs 
Madam Anna Le Pleaux and Mel- 

rohe Steel Co 

Dec. 31, 1930— INTERSECTION OF 
N line of County Road No. 1469 
with the W line of Road leading 
from Mission San Jose to Patter- 



Alters. & repairs.. 



55 



43,434 



Member Insurance Brokerj' Exchange 

FRED H. BOGGS 

INSURANCE 

490 GEARY STREET 



Phone FRanklin 9400 



San Francisco 



Thirty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 10, 1931 



son's Pass, Alameda County. Hans 
Johnson, vs Madam Anna Le 
Pleaux (also known as Anna Py), 
John Doe Py and Melrose Stee! 
Co $253 

Jan 6, 1331— NORTH LINE EAST 
14th St 181-21 ft E of 13th Ave, 
Oakland. E K Wood Lumber Co 
vs J R L Jones, Melrose Steel Co 
$71.46 

Jan. 5, 1931—1201 INA WAY. Berk- 
eley. Edw W Brodrick vs Mary 
M. James G, and Jean E Walton, 
and J Harrv Smith $38 

Jan 2, 1931—047 SAN LUIS ROAD, 
Berkeley. A H Hasseler vs David 
and Rauha Kesti $211 

Jan 2, 1931— NE EAST 14lh ST 181- 
21 ft E of 13th Ave, Oakland. Tyre 
Bros Glass Co vs J R L Jones, 
Melrose Steel Co $42.40 

Jan 2, 1931— NE TAYLOR AVE and 
Caroline St, Alameda. L<~-e Hard- 
ware Co Inc vs Aileen Marie Rob- 
erts, Mary Dickson, M P Hru- 
banik $114.51 

RELEASE OF LIENS 

Alameda County 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOT 50 BLK 6, Thous- 
and Oaks Heights, Berkeley. Sun- 
set Hardware Co to Fuller Weston; 
Helen Weston and E M Con- 
verse $1S7.77 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOT 27 BLK 11, 
Amended Map of Central Park, 
Berkeley. Herman C Orth to C G 
Coates also known as Clifford G 
Coates and Myrta C Coates «51 

BUILDING PERMITS 



(Sa 



Mi 



in County) 



SAN ANSELMO, Marin Co., Cal.— 
Following building permits were 
granted during the month of Decem- 
ber. 1930, by Chas. H. Cartwright, 
town building inspector of San An- 
selmo: 

R. C. Buell. Dwelling. Bush Tract. 
Fern Lane. Est. cost, $6000. 

E. Bekovitsky. Addition. Lot 6 
Blk 1, Sunnyside Tract. Woodland 
Ave. Est. cost, $200. 

Walter Mayer. Dwelling. Lot 2, 
Sub. 2, Morningside Court. Brookside 
Drive. Est. cost. $4000. 

W. Mayer. Dwelling. Lot 3, Sub. 2, 
Morningside Court. Brookside Drive. 
Est. cost $4000. 

E. Ruhl. Garage. Lot 17 Block 7, 
Morningside Court. Cost. $150. 

G. C. Reed. Addition. Lot 2, Sub. 
Lots 85-87 Bush Tract. Elm Ave. 
Est. cost, $100. 

C. Guidi. Dwelling. Lot 22, Sub. 1, 
Morningside Court. Morningside Dr. 
Est. cost, $4000. 

C. Pizochero. Alterations for store. 
San Anselmo Ave Est. cost $500. 

G. C. Gunther. Garage. Lot 35 Bush 
Tract. Oak Knoll Ave. Est. cost, 
$100. 

J. V. Kriel. Addition and garage 
Lnt 11 Blk 4, Sequoia Park Section 1. 
Sequoia Drive. Est. cost, $500. 

E. E. Vaughan. Dwelling. Portion 
Lot 166, Ross Valley Park Villa Lots 
Crescent Road. Est. cost, $9000. 

BUILDING PERMITS 



SAN MATEO 



RESIDENCE, $6000; Lot 30 Blk H, re- 
subdivision 86-92, San Mateo; 
owner and contractor, Lengfeld & 
Olund, 145 El Camino. San Mateo. 

STORE building, $30,000; B and Bald- 
win Sts., San Mateo; owner, Wis- 
nom Co., 5th and S-Claremont Sts., 
San Mateo; architect, Edwards & 
Schary, 005 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco; contractor, S. A. Wisnom, 



140 S-Ellsworth St., San Mateo. 

RESIDENCE, $9000; Lot 30 Blk 17, 
No. 506 Nevada St., San Mateo; 
owner and contractor, I. Sorenson, 
1128 Lincoln St , San Mateo. 

BUNGALOW, $3000; Lot 4 and Ptn 
Lot 7 Blk 9, No. 1013 Ninth St., 
San Mateo; owner and contractor, 
G. Ward, 1028 4th Ave., San Mateo 

BUNGALOW, $2400; No. 923 S-Clare- 
mont St., San Mateo; owner, A. J. 
Favre, 16 Hobart Ave., San Mateo; 
contractor, Wallace Waterhouse, 
1235 Shatter Ave., San Mateo 

SERVICE buildings, $45,000; Lots 6, 7. 
S, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 15 16 and 17 
Blk 6 S-Claremont St., San Mateo; 
owner, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., 
245 Market St., San Francisco. 

COMPLETION NOTICES 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec 30, 1930— LOT 13 BLK 26, Mil- 
brae Highlands. George Trail- 
man to whom it may concern 

Dec. 26, 1930 

Dec. 30, 1930— LOT 7, Hillsborough 
Acres. Aug J Lang Jr to whom 
it may concern Dec. 20, 1930 

Dec. 31, 19304— PART BLK 16, Bur- 
lingame. Greyhound Lines, Inc to 
Charles R J Dowe Dec. 30. 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— LOTS 12, 14 and 15 
Blk 16, San Carlos Lyon & Hoag 
Subdivision. San Carlos Cleaning 
& Dyeing Works to whom it may 
concern Dec 22, 193C 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOT 29 BLK 2, Jef- 
ferson Park, San Mateo. Castle 
Bldg Co to Henry Horn.Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOT 32 BLK 3, Jef- 
ferson Park. San Mateo. Castle 
Bldg Co to Henry Horn..Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOT 18 BLK 15, Third 
Addition to San Bruno Park A J 
Dalton to whom it may concern 
...; Dec. 18, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— N 50 FT. LOT 14 BLK 
12, Woodland Subdivision, San 
Mateo. Arthur C Heald to whom 
it may concern Dec. 24, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— LOT 19 BLK 60, Belle 
Monte Country Club. Frances J 
Roach to whom it may concern... 
Dec. 29, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— LOT 7 BLK 54, Easton 
Addition to Burlingame No. 5. 
Charles L Bell to whom it may 
concern Dec 1, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— N PART LOT 175, San 
Mateo Park. Allen Mclntyre to 
whom it mav concern- De'-. 20, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. 27. 1930— LOTS 1 AND 2 BLK 
20, Huntington Park 2nd Addition 
R H Sohn vs C Chiappa $177 

Dec. 29, 1930 — LOT 32 BLK 10, 
Crocker Tract Sub. No. 1, Daly 
City. A L Stockton Lumber Co vs 
Gordon Thompson and Gust Blom- 
quist - $721.38 

Dec. 29, 1930— PTN LOTS 38 AND 40 
Wellesley Park and Ptn Lot A Blk 
10, Edgewood Park. Redwood City 
Hardware Co vs Henry McQuil- 
kon and Martin Peterson $96.15 

Dec. 29, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 15, Bay- 
view Heights, P O Lind vs Martin 
Peterson $86 

Dec. 29. 1930— LOTS 14 AND 15 BLK 
2, Bayview Heights. P O Lind vs 
Martin Peterson and S A Smoot 
$206 

Dec. 29, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 15, Bay- 
view Heights. G Adolphson vs 

Martin Peterson and S A Smoot 

$518.25 

Dec. 30, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 15, Bay- 
view Heights. C A Bloomquist vs 
$380 



. 31, 1930— LOTS 14 AND 15 BLK 
Bayview Heights. J A Gaffigan 

i Martin Peterson et al $1,88.66 

. 31, 1930— PART LOTS 38 AND 
' and part Lot A Blk 10, Welles- • 
y Park. J A Gaffigan vs Henry 

McQuilken $145 

. 31, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 15, Baq- 
ew Heights. J A Gaffigan vs 
artin Peterson $321.04 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 31, 1930— LOTS 1, 2, 3, 10 and 

Part 11 Blk 11, Town of San Mateo 

W T Pierce Constr Co to whom it 

may concern 

Dec. 31, 1930 — LOCATION NOT 
given. A A Arends et al to Anna 
E Miller et al Full 

BUILDING PERMITS 

PALO ALTO 

RESIDENCE, stucco, $12,500; No. 168 
Edgewood Road, Palo Alto; owner, 
O. A. Comper, 915 Waverly St., 
Palo Alto; contractor, H. H. Da- 
binett. 1765 Fulton St., Palo Alto. 



BUILDING PERMITS 

SAN JOSE 

RESIDENCE, 5-room frame, $3800; 
Second and Taylor Sts., San Jose; 
owner, B. De Marco, 601 N-Third 
St., San Jose; contractor, S. De 
Cola, 511 E-Empire St., San Jose. 

ALTER frame residence, $1000; No. 
915 Harliss St., San Jose; owner, 
R. Walker, Premises; contractor, 
G. J. Luebben, 843 Delmas Ave , 
San Jose. 

ADD to frame college, $3070; Naglee 
near Park, San Jose; owner, A. M. 
O. R. C, Naglee Ave., San Jose; 
contractor, Paul Anderson, 1210 
Lincoln St., San Jose. 

RESIDENCE, 6-room frame, $5000; 
Riverside near Coe St, San Jose; 
owner and contractor, Geo. Mc- 
Crary, 1027 Clark Way, San Jose. 

RESIDENCE, 4-room frame, $3000; 
19th St. near St. James St., San 
Jose; owner and contractor, L. S. 
Brisbin, 434 E. San Salvador St., 
San Jose. 

GYMNASIUM, concrete. $120,000; 
Washington Square, San Jose; 
owner, State of California; archi- 
tect. State Architect; contractor, 
J J. Groden & Co., 1028 San An- 
tonio St., Alameda. 



BUILDING PERMITS 



REDWOOD CITY 



DWELLING and garage, frame, $3000; 
No. 535 Jeter St., Redwood City; 
owner and contractor, Leonard A. 
Monroe, 4th Ave., Rdwood City. 

DWELLING and garage, frame, $5000; 
No. 441 Hudson St., Redwood City; 
owner, and contractor, James S. 
Forster, 1215 Jefferson St , Red- 
wood City. 

DWELLING and garage. $3000; 234 
Madison St.; owner and builder, 
J. T. Bonner. 717 Clinton St., Red- 
wood City. 

DWELLING and garage, frame, $4000 
No. 64 Hillview Ave., Redwood 
City; owner, J. L. Chiapelone, 718 
Roosevelt St., Redwood City; con- 
tractor, C. S. Baker, 611 9th Ave.. 
San Mateo. 

DWELLING and garage, frame, $3000 
No 1124 Clinton St., Redwood City 
owner, Louis Foss; contractor, S. 
B. Goss. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Thirty-one 



BUILDING PERMITS 

BURLINGAME 

RESII'ICN't'E, $6000; Lot 19 Blk 
Castillo St., Burlingame; owne 

.,„ mtractor, G. W. Willlan 

Co., 1404 Broadway, Burlingame 

■BSIDENCE, 15500; Lot 9 Block 
Francisco St., Burlingame; owm 

I contractor, Roy Allen, 5 

Francisco St., Burlingame. 

H5NGALOW, $5000; Lot 9 Block 
Marin St., Burlingame; owner at 
contractor. Emma E. Atkinson, 5 
Marin St., Burlingame. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 19, 1930— PART LOT S, Mrs. A. 

E. Colton's Subd., San Jose. Isabel 

E Patton to whom it may concern 

Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec Hi. 1930— PART LOT 40, Subd 

of Montebello Acres Wm H 

Bauman to whom it may concern 

Dec. 18, 1930 

I Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 9, Seale 
Addition Nn. 2. Palo Alto. C L 
Blacker to whom it may concern 

Dec. 18, 1930 

Dec 20, 1930— SE ADDISON 100 SW 
Webster St. SW 40xSE 110 Ptn 
Lot l P.Ik 75, Palo Alto. Alfred A 

Dulin to whom it may concern 

Dec. 18, 1930 

1 Dec 20, 1930— NW KELLOGG AVE 

1 SW Emerson St. NW 50xSW 

100 Part Lots 7 and 8 Blk 2, Seal© 
Addition No. 1, Palo Alto. Dale 
H Nichols to whom it may concern 

Dec. 15, 1930 

Dec 22, 1930— NW K1NGSLEY AVE 
and SW Fulton St. NW 50xSW 
112!4 Part Blk 94, Palo Alto. An- 
drew Aro to whom it may con- 
cern Dec. 20, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT S, Lincoln 
Manor. David L Strom et al to 
whom it may concern....Dec. 22, 1930 
Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 19 Nott Subd., 
Lns Gatos. Carmela Colangelo to 
whom it may concern. ...Dec 19, 1930 
Dec. 23, 1930— SW FIRST AND SAN 
Antonio Sts., San Jose. Conserva- 
tive Realty Co to whom it may 

concern Dec. 17, 1930 

Dec. 22, 1930— LOT 14 BLK 9, Seale 
Addition No. 2, Palo Alto. Conrad 
L Blacker to whom it may concern 

Dec. 18. 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— CAMPUS OF STAN- 
ford Jr. University. Board of Ath- 
letic Control of the Stanford Uni- 
versity to whom it may concern 

(golf course) Dec, 24, 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— LOT 18 BLK 24, Los 
Altos No. 2. T V Hardeman et 

al to whom it may concern 

Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— SW FIFTH AND 
Church Sts., Gilroy. Presbyterian 
Church of Gilroy to whom it may 

concern Dec. 18, 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— PART LOT 1, P. G. 
Keith Subd, San Jose. Walter 

Dixon to whom it may concern 

Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— LOT 5 BLK 6, Clare- 
mont Subd., San Jose. Robert 
Larocca to whom it may concern 

Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 24, 1930— ON 1.72 ACRE'S beg. 
E Cor 23.14 ac to Part Public 
Tract No. 1. Joaquin E Rose to 
whom it may concern. .. .Dec , 23, 1930 
Dec. 24, 1930— PART 500 ACRES. Lot 
26 and part Lot 34, Chace Villa 
Lots. Anthony Jangrus to whom 

it may concern Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 27, 1930— LOT 15 BLK 3, North 
Range 6 West Miller & Lux, West- 
ern Addition, Gilroy. W F Sech- 

Dec. 26, 1930 

rest to whom it may concern 



LIENS FILED 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec, 20, L980- LOT 5 BLK K, South- 
gate. Palo Alto. Merner Lumber 
Co vs George J and Ida Catherine 
Miller (4) liens)....$190.77; $448.29 
(98.19; (126 15 respectively 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 5 BLK K, South- 
gate, Palo Alto. The Minton Co 
vs George J Miller $749.54 

Dec. 20, 1930— LOT 5 BLK K, South- 
gate, Palo Alto. Grant Winner 
vs George J and lea C Miller$115.G5 

Dec. 23, 1930— LOT 16 BLK 62, Seale 
Addition No. 2. Palo Alto. Frank 
A Grunert vs Robert and Lottie 
M Neil U57 

Dec. 27, 1930—593 ACRES Part La- 
guna Seca Rancho, Adrian Mfg 
Co vs E Avery Newton $1338.45 



RELEASE OF LIENS 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. IS. 1930— LOT 35 BLK 1, Conk- 
ling and Col Subd., San Jose. 
Hub bard & Carmichael Bros to C 

V Brown et al 

Dec. 20, 1930— E OLD MARKET ST. 
142 N Julian St., San Jose. Henry 
Cowell Lime & Cement Co to E 
J Clark 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



COMPLETION NOTICES 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

.Ian 2, 1931— NORTH SIDE "f Spen- 
cer Ave 200 ft E from Mendocino 
Ave, Santa Rosa. Frank A and 
Grace R White to C W Hansen 

December 11, 1930 

I ii o 26, L930 - NW tNER, THIRD 

and E Sts. Petaluma. General Pe- 
troleum Corp of California to H P 
Vogensen-Vogensen Const Co 

December 16, 1930 

Dec £9, 1930— WHITE-O-RANCHO 
about 5 miles SW of Healdsburg. 

Aileen D White to W Singleton 

December 20, 1930 

Dec 29, 1930— WEST SIDE of Col- 
lege Ave 150 S of South line of 
Lincoln St, Santa Rosa. J Lee 
and Grace M Hoy to whom il maj 
concern December 26, 1930 

.In ii ;:. 1930 — STEINER COURT, 
Santa Rosa. W R Lippincott to 
whom it may concern Jan. -3, 1931 

LIENS FILED 



MARIN COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 31, 1930— LARKSPUR. Ger- 
aldo Granucci and wife to Ever- 
ett W Ruhl Dec. 19, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— SAUSALITO. Kate O 

Smith to Walter L Broderick 

Dec. 30, 1930 

Dec. 30, 1930— CORTE MADERA 
Chas L Donovan; H E Ziegler and 
Jam Kennett to whom it may con- 
cern Dec. 26, 1930 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 31, 1930— RODEO. Associated 
Oil Co to The Dyer Constr Co. 
(construct Type K Canopy Unit 

Service Station) Dec. 24, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— LOTS 2 AND 3 BLK 
24, Henderson Tapscott No. 1. Im- 
provement Bond Co, Ltd. to whom 

it may concern Dec. 30, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— PTN BLK 159, Original 
Survey, Martinez. Alhambra Union 
High School District to Wallace 

Snelgrove (addition to school) 

Dec. 30, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. 31, 1930— ON COUNTY ROAD, 

bet. Concord and Walnut Creek. 

Chester A Bray vs A L Schneck 

and J J Hansen $64.81 



RELEASE OF LIENS 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec 29, 1930— LOTS 1, 2 AND 3 
Blk 336, Additional Survey, Mar- 
tinez. Judson Pacific Co to Wal- 
lace Snelgrove and J F Marino.... 



SONOMA COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Dec 31, 1930— LOT C 132 and part 
lot 133 Sub No 5, Cotati Rancho. 
Camm & Hedges vs W J Marquart, 
W J Marquart and Chas Spencer 
$17S4 12 

Dec 31. 1930— LOT 6 BLK I Mer- 
riam's Addn, Santa Rosa. Ster- 
ling Lumber Co vs Robert O'Con- 
nor, Mr and Mrs E A Bradbury.... 
$106.77 & Int. 

Jan. 5, 1930— LOT 1 Subd A. A. W. 
Lehrke's Subd. 1, 2 and 3 of T. B 
C'armody Ranch, Sonoma Valley. 
L P Kearney (El Verano Lumber 
Yard) vs Joe Battini and Josie 
Mairani $71.58 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



SONOMA COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 
Jan. 3, 1931— FITCH MOUNTAIN, 
near Healdsburg. Rose & Stev- 
enson to Thomas Scoble and Del 
Rio Properties, Inc 

BUILDING PERMITS 



STOCKTON 



DWELLING and garage, $4000; No. 437 
Lexington Ave., Stockton; owner 
and contractor, Robert R. Wagner, 
Bank of Italy Bldg., Stockton. 

RESIDENCE and garage, $5000; No. 
1061 West Elm St., Stockton; own- 
er, H. H. Thurston, 433 E-Wyan- 
dotte St., Stockton. 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



De 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 
1930 — STATE HIGHWAY 
through California. Department 
of Public Works, State of Calif, to 
Lilly. Willard & Biasotti (use gaso- 
line roller) Dec. 20, 1930 

LIENS FILED 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Jan. 3, 1931— E 21 FT. OF S 75 FT. 
Lot 2 and W Vz of S 75 ft. Lot 4. 
all in Blk 5, East of Center St. 
fronts Sly 45 ft. SVi nches on Nly 
side of Main St. standing of rec- 
ord in the name of George L 
Bishop; N 25 ft. Lot 2 and N 23 ft. 
of W 'A of Lot 4 and S 40 ft. of W 
% of Lot 14, all in Blk 5, East of 



Thirty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January in, 1931 



Center St., fronts Wly 65 feet 3\4 
inches on Ely side of Sutter St. 
standing of record in the names of 
Eva Brooks and Florence Brooks. 
L V Daundivier, $426.10; San Joa- 
quin Brick Co, $5544 84; San 
Jiaquin Brick Co, $7675.25; H P 
Fischer, $704.11 vs George L 
Bishop, Eva Brooks. Florence 
Brooks, S H Kress & Co and J S 

Metzger & Son 

Jan. 6, 1931— KRESS BLDG. Stock- 
ton. Citizens Sheet Metal Works, 
$3497.07; Walworth Calif. Co., 
$1557.95 vs S H Kress & Co; Eva 
and Florence Brooks; George L 
Bishop; Donald Metzger & Son 
and Louis Brandt 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



MONTEREY COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 2, 1931— BEING PT LOT 6 of 
Rancho Bolsade, San Cayetano. M 
L and Edith May Lundy to Ray 
E Apperson Dec. 27, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— VILLA LOT 2, Bur- 
bank and Devendorf Addition to 
King City. Pacific Gas & Electric 

Co to Hugh S Thompson 

December 31, 1930 

Jan. 5, 1931— LOT 16 BLK 21, Map 
Spring's Second Addition to Sa- 
linas City. Robert B Mitchell to 
S Trondhjem Jan 3, 1931 

Jan. 6, 1931— LOT 10 BLK 2. Map of 
Spring and Abbott's Addition to 
Salinas. Lulu Manning to L 
Manning Jan. 5. 1931 

Dec. 26, 1930— LOTS 34 AND 36 BLK 
7, Map of Withers' Addition to 
City of Monterey. Chas O Tibbs 

to whom it may concern 

Dec. 24, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— NW wall line of Mer- 
ritt and Preston Sts., Monterey. 

D Pieri to Fred McCrary 

Dec. 28, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— LOT 1 BLK 39, Map 
of Carmel City. Elizabeth Mc- 

Clung White to Sam Miller 

Dec. 23, 1930 

Dec. 29, 1930— LOT 2 BLK 24, Monte 
Regio No. 1. Grace E Lewis to W 
C Mann Dec. 24, 1930 

Jan. 5, 1931— LOTS 5 AND S BLK I 
Town of New Republic. S L Weber 
vs Helen Johnson and Frances 
Riedriguez $148.7S 



BUILDING PERMITS 



SACRAMENTO 



REMODEL, $1500; No. 1723 J St., Sac- 
ramento; owner, Chas. Blumberg, 
Premises; contractor, C. J. Hop- 
kinson, 1S10 18th St., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE. 4-room, $3500; No. 1106 
Howell Ave., Sacramento; owner, 
Gene McShane, 3013 42nd St., Sac- 
ramento; contractor, E L. Eachus, 
2175 Weller St.. Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 4-room, $3500; No. 1104 
Howell Ave., Sacramento; owner, 
E. L. Eachus, 2175 Weller Way, 
Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE seven room and garage, 
$6500; No. 3661 Curtis Park Drive, 
Sacramento; owner and contrac- 
tor, Watson & Bennie, 2719 Fifth 
Ave., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 6-room, $4450; No. 625 
46th St., Sacramento; owner and 
contractor, Properties Finance 
Corp., 819 J St., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 9 room, $11,000; No. 150S 
37th St , Sacramento; owner, Ralph 
E. Fellows, 2115 I St., Sacramento; 
contractor, N. H. Lund, 3300 Cut- 
ter St., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 6-room, $4000; No. 500 
Coloma Way, Sacramento; owner, 
and contractor, C. E. Wright, 1054 
40th St.. Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 5 room, $3500; No. 510 



Pico Way, Sacramento; owner and 
contractor, C. E.Wright, 1054 40th 
St., Sacramento. 

RESIDENCE, 4 room, $3500; No. 1032 
Howell Ave., Sacramento; owner, 
P. F. Reed, 2545 28th St., Sacra- 
mento. 

GENERAL repairs, $2650; No. 2S33 
Sacramento Blvd., Sacramento: 
owner, Stilson Bros , Premises. 

RESIDENCE, 7-room & garage, $600u 
No. 5016 T St, Sacramento; own- 
er, A. R. Cowler, 2501 52nd St.. 
Sacramento. 

SERVICE station, $1200; No. 1216 15th 
St., Sacramento; owner, L. D. 
Ehert, 1050 38th St., Sacramento 

RESIDENCE, 5-room, $3000; No. 1127 
34th St., Sacramento; owner, Klein 
Realty Co.; 1009 8th St., Sacra- 
mento. 

GENERAL repairs, $1500; No. 1200 J 
St., Sacramento; owner, W. P. 
Fuller Co., 1015 12th St., Sacra- 
mento; contractor, Clarence Saun- 
ders, 2501 H St., Sacramento. 



BUILDING PERMITS 



FRESNO 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



ALTERATIONS and additions, $1000; 
No. 124S Fulton St , Fresno; own- 
er, Annie L. Wallace, Premises; 
contractor, Fisher & McNulty, 
Mattei Bldg., Fresno. 

DWELLING and garage. $4900; No. 
933 Terrace Ave., Fresno; owner 
and contractor, Taylor - Wheele 
Inc., Power Co. Bldg.. Fresno, 

ALTERATIONS and additions, $2000: 
No. 1931 Mariposa St., Fresno; 
owner, C. H. Staples; contractor, 
E. J. Farr & Son, 1296 Linden St., 
Fresno. 

DWELLING, $5000; No. 1621 N-Van 
Ness Ave , Fresno; owner and con- 
tractor, A. F. Lambert. 1576 Poplar 
St., Fresno. 

SERVICE station, $2400; No. 505 Van 
Ness Ave., Fresno; owner, Arsen 
Orphan, 732 Fulton St., Fresno; 
contractor, Eagle Transfer Co., 
752 H St., Fresno. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 
Jan. 2, 1930— LOT 38, Land Drive 
Terrace Unit No. 1, Sacramento. 
McClatchy Realty Co and Robert- 
son Govan Co to whom it may con- 
cern Dec. 22, 1931' 

Dec. 30, 1930— TRACT LAND LYING 
S of Lot SI, Harding Place and W 
Lot 19, East Terrace City. A S 
Hackett to whom it may concern 
Dec 29, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY 



Dec 31, 1930— SECTION 15-8-5 desc 
as E three acres Lot 1 White Tct. 
Ralph E Huston vs Fred and Em- 
ma Dixon $159.12 



FRESNO COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 30, 1930— LOTS 19 AND 20 BLK 
4, K & B Heights. C W Church 
to J R Church Dec 29, 1930 



LIENS FILED 



FRESNO COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOT 96, Scandinavian 
Col. A B Pretzer vs Vincenzo G 
Aiello $51.00 

Dec. 31, 1930— NE Vi OF NW H OF 
Sec. 5, 14-19, Fresno. C S Pierce 
Lumber Co vs A Chakurian and 
Aram Arax $687 

Jan. 2, 1930— W % OF NW 14 OF 
NW U. of Section 5, 14-19, Fresno. 
C S Pierce Lumber Co vs A Chak- 
urian and Aram Arax $68 




A "Pittsburg" Auto- 
matic Water Heater 
installed in the Home 
indicates high quality 
throughout. 

Recommended and speci- 
6ed by all the leading ar- 
chitects, plumbers and 
builders. 

Consider the high merit 
of the Pittsburg coupled 
with ' 'Pittsburg Perfect 
Service." 

"Hot water quick as a 
wink." 



Pittsburg Water Heater Co. 

Makers of "Pittsbuig Automatic" — "Bungalow Automatic" 

Scorage Systems and "Lyon" Tank Water Heaters. 

309 1 3th Street. Oakland 478 Suiter St., San Francisco 

SEND FOR CATALOGS 



U KliM MUAJLMMM, 



iH M'ii A2UM 1 ft M, U.li At JUUiJU. 




<*-~W 




vi 



Building 
Engineering 

^ NEWS „ ■ 



■Su- *z ... 



X. '- 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY I 7, 1931 H *J!b!S!ii!S?7." t Ni'i 




scxmiicm 1 1 

TRUSS CO 



OAKI AYI> 



1 m Oakland m m 

mm BUILDERS' § Ml 

11 EXCHANGE ## ' 

11 GLcncort 7400 MM 



PORTLAND 



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Building and Engineering News 

Devoted to the Architectural, Building, Engin eering and Industrial Activities on the Pacific Coast 

..sued Every Saturday SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 17, 1931 Thirty-flrst Year, No.7~ 



Subscription terms, payable In ad- 
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Bill Advocates Insurance 
A<ramst Unemployment 
~ For Cal fornia Workers 

Insurance against unemployment is 
the objective of a bill Assemblyman 
William Hornblower, San Francisco, 
is having drafted for introduction in 
the legislature. 

The insurance would be financed 
jointly by the employer and employe. 
the employe contributing 1 per cent 
per month of his wages toward the 
fund and the employer contributing 2 
ner rent of the wages paid the em- 
ploye The employer, in other words, 
would contribute twice the amount 
contributed by the employe. 

Any person who had worked twenty 
six weeks in the two years prior to 
filing application for such insurance 
would be eligible. 

After a lay-off of nine days or more, 
the worker thus insured would be en- 
titled to $9 a week if single and $12 
a week if married, with an additional 
$1 for every minor child. 

Unemployment due to drunkenness 
would not entitle the worker to in- 

The act would be administered by 
the state industrial accident commis- 



Hornblower says 1 
>n a study by insui" 
s sound in principle. 



bill is based 
:e experts and 



OFFICERS NAMED BY 

BAKERSFIELD EXCH. 



G. A. Graham, general contractor, 
was elected president of the Bakers- 
field Builders' Exchange at the an- 
nual meeting of that body held last 
week. Gene Gartley. electrical con- 
tractor, was elected vice - president; 
George Wilson, sheet metal contrac- 
tor, was re-elected treasurer and D. 
T. Turner, secretary-manager. 

Directors chosen were: G. A. Gra- 
ham, V. A. Young and H. C. Evans, 
representing the general contractors; 
Thos. W. Fraser, representing the 
hardware floor and ornamental iron 
contractors; W. !\1. Fisher, represent- 
ing the heating contractors; Ace Ab- 
bott, representing the plumbing con- 
tractors; A. J. Hendricks, represent- 
ing the brick and tile contractors; 
George Wilson, representing the sheet 
metal contractors: Gene Gartley, rep- 
resenting the electrical contractors; R. 
L. Perry, representing the roofing and 
plastering contractors; P. J. Stevens, 
representing the painting contractors. 

The Eakersfield Builders' Exchange 
recently opened larger quarters at 1200 
Eighteenth Street, Bakersfield, to bet- 
ter serve the membership which now 
includes the leading contractors and 
material dealers in the Kern County 
section. 



To be installed in a new substation 
at Herndon, Fresno County, four huge 
air-blast transformers, costing $250,- 
000, have been ordered by the Pacific 
Gas & Electric Company from the 
Westinghouse Electric & Manufactur- 
ing Company at Pittsburgh, Pa. 



STARK - RATH PRINTING AND 

PUBLISHING CO., Publishers 

545-547 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfleld 8744-8745-8746 

J. P. FARRELL, Editor 

J. E. ODGERS, Advertising Manager 



All communications for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor. 

Building and Engineering News w'.U 
be sent to subscribers until ordered 
stopped and all orders to discontinue 
must be sent in writing to this office. 



HUNTINGTON, L. A. 
ATTORNEY, IS NAMED 
STANDARDS DIRECTOR 



Go 


/ernor Rol 


ph ha 


appoi 


nted 


Colo 


iel Carlos 


Hunt 


ngton, 


Los 


Anqe 


les attorns 


y, as 


directo 


p of 


the 


Departmen 


t of 


Profess 


onal 


and 


Vocational 


Stand 


ards. 




Co 


onel Hunti 


Tgton s u c c e 


e d s 


Jame 


s Collins o 


Long 


Beach, 


who 


resig 


ned. 








Th 


e new dire 


ctor is 










ed with 


the 


16th 


ammunitio 


n train 


in the 


91st 


divis 


on. He ha 


s lived 


in Los 


An- 


qeles 


since 1919 


and v 


/as very ac- 


tive 


in Rolph's 


campaign for 


the 


gove 


rnorship. 








As 


director c 


f the 


Depart 


nent 


of 


'rofessiona 


and 


Vocat 


onal 


Stan 


dards he v 


/HI be 


at the 


head 


of m 


ost of the 


profess 


ional boards 


of i 




such 


as con 


rac- 


tors 


pharmac 


sts, t 


entists, 


ac- 




tants. emb 


aimers 


architects, 


opto 


metrists an 


d barb 







WESTERN SPRINKLER 

CHANGES FIRM NAME 



The Western Automatic Sprinkler 
Company announces a change of name 
to the Viking Automatic Sprinkler 
Company with offices at 114 Sansome 
St , San Francisco. G. W. Greeley is 
the local manager. 

Further announcement is made of 
this company's recent association with 
the Northwestern Sprinkler Company 
of Seattle, Washington, which has 
also changed its name to the Viking 
Automatic Sprinkler Company. The 
Northern Division will handle a com- 
plete line of Viking devices and op- 
erate in the entire Northwest terri- 
tory, with R. L. Thorsdale, president 
and general manager, and S. F. 
Martin, vice-president. The Southern 
Division, with S. F. Martin, president, 
has its headquarters at 2715 East 12th 
St. where they recently moved into a 
new modern plant. 

The Viking Automatic Sprinkler 
Company, a subsidiary of the Viking 
Corporation of Hastings, Michigan, 
announces a new Pre-action Device 
for the quick detection of fires, in ad- 
vance of the operation of automatic 
sprinklers. This is in line with their 
practice of making many changes and 
improvements in the old style Auto- 
matic Sprinkler Devices. 



Objections to building a jail or es- 
tablishing a jail farm for San Fran- 
cisco along the coast of San Mateo 
County have been raised by the di- 
rectors of the Coastside Civic Union 
of San Mateo County. The organiza- 
tion declares that an unidentified 
man already had obtained option on 
the old Valencia ranch, which in- 
cludes within its boundaries historic 
Pillar Point. 



OREGON REALTORS 
WILL MAKE STUDY OF 
STATE BUILDING CODE 



To obtain all knowledge available 
on the proposed state building code 
and become thoroughly acquainted 
with all the measures involved, the 
Portland Realty board has asked the 
legislation committee, of which Henry 
E, Reed is chairman, to study ami 
prepare a report on the code. 

This action followed a debate on the 
measure in which Francis H. Murphy, 
president of the Oregon Building 
Congress, took the affirmative side of 
the question: "The State should adopt 
the state building code," and Ernst 
Kroner, architect, stood for the neg- 

In explaining the measure. Murphy 
stated the proposal was to combine 
an electrical and plumbing code with 
the building code, thereby obtaining 
a stricter surveillance of localities 
which otherwise are too loosely in- 
spected. 

The structural code in the measure 
has alreadv been adopted by 90 cities 
in the West, and many cities in Ore- 
gon are now using the combined elec- 
trical, plumbing and building code. 
California has successfully operated 
under this law for some time. Murphy 
declared, and Washington is seriously 
considering the matter. The adoption 
of such a measure, according to Mur- 
phy, who represents an organization 
of builders, architects, engineers and 
subcontractors of Portland, would 
eliminate many of the dishonest and 
unsatisfactory contractors now oper- 
ating throughout the state. 

Kroner emphatically denied the ben- 
efiit of such a code, claiming it to be 
one of the most dangerous measures 
at the time as it would give inex- 
perienced inspectors and ignorant of- 
ficials the authority to take steps 
which they are not fit to take intel- 
ligently. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT 

VALIDITY IS UPHELD 



The validity of Joint Highway Dis- 
trict No. Six was upheld Jan. 13 by 
the State District Court of Appeal. 

In confirming the judgment of Su- 
perior Court, the higher tribunal 
turned away the complaint of J. M. 
Sharp, property owner, who held "that 
the district was attempting the illegal 
collection of revenue and had no valid 
existence as a taking agency." 

The court found no merit in Sharp's 
main contention that he had had suf- 
ficient opportunity to protest — and 
held that his complaint thus became 
merely "another attack upon the sta- 
tutes under which highway districts 
are formed." 

The protested highway would run 
from Maricopa, Kern County, over the 
mountains to Ojai Valley. Ventura 
County, thence to Rincon Creek, San- 
ta Barbara County. 



1 wo 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



STATE HIGHWAY BUDGET FOR 1931-1933 

BIENNIUM PRESENTED TO STATE LEGISLATURE 



REDWOOD HIGHWAY 

(San Francisco to Oregon Line near 

Monumental) 

Grading, structures, 17,3 miles, Clov- 
erdale to Hopland (Mendocino and So- 
noma counties), $900,000. Beginning 
of construction on new line along the 
Russian River between Cloverdale and 
Hc-pland which will eliminate the 
present steep and crooked existing 
road. This section was never under- 
taken before through fear of slide 
conditions. The design of the road to 
be built there provides for these con- 
ditions, shortens the distance over l'A 
miles, substitutes a light water grade 
for a long mileage of steep maximum 
grades. 

Grading, structures, armor rock sur- 
facing, 1.4 miles, Little Dam Creek to 
Leggett (Mendocino county). $85,000. 

Cedar Creek and Darn Creek (Men- 
docino county), two bridges, concrete 
and steel, $284,000. 

Crescent City to Elk Valley (Del 
norte county), 5.3 miles, grading, 
structures, oil rock surfacing. $249,000. 
This completes the present Redwood 
Highway gap in Del Norte county and 
locates the road via Crescent City, 
settling a long existing controversy. 

Dverville bridge and approaches 
(Humboldt county), $196,400. 

Fridge and approaches over east 
branch of Eel River at Ben Bow 
(Humboldt county), $111,000. 

Grading and trestle approaches, 
Robinson Ferry bridge (Humboldt 
county), $51,4011. 

Slope protection, Hiouchi Bridge to 
north boundary of Del Norte county, 
$50,000. 

Grading, structures and armor rock 
surface. 5.5 miles. Pepperwood School 
to Farm House Inn (Mendocino coun- 
ty). $561,000. This provides for the 
reconstruction of the present narrow, 
steep and tortuous Rattlesnake grade 
in Mendocino county. 

Grading and macadam shoulders 11.3 
miles. South Scotia bridge to Fortuna 
(Humboldt county), $135,000. The 
present 15-ft. pavement will be widen- 
ed and made safer for the increased 
traffic using this section of the road. 

Grading and oil surfacing. Arnold to 
Pepperwood School, portions (Mendo- 
cino county), $S5,000. 

Old surfacing .Loleta to two miles 
north of Beatrice. 5.3 miles (Hum- 
bolt county), $60,000. 

PACIFIC HIGHWAY 
(Section from Red Bluff to Oregon 
Line) 
Bridge at Clear Creek (Shasta 
county). $57,800. 

Bridge at Cottonwood Creek (Siski- 
you county), $18,500. 

Oil surfacing, Loleta to two miles 
north of Yreka to Klamath River (Sis- 
kiyou county), $22,400. 

Grading, oil surfacing, Cottonwood 
Creek bridge, approaches (Siskiyou 
county), $27,600. 

PACIFIC HIGHWAY 

(East Side — -Sacramento -to Tehama 

Junction via MarysVille) 

Grading and shoulders, '6.3-- mil.es. 
Shasta Union School to 6 miles north 
(Butte. county). $28,350. "'■'".: 

■ Grading- and' pavement, 8.4 miles, 
Lincoln to Sheridan and Wheatland 
to Drv Creek (Placer and Tuba coun- 
ties). $63,000. 

Bridge at Coon Creek (Placer coun- 
ty), $27,500. 

PACIFIC HIGHWAY 
(West Side— Tehama Junction to 



Be 



The biennial state highway budget 
recommending expenditures of $63.- 
322,500 upon the state highway system 
for the ensuing two fiscal years wa i 
presented to the State Legislature on 
January 12. by Governor Rolph. 

The bulget covers contemplated ex- 
penditures for all state highway pur- 
poses including construction, recon- 
struction, maintenance, purchase of 
rights of way, engineering and admin- 
istrative costs. The distribution of 
the money between northern and 
southern counties, and between pri- 
mary and secondary highways is in 
accordance with the provisions of the 
Breed Bill. 

While the budget is for the fiscal 
years of July 1. 1931, to June 30, 1933, 
if previous rulings are followed, the 
funds provided in the budget will be 
available for expenditure upon adop- 
tion by the Legislature and approved 
by the Governor. This will enable 
state highway work to proceed with- 
out interruption, a course greatly de- 
sired by Governor Rolph and Colonel 
Garrison, director of the Department 
of Public Works. 

Construction and reconstruction 
projects included in the budget, as 
submitted to the Legislature by Gov- 
ernor Rolph are as follows: 

Oil rock surfacing, 8.9 miles, Wil- 
liams to Maxwell (Colusa county), 
$100,000. 

Grading, gravel base and small 
structures, 4 miles, Williams to 4 
miles south (Colusa county), $S0.0O0. 

All three of these projects consti- 
tute the progressive improvement of 
the West Side Highway. 

GOLDEN STATE HIGHWAY 

(Valley Route— Sacramento to Los 

Angeles) 

Merced River Bridge and approach- 
es (Merced county). $215,000. 

Berenda Slough Bridge (Madera 
county), $3S,000. 

Grading, structures and pavement, 
0.7 of a mile, Madera city limits 
northerly, $40,500. 

Bridge over Fresno River (Madera 
county), $00,000. 

Grading, structures, pavemtnt ami 
oiled shoulders. Turner's Station to 
Stockton (San Joaquin county), $319,- 
40ii This provides for the improve- 
ment of the so-called "Hogan" Road 
from Stockton south. 

Nine timber bridges (San Joaquin 
county). $95,600. 

Grading, filling borrow pits, pave- 
ment and structures, Cosumnes River 
bridge to 1.4 miles north of McCon- 
nell (Sacramento county), $26,600. 

McConnell grade separation, sub- 
way (Sacramento county), state's 
share. $66,500. 

Stanislaus River Bridge and ap- 
proaches (Stanislaus county), $105.- 
300. 

Grading and structures, 5.3 miles. 
Canton Creek to Piru Creek, Ridge 
Route Alternate (Los Angeles coun- 
ty). $500,000. .. 

Grading and structures, 3.9 miles. 
Los Alamos Divide. Ridge Route Al- 
ternate (Los Angeles county), $1,000.- 
000. This item and the one- imme- 
diately above provides for continua- 
tion of construction upon the Alter- 
nate Ridge Route. 

Grading, structures and pavement, 
3.1 miles, Fresno to Fancher Creek 
(Fresno county), $216,200. This com- 
pletes the widening of pavement im- 
mediately north of the city of Fresno. 

Grading, oil rock shoulder, 29.8 
miles. Bakersfleld to Grapevine (Kern 



county). $360,000. This widens the 
roadbed and improves conditions up- 
on the "seventeen mile tangent." 

Grading and resurfacing, 11.8 miles, 
Goshen to Kingsburg (Tulare coun- 
ty), $473,000. This provides for wid- 
ening the 15-ft. pavement in Tulare 
county. 

Five bridges over Cross Creek( wid- 
ening; bridge over canal near Traver 
(Tulare county), $60,000. 

Grading, structures, oil shoulders, 
pavement, 5.5 miles, Plaza Garage to 
Goshen; grading, structures, oil shoul- 
ders. Plaza Garage to 0.3 of a mile 
westerly (Tulare county), $272,000. 
This with other work will complete 
the widening of the 15-ft. pavement 
in Tulare county and provide a grade 
separation at the junction of the 
Golden State Highway and the Han- 
ford lateral. 

Plaza Garage grade separation (sub- 
way) Tulare county, state's share, $50- 
000. 

Grading, structures, oil shoulders, 
pavement 2.9 miles. Union Avenue to 
Beardsley Canal (Kern county), $236.- 
000. This provides for improving and 
widening pavement at the north city 
limits of Bakersfleld. 

Bridge over Kern River (Kern coun- 
ty), $400,000. 

Bridge over Beadsley Canal (Kern 
county), $16,000. 

COAST HIGHWAY 
(San Francisco to San Diego) 

Grade separation with S. P. tracks 
at Madrone (Santa Clara county), 
state's share, $110,000. 

Soledad Grade separation and ap- 
proaches (Monterey county). $96,000. 

Bridge over San Benito River (San 
Benito county), $140,000. 

Santa Clara River bridge (Ventura 
county), $410,000. The original was 
washed out by the flood following the 
failure of the San Francisquito Dam. 
The new bridge is on new alignment, 
and is an improved structure. 

Grading, structures, widening pave- 
ment, Fullerton to Los Angeles coun- 
ty line (Orange county), $164,500. 
This will complete the 30-ft. width of 
pavement on the Coast Highway be- 
tween Los Angeles and Santa Ana. 

Grading, surfacing and structures. 
3.9 miles, Wigmore to Los Alamos 
(Santa Barbara county), $150,000. This 
provides for widening the existing 15- 
ft. pavement. 

Repairing floor, Santa Ynez River 
bridge at Buelton (Santa Barbara 
county), $18,000. 

Grading, pavement, structures, wid- 
ening, 5.1 miles. Serra to San Diego 
county line (Orange county), $3S2,500. 
This project increases the present 20- 
ft. pavement to 30 feet in the south- 
ern part of Orange county between 
the junction of the Coast Highway 
and the Oxnard-Caplstrano Highway. 

Grading, structures, pavement, wid- 
ening 4.5 miles, Ventura to El Rio 
(Ventura county), $100,000. This pro- 
vides for a 30-ft. pavement south of 
Ventura to the junction of the Coast 
Highway and the Oxnard-Capistrano 
Highway. 

Bridge and approaches. San Diegu- 
ito River bridge (San Diego county). 
$224,500. This corrects alignment and 
substitutes an improved bridge for 
the present tule trestle. 

Grading, structures, pavement, 16.8 
miles, Santa Rita to San Eenito Riv- 
er, 16.8 miles (Monterey and San Be- 
nito counties), $1,046,700. This pro- 
vides for grading and paving of the 
relocated San Juan grade. 

Bridge over San Juan Creek (San 
Benito county), $10,000. 



Saturday, January 17, 1831 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Three 



VICTORY HIGHWAY 
(Roseville to Nevada Line via Auburn) 

Grading, pavement and small struc- 
tures, 4 miles, Newcastle to Auburn 
(Placer county), $335,000. This proj- 
ect provides for correction of align- 
ment and widening of 15-ft. pave- 
ment. 

Oil rock surfacing, Airport to Soda 
Springs, 110 miles U'lacer and Nevada 
counties), $03,000. 

Oil rock surfacing, Colfax to Gold 
Run, 8.9 miles (Placer county), $135,- 
000. 

Grading, structures, oil rock surf.. 
Gold Run to Airport, 12 miles (Placer 
county), $780,000. This completes the 
remaining unimproved section east of 
Auburn. 

Towle Grade separation (subway be- 
neath S. P. tracks) (Placer county), 
state's share, $20,000. 

Oil rock surfacing, 1.8 miles near 
Bay View Rest (El Dorado county), 
$7200. 
Myers to Nevada Line via Truckee 
River 

Oil roc 
to Hinto 
$135,000. 

Oil surfacing Bay View, northerly, 
1.8 miles (El Dorado county), $7200. 
TAHOE-UKIAH HIGHWAY 

Armor top surface, Nevada City to 
Washington Road, 11.8 miles (Nevada 
county), $41,000. 

Bridge over Russian River (Mendo- 
cino county), $30,000. 



Pla 



■ lie) 



Grading and structures from Brigh- 
ton to Mills (Sacramento county), 
$339,000. This provides for placing a 
concrete pavement on the first sec- 
tion of the Placerville road from Sac- 
ramento easterly. 

Grading, structures, paving in Plac- 
erville (El Dorado county), $10,000. 
(Cooperative project). 

Oil rock surfacing Riverton to Ky- 
burz, Strawberry to Philips (El Do- 
rado county), $51,200. 

Oil rock surfacing, Mays to state 
line (El Dorado county), $50,200. 

Grading, structures, oil rock surf- 
acing, Placerville to R R Xing (El 
Dorado county), $59,000. This pro- 
vides for grading and surfacing a sec- 
tion of the road immediately east of 
Placerville hitherto unimproved ex- 
cept for maintenance. 

Oil surfacing. Clarks Corner to Plac- 
erville, 1.7 miles (El Dorado county), 
$5450. 

MOTHER LODE HIGHWAY 
(Auburn to Sonora) 

Grading, structures, armor top sur- 
facing. 1.2 miles. San Andreas to 1.4 
miles north of Calaveritas Creek (Cal- 
averas county), $35,000. 

Armor top surfacing north and 
south of Calaveritas Creek, 2.9 miles 
(Calaveras county), $13,300. 

Armor top surfacing. 7.2 miles. Do- 
Town to Martell (Amador county), 
$29,500. 

FEATHER RIVER LATERAL 

(From Pacific Highway to Quincy via 

Oroville) 

Grading, structures and oil rock sur- 
face from Pulga to East Butte coun- 
ty line (Butte county). $483,400. This 
continues construction on the Feather 
River lateral from the crossing at Pul- 
ga east to the Plumas county line. 

Pardees Bar bridge (Butte county) 
$41,000. 

Grading, structures and oil rock sur- 
facing 1,2 miles, Spanish Creek to 
Keddie (Plumas county), $135,000. 

Spanish Creek and D. P. tunnel, 
bridge and portal structures (Plumas 
county), $100,000. 

Bridge over West Branch Creek 
(Butte countv), $45,000. 

Oiled surface, Oroville to Feather 
River, 4.1 miles (Butte county), $1«,- 
600. 

TRINITY LATERAL 
(Redding to Areata via Weaverville) 

Oiled surface, Weaverville. to Tower 



House, 32 miles (Trinity and Shasta 
counties), $09.1011. 

Clear Creek bridge approaches 
(Shasta county), *9300. 

Bridge at Browns Creek and ap- 
proaches (Trlnitj County), $9700. 

Bridge at Clear Creek (Shasta coun- 
ty), $17,700. 

Oil rock surfacing, 9 miles, Hum- 
boldt . Creek to Willow Creek (Hum- 
boldt county), $58,500. 

DOWNIEVILLE LATERAL 
(Nevada City to Downieville) 

Grading, structures and surfacing, 
Nevada City to Downieville (Nevada, 
Tuba and Sierra counties). $50,000. 
This starts the redevelopment and 
widening of the "id highway original- 
ly built by convicts on standards not 
satisfactory for present traffic. 
ALTURAS LATERAL 
Redding to Nevada Line via Alturas) 

Oiled surface. Fall River to Hot 
Creek, 66 miles (Shasta, Lasen and 
Modoc counties). $243,600. 

Oiled rock surfacing. Diddy Hill to 
Old Round Mountain, 8.7 miles (Shas- 
ta county), $115,000. 

Oiled surface, 3 miles east of Alturas 
to railroad crossing, 1.4 miles (Modoc 
county), $5000. 

Oiled rock surfacing, Main Street to 

East City limits of Alturas (Modoc 

county), $5500. 

RED BLUFF - SUSANVILLE LAT. 

ERAL 

(Red Bluff to Nevada Line near 

Purdy's via Susanville) 

Oiled surfacing, Mineral to Chester, 
31 miles (Tehama and Plumas coun- 
ties), $55,600. 

Oiled surfacing, Westwood to Wil- 
lards, 12.8 miles (Lassen county), $32- 
000. 

Grading, oil rock surfacing, struc- 
tures, 9.2 miles, Willards to Susan- 
ville (Lassen county), $296,S00. This 
provides for reconstructing and im- 
proving a section that is difficult both 
of maintenance and snow removal. 

Oiled rock surfacing from 2 miles 
east of Dales to Paynes Creek, 7.3 
miles (Tehama county); $96 700. 

Oil rock surfacing, 11.4 miles, Lake 
Almanor to Westwood (Lassen and 
Plumas counties), $97,700. 

Oil surfacing, Doyle to Long Valley 
Creek, 7.5 miles (Lassen county), $1S- 
800. 

KLAMATH RIVER LATERAL 

(Redwood Highway near Klamath 
River to Pacific Highway) 

Walker bridge and approaches (Sis- 
kiyou county), Cooperative project, 
state's share, $19,000. 

Eeaver Creek bridge and approach- 
es (Siskiyou county), $48,300. 

Grading and bridge replacements, 
Weitchpec to Happy Camp, $105,000 
(Siskiyou and Humboldt counties). 

UKIAH TO MENDOCINO STATE 
HOSPITAL 

Bridge over Russian River (Mendo- 
cino county), $30,000. 

BAYSHORE HIGHWAY 
(San Francisco to San Jose) 

Bituminous macadam pavement 
from Fifth Ave., San Mateo to Wil- 
lows Road, 11.4 miles (San Mateo 
county), $315,200. 

Grading, structures, and bituminous 
macadam pavement, 9.3 miles. Willow- 
Road to Alviso Road (San Mateo and 
Santa Clara counties), $716,850. 

Bridge over San Francisquito and 
Stevens Creek, $65,000. 

Concrete pavement, Broadway to 5th 
Ave., 3 miles (San Mateo county). 
$272,450. 

These projects continue present 
pavement activities to San Mateo and 
provide for construction and surfac- 
ing of the remaining sections of the 
road to a connection with the Alviso 
Road, 6 miles from San Jose. 
SKYLINE BOULEVARD 
(San Francisco to Glenwood) 

Grading, structures and bituminous 
macadam, Saratoga Gap to Black Rd.. 
portions, 4 miles (Santa Clara and 
Santa Cruz counties), $300,000. This 
continues the construction of the Sky- 
line Boulevard southerly. 



SACRAMENTO. OAKLAND HIGH. 
WAY 

Grading, pavement, structures and 
<<il shoulders, 1.7 miles west of Cor- 
delia to 1.7 miles west of Fairfield 
(Solano county), $294,600. This will 
eliminate the last piece of 15-ft pave- 
ment existing on this highway. 

Bridges over Ledgewood, Suisun ami 
Knightson creeks (Solano county), 
$26,000. 

Filling borrow pits, pavement, and 
oil shoulders, 1.8 miles, w<-si of cause- 
way (Yolo county), $70,000. 

ALBANY TO MARTINEZ 
Grading, structures ami pavement, 

San Pablo Creek to Crockett, 1 >|.t 
Ing Pinole; "A" St. subway, Crockett 
•(Contra Costa county), $396,000. This 
project provides for a 30-ft. asphaltic 
and concrete pavement on the exist- 
ing macadam highway between Rich- 
mond and Crockett. 

STOCKTON TO SANTA CRUZ VIA 
OAKLAND 

Grading, structures, and pavement, 
Castro Valley Road (Alameda county) 
$50,000. 

Grading, armor top surface, struc- 
tures, French Camp via McKinley 
Ave. to Stockton (San Joaquin coun- 
ty). $50,000. This completes the im- 
provement of the south approach to 
Stockton through Altamont Pass. 

Bridges, over Homestead Canal and 
Walker Slough (San Joaquin county), 
$16,500. 

Grading, structures, pavement and 
shoulders, 5 miles, Greenville to Liv- 
ermore (Alameda county), $166,100. 
This project constitutes an improve- 
ment of the westerly side of the Alta- 
mont Pass. 

Grading, structures, pavement, 
shoulders, 3.5 miles. Meridian Road to 
Ware Avenue (Santa Clara county). 
$70,000. This will correct reverse 
curves near Johnson's Corner south 
of San Jose. 

Grading, structures, surfacing (San- 
ta Cruz county), Santa Cruz to 1 mile 
west, $60,000. 

Grading, structures, surfacing, 6.5 
miles, Inspiration Point to Vine Hill 
Road, portions (Santa Cruz county), 
$360,000. This with the item imme- 
diately preceding constitutes the first 
unit in the relocation of the present 
highway congested Los Gatos - Santa 
Cruz highway. 

SALIDA TO ROUTE 23 AT JUNC- 
TION 

(Salida on Valley Route North of Lodi, 

Through Sonora, Over Sonora 

Pass to Junction North of 

Bridgeport) 

Grading, armor top surface, struc- 
tures, Sonora to one-half mile east 
(Tuolumne county), $27,400. 

Grading, structures, and oil rock 
surfacing, Long Barn to Stoddard 
Springs (Tuolumne county), $97,000. 
(Note an additional $30,000 will be 
spent on this section from Forest 
Highway Funds). This continues the 
improvement from the end of the sur- 
faced road at Long Barn. 

SAN ANDREAS LATERAL 

(From Golden State Highway, Valley 

Route, Near Lodi. to Route 23, 

Near Silver Creek, Calaveras 

County) 

Grading, structures and surfacing, 
7.1 miles. Waterloo Road to 1.3 miles 
east of Clements (San Joaquin coun- 
ty), $213,000. This project provides 
for the pavement of the present coun- 
ty built macadam east of Lodi, taken 
over by the state when the road was 
admitted 'into the state system. 

Grading, structures, oil rock sur- 
facing, Big Trees to Dorrington, three 
miles (Calaveras county), $104,000. 
(This is a cooperative project and 
$36,000 of Forest Highway funds will 
be added to the state construction of 
$104,000). 

Grading, structures, surfacing near 
Lake Alpine, 5 miles, portions (Alpine 
county). $50,000. 



four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



MANTECA TO ROUTE 5 NEAR 

MOSSDALE SCHOOL 
Grading, pavement and structures, 
4.2 miles, Mossdale to Manteca (San 
Joaquin county), $174,000. 

Grade separations, underpass, W. P. 
Ry. (San Joaquin county), state's 
share, 130,000. 

This provides for paving the re- 
maining unimproved portion of the 
road with a grade separation struc- 
ture beneath the tracks of the West- 
ern Pacific tracks. 

PACHECO PASS LATERAL 
(Califa, on the Valley Highway to 

Gilroy on the Coast) 
Three timber bridges with approach- 
es over Highline Canal and San Joa- 
quin overflow (Merced county), $51,- 
500. 

REDWOOD PARK ROAD 
(Saratoga Gap Near Redwood Park to 
Blooms Mill) 
Grading, structures and armor top 
surfacing, 3.6 miles, Saratoga Gap to 
Waterman Switch (Santa Cruz coun- 
ty), $271,600. This completes the grad- 
ing to a connection with the improved 
county road in San Lorenzo Canyon. 
SAN LUCAS TO SEQUOIA NATION. 
AL PARK 
Grading, structures and 20-ft. bi- 
tuminous macadam pavement from 1 
mile west of Merryman to 3 miles east 
of Lemon Cove, 10.4 miles (Tulare 
county), $350,000. This constitutes an 
improvement of the present unsatis- 
factory county paved road which was 
taken over by the state when this 
road was admitted into the state sys- 
tem. 

Grading and oil shoulders west of 
Plaza Garage to county line, 3.5 miles 
(Tulare county), $12,000. 
CARMEL-SAN SIMEON HIGHWAY 
Grading, structures and oil rock sur- 
facing, 5.4 miles, San Remo Divide to 
Carmel (Monterey county), $214,000. 

Bridge over Carmel River, San Jose 
and Wild Cat Canyon Creeks( Mont- 
erey county), $85,000. 

Bridge over Granite Creek (Mont- 
erey county), $45,000. 

Bridge over Garrapata Creek (Mont- 
erey county), $35,000. 

Grading, structures and oil rock 
surfacing. S 6 miles, Cambria to San 
Simeon (San Luis Obispo county), 
$210,000. This completes the present 
state highway at southerly end con- 
necting with convict construction to 
the north. These projects will com- 
plete the grading and surfacing of the 
highway with the exception of a 25 
mile gap between convict camps. 

Bridge over San Simeon Creek, Pico 
Creek, Little Pico Creek, near San 
Simeon (San Luis Obispo county), $90- 
000. 

EAST OF SIERRA HIGHWAY 

(Saugus to Route 11 at Alpine 

Junction) 

Grading, structures and oil rock 

surfacing, Yerbys to McGee Creek, 

7.3 miles (Mono county), $243,600. 
Grading, structures and oil rock 

surfacing, Convict Creek to Casa Di- 
ablo Hot Springs, 5.5 miles (Mono 
county), $120,450. 

Grading, structures and oil rock 
surfacing, Casa Diablo Hot Springs to 
Deadman Creek, 8.8 mil«s (Mono 
county). $234,950. 

Grading and structures from 1 mile 
north of Bridgeport to Sonora Pass 
Junction, 15 miles (Mono county), 
$261,000. 

Bridge over Walker River (Mono 
county), $15,000. 

All of these projects are in Mono 
county and located north of Bishop. 
EL RIO TO SAN JUAN CAPLSTRANO 
(Portion of the Coast Route) 

Grading, structures and pavement, 

7.4 miles, Los Flores Canyon to San- 
ta Monica (Los Angeles county). $510- 
200. This provides for widening pave- 
ment to 40 feet. 

Widening pavement. Topanga Can- 
yon to Los Flores Canyon, 3 2 miles 
(Los Angeles county), $80,000. 

Santa Ana River bridge, widening 
(Orange county). $SO,000. 



Shore protection, Santa Monica to 
Pt. Mugu, 7.2 miles (Los Angeles and 
Ventura counties), $240,000. 

ARROYO SECO HIGHWAY 

(La Canada to Mt. Wi son Road via 

Arroyo Seco) 

Grading and structures, La Canad i 

to Mt. Wilson (Los Angeles county.), 

$520,000. This continues construction 



thi; 



Lit.-. 



BEAR LAKE HIGHWAY 

(San Bernardino, End of County 
Pavement, to Bear Lake) 

Grading, structures, oil rock sur- 
facing, 5 miles, near Camp Waterman 
to end of county pavement (San Bern- 
ardino county), $650,000. This com- 
pletes the grading and surfacing cf 
this highway. 

ARROWHEAD TRAIL 

(San Bernardino to Nevada Line Near 

Jean) 

Alray grade separation, subway be- 
neath Santa Fe tracks (San Bernar- 
dino county), state's share $30,000. 

Gish grade separation, subway be- 
neath Santa Fe tracks (San Bernar- 
dino county), state's share $30,000. 

Grading, structures, rock surfacing, 
from point near Baker to 28 miles east 
(San Bernardino county), $475. 0U0. 

Grading, structures, oil rock sur- 
facing, 12 miles, Devore to Alray (San 
Bernardino county), $400,000. 

These projects combine construction 
on the main highway leading to Boul- 
der Dam. 
COLTON-LOS ANGELES HIGHWAY 

Grading, structures and pavement. 
Pomona to Los Angelea (Los Angeles 
county), $540,000. This is one of the 
recommended additional highways. 
WEST OF CLAREMONT TO RIVER 
SIDE 

Widening bridge and approaches 
ov Santa Ana River at Riverside 
(Riverside county), $150,000. 
SAN BERNARDINO TO EL CENTRO 

Grading, structures, second story 
concrete pavement, shoulders, Imper- 
ial county line to 6 miles north (Riv- 
erside county), $390,000. 

This project provides for widening 
the 15-ft. pavement from the Salton 
Sea northerly on this route. 

SAN DIEGO TO EL CENTRO 

Pavement of unpaved portions, La 
Posta to Tecote Divide, 8.3 miles (San 
Diego county), $332,000. This com- 
pletes the paving of the entire dis- 
tance on the San Diego - El Centro 
highway. 

Grading, structures, pavement, 8 
miles, 3 miles west of Coyote Wells 
to 7 miles west of Dixieland (Imper- 
ial county), $492,400. This project 
provides for widening the east sec- 
tion of the old 15-ft. highway on this 
road. 

EL CENTRO TO YUMA 

Grading, structures, and pavement, 
9 miles, Sand Hills to 5 miles west of 
Yuma (Imperial county), $441,000. This 
provides paving the last unpaved sec- 
tion of this route. 

MECCA - BLYTHE HIGHWAY 

Grading, structures, oil rock surfac- 
ing, 16 miles, portion (Riverside coun- 
ty), $300,000. This continues con- 
struction. 

COOPERATIVE PROJECTS 

The budget sets up a total of $1,- 
600,000 for cooperative projects in the 
southern portion of the state, and an 
amount of $500,000 for similar work in 
the northern portion. 



Legislation requesting that the en- 
tire elimination of billboards and ov- 
erhanging signs outside property lines 
be put to a vote of the people at the 
August primary has been introduced 
in the Toledo city council. The legis- 
lation provides that in event such ac- 
tion is approved the elimination of 
billboards and signs be completed 
within 60 days. Factories and busi- 
ness places are exempted in the pro- 
posed ordinance. The legislation was 
referred to the rules committee of 
council, which has it under consider- 
ation. 



ALONG THE LINE 



H. L. Carnahan of Los Angeles, 
former lieutenant-governor, has been 
appointed State Building and Loan 
Commissioner by Governor Rolph. It 
will be a temporary service. Com- 
missioner Carnahan has consented to 
remain on the job until September. 

Edward K. Hussey has been ap- 
pointed city engineer of Oakdale, suc- 
ceeding George D. Macomber who was 
elected to the office of surveyor ot 
Stanislaus County at the last general 
election. R. T. Belcher of Oakland 
will be a member of Hussey's staff. 

Washoe County Commissioners 
(Reno, Nevada). have rejected the 
proposal of J. C. Durham, newly elec- 
ted commissioner, to appoint a high- 
way engineer for the county and place 
him in charge of road construction and 
maintanance. 

A. C. Byer, engineer with the Wal- 
lace and Tiernan Co. of Newark. N 
J., with Pacific Coast headquarters in 
San Francisco, spent two days with 
engineers for the Hawthorne Naval 
Ammunition Depot in Nevada state, 
planning the installation of a chlor- 
ination plant for the depot water sup- 
ply. 

W. H. Sloan, manager of the Hay- 
ward Lumber and Investment Co. at 
Los Banos, resigned Jan. 1 to devote 
his time to his farm properties. He 
will be succeeded by A. E. Anderson, 
formerly of Paso Robles. 



According to word from Lincoln. 
Calif., A. L. Gladding, has tendered 
his resignation to the firm of Glad- 
ding-McBean & Company, effective 
January 15, and will become associat- 
ed with his brothers, Charles and 
Chandler Gladding, in San Jose. 

H. J. Jackson has been installed as 
paid secretary of the San Joaquin 
Valley Master Plumbers' Associa!:on. 

Ira B. Cross, professor of economies 
of the University of California, in 
addressing the Pacific Coast Electrical 
Bureau, pleaded for higher wages, 
stating that it was the wage earner 
who had the greater buying power, 



A. M. Barton has been reappointed 
chief engineer and general manager 
of the State Reclamation Board by 
Governor Rolph. Mr. Barton, a former 
army engineer, is now completing his 
eighth year in the office. He also has 
served as chief engineer of the Ameri- 
can River Flood Control District 

Fresno has fewer civil engineers 
than the normal ratio throughout the 
state, Donald M. Baker of Sacra- 
mento, president of the State Board 
of Registration for Civil Engineers, 
told the Fresno Engineers' Club at a 
recent luncheon meeting. "The aver- 
age in the state is one engineer to 
every 1,000 people," he said. "In Fres- 
no County there are only sixty. Cali- 
fornia has 5,000. We are planning 
stricter enforcement of the state law 
which requires men in charge of de- 
sign to be registered with our board." 

George C Jacobs and Newton Ack- 
erman, architect, operating under the 
firm name of George C. Jacobs Com- 
pany, mill work and building mate- 
rials, with headquarters at Eureka, 
announces dissolution of the partner- 
ship. The business will be continued 
with Jacobs as sole owner. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Five 



THE OBSERVER 
What He Hears and Sees on His Rounds 



Because an automobile can stand 
the vagaries of the weather when 
being run or while waiting at the curb, 
sponsors for a new garage proposed for 
Providence, R. I., argue that it can 
stand being stored in a wall-less ga- 
rage. They are planning a 4-story 
one with the first story of convention;il 
construction, offering store rental 
space, with the upper 3 stories wide 
open to the winds. Other arguments 
are comparatively low building costs, 
freedom from carbon mon-oxide haz- 
ards. 



According to word from New York 
City, the Lehigh Portland Cement Co. 
has reduced the price of cement 10c a 
barrel in Maryland and the District of 
Columbia. The cut is understood to 
meet price shading by smaller com- 
panies in the territory. 

Under an ordinance adopted by the 
Redwood City Council, architects will 
pay the city a license fee of $12 a 
year. The ordinance provides a penal- 
ty of $300 and a 90-day jail sentence 
in the event of violation. 



Bank executives of the country em- 
phatically agree with President Hoo- 
ver that home building and home buy- 
ing form a great and desirable chan- 
nel for return to normal creative em- 
ployment of capital and to normal 
prosperity. Statements from execu- 
tive heads of leading banks and trust 
companies made to the National As- 
sociation of Real Estate Boards in re- 
sponse to a telegraphic inquiry sent 
out last week and made public by 
Herbert U. Nelson, executive secre- 
tary of the Association, heartily en- 
dorse the President's position. They 
assure the support of the financing 
agencies they represent in a continu- 
ing movement toward residential ac- 
tivity. The opening of such a move- 
ment is already indicated. 



A proposal to create a method 
through which qualified real estate ap- 
praisers could be certified as such will 
come before the National Association 
of Real Estate Boards at its annual 
meeting, to be held in St. Petersburg, 
Florida, January 15, 16 and 17. 

The proposal will come before the 
meeting in a report to be made to the 
executive committee of the Appraisal 
Division by Philip W. Kniskern, of 
New York. Mr. Kniskern is chairman 
of a special committee appointed 
some months ago by the Division to 
work out and bring before the com- 
ing meeting a tentative plan for cer- 
tifying or otherwise attesting quali- 
fied valuators of real estate. 

The proposed plan, after discussion 
by the Appraisal Division at a meet- 
ing of its executive committee, will 
be brought before the general dele- 
gate body of the Association. 

Attestation of qualified appraisers by 
a group of their peers is proposed to 
advance the work of establishment of 
standards of practice for the appraisal 
of real property and to further safe- 
guard the public in all matters in 
which the accuracy and soundness of 
the real esetate appraisal is the key 
factor. 

Threat to campaign against the pro- 
posed $300,000 San Mateo Union High 
School bond issue for school exten- 
sions was made at a mass meeting 
held by citizens, unless steps are tak- 



en to hire local workmen on the new 
building. Labor union representatives 
said that county workers have not 
been protected heretofore in public 
and civic projects. 



If the opinion of members of the 
Fresno County Board of Supervisors 
are followed, the construction of ad- 
ditions to county hospital, for which 
bonds of $250,000 were recently voted, 
will be carried on under the segregat- 
ed contract plan rather than under a 
general contract. Each member of the 
board expressed himself as favoring 
the segregated bid system. 

A survey of the operations of 29 re- 
tail lumber yards in Colorado and Wy- 
oming by the University Extension 
Division, University of Colorado, in 
cooperation with the Mountain States 
Lumber Association, shows a gross 
business of $3,449,109 for the year 1929. 
The total cost of merchandise was 
73.5 per cent, the total expense was 
19.5 per cent and the net profit was 
6.35 per cent. The net profit of the 
same yards for 1928 was 7 2 per cent 
and for 1927 was 7.5 per cent. 



Tacoma, Wash., Section of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers 
has gone on record as favoring the 
proposed state license law for the en- 
gineering profession to be .submitted 
to the Washington State Legislature 
this month. The measure was kiled 
in committee at several previous legis- 
latures. 



After several amicable meetings 
with employers of union journeymen, 
members of Plumbers' Local No. 78, 
Los Angeles, adopted the five-day 
week. Under the terms of the pres- 
ent agreement the old established 
rules of the local prohibiting mem- 
bers to contract labor or work on the 
piece work basis were reaffirmed. 



Efforts will be made in Washington 
State to put a bill through the Legis- 
lature increasing the tenure of office 
of county commissioners of that state. 
The bill will be sponsored by the 
Washington State Association of 
County Commissioners and the Wash- 
ington State Association of CounLy 
Engineers. Under the present law, 
county commissioners may serve only 
two successive terms of two and four 
years, respectively. The commis- 
sioners' organization proposes to 
lengthen these terms to four and six 
years, respectively, increasing the pos- 
sible tenure of office, from six to ten 
years. 

Underestimating the cost of the 
proposed improvements may seriously 
upset the financing arrangements of 
the property owner and may easily be 
the forerunner of many troubles, it is 
set forth in the lesson on financing 
the home in the general real estate 
course given jointly by the California 
Real Estate Association and the Uni- 
versity of Southern California. One 
should never attempt to build without 
having a plan that satisfies him and 
that is complete in all details. The 
specifications in particular should be 
complete, especially as to those de- 
tails which if overlooked, are likely 
to lead to extras which have not been 
included in the estimated or contract 
price. 



The Oakland cltj council has ap- 
proved final paNsa^.- of an ordinance 
requiring the Installation "f sasoline 

.•-'■■i.i;;. tanks inside properly occu- 
pied by service stations instead of 
under sidewalks. Trucks must load 
tanks while parked Inside property 
lines Instead of from the streets. 

"Those who may be entertaining the 
belief that federal government of- 
ficials at Washington are not doing 
all possible to expedite the nation's 
public building program are mistaken 
in such assumption, " says John Gra- 
ham, Seattle architect, who recently 
returned from Washington, after con- 
ferring with the U. S. Treasury De- 
partment on plans for the proposed 
Marine Hospital at Seattle. Mr. Gra- 
ham, associated with Bebb & Gould. 
Seattle architects, is preparing plans 
for the new hospital which is estimat- 
ed to cost $1,750,000. 

The Building Trades Employers As- 
sociation of Pittsburgh. Pa., an- 
nounces adoption of a plan of rota- 
tion of available employment in those 
trades among men now at work and 
those out of jobs. The plan, F. O 
Reed, association secretary, said, is 
expected to provide part-time work 
for 5000 of the 11.000 building trades 
workers estimated to be unemployed 
in Pittsburg. Under the scheme, the 
men will work on alternate weeks, 
preference being given former em- 
ployes of individuel concerns. 



State participation in construction 
of the Golden Gate bridge, which 
would connect San Francisco with Ma- 
rin County, is sought in a bill intro- 
duced in the assemblv by Frank L. 
Gordon, Suisun. 

Under provision of the proposed 
measure the state would participate 
with funds either now available or 
from a special appropriation to be 
asked of the legislature. 

The amount of the money the state 
would expend under the provision of 
the bill has not been determined. The 
act would provide for allocation of 
costs by a committee composed of 
members of the bridge district, boards 
of supervisors of the counties which 
comprise the district and state de- 
partment of public works. 

Gordon said it was too much to ex- 
pect for the counties and the district 
to stand the entire cost of the bridge 
and consequently he is asking the 
state to aid in the project. 



Unemployed are urged to stay away 
from Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, 
the site of the proposed naval dirigible 
base. M. B. Eaton, secretary of the 
Sunnyvale Chamber of Commerce, an- 
nounces that the unemployed have 
been given to understand that regis- 
tration of men is underway for em- 
ployment on the project. Such is not 
the case. 

Under a decision just made public 
by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion in the case of the Blue Diamond 
Company of Nevada against the San- 
ta Fe Railroad et al, the rate on gyp- 
sum in carloads from Arden. Nev., to 
Monolith. Calif., is held unduly prej- 
udicial to the complainant. An order 
has been issued that the rate in the 
future shall not exceed 12 cents per 
100 pounds, subject to a carload min- 
imum of S0.000 pounds. 

Spanish Peak Lumber Company, op- 
erating a large mill in Meadow Val- 
ley, near Quincy, Plumas County, re- 
duced wages 10 to 15 per cent effec- 
tive as of January 11. Notices to em- 
ployees said the reduction conformed 
to the downward trend in the price 
of manufactured lumber. Prices at the 
company boarding house also were re- 
duced from $1.35 a day to $1.20. 



Six 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



TRADE NOTES 



A. M. Mortensen, president of the 
San Jose Chamber of Commerce, an- 
noonces the organization of A. M. 
Mortensen, Inc , for the manufacture 
of the Cuthbert air compressor, the 
invention of a San Jose man. In ad- 
dition, the company will distribute a 
complete line of service station con- 
struction, management and mainten- 
ance. A plant has been leased at 138 
Stockton avenue, San Jose. 



Western Door & Sash Company of 
Oakland has opened a San Francisco 
office at 320 Santa Maria Building, 112 
Market Street R. S. Grant for many 
years connected with the old Califor- 
nia Door Company, is manager of the 
San Francisco branch. The company 
carries a complete line of sash, win- 
dows, doors, panels and built-in fix- 
tures. 



Brownson Patents, Ltd , has been 
organized in Fresno to manufacture 
and market gas heater, appliances and 
devices. Stockholders in the company 
are Walter E. Bruns, W. H. Moeller, 
J. C. Hammel, M. L. Hoff, J. F. 
Moody. Charles G. Connors, Kenneth 
R. Brown, F. H. Gonsalves. Warren 
G. Moody, J. Herrera, Hugh G. Rod- 
gers, Arsen M. Thomas, Forest L. 
Brown, R. W. Millard. L. J. 
Kemalyan, Ernest Scribn.r, Mrs. 
Waldo Shipman. W. G. Donovan. H. 
S. Cedarquist, M. K. Gibbs and W. 
B. Backlund. 



Agency for the Pacific line of deep 
well turbine centrifugal pumps in the 
territories surrounding Tulare, Han- 
ford, Visalia. Lindsay. Tipton, Cor- 
coran, Exeter, Porterville, Pixley and 
Earlimart has been taken by the Lind- 
say Pump and Machinery Co. of Lind- 
say, Calif. A branch office has been 
opened in Tulare with Harvey Sher- 
wood in charge. 



The American Hoist and Derrick 
Company, having closed their branch 
office in Emeryville, Calif., announce 
the appointment of Harron, Rickard 
& McCone Co. of 1600 Bryant St.. San 
Francisco, and 2205 Santa Fe Ave., 
Los Angeles, as their exclusive rep- 
resentatives in the sale of their line 
of hoisting equipment, consisting of 
electric, steam and gasoline hoisting 
engines, slewing engines, derrick 
irons, sheaves and blocks. Stocks of 
equipment and repair parts will be 
carried in the San Francisco and Los 
Angeles warehouses of Harron, Rick- 
ard & McCone Company. 



A machine to mix material on the 
road for oiled surfacing of highways 
has been successfully used on a state 
highway job in Montana, according to 

Fowler & Myers Company, manu- 
facturing concrete pipe, have started 
operations in the new plant in Kings 
City, Monterey County. The company 
also operates similar plants at Somas 
and San Fernando. 

R. J. Cordiner, Northwest manager 
of the Edison General Electric Appli- 
ance Co., Inc., 2032 Second Ave., has 
been named Pacific Coast manager of 
the company with headquarters in 
San Francisco. He succeeds Ray 
Turnbull who was promoted to the 
vice presidency of the Edison com- 
pany and who hereafter will be lo- 
cated in Chicago. Cordiner*s place in 
the Seattle office will be filled by J. 
C. Piatt. 



BUILDING PERMIT STATISTICS OF PACIFIC COAST 
CITIES FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER, 1930 
AND 1929, AND FOR THE YEARS 1929 AND 
1930 AS REPORTED BY BUILDING DE- 
PARTMENT EXECUTIVES OF THE 
CITIES REPORTED. 







CALIFORNIA 






City 


Dec 


mber, 1930 


Dec. 


Yea 


r, 1930 


Year. 




No. 


Cost 


1929 


No. 


Cost 


1929 


Alameda 


45 


$ 148,332 


$ 47,289 


806 


$ 978,262 


$ 1,404,415 


Alhambra .... 


62 


117,750 


287.175 


793 


2.017,855 


2.511.501 


Anaheim 




38,813 


17,185 




528,416 


427,354 


Fakersfleld .. 


65 


78,350 


73,775 


717 


1,487,085 


1,580,216 


Berkeley 


75 


129.S31 


16S.S18 


1540 


2.986,789 


4,732,845 


Bev'Iy Hills.. 


64 


299.400 


364.600 


1057 


6.266.S90 


8.127.292 


Burbank 


37 


180,350 


36,285 


359 


998,634 


1,271,129 


Burlingame.. 


16 


52,350 


23,500 


176 


756,122 


1,506,073 


Carmel 


8 


8,115 


12,200 


148 


228,260 


289.790 


Chula Vista.. 


20 


13,525 


8,330 


149 


119,340 


355.275 


Colton 


9 


3,600 


2,000 


119 


118.250 


112.300 


Coronado .... 


12 


14,337 


3,027 


166 


264.826 


452.085 


Emeryville -. 


4 


6,100 


850 


51 


228,450 


521,065 


Eureka 


30 


144,372 


63,040 


401 


659.91G 


765,425 


Fresno 


131 


89,335 


113,574 


1410 


1.451,991 


1.702,842 


Glendale 


70 


191,365 


153,810 


1231 


3.409,701 


5,456,149 


Havward 


4 


4,575 


3,965 


92 


258,475 


250,653 


H'ntg'tn Pk. 


28 


43,781 


80,310 


519 


1.5S8.529 


2.370,950 


Inglewood .... 


23 


67,035 


29,850 


399 


823,931 


557,232 


Long Beach.. 


287 


744,105 


1,103,305 


5099 


13,480,380 


18,149,585 


Los Angeles.. 


2056 


5,283,235 


3,992,459 


30612 


74,088,725 


93,016.160 


Los Gatos 






475 


81 


75,178 


174.400 


Lynwood 


16 


22,975 


45,275 


214 


637,605 


822,267 


Modesto 


21 


26,130 


93,753 


358 


555,637 


710,250 


Monrovia .... 


14 


9,140 


16,000 


210 


326,657 


441,000 


Montebello .. 


IS 


16,775 


19,550 


125 


228.397 


353,493 


Monterey 


26 


46.300 


33,165 


344 


504,769 


853,162 


N't'l City 


167 


107,769 


3.940 


326 


215.318 


251,223 


Oakland 


247 


1,063,546 


485,717 


3820 


9,184.758 


14,317,428 


Oceanside .... 


13 


6,897 


22.566 


150 


113,367 


340,706 


Ontario 


19 


19,150 


43,135 


255 


671,920 


481,461 


Orange 


15 


59,417 


4,950 


139 


203,877 


324,775 


Pac. Grove.... 


10 


15,450 


19,650 


178 


311,025 


272,172 


Palo Alto .... 


36 


94,450 


116,610 


514 


1,385,423 


1.789,793 


Palos V'rdes 




9,500 


37,250 




311,660 


604,255 


Pasadena .... 


455 


313,741 


298,872 


4026 


5,944,751 


6,991,204 


Petaluma ... 


9 


27,925 


9,700 


95 


232,120 


279,725 


Piedmont 


10 


12,663 


4,650 


142 


639.111 


1,231,143 


Pomona 


32 


30,590 


62,175 


727 


1.254.S39 


1,003,130 


Redlands 


15 


20,554 


22,618 


206 


666,313 


598,255 


Redw'd City 


23 


76.860 


25,541 


334 


S69.627 


683,097 


Richmond ... 


24 


49,956 


10,665 


524 


525, 7S2 


629,300 


Riverside ... 


52 


166,183 


191,623 


614 


1.665.87S 


1,485,348 


Saoramento. 


119 


286,695 


117,259 


1785 


3,062,363 


5,409,244 


Salinas 


37 


41,148 


89.215 


477 


1.215,748 


1.308,679 


San Fran'co. 


445 


2,292,388 


1,617,691 


6541 


22,726.994 


33.682,025 


San B'n'd'o. 


54 


130,651 


75,170 


710 


1,852,646 


2,386,901 


San Diego ... 


268 


394,150 


780.535 


4060 


5.393,252 


11,583,736 


San Gabriel. 


7 


15,345 


24.900 


148 


412,336 


495,790 


San Jose 


48 


200,450 


77,730 


744 


3,428,000 


2,468,200 


San Leandro 


12 


19,050 


63,100 


200 


499.907 


915.308 


San Marino. 


6 


18,895 


185,176 


189 


2,015,744 


2.851,104 


San Mateo . 


10 


42,950 


77,900 


325 


1,475,545 


1.907.3S3 


San Rafael. 




17,090 


36,575 


147 


592.178 


394,370 


Santa Ana... 


107 


97,118 


158.935 


S46 


2.154.943 


1.812.216 


S'ta Barb'ra 


80 


118,186 


126.186 


1237 


2,997.390 


2.653,903 


Santa Cruz... 


18 


11,802 


38.755 


352 


520,908 


1.019.400 


S'ta Monica. 


59 


9S.145 


95,766 


926 


2,400.541 


2,987,104 


Santa Rosa. 


15 


33,875 


10,255 


232 


413,256 


342,789 


South Gate. 


24 


33.056 


372,475 


494 


1,334.148 


2.663,380 


So. Pasad'a. 




10.425 


43.840 




458,306 


580.S69 


Stockton 


61 


84,975 


63,947 


665 


1,317,528 


1,444,054 


Torrance 


10 


8,058 


23,525 


164 


420,387 


606.41S 


Vernon 




74,300 


92,635 




803,097 


1.673,004 


Ventura . 


12 


11,650 


49,700 


200 


817,326 


2,186.960 


Watsonv'e . 


19 


83,570 


19,250 


204 


447.050 


456,750 


Willow Glen 


5 


16,300 




153 


590.SS5 




Total 


3684 


$13,995,141 


$12,396,747 


80025 


$195,812,220 


$261,117,570 








ARIZONA 






Phoenix 


51 


$ 396,636 


$ 4S5.145 


852 


$ 3.001.066 


$ 5,248.674 


Tucson 


80 


78,030 


245,690 


1099 


2.096.345 


3,450,922 


Total 


131 


$ 474,666 


$ 730.S35 


1961 


5,097,411 


8,649,596 








IDAHO 






Boise 


35 


$ 16,471 


$ 76.S30 


828 


$ 786,624 


$ 1,052,965 


Lewiston 


19 


37.385 


6,550 


253 


372. S85 


570.251 


Nampa 


14 


14,045 


14,605 


286 


293.137 


320,406 


Total 


68 


67,901 


96.9S5 


1367 


$ 1.452.64S 


$ 1,943,622 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Reno 22 

Albany 7 

Astoria 12 

Corvallls 12 

Eugene 35 

La Grande.... 3 

Marshfleld " 

Portland 391 

Salem 2S 

Total 455 

Logan 1 

Ogden 4 

Salt Lake.... 57 

Total 62 





NEVADA 


44.950 


$ 268,300 




OREGON 


10.045 


$ 1.675 


696 


0,513 


10,000 


650 


20.059 


61,783 


2.750 


16,260 


1,270 


2,950 


69.415 


613,226 1 


32.1S7 


23,801 



62.-1,747 7951 



$ 3,000 

11,225 

135,514 

$ 149,739 



UTAH 



41N.73S 1221 



144,952 


$ 209,655 


95,001 


93,163 


312.4110 


260,205 


829 774 


664,112 


1 16.525 


2»i;, 271' 


141.002 


165,455 


2,063,580 


15,493,310 


509,402 


2,063,792 


4,542,1)36 


$ 19,150,014 


282,586 


$ 353,800 


579,760 


700,695 


3,110,243 


5.670,891 


3, 97S, 588 


$ 0,725,386 



WASHINGTON 



Aberdeen .... 10 


$ 11.990 


$ 150,075 


383 


% 393,470 


$ S38.479 


Pellingham .. 20 


11,620 


24.645 


588 


743,915 


1,769,738 


Everett 37 


93.345 


56,855 


807 


S25.S05 


1,344,455 


Hoquiam 4 


12,475 


3,290 


267 


128,052 


477,793 


Longview .... 3 


2.150 


3.920 


108 


878,638 


551.991 


Port Angeles 11 


10.375 


3S.175 


236 


390,765 


440,265 


Seattle 413 


5,041.325 


1,373.175 


6649 


30,843.465 


29.104.77ll 


Spokane 77 


337.230 


124.331 


£150 


3,730,843 


4.14S.210 


Tacoma 118 


113,720 


277.090 


2343 


4,551.471 


4.761.231 


Vancouver .. 8 


1,620 


12,485 


255 


222,343 


487,196 


Walla Walla 16 


79.967 


1,985 


271 


403.542 


282,741 


Wenatchee ....13 


55.350 


26,835 


261 


911.280 


2,110,825 


Yakima 33 


34,480 


30,095 


557 


1.648,185 


1,242,705 


Total 763 


$ 5,805,647 


$ 2,122,956 


14880 


$ 45.371.774 


$ 47,560,399 


Grand Total 5225 


$21,277,466 


$16,660,30S 


107830 


$267,478,010 


$347.323,4S7 


HERE— THERE 




TRADE LITERATURE 


EVERYWHERE 











C. W. Fairbanks was elected presi- 
dent of the San Luis Obispo Counly 
Builders' Exchange at the annual 
meeting of that organization last 



Tuesda 

vice-president 

treasurer. 

sergeant-at 

Quagl 



W. J. Charters was elected 

James Jepson, 

H. J. Kyle was elected 

Directors are Jas. 

Holzinger, Robert 

A. Charters and Ross Mo- 



Installation of officers of the San 
Luis Obispo County Builders' Exchange 
was held last week with a banquet at 
the Anderson Hotel in San Luis 
Obispo. Officers installed were: Presi- 
dent, C. W. Fairbanks; Vice-President, 
W. J. Charters; Treasurer, James 
Jepson; Sergeant-at- Arms, H. J. Kyle. 
Board of Directors — Ross MacMillan, 
H. M. Holzinger, W J. Charters, 
Robert Forbes, James Quaglino. Ex- 
ecutive Secretary, J. F. Sobeck. 



O. J. Amberg of Spokane was re- 
elected president of the Northwest 
Branch, Associated General Contrac- 
tors of America, at the close of the 
annual convention held in Seattle. 
January 10. J. A. Lyon, Spokane, was 
elected treasurer, and J. M. Clifton. 
Spokane, corporate secretary. The 
heads of three chapters. Portland. 
Spokane and Seattle, will, as accord- 
ing to custom, serve as directors of 
the Northwest branch. Geo. D. Lyon 
is president of the Spokane chapter. 
James Murdock of the Seattle group 
and W. T. Jacobsen of the Portland 
chapter. 

Basalt Rock Company of Napa, has 
leased property in South Vallejo and 
will establish a plant to serve as an 
all-rail-and-water outlet to and from 
its plant near Napa. 



Durabilt Steel Locker Co., Aurora. 
111., has issued a 16-page illustrated 
catalogue with A. I. A. file cover 
featuring the solution of gymnasium 
storage problems which has been re- 
printed from recent issues of the 
Journal of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. Copies of the booklet, of par- 
ticular value to architects specializ- 
ing in schools, halls and society build- 
ings, churches and hospitals, will be 
sent upon request. 

The complete line of Westinghouse 
electric service plants is described and 
illustrated in an eleven-page folder, 
identified as MK 1284, recently pub- 
lished by the "Westinghouse Electric 
& Manufacturing Company. These 
electric plants are made in several 
sizes, from which the correct size for 
any of a number of applications may 
be chosen. Supplying power for 
farms, rural homes, camps, boats, 
stores, buildings, amusement parks, 
mines, quarries, and motion picture 
theatre are some of the applications 
of these plants. This new publication 
includes in addition to the electric 
plants, a brief description of Westing- 
house Batteries for use with the ser- 
vice plants and a page on Westing- 
house water systems. 



During the past year 114 new indus- 
tries were established in San Fran- 
cisco as compared with 90 during 
1929, according to the Industrial De- 
partment of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Although these new plants, 
with 1094 people on their pay rolls, 
employed 250 fewer people than those 
established during 1929 their esti- 
mated annual pay roll of $2,209,800 ex- 
ceeds by $169,800 the estimated pay 
roll of the new plants started in the 
previous year. 



ENGINEERING SOCIETIES 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 



ton D. Cook, 
Street, San 
SUtter 1684). 



R-3453-S SALESMAN, experienced, 
with a fair amount of technical train- 
ing and good knowledge of chemistry 
of metals, to sell roundry products, 
Must have qualities of leadership in 
sales department Salary open. Lo- 
cation, San Francisco. 

R-3452-S SENIOR PERSONNEL EX- 
AMINER for Engineering and 
Trades positions. Should be grad- 
uate civil or mechanical engineer 
with special training and experience 
to qualify for testing of applicants 
for technical position. Age limits, 
25-50 years. Salary $250-$300 month. 
Apply by letter for full details. Lo- 
cation, California. 

R - 3309-S - ENGINEER, mechanical 
or electrical, not over 30, with 3-5 
years experience on hydro-electric 
plant operation for service and test- 
ing. Must have mechanical skill, 
agreeable in field. Apply by letter. 
Headquarters, San Francisco. 
R-3303-S ENGINEER, preferably me- 
chanical or chemical graduate, with 
6 to 10 years experience including 
considerable application of thermo- 
dynamics to solution of heat ex- 
change problems as found in oil re- 
finery equipment. Must have ex- 
ecutive ability. Apply by letter with 
details of experience, references and 
photo. Salary $200-$250 per month to 
start. Location, Northern Califor- 
nia. 
K-337-W-2182-C-S SPECIALISTS on 
oil well drills, drilling machinery and 
equipment. One designer, technical 
graduate, experienced; one machine 
shop production man; one tool man 
for machining operation; one forge- 
shop foreman; one heat treater. 
Salaries open, will be based upon 
earnings in U. S., subject to Russian 
income tax, about 10%. Part pay- 
able in U. S. money to American 
bank. Contract for 1 or 2 years, re- 
newable. Applications only by letter 
showing education and details of ex- 
perience. Location, Russia. 
K-338-W-2183-C-S SPECIALISTS on 
oil cracking equipment, boilers, 
bubble-towers, evaporators, piping, 
etc. One designer, graduate; one 
production foreman; one weUer 
foreman and instructor; one field 
man for erection, etc. of stills, 
towers, etc.; one foreman for pipe 
fabrication and installation; one field 
man for installation of valves, etc. ; 
one field man for installation and 
adjustment of control and measur- 
ing apparatus; one electric fore- 
man for steel foundry; one open 
hearth steel foreman for melting and 
casting of alloy and special seteel 
ingots. Salaries open, based on 
earnings in U S. Entire salary sub- 
ject to Russian income tax of about 
10%. Contract for 1 or 2 years, re- 
newable. Applications only by letter 
showing education and details of ex- 
-perience. Location, Russia. 



Barnewitz Painting and Decorating 
Co. has opened new quarters at 521 
Marin Street, Vallejo, and will carry a 
complete line of stocks for the whole- 
sale and retail trade, including Super- 
lac Enamel and Morwear paints <»f 
the Friedman Paint Company of Oak- 
land. 



Eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



PURPOSES OF 

TIMBER STRESS 

COMMITTEE TOLD 



P. O. Dufour of Philadelphia, Pa., 
chairman of the recently appointed 
subcommittee of the National Com- 
mittee on Wood Utilization of the De- 
partment of Commerce, for the pur- 
pose of passing- in working stresses for 
timber, believes that in the establish- 
ment of such a body an important step 
has been taken toward solving one of 
the most preplexing problems con- 
fronting the lumber and building in- 
dustries. 

"Through voluntary co-operation 
between the lumber industry on the 
one hand, and the consumer groups 
represented on the committee by some 
of the nation's foremost engineering 
talents on the other, it is hoped that 
many of the existing uncertainties per- 
taining to timber stresses may be 
eliminated," Mr, Dufour stated. 

For centuries, it was pointed out, 
engineers and builders have struggled 
with the problem of the efficient use of 
wood. Unlike most other building ma- 
terials, wood is not of a homogeneous 
nature. There are In this country 
alone more than on hundred different 
species, most of which are used in 
building and construction. Each has 
its own peculiar characteristics and 
properties with which the consumer 
must be familiar in order to obtain 
the most effective and economical use 
of the material. Fortunately, the 
problem is somewhat simplified by the 
fact that only a few of the most im- 
portant species are commonly used 
for structural purposes where stress 
values play an essential part. 

"Realizing the great need for definite 
data on the strength properties of the 
various species of wood," Mr. Dufour 
continued, "the United States Govern- 
ments through its Forest Product 
Laboratory at Madison, Wisconsin, 
has conducted hundreds of thousands 
of tests. Consequently, there is avail- 
able in the subject of timber stresses 
a mass of information which now 
needs to be adapted to current grades 
of lumber produced." 

It was explained that some years 
ago the Forest Products Laboratory 
recommended definite working stresses 
applicable to the various basic grades 
of timber of the different species. 
These recommended stresses, however, 
do not apply in most instances to 
present day grading practices, for the 
lumber manufacturers during recent 
years have made certain changes of 
grades in order to make their product 
more adaptable to the specific needs of 
consumers Confusion as to working 
stresses of commercial grades has de- 
veloped . 

"It Is obvious that the Forest Pro- 
ducts Laboratory, which primarily is a 
research organization, with its multi- 
tidinous responsibilities cannot be ex- 
pected to bear the burden of interpret- 
ing and applying to commercial grad- 
ing practices the stress data which it 
develops. The new Timber Stress 
Commttee, therefore, will be a valuable 
aid to the laboratory in making prac- 
tical use of its findings," Mr. Dufour 
concluded. 

Establishment of such a body as the 
Timber Stress Committee, while a new 
departure in the lumber field, is not 
an experiment in other industries. The 
steel industry, for one, has had for a 
number of years the advantages of a 
similar organization, passing on tht 
stress values of structural steel. 

The new subcommittee, according to 
officials of the National Committee on 
Wood Utilization, is a logical follow- 
up to the successful consummation of 
the standardization program of the 
Department of Commerce definitely 



fixing 


lumber s 


zes and grade 


3 In ac- 


cordan 


ce with 


American 


Lumber 


Standa 


rds. It 


s difficult to 


conceive 


of another item 


on the program of the 


Wood 


Uliliaati 


an Committee 


which 


would 


have a more important 


bearing 


on the 


proper u 


:ilization of tl 


e coun- 


try's timber res 


ources, it was 


said. 



PORTLAND PLANS 

MUNY POWER PLANT 



Portland, Oregon, city council has 
adopted a resolution providing for 
"immediate action" that Portland 
might have a municipally owned pow- 
er and light plant. The resolution was 
introduced by Ralph C. Clyde who 
was elected on a public ownership 
platform. The vote was 3 to 2. 

The resolution declared the council 
in favor of a municipally owned and 
operated power system; authorized 
Clyde as commissioner of public util- 
ities to proceed immediately with in- 
vestigation of a feasible method, and 
called on the council to make avail- 
able any or all of the $25,000 recently 
appropriated for power survey pur- 
poses. 



JACOBSEN HEADS 

MONTEREY EXCHANGE 



Andrew Jacobsen was re - elected 
president of the Builders' Exchange 
of Monterey County at the annual 
meeting of that organization last 
Wednesday evening. 

Other officers re - elected include 
Fred Ruhl. Pebble Beach, vice presi- 
dent; Dio Dawson, Carmel, secretary; 
Harold Prince, Monterey, treasurer; 
and Joseph Goodrich, Monterey, ser- 
geant at arms. The executive board 
will consist of Ed Simpson, Pacific 
Grove, Ruhl, John McNeil, Monterey, 
Charles Frost. Monterey and Hugh 
Comstock, Carmel. 

In addition to selecting officers for 
the year the exchange organized its 
1931 program of activities. 

GLASS DEVELOPED^AS 
A BUILDING MATERIAL 



America knows glass as something 
with which to fill window frames. In 
Europe, particularly in Germany, it is 
being used to replace concrete blocks, 
brick, hollow tile, plaster, and other 
materials commonly employed for ex- 
terior and interior walls and parti- 
tions, the Business Week reports. 

The Siemens Glass Works of Dres- 
den, Germany, has been especially 
active in developing new types of 
glass, and through its American rep- 
resentatives, the Structural Glass 
Corp. of New York, American builders 
will be able to include this new ma- 
terial in their plans. The Siemens Co. 
supplies prisms for sidewalks, floors, 
and roof lights; tile for windows, 
walls, and partitions; hollow block for 
walls and partitions. 



MASTER PLUMBERS OF 

S. F. ELECT OFFICERS 

I. V. Young of the Gilley-Schmid 
CV , was re-elected president of the 
Master Plumbers' Association of San 
Francisco, at the annual meeting held 
last month. Chas Mayer of Alhbaeh 
& Mayer was re-elected vice-presi- 
dent, Alexander Coleman, treasurer 
and Jack Camp, re-elected secretary. 

Directors of the association, in- 
cluding the above named, are: Wm. 
J. Monihan, Louis Bernstein, Jas. H. 
Pinkerton, Jos. Rohr, A. G. Trezise, S. 
J. De Vecchio, N. J. Cohen, Wm. P. 
Gross, Chas. Noury, Roy Murray and 
V. J. Peterson. 



MONTEREY BUILDERS TO 
WORK WITH UNIONS 



Continuation and strengthening of 
the amicable relations which exist be- 
tween the Builders' Exchange of Mon- 
terey county and the Building Trades 
Council, representing organized labor, 
occupies first place in the exchange 
program for 1931 according to Andy 
Jacobsen, president 

"We have been operating harmoni- 
ously for a year now with committees 
of the Builders' Exchange and Build- 
ing Trades Council co-operating," 
Jacobsen said, "and we shall do every- 
thing in our power to continue this 
satisfactory relationship." 

Jacobsen, who was president of the 
exchange in 1930 was re-elected at a 
meeting last week. Other officers re- 
elected include Fred Ruhl, Pebble 
Beach, vice-president ; Dio Dawson, 
secretary; Harold Prince, Monterey, 
treasurer; and Joseph Goodrich, Mon- 
terey, sergeant at arms. The execu- 
tive board is composed of Ruhl. Ed. 
Simpson, Pacific Grove; Charles Frost, 
Monterey; John McNiel, Monterey, and 
Hugh Comstock, Carmel. 



ADVERTISING URGED 

TO WIN THE PUBLIC 



Speaking at the recent meeting of 
the Millwork Institute of California, C, 
H. White, vice-president and general 
manager of White Bros., San Fran- 
cisco, said: 

"Is it not a fact that the wood- 
working industry is down because the 
general public does not understand it. 
isn't even interested in it, and doesn't 
know that it exists? The people "who 
are competing against us have taken 
the pains to put themselves before the 
public in a favorable light. When 
good times resume; I think we will all 
admit that times are bad, but we hope 
they are convalescing; and our com- 
petitors in substitutes are looking for 
these general times, too, and are pre- 
paring for them; I believe that the 
woodworking industry must increase 
its advertising efforts to the general 
public. I might say in passing that 
one of the principal things which will 
bring on normal conditions of business 
is the passing on to the consumer of 
the reduction in wholesale prices of 
material. The hardwood dealers are 
passing the reduced sawmill prices on 
to the planing mills, and I just want to 
leave this little thought with you— 
that is, you shoud pass these reduced 
prices to your customer. I think this 
is a necessary thing to do to bring 
back good times, and when everybody 
does it, we will be back to normal 
again." 



CELOTEX ANNUAL 

REPORT IS ISSUED 



Earrings of the Celotax Company 
for the fiscal year ended October 31, 
1930, amounted to $1,017,497.80 before 
depreciation, fixed charges and Fed- 
eral taxes, the annual report to stock- 
holders states. After writing off $479- 
970 for depreciation, $255,448 for in- 
terest charges, including amortization 
of discount and expense on funded 
debt, and $38,000 for Federal income 
taxes, a net profit of $244,079 was car- 
ried to surplus. 

During the fiscal year total net sales 
decreased 17 per cent. 

The balance sheet as of October 31, 
shows total assets of $17,129,094. Cur- 
rent assets of $2,982,094 compare with 
$1,144,393 of current liabilities. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



SACTO. ARCHITECTS 

FORM ORGANIZATION 



Practicing architects in the Capitol 
City h:i\e complied organization of a 
new association known as the So- 
ciety of Sacramento Architects. 

Leonard F. Starka of the firm of 
gtnrks ,C- Flanders, is president of the 
society, Harry J. Devlne la secretary, 
and Charles F. Dean la treasurer. 

The organization has an initial 
membership of nine practicing archi- 
tects There are about twenty-three 
architects in Sacramento County. 

In discussing the aims of the society, 
Mr. Starks said the organization will 
make a strong effort to have the fed- 
eral government distribute to. archi- 
tects the jobs of preparing plans and 
specifications for new federal build- 
ings, thereby speeding construction. 

The society also will favor legisla- 
tion beneficial to the building trades 
and aid in the revision of several ex- 
isting ordinances governing the erec- 
tion of buildings, which were deemed 
Inadequate to meet current needs and 
which, in many casea, work a hard- 
ship on the public as well as creating 
many unnecessary responsibilities on 
the part of city officials. 

It will work as a sub-committee on 
Jegialation concerning highway beau- 
tlftcatlon, involving landscaping, sign- 
board regulation and the erection of 
small business buildings along the 
sides of roads. 

The society will favor standard con- 
tract documents and standard prac- 
tices of payments to contractors on 
building projects, so sub-contractors 
and material dealers will be protected 
properly and the building Industry, in 
general, will be placed upon a thirty- 
day cash basis. 

Mr. Starks said the organization will 
work in conjunction with the State 
Association of California Architects 
and the State Board of Architects. 



STATE'S MINERAL 

PRODUCTION IN 1930 



The total value of the mineral pro- 
duction of California for the year 1930 
is conservatively estimated by the 
statistical division of the State Divis- 
ion of Mines under the direction of 
Walter W. Bradley, State Mineralog- 
ist, to have been 5347,797,000. This is. 
In part, detailed in the tabulation be- 
low, but. as there are more than fifty 
mineral substances on California's 
commercial list, it is impracticable at 
this earlv date to obtain definite fig- 
ures on other than the more import- 
ant items. The blank report forms are 
being mailed to the operators in all 
mineral lines, and the detailed and 
complete report will be compiled and 
published later. 

The estimated total of $347,797,000 is 
a decrease of approximately $84,450,- 
000 from the value of 1929 production. 
The decrease is due mainly to petrol- 
eum and in a smaller measure to ce- 
ment, copper, structural materials in 
general, industrial materials, and sa- 
lines. Increases in value were shown 
by natural gas, gold, and lead. There 
was a decrease of approximately 64,- 
000,000 barrels in quantity of crude 
oil, with the average per barrel prac- 
tically the same as for 1929. 

The structural group showed about 
a 20% decrease throughout on account 
Of lesser construction work during the 
year. The industrial and saline groups 
will show decreased totals. 

The estimated values and quanti- 
ties for 1930 are as follows: -$9,034,000, 
gold; $557,000 (1.445,000 fine oz.), sil- 
ver; $3,238,000 (26,113,000 lbs.), copper; 
$178,000 (3.423,000 lbs.), lead; $1,155.- 
000 (10,500 flasks), quicksilver; $125,- 



nose, platinum, tungsten; J251.000.000 
t228.300.000 I'M- I, pi troleum; $30,825,- 
000 (425,000.000 M on. ft.), natural 
gas; $ifi,si;2,om> im/js:' m. bills.), ce- 
ment; $15,000,0(111, crushed rock, sand, 
and gravel; 14,500,000, brick and hol- 
low building tile; $473,000 (46,000 tons) 

magncsite; 11,250, other structural 

materials Including granite, lime, etc.; 
15,700,000, miscellaneous industrial 

minerals; $8,000,1 salines. Including 

borates, potash, salt, soda, etc. 



PAINTERS ATTFMPT 

UNEMPLOYMENT AID 



A resolution designed to aid the un- 
employment situation has been pass- 
ed by the Seattle chapter of the 
Northwest Master Painters Associa- 
tion, Inc. The resolution follows; 

Whereas, the unemployment situa- 
tion in our industry is very acute, 
and threatens to become worse in the 
approaching winter, and, 

Whereas, President Hoover has ap- 
pointed a committee on unemploy- 
ment, headed by Col. Woods, and. 

Whereas, this committee is doing 
everything possible to alleviate this 
unemployment situation, and. 

Whereas, the Seattle Chapter of the 
Northwest Council of the International 
Society of Master Painters and Dec- 
orators, Inc.. as an employer's organ- 
ization is desirous of assisting the 
President of the United States in his 
efforts to alleviate this situation, and. 

Whereas, the Seattle Chapter of the 
Northwest Council of the International 
Society of Master Painters and Dec- 
orators, Inc., at its meeting of De- 
cember 10th expressed its sympathy 
with this movement. 

Now, therefore, be it resolved that 
the Seattle Chapter of the Northwest 
Council of the International Society of 
Master Painters and Decorators, inc., 
recommend to its membership that 
during the coming winter, they stag- 
ger the unemployment of their men 
to the end that as many men as pos- 
sible may find employment, and be it 
further resolved that it shall be un- 
ethical for a member to employ a man 
temporarily unemployed as a result 
of this resolution. 

And. be it further resolved that a 
copy of this resolution be read to the 
members at its next regular meeting 
and also that a copy be forwarded to 
the Secretary of the International So- 
ciety and to the President. 



MORTGAGE CONCERNS 
AND MATERIAL MEN 
WILL DISPUTE LIENS 



A discussion between the mortgage 

companies and the bnildine material 

dealers of Oregon state will be held 

the floor of the legislature at Salem 



(hi. 



nth. 



A bill, backed by several of the 
mortgage and loan companies, it is 
said, is to be presented providing for 
the amendment of section 10193. Ore- 
gon laws, to change the priority of 
the liens on material and make them 
subordinate to mortgages and other 
incumbrances. 

If the amendment carries, according 
to many, material men will not be de- 
prived of a lien, but will have one 
inferior to labor liens and mortgages. 

A direct threat to the building 
trade is seen in the proposal by 
building material men who are com- 
bining efforts to combat the act in the 
legislature. 

A direct mail appeal is being made 
by the material dealers of Portland 
urging that the measure be killed. The 
Retail Lumbermen's Association of 
Spokane, "Wash., is said to have joined 
the Oregon dealers in the fight to kill 
the proposed legislation. 



METAL CONGRESS 

PROGRAM OUTLINED 



Nun 



erous Items of Interest to the 
building industry have been included 
no programs of the Western National 
Metal Congress, to be held February 
16 to 20 in tin- civic auditorium, San 
Francisco, according lo officials of the 
American Society for Steel Treating 

Discussions of chromium steels, 
stainless products and rust reslstants 
■ >s applied to trims for structural work 
will be found in plenty on the five 
days of technical programs, according 
to W. H. Eisenman of Cleveland, sec- 
retary of the society. 

One of the speakers, A. F. Davis, "f 
Cleveland, has been assigned to talk 
on structural arc welding, as a sub- 
situte for the noisy riveting hammer 
in erecting building frames. 

The Western National Metal & Ma- 
chinery Exposition, according to 
Eisenman. will feature many new 
metals, especially designed for the 
builder's use. The show will take 
place on the same dates as the con- 
vention of technical men, and will 
be held in the same building. 

Nitriding, new process by which ex- 
treme hardness and smoothness is ob- 
tained in steel by injecting nitrogen 
from ammonia gas into the metal's 
pores, will be discussed in full by 
several speakers, with a view to mak- 
ing the talks apply to building opera- 



lid. 



J. H. Knapp, of Los Angeles, and 
Dr O. E. Harder, of Battelle Memorial 
Institute, Cleveland, have been as- 
signed to cover this topic in detail. 

Probably 50 talks will be included 
on the five days of technical sessions, 
according to Eisenman. These will 
be timed in such a way that they will 
not interfere with inspection of the 
exposition displays. In the exposition, 
many of the booths will have machines 
in operation to add to the clearness of 
the demonstrations. 

Speakers will include J. H. Watson 
of Detroit; A. E. d'Arcambal, Hart- 
ford: A. Oren Fulton, Cambridge; B. 
F. Shepherd. Phillipsburg, N . J. ; W. 
B. Coleman, Philadelphia; F. B. Drake, 
Berkeley, and Dr. Harder. 

At least thirteen prominent tech- 
nical societies will participate in the 
convention and exposition. They are, 
in addition to the steel treaters' 
group: American Welding Society, 
American Chemical Society, Institute 
of Metals, American Institute of 
Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, 
American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers, National Purchasing Agents' 
Association. Pacific Coast Electrical 
Association, Pacific Coast Gas Asso- 
ciation, Society of Automotive Engi- 
neers, American Society for Testing 
Materials, National Association of 
Power Engineers and American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers. 



STATE LABOR LAWS 

LAUDED BY FRENCH 



Will J. French, State Director of 
Industrial Relations, last Monday out- 
lined some of the work that labor leg- 
islation in California has accomplished 
in recent years in an address before 
members of the San Francisco Elec- 
trical Decelopment League. 

Principally, he said, it has establish- 
ed the security, promoted the welfare 
and prevented the exploitation of work- 
ing men and women. In addition, it has 
made working conditions so much 
more sanitary and less dangerous 
that the death rate from accidents and 
other causes has been kept down to 
the same level it held fifteen years 
ago despite the enormous increase in 
the number of workers. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



LIGHTING STANDARD 
REJECTION UPHELD BY 
LOS ANGELES JUDGE 



Refusing a peremptory writ to com- 
pel City Engineer Hooper of Pasadena 
to accept the electric lighting and 
trolley posts installed on Lake Ave. 
in a $160,000 improvement, Superior 
Judge Yankwich held that the courts 
will not substitute their judgment for 
that of a city official exercising discre- 
tionary power on reasonable grounds, 
says Southwest Builder and Con- 
tractor. The writ was sought by G. 
"W. Bond & Son and Ducey & Breit- 
enstein, contractors. The Marbelite 
Company was brought in as a de- 
fendant. 

City Engineer Hooper refused to ac- 
cept the posts installed on the ground 
that they were not in compliance with 
the specifications. A personal inspec- 
tion of the posts was made by Judge 
Yankwich. 

Judge Yankwich held the city engi- 
neer is sole judge as to interpretation 
of all specifications. 

"Even if ... we should reach 
a different conclusion, the writ could 
not issue," Judge Yankwich said. 
"For we cannot substitute our judg- 
ment for his except where there is no 
reasonable ground to justify his de- 
cision other than one way." 

The judge held that the engineer's 
position may be sustained on the as- 
sumption when the specification re- 
quirements are satisfied, Hooper would 
not deliberately refuse to accept the 
work upon a ground not sanctioned 
by law. The opinion sets forth: 

"Mandamus is never granted in an- 
ticipation of a supposed omission of 
duty, however strong the presumption 
may be that the persons whom it is 
sought to coerce by writ will refuse 
to perform their duty when the proper 
time arrives . . The problem 

cannot be solved by projecting our- 
selves into futurity. If there be, 
among his grounds for refusal, grounds 
tenable or reasonable — they as com- 
pletely constitute a sufficient defense 
to the issuance of the writ as if they 
were the sole grounds, not inter- 
mingled with others which have no 
legal significance." 

He ruled there cannot be a reas- 
sessment and that he cannot compel 
acceptance of the curbing and other 
street work which is not disputed. 



GOV'T. TO OBSERVE 

LOCAL WAGE SCALES 



In announcing that the total expendi- 
ture by the federal government for 
public works during the calendar year 
1931 will be 5724.058,000, President 
Hoover let it be understood that the 
government will insist that contractors 
on the work shall observe the prevail- 
ing wage scales in the various scetions 
and communities 

This is in accordance with the more 
restrictive policy favored by the 
Senate in attempting to insert an 
amendment in the $116,000,000 emer- 
gency construction bill stipulating 
that local wage rates be paid in all 
work done under the terms of the 
measure. This amendment, however, 
was taken out upon the insistence of 
the House. 

It is pointed out that the President 
has preserved the spirit of the amend- 
ment but has left out its restrictions. 



Oakland city council has approved 
an appropriation for $499 to be used 
by the Building Trades Council of Al- 
ameda County to help in defraying ex- 
penses of the state convention to be 
held in Oakland in March. 



BREACH OF CONTRACT 

IS ALLEGED IN SUIT 



The $586,059.90 suit of H. H. Boom- 
er, contractor, against R. C. Storrie 
& Company, Robert C. Storrie, Robert 
B. Muir and others began last Tues- 
day in the court of Superior Judge 
Franklin A. Griffin of San Francisco. 

Coupled with this suit is the action 
brought by the defendants against 
Boomer, in which they ask damages 
of $128,322.12, alleging breach of con- 
tract. 

The actions arise from a contract 
entered into by the Storrie Company 
and Boomer in 1925 for Boomer to 
construct a dam and hydro-electric 
power project at Buck's ranch, Plu- 
mas county, as a unit of the Feather 
River Power Company. Boomer and 
the Storrie Company both allege that 
the other broke its part of the con- 
tract. 



SEATTLE COUNCIL 

PLANS 5-DAY WEEK 



Submission at the March 10 election 
of a proposed charter amendment 
limiting the work period of all city 
employes to five days per week is 
asked of the Seattle city council by 
the Central Labor Council. 

"Economists agree that no perma- 
nent solution of the present unem- 
ployment problem is possible without 
a material lessening of the hours of 
work and an increase of compensa- 
tion for the producers of the country," 
the petition filed by the labor council 
declared. 

"Private employes cannot be ex- 
pected to move faster in this direc- 
tion than pubic employers." 

The petition was referred by the 
city council to its judiciary and 
finance committees 



CLE ELUM DAM 

PLANS UNDER WAY 



Plans for the Cle Elum dam, the 
sixth and last of the series forming 
the water-storage system of the Yak- 
ima reclamation project in Washing- 
ton, are being prepared by engineers 
of the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation. 
An appropriation of $15,500,000 is avail- 
able and it is hoped that construction 
can be started in the spring. 

The dam, which will be on the Cle 
Elum River near Ellenshurg, Wash., 
wil be 125 ft. high and 700 ft. long. 
It will form a reservoir of 4,680 acres, 
in which will be stored 435,000 acre- 
feet of water. 



$21,000,000 FOR 

POWER DEVELOPMENTS 



Continuance of the expansion pro- 
gram of the Paget Sound Power and 
Light Co., Seattle, Washington, is an- 
nounced. During 1931 the company 
will spend nearly $21,000,000, inclusive 
of construction costs, operation and 
maintenance, taxes, and local divi- 
dends and interest. Construction 
plans to be carried out include ex- 
penditures totaling $10,310,000. Most 
of this amount is for power plant, 
transmission and distributing system 
costs. In 1930 these items aggregated 
$12,201,000; for 1931 the total is $9.- 
308,000. For carrying on work at Rock 
Island $6,755,000 is allotted, and for 
the transmission line over the Cas- 
cades' from Rock Island, $847,000. 
bringing the total to be expended on 
that hydro-electric project to $7,602.- 
000. 



L. A. COUNTY 

BUILDING PERMITS 

During 1930 permits for 5351 build- 
ings and structures estimated to cost 
$12.566,1S7 were issued in the unin- 
corporated territory of Los Angeles 
county. Following are the permits 
classified according to ■ use or occu- 
pancy of buildings: 

Residences 1869 $ 5.681.000 

Duplexes 50 312,900 

Apartments 53 2,731,100 

Bungalow courts... 27 210,100 

Commercial 391 1,684,055 

Industrial 67 821,000 

Hospitals 6 133,500 

Schools 5 68,500 

Private garages... 1345 320,957 

Miscellaneous 1239 1,385,975 

Totals 5351 $12,506,187 



An interesting feature in the con- 
struction of Boulder dam, or Hoover 
dam, as it officially designated, will 
be a cooling system to dissipate the 
heat generated by the setting of- ce- 
ment in the concrete. Refrigerated 
water will be forced through pipes em- 
bedded in the concrete. This will be 
the first time such a system has been 
used. Due to the great depth of the 
structure at the base, 650 ft., it is 
quite necessary that something be 
done to reduct the temperature of the 
concrete and prevent serious cracks 
by subsequent contraction. The 
amount of heat to be dissipated will 
be approximately 700 British thermal 
units per cubic yard of concrete. About 
S00.000 ft. of 2-in. standard pipe will 
be required for the cooling system. 
This will be furnished by the govern- 
ment, but the contractor will install 
it and furnish and operate the cool- 
ing plant, which must have a ca- 
pacity to reduce the temperature of 
a flow of 2100 gallons of water per 
minute from 47 degrees to 40 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 



Co-operating in a statewide cam- 
paign to restore confidence in the 
ranks of salaried employees, the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce is 
sending letters to more than nine 
hundred employers within the city 
asking them to assure their workers 
of the safety of their positions. The 
letter which is signed by President 
Cutler, emphasizes the depressing 
effect on business caused by the ten- 
dency of workers to hoard their sal- 
aries in anticipation of dismissal, and 
suggests that a return to normal 
spending might be accomplished 
through the elimination of this fear. 



Harry A. Trueblood, master plumb- 
er, and a member of the Modesto city 
council, who died suddenly several 
weeks ago, left an estate valued at 
$12S,167.69, according to the report of 
Harry Windus, inheritance tax ap- 
praiser. The estate consists of $58,- 
527.40 in personal property; $17,540.29 
in cash, and real property valued at 
$52,100. 



Richmond, Contra Costa County, 
will put 160 heads of families to work 
in the street, park and other mu- 
nicipal departments to relieve the un- 
employment problem in that city. The 
men will work three days a week. 



Brantson Miles, 20-year old eleva- 
tor operator, found dead in a San 
Francisco apartment house, has been 
identified as the nephew of Roderick 
Miles, architectural designer with the 
State Department of Public Works at 
Sacramento. 



Saturday, January n. 1331 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Building News Section 



APARTMENTS 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 

APARTMENTS Cost approx. $300,000 

ALAMEDA, Alameda Co., Cal. NW 
Webster and Taylor Sts. 

Seven-story class B reinforced con- 
crete and steel apartments (60 2- 
3- and 4-room apts.) 

Owner — J. S. Bercovich, Actico Bldg., 

Oakland. 

Plans by Thomas Keenan, 1440 Broad- 
way. Oakland. 

Contractor— G. P. W. Jensen, 320 Mar- 
ket St.. San Francisco. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, J 

SAN FRANCISCO. No. 499 Buena 
Vista Avenue. 

Alter residence for apartments 

Owner— Mrs. J. A. Wilcox, Premises. 

Architect — Henry H. Gutterson, 526 
Powell St., San Francisco. 

Contractor — Clinton-Stephenson Con- 
struction Co., Monadnock Bldg., 
San Francisco 
Sub-bids will be taken in about one 

week. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. Clay Street. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apts. (nine 3-room apts.) 
Owner— Withheld. 
Architect— Masten & Hurd, 210 Post 

Street. 






Owner Taking Sub-Bids. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $25,000 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (17 2 and 3- 

room apts.) (tile garage 36x64 ft.) 
Owner— E, Cobo, 37S N. Delaware St., 

San Mateo. 
Plans by Grimes & Schoening, Balo- 

vich Bldg., San Mateo. 
Sub-bids are desired on all portions 
of the work excepting carpentry and 
painting. 

Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
REMODELING Cost, $6000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Remodel 2-story and basement frame 

and stucco store and apartments. 
Owner— A. Tulanian, 299S College Ave. 

Berkeley. 
Plans by Mr. Terrick. 
Contractor— A. J. Terrick, 5263 Col- 
lege Ave., Oakland. 
Plumbing— J. R. Pierce Co., 7109 East 

14th St., Oakland. 
Concrete and Excavation — Frank Sal- 

amid, 5350 Manila, Oakland. 
Sewer Work — Frank Gonsalves, 1671 

Ninth St., Oakland. 
Lumber — Loop Lumber Co., Broadway 

and Blanding, Alameda. 



Architect Taking Heating Bids. 

APARTMENTS Cont. price, $11,500 

SAN FRANCISCO. SE Army and Al- 
abama Streets. 

Two - story and basement frame and 
stucco apartments (4 apts.) 

Architect— G. A. Berger, 309 Valencia. 

Contractor — J. L. Cuneo and F. D. 
Martini, care architect. 
Oil burning heating system is to be 

Installed. 

Completing Plans. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $125,000 

LOS ANGELES. Cal. Miller Drive 

near Sunset. 
Two-story and basement reinforced 



concrete and brick apartments (4, 

5 and 6 room apts.) 
Owner — F. J. Schwarz. 
Architect— J. A. Schwarz, Black Bldg., 

Los Angeles. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $45,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. . NW Thirtieth 
Ave. and Fulton St. 

Three-story and basement frame and 
stucco apartments (15 apts.) 

Owner and Builder — A. T. Morris & 
Sons, 3500 Fulton St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Plans by Owner. 

Brick Work— Sed Hoffman. 

Concrete— Standard Concrete Co., 3025 
Geary St., San Francisco. 

Steel— Schrader Iron Works, 1247 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco. 

Hardware — T. G. Worman 

Hardwood Flooring — Western Hard- 
wood Floor Co., 21 Capistrano St., 
San Francisco. 
Sub-bids are wanted on plumbing, 

electric wiring, heating, plastering. 

tile work, lighting fixtures, and roof- 
ing. 



Plans Being Prepared — Contract 
Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $1,500,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. W Gough St. bet. 
Washington and Sacramento Sts. 

Class A 16-story steel frame and con- 
crete apartments. 

Owner— Coast Bay Co., % contractors. 

Architect— Geo. Kelham, Sharon Bldg. 

Structural Engineer— H. J. Brunnier, 
Sharon Bldg. 

Mechanical Engineer— Hunter & Hud- 
son, 41 Sutter St. 

Contractor — Lindgren and Swinerton, 
Inc., 225 Bush St. 



Sub-Bids Being Taken. 
APARTMENTS Cost, $50,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 25th Avenue near 

Fulton Street. 
Three-story and basement frame and 

stucco apartments (12 2- and 3- 

room apts.) 
Owner and Builder — Fred. Anderson, 

1320 22nd Avenue. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets, Call Bldg. 

Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
APARTMENTS Cost. $125,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. NE Fair Oaks and 
25th Sts. 



SKILSAW Portable Electric Hand 
Saws (4 models). 

SKILSAW Portable Electric Sander 

SKILSAW Radial Arm Attach- 
ments. 

SYNTRON Portable Electric Ham- 
mers (4 models, motor- 
less). 

MALL Flexible Shaft Machines (50 
models). 

Electric Drills. Grinders. Buffers, 
Routers, Lock Mortisers. 

PETER H. NELSON 

Labor Saving Portable Electric 
Tools. 

1248 Mission St. UNderhill 

San Francisco 7662 

SALES . SERVICE . RENTALS 



Six-story and basement class C steel 

frame and c xete aparl ments (36 

3-room apts.) 

Owner— V. Gullmes, 1203 Guerrero St. 

Plans by Owner. 

Engineer— J. M. Smith, 251 Kearny St. 

Steel— Golden Gate Iron Works, 1541 
1 Inward St. 

Plumbing — E. Sugarman, 3624 Geary 
Street. 

Concrete — Frank Vannucci, 55 Oak- 
wood Street. 

Work— W.| B. Eaker, 270 6th 



Str 



Roland Lbr. Co., 301 



Mill Work— Eureka Mill & Lbr. Co. 
Reinforcing Steel— W. C. Haucfc & Co. 
2S0 San Bruno Ave. 



Additional Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $125,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Broadway 1S7 E 
Webster Street. 

Seven - story and basement class A 
apartments (7 apts.) 

Owner— Wm. Helbing, Sr., 1310 Lom- 
bard Street. 

Architect— H. S. Helbing, 1310 Lom- 
bard Street. 

Contractor— The Helbing Co., 13 10 
Lombard Street. 

Conrr-t.- Trnn-it Concrete Co., Call 
Bldg. (Acme Concrete Co., 6G6 
Mission St., is pouring the con- 
crete). 

Steel Joists— Truscon Steel Co., Call 
Bldg. 

Cases and Mill Work— Builders' Sup- 
ply Depot, 390 9th St. 
As previously reported, structural 

steel awarded to Judson Pacific Co.. 

609 Mission St.: electrical work to 

Aetna Elec. Co., 1337 Webster St.; 

lumber to Loop Lumber Co., Central 

Basin. 



Contract Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $50,000 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co., Cal. East 
Erie St. North Mandana Blvd. 

Three-story and basement frame and 
stucco apartments (4S rooms). 

Owner— Louise B. Erain, 3600 Lake- 
shore Ave., Oakland. 

Architect — Clay N. Burrell, American 
Bank Bldg., Oakland. 

Contractor— R. G. Roberts, 3001 Ful- 
ton St., Berkeley. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $150,000 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co., Cal. Cres- 
cent Avenue near Santa Clara. 

Three-story frame and stucco apart- 
ments with class C concrete ga- 
rage. 

Owner and Builder— R. E. Mayer. 1129 
McKinley St., Oakland. 

Architect— Douglas stone, Gt. West- 
ern Power Bldg.. Oakland. 

Heating— Frank J. Edwards, 354 Ho- 
bart St.. Oakland. 

Elevators— Spencer Elevator Co., 166 
7th St., San Francisco. 

Plumbing— J. M. Dale, 372 24th St., 
Oakland. 

Excavation— Ariss-Knapp Co., 961 41st 
St., Oakland. 

Reinforcing Steel— McGrath Steel Co., 
354 Hobart St., Oakland. 

Concrete — Pacific Coast Aggregates, 
Inc.. 82 2nd St.. San Francisco. 

Concrete In Place — George McMullin, 
747 Victoria. Oakland. 

Steel Pans— Concrete Eng. Co., 12S0 
Indiana St., San Francisco. 

Lumber— E. K. Wood Lumber Co. 
Frederick and King Sts., Oakland. 



1 welve 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BONDS 



ALBANY, Alameda Co., Cal — Elec- 
tion will be held February 14 in Al- 
bany School District to vote bonds cf 
$130,000 to finance erection of a ten- 
classroom addition to the Marin Ave. 
School and a six-classroom addition 
to the Cornell School, in addition to 
grading land, landscaping and addi- 
tions; also a new heating plant for 
the Cornell School. 



SALINAS, .Monterey Co., Cal.— Elec- 
tion will be held February 3, in Sa- 
linas City School District to vote 
bonds of $154,000 to finance erection 
of three new units to present school 
plant. Arthur Walter is City Super- 
intendent of Schools. 



CLEAR LAKE, Lake Co, Cal — 
Stubbs School District votes bonds of 
$8000 to finance erection of a new 
school to house 40 pupils. 



PITTSBURG, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
— Petitions are being circulated seek- 
ing to have city council call an elec- 
tion to vote bonds to finance construc- 
tion of a municipal hospital. The pro- 
posal lias the support of the City 
Planning Commission and local busi- 
ness interests. 



LAS VEGAS, Nev.— Dr. F. M. Ferg- 
uson, county health officer, has recom- 
mended to the Clark County Commis- 
sioners the erection of a modern 
county hospital. It is expected that 
the commissioners will present a bill 
to the state legislature seeking au- 
thorization for a bond Issue to secure 
funds to finance the project. 



SAUSALITO, Marin Co., Cal.— The 
Sausalito School District votes bonds 
of $24,000 to finance beautification and 
general improvement of school play- 
grounds. 



TUBA CITY, Sutter Co., Cal.— Trus- 
tees of Yuba City Grammar School 
District will call election shortly to 
vote bonds of $S6,000 to finance erec- 
tion of a new main building and a 
wing extension in Plumas street 
school to comprise 10 classrooms, au- 
ditorium, cafeteria, and manual 
training department. 



CHURCHES 

Plans Being Completed. 

MONASTERY Cost, $200,000 

SAN DIEGO, Cal No. 5158 Hawley 
Avenue. 

Two and three-story reinforced con- 
crete monastery (160x200 feet). 

Owner — Carmelite Sisters. 

Architect— Frank L. Hope Jr., Bank 
of Italy Bklg.. San Diego. 
Preliminary estimates are now being 

taken by the architect and general bids 

will be taken the end of January. 



PORTERYILLE, Tulare Co., Cal — C. 
B. Van de Mark, Porterville, at ap- 
proximately $2000 has contract to re- 
model First Methodist Church. A new 
pipe organ and pews will also be in- 
stalled. Approximately $25,000 will be 
expended in the improvements. 



To Be Done By Day's Work By Owner. 
CHURCH Cost, $12,000 

TAFT, Kern Co., Cal. 
One-story frame and stucco church 
(70x50 ft.) auditorium to seat 250. 
Owner— First Christian Church of Taft 
Architect— Robert H. Orr, Corporation 
Bldg., Los Angeles. 

H. J. Kirschlein is chairman of the 
building committee. 

Composition shingle roof, steel sash, 
gas steam radiators, wood trusses, etc. 



sketches Being Prepared. 

CHURCH Cost, $22,000 

HAYWARD, Alameda Co., Cal Foot- 
hill Blvd. and A Street. 

One-story and basement brick and 
cast stone church. 

Owner— First Congregational Church, 
Premises. 

Architect— E. P. Whitman, 192 Main 
St., Hayward. 
Present church on site will probably 

be wrecked Financing arrangements 

are now being made. 



SANTA BARBARA, Cal. -First Con- 
gregational Church has referred to its 
Board of Trustees the matter of se- 
lecting a site for a new edifice to re- 
place the building destroyed by fire 
two years ago. 



Contracts Awarded. 

CHURCH Cost, $70,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Emer- 
son and Excelsior Avenues. 

Reinforced concrete church. 

Owner— Roman Catholic Archbishop of 
San Francisco, 1100 Franklin St.. 
San Francisco. 

Architect— W. E. Schirmer, 700 21st 
St., Oakland. 

General Work 

Thomas Furlong, 460 Jerome Ave., 
Oakland, $43,000. 

Lathing and Plastering 

Wm. Makin. 1048 Excelsior Ave., Oak- 
land, $11,900. 

Roofing 

General Roofing Co., 2985 Beach St.. 
Oakland. $3,258. 



FACTORIES AND WARE- 
HOUSES 

Plans To Be Prepared. 

TERMINAL Cos., $ — 

TRACY', San Joaquin Co., Cal. Adai 

and 11th Streets. 
Stage terminal and super service str 

tion. 
Owner— Pacific Geryhound Lines, 

Main St., San Francisco. 
Architect— Not Selected. 

Proposed project is in a preliminai 
stage. 



January It, 1980 

Plans Being Prepared. 

POULTRY" BLDG. Cost. $7."). 000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
State Fair Grounds. 

One-story brick poultry building. 

Owner — State of California. 

Architect— Geo. McDougall. State Ar- 
chitect, Public Works Bldg., Sac 
ramento. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

LIVESTOCK BLDG. Cost, $125.0(10 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
State Fair Grounds. 

One-story brick livestock building. 

Owner — State of California. 

Architect — Geo. McDougall. State Ar- 
chitect, Public Works Bldg., Sac- 
ramento. 



Contract Awarded. 

LAUNDRY' & APT?. Cost, $15,000 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Calif. Cen- 
tral Avenue. 

Two-story reinforced concrete laun- 
dry and apartments (2 apts.) 

Owner— C. C. Pontacq, 27 Central Ave. 
Salinas. 

Architect— A. W. Story, Pajaro Val- 
ley Bank Bldg.. Watsonville. 

Contractor — Fred. McCrary, 506 Fre- 
mont St., Monterey. 
Construction has just been started. 

Prospective Bidders. 

FACTORY Cost, $70,00" 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Eighty- 
first Avenue near 14th St. 

One-story reinforced concrete factory. 

Owner— Blue Bird Potato Chips, Inc , 
68th Ave. and Beck Sts., Oakland 

Architect— Charles W. McCall, 14 4 
Franklin St., Oakland. 



Following contractors will submit 
bids: 

Barrett & Hilp, 918 Harrison St., 
San Francisco. 

A. Cedarborg, 1455 Excelsior Ave . 
Oakland. 

G. P. W. Jensen, 320 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 

C. H. Lawrence, 5321 Hill Rd., Oak- 
land. 

Clinton Stephenson Const. Co. Mo- 
nadnock Bldg., San Francisco. 

R. W. Littlefield, 337 17th St. Oak- 
land. 

Wm. Splvock, Hobart Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

H. L. Page, 5651 Oak Grove, Oak- 
land. 

A. A. Haskell, 4437 23rd Ave., San 
Francisco. 

Austin Co. of California, 1924 Broad- 
way, Oakland. 

Jacobs & Pattiani, 337 17th Street. 
Oakland. 

Gaubert Bros.. 4735 Brookdale, Oak- 
land. 

Chase. D. Vezey & Sons, 3220 Sacra- 
mento St., Oakland. 

Chas. Heyer, Mills Bldg., San Fran- 
Bids are to be opened Jan. 20. 

PITTSBURG, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
—Columbia Steel Corp. has purchased 
20.8 acres of land as an addition to 
the present Pittsburg holdings and 
will construct additional plant units 
as production warrants. 

Owner Taking Bids. 

PACKING HOUSE Cost, $10,000 

GILROY', Santa Clara Co., Calif. 
One-story wood packing house (55x 

200-ft.; gravel roof). 
Owner— Aiello Bros., North San Pedro 

San Jose. 
Architect — Charles McKenzie, "wohy 

Bldg., San Jose. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

HANGAR, ETC. Cost, $75,000 

ALAMEDA, Alameda Co., Cal. Web- 
ster Street. 

All - steel hangar and administration 
building (160xl30-ft.) 

Owner— San Francisco Bay Airdrome 
(R. U. St. John, field manager). 

Contractor — Lindgren and Swinerton. 
Inc., 225 Bush St., San Francisco. 

Structural Steel— Western Iron Wks, 
141 Beale St., San Francisco. 

Piling— Healy-Tibbitts Const. Co.. 04 
Pine St., San Francisco. 

Hangar Doors, Steel Sash and Glazing 
— Herrick Iron Works, 18th and 
Campbell Sts., Oakland. 

Reinforcing Steel— W. C. Hauck Co., 
280 San Bruno Ave., San Fran- 
cisco. 
The structure will be 160 by 130 ft. 

and will house shops and offices, in 

addition to providing plane storage 

space for 70 small planes or 15 tri- 

motored transports. 



Contract Awarded. 

HANGAR Cont. price, $32,746 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
Freeport Blvd. at Municipal Air- 
port. 
Steel frame and wood hangar and air 

terminal station, SOxlOO feet. 
Owner — City of Sacramento (to be 
leased to Boeing Air Transport 
Company). 
Architect — Harry Devine, 1405 Forty- 
first St., Sacramento. 
Contractor — Lindgren and Swinerton, 
Inc.. California State Life Bldg.. 
Sacramento. 
Structure will be of steel frame and 
wood construction covering an area of 
SO by 100 feet, with an exterior cov- 
ering of corrugated iron. 

VALLEJO, Solano Co., Cal.— Basalt 
Rock Co., Napa, has purchased a site 
in South Vallejo on the Will Smith 
holdings on the tidelands between the 
Southern Pacific holdings and the wat- 
erfront, and plans to establish a plant 
to serve as an all-rail-and-water out- 
let to and from its plant at Napa. 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



rhirteen 



Segregated Bids Being Taken. 

FACTOR"! Cost, $ 

SAN LEANDRO, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Foothill Blvd. and 163rd Ave. 
One-story brick and steel factory (GOx 

108 feet). 
Owner — Wurm Wooven Hoisery Mills, 

J. W. Tllley, Mgr., 414 13th St., 

Oakland. 
Plans by Owner. 

Segregated bids on all portions of 
the work are being taken by J. W. 
Tilley. 

Contract previously reported as be- 
ing awarded to Drew Caminetti, 2212 
21st Ave., Oakland. 



Elds Being Taken. 

RECONSTRUCTION Cost, $ 

TRACY, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 

Reconstruct present warehouse (brick 
walls, steel and wood roof). 

Owner— Hollv Sugar Co., West Chan- 
nel. Stockton. 

Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

GARAGES AND SERVICE" 
STATIONS 

Preparing Working Drawings. 

AUTO AGENCY Cost. ?40. 000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

NE 22nd and Y Sts. (120xl50-ft.) 
One-story brick Ford automobile 

agency. 
Owner— Ellsworth Harrold, 7 12 12th 

St., Sacramento. 
Architect — Chas. F. Dean, California 

State Life Bldg., Sacramento. 






Wood Roof Truss Contract Awarded. 

GARAGE Cost, $15,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Third Street, bet. 
22nd and 23rd Sts. 

One-story and basement reinforced 
concrete garage and service sta- 
tion (150x50 feet). 

Owner— Samuel Ran, 238 5th St., San 
Francisco 

Plans by D. K. Dobkowitz, 125 Mont- 
erey Blvd., San Francisco. 

Engineer — W. Adrian, 417 Market St., 
San Francisco. 

Wood Roof Trusses — Summerbell 

Truss Co., 354 Hobart St.. Oakland 

Contract awarded for furnishing and 

erecting nine Summerbell wood roof 

trusses. 

Owner is taking bids on other por- 
tions of the work 

GOVERNMENT WORK AND 
SUPPLIES 

SAN FRANCISCO— Until January 2S. 
11 A. M., under Specification No. 6386. 
bids will be received by Public Works 
Officer, Twelfth Naval District, 100 
Harrison St., for extension of glazed 
partitions in the Communication Of- 
fice on fifth floor at 100 Harrison St. 
Deposit of $10 required for plans ob- 
tainable from above office. 






HAWTHORNE. Nevada— Until Jan- 
uary 27, 10 A. M„ bids will be re- 
ceived by the Bureau of Supplies and 
Accounts, Navy Department, Wash- 
ington, D. C, to furnish one motor 
ambulance for Naval Ammunition De- 
pot at Hawthorne, Nev. Specifica- 
tions obtainable from above office or 
from Navy Purchasing Office, 100 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco. 



COCO SOLO, C. Z.— Following bids 
taken under advisement by Bureau 
of Yards and Docks. Navy Depart- 
ment, under Specification No. 6357. for 
cranes for Coco Solo: 

Harnischfeger Sales Corp., 440 W 
National Ave., Milwaukee, $5,175. 

Box Crane & Hoist Corp., E On- 
tario St. and Arenton Ave.. Philadel- 
phia, $6,061. 



COCO SOLO. C. Z.— Following bids 
taken under advisement by Bureau of 
Yards and Docks, \':ivy Department, 
for elevator at Coco Solo, under Spec. 
No. 6356: 

('tis Elevator Co., Washington, $2.- 
970. 

Moffatt Machinery Mfg. Co., Char- 
lotte, N. C, $3,1711. 

Salem Foundrj & Machine Works, 
Inc., Salem, Va.. $3,245. 

Warner Elevator Mfg. Co., Cincin- 
nati, $3,690. 

Kimball Bros. Co., Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, $4,300. 



Contracts Awarded. 

CHAPEL $40,000 appropriated 

SAN FRANCISCO. Presidio Reserva- 
tion. 
Two-story reinforced concrete chapel. 
(70.\47-feet, seating 200: Mission 
style: Sunday school in basement) 
Owner — United States Government. 
Architect — Constructing Quartermas- 
ter, Fort Mason. 
Tile roof, cast artificial stone and 
terra cotta front, artificial tile floors, 
hot air fan system, oil burners, oil 
tanks, motor and outlet for organ, 3 
lavatories, accoustic plaster interior, 
Spanish Mission texture. Organ not 
included in general contract. 

General Work 
John Bjorkman, San Francisco, $21,918 

Heating 
Montague Range &. Furnace Co., $1470 

Electric 
Johnson Electric Co., 758 Monte- 
rey Elvd $789 

Plumbing 

Albert Nelson. 212 Ocean Ave $885 

Complete list of bids published Dec. 
30, 1930. 



PEARL HARBOR, T. H.— A. Neko- 
moto, 1805 S. King St, Honolulu, was 
awarded contract at $14,398 by the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks, Navy 
Department, for installing refrigerat- 
ing plant at Naval Operating Base, 
Pearl Harbor. Spec. No. 6005. 



TUCSON, Ariz.— Dr. Paul D. Moss- 
man, medical director, U. S , Bureau 
of Indian affairs, will select a site at 
once for the proposed $128,000 Papago 
Indian sanatorium to be erected this 
spring near Six Xavier mission. Plans 
have not yet been drawn for the 
structure but as soon as the site is 
selected they will be started. J. W. 
Elliott is director of the Papago Indian 
reservation with offices at Sells, Ariz. 



MARE ISLAND, Cal.— Chief of the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks. Navy De- 
partment has approved a $350,000 ex- 
penditure for construction at Mare 
Island, in addition to the $100,000 al- 
ready granted for improvements at 
the sawmill, foundry, sheet metal 
shop and machine shop. Following are 
the items in the $350,000 expenditure: 

Building 51— Sail and Flag Loft. In- 
stall fire escapes from second floor at 
each end of building, $2600. 

Building 334— Paint Shop. Provide 
adequate fire protection. $18,400. 

Buildings 36, 38. 40, 42, 44, 46, 48— 
Pipe and Copper Shop. Replace roofs, 
fit out to house pipe shop, $170,000. 

Building 271 — Machine Shop (Inside) 
Install drainage, render elevator au- 
tomatic, $5100. 

Roof of Building 273— Optical Shop. 
Extend optical shop and install crane 
on roof. $19,500. 

Building 115 — Gas Cylinder Shop. 
Fit out acetylene cylinder recondition- 
ing plant, $5000. 

Building 55— Pattern Shop. Install 
elevator and improve floor, $7000. 

Building 85— Machine Shop (Inside). 
Fit out section to receive steam test 
plant, $10,000. 



Building 52- Machine Shop (Out- 
side). Install railroad track Into m I 

l lid Of I. wilding, $3000. 

Building 105 Electric Shop. Kit out 
building as additional space for t lee 
trie shop, $400. 

Buildings 886 and 128 Fou 1 Im 

prove Building 128 and lit oul Build 
ing 33(1, $3000. 

Building 62 — Shipbuilding Lobby. 
Renew roof and repair fl 's, $6000 

Supply Department, install Chain 
Storage Platforms, $22,000. 

Building 101- Electric Shop Eti new 
lower floor, $2000. 

Building 11 — Present Sheet Metal 
Shop. Renew roof. $8000., 

Building 114 — Saw Mill. Remodel 
toilet, $2000 

Buildings 87, 89 and 91 — Mac 

Shop (Outside). Renew roofs of Build- 
ings S9 and 91 and repair roof of 
Building 87, $20,000. 

Building 108— Shipwright Shop. Pro- 
vide oakum storage and renew lower 
floor, $8000. 

Building 147— Dry Kiln. Renew dry- 
kiln. $25,000. 

Building 71— S u p p I y Department 
Storehouse. Fill basement and install 
concrete floor, $18,000; total. $350,1 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Severin Electric 
Co., 172 Clara St., at $6569 awarded 
contract by Constructing Quartermas- 
ter, Fort Mason, for alterations to 
electric feeder system at Letterman 
General Hospital. 

Bids Opened. 

POSTOFFICE Cost, $ 

SANTA ANA, Orange Co., Cal. 
Class A postoffice. 
Owner— U. S. Government. 
Plans by Supervising Architect, Treas- 
ury Dept.. Washington. D C 

Following are three low bidders: 
R. J. Chute Co., 2506 W Santa 

Barbara St., Los Angeles... $148. Tl ■■ 

L. A. Contracting Co.. L. A 149, 

Sarver & Zoss, Los Angeles 152,450 

A complete list of bids will be pub- 
lished shortly. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Following bids 
taken under advisement by Construct- 
ing Quartermaster, Fort Mason, to 
furnish f.o.b. Dock 3, Fort Mason: 

(a) 2500 firebrick, best quality, eo.ii.il 

to Wemco or Gasco; 

(b) 1400 lbs. Hi-temperature cement. 

equal to "Latite." 

W. S. Dickey Clay Mfg. Co. (a) 6c 
each; (b) 7c lb. alternate, $55 ton. 

W. E. Mushet Co. (a) $.095; (b) 6c. 

Stockton Firebrick Co. (a) $.066; (b> 
3c lb. 

Gladding. McBean & Co. (a) $70.2', 
Per M.; (b) $.06975 lb. 

Taken under advisement. 

SAN FRANCISCO. — Until January 
26, 10 A. M., bids will be received by 
Quartermaster Supply Officer, Gener- 
al Depot, Fort Mason, under Schedule 
No. 928-31-176, to furnish and deliver 
843 gas range parts, concealed mani- 
fold, for Special Fire King No. 16-18, 
as manufactured by A. Weiskittel .v. 
Son Co., Baltimore, Md. Specifications 
obtainable from above. 

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Hallhauer-La- 
Bahn, Inc , 844 Rush St., Chicago, 111., 
at $104,000. time for completion 480 
days, awarded contract by Supervis- 
ing Architect, Treasury Department, 
to erect postoffice at Corvallis, Ore. 

Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Jan. 
27th. 

EXTENSION $1,115,000 available 

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah. 

Class A postoffice and courthouse ex- 
tension and remodeling. 

Owner — U. S. Government. 

Architect — Supervising Architect, 
Treasury Dept., Washington, D. C. 
Deposit of $25 required for plans, ob- 
tainable from above office. 



Fourteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



SAN DIEGO, Cal.— Anton Johnson 
Co., 517 El Centro St., South Pasa- 
dena, submitted low bid of $98,047 to 
the Public Works Department of the 
Eleventh Naval District at San Diego, 
for construction of reinforced con- 
crete, steel and hollow tile physical 
instruction, gymnasium and welfare 
building at the Naval Operating Base 
(Air Station), San Diego. Specifica- 
tion No. 6275. The public works of- 
ficer has recommended that contract 
be awarded to Johnson Company on 
item No. 1 Will be T-shaped, front 
portion two stories, 207xS2 feet in area, 
and the rear portion one-story, 131x78 
feet in area. 

SACRAMENTO, Cal.— Until Jan. £0 
3 P. M., under Order No| 2S07-1749, 
bids will be received by U. S. Engi- 
neer Office, California Fruit Bldg., to 
furnish and deliver Rio Vista, Solano 
county, 1200 condenser tubes, %-in. 
dki. by lu-ft. 1%-in. long. The tubes 
shall be made of admiralty metal (U. 
S. Navy Spec. No. 46115a) and shall 
be No. 16 stubs gauge, seamless con- 
denser tubes each %-in. dia. x 10 ft. 
1%-in. lung, cut exactly to length. 
Delivery is desired within 20 calendar 
days after notification of award and 
no bid conemplating delivery in excess 
of 35 calendar days will be accepted. 
Delivery is a matter of importance 
and will be considered in making the 
award. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Until Jan. 26, 2 
P. M., bids will be received by U. 3. 
Foreit Service. Ferry Bldg., to fur- 
nish and deliver 2.170 metal porcelain 
enamel road and trail direction and 
miscellaneous signs. Specifications ob- 
tainable from above on request. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Until Jan. 21, 
10 A. M., under Schedule No. 92S-31- 
178, bids will be received by Quarter- 
master Supply Officer, General Depot. 
Fort Mason, to furnish and deliver 
7,000 ft. Douglas Mr or O. P. No. 2 
common, lumber, in lengths of 10-ft. 
or over but not exceeding 20-ft. ,as 
follows : 

1.000 ft. l.\6-in., SIS. 
1,000 ft. Ixl0-in., SIS. 
3.000 ft. Ixl2-in.. SIS. 
1,000 ft. 2x4-in.. SIS. 
1,000 ft. H4xl2-in., S2S. resawed to 



230 tun 



u-i 



SAN FRANCISCO — Until January 
22, 10:00 A. M., under Schedule No. 
928-31-179, bids will be received by 
Quartermaster Supply Officer, General 
Depot, Fort Mason, to furnish and de- 
liver main engine parts for G. E. Co's. 
6,000 H. P. turbines. Specifications 
obtainable from above. 

WASHINGTON, D. C— Bids are be- 
ing received by Bureau of Supplies & 
Accounts, Navy Department. Wash- 
ington, D. C, to furnish and deliver 
miscelaneous supplies and equipment 
as noted in the following schedules, 
further information being available 
from the Navy Department Officer, 
100 Harrison St., San Francisco: 
Bids Open Jan 27 

Western yrds, 7 motor-driven sensi- 
tive bench drills; sch. 4891. 

Western yards, 9 motor-driven bench 
type coil winding machines; sch. 4892. 

San Francisco, 1 motor-driven buf- 
fer and polishing lathe, and 1 motor- 
driven ball bearing bench buffer; sch. 
4864. 

Western yards, 9 electric baking ov- 
ens and spares; sch. 4893. 

Western yards. 7 motor-driven com- 
bined bench grinders and buffers; sch. 
4890. 

San Francisco, 1 motor generator 
set and spares; sch. 4912. 

Mare Island. 1 motor-driven drill 
grinder; sch. 4908. 

Mare Island, 5700 steel boiler tubes; 
sch. 4904. 



F. O. B. 
4903. 

Mare Island, 300 sheets non-shat- 
terable glass; sch. 4901. 

Western yards, radio transmitters 
and spares; sch. 4894. 

Western yards, resistors and con- 
densers; sch. 4899. 



PEARL HArcBOn. i. n.— roil., win: 
is a partial list of prospective bidder 
for Seaplane Hangar to be erected a 
Pearl Harbor, T. H., bids for wllicl 
w.ll be opened February 18 by Bu 
icau of Yards and Docks, Navy Dept. 
under Spec. No 0215: 

Detroit Steel Prod. Cor., 712 Bar 
Bldg., Washington. 

H. H. Robertson Co., 2000 Gran 
Bldg.. Pittsburgh. 

Soule Steel Co.. 4909 Everett \ve. 
Lor Angeles, Calif. 

Marion Machine Foundry & Suppl; 
Co., Marion. Ind. 

Anchor Corrugating Co., 130 W 42m 
St.. New York City. 



MARE ISLAND. Cal.— Following is a 
partial list of prospective bidders to 
erect Barracks Bldg., etc., at Mare 
Island Navy Yard, bids for which will 
be opened January 28 by the Bureau 
of Yards and Docks, Navy Depart- 
ment, under Spec. No. 6330: 

James Shaw. Richmond (represent- 
ative of Western Foundation Co., Chi- 
cago). 

Sullivan & Sullivan ,2653 Best Ave., 
Oakland. 

Fred. Hayden, San Jose. 

Frank Lamb. Vallejo. 

Leroy Bldg. Service, 165 Jessie St., 
San Francisco. 

Mahony Bros., Follod Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Associated Hardware Co., 3S60 San 
Pablo Ave., Oakland. 

E. Rosemont, 176 Duboce Ave., San 
Francisco. 

James L. McLaughlin, 251 Kearnv 
St.. San Francisco. 

Healy-Tibbitts Const. Co., 64 Pine 
St., San Francisco. 

Jacks and Irvine, Call Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Johns-Manville Co., 159 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Herman Lawson, 465 Tehama St., 
San Francisco. 

Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Co., 
Sharon Bldg., San Francisco. 

Wm. Spivock. Hobart Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

MacArthur Concrete Pile Corp., 58 
Sutter St., San Francisco. 

National Surety Co., 160 Sansome 
St.. San Francisco. 

Young & Horstmeyer, 461 Market 
St., San Francisco. 



Crockett Electric Co., Crockett. 
Raymond Concrete Pipe Co., Hunt- 
er-Dulin Bldg.. San Francisco. 

F. H. Cress, 828 Excelsior, Oakland. 
Fred. J. Maurer. Eureka. 
Mangrum-Holbrook Co., 1235 Mission 

St., San Francisco. 
Mona Plumbing Shop, Crockett. 
K. E. Parker, 135 South Park, San 

Root. E. McKee, Central Bldg., Los 
Angeles. 

Jacobs & Pattiani, 337 lt7h Street, 
Oakland. 

G. F. Campbell. San Diego. 
MacDonald & Kahn. Financial Cen- 
ter Eldg.. San Francisco. 

Carl S. Koller. Crockett. 

A. G. Atwood, 3623 18th St., San 
Francisco. 

Soule Steel Co., Rialto Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Baker Ice Machine Co., 2459 E 14th 
St.. Oakland. 

J. H. Kruse, 23rd and Shotwell Sts., 
San Francisco. 

Wm. MacDonald Const. Co., Syndi- 
cate Bldg., St. Louis. 

Kewanee Boiler Crop., Kewanee, 111. 

Crescent Steel Co., 12 E Lough- 
borough Ave., St. Louis. 

Hallbauer & La Bahn, Inc.. 844 Rush 
St.. Chicago. 

George Griffiths Const. Co., Arcade 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

W. P. Winston Co., Inc., Box 2089 
Richmond, Va. 



HALLS AND SOCIETY 
BUILDINGS 



Conlract Awarded. 

LODGE BLDG. Cost, $90,000 

LAS VEGAS, Nevada. Third and Fre- 
mont Streets. 

Two-story Class C brick store and 
lodge'building (100x130 feet). 

Owner — Las Vegas Masonic Lodge. 

Architect— Gilbert Stanley Underwood 
730 S. Los Angeles St., Los An- 
geles. 

Contractor — Los Angeles Contracting 
Co., 4816 W. Pico Blvd., Los An- 



Plans Being Completed. 

BUILDING Cost, $ 

RICHMOND, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 

11th Street off Macdonald Ave. 
Two-story and basement class C brick 

building. 
Owner — The Salvation Army. 
Architect— Douglas Stone, 337 17th St., 

Oakland. 
Plans will be ready for bids in one 
week. 



ORNAMENTAL WIRE AND IRON WORK 



IRON 
WIRE 



Fence and Gates 



TENNIS COURT ENCLOSURES 
WIRE SCREENS AND GUARDS 



WEST COAST WIRE & IRON WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
86-863 Howard Street * ** * 'Phone SUtter 1136, 

Continuous Operation Since 1887 



Saturday, January 17, 11)31 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Fifteen 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
M EMI iRLAL BLDG. Coal 

HATWARD, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Street. 
Two - story reinforced concreti 

erans' memorial building. 
Owner -County of Alameda, 
Architect- Henry H. Meyers, 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Plans will lie ready fur bids ill 
f»r four w.-eks. 






OAKLAND, Cal.— Following awards 
of contract made by county super- 
Visors in connection with furniture 
and equipment tor the Veterans' Me- 
rial Building at Emeryville: 

Anderson Carpet House, items 3 to 
9 Inc., velvet hangings, {909.90. 

Jackson Furniture Co., item In. rue, 
$33; items 17 and IS. chairs, $212. 

C. L. Robinson Co., items 11 and 12, 
rugs, $324.50 and item 13, canvas floor 
covering, $199. 

C. F. Weber Co.. item 14, folding 
chairs, $2,073.50 and item 34>4, opera 
chairs. $224.50. 

Remington Rand Service Co., item 
27, banquet table, $317.50; items 30 
and 37. lodge room chairs, $314; item 
88, pulpit, $25; item 37, pedestal, $7S; 
item 40, altar, $43.75; item 41, desk. 
$154; item 42, chairs, $60. 

John Breuner Co., item 15, daven- 
port, $309.90; item 16, upholstered 
chairs, $274.50. 



HOSPITALS 

Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Feb. 
3. 2 P. M. 

WARD Cost, $ 

TALMAGE. Mendocino Co.. Cal. State 
Hospital Grounds. 

Ward No. 7, consisting of six one ■ 
story dormitories and connecting 
arcade; reinforced concrete con- 
struction (total floor area 10,000 
sq. ft. with arcade space of 4,00.) 
sq. ft.) 

Owner— State of California. 

Architect — State Department of Pub- 
lic Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, Geo. B. McDougall. state ar- 
chitect. Public Works Building, 
Sacramento. 

Will have tile & wood partitions, and 

roof construction, tile roof similar to 

existing buildings. Separate bids are 

wanted for 

1. General Work. 

2. Electrical Work. 

3. Plumbing, Heating and Ventila- 
tion Work. 

4. Complete Mechanical, including 
Plumbing, Heating, Ventilating and 
Electrical Work. 

The "General Work" bid will em- 
brace all branches of work other than 
segregated above. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 



ARLINGTON. Riverside Co., Cal.— 
State Department of Public Works, 
Division of Architecture, has cancel- 
led the call for bids to erect the two- 
story reinforced concrete ward build- 
ing at Arlington, the site for the new 
state hospital. It is probable that a 
new call for bids will be issued at a 
later date. 



AGNEW, Santa Clara Co., Calif.— 
Spencer Elevator Co., 166 7th St., San 
Francisco, at $3326 submitted lowest 
bid to State Department of Archi- 
tecture, Public Works Bldg., Sacra- 
mento, for reconstruction of two ele- 
vators in the Agnew State Hospital. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

Spencer Elevator Co., S. F $3,326 

Pacific Elevator & Equip. Co 4,422 

Otis Elevator Co 5,693 

Bids held under advisement. 



SAN FRANCISCO. — Until January 
21, 2:30 P. M., bids will be received 
by S. J. Hester, secretary. Board of 
Public Works, to fabricate, deliver and 
erect structural steel for roof ward 



additions to the San Francisco Hos- 
pital. Estimated cost $28,000. Cer- 
tified check 1"'. payable to Clerk ol 
Hi.- Board "f Supervisors required 

with bid. Plans obtainable fi Bu 

reau of Architecture, 2nd floor, City 
Hall, mi deposit "f $25. returnable. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
PREVENTORIUM Cost, 1100,000 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mat !o., i':ii 

Three frame and stucco Preventorium 

buildings witli tile roofs. 
Owner— City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 
Architect — Henry H. Meyers, K o h I 
Bldg., San Francisco. 



Contracts Awarded 
KITCHEN, ETC. Cost, $ 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 
One-story reinforced concrete kitchen 
and commissary building and two- 
story reinforced concrete boys' 
and girls' dormitory. 
Owner— State of California. 
Architect— State Department of Pub- 
lic Works. Division of Architec- 
ture, George B. McDougall. State 
Architect, Public Works Building, 
Sacramento. 
Kitchen and dormitory building will 

have tile partitions, steel and w d 

roof construction and tile roof; total 
floor area 14,000 sq. ft. 

Boys' and girls' dormitory will have 
tile partitions, wood roof construction 
and tile roof; total flor area 42,700 
sq. ft. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 
Alt. No. 1, add for addition of bakery. 
Alt. No. 2, add for addition for arcade. 
Alt. No. 3. deuct for omission of ele- 
vator. 

General Work 
Monson Bros.. 475 6th St., San Fran- 
cisco, $172,740. 
Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating 
George A. Schuster, 3712 Grove St., 
Oakland, $35,791. 

Electrical Work 
George Woolf. 795 Aleatraz Ave.. 

Oakland, $8190. 
Alternates 1 and 2 accepted, alter- 
nate 3 rejected. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Until January 
26, 3 P. M., under Proposal No. 678, 
bids will be received by Leonard S. 
Leavy, city purchasing agent, 270 City 
Hall, to furnish and deliver X-Ray 
films for San Francisco Hospital. 
Specifications obtainable from above 



Preparing Working Drawings. 

ADDITION Cost, $50,000 

VENTURA. Ventura Co , Cal. Foot- 
hill Blvd. 

Two-story Class A addition to hospital 
(60x34 feet). 

Owner — County of Ventura. 

Architect— Harold E. Burket, 455 E. 
Main St., Ventura. 



Calll 



."'ill. ' ' .'n't.". Awarded 

HOSPITAL Conl 

s'l KTON, San Joaqul 

Stat,. Hospital Grounds 

Two - story and be n menl rein- 
forced c hi. hospital .mil i«" 

story reinforced concrete indus- 
ti mi building. 

1 1« in i' state "I i alifornia. 

Architect State Department of Pub- 
lic Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, George B. McDougall, State 
.\i. hiti ,t. Public Weil.:- Building, 



S.i, 



lit... 



i '..mi in et i ir — So ten seii ;iini Haggmark, 

2652 Harrison si , San Francii co 
Reinforcing Steel- W. C. Hauck .V- ''.. 

280 San Bruno Ave . S. ]•'. 
Steel Sash — Smile steel Co., Rialto 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Miscellaneous Steel— Michel & Pfeffer 

In. n Works. Marrison and Tenth 

Sts., San Francisco, 
Other awards will be made shortly. 
As previously reporteu piumDing and 
heating awarded to .1 C. Plack, 721 W 
Elm Street. Stockton, at $14.9110; elec- 
trical work t" Collins Electric Co., , 
E Market St., Stockton, at $3881. 



MADERA. Madera Co., Cal - 
lowing bids taken under advisei 
until Feb. 3 by county supervisor: 
wiring and installation of ele 
heating stoves in Madera Co 
Hospital: 



No. 



Olsen Electric Shop, Madera 1 

3 

Valley Elec. Sup. Co., Fresno 1 



$1U3 
1643 

2221 



Rnbil 



Ele 



Co.. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Feb. 

10, 2 P. M. 
COTTAGE Cost, $25,000 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Calif. 

State Hospital Grounds. 
Two-story reinforced concrete cottage 
for employees (floor area 6,700 s.i 
ft.) 
Owner— State of California. 
Architect — State Department of Pub- 
lic Works. Division of Architec- 
ture. Geo. B. McDougall, state ar- 
chitect, Public Works Building. 
Sacramento. 
Will have wood partitions, floor and 
roof construction and tile rout". Sep- 
arate bids are wanted for 

1. General Work. 

2. Electrical Work. 

3. Plumbing and Heating Work. 

4. Complete Plumbing, Heating and 
Electrical Work. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 



"Gold Medal" Safety Scaffolding 

for use on steel and concrete frame buildinas, saves 
lives, time and monev 

It pavs to use the best Scaffolding Equipment 
whenever a Scaffold is reauired. The risk is 
always ereat. 

The Patent Scaffolding Company 



270— 13th St.. San Francisco 



Phone Hemlock 4278 



Lessor of Suspended and Swinging Safety "Gold Medal" Scaffolding. 



Sixteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $ 

AUBURN, Placer Co., Cal. 
Alterations and additions to County 

Hospital. 
Owner — County of Placer. 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 

St , San Francisco. 
Preliminary plans are to be sub- 
mitted to the Board of Supervisors on 
February 10. 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal.— 
See "Schools," this issue. Out-patient 
building planned by Regents of the 
University of California in connec- 
tion with medical school campus in 
San Francisco. 

HOTELS 

Plans Being Prepared. 

HOTEL Cost. $125,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Market St., W 

12th Street. 
Six - story and basement reinforced 

concrete hotel. 
Owner— J. T. Schlinger. 510 Battery 

Street. 
Plans by L. H. Thomas, 001 Excelsior 

Ave., Oakland. 
Proposed project in in the process 
of financing. More definite informa- 
tion will be given in about 30 days. 

Contract Awarded. 

HOTEL Cost, $16,000 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Cal. 

One-story steel frame and concrete 
hotel. 

Owner — J. Trigonis, Salinas. 

Plans by Willis Huson, 102 Central 
Ave., Salinas. 

Contractor — Ronald Thompson, Sa- 
linas. 

CALEXICO, Imperial Co., Cal.— Ar- 
chitect and Engineer Merrill & Wil- 
son, Petroleum Securities Bldg , Los 
Angeles, annaunce that a bids have 
been rejected for the erection of a 
new hotel building at Calexico for Will 
Conway. Owner will proceed with 
construction immediately and desire 
sub-bids on all trades. Building will 
be irregular in shape and will contain 
eighty rooms, coffee shop, dining rooms 
banquet rooms, offices, three shops, 
patio. Frame and stucco construction 
with tile roofing. Cost, $350,000. 

Contract Awarded. 

HOTEL & STORES Cost, $30,000 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Calif. Cen- 
tral Avenue. 

Two-story and basement reinforced 
concrete hotel-apts. & store bldg. 
(stucco finish). 

Owner— C. C. Pontacq, 27 Central Ave. 
Salinas. 

Architect— A. W. Story, Pajaro Val- 
ley Bank Bldg., Watsonville. 

Contractor— Fred. McCrary, 506 Fre- 
mont St., Monterey 
Construction has just been started. 

Preparing Sketches. 

HOTEL Cost, $1,000,000 

LAS VEGAS, Nevada. 

Spanish type hotel (200 rooms). 

Owners— B. U. Cain and E. L. Olm- 

stead (% Lamont & Co.) 
Architect— Hibbard. Gority & Kerton. 

Architects' Eldg., Los Angeles. 

Contract Awarded. 

HOTEL Cost, $3,500,000 

PORTLAND, Oregon. Thirteenth and 
Fourteenth; Holladay and Mult- 
nomah Sts. 

Twentv-two-story class A steel frame 
and concrete hotel (500 rooms). 

Owner— Ralph B. Lloyd, Bank of Italy 
Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Architect — Morgan, Walls & Clements 
Van Nuys Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Contractor— Dinwiddie Const. Co., 

Crocker Bldg., San Francisco. 

Sub-bids will be taken in 30 days. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, FIRE 
HOUSES AND JAILS 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Until 11 A. 
M., Jan. 21, bids will be received by 
the Los Angeles Board of Public 
Works for furnishing kitchen equip- 
ment for the Lincoln Heights jail, 419 
N. Avenue 19, under Specifications No. 
2306. The items are: range assembly; 
steam cookers, steam kettles, steam 
coffee urns, dishwashing machine, 
soiled and clean dish tables, cook's 
sink; pot sink; canopy over range and 
steam kettles; combination work table 
and steam table; laundry tables; set- 
up table; maple butcher block; vege- 
table table; vegetable peeler; vege- 
table sinks; vegetable storage sink. 

Note: The date has been changed 
from Jan. 14 to Jan. 21 as shown above 

Planned. 

CIVIC BLDG. Cost approx. $40,000 

LINDSAY, Tulare Co., Cal. N Mirage 
Avenue. 

Two - story and basement brick and 
stucco civic building. 

Owner — City of Lindsay. 

Architect — Swartz and Ryland, Brix 
Bldg., Fresno; 373 Main St., Sa- 
linas and Spazier Eldg., Monterey. 
Bond election will be held to finance 

construction. 



RESIDENCES 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $11,000 

KING CITY, Monterey Co., Cal. 

Two - story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (7 rooms). 

Owner— L. Hables, King City. 

Architect— Miller and Warnecke, Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg., Oakland. 

Contractor— W. J. Smith, San Luis 
Obispo. 
Plans are to be slightly revised and 

construction will be started upon their 

completion. 



Completing Plans. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $ 

ATHERTON, San Mateo County, Cal. 

Atherton Avenue. 
Alterations and additions to residence. 
Owner— Edward H. Heller, Atherton 

Ave., Atherton. 
Architect— Henry H. Gutterson, 526 

Powell St., San Francisco. 
Bids will he taken in one week. 



Plans Being Completed. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. St. Francis Woods. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (9 rooms). 
Owner— Dr. S. J. Hunkin, 1155 Bush 

Street. 
Architect— Henry H. Gutterson, 520 

Powell Street. 
Bids will be taken in ten days. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $15,400 

BERKELEY. Alameda Co., Cal. Clare- 

mont Tract. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence. 
Owner — Myron D. Taylor. 
Architect— W. R. Yelland. Financial 

Center Bldg., Oakland. 
Contractor— Jensen & Pedersen, 3443 

Adeline St., Oakland. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $8000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Baker St. (Ma- 
rina District). 

One-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (6 rooms). 

Owner — R. Cook. 

Architect— Chas. Strothoff, 2274 15th 
Street. 

Contractor — G. J. Elkington & Son, 
1291 33rd Ave. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $11,000 

EERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 1140 

Grizzly Peak Blvd. 
Alterations to residence. 
Owner — Mrs. V. Mauzy, premises. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— Arthur W. Shaw, 5 4 1 

Broadway. Oakland. 

Planned. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $300,000 

MONTECITO, Santa Barbara Co., Cal. 

Riven Rock. 
Two-story stone residence (12 rooms). 
Owner — Stanley McCormick Estate. 

Santa Barbara. 
Architect — Not Given. 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cont. price, $7S20 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Margaret Street. 

Two-story and basement brick resi- 
dence with tile roof (9 rooms, 2 
baths). 

Owner— Chas. Gladding, 1215 Yosemite 
St., San Jose , 

Arvhitect — Charles McKenzie, Twohy 
Bldg., San Jose. 

Contractor — F. T. Edmans, 143 N. Sth 
St., San Jose. 

Brick Work-F. H. Deagling, % Owner 
Bids on heating, painting and tile 

will be taken in about two weeks. 

Plans Completed. 

RESIDENCE 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. 

fael Avenue. 
Three-story and basement steel frame 

and reinforced concrete residence, 

(199x77 feet). 
Owner— Otto Thum. 
Architect — Marston & Maybury, 25 S. 

Euclid Ave , Pasadena. 
Two fountains, nine fireplaces, 
steam heating system, elevator, pipe 
organ, incinerator, carved marble 
work, etc. Bids will be called for at 
a later date. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $ 

ATHERTON, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

Atherton Avenue. 
Alterations and additions to residence 
Owner — Edward H. Heller, Atherton 

Ave., Atherton. 
Architect — Henry H. Gutterson, 526 

Powell St , San Francisco. 
Plans will be ready for bids in about 
three weeks. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN JOSE. Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

One and one - half - story frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner — Malcolm Donald, 68 S 2nd St., 
San Jose. 

Plans by Russell Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 

Sub-Bids Wanted. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SANTA CRUZ. Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (S rooms). 

Owner — H. E. Murray. Santa Cruz. 

Plans by Russel Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 
The Minton Co., Mt. View, is the 

only contractor figuring the plans and 

they desire sub-bids on all portions 

of the work. 

Plans Completed. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $15,000 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co., Cal. Con- 
tra Costa Road. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (eight rooms and 
three baths). 

Owner— Withheld. 

Architect — Masten and Hurd. Shreve 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
Bids will be called for at a later 

date. 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Sevent 



een 



Prsll jit Plane Balng Prepared. 

MANSION Cost, (250.000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

Tfl iv early California type (Gov- 

,i inn's i .Mansion. 
i m ii. i' State of I lalifornla. 
Architect— State Department or Pub- 
tic Works, Division of Architec- 
ture, Geo. McDougail, state archi- 
tect, Public Works Bldg., Sacra- 
mento, 
Landscape work in connection with 
this project will involve no expendi- 
ture "f $15,000; furnishings $50,000. 
Tennis courts costing $i;,noo and swim- 
i, mm pool costing $13,000, are other 
features, 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cont Apprix. $20,000 

SANTA CKUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
seucco residence. 

Owner— Dr Percy Phillips, 2S6 Wal- 
nut St., Santa Cruz. 

Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 
St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— The Minton Co., Mt. View. 



Contract Awarded. 

GARDENING Cost, $ 

HILLSBOROUGH, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
670 Brewer Drive. 

Terrace walls, landscape gardening, 
etc. 

Owner — Chas. B. Henderson, premises 

Architect— W. W. Wurster, 260 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— G. W. Williams Co.. Ltd., 
1404 Broadway, Burlingame. 

Landscape Architect — Lockwood de 
Forest, Santa Earbara. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $300,000 

SEATTLE, Washington. 

Three-storv reinforced concrete resi- 
dence. 

Owner— D. E. Frederick, Seattle. 

Architect— Lewis P. Hobart, Crocker 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Teufel & Carlson, Skin- 
ner Bldg., Seattle. 
In all probability bids will not be 

called for. Work will be done by a 

Seattle contractor. 



Sub-Bids Wanted. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $25,000 

BERKELEY. Alameda Co. Cal. Clare- 

mont Pines. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 

and garage (9 rooms). 
Owner and Builder— A. H. Feasey, 210 

Clara St.. San Francisco. 
Architect— Masten and Hurd. Shreve 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Hot air heating system. 



Bids Opened. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $16,500 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 
Margaret Street. 

Two-story and basement brick resi- 
dence with tile roof (9 rooms, 2 
baths). 

Owner — Chas. Gladding, 1215 Yosemite 
St., San Jose. 

Architect — Charles McKenzie. Twohy 
Bldg.. San Jose. 

Low Bidder— F. T. Edmans. 143 N 8th 
St.. San Jose. 
Hot air heating system. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 

F. T. Edmans, San Jose $7,820 

M. W. Reese, San Jose 8.134 

M. J. Nielsen, San Jose 8.195 

Win, Oowell, San Jose 8.571 

G. M. Latta, San Jose 8.7S5 

George Honore. San Jose 8,798 

J. C. Thorp, San Jose 9,000 

Ira Brotzman. San Jose 9,000 

The Minton Co., Mt. View 9.077 

R. O. Summers. San Jose 9.195 

Thos. Hershback, San Jose 9,410 

Megna & Newell, San Jose 9,750 

Contract will probably be awarded 
to low bidder. Brick work will be done 
by the owner. Architect will call for 
bids on painting, heating and tile 
work at a later date. 



Sub-Figures Being Taken. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $8500 

REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

Edgewood Park 
One-story and basement frame and 



stu 



sside 



Owner and Builder — Paul Euthman. 
415 Lincoln, Redwood City. 

Plans by Ernest Relchel, 303 Univer- 
sity Ave., Palo Alto. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
RESIDENCE Cost Approx. $40,000 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (12 rooms). 
Owner— Withheld . 
Architect — Williams & Wastell, 374 

17th St., Oakland. 
Bids will be taken in about three 
weeks. 



CHICO, Eutte Co., Cal.— C. I. Fish- 
er and Son, N. W. Fisher of Wiscon- 
sin, has purchased the Sisters Hos- 
pital Tract near the Diamond Match 
Factory and plan immediate construc- 
tion of fifty homes. The new firm will 
be known as the Fisher Lumber Co., 
and has purchased the O. E. Tracy 
lumber mill and cabinet shop at 8th 
and Pine Sts. and will commence mill 
work operations in connection with 
the home building project at once. 

Bids Opened. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $12,000 

KING CITY, Monterey Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (7 rooms) . 
Owner — L. Hables, King City. 
Architect — Miller & Wernecke, Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg., Oakland. 
Low Bidder— W. J. Smith, San Luis 
Obispo. 
Following is a complete list of bids 
received: 
W. J. Smith, San Luis Obispo....$ll,572 

G. W. Bruce, King City 11,680 

T. D. Courtright, Oakland 11,790 

The Minton Co.. Mt. View 11,824 

A. C. Sharp, Oakland 11,896 

R. J. Bruce, King City 11,976 

Jensen & Pedersen, Oakland 12,375 

B. F. Wooley, Oakland 12,899 

H. K. Henderson, Oakland 13,725 

Contract will be awarded to the 
lowest bidder. 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cont. Price, $7335 

AGNEWS, Santa Clara Co., Cal. State 

Hospital. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco 'residence. 
Owner— State of California. 
Architesct— Geo. B. McDougall, State 

Architect, Public Works Bldg., 

Sacramento. 
Contractor — The Minton Co., Mt. View. 



SCHOOLS 

Ornamental Iron Contract Awarded. 

SCHOOL Cont. Price, $29,999 

UPPER LAKE, Lake Co., Cal. 

One-story reinforced concrete high 
school (five classrooms and audi- 
torium) 

Owner — Upper Lake Grammar School 
District. 

Architect — Wm. Herbert, Rosenberg 
Bldg., Santa Rosa. 

Contractor — Petaluma Constr. Co., 
Petaluma. 

Ornamental Iron — Patterson & Koster 

Iron Works, 2S0 13th St., S. F. 

Other awards reported Jan. 7, 1931. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Until January 
21, 2:30 P. M., bids will be received 
by S. J. Hester, secretary, Board of 
Public Works, to furnish, fabricate, 
and deliver structural steel for the 
proposed James Lick Junior High 
School, the contract for erection of 
which has already been awarded to 
J. Gerrick and Co.. 74 New Montgom- 



ery St., at $2,568. Bids were original- 
ly scheduled for opening on this work 
January 7 but lacking a quorum of 
the Board of Public Works the bids 
were returned to the bidders unopen- 
ed. Plans are obtainable from the 
Bureau of Architecture, 2nd floor, 
City Hall. 



MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal.— 
Until January 23, 4 P. M., bids will 
be received by Monterey Union High 
School District to furnish and Install 
machinery, equipment and fixtures in 
shop department of high school. 
Swortz & Ryland, architects, Spazler 
Bldg.. Monterey Certified check 10% 
required with bid. Specifications ob- 
tainable from clerk. 



Bids to be taken In one week. 

SCHOOL BLDGS. Approx. $300,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Pied- 
mont Highlands (Edith St. near 
Morpeth). 

Group of reinforced concrete high 
school buildings (academic build- 
ing, auditorium and gymnasium; 
accommodate 500). 

Owner— Roman Catholic Archbishop of 
San Francisco, 1100 Franklin St., 
San Francisco. 

Architect— H. A. Minton, E a n k of 
Italy Bldg.. Eddy and Powell Sts.. 
San Francisco. 
Buildings will be constructed for the 

Sister of The Holy Name. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Feb. 
16. 7:30 P. M. 

GYMNASIUM, ETC. Cost, $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. 

One-story reinforced concrete aca- 
demic building with tile roof. 

Owner — Monterey Union High School 
District. 

Architect— Swartz & Ryland, Spazler 
Bldg., Monterey. 



Sub-Bids To Ee Taken In One Week. 
MEMORIAL Cont. price $116,995 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. Camp- 
us of University of California. 
Two-story class A concrete Eshleman 
Memorial Bldg. (student publish- 
ing building). 
Owner— Regents of the University of 

California, Berkeley. 
Architect— G. W. Kelham, 315 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 
Contractor— J. J. Grodem & Co., 1028 
San Antonio Ave., Alameda. 
As previously reported, heating, 
plumbing and ventilating and elec- 
trical work awarded to The Turner 
Co., 329 Tehama St., San Francisco, 
at $22,035. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

SCHOOL Cost, $20,000 

UKIAH. Mendocino Co., Calif. Red- 
wood Valley District. 

One-story school (reinforced concrete 
walls). 

Owner — Redwood Valley Union School 
District. 

Architect— Norman R. Coulter, 46 
Kearny St., San Francisco. 

BERRYESSA. Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
—Until January 24, 7:30 P. M., bids 
will be received by Don E. Tuttle. 
clerk, Berryessa School District, for 
concrete work, windows, doors, plumb- 
ing and electric work in connection 
with completion of cafeteria unit of 
school plant. Specifications obtain- 
able from above. 

Commissioned To Prepare Plans. 

ADDITIONS Cost, $154,000 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Calif. 

Additions to two schools and construct 
new unit (probably brick and steel 
construction). 

Owner — Salinas City School Dist. (Ar- 
thur Walter, Supt. of Schools). 

Architect — J. J. Donovan. 1916 Broad- 
way, Oakland. 
Construction of buildings depends 

upon the passage of a bond issue to 

be voted upon Feb. 3. 



Eighteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



January 14, 1930 
Sun-Bids Being Taken. 

SCHOOL BLDGS. Cost, $ 

NAPA, Napa Co., Cal. Napa Red- 
woods. 
Three-story reinforced concrete school 

buildings (4 units and chapel). 
Owner — La Salle Institute, Martinez. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, 525 Market 

St., San Francisco. 
Contractor— J. P. Erennan, 354 Ho- 
bart St., Oakland. 
Two football fields, two baseball dia- 
monds and a gym for both the juniors 
and the senior novices will be con- 
structed. Minor sports will also be 
arranged for. A swimming pool is in 
the plans. 



SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
—Until February 5, 4 P. M., bids wi.U 
be received by John D. Bromfield, 
clerk, San Mateo High School Dis- 
trict, for planting material for high 
school grounds. Specifications ob- 
tainable from the Superintendent of 
Schools at San Mateo. 



MARTINEZ, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
— Until February 10, bids will be re- 
ceived by William H. Hanlon, city su- 
perintendent of schools, to furnish and 
deliver standard school supplies for 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 1931, and 
ending June 30, 1932 Specifications 
obtainable from above. 



Bids Wanted— To Be Opened Jan. 29. 

SCHOOL BLDGS. Approx. $300,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co.. Cal. Pied- 
mont Highlands (Edith Street near 
Morpeth). 

Group of reinforced concrete high 
school buildings (academic build- 
ings, auditorium and gymnasium; 
accommodate 500). 

Owner — Roman Catholic Archbishop of 
San Francisco, 1100 Franklin St., 
San Francisco. 

Architect— H. A. Minton Bank of 
Italy Bldg., Eddy and Powell Sts., 
San Francisco. 
Buildings will be constructed for the 

Sister of The Holy Name. 



SAN FRANCISCO — Following bids 
taken under advisement by Leonard 
S Levy, city purchaing agent, under 
Proposal No. 673, to furnish and de- 
liver 124 opera chairs in Choral Room 
of the Francisco Junior High School: 

C. F. Webber Co., bidding, alternate 
(a) $5.14 each; 35 days. 

Stevenson and Sons, bidding on al- 
ternate (a) $5.67 each; 60 days. 

F. E. Turner, $6 65; 45 days. 

C. E. Corbly, $6.72; (a) $7.07; 60 
days. 

Heywoort Wakefield Co., $6.77; (a) 
$6.52- en days ' 



Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 

26th. 
SCHOOL Cost, $150,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. 32nd St. School 

Site. 
Two-story class B brick and concrete 

school (24 units). 
Owner— Los Angeles City School Dist. 
Architect— A. S. Nibecker, Jr., Los 

Angeles. > 



Bids To Be Taken Shortly. 

COLLEGE BLDGS. Cost, $500,000 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co.. Calif. 
Campus of California Institute of 
Technology. 

Two 2- and 3-story reinforced con- 
crete college bldgs. (geology lab- 
oratory and astrophysics labora- 
tory). 

Owner — California Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

Architect— Mayers. Murray & Phillip. 
Bertram G. Goodhue, associated. 
2 W 47th St., New York City. 



Preparing Plans. 

SCHOOL Cost, $100,000 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co., Calif. 

Rose Villa St. 
Reinforced concrete school addition. 
Owner— Pasadena City School Dist. 
Architect— Bennett & Haskell, First 

Trust Bldg.. Pasadena. t 



BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
—Rev. H. J. Lyne, pastor of St. 
Mathew's Catholic Church, announces 
plans for a new parochial school in 
connection with Our Lady of Angels 
Parish in Burlingame. 



BANKS, STORES & OFFICES 

Plans Being Completed. 

BANK Cost, $60,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 1st 

Street. 
Two - story steel and concrete bank 

(25xl37%-ft.) 
Owner — Italian National Bldg. & Loan 

Assn., 524 Montgomery St., San 

Francisco. 
Architect — F. Eugene Barton, Crocker 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Will have terra cotta front, bronze 
grills, marble flors and counters, vault 
door, etc. Bids will be taken in two 
or three weeks. 



Date Of Opening Bids Postponed. 
STORES Cost approx. $75,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. SW 

19th St. and Eroadway. 
Group of 1-story steel frame and terra 

cotta shops and stores. 
Owner— Twentieth & Broadway Real- 
ty Co., Oakland. 
Architect— A. J. Evers, 525 Market St. 
San Francisco. 
Due to the illness of Mr. Fisher op- 
ening of bids have been postponed in- 
definitely. 



Plans Being Prepared — Contract 

Awarded. 
REMODELING Cost, $50,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. First and Mission. 
Remodel present building. 
Owner — C. C. Moore & Co., Sheldon 

Building. 
Architect — Fred H. Meyer, 525 Market 

Street. 
Contractor — Geo. Wagner. 181 Soutli 

Park St. 
It is indefinite at this time when 
proposed work will go ahead. 



Preparing Plans. 

OFFICES Cost, $100,000 

LONG BEACH, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
NE First and Locust Streets. 

Two and three-story reinforced con- 
crete offices. 

Owner — LonE Beach Building & Loan 
Association. 

Architect — W. Horace Austin, Paciic 
Southwest Bank Bldg., Long Beach 



Completing Plans. 

OFFICES Cost, $25,000 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Broadway. 

Two - story steel frame and concrete 
office and store building. 

Owner — Leo Escloses, 5486 Mission St. 
San Francisco. 

Plans by Russell Coleman, 1404 Broad- 
way, Burlingame. 
Sub-bids will be taken by owner 

about Jan. 17. Plans and specifications 

obtainable from Mr. Coleman, 



Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 
27th. 

STORE Cost, $250,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. 537-41 S Eroad- 
way. 

Six-story and basement class A re- 
inforced concrete brick and steel 
store. 

Owner — F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, 
Inc., 902 Broadway. Los Angeles. 

Architect — Walker & Eisen. Western 
Pacific Bldg.. Los Angeles. 



Contract Awarded. 

STORE Cont. Price, $24,000 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Cal. Main 

Street. 
One-story and mezzanine floor and 

basement reinforced concrete and 

steel department store. 
Owner — Porter & Irvine, 210 Main St., 

Salinas. 
Architect — M. W. Morrison, 601 42nd 

Ave., San Francisco. 
Contractor — E. F. Reese, 158 Central 

Ave., Salinas. 
Ornamental Iron — San Jose Iron Wks. 

535 W-San Carlos St., San Jose. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 

STORE Cost, $ 

SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Two - story reinforced concrete store 
and offices. 

Owner— Eugene Simas, 675 Washing- 
ton St., Santa Clara. 

Architect— Wolfe and Higgins, Realty 
Bldg., San Jose. 



Contracts Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $ 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Calif. 451 

12th Street. 
Alterations to store (new store fronts, 

etc.) 
Owner — Excelsior Laundry, 2116 West 

St., Oakland. 
Architect— Guy L. Brown, American 

Bank Bldg., Oakland. 
Plate Glass— W. P. Fuller Co., 301 

Mission St., San Francisco. 
Mill Work— Lannom Eros. Planing Mill 

Fifth and Magnolia Sts., Oakland. 
Iron— Paul Romak, 3630 Victor Ave.. 

Oakland. 
Plastering — J. Pardoni. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $ 

SAN MATEO. San Mateo Co., Calif. 

140 Third Ave. 
Alterations to present store. 
Owner — Martin Steiling and E. L. 
Gould, 155 Montgomery St., San Fran- 
Architect — Bertz, Winter and Maury, 

210 Sutter St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — Clinton Stephenson Con- 
struction Co., Monadnock Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
Sub-bids are wanted on hot coating 
and concrete work. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

OFFICES Cost, $50,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Post and Scott 

Streets. 
Three-story brick offices. 
Owner — Eureka Eenevolent Society, 

436 O'Farrell St. 
Architect— Hyman & Appleton, 68 Post 

Street. 
Contractor — A. F. and C. W. Mattock, 

212 Clara St. 
Painting— D. Zelinsky and Sons, 165 

Grove Street. 
Heating — James Pinkerton, 927 How- 
ard Street. 
Plumbing — E. Sugarman, 3624 Geary. 
Electric Wiring— Atlas Elec. & Eng. 

Co., 343 4th St. 
Other sub-contracts will be award- 
ed shortly. 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 
MEDICO-DENTAL BLDG. 

Cost, $350,000 
SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co.. Calif. 
W Santa Clara St. (site of old 
Notre Dame Convent). 
Fivteen-story and basement class A 
steel frame and reinforced con- 
crete Medico-Dental Building (2 
elevators). 
Owner— Medical Arts Bldg. Corpora- 
tion (now being organized). 
Architect— W. H. Weeks. JD..nk of 
Italy Bldg., San Jose, ana ul Sut- 
ter St., San Francisco. 
Proposed project is in process of 
promotion. Foundation and excava- 
tion bids have been taken and are be- 
ing held under advisement. 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Nineteen 



Contract Awarded. 

STORE Cos 

S VLINAS, Monterey Co., Cal. 

onr-story steel frame and 
store building. 

Owner— J. Trbjonls, Salinas. 

Nana by Mr. Thompson. 

runt motor — Ronald Thompson, Sa- 
linas. 



Plans llriiu; KiYisrd. 

BTI IRE Cost, $100.00.1 

OAK! \.\l>, Alameda Co., Calif. 171", 
I '.I .M.lua> . 

Tu.. - story and basement reinforced 
concrete store (75xll0-ft.) 

Owner— Mrs. Phillip E. Bowles, Russ 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Architect— Douglas Stone, 1706 Broad- 
wax-, Oakland. 
New bids will be taken in one week. 



Excavation Contract Awarded. 

BANK Cost, $200,000 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. Lo- 
cation not selected. 

One-story and mezzanine steel frame 
and concrete bank with tile roof. 

Ow-ner — Monterey County Trust and 
Savings Hank. 

Architect— H. H. Winner Co., 5S0 
Market St., San Francisco. 

jlgr. c.f Const.— Mark Finlayson, % 
architect. 

Excavation— M. J. Murphy. Carmel. 
Segregated bids will be taken by the 

architect on other portions of the 

work within one week. 



Contract Awarded. 

•PHONE EXCHANGE Cost, $475,000 

TACOMA, Wash. Ninth and Fawcett 
Streets. 

Four-story and basement (ultimate 8- 
story) class A telephone exchange, 
face brick and terra cotta exter- 
ior. 

Owner— Pacific T. & T. Co. 

Architect — Hill, Mock and Morrison. 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Contractor — Sound Construction and 
Engineering Co.. Northern Life 
Tower, Seattle, and C. E. Bonnell 
and Son, Tacoma, Wash. 

Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $7500 

SAN FRANCISCO. No. 650 Second St. 

Alterations to offices. 

Owner— C. F. Weber & Co., 650 Second 

St., San Francisco. 
Architect — J. E. Norberg, 5S0 Market 

St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — J. W. Cobby & Son, 260 

Tehama St., San Francisco. 

Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
ALTERATIONS Cost. $12,500 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co.. Cal. 518 

Sixteenth St. 
Alterations to present store. 
Owner — Oakland Remedial Loan Assn., 

514 17th St., Oakland. 
Plans by Contractor. 
Contractor— S. Kulchar & Son. 731 E 

Tenth St.. Oakland. 
Vault Work— Oakland Concrete and 

Terrazzo Co., 2227 Market Street. 

Oakland. 
Plumbing— H. G. Newman Co., 2004 

Telegraph Ave., Oakland. 
Plastering— Sam Hedrick. 
Brick Work— Herman Block, 1408 2 

36th St., Oakland. 
Electric Work— California Electric Co 

579 18th St., Oakland. 
Steam Heating— Eell Heating & Sheet 

Metal Co., 5820 College Avenue. 

Oakland. 

Contract Awarded. 

BANK BLDG. Cost, $100,000 

CHICO, Butte Co.. Cal. Broadway and 

Second Sts. (95x51 feetl . 
One-story reinforced concrete hank 

(steel trusses, marble work, etc.) 
Owner— Bank of Italy. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, Bank of Italv 

Bldg., Eddy and Powell Sts., San 

Francisco. 
Contractor— James L. McLaughlin Co , 

251 Kearny St., San Francisco. 



Bids Wanted. 

STORE Cost, $ 

MODESTO, Stanislaus Co., Cal. No. 

922-24 Tenth Street. 
Two-story and basement Class C brick 

store (60x140 feet). 
Owner — S. H. Kress Co., Western 

Pacific Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Architect — Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

Cement and wood floors, plate glass, 
metal store fronts, etc. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
BANK Cost, $100,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Two-story steel frame and concrete 

bank. 
Owner— Italian National Building & 

Loan Assn., 524 Montgomery St., 

San Francisco. 
Architect — F. Eugene Barton, Crocker 

Bldg , San Francisco. 
Terra cotta exterior, marble floors 
and counters, bronze screens, vaults, 
etc. 

Bids will be called for in about 30 
days. 



THEATRES 

Plans Being Prepared. 

THEATRE Cost, $150,000 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Calif. 

New theatre. 

Owner— United Artists Theaters of 
California (Jos. M. Schenck, vice- 
president), 1966 S Vermont St., 
Los Angeles. 

Architect— Walker & Eisen and C. A. 
Ealch, Western Pacific Bldg., Los 
Angeles. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

THEATRE Cost, $150,001.' 

RICHMOND, Contra Costa Co., Calif. 

New theatre. 

Owner — United Artists Theaters of 
California (Jos. M. Schenck, vice- 
president), 1966 S Vermont St., 
Los Angeles. 

Architect— Walker & Eisen and C. A. 
Ealch, Western Pacific Bldg.. Los 
Angeles. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

THEATRE Cost, $150,600 

PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 



Ne 



the 



Owner — United Artists Theaters of 
California (Jos. M. Schenck, vice- 
president), 1966 S Vermont St., 
Los Angeles. 

Architect— Walker & Eisen and C. A 
Ealch, Western Pacific Bldg., Los 
Angeles. 

Plans Being Prepared. 

THEATRE Cost, $150,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 

New theatre. 

Owner — United Artists Theaters of 
California (Jos. M. Schenck, vice- 
president). 1966 S Vermont St., 
Los Angeles. 

Architect — Walker & Eisen and C. A. 
Ealch, Western Pacific Bldg.. Los 
Angeles. 

Contracts Awarded. 

REMODELING Cost, $175,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 1966 Market Street 

(Paramount Theatre). 
Remodel present theatre (redecora- 

tion, lighting fixtures, etc.) 
Owner — Fox West Coast Theatres, Inc. 

1350 Market St. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Carpentry — Alfred J. Hopper. 17 6 9 

Pleasant Valley Ave., Piedmont. 
Marble — Jos. Musto Sons-Keenan Co.. 

535 North Point St. 
Decorating — Cliff Heinsberger, Los 

Angeles. 
Electric Fixtures — Bnyd Lighting Fix- 
ture Co., 278 Post St. 

Plans Being Completed. 
THEATRE Cost, $200,000 

MERCED, Merced Co., Cal. Seventh 
and J Sts. (150xl50-ft.) 



Two-story class C steel frame and 
reinforced concrete theatre, stores 
and office building (theatre to seat 
1700). 

Owner — Golden State Theatres, Inc., 
988 Market St., San Francisco. 

Architect— Reid Urns., 106 Montgom- 
ery St.. San Francisco. 

Contractor— Salih Bros., Golden Gate 

Theatre Bldg., San Francisco. 

Sub-Bids will be taken in about two 

weeks. 
As previously reported, excavation 

awarded to J. W. Huffman. Merced. 



Plans Being Completed. 
THEATRE Cost, $100,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Two-story class C concrete and steel 

theatre and store (to seat 1000; 

contain four stores). 
Owner— W. S. Leadley, 207 2nd Street, 

San Mateo. 
Architect— S. Chas. Lee, 2404 W 7th 

St., Los Angeles. 
Contractor— Leadley & Wiseman, 207 

2nd St., San Mateo. 
Sub-bids will be taken in about two 
weeks. 

WHARVES AND DOCKS 

January 9. 1931 
Plans Being Prepared. 
SHED Cost, $125,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Pier No. 15. 
Shed and bulkhead building (150x800- 

ft.; steel frame construction with 

concrete walls). 
Owner — State Board of Harbor Corn- 



Engineer — Frank White. Ferry Bldg 

Sub-structure is nearing completion. 
Total cost of project, $700,000. Bids 
will be called for about Feb. 15. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
CONSTRUCTION 

SAN FRANCISCO— Frank G. White, 
chief engineer. State Harbor Commis- 
sion, Ferry Bldg., announces $225,000 
will be expended in raising the level 
of the Embarcadero sidewalk and bulk- 
head between the south end of the 
Southern Pacific waterfront baggage 
depot and Pier No. 24. The raise, 
which will average about three feet* 
will compensate for a gradual sinking 
resulting from the deterioration of the 
old 1912 seawall. Work on the project 
will start some time in February' con- 
tingent on the approval of the in- 
coming harbor board. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
GRANDSTAND, ETC. Cost, $1,250,000 
SAN FRANCISCO. Fifteenth St. and 

Potrero Ave. 
Baseball Park, Class A steel and con- 
crete grandstand. 1000 ft. long. 
Owner — San Francisco Baseball Club. 

15th and Valencia Sts. 
Engineer— H. J. Erunnier, Sharon 

Bldg. 
Contractor — Lindgren and Swinerton. 

Inc., 225 Bush St. 
Mill Work— Pacific Mfg. Co., Monad- 
nock Bldg. 
Light Towers— Pacific Coast Steel Co.. 

215 Market St. 
Elevators— Spencer Elevator Co., 166 
Seventh St. 
Ornamental iron bids are now being 
taken. 

As previously reported, plumbing 
awarded to Wm. J. Forster Co., 355 
4th St.; steel sash to Tyre Bros., 666 
Townsend St.; reinforcing steel to Pa- 
cific Coast Steel Co.. 215 Market St.; 
lumber to Christensen Lbr. Co., Fifth 
and Hooper Sts.; lawn sprinkler sys- 
tem to The Turner Co., 329 Tehama 
St.; excavation to Sibley Grading and 
Teaming Co.. 165 Landers St. 

UKIAH, Mendocino Co., Cal.— Due 
to a misunderstanding of the bidders 
with regard to time of delivery, the 
city council will ask new bids to fur- 



Twenty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



nish f.o.b. cars. Ukiah, two .-,000 cu. ft. 
riveted gas tanks, 6-ft. dia. by 30 ft. 
long. %-in. shell and %-in. heads. 
Equipped with one llxl5-manhole in 
head, three 2-in. forged steel flanges, 
one 4^-in. dial pressure gauge, de- 
signed for 90 lb. per sq. in. working 
pressure and building in accordance 
with A. S. M. E. Code for Unfired 
Pressure Vessels. Further mention 
will be made of this project when a 
new date for opening bids is set. Fred 
L. Bosworth is city clerk. 



Preliminary Plans Being Prepared. 

CREMATORY, ETC. Cost, $ 

BAKERSFIELD, Kern Co., Cal. 

Crematory, chapel and columbarium. 

Owner — Bakersfield Memorial Park (J. 
K. McAlpine, promoter). Bakers- 
field. 

Architect — Edwin J. Symmes, Haber- 
felde BIdg., Bakersfield 



SAN FHANCISCO— Following bids 
received by Board of Supervisors for 
garbage disposal have been referred to 
City Engineer M. M. O'Shaughnessy 
for report: 

San Francisco Disposal Company. 
(Floyd E. Harper, vice-president) — 
Erect plant on company's own plans 
on city-owned land. Plant to be of 
Superior Incinerator Company's de- 
sign. Bids $100 for a twenty-five- 
year franchise; to erect plant to in- 
cinerate S00 tons a day. Will begin 
work in four months after award of 
contract, completing plant in one 
year. City given right to acquire plant 
at any time for $900,000. Price to be 
SI per ton. 

Octavius Torre Jr. and Antonio 
Faliano. 

Bid No. 1— To erect plant on plans 
of the City Engineer, installing Ster- 
ling-type furnaces and equipment, ca- 
pacity 800 tons daily. Price to be not 
in excess of $2.32 a ton. Set recapture 
figure at $1,200,000 less depreciation. 

Bids No. 2 — Build plant on own 
plans and specifications, using Ster- 
ling type equipment. Price per ton 
not in excess of $2.05. Recapture fig- 
ure $1,038,700, less depreciation. 

Above two bids provide for repeal 
of the initiative ordinance fixing $1 a 
ton for incineration. Both bids offered 
$1000 for the franchise. 

Dumping at sea bids were submitted 
by J. H. Baxter & Co., who set a price 
of $1 a ton, and offered to begin op- 
erations two to four months after 
award of contract, and from Walter 
C. O'Brien and Frank P. O'Kane. The 
latter offered a sliding scale of prices 
to be charged for dumping, running 
from 24 to 37 cents a ton. They of- 
fered to sell plant to city at any 
time for $462,000. less depreciation. 
Two per cent of the total collections 
were offered the city in return for the 
franchise. 



SAN FRANCISCO — Pacific Coast 
Steel Corp., 215 Market St., at $l,78a 
awarded contract by Board of Super- 
visors to furnish and erect steel tow- 
ers for radio broadcasting system for 
Police and Fire Departments. Grav- 
bar Electric Co., 9th and Howard Sts. 
at $7,000 awarded to furnish tubes In 
connection with the same project. 

ALAMEDA. Alameda Co.. Calif.— 
All bids received by City Purchasing 
Agent have been rejected for painting 
and spraying fences at Lincoln Park 
Nursery on Fernside Blvd., pump 
house at Jackson Park, fence at Hi- 
Kinley Park and pump house, etc., at 
Washington Park. 

Lowest bid was submitted by Hauck 
& Huber. 1012 Eagle Ave., Alameda, 
at $1080. New bids will be called for 
shortly. 



MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES 
AND MATERIALS 

GLENDALE. Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
—Until 10 A. M., Jan. 22, bids will be 
received by the city council for fur- 
nishing f. o. b. warehouse by truck. 
115 N. Howard St., Glendale: 

Item 1—30,000 lbs. No. 2-0 stranded, 
7 strands, bare, medium hard drawn 
copper wire. 

Item 2—650 lbs. No. 4-0 stranded, 19 
strands, bare, soft drawn copper wire. 

The quantity specified may be in- 
creased or decreased 25% at the option 
of the city, at any time before signing 
of contract. Certified check, 10%. G. 
E. Chapman, city clerk. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— Until Jan. 26, 2 
P. M., bids will be received by U. S. 
Forest Service, Ferry Bldg.. to fur- 
nish and deliver 2,176 metal porcelain 
enamel road and trail direction and 
miscellaneous signs. Specifications ob- 
tainable from above on request.. 



FRESNO, Fresno Co., Cal.— Until 
February 12. 5 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by L. L. Smith, Secretary, 
Board of Education, 2425 Fresno St., 
for the sale of 19 used typewriters and 
the purchase of 19 new typewriters. 
Bid bond or certified check 10% re- 
quired with bid. Further information 
obtainable fro msecretary. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

Names and addresses of persons or 
firms concerned in the following op- 
portunities will be furnished on re- 
quest to Business Opportunity Depart- 
ment, Daily Pacific Builder, 547 Mis- 
sion St., San Francisco or Phone GAr- 
field 8744: 

20761— Representation. Berlin, Ger- 
many. Firm offers to advise and to 
help San Francisco merchants or 
manufacturers for any current or in- 
tended business with merchants or 
manufacturers in Germany, Austria 
and Switzerland. Can correspond in 
Germany, English and French. 

20762 — Representation. Bremen, 
Germany. Firm established since 1895 
is in a position to handle on a large 
scale any commodity for which a 
trade can be established on the Ger- 
man and continental markets. 

£0766 — -Businessi Machines. Hono- 
lulu, T. H. Firm wishes list of whole- 
salers, manufacturers and dealers of 
business machines, equipment and 
stationery. 

20767 — Single Phase Motors. Los 
Angeles, Calif. Firm Is interested in 
contacting manufacturers of single 
phase motors from % to lty horse- 
power. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Following bids 
received by Board of Supervisors to 
furnish and deliver 35 radio receiving 
sets for the Department of Electric- 
ity: 

Julius Brunson and Sons, $94.71 
each; alt. (a) $80.06; (b) $85.95. De- 
livery 60 days. 

U. S. Motor Service, $97.50 each; de- 
livery GO days. 

Electric Lighting Supply Co.. $112; 
delivery 45 to 60 days. 

Graybar Electric Co., $99 each; de- 
livery 30 days. 

Sierra Equipment Co , $171: deliv- 
ery 90 days. * 



The number of homes in the United 
States wired for electricity was esti- 
mated at 19,721,486 on January 1 of 
this year, the electrical division of 
the Department of Commerce reports. 
This figure now has very likely ad- 
vanced to well over 20,000,000. The 
1930 figure represents a substantial 
increase over the number of homes 
estimated to be wired on January 1, 
1929, which was 19,012,664. Likewise, 
the 1929 number of wired homes in- 
creased over 1927, which totaled 15,- 
923,060. In 1929, New York state led 
the Union with 2,977,426 electrified 
homes, followed in order by Pennsyl- 
vania, Illinois, California, and Ohio. 



Send for a Sample Copy 
of the New 

DAILY PACIFIC BUILDER 



The only daily construction newspaper affording 
complete coverage of the construction activities in Central 
and Northern California — featuring work contemplated, 
bids wanted, bids opened, contracts awarded, sub-bids 
wanted and sub-contracts let on all types of building con- 
struction; bridges, dams and harbor works, irrigation proj- 
ects; machinery and equipment; water works and supplies; 
business opportunities; building permits; building con- 
tracts, mechanics' liens; acceptances, etc., etc. 

Keep informed on construction developments in Cen- 
tral and Northern California, and the major projects in 
Southern California, the states of Oregon, Washington, 
Nevada and Arizona. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-one 




BRIDGES 



HILLSBOROUGH. San Mateo Co., 
Cal. — Town Clerk John A. Hoey in- 
structed to advertise for bids to widen 
bridge over San Mateo Creek on the 
Stonehedgo road. 



SONORA. Tuolumne Co., Cal.— City 
council has ordered bids received to 
reconstruct Stockton Street bridge, in- 
volving widening to 18-ft. and length- 
ening same to eliminate "S" turn. 
Plans on file In office of city clerk. 



NAPA, Napa Co., Cal.— City Engi- 
neer II. A. Harrold completes plans 
for Brown St. bridge; estimated cost 
111. 000. City has $0000 available for 
construction. Action on the plans de- 
ferred. '■' 



SANTA ROSA, Sonoma Co., Cal.— 
Frank Brvant, 2911 23rd Street, San 
Francisco, at $17,344 awarded contract 
by county supervisors to construct a 
140-ft. riveted steel truss bridge over 
Sonoma Creek near the Sonoma State 
Home in the First Supervisorial Dis- 
trict. Project involves: 

(a) 1S5.000 lbs. struc. steel; 

(b) 202 cu. yds. class "A" concrete; 

(c) 225 cu. yds. struc. excav. ; 

(d) 25,000 lbs. reinf. steel; 

(e) 2,500 cu. yds. approach fills. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 

Frank Brvant $17,344 

Cox & Whitehead 17,383 

W. C. Colley 17.550 

Fred Smith 18,383 

Ralph Hunter 18,600 

M. B. McGowan 18,659 

Harry Thorsen 18,700 

W. L. Proctor 18,720 

Peter McHugh 19.663 

Albert Helwig 19,856 

Larsen Eros 19,975 

Ben. C. Gerwick 20,112 

F. J. Maurer & Son 20,317 

A. T. Howe 20,700 

Sciarrino & Sneed 20,851 

Sullivan & Sullivan 20,999 

Wm. Spivock 21,300 

Geo. Hudson 21,400 

Smith Bros 21,450 

C. Emil Force 23,816 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Until February 3, 
' 10:30 A. M., bids will be received by 
i George E. Gross, county clerk, to con- 
1 struct steel and concrete bridge on 
; Redwood Road in Eden Township; es- 
timated cost, $10,000. Plans obtain- 
able from County Surveyor George A. 
Posey. i 



PORTLAND, Ore. — Lindstrom & 
Feigenson, Railway Exchange Bldg., 
Portland, at $89,617.50 for fir piling 
and $57,417.50 for cedar piling, sub- 
mitted low bid to Multnomah County 
Commissioners to recondition the 
Hawthorne Bridge. Edelfesen-Wey- 
gandt Co., 2S0 Front St., Portland, at 
■5,690.75 submitted low bid for 
abutments, paving and fill in connec- 
tion with the same project. Taken 
under advisement. 

DREDGING, HARBOR 
WORKS & EXCAVATIONS 

VENTURA, Ventura Co., Cal.— Un- 
til Feb. 3, 10 A. M„ bids will be re- 
ceived by county supervisors to con- 
struct four protection jetties, each 100 
ft. long, made of r.r. rails fabricated 
Into the forms of tetrahendrons, in- 
volving: 



(a) 28 tons used 60-lb. rails; 

(b) 13 cu. yds. class E coner 
Cash Contract No. 718. Pla 

tainable from Chas. W. Petit, count 
surveyor. 



b- 



LONG BEACH, Cal —The Standard 
Dredging Co., Central Bldg., Los An- 
geles at 16.95c ($113,193) awarded con- 
tract by U. S, Engineer Office for 
dredging in Long Beach Harbor and 
Cerritos Channel, involving 774,000 cu. 
yds. 



RENO, Nevada — Disapproval of the 
request of the Newlands project board 
for $200,000 in federal funds for the 
enlargement of the Lahontan power 
plant has been expressed by Dr. El- 
wood Mead, commissioner of reclama- 
tion, who has addressed the board a 
letter upon the subject. The commis- 
sioner of reclamation makes the fol- 
lowing objections: 

That there is not sufficient money in 
the reclamation fund to permit the 
appropriation requested. 

That it is contrary to the policy of 
the bureau, the department of the in- 
terior and of congress to advance fed- 
eral funds for a long period of time, 
without making interest charges. 

That it is also contrary to the pol- 
icy of the government to make new 
contracts under which power revenues 
upon irrigation projects will accrue 
to the districts after repayment is 
made. 

That it is likewise contrary to gov- 
ernment policy to undertake further 
construction upon irrigation projects 
after such projects have been taken 
over for operation and maintenance 
by the water users. 

In requesting the appropriation the 
project board asked that it be given 
the $200,000 loan referred to for a 
period of forty years without interest. 
It also asked that the net revenues 
accuring from the new power unit 
accrue to the project after repayment 
of the loan should be made. Refer- 
ring to the latter request Commis- 
sioner Mead said that it is now the 
policy of the government to convert 
all project power revenues into the 
reclamation fund after government 
loans for construction are fully re- 
paid by the project. 



RICHMOND. Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
— Following bids received January S 
by U. S. Engineer Office, San Fran- 
cisco, for furnishing (a) 81,000 tons of 
core rock and (b) 18.000 tons of fac- 
ing rock and building extension to the 
training wall in Richmond Harbor: 

(1) Healy-Tibbitts Const. Co., 64 Pine 
St., San Francisco. 

(2) Kern and Kibbe, 290 E Salmon St.. 
Portland. Oregon. 

(3) Blake Bros., Balboa Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

(A) (B) 

(1) $.8975 $2.25 

(2) 93 2.7-, 

(3) 1 00 2.50 

Taken under advisement. 



LONG BEACH, Cal.— S t a n d a r d 
Dredging Co., Central Bldg., Los An- 
geles, at 16.95c cu. yd., submitted low- 
bid to U. S. Engineer's Office. Los An- 
geles, for dredging in Long Beach 
Harbor and in the Cerritos Channel 
turning basin. Project involves 774,- 
000 cu. yds. 



LANCHA PLANA, Amador Co . 
Cal.— California Debris Commission,' 
California Fruit Bldg., Sacramento, 
will hold public hearing January 16 
on the application of the Lancha 
Plana Gold Dredging Company to 
move by the hydraulic process ap- 
proximately 700,000 cubic yards of 
debris located one mile from Lancha 
Plana, Amador County, draining into 
Mokelumne River, and to store debris 
in pits, resulting from removal of sand 
and gravel for construction of Par- 
dee Dam. 



LOS ANGELES, Cailf.— San Fran- 
cisco Bridge Co., 14 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco, was awarded the con- 
tract by the U. S. Engineer at (255,500 
(estimate) or 18.25c cu. yd. for dredg- 
ing approx. 1,400,000 cu. yds. material 
in the East Basin Channel, Los An- 
geles Harbor, and in Cerritos Chan- 
nel, to hook up with similar work to 
be done in Long Beach. Engineer's 
estimate, not including overhead, $2S3- 
260. 



REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., 
Cal.— Standard Dredging Co., 414 13th 
St., Oakland, at 7.94c cu. vd.. sub- 
mitted low bid to U. S. Engineer Of- 
fice, Custom House, San Francisco, 
for dredging in Redwood Creek, in- 
volving 614,750 cu. yds. Complete list 
of bids follows: 

Standard Dredging Co 7 94c 

Franks Contracting Co 8.90c 

Hydraulic Dredging Co. 13.25c 

S. F. Bridge Co 14.00c 

Engineer's estimate 7.73e 

Taken under advisement. 



SAN DIEGO, Cal.— Western Dredg- 
ing Co., 611 Security Title Insurance 
Bldg., Los Angeles, awarded contract 
by U. S. Engineer at $297,000 (esti- 
mate) for dredging approx. S25.000 cu 
yds. material from an area of about 
185 acres in thme NE portion of San 
Diego Harbor. The area lies westerly 
of the western waterfront of the city 
of San Diego, extending from Mu- 
nicipal Pier No. 1 to Spreckels Wharf. 
Other bids were: Standard Dredging 
Co., 37.9c; San Francisco Bridge Co., 
39c; Morris & Cummings Dredging 
Co., New York City, 68c. The engi- 
neer's estimate was $329,200. 



STREET LIGHTING 
SYSTEMS 

EUREKA, Humboldt Co., Cal.— City 
council starts proceedings to install 
electrolier system on Fourth St., bet. 
Broadway and J streets; estimated 
cost $15,000. E. D. Gardner, city engi- 
neer. 



SANTA ROSA. Sonoma Co., Cal — 
City Manager C. O. Dunbar recom- 
mends extension of the present street 
lighting system. 23 



SAN LEANDRO, Alameda Co., Cal. 
— R. Flatland, 1S99 Mission St., San 
Francisco, at $6200 submitted low bid 
to city trustees to install street light- 
ing system in Dutton Ave., involving 
29 electrolier standards with under- 
ground system. Other bids: City 
Improvement Co., (C. N Chick). 2055 
Center St., Berkeley, $6400; Butte 
Electric & Mfg. Co., 956 Folsom St., 
San Francisco, $7950. Taken under 
advisement. 



Twenty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, Ja 



ry 17, 1931 



SAN FRANCISCO— NePage-McKen- 
uy Co., 7 Front Street, at $66 each, 
awarded contract by Board of Super- 
visors to furnish 300 concrete elec- 
trolier standards in connection with 
city's boulevard system. 

Taper Tube Pole Co., Monadnock 
Eldg., at $85 each, awarded contract 
to furnish 600 metal standards. 

MACHINERY AND 
EQUIPMENT 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal.— 
Until January 23, 4 P. M., bids will 
be received by Monterey Union High 
School District to furnish and install 
machinery, equipment and fixtures in 
shop department of high school. 
Swartz & Ryland, architectts, Spazier 
Bldg., Monterey. Certified check 10% 
required with bid. Specifications ob- 
tainable from clerk. 

SACRAMENTO, Cal.-— Moeller Auto 
Co., Sacramento, at $691 awarded con- 
tract by city council to furnish sta- 
tion wagon, and at $593 to furnish 
one coupe automobile from City Engi- 
neering Department. 



WANTED 



TO PURCHASE used Linn Tractor 
Truck. Lidral-Wiley, Inc., 208 Colum- 
bia St., Seattle Washington. 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. — 
Until February 2, 10 A. M., bids will 
be received by Henry A Pfister. 
county clerk, for the purchase of a 
60-Best Caterpillar Tractor, no longer 
required by the county. Further in- 
formation obtainable from county 
clerk or Itobt. Chandler, county sur- 
veyor. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Hap Alzina. 217 
12th St., Oakland, at $2700 awarded 
contract by city council to furnish six 
4-cylinder motorcycles for traffic unit 
of the Police Department. 



TOLEDO, Oregon — Until February 
2, 8 P. M., bids will be received by C. 
S. Welborn, city clerk, to construct 
15-inch suction dredge for Port of 
Toledo; engineer's estimate $45,000 
Specifications obtainable from city 
clerk on deposit of $25, returnable. 



WASHINGTON, D. C— See "Gov- 
ernment Work and Supplies," this is- 
sue. Bids wanted for miscellaneous 
supplies and equipment for Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards and Stations. 



SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until Jan. 23, 
2 P. M., bids will be received hy D. 
H. Greeley, Superintendent of Equip- 
ment, Shop No. 3, State Highway 
Commission. 1S02 34th St.. Sacramento 
for the purchase of the following 
equipment no longer required: 
CHC 2295 Indiana l'/i-ton truck. 
CHC 2618 Ford Express Model A. 
CHC 2670 Ford Express Model A. 
CHC 142-150 Gallon Alco Kettle, asph. 
CHC 143-150 Gal. Alco Kettle, asph. 
CHC 180-71 McCormick-Deering 10-20 
Tractor and Spearwells Grader at- 
tachment. 

Bidders may make offers for one or 
more items, but must state price of- 
fered for each Item. No lump sum 
bids will be considered. 

All equipment may be inspected at 
the Division of Highways yards at 
1852 34th St., Sacramento. 

RAILROADS 

LAS VEGAS, Nevada— (By Special 
Wire)— Lewis Const. Co., 300 S Jua- 
nita St., Los Angeles, at $455,509.50, 



submitted the lowest of 12 bids to the 
U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, Las 
Vegas, for the construction of a rail- 
way from Boulder City to the Hoover 
Dam site. This work will involve con- 
struction of 10.5 miles of railroad con- 
struction with heavy construction in 
solid rock formation, including five 
tunnels within one mile. The project 
will extend from the summit, the end 
of the L. A. & Salt Lake Ry. section, 
down to the dam site. The principal 
items and quantities follow: 

115,000 cu. yds. common excav.; 364,- 
cu. yds. rock excav.; 163,000 cu. yds. 
unclass. borrow; 803,000 sta. yds. ov- 
erhaul; 2S7.0U0 cu. yds. long haul un- 
class. borrow "loaded into hauling 
equipment"; 705,000 yd. mi. haul and 
spread "long haul unclass. borrow" ; 
29,000 cu. yds. tunnel excav.; 200,000 
ft. b.m. permanent tunnel timbering; 
800 cu. yds. struc. excav. common; 1,- 
200 cu. yds. struc. excav. rock; 6,000 
cu. yds. rock fill; 220 cu. yds. concrete; 
16,000 lbs. reinf. steel; 2,100 cu. yds. 
rock riprap ; 2600 cu. yds. concrete 
crib wall; 1600 ft. 24-in. corru. pipe; 
120 lin. ft. 30-in. do; 180 lin. ft. 36-in. 
do; 280 lin. ft. 42-in. do; 200 lin. 48-in. 
do; 600 lin. ft. GO-in. do; 3D, 000 ft. b.m. 
bridges or trestle timbering; 200 lbs. 
rail stringers in rail top trestle; 2,000 
lin. ft. piling; 80 pile point shoes; 22,- 
800 cu. yds. ballasting; 7 miles laying 
track (tie plated); 10 miles laying 
track (not tie plated). J. C. Page is 
office engineer at Las Vegas. S. O. 
Harper, acting chief engineer, Denver. 



FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS 

SANTA ROSA, Sonoma Co., Cal.— 
City Manager C. O. Dunbar recom- 
mends early extension of the munici- 
pal fire alarm system. 



FIRE EQUIPMENT 

NAPA, Napa Co., Calif. — American 
La France and Foamite Industries, at 
$15,100 awarded contract by city coun- 
cil to furnish motor fire truck with 
the following equipment: 

Complete set of ladders: one 50-ft., 
one 35-ft., one 28-ft., two 26-ft., one 
24-ft., one 20-ft., one 16-ft. roof lad- 
der and one 12-ft. roof ladder. It will 
have a pump throw 750 gallons of 
water at 120 lbs. pressure as well as 
a booster tank of 100-gallon capacity. 
Will be equipped with a life-saving 
net, a life-saving gun and 700 feet of 
2-in. hose. Allowance of $200 on the 
old Seagraves chemical truck. 



PITTSBURG, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
— City Manager George Oliver author- 
ized by city council to purchase 500 
ft. cf fire hose at a cost of $500. 



HAWTHORNS, Nevada— Until Jan- 
uary 27, 10 A. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by the Bureau of Supplies and 
Accounts, Navy Department, Wash- 



ington, D. C, to furnish one motor 
ambulance for Naval Ammunition De- 
pot at Hawthorne, Nev. Specifica- 
tions obtainable from above office or 
from Navy Purchasing Office, 100 Har- 
rison St., San Francisco, 



RESERVOIRS AND DAMS 

SHASTA and Fresno Counties, Cal. 
— Immediate construction of an $85,- 
000,000 dam and reservoir at Kennett, 
on the Sacramento River, and a $50,- 
000,000 dam and reservoir, with lateral 
canals at Friant. Fresno County, on 
the San Joaquin River, has been rec- 
ommended by the joint Hoover-Young 
water resources commission. 

A definite recommendation against 
construction of a salt water barrier 
across Carquinez Strait was made by 
the commission, which held that the 
Kennett dam and reservoir not only 
would satisfactorily solve the delta 
salinity problem and furnish fresh 
water for Suisun Bay industries, but 
also would be of material assistance 
in controlling Sacramento river floods. 
The Kennett dam also would help nav- 
igation and irrigation. 

The commission further recommend- 
ed that the federal government finance 
and construct both projects, with the 
state taking over their operation af- 
ter guaranteeing payment of interest 
at 3% per cent or less, and repay- 
ment of the $135,000,000 principal ov- 
er a period of fifty years. An agreed- 
upon federal government contribution 
for improvement of navigation and 
flood control on the Sacramento Riv- 
er would be deducted. The state in 
turn would look to those sections ben- 
efited by the project, either directly 
or indirectly, for its reimbursement. 

The state also would be expected to 
meet the cost of relocating state high- 
ways, made necessary by the con- 
struction of the two 



HATWARD, Alameda Co., Cal.— 
City Engineer Jesse B. Holly is mak- 
ing surveys for proposed emergency 
reservoir in connection with the muni- 
cipal water system. Will be con- 
structed in upper D street. 



SAN DIEGO, Cal — H. N. Savage, 
city hydraulic engineer, instructed by 
the city council to prepare plans for a 
dam at El Capitan site on the San 
Diego River. Plans were ordered for 
two types of dams, viz. gravity-arch 
type and a rock fill structure. 



YAKIMA, Wash.— U. S. Bureau of 
Reclamation, Yakima, preparing plans 
for proposed Cle Elum Dam, the last 
unit of the Yakima reclamation proj- 
ect. For this unit $15,500,000 is avail- 
able. Dam will be constructed on the 
Cle Elum river near Ellensburg and 
will be 125-ft. high and 700-ft. long. 
It will form a reservoir of 4.GS0 acres 
in which will be stored 435,000 acre- 
feet of water. 



CONTRACTORS' MACHINE WORKS 

SPECIALISTS ON REPAIRING AND REBUILDING OF 

Bunkers, Hoppers, Chuting, Conveyors, Rollers, Mixers, Hoists, 

Shovels, Tractors, Pavers, Crushers, Drag Lines, Elevators, Car 

Unloaders, and other Road and Building Equipments; 

BLACKSMITHING AND WELDING 

Builders of Rosenberg Portable Car Unloaders 

CREAR & BATES 

57 Zoe St., bet. 3rd and 4th, off Brannan St. 
Phone GArfield 4374 San Francisco 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-thrfe 



PIPE LINES, WELLS, ETC. 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Until January 19. 
4:30 P. M., bids will be received by G. 
B. Hegardt, secretary. City Port Com- 
mission, 424 Oakland Bank Bldg., to 
furnish used steel pontoon pipe, 
equipped with ball joints, delivered 
Outer Harbor Certified check 10% 
required with bid. Specifications ob- 
tainable from secretary. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Western Pipe 
\ Steel Co., r.Tl 7 Santa Pe Ave., 
awarded contract by city purchasing 
agent, at prices below for welded steel 
pipe under Specifications No. 2286. 
Bids werfe taken on the following 
Items: 

(1) 1560 ft. laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel pipe: 

(2) 1560 ft. laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel jije, double dipped in Mc- 
Everlast steel water pipe coating: 

(3) 1560 ft laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel pipe with not more than two 
girtli seams and only one longi- 
tudinal seam; 

(4) 1560 ft. laying length, 51-in. welded 
steel pipe identical with Proposal 
No. 3, except that the dipping shall 
comply with Proposal No. 2. 

The prices are: Electric welded — 
(1) $6.55, (2) $6.35, (3) $7.05, (4) $6.85; 
net Delivery start Feb. 2, complete 
Feb. 12. 



CARMICHAEL, Sacramento County 
Cal— Western Pipe and Steel Co., 444 
Market St., San Francisco, at $.41 lin. 
ft awarded contract by Carmichael 
Irrigation District to furnish and de- 
liver f.o.b. Fairoaks, Sacramento Co., 
4.300 ft. of welded steel pipe. Com- 
plete list of bids follows: 

Western Pipe & Steel Co $.41 

Corrugated Pipe Co., S. F 423 

Crane Co.. Sacramento 51 H' 

SEWERS AND SEWAGE 
DISPOSAL PLANTS 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Until January £2. 

bids will be received by C. 

'. Merritt, city clerk, to construct 

torm sewer with appurtenances in 

irove St. bet. 26th and 28th Sts.; est. 

t $17500. Certified check 10% pay- 

ty required with bid. Plans 

file in office of clerk. Walter N. 

kstad. city engineer. 



12 



able 



HILLSBOROUGH, San Mateo Co., 
Cal.— Town Clerk John A. Hoey in- 
structed to advertise for bids for con- 
struction of storm sewers and other 
miscellaneous improvements in the 
Brewer Drainage District. 



GONZALES. Monterey Co., Calif — 
Gonzales Sanitary District votes bonds 
of $40,000 to finance construction of a 
sewer system. Directors of the dis- 
trict are: Enos DeCarli. William Tav- 
ernettl, Bert M. earner. M. H. Woods- 
worth and J. A. Morrill. 



OAKLAND, Cal. — Robert B. Me- 
Nair, 3745 Rhoda St., Oakland, at $8686 
awarded contract by city council to 
construct drainage structures in por- 
tions of E-8th and E-lOth Sts. 4th. 
5th and 8th Aves., involving: 
375 ft. 10-in. pipe conduit, $1 45. 
552 ft. 12-in. do, $1.35. 
536 ft. 15-in. do, $1.55 
320 ft. 18-in. do, $2.20. 
930 ft. 24-in. do, $3 30. 
300 ft. 15-in. pipe sewer, $1.55 
389 ft. 18-in. do, $2 20. 

6 manholes, standard tops, $70. 

4 manholes, inlet top, 34-in., $85. 

4 catchbasins, 34-in., $66. 

2 catchbasins. 21-in., $56. 

4 storm water inlets, 34-in, $41 

6 storm water inlets. 21-in., $34.60. 

Complete list of unit bids received 
published in issue of January 2 



SANTA MONICA Cal —Until Ian 
20, bids will be reci Ived by city coun- 
cil to dig trench, lay and connect 7,- 
000 lin. ft. 30-in. sand cast iron pipe, 
together with one 30 In, by 20-in. re- 
ducer, gate valves, valve boxes and 
covers, fill tretn-li ;md replace pave- 
ment In Sawtelle Blvd. Certified check 
5% required with bid. Plans obtain- 
able from John A, .Morton, city com- 
missioner of public works. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— R. H. Downer. 700 
East 24th Street, Oakland, at $2,005 
awarded contract by city council to 
sewer portions of Foothill Blvd., Iris, 
Dowling and Blanche Sts., and S4th 
Ave., involving: 

285 lin. ft. 24-in. pipe sewer, $3.76; 

606 lin. ft. S-in. pipe sewer, $ .80; 
6 manholes, $75.00. 

Complete list of unit bids received 
published January 2. 



SANTA MARIA, S 
Cal.— The city engii 
plans for extensions 
system on Broadway 
ditional famil 
is $25,000. 



'I'll. 



ta Barbara Co. 
sr is preparing 

the city sewe 
serve 2i«J ad 

estimated 



ost 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Proceedings will 
be started at once by city council to 
construct storm sewer in Grove St.. 
bet. 26th and 2Sth Sts.; estimated cost 
$S000 and to sewer portions of Moun- 
tain Blvd. Greenly Dr. and 15 small 
streets in the Melrose Highlands and 
Melrose Highlands Extensions Tracts. 
Walter N. Frickstad, city engineer. 

WATER WORKS 

GRIDLEY, Butte Co., Cal.— Worth- 
ington Co., 543 Howard St., S. F., al 
$10,648 for 100-h. p. and $11,898 for 
125-h. p., submitted low bid to city 
council to furnish one Diesel engine 
generating unit with auxiliary pumps, 
motors, equipment and materials. Com- 
plete list of bids, taken under advise- 
ment, Until January 19, follows: 

Worthington Co., 100-h.p. $10,648. 
125-h. p. $11,898. 
Fairbanks-Morse Co.. S. F., $15.S.'i.1. 
U. S. Machinery Co.. S. F. $17,519. 



MERCED, Merced Co., Calif.— City 
council has started proceedings to 
purchase privately owned water sys- 
tem of the Crocker-Huffman Land & 
Water Co., to operate as a municipal 
project. W. T. Clough. city clerk. 

ST. HELENA, Napa Co., Cal.— 
Pacific States C. I. Pipe Co., Ill Sut- 
ter St., San Francisco, at $.38 ft. 
$1520) awarded contract by city trus- 
tees to furnish 4000 ft. 150 Class 150, 
B and S McWane Pacific c i. pipe and 
fittings. U. S. Pipe & Foundry Co.. 
San Francisco, only other bidder at 
$.39% ($1580). 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co., Cal.— A. 
'.. Johnson. Eureka, at $6S94 awarded 



contract by city council to tear down 
old water tank at Harris and E Sts 
and construct new 520,000-gallon tank 
on the some site. Halsby & Lax, 
Eureka, bid $6896 and Mercer-Fraser 
Co. Eureka $11,587. 



Cal. 



Mi iN'ROVIA. Los Angele 
—Pacific Pump Works awarded 
tract by the city council at $1620 net, 
for one 1400 G. P. M. centrifugal boos- 
ter pump and one 150-hp. motor. 



INGLEWOOD, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
— National Cast Iron Pipe Co., 417 S. 
Hill St., Los Angeles, awarded con- 
tract by city council at prices shown 
for furnishing cast iron water pipe as 
follows: 



(1) 5000 ft 4-in. 


44.7c 


(2) 2000 ft. 6-in., 


63.8c. 


(3) 1000 ft. S-in. 


91.4c 


(4) 1000 ft. 10-in 


$1.23 



ONTARIO, San Bernardino Co., Cal. 
— L. A. Manufacturing Co., 2500 E. 
23rd St.. Los Angeles, submitted low 
bid to the city council at $2592 67 to 
furnish and lay 2600 lin. ft. 12-in. 
welded steel pipe and fittings. West 
Coast Pipe & Steel Co. bid $2918.27. 
Bids taken under advisement. 

DENVER, Colo.— Until January 26 
bids will be received by the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Reclamation, Denver, for fur- 
nishing pumping equipment for the 
water supply system for Boulder City. 



ONTARIO. San Bernardino Co.. Cal. 
— Call for bids for a centrifugal boos- 
ter pump at Pumping Plant No. 6, 
scheduled for opening Jan. 5, was 
withdrawn by the city council. 



GLENDALE. Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
—Until 10 A. M., Jan. 22. bids will be 
received by the city council for fur- 
nishing f.o.b. Glendale. the following: 
Item 1— Six 30-in. hub end. vertical 
valves with spur gears. 

Item 2— One 24-in. hub end. vertical 
valve with spur gears. 

Item 3— Four 30-in. flanger, vertical 
valves with spur gears. Flanges to be 
faced and drilled for twenty-eight 1H 
in. bolts on 36-in. bolt circle. 

Item 4— Two 20-in. flanged, vertical 
valves with spur gears. Flanges to be 
faced and drilled for twenty 1%-inch 
bolts on 25-in. bolt circle. 

Item 5— Two 24-in. hub end check 
valves. 

All above valves to be suitable for 
operation on 50 lbs. pressure. Items 
1 to 4. inclusive, to have double discs 
and to open by turning nut counter 
clockwise. Bidders to furnish name 
of manufacturer, delivery date and 
specifications of valves they propose 
to furnish, including total net weight 
operating 
E. Chap- 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal 
— U. S. Pipe and Foundry Co., Mo- 
nadnock Bldg., San Francisco, at $3 50 



DO NOT RISK AN EXPERIMENT 

SPECIFY --USE 

Timpie Hydrated Lime 

STRONG— PURE— PLASTIC 



of Unifor 
Class Pa 



rily Satisfactory Experience In High 
:iflc Coast Construction 
FOR BRICK MORTAR, WHITE COAT AND SAND FLOAT FINISH 
Sold by Representative Dealer; Everywhere 



Twenty-four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 






ft. awarded contract by city counci 
to furnish 7700 lin. ft. 20-in. pipe ii 
connection with new main from th 
Crossing Street Pumping Plant to th 
Bay Street Reservoir. 



LAFAYETTE, Contra Costa Co., 
Cal. — Petitions are in circulating seek- 
ing Cremation of County Water Works 
District No. 2 which proposes to fi- 
nance construction of a domestic wat- 
er distributing system to connect up 
with the mains of the East Bay Mu- 
nicipal Utility District. Col. M. M. 
Garrett, chairman of the water com- 
mittee of the Lafayette Improvement 
Club, is a prime mover for organiza- 
tion of the district. 



SAUSALITO, Marin Co., Cal.— City 
council will confer with directors of 
the Marin Municipal Water District 
with a view to providing additional 
water supply for the "higher parts" 
of the city not now adequately served. 



PORTLAND, Ore. — Following con- 
tracts awarded by City Purchasing 
Agent Coffinberry to furnish pipe for 
Municipal Water Bureau: 

R, D. Wood & Co., at $47,511.95 for 
9612 ft. of 6-in. pipe, 11,328 ft. of 12- 
in. and 610 ft. of 24-in. 

American Cast Iron Pipe Co., at 
{3075 for 75 tons 20-in. 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co. 
at $48,676.80 for 20,208 ft. S-in„ 750 

MADERA, Madera Co., Cal.— Until 
February 2, 8 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by Jas. Wakefield, city clerk, 
to furnish and deliver pipe and fit- 
tings, as follows: 

3,500 ft. 6-in. c. i. pipe, 150 lbs. work- 
ing pressure; 
S 6x6x6x6 bell and end crosses; 
1 8x6x6x6 bell end cross; 
4 6x6x6 bell end tees; 
14 6x4 reducers, 6-in. spigot, 4-in. 

bell; 
4 6-inch plugs; 

jointing material for 260 6-inch 
joints. 
Alternate bids will be received on 
McWane precaulked cast iron pipe 
and fittings. Certified check 10% pay- 
able to city required with bid. 



VANCOUVER, B. C— Until Feb. 9. 
2 P. M., bids will be received by W. 
A. Sheppard, city purchasing agent, 
to furnish and deliver 65.000 ft. 6-in. 
and 8-in. c. i. pipe, as follows: 

30,000 ft. 6-in. Class C; 

10,000 ft. 6-in. Class D; 

15,000 ft. S-in. Class C; 

10,000 ft. 8-in. Class D. 

Certified check 5% required with 
bid. Specifications obtainable from the 
city engineer. i 



DENVER. Colo.— Until 2 P. M., Jan. 
28, bids will be received by the Chief 
Engineer, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Denver, for furnishing pumps as fol- 
lows: 

Three motor-driven deep well tur- 
bine pumps, each having a discharge 
capacity of 550 G. P. M. when oper- 
ating under a total effective head of 
110 ft. 

Six horizontal motor-driven centri- 
fugal pumps, each having a discharge 
capacity of 450 G. P. M. when oper- 
ating under a total effective head of 
1200 ft. 

Three motor-driven horizontal cen- 
trifugal pumps, each having a capac- 
ity of 500 G. P. M. when operating un- 
der a total effective head of 170 ft. 

Spec, may be obtained from the 
chief engineer, 1441 Welton St., Den- 
ver. Proposal guaranty, 10%. 

PLAYGROUNDS & PARKS 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
—Until February 5, 4 P. M., bids will 
be received by John D. Bromfleld, 
clerk, San Mateo High School Dis- 
trict, for planting material for high 



school grounds. Speci 
tainable from the Supe 
Schools at San Mateo. 



STREETS AND HIGHWAYS 

PACIFIC GROVE, Monterey Co., 
Cal.— Until February 5, 7:30 P. M.. 
bids will be received by Elgin C. 
Hurlhert. city clerk, (3305) to improve 
Fifth St. bet. Ocean View and Light- 
house Aves., and Cypress Ave. and 
Granite St. bet. Lighthouse Ave. and 
Laurel Ave., and bet. Laurel Ave. and 
Pine Ave., involving cem. cone, curbs 
and gutters; oil macadam surface 
pavement (composed of graded rock 
not less than 13 lbs. sq. ft.) and Dur- 
emulse emulsified asphalt; cem. cone, 
driveways; 4-in. vit. clay lateral sew- 
ers. 1911 Act. Eond Act 1915. 

Certified check 10% payable to city 
required with bid. Plans on file in 
office of clerk. 



SANTA BARBARA. Calif. — County- 
Surveyor Owen H. O'Neill completing 
plans for last section of San Julian 
Road known as second half of Section 
No. 2. It is approx. three miles in 
length and will have a graded and 
graveled surface. Bids will be called 
probably within 30 days. 



BELL. Los Angeles Co.. Cal.— Until 
8:30 P. M, Feb. 2 (tentative date), bids 
will be received by city council for 
improving Mayflower Ave. 
Baker and Florence Aves., 
streets, under A & I. No. 3, 

(1) 47,990 sq. ft. walk; 

(2) 12,049 ft. curb; 

(3) 181,430 sq. ft. oiled mai 

D. G. sub-base; 

(4) 297,673 sq. ft. grading; 

(5) 4436 ft. 8-in. vit. sewers; 

(6) 18 manholes and other 

tures; 

(7) 4416 ft. 6-in. vit. sewers. 



between 
nd other 
lvolving: 



adam and 



The contractor 
purchase the $50,000 
session bonds. Check 
Tracy Bousman 



11 l„ 



the 



required to 
nediate pos- 
r bond, 10%. 
ity engineer 



vhich bids 



i-lude the 



SANTA BARBARA, Cal.- 
gineer E. B. Brown, has 
that projects 
called in the 
following: 

Eath Street paving bet. Fuinto and 
Alamar Ave., two blocks of paving, 
$6032. 

Canon Peridido paving, seven blocks 
paving and sidewalks. $53,000. 

Westside, Mission. Chino, Gillespie 
and Robins St., 21 blocks, $110,000. 

Por la Mar Drive, paving one block, 
$3400. 

Nopal St. paving, Figueroa to Canon 
Peridido, $9000. "' 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal.— 
City Engineer Wm. Popp making sur- 
d pave all unimproved 
lits. Esti- 
tted to the 
one week. 



veys to grade 
streets within the city 1 
mates of cost will be 
council withir 



PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Irving L. Ryder, San Carlos and Du- 
pont Sts., San Jose, at $19,441.80 was 
awarded contract by city council (938) 
to improve High St. bet. Lytton Ave. 
and Addison Street, involving vit. san. 
sewer:;, cem. cone, gutters, driveways, 
curbs and walks, catchbasins, cone, 
storm sewer pipe, electrolier system, 
resurface roadway with asphalt con- 
crete. Complete list of bids as fol- 
lows: 

Irving L. Ryder $19,441 

Freeman and Cavanaugh 20,310 

W. A. Dontanville Salinas.... 24,626 

Ferioll and Bettini 25.630 

M. Hanrahan, S. F 2G.793 



and Sproule Aves., just outside the 
Sacramento city limits, between 12th 
and 16th Sts. Referred to County En- 
gineer Chas. Deterding for report. 



RICHMOND. Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
—City Engineer E. A. Hoffman in- 
structed to prepare plans to pave east 
half of Tenth St. from Dock Street to 
street at Ford Plant site. The sec- 
tion between Cutting Blvd. and Dock 
St. will remain unpaved until sewer 
mains are installed. 



MENLO PARK, San Mateo Co., Cal. 
—Clyde W. Wood, P. O. Box 1435. 
Stockton, at J90.026.S1 submitted low 
bid to town trustees (30-3) to im- 
prove College Ave. and Cambridge 
Ave. from Arbor Road to El Camino 
Real; Harvard Ave. bet. University 
Drive and El Camino Real; Univer- 
sity Drive from Middle Ave. to Stan- 
ford Ave.; Yale Road bet. Middle Ave. 
and Stanford Ave.; Princeton Road 
bet. College and Stanford Ave., in- 
cluding all street intersections. Proj- 
ect involves: 
30,000 cu. yds. grading; 
670,400 sq. ft. IVi-inch emulsified as- 
phalt sur. pave, on 6-inch 
macadam base; 
32,000 lin. ft. concrete curb; 
220 water service connections, 
curbs, storm drains, catchbasins, man 
holes, etc. Complete list of unit bids 
will be published shortly. Following 
complete list of the lump sum 



bids 



ved: 



W. Wood. Stockton $ 90,026 

I. L. Ryder, San Jose 91, mi:: 

Union Paving Co., S. F 97,303 

A. J. Raisch, S. F 97,551 

W. A. Dontanville, Salinas 99,435 

A. Teichert & Son, Sacto 101,100 

M. F. Hanrahan, S. F 102,987 

Valley Paving & Const. Co., 

Visalia 104,730 

Jack Casson, Hayward 106, 96u 

W. O. Tyson, Redwood City... lOS.THS 
Clark & Henery Const. Co., 

San Francisco 112,793 



SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — McCor- 
mick estate proposes installing a new 
water system at Riven Rock, Monte- 
cito, to cost about $100,000. 



HILLSBOROUGH, San Mateo Co., 
Cal.— Union Paving Co.. Call Bldg., 
San Francisco at $23,142.50 awarded 
contract by town trustees to pave 
streets in Brewer Tract No. 3. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
—Until January 26, 11 A. M„ bids will 
be received by Eugene D. Graham, 
county clerk, to pave W. C. Miller 
road, 0.89 mile in length. Certified 
check 10% payable to Chairman of the 
Board of Supervisors required with 
bid. Plans obtainable from Julius 
Manthey, county surveyor. 



SONORA, Tuolumne Co., Cal —Mo- 
desto and Turlock Irrigation Districts 
petition county supervisors to ac- 
quire rights- of-way for a road to 
connect Don Pedro Dam with the 
present county road at or near the 
Clavey residence; will be approximate- 
ly 3 miles long. 



-Cou 



SACRAMENTO, Oal-- 
pervisors petitioned to improve Spear 



SAN FRANCISCO. — Until January 
21, 2:30 P. M., bids wil be received by 
S. J. Hester, secretary, Eoard of Pub- : 
lie Works, to improve Duncan St. bet. 
Douglass St. and Hoffman Ave., in- 
volving armored concrete curbs, side 
sewers, Hi-inch asphaltic concrete 
wearing surface and 6-in. class F. 
concrete base. Certified check of 10% 
required with bid, payable to Clerk 
of the Supervisors. 

Bids on this work were originally 
scheduled for opening on January 7, 
but lacking a quorum of the Board of 
Public Works, the bids were returned 
unopened. Plans obtainable from Bu- 
reau of Engineering, 3rd floor. City 
Hall. ,<! 



iturday, Ja 



ry 17, 193] 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-five 



.SANTA 1IC1SA, Sonoma I'm. Cal — 

CItj Manager C. lumbar recom- 
mends an extensive street paving pro- 
tram. Approximately 7% miles • >( the 
dlty's streets arc unpaved. 



SAN FRANCISCO. — Until Januarj 
21 2:30 P. M., bids will be received 

fo s ,i Hester, secretary, B I of 

Public Works to Improve Bradford st 
i„ I Cortland ami Powhattan Aves.. 
Involving side sewers, 6-in. concrete 
class E pavement, Certified check of 
in-; required, payable to Clerk of the 
Supervisors. 

Bids on this work were originally 
Scheduled for opening on January 7 
lull lacking a mi. ■rum "f the Board of 
Public Works, the bids were returned 
unopened. Plans obtainable from Bu- 
reau of Engineering, 3rd floor, City 
Hall. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
—Until January 26, 11 A. M., bids will 
be received by Eugene D. Graham. 
Bounty clerk, to shape roadbed and 
cmss section and construct pavement 
in Harney Lane in Road District No. 
2; oil macadam pavement; estimated 
cost $20000. Certified check 10% pay- 
able to Chairman of the Boards of 
Supervisors required with bid Plans 
obtainable from Julius Manthey, 
county surveyor. 

SAN FRANCISCO. — Until January 
21, 2:30 P. II.. bids wil be received by 
S. J. Hester, secretary. Board of Pub- 
lic Works, to improve Campbell Ave. 
bet. Alpha and Rutland Sts., involv- 
ing armored concrete curbs, 2-course 
concrete sidewalks, vit. clay pipe side 
sewers, asphaltic concrete pavement. 
Certified check of 10% required, pay- 
able to clerk of the Supervisors. 

Bids on this work were originally 
scheduled for opening on January 7, 
but lacking a quorum of the Board of 
Public Works, the bids were returned 
unopened. Plans obtainable from Bu- 
reau of Engineering, 3rd" floor. City 
Hall. t 



LAS VEGAS, Nev.— General Const. 
Co., Colman Bldg., Seattle, at $329,- 
917 for lfi-ft. roadway and $394,257 for 
30-ft. roadway submitted low bid to 
U. S. Bureau of Reclamation. Las 
Vegas. Nev., for construction of a 
highway, approximately 7 miles long, 
from the vicinity of Boulder City to 
the Hoover Dam Site, Boulder Can- 
yon Project, Arizona - California - Ne- 
vada. The work is located about 25 
to 30 miles southeast of Las Vegas, 
which town is on the main line of the 
Los Angeles and Salt Lake (U. P.) 
Railway. The principal items are: 

418.720 cu. yds. open cut excav. (all 
classes); 6000 cu. yds. tunnel excav.; 
249,000 cu. yds. overhaul; 2000 cu. yds. 
back fill; 160 cu. yds. concrete; 5000 
cu. yds. concrete crib wall; 5600 sq. 
yds. dry rock paving (placing); 8000 
lbs. reinf. bars (placing); 30 M. ft. 
b.m. erecting permanent tunnel tim- 
bering; 45 M. ft. b.m. erecting timber 
in bridge: 4510 ft. 18-in. to 72-in. corr. 
metal pipe (laying); 39,000 cu. yds. 
gravel surface (furnish and place); 
147,000 sq. ft. oil treating surface; 27,- 
000 lin. ft. guard rail. 

This call for bide does not cover the 
purchase of materials which are to be 
furnished by the government. 



SAN ANSELMO, Marl Co., Cal — 
Town trustees declare intention (96) 
to improve Essex St., involving grad- 
ing, hyd. cem. cone, curbs, gutters 
and headwall, hyd. cem. cone, pave., 
vit. pipe sewers with wye branches 
and laterals, vit. pipe lampholes. 1911 
Act. Hearing Feb. 2. F. D. Burrows, 
city clerk. 

SONORA, Tuolumne Co., Cal.— City 
council plans extensive street im- 
provement program during current 
year, involv. grading, rock, surf, and 
oiling. Work will be financed from 
General Fund. *1 



KING CITY, Monterey Co., Cal.— 
W. A. Dontanvllle, at $9,096.72 award- 
ed contract by city council to Improve 
portions of Mildred Ave., Involving 
grading, hyd cem cone, curbs, 6-ln. 
hyd. cem. cone, pave. Complete list 
of bids follows: 

W. A. Dontanvllle $ 9.091! 

Granite Const, i'o 9,744 

A. J. Ralsch 10,176 

J. L. Connor 10,260 

Engineer's estimate 8,880 

Project Involves 43,171 sq. ft. grad- 
ing and paving and 1698 lin. ft. curbs. 



PACIFIC GROVE, Monterey Co., 
Cal. — City council declares Intention 
(3327) to improve Laurel Ave. bet. 
Congress Ave. and Willow St.. and 
be) Willow St. and Alder St., involv- 
ing cem. cone, curbs and gutters; oil 
macadam surface pavement, to be 
composed of graded rock not less than 
13 lbs. per sq. ft. and Dur - Emulse 
emulsified asphalt, not less than 1-gal. 
per sq. yd.; two cone, catchbaslns; 
cem. cone, driveways. 1911 Act. Bond 
Act 1915. E. C. Hurlbert, city clerk. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Bureau of En- 
ineering, Department of Public W'k.s. 
rd floor, City Hall, completes speci- 



ations 


to Improve 


.Tossing of 


Alli- 


l and 


Hanover Sts 


Est. cost $1600. 


olving 








94 


lin. ft. arm. 


red cone, curb; 


660 


sq. ft. 1-co 

walks; 


urse cone. 


side- 


4 


brick catchliasins; 




75 


lin. ft. 10-il 


. V.C.P. cu 


Ivert ; 


2,894 


sq. ft. asph. 


cone, pave 


ment. 




consisting 


of 2-in. a 


phait 




concrete 


surface on 


6-in. 




class "F" 


concrete base. 



PACIFIC GROVE, Monterey Co.. 
Cal.— Until February 5, 7:30 P. M., 
bids will be received by Elgin C. 
Hurlbert, city clerk, (3308) to improve 
Grand Ave. bet. Ocean View Avenue 
and Park Place, involving cem. cone 
curbs, oil macadam surface pavement 
(composed of graded rock not less 
than 13 lbs. to sq, ft.) and Duremulse 
emulsified asphalt; cem. cone, drive- 
ways; 4-in. vit. clay lateral sewers. 
1911 Act. Bond Act 1915. 

Certified check 10% payable to city 
required with bid. Plane on file in 
office of clerk. 



UNIT BID LISTING ON SANTA 

CRUZ COUNTY BRIDGE PROJECT 

SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal.— As previously reported. Prank 
Bryant, 2911 23rd St., San Francisco, at $28,804.72 submitted low bid to 
the county supervisors to construct a timber bridge with reinforced con- 
crete floor over the Southern Pacific tracks near Felton Station, Zayante 
Creek and Zayante Road in San Lorenzo Road District. 

C. C. Gildersleeve, 1608 G St., Napa, at $33,989 submitted low bid for 
steel bridge with reinforced concrete floor. 

Following is a complete list of the unit bids received: 

TIMBER CONSTRUCTION 

(a) 690 cu. yds. excavation; (d) 236 cu. yds. "A" concrete (floor 

(b) 170 cu. yds. "B" coneretet foot- paving); 

ings and abutments); (e) 31.000 lbs. reinforcing steel; 

(c) 40 cu. yds. "A" concrete (bent); (f) 240,000 ft. redwood timber. 



(a) 

Frank Bryant, San Francisco $2.00 

M. B. McGowan, San Francisco 1.00 

C. C. Gildersleeve. Napa 2.00 

Lord & Tlshop. Sacramento 1.00 

Leo Cardwell, Santa Cruz 1.50 



(b) 


(e) 


(d) 


$17.00 


$19.80 


$14.52 


10.50 


18.50 


15.00 


16.00 


18.00 


11.50 


22.00 


24.00 


14.00 


16.29 


20.90 


13.08 



(e) 



(a) 450 cu. yds. 

(b) 226 tons stri 

(c) 365 cu. yds. 

paving); 

C. C. Gildersleevf 

Frank Bryant 

M. B. McGowan.. 
Lord & Bishop.. 
Leo Cardwell 



STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

excavation; (d) 22 cu. yds. "A" concrete (bent); 

c. steel (lump sum); (e) 213 cu. yds. "B" cone, (footings) 
"A" floor (f) 48,000 lbs. reinforcing steel; 

(g) 16,000 ft. redwood timber, 
(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 

$2.00 $19,420 $17.00 $20.00 $16.00 $.042 
2.00 20,300 17.02 19.80 17.00 .04 
1.00 21.741 15.00 20.00 12.00 .05 
1 00 21.000 16.00 24.00 22.00 .045 
1.50 21,367 18.86 20.88 16.29 .046 



$100.00 
84.00 

120.00 
90.00 

100.00 



BIDS OPENED FOR PIPE FITTINGS 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Following bids received by Thomas Oughton, city 
purchasing agent, under Specification No. 2297, to furnish galvanized hy- 
draulic, banded type, fiittings, have been taken under advisement, (all 
bidders of Los Angeles): 

(1) 10.000 only, 1-in. galvanized malle- able do; 

able iron elbows, banded type; (4) 1,000 only, IVi-in. galv. malle- 

(2) 1,000 only, lte-in. galv. malle- able iron tees, banded type; 

able do; (5) 5,000 only, 2-in. galvanized malle- 

(3) 5.000 only. 2-in. galvanized malle- able do. 
The bids were: 

(1) 

Calif. Pipe & Supply Co $14.55 

Hickev Pipe & Supply Co... 13.22 

M. O. Haldeman Corp 14.55 

Petroleum Equip. Co 14.55 

Crane Company 19.25 

Ducommun Corp 19.35 

Griffith Pipe & Supply Co. 13.14 

Santa Fe Pipe & Sup. Co 

Pacific Pipe & Sup. Co 19.35 

Fitzpatrick & Locke 19.33 



(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


Totals 


$29.19 


$39.19 


$45.85 


$58.30 


$7097.70 


26.44 


44.07 


40.77 


49.50 


6677.10 


29.19 


39.19 


41.70 


58.30 


7038.40 


29.19 


39.19 


45.85 


58.30 


7079.90 


34.05 


44.35 


51.00 


66.30 


6534.00 


34.25 


44.44 


50 86 


66.08 


S312.10 


26.30 


43.85 


40.65 


49.33 


6641.50 


34.25 


44.44 


50.86 


66.08 


8312.10 


34.25 


44.44 


50.86 


66.08 


8312.10 



Twenty-six 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



Contracts Awarded ^.Acceptances, & c . 



BUILDING PERMITS 





San Francisco County 




No 


Owner 


Contractor 


Amt. 


29 


Hapola 


Owner 


4000 


30 


Michael 


Owner 


5000 


31 


Globe 


Balliet 


8000 


32 


Keeley 


Owner 


3000 


33 


Mirsky 


Standard 


3500 


34 


Schroeder 


Mangels 


4000 


35 


Weber 


Cobby 


4000 


35 


Ran 


Owner 


6000 


36 


Castle 


Owner 


3000 


37 


Nyland 


Owner 


3750 


38 


Laguens 


Owner 


8000 


39 


Caro 


Cox 


12500 


40 


S F Theatre 


Salih 


2000 


41 


Morris 


Owner 


9000 


42 


Christensen 


Owner 


4000 


43 


Anderson 


Owner 


27000 


44 


Rainier 


Villadsen 


5000 


45 


Hoern 


Owner 


3200 


46 


Tofanelli 


Foliotti 


1350 


47 


Eerwick 


Owner 


6000 


48 


Galli 


Owner 


1000 


44 


Laguens 


Owner 


5000 


45 


McCleave 


Owner 




46 


Coliseum 


Erumfield 


4948 


47 


Hallgren 


Owner 


4000 



DWELLING 

(29) E 42nd AVE. 325 N Geary St.: 

one - story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
Owner— J. Hapala, 376 4th Ave. 
Plans by Owner. $4000 



DWELLING 

(30) W 12th AVE. 193 S Santiago; 

one - story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
Owners— J. Michael and C. Bomerer, 

762 De Haro St. 
Plans by Owners. $5000 



DWELLINGS 

(31) W 32nd AVE. 350 S Quintan; 

two 1 -story and basement frame 

dwellings. 
Owner— G lobe Securities Co., 740 

Hunter-Dulin Bldg. 
Plans by Owner. 
Contractor— F. F. Balliet. 8 10, 47th 

Avenue. each $4000 



DWELLING 

(32) E DANTON 125 N Cayuga St.; 
one - story and basement frame 
dwelling. 

Owner— J. Keeley, 4668 18th St. 
Plans by Owner. $3000 

DWELLING 

(33) W 27th AVE. 25 S Rivera; one- 
story and basement frame dwell- 



sky & Son, Inc 



218 



Owner— B. Mil 

Castenada. 
Plans by Builder. 
Contractor— Standard Bldg. Co.. 218 

Castenada. $3500 



DWELLING 

(34) NE DEMING Way and Uranus 
Terrace; one-story and basement 
frame dwelling. 

Owner — W. S. Schroder, 407 41st Ave. 

Architect— C. F. Strothoff, 2274 15th 
Street. 

Contractor— H. C. Mangels, 1142 Ma- 
ple St. $4000 



ALTERATIONS 

(35) No. 650 SECOND ST. Altera- 
tions to offices. 

Owner — C. F.Weber Co., Premises. 

Architect— N. E. Norberg, 580 Market 
St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— J. W. Cobby & Son, 260 
Tehama St., San Francisco. $4000 



GARAGE 

(35) 2G16 THIRD ST.; one-story class 
C garage (public). 

Owner— S. Ran, 234 5th St. 

Plans by B. K. Dobkowitz, 425 Mont- 
erey Blvd. $6000 



DWELLING 

(36) NW 24th AVE. and Wawona; 1- 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ing. 

Owner and Builder— Castle Bldg. Co., 
830 Market St. 

Architect— Not Given. $3000 



D WELLING 

(37) E BAYSHORE BLVD. 325 N 

Thornton; 1-story and basement 

frame dwelling. 
Owner and Builder— O. Nylund, 3900 

Folsom Street. 
Architect— Not Given. $3750 



DWELLINGS 

(38) W YORK 30 S 25th St.; two 2- 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ings. 

Owner and Builders — Laguens & Plov. 

2220 Mission St. 
Architect— F. W. Dakin, 625 Market 

Street. each $4000 

APARTMENTS 

(39) E 24th AVE. 275 N Irving St.; 
two-story and basement frame (4) 
apartments). 

Owner— C. and J. Caro, 2763 Bush St. 
Plans by Mr. Cox. 

Contractor— L. H. Cox, 1950 Irving St. 
$12,500 

REPAIRS 

(40) SE CLEMENT and 9th Ave., re- 
pair fire damage to theatre. 

Owner — San Francisco Theatres, Inc., 

25 Taylor St. 
Architect — S. C. Lee, Los Angeles. 
Contractor— Salih Bros., 25 Taylor St. 
$2000 



DWELLINGS 

(41) W PINEHURST 72 N Kenwood; 

two 1 -story and basement frame 

dwellings. 
Owner and Builder— G. W. Morris, 95 

Pinehurst Way. 
Plans bv D. E. Jaekle, Call Bldg. 

each $4500 



DWELLING 

(42) E 22nd AVE. 260 N Judah St.; 

one - story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
Owner— H. Christensen, 1422 27th Ave. 
Plans by Owner. $4000 



APARTMENTS 

(43) W 25th AVE. 100 N Fulton St. 

three-story and basement framt 

(12) apts. 



CAPITAL CITY TILE 
COMPANY 

J. C. PALEN 

Manager 

914 Seventh Street 
Sacramento - - - - OHfornia 



ALTERATIONS 

(44) 1550 BRYANT ST.; alterations 

to lay concrete flooring. 
Owner — Rainier Brewing Co., 15 5 

Bryant Street. 
Plans by Owners. 
Contractor— Villadsen Bros., Inc., 417 

Market St. $5000 



DWELLING 

(45) NE ROUSSEAU 175 NW Cay- 
uga; 1 -story and basement frame 
dwelling. 

Owner — A. Hoern, 177 Highland Ave. 

Architect— Not Given. $3200 



STORE 

(46) 944 COLUMBUS Avenue; one- 
story and basement frame store. 
Owner— S. Tofanelli. 
Plans by Owner. 

Contractor— R. Foliotti, 949 Filbert St. 
$1350 



DWELLINGS 

(47) E DANTON 200 N Cayuga; two 

one - story and basement frame 

dwellings. 
Owner and Builder— A. Berwick, 1525 

Noe St. 
Architect— Not Given. each $3000 



CONCRETE WALL 

(48) E EIGHTH AVE., 100 N Nor- 
iega; reinforced concrete wall. 
Owner— R. F. Galli, 1574 28th Ave. 
Plans by Owner. $1000 



DWELLING 

(44) NW PINEHURST 201 NE Ken- 
wood; 1-story and basement frame 
dwelling. 

Owner and Builders — Laguens & Lar- 
son, 369 Ashton Ave. 

Plans bv Owner. $5000 



ALTERATIONS 

(46) 745 CLEMENT ST.; remove old 
and install new marquee. 

Owner — Coliseum Theatre, 745 Cle- 
ment St. 

Architect — Not Given. 

Contractor— Brumfleld Elec. Works, 
965 Folsom St. $4948 



BUILDING 


CONTRACTS 


SAN FRANC 
No. Owner 


SCO COUNTY 
Contractor Amt. 


6 Regents 

7 Eureka 

8 Same 

9 Same 

10 Same 

11 Same 

12 McCarthy 


Moore 88805 

Mattock 34142 

Zelinsky 2012 

Sugarman 2200 

Pinkerton 2390 

Atlas 1380 

Meyer 7200 



DWELLING 

(45) SE 41st AVE. and Clement St.; 

two - story and basement frame 

dwelling. 
Owner— Mrs. E. R. McCleave, 1927 

Sutter Street. 
Architect— A. O. Johnson, 16 Turk St. 
$4500 



DWELLING 

(47) E 23rd AVE. 125 N Moraga; one- 
story and basement frame dwell- 
ing. 

Owner and Builder— A. Hallgren, 1594 
29th Avenue. 

Plans by Owner. $4000 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-seven 

Chrlstensen to whom It may con- 
cern Jan. 13, 1931 

Jan 13, 1931— N JACKSON 40 W 
Stelner W 35xN 92-8%. Frederick 
G and Juanita Zelinsky to W K 
Irvine and Henry Jacks (as Jacks 
& Irvine, Inc) Jan. 9, 1931 

Jan. 13, 1931— SE MARKET AND 
First frontage 91-8 on Market and 
137-6 on First. Mark Sheldon Co 
to Chas H Moore and A P Teele 
Jan. 13, 1931 

Jan. 13, 1931— SW ULLOA ST. AND 
Twenty-fifth Ave S 25xW 95. N 
E Johnson to whom it may con- 
cern Jan. 13, 1931 

Jan. 13, 1931— E TWENTY-FOURTH 
Ave 191 N Kirkham 25x120. Chris- 
tian Andersen to whom it may 
concern Jan. 12, 1931 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOTS 41 AND 42 BLK 
6801, Map Castle Manor. Castle 
Bldg Co to Henry Horn ...Jan. 6, 1931 

Jan 12, 1931— NOS 42 and 44 CASA 
Way, bet. Marina Blvd. and 
Retire R P Baron to C D De 
Velbiss Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan. 10, 1931— W THIRTIETH AVE 
200 S Cabrillo S 25xW 120. H C 
and S J Arndt to Orrin Knox & 
Son Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— S PINE 112-6 W 
Gough W 25xS 120. H D Hopper to 
W C Boswall Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— W VALENCIA 257-6 
N Sixteenth 25x90. J Mancuso to 
whom it may concern.. ..Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— LOT 16 BLK 20, Map 
Sunnyside. H J Ohlsen to whom 
it may concern Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan 10, 1931— W TWENTY-FIRST 
Ave 225 S Moraga 25x120. G and 
B Leask to whom it may concern 
Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931 — SIXTEENTH ST. 
plant of Associated Oil Co. Asso- 
ciated Oil Co to Bay City Iron 
Works Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan 9, 1931— PTN LOT 15 BLK 5835 
St Marys Park: NE line lot 15 
and NW Benton Ave N 51" 52' W 
106-58 S 38" 08' W 2S S 51* 52' E 
111-26 NE 28-387. A R and H M 
Johnson to whom it may concern 
January 2. 1931 

Jan 9, 1931— SW NAGLEE AVE 
27-6 SE Huron Ave Lot 1 Blk 17 
West End Map 2. Patrick Horgan 

to whom it may concern 

January 8, 1931 

LIENS FILED 



15 



Kavanagh 
Pollak 



Atwood 720 
Atwood 920 

mangels 51)18 



EQUIPMENT 

u;> SAN FRANCISCO Campus, Uni- 
versity of California; Installation 
of mechanical equipment in cen- 
tral heating plant. 
Owner— Regents of the University of 

California. 
Architect— B. F. Raber. 
Contractor— C. C. Moore & Co., Shel- 

don Bldg. 
Filed Jan. 9, '31. Dated Jan. 5, '31. 

1st of every month 75% 

Usual 35 days 25% 

TOTAL COST, $88,S05 
Eond, $44,500. Sureties, U. S. Guar- 
antee Co. Forfeit. $50. Limit, 168 
days. Plans and Spec, filed. 



BUILDING 

(7) N POST and E Scott E 62-6xN 
87-6. General construction for 
building. 
Owner — Eureka Benevolent Society. 
Architect— S. L Hyman and A. Apple- 
ton, 6S Post St., San Francisco. 
Contractor— A. F. and C. W. Mattock, 

212 Clara St., San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 10, '31. Dated Dec. 17, '30. 

On 5th of each month 75% 

Usual 35 days..... 25% 

TOTAL COST, $31,142 
Bond, $36,142. Surety, Indemnity In- 
surance Co. Limit, 100 days. Forfeit, 
none. Plans and specifications filed. 
NOTE— $1000 extra for supervising 
and directing construction of building. 



(8) PAINTING WORK ON ABOVE. 
Contractor — D. Zelinsky Sons, Inc., 

165 Grove St., San Francisco. 
Fil.-d Jan. 10, '31. Dated Jan. 10, '31. 

Payments same as above 

TOTAL COST, $2012 
Bond, $2012. Surety Commercial Casu- 
alty Co. Limit, as fast as possible. 
Forfeit, none. Plans and specifica- 
tions filed. 

(9) PLUMBING WORK ON ABOVE. 
Contractor — E. Sugarman, 3624 Geary 

St., San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 10, '31. Dated Jan. 10, '31. 

Roughed in 50% 

Completed 25% 

Usual 35 days 25% 

TOTAL COST, $2200 
Bond, $1100. Surety, National Surety 
Co. Limit, 60 days. Forfeit, none. 
Plans and specifications filed. 



(10) HEAT1NK WORK ON ABOVE 
Contractor — Jas. H. Pinkerton Co., 927 

Howard St., San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 10, '31. Dated Jan. 10, '31. 

Payments same as above 

TOTAL COST, $2390 
Bond, $2390. Surety, American Bond- 
ing Co. Limit, as fast as possible. 
Forfeit, none. Plans and specifications 
filed. 



(11) ELECTRIC WORK ON ABOVE. 
Contractor — Atlas Elec. & Engr. Co., 

343 4th St., San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 10, '31. Dated Jan. 10, '31 

Payments same as above 

TOTAL COST, $1380 
Bond, $13S0. Surety, American Bond- 
ing Co. Limit, 60 days. Forfeit, none. 
Plans and specifications filed. 



DWELLINGS 

(12) LOTS 46 AND 47 BLK 2947-A 

Map Sub. 7, Miraloma Park. All 

work for two one-story frame 

dwellings. 

Owner — The McCarthy Co , 46 Kearny 

St., San Francisco. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor — Meyer Bros., 727 Portola 

Drive, San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 12, '31. Dated Dec. 18, '30. 

Side and roof sheathing on $2800 

Brown coated 1800 

Completed and accepted 1800 



■ Usual 35 days 1800 

TOTAL COST, $7200 
Bond, none. Limit, 90 days. Forfeit, 
none. Plans and specifications filed. 

EOILER, ETC. 

(13) E RETIRO WAY 50 N Beach 

St.; boiler, radiators and valves, 

and pipe fittings. 
Owner— D. S. Kavanagh. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— A. G. Atwood, 3623 18th 

Avenue. 
Filed Jan. 13. '31. 1 lated Dec. 8, '30. 
Payments not given. 

TOTAL COST, $720. 



BOILER, ETC. 

(14) 496 GROVE STREET; gas boiler, 
breeches, radiators and valves, 
electric clock, terra cotta flue, etc. 
Owner — Mr. Pollak. 
Architect — None. 
Contractor— A. G. Atwood, 3623 18th 

Avenue. 
Filed Jan. 13, '31. Dated Nov. 18, '30. 

On delivery $250 

Balance in 12 equal monthly in- 
stallments. 

TOTAL COST, $920 



BUILDING 

(15) NE COR. DEMING WAY and 
Uranus Terrace; all work on one- 
story and basement frame build- 
ing. 
Owner— Wm. H. and A. A. Schroeder, 

407 41st Ave. 
Architect— C. F. Strothoff, 2274 15th 

Street. 
Contractor— H. C. Mangels, 1141 Na- 
ples St. 
Filed Jan. 13, 'SI. Dated Jan. 9, '31. 

Frame up $1254 

Brown coated 1254 

Completed and accepted 1254 

Usual 35 days 1254 

TOTAL COST, $5018 
Limit, 90 days. Plans and Spec, filed. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



San Francisco County 

Recorded Accepted 

Jan 6, 1931— NW CAYUGA AVE 150 
SW Lamartine SW 25 x NW 100. 
J Horn to whom it may concern.... 
January 5. 1930 

Jan 6 1931— E YORK ST 70 N 25th 
St 25x75. J R and H M Schroff 

to G L Plov and V P Laguens 

December 29. 1930 

Jan 6, 1931— NE TOCOLOMA AVE 
and Lathrop Ave 30x100. Wm H 
Grahn to whom it may concern ... 
January 3, 1931 

Jan 8. 1931— NW HOWARD 225 SW 
7th SW 50 x NW 165. Julius and 
Dorothea Harband and Arthur 
Wagner to Schultz Const Co 

January 6, 1931 

Jan 8, 1931— LOT 2 BLK 36 map of 
Ingelside Terraces. F E and V 

E Augustiny to H W Armbrust 

January 8, 1931 

Jan 8. 1931— W 27th AVE 50 and 75 

5 Rivera St 25x82 6/12. E Mirsky 

6 Son Inc to Standard Bldg Co 
(two completions) Jan 8, 1331 

Jan 8, 1931— N FELL ST, 109 x N 
120, SW corner of lot being 100 E 
of NE corner Van Ness Ave. The 

Viavi Co to Barrett & Hilp 

November 24, 1930 

Jan 6, 1931— SW COR FRANKLIN 
and Elm Sts, No 711 Franklin St. 
F Barriere to whom it may con- 
cern January 2, 1931 

Jan 6, 1931— W 25th AVE 275 S 
Ulloa St S 25 x W 120. N E John- 
son to whom it may concern 

January S, 1930 

Jan 13, 1931— NE CALIFORNIA and 
Franklin Sts. First Church of 
Christ Scientist to C M Moore and 
M P Madsen as Moore & Madsen 
December 26, 1930 

Jan. 13, 1931— E TWENTY-SECOND 
Ave 160 N Judah N 50x120. H 



San Francisco County 

Jan. 13, 1931— NE MCALLISTER & 
Laguna N lOOxE 30. Joseph W 
Dolan vs Skelly Estate Co and Jas 
J O'Connor $25 

Jan 9, 1931— N CABRILLO ST bet 
23rd and 24th, No 2242 Cabrillo St. 
Selva Bros vs S and M Piercy $78 

Jan 6, 1931— LOTS 1 to 10 INC BLK 
4 Heyman Tract No 2. Pacific Mill 
& Cabinet Co vs Heyman Bros 
and C Mourgos, trustee for J, G, 
E and A Mourgos $238.15 

Jan 6, 1931— NE NEWCOMBE St 275 
NW Ingalls St NW 25 x NE 100. 
Z Dominguez vs H and D Rojo.... 
$481 

Jan 6. 1931— NE HAYES ST and 
Van Ness Ave N 60-0% x E 109. 
Standard Distributing Co vs Edw 
and Arline M Rolkin, Max Schall- 
man and J Bush $229 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



San Francisco County 

Recorded Amount 

Jan 9. 1931— SE MARKET and NE 
12th St SE 275 NE 83-94 N 324-58 
SW 226-96. E B Morf and G Pence 
as Pence-Morf Electric Co to A 
J Stern, W Graf and S J Peyser.. 



Twenty-eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Jan. 3, 1930— SE MISSION 100 NE 
Russia Ave NE lOOxSE 108-6, G 
Bianchi ; J Condi anil Excelsior 
Builders Supply Co to J Hill and 
A U and V B Frank 

Jan 10 1931 — W FOURTEENTH 
Ave 220 S Taraval S 30xW 135. 
Chas W Higgins and E J Kraus; 
A Cook and J H Kruse to J E and 
T C Peterson; F H Lisi and H W 
Bott ___-.-. 

BUILDING PERMITS 

ALAME DA COUNTY 



No. Owner 



Contractor Amt. 



20 Bemis 

21 Mayer 

22 Sorenson 

23 Miller 

24 Firestone 

25 U S Battery 

26 Flagg 

27 Short 

28 Kingman 

29 Grubb 

30 Henning 

31 Von Salzen 

33 Marston 

34 Brain 

35 Brusasco 

36 Chamberlain 

37 Compton's 

38 Moore 

39 Rodrigues 

40 Russell 

41 Miller 

42 U C Storage 

43 Mauzy 



Owner 

Owner 

Paige 

Porter 

Thrams 

Brown 

Watson 

Owner 

Anderson 

Owner 

Harwood 

Swansctrom 

Thorpe 

Roberts 

Peppin 

De Velbiss 

Owner 

Dooley 

Owner 

Owner 

Stockholm 

Electrical 

Shaw 



RESTAURANT 

(20) SW CORNER 42 

way, OAKLAND; 

taurant. 
Owner and Builder — K. 

San Pablo Ave., Of 
Architect— Not Given. 



2000 
120000 
1500 
4800 
7000 
1400 
3000 
15600 
5900 
3300 
2000 



5000 
2000 
3200 
6000 
3000 
11000 



$20110 



APARTMENTS 

(21) W CRESCENT ST. 130 S Santa 
Clara Avenue, OAKLAND; three- 
story 100-room apartments. 

Owner and Builder— R. E. Mayer, 1129 
McKinley Ave., Oakland. 

Architect— D. D. Stone, Howden Bldg., 
Oakland. $120,000 



ADDITION 

(22) 5809 IVANHOE ROAD, OAK- 
LAND; addition to garage. 

Contractor — H. L. Paige, 5651 Oak 

Owner — H. L. Sorenson, 5809 Ivanhoe 
Road, Oakland. 

Architect— W. E. Schirmer, 700 21st 
Ave., Oakland. 
Grove Ave., Oakland. $1500 



RESIDENCE 

(23) NO. 698 CRAGMONT AVE., 

BERKELEY. One-story 6-room 1 

family frame residence. 
Owner — H. D. Miller, 732 Cragmont 

Ave., Berkeley. 
Architect— W. H. Hooper. 
Contractor — Porter & Porter, 209 

Amhurst Ave., Berkeley. $4S00 



ALTERATIONS 

(24) 288 11th STREET, OAKLAND; 
alterations. 

Owner— Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— C. H. Thrams, 28 Home 

Place, Oakland. $7000 

ALTERATIONS 

(25) 2536 WEBSTER STREET, OAK- 
LAND; alterations. 

Owner— U. S. L. Battery Co., 98th 
Ave. and Bancroft Ave., Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— H. Brown, 1S9 Warwick 
Ave., Oakland. $1400 

DWELLING 

(26) NO. 723 WOODLAND AVE., SAN 
LEANDRO. One-story five-room 
dwelling . 



Owner— J. S. Flagg, 3562 Redwood Rd., 

San Leandro. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— Wm. Watson, 1036 Balboa 

St., Burlingame. $3000 



FLATS 

(27) N FLEMING AVE 200-240 W 
Seminary Ave , OAKLAND. Two- 
story 10-room (2) flats. 

Owner— C. W. Short, 574 Rosal Ave., 
Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $7800 each 



RESIDENCE 

(28) No. 1680 LA LOMA AVE., BER- 
KELEY. Two-story i,6-room 1- 
family frame residence. 

Owner— H. L. Kingman, 374 17th St., 
Oakland. 

Architect — Williams & Wastell, 374 
17th St , Oakland. 

Contractor — W. H. Anderson, 1014 
Doris Court, Alameda. $5900 



DWELLING 

(29) E 105TH AVE 240 S Beverly 
Ave. OAKLAND. One-story six- 
room dwelling. 

Owner— Jas. B. Grubb, 2012 38th Ave., 
Oakland . 

Architect— None. $3300 



ALTERATIONS 

(30) NO. 1006 SEVENTH AVE. .OAK- 
LAND. Alterations and additions 
to apartments. 

Owner — L. H. Henning, Premises. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor — Harwood & Peppard, 1116 
Kains Ave., Oakland. $2000 



GARAGE 

(31) W SEVENTEENTH AVE 90 N 

E-14th S 1 OAKLAND. One-story 

brick garage and shop. 
Owner — John Von Salzen, 2245 10th 

Ave., Oakland. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor — Geo. Swanstrom, 1723 

Webster St., Oakland . $2500 



I 'WELLING 

(32) NO. 2707 CLAY ST., ALAMEDA. 

One-story 5-room frame and stucco 

dwelling. 
Owner— N. F. Justice, 973 Pearl St, 

Alameda. 
Architect— Not Given. $3750 



ALTERATIONS 

(33) NO. 1111 REGENT, ALAMEDA. 

Alterations and additions. 
Owner — T. Marston, Premises. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— V. Thorpe, 1715 Alameda 

Ave., Alameda. $1500 



APARTMENTS 

(34) E ERIE ST.. 150 N Mandana 
Blvd., OAKLAND; three-story 48- 
room apartments. 

Owner— Louise B. Brain, 3600 Lake- 
shore Ave., Oakland. 

Architect — Not Given. 

Contractor— R. G. Roberts, 3001 Ful- 
ton St.. Berkeley. $40,000 



DWELLING 

(35) 4536 WEST ST.. OAKLAND; 1- 
story 4-room dwelling. 

Owner— John B. Brusasco. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— Peppin & Johnson, 21S5 
50th Ave., Oakland. $2900 

REPAIRS 

(36) NE COR. 12th and Washington 
Sts , OAKLAND; fire repairs. 

Owner— Selah Chamberlain, Mills 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— C. D. DeVelbiss, 354 Ho- 

bart St.. Oakland. $2000 

ALTERATIONS 

(37) 447 12th STREET, OAKLAND; 
alterations. 



Owner and Builder — Gene Compto 

Inc., 1124 Broadway, Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $: 



DWELLING 

(38) E OAKMORE ROAD 40 North 
Casterline Road, OAKLAND; one- 
story 5-room dwelling. 

Owner— E. T. Moore. 

Architect — Not Given. 

Contractor— F. T. Dooley, 3936 Vale 
Ave., Oakland. $5000 



DWELLING 

(39) W 10t7h AVE. 

OAKLAND; on< 

dwelling. 
Owner and Builder— J. F. 

926 39th Ave., Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given. 



$2000 



DWELLING 

(40) S SCOTT ST., 250 E 94th Ave., 
OAKLAND; one-story six-room 
dwelling and 1-story garage. 

Owner and Builder— Geo. H. Russell, 
8121 Idlewood St.. Oakland. 

Architect— Not Given. $3200 



ELEVATOR 

(41) NO. 445 MOUNTAIN AVE., 

PIEDMONT. Elevator. 
Owner — Annie Miller, Premises. 
Architect — Bakewell & Weihe, 251 

Kearny Ct., San Francisco. 
Contractor — Cnas. Stockholm Sons, 

Russ Bldg., San Francisco. $6000 



SIGNS 

(42) NW COR. 46th ST. and Shat- 

tuck Ave., OAKLAND; roof sign 

and two electric signs. 
Owner— U. C. Storage Co.. 46th and 

Shattuck Ave., Oakland. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— Electrical Prod. Corp., 950 

30th St., Oakland. $3000 



ALTERATIONS 

(43) 1140 GRIZZLY PEAK BLVD., 

BERKELEY: alterations. 
Owner — Mrs. V. Mauzy, premises. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— Arthur W. Shaw, 5 4 1 
Broadway. Oakland. $11,000 



BUILDING 


CONTRACTS 


ALAMEDA COUNTY 




No. Ownir 


Contractor 


Amt. 


2 Miller 


Finzel 


1018 


3 Miller 


Bell 


1595 


4 Miller 


Woolf 


1965 


4 Firestone 


Thrams 


8700 


5 Howard 


Picard 


3896 


6 Regents 


Turner 


22035 


7 Regents 


Grodem 


116995 


8 Regents 


Lawson 


4041 


9 Dinkelspie! 


Mattock 


20500 


10 Taylor 


Jensen 


15400 


11 Catholic 


Furlong 


43000 



PLUMBING 

(2) 2850 TELEGRAPH AVE.. Oak- 
land; plumbing for additions and 
alterations, together with a new 
chapel building. 

Owner— Grant D. Miller, 1028 Holly- 
wood, Oakland. 
Architect — Miller and Warnecke, Fi- 
nancial Center Bldg., Oakland. 
Contractor — Max Finzel, 2025 Hopkins 

St.. Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 8, '31. Dated Jan. 5, '31. 

When roughed In $500 

When completed - 300 

Usual 35 days 218 

TOTAL COST, $1018 
Bond, $1018. Sureties, Globe Indem- 
nity Co. Limit, 90 days. Plans and 
Spec, filed. 

(3) HEATING on above. 
Contractor— Geo. C. Bell, 1826 E 15th 

St.. Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 8, '31. Dated Jan. S, '31. 

When piping is installed $595 

When accepted 700 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-nine 



Usual 35 days 300 

TOTAL COST, $1595 
Bond, $1595. Sureties. Globe lndem- 
! nlty Co. Limit. 90 days. Plans and 
Spec, filed. 

(4) ELECTRICAL WORK on above. 
Contractor— Geo. Woolf, Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 8, '31. Dated Jan. 5, '31. 

When roughed In $650 

For electric fixtures on order of 

architect 1000 

When completed 215 

Usual 35 days 100 

TOTAL COST, $1905 
Bond, $1965. Sureties, Globe Indem- 
nity Co. Limit, 90 days. Plans and 
Spec, filed. 

KTc iRE & SERVICE STATION 

(4) ELEVENTH and Harrison Sts,, 
Oakland; general construction )n 
tire store and service station. 

Owner— Firestone Realty Co., prem- 
ises. 

Architect— Not Given. 

Contractor— C. H. Thrams. 28 Home 
Place, Oakland. 

Filed Jan. 13, '31. Dated Dec. 20, '30. 

15lh of each month 75% 

Usual 35 days Balance 

TOTAL COST, $8700 

Bond. $8700. Sureties. Ralph W. Kin- 

nev. Limit, Feb. 2, 1931. 



HEATING SYSTEM 

(5) 1545 SANTA CLARA AVE., Ala- 
meda; installing steam heating 
system in bungalow court. 
Owner— C. C. Howard. 1541- \i Santa 

Clara Ave., Alameda. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— W. H. Picard, Inc., 5656 

College Ave., Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 13, '31. Dated Sept. 30, '30. 

Cash $711 

Balance in 18 equal monthly in- 
stallments begining Jan. 16th. 

TOTAL COST, $3896 
Specifications filed. 



MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT 

(6) CAMPUS of the University of 
California, Berkeley; installing me- 
chanical equipment in Memorial 
Eldg. 

Owner — Regents of the University of 
California, Berkeley. 

Architect— Geo. W. Kelham. 315 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Contractor— The Turner Co., 329 Te- 
hama St., San Francisco. 

Filed Jan. 13. '31. Dated Jan. 6, '31. 

1st of each month 75% 

Usual 35 days Balance 

TOTAL COST, $22,035 

Bond: Labor and Materials, $12,000; 

Performance. $12,000. Sureties, U. S. 

Guarantee Co. Forfeit, $25 per day. 

Limit, 180 days. Plans and Spec, filed. 



MEMORIAL BLDG. 

(7) GENERAL Construction of above 

Memorial Bldg. 
Contractor— J. J. Grodem & Co., 1028 

San Antonio Ave., Alameda. 
Filed Jan. 13, '31. Dated Jan. 7. '31. 

1st of each month 75% 

Usual 35 days Balance 

TOTAL COST, $116,995 
Bond: Labor and Materials. $59,000; 
Performance, $59,000. Sureties, Fidel- 
ity and Deposit Co., of Maryland. For- 
feit. $125 per day. Limit, 180 days. 
Plans and Spec, filed. 



PNEUMATIC TUBE SYSTEM 
(8) CAMPUS of the University of 
California, Eerkeley; completion of 
pneumatic tube system for hos- 
pital building. 
Owner— Regents of the University of 

California, Berkeley. 
Architect — W. P. Stephenson, Univer- 
sity of California. Berkeley. 
Contractor — The Lawson Company. 

611 Howard St . San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 13, '31. Dated Jan. 7, '31. 

On completion 75% 

Usual 35 days Balance 

TOTAL COST, $4041 
Bond: Labor and Materials, $2,100; 
•Performance. $2100. Sureties. Stand- 



Spec, filed. 



RESIDENCE 

(9) ESTATE of Mrs G. W. Hellman, 
Jr., Oakland; general construction, 

painting and lighting fixtures on 
residence. 

Owner — Lloyd and Florence Dinkel- 

splel. 
Architect— Jas H. Mitchell, 369 Pine 

St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — A. F. and C. W. Mattock, 

212 Clara St., San Francisco. 
Filed Jan. 14, '31. Dated Jan. 7. '31. 

Monthly payments of 757,, 

Usual 35 days Balance 

COST plus 10%. not to exceed $20,500 
Plans and Spec, filed. 



RESIDENCE 

(10) ALVARADO ROAD, Berkeley; 
Lot 15 Block 4, Hotel Claremont 
Trac,; general construction on J- 
story and attick frame residence 
and garage. 
Owner— Mvron D. Taylor. 
Architect— W. R. Yelland, Financial 

Center Bldg., Oakland. 
Contractor — Jensen & Pedersen, 3443 

Adeline St., Oakland. 
Filed Jan. 14, '31. Dated Jan. 9, '31. 

When frame is up $3850 

First coat of plaster 3850 

When accepted 3850 

Us ual 35 days 3850 

TOTAL COST, $15,400 
Limit, 90 days. Plans and Spec, filed. 



CHURCH 

(11) NW EXCELSIOR AVE. and 
Emerson St., Oakland: general 
construction on concrete church 
and basement except lathing and 
plastering, heating and roofing. 
Owner— The Roman Catholic Arch- 
bishop of San Francisco, 1100 
Franklin St., San Francisco. 
Architect— Wm. E. Schirmer, 700 21st 

St., Oakland. 
Contractor — Thos. F. L. Furlong. Em- 
erson Ave. and Excelsior Street, 
Piedmont. 
Filed Jan. 14, '31. Dated Jan. 12, '31. 

When 1st floor joists laid $8062.50 

When roof sheathing is on.... 8062.50 

When brown coated _ 8062.50 

When completed 8062.50 

Usual 35 days 10750.00 

TOTAL COST, $43,000 
Bond. $43,000. Sureties. Aetna Cas- 
ualty & Surety Co. Limit, 150 davs. 
Plans and Spec, filed. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 10, 1931— PTN LOTS 48 AND 
49 BIk D, Lakeshore Hills, Oak- 
land. Byard C Taylor to whom it 

may concern Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— ON STATE HIGH- 
way bet. Dublin and Hayward. 
(property of May Howard and 
Alexander M Anderson). Dept. of 
Public Works, Division of High- 
ways, State of Calif, to Rufus 

Gonsalves Jan. 9, 1931 

Jan 9, 1931— LOT 23 BLK K, Durant 
Manor. Oakland. Charles W and 
Ada J Griffith to whom it may 
concern January 8, 1931 



Jan 9, 1931— LOT 27 BLK K. Durant 
Manor. Oakland. Charles W and 
Ada J Griffith to whom it may 
concern January 8, 1931 

Jan 9. 1931— LOT 205 BLK M, Fern- 
Mil. . Alameda. Noble F Justice 

to whom it may concern 

January 8. 1931 

Jan 9, 1931— WEBSTER STREET at 
the Oakland Estuary, Alameda. 
Associated Oil Co to A H Davies .. 
January 5, 1931 

Jan 8, 1931— SW 32nd and Chestnut 
Sts, Oakland. J F Summers to 
whom it may concern Jan 2, 1931 

Jan 7. 1931—2643 70th AVE. Oak- 
land. E S Hanson to Self 

January 5, 1931 

Jan 7. 1931—176 ATHOL AVENUE. 
Oakland. Mae E Morehouse to C 
W Leekins January 6, 1931 

Jan 7, 1931— ALTAMOUNT PASS, 
State Highway bet Greenville and 
San Joaquin Countv Line. Dept 
of Public Works, Div of High- 
ways, State of California to Chas 
W Beguhl January 2, 1931 

Jan. 9, 1931— LOT 37 BLK H, Clare- 
mont Pines, Oakland. Benton A 
and Mabel I Sifford to J M Olson 
Jan. 6. 1931 



LIENS FILED 



Jan 13. 1931— PTN LOTS 14 AND 
149, Unit C, Oak Knoll, Oakland. 
Boorman Lumber Co, $267.37; 
Freitas Plumbing & Heating Co, 
$158 vs Jesse D and Jewell R Col- 
bert and Wm Arthur 

Jan. 13, 1931— NW E-FIFTEENTH 
St. and Thirteenth Ave, Oakland. 
City of Oakland vs $57.79 

Jan. 13, 1931— NO. 2838 GRANT ST., 
Berkeley. Bay City Asbestos Co, 
Inc vs Leon F Marsh; Vivian 
Marsh and Gerald W Marsh J155 

Jan. 12, 1931 — NO. 48S THIRTY- 
fifth St., Oakland. R B Mont- 
gomery vs Axel C Nelson and 
Henry Nelson Bros $39 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 143-H, Unit C. 
Oak Knoll, Oakland. T A Ryan vs 
J D Colbert and Wm Arthur....$138.25 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 143-H, Unit C, 
Oak Knoll, Oakland. Melrose 
Bldg Material Co vs J D Colbert 
and Wm Arthur $243.95 

Jan. 10, 1931— E LENOX AVE 350.55 
SE Montecito Ave., Oakland. Wilis 
C Lowe vs Albert and Emily Kroll 
$3564 

Jan 9, 1931— LOT 17 BLK 4, Thous- 
and Oaks Heights, Berkeley. Sun- 
set Hardware Co vs Earle R and 
Fraye M Converse $74.30 

Jan 9, 1931— NORTH END E 14th 
St and 14th Ave, Oakland. Atlas 
Sales Co vs R L Jones and Mel- 
rose Steel Co $175 

Jan 7. 1931— PTN LOTS 148 and 149 
Oak Knoll Unit C. Oakland. Walt- 
er Maiden vs Jesse D and Jewel 
R Colbert, Wm Arthur $43.75 

Jan 7, 1931— SE 13th and WASH- 
INGTON Sts, Oakland. Carl T 
Doell Co vs Julius and Hugo 
Abrahamson, Earl S Harless and 
F J Golfuss $169 



Member Insurance Brokers' Exchange 

FRED H. BOGGS 

INSURANCE 

490 GEARY STREET 



Phone FRanklin 9400 



San Francisco 



Thirty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING CONTRACTS 



SAN MATEO COUNTY 

GARDEN WALLS 

NO. 670 BREWER DRIVE, Hills- 
borough. All work for garden 
walls, etc. 
Owner — Ethel S. Henderson, Prem. 
Architect— Not Given. 
Contractor— G. W. Williams Co., Ltd., 
2807 Adeline St., Burlingame. 

Concrete poured V\ 

Plastered *4 

Completed *4 

Usual 35 days Vi 

TOTAL COST, $34S0 
Bond, none. Limit, 40 working days- 
Forfeit, none. Plans and specifica- 
tions filed. 



COMPLETION NOTICES 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 5, 1931— LOT 4, Oakknoll Manor 
Mary T Casaretto to whom it may 
concern Dec. 29. 1930 

Jan. 7, 1931— LOTS 21 AND 23 BLK 
Schultz et al to Schultz Constr Co 
Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan. 8, 1931— LOT 5 BLK 5, Bay- 
wood. Gordon C Hess et al to W 
O Nicolaide s Jan. 7, 1931 

Jan. 8, 1931— PART LOTS 16 AND 
17 Blk 6, Polo Field. Edmund 

Bourne to G W Williams Co 

Jan. 2, 1931 

Jan. 8, 1931— LOT 4 BLK 11, Abbey 
Homestead. G Martini to W E 
Merritt Jan. 1, 1931 

Jan. 9, 1931— SOUTH SAN FRAN- 
cisco and Burlingame. State High- 
way Commission to Basich Bros 
Constr Co Jan. 3, 1931 

Jan. 9, 1931— NW CARMELITA AVE 
Burlingame. Mary C Hess et al 
to Gordon C Hess Jan. S, 1931 

Jan. 2. 1931— PART LOT 14 BLK 4, 
Burlingame Shore Land Co. Anna 

J Tegner to Grove Pederson 

Dec. 31, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOT 22 BLK 5, Con- 
cordia Land Co., San Mateo. 
Pietro Pastorino to Joseph Ragni 
Dec. 23, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOT 35 BLK 2, Jeffer- 
son Park, San Mateo. Castle Bldg 
Co to Henry Horn Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— PART LOT 6 and Lot 
7 Blk 6, Blosom Heath Manor, San 
Mateo. Castle Bldg Co to Henry 
Horn Dec. 31, 1930 

Jan. 4, 1931— LOT 7, Bowie Estate, 
San Mateo. Raimund B Wurlitzer 
to Lloyd C Simpson Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan. 4, 1931— LOT 30 BLK 2-A, 
Aragon . Meyer Bros to whom it 
may concern Jan. 2, 1931 

Jan. 6, 1931— LOT 13 BLK 21, Rob- 
inson Sub., San Mateo. Eric 
Slandquist as to improvements on 
property Jan. 6, 1931 

Jan. 6, 1931— LOT 3 BLK 32, Red- 
wood Highlands. Charles H Beck- 
man to whom it may concern 

Jan. 6, 1931 

Jan. 6. 1931— PART LOTS 11, 12 & 
13 Blk 11, Menlo Heights. Leon 

Lewis to whom it may concern 

Jan. 6, 1931 

LIENS FILED 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Jan. 9, 1931— LOT 2 BLK 2, Red- 
wood Farm. Progress Lumber Co 
vs S J Clements $579.27 

Jan. 7, 1931—2.95 ACRES LAND, 
Part of Bella Britton Lands , Red- 
wood City Hardware Co vs 
Amanda Thai et al $192.91 

Jan. 7, 1931— LOT 2 BLK 15, Bay- 
view Heights. W A Heiman et 



al vs Martin Peterson $47.50 

Jan. 2, 1931— LOTS 19 AND 22 BLK 
6, Lomita Park. San Mateo Feed 
& Fuel Co vs Jerry Deil et al..$103.90 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOT 2 BLK 15, Bay- 
view Heights. Peerless Plumbing 
& Supply Co., $201 70; F G Peter- 
son, $87; Palo Alto Lumber Co, 
$518 vt' Martin Peterson et al 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOTS 14 AND 15 BLK 
2, Bayview Heights. F G Peterson 
vs Martin Peterson $49.50 

Jan. 31, 1931— LOT 2 BLK 9, Eagle 
Hill Addition. Leon A Demars vs 
C G Lambert et al $50 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOT 2 BLK 2, Waste 
Whilten Montgomery Subd. Leon 
A Demars vs C G Lambert et al 

Jan.' 4, 1931—2 95 ACRES, Mary Bell 
Britton Tract. Donald B Sevier 
et al vs R L Dineley $1044. 5S 

Jan. 6, 1931— LOT 1 BLK 21, Town 
of San Mateo; Easton Part of. 
San Francisco Roofing Co vs Hugh 

Ridge et al (2 liens) 

..$205 and $165 respectively 



BUILDING PERMITS 



PALO ALTO 



RESIDENCE, stucco, $S700; No. 1178 
Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto; owner, 
E. H. Helm, 419 University Ave., 
Palo Alto; contractor, John E. 
Hanson, 253 Fulton St., Palo Alto. 

BUILDING PERMITS 



REDWOOD CITY 



M. 



ADDITIONS and alterations to fram 
dwelling, $2000; No. 273 Arlingb 
Road, Redwood City; i 
Dulik; contractor, C. F. Magne 
114 Hudson St.. Redwood City. 

DWELLINGS rooms and bath and ga 
rage, $3000; No. 1165 Clinton St. 
Redwood City; owner, and con 
tractor, Geo. J. Lehman. 



BUILDING PERMITS 



BURLINGAME 



BUNGALOW, $4000; Lot 12 Blk 2, Oak 
Grove Ave., Burlingame; owner 
and contractor, Milton Flnlof, 540 
Francisco St., Burlingame. 
STORE and apartments, $16,700; Lot 
21 Blk 14, Broadway, Burlingame; 
owner, Geo. Lemperogulas, 1212 El 
Camino Ave., Burlingame; con- 
tractor, I. Sorensen, 1128 Lincoln 
St , Burlingame. 
Jan. 12, 1931— S KATHERINE AVE 
at NW cor of parcel of land deed- 
ed to owner. Angus L and Vera 
Vitelle to whom it may concern.... 
Jan. 10, 1931 

COMPLETION NOTICES 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Dec. 29, 1930— S DANNA ST. 80 W 
Mt. View Ave., Mountain View. 
William Dirksen to whom it may 
concern Dec. 25, 1930 

Dec. 30, 1930— E LINCOLN AVE 200 
N Minnesota Ave, San Jose. G W 
Brown to whom it may concern 
Dec. 28, 1930 

Dec. 30, 1930— LOT 19 BLK 2, Gar- 
den City Tract, San Jose. Lena 
Fate Delmue to whom it may con- 
cern Dec. 30, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— PART 500 ACRE LOT 
26. Pietro Piane et al to whom it 
may concern Dec. 31, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— LOT 7 BLK 3, Lincoln 
Gates. Charles W Sannin to whom 
It mayconcern Dec. 30, 1930 

Dec. 31, 1930— LOT 8 BLK 2, Rest- 



wood Park No. 2. Alfred D Zeder 

et al to whom it may concern 

Dec. 27, 1930 

Jan. 2, 1931— LOT 14 BLK 3, N R 6 
W Miller & Lux Western Addi- 
tion, Gilroy. W F Sechrest to 
whom it may concern Jan. 2, 1931 

Jan. 3, 1931— LOTS 18 AND 19 BLK 
2, Vendome Park, San Jose. Lucy -• 
A Addington to whom it may con- 
cern Jan. 2, 1931 

Jan. 5, 1931— LOT 16, Greenside Ter- 
race, except ptn conveyed to Santa 
Clara County. Mary G Santana to 
whom it may concern....Dec. 26, 1930 

Jan. 5, 1931 — LOT 1, Broadway 
Court, San Jose. W H Ackerman 
to whom it may concern. .Jan. 3, 1931 

Jan. 6, 1931— NE FULTON ST and 
SE Tennyson Ave SE 63xNE 125 ft. 
being all Lot 10 and part Lot 11 1 
Blk 141. Embarcadero Oaks, Palo 
Alto. Enoch M Brickey to whom 
it may concern Jan . 5, 1931 

Jan. 7, 1931— LOT 4, Taaffe Parti- 
tion, San Jose. Francis V Bloch 
to whom it may concern. .Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan. 7, 1931— LOT 9 BLK 33, Los 
Altos No. 3. W H Sherman to 
whom it may concern. ...Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan. 8, 1931— LOTS 11 AND 12 BLK 
26, College Terrace, Palo Alto. E 
H Tucktr & A H ExcelL.Jan. 6, 1931 

Jan. 8, 1931— LOT 7 BLK 7, Rose 
Lawn. Martin Volkmann et al to 
whom it may concern ...Jan. 8, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— TULLT ROAD, San 
Jose. Board of Trustees Frank- 
lin School District to whom it may 
concern (heating Franklin School) 
Jan. 9, 1931 

Jan. in, 1931— TULLY ROAD, San 
Jose. Board of Trustees Frank- 
lin School District to whom it may 
concern (Franklin Grammar 
School) Jan. 9, 1931 

Jan. 12, 1931— NO. 591 OREGON AVE 
Palo Alto. Louise Fixes et al to 
whom it may concern Jan. 8, 1931 

Jan. 12. 1931— LOT 14 BLK 62, Seale 
Addition No 2, Palo Alto. Fred 
and Carrie Kunz to whom it may 
concern Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 12, 1931— PART LOT 40, Lyn- 
dale Subd.. San Jose Jay C Goold 

et al to whom it may concern 

Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 38 Palmita Park 
Mountain View. Earl D Minton 
to whom it may concern. ...Jan. 9, '31 

LIENS FILED 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Jan. 9, 1931— E % LOT 2S, Emerson 
Tract, San Jose. Phillip Schmidt 
vs Evan Churin $116.25 

Jan. 9, 1931— E % LOT 28, Emerson 
Tract, San Jose. W C Duckgeis- 
chel vs Evan Churin $161 28 

Jan. 12, 1931— SUBD 13 BLK 89, 
Palo Alto. Edward P Cashel vs 
John C Whipple $89.13 

Dec. 29, 1930— S 30 FT. LOT 5 and 
N 17 2/12 ft. Lot 6 Blks 3 and 4 
North Range 1, East, Gilroy. J I 
Gray vs Lawrence Vincino $33.60 

Dec. 29, 1930— NW FOURTEENTH 
and North Sts., San Jose. M W 
Reese vs P M Takaichi $227.60 

Dec. 29. 1930— NW COLLEGE AVE 
50 SW Williams St SW 37%xNW 
115 ft. part Lot 7 and all Lot 8 
Blk 40, College Terrace, Palo Alto. 
Progress Lumber Co vs Willis J 
Sheldon $80.37 

Dec 29, 1930— NW COLLEGE AVE 
SW Williams St. SW 37%xNW 115 
ft. Part Lot 7 and all Lot 8 Blk 
40, College Terrace, Palo Alto. 
Merner Lumber Co vs Willis J 
Sheldon $464.86 

Dec. 29, 1930—10 ACRES on North 
Homestead Road. Fred Bowen vs 






Saturday, January 17, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Thirty-one 



Perry Camacho et al $32.29 

an. 2, 1931— NE THIRTEENTH & 
Santa Clara Sts., San Jose. J A 
Ferguson vs L A Peckham et al.. 
_ $198.45 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Dec. 30, 1930— LOT 5 and NE M Lot 
4 Blk 5. East San Jose Homestead 
Assn. Henry Cowell Lime & Ce- 
ment Co to Nellie Saries $82.40 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 5 BLK W, Los 
Altos Country Club Properties. G 
W Wilson to Kathryn Nielson....$225 

Jan. 12. 1931— LOT 5 BLK W, Los 
Altos Country Club Properties. 
Sunset Lumber Co to Jessie R 
Grant et al $284.85 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 5 BLK W, Los 
Altos Country Club Properties 
Peninsular Roofing Co to Kathryn 
Nlelson $437 



BUILDING CONTRACTS 



MONTEREY COUNTY 



STORE 

MAIN ST., Salinas. All work for one 

story and mezzanine floor store 

building. 
Owner— W. M. Irvine, 75 Willow St.. 

Salinas. 
Architect — Milton W. Morrison, 601 

42nd Ave., San Francisco, 
Contractor — E. F. Reese, 158 Central 

Ave., Salinas. 
Filed Jan. 12. '31. Dated Jan. 7, '31. 
On or before 10th of ea month 75% 

Usual 35 days 25% 

TOTAL COST, $24,000 
Bond, $24,000. Surety, The Fidelity & 
Casualty Co, of New York. Limit, 125 
working days. Forfeit, none. Plans 
and specifications filed. 



HOTEL 

NW MAIN AND CENTRAL AVE., 
Salinas. All work or one-story 
Class C hotel. 
Owner — James Trigonis, 103 Central 

Ave., Salinas. 
Architect — Willis E. Huson, San 

Francisco. 
Contractor— R V. Thompson, 7 Pajaro 

St., Salinas. 
Filed Jan. 7, 1931. Dated Jan. 6, 1931. 

1st floor joists in place 1/5 

Ceiling joists in place 1/5 

Roof sheathing in place 1/5 

Interior plastering finished 1/5 

Usual 35 days 1/5 

TOTAL COST, $16,000 
Bond, $8000. Surety, Howard Chad- 
bourne and C. B. Phillips. Limit, 90 
working days , Forfeit, none. Plans 
and specifications filed. 

LIENS FILED 



MONTEREY COUNTY 



Recorded Amoun 

Jan. 7, 1931— LOT 1 BLK 15, Home- 
stead Addition, Monterey. P C 
Storm vs Lavenna P Lake; Thad 
S Lake and William A Williamson 



COMPLETION NOTICES 



MONTEREY COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 4 BLK 19, Map 

of Monterey Heights. Laura M 

Williams to Oscar Parraguez 

Jan. 7, 1931 

Jan. 6, 1931— LOT 6 BLK 3, Maple 
Park Addition No. 2, Monterey, 
William Carpenter to Bruce E 



Balrd Jan. 6, 1931 

Jan. 7, 1931— LOT 54 BLK 9, Lang 
& Kessel's Addition to City of Sa- 
linas. John O Breschinl to whom 
it may concern Jan. 6, 1931 

BUILDING PERMITS 



MARTINEZ 



DWELLING and garage, frame and 
stucco, $4000; Location omitted, 
Martinez; owner, .1. E. and M. J. 
Antrobus; contractor. Jack Mar- 
tin and J Bennett!. 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



MARIN COUNTY 



Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 7, 1931— SAUSALITO. Kate O 

Smith to Walter L Broderick 

Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan . 9, 1931— HAWTHORNE HILLS, 

San Anselmo. Ed Rhodes to 

Harold E Squire Jan. 9, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931 — HAWTHORNE 

Hills, San Anselmo. Harold Squire , 

to Chas E Service Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— H A W THORNE 

Hills. Horald Squire to Chas A 

Service - Jan. 10, 1931 

Jan. 2, 1931 — N E A F TIBURON. 

Wm Geo Clerc to whom it may 

cern Dec. 24, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— LARKSPUR. S Virzi 

to whom it may concern 

Dec. 26, 1930 

Jan. 3, 1931— CORTE MADERA. S 

Virzi to whom it may concern 

Dec. 26, 1930 

Jan. 6, 1931— TIBURON TWP. Hugo 

Cattani to whom it may concern 

Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan 6, 1931— SAN ANSELMO. Mabel 

S Hines to E E Vaugham.Jan. 2, 1931 



LIENS FILED 



MARIN COUNTY 



Fecorded Amount 

Jan. 2, 1931— TAMALPAIS WOODS 

Addition near Mill Valley. Mill 

Valley Lumber Co vs Jos R H Ja- 

coby $643.01 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



MARIN COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Jan. 8, 1931— SAUSALITO. Marin 

Lumber & Supply Co to P F Frund 

$517.15 

Jan. 10, 1931— SHORT RANCH, San 
Anselmo. Dallas Perrenot to 
Gallia Fisher $117 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 7, 1931— PTN LOT 21, Govern- 
ment or Gwin Ranch California 
Water Service Co to E H Mellen- 
camp (Unit No. 3, Chenery Filter 
Plant) Dec. 31, 1930 

Jan. 7, 1931— PTN LOT 16 BLK G 
Berkeley Park. R W Serviss to 
R O Brown Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan 7, 1931— LOT 6 BLK 102, Castro 
St. Extension Tract, Richmond. A 
E Warburton to whom it may 
concern Dec. 30, 1930 

Jan. 8, 1931— ALL OF BLK 5 ex- 
cept Lots 1 and 2 fronting on Ten- 
nent Ave, bet Pear and Plum Sts, 
Town of Pinole. Roman Catholic 

Church to Valine & Lawrence 

Dec. 31, 1930 

Jan 10, 1931 — MEMORIAL BLDG. 



Richmond. J H Wells, County 
Clerk to Lamble & Lamble (paint- 
ing) Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— CONTRA COSTA 
County Hospital. J H Wells, 
County Clerk, to Benjamin Hall. 

Addition to laundry building) 

Jan. 5, 1931 

Jan. 10, 1931— LOTS 27 AND 28 BLK 
67, Richmond Annex. Joseph Fara 
to Chas F Kayser .Tan 8, 1931 

Jan, 5, 1931— SCHOOL AND FRONT 
Sts., Pittsburg. Pittsburg School 

District to George J Maurer 

Jan. 2, 1931 

Jan. 5, 1931— EAST BAY MUNI- 
clpal Utility District in Counties 
of Alameda and Contra Costa. East 
Bay Municipal Utility District to 
Horace Phillips and John Gon- 
salves (removal of all timber, etc. 
from properties) Dec. 31, 1930 

Jan. 5, 1931— EAST BAY MUNI- 
cipal Utility District in Counties 
of Alameda and Contra Costa. East 
Bay Municipal Utility District to 
Hutchinson Co (repairs on as- 
phaltic concrete surfacing of Sts. 
within or adjacent to the boun- 
daries) Dec. 31. 1930 

RELEASE OF LIENS 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Recorded Accepted 

Jan. 13, 1931— LOT 11 BLK 2, Grand 
View Terrace, Berkeley. Aladdin 
Heating Corp to Mrs. Mabel D 
Bullis $381.50 

Jan. 10, 1931— PTN LOTS 1 AND 2 
Blk 12. Cragmont, Berkeley. Ed- 
ward W Brodrick to Mary M Wal- 
ton, James G Walton, Jean E Wal- 
ton and J Harry Smith $3S 

Jan. 6, 1931— PORTION LOT 14 BLK 
A No. 1, Parkside Addition and 
Racetrack Sub. Concord, being also 
known as Lot 19, Adams Sud- 
division. D J Baldwin and W H 
George (as Concord Mercantile Co) 
to C F and Lillian Adams (2 re- 
lease of liens) 

LIENS FILED 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 

Jan. 9, 1931— LOT 11 BLK 137, E of 
Center St., Stockton. Fisher Bros 
Lumber & Mill Co vs Perry E Fol- 
som, H E McVay and W G By- 
water $173.75 

Jan. 9, 1931 — KRESS BUILDING, 
Stockton. Raphael Glass Co vs J 
S Metzger & Sons; S H Kress & 
Co; George L Bishop; Eva Brooks 
and Florence Brooks $2195 

Jan. 9, 1931 — KRESS BUILDING, 
Stockton Ilg Electric Ventilating 
Co vs Paul W Hirshberg (as Cit- 
izens Sheet Metal Works) and S H 
Kress & Co $1468.90 

Jan. 7, 1931— KRESS BUILDING, 
Stockton. Star Lumber Co vs J S 
Metzger & Son; S H Kress & Co; 
George L Bishop; Eva and Flor- 
ence Brooks $173.06 

BUILDING PERMITS 



STOCKTON 



REPAIR fire daamage, $1300! No. 527 
N-Arganout St., Stockton; owner, 
Georga S. Sharp, Premises. 

BUILDING PERMITS 



SACRAMENTO 



SERVICE station, $2000; No. 500 Y 
St., Sacramento; owner, R. W. 
Bird, Route 7, Box 2714, Sacra- 
mento. 



Thirty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 17, 19 



GENERAL repairs, $1000; No, 1120 1 
St., Sacramento; owner, Mrs. Anna 
Menkin, 91B 11th St., Sacramento 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Recorded Accel ted 

Jan. 6, 1931 — LOTS 30 and 4 Land 
Drive Terrace Unit 1, Sacramento 
McClatchy Realty Co and Robert- 
son Govan Co to whom it may 

concern Jan 6, 1931 

Jan 6, 1931— LOT 3, Land Drive Ter- 
race Unit 1; Lot 19, Land Drive 
Terrace Unit 1, Sacramento. Mc- 
Clatchy Realty Co and Robertson 
Govan Co to whom it may concern 

Dec 31, 1930 

Jan, 8, 1930 — NO. 2750 TWELFTH 
Ave., Sacramento. Sacramento 
Orphanage and Children's Home 
to whom it may concern (2 com- 
pletions) Jan. 7, 1931 

Foundations Only (all Classes) 
Jan. 12, 1931— LOT 34, South Curtis 
Oaks Subdivision No. 2, Sacra- 
mento. Bernard J Rea to whom 
it may concern Jan. 8, 1931 



LIENS FILED 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Recorded Amount 

Jan. 8, 1931— S 20 FT. OF N 60 FT. 

of W 60 ft. Sacramento C B Conn 

vs Joseph B Mazzuchi and Emil 

Biscard $216.47 

Jan. 6, 1931— N 100 FT. LOT 5 BLK 
5, North Sacramento Sub. No. 8. 
Cutter Mill & Lumber Co Ltd vs 
Hazel Warren Hill $420.78 

BUILDING PERMITS 



FRESNO 



ALTERATIONS and additions, $1000; 
No. 2015 Fresno St., Fresno; own- 
er, Betty Shoppe, Premises; con- 
tractor, E. J. Farr & Son, 129C 
Linden St., Fresr.o. 

ALTERATIONS and additions, $1000; 
No. 2250 Harvey St., Fresno; own- 
er, Walter Lynn . 

COMPLETION NOTICES 



FRESNO COUNTY 



Recorded Ac-pled 

Jan. 10, 1931— LOTS 9, 10 AND 11 
Blk 121, Sanger. W H Jones to 
whom it may concern Jan. 9, 1931 



LIENS FILED 



FRESNO COUNTY 



Recorded Amount 
Jan. 8, 1931— LOT 9, Salinger Ter- 
race, Fresno. Guilbert Wholesale 
Electric Co vs Guido Giometti et 
al $1263 



OFFICIAL PROPOSALS 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 



SEALED BIDS will be received by 
Geo. B. McDougall. State Architect. 
Public Works Building, 11th and P 
Streets. Sacramento, California, up to 
2 o'clock P. M., Tuesday, Feb. 10, 1931, 
said bids thereafter on said day to be 
publicly opened and read for the erec- 
tion and completion of the Cottage 
for Employees, Stockton State Hos- 
pital, Stockton, California, in accord- 



ance with plans and specifications 
therefore. 

The Building is to be a two-story 
reinforced concrete structure with 
wood partition, floor and roof con- 
struction, and tile roof. The total 
floor area is approximately 6,700 si] Ci 

Separate bids will be entertain d .is 
follows: 

1. General Work, 

2. Electrical Work. 

3 Plumbing and Heating Work 

4. Complete Plumb ng, Heating and 
Electrical Work. 

Contractors must state clearly in 
their application the particular seg- 
regation of work that they desire plans 
for. 

Plans and specifications are on file 
for examination in the offices of the 
Division of Architecture, Public W'ks 
Building, Sacramento, and Room 1025 
Associated Realty Building, Los An- 
geles, and at the principal California 
Cities Builders' Exchange Offices. 

Plans, specifications, and proposal 
forms may be secured by licensed 
Contractors who have qualified or 
who will qualify by furnishing a ver- 
ified statement of experience and fi- 
nancial condition as required by the 
provisions of Chapter 644. Statutes 
1329, and whose statements so fur- 
nished are satisfactory to the Depart- 
ment of Public Works. Questionnaire 
forms may be secured from the Di- 
\isirm «.f Architecture. 

Bids will not be accepted from a 
Contractor to whom a proposal form 
has not been issued and all bids must 
be on proposal forms supplied by the 
State. 

Requests for plans shall be accom- 
panied by a deposit of twenty - five 
($25. 00) dollars. Check shall be made 
payable to the Department of Public 
Works, Division of Architecture. De- 
posit will he returned upon receipt 
of the set in good condition, at Sac- 
ramento Office of the Division within 
30 days after opening bids, otherwise 
it will be forfeited to the State. 

All bids must be filed at the office 
of the State Architect on or before 
the time heretofore stated and in ac- 
cordance with the "Rules for Bidding" 
ying the proposal form. 



No bid will be considered ur 
cash, a bidder's bond made pavabh 
to the State of California, or a c<_ 
tied check made payable to the "Statt 
Engineer. Department of Publii 
Works," in the sum of at least lei 
per centum (10%) of the amount o 
the bid is enclosed with the bid. 

The Division of Architecture, De 
partment of Public Works, reserve: 
the right to reject : ny or all bid~ anjj 
to waive any informality in any bk 
received 

DEPARTMENT OF PC LIT WORKS 
DIVISION OF ARCHITECTURE 
GEO. B. McDi lUGALL, 

State Architect. 
W. E. GARRISON, 
Director of Public Work; 



A. O. Smith Corporation of Milwau- 
kee during 1930 shipped 472,000 tons 
of electrically welded pipe to all part ; 
of the United States, compared with 
425,000 tons in 1929. The 1930 ton- 
nage, according to Carl C. Joys, Jr . 
manager of pipe sales, consisted of 
about 3,000 miles, or 24,272 carloads 
The mileage was nearly the same a; 
in 1929, and the carloads compared 
with 30,474 in 1929. More heavier i 
was made during the year just closed 
than in the previous year. 



George Ulrich, general contractor of 
Modesto, has been elected presiden 
of the Modesto Chamber of Commerce 



Russian softwood, mostly spruce, 
amounting to some 7,000,000 board 
feet, arrived on consignment in Ha- 
vana, Cuba, during the past year and 
approximately 56 per cent remains 
unsold, says a recent communication 
from Acting Commercial Attache Al- 
bert F. Nufer at Havana to the lum- 
ber division of the Department of 
Commerce. This Russian lumber c 
sists of spruce and pine, the bulk of 
the shipments being spruce. Of the 
total quantity delivered, about 3,900,- 
000 board feet remain unsold, of which 
3,700.000 board feet are spruce. The 
Cuban trade reports that the primary 
use to date of this Russian lumber 
has been for box manufacture. 




A "Pittsburg" Auto- 
matic Water Heater 
installed in the Home 
indicates high quality 
throughout. 

Recommended and speci- 
6ed by all the leading ar- 
chitects, plumbers and 
builders. 

Consider the high merit 
of the Pittsburg coupled 
with 'Pittsburg Perfect 
Service." 

"Hot water quick as a 
wink." 



Pittsburg Water Heater Co. 

. Makers of "Pittsbutg Automatic" — "Bungalow Automatic" 

Storage Systems and "Lyon" Tank Water Heaters. 

309 13th Street, Oakland 478 Sutler St., San Francisco 

SEND FOR CATALOGS 



« JAM MUMMMAV 



*■ « uimmuiu,u mum u_ 



Building 



and 



Engineering 

— NEWS _ 



3E 



WW l-fTC 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 24, 1931 



Published Every Saturday 
Thirty-first Year, No. 4 




EXCHANGE 
GLencort 7400 



Send For a Sample Copy 

Of The NEW 

Daily Pacif icBuilder 

The only daily construction newspaper 
affording complete coverage of the con- 
struction activities in Central and Northern 
California, featuring work contemplated, 
bids wanted, bids opened, contracts award- 
ed, sub-bids wanted and sub-contracts let on 
all types of building construction, bridges, 
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machinery and equipment; water works 
and supplies business opportunities, build- 
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Send for free sample copy today. 



DAILY PACIFIC BUILDER 

545-547 Mission St. San Francisco, Calif. 
GArfield 8744-8745-8746 



Building and Engineering News 



Devoted to the Architectural, Building. Engineering and Industrial Activities on the Pacific Coast 



Issued Bvery Saturday 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 24, 1931 



Thirty-first Ye 



No. 4 



Subscription terms, payable in ad- 
vance: 

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Canadian and Foreign, per year.. 6.00 
Single Copies 25c 

Entered as second-class matter at 
San Francisco Post Office under act 
of Congress of March 3, 1S79. 



STARK - RATH PRINTING AND 

PUBLISHING CO., Publishers 

545-547 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfield 8744-8745-8746 

J. P. FARRELL, Editor 

J. E, ODGERS, Advertising Manager 



SERIES OF LECTURES 

ON CONCRETE MIXING 



New 



ethods of mixing concrete to 
secure a definite strength will be ex- 
plained and demonstrated with lan- 
tern slides by Mr. J. W. Kelly of Chi- 
cago in a series of lectures on design 
and control of concrete mixtures, it is 
announced by Arthur P. Denton, dis- 
trict engineer for the Portland Ce- 
ment Association, 

The first of these lectures will be 
held in the Jubilee Room of the Sena- 
tor Hotel at Sacramento next Monday 
evening. The second lecture will be 
held in the auditorium of the Pacific 
Gas & Electric Building in San Fran- 
cisco on January 2S, the third at the 
Builders" Exchange, 354 Hobart St., 
Oakland on January 29 and the fourth 
in Room 120 of the State Teachers' 
College at San Jose on January 30. 
Each lecture will commence at 7:30 
P. M. 

These lectures are a continuation of 
a series of talks, given several years 
ago, to bring before architects, engi- 
neers and contractors the new de- 
velopments in mixing and placing con- 
crete which have been recently dis- 
covered. The discussion covers major 
research projects, Improved methods 
now in use and new machinery for the 
control of quality concrete. The talk 
is illustrated by lantern slides. A 
few of the important local structures 
on which scientifically controlled con- 
crete has been used are the Suisun 
Bay Bridge of the Southern Pacific, 
the Russ, Hunter-Dulin and Shell 
Buildings in San Francisco and the 
seven and a half mile San Mateo- 
Hayward Bridge. 

There is no charge for attending 
these talks which are open to anyone 



iter 



sted. 



PROTESTS PAYING 

WAGES BELOW SCALE 



The 



cutive council of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, in session 
at Miami, Fla., directed the sending 
of a telegraphic protest to President 
Hoovor against the action of hwda of 
departments who have awarded con- 
tracts for government work to con- 
tractors who pay wages below the 
prevailing rate in the different com- 
munities. 

William Green, president 
Federation, said: 



the 



"The 



of 



cf 



these contractors who are follow- 
ing this policy will be submitted 
to the President with a vigorous 
protest against their low wage 
policy and their indefensible action 
in the payment of low wages 
which are known to be lower than 
the rates paid in private industry 
where government work is per- 
formed. 



COURT RULES ON 

PAYMENT TO WRONG 
ACCOUNT BY DEALER 



It Is well settled that if no direction 
is given by a contractor to which ac- 
count a meterialman shall credit a 
payment, credit may be given by the 
creditor to the oldest account, says 
Leo T. Parker, attorney, in the Gen- 
eral Building Contractor. So held the 
higher Court in Shreveport, Co., vs. 
Meek, 12G So. 513 In this case it was 
shown that a contractor, who had 
several accounts with a materialman, 
paid the latter a sum of money with- 
out directing what account should be 
credited. The materialman credited 
the payment to the oldest account and 
later sued to recover payment of the 
account which the contractor intend- 
ed to pay when the payment was 
made. 

However since the contractor testi- 
fied that when the payment was made 
he instructed the bookkeeper of the 
materialman to credit the amount to 
a particular account the Court held 
the materialman should have credited 
the money to the named account in- 
stead of the oldest one. 



NEW QUARTERS FOR 

STOCKTON BUILDERS 



Confidently anticipating a marked 
upturn in the building industry in the 
San Joaquin Valley area, the Stock- 
ton Builders' Exchange in special 
meeting last Thursday night voted to 
move their offices from 20 North San 
Joaquin Street to more spacious quar- 
ters at 242 East Miner Avenue. 

The change was voted. Secretary E. 
M. Lewis reported, in order that dis- 
play windows and a display space on 
the main floor of the offices might be 
available to builders and architects 
for the exhibition of the latest designs, 
household implements, materials etc 
The remainder of the 40 by 5o' foot 
quarters will be devoted to exchange 
offices, estimating quarters and a 
meeting room. 

The Exchange also voted to change 
its meeting date from the first Mon- 
day of the month to the first Tuesdav. 

The annual election of officers will 
be held by the organization on Feb- 
ruary 3, according to L. S. Peletz. 
president of the Exchange. 

There is every indication that the 
building boom anticipated will mate- 
rialize, members of the Exchange 
state. It is expected to develop prin- 
cipally in the construction of residen- 
tial buildings. 

As evidence of their fath in the 
future of Stockton, the Exchange has 
taken a five year lease on its new 
quarters. 

Hoyt Heater Company of Northern 
California, Ltd., capitalized for $75.- 
000, has filed articles of incorporation 
in Oakland. Directors are: R. c. Hoyt 
Ella M. Hoyt and M. M. Lannes ali 
of Oakland. 



All communications for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor. 

Building and Engineering News will 
be sent to subscribers until ordered 
stopped and all orders to discontinue 
must be sent in writing to this office. 



CEMENT PRODUCTION 
AT NEW HIGH RECORD 



A new high record of more than 
100,000,000 barrels' idle capacity was 
set by the Portland cement industry 
of the United States for the year 1930, 
according to production and used ca- 
pacity figures of the U. S. Bureau of 
Mines. 

Many plants throughout the country 
have reported weeks of idleness or 
partial idleness during previous years 
as well as during 1930. Last year, 
however, according to the government 
report, the 165 plants operating pro- 
duced only 61.5 per cent of the ap- 
proximately 260,000,000 barrels of ce- 
ment that they were equipped to pro- 
duce ahd the market been favorable. 
The 1930 production figure of 160,905,- 
000 barrels is a drop of 9,293,000 bar- 
rels from 1929 production 

The cement industry had its biggest 
year in 192S, when a readier market 
permitted the production of 176,300,000 
barrels. Even in that banner year, 
however, according to the Bureau of 
Mines, there was a surplus of 67,400,- 
000 barrels' capacity, or nearly 2S per 
cent of total capacity. 

The industry, according to succes- 
sive Bureau reports, has built 97,000,- 
000 barrels of new capacity since 1923, 
while production, which is held in 
check by market demands, has been 
gaining but 39,000,000 barrels. Thus 
unused capacity in the industry has 
climbed from 24,400,000 barrels, or 15 
per cent of the total, in 1923, to 101,- 
729,000 barrels, or nearly 40 per cent 
of the total capacity, for 1930, as just 
announced. 



NICKERSON, R. R. 

ENGINEER, PASSES 



G. H. Nickerson, chief engineer for 
the Yosemite Valley Railroad, died in 
a San Francisco hospital last Thurs- 
day. Born in Lebanon, Oregon, in 
1863, he entered railwav work when a 
boy. 

He went to Merced in 1906 to take 
charge of construction work for the 
then building Yosemite Valley rail- 
road, having previously served as su- 
perintendent of bridges and buildings 
for the Santa Fe line. 

He remained with the Yosemite Val- 
ley railroad as chief engineer from 
the time of the road's completion un- 
til 1911 when he resigned to enter 
the employ of the Yosemite Lumber 
Company, and for that concern was 
in charge of construction of the first 
incline road at EI Portal. 

Later he became superintendent of 
the Oakdale Irrigation District, re- 
turning to Merced County to become 
superintendent of construction in the 
office of the county engineer, then oc- 
cupied by A. E. Cowell. 

He then returned to the Yosemite 
Valley railroad as chief engineer to 
continue in that capacity until his 
death. 



Two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, Janu 



THE QUANTITY SURVEY AS ADAPTED TO BRICK ESTIMATING 



(By C. L. Weeks, 



sident, Alliance Engineers, Inc., and Vi< 
an Institute of Quantity Surveyors) 



Construction efficiency and success 
is dependent on economy in time and 
material. While great progress has 
been made in economy of design thru 
the scientific working out of engineer- 
ing practice and the development of 
more suitable building material, there 
is still room for improvement in meth- 
ods of construction management, es- 
pecially in the branch of Quantity 
Surveying. 

Economy in Quantity Surveying is 
dependent upon its scientific develop- 
ment in line with a simple, unified 
plan. Such a plan would coordinate 
the various branches of construction 
which are all using different methods 
of arriving at their objective, namely, 
to provide a tabulated list of quanti- 
ties for the primary purpose of arriv- 
ing at a true cost, and for a secon- 
dary purpose of providing a list of the 
material which is required for the 
construction of the particular build- 
ing. 

This purpose is accomplished and a 
plan provided which can be used to 
advantage in all the various crafts 
which compose the entire building in- 
dustry by patterning the various pro- 
cedures in Quantity Survey on the 
following set of general rules. 

1. Measurements of completed con- 
struction work in place are used as 
the standard of measurement in all 
cases and a separate Bill of Material 
is provided to serve for ordering ma- 
terial. 

2. Unit of measurement to be the 
unit (number), lineal, and super- 
ficial area; the third dimension being 
taken as an element of description. 

3. Actual measurements are taken, 
without addition or reduction for the 
purpose of equalizing or providing for 
additional labor or cost, or to take 
care of waste. 

4. Measurements are taken to the 
nearest even lineal feet, and may be 
taken to the nearest even inch in sec- 
tion measurements. Exterior walls 
rnay be taken as outer measurements 
without making allowances for deduc- 
tions or additions for corners. Open- 
ings may be taken at either opening 
size or sash and door size. In case, 
however, there is a deviation exceed- 
ing one per cent in the total amount 
in any one class of measurements, 
more accurate measurements shall be 
taken. 

Sometimes the drawings give one. 
sometimes the other. Both must be 
eventually known, the opening size 
for laying out the construction, and 
the sash and door size for ordering. 
The latter is preferable, but it is 
more important to conform with the 
drawings for identification purposes. 
The Bill of Material must of course 
have the Sash and Door size. 

5. Measurements of the members of 
a structure, or a group of structures, 
are taken in such manner that they 
may be segregated by separate struc- 
tures, separate stories, by different 
types of construction and by differ- 
ing costs, which would necessarily 
include different thicknesses or 
widths. 

6. Abbreviations In general use or 
in accordance with American Insti- 
tute of Architects Document No. 172 
(Filing System of Building Materials 
and Appliances) may be used. 

7. A Quantity Survey should not 
Include drawings or sketches. Refer- 
ence should be made to the drawings 
of the architect or engineer, and it 
may be advisable to get the architect 
to furnish details essential for record 
or reference in such form that they 



may be separately printed and at- 
tached to the Quantity Survey. 

The Quantity Survey compiled in 
accordance with this set of measure- 
ments, providing the description is 
adequate, gives all the data on nearly 
all construction work that is neces- 
sary for one who has proper cost rec- 
ords to accurately price the work. 

A further step is necessary when 
material is to be ordered. The meas- 
urements of the Quantity survey, 
when not in the form of material, are 
developed into a Bill of Material con- 
forming to the usual trade require- 
ments. This means that our Quantity 
Survey used for pricing gives the 
walls in terms of superficial measure- 
ment, square foot area; it does not 
give the number of brick or the yards 
of mortar. This Information is to be 
found in the Bill of Material. One is 
the instrument used for the purpose 
of arriving at cost, the other that 
used for ordering. 

Masonry construction in either brick 
work or stone work may involve a 
great number of different kinds of ad- 
ditional labor, especially in exterior 
wall construction for the purpose of 
ornamentation. These are taken care 
of by the notation, "extra- on 17-inch 
face brick wall," etc., giving the de- 
scription of the extra labor and ref- 
erence to the drawings in such a way 
that Identification may be made. 

Care should be taken to avoid as 
much as possible the enumeration of 
extra labor if it can be included in 
the main items listed. 

Segregation: In segregating by stor- 
ies it is customary to take off the 
work for basement and foundations to 
first floor level, and for each succeed- 
ing floor for all construction contained 
between the floor levels. Sometimes 
we find there are several different 
floor levels for a single story; in such 
a case the principal level is taken as 
datum, and all other measurements 
are taken to this datum regardless 
of whether they come above the fin- 
ished floor or not. Another method 
may be used in certain cases. The 
building may be divided into different 
units, and the levels of the finished 
floors taken as the line of segrega- 
tion, even though thev mav differ in 
elevation. 

Basic Measurements: There are 
three main divisions in every build- 
ing structure into which the entire 
structural part of the building and 
much of the finish may be separated, 
and if basic measurements are pre- 
pared in this manner, it will greatly 
simplify the take off. They are: 

1. Floors, ceilings, roofs and all 
horizontal members. 

2. Exterior walls. 

3. Partitions. 

In taking off there three classes of 
construction it Is also necessary to 
list the respective openings contained 
within them. 

It is important to total units and 
lineals as well as superficies. 

In starting a take off it is good prac- 
tice to begin at a certain point on a 
plan. A logical order is to start at 
the upper left hand corner and pro- 
ceed as in reading a book, to the 
right and downwards. 

Floors, Ceilings, Roofs and All Hor- 
izontal Members: Floors are taken off 
to outside measurements. The basic 
measurements form an accurate set 
of figures of lineals and superficies, 
and duplication in take off is avoided. 
The structural measurements are 
these basic measurements less the op- 
enings for stairs, elevator shafts, etc., 



and with the lineals of walls and par- 
titions multiplied by the thickness de- 
ducted in addition give the quantity 
for the interior finish. Ceilings and 
roofs, if flat, are equivalent to the 
floors below them; if pitched, arched 
or vaulted, the flat horizontal meas- 
urements, multiplied by the proper 
constant, give the surface area. Lin- 
eal measure of exterior walls multi- 
plied by overhang must be added for 
pitched roofs. The different segrega- 
tions added together must equal the 
result of the extreme over-all dimen- 



ithii 



per 



tions should be made. This method 
of checking makes large errors in 
take-off nearly impossible. The rule 
of keeping within one per cent can 
usually be checked mentally and 
avoids useless splitting of hairs. 

As we are not considering concrete 
as masonry construction, we are lim- 
ited to certain types of floor construc- 
tion where clay tile is used, and to 
brick flooring and paving. 

The foot, lineal or square, should 
suffice as the unit of measurement 
until such time as the metric system 
may be adopted. It is customary to 
measure roofing by squares of 100 
feet, paving by yards of 9 feet, but 
we should he consistent, pointing off 
to the hundredth place, and making 
our unit the square for everything in 
superficial area. 

How Many Brick to a Foot: There 
can be only a certain definite number 
of brick of a known size, laid with a 
specified thickness of a joint, in a 
given space. Quantity Survey should 
be scientific and deal only with actual- 
ities. There is no room for argu- 
ment as to how many brick should 
be figured for a given area of floor, 
wall, or partition. That is determined 
mathematically from the thickness of 
the members, the size of the brick, 
the thickness of the joint, and wheth- 
er the brick are laid on edge, side or 
on end. 

Exterior Walls: The measurements 
for the exterior walls when totaled 
correspond with the actual perimeter 
of the building; in detail they coin- 
cide with the measurements taken for 
the floors. The length of the building 
corresponds with the length of the 
wall on that particular elevation and 
the width of the building corresponds 
with the length of the elevation abut- 
ting. Twice the length of the build- 
ing plus its width, with the depth of 
indentations added, gives the total 
perimeter. Corners may be disregard- 
ed, as a rule, and still keep within 
the allowance of one per cent area 
but if it is desired to obtain absolute 
accuracy in arriving at the cubic con- 
tents for the Bill of Material, pro- 
jecting corners must be deducted, and 
indented corners must be added. The 
perimeter multiplied by the height 
represents the exact superficial area, 
and is used for structural and finish 
measurements if within one per cent 
accurate. 

Pilasters may be taken under a de- 
scription based on a greater thickness 
of wall. In this case it is necessary 
to add the amount of projection when 
exterior surface is measured, such as 
the quantity of pointing and clean- 
ing, unless the amount is less than 
one per cent. 

The description states the kind of 
brick, the mix of the mortar, the 
thickness of the joints, the method of 
pointing and cleaning, and if the work 
is a veneer the description should 
state whether it is on wood or con- 
crete, and the kind of anchors or ties 
to be used. 



Saturday, January 24, 19.11 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Three 



All extras In the form of additional 
cost of labor required for corbels, 
channels, skirtings, etc., which mean 
additional cost, must be measured and 
listed In units, lineals or superficies. 
The Lineal feet of the side of project- 
fag pilasters and panels must be giv- 
en, also the lineal feet of reveals. 

Partitions: The partitions should be 
taken off running all the way through 
In one direction, and between parti- 
tions In the other direction. This will 
give the structural work accurately 
and an excess in finish amounting to 
two times the section area of the par- 
tition for each four-way intersection 
and once the section area for each 
three-way intersection. This may be 
Keregarded if it amounts to less than 
one per cent. 

Openings: All openings should be 
totaled for deductions, and in the 
take off they should be arranged in 
the same order as the take off of the 
walls and partitions. Notations should 
be made of the nature of the work 
from which they are to be deducted, 
so that deductions may be made from 
the right quantities. 

While it is true that in many cases 
It costs as much or more to leave an 
opening in brickwork, the quantities 
are necessary in order to calculate the 
Bill of Material accurately, and even 
in pricing the work from the Quantity 
Survey it is important to know the 
number of openings and the relation 
of area in openings to the entire sur- 
face. It is a matter of adjustment of 
pricing methods to a more accurate 
basis. 

Hollow Tile and Gypsum Blocks: 
Hollow tile construction is taken off 
in the same general way as brick. It 
Is also necessary to take the lineal 
feet of lintels from the measurements 
of the openings, which have a total 
for lineals as well as for area. 

The Bill of Material lists the tile 
as they are to be ordered, allowing 
for waste and breakage, and taking 
care of the different shapes required 
In the case of the bearing or inter- 
locking tile, special shapes for re- 
veals, wire mesh for reinforcing, mor- 
tar, and concrete aggregate, cement 
and reinforcing for lintels. 

Architectural Terra Cotta: As the 
cost of architectural terra cotta var- 
ies greatly from the number of pieces 
to be made from each model, it is 
necessary to list not only the super- 
ficial area of plan surface, but also 
the lineal feet or number of units of 
all lintels, copings and all special orn- 
amentations. 

The usual method used by the gen- 
eral contractor in arriving at the la- 
bor cost on setting terra-cotta is to 
cube up over-all dimensions and al- 
low about 70 pounds to the cubic foot, 
extend to tons and price by the ton. 
This method can be improved on by 
listing in units, lineals and super- 
ficies. 

The terra cotta manufacturers, how- 
ever, will require a detailed list pre- 
pared by an experienced terra cotta 
detailer. or will get one out them- 
selves, before they bid, from the ar- 
chitect's drawings. If this is under- 
taken by the Quantity Surveyor, he 
must bs an expert in this line. 

Cut Stonework: In general, what ap- 
plies to architectural terra cotta, also 
applies to stonework. Here we have 
the cost of the rough stone as it 
comes from the quarry, the cost of 
machine cutting and polishing, the 
cost of hand cutting and hammering, 
carving and the cost of erection. 

With all this to be considered In or- 
der to get" exact prices, all information 
must be furnished, and this can be 
done only by detailing, and listing 
every piece. It is thje work of a spec- 
ialist. 

Artificial Stonework: The Quantity 
Survey of artificial stone does not dif- 
fer in principle from that for the cut 
stone and terra cotta. In all these 
crafts the basic measurements are 
valuable for approximate costs and to 



give a perspective of the requirements 
or a check on the totals, mid are an 
improvement on usua I rule of thumb 
methods, but exact prices can be ob- 
tained only by detailing. These de- 
tails should be prepared under the 
supervision of the archltedt by a qual- 
ified specialist, and furnished with the 
other drawings Too often this duty 
of the architect, just as that of fur- 
nishing efficient and economical me- 
chanical engineering drawings and 
specifications for the benefit of the 
owner, is omitted and left to the con- 
tractors, with the result that the own- 
er may pay more or get less for his 
money than he would if his interests 
were properly protected. 

The Quantity Surveyor should not 
be called on to furnish structural or 
mechanical engineering, or to detail 
stonework as part of his duty In fur- 
nishing Quantity Survey Service. 

Marble and Tile Work: Marble and 
tile work are generally considered sep- 
arate trades, and therefore will not be 
discussed at this time. 

Miscellaneous Items: There are a 
number of items which can be includ- 
ed in the description for the struc- 
tural work, and omitted from the 
Quantity Survey listing. This means 
that allowance should be made in the 
pricing of the structural work to cov- 
er them. They should b<» taken care 
of in the Bill of Material, when ma- 
terial is involved. Some of these 
items are bonds, joints, and pointing, 
cleaning, reinforcements, mortar color, 
clamps and anchors, painting. 

There are certain items which must 
be specially listed such as flues and 
flue linings, fireproofing. fire stopping, 
arches, thimbles, chimney pots, rag- 
gle blocks, fireplaces, fireplace linings 
and hearths. 

The simple rule for all these items 
is to give them separate listing in the 
Quantity Survey if necessary to cover 
an added cost; but to omit listing 
them if mention in the description 
will assure allowance being made to 
cover their cost when the principal 
work is priced. 

Some items involve extra labor only, 
such as the many types of corbels, 
mouldings and ornamentation. If so, 
they should be listed in the Quantity 
Survey as extra labor, and they are 
omitted in the Bill of Material, unless 
extra material is required. 

Document 172: There should be a 
revision of the Filing System Docu- 
ment 172, to conform it to general use 
for Quantity Survey and Cost Ac- 
counting purposes. As a Materials 
Catalogue Filing Index it does very 
well, but it is too bad that its com- 
pilers did not visualize its possibili- 
ties as the basis of a more extended 
use, and make it less complicated and 
more in accordance with the custom- 
ary segregation of the different crafts. 



PRIVATE ARCHITECTS 

FOR STATE BUILDINGS 



CANNOT LIEN 

U. OF C. BUILDING 



What courses are open to a sub- 
contractor to secure collection of 
moneys due him on account of a con- 
tract on University of California con- 
struction ? 

"Mechanics liens have been filed 
against University work but the 
Attorney for the Regents contends 
that such liens cannot constitute 
a lien against State property," 
says L. A, Nichols, Comptroller of 
the University. "More frequently 
we have received notices of stop 
payment and it has been the prac- 
tice of the Regents to co-operate 
with the sub-contractors in with- 
holding the amount due pending 
a settlement of the case by the 
contractor. It has been the prac- 
tices of the University for years 
to see that all obligations of a 
general contractor are properly 
met." 



Selection of private architects to 
speed California's $5,000,000 program 
of public building Is expected to result 
from a conference last Tuesday at- 
tended by Governor James Rolph Jr., 
other state officials and Frederick H. 
Meyer of San Francisco, president of 
the northern division, state board of 
architecture. 

"It Is our intention," said the 
governor, "to expedite tins building 
program as much as possible, so that 
it may be of practical benefit in 
alleviating unemployment. 

"The private architects will sup- 
plement the usual work of the state 
division of architecture in order that 
the plans and specifications may be 
prepared as early as possible for the 
letting of private contracts." 

The governor stated that the archi- 
tects are going to be chosen on the 
basis of merit only, and not out of 
any political consideration. 

"We will select only well-qualified 
architects," he said. "They will be 
responsible men and those only who 
can be held responsible." 



PREVAILING WAGE 
AND 8-HOUR LAW IS 
UPHELD IN NEW YORK 



The validity of the act passed last 
year by the New York state legislature 
providing that the eight-hour law and 
prevailing wage rate law should apply 
to all grade-crossing elimination work 
performed under the $300,000,000 state 
bond issue was upheld in part by a de- 
cision handed down Jan. 2 hy .Tnst'ce 
Ellis J. Staley of the state supreme* 
court, according to Engineering iNews- 
Record. 

The law was held valid in so far as 
it applies to private contractors on 
grade-elimination work, but was held 
invalid concerning employees of rail- 
roads on similar work on the ground 
that railroad employees are already 
subject to wage and time restrictions 
imposed by acts of Congress. 

Suits to test the constitutionality of 
the law have been brought by all of 
the railroads operating in the state, 
declaring that the act would increase 
the cost of grade separation, of which 
the railroad pays 50 per cent. In a 
lengthy decision Justice Staley estab- 
lishes grade-crossing elimination 
work as public work and therefore 
subject to acts of the legislature. 

An appeal will probably be taken. 



SEATTLE PAVING 

WORKERS FILE WAGE 
SCALE WITH COUNCIL 



Organized paving workers in Seattle 
have filed with the city council through 
J. H. Coulson, secretary of Street 
Pavers' Local No. 440, a list of wage 
scales and working conditions during 
1931. 

A continuance of the eight-hcur day 
is asked with a five-and-a-half -day 
week. 

A wage of $9 Is asked for manhole 
and catchbasin men, cement finishers, 
dummy men and ribbon setters. Rod- 
ers, sloat men, spreaders and mixers 
ask $8 a day. Roller men, concrete 
wheelers, curb men, dummy helpers, 
ribbon helpers, and fine subgraders, 
ask $G.60 a day, while all other labor- 
ers on paving jobs will demand $5. 60, 
the same wage now paid building 
laborers, compared with $4.50 paid or- 
dinary labor. 



Four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



THE OBSERVER 
What He Hears and Sees on His Rounds 



The city trustees of Crescent City 
will shortly enact an ordinance re- 
quiring that all contractors on public 
work employ local labor wherever 
possible. 



"Don't bid too low," says Thos. D. 
Hunt, county engineer of King Coun- 
ty, Washington. "The county, city or 
state doesn't want work done for 
nothing nor at prices that jeopardize 

Contractors, particularly those en- 
gaged in public works construction, 
should memorize that advice. 



Uncle Sam finds it profitable to build 
now. In answer to a call for bids to 
erect the Santa Ana postoffice the 
Treasury Department received 34 fig- 
ures, the lowest being $148,710, and 
the highest $196,400. The second low- 
bid called for $149,000, the third $152,- 
450 and the fourth $153,000. The re- 
maining bids ran closely between $154- 
000 and $170,000. 



Repeal of the Mattoon act, under 
\Ohich virtually all public improve- 
ment projects are authorized, is sought 
in a bill introduced in the assembly 
by Ed L. Head, San Diego, formerly 
of Sacramento. A series of other bills 
affecting the Mattoon act are pending 
before the legislature. 

Building and construction work gen- 
erally took first place in 1930 as a 
consumer of steel, forcing the auto- 
mobile industry into second place 
from first position which it occupied 
in 1929. This was shown in an an- 
alysis of steel consumption recently 
published by the Iron Age. 

The compilation was based on re- 
turns from steel companies which pro- 
duced 98 per cent of the estimated 
total for the entire steel industry. 

The building industry was the larg- 
est user of steel in 1927, but was dis- 
placed by the automobile industry in 
both 1928 and 1929. The railroads 
were the third largest users of steel 
in 1930, having occupied second posi- 
tion in 1929. 



The executive council of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor in session 
at Miami, Fla., Jan. 14, adopted a 
resolution urging the immediate plac- 
ing of federal employes on a five-day 
week basis to relieve unemployment. 
The resolution said the government 
should keep step with private employ- 
ers who already have done so and im- 
mediately inaugurate a five-day week 
for government employes. 



To expedite the letting of contracts 
undertaken in connection with the 
emergency construction appropriation 
bill, the Corps of Engineers is insist- 
ing that bidding be limited to con- 
tracting firms with sufficient capital 
and plant to start operations imme- 
diately, says Paul Wooton, Washing- 
ton correspondent for Engineering 
News-Record. 

District engineers have been remind- 
ed that the work is being undertaken 
in order to accelerate such construc- 
tion projects as will increase public 
employment. They have been in- 
structed to reject a bid unless the bid- 
der can show that he has the neces- 
sary capital, equipment and exper- 
ience and that he is not already ob- 
ligated for the performance of as 
much work as he will probably be able 
to do during the period contemplated 
by the advertisement. 



A profit on a project for the con- 
tractor is justifiable, and the tendency 
of contractors to bid against each 
other instead of on the job adds to 
the grief of both engineer and build- 
er, decreasing the fair profit and mak- 
ing performance of the contract a 
question, says Major O. A. Piper, 
chief assistant city engineer of Seat- 
tle. 

"The public demands service from 
a contractor on city, county and state 
work, but this cannot be given if the 
work is being done below cost," Maj. 
Piper declares. Explaining the rela- 
tion of the contractor to city en- 
gineer, he points out that experience 
and cooperation alone can spell suc- 
cess for each, assuring good work, a 
fair profit, and the job completed on 
time. 

"Engineers as a whole heartily ap- 
prove of the prequalification of con- 
tractors," Engineer Piper declares. 
Such a law. he says, would assure 
public work being done by capable 
contractors with a background that 
assured the best service. 

The penalties and liquidation dam- 
ages attached to failure to complete 
a job on time are an important con- 
sideration of a contract, but are rare- 
ly taken seriously until the occasion 
arises to actually exact the penalty 
and damages, Major Piper says. He 
states that contractors should remem- 
ber such clauses are enfurcible and 
should be considered step by step on 
the work being done. 



Colonel Walter E. Garrison, state 
director of public works, has request- 
ed contractors to employ only Cali- 
fornia residents as labor in the state's 
$5,000,000 public building program as 
far as possible. 

"This building program is mapped 
and is being speeded primarily as an 
aid in relieving the unemployment 
crisis in the state," remarked Garri- 
son. "Therefore, to realize this ob- 
jective, it is necessary that resident 
of the state be employed on the jobs. 

"While it is not legally possible for 
the state to restrict labor used by 
private contractors to Calif ornians. 
we may decline to consider bids on 
future jobs submitted by contractors 
who persistently refuse to give Cali- 
fornia labor the first opportunity of 
employment." 



Definite limitation of debts on street 
improvement projects is called for in a 
bill introduced by Assemblyman Wal- 
ter J. Little of Santa Monica and other 
members of the Southern California 
delegation. The measure would pro- 
hibit local legislative bodies from 
going ahead with public improvement 
undertakings when the proposed cost 
totals more than 50 per cent of the 
actual value of property involved. 



Public work contracts entered into 
by the city of Portland, Oregon, will 
carry a clause that will insure main- 
tenance of the pavements for five 
years, the city council having passed 
an ordinance inserting the clause in 
all contracts hereafter. The ordinance 
carried an emergency clause and was 
urged by Commissioner Barbur be- 
cause of numerous contracts that will 
be before the city shortly. 

The clause provides that the dis- 
covery of a defect in a street pave- 
ment will be accepted by the con- 
tractor as prima facie evidence of a 
defect in material or workmanship. 



despite the fact that the work was 
done under city inspection and ac- 
cepted by the city. 

While only two contractors have re- 
fused to maintain their work for five 
years, some bonding companies have 
taken the stand that when the city 
inspects the work and accepts it the 
city then must prove defective work- 
manship. The new provision is in- 
tended to meet that position. 

CONTROL BILLBOARDS 
VIA VOLUNTARY ZONING 



A proposal for voluntary zoning of 
portions of rural highways having high 
scenic value against defacement by 
billboards, posters, hot dog stands, 
filling stations and other forms of way- 
side commercial enterprise was ad- 
vanced by Herbert U. Nelson, of Chi- 
cago, executive secretary of the Na- 
tional Association of Real Estate 
Boards, at a national conference on 
roadside business and rural beauty 
held in Washington, D. C 

The proposal was put forth as a 
method of conserving to the public 
both aesthetic values and proper com- 
mercial values along rural highways 
It is novel in that it obviates the 
necessity for arbitrary action by state 
authorities, and in that it gives owners 
of property abutting scenic highway 
a quid pro quo for the property rights 
they would give up where such zoning 
was put into effect. 

The plan proposes that an enabling 
act be passed by the various states 
under which there might he set up in 
connection with the state highway de- 
partment a special zoning board for 
non-urban regions of the state. This 
board would have the right to zone 
any stretch of roadway as a scenic 
region upon petition of 75% of the 
owners of abutting property. Along 
the highway so zoned wayside com- 
mercial business of all kinds would be 
banned, not only on the highway Itself 
but on abutting property, except at 
such intervals as may be established 
to meet public necessity and con- 



The plan proposes further that on 
roads along which the owners of 
abutting property voluntarily forego 
the commercial use of their properties 
in this manner the state highway 
commission would undertake a definite 
program of beautification, through the 
planting of trees and shrubs, through 
care that bridges erected should har- 
monize with the general scenic effect, 
through the adaptation of the highway 
to the natural contours of the land- 
scape, and through similar measures 
which would aid in the conservation 
of the recreational values of the 
region. 



A total of $30,974,030 may be spent 
in the State of Washington for high- 
way work during the 1931-33 biennium 
if the state legislature approves the 
road budget submitted by Governor 
Roland Hartley. Of this total $21,974.- 
030 is contained in the budget, the re- 
mainder will be raised by the state 
to spend on lateral highways and by 
the various counties. Expenditures by 
the counties will probably total $4,- 
000,000, and for lateral work by the 
state about $5,000,000 will be expended. 
Also in the total is $3,799,000 federal 
aid funds which will be spent by the 
state highway department. Work 
planned by the state with the $21,974,- 
030 asked of the legislature includes 
146 miles of paving, 610 miles of grad- 
ing and surfacing and 1699 miles of 
oiling during the next two years. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Fh 



HERE— THERE 
EVERYWHERE 



ALONG THE LINE 



TRADE NOTES 



James A. Farrell, president of the 
United States Steel Corporation, de- 
Olares thai in his opinion the peak "f 
the financial depression had been 
passed thirty days ago and the pen- 
dulum of Industrial activity was now 
swinging back to normalcy. Mr. Par- 
rel! asserts that "the last thirty days 
hai e gi\ en n mple e\ idem-e ■■( a con- 
siderable Increase not only in t lie 
business of the steel industry, but in 
collateral and unrelated lines." 



die ensuing year will be elected at 
the January 26 meeting of the Sacra- 
Builders' Exchange, it is an- 
nounced by Secretary Patterson. The 

meeting will he addressed by a speak- 
er yet In Ih- selected. Refreshments 
will he a part of the program. 

The State Senate adopted unani- 
mously a resolution by Senator Roy 
Fellom, San Francisco, urging cong- 
n - to adopt legislation consenting to 
the construction of a bridge across 
San Francisco Hay from Rincon Hill 
by way of Goat Island to Alameda 
County. This route was declared by 
Senator A. H. Breed of Piedmont to 
be the most practical and the least 
expensive to span the bay. The proj- 
ect calls for an expenditure of $72,- 
000,000. A toll bridge would be built 



A. F. Davis of the Lincoln Electric 
Company is scheduled to provide a 
paper revealing the latest steps made 
in electric arc welding at the West- 
ern Metal Congress to be held in the 
San Francisco Municipal Auditorium 
February 16-20. 



By a vote of eight to one the Seattle 
city council decided to place upon the 
March election ballot a proposed 
charter amendment that will empower 
the city light department to do its 
own engineering work. Sponsors of 
the proposed amendment declare that 
if engineering work in connection 
with city light development is handled 
by that department it will be faci- 
litated. 



F. P. Basler, operating the Mat- 
hews Construction Company of Sac- 
ramento, has instituted suit in the 
i Sacramento Superior Court to recover 
$9,894.21 from C. Miles and the Amer- 
ican Surety Company. Basler claims 
the amount is due for equipment 
which he rented to Miles to do road 
construction in Mono County. 



Recognizing the seriousness of the 
present unemployment condition of the 
country, and in order to alleviate as 
much as possible that situation, the 
plumbers of Long Beach have inaug- 
urated the five-day week. Negotia- 
tions to this end have been under way 
for some months between the con- 
tractors and the journeymen and an 
agreement was reached recently 
whereby the work week was shorten- 
ed to five days. 



Clyde Hickman has been elected 
president of the Long Beach Builders' 
Exchange. Other officers are: J. H. 
Pelkey, vice-president; A. G. Motsch, 
secretary; W. M. McGrew, B. H. Hor- 
kin and E. L. Card, directors; Eugene 
C. Eradbury. executive secretary. 

Samuel J. Humes, director of the 
Washington State Highway Depart- 
ment, urges that contractors keep the 
wage scale up. The present is not the 
time to cut wages, Hume declares, 
even though work is scarce and labor 
plentiful. 



Raymond H. Holtzman, founder of 
the Shelton-Holtzman Lumber Com- 
pany, and later manager of the Ely 
Lumber and Coal Company of Elv. 
Nov., died in Glendale, cal., Jan. 16. 
He had been ill for several weeks. The 

d ased was 63 years of age and had 

been prominent in business circles of 
Nevada for more than twenty years. 



Major William S. Post, designing en- 
gineer of the Los Angeles County Flood 
Control District, has been appointed 
chief engineer of tile irrigation ser- 
vice, United States Bureau of Indian 
affairs, according to word received by 
Chief Flood Control Engineer E. C. 
Eaton. Major Post, who is now in 
Washington, has been engaged in de- 
signing a new type of rockfilled dam 
for the San Gabriel river. 

Stephen Henry Reno, building con- 
tractor and a resident of Berkeley for 
40 years, died in that city Jan. 15 fol- 
lowing a brief illness. His widow and 
one daughter, Florence Helen Reno, 
survive. 



J. B. Lippincott of Los Angeles has 
been retained by the city of Long 
Beach as consulting expert for the 
water department. 

Nevada State Highway Commission 
has adopted a highway building bud- 
get involving the expenditure of $2.- 
989,447 for the year 1931. 



C. H. Purcell, state highway engi- 
neer, has been appointed engineer for 
the proposed San Francisco Bay 
Bridge, according to an announcement 
of the State Department of Public 
Works. 

John F. Collins, Oakland contractor, 
has filed a schedule in bankruptcy in 
the Federal Court. San Francisco, 
listing his debts at $77,236 and assets 
at $37,200. 



H. A. Van Norman, formerly chief 
water engineer for the city of Los 
Angeles, has been appointed general 
manager of the entire department of 
the municipally-owned water and pow- 
er department by the Municipal Water 
and Power Commission. 



SEEKS TO AMEND 

ANTI-TRUST LAWS 

The California State Chamber of 
Commerce has adopted a resolution 
urging the amending- of the anti-trust 
laws of the U. S., declaring that the 
present laws are involved in so much 
uncertainty respecting their interpre- 
tation as to impede business and in- 
dustrial progress, and are so restric- 
tive in their nature that they en- 
courage and foster an unbusinesslike, 
unfair and oftentimes ruthless com- 
petition which results in great hard- 
ship and losses to producer, wage 
earner and consumer alike, and their 
enforcement has been particularly det- 
rimental to and destructive of our 
natural resources, both State and Na- 
tional. 

The United States Chamber of Com- 
merce will be asked to take such 
action as may be proper to procure 
such amendments and copies of the 
resolution adopted by the California 
body will be forwarded to Senators 
and Representatives of the state in 
Congress for their attention. 



Darwin Meisnest, sales manager for 
thi Pacific Coast Cement Company of 
Seattle, has been elevated to the posi- 
tion of vice-president in charge r.f 
sales, it is announced by E. C. Ward, 
president of the company. 



A. L. Gladding, formerly of Glad- 
ding, McBean & Company, has re- 
signed his position with that firm and 
is now associated with his two broth- 
ers. Chandler and Charles Gladding, 
in Gladding Brothers, clay products 
firm of San Jose. The three Gladding 
brothers have been in clay products 
manufacturing for years, having been 
brought up in the business. One and 
one-half years ago they purchased the 
Kartschoke Clay Products Company 
in San Jose and have since operated 
it as Gladding Brothers. The firm 
manufactures vitrified clay sewer 
pipe, roof tile, brick and terra cotta. 
The plant is located at Third and 
Keyes Streets, San Jose. 



Indiana Limestone Co. of California, 
Ltd., with headquarters in San Fran- 
cisco, has filed articles of incorpora- 
tion with the county clerk. Directors 
are A. E. Freston, V. E. Fay and A. 
M. Johnson. 



PHILIPPINE WOOD 

TRADE IN INFANCY 



In a review of the Philippine hard- 
wood situation, "W. G. Scrim of Los 
Angeles, president of the Philippine 
Mahogany Association, says: 

"The trade in Philippine woods is 
still in its infancy as most of the 
woods used so far are the Philippine 
mahogany and Apltong varieties. 
Woods, such as Narra, Tindilao, Acl s 
and many others, are ideal for furni- 
ture and cabinet purposes, while fo:- 
auiomobile and other construction pur- 
poses there are available such woods 
as Yacal, Guijo. Mungachapuy, etc. 
A favorable decision by the Federal 
Trade Commission on the nomencla- 
ture of Philippine maho^ny wouM 
stimulate trade in this wood as Ui*- 
investigatlon of Uie last five years hi»d 
l-'d a number of potential users to 
hesitate about using the term 'Philip- 
pine mahogany,' fearing that they 
were liable to prosecution by a gov- 
ernment body. Hearings by the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission are about com- 
pleted and we shall soon know whether 
the term is applicable as a botanical 
or commercial term. Generally 
speaking, the state of business can 
be summed up as follows: Busines.-', 
fair; stocks, low; prices, fair." 



Construction of a veterans' hospital 
to care for former service men em- 
ployed on the Boulder-Hoover Dam is 
asked by George Malone, Nevada State 
road commissioner who is in Washing- 
ton to confer on the matter with Gen- 
eral Frank T. Hines, administrator of 
veterans' affiairs. The Nevadan, who 
wants the hospital built near Las 
Vegas, is seeking authorization for 
immediate construction, on the grounds 
that more that one-third of the 
workers to be employed on the dam 
project will be war veterans. At 
present, there is no veterans' hospital 
within over a day's travel, he says. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



TRADE LITERATURE 



Details regarding pivoted industrial 
windows and projected windows of 
the commercial and architectural type 
are given in two recent bulletins of 
the Campbell Industrial Window Co., 
Inc., Pershing Square Building, New 
York City. 



Type SSU centrifugal pumping 
units, in which a single ball-bearing- 
mounted shaft serves both an electric 
motor and a centrifugal pump, are 
described in bulletin 1647 of the Allis- 
Chalmers Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Engineering data and price lists on 
continuous steel flooring are contain- 
ed in a folder compiled by the Irving 
Iron Works Co., Long Island City, 
New York. 



Recent publications of the engineer- 
ing and research division, National 
Sand & Gravel Association, Munsey 
Building, Washington, D. C, are as 
follows: Circular 6— "Effect of Soft 
Particles of Coarse Aggregate on 
Strength of Concrete." by W. J. Em- 
mons; circular 7— "Effect of Addition 
of Finer Sizes to Gravel on Strength 
of Concrete," my Stanton Walker; 
and circular S— "Effect of Grading of 
Gravel and Sand on Voids and 
Weights," by Stanton Walker. 



STATE BUILDING 
CODE OPPOSED BY 
PORTLAND REALTORS 



Disapproval of the proposed state 
building- code was expressed by mem- 
bers of the Portland Realty Poard in 
a resolution presented by Henry E. 
Reed, chairman of the committee on 
legislation. It was decided to refer 
the resolution to the proper commit- 
tee of the state legislature to give 
them the board's opinion on the mat- 
ter. 

The decision was taken following a 
report submitted by Reed on behalf 
of his committee and concurred in by 
the committee of taxation on which 
A. C. Callan is chairman. 

The report, which contained a 
lengthy survey of the proposed code 
stated that while it might be desir- 
able that Oregon should have a state 
building code providing minimum re- 
quirements as to structure, plumbing 
and electricity, such a measure should 
be drafted by a representative state- 
wide committee as was contemplated 
by the legislative resolution of 1927- 

As the proposal stands now, accord- 
ing to the report, the sponsors of the 
code are not sufficiently representa- 
tive of the sentiment and needs of the 
state; the code as proposed would be 
confusing to the building industry: : t 
provides for amendment without no- 
tice to certain municipalities; it grants 
legislative powers to the labor com- 
missioner and his advisory commit- 
tee; it would cause needless expense, 
and the penal provisions are too dras- 
tic. 



The state would be authorized to 
continue for two years with its ne- 
gotiations with private capital for the 
construction of a dam on the Ameri- 
can River at Folsom under a bill in- 
troduced in the senate by Senator J. 
M. Inman of Sacramento. 

The bill is identical to the present 
law, which has been in effect for four 
years, except that the date is extend- 
ed to 1933 to allow further negotia- 
tions. 

Provision is made for the reversion 
of the works to the state at the end 
of fifty years. The private concern 
would hold title under a lease. 



SURVEY REVEALS 

17% DECREASE IN 
1930 CONSTRUCTION 



A decrease of 17 per cent in the vol- 
ume of construction performed in the 
United States during 1930, as compared 
with the previous year, is reported in 
the current issue of The Constructor, 
official publication of the Associated 
General Contractors of America. 

Charts prepared by the assoc.iatlTin 
show the average monthly performance 
during the year, as determined by 
shipments of basic construction ma- 
terials, at index number 1G3, as com- 
pared with an average of 196 for ilie 
previous year and 188 for the preced- 
ing five-year period. December con- 
struction volume dropped to index 
number 123, a decrease of 29 per cent 
from the previous month and 27 per 
cent less than in December, 1929. 

As yet there is no statistical indi- 
cation that the bottom in construction 
activity has been reached or that the 
upturn is just ahead, according to 
"The Constructor's" editorial com- 
ment. It points out that in all classi- 
fications, except those of educational 
and public buildings, reports of con- 
templated projects compiled by (he 
F. W. Dodge Corp. continue to show 
lower totals than those of the corres- 
ponding months a year ago. Any 
future rise in construction activity will 
be preceded for several months by a 
notable rise in the reports of con- 
templated projects, it states, and since 
this rise is not yet in evidence it ap- 
pears patent that activity in private 
construction during 1931 probably will 
not exceed that of 1930. 

"The Constructor's" chart show 
that despite the fact that the monthly 
average of wages paid in the industry 
was higher than in any year on rec- 
ord, with the exception of 1920, the 
cost of construction in 1930 was the 
lowest in recent years. After a steady 
five-month decline in the cost of con- 
struction earlier in the year, the cost 
index remained stationary during the 
last five months at the low level of 
19S.4. 

Indications of a near record year in 
contract surface pavement awards are 
shown in the publication's chart of 
reports from the Portland Cement As- 
sociation for the first eleven months 
of 1930. During this period a total of 
137,012,000 square yards was awarded, 
as compared with 132,201,000 square 
yards during the same period of 1929. 
This total was only 2.9SS.000 square 
yards less than for the corresponding 
period during the peak year of 1928 
and constituted the second largest on 
record for the period 



WASHINGTON STATE 

ARCHITECTS ELECT 



Roland E. Borhek was re-elected 
president of the Washington State 
Chapter, American Institute of Archi- 
tects, at the close of the annual meet- 
ing of the organization at the Wash- 
ington Athletic Club in Seattle, last 
week. 

Other officers elected were: First 
vice president, J. Listre Holmes; sec- 
ond vice president, Earl N. Dugan; 
third vice president, Stanly A. Smith; 
fourth vice president, John W. Ma- 
loney; secretary, Lance E. Gowen; 
treasurer, Albert M. Allen; executive 
board, three-year term, George W. 
Stoddard, and for delegates to the 
institute convention. Lance E. Goken, 
Sherwood D. Ford and Nelson J. Mor- 
rison. 



CONFERENCE CALLED 

ON ROAD BUILDING 



A series of conferences between 
members of Congress, from states 
neighboring California are being ar- 
ranged by Representative Albert A. 
Carter of Oakland. These conferences 
have for their purpose the formula- 
tion of plans for road construction and 
far reaching results are expected from 
the gatherings. 

The California member took the in- 
itial step on being informed by of- 
ficials of the Bureau of Public Roads 
that the $80,000,000 recently appro- 
priated by Congress for road building, 
plus an additional $80,000,000 was 
available for immediate use. In mak- 
ing overtures for these meetings Cong- 
ressman Carter states that he believed 
more benefit could be secured for the 
states involved by close cooperation. 
It is worthy of note that many of the 
road projects which will come up for 
discussion will have their terminus 
in Oakland or the vicinity. 

In addition to this the monies re- 
leased, in the opinion of the Califor- 
nian, will render material aid in re- 
lieving unemployment. About half the 
money spent will go directly to labor, 
while another large percent will bene- 
fit employes of the various industries 
allied to road building. 



STATE PUBLIC WORKS 
CHIEF MAKES CHANGES 



The first move toward a general 
shakeup in the State Department of 
Public Works was made last Tuesday 
by Col. Walter C. Garrison of Lodi, 
newly-appointed director of the de- 
partment. 

Garrison announced the reorganiza- 
tion of rights-of-way divisions in five 
California cities. These agencies have 
charge of the purchase of all prop- 
erties required by state highway and 
other building operations, involving 
millions of dollars annually. 

The changes follow: 

San Francisco — Holloway Jones, in 
place of George Geiger; John Howard, 
replacing Morgan A. Sanborn; Herbort 
Forbes, succeeding W. E. Cathie; 
Frank F. Webb, replacing Leo J. Mc- 
Carthy; Harold J. Lorentzen to be dis- 
placed later. 

Eureka — Phillip C. Eastman, re- 
placing Paul Williamson. 

Redding — Leland L. Rose, succeed- 
ing L. H. Williams. 

Los Angeles— Adolph N. Sutro, suc- 
ceeding Harold D. Dale. 

Sacamento — George Paulich, suc- 
ceeding A. M. Nash; Charles S. Smith, 
replacing John W. White; Bradford 
Perry, replacing J. F. O'Hara. 



COMBINE FORCES 

TO SUBMIT BID ON 
HOOVER DAM PROJ. 



Siems , Helms, Inc., St. Paul, Mo., 
contractors, with branch offices at 206 
Sansome St., San Francisco, has 
formed a corporation with two other 
concerns to bid on the Hoover dam at 
Boulder City, Nevada, it is announced 
by Ralph Christofferson, San Fran- 
cisco manager for the firm. 

The corporation's bid will be sub- 
mitted about March 1 to the Denver, 
Colo., offices of the Reclamation Bu- 
reau, Christofferson said. 

The other concerns in the combine 
are: A. Guthrie & Co., also of St. 
Paul, and "Woods Bros, of Lincoln, 
Nebraska. 

The Siems. Helmers Co. laid the 
foundations for the Southern Pacific 
bridge between Martinez and Benicia. 



Saturday, Janua 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Seven 



EMBRITTLEMENT IN 

BOILERS INVESTIGATED 



METHOD TO CUT 

OFF PILES UNDER 
WATER DESCRIBED 



Since ii"' earlj days of steam boiler 

operation the industry has b.'.-n m- 
counterlng various types of boiler 
!; M ini. . A number of these have 
i, ri n eliminated, but there is one type 
,,r crack which still occurs. This is 
iiir cracking which takes place in the 
riveted areas of the boiler going from 
rivi t hole to rivet hole, often unseen 
and uiul.t, rud until a dangerous con- 
dition exists. 

The purpose of the investigation re- 
ported in Bulletin No int.; of the En- 

ig Experiment Station of the 

University of Illinois was to secure 
Information relative to the occurrence 
nf this type of cracking in boiler 
plate, in order to determine the cause 
of the difficulty and to devise methods 
of preventing it. The data were ob- 
tained from power plants which have 
experienced cracking in steam boilers, 
as well as from tests made- in the 
laboratory. 

The investigation was begun five 
years ago, and results were previously 
published in Bulletin No. 155 in 1926 
and in Bulletin No. 177 in 1928. Since 
editions of these two bulletins have 
hausted it seemed desirable to 
include in the present bulletin a large 
part of the material already published 
in the previous hull- tins together with 
the new material obtained. This bull- 
etin, therefore, contains the complete 
results of the full five years' investi- 
gation of boiler plate embrittlement. 

In addition to recording some more 
recent instances of embrittlement in 
strain boilers and caustic digestors, 
the new material deals chiefly with a 
study of the solubility of embrittle- 
ment-inhibiting agents in boiler water 
and of the concentrations of solutions 
in capillary spaces, as well as tests of 
inhibiting agents other than sulphate 
or carbonate. 

Copies of Bulletin No. 216 may be 
obtained without charge by address- 
ing the Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion, Urbana, Illinois. 



ARIZONA SUIT ON 

BOULDER DAM WILL 
BE HEARD MARCH 9 



Setting of March 9 by the U S. su- 
preme court as the date for hearing 
the motion of the Federal govern- 
ment and the six states in the Colo- 
rado river pact to dismiss the suit of 
Arizona to block the building of 
Hoover (Boulder) dam, indicates that 
the legal phases of the project will bt 
settled before the appropriation to be 
made by Congress for th-> coming 
fiscal year becomes effective on July 
1. 

The technical ground on which dis- 
missal of the suit is asked is that in 
attacking the constitutionality of the 
Act of Congress authorizing the con- 
struction of the dam Arizona erred in 
not making the Federal government a 
party defendant to the suit", since it \y 
vitally concerned. 

Issues raised in connection with the 
motion to dismiss the suit, however, 
insure rulings by the court on the con- 
stitutionality of the law providing for 
construction of the dam. on the valid- 
ity of the pact between the six Colo- 
rado states — California, Nevada, Utah, 
Colorado and New Mexico; on the 
navigability of the Colorado river 
below Hoover dam, and on the powers 
of the government and itst officials to 
preceed with the project. 

*> 

Battista Celia will operate in San 
Francisco under the firm name of 
Marina Construction Company, ac- 
cording to articles filed for record with 
the county clerk. 



Marine contractors are often faced 
with the necessity of pulling or cut- 
ting off wooden piling at the level of 
the bottom in order to clear a river 
or harbor for navigation purposes, 
says S. Standish of the Standish En- 
gineering Corp., of Chicago, 111., in 
Engineering News-Record. In many 
instances the cost of pulling the piling 
is excessive, especially where there is 
considerable penetration. The under- 
water saw can be user 1 , but this, while 
much more economical than pulling, 
requires a special rig The old method 
for cutting off piling with dynamite 
was to encircle the pile with a heavy 
wire ring, attach several sticks of dy- 
namite to this ring and then lowei 
It to the bottom where it was ex- 
ploded. The difficulty with this method 
lies in the fact that two or three shots 
are usually required, and often ob- 
stacles, such as spikes, bolts, or knots 
on the body of the pile, prevent the 
ring from slipping all the way down. 

The writer has found through ex- 
perience that the simplest way to cut 
off wooden piles with dynamite is to 
prepare a bomb consisting of three or 
five sticks of dynamite with which are 
grouped a corresponding number of 
round steel bars of about the same 
length. The bomb is held together 
with several turns of wire. If this 
bomb is lowered in the water so that 
it rests on the bottom within 3 ft. of 
the pile, the explosion will cut the 
pile off clean at the bottom, as the 
bars act somewhat in the nature i I 
shrapnel. 



EFFECT OF CERTAIN 
FURNACE GASES ON 
ENAMELS REPORTED 



' The detrimental effect of certain 
furnace gases on enamels is fully re- 
alized, but practically no data are at 
the disposal of the enameler. The 
term " gassing " is quite generally 
heard among plant men, and it is us- 
ually associated in thought with the 
presence of sulphur gases, probably 
correctly so in most cases. That the 
presence of reducing gases Is not fa- 
vorable for the production of good 
enamels is also a generally accepted 
fact. 

Bulletin No. 214 of the Engineering 
Experiment Station of the University 
of Illinois contains the results of an 
investigation to determine the effect 
of furnace gases on enamels for sheet 
steel. The compositions of the enamels 
used in the investigation were typical 
of those used in the industry. Tests 
were made to determine the effect of 
sulphur dioxide, nitrogen, carbon di- 
oxide, oxygen and steam on enamels; 
also the effect of unburned city gas 
and of products of combustion of city 
gas on enamels. 

The conclusions drawn as a result 
of the investigation are as follows: 
Very small amounts of sulphur di- 
oxide such as are sometimes found 
present in the atmosphere around in- 
dustrial districts may be deleterious 
to enamels; the composition of sheet 
steel cover coats has an important 
bearing on their resistance to sulphur 
attack; oxygen is a necessary constit- 
uent of the furnace atmosphere if an 
enamel of the best quality is to be 
obtained; the presence of reducing 
gases in the furnace atmosphere 
causes blistering 1 . 

Copies of Bulletin No. 214 may be 
obtained without charge by address- 
ing the Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion, Urbana, Illinois. 



| ENGINEERING SOCIETIES g 

£ EMPLOYMENT SERVICE Jf 

? Further Information regard- jf 

£ Ing positions listed In thla J 

£ column Is obtainable from New- r> 

C ton D. Cook, Room 716, 67 Poat «- 

>t Street, San Francisco. (Phone J 

£ SUttor 16*4). 

R-3309-S ENGINEER, mechanical or 
electrical, not over 30, with 3 to 5 
years' experience on hydro-electric 
plant operation for service and test- 
ing. Must have mechanical skill, 
agreeable personality and single. 
Salary about $175 month and ex- 
penses in field. Apply by letter. 
Headquarters, San Francisco. 

K-332-W-2034-C-S PROFESSOR of 
printing for school of industrial en- 
gineering; must be a college grad- 
uate with broad experience in 
printing. Position will involve re- 
search and application to courses in 
craftsmanship training. Salary $5.- 
000 a year. Apply by letter with full 
details of experience, references and 
photo. Location, East. 

R-3459-S ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, 
graduate under 35 years of age, 
with 2 years G. E. or Westinghouse 
factory test training and some field 
experience, for power plant safety 
and economy inspection. Salary dur- 
ing preliminary training period $150 
month with increase on the road. 
Apply by letter. Headquarters, Col- 
orado. 

R-3429-S ENGINEER, preferably me- 
chanical, 35-45 years old, with force- 
ful personality and ability to handle 
men, for production manager of 
company operating several scatter- 
ed plants in California. Must have 
good record as executive. Salary 
$5000-6000 a year. Apply by letter 
with brief of experience and photo. 
Headquarters, San Francisco. 

R-3303-S ENGINEER, preferably me- 
chanical or chemical graduate, with 
5 to 10 years' experience including 
considerable application of thermo- 
dynamics to solution of heat ex- 
change problems as found in oil re- 
finery equipment. Must have ex- 
ecutive ability. Apply by letter with 
details of experience, references and 
photo. Salary $200-250 per month 
to start. Location, Northern Cali- 
fornia. 

R-345G-S MECHANICAL ENGINEER 
graduate, not over 32, with some 
practical knowledge of machine de- 
sign for plant equipment develop- 
ment. Good opportunity for man 
with constructive ideas and initia- 
tive. Salary $175-225, depending up- 
on man. Location, San Francisco. 



FREIGHT TERMINAL 
FOR NEW YORK WILL 

COST $13,000,000 

The Port of New York Authority 
has announced that it has completed 
negotiations with the twelve railroads 
service the port district for the opera- 
tion of the $13,000,000 union inland 
freight terminal which it will build 
on the block bounded by Eighth and 
Ninth Aves. and Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth Sts.. and that the railroads 
have signed an agreement to use the 
building as their central point in the 
delivery and collection of less-than- 
carload freight bound to and from 
New York. 

Under the agreement it is stipulated 
that the railroads shall organize an 
agency to operate the terminal, and 
the Port Authority pledges itself to 
build other terminals if the first ex- 
periment proves successful and need 
for additional facilities arises. 



Eight 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY RESISTS 
DOWNWARD TENDENCY DURING 1930 



While the business and industrial 
depression during- 1930 had an ad- 
verse effect on the aggregate output 
of electrical equipment, says John 
Lis ton in the January issue of the 
General Electric Review, there were 
certain classes of electric apparatus 
which resisted the general downward 
tendency, in comparison with the rec- 
ord activity of 1929, and in fact cre- 
ated new high figures for both the 
volume and the dollar value of pro- 
duction as compared with any pre- 
vious year. 

In this group were included railway 
electric locomotives and electric equip- 
ment for street railway and railroad 
motor cars, electric propulsion equip- 
ment for merchant ships, mercury 
arc power rectifiers and high tension 
cable. The number of installations of 
household type electric refrigerators 
also showed a marked increase. 

Developmental work was continued 
actively throughout the year in the 
laboratory, the factory and in the field 
with the result that improvements in 
design, materials and construction 
were sercured in numerous classes of 
apparatus all tending toward increased 
efficiency or economy in the genera- 
tion, transformation, distribution and 
application of electric energy for pow- 
er systems, transportation, communi- 
cation, industrial modernization and 
in the rapidly growing field of farm 
electrification. 

Mercury arc power rectifiers instal- 
lations increased both in number and 
capacity the largest unit produced be- 
ing rated 6500 kw„ 650 volts, 10.000 
amperes. It was designed for use in 
the production of electrolytic-hydro- 
gen. One railroad applied power rec- 
tifiers in all of its substations as the 
sole source of the supply of energy 
to its feeder system. This was the 
first exclusive use of this apparatus 
for this class of service. 

Building construction utilized elec- 
tric welding to a greater extent than 
heretofore and 84 cities and towns in 
the United States were added to the 
list of those permitting the use of 
this efficient and silent tool in place 
of the noisy riveter for this class of 
work. The tallest building so far 
by electric welding is nineteen stories 
in height. Automatic welding ma- 
chines including those applying the 
atomic-hydrogen process were further 
improved for industrial use. 

In order to facilitate a more ex- 
tensive use of hydrogen atmospheres 
in electric furnaces, apparatus was 
developed for the economical produc- 
tion of gases, rich in hydrogen, from 
natural gas or illuminating gas. This 
apparatus can be conveniently located 
near the furnaces served and can thus 
form an integral part of an industrial 
process heating equipment. 

A 110,000 kw., 1200 lb. steam tur- 
bine generator built for the Ford Mo- 
tor Company was not only the largest 
high pressure steam unit so far con- 
structed but also the highest rated 
generating unit ever designed for an 
industrial installation. 

The requirements of electrical trans- 
portation both on land and sea called 
for a record production of equipment. 
In addition to the electric locomotives 
and motor cars produced for the elec- 
trification of important sections of 
large steam railway systems, there 
was a growing demand for motor and 
braking equipment for the rehabilita- 
tion of street railway rolling stock. 
Gas-electric buses were used for the 
first time for interurban service and 
there was renewed interest in the flex- 
ibility and economy of the trolley bus 
for operation in modern urban street 
traffic. 

In December, the turbine electric 
liner, "Herbert Hoover" was launched. 



She was at that time the largest mer- 
chant ship ever built in America and 
with her propelling motors rated 26,- 
500 shaft horse power exceeded in 
power rating any electrically propel- 
led merchant ship in the world. 

Lighting is still the arch enemy of 
uninterrupted electric service but lab- 
oratory and field investigations with 
improved recording instruments added 
greatly to our knowledge of the char- 
acteristics of lightning during the 
year, while the development of Thy- 
rite material made it possible to utilize 
the data so secured in a practical way 
for power system protection. The Thy- 
rite lightning arrester has already 
been installed on systems operating at 
the highest commercial voltage. 

Perhaps the most interesting de- 
velopment from the standpoint of fu- 
ture possibilities was the greatly in- 
creased application of electronic tubes 
for purposes other than radio com- 
munication. Their remarkable versa- 
tility in rectifying, converting, invert- 
ing, regulating, measuring and con- 
trolled has resulted in numerous ap- 
plications in substitution for electro- 
mechanical methods of current con- 
trol. 

Other work with vacuum tubes in- 
cluded tests of apparatus designed to 
produce artificial fevers by induction 
and the construction of an X-ray tube 
for operating at a potential of 500,000 
volts or more than twice the maxi- 
mum voltage previously used. 

In presenting a review of these and 
many other developments which oc- 
curred during the year, all the ap- 
paratus referred to are products of 
the General Electric Company. These 
cover such a wide range that the ref- 
erences will serve as an indication of 
the tendencies in design and construc- 
tion as well as the general progress 
in the electrical manufacturing indus- 
try as a whoje. 



STATE TO GET 

FUNDS FOR NAT'L 
FOREST HIGHWAYS 



Construction of 210 miles of ap- 
proach roads to national parks in Cali- 
fornia, at a cost of more than $7,250,- 
000 is planned in the Leavitt bill, which 
will shortly be passed to the Senate 
for consideration, according to word 
from Washington. 

Under the terms of tin- bill, which 
increases the appropriation for na- 
tional park roads, the biggest project 
is planned for Yosemite Valley. 

Approach roads totalling 107 miles 
at a cost of $4,050,000 are planned for 
this area. Others included are: 17 
miles of roads at Sequoia National 
Park, costing $595,000; 69 miles of 
roads at Lassen Volcanic National 
Park, costing $2,010,000, and 17 miles 
at General Grant National Park, cost, 
ing, $595,000. 

The Leavitt bill has yet to pass the 
Senate, after which funds must be 
appropriated. The bill alone does not 
authorize sufficient funds to build all 
of the roads contemplated, but the 
funds will be supplemented by moneys 
spent by the National Forest Service 
and under the terms of the Colton- 
Oddie act, passed recently. 



COMBUSTION TESTS 

WITH ILLINOIS COAL 



bust ion tests made with coal from 
four mining districts of the state of 
Illinois, two being representative of 
Northern Illinois coals and two of 
Southern Illinois coals. The tests were 
made using one of the boiler units in 
the University of Illinois Power Plant. 

The principal objects of the investi- 
gation were to compare the perform- 
ance characteristics of the various 
coals as determined by their influence 
on the overall efficiency, temperature 
of the flue gases, combustion rate and 
draft required when the boiler unit 
was operated at given steaming ca- 
pacities; and to make a study of in- 
cidental factors, such as excess air, 
ash-pit loss, and flue-gas loss, as in- 
fluenced by the physical and chemical 
characteristics of the various coals. 

The bulletin includes a description 
of the plant, a discussion of the meth- 
ods used in conducting the tests and 
making the computations, and a dis- 
cussion of the results obtained. 

Copies of Bulletin No. 213 may be 
obtained without charge by address- 
ing the Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion, Urbana, Illinois. 



NEW PORTABLE 

AIR COMPRESSOR 



Ingersoll-Rand Co., 11 Broadway, 
New York, announces a new portable 
air compressor with a piston displace- 
ment of 500 cu. ft. per minute. This 
unit not only has a capacity 60 per 
cent greater than the largest portable 
previously offered, but follows a type 
of design that is distinctly different 
from that of smaller machines. It is 
designated the Type "XL." 

The unit consists of a two-stage, 
horizontal compressor direct-connect- 
ed to a 4-cylinder, 4-cycle Waukesha 
gasoline engine trough spiral bevel re- 
duction gears operating on ball bear- 
Two complete water cooling systems 
are provided — one for the compressor 
and one for the engine. Separate, 
automatic lubricating systems also are 
used. A radiator-type intercooler cools 
the air between the stages of com- 
pression. Regulation is automatic. 

The complete unit, with gasoline 
tank and receiver, is mounted on a 
one-piece, cast-steel frame, equipped 
with rubber- tired steel wheels. The 
steel top is fitted with removable steel 
side covers arranged for locking. 

The Type "XL" is intended for use 
on jobs which require a considerable 
amount of air. It will do the work of 
two or more small portables, with 
resulting savings in operating costs 



PAVING FIRM ASKS 

$7,994.20 IN SUIT 



Charging breach of contract the Na- 
tional Pavements Corporation of Cali- 
fornia has filed suit in Oakland for 
$7994.20 damages against the Hutch- 
inson Construction Company. 

The action is based on the failure 
of the defendant to purchase agreed 
material from the paintiff in connec- 
tion with the pavement of East 14th 
Street between 12th and 23rd Aves. 

It is alleged the Hutchinson Con- 
struction Company had agreed to pay 
$21,296.50 for material, expert service 
and the paving patent but later can- 
celled the agreement, the city paying 
the defendant $9523.55 for the cancel- 
lation. 



Bulletin No. 213 of the Engii 
Experiment Station of the University 
of Illinois contains the results of com- 



H. J. Prunnier, San Francisco struc- 
tural engineer and P. J. Walker, gen- 
eral contractor of San Francisco, have 
been elected to the Board of Direc- 
tors of the California State Automo- 
bile Association. Both will serve 
three year terms. 



Saturday. Janiui 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Nine 




APARTMENTS 



plans Being: Figured. 

APARTMENTS Cost Approx. $20,000 

SANTA ROSA, Sonoma Co., Cal. 7th 
and A Streets. 

Two-story frame and stucco apart- 
ments (6 apts.) 

Owner— P. Gambini and S. Testorelli, 
Santa Rosa. 

Architect — Wm. Herbert, Rosenberg 
Bldg., Santa Rosa. 
Bids are being taken from selected 

list of local contractors. 

Sub-Contracts Awarded 
APARTMENTS Cost, $125,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Broadway 187 

E Webster Street. 
Seven-story and basement Class A 

apartments (7 apts.) 
Owner— Wm. Helbing, Sr., 1310 Lom- 
bard St., San Francisco. 
Architect— H. S. Helbing, 1310 Lom- 
bard St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — The Helbing Co , 1310 

Lombard St., San Francisco. 
Concrete— Golden Gate Atlas Material 
Co., 16th and Harrison Sts., (Acme 
Concrete Co., 666 Mission St., is 
pouring the concrete). 
As previously reported steel joists 
awarded Truscon Steel Co., Call Bldg.. 
S. F.; cases and mill work to Builders' 
Supply Depot, 390 9th St , S. F. ; struc- 
tural steel to Judson-Pacific Co., 609 
Mission St.; electrical work to Aetna 
Elec. Co., 1337 Webster St.; lumber 
to Loop Lumber Co., Central Basin. 



Plans Being Figured. 

APARTMENTS Cost. $175,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. N Sutter Street 
137% W Franklin St. 

Seven - story and basement class A 
steel frame, concrete and wood 
joist apartments. 

Owner— Mutual Owners Association. 

Architect— Jos. L. Stewart, 206 San- 
some Street. 
Bids are being taken for a general 

contract. 



Completing Plans. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $175,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Detroit St. near 

Wilshire Blvd. 
Seven-story and basement reinforced 

concrete apartments (60x125 ft.) 
Owner — Ernest and Elizabeth Mc- 

Intyre. 
Architect — Fred Sward, Delta Bldg., 

Los Angeles. 
Sub-bids will be taken Jan. 26. 



Sub-Bids Wanted. 

APARTMENTS Cost, $50,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. East 
Erie St N Mandana Blvd. 

Three-story and basement frame and 
stucco apartments (4S rooms). 

Owner— Louise B. Brain, 3600 Lake- 
shore Ave.. Oakland. 

Architect — Clay N. Burrell, American 
Bank Bldg., Oakland. 

Contractor— R. G. Roberts, 3001 Ful- 
ton St., Berkeley. 
Sub-bids are wanted on plumbing. 

hardwood floors, heating, insulation, 

roofing, tile sinks and baths, painting, 

ornamental iron and plastering 

Construction Started. 

APARTMENTS Cont. price, $11,500 

SAN FRANCISCO SE Army and Al- 
abama Streets. 



- story and basement fivmo and 
stucco apartments (4 apts.) 
Architect— G. A. Berger, 309 Valencia. 
Contractor— J. L. <uneo and F. D. 
Martini, care architect. 
Architect is taking heating bids. Oil 
burning heating system is to be in- 
stalled. 



CHURCHES 



NAPA. Napa Co., Cal.— St. Mary's 
Parish Church has voted to erect a 
new edifice to replace the present 
structure in Randolph St. The church 
has $18,000 available for such a pur- 
pose and proposes to raise $5,000 ad- 
ditional to finance the structure. The 
following have been appointed a build- 
ing committee to secure a site for the 
proposed structure; Rev. W. Charles 
Pearson, H. E. Bnudier, H. S. Davis, 
George W. Danforth and C. W. Mer- 



FRESNO, Fresno Co., Calif.— Until 
January 27, bids will be received by 
Rev. F. C. Zahl. pastor, Zion Congre- 
gational Church, E and Monterey Sts., 
to erect new church building. Plans 
and further information on file at 25-1 
E St., Fresno. 



LAS VEGAS, Nev.— Architect Jas. 
A. Fleming, Sr., Las Vegas, is com- 
pleting plans and will take bids for 
the construction of additions to St. 
Joan of Arc Catholic church on Sec- 
ond Street. 



Plans Being Completed. 

CHURCH Cost, $75,000 

BERKELET. Alameda County, Calif. 

Scenic and Le Conte Avenues. 
One-story brick church (to seat 5000). 
Owner— University Christian Church. 
Architect— W. H. Ratcliff. Jr.. Cham- 
ber of Commerce Bldg., Berkeley. 
Bids will be taken for a general con- 
tract in one week. 



SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal.— 
Rev. John T. Buckley, pastor of St. 
Leo's Catholic Church, announces that 
plans will be prepared for a new edi- 
fice to replace the present building at 
1051 W San Fernando St. The cost of 
construction, according to tentative 
estimates, is placed at $100,000. 



RIVERSIDE. Calif.— First Christian 
Church, Rev. C. L. Waite, pastor, has 
appointed a building committee to 



SKILSAW Portable Electric Hand 
Saws (4 models). 

SKILSAW Portable Electric Sander 

SKILSAW Radial Arm Attach- 
ments. 

SYNTRON Portable Electric Ham- 
mers (4 models motor- 
less). 

MALL Flexible Shaft Machines (50 
models). 

Electric Drills, Grinders, Buffers, 
Routers, Lock Mortisers. 

PETER H. NELSON 

Labor Saving Portable Electric 
Tools. 



1348 Mission St. 

San Francisco 

SALES . SERVICE . RENTALS 



UNderhill 
7662 



work out details preparatory to the 
erection of a new edifice to cost about 
$50,000. 



Bids To Be Taken In One Week. 

CHURCH Cost. $19,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 32nd Avenue and 
Ulloa Street. 

One- and two-story frame and stucco 
church with slate roof (to seat 
400). 

Owner— St. Stephens Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. 

Architect— Chas. Strothoff, 2724 16th 
Street. 



FACTORIES AND WARE- 
HOUSES 

Contract Awarded. 

CANNERY Cost, $10,000 

ISLETON, Sacramento Co, Cal. 

Rebuild cannery. 

Owner— Isleton Canning Co. 2 Pine St. 

San Francisco. 
Architect — Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor— J. F. Watson, Isleton. 

Building was recently partially de- 
stroyed by fire. Equipment will bo 
replaced to cost approximately $12,- 
000. 



Sprinkler System Eids Wanted. 
RECONSTRUCTION Cost, $45,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 700-798 York St. 
Reconstruct portions of plant. 
Owner— Trevor & Co., 71 Sutter St. 
Architect— Not Given. 

Bids on other portions of the work 
will be taken shortly. 



Contract Awarded. 

DAIRY Cost approx. $10,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Calif. 

One-story and mezzanine floor frame 
and stucco dairy bldg. (40x70-ft.; 
concrete floor, composition roof). 

Owner— Jersey Dairy Farm, 833 South 
Idaho, San Mateo. 

Plans by D. K. Dobkowitz, 424 Mont- 
erey Blvd., San Francisco. 

Contractor— Castle Bldg. Co., 830 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 



NEAR BLYTHE, Riverside Co., Cal. 
—United States Gypsum Co., 300 W. 
Adams St., Chicago, contemplates 
erecting a wallboard factory at Mid- 
land, 22 miles north of Blythe. 



SACRAMENTO, Cal.— Assembly has 
passed to the Senate a bill appro- 
priating $81,000 to finance construc- 
tion of an addition and purchase of 
equipment for the state printing plant 
at 11th O Sts., Sacramento. 



Preparing Plans 

TERMINAL BLDG. Cost, $300,000 

AVALON, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Three-story and tower Class A rein- 
forced concrete terminal building. 

Owner— Santa Catallna Island Co. 

Architect— Earl T. Heitschmidt, Sub- 
way Terminal Bldg., Los Angeles. 



Contract Awarded — Sub - Bids Being 

Taken. 
SERVICE BLDG. Cost, $60,000 

SAN MATEO. San Mateo Co., Cal. 
Group of service buildings (concrete 

construction). 
Owner— Pacific Gas & Electric Co., 

245 Market St., San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor— H. H. Larsen Co., 64 So. 

Park St., San Franolsco. 



i en 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, Ja 



y 24, 1931 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 
HANGAR Cont. price, $32,746 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
Freeport Blvd. at Municipal Air- 
port. 

Steel frame and wood hangar and air 
terminal station, SOxlOO feet. 

Owner — City of Sacramento (to be 
leased to Boeing Air Transport 
Company). 

Architect— Harry Devine. 1405 Forty- 
first St.. Sacramento. 

Contractor— Lindgren and Swinerton, 
Inc., California State Life Bldg., 
Sacramento. 

Rock, Sand and Cement — American 
Fuel Co., 2701 Stockton Blvd., Sac- 
ramento. 

Structural Steel — Palm Iron Works, 
15th and S Sts., Sacramento. 

Reinforcing Steel— W. S. Wetenhall, 
17th and Wisconsin Streets, San 
Francisco. 

Lumber & Mill Work— Friend & Ter- 
ry, 2nd and S Sts., Sacramento. 

Plumbing and Heating— A. W. Sweet, 
1436 Del Paso Blvd.. Sacramento. 

Electric Work— Sterling Electric Co., 
907 8th St., Sacramento. 

Grading— J. R. Reeves Co., 12th and 
American River, Sacramento. 
Structure will be of steel frame and 

wood construction covering an area of 

SO by 100 feet, with an exterior cov- 
ering of corrugated iron. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
PLANT Cost, U00.000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Three- or four-story concrete or brick 
manufacturing and refining plant. 
Owner— Liquid Sugar Corp., 637 Bat- 
tery St., San Francisco. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

It is expected to start construction 
about Feb. 1, 1931. Similar buildings 
will be constructed at Los Angeles 
and Stockton at a later date. 
(4458) 4 



Bids Opened. 

FACTORY Cost, $ 

OAKLAND. Alameda Co.. Cal. Eighty- 
first Avenue near 14th Street. 
One-story reinforced concrete factory. 
Owner — Blue Bird Potato Chips, Inc 
68th Ave. and Beck Sts., Oakland. 
Architect— Charles W. McCall, 14 4 
Franklin St., Oakland. 
Following is a complete list of the 
general bids received: 
Harold Paige, 5651 Oak Grove. 

Oakland $35,755 

Wm Spivock, S. F _ 35,930 

Gaubert Eros.. Oakland 36,350 

Chas. Vezev & Sons, Oakland.... 36.782 

G. P. W. Jensen. S. F 36.800 

J. J. Moore, Oakland 37,255 

Clinton-Stephenson Const. Co., 

San Francisco 37,474 

C. H. Lawrence. Oakland 37.485 

Chas. Heyer. S. F 37.740 

R. W. Littlefleld, Oakland 37,926 

A. A. Haskell, S. F 37,985 

Barrett & Hilp. S. F 38,200 

H. S. Shain, Oakland 38,379 

A. Cedarborg, Oakland 39.650 

Jacobs & Pattiani, Oakland 39,670 

Austin Co. of Calif.. Oakland 40,400 

Villadsen Bros., S. F 41,150 

A number of alternates were sub- 
mitted which may change the low 
bidder's figures. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

HANGAR, ETC. Cost, $65,000 

SACRAMENTO, Cal. Municipal Air- 
port. 

Steel frame and wod hangar and air 
terminal station. 

Owner — City of Sacramento, H. G. 
Denton, city clerk. 

Architect— Starks & Flanders. Forum 
Bldg., Sacramento. 

Construction Postponed. 
CANNING PLANT Cost, $250,000 

WATSONVILLE, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
One-story reinforced concrete canning 
plant (main structure 150x550-ft.) 
Owner — Manuel A. Travers, et al. 
Plans by Manuel Travers. 



Manuel A. 
this project, is manager of the com- 
mission house, Travers and Sakata, 
Beach Road, Watsonville. Construc- 
tion has been postponed for approxi- 
mately one year. 



Plans Being Figured. 

LAUNDRY Cost, $10,000 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal. No. 
719 Woodside Ave. 

One-story frame and stucco laundry 
building. 

Owner — Superior Service Laundry 
(Theo. Ryerson, Mgr.), 719 Wood- 
side Ave., San Mateo. 

Architect — Not Given. 

Building will house new machinery, 

including water softener and purifying 

plant. 



Contract Awarded. 

SHOP Cost, $ 

RICHMOND. Contra Costa Co.. Cal. 

One-story steel frame and brick shop. 

Owner — Santa Fe Railroad Co. 

Architect— Eng. Dept of Owner (M. C. 
Blanchard, Chief Engr.), Kerckhoff 
Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Contractor — Villadsen Bros., 417 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Feb. 
3rd. 

PUBLISHING BLDG. Cost, $ 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. No. 118 S. 
Broadway. 

Three-story Class A steel frame and 
reinforced concrete publishing build- 
ing (110x165 feet). 

Owner — Times Mirror Co. 

Architect — Gordon Kaufmann, Union 
Bank Bldg., Los Angeles. 



Final Plans Approved. 

SHOP BLDG. Cost, $30,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co.. Cal. 52nd 
Ave. and E 10th St. 

Two-story reinforced concrete main- 
tenance shop building. 

Owner— City of Oakland School Dist. 

Plans by Euilding and Grounds De- 
partment. Oakland. 
Bids will be advertised Jan. 26 and 

will be opened Feb. 10. 



Bids Wanted— 
12 Noon. 

WAREHOUSE. 

SANTA ROSA. 

Service g r o u 
shops, trai 
house, pole 

Owner — Pacific 
Market St. 

Plans by Eng. 
As previous! 

tract awarded 

Santa Rosa. 



To Be Opened Feb. 3. 

ETC. Cost. $60,000 

Sonoma Co.. Cal . 
p (warehouse, garage, 
isformer house, meter 

yard, etc.) 

Gas & Electric Co., 245 
, San Francisco. 
Dept. of Owner. 
' reported, grading con- 

to Connors & Hansen. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

RECONSTRUCTION Cost, $ 

TRACY, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
Reconstruct present warehouse (brick 

walls, steel and wood roof). 
Owner— Holly Sugar Co., West Chan- 
nel St., Stockton. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 

Fabrication of steel trusses award- 
ed to the Herrick Iron Works, 18th 
and Campbell Sts., Oakland. Remain- 
ing work will be done by owners. 

GARAGES AND SERVICE 
STATIONS 

Contract Awarded 

GARAGE Cost, $12,500 

RENO. Washoe Co., Nevada. South 
Virginia and Court Sts. 

One-story brick garage, 50x100 feet. 

Owner — H. C. Heidtman (Durham- 
Chevrolet Co., lessees), Reno. 

Architect — Geo. A. Ferris & Son, Clad- 
inos Bldg., Reno. 

Contractor — Wine & Williams, Reno. 



OAKLAND. Ca.— David Barnes. 593 
2Sth St.. Oakland, at $1,600 submitted 
lowest bid to city clerk to furnish and 
install four unit gas heaters in Mu- 
nicipal Garage at 5th Ave. and E 7th 
St. Council has appropriated $2,000 
for this work. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

David Barnes, Oakland $1,600 

Geo. C. Bell, Oakland 1.749 

East Bay Sheet Metal Works 1,837 

George A. Schuster 1,845 

Pacific Gas & Elec. Co 1,910 

Golden Gate Sheet Metal Works.. 2.124 

Fearey & Moll 2.179 

H. S. Salsberry 2,200 

(4352) 1st report Jan. 9. 1931. 6 



Segregated Bids To Ee Taken In One 

Week. 
GARAGE Cost. $15,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Third Street bet. 

22nd and 23rd Sts. 
One - story and basement reinforced 
concrete garage and service sta- 
tion (150x50-ft.) 
Owner — Samuel Ran, 238 5th St. 
Plans by D. K. Dobkowitz, 425 Mont- 
erey Blvd. 
Engineer— W. Adrian. 417 Market St. 
As previously reported wood roof 
trusses awarded to Summerbell Truss 
Co., 354 Hobart St., Oakland. Con- 
tract awarded for furnishing and 
erecting nine Summerbell wood roof 
trusses. 



Bids To Be Taken In A Few Days. 
AUTO AGENCY Cost. $20,000 

SACRAMENTO. Sacramento Co., Cal. 

NE 22nd and Y Sts. (120xl50-ft.) 
One - story brick Ford automobile 

agency. 
Owner— Ellsworth Harrold, 7 12 12th 

St., Sacramento. 
Architect — Chas. F. Dean, California 

State Life Bldg., Sacramento. 



Contract Awarded. 

SERVICE STATION Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Masonic Ave. and 

Turk Street. 
Owner — Associated Oil Co., 79 New 

Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — Reavey & Spivock, Shell 

Oil Bldg., San Francisco. 



Bids Close Jan. 31. 12 Noon. 

AUTO SALES BLDG. Cost. $70,000 

SAN FARANCISCO. Mission Street 

near Ney St. 
One- and two-story steel frame and 
reinforced auto sales and service 
building. 
Owner— W. E. Street. 251 Magellan 

Avenue. 
Architect— Irvine & Ebbets, Call Bldg. 

Following contractors will submit 
bids: 

T. J. Broderick, 13 5 Burlingame 
Ave., Burlingame. 

G. P. W. Jensen. 320 Market St. 

I. W. Coburn, 204S Market St. 

Stoneson Bros, and Thorinson, 279 
Yerba Puena Ave. 

Chas. Heyer. Mills Bldg. 

Peter Sartorio. 2440 Greenwich St. 

H. P. Hoyt, 45 2nd St. 

Young & Horstmeyer, 461 Market St. 
T. B. Strand. 50 Castenada. 

L. M. Bruce. 3553 Divisadero St. 

K. E. Parker. 135 South Park. 

Lindgren & Swinerton Inc., 225 Bush 



Bids Opened — Held Under Advisement 

SERVICE STATION Cost, $7500 

SAN FRANCISCO. SW Pacific Ave. 
and Larkin St. 

Reinforced concrete service station. 

Owner— E. Dodge, care Mr. Orth, Al- 
len & Co., 168 Sutter St. 

Architect — Not Given. 
Announcement will be made in a 

few days, 



GOVERNMENT WORK AND 
SUPPLIES 

MARE ISLAND. Calif. — Bureau of 

Yards and Docks, Navy Department, 
has set aside $-14,000 for Improvements 
at Marc Island Navy Yard. The 
money will lie expended as follows: 

Repairs to timber wharf $3,000 

Improve elee. wiring machine 

ohops 2,200 

Composition wood block roofing. 

l:ldg. 271 10,000 

Covered passageway, Bldgs. G9- 

71-215-71 1,500 

Repair struc. shop floor 1,700 

Drainage Bldg. 500, paint shop 

annex 1,000 

Repair center track door, W. 

C. Eldg. 388 1,800 

Hammerhead cranes, grid re- 
moval 750 

Miscellaneous repairs to cranes 

3292. 3134. 3033. 2422 1,500 

Painting Bldgs. 123-160-146-125 
103 and outbuildings in rear 

quarters 8,000 

Repair 5th St. bridge 500 

Repair railroad trestle from 
causeway to Submarine 

Base Wharf 2.400 

Renew springline, ferry slip 2,400 

POMONA, Los Angeles Co., Cal.— 
U. S. Treasury Dept., office of the 
Supervising Architect, informs bid- 
ders for construction of the U. S. Post 
Office at Pomona that specifications 
have been modified. The changes 
apply to bronze entrance door finish, 
tile work, inner vestibule doors, boiler 
room bolts, public entrance doors and 
other doors. 



WASHINGTON. D. C— Bids are be- 
ing received by Eureau of Supplies & 
Accounts, Navy Department, Wash- 
ington. D. C. to furnish and deliver 
miscellaneous supplies and equipment 
as noted in the following schedules, 
further information being available 
from the Navy Department Officer, 
l/)0 Harrison St., San Francisco: 
Bids Open Feb. 3 

Western yards, hammers and hat- 
chets; sch. 4927. 

San Diego, one motor driven hand 
milling machine; sch. 4935. 

Mare Island, 4 electric refrigera- 
tors; sch. 4933. 

Mare Island. 150 ft. flexible metallic 
hose. 4-in.; sch. 4931. 

Mare Island. 130 waterproof vibrat- 
ing horns, electric; sch. 493S. 

San Diego, 1000 lbs. steel wool; sch. 
4954. 

San Diego, 3 subway type trans- 
formers; sch. 4963. 

Mare Island, 3 electric drills; sch. 
4953. 

Bids Open Feb. 10 

Mare Island. 13.200 ft. steel wire 
rope; sch. 4962. 

Bids Open Feb. 17 

Mare Island. 60,000 ft. b.m. teak; 
sch. 4928. 



MARE ISLAND, Cal.— L Hecht, 340 
Pine St., San Francisco, (rep. Eastern 
Contracting Firm) (Tel. Exbrook 4078) 
desires sub-bids in connection with 
the barracks buildings to be con- 
structed at Mare Island for the U. S. 
Government. General bids are to be 
opened January 28 by the Bureau of 
Yards and Docks, Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C. Sub-bids desired 
on all portions of the work. 

WASHINGTON, D. c— Until Feb- 
ruary 11, 10:30 A M., under Schedule 
No. 2625, bids will be received by Pur- 
chasing Officer, Panama Canal, for 
transmission line towers. Specifica- 
tions obtainable from Assistant Pur- 
chasing Agent at Fort Mason, San 
Francisco. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS Eleven 

SAN FRANCISCO.— J. E. Rodgers, New Era Work Shop, G03C Mission 

at $2300 submitted lowest bid to Ar- Street. 

chitect Wm. A. Newman, Post Office I>. F. Speidel, 185 Stevenson St. 

Bldg., for furnishing all labor and ma- O. W. Litsinger, 19th and Minne- 

terlals and performing all work fur sota Sts. 

test borings on thi site "f the United F. J. Reilly, 66G Mission St. 

States Federal < hi,,, huiiding at San Bids are to be opened Feb. 3, 11 A. 

Francisco. Following is a complete M.. by Constructing Quartermaster, 

list of the bids: Fort Mason. 

J. B. Rodgers $2,300 

Wm. Allingham Co 3.0S0 PEARL HARBOR, T. H.— In addi- 

N. H. Wright 4,900 t j on to those previously reported foi- 
ls id s referred to Washington for ]owinE are prospective bidders to erect 

■ seaplane hangar at Pearl Harbor, T. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Until Tan 27 10 "' ' J ' dS f " r wnich wil1 be opened 

A S M N un^?Sc S hedule U C SmSs" ^iTI "J" "£ BureaU ° f Z"? 
bids will be received l,v Quartermast- and I>ocks ' Navy Department. Wash- 
er Supply Officer. General Depot, Fort ington, D. C, under specification No. 
Mason, to furnish and deliver Manila 6215: 

rope: 1,000 ft. water hose of which Ingalls Iron Works, Verona. Pa. 
300 ft. will be %-in. dia. in 25 ft. Moore & Co., P. O. Box 1080, Hunt- 
lengths, 300 ft. 94 -in. in 50 ft. lengths; ington. W. Va. 

100 ft. 1-in., 50-ft. lengths and 300 ft. American Bridge Co.. Washington, 
l'/j-in. in 50 ft. lengths; 15,500 ft. Honolulu Iron Works Co., 165 Broad- 
braided water hose. s i-in. dia. in 50 way ; ew York City 

ft. lengths; 2556 gallons olive drab L_ 

Ki n «„XSiS n i iXert r "' i ? oellan 7"s of- SaN FIRANCISCO-Until January 

frorrfabove office obtainable 2C , under <,,„„,„ No , ]Ms „,„ be 

irom above omce. received by Signal Section, General 

Contract Awarded. Depot, Procurement Division, Presl- 

FOUNDATION Cont. Price $38 480 d ' ' for one stora E e battery, one bat- 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 12th, tery charger and 1 filter reactance. 

13th, Alice and Jackson Sts. Specifications obtainable from above. 
Foundation work in connection with 

proposed new post office. _ . ^ _, January 20, 1930 

Owner— U S Government Contract Awarded. 

Plans by Supervising Architect Treas- ™£*g Monte^eyVo^Cai^r? 

ury Dept, Washington, D. C. s j,jj 

Contractor — George Petersen, San SeV en 1 -story frame mess hall bldgs. 

Leandro. Owner— United States Government. 

Plans by Construction Quartermaster. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Until February Presidio, Monterey. 

3, 11 A. M., bids will be received by Contractor — Newman & Halsted. Pa- 
Construqting Quartermaster, Fort cific Grove. 
Mason,, to construct ornamental en- — — ^— 
trance gates for San Francisco Na- PACIFIC COAST— Following con- 
tional Cemetery, Presidio of San tracts awarded by Bureau of Yards 
Francisco. Bids for finish in granite, and Docks, Navy Department, Wash- 
Indiana Limestone or cast stone will ington, D C, in connection with de- 
be considered. Separate bids will be velopments on the Pacific Coast: 
considered for the Iron work. Speci- Spec. 6362, turbo alternator, navy 
fications obtainable from above. yard. Mare Island, Calif., Elliott Co., 

Jeanette, Pa., item 1, $44,500; 180 cal- 

BOULDER CITY - . Nev.— See "Wat- endar days: unit price, $21.40 calendar 

erworks," this issue. Eids opened by day also accepted. 

U. S. of Reclamation. Denver, Colo.. Spec 6275i Ban Diego, Calif., for 

to fabricate and erect two arc- welded physical instruction gymnasium and 

wn * S '* e i,„ UnkS fOT B ° Ulder C ' ty welfar e building, Anton Johnson Co., 

water supply. 5n E , Centro st ^ South Pasadenai 

Calif.. $98,647, 280 days. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Until Jan. 26, Spec. 6356, Coco Solo, C Z., elevator, 

10 A. M., under Schedule No. 928-31- Otis Elevator Co., 810 18th St., N. W., 

181, bids will be received by Quarter- Washington, $2970. 180 days. 

master Supply Officer. General Depot, 

Fort Mason, to furnish and deliver ~.-,™ 

ten oil cooled distribution transform- SACRAMENTO. Cal.— Until January 

ers, 440 volt primary, 110 to 220 volt 2fi ' 3 P. M , under Order No. 2889-1757, 

secondary. 60 cycles, single phase. "'ds will be receivd by U. S. Engi- 

each complete with the necessary ail neer Office. California Fruit Bldg.. to 

and hangers, or suspension hooks. furnish and deliver Rio Vista, Solano 

Quantities and capacities as follows: County: 

2" e 5 ?,w V ^, 0ne dou ble acting ratchet, for Morse 

-p WO oc TV,;. Taper Shank, complete with necessary 

™>-ee 25 KVA. colletS| so any size eri „ can be used 

Three 5 KVA Renshaw No. 3, page 94, Marwedel 

Each transformer to be packed Sep- Ca '' No ,' "■ or fual. 

arately with its necessary equipment, ° ne Carbnn st J>^ twist drill, Morse 

and to be suitably boxed for oversea Taper shank, %". 

shipment. One do, %". 

One do, %". 

Prospective Bidders. One do, %". 

GATES. ETC. $17,000 available One do, %". 

SAN FRANCISCO. Presidio (National One do, 1". 

Cemetery). old Man, for use with ratchet drills. 

Granite and bronze gates, urns, etc., No. 19, page 94, Marwedel Cat. No. 12, 

at entrance to National Cemetery. D r eaual 

Owner— United States Government. ' 

ArC ter! C F"c:r C t Ma r son tinS Q ^^^ MARE ISLAND . Cal-A. Nelson. 

pe^ve^aer^ ^ "" ° f "^ ^^idT in 5S-SS°S& tt 

H. E. Root, 639 Howard St. barracks buildings to be constructed 

Superior Granite Co., Clovi's, Calif. at Mare Island for the U. S. Govern- 

Michel & Pfeffer Iron Works, Har- ment. General bids are to be opened 

rison and 10th Sts. January 28 by the Bureau of Yards 
Anchor Post Fence Co., 460 5th St. and Docks, Navy Department, Wash- 
Western Artificial Stone Co., 666 ington. D. C. Snb-bids desired on all 

Brannan St. portions of the work . 



Twelve 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1D31 



HALLS AND SOCIETY 
BUILDINGS 

WILLOWS, Glenn Co., Cal.— As pre- 
viously reported, Rucker-Fuller Co., 
San Francisco, at $6,599.48 awarded 
contract by county supervisors to fur- 
nish and install furniture, draperies 
and equipment in Orland Memorial 
Building. Other bids: W. and J. 
Sloane, San Francisco, $3,984.05, bid- 
ding: on portions only; Frank M. 
Beecher, San Francisco, $7,720. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

CLUBHOUSE Cost, $10,000 

FRESNO, Fresno Co , Cal.— NE Cali- 
fornia and A Streets. 

One -story frame clubhouse (site 75x 
200 feet). 

Owner — Edison Social Club, California 
St. near Elm Ave. 

Private plans. 

Members of the building committee 

are: C. J. Sommers, chairman; Pete 

Steitz, Ed. Steitz and P. A. Schneider 

of Biola. 



PORTERVILLE, Tulare Co., Cal.— 
Lions Club special committee, recently 
appointed to secure data for a new- 
municipal building project, is having 
sketches prepared by a Fresno archi- 
tect for a building to house the city 
offices, fire station and jail. Property 
at Main and Cleveland Sts. has been 
tentatively chosen as a site for the 
structure. 



HOSPITALS 

Bids Opened. 

WARD BLDGS. Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. Relief Home T'ct. 
Two class A ward buildings (Wards 

K and L). 
Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 
Architect— Hyman & Appleton, 68 Post 
Street. 

General Contract 
Anderson & Ringrose, 320 Mar- 
ket St $324.4011 

Monson Bros 324.875 

K. E. Parker 326,700 

Barrett & Hilp 329,959 

MacDonald & Kahn 332,301 

H. L. Peterson 334.324 

J. L. McLaughlin Co 335,000 

Larsen & Larsen 336,000 

Young & Horstmeyer 345,000 

F. C. Amoroso 347.900 

Jacks & Irvine, Inc 348,407 

A. Nelson 352,000 

Frank J. Reilly 357,654 

C. L. Wold 374,000 

Mechanical Equipment 

Scott, Co., 243 Minna St $20,842 

Frederick W. Snook Co 23,520 

Turner Company 23,600 

Jas. H. Pinkerton Co 23,890 

Jas. A. Nelson, Inc 23,978 

B. O. Brace 25,692 

Henry Ernst & Sons 26,600 

Plumbing System 

Turner Co., 329 Tehama St $36,370 

Jas. H. Pinkerton Co 37,961 

Scott Company 38,987 

Alex. Coleman 39,509 

Oscar Aaron 39,900 

B. O. Brace 42,465 

Frederick W. Snook Co 42,545 

Electrical Work 

G. H. Armstrong, 2890 Howard 

Street $16,700 

Superior Electric Co 19,675 

Aetna Electric Co 19,971 

Strom & Smith 20,723 

Turner Company 20,990 

Decker Electric Co 23,050 

PAN FRANCISCO. — Golden Gate 
Iron Works, 1541 Howard St., sub- 
mitted low bid to Board of Public 
Works to fabricate and deliver struc- 
tural steel for roof ward additions to 
the San Francisco Hospital. J. Ger- 
rick and Co., 74 New Montgomery St., 
at $7,560 submitted low bid to erect. 



Following is a complete list of bids: 

(a) Work as per specifications; 

(b) Fabricate and deliver; 
<c) Erection. 

Golden Gate Iron Works. 1541 How- 
ard St., (a) $27,440; (b) $19,312; (c) 
no bid. 

McClintock-Marshall Co., (a) $27.- 
740; (b) $19,070; (c) no bid. 

Schrader Iron Works, (a) $28,420; 
<b) $21,080; (c) no bid. 

Dyer Bros., (a) $28,512; (b) $20,000; 
(3) no bid. 

Judson-Pacific Co., (a) $29,097; (b) 
$20,572; (c) no bid. 

Minneapolis-Moline Power Co., (a) 
$31,200; (b) $22,300; (c) no bid. 

J. Gerrick & Co., (c) $7,560. 

J. T. Walsh, (c) $11,500. 



Completing Plans — Contract Awarded. 

ADDITION Cost, $30,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. 27th and Valencia 
Streets. 

Two-story steel frame cafeteria addi- 
tion. 

Owner— St. Luke's Hospital, premises. 

Architect— George Kelham, 315 Mont- 
gomery Street. 

Contractor— Chas. Stockholm & Sons. 
Russ Bldg. 



Plans Complete. 

HOSPITAL Cost, $250,000 

(1st unit $66,000) 

COLUSA, Colusa Co., Calif. County 
Hospital Grounds. 

One- and two-story reinforced con- 
crete hospital (1 -story wing and 
2-story administration building). 

Owner — County of Colusa. 

Architect— Otto Deichmann, 110 Sut- 
ter St.. San Francisco. 
Only the first unit, having a 24-bed 

capacity, will be undertaken at this 

time. The structure, when completed. 

will have a capacity of 100 beds. Eids 

will be advertised for shortly. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— The Board of 
Supervisors has rescinded the order 
advertising for bids on Feb. 16 for 
furnishing terrazzo work for the Los 
Angeles General Hospital. A new date 
will be announced later. 



Plans Being Figured — Bids Close Feb- 
ruary 17, 2 P. M. 

HOSPITAL Cost, $ 

SPADRA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. Sta-.e 

Hospital Grounds. 
Hospital, Administration Building and 

Girls' Industrial Building. 
Owner — State of California. 
Architect— State Department of Public 
Works, Division of Architecture, 
Geo. B. McDougall, State Archi- 
tect, Public Works Bldg., Sacra- 
mento. 
The hospital building is two story 
reinforced concrete walls and floors, 
tile partitions and tile roof on wood 
construction. Total floor area is ap- 
proximately IS, 000 square feet. The 
Administration Building is one story 
reinforced concrete walls and floor,, tile 
partitions and tile roof on wood con- 
struction. Total floor area is ap- 
proximately 5300 square feet. The 
Girls' Industrial Euilding is a one- 
story addition with reinforced con- 
crete walls, wood floor, partitions and 
roof construction and tile roof. Total 
floor area is approximately 2200 
square feet. 

Separate bids will be entertained 
for the following segregate parts of 
the work and combinations thereof: 

1. General Work, embracing all 
branches of the construction other 
than plumbing, heating, ventilating 
and electrical. 

2 . Electric work. 

3. Plumbing, Heating and Venti- 
lating Work. 

4. Complete Plumbing, Heating, 
Ventilating and Electrical Work. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 



Bids Opened. 

ADDITIONS Cost, $379,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Potrero Ave. bet. 

20th and 23rd Sts. (San Francisco 

Hospital). 
Class A addition on roof of four ward 

buildings (brick walls, tile roof). 
Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
Architect— Alfred I. Coffey and Martin 

J. Rist. associated. Phelan Bldg. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 
General Work 
Barrett & Hilp. 91S Harrison 

Street $2l',n,S37 

E. K. Nelson & Son 275.000 

J. L. McLaughlin Co 283,700 

Anderson & Ringrose 2S4.000 

Jacks & Irvine 289,630 

MacDonald & Kahn 294,000 

H. L. Petersen 294,097 

F. J. Reilly 295,432 

Plumbing 

Turner Co., 329 Tehama St $3S,225 

Scott Company 41,187 

B. O. Brace 41.633 

Alex. Coleman 42,567 

Frederick W. Snook Co 44,630 

Dowd-Welch Co 67,000 

Electric Work 
Alta Electric Co., 938 Howard 

Street $42,895 

Superior Electric Co 43,200 

Michels & Lucas 44,850 

Heating 
J. A. Nelson. 10th & Howard ..$17,691 

Scott Company 17,700 

B. O. Brace 20.902 

F. W. Snook 21.610 

The Turner Co 22,324 

Dowd & Welch 35,000 



Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Feb- 



17, 



P. M 



Cal. 



HOSPTTAL Cost, 

NORWALK, Los Angeles Co., 

State Hospital Grounds. 
Two-story reinforced concrete Night 
Attendants' Quarters and two- 
story reinforced concrete Day 
Attendants' Quarters and one- 
story frame and stucco residence. 
Owner— State of California. 
Architect— State Department of Public 
Works, Division of Architecture, 
Geo B. McDougall, State Archi- 
tect, Public Works Bldg., Sacra- 
mento. 
The Quarters for Night Attendants 
two - story reinforced concrete walls, 
and floors, tile partitions and tile 
roof on wood construction. Total 
floor area approximately 7600 sq. ft. 

The Quarters for Day Attendants is 
two-story reinfoced concrete walls, 
wood floor, partition and roof con- 
struction and tile roof. Total floor 
area approximately 6800 square feet. 
The Residence is one-story frame, 
exterior and stucco walls and shingle 
roof and of approximately 1800 square 
feet. 

Separate bids will be entertained 
for the following segregate parts of 
the work and combinations thereof: 
1 General Work and Alternates, 
embracing all branches of the con- 
struction other than Plumbing, Heat- 
ing and Electrical. 

2. Electrical Work and Alternates. 

3. Plumbing and Heating Work and 
Alternates. 

4. Complete Mechanical including 
Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 
Work and Alternates. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Until Feb. 9, 
2 P. M., bids will be received by Los 
Angeles County Supervisors for the 
following items in connection with the 
Los Angeles Genera! Hospital: (1) 
dishwashing machines; (2) heavy duty 
ranges; (3) kitchen equipment, meat 
tracks and scales; (4) steamers and 
kettles; (5) light duty ranges; (6) lino- 
leum; (7) sheet metal equipment. 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



rhirteen 



is on file at the office of Miss 
i B. Beatty, Hall of Records 
I.ms Angeles. 



P.Mg 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Until Feb. IS, 
2 P. M., bids will be received by Los 
Angeles County Supervisors for the 
following items in connection with 
thf Los Angeles General Hospital: (1) 
plastering: (!) terrazzo work; (3) low 
pressure refrigeration; (4) carbon 
dioziiie equipment; (5) high pressure 
, itlon; (6) lighting fixtures. 

Plans on file at the office of Miss 
Maim' B. Beatty. Hall of Records 
Bldg., Los Angeles. 



Tlans Being Prepared. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, 

MEKCED, Merced Co.. Cal. County 
Hospital Grounds. 

Enlarge and remodel kitchen in Isola- 
tion Ward. 

Owner — County of Merced. 

Plans by W. E. Bedesen, County Sur- 
veyor, Shaffer Bldg., Merced. 

TUCSON, Ariz.— Dr. Paul D. Moss- 
man, medical director, U. S. Bureau 
of Indian Affairs, has tentatively chos- 
en Sahuarita hill, east of San Xavier 
mission, as a site for the proposed Pa- 
pago Indian sanatorium, to be erect- 
ed this year. Plans will be drawn at 
once for a structure to cost about 
$12S.000. J. W. Elliott is director of 
the Papago Indian Reservation with 
offices at Sells, Ariz. 



SAN FRANCISCO— A. Nelson, 242 
Ocean Ave., desires sub-bids in con- 
nection with the construction of two 
Class A ward buildings (Wards K and 
L) for which bids are being received 
on Jan. 21, at 2:30 P. M. by San Fran- 
cisco Board of Public Works. Plans 
prepared by Architects Hyman *r 
Appleion, OS Post Street. Cost esti- 
mated at $3SS,500. Mr. Nelson desires 
sub-bids on all portions of the work. 



Contract Awarded. 

ADDITION Cont. price, $962a 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara County, Cal. 

County Hospital. 
Two-story frame and stucco addition 

to health cottage. 
Owner— County of Santa Clara. 
Architect— Binder & Curtis, 35 W San 

Carlos St., San Jose. 
Contractor — Frank Neves, S91 Harri- 
son St., San Jose. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 

Frank Neves. San Jose $ 9,625 

Wm. Meyer, San Jose 9.7S0 

Paul Anderson. San Jose 10,343 

G. M. Latta, San Jose 10.374 

R. C. Summers. San Jose 10.500 

Geo. Honore, San Jose 10,574 

Thermotite Const. Co.. San Jose 10.579 

The Minton Co., Mt. View 10,794 

Collins & Martin, San Jose 10.89S 

Megna & Newell, San Jose 11,060 

J. D. Carlsen, San Jose 11.089 

B. J. Smith. San Jose 11.350 



Contract Awarded. 

EQUIPMENT Cont. price. $9J97 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Cal. In- 
firmary Road. 
Mechanical equipment for Service 
Building and underground piping 
system for Santa Clara County 
Hospital. 
Owner — County of Santa Clara, Henry 

A. Pfister, county clerk. 
Architect— Binder & Curtis, 35 W San 

Carlos St., San Jose. 
Contractor — A. J. Peters & Son, 455 
E Washington St., San Jose. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 

A. J. Peters & Son, San Jose $ 9.997 

O'Mara & Stewart, S. F 11,900 

Geo. Schuster. Oakland 12.703 

Wm. Serpa, San Jose 13,100 

J. A. Nelson, S. F 14,564 



AGNEW, Santa Clara Co., Calif.— 
Spencer Elevator Co . 106 7th St.. San 
Francisco, at $3320 awarded contract 
by State Department of Architecture. 
Public Works Rldg . Sacramento, for 
reconstruction of two elevators In the 
Agnew State Hospital. 



Plans Being Completed. 

BUILDINGS Cost, $10,000 each 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Del 

Valle Tuberculosis Farm. 
Two Preventorium buildings. 
Owner — County of Alameda. 
Architect— H. H. Myers, Kohl Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

One building will be an open-air 
pavilion. 

Bids will be taken in 2 or 3 weeks. 



January 21, 1931 
Plans Being Prepared. 
NURSERY Cost, $25,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 

Eighth Street. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco nursery. 
Owner — San Jose Day Nursery, 32 N 

7th St., San Jose. 
Architect— Binder & Curtis, 35 W San 

Carlos St., San Jose. 
Members of the Building Committer 
are: Mrs. W. G. Alexander, chairman; 
Mrs. J. E. Fisher, Mrs. Preston H. 
Eoomer, Mrs. Albert R. Thompson, 
Mrs. Fred N. Hess and Mrs. F. H. 
Glasson. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
ORPHANAGE Cost, $225,000 

GRASS VALLET, Nevada Co., Cal. 
Two - story and basement reinforced 

concrete orphanage (parochial 

school, dormitory, etc.) 
Owner — Saint Patrick's Oorphanage. 

Grass Valley. 
Architect — Harry Devine, California 

State Life Bldg.. Sacramento. 
Eids will be called for about June 1. 



BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal.— 
Lamson Company, 611 Howard St., 
San Francisco, at $4041 awarded con- 
tract by Regents of the University of 
California for furnishing and install- 
ing pneumatic tube system in Cowell 
Memorial Hospital, Berkeley. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

HOSPITAL Cost, $65,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Ocean Ave. and 
Alemany Blvd. 

Two-story class A reinforced concrete 
emergency hospital. 

Owner — City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Architect — Bureau of Architecture, 
Chas. Sawyer, chief. City Hall. 

HOTELS 

Work Started. 

REMODELING Cost, $50,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Fowell and O'Far- 

rell Streets. 
Remodel interior of hotel (painting, 

papering, etc.) 
Owner — Manx Hotel, premises. 
Architect— Not Given. 

Work is being 1 done by owners on 
day's work basis. 



Plans Being Figured— Eids Close Jan. 

28th. 
H< »TEI, Cost, $700,000 

YAKIMA, Washington. 
Thirteen-story and basement class A 

Hotel (200 guest rooms). 
Owner — Naches Hotel Co., J. G. Von 

Herberg, president, Seattle. 
Architect — Henry Bittman, Securities 

Bldg., Seattle. 
Bids are being received for a gen- 
eral contract with separate bids for 
plumbing, heating and electric work. 

Owner Taking Bids. 

REMODELING Cost, $20,000 

MODESTO, Stanislaus Co., Cal. 



Remodel hotel (enlarge floor, new fur- 
nishings, etc. • 
Owner — Henry Crow, Modesto Hotel, 

Modesto. 
Architect — Davls-Pearce Co., Grant 
and Weber Sts., Stock ton. 
Bids aro being taken for a general 
contract with separate bids on paint- 
ing and electric work. 

ICE AND COLD STORAGE 
PLANTS 

NAPA, Napa Co., Cal.— Union Ice 
Co., will spend $20,000 in new cold 
storage facilities at the present plant 
in the East Napa section, it is an- 
nounced by Ed Milde, plant manager. 
Construction has already been started. 



Plans Being Completed— C o n t r a c t 

Awarded. 
ICING PLANT Cost, $150,000 

SACRAMENTO, Cal. 9th and C Sts. 
Reinforced concrete refrigerator car 

icing plant. 
Owner— Consumers Ice & Cold Stor- 
age Co., 9th and L Sts., Sacra- 
mento. 
Plans by Contractor. 
Contractor — W. W. Williamson, 320 
Market St., San Francisco. 
The addition will house cold storage 
and pre-cooling of perishable com- 
modities to be handled by the West- 
ern Pacific Railroad. 



Contract Awarded. 

COLD STORAGE Cost, $20,000 

NAPA, Napa Co., Calif. East Napa 

Section. 
Cold storage facilities at present plant 
Owner — Union Ice Company. 
Plans by W. W. Williamson. 
Contractor— W. W. Williamson, 320 

Market St., San Francisco. 
Construtcion will start shortly. 



BERKELEY, Alameda Co.. Calif.— 
California Cork Insulation Co., Inc., 
354 Pine St., San Francisco, at $7,175 
awarded contract by Regents of the 
University of California for refrigera-- 
tion and air conditioning room in the 
Engineering laboratory on the campus 
of the University of California. 



POWER PLANTS 

SAN BERNARDINO, Cal.— Couthern 
Sierras Power Co. has started work 
on the erection of a transmission line 
terminal at its Oak Street plant here. 
Steel bus structures, switching equip- 
ment, etc., will be installed; cost $255- 
000. 



GUSTINE, Merced Co.. Calif.— City 
Engineer A. E. Cowell has completed 
plans and bids will be asked shortly 
by town trustees to erect power house 
to house transformers and other 
equipment for the street lighting sys- 



BEVERLY HILLS, Los Angeles Co., 
Cal.— Until 8 P. M., Feb. 10, bids will 
be received by the city of Beverly 
Hills for approximately 33,000 ft. lead- 
covered wire for the street depart- 
ment. 

GUSTINE, Merced Co., Cal.— Until 
January 26, 7:30 P. M., bids will be 
received bv W. L. Chappell, city clerk. 
Room 2, I. O. O. F. Bldg., Gustine. 
to erect transformer house, 12xl6-ft.. 
with hollow tile walls and concrete 
floor. Certified check 10% payable tn 
Chairman of the Eoard of Trustees 
required with bid. Plans obtainable 
from city clerk. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— City council 
has before it a measure proposed by 
Thomas W. Williams, councilman, for 
placing on the June ballot a $19,000.- 
000 power bond issue. 1 



Fourteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



TUCSON, Ariz.— Tucson Gas, Elec- 
tric Light & Power Co., Max A. Pooler, 
general manager, will start work Feb. 
1 on expansions to its plant to cost 
approximately $400,000. A large Diesel 
engine will be installed and buildings 
erected to house the machine. Plans 
are being drawn by Samuel Headman, 
superintendent of construction for the 
Federal Light & Traction Co., the 
parent concern. 



LONG BEACH, Los Angeles Co.. 
Cal.— Stone & Webster, H. F. Hen- 
drickson, local manager, 510 Laugh- 
lin Bldg.. Third and Broadway. Los 
Angeles, engineers and contractors, 
will prepare plans and specifications 
and will build a new steam plant unit 
at Long Beach for the California Edi- 
son Co. The new unit will develop an 
additional 135,000-hp. and is estimated 
to cost $7,500,000. 



January 19, 1931 
Contracts Awarded. 

POWER HOUSE Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. Third Avenue and 

Parnassus Avenue. 
One-story steel frame and concrete 

power house. 
Owner— University of California. 
Architect — Wm. C. Hays, Crocker 1st 

Nat'l Bank Bldg., San Francisco. 
General Work 
J. S. Hannah, 268 Market St., San 

Francisco, $23,753. 

Mechanical Equipment 
C. C. Moore & Co., Sheldon Bldg., San 

Francisco, $88,805. 



LONG BEACH. Calif. — Application 
has been made to the U. S. Engineer 
Office at Los Angeles by the Southern 
California Edison Company, Ltd., for 
War Department permission to con- 
struct an extension to condenser wat- 
er intake for their electric generating 
plant at the entrance to Long Beach 
Harbor. 



LOS ANGELES. Cal.— Los Angeles 
Gas & Electric Corp. will spend about 
$4,000,000 this year on additions and 
betterments to its gas and electric 
systems. The chief items on the 1931 
betterment program include 20 miles 
of commercial gas mains, 9500 gas 
services, 10.000 gas meters, 4000 gas 
regulators, 8000 electric services, 6600 
electric meters with the necessary 
poles, wires and conduits; a new su- 
pervisory control electric substation 
of 15.000 Kva capacity and prepara- 
tion for changing 16,500-volt high lines 
to 33.000-volt lines. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, FIRE 
HOUSES AND JAILS 

Contract Awarded. 

ELEVATOR Cost, $10,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 

Court House. 
Install elevator in courthouse. 
Owner — County of Santa Clara. 
Architect— Binder & Curtis, 35 W San 

Carlos St., San Jose. 
Contractor — Thermotite Const. Co., 580 

Stockton Ave., San Jose. 
Elevator— Otis Elevator Co., 1 Beach 

St., San Francisco. 



Commissioned To Prepare Plans. 
HALL OP RECORDS Cost, $500,000 
MARTINEZ. Contra Costa Co., Cal. 
Class A Hall of Records Bldg:. 
Owner — County of Contra Costa. 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 
St., San Francisco. 
Project will be financed by a three- 
year tax levy, two assessments having: 
already been raised. Among; other ar- 
chitects who sought commission to 
prepare the plans were John J Don- 
ovan of Oakland, A. W. Cornelius of 
San Francisco, Jas. T. Narbett of 
Richmond. 



Bids Opened For Foundation Work 
LEGION BLDG. Cost. $2,500,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Civic Center. 
Four - story and basement concrete 

class A Legion Building. 
OPERA HOUSE Cost. $2,500,000 

Six-story class A opera house, seating 
capacity 4000: standing room 500. 
Owner— City and County of San Fran- 
cisco (S. F. War Memorial). 
Architect— G. A. Lansburgh, 140 Mont- 
gomery St. and Arthur Brown, 251 
Kearny St. 
Manager of Const.— Lindgren & Swin- 
erton. Inc., 225 Bush St. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 

L. J. Conn. 1 De Haro St $236,200 

MacDonald & Kahn 242.999 

Hanrahan Company 255.000 

K. E. Parker Co 256,000 

Monson Brothers 208,000 

Clinton Construction Co 272,424 

Barrett & Hilp 286,500 

Chas. L. Harney 295,000 

Guy F. Atkinson 304,400 

Eaton & Smith 311,300 

Complete list of unit prices obtain- 
able from this office. 

Completing Plans. 

ADDITION Cost, $250,000 

SAN FRANCISCO Golden Gate Park 
Addition to present Academy Building 

(steel and brick construction). 
Owner— California Academy of Science 

Premises. 
Architect — Lewis P. Hobart, Crocker 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Bids will probably be called for 
within ten days. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
ADDITION Cost, $150,000 

RENO, Washoe Co , Nevada. 
Two-story fireproof addition to County 

Courthouse, 80x140 feet. 
Owner — County of Washoe. 
Architect — F. J. DeLongchamps, Ga- 
zette Bldg., Reno, Nevada. 

Modern heating plant will be in- 
stalled. District Attorney Melvin E. 
Jepson has been authorized by the 
county commissioners to draw up a 
bill to be presented at the forthcoming 
state legislature authorizing a $150,- 
000 bond issue to finance this con- 
struction. 



Janua:y 16, 1931 
Bids To Be Advertised Feb. 2nd. 
JAIL Cost, $110,000 

SALINAS, Monterey Co., Cal. 
Two-story reinforced concrete jail (to 

accommodate 100 prisoners). 
Owner — County of Monterey. 
Architect — Reed & Corlett, Oakland 

Bank of Savings Bldg., Oakland. 



RENO. Nev.— County Library Trus- 
tees reject lone bid of B. E. Bevilac- 
qua of Reno at $11,000 to move the 
old county library building from Reno 
to Sparks, Nevada. The trustees are 
now considering the erection of a now 
structure in Sparks, having abandon- 
ed the proposal to move the building 
at Reno. 

Preparing Plans, 

CITY HALL Cost, $90,000 

REDLANDS, San Bernardino Co., Cal. 

Vine and Cajon Streets. 
One and two-story reinforced concrete 

and masonry city hall. 
Owner — City of Redlands. 
Architect— E. T. Voellmy, 125 E. Fern 

St., Redlands. 

Preparing Preliminary' Plans. 

POLICE STATION Cost, $60,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Golden Gate Park. 

Police Station. 

Owner— City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Architect — Weeks and Day, Fnancial 
Center Bldg. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Vogt & David- 
son, 185 Stevenson Street, at $4,480 
awarded contract by State Depart- 
ment of Architecture, Public Works 
Bldg., Sacramento, for partition work 
in the State Eullding, San Francisco. 



RESIDENCES 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $4500 

SAN LEANDRO, Alameda Co., Calif. 
Glen Drive. 

1% -story frame and stucco residence 
(5 rooms). 

Owner — Mrs. Law. 

Plans by Ralph Wood, 1197 Foothill 
Blvd.. San Leandro. 

Contractor — Arthur Nylander, San Le- 
andro. 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $9000 

SAN LEANDRO. Alameda Co.. Calif. 
Estudillo Estate, Rodney Drive. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (7 rooms). 

Owner— Mr. Bruning. 

Plans by Ralph Wood, 1197 Foothill 
Blvd., San Leandro. 

Contractor — Arthur Nylander, San Le- 
andro. 

Bids To Be Taken Shortly. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. St. Francis Wood. 
Two-story and basement frame and 



stu 



S H 1 < ' M 



(9 




turday, January 24, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Fifte 



Owner— Dr. S. J. Hunkln, 1155 Bush 

St., San Francisco. 
Irel i I' 1 '" I I'- Outterson, 520 

Powell St.. San Francisco. 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost. $12,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Washington St. 

Tu.i story and basement frame and 
stucco residence. 

Owner— Dr. B. H. Howell, 909 Hyde 
Street. 

Architect— Harris Allen. 1924 Broad- 
way, Oakland. 

Contractor — J. Harold Johnson, Hearst 
Building. 

Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, % 

BURLINGAME, San Mateo Co., Cal. 

Walnut and Willow Sts. 
Two - story and basement frame and 

stucco residence. 
Owner — D. H. Wade Macomber, 1425 

Broadway, Burlingame. 
Architect— Jas. J. Mitchell. 369 Pine 

St., San Francisco. 
Contractor— Mr. Coykendall. Redwood 

City. 



Sketches Being Prepared. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $2(1,000 

BERKELEY, Alameda County, Calif. 

Claremont Pines. 
T-wo-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (10 rooms and 4 

baths). 
Owner — Withheld. 
Architect— W. E. 

St., Oakland. 



Schirmer, 780 21st 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. West 

Kingsley Place N Trestle Glen Rd. 
Two-storv frame and stucco residence 

(7 rooms). 
Owner — P. De Lucce, 327 17th Street. 

Oakland. 
Architect— H. L. Slocombe, 62 York 

Drive, Oakland. 
Contractor— H. C. Knight. 327 17th St.. 



Construction Postponed Indefinitely. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. Forest Hill. 
Two - story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (6 rooms and 2 

baths). 
Owner— John Gould. 
Architect — Crim. Resing & McGuinnes. 

525 Market St. 



Contract Awarded. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $10,000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

No. 3701 19th St. 
Two-story frame and stucco residence 

(7 rooms). 
Owner— Frank Mead, Rt. 1, Box 347. 

Sacramento. 
Architect — Not Given. 
Contractor— Mead & Mead Constr. Co., 

Premises. 



Plans Being Com] l 

RESIDENCE Cost, $8000 

STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
One and one- half story frame and 

stucco residence 
Owner— A. C. Weber, 17C6 W Willow 

St., Stockton. 
Architect— Glenn Allen, Union Block 

Bldg., Stockton 
Plans will be ready for bids in one 



Plans Complete. 

BUNGALOW COURT Cost, $12,500 

SAN RAFAEL, Marin Co., Cal. 
Frame and stucco bungalow court. 
Owner— F. Mendenhall, % architect. 
Plans by L. F. Hyde, 372 Hanover St.. 
Oakland. 
Bids will be called for as soon as 
financing arrangements are completed. 



Plans Being Completed. 
RESIDENCE Cost, $7500 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Calif. 706 

Hilldale Avenue. 
1% - story and basement frame and 
stucco residence (6 rooms; Eng- 
lish type). 
Owner — S. C. Couper, Berkeley. 
Plans by Mr. Walker. 
Contractor — J. M. Walker, 1709 Grove 
St., Berkeley. 
Wood panel walls, shingle roof, gas 
furnace, concrete double garage. Sub- 
bids will be taken shortly. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 
RESIDENCE Cost approx. $,0,000 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (12 rooms). 
Owner— A. F. Eingalli. 
Architect— Williams and Wastell. 374 

17th St., Oakland. 
Plans will be ready for bids in about 
three weeks. 



SCHOOLS 

Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 
30th 

SCHOOL Cost, $400,000 

LOS ANGELES, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
No. 2995 Robertson Blvd. 

Group of reinforced concrete and brick 
school buildings (10 rooms, cafe- 
teria, etc.) 

Owner— Los Angeles City School Dist. 

Architect— J. C. Austin and F. M. 
Ashley, Los Angeles. 



Plans Completed 

SCHOOL Cost, $225,000 

PASADENA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Lake Avenue. 
Reinforced concrete Junior High 

School. 
Owner — Pasadena City School District 
Architect — Marston & Maybury, 25 S. 

Euclid Ave., Pasadena. 



Plans Being Figured— Bids Close Jan. 
31, 7:30 P. M. 

ADDITIONS Cost, $ 

PACIFIC GROVE, Monterey Co., Cal 
Furnish and install stage curtain, 
stage cyclorama and auditorium 
window drapes; fiurnish and in- 
stall electric light fixtures and 
lamps for high school additions 
Owner — Pacific Grove High School 
District, Dr. J. J. Williams, Clerk. 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 
St , San Francisco. 
Certified check 5% payable to clerk 
required with bid. Specifications ob- 
tainable from the San Francisco office 
of the architect and the San Jose 
office in the Bank of Italy Bldg., also 
on file in the office of the secretary of 
the board of trustees at Pacfic Grove. 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
—Until February 3, 8 P. M., bids will 
be received by C. R. Holbrook, secre- 
tary, Board of Education, for the sale 
and removal of the old main building 
and church on the Gault School prem- 
ises at Seabright and Effey streets. 
Specifications obtainable from secre- 
tary. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

AUDITORIUM Cost, $25,000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

One-story and basement brick audi- 
torium. 

Owner — St. Joseph's Academy. 

Architect — Harry Devine, California 
State Life Bldg., Sacramento. 
Plans will be ready for bids in about 

thirty days. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

SCHOOL Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. Noe and 25th Sts. 
Class A junior high school building 

(3 - story and basement concrete. 

Travertite exterior, tar and gravel 

roof; to accommodate approx. 800 

students). 
Owner — City and County of San Fran- 

Architect — Crim, Resing and McGuin- 
ness, 488 Pine St. 

Contractor — Anderson & Ringrose, 320 
Market St. 

Excavation and Grading— J. P. Hol- 
land, 1834 McKinnon Ave. 

Reinforcing Steel — Truscon Steel Co., 
Call Bldg. 

Marble— J. E. Back Co., 1533 San Bru- 
no Avenue. 

Lumber— Loop Lbr. Co.. Central Basin 

Accoustic Treatment — Western Asbes- 
tos Magnesia Co., 25 South Park. 
As previously reported plumbing & 

gas fitting awarded to Turner Co., 329 

Tehama St.; mechanical equipment to 

Herman Lawson. 465 Tehama St.; 

electric work to Alta Electric Co.. 976 

Indiana St. 



Plans Being Figured. 

RESIDENCE Cost, $5500 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal. 
One-story and basement frame and 

stucco residence (6 rooms). 
Owner— A. J. Martin, 1040 Murray St., 

Berkeley. 
Architect — F, H. Slocombe, 62 York 

Drive, Berkeley. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
RESIDENCES Cost, $7500 and $8000 
SAN FRANCISCO. San Mateo and 
Santa Clara Counties in San Fran- 
cisco and Peninsular District. 
Group of 65 one-story and basement 

stucco residences. 
Owner — Eastern Corp. (Name with- 
held). 
Architect— Jos. L. Stewart, 206 San- 
some St., San Francisco. 
Financial arrangements are now be- 
ing worked out. 



"Gold Medal" Safety Scaffolding 

for use on steel and concrete frame buildinps, saves 
lives, time and monev 

It pays to use the best Scaffolding EauioiaeBt 
whenever a Scaffold is required. The risk is 
always great. 

The Patent Scaffolding Company 

270— 13th St.. Saa Francisco Phone Hemlock 427S 

Lessor of Suspended and Swinging Safety "Gold Medal" Scaffolding. 



Sixteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



Bids Wanted— To Close Feb. 9th. 
PCIIi " >L Cost, $300,000 

ALTADENA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Lake Ave. near Calveras St. 
Reinforced concrete Junior High 

School (auditorium to seat 900). 
Owner— Pasadena City School Dist. 
Architect — Marston & Maybury, 25 S. 

Euclid Ave , Pasadena. 

Bids Wanted — To Close Feb. 5. 

LABORATORY Cost, $120,000 

LA JOLLA, San Diego Co., Cal. 
Scripps Institution of Oceano- 
graphy. 

Two-story reinforced concrete labora- 
tory (46x100 feet). 

Owner — University of California, 405 
Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles. 

Architect — Louis J. Gill, 32 Sefton 
Bldg., San Diego. 

Bond Election Planned , 

SCHOOL Cost, $230,000 

VALLEJO, Solano Co., Cal. 

Class C brick or concrete Junior High 

School. 
Owner — Vallejo Junior High School 

District. 
Architect — Davis-Pearce Co., Grant 

and Weber Sts., Stockton. 

BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Calif.— 
Pacific Mfg. Co., Monadnock Bldg., 
San Francisco, at $4670 awarded con- 
tract by Regents of the University of 
California for furnishing and install- 
ing laboratory equipment and furni- 
ture in the Agricultural Hall and Hil- 
gard Hall, on the campus of the Uni- 
versity of California. 

SAN FRANCISCO. — Judson Pacific 
Co., 609 Mission St., at $7495 submit- 
ted lowest bid to Board of Public 
Works to furnish, fabricate and de- 
liver structural steel for the proposed 
James Lick Junior High School, the 
contract for erection of which has al- 
ready been awarded to J. Gerrick and 
Co., 74 New Montgomery St., at $2,568. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 

Judson Pacific Co $7,495 

McClintic-Marshall Co 7,496 

Dyer Brothers 7,600 

Golden Gate Iron Works 7,800 

Minneapolis-Moline Power Co 7,894 

Schrader Iron Works 7,990 

Bids held under advisement. 



Contracts Awarded. 

GYMNASIUM Cost, $50,000 

KENTFIELD, Marin Co., Cal. 

Gymnasium (wood frame, roof trusses 

over gymnasium proper carried on 

steel columns) planting lawns and 

shrubbery, etc., at college grounds. 

Owner — Marin Junior College District. 

Architect — A. A. Cantin, 544 Market 

St., San Francisco. 

General Work 
Young & Horstmeyer, 461 Market St., 
San Francisco, $44,662. 
Electrical Work 
North Eay Electric Co., San Rafael. 
$2134. 
Contracts awarded on alternates 
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 7, 10 and possibly 13. 
(Same may be obtained at this of- 
fice upon request. 

Bids on heating and painting were 
rejected. New bids will be called for 
shortly. 

Complete list of bids published Jan. 
16th. 

To Vote Bonds At Election Feb. 11. 

SCHOOL Cost, $87,000 

YUBA CITY, Sutter Co., Cal. 

Two-story brick elementary school. 

Owner— Yuba School District; C. P. 
Taylor, Roy E. Cassidy and Eliza- 
beth Z. Littleton (clerk), trustees 
of district. 

Architect — Davis-Pearce Company Inc. 
Builders' Bldg., Stockton. 



received by Walter L. Bachrodt, sec- 
retary, Board of Education, to fur- 
nish and deliver: 

(a) Steel Lockers: 

(b) Electrical Fixtures 

for school department. Specifications 
on file in office of City Superintendent 
of Schools. 



Plans Completed. 

SCHOOL Cost, $225,000 

ALTADENA, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Lake Avenue. 
Reinforced concrete Junior High 

School . 
Owner — Pasadena City School District 
Architect — Marston & Maybury, 25 S. 

Euclid Ave., Pasadena. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
SCHOOL Cost, $30,000 

SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Reinforced concrete elementary school 
Owner— Santa Clara School District. 
Architect— Ralph Wyckoff, 19 N 2nd 
St., San Jose. 
This structure will be financed with 
monies now in the district's Reserve 
Fund. 



Plans Being Prepared. 
SCHOOL Cost, $40,000 

SANTA CLARA, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Reinforced concrete annex to high 

school. 
Owner— Santa Clara School District. 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 
This structure will be financed with 
monies now in the district's Reserve 
Fund. 



SAN JOSE. Santa Clara Co., Cal.— 
Until February 3, 10 A. M., bids will 
be received by Walter L. Bachrodt, 
secretary, Board of Education, to fur- 
nish and install library furniture for 
school department. Specifications ob- 
tainable from City Superintendent of 
Schools. 



Prospective Bidders. 

GYMNASIUM, ETC. Cost, $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal . 
One - story reinforced concrete aca- 
demic building with tile roof. 
Owner— Monterey Union High School 

District. 
Architect — Swartz & Ryland, Spazier 
Bldg.. Monterey. 
Following is a partial list of the 
prospective bidders: 

General Work 
M. J. Murphy, Carmel. 
Union Supply Co., 686 Lighthouse. 
Monterey. 

W. P. Sweeney, 781 Del Monte Blvd., 
Pacific Grove. 

Brick Work 
E. H. Raymond, 722 Granite, Pacific 
Grove. 

Linoleum 
Rudolph Furniture Store, S01 Light- 
house, Monterey. 

Plastering 
W. N. Ingram, 850 Archer, Mont- 
erey. 
A. B. Jacobsen, Monterey. 

Ornamental Roof Tile 
C. L. Frost, i65 Webster, Monterey. 

Hardware 
R. M. Wright, 570 Lighthouse, Pa- 
cific Grove. 
Plumbing, Heating and Sheet Metal 
Barton OIl-O-Matic, 635 Cass, Mont- 
Phillips Plumbing Co., 130 Pearl, 
Monterey. 

Mill Work 
T. A. Work, Monterey. 

Painting 
R. Page, Monterey. 

Electric Work 
Chas. Langlais, 472 Tehama Street. 
San Francisco. 

McConnell Electric Works, 443 Al- 
varado, Monterey. 

T. B. Reardon, Carmel. 
Bids are to be opened Feb. 16, 7:30 
P. M. 



SANTA CRUZ. Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
—Roberts Mfg. Co., 663 Mission Street, 
San Francisco, at $1,915, awarded con- 
tract by Board of Education to fur- 
nish and install lighting fixtures for 
new Laurel, Gault and Mission Hills 
Schools. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 

Roberts Mfg. Co., S. F $1,915 

Thomas Day, San Francisco 1,932 

I. Smith, Santa Cruz 2.412 

Boyd Lighting Fixture Co., S. F. 2,511 

Mission Electric Co 2.605 

John Holt, Santa Cruz 2,735 

T. L. Rosenberg, Oakland 3.255 

Window shade bids under advise- 
ment. Complete list of itemized bids 
on file in this office. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal— Sarver & 
Zoss. Inc., 727 W. 7th St., submitted 
low bid ot $151,960 on general contract 
to Los Angeles Board of Education for 
Class A reinforced concrete school 
auditorium (98x190 feet) at the Uni- 
versity High School site, Southeast 
corner of Texas and Westgate Aves., 
Sawtelle. Other low bids were: Pohl- 
Brown Co., 793 E. 17th St., painting at 
$2900; R. M. Wilson, 210 S. Flower St., 
heating and ventilating at $21,597; 
American Electric Constr. Co., 722 S. 
Towne Ave., electric wiring at $7730; 
Coony & Winterbottom, 2425 Hunter 
St , plumbing at $6712. Plans were 
prepared by the business department 
of the Board, W. E. Record, manager. 
A. S. Nibecker Jr , architect. 



Preparing Preliminary Sketches. 
COLLEGE ELDGS. Cost, $6,000,000 
SAN FRANCISCO. Vicinity of present 

Masonic Cemetery. 
Group of college buildings. 
Owner — San Francisco University. 
Architect— Edward A. Eames, 353 Sac- 
ramento Street. 
Structures will include quarters for 
the following studies: Science, $300,- 
000; law, $250,000; library, $200,000; 
gymnasium, $230,000; auditorium, $100- 
000; medical unit, $350,000; stadium 
(cost not determined) ; purchase of 
athletic equipment, $690,000. and stu- 
dents' union building. $100,000. 



Commissioned To Prepare Plans 
ANNEX TO SCHOOL Cost $20,000 
BIEBER, Lassen Co., Cal. 
Three classroom and gymnasium 

annex for Bieber High School 
Owner — Lassen County High School 

District . 
Architect— Ralph D. Taylor, Alturas. 



Commissioned To Prepare Plans. 

SCHOOL Cost, $ 

LOS BANDS, Merced Co., Cal. 

Brick and concrete high school plant. 

Owner— West Side Union High School 

District. 
Architect— W. D. Coates Jr., Rowell 

Bldg., Fresno. 
A bond election will be held to secure 
funds to finance construction. The 
amount of the bonds to be voted has 
not yet been determined. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— The Los An- 
geles Board of Education has adopted 
plans and specifications prepared by 
John C. Austin and Frederick M. 
Ashley, 608 Chamber of Commerce 
Bldg., for three-story reinforced con- 
crete and brick 44-room, classroom 
and library building, 72x316 feet; two- 
story, ten-room cafeteria building, 90x 
128 feet; part two-story, 13-room phys- 
ical education building, 72x180 feet, 
and one-story nine-room shop build- 
ing, 78x156 feet, at 2955 Robertson 
Blvd. (Alexander Hamilton High 
School site). Cost, $400,000. 



SANTA BARBARA. Cal.— The Min- 
ton Co., Front St., Mountain View, 



ida: 



ry 24, 1931 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Seventeen 



submitted the low bid of $174,672 on 
general contract to the Santa Bar- 
bara Board of Education January 12 
for the erection of a new school 
building on the McKlnley site In 
Santa Barbara. California Electric 
Corp, Santa Barbara, submitted the 
low bid of J5918 on electrical work 
and Ott Hardware Co., Santa Bar- 
bara, submitted the lowest combined 
bid of $24,677 on plumbing, heating 
and ventilating. The Board of Edu- 
cation will probably award contracts 
to the low bidders. Soule, Murphy & 
Hastings, architects, 116 E. Sola St., 
Santa Barbara. The building will con- 
tain fifteen classrooms and will be a 
masonry structure with stucco ex- 
terior and tile roof. The bids follow: 

General— The Minton Co., 5174.672; 
Gene B. Foster, $178,493; J. J. Munne- 
man, $179,885; Johnson & Hansen, 
$1S1,172; W. L. Snook, $181, 9S9; Christ 
Thoren, $1S3.650; A. L. Vezina, $186,- 
000; J. P. Sullivan, $188, S94; J. F. 
Kobler $189,500. 

Electrical Work— California Electric 
Corp., $5918; Flynn Electric Co., $6280; 
Campbell Electric Co., $6495; Nielson- 
Smith Electric Co., $6748; American 
Electric Constr. Co., $7320. 

Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating 
—Ott Hardware Co., (1) plumbing. 
$10,894, (2) heating, $12,7S8, (3) ven- 
tilating, $995; Sweeny & Sons (1) $11,- 
894, (2) $14,990. (3) $1000; Kenneth 
Fraser, (1) $11,994, (2) $14,008, (3) 
$1094; Hickman Bros. (1) $13,562. (2 
and 3) combined, $15,610; Tom Win- 
das, (1) no bid, (2) $13,5S7, (3) $1250; 
H. O. Ehlen (1) no bid. (2) $16,961, (3) 
no bid; Messenger & Montgomery, (1) 
no bid, (2) no bid, (3) $850. 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Ernest C. 
Moore, Director of the University of 
California at Los Angeles, announces 
funds are now available for construc- 
tion of two new gymnasiums on the 
campus of University at Westwood. 
One of the buildings to be designed for 
the use of female students and the 
other for men Estimated cost $750.- 
000. Allison & Allison. 1005 California 
Reserve Bldg., Los Angeles, archi- 
tects for one of the buildings and 
George W. Kelham, 315 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, will be the archi- 
tect for the other. 



BANKS, STORES & OFFICES 

Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost. $30,000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 

Ninth St. near K St. 
Alterations and additions to one-story 

and basement brick store and 

bank. 
Owner— Peoples Finance & Thrift Co., 

1005 8th St., Sacramento. 
Architect— Chas. F. Dean, California 

State Life Bldg., Sacramento. 
Contractor— Campbell Const. Co., 800 

R St., Sacramento. 



Completing Plans. 

STORE Cost, $100,000 

PHOENIX, Arizona. First Avenue and 

Adams Street. 
Two-story class B concrete store (7Sx 

150-ft.) 
Owner— Dr. R. W. Craig. 
Architect— Morgan, Walls & Clements. 

Van Nuys Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Owner Taking Bids. 

STORE Cost, $5000 

MONTE VISTA, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
One-story frame and stucco store. 
Owner— C. Rifredl, Sunnyvale. 
Architect — Wolfe & Higglns, Realty 
Bldg., San Jose. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

OFFICES Cost, $50,000 

SAN FRANCISCii. Post and Scott Sts. 

Three-story brick oirices. 

Owner — Eureka lVnevolent Society, 

436 O'Farrell St. 
Architect— Hyman * Appleton, 68 Post 

Street. 
Contractor— A. F. and C. W. Mattock, 

212 Clara St. 
Glass— Cobbledlek - Kibbe Glass Co., 

606 Howard St. 
Sheet Metal— Metals Const. Co., 912 

Howard St. 
Mill Work— Lannom Pros., Fifth and 

Magnolia Sts.. Oakland. 
Terra Cotta— Gladding, McBean & Co., 

660 Market St. 
Structural Steel and Ornamental Iron 

— Folsom Street Iron Works, 17th 

and Missouri Sts. 
Reinforcing Steel— W, C. Hauck & Co. 

280 San Bruno Ave. 
As previously reported painting con- 
tract awarded to D. Zelinsky & Sons, 
165 Grove St.; heating to Jas. Pink- 
erton, 918 Howard St.; plumbing to E. 
Sugarman, 3624 deary St.; electric 
wiring to Atlas Elec. & Eng. Co., 343 
4th St. 



Plans Being Figured. 
STORE Cost, $10,000 

SAN JOSE, Santa Clara Co., Calif. 
Two-story frame and stucco store and 

residence. 
Owner — Delia Maggiore. 
Architect — Wolfe and Higgins, Realty 

Bldg., San Jose. 



Plans Being Completed. 

STORE Cost, $50,000 

BAKERSFIELD, Kern Co., Cal. I and 

N 19th Sts. 
One-story and basement class C brick 

store. 
Owner — Bank of America. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, Bank of Italy 

Bldg., Eddy and Powell Sts., San 



Lessee — J. J. Newberry Co. 

Plans will be ready for bids in 
about one week. 



Plans Being Prepared. 

STORE Cost approx. $500,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Broad- 
way. 

Three-story class A department store. 

Owner — Isadore Weinstein, 1041 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 

Architect — Wm. Knowles, 1214 Web- 
ster St., Oakland. 



Contract Awarded. 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $4000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. 22nd 

and Grove Sts. (Key Route Inn). 
Minor alterations to building. 
Owner — Key Route Inn, premises. 
Architect— Kent & Hass, 525 Market 

St., San Francisco. 
Contractor — Jensen & Pedersen, 3443 

Adeline St., Oakland. 



CALIFORNIA— A r c h I t e c t H. A. 
Minton, Bank of America Bldg., Eddy 
and Powell Sts., San Francisco, is 
taking bids for croinium plated bronze 
signs to replace those on American 
Bank buildings throughout California. 
Thollander Const. Co., Call Bldg., San 
Francisco, has the contract to remove 
old signs. • 

Preparing Plans. 

STORE ■ Cost, $750,000 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Hollywood 

Blvd. near Wilcox. 
Twelve-story and basement Class A 

reinforced concrete and steel 

store and offices. 
Owner — Thomas D. Barnett. 
Architect — Morgan, Walls & Clements, 

Van Nuys Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Contractor — Lindgren & Swinerton, 

Inc., 523 W. Sixth St., Los Angeles. 



Sub-Contracts Awarded. 

REMODELING Cost, $ 

HAN FRANCISCO. S Post Street bet. 
Grant Ave. and Kearny St. 

Remodel present building for sporting 
goods store. 

Owner— A. Carlisle Co., Upharn and 
Rutledge, 135 Post St. 

Architect— Willis Polk & Co., 277 Pine 
Street. 

Lessee — Shreve & Barber, 441 Kearny 
Street, 

Contractor— William Splvock, Hobart 
Bldg. 

Lumber— J. H. MeCallum Lumber Co.. 
748 Bryant St. 

Stairs— Atlas Stairbuilding Co., 12 En- 
terprise St. 

Travertite— P. (irassi, 1945 San Bruno 
Avenue. 

Plumbing — Frank Davison, 65 Chesley 
Street. 

Glass— Tyre Brothers Glass Co.. 666 
Townsend St. 

Electric — Apex Electric Co., 154 Leav- 
enworth St. 

Steel Sash— M i c h e 1 & Pfeffer Iron 
Works, Harrison and 10th Sts. 

Concrete — Golden Gate Atlas Mate- 
rials Co., 16th and Harrison Sts. 
(4200) 1st report Dec. 22, 1930; 5th, 
Jan. 20, 1931. 10 



Preparing Preliminary Plans. 

STORE, ETC. Cost, $ 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. Al- 

varado Street. 
Two - story reinforced concrete store 

building, social hall, etc. (Spanish 

type). 
Owner— E. B. Gross, Reeside and 

Wave Sts., Monterey. 
Architect— Swartz and Ryland Spa- 

zier Bldg., Monterey; Brix Eldg., 

Fresno, and 373 Main St., Salinas. 



Plans Being Figured. 

STORE, ETC. Cost approx. $40,000 

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Cal. 

Three-story steel frame and concrete 
store, offices and apartments. 

Owner — John Norton, San Luis Obis- 
po. 

Architect — Wm. Mooser Co., Monad- 
nock Bldg., San Francisco. 



Preparing Working Drawings. 

ST< HIES Cost, $1,000,000 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. NW 
Twenty-first St. and Broadway. 

Eight-story and basement Class A re- 
inforced concrete furniture display 
rooms and stores, 100x280 feet. 

Owner— Pacific States Auxiliary Corp. 

Lessee — John Breuner Co., 15th and 
Clay Sts., Oakland. 

Architect— Albert F. Roller, 1st Na- 
tional Bank Bldg., San Francisco. 

Engineer — H. J. Brunnier, Sharon 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Plans Being Completed. 

OFFICES Cost Approx. $800,000 

SACRAMENTO, Sacramento Co., Cal. 
Eighth and J Streets. 

Sixteen-story and basement Class A 
reinforced concrete office building 

Owner— Henry Mitau et al, 1422 40th 
St., Sacramento. 

Architect— George Sellon & Co., Cali- 
fornia State Life Bldg , Sacra- 
mento. 

Segregated Bids To Be Taken In One 

Contract Awarded. 

REMODELING Cost, $ 

SAN FRANCISCO. S Post Street bet. 

Grant Ave. and Kearny St. 
Remodel present building for sporting 

goods house. 
Owner— A. Carlisle Co., Upham and 

Rutledge, 135 Post St. 
Architect— Willis Polk & Co., 277 Pine 

Street. 
Lessee — Shreve & Barber, 441 Kearny 

Street. 
Contractor — William Spivock, Hobart 

Bldg. 



Eighteen 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



Preparing Sketches. 

STORE Cost, $5000 

SARATOGA, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
One-story frame and stucco store. 
Owner — C. Rifredi , 

Architect— Wolfe & Higgins, Realty 
Bldg., San Jose. 



January 17 1931 
Preparing Preliminary Plans. 
STORE Cost, $100,000 

LOS ANGELES, Los Angeles Co, 

Cay. Hollywood Blvd. 
Two and three-story reinforced con- 
crete store. 
Owner — Col. Harry M. Baine. 
Architect— Carl Jules Weyl, 653« Sun- 
set Blvd., Los Angeles. 



Planned. 

STORE Cost, $ 

LOS ANGELES, Cal. Hollywood Blvd 

near Whitley Avenue. 
Four-story brick, ■ concrete and steel 

store. 
Owner— S. H. Kress & Co., Western 

Pacific Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Architect— Eng. Dept. of Owner. 



January 17, 1931 
Mill Work Contract Awarded. 
OFFICES Cost, $30,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. NE Army St. and 

Missouri. 
Two-story and basement frame and 

stucco offices. 
Owner— Soule Steel Co., 1750 Army St. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of Owner. 
Contractor— Chas. Stockholm & Sons, 

Russ Bldg. 
Mill Work— Pacific Mfg. Co., Monad- 
nock Bldg. 
As previously reported, plumbing & 
heating awarded to James H. Pink- 
erton Co., 927 Howard St.; grading to 
Sibley Grading & Teaming Co., 165 
Landers St. 



Plans Being Figured 

ALTERATIONS Cost, $25,000 

FRESNO, Fresno Co., Cal. No. 1045 

Fulton Street. 
Alterations to store (new front and 

interior work). 
Owner — Clark's Dollar Stores. 
Architect — Marshall R. Lawson, 614 S. 

Pacific Ave., San Pedro. 



Permit Applied For. 

ALTERATIONS Cost. $10,000 

SAN FRANCISCO. N Turk Street E 

Larkin St. 
Alterations and additions to stores and 

lofts (add one story). 
Owner— Bell Bros., Mills Eldg. 
Architect— W. D. Peugh, 333 Sansome. 
Contractor — Cahill Bros., 206 Sansome 

Street. 



Plans Being Figured. 

BANK Cost, $800,000 

PHOENIX, Arizona. SE Central Ave. 

and Monroe Street. 
Eleven-story Class A steel frame bank 

and offices. 
Owner— Valley Bank & Trust Co. 
Architect — Morgan, Walls & Clements 

Van Nuys Bldg, Los Angeles. 

Completing Plans. 

BANK Cost. $50,000 

MONTEREY, Monterey Co., Cal. SB 

Alvarado and Franklin Sts. 
One - story and basement reinforced 

concrete bank and store building 

(two stores). 
Owner — E. F. Wright, Monterey. 
Architect— W. H. Weeks, 111 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 
Lessee — Bank of Italy and Palace 

Drug Company. 
Bids will be taken In two or three 
weeks. H. A. Minton, Bank of Italy 
Bldg., San Francisco, will prepare 
plans for interior bank fixtures, etc. 



Plans Being Revised. 

BANK Cost, $60,000 

LOS GATOS. Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Main St. and Santa Cruz Avenue 

(52xl00-ft.) 
One - story reinforced concrete bank 

with tile roof (ornamental stone 

and accoustical plaster). 
Owner — Bank of Italy. 
Architect— H. A. Minton, Bank of Italy 

Eldg., Eddy and -Powell Sts., San 

Francisco. 
There will be two stores, 20x72 feet, 
in connection with the building. Bids 
will be taken in a few days. 



THEATRES 

Preparing Plans. 

THEATRE Cost, $ 

INGLEWOOD, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
Masonry theatre (to seat 900). 
Owner — United Artists Theatres of 

Calif., Ltd. 
Architect — Walker & Eisen and C. A. 

Balch, Western Pacific Bldg., Los 

Angeles. 



WHARVES AND DOCKS 

ISLETON, Sacramento Co., Cal — 
Engineering Department, Southern 
Pacific Railroad, 65 Market St., San 
Francisco, preparing plans for dock 
to be constructed at Isleton in con- 
nection with a 2% mile r. r. extension 
from Isleton to Georgiana Slough and 
the Mokelumne river. The dock will 
cost $55,000 and the railroad exten- 
sion $96,000. 



Bids Opened. 

SUB-STRUCTURE Cost, $ 

OAKLAND, Alameda Co., Cal. Foot 

of Webster Street. 
Concrete sub-structure for Inland 
Waters Terminal; 152 ft. on har- 
bor side, 285 ft. on slip side; also 
concrete viaduct 260 ft. by 33 ft. 
Owner— City of Oakland (Port Com- 
mission, G. B. Hegardt. secretary) 
Oakland Bank Bldg., Oakland. 
Plans by Eng. Dept. of City Port Com- 
mission, Oakland Bank Eldg., Oak- 
land. 
Following is a complete list of bids: 
M. B. McGowan, 74 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. .$121, 844 
Duncanson-Harrelson Co., San 

Francisco 123,168 

A. W. Kitchen, S. F 123,260 

Merritt, Chapman & Scott 124.500 

Geo. Pollock, Sacramento 126,240 

Healv-Tibbitts Const. Co.. San 

Francisco 127,600 

Schuler & MacDonald, Oakland 143.333 

Bodenhammer Const. Co 149,976 

C. J. Nystedt. Oakland 158,730 

Frederickson & Watson, Oak- 
land 164,000 

Bids held under advisement. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
CONSTRUCTION 

LOS ANGELES, Cal —Until 9:30 A. 
M., January 28, bids will be received 
by Los Angeles Board of Education, 
Chamber of Commerce Bldg., for 
swimming pool and bleachers at Los 
Angeles High School site, located on 
southwest corner of Olympic and Rim- 
pau Blv4s. (90x150 feet). The five 
kinds of contracts contemplated are: 
(1) general, (2) plumbing, (3) paint- 
ing, (4) heating and ventilating, (5) 
electric wiring. Plans and specifica- 
tions are on file at the secretary's 
office, 761 Chamber of Commerce 
Bldg. Plans by Architects John C. 
Austin and Frederick M. Ashley, 608 
Chamber of Commerce Bldg. Cost, 
$85,000. 



VALLEJO, Solano Co., Cal.— Cham- 
ber of Commerce and City Council are 
seeking a site and plan improvements 
for a new airport to provide per- 
manent accommodations for seven lo- 
cally owned airplanes. 



Plans Completed. 

CHAPEL Cost. $18,000 

SAN ANSELMO, Marin Co., Cal. 

Two-story and basement frame and 
stucco chapel for undertaking es- 
tablishment. 

Owner — Berg & Guzman, Greenfield & 
Lincoln, San Anselmo. 

Architect — N. W. Sexton, deYoung 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
It is not decided just when bids will 

be called for. 



SACRAMENTO, Calif.— Luppen and 
Hawley, 3126 J St., Sacramento, at 
$21,500 submitted lowest bid to city 
clerk for electric lighting and wiring 
at the Sacramento Municipal Airport. 

Following is a complete list of bids: 
Luppen & Hawley, Sacramento. .$21, 500 

J. W. Terrell, Sacramento 21,749 

Geo. C. Foss, Sacramento 22,632 

Sterling Elec. Co 22,840 

The Turner Co., S. F 24,190 

Globe Elec. Co., S. F 24,250 

H. C. Reid, S. F 24,285 

Bids held under advisement for on* 
week. ) 



SACRAMENTO, Cal.— City Manager 
Jas. S. Dean has been authorized by 
the city council to make preliminary 
surveys for a vehicular tube beneath 
the Sacramento river. Crossings at M 
or Y streets are being considered. 



EUREKA, Humboldt Co., Cal.— H. 
A. Anderson, Rio Dell, at $784 award- 
ed contract by county supervisors to 
move certain buildings at Garberville. 
Other bids were: R. L. Goodwin, $850; 
G. H. Johanson and Robt. McCarty, 
$980; K. Evans, $1,030; Henry Padgett 
$1,198; Bliven and Reese, $2,198. 



Plans Completed. 

RESTAURANT. ETC. Cost, $ 

SACRAMENTO. Cal. Municipal Air- 
port. 

Ornamental gate entrance to Munici- 
pal Airport with one-story Span- 
ish type restaurant building. 

Owner — City of Sacramento, H. G. 
Denton, city clerk. 

Architect — Charles F. Dean, Califor- 
nia State Life Bldg., Sacramento. 



SACRAMENTO, Calif.— City council 
will set date shortly to vote on ques- 
tion of issuing and selling bonds of 
$450,000 to finance construction of a 
new sedimentation basin in connec- 
tion with municipal filtration plant. 
Fred J. Klaus is city engineer. 



POMONA, Los Angeles Co., Cal — 
Karl Muck, County Architect, 10th 
Floor, Hall of Records, is preparing 
preliminary sketches for a permanent 
grandstand to be built at the Los An- 
geles County Fair Grounds, Pomona, 
to cost between $150,000 and $200,000. 
The stand, which will probably be a 
a reinforced concrete structure, will 
seat about 18,000. 



TULARE, Tulare Co , Cal.— Edgar 
Smith, chairman of a committee of 
local civic organization members, is 
completing a campaign for funds to 
finance construction of a swimming 
pool to be the first unit in the con- 
struction of a community recreation 
center. The cost of the pool is esti- 
mated at $10,000. Early construction 
ts planned. 



Saturday, Jai 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Nineteen 



MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES 
AND MATERIALS 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— See "Hospi- 
tals," this Issue. Bids wanted for 
miscellaneous fixtures and equipment 
for installation In Acute Unit of the 
Los Angeles General Hospital; bids 
to be opened February 9 and ir>. 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co.. Cal. 

Until February 5. 4 P. M ., bids will 
be received by John D. Bromfleld. 
clerk, San Mateo Union High School 
District, to furnish and deliver fuel 
oil, lubricating oils and stove distil- 
late, for the period beginning March 1, 
1931, and ending February 28, 1932. 
as follows: 

1. Fuel oil, commercial grade, in 
accordance with specification for Bun- 
ker Fuel "C" in United States Gov- 
ernment Department of Commerce. 
Bureau of Mines, Technical Paper 323 
B, except as to water and nonpetro- 
leum sediment, delivered in tank truck 
load lots to the schools of the dis- 
trict as ordered. 

2. Lubricating oils, Eastern and 
•Western, light, medium, and heavy, 
delivered In barrel lots to San Mateo 
High Schools as ordered. Specify 
trade names. 

3. Stove distillate, 30°-32° Gravity, 
168° Flash, delivered in lots of two 
hundred gallons, more or less, to the 
schools of the district as ordered. 

Bids may be submitted on any or 
oil of the above items. 

Further information obtainable from 
Superintendent of Schools, Bellevue 
Ave. and Delaware St., San Mateo. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Until February 
2, 3 P. M., under Proposal No. 679, 
bids will be received by Leonard S 
Leavy, city purchasing agent, 270 City 
Hall, to furnish 300 galvanized iron 
garbage cans for School Department. 
Specifications obtainable from above. 

KENTFIELD, Marin Co.. Cal.— Un- 
til February 2, 12 noon, bids will be 
received by Mary F. Seymour, secre- 
tary, Tamalpais Union High School 
District, to furnish and deliver: 

(a) Standard Typrewriters: 

(b) Noiseless Typewriters (Standard 
Make). 

Specifications obtainable from sec- 
retary. *• 

SACRAMENTO, Cal.— Until January 
22, 8:15 P. M, bids will be received 
by H. G. Denton, city clerk, to fur- 
nish one Moon-Hopkins Special Tax 
Billing Machine, for the office of the 
City Assessor - Collector. Certified 
check 5% payable to City Controller 
required with bid. Further informa- 
tion obtainable from clerk. 

BUSINESS~OPPORTUNITY 

Frank O'Brien of O'Brien Sales Co., 
General Motors Bldg., Detroit, Mich.. 
with patent rights on an electrically 
equipped advertising display Is de- 
sirous of securing distributor. 

R. P. Messer, sales manager for 
Trautman-Messer & Co., Inc., Wapa- 
koneta, Ohio, manufacturers of cast 
Iron and aluminum cooking utensils 
Is Interested in securing representa- 
tion in San Francisco and adjacent 
tertory. 

I. Salkind, 258 Lake St., Albany, N. 
Y., wishes to make connection with 
concern In this section which is de- 
sirous of having an agent or a repre- 
sentative in the East. 

E. W. Simons, vice-president of the 
Pittsburgh Reflector Co, 304 Ross St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa., wishes to appoint a 



representative In the San Francisco 
district for the sale of reflectors de- 
signed to Improve the lighting of 
store windows ami displays. 

Names and addresses of persons or 
firms concerned in the following op- 
portunities will be furnished on re- 
quest to Business i ipportunity Depart- 
ment, Daily Pacific Builder. 647 Mis- 
sion st., San Francisco or Phone GAr- 
field 8744: 

20775— Steel Materials. San Fran- 
cisco. Firm In Germany is desirous 
of contacting local importers of steel 
beams, steel joists, angles, bars and 



ithe 



el mate 



20774 — Calculating Machines. Berlin, 
Germany. Manufacturer of calculat- 
ing machines of exceptional value at 
reasonable prices desires to get in 
touch with interested Importers. 

20772— Folding Boats. New York 
City. Manufacturers of folding boats 
are looking for local agents. 

20776 — Representation. Fiume. Italy. 
Party is anxious to represent local ex- 
porters or manufacturers, for Italy. 

20790 — Scrap Iron. Mexico. D. F. 
Party is anxious to contract firms in- 
terested in importing approximately 
ten thousand tons of mixed scrap iron. 
D-3662 — Eastern Representation. San 
Francisco. Gentleman wishes to con- 
tact local manufacturers or packers of 
products of distinctive Californian 
character who desire representation 
on Eastern seaboard. 

D-3663— Representation. San Fran- 
cisco. Local party interested in se- 
curing representation here for East- 
ern concerns, particularly mechanical 
or electrical lines. 

D - 3664 — Representation. Seattle, 
Wash. Party interested in represent- 
ing, in a sales capacity in the Pacific 
Northwest, a reliable manufacturer in 
San Francisco or California. 

D.3665 — Distribution. Portland, Ore. 
Sales Director interested in securing 
the names of those manufacturers, 
importers, and distributors who are 
interested in securing and maintain- 
ing distribution of their products 
throughout the Northwest. 



D-3666 — Distribution. Chicago, 111. 
Firm wishes to contact reliable local 
man who is well enough acquainted 
with the department store and furni- 
ture store trade to get business on a 
few exceptional values in low priced 
furnishings and imports, including 
dollar day specials. 

D-3667— West Bend, Wis. Manu- 
facturer of brake testing machine 
wishes to contact with concern in this 
territory who would be interested in 
taking over the manufacture of this 
machine. 

D-3669 — Representation. San An- 
tonio, Texas. Firm with established 
sales force Is seeking new Californian 
products to handle. 

D-3670 — Distributor. Manufacturers 
of belting for power transmission in 
all the various types, also leather 
packings for pneumatic and hydraulic 
use: wish to secure distribution here. 

D-3671 — Dealers. Alexandria. Ind. 
Manufacturers of wool insulation for 
heat, cold and sound wish to contact 
with firms who would make good house 
insulating dealers. 



The Department of Agriculture 
stands sixth in the number of em- 
ployees of all the Government depart- 
ments. The personnel numbers 25.736. 
according to figures compiled by the 
Civil Service Commission. There are 
20.558 men and 5,178 women. One of 
the largest bureaus of the Departmnt 
of Agriculture is the U. S. Forest Ser- 
vice, charged with the administration 
and protection of 159,750,000 acres of 
Government land included in 149 na- 
tional forests, which has 2,710 per- 
manent employees. 



While detailed earnings figures are 
not available at this time, President 
Burnett of the Monolith Portland Ce- 
ment Company, told stockholders at 
the annual meeting that the company 
had strengthened materially its cur- 
rent position during the year 1930. 
Current assets were 3.77 times current 
liabilities, as compared with a ratio 
of 2.1 at the end of the previous year. 
All officers and directors were re- 
elected. 



Send for a Sample Copy 
of the New 

DAILY PACIFIC BUILDER 



The only daily construction newspaper affording 
complete coverage of the construction activities in Central 
and Northern California — featuring work contemplated, 
bids wanted, bids opened, contracts awarded, sub-bids 
wanted and sub-contracts let on all types of building con- 
struction; bridges, dams and harbor works, irrigation proj- 
ects; machinery and equipment; water works and supplies; 
business opportunities; building permits; building con- 
tracts, mechanics' liens; acceptances, etc., etc. 

Keep informed on construction developments in Cen- 
tral and Northern California, and the major projects in 
Southern California, the states of Oregon, Washington, 
Nevada and Arizona. 



Twenty 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 




BRIDGES 



VENTURA, Ventura Co.. Cal.— 
Until 10 A. M., Feb. 3. bids will be re- 
ceived by county supervisors to con- 
struct timber bridge 20 ft. wide and 
SO ft. long with concrete paving and 
earth fill approaches, involving: 

(1) 15,000 ft. B. M. timber; 

(2) 7 cu. yds. class A paving con- 
crete; 

(3) S50 lbs. reinf. steel; 

(4) 330 cu. yds. earth fill. 

Cash Contract No 716. This bridge 
will be built across the Canada Larga 
near the Walker Ranch. Chas. "W. 
Petit, county surveyor. 



MODESTO. Stanislaus Co., Cal. — 
County Surveyor Geo. Macomber Is 
preparing revised plans for proposed 
Oakdale bridge over the Stanislaus 
river. This structure is in addition to 
that for which $103,500 is sought In 
the state budget for a bridge over the 
Stanislaus river on the main high- 
way between Ripon and Salida. 



ALBANY. Alameda Co., Cal.— City 
Engineer H. I. Dygert is preparing 
plans for culvert over Cerrito Creek 
in Pomona Ave.; estimated cost $500. 
Cost will be borne equally by the cit- 
ies of Albany and El Cerrito. 



PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co., Cal 
—City Planning Commission will rec- 
ommend to the city council the con- 
struction of a subway under the 
Southern Pacific tracks at Embarea- 
dero road, 8 blocks south of Univer- 
sity Ave. A bond election is con- 
templated to finance the city's one- 
half share of the cost, the remaining 
half to be paid by the railroad. Ten- 
tative plans are also being considered 
by the Planning Commission for sub- 
ways in University Ave. and at Cali- 
fornia Ave., 1 mile south of the Uni- 
versity The cost of the three sub- 
ways is estimated at $811,500 by City 
Engineer J. F. Byxbee. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Formal applica- 
tion for a permit from the War De- 
partment to construct the proposed 
$72 ono. iioo bridge over San Francisco 
Bay has been filed by Col. Walter E. 
Garrison, director of the State De- 
partment of Public Works, acting for 
the California Toll Eridge Authority, 
which will issue bonds and supervise 
construction of the bridge. 

The application and plans prepared 
by State Highway Engineer C. H. 
Purcell call for an SOO-foot span on 
the Oakland side, but this may be 
changed, if deemed necessary, with- 
out further hearings by the War De- 
partment, once the permit is granted. 

Maj. E. H. Ropes of the Army En- 
gineering Corps.. San Francisco, states 
that it will be necessary to advertise 
the plans and application for approxi- 
mately three weeks, and hearings 
then will be started by three engi- 
neers from the War Department sent 
here from Washington. 

JACKSON, Amador Co., Cal.— City 
council petitioned to construct bridge 
across South Jackson Creek to serve 
the Peek Hill Section. The council 
has ordered estimates of cost to be 
prepared. 



Portland, at $87,417.50 for cedar piling, 
awarded contract by Multonamah 
County Commissioners to recondition 
the Hawthorne Bridge. Edelfesen- 
Weygrandt Co., 280 Front St , Port- 
land, at $35,600.75 awarded contract 
for abutments, paving and fill in con- 
nection with the same project. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
— County supervisors will ask bids al 
once to construct subway under South- 
ern Pacific tracks on the Lower Sac- 
ramento road in the Forrest Lake 
district; estimated cost $26,000. The 
bids will probably be opened Feb. 9. 
Southern Pacific R. R. will share cost. 
Details will be published shortly. 



YUBA CITY. Sutter Co.. Cal.— Coun- 
ty Supervisors have authorized recon- 
struction of the Feather River Eridge 
at Nicolaus to meet the demands of 
the War Department. The federal 
department, acting on a protest filed 
by the California Debris Commission, 
objected to the character of 160 feet 
of the causeway when the river cut 
a new channel during a floor period. 

OAKLAND. Cal.— As previously re- 
ported, bids will be received February 
3, 10:30 A M., by George Gross, county 
clerk, to construct bridge on Redwood 
Road in Eden Township. The work 
involves the following approximate 
quantities: 

(1) S5 cu. yds. structure excav. ; 

(2) 1100 ft. steel piles; 

(3) 125 cu. yds. concrete; 

(4) 21,000 lbs. reinf. steel; 

(5) 60,500 lbs. structural steel; 

(6) 170 ft. timber guard rail 
Plans and specifications obtainable 

from County Surveyor George Posey. 



DREDGING, HARBOR 
WORKS & EXCAVATIONS 

FORT BRAGG, Mendocino Co., Cal. 
— Dutton Dredge Co., Mills Bldg.. San 
Francisco, awarded contract at $178.- 
720 by U. S. Engineer Office, San 
Francisco, to remove old jetty, con- 
struct new jetties and dredging in the 
Noyo river, approximately 1% miles 
from Fort Bragg. Only other bidder 
was Healy-Tibbitts Const. Co., San 
Francisco. Project involves: 

(1) 110,600 cu. yds. dredging of sand. 

gravel, boulders and slabs. 

(2) 1,820 cu. yds. rock to be re- 

moved from river; 

(3) 8,000 tons of rock (removed from 

old jetty and placed in in- 
ner jetty); 750 cu. yards 
concrete (removed from old 
jetty). Total sum for both: 

(4) 25,000 tons to be furnished and 

placed in 2.000 ton units; 

(5) 240 ft. sheet pile bulkhead 

(new jetties). 
Unit figures follow: 

Dutton Dredge Healy-Tibbitts 

(1) $ .48 $ .60 

(2) 3.10 10.00 

(3) 21,200.00 45,000.00 

(4) 3.75 4.50 

(5) 21.00 20.00 



PORTLAND. Ore. — Lindstrom & 
Feigenson, Railway Exchange Bldg., 



PORTLAND, Ore. — Kern and Kibbe, 
290 E Salmon St., Portland, under 
Schedule A. at $20,506.31 submitted 
low bid to U. S. Engineer Office, Port- 
land, to construct three dikes at Mar- 
tin Island bar. 



Parker Schram, Couch Bldg., Port- 
land, under Schedule B, at $14,126.96 
submitted low bid to construct one 
dike at Martin Island bar. 

Gilpin Const. Co.. Worcester Bldg., 
Portland, under Schedule C. at $14.- 
329.13 submitted low bid to construct 
two spur dikes at Dokelbower bar. 

The above work is in connection 
with the construction of 4,340 lin. ft. 
of pile dikes in the Columbia river be- 
low the mouth of the Willamette. 



SACRAMENTO, Cal.— City Manager 
Jas. S. Dean has been authorized by 
the city council to make preliminary 
surveys for a vehicular tube beneath 
the Sacramento river. Crossings at M 
or Y streets are being considered. 



OAKLAND, Cal— Until January 26, 
4:30 P. M., bids will be received by 
G. B. Hegardt, secretary, City Port 
Commission, 424 Oakland Bank Bldg., 
for dredging in slip of Inland Water- 
ways Terminal at foot of Franklin 
and Webster Sts., involving 20.000 cu. 
yds. Specifications obtainable from 
above. 



STREET LIGHTING 
SYSTEMS 

ALAMEDA, Alameda Co., Cal.— 
City council will start proceedings 
shortly for ornamental electrolier 
system in Third Street, 50% of the 
property owners having petitioned for 
the work. Burnett Hamilton, city 
engineer. 



BEVERLY HILLS, Los Angeles Co., 
Cal.— Until 8 P. M., Feb. 10, bids will 
be received by the city for approxi- 
mately 1100 8xl6-in. ball globes for 
street lights. 



SAN MATEO. San Mateo Co., Cal. 
—See "Streets and Highways." this 
issue. Proceedings started by city to 
resurface streets and install electro- 



MACHINERY AND 
EQUIPMENT 



HANFORD, Kings Co., Cal.— Until 
February 4, 7 P. M.. bids will be re- 
ceived by D. C. Williams, city clerk, 
to furnish coupe automobile for use 
of fire chief. Specifications on file In 
office of clerk. 



HOLTVILLE. Imperial Co., Cal.— 
Until February 4, 5 P. M., bids will 
be received by E. M. Carpenter, city 
clerk, to furnish one 2-ton truck with 
flat rack, hydraulic hoist and dual 
rear wheels. Further information ob- 
tainable from above. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Until January 29. 
12 noon, bids will be received by F. 
C. Merritt. city clerk, to furnish and 
deliver three motor trucks for use of 
street department. Specifications on 
file in office of clerk. Walter N. Frick- 
stad, city engineer. 

EUREKA, Humboldt Co., Cal.— Un- 
til January 29, 2 P. M.. bids will be 
received by W. H. Pierce, superinten- 
dent of equipment, Shop No. 1, State 
Highway Commission, Eureka, for the 
purchase of the following equipment 
no longer required: 
CHC 2967 Ford Express Model A. 



Jai 



24, 11131 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Twenty-one 



ciii' S027 Pontiac Sedan 4-door. 

Bidders may make offers for one or 
more Items, but must stat.- price "f- 
fered tor each item. No lump sum 
bids will he considered. 

\u equipment may be Inspected at 
the Division of Highways yards at 
Eureka from 8:30 A. M. to 4:30 P. M. 



SACRAMENTO, Cal.— Until Jan. 29, 
i P. M., bids will lie received by W. 
n Reichel, superintendent of equip- 
ment, Shop No. 10, State Highway 
Commission, 1802 34th St.. for the pur- 
i, i . of the following equipment no 
longer required: 
flic 2647 Ford Tudor Sedan. 
CIP' 2666 Ford Tudor Sedan. 
CHC 41 Sullivan Portable Air Com- 
pressor, 170 cu. ft. capacity. 
CHC 227 Austin S-ft. Giant Grader. 
CHC 2S6 Austin S-ft. Jr. Rip Snorter 
Grader. 

Eidders may make offers for one or 
more items, but must state price of- 
fered for each item. No lump sum 
bids will be considered. 

All equipment may be inspected at 
the Division of Highways yards at 
1802 34th St., Sacramento, from 8:30 
A. M. to 4:30 P. M. 



MADERA, Madera Co., Cal.— Until 
February 2, 10 A. M., bids will be 
received by L. W. Cooper, county 
clerk, to furnish one new 35 Monarch 
Tractor, f. o. b. Madera and for the 
sale of one used 30-Best Tractor no 
longer required by the county. Fur- 
ther information obtainable from 
clerk. 



REDDING, Shasta Co.. Cal.— Until 
Januaryv29, 2 P. M., bids will be re- 
ceived by J. M. O'Malley, superinten- 
dent of equipment, Shop No. 2, State 
Highway Commission, Redding, for 
the purchase of the following equip- 
ment, no longer required: 
CHC 1885, Liberty Dump Truck. 
CHC 2490, Dodge Touring Car, 1927 

model. 
CHC 2073, Dodge Touring Car, 1928 

model. 
CHC 54 Ingersoll-Rand Drill. 
CHC 34. Royal Special Grader. 
CHC 72, Spearswells Grader Tractor 

Attachment. 
CHC 6, Jaeger, 1-2 sack Concrete 

Mixer. 
CHC 39. Marion 1 cu. yd. type 7 Gas 

Electric Shovel. 
CHC 181, McCormick-Deering Tractor 
Eidders may make offers for one or 
more items, but must state price of- 
fered for each item. No lump SMm 
bids will be considered. 

All of the above equipment, except 
CHC 39 Shovel, may be inspected at 
the Division of Highways' yards at 
Redding. CHC 39 Shovel may be in- 
spected at Convict Camp 24. Oroville. 



BEVERLY HILLS, Los Angeles Co., 
Cal.— Until 8 P. M., Feb. 10, bids will 
be received by the city for the con- 
struction of one hand derrick. Speci- 
fications are on file at office of Street 
Superintendent. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
— Until January 26. 5 P. M., bids will 
be received by M. E. Page, city clerk, 
to furnish and deliver: 

(a) 1% ton truck with closed cab; 

(b) two sedan automobiles: 

(c) one coupe automobile. 
Allowances to be made for cars no 

longer required bv the city. Certified 
check 10% payable to City Auditor 
required with bid. Further informa- 
tion obtainable from clerk. 



BAKERSFIELD, Kern Co., Cal.— 
Until February 2, 4 P. M., bids will 
be received by Wm. Gleason, clerk, 
Kern County Union High School Dis- 
trict, Fourteenth and F Sts, to furnish 
and deliver one or more transportation 



chassis and one or 
same Specifications 



clerk 



RENO, Nev. — Following bids taken 
under advisement by Washoe County 
Commissioners to furnish and deliver 
one '--yard full suing gasoline shovel: 
Hanson Clutch and Machinery 

Co $6,610 

Leigh M. Railsback 6,689 

Curtis Machinery Co 7,176 

Snelson Motor Co 7,250 

(a) 8,266 

(b) 9.127 

Harron, Rlckard & Mi-Cone 7.350 

Calavada Auto Co 7,700 

Industrial Brownhoist Corp 7,860 

Collier Tractor and Equip. Co 7,885 

Osen Motor Sales Co 8,162 

Northwest Engineering Co 8.912 

Eucyrus-Erie Co 8,965 

Edw. R. Bacon Co 9.2S0 



WANTED 

TO PURCHASE used Linn Tractor 
Truck. Lidral-Wiley, Inc., 208 Colum- 
bia St., Seattle Washington. 



RAILROADS 



ISLETON, Sacramento Co., Calif.— 
Southern Pacific R. R., 65 Market St., 
San Francisco, authorized by Inter- 
state Commerce Commission to con- 
struct IV2 mile feeder extension from 
Isleton to Georgiana Slough and the 
Mokelumne river. The railroad will 
cost $96,000. A dock will be con- 
structed at Isleton at a cost of $55,000. 



SAN FRANCISCO. Columbia Steel 
Corp. and Pacific Steel Corp., San 
Francisco, awarded contract by South- 
ern Pacific R. R.. 65 Market St.. San 
Francisco, to furnish the bulk of an 
order for 63,764 tons of rail steel for 
the railroad's requirements during 
1931. The remainder of the order has 
been let to the Colorado Steel & Iron 
Co.. of Denver. 



HOOVER DAM RAILWAY.— A com- 
plete list of the total bids for the con- 
struction of the Hoover Dam Rail- 
way, as submitted to the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Reclamation at Las Vegas, 
on January 12, follow: 

Lewis Const. Co., Los Angeles, $455- 
509.50 (low as previously announced). 

J. F. Shea Co., Portland, $469,028. 

Merritt-Chapman & Scott Corp., San 
Pedro, $486,936. 

Utah Const. Co.. Ogden Utah, and 
Morrison - Knudsen Co., Boise, Idaho, 
$534,704. 

General Const. Co., Seattle, $537,- 
263.50. 

Healy-Tibbitts Construction Co., San 
Francisco, $546,114. 

O. A. Lindbergh, Stockton, $567,713. 

Siems-Spokane Co., Spokane, $629,- 
552.50". 

Hamilton-Gleason Co., Denver, $657- 
540. 

L. Romano Eng. Corp., Seattle. $719- 
548. 

Schuler and McDonald, Inc., Oak- 
land, $732,567.50. 

Mittry Bros. Const. Co., Los Ange- 
les, $892,109. 

The bid of Merritt-Chapman & Scott 
Corp. contained a stipulation that the 
corporation would only accept the 
railway contract in the event it was 
also awarded the Hoover Dam High- 
way contract. 

The proposed railway consists of 
10.23 miles of track, using second- 
hand or relay rails, extending from 
Summit where a connection will be 
made with the Union Pacific Ry. from 
Las Vegas to the site of the Hoover 



SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Interstate 
Commerce Commission is giving fav- 
orable consideration to the applica- 
tion of the Sacramento Northern R. R., 
electric subsidiary of the Western Pa- 
cific R. R., for authorization to ex- 
tend its Westfield-Ryde branch eight 
miles Into the territory across the 
Sacramento river. n * 



SEATTLE. Wash.— Bids will be ask- 
ed at once by Board of Public Works 
to construct municipal street car line 
in 8th Avenue northwest from Learny 
Way to West 85th St.; estimated cost 
$160,000. « 



FIRE EQUIPMENT 

OAKLAND. Cal.— Until Januarv 29. 
12 noon, bids will be received by F. 
C. Merritt, city clerk, to furnish: 

(a) 10,000 ft. 2%-in. fire hose; 

(b) 4,000 ft. lj^-in. fire hose. 
Certified check 10% payable to city 

required with bid. Specifications ob- 
tainable from city clerk. 



PACIFIC GROVE, Monterey Co., 
Cal— Until February 5, 7:30 P. M., 
bids will be received by E. C. Hurl- 
bert, city clerk, to furnish and de- 
liver one 750-gallon pumping engine 
and hose car with booster tank. Cer- 
tified check 10% payable to city re- 
quired with bid. Specifications are 
on file in the office of Daily Pacific 
Builder and may be inspected by 
those interested. * 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Until 11 A. M. 
Feb. 4, bids will be received by the 
city purchasing agent, Thomas Ough- 
ton, for furnishing 30.000 ft. of 2% -in. 
fire hose; specifications No. 2315. 



RESERVOIRS AND DAMS 

GLENDALE, Los Angeles Co., Cal 
—Mittry Bros. Constr. Co., 723 Det- 
wiler Bldg., Los Angeles, awarded the 
contract by the city council at J499,- 
000 for construction of two reservoirs 
on the city reservoir site. The reser- 
voir will be built of rectangular shape. 
22 ft. deep, with an area of 238,322 sq. 
ft. The reservoirs will be constructed 
adjoining, providing a total capacity 
of 35,000,000 gallons. They will be 
of the retaining wall type with rein- 
forced concrete roof. The construc- 
tion involves: 

26,000 cu, yds. reinforced concrete; 

10,000 cu. yds. excavation; 

10,00 cu. yds. tamped embankment; 

22,000 cu. yds. earth placed on con- 
crete roof. 

PIPE LINES, WELLS, ETC. 

- ■ ■ - - . ■ ■ * 

OAKLAND, Cal.— Pacific Coast En- 
gineering Co., foot of 14th St., Oak- 
land, at $4500 submitted only bid to 
City Port Commission to furnish and 
deliver fifteen 45-ft. lengths of 20-in. 
welded steel dredge pipe. Taken un- 
der advisement. 1 



SAN FRANCISCO— City Engineer 
M. M. O'Shaughnessy instructed by 
supervisors to prepare plans for 
Hetch Hetchy pipe line across the San 
Joaquin Valley from Oakdale portal 
on the east side to the Tesla portal 
on the west; also for the construc- 
tion of a pipe line from the Tesla 
portol to Altamont Pass with a pump- 
ing plant, to get Hetch Hetchy water 
into San Francisco ahead of the com- 
letion of the Coast Range tunnel 
which will probably require another 
three years. 



Twenty-two 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



SEWERS AND SEWAGE 
DISPOSAL PLANTS 

January 16. 1931 
ESTIMATES SUBMITTED 
ATHERTON, San Mateo Co., Cal.— 
Geo. A. Kneese, consulting engineer, 
Redwood City, in report to town trus- 
tees estimates cost of culverts, ditches 
and storm sewers for relief of storm 
waters at $24,000. Taken under ad- 
visement. 

33 



BERKELEY, Alameda Co., Cal.— 
Until January 27, 10 A. M., bids will 
be received by Florence E. Turner, 
city clerk, to construct storm sewer 
in west side of Garfield School grounds 
from Hopkins street southerly; esti- 
mated cost $2000. Certified check 10% 
payable to city required with bid 
Plans obtainable from Harry Good- 
ridge, city engineer, on deposit of $10, 
returnable. 



FAIRFIELD. Solano Co., Cal.— J. C 
Parsons, engineer, will present plans 
to county supervisors shortly for pro- 
posed sewage system to serve the 
home Acres and Petaluma Farm dis- 
tricts adjoining the city of Vallejo. 
Details will be published shortly. 



MODESTO. Stanislaus Co., Caifl— 
City Engineer Frank J. Rossi instruct- 
ed by city council to proceed with the 
construction of sewers in the indus- 
trial section at a cost of $16,000. The 
work will be done on a day labor ba- 
sis with a view to relieving the un- 
employment situation. Materials will 
probably be purchased in the open 
market although this has not been 
definitely decided. This work will be 
the first unit of a $55,000 sewer con- 
struction program, ? 



HILLSBOROUGH, San Mateo Co., 
Cal.— Until February 3, 5 P. M.. bid? 
will be received by John A. Hoey. 
town clerk (30-3) to construct storm 
sewer system, consisting of 12-in., lo- 
in., 18-in. and 24-in. concrete pipe 
sewers; brick manholes and catch - 
basins. 1911 Act. Certified check 10% 
payable to mayor of town required 
with bid. Plans on file in office of 
clerk. ? 



EL CENTRO, Imperial Co., Cal.— A 
straw vote will be held in the Imperial 
Irrigation District Feb- 4 on the pro- 
posal to vote $1,000,000 in bonds to fi- 
nance drainage extensions and storm 
water system. 



REDWOOD CITY, San Mateo Co., 
Cal. — County supervisors petitioned to 
ask bids to construct sewear system 
for Lomita Park Sanitary District. 
Robert A. Klassen, engineer, 154 Arch 
St., Redwood City. 



SANTA CRUZ, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 
— February 7 is date set by county 
supervisors to consider proposal of 
property owners in the Soquel-Capi- 
tola sections for a sewer system, pre- 
liminary surveys for which have been 
completed by County Surveyor Lloyd 
Bowman. The cost is estimated at 
$56,000 which include a pumping plant 
at a point near the water front at 
Capitola and an outfall system into 
the bay. 

WATERWORKS 

LOMPOC, Santa Barbara Co., Cal. 
—Until February 3, 7:30 P. M., bids 
will be received by city to furnish 
f.o.b. Lompoc, the following pipe; 

(a) 2,800 ft. 8.625 in. O. D. by 8.249 
in. I. D. lap welded black steel pipe, 



plain end beveled 45 deg. for welding, 
asphaltum dipped, weight 16.94 lbs. 
per foot; 

(b) 100 ft. 8-in. O. D. by 7.628 in. 
I. D. lapwelded black steel pipe, plain 
end beveled 45 deg. for welding, as- 
phaltum dipped, weight 15.522 lbs. per 
foot. 

(c) 600 ft. 7-in. O. D. by 6 652 I. D. 
lapwelded black steel pipe, plain end 
beveled 45 deg. for welding, asphaltum 
dipped, weight 12.685 lbs. per foot. 

Specifications obtainable from city 
clerk. 



SACRAMENTO, Calif.— City council 
will set date shortly to vote on ques- 
tion of issuing and selling bonds of 
$450,000 to finance construction of a 
new sedimentation basin in connec- 
tion with municipal filtration plant. 
Fred J. Klaus is city engineer. 



PALO ALTO, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Santa Clara County "Water Works Dis- 
trict No. 1, just south of Palo Alto 
city limits, was organized at a recent 
election and authorized the sale of 
bonds of $27,500 to finance construc- 
tion of a water distributing system 
to be supplied from Spring Valley 
water lines, Palo Alto's municipal 
water system and domestic wells. 



BOULDER CITY, Nev— Lacy Mfg. 
Ci., 1000 N Main St., Los Angeles sub- 
mitted low bid, f.o.b. destination, o 
U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, Wilda 
Bldg., 1441 Welton St., Denver, for 
the fabrication and erection of £ aro- 
welded or riveted plate steel tanks 
fox water supply, Boulder City, Nev., 
Boulder Canyon project. One tank 
will be K)0 ft. in diameter and 34 ft. 
high, with No. 10 gauge sheet steel 
roof of 2.000,000 gallons capacity, to 
be erected in Boulder City. The oth- 
er tank will be 40 ft. in diameter and 
25 ft. high, without roof, of 235,000 
gallons capacity, to be erected at the 
site of the filter plant about 4 miles 
east of Boulder City. The tanks will 
be erected on oiled sand foundations 
constructed in advance by the gov- 
ernment. Complete list of bids will 
be published shortly. 



EXETER, Tulare Co.. Calif.— City 
council, T. E. Awbrey, city clerk, 
adopts Resolution "A" declaring in- 
tention to construct improvements for 
additional water supply, involving 
drilling well, purchase of pumping 
plant with automatic control, motor 
and switchboard; 200,000-gallon sur- 
face steel storage tank, booster pump 
with automatic controls and water 
line extensions; estimated cost $24,000. 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. Cal.— 
Three projects aimed to provide ade- 
quate water systems at a cost of ap- 
proximately $200,000 are planned in 
Contra Costa County. 

At Lafayette, the Lafayette Water 
Works District contemplates a domes- 
tic water system to tie-in with the 



East Bay Municipal Utility District. 
The cost of construction is placed at 
$100,000. 

At Saranap, a district is to be or- 
ganized to vote bonds of $50,000 to fi- 
nance construction of a domestic wat- 
er distributing system. 

At Walnut Creek, a bond election 
will be called shortly to vote bonds 
of $60,000 to finance construction of a 
water distributing system. Should the 
bond issue fail to carry it is probable 
that funds to finance the project will 
be raised by direct tax. 



HAWTHORNE, Los Angeles Co., 
Cal. — Pacific States Cast Iron Pipe Co., 
417 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, awarded 
contract by city council to furnish cast 
iron pipe as follows: 

5200 ft. 2-in. pipe at 19c ft.; 

2500 ft. 4-in, pipe at 39.5c ft.; 

2500 ft.6-in. pipe at 59c ft. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Art Concrete Wks 
24th and Adeline Sts., Oakland, at $3,- 
380 awarded contract by East Bay 
Municipal Utility District to furnish 
concrete meter boxes and tops. 



GLENDALE. Los Angeles Co., Cal. 
—Until 10 A. M., Jan. 29, bids will be 
received by the city council for deliv- 
ering f. o. b. cars, equipment as fol- 
lows: 

Item 1. One (1) horizontal centri- 
fugal pump capable of pumping 2000 
gallons of water per minute against a 
total head of 320 feet. Pump . to be 
constructed for direct connection to a 
four pole 50 cycle electric motor. 

Item 2. One (1) 250 H. P. horizontal, 
3 phase, 4 pole, 50 cycle, 4000 volt, 40 
degree squirrel cage full voltage start 
induction motor for direct connection 
to Item 1 , 

Item 3. One (1) automatic, remote 
control magnetic switch, with over- 
load and under- voltage release for a 
250 H. P., 50 cycle, 4000 volt,, 3 phase, 
full voltage start induction motor, op- 
erating coil for 230 volts. 

Alternate bids will be received on 
Item 2, for a 250 H. P. horizontal, 3 
phase, 4 pole, 50 cycle, 4000 volt, 40 
degree unity power factor synchron- 
ous motor with direct connected exciter 
and exciter field rheostat. 

Alternate bids will be received on 
Item 3, for automatic starting and 
control equipment for a 250 H. P., 3 
phase, 4 pole, 50 cycle, 4000 volt, 40 
degree synchronous motor. Equip- 
ment to include an A. C, line amme- 
ter, D. C. field ammeter and power 
factor meter. 

Alternate bids will be received on 
Item 3, for automatic starting and con- 
trol equipment for a 250 H. P., 3 
phase, 4 pole, 50 cycle, 4000 volt, 40 
degree synchronous motor, with A, C. 
line ammeter, D. C. field ammeter 
power factor, meter and automatic 
equipment for maintaining any desired 



CONTRACTORS' MACHINE WORKS 

SPECIALISTS ON REPAIRING AND REBUILDING OF 

Bunkers, Hoppers, Chuting, Conveyors, Rollers, Mixers, HoisU, 

Shovels, Tractors, Pavers, Crushers, Drag Lines, Elevators, Car 

Unloaders, and other Road and Building Equipments; 

BLACKSMITHING AND WELDING 

Builders of Rosenberg Portable Car Unloaders 

CREAR & BATES 

57 Zoe St., bet. 3rd and 4th, off Brannan St. 
Phone GArfield 4374 San Francisco 



Saturday, J« 



24, 1931 



BUILDING AND EN NEERING NEWS 



rwenty-three 

Ushed in tomorrow's issue. Complete 
lump sum bid listitiK follows: 

('. L. Harney $54,063 

M. -Donald ,t Kahn 54,283 

M. J. Lynch 54.785 

C. B. Eaton 54,899 

B. J. Treacy 59,489 

Fay Improvement Co 61,973 

IMPERIAL COUNTY, Calif.— Grif- 
fith Co., Railway Exchange Bldg., Los 
Angeles, at $142,323 submitted low bid 
to State Highway Commission Jan. 21 
to grade and pave with asphalt con- 
crete 6.3 milps between Trifolium Ca- 
nal and Kane Springs, involving: 

(1) 33,000 cu. yds. rdwy. excav. with- 

out class. : 

(2) 43.000 sta. yds. overhaul; 

(3) 1,300 cu. yds. struc. excav.; 

(4) 14,500 sq. yds. subgrade for pave- 

(5) 54,400 sq. yds. asph. paint binder; 

(6) 28,800 tons asphalt concrete; 

(7) 1,292 lin. ft. 24-in. corru. metal 

pipe; 

(8) 132 lin. ft. 36-in. corru. metal 

pipe; 

(9) 900 lin. ft. furnishing treated 

piles; 

(10) 36 each, driving piles; 

(11) 16 M. ft. b.m. redwood timber, 

dense select all-heart struc. 
grade: 

(12) 10 M. ft. b.m. redwood timber. 

select all-heart struc. grade; 

(13) 72 cu. yds. remove and dispose 

of Portland cement concrete 
in existing pave, and struc. 

(14) 332 sta. finish roadway; 

(15) 120 each, monuments, complete 

in place. 
The state will furnish corrugated 
metal pipe. Complete list of bids fol- 
lows: 

Griffith Co., Los Angeles $142,323 

Steele Finley, Santa Ana 143,845 

R. E. Hazard Const. Co., San 

Diego 151,638 

Basich Bros., Torrance 158.285 

Clark & Henery, San Francisco 159,523 
Daly Corp., San Diego 181,926 



power factor from unity to 90% lead- 
ing. 

Certified check, 10% G. E. Chap- 
man, city clerk. P. Diederlch, plant 
superintendent. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Renssalaer Valve 
fcto., Sharon Bldg., San Francisco, at 
$8300 awarded contract by East Bay 
Municipal Utility District to furnish 
and deliver assorted valves. Com- 
plete 1^1 of unit bids published in our 
Issue of January 8. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— U. S. Pipe & 
Foundry Cs., Monadnock Bldg, San 
Francisco, at $47,790 awarded contract 
by East Bay Municipal Utility District 
to furnish and deliver c. I. pipe for 
■ Isti lulling system. Complete list of 
unit bids published in our issue of 
January 7. 

PLAYGROUNDS & PARKS 

BEVERLY HILLS, Los Angeles Co. 
Cal.— Until 8 P. M., February 10, bids 
will be received by the city council 
tor planting a rose garden in the park 
strip along Santa Monica Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Specifications on file at 
office of park supt. 



STREETS AND HIGHWAYS 

SAN MATEO, San Mateo Co., Cal.— 
City council starts proceedings to pave 
Poplar St, from Delaware to Hum- 
boldt St., and along south line of San 
Mateo High School grounds; estimated 
cost $30,000. Details will be published 
shortly. 



LODI, San Joaquin Co.. Cal.— Pe- 
titions are being circulated seeking 
formation of road improvement dis- 
trict to complete paving of Cherokee 
Lane to a width of 76 feet where that 
thoroughfare forms the city boundary 
and for a distance of 1 mile. Julius 
Manthey is county surveyor. 



OAKLAND, Cal.— Hutchinson Co , 
1450 Harrison St., Oakland, at $33,065 
awarded contract by city council to 
improve portions of Eighth St., Fal- 
lon St., and the extension of Tenth 
street; cash job. Complete list of unit 
bids on this project were published in 
issue of January 16th. Successful bid 
follows: 

(1) 7,548 cu. yds. fill, $1.08. 

(2) 1,336 cu, yds. excavation, $.40, 

(3) 100 cu. yds. material in excava- 
tion below subgrade to be re- 
moved and replaced with filling 
material, $1.50. 

(4) 322 lin. ft. wood curb, $.21. 

(5) 4,779 lin. ft. concrete curb, $.48. 

(6) 4. 781 sq. ft. concrete gutter, $.26. 

(7) 9.225 sq. ft. asphaltic concrete 
pavement (asphaltic concrete surf, 
course, 2-inch thick, laid upon a 
Portland cement concrete founda- 
tion, 6-in. thick), $.225. 

(8) 127.088 sq. ft. penetration macad- 
am pavement, $.115. 

(9) 2,411 sq. ft. existing pave, to be 
resurfaced with asph. concrete, $.07 

(10) 21.662 sq. ft, cement sidewalk. 
$.15. 

(11) 235 lin. ft. 6-in. by 22-in. wood- 
en culvert, $1.60. 

(12) 2 manholes with inlet tops (34- 
Inch opening), $70.00 



YOSEM1TE PARK, Cal.— The House 
of Representatives has passed the 
Leavitt bill, which directs the secre- 
tary of the interior to spend an au- 
thorized appropriation of $7,500,000 
during each of the fiscal years 1932 
and 1933 on building approach roads 
to national parks , These approaches 



are limited to 60 miles, not more than 
40 miles of which may be in any one 
county and must lead across land at 
least 90 per cent owned by the gov- 
ernment. Amounts apportioned are: 
General Grant, $595,000; Grand Can- 
yon, $1,600,000; Lassen Volcanic, $2,- 
010,000; Mesa Verda, $30,000; Sequoia. 
$595,000; Yellowstone, $5,408,200; Yo- 
semite $4,050,000. These amounts cover 
the two-year program for these na- 
tional parks. 



CLARK COUNTY, Nevada— As pre- 
viously reported, bids will be received 
February 4, 2 P. M., by State Highway 
Commission, S. C. Durkee, chief engi- 
neer, Heroe's Memorial Bldg., Carson 
City, for 19.68 miles of grading; struc- 
tures and gravel surfacing in Clark 
County between West Slope of Mor- 
mon Mesa to the Lower Virginia 
River Bridge. Project involves: 

(I) 77.000 cu. yds. excavation, unclass; 
i.'j 96,564 yds sta. overhaul; 

(3) 12.95 miles prepare subgrade and 
shoulders; 

(4) 6.73 miles preparing shoulders; 

(5) 48,700 cu. yds. crushed rock or 
crushed gravel in place; 

(6) 1000 cu. yds. crushed rock or 
crushed gravel in stockpile; 

(7) 13 cu. yds. class A concrete; 

(8) 17 cu. yds. class B concrete; 

(9) 46 lin. ft. removing 18-in. corr. 
metal pipe; 

(10) 24 lin. ft. removing 24-in. corr. 
metal pipe; 

(II) 244 lin. ft. install 15-ln corr. 
metal pipe; 

(12) 552 lin. ft. install 18-in. corr. 
metal pipe; 

(13) 522 lin. ft. install 24-in. corr. 
metal pipe: 

(14) 46 lin ft. install 30-in. corr. 
metal pipe; 

(15) 34 lin. ft. install 36-in. corr, 
metal pipe; 

(16) 4 corr. metal pipe culvert ex- 
tensions; 

(17) 74 demolishing headwalls: 

(18) S5 mounments; 

(19) lump sum, furnish water equip- 
ment; 

(20) 72S M. gals, applying water; 

(21) 1024 lin. ft. remove wooden guard 
rail; 

(22) 1128 lin. ft standard timber guard 
rail in place; 

(23) 2 furnish and install posts for F. 
A. markers; 

(24) 19.68 miles finishing roadway. 
State will furnish corrugated metal 

pipe culverts and band couplings, f. o. 
b. cars, Arrowhead Siding, Clark 
County. 



SAN FRANCISCO.— C. L. Harney. 
Call Bldg,, at $54,003 submitted low 
bid to Board of Public Works to im- 
prove Montgomery St. bet. Union and 
Greenwich Sts., etc. A complete list 
of the unit bids received will be pub- 



5TOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
— As previously reported, bids will be 
received January 26. 11 A. M., by E. 
Graham, county clerk, to improve 
Harney Lane between Lower Sacra- 
mento Road and Cherokee Lane. Proj- 
ect involves: 

(a) 4,000 cu. yds. grading; 

(b) 6,400 tons base course; 

(c) 590 tons crushed rock; 

(d) 260 tons rock chips; 

(e) 212 tons pea gravel; 

(f) 140 bbls. fuel oil; 

(g) 50 tons asphaltic oil. 
Certified check 10% payable to 

Chairman of the Board of Supervisors 
required with bid. Plans obtainable 
from Julius Manthey, county surveyor. 



OROVILLE, Butte Co., Cal.— County 
Surveyor J A. Bumgarner making 
surveys to improve Buena Vista Ave., 
connecting Quincy Road and the 
Feather River Highway. Crushed rock 
surfacing will probably be specified. 



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Twenty-four 



BUILDING AND ENGINEERING NEWS 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



SAN MATEO. San Mateo Co., Cal. 
— City council declares intention (31- 
1) to improve B St. bet. 9th and Bald- 
win Aves. ; 2nd Ave. from San Mateo 
Drive to Main St.; 3rd Ave. from Ells- 
worth to Railroad Aves., involving: 

(1) 24,510 sq. ft. grading; 

(2) 16,000 sq. ft. sidewalk; 

(3) 1,122 lin. ft. 12-in. curb, 24-in. 

gutter; 

(4) 4,538 lin. ft. 16-in. curb, 4-ft. 3- 

in. gutter; 

(5) 34S lin. ft. 16-in. curb, 4-ft. ■)- 

in. gutter; 

(6) 2,334 lin. ft. 16-in. curb 5-ft. do; 

(7) 26 lin. ft. 16-in.' reinf. curb 

4-ft. 3-in. reinf. gutter; 

(8) 20 lin. ft. 16-in. reinf. curb. 

4-ft. 9-in. reinf. gutter; 

(9) 189 lin. ft. 16-in. reinf. curb, 

5-ft. reinf. gutter; 

(10) 2 cu. yds. reinf. columns and 

beams; 

(11) 21.660 sq. ft. 6-in. asph. cone. 

pavement; 

(12) 1,700 tons asph. concrete; 

(13) 613 lin. ft. 4-in. vit. pipe lat- 

eral sewers; 

(14) 940 lin. ft. 21-in. concrete pipe 

storm sewers; 

(15) 372 lin. ft. 18-in. do; 

(16) 594 lin. ft. 15-in. do; 

(17) 168 lin. ft. 12-in. do; 

(18) 4 manholes; 

(19) 26 catchbasins; 

(20) 89 electroliers; 

(21) 11,200 lin. ft. conduit; 

(22) 12,700 lin. ft. cable. 

1911 Act. Eond Act 1915. Hearing 
Feb. 2. E. W. Foster, city clerk. 



STOCKTON, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 
— As previously reported, bids will be 
received January 26, 11 A. M., by E. 
Graham, county clerk, to improve 
Miller Road from Acampo Road to 
Peltier Road. Project involves: 

(a) 1,500 cu. yds. grading; 

(b) 3800 tons base course; 

(c) 210 tons crushed rock; 

(d) 92 tons rock chips; 

(e) 75 tons pea gravel: 

(f) 50 bbls. fuel oil; 

(g) 18 tons asphaltic oil; 
(h) 1 pipe to be installed. 
0.89 mile in length. 

Certified check 10% payable to 
Chairman of the Board of Supervisors 
required with bid. Plans obtainable 
from Julius Manthey. county surveyor. 



SANTA ROSA, Sonoma Co., Cal.— 
Until February 10, 12 noon, bids will 
be received by Geo. P. Sanborn, county 
clerk, for concrete pavement on the 
Petaluma to Point Reyes Highway, 
Section B in the Second Supervisorial 
District, involving: 

(1) 9500 cu. yds. excavation; 

(2) 2465 cu. yds. concrete In pave- 
ment; 

(3) 70 cu , yds. concrete in struc- 
ture and headwalls; 

(4) 4000 lbs. reinforcing steel; 
metal pipe: 

(5) 400 lin. ft. 12-in. corrugfeted 

(6) 44 lin. ft. 18-in. do do do; 

(7) 30 lin. ft. 24-in. do do do; 

(8) 32 lin. ft.30-in. do do do; 

(9) 16 lin. ft. 36-in. do do do. 
Plans obtainable from E. A. Peugh, 

county surveyor. 

See call for bids under official pro- 
posal section in this issue. 



PLUMAS COUNTY, Cal.— Charles 
Harlowe Jr., 378 Belmont St., Oak- 
land, at $64,513.60 (using treated tim- 
ber) awarded contract by District En- 
gineer, U. S. Bureau of Public Roads, 
San Francisco, to grade Section F. 
Route 23. Qumcy-Beckwith National 
Forest Highway in Plumas National 
Forest, 7.99 miles in length, involving: 
29 acres clearing; 73,180 cu. yds. un- 
class. excav.; 660 cu. yds. unclass. 
excav. for struc; 97,800 sta. yds. over- 
haul; 7.942 mile finishing earth- 
graded road; 89 M.B.M. untreated tim- 



ber in place; 85 M.BM. treated timber 
in place; 11 cu. yds. class A concrete; 
89 cu. yds. class B concrete; 1250 lbs. 
reinforcing steel; 18 lin. ft. 12-in. corr. 
galv. metal pipe in place; 1618 lin. ft. 
18-in, 366 lin. ft. 24-in., 90 lin. ft. 30- 
in. and 24S lin. ft. 36-in. corr galv. 
metal pipe: 1600 lin ft. untreated tim- 
ber piling in place; 500 cu. yds. hand- 
laid riprap in place; (extra work) 
maintenance of sections accepted for 
traffic; 655 sq. yds. bitum. wearing 
surf, in place; 102 each right-of-way 
monuments in place. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Until January 29, 
12 noon, bids will he received by F. 
C. Merritt. city clerk, to improve por- 
tions of E-Sth St., E-lOth St., 3rd 
Ave., 5th Ave., 6th Ave. and 7th Ave., 
involving: 

(1) 351.339 sq. ft. grading: 

(2) 7,947 lin. ft. cone, with steel 

curb guard; 

(3) 293.920 sq. ft. cone, pavement; 

(4) 22,663 sq. ft. cement sidewalk: 

(5) 3,576 sq. ft. concrete driveways 

(6) 261 lin. ft. of 8x29-in. corru. 
iron and cone, culvert; 

(7) 4 cast iron handholes; 

(8) 66 lin. ft. 10-inch vit . pipe 
conduit; 

(9) 3S lin. ft. 12-inch do; 

(10) 1 catchbasin (34-inch open- 

ing); 

1 catchbasin (21-inch open- 
ing); 

(12) 2S0 lin. ft. 8-in. vit . pipe sewer 

(13) 1 lamphole. 

City will pay 29% of cost from the 
Treasury. Certified check 10% pay- 
able to city required with bid. Plans 
on file in office of clerk. Walter N. 
Frickstad, city engineer. 



(11) 



SANTA ANA, Orange Co., Cal.— 
Until February 3, 11 A. M., bids will 
be received by J. M. Backs, county 
clerk, to widen portions of Westminis- 
ter Ave. in 2nd Rd. Dist., involving: 

(a) 8,400 cu. yds. excavation un- 
classified for roadway, shoulders 
and ditches; 

(b) 220,460 sq. ft. gravel base; 

(c) 78,735 sq. ft. gravel shoulders; 

(d) 4,666 cu. yds. cement concrete 
pavement . 

Specifications obtainable from Nat 
H. Neff. county road commissioner. 



CULVER CITY, Los Angeles Co., 
Cal.— Until February 16, 8 P. M., bids 
will be received by Paul Jarrett, city 
clerk, to improve Sepulveda Blvd., bet 
Venice Blvd. and city limits, A & I 
No 8, involving in the main 1,619,517 
sq. ft. grading; 471,595 sq. ft. 6-in. as- 
phaltic cone, base, 2-in. Warrenite 
surface paving; cement pipe; catch- 
basins, curbs, walks, gutters, etc. 

Specifications obtainable from Geo. 
E. Lee, City Engineer. 



FRESNO, Fresno Co., Calif.— Until 
January 29. 10:30 A. M., bids will be 
received by H. S. Foster, city clerk. 
(108-D) to improve Terrace Ave. bet. 
Palm and Wilson Aves., involving 
grading: cement concrete curbs, gut- 
ters and walks; corrugated metal cul- 
verts with manholes; 2>i-in. asphalt 
concrete base with 1%-in. asphalt 
concrete surface and liquid asphalt 
and rock screening surface coat. 1911 
Act Certified check 10% payable to 
citv required with bid. Plans on file 
in "office of clerk. C. C. Valkenburg, 
city engineer. 



OAKLAND. Cal.— Heafey-Moore Co., 
344 High St. Oakland, at $2250 award- 
ed contract by East Bay Municipal 
Utility District to furnish and deliver 
hote asphalt for year 1931. 



SACRAMENTO, Calif.— W. H. Lar- 
son. 2650 Curtis Way, Sacramento, at 
$17,920 awarded contract by East Bay 
Municipal Utility District for making 
asphalt street repairs to pavements. 

SANTA BARBARA, Cal.— Until 1:30 
P. M., Jan. 29, bids will be received 
by the City Council to improve Bath 
St., between Quinto St. and Alamar 
Ave., approximately one and one-half 
blocks, involving asphaltic concrete 
pavement, curb, gutter, combined curb 
and gutter, walk, concrete landing 
walk; 1911 Act. Geo. D Geib, City 
Clerk. E. B. Brown, city engineer. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY, Calif.— Tri- 
angle Rock and Gravel Co., San Bern- 
ardino, at $32,715 awarded contract by 
U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. San 
Francisco, for grading Section B and 
placing selected material on Sections 
A and B of Route 75, Laguna National 
Forest Highway, in Cleveland Nation- 
al Forest, 10.86 miles in length, involv- 
ing: 21 acres clearing: 28,750 cu. yds. 
excavation, unclass.; 200 cu. yds. ex- 
cavation, for structures; 5.000 cu. yds. 
overhaul; 6.5 miles preparing roadbed; 
1,096 lin. ft. corru. metal pipe in place; 
19,000 cu. yds. selected material in 
place. ** 



SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY, Cal. 
— As previously reported, bids will be 
received Feburary 11 by State High- 
way Commission to grade and surface 
with oil-treated crushed gravel or 
stone, 29.2 miles between 1.5 miles east 
of Essex and 1 mi. southeast of Kine- 
felter. Project involves: 

(1) 227.600 cu yds. roadway excava- 
tion without class (Location A); 

(2) 132,000 cu. yds. roadway excava- 
tion without class (Location B); 

(3) 490,000 sta. yds. overhaul; 

(4) 106,000 cu. yds. imported borrow; 

(5) 97,000 cu. yds. ditch and channel 
excavation; 

(6) 42,800 cu. yds pit run gravel sub- 
base; 

(7) 9170 cu. yds. structural excavation; 
(S) 80,000 tons oil-treated crushed 

gravel or stone surfacing; 

(9) 1900 cu. yds. crushed gravel or 
stone screenings (seal coat) ; 

(10) 1400 bbls. fuel oil (seal coat); 

(11) 346 lin. ft. 18-in. corr. metal pipe: 

(12) 2032 lin. ft. 24-in. corr. metal pipe; 

(13) 2888 lin. ft. 36-in. corr. metal pipe; 

(14) 648 lin. ft. 48-in.corr. metal pipe; 

(15) 8700 M. gals, water applied to 
sub-base; 

(16) 29,420 lin. ft. furnishing treated 
piles; 

(17) 1399 each, driving piles; 

(18) 588 M. ft. B. M. redwood tim- 
ber, dense select all-heart struc- 
tural grade; 

(19) 387 M. ft. B. M. redwood timber, 
select all-heart structural grade; 

(20) 1543 stas. finishing roadway; 

(21) 480 each, mounments, complete, in 
place. 

The state will furnish corrugated 
metal pipe. 

NEVADA STATE — State Highway 
Department, S. C. Durkee, Chief engi- 
neer, Heroes' Memorial Bldg.. Carson 
City, has adopted the revised budget 
involving the expenditure of $2,989,447 
for improvements during the current 
year of which approximately $1,900,- 
000 will come from general funds as 
the construction and oiling work is on 
the Federal Aid system only, A sum- 
mary of the improvements segregated 
by counties follows: 

CHURCHILL COUNTY— New con- 
struction — none; reconstruction and 
oiling— 5 miles south of Fallon to Salt 
Wells. 10.15 miles, $86,275; general 
maintenance, 139.66 miles, $36,192; 



Saturday, January 24, 1931 



specific maintenance, $4700. Total— 
|12T,617, 

CLARK COUNTY— New Construc- 
tion—Las Vegas south toward Bouldl t 
Canyon I'am site. 10 miles, $150,000; 

(•construction and oiling— West si ■ 

Mormon Mesa to Lower Virgin river 
bridge, 19.89 miles, $169,005; oiling— 
Jean to state line, 12.62 miles, $31,550; 
construction of new Upper Virgin 
river bridge, $125,000; general main- 
tenance, 179.40 miles, $39,S27; specific 
maintenance. $5200, Total— $520,642. 

DOUGLAS COUNTY— New construc- 
tlqn— None; reconstruction and oiling 
—5 miles east of Holbrook to 2 miles 
north of Carter's 15.02 miles, $127,670; 
general maintainance — 53.19 miles, 
$13,450; specific maintenance, $1750. 
Total!— $142,870. 

ELKO COUNTY— New construction 

Thousand Springs creek to Contact, 

20.00 miles. $160,000; new construction 
and reconstruction — Deeth to Wells. 
17.81 miles. $126,160; reconstruction 
and oiling— 4 miles east of Silver Zone 
to Utah line, 16.86 miles, $143,310; 
south county line to Wendover, 53.52 
miles, $165,912; oiling— Elko to Deeth, 
31.44 miles, $78,600; General main- 
tenance— 214.61 miles, $56,442; specific 
maintenance, $7350 Total— $737,774. 

E