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Bulletin 

OF THE 

Public Affairs 
Information Service 

A Cooperative Clearing House 
OF Public Affairs Information 

SECOND annual CUMULATION 




THE H. W. WILSON COMPANY 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y., AND NEW YORK CITY 
1916 



PREFACE 

Public Affairs Information Service is a forcible example of the truth of 
the hackneyed saw that "Necessity is the Mother of Invention." The Service 
has completed its third year — the second year since The H. W. Wilson Com- 
pany took over its management. It is unnecessary to repeat the details leading 
to the inception of this cooperative movement, since they have been given in 
the 191 5 Annual, and a report v^as presented to the Special Libraries session at 
the American Library Association in June, 19 16, a resume of which was printed 
in the weekly Bulletin, July 29, 1916. 

The value of the affiliation of the vService with The H. W. Wilson Com- 
pany has been inestimable from the editor's viewpoint. The many detail fea- 
tures that must be evolved in order to make a publication of this kind possible 
had already been worked out in other publications and all that was necessary 
was to adapt them to the particular needs of the Bulletin. 

From the standpoint of material, more difficulty has been encountered. It 
is necessary to continuously establish and keep alive relations with many dis- 
tributing agencies — associations, organizations, governmental, state and munici- 
pal departments, and prominent individuals — all of whom must be persuaded to 
cooperate by sending reports, publications, etc. 

The cooperation of these sources is now more easily enlisted because they 
are beginning to realize that the Bulletin is an excellent medium thru which 
their work may be brought to the attention of those interested in such activities. 

The world, however, does not stand still and it is necessary to keep pace 
with new movements and developments. The Service is neither partisan nor 
local. Material must be secured covering all points of view. The vastness of 
this task is apparent and the editor realizes that there are omissions in many 
lines of activity. With a limited staff it is impossible to follow up consistently 
everything of interest and it is the desire of all concerned to develop a systematic 
cooperation, in order to eliminate these omissions as far as possible. This is one 
of the ambitions for the coming year. 

The Service is not merely an information collecting and disseminating 
agency. Its primary aim is to be of concrete assistance in minimizing the task 
of the busy librarian, professor, social worker, business man, head of depart- 
ment or bureau; 

The Service carries out its activities by means of the weekly bulletins, the 
bi-monthly cumulations and the annual number. It acts as agent for the dis- 
tribution of both free material and material with a cost, desired by the cooper- 
ators. It extends the privilege of borrowing from the collection and supplies 
typewritten material for copying purposes. The Service may be freely used as 
an information bureau. 

In outlining the scope of material to be listed, the cooperators and editor 
decided to include some entries obtained from other standard sources of reference. 
An endeavor is made to avoid duplication when possible, but as a matter of con- 



IV 



PREFACE 



venience it has seemed advisable to bring together in one alphabet all material 
of the character one would expect to find listed in the Bulletin. 

A list of typewritten material indexed since the establishment of the Service 
will be found in the last pages of the annual. The full entries for 19 15 and 
19 1 6 have been given for the convenience of those wishing to order material. 
This feature of the Service has met with gratifying success and promises to 
become entirely self supporting. 

The user of the annual will occasionally find incomplete entries. Several 
hundred letters were sent out in an attempt to complete the information, but 
replies to all have not been received and the staff is not sufficiently large to 
allow any one person to devote time exclusively to such research work. 

Miss Orrena Louise Evans, who has been the editor for two years, left 
the Service in August. Much credit is due her for the general organization of 
the Service, the style adopted in the Bulletins, and the solving of the innumer- 
able problems incident to the development of any new publication. In editing 
the annual number it has been the endeavor to carry out her ideas. 

The staff wishes to express its appreciation to the cooperators for their 
assistance, to the advisory committee, consisting of John A. Lapp, Director, 
Indiana Bureau of Legislative Information, George S. Godard, State librarian, 
Connecticut, and C. C. Williamson, Librarian, New York Municipal Reference 
Library, for their willing advice and interest, and to the members of The H. W. 
Wilson Company staff who have so kindly assisted in solving the many perplexing 
problems which constantly arise. 

Lillian Henley, 

Editor. 
October 11, 1916. 



Key to Bibliographical Abbreviations 



♦ Main entry; not used for periodical references 
nor analyticals 

* Net (when used before price) 
JtArticIes in preparation 

-A. Atlantic Reporter 

Ag. August 

Agric. Agricultural, Agriculture 

Ap. April 

B. Copies may be borrowed from the compiler 

Tad. board 

bibl. bibliography 

Bui. Bulletin 

bur. bureau 

Circ. Circular 

com. committee 

comm. commission 

comr. commissioner 

cond. condensed 

D. December 

Dept. Department 

diag. diagram 

div. division 

dom. domestic 

ea. each 

Exp. Experiment 

Ext. Extension 

F. February 

Fed. Federal reporter 

fig. figure 

for. foreign 

found, foundation 



Gaz. Gazette 

H J R. House joint resolution 

il. illustrated, -ion. -ions 

Introd. Introduced 

Ja. January 

Je. June 

Jl. July 

leg. legislative 

misc. miscellaneous 

Mr. March 

My. May 

n p. Price not known 

N. November 

N W. Northwestern reporter 

Nat. National 

O. October 

P. Pacific reporter 

pa. paper 

pi. plate 

ref. reference 

S. September 

S. Southern reporter 

S C. Supreme court reporter 

S doc. Senate document 

S E. Southeastern reporter 

S W. Southwestern reporter 

Sta. Station 

sup. Supplement 

Univ. University 

Y B. Yearbook 



COLON ABBREVIATIONS FOR FORENAMES 



A: 


Augustus 


B: 


Benjamin 


C: 


Charles 


D: 


David 


E: 


Edward 


F: 


Frederick 


G: 


George 


H: 


Henry 


I: 


Isaac 


J: 


John 


K: 


Karl 



L: 


Louis 


M: 


Matthew 


N: 


Nicholas 


O: 


Otto 


P: 


Peter 


R: 


Richard 


S: 


Samuel 


T: 


Thomas 


V: 


Victor 


W: 


William 



Key to Periodical References 



Aera. Aera. $2; single numbers 25c. American 

Electric Railway Association, 8 W. 40th St., 

N. Y. 
Am City. American City. $3; single numbers 

35c. Civic Press, 87 Nassau st., N. Y. 
Am City (T and C ed). American City (Town 

and county edition). $3; single numbers 35c. 

Civic Press, 87 Nassau st., N. Y. 

Am Econ R. American Economic Review. $5; 
single numbers $1.25. American Economic 
Association, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Am Gas Light J. American Gas Light Journal. 
$3; single numbers 10c. 42 Pine St., N. Y. 

Am Ind. American Industries. $1; single num- 
bers 10c. National Manufacturers Co., 30 
Church St., N. Y. 



Am Inst E E Pro. American Institute of Electri- 
cal Engineers. Proceedings. $10; single num- 
bers $1. F. L. Hutchinson, sec, 33 W. 39th st., 
N. Y. 

Am J Pub Health. American Journal of Public 
Health. $3; single numbers 30c. American Pub- 
lic Health Assn., 755 Boylston st., Boston, 
Mass. 

Am J Soc. American Journal of Sociology. $2; 
single numbers 50c. Univ. of Chicago Press, 
Chicago, 111. 

Am Judicature Soc Bui. Bulletin of the Ameri- 
can Judicature Society, 1732 First nat. bank 
bldg., Chicago 

Am Labor Leg R. American Labor Legislation 
Review. $3; single numbers $1. American Assn. 
for Labor Legislation. 131 E. 23d st., N. Y. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 
Key to Periodical References— Conimwerf 



Am Law R. American Law Review. $5 a year; 
single numbers $1. 14 S. Broadway, St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Am Medical Assn J. American Medical Associa- 
tional Journal. $5; single numbers 15c. 535 
N. Dearborn st.. Chicago, 111 

Am Phys Educ R. American Physical Educa- 
tion Review. |3; single numbers 50c. American 
physical education assn., 93 Westford av., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Am Pol Sci R. American Political Science Re- 
view. S3; single numbers 75c. American Politi- 
cal Science Association, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Baltimore, Md. 

Am Statis Assn. Quarterly Publications of the 
American Statistical Association. American 
Statistical Association, 491 Boylston St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Am Vet M Assn J. Journal of the American 
Veterinary Medical Association. $3; single 
numbers 30c. Journal of the American Veter- 
inary Association, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Am Water Works Assn J. Journal of the Amer- 
ican Water Works Association. American 
Water Works Assn., 2419 Greenmount av., 
Baltimore, Md. 

Ann Am Acad. Annals of the American Acad- 
emy of Political and Social Science. $6. $5 to 
members of the Academy; single numbers $1. 
36th and Woodland av., Philadelphia 

Ann Cas. American and English Annotated 
Cases. $4.50. Edward Thompson Co., Northport, 
Long Island, N. Y. 

Atlan. Atlantic Monthly. $4; single numbers 35c. 
Atlantic Monthly Co., 3 Park st., Boston 

Berkeley Civic Bui. Berkeley Civic Bulletin. 
$1; single numbers 10c. City Club, 2525 Hearst 
av., Berkeley, Cal. 

Boston City Record. $1; single numbers 5c. City 
Record, Boston, Mass. 

Bur Railway Econ Bui. Bureau of Railway Eco- 
nomics Bulletin, 1329 Pennsylvania av., Wash- 
ington D. C. 

Cal Commonwealth Club Transac. Transac- 
tions of the Commonwealth Club of Cali- 
fornia. C. E. Grunsky, sec, room 402, 153 
Kearny St., San Francisco 

Cal Univ Agric Exp Sta Bui. University of Cali- 
fornia. Agricultural Experiment Station. Bul- 
letin, Berkeley, Cal. 

Case & Com. Case and Comment. $1.50; single 
numbers 15c. The Lawyers Co-operative Pub- 
lishing Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Cent. Century. $4; single numbers 35c. Century 
Co., Union sq., N. Y. 

Chicago City Club Bui. City Club Bulletin. 
Single numbers 10c. City Club of Chicago, 315 
Plymouth court, Chicago 

Chicago City Council J. Journal of the proceed- 
ings of th<? City Council of the City of Chicago, 
Illinois. City clerk, Chicago, 111. 

Chicago City Council Pam. Chicago. City Coun- 
cil. Pamphlets. Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Child Labor Bui. The Child Labor Bulletin. $2. 
National Child Labor Committee, 105 E. 22d 
St.. N. Y. 

Coal Age. Coal Age and Colliery Engineer, con- 
solidated. $3; Single numbers 10c. Hill Pub. 
Co., 10th av. and 36th st., N. Y. 

Cong Rec. Congressional Record. $8 for the ses- 
sion; $1.50 per month; single numbers 3c for 
24 pages or less, each additional 8 pages Ic ex- 
tra. Cornelius Ford, public printer, Washing- 
ton. May be obtained gratis from local repre- 
sentative 

Cornell Univ Agric Exp Sta Bui, Cornell Univer- 
sity Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin. 
Agricultural Experiment Station of the New 
York State College of Agriculture, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 

Country Gent, Country Gentleman. $1; single 
numbers 5c. Curtis Publishing Co., Independ- 
ence square, Philadelphia 



Dom Eng. Domestic Engineering. $2; single 
numbers 10c. Domestic Engineering Co., 407 S. 
Dearborn st., Chicago 

Econ J. Economic Journal. Annual subscrip- 
tion, together with other occasional publica- 
tions, $5; to libraries, $4.50; Royal Economic 
Society, 9 Adelphi Terrace, London, W. C, 
single numbers *5s. The Society or Macmillan 
& Co., Ltd., St. Martin's st., London, W. C. 

Econ World. Economic World. $4; single num- 
bers 25c. Chronicle company, ltd., 80 Wall st., 
N. Y. 

Educa. Education. $3; single numbers 35c. Pal- 
mer Co., 120 Boylston St., Boston 

Educ R. Educational Review. $3; single num- 
bers 35c. Educational Review Pub. Co., Easton, 
Pa. 

Elec Ry J. Electric Railway Journal. |3; 
single numbers 10c. McGraw Pub. Co., 239 
W. 39th St., N. Y. 

Elec R & W Elec'n. Electrical Review and 
Western Electrician. $3; single numbers 10c. 
Electrical Review Pub. Co., 608 S. Dearborn 
St., Chicago 

Elec W. Electrical World. $3; single numbers 
10c. McGraw Pub. Co., 239 W. 39th St., N. Y. 

El School J. Elementary School Journal. $1.50; 
single numbers 20c. University of Chicago 
Press, Chicago, 111. 

Eng & Contr. Engineering and Contracting. $2 
Myron C. Clark Pub. Co., 608 S. Dearborn St., 
Chicago 

Eng N. Engineering News. $5; single numbers 
15c. Hill Pub. Co., 10th av. at 36th st., N. T. 

Eng Rec. Engineering Record. $3; single num- 
bers 10c. McGraw Pub. Co., 239 W. 39th St., 
N, Y. 

Engineer. Engineer. Thick paper ed £2 Os 6d; 
Canadian subs £1 16s; thin paper ed £1 16s; 
Canadian subs £1 lis 6d. Engineer, 33 Nor- 
folk St., Strand, London, W. C. 

Farmers' Bui. United States Department of 
Agriculture. Farmers' bulletins, gratis. Secre- 
tary of agriculture 

Good Roads n s. Good Roads new series. $2; 
single numbers 5c except first numbers of each 
month 10c. E. L. Powers Co., 150 Nassau St.. 
N. Y. 

Harv Law R. Harvard Law Review. $2.50; sin- 
gle numbers 35c. Harvard University Press, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Harvard Univ Bur of Business Research Bui. 
Bulletin of the Bureau of Business Research, 
Graduate School of Business Administration, 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 

Health News. Monthly Bulletin New York State 
Dept. of Health, New York State Dept. of 
Health, Albany, N, Y, 

Horseless Age. $2; single numbers 10c. Horse- 
less Age Co., 440 4th av,, N, Y. 

Ilium Eng Soc Transac. Transactions of the Il- 
luminating Engineering Society. $5; single 
numbers 75c. Illuminating Engineering Soc, 29 
W. 39th St., N. Y. 

Immigrants in Am R. Immigrants in America 
Review. $2; single numbers 50c. Committee for 
Immigrants in America, 20 W. 34th st., N. Y. 

Inst Q. Institution Quarterly: an official Organ 
of the Public Charity Service of Illinois. A. L. 
Bowen, Springfield, 111. 

Iowa J Hist and Pol. Iowa Journal of History 
and Politics. $2; single numbers 50c. Iowa 
State Historical Society, Iowa City 

Iron Age. Iron Age. $5; single numbers 20c. 
David Williams Co., 239 W. 39th st., N. Y. 

J H U Studies. Johns Hopkins University 
Studies in Historical and Political Science. 
$3.50 Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, Md. 

J Account. Journal of Accountancy. $3; single 
numbers 30c. The Ronald Press Co., 20 Vesey 
St., N. Y. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Key to Periodical Reieiences— Continued 



J Am Bankers Assn. Journal of the American 
Bankers Assn. (including Bulletin of the A. I. 
B.) $1. American Bankers Assn., 5 Nassau st., 
N. Y. 

J Grim Law. Journal of the American Institute 
of Criminal Law and Criminology. $3; single 
numbers 60c. American Institute of Criminal 
Law and Criminology, 31 W. Lake st., Chicago, 
111. 

J Educ. Journal of IMucation. $2.50; single num- 
bers 5c. 6 Beacon st., Boston 

J Home Econ. Journal of Home Economics. $2; 
single numbers 25c, American Home Eco- 
nomics Assn., Station N. Baltimore, Md. 

J Pol Econ. Journal of Political Economy. $3; 
single numbers 35c. University of Chicago 
Press, Chicago, 111. 

Kan Munic. Kansas Municipalities. $2; single 
numbers 25c. Official organ of the League of 
Kansas Municipalities, Eraser Hall, Lawrence, 
Kansas 

Labor Gazette. Labor Gazette. $1; single num- 
bers iOc. 710 Southern bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 

Law Lib J. Index to Legial Periodicals and Law 
Library Journal. $5. H. W. Wilson Co.. White 
Plains. N. Y. 

L R A. Lawyers' Reports. Annotated. $24. Law- 
yers' Cooperative Pub. Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Manual Train. Manual Training and Vocational 
Education. $2; single numbers 35c. The Man- 
ual Arts Press, Peoria, 111. 

Mass Agric Circ. Massachusetts Bd. of Agri- 
culture Circular, Boston, Mass. 

Mass Labor Bui. Massachusetts Bureau of Sta- 
tistics. Labor Bulletin. Boston, Mass. 

Med Rec. Medical Record, $5; single numbers 
15c. William Wood & Co., 51 5th av., N. Y. 

Metal Work. Metal Worker. $2; single numbers 
10c. David Williams Co., 239 W. 39th st.. New 
York 

Met & Chem Eng. Metallurgical and Chemical 
Engineering. $2; Single numbers 25c. McGraw 
Pub. Co., 239 W. 39th St., N. Y. 

Mich Univ Bui University of Michigan. Uni- 
versity Bulletin, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Minn Bd of Control Quar. Quarterly representing 
the Minnesota Educational, Philanthropic, 
Correctional and Penal Institutions under the 
State Board of Control, St. Paul. State Bd. of 
Control, St. Paul 

Monthly R. Monthly Review of the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. 

Munic Eng. Municipal Engineering. $2; single 
numbers 25c. Engineering Pub. Co., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Munic J. Municipal Journal. $3; single numbers 
10c. Municipal Journal and Engineer, inc., 50 
Union Square, N. Y. 

Munic Research. Municipal Research. $5. Issued 
monthly by the Bureau of Municipal Research, 
261 Broadway, N. Y. 

Nation. Nation. $3; single numbers 10c. P. O. 
box 794, N. Y. 

Nat Conf of Charities and Correction. National 
Conference of Charities and Correction. Pro- 
ceedings. $2. National Conference of Charities 
and Correction, Wm. T. Cross, 315 Plymouth 
court, Chicago 

Nat Economic League Q. National Economic 
League Quarterly. $2 a year, $1 to libraries and 
members of economic clubs; single numbers 
50c. National Economic League, 6 Beacon st., 
Boston, Mass, 

Nat League on Urban Conditions among Ne- 
groes Bui. Bulletin of National League on 
Urban Conditions among Negroes, 2303 7th 
av., N. Y. 

Nat Munic R. National Municipal Review. $5; 
single numbers $1.25. National Municipal 
League, North American Bldg., Philadelphia 

Nat Real Estate J. National Real Estate Jour- 
nal. $1; single numbers 10c. St. Paul, Minn, 



Nation's Business. $1; single numbers 10c. 
Chamber of commerce of the U. S, A,, Riggs 
bldg., Washington, D. C, 

Nature. Nature. £1 10s 6d; single numbers 6d, 
Macmillan & Co., Ltd., St. Martin's st., Lon- 
don, W. C, 

New Ropub. New Republic. $4; single numbers 
10c. The Republic Pub, Co., 421 W. 21st st.. 
N. Y. 

N Y City Rec. City Record: official journal of 
the city of New York. $9.30; single copies 3c, 
Board of city record, supervisor's office, 1356 
Municipal bldg., N. Y. 

N Y Labor Bui. New York State Department of 
Labor Bulletin, Albany 

N Y State Bur Municipal Information Rept, 
New York State Bureau of Municipal Informa- 
tion of the New York State Conference of 
Mayors and Other City Officials Report. Wm. 
P. Capes, sec, Albany, N. Y. 

No Am. North American Review. $4; single 
numbers 35c, North American Review, 171 
Madison av„ N. Y. 

Ohio Bui Char & Correc, Ohio Bulletin of 
Charities and Correction. Subscription free, 
H, H. Shirer, ed., 1010 Hartman bldg., Colum- 
bus, O, 

Ohio Pub Health J. Ohio Public Health Jour- 
nal. Ohio. State Board of Health, Columbus, 
O. 

Outlook. $3; single numbers 10c. Outlook Co., 381 
4th av., N, Y, 

Pa Health Bui. Pennsylvania Health Bulletin. 
State Dept, of Health, Samuel G, Dixon, comr., 
Harrisburg, Pa, 

Playground, Playground. $2; single numbers 25c. 
Playground and Recreation Association of 
America, 1 Madison av., N. Y. 

Pol Sci Q, Political Science Quarterly. $3; 

single numbers 75c. Ginn & Co., 70 5th av,, 

N. Y. 
Power, Power, %Z; single numbers 5c. Hill 

Pub, Co., 10th av. at 36th st„ N, Y, 

Proc Acad Pol Sci, Proceedings of the Acad-r 
emy of Political Science, Quarterly, Dues 
$5, Academy of Political Science, Kent Hall, 
Columbia University, N, Y. 

Pub Health (Mich.), Public Health. Michigan 
State Board of Health, Lansing 

Q J Econ, Quarterly Journal of Economics, $3, 
Harvard univ, press, 2 University Hall, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Quar J Univ N Dak. The Quarterly Journal of 
the University, of North Dakota, Univ. of 
North Dakota, University 

Ry Age. Railway Age Gazette. $5; single num- 
bers 15c. Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co,, Wool- 
worth bldg., N, Y. 

Ry R. Railway Review. $4; single numbers 15c. 
Railway Review, 537 S. Dearborn st,, Chicago^, 
30 Church St., N. Y. 

R of Rs, Review of Reviews, $3; single numbers 
25c, Review of Reviews Co., 30 Irving place, 
N. Y. 

School and Soc, School and Society, $3; single 
numbers 10c, Science Press, Garrison, N. Y. 

School R, School Review, $1,50; single num- 
bers 20c. University of Chicago Press, Chir 
cago. 111. 

Science n s. Science. $5; single numbers 15c. 
Science Press, Garrison, N. Y. 

Sci Am S. Scientific American Supplement. $5; 
single numbers 10c. Munn & Co., 233 Broad- 
way, N. Y. 

Short Ballot Bui. Short Ballot Bulletin. 25c; 
single numbers 5c. National Short Ballot Or- 
ganization, 383 4th av., N. Y. 

Social Hygiene. $2; single numbers 50c, Amer- 
ican Social Hygiene Assn., 105 W, 40th st,^ 

N. Y, 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Key to Periodical References— Continued 



Southern Workman. $1; single numbers 10c. 

Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, 

Hampton, Va. 
Special Libraries. |2; single numbers 25c, Special 

Libraries Association, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Survey. Survey. J3; single numbers 10c. Sur- 
vey Associates, 105 East 22d st., N. Y. 

Texas Munic. Texas Municipalities. 50c; single 
numbers 15c. League of Texas municipalities. 
Bureau of Municipal Research and Reference, 
University of Texas, Austin 

U Pa L Rev. University of Pennsylvania Law Re- 
view. $2.50; single numbers 35c. Law school, 
U. P., 236 Chestnut st.; 34th and Chestnut st., 
Philadelphia 

U S Bur Educ Bui. United States Bureau of 
Education Bulletin, Washington, D. C. 

U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui. United States 
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

U S Bur Mines Bui. United States Bureau o' 
Mines Bulletin, Washington, D. C. 

U S Bur Mines Tech Pa. United States Bureau 
of Mines. Technical pa:per. U. S. Bureau of 
Mines, Washington, D. C. 



U S Commerce Repts. Commerce Reports. U. S. 

Dept. of commerce, Washington, D. C. 
U S Pub Health Bui. United States Public 

Health Service. Public Health Bulletin. 

Washington, D. C. 

U S Pub Health Repts. United States Public 
Health Service. Public Health Report, Wash- . 
ington, D. C. 

Ungraded. Ungraded. $1.50; single numbers 20c. 
Ungraded Teachers Assn. at Concord, N. H.; 
Editorial Office, 500 Park av., N. Y. 

Utilities Mag. Utilities Magazine, Utilities Bur., 
1009 Finance bldg., Philadelphia 

Wash Univ Exten J. University Extension 
Journal, Extension Division, University of 
Washington, Seattle 

W Soc E J. Journal of the Western Society 
of Engineers. $3; single numbers 50c. West- 
ern Society of Engineers, 1735 Monadnock 
blk., Chicago 

World Almanac. World Almanac and Encyclo- 
pedia. 25c; by mail 35c. Press Pub. Co., Pu- 
litzer bldg., N. Y. 

World's Work. World's Work. $3; single num- 
bers 25c. Doubleday, Page & Co., Garden City, 
N. Y. 



Directory of Publishers 



Am. assn. for labor leg. American Association 
for Labor Legislation, 131 E. 23d st., N. Y. 

Am. assn. on unemployment. American Asso- 
ciation on Unemployment. (American sections 
of the International Association) 131 E. 23d 
St., N. Y. 

Am. medical assn. American Medical Associa- 
tion, 535 N. Dearborn St., Chicago 

Am. soc. hygiene assn. American Social Hy- 
giene Association, 105 W. 40th st., N. Y.; 
Walter Clarke, 332 S. Michigan av., Chicago; 
T: D. Eliot, Phelan bldg., San Francisco 

Appleton. Daniel Appleton & Co., 29-35 W. 32d 
St.. N. Y.; 533 S. Wabash av., Chicago 

Assn. press. Association Press, 124 E. 28th st., 
N. Y. 

Badger. Richard G. Badger, 194-200 Boylston St., 
Boston 

Baker. Baker and Taylor Co., 354 4th av., N. Y. 

Bobbs. Bobbs-Merrill Co., University Square, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Century. Century Co.. 353 4th av., N. Y. 

Chamber of Commerce of the United States of 
America, Riggs bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Civic Press. Civic Press, 87 Nassau st„ N. Y. 

Clark. Clark Book Co., 27 William st., N. Y. 

Columbia univ. press. Columbia University 
Press, Lemcke & Buechner. agents. 30-32 W. 
27 St., N. Y. 

Crowell. T. Y. Crowell Co., 426-428 W. Broad- 
way, N. Y. 

Dodd. Dodd. Mead & Co., 4th av. & 30th st., 

N. Y. 
Doubleday. Doubleday, Page & Co., Garden City 

N. Y. 

Dutton. E. P. Dutton & Co., 681 5th av., N. Y. 
Punk. Funk & Wagnalls Co., 354-360 4th av., 

N. Y. 
General educ. bd. General education board, 61 

Broadway, N. Y. 
Ginn. Ginn & Co., 29 Beacon st., Boston; 2301- 

2311 Prairie av., Chicago 
Griffith & Rowland press, Philadelphia 
Harper. Harper & brothers, Franklin Square, 

N. Y. 
Harvard univ. press. Harvard University Press, 

2 University Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 



Hearst's int. lib. Hearst's International Library 
Co., 119 W. 40th St., N. Y. 

Heath. D. C. Heath & Co., 50 Beacon st., Bos- 
ton; 231 W. 39th St.. N. Y.; 623 S. Wabash av., 
Chicago 

Holt. Henry Holt & Co., 34 W. 33d st.. N. Y. 

Houghton. Houghton, Mifflin Co., 4 Park St., 
Boston; 16 E. 40th St., N. Y.; 623 S. Wabash 
av., Chicago 

Huebsch. B. W. Huebsch, 225 5th av, N Y. 

Joint bd. of sanitary control. Joint board of 
sanitary control in the cloak, suit and skirt, 
and the dress and waist industries. Dr. Henry 
Moskowitz, sec, 31 Union sq., N. Y. 

King. King (P. S.) & Son, Ltd., 2 & 4 Great 
Smith St., London 

Lea. Lea & Febiger, 706-710 Sansom st., Phila- 
delphia; 2 W. 45th St., N. Y. 

Lemcke. Lemcke & Buechner, 30-32 W. 27th st., 
N. Y. 

Lippincott. J. B. Lippincott Co., E. Washington 
square, Philadelphia 

Little. Little, Brown & Co., 34 Beacon st., 

Boston 
Longmans. Longmans, Green & Co., 4th av. and 

30th St., N. Y. 

McClurg. A. C. McClurg & Co., 330-352 E. Ohio 

St., Chicago 
McGraw. McGraw-Hill Bk. Co., 239 W. 39th st., 

N. Y. 
Macmillan. The Macmillan Co., 66 5th av., N. Y. 

Mass. supt. of doc. Massachusetts. Superintend- 
ent of documents, Boston 

Nat. bd. of fire underwriters. National board of 
fire underwriters, 76 William st., N. Y. 

Nat. conference of charities and correction. Na- 
tional Conference of Charities and Correction, 
315 Plymouth court, Chicago, 111. 

Nat. consumers' league. National • Consumers' 
League, 105 E 22d St.. N. Y. 

Nat. fire protection assn. National Fire Pro- 
tection Association, 87 Milk st., Boston, Mass. 

Nat. housing assn. National Housing Association, 
105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Nat. munic. league. National Municipal League, 
703 North American bldg., Philadelphia 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 
Directory of Publishers— Con^mz^ed 



Nat. wholesale liquor dealers assn., 301 United 
bank bldg., Cincinnati. O. 

N. Y. state bur. of munic. information. N. Y. 
state bureau of municipal information of the 
New York state conference of mayors and 
other city officials, Wm. P. Capes, sec, 25 
Washington av., Albany, N. Y. 

Pilgrim press. Pilgrim Press 14 Beacon st., Bos- 
ton; 120 S. Wabash av., Chicago 

Princeton univ press. Princeton, N. J. 

Putnam. G. P. Putnam's Sons, Putnam bUlg., 
2-6 W. 45th St., N. Y. 

Rand. Rand-McNally & Co., Rand McNally 
bldg., Chicago; 40 E. 22d st., N. Y.; 455 S. 
Olive St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Religious educ. assn. Religious Education Asso- 
ciation, 332 S. Michigan av., Chicago 

Revell. Fleming H. Revell & Co.. 158 5th av., 
N. Y.; 17 N. Wabash av., Chicago 

Russell Sage found. Russell Sage Foundation, 
130 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Scribner. Charles Scribner's Sons, 597 5th av., 
N. Y. 

Small. Small, Mayn^rd & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Society of sanitary and moral prophylaxis, 105 
W. 40th St., N. Y. 

Stokes. F. A. Stokes Co., 443-449 4th av., N. Y. 

Survey associates, inc., 105 E. 22d st., N. Y. 



Teachers college. Teachers college, Columbia 
university, N. Y. 

Toronto bur. of munic. research. Bureau of Mu- 
nicipal Research, 813-820 Traders bank bldg., 
Toronto 

U. S. Bur. For. & Dom. Com. United States Bu- 
reau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
Washington, D. C. 

U. S. supt. of doc. Superintendent of Docu- 
ments, Union Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Van Nostrand. D. Van Nostrand Co., 25 Park 
PL. N. Y. 

Whitcomb & B. Whitcomb & Barrows, Hunt- 
ington Chambers, Boston 

Wiley. John Wiley & Sons, inc., 432 4th av., 
N. Y. 

Wilson. H. W. Wilson Co., White Plains. N. Y. 

Winston. John C. Winston Co., 1006-1016 Arch 
St., Philadelphia 

Women's educ. and ind. union. Women's edu- 
cational and industrial union, 264 Boylston st., 
Boston 

Wood. William Wood and Co., 51 5th av., N. Y. 

World bk. co. World Book Co., Park Hill, 
Yonkers-on-Hudson, N. Y. ; 6 N. Michigan 
av., Chicago 

Yale univ. press. Yale University Press, 135 Elm 
St., New Haven, Conn. 



List of Books Indexed 



Alderman, L. R. School credit for home work. 

*$1 '15 Houghton 
Alexander, De Alva Stanwood. History and 

procedure of the house of representatives. *$2 

'16 Houghton 
American college. *$1.25 '15 Holt 

American electric railway engineering associa- 
tion. Engineering manual. $4 '16 The Assn., 
8 W. 40th St.. N. Y. 

American yearbook: a record of events and prog- 
ress, 1915; ed. by Francis G. Wickware. *$3 
'16 Appleton 

J Ash burn, Percy IVI. Elements of military hy- 
giene. *$1.50 '15 Houghton 

t Ash by, Hugh T. Infant mortality. |3.25 '15 Put- 
nam 

Atkinson, Henry A. Church and the people's 
play, il *$1.25 '15 Pilgrim press 

Aurner, Clarence Ray. History of education in 
Iowa. 4v $2 ea '14-'^16 State hist. soc. of Iowa, 
Iowa City 

Ay res, Leonard, and Ayres, May. School build- 
ings and equipment. 25c '16 Survey com., 
Cleveland found., Cleveland 

Bachman, Frank P. Problems in elementary 
school administration. $1.50 '15 World bk. co. 

Bacon, Charles W. American plan of govern- 
ment. *$2.50 '16 Putnam 

Bailey, Arthur L. Library bookbinding. *?1.25 '16 
Wilson 

Ball, Sarah B., comp, 1600 business books. 75c 
'16 Wilson 

Bannington, B. G. English public health admin- 
istration, tables $1.87 (postage and duty ex- 
tra) '15 King 

Barnes, Charles B. Longshoremen. (Russell 
Sage found.) $2 postpaid '15 Survey associates, 
inc. 

JBarnett, James D. Operation of the initiative, 
referendum, and recall in Oregon. $2 '15 Mac- 
millan 

Baugh, Frederick H. Principles and practice of 
cost accounting. $3 '15 Frederick H. Baugh, 
P. O. box 682, Baltimore 



Beegle, Mary Porter, and Crawford, Jack Ran- 
dall. Community drama and pageantry. *$2.50 
'16 Yale univ. press 

Beman, Lamar T., comp. Selected articles on 
prohibition of the liquor traffic. *$1 '15 Wilson 

Benton, Josiah Henry. Voting in the field. $3.50 
'15 W. B. Clarke co., 26 Tremont st., Boston 

tBeyer, David Stewart. Industrial accident pre- 
vention. $10 '16 Houghton 

Bixby, Henry B. American public health pro- 
tection. *$1.25 '16 Bobbs 

Black, Clementina, ed. Married women's work. 
*2s 6d '15 B. Bell and sons, London 

Blake, Clinton, H., jr. Law of architecture 
and building. *$3 '16 William T. Comstock 
CO., 23 Warren st., N. Y. 

$Blanchard, Arthur H. Elements of highway 
enginering. *$3 '15 Wiley 

Bloomfield, IVIeyer, ed. Readings in vocational 
guidance. $2.25 '15 Ginn 

JBonger, William Adrian. Criminality and eco- 
nomic conditions. (Modern criminal science 
ser) *$5.50 '16 Little 

Bourne, Randolph S. Gary schools. *$1.15 '16 
Houghton 

Brearley, Harry Chase. Fifty years of a civilizing 
force. *$2.50 '16 Stokes 

JBrecklnridge, Sophonlsba P., and Abbott Edith. 
Delinquent child and the home. (Russell Sage 
found.) $2 '16 Survey associates, inc. 

Brown. Harry Gunnison. Transportation rates 
and their regulation. $1.50 '16 Macmillan 

Brown, William Jethro. Underlying principles 
of modern legislation. *$2.25 '15 Dutton 

Burleigh, Louise, and Bierstadt, Edward Hale. 
Punishment: a play in four acts. *$1 16 Holt 

Butler, Nicholas Murray. Meaning of education. 
*$1.50 '15 Scribner 

Cadbury, George Jr. Town planning. *$2.25 '15 
Longmans 

Cahn, Herman. Capital to-day. *$1.50 '15 Put- 
nam 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



List of Books Indexed— Continued 



Carnegie endowment for international peace. 

Yearbook for 1916. The Endowment, 2 Jack- 
son Place. Washing-ton, D. C. 

Carson, William E. Marriage revolt. *$2 '15 
Hearst's int. lib. 

^Carver, Thomas Nixon, comp. Selected read- 
ings in rural economics. $2.80 '16 Ginn 

Chapin, Charles Value. Report on state public 
health work based on a survey of state boards 
of health. '16 Am. medical assn. 

Clapp, Edwin J. Port of Boston. *$2.50 '16 Yale 
univ. press 

Cohen, Julius Henry. Law and order in indus- 
try. $1.50 '16 Macmillan 

Coleman, George W., ed. Democracy in the 
making. *$1.50 '15 Little 

^Commons, John R., and Andrews, John B. Prin- 
ciples of labor legislation. *$2 '16 Harper 

JCubberley, Ellwood P. The Portland survey. 
$1.50 '15 World bk. co. 

JCubberley, Ellwood P, Public school administra- 
tion. *$1.75 '16 Houghton 

Cushing, Harry A. Voting trusts. $1.50 '15 
Macmillan 

:(Dana, John C. Libraries: addresses and es- 
says. 299p $1.80 '16 Wilson 

Davol, Ralph. Handbook of American pagean- 
try. $2.50 '14 Davol pub. CO., Taunton, Mass, 

Dixon, Royal. Americanization. 196p *50c '16 
Macmillan 

Dooley, William H. Education of the ne'er-do- 
well. *60c '16 Houghton 

Doolittle, F. W. Studies in the cost of urban 
transportation service. $3.50 '16 Am. electric 
railway assn., 8 W. 40th st., N. Y. 

Dorion, Eustache Charles Edouard. Redemption 
of the South End, a study of city evangeliza- 
tion. *$1 Abingdon press, 150 5th av., N. Y. 

Elliott, Edward. American government and ma- 
jority rule. *$1.25 '16 Princeton univ. press 

Empire directory of municipal authorities and 
officials and year book of the Sanitary Record 
and Municipa,l Engineering for 1916. 34th an- 
nual issue. $1.40 (duty extra) '16 Sanitary Rec- 
ord and Municipal Engineering, London 

Evans, i^aurice S. Black and white in the 
southern states. 7s 6d '15 Longmans, London 

Fabian, Franklin. Cost of living, *$1 '15 Double- 
day 

Fels, Mary. Joseph Fels: his life-work. *$1 '16 

Huebsch 
Felton, Ralph A. Study of a rural parish: a 

method of survey. '15 Bd. of home missions, 

Presbyterian church of U. S. A., 156 5th av., 

N. Y. 

Field, Jessie, and Nearing, Scott. Community 

civics, il *60c '16 Macmillan 
Fleming, A. P. M., and Pearce, J. P. Principles 

of apprentice training. *3s 6d '16 Longmans 

Floy, Henry. Value for rate-making. *$4 '16 
McGraw 

Folwell, Amory Prescott. Sewerage: the design- 
ing, construction and maintenance of sewerage 
systems. 7th ed rev and enl il *$3 '16 Wiley 

Forbush, Edward Howe. History of the game 
birds, wild fowl and shore birds. 2d ed $1 
Mass. state bd. of agriculture 

Forbush, Edward Howe. Useful birds and their 
- protection. 4th ed. $1 Mass, state bd, of 
agriculture 

Forbush, William Byron. Child study and child 
training. *$1 '15 Scribner 

Fowler Charles N. National issues of 1916. $1.50 
'16 Harper 

Fowler. Nathaniel C, jr. Principle of suffrage. 
*25c; pa *]5c '16 Sully & Kleinteich, 373 4th 
av,. N. Y. 

Gerhard, William Paul. Theatres, 2d ed *$1 '15 
Baker 



Gllbreth, Frank B., and Gilbreth, Lillian M. 

Fatigue study, *$1.50 '16 Sturgis & Walton 
CO., N. Y. 

Gillette, John M. Sociology. *50c '16 McClurg 

Godbille, P. Lymphatic glands in meat-produc- 
ing animals. $2 '15 William R. Jenkins co., 6th 
av. & 48th St., N. Y, 

Goddard, Henry Herbert. Criminal imbecile, 
$1.50 '15 Macmillan 

Goodnow, Frank J. Principles of constitutional 
government. *$2 '16 Harper 

Goodsell, Willystine. History of the family as a 
social and educational institution. *$2 '15 Mac- 
millan 

Gowin, Enoch Burton, and Wheatley, William 
Alonzo. Occupations. $1.20 '16 Ginn 

tGroat, George Gorham. Introduction to the 
study of organized labor in America, *$1.75 
'16 Macmillan 

Groves, Ernest R. Moral sanitation. *50c '16 
Assn press 

Guyer, IVlichael F. Being well-born. *$1 '16 
Bobbs 

Haines, Lynn. Your congress. $1.15; pa 65c '15 

Nat. voters' league, Washington, D. C. 
tHart, Albert Bushneii. Monroe doctrine. f$1.75 

'16 Little 
Haynes, Fred E. Third party movements since 

the civil war with special reference to Iowa. 

$2.50 '16 State hist. soc. of Iowa, Iowa City 
Hayden, James Raynor. Venereal diseases, 4tb 

ed rev *$2.50 '16 Lea 
Hebble, Charles R., and Goodwin, Frank P. 

Citizens' book. *$1.25 '16 Stewart & Kidd com- 
pany, Cincinnati 
Hedges, Anna Charlotte. Wage worth of school 

training. $2 '15 Teachers college 
Hemenway, Henry Bixby. American public 

health protection. *$1.25 '16 Bobbs 
Hepburn, A. Barton. History of currency in the 

United States. $2.50 '15 Macmillan 
Hill, David Jayne. Americanism. *$1.25 '16 Ap- 

pleton 
Hill, Hibbert Winslow. New public health. *$1.25 

'16 Macmillan 
Hill, John Philip. Federal executive, *$2 '16 

Houghton 
Hinchman, Walter S. American school. *$1 '16 

Doubleday 

Hoare, H. J. Old age pensions. *3s 6d '15 King 
Hollopeter, W. C. Hay-fever, its prevention and 

cure. *$1.25 '16 Funk 
IHolmes, Fred L. Regulation of railroads and 

public utilities in Wisconsin. *$2 '15 Appleton 

$Howe, Frederic C. Socialized Germany. *$1.50 '15 
Scribner 

Hoxie, Robert Franklin. Scientific management 
and labor. *$1.50 '15 Appleton 

H udders, E. R. Indexing and filing. $3 post- 
paid '16 Ronald press co., 20 Vesey st„ N. Y. 

tHuebner, Grover G. Agricultural commerce, *$2 

'15 Appleton 
Hutch ins, B. L. Women in modern industry. 

$1.25 '15 Macmillan 
Hutchinson, Woods. Community hygiene. *60c 

'16 Houghton 

Ingram, John Kells. History of political econ- 
omy. '*$1.75 '16 Macmillan 

tJessup, Walter A. Teaching staff. 25c '16 Sur- 
vey com., Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 

tJohnsen, Julia E., comp. Unemployment, *$1 '15 

Wilson 
Johnson, William E. Liquor problem in Russia, 

$1 '15 Am. issue pub. co., Westerville, O. 

Kelior, Frances A. Out of work. $1.50 '16 

Putnam 
Kelior, Frances A. Straight America: a call to 
national service, 50c '16 Macmillan 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 
List of Books Indexed— Continued 



Kennedy, May, comp. Question manual, *$1 

'15 Whitcomb & B. 
Kinne, Helen. Equipment for teaching- domestic 

science. *80c '16 Wliitcomb & Barrows 

Kittredge, Mabel Hyde. Second course in home- 
making. *80c '15 Century 

Klein, Henry H. Bankrupting a great city. 75c; 
pa 40c '15 Henry H. Klein, Tribune bldg., N. Y. 

Koren, John. Alcohol and society. *$1.25 '16 
Holt 

Krijger, Fritz- Konrad. Government and poli- 
tics of the German empire. $1.20 '15 World 
bk. CO. 

Kuhne, Frederick. Finger print instructor. $2 
'16 Munn & co., inc., N. Y, 

Lambert, W. A. Religious education and For 
the healing of the church *75c '15 Badger, 
R: G., 194-200 Boylston St., Boston 

ILapp, John A., and Mote, Carl H. Learning to 
earn. *$1.50 '15 Bobbs 

Lavis, Fred. Building the new rapid transit sys- 
ten of New York city; Design of the new ele- 
vated railway lines, by M. E. Griest. *$1.50 '15 
McGraw 

Leavitt, Frank Mitchell, and Brown, Edith. Pre- 
vocational education in the public schools. 
*$1.10 '15 Houghton 

Le Prince, Joseph A., and others. Mosquito con- 
trol in Panama. *$2.50 '16 Putnam 

Lewis, Nelson P. Planning of the modern city. 
*$3.50 '16 Wiley 

Lockwood, J. H. Creation of wealth. *$1 '15 
Bobbs 

Lutz. R. R. Metal trades. 25c '16 Survey com., 
Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 

Lyie, William Thomas. Parks and park engi- 
neering. *$1.25 '16 Wiley 

JLyon, T. Lyttleton, and others. Soils. *$1.75 '15 
Macmillan 

JMabie, Edward Charles, ed. University debaters' 
annual, 1914-1915. *$1.80 '15 Wilson 

McBain, Howard Lee. Law and the practice of 
municipal home rule. $5 '16 Columbia univ. 
press 

MacBrayne, Lewis E., and Ramsay, James P. 
One more chance. *$1.50 '16 Small 

Macauley, Ward. Reclaiming the ballot. *75c 
'16 DufHeld and company. N. Y. 

McClure, Wallace, State constitution-making, 
n p '16 Marshall & Bruce co., Nashville, Tenn. 

McCrimmon, A. L. Woman movement. *$1 '15 
Gri^th & Rowland press 

Mackaye, Percy. New citizenship. 50c '15 Mac- 
millan 

JMacNutt, J. Scott. Manual for health officers, 
*$3 '15 Wiley 

Macy, Jesse, and Gannaway, John W. Compara- 
tive free government. '"$2.25 '15 Macmillan 

Marden, Orison Swett. Woman and home. *$1.25 
'15 Crowell 

Martin, John, and Martin, Prestonia Mann. 
Feminism. *$1.50 '16 Dodd 

Maxcy, Carroll Lewis. Brief, with selections for 
briefing. *$1.25 '16 Houghton 

Mead, Daniel W. Water power engineering. 2d 
ed *$5 '15 McGraw-Hill book co., inc., 239 W. 
39th St., N. Y. 

Miller, Herbert Adolphus. School and the immi- 
grant. 25c '16 Survey com., Cleveland found., 
Cleveland, O. 

Morgan, Dick T. Land credits. *$1.50 '15 
Crowell 

tMote, Carl H. Industrial arbitration. *$1.50 '16 
Bobbs 

Moulton. Harold G. Principles of money and 
banking. *$3 '16 Univ, of Chicago press 

iiMunro, William Bennett. Bibliography of mu- 
nicipal government in the U, S, •$2.50 '15 Har- 
vard univ. press 



iMunro, William Bennett. Principles and meth- 
ods of municipal administration. $2.25 '16 Mac- 
millan 

Nassau, Mabel Louise. Old age poverty in 
Greenwich village, 60c '15 Revell 

^National association for the study and preven- 
tion of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis directory: 
containing a list of institutions, associations 
and other agencies dealing with tuberculosis 
in the United States and Canada. 60c '16 The 
Assn., 105 E. 22d st., N, Y, 

Nearing, Scott. Anthracite. *$1 '15 Winston 

New international year book, 1915; ed. by F, M. 
Colby. $5 '16 Dodd 

tNolen, John, ed. City planning. *$2 il '16 Apple- 
ton 

Northend, Mary H. Remodelled farmhouses, *$5 
'15 Little 

Oliver, Sir Thomas. Occupations from the social 
hygiene and medical points of view. (Cam- 
bridge public health ser) *$1.80 '16 Putnam 
Orr, Fred B. District heating. $3 '15 Am City 
Osborne, Thomas Mott. Society and prisons, 
*$1.35 '16 Yale univ. press 

Parmelee, Maurice. Poverty and social progress. 
*$1.75 '16 Macmillan 

Parsons, Sara E. Nursing problems and obliga- 
tions. *$1 '16 Whitcomb & Barrows 

Payne, George Henry. Child in human progress. 
*$2.50 '16 Putnam 

Penman, John Simpson. Poverty the challenge 
to the church. *$1 '15 Pilgrim press 

Phelps, Edith M., comp. Selected articles on the 
Monroe doctrine. 2d and enl ed *$1 '16 Wilson 

Phelps, Edith M., comp. Selected articles on 
woman suffrage. 3d ed rev (Debaters' hand- 
book ser) 274p *$1 '16 Wilson 

tPigou, A. C. Unemployment, *50c '15 Holt 

JPIehn, Carl C. Government finance in the 
United States. *50c '15 McClurg 

Porter, Tilla Boyce. Parliamentary law simpli- 
fied. 50c '15 Mrs. C: E. Porter, 44 Northfield 
av., Cleveland, O. 

Post, Louis F. Taxation of land values, il 5th 
ed *$1 '15 Bobbs 

Ralph, Georgia G. Elements of record keeping 
for child-helping organizations. $1.50 '15 
Survey associates, inc. 

Rankin, M. T. Arbitration and conciliation in 
Australasia, n p '16 Allen and Unwin, London 

Rapeer, Louis Win. Educational hygiene. *$2.25 
'15 Scribner 

Raymond, William L. American and foreign in- 
vestment bonds. *$3 '16 Houghton 

Reely, Mary Katharine, comp. Selected articles 
on world peace. 2d ed enl '*$1 '16 Wilson 

Rice, Joseph Mayer. People's government. *$1 
'15 Winston 

Riley, William Zebina. Trusts, pools and cor- 
porations. (Selections and documents in eco- 
nomics) rev ed *$2.75 '16 Ginn 

Rindsfoos, Charles Siesel. Purchasing. *$2 '15 
McGraw-Hill book co., inc., 239 W. 39th St., 
N. Y, 

Robbins, E. C, comp. Socialism. *$1 '15 Wil- 
son 

tRobinson, Charles Muiford. City planning. $2.50 
'16 Putnam 

Robinson, Ernest F. Military preparedness and 
the engineer, il $1.50 '16 Clark 

Russell, William F. Economy in secondslry edu- 
cation, 35c '16 Houghton 

Sailers, Carl Adolphus. Principles of deprecia- 
tion. $2.50 '15 Ronald 

Sanders, W. S. Trade unionism in Germany, 
n p '16 Fabian soc, London 

Sayers, W. C. Berwick. Canons of classifica- 
tion. *2s 6d '15 Grafton & co., Coptic House, 
8 Coptic St., London, W. C, 



8 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



List of Books Indexed — Continued 



Schroeder, Theodore. Free speech for radicals. 
$1.50 '16 Hillacre bookhouse, Riverside, Conn.; 
Free speech league. 56 E. 59th st., N. Y. 

Scott, William A. Money and banking. 5th ed 
12 '16 Holt 

Seaton, Roy A. Concrete construction for rural 
communities. *|2 postpaid '16 McGraw 

Sellars, R. W. Next step in democracy. $1.50 '16 
Macmillan 

Shaw, Frank L. Printing trades. 25c '16 Sur- 
vey com., Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 

SIdis, Boris. .Causation and treatment of psy- 
chopathic diseases. *$2.40 '16 Badger 

Slingerland. William H. Child welfare work in 
California. $1.50 '15 Dept. of child-helping, 
Russell Sage found. 

Slingerland, William H. Child welfare work in 
Pennsylvania. $2 '15 Russell Sage found 

Smith, J. Russell. Elements of industrial man- 
agement. *$2 '15 Lippincott 

Smith, Stephen. Who is insane? $1.25 '16 Mac- 
millan 

fSnedden, David, and others. Vocational educa- 
tion: its theory, administration and practice. 
•$1.20 (c '10-'12) *15 Houghton 

Sparks, Frank M. Business of government: mu- 
nicipal. *$1.25 '16 Rand 

Splngarn, Arthur B. Laws relating to sex mo- 
rality in New York city. 60c '16 Century 

Stone, Harlan F. Law and its administration. 
•$1.50 '15 Lemcke 

$Strelghtoff, Frances Doan, and Streightoff, 
Frank Hatch. Indiana: a social and eco- 
nomic survey. $1.25 '16 W. K. Stewart co., 
Indianapolis 

Taylor, Arthur O. Persistent public problems. 

•$2 '16 Scientific standard service, Boston, 

Mass. 
Taylor, Graham Romeyn. Satellite cities, il $1.65 

N '15 Nat. munic. league 

Terman, Lewis M. Measurement of intelligence 
•$1.50 '16 Houghton 

t Books have been analyzed. 



Twyford, Henry Beaumont. Purchasing, il *$3 

'15 Van Nostrand 
Van Cleve, Charles M. Principles of double-entry 

bookkeeping. $1.50 '13 Charles M. Van Cleve, 

46 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Waid, Lillian D. House on Henry street. ♦$2 

'15 Holt 
Wailing, William English, and others. Socialism 

of to-day. *$1.60 '16 Holt 
Watson, Wilbur Jay. General specifications for 

concrete bridges. *$1 '16 McGraw 
Weeks, Arland D. Avoidance of fires. *60c *16 

Heath 
Weld, L. D. H. Marketing of farm products. 

$1.50 '16 Macmillan 
Wlckersham, George W. Changing order. *$1.25 

'14 Putnam 
Williams, Henry Smith.- Luther Burbank: his 

life and work. *$2.50 '15 Hearst's 
Willis, Henry Parker. American banking. $2 

'16 LaSalle extension univ., Chicago 
Willis, Henry Parker. Federal reserve. *$1 '15 

Doubleday 
Wilson, Elizabeth. Fifty years of association 

work among young women. $1.35; library bind- 
ing $1.60 '16 Nat. bd. of the young women's 

Christian associations of the U. S. A., 600 

Lexington av., N. Y. 
Witmer, LIghtner. Nearing case. *50c '15 

Huebsch 

Woodson, Carter Godwin. Education of the 
negro prior to 1861. $2 '15 Putnam 

Wright, Henry C The American city. *50c '16 
McClurg 

JWymond, IVIark. Railroad valuation and rates. 
$1.50 '16 Wymond & Clark, 909 Rand-McNally 
bldg., Chicago 

JYear-book of wireless telegraphy and telephony, 

1915. Marconi pub. corporation, 450 4th av., 

N. Y. 
Young, Arthur Nichols. Single tax movement 

in the U. S. *$1.50 '16 Princeton univ. press 
JZuebiin, Charles. American municipal progress, 
$2 '16 Macmillan 



Public Affairs Information Service 

Annual Cumulation of printed Bulletins issued October, 1915, to October, 1916 



Abattoirs 

Modern abattoirs: fine buildings at Newcastle. 
Building (17 Grosvenor st., Sydney, Austra- 
lia) V 17 no 102 p 135-43 F 12 '16 Is 
[Statutory regulation of slaughterhouses: case- 
note to Noe V. Mayor, etc.] Ann Gas 1915C 
245 
Abattoirs, IVIunicipal 

• Municipal abattoir. N Y State Bur Municipal 

Information Rept no 1& 9p O 9 '15 (Typew 45c) 
Discusses inspection and by-products of 
slaughterhouses, municipal plants, and pri- 
vately owned, municipally controlled plants. 
Describes the plants at Paris, Tex.; Grand 
Forks, N. D.; Greenville, S. C.; Nashville, 
Tenn.; and North Yakima, Wash. 
Municipal abattoir at Baton Rouge. Munic J 
40:612-13 My 4 '16 

Bibliography 

Municipal markets and abattoirs. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 288-93 '15 
Ability tax 

Ability, or presumptive income, tax; Income 
tax; Draft of law for income tax. In N. Y. 
(state). Joint legislative com. on taxation. 
Report, p 161-8, 184-206, 215-34 '16 

Ability or presumptive income tax: majority 
report; Bill for ability or presumptive income 
tax. In N. Y. (city). Com. on taxation. 
Final report, p 85-99. 379-91 '16 

Committee recommends that if a state in- 
come tax dees not prove feasible, an ability 
tax, consisting of a habitation tax, an occu- 
pation tax, and a salaries tax, be adopted for 
the city 
Ability tests 

Chart of mental examinations; with discussion. 
Maud Merrill. Minn Bd of Control Quar 15:72- 
8 N '15 

Clinical psychology in its relation to the 
school and to social medicine: a suggestion 
for an active affiliation. J. V: Haberman. 
Medical Record (51 5th av., N. Y. 15c) 88: 
861-4 N 20 '15 
♦—Same. Reprinted. 12p '15 J. V. Haberman, 60 
W. 85th St., N. Y. 

Educational laboratory. In New Orleans (La.). 
Public schools. Annual report, 1913-1914, p 
95-106 

• Eleven mental tests standardized. (Eugenics 

and social welfare bul 5) 87p il Je 1 '15 Bur. 
of analysis and investigation, N. Y. state 
bd. of charities 
In reply to Dr. J. B. W. Wallin's article 
"Who is feeble-minded?" Samuel Kohs. Un- 
graded 1:165-71 Mr '16 

• Intellectual status of children who are public 

charges. J. D. Stenquist and others. (Arch- 
ives of psychology no 33) 52p il 50c; cloth 
75c S '15 Science press. Sub-station 84, N. Y. 
Columbia university contributions to phil- 
osophy and psychology v. 24, no. 2 

• Intelligence examination and evaluation, and a 

new intelligence examination sheet. J. V. 
Haberman. 16p-t-l sheet '15 J. V. Haber- 
man, 60 W. 85th St., N. Y. 

Reprinted from Journal of the American 
Medical Association, July 31, 1915, v. 65 p. 
399-404 
Legal problems and mental abnormality: some 
fundamentals. William Healy. Case & Com 
22:990-2 My '16 



*' Measurement of intelligence: an explanation 
of and a complete guide for the use of the 
Stanford revision and extension of the Binet- 
Simon intelligence scale. L. M. Terman. 
362p *$1.50 '16 Houghton 

Sets forth large importance for public ed- 
ucation of a careful measurement of the 
intelligence of children, and describes the 
tests which are to be given and the entire 
procedure of giving them 
Memory tests of school children: memory span 
of 1,585 white school children (751 boys, 834 
girls) in the city of X. C. W. Stiles. U S 
Pub Health Repts 30:3738-45 D 24 '15 

* Mental examination of juvenile delinquents. 

T: H. Haines. (Pub no 7) 15p D '15 Ohio 

bd. of administration 
Mental laboratory in the juvenile court. G: F. 

Austin. In Southern sociological congress. 

New chivalry: health; proceedings, 1915, p 

233-43 
Mental survey of the Ohio state school for the 

blind. T: H. Haines, charts Ohio Bd of Ad- 
ministration Pub no 9 24p Ja '16 

* New scale of mental and physical measure- 

ments for adolescents, and some of its uses. 
H. T. Wooley. 32p '15 Cincinnati, O., voca- 
tion bur. 

Reprint from November, 1915, Journal of 
Educational Psychology 
New way of measuring mental ability: study- 
ing the psychology of the individual. A. M. 
Jungmann. il Sci Am S 80:140-1 Ag 28 '15 

* Practicability of the Binet scale and the ques- 

tion of the borderline case. S: C. Kohs, 
Chicago House of Correction Research Dept 
Bul no 3 (Psychopathic dept ser no 2) 23p N 
'15 15c 

Psychological basis for the diagnosis of feeble- 
mindedness. Rudolf Pinter and D. G. Pater- 
son, bibl charts J Crim Law 7:32-55 My '16 

Use of mental tests in vocational guidance. 
G. M. Whipple. Ann Am Acad 65:193-204 
My '16 

Who is feeble-minded? J. E. W. Wallin. Un- 
graded 1:105-13 Ja '16; Same. J Crim Law 6: 
707-16 Ja '16 

The first of a series of articles bearing upon 
the applicability of psychological methods of 
diagnosis to delinquents, both juvenile and 
adult. Points out that there are various de- 
grees of mental defect and warns against 
careless conclusions drawn from Binet tests 

Who is feeble-minded? S: C. Kohs. J Crim Law 
6:860-71 Mr '16 

A reply to an article by Dr. J. E. W. 
Wallin in the January, 1916, issue criticising 
the Binet tests 

—Same. Ungraded 1:165-72 Mr '16 

Who is feeble-minded: a reply to Mr. Kohs. 
J. E. W. Wallin. J Crim Law 7:56-78 My '16 

Who is feeble-minded? A rejoinder and a re- 
buttal. S. C. Kohs. J Crim Law 7:219-26 Jl 
'16 

See also Crime and criminals — Laborato- 
ries; Mental hygiene 

Reports 
Report of mental examinations of 202 persons 
under the care of the N. Y. probation and 
protective assn. during the year 1913-1914. 
F: W. Ellis. In N. Y. probation and protec- 
tive assn. Report, 1914, p 37-41 



10 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Abortion Legislation, Comparative 

• Digest of the laws of the several states rela- 

tive to the subject of abortion and birth re- 
porting. G. M. Sherwood, comp.. R. I. leg. 
ref. bur. 46p My '16 (Typew B $2.30) 
Abortion, Infectious. See Cattle— Abortion, In- 
fectious 

Kansas state troops will be allowed to vote at 
the August primary as well as the November 
presidential election. The privilege was ac- 
corded by a special state law during the 
Philippine war. Both New York and New 
Jersey are confronted with the same prob- 
lem. Both constitutions provide that in time 
of war no elector shall be deprived of his 
vote, but what action can be taken if state 
of war does not exist is the question. Spe- 
cial sessions of the legislatures are contem- 
plated (Jl '16) , . . . 

Missouri— Application for an early decision on 
the legality of the absentee voter law passed 
by the last legislature has been filed with the 
supreme court in connection with the Meyer 
vs. Straughan case, in which Judge Ranney 
decided that the law applied only to St. Louis 
and St. Louis county. This decision elected 
Straughan, county judge, after Meyer had 
first been elected (Press rept D 16 '15) 

Virgina— Absent voters' bill, advocated by the 
Travellers' protective assn., has been passed 
by the legislature. The bill provides that 
any qualified elector, who is away from his 
precinct on election day, may vote by regis- 
tered mail (Mr 11 '16) 

• Voting in the field: a forgotten chapter of the 

civil war. J. H: Benton. 332p il map $3.50 
'15 W. B. Clarke Co.. 26 Tremont St., Boston 

Legislation, Comparative 
[Legislative note on] absent voting. F. G. 
Bates. Am Pol Sci R 10:114-15 F '16 

Legislation, Proposed 

British Columbia — Provincial legislature has 
passed a referendum measure granting suf- 
frage to all men over eighteen years of age 
serving with the overseas forces, which will 
be submitted to the voters at the general 
election, September, 1916 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Law permitting absent vot- 
ing is limited to registered voters who, on 
account of their business are absent from 
the city on election day. Many requests 
have been made to the city election commis- 
sion for ballots to vote by mail from per- 
sons prevented by sickness from going to the 
polls; although the commission is in favor 
of granting the privilege, it cannot do so 
because no such provision was made in the 
law by the legislature (Mr 26 '16) 

Minnesota — Law providing that a voter may 
cast his vote from any state in the union, 
if he is obliged to be away from home on 
election day, is to be presented to the next 
legislature. The proposed act requires the 
voter to register before leaving home, but 
if he cannot be home for election, he makes 
an affidavit to that effect and receives an 
official ballot which he marks and sends 
back to the precinct in which he lives. The 
law also permits him to cast his ballot in 
the same way 15 days before leaving home 
(My 7 '16) 

Reports 

• Massachusetts. Sec. of the commonwealth and 

attorney general. Report relative to the feas- 
ibility and desirability of permitting ab- 
sentee voting in the elections of the com- 
monwealth. (House no 430) 9p postage Ic 
Ja '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

Academic fees. See Colleges and universities — 
Fees 

Academic freedom 

Academic freedom. J: M. Gilette. School and 
Son 2:873-9 D 18 '15 

Academic freedom. V. D. Scudder. Cent 92: 
222-30 Je '16 

Discusses the question from the stand- 
point of the professor, the governing board, 
and the parent 

Academic freedom and status. J: M. Mecklln. 
School and Soc 3:624-30 Ap 29 '16 



Demands of the professors' union for protec- 
tion and academic freedom. Current Opinion 
(134 W. 29th St., N. Y.) 60:192-3 Mr '16 25c 

* Nearing case: the limitation of academic free- 

dom at the University of Pennsylvania by 
act of the board of trustees, June 14, 1915; 
a brief of facts and opinions. Lightner 
Witmer, prof., Univ. of Pa. 123p *50c '15 
Huebsch 

* Trustees and faculties. E: P. Cheyney. School 

and Soc 2:793-806 D 4 '15 

See also Colleges and universities — Adminis- 
tration 

Reports 
General report of the committee on academic 
freedom and academic tenure [of the Ameri- 
can assn. of univ. professors]. Am Pol Sci R 
V 10 no 2 pt 2 29p My '16 

This committee included in its membership 
the joint committee of nine appointed by the 
Am. pol. sci. assn., Am. econ. assn., and Am. 
sociological assn. 

* Report of the committee of the American as- 

sociation of university professors on aca- 
demic freedom and academic tenure. School 
and Soc 3:109-21 Ja 22 '16; Same. Am 
Econ R 6:sup 230-46 Mr '16 

The Association held its annual meeting 
Dec. 31, 1915-Jan. 1. 1916 
Accident insurance. See Insurance, Liability; 
Workmen's compensation 

Accidents 

* Conservation of life; holocaust of child life in 

the home; a record of the dead, a lesson for 
the living. (Special bul) 16p My '16 Public 
safety comm. of Chicago and Cook county, 
10 S. La Salle st,, Chicago 

See also Electric plants. Central — Safety 
devices; Electric railroads — Accidents; 
Elevators; Employers' liability; Mines — Acci- 
dents; Motor trucks — Fenders; Moving 
picture theaters; Railroads — Accidents; Rail- 
roads — Trespass; Street railroads — Acci- 
dents; Workmen's compensation 

Legislation, Comparative 
Summary of laws relating to accidents and 
safety provisions under the jurisdiction of 
public service commissions. U S Bur Stand 
Circ no 56 p 227-41 Jl 28 '16 

Prevention 

Building managers assn. of N. Y. estimates 
that it would cost $2,600,000 to install inter- 
locks in passenger elevators, as contained in 
the tentative new building code. President 
Martin of the association suggests the fol- 
lowing rules, which he thinks would prevent 
more accidents than the interlocks, if 
strictly enforced: Operators are forbidden to 

(1) carry more than ? passengers on car, 

(2) start car until gates are properly closed 
and locked, (3) open gates until car is sta- 
tionary, (4) return car to floor after leaving 
same. (5) converse with passengers, unless 
as business requires, (6) stop, unless on 
signal (N 13 '15) 

* Chicago and Cook county public safety comm. 

Annual report presented at the 2d annual 
meeting of the commission held at the City 
club, Sept. 28, 1915. 17p '15 Pub. safety 
comm. of Chicago and Cook co., 10 S. La 
Salle St., Chicago 

* Chicago and Cook county public safety comm. 

Statement of plan of extended activities, 
lip '15 Pub. safety comm. of Chicago and 
Cook CO., 10 S. La Salle St., Chicago 

Public safety. H. W. Newman. In League of 
American municipalities. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 53-5 '16 

Public safety commission of Chicago: remark- 
able work and success follows its creation 
three years ago. Chicago Republican (Chica- 
go, 111.) 6:4 Ap 22 '16 5c 

Safety first federation of America (6 E. 39th 
St. N. Y.) was organized in New York city, 
Feb. 25, 1915. The plan and scope adopted 
by the board of directors is as follows: to 
co-ordinate the work of the many public 
safety bodies in a strong national organi- 
zation, through which local activities can 
be expedited and extended assuring greater 
efficiency in effecting results. It will serve 
as a clearing house for ideas and sugges- 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



11 



Accidents — Prevention — Continued 

tions, collection of information, compilation 
of statistics, distribution of literature, and 
for advice and counsel regarding the best 
safety measures for general adoption. It 
will endeavor to secure the enactment and 
enforcement of laws designed to insure 
such safety, to bring about uniformity of 
laws and regulations on the subject among 
the several cities and states, to secure the 
construction and maintenance of good roads, 
to establish and maintain exhibits of safety 
devices and methods, and to define a com- 
prehensive educational campaign for public 
instruction. A uniform lecture course for 
public schools on safeiy precautions will be 
provided and a safety first text book will 
be compiled 
See also Doors, Revolving; Explosives 

Conferences 

National exposition of safety and sanitation 
under the auspices of the American museum 
of safety. New York, May 22-27, 1916. Bal- 
timore and Ohio ry. occupied a large space 
in the exhibit bringing out the historic facts 
that America's first railroad was also the 
first to adopt the things which made for bet- 
ter transportation service and the first to 
organize a department of safety. W. H. 
Tolman, sec, 14 W. 24th st., N. Y. 

Safety first federation of America. Convention 
in Cincinnati, April 20. 1916. Uniform sys- 
tem of signs and signals for the regulation 
of street traffic held an important place on 
the program 

* Safety first federation of America. Report of 

proceedings [of the] first annual conven- 
tion, Detroit, Mich., Oct. 19-20, 1915. 132p 
'15 Frederick H. Elliott, executive sec, 6 E. 
39th St., N. Y. 

* Safety first federation of America. Transpor- 

tation com. Report of the proceedings of the 
meeting held at the headquarters of the 
federation, .Tulv 13, 1915. 29p '15 The Feder- 
ation, 6 E. 39th St., N. Y. 

Exhibitions 

National exposition safety and health held 
under auspices of the American museum of 
safety, New York, May 22-27, 1916 

Safety first exhibition was held in "Washington 
by the U. S. government, Feb. 21-27, 1916. 
It showed what the various government de- 
partments and other organizations are doing 
in the Safety first movement and in instruct- 
ing the public in the essentials of the move- 
ment. The work was explained by demon- 
strations, charts, models and statistics. 
The public manifested such an interest that 
the government decided to send the exhibit 
on a three months tour, leaving Washington 
May 1, 1916. Twenty-seven federal bureaus, 
the American red cross and the police de- 
partment of the District of Columbia ar- 
ranged exhibits of their safety first work. 
President Willard of the Baltimore and Ohio 
railroad offered a complete train of 12 steel 
cars for free transportation of the exposi- 
tion over his road, and other railroads assis- 
ted in the same way. The train first visited 
Philadelphia, different cities in Pa., Del., Md., 
and W. Va., before starting farther west 
where it was switched to other trunk line 
railroads to complete its tour 

Accidents, industrial 
On the relation of accident frequency to busi- 
ness activity. A. H. Mowbray and S. B. 
Black. Econ World n s 11:795-7 Je 17 '16 

See also Employers' liability; Mines — Acci- 
dents; Quarries and quarrying; Workmen's 
compensation 

Ciassificatlon* 

Classification of hazardous occupations. E. R. 

Hayhurst. Am J Pub Health 6:460-» My '16 

Read before the vital statistics section of 

the Am. public health assn., Rochester, 

N. Y., Sept. 8, 1915 

Conferences 

* Industrial accident prevention conference. Ad- 

dresses and discussions at the meeting held 
in the hall of the house of representatives, 



State capitol, Harrisburg, Pa., March 23, 1916. 
Pa Dept Labor Industry Monthly Bui v 3 
no 5 66d Mv '16 

Contains the following addresses: Address 
by Governor Brumbaugh; Address by Com- 
missioner J: P. Jackson; Labor's share in 
reducing accidents, by Samuel Gompers, 
president of the Am. federation of labor; Ac- 
cident prevention from the view point of 
the railroad company, by L. F. Loree, presi- 
dent of the D. & H. R. R. co.; Hazards of 
the steel industry and their prevention, by 
J. T. McCleary, sec. Am. iron and steel 
institute; Railroad accidents and their pre- 
vention, by W: C. Wilson; Mine accidents 
and their prevention, by Van Manning 

First aid 

Seattle, Wash. — Amendment has been proposed 
to the charter which would require an em- 
ployer to render first aid to his injured em- 
ployees; such an amendment would mean 
that an employer pay hospital and physi- 
cian fees (D 31 '15) 

Individual industries 

Report on a hundred accidents in the paper 
box industry of Greater New York. M. S. 
Orenstein. In N. Y. (state). Factory inves- 
tigating comm. Fourth report, 1915, v 2 p 
271-300 

See also Accidents. Industrial — Prevention 
— Individual industries; Accidents, Industrial 
—Statistics 

Prevention 

American meat packers assn., at its conven- 
tion held in St. Louis, Mo., Oct., 1915, dis- 
cussed methods of preventing industrial acci- 
dents and minimizing their cost. Safety 
committees in every department of the pack- 
ing industry, transportation of meats by 
motor trucks, with careful attention paid to 
the actual cost of transporting meats, and 
the installation of a scientific schedule of 
routes and work hours, to maintain a high 
standard of efficiency were strongly urged. 
It was estimated that accidents cost the in- 
dustry $700,000 a year (O 12 '15) 

Attitude of the employer towards accident 
prevention and workmen's compensation; 
with discussion. W. H. Cameron. Am Soc 
Mech Eng J (29 W. 39th st., N. Y.) 38:287-9 
Ap '16 10c 

Abstract of paper presented at the Annual 
meeting of the American society of mechan- 
ical engineers, N. Y., Dec. 7-10, 1915 

* — Same. Reprinted, without discussion. 10c 

Cost of accidents greatly reduced by methods 
adopted at some plants and discussed at 
meeting of Am. society of mechanical engi- 
neers. Iron Trade R (Penton bldg., Cleve- 
land, O.) 57:1195-8 D 16 '15 15c 

* General orders on safety. Wis Industrial Comm 

Bui Ag 1 '15 19p 

Contains orders on ssifety common to all 
industries 

* Industrial accident prevention, charts N Y 

Labor Special Bui no 77 54p '16 

Investigation of the accident experiences 
of a number of manufacturers and public 
service corporations to ascertain whether or 
not any of the employers in N. Y. state are 
reducing their accidents and, if so, what 
means they are employing, together with 
study of recent safety literature especially 
bulletins published by the establishments 
visited and the proceedings of- the Nat. 
safety council for 1915 

* Industrial accident prevention. D. S. Beyer. 

421p il $10 '16 Houghton 

Sums up and standardizes the methods and 
appliances that have proved themselves best, 
explains them in detail and makes them 
graphic by more than 600 photographs. Dis- 
cusses the question under the following 
headings: General phases of the accident 
problem; Building construction and arrange- 
ment; Power generation and distribution; 
Machine construction and arrangement, etc.; 
Special industries; Fire hazard; Explosion 
hazard; Personal elements 



12 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Accidents, Industrial— Prevention— Contrnwed 
Modern movement for safety from standpoint 
of manufacturer; with discussion. M. W. 
Mix. Am Soc Mech Eng J (29 W. 39th St., 
N. Y.) 38:285-7 Ap '16 35c 

Abstract of paper presented at the annual 
meeting of the American society of mechan- 
ical engineers, N. Y., Dec. 7-10, 1915 
* — Same. Keprinted, without discussion. 10c 
National electric light assn. Convention, Chi- 
cago, May 23-26. 1916. Martin J. Insull pre- 
sented a plan for a safety campaign in 
electrical plants. He would have employers 
take all precautions to have dangerous 
machinery safeguarded, and eliminate un- 
safe methods of operation; they should dis- 
tribute printed instructions among employ- 
ees, appoint an officer to investigate all 
accidents in order to prevent others. Com- 
mittees from the various departments should 
be organized to report on hazardous con- 
ditions, present recommendations for bet- 
terment, and keep the individual men 
interested 
Standardization of safety principles; with dis- 
cussion. C. M. Hansen, il Am Soc Mech Eng 
J (29 W. 39th St., N. Y.) 38:277-84 Ap '16 35c 
Abstract of paper presented at the annual 
meeting of the American society of mechan- 
ical engineers. N. Y., Dec. 7-10, 1915 
— Same. Reprinted, without discussion. 20c 
. Symposium on industrial safety [at annual 
meeting of Am. soc. mech. engrs.]. Iron Age 
96:1418-19 D 16 '15 

• Wisconsin's movement for industrial safety. 

Wis Industrial Comm Bui My 1 '15 ]4p 

Bibliography 

• Books and periodicals on accident and disease 

prevention in industry in the library of the 
bureau of labor statistics. 23p '16 U. S. bur. 
of labor statistics 

Conferences 
Accident prevention conference, Harrisburg, 
Pa., March 23, 1916. L. F. Laree, president of 
the Delaware and Hudson road, urged anti- 
trespassing laws to cut down railroad fatal- 
ities, and J: H. Maurer, president of the 
state federation of labor praised the de- 
velopment of laws in the interest of labor. 
A resolution was adopted calling for the 
education of workmen and the cooperation 
of safety organizations in carrying on the 
state-wide movement for the elimination of 
accidents 

• Papers on accident prevention read at round 

table conferences during 1st annual indus- 
trial safety exposition of Ohio, held under 
auspices of industrial commission, at Colum- 
bus, Jan. 13-16, 1915. il Ohio Industrial 
Comm Safety Bui v 2 no 3 80p Mr 1 '15 

Expositions 

• Second annual industrial safety exposition of 

Ohio and safety conferences, under auspices 
of the industrial commission of Ohio, at 
Cleveland, Ohio. Jan. 22-29, 1916. Program. 
16p '16. Ohio industrial comm. 

Round tables were held on various phases 
of the problem, demonstrations of life sav- 
ing devices and safety motion pictures were 
given 

Individual industries 

• Proposed rules relating to steel mills. 14p '15 

Dept. of workshops and factories, Ohio in- 
dustrial comm. 

Contains: proposed safety standards for 
by-product coke ovens: code of safety rules 
for blast furnaces, docks, ore storage yards, 
and other equipment pertaining to the man- 
ufacture of pig iron, and for the Bessemer 
department of steel plants; safety rules ap- 
plying to open hearth, crucible, and electric 
furnace practice; proposed safety standards 
for blooming, billet, plate, bar and mechani- 
cally operated mills, hand operated merchant 
and rod mills; code of safety rules for pipe 
mills, wire mills, sheet and tin mills, tinning 
and galvanizing; proposed code of safety 
rules for puddling mills, busheling or scrap 
furnaces 
—Same. Iron Age 97:546-8 Mr 2 '16 



* Safety in stone quarrying. Oliver Bowles, il 

U S Bur Mines Tech Pa no 111 48p '15 
State adopts foundry regulations: a compre- 
hensive and carefully prepared set of rules 
for the operation of foundries in the state of 
Pennsylvania, compiled by the industrial 
board. Iron Trade Review (Cleveland, O.) 
58:240-1 Ja 27 '16 15c 

These rules are similar to rules adopted by 
the N. Y. industrial comm. 

See also Accidents, Industrial — Statistics 
Information bureaus 
Bureau of information, including a library 
made up practically of all safety material 
published thruout the country, has been 
developed and placed at the command of the 
National safety council. A. T. Morey, pres., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Legislation, Comparative 
[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] 
accidents and diseases. Am Labor Leg R 5: 
639-78 D '15 
Safety and health. In J: R. Commons and 
J: B. Andrews. Principles of labor legisla- 
tion, p 295-353 '16 

Contains: Reporting; Prohibition; Regula- 
tion 

Reports 
'■' National assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 
A. Comr for accident prevention and work- 
men's compensation. Report presented at 
21st annual meeting, New York city. May, 
1916. 6p '16 The Assn., 30 Church st., 
N. Y. 

Statistics 

* Coke-oven accidents in the United States dur- 

ing the calendar years 1913 and 1914. A. H. 
Fay, comp. U S Bur Mines Tech Pa 118 16p 
Je '15 
Industrial accidents in Canada, 1914. In Cana- 
da. Dept. of labour. Report, 1915, p 98-119 

New method of computing accident rates, 
tables Monthly R 3:6-17 Jl '16 

* Quarry accidents in the United States during 

the calendar year 1914. A. H. Fay, comp. U S 
Bur Mines Tech Pa no 128 45p O '15 
Statistics of industrial accidents, 1914. N T 
Dept Labor Special Bui no 75 77p Mr '16 
Accidents, Traffic 

* Street accidents caused by vehicles during 

year ending Dec. 31, 1915. Great Britain. 
Home office. (House of Commons pa no 39) 
16p 2d '16 Eyre & Spottiswoode, London 
Accountants 
What is a certified public accountant? W: P. 
Musaus. J Account 20:438-50 D '15 

Directories 
State boards of accountancy. In American 
assn. of public accountants. Yearbook, 1914- 
1915, p 235-40 

Laws 

Certified public accountant laws of the several 
states. In American assn. of public account- 
ants. Year-book, 1914-1915, p 243-346 

New C. P. A. law of Maryland. J Account 21: 
446-9 Je '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
Comparative data regarding issuance of cer- 
tified public accountant certificates by the 
several states. C: F. McWhorter. In Ameri- 
can assn. of public accountants. Year-book, 
1914-1915, p 176-91 
Accounting 

See also Colleges and universities — Ac- 
counting; Concrete construction — Account- 
ing; Cost accounting; Electric plants — Ac- 
counting; Factories — Accounting; Farm 
accounting; Foundry accounting; Grain ele- 
vators — Accounting; Horticulture — Account- 
ing; Hospitals— Accounting; Household 
accounting; Insurance, Liability — Account- 
ing; Lumber industry — Accounting; Mu- 
nicipal accounting; Municipal contracts 
— Accounting ; Newspapers — Accounting ; 

Plumbing — Accounting; Public utilities — 
Accounting; Public works — Accounting; 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



13 



Accounting — Continued 

Railroads — Accounting; Retail merchants — 
Accounting; Roads — Accounting; School 
accounting; Shoe retailers — Accounting; 
Streets — Accounting; Sugar refineries — Ac- 
counting; Town accounting — Uniform ac- 
counting; Waterworks — Accounting 

Conferences 

* American assn. of public accountants. Year- 

book, 1914-1915. 363p $1.65 postpaid '15 Ron- 
ald press CO., 20 Vesey st., N. Y. 

Contains: Officers, committees, trustees 
and members; Proceedings of the annual 
meeting at Seattle, Washington, Sept. 21- 
23, 1915; Papers read at convention; List of 
C. P. A. examiners; Certified public account- 
ancy laws in force in the several states; 
Constitution and by-laws of the American 
association as revised at the Seattle con- 
vention 
National assn. of comptrollers and accounting 
officers. Conference, Syracuse, N. Y., May 31- 
June 2, 1916. George M. Rex, sec, Industrial 
trust bldg.. Providence, R. I. 

Legislation, Proposed 
Accountancy legislation [in District of Colum- 
bia and Kentucky]. J Account 21:206-14 Mr 
'16 
Gives text of bills introduced in 1916 
Accounts. See Collecting of accounts 
Administration of justice 

Menaces to the administration of justice. 
A. T. Clearwater. In N. Y. state bar assn. 
Proceedings, 1916, p 133-54 
Administrative boards. See Labor bureaus; Pub- 
lic utilities commissions; State boards and 
commissions; Tax commissions 
Advertising 

Montevideo, Uruguay — Municipal authorities 
will distribute annual prizes amounting to 
1,000 pesos ($1,034) for the most artistic de- 
signs in poster advertisements. Municipal 
billboards are placed in the parks and along 
the boulevards for the only advertising that 
is permitted in these sections of the city 
(Mr '16) 

* Principles of advertising: based on a psy- 

chological investigation of Iowa news- 
papers. P. J. Sodergren. Univ of la Bui n s 
no 98 (Univ exten bul no 10) My 22 '15 
State univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, la. 

Special Libraries (Indianapolis, Ind. $2 a 
year) for April, 1916, is devoted to Adver- 
tising. Merle Sidener describes the library 
maintained by the Associated advertising 
clubs of the world in Indianapolis, with valu- 
able notes on the distinctive features of 
several recent books on advertising. H. H. B. 
Meyer of the Library of Congress has com- 
piled a bibliography on Advertising for this 
issue 

Various cases brought under honest advertis- 
ing laws. E. J. Buckley. Hardware Age 
(239 W. 39th St., N. Y.) 98:56 Ag 31 '16 

See also Billboards; Elections — Advertise- 
ments; Moving pictures — Advertising; Muni- 
cipal advertising 

Bibliography 

lAst of references on advertising. H. H. B. 
Meyer, comp. Special Libraries 7:61-76 Ap 
'16 

Conferences 

Associated advertising clubs of the world. 
12th annual convention, Philadelphia, June 
25-30, 1916 

National association of advertisers, E. L. 
Shuey, pres., Dayton, O. Semi-annual meet- 
ing, Dayton. May 4-6, 1916. The purpose of 
the organization is to systematize the work 
of the advertiser and the advertising depart- 
ments. The association is also waging a 
fight against the fraudulent advertiser. The 
sessions of the convention were closed and 
the proceedings will not be made public 

Rates 

New Jersey — U. S. district court has handed 
down a decision holding that a business 
house contracting for a certain amount of 
advertising in newspapers but using less 
than the amount specified, has to pay the 



5*P^® ^t ^^^^ ^s known as short rates. 
Matos-Menz advertising company v Fitz- 
gerald soap company (Press rept My 8 '16) 

Signs 

New Jersey supreme court held, June 6, 1916, 
that the statute prohibiting the use of the 
Palisades for advertising purposes was un- 
constitutional; held that the act, which 
would prohibit a property owner from using 
his property for advertising purposes is a 
violation of the constitutional prohibition 
against taking property without compensa- 
tion; that it was not shown that the adver- 
tisement would be detrimental to public 
safety, health or morals and hence the ques- 
tion was the right of the legislature to de- 
prive an owner of the use of his lands 
(Press rept) 

Orange county, Cal.— Ordinance forbids the 
placing of advertising signs along county 
roads, and recently a number of such signs, 
placed in violation of the ordinance, were 
removed by order of the county bd. of for- 
esters. State highway commission has taken 
similar action and will allow no advertise- 
ment on any structure erected along the 
state highway (Je 10 '16) 

Ordinances 

Sacramento, Cal.— Ordinance to regulate the 
construction, use, erection and maintenance 
of billboards and signs, advertisements and 
bulletin boards on public and private prop- 
erty, and providing for the inspection of the 
same, and for the issuance of a license to 
persons engaged in the business of erecting 
or handling signs or billboards or other ad- 
vertising device. (Ord no 245 3rd ser 
Passed My 31 '16) Official Gazette (Sacra- 
mento, Cal.) v 2 no 45 p 3 Je 5 '16 

Sign ordinance [Columbus, O.l Am City 14: 
172 F '16 

Gives the provisions in brief of the new 
Columbus ordinance 

Spokane, Wash. — Ordinance relating to and 
regulating awnings, signs, banners, advertise- 
ments and other similar devices; relating 
to and regulating the erection and main- 
tenance of signs and bill-boards; relating to 
and regulating advertising on the streets and 
providing a penalty for the violation thereof. 
(Ord no C2114 Approved Je 12 '16) Official 
Gazette 6:3944 Je 17 '16 

Taxation 

Montevideo, Uruguay — All advertisements 
posted or distributed in the city and depart- 
ment of Montevideo are subject to a munici- 
pal impost. The tax applies to commercial 
advertisements and professional notices of 
all kinds posted on walls, buildings, bill- 
boards, interiors, railway coaches, street 
cars, carts and other vehicles, and to adver- 
tising by means of electric flashers, street 
banners, awnings and handbills. Advertise- 
ments of alcoholic beverages are subject to an 
additional tax of 10 per cent of the regular 
schedule (Mr '16) 
Advertising, Fraudulent 

Audit bureau of circulations. Annual conven- 
tion, Chicago, June 2, 1916. The bureau is 
an organization to which class, trade and 
technical journals, farm papers, newspapers 
and magazines cannot belong unless they 
are willing to tell what their circulation is 
and not only to tell what it is but swear to 
it, and swear not only as to the quantity of 
circulation but as to how it is distributed, 
how it is obtained, how much is paid and 
how much is free, and what proportion of it 
is in arrears. This is for the protection of 
advertising agents against publications that 
conceal the character or misrepresent the 
quantity of their circulation. M. F. Harris, 
sec, Chicago Je 17 '16 

Fraud in realty deals. L. D. Woolworth. Nat 
Real Estate J 13:333-4, 367 Je '16 

National advertisers' assn., at its semi-an- 
nual meeting at Cleveland, O., in May, 1915, 
discussed the subject of fraudulent advertis- 
ing and passed a resolution favoring a dig- 
nified but specific inquiry by the association 
as to the classes of advertising carried on 
by the principal mediums of the country 



14 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Advertising, Fraudulent— Contmuc^Z 

U. S. supreme court has handed down a de- 
cision holding that advertisers, even though 
they give purchasers value received for their 
money, are guilty of fraud if, by exaggerated 
advertising propaganda, they have led cli- 
ents to expect more. The decision is ex- 
pected to make possible the enforcement of 
a much more stringent official supervision 
of mail advertising. The decision of the court 
is discussed in the Outlook Je 7 '16 

Reports 

[Report of the committee on false advertising.] 
In Assn. of Am. dairy, food and drug offi- 
cials. Official proceedings, 1915, p 23-6 
Age of consent 

Legislation, Comparative 
Age of consent and fornication: [legislation in 
1915]. Social Hygiene 2:246 Ap '16 

Summarizes bills which became laws and 
bills introduced but not passed 
Age of majority 
New York (state)— Deputy atty. gen. C. T. 
Dawes has given his opinion that a man 
becomes of a^e the day before his 21st birth- 
day and at the beginning of that day; there- 
fore, a man attaining his majority Nov. 3, 
the day following election day, may register 
as an elector on one of the registration days 
and may vote on Nov. 2 (O 7 '15) 
Agents. See Insurance — Agents 
Agricultural clubs 

• Boys' agricultural club work. H. H. William- 

son. Agric and Mechanical College of Tex- 
as Exten Service Bui no B12 lOp O '15 Ex- 
tension service, A. & M. college, College 
station, Texas 

• Boys' agricultural clubs. W: H. Kendrick. il 

West Va Univ Agric Col Exten Dept Circ 
49 (Organization circular) 23p F '16 Exten- 
sion dept.. College of agric, West Va. univ., 
Morgantown 

• Boys' and girls' agricultural clubs for Kansas. 

O. E. Hall, il Kan State Agric College and 
U S Dept of Agric Cooperating Circ no 1 24p 
Mr 1 '15 Div. of college exten., Kan. state 
agric. college, Manhattan 

• Boys' and girls' industrial clubs of Oregon: a 

message from the rural school exhibit of 
Oregon, Panama-Pacific exposition, 1915. 7p 
il '15 Oregon state lib. 

Furnished only on exchange accounts 

• Boys' and girls' poultry clubs. E. O. Edson. 

il La State Univ and Agric and Mechanical 
College Circ no 4 16p S '15 Extension div., 
Louisiana state univ.. Baton Rouge 
Decline and fall of a state system of boys' 
and girls' agricultural clubs. Josiah Main. 
School and Soc 3:514-20 Ap 8 '16 

• Girls' garden and canning clubs. S. R. Guse- 

man. il West Va Univ Agric Coll Exten Dept 
Circ 50 (Organization circular) 15p F '16 
Extension dept.. College of agric, West 
Va. univ., Morgantown 

• Home economics clubs: suggestions for or- 

ganizing and conducting in Oregon. H. W. 
Calvin. Oregon Agric College Exten Service 
Bui ser 3 no 7 7p Oregon agric. college, Cor- 
vallis 

School clubs and school contests. M. G. Nel- 
son and others. In N. Y. state assn. of dis- 
trict superintendents of schools. Proceed- 
ings, 1914, p 57-68 
See also Boys' clubs 
Reports 

First annual report on boys' and girls' club 
work, il In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d 
annual report. 1914, p 453-77 '15 
Agricultural communities 

Community civics. Jessie Field and Scott 
Nearing. 270p il *60c '16 Macmillan 

A textbook for country schools, con- 
solidated and township schools and schools 
in towns that are closely related to country 
life 

Vitalizing the nation and conserving human 
units through the development of agricul- 
tural communities, Hugh MacRae. Ann Am 
Acad 63:278-86 Ja '16 



Agricultural cooperation. See Farmers' coopera- 
tive movements 
Agricultural credit 

Agricultural credit. In H. G. Moulton. Prin- 
ciples of money and banking, p 363-401 '16 

Contains articles on short time "commer- 
cial" credit and long-time investment credit 

Building and loan associations the solution of 
the rural credit problem. W. O. Hedrick. 
Scientific Monthly (Sub-station 84, N. Y.) 2: 
453-9 My '16 30c 

Effect of soil depletion and of soil enrichment 
on loan values of farms. C. G. Hopkins. 
In Assn. of life insurance presidents. Pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 81-6 

* Farm mortgage credit in New Hampshire. 

G. C. Smith, maps N H College Arts and 
Research Bui no 2 16p Ja '16 Guy C. Smith, 
Dept. of economics, N. H, College, Durham 

Financing of crops. In G. G. Huebner. Agri- 
cultural commerce, p 327-40 '15 

Getting closer to the farmer. C: G. Taylor. 
In Assn. of life insurance presidents. Pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 45-59 

* Land bank for immigrants. J. W. Pincus. 3p 

Joseph W. Pincus, 174 2d av., N. Y. 

Reprint from the Jewish Immigration Bul- 
letin, October, 1915 

* Land credits: a plea for the American farmer. 

D. T. Morgan. 299p *$1.50 '15 Crowell 

Contains: Crisis in land credit legislation; 
Discrimination against farmers; Fundamen- 
tal principles of European land-credit insti- 
tutions; Commission bill, the sub-committee 
bill, and the senate committee bill; Type of 
institution; Adequate credit; Economy of 
administration; Competitive land banks; In- 
adequacy of reserve fund; Multiplicity of 
bond-issuing banks; Interest; Government 
aid. The writer holds that our new land- 
credit institutions must provide equal credit 
facilities and uniform interest charges thru- 
out the Union; this, he asserts, cannot be 
accomplished except through unity and cen- 
tralization in the institutions authorized to 
issue farm-mortgage bonds 

* Life insurance investments with special refer- 

ence to farm mortgages. R: L. Cox. 18p 
maps '15 Assn. of life insurance presidents, 
165 Broadway, N. Y. 

Report submitted December 9, 1915, at the 
ninth annual meeting of the Association of 
life insurance presidents 
Millions for agriculture: farming takes rank 
with manufacturing and commerce under 
the farm loan act. Country Gent 81:3-4 Ag 
26 '16 

* Need of savings and loan associations in 

farming communities. J. W. Pincus. 4p Jo- 
seph W. Pincus, 174 2d av.. N. Y. 

Read at meeting of the N. Y. state league, 
1915 

Problem of rural credits. L, G. Robinson, il 
Agricultural Digest (2 W. 45th st.. N. Y.) 
1:56-8 Je '16 15c 

Rural credit problems from investors' view- 
point. J. R. Clark. In Assn. of life insur- 
ance presidents. Proceedings, 1915, p 97-102 

Rural credit system for the development of 
the Pacific coast. Elwood Mead. Oregon 
Voter (Portland, Ore.) 3:365-74 Ja 8 '16 10c 

Rural- credit movement: cheaper money not 
its only aim. M. T. Herrick. Oregon Voter 
(Portland, Ore.) 2:341-51, 354 O 9 '15 10c 

* Rural credits. P. W. Goebel. 18p '16 Commer- 

cial nat. bank, Kansas City, Kan. 

Address before the annual meeting of the 
Kansas state bd. of agriculture, Topeka, 
Kan., Jan. 13, 1916 

* Rural credits. M. T. Herrick. Mass Agric Circ 

no 59 15p Ja '16 

Reprinted from the 63d annual report of 
the Massachusetts state board of agricul- 
ture 

Rural credits. R. W. Moss. Pa Dept Agric 
Bui no 278 p 95-104 '16 

Rural credits. P, H. Saunders, Nat Real Es- 
tate J 13:189-92 Ap '16 

Read at the 9th annual convention of the 
Nat. assn. of real estate exchanges. New 
Orleans, La.. March 27-31. 1916 

Rural credits: farmers may now borrow money 
at a rate of interest not to exceed 6 per 
cent. F. M. Loomis. Farm Eng (608 S. 
Dearborn st., Chicago, 111.) 4:434 S '16 5c 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



15 



Agricultural credit — Continued 

liural credits: [letter criticising the Moss 
rural-credit bill]. C: H. Davis. Cong Rec 53: 
1631-3 Ja 24 '16 

Extension of remarks of William Schley 
Howard 

* Rural credits: recommendations of the Farm 

mortgage bankers assn. of America through 
its board of governors, based on the pro- 
visions of senate bill no 2986 and house of 
representatives bill no 6838 introduced in the 
64th congress. lOp F 15 '16 Farm mortgage 
bankers assn. of America, 112 W. Adams 
St., Chicago, 111. 
Rural credits as a matter for state or national 
action. J Am Bankers Assn 8:483-5 D '15 

Contains a list of states which have en- 
acted rural credit laws 

* Rural credits in Australia. Elwood Mead. 14p 

(Mim) '15 Dr. Elwood Mead, Univ. of Cal. 

Address delivered at the Conference on 
rural credits, Panama Pacific international 
exposition, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 21, 
1915 

Rural credits necessary if irrigation enter- 
prises are to succeed. Edward Gillette. Eng 
Rec 72:789-90 D 25 '15 

Six per cent money for farmers: stories that 
illustrate the need of new federal laws on 
rural credit. J. R. Merriam. World's Work 
31:523-6 Mr '16 

State aid to land purchase. Clarence Lohman. 
Univ of Texas Bui 1915 no 39 p 78-101 Jl 10 
'15 

Outlines the situation in New Zealand, Ire- 
land, England, Germany, Denmark, and 
other countries, and in Oklahoma and Texas 

Sub-committee of the joint com. of the Inter- 
national farm congress, the Nat. irrigation 
congress, and the Investment bankers' assn. 
of America have selected members of a na- 
tional committee on rural credits to consist 
of a representative of every state in the 
union (O 9 '15) 

See also Credit unions; Farm tenancy; 
Land — Settlement 

Bibliography 
List of references on government aid to farm- 
ers and immigrants. Special Libraries 6:119- 
26 S '15 

* List of United States documents on agricultural 

credit banks. U. S. Library of congress. 
lOp Ap 7 '15 (Typew Cost of copying 50c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

* Tacoma, Wash. Public library. [List of books, 

documents and periodical references on rural 
credits systems.] Tacoma Ledger Ap 17 '16 

* [Title page and table of contents to a] com- 

pilation of U. S. documents relating to ag- 
ricultural cooperation and rural-credit 
banks, collated and printed for the use of 
the joint committee on rural credits; in two 
volumes. 6; 3p '15 U. S. supt. of doc. 

The compilation itself is absolutely not 
obtainable. The table of contents, how- 
ever, forms a complete list of all public 
documents, including bills, reports, public 
documents, and hearings issued on the ques- 
tion by the U. S. government 

Bonds 

British Columbia has recently sold $1,000,000 
of bonds, issued under the agricultural 
credits act, which are to run for 25 years 
and bear iV2 per cent interest. By this sale 
the government is provided with funds to 
put the agricultural credits act into opera- 
tion (Ap 19 '16) 

Conferences 

At the National conference on marketing and 
farm credits at Chicago, early in December, 
1915, Myron T. Herrick spoke on the dan- 
gers of government aid to farmers, and 
deplored the fact that the farm credits 
movement, whose objects originally were 
co-operative banking and long term mort- 
gaging, has taken on such paternalistic and 
socialistic tendencies. His speech, which in- 
cludes a brief r6sum$ of the actions of a 
number of states in regard to state aid, Is 
quoted at length in the Des Moines, la., 
Monitor D 5 '15 



At the ninth annual meeting of the National 
assn. of life insurance presidents in New 
York, Dec. 9-11, 1915, President Jesse R. 
Clark, of the Union central life, led in a dis- 
cussion of "Rural credi' problems from an 
investor's standpoint." ^a. report was read 
by Robert Lynn Cox on Life insurance in- 
vestments with special reference to farm 
mortgages, and several addresses were given 
on the subject. A summary of these appears 
in The United States Review (411-413 Walnut 
St., Philadelphia) D 16 '15 5c 

Farm mortgage bankers' assn. at its meeting 
in Chicago, Feb. 1916, brought out informa- 
tion showing the agricultural prosperity of 
the country and the activity of the states 
in making laws concerning credit unions 
and land banks. $7,000,000 are invested in 
farm mortgages. In three years a dozen 
states have adopted the Torrens system for 
land titles. Twenty-five states have passed 
laws protecting cooperative rural banks, cre- 
ating state land banks, exempting credit 
unions from taxation, authorizing building 
and loan assns. to issue privileged rural 
credit shares, or, in some cases, permitting 
the investment of state funds in farm mort- 
gages (F 8 '16) 

Marketing and farm credits: a collection of 
papers read at the third annual sessions of 
the National conference on marketing and 
farm credits, in joint program with the Na- 
tional council of farmers' cooperative asso- 
ciations, in Chicago, Nov. 29-Dec. 2, 1915. 
531p $1; 2 copies $1.75 postage 15c; with 
proceedings of 1st conference $1.50 postage 
15c '15 Chas. W. Holman, sec, Nat. conf. on 
marketing and farm credit, Madison. Wis. 

Sessions were devoted to: Organizing 
agricultural cooperation; Marketing the 
farm product; Standardization of farm prod- 
ucts; Warehousing and standardization of 
farm products; Elevators, local and ter- 
minal; Rural credit aids to land purchase; 
Present facilities for land purchase and need 
of legislation; Financing farm business; In- 
dustrial cooperation 

National implement assn., at its convention at 
Indianapolis, Oct. 20, 1915, discussed the 
question of shortening the time in which 
farmers may pay for their implements. Gen- 
eral manufacturers declared the implement 
men are being unjustly dealt with when 
farmers request credit on implements but 
are able to pay cash on automobiles. A 
committee was appointed to work out a plan 
for a solution of the problem (O 21 '15) 

Rural credits conference day was held at the 
Panama- Pacific international ex'position, 
San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 21, 1915. It con- 
sisted of a great public mass meeting, a 
round table conference and a discussion by 
distinguished experts. Among the ad- 
dresses were: The rural credit movement: 
cheaper money not its only aim, by M. T. 
Herrick; Rural credits in Australia, by 
Elwood Mead; Legislation enacted and pro- 
posed, by J. D. Phelan; Co-operative mar- 
keting in its relation to rural credits, by 
James Madison 

Texas — Conference called by the state ware- 
house department to discuss plans for better 
marketing and to finance the crops of the 
state, opened in Austin, March 9, 1916. 
Addresses were delivered on: Public ware- 
houses, by F. C. Weinert, manager of the de- 
partment; Features of the warehouse act, 
by W. F. Loudermilk; Merits of the Smith- 
Lever bill, by F. S. Williams 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
California — Authorizing legislature to provide 
land colonization system, establish rural 
credit system in aid of agriculture, authorize 
issuance of bonds secured by first mortgages 
on farms, declaring same exempt from taxa- 
tion and acceptable as security for public 
deposits, provide for state participation in 
rural credit system by establishing trust 
fund, authorize trustees thereof to issue 
bonds, guaranteed by state, upon securities 
thereof, and deal generally in rural credit 
bonds; also, authorizing legislature to effect 
purposes of section notwithstanding con- 



16 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Agricultural cred\t— Continued 

trary constitutional provisions. Constitu- 
tional amendment. Rejected. Yes 124,247 
No 132,320 O '15 
Constitutional amendments, Proposed 

Oregon — Proposed amendment would amend 
the bonding provisions in a roundabout way, 
by repealing all portions of the constitution 
in conflict herewith, so that $18,000,000 may 
be borrowed by the state and loaned to 
farmers on the security of their land. The 
law part of the proposal provides for the 
administration of the fund (Je 24 '16) 

Oregon — Proposed people's land and loan law 
enacts single tax, provides for loaning 
small sums without security, and works out 
the system in every detail, where it will 
be part of the constitution and beyond the 
corrective reach of the legislature (Je 24 
'16) 

Oregon — Tentative draft of a proposed consti- 
tutional amendment providing for a system 
of rural credits is printed in full in the 
Oregonian (Portland, Ore.) and will be 
submitted to the voters at the election next 
November (Ap 16 '16) 

Investigations 

Virginia legislature has appointed a commis- 
sion to make a study of rural credits and 
report to the next general assembly a plan 
of agricultural banking suitable for the needs 
of Virginia (Mr 19 '16) 

Legislation 
Agricultural credit legislation and the tenancy 
problem. G: E. Putnam. Am Econ R 5:805- 
15 D '15 

• Agricultural credit systems in the several 

states. F: A. Ballou, jr., comp., R. I. leg. 
ref. bur. 49p Mr 27 '16 (Typew B $2.45) 
Complete digest of all laws 

Argentina — Agrarian pledge law, which went 
into effect on Dee. 1, 1914, provides that 
loans may be made on machinery in gen- 
eral, animals of whatever species and their 
products, as also movable goods utilized in 
rural exploitations; produce of any nature 
corresponding to the agricultural year in 
which the contract is made, whether such 
"be pending, on the hoof, after separation 
from the plant, as also wood and timber, 
mineral products and products of national 
industries. Pledges made under this law 
expire after two years from the day of their 
•execution. A contract for such a loan can 
be constituted either by a private or a pub- 
lic instrument, but in both cases it only be- 
comes effective, in relation to third parties, 
from the day of its inscription in the public 
register which is established for this pur- 
pose by the executive power. It is esti- 
mated that the aggregate amount of all the 
loans contracted under this law up to Nov. 
30, 1915, is $35,000,000 

British Colombia — Legislature passed on act 
during 1915, providing for loans to agricul- 
turists. The measure sets aside a fund of 
$15,000,000, for which bonds of the Province 
are to be issued. Subsequent issues must first 
be authorized by special act of legislature 
supplementing the power contained in the 
present act 

• Federal farm loan act. W: R. Camp. N C 

Agric Ext Service Ext Circ no 14 7p Ag '16 
U. S. 64th cong. 1st sess. May, 1916, passed 
the Hollis bill which provides for the estab- 
lishment of a rural-credit system. The ma- 
chinery of the system is provided by the 
federal government, but the actual institu- 
tion of the proposed land-mortgage banks is 
a matter of local undertaking; and the banks 
will be grounded on the cooperative principle. 
President signed the bill Jl 17 '16 

Legislation, Proposed 

• Bills introduced in the U. S. senate and the 

house of representatives during the 63d con- 
gress relative to rural credits. 1083p '15 U. S. 
senate doc. clerk 

Periodicals 
International Review of Agricultural Econo- 
mics, formerly the Monthly Bulletin of 
Economic and Social Intelligence, published 



by the Bureau of economic and social intel- 
ligence. International institute of agriculture. 
Villa Umberto I, Rome, Italy, is a monthly 
bulletin published in English, French, Ger- 
man, Spanish and Italian. It contains 
articles relative to cooperation and associ- 
ation, insurance and thrift, credit, and 
agricultural economy in general in the 
various countries, also notices of recent 
publications. The price is 18 frs., single 
numbers 2 frs. 

Reports 

* Northern Minn, development assn. Com. on 

rural credits. Report submitted at Bemidji, 
Minn., Dec. 9, 1915. 20p '15 C. R. Middleton, 
Baudette 
Agricultural directories 

State directory of agricultural activities. Gar- 
den and Farm Almanac (Garden City, N. Y.) 
1916 p 97-115 25c 

Lists, by states, state officials having 
supervision over any agricultural activity; 
organizations, including farmers' unions; 
educational agencies, including schools and 
colleges, and experiment stations, state and 
county agents, agricultural clubs, with 
names of persons in charge; and achieve- 
ments, as highest value per acre of all 
states in production of potatoes 

See also Agricultural organizations — Direc- 
tories 
Agricultural education 
Agricultural education. A. C. Monahan and 
C. H. Lane. In U. S. Comr. of education. 
Report, 1914, v 1 p 291-318 '15 

Contains: Introduction of agriculture into 
the curricula of high schools; Agricultural 
education at meetings of the year; Agricul- 
tural education in other countries; Educa- 
tional work of the department of agricul- 
ture; Educational work of the office of 
experiment stations 
Agricultural education. A. C. Monahan and 
C. H. Lane. In U. S. Comr. of education. 
Report, 1915, v 1 p 295-316 '15 

Discusses agriculture in elementary 
schools, in secondary schools, and in other 
countries; agricultural education at meet- 
ings of the year; educational work of the 
department of agriculture and of the office 
of experiment stations 
Agricultural revival in Massachusetts: the re- 
markable work of the agricultural college at 
Amherst which is rejuvenating the rural 
life of the state. R. S. Baker. World's 
Work 32:337-40 Jl '16 
Agricultural section. In Illinois high school 
conference. Proceedings, 1915, p 78-95 '16 

Contains: Requirements for university en- 
trance units in agriculture, by D. O. Barto; 
Use of the home farm as a laboratory, by 
H. R. Pollock; Vocational opportunities in 
scientific agriculture, by A. M. Wilson; Re- 
port on textbooks and reference libraries 
Agriculture and its educational needs. In 
J: A. Lapp and C. H. Mote. Learning to 
earn, p 89-115 '15 

* City-wide congress. Report of committee on 

Maryland agricultural college. 5p '16 Leg. 
ref. dept., Baltimore, Md. 

Committee was appointed by the board of 
directors of the congress, which is composed 
of delegates selected by the several business 
and improvement associations of Baltimore 
city 

Does agricultural education pay? il News 
Notes (no 308) 8p ['16] Colo, agric. college, 
Fort Collins 

[List of] the land -grant colleges, agricultural 
experiment stations and agricultural exten- 
sion services. In Assn. of Am. agric. colleges 
and exper. stations. Proceedings, 1915, p 7-12 

New Brunswick, Can. — Provincial department 
of agriculture holds schools for farmers, and 
a course was given at Woodstock from 
March 20 to April 1, 1916. Instruction is free 
and railroads offer reduced rates, though 
transportation amounting to $2 or more is 
refunded by the government to encourage 
attendance. A feature being advocated in 
such local schools is the holding of one con- 
tinuous session thru the middle of the day, 
thus allowing farmers to care for their stock 
while attending sessions 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



17 



Agricultural education — Continued 

* Value of education to the farmer. O. R. John- 

son. Univ of Mo Agric Exper Sta Circ no 77 
4p O '15 Univ. of Missouri, College of agric, 
Columbia 
Vocational agricultural education. L. H. Den- 
nis. Pa Dept Agric Bui no 278 p 81-95 '16 

See also Agricultural clubs; County farm 
bureaus; Demonstration work in agriculture; 
Farmers' institutes; Prisoners — Agricultural 
extension work 

Conferences 

* Association of American agricultural colleges 

and experiment stations. Proceedings of the 
2bth annual convention; and of the fourth 
annual convention of the Land-grant college 
engineering assn,, held at Berkeley, Cal., 
Aug. 11-13, 1915. 304p '15 J. L. Hills, sec. 
Agric experiment station, Burlington, Vt. 

The following are among t^e addresses 
given: National system of education, by E. A. 
Bryan; Account of the methods of work of 
the agricultural institutions in California, 
by T. F. Hunt; Exhibit in agricultural educa- 
tion at the Panama-Pacific international ex- 
position, by A. C. True; Economic science in 
agricultural and mechanical colleges, by 
C. A. Duniway; Preparation of teachers as 
contemplated by the Nelson amendment, by 
A. R. Hill; Exchange of instructors in agri- 
cultural college work, by H. L. Russell; Cor- 
relation of the colleges of agriculture with 
other colleges of the state, by A. Vivian; Re- 
lation of the bureau of education to the agri- 
cultural colleges, by S. P. Capen 

* Association of western land-grant colleges. 

Meetings at Berkeley, Cal., Aug. 9-10, 1915. 
3p (Mim) E. G. Peterson, sec-treas., Utah 
agric. college, Logan 

The following matters were referred to the 
executive committee: 1, Summer school of 
extension workers of western states in a 
single session or in convenient groups; 2, 
Preparation of a statement to be presented 
to senators and congressmen of the West, 
and others interested, embodying an expres- 
sion of the need of western states for addi- 
tional federal appropriations for extension 
work; 3, Preparation of a report to western 
colleges on the need and cost of motion pic- 
tures, and their adaptability to extension 
work in particular and college work in gen- 
eral; 4, Consideration of matter of exchange, 
among western colleges, of members of 
faculties engaged in interior instruction, ex- 
perimentation or extension 

* Western agricultural colleges. [Proceedings of 

the] first convention, held at Utah agricul- 
tural college, Logan, Feb. 5, 1914. 7p (Mim) 
Extension div., Utah agric college, Logan 

Question was raised regarding the method 
of expenditure of money under the proposed 
Lever bill. It was generally agreed that ex- 
tension work might be segregated to advan- 
tage into departments as follows: 1, Farmers' 
institutes and movable schools; 2, Boys' and 
girls' clubs; 3, Farm and home demonstra- 
tion; 4, Correspondence studies; 5, Women's 
associations; 6, Publications; 7, Trains, fairs, 
and exhibits. Questions raised and discussed 
without definite decision were as follows: 
What relation should the county agent bear 
to other extension division activities in the 
county; What relation should exist between 
instructors in the extension division and 
the departments of instruction in college? 

Farm practice 
Effective use of the school farm: a record of 
an unfinished experiment. R. J. Teall. il 
Manual Train 17:762-70 Je '16 

Home-project plan 

* Home projects in secondary courses in agri- 

culture. H. P. Barrows. U S Dept Agric Bui 
no 346 (Professional paper) 20p F 21 '16 

Investigations 

Massachusetts — Legislature, at its 1916 ses- 
sion, appropriated $7,500 and provided for a 
commission to investigate the state agricul- 
tural college. The commission will give pub- 
lic hearings and must report in print by Jan. 
10, 1917. It will investigate and report as to 



the advisability of further expenditures for 
new buildings, as to present policy of the 
college, as to the use of state and federal 
appropriations and grants, as to extension 
work, etc. It will also report as to whether 
it is advisable to continue the college as it 
is organized at present 

Laws 

* Massachusetts — Act to authorize cities to 

maintain schools of agriculture and horti- 
culture. Ip (Chap 185, Laws 1916) Mass. 
homestead comm. 

Subject will be submitted to the people at 
the next state election 

Legislation, Comparative 

State laws relating to agricultural schools; 
State laws relating to agricultural colleges; 
Federal legislation affecting agricultural col- 
leges and experiment stations. U S Bur Eduo 
Bui 1916 no 47 p 702-9, 741-58, 956-68 '16 

Pre-vocational work 

* Laboratory exercises in principles of agricul- 

ture. Hopt and Spafford. 192p il maps 40c 
W. M. Welch mfg. co., 1516 Orleans St., 
Chicago, 111. 

State aid 

State-aided vocational agricultural education. 
R. W. Stimson. Mass Board Educ Bui 1915 
no 6 weight 8 oz inclose postage p 39-76 '15 

Statistics 

* Statistics of certain manual training, agricul- 

tural, and Industrial schools, 1913-1914. U S 
Bur Educ Bui 1915 no 19 79p '15 

This bulletin presents the statistics of 479 
manual training schools, agricultural schools, 
and industrial, trade, and vocational schools 
for 1914. It also presents a list of 1,414 
public high schools having 55,946 students in 
manual training, 19,909 in courses in agri- 
culture, and 67,521 in courses in domestic 
economy 

Women 
Instruction in light farm work and milking for 
women and children. J Bd of Agric (White- 
hall Place, London) 23:264-71 Je '16 4d 

Brief summary indicating the provision 
being made for instruction in different coun- 
ties of England 
Agricultural engineering 

Conferences 

* American soc. of agricultural engineers. Re- 

port of the 9th annual meeting, Chicago, 
Dec, 1915, with business records, il Am 
Soc Agric Eng Transac (Ames, la.) v 9 no 1 



Agricultural experiment stations 

[List of] the land-grant colleges, agricultural 
experiment stations and agricultural exten- 
sion services. In Assn. of Am. agric. col- 
leges and exper. stations. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 7-12 
Report of committee on experiment station 
organization and policy; A discussion of ex- 
periment station publications as follows: 
annual reports, bulletins, and the publication 
of the results of investigations made in ex- 
periment stations in technical scientific 
journals, including the Journal of Agricul- 
tural Research. Jn Assn. of Am. agric col- 
leges and exper. stations. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 123-5, 179-99 

• Report on the work and expenditures of the 
agricultural experiment stations during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1914. E. W. Allen 
and E. V. Wilcox. 289p il '15 U. S. dept. 
of agric. 
Uruguay — Government conducts an experiment 
farm on a tract of 1,000 acres of land in 
the department of Colonia, one of the chief 
objects of which is the production of seeds 
of the best quahty, which are supplied to 
small farmers on liberal terms. In addition 
to experiments with new varieties of grain 
and vegetables, with fertilizers, and methods 
of cultivating the soil, the government is 
making a series of experiments with a view 
to ascertaining the best times for planting. 
Recently a plan of annual expenditures for 



18 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Agricultural experiment stations— Contmwed 
the work of the farm, amounting to $16,800, 
has been guaranteed by the ministry of 
industries (Ap 21 '16) 

iSee also Prisoners — Agricultural extension 
work; Soils; States relations service 

Bibliography 

• Agricultural experiment stations, irrigation, 

drainage: list of U. S. government publica- 
tions. (Price list 42 7th ed) 24p N '15 U. S. 
supt. of doc. 

Reports 
Michigan. Bd. of agriculture. 54th annual re- 
port of the sec. and 28th annual report of the 
experiment stations from July 1, 1914 to June 
30, 1915. 362p '15 

Contains principal legislation now in force 
relating to Michigan agric. college and state 
bd. of agriculture 
Agricultural experiment work 
Reports 

• Experimental farms: reports for the year end- 

ing March 31, 1915. (6 George V Sessional pa 
no 16) 2v 1229p il plans 45c '15 Canada 
minister of agric. 

Contains the report of the director, and a 
summary of the year's results in the various 
divisions on the central experimental farm 
and on the branch experimental farms, sta- 
tions and substations; also detailed reports 
on the various lines of experimental work 
under way thruout the dominion experimen- 
tal farms system during the year 
Agricultural extension work 
Agricultural extension work. C. S. Wheeler. 
Ohio State Univ Bui v 20 no 6 p 45-54 O '15 
Ohio state univ., Columbus 

• Cooperative agricultural extension work. U S 

Dept Agric Circ no 47 12p My 3 '15 

Farmers' institute work in the U. S. in 1914, 
and notes on agricultural extension work In 
foreign countries. J. M, Stedman. U S Dept 
Agric Bui no 269 21p Jl 31 '15 

[List of] the land-grant colleges, agricultural 
experiment stations and agricultural exten- 
sion services. In Assn. of Am. agric. colleges 
and exper. station's. Proceedings, 1915, p 7-12 

Report of the committee on extension organi- 
zation and policy; Effective correlation of 
station and extension workers, and Place 
which demonstrations should have in exten- 
sion work; with discussion. Bradford Knapp. 
Jn Assn. of Am. agric. colleges and exper. 
stations. Proceedings, 1915, p 125-9. 199-214 

Shall extension service include the social, 
recreational, and educational improvement 
of rural and urban districts? W. D. Hurd. In 
Am. assn. of farmers' institute workers. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 124-34 

Smith-Lever act and what it provides for Colo- 
rado farmers and housekeepers. 7p ['16] 
Colo, agric. college, Fort Collins 

See also Prisoners — Agricultural extension 
work; Soils; States relations service 

Conferences 
Section on extension work. In Assn. of Am. 
agric. colleges and exper. stations. Proceed- 
ings, 1915. p 209-53 

Discusses: The place which demonstrations 
should have in extension work; County or- 
ganization of extension work in agriculture 
and home economics; Organization of co- 
operative extension work, machinery and 
method (in the state) ; Shall extension ser- 
vice include the social, recreational and 
educational improvement of rural and ur- 
ban districts; Organization and methods in 
home economies extension; Home demon- 
strations 
♦ Western agricultural colleges. [Proceedings of 
the] first convention, held at Utah agricul- 
tural college, Logan, Feb. 5, 1914. 7p (Mim) 
Extension div., Utah agric. college, Logan 
Question was raised regarding the method 
of expenditure of money under the proposed 
Lever bill. It was generally agreed that 
extension work might be segregated to ad- 
vantage into departments as follows: 1, 
Farmers' institutes and movable schools; 
2, Boys' and girls' clubs; 3, Farm and home 



demonstration; 4, Correspondence studies; 
5, Women's associations; 6, Publications; 
7, Trains, fairs, and exhibits. Questions 
raised and discussed without definite deci- 
sion were as follows: What relation should 
the county agent bear to other extension 
division activities in the county; What rela- 
tion should exist between instructors in the 
extension division and the departments of 
instruction in college? 
Agricultural laborers 

Employment of women on the land. Bd Agri- 
culture J (Whitehall Place, London. S. W.) 
23:143-5 My '16 4d 

French agricultural labour problem. J Bd Agrric 
(Great Britain bd. of agric, Whitehall place, 
London, S. W.) 23:1-16 Ap '16 4d 

Report of the women's mission to French 
farms in February, 1916. 20p 6d '16 Berk- 
shire com. on women and farm labour, Shire 
Hall, Reading, England 

Legislation, Comparative 
Laborer as tenant: Classes of agricultural 
workers; Agricultural labor legislation. In 
J: R. Commons and J: B. Andrews. Princi- 
ples of labor legislation, p 61-8 '16 
Agricultural legislation 
Agricultural legislation [in Canada]. Agric 
Gaz of Canada (Dept. of agriculture, Otta- 
wa, Canada) 3:551-9 Je '16 10c 

A summary of legislation passed at the 
recent sessions of the legislature in Prince 
Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Mani- 
toba, Saskatchewan, Alberta 
Massachusetts — Agricultural legislation, 1914. 
In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d annual re- 
port, 1914, p 329-53 '15 

Pt. 1, Legislation conferring powers and 
duties on the board of agriculture; pt. 2, 
Legislation referring to forestry; pt. 3, Leg- 
islation of general agricultural interest 
Agricultural legislation, Comparative 
* Annuaire international de legislation agricole 
IVeme annee, 1914. lOfr '15 International 
inst. of agric, Rome, Italy 

This volume contains notices of the laws, 
decrees and regulations relating to agri- 
culture, promulgated and published in 1914 
in the various countries of the world as 
weir as a French translation of their most 
important provisions 
Agricultural machinery. See Farm power 
Agricultural management. See Farm manage- 
ment 
Agricultural organizations 

Agrarian movements in the U. S. In T: N. 
Carver, comp. Selected readings in rural 
economics, p 645-763 '16 

Contains the following articles: The rise 
of the granger movement, by C: W. Pierson; 
Outcome of the granger movement, by C: W. 
Pierson; Populist movement, by F. L. Mc- 
Vey; An analysis of agricultural discontent 
in the U. S., by C. F, Emerick 
Financial returns and analysis of premiums 
and gratuities of the incorporated societies, 
with membership and institutes, for the 
year 1914. In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d 
annual report, 1914, p 585-99 '15 
Illinois agricultural assn., composed of repre- 
sentatives of twenty-three county farm 
bureaus, has been organized to promote 
cooperation between farming associations 
and to secure legislation beneficial to farm- 
ers. Membership is open to associations em- 
ploying agents under the Smith-Lever act 
(Mr 16 '16) 
National agricultural society. Agricultural Di- 
gest (2 W. 45th St., N. Y.) 1:53-4 Je '16 15c 
National agricultural society was formed, April 
27, 1916, in New York city. Its object is to 
improve agricultural conditions thruout the 
country. James Wilson, former U. S. sea of 
agriculture, was elected president, and G. 
Howard Davison, chairman of the executive 
committee 
National association of commissioners of agri- 
culture was founded in Washington, D. C, 
May 4, 1916. The organization has absorbed 
the Southern and Eastern association of 
commissioners of agriculture. The members 
will work for the passage of the Sheppard 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



19 



Agricultural organizations— Continued 

bill before congress, providing for a national 
chamber of commerce for the purpose of 
marketing products grown in the U. S 
See also Agricultural clubs 
Directories 

Directory of national organizations having to 
do with agriculture and related subjects, in- 
cluding the names and addresses of their 
secretaries. Garden and Farm Almanac 
(Garden City, N. Y.) 1916 p 55-7 25c 

Directory of the agricultural and similar or- 
ganizations of Massachusetts, 1915.' 29p '15 
Mass. bd. of agric. 

—Same. In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d an- 
nual report, 1914, p 601-29 '15 

* Pennsylvania — List of county and local agri- 

cultural societies. Pa Dept Agric Bui no 
281 8p '16 
See also Agricultural directories 

Laws 
Ohio — [Laws relative to state aid to agricul- 
tural societies and real estate of agricultural 
societies]. Ohio Agric Comm Official Bui v 6 
no 3 p 24-5 D '15 

Reports 

* Jewish agricultural and industrial aid society. 

Annual report for the year 1915. 61p '15 
Cyrus L. Sulzberger, sec, 174 2d av., N. Y. 

Agricultural pests. See Army worms; Plant 
diseases 

Agricultural surveys ^ tttt 

* Agricultural survey of Brooke county, [W. 

Va.] O. M. Johnson and A. J. Dadisman. 
W Va Univ Agric Exp Sta Bui no 153 32p 
Ag '15 Dept. of farm management. West 
"Virginia univ., Morgantown 

* Rhode Island. Comm. of inquiry into the 

agricultural resources of the state. Prelim- 
inary report. 30p '16 R. I. state lib. 

Agriculture . ^ , 

Intensive farming in the irrigated district, by 
H. H. Harrington; Intensive farming in the 
drainage belt, by B. E. Rice; Corn grow- 
ing in the Northwest, by D. E. Willard; 
Relation of Uve stock to agriculture, by 
Thomas Shaw; County agent as a factor in 
railroad development work, by D. C. Welty; 
Co-operating with farmers, by G. E. Cassel; 
Conservation of agriculture for the North- 
west, by F. R. Crane. In Railway develop- 
ment assn. Proceedings, 1915, p 23-37, 46-9, 
53-6, 59-63, 73-4 

* Selected readings in rural economics. T: N. 

Carver, comp. 974p *$2.80 'Ig Ginn 

Contains the following general chapters: 
Agricultural history; Land tenure; Agri- 
cultural labor; Farmer's business; Agrarian 
movements in the U. S.; Rural organization 
and marketing; Agricultural policy 
Stability of agriculture. J. W. Wadsworth. In 
Assn. of life insurance presidents. Proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 69-77 

See also Dairying; Farm products; Farm- 
ers' cooperative movements; Feeding stuffs; 
Fertilizers; Horticulture; Negroes — Occupa- 
tions; Railroads — Development; Soils; State 
farms; also entries under headings begin- 
ning Agricultural, Farm 

Bibliography 
Agricultural Index, of which the number for 
March, 1916, is the first issue, is a cumula- 
tive index to agricultural periodicals and 
• bulletins, published by the H. W. Wilson 
company. White Plains, N. Y. The initial 
number indexes fifteen agricultural period- 
icals, the bulletins of sixteen agricultural 
experiment stations and state boards, the 
bulletins of the U. S. department of agri- 
culture, and the journals of three associa- 
tions devoted to the science and art of agri- 
culture. It is scarcely more than a pro- 
spectus of what is planned. The price is on 
a sliding scale 

* Farmers' bulletins, department bulletins and 

yearbooks of the department of agriculture. 
(Price list 16 9th ed) 41p O '15 U. S. supt. 
of doc. 

♦ List of available publications of the Mass. 

state bd. of agric. lOp Mr 1 '16 



* U. S. Dept. of agriculture. List of publica- 
tions issued since July 1, 1913. 54p rev to 
July 1, 1915 Jl 26 '15 

Conferences 

Extension dept, of Ohio state university ar- 
ranged for a number of the state's farm 
organizations to hold their annual meetings 
on the campus during Farmers' week, Jan. 
31 to Feb. 4, 1916. The list included the 
Ohio corn show, the Ohio dairymen's assn., 
the Farm institute workers, the Ohio vege- 
table-growers assn. and four dairy-cattle 
breed clubs. A statewide boys' stock- judg- 
ing contest was also held, which was parti- 
cipated in by 96 boys, the winners of the 
county judging contest conducted by the 
extension dept., in the fall. The dairymen's 
association had the use of the armory for 
the week, for exhibits of milking machines, 
dairy apparatus and creamery supplies. 
Prof. Alfred Vivian, dean of the college of 
agriculture, delivered a series of illustrated 
lectures on "A farmer's trip around the 
world" (D 13 '15) 

Farmers' congress. New York, fall of 1916, to- 
discuss the food supply problem of New 
Y'ork city, to endeavor to bring about co- 
operation between producer and consumer, 
and keep down the cost of living so far as 
food supplies may affect it. Comr. Joseph. 
Hartigan, Bur. of weights and measures^ 
N. Y. city, is working on the program 

Farmers' nat, congress. Annual convention, 
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 17-20, 1916. Discus- 
sion of American bankers in relation to farm 
development will occupy a prominent part 
on the program as well as marketing and 
distribution of farm products 

* Farmers nat. congress of the U. S. Offi- 

cial proceedings, 34th annual session, 1914. 
202p il Je 1 '15 O. D. Hill, sec, Kendalia,. 
W. Va. 

Addresses were delivered on farm tenancy,, 
marketing, rural credit, production of cot- 
ton, the rural home, rural schools and water- 
ways , ,^ 
National farmers' assn. Conference in Kansas- 
City, February, 1916. Marketing and rural 
credit were discussed; and federal investiga- 
tion of matters of importance to farmers re- 
quested. Critics of the program adopted sug- 
ge.st that the association complete facts and 
make a scientific study of conditions affect- 
ing farming before seeking federal aid 

* Pennsvlvania. Bd. of agriculture. Proceed- 

ings'^ of the 39th annual meeting, Harrisburg, 
Pa., Jan. 26-27, 1916. Pa Dept Agric Bui no- 
278 184p '16 

Program includes the following papers: 
Vocational agricultural education, by L. H. 
Dennis; Rural credits, by R. W. Moss; Mar- 
keting, by E. B. Dorsett. Among the com- 
mittee reports is the report of the commit- 
tee on roads and road laws . 

* Pennsylvania farmers' annual normal insti- 

tute and spring meeting of the state hd. of 
agriculture, Exposition Park, Pa., May 25- 
27, 1915. Proceedings. Pa Dept Agric Bui no 
267 204p '15 

Following were among the addresses 
given: Infectious abortion, by C. J. Mar- 
shall; Agriculture and the public schools, by 
L. H. Dennis; Centralizing of public schools,, 
by E. B. Dorsett; The country church, by 
B. M. Posten; The Pennsylvania experiment 
station, its work and lessons, by R. L. 
Watts; The relation of birds to agriculture, 
by W. W. Cooke; Some orchard insects and" 
their control, by F. H. Fassett; Community 
breeding, by H. T. Rabild 

Legislation 
See Agricultural legislation 

periodicals 
Agricultural Digest is published under tlie aus- 
pices of the National agricultural society. 
The first issue appeared May, 1916. Sub- 
scription, $1.50 a year; single numbers. 15c. 
The Digest will report the essentials of the 
experiment station publications and the re- 
search work of the dept. of agriculture, the 
agricultural colleges and other institutions 
investigating agricultural problems; present 
instructive feature articles covering all or 
the important agricultural movements or 



20 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Agriculture— Periodicals— Oontuiiied 

the country; support all wise and useful legr- 
islation tending to better the condition of 
the agricultural classes. The Digest will be 
national in scope and character and will lend 
its support to all measures making for agri- 
cultural progress. Agricultural press, 2 W. 
45th St., N. Y. 

•Canada — Department of agriculture issues a 
monthly bulletin called Bulletin of Foreign 
Agricultural Intelligence, covering the fol- 
lowing general topics: Agricultural intelli- 
gence and plant diseases; Economic and 
social intelligence; Agricultural and com- 
mercial statistics 

International Review of Agricultural Econom- 
ics, formerly the Monthly Bulletin of Eco- 
nomic and Social Intelligence, published by 
the Bureau of economic and social intelli- 
gence, International institute of agriculture. 
Villa Umberto I, Rome, Italy, is a monthly 
bulletin published in English, French. Ger- 
man, Spanish, and Italian. It contains 
articles relative to cooperation and associa- 
tion, insurance and thrift, credit, and 
agricultural economy in general in the various 
countries, also notices of recent publications. 
The price is 18 frs., single numbers 2 frs. 

Reports 

* Massachusetts. Bd. of agriculture. 62d annual 

report of the secretary, 1914. (Pub doc 4) 
640p il '15 

The following lectures and essays are 
given: Profitable farm poultry, with special 
reference to eggs and meat, by W. R. Gra- 
ham; Value of experimental work for truck 
farmers, by T. C. Johnson; Co-operation in 
fruit growing as practiced in Nova Scotia, 
by W. H. Woodworth; Beef production in 
New England, by H. H. Wing; Household 
accounting, by Laura Comstock; Factors 
affecting economical milk production, by 
C. H. Eckles; Encouragement of clean milk 
production, by L. B. Cook; Some experi- 
ences in farm accounting, by C. P. God- 
dard; Alfalfa for New England, by A. D. 
Cromwell; Rats and rat riddance, by E: H. 
Forbush; Cranberry growing, by H: J. 
Franklin; The army worm, by H: T. Fer- 
nald; Home vegetable garden, by Allen 
French; Sanitary side of farm water sup- 
plies, by X. H. Goodnough; Sewage disposal 
in rural districts, by E: H. Williams 
Massachusetts. Bd. of agriculture. 63d an- 
nual report, 1915 (Pub doc no 4) 252+ 312p 
Weight 2% lbs Enclose postage '16 

Pt. 1, Report of the secretary; pt. 2, Year- 
book. The latter contains agricultural legis- 
lation of 1915, p 281-301 
=* Michigan. Bd. of agriculture. 54th annual 
report of the sec. and 28th annual report of 
the experiment stations from July 1, 1914 to 
June 30, 1915 362p '15 

Contains principal legislation now in force 
relating to Michigan agric. college and state 
bd. of agriculture 

* South Carolina. Comr. of agriculture. 7th an- 

nual report of the labor division. 145p '15 

* South Carolina. Comr. of agriculture, com- 

merce and industries. 12th annual report. 
259p il '15 

* Vermont. Comr. of agriculture, 7th annual 

report for the year 1915. 91p '15 

Statistics 

* Agricultural statistics for Wisconsin, 1915. 

Wis Dept Agric Bui no 4 14p Ja 1 '16 

* Annuaire international de statistique agricole 

1913 et 1914. 787p 5fr '15 International inst. 
of agric, Rome, Italy 

This volume, which is the third of the 
series, makes a systematic collection of 
data on the production, commerce, con- 
sumption and prices of the principal agri- 
cultural products, for all countries in the 
world which have statistics, for a whole 
10-year period from 1905 to 1914 (in the 
southern hemisphere up to the first half 
of 1915) 

-■* Ireland. Dept. of agriculture and technical in- 
struction. Agricultural statistics, Ireland, 
1914: report and tables relating to Irish ag- 
ricultural laborers. 35p n p '15 



Air 

Character and extent of atmospheric pollution 
in English and Scotch towns, with notes 
upon a new type of recording actinometer. 
J: B. C, Kershaw. Met & Chem Eng 13:967- 
71 D 15 '15 

See also Dust; Railroads — Electrification; 
Smoke 

Reports -^ 

* Manchester, England. Sanitary com. Report 
on the subject of air pollution. 42p il charts 
Ap '15 W. T. Jackson, chm., Civics bldgs., 
Manohester 

Aircraft 

iSee also Insurance, Aircraft 

Legislation, Proposed 

Pan American conference recently held in 
Santiago adopted the first international law 
bills for airships. The conference resolved to 
recommend the bills to all American coun- 
tries. The text of bills appears in the N. Y. 
Times for July 23, 1916 
Alabama. Laws, etc. 

Commercial feeding stuffs laws and regula- 
tions; Alabama pharmacy laws. Alabama 
Agric and Industries Dept Bui v 6 no 74 Ja 1 
'16 (Feeding stuffs— Laws) 

Game and fish laws in force Nov, 1, 1915. '15 
Ala. dept. of archives and history (Game — 
Daws) 
Alcohol. See Intoxicating liquors 
Alderman, L. R. 

School credit for home work. $1 '15 Houghton 
(School credits) 
Alexander, De Alva Stanwood 

History and procedure of the house of repre- 
sentatives. *$2 '16 Houghton (United States 
— House of representatives) 
Alien labor 

Arizona — U. S. supreme court has held the 
Arizona anti-alien labor law invalid, in 
that it conflicts with the 14th amendment. 
The decision is regarded not merely as 
annulling the Arizona law, requiring em- 
ployers to employ not less than 80 per 
cent, qualified electors or citizens, but also 
as forecasting the downfall of anti-Japan- 
ese legislation, proposed from time to time 
on the Pacific coast. The question involved 
had reference to private employment only. 
Truax v. Raich, 239 U S 33 

Legislation, Comparative 

[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] im- 
. migration and aliens. Am Labor Leg R 5: 
735-6 D '15 

Public works 

New York — U. S. supreme court has upheld 
the validity of the New York law (recently 
amended by the legislature so as to ward 
off its worst effects) directed against the 
employment of alien labor on public works. 
Heim v. McCall, 239 U S 175 

Seven states expressly prohibit the employ- 
ment of immigrants upon public works: 
Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New Jersey, 
Arizona, Wyoming, and Idaho; and Cali- 
fornia has a law only slightly less sweeping. 
Many municipalities supplement these laws 
by discriminatory regulations of their own 
(N 2 '15) 

Reports 
■^ Washington. Bur. of labor. Special report on 

the salmon canning: Industry in the state of 

Washington and the employment of oriental 

labor, Nov., 1915. 16p '15 
Aliens. See Citizenship; Immigrants; Insane — 

Aliens; Japanese 

Allen, Edward Ellis, comp. 

Special reference library of books relating to 
the blind: 1st supplement to pt. 1, books in 
English. '16 Perkins institution and Mass. 
school for the blind, Watertown, Mass. 
(Blind — Bibliography) 
Alleys 
Importance of alley paving. R. F. Hall, il Am 
Citv 13:329-31 O '15 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



21 



Alleys — Continued 

Toledo, O. — City platting commission has not 
approved a plat which provided for alleys, 
since Jan. 1, 1916. Service director Good- 
willie would cut out the alleys entirely as 
practically unnecessary in a city of Toledo's 
size (Mr 15 '16) 

iiee also Housing — Alleys 
Ordinances 

* Chicago 111. — Summary of ordinances relating 

to sanitation and to the maintenance of 
streets and alleys, to be enforced by the 
dept. of police; prepared under the direction 
of J: D. Robertson, comr. of health, and 
W: R. Moorhouse, comr. of public works. 
29p Jl '15 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Almshouses 

Reports 

Institution Quarterly for March 31, 1916, v. 7, 
no. 1, has been devoted almost exclusively 
to a study of the jails, almshouses and relief 
agencies of Illinois. It contains a report 
upon every jail and almshouse in the state, 
except those of Peoria and St. Clair coun- 
ties, which were inspected early in the year, 
and an account of the relief measures and 
methods of every county in the state. The 
commission favors the district or the state 
penal farm for petty offenders; the exten- 
sion of the system of probation for men and 
women who cannot give bail; a monthly 
grand jury in the populous counties; the 
prohibition of the per diem system of feed- 
ing prisoners, and the power, reposed in the 
governor, to close any almshouse or jail 
which fails to meet the requirements of 
decency, sanitation and humanity in its 
administration; also a law which will permit 
two or more counties to join in the erection 
and maintenance of a district almshouse; a 
law to prohibit the letting of the superm- 
tendency of the county farm to the highest 
bidder on the land, and the lowest on the 
keep of the inmates; a law requiring the 
filing with a central state authority of dupli- 
cates of all orders for relief, issued by over- 
seers of the poor or supervisors 
American academy of medicine 

Medicine an aid to commerce: proceedings, 
1915. '16 The Academy, Easton, Pa. (Medi- 
cine — Conferences) 

American association for labor legislation 

* American assn. for labor legislation. Pro- 

ceedings of the ninth annual meeting, 
Washington. D. C, Dec. 28-29, 1915. Am 
Labor Leg R v 6 lllp Mr '16 

Sessions were held on Social insurance, 
Protective legislation for seamen. Legisla- 
tion, and Industrial hygiene and sanitation 

American association for study and prevention 
of Infant mortality 
Transactions of the 6th annual meeting, Phil- 
adelphia, Nov. 10-12, 1915. $3 Weight 1 lb, 
7 oz Enclose postage '16 The Assn., 1211 
Cathedral st., Baltimore, Md. (Infant mor- 
tality conferences) 

American association of farmers' institute 
workers 

Proceeding of the 20th annual meeting held 
at University of California, Berkeley, Cal., 
August 12-14, 1915. '15 (Farmers' institutes 
— Conferences) 

American association of public accountants 

Year-book, 1914-1915. $1.65 '15 Ronald press co., 
20 Vesey St., N. Y. (Accounting — Confer- 
ences 

American association of public employment 
offices 
Proceedings of the annual meetings: 1st, Chi- 
cago, Dec. 19-20, 1913; 2d, Indianapohs, 
Sept. 24-25, 1914; 3d Detroit, July 1-2. 1915. 
U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 192 (Em- 
ployment and unemployment ser no 1) 177p 
My '16 (Employment agencies — Conferences) 

American association of societies for organizing 
charity 
Charities of Springfield, Illinois: a survey by 
F. H. McLean. 25c D '15 Russell Sage found. 
(Charities — Surveys) 



American automobile association 

Why federal aid in roads? Am. automobile 
assn., Riggs bldg., Washington, D. C. (Roads 
— Federal aid) 
American electric railway transportation and 
traffic association 

Report of the com. on passenger traffic, read 
before the convention held at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., October 4-8, 1915. il 25c '15 
The Assn., 8 W. 40th St., N. Y. (Electric 
railroads — Passenger traffic) 
American federation of labor 

American federation of labor, at its conven- 
tion in San Francisco, Nov. 16, 1915, declared 
itself in favor of government ownership of 
the telegraph lines; creation by congress of 
a permanent non-partisan tariff commission; 
an American merchant marine to be manned 
by American seamen under conditions which 
would make them an effectual naval reserve; 
a petition to congress asking enactment of 
a law that would prohibit contractors from 
employing alien labor on all government 
work in preference to American citizens in 
the U. S. and its territorial possessions. It 
voted down a measure in favor of the ini- 
tiative, referendum and recall as applied to 
federation officers and business, and ex- 
pressed its disapproval of legislative methods 
of obtaining an eight-hour day for men, 
approving it for women and children (N 23 
'15) 
American society of municipal improvements 

Proceedings, 1915. '16 The Society. 702 Wulsin 
bWg., Indianapolis (Municipal improvements 
— Conferences) 
American wood preservers' association 

Proceedings of the 12th annual meeting held 
at Chicago, 111., January 18-20, 1916. 432p 
'16 F. J. Angier, sec.-treas., Mt. Royal Sta- 
tion, Baltimore, Md. (Wood preservation — 
Conferences) 

Americanism 

* Americanism: what it is. D: J. Hill. 280p 

*$1.25 '16 Appleton 
Americanization. See Citizenship: Immigrants 

— Americanization ; Immigrants — Education 
Ammunition. See Explosives; Munitions of war 
Amortization. See Insurance — Amortization 
Amusements 

See also Athletics; Cabarets; Dance halls; 

Moving pictures; Playgrounds; Recreation; 

Theater; Piers, Municipal 

License 

Nuremberg, Germany — Amusement tax adopted 
in April, 1912, appHes to all public and so- 
ciety amusements and specifies several 
dozen varieties of taxable amusements such 
as dancing, festivals, mask balls, bazaars, 
carnivals, parades, circuses, theatrical per- 
formances, concerts, singing, recitations, 
various acrobatic and variety performances, 
racing, lotteries, fireworks, merry-go-rounds, 
exhibitions of trained animals, sporting 
.games, athletic performances, etc. The 
charge may be measured by the price of the 
ticket issued. The tax is doubled when the 
tickets are issued for fancy and mask balls, 
carnival sittings, etc. Instead of a tax on 
each ticket the persons organizing the en- 
tertainments may arrange to pay a lump 
sum. The total receipts from the tax m 
1915 amounted to $19,649. of which $14,957 
was derived from tickets and $4,692 from 
lump pavments. Several other German 
cities have also introduced the taxation of 
amusements in recent years 

Legislation, Comparative 

* State laws providing for the licensing or taxa- 

tion of theaters, theatrical exhibitions, 
shows, moving pictures, etc. William Webb, 
comp.. N. Y. (state) leg. ref. lib. 16p 16 
(Typew 90c) 

Ordinances, Proposed 

* Chicago, 111.— Ordinance recommended for 

passage by the committee on judiciary 
on amusements located within 200 ft. of 
churches, hospitals and schools. (Pam no bOU) 
Ip Je 26 '16 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 



22 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Andrews, John B. 

Health insurance and the prevention of tuber- 
culosis. '16 John B. Andrews, sec, Am. assn. 
for labor leg., 131 E. 22d st., N. Y. (Insur- 
ance. Health) 

Animals 

Diseases 
Ideal state law for cooperation between state 
and federal authorities in the work of eradi- 
cating contagious animal diseases. C. J. 
Marshall. Journal of the Am Veterinary- 
Medical Assn (Ithaca, N. Y.) n s 1:429-41 Ja 
'16 30c 

* Lymphatic glands in meat-producing animals: 

their methodical examination with sanitary- 
inspection as the viewpoint, topographical 
data and pathological alterations occurring 
in these organs. P. Godbille. 175p $2 '15 Wil- 
liam R. Jenkins co., 6th av. & 48th st., N. Y. 
Rockefeller foundation appropriated $1,000,000 
to the Rockefeller institute for medical 
research, for additional endowment needed 
in connection with the department of animal 
pathology, recently established at Prince- 
ton, N. J., to undertake the study of animal 
diseases (Mr 19 '16) 

See also Anthrax; Cattle — Abortion, Infec- 
tious; Cattle tick; Foot and mouth disease; 
Live stock; Live stock — Remedies; Lung- 
worms; Tuberculosis of animals 

Reports 

* Maine. Live stock sanitary comr. Report on 

contagious diseases of animals, 1915. 83p il 
'16 

Treatment 

Humane Sunday was observed by churches 
thruout the country. May 21, 1916. The ob- 
ject was to have one Sunday in the year set 
apart for special services calling attention 
to the need for protection for animals 

Prevention of cruelty to animals in Illinois, 
Colorado and California. F, M. Hubbard. 
Proc Acad Pol Sci v 6 209-320p Ja '16 $1 
Monograph prepared for the Henry Bergh 
foundation for the promotion of humane 
education and published by the Foundation 
as Bulletin of Social Legislation no. 4. 
March, 1916, Columbia university press 

Reports 

* American society for the prevention of cruelty 

to animals. 49th annual report, year ended 
Dec. 31, 1914. SOp il '15 Richard Welling, 
sec, Madison av. & 26th st., N. Y. 

Annulment of marriage. See Marriage — Annul- 
ment 

Anthrax 

Anthrax as an occupational disease. W: H. 
Rand. Monthly R 3:1-5 Jl '16 

* Experiments in vaccination against anthrax. 

Adolph Eichhorn. U S Dept Agric Bui no 340 
(Professional paper) 16p D 27 '15; Same. J 
of the Am Veterinary Medical Assn (Ithaca, 
N. Y.) n s 1:669-86 Mr '16 30c 

Apartment houses. See Girls — Housing; Housing 

Apiaries. See Bees 

Apples 

* Cost of producing apples in Maine in 1914. 

A. K. Gardner. Maine Dept of Agric Quar 
Bui V 14 no 3 22p S '15 

The use of a Regular worker's daily time 
sheet proved very satisfactory and it is 
recommended that large growers adopt it. 
A copy of sheet is given on p. 3 

Grading 

Laws 

* Apple grading and packing. U. S. stand- 

ard barrel law, apple grading law. Wilfrid 
Wheeler. Mass Bd Agric Circ no 50 27p post- 
age 2c Jl '16 
Apportionment 
Apportionment of representatives. W. F. Will- 
cox. Am Econ R 6:sup3-16 Mr '16 
New York (state) — Court of appeals has nulli- 
fied the senate district reapportionment en- 
acted by the 1916 legislature. The lower 
court held that the provision for fifty-one 
senators instead of fifty was unconstitu- 
tional, but that the rest of the act would 
stand; the upper court held that the pro- 



vision for fifty-one senators was legal, but 
that the rest of the act, at least that por- 
tion of it affecting New York city, was un- 
constitutional (Jl 26 '16) 
Ohio supreme court handed down a decision, 
April 18, 1916, holding that congressional 
redistricting bills are subject to the referen- 
dum. Decision was upheld by the U. S. su- 
preme court Je 12 '16 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
New York — Providing for a new legislative 
apportionment in 1916 on the basis of the 
federal enumeration. Amendment proposed 
by the constitutional convention. Rejected. 
Yes 371,588 No 891,337 N '15 

Referendum measures, 1915 
Ohio — Amending section 4828-1 of the general 
code, making an apportionment of the state 
of Ohio into congressional districts under 
the thirteenth census of the United States. 
Referred law (Sprague act. H B no 710) Re- 
jected. Yes 271,987 No 329,095 N '15 
Apprenticeship 

* Apprentice system of the General electric 

company. West Lynn, Mass. 32p il Ja '16 
General electric company, West Lynn, Mass. 
Practical, systematic training of apprentices. 
Am Ind 17:27-9 Ag '16 

* Principles of apprentice training, with special 

reference to the engineering industry. 
A. P. M. Fleming and J. P. Pearce. 202p 
''=3s 6d '16 Longmans 
Appropriations 

High cost of the pork barrel. J. E. Ransdell. 
Ann Am Acad 64:43-55 Mr '16 

Discusses appropriations for waterways, 
public buildings and pensions 

See also Veto power — Appropriation bills 

Fergus case 

* Opinion of the supreme court in the Fergus 

case, filed Nov. 6, i915. 43p '15 111. leg. ref. 
bur. 

* Status of the Fergus suits. 14p '15 111. leg. ref. 

bur. 

Fergus suits consist of five suits, each 
setting forth alleged irregularities in appro- 
priations made by the 49th general assembly 
and praying for an injunction to restrain 
payment. The suits involve the "relief 
bills" including several sums granted to per- 
sons injured while in the employ of the 
state; deficiency appropriations; committee 
expenses; members' mileage appropriation; 
and the "omnibus bill" 

Apthous fever. See Foot and mouth disease 

Arbitration, Commercial 

* International arbitration of individual com- 

mercial disputes: tentative plan suggested 
by the Chamber of commerce of the state 
of New York. 51p '14 N. Y. chamber of 
commerce, 65 Liberty st., N. Y. 

Printed in English, French, Italian, Ger- 
man and Spanish for the delegates to the 
6th International congress of chambers of 
commerce meeting in Paris, June 8, 1914 
Organized arbitration of trade disputes. Sam- 
uel Rosenbaum. Nation's Business 4:11 Jl 
'16 

Address delivered before the Chicago assn. 
of credit men 
Arbitration, Industrial 
Arbitration. In G: G. Groat. Introduction to 
the study of organized labor in America, p 
204-38 '16 

* Arbitration and conciliation in Australasia. 

M. T. Rankin. 192p n p '16 Allen and Un- 
win, London 

* Industrial arbitration: a world-wide survey of 

natural and political agencies for social jus- 
tice and industrial peace. C. H. Mote. 351; 
xlvp *$1.50 '16 Bobbs 

Discusses conditions in England, Ger- 
many, France, New Zealand, and Australia, 
and takes up investigations, experiments, 
legislation, strikes and trade agreements in 
the U. S. 
Industrial peace in Australia through mini- 
mum wage and arbitration. H: B. Higgins. 
Monthly R v 2 no 2 p 1-22 F '16 

Reprinted from Harvard Law Review, No- 
vember, 1915 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



23 



Arbitration, Industrial — Continued 

Labor and industrial courts. In F: C. Howe. 
Socialized Germany, p 182-91 '15 

New province for law and order: industrial 
peace through minimum wage and arbitra- 
tion. H: B. Higgins. Harv Law R 29:13-39 
N '15 

Describes the Australian methods of deal- 
ing with labor questions thru the court of 
conciliation and arbitration 

Wage theories in industrial arbitration. Wil- 
son Compton. Am Econ R 6:324-42 Je '16 

See also Collective bargaining; Concilia- 
tion; Hours of labor — Railroads; Street 
railroads — Strikes; Trade agreements 
Legislation 

Norway has recently passed an act for the 
settlement of trade disputes, which provides 
for compulsory investigation before stoppa.i^e 
of work takes place, compulsory registration 
of trade unions and employers' associations, 
and the recognition and regulation of col- 
lective agreements. It also provides for a 
labor court, sitting at Christiana, the deci- 
sions of which are enforceable and final, 
except on questions of law and jurisdiction. 
The court consists of a president and four 
other members, appointed by the crown, 
to hold office for a period of three years. The 
president must be qualified to act as a judge 
in the supreme court, and the members must 
be nominated, two by employers and two by 
labor. Fixed salaries are paid by the state 
to the members, none of whom shall be paid 
servants or officers of any trade union or 
employers' association (Mr 17 '16) 

Legislation, Comparative 

Legislation in the U. S. In C. H. Mote. In- 
dustrial arbitration, p 215-38 '16 

[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] trade 
unions and trade disputes. Am Labor Leg R 
5:756-60 D '15 
Arbitration, International 

Carnegie endowment for international peace. 
Yearbook for 1916. 204p '16 The Endow- 
ment, 2 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. 

Justiciability of international disputes. J. S. 
Reeves. Am Pol Sci R 10:70-9 F '16 

National chamber of commerce conducted a 
referendum for the purpose of ascertaining 
the business opinion thruout the country on 
the report of a special committee on eco- 
nomic results of the war and American busi- 
ness. 282 commercial organizations in 40 
states, Hawaii and the District of Columbia 
filed ballots. A large majority were in favor 
of the recommendation that, for considera- 
tion of questions which arise between na- 
tions and which do not depend upon estab- 
lished rules nor upon facts which cannot be 
determined by an international court, the 
U. S. should take the initiative in estab- 
lishing a council of conciliation. There was 
a majority vote, also, in favor of the fol- 
lowing proposals: the establishment of an 
international court, thru the initiative of 
the U. S., for the decision of questions 
which arise between nations and which can 
be resolved upon the application of estab- 
lished rules or upon the determination of 
facts; better defined and stronger rules for 
the protection of life and property upon 
the high seas: frequent international con- 
ferences for the progressive amendment of 
international law; the use of concerted eco- 
nomic pressure on any nation resorting to 
military measures without submitting its 
quarrel to an international court. The 
measure providing for the use of force to 
establish peace was not carried CJa 5 '16) 

Report [and resolutions] of com. on interna- 
tional arbitration. In N. Y. state bar assn. 
Proceedings. 1916. p 103-15 

Supreme court of the United States as an In- 
ternational tribunal. W: R. Vance. Judicial 
Settlement International Disputes no 23 21p 
N '15 Am. society for judicial settlement of 
international disputes. Baltimore. Md. 

Commencement address before the Unl- 
ersity of North Dakota, June 16, 1915 

Toward world government: an interpretation 
of ten more constructive proposals. G: W. 
Nasmyth. Survey 35:183-7 N 20 '15 



World court congress. Second meeting. New 
York, May 2-4, 1916. The program was 
limited to the one topic of promoting a true 
international court of justice, without ref- 
erence to present conditions or the need for 
adequate defenses. Such a court has been 
endorsed by the Institute of international 
law, by all the leading powers, and by state 
legislatures, chambers of commerce and 
representative religious bodies; it has been, 
exhaustively studied at four annual con- 
ferences of the American society for judicial 
settlement of international disputes. The 
program contained the names of many rep- 
resentative citizens r'ncluding John Hays 
Hammond, president of the World's court 
league; William Howard Taft, honarary pres- 
ident; Prof. Albert Bushnell Hart, Simeon E. 
Baldwin, Oscar S. Straus. Judge Alton B. 
Parker, Henry Clews, Charles Thaddeus 
Terry and several members of the national 
senate and house of representatives. J: Wes- 
ley Hill, sec, N. Y. 

Reports 

* New York state bar assn. Com. on interna- 

tional arbitration. Report presented at the 
39th annual meeting, held at New York, Jan. 
14-15, 1916. lip Everett P. Wheeler, 27 Wil- 
liam St., N. Y. 

The resolutions recommended in tlie report 
were unanimously adopted by the Associa- 
tion, Jan. 14, 1916 
Archeological remains 

Preservation 

Nineteenth international congress of Ameri- 
canists, at its meeting in Washington, D. C, 
Dec. 28, 1915, passed resolutions recommend- 
ing that the different countries of the western 
hemisphere pass uniform laws that will 
effectively safeguard archeological remains, 
such as ruins, monuments and burial sites 
containing examples of industry and art as 
practised by the aborigines; and that the 
delegates to the congress use their influence 
to impress the governments with the im- 
portance of promoting research in this field, 
of organizing surveys for the study of primi- 
tive tribes and of building up national and 
local museums for the preservation of the 
data and materials collected 
Architects 

* California. Bd. of architecture. 5th report: the 

law, rules of the board, and list of certifi- 
cated architects. 48p '15 The Board, 1040 
Phelan bldg., San Francisco 

* Law of architecture and building: a consid- 

eration of the mutual rights, duties and 
liabilities of architect, owner and contrac- 
tor, with appendices and forms. C. H. Blake, 
jr. 314p *$3 '16 William T. Comstock co., 23 
Warren st., N. Y. 

License and registration 
Grand Rapids, Mich. — State supreme court has 
upheld the validity of the ordinance re- 
quiring architects to obtain licenses. R. A. 
Jorgen v. R. M. Wedgewood (Press rept Ap 
6 '16) 

Reports 
Report of the committee on registration of 
architects. Am Inst Arch J (American insti- 
tute of architects. The Octagon, Washington, 
D. C.) 4:358-9 Ag '16 30c 

Contains: Important provision of the law 
and criticism of New York law 
Architects, IVIunicipal 
Seattle, Wash. — Joint com. of the Washington 
state chapter of the Am. institute of archi- 
tects and the Municipal league have pre- 
sented a resolution to the city council urging 
the permanent employment of a city archi- 
tect at a salary of $300 a month. It was 
regarded as probable that the council would 
approve the bill when voted upon June 12, 
1916 
Architectural education 

Reports 
Report of the committee on education. R. C. 
Sturgis. Am Inst Arch J (American insti- 
tute of architects, The Octagon, Washington, 
D. C.) 4:357-8 Ag '16 30c 



24 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Archives ^ 

U. S. house of representatives on June TO, 
1916, passed a bill providing for the erection 
of a national archives building. The bill was 
passed by the senate in May. Carnegie in- 
stitution has made a study of all informa- 
tion in print concerning the best national 
halls of archives in Europe. The war pre- 
vents consultation with European authori- 
ties 
Arithmetic 

Economy of time 

* Economy of time in arithmetic. W. A. Jessup. 

Univ of la Bui n s no 2 (Univ exten bul 
no 5) 461-76p Je 13 '14 State univ. of Iowa, 
Iowa City, la. 
Armies 

See also National defense; also names be- 
ginning Military 

Bibliography 
Army and militia: including publications on 
aviation, preparedness for war, export of 
munitions, pension laws, (Price list 19 6th 
ed) 26p Mr '16 U. S. supt. of doc. 

* List of references on the Swiss military sys- 

tem. U. S. Library of congress. 9p N 30 '15 
(Typew Cost of copying 45c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Armor piate. See Munitions of war 
Armories 

Legislation, Comparative 

* State armories: non-attendance at drills. R. I. 

leg. ref. lib. 6p Ja 10 '16 (Typew B 30c) 

Army worms 

Army worm. H. T. Fernald. il In Mass. 
Bd. of agriculture. 62d annual report, 1914, 
p 284-94 '15 

* True army worm and its control. W. R. Wal- 

ton, il map Farmers' Bul no 731 12p My 23 

'16 
Arson 

Arson and citizenship: East Youngstown, O., 

and the aliens who set it on fire. J: A. 

Fitch, il Survey 35:477-80 Ja 22 '16 
Beating the modern arson game. Haldane 

White, il Am City 14:390-3 Ap '16 

* Brief for the people: arson, burning to de- 

fraud, conspiracy and kindred crimes, to- 
gether with suggestions for the condemna- 
tion and removal of fire hazard conditions. 
W. H. Bennett. 96p '15 111. fire marshal dept. 
^ee also Fires 
Art 

American federation of arts, composed of 
museums, art assns., art comms., public li- 
braries, universities, etc., is best known for 
its traveling exhibitions. It also sends out 
typewritten illustrated lectures on subjects 
pertaining to art, and publishes a monthly 
illustrated magazine. Art and Progress, and 
a yearly directory, the American Art 
Annual. At the annual meeting held in 
Washington, in the spring of 1915, ah exhi- 
bition of American industrial art was inaug- 
urated. It was held at the National mu- 
seum. It is the first time manufacturers, 
artists and the federal government have 
combined in assembling such an exhibition. 
The chief topic of the convention was art 
education, with special reference to cultural 
and industrial development 

Study and teaching 

Art education. C: F. Kelley. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 371-90 '15 
Discussion is limited to the study of draw- 
ing, painting, design, and the history and 
appreciation of the fine arts 
Professional art schools. F. N. Levy. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 375-99 
'15 

Statistics of art schools: schools and en- 
rollment in 1913-14; List of art schools, 
classified as to management; Professional 
art schools classified by subjects, p 388-99 
See also University extension — Art 
Art commissions 
American federation of arts. Convention at 
Washington, D. C, June, 1916. The suc- 
cessful work of the N. Y. city art commis- 
sion and that of other cities was reviewed, 
and a plea was made particularly for in- 



creased power for the art commission at the 
national capitol. Leila Mechlin, sec, Ameri- 
can fine arts bldg., N. Y. 

Art commissions and the future of American 
cities. A. W. Crawford. Am Inst Arch J (Am. 
institute of architects, The Octagon, Wash- 
ington, D. C.) 3:528-34 D '15 50c 

Chicago, 111. — Municipal art league and other 
organizations have signed petitions asking 
for the appointment of a municipal art com- 
mission (My 10 '16) 

* Philadelphia, Pa. Art jury. Bulletin of infor- 

mation, lip '13 

Text of act creating an art jury for cities 
of the first class and prescribing its powers 
and duties, p 7-9 

Reports 

* Philadelphia, Pa. Art jury. Third and fourth 

annual reports, 1913 and 1914. 44, 44p il '13, 
'14 
Art surveys 
Municipal art society of New York is to make 
an art survey of the city for the purpose 
of safeguarding the city against an invasion 
of misplaced art in the shape of monuments, 
statues, etc. A chart of all present monu- 
ments, etc., has been made and with this 
as a basis for its work the committee will 
begin a general survey of city property and 
take a sort of census of all available sites 
for monuments of the future in all the 
boroughs. Residents of every district in the 
city are to be consulted in regard to their 
wishes and desires in things artistic (F 18 
'16) 

Ashburn, Percy IVi. 
Elements of military hygiene. *$1.50 '15 
Houghton (Military hygiene) 
Ashby, Hugh T. 

Infant mortality. $3.25 '15 Putnam (Infant 
mortality) 
Ashes. See Refuse and refuse disposal 
Asphalt pavements. See Pavements, Asphalt 
Asphalt plants, Municipal 

(Ilamden's municipal asphalt plant. Munic J 

38:127-30 F 4 '15 
City makes money by purchasing plant and 
laying its own asphalt paving: Flint, Mich., 
saved $43,000 last year under contractors' 
estimates by forming an efficient day-labor 
organization. C. E. Ridley, diags Eng Rec 
73:767-9 Je 10 '16 
Operation of the municipal asphalt plant of 
the borough of Manhattan, New York city. 
Good Roads n s 10:298-9 D 4 '15 
Assessment 
How the state of Wisconsin improved its local 
assessment work; with discussion. T: S. 
Adams. In N. Y. state conference on tax- 
ation. Addresses and proceedings, 1916, p 88- 
117 

* Kansas — Revised instructions to be observed 

in the assessment and equalization of prop- 
erty, both real and personal, for purposes of 
taxation, revised 1916. 130p '16 Kansas tax 
comm., Topeka, Kansas 
Listing system. In N. Y. (state). Joint legis- 
lative com. on taxation. Report, p 143-8 '16 

* National tax assn. Com. on the method of se- 

lecting assessors. Report. 197-207p '15 Office 
of treasurer, 15 Dey st,, N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the 
ninth annual conference of the National tax 
assn. Recommends four plans for choosing 
assessors, three of which make the county 
the unit 

* New York (state). Tax dept. Manual for in- 

struction of assesors. N Y State Tax Bul v 1 
no 3 84p My '16 

See also Real estate— Taxation; Taxation 

County 
County simplification. H: J. Cookingham, jr. 
In N. Y. state conference on taxation. Ad- 
dresses and proceedings, 1916, p 74-87 

Conferences 
County assessors assn. of the state of Cali- 
fornia. 13th annual session, Dec. 7, 1914, 
Merced, Cal. In Cal. State bd of equalization, 
Report, 1913-1914, p 183-237 

Contains: State budget and revenue, by 
J: S. Chambers, Controller; Federal income 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



25 



Assessment — County — Conferences —Con timied 
tax, by C, C. Plehn; Methods of the N. T. 
department of taxes and assessments, by 
J. D. Burks; Torrens land act in other 
lands, by John Glnty; Increase in public ex- 
penditures, by T: S. Adams 
Proceedings of the county assessors' assn. of 
California, in 12th annual convention. Jack- 
son, Amador county, Nov., 1913. In Cal. 
state bd. of equaUzation. Report, 1913-1914, 
p 137-180 

Contains: National tax association, by 
John Mitchell; Elimination of fraudulent land 
subdivisions, by C: O. King; Home rule in 
taxation, by W. G. Eggleston; Currency re- 
form, by C. C. Plehn; Automobile tax, by 
C. E. Jarvis; Tax association, by Alexander 
Brown; Public opinion on assessments, by 
F. A. Bondshu; Federal income tax, by G: E. 
Mitchell 

Information from banks 
Virginia attorney general has given his opin- 
ion that all banking institutions in the state 
must disclose, on demand of the taxing offi- 
cers of the state, complete lists 'Of their 
depositors and the amount of their "time 
deposits" and "savings deposits." The text 
of the opinion appears in the Richmond 
Times Dispatch N 10 '15 

Assessors 

Appointment 

* Method of selecting assessors [in New York 

state cities]. N Y State Bur Municipal 
Information Rept no 72 Ip F '16 (Typew 5c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Salaries 

See Salaries — Assessors 

Association of American agricultural colleges 
and experiment stations 

Proceedings, 1915. '15 J. L. Hills, sec, Agric. 
experiment station, Burlington, Vt. (Agri- 
cultural education — Conferences) 
Association of American dairy, food and drug 
officials 

Official proceedings of the 19th annu3,l con- 
vention, Berkeley, Cal., 1915. $1 '15 J. B. 
Newman, sec, Manhattan bldg., Chicago, 
111. (Food — Conferences) 
Association of governmental labor officials of 
the United States and Canada 

Proceedings, 1915. 50c; 35c to members '15 
John T. Fitzpatrick, sec-treas., Kansas 
City, Mo. (Labor bureaus — Conferences) 
Association of life insurance presidents 

Proceedings of the 9th annual meeting held 
at the Astor Hotel, New York, Dec. 9-10, 
1915. '16 The Assn., 16 S. Broadway, N. Y. 
(Insurance, Life — Conferences) 
Athletics 

Educational value of athletics in schools and 
colleges. J. E. Raycroft. School and Soc 3: 
295-300 F 26 '16 

Eligibility rules for intercollegiate athletics. 
School and Soc 4:212-13 Ag 5 '16 

Indictment of intercollegiate athletics. W: T. 
Foster. Atlan 116:577-88 N '15 

* State wide athletics, season 1915, under the 

direction of the Public athletic league. 14p il 
Baltimore dept. of leg. ref. 

Claims that Maryland is the first state to 
recognize the relation of games and sports 
to education and character 

Conferences 

National collegiate athletic assn. [Papers read 
at the 10th annual convention. New York 
city, Dec. 28, 1915.] Am Phys Educ R 21: 
201-29 Ap '16 

Contains: President's address, 1915, by 
L. R. Briggs; Schedule-making and insti- 
tutional responsibility, by Albert Lefevre; 
College ideals and athletics, by R. N. Cor- 
win; Athletic standards, by Howard McClen- 
ahan; Athletics for all, by H. A. Garfield; 
College athletics, by Y^: H. Taft 
Athletics, Municipal 

Municipal control of athletics in Saint Louis. 
R. H. Abeken. Playground 10:181-4 Ag '16 
Atkinson, Henry A. 

Church and the people's play. *$1.25 '15 Pil- 
grim press (Church and social problems) 



Attachment 

^/il^t2''f !f"*^ company, Toledo. O., thru 
Its legal department, successfully conduct^ 
a branch to deal free of charge with caJel 
of garnishment and attachment among itf 
employees. F. J. Kessel. an attorney with 
experience in such cases, is in charg? of 
f^of ^''^^^^• "^^ ^«^k ^^s sta?ted to^pro- 
i^^iJ^^ "^^''- f,^°^ ""J"s<^ attachment of 

Hints ('ir2f"'!6)'^ ^^^^°"^^^ ^°"-^-- 
Attorneys 

* ^v^^l^^A^ °^ *^® ^^^ of the city of New 

York. Annual report of the com. on griev- 

W.^llth'st'^N Y^ ''' ^- ^- ^°ole?'iibTri2 

cia'tiot jU'^lin^Je^' "^^"""^ ^^ ^^« ^«^«- 

* Lawyer- citizen: his enlarging responsibilities. 

Samuel Untermyer. 32p '16 Samuel Unter- 
niyer, N. Y. 

Address delivered at the meeting of the 
Jul?'27^''l916 l^^sue, Atlantic City. N. J., 

See also Bar associations; Legal education 
Admission to bar 

* Texas. Supreme court. Rules prescribing a 

course of study and regulations governing 
the mode of examination for admission to 
the bar. 3p '16 
Auditing 
New York university. School of commerce, 
??,T^^*^^*^^Y^^^P'^ of- applied accounting in 
1914. Students in the department conduct 
free audits and make classifications of ac- 
counts for charitable societies that apply. 
Similar work is done by students in the ac- 
counting dispensary opened by the Univer- 
®l:^ of Denver in 1914, while accounting for 
charitable organizations is planned in the 
future by the University of Pittsburgh (1916) 
?o^ o"?, Papers. F. G. CoUey. J Account 22: 
4o-9 Jl 16 

Address before the New York state society 
or certified public accountants, April 10, 

Legislation, Comparative 

* Auditing of public accounts, and uniform ac- 

counting: digest of state statutes relative 
thereto. H. D. Scott and F. R. Smith, comps. 
R. I. leg. ref. lib. 31p Ja 4 '16 (Typew B $1.55) 
Auditoriums 

* Chicago needs a great convention hall, lip '16 

Chicago assn. of commerce, Otis bldg. 

* Municipal public halls: power of cities to erect 

halls for public meetings, conventions, en- 
tertainments and other purposes; court de- 
cisions in several states. John Simpson. 
Munic J 39:617-9 O 21 '15 

Automobiles. See Jitney buses; Motor omnibuses; 
Motor vehicles; Taxicabs 

Awnings 

Ordinances 

* St. Louis, Mo. — Ordinance relative to station- 

ary awnings. (Ord 28613 Approved Mr 9 
'16) Ip St. Louis munic. ref. lib. 
Ayres, Leonard P., and Ayres, May 

School buildings and equipment. 25c '16 Sur- 
vey com., Cleveland found., Cleveland 
(Schoolhouses) 



B 



Babies. See Infants 

Back to the land movement. See Land — Settle- 
ment 
Bacon, Charles W. 
American plan of government. *$2.50 '16 Put- 
nam (Constitutions — United States) 
Baggage 

Solicitation 
Ordinances 
* St. Louis, Mo. — Ordinance relating to the so- 
licitation of passengers and baggage. (Ord 
28605 Approved Mr 9 '16) Ip St, Louis munic. 
ref. lib. 



2JS 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Ball, Sarah B., comp. 
1600 business books. 75c '16 Wilson (Business 
— Bibliography) 

Ballots 

Bibliography 

* List of references on ballot reform, exclusive 

of the short ballot. U. S. Library of con- 
gress. 8p O 16 '15 (Typew Cost of copying 
40c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Referendum measures, 1915 
California — Provides for the size, form and 
manner of printing of ballots to be used at 
general elections, including gubernatorial 
and presidential elections, for the determin- 
ation of the order in which state, district 
and county offices shall appear thereon, for 
the preparation of ballot titles for measures 
submitted to the electors, and for the man- 
ner In which such titles, offices and names 
of candidates therefor, and instructions to 
voters shall be printed upon such ballots. 
Referendum measure by petition of voters. 
Rejected. Yes 106,377 No 151,067 O '15 
Baltimore, IVId. Board of police commissioners 

Report, 1915. '16 (Police — Reports) 
Bands, Municipai 

l^aintenance 

* Municipal band concerts. N Y State Bur Mu- 

nicipal Information Rept no 141 6p Ap 5 '16 
(Typew 30c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Reports 

* Municipal bands in American cities. N Y 

State Bur Municipal Information Rept no 
158 8p My 5 '16 (Typew 40c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Banl< deposits 

Taxation 
Savings deposits in national banks. In Rhode 
Island. Bd. of tax comrs. Fourth annual 
report, 1916, p 83-6 

Recommends taxation as practiced in Ver- 
mont and Connecticut and gives text of a 
proposed law 
Bank stocks 

Taxation 

* Memorandum for the comptroller relative to 

proposed higher rates of taxation for bank 
shares. 5p (Mim) O 18 '15 Dept. of finance, 
N. Y. 
Banking and currency 

* American banking. H. P. Willis, sec. Federal 

reserve board. 361d chart map $2 '16 LaSalle 
extension univ. Chicago 
Dangerous drift towards monopolized banking 
in the United States. A. J. Frame. Econ 
World 12:204-8 Ag 12 '16 

An address delivered before the State 
bankers association of Colorado, Denver, 
Colo., July 21, 1916 

* Federal reserve: a study of the banking sys- 

tem of the U. S., with an introduction by 
C: S. Hamlin. H: P. Willis. 342p *$1 '15 
Doubleday 
First year of the new banking system. H. P. 
Willis. Pol Sci Q 30:591-617 D '15 

* History of currency in the United States, with 

a brief description of the currency systems 
of all commercial nations. A. B. Hepburn. 
552p $2.50 '15 Macmillan 

Contains: Colonial currency; Continental 
currency; Sound money in national politics; 
Coinage system; Paper currency; Legal ten- 
der notes; Legal tender cases in the supreme 
court; Silver question; National banking 
system; Silver contest of 1896; Gold standard 
act of 1900; Defects of the old system and 
proposed reforms; Proposed federal reserve 
act; National bank act; General review and 
the federal reserve law; Currency systems of 
other nations; Bibliography 

Money and banking. W: A. Scott. 5th ed enl 
406p bibl $2 '16 Holt 

Organization and work of the federal reserve 
board, by E. M. Patterson; Credit reforma- 
tion, by William Ingle; Commercial paper 
and the federal reserve board, by E. E. Ag- 
ger; Some phases of the new check collec- 
tion system, by G. B. Anderson; Develop- 



ment of our foreign trade under the federal 
reserve act, by John Clausen; Completing 
the reform of our banking system, by G: J. 
Seay. Ann Am Acad 63:88-154 Ja '16 

* Principles of money and banking: a series of 

selected materials, with explanatory intro- 
ductions. H. G. Moulton. 502p *$3 '16 Univ. 
of Chicago press 
Pros and cons of the use of federal reserve 
notes in bank reserves. Econ World n s 12: 
26S-71 Ag 26 '16 

* What the banks of the U. S. think of the fed- 

eral reserve act. 6p '16 Guaranty trust co., 
140 Broadway, N. Y. 

Contains a chart showing favorable and 
unfavorable opinions held by banks regard- 
ing the act 

Legislation 

* Digest of the federal reserve act. 17p '16 

Guaranty trust co., 140 Broadway, N. Y. 

Reports 

* National assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 

A. Com. on banking and currency. Report 
presented at the 21st annual meeting. New 
York, May, 1916. 7p '16 The Assn., 30 
Church St., N. Y. 

* National assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 

A. Com. on bankruptcy. Report presented 
at the 21st annual meeting, New York city, 
May, 1916. 3p '16 The Assn., 30 Church St.. 
N. Y. 
Report of com. on banking and currency. In 
Nat. assn. of manufacturers. Proceedings, 

1915, p 220-35 

* U. S. Federal reserve board. First annual re- 

port, for the period ending Dec. 31, 1914. 218p 
'15 

Contains a map showing the location of 
the twelve federal reserve banks and the 
boundaries of the twelve federal reserve dis- 
tricts 
Bankruptcy 

Bankruptcy law and suggested amendments. 
Samuel Hershenstein. Nat Assn Credit Men 
Bui (41 Park row, N. Y.) 15:479-86 Jl '15 

United States supreme court has upheld the 
validity of a transfer of land although the 
deed was not recorded within four months 
of bankruptcy, while the law designates as 
invalid certain deeds not recorded within 
that time; held that the law invalidated only 
deeds required by local law to be recorded 
to make them valid as to creditors. This 
reversed the interpretation given the bank- 
ruptcy law in Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, 
Arkansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, 
Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico, and 
sustained the interpretations in New York, 
Vermont, Connecticut, Georgia, Florida, Ala- 
bama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Califor- 
nia. Oregon, Nevada. Montana. Washington, 
Idaho, and Arizona (Mr 13 '16) 

Conferences 
Conference of representatives of the Southern 
wholesale grocers' assn. and other trade or- 
ganizations. Memphis, Tenn., May 26, 1916. 
The principal topic considered was whether 
the present bankruptcy laws should be re- 
pealed. The matter was debated by J. H. 
Tregoe for the negative side and O. B. Mc- 
Glasson for the affirmative 

Laws 

U. S. house committee on printing has favor- 
ably reported a resolution providing for the 
printing of 20,000 copies of the revised edi- 
tion of the U. S. bankruptcy laws. This will 
allow each representative to secure about 20 
copies for distribution (Ap 13 '16) 
Banks 

8ee also Deposits and depositories 
Conferences 
American bankers' assn. Executive council. 
Meeting at BriarclifC Manor. N. Y., May 8-10. 

1916. Discussions were held on the Kern 
bill which allows a person to be director 
of two banks at once, if they are not com- 
peting, the recently defeated Philippines 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



27 



Banks — Conferences —Continued 

independence bill from the standpoint of its 
effect upon American banking interests in 
the islands, and the bill on fraudulent bills 
of lading, which the bankers agreed should 
pass 

Guaranty of deposits 

Kansas — According to the report of the state 
bank comr., only one bank operating under 
the guaranty law has failed within five 
years, and so successful is the system that 
large amounts of money are deposited in 
Kansas banks by individuals and firms out- 
side of the state (Ja 16 '16) 

Texas depositors' guaranty fund. J: S. Patter- 
son. Bankers' Magazine (253 Broadway, 
N. Y.) 92:367-71 Mr '16 50c 

Laws 

* Connecticut — Laws relating to banks, savings 

banks, and trust companies, building and 
loan associations and investment companies, 
1915. Conn, bank comr., comp. llOp '15 
Conn, state lib. 

* Kansas banking law, 1915, also bank deposit- 

ors' guaranty law, Kansas trust company 
law, and summary of Kansas corporation 
laws. 64p '15 Kansas bank comr. 

* Oregon — Laws relating to banking, enacted by 

the legislative assembly, 1915. I6p '15 Ore. 
state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 

Legislation, Proposed 
Switzerland — Federal bank inspection bill has 
been drafted and an exhaustive report made 
which will be published during the summer 
of 1916 for public consideration. It will no 
doubt be necessary to supplement this pro- 
posed legislation by another law concerning 
the issue of securities 

Supervision 
Uruguay — Law providing for government in- 
spection of banks has been passed by con- 
gress, and the president has appointed a 
national bank inspector. The government 
will assess the national institutions of credit, 
for a sum sufficient to cover the cost of 
inspection (My 12 '16) 

Tax information 

Virginia attorney general has given his opin- 
ion that all banking institutions in the state 
must disclose, on demand of the taxing offi- 
cers of the state, complete lists of their 
depositors and the amount of their "time 
deposits" and "savings deposits." The text 
of the opinion appears in the Richmond 
Times Dispatch N 10 '15 
Bar associations 

Conferences 

American bar association. Convention, Aug. 
30-Sept. 1, 1916, Chicago, 111. George White- 
lock, sec, 1416 Munsey bldg., Baltimore, Md. 

Florida state bar assn. Convention, Atlanta 
Beach, June 16, 1916. Program includes fol- 
lowing addresses: Something of the history 
and application of the doctrine of the non- 
suability of a state of the U. S. by an indi- 
vidual, by Pres. T. F. West; How far is 
the endorsee of a negotiable instrument 
affected by the fact that its consideration is 
executory? by W. H. Watson; Child labor 
legislation in the 64th congress, by H. St. 
George Tucker; Riparian rights, by W. H. 
Ellis 

Illinois state bar assn. 40th annual conven- 
tion, June, 1916. At a series of meetings by 
suborganizations of the association, empha- 
sis was placed upon the failure of the 
courts in their administration of criminal 
cases in large cities, because of delay, un- 
scrupulous lawyers, and juries with too 
much power. Discussions also took place on: 
Value of the parole law; Needed legislation 
for county and probate courts; Is our pres- 
ent probation law conducive of good or evil; 
Should courts take cognizance of public sen- 
timent? 

Kansas state bar assn. Thirty-third annual 
meeting, Topeka. Jan. 27, 1916. Following 
addresses were delivered: State and federal 
control of carriers, by E: J. White; High 



cost of justice, by C. L. Kagey; Lawyer out- 
side the courts, by T. A. Moxcey; Trust es- 
tates in Kansas, by G. H. Frith; Bulk sales 
law, by C. L. Hunt; Free justice, by C: D. 
Shukers; A corporation's contracts and the 
courts, by G: T. McDermott 

* New York state bar association. Proceedings 

of the 39th annual meeting held at New 
York, Jan. 14-15, 1916, and charter, con- 
stitution, by-laws, list of members, officers, 
committees and reports for 1915. 770p '16 
Frederick E. Wadhams, sec, Albany, N. Y. 

• Ohio state bar assn. Proceedings of the 36th 

annual session, held at Cedar Point, O., July 
6-8, 1915. 206p '15 Charles M. Buss, sec, 701 
Marshall bldg., Cleveland 

Besides the address of the president, J: N. 
Van Deman, the following were delivered: 
Government ownership of railways, by C: W. 
Dustin; Making law and finding law, by Ros- 
coe Pound 

Pennsylvania bar association. Convention, 
Bedford Springs, June 20-22, 1916. The pro- 
gram includes the following papers: Limits 
of effective legal actions, by Roscoe Pound; 
Six month's experience under the workmen's 
compensation system of Pennsylvania, by 
F. H. Bohlen; Judicial abuse, by R: H. 
Hawkins. The following committee reports 
were made: Contingent fees; Revision and 
unification of the statutes; Revision and 
amendment of penal laws; To receive com- 
plaints against corporations, etc., practicing 
law without authority; Advisability of re- 
moving liquor licenses from the courts; To 
present resolutions concerning modernizing 
and making uniform the procedure of the 
courts; To consider the advisability of intro- 
ducing a resolution at the next session of 
the legislature of Pennsylvania to convene a 
constitutional convention 

Tennessee bar assn. 35th annual meeting, 
Memphis, June 29-30, 1916, Program includes 
following addresses: Judicial administration 
and remedial procedure, by R. M. Barton, 
and Recollections of the Memphis bar from 
1865 to 1875, by J. P. Young 

Wisconsin .state bar assn. Convention, Osh- 
kosh, June 28-30, 1916. Program includes 
the following papers: Benjamin Franklin, by 
Burton Hanson; Will the bar furnish our 
leaders in the impending world crisis, by 
M. B. Rosenberry; Should the various mu- 
nicipal courts of Wisconsin outside the 
county of Milwaukee be standardized? af- 
firmative, by C. A. Fowler, negative, by 
Timothy Burke; To what extent should the 
supreme court interfere by cutting down 
damages in cases where the verdict of the 
jury has met the approval of the circuit 
court? in favor of the present practice, by 
P. H. Martin; against the practice, by R. P. 
Wilcox; Keeping our treaty obligations, by 
S. E. Baldwin 

• Wisconsin state bar assn. Report of the pro- 

ceedings of the meetings for the years 1912, 
1913, 1914. 309p '15 

Reports 

* New York (city) assn. of the bar. Year book, 

1916. 210p '16 The Assn., 42 W. 44th st.,.N. Y. 

Barbers 

Examination and licensing 
Colorado — Barbers are required to take a 
written examination and give a practical 
demonstration of their ability to use the 
necessary tools in order to secure the li- 
cense required by law for practising their 
profession. A barber must also be in good 
health, and he must conduct his business in 
a way sufficiently hygienic to meet the ap- 
proval of the inspectors. Colorado is one of 
fifteen states having a barbers' examination 
law. The measure has raised the standard 
of barbers in Colorado by eliminating the 
unskilled and the unfit (Mr 28 '16) 

Barnett, James D. , ^ j 

Operation of the initiative, referendum, and 
recall in Oregon. $2 '15 Macmlllan (Referen- 
dum) 

Basebali, Sunday 

Ordinances 

Baltimore, Md.— City council has passed an 
ordinance, which will be submitted to the 
people in November, 1916, prohibiting base- 



28 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Baseball, Sunday— Ordinances— Confinwet? 

ball games and other amusements on Sun- 
day, if they are played for reward of any 
sort and if admission to them is charged (Je 
16 '16) 

Bastardy. See Illegitimacy 

Baths, Public 

See also Swimming pools 

Bibliography 

Municipal baths. InW: B. Munro. Bibliography 
of municipal government in the U. S., p 370- 
2 '15 

Bats 

* Bats as desirable citizens. Joseph Grinnell. il 

Teachers' Bui no 6 4p Ap '16 Cal. fish and 
game comm., San Francisco 

Points out that one Texas city has placed 
bats under the protection of the law and 
another has had constructed especially- 
planned bat-roosts in the outskirts of the 
city 

Bees , , 

New Zealand — Bee industry has reached a 
high state of development and is supported 
by laws and regulations. In 1906 the gov- 
ernment established an experimental api- 
ary, where between 40 and 50 students are 
trained annually. During the year 1915, 
224,000 pounds of honey were exported to 
England, and it is anticipated that this 
trade will be more than doubled during 
1916. All honey is inspected and graded 
by government experts before it is allowed 
to be exported. The New Zealand dept. 
of agriculture, industries and commerce has 
published several bulletins on the subject 
and special apiaries acts were passed in 
1908 and 1913 (Mr 14 '16) 

Reports 

Massachusetts. Inspector of apiaries. 5th an- 
nual report, Jan. 13, 1915. il In Mass. Bd. of 
agriculture. 62d annual report, 1914, p 405-15 
•15 

Begging 

Treatment of beggars and vagabonds in Bel- 
gium. R. M. Binder. J Crim Law 6:835-48 
Mr '16 
Vagrancy and mendicity. In W: A. Bonger. 
Criminality and economic conditions, p 546- 
63 '16 

ISee also Vagrancy 

Bell, Finiey F., comp. 
Cost of state government. 46p '16 (Mim) Leg. 
ref. bur., Springfield, 111. (State, govern- 
ment) 

Benefit systems 
Trade-union benefits. In G: G. Groat. Intro- 
duction to the study of organized labor in 
America, p 329-40 '16 

Bertillon system. See Crime and criminals — 
Identification 

Beverages. See Milk; Soft drinks 

Beyer, David Stewart 
Industrial accident prevention. $10 '16 Hough- 
ton (Accidents, Industrial — Prevention) 

Bible in the schools 
Gary plan for religious instruction was advo- 
cated before the last monthly meeting of the 
federated ministers of Minneapolis, March 
27, 1916, as the only practical plan that 
avoids church and state conflict. Under the 
Gary system the pupils are given two hours 
a day that may be spent in religious instruc- 
tion, or in any way the parents see fit. 
Other methods generally favored are for the 
school to add the study of the Bible to the 
school curriculum and to give credits for 
religious study pursued outside of school. 
The latter is used in Colorado and North 
Dakota 

* North Dakota plan of Bible study: a report 

prepared for the conference of the Religious 
educ. assn., Feb. 28-March 1, 1916. V. P. 
Squires. Religious Educ Assn Bui 1916 no 3 
8p 

Reprinted from Religious Education, v. 11, 
no. 1, Feb., 1916, p 20-7. Under the North 
Dakota plan school credit is given for out- 



side Bible study. The syllabus prepared by 
the state board of education is used as a 
guide 
[Religious exercises or instruction in public 
schools: case-note to Herold v. Parish bd. 
of school directors.] L R A 1915D 941 

* Religious instruction and public education. 

Religious Educ Assn Bui 1916 no 4 40p 

Reprinted from Religious Education, v. 11, 
no. 2, April, 1916. Contains: Present legal 
status: new and proposed legislation con- 
cerning religious instruction in public 
schools, by S: W. Brown; General view of 
the movement for correlating religious edu- 
cation with public instruction, by G: A. Coe; 
Progress in New York city, by D. W. Davis; 
Colorado plan, by L. D. Osborn; Lutheran 
parochial schools, by G: U. Wenner; Atti- 
tude of certain church communions toward 
the teaching of religion in the pubUc 
schools, by L. V. Lynch; Lutheran attitude, 
by G. L. Kieffer; Religious exercises in pub- 
lic schools, by W. S. Athearn 
Teaching the Bible in colleges. Religious Educ 
11:314-23 Ag '16 

Bibliography 

* Instruction in religion in relation to public 

education: a book list. 12p Religious educa- 
tion assn. 

Reprinted from Religious Education, v. 10, 
p 613-24 

Legislation, Proposed 

Present legal status: new and proposed legis- 
lation concerning religious instruction in 
public schools. S: W. Brown. Religious 
Educ 11:103-8 Ap '16 

— Same. Religious Educ Assn Bui 1916 no 4 p 
3-8 
Bibliography 

* Lists of material which may be obtained free 

or at small cost. M. J. Booth. 67p 25c '15 Am. 
library assn. pub. bd., 78 E. "Washington St., 
Chicago 

Excludes almost all government and many 
state publications. Contains lists of material 
on: sociology, ethics, psychology, religion, 
edvication, science, public health and sanita- 
tion, engineering, business, occupations, ag- 
riculture, home economics, fine arts, litera- 
ture, history 
Special Libraries, beginning with the Novem- 
ber, 1915, issue, is running a series of lists 
of recent bibliographies on public questions 
See also entries under various subjects, 
subhead Bibliography 

Bill drafting. See Legislative bill drafting 

Billboards 

* Billboard regulation. Citizens' Business (Bur. 

of municipal research, Philadelphia) no 199 
3p Mr 16 '16 

Summarizes state laws, Philadelphia ordi- 
nances and rules of administrative bureaus, 
and discusses their enforcement 

Indianapolis city council is considering the 
adoption of an ordinance whereby billboards 
may be removed from any neighborhood by 
a vote of the majority of the residents. The 
ordinance is modeled after one in force in 
Chicago, which the Illinois supreme court 
declared valid on the ground that things 
objectionable to the eye are public nui- 
sances. No action has yet been taken (S 21 
'16) 

Decisions 

Billboard regulation: court decisions in vari- 
ous states as to extent of municipality's 
power to regulate erection and maintenance 
of billboards on private property. John Simp- 
son. Munic J 39:949-51 D 23 '15 

San Antonio, Texas — U. S. district court has 
ruled that an amendment to the ordinance 
governing billboards, which prohibited the 
erection of billboards under all circumstances 
within 200 feet of a street car line, is un- 
reasonable and void. Decision was rendered 
in the case of the Sunset system v. San 
Antonio, in which the city refused to allow 
the Sunset system to erect billboards in 
certain places. Findings of the court are 
printed in full in the San Antonio Express, 
Mr 14 '16 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



29 



Billboards— Con* JnMe(? 

Ordinances 
Brief abstracts from regulations in force in 
some of the largest cities in the U. S., Great 
Britain and France. In Springfield, Mass. 
City planning comm. Report on billboard 
advertising in Springfield, Mass., p 12-20 

Reports 

* Springfield, Mass. City planning comm. Report 

on billboard advertising in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts. 46p il 

Bills, Legislative. See Legislative bills 

Bills of lading 
Responsibility of carriers. C: S. Haight. il Na- 
tion's Business 4:17-19 My '16 

Discussion of Pomerene bill. Most of the 
provisions of the uniform state act have 
been copied in the bill verbatim. Contains a 
list of states that have passed the uniform 
bill of lading act 

Bills of lading, Uniform 

Legislation 
President Wilson signed the uniform bill of 
lading law, Aug. 29, 1916. It is expected this 
bill will be most valuable to both the com- 
mercial and financial business of the country 

Bird censes 

U. S. biological survey directed a bird census 
thruout the country, during the last week 
in May and the first in June, 1916, based 
upon nesting pairs and not upon flying birds. 
No appropriation was made for this service, 
and the survey relied upon volunteers in the 
various states, who covered a specified area, 
from which the computation for the wider 
territory was made 

Birds 

* History of the game birds, wild fowl and shore 

birds. E: H. Forbush. 2d ed 600p il $1 Mass. 
state bd. of agriculture 

* Useful birds and their protection. E: H. For- 

bush. 4th ed 500p il $1 Mass. state bd. of 
agriculture 

Protection 

Case to test the constitutionality of the fed- 
eral migratory bird law was argued before 
the U. S. Supreme court, Oct. 18, 1915. but 
no decision has been announced. A list of 
representative organizations of farmers, 
stock breeders. forest conservationists, 
sportsmen and others, representing 38 states, 
joined with the Am. game protective assn. 
in the brief for the defense, U. S. v. Har- 
vey C. Shauver 

Iowa fish and game laws, federal migratory 
bird regulations and the Lacey bird law 
(federal law), in force July 4, 1915. 46p '15 
la. fish and game warden. Spirit Lake 

* Necessity for and constitutionality of the 

act of congress protecting migratory birds. 
George Shiras. 99p U. S. dept. agric. 

Contains: Why the migratory bird law 
was necessary; Why the federal migratory 
law is constitutional. Appendix contains: 
Regulations for the protection of migratory 
birds; Original Shiras bill; Weeks-McLean 
bill, as incorporated in the act of March 4, 
1913, making appropriations for the depart- 
ment of agriculture; Advisory committee of 
fifteen on the preparation of regulations by 
the department of agriculture for the protec- 
tion of migratory birds; Why federal protec- 
tion of migratory birds became necessary 

Reports 

Massachusetts. State ornithologist. 7th annual 
report, Jan. 13, 1915. II In Mass. Bd. of agri- 
culture. 62d annual report, 1914, p 373-403 '15 
Birth control 

Catholic church and birth restriction. J: A. 
Ryan. Survey 35:671-2 Mr 4 '16 

* Family limitation: control of conception. Eliza- 

beth Hamilton-Muncie. 8p (Typew) '15 Dr. 
Elizabeth Hamilton-Muncie, 119 Macon St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Address before the Am. institute of home- 
opathy, June 28, 1915 
Freedom that kills. Caspar Lang. New Repub 
7:85-7 My 27 16 



* National birth control league: a brief state- 

ment of what it stands for. lip '16 A. H. 
Burd, sec, 305 W. 55th st., N. Y. 

National birth control league. Public meeting. 
Academy of medicine, New York city, March 
10. 1916. Dr. A. Jacobi presided. Dr. W: J. 
Robinson, Dr. Elizabeth Hamilton Muncie, 
Paul Kennaday, Rabbi Sidney E. Goldstein, 
Laura Garrett were among the speakers. 
The League has republished an editorial from 
The New Republic on the control of births, 
and published a small pamphlet, "The na- 
tional birth control league: a brief statement 
of what it stands for." The latter contains 
a list of articles and books on birth control. 
These pamphlets are sold at $1 per 100, but 
single copies may be obtained gratis. It 
has also issued a number of slips which sell 
at 20c per 100. The League has offices at 36 
E. 57th St., N. Y. 

Publicity by prosecution: a commentary on the 
birth control propaganda. J: A. Field. Sur- 
vey 35:599-601 F 19 '16 

Social devices for impelling women to bear 
and rear children. L. S. Hollingworth. Am 
J Soc 22:19-29 Jl '16 

Voluntary maternity. A. H. Jacobs. Survey 35: 
142 N 6 '15 

Bibliography 
List of books and articles on birth control. In 
Nat. birth control league: a brief statement 
of what it stands for, p 6-11 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 

New Zealand and France have no restrictive 
legislation, Holland and Germany almost 
none, and England very little (F '16) 
Birth rate 

Reports 

* Declining birth-rate: its causes and effects. 

Nat. birth rate comm. 450p *10s 6d postage 
9d to America '16 Chapman & Hall, 11 Hen- 
rietta St., London, W. C. 

Report of and the chief evidence taken 
before the National birth-rate commission, 
instituted with official recognition, by the 
National council of public morals for the 
promotion of race-regeneration, spiritual, 
moral and physical 
Birth records. See Vital statistics 
Bituminous roads. See Roads, Bituminous 

Blanchard, Arthur H. 

Elements of highway engineering. *$3 '15 
Wiley (Highway engineering) 

Blind 

* Mental survey of the Ohio state school for the 

blind. T: H. Haines, charts Ohio Bd of Ad- 
ministration Pub no 9 24p Ja '16 

Bibliography 

* Special reference library of books relating to 

the blind: 1st supplement to pt. 1, books in 
English. E: E. Allen, comp. 128p '16 Perkins 
institution and Mass. school for the blind, 
Watertown, Mass. 

Education 
Education for the blind. E: E. Allen. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 503-11 

Discusses: Progress in education for the 
blind: Classes for the conservation of vision 
and for the prevention of blindness 

Bibliography 
Industrial training; Education of the blind. In 
E: E. Allen, comp. Snecial reference library 
of books relating to the blind: 1st supple- 
ment to pt. 1, books in English, p 12-16, 87- 
120 '16 Perkins institution and Mass. school 
for the blind, Watertown, Mass. 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] schools for the blind. 
U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 801-9 '16 

Reports 

* New York institute for the education of the 

blind. Year-book, 1915. 36p '16 N. Y. institute 
for the education of the blind, 9th av. at 
34th St., N. Y. 



30 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Blind— Education —Continued 
Statistics 
Schools for the blind and the deaf. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 2 p 523- 
47 '15 

Investigations 
Missouri and New Hampshire have commis- 
sions investigating the needs of the bhnd 
(N 15 '15) 

Legislation, Comparative 
Legislation in behalf of the baby blind [in the 
several states], il In International sunshine 
society. Dept. of the blind. 9th and 10th an- 
nual reports, 1913-1914, p 38-46 '15 

Relief 

Missouri commission for the blind, created at 
the last session of the legislature, has 
launched a campaign to raise by private 
subscription $12,500, the amount necessary 
to qualify for a like amount conditionally 
appropriated by the legislature. In Illinois 
the law provides a pension of $150 a year 
for blind persons (Mr 21 '16) 

Practical application of the blind pension law. 
Louis Strieker. Ohio Bui Char & Correc 
v 22 no 3 p 40-51 Je '16 

Reports 

* International sunshine society. Dept. of the 

blind. 9th and 10th annual reports, 1913- 
1914. lllp il '15 The Society, 96 5th av., 
N. Y. 
Blindness 

Prevention 

* Conservation of vision and prevention of blind- 

ness. G. E. de Schweinitz. 14p '16 Am. med. 
assn. 

Reprinted from the Journal of the Am. 
Medical Assn., Feb. 5, 1916, v. 66, p. 393-7 
National com. for the prevention of blindness, 
following its recent meeting in N. Y., is 
preparing to launch an organized campaign 
of education against blindness in every state 
in the Union. This Committee has welded 
together the unrelated organizations and will 
direct the state campaigns (N 14 '15) 
National committee for the prevention of 
blindness has published the following pam- 
phlets, no. 2, Take care of your eyes: your 
eyes are your breadwinners; no. 3, Need- 
lessly blind for life; no. 5, What women's 
clubs and nursing organizations can do to 
prevent blindness. The Com., 130 E. 22d 
St., N. Y. 

Individual copies are free and special 
prices may be had from the com. for large 
quantities of these leaflets 
Prevention of blindness. Health News n s 
11:116-17 My '16 

Contains the program and policy of the 
N. Y. state commission for the blind 

See also Nightblindness 

Bibliography 
Blindness: cause and prevention. In E: E. 
Allen, comp. Special reference library of 
books relating to the blind: 1st supplement 
to pt. 1, books in English, p 63-76 '16 Per- 
kins institution and Mass. school for the 
blind, Watertown, Mass. 

Legislation 
Illinois — Bill in regard to ophthalmia was 
passed by the legislature, June 24, 1915. It 
provides that physicians and midwives must 
advise the use of such prophylactic as shall 
be prescribed by the state board of health 
for the prevention of .ophthalmia and inform 
parents or guardians of the child as to the 
dangers and consequences of this disease. 
Midwives may only use the prophylactic af- 
ter securing the consent of the parents or 
guardians. Any physician, midwife or 
other person observing any evidence of in- 
flammation of the eye of an infant, within 
two weeks after childbirth, is required to 
report the case within six hours to the local 
health authority, under penalty of not less 
than $10 or more than $100 fine. Cases thus 



reported are visited at once by a super- 
vising health officer, who makes smears for 
laboratory examination and gives treat- 
ment, if no physician is in charge 

* Summary of state laws and rulings relating to 

the prevention of blindness from babies' 
sore eyes. (Pub no 9) 6p tables Ag 1 '16 
Nat. com. for prevention of blindness, 130 
E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Individual copies are free and special 
prices may be had fojc large quantities of 
these leaflets 

Reports 

* National com. for the prevention of blindness. 

1st annual report including the 7th annual 
report of the N. Y. state com. for the pre- 
vention of blindness, Nov., 1915. Nat Com 
for the Prevention of Blindness Pub no 8 
56p N '15 The Com., 130 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Blower systems 
National board of fire underwriters adopts 
rules regarding installation of blower sys- 
tems, il Heating and Ventilating Mag (1123 
Broadway, N. Y.) 13:40-2 Ap '16 10c 

Blue books 

* Oregon blue book, 1915-1916. 192p il '15 Oregon 

state lib. 
Blue laws. See Sunday 
Blue sky laws. See Investment companies 

Boats 

* Milwaukee, Wis. — Ordinance regulating the 

operation of canoes and boats on the upper 
Milwaukee -river. (Ord 212. Passed Ja 3 '16) 
Ip City clerk, Milwaukee 
See also Jitney boats; Vessels 
Boiler codes 
A. S. M. E. code and the Massachusetts rules: 
a comparison. S. P. Stewart. Power 43:547- 
50, 582-5 Ap 18-25 '16 

* American society of mechanical engineers. 

Com. to formulate standard specifications for 
the construction of steam boilers and other 
pressure vessels and for their care in ser- 
vice known as the boiler code com. Rules 
for the construction of stationary boilers and 
for allowable working pressures. 147p il 80c 
'14 Am. soc. of mechanical engineers, 29 W. 
39th St., N. Y. 

American society of mechanical engineers has 
made some progress in promoting legisla- 
tion in different states based on, its steam 
boiler code. The Bewley bill in New York 
was vetoed by Gov. Whitman. A similar 
bill will be introduced in the Louisiana legis- 
lature and one will be introduced at the 
next legislative session in Michigan (Je '16) 

American uniform boiler law society was or- 
ganized at a meeting held in New York 
city on July 28, 1915. It includes repre- 
sentatives of practically all the interests 
which could be affected directly by the 
enactment of such legislation. Its object 
is to secure uniform boiler legislation in the 

* several states, and particularly to push the 
acceptance of the A. S. M. E. code as the 
standard for boiler construction to be in- 
corporated in this legislation (O '15) 

Work of the boiler code committee [of the 
Am. society of mechanical engineers], il Am 
Soc Mechanical Engineers J (29 W. 39th St., 
N. Y.) 38:42-6 Ja '16 35c 
Boiler inspection 

Inter-boiler inspection. J. C. Hawkins. Power 
44:379-80 S 12 '16 

Outline of procedure for boiler inspection 
between visits of the state or insurance in- 
spector 

Laws 

British Columbia — Act respecting the inspection 
of steam boilers and engines, and the exam- 
ining and licensing of engineers has re- 
cently been put in force; also new rules for 
the inspection of boilers and engines, have- 
been adopted (Je 26 '16) 

Legislation, Comparative 
Licensing of stationary engineers and fire- 
men; steam boiler inspection. H. D. Scott, 
comp., R. I. leg. ref. bur. 4p Mr 14 '!& 
(Typew B 20c) 
Digest of state laws 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



31 



Boilers 

* Boiler house: a treatise for the promotion of 

efficiency and economy in the boiler house; 
how one-third of fuel may be saved. H. S. 
Riddle. (Pub 4) lOp Ja '15 Ohio bd. of ad- 
ministration 
[Public regulation of steam boilers: case-note 
to Law V. San Francisco gas, etc. co.] Ann 
Cas 1915D 846 

Laws 

• [Massachusetts — Law relative to the marking, 

sale and installation of range boilers.] Nat 
Com of the Confederated Supply Assn Bui 
(261 Broadway, N. Y.) no 18 p 2-3 My '16 

Legislation 

New legislation relating to range boilers. Mass 
Dept of Weights and Measures Bui no 8 p 
88-9 Jl '16 

Legislation, Uniform 
American uniform boiler law society, which 
was organized to bring about the legal adop- 
tion in the different states of the boiler code 
drawn up by the American society of me- 
chanical engineers, held a meeting of the 
administrative council on July 11, 1916 in 
New York city. T: E. Durban, Erie City 
iron works, Erie, Pa., has been retained as 
chairman of the council 
Uniformity of boiler laws. Power 44:224-5 Ag 
8 '16 
Boise, Ida. Superintendent of schools 
Special report of the public schools, June, 
1915. '15 (School reports) 
Bonds 

See also Municipal bonds; School finance 

Taxation 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
Kentucky — Extending the power to the gen- 
eral assembly to enact laws to divide prop- 
erty into classes for the purpose of taxa- 
tion and to determine what class or classes 
of property shall be subject to local taxation, 
and to exempt from taxation bonds of the 
state and of the counties, municipalities, and 
taxing and school districts, and providing 
that laws passed pursuant to said amend- 
ment shall be subject to the referendum 
power of the people. Constitutional amend- 
ment. Adopted. Yes 67,449 No 35,467 N '15 
Ohio — Exempting from taxation bonds issued 
on or after January 1, 1916, by the state of 
Ohio or any subdivision or district thereof 
authorized to issue bonds. Constitutional 
amendment. Rejected. Yes 337,124 No 
401,083 N '15 

Bonds, Corporation. See Stocks and bonds 

Bonfires 

Ordinances 

• Municipal regulation of bonfires: [digest of or- 

dinances in New York cities]. N Y State Bur 
Municipal Information Rept no 13 2p O 1 '15 
(Typew 10c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Bonger, William Adrian 

Criminality and economic condition; tr. by 
H. P. Horton. (Modern criminal science 
ser.) *$5.50 '16 Little (Crime and criminals) 
Bookbinding 

• Library bookbinding. A. L. Bailey. 248p 11 

*$1.25 '16 Wilson 

Attempts to set forth as clearly as pos- 
sible the best Information relating to mate- 
rials, processes, routine, and various lesser 
matters pertaining to bookbinding 

Bookkeeping 

t Principles of double-entry bookkeeping. C: M. 
Van Cleve. 210p $1.50 '13 Charles M. Van 
Cleve. 46 S. Oxford st., Brooklyn, N. T. 

Bootlegging 
Arkansas supreme court handed down an opin- 
ion. May 8, 1916, holding that one year's im- 
prisonment was the punishment for persons 
convicted of selling or giving away liquor in 
violation of the new statewide prohibition 
law (Press rept) 

See also Intoxicating liquors — Interstate 
shipments 



Boss rule 
Invisible government. Elihu Root. Ann Am 
Acad 64:x-xiii Mr '16 

Extracts from an address in the New York 
constitutional convention, Aug. 30, 1915 

Boston, Mass. Children's institutions department 

Annual report for the year 1915-1916. 50p '16 
(Children — Charities, protectiom, etc. — Re- 
ports) 

Boston, Mass. Finance commission 
Reports and communications. '16 (Municipal 
finance — Reports) 

Boston and Maine railroad 

Valuation 

Federal valuation of the Boston and Maine 
railroad. F. C. Shepherd. Boston Soc Civil 
Engineers J (715 Tremont temple, Boston) 
2:291-326 O '15 50c 

Discusses the "Federal valuation act," and 
the controlling force in securing the adop- 
tion of the act, and describes the magnitude 
of the work as regards the railroads of the 
U. S.. as well as that of the Interstate com- 
merce commission in carrying out the pro- 
visions of the act. The author is valuation 

. engineer of the B. & M. R. R. and tells of 
the valuation work on it 

How the federal evaluation of the Boston & 
Maine railroad is being done. F. C. Shepherd. 
Eng Rec 72:538-41 O 30 '15 

Bottled goods 

* St. Louis, Mo. — Ordinance to allow persons 

engaged in manufacturing, bottling or sell- 
ing liquids in vessels with their name pro- 
duced thereon, to register the said name, 
and prescribing what they shall do to regis- 
ter the same; providing for the filing and 
registration of the said name by the city 
register; prohibiting the sale or certain uses 
of vessels marked with a brand so regis- 
tered, etc. (Ord 28512. Approved F 18 '16) 3p 
St. Louis munic. ref. lib. 

Boundaries. See Town boundaries 

Box making industry 
Establishment of minimum rates in the box- 
making industry. M. E. Bulkley. 95p *ls 6d 
'15 Ratan Tata foundation, London school of 
economics, Clare market, Kingsway, W. C. 
See also Paper box industry 

Boxing 

Laws 

* New York (state) — Laws and rules for the 

government of boxing. 22p Ja '16 N. Y. state 
athletic comm. 

Moving pictures 

U. S. supreme court, in a suit arising over 
the exclusion at Newark, N. J., of a film of 
the Willard-Johnson. fight at Havana, Dec. 
13, 1915, upheld the law of 1912, under which 
it is unlawful to import picture films of 
prize fights for public exhibition (Weber v. 
Freed, 239 U S 325) 

Reports 

* New York (state). Athletic comm. 4th annual 

report. 28p '15 Wm. F. Mathewson, sec, 41 
Park Row, N. T. 

Boycott 
Boycott. In G: G. Groat. Introduction to the 
study of organized labor in America, p 239-66 
'16 

* Boycott in American trade unions. Leo Wol- 

man. J H U Studies ser 34 no 1 148p '16 
*$1.25; pa $1 

Discusses the nature and history of the 
boycott, the boycott on materials and com- 
modities, the mechanism of the boycott and 
the law and the boycott 

Bibliography 

Select list of references on the legal aspect of 
trade unions, boycotts, injunctions, picket- 
ing, etc. U. S. bur. labor statistics. 4p Ja 18 
'16 (Typew 20c) 



32 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Boys 

* Schedule on the adolescent boy. Nat. federa- 

tion of settlements. Com, on the study of 
the boy problem. 8p May 1 '15 Special com., 
112 Salem st., Boston, Mass. 

Detailed questions to serve as a basis for a 
national study of the problem of the adoles- 
cent boy in his neighborhood relations 

See also Juvenile delinquents; Police — 
Junior police departments 

Employment 

* Work, wages, and schooling of eight hundred 

Iowa boys, in relation to the problems of 
vocational guidance. E. E. Lewis. Univ of 
la Bui n s no 90 (Univ Exten Bui no 9) F 
6 '15 State univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, la. 
Boys' clubs 

See also Agricultural clubs 
Bibliography 

* References on boys' clubs. U. S. Library of 

congress. 6p (Typew Cost of copying 30c) 

This list does not include references to 

Boy scouts, nor to the George Junior and 

other juvenile republics. Obtained only thru 

P. A. I. S. 

Breckinridge, Soplionisba P., and Abbott, Edith 

Delinquent child and the home. (Russell 
Sage found.) $2 '16 Survey associates, inc. 
(Juvenile delinquents) 
Brick pavements. See Pavements, Brick 
Bridges 

Bridge building in New Zealand. Oliver John- 
son. Sci Am S 82:152-3 S 2 '16 

Bridges and culverts; with discussion. L. E. 
Allen. In Ontario good roads assn. Proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 57-66 

Construction and maintenance of roads and 
bridges from July 1, 1913, to December 31, 
1914. U S Dept Agric Bui no 284 64p S 17 '15 

Erection of the new Quebec bridge. N. C. Mc- 
Math. il Cornell Civil Engineer (Ithaca, 
N. Y.) 24:405-18 My '16 25c 

Kansas supreme court by a recent decision 
has swept aside the corrupt system of bridge 
contracts and has ruled that the statute 
requiring all contracts to be awarded on a 
public letting to the lowest responsible bid- 
der, makes it necessary that the plans and 
specifications adopted and placed on file for 
the inspection of bidders must so far as the 
nature and character of the proposed work 
will admit, be sufficiently definite and explicit 
to enable bidders to prepare their bids intelli- 
gently on a common basis. The case in ques- 
tion was ^ regarded as a test case. Topeka 
bridge and iron co. v Bd. of county comrs. 
of Labette co., Kan. (Press rept Ag 3 '16) 

New bridge of the Chicago & Northwestern Ry. 
over the north branch of the Chicago river, 
il diags Ry R 59:203-6 Ag 12 '16 

Plaza improvements of the Manhattan bridge, 
New York city. C. N. Pinco. il Cornell Civil 
Engineer (Ithaca, N. Y.) 24:427-37 My '16 25c 

San Francisco, Cal. — Further details regard- 
ing the proposed bridge*across San Francisco 
bay, from the city of San Francisco, Cal. 
to Oakland, make it apparent that the struc- 
ture would cost approximately $22,000,000. 
According to a statement by one of the en- 
gineers who was associated in the work of 
preparing the plans, the bridge would be 
one of the greatest, if not the greatest ever 
built. The proposed bridge would be approx- 
imately four miles long, with an average 
height of 30 ft. above the surface of the 
water. It is intended that there shall be 
four railway tracks and two driveways, one 
for motor vehicles and the other for slower 
moving conveyances (Je 8 '16) 
See also Convict labor — Bridges 

Bibliography 
Bridges. In W: B. Munro. Bibliography of 
municipal government in the U. S., p 156-7 
'15 

Comparative information 

* Concrete and steel bridges. N Y State Bur 

Municipal Information Rept no 33 3p O 25 '15 
(Typew 15c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. L S. 

Investigations 

New York (state) — Legislature has authorized 
the joint com. appointed to investigate the 



condition of state bridges outside of cities 
to continue its work (My 26 '16) 

Reports 

* New York (city). Comptroller. Report on the 

maintenance of the department of bridges 
of the city of New York in 1913 and 1914 
prepared from the detailed expense state- 
ments of that department. 42p S '15 Com. 
on tax budget, Bd. of estimate and appor- 
tionment, N. Y. 
Bridges, Concrete 

* General specifications for concrete bridges. 

W. J. Watson. 3d ed 70p *$! '16 McGraw 
Briefs 

* Brief with selections for briefing. C. L. Max- 

cy. 332p *$1.25 '16 Houghton 
Brokers 

License 
Ordinances, Proposed 

* Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended for pas- 

sage by the committee on judiciary, in re- 
gard to brokers' licenses: issuance to co- 
partnerships. (Pam no 549) p 1-2 Mr 27 '16 
Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Brown, Harry Gunnison 
Transportation rates and their regulation. 
$1.50 '16 Macmillan (Transportation) 

Brush industry 
Effect of the minimum wage decree on the 
brush industry in Massachusetts. Mass 
Minimum Wage Comm Bui no 7 14p S 16 '15 

Bubonic plague 
Extension of plague infection of the bubonic 
type. R. H. Creel, maps Am J Pub Health 
6:191-221 Mr '16 

Budget 

* Budget. W: T. Donaldson. Indiana Bur of Leg 

Information Bui no 6 30p Ja '16 

Explains the nature and advantages of the 
budget system and discusses the make-up 
and location of the budget-making authority 

Budget making and the increased cost of gov- 
ernment; with discussion. F: A. Cleveland. 
Am Econ R 6:sup50-84 Mr '16 

Nature and functions of a budget. W. F. 
Willoughby. Chinese Social and Political 
Science R (Chinese social and political sci- 
ence assn., Peking, China) 1:86-101 Ap '16 
60c 

* Public budgets. Ann Am Acad v 62 324p N 

'15 

Pt. 1, Budget idea and the national bud- 
get; pt. 2, State budgets; pt. 3, Public bud- 
gets and efficiency in the public budgets; 
pt. 4, Development of budgets and budget- 
ary procedure in typical cities 

Bibliography 

Select list of references on national, state, 
county and municipal budgets in the U. S. 
H.- A. Rider. Ann Am Acad 62:277-87 N '15 

— Same. Reprinted. (Pub no 954) 

Legislation, Comparative 
Budget reform. C. C. Williamson. National 
Tax Assn Bui (Lancaster, Pa. $2 a year) 1: 
51-3 Mr '16 

An account of recent legislation governing 
state and local budgets 
Budget, County 
County budgets and their accounting. O. G. 
Cartwright. Ann Am Acad 62:223-34 N '15 
Budget, Municipal 

* Budget items, municipal revenue. 6p Mr 9 '16 

Bd. of estimate and apportionment, St. 
Louis, Mo. 
Budget making; with discussion. G. C. Cum- 
min. In City managers' assn. Proceedings, 

1915, p 94-105 

* Budget-making for Maine towns and a com^ 

parative analysis of the expenditures of cer- 
tain Maine municipalities. O. C. Hormell. 
21p '16 Bowdoin college, Brunswick, Me. 

* Dayton, O. — Budget of the city of Dayton, 

1916, as enacted by the city commissioTa, 
Feb. 23, 1916. 60p '16 Dayton bur. of munic. 
research 

Efficient budget making. H. R. Sands. In Con- 
ference of mayors and other city officials of 
the state of N. Y. Proceedings of the sixth 
annual conference, 1915, p 7-11 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



33 



Budget, Municipal — Continued 
Grand Rapids budget system. C: W. Shafer. 
Munic J 41:68-70 Jl 20 '16 

* Los Angeles, Cal. Efficiency comm. Summary 

of budget estimates for the fiscal year 1915- 
16, including General summary (all funds), 
Estimated revenues (all funds). General 
fund summary. Summary of departmental re- 
quests (general fund). '15 

* New York (city). Bd. of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Com. on tax budget. Budget news 
bulletin, no 1-5 78; 30; 24; 32; 26p '15 

New York charter provides for the holding 
of preliminary public hearings on proposed 
expenditures. To disseminate in advance the 
information needed for intelligent participa- 
tion in these hearings the bd. of estimate 
and apportionment publishes this series of 
budget bulletins, containing statistical tables 
of departmental estimates, appropriations, 
expenditures, and sources of the funds ex- 
pended, for a series of years, with signifi- 
cant summaries and comparisons. Pamphlet 
no. 1 of the 1915 series prefaces its finan- 
cial statement with an attempt to set forth 
clearly the consecutive steps that precede 
the adoption of a tax budget 

* New York (city). Bd. of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Departmental estimates for budget 
of 1916. N Y City Rec 43:sup 1-700 Ag 18, S 
8, 24, 29, O 6, 23, 25 '15 
Bound in one volume 

* New York (city). Bd. of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Tentative budget for 1916. 3 pts 
980p '15 

Each part contains a section devoted to 
supporting schedules and schedules of sal- 
aries and wages 

* New York (city). Bd. of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Tentative budget for 1916 [for the] 
board of estimate and apportionment. 8p '15 

* New York (city). Bd. of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Tentative budget for 1916 [for the] 
president of the borough of Manhattan. 21p 
'15 

* Philadelphia, Pa. City controller. Budget state- 

ment for 1916, 317p O 1 '15 

Recent progress in municipal budgets and ac- 
counts. C. E. Rightor. Nat Munic R 5:403- 
10 Jl '16 

Rochester, N. Y., bur. of municipal research 
has introduced a new budget system and 
worked out the details necessary to its pres- 
entation in complete form. The new budget 
system has made necessary a reclassification 
of the accounts system in the office of the 
comptroller (F 25 '16) 

Taxation and the municipal budget, by M. E. 
Loomis; Sources of revenue, by H. S. 
Swan; Accounting basis of budgetary pro- 
cedure, by W. B. Hadley; Unit costs in 
recreational facilities, by P. T. Beisser; 
Some suggestions for preparing a budget 
exhibit, by J. H. Braddock; Budgetary pro- 
cedure under the manager form of city 
government, by 4. M. Mandel; Budget as 
an administrative program, by Henry 
Bruere; German municipal budget and its 
relation to the general government, by 
K. F. Geiser; Budget procedure of English 
and French cities, by D. C. Baldwin; Move- 
ment for improved financing and account- 
ing practice in Toronto, by H. L. Brittain; 
County budgets and their construction, by 
O. G. Cartwright; Budget making for small 
cities, by L. D. Upson; Preparation of esti- 
mates and the formulation of the budget: 
the New York city method, by Tilden 
Adamson; Budget making in Cleveland, by 
Mayo Fesler; Budget making in Chicago, 
by C: F. Merriam. Ann Am Acad 62:113- 
276 N '15 

* Toronto's budget for 1915 based upon the offi- 

cial draft and final estimates, rearranged 
by the Bureau of municipal research so as 
to show costs of services rendered and of 
things purchased. (Citizen control of the 
citizens' business) 23p 20c '15 Toronto bur. 
of munic. research 

Bibliography 

Municipal budget-making and expenditures. 
/n W: B. Munro. Bibliography of municipal 
government in the U. S., p 409-13 '15 

Municipal budgets. In H. A. Rider. Select list 
of references on national, state, county and 
municipal budgets In the U. S., p 3-11 '15 



Budget, National 

Budget making and the work of government, 
by H: J. Ford; Evolution of the budget idea 
in the U. S,, by F: C. Cleveland; Budget 
and the legislature, by R. F. Miles. Ann 
Am Acad 62:1-46 N '15 

Demand for a national budget. Econ World 
n s 11:338-40 Mr 11 '16 

Efforts of Pres. Wilson and the Democratic 
leaders in the house of representatives to 
bring about a budget system that could be 
applied to appropriations at the 1st session 
of the 64th congress were abandoned as im- 
possible 

Japanese budget for current year [ending 
March 31, 1917]. G: W, Guthrie, U S Com- 
merce Repts no 151 p 1192-6 Je 28 '16 

Need of a national budget: report of the com- 
mittee on the national budget of the na- 
tional chamber of commerce. Nation's 
Business v 4 no 2 pt 2 p 66-9 F '16 

Shall we have responsible government? B. J. 
Hendrick. il World's Work 31:189-202, 273- 
85, 374-88. 519-23; 32:63-8 D '15-My '16 

U. S. chamber of commerce urges the in- 
auguration of a budget system which will 
place government appropriation and expendi- 
ture on a business basis. Three questions 
should be answered in solving the budget 
problem: (1) How much money is needed 
for the conduct of the government for the 
fiscal year (2) What money is on hand and 
from what sources shall the balance be raised 
(3) What shall be the amount appropriated 
to each function performed by the govern- 
ment (O 14 '15) 

Uruguay — Administration has presented to the 
national assembly a budget for the fiscal 
year of 1916-17, and urges its prompt adop- 
tion to replace the present custom of meet- 
ing expenses by successive quarterly exten- 
sions of a former appropriation law (Je 26 
'16) 
Budget, School 

* Chicago, 111. Bd, of education. Budget for the 

fiscal year 1916, 805p Weight 3 lb Enclose 
postage Chicago munic, ref. lib. 
■* Chicago, 111. Bd, of education. Educational 
budget for the fiscal year, 1915, 680p Weight 
2 lb 1 oz. Enclose postage Jl 7 '15 Chicago 
munic. ref, lib. 

* Cincinnati, O, Budget of the school district; 

financial program of the bd. of education, 
1915. 6p '15 

Shows proposed expenditure for each func- 
tion performed by the board, the fund from 
which it is proposed to make the expendi- 
ture, and the estimated revenue available 
or requested for financing the program 

* New York (city). Bd. of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Com, on education. Report on 
the method of computing salary accruals 
affecting the 1916 appropriation to the de- 
partment of education for the purposes of 
the general school fund, Oct. 4, 1915. 112p 
'15 

* New York (city). Bd, of estimate and appor- 

tionment. Com, on education. Statement 
to accompany tentative budget for 1916, 
submitted to board of education, Oct. 25, 
1915. 6p '15 

Contains a summary of the tentative 
budget 

Budget, State ,. ^ 

Budget system in Ohio, E. M. Fulhngton. J 
Account 21:114-24 F '16 

Address delivered at the Nat. auditors' 
convention. Salt Lake City, Aug. 21, 1915 
Cost of state government. F. F. Bell, comp. 
46p (Mim) '16 Leg, ref. bur., Springfield, 111. 
Contains: Description of charts; Govern- 
mental cost and budget considerations; Fis- 
cal statements and graphic presentations: 
Illinois, and other states; Bibliography on 
Cost of state government; Index 

* Maryland— Bill for an act to propose an 

amendment to the constitution, regulating 
the making of appropriations by the general 
assembly. (S B 76) 6p Ja 28 '16 Baltimore 
dept, of leg, ref, ^ ^ . ^ 

The bill embodies the state budget plan 
recommended by the economy and efficiency 
comm. ^^ ^ . - 

* Massachusetts, State auditor. Statement or 

estimates of the amounts required by the 
various departments, institutions and under- 



34 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Budget, State — Continued 

takings for the fiscal year ending on Nov. 
30, 1916. (House no 1) 133p Weight 3 oz. 
Enclose postage Ja '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

* New York (city) bureau of municipal research. 

Memorial to the senate and assembly asking 
consideration in committee of the whole of 
the appropriation bill submitted by the gov- 
ernor with his annual message, Jan. 5, 1916. 
(Senate no 22) 40p Ja 25 '16 N. Y. supt. of 
sen. doc. 

* New York (state). Governor. Budget con- 

ference revision of desired appropriations 
by the state departments and institutions 
transmitted Jan. 5, 1916. 420p '16 

* New York (state). Governor. Tentative bud- 

get proposals for 1916-17 transmitted Jan. 5, 
1916. 603p '16 
Proper function of the state budget, by S. G. 
Lowrie; Budgetary provisions of the N. Y. 
constitution, by C: A. Beard; California's 
state budget, by J: F. Neylan; Illinois bud- 
get, by F. F. Bell; Budget methods in Illi- 
nois, by J: A. Fairlie; State budget making 
in Ohio, by W. O. Heffernan; Financial ad- 
ministration of the commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, by E. H. Maling. Ann Am 
Acad 62:47-112 N '15 

* Three proposed constitutional amendments for 

control of the purse. Munic Research no 73 
86p My '16 $1 

Contains the following chapters: Execu- 
tive versus legislative budget; Alternatives 
before Gov. Whitman; Maryland proposed 
constitutional amendment for an executive 
budget; The New York proposed constitu- 
tional amendments 

Legislation, Comparative 
Budgetary laws [enacted in 1915]. F. G. 
Bates. Am Pol Sci R 9:759-62 N '15 

Washington, Vermont, Nebraska. North 
Dakota and Wisconsin adopted legislation 
on the subject. Wisconsin law applies to 
municipalities 

Reports 

Maryland — Report to Hon. Emerson C. Har- 
rington, comptroller of the treasury, con- 
cerning the financial condition of the state 
of Maryland, and also concerning a proposed 
state budget, Dec. 15, 1915. Harvey S. Chase 
& CO., certified public accountants. 16p '15 
Baltimore dept. of leg. ref. 

Submitted by Mr. Harrington to the comm. 
on economy and efficiency in the state of 
Maryland, Dec. 18, 1915 

* Massachusetts. Comm. on economy and efll- 

ciency. Report on budget procedure. (House 
no 2288) 32p Weight 1 oz Enclose postage 
My 27 '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

Buffalo fire department. Dauntless club 
Statistics of fire departments. 25c '16 Daunt- 
less club, Buffalo, N. Y. (Fire departments 
— Salaries) 

Building and loan associations 
Buildmg and loan associations the solution of 
the rural credit problem. W. O. Hedrick. 
Scientific Monthly (Sub-station 84, N. Y.) 
2:453-9 My '16 30c 

Conferences 

* United States league of local building and loan 

assns. Proceedings of the 23d annual conven- 
tion held at the Inside Inn, Panama-Pacific 
international exposition, San Francisco, Cal., 
July 27-29, 1915. 16Sp '15 H. F. Cellarius, 
sec, Cincinnati, O. 

Laws 

* California — General laws governing building 

and loan associations. 23p Cal. building and 
loan comr., San Francisco 

* Ohio — Laws relating to building and loan asso- 

ciations, 1915. 43p '15 Ohio dept. of building 
and loan assns. 
See also Banks — Laws 

Legislation, Comparative 
[Digest of 1915 state laws relating to building 
and loan associations.] In U. S. league of 
local building and loan assns. Proceedings, 
1915, p 31-44 



Building codes 

• New Y'ork (city) — Enforcement of building 

code: article 32 of building code; effective 
Nov. 29, 1915. (Bui no 28, 1915) 4p Bur. of 
buildings, N. Y. 

* New York (city). Bureau of buildings. Build- 

ing code. 278p 1 lb Enclose postage Mr 4 '16 
Municipal bldg., N. Y. 

Includes: Building code; Elevator regula- 
tions; Plumbing regulations; Plastering law; 
Plastering rules; Obstructions and incum- 
brances; Projections and encroachments; 
Sign structures; Moving pictures; Chapter 
sections; General index 

• Ohio state building code. 259p '15 Ohio indus- 

trial comm. 

Pt. 1, Administration; pt. 2, Theaters and 
assembly halls. School buildings; pt. 3, Stan- 
dard devices; pt. 4. Sanitation 

Paris, Texas, city council has passed an ordi- 
nance adopting the National builders' code 
as promulgated by the state fire insurance 
commission, and has adopted the National 
electric code as compiled and distributed by 
it (Mr 28 '16) 

Pittsburgh, Pa. — City council passed two ordi- 
nances, Feb. 14, 1916, which provide for the 
reorganization of the bureau of building in- 
spection in the department of public safety 
and confer the proper authority thereon. 
These ordinances are the first complete<l 
portions of the work of the building code 
committee which is preparing a temporary 
code to be in force until the gradual com- 
pletion of the final code. The code will pro- 
vide for tests of all building materials, of 
strength and fire resistance, classification of 
buildings according to use, and permits both 
for erection and occupancy of buildings (Mr 
•16) 

State building code; with discussion. J. R. 
Young. In Fire marshals' assn. of North 
America. Proceedings, 1915, p 91-104 

Discusses building code of North Carolina. 
Only Ohio, Wis., 111., Pa., N. Y., and N. C. 
have or are attempting to have building 
codes 
Building districts. See Zoning 
Building trades 

Analysis of findings based on the individual 
schedules secured from workers in printing, 
building, and metal trades; Analysis of find- 
ings based on the establishment schedules 
secured from employers in the printing, 
building and metal trades; Analysis of occu- 
pations in the building trades in Richmond: 
summary of the industrial survey of the 
building trades, chart. U S Bur Labor Sta- 
tistics Bui no 162 p 33-42, 141-82 '16 

Building trades. F. L. Shaw. (Cleveland edu- 
cation survey) 107p il 25c '16 Survey com., 
Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 

Recommends a school giving strictly trade 
courses of two years; and raising of com- 
pulsory attendance age to sixteen years 

* White's estimators' guide for contractors and 

builders: a vest pocket book of ready ref- 
erence and useful tables. 59p limp lea $1.25 
'16 A. E. White, contractor, Alaska bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. 
Issued also in paper cover 

Decisions 

Important legal decisions in 1915. A. L. H. 
Street. Building Age (239 W. 39th st., N. Y.) 
38:45-6 F '16 20c 

Decisions relate to phases of building con- 
tracts, responsibility for personal injuries, 
and rights of builder's surety 
Buildings 
Building construction and arrangement, il In 
D. S. Beyer. Industrial accident prevention, 
p 21-76 '16 

Discusses: Fire resistance and exit facili- 
ties; Collapse or failure of building struc- 
ture; Lighting; Ventilation; Stairways, rail- 
ings, and other building features 

See also Concrete; Doors, Revolving; Pub- 
lic buildings; Stairways; State buildings 
Bibliography 
Building laws and regulations. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 334-9 '15 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



35 



Buildings —Continued 

Condemnation 

See Fire protection — Condemnation of 
buildings 

Exits 
* New Yorlc (city). Bur. of fire prevention. Regu- 
lations governing exit facilities for buildings 
hereafter erected. 24p '15 

Height 

Building districts defined for New York city: 
height and use limitations fixed by new law; 
maps of borough of Manhattan indicate 
restrictions in detail. Eng Rec 74:166 Ag 5 
'16 

Building restriction in New York. Munlc J 41: 
158-9, 191-2 Ag 10-17 '16 

Height and area resolution: tentative draft, 
March 10, 1916. In N. Y. (city). Comm. on 
building districts and restrictions. Tentative 
report, March 10, 1916, p 25-31 

— Same. In Kept. pub. by Eagle lib., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. p 1-2, '16 

Height districts. Jn N. Y. (city). Comm. on 
building districts and restrictions. Final re- 
port, p 36-41 '16 

Protecting the future of New York city: a 
plea for stricter regulations in certain mat- 
ters pending before the commission on 
building districts and restrictions, April, 
1916. 14p '16 City club of N. Y., 55 W. 44th 
St., N. Y. 

Maintains that the deficiencies in the pres- 
ent proposals of the commission consist of 
far too liberal height limitations and too lib- 
eral allowances as to the proportion of the 
lot area which may be built upon 
See also Zoning 

Ordinances 

New York (city) — Board of estimate practi- 
cally unanimously passed the zoning and 
height limiting resolution, presented by the 
Comm. on building district and restrictions. 
The new ordinance permits tall buildings 
but requires a maximum amount of light and 
air to adjoining owners. It is generally con- 
sidered that the new law is the most im- 
portant step ever taken in the direction of 
an orderly and sane development of the 
building of the city (Jl '16) 

New York (city). Comm. on building districts 
and restrictions. Draft of building zone 
resolution prepared by the committee for 
submission to the board of estimate at a 
special meeting, .July 25, 1916. Record and 
Guide (119 W. 40th st., N. Y.) 98:112-13. 
118-19 Jl 22 '16 20c 

Salem, Mass. — New housing ordinance pro- 
vides that no dwelling or apartment house 
may have more than one story for each ten 
feet of width of the street, unless the house 
is set back from the street a distance equal 
to the excess of its height over that per- 
mitted at the street line. A hotel is in no 
case to exceed seventy feet in height (D '15) 

Investigations 

Massachusetts — Governor McCall's special 
message in regard to the safeguarding of 
schoolhouses, together with propositions rel- 
ative to the construction, alteration and 
maintenance of buildings, has been referred 
to a special recess commission, which is to 
make a thorough investigation of fire risks 
in school buildings (My '16) 

Legislation, Proposed 
Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended for pas- 
sage by the com. on buildings and city hall 
[relative to] approval of plans for buildings: 
work to be centralized in dept. of buildings. 
Chicago City Council Pam no 525 3p F 11 
'16 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Provides for the transmission by the com- 
missioner of buildings of plans of buildings 
requiring permits to the departments of 
smoke inspection, boiler inspection and pub- 
lic works, the bureau of fire prevention and 
public safety and the sanitary bureau for 
approval 



Dwelhng houses: a code of suggestions for 
construction and fire protection. 115p il 10c 
'16 Nat. bd. of fire underwriters 

Ordinances, Proposed 
Atlanta, Ga. — Proposed anti-wood shingle or- 
dinance provides strict regulation of the use 
of wood roofs on new houses within the city 
limits. Where roofs of present houses have 
to be replaced, they must be of fireproof 
material. If the ordinance is passed, it is 
the plan of the councilmen to have it be- 
come effective on Jan. 1, 1917 (Ap 6 '16) 

Registration 

* Chicago, 111. — Ordinance requiring contractors 
to register with dept. of buildings recom- 
mended for passage by the committee on 
buildings and city hall. (Pam no 554) 2p Mr 
31 '16 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Regulation 

Building districts and restrictions to be based 
upon definite principles: New York city 
commission working on plans for regulating: 
height of buildings, area of courts and loca- 
tion of trades. Eng Rec 73:284-5 F 26 '16 

Consolidation of departments having jurisdic- 
tion over buildings in New York city. In 
N. Y. (state). Factory investigating comm. 
Fourth report, 1915, v 1 p 65-71; 888-917 
Proposed act, v 1 p 299 

Uruguay — All buildings on public streets out- 
side of the radius of the city of Montevideo- 
and other urban centers of Uruguay must 
be constructed at least 10 meters (32.8 feet) 
from the boundary line of the property. 
Within the city radius the free space must 
be at least 4 meters (13.12 feet). These 
distances of 10 and 4 meters, respectively, 
are to be measured from the front bound- 
ary line of the land to the most salient part 
of the building, and the space between must 
not be occupied by steps, balustrade, or 
ornaments. The law also makes obligatory 
the construction of fences on property in 
Montevideo, even if lots are vacant, when 
pavement has been laid (Mr 8 '16) 

Wisconsin supreme court has held that a pro- 
vision of a municipal code, prohibiting the 
building, remodeling, or maintenance of 
garages, livery stables, etc., without the 
written consent of all real estate owners 
within 300 feet of the space occupied by the 
business proposed to be maintained, is in- 
valid, as delegating to private individuals the 
legislative power vested in the city council 
to determine whether such structures might 
be maintained; property owners being al- 
lowed at their caprice to refuse to allow ad- 
joining owners to devote their lands to such 
purposes. State ex rel. Nehrbass et al. v. 
Harper, Bldg inspector. 156 N W 941 

Statistics 

Statistics of building operations for February, 
1916, in 97 cities, showing an increase of 
17.5 per cent over February, 1915, appear 
in Building Age Ap '16 also in the Boston 
Transcript Ap 8 '16 

Surveys 

New York (city) — Committees from the de- 
partment of plant and structures are mak- 
ing a thoro investigation of the building con- 
struction, maintenance and repair shop work, 
in charge of the department of health and 
other departments. This is pursuant to the 
plan for effecting economies by centraliza- 
tion, as outlined in a bill passed by the last 
legislature (Je 1 '16> 

Taxation 

See Improvements — Taxation 

Bulk sales 
[Construction of statutes prohibiting sales of 
merchandise in bulk: case-note to Johnson 
company v. Beloosky.] Ann Cas 191 5C 414 

Legislation 
Bulk sales legislation. E. A. Sailers. Econ 
World n s 12:720-1 Je 3 '16 



36 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Bunting, Franklin O., v. State of Oregon 
Brief for the defendant in error in the case for 
the shorter work- day, by Felix Frankfurter 
and Josephine Goldmark, 2v postage 25c lb 
Nat. consumers' league, 289 4th av., N. i. 
(Hours of labor— Limitation) 

Burlington, Vt., committee on social survey 
Survey of the city of Burlington. 15 (Social 
surveys — Individual surveys) 

Burying grounds. See Cemeteries 

Business . ^ , , 

Commercial mortality: why it exists and how 
it can be prevented. H. S. Gaunce. Econ 
World n s 12:77-8 Jl 15 '16 

Bibliography 

* 1600 business books: a list by authors, by titles 

and by subjects. S. B. Ball, comp. 166p 75c 
'16 Wilson ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Compiled under the supervision of John C 
Dana, librarian Free public library of New- 
ark, N. J., chm. of the committee on libra- 
ries of the Associated advertising clubs of 
the world 

Periodicals 
Better Business, a magazine for western men 
and women, is published monthly by the 
Univ. of Washington extension division. It 
seeks to bring together the practical inter- 
ests of the business men in the state of 
Washington and the educational interest of 
the University. It will be a working labor- 
atory for some of the students and a means 
of communication of ideas for those engaged 
in business affairs. E. F. Dahm. ed., 1041-44 
Henry bldg., Seattle. $1 a year in advance 
Business conditions 

* General crop and business conditions and the 

outlook for business during the first four 
months of 1916 in the United States. (Special 
bul) 8p maps D 31 '15 Chamber of commerce 
of the U. S. A. 

The basis of the bulletin is a special re- 
port as of December 11, made by the stand- 
ing committee of the chamber, on statistics 
and standards. Contains a striking map 
showing the general business conditions of 
the country 

Business education. See Commercial education 

Business legislation, Proposed 

Business legislation now before congress. Am 
Ind 36:13-19 F '16 

Business managers. See County government — 
County manager plan; Municipal government 
— City manager plan 

Butler, Amos W. 
Indiana, a century of progress: a study of the 
development of public charities and correc- 
tion, 1790-1915. il '16 Amos W. Butler, 
sec, Indiana board of state charities (Chari- 
ties) 

Button industry 

Covered and celluloid button factories in New 
York city. In N. Y. (state). Factory investi- 
gating comm. Fourth report, 1915, v 2 p 
339-59 



Cab service 

Rates 

Bibliography 

[References on] cab service [rates with spe- 
cial reference to regulation]. U. S. Library 
of congress. Special Libraries 7:22 F '16 
Cabarets 

Chicago, 111. — Illinois supreme court. June 22. 
1916, handed down a decision holding that 
the ordinance prohibiting public dancing in 
restaurants and cafes is unconstitutional 
because it is clearly an invasion of the 
property rights of the individual (Press rept) 

Ordinances 
* Chicago, 111. — Ordinance prohibiting cabaret 
performances in saloons and restaurants 
where intoxicating liquors are sold. (Pam 
no 574) Ip '16 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 



* Milwaukee, Wis. — [Ordinance prohibiting cab- 
aret performances, and prohibiting private 
rooms and entrances in places licensed to 
sell liquors.] (Ord 157 Passed S 27 '15) Ip 
City clerk, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Regulating entertainment in saloons and ho- 
tels [in New York state cities]. N Y State 
Bur Municipal Information Rept no 23 Ip O 
13 '15 (Typew 5c) 

Obtained only thru P. A- I- S. 
Cabinets. See Executive departments 
California. Commission of immigration and 
housing 

2d annual report, 1916. (Immigration — Re- 
ports) 
California. Industrial welfare commission 

Report on wage board in the fruit and vege- 
table canning industry. '16 Cal. industrial 
comm., 948 Market St., San Francisco (Mini- 
mum wage — Individual industries) 
California. Laws, etc. 

California fish and gam© laws, 1915-1917. 18th 
ed '15 Cal. bd. of fish and game comrs.. Mills 
bldg., San Francisco (Fish — Laws) 

California laws of interest to women and chil- 
dren; supplement' 1913-1915. '16 Cal. state 
lib. (Women — Laws) 

Laws regulating the drilling of petroleum and 
gas wells. '15 Cal. state mining bur.. Ferry 
bldg., San Francisco (Gas wells — Laws) 
California. Reclamation board 

Flood control and reclamation in California. 
V. S. McClatchy. 8p '16 The Bd., Sacra- 
mento, Cal. (Floods) 

Report, 1916. 36p '16 The Bd., Sacramento, 
Cal. (Reclamation of land — Reports) 

California. Senate clerk 

Legislative manual and form book, prepared 
for the use of the California legislature. '15 
Cal. leg. counsel bur. (Legislative procedure 
— Manuals) 
California commonwealth club 
Appellate courts. Transactions.- v 11 no 2 
94p lie My '16 (Courts, Appellate) 
Campaign advertising. See Elections — Adver- 
tisements 

Camps 

Sanitation 

* Advisory pamphlet on camp sanitation and 
housing. 56p il '15 Cal. comm. of immigra- 
tion and housing; Underwood bldg., 525 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Camps. In P. M. Ashburn. Military hygiene, p 
73-102 '15 

Camps, Labor. See Convict labor — Camps; La- 
bor camps 

Canada. Department of labour 

Report, 1915. '15 (Labor bureaus — Reports) 

Canada. Registrar of boards of conciliation and 
investigation 
8th report of the proceedings under the indus- 
trial disputes investigation act, 1907. '15 
Canada dept. of labour, Ottawa (Concilia- 
tion) 

Canada. Secretary of state 

Civil service list of Canada, 1915, to which are 
added [the civil service laws]. (6 George V. 
Sessional paper 30 A 1916) '15 Ottawa (Civil 
service) 

Canals 

New York (state) — New barge canal now 
nearing completion consists of 440 miles of 
new canal construction and 350 miles of in- 
tervening lakes and rivers. All the machin- 
ery used to operate gates, valves, and cap- 
stans is operated by electric power. New 
York Times. July 9, 1916, gives a full de- 
scription of the new canal 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
New York — Providing for a $27,000,000 canal 
bond issue. Constitutional amendment. 
Adopted. Yes 625,159 No 580,242 N '15 
Cancer 
American medical assn. has a Prevention of 
cancer series of pamphlets. No. 1, What 
every one should know about cancer, by 
J. C. Bloodgood. lip; no. 2, Cancer of the 
womb, by F. H. Martin. 7p; no. 3, Cancer 
of the genito-urinary organs, by H. H. 
Young. 7p; no. 4, Cancer of the skin, by 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



37 



Cancer — Continued 

H: H. Hazen. 24p; no. 5, Cancer of the 
breast, by W: L. Rodman. 6p; no. 6, Cancer 
problem, by J. C. Bloodgood. 5p; no. 7, Con- 
trol of cancer, by J. C. Bloodgood. lip. Oth- 
ers are In preparation. The Assn., 535 N. 
Dearborn st., Chicago _ „. , . 

Cancer and the public health. F. C. Wood. Am 
J Pub Health 6:118-23 F '16 ^ . . 

* Cancer and the public health. F. C. Wood; 

Discussion, by Edward Reynolds and E. R. 
Kelley. (Bui no 9) 24p Mr '16 Am. soc. for 
the control of cancer, 25 W. 45th St., N. Y. 
Address delivered at a meeting for health 
officers, Jan. 29, 1916, arranged by the Boston 
local com. of the society 
Groping toward the cause of cancer. Survey 
36:302 Je 17 '16 

* Health News for March, 1916, is a Cancer num- 

ber. It contains: What people should know 
about cancer, by F. C. Wood; Need of better 
education in the early recognition of cancer, 
by J: A. Hartwell; Statistical evidence of 
cancer increase, by F: L. Hoffman; Labora- 
tory diagnosis of cancer, by H. R. Gaylord 
Pan American scientitic congress, section VIII. 
public health and medical science, at its 2d 
congress, Washington, Jan. 5, 1916, held a 
symposium on cancer research and a joint 
session of subsection E with the American 
assn. for cancer research. John Barrett, sec. 
gen.. Pan American union, Washington, D. C. 

* PubUc health authorities and the campaign 

against cancer. C. E. Lakeman. (Bui no 7) 
687-94p N '15 Am. soc. for the control of 
cancer, 25 W. 45th St., N. Y. 

Paper read before the section of health 
officials of the Am. public health assn., Jack- 
sonville, Fla., Dec. 4, 1914. Reprinted from 
the American Journal of Public Health, Au- 
gust, 1915 
Scientific investigation of cancer. Leo Loeb. 
Scientific Monthly (Science Press, Garrison, 
N. Y.) 3:209-26 S '16 30c 

* What people should know about cancer. F. C. 

Wood (Bui no 10) 8p Ap '16 Am. soc. for the 
control of cancer, 25 W. 45th St., N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Monthly Bulletin of the 
N. Y. state dept. of health, March. 1916 

Conferences 

American society for the control of cancer. 
Annual meeting, May 18, 1916. In coopera- 
tion with the Society, the N. Y. academy of 
medicine arranged for the following ad- 
dresses on different aspects of the cancer 
problem: Interest of the community in the 
problem of cancer, by L: I. Dumlin; Our 
present knowledge of the nature of cancer, 
by F. C. Wood; Place of surgery in the 
treatment of cancer, by G: D. Stewart. The 
Assn., 25 W. 45th st., N. Y. 
Proceedings were not printed 

Periodicals 
Journal of Cancer Research, edited by Dr. 
Richard Weil of New York, with the assis- 
tance of the editorial committee of the 
American association for cancer research, 
is a quarterly devoted to cancer. The first 
issue contains six excellent articles by lead- 
ers in research and an abstract of the 
proceedings of the American assn. for cancer 
research (F 12 '16) 

Statistics 

Improvement of cancer mortality statistics in 
the U. S. ; with discussion. C. E. Lakeman. 
Am J Pub Health 6:791-804 Ag '16 

Read before the Vital statistics section 
of the Am. public health assn., Rochester, 
N. Y., Sept. 9, 1915 

* Some essential statistics of cancer mortality 

throughout the world. F: L. Hoffman. (Bui 
8) 16p D '15 Am. society for the control ot 
cancer, 25 W. 45th St., N. Y. 
United States census bureau is compiling 
cancer statistics which will probably be 
available in the spring. New classification 
as to sex, age, race, etc. are to be included 
(Ja 11 '16) 
Candy Industry 

Certain sanitary aspects of candy manufac- 
ture. E. H. Cummins. Am J Pub Health 5: 
1148-63 N '15 



Confectionery industry in New York state. Jn 
N. Y. (state). Factory investigating comm. 
Fourth report, 1915, v 2 p 301-38 
Statistical tables, v 3 

Investigation of the candy industry to deter- 
mine the possibilities of vocational training. 
A. C. Phillips. In N. Y. (state). Factory in- 
vestigating comm. Fourth report, 1915, v 4 
p 1347-62 

Canneries 

California. Industrial welfare comm. Report on 
wage board in the fruit and vegetable can- 
ning industry. 16p '16 Cal. industrial welfare 
comm., 948 Market st., San Francisco 

Labor forces of the Alaska coast. William 
Kirk, il Survey 36:351-7 Jl 1 '16 

* Washington. Bur. of labor. Special report on 

the salmon canning industry in the state of 
Washington and the employment of oriental 
labor, Nov., 1915. 16p '15 

Capital punishment 

Legislation, Comparative 

Tennessee legislature voted, March 5, 1915, 
51 to 44, to abolish the death penalty for 
murder; but not for murder by life convicts, 
or for criminal assaults. Several cases of 
lynching were reported after the adoption 
of this bill by the legislature. May 5, 1915. 
Gov. T. C. Rye vetoed the bill; the veto 
was upheld in the legislature by a vote of 
57 to 26. Later the supreme court declared 
the veto ineffective because the governor 
held the bill over a recess of the legislature, 
retaining it longer than the five days allowed 
by law; and the law stands. Nine other 
states have abolished the death penalty for 
murder: Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Minne- 
sota, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, 
South Dakota and Wisconsin (F 1 'IQ) 

Cargo handling. See Freight handling 

Carnegie foundation for the advancement of 
teaching 

10th annual report of the president and of the 
treasurer, 1915. '16 The Found., 576 5th av., 
N. Y. (Education — Reports) 

Carson, William E. 

Marriage revolt. *$2 '15 Hearst's int. lib. 
(Marriage) 

Case law 

$|Ruling Case Law will be published by the 
Bancroft- Whitney company of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. It will emphasize reasons, trace 
the source and development of the law, and 
discuss principles. The price will be $6.50 
per volume and there will be at least 30 vol- 
umes. The date of issue has not been an- 
nounced (Je '16) 

Casual labor. See Labor, Casual 

Cataloging 

* Cataloging as an asset. W: W. Bishop. 22p 

50c '16 Waverly press, Williams & Wilkins 
CO., 2419 Greenmount av., Baltimore 
' An address to the N. Y. state library 
school. May 1, 1915 

Cats 

/* Domestic cat: bird killer; mouser and de- 
stroyer of wild life; means of utilizing and 
controlling it. E: H, Forbush. (Economic 
Biology Bui no 2) 112p il '16 Mass. bd. of 
agric. 

Discusses the economic value of cats, leg- 
islation for the control of the cat, and legal 
rights of the cat. St. Petersburg, Fla., and 
Montclair. N. J., have ordinances requiring 
tags or collars, and Iowa has a state law 
under which cats might be taxed 

Cattle 
Committee on agriculture of the Illinois bank- 
ers assn., of which M. A. Traylor of Chicago 
is chairman, is busy with a plan to finance 
cows for farmers in southern Illinois, co- 
operating with the state food commission. 
It is hoped to greatly increase the prestige 
of the state in dairying (Ap '16) 

* Report of the first Jersey sires' futurity test 

of the Aroostook Jersey breeders' associa- 
tion. Raymond Pearl. Maine Agric Exp Sta 



38 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Cattle — Continued 

Bui no 247 p 37-52 F '16 Agricultural experi- 
ment station, Orono, Me. 

Maintains that the only certain test of 
the breeding worth of an individual in 
breeding for performance is the progeny test 

See also Foot and mouth disease 

Abortion, Infectious 
Cause and occurrence of contagious abortion 
in cattle, E. C. Schroeder. In International 
assn. of dairy and milk inspectors. 4th an- 
nual report, 1915, p 139-45 

* Contagious abortion in cows. J. W. Kalkus. 

Wash Agric Exp Sta Popular Bui no 94 4p 
Jl '15 Agricultural experiment station, Pull- 
man, Wash. 

Outlook for the control of cattle abortion. 
W. L. Williams. J Am Veterinary Medical 
Assn (Ithaca, N. Y.) 49:199-217 My '16 30c 

Studies in infectious abortion in cattle. Ward 
Giltner and others. Am Vet M Assn J n s 
49:320-39 Je '16 

Investigations 

New York (state) — Legislature has granted 
the State veterinary college at Cornell an 
appropriation of $15,000 for the investiga- 
tion of infections and sterility in dairy cat- 
tle (My 26 '1*6) 

Cattle tick 

Louisiana — Governor Hale proclaimed April 20, 

1916 as Tick eradication day, and called for 

its observance in all the schools of the 

state, by special instruction about the tick 

Caucus system. See United States — Congress — 
Caucus system 

Cement 

Specifications 

* United States government specification for 

Portland cement. U S Bur of Stand Circ no 
33 2d ed 28p il '14 

Cemeteries, IVIunicipal 

Bibliography 
Municipal cemeteries. In W: B. Munro. 
Bibliography of municipal government in 
the U. S., p 287-8 '15 

Census 

Some population statistics of the Pacific coast 
states. W. F. Willcox. Am Statis Assn 14: 
711-26 D '15 

Census, State 

* Census of 1915. 27p '15 N. J. dept. of state 

* Census of the state of Wyoming, 1915. 20p 

'15 Wyo. sec. of state 

Centennial celebrations 

* Official book of the Fort Armstrong centennial 

celebration, June 18-24, 1916, Rock Island 
and Moline, 111., and Davenport, Iowa, 1816- 
1916. 76p il '16 *$1.50; pa *50c E. O. Vaile, jr., 
pub.. Rock Island, 111. 

Investigations 

Massachusetts — Legislature has authorized a 
Pilgrim tercentenary commission to report 
to the next legislature on the plan, scope and 
place for an international exposition and 
other means for observing in 1920 the 300th 
anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims. 
The commission is authorized to expend 
$25,000 (My '16) 

Central electric plants. See Electric plants. Cen- 
tral 

Central heating plants. See Heating from cen- 
tral stations 

Central power plants. See Power plants, Cen- 
tral 

Central purchasing 

* Procedure for the office of the commis- 

sioner of supplies [of the city and county 
of Denver]. 17p 25c plus postage '15 Colo- 
rado taxpayers protective league, room 402 
Kittredge bldg., Denver 

See also Municipal purchasing; State pur- 
chasing 



Chain stores 



Bibliography 



* List of references on chain stores. U. S. 

Library of congress. 4p Je 2 '16 (Typew Cost 
of copying 20c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Chamber of commerce of the United States of 
America 

* Nation's business and "the nation's govern- 

ment: review of the history, purposes, and 
achievements of the Chamber of commerce 
of the U. S. A. Felix Orman. 24p Mr 25 '15 
U. S. chamber of commerce, Riggs bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 

Reprinted from The Outlook, Feb. 3, 1915 

Conferences 

Chamber of commerce of the U. S. Proceed- 
ings of the 4th annual meeting, Washington, 
D. C, Feb. 8-10, 1916. il Nation's Business 
V 4 no 2 pt 2 84p F '16 

Contains the following addresses: Na- 
tional chamber, democracy of business, by 
J: H. Fahey; President's message to busi- 
ness men, by Woodrow Wilson; Navy's 
task in national defense, by Josephus Dan- 
iels; Vocational education and industrial 
efficiency, by W: C. Redfield; Malady of 
the railroads, by Howard Elliott; China as 
•an American market, by V. K. W. Koo; 
Pan-American international high commis- 
sion, by D. U. Fletcher; Business view of 
the peace to come, by E: A. Filene; Veto 
power of the president, by W: C. Breed. 
Reports on the following subjects were also 
given: Necessary basis of national de- 
fense; Permanent tariff commission; How 
shall we get a merchant marine? Cooperat- 
ing with the federal trade commission; 
Need of a national budget; Working with 
the department of commerce; The Ameri- 
canization of our alien workmen; Our need 
of vocational education; Facilities for labor 
exchanges; Arbitration of commercial dis- 
putes; Trade and our foreign relations; De- 
partment of commerce and commercial 
statistics; Presenting the figures of trade 
and industry. Resolutions adopted called 
upon the railroads and their employees to 
adjust their wage controversy by arbitration; 
favoring the ratification of a program for 
national defense which proposes universal 
military training, an increased navy, and the 
creation of a council of national defense to 
mobilize when needed all the nation's forces: 
fighting, industrial, commercial and scienti- 
fic. Other resolutions provided for a referen- 
dum to the members of the chamber thruout 
the country on providing pensions for federal 
civil service employees, and on amending 
the federal constitution to permit the presi- 
dent to veto specific items of appropriation 
bills, thus eliminating objectionable riders 
to such bills, which the president cannot now 
veto without disapproving the entire bill. 
The chamber has published a separate sheet 
summarizing the meeting and giving indi- 
vidual addresses 

Chambers of commerce 

American-Russian chamber of commerce, 60 
Broadway, N. Y., has been organized to 
promote and encourage a closer union in 
industry, commerce and finance and to 
create bonds of mutual sympathy and 
friendship between Russia and the United 
States (Mr '16) 
Philadelphia, Pa., chamber of commerce begin- 
ning March 6, 1916, made a tour of the cities 
of western Pennsylvania and New York 
state. The purpose of the trip was to lend 
a personal touch to business and to empha- 
size the resources of Philadelphia, its 
unusual railroad facilities and the ability 
to fill the needs of all retail concerns of the 
territory visited. Report made by the trade 
expansion com. appears in the Journal of 
the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce for 
April, 1916 

* Some activities of the Rochester chamber of 
commerce during 1915 as set forth in the re- 
ports of the committee chairmen. 49p '15 
Rochester chamber of commerce 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



39 



Chambers of Gommerce — Continued 
Spokane, Wash., chamber of commerce, com- 
mittee on immigration has sent out a ques- 
tionnaire on immigration to the bankers of 
the state. It issued a call for a 
conference of representatives from all com- 
munities in the state, to be held March 8, 
1916, in Spokane, to consider agriculture and 
immigration 

See also Charities — Control by commercial 
organizations; Commercial organizations 

Memberships 
Taxation 
Minneapolis, Minn. — U. S. supreme court has 
upheld the tax levied by Hennepin county 
upon the memberships in the Minneapolis 
chamber of commerce on the ground that 
memberships are property and as such tax- 
able (Press rept F 21 '16) 

Reports 

* Boston, Mass., chamber of commerce. Bd. of 

directors. 8th annual report, May, 1916. 29p 
'16 

Chapin, Charles V. 

Report on state public health work based on a 
survey of state boards of health. *16 Am. 
medical assn. (Public health — Surveys) 

Charitable and penal Institutions. See State in- 
stitutions 

Charities 

Charities and correction. C. C. North. In F. D. 
Streightoff and F. H. Streightoff. Indiana: 
a social and economic survey, p 178-218 '16 

Takes up: Poor relief; Children; Defec- 
tives; Medical charities; Adult dehnquent; 
Administration 

Discussion, by Comr. John A. Kingsbury, of 
the work of the New York (city) dept. 
of public charities is printed at length in 
the Brooklyn Daily Eagle D '5 '15 

* Indiana, a century of progress: a study of the 

development of public charities and correc- 
tion, 1790-1915. A. W. Butler, il fig I54p '16 
Amos W. Butler, sec, Ind. board of state 
charities 

Souvenir of the 43d Nat. conference of 
charities and correction, Indianapolis, Ind., 
May 10-17, 1916 

* Organized poor relief work in Wisconsin. K, L. 

Van Wyck. Univ of Wis Exten Bui ser no 
739 (Gen ser 543) lip 5c My '15 Univ. of 
Wisconsin, Madison 

Public and private charities: Introductory 
statement by the chairman of the commit- 
tee, G. S. Wilson; Official outdoor relief and 
the state, by A. W. Butler; Public outdoor 
relief in the United States, by J. R. Brack- 
ett; Policy of state aid to private charities, 
by R. D. Dripps; Discussion of public out- 
door relief, by T. J. Riley; Principles and 
methods of outdoor relief, by Gertrude 
Vaile; Policy of issuing state charters to 
charities, by R. W. Kelso. In Nat. conf. of 
charities and correction. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 434-492 

Relation of private societies to juvenile courts 
and to state bureaus of protection. C. C. 
Jones. (Reprints 1915 no 35) 14p '15 10c Nat. 
conf. of charities and correction 

Address before the National conference 
of charities and correction, Baltimore, Md., 
May 12-19, 1915 

State aged 100: glimpses of social progress in 
Indiana during one hundred years. Alex- 
ander Johnson. Survey 36:97-101, 117-21 Ap 
22, 29 '16 

* State charities aid assn. of New York: what 

it is, what it does, how it works, what It 
needs. (Pub 144) 7p Ja '16 The Assn., 105 E. 
22nd St.. N. Y. 

See also Children— Charities, protection, 
etc.; Hospitals; Orphan asylums; Poor; So- 
cial service; State institutions; Vagrancy; 
Visiting nurses; Widows 

Bibliography 
Child welfare surveys and bibliography. Univ 
of la Bui n s no 111 (Exten div bul no 
16) 7p Mr 15 '16 



Poor relief and child welfare. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 367-70 '15 

Conferences 

Connecticut conference of charities and cor- 
rection. 6th annual meeting, Norwich, Conn., 
April 30-May 2, 1916. The following addresses 
were delivered: Program of legislation for 
Connecticut especially with reference to set- 
tlement laws, by F. R. Johnson; Ideals of 
charity organization work, by Mrs. W: H. 
Lothrop; County home system, including the 
placing out of children, by Mrs. F. A. 
Mitchell; Outline of the work of the private 
charities of the state in the placing out of 
dependent children, by Lina Phipps; Sug- 
gestions for improvement in the present 
practice of caring for dependent children in 
Connecticut, by C. C. Carstens; Situation 
with regard to the care of children under 4 
by private institutions, especially St. Agnes 
home, by J: T. Ryan; Care of the feeble- 
minded, by C: T. La Moure; Care of mentally 
defective epileptics, by Donald Ross; Insane, 
by Dr. Haviland; Need of a woman's re- 
formatory, by M. P. Falconer; Probation by 
T. C. T. Crain; Newer ideals in prisons, by 
C: H. Johnson 

Kith and kin of charity. G. R. Taylor. Survey 
36:219-20. 231-3 My 27 '16 

Reflections on the recent session of the 
National conference of charities and correc- 
tion which met from May 10-17, 1916, in 
Indianapolis 
* National conference of charities and correc- 
tion. Proceedings of the 42d annual ses- 
sion, held in Baltimore, Md., May 12-19, 
1915. 665p $2 '15 

Addresses were made on the following 
general subjects: Family and the commun- 
ity; Children; Health; Social hygiene; State 
care of the insane, feeble-minded and epi- 
leptic; Corrections; Public and private 
charities; Social legislation; Education for 
social work. Addresses have been reprinted 
at prices varying from 5 to 10 cents 

National conference of charities and correc- 
tion, 43d annual meeting, Indianapolis, Ind., 
May 10-17, 1916. Program contains addresses 
on: Police as a social force, by Arthur 
Woods, police comr. of N. Y., and Alice S. 
Wells, member of the Los Angeles police 
force; Gary system as applied to social work, 
by William Wirt, supt. of schools at Gary, 
Ind.: Steering the child into work, by Anna 
Herkner. Maryland bur. of statistics and in- 
formation; Methods of coordinating the civic 
work of smaller communities, by R. A. 
Hoyer, La Salle, 111.; Right to be well born, 
by C. A. L. Reed, former pres., American 
medical assn.; Function of the psychopathic 
hospital in social service, by E. E. Southard, 
Boston psychopathic hospital. Business men, 
newspaper editors and public officials gave 
their views of social workers and the prac- 
tical value of organized charity in a sympo- 
sium arranged by G. R. Taylor of New 
York. Other topics for discussion include 
public outdoor relief, feeble-minded, charac- 
ter of immigration after the war in relation 
to unemployment. It was also proposed to 
hold a series of informal conferences on the 
subject of social hygiene 

National conference of Jewish charities. Indi- 
anapolis, May 7, 1916. Speakers included 
Governor S: M. Ralston, Father F. H. Gav- 
isk. Rabbi M. M. Freuerlicht, and M. F. 
Low. president of the Jewish conference 

* New York city conference of charities and cor- 

rection. Proceedings [of the 6th conference. 
May 25-27, 1915]. 266p 60c; pa 35c '16 J: B. 
Prest. sec. 287 4th av., N. Y. 

Ohio state conference of charities and correc- 
tion. Proceedings [of the 25th annual meet- 
ing], Dayton, Nov. 3-5, 1915. Ohio Bul Char 
& Correc v 22 no 3 I28p Je '16 

20th annual state conference of charities and 
correction at Danville. Illinois. October 21- 
25, 1915. [Proceedings]. Inst Q 7:151-61 Je 
30 '16 
Control by commercial organizations 

♦ Commercial organizations and charitable con- 

trol. Univ of Wis Exten Bul no 748 (Gen 
ser 552) 18p 5c Je '15 



40 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Charities— Control by commercial organizations 
» Youngstown, O. Chamber of commerce. Com. 
on benevolent associations. Report. Youngs- 
town (Youngstown, O.) no 9 6p F 15 '16 

Directories 

Classified list of local philanthropic and char- 
itable organizations believed by the Chicago 
assn. of commerce subscriptions investi- 
gating com. to be M^orthy of the support of 
those who desired to further their aims; 
endorsed for the period ending Nov. 30, 
1916. 73p Chicago munic. ref. lib.; Chicago 
assn. of commerce, 10 S. La Salle St., Chi- 
cago 

* New York charity directory. 607p $1 '16 Char- 

ity organization society, 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 
Contains a topical index of agencies; an 
alphabetical list of statements giving the 
necessary information concerning each 
agency; a list of churches grouped by de- 
nominations according to their respective 
boroughs (in most cases the names of pas- 
tors are also given) ; an index of the names 
of persons mentioned in connection with any 
of the agencies listed 

Federation 

Federation for the support of Jewish philan- 
thropic societies of New York city has been 
consummated. The purpose is to provide 
adequate support for tiie societies repre- 
sented in it, to provide an efficient method of 
collecting and distribviting contributions to 
the societies in accordance with the wishes 
of the donors and to relieve societies from 
making separate appeals and collections. A 
provision is proposed that no society may 
withdraw from the new organization before 
Jan. 1, 1919. Samuel Greenbaum, chm. (Je 
24 '16) 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — A movement is on foot to 
form a federation of practically all charitable 
organizations in the city. It is believed 
that charity can be administered much more 
efficiently and economically if the societies 
are federated and are able to consult with 
each other. The plan has been found suc- 
cessful in many of the large cities (Je 16 '16) 

Survey, May 13, 1916, gives a brief review of 
charity federation in Baltimore, Erie, Pa., 
Oshko'sh, Wis., St. Joseph, Mo., Cincinnati 
and Cleveland. The system of a single an- 
nual campaign for money has been found to 
be more remunerative than all the separate 
campaigns formerly conducted by the various 
societies put together. Notice is also given 
of the formation of the Bureau of philan- 
thropic research in New York with Morris D. 
Walsman as sec, which will act under the 
auspices of the Council of Jewish communal 
institutions and will serve as an agency for 
investigation and coordination of philanthro- 
pic activities and a center for information 

Investigations 
Mayor Mitchel takes the stand: a further 
chapter in the story of the children's insti- 
tutions of New York. W. D. Lane. Survey 
36:263-5 Je 3 '16 

Discusses the attempt of co-religionists 
to obstruct his administration and interfer- 
ence with the control of private charitable 
institutions. Tapping of private telephone 
wires by the police is justified by the mayor 

* Public outdoor relief: an inquiry into the 

administration of public outdoor relief in 
Dutchess county. New York, for the three 
year period, Oct. 1, 1910-Sept. 30, 1913. (No 
137) 29p State charities aid assn., 105 E. 
22d St., N. Y. 

Reports 

* State of New York: in a matter of the inves- 

tigation, pursuant to section eight of the 
executive law, by C: H. Strong, as commis- 
sioner, of the state board of charities, the 
fiscal supervisor of state charities, and cer- 
tain state commissioners. Brief on behalf of 
the commissioner of public charities of the 
city of New York. W: H. Hotchkiss. 106p 
'16. Dept. of public charities, Municipal bldg., 
N. Y. 



Legislation 

Charity legislation of 1915, New York. In 
N. Y. (state). Bd. of charities. Report, 1915, 
p 13-17 '16 

License 

New York (city) — Proposed ordinance intro- 
duced into the board of aldermen recently 
by Louis J. Wendel, provides that managers 
of charity entertainments must obtain a 
license and furnish a. bond; that managers 
shall file an estimated list of expenses with 
the bureau of licenses at the time of pro- 
curing the license; that this list or a state- 
ment of the portion of the gross proceeds 
to be devoted to charitable purposes must 
appear in a conspicuous place on all adver- 
tisements, programs, invitations, and letters 
of appeal; and that an expense account, 
accompanied by vouchers, must be filed with 
the commissioner of licenses within ten days 
after the entertainment is held. The law is 
especially aimed at those who make a busi- 
ness of managing charitable affairs for a 
percentage of the gross receipts (My 3 '16) 

Municipal appropriations 

* Charity department appropriations in New 

York state cities. N Y State Bur Municipal 
Information Rept no 51 3p D 7 '15 (Typew 
15c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

* Charity department budgets in second class 

cities [in New York state]. N Y State Bur 
Municipal Information Rept no 73 Ip Ja 27 
'16 (Typew 5c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

* Charity department expenses and appropria- 

tions for cities of a certain population [in 
New York state]. N Y State Bur Municipal 
Information Rept no 56 Ip D 20 '15 (Typew 
5c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

* Cost of care of charity patients in private hos- 

pitals [in New York state cities]. N Y State 
Bur Municipal Information Rept no 22 3p O 
13 '15 (Typew 15c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Regulation 
Los Angeles, Cal., has endeavored to bring 
charity under municipal control without suc- 
cess. The California supreme court. Feb. 3, 
1916, overruled the ordinance of that city, 
under which a Salvation army leader was 
arrested for soliciting gifts after having 
been refused a permit to do so; court held 
that a city cannot say who may engage in 
charitable work dependent upon voluntary 
contributions; held that it constitutes an 
arbitrary and oppressive use of police power. 
.Ex parte Dart. 155 P 63 

Reports 

* How much did you give to the Charity organ- 

ization society last year: what was done 
with your money; an outline report. (Char- 
ity organization bul 100) lip D 1 '15 Charity 
organization society, 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Summary of the manifold activities of the 
Charity organization society of New York 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1915 
Institution Quarterly for March 81, 1916, v. 7, 
no. 1, has been devoted almost exclusively 
to a study of the jails, almshouses and re- 
lief agencies of Illinois. It contains a report 
upon every jail and almshouse in the state, 
except those of Peoria and St. Clair coun- 
ties, which were inspected early in the 
year, and an account of the relief measures 
and methods of every county in the state. 
The commission favors the district or the 
state penal farm for petty offenders; the 
extension of the system of probation for 
men and women who cannot give bail; a 
monthly grand jury in the populous coun- 
ties; the prohibition of the per diem system 
of feeding prisoners, and the power, re- 
posed in the governor, to close any alms- 
house or jail which fails to meet the 
requirements of decency, sanitation and 
humanity in its administration; also a law 
which will permit two or more counties to 
join in the erection and maintenance of 
a district almshouse; a law to prohibit the 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



41 



Charities — Reports — Continued 

letting- of the superintendency of the county 
farm to the highest bidder on the land, and 
the lowest on the keep of the inmates; a law 
requiring the filing with a central state 
authority of duplicates of all orders for re- 
lief, issued by overseers of the poor or su- 
pervisors 

* New York (state). Bd. of charities. 49th an- 

nual report for the year 1915. 264p '16 

Contains a summary of legislation in 1915, 
and a discussion of the findings of an in- 
vestigation into the charges made against 
the N. Y. state reformatory for women at 
Bedford Hills, N. Y. ; investigation of alleged 
conditions at the N. Y. city children's hos- 
pitals and schools at Randall's Island; in- 
vestigation of the board under the Moreland 
act 
New York assn. for improving the condition of 
the poor. Year book, 1915. 144p '16 The 
Assn.. 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

* State charities aid assn. Annual report for 

the year ending Sept. 30, 1915. (Pub nos 
141-142 233p '15 The Assn., 105 E 22d St., 
N. Y. 

* Year of service: fiftv- fifth annual report, Nov. 

1, 1914, to Oct. 31, 1915, of the St. Louis 
provident assn. 44p '15 The Association, 
2221 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo. 
See al^o Charities — State aid 

State aid 

* Maryland. Bd. of state aid and charities. 

Eighth biennial report, 1914-1915. 133p '15 

Discusses the subsidy system in Maryland 
and per capita system and its cost; outlines 
the practices of state appropriations to hos- 
pitals in the several states, and recommends, 
that until all charges can be cared for in 
public institutions, appropriations should be 
made thru a central board 

* Policy of state aid to private charities. R. D. 

Dripps. (Reprints 1915 no 40) 15p 10c Nat. 
conference of charities and correction 

Address before the National conference of 
charities and correction, Baltimore, Md., May 
12-19, 1915 

* State aid to private charitable institutions, by 

Joseph A. Beck; Advantages and disadvan- 
tages of institutions for dependent children, 
by T: F. Coakley. 15p Catholic truth society, 
St. Paul's cathedral, 136 N. Craig St., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Articles were originally written for the 
Russell Sage foundation 

Statistics 

* Charity organization statistics: report of the 

com. on statistics of the Am. assn. of socie- 
ties for organizing charity. (Pub C O 43) 
118-151p 10c '15 Charity organization dept., 
Russell Sage found. 

Discusses methods of handling statistics 
and suggests certain classifications 

Surveys 

* Charities of Springfield, Illinois: a survey 

under the direction of the American associ- 
ation of societies for organizing charity. 
F. H. McLean. (Springfield survey charities 
section) 185p il 25c D '15 Russell Sage found. 
Survey is divided into 5 parts, as follows: 
Children in Springfield institutions; Care of 
the sick; Family disabilities and treatment; 
Social agencies dealing with families; Sum- 
mary of conclusions and recommendations 
Cliarities, County 
Law governing county visitors, by J: H. Kin- 
kade; Medical service in county institutions, 
by J. M. Howell; Visiting board from a 
matron's viewpoint, by Mrs. E. S. Peake; 
Discussion of the limitations and difficulties 
of boards of county visitors and desirable 
amendments to the laws governing their 
functions, by O. C. Larason and Mrs. A. E. 
Rumer. Ohio Bui Char & Correc v 22 no 3 
p 79-88 Je '16 

Administration 

Administration of county charities; with dis- 
cussion. V. E. Macy. In N. Y. constitutional 
convention comm., corap. County govern- 
ment, p 20-6 '15 



Reports 

* Cook county. III. Bd. of comrs. 1st annual 
message of Peter Reinberg, pres. 15p '15 
Chicago munic. ref, lib. 

Includes the more important work done 
in the different charitable institutions, a re- 
view of social legislation as it relates to 
Cook county and proposed improvements 

Charters. See Corporations — Charters; County 
charters; Municipal charters 

Chattei loans 

Colorado supreme court has upheld the con- 
stitutionality of the anti-loan shark law 
enacted two years ago by the general assem- 
bly. The law requires anyone making a 
business of lending money to take out a 
license and pay a fee of $50, and establishes 
a maximum rate of 2 per cent a month; it 
exempts banks, building and loan associa- 
tions, and title and guaranty companies 
(Press rept My '16) 
Loan sharks. In H. G. Moulton. Principles of 
money and banking, p 338-48 '16 

Contains the following articles: Salary 
loan business in New York City, by C. W. 
Wassam; Efforts at remediation, by A. H. 
Ham; Loan shark campaign, by M. W. 
Davis; Morris plan of loaning on personal 
responsibility 

See also Pawnshops 
Chauffeurs 

Railroad and street transportation. R, D. 
Fleming. (Cleveland education survey) 76p 
il 25c '16 Survey com., Cleveland found., 
Cleveland. O. 

Liability 
Ohio supreme court has affirmed a judgment 
emphasizing the liability of automobile driv- 
ers in failing to stop at street crossings 
where cars are taking on or discharging 
passengers; held that the obligation is im- 
posed on a driver for public protection, and 
by violation of it he was guilty of negli- 
gence. Decision vindicated the rights of 
pedestrians (Press rept Mr 12 '16) 

License 

New York — Bill v/as introduced in the assem- 
bly to compel owners of cars, as well as 
chauffeurs, to make out a license for run- 
ning a car: to require notice to the secre- 
tary of state upon change or discharge of 
operator or chauffeur, and to provide for 
suspension and revocation of a license of op- 
erator or chauffeur. The text of the pro- 
posed amendment appeared in the N. Y. 
Evening Post Jan 5, 1916. This bill did not 
pass, but a similar bill did pass, and was 
vetoed by the governor 

Text of statement submitted to the judiciary 
committee of the Louisiana state senate, in 
opposition to the Davey bill, which sought to 
prohibit municipalities from requiring photo- 
graphs as a requisite for licensing opera- 
tors of mechanically driven vehicles. In 
Safety first federation of America. Report 
of proceedings, 1915, p 38-41 

Check rooms 

Ordinances 

Cleveland, O. — City council has passed a reso- 
lution providing that the director of law be 
requested to advise the council as to its 
power and authoritv to regulate the rate of 
charge to be made in public checking rooms 
of the city. (Ord no 40635 Approved Je 5 '16) 
Cleveland City Record 3:21 Je 14 '16 
Chicago. Board of supervising engineers 

Report of investigation of traffic conditions 
and track capacity with respect to the 
possibilities of improved street railway ser- 
vice and re-routing of cars of the Chicago 
surface lines and advance reprint from the 
9th annual report. 159p Mr 1 '16 Chicago 
munic. ref. lib. (Street railroads— Reports) 

Chicago. City clerk „^ ^„^_ 

Annual report for the year ended Dec. 31, 1915. 

Ja '16 (Municipal officers— Reports) 

Chicago. Civil service commission 

Reports on the investigation into organization 

and administration [of the] department of 

health, city of Chicago, May 26, 1914-April 



42 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Chicago. Civil service commission — Continued 
19, 1915. Weight 10 oz. Enclose postage '15 
Chicago munic. ref. lib. (Public health- 
Municipalities) 

Chicago. Ordinances . ^. 

Summary of ordinances relating to sanitation 
and to the maintenance of streets and al- 
leys. Jl '15 Chicago munic. ref. lib. (Sanita- 
tion — Regulation) 
Chiid birth 

See also Insurance, Maternity 
Empioyment before and after 

Employment of married women. In H. T. 
Ashby, Infant mortality, p 57-70 '15 

Pan American scientific congress. 2d congress, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 1916. 
Program of section VIII: public health and 
medical science, lists addresses on Employ- 
ment of married and pregnant women and 
the protection and promotion of the health 
of female wage earners, by Mrs. J: B. An- 
drews and Eicardo Ortiz. John Barrett, sec. 
gen.. Pan American union, Washington, 
D. C. 

Legislation, Comparative 

Legislation affecting motherhood. In L. K. 
Frankel. Maternity insurance, p 4-7 '15 
Child labor 

"Beeters": what field labor means to 5,000 
children in the Colorado sugar beet districts. 
E: N. Clopper. il Survey 35:655-60 Mr 4 '16 

* Child in the cotton mill. (Pam 260) lOp il Mr 

'16 Nat. child labor com., 105 E. 22d St., 
N. Y. 

Child labor and child labor legislation in the 
South, by A. J. McKelway; Supervision of 
working children under the Ohio law, by 
H. T. Woolley. In Nat. conf. of charities 
and correction. Proceedings, 1915. p 514- 
18. 526-8 

Child labor in mills, factories, and mines; with 
discussion. E. Y. Webb. Cong Rec 53:1986-93 
Ja 29 '16 

Child labor in the sugar-beet fields of Color- 
ado. E: N. Clopper and L. W. Hine. il Child 
Labor Bui 4:176-206 F 16 50c 

* — Same. Reprinted. (Pam no 259) 34p 11 25c 

postpaid Mr '16 

* Constructive program for securing the full 

benefit of existing child labor laws in Massa- 
chusetts, 1916. 15p il '16 Mass. ' child labor 
com., 6 Beacon St., Boston 

Discussion of child labor legislation: criticism 
of political methods responsible for present 
agitation. J. M. Davis. Textile World J 
(130 Beekman st., N. Y. $3 a year) 51:34 Je 
24 '16 

Address delivered at Southern textile assn. 
convention Ashville, N. C, June, 1916 

Enforcement of child labor laws. E. N. Clop- 
per. Ann Am Acad 63:272-7 Ja '16 

Labor of wife and children as a factor in fam- 
ily support: with discussion. Mrs. Harry 
Kraft. In N. Y. city conference of charities 
and correction. Proceedings, 1915, p 170-82 
'16 

Regulating child actors in the movies. Survey 
36:301-2 Je 17 '16 

See also Boys — Employment; Home labor; 
Hours of labor — ^Women and children; Mov- 
ing picture acting; Social legislation; Street 
trades 

Ages 
Legislation, Comparative 

Minimum and regulated ages: [analytical 
charts showing legislation by states]. U S 
Children's Bur Pub no 10 (Industrial ser no 
1) p 28-99 '15 

Conferences 

National child labor com. Proceedings of the 
12th annual conference on child labor, Ashe- 
yille, N. C, Feb. 3-6, 1916. Child Labor Bui 
5:5-78 My '16 50c 

Contains the following addresses: Voca- 
tional scholarships, by L. D. Wald; At- 
tempted child labor legislation in North Car- 
olina, by Zebulon Weaver; True preparedness 
in greater protection to childhood, by S: M. 
Lindsay; Moving forward in Alabama, by 
W. L. Murdoch; Effects of child labor on 
social standards, by Mrs. T: W. Ldngle; 



Effects of child labor on community life, by 
Eunice Sinclair; Pan-American child wel- 
fare, by E : N. Clopper ; Organized labor and 
child labor reform, by J. F. Barrett; Citizen 
and the National child labor committee, by 
J: J. Eschenbrenner; Informal reports and 
discussion on Colorado beet-workers, Iowa 
canneries, trade unionism, cotton manu- 
facturers point of view. New Hampshire 
stage children, and moving pictures; Eight- 
kour day for children ib Massachusetts, by 
R: K. Conant; Eight- hour day for children 
in New Jersey, by D. P. Falconer; Two con- 
ceptions of child employment, by W. H. 
Swift; National responsibiUty for child labor, 
by R. F. Campbell; Federal child labor legis- 
lation, by Edward Keating; Child labor in 
North Carolina, by G: T. Winston; What will 
be left for the states to do after the Keating 
bill becomes law, by Florence Kelley 

Decisions 

Court decisions affecting child labor, 1902-1914. 
S. D. White. Child Labor Bui 4:207-12 F '16 
50c 

Employment certificates 

* Issuing of working permits and its bearing on 

other school problems. H. T. Woolley. 7p '15 
Bur. of vocational guidance. Public schools, 
Cincinnati, O. 

Reprinted from School and Society, v. 1, 
no. 21, p 726-33 My 22 '15 

* Pennsylvania — Digest of the decisions of the 

attorney general interpreting the child labor 
act of 1915, and directions for the issuance 
of employment certificates. Pa Dept Pub In- 
struction Bui 1916 no 6 16p '16 

Legislation, Compm-ative 
Working papers required: [analytical table 
showing legislation by states]. U S Chil- 
dren's Bur Pub no 10 (Industrial ser no 1) 
p 184-225 '15 

Laws 

* Certain provisions concerning the child labor 

laws [of the various states]. H. D. Scott, 
comp., R. I. leg. ref. bur. 13p Mr 10 '16 
(Typew B 65c) 

Shows the age limits and prohibited em- 
ployments 

* Delaware — Act to regulate the employment of 

children and to make uniform the laws re- 
lating thereto; and an act creating the Del- 
aware child labor comm. 27p '13 Del. supt. 
public schools 

* Delaware — [Acts to abolish the child labor 

commission and to give its powers and 
duties to the labor commission, to amend 
the uniform child labor law, and to provide 
that the inspector of female labor shall be 
appointed by the labor commission]. 8p '15 
Del. supt. public schools 

* Pennsylvania child labor act and continu- 

ation schools. (Bui no 5) 26p '15 Pa. dept. 
of pub. instruction. Bur. of vocational edu- 
tion 

Contains an explanation of the several 
sections and a true copy of the act 
Text of child labor laws [of the various 
states]. U S Children's Bur Pub no 10 (In- 
dustrial ser no 1) p 477-1103 '15 

Legislation 

Abstract of laws governing employment of 
women and minors [in Pennsylvania, effec- 
tive Jan. 1. 1916]. Pa Dept Labor and In- 
dustry Bui 3:32-5 Ja '16 

Brief for the Keating-Owen bill. T: I. Parkin- 
son. Child Labor Bui 4:pt 2 219-65p F '16 50c 

Child labor: [discussion on bills to prevent in- 
terstate commerce in the products of child 
labor]. I. C. Copley and others. Cong Rec 53: 
1744-66 Ja 26 '16 

Child labor bill has passed both the U. S. 
senate and house. The bill was made a 
party measure and its passage was urged by 
the president. The bill differs in certain re- 
spects from the one passed by the lower 
house in February. Senate amendments were 
accepted by the house without change (Ag 
18 '16) 

Constitutionality of the federal child labor law. 
N. W: MacChesney. Child Labor Bui 4:155-63 
N '15 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



43 



Child labor— Legislation— Contrnwed 

Japan — Law has been passed applying to those 
factories employing ordinarily not less than 
15 operatives or persons engaged in danger- 
ous or injurious work. It prohibits child 
labor in any heavy work; employment of 
male workers under 15 years, and females of 
any age for more than twelve hours in a 
.single day; employment of male operatives 
under 15, and all females between the hours 
of 10 p. m. and 4 a. m., except in exceptional 
cases, when speedy execution of a contract 
on hand is required; employment of boys un- 
der 15, or women, for such work as cleaning, 
oiling or repairing of machines in motion or 
for any other dangerous work, such as the 
handling of explosives, poisonous, or any 
other injurious material and in a general 
way where conditions are dangerous or hy- 
gienically harmful. In case of injury or 
death of the operative through no gross 
fault of his own, the owner of the factory 
shall give relief to the operative or his fam- 
ily. Factory owners are required to give at 
least two holidays a month to male opera- 
tives under 15 and to all females, with the 
understanding that this number is to be 
doubled in case the work is carried on day 
and night and the operatives engaged are 
divided into two groups and work in turn. 
The regulations provide a fine for violation 
of the law (F 24 '16) 

♦ National child labor committee, 105 E. 22d St., 

N. Y., has published the text of the Keating 
Dill and the following pamphlets favoring its 
passage: Do you know why the Keating bill 
to regulate child labor demands your active 
support; What the newspapers say about 
the Keating-Owen bill; Supporters of the 
Keating-Owen bill; Who made what you 
buy 
Passing the federal child labor law. A. J. 
McKelway. Child Labor Bui 5:91-3 Ag '16 

♦ U. S. 64th Congress, 1st session — Bill to pre- 

vent interstate commerce in the products of 
child labor, and for other purposes. (H R 
8234 Introd by Mr. Keating) Nat Child La- 
bor Com Pam no 257 2p Mr 15 '16 The Com- 
mittee, 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 
Vote in the U. S. House of representatives in 
favor of the Keating child labor bill was 337 
against 46, with 48 not voting (Mr 18 '16) 

Legislation, Comparative 

♦ Child labor legislation in the U. S. H. L. 

Sumner and E. A. Merritt, comp. U S Chil- 
dren's Bur Pub no 10 (Industrial ser no 1) 
1131p '15 

Contains analytical tables showing: sum- 
mary of minimum and regulated ages; sum- 
mary of hours of labor; minimum age; 
requirements for entering employment; 
working papers required; hours of labor; 
compulsory school attendance; street trades; 
public exhibitions; and the text of the laws 
by states 

[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] 
child labor. Am Labor Leg R 5:694-721 D '15 

[State laws relating to] child labor. U S Bur 
Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 559-85 '16 

Public exhibitions 

Leffislation, Comparative 
Public exhibitions: [analytical table showing 
legislation by states]. U S Children's Bur 
Pub no 10 (Industrial ser no 1) p 418-65 '15 

Reports 
• National child labor committee. 11th annual 
report of the general secretary for the fiscal 
year ending Sept. 30, 1915. Nat Child Labor 
Com Pam no 255 12p 5c postpaid Ja '16 The 
Committee. 105 E. 22d St.. N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Child Labor Bulletin, v. 
4, no. 3, Nov., 1915 
Summary of the report on condition of woman 
and child wage earners in the United States. 
IT S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 175 (Women 
in industry ser no 5) 445p D '15 

Gives summaries of the 19 volumes of the 
report of the investigation begun in 1907 

Surveys 

" Survey of wage-earning girls below sixteen 
years of age in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 



1915. S. H. Atherton. (Women in industry 

felsuVil^nn^'^^Y'.' ''"• <="«>""'■■»• 

The object of this study is to give facts 
about girls fourteen to sixteen years of age 
m an mdustrial community of the coal 
regions who have left school to go to work 
The first part is an attempt to give their 
setting, where they are working, the native 
country of their fathers, their family in- 
comes, the disposal of their wage, the oc- 
cupations of their parents, how they are 
housed. The second part is a study of the 
girls themselves; why they leave school, how 
old they are, how many of them take ad- 
vantage of opportunities offered for further 
education, how widely they continue to 
speak the language of their foreign born 
parents, why they choose their employment, 
and how much influence education and in- 
dustrial experience have on their wages 

Child placing. See Children— Placing in homes 

Child study 
Child study and child training. W: B. Forbush. 
319p *$1 '15 Scribner 

Basis for a study of human development 
from infancy to maturity 

Child welfare. See Children— Charities, protec- 
tion, etc. 

Children 

^ See also Boys; Defective children; Infant 

mortality; Infants; Juvenile delinquents; 

Orphan asylums 

Bibliography 

Books about children. S. N. Gruenberg. Out- 
look 113:1058-60 Ag 30 '16 

Divided under the following heads; Physi- 
cal care of the child, Child study, Philosophy 
of education. Eugenics and heredity. Appre- 
ciations of child hfe. Play and recreation, 
Sex education 
* Reading list on children; including mothers, 
care and hygiene, home education and train- 
ing, boy and girl building. (Special lib list 
no 12) lip F '16 Kansas City (Mo.) pub. lib. 

Care and hygiene 

Child hygiene. In C: V. Chapin. Report on 
state public health work, p 152-5 '16 

Child hygiene. In J. S. MacNutt. Manual for 
health officers, p 296-344 '15 

Cumberland county, N. C— U. S. public health 
service has established in Cumberland county 
and Fayetteville a children's bureau for the 
study of diseases and other conditions per- 
taining to child life. The work is in charge 
of Dr. Frances S. Bradley, Washington, 
D. C, of the Children's bureau (F 12 '16) 

Instruction 

Education for child nurture and home making 
outside of schools. Mrs. Frederic Schoff. In 
U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 
363-74 -15 

Contains: Education of parents in infant 
hygiene; Cooperative plan for education of 
mothers in infant hygiene; Hospitals edu- 
cate mothers; Helps for parents in moral 
training of children under school age; 
Mothers' clubs in kindergartens and pri- 
mary classes; What some high schools have 
done in promotion of better homes; How 
one school enlists outside help in teaching; 
Home education extension work of normal 
schools and colleges; Colleges giving oppor- 
tunities for study of child nurture and home 
making by parents; etc. 

Springfield, 111. — Clinics in charge of a physi- 
cian are being conducted every Wednesday 
afternoon in the schools, under the direction 
of the Woman's civic league. Mothers in 
the school districts are instructed how to 
care for children, protect them from dis- 
ease, and maintain a high standard of 
' physical efficiency. The health department 
has agreed to furnish a nurse two hours a 
week who will go into the homes of the city 
to aid in whatever way desired. The clinics 
have been complimented by the Russell Sage 
foundation which recently made a survey of 
charity conditions and activities in Spring- 
field (F 4 '16) 



44 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Children —Continued 

Charities, protection, etc. 

Care of homeless babies. In Am. assn. for 
study and prevention of infant mortality. 
6th annual meeting. Transactions, 1915, p 
243-78 '16 

• Child in human progress. G: H: Payne. 400p 

il *$2.50 '16 Putnam 

A history of the treatment received by chil- 
dren, showing the successive steps which 
have been taken since the days of Tyre to 
the founding of child-welfare societies during 
the present generation 

♦ Child welfare surveys and bibliography. Univ 

of Iowa Bui n s no 111 (Exten div bul no 16) 
7p Mr 15 '16 , ^ ^ 

Edition exhausted. Reprints will be pub- 
lished 

* Child welfare work in Pennsylvania: a cooper- 

ative study of child-helping agencies and 
institutions, directed by W: H. Slingerland 
in cooperation with the officers and a com- 
mittee of the Pennsylvania state conference 
of charities. 352p $2 '15 Russell Sage found. 

This book is the outcome of one of the 
series of social investigations undertaken 
by the Russell Sage foundation. The study 
consists largely of descriptive material de- 
tailing the child-welfare work carried on in 
Pennsylvania by 80 almshouses, 53 child - 
caring agencies, that is, children's aid and 
humane societies, and 210 institutions for 
children 
Community plan in children's work, by C. C. 
Carstens; Children's charter, by E. N. Clop- 
per; Relation of private societies to juvenile 
courts and to state bureaus of protection, 
by C. C. Jones; Study of results of a child- 
placing society by R. W. Lawton and J. P. 
Murphy; Study of results of institutional 
care, by W. J. Doherty; Service that settle- 
ments and neighborhood houses may render 
in the community's plan of child protection, 
by C. C. Cooper. In Nat. conf. of charities 
and correction. Proceedings, 1915, p 92-110, 
149-97 

Addresses have been reprinted at prices 
varying from 5 to 10 cents 

• Elements of record keeping for child-helping 

organizations. G. C. Ralph. 195p il $1.50 '15 
Survey associates, inc. 
Intellectual status of children who are public 
charges. J. L. Stenquist and others. (Arch- 
ives of psychology no 33) 52p il 50c; cloth 
75c S '15 Science press. Sub-station 84, N. Y. 
Columbia university contributions to phil- 
osophy and psychology v. 24. no. 2 

♦ Iowa handbook on child welfare. Univ. of la 

Bul n s no 109 (Exten div bul no 14) 17p F 15 
'16 Univ. of la., Iowa City 

Mayor Mitchel takes the stand: a further 
chapter in the story of the children's insti- 
tutions of New York. W. D. Lane. Survey 
36:263-5 Je 3 '16 

Discusses the attempt of co-religionists 
to obstruct his administration and interfer- 
ence with the control of private charitable 
institutions. Tapping of private telephone 
wires by the police is justified by the mayor 

Missouri — Preliminary report of the Missouri 
children's code commission is in preparation 
and the final report will be published in 
October, 1916. It will embody a redrafting 
and recodification of all laws relating to the 
welfare of children. The report will ask for 
the creation in each county of a board of 
public welfare, a juvenile court and an office 
to be filled by a trained social worker. If 
these measures are enacted Missouri will be 
the first state to provide so completely for 
child welfare. Manley O. Hudson, sec, State 
univ., Columbia, Mo. (Jl '16) 

Modern schools for New York city. Women's 
municipal league of the city of New York. 
J Educ 84:143-5 Ag 24 '16 

From a study showing what is being done 
for child welfare in six districts of N. Y. city 
and the possibilities of building up a "child 
world" thru the work- study-play plan of 
school organization 



Opinions of attorney-general [relating to pow- 
ers and duties of trustees of county chil- 
dren's homes; guardianship; reception and 
boarding of infants; authority of juvenile 
court over committed children; removal from 
foster homes; effect of refusal of board of 
state charities to endorse a county chil- 
dren's home]. Ohio Bul Char & Correc 21: 
29-37 Ag '15 

Organizing a community's resources. J. B. 
Byall. In Nat. conf. of charities and cor- 
rection. Proceedings, 1915, p r41-5 

Describes the growth of and the work done 
by the Children's bureau of Philadelphia 

Summer play in spite of an epidemic. Wanda 
Greineisen. Survey 36:501-2 Ag 12 '16 
See also Orphan asylums 
Conferences 

First American congress for the child, Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, July, 1916. The proposed 
congress is due to the initiative of the Na- 
tional congress for the child, convened in 
Buenos Aires on Oct. 19, 1913, which by a 
resolution at the closing session determined 
to emphasize the importance of welfare acti- 
vities in behalf of children, in connection 
with the centenary celebration of the inde- 
pendence of Argentina. The congress was 
organized in 7 sections as follows: Law, 
hygiene, psychology, education, assistance 
to the mother and the child, sociology, and 
industrial legislation. An exposition was 
held in conjunction with the discussions. 
Copies of the program may be secured from 
Edward N. Clopper, National child labor 
com., 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

* Ohio state conference on dependent children. 

Proceedings of the conference held at Day- 
ton, O., Nov. 3-5, 1915. 60p il '16 R. A. 
Longman, sec, Cincinnati, O. 

Contains addresses on children's homes, 
child placing, juvenile courts, probation, etc. 

Laws 

* Connecticut — Statutes and public acts relat- 

ing to the Connecticut school for boys, the 
Connecticut industrial school for girls, 
county temporary homes for dependent and 
neglected children; other measures con- 
cerning delinquent, defective and dependent 
children, state and town poor, the state 
board of charities. (Pub doc no 28, sp no 
2) 80p '14 Conn. sec. of state 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] welfare of dependents 
and delinquents, U S Bur Educ Bul 1916 no 
47 p 817-62 '16 

Lefjislation, Proposed 

* United States. 64th congress, 1st session. 

Joint resolution authorizing the president to 
appoint a commission to inquire into the 
causes of child poverty and suggest remedies 
therefor. (H J Res 142) 2p F 8 '16 

Reports 

* Boston, Mass. Children's institutions depart- 

ment. Annual report for the year 1915-1916. 
50p '16 

* Chicago, 111. Juvenile protective assn. 14th 

annual report, 1914-1915. 52p 816 S. Halstead 
St., Chicago 

This association was formerly the Juvenile 
court committee 

* Hartford, Conn. Juvenile commission. 7th 

annual report to the mayor and court of 
common council for the year ending April 
30, 1916. 30p '16 

* Missouri children's code comm. Preliminary 

report of the committees of the children's 
code comm., July, 1916. 17p '16 (Mim) The 
Comm., 5646 Kingsbury av., St. Louis, Mo. 

Contains: Summary of the chief recom- 
mendations and recommendations of the 
sub-committees on: present laws, public ad- 
ministration, delinquency, defective children, 
destitute and neglected children, child labor 
and school attendance, health and recrea- 
tion, education. The final report will be 
published in October, 1916 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



45 



Children — Charities, etc. — Reports — Continued 

* Ohio. Bd. of state charities. Children's wel- 

fare dept. Report, from Dec. 15, 1913-July 
1, 1915. Ohio Bui Char & Correc 21:3-28 Ag 
'15 

Surveys 

* Child welfare work in California; a study of 

agencies and institutions. W: H. Slinger- 
land. 247p il $1.50 '15 Dept. of child-helping, 
Russell Sage found. 

* Child welfare work in Pennsylvania: a coop- 

erative study of child-helping agencies and 
institutions, directed by W: H. Slingerland 
in cooperation with the officers and a com- 
mittee of the Pennsylvania state conference 
of charities. 352p $2 '15 Dept. of child- 
helping, Russell Sage found. 
New Orleans, La.— Dr. W. H. Slingerland, the 
representative of the Child welfare dept. of 
the Russell Sage foundation, is making a 
study of child-helping institutions in the 
city. Dr. Slingerland will also deliver a series 
of free lectures on various phases of child 
welfare work (Mr 22 '16) 

Laws 

California laws of interest to women and chil- 
dren: supplement 1913-1915. 96p '16 Cal. 
state lib. 

* Pennsylvania — Compilation of laws relating to 

children. 212p n p '15 S. S. Beatty, 862 Frick 
bldg. annex, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chapters relate to: Establishment and of- 
ficers of juvenile court; Commitment and 
maintenance of children; Protection of chil- 
dren; Crimes against children; White slave 
traffic; Safeguarding of children; General 
child labor acts; Disciplinary and industrial 
schools; Public school code; Special privi- 
leges conferred on mothers; Adoption; Ap- 
prentices; General desertion and non-sup- 
port laws; Charity and visitation boards 

* Revised manual of juvenile laws [of Illinois.] 

155p 25c '16 Juvenile protective assn., 816 S. 
Halsted St., Chicago 

* Summary and analysis of the juvenile laws in 

Virginia. J. H. Ricks. 30p '15 Va. Bd. of 
charities and corrections 

Reprinted from annual report of the state 
board of charities and correction, 1914 

Legal status 

* Infamous juvenile law: crimes against chil- 

dren under the cloak of charity. H. N. Dunn. 
19p '15 Harriette N. Dunn, 4033 Adams St., 
Chicago 

An exposition of the law and practices of 
Illinois 

* Some aspects of the status of children in Mis- 

souri. E. R. James. Univ of Mo Bui v 17 
no 2 (Law ser 10) 64p P '16 Univ. of Missouri, 
Columbia 

Study of the various kinds of status of 
children in Missouri law, the condition under 
which each may come into existence, and 
the rights of inheritance which flow from 
each of them; arranged under the following 
heads: Legitimacy; Illegitimacy; Adoption; 
Suggested changes in status 

Legislation 

National committee for standardizing chil- 
dren's laws (C. C. Carstens, Massachusetts 
society for the prevention of cruelty to chil- 
dren, chairman) has been appointed as the 
result of a movement begun at the meeting 
of the National conference of charities and 
correction, at Baltimore, May, 1915. The 
committee has prepared an extensive cam- 
paigm for the appointment of a commission 
in each of the states to undertake the com- 
pilation of all laws affecting children. The 
committee will act only as a clearing house 
in stimulating the appointment of commis- 
sions, in suggesting methods to be followed 
in each state and in encouraging the prep- 
aration of material which would be of use 
to all the commissions. The proposed new 
codes will cover every subject touching chil- 
dren from birth to maturity, particular atten- 
tion being paid to a system of administra- 
tion of laws for children in the counties and 
the relation of the county to state agencies. 
Mis,«ouri already has the work well under 



way thru a commission appointed by the 
governor, last June. The Children's bureau 
has prepared a synopsis of laws relating to 
children and has suggested a standard out- 
line for all the states (Mr 4 '16) 

Legislation, Comparative 

Children's laws of 1915: forty-five state and 
territorial legislatures and the Congress of 
the U. S. in 1915 passed laws affecting chil- 
dren; twenty-seven states have amended 
their provisions for dependent children, eigh- 
teen have improved their treatment of juve- 
nile dehnquents, sixteen have strengthened 
their child-labor law, fourteen have con- 
cerned themselves with the needs of the 
mentally defective or feeble-minded, three 
states and the District of Columbia were 
added to those specifically permitting the 
use of public school buildings as social cen- 
ters, nine amended or for the first time 
passed a playground law, and four states 
passed a model vital statistics law. Ala- 
bama, whose legislature meets only once 
in four years, enacted a new child-labor 
law, a compulsory school-attendance law, 
an excellent desertion and ncn-support law, 
and a state-wide juvenile court law; Florida 
remodelled its treatment of juvenile delin- 
quents, recognized the principle of com- 
pulsory school attendance, passed the model 
vital statistics law; Kansas established an 
industrial commission to regulate hours, 
wages, and conditions of work for women 
and minors, and a division of child hygiene 
in the state board of health; it also en- 
acted a playground law and a mothers' 
pension law. New Jersey and Wyoming 
passed comprehensive acts relating to the 
care of dependent children, and Pennsyl- 
vania carefully drafted laws relating to child 
labor and vocational education. N Y Post N 
15 '15 
. U. S. children's bureau has begun work on a 
reference index to all laws in the U. S. re- 
lating to children (F '16) 

Placing in homes 

New York (city)— The newly organized chil- 
dren's home bureau of the Department of 
public charities has begun a campaign to 
obtain as far as possible, a large number of 
high grade foster homes for the boarding and 
free placing out of dependent children be- 
tween the ages of two and seven, inclusive. 
John Daniels is director of the bureau (Jl 19 
'16) 

* Study of results of a child-placing society. 

R. W. Lawton, research worker, and J. P. 
Murphy, general sec, Boston children's aid 
society. lOp Single copies gratis; additional 
copies 5c; ten or more copies at 3c each Je 
'15 Dept. of child-helping, Russell Sage found, 
—Same. (Reprints 1915 ch 21) lOp 5c Nat. 
conf. of charities and correction 
See also Infants — Placing in homes 

Laws 

Maryland — Bill has been passed by the 1916 
legislature that makes it unlawful to separ- 
ate from his mother any child under the age 
of six months for the purpose of placing 
him in a foster home or institution, unless 
for the physical good of mother and child, 
and unless this be attested to by two phy- 
sicians of five years' practice, or unless 
ordered by the court or by the board of 
state aid and charities. Other provisions 
prevent secret, careless or unscientific 
methods of dealing with the placing of 
children in homes (Chap 210 P L 1916) 2p 
'16 

Reports 

Boston, Mass. Children's institutions depart- 
ment. Annual report for the year 1915-1916. 
50p '16 

• New York state conference of charities and 

correction. Special com. on standards of 

placing-out, supervision and after-care of 

dependent children. Report. 12p '15 N. Y. 
bd. of charities 



46 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Children — Continued 

Statistics 

Heights and weights of children: classification, 
by age and by sanitation, of 1,652 white 
school children (771 boys, 881 girls) in the 
city of X. C. W. Stiles. U S Pub Health 
Repts 30:2290-3003 O 8 '15 

Chiidren, Defective. See Defective children 

Children, Delinquent. See Juvenile delinquents 

Chimneys 

Chimney and flue ordinance suggested by Nat. 
fire protection assn. In Indiana. Fire mar- 
shal. Report, 1915, p 54-6 '16 

Chiropodists 

Legislation, Comparative 

* List of citations for licensing chiropodists. 
H. D. Scott, comp., R. I. leg. ref. bur. 3p 
Mr 14 '16 (Typew B 15c> 

Legislation, Proposed 

Missouri pedic association is preparing a bill 
to be introduced in the next legislature, reg- 
ulating the practice of chiropoay and placing 
that profession under the supervision of the 
state board of medical examiners. Its pur- 
pose is the protection of the people against 
incompetent and unskilful practitioners (Mr 
29 '16) 

Christmas trees, Municipal 
Joyeux Noel; a glimpse of the community 
Christmas movement after three years' 
growth. G. M. Johnston, il Survey 35:205-7 
N 27 '15 

Church and social problems 
Church and the conservation of health. Jn 
Southern sociological congress. New chivalry: 
health; proceedings, 1915, p 447-521 '15 

Contains: Health, tlie new attitude, the 
new knowledge, the new responsibility, by 
J. L. Kesler; Modern miracles of the church 
in health conservation, by S. Z. Batten; The 
challenge to the church to keep children 
out of heaven, by C. A. Waterfield; The pri- 
mary function of the church, to save life, 
by J. C. Granbery; Physical health cham- 
pioned by the church, by J. L. Kesler; The 
program of the church as the conserver of 
social health, by H. B. Carr6; War on dis- 
ease, a worthy objective for religious crusade, 
by C. S. Macfarland 

* Church and the people's play. H: A. Atkinson. 

259p il *$1.25 '15 Pilgrim press 

This book is written for the purpose of 
showing the importance of play in the life of 
individuals and the community and the rela- 
tion of the church to the question, especially 
in its democratic aspects. Contains chapters 
on: The case stated; Attitude of the church 
past and present; Play and normal life; Dan- 
gers and disasters; Dancing, card playing, 
theater going; Reconstructing the play life of 
the people; A program for the church; Re- 
sults attained and attainable; The church a 
social center; Bibliography 

* Redemption of the South End, a study in city 

evangelization. E. C: E. Dorion. il *$1 Abing- 
don press, 150 5th av., N. Y. 

Gives a report of the part played by Mor- 
gan memorial in the South End of Boston 
among the redemptive forces at work in this 
needy neighborhood 

* Study of a rural parish: a method of survey. 

R. A. Felton. 232p '15 Bd. of home missions, 
Presbyterian church in the U. S. A.. 156 5th 
av., N. Y. 

Outlines a plan for a survey and gives 
suggestions for improvements 
See also Social surveys 
Church property 

Taxation 

* Exempting the churches. J: F. Morton, jr. 

84p '16 25c Truth seeker co., 62 Vesey St., 

Expansion of the argument made by the 
author, June 1, 1915, at a hearing held in 
the senate chamber at Albany, N. Y., before 
the committee on taxation of the constitu- 



tional convention, in support of an amend- 
ment to abolish all exemptions of church 
property from taxation 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 

California — Exempting property used solely 
and exclusively for social purposes for the 
benefit of the organized religious body using 
said property for such purposes; and provid- 
ing that exemption shall not extend to build- 
ing so used, rented for religious purposes 
and rent received by owner therefor. Con- 
stitutional amendment. Rejected. Yes 94.460 
No 168.171 O '15 
Cigarettes 

City fights the cigarette habit. C: A. Byers. il 
Am City 14:369-70 Ap '16 

Describes the work of the Los Angeles 
anti-cigarette clinic 

Des Moines. la., W. C. T. U., with other or- 
ganizations of the city, in a rigid anti-cig- 
arette campaign which it is carrying on in 
homes, schools and clubs, is calling particular 
attention to the following state laws on cig- 
arettes: Bovs under 21 years of age are pro- 
hibited by law from smoking cigarettes in 
DubUc places unless accompanied by parents; 
Use of tobacco by any student of the public 
schools is prohibited by law; It is prohibited 
by law to sell or give away tobacco to minors 
under 16 years of age, except upon the writ- 
ten order of parents. Excerpts from the 
laws are given in the Des Moines Capitol N 
27 '15 

Detroit, Mich. — Anti-cigarette campaign was 
waged, April 27-May 5, 1916, by means of 
lectures, clinics and hospital treatment. 
Dr. Daniel H. Kress of Chicago addressed 
the boys of the junior high schools 

Laws 

* Minnesota— Act prohibiting the use of cigar- 

ettes by minors and prohibiting the supply- 
ing of cigarettes and cigarette paper to 
minors and regulating and providing for the 
licensing of the manufacture, sale, barter, 
exchange or giving away of cigarettes, cigar- 
ette paper and cigarette tobacco, and mak- 
ing the violation thereof a criminal offense, 
and providing for penalties for such viola- 
tion. (Bui no 48) 2p Ag 20 '15 Minn, dairy 
and food comr. 

Cincinnati. City solicitor 

Annual report, 1915. (Legal departments — 
Reports) 

Cincinnati chamber of commerce 

Industrial survey of Cincinnati: vocational 
survey; printing trades. 55c F '15 (Printing 
trade) 

Circuit courts. See Courts, Circuit 
Cities. See Municipalities 
Citizenship 

* Active citizenship: a study outline. Charles 

Davidson. (Study outline ser ) 40p 25c '15 
Wilson 

Study of citizenship in general and of the 
intelligent management of local problems. 
Topics for discussion in meetings and short 
lists of books and documents which may be 
consulted 
American citizenship in the educational sur- 
veys, with special reference to high schools. 
James Mahoney. In U. S. Comr. of educa- 
tion. Report, 1914, v 1 p 563-96 '15 

Contains: Evaluation of the surveys; The 
spirit of American citizenship; The view 
point of the republic as revealed in the sur- 
veys; American spirit in high school admin- 
istration and program of studies; The high- 
school problems: The balance sheet 

* Americanization. Royal Dixon. 196p *50c '16 

Macmillan • 

* Guide for applicants for citizenship. C. O'C. 

Cowley. 95p '15 County clerk, City Hall 
Park, N. Y. 

National assn. of patriotic instructors, John B. 
Lewis, pres., Boston, is a non-partisan body, 
incorporated under the laws of the District 
of Columbia in 1913, for the promotion of 
patriotism and good citizenship by afford- 
ing ah opportunity for interested persons to 
study the best methods for the advancement 
of patriotic work, to secure the enactment 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



47 



citizenship— Cowtinwed 

of laws to safeguard American institutions 
and protect our flag from insult, to promote 
greater interest in American history, to 
insist that immigrants coming to this coun- 
try shall receive such instruction in our 
history, laws and customs as shall help to 
make them desirable citizens. The member- 
ship in the association is open to all desir- 
able persons over fifteen years of age 

* New citizenship: a civic ritual devised for 

places of public meeting in Amei'ica. Percy 
Mackaye. 92p 50c '15 Macmillan 
U. S. supreme court has affirmed the de- 
cision of the California court interpreting 
the federal expatriation law of 1907 as ap- 
plicable to women who continue to live in 
the U. S. after marriage to foreigners, as 
well as to those who marry foreigners and 
live abroad. MacKenzie v. Hare, 239 U S 299 
See also Immigrants — Americanization 

Conferences 
Citizenship convention under the auspices of 
the U. S. bureau of naturalization, Washing- 
ton, D. C. July 10-15, 1916. Program includes 
the following papers: Americanism, by L: F. 
Post; Evening schools for foreigners in the 
northw^est, by R. S. Coleman; Public schools 
in the Philippines and Hawaii, by C. B. Mil- 
ler; Schools of the United States army, by 
E. Z. Steever; Americanizing a community, 
by J. H. Wagner; Rural night schools for 
aliens in northern Minnesota, by E. A. Free- 
man; Preparation for American citizenship 
and life, by P. P. Claxton; Methods of reach- 
ing and teaching illiterates, by Mrs. C. W. 
Stewart; Outdoor school work in Tacoma, 
Wash., by A. Johnson; Civic preparedness 
and Americanization, by J. M. Berkey; 
Some of the problems of getting aliens into 
the night schools, by W. M. Ragsdale; What 
Portland, Ore., is doing to Americanize for- 
eigners, by L. R. Alderman; What Boston is 
doing in immigrant education, by M. J. 
Downey; Business man's point of view, by 
I. W. Schmidt; Industrial plan of education 
in Wisconsin, by A. H. Melville 

Legislation, Comparative 

* Citizenship and residence requirements: civil 

service commissions, states and principal 
cities, Douglass Killin. 5p (Typew N '15 
Colo, civil service comm., Denver 

Training 

* Citizenship syllabus: a course of study and 

syllabus in civic training and naturalization 
for adult immigrants in evening schools. Re- 
search dept.. Com. for immigrants in Am. 
48p "16 N. Y. dept. of educ. 

* —Same. Univ. of the State of N. Y. Bui no 622 

45p S 1 '16 
Training for citizenship. In J: A. Lapp and 

C. H. Mote. Learning to earn, p 344-65 '15 
Training for citizenship. Monthly R v 2 no 3 

p 9-11 Mr '16 
U. S. bureau of naturalization has formulated 
a plan to enlist the co-operation of the pub- 
lic schools of the country in the education 
and Americanization of candidates for citi- 
zenship. Already about 400 towns and cities 
have joined the movement. During the cur- 
rent school year all superintendents of 
schools where classes may be formed, will 
receive monthly the name, address, age and 
nationality of each alien residing within 
their jurisdiction who files a declaration of 
intention or petition for naturalization. 
Since Oct. 1, notifications have been sent to 
approximately 40,000 declarants, 20,000 peti- 
tioners and 15,000 wives of petitioners advis- 
ing them to attend school (N 24 '15) 

Conferences 
U. S. bur. of naturalization plans to hold a 
convention in July, 1916, in Washington, 

D. C, for the discussion of the various ques- 
tions in regard to citizenship schools and 
for exhibiting the result of the work of vari- 
ous schools of this character. It also de- 
sires to develop out of the conference a more 
complete course of instruction based upon 
the experience of the several schools 

City attorneys. See Legal departments 



City ciiarters. See Municipal charters 

City cierks. See Municipal officers — City clerks 

City councils. See Municipal councils 

City directories. See Directories 

City engineers 

Salaries 
^ee Salaries — City engineers 
City government. See Municipal government 
City manager plan. See Municipal government — 

City manager plan 
City manuals 

* Chicago city manual, 1915. 215p il 20c post- 

age prepaid '15 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 
City planning 

American civic assn. will direct a campaign 
this year for the adoption by American 
towns and cities of comprehensive city plan- 
ning for their future physical development 
(F 1 '16) 

Automobile and the city plan. N. P. Lewis. 
Eng Rec 73:773-4 Je 10 '16 

Resume of a paper presented at the 6th 
National conference on city planning in 
Cleveland, June 5-7, 1916, discussing the 
growth of and present tendencies in motor 
vehicular transportation, and suggesting how 
they should be met 

Automobile and the city plan. N. P. Lewis; 
Planning problems of smaller cities in the 
United States. John Nolen. City Plan (19 
Congress St., Boston, Mass.) 2:2-17 Je '16 
25c 

Automobiles, motor trucks and city planning. 
N. P. Lewis. Eng N 75:1162-3 Je 22 '16 

From a paper read before the City planning 
conference, Cleveland, O., June, 1916. The 
paper in full appeared in the June issue of 
the City Plan, the official organ of the Nat. 
conference on city planning, 19 Congress st., 
Boston 

Breslau, Germany — Breslauer Verschonerungs 
Verein, organized in 1892, has devoted itself 
chiefly to the acquirement of waste and un- 
improved land immediately outside the city 
limits. These areas have been drained and 
laid out with paths, flower beds, playgrounds 
and resting stations. Monuments and memo- 
rial buildings have been erected to the 
memory of former active members of the 
association. Funds are procured by gifts, 
endowments, voluntary membership fees, 
etc. (My 15 *16) 

Building of cities. In F« C. Howe. Socialized 
Germany, p 298-312 '15 

* City planning. N. P. Lewis. 82p il 50c Am. 

city bur., 87 Nassau St., N. Y. 

Defines the term; outlines what has been 
done by European cities; discusses the ele- 
ments of a city plan under the following 
headings: the transportation system, the 
street system, parks and recreation facilities, 
the location of public buildings; and dis- 
cusses subdivision into blocks and lots, fi- 
nancing a city plan, city planning legisla- 
tion, and the responsibility of the municipal 
engineer 

* City planning: a series of papers presenting 

the essential elements of a citv plan. John 
Nolen, ed. 447p il bibl *$2 '16 Appleton 

City planning. In W: B. Munro. Principles and 
methods of municipal administration, p 30-73 
'16 

Outlines the history and discusses types, 
surveys, city planning in America, planning 
in relation to traffic, recreation, building lots 
and public buildings, and restricting private 
property 

Citv planning accomplished. S. L. McMichael. 
if Nat Real Estate J 14:53-7 Ag '16 
Review of Cleveland's plan 

City planning and the courts. R. E. Cushman. 
In Illinois municipal league. Proceedings, 
1915, p 83-100 

City planning in New York state. A. W. 
Brunner. In Conference of mayors and other 
city officials of the state of N. Y. Proceed- 
ings of the sixth annual conference, 1915, 
p 119-28 

City planning on an exceptionally large scale 
is meeting with public approval at Phila- 
delphia, n Eng Rec 73:344-8 Mr 11 '16 



46 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



City planning — Continued 

"City planning, with reference to Cincinnati 
was the subject selected for 1916 for "The 
Cincinnati prize" offered annually by the 
National municipal league to that student 
of the University of Cincinnati who sub- 
mits the best original essay on a given 
subject bearing upon the civic life or gov- 
ernment of Cincinnati. Manyessays were 
submitted but none were judged worthy and 
the prize was not awarded (Ag '16) 

• City planning with special reference to the 

planning of streets and lots. C: M. Robinson. 
344p il $2.50 '16 Putnam 

Advocates more rational methods of street 
platting, discusses administrative measures, 
suggests various methods of street widening. 
Appendix contains: Certain principles of a 
uniform city planning code, and Drafts of 
suggested acts 

* English town planning proposals: the town 

planning proposals of the Urban land report. 
H. R. Aldridge and Harold Shawcross. (Pub 
V 2 no 5) 19p tables diag Is '16 Town planning 
institute, 4 Arundel st., London, W. C. 

Papers read before the Town planning 
institute, Feb. 4, 1916 

Financial aspects of the city plan; with dis- 
cussion, by R. S. Binkerd; Social aspects of 
the city plan; with discussion, by D. F. Wil- 
cox. In N. Y. city conference of charities 
and correction. Proceedings, 1915, p 52-78 
'16 

How a small municipality is profiting by a 
city plan: an Iowa community which has had 
the foresight to adopt a plan and the wis- 
dom to act on it. il map Am City (T & C 
ed) 13:289-94 O '15 
Describes city planning in Emmetsburg, la. 

Inhibition, permission, compulsion: [pathways 
of city planning progress], il Am City 14: 
325-7 Ap '16 
Discusses conditions in England 

Massachusetts federation of planning boards 
has begun the publication of a Bulletin dis- 
cussing various phases of town planning. 
Bulletin 1, issued in May, 1916, discusses: 
The functions of Massachusetts planning 
boards and The official plan. The June Bul- 
letin takes up Town planning and present 
legislation in Massachusetts. Bulletins on 
Future planning legislation. Publicity and 
Cooperation will follow. The Federation, 
Salem, Mass. 

Paris, Texas, a large part of which was re- 
cently destroyed by fire, is to rebuild accord- 
ing to a systematic town plan, under the 
direction of a town planner (Ap 23 '16) 

Planning for civic betterment in town and 
country. Thomas Adams. Am City (T and 
C ed) 15:47-51 Jl '16 

An address delivered before the biennial 
convention of the General federation of 
women's clubs at New York, May 29, 1916 

• Planning of the modern city: a review of the 

principles governing city planning. N. P. 
Lewis. 423p il *$3.50 '16 Wiley 

This book is the first comprehensive work 
devoted to city planning as an engineering 
problem 
Planning problems of smaller cities. John Nolen. 
Nat Real Estate J 13:325-30 Je '16 

Abstract of the general paper given before 
the 8th National conference on city planning 
at Cleveland, O., June 7, 1916 
Planning the city for community life. G: B. 
Ford. Nat Real Estate J 13:357-8 Je '16 

Paper read at the 1916 National conference 
on community centers 
Practical problem in subdividing. C: M. Rob- 
inson. Am City 15:153-6 Ag '16 

• Problem of city beautification as observed in 

Europe. G: T. Hammond. 42p il '15 George 
T. Hammond, 215 Montague St., Brooklyn, 

Reprinted from the twentieth annual re- 
port of the American scenic and historic 
preservation society 

Progress in town planning and civic improve- 
V\^}}} .^^ Canada. Thomas Adams. Am City 
14:20-1 Ja '16 

Review of report on town planning. J. C. Mor- 
rell. il plans Building (17 Grosvenor st , 
Sydney, Australia) v 17 no 101 p 65-96, no 102 
p 65-112 Ja-F '16 Is ea (to be cont) 



* Texas Municipalities for July, 1916, is a city 
planning number. 67-104p 

Contains: Saving money to Texas towns, 
by O. C. Ahlers; Well-planned city, by G. B. 
Dealey; Solving the vacant lot problem, by 
J. L. Young; Methods of conducting city 
beautification campaigns, by A. W. Grant; 
Legal obstacles to effective town and city 
planning and how to solve them, by W. M. 
Holland; Attractive public buildings, by 
Florence Moore; Eliminating billboards, by 
E. H. McCuistion; Carrying out the Kessler 
city plan in Dallas, by E." N. Noyes 

Town planning and housing. Thomas Adams, 
town planning adviser to the conservation 
comm. of Canada, il Wildwood Mag (817 
Shoaff bldg.. Fort Wayne, Ind.> 3:20-3 Spring 
'16 15c 

Town planning and roads; with discussion. 
Thomas Adams. In Ontario good roads assn. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 132-44 

Town planning in Canada. Thomas Adams. Eng 
N 75:991-2 My 25 '16 

Town planning in modern America, showing 
the need of a comprehensive plan and the 
work before a city plan commission: some 
of the fundamentals that need to be consid- 
ered in Kansas City, Kansas, right now. 
Gazette Globe (Kansas City, Kan.) Je 25 '15 
Abstract of address before the London 
summer school of town planning, Aug. 14, 
1914, by John Nolen, Cambridge, Mass. 

Town planning legislation. John Garlick. 
Building (17 Grosvenor St., Sydney, Aus- 
tralia) V 17 no 102 p 17-27, 31-3 F 12 '16 Is 
Extracts from an address before the recent 
conference of the local government clerks' 
association 

* Town planning, with special reference to the 

Birmingham schemes. George Cadbury, jr. 
202p il maps *$2.25 '15 Longmans 

See also Country planning; Garden cities; 
Municipal centers; Street ornamentation; 
Street railroads 

Bibliography 

• City planning: list of references to material 

in Cincinnati municipal reference bureau. 
Cincinnati munic. ref. bur. lip '15 (Typew 
55c) 

Prepared for use of students competing 
for Cincinnati prize offered by the National 
municipal league. Arranged under the follow- 
ing headings: Bibliographies; General mate- 
rial; In special places; Garden and industrial 
cities; Laws and legislation 
City planning and municipal art. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the I^. S., p 113-35 '15 

References are grouped as follows: Lists of 
references; General books and articles; City 
development and extension; Channels of 
traffic; Buildings; Open spaces; Garden cities 
and suburbs; Financial aspects; Legal as- 
pects; Individual cities; Periodicals 
General bibliography. In John Nolen, ed. City 
planning, p 427-36 '16 

A bibliography is also appended to each 
chapter 

Central traffic circuits 
Philadelphia, Pa. Permanent com. on com- 
prehensive plans. Report on the proposition 
of a central traffic circuit. 19p il '15 Dept. 
of public works, Philadelphia 

Commissions 

Bristol, Conn., chamber of commerce is to 
appoint a city planning board to study and 
work out a definite plan of future city de- 
velopment along economical and sensible 
lines. It has been suggested that the 
board's membership be made up of a tech- 
nical man, a manufacturer, a retail man, 
a real estate man, and a representative of 
civic interests, in order to bring out all 
viewpoints on the subject (F 10 '16) 

Cities in the U. S. with city planning commis- 
sion. Nat Munic R 5:315-16 Ap '16 

Des Moines, la. — City council has created by 
ordinance a town planning commission that 
will act in an advisory capacity with all city 
departments, especially those having to do 
with permanent public improvements. All 
recommendations and suggestions made by 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



49 



City planning — Commissions — Continued 

the commission will be filed among the rec- 
ords of the department to which they are 
submitted (My 2 '16) 
Manchester, N. H. — City planning commission 
has been created by the mayor and board of 
aldermen. It will begin its work by devising 
and putting into effect a plan for the 
preservation and planting of trees (Ap 17 '16) 

Legislation, Comparative 
Plan commission legislation. City Plan (19 
Congress St., Boston) 1:9-13 Ja '16 25c 

Survey of existing legislation under which 
plan commissions are authorized 
Conferences 
* Massachusetts planning boards. Proceedings 
of the third annual city and town planning 
conference, Nov. 12, 1915, in conjunction 
with an eight- day city and town planning 
and housing exhibition in charge of a metro- 
politan council of fifty. (Bui no 4) 40p D '15 
Mass. homestead comm. 

Questions for consideration were; How 
to promote public interest in and under- 
standing of city and town planning; What 
are the first steps for a local planning 
board; Is further legislation desirable 
National assn. of real estate exchanges. Con- 
vention in New Orleans, March 29, • 1916. 
Topics for discussion included conservation 
of natural resources, building and apartment 
house management, and city planning. J. C. 
Nichols of Kansas City urged that particular 
attention be paid to the problem of con- 
structing streets wide enough to prevent un- 
necessary delay in traffic. He advocated the 
limitation of the height and cubage of build- 
ings to relieve congestion and afford light 
and air. He held that the width of the 
streets should be regulated by the traffic, 
and that it was more important to provide 
broad business streets than broad residential 
streets 
National civic planning com. Meeting in Co- 
lumbus, O., Jan. 19-20, 1916. Subject under 
consideration: Establishment of close rela- 
tionship between scientific development of 
the city by real estate promoters and the 
progress of a definite city plan. Definite 
steps are being taken toward the creation 
of a Columbus city planning commission to 
collect data looking to development of the 
city along lines proved successful elsewhere 
(D 23 '15) 
National conference on city planning. 8th an- 
nual convention, Cleveland, O., June 5-7, 
1916. Program contains the following ad- 
dresses: Automobile and the city plan, by 
N. P. Lewis; Automobile and the city plan 
treated from the standpoint of traffic regu- 
lation, by H. Gillespie; Districting by pri- 
vate effort, by Alexander Taylor; Districting 
by municipal regulation, by George Mc- 
Aneny; Money value of good planning in 
land subdivision, by W: E. Harmon; 
Cleveland's needs and achievements, by 
Lawson Purdy; Planning problems in cities 
of less than 100,000, by John Nolen; How to 
get started in city planning, by W. T. John- 
son; Street systems, including transit prob- 
lems, by Joseph Shirley; High buildings in 
the business district, by A. C. Comey; Over- 
building on land used for dwellings, by 
Thomas Adams; Park systems and recrea- 
tion grounds. Detroit's successful remedies 
for prevention of traffic accidents, which 
were discussed, appear in the Cleveland 
Press. Je 6 '16 
Pennsylvania housing and town planning assn. 
Convention at Reading. March, 1916. The 
principal address was delivered by Bernard J. 
Newman of the Philadelphia housing com- 
mission. He explained how the land along 
railroad lines and water fronts should be laid 
out for industrial and commercial purposes, 
entirely apart from the residential district. 
He urged that territory likely to be occunied 
by an urban population be under a city plan- 
ning organization, and be carefully planned 
out in advance 
Report of a conference called by His Excel- 
lency, David I. Walsh, governor of Massa- 
. chusetts, between Massachusetts homestead 
commission and local planning boards, Dec. 



16, 1914, State house, Boston. In Mass. 
Homestead comm. 2d annual report, 1914, p 

Program: Significance of city planning 
from the pomt of view of the state, by D: I. 
Walsh; Reports from local planning boards; 
Makmg civic surveys graphic, by A. C. Co- 
mey; City planning achievements that apply 
to Massachusetts, by A. W. Crawford; De- 
sirable legislation: discussion, by C. B. 
Parker 

Texas town and city planning assn. First con- 
vention, Dallas, Jan 17, 1916 

Texas town and city planning assn. 2d conven- 
tion, Dallas, June 27, 1916. Program includes 
the following addresses: Recreational needs 
of the town, by G: E. Kessler, Practical city 
planning, by M. H. West; Shade trees as a 
civic asset: how to get and maintain them, 
by F. K. McGinnis; Old and the new Paris, 
by W. H. Dunn; Removing menaces to health, 
by H. W. Van Hovenberg; Needed city legis- 
lation, by H. G. James; Sewerage system of 
Cleburne, by O. L Bishop; Care of the 
cemetery, by Mrs. Osco Taylor; Lessons for 
Texas cities from Paris, by E. H. McCuiston; 
Twentieth century city, by H: D. Lindsley; 
Women's work in city beautification, by Mrs. 
J. C. Pyle; Place of the chamber of com- 
merce in city planning, by J. B. Babcock; 
C^ty planning for the reduction of fire waste, 
by S. W. English; Planning of school grounds 
and gardens, by C. L. Davis; Report of 
National city plan association, by K. K. 
Hooper; Co-operation of the chamber of 
commerce and manufacturers' association. 
Dallas 

Diagonal streets 

Diagonal thorofares, oblique junctions and 
traffic, single and double junctions, pedes- 
trian traffic at such points, multiple traffic 
centers, duplicating thorofares. il Munic J 
40:74-7. 105-8 Ja 20, 27 '16 

Contains a set of rules adopted several 
years ago by the commission appointed to 
prepare a street plan for the District of 
Columbia outside of the city of Washington 

Duluth. Minn.— W: B. Patton. a member of the 
street sub- committee of the Commercial club 
city planning committee has presented a 
plan of diagonal highways for the city which 
would greatly shorten the distances from the 
outlying sections to the business center of 
the city. Mr. Patton maintains that the 
present growth of the city will soon demand 
a readjustment of the present plat (Je 24 
'16) 

Instruction 
Universities and city planning. Nat Munic R 
5:480 Jl "16 

Eight universities now have courses on 
city planning 

Investigations 

Johnstown, Pa. — City planning commission has 
appointed Henry Hornbostel of N. Y., as con- 
sulting city planner with George Wild of 
Johnstown as assistant, to furnish a com- 
prehensive city plan, including all reports, 
sketches, perspectives and other details (Je 
10 '16) 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Dr. Werner Hegemann, Ber- 
lin city planning expert, and an optimist in 
regard to the American city, is making a • 
special study of Milwaukee (Ja 29 '16) 

Omaha, Neb., city plan board is considering 
the question of employing a specialist on city 
planning in a consulting capacity (Mr 14 '16) 

St. Louis, Mo. — City plan commission has 
asked the Engineers' club to outline a plan 
for the development of the river front, the 
Civic league to submit plans for solving the 
housing problem, the Business men's league 
to make recommendations for the districting 
of the city for the purpose of regulating the 
height, area and occupancy of buildings. 
The question of land sut)-dIvisIons has been 
referred to the Real estate exchange, while 
the matter of street development in the 
downtown district has been submitted to the 
St. Louis chapter of the American institute 
of architects (Mr 1 '16) 



50 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



city planning— Investigations— Continued 
Legislation 
Town planning and present legislation [in 
Mass.]. C: S. Bird, jr. City Plan (19 Congress 
St., Boston, Mass.) 2:18-19 Je '16 25c 

* Town planning and present legislation in Mas- 

sachusetts. Mass Federation of Planning 
Boards Bui no 2 12p Je '16 The Federation, 
Salem, Mass. 

Legislation, Comparative 
City-planning legislation. C: M. Robinson. In 
John Nolen, ed. City planning, p 404-26 16 
Summarizes legislation by states 

Periodicals 

• City Plan (19 Congress St., Boston, Mass. $1) 

the official organ of the National conference 
on city planning is published quarterly. The 
issue for January, 1916, contains: Street sur- 
faces and the city plan, by A. H. Blanchard; 
Plan commission legislation; List of garden 
suburbs in the United States, by A. C. 
Comey; and notice of the city planning con- 
ference to be held in Cleveland in May or 
June 

Progress 

Progress in town planning and civic improve- 
ment in Canada. Thomas Adams. Am City 
14:20-1 Ja '16 

Six years of city planning in America. Flavel 
ShurtlefC. Nat Real Estate J 12:30-2 Jl '15 

Summary of an address made at the Na- 
tional conference on city planning at Detroit, 
June 7-9. 1915 

Reports 

♦ Canada. Federal plan comm. Report on a 

general plan for the cities of Ottawa and 
Hull. 158p diags '16 Minister of finance, Ot- 
tawa, Canada 

The commission was appointed to draw up 
and perfect a comprehensive scheme or plan 
looking to the future growth and develop- 
ment of a capital city for Canada befitting 
the size and importance of the Dominion. 
The report recommends the separation of 
Ottawa and Hull into a separate federal dis- 
trict, and the molding of the two cities into 
an appropriate governmental seat. The plan 
sets aside 120 acres for government grounds, 
in addition to that occupied by the build- 
ings, and other areas for parks and other 
purposes. The recommendations also em- 
brace streets, bridges, railways and water 
transportation 

City planning, by E: H. McCuistion; City 
planning, by J. B. Marmion. Texas Munic 
3:22-8 Ja '16 

Report and supplemental report pre- 
sented at the League's third annual conven- 
tion, Greenville, Nov. 12, 1915 

Dallas, Tex. — Mayor E. H. McCuiston, in his 
report to the League of Texas municipali- 
ties, insists on combining the practical with 
the aesthetic in city planning, and em- 
phasizes the importance of well-made plans 
for the small town and the suburbs of large 
cities. He divides the work into three 
heads: thoroughfares, public lands, and de- 
velopment of private property, all of which 
must be considered in the light of local con- 
ditions. The report appears in the Dallas 
News N 28 '15 

• Lawrence, Mass. Planning board. Second an- 

nual report for year ending Dec. 31, 1914. 
59p il '15 City clerk, Lawrence 
Massachusetts. Homestead comm. 2d annual 
report, 1914. (Pub doc no 103) 144p il '15 
Supply is exhausted 

• Newark, N. J. City plan comm. Comprehen- 

sive plan of Newark. $1 '16 

The study is divided into four parts: 
Streets and transportation; recreation and 
civic beauty; housing and public control of 
private development; and planning the 
greater city, and a program for future work. 
The program assigns work in five year 
periods up to 1956 

• Preliminary plan of Detroit, by E: H. Bennett; 

together with sketch plans for a new bridge 
to Belle Isle, by Cass Gilbert. 10p+24pl '15 
City plan and improvement comm., Detroit, 
Mich. 



Recent city plan reports. C: M. Robinson. 

Nat Munic R 5:388-94 Jl '16 
Report of city planning com. [Nat. assn. of 

real estate exchanges.] Nat Real Estate J 

13:194-6 Ap 15 '16 
Report read at the 9th annual convention 

of the Nat. assn. of real estate exchanges. 

New Orleans, La., March 27-31, 1916 

* Report on a city plan for the municipalities of 

Oakland .& Berkeley, prepared and published, 
under the auspices of the municipal gov- 
ernments of Oakland and Berkeley, the su- 
pervisors of Alameda county, the Chamber 
of commerce and Commercial club of Oak- 
land, the Civic art commission of the city 
of Berkeley, the City club of Berkeley. 
Werner Hegemann. 156p il $1.50; pa 75c 
Smith bros. book store, Oakland; Berkeley 
city club, Berkeley 

* Springfield, Mass. City planning comm. Second 

annual report, 1915. 12p '15 

* Town planning: report to the honorable the 

minister of public works. J. C. Morrell. 82p il 
maps diags Ag 24 '15 Minister of public 
works, Melbourne, Australia 
"■ Victoria — Town planning: report to the min- 
ister of public works. J. C. Morrell. il 82p 
'15 Minister of public works, Melbourne, 
Australia 

Report from investigations made during 
an official visit to England, Scotland, and 
the U. S. of A. 

Surveys 

* Getting to work on a city plan: the survey 

and the collection of data. G: B. Ford. lOp 
(Mim) N 12 '15 G: B. Ford, 101 Park av., 
N. Y. 

Address delivered at the 3d annual confer- 
ence of Mass. city plan commissions 

City solicitors. See Legal departments 

Civic associations 

Activities 
Chicago, 111. — Civic cooperation movement has 
been inaugurated by the Industrial club of 
Chicago in the endeavor to secure to the 
city authorities such assistance and con- 
structive suggestion in matters relating to 
health, sanitation, fire prevention and police 
protection as may be given by a citizen 
interested in the general welfare of the 
community. Citizens becoming civic cooper- 
ators are expected to report violation of 
ordinances in their particular block, and to 
work to secure community interest in their 
section of the city ('16> 

* Denver civic and commercial association: a 

statement outlining the plans and purposes 
of the movement for a consolidation of the 
civic and commercial forces of Denver into 
a strong centralized organization truly 
representative of Denver; also a detailed 
statement of the plan of organization, and a 
budget showing the activities of each bu- 
reau, and the amount of funds necessary for 
■ maintenance. 6p '16 Com. of fifty, Denver 
civic and commercial assn., Denver, Colo. 

Members register their preferences regarding 
various activities of the association. Min- 
neapolis Civic & Commerce Assn Members 
Bui 4:6-7 N '15 

Table presenting the results of the vote 
of members on a questionnaire listing 63 of 
the activities of the association. Members 
were requested to note their opinions re- 
garding the relative importance of these 
undertakings. Efficient municipal adminis- 
tration received the largest vote, and anal- 
ysis of municipal finance and budget, the 
second largest 

News and ideas for commercial and civic 
organizations, il Am City 14:360-8 Ap '16 

Gives notes showing what the organiza- 
tions in various cities are doing 

Conferences 

American civic assn. held its 11th annual 
convention at Washington, D. C, Dec. 28- 
31, 1915, in conjunction with the second Pan- 
American scientific congress. Subjects re- 
lating to physical improvements of towns 
and cities were discussed, attention being 
given to town and city planning, the smaller 
cities especially (N '15) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



51 



civic associations — Conferences —Continued 
National civic federation met in Washington, 
Jan. 17, 1916. The general topics discussed 
were: The legal and moral obligations rest- 
ing upon foreign born citizens of the U. S., 
those who have become naturalized citizens, 
those who have taken steps to become citi- 
zens, and those engaged in labor or business 
here who do not intend to take out citizen's 
papers; The present and prospective effects 
of the war upon immigration to the U. S. in 
relation to (1) the wage earner, (2) industry, 
(3) the body politic, and what, if any, new 
legislation is required to deal with this prob- 
lem. A report was made, analyzing over 100 
profit-sharing plans in operation in this 
country and covering industrial enterprises 
of various kinds; and another, by the in- 
dustrial economics dept. on its survey of the 
social and industrial changes that have taken 
place in the U. S. in the last generation. A 
plan was presented for the organization of a 
commission to study the question of how 
far this government shall enter into private 
industry. Proceedings will not be published 
National municipal league. City manager's as- 
sociation. Civic secretaries conference, Mass. 
federation of planning boards, Springfield 
bureau of municipal research workers, and 
the N. Y. training school of public service 
will meet in joint session during the week of 
Nov. 20-25, 1916, in Springfield. Mass. 
New constitution for Indiana conference under 
the auspices of the Citizens' league of In- 
diana. Meeting at Muncie, Ind., May 23-24, 
1916. Following addresses were delivered: 
New constitution movement, by R. F. Lock- 
ridge; Equal suffrage for Indiana, by O. B. 
Lewis; Some suffrage safeguards, by H. B. 
Snyder; Needed reforms in criminal proce- 
dure in state courts, by A. J. Rucker; Best 
way to procure needed constitutional changes 
in Indiana, by A. C. Harris; Same, by W. H. 
Eichhorn; How to get taxation reform in 
Indiana, by F. T. Stockton; Same, by S: M. 
Foster; Why labor wants a new constitu- 
tion for Indiana, by J: J. McNamee; Needed 
reorganization of state and local govern- 
ment in Indiana, by E: R. Lewis; How to 
procure better city government in Indiana: 
short talks, by T. E. Thieme and others; 
Needed reorganization of our public school 
system, by F. C. Tilden; Some possible sub- 
stitutes for our present system of choosing 
the state superintendent, by W. E. Stone; 
Same, by T: C. Howe; Some possible substi- 
tutes for our county superintendent and 
township trustee system, by J. J. Petti John; 
What can we do? by J. F. Walker 

Publications 

* Civic Affairs is a bulletin published by the 

Civic league of Cleveland, O., for the infor- 
mation of the citizens. Number 1 appeared 
in March, 1916. The bulletin is 5c a copy 

Reports 

* Allegheny county. Pa., civic club. 20th annual 

report for the year ending Nov. 1, 1915. 37p 
'16 The Club, 608 Keenan bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

* Chicago, 111., city club. 11th year book. March 

1, 1916. 72p il '16 City club, 315 Plymouth 
court 

* Massachusetts civic alliance. 15th annual re- 

port for the year Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1915. 19p 
'16 The Alliance, 50 Bromfield st., Boston 

* Massachusetts civic league. Annual report for 

the year ending Oct. 31, 1915. 19p '16 The 
League, Boston, Mass. 

* Minneapolis, Minn., civic and commerce asso- 

ciation. 4th annual report, 1915. 155p 11 
O '15 

* St. Louis, Mo., civic league. 14th year 

book, 1915-16. 20p Ja '16 Roger N. Baldwin, 
sec, 911 Locust st. 

Civic exhibitions. See Municipal exhibits 

Civics 

* Cincinnati. Public schools. Outline for the 

study of civic and vocational service for 
fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades, 1915- 
16. 16p '15 Cincinnati munic. ref. bur. 



* Community civics. Jessie Field and Scott 

Nearmg. 270p il *60c '16 Macmillan 

A textbook for country schools, consoli- 
dated and township schools and schools 
in towns that are closely related to country 
life 

Trend of civic education. A. W: Dunn. In 
U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 1914, p 

See also Citizenship 

Bibliography 

List of school text books in civics. St. Louis 
Pub Lib Monthly Bui n s 13:118-21 Ap '15 

These books were gathered in connection 
with the work of the com. on education for 
citizenship of the Civic league of St. Louis 

Civil pensions. See Firemen — Pensions; Pensions, 
Civil; Police — Pensions 

Civil procedure. See Procedure 

Civil service 

* Civil service list of Canada, 1915, to which 

are added [the civil service laws]. (6 George 
V. Sessional paper 30 A 1916) 737p '15 Sec. 
of state, Ottawa, Canada 
Civil service, old and new. Blackwood's Edin- 
burgh Magazine (249 W. 13th st., N. Y.) 
199:350-9 Mr '16 30c 

* Civil service reform assn. [Resolution of the 

association on the President's action relative 
to the appointment of the N. Y. postmaster.] 
3p (Mimj Ja 15 '16 The Assn., 79 Wall st., 
N. Y. 

Civil service throughout the country. Good 
Government (79 Wall st., N. Y.) 32:73-7 S 
'15 10c 

Future of the merit system. R: Catherwood. 
Good Government (79 Wall St., N. Y.) 32:79- 
80 S '15 10c 

Address before the Nat. assembly of civil 
service comrs. 

National civil service reform league, G: T. 
Keyes, sec, 79 Wall st., N. Y., sent a letter 
to every member of th$ federal senate 
protesting against a rider in the rural cred- 
its bill, which exempted from the operation, 
of the civil service law every employe of the 
federal farm loan board, including ordinarjr 
clerks; the league considered the rider a 
serious menace to the rural credit system 
in making its administration open to the 
spoils system (My 8 '16> 

Old and new problems of civil service. Henry 
Moskowitz. Ann Am Acad 64:153-67 Mr 'IS- 

Some essential features of a model civil ser- 
vice law. G; T. Keyes. Good Government 
(79 Wall St., N. Y.) 32:sup 22-4 Ja '15 10c 

* Sound business principles of civil service. 

Henry Moskowitz. 16p '15 Munic. civil ser- 
vice comm., Municipal bldg., N. Y. 

Address before the seventh annual confer- 
ence of the Nat. assembly of civil service 
comrs., Los Angeles, Cal., June 15-19, 1915 

* Things you should know about the civil ser- 

vice law of the state of Ohio, effective Aug. 
30, 1915. 13p '15 Ohio civil service comm. 
See also Highway officers — Civil service 

Conferences 

International assembly of civil service com- 
missions. Annual convention, Ottawa, Can- 
ada, June, 1916. J. T. Doyle, sec, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

National assembly of civil service comm. 
Meeting in Cincinnati, April, 1916. A model 
constitutional amendment to establish pub- 
lic employment on the merit system in any 
state, was drafted and submitted to the in- 
ternational assembly held in June, at Ottawa, 
Canada. Important changes in the draft of 
a model civil service law provide that the 
salary of a civil service commissioner should 
be not less than that of the principal head 
of a state or local department. In a city 
of 500,000, it should not be less than $5,000; 
and that unless local constitutional require- 
ments forbid, the rule of certifying only 
one name from the list should be rigidly 
followed 



52 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Civil service — Conferences — Continued 

National civil service reform league. Reports, 
addresses and papers at the 34th annual 
meeting, held at Chicago, Dec. 3-4, 1914. 
Good Government (79 Wall St., N. Y.) 32 .sup 
9-24 Ja '15 10c 

Contains: President's address, by R. H. 
Dana; Report of the council; Resolutions of 
the league; Constructive program for the 
national civil service, by W: B. Hale; Some 
essential features of a model civil service 
law, by G: T. Keyes 
National civil service reform league. 35th an- 
nual meeting, Philadelphia, Dec. 2, 1915. Re- 
ports, addresses and papers. Good Govern- 
ment (79 Wall St., N. Y.) 33 sup 24 p Ja '16 
10c Addresses included: Democracy and 
efficiency, by R. H. Dana; Civil service re- 
form as seen by the Consumers' league, by 
Florence Kelley; Merit system in Philadel- 
phia, by G: W. Norris; Application of the 
merit system to post offices of the presiden- 
tial class, by G: W. Norris; Can the civil 
service of a democracy be made efficient by 
C: W. Eliot. G: T. Keyes, sec, 79 Wall St., 
N. Y. 
Ohio civil service assn. Meeting, Dayton, O., 
Nov. 17, 1915. Addresses were given on the 
Merit system in state offices, and the Civil 
service situation in Ohio 

Counties 
Reports 

* Cook county civil service commission and 

rules. 20th report. 48p postage 3c '15 Chi- 
cago munic. ref. lib. 

Directories 

* List of civil service commissions. 12p (Mim) 

Mr 1 '16 U. S. civil service comm. 

Gives the names of the comrs. in Canada, 
IT. S., and the various states and municipali- 
ties 

Efficiency records 
=* National assembly of civil service commis- 
sions. Com. on efficiency records and read- 
ings and their use. 1st report. 56p postage 
4c Je '16 Thomas C. Murray, chm., N. Y. 

Examinations 

National assembly of civil service commis- 
sions. Report of Com. on cooperation among 
commissions on examination standards. 31p 
'16 J. T. Doyle, sec, Washington, D. C. 

National civil service reform league. Com- 
petitive examinations for higher offices. Re- 
port of joint com. of the Nat. municipal 
league and the Nat. civil service reform 
league; with supplemental papers by H. E, 
Deming and R: H: Dana. 20p '16 G: T. 
Keyes, sec, Nat. civil service reform league, . 
79 Wall St., N. Y. 

_ See also Recreation workers — Examina- 
tions 

Laws 
Canada— [Civil service laws]. In Civil service 
list of Canada, 1915, p 541-633 '15 

* Connecticut— State civil service law as 

amended March 1, 1915. 9p Conn, civil ser- 
vice comm. 

* Ohio— Civil service laws. 70p '15 Ohio leg. ref 

dept. 

iVlunicipalities 
=* Civil service reform. Boston City Club Bui v 10 
no 6 p 36-50 Mr '16 

T. 9-°'^i^l".^ ^P,^?^^®s ^y Robert Catherwood, 
Robert W. Belcher, and R. H. Dana, given at 
a luncheon, Feb. 14, 1916 

Civil service trial boards: a new system in 
successful operation in New York citv M M 
Marks. R of Rs 53:458-60 Ap '16 

Municipal Journal, April 27, 1916, maintains 
that civil service methods have serious de- 
fects. It holds that the method of appoint- 
ment lessens the control of an employer over 
his employee and his authoritv over the 
whole force, by making them feel that their 
position does not depend upon him; that 
civil service allows many undesirable men 
to be retained simply because a charge can- 
not be brought against them that is suffi- 
ciently serious for their dismissal 



* New system of service records for municipal 

employees proposed by the municipal civil 
service commission. 16p D '15 Municipal civil 
service comm., N. Y. 

Based upon a comprehensive report sub- 
mitted by the New York bureau of munici- 
pal research to the municipal civil service 
commission 
New York city's civil service: the late investi- 
gation of the administration of the civil 
service law in the city of New York N S 
Spencer. Nat Munic R -5:47-55 Ja '16 

* Power of appointment of municipal civil ser- 

vice commissions by the state commission 
[in New York state]. N Y State Bur Mu- 
nicipal Information Rept no 11 2p S 30 '15 
(Typew 10c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

* Seattle, Wash. Civil service dept. Examina- 

tion and cost statistics including graphic 
charts. 1 sheet 

Bibliography 
Municipal civil service reform. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 106-10 '15 

Reports 

* Oakland, Cal. Civil service bd. Report and 

review of civil service operation in the city 
of Oakland, California, from organization of 
the civil service board on Sept. 5, 1911, to 
June 30, 1915, including rules and regula- 
tions, and sample examinations. 242p Je 30 
*15 

* Philadelphia, Pa. Civil service comm. Annual 

report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1914. 
122p '15 

Rules and regulations 

* Philadelphia, Pa. Civil service comm. Civil 

service acts and rules, 1913-14. 49p 

* Philadelphia, Pa. Civil service comm. General 

information for applicants. 14p '15 

* Philadelphia, Pa. Civil service comm. Regula- 

tions, 1914. 27p 

* Portland, Ore. Civil service bd. Rules and 

regulations. 23p Munic. ref. lib., Portland, 
Ore. 

* St. Louis, Mo. — Rules of the efficiency board 

governing the classified service. 31p F 2 '15 
W. E. Van Pelt, sec, 5307 Devonshire av.. 
St. Louis 

Publications 

Civil Service Record, Chicago, was discon- 
tinued with the March 16, 1916 issue, owing 
to lack of funds and the necessity for rigid 
economy in the expenditure of such appro- 
priations as were available for the current 
year 

Reports 

Civil service of Cleveland: [report" on an in- 
vestigation made by the Civic league of 
Cleveland]. Municipal Bulletin (Civic league, 
Cleveland, O.) Ja '16 p 14-24 5c 

* Connecticut. Civil service comm. First re- 

port for the period ended Sept. 30, 1914. 51p 
'14 Conn, civil service comm. 

* New York (state). Senate com. on civil service 

appointed to investigate the civil service of 
the state with particular reference to sal- 
aries, grades and duties of officers and em- 
ployes. 1st report, 933p tables '16 C. T. 
Horton, chm., Com. on civil service 

Discusses present conditions and analvzes 
problems presented; recommends modifica- 
tion of law so as to include basic standards 
governing personal service, additional legis- 
lation and administrative machinery for pur- 
poses of civil service control, and changes in 
practice and procedure of the civil service 
commission; submits a proposed bill; gives 
schedule of specifications for personal ser- 
vice; and a comparative classification of 
employments 

* New York civil service reform assn. Execu- 

tive com. Report submitted at the annual 
meeting. May 24, 1916. 15p '16 The Assn., 79 
Wall St., N. Y. 

Contains a statement with reference to 
the action of the President on the appoint- 
ment of a postmaster for New York, a state- 
ment to the newspapers, and a resolution of 
the association on the President's action 
relative to the appointment of the N. Y. 
postmaster 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



53 



Civil service commissioners 
Salaries 

^ec Salaries — Civil service commissioners 
Clapp, Edwin J. 
Port of Boston. *$2.50 '16 Yale univ. press 
(Transportation) 
Cleaning of cities 
Children in city clean-up work, il; Parade 
that inaugurated a village clean-up cam- 
paign, by Mrs. G: E. Bird, il Am City 14:156- 
64 F '16 

* Cincinnati clean up and paint up campaigns 

of 1914 and 1915, with recommendations for 
the future. (Bui no 2) 48p il S '15 Cincin- 
nati chamber of commerce, Cincinnati, O. 
"Clean-up week" work in Montreal. F. A. 
Covert. Canadian Munic J (Coristine bldg., 
Montreal, Can. $1.25 a year) 12:370 Je '16 

* Municipal clean-up campaigns: various meth- 

ods and plans adopted by American cities, 
organization, samples of literature used, 
programs. N Y State Bur Municipal In- 
lormation Rept no 111 lOp Mr 1 '16 
Suggestions for clean-up week. O. O. Roe. In 
Fire marshals' assn. of North America. Pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 87-90 

See also Refuse and refuse disposal; Street 
cleaning 

Bibliography 

* List of references on clean up and paint up 

campaigns. Chicago munic. ref. lib. 2p '16 
(Typew Cost of copying 10c) 
Clark, Walter 

Constitution. Article entitled Back to the 
constitution. (U S 64th cong 1st sess S 
doc 308) 13p '16 (Courts— Judicial review of 
legislation) 

Clearances. See Railroads — Clearances 

Clergymen's pensions 
Protestant Episcopal church of America is 
planning to establish a clergymen's pension 
fund as soon as the necessary reserve of 
$5,000,000 is raised. Bishop Lawrence of 
Massachusetts has worked out a system 
which requires the payment of 7 per cent, 
of the rector's annual salary into the pen- 
sion fund; the money will be placed at com- 
pound interest, and if he retires at 68 he 
will receive half salary, and after his death 
his widow and minor children will be pro- 
vided for (D 12 '15) 

Cleveland, O. Ordinances 
Summary of ordinances relating to sanitation 
and to the maintenance of streets and al- 
leys to be enforced by the department of 
police. Jl '15 Chicago munic. ref. lib. (Al- 
leys — Ordinances) 

Clinical psychology. See Ability tests 

Clippings 
Progress report of the committee investigating 
the use and methods of handling and filing 
newspaper clippings. Jesse Cunningham. Spe- 
cial Libraries 6:116-17 S '15 

Closed shop. See Open v. closed shop 

Clothing industry 
Establishment of minimum rates in the tailor- 
ing trade. R. H. Tawney. 270p •Ss 6d '15 
Ratan Tata foundation, London school of 
economics, Clare market, Kingsway, W. C. 
Garment trade and the minimum wage: an in- 
terview with Dr. Henry Moskowitz, presi- 
dent of the N. Y. municipal civil service 
commission. Outlook 113:66, 83-7 My 10 '16 
Law and order in industry: five years' experi- 
ence. J. H. Cohen. 292p $1.50 '16 Macmillan 
Discusses the protocol, reviews the trou- 
bles that lead up to its adoption by the 
cloak, suit and skirt industry of New York 
city, with the provisions contained therein. 
Appendixes contain: Text of the protocol 
agreement; Rules and plan of procedure; De- 
cision of board of arbitration; Findings and 
recommendations of a council of concilia- 
tion; Industrial agreements; Skeleton outline 
of provisions of a bill 

* Men's factory-made clothing industry: report 

on the cost of production of men's factory- 
made clothing in the U. S. US Bur For & 
Dom Com (Misc ser no 34) il 300p '16 



Regularity of employment in the women's 
ready-to-wear garment industries, charts 
U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 183 155p '16 

Sweatshop, root of all garment trade evils. 
N. I. Stone. Survey 36:499-501 Ag 12 '16 

Wages and hours of labor in the men's cloth- 
ing industry, 1911-1914. U S Bur Labor Sta- 
tistics Bui no 187 (Wages and hours of labor 
ser no 20) 130p Mr '16 

Wages of women in women's clothing fac- 
tories in Massachusetts. Mass Minimum 
Wage Comm Bui no 9 38p S '15 

Conferences 
Garment manufacturers' assn. Annual conven- 
tion. Chicago, May, 1916. The association 
will cooperate with federal authorities who 
are making an investigation of the hours of 
labor in garment manufacturing plants, with 
a view to standardizing the number of work- 
ing hours. The Hughes bill prohibiting the 
exportation of convict-made goods from one 
state to another is supported by the associ- 
ation 
Coal 

* Inflammability of Illinois coal dust. J. K. Cle- 

ment and L. A. Scholl, jr. il maps U S Bur 
Mines Bui no 102 74p '16 
"We demand." G. W. McConnell. il World's 
Work 31:645-51; 32:85-96 Ap-My '16 

The first article discusses Anthracite and 
the high cost of cheap labor; the second, Soft 
coal, wages, and the public 

Analyses 

* Graphic studies of ultimate analyses of coals. 

O. C. Ralston, pi U S Bur Mines Tech Pa 
no 93 41p '15 

Prices 
Pennsylvania — Gov. Brumbaugh has appointed 
a state coal commission to investigate the 
high prices on coal. Dealers have added 25c 
per ton on the plea that such an increase is 
necessary to cover the coal tax of 2% per 
cent. It is charged by the state that the 
coal tax law has been used by coal operators 
and dealers as an excuse to advance 
the price of coal, thereby collecting some 
$10,000,000 tax without handing it over to the 
state. Report will be made Jan. 1, 1917 

Coal lands 

Legislation 
Coal-land sections and statutes. In J. W. 
Thompson, comp. United States mining 
statutes, annotated, v 1 p 724-829 '15 

Coal mines 

* Anthracite: an instance of natural resource 

monopoly. Scott Nearing. 251p *$1 '15 Win- 
ston 

The author uses the private ownership of 
the anthracite coal fields to show the effect 
of private ownership of natural resources 
on consumers and workers. He maintains 
that the general sitiiation is brought out 
by the strike of 1912; the workers' gains 
are slight, the operator's gains are immense 
and the consumer foots the bill. Coal Age, 
Jan. 29, 1916, reviews the book and finds the 
author's interpretation of the facts "en- 
tirely unreliable" 

* Coal mining in Illinois. S. O. Andros. il bibl 

tables 111 Coal Mining Investigations Bui no 
13 250p S '15 Univ. of 111., Urbana 

Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal 
industry. U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 
191 (Conciliation and arbitration ser no 6) 
171p Mr '16 

Accounting 
Uniformity 

Federal trade commission has promised its aid 
in obtaining a uniform system of account- 
ing for coal mines. It urges mine organiza- 
tions to draw up their own systems, and 
then call a .joint conference to formulate a 
model system. The commission will then 
use its influence in the way of getting it put 
into use (Ap '16) 

Legislation, Uniform 

Conference of state mine inspectors and other 

delegates results in strong movement to 

standardize state laws and regulations 

affecting coal mining throughout the coun- 



54 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Coal mines— Legislation, Vnlform—Contmued 
try. Mining Congress J (Munsey bldg., 
Washington; D. C.) 2:109-12, 142-4 Mr '16 
20c 

Statistics 
Coal-mine fatalities in the U. S., 1870-1914, 
with statistics of coal production, labor, and 
mining methods, by states and calendar 
years. A. H. Fay, comp. map tables U S Bur 
Mines Bui no 115 370p '16 
Taxation 
Output 
Pennsylvania state tax upon anthracite in- 
valid. Coal Age 8:802-3 N 13 '15 

Valuation 

Valuation of anthracite mines. R. V. Norris. 
School of Mines Quarterly (Columbia univ., 
N. y. city) 36:313-25 Jl '15 50c 
Coast patrol 
Aerial coast patrol. J: H. Hammond, jr. In- 
dependent (119 W. 40th St., N. Y.) 87:336 S 4 
'16 10c 
Coercion. See Open v. closed shop 

Cold storage 

* Cold storage of food products with some notes 

on insulation and warehouse management. 
J. A. Ruddick and Joseph Burgess. Canada 
Dept Agric Dairy and Cold Storage Ser Bui 
no 44 23p '15 Dairy and cold storage comr., 
Ottawa, Canada 

See also Eggs^Cold storage 
Laws 
Cold storage acts of other states. Pa Legisla- 
tive J— House Ap 1 '15 p 1189-95 

Gives the laws of California, New Jersey, 
Kansas, North Dakota, New York, Indiana, 
Arizona, Iowa, Nebraska 

Reports 

* Pennsylvania. Comm. to investigate cold stor- 

age. Report, March, 1915. Pa Legislative J— 
House Ap 1 '15 1177-98p Senate libn., Har- 
risburg 

Commission finds that cold storage is 
necessary, that it increases the available 
supply of food and tends to make the prices 
lower and steadier. The commission does 
not favor branding. It recommends uniform 
legislation by the states 

Coleman, George W., ed. 
Democracy in the making. *$1.50 '15 Little 
(Democracy) 

Collar industry 

Shirt and collar industries: report on the cost 
of production of men's shirts and collars in 
the U. S. U S Bur For and Dom Com (Misc 
ser no 36) 178p '16 

Collection of taxes 
California assn. of tax collectors in session at 
Fresno, February, 1916, proposed the follow- 
ing changes in the tax law: Additional help 
to be allowed to collectors when necessary; 
the elimination of the present rule of posting 
a notice on property to be sold for taxes 
due; no assessment to be made on contract 
purchasers until a deed is placed on record; 
no refund to be authorized where it is found 
that property sold to an innocent* buyer be- 
longs to the United States, the state or 
county; and the tax collectors to be author- 
ized to file a bill for actual traveling expenses 
while attending state conventions. Bills to 
this effect are to be proposed in the next 
legislature 

Collective bargaining 
Collective bargaining, charts; Political labor 
party. In G: G. Groat. Introduction to the 
study of organized labor in America, p 159- 
340, 367-75 '16 

* Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal in- 

dustry. U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 191 
(Conciliation and arbitration ser no 6) 171p 
Mr '16 

Legislation 
Collective bargaining. In J: R. Commons and 
J: B. Andrews. Principles of labor legisla- 
tion, p 91-166 '16 

Contains: Law of conspiracy; Mediation by 
government; Coercion by government; 
Unions of government employees 



College athletics. See Athletics 
College fraternities 

Culture and the college fraternity. L. H. Har- 
ris. School and Soc 2:661-4 N 6 '15 
College professors and instructors 

Insurance and annuities for college professors. 
M. A. Linton. Econ World n s 12:119-21 Jl 
22 '16 
* Life insurance for professors. C: E. Brooks. 
Univ of Cal Publications in Economics v 4 
no 2 83-113p 25c Ap '16 

Shall professors form a union. William Mac- 
donald. Nation 101:621-2 N 25 '15 

Discusses the question of whether the Am. 
assn. of univ. professors should confine it- 
self to the investigation of abuses and trust 
to public opinion to bring redress, or 
whether it should so enlarge and perfect its 
organization to secure for the university 
professoriate the full measure of rights, 
position and recognition to which it is en- 
titled 

Conferences 

American assn. of university professors. An- 
nual meeting, Dec. 31, 1915-Jan. 1, 1916. 
Principle topic of discussion: the declaration 
of principles of the Com. on academic free- 
dom and tenure of office. H. W. Tyler, sec, 
Mass. inst. of technology 

Dismissal 

Methods of the board of regents of the Uni- 
versity of Utah. School and Soc 3:314-16 F 
26 '16 
See also Academic freedom 

Outside employment 

Relation of professors to outside employment: 
a discussion. In Nat. assn. of state univ. 
in the U. S. A. Transactions and proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 78-87 

College students 

Geographical distribution of the student body 
at a number of universities and colleges. 
J: C. Burg. School and Soc 2:677-83 N 6 '15 
The accompanying table shows numerically 
for the academic year, 1914-1915, the geo- 
graphical distribution of the student body, 
exclusive of summer sessions, of 29 Ameri- 
can universities, 5 New England colleges for 
men, 5 colleges for women, one eastern and 
one western school of technology, and one 
Pennsylvania college and engineering school 

Harper's Weekly, for Jan. 15, 1916, begins a 
series of articles on Jews in colleges and 
schools. The first article is "Jews and 
college life." and the second, "Schools, 
colleges, and Jews" 

Should students study? W: T. Foster. Har- 
per's M (Harper & brothers, N. Y.) 133:509- 
18 S '16 35c 

See also Militia — Student battery; Voca- 
tional surveys 

Advisory system 
Student council of Washington university, St. 
Louis, Mo., has installed a "Big brother" ad- 
visory system for the freshman class, 
whereby each freshman has an upper class- 
man to whom he reports regularly to get ad- 
vice and information regarding his studies 
and activities. The adviser in turn keeps an 
eye on the freshman (N 13 '15) 

Cost of living 
Budgets of Smith college girls. F. S. Chapin. 
tables Am Statis Assn 15:149-56 Je '16 

Rooming conditions 
Survey of rooming conditions in a small col- 
lege. H. T. Lewis. Educa 36:157-62 N '15 

Self-help 

Employment bureau of the University. Abra- 
ham Bowers. Univ of Chicago Mag (58th st. 
and Ellis av., Chicago) 8:325-30 My '16 20c 
Describes the bureau maintained by the 
University of Chicago to find positions for 
students desiring to work their way thru the 
university 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



55 



College students — Self-help — Continued 

Self-help of Yale students. School and Soc 2; 
665-6 N 6 '15 

In assisting men to self-supporting labor 
the effort is made by the Bur. of appoint- 
ments to plan out carefully with each stud- 
ent his financial necessities for the year 
Colleges and universities 

* American college: a series of papers setting 

forth the program, achievements, present 
status, and probable future of the American 
college; with an introduction by W: H. 
Crawford. 194p *$1.25 D '15 Holt 

American state university. B: I. Wheeler. 
Educ R 51:29-39 Ja '16 

President's address delivered before the 
National assn. of state universities at Berke- 
ley, Cal., Aug. 30, 1915 

Higher education. S: P. Capen. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 159-90 '15 

Higher education. S: P. Capen. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 131-67 '15 

Contains: General tendencies, surveys, and 
legislative action; State-supported institu- 
tions of Iowa; Inspection of higher institu- 
tions by the bureau of education; Legisla- 
tion affecting higher educational institutions; 
Nebraska initiative; Entrance requirements; 
Classification; New associations and founda- 
tions; Academic freedom 

Higher education: providing the expert. In 
F: C. Howe. Socialized Germany, p 208-19 '15 

* Opportunities for foreign students at colleges 

and universities in the U. S. S: P. Capen. 
U S Bur Educ Bui 1915 no 27 216p il '15 

Shows the organization of American edu- 
cation with special reference to universities, 
colleges and professional schools; explains 
admission requirements with special refer- 
ence to the needs of foreign students; and 
outlines the general and specific opportuni- 
ties to be found at American institutions of 
higher education 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil — Editor of Vida Escolar, 
a newspaper devoted entirely to educational 
and student affairs, and having a wide cir- 
culation among students, has offered to ac- 
cept views of school buildings, campuses, 
and other views relative to college life in 
the U. S. Photographs of the professional 
and post-graduate schools of the larger uni- 
versities are of particular interest. The 
matter is recommended as forming part of 
a press campaign in favor of sending young 
Latin Americans to the U. S. to study (Ap 
15 '16) 

Status and service of the small college. A. A. 
Gray. School and Soc 3:586-94 Ap 22 '16 

What are colleges for? C: W. Clark. No Am 
204:413-20 S '16 

See also Academic freedom; Agricultural 
education: Dissertations. Academic; Junior 
colleges: Rural schools — Relation to univer- 
sities; Scholarships; University extension 

Accounting 

Accounting procedure for state universities. 
W: B. Castenholz. J Account 21:81-92, 167-75 
F-Mr '16 

Administration 

Control of degree conferring institutions in the 
District of Columbia. Educ R 51:64-77 Ja '16 
Contains: Report of the committee on uni- 
versities, Oct. 28. 1914; Special report of the 
committee on universities, Apr. 27. 1915; Bill 
to establish a university board in the depart- 
ment of the interior 

Faculty participation in college government. 
W: T. Foster. School and Soc 3:594-9 Ap 22 
'16 

Idaho situation; with discussion. E. O. Sisson. 
In Nat. assn. of state univ. in the U. S. A.. 
Transactions and proceedings, 1915, p 55-65 

Under the Idaho plan the state board of 
education is ex officio board of regents of 
the university 

Nomination of the trustees of the University 
of Pennsylvania by the alumni. School and 
Soc 3:599-600 Ap 22 '16 

Oberlin as a model of college administration. 
M. M. Metcalf. School and Soc 3:635-8 Ap 
29 '16 

Reasons why the state university, as distin- 
guished from other state institutions, de- 
serves government by a distinct and sepa- 



rate board of regents; with discussion. S. 
Avery. In Nat. assn. of state univ. in the 
U. S. A. Transactions and proceedings, 1915, 

University of Pennsylvania— By the adoption 
of an amendment to the regulations that 
gpvern the University, the trustees have 
given the faculty a share in the appoint- 
ment, reappointment and dismissal of uni- 
versity teachers. Before reappointment or 
promotion the trustees must request a re- 
commendation from that group of instructors 
with which the individual involved is asso- 
ciated. In case recommendation is not ac- 
cepted, or in case no recommendation is 
made, the trustees will follow their own 
judgment. Similarly, they are expected to 
take the advice of the proper group of in- 
structors in case of original appointments. 
Appointments shall cease unless notice of 
reappointment is made at a prescribed time 
before the expiration of the term of the 
teacher. In case of the removal of a pro- 
fessor, or assistant professor, action shall 
be taken only upon a report of a committee 
of the trustees and members of the faculty 
(D 29 '1.^) 

* Washington, D. C, board of trade. Com. on 

universities. Reports of October 28, 1914, 
and April 27, 1915, relating to proposed leg- 
islation by congress to secure the mainte- 
ance of proper standards for granting de- 
grees in the District of Columbia together 
with a proposed bill recommended by the 
committee and approved in principle by the 
board of trade, entitled "A bill to establish 
a university board in the department of the 
interior." 17p 

Reprinted from the annual report of the 
Washington board of trade for 1914-1915 
See also Academic freedom 
Bibliography 
Bibliography on college organization and ad- 
ministration. In Assn. of Am. agric. col- 
leges and exper. stations. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 115-23 

Bibliography 
American colleges and universities. St Louis 
Pub Lib Bui n s V 14 p 248-57 Je '16 

Intended as a guide for preparatory 
students 

Conferences 

Association of urban universities. Second an- 
nual convention, Cincinnati, O., Nov. 15-17i 
1915. Leading topic for discussion was "Co- 
operation between cities and universities in 
training for public service" 

* National assn. of state universities in the 

U. S. A. Transactions and proceedings of 
the 20th annual meeting Berkeley, Cal., Aug. 
30-31, 1915. V 13 148p '15 G. P. Benton, sec- 
treas., Burlington, Vt. 

* University and the municipality: summary of 

proceedings of the first session of the Na- 
tional assn. of municipal universities. U S 
Bur Educ Bui 1915 no 38 66p '15 

Sessions were devoted to: Aims and pur- 
poses of the urban university. Brief de- 
scription of typical urban universities 

See also Women — Education — Conferences 
Consolidation 

See Medical education 

Cooperation with state and local 
governments 

See Public service 

Entrance requirements 

Should colleges admit high school graduates 
without regard to subjects studied in the 
high schools. T: C. Blalsdell. School and Soc 
3:366-70 Mr 11 '16 

University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill, 
N. C.) has voted to accept two units of ap- 
proved work in vocational subjects for ad- 
mission to the College of liberal arts and 
three units for admission to the School of 
applied science, as a part of the fourteen 
units required for unconditional entrance 
(Ja '16) 



56 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Colleges and universities— Cont/nuerf 
Fees 

Academic fees in the U. S. F: A. Dickey. Educ 
R 50:136-43 S '15 

Washington supreme court has upheld the con- 
stitutionality of the law passed by the last 
legislature providing for matriculation and 
tuition fees at the state university; held 
that the legislature had the right to permit 
such fees or not, as it saw fit. Mark M. 
Litchman v. University regents (Press rept 
Mr 7 '16) 

See also Colleges and universities— Tuition 

Field work 

Does field work deserve collegiate recognition? 
P. R. Kolbe. School and Soc 3:721-6 My 20 
'16 

Richmond, Va. — Richmond college students 
studied the Richmond form of government 
during the spring of 1916. One group studied 
the workings of the administrative board, 
another the city council, others the board of 
police commissioners, the city gas works, the 
electric plant, various other public utilities, 
and the board of health (My 19 '16) 

St. Louis, Mo. — Eight members of the class in 
civic design of the Univ. of Illinois visited 
St. Louis, March 31-April 3, 1916, as guests 
of the city plan commission to gain first- 
hand knowledge of the typical planning sys- 
tem of a large city. Statements of their 
observations, containing suggestions for im- 
provement, appear in the St. Louis Daily 
Globe-Democrat Ap 25 '16 

Some phases of field work. P. R. Kolbe. Educ 
R 51:479-87 My 'lo 

Address before the Association of urban 
universities at Cincinnati, Nov. 17, 1915 

Graduate schools 
Function of graduate schools in the universi- 
ties of the U. S. W: H. Carpenter. Educ R 
51:433-46 My '16 

Paper read before the 4th section at the 
2d Pan-American scientific congress, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Dec. 29, 1915 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] higher educational in- 
stitutions; Professional and higher technical 
education; Private and endowed higher in- 
stitutions, state control. U S Bur Educ Bui 
1916 no 47 p 711-70 '16 

Statistics 

* Statistics of state universities and state col- 

leges for the year ended June 30, 1915. U S 
Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 6 19p '16 

Universities, colleges, and technological 
schools; Agricultural and mechanical col- 
leges; Professional schools. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1914. v 2 p 191-347 '15 

University registration statistics. J: C. Burg. 
Science 43:87-92 Ja 21 '16 

Student activities 
See Athletics 

Student voting 

Bee Student voting 

Surveys 
Maryland general assembly has appropriated 
$1,000 for a survey of all the colleges and 
other high institutions in the state, in order 
that the board of education can pass intelli- 
gently on their standards. The work is un- 
der the direction of Dr. Simon P. Flexner, of 
the Rockefeller foundation, who conducted a 
similar survey of the public schools last 
year (Ap 24 '16) 

* Report of a survey of the university of Ore- 

gon made by the U. S. bureau of education, 
September, 1915. S: P. Capen. Univ of Ore 
Bui n s V 13 no 4 28p D '15 U. S. bur. of 
educ. 

Tuition 
College charges for tuition arranged according 
to institutions, [1906-1915]. tables In Car- 



negie found, for the advancement of teach- 
ing. 10th annual report of the president and 
of the treasurer, 1915, p 44-5 '16 

University of Wisconsin 

Madison: the passage of the University of 
Wisconsin through the state political agita- 
tion of 1914; the survey by William H. Allen 
and his staff and the legislative fight of 
1915, with the indications these offer of the 
place the state university holds in the com- 
munity. G: H. Mead, il Survey 35:349-51, 354- 
61 D 25 '15 

Smashing the looking glass, by W: H. Allen; A 
rejoinder, by G: H. Mead. Survey 35:602-7, 
610 F 19 '16 

University of Wisconsin. J: L. Sturtevant. 
Educ R 50:109-19 S '15 

University of Wisconsin survey and legisla- 
tion; with discussion. G: C. Comstock. In 
Nat. assn. of state univ. in the U. S. A. 
Transactions and proceedings, 1915, p 102-22 

Colorado taxpayers protective league, Denver 
Uniform system of accounts for the city and 
county of Denver, issue of 1916, prepared by 
T: R. Lill. '15 (Uniform accounting) 

Comfort stations. See Public comfort stations 

Commerce 

American international corporation, R. P. 
Tinslev, sec, New York, was incorporated, 
Nov. 23, 1915, with a capital of $50,000,000. 
Its purpose is to develop American trade in 
Europe and South America, and to further 
foreign loans and investment enterprises 

* Analysis of the present foreign trade of the 

U. S. (Bui no 3) 19p '16 Mass. directors of 
the port of Boston, Edward F. McSweeney, 
chm. 
Economic readjustment in the United States 
after the European war. Nat Economic 
League Q 1:49-66 My '16 50c 

* Export trade suggestions: extracts from re- 

ports of American consular officers and data 
from other sources dealing with the pro- 
motion of American trade. U S Bur of For 
and Dom Com (Misc ser no 35) 141p '16 15c 
U. S. supt. of doc. 

Industrial commission has been appointed in 
France for the study of plans for the re- 
habilitation of its industries affected by the 
war. In Germany, an organization, headed 
by Dr. Dernberg, has been formed for the 
development of plans for a trade conquest 
of South America after the war shall have 
ended. A combination of German dye manu- 
facturers have greatly increased their capi- 
talization in order to combat the disuse of 
their plants which might occur because of 
the development of the industry by other 
countries during the war (Ap 8 '16) 

Industrial preparedness for peace: new oppor- 
tunities for AYnerican commerce and indus- 
J. E. Davies. Sci Am 115:8, 28-9 Jl 1 



ni 



International high commission, Dr. S. Rowe, 
sec, Washington, D. C, appointed by the 
Pan-American financial conference, at its re- 
cent meeting in Buenos Aires, declared the 
creation of an American merchant marine 
to be of paramount importance, adopted the 
franc of .33437 gramme gold 900 fine, as a 
Pan-American unit of money; urged the 
completion of an intercontinental railway 
system and the improvement of telegraph 
and cable facilities, with absolute govern- 
ment control of all wireless communication; 
agreed upon all the reservations made in the 
Hague convention of 1912 in connection with 
the adoption of a uniform law for bills of 
exchange, with one exception; approved the 
arbitration plan between business men of the 
U. S. and those of Argentina which was 
negotiated thru the chamber of commerce 
of the U. S., and the unification of laws re- 
lating to commercial travelers and samples 
in such a manner as to reduce taxes on 
commercial travelers; and recommended the 
collection of tariff statistics on uniform 
classification, the simplification of port 
charges and consular fees, and reduction of 
postal rates (Ap '16) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



57 



Commerce — Continued 

International high commission announced the 
American committee of business men July 
21, 1916, who would visit Brazil to advance 
trade relations, as a result of resolutions 
adopted at the Pan-American conference. 
Committee sailed July 29 to be in Brazil 
from August 15 to September 12, 1916 

* Merchants' assn. of N. Y. Com. on the federal 

trade comm, [Report embodying general 
views and suggestions concerning the sub- 
ject of export trade], lip Merchants' assn. 
of N. Y., 233 Broadway, N. Y. 

A resume of the agencies and methods 
now employed in promoting export business: 
Joint agencies; Export commission houses; 
Direct representation; Governmental aid; 
Export associations; Banking connections; 
Mail service; Merchant marine; United 
States navy; Treaty with Russia 

* Methods of transacting business in foreign 

lands, particularly in the West Indies and 
South America. William Tonk. 5p '16 Nat. 
assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. A., 30 
Church St., N. Y. 

Address at the Export trade round table, 
Tuesday evening. May 16, 1916, 21st annual 
convention, Nat. assn. of manufacturers 

* Outlook for our commerce and industry. W: 

C. Redfield. Boston City Club Bui v 10 no 1 
p 17-34 O 1 '15 

Address before The Boston City Club, May 
13, 1915 

Possibilities for the economic development of 
the U. S. W. S. Kies. Econ World n s 11: 
463-6 Ap 8 '16 

Probable changes in the foreign trade of the 
United States resulting from the European 
war; with discussion. E. R. Johnson. Am 
Econ R 6:supl7-49 Mr '16 

Relation of investments to South American 
trade, by C: M. Muchnic; Governmental policy 
and trade relations with the Far East, by 
Willard Straight; Investment and trade in 
China, by E. P. Thomas; Our trade with 
South America and China, by W: R. Shep- 
herd; Tariff in relation to foreign trade, by 
Guy Emerson; Probable effects of the war 
on the foreign trade of the U. S., by G. G. 
Huebner. Proc Acad Pol Sci 6:138-84 O '15 

Resolution has been introduced in congress by 
Senator Nelson of- Minnesota authorizing 
the president to appoint a commission to 
promote trade relations between the U. S. 
and Norway. The commission would be ex- 
pected to cooperate with the American-Nor- 
wegian chamber of commerce, which main- 
tains headquarters at Chicago (My 26 '16) 
■* Summary of the report of the federal trade 
commission on cooperation in American ex- 
port trade. 7p My 2 '16 Federal trade comm., 
Washington, D. C. 

Thirteen leading newspapers in the U. S. have 
formed a syndicate to promote business be- 
tween North and South America. They have 
sent G: A. March to Buenos Aires, to re- 
present them and present to business men the 
mutual benefits of commerce between the 
countries (Je 16 '16) 
See also Merchant marine 

, Bibliography 

1600 business books: a list by authors, by ti- 
tles and by subjects. S. B. Ball, comp. 166p 
75c '16 Wilson 

Compiled under the supervision of John C. 
Dana, librarian. Free public library of New- 
ark, N. J., chm. of the committee on libra- 
ries of the Associated advertising clubs of 
the world 

Conferences 

Economic conference of the Allied govern- 
ments. Paris, June, 1916. An economic 
plan was agreed on to cover the period of 
the war, the transition, and the period after 
the war. During the war all commerce with 
the enemy is forbidden; restrictions are 
placed on exportations and contraband. Dur- 
ing the transition period, the Allies will act 
jointly in restoring industry, agriculture, 
and merchant fleets, and will deal among 
themselves as far as possible. A period of 
time shall be fixed during which enemy 
commerce shall be subject to special rules 
and restrictions. Mutual exchange of goods 
among the Allies will be encouraged by 



rapid transit, reduced freight rates and 
common arrangements in regard to postal 
and telegraph communication. As far as 
possible uniform regulations of patents and 
trade-marks, and of inventions and copy- 
right of literary and artistic works created 
in enemy countries during the war will be 
formulated. Bosseront Danglade, sec, Paris 
International trade conference under the aus- 
pices of the Nat. assn. of manufacturers in 
co-operation with banking and transporta- 
tion interests of the U. S.. New York city. 
Dec. 6-8, 1915. Summary of the proceedings, 
il Am Ind 16:1-48 Ja '16 

The program included: the problems af- 
fecting international credit, foreign exchange 
and transportation; discussions by experts 
of special phases of the problem, such as se- 
curing credit information and methods of 
salesmanship and advertising; exhibits hav- 
ing reference to the subjects discussed, il- 
lustrating them in a graphic manner 

* National foreign trade convention. 3d official 

report, New Orleans, La., Jan. 27-29, 1916. 
530p $1.50 16 R: H. Patchin, sec, 171 Broad- 
way, N. Y. 

Commercial preparedness was the keynote 
of the convention. Among the subjects con- 
sidered were world conditions after the Eu- 
ropean war, foreign investment of Ameri- 
can capital, relation of tariff to world trade 
conditions after the war, anti-dumping leg- 
islation, American dyestuffs industry, the 
merchant marine, the smaller manufacturer 
in foreign trade, cooperation in foreign trade, 
American banking in foreign markets, rela- 
tion of American railroads and of improved 
waterways to foreign trade 

* Pan-American financial conference. Pro- 

ceedings of the first conference, Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 24-29, 1915. 744p $1 '15 
U. S. supt. of doc 

Pan American scientific congress. 2d con- 
gress, Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915- 
Jan. 8, 1916. Program of section IX: 
transportation, commerce, finance, and 
taxation. 22p '15 John Barrett, sec. gen., 
Pan American union, Washington, D. C. 

Lists following papers and discus- 
sions relative to commerce: Preparation 
for trade, domestic and foreign: from the 
standpoint of the business man, by J. A. 
Farrell, Nat. foreign trade council, N. Y. ; 
from the standpoint of the educator, by 
Edwin F. Gay, dean. Harvard univ., Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; Is it desirable and possible 
to establish uniform rates, methods, and 
classifications in port charges, customs 
regulations, and classifications between 
North, Central and South American re- 
publics; discussion; Changes in accepted 
conclusions as to international trade due 
to (1) Asiatic development and (2) War, 
by John B. Clark, Columbia univ., N. Y. ; 
Commercial relations between Salvador and 
the U. S., by P. S. Fonseca. Salvador; 
Effects of the war upon the trade of South 
America, by George E. Roberts, Nat, city 
bank, N. Y.; Organization of the European 
foreign trade with Uruguay, with special 
reference to manufactured " goods, by Don 
O. Morat6, in collaboration with Don J. 
West, Uruguay; Balance of trade in the 
commerce between South America and the 
U. S., by J. W. Jenks, N. Y. univ., N. Y.; 
Foreign trade between the countries of the 
American continent, by Arthur Guimaraes, 
Brazil; Possibility of standardizing census 
and commercial statistics in the American 
Republics, by S. N. North, Carnegie en- 
dowment for internatonal peace, Wash., 
D. C; Resources of Honduras and its com- 
mercial development by Don Guillermo 
Campos, minister of Honduras in Guate- 
mala; Natural resources and the commer- 
cial and economic development of Uruguay, 
by Pablo Fontaina; Customs regulations in 
Uruguay, by Don A. Idiartegaray, Uruguay; 
Credit and banking in Uruguay, by Don 
Alejandro Taiice, Uruguay 

Southern commercial congress opened its 
seventh annual convention at Charleston, 
S. C, Dec. 13, 1915. A r4sum6 of the 
speeches of the most prominent speakers is 
given in the Charleston News and Courier 
D 14 '15 



58 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Commerce— Conferences— Continued 

• Wisconsin commercial and industrial congress. 
Papers and discussions at the meeting held 
at Madison. Wis., Feb. 14-18, 1916, under the 
direction of the Dept. of political economy 
and the University extension division of the 
Univ. of Wisconsin. 294p 50c Jl '16 Andrew 
H. Melville, sec, Madison, Wis. 

Program includes the following general 
topics: Functions of commercial organiza- 
tions; Industrial development; Employer and 
employe; Advertising and salesmanship; 
Traffic problems and foreign trade; Govern- 
ment regulation of business; Commercial as- 
sociation and community welfare; Roads 
problem; Bank and the community. Ad- 
dresses were delivered on: Unemployment, 
by J: R. Commons; Practice of scientific 
management, by F. S. Gilbreth; Some as- 
pects of industrial development in central 
Wisconsin, by George Hambrecht; How na- 
tional advertising helps the retail merchant, 
by C: L. Benjamin; Economic justification 
of the middleman, by R. S. Butler; Educa- 
tion for business, by W: A. Scott; Busi- 
ness and citizenship, by Joseph Messer- 
schmidt; Business ideals of a student, by 
H. M. Van Auken- Keeping in touch with 
the university, by E. A. Dettman; Learning 
from hard knocks, by Morris Fox 

Investigations 

Canadian trade commission has been ap- 
pointed to visit the United Kingdom, 
France, and Belgium for the purpose of in- 
vestigating and reporting on trade oppor- 
tunities in those countries (My 18 '16) 
U. S. bur. of foreign and domestic commerce 
will begin, after July 1, 1916, a very exten- 
sive investigation into foreign market con- 
ditions. In South America a study will be 
made particularly of markets for construc- 
tional material and machinery, fancy 
groceries, furniture, glass and glassware, 
jewelry and silverware, motor vehicles, pa- 
per and printing supplies, railway supplies, 
and stationery and office supplies. In the 
Far East the markets for boots and shoes, 
motor vehicles, electrical goods and railway 
supplies will be especially investigated. In 
all, twelve different lines are to be investi- 
gated 

Legislation, Uniform 
Domestic commerce and uniform state laws. 
S. R. Child, il Nation's Business v 4 no 6 
p 12-13 Je '16 
Commercial education 
Business and its educational needs. In J: A. 
Lapp and C. H. Mote. Learning to earn, 
p 116-42 '15 
Columbia university has organized a school of 
business, which differs from those in the 
City college and New York university in 
that the courses are open only to those who 
have completed two years' of collegiate work 
Commercial education; [importance, essentials, 
courses of study, and scientific standards 
and tests]. F. V. Thompson. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 279-93 '15 
Commercial training under state supervision. 

O. C. Schorer. School R 24:1-19 Ja '16 
Minnesota university has announced the es- 
tablishment of a one-year course in retail 
merchandising and a four-year course in 
commerce. An outline of the studies included 
in the former, appears in the Minneapolis 
Civic «& Commerce Assn Bui Mr '16 
Modern high school of commerce. J. E. 
Downey, il Nation's Business v 4 no 2 pt 1 
20-1 F '16 

Describes the work of the Boston high 
school of commerce 
New York (city) chamber of commerce has 
appointed a standing committee to deal with 
the question of commercial education. The 
National foreign trade council has also in- 
vestigated the subject and presented the re- 
sults of a comprehensive inquiry among 
employers at its recent convention in New 
Orleans (F 14 '16) 
New York national city bank is completing 
arrangements with several American univer- 
sities for cooperation in training students for 



business careers. The plan being worked out 
calls for the employment by the bank of more 
than 100 college men during their last two 
summer vacations, and upon the completion 
of their college courses. These men will 
receive credit from their universities for 
studies pursued while in the bank. They 
will be employed in the bank at $50 a month, 
and will have six hours' banking practice 
and three hours of class room work each day. 
A-t the end of the summer they will return 
to college and elect studies which will fit 
in with their projected employment. At the 
end of their junior year they will return for 
another three months, and at the end of the 
first half of their senior year one man from 
each group of three will be permitted to leave 
college to work in the bank. He will return 
at commencement to receive his degree, his 
work with the bank taking the place of cur- 
riculum work for the final semester. On 
leaving college at the middle of his last year 
each man will get $125 a month and continue 
his studies and banking work for a full 
year. He will then be qualified to take a 
place in one of the foreign branches. The 
experiment will be started next June with 
from 30 to 40 sophomores; but at the same 
time 40 college graduates will be taken on 
to be ready before the undergraduates have 
completed the bank course. It is planned to 
take in students only after a personal con- 
sultation, and to get men from as widely 
separated regions as possible. Those who 
make the best showing will get permanent 
positions. Classes have been established at 
the home institution in New York, which 
at present has a total enrollment of nearly 
1,000; they meet between 8 and 9 o'clock in 
the morning, during the luncheon hour, and 
between 5 and 6 at night (F 27 '16) 
Report on departments of commerce and ac- 
counts in American universities and colleges. 
W. H. Rand. In American assn. of public 
accountants. Yearbook, 1914-1915, p 192-8 

A tabulation giving comparative informa- 
tion 

* School of commerce and finance, 1916-1917. St 

Louis Univ Bui v 12 no 5 2 pts D '16 

Contains schedule of courses. The pur- 
pose of the St. Louis university school of 
commerce and finance is to afford this high 
degree of training required by modern busi- 
ness. It aims to produce industrial engi- 
neers, broad visioned and resourceful or- 
ganizers and managers, efficiency experts, 
and specialists in the various lines of com- 
mercial activity 

* Specimen examinations given in the School of 

commerce and finance, St. Louis university. 
19p '15 Francis A. Thornton, sec, School of 
commerce and finance, St. Louis univ. 

University of Wisconsin, thru its extension 
division, offered a short course for business 
men, last spring. The object was to bring 
together business men from all parts of the 
state for the discussion of problems of 
credit, marketing, salesmanship and busi- 
ness law 

University school of business [at Columbia]. 
E. R. A. Seligman. Columbia Univ Q (Col- 
umbia univ., N. Y.) 18:241-52 Je '16 

Uruguay — National school of commerce will 
give a degree of commercial expert to stu- 
dents completing a four years' course in the 
following subjects: civil, maritime and com- 
mercial law, consular and tariff legislation, 
political economy, linear and industrial 
drawing, commercial geography, finance and 
statistics, merchandise, French and English, 
stenography and typewriting, mercantile 
and administrative accounting. The law 
providing for this course, also provides for a 
fifth year to students desiring a longer 
course who have taken German and univer- 
sal history in their fourth year. The studies 
are German, national history, international 
public and private law and treaties, practice 
in chancellery and notarial work. The pro- 
fession of translator is also added to the 
school of commerce (Mr 10 '16) 

Wall street bankers and brokers have arranged 
for the establishment of a branch of N. Y. 
university in a building provided by "the 
Street" and near it, where instruction in 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



59 



Commercial education —Continued 

every branch of commercial work will be 
provided for employees of brokerage firms. 
Employers pay the tuition and are responsi- 
ble for all expenses of the institution. 
Nearly a thousand students are enrolled now 
in the classes, which are planned in general, 
so as not to conflict with the work of the 
students (F 3 '16) 

-See also Teachers' institutes 

Foreign trade 

Course in training for foreign trade, for men 
interested or engaged in the export trade, 
opened Nov. 8, 1915, under the direction of 
an advisory committee con>posed of repre- 
sentatives from the College of the city of 
N. Y., the Am. manufacturers' export assn., 
the Merchant's assn., the Nat. assn. of man- 
ufacturers and the Board of trade and trans- 
portation. The scope of the course will cover 
sales organization and sales methods in for- 
eign trade, financial organization and financ- 
ing export trade, transportation problems 
and government regulations affecting inter- 
national trade. The class, limited to 150, 
meets on Monday and Tuesday afternoons 
from 5.30 to 6.30 in the Custom House, 
N. Y. Prof. Guy E. Snider of the College of 
the city of N. Y, is supervisor (N 11 '15) 

Statistics 
Commercial and business schools. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 2 p 449-90 

Surveys 

* Boj's and girls in commercial work. B. M. 

Stevens. (Cleveland education survey) 181p 
il 25c postpaid '16 Survey com., Cleveland 
found., Cleveland, O. 

The report advances the opinion that the 
present school is a better training for girls 
than for boys, that boys should have general 
training for clerical work, that immaturity 
is less a disadvantage to a boy than -to a girl 

* Survey of needs in commercial education. 

18p 10c '15 Commercial and industrial educa- 
tion com., Rochester chamber of commerce, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Commercial feeding stuffs. See Feeding stuffs 

Commercial fertilizers. See Fertilizers 

Commercial laws 

* Commercial laws of England, Scotland, Ger- 

many, and France. A. J. Wolfe and E. M. 
Borchard. U S Bur For & Dom Com (Spe- 
cial agents ser no 97) 127p '15 

Commercial organizations 
Argentina^-Confederation of the leading com- 
mercial and industrial associations has been 
concluded. The object is to secure a more 
concerted action in the interests of com- 
merce, industry and national production and 
in defending the same before the public 
powers, companies or corporations. The 
federation will study such national prob- 
lems as those regarding a merchant marine 
and land transportation, custom house laws, 
tariffs and regulations; organization and 
mobilization of credit; the development of 
the live-stock industry, agriculture and 
all phases of national production; commer- 
cial treaties and all questions that may in- 
terest the various associations forming a 
part of the federation (Je 17 '16) 

* Commercial organizations in France, with 

summary of government's activities on pro- 
moting commerce. A. J. Wolfe. U S Bur 
For & Dom Com (Special agents ser no 98) 
75p '15 

* Commercial organizations in Germany. A. J. 

Wolfe. U S Bur For & Dom Com (Special 
agents ser no 78) 170p '14 20c U. S. supt. of 
doc. 

** Commercial organizations in southern and 
western cities. G: W. Doonan. U S Bur For 
& Dom Com (Special agents ser no 79) 54p 
'14 10c U. S. supt. of doc. 

* Commercial organizations in Switzerland and 

the Swiss department of commerce. A. J. 
Wolfe. U S Bur For & Dom Com (Special 
agents ser 101) 28p 5c '15 U. S. supt. of doc. 



* Commercial organizations in United Kingdom. 

with description of British manufacturers' 
TT^^c ej^^Ployers' organizations. A. J. Wolfe. 

* Commercial organizations of U. S. U S Bur 

For & Dom Com (Misc ser no 28) 104d '15 
15c U. S. supt. of doc. 

Complete commercial directory of organi- 
zations in the U. S. It is divided into three 
classes: Interstate, national and interna- 
tional listed alphabetically and by trade 
classification; State and territorial, arranged 
alphabetically by states and territories; and 
Local 

Denver civic and commercial association: a 
statement outlining the plans and purposes 
of the movement for a consolidation of the 
CIVIC and commercial forces of Denver into 
a strong centralized organization truly 
representative of Denver; also a detailed 
statement of the plan of organization, and a 
budget showing the activities of each bu- 
reau, and the amount of funds necessary for 
maintenance. 6p '16 Com. of fifty, Denver 
civic and commercial assn., Denver, Colo. 

Municipal commercial club. W. D. Hornaday. 
il Munic Eng 51:11-12 Jl '16 

National trade assn., Louis Barnet, sec, 18 E. 
41st St., N. Y., has been organized to bring 
together in one powerful trade organization, 
various local and trade organizations of 
manufacturers, merchants and consumers not 
now affiliated. Its object is to oppose class 
legislation and to endeavor to work out 
effectively national problems (F 14 '16) 

Questionnaire number one: plans of organiza 
tion structure. Nation's Business 4:22-3 M^ 



'16 



My 



Resume of reports made in answers to 
the first questionnaire concerning the organ- 
izations of different chambers of commerce, 
boards of trade, commercial clubs, mer- 
chants' and manufacturers' associations, etc. 
* Successful methods of commercial organiza- 
tions. H. A. Wheeler. 17p Mr 25 '15 
Chamber of commerce of U. S. A. 

See also Chamber of commerce of the 
United States of America; Chambers of com- 
merce; Charities — Control by commercial or- 
ganizations 

Activities 
Members register their preferences regarding 
various activities of the association. Min- 
neapolis Civic & Commerce Assn Members 
Bui 4:6-7 N '15 

Table presenting the results of the vote of 
members on a questionnaire listing 63 of the 
activities of the association. Members were 
requested to note their opinions re- 
garding the relative importance of these 
undertakings. Efficient municipal adminis- 
tration received the largest vote, and anal- 
ysis of municipal finance and budget, the 
second largest 
News and ideas for commercial and civic or- 
ganizations, il Am City 14:360-8 Ap '16 

Gives notes showing what the organiza- 
tions in various cities are doing 

Conferences 

• National assn. of commercial organization 
secretaries. First annual meeting, St. Louis, 
Sept. 27-29, 1915. 254p $1 '15 Howard Strong, 
sec. Civic & commerce assn., Minneapolis 
Contains the following addresses and re- 
ports: Conservation of committee energy, by 
S. C. Mead; Commercial association adver- 
tising, committee report no. 2; University 
and the secretary, by E: D. Jones; Problems 
of the commercial organization in the town 
and small city, by J. P. Hardy; Most help- 
ful secretarial literature, by R. B. Wood- 
ward; Technique of association administra- 
tion, by Robert Wadsworth; State and sec- 
tional organizations, a committee report; 
Organization costs and results, by G: W. Gil- 
lette; Agriculture and commercial organiza- 
tions, committee report 
National assn. of commercial organization sec- 
retaries. First annual meeting. St. Louis, 
Sept. 27-29. 1915. The Nation's Business, 
Oct. 15, 1915, gives a r6sum6 of the salient 



60 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Commercial organizations— Conferences — Cont. 
points brought out in the papers and discus- 
sions. Howard Strong, sec.-treas., Minne- 
apolis 

Publications 
Publications of local chambers of commerce, 
commercial clubs, etc. M. L. Conat, comp. 
Special Libraries 6:136-8 O '15 

Lists American and foreign publications 
separately 

Reports 

• Chicago assn. of commerce. Annual reports for 

1915. 116p Ja 12 '16 Chicago assn. of commerce, 
10 S. La Salle st. 

• Fifth avenue assn. Annual report, 1915- 

1916. 12p F 8 '16 W. W. Hoppin, sec, 542 5th 
av., N. Y. 

• Merchants' assn. of New Yorli. Year book, 

1915. 240p '15 Merchants* assn. of N. Y., 233 
Broadway, N. Y. 

Statistics as to meetings held, subjects 
discussed and attendance, are given for the 
years 1913-1914, 1914-1915. A list of the ad- 
dresses delivered by prominent speakers at 
the monthly luncheon meetings is also in- 
cluded 
Minneapolis, Minn., civic and cominerce associ- 
ation. Fourth annual report, 1915. 155p il O 
'15 

• Westchester county chamber of commerce. 

Annual report, 1915. 15p '16 Herbert E. 
Angell, sec, 6 Grand st.. White Plains, N. Y. 
Principal accomplishment was the ap- 
pointment of the Westchester county plan- 
ning comm. by the board of supervisors 
Commercial surveys 
Missouri federation of commercial clubs is 
planning a survey of every county in the 
state, to secure definite and reliable informa- 
tion concerning its resources, and the con- 
dition and location of schools, churches and 
roads. The ultimate plan is to use the data 
secured for purposes of intensive develop- 
ment of the resources and promotion of the 
welfare of the various communities of Mis- 
souri (Mr 19 '16) 
Commercial yearbooks 

Bibliography 
List of commercial year-books and similar 
publications. H. H. B. Meyer, comp. Special 
Libraries 7:86-8 My '16 
Commercialism 

Bibliography 

• List of references on commercialism. U. S. 

Library of congress. 4p Ja 10 '15 (Typew 
Cost of copying 20c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Commission markets, State 

California — A law has recently been passed 
creating a state commission market to deal 
directly between producers and consumers of 
food of all kinds. The director, who makes 
all rules, is appointed by the governor. Re- 
ceiving stations are to be established all over 
the state, where any producer may deposit 
his goods for sale and distribution, for which 
a reasonable commission is charged by the 
market. Text of the law appears in the 
Philadelphia North American N 21 '15 

• State commission market of California. Har- 

ris Weinstock. 4p D 1 '15 Harris Weinstock, 
Cal. market director, 525 Market st., San 
Francisco 

• State proposes its plan for aid of farmers. 

Harris Weinstock, Cal. market director. The 
Bulletin (San Francisco) D 22 '15 p 2 

Outlines method of operation and calls 
for cooperation of the growers 
Commission merchants 

License 

Washington supreme court has declared un- 
constitutional the state commission law, 
which provided for an annual license fee of 
JIO and the filing of a $3,000 bond with 
the agricultural department; court held that 
the statute was void through deficiency of 
definition (Press rept Mr 3 '16) 
Commission plan of government 

Uruguay— Senor Battle Ordonez, a former 
president of the republic, has proposed a 
constitutional reform that would establish a 



collegiate or commission form of government. 
The commission would consist of nine mem- 
bers elected directly by the people, one of 
whom would act as president. The cabinet 
of ministers would remain, but be reduced 
to the role of purely executive officers or 
chiefs of offices. The plan will be con- 
sidered, in the approaching national conven- 
tion, to decide upon the constitutional 
changes (Je 17 '16) 

Commons, John R., and Andrews, John B. 
Principles of labor legislation. *,$2 '16 Harper 
(Labor legislation) 

Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago 
Rules and information pertaining to electric 
service, meters, wiring and motors, diags '15 
Chicago munic. ref. lib. (Electric apparatus 
and appliances) 

Communicable diseases. See Infectious diseases 

Community centers 

* Community center. J. C. Preston. Wash Dept 

Educ Bui no 20 28p '14 
Community consciousness 
Building up rural communities. W. W. Bart- 
lett. il Am City (T and C ed) 13:371-6 N '15 
Results obtained by the Bennington coun- 
ty Vermont improvement assn. during the 
three years of its existence 
Community foundations. See Social service — Or- 
ganizations 
Competition 
Competition and capital. O. W. Knauth. Pol 
Sci Q 30:578-90 D '15 
Comptrollers 

Salaries 
See Salaries — Comptrollers 
Compulsory education. See School attendance— 

C^ompulsory 
Conciliation 
Arbitration and conciliation in Australasia. 
M. T. Rankin. 192p n p '16 Allen and Un- 
win, London 

* Canada. Registrar of boards of conciliation 

and investigation. Eighth report of the pro- 
ceedings under the industrial disputes inves- 
tigation act, 1907, for the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1915: appendix to the annual re- 
port of the department of labour for the 
same period. 354p '15 Canada dept. of labour, 
Ottawa 
Strikes in federal mediation. Labor Gazette 
1:112 Je '16 

Statement showing the number of labor 
disputes handled by the U. S. dept. of labor 
thru its comrs. of conciliation subsequent 
to April 10, 1916 
See also Arbitration, Industrial 

Legislation 
Mediation by government. In J: R. Commons 
and J: B. Andre w^s. Principles of labor legis- 
lation, p 124-39 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] 
trade unions and trade disputes. Am Labor 
Leg R 5:756-60 D '15 
Conciliation tribunals. See Courts, Conciliation 
Concrete 

* Concrete construction for rural communities. 

R. A. Seaton. 225p il *$2 postpaid My '16 
McGraw 

Data on the requirements of different building 
regulations and authorities governing rein- 
forced concrete columns. Eng & Contr 45: 
204-6 Mr 1 '16 

From paper by Pierce P. Furber before 
convention, American concrete institute, Chi- 
cago, Feb. 14-17, 1916 

General specifications for concrete bridges. 
W. J. Watson. 3d ed 70p *$1 '16 McGraw 

* Influence of temperature on the strength of 

concrete. A. B. McDaniel. Univ of 111 Engi- 
neering Exp Sta Bui no 81 24p charts 15c Jl 
26 '15 
Report on the destructive action of sea water 
on concrete and methods of guarding against 
it. W. W. Pagon. bibl Monthly J of the 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



61 



Concrete — Continued 

Engineers Club of Baltimore (203 State bank 
of Maryland bldg., Baltimore) v 5 no 8 p 
2-7, no 9 p 2-10 Mr-Ap '16 10c ea 
Continued from the February issue 
Strength and other properties of concretes as 
affected by materials and methods of prep- 
aration. R. J. Wig and others. U S Bur 
Standards (Technologic pa no 58) 172p '16 

* Tests of reinforced concrete flat slab struc- 

tures. A. N. Talbot and W. A. Slater, il 
diags Univ of 111 Eng Exp Sta Bui no 84 
128p 65c Ja 31 '16 Engineering experiment 
station. Urbana, 111. 

See also Pavements, Concrete; Roads, Con- 
crete; Sewers, Concrete; Sidewalks 
Concrete construction 

Accounting 
Simple and efficient cost keep system for con- 
crete construction. Eng & Contr 46:199-202 
Ag 30 '16 

Condensed from a thesis prepared by H. J. 
Gould, Cost engineer, Cincinnati, O. 
Concrete plants 

Central concrete-mixing plant tried at Balti- 
more, G. Y. Carpenter, il Eng N 76:268-9 
Ag 10 '16 
Condemnation of lands. See Eminent domain; 

Excess condemnation 
Conference of mayors and other city officials of 
the state of New York 
Efficiency first: proceedings, 1915. $1 W: P. 
Capes, sec, 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. (Mayors- 
Conferences) 
Conference of state and government officials re- 
garding the standardization of mining stat- 
istics and mine regulations 
Report of the meeting, Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 24-25. 1916. '16 U. S. bur. of mines 
(Mines — Statistics — ^Conferences) 
Conference of western governors 

Proceedings, 1915. Office of the governor, 
Olympia, Wash. (Governors — Conferences) 
Conferences 

Announcements of [94] conventions, celebra- 
tions, and other gatherings, 1916. R of Rs 
53:598-9 My '16 

Name of organizations, place and date of 
meeting, with name of secretary 
Holiday conventions: Pan-American scientific 
congress, American association of university 
professors, American economic assn., Ameri- 
can sociological society, American political 
science assn., American assn. of labor legis- 
lation, American civic assn., Pan-American 
union of women. National women's peace 
party. Survey 35:485, 488-92 Ja 22 '16 

See also entries under various subjects, 
subhead Conferences 
Congress. See United States— Congress 
Connecticut. Laws, etc. 
Dairy and pure food laws. Conn, dairy and 
food comm., comp. '15 Conn, state lib. 
(Dairying — Laws) 
Conservation of natural resources. See Natural 
resources 

Conservation of vision. See Blindness— Preven- 
tion 

Consolidation of schools. See Rural schools — 

Consolidation 
Constitution, United States 

* American plan of government; the constitu- 

tion of the U. S. as interpreted by accepted 
authorities. C: W. Bacon. 474p *$2.50 '16 Put- 
nam 

Presents the constitution as a logical whole 
with the amendments dealt with in connec- 
tion with the clauses which they alter or 
supersede. Shows what our plan of govern- 
ment actually is by quoting the words of 
legal decisions which are precedents for 
future action when the meaning and purpose 
of our political institutions shall be in doubt. 
Contains: The making of the constitution; 
Nature of the preamble; Organization of the 
federal congress; Legislative government in 
• the U. S. ; Limitations upon legislative gov- 
ernment in the U. S. : rights guaranteed by 
the constitution and its amendments; Exe- 



cutive government in the U. S.; Judicial 
government in the U. S.; The federal com- 
pact 

<Sce also Constitutions, State; Courts — Ju- 
dicial review of legislation; Supreme court 
of the United States 
Constitutional amendments 
Constitutional amendments and referred meas- 
ures, 1915. Arthur Conners. Am Pol Sci R 
10:104-9 F '16 

Gives the result of the year's constitution 
making by popular vote, including a tabular 
presentation of the vote 

* Constitutional amendments of 1915 and non- 

partisan acts. Cal Commonwealth Club 
Transac v 10 no 12 423-86p O '15 

Amendments relate to classification of 
property for purposes of taxation and the 
creation of a tax commission; the deposit 
of state, county and municipal moneys; 
referendum; exemptions from taxation; ex- 
cess condemnation and county charters 

New York — Legislature has passed the fol- 
lowing constitutional amendments, which, if 
approved by the nex't legislature, will be pre- 
sented to the people for consideration: the 
Whitney- Brereton woman suffrage amend- 
ment; one giving the legislature the right to 
delegate to conventions .of justices of the 
supreme court and attorneys the power to 
adopt the rules of practice and procedure for 
the courts of the state, two thirds of the 
members of the convention to be supreme 
court justices; an amendment exempting all 
water supply debts from the debt limit of 
cities; one which permits the construction of 
a highway from Saranac lake thru Forest 
preserve to Old Forge; another to have the 
state change from the sinking fund system 
to the serial bond system, and a measure 
jiroviding that all bills imposing a direct 
tax shall be submitted to a popular referen- 
dum (Ap 17 '16) 

New York (state) — Proposed constitution 
which was submitted by the state constitu- 
tional convention to the voters, Nov. 2, 1915, 
was defeated by a large majority. Had the 
important issues, home rule, short ballot 
and the budget system been submitted separ- 
ately, some of them might have been adop- 
ted. "V^'^oman suffrage amendment was also 
defeated. Amendment providing for a 
$27,000,000 bond issue to complete the barge 
canal passed. The amendment permitting 
the legislature to alter the rate of interest 
on certain state debts already incurred was 
also defeated 

* Taxation: proposed revenue amendment to thd 

constitution of the state of Illinois. J. J. 
Thompson, lip (Mim) Ag 25 '16 Leg. ref. 
bur., Springfield, 111. 

Contains: Introductory; The effect of the 
adoption of the amendment; History of agi- 
tation for changes in the taxing system; Ob- 
jections urged against the provisions of the 
constitution sought to be amended; Reports 
and recommendations of tax commissions, 
taxing officers and others, with reference to 
classification of property, taxing intangible 
property and the separation of sources of 
revenue; States permitting classification of 
property for the purpose of taxation 

See also Publicity pamphlets; Referendum; 
entries under various subjects, subhead Con- 
stitutional amendments 

Procedure 

New Jersey — Permitting the initiation of a 
constitutional amendment in any year, but 
providing that a matter once defeated can- 
not be brought up again for five years; also 
requiring that every amendment shall be 
voted on separately. Constitutional amend- 
ment. Rejected. Yes 137,092 No 162,108 O '15 

Ohio — Limiting elections on twice defeated 
constitutional proposals and making provi- 
sion against the abuse of the initiative and 
referendum. Constitutional amendment. Re- 
jected. Yes 417,384 No 482,275 N '15 
Constitutional conventions 

Massachusetts will have a constitutional con- 
vention. The platform of both parties called 
for it, the Democratic demanded it be "free 



62 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Constitutional conventions— CoHtjHMcrf ^,,„^„ 
and untrammelled," while the Repubhcan 
indicated that a Republican legislature w9uld 
be bound to limit it in treating the judiciary 
article and the bill of rights. Some of the 
changes asked for are the abolition of the 
executive council, biennial elections, a short 
ballot and the executive budget system. The 
bill of rights strongly asserts the separation 
of the executive and legislative branches so 
the Republican victory would indicate the 
defeat of the executive budget proposals m 
the convention (N 3 '15) 
Missouri state teachers association is promot- 
ing a movement to secure a constitutional 
convention for the revision of the Missouri 
constitution (My '16) 
Tennessee— Constitutional convention will be 
held in 1917, if the people, at the August elec- 
tions approve of the law calling for such a 
convention. A conference was held in Nash- 
ville, Jan. 25, 1916, for discussion of the pro- 
posed convention 

New York 

* Calendars of the constitutional convention of 

the state of New York, 1915, begun and held 
at the capitol, Albany, April 6, 1915. n p '15 
State lib., Albany, N. Y. 

* Constitutional convention of the state of New 

York. Journ&l of the convention held at 
Albany. April 6, 1915. lOlSp n p '15 , 

* Documents of the constitutional convention of 

the state of New York, 1915, begun and held 
at the capitol, Albany, April 6, 1915. n p 
'15 State lib., Albany, N. Y. 

Making over New York's constitution: a 
gathering of political ghosts who, under the 
leadership of Mr. Elihu Root, are showing a 
modern spirit in making the sixth revision 
of the constitution since the revolutionary 
war; progressives turned conservative and 
conservatives become radical. B. J. Hendrick. 
il World's Work 30:545-58 S '15 

New York constitutional convention. C: A. 
Beard. Nat Munic R 4:637-45 O '15 

* Proposed amendments of the constitutional 

convention of the state of New York, 1915, 
begun and held at the capitol, Albany, April 
6, 1915. 2 v. n p '15 State lib., Albany, N. Y. 

* Record of the constitutional convention of the 

state of New York, 1915, begun and held at 
the state capitol in the city of Albany, April 
6, 1915. 4v. 4577p n p '15 State lib., Albany, 
N. Y. 

* Revision of the state constitution: a col- 

lection of papers, addresses and discus- 
sions presented at the annual meeting of 
the Academy of political science in the 
city of New York, Nov. 19-20, 1914. 2 pts 
262; 211p '15 Frederick D. Colson, sec, Con- 
stitutional convention comm.. State lib., Al- 
bany 

Pt. 1, General principles and mechanics 
of revision; The structure of state govern- 
ment, pt. 2, City and county government; 
Regulation of economic and social con- 
ditions 

Cost 
New York constitutional convention cost 
the people of the state $454,591, of which 
$252,000 was expended for members' sal- 
aries, $5,499 for mileage, $95,807 for of- 
ficers' and employees' salaries, $53,277.50 
for printing and $14,234 for stenographers' 
fees (N '15) 

l7ldCX€S 

* New York constitutional convention: index. 

Complete record of all proposed amendments 
introduced in the convention beginning April 
6, 1915. 257p n p '16 State lib., Albany, N. Y. 
Constitutional history 

* Constitutional history of the state of New 

York. J. H. Dougherty. 408p *$3 '15 Neale 

After a brief review of the colonial period, 
the book takes up in different chapters: the 
Constitutional conventions of 1777; of 1801, 
called to deal with two particular subjects; 
of 1821; of 1846; of 1867, and the convention 
of 1894. The proceedings of the Constitu- 
tional commission of 1872 and of the Judi- 
ciary commission of 1890 are fully analyzed 
and explained. The causes that led to the 
assembling of each convention; the problems 
before each; the treatment of each problem 



are set forth. It discusses all the topics that 
were likely to receive foremost consideration 
in the last convention. The second edition 
covers even the most recent constitutional 
questions, including the Sulzer impeachment 
and workmen's compensation. The first edi- 
tion was published as the second volume of 
the Legal and judicial history of New York, 
edited by Judge Alden Chester 

Constitutional limitations. See Taxation — ^Con- 
stitutional limitations ■ 

Constitutionality of legislation. See Courts — Ju- 
dicial review of legislation; Supreme court 
of the United States; Statutes — Constitu- 
tionality 

Constitutions, Foreign 
Denmark — New constitution which went into 
effect June 5, 1916, has abolished all political 
privileges that formerly went with the own- 
ership of land or capital, and has granted 
equal suffrage to men and women 25 years 
of age and over. The center of government 
has been transferred from the upper to the 
lower house by conferring on the latter the 
power of dissolving parliament under certain 
conditions. All election laws to the lower 
house may be amended at any election. An 
outline of the constitution appears in the 
Chicago Post Je 3 '16 

Constitutions, State 

[Power of legislature to formulate and submit 
to people entire new constitution: case-note 
to Ellingham v. Dye.] Ann Gas 1915C 240 

* State constitution-making, with especial refer- 

ence to Tennessee. A review of the more 
important provisions of the state constitu- 
tions and of current thought upon constitu- 
tional questions. An outline of constitutional 
development and problems in Tennessee. 
Wallace McClure. 472p n p '16 MarshaU & 
Bruce co., Nashville, Tenn. 
Bibliography, p 4-17 

Digests 

* Index digest of state constitutions, prepared 

for the New York state constitutional con- 
vention comm., by the Legislative draft- 
ing research fund of Columbia university. 
1546p '15 Frederick D. Colson, sec. Consti- 
tutional convention comm., State lib., Al- 
bany 

Material digested includes all amend- 
ments adopted up to January 1, 1914, so 
far as obtainable. It is arranged by sub- 
jects and has been' prepared with the idea 
of giving under each title and subhead 
enough of the constitutional provisions to 
render unnecessary reference to the text 
of the constitution unless, for such pur- 
poses as the drafting of new provisions, 
the exact phraseology is wanted 

New York 

Attempted revision of the state constitution 
of N. Y. G. G. Benjamin. Am Pol Sci R 
10:20-43 F '16 

* Constitution and government of the state of 

New York: an appraisal prepared at the re- 
quest of the constitutional convention com- 
mission [based on the detail outline and 
descriptive report entitled, "Government of 
the state of N. Y., organization and func- 
tions" prepared and submitted jointly with 
the state dept. of efficiency and economy.] 
246p charts '15 Frederick D. Colson, sec. 
Constitutional convention comm., State lib., 
Albany 
Defeated New York constitution. W. T. Arndt. 
Nat Munic R 5:92-101 Ja '16 

* For the busy voter: the proposed constitution; 

.summary of important changes, prepared by 
the Citizens union of the city of N. Y. (Pub 
no 12) 14p '15 Com. for the adoption of the 
constitution, 23 Washington av., Albany 
New York (state) — Proposed constitution 
which was submitted by the state constitu- 
tional convention to the voters, Nov. 2, 1915, 
was defeated by a large majority. Had the 
important issues, home rule, short ballot and 
the budget system been submitted separ- 
ately, some of them might have been adop- 
ted. Woman suffrage amendment was also 
defeated. Amendment providing for a 
$27,000,000 bond issue to complete the barge 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



63 



Constitutions, State — New Yor'k.—Cotitinued 

canal passed. The amendment permitting 
the legislature to alter the rate of interest 
on certain state debts already incurred was 
also defeated 

* New York state constitution annotated, pre- 

pared under the direction of the New York 
state library. 376p '15 Frederick D. Colson. 
sec, Constitutional convention comm.. State 
lib., Albany 

Pt. 1, Text in force April 6, 1915, with 
notes; pt. 2, Amendments adopted and pro- 
posed, 1895-1914 
Rejected constitution of New York. World 
Almanac, 1916, p 691-7 

Gives text of the constitution submitted 
to the voters at the fall election, 1915 

* Responsible government; speeches on the 

proposed constitution: Closing address to 
the convention, Sept. 10, 1915; On execu- 
tive reorganization as a step towards the 
abolition of "invisible government"; On 
ending the scandal of the law's delays; 
On the regulation of public utilities and 
the decline of the "black horse cavalry." 
Elihu Root. (Pub no 2a) 37p '15 Com. for 
the adoption of the constitution, 23 Wash- 
ington av., Albany 

* Saving the state's money: the sound and 

far-reaching financial reforms contained in 
the proposed constitution. H: L. Stimson. 
(Pub no 5) lip '15 Com. for the adoption 
of the constitution, 23 Washington av., 
Albany 

* Short form of state constitution, submitted 

to New York state constitutional conven- 
tion and the people of the state for con- 
sideration, by the Referendum league of 
Erie county; also some brief arguments in 
favor of the same, by A. H. Jackson. 31p 
'15 Referendum league of Erie co., 68 Erie 
CO. bank bldg., Buffalo, N. Y. 

* Why the constitution should, be adopted. 

(Pub no 3) 16p '15 Com. for the adoption 
of the constitution, ■ 23 Washington a v.. 
Albany 

Election returns, 1915 

New York — ^Abolishing Indiscriminate and 
permanent exemptions from taxation and 
equalizing and harmonizing assessments. 
Article X of the constitution as proposed by 
the constitutional convention. Rejected. 
Yes 346,922 No 924,571 N '15 

New York — Providing for a new legislative 
apportionment in 1916 on the basis of the 
federal enumeration. Amendment proposed 
by the constitutional convention. Rejected. 
Yes 371.588 No 891,337 N '15 

New York — Revised constitution submitted by 
the constitutional convention not including 
questions 2 and 3. Rejected. Yes 400,423 No 
910,462 N '15 

Consumers' league of the city of New York 

Vacation time: bulletin on summer conditions 
in retail stores. My 17 '16 The League, 105 
E. 22d St., N. Y. (Department stores— Va- 
cations") 
Consumers' leagues 

* Twenty- five years of the consumers' league 

movement. Florence Kelley. (Women in in- 
dustry ser no 10) 6p il postage Ic '15 Nat 
consumers' league, 289 4th av., N. Y. 
Reprinted from The Survey, Nov. 7, 1915 

* Work of the Consumers' league of the city of 

New York, 1915. 28p Mr '16 The League, 105 
E. 22d St., N. T. 

Conferences 

Consumers' league of Am. opened its 16th an- 
nual convention at Cleveland, O.. Nov. 4, 
1915. One of the main features of the con- 
vention was an exhibition and sale of articles 
furnished by the French consumers' league, 
to assist the . women of southern France, 
who have been made destitute by the war. 
Besides these the League exhibits labelled 
goods of American manufacture with the 
idea of extolling the merits of American- 
made goods. Reflections of a pioneer con- 
sumer, by Mrs. Frederick Nathan, and Some 
practical experience in shortening the hours 
of labor, by Frederick R. Hazard, were two 
of the addresses (N 4 '15) 
Contagious diseases. See Infectious diseases 



Contempt of court 

Constructive contempt. J: C. Palmer jr. Am 
Law R (14 S. Broadway, St. Louis, Mo.) 50: 
368-414 My-Je '16 $1 
Contested elections. See Elections, Contested; 

Legislative procedure— Contested elections 
Continuation schools 

Continuation schools. R. O. Small. Mass Board 
Educ Bui 1915 no 6 p 5-33 '15 

* Continuation schools in Massachusetts. Mass 

Bd Educ Bui 1916 no 6 (Whole no 55) 12p 
postage Ic '16 

Reprint from the 79th report of the Mass. 
board of education 
Continuation schools of Munich. W. F. Faulkes. 
In Institute of teachers [of the] Wisconsin 
public industrial, commercial, continuation 
and evening schools. Outlines of lessons, 
1914, p 287-90 

* Education of the ne'er-do-well. W: H. Dooley. 

164p *60c '16 Houghton 

Contains: The neglected ne'er-do-well; 
Qualities of the ne'er-do-well; Traditional 
school's failure to adapt; Special needs of 
this class; Educational adaptations abroad; 
Some American experiments; A constructive 
program 

Highest service of the new schools organized 
under the industrial law of 1911. In Insti- 
tute of teachers [of the] Wisconsin public 
industrial, commercial, continuation and 
evening schools. Outlines of lessons, 1915, p 
140-8 

Need of the extension of continuation schools. 
E. M. Haas. In Assn. of governmental labor 
officials of the U. S. and Canada. Proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 41-8 

Part-time co-operative and continuation 
classes: 17th annual report of the supt. of 
schools, New York city, 1914-1915. 141p 
charts '15 

Pennsylvania's new compulsory continuation 
schools, by H. E. Miles; Industrial continua- 
tion work in New York city, by J: H. 
Haaren; Foreign trade and the continuation 
schools, by H. E. Miles; Diisseldorf school 
under war conditions. Am Ind 16:28-30 N '15 

* Problems of vocational education in Germany, 

with special application to conditions in the 
U. S. G: E. Myers. U S Educ Bui 1915 
no 33 42p '15 

Problems discussed are: Continuation 
schools for boys in unskilled occupations in 
Berlin; Continuation schools for girls and 
women in Berlin; The training of industrial 
continuation-school teachers in Prussia; 
Dual control in industrial education in Prus- 
sia 

See also Children — Care and hygiene — In- 
struction; Industrial education; Teachers' in- 
stitutes 

Compulsory 

* Compulsory continuation schools: the Massa- 

chusetts plan. Mass State Bd Education 
Booklet no 2 12p postage Ic Ap '16 Mass. bd. 
of education, Boston, Mass. 

Laws 

Pennsylvania child labor act and continuation 
schools. (Bui no 5) 26p '15 Pa. dept. of pub. 
instruction. Bur. of vocational education 

Contains an explanation of the several 
sections and a true copy of the act 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] continuation schools. 
U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 710-11 '16 
Contract system. See Convict labor — Contract 

system 
Contractors 

License 
Licensing of electrical contractors: a review 
of the movement for raising the standards 
of electrical construction by eliminating in- 
competent and unscrupulous contractors, il 
Elec R & W Elec'n 69:100-5 Jl 15 '16 
Contracts 
Public contracts; with discussion. S. P. Orth. 
Cornell Civil Engineer (Ithaca, N. Y.) 24:354- 
69 Ap '16 25c 



64 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Contracts— t'o«/tnHe(/ . . , 

* Treatment of the fundamental principles of 
the law of contract, with digests of cases 
contained in Keener's and Williston's case- 
books. Carl Helm, comp. 240p pa $3.50 '14 
Columbia univ. press bookstore 

/STc aluo Building: trades— Decisions; Street 
lighting— Contracts; Street railroads — Con- 
tracts 
Convention halls. See Auditoriums 

Convict labor 

Convict labor, by G: P. Coleman; Convict la- 
bor in Colorado; with discussion, by J. E. 
Maloney. In Proceedings of the Fourth 
American road congress, under auspices of 
American highway assn. [and] American 
automobile assn., 1914, p 268-86 '15 

Kansas— Topeka Capitol, June 4, 1916, con- 
tains an interesting article on convict labor 
and prison management in the Kansas state 
prison. The statements come from J. N. 
Dolley who has recently studied that insti- 
tution carefully. His proposal is for re- 
modeling the present penitentiary at reduced 
figures, by the prison supplying the labor 
and 90 per cent of the building materials 

Ohio — C. C. Lyon, a reporter for the Scripps- 
McRae newspapers in Ohio, spent nine 
days incognito in the state-penitentiary 
at Columbus. He found the prisoners well- 
treated, but greatly in need of work to keep 
them mentally well. He reported that al- 
ready 80 have become insane thru idleness 
and that the unemployed men are all haunted 
by the fear of madness. The convicts them- 
selves have figured out ways of doing away 
with idleness, such as employment of more 
prisoners on the state's brick-making plant, 
on road building and on the new prison 
under process of construction in Madison 
county (Ap 1 '16) 

Pennsylvania prison labor comm., after con- 
siderable research work, has formulated a 
plan for introducing industrial work into the 
prisons. Machinery for making various ar- 
ticles ranging from underwear and shoes 
to automobile tags will be installed in the 
three state prisons. Convicts will be paid 
from ten to fifty cents a day, three-fourths 
of the amount to be paid to the prisoner's 
family, the remainder to be held for him 
until his release. If he has no dependents, 
he will receive all on his discharge (My 24 
'16) 

Prison labor on works of public improvement. 
.T. C. Davis. Iowa State Institutions Bui 18: 
38-43 Ja '16 Iowa bd. of control, Des Moines 
See also Prisoners — Payment for labor 

Bibliography 
* List of references on prison labor. U. S. Library 
of congress. 74p '15 

Notes the literature of the subject from 
the point of view of the prisoner, of the state 
or community, and of labor. References are 
classified as follows: Special investigations; 
Laws, regulations, etc.; Reports of prisons, 
etc.; Congresses, societies, etc.; Articles in 
periodicals; Speeches in sixty-third congress, 
.second session; Bills before congress; For- 
eign countries 

Reading list on convict labor supplied by the 
bur. of labor statistics, U. S. dept. of labor. 
In Pa. Penal comm. Employment and com- 
pensation of prisoners in Pennsylvania: re- 
port, 1915, p 105-7 

Reading list on outdoor employment of con- 
victs, supplied by the div. of bibliography, 
library of congress. In Pa. Penal comm. 
Employment and compensation of prison- 
ers in Pennsylvania: repoVt, 1915, p. 100- 
105 '15 

Bridges 

^,?^*, T^^^^'^^^ ^^ going to use prisoners to 
build two concrete bridges, one of which 
will be an overhead railroad crossing and 
the second an undergrade crossing. Both 
spans will be of re-enforced concrete. It is 
an open question whether convicts can make 
good on high-grade work, but West Virginia 
will try the experiment (D 12 '15) 



Camps 

Convict camps in the South. P. St, J. Wilson. 
In Nat. conf. of charities and correction. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 378-85 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
Kentucky — Permitting the use and employ- 
ment of convict labor outside of the walls 
of the penitentiary for the purpose of con- 
structing or reconstructing and maintain- 
ing public roads and bridges and preparing 
material for public roads and bridges, and 
work on the state farm or farms. Consti- 
tutional amendment. Adopted. Yes 81,739 
No 37,855 N '15 

Contract system 
Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Mary- 
land, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Ver- 
mont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, 
and Wyoming still lease the labor of prison- 
ers under the contract system to private 
manufacturers who are interested in finan- 
cial profit, not the welfare of the prisoners. 
In Alabama, Florida, North and South Caro- 
lina, the prisoners are turned over bodily to 
a lessee who works them and maintains 
them as he will (Mr '16) 

* National committee on prisons and prison la- 

bor, Broadway and 116th st., N. Y., issues a 
series of leaflets on various phases of prison 
problems. V. 1, no. 3, June, 1915, gives a list 
of prison contracts during 1915, by states 
Rhode Island supreme court held, Jan. 25. 1916, 
that the provision for the leasing of convict 
labor is not in violation of the constitutional 
inhibition against slavery; that the term 
"slavery" as used in the constitution and the 
earlier statutes implies African slavery, and 
denotes that civil relation in which one man 
has absolute power over the life, fortune, 
and liberty of another, a slave being a per- 
son wholly subject to the will of another; 
that the employment of a convict upon the 
materials of the contractor does not change 
his condition as a convict into that of a 
slave either of the state or of the contractor 
and such a convict is not entitled to remun- 
eration for his services from the contractor. 
Anderson v. Salant, 96 A 425 

Legislation 
Penal legislation of 1915 in Pennsylvania. 
A. H. Votaw. J Crim Law 7:124-7 My '16 

Legislation, Comparat^ive 
New legislation relating to convict labor. 

Monthly R v 1 no 6 p 41-3 D '15 
[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] 

prison labor. Am Labor Leg R 5:754-5 D '15 

Reports 

* Employment and compensation of prisoners in 

Pennsylvania: report of the penal comm. 
appointed under authority of an act approved 
July 25, 1915. 112p '15 Pa. leg. ref. bur. 

Recommends employment under the state- 
use system, purchase of a moderate sized 
farm to be used in connection with Eastern 
penitentiary, opportunity for the counties 
to employ the inmates of the jails, work- 
houses, houses of correction, etc., in the pro- 
duction of goods for the use of county in- 
stitutions or the inmates thereof, creation 
of six industrial farms for misdemeanants 
and the employment and compensation of 
the inmates, modification of the existing 
wage system. Report contains tables giving 
data relative to organization of state-use 
system, and prisoners' wages, in state and 
local institutions in the various states 

Roads 

California highway commission asserts that 
the experiment of placing convicts on road 
work has proved a success. There are no 
firearms in evidence in the camps or on the 
work, and the men are not guarded. No 
precautions are taken against escape and 
only four attempts to escape have been made. 
The men are well housed and fed, and are 
provided with all sorts of games and read- 
ing matter. Sanitary conditions accord with 
the regulations of the state housing and 
immigration comm. Punishment is admin- 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



65 



Convict labor — Koads— Continued 

istered only by the men being returned to 
priaon and privileges withdrawn. In return 
for proper consideration and liumane treat- 
ment honest effort on their part is demanded 
(F 12 '16) 

* Honor men and good roads everywhere. 2d ed 

8p il Nat. com. on prisons and prison labor, 
Broadway and 116th st., N. Y. 

Reprinted, with some additions, from Pro- 
ceedings of the Academy of Political Science, 
January, 1914, under the title Good roads and 
convict labor. Contains: Foreword to a fore- 
word, by E. S. Whitin; Foreword, by C: H: 
Davis 

Illinois — Warden Zimmer of the state peniten- 
tiary reports great success in convict road 
work. Five camps have been established in 
Illinois and worked without friction. Success 
of the plan depends upon the selection of 
officers capable of supervising the camp and 
having charge of the prisoners. Fifty prison- 
ers are to work in and around the new epilep- 
tic colony in Illinois this summer on grad- 
ing and road building (Ap 15 '16) 

Kansas municipalities are now allowed to hire 
prisoners for road work. Warden Codding of 
the state penitentiary is organizing the work. 
One day out of every three is allowed off 
the sentence of every prisoner for faithful 
labor on public roads. The municipality for 
which the work is done pays the state $1 
a day per prisoner; about 50c is used in 
feeding and caring for him, the rest is paid 
to him or to his family (F 19 '16) 

Making roads and men: modern methods that 
are a double benefit to the public. O. R. 
Geyer. il Sci Am S 81:408-9 Je 24 '16 

* National good roads board of the American 

automobile assn. has sent out for the Nat. 
com. on prisons a sheet concerning the law 
passed by the 1916 legislature in Kentucky 
providing for the utilization of convict labor 
in the construction of roads and bridges. 
Ip '16 The Assn., Riggs bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 

* Results of state prison labor in Kanawha 

county, p. J. Walsh, engineer and general 
superintendent, road construction, Kanawha 
county, W. Va. 4p 16 (Typew) P. J. Walsh, 
Charleston, W. Va. 

Read before the School of good roads Jan. 
13. 1916 

* Utilization of short-term convicts for highwav 

work in Georgia. J. L. Stanford. 7p Nat. 
com. on prisons and prison labor, Broadway 
and 116th st, N. Y. 

Reprinted from Better Roads and Streets, 
Dayton, O., March, 1915 
Wisconsin state bd. of control has offered to 
provide counties and towns with convict 
labor at $1.50 per 10 hour day; if this is not 
satisfactory to the counties, the bd. will take 
contracts for construction of highways at 
a lower price per yard than another con- 
tractor could take it. Some counties consider 
that to accept would be unfair to other 
laborers (O 12 '15) 

* Working convicts on the public roads of Ala- 

bama. W. S. Keller. (Bui no 9) lip il Je '15 
Ala. highway dept., Montgomery, Ala. 

Statistics 

* Total expenditure on Maiden road by prison 

labor, Aug. 11, 1914, to June 1, 1915. Meas- 
ured quantities on Maiden road by prison 
labor, Aug. 1, 1914, to June 1, 1915. P. J. 
Walsh, comp. 4p (Typew) Charleston. W. 
Va. 

Sale of products 
Bills were introduced in congress that, if 
passed, would have practically prohibited 
transportation of penitentiary products in in- 
terstate commerce. One bill made such 
goods subject to the restrictive laws in force 
in the state to which they are shipped. 
Prison authorities protest that legislation re- 
stricting shipment would seriously complicate 
the problem of managing: prisons, would 
make it almost impossible to keep convicts 
at work, would increase very much the ex- 
pense of the institutions, and would, almost 
at one blow put an end to the efforts at in- 
dustrial and intellectual betterment of pris- 



oners. Bill was considered by the committee 
on education and labor of the senate and 
favorably reported, going upon the senate 
calendar Ap 22, '16 
Cook county, III. Adult probation office 

Report, 1912-1913. postage 3c. Chicago munic. 
ref. lib. (Probation — Adults — Reports) 
Cooperation 

Cooperation in the U. S. C. W. Perky. In- 
tercollegiate Socialist (70 5th av., N. Y.) v4 
no 4 section 1 p 16-23 Ap-My '16 10c 

Co-operative movement in India. R. B. 
Ewbank. Quar Review (249 W. 13th St., N. 
Y.) no 447 p 368-82 Ap '16 .$1.25 

Remarkable growth of co-operation among the 
peasants of India. Econ World n s 12:240-1 
Ag 19 '16 

Republished from the Economist of Lon- 
don, July 22, 1916 

See also Agricultural credit; Credit unions; 
Farmers' cooperative movements; names be- 
ginning Cooperative 

Conferences 

Third annual Babson conference on coopera- 
tion. Wellesley Hills, Mass.. Sept. 13-15, 1916. 
All speakers were men with practical ex- 
perience either with progressive plans for 
cooperation between employer and employee, 
or with the open price plan and other ad- 
vanced forms of cooperation between com- 
petitors 

Periodicals 

Better Business (96 Middle Abbey st., Dublin 
*ls) is a quarterly journal of agricultural 
and industrial cooperation edited at the Co- 
operative reference library, Dublin. The 
January, 1916, issue is the second which has 
appeared. It contains: Dublin consumers, 
high prices, and co-operation; Co-operative 
movement in Finland; An American estimate 
of agricultural co-operation in Ireland, by 
C: A. Lyman; University co-operative socie- 
ties, by W: J. O'Bryan; Economic advantages 
of agricultural co-operation, by L. C. Staples; 
Small husbandry for urban dwellers, by 
T. K. Hackett; Co-operative unions among 
Jewish colonists in Canada, by H. Michell; 
Notes on Danish agriculture, by J. J. Dunne; 
Relation of producer to consumer in co-oper- 
ation 
Cooperative banks 

Co-operative banking agencies. In H. G. 
Moulton. Principles of money and banking, 
p 338-62 '16 

Contains articles on the following topics: 
The loan sharks; Co-operative institutions; 
Building and loan associations 
Cooperative creameries 

California — Managers of cooperative creameries 
in the vicinity of Los Angeles have formed 
an organization, with the object of organiz- 
ing a better system of marketing their but- 
ter and pushing into new marketing chan- 
nels. They have found that in marketing 
their product thru commissions and other 
wholesale firms, that they are at a disad- 
vantage with the large centralized creameries 
(Ag '16) 

Cooperative students' creamery has been suc- 
cessfully operated in th« Central high school 
at Duluth, Minn., with an appropriation of 
$150. A suitable creamery outfit was pur- 
chased and the students in the agricultural 
courses have had practical experience in 
purchasing, manufacturing and marketing 
creamery products (.11 '16) 
Cooperative credit. See Credit unions 
Cooperative dairying 

Cooperative dairy societies in Great Britain. 
For Agric InteHigence Bui (Canada dept. of 
agric, Ottawa) 6:461-8 Je '16 

Denmark — Cooperative dairies deal with 77 per 
cent of all the milk produced and re- 
presented in 1913 an investment of some 
$10,720,000. The average number of milk pro- 
ducers per dairy in that year was 157, and 
the number of cows 958, A number of co- 
operative societies have been organized for 
the exportation of butter, each composed of 
federated dairies which undertake to sell 
their butter thru the medium of their 
particular export society. At present there 



66 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Cooperative dairying— Continued 

are seven such in different sections of the 
country; these include 275 dairies and have 
an annual turnover of about $11,524,000. One 
hundred and seventy-five dairies united in 
1901 for the cooperative purchase of indus- 
trial machines and apparatus, and the an- 
nual expenditure of this purchasing society, 
which now includes 851 dairies, is about 
$589,600. Half of this amount is spent on 
dairy machinery and appliances (Mr '16) 

Cooperative garages. See Garages, Cooperative 

Cooperative housing 
Financing English housing. J: Ihlder. il Am 
City 13:291-8 O '15 

Cooperative laundries 

♦ Chatfield cooperative laundry. lOp il postage 

Ic '14 C. J. Manahan, sec, Chatfield asso- 
ciated schools, Chatfield, Minn. 
Cooperative live stock associations 

♦ Cooperative livestock shipping associations in 

Minnesota. E. D. Durand. Univ of Minn 
Agric Exp Sta Bui no 156 29p F '16 Univ. 
farm, St, Paul 
Cooperative live stock breeding 

Cooperation in live stock breeding. W. H. 
Tomhave. Practical Farmer (117-21 N. 7th 
St., Philadelphia oOc a year) 112:307, 318-19 
Ag 15 '16 
Cooperative marketing 

Cooperative marketing of milk. R. B. Swift. 
Breeder's Gazette (Sanders pub. co., 542 
Dearborn St., Chicago $1 a year) 70:198 Ag 
10 '16 

Rural cooperation and cooperative marketing 
in Ohio, 1913. C. F. Taeusch. Ohio Agric 
Exp Sta Circ no 141 17-39p D 15 '13 Agri- 
cultural experiment station, Wooster, O. 

See also Farmers' cooperative movements; 
Marketing 

Fruit 

Co-operation in fruit growing as practiced in 
Nova Scotia. W. H, Woodworth. il In Mass. 
Bd. of agriculture. 62d annual report, 1914, 
p 38-58 '15 

—Same. Mass State Bd of Agric Circ no 40 14p 
Ja '15 

♦ Successful marketing: experience and methods 

of the East Texas fruit and truck growers' 
assn. at Jacksonville, Texas. H. M, Eliot. 
14p My '15 Extension service, A. & M. col- 
lege. College station, Texas 

Laws 

Texas— Warehouse and marketing law passed 
by second called session, 33d legislature. 
(H B no 4) 77p '15 Texas permanent ware- 
house dept. 
Cooperative stores 
Co-operative stores. N. O. Nelson. Outlook 112: 

395-7 F 16 '16 
"Work of the Montclair cooperative store. 
E. P. Harris. In Nat. conf. on marketing 
and farm credits. Marketing and farm 
credits, p 497-503 '15 
Co-partnership. See Profit sharing 
Corporation schools 
Corporation schools: how ninety-three big 
American corporations are meeting the need 
for better mechanics, clerks, and salesmen. 
World's Work 31:417-20 F '16 
Educational work of New York Edison com- 
pany: lecture and laboratory classes to de- 
velop the larger usefulness of technical, 
accountmg and commercial employees, con- 
ducted by the company and by the employees 
themselves, il Elec W 67:979-81 Ap 29 *16 
See also Department store education 
Conferences 
National assn. of corporation schools. Fourth 
annual convention, Pittsburgh, Pa., May 30- 
June 2. 1916. F. C. Henderschott. executive 
sec, Irvmg place at 15th st., N. Y. 
Corporations 

See also Monopolies; Public utilities 
Charters 
Canada— British privy council has reversed the 
decision of the supreme court of Canada as 
to Dominion and provincial corporations, 



holding that a provincial charter in itself 
was sufficient for a company to conduct 
business in a province. The Canadian gov- 
ernment took the stand that a company in- 
corporated by one province had no right to 
do business in another without taking out a 
Dominion charter (F 28 '16) 

Reports 

* National assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 

A. Com. on interstate commerce and fed- 
eral incorporation. RejJort presented at the 
21st annual meeting, New York, May, 1916. 
3p '16 The Assn., 30 Church st., N. Y. 

Laws 

* Connecticut — Corporation laws revised August 

1, 1915. 72p '15 Conn, state lib. 
■* North Carolina — Corporation law: revisal of 
1905, chapter 21, as amended by public laws 
1907-1915. 63p '15 N. C. sec. of state 

* Oregon — Corporation laws. Ore. corporation 

comr. 177p '15 Oregon state lib. 

Furnished only on exchange accounts 
■* Wyoming— Corporation laws. 159p '15 Wyo. 
sec. of state 

Legislation, Proposed 
Uruguaj^ — Bill providing for government in- 
spection of foreign and domestic corporations 
has been recommended by the president of 
Uruguay. Under the proposed law, as pub- 
lished in the Diario Official of May 5, 1916, 
all corporations as well as branches and 
agencies of corporations established in Uru- 
guay must show that their capital stock is 
fully subscribed, with at least 25 per cent 
paid in, and the amount deposited in the 
bank of the republic 

Legislation, Uniform 
Report of the committee on uniform incor- 
poration law. In Nat. conference of comrs. 
on uniform state laws. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 179-200 

Contains drafts of proposed laws to make 
uniform the law of business corporations and 
defining qualifications of foreign corpora- 
tions to do business in other states 

Regulation 
Uniform corporation laws. In Assn. of Am. 
secretaries of states. Proceedings, 1915, p 14- 
15 

Regulation, Federal 
See Trade commission. Federal 

Taxation 

Franchise and minimum tax on domestic cor- 
porations. In Rhode Island. Bd. of tax 
comrs. Fourth annual report, 1916, p 80-3 

Gives text of a proposed amendment to 
provide for such taxes 

Some forms of corporate taxation found in 
other states. In N. Y. (state). Joint legis- 
lative com. on taxation. Report, p 150-60 
'16 

See also Federal public utilities — Taxa- 
tion; Income tax 

Voting trust agreements 

* Voting trusts: a chapter in recent corporate 

history. H. A. Cushing. 226p $1.50 '15 Mac- 
millan 

Contains: Significance of voting trusts: 
Contents of voting trusts; Law of voting: 
trusts; Forms relating to voting trusts 
Corporations, Foreign 

See also Insurance — Foreign corporations 

Legislation, Comparative 

* United States. Comr. of corporations. Report 

on state laws concerning foreign corpora- 
tions. 238p Mr 15 '15 

Pt. 1, Constitutional and statutory pro- 
visions of the states; Pt. 2, Federal consti- 
tutional limitations. Relates chiefiy to the 
constitutional and statutory provisions of 
the several states imposing conditions pre- 
cedent to the right of a corporation to do 
business in states other than the state creat- 
ing it, and also the provisions which such a 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



67 



Corporations, Foreign — Legislation — Continued 
corporation must observe in order to con- 
tinue to do business therein. Business cor- 
porations only are covered by this report 

Taxation 

Taxation of foreign corporations. In N. Y. 
(state). Joint legislative com. on taxation. 
Report, p 103-16 '16 

Transfer of suits 

Wisconsin — U. S. supreme court. May 22, 1916, 
annulled as unconstitutional the Wisconsin 
statute making it the duty of state officials 
to revoke the license to do business in the 
state of any foreign corporation which shall 
remove into any federal court any action 
against it by any citizen of the state upon 
any claim or cause of action arising within 
the state; held that it was enough to say 
that it was impossible for a state to legis- 
late to deprive a foreign corporation doing 
both intrastate and interstate commerce of 
the privilege of removing cases to the fed- 
eral courts. Philadelphia and Reading coal 
and iron company and Western union tele- 
graph company v. State of Wisconsin 

Corrupt practices 

Graft prosecutions: 1914-1915. A. M. Holden. 
Nat Munic R 4:572-86 O '15 

Takes up the question by cities; election 
frauds stand out pre-eminent in number and 
in seriousness 

* Reclaiming the ballot. Ward Macauley. 109p 

*75c '16 DufReld and company, N. Y. 

Terre Haute election trial. S. C. Stimson. 
Nat Munic R 5:38-46 Ja '16 

Wisconsin supreme court has held the clause 
to be void in the corrupt practice act which 
is designed to prevent citizens from circu- 
lating pamphlets and making appeals thru 
the newspapers in counties outside their 
habitat for political purposes, in that it is 
calculated to deprive citizens of Wisconsin 
of their constitutional right to speak and 
write freely upon public questions. State of 
AVisconsin v. C: E. Pierce of Janesville (Je 
13 '16) 

&ee also Municipal government — Corruption 

Reports 

* Honest ballot assn,, inc. Report, Jan. 1, 1914- 

Dec. 31, 1915. 19p '16 The Assn., 18 W. 34th 
St.. N. Y. 

Cost accounting 
Importance of true cost. R. B. Belt. J Account 
22:28-34 Jl '16 

Address at the annual meeting of the 
North Carolina pine assn., Norfolk, Va., 1916 

* Principles and practice of cost accounting for 

accountants, manufacturers, mechanical en- 
gineers, teachers and students. F: H. 
Baugh. 194p '15 $3 Frederick H. Baugh, P. O. 
box 682, Baltimore 

Explains the general principles upon which 
cost accounting for manufactured articles 
is based, the application of these principles 
in a general manner to the most common 
types of manufacture and the illustration of 
the details 

See also Foundry accounting; Municipal 
accounting; Power cost 

Cost of living 

Comparison of food cost per family per day 
for two days: New York, 1909, and Spring- 
field, 1913. In F. H. McLean. Charities of 
Springfield, lU., p 173 '15 

* Cost of living. Fabian Franklin. 162p *$1 '15 

Doubleday 

Object of the book is to promote clear 
thinking and to point out some fundamental 
truths relating to money and prices. It 
discusses the rise of prices in the last eigh- 
teen years, the distinction between prices 
and cost, the rise of standards of living, the 
era of low prices that preceded the present 
high-price period, the effect of the war on 
the cost of living, and other topics in which 
straight thinking is valuable to the per- 
plexed wage- earner 



Cost of living in New York state. F. H. 
Streightoff. In N. Y. (state). Factorjr in- 
vestigating comm. Fourth report, 1915. v 4 
p 1461-1844 

Contains: Cost of living to the single 
woman; Cost of living to men living inde- 
pendently; Cost of livmg for a normal fam- 
ily; Living on six dollars a week; How the 
working girl of N. Y. lives; Replies to let- 
ters of inquiry concerning the cost of liv- 
ing; Supplementary tables; A study of 
families 

* Cost of living of working women in Ohio. 

(Dept of investigation and statistics rept no 
14) 255p '15 Ohio industrial comm. 

Summary tables: 1. General summary of 
164 annual budgets, by cities; 2. General 
summary of 164 annual budgets, by mode of 
living; 3. General summary of 164 annual 
budgets, by occupation; 4. Expenditures for 
clothing as reported on 164 annual budgets, 
by cities; 5. Expenditures for clothing as 
reported on 164 annual budgets, by occupa- 
tion; 6. Expenditures per week as reported 
on 208 daily accounts, by city, mode of liv- 
ing, and occupation. Two considerations 
were responsible for the investigation: public 
interest in the question as to what effect, if 
any, the increase in the cost of living has 
had on the standards of living of wage earn- 
ers; and, the possibility that in the near 
future an effort will be made to provide a 
legal minimum wage at least for women em- 
ployees in Ohio 
Muckers. W: H. Matthews. Survey 35:5-8 O 2 
'15 

Discusses low wages paid to the laborers 
constructing the N. Y. subway 

* New York (city). Bur. of standards. Report on 

the cost of living for an unskilled laborer's 
family in New York city, submitted to the 
committee on salaries and grades of the 
board of estimate and apportionment, sup- 
porting the salary recommendations for posi- 
tions in the lowest grades of the street 
cleaning specifications and for other positions 
as unskilled laborers throughout the city 
service. 57p '15 

Appendixes contain: Bibliography and di- 
gest of more important literature; List of 
persons interviewed: Field report: sup- 
porting data on food, clothing, rent, and 
fuel and light; Selected family budgets sub- 
mitted by public and private organizations- 
or commissions and by individual authori- 
ties; Summary of family budgets submitted 
by members of the uniformed force of the 
department of street cleaning; Excerpts 
from a translation of an official report on the 
salaries of municipal officials in the city of 
Frankfort on the Main, Germany; Letters 
and budget forms used in obtaining sup- 
porting data 
Standard of living: up or down. H: P. Fair- 
child. Am Econ R 6:9-25 Mr '16 

See also Minimum wage; Prices; Wages; 
Women — Employment — Cost of living 

Cotton 

* Community production of Durango cotton in 

the Imperial valley. Argyle McLachlan, U S 
Dept Agric Bui no 324 16p D 22 '15 

* Community production of Egyptian cotton in 

the U. S. C. S. Scofield and others. U S 
Dept Agric Bui no 332 30p Ja 13 '16 

* Cotton production and distribution, season of 

1914-15. U S Bur Census Bui no 131 102p il 
'15 

Statistics 

* Cotton production in the U. S., crop of 1915.. 

28p tables '16 U. S. bur. of the census 

Warehouses 

Proceedings of the financing committee of the 
warehouse and marketing associations. 9p- 
'16 Warehouse and marketing dept., Austin, 
Texas 

Texas supreme court has handed down a de- 
cision holding valid the gin sampling provis- 
ion of the state warehouse law. It is ex- 
pected that this decision wiU prove of much 
value to the farmers in that the warehouse 
system can be perfected, and that farm 
products, especially cotton, will bring higher 
prices in the future (D' 14 '15) 



68 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Cotton — Warehouses— C'oH*//JMe(Z 
Warehousing and standardization of farm 
products. In Nat. conf. on marketing and 
farm credits. Marketing and farm credits, 
p 209-41 '15 

Contains papers on: State warehousing 
and cotton, by Clarence Ousley; Adminis- 
tration of Texas law, by F: W. Davis; 
Work of farmers' union, by J. E. Edmund- 
son; Warehousing and price of cotton, by 
E. M. Loeb 

Laws 

* Texas— Warehouse and marketing law passed 

by second called session, 33d legislature. 
(H B no 4) 77p '15 Texas permanent ware- 
house dept. 

Cotton industry ^ ., ,, 

Child in the cotton mill. (Pam 260) lOp il Mr 
'16 Nat. child labor com., 105 E. 22d St., 
N. Y. 

* Cotton-spinning machinery industry: report on 

the cost of production of cotton-spinning 
machinery in the United States. U S Bur 
For & Dom Com (Misc ser no 37) 99p '16 

Other side of the cotton mill. Kingsley Moses. 
Outlook 113:977-84 Ag 23 '16 

W^ages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen 
and silk industries, 1907-1914. U S Bur Labor 
Statistics Bui no 190 (Wages and hours of 
labor ser no 21) 241p My '16 

Conferences 

National association of cotton manufacturers. 
Convention papers and addresses, il Textile 
World J (377 Broadway, N. Y., $3 a year) 
51:71-109, 135-7 Ap 29 '16 

Contains the following addresses: [Nation- 
alism], by President Duncan; Reconstruction 
in dyeing, by E. S. Chapin; Indigo phase of 
dyestuf^ situation, by L. W. Cronkhite; Re- 
lation of New England agriculture to manu- 
facturing, by K. L. Butterfield; Calico print- 
ing: its origin and development, by Robert 
Reoch; Cotton of ancient Peru, by M. D. 
Crawford; Boiler code of American society 
of mechanical engineers, by S. F. Jeter; Cot- 
ton handling in southern warehouses, by 
J: R. Fordyce; Does the comber remove 
short fibers? by W: E. Hatch and William 
Smith; Foreign commerce in American tex- 
tiles, by F. A. Vanderlip; Tire fabric and 
other testing requirements, by W: D. Harts- 
horne; Theory and practice in cotton mill 
lighting, by Ward Harrison; Comparative 
tests on amount of moisture in cotton, by 
R. E. Naumburg 

National assn. of cotton manufacturers held 
its autumn convention at the Hotel Griswold, 
near New London, Conn., Sept. 9-11, 19.15. 
A summary of the proceedings is published 
in Textile World Record (144 Congress St., 
Boston $2) for Sept. 1915; also the following 
addresses: President's address; Methods of 
determining length of cotton staple and 
illustrations of their application, by N. A. 
Cobb; Address of J: W. Weeks: Some labor 
problems, by C: G. Bancroft; Prevention of 
accidents in cotton mills, by John Calder; 
Are the textile schools doing all that should 
be expected of them, by A. N. Sheldon; 
Cooling ponds for condensing engines, by 
L. H. Parker; Ball bearings for cotton mills, 
by E. A. Allen; Development of the use of 
natural dyestuffs, by E: S. Chapin; Scarcity 
. of dyes and chemicals during the present 
war, by I. V. S. Stanislaus; Purchasing 
atnd storing of materials and supplies for 
cotton mills, by H. B. Twyford 

Councils. See Municipal councils 
Counties 

See also entries beginning County 

Legislative representation 

Massachusetts supreme court declared, Sept. 8, 
1916, that the redistricting of Suffolk county, 
for the legislature as made by the appor- 
tionment commission was mill and void. 
Court ordered that a new apportionment be 
made which should be more nearly in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the consti- 
tution (Press rept S 14 '16) 



Country life 

* Community welfare in Kansas. Walter Burr. 

il Kan State Agric College Exten Bui no 4 
34p O '15 Div. of college extension, Kan. 
state agric. college, Manhattan 

* Country life week at the Ohio state university, 

August 2-6, 1915. Ohio State Univ Bui v 20 
no 6 70p O '15 Ohio state univ., Columbus 

Rural recreation, by W. K. Tate; Organizing 
the neighborhood for recreation, by L. F. 
Hanmer. In Nat. conf. of charities and 
correction. Proceedings, 1915, p 65-77 

Shall extension service include the social, 
recreational and educational improvement of 
rural and urban districts. W. D. Hurd. In 
Assn. of Am. agric. colleges and exper. sta- 
tions. Proceedings, 1915, p 232-41 

* Social anatomy of an agricultural community. 

C. J. Galpin. maps Univ of Wis Agric Exp 
Sta Research Bui no 34 34p My '15 

* Solving country life problems in Massachu- 

setts. J. M. Andress, 4p J. Mace Andress, 
State normal school, Worcester, Mass. 
Reprinted from October Education 
See also Church and social problems; 
Farmhouses; Social surveys — Rural commu- 
nities 

Bibliography 

* Bibliography on country life, the farm and the 

small town. Indiana State Lib Q v 10 no 4 
lip D '15 

Conferences 

Better living for Southern mountaineers. Sur- 
vey 36:92-3 Ap 22 '16 

Relates to 4th annual Conference of south- 
ern mountain workers held at Knoxville, 
Tenn. 

Country life conference of delegates from 
Pennsylvania^ New Jersey, Delaware and 
Maryland, Philadelphia, Feb. 7-10, 1916. A 
resolution was adopted providing for a com- 
mittee ot nine to lead a movement to unite 
all associations for the betterment of coun- 
try conditions. Other resolutions urged the 
vitalization of the country church as a 
means to progress, encouragement of all 
forms of entertainments and sports in the 
rural community, state payment of transpor- 
tation for pupils in consolidated schools, the 
enactment of legislation to supervise the 
care of children placed in rural sections by 
charitable organizations. Pennsylvania will 
be asked by the conference for an appropria- 
tion to place libraries in rural schools, while 
the federal government will be asked for aid 
in road building 

Surveys 

* Rural survey of Morgan county, Missouri. 11 

Mo Bd Agric Bui v 14 no 2 51p F '16 
Country planning 

* Country planning. F. A. Waugh. Am Civic 

Assn (ser 2 no 8) 13p 25c Ja '16 The Assn., 
914 Union trust bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Address delivered at the 11th annual con- 
vention of the Am. civic assn., Washington, 

D. C, Dec. 31, 1915 

Landscape demonstrations being introduced in 
rural districts of Indiana, ten counties in- 
cluded. E. T. Demaree.il J Educ 83:727 Je 29 
'16 
County accounting. See Uniform accounting 
County agents. See Demonstration work in agri- 
culture— (bounty agents 
County and city 

Schenectady's city-county plan. Benedict Hat- 
maker. In N. Y. constitutional convention 
comm., comp. County government, p 77-9 '15 

Bibliography 
Relations of city and county. J« W: B. Munro. 
Bibliography of municipal government in the 
U. S., p 71-3 '15 
County auditors 

County auditor: with discussion. G: S. Buck. 
In N. Y. constitutional convention comm., 
comp. County government, p 37-45 '15 
County budget. See Budget, County 
County charities. See Charities, County 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



69 



County charters 

See also County home rule 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
California — County charters: Present section 
unchanged except as follows: such charters 
may provide for election, appointment and 
tenure of all county officers, number of jus- 
tices, constables and officers of inferior 
courts, qualifications of all such officers, if 
appointed, assignment to new officers of 
certain functions of certain officers, delega- 
tion to executive committee of supervisors 
of certain administrative functions, and 
creation of additional boards and offices; 
determines tenure of elective officers in of- 
fice on approval of charter; validates char- 
ters and amendments adopted under present 
section. Constitutional amendment. Rejected. 
Yes 85,571 No 152,697 O '15 

County courts. See Courts, County 

County demonstration farms. See Demonstration 
work in agriculture — County demonstration 
farms 

County farm bureaus 
Southern Rhode Island farm bureau. Constitu- 
tion, adopted July 22, 1915. 8p '15 Southern 
R. I. farm bur., Lafayette, R. I. 

County finance 

* Massachusetts; Controller of county accounts. 

Estimates of county receipts and expendi- 
tures for the year ending Dec. 31, 1916. 
(House no 1658) 36p postage Ic '16 Mass. 
supt. of doc. 
Statistical tables relative to county finance. 
In N. Y. constitutional convention comm., 
comp. County government, p 243-613 '15 

Sre also Budget, County; Deposits and de- 
positories 

County government 

Alabama— W. K. Terry, counsel for the Jef- 
ferson county bd. of revenue, has rendered 
an opinion declaring the act of the legisla- 
ture requiring the board to establish 
branches of all county offices in Bessemer 
to be invalid, on the ground that it would 
in effect create a new county. The act was 
a compromise in the fight for Peltus county 
of which it was planned to have Bessemer 
the county seat. A court contest by Bes- 
semer people is expected (O 1 '15) 

* County government: [papers, reports and sta- 
- tistical tables]. N. Y. constitutional conven- 
tion comm., comp. 613p charts '15 Frederick 
D. Colson, sec. Constitutional convention 
comm.. State lib., Albany 

Pt. 1, Papers on special topics; pt. 2, Or- 
ganization of Westchester county; pt. 3, 
Expenses of education; pt. 4, County finance 

Government of Monroe county, N. Y. (in- 
cluding town government) : description of 
organization and functions. In N. Y. con- 
stitutional convention comm., comp. City 
and county government: special reports, 1- 
60p '15 

Government of Nassau county, N. Y. : descrip- 
tion of organization and functions. In N. Y. 
constitutional convention comm., comp. City 
and county government: special reports, 1- 
103p '15 

Movement for responsible county government. 
H. S. Gilbertson. Ann Am Acad 64:116-21 
Mr '16 

New York county government association has 
prepared a legislative program which would 
confer upon counties the right of self-gov- 
ernment. Proposed amendments authorize 
the legislature to provide several plans of 
county government suitable to the different 
types into which the counties may be classi- 
fied, and any county will be permitted, by 
popular election, either to choose one of 
such optional forms or to remain under its 
present system; a county having adopted 
one of the optional plans would have author- 
ity to supersede any special state law pre- 
viously passed which did not extend to laws 
applicable to all counties and was not 
passed to provide necesary uniformity of 
organization and system. One measure 
authorizes the board of supervisors to em- 
ploy a county manager, who would appoint 
all officers and subordinates except those 



elective under the constitution. Another 
provision would enable counties to transfer 
administrative functions from towns to 
counties or from counties to towns (My 6 
•16) 

Program of county government reform. R: S. 
Childs. Am City (T and G ed) 14:337-40 Ap 
'16 

Ramshackle county government. R: S. Childs. 
Outlook 113:39-45 My 3 '16 
• Study of county government within the city 
of New York and a plan for its reorganiza- 
tion; prepared for the constitutional con- 
vention, 1915, by the comr. of accounts and 
the city chamberlain of N. Y. city. 91p charts 
tables Ag 13 '15 Comr. of accounts, N. Y. 

Conferences 

Conference for better county government in 
New York state. Papers read at the first 
conference, held at Schenectady, N. Y., Nov. 
13-14, 1914. In N. Y. constitutional conven- 
tion comm., comp. County government, p 3-79 
'15 

Contains the following papers: Address of 
welcome, by C. A. Richmond; Some needs 
to be considered in reconstructing county 
government, by O. G. Cartwright; Adminis- 
tration of county charities, by V. E. Macy; 
Taxation and county government in New- 
York state, by H: J. Cookinham; The county 
auditor, by G: S. Buck; The county judi- 
ciary, by Herbert Harley; The sheriff and a 
state constabulary, by Ernest Cawcroft; The 
county manager plan, by R: S. Childs; 
Schenectady's city-county plan, by Benedict 
Hatmaker 

County manager plan 

Alexandria county, Va. — The board of super- 
visors has worked out a plan to appoint a 
county manager or consulting engineer at a 
maximum salary of $2,500 a year, to per- 
form the duties of county surveyor and, in 
addition, to act as adviser to the board in 
matters pertaining to road improvements 
and extensions as well as in other public 
matters of general importance. Strong op- 
position has developed because voters and 
. taxpayers have had no opportunity to be 
heard. At a special meeting of the Alex- 
andria county civic federation, resolutions 
were adopted urging that the board take no 
action until the plan had been brought be- 
fore the taxpayers and voters and that it be 
given the widest possible publicity (N 21 '15) 
County manager plan. R: S. Childs. In N. Y. 
constitutional convention pomm., comp. 
County government, p 68-77 '15 
County home rule 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
Maryland — Providing for the creation of char- 
ter boards by the several counties and the 
city of Baltimore and for home rule for 
such counties or for Baltimore as shall 
adopt a charter prepared by such board. 
Constitutional amendment. Adopted. Yes 
50,436 No 25.160 N '15 
County jails. See Jails 
County libraries. See Libraries, County 
County officers 

Sec also names of various officers, as Sher- 
iff 

Terms 
Constitutional amendments, 1915 
Ohio — ^Fixing the terms of all county officers 
at four years, providing for the election, 
quadrennially, and applying the amend- 
ment to incumbents. Constitutional amend- 
ment. Rejected. Yes 207,435 No 604,463 N '15 
County superintendents 

County superintendent proposition. In W. F. 
Doughty. Recommendations regarding public 
education in Texas, p 17-22 

Election 

Kansas supreme court, June 15, 1916, de- 
clared unconstitutional the law which pro- 
vided that the residents of cities of the 
first and second class could not vote for 
county superintendent of schools; held 
that the law was unconstitutional and an 



70 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



County superintendents — Election — Continued 
interference witli the franchise rights. The 
law was passed on the theory that as the 
cities maintain their own school superin- 
tendent and the county superintendent is 
not permitted to interfere in the city schools, 
that the residents of these cities also should 
not interfere with the county superin- 
tendent. S. M. Brewster, attorney general, 
V. John Doane, county clerk 

County taxation 

Taxation and county government in New York 
state. H: J. Cookinham. In N. Y. constitu- 
tional convention comm., comp. County gov- 
ernment, p 27-36 '15 
Westchester county's new special tax law, by 
O. G. Cartwright; Same, by F: P. Close; 
County simplification, by H. J. Cookingham, 
jr.; Discussion, by H, A. Hickman. Jn 
[N. Y.] state conference on taxation. Ad- 
dresses and proceedings, 1915, p 112-52 
Court houses 

Cost of building 
• Tables of comparative accommodations and 
costs of the proposed N. Y. county court 
house and of modern court houses in Eu- 
rope and the U. S. have been compiled, by 
the architects and engineers of the N. Y. 
county court house. Some comparative 
figures, giving number of court rooms in 
building, cost of building and cost per cubic 
foot of court houses of ten European and 
American cities are given in the N Y Even- 
ing Post O 23 '15 
Court officers 

Directories 
Directory. In N. Y. (state). Probation comm. 
Report, 1914, p 441-91 '15 

Contains: Probation officers in New York 
state; Probation association in New York 
state; Directory of magistrates and other 
local officials; Directory of public institu- 
tions: Parole officials 
Courts 
Alabama — Gov. Henderson vetoed the re-clr- 
cuiting bill, thereby rousing much unfavor- 
able comment. Some claim that his action 
leaves Marengo and Lee counties without 
courts, and some of the largest counties with 
only one judge, while some counties will not 
even have a solicitor. Others claim that 
thru the passage of the bill, allowing the 
chief justice of the supreme court to assign 
judges from one circuit to duty in another 
v/here the docket is congested and by the 
passage of the bill permitting the attorney 
general to shift the solicitors around and 
send an assistant attorney general to aid in 
prosecutions, the judicial system can be 
maintained (O 5 '15) 

* Judicial reform in Texas. Univ of Texas Bui 

1916 no 12 39p F 25 '16 

Contains: Reforms in the Texas judiciary, 
by W. H. Kimbrough; Procedural reform in 
Texas, by R. S. Baker; Organization of the 
German judiciary, by G: C. Butte; Proposed 
constitutional amendment 
Louisiana— Times-Picayune (New Orleans), 
May 22, 1916, discusses in an editorial, opin- 
ions of lawyers and bar associations in re- 
gard to early reform of the judiciary 

* New York (city) assn. of the bar. Com. on 

law reform. Annual report for 1915. lip '16 
The Assn., 42 W. 44th St., N. Y. 

Read at the annual meeting of the associa- 
tion, Jan. 11. 1916 
Some aspects of the development of American 
law. C: E. Hughes. In N. Y. state bar 
assn. Proceedings, 1916. p 266-88 

* University of Texas law assn. Report of sub- 

committee on judicial reform. 6p '16 W. H. 
Kimbrough, pres., Amarillo, Tex. 

Part 1 contains suggestions for the imme- 
diate relief of the present overcrowded con- 
dition of the courts; part 2. suggestions that 
would tend to give permanent relief and 
make such changes in the trial court and 
appellate court- procedure that would require 
the constitution to be amended 
University of Texas law association. Special 
meeting, Austin, June 12-14, 1916. The pur- 
pose of the meeting is to consider and for- 
mulate a remedy or a program of remedies 



for existing evils that affect the adminis- 
tration of law thru the courts of Texas. It is 
proposed to consider what changes may 
profitably be made in the judiciary articles 
of the state constitution respecting the num- 
ber and designation of courts, their jurisdic- 
tion, composition and organization, the qual- 
ifications of their judges, their selection, ten- 
ure, compensation, etc.; what statutory 
changes may profitably be made, affecting 
the judiciary system, the trial court pro- 
cedure, and the appellate procedure. W. H. 
Kimbrough, pres., Austin 

See also Administration of justice; Con- 
tempt of court; Criminal procedure; Juvenile 
courts; Procedure; Supreme court of the 
United States; Women — Delinquents — Sepa- 
rate trials 

Bibliography 
Bibliography of organization of courts. Nat 
Economic League Q 1:50-1 D '15 

Judicial review of legislation 

* Back to the constitution. Walter Clark. 

(U S 64th cong 1st sess S doc "308) 13p '16 

Reprinted from v. 3, no. 3, of the Virginia 
Law Review 

Courts and constitutional restrictions. H: H. 
Wilson. Am Legal News (720 Penobscot 
bidg.. Detroit, Mich. $2 a year) 26:15, 17-26 
O '15 

Address delivered by the president of the 
Nebraska bar assn. 

Judicial control of administrative and legisla- 
tive acts in France. J. W. Garner. Am Pol 
Sci R 9:637-65 N '15 

Pan American scientific congress. 2d congress, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 1916. 
Program of section VI: international law, 
public law, and jurisprudence, li.sts the 
following addresses: Relations between the 
judicial and legislative powers, by E. R. 
Pirieres, of Colombia; Same, by Carlos Bravo, 
of Colombia. John Barrett, sec. gen.. Pan 
Arherican union, Washington, D. C. 

See also Supreme court of the United 
States 

Reports 

* New York state bar assn. Com. on the duty 

of courts to refuse to execute statutes in 
contravention of the fundamental law. Sec- 
ond report, presented at the 39th annual 
meeting. New York, Jan. 14-15, 1916. 57p Ja 
'16 Henry A. Forster, 76 William St., N. Y. 
Released on presentation of written report 
Jan. 14 or 15, 1916 
— Same. In N. Y. state bar assn. Report, 1916 
p 163-220 '16 

* — Same. (U S 64th Cong 1st sess S doc no 

454) 31p Ja '16 

Laws 

* Alabama — Recess judiciary acts passed by the 

legislature, session 1915. 58p 50c postpaid 
Alabama dept. of archives and history 
Limited number free to cooperators 

Public hearings 

Montana supreme court declared, April 10, 
1916, that it is unconstitutional for a trial 
judge to exclude the public in any criminal 
case, under any pretext whatsoever; held 
that the constitution guarantees every de- 
fendant a public hearing. Louis Keeler v. 
State of Montana (Press rept) 

Unnecessary litigation 

Minority report of the com. on the prevention 
of unnecessary litigation. In N. Y. state 
bar assn. Proceedings, 1916, p 289-95 

* Report of committee on prevention of unnec- 

essary litigation presented at the 39th an- 
nual meeting of the New York state bar 
assn.. held at New York, Jan. 14-15, 1916. 
17p '16 Frederick E. Wadhams, sec, 78 
Chapel St., Albany, N. Y. 

Recommends settlement out of court, in- 
cluding conciliation and arbitration, stricter 
requirements for admission to law, prepara- 
tion of better wills and other legal instru- 
ments, better drafting of laws 
— Same. In N. Y. state bar assn. Proceedings, 
1916, p 251-66 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



71 



Courts, Appellate 

♦ Appellate courts. Cal Commonwealth Club 

Transac v 11 no 2 41-94p lie My '16 • 

Reports and discussions at a club meeting, 
May 17, 1916, to consider a report of a spe- 
cial committee on relief of congestion in 
appellate courts. This committee cooperated 
with the supreme court and a committee of 
the California bar assn. 
Courts, Circuit 

Address on the proposed amendment to in- 
crease the number of judicial circuits in 
Wisconsin. G: B. Hudnall. In Wis. state 
bar assn. Report of proceedings, 1912, 1913, 
1914, p 256-61 '15 

Amendment to the constitution providing' for 
larger circuits and more than one judge 
upon each circuit, A. W. Sanborn. In Wis. 
state bar assn. Report of proceedings, 1912, 
1913, 1914, p 262-9 '15 

Non-jury cases 

Missouri — Under the new system for trying 
cases in the circuit court, two courts are 
set aside for non-jury cases and all pre- 
liminary motions are heard in the chamber 
of the presiding judge and after the prelim- 
inaries have been disposed of the cases are 
assigned to a division. In contrast to this, 
under the old system all courts tried jury 
and non-jury cases. The new plan expedites 
litigation to such an extent that the eight 
judges try an average of 40 cases a month 
more than under the former system (D 16 
'15) 

Procedure 

♦ St. Louis, Mo. Rules of practice of the cir- 

cuit court in force from Sept. 6, 1915. 36p 
'15 St. Louis munic. ref. lib. 
Courts, Conciliation 

Chicago, 111. — Municipal court is to open a 
branch to be devoted exclusively to the 
settling, thru arbitration, of civil suits in- 
volving money and property. Litigants who 
agree to arbitrate their differences will se- 
lect a board of arbitration to decide accord- 
ing to the evidence, but if no settlement is 
reached, the judge of the court will give the 
decision (Ap 21 '16) 

♦ Conciliation branch of the municipal court of 

Cleveland. P. R. White. Legal Aid R (239 
Broadway, N. Y.) 13:1-4 O '15 

Discussion on resolution relative to appoint- 
ment of commissioner on conciliation; adop- 
tion of resolution relative to appointment of 
commissioner on conciliation. In N. Y. state 
bar assn. Proceedings, 1916, p 295-310 

Tribunals of conciliation. J: B. Winslow. In 
Wis. state bar assn. Report of proceedings, 
1912, 1913, 1914, p 206-28 '15 

Tribunals referred to are local courts 
whose function is to try to reconcile parties 
at law 
Courts, County 

County judiciary. Herbert Harley. In N. Y. 
constitutional convention comm., comp. 
County government, p 46-60 '15 
Courts, Domestic relations 

Court of domestic relations [of Chicago!. J. Z. 
Uhlir, presiding judge, il In Cook county. 111. 
Adult probation office. Report, 1912-1913, p 
13-15 

Cuyahoga county, O. — Conciliation branch In 
the common pleas court has been suggested 
to bring estranged wives and husbands to- 
gether. All persons wishing a divorce 
would be required to bring their case first 
into the conciliation court, where every ef- 
fort would be made by the judge to rec- 
oncile the parties, without the aid of attor- 
neys. It is believed that such a court would 
help greatly in preventing divorce in a large 
number of cases (Ap 5 '16) 

Reports 

Probation department of the domestic rela- 
tion? division. J. D. Rippin. tables In Phila- 
delphia. Pa. Municipal court. Report, 1915, 
p 158-243 '16 

Courts, Federal. See Supreme court of the United 

States 
Courts, Juvenile. See Juvenile courts 



Courts, IVIorals 

Morals court [of Chicago]. J. H. Hopkins, 
presiding judge, il In Cook county, lU. Adult 
probation office. Report, 1912-1913, p 17-19 
This court was organized as an instru- 
ment to assist in the suppression of the so- 
cial evil 
Courts, iVIunicipal 

Chicago, 111. — Amendment to the municipal 
court act, providing that in forcible detainer 
suits service may be had by notification of 
any member of the defendant's family; pro- 
viding also for an increase of salary frohi 
$3,000 to $5,000 for the attorney of the bailiff 
of the court and that the city shall furnish 
the bailiff's defense in all suits, even after 
the expiration of his term of office. Rejected. 
Yes 133,085 No 133,090 Ap 4 '16 

Des Moines, la. — Proposition for the establish- 
ment of a municipal court which will do 
away with the justice and police courts was 
carried by 80 votes in the recent election, 
tne women voting on this issue (D 13 '15) 

Justice in our inferior criminal courts. Charity 
Organization Bui no 105 p 3-23 Ja 5 '16 Char- 
ity organization society, 105 E. 22d st., N. Y. 
Describes the bill of the committee on 
criminal courts, amending generally the in- 
ferior criminal courts act of the city of New 
York, which became a law, May 18, 1915 

* Modern experiment in judicial administration: 

the municipal court of Chicago. Herbert Har- 
ley. 43p Am. judicature soc, 1732 First 
nat. bank bldg., Chicago 

Annual address to the Louisiana state bar 
assn., delivered at New Iberia, May 8, 1915 

* Municipal court of Chicago, a tribunal of pro^ 

cedural reform and social service. Harry Ol- 
son. 15p 16 Hon. Harry Olson, Munic. court, 
Chicago 

Address delivered under the auspices of 
the Associated charities of San Francisco, 
May 10, 1916 

Municipal court of Cleveland. Raymond Mo- 
ley. Nat Munic R 5:452-6 Jl '16 

New York (city) — New magistrate's court 
has been opened to try persons charged 
with breaking the tenement, fire, health 
and license ordinances, a day being reserved 
for each department. A similar court is 
to be opened shortly in Brooklyn (Mr 22 
'16) 

* Second draft of a model act to establish a 

court for a metropolitan district. Am Judica- 
ture Soc Bui IV-B (Bui iv revised) 94p Ja '16 
[Should all municipal courts be established by 
general statute to be adopted or not by each 
county as its needs require? If so, should the 
legislature, county board or census return 
determine the adoption], by C. L. Baldwin; 
Same, by T. H. Ryan. In Wis. state bar 
assn. Report of proceedings, 1912, 1913, 

1914, p 275-92 '15 

See also Women — Delinquents 

Conciliation branch 
See Courts, Conciliation 

Evening sessions 
New York (city) — Night civil court has been 
established as a branch of the municipal 
court, where wage-earners seeking the aid 
of the law in ca.«es involving less than $50 
. can be heard without being obliged to lose a 
day's wages (Je 7 '16) 

Reports 

* Boston, Mass. Municipal court. Report, Dec, 

1915. (Doc 115-1915) 71p '16 

Appendixes contain: Synopsis of decisions 
of appellate division on matters of prac- 
tice; Report of chief probation officer; Re- 
port of the medical and psychological work 
in connection with the probation depart- 
ment of the municipal court of the city of 
Boston 

* New York (city). Court of special sessions. 

Annual report for the year ending Dec. 31, 
1914. 162p '15 
■* Philadelphia, Pa. Municipal court. 1st annual 
report for the year Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1914. 51p 
tables '15 

Contains the act of assembly and the rules 
of the court. The court consists of nine 
judges, elected for ten-year terms, one of 



n 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Courts Municipal— Reports— CoHfrnwerf 

whom is designated by the governor as presi- 
dent judge. It has wide latitude in the for- 
mation of its own rules of practice, and has 
exclusive jurisdiction in juvenile, desertion 
and non-support (domestic relations) cases. 
It also lias all the powers of a court of 
record possessed by the courts of common 
pleas, and of quarter sessions of the Peace 
and Oyer and Terminer of the county of 
Philadelphia, with the exception of specified 
limitations 

• Philadelphia, Pa. Municipal court. 2d annual 

report for the year 1915. 320p '16 

Small claims branch 

/SVe Courts, Conciliation; Courts, Municipal 
— Evening sessions 

Traffic branch 
New York (city) magistrates have decided to 
establish a special court to handle all cases 
dealing with violations of the traffic laws 
(Mr 4 '16^ 

Courts, Small debtors' 

"Poor man's court" needed. W: T. Wheeler. 
In Philadelphia, Pa. Municipal court. Report 
1915, p 33-40 '16 

Courts, Supreme. See Supreme court of the 
United States 

Courts, Traffic 

New York (city) — First traffic court in the 
U. S. has been opened under the direction of 
the board of magistrates of which William 
McAdoo is head. This court will have juris- 
diction over all violations of ordinances gov- 
erning vehicular traffic in the Borough of 
Manhattan. This court will relieve the con- 
gestion in the various police courts, due to 
the growth of motoring and consequent or- 
dinances applying to automobiles and motor 
trucks (Je 12 '16) 

Cow testing 

• Official tests of dairy cows. F. W. Woll and 

C. J. Hill. Cal Univ Agric Exp Sta Circ no 
135 lOp il Ag '15 

Cox, Robert Lynn 
Life insurance investments with special refer- 
ence to farm mortgages. Assn. of life insur- 
ance presidents, 1 Madison av., N. Y. (In- 
surance, Life — Investments) 

Coyotes. See Rabies 

Creameries. See Cooperative creameries 

Credit 
False statement legislation. E. A. Saliers. 
Econ World n s 11:558-9 Ap 29 '16 

* Retail credit and adjustment bureaus: their 

organization and their conduct. C. O. 
Hanes. 43p 50c '15 C. O. Hanes, sec, Re- 
tail merchants' assn., Columbia, Mo. 

Conferences 

* National assn. of credit men. Proceedings of 

the 21st annual convention, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
June 13-16, 1916. il Nat Assn of Credit Men 
Bui 579-864p Ag '16 J. H. Tregoe, sec, 41 
Park Row, N. Y. 

Program includes the following papers: Ef- 
ficient credit man as a power in commerce, 
by P. G. Smith; Our responsibilities to the 
retail merchant, by E. W. McCullough; Econ- 
omy and advantages of the adjustment bu- 
reau in the liquidation of insolvent estates, 
by J: P. Galbraith; Unconscious results, bv 
F. M. Gettys; Effect of greater cooperation 
between credit men in a reduction of the 
bad-debt waste, by Charles Biggs; Patriot- 
ism in business, by W. A. Prendergast; Com- 
mercial mortality: its reason and its preven- 
tion, by H. S. Gaunce; Federal reserve act, 
by C: S. Hamlin; Responsibilities of business 
men for the decrease in the fire waste, by 
I. C. Hoagland; National bankruptcy act in 
prmciple and practice, by J. T. Bartlette; 
Spirit of the courts, by T. W. Shelton; 
Cooperation and industrial preparedness, by 
E. N. Hurley; Some problems of the for- 
warding business from the viewpoint of the 
commercial attorney, by G: W. Carr; Effect 
ot a greater cooperation between credit men 
in a reduction of bad-debt waste, by Charl^^s 
Biggs; Central interchange bureau plan by 
J. W. Chilton 



Credit bureaus 
Report of special committee on credit inter- 
change bureaus; Central interchange bureau,, 
by J. W. Chilton. In Nat. assn of credit men. 
Proceedings, 1916, p 704-14 '16 

Credit unions 
Burma — Cooperative credit societies have re- 
duced the rates of interest, varying from 
48 to 72 per cent, to a uniform charge of 
only 15 per cent. All the credit unions are 
managed by private individuals under gov- 
ernment supervision. Loans are made for 
seed, cultivation expenses, or cattle fodder; 
for purchase of carts or cattle, liquidation 
of small debts, and for house building; for 
liquidation of large debts to nonmembers, 
the acquisition of land, and for the making 
of expensive canals or bunds. The cooper- 
ative movement has been so successfully 
directed and so firmly established that the 
Upper Burma central bank, which finances 
most of the credit societies in the province, 
has hardly been affected by the depression 
resulting from the war (Ap 1 '16) 
Co-operative credit unions. A. H. Ham and 
L. G. Robinson. In H. G. Moulton. Princi- 
ples of money and banking, p 348-53 '16 

* Determining credit: a suggestive method for 

credit committees of credit unions, used by 
the industrial credit union of Boston, Mass. 
R. S. Hale. 8p 5c My '16 Division of reme- 
dial loans, Russell Sage found. 
Movement to organize credit in North Caro- 
lina. W. M. R. Camp. For Agric Intelli- 
gence Bui (Canada dept. of agric, Ottawa) 
6:468-71 Je '16 
—Same. Econ World n s 12:106-8 Jl 22 '16 
North Carolina — Seven credit unions have 
been formed in the state, which will enable 
farmers to make loans that will allow them 
to buy farm implements at the reduced 
price of cash purchases. Mr. E. E. Cul- 
breth has been appointed examiner of 
credit unions (Mr ^ '16) 

* North Carolina credit union. W: R. Camp. 

N C Agric Ext Service Ext Circ no 13 lip Ag 
'16 

* Object of the credit union: a reply to Myron T. 

Herrick. A. H. Ham. lOp 5c Jl '16 Division 
of remedial loans, Russell Sage found. 

Reprinted from the N. Y. Sunday Times, 
May 7, 1916 

See also Agricultural credit: Agricul- 
tural organizations 
Credits 

Taxation 
Five mill tax on moneys and credits in Iowa. 

J: E. Brindley. Q J Econ 30:5.«8-9.-. My '16 
Low rate on intangibles. In N. Y. (state). 
Joint legislative com. on taxation. Report, 
p 170-84 '16 

Discusses experiences of other states 

* Secured debts tax law. 13p '15 Guaranty trust 

CO., N. Y. 

An explanation of the N. Y. law as 
amended 

* Secured debt tax law amendments, 1915. 3p 

N. Y. tax reform assn., 29 Broadway, N. Y. 

Taxation of intangible personal property in 
Maryland; with discussion. A. C Girdwood. 
In [N. Y.] state conference on taxation. 
Addresses and proceedings, 1915, p 259-94 

Virginia supreme court has handed down a 
decision holding that shares of stock of 
banks, banking associations, trust and se- 
curity companies, in the hands of individuals 
domiciled in Virginia, are not taxable. Com- 
monwealth V. J. Jordan Leake (Pre.ss rept 
Mr 26 '16) 

Bihliography 

* List of references on the taxation of intang- 

gible property (with special reference to 
mortgages). U. S. Library of congress. 6p 
Je 22 '16 (Typew Cost of copying 30c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Crime and criminals 

Causes of delinquency and the remedy: with 
discussion. F. H. Briggs. In N. Y. city con- 
ference of charities and correction. Pro- 
ceedings. 1915. p 126-44 '16 

Chicago association of detective sergeants met 
with the anti-crime committee of the Illi- 
nois legislature on May 1, 1916, to give their 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



71 



Crime and criminals— CoH^/»we(Z 

views on crime and criminals. An anti-jost- 
ling- law, mailing- it a misdemeanor to jostle 
persons or touch their clothing with intent 
to rob, was urged as an effective means of 
ridding the city of pickpockets. Court delays 
were blamed for the prevalence of crime; 
complaints were made about the laxity of the 
laws relating- to impersonating policemen; 
and a more stringent vagrancy law was ad- 
vocated 

Chicago's survey of its mental defectives. Sur- 
vey 36:494-5 Ag 12 '16 

Criminal: why is he, and what we do to him. 
G: T. Page. J Crim Law 6:663-71 Ja '16 

* Criminality and economic conditions. W: A. 

Bonger, Tr. by H. P. Horton. (Modern crim- 
inal science ser) 706p bibl *$5.50 '16 Little 

Part one is a critical exposition of the lit- 
erature dealing- with the relation between 
criminality and economic conditions; part 
two discusses the present economic system 
and its consequences, including: present 
economic system, social condition of the dif- 
ferent classes, relation of the sexes and of 
the family, alcoholism and militarism; also 
criminality, including economic crimes, sex- 
ual crimes, crimes from vengeance and 
other motives, political crimes and patho- 
logical crimes 

Feeble minded as criminals. L. E. Bisch. 
New Repub 8:66-7 Ag 19 '16 

Individual delinquent. H. C. Stevens. J Crim 
Law 6:849-59 Mr '16 

A review of The individual delinquent: 
testbook of diagnosis and prognosis for all 
concerned in understanding offenders, by 
William Healy, director of the Psychopathic 
institute. Juvenile court, Chicago 

Probation and parole in their relation to crime. 
T: M. Kilbride. J Crim Law 7:173-85 Jl '16 

Propensity to crime. Ignacio Villamor. J Crim 
Law 6:729-45 Ja '16 

* Real jail problem. Edith Abbott. 8p '15 Ju- 

venile protective assn., 816 S. Halsted st., 
Chicago 

Maintains that the real problem is not 
so much a question of the jail building as 
of the prisoners, and that most of the 
prisoners are there because they are too 
poor to furnish bail or pay fines. Recom- 
mends probation 
Some fallacies about crime. Unpopular Re- 
view (35 W. 32d St., N. Y.) 6:116-31 Jl-S '16 
75c 
State conference of social agencies in session 
in Los Angeles, Cal., May. 1916. Speaking on 
Disease and crime: an analogy, Judge Olson 
of Chicago declared that legal procedure 
against crime was useless, that medical pre- 
cepts of diagnosis and prevention must be 
applied to criminals. His speech, including 
interesting statistics, is quoted in part in 
the Chicago Herald My 3 '16 

See also Ability tests; Discharged prison- 
ers; Feeble-minded; Immigrants — Crime; 
Indeterminate sentence; Insanity; Intoxi- 
cating liquors; Juvenile delinquents; Lynch- 
ing; Negroes — Crime; Parole; Penal farms; 
Prisoners; Prisons; Probation; Reforma- 
tories; Sterilization; Suspension of sentence; 
Women — Delinquents 

Bibliography 

Bibliography of works cited. In W: A. Bon- 
ger. Criminality and economic conditions, p 
673-700 '16 

Crime and correction. In W: B. Munro. Bib- 
liography of municipal government in the 
U. S., p 312-14 '15 

* List of references on the relation between 

vagrancy and crime. U. S. Library of con- 
gress. 3p Je 20 16 (Typew Cost of copying 
15c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Conferences 
American institute of criminal law and crim- 
inology. Conference. Aug. 29. 1916. Chicago, 
111. E. M. Abbott, sec. 1027 Land Title bldg., 
Philadelphia 

Program includes the following addresses: 
Probation in its relation to social welfare, 
by R. O. Harris; The legal status of the 



national guard under the army reorganiza- 
tion bill, by B. C. Chiperfleld; The pioneers' 
military establishment: a question of the 
constitution, by T: W. Shelton 

Identification 

Canadian criminal identification bureau, by 
A. P. Sherwood; Identifications by the finger 
print system, by P. C. Holland. In Interna- 
tional assn. of police. Proceedings, 1915, p 
82-7 

* Finger print instructor. Frederick Kuhne, 

bur. of criminal identification, police dept., 
city of New York. 155p il *$2 '16 Munn & 
CO., inc., N. Y. 

A text book for the guidance of finger 
print experts and an instructor for persons 
interested in the study of finger prints, 
based upon the Sir E. R. Henry system of 
classifying and filing 

Modus operandi system in the detection of 
criminals. R. B. Fosdick. J Crim Law 6:560- 
70 N '15 

Passing of the Bertillon system of identifica- 
tion: an elaborate system of measurements 
that has been displaced by simpler methods. 
R. B. Fosdick. Sci Am S 80:330-1 N 20 '15 

Investigations 

Chicago, 111. — New crime commission has been 
appointed to look into the matter of de- 
creasing crime thru improved methods of 
discovery and court procedure (O 3 '15) 

Chile — Minister of justice has appointed a 
commissioner to study crime in Chile and to 
report to the government his recommenda- 
tions for mea.sures to prevent crime, reform 
delinquents, and for the classification and 
separation of prisoners. A laboratory of ex- 
perimental psychology is to be established 
in the penitentiary at Santiago, and physi- 
cians in penal institutions will be required 
to furnish information or data in connec- 
tion with the work (F 12 '16) 

National cornmittee on prisons has organized 
a committee on eugenics to consider the 
constitutional basis of criminalistic beha- 
vior. The inquiries into family history are 
to be made by a field worker trained by the 
Eugenics record office. At present, opinions 
of experts on the subject differ widely (My 
'16) 

Laboratories 

New York police commissioner has established 
a laboratory at police headquarters for the 
purpose of examining prisoners so as to de- 
termine which among them are mentally 
defective. The laboratory is under the di- 
rection of Dr. Louis Bisch of New York 
(F 5 '16) 

Police psychopathic laboratory. L: E. Bisch. 
J Crim Law 7:79-88 My '16 

Rockefeller foundation has contributed funds 
to establish a psychopathic clinic at Sing 
Sing prison. All incoming prisoners and 
those already within the walls will undergo 
a thorough mental examination and the fee- 
ble-minded and mentally deficient separated 
from the normal group. Sufficient funds 
have been obtained by the Nat. com. on so- 
•cial hygiene to continue the work for five 
years. The establishment of a psychopathic 

• clinic marks a most important advance in 
the scientific study of crime (Jl '16) 

Testing criminal offenders: scientific system of 
police administration requires that heredity 
and mentalitv of persons arrested should be 
ascertained before they are brought to trial, 
il J Heredity (511 11th st.. N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C.) 7:255-62 Je '16 25c 

Description of the work of the laboratory 
of the N. Y. police department 

Reports 
Crime in Chicago. New Republic v 5 no 53 p 7- 
8 N 6 '15 

R6sum6 of the report of the Chicago city 
council committee on crime, March, 1915. 
Protests against keeping men in jail because 
they are too poor to furnish bail or pay a fine 

* — Same. Reprinted. 4p '15 Juvenile protective 

assn., 816 S. Halsted st., Chicago 



74 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Crime and criminals— Reports— ConttimetJ 
Statistics 

* Chicago, 111. Dept. of police. Reports of crim- 

inal complaints. (Pam no 555-A) 16p F 18 16 
Chicago munic. ref. lib. , , c, * 

* Criminal statistics for the year ended Sept. 

30 li'13. (4 George V Sessional pa no 17 A 
1914^ 374p 25c '14 Sale & dist. office, Domin- 
ion government publications, Ottawa, Canada 

Reports 
Statistics of crime and criminals. Report of 
the com. of the American prison assn. F. L. 
Hoffman. J Grim Law 7:186-204 Jl '16 

Criminal procedure 

Criminal law and practice. W: R. Riddell. 
In Wis. state bar assn. Report of proceed- 
ings, 1912, 1913, 1914, p 229-55 '15 

Defects in our criminal procedure: Defects in 
our criminal justice, by Walter Clark; Leg- 
islative neglect to reform criminal procedure, 
by C: B. Faris. J Grim Law 6:546-56 N '15 

[Unsatisfactory administration of the criminal 
law in the U. S.] Robert Ralston. J Grim 
Law 6:490-506 N '15 

President's address, read at the seventh 
annual meeting of the Am, institute of crim- 
inal law and criminology at Salt Lake city 

Cripples 

Federation of associations for cripples was 
organized to increase cooperation and effi- 
ciency among the agencies dealing with 
cripples. It has established a central bureau 
where a register of all such agencies is 
kept, together with an accurate census of 
cripples, and to which cripples may be di- 
rected for information. The official organ 
of the federation is the American Journal 
of Care for Cripples, a quarterly, published 
by D. C. McMurtrie. Committee on legisla- 
tion expects to investigate the problem of 
the care of defectives, with special reference 
to cripples of this class, and to the work- 
men's compensation law. Mildred Terrett, 
exec, sec, 105 E. 22d st., N.. Y. 

Education 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to education of the] crip- 
pled and deformed. U S Bur Educ Bui 1910 
no 47 p 809 '16 

Employment 

Motion study for the crippled soldier. F. B. 
Gilbreth. 669-75p il Frank B. Gilbreth, 77 
Brown st., Providence, R. I. 

Presented at a meeting of the New York 
local section of the American society of me- 
chanical engineers. Oct. 12, 1915 

Investigations 

Cleveland, O., has employed Miss Grace Har- 
per of the social service department of the 
Massachusetts general hospital and Miss 
Amy Hamburger of the orthopaedic depart- 
ment to make a house-to-house canvass 
of cripples. The purpose of the survey 
is to discover the educational and economic 
needs, capacities and possibilities of those 
crippled children and adults in Cleveland 
who are industrially handicapped, and to 
make such recommendations for meeting 
these needs as the facts brought out by 
the study may suggest. The Survey, March 
18, 1916, gives statistics for the third of 

■ the city covered so far 

Crossings. See Railroads — Crossings 
Cruelty to animals. See Animals— Treatment 
Cubberley, Ellwood P. 
Portland survey. $1.50 '15 World bk. co. 

(School surveys— Individual surveys) 
Public school administration. *$1.75 '16 Hough- 
ton (Scnool administration and organization) 
Currency. See Banking and currency; Money 
Cushing, Harry A. 
Voting trusts. $1.50 '15 Macmillan (Corpora- 
tions—Voting trust agreement) 



Dairying 

»See also Cooperative dairying; Cow testing; 
-Milk 

Conferences 
See Food — Conferences 
Laws 

* Connecticut — Dairy and pure food laws. Conn 

dairy and food comm., comp. 52p '15 Conn, 
state lib. 

* Massachusetts — Dairy laws, with digest of 

supreme court decisions. 63p Je '15 Mass. 
bd. of agric. 

* Minnesota dairy and food laws. 115p '15 Minn. 

dairy and food comr. 
Missouri dairy laws. art. IV. Mo Bd Agric Bui 
V 13 no 11 p 11-16 N '15 

* Wisconsin — Dairy laws and rules and regu- 

lations, effective Jan. 1, 1916, governing the 
licensing of butter makers and cheese 
makers and operators of butter and cheese 
factories, adopted by the dairy and food 
commissioner under authority of chapter 
597 of the laws of 1915. 29p N '15 Wis. dairy 
and food comr. 

Utah — Dairy and food laws with dairy and 
food regulations. 44p '15 Utah dairy and food 
comr. 

Reports 

Massachusetts. Bd. of agriculture. Dairy bur. 
24th annual report, Jan. 15, 1915; Report on 
the encouragement of dairying contests, 
1914. il In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d an- 
nual report, 1914, p 417-52 '15 

* Pennsylvania — Preliminary report of the dairy- 

ing and food comr. for the year 1915. Pa 
Dept Agric Bui no 279 53p '16 
Dams 

* United States. 64th Congress, 1st session. Bill 

to amend an act entitled "An act to regulate 
the construction of dams across navigable 
waters." (S 1341. Introduced by Mr. Shields) 
18p D 10 '15 
Dana, J-ohn C. 

Libraries: addresses and essays. 299p *$1.80 
'16 W^ilson (Libraries) 
Dance halls 

[Validity of statute for municipal regulation 
of dance halls: case-note to Mehlos v. Mil- 
waukee.] Ann Gas 1915G 1110 

License 

[Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended by the 
committee on finance giving power to the 
second deputy supt. of police to licence dance 
halls.] Chicago City Council Pam no 530 
p 3-4 F 21 '16 Chicago munic. ref. lib. 
Dangerous occupations. See Accidents, Indus- 
trial; Occupational diseases 
Daylight saving 

Cleveland under eastern time, by W. S. 
Lloyd; Early rising in Detroit, by G: L. 
Renaud. R of Rs 54:206-8 Ag '16 

Daylight saving scheme. Nature 97:183-4 Ap 
27 '16 

Advances some of the main objections to 
the scheme. States that Germany has 
adopted such legislation and France and 
England are considering similar proposals 

Eastern standard time. G: L. Renaud. In 
League of Michigan municipalities. Pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 47-51 

Halifax, N. S. — Daylight-saving scheme was 
instituted on May 1, 1916, all clocks being 
advanced one hour at midnight 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Milwaukee harvester works 
of the International harvester company has 
recognized the request of its 2,250 employees 
in the various departments that they be 
permitted to start work an hour earlier each 
day and thus be released one hour earlier 
each evening. The movement is the result 
of a general agitation in Milwaukee for day- 
light-saving. Individual employers are giv- 
ing permission for an earlier start of work 
if it appears that the large majority of em- 
ployees desire it (Je 15 '16) 

New York (city) — Bd. of directors of the 
Merchants' assn. has appointed a special 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



75 



Daylight saving — Continued 

committee with L. E. Pierson as chairman, 
to consider the question of daylight-saving 
by setting the clock forward one hour (Ja 12 
'16> 

Norway — Storthing passed the daylight saving 
bill and all clocks were advanced one hour 
May 22, 1916. Germany passed the first mea- 
sure, being followed by Holland. France, 
England, Sweden, Hungary, and Italy 

Portugal — Legal time was advanced one hour 
June 18, 1916 

Saving daylight: economic reasons that make 
a change in our hours of work desirable. 
G: F: Kuntz. Sci Am S 82:18-19 Jl 8 '16 
See also Time 

Deaf and dumb 

Education 
Progress in the education of the deaf. E: A. 
Fav. In U. S. Comr, of education. Report, 
1915, v 1 p 493-501 '15 

Conferences 

* American instructors of the deaf. Proceedings 

of the 20th meeting of the convention, held 
at the Virginia school for the deaf and blind, 
Staunton, Va., June 25-July 1, 1914. (U S 
63d Cong 3d sess S doc 986) 374p F 15 '15 

Contains in addition to the various ad- 
dresses and discussions the results of a ques- 
tionnaire sent to the various states and 
Canada asking for information in regard to 
education, occupations and wage earning of 
the deaf 

Leqislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to education of the] deaf 
and dumb. U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 
784-801 '16 

/Statistics 
Schools for the blind and the deaf. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1914. v 2 p 523- 
47 '15 
Deafness 

* Deafness cure fakes. 53p 10c '15 Am. medical 

assn. 
Death records. See Vital statistics 
Debates 

* Both sides: briefs for debate on important 

questions of the day, prepared for the use 
of schools, debating societies and lyceums. 
15p 25c '15 The Independent, 119 W. 40th st., 
N. Y. 

Subjects: Single six-year term for presi- 
dent; Death penalty; Price maintenance; 
Minimum wage legislation; Mothers' pen- 
sions; Who is responsible for the war; Shall 
we have a government-owned merchant ma- 
rine; Shall we enlarge our army; Convict 
labor in the United States; Problem of the 
trusts; Monroe doctrine; Military training 
for college students; Embargo on arms; Mex- 
ico and the United States 

* University debaters' annual: constructive and 

rebuttal speeches delivered in the intercol- 
legiate debates of American colleges and 
universities during the college year 1914- 
1915. E: C: Mabie, ed. *$1.80 '15 Wilson 

The first volume in a series of yearbooks 
of college debating. Contains the affirma- 
tive and negative speeches actually deliv- 
ered in 1914-1915 in the intercollegiate de- 
bates of the following universities: Yale, 
Columbia, Dartmouth, Brown, Williams, 
Chicago, Swarthmore, Iowa, Minnesota, 
Texas, Ohio State, Colgate and Kansas. The 
subjects debated are Increase of army and 
navy, Monroe doctrine, Minimum wage, 
Government ownership of telegraph and 
telephone. Socialism and Single tax. A 
bibliography is included for each 

Debtor or creditor. See Fines — Imprisonment for 
non-payment 

Debts. See Debts, Public; Municipal debts 

Debts, Public 

* Commonwealth of Virginia v. State of West 

Virginia. [Briefs in the Virginia debt case.] 
3 pts W. Va. atty. gen. 

In the supreme court of the U. S., October 
term, 1914. Pt. 1, Argument before master 
in support of West Virginia credits upon 
her assigned proportion of the principal of 
the Virginia debt. 60p; pt. 2, Reply of West 
Virginia to supplemental note of Virginia 



and to extracts from official records of the 
rebellion in reference to condition of rail- 
ways in Virginia and in the Confederate 
states. 39p '15; pt. 3, Brief for West Vir- 
ginia upon exceptions to the master's report 
and upon the subject of interest. 81p '15; 
West Virginia has also issued seven other 
briefs dating from 1910 
"■ Commonwealth of Virginia v. State of West 
Virginia. [Briefs in the Virginia debt case.] 
6 pts Va. atty. gen. 

In the supreme court of the U. S., October 
term, 1914. Pt. 1. Complainant's excep- 
tions to report of the special master, dated 
Jan. 21, 1915. 5p; pt. 2, Brief of counsel for 
Virginia upon the hearing April, 1915, 76p; 
pt. 3, Notice of motion. Ip; pt. 4, Copy of 
bill as filed. 14p; pt. 5, Brief for complain- 
ant upon final hearing set down for April 
13, 1914, 24p; pt. 6, Response of the com- 
plainant to the motion of the defendant. 
15p 

Tax burdens increased by great bonded debt. 
J: S. Chambers. Good Roads n s 12:76-8 Ag 
5 '16 

Virginia — Attorney general filed a motion in 
the U. S. supreme court, June 5, 1916, ask- 
ing that steps be taken to execute the judg- 
ment of the court In behalf of the state of 
Virginia for approximately $13,000,000 due 
from West Virginia as a part of the state 
debt on Jan. 1, 1861, when the two states 
were separated. The West Virginia attor- 
ney general claims that state property is 
not subject to levy; that the judgment is 
only persuasive, and that the state cannot 
act on the payment of the debt until the 
legislature convenes in January, 1917 

Virginia debt controversy. J: G. Randall. Pol 
Sci Q 30:553-77 D '15 

Wheeling (W. Va.) Register, May 8, 1916, gives 
a resumS of the symposium opened in the 
May number of The Bar on the W. Virginia 
debt question, which involves a payment of 
$13,000,000 by that state to Virginia, in ac- 
cordance with an opinion from the U. S. su- 
preme court 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 

New York — Permitting the legislature to 
alter the rate of interest on certain state 
debts already incurred. Constitutional 
amendment. Rejected. Yes 430,423 No 725,784 
N '15 
Debts, Secured 

Taxation 

* New York Cstate) — Tax on secured debts, chap- 

ter 802 of the laws of 1911, in effect Sep- 
tember 1, 1911, as amended by chapter 465 
of the laws of 1915, in effect April 30, 1915. 
13p '15 Guaranty trust co. of N. Y., 140 
Broadway, N. Y. 

Decisions 
American state reports and session laws ex- 
clusive of side reports, revised to May 1, 
1916, list. Law Lib J 9:32-5 Ap '16 

Indexes 
Cooperation among lawyers. J. C. Ruppenthal. 
Law Lib J 9:9-19 Ap '16 

Discusses the need of uniform indexes and 
histories of laws and decisions in the vari- 
ous states 

Defective children 

Census of speech defectives among 89,057 pub- 
lic school pupils. J. E. W. Wallin. School 
and Soc 3:213-16 F 5 '16 

Intelligence and delinquency: a study of two 
hundred and fifteen cases. J. H. Williams. J 
Crim Law 6:696-705 Ja '16 

Education 

Collected papers of Margaret Bancroft on 
mental subnormality and the care and 
training of mentally subnormal children. 
102p '15 Ware bros. co., 1010 Arch St., 
Philadelphia ^„ ., ^„ 

* Latshaw school. Allen Latshaw. 43p il Allen 

Latshaw, 3412-3414 Sansom St., Philadel- 
phia; The Maples, Berwyn, Pa. 

A description of a school whose aim is 
to develop backward, subnormal, or defec- 
tive children into their natural normal 
activities so that they may take their 
rightful place in the world 



le 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Defective children— Education— CoHt/ziwerf 
Milwaukee, Wis. — School board has decided to 
adopt the Louisville, Ky., method for tak- 
ing subnormal school children from the pub- 
lic schools and forcing them to go into 
special classes, so they will not hold back 
the children of higher mentality. The au- 
thorities will determine which types shall 
be excluded from the public schools and 
given special training by expert educators 
(My 19 '16) 

• Organization and management of auxiliary 

classes. Helen Macmurchy. Ontario (Can ) 
Dept of Educ Educational Pam no 7 212p 15 

Preliminarv report on children discharged 
from ungraded classes. E. E. Farrell. Un- 
graded 1:87-9 D '15 20c 

Psvcho- educational clinic and special schools. 
in St. Louis, Mo. Board of education. 61st 
annual report, 1915. p 129-60 

Problem of the feeble-minded child in the pub- 
lic schools. A. W. Edsdn. Ungraded 1:189-93 
Ap '16 

• Schools and classes for exceptional children. 

David Mitchell. (Cleveland education sur- 
vey) 122p 25c postpaid '16 Survey com., 
Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 
Survev of retarded school children. H. C Ste- 
vens, charts School R 24:450-61 Je '16 
What becomes of the "special class" children? 
J Hereditv (511 11th st., N. W., Washington, 
D. C.) 7:248 Je '16 25c 

Results of an investigation made by the 
school department of Detroit, Mich., of the 
records of 100 pupils from "special classes" 
who had left school at 16 years of age, and 
who had in no case been out longer than 
five years 

Hce also Blind — Education; Deaf and dumb 
— Education; Retardation of school children 

Lepislation, Comparative 

[State laws relating to educatioh of the] 
feeble-minded. U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 
p 809-16 '16 

Statistics 

Schools for the feeble-minded. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1914, v 2 p 549-62 '15 

Teachers 

Graduate course for teachers in service. E. L. 
Johnston. Ungraded 1:255-9 Je '16 

Defectives 
New Jersey has a commission to prepare a 
state program for the reorganization of pub- 
lic care of defectives, dependents and de- 
linquents (N 15 '15) 

See also Blind; Cripples; Deaf and 
dumb; Feeble-minded; Insane; Sterilization 

Education 

Public schools and the abnormal child. K. J. 
Hoke, il tables In Mental defectives in Vir- 
ginia, p 120-8 '16 

Delinquent children. See Juvenile delinquents 

Delinquent taxes 

Yonkers, N. Y. — Supreme court justice Arthur 
S. Tompkins, in an opinion, upholds the con- 
stitutionality of the delinquent tax sale law 
of 1914, attacked by the Homesite realty 
company and the Valley farms company. 
The ruling is of the utmost importance, as 
It affirms the right of the city to foreclose 
on all tax liens. It affects more than $4,000,- 
000 of back taxes and was a test case for 
the validity of the law. Jacob Kramer v 
City of Yonkers, the Homesite Realty co. 
and the Valley Farms co. (Jl 27 '16) 

Democracy 

• Democracy in the making. Ford Hall and the 

open forum movement: a symposium. C: W 
Coleman, ed. 340p *$1.50 '15 Little 

Four sections of the book tell in turn how 
the work is done, what is thought of it 
who are in the audience, and what is the 
character of the addi^esses delivered there 



Demonstration work in agriculture 
Farm bureau or county agent movement. 
G: W. Bush. Ohio State Univ Bui v 20 no 6 
p 54-61 O '15 Ohio state univ., Columbus 
See also County farm bureaus 
County agents 

* County farm advisor. B. H. Crocheron. 

Univ of Cal Agric Exp Sta Circ no 133 
8p il Jl '15 Univ. of Cal., College of agric.^ 
Berkeley 

County demonstration farms 

* County experiment farm: its function, selection 

and management. C. E. Thorne. Ohio Agric 
Exp Sta Circ no 145 99-118p My 15 '14 Agri- 
cultural experiment station, Wooster, O, 

* County experiment farms in Ohio: annual 

reports for 1914. Ohio Agric Exp Sta Bui 
no 286 225-291P il My '15 Experiment sta- 
tion, Wooster, O. 

Laws 

* OhiO — County experiment farm law. (H B no 

163; Ohio Agric Exp Sta Circ no 155 4p Ag 
15 '15 Agricultural experiment station, Woos- 
ter, O. 
Demonstration work in domestic science 

* Farm home demonstration schools, il Cornell 

Reading Courses (N. Y. state college of agri- 
culture, Cornell univ.) v 4 (Rural life ser no 
12) 257-72P Ag 1 '15 

Denominational schools. See Schools, Denomina- 
tional 

Dental hygiene 

* Dental prophylaxis and the pubhc health; 

How painless and hidden mouth infections 
shorten human life, by T: B. Hartzell; The 
importance of mouth hygiene and how to 
practice it, by W, G. Ebersole; Dental pro- 
phylaxis, by M. L. Rhein. Health News 10: 
295-6. 304-12 O '15 

* Mouth conditions and their relation to the 

health and development of the child. F. H. 
Herrald. Iowa Bui of State Institutions 17: 
243-51 Jl '15; Discussion, p 191-209 

Address before the quarterly conference 
of the chief executive officers of the state 
institutions and others with the board of 
contiol of state institutions, Des Moines, 
June 8-9, 1915 

Education 

Columbia university school of dentistry. W. B. 
Dunning. Columbia U Q (Columbia univ. 
press, N. Y.) 18:345-51 S '16 25c 

Dental research 
Journal of the Nat. Dental Assn. (Huntington, 
Ind. 25c) contains a research department 
conducted by the Research institute of the 
National dental assn. The November, 1915, 
issue contains an article on the organization 
of the institute, the by-laws of the institute, 
the endowment fund plan for the institute, 
the report of the Scientific foundation and 
research commission to the Nat. dental assn. 
made to the House of delegates at San 
Francisco, Cal., Sept. 2, 1915, for fiscal year 
July 4, 1914, to July 3, 1915, inclusive, and 
report of the Minnesota division of the Sci- 
entific foundation and research commission 

"' Research institute of the National dental assn. 
Scope and organization. 16p il '15 The Insti- 
tute. 8803 Euclid av., Cleveland, O. 

Dentists 

Reports 

■* Oregon. Bd, of dental examiners. 27th annual 
report, April 1, 1915; and Official register of 
dentists holding certificates from this board. 
16p '15 Oregon state lib. 

Contains the opinion in the supreme court 
case upholding the dental law. Furnished 
only on exchange accounts 

Conferences 

* National assn. of dental examiners. Proceed- 

ings of the 33d annual meeting, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal., Aug. 30-31, 1915. 98p J. A. West, 
sec.-treas., 417 Utica bldg., Des Moines, la. 
Discussion hinged on the education and 
qualifications of dentists and the advisabil- 
ity of dental nurses 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



77 



Department store education 

Chicago, 111. — Supt. 8clioop has asked the co- 
operation of department stores in a pre- 
liminary course in salesmanship for iiign 
school girls. One store has agreed to em- 
ploy girls on Saturaays and other special 
days, at a certain agreed sum, their store 
experience to form tne basis for class dis- 
cussion the following week. If the work 
proves satisfactory, the store will give gradu- 
ates of the course permanent employment at 
a minimum of $9 a week (Ap 19 '16) 

New York (city) — Sixty employees of B. Alt- 
man & CO. including 25 salesgirls and 35 
boys received diplomas June 28, 1916, at the 
Altman continuation school. It is announced 
that the company will soon establish higher 
vocational classes for instructing employees 
in merchandise selling and business systems 

New York (city; — Thirty-two saleswomen 
from various departments in Stern brothers 
received certificates in the salesmanship 
course given under the auspices of the dept. 
of education of the city of New York and 
the Dept. store education assn., June 29, 
1916. This is the fourth class to complete 
the course since February, 1915, when the 
educational work was started by Miss Anne 
Morgan 

New York university, under the supervision of 
the School of pedagogy and with the co- 
operation of the Department store education 
assn., has opened a series of courses on de- 
partment store education to fit teachers to 
conduct classes in stores, dealing With the 
handling of merchandise, the art of selling, 
the psychology of the customer. Only those 
persons are admitted to the courses who 
have had either a normal school training or 
at least two years of college work, or who 
show special aptitude for this sort of work. 
It is expected that, later, only college grad- 
uates will be admitted. The University has 
issued an announcement of the course. Beu- 
lah E. Kennard, 105 W. 40th St., N. Y., 
is sec. of the Dept. store education assn. 
(Ja 25 '16) 

University of trade and applied science was 
formally opened April 8, 1916, at the John 
Wanamaker store in Philadelphia. The 
store offers to its adult employees the oppor- 
tunity of continuing their education while 
earning their own livelihood, so that they 
may become better individuals^, better mem- 
bers of society and better citizens of the 
nation. It will afford education technical 
to the job; education for health, for vigor 
of body and mind; education for thrift and 
good financial standing; education for higher 
ethical and social standards of living; and 
education for culture and wise use of leisure 
Department stores 

Analysis of individual schedules secured from 
women and girls in retail stores; Analysis of 
occupations in department stores in Rich- 
mond: general summary of occupations. U S 
Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 162 p 42-7, 227-54 
'16 
* Department store occupations. I. P. O'Leary. 
(Cleveland education survey) 127p diags 25c 
postpaid '16 Survey com., Cleveland found., 
Cleveland, O. 

Study in the interest of the young people 
who will look to these establishments as a 
possible source of work and wage. Gives 
the opportunities which exist in department 
store work for different types and the re- 
quirements which should deter others from 
entering- this kind of employment 

Investigation of department store work to de- 
termine the possibility of vocational train- 
ing. I. P. O'Leary. In N. Y. (state). Factory 
investigating comm. Fourth report, 1915, v 4 
p 1363-1406 

Mercantile establishments: [report on wage 
investigation]. In N. Y. (state). Factory in- 
vestigating comm. Fourth report, 1915, v 2 p 
51-174 

Statistical tables, v 3 

Unemployment among women in department 
and other retail stores of Boston. U S Bur 
Labor Statistics Bui no 182 (Women in In- 
dustry ser no 8) 72p Ja '16 

Investigation of the extent and causes of 
unemployment among women. Loss of time 
■was due to sickness, "lay-offs," "unpaid 



vacations," and miscellaneous causes arising 
primarily from personal rather than indus- 
trial conditions 

Bee also Minimum wage 
Employees 

* Department store girl and her friend in "the 

five and ten." M. C. Welles. (Pam 9) 8p '15 
Consumers' league of Conn., 36 Pearl st., 
Hartford 

A review in part of the report of the spe- 
cial investigator, Charlotte M. HoUoway, to 
the general assembly, Jan. 1915 
Health of department store women in New 
York city. Kristine Mann. Am J Pub Health 
6:446-51 My '16 

Read before the industrial hygiene section. 
Am. public health assn., Rochester, N. Y., 
September. 1915 

Vacations 

* Vacation time: bulletin on summer conditions 

m retail stores. 2p My 17 '16 Consumers' 
league of N. Y., 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Table giving information as to vacation 
policy, Saturday closing, daily closing of 
N. Y. stores 

Dependent classes. See Charities; Crime and 
criminals; Defectives; Poor 

Deposits and depositories 
Deposits of public funds: senate constitutional 
amendment no. 19 (Ballot no 6). Cal Com- 
monwealth Club Transac 10:448-54 O '15 

Proposed amendment provides that state, 
county or municipal money may be deposited 
in banks in such manner and under such 
conditions as may be provided by any law 
adopted by the people under the initiative or 
by a two-thirds vote of each house of the 
legislature and approved by the governor 
and subject to the referendum 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
California— Providing that state county or 
municipal moneys may be deposited in bank 
under such conditions as may be provided 
by law adopted by initiative or two-thirds 
vote of each house of legislature approved 
by governor and subject to referendum; 
continuing in force laws now governing de- 
posit of such moneys until same are changed 
as in this section authorized. Constitutional 
amendment. Rejected. Yes 92,981 No 151,845 
O '15 

Legislation, Comparative 

Selected state laws and municipal ordinances 
requiring banks serving as public deposi- 
tories to furnish personal surety company 
bonds or collateral as security for state, 
municipal or other public funds placed in 
the same. Chicago munic. ref. lib. 9p D '15 
(Typew 45c) 

Compiled at the request of Alderman 
James H. Lawley, com. on finance, Chicago 
city council 
Depreciation 

Depreciation. In F. L. Holmes. Regulation 
of railroads and public utilities in Wiscon- 
sin, p 79-95 '15 

Depreciation and rate control; a further dis- 
cussion. J. C. Bonbright. Q J Econ 30:546- 
58 My '16 

Depreciation and valuation. J: J. Thomas. J 
Account 21:24-33 Ja '16 

Depreciation defined, by F: P. Stearns; Court 
decisions on depreciation, by J. H. Goetz; 
Depreciation and its relation to the fair 
value, by Halford Erickson; Criticism of 
theoretical depreciation, by J: E. Allison; 
Discussion, by John Bauer; Making depreci- 
ation discussion understood, by Harry 
Barker; Open discussion. Utilities Mag 1:100- 
36 .Ja '16 $2.50; pa $2 

Papers and discussion at the Conference 
on valuation held at Philadelphia, Nov. 10-13, 
1915 

Depreciation reserves as affected by property 
growth. L. R. Nash. Am Econ R 6:69-89 Mr 
'16 

New York (city)— U. S. district court held that 
3 per cent was an adequate allowance for 
exhaustion, wear and tear on apartment 
house property in the case of paying tax in 



78 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Depreciation— Conttni/ed . . 

excess of the law by the provision of the 
special income tax law. Hyman Cohen v, 
TJ S (Press rept «JI 1 '16) 

• Principles of depreciation C- A. Saliers( Ron- 

ald accounting ser) 200p $2.50 '15 Ronald 

Detroit citizens ieague . . -,v,av.tov 

Petition lor election commission: charter 
amendment. 6p '16 The League, 623 Free 
press bldg., Detroit, Mich. (Municipal char- 
ters — Amendments) 

Detention homes. See Juvenile delinquents— De- 
tention homes 

♦ Active'*' Immunization with diphtheria toxin- 

antitoxin and with toxin-antitoxin combined 
with diphtheria bacilli. W: H. Park and 
Abraham Zingher. (Reprint ser no 39) 12p 
Ja '16 Dept. of health, New York city 

Diphtheria immunity, natural, active and pas- 
sive: its determination by the Schick test. 
W H. Park and Abraham Zingher. tables 
Am J Pub Health 6:431-45 My '16 

Municipal control of diphtheria: a new method; 
with discussion. W. C. McKay. Am J Pub 
Health 5:982-8 O '15 ^ ^^^ ^ . , 

Read before the Public health officials 
section of the American public health assn., 
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 2, 1914 
Diplomacy 

Bibliography 

* List of references on secret diplomacy and a 

more democratic control of foreign policy. 
U. S. Library of congress. 2p Ap 29 '16 
(Typew Cost of copying 10c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Direct iegisiation. See Referendum 

Direct primaries. See Primaries 

Directories 
Rochester, N. Y., chamber of commerce, with 
other organizations, has recommended that 
the Drew-AUis company, publishers of the 
city directory, list the vocations of all men 
in prominent positions, indicate by a symbol 
whether a man is married or not, give the 
names of the public schools as well as 
their numbers, the names of all persons 
who live on opposite sides of city bound- 
ary streets, classify and index the advertis- 
ing section, give thumb index to those 
desiring it, give names of persons on R. F. 
D. routes out of the city, and combine the 
street directory with the directory. All 
the suggestions will be complied with ex- 
cept the last (Mr 18 '16) 

See also Agricultural directories; Agricul- 
tural organizations — Directories; Court offi- 
cers — Directories ; Educational directories ; 
School directories; Social service — Directo- 
ries 

Discharged prisoners 

* Some facts about Sing Sing; a comparison 

covering the years 1911 to 1915. (Bui 4) 
5p (Mim) '16 Otho G. Cartwright, sec, 
Westchester county research bur., 15 Court 
St., White Plains, N. Y. 
Discusses rehabilitation of ex-convicts 

Employment 
Man who comes out. O. F. Lewis. R of Rs 

54:314-7 S '16 
Prison assn. of N. Y. has established an em- 
ployment bureau for ex- convicts. It has 
been in existence a month, has had 52 appli- 
cations and has placed 33 men (N 8 '15) 
Disease carriers. See Food handlers; Infectious 
diseases — Carriers; Typhoid fever — Typhoid 
carriers 
Disease prevention. See Public health 
Disinfection and disinfectants 

Disinfection and disinfectants. In J. S. 
MacNutt. Manual for health officers, p 569- 
93 '15 
Disinfection as a factor in the control of 
communicable diseases. B. F. Knause. Am J 
Pub Health 6:364-8 Ap '16 

Read before a general session of the Am. 
public health assn., Sept. 10, 1915 

• —Same. (Reprint ser no 43) 8p Mr '16 Dept 

of health. New York city 



Practical use of disinfectants. H. E. Hasseltlne. 
Pub Health (Mich.) 4:63-74 F '16 

Read at the conference of State and pro- 
vincial boards of health of North America, 
held at Washington, D. C, May 14, 1915 
Dispensaries 

* Dispensaries: a growing factor in curative 

and preventive medicine. S. S. Goldwater, 
comr. of health, city of N. Y. (Reprint ser 
29) lOp Je '15 Dept. o1^ health, N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Boston Medical and 
Surgical Journal, v. 172, no, 17, p 613-17, 
April 29, 1915 
Dispensaries (liquor) 
South Carolina — U. S. supreme court, in de- 
ciding the appeal of the Carolina glass co., 
charged in the state courts with conspiracy, 
has declared the dispensary law constitu- 
tional (Press rept F 21 '16) 
Dissertations, Academic 

Bibliography 

* List of American doctoral dissertations 

printed in 1914. A. M. Stephens, comp. 157p 
'15 U. S. Library of congress 
List of doctoral dissertations in political sci- 
ence. Am Pol Sci R 10:158-63 F '16 
Thirteenth list of doctoral dissertations in po- 
litical economy in progress in American uni- 
versities and colleges. Am Econ R 6:499-511 
Je '16 
District of Columbia 

* Brief [upon the relationship of the U. S. with 

the District of Columbia] to be presented to 
the joint congressional committee. L. P. 
Shoemaker, pres., Brightwood citizens' assn. 
13p Jl 1 '15 Louis P. Shoemaker, 15th and 
H St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
District of Columbia— Petworth citizens' asso- 
ciation has adopted resolutions urging a 
change of government for the District which 
will provide for a governor and 10 commis- 
sioners, 5 appointed by the president and 5 
elected by the people, men and women voting 
alike, and an amendment to the federal con- 
stitution giving citizens of the District the 
same status as citizens of a state in voting 
for representation in congress and in the 
electoral college. The text of the resolutions 
appears in the Washington (D. C.) Star Ap 

26 '16 

District of Columbia referendum assn. has 
been formed to promote an energetic and 
vigilant home rule body, to keep constantly 
on the alert and to call for a referendum on 
important congressional proposals which af- 
fect their interests or those of the city (F 

27 '16) 

* United States. 64th Congress, 1st session. Bill 

to abolish the District of Columbia, and for 
other purposes. (S 3249) 4p Ja 6 '16 

Provides for a city of Washington under 
the direct ownership, control and supervision 
of the U. S. government and for taxation of 
private property to support the municipal 
government 

See also Municipal taxation; Municipal 
taxation — Investigations 

Suffrage 

District representation in congress: argument 
of Theodore W. Noyes before senate district 
subcommittee, Feb. 24 and 29, 1916. Even- 
ing Star (Washington, D. C.) Ap 14 '16 

Contains also the text of the proposed 
amendment (S J R 32) 
Districting. See Zoning 
Divorce 

Family and marriage: an analytical reference 
syllabus. G: E. Howard. 177p 75c '14 
George E. Howard, Dept. of pol. sci. and so- 
ciology, Univ. of Nebraska 

Marriage revolt; a study of marriage and di- 
vorce. W: E. Carson. 481p *$2 "^15 Hearst's 
int. lib. 

The object of the book, in the first place, 
is to present the facts and opinions that 
have led to what appears to be a widespread 
revolt against conventional marriage and an 
equally widespread increase of divorce: next, 
to discover to what extent any definite new 
conceptions, emerging from this conflict, are 
finding acceptance; and, lastly, from an 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



73 



Divorce — Continued 

examination and analysis of causes and ef- 
fects to obtain a forecast of probable future 
results. Contains a summary of tlie marriage 
laws of tlie several states 

See also Courts, Domestic relations; Mar- 
riage 

Bibliography 

* References on divorce: list of references sub- 

mitted to the committee on the judiciary, 
U, S. senate, 63d congress, third session, in 
connection with S. J. res. 109, a resolution 
proposing an amendment to the constitution 
of the U. S. relating to divorces. llOp '15 
U. S. senate doc. clerk (Out of print) 
Select bibliography. In G: E. Howard. Fam- 
ily and marriage, p 90-177 '14 

Divided as follows: (1) Development of 
family institutions; (2) Problems of mar- 
riage, divorce, and the family; (3> Social 
condition of woman: her advance toward eco- 
nomic, intellectual, and vocational freedom; 
(4) Political condition of woman: her ad- 
vance toward equal sulXrage; (5) Mother 
and infant welfare, child welfare, and the 
family as influenced by industry; (6) Eu- 
thenics, eugenics, and heredity; (7) Social 
disease, sex hygiene, education for parent- 
hood and the family life 

Legislation 
Brazil — ^New civil code, worked out by the fed- 
eral congress comm. and recently signed by 
the president, permits absolute divorce, but 
does not permit remarriage. Divorce was 
formerly prohibited in Brazil (F 24 '16) 

Legislation, Proposed 
U. S. congress has received a constitutional 
amendment giving the federal government 
power to pass a national divorce law. It 
provides that "Congress may define and 
limit the causes for divorce from the bonds 
of matrimony and the conditions under 
which suits for divorce may be brought. But 
no divorce shall be granted in any state ex- 
cept under its laws which permit divorces 
for one or more causes, subject to the con- 
ditions preserved by congress. Divorces 
granted shall be valid everywhere." It is 
doubtful whether any action will be taken 
during this session, altho there is a growing 
sentiment in favor of a national divorce law 
(My 7 '16) 

Docks 

Sec also Harbors 

Bibliography 
Dock improvement in other cities. Newarker 
(Free public library, Newark, N. J.) 4:190-1 
O '15 

Docks and harbors. In W: B. Munro. Bibliog- 
raphy of municipal government in the U. S., 
p 158-62 '15 

Ordinances, Proposed 

* Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended for 

passage by the committee on harbors, 
wharves and bridges, concerning concrete 
construction work. (Pam no 617) 2p Jl 10 '16 
Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Reports 

* New York (city). Comptroller. Report on the 

maintenance of the department of docks and 
ferries of the city of New York in 1913 and 
1914, prepared from the detailed expense 
statements of that department. 23p O '15 

* New York (city). Comptroller. Report on the 

maintenance of the department of docks 
and ferries of the city of New York in 1914 
and 1915, prepared from the detailed expense 
statements of that department. 20p Jl '16 

Dixon, Royal 

Americanization. 196p 50c '16 Macmillan (Citi- 
zenship) 

Doctoral dissertations. See Dissertations, Aca- 
demic 

Documents. See Public documents; State publi- 
cations 



Dogs 

Laws 

* Alabama — Dog laws enacted by the legislature 

of Alabama, 1915. 4p Ala. dept. of archives 
and history 

Muzzling 

Ordinances 

* St. Louis, Mo.— Ordinance making it a mis- 

demeanor to allow an unmuzzled dog to- 
run at large contrary to an order of the 
health commissioner. (Ord 28369. Approved 
N 26 '15) 3p City clerk, St. Louis 

Ordinances 

* Regulating the licensing and empounding of 

dogs [in New York cities]. N Y State Bur 
Municipal Information Rept no 149 8p My 18 
'16 (Typew 40c) 

Gives a representative ordinance and the 
exceptions and additions by cities. Obtained 
only thru P. A. I. S. 

Domestic relations. See Courts, Domestic rela- 
tions; Divorce; Family; Marriage 

Domestic science 

* Agricultural extension department of the 

Iowa state college of agriculture and me- 
chanic arts (Ames, la.) has published a 
series of Home economic bulletins. 1, Plan- 
ning and serving meals; 2, Child and its 
care; 3, Personal hygiene; 4, Textiles: their 
care and use; 5, Public and home sanita- 
tion; 6, Home management; 7, Home fur- 
nishing; 8, Planning and equipping the kit- 
chen; 9, Planning the costume 
An antediluvian on the education of working- 
class girls. E. Sellers. 19th Cent 80:337-49 
Ag '16 50c 

* Domestic science teaching in rural districts. 

S. T. Rorer. Mass Agric Circ no 62 lOp Ja '16 
Reprinted from the sixty-third annual re- 
port of the Mass. state board of agriculture 

Education for the home. B: R. Andrews. In 
U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 
319-44 '15 

Pt. 1, Introduction; pt. 2, Status and pro- 
gram of education for the home; pt. 3, Local 
progress in education for the home 

Education of girls in domestic subjects. In 
H. T. Ashby. Infant mortality, p 193-9 '15 

Highest education for women. J. C. Lathrop. 
J Home Econ 8:1-8 Ja '16 

A plea for a graduate school which would 
be a center for research and discovery in 
regard to questions affecting the home 

Home economics. H. W. Calvin and C. A. Ly- 
ford. In U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 
1915, V 1 p 317-43 "15 

Discusses home economics in various 
kinds of schools, state supervision, text- 
books, practice work, continuation schools 
and classes for adult women and for col- 
ored students, legislation, and associations 

Organization and methods in home economics 
extension, by Mrs. H. W. Calvin; Home 
demonstrations, by M. E. Creswell. In Assn. 
of Am. agric. colleges and exper. stations. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 241-53 

Second course in homemaking, with two hun- 
dred inexpensive cooking receipts. Mabel H. 
Kittredge. 249p il *80c (My) '15 Century 

Training for the home. In J: A. Lapp and C. H. 
Mote. Learning to earn, p 143-63 '15 

Vocational training of girls in the state of 
New York. A. C. Hedges, il bibl N Y State 
Univ Bui no 612 41p Ap 1 '16 Univ. of 
state of N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 

See also Demonstration work in domestic 
science; States relations service 

Bibliography 

* List of references on domestic science (especi- 

ally food and cooking) in relation to working 
people. U. S. Library of congress. 12p S 2 
'15 (Typew Cost of copying 60c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Conferences 

* American home economics assn. Meetings of 

the council, Seattle, Washington, Aug. 18, 
1915. American Home Economics Assn Bui 
no 3 ser 3 24p N '15 The Assn., Baltimore. 
Md. 



80 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Domestic science — Conferences — Continued 

* American home economics assn. Program of 

the annual meeting:, N. Y. state college of 
agriculture at Cornell university, Ithaca, 
N. Y., June 28-July 2, 1916. American 
Home Economics Assn Bui (Baltimore, Md.) 
no 2 ser 4 15p Je '16 

Curriculum 

* Domestic science: state course of study for the 

public schools of Indiana. Ind Dept of Pub 
Instruction Bui no 20 (Vocational ser no 13) 
126p S '15 

Equipment 
Equipment for teaching domestic science. 
Helen Kinne. 104p il *80c '16 Whitcomb & 
Barrows 
Domestic servants 

* Road to trained service in the household. 

Henrietta Roelofs. (Comm on household em- 
ployment bul no 2) 13p Nat, bd, of young 
women's Christian assn., 600 Lexington av., 
N. Y. 

Doors, Revolving 
Iowa state labor commission has ruled that 
revolving doors are illegal because they do 
not comply with the law requiring all en- 
trance and exit doors to open outward 
(Press rept D 2 '15) 

Double taxation 

Reports 

* National tax assn. Com. on double taxation 

and situs for the purposes of taxation. Re- 
port. 358-90P '15 Office of treasurer, 15 Dey 
St., N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the 
ninth annual conference of the National tax 
assn. 
Drainage 

* Drainage. W: P. Brooks. 16p '15 Wm. P. 

Brooks, Amherst, Mass. 

Reprint from the Fifty- sixth annual re- 
port of the Massachusetts state board of 
agriculture 

* Farm drainage in North Carolina. H. M, 

Lynde. N C Agric Exp Sta Bul no 234 32p 
il N '15 N. C. dept. of agric. 

Kansas state drainage and conservation assn. 
was formed in Topeka on June 22, 1916. 
The object of the association is to unite the 
influence of all interested in drainage and 
flood prevention, in securing better legisla- 
tion. C. B. Zarker, chm,, Topeka 

Land drainage. In T. L. Lyon and others. 
Soils, p 627-62 '15 

Contains short bibliography 

Testing various soils for drainage properties. 
J: R. Haswell. Eng N 76:211-14 Ag 3 '16 

Utah supreme court has upheld the validitv of 
the drainage act, passed in 1913 and amended 
in 1915; held that provision for the taxation 
of lands on the acreage basis does not in- 
validate the act, since the taxation referred 
to is a special assessment levied for local 
improvements. State, ex rel., v. Corinne 
drainage district of Boxelder county, Utah, 
and others (Press rept Mr 27 '16) 

Bibliography 

Agricultural experiment stations, irrigation, 
drainage: list of U. S. government publica- 
tions. (Price list 42 7th ed) 24p N '15 U. S. 
supt. of doc. 

Conferences 
National drainage congress. Sixth annual 
meeting, Cairo, 111., Jan. 19-21, 1916. Ad- 
dresses were delivered by F. W. Newell on 
Federal legislation, and by John T. Stewart 
on Farm drainage, S. M. Woodward and 
w. K. Halt discussed flood protection. The 
congress advocates national legislation for 
flood protection and reclamation of swamps 
and overflowed lands 
• North Carolina drainage assn. Proceedings of 
the 7th annual drainage convention held at 
Wilson NC., Nov. 18-19, 1914. (Economic 
pa no 41) 76p il postage 15c '15 N. C. geolog- 
ical and economic survey, Chapel Hill 

Contains: Upbuilding of eastern Carolina 
thru dramage and the resulting benefits to 
the railroads, by B. E. Rice; Tile drainage, 
by W. E. Sherwin; importance of principles 



of farm drainage, by H. M. Lynde; Drainage 
and development of North Carolina's muck 
lands, by C. W. Mengel; North Carolina 
drainage law and some needed amendments, 
by J: H, Small; Some new factors in drain- 
age work in North Carolina, by Lawrence 
Brett 

Constitutional amendments 

Oregon — Amendments to permit the state to 
bond itself up to $18,000,000 for the purchase 
of irrigation and drainage district bonds 
where the interest on same is guaranteed 
by the county in which the district is 
situated and permit the county to guarantee 
the interest. Administrative details are left 
to the legislature (Je 24 '16) 

Cost 
* Cost of tile drainage: a study of the cost of 
installing thirty-five miles of tile drains on 
a farm in Huron county, Ohio. L. H. Goddard 
and H. O. Tiffany. Ohio Agric Exper Sta 
Circ no 147 21-44p S 15 '14 Agricultural ex- 
periment station, Wooster, O. 

Districts 

[Discussion of power of legislature to create 
drainage districts: case- note to Mittman v. 
Farmer.] Ann Cas 1915C 9 

Nebraska — U. S. supreme court upholds the 
constitutionality of the Nebraska drainage 
laws of 1905 and 1909 and the validity of 
the creation of drainage district no. 2 in 
Dakota county, which involved the construc- 
tion of a ditch across private lands. The 
court asserts that there is nothing in the 
federal constitution which denies to states 
the right to take account of their special 
exig-encies and when the extent of their arid 
or wet lands is such that a plan for irriga- 
tion or reclamation, according to districts, 
may fairly be regarded as one which pro- 
motes the public interests, they may formu- 
late this policy or exercise the right of emi- 
nent domain. Missouri drainage law was also 
upheld (Press rept N 29 '15) 

Investigations 

Manitoba provincial government has promised 
a large deputation to appoint a drainage 
commission to report on a comprehensive 
scheme of drainage in the whole province 
(F '16) 

Machinery 

* Trenching machinery used for the construc- 

tion of trenches for tile drains. D. L. Yar- 
nell. Farmers' Bul no 698 27p il D 28 '15 

Reports 

Massachusetts. Dept. of health. Report upon 
the protection of the public health in the 
valley of the Neponset river. (House no 1780) 
75p Weight 6 oz Enclose postage map '16 
Mass. supt. of doc. 

Drama, Municipal 
Bulletin on community music and drama, out- 
lining a plan for the development of a series 
of "home talent entertainments." E. B. 
Gordon, 16p il Je '15 Bd, of education, Win- 
field, Kan, 

The board also publishes the program of 
the Fourth season of community music and 
drama in Winfield 

Druggists. See Pharmacists 

Drugless healing 
California — P. L. Crane, drugless practitioner 
of Los Angeles, filed, April 12, 1916, notice 
of appeal to the U. S. supreme court from a 
decision of the federal district court denying 
an injunction against enforcement of the 
state medical practice act. The petition al- 
leged the law discriminated in favor of 
"divine healing" 

Regulation 

* Oregon, Bd. of chiropractic examiners. Rules 

and regulations, 3p '16" Oregon state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 
Drugs 
Decennial edition of the U, S, Pharmacopoeia 
has been issued, which in October becomes 
the official and legal standard for doctors, 
druggists and chemists. The war is respon- 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



81 



Drugs —Continued 

sible for an uncommon number of alterations 
in this edition. Sixty new drugs are added 
to the list offered in 1905. This is the first 
edition since the Pure food and drugs act 
and hence the first to establish the minimum 
standards of purity for drugs that enter into 
the preparation of certain prepared foods (Je 
'16) 

See also Narcotics; Poisons 

Conferences 
See Food — Conferences 
Laws 
Ohio food and drug laws; also sanitary in- 
spection and weights and measures laws. 
58p '16 Ohio bd. of agric. 

Legislation, Comparative 

Report of legislative committee. C. C. Doll, 
chm. In Am. assn. of pharmaceutical 
chemists. Proceedings, 1915, p 180-208 

Contains a digest of proposed and en- 
acted legislation of 1915 relative to phar- 
macy, drugs, narcotics, weights and meas- 
ures, and honest advertising. Federal anti- 
narcotic law, regulations and decisions, 
p 243-75 

IVIisbranded 
United States supreme court has upheld the 
constitutionahty of the Sherley amendment 
to the 1906 pure food law regulating state- 
ments as to the curative effects of medicines 
in interstate commerce; held that the law 
struck precisely at misstatements either on 
the label or on printed circulars accompany- 
ing medicines (Press rept Ja 11 '16) 
Drunkenness. See Inebriates 
Dry farming 

Dry- farming. In T. L. Lyon and others. Soils, 
p 712-17 '15 
Dumb, See Deaf and dumb 
Dumping. See Tariff— Dumping duties 
Dust 

Pathogenicity of street dust; report by the 
Public health committee of the New York 
academy of medicine, bibl Medical Record 
(51 Fifth av.. N. Y.) 88:1059-61 D 18 '15 15c 
Dust prevention 
Dust prevention and bituminous surfaces. 11 
In A. H. Blanchard. Elements of highway 
engineering, p 227-52 '15 
Dust prevention; with discussion. W. W. 
Crosby. In Ontario good roads assn. Pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 83-8 
Dust suppression on suburban and country 
roads. W: H. Connell. il Am. City (T & C 
ed) 13:279-82 O '15 
Results of road oiling in the Middle west. T. R. 
Agg. il Am City (T and C ed) 14:330-2 Ap '16 
Cost 

* Cost of oiling streets in New York state cities 

and kinds of material used. N Y State Bur 
Municipal Information Rept no 65 3p (Typew 
15c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Methods and cost of oiling earth roads in 
Illinois. B. H. Pepmeier. il Eng & Contr 46: 
112-15 Ag 2 '16 
Dust removal 

* New sampling apparatus for the determination 

of aerial dust. G: T. Palmer. 54-5p il 
George T. Palmer, N. Y. state comm. on 
ventilation, Albany 

Reprinted from American Journal of Pub- 
lic Health, 755 Boylston St., Boston, v. 6, 
no. 1 
Solution of smoke, fume and dust problems bv 
electrical precipitation. Linn Bradley. Met & 
Chem Eng 13:911-14 D 1 '15 
See also Coal dust 
Dyestuffs 

Coming industry: the development of Ameri- 
can color chemistry and dyestuff manufac- 
ture, il Nation's Business 4:16-17 Jl '16 

Bibliography 

* List of references on dyestuffs (chemistry, 

manufacture and trade). U. S. Library of 
congress, lip Ja '16 (Typew Cost of copying 
55c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 



Earth roads. See Roads. Earth 
Economic surveys 
Economic situation and possibilities of Peru. 
Isaac Alzamora. Econ World n s 11:782- 12- 
11-13, 74-7, 202-4, 266-8 Je 17, Jl 1, 15 Ag 12,' 
26 '16 

The first of a series of articles upon the 
present economic conditions in Peru and 
upon the economic possibilities afforded by 
that South American republic 
Indiana: a social and economic survey. F. D. 
Streightoff and F. H. Streightoff. 261p $1.25 
16 W. K. Stewart co., Indianapohs 

Contains chapters on: Physical basis; 
Trees; Agriculture; Manufactures; Trans- 
portation; Labor; Labor legislation; Govern- 
ment; Finances; Constitution; Charities and 
correction; Education. Appendix contains 
selected references 
Economic zoologoy. See Birds; Cats; Rats 
Economics 
Creation of wealth: modern efficiency meth- 
ods analyzed and applied. J. H. Lockwood. 
225p *$1 '15 Bobbs 

Handbook of the American economic associa- 
tion, 1916. Am Econ R 6:sup l-95p '16 75c 
See also European war — Economic results 
Conferences 
* American economic assn. Papers and pro- 
ceedings of the 28th annual meeting, Wash- 
ington, D. C, December, 1915. Am Econ R 
V 6 sup 246p Mr '16 

Contains the following papers: Apportion- 
ment of representatives, by W. F. Willcox; 
Probable changes in the foreign trade of the 
U. S. resulting from the European war, bv 
E. R. Johnson; Budget making and the in- 
creased cost of government, by F: A. Cleve- 
land; Economic costs of war, by J: B. Clark; 
Statistical side of the economic costs of war, 
by W: S. Rossiter; Economic theorizing 
and scientific progress, by J. H. Hollander; 
Role of money in economic theory, by W. C. 
Mitchell; Price maintenance, by F. W. Taus- 
sig; Relation of public finance to private 
credit, by Willard Straight 

Periodicals 
National Economic League Quarterly is pub- 
lished by the National economic league (6 
Beacon st., Boston). The first issue ap- 
peared in April, 1915. It declares for its ob- 
ject: The education and expression of public 
opinion. Subscription, $2 a year; single 
numbers 25c. $1 to libraries and members of 
economic clubs 
Edison, Thomas Alva 

Bibliography 
List of references on the life and inventions of 
Thomas A. Edison. TJ. S. Library of con- 
gress. 5p Ap 24 '16 (Typew Cost of copying 
25c) 
Obtained only thru P. A, I. S. 
Education 
Education in Canada, by A. T. Smith; Educa- 
tion in the Central and South American 
states; Educational movements in Great 
Britain and Ireland; Education in the smal- 
ler kingdoms of Northern Europe; Educa- 
tional conditions in France and Switzerland; 
Education in Central Europe; Education in 
the kingdoms of Southern Europe; Educa- 
tion in Russia; Modern education in Asia, 
and Africa; Education in Australasia. Jn 
U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 
665-788 '15 
Education in territories and dependencies: 
schools conducted by the United States gov- 
ernment. In U. S. Comr. of education. Re- 
port, 1914; V 1 p 633-54 '15 

Contains: Education of natives of Alaska; 
The schools of Hawaii; Canal zone; Educa- 
tion in the Philippines 
• General survey of education, 1914. W. C. Ryan, 
Jr. 18p '15 U. S. bur. of educ. 



^2 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Education —Continued , 

Great Britain— Prime Minister has appointed 
two committees to inquire into the position 
of science and modern languages respec- 
tively in the system of education in Great 
Britain. These subjects will be considered 
chiefly from the point of view of education 
as a whole (Ag '16) 

* History of education in Iowa. C R. Aurner. 4v 

436, 469, 464, 471p $2 ea '14-'16 State hist. soc. 
of Iowa, Iowa City 

* Meaning of education; contributions to a phil- 

osophy of education. N. M. Butler, rev and 
enl ed 385p *$1.50 N '15 Scribner 
Significant problems of education in New Or- 
leans. D. S. Hill. School and Soc 4:197-203 Ag 
5 '16 

Contains the following parts: pt. 1, Educa- 
tion the eternal question; pt. 2, All citizens 
should know the schools; pt. 3, Trained edu- 
cators are in demand; pt. 4, Education as a 
science; pt. 5, No cure-all in education; pt. 
6, Gratifying progress, shoals ahead; pt. 7, 
Nine typical educational problems in New 
Orleans; pt. 8, Open-mindedness, not blind 
partisanship, to solve educational problems 

* The Nation for June 29, 1916, is a National edu- 

cation association number. It contains: 
Great step in the progress of health; Na- 
tional education association; Old education 
and the new, by P. E. More; Vocational and 
occupational education in New York city, by 
John Martin; Gary system; a summary and 
a criticism, by H. deW. Fuller; Tenders of 
the lamp, by Stanley Went; Supervision of 
play, by R. J. Davis. A twelve page sup- 
plement contains the program of the asso- 
ciation meeting held in New York, July 1-8, 
1916 10c 

See also Agicultural education; Architec- 
tural education; Art — Study and teaching; 
Bible in the schools; Blind — Education; 
Colleges and viniversities; Commercial edu- 
cation; Continuation schools; Corporation 
schools; Cripples — Education; Deaf and 
dumb — Education; Defective children — Edu- 
cation; Department store education; Do- 
mestic science; Engineering education; High 
schools; Home making; Immigrants — Edu- 
cation; Immigration — Educational test; In- 
dians — Education; Industrial education; In- 
s.urance. Life — Education; Junior high 
schools; Kindergartens; Lectures; Legal 
education; Medical education; Military in- 
struction; Mining education; Montessori 
method; Moving pictures; Museums; Nauti- 
cal education; Negroes — Education; Normal 
schools; Parents — Education; Part-time 
schools; Play schools; Public health educa- 
tion; Religious education; Roads — Construc- 
tion and repair — Training; Rural schools; 
Scholarships; Schools; Summer schools: 
Text-books; Trade schools; Veterinary edu- 
cation; Vocational education; Women — Edu- 
cation; Young men's Christian association — 
Educational work 

Administration 

* Improvement of educational administration in 

Massachusetts. David Snedden. Mass Bd 
Educ Bui 1916 no 1 (Whole no 50) 70p pos- 
tage 2c '16 

Reprint from the 79th report of the Mass, 
board of education 

Bibliography 

* Bibliography of education for 1911-12. U S Bur 

Educ Bui 1915 no 30 151p '15 

* Education: list of U. S. government publica- 

tions. (Price list 31 5th ed) 48p Mr '16 U. S. 
supt. of doc. 

Conferences 
Educational organizations. H: R. Evans. In 
U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 
615-32 '15 

Contains a r6sum6 of the annual meetings 
of: N. E. A. (Department of superintend- 
ence; National council of education); Na- 
tional society for the study of education; 
Association of collegiate alumnae; Associa- 
tion of history teachers of the Middle states 
and Maryland; Association of colleges and 
secondary schools of the Southern states; 



Catholic educational association; American 
institute of instruction; American associa- 
tion for the advancement of science, section 
L; National league of compulsory education; 
Conference on the education of backward, 
truant, delinquent, and dependent children; 
National association of school accounting 
ofliicers; General education board; Report of 
secretary of the National education associa- 
tion 
National education assn.. Annual convention. 
New York, July 3-8, 1916. Program appears 
in the bulletin of the association for June 
1916 

* National education assn. of the U. S. Journal 

of proceedings and addresses of the 53d 
annual meeting and International congress 
on education, Oakland, Cal., Aug. 16-27, 1915. 
1193p $2 '15 Secretary's office, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 

Contains addresses on educational progress 
in various countries, and on various phases 
of the school question; reports of round 
tables on school codes, education of the 
immigrants, exceptional children, teachers, 
and child relations; and reports of the de- 
partmental meetings. Indexed completely in 
Readers' Guide 

* Pan American scientific congress. 2d congress, 

Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 1916. 
Program of section- IV: education. 5lp '15 
John Barrett, sec. gen., Pan American 
union, Washington, D. C. 

Sessions were held by various subsections 
on: Engineering education. Medical educa- 
. tion. Agricultural education. Industrial edu- 
cation, Commercial education, Elementary 
education, University education. Education 
of women. Secondary education, Exchange 
of professors and students 
Southern conference for education and indus- 
try. Meeting at New Orleans, La., April 
16-20, 1916. Topics for discussion include: 
Ideals of American education on the light 
of the present world crisis; System of voca- 
tional education adapted to Southern needs; 
Training for leadership. Cne session was 
scheduled for a community conference, at 
which the members would be neighbors come 
together to plan out the community program 
for the year. Resolutions were adopted urg- 
ing congress to create a federal education 
department, and endorsing the Smith- 
Hughes bill, now before congress, which 
proposes to establish vocational training in 
high and normal schools of the United States 

Cost 

* Cost of education per pupil in cities of New 

York state. N Y State Bur Municipal Infor- 
mation Rept no 96 Ip Je 8 '16 (Typew 5c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Exhibits 

* Education exhibits at the Panama-Interna- 

tional exposition, San Francisco, Cal., 1915. 
W. C. Ryan, jr. il maps U S Bur Educ Bui 
1916 no 1 113p '16 

Laws 

See School laws 

Periodicals 
Educational Monthly (State normal school, 
Athens, Ga.) became with the Jan., 1916, 
issue an organ of the Southern conference 
for education and industry. A department 
devoted to the conference will be conducted 
under the direction of Dr. A. P. Bourland, 
the conference secretary 

Reports 

* Carnegie foundation for the advancement of 

teaching. 10th annual report of the presi- 
dent and of the treasurer, 1915. 141p Je 19 '16 
The Found., 576 5th av., N. Y. 

* General education bd. Report of the secre- 

tary, 1914-1915. 82t) maps '15 The Board, 
61 Broadway. N. Y. 

Contains: College and university appro- 
priations; Medical education; Education in 
the southern states; Farm demonstrations; 
Educational research; Public education in 
Maryland; Treasurer's report 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



83 



Education — Heports— Continued 

* Idaho. Boara of education and board of re- 

gents of the University of Idaho. First 
biennial report together with report of the 
state superintendent of public instruction 
and of state educational institutions for 
1913-1914. 282p '15 

Contains special reports on high schools 
and school revenue; reports of state educa- 
tional institutions; and an appendix giving 
constitutional and legislative provisions 

* Massachusetts. Bd. of education. 79th an- 

nual report, January, 1916. (Pub doc no 2) 
361-lllp Weight 1% lbs Enclose postage '16 
Part 1 contains: Improvement of educa- 
tional administration in Massachusetts, Re- 
view of report of the commission on economy 
and efficiency relative to Mass. normal 
schools; Proposed legislation; pt. 2, Review 
of reports of agents of the board and normal 
school principals; pt. 3, Detailed report of 
the work of the board; pt. 4, Statistical re- 
turns 

* Report on the work of the bureau of education 

for the natives of Alaska, 1913-14. U S Bur 
Educ Bui 1915 no 48 52p il map '15 

* U. S. Commissioner of education. Report for 

the year ended June 30, 1914. 2 v 810; 565p 
'15 

* U. S. Commissioner of education. Report for 

the year ended June 30, 1915. v 1 780p '15 
Educational directories 

* Educational directory, 1915-16. U S Bur Educ 

Bui 1915 no 43 192p '15 

* New York Evening Post educational directory, 

1915-1916, containing an up-to-date list of 
the leading schools and colleges in the East- 
ern states, comp. by the Educational bur. 
of the N. Y. Evening Post. 32p il '15 N. Y. 
Evening Post, 20 Vesey St., N. Y. 

Schools are grouped by subjects, as law 
schools, military schools, etc. 

See also School directories 
Educational institutions. See Colleges and uni- 
versities; Normal schools 
Educational measurements 
Measurements in elementary education. D. S. 
Hill. In New Orleans, La. Public schools. 
Annual report, 1913-1914, p 57-127 

Pt. 1, Studies of the progress of 36,284 
school children in New Orleans and related 
questions; 2, The educational laboratory; 3, 
Concerning industrial education 

See also Teachers — Measurement 
Conferences 

* Second annual conference on educational 

measurements held under the auspices of 
the Extension division of Indiana university 
at Bloomington, Ind., April 16-17, 1915. Ind 
Univ Bui V 13 no 11 221p 50c O '15 Univ. 
bookstore, Bloomington, Ind. 

Economy in education, cooperative re- 
search, supervisory control by means of ob- 
jective standards, limitation of training, 
making education definite, problems in high 
schools and with special subjects, distribu- 
tion of teachers' marks and school surveys 
were among the subjects discussed. Appen- 
dix contains charts dealing with problems 
discussed 

Educational organizations 
Educational boards, foundations, and associ- 
ations. H: R. Evans. In U. S. Comr. of 
education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 603-34 '15 

Outlines work of various educational 
boards and foundations and gives a brief 
r6sum6 of the meetings of the various as- 
sociations 

Efficiency 

* Chicago bur. of public efficiency. Some opin- 

ions of its work. 24p '15 Chicago bur. of pub, 
efficiency, 315 Plymouth court, Chicago 

Efficiency and standardization. C. B. Auel. 
Am Ind 16:31-3 N '15 

Non-technical discussion of various lines 
in which energy may be conserved by means 
of intelligent public effort. From an address 
before the recent Efficiency society confer- 
ence. Lake Placid, N. Y. 

Efficiency society, incorporated, has for its ob- 
ject the reduction of waste thru the adop- 
tion of right methods. Its efforts are both 



curative and preventive; they are intended 
to meet existing evils and to influence in- 
struction of the rising generation. The so- 
ciety, commencing September, 1915, publishes 
a Journal under the direction of an editor- 
in-chief, at $2 per year; single copies 20 
cents. The old Journal was discontinued. 
May, 1913. The Soc, 119 W. 40th st.. N. Y. 
Increased efficiency as a result of increased 
governmental functions. R. E. George. Ann 
Am Acad 64:77-88 Mr '16 

See also Municipal government; State gov- 
ernment 

Conferences 

Third Pennsylvania welfare, efficiency and 
engineering conference was held in Harris- 
burg, Nov. 16-18, 1915. It was called to- 
gether to familiarize the public and the 
various departments of the state government 
with the work of the separate departments 
which have to do with state engineering 
projects, natural resources and industries 
Efficiency, Industrial 

* [Business efficiency.] E: N. Hurley. ISp- 

(Mim) F 3 '16 U. S. federal trade comm. 

Discusses a plan to cooperate with manu- 
facturers and merchants to improve business 
conditions thru a better knowledge of busi- 
ness costs and principles. This involves uni- 
form accounting and standard systems 

* Creation of wealth: modern efficiency meth- 

ods analj'zed and applied. J. H. Lockwood. 
225p *$1 '15 Bobbs 
Effect of temperature and humidity. Metal 
Work 86:175-6 Ag 11 '16 
"= Hiring and firing: its economic waste and how 
to avoid it. M. W. Alexander. 16p Jl '15 Nat. 
assn. manufacturers, 30 Church st., N. Y. 

Address delivered at the twentieth annual 
convention of the National association of 
manufacturers of the U. S. A., New York 
city. May 26, 1915 

See also Motion study; Scientific manage- 
ment 
Efficiency, Personal. See Thrift 
Efficiency bureaus. See Municipal research 

Eggs 

* New York (city). Dept. of health. Regulations,^ 

adopted Mar. 30, 1915, governing the break- 
ing out of eggs for edible and inedible pur- 
poses. 12p '15 

* Study of the preparation of frozen and dried 

eggs in the producing section. M. E. Pen- 
nington and others, pi U S Dept of Agric 
Bui no 224 (Professional paper) 99p il Ap 
28 '16 

Cold storage 

* Minnesota — Act to prohibit the sale or adver- 

tising for sale of cold storage eggs without 
making it known to the purchaser or pros- 
pective purchaser that they are cold storage 
eggs. (Approved F 25 '15) Minn Dairy and 
Food Comr Bui no 58 Ip '15 
New York state department of food and mar- 
kets has directed that all eggs kept in cold 
storage must on and after Sept. 1, 1916, be 
branded on the shell with the words "cold 
storage" or their equivalent. As a conse- 
quence of protests it was later decided that 
the cases should be stamped storage eggs 
instead of each one being stamped individu- 
ally 
■" Rules and regulations governing the storage 
and distribution of cold storage eggs. Ip 
(Mim) N 16 '15 N. Y. (state) dept. of food 
and markets, 202 Franklin st., N. Y. 

Shipment 

Conferences 
Egg damage conference met, Aug. 25, 1916, to 
discuss rules affecting the inspection of egg 
shipments and the basis of claims for dam- 
age. Traffic managers' committee of the 
Trunk line assn. and representatives of lead- 
ing trade organizations attended. The text 
of the proposed rules appeared in tbo N. Y. 
Produce Review and American Creamery 
(173-175 Chambers St., N. Y. $1 a year) for 
August 30, 1916 



84 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Oreg-on— Supreme court held June, 1916, as un- 
constitutional and void, the 1915 session 
laws, which required Oregon Arms selling 
imported eggs to advertise such sale for use 
in their places of business ; held that im- 
ported eggs are subject to federal pure food 
and drug act and that this section of the 
law is beyond the power of state legislation 
anti void. State of Oregon v. J. C. Jackson 
(Press rept) 
Eight- hour day. See Hours of labor 

Election officers 

Salaries 

See Salaries^Election officers 

Elections 

See also Absent voting; Corrupt practices; 
County superintendents — Election; Munici- 
pal elections; Nominations; Preferential 
voting; Primaries; Proportional representa- 
tion; Registrations; Suffrage; Voting: 

Advertisements 
New York — Bill was introduced into the 
legislature which provides that the state 
shall issue and place in the hands of every 
voter five days before a primary election a 
catalogue containing a picture and biographi- 
cal sketch of every candidate, with a state- 
ment of his political principles and what he 
intends to accomplish while in office. Can- 
didates must bear the expense of the cata- 
logue, state officers being assessed $300 a 
page, senators, $50, and representatives, $25. 
State committees may explain their princi- 
ples and insert their platforms at the rate 
of $300 a page. Two pages is the individual 
limit. It is urged in support of this measure 
that it is the duty of the state to see that 
the voters are fully informed as to the quali- 
fications of all of the candidates so that they 
may be enabled to make an intelligent choice 
on election day; the information, however, to 
come from the candidate himself (F 18 '16) 

Laws 

* Alabama — Act providing for the establishment 

of election districts, etc. (H B 490 Approved 
F 11 '15) 3p Ala. dept. of archives & history 

* Alabama — Act relating to elections and to 

limit, regulate, control and restrict cam- 
paign and other expenditures in connection 
with elections, etc. (H B 493 Approved Je 
19 '15) 8p Ala. dept. of archives & history 

* Alabama — Act to amend sections 407-11 of the 

Code of Alabama relating to challenging of 
voters. (H B 492 Approved Je 19 '15) 3p 
Ala. dept. of archives & history 

* Illinois election laws in force February 5, 1916. 

140p '16 111. sec. of ^ate 

* Minnesota — General election laws. 155p '15 

Minn. sec. of state 

* Missouri — Election laws of the state -of Mis- 

souri and the federal naturalization laws. 
233p '16 Cornelius Roach, sec. of state, Jef- 
ferson City, Mo. 

* Ohio — Election laws. 317p '15 Ohio sec. of state 

* Oregon — Statutes and constitution relating to 

elections in the state of Oregon, 1915; also 
such provisions of the constitution of Oregon 
and such statutes of the U. S. as pertain 
to elections in this state. 245p '15 Oregon 
state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 

* Pennsylvania — Digest of the election laws and 

an index to the same as compiled for 
Smull's legislative hand book. 431-552+401- 
30p '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
Legislation of 1914 affecting nominations and 
elections. V. J, West. Am Pol Sci R 9:738- 
43 N '15 

Arranged under following subjects: Equal 
suffrage; Nominations; Elections; The short 
ballot; The recall; Corrupt practices 
Legislation of 1915 concerning nominations and 
elections. V. J. West. Am Pol Sci R 9:743-8 
N '15 
Arranged under following subjects: Quali- 



fications for voting; Registration of voters; 
Nominations; Presidential preference prima- 
ries; Second choice voting; Rotation of 
names; Non-partisan elections; Elections; 
Absentee voting; The recall; Corrupt prac- 
tices 

Non-partisan 

Constitutional amendments of 1915 and non- 
partisan acts. Cal Commonwealth Club 
Transac v 10 no 12 423-86p O '15 

[Validity of non-partisan ballot law: case-note 
to Winston v. Moore. J Ann Cas 1915C 504 

See also Municipal elections — Non-parti- 
san; Primaries 

Referendum measures, 1915 
California — Defining political parties; declar- 
ing that office of United States senator, rep- 
resentative in congress, congressional party 
committeeman, delegate to national party 
convention and presidential elector shall be 
partisan, and all other offices non-partisan; 
regulating primary elections, etc.; provid- 
ing for election and organization of con- 
gressional party committees by political 
parties; and repealing primary law of 1913. 
Referendum measure by petition of voters. 
Rejected. Yes 112,681 No 156,967 O '15 
California — Providing for the size, form and 
manner of printing of ballots to be used at 
general elections, including gubernatorial 
and presidential elections, for the determi- 
nation of the order in which state, district 
and county offices shall appear thereon, for 
the preparation of ballot titles for measures 
submitted to the electors, and for the man- 
ner in which such titles, oflfices and names 
of candidates therefor, and instructions to 
voters shall be printed upon such ballots. 
Referendum measure by petition of voters. 
Rejected. Yes 106,377 No 151,067 O '15 

Official pamphlet 

Sec Elections — Advertisements 

Elections, Contested 

Ohio supreme court handed down a decision 
April 25, 1916, upholding the provision of the 
Dayton charter and similar home rule gov- 
ernments in the case of the election of J: R. 
Flotron to the city commission of Dayton, 
which had been contested by Willard Bar- 
ringer, Socialist opponent for 'the commis- 
sionship. This is the first case of its kind 
taken into the state courts for settlement 
and was a test of the home-rule city govern- 
ment. Mr. Flotron says the fight was for a 
principle and that it means tnat cities can 
enact their own organic laws without the in- 
terference of the state authorities 

See also Legislative procedure — Contested 
elections 

Electric apparatus and appliances 

* Commonwealth Edison company, Chicago. 

Rules and information pertaining to electric 
service, meters, wiring and motors, filed with 
the state public utilities comm. of Illinois, 
June 1, 1915. diags 86p postage 3c '15 Chicago 
munic. ref. lib. 

* List of inspected electrical appliances. 171p 

Ap '16 Underwriters laboratories, 207 E. 
Ohio St., Chicago 

See also Electric wire and wiring 

Bibliography 

* List of references on the life and inventions 

of Thomas A. Edison. U. S. Library of con- 
gress. 5p Ap 24 '16 (Typew Cost of copying 
25c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Statistics 

Census of electrical machinery, appai-atus and 
supplies. Elec W 68:264-5 Ag 5 '16 
Electric lamps 

Unit of measurement 

Association of railway electrical engineers 

received a report at its meeting June 16, 

1916, from the committee on illumination 

recommending lumens to be adopted as the 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



85 



Electric lamps — Unit of measurement — Cont. 
unit of measurement in rating incandescent 
lamps, instead of the watt. Tile distinction 
is that the lumen is a unit of illumination 
while the watt is a unit of electrical power. 
The adoption of the new unit will have the 
practical effect of maintaining the same 
illumination, at less power consumption, 
instead of increasing the illumination with 
the same power consumption. The report 
will be referred to the membership by letter 
ballot 

Electric plants 

See also Hydroelectric plants; Power costs 
Accounting 

• Uniform system of accounts for electric light 

and power utilities, effective Jan. 1, 1916. 
73p '15 Colo, public utilities comm. 

Franchises 
Dallas, Texas — Granting a franchise covering 
the existing electric light plant. Referendum 
ordinance. Adopted. Yes 5.918 No 5.344 Ap 4 
'18 

Regulation 

Electric, gas and heating utilities. In F. L. 
Holmes. Regulation of railroads and pub- 
lic utilities in Wisconsin, p 170-92 '15 

Reports 

* Massachusetts. Gas and electric light com- 

missioners. 31st annual report of the board 
for the calendar year 1915, including tables 
from the annual returns for the year ending 
June 30, 1915. (Public doc no 35) 493p 3 lbs 
Enclose postage '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

Statistics 

Power-customer statistics in Massachusetts: 
analysis showing extent of power develop- 
ment in 24 municipalities with reference to 
population, energy used and rates. Elec R & 
W Elec'n 68:459 Mr 11 '16 
Electric plants, Central 

Electric service to interconnected Illinois 
towns: stages in the development of Illinois 
properties of middle west utilities company 
which serve 204 cities and hamlets; econo- 
mies effected by operation of few generating 
stations and by unit management, il Elec W 
67:1146-53 My 20 '16 

Growth of a combination utility in a small 
city: developments in growth of Texas prop- 
erty furnishing electric service, water and 
ice to city of 5,000 people, showing role 
played by efficient operation and manage- 
ment. A. C. Scott, il Elec W 67:1039-40 My 
6 '16 

Power station buildings. J. N. Hatch, il W 
Soc E J 21:266-87 Mr '16 

Trend of central station development: r6sum§ 
of early conditions in Chicago; Centraliza- 
tion of generating sources, station additions 
to meet future requirements and changing 
characteristics of peak loads. L. A. Fergu- 
son. Elec W 67:1156-61 My 20 '16 
Conferences 

American institute of electrical engineers, Chi- 
cago section, and the Western society of en- 
gineers. Electrical section. Joint meeting in 
Chicago, April 24, 1916. Central generating 
station in cities of less than 50,000 inhabi- 
tants was discussed. The following points 
were taken up: Reasons for failure in small 
cities, by A. J. Goed.ien; Duties and qualifi- 
cations of a city manager, which largely 
involve engineering matters, by R. L. Fitz- 
gerald; Work of the industrial preparedness 
committee, by Mr. Junkersfeld 
Safety devices 

Experience and recent developments in central 
station protective features. N. L. Pollard 
and J. T. Lawson. diags Am Inst E E Pro 
35:879-99 Je '16 

Paper presented at the 33d annual conven- 
tion of the Am. institute of electrical engi- 
neers. Cleveland. O.. June 27-30, 1916 
Electric plants, IVIunicipal 

Adair, la. — At the special election held to de- 
cide on the proposition to sell the local mu- 
nicipal electric light plant to the Iowa rail- 
way and light company of Cedar Rapids the 



vote was practically unanimous in favor of 
selhng. The plant will be turned over to the 
purchasing company shortly, and 24 hour 
service will then be inaugurated (My 11 '16) 

Calgary s municipal power plant. A. G. Chris- 
tie, il Power 43:352-7, 389-90 Mr 14-21 '16 

Evolution of the municipal electric and water 
plants of Tarentum, Pa. W. S. Robinson, 
il Am City (T and C ed) 14:341-3 Ap '16 

Municipal electrical utilities of western Can- 
ada. A. G. Christie. Power 43:378-81 Mr 14 '16 
Gives the factors contributing to success- 
ful municipal ownership and operation of 
electrical plants in western Canada, a brief 
survey of their equipments and itemized 
production cost 

Municipal power plant at Medicine Hat. A. G. 
Christie, il Power (10th av. and 36th st.» 
N. y.) 43:138-42 F 1 '16 5c 

Tacoma, Wash., is conducting a campaign for 
a chimneyless city in 1920 by supplying elec- 
tric power from its municipal plant for 
domestic use at a rate cheaper than the gas 
rate. Business rates are correspondingly low, 
and power current is supplied at a rate of 
from 5 to 15 per cent below that of the 
local private company 
See also Power plants 

Cost of operation 

Results from New York hall of records test. 
Power 43:361-2 Mr 14 '16 
Electric railroads 

See also Elevated railroads; Parks — Trans- 
portation; Street railroads 

Accidents 
See also Street railroads — Accidents 
Conferences 

American electric railway assn. Annual con- 
vention, Atlantic City, Oct. 9-13, 1916. E. B. 
Burritt, sec.-treas., 8 W. 40th st., N. Y. 

American electric railway assn. [Proceedings 
and abstracts of addresses given at the mid- 
year meeting at Chicago, Feb. 4, 1916]. Elec 
Ry J 47:244-72 F 5 '16 

Following addresses were given: What 
the electric railwaj^ wants, by C: L. Henry; 
Railways and government regulation, by 
O. W. Underwood; Principles of railway 
valuation, by N: T. Guernsey; Rate of re- 
turn on railway capital, by J. D. Mortimer; 
Uncertainty of utility valuation, by T. S. 
Williams; Return on Massachusetts invest- 
ment, by D. J. McGrath; Competition with 
other investments, by O. B. Willcox; In- 
creasing capacity of urban systems, by 
M. C. Brush; Elements of utility valuation, 
by George Weston; What constitutes util- 
ity value, by P. J. Kealy 

Crews 

See Street railroads — Crews 

Freight traffic 

Developing carload freight traffic on Illinois 
traction system, il Elec Ry J 48:48-57 Jl 8 
•16 

Shipping fruit by intef urban: how electric 
traction lines enable the farmer to reach 
the best markets easily and economically; 
the rapid growth of interurban freight ser- 
vice in the central states. H. C, Mason. 
Aera 4:184-8 O '15 

Passenger traffic 
* American electric railway transportation and 
traffic assn. Com. on passenger traffic. Re- 
port read before the convention held at San 
Francisco, Cal., Oct. 4-8, 1915. 14p il 25c '15 
The Assn., 8 W. 40th st., N. Y. 

Discusses: One-man car operation. Motor 
bus and trackless trolley, and Effect of pri- 
vately owned automobiles; gives excerpts 
from franchises requiring two men on each 
car; and gives extracts from a paper on one 
man car operation by R. M. Howard 

Regulation 
Regulation of public utilities. L. A. Busby. 
Elec Ry J 46:1081-4 N 27 '15 

Explains why electric railway regulation 
is a particularly difficult problem and dis- 
cusses the factors involved in regulation and 
in good service 



^ 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Electric railroads— Regulation —OontiwMcd 
Street and interurban rail.vays. In F. L. 
Holmes. Regulation of railroads and public 
utilities in Wisconsin, p 159-69 '15 

Relation of motor vehicles 
Electric railway and the automobile. Ernest 
Gonzenbach. Elec Ry J 47:75-6 Ja 8 '16 

The author considers competition from the 
private automobile a serious problem of the 
future, and recommends greater attention 
to the freight business, systematic traffic 
development, rearrangement of schedules 
and possible auxiliary bus service as reme- 
dies 

Standards 

* Engineering manual. $4 '16 Am. elec. ry. engi- 

neering assn., 8 W. 40th st., N. Y. 

Compendium of the standards and recom- 
mendations created and elaborated by com- 
mittees of the best railway engineering tal- 
ent in the country 

Statistics 

Electric railway statistics. Elec Ry J 47:159 
Ja 22 '16 
Electric transmission 

"* Electric power transmission in Iowa. A. H. 
Ford, map Univ of Iowa Ext Bui no 19 I6p 
Je 1 '16 Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City 

Rural service from Iowa transmission lines; 
analysis of five methods of supplying energy 
to Iowa farmers, giving division of invest- 
ment, rates for service and revenue, with 
recommendations. Elec W 68:221-2 Jl 29 '16 
Electric wire and wiring 

Commonwealth Edison company, Chicago. 
Rules and information pertaining to elec- 
tric service, meters, wiring and motors, filed 
with the state public utilities comm. of Illi- 
nois, June 1, 1915. diags 86p postage 3c '15 
Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

* Removal of wires and poles from streets: re- 

port. St. Louis munic. ref. lib. 3p Ap 21 '16 
(Typew 15c) 

Brief report based on replies from officials 
of seventeen of the largest cities in U. S. in 
response to the following questions: Do any 
leading cities prohibit stringing new wires 
and poles? What are the provisions for re- 
moving present wires and poles? In general, 
how far has work of removal progressed to 
date? Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Electrical engineers 

Conferences 

* American institute of electrical engineers. 

Proceedings of the meetings in New York, 
Oct. 8, 1915; Philadelphia, Oct. 11, 1915; St. 
Louis, Oct. 19-20. 1915. Am Inst E E Pro 34: 
2175-2594 O '15 $1 

* American institute of electrical engineers. 

Proceedings of the Pacific coast convention, 
Seattle, Wash., Sept. 5-9. 1916; and joint 
convention of Assn. of iron and steel electri- 
cal engineers with Am. institute of electrical 
engineers, Chicago, 111., Sept 18-22, 1916. il 
Am Inst E E Proc 35:1171-1337 Ag '16 $1 
Electricians, Municipal 

Conferences 
International assn. of municipal electricians. 
Annual convention, Baltimore, Md., Aug. 22- 
25, 1916. Program includes the following- 
papers: Electric powers and its value to 
municipalities, by C. P. Steinmetz; Modern 
municipal electric plants, by Frank Dix; 
Electrical fire hazard, by F. H. Moore; Street 
signs and traffic warning in connection with 
fire apparatus, by L. S. Branch; Fire alarm 
system, bv C. I. Diehl; Police signaling, by 
J. W. Kelly; Standard specifications cover- 
mg the construction at overhead crossings 
of Imes of public utilities in Pennsylvania, 
by F. H. Snow. C. R. George, sec, Houston, 
Tex. 

Ordinances 

* Berkeley, Cal.— Ordinance, rules and regula- 

tions governing electrical work in the city 
ot ^?,^i^^?y- <^0^<3 442 Passed Feb. 22, 1916) 
27p '16 City clerk, Berkeley, Cal. 



Electricity 

Society for electrical development has perfected 
plans for America's electrical week, Dec. 2-9, 
1916. Several booklets on "How to" will be 
issued. Also a booklet outlining the work 
that may be done by the industry in gen- 
eral and presenting the preliminary plan of 
action. S. L. Coles, sec, 29 W. 39th St., 
N. Y. 
See also Public works — Electric power 
Conferences 

National electric light assn. Conference, Chi- 
cago, May 22-27, 1916. Proceedings are pub- 
lished in Elec. R and W. Elec'n for May 27, 
1916. Technical and hydroelectric, commer- 
cial, electric range, accounting, electric vehi- 
cle sessions are reported, as well as individ- 
ual committee reports made at different 
sessions 

Pennsylvania electric assn. Convention, Eagles 
Mere Park, Sept. 6-8, 1916. Program includes 
the following papers: Construction records 
and accounts, by H. C. Hobson; Construc- 
tion costs, by F. Heinbokel; Store room and 
tool records, by W. P. McArdle; Method of 
securing consumers deterred by first cost of 
wiring, by E. C. Newman; Increased use of 
electric ranges and small appliances in the 
home, by H. W. Reed; Testing of current 
and potential transformers, by W. A. Fog- 
ler; Boiler-room operations, by H. H. Wil- 
son; Classification of men, wages and meth- 
ods in central station industry, by J. F. 
Martin and H. N. Mtiller and Cost and fac- 
tors in underground construction, by W. H. 
Keating and H. N. Miiller. H. M. Stine, sec, 
211 Locust St., Harrisburg 

Ordinances 

* Portland, Ore.— Electrical code. 216p '15 Lib. 

assn., Portland, Ore. 

Rates 

Chile — All electric companies furnishing light, 
power, telephone or transportation service 
must submit their rates for the approval of 
the president, unless such rates have been 
established by law or concession. Existing 
electric companies must submit their rates 
within 30 days from the date of the decree, 
and new companies must submit their rates 
within 30 days prior to the installation and 
operation of their service. When rates have 
been fixed, they cannot be altered without 
the approval of the president, and failure to 
comply with these regulations will result in 
cancellation of contract. No concession will 
be granted or renewed unless the conces- 
sionary agrees to give a discount of 50 per 
cent from regular rates to public or munici- 
pal offices of the cities in which the service 
is supplied (Mr 15 '16) 

Electric light and power. Univ of Texas Bui 
1915 no 45 (Munic research ser no 10) p 64- 
96 Ag 10 '15 

Electric lighting rates in some of the prin- 
cipal cities in the U. S. Comparative elec- 
tric power rates in some American cities. 
In Los Angeles, Cal. Bd. of public utilities. 
Report, 1915, p 21-2 '15 

Electrical rates: the load factor and the den- 
sity factor. G. P. Watkins. Q J Econ 30: 
519-45 My '16 

Rates and rate making. P. M. Lincoln. A.m Inst 
E E Pro 34:2175-214 O '15 

Bihliography 
[References on] electric light and power [rates 
with special reference to regulation]. U. S. 
Library of congress. Special Libraries 7:22- 
4 F '16 

Statistics 

* Electric power rates in cities. N Y State Bur 

Municipal Information Rept no 63 3p D 23 
'15 (Typew 15c) 

Statistics as to ownership; cents, minimum 
rate; minimum amount kilowatt to which it 
applies; cents, maximum rate; maximum 
amount kilowatt to which it applies; dis- 
count; minimum payment. Cities are ar- 
ranged by states. Obtained only thru 
P. A. I. S. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



87 



Electricity — Rates — Statistics —Continued 

* Rates for electric power in New York state 

cities. N Y State Bur Municipal Informa- 
tion Rept no 137 lip Mr 24 '16 (Typew 55c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Rates for residence lighting. Elec W 68:243-6 
Jl 29 '16 

Rules 

* National electrical code: regulations of the 

National board of tire underwriters for elec- 
tric wiring and apparatus as recommended 
by the National fire protection association. 
224p '15 Nat. fire protection assn. 

* Rules and information pertaining to electric 

service, meters, wiring and motors, filed 
with the state public utihties comm. of Illi- 
nois, June 1, 1915. 86p il '15 Commonwealth 
Edison co., Edison bldg., Adams & Clark 
St., Chicago 

Contains the reasonable rules and regula- 
tions of the company in force from time to 
time referred to in the printed contracts 
which customers are required to sign in 
order to obtain the company's service and 
which are supplementary to tlie electrical 
code of the city of Chicago 

* St. Louis, Mo. Dept. of public utilities. Rules 

and regulations lor the installation of wire 
and apparatus for light, heat and power. 
224p '16 St. Louis munic. ref. lib. 

Service 

* Commonwealth Edison company, Chicago. In- 

formation regarding lamp and repair service, 
effective March 1, 1916. 7p '16 Chicago munic. 
ref. lib. 

Legislation, Comparative 

Summary of state laws now enacted providing 
for the regulation of electric service, U S 
Bur Stand Circ no 56 (1st ed) p 202-26 Jl 28 
'16 

Standards 

* Standards for electric service, bibl U S Bur 

Stand Circ no 56 (1st ed) 262p Jl 28 '16 

Contains: Adequacy and safety of electric 
service; Meters and instruments; Standard- 
izing laboratories of state public-service 
commissions; Rules and regulations for elec- 
tric service as adopted by state commis- 
sions; Suggested rules for the regulation of 
electric service by state commissions; Regu- 
lation of electric service by city ordinance; 
Suggested ordinances for the regulation of 
electric service in towns and cities 

Statistics 

Electrical statistics, year 1914-15: showing 
comparative average consumption and aver- 
age price for electric current in ten large 
American cities. In Los Angeles, Cal. Bd. 
of public utilities. Report, 1915, p 21 '15 

Electricity on the farm. See Farm power 

Elevated railroads 

Building the new rapid transit system of New 
York city, by Fred Lavis; Design of the 
new elevated railway lines, by M. E. Griest. 
73p il '15 McGraw 
Reprinted from Engineering News 

Investigations 

Massachusetts — Legislature has appointed a 
recess committee to investigate the Boston 
elevated railroad (Je 2 '16) 

Ventilation 

Chicago elevated railroads have tried success- 
fully the experiment of running one fresh-air 
coach, with all windows removed, on each 
train. The experiment followed complaints 
against poorly ventilated cars (N 1 '15) 

Elevators 

* Elevator dangers: 401 fatal accidents on 

freight and passenger elevators in Chicago 
and Cook county, from December 1904 -March 
1916 inclusive. 30p '16 Public safety comm. 
of Chicago and Cook county, 10 S. La Salle 
St., Chicago, III. 



Elevators. W. R. Erskine. In Assn. of gov- 
ernmental labor officials of the U, S. and 
Canada. Proceedings, 1915, p 27-32 

Discusses prevention of accidents on all 
classes of elevators 

Doors 

Interlocks 
Building managers assn. of N. Y. estimates 
that it would cost $2,600,000 to install inter- 
locks in passenger elevators, as contained in 
the tentative new building code. President 
Martin of the Association suggests the 
following rules, which he thinks would pre- 
vent more accidents than the interlocks, if 
strictly enforced: Operators are forbidden 
to: (1) carry more than ? passengers on car, 
(2) start car until gates are properly closed 
and locked, (3) open gates until car is sta- 
tionary, (4) return car to floor after leaving 
same, (5) converse with passengers, unless 
as business requires, (6) stop, unless on sig- 
nal (N 13 '15) 

Ordinances 

* Portland, Ore. — Ordinance regulating auto- 

matic elevators, and declaring an emergency, 
(Ord 30871 Approved S 10 '15) 6p (Mim) '15 
Munic. ref. lib., Portland, Ore. 

Elevators. Grain. See Grain elevators 

Embargo 

Bibliography 

* List of references on the embargo, U, S. 

Library o"" congress. 12p Ja 17 '16 (Typew 
Cost of copying 60c) 

Obtained only thru P, A. I. S. 
Eminent domain 
Compensation in kind involved in Hartford 
water case. C, M, Saville. Eng N 76:246-7 
Ag 10 '16 

United States supreme court holds private 
property can be condemned for compensation 
purposes in Hartford water-rights case. 
Compensation in kind is a public use 
Minnesota supreme court has held that the 
pow^er of eminent domain cannot be exer- 
cised to take private property for a private 
purpose; that if municipalities are author- 
ized to take private property for a certain 
designated purpose, which is a public pur- 
pose, the necessity and propriety of taking 
the property becomes a legislative question 
over which the courts have no control; that 
if property taken for a proper purpose is 
used for an improper purpose, it is the duty 
of the courts to intervene for the protection 
of the property owner; that a city has power 
to condemn land for streets and alleys but 
not for a railroad right-of-way. State ex 
rel. Ford motor company, relator v. District 
court of the fourth iudicial district, respon- 
dent (Je 9 '16) 

See also Excess condemnation 

Bibliography 
Land taking for public improvements. InW: B, 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 136-9 '15 

Reports 

* Massachusetts. Comm. relative to taking land 

for public purposes. Supplementary report 
of the tax comr., the attorney-general and 
the chairman of the homestead comm. rela- 
tive to uniform methods and procedure for 
taking land for public purposes. (House 
no 1750) 78p postage 2c '16 Mass. oupt. of doc. 
The commission has redrafted the proposed 
act with a few minor changes 

Empire directory of municipal authorities and 
officials and year book of the Sanitary 
Record and Municipal Engineering for 1916. 
34th annual issue. $1.40 (duty extra) '16 
Sanitary Record and Municipal Engineer- 
ing, London (Municipal engineering) 

Employers' associations 

* Federation of employers' or^^anizations. Earl 

Constantihe, 4p '16 Nat, assn. of manu- 
facturers of the U. S. A., 30 Church St., 
N. Y. 

Address delivered at the 21st annual con- 
vention of the Nat. assn. of manufacturers. 
New York city. May, 1916 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Employers' associations —ConfmHCd 
National assn. of manufacturers. Annual con- 
vention. New York city. May 15-17, 1916. 
Addresses delivered included Paper industry 
under existing conditions, by F. L. Moore, 
and Cross-Licensing patent agreement m the 
automobile industry, by Aldred Reeves. A 
discussion of industrial legislation by J. . S. 
Emerv is quoted in part in the N. Y. Evenmg 
Post. 'May 17, 1916. The same paper also 
prints a resolution adopted by the associa- 
tion suggesting the foundation of a national 
federation of all employers' associations 
which may express the authoritative opmion 
of associated industry with regard to meas- 
ures and policies effected by the government 
and congress of the U. S. George Pope, pres. 
National founders' association. M. L. Stecker. 
Q J Econ 30:352-86 F '16 
See also Employment managers 

Employers' liability , ,^ *r, 

Indiana — U. S. supreme court has upheld the 
validity of the employers' liability law in 
approving a verdict of $12,000 recovered 
from the Vandalia railroad by Charles Still- 
well, brakeman, who was thrown from a car 
while at work and injured (Press rept 
Ja 18 '16) 
New Jersey supreme court has rendered a 
decision holding that where an employer is 
not aware of the working risks attending his 
employees and accidents result, he should 
not be held liable for compensation. L. K. 
Schmoll V. Weisbrod and Hess brewing com- 
pany (Press rept My 28 '16) 
TJ. S. supreme court, April .17, 1916, construed 
the various federal safety appliance acts so 
that all employees, whether engaged at the 
time in intrastate or interstate commerce, 
may recover damages for injuries occurring 
thru failure of interstate commerce rail- 
roads to comply with the safety appliance 
laws. It was regarded as a precedent-mak- 
ing decision giving safety appliance laws a 
scope far greater than the federal employ- 
ers' liability law. A. R. Rigsby v. Texas 
and Pacific railroad (Press rept) 
See also Workmen's compensation 
Bibiiograpliy 
• List of references on employers' liability insur- 
ance (especially mutual or cooperative). U. S. 
Library of congress. 8p S 11 '15 (Typew Cost 
of copying 40c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Investigations 
Alabama and Utah have appointed legislative 
commissions to investigate and report on 
systems of employers' liability and work- 
men's compensation. Alabama report will 
not be made until the 1919 legislature. Utah 
report will be made to the 1917 legislature 

Legislation, Comparative 
[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] em- 
ployers' liability, workmen's compensation 
and insurance. Am Labor Leg R 5:722-8 D 
'15 

Employers' welfare institutions. See Welfare 
work (in industry) 

Employment 
Personnel, and employment problems. Ann 
Am Acad v 65 326p My 16 

Articles are grouped into five parts as 
follows: pt 1, Place of the human element 
in industrial management; pt 2, Function- 
alized employment department; pt 3, Un- 
necessary hiring and firing of employes; 
pt 4, Securing, selection and assigning of 
employes; pt 5, Employe at work 
Rates of wages, hours of labor and fluctuation 
of employment in Ohio in 1914. (Dept of in- 
vestigation and statistics rept no 16) 317p 
Weight 2 lb Enclose postage S 15 '15 Ohio 
industrial comm. 

See also Employment managers 
Employment agencies 
Administration of public employment bureaus. 
W. L. Sears. In Assn. of governmental labor 
officials of the U. S. and Canada. Proceed- 
ings. 1915, p 72-80 



American cities and the prevention of unem- 
ployment. J: B. Andrews, il Am City 14: 
117-21 F '16 

Contains a map indicating existence of 
state and municipal public employment 
bureaus 

Employment exchanges, il Am Labor Leg R 
5:543-63 N '15 

Map showing state and municipal public 
employment offices opposite p 480 

Facilities for labor exchanges: preliminary re- 
port of the special committee on labor ex- 
changes of the National chamber of com- 
merce. Nation's Business v 4 no 2 pt 2 p 74- 
5, 82 F '16 

Immigration. In Pa. Dept. of labor and indus- 
try. 1st annual report, 1913, p 221-75 '15 

An exhaustive study covering a large part 
of the commonwealth and developing two 
important weak spots needing correction: 
first, the lack of rapid acquirement by our 
aliens of the English language and a knowl- 
edge of the fundamental elements of our 
government; second, that there are no sys- 
tematic, scientific and businesslike agencies 
to enable aliens to be placed at labor where 
they will be most efficient as producers for 
the commonwealth, and for the support of 
themselves and families 

* New York state bureau of employment. (Bui 

no 15) 2p (Typew) Mr 2 '16 N. Y. state indus- 
trial comm. 

Describes the work of the bureau and 
gives a table showing the work of the five 
offices in Brooklyn, Syracuse, Rochester, 
Buffalo and Albany, from the date of open- 
ing up to the 1st day of March, 1916 

Newark, N. J. — A new employment bureau has 
been established to serve as a clearing house 
for the state. It will also be used as head- 
quarters by Mr. Burns, as federal represen- 
tative. This arrangement has been made 
possible thru the national system of em- 
ployment service now being carried on by 
the federal government. The entire country 
has been divided into employment zones 
which are in direct relation to a general 
clearing house at Washington. The ex- 
penses of the bureau are shared by the state 
and federal government. Joseph Spitz is in 
charge of the Newark bureau (.11 '16) 

Public employment bureaus and their relation 
to managers of employment in industry. 
Hilda Muhlhauser. Ann Am Acad 65:170-5 
My '16 

Public employment bureaux. In Ontario. 
Comm. on unemployment. Report, p 41-5, 
124-34 '16 

Seattle, Wash. — Corporation counsel Caldwell 
held, April 20, 1916, that the proposed ordi- 
nances prohibiting the use by any employ- 
ment agency of the word "city," "Seattle," 
"municipal" or "public" which may tend to 
convey the impression that the office is 
conducted by Seattle is unconstitutional; 
held that the state constitution provides that 
no law shall be passed granting to any citi- 
zen, class of citizens or corporation, other 
than municipal, privileges or immunities 
which upon the same terms shall not equally 
belong to all citizens or corporations. (Press 
report) 

* Tentative scheme for central control of labor 

supply, unemployment and immigration. 
(Effective citizen co-operation bul no 28) 
3p 5c Ag 27 '14 Toronto bur. of munic. 
research 
Workmen's compensation and employers' lia- 
bilitv problem; Work of the Missouri free 
employment department, St. Louis» Kansas 
City and St. Joseph, during the fiscal year 
which closed Sept. 30. 1914; Accomplishment 
of the women's department of the St. Louis 
state free employment bureau during the 
year 1914: a prelude, and supplementary to 
the 1914 Red book. 40p Missouri bur. of 
labor statistics, Jefferson City 

See also College students— Self-help; Dis- 
charged prisoners — Employment; Juvenile de- 
linquents — Employment; Unemployment 

Conferences 

* American assn. of public employment offices. 

Proceedings of the annual meetings: 1st, 
Chicago, Dec. 19-20, 1913; 2d, Indianapolis, 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



89 



Employment agencies — Conferences — Continued 
Sept. 24-25, 1914; 3d. Detroit, July 1-2, 1915. 
U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 192 (Em- 
ployment and unemployment ser no 1) 177d 
My '16 

Directories 
Federal, state, and municipal employment bu- 
reaus in the U. S. In Am. assn. of public 
employment ofHces. Proceedings, 1913-1915. 
p 144-5 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
Public employment exchanges. In J: R. Com- 
mons and J: B. Andrews. Principles of labor 
legislation, p 270-83 '16 

Contains a list of states and cities main- 
taining agencies 
[Review of legislation of 1915 relative to] un- 
employment. Am Labor Leg R 5:761-80 D '15 
Takes up investigation, emergency public 
work, public employment bureaus, private 
employment bureaus 

License 
Michigan — ^U. S. supreme court upheld. May 22, 
1916, the constitutionality of the law requir- 
ing employment agencies to take out licenses 
to conduct their business (Press rept) 

Reports 

• Massachusetts. Bur. of statistics. Ninth an- 

nual report on the state free employment 
OfHces, 1915, (Pub doc no 80) 43p '16 

* Milwaukee, Wis. Citizens' com. on unemploy- 

ment and the Public employment bureau of 
Milwaukee. Fourth annual report to the 
common council, city of Milwaukee; bd. of 
supervisors, county of Milwaukee, and the 
industrial comm. of Wisconsin, year ending 
Oct. 31, 1915. 9p 

* National employment exchange, New York, 

6th annual report for the year ending Sept. 
30, 1915, 20p The Exchange, 30 Church St., 
N. Y. 

• Ohio. Industrial comm. Dept. of investiga- 

tion and statistics. Work of the free labor 
exchanges of Ohio for the year ending 
June 30, 1915. (Rept no 15) 88p '15 

• Philadelphia, Pa. Bur. of employment of the 

home relief division. Emergency aid com. 
Special report. 21p '15 Emergency aid com., 
1428 Walnut St., Philadelphia 

* Richmond, Va. Public employment bur. 1st 

annual report for the year ending Dec, 31, 
1915, 3p '16 

Statistics 

State and municipal public employment bu- 
reaus. Monthly R v 1 no 1 p 15-17, no 2 p 
41-3, no 3 p 15-18, no 4 p 8-11, no 5 p 10-13 
Ja-My '16 
Employment agencies, Federal 

Labor distribution. In U. S. Secretary of 
labor. Third annual report, 1915, p 32-43, 
68-71 

* Labor exchanges: an article suggesting a na- 

tional system of labor exchanges, J: B, 
Andrews. (U S 63d Cong 3d Sess S Doc no 
956) 14p '15 

• National employment bureau: report of the 

committee on labor, to which was referred 
the bill (H R 19015), to provide for the estab- 
lishment of a national employment bureau 
in the department of labor. (63d Cong 3d 
sess H rept 1429) 8p F 20 '15 

Bill was the outcome of prolonged investi- 
gation on the part of the committee into the 
problem of unemployment 
Employment agencies, Municipal 

♦ Administration of public employment bureaus. 

W. L. Sears. 15p 10c S 2 '15 Pub. employ- 
ment bur., Lafayette & Leonard st,, N. Y. 

Paper prepared for the conference on labor 
and related subjects, held at San Francisco, 
Cal.. during the week of Aug, 2, 1915 
Municipal free employment bureau, fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1915. il In Los An- 
geles, Cal. Municipal charities comm. Sec- 
ond annual report, 1915, p 35-59 

Bibliography 
Free employment agencies and placement bu- 
reaus. In W: B. Munro. Bibliography of 
municipal government in the U. S., p 379- 

81 '15 



Statistics 

* Labor Gazette (Washington, D. C.) for Febru- 

ary, 1916, contains a table giving statistics 
by months in regard to the number of work- 
ers placed in jobs by public free employment 
offlces in 27 industrial localities, 1915 
Work of state and municipal employment bu- 
reaus. Monthly R 3:36-9 Jl '16 
Employment agencies, Private 

Legislation, Comparative 
Regulation of private employment offices. In 
J: R. Commons and J: B. Andrews. Princi- 
ples of labor legislation, p 264-9 '16 
Employment agencies, State 

* Why labor exchanges? a forecast of next steps 

beyond state free employment offices. Mass 
Com on Unemployment Bui no 1 12p N '15 
The Com., 75 State st., Boston, Mass. 
Employment certificates. See Child labor— Em- 
ployment certificates 

Employment managers 
Employment manager. E. F. Nichols, Ann Am 

Acad 65:1-8 My '16 
Employment managers solving a business 

problem, E. F, Nichols. Nation's Business 

4:14-15 Mr '16 

Functionalized employment department as 
factor in industrial efficiency, by E. M. Hop- 
kins; Aim and work of employment mana- 
gers' associations, by Meyer Bloomfield; Work 
of employment department of Dennison 
manufacturing company, Framingham, Mas- 
sachusetts, by P. J. Reilly; Employment work 
of the Curtis publishing company, by R. C. 
Clothier; Work program of the employment 
managers' association of Boston, by R. G. 
Wells; University schools of business and 
the training of employment executives, by 
H. S. Person. Ann Am Acad 65:67-127 My '16 

Conferences 
Employment managers' conferences, Boston, 
Mass., May 10, 1916. [Brief report.] R. G. 
Wells, sec. Monthly R 3:62-70 Jl '16 

Program includes the following addresses: 
Sources of supply and means of getting in 
touch with them, by H. B. Coho; Selection 
and examination of employees, by D. G. 
Steely; Training, promotion, transfer, dis- 
charge, by J. M. Larkin; Records and filing 
systems for employment departments, by 
W, C, Swallow; Selection and development 
of employees, by T, K, Cory; Improving the 
efficiency and quality of the personnel, by 
H, G. Smith; Methods of reducing the labor 
turnover, by H: S. Dennison; Employment 
department, its functions and scope, by H. L. 
Gardner 

* Employment managers' conference, held under 

the auspices of the National society for the 
promotion of industrial education and the 
Minneapolis civic and commerce association, 
Jan. 19-20, 1916. Proceedings. U S Bur La- 
bor Statistics Bui no 196 (Employment and 
unemployment ser no 3) 82p My '16 

Contains the following papers: Function 
of the employment department, by R. C. Clo- 
thier; Methods of reducing the labor turn- 
over, by Boyd Fisher; Public employment 
bureaus and their relation to managers of 
employment in industry, by Hilda Muhlhau- 
ser: University schools of business and the 
training of employment executives, by H. S. 
Person; Aim and work of employment man- 
agers' associations, by Meyer Bloomfield; 
The new apprenticeship as a factor in re- 
ducing labor turnover, by C: A. I*rosser; 
Training the immigrant in industry, by W: C. 
Smith; Work of the employment department 
of the Ford motor co., by George Bundy 

Organizations 
Employment managers associations have been 
formed in Boston, New York and Philadel- 
phia for the purpose of studying in a pro- 
fessional way the selecting, hiring, training 
and promotion of workers as a phase of 
management. Representatives of these asso- 
ciations and of the Boston vocation bureau, 
the Tuck school of finance and business ad- 
ministration of Dartmouth college and the 
Civic and commerce association of Minnea- 



90 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Employment managers— Organizations— Cont. 
polis held a conference in MinneapoUs, 
Jan. 19-20, 1916, in connection with the con- 
vention of the National society for the pro- 
motion of industrial education. The topic 
for consideration being "Problems of per- 
sonnel in industry." Program contains ad- 
dresses by the following: David Snedden, 
comr. of education for Mass. ; Sarah Conboy, 
sec.-treas. of the United textile workers of 
Am.; Sarah Louise Arnold, dean of Sim- 
mons college; Mary Schenck Woolman, spe- 
cialist in vocational education for girls; 
Lucinda W. Prince, educational director of 
the Nat. retail dry goods assn.; Frank V. 
Thompson, asst. supt, of schools in Boston 
and others ^ ^ 

New England — Employment managers of Bos- 
ton have an organization including a number 
of large manufacturing and retail organiza- 
tions of New England, which endeavors to 
solve the problems of employment by sci- 
entific methods. A study of individual em- 
ployees is made and they are shifted from 
one kind ofi work to another until their 
proper sphere is found. During busy sea- 
sons concerns may borrow employees from 
firms whose dull season it may be, thereby 
preventing a considerable amount of un- 
necessary unemployment (Je 4 '16) 

Engineering 

* Pan American scientific congress. 2d congress, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 1916. 
Program of section V: engineering, lists 
papers on streets and roads, water supply, 
power plants, public buildings and grounds, 
bridges, water power, rivers and canals, re- 
clamation of land, engineering education, 
harbors, electricity, sewage disposal, mer- 
chant marine, electrification of transporta- 
tion lines, street cleaning, geological survey, 
telephone and telegraph, uniform gauge for 
railways. 28p '15 John Barrett, sec. gen., Pan 
American union, Washington, D. C. 

See also Agricultural engineering; Highway 
engineering; Hydraulic engineering; Water 
supply engineering 

Periodicals 
Engineering and Contracting will publish four 
times a year issues devoted to surveying, 
drafting and engineering office management. 
The first issue appeared Aug. 30, 1916 

Engineering accounting 
How one storekeeper looks at it: recommenda- 
tion of committee on engineering accounting 
for a perpetual inventory discussed. P. F. 
McCall. Aera 4:848-50 Mr '16 

Engineering departments. See Public utilities 
commissions — Engineering departments 

Engineering education 
Does present-day college education produce 
accuracy and thoroughness? G: F. Swain 
and D. W. Mead. Eng R.ec 73:607-9 My 6 '16 
Engineering schools and industrial methods. 
H. L. Gantt, Eng Mag (140 Nassau St., N. Y.) 
51:161-6 My '16 25c 
Industries and the universities. W: H. Nich- 
ols. J Ind & Eng Chem (American chemical 
soc, Easton. Pa.) 8:441-51 My '16 

Advocates forming of an "Advisory coun- 
cil" composed of great chemists located in 
universities and schools of science to whom 
will be referred new problems arising with 
the general chemical company. Anything of 
value resulting from this work will be re- 
warded with a share of the profits resulting 
Massachusetts institute of technology will 
teach writing of engineering reports. The 
scheme is to give out an engineering prob- 
lem to the students (third-year men) and 
require a report which may be in the shape 
of a technical article, popular story or con- 
cise outline with details in appendices, after 
the style of formal reports (Ja 13 '15) 
Military preparedness and the engineer. E. F. 
Robinson. 224p il $1.50 '16 Clark 

Purpose of this book is to place before the 
engineers of America as accurate an idea 
as possible of the opportunities and limita- 
tions that will confront the civilian engineer 
in the event of war, to show him what he 
can do to assist in preparedness against 
invasion and how he must go about the 
matter 



Place of mechanic arts in land-grant institu- 
tions, by R. A. Pearson; Federal aid to 
engineering experiment stations, by F. G. 
Newlands; Duplication in engineering be- 
tween land-grant institutions and state uni- 
versities, by A. Marston; discussion. In 
Assn. of Am. agric. colleges and exper. sta- 
tions. Proceedings, 1915, p 135-40, 146-50, 
171-8 

* Some important questions in engineering edu- 

cation. J. A. L. Waddell. 207-19p '15 

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the 
Society for the Promotion of Engineering 
Education v. 23, 1915 
What can best be done to advance the inter- 
ests of the engineering profession in the 
United States; with discussion. J. A. L. 
Waddell. Engineers' Soc Western Pa Pro- 
ceedings. (2511 Oliver bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa.) 
32:467-564 50c 

Conferences 

* Land grant college engineering assn. Proceed- 

ings of the third annual meeting, held at 
Washington, D. C, Nov. 10-13, 1914. 170p '14 
G. W. Bissell, sec, East Lansing, Mich. 

Contains addresses on Functions of a uni- 
versity, Co-operative extension work In agri- 
culture and engineering. Legislation and ju- 
dicial decisions affecting the status of en- 
gineering at the separate land grant colleges, 
Organization for engineering extension work. 
Methods of instruction in engineering ex- 
tension, Engineering extension in Maine, 
Mine extension in West Virginia, Engineer- 
ing experiment stations and their work. En- 
gineering experiment station at Kansas state 
agricultural college, Agricultural engineering 
at Kansas, Present situation of land grant 
colleges 
Land-grant college engineering assn. Pro- 
ceedings of the fourth annual convention, 
held at Berkeley, Cal., Aug. 11-13, 1915. In 
Assn. of Am. agric. colleges and exper. sta- 
tions. Proceedings, 1915, p 255-97 

Cooperative 

Co-operative education in electric railway 
work. A. M. Wilson, il Elec Ry J 47:724-7 Ap 
15 '16 

Explains and summarizes the results of 
the educational plan developed by the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati in cooperation with the 
Cincinnati traction company 

Co-operative technical schools meet present 
needs. F. E. Ayer. Eng N 74:1059-61 D 2 '15 

How co-operative courses train young engi- 
neers. H. A. Stringfellow. Eng N 75:63-4 Ja 
13 '16 
Engineering experiment stations 

Adaptation of engineering experiment stations 
to local needs, by F. E. Turneaure; Relation 
of the engineering experiment station to the 
college of engineering, by C. S. Nichols; 
Lessons to be drawn from the experience of 
the agricultural experiment stations, by 
O. V. P. Stout; Engineering experiment sta- 
tion problems at the University of Nevada, 
by J. G. Scrugham. In Assn. of Am. agric. 
colleges and exper, stations. Proceedings, 
1915, p 282-95 

Engineering experiment station of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. E. B. Paine. Am Inst E E Pro 
34:2421-7 O '15 

Describes the organization for engineering 
research at the University of Illinois 

Engineering experiment stations and engineer- 
ing experimentation work, by C. S. Nichols; 
Engineering experiment station at the Kan- 
sas state agricultural college, by A. A. Pot- 
ter; Discussion. In Land grant college en- 
gineering assn. Proceedings, 1914, p 100-32 
Engineering extension work 

Cooperative extension work between the en- 
gineering and agricultural departments of 
the land grant colleges, by P. P. Claxton; 
Organization for engineering extension work, 
by J. A. Moyer; Organization for engineering 
extension, by C. E. Ferris; Engineering ex- 
tension, by J. G. Scrugham; Methods of in- 
struction in engineering extension, by K. G. 
Smith; Engineering extension at the Uni- 
versity of Maine, by H. S. Boardman; Mine 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



91 



Engineering extension work — Continued 

extension in West Virginia, by C. R. Jones. 
In Land grant college engineering assn. 
Proceedings, 1914, p 34-42, 70-99 
Pennsylvania state college has an engineering 
extension division that has already given 
instruction to more than 3,000 students. 
Classes in mechanical, civil, electrical and 
industrial engineering have been established 
thruout the state, wherever a few men de- 
sired them. They have been conducted thru 
cooperation with railroad companies, labor 
unions, and the Philadelphia navy yard. 
The plan has been remarkably successful 
(Mr 4 '16) 

Engineering organizations 
At the recent conference on engineering co- 
operation, Chicago, 1916, Paul Hansen, chief 
engineer of the Illinois state board of health, 
suggested a single engineering association 
for each state, representing all the associa- 
tions within that state, to be devoted to 
promoting engineering activities, both gen- 
eral and specific. The formation of sections, 
largely autonomous in character and devoted 
to any idea or piirpose in which engineers 
may be interested, and including in its 
membership others than engineers, was also 
urged as part of the plan 

Engineering researcli 
Engineering foundation, an endowment re- 
ceived in 1915 from Ambrose Swasey of 
Cleveland, administered in the interest of 
scientific research by trustees from the na- 
tional societies of civil, mining, mechanical 
and electrical engineers representing 30,000 
engineers in all, has decided to offer its ser- 
vices to the National academy of sciences of 
the U. S. It hopes to federate the national, 
government, university and private researcti 
agencies to encourage the application of sci- 
entific principles to American industries. A 
competent executive secretary will be em- 
ployed to mobilize these organizations CJl 
•16) 

Engineers 

See also Electrical engineers; Sanitary en- 
gineers 

Examinations 
California examination for construction en- 
gineer. Eng N 74:1081 D 2 '15 

License 
Legislation 
British Columbia — Act respecting the inspec- 
tion of steam boilers and engines, and the 
examining and licensing of engineers has 
recently been put in force, also new rules 
for the inspection of boilers and engines. 
have been adopted (Je 26 '16) 

Legislation , Comparative 

* Licensing of stationary engineers and firemen; 

steam boiler inspection. H. D. Scott, comp., 
R. I. leg. ref. bur. 4p Mr 14 '16 (Typew B 
20c) 
Digest of state laws 

Standardization of positions 
New York engineer positions standardized. Eng 
N 75:654-5 Ap 6 '16 

Gives the tentative specifications prepared 
by the senate committee on civil service of 
the N, Y. legislature 
Epiieptics 

* Nine family histories of epileptics in one rural 

county. (Eugenics and social welfare bul no 
7) 66p '1.6 Bur. of analysis and investigation, 
N. Y. state bd. of charities, Albany, N. Y. 
Equalization of taxes 
Colorado supreme court upheld, on April 4, 
1916, the validity of the constitutional 
amendment adopted by the people in 1914 
allowing the state board to equalize taxation 
by both increasing and lowering values; 
held that the state board is the final arbiter 
of values and that its orders cannot be 
questioned by assessors and other subordi- 
nate state officers; that the board, moreover, 
can choose any method of procedure it sees 
fit and base its judgment on any information 
it regards as satisfactory. The text of the 
opinion is printed in part In the Rocky Moun- 
tain News (Denver) Ap 4 '16 



State equalization and apportionment. In 
Maryland. Tax comm. Separate report of 
Oscar Leser, p 12-27 F '16 

Recommends equalization by a state board 
as opposed to the county system recom- 
mended by the other commissioners 

Reports 

•► California state bd. of equalization. Report 

for the year 1913-1914. 23<p '14 
Eugenics 
Alcoholism and eugenics, by Leonard Darwin; 

Communications on alcoholism and eugenics, 

by G. A. Reid and others. In U. S. brewers' 

assn. Year book. 1915, p 252-8 

* Bemg well-born. M. F. Guyer. 374p *$1 '16 

Bobbs 
Consanguineous marriage: subject often re- 
garded by unscientific methods of thought 
and effects misunderstood. J Heredity 
(Washington, D. C.) 7:343-6 Ag '16 25c 

* Feebly inhibited: violent temper and its in- 

heritance. C: B. Davenport. (Bul no 12) bibl 
593-628P charts 15c S '15 Eugenics record 
office. Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, 
N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Journal of Nervous 
and Mental Disease, v. 43 no. 9, 1915 

* How to make a eugenical family study. C: B. 

Davenport and H. H. Laughlin. (Bul no 13) 
bibl 35p charts 10c Je '15 Eugenics record 
office. Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, 
N. Y. 

* Luther Burbank: his life and work. H: S. 

Williams. 333p il *$2.50 '15 Hearst's int. lib. 

Part three, p. 239-329, discusses Burbank's 
methods and the human plant. It contains 
the following chapters: The breeding of men; 
The laws of heredity, their definite meaning 
and interpretation; Nurture versus nature 
Marriage of kin. Edward Nettleship. J of 
Heredity (511 11th st. Northwest, Washing- 
ton, D. C.) 6:257-61 Je '15 25c 

Author maintains there is no adequate 
evidence that any evil results from consan- 
guineous matings, as such, although where 
both stocks are weak the offspring may 
show double amount of weakness 
Right to marry: what can a democratic civil- 
ization do about heredity and child welfare. 
Adolf Meyer. Survey 36:243-6 Je 3 '16 
Session in eugenics, Nov. 11, 1915. In Am. 
assn. for study and prevention of infant 
mortality. 6th annual meeting. Trans- 
actions, 1915, p 209-42 '16 

General topic: Factor in improving the 
race and the opportunities for success of 
individuals of each generation 

See also Feeble-minded; Marriage; Sterili- 
zation 

Bibliography 

Bibliography of eugenics and related subjects. 
In N. Y. (State). Comm. to investigate provi- 
sion for the mentally deficient. Report, 1915, 
p 509-616 

Conferences 

Eugenics research assn. and conference of the 
field workers of the Eugenics research office. 
Conference, Cold Springs Harbor, L. I., June 
23, 1916. 'The program includes a disserta- 
tion on Inheritance of human stature, by 
Dr. Davenport 

Periodicals 

Eugenical News is the monthly organ of the 
Eugenics record office, Cold Spring Harbor, 
Long Island, N. Y. The March, 1916, issue, 
which is the third number that has appeared, 
consists of twenty pages containing a num- 
ber of short articles, chiefiy summaries of 
other articles, news notes, personals, and 
The price is twenty-five cents for six months 
notices of articles in current periodicals. 

Surveys 
Kansas City, Mo. — Southwest school of hy- 
giene of Kansas City, Mo., under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Belle S. Mooney, is organizing a 
eugenics survey of the city with the co- 
operation of the board of education. The 
plan is to secure the family history of all the 
school children and not simply the history 
of the backward children 



92 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Eugenics— Surveys— CoHimMed 
Nassau county, N. Y.— Rockefeller foundation, 
by a gift of $10,000, has made possible the 
immediate beginning of a eugenic survey of 
Nassau county, N. Y. It will particularly at- 
tempt to find the amount of mental defi- 
ciency existing. The survey will consist of 
the examination of selected persons m all 
parts of the county. The state of New York 
has furnished the services of Dr. A. J. Ro- 
sanoff, of King's Park hospital, to direct the 
survey; with him will be one or more medi- 
cal examiners furnished by the U. S. public 
health service, 8 field workers to investigate 
the family histories of the individuals exam- 
ined, and several clerical assistants. Head- 
quarters will be at Mineola, the county seat 
(My '16) 

European war 

Economic results 
Economic influence of the war on the U. S. 
E. R. A. Seligman. Econ J 26:145-60 Je '16 
•Referendum on the report of the special com- 
mittee on economic results of the war and 
American business. International Concili- 
ation (Am. assn. for international concilia- 
tion, 407 W. 117th St., N. Y.) no 97 46p D '15 
Reprinted by permission of the Chamber 
of commerce of the United States 

Financial Influence 
Bibliography 

• List of references on the financial influence 

of the European war, especially on the 
United States. U. S. Library of congress. 4p 
S 8 '15 (Typew Cost of copying 20c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Evening schools 

See also Illiteracy; Immigrants — Educa- 
tion; Teachers' institutes 

Finance 

• Evening school expenditures of the twenty- 

one leading cities of the U. S. arranged in 
order of their per capita expenditures on 
the basis of total population. Immigrant 
•Education Letter (U. S. bur. of educ, dir. 
of immigrant educ. (no 4-2) 2p (Mim) '16 
—Same. School and Soc 4:21 Jl 1 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 

[State laws relating to] evening schools. U S 
Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 651-3 '16 

Statistics 
Evening school expenditures of the leading 
American cities. Am City 15:167 Ag '16 

Evidence 

Capacity to report upon moving pictures as 
conditioned by sex and age: a contribution 
to the psychology of testimony. E. G. Boring. 
J Crim Law 6:820-34 Mr '16 

Insanity and criminal responsibility: report of 
committee B of the institute. J Crim Law 6: 
672-4 Ja '16 

Proposed expert evidence bill. A. M. Kidd. Cal 
Law R (Berkeley, Cal.) 3:216-26 Mr '15 50c 

Exceptional children. See Defective children — 
Education; Retardation of school children 

Excess condemnation 
California — City and county amendments: ex- 
cess condemnation; report for senate con- 
stitutional amendment no. 27. Cal Common- 
wealth Club Transac 10:455-8 O '15 

Proposed amendment is identical with 
sena.te constitutional amendment no. 16, 
which was voted on by the people. Novem- 
ber 3, 1914, and was defeated. It provides 
that more land than is actually needed for 
a public improvement may be taken under 
the law of eminent domain, provides that 
such property shall be "deemed to be taken 
for public use" 
Excess condemnation. In C: R. Robinson. City 
planning, p 255-64 '16 

Contains a summary of recent legislation 

• Excess condemnation: a report of the com- 

mittee on taxation of the city of New York: 



with a report prepared by Herbert S. Swan 
for the National municipal league. 122p il 
'15 Com. on taxation, N. Y. 

Contains following chapters: Argument for 
excess condemnation; Financing London 
street improvements by recoupment; Clear- 
ance of unsanitary areas in English cities; 
Excess condemnation in the U. S.; Con- 
clusions of the committee on excess condem- 
nation, National municpal league 

Excess condemnation and city planning. 
C: K. Mohler. il Eng News 76:20-2 Jl 6 '16 

Excess condemnation in street improvements. 
H. S. Swan, il Am City 14:258-62 Mr '16 

Bibliography 
Excess condemnation. In W: B. Munro. 
Bibliography of municipal government in 
the U. S., p 137-9 '15 

Constitutional amendments, 1916 
California — Authorizing state, county, and mu- 
nicipality to condemn neighboring property 
within its limits additional to that actually 
intended for proposed improvement; declar- 
ing same taken for public use; etc. (Constitu- 
tional amendment. Rejected. Yes 92,048 No 
155,786 O '15 
New Jersey — Allowing state, counties and mu- 
nicipalities to condemn for public improve- 
ments more property than is needed and sell 
what is not used under restrictions that will 
require development along certain lines to 
insure the continued value and character of 
the improvement made. Constitutional 
amendment. Rejected. Yes 125,206 No 173,755 
O '15 

Laws 
Acts [and constitutional amendments] on ex- 
cess condemnation in the U. S.; New York 
city excess condemnation act. In N. Y. 
Com. on taxation. Excess condemnation: a 
report, p 77-98 '15 

Contains the laws of New York, Massachu- 
setts, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Ore- 
gon, Virginia, and Maryland; and constitu- 
tional amendments adopted by Massachu- 
setts, New York, Ohio and Wisconsin 

Executive departments 

* Federal executive. J: P. Hill. 269p *$2 '16 
Houghton 

Gives the history of our federal executive 
departments, showing the steps by which 
the executive branch of the government has 
gradually enlarged its functions and influ- 
ence 

Exemption 

Exemption as a principle of social justice. 

J. H. Underwood. Am J Soc 22:53-79 Jl '16 

Sec also Municipal bonds — Taxation; Public 

property — Exemption ; Taxation — Exemption ; 

Veterans — Taxation 

Exhibits. See Education — Exhibits; Food — Ex- 
hibits; Industrial expositions; Municipal ex- 
hibits; Rural schools — Exhibits 

Exits. See Buildings — Exits 

Expatriation 
Japan — Act of nationality recently passed by 
the Diet, permits children of Japanese par- 
entage born in another country to choose 
their nationality by permission of the min- 
ister of the interior. Similarly persons under 
fifteen may repatriate themselves by special 
permission. Adult Japanese emigrants are 
not allowed to become citizens of other 
countries. The law is expected to settle 
the legal status of the foreign-born children. 
This law will also, no doubt, aid in solving 
the Japanese problems in the U. S. (Je 19 
'16) 

Experiment stations. See Agricultural education; 
Agricultural experiment stations; Demon- 
stration work in agriculture; Engineering 
experiment stations 

Expert testimony. See Evidence 

Explosives 
Explosion hazard, il In D. S. Beyer. Industrial 
accident prevention, p 341-58 '16 

Discusses: Explosives; Explosive dusts; 
Celluloid, and celluloid goods manufacture; 
Volatile and inflammable liquids 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS. INFORMATION SERVICE 



93 



Explosives — Continued 

Use and care of explosives. R. E. Somers. il 
Cornell Civil Engineer (Ithaca, N. Y.) 24: 
381-8 Ap '16 25c 

Bibliography 

* List of references on the manufacture, te^' 

ing and transportation of explosives. U. S. 
Library of congress. 8p My 22 '16 (Typew 
Cost of copying 40c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Ordinances 

* New York (city) — Code of ordinances relat- 

ing to explosives and ammunition. (Ex- 
tracts from chap 10 j 31p '15 Bur. of fire 
prevention, N. Y. 

Regulation 

Wisconsin. Fire marshal. Regulations gov- 
erning the storage of volatile liquids and of 
explosives. Ip F 1 '16 

Export trade. See Commerce 

Expositions. See Panama Pacific exposition 

Express companies 

Taxation 
California's entire state tax system will be 
reviewed by the supreme court of the U. S. 
as the result of a suit filed by the "Wells 
Fargo express company against the state 
board of equalization in protest against the 
tax levied by the board against the prop- 
erty and intangible franchise of that com- 
pany. The suit strikes directly at the 
fundamental principles of our bifurcated 
state and county tax system, as the com- 
plaint alleges that two articles of the con- 
stitution of the U. S. are violated by the 
state in levying a state tax on the gross 
earnings of the Wells Fargo company: the 
fourteenth amendment, because part of the 
property of the state is assessed on a gross 
earnings basis and part on an ad valorem; 
and the equal protection clause, because 
there is no tribunal to which it can appeal. 
Case has been tried in lower court, but will 
probably pass through two appellate courts 
before reaching the federal courts (Je 28 '16) 
South Dakota — U. S. supreme court has 
handed down a decision to the effect that 
the gross earnings tax law of South Dakota, 
as applied to interstate express companies, 
transacting business in the state, is uncon- 
stitutional. This decision will necessitate a 
revision of the state law at the next session 
of the legislature. The suits were brought 
by the American and Wells Fargo express 
companies (Press rept N 29 '15) 

Eyestrain 

* Eye strain and occupational disease. G: M. 

Gould. 24p George M. Gould, Atlantic City. 
N. J. 

Read at the meeting of the 15th Interna- 
tional congress on hygiene, Washington, 
D. C. Sept 23-28, 1912 
Eyesight and the war. Dr. Ernest Clark, 
tables fig Nature 97:552-5 Ag 31 '16 

* Eyestrain the chief cause of stimulant and 

narcotic diseases. G: M. Gould. 8p '16 
George M. Gould, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Read befbre the Am. medical soc. for the 
study of alcohol and narcotics, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 15, 1915. Reprinted from Medical 
Times, January, 1916 

* Miners' nystagmus. F. L. Hoffman. U S Bur 

Mines Bui no 93 67p '16 

* Systemic disease caused by eyestrain. G: M. 

Gould. 42p '15 George M. Gould, Atlantic 
City, N. J. 

Read at the meeting of the Atlantic 
county medical society, March 12, 1915. Re- 
printed from American Medicine, September, 
1915 



Factories 

See also Fire protection — Factories 

Accounting 
* Fundamentals of a cost system for manufac- 
turers. July 1. 1916. 31p '16 U. S. federal 
trade eomm., Washington, D. C. 



Industrial accounting. F. J. Knoepel. J Ac- 
count 21:431-40; 22:16-27 Je-Jl '16 



See Lighting 



Lighting 



Medical inspection 

* Industrial medical supervision. G. L. Howe. 

13p lOe '15 Rochester chamber of commerce, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Address at a meeting of the Manufactur- 
ers' council of the Rochester chamber of 
commerce, Nov. 22, 1915. Considers the 
functions of the medical department of tae 
Eastman kodak company 

* Industrial medical supervision. G. L. Howe. 

13p '15 Eastman kodak co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Address at a meeting of the Manufactur- 
ers' council of the Rochester (N. Y.) cham 
ber of commerce, Nov. 22, 1915 

See alsch Industrial hygiene; Physical ex- 
aminations 

Reports 

■► New York (state). Factory investigating 
comm. Fourth report, 1915. 5v 2922p '15 
N. Y. state lib. 

Taxation 

Iowa state executive council has passed a 
resolution that the state shall not permit 
property to escape taxation, but that no 
effort would be made to collect back taxes 
from firms which had been granted exemp- 
tion for 5 years as inducement to locate in 
Iowa. County officials will follow suit and 
wiU put such firms on 1915 books and 
collect taxes in 1916. It is now definitely 
settled that no Iowa city may grant a 
manufacturing plant exemption of taxes as 
an inducement to locate (D 30 '15) 

Manufacturers and merchants taxation league, 
Gladwin Bouton, sec, Kinney bldg., Newark, 
N. J., aims to secure legislation exempting 
from taxation machinery, merchandise and 
household goods; gradually reducing the tax 
on buildings and increasing the rate on land 
as Pittsburgh and Scranton are doing under 
a Pennsylvania law 
Factory inspection 

Factory inspection in the South. W. L. Mit- 
chell. In Assn. of governmental officials of 
the U. S. and Canada. Proceedings, 1915, p 
32-6 

Summarizes the laws of Georgia, Alabama, 
Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Tennessee, 
Virginia 

Departments 

State bureaus charged with enforcement of 
factory inspection laws, and chief inspection 
officials. Monthly R v 1 no 5 p 106-7 N '15 

Laws 

* Connecticut — Laws relating to bakeshops, ele- 

vators, factories and factory inspection. 24p 
'16 

Reports 

* Inspection of workshops, factories and public 

buildings in Ohio, Sept. 1, 1913 to Dec. 31, 

1914. Ohio Industrial Comm Bui v 2 no 5 
(Dept of investigation and statistics rept no 
17) 236p S 29 '16 

Factory visits 

Rochester chamber of commerce. Sons of 
members com., conducts weekly inspection 
trips for boys to typical factories of the 
city's leading industries. The Chamber aims, 
thereby, to awaken in the boy a realization 
that the part he is capable of playing in the 
development of the city is considered of 
value by the business man and that Roches- 
ter is bidding for his permanent interest in 
its development and welfare (N 18 '15) 

Family 
Ethics of the family, by J. H. Tufts; Enlarge- 
ment of the family ideal, by S. M. Crothers; 
Search for fundamentals causing family 
break- downs, by J. C. Logan. In Nat. conf. 
of charities and correction. Proceedings, 

1915, p 24-42, 145-9 

Addresses have been reprinted at prices 
varying from 5 to 10 cents 



94 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



FamWy— Continued 

* Family and marriage: an analytical reference 

syllabus. G: E. Howard. 177p 75c '14 George 
E. Howard, Dept. of pol. sci. and sociology, 
Univ. of Nebraska 
Family disabilities and treatment; Social agen- 
cies dealing with families, il F. H. Mc- 
Lean. Charities of Springfield, 111., p 53-151 D 
'15 

* History of the family as a social and educa- 

tional institution. Willystine GoodselL 588p 
*$2 '15 Macmillan 
isee also Divorce; Eugenics; Marriage 

Bibliography 
Select bibliography. In G: E. Howard. Family 
and marriage, p 90-177 '14 

Divided as follows: (1) Development of 
family institutions; (2) Problems of mar- 
riage, divorce, and the family; (3; Social con- 
dition of woman; her advance toward eco- 
nomic, intellectual, and vocational freedom; 
(4> Political condition of woman: her advance 
toward equal suffrage; (5> Mother and in- 
fant welfare, child welfare, and the family 
as influenced industry; (6> Euthenics, eu- 
genics, and hereditary; {1 ) Social disease, 
sex hygiene, education for parenthood and 
the famly life 
Farm accounting 
Farm cost accounting: essential farm records 
and their interpretation. E. H. Thomson. J 
Account 20:401-26 D '15 
Farm valuations for book-keeping purposes. 
James Wyllie, J Bd Agric (Great Britain 
bd. of agric, Whitehall place, London, 
S. W.) 22:1215-28 Mr '16 4d 
How Kansas bankers are bringing better busi- 
ness to the farm. E. C. Johnson and P. E. 
McNall. Banker-Farmer (Champaign, 111.) 
3:14-15 My '16 
Kansas — Dean Johnson, director of extension. 
Kansas state agricultural college, and P. E. 
McNall, farm management demonstrator, 
have compiled the farm record book which 
has been distributed to 30,000 farmers by 
Kansas bankers. By cooperating with the 
agricultural college, the Kansans hope to 
follow up the distribution, check up results 
and stimulate bookkeeping among the farm- 
ers of the state (My '16) 

* Practical system of farm bookkeeping. C. P. 

Goddard. Mass Agric Circ no 39 19p My '15 
Some experiences in farm accounting. C. P. 
Goddard. In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d 
annual report, 1914, p 124-41 '15 
^ee also Horticulture — Accounting 
Farm bureaus. See County farm bureaus 
Farm colonies. See inebriates— Farms; Insane- 
Farm colonies; Penal farms; Vagrancy- 
Farms 
Farm costs 

* Machinery cost of farm operations in western 

New York. H. H. Mowry. U S Dept Agric 
Bui no 338 24p Ja 18 '16 

See also Apples; Fences — Cost 
Farm demonstrations. See Demonstration work 

in agriculture 
Farm labor. See Agricultural laborers 
Farm machinery 
Efficiency of farm tractors: a standard system 
of testing needed, by C. M. Eason; Modern 
agricultural tractor designs, by V. W. Page, 
il Sci Am Jl 29 '16 p 96-7. 100-1 
See also Drainage — Machinery 
Farm management 

* Farm management: its application to southern 

New England conditions. Mass Agric Circ 
no 56 12p Ja '16 

Reprinted from the 63d annual report of 
the Massachusetts state board of agriculture 

* Farm management practice of Chester county 

Pa. W. J. Spillman and others. U S Dept 
Agric Bui no 341 (Professional paper) 99p 

11 o Si 17 lb 

* Farm- management survey of three represen- 

tative areas in Indiana. Illinois, and Iowa 
E. H. Thomson and H. M. Dixon, il U S 
Dept Agric Bui no 41 42p Ja 14 '14 



Farm mortgages. See Mortgages 
Farm power 
Electricity in agriculture: a report of the ac- 
tivities in England towards electrifying 
farms. Elec R & W Elec'n 69:154 Jl 22 '16 
Electricity on the farm. A. E. Waller. Kim- 
ball's Dairy Farmer (407-11 Commercial St., 
Waterloo, la.) 14:499, 525-33 Ag 15-S 1 '16 5c 
ea 

Uses and benefits of hydroelectricity on the 
farm and on education and industry, T. W. 
Sims. Cong Rec 53:108-10 D 7 '15 

Farm practice. See Agricultural credit— Farm 
practice 

Farm products 

* Utilization of surplus farm products. H. F. 

Hall. Mass Bd Agric Circ no 58 8p Mr '16 
From the 63d annual report of the Mass. 

state bd. of agric. 
Sec also Marketing 

Farm tenancy 
[Addresses on] rural credit aids to land pur- 
chase; Present facilities for land purchase 
and need of legislation; Financing farm 
business. In Nat. conf. on marketing and 
farm credits. Marketing and farm credits. 

' p 301-472 '15 
Agricultural credit legislation and the tenancy 
problem. G: E. Putnam. Am Econ R 5:805- 
15 D '15 

* Farm leases in Iowa. O. G. Lloyd. Iowa Agric 

Exp Sta Bui no 159 (Abridged) 30p D '15 
State college of agriculture and mechanic 
arts, Ames, Iowa 
Land tenure reform and democracy. G: E. 
Putnam. Pol Sci Q 31:53-65 Mr '16 

* Studies in the land problem in Texas, by 

members of the Texas applied economics 
club. L. H. Haney, ed, Univ of Texas Bui 
1915 no 39 181p Jl 10 '15 

The following are some of the articles 
given: The recent increase in tenancy, its 
causes, and some remedies, by W. E. Leon- 
ard and E. B. Naugle; A study in the size 
of farms in Texas, by J. G. Grissom; Hous- 
ing conditions among tenant farmers, by 
G: S. Wehrwein; Improved systems of ten- 
ancy, and suggestions for a good rent con- 
tract, by Carl Gardner 

* Study of the tenant systems of farming in 

the Yazoo-Mississippi delta. E. A. Boeger 
and E. A. Goldenweiser. U S Dept Agric 
Bui no 337 18p Ja 13 '16 
Tenancy. In T: N. Carver, comp. Selected! 
readings in rural economics, p 486-546 '16 

Contains the following articles: Tenancy 
in the U. S., by G: K. Holmes; Tenancy io 
the north Atlantic states, Tenancy in the 
north central states, Tenancy in the south- 
ern states. Tenancy in the western states 
by B. H. Hibbard 

Farmers 
Farmers' income. E. A. Goldenweiser. Am 
Econ R 6:42-8 Mr '16 

Farmers' cooperative movements 
Co-operative farm implement societies. T. 
Wibberley. il J Bd Agric (Great Britain 
bd. of agric, Whitehall place, London. 
S. W.) 23:52-8 Ap '16 4d 

* Farmers' cooperative corporations. A. E. Cance 

and L. P. Jefferson. Vermont Dept Agric 
Bui no 24 48p postage 2c D '15 

Prepared for the purpose of giving Ver- 
mont farmers an idea of present marketing 
conditions and of the essentials of success- 
ful cooperation, with special emphasis upon 
the subject of the formation of cooperative 
creameries. Appendices contain forms of 
articles of association and by-laws; and 
forms of minutes of the first meeting of in- 
corporators 

* Farmers' cooperative exchange. A. E. Cance. 

Mass Agric College Bui (Ext service) 34p 
14 Mass. agric. college, Amherst, Mass. 

Published as a guide to farmers desiring 
to form cooperative societies for buying ag- 
ricultural requirements or collecting, ship- 
ping, selling, storing, or noanufacturing farm 
products 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



95 



Farmers' cooperative movements — Continued 
Organizing agricultural cooperation. In Nat. 
conf. on marketing and farm credits. Mar- 
keting and farm credits, p 9-97 '15 

Contains: Work of 1915 meeting, by F: L. 
McVey; The next step, by Sir Horace Plun- 
kett; Kind America needs, by M. R. Myers; 
In Wisconsin, by C: A. Lyman; The business 
side, by E. M. Tousley; Attitude of rail- 
roads, by R. W. Hockaday; A conservation 
policy, by Gifford Pinchot; Work among 
Jewish farmers, by G: W. Simon; Relation 
to trusts, by Samuel Untermyer; Coopera- 
tion at work, by W: M. Stickney 

• Rural cooperation and cooperative marketing 

in Ohio, 1913. C. F. Taeusch. Ohio Agric 
Exp Sta Circ no 141 17-39p D 15 '13 Agricul- 
tural experiment station, Wooster, O. 

• Spraying farm orchards by the club plan. R. D. 

Jay. Ohio Agric Exp Sta Circ no 148 45-52p 
D 1 '14 Agricultural experiment station, 
Wooster, O. 

See also Agricultural credit; Agricultural 
organizations; Cooperative marketing; Cot- 
ton; County farm bureaus; Credit unions; 
Grain elevators 

Conferences 

National council of farmers' co-operative 
assns. Report of the annual meeting, Des 
Moines, la.. May 23, 1916. Am Co-operative 
J (230 S. La Salle st., Chicago) 11:1002-4 Je 
'16 10c 

The association represented 400,000 organ- 
ized farmers of the grain belt and only two 
states, Kansas and Ohio, were absent. A 
resolution was passed recommending enlarg- 
ing the Farmers' national co-operative ele- 
vator mutual insurance assn. of Iowa into a 
national proposition 

Periodicals 

American Cooperative Journal (230 S. La 
Salle St., Chicago $1 a year) a publication 
devoted to the interests of grain, coal, live 
stock, dairy products, and building mate- 
rials, was purchased in 1911 by the Farmers' 
cooperative grain trade of the U. S. It 
aerves all cooperative organizations and 
associations of managers and farmers. The 
March, 1916, issue contains complete reports 
of the Illinois, Iowa and Minnesota farmers' 
grain dealers' associations 

Better Business (96 Middle Abbey st.^ Dublin 
*ls) is a quarterly journal of agricultural 
and industrial cooperation edited at the Co- 
operative reference library, Dublin. The 
January, 1916, issue is the second which has 
appeared. It contains: Dublin consumers, 
high prices, and co-operation; Co-operative 
movement in Finland; An American estimate 
of agricultural co-operation in Ireland, by 
C: A. Lyman; Universitj^ co-operative socie- 
ties, by W: J. O'Bryan; Economic advan- 
tages of agricultural co-operation, by L. C. 
Staples; Small husbandry for urban dwellers, 
by T. K. Hackett; Co-operative unions 
among Jewish colonists in Canada, by H. 
Michel]; Notes on Danish agriculture, by 
J. J. Dunne; Relation of producer to con- 
sumer in co-operation 

International Review of Agricultural Econo- 
mics, formerly the Monthly Bulletin of Eco- 
nomic and Social Intelligence, published by 
the Bureau of economic and social intelli- 
gence, International institute of agriculture, 
Villa Umberto I, Rome, Italy, is a monthly 
bulletin published in English, French, Ger- 
man, Spanish and Italian. It contains arti- 
cles relative to cooperation and association, 
insurance and thrift, credit, and agricultural 
economy in general in the various countries, 
also notices of recent publications. The price 
is 18 frs., single numbers 2 frs. 

Rules and by-laws 

How shall farmers organize. W: R. Camp. 
N C Agric Exp Sta Bui no 225 17p F '14 In 
N. C. agric. experiment station. Biennial re- 
port, June 30, 1912-June 30, 1914. '15 

Suggested by-laws for co-operative pur- 
chase and sale societies 



Farmers' institutes 

* Farm and home week, Dec. 27-31, 1915. Agri- 

cultural Education (Div. of college exten- 
sion, Kan. state agric. college, Manhattan) 
V 6 no 13 35p N '15 

* Farmers' institute work in the U. S. in 1914, 

and notes on agricultural extension work in 
foreign countries. J. M. Stedman. U S Dept 
Agric Bui no 269 21p Jl 31 '15 

* Farmers' week at Cornell: course for the farm. 

il Cornell Reading Courses (N. Y. state col- 
lege of agric, Cornell univ.) v 5 27-50p N 
15 '15 

* Kentucky state farmers' institute, held at 

Frankfort, Ky., February 15-17, 1916. 11th 
annual report. 128p '16 Ky. state bd. of agri- 
culture 

Contains the following addresses: The 
story of a run down farm, by S. M. Jordan; 
The maintenance of soil fertility, by C. E. 
Thome; What the county agent is doing to 
organize the farmers, by Geoffrey Morgan; 
Conservation and protection of game, fish 
and song and insectiverous birds, by T: W. 
Thomas; Sanitary measures in the preven- 
tion and eradication of communicable dis- 
eases, by A. J. Payne; Advancing dairying in 
Kentucky, by H. G. Van Pelt; The present 
status and the outlook for fruit growers 
in Kentucky, by J. H. Carmody; The dual 
purpose of girls' clubs, by Mrs. H. B. Wol- 
cott; Home making, by Mrs. A. F. Howie; 
Economics of road building, by R. E. Toms; 
Efficiency and waste, by H. H. Cherry; Prac- 
tical problems of the horse breeder, by 
W. S. Anderson; Grasses and conservation 
of soils, by J. A. English 

* Massachusetts — Farmers' institutes: season of 

1915-16. List of lecturers available thru the 
state bd. of agric, and their subjects to- 
gether with a classified subject list of lec- 
tures and regulations of the board concern- 
ing farmers' institutes. 32p D '15 Mass. state 
bd. of agric. 

* Pennsylvania — Farmers' institutes in Pennsyl- 

vania to be held under the auspices of the 
Pennsylvania dept. of agriculture, season, 
1915-1916. Pa Dept. Agric Bui no 270 74p 
'15 

* Program for farmers' week at the College of 

Agriculture, West Virginia university, Jan. 
3-8. 1916. W Va Univ Bui ser 16 no 5 15p il 
D '15 W. Va. university, Morgantown 

Conferences 

* American assn. of farmers' institute workers. 

Proceedings of the 20th annual meeting held 
at Univ. of Cal., Berkeley, Cal., Aug. 12-14, 
1915. il 155p '15 L. R. Taft, sec, E. Lansing, 
Mich. 

Contains: How can Smith-Lever funds be 
used for the furtherance of farmers' insti- 
tutes? by W. T. Clarke; Movable schools of 
agriculture and their work; by G. I. Christie; 
Cooperation of farmers' institutes with other 
educational agencies, by F. S. Cooley; What 
can the government do to aid the work of 
farmers institutes? Demonstration work in 
farmers' institutes, by J. M. Stedman; 
Farmers' responsibilities, by H. J. Waters; 
How can we help the boys? by Bradford 
Knapp; Report of standing committee on 
women's institutes, by Mrs. I. S. Harrington; 
Women's institutes in Providence of Ontario, 
by G. A. Putnam; etc. 
American assn. of farmers' institute workers. 
21st annual convention. New Willard hotel, 
Washington. D. C, Nov. 13-14, 1916. In 
addition to topics relating to farmers' insti- 
tutes and extension work in general there 
will be addresses on rural credits, coopera- 
tive marketing, and home economics. The 
"Model" institute lecture upon The present 
status of the humus question will be given 
by Dr. H. J. Wheeler, of Boston. 

Farmhouses 

* Remodelled farmhouses. M. H. Northend. 264p 

il *$5 '15 Little 

Farming, Dry. See Dry farming 
Farms, State. See State farms 



96 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Fatigue 

* Fati&ue study: the elimination of liumanity's 
greatest unnecessary waste; a first step in 
motion study. F. B. and L. M. Gilbreth, 
159p il *$1.50 '16 Sturgis & Walton co., N. Y. 
Wisconsin — Dr. Robert Oleson of the U. S. 
public health service is making an official 
study of the question whether fatigue is an 
industrial health hazard for women workers 
In Milwaukee and other Wisconsin cities (Ag 
'16) 

Federal aid. See Roads — Federal aid; Tuberculo- 
sis; Vocational education — Federal aid 

Federal budget. See Budget. National 

Federal courts. See Supreme court of the United 
States 

Federal Industrial commission. See Industrial 
commission. Federal 

Federal reserve act. See Banking and currency 

Federal trade commission. See Trade commis- 
sion. Federal 

Feeble-minded 
California — C. Annette Buckel foundation, a 
research fellowship for the psychological and 
pedagogical study of backward and mentally 
defective children, has recently been estab- 
lished in connection with Stanford univer- 
sity. Five lines of research are proposed: 
Backward and feebleminded children; delin- 
quent or potentially delinquent children; 
nervous, morbid, or psychopathic children; 
children of superior ability; normal children. 
There is contemplated the establishment of 
a hospital, school or home for the firsthand 
study of exceptional children, and for the 
practical training of special teachers of such 
at some future date (My '16) 
Cause of feeble-mindedness and treatment of 
the feeble-minded. E. J, Emerick. Ohio 
State Univ Bui v 20 no 6 p 61-70 O '15 Ohio 
state univ., Columbus 

* Citizen Control of the Citizen's Business, 

white paper no. 12, March 25, 1916, is de- 
voted to the question of the feeble-minded 
and the Nat. welfare exhibit, 11 1/^ Queen st. 
east, Toronto, March 28-April 1, 1916. Bur. 
of munic. research, Toronto. 10c 

* Collected papers of Margaret Bancroft on 

mental subnormality and the care and 
training of mentally subnormal children. 
102p '15 Ware bros. co., 1010 Arch St., 
Philadelphia 

* Criminal imbecile: an analysis of three re- 

markable murder cases. H. H. Goddard. 157p 
$1.50 '15 Macmillan 

It is the belief of the author that the 
three cases herein described are typical of a 
large proportion of criminal cases and that 
the analysis and discussion attempted will 
help to make clear important points which 
are often misunderstood, points relative to 
the criminal and to the imbecile. These 
were the first court cases in which the Binet- 
Simon tests were admitted in evidence 

Criminal responsibility. P. C. Knapp. J Crim 
Law 6:571-85 N '15 

Distribution of the feeble-minded in society. 
F. Kuhlmann: J Crim Law 7:205-18 Jl '16 

Feeble minded as criminals. L. E. Bisch. New 
Repub 8:66-7 Ag 19 '16 

* Menace of the mentally defective. Alexander 

Johnson and M. J. Lane. (Dept of social and 
pub service bul no 37, Social service ser) 
20p Am. unitarian assn., 25 Beacon st., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Movement has been launched in Philadelphia 
by a committee of Philadelphia physicians, 
working in conjunction with twenty-five 
institutions and organizations in Pennsyl- 
vania and elsewhere, to attempt to control 
the propagation of feeble-minded and de- 
fective individuals in Pennsylvania. A 
tentative year's program has been worked 
out to endeavor to bring all classes of 
defectives or feeble-minded persons either 
under the direct control of the law, or into 
state or other institutions controlled by law 
(P 13 '16) 

Prison reform and the feeble-minded criminal. 
J. P. Byers. Ohio Bul Char & Correc v 22 
no 3 p 19-28 Je '16 

Study of deviate children: the problem of de- 
linquency and sub- normality. C. E: Jones, 
Ungraded 1:159-62 Mr '16 



* What constitutes feeble-mindedness? F. 

Kuhlmann. 214-36p F, Kuhlmann, Fari- 
bault, Minn, 

Reprinted from Journal of Psycho-As- 
thenics, v. 19, no. 4, June, 1915 
What is practical in the way of prevention of 
mental defect, by W. E. Fernald; Where 
should we attack the problem of the pre- 
vention of mental defect and mental disease, 
by Adolf Meyer; Possibilities of research as 
applied to the prevention of feeble-minded- 
ness, by H. H. Goddard; Field work an 
indispensable aid to state care of the socially 
inadequate, by C. B. Davenport; Feeble- 
minded as subjects of research in efficiency, 
by E. E. Southard; Available fields for re- 
search and prevention in mental defect, by 
M. G. Schlapp; Methods of preventing 
feeble-mindedness, by W. S. Cornell; Rela- 
tion of mental defect to the neglected, de- 
pendent, and delinquent children of New 
Hampshire, by L, C, Streeter; Prevention of 
feeble-mindedness, a problem yet unsolved, 
bv Bleecker Van Wag-enen; Feeble-minded: 
the need of research, by A, W. Butler; Pre- 
vention of mental defect, the duty of the 
hour, by M. W. Barr. In Nat. conf, of char- 
ities and correction. Proceedings, 1915, p 
289-367 

Addresses have been reprinted at prices 
varying from 5 to 10 cents 

See also Ability tests; Crime and criminals 
— Laboratories; Defective children — Educa- 
tion; Juvenile delinquents; Mental hygiene 

Bibliography 

* Feeble-mindedness: a selected bibliography; 

[with] annotations by H. Kaplan. Russell 
Sage Foundation Lib Bul no 15 4p F '16 Rus- 
sell Sage found. 

Border-line cases 

Classification of borderline mental cases 
amongst offenders. V. V. Anderson. J Crim 
Law 6:689-95 Ja '16 

* New York. State bd. of charities. Bur. of 

analysis and investigation. Second report 
on fifty-two border-line cases in the Rome 
state custodial asylum, made to the state 
board of charities at its special meeting, 
held Nov. 16, 1915, by the board's standing 
com. on idiots and feeble-minded. (Eu- 
genics and social welfare bul no 6) 32p 
charts '15 

Directories 
Directory of state and other institutions in the 
U. S. for the care of the mentally deficient. 
S. E. Packard, comp. il In N. Y. (state). 
Comm. to investigate provision for the men- 
tally deficient. Report, 1915. p 423-508 

Gives a sketch of institutions by states, 
with tables showing per capita cost in pub- 
lic and private institutions, special institu- 
tions, and public provisions 

Investigations 

Cooke county, 111. — Rockefeller institute is 
conducting a complete survey in regard to 
subnormal mind conditions. "This investiga- 
tion is an aftermath of the recent killing 
of six persons by a negro fanatic and is a 
step toward the elimination from society of 
half wits and subnormal persons (Ag 1 '16) 

* Family of Sam Sixty. M. S. Kostir. charts 

Ohio Bd of Administration Pub no 8 29p Ja 
•16 

Florida has appointed a commission to report 
on the needs of the feeble-minded (N 15 '15) 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Central council of social 
agencies with the cooperation of social 
agencies of the state are attempting to get 
a registration of feeble minded and of chil- 
dren in the public schools who are three 
or more years retarded. No report of the 
committee has been published but a report 
will be read at the state conference of char- 
ities and correction in October, 1916 

* New York (state). Comm. to investigate provi- 

sion for the mentally deficient. Report 
transmitted to the legislature Feb. 15, 1915. 
628p il chart '15 

Report is absolutely not to be obtained. 
P. A. I. S. has one copy for loan purposes. 
Recommends that the problem be considered 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



97 



Feeble-minded — Investigations — Continued 

a state problem and New York city institu- 
tions be taken over by the state, also that 
present state institutions be enlarged and 
additional ones built; another colony for epi- 
leptics; provision for the care of mentally 
defective delinquents; establishment of 
clearing houses to pass on the mentally de- 
ficient; training and supervision of the high 
grade mentally deficient in the public school 
system 

* Study of feeble-minded in Cincinnati. Juvenile 

protective assn. 28p Ja '15 The Association, 
S04 Neave bldg.. Cincinnati 

* Study of mentally defective children in Chi- 

cago: an investigation made by the Juvenile 
protective association. 72p charts '15 Juve- 
nile protective assn., 816 S. Halsted st., 
Chicago 

Social study of the living conditions of 
Chicago's mentally defective children. Takes 
up: Subnormal rooms in Chicago public 
schools; State school and colony for the 
feeble-minded at Lincoln; Other institutions 
in which subnormal children from Cook 
county are cared for; Need for further in- 
stitutional provision; Segregation of feeble- 
minded women of child-bearing age 

U. S. children's bureau has arranged to under- 
take a study of the social conditions and 
needs of the feeble-minded in the state of 
Delaware (F '16) 

Utah — Commission of three has been created 
to investigate public provision for the care, 
custody and treatment of the mentally de- 
fective, and to report at the 1917 session of 
the legislature 

Laws 
Illinois law, providing for the legal commit- 
ment of feeble-minded persons and their 
permanent segregation in institutions. Inst 
Quar 6:9-16 S 30 '15 

Reports 

* Mental defectives in Virginia. 128p il '16 State 

bd. of charities and correction Richmond, 
Va. 

Special report of the state board of chari- 
ties and corrections to the general assembly 
of 1916, on weak-mindedness in the state of 
Virginia; together with a plan for the train- 
ing, segregation, and prevention of the pro- 
creation of the feeble-minded 

* Ontario. Inspector of feeble-minded. 10th an- 

nual report on the care of the feeble-minded 
in Ontario for the year ending Oct. 31, 1915. 
54p '16 Dept. of the provincial sec. Parlia- 
ment bldgs., Toronto. Ont. 
Feeding stuffs 
Feeding stuffs inspection laws and their ad- 
ministration. F. L. Brown. In Assn. of 
Am. dairy, food and drug officials. Official 
proceedings, 1915, p 121-6 

* South Carolina — Directory of registration of 

commercial feed stuffs, manufacturers au- 
thorized to sell in South Carolina markets 
for the year 1915, and brands of the goods 
they are authorized to sell under the law, 
with advice to purchasers. (Bui no 51) 16p 
il Ap '15 S. C. dept. of agriculture, com- 
merce and industries 

* South Carolina — Rules and regulations govern- 

ing the sale of commercial feed stuffs in the 
state of South Carolina, and copy of the 
law. (Bui no 46) 35p map O '14 S. C. dept. 
of agriculture, commerce and industries 

Analyses 

* Analysis of feeding- stuffs made for the state 

department of agriculture. N H Agric Exp 
Sta Bui no 178 (Dept of chemistry) 16p Mr '16 
Agricultural experiment station, Durham, 
N. H. 

* Commercial feeding stuffs. Purdue Unlv Agric 

Exp Sta Bui no 181 523-835p Ag '15 Agricul- 
tural experiment station, Lafayette, Ind. 

* Commercial feeding stuffs, 1915. (Part 4 of 

the annual report of 1915.) 233-64p Conn, 
agric. exp. sta.. New Haven 

* Concentrated commercial feeding stuffs. Ten- 

nessee Agriculture (Tenn. dept. of agric.) v 4 
no 3 129-72P Mr 1 '15 

* Feeding stuffs inspection. (Official inspections 

72) 101-96p Ag '15 A^ic. experiment station, 
Orono, Maine 



* Inspection of commercial feedstuffs. P. H. 

Smith and C. L. Beals. Mass Agric Exp Sta 
Control Ser Bui no 3 70p O '15 Agricultural 
experiment station, Amherst, Mass. 

Contains the results of an analysis of 
commercial feedstuffs found in the Massa- 
chusetts markets during the year ending 
Sept. 1, 1915. Two special articles entitled 
Feeding standards and the dairy cow, and 
Information of interest to dairymen, both of 
which deal with our present knowledge of 
feeding practice, and a tabulated list of the 
wholesale cost of feedstuffs for the year 
based upon Boston rate are also given 

* Inspection of feeding stuffs. N Y Agric Exp 

Sta Bui no 420 309p My '16 N. Y. dept. of 
agric. 

* South Carolina — Commercial feed stuffs; con- 

taining results of inspection and analyses 
during the year 1914. (Bui no 52) 120p Je 
'15 S. C. dept. of agriculture, commerce and 
industries 

* Tabulated analyses of commercial fertilizers 

and fertilizer materials, Jan. 1, 1915, to Jan. 
1, 1916. Tenn Dept Agric Bui 62p '16 

Contains also the law and the rules and 
regulations 

* Texas teecimg stuffs; their composition and 

utilization. G. S. Fraps. • Texas Agric 
Exp Sta Bui 170 (Div of chemistry^ 34p N 
'14 Texas agric. exper. sta., College station, 
Brazos co., Texas 

Laws 

* Alabama — Commercial feeding stuffs laws and 

regulations; Alabama pharmacy laws. Ala- 
bama Agric and Industries Dept Bui v 6 no 
74 (Food drug and feed bur bul 1) 46p Ja 
1 '16 Ala. dept. of archives and history 

* Kansas feeding-stuffs law: revision of 1913; 

amended 1915. Kan State Agric College Exp 
Sta Circ no 52 lOp Je '15 Kan. state agric. 
college, Manhattan 

Reports 
Feeding stuffs report. G: G. Hutchinson. Pa 
Dept Agric Bul no 278 p 148-58 '16 
Felton, Ralph A. 
Study of a rural parish. '15 Bd. of home mis- 
sions, Presbyterian church in the U. S. A., 
156 5th av., N. Y. (Church and social prob- 
lems) 
Feminism 

* Feminism: its fallacies and follies. John Mar- 

tin and P. M. Martin. 359p *$1.50 '16 Dodd 
Women's movement from the two main 
points of view, that of the man and that of 
the woman. Both authors arrive at the 
same conclusions, a plea for sanity and a 
right judgment for the movement, seeing 
much good and no little evil in the wom- 
en's activities 

"■ Feminist revolutionary principle biologically 
unsound. George Macadam. (Pub 3) 13p '15 
Man-suffrage assn., 27 William st., N. Y. 

Interview with Prof. W: T. Sedgwick, re- 
printed from The New York Times, Sunday, 
January 18, 1914 

Fences 

Cost 

* Cost of fencing farms in the north central 

states. H. N. Humphrey. U S Dept Agric 
Bul no 321 32p il Ja 12 '16 

Ordinances 

* Milwaukee, Wis. — Ordinance regulating the 

erection of fences in the city of Milwaukee. 
(Ord 195. Passed D 6 '15) Ip City clerk, 
Milwaukee 

Provides that no fence, screen or struc- 
ture in the nature of a fence, shall be 
erected in the city of Milwaukee in such 
position or place as to be dangerous or 
detrimental to the health of persons living 
in any house or premises 
Fergus case. See Appropriations— Fergus case 

Ferries 

Reports 

New York (city). Comptroller. Report of 
the maintenance of the department of docks 
and ferries of the city of New York in 1913 
and 1914, prepared from the detailed ex- 
pense statements of that department. 23p 
O '15 



98 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Ferries — Reports — Continued 
New York (city). Comptroller. Report on 
the maintenance of the department of docks 
and ferries of the city of New York in 1914 
and 1915, prepared from the detailed expense 
statements of that department. 20p Jl '16 
Ferries, IVIunicipal 

Reports 

* New^ York (city). Comr. of docks. Report on 

the operation of municipal ferries by the 
city of New York from 1905 to 1915. 20p '16 
Fertilizers 

* Commercial fertilizers. Kan State Agric College 

Exp Sta Bui no 204 40p Ja '15 Agricultural 
experiment station, Manhattan, Kan. 

Contains: Analyses of inspection samples 
of fertilizers; Value and use 
Commercial fertilizers; Soil amendments; Fer- 
tilizer practice; Farm manures. In T. L. 
Lyon and others. Soils, p 489-626 '15 

Bibliographical references given 

* Determination of availability of nitrogenous 

fertilizers in various California soil types by 
their nitrifiability. C. B. Lipman and P. S. 
Burgess, Cal Univ Agric Exp Sta Bui no 260 
107-27P O '15 

* Experiments, with fertilizers, F, ' E, Bear. 

West Va Univ Agric Exp Sta Bui no 155 19p 
il O '15 Agricultural experiment station, 
Morgantown, W. Va. 

* Fertilizer problem from the vegetable grow- 

er's standpoint. C. E. Durst. Univ of 111 Agric 
Exp Sta Circ no 182 28p il My '15 

* List of fertilizer and lime manufacturers and 

importers. Pa Dept Agric Bui no 275 41p '16 
Contains: Pennsylvania fertilizer law. bone 
law, and lime law 
Manurial value of sewage sludges. Gladys 
Mumford. Bd. of Agriculture J (Whitehall 
place, London, S. W.) 23:129-35 My '16 4d 

* Preparation of fertilizer from municipal waste. 

J. W. Turrentine. (Y B separate 643) 295- 
310p il '15 U. S, dept, agric. 

From Yearbook of U. S, dept. of agricul- 
ture for 1914 
World's production of fertilizers. U S Com- 
merce Repts no 138 p 986-7 Je 13 '16 

Anaiyses 

* Analyses and valuations of commercial fertil- 

izers and ground bone; analyses of agricul- 
tural lime. N J Agric Exp Sta Bui no 274 
63p D 17 '14 N. J. agric. experiment stations. 
New Brunswick 

* Analyses and valuations of commercial fertili- 

zers, fertilizer supplies and home mixtures, 
N J Agric Exp Sta Bui no 285 45p Ag 31 
'lo N. J, agric. experiment stations. New 
Brunswick 

* Analyses of commercial fertilizers. S C Agric 

Exp Sta of Clemson Agric College Bui 181 
58p N '15 Clemson college, S, C. 

* Analyses of commercial fertilizers (limes, 

ashes, acid phosphates, nitrates of soda, 
complete fertilizers, comparisons of guar- 
anties and analyses in case of each manu- 
facturer). R I State College Agric Exp Sta 
Inspection Bui O '15 12p R. I, agric, experi- 
ment station, Kingston 

* Analyses of commercial fertilizers ("potato" 

fertihzers, bones and tankages), R I State 
College Agric Exp Sta Inspection Bui Jl '15 
8p R. I. agric. experiment station, Kingston 

* Commercial fertilizers. P. L. Hibbard. Cal Univ 

Agnc Exp Sta Bui no 259 104p S '15 

* Commercial fertilizers. Purdue Univ Affric 

Exp Sta Bui no 180 407-520p My '15 Agri- 
cultural experiment station, Lafayette, Ind. 

* Commercial fertilizers: [analyses]. H. E Cur- 

l\^:^yA^P^ ^^P St^ ^"1 no 189 631-752p D 
31 14 Agricultural experiment station, Lex- 
mgton, Ky. 

* Commercial fertilizers, inspection 1915, B H 

Hite and F, B Kunst, W Va Univ Agric 

?^^A ?Q^ ^^^EV^^}^^. ^V^ (^^P<^ of chemistry) 
no 4 69p F '16 Agricultural experiment sta- 
tion, Morgantown, W. Va, 

* Farmers' bulletin on fertilizers. Maine Dept of 

Agric Bui V 14 no 4 48p D '15 Maine comr. 
of agric. 



* Fertilizer inspection. Maine Agric Exp Sta Of- 

ficial Inspections no 74 225-84p D '15 Agri- 
cultural experiment station, Orono, Me, 

* Fertilizer registrations, C: S. Cathcart. N J 

Agric Exp Sta Bui no 275 34p Ja 7 '15 N. J. 
agric. experiment stations, New Brunswick 

* Illinois. Dept. of agriculture. Report for 1915 

giving the analyses of fertilizers licensed 
for sale or manufactured in Illinois. lOp 

* Inspection of commercial fertilizers. H. D. 

Haskins and others. Mass Agric Exp Sta 
Control Ser Bui no 4 iOOp D '15 Agricul- 
tural experiment station, Amherst, Mass. 

* Inspection of commercial fertilizers: 1915. map 

Univ of Mo Agric Exp Sta Bui ^no 139 58p 
Ja '16 
■* Report on analyses of samples of commercial 
fertilizers collected by the commissioner of 
agriculture during 1915. N Y Agric Exp 
Sta Bui no 410 475-550p O '15 N. Y, agric. 
experiment station, Geneva 

* Report on commercial fertilizers, 1915, with 

suggestions regarding fertilizers in 1916, 
E. H. Jenkins. 80p '16 Conn, agric, exper. 
station, New Haven 

Pt. 1 of the annual report of 1915 

* Tabulated analyses of commercial fertilizers 

and fertilizer materials, Tennessee Agricul- 
ture (Tenn. dept. of agric.) v 4 no 2 61-123p 
F 1 '15 

Conferences 

National fertilizer assn. 23d annual conven- 
tion, held at Hot Springs, Va., July 10-14, 
1916. Program includes the following ad- 
dresses: Need of cooperation between manu- 
facturers and bankers in the U. S., by F. C. 
Schwedtman; New agriculture, by G. I. 
Christie; Appraisals and depreciation of fer- 
tilizer plants, by W. S. Rankin 
Fieid, Jessie, and Nearing, Scott 

Community civics, il 60c '16 Macmillan. 
(Civics) 
Filing 

Data filing system. International Marine En- 
gineering (461 8tb av.. N. Y. $2 a year) 21: 
342-3 Jl '16 

Filing. Mrs. A. L. Robinson. Special Libraries 
6:147-9 N '15. 

Filing correspondence in a municipal depart- 
ment. R. J. Fee. Kng N 75:786-8 Ap 27 '16 

Filing printed samples. R. D. Heiner. Print- 
ing Art (Univ. press, Cambridge, Mass.) 27: 
527-8 Ag '16 30c 

* Indexing and filing: a manual of standard 

practice, E. R. Hudders, 292p $3 postpaid '16 
Ronald press co., 20 Vesey st., N, Y. 

Author attempts to clear up some of the 
obscure points, and at the same time set 
forth the basic principles necessary to the 
establishment of a manual of standard prac- 
tice instructions in this field 

Our easy way to file bulky papers. Lee Dol- 
kart. System (Wabash av. & Madison St., 
Chicago) 30:192-3 Ag '16 20c 

Seattle. Wash. — Dept, of public utilities has 
adopted a new method of filing, whereby 
blue-prints and maps are rolled around cedar 
blocks, the ends of which are plainly labeled, 
and are arranged conveniently in a spe- 
oially constructed closet. The advantages 
are the ease with which blue-prints or maps 
may be obtained, the low cost of installation, 
and the saving in wear and tear. The closet 
is one of the new features of the new office 
in the county and city building and con- 
tains hundreds of shelves about three inches 
apart (Je 10 '16) 

See also Clippings; Railroads — Valuation — 
Filing systems 

Bibliography 
"■ List of references on systems and methods 
of office filing. Munic Ref Lib Notes (Munic- 
ipal bldg., N. Y.) 2:141-5 Ja 5 "16 
Finance 
Increase in public expenditures. T: S. Adams. 
In Cal. State bd. of equalization. Report, 
1913-1914. p 229-34 

* New form of government: taxation and tariff 

question solved, R. E. L: Maxey, 51p $1 R, E. 
L: Maxey, Henry W. Oliver bldg., Pitts- 
burgh. Pa, 

Recommends the creation of a U. S, bu- 
reau of loans, to finance railroads, munic- 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



99 



Finance — Continued 

ipalities, and states; government appraisal 
of railroads, and government jurisdiction 
over all corporation bonds 

See also Budget; County finance; Euro- 
pean war — Financial influence; Municipal 
finance; Parks — Finance; Penal institutions 
— Finance; Railroads — Finance; School fi- 
nance; State buildings — Finance; State fi- 
nance; Street railroads — Finance; United 
States — Finance 

Bibliography 

♦ Finance: government publications pertaining to 

revenue, taxation, banking, appropriations, 
agricultural credit, coinage, panics. (Price 
list 28 5th ed) 28p Mr '16 U. S. supt. of doc. 

Conferences 

Pan-American financial conference. Proceed- 
ings of the first conference, Washington, 
D. C, May 24-29, 1915. 744p $1 '15 U. S. supt. 
of doc. 

Pan American scientific congress. 2d congress, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 
1916. Program of section IX: transportation, 
commerce, finance, and taxation, lists the 
following papers and discussions relative to 
finance: Relation of public finance to pri- 
vate credit in Latin America; Requisites for 
the encouragement of the investment of for- 
eign capital, by Willard Straight, N. Y. ; Re- 
quisites for the stimulation of the invest- 
ment of foreign capital, by M. A. Montes de 
Oca, Argentina, Luis Tejada, Bolivia, and 
Rub6n M. Barrientos, Honduras; Best meth- 
ods to facilitate commercial transactions be- 
tween manufacturers of the U. S. and Span- 
ish-American merchants, by Lorenzo Anad6n, 
Argentina; Obstacles to the establishment of 
long-term credits as between manufacturers 
and merchants, by George E. Roberts, Nat. 
city bank, N. Y. ;' Problem of international 
exchange (monetary) and the means best 
adapted to establish direct exchange (mone- 
tary) between the countries of the American 
continent; Public finance and credit in Peru, 
by Don Enrique Ramirez Gastn6, Peru; 
Effects of the war on Latin American 
finance, by C. L. Jones. Univ. of Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wis. ; Natural resources, and the 
commercial and economic development of 
Guatemala, by Gaivez Portocarrero, Guate- 
mala; Financial problem of Nicaragua, by 
Pedro J. Caudra Ch: Industrial and financial 
investments as a basis of foreign trade ex- 
pansion, by David Kinley, dean, Graduate 
school, Univ. of 111., Urbana, 111.; Importance 
of organized information concerning the na- 
tional, state, and municipal bonds of the 
Central and South American countries, by 
R. W. Babson, Babson's statistical organiza- 
tion, Boston, Mass. 22p '15 John Barrett, 
sec. gen.. Pan American union, Washington, 
D. C. 

Reports 

♦ National tax assn. Com. on increase in public 

expenditures. Report. 463-9p '15 Office of 
treasurer, 15 Dey St., N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the 
ninth annual conference of the National tax 
assn. 

Fines 

Fines and community protection in Springfield. 
Illinois. Z. L. Potter. J Crim Law 6:675-83 
Ja '16 

From Correctional system of Springfield, 
111., by Zenas L. Potter 

♦ Opinion of the attorney general of the state 

of Ohio relative to the remitting and as- 
sessing of fines by justices of the peace 
and mayors. 7p '15 Ohio industrial comm. 

Imprisonment for non-payment 
Arizona supreme court has sustained an Ari- 
zona law permitting the infliction of a day's 
jail imprisonment for each dollar of an un- 
paid fine. Plaintiffs contended that this was 
equivalent to imprisonment for debt and 
therefore illegal (Press rept Mr 24 '16) 

Finger print system. See Crime and criminals — 
Identification 



Fire alarms 

* National bd. of flre underwriters. Regulations 

for the installation and use of municipal fire 
alarm systems; recommended by the Nat. 
flre protection assn. 31p '15 

* New York (state). Industrial comm. General 

speciflcations for flre alarm signal systems, 
for factory buildings more than two stories 
in height, in which more than twenty-flve 
persons are employed above the ground 
floor. (Bui no 5 as amended) 16p '16 

Philadelphia fire department has decided to. 
remove the glass door attachment of alarm 
boxes and place the keys which were in 
the boxes in stores and houses as a pre- 
ventive measure against false alarms. Red 
lights will be placed on every pole to which 
an alarm box is attached (F 10 '16) 

San Francisco's new fire alarm station. J: M. 
Barry. Munic J 39:837-40 D 2 '15 
Fire apparatus 

Apparatus and equipment in 1915: review of 
last year's trade activities. 11 Fireman's Her- 
ald (225 5th av., N. Y.) 71:187-93, 204-22 Mr 
4 '16 5c 

Fire fighting equipment and methods in Provi- 
dence. R. DeM. Weeks, il Am City 15:122-6. 
Ag '16 

Preparing for increased efficiency in fire-fight- 
ing. G: W. Booth. Am City 14:49-53 Ja '16 

See also Fire hose; Motor trucks in public- 
service 

Statistics 

* Fire equipment statistics: figures showing the 

fire apparatus and hose in service and re- 
serve in the cities of the U. S. and Canada, 
of 7,000 population and over. Fireman's Her- 
ald (225 5th av., N. Y.) 71:183-6 Mr 4 '16 5c- 
Fire departments 

* Newarker the house organ of the Newark 

free public library, for Sept. 1915, is a fire 
number. Besides a table giving the com- 
parative strength and cost of fire depart- 
ments for 1914 in 27 cities of the U. S., it. 
contains a directory of the fire department 
of Newark and the following articles: Fire 
insurance in Newark; Fire department of 
the city of Newark: how it is managed; Bu- 
reau of combustibles and fire risks; Newark 
fire alarms, losses and insurance, 1890-1914,. 
History of the Newark fire department, 
1797-1915; Books for a fireman; Fire pre- 
vention; Exempt firemen; Fire insurance: 
what it means to a community 
Police and fire telephone systems. J. M. Sut- 
ton. Fire (36 Whitefriars st., London, E. C.)- 
8:197, 195 Ap-My '16 6d ea (to be cont) 

Conferences 

Dominion assn. of fire chiefs. 8th annual con- 
vention, Windsor, Ont., Aug. 8-11, 1916. Pro- 
gram includes following addresses: Signifi- 
cance of the fire waste, by F. H. Wentwortli; 
Fire wall an essential in crowded buildings, 
by H. F. J. Porter; Duties, responsibilities 
and work of the fire marshal's office, by E. P. 
Heaton; Demonstration of spontaneous com- 
bustion and its causes, by G: E. Walker; 
Fires caused by accident, carelessness or 
design, by J. W. Graham; Town planning 
and fire prevention, by a member of the 
commission on conservation, Ottawa; Stand- 
ardization, having special reference to its 
need in regard to fire apparatus and tools, 
by J. G. Smith 

New York (state) assn. of fire chiefs. Conven- 
tion, Elmira, N. Y., June 28-29. 1916. The 
program includes the following papers: Elec- 
tric fires, their cause and methods of extin- 
guishment, by Thomas O'Connor; Advan- 
tages to the flre department by the removal 
of dangerous overhead wires, by G: M. 
Bower; Superiority of motor apparatus over 
hand or horse drawn for smaller cities or 
towns, by C. E. Forbush: Red cross first 
aid, by A. G. Wicks; Handling of telephone 
alarms, by J. J. Mulcahey 

Days off 
Boston, Mass., finance commission has ex- 
pressed strong disapproval of the ordinance 
pending before the city council providing for- 
one day off in three for firemen. The com- 
mission holds that such an ordinance would! 



100 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Fire departments — Days off — Continued 

entail unwarranted expense, as approxim- 
ately 192 men would have to be added to the 
service at an additional cost of about $268,000 
annually. The commission believes that the 
money could be better expended for neces- 
sary street and sidewalk improvements. The 
ordinance is before the Committee on ordi- 
nances and a hearing was held June 28, 
1916 

Days off for firemen: report of the committee 
on municipal and metropolitan affairs of the 
Boston chamber of commerce concerning- the 
proposed "one day off in three" schedule for 
the Boston fire department. Am City 15:128- 
32 Agr '16 

Includes list of cities giving more than one 
day off in five 

Michigan — U. S. circuit court has handed 
down a decision holding that the act of the 
1915 legislature, giving members of city fire 
departments one day off in four and 20 days' 
furlough each year, is unconstitutional and 
void; held that the law is a violation of the 
right of the city to local self-government, 
and contrary to the home rule of 1909 and 
the state constitution's home rule provi- 
sion. Charles Simpson v. Mayor H. F. Pad- 
dock, Saginaw (Press rept Mr 23 '16) 

Reports 

* Boston, Mass., Chamber of commerce. Report 

on the proposed ordinance to grant one day 
off in three for firemen. 12p '16 Chamber 
of commerce, Boston, Mass. 

This report was unanimously adopted by 
the board of directors at its meeting on 
March 9, 1916 

Manuals 

* Mass. Civil service comm. Manual of fire de- 

partment equipment and practice. llOp il '15 
Articles and tables bearing on the general 
subject of Fire fighting and fire prevention, 
intended for applicants desirous of entering 
the service and for firemen already in the 
service preparing for promotion examinations 

Motor equipment 
^ee Motor trucks in public service 

Pensions 
Dallas, Texas — Establishing a police and fire- 
men's pension fund. Charter amendment. 
Adopted. Yes 6,849 No 5,397 Ap 4 '16 

Removal from office 
IRemoval of veterans and volunteer firemen; 
Removal of members of the uniformed 
force of the fire department. Munic Research 
no 66 p 58-70, 92-8 O '15 

Reports 

■* Concerning the fire department: report on cer- 
tain features of administration of the Mil- 
waukee fire department. 14p D '15 Citizens' 
bur. of municipal efficiency. Milwaukee 
'* New York (city). Fire dept. Annual report, 
year ending Dec. 31, 1914, embracing the 
last quarterly report of that year. 162p il 
15 

Salaries 
See Salaries — Fire departments 

Statistics 
.'Statistics of fire departments. Dauntless club 
of the Buffalo fire department. 39p 25c '15 
Dauntless club, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Contains the salaries of the chiefs and 
other employees in the fire departments of 
various cities; time off allowed; allowances 
made; allowances made for sickness and in- 
jury and size of department 

Training 

"Philadelphia's training school for fire service. 
11 Am City 14:251-5 Mr '16 

I>ittsburgh, Pa., has opened a school for fire- 
men; actual instruction in modern fire- 
fighting and other hazardous work, ladder 
and hose drills, rescue work and instruction 
in pulmotor application will be given by 
•ofHcers of the department, who spent a 



month in the N. Y. school of instruction. A 
training tower, 90 feet high, has been 
erected (N '15) 

Two-platoon system 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Ordinance proposed by ini- 
tiative petition, repealing the two-platoon 
fire department salary ordinance was de- 
feated at the election, June 6, 1916. The 
vote stood Yes, 19,101 No 37,469 

San Francisco, Cal. — Tax com. will make a 
thoro study of the two- platoon system of 
fire service in cities where it is now in ef- 
fect, after which a report will be returned 
(Mv 15 '16) 

* Two platoon system in municipal fire depart- 

ments. N Y State Bur Municipal Informa- 
tion Rept no 107 5p (Typew 25c> 

Gives data for Omaha, Neb.; Kansas City, 
Mo.; Seattle, Wash.; Yonkers, N. Y. ; Kansas 
City, Kan.; Youngstown, O. ; Lincoln, Neb.; 
Tacoma, Wash. Obtained only thru 
P. A. I. S. 

Ordinances 
Duluth, Minn. — Ordinance providing for the 
two-platoon system in the fire department 
was carried at the election June 19, 1916, 
by a vote of 11,029 to 3,189 
Fire districts 

* List of fire districts for Rhode Island and 

citations for jurisdiction together with list 
of towns and villages included in said fire 
districts. E. T. Willson. jr. comp., R. I. leg. 
ref. bur. 6p Je '16 (Typew B 30c) 
Fire hose 

Fire insurance companies and fire prevention 
organizations, such as that of the Central 
Ohio fire chiefs, are supporting a move- 
ment to secure the adoption of the national 
standard specifications for fire hose. The 
movement will be nationwide in scope, but 
will be first worked out in Ohio (Ap 5 '16) 

Cost 

* Cost of fire hose: [data for New York cities]. 

N Y State Bur Municipal Information Rept 
no 91 3p F 1 '16 (Typew 15c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Fire hydrants. See Waterworks — Hydrants 
Fire insurance. See Insurance, Fire 
Fire limits districts. See Zoning — Fireproof 

zones 
Fire marshals 
Relation of fire marshal's department to in- 
surance companies, by R. W. Hargadine; Re- 
lation of fire marshal departments to insur- 
ance companies, by G. E: Myers; Discussion. 
In Fire marshals' assn. of North America. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 105-23 

See also Fire protection — Condemnation of 
buildings 

Conferences 

* Fire marshals' assn. of North America. Pro- 

ceedings of the 10th annual convention, Chi- 
cago. lU., Sept. 10-11, 1915. 135p '15 L. T. 
Hussey, sec.-treas., Topeka, Kan. 

Contains papers relating to the condemna- 
tion of buildings that are fire hazards, mov- 
ing picture theaters, individual responsibil- 
ity for negligent or criminal fires, inspection 
of fire hazard conditions by members of fire 
departments, teaching of fire prevention, 
gasoline and explosives, suggestions for 
clean-up week, state building code, and the 
relation of fire marshal departments to in- 
surance companies, and to the state fire 
prevention assns. 

Laws 

* Iowa — Law relating to the duties and powers 

of the state fire marshal. lOp '15 Iowa state 
fire marshal 

* Michigan — Fire marshal law as amended by 

the legislature of 1915. 12p Mich, fire mar- 
shal 

Reports 

* Indiana. Fire marshal. 3d annual report to 

the governor for 1915. 57p il '16 
Fire marshals' association of North America 
Proceedings, 1915. '15 L. T. Hussey, sec.- 
treas., Topeka, Kan. (Fire marshals — Con- 
ferences) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



lot 



Fire protection 
American and Canadian fire prevention and 
fire- fighting methods. G: J. Gawley. Fire 
(36 Whitefriars St., London. E. C.) 8:177-8, 
193-4 Ap-My '16 6d ea (to be cont) 

* Avoidance of fires. A. F. Weeks. 128p il 

bibl *60c '16 Heath 

Textbook on fire prevention 

* British fire prevention com. Fire protection 

for passenger ships. (Red book no 203) 44p 
.2s 6d '16 The Com., 8 Waterloo place. Pall 
Mall. London. S. W. 

* Dwelling houses: a code of suggestions for 

construction and fire protection. 115p il 10c 

'16 Nat. bd, of fire underwriters 
Fire prevention and fire extinguishing; Fire 

drills and fire-alarm systems, il In D. S. 

Beyer. Industrial accident prevention, p 330- 

40 '16 
Fire prevention and fire protection. In W: B. 

Munro. Principles and methods of municipal 

administration, p 314-55 '16 
Fire prevention in Detroit. J. C. McCabe. In 

American society of municipal improve- 
ments. Proceedings, 1915. p 373-4 

* Fire problem in IlUnois: one of the big ques- 

tions of state conservation. W. H. Ben- 
nett. 30p '15 111. fire marshal dept. 

Address before the State fire prevention 
assn. meeting, and banquet of the Commer- 
cial club at Lincoln, 111., March 10, 1915. 
Advocates personal liability for damages 
caused by fires 

* Fire protection in factories, stores, etc. 20p 

il N 1 '15 Wis. industrial comm. 
Iowa university pharmacists have announced 
the perfection of a liquid preparation which 
will render inflammable materials absolutely 
fireproof. It was discovered by Arthur 
Arent, a druggist of Badger, la., and per- 
fected in the university laboratories by Prof. 
W. J. Teeters and Prof. R. A. Keever. The 
liquid is to be patented (Je 17 '16) 

* Manufacturers' Bulletin for Fire Protection 

issued by the Joint bd. of control in the 
cloak, suit and skirt and the dress and waist 
industries (31 Union sq. West, N. Y.) for 
March. 1915. contains: Memento mori, the 
fourth anniversary of the Triangle fire; Fire 
prevention bureau and fire hazards in the 
cloak, suit and skirt and the dress and waist 
industries, by J. O. Hammitt; Safety of fac- 
tory buildings, by H. F. J. Porter; Com- 
mittee of safety, by F. Perkins; Height of 
buildings, exits and safety; Fire protection 
in the cloak and suit and dress and waist 
industries; Fire protection in factories; Re- 
sume of labor laws in re fire protection; 
Dont's for manufacturers 

* Needed in every city: adequate power and 

common sense in fire prevention. C, J. Dris- 
coll. (Am City pam no 139) 4p 10c Civic press 
Recommends a municipal fire-prevention 
commission, with the local fire chief as ex- 
ecutive officer 

* New York (city) bur. of fire prevention has 

pubHshed the following bulletins: Regula- 
tions for construction and use of portable 
motion picture booths. 4p; Regulations gov- 
erning exit facilities for buildings here- 
after erected. 24p; Regulations for stand- 
pipe (fire line) equipment. 15p drawing; 
Code of ordinances relating to garages, dry 
cleaning and dry dyeing establishments, 
motor vehicle repair shops, mineral oils, 
etc. 64p; Extracts from code of ordinances 
relating to explosives and ammunition. 31p; 
Plans and specifications, fire department's 
oil separator. 7p plans ('15) 

Operations of the fire prevention bureau. 
J: O. Hammitt il In N. Y. (city). Fire 
dept. Annual report, 1914, p 35-42 '15 

Statistical charts of various divisions of 
bureau of fire prevention are contained in 
appendix B, p 122-55 

Preparing for increased efficiency in fire- 
fighting. G: W. Booth. Am City 14:49-53 Ja 
'16 

Prevention or reduction of fire losses: should 
the owner bear a part of his loss, (affirma- 
tive) by H. L. Ekern and (negative) by 
J. E. Phelps; Should the owner be respon- 
sible for the loss of another, (affirmative) 
by John James and (negative) by Harvey 



Wells. In Nat. convention of insurance 
comrs. Proceedings of the 46th session, 
1915, p 187-205 

Responsibilities of business men for a de- 
crease in the fire waste. I. G. Hoagland. 
Econ World n s 11:817-19 Je 24 '16 

Safety and saving by fire prevention. Robert 
Adamson, fire comr, of New York city. In 
Safety first federation of America. Report 
of proceedings, 1915, p 43-9 

Seattle, Wash. — Special council committee on 
fire prevention recommends legislation 
aimed to prevent over- insurance of property 
and to provide personal liability for fires 
originating thru carelessness and negUgence. 
It also urges the establishment of a fire in- 
spection bureau, headed by the fire marshal 
and consisting of a detail of specially trained 
men who will devote their entire working 
time to the regular and systematic patrol of 
buildings thruout the city. Provision will be 
made for bettering fire hazard conditions in 
old buildings and for an examining board to 
pass on all such matters (Ap 9 '16) 

• Statement addressed to Hon. Charles S. Whit- 

man, governor, upon the failure of the in- 
dustrial commission to enforce the labor law, 
with particular reference to the fire in Dia- 
mond factory. Williamsburg, Brooklyn, on 
Nov. 6, 1915, 73p '16 Nat. consumers' league, 
289 4th av.. N. Y. 
"' Story of the National fire protection associ- 
ation and list of its publications. 12p Ja 1 
'16 Nat. fire protection assn. 
Thru the effort of the Fire prevention com. of 
the Safety first federation of America. Presi- 
dent Wilson has set Oct. 9, 1916 for a na- 
tional fire prevention day 

See also Chimneys; Explosives; Garages; 
Inflammable liquids; Inflammable materials; 
Inflammable mixtures; Moving picture thea- 
ters; Theater — Fire protection; Water rates — 
Statistics; Zoning — Fireproof zones 

Bibliography • 
Fire prevention and fire protection. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 321-34 '15 

Condemnation of buildings 
Constitutionality of the provision of the law 
authorizing the state fire marshal to con- 
demn and remove buildings that are fire haz- 
ards; with discussion. D: B. Sharp. In Fire 
marshals' assn. of North America. Proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 20-35 

Conferences 

International assn. of fire engineers. Confer- 
ence. Aug. 29-31. 1916. Providence. R. I, 
Program includes the following topics: Util- 
ity of the triple combination pump, hose 
wagon and chemical; Fire department under 
a commission manager form of government; 
Does the menace of the wood shingle justify 
its abolition? Self contained oxygen breath- 
ing mine rescue and fire fighting apparatus, 
James McFall. sec. Roanoke. Va. 

National fire protection assn.. Annual meeting 
at Minneapolis, May 9-11. 1916. Ten meas- 
ures relative to fire prevention, presented 
at the opening session, President Meek's 
address, reports of the secretary and of the 
com. on public information, and an address 
on Securing public and governmental co- 
operation in protecting cities from conflagra- 
tions, by H. L. Ekern are published in Safety 
Engineering (80 Maiden Lane. N, Y, single 
numbers 25c) May. 1916. p 261-8. Franklin 
K. Wentworth, sec.-treas., Boston 

Cost 

Cost of water for fire protection, D. F. Wil- 
cox, Am City 14:168-71 F '16 

• Rates for private fire service charged by pri- 

vate companies to municipalities. N. Y, state 
bur. of munic. information. 3p (Typew 15c) 
Data are arranged by states and by cities 
under the state 

Directories 

• National fire protection assn., United States 

and Canada. Year book: articles of associ- 
ation, officers and committees, for the year 
1915-1916, and membership directory. 140p Ag 
'15 



102 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Fire protection —Continued 
Factories 

• Fire hazards in factory buildings: special re- 

port. G: M. Price. (Bui no 8) 16p D '15 Joint 
bd. of sanitary control 

New York (state). Industrial comm. General 
specifications for fire alarm signal systems 
for factory buildings more than two stories 
in height, in which more than 25 persons 
are employed above the ground floor. (Bui 
no 5 as amended) 16p '16 
Inspection 

Practical plan to make members of fire de- 
partments inspectors of fire hazardous con- 
ditions; with discussion. J: T. Winship. Jn 
Fire marshals' assn. of North America. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 51-8 

Investigations 

Pennsylvania — Cooperating with the state 
dept. of labor and industry, a group of 
Bryn Mawr college alumnae is making a 
study of fire prevention in factories and 
industrial establishments employing girls 
and women. The necessary funds have 
been raised by the class of 1889, which is 
celebrating its 25th anniversary by this 
undertaking (Ja 6 '16) 

Ordinances 

Los Angeles, Cal. — An ordinance has been 
adopted creating a fire prevention bureau, 
which will consist of six inspectors in charge 
of a fire prevention engineer and a deputy 
fire prevention engineer. There will also be 
six civilian inspectors from outside the fire 
department, who will serve without pay. 
Authority to call in the police department 
to enforce its orders for the elimination of 
fire hazards is given the bureau (Press rept 
Je 29 '16) 

Reports 

• British fire prevention com. Record for the 

years 1914 and 1915. (Red book no 200; 44p 
2s 6d '16 The Com., 8 Waterloo place, Pall 
Mall. London. S. W. 

Contains: Committee's record for the 
years 1914 and 1915; Committee's war emerg- 
ency work; Meeting of the International fire 
service council in London, 1914; Celluloid 
and petrol dangers during the war; Proposed 
celluloid regulation for factories 
Fire prevention. Fire (36 Whitefriars st, Lon- 
don, E. C.) 8:145-8 F '16 6d 

Report of the committee on fire prevention 
appointed by the International association of 
fire engineers 

• National assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 

A. Com. on fire prevention. Report pre- 
sented at the 21st annual meeting. New 
York city, May, 1916. 3p '16 The Assn., 30 
Church St., N. Y. 

• National bd. of fire underwriters. Report on 

the city of Baltimore, Md. (Superseding pre- 
vious reports) by the com. on fire prevention. 
(Rept no 273) 55p maps '16 

Report of the committee on fire prevention. 
In American society of municipal improve- 
ments. Proceedings, 1915, p 368-73 '16 

Report of the fire prevention committee. Jn 
Safety first federation of America. Report of 
proceedings, 1915, p 103-6 

Contains text of Pennsylvania act declar- 
ing persons who negligently cause fires to 
be liable for the cost of extinguishing same; 
also text of a proposed ordinance regulating 

- use and handling of inflammable liquids, 
etc. 

• Report on fire in the Edison phonograph 

works, Thomas A. Edison, inc., West 
Orange, N. J., Dee. 9, 1914. Nat. fire pro- 
tection assn. and Nat. bd. of fire under- 
writers. 61p il 25c '15 Nat. fire protection 
assn. 

Rules 

• Michigan. Fire marshal. Regulations issued 

under the provisions of section no. 5 of act 
no. 178 of the public acts of 1915. 8p Jl '15 

Schools 

• Fire prevention lessons for use in the schools 

of N. Y. city; prepared under the direction 
of Fire comr. Robert Adamson. 30p il 
'14-'15 Fire prevention bur.. Fire dept., N. Y. 



* Fire prevention school reader: a text-book 

dealing with the ordinary fire hazards com- 
mon to every community, with instructions 
for the removal of the same, and thus les- 
sening the enormous fire waste in Illinois. 
95p il '15 111. fire marshal dept. 
Fire protection in public schools; digest of 
report made by Robert Adamson, fire comr., 
to Mayor Mitchel concerning safety of pub- 
lic schools: main findings and recommenda- 
tions, il In N. Y. (city). Fire dept. Annual 
report, 1914, p 43-53 '15 

* Fire protection in schools. 16p il D 1 '14 Wis. 

industrial comm. 

The greater part of the bulletin is re- 
printed from bulletin E132 of the Russell 
Sage foundation 
Massachusetts — As a result of the parochial 
school fire in Peabody, the state fire pre- 
vention comr. called a conference at Faneuil 
Hall, Nov. 9, 1915, to consider safety in 
school-houses thruout the state. The views 
of F. I. Cooper, consulting architect for the 
Nat. fire prevention assn., were given at the 
conference. His recommendations to state 
legislatures are printed in the Boston Tran- 
script N 6 '15 

* Outlines of the causes and dangers of fires; 

compiled in comphance with the provisions 
of section 2468-k, 1913 supplements to the 
code, for use in the public schools of Iowa. 
(Bui no 1) 40p Iowa state fire marshal 

* Safeguarding schoolhouses from tire; report 

of Faneuil hall com. lip '16 Fire prevention 
comr. for the Metropolitan district of Mass., 
Boston 
Teaching of fire prevention in schools; with 
discussion. W. H. Bennett. In Fire mar- 
shals' assn. of North America. Proceedings, 
1915, p 58-68 

Lef/islation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] fire drills [in public 
schools]. U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 
590-1 '16 

Standards 

* Booklet of prints showing standards for fire 

protection. 2d ed 22p '15 German American 
insurance co., 1 Liberty St., N. Y. 

Vessels 

U. S. secretary of commerce called an advisory 
conference at his office, May 3, 1916, to con- 
sider the subject of making passenger 
vessels more secure from destruction by fire. 
Invitations were included to naval experts, 
engineers, presidents and managers of 
steamship lines 

Fire pumps 

* National bd. of fire underwriters. Regulations 

for the installation of rotary and centrifugal 
fire pumps and for the electrical driving of 
fire pumps; recommended by the Nat. fire 
protection assn. 75p '15 

Regulation 

* Regulations for the manufacture and installa- 

tion of steam fire pumps recommended by 
the Nat. fire protection assn. 64p '15 The 
Assn., 76 William St., N. Y. 
Firemen 

See also Hours of labor — Stationary fire- 
men 

Pensions 
Pittsburgh, Pa.— City council has requested 
the Pension life insurance company to make 
a proposition to council covering the disabil- 
ity, pension and death benefits for policemen 
and firemen, based on a compulsory age for 
retirement from service at 65 years (Mr 10 
'16) 

List of questions concerning the fire hazard 
in mercantile establishments. In N. Y. 
(state). Factory investigating comm. Fourth 
report, 1915. v 1 p 918-20 
See also Arson 

Liability 

Individual responsibility for negligent or crim- 
inal fires; with discussion. F. H. Went- 
worth. In Fire marshals' assn. of North 
America. Proceedings. 1915. p 43-50 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



103 



Fires — Liability — Continued 

National fire protection assn, recommends the 
enactment of ordinances similar to that of 
Cleveland, O., fixing the cost of extinguish- 
ing preventable fires upon citizens disregard- 
ing fire prevention orders, and a more gen- 
eral legal recognition of the common law 
principle of personal liability for damage re- 
sulting from fires due to carelessness or 
neglect (My 14 '16) 

Pennsylvania — Act imposing certain liabilities 
on persons, firms and corporations in cities 
of the second class for the cost of extin- 
guishing fires which occur thru their crirri- 
inal intent, design or willful negligence, or 
where they have not complied with any law, 
ordinance or other lawful regulation for 
the prevention of fire. In Indiana. Fire 
marshal. Report, 1915, p 26-7 '16 

Statistics 

Statistics of fires in American cities having a 
population of 20,000 and upward, 1915. table. 
In Nat. bd. of fire underwriters. Proceed- 
ings, p 100 '16 

Surveys 

U. S. forest service will be asked by lumber 
men to make a comprehensive survey of 
the .nation's fires, to investigate the source 
of conflagrations in order that building 
codes may be revised to prevent fires more 
successfully. It is believed that from 60 to 
75 per cent of fire losses are due to lack of 
preventive measures, bad design and im- 
proper construction, and that the suscepti- 
bility of wood to fire has been greatly over 
estimated. The survey would show the 
effects of the various preventive measures 
now used in protecting wooden structures 
(My 14 '16) 

Fireworks 

Ordinances 

* [Model] ordinance relating to the sale, dis- 

charge and firing of fireworks, and other 
pyrotechnic display. Homer Talbot, sec. 
League of Kansas municipalities. Ip '15 
(Typew 5c) 

"Sane Fourth" ordinances and laws re- 
duced death and injuries due to Independ- 
ence Day celebrations more than 60 per cent, 
since 1903. More than a hundred Kansas 
cities have "Sane Fourth" ordinances 

First aid. See Accidents, Industrial— First aid 

Fish 

Aliens 

Florida supreme court held, Dec. 8, 1915, that 
the state may by the imposition of a license 
tax upon aliens and nonresidents, without 
denying to any person within its jurisdic- 
tion the equal protection of the laws, justly 
discriminate in favor of its citizens in regu- 
lating the taking for private use of the 
common property any fish found in the pub- 
lic waters of the state, where such regu- 
lations have a fair relation to and are 
suited to conserve the common rights which 
the citizens of the state have in such fish 
as against aliens and nonresidents. The 
equal right of all persons residing within a 
state, whether citizens or aliens, to labor 
therein, does not include an equal right 
of an alien to participate in the common 
property and privileges that are peculiar 
to citizens. Ex parte Gilletti v. State of 
Florida, 70 S 446 

Laws 

♦ Alabama — Game and fish laws in force Nov. 1, 

1915. 47p '15 Ala. dept. of archives and 
history 

♦ Cahfornia fish and game laws. 1915-1917. 18th 

ed 144p maps '15 Cal. bd. of fish and 
game comrs.. Mills bldg., San Francisco 

* Iowa fish and game laws, federal migratory 

bird regulations and the Lacey bird law 
(federal law), in force July 4, 1915. 46p 
'15 la. fish and game warden, Spirit Lake 

• Michigan — Game and fish laws and laws rela- 

tive to destruction of noxious animals. 278p 
'15 Mich. sec. of state 



* New York (state)— Conservatiop law in re- 

lation to fish and game and to lands and 
forests as amended to the close of the 
regular session of 1915. 303p '15 N. Y. 
conservation comm. 

* Ohio — Fish and game laws. Ohio Agric Comm 

Oflicial Bui V 6 no 3 p 25-46 D '15 

* Oregon fish and game laws, 1915-1916. 190p 

'15 Oregon state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 

* Pennsylvania — Digest of the game, fish and 

forestry laws. J. Kalbfus, ed. 342p '15 J. 
Kalbfus, sec. Pa. game comm. 

Legislation 

Necessity for biological bases for legislation 
and practise in the fisheries industries. G. W. 
Field. Science n s 44:224-9 Ag 18 '16 

Legislation, Uniform 

Conference on ways and means to secure uni- 
formity of fishing laws governing the taking 
of fish in lake Erie was held in Buffalo, 
N. Y., Feb. 17, 1916, by prominent fish and 
game officials of Ohio, Pennsylvania, New 
York and Canada 

Reports 

■* Massachusetts. Bd. of comrs. on fisheries and 
game. Special report relative to the fish and 
fisheries of Buzzards bay, Jan., 1916. (House 
no 1775) postage 3c 77p il map '16 Mass. supt. 
of doc. 

Discusses preservation of Buzzards bay as 
a breeding place and the removal of fish 
prejudicial to the increase of the valuable 
species* 

FItzpatrick, Edward A. 
Plan for a university extension department. 
50c Ag '15 Society for the promotion of 
training for public service, Madison, Wis. 
(University extension) 

Flags 

* Municipal flags. (Munic ref bul no 6) 22p N '15 

Chicago munic. ref. lib. 

Contains information by cities relative to: 
Municipal flags and home rule; Kinds of 
municipal flags; Description of municipal 
flags; City seals on municipal flags; Use of 
municipal flags by city departments; Method 
of selection; Flags approved by municipal 
art commission; Flag not to be used for ad- 
vertising purposes; Ofl^cial flag days; and 
select city ordinances providing for munic- 
ipal flags 
Municipal flags: why and how they have been 
adopted; some distinctive features; how the 
flags are used, il Am City 14:244-9 Mr '16 

Contains the pictures and descriptions of 
the flags of some twenty cities 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] United States flag in 
schools. U S Bur Educ Bul 1916 no 47 p 372-3 
'16 
Flax Industry 

* Culture and manufacture of flax for fibre and 

seed. J. F: Thorne, comp. '16 Univ. of Ore- 
gon, School of commerce 
Fleets 

* Fleets of the world, 1915: comp. from official 

sources and classified according to types. 
19Sp il *$2.50 '15 Lippincott 

Fleming, Ralph D. 
Railroad and street transportation. (Cleveland 
education survey) 25c '16 Survey com., 
Cleveland found., Cleveland O. (Railroads — 
Employees) 

Flexner, Abraham, and Bachman, Frank P. 
Public education In Maryland: a report to the 
Maryland educational survey comm. '16 Gen,- 
eral education bd., 61 Broadway, N. Y.; 
Baltimore dept. of leg. ref. (School surveys — 
Individual surveys) 

Files 

Dispersion of musca domestica linnaeus under 
city conditions in Montana, by R. R. Parker; 
Some observations on the breeding habits of 
the common house-fly (musca domestica lin- 
naeus). by A. T. Evans, tables pi bibl J 
Economic Entomology (Am. assn. of eco- 
nomic entomologists. Concord, N. H.) 9:325- 
61 Je '16 50c 



104 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Files— Continued . 

House fly in relation to public health in Mon- 
tana: 1, Some facts concerning its habits; 
2, House fly as a disease carrier. R. K. Par- 
ker. Montana Dept Pub Health Bui v 9 nos 
9-10, 11 p 6-11, 5-11 Ja-Mr '16 
Investigation into the relationship of flies and 
diarrheal disease in children under one year 
of age in New York city, by P. S. Piatt; 
Discussion by E. C. Levy. Am J Pub Health 
6:143-55 F '16 

Floods 

"Cat and kitten" holes in outlet of dam; con- 
trol high and low flood discharges: water- 
supply storage, protection of farmland from 
summer floods and novel drift barriers are 
features of the Columbus flood-relief plans, 
fig Eng Rec 74:162-3 Ag 5 '16 

• Flood control and reclamation in California. 

V. S. McClatchy. 8p '16 Cal. reclamation 
bd., Sacramento, Cal. 

Flood control in Los Angeles county in Cali- 
fornia, il Eng N 75:272-5, 310-13 F 10, 17 '16 

Flood prevention plans for the Miami valley. 
G: B. Smith. 11 Wildwood Mag (817 ShoafC 
bldg., Fort Wayne, Ind.) 3:16-17, 41 Spring 
'16 15c 

• Flood prevention research report and recom- 

mendation of special committees. Cincinnati 
Chamber of Commerce Bui no 3 16p O '15 

Flood protection in Indianapolis, il Munic 
Eng 50:124-7 Ap '16 

Floods; Flood protection plans, il maps Ohio 
State Univ Bui 20:3-36 N '15 

Indianapolis flood protection, il Eng N 74:961-5 
N IS '15 

Kansas state drainage and conservation assn. 
was formed in Topeka on June 22, 1916. The 
object of the association is to unite the in- 
fluence of all interested in drainage and flood 
prevention, in securing better legislation. 
C. B. Zarker, chm., Topeka 

Memphis flood protection, il Eng N 75:890-4 My 
11 '16 

Ohio — It is probable that actual construction 
on the Miami valley flood protection project 
will not be started this year. The conserv- 
ancy court has postponed until Oct. 3. 1916, 
the date for hearing objections to the offlcial 
flood protection plan, and it is likely that 
these sessions will extend into November. In 
the meantime, however, the appraisement of 
property thruout the district will continue, 
and abstracts of title to condemned proper- 
ties will be examined and prepared. "The re- 
maining engineering work, also, will be 
pushed forward with all possible speed (Je 
14 '16) 

Pittsburgh flood commission has been asked 
by Gov. Brumbaugh to submit him drafts 
for legislation' in 1917, to bring about coop- 
eration between the city of Pittsburgh, the 
commission and the national government in 
the construction of seventeen flood preven- 
tion reservoirs to impound flood waters on 
the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers. The 
project will call for an expenditure of 
$20,000,000 (Je '16) 

Plan for the protection of the Miami valley 
district from flood damage. A. E. Morgan, 
maps Am City 14:437-40 My '16 

Retarding basin plan of flood control for Day- 
ton, O., and the Miami valley. A. E. Mor- 
gan, il Eng & Contr 45:382-5 Ap 26 '16 

Extracts from the chief engineer's report 
to the Miami conservancy district 

Ordinances 

• Sacramento, Cal. — Ordinance calling a special 

election, at which there shall be submitted 
to the qualified voters of the city of Sacra- 
mento, the proposition of adopting and rati- 
fying a plan for the enlargement and im- 
provement of the levee system of the city 
of Sacramento, and for works necessary for 
the protection of the city of Sacramento 
from inundation, through the construction 
of an overflow wier at a point commonly 
called Bryte's Bend in Yolo county, Cal., to 
relieve the Sacramento river of surplus flood 
waters, etc. (Ord 37 2d ser) Oflacial Gaz- 
ette (Sacramento, Cal.) N 7 '15 p 3-4 

Reports 
California. Reclamation board. Report, 1916. 
36p '16 The Bd., Sacramento, Cal. 



Chicago, 111. Rivers and lakes commission. 
Report on the Illinois river and its bottom 
lands with reference to the conservation of 
agriculture and fisheries and the control of 
floods. J: W. Alvord and C: B. Burdick. 
141p il maps '15 The Comm., 130 N, 5th av., 
Chicago (ed exhausted) 

* Los Angeles county, Cal. Bd. of engineers 

flood control. Reports to the board of super- 
visors, submitted July 27, 1915. 400p il maps 
'15 Co. bd. of supervisors, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Individual and joint reports presented in 
full and accompanied by maps showing flood 
districts and proposed locations of dams, etc. 

* Ohio. The Franklin county conservancy dis- 

trict. Flood relief for the Scioto valley, 1916, 
report and recommendations of the chief 
engineers. 279p 50c '16 The District, Co- 
lumbus, O. 

Flowers 
Preservation of our wild flowers. Gardeners' 
Chronicle of Am (286 5th av., N. Y.) 20:277 
Je '16 15c 

Flytraps 

* Flvtraps and their operation. F. C. Bishopp. 

U S Dept Agric Farmers' Bui no 734 13p il 
Je 10 '16 
Folk high schools. See High schools — Folk high 

schools 
Food 
Food. In C: V. Chapin. Report on state public 
health work, p 167-74 '16 

See also Eggs; Restaurants; Soda foun- 
tains; Slate institutions — Food 

Adulteration 
New York court of appeals handed down a de- 
cision May 12, 1916, holding that the ban 
placed on the adulteration of vinegar sold in 
the state extends to products put up and 
adulterated in foreign countries. Adolph 
Schmidt v. State of New York (Press rept) 

Bibliography 
Food inspection. In W: B. Munro. Bibliography 
of municipal government in the U. S., p 252- 
4 '15 

Conferences 

* Association of Am. dairy, food and drug offi- 

cials. Ofl!icial proceedings of the 19th an- 
nual convention. 228p $1 '15 J. B. Newman, 
sec, Manhattan bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Following were among the addresses 
given: Administrative methods in sanitary 
control; Bacteriological problems arising 
under food and drugs act; Exclusion of em- 
ployees affected with disease; Feeding stuffs 
inspection laws; How should food and drug 
standards be promulgated and legalized; 
Physical examination of employees handling 
food products; Report of committee on false 
advertising; Sanitary problems of soft drink 
establishment; Value of a "Food law Bulle- 
tin" and digest of decisions relative to food 
laws; What is present effect of national food 
law enforcement upon efficiency of state 
controls? 

Exhibits 
Boston, Mass. — ^Women's municipal league 
held an exhibit the first week in February 
showing the work of its departments. Par- 
ticular interest centered in the model and 
dirty grocery shops, with a miniature shop 
for children, and a model soda fountain 
equipped with paper drinking cups instead 
of glasses. In an address at the exhibit, 
Mrs. T. J. Bowlker, pres. of the league, em- 
phasized the necessity for clean markets, 
and the inestimable help of even the poorest 
women in the poorest parts of the city in 
enforcing the sanitary regulations in regard 
to food (F 1 '16) 

Laws 
Connecticut — Dairy and pure food laws. Conn, 
dairy and food comm., comp. 52p '15 Conn, 
state lib. 

* Food and drug laws. N D Agric Exp Sta Spe- 

cial Bui 6 (Reprint) 48p My '15 Agricultural 
college, N. D. 

Contains food, drug and paint laws 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



105 



Food — Laws — Contin ued 

* Georgia — Laws relating to the adulteration 

and misbranding of foods, drugs and feed- 
ing-stuffs, narcotic and poison laws, sani- 
tary law: revised rules, regulations and food 
standards. Ga Dept Agric Bui Serial no 66 
141p '15 

Minnesota dairy and food laws. 115p '15 Minn, 
dairy and food comr, 

* Ohio food and drug laws; also sanitary in- 

spection and weights and measures laws. 
58p '16 Ohio bd of agric. 

* Oregon — Laws relating to the manufacture and 

sale of food products including dairy prod- 
ucts, food products, concentrated commer- 
cial feed stuffs, illuminating oil, linseed oil, 
and agricultural seeds together with rules 
and regulations for the enforcement of the 
acts. Ore. dairy and food comr., comp. 81p 
'15 Oregon state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 

* Utah — Dairy and food laws with dairy and 

food regulations. 44p '15 Utah dairy and food 
comr. 

* Wyoming — Food and oil laws and regulations 

thereunder. 82p '15 Dairy, food and oil comr., 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 

* Wyoming — Sanitary inspection law and regu- 

lations thereunder. 26p '15 Wyoming dairy, 
food and oil comr.. Cheyenne, Wyoming 

Package sales 

Nebraska supreme court held, Dec. 3, 1915, 
that the prohibition against the misbrand- 
ing of food packages, does not prohibit 
placing in a food package advertising mat- 
ter in the form of a coupon exchangeable 
for certain articles and which has no appre- 
ciable weight and does not affect the health- 
fulness of the food. Ex parte De Klotz v. 
State of Nebraska, 155 N W 240 

Regulation, Municipal 

* New York (city). Dept. of health. Regula- 

tions, adopted Mar. 30, 1915, governing the 
conduct and maintenance and operation of 
any building, room or place where food or 
drink is prepared, cooked, mixed, baked, 
exposed, bottled, packed, handled, stored, 
manufactured, offered for sale or sold. 27p 
'15 

* New York (city). Dept. of health. Regulations, 

adopted Mar. 30, 1915, governing the pre- 
paration, storing, offering for sale and sell- 
ing of food and drink in kitchens, serving 
and dining rooms of hotels, restaurants, 
boarding houses, cafes, lunch rooms, sa- 
loons, grill rooms, buffets, or other public 
places, lip '15 

Regulation, State 

* Missouri. Food and drug dept. Rules and 

regulations [relating to the sanitation of 
places in which food is prepared or distrib- 
uted and regulating the health of the opera- 
tives, employees, drivers and other persons 
on the premises, or who handle the mate- 
rial from which food is prepared, or the 
finished product]. (Circ 100) 2p (Mim) 

Surveys 

National housewives' league, Mrs. Julian 
Heath, pres., has appointed a special de- 
fense committee of members to make a sur- 
vey of food supplies in every state as part 
of the preparedness movement. The com- 
mittee will also supervise the work of state 
committees in a study of the health of men 
who must compose the fighting forces of 
the country, and in a study of the nutritive 
value of foods (F 4 '16) 

Food handlers 

* Consumers' league of Massachusetts, 4 Joy St., 

Boston, has issued the following leaflets 
which may be obtained for postage: Im- 
provement of bakery conditions in Massa- 
chusetts. (Bui no 8) N '15; Conditions in 
Boston restaurants. (Bui no 10) Mr '16; 
Some costly Christmas candy. (Bui no 9) D 
•15 



Need for medical inspection of employees who 
are engaged in the production and handling 
of milk. Ernest Kelly. In International 
assn. of dairy and milk inspectors. 4th an- 
nual report. 1915. p 80-6 

Infectious diseases 

New York (city) dept. of health has inaugu- 
rated a plan of examining waiters, cooks, 
and other food handlers in public restaur- 
ants, together with the peddlers of food and 
all bakers, with the purpose of prohibiting 
persons who have communicable diseases 
from touching the food or utensils used by 
the public. Proprietors and the waiters' 
union are cooperating. Out of 14,000 persons 
examined omy 200 have been found diseased 
and these have been prohibited from working 
or have been put on probation. New Jersey 
legislature failed to pass a bill (M 134, 1915; 
H 84, 1916) to prohibit any person who has 
a communicable disease from working in a 
building, basement or vehicle used for the 
production, storage, sale or transportation of 
food products and carrying a provision for an 
inspector, under the state board of health, 
to enforce the act (F 8 '16) 

Physical examination of employes handling 
food products: necessity, progress made, 
outlook, by H. E. Barnard; Exclusion from 
official establishments of employees affected 
with communicable disease, by H. H. Hicks. 
In Assn. of Am. dairy, food and drug offi- 
cials. Official proceedings, 1915, p 46-58 

Restaurants and disease. Outlook 112:59-60 Ja 
12 '16 

Describes the work being done by the N. Y. 
city dept. of health 

Legislation, Comparative 

* [Digest of statutes relative to] contagious 
diseases and physical examination of food 
handlers. F. R. Smith, comp., R. I. leg. 
ref. bur. 12p Ap 18 '16 (Typew B 60c) 

Foot and mouth disease 
Control of foot-and-mouth disease. J: R. Moh- 
ler. In International assn. of dairy and milk 
inspectors. 4th annual report, 1915, p 128-38 
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical 
Association (Original official organ U. S vet. 
med. assn., P. A. Fish, ed., Ithaca, N. Y.' 30c) 
is running a series of articles on Foot-and- 
mouth disease with special reference to the 
outbreak of 1914-1915. Methods of eradica- 
tion appears in the January, 1916, issue 
What general and what specific rules should 
be observed in fixing the periods and dura- 
tion of the different forms of quarantine 
against foot-and-mouth disease. V. A. Moore. 
Journal of the Am Veterinary Medical Assn 
(Ithaca, N. Y.) n s 1:44-50 Ja '16 30c 

Moving pictures 
On account of an epidemic of foot and mouth 
disease, which necessitated the exclusion of 
all cattle, swine, goats and sheep from the 
Hornell (N. Y.) fair, the secretary of the 
fair assn. obtained from the state dept. of 
agriculture moving picture films of the foot 
and mouth disease and fro.m the state dept. 
of health two health films. The exposition 
of the films, each hour, was accompanied 
by a demonstration. Thousands came from 
all parts of the county expressly to see these 
pictures (N '15) 
Foreign corporations. See Corporations, Foreign 
Foreign relations. See International relations 
Foreign schools. See Schools, Foreign 
Foreign trade. See Commerce 

Forest fires 

* Forest fires in North Carolina during 1914 and 

forestry laws of North Carolina. N C Geo- 
logical & Econ Survey (Econ paper no 40) 
55p '15 

Laws 

* California — State bd. of forestry. Handbook 

of forest protection: forest fire laws, 1915. 
87p '15 
■* Forest fire laws of Virginia. Va Geological 
Comm Forestry Leafiet no 2 8p Ap 20 '15 
Geological comm., Charlottesville, Va. 



106 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Forest lands 

Taxation 
Recent tendencies in the reform of forest taxa- 
tion. Wilson Compton. J Pol Econ 23:971-9 D 
'15 

Laws 

* Massachusetts forest taxation law explained 

and printed in full. 35p il Mass. state for- 
ester 
Forestry 
Costs and values of forest protection. P. S. 
Love joy. Forestry Q (1410 H st., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. $2 a year) 14:24-38 Mr 
'16 

* Forest conservation for states in the south- 

ern pine region. J. G. Peters. U S Dept 
Agric Bui no 364 14p Ap 15 '16 

Forest provisions of New York state constitu- 
tion. C. R. Pettis. Forestry Q (1410 H St., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. $2 a year) 14:50- 
60 Mr '16 

New York (state) — Referendum on the ques- 
tion of the issue of $10,000,000 bonds for the 
extension of the forest preserve will be 
submitted to the voters in the fall of 1916. 
If approved, $2,500,000 bonds may be sold, 
and the proceeds applied to the acquisition 
of lands for the extension of the Palisades 
interstate park. The proceeds of the other 
$7,500,000 bonds must be applied to the 
acquisition of lands for state park purposes 
within the forest preserve counties 

* Northern hardwood forest: its composition, 

growth, and management. E. H. Frothing- 
ham. U S Dept Agric Bui no 285 80p il '15 
Sec also Timber 

Bibliography 

* Forestry in the United States of America: 

government publications. (Price list 43 8th 
ed) 28p D '15 U. S. supt. of doc. 

Departments 

* List of state forestry departments. 3p Ap 15 '16 

U. S. forest service CTypew 15c) 

Laws 

Forest fires in North Carolina during 1914 and 
forestry laws of North Carolina. N C Geo- 
logical & Econ Survey (Econ paper no 40) 
55p '15 

New Louisiana forestry law. Am Forestrv 
(1410 H St., N. W.. Washington, D. C.) 22: 
479 Ag '16 25c 
Contains text of law 

New York (state) — Conservation law in rela- 
tion to fish and game and to lands and 
forests as amended to the close of the 
regular session of 1915. 303p '15 N. Y. 
conservation comm. 

* North Carolina's forestry laws. N C Geological 

& Econ Survey Press Bui no 152 (Forestry 
div) lOp Mr 1 '16 N. C. geological and eco- 
nomic survey. Chapel Hill 
Pennsylvania— Digest of the game, fish and 
forestry laws. J. Kalbfus, ed. 342p '15 J. 
Kalbfus, sec. Pa. game comm. 

* Virginia— Forestry laws. (Forestry leaflet no 

1) 12p Ap 15 '15 Virginia geological comm., 
Charlottesville 

Legislation 

Algerian forest code. T. S. Woolsey, jr. For- 
estry Q (1410 H St., N. W., Washington, 
D. C. $2 a year) 14:66-80 Mr '16 

Flaw in Indiana's state fqrestry organization. 
Am Forestry, 1410 H St., N. W., Washington, 
D. C.) 22:495 Ag '16 25c 

Legislation, Comparative 

U. S. forest service, in order to make easy a 
comparative study of the laws of the dif- 
ferent states and to further the development 
of practical forestry legislation, has issued 
a series of separate state leaflets contain- 
ing the forestry laws of each state arranged 
according to a uniform classification. The 
main headings are Administration, Fires, 
Public forests, and Taxation. It plans to 
keep each one of the states revised up to 



date. The leaflets are intended for the use 
of legislative drafting divisions or reference 
libraries, of forest schools, state forestry 
officials and other similar special investiga- 
tions and are not available for distribution 
in the sense that other publications are 
available. Loan copies may be had upon ap- 
plication to the Librarian, Forest service, for 
periods of two to four weeks. P. A. I. S. 
also has two partial sets for loan purposes 
(My 5 '16) 

Reports 
Massachusetts. State forester. 11th annual re- 
port, il In Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d an- 
nual report, 1914, p 479-583 '15 

Contains the state fire warden's report 
Report on forests and forestry. I. C. Wil- 
liams. Pa Dept Agric Bui no 278 p 136-147 
'16 

Taxation 
See Forest lands — Taxation 
Forests, Communal 
Town of Walpole, Mass. establishes a com- 
munal forest of 200 acres. J: A. Murphy, il 
Am City 15:149-53 Ag '16 
Fornication. See Age of consent 
Foundations. See Social service 
Foundries 
How the sanitation of brass foundries is pro- 
moted by good ventilation, il Iron Trade 
Review. (Penton bldg., Cleveland, O.) 59: 
375-7 Ag 24 '16 15c 
Massachusetts state bd. of labor and indus- 
tries is conducting hearings on a tentative 
draft of rules and regulations relating to 
safe and sanitary working conditions in foun- 
dries and. the employment of women in core 
rooms (Mr 16 '16) 
Ohio rules governing foundry operations. 
Foundry (Penton bldg., Cleveland, O.) 44:90- 
2 Mr '16 15c 
Foundry accounting 
Recommends uniform cost system; [report of 
the cost committee of the American foundry- 
men's assn.] Iron Trade Review (Penton 
bldg., Cleveland, O.) 57:1277-9; 1302b-1302c 
D 30 '15 15c 
Two examples of foundry cost accounting. 
W. E. Freeland. Iron Age 98:493-8 S 7 '16 

Foundry codes 

Association safety code for foundries: work of 
the conference board on safety and sanita- 
tion promulgated by the National founders 
association for adoption by the various 
states. Iron Age 97:1016-7 Ap 27 '16 
New safety code adopted by National founders. 
Foundry" (Penton bldg., Cleveland. O.) 44:174- 
5 My '16 15c 

Fourth of July. See Fireworks 

Fowls. See Poultry 

Franchises 

See also Electric plants— Franchises ; Pub- 
lic utilities — Franchises; Street railroads- 
Franchises ; Telephone — Franchises 

Taxation 

Section 182 or the franchise tax. In N. Y. 
(state). Joint legislative com. on taxation. 
Report, p 137-42 '16 

Frankel, Lee K. ,.^ . 

Maternity insurance. '15 Metropolitan life in- 
surance CO., 1 Madison av., N. Y. (Insur- 
ance, Maternity) 

Frankfurter, Felix, and Goldmark, Josephine, 
comps. 
Franklin O. Bunting v. State of Oregon. Brief 
for the defendant in error in the case for 
the shorter work-day. 2v postage 25c '16 Nat. 
consumers' league, 289 4th av., N. Y. (Hours 
of labor — Limitation) 

Fraternal beneficiary societies 

* New York (state) and Indiana. Insurance 
depts. Report on examination of the Su- 
preme lodge, knights and ladies of honor, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 32p '16 N. Y. (state) in- 
surance dept. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



107 



Fraternities 

[Validity of regulations re forbidding affiliation 
of students with secret societies: case-note 
to Univ. of Mississippi v. Waugh.] L R A 
1915D 588 

See also College fraternities; High school 
fraternities 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] school fraternities. U 
S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 591-2 '16 
Fraudulent advertising. See Advertising, Fraud- 
ulent 
Free communication. See Freedom of speech; 
Liberty of the prerfs; Open forum move- 
ment 
Free harbors 

* Digest of a report to the foreign trade com- 

mittee of the Merchants' association of New 
York on A comparative study of the eco- 
nomic, industrial and commercial conditions 
in the free ports of Europe and the port of 
New York. P. B. Kennedy. 55p '14 Mer- 
chants' assn. of N. Y., 233 Broadway, N. Y. 
Free harbors and foreign trade. C. M. Gordon. 
In Pacific coast assn. of port authorities. 
Report, 1915, p 34-42 

* Free port an agency for the development of 

American commerce F: C Howe. (Pub no 
881) 9p Frederic C. Howe, comr. of immigra- 
tion, Ellis island, N. Y. harbor, N. Y. 

Reprinted from The Annals of the Amer- 
ican Academy of Political and Social Sci- 
ence, Philadelphia, May, 1915 
Los Angeles chamber of commerce is en- 
deavoring to establish a free port in that 
city. It has obtained information from 
Professor Philip B. Kennedy, who made the 
investigation for the Merchants' assn. of 
N. Y. and is now American commercial 
attach^ at Melbourne, Australia, and stands 
ready to join in promoting the necessary 
legislation (My 1 '16) 

Legislation 
Honduras congress has passed a law providing 
for the establishment of a free port, to be 
known as Puerto Herrera, in the province 
of Mosquitia where the Cruta river empties 
into the Bay of Caratasca. The govern- 
ment plans to develop the port as rapidly 
as possible (F 8 '16) 

Legislation, Proposed 
New York (city) — Representative Murray Hul- 
bert has introduced a resolution in congress 
looking toward the creation of a free port 
at the port of New York. The resolution 
provides that the secretary of the treasury, 
the secretary of war and the secretary of 
commerce be directed to report to congress 
on or before Dec. 15, 1916, as to the advis- 
ability of the establishment of free ports 
within the limits of the established customs 
districts of the U. S. and the Panama canal 
zone; that there be appropriated for the 
purpose of defraying the expense of con- 
ducting the investigation herein authorized, 
out of any money in the treasury of the 
U. S. not otherwise appropriated, the sum 
of $10,000 (My 1 '16) 

Free lunches. See Saloons — Free lunches 
Freedom of speech 

* Case and Comment for November, 1915, is de- 

voted largely to the subject of free speech. 
It contains: Free speech and its limits; 
Constitutional freedom of speech and of the 
press, by W. W. Ackerly; Freedom of 
speech in public streets, parks and com- 
mons, by J: D. Chamberlain; Freedom of 
speech in industrial controversies, by A. G. 
Shepard; Free speech and its enemies, by 
J. F. Morton, jr.; What is liberty of the 
press, by L. J. Oare; Words adjudged not 
to be slanderous, by W: W. Brewton 
Constitutional freedom of speech and of the 
press. W. W. Ackerly. il The Cooperator 
(Rochester, N. Y.) D '15 p 17, 26-8 

* Free speech for radicals. Theodore Schroeder. 

enl ed 206p $1.50 '16 Hillacre bookhouse. 
Riverside, Conn.; Free speech league, 56 E. 
59th St.. N. Y. 

See also Liberty of the press; Open forum 
movement 



Freight and freightage 

See also Electric railroads— Freight traffic- 
Lumber — Shipment 

Classification 

Bibliography 

* ^^TT^ 9.^ references on freight classification. 

U. S. Library of congress. 3p My 27 '16 
(Typew Cost of copying 15c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Freight handling 

* Cargo handimg methods and appliances. 

H. McL. Harding. 29p il O 1 '15 Internat. 
engineering cong., l-oxcroft bldg., San 
Francisco, Cai 

Paper presented at a meeting of the In- 
ternat. engineermg cong., 1915, in San 
Francisco, Cal., Sept. 20-25, 1915 
Costly congestion at terminals: antiquated 
facilities and poor delivery systems boost 
costs, remedies suggested, A. J. Marshall, il 
Electric Vehicles (1253 Monadnock blk., 
Chicago) 8:99-103 Mr '16 15c 
Economical handling of L. C. L. freight traf- 
fic: the two prize-winning papers received In 
the contest which closed August 1; practical 
plans described. Ry Age 59:1005-9 N 26 '15 
Contains: How the operation of one local 
freight station was improved, by C. B. 
Anderson; and Important principles in the 
handling of L. C. L. freight, by C. G. John- 
son 
New York (city)— At a meeting of freight 
shippers, held March 22, 1916, at the Mer- 
chants' association headquarters, remedies 
for the freight congestion at the port of New 
York, and proposals for cooperating with the 
committee of presidents of railroads, were 
discussed. Suggestions were made that the 
carriers mobilize the trucking of New York, 
and that the lighterage be coordinated under 
one control. A committee of twelve, drawn 
from the various industries affected by pres- 
ent conditions, was appointed to inquire into 
the causes of the congestion, to devise plans 
for dealing with it, and to confer with the 
presidents of railroads. Two other commit- 
tees were appointed, one to deal with do- 
mestic shipments, the other with export 
shipments 
Scientific management applied at one station. 

W: J. Collins. Ry Age 61:240-2 Ag 11 '16 
Status of cargo handling in American marine 
terminals. J. A. Jackson and R. H. Rogers. 
General Electric Review (Schenectady, N. Y.) 
19:127-32 F '16 20c 
Fresh air movement 

* Summer camp and fresh air facilities in New 
York city; prepared for the Assn. of neigh- 
borhood workers by the summer work 
com. 20p '15 Assn of neighborhood work- 
ers, 413 W. 4oth St., N. Y. 
Fruit. See Cooperative marketing — Fruit 
Fuel 
National commercial gas assn., 61 Broadway, 
N. Y., secured, on March 1, 1916, the ser- 
vices of W: A. Ehler as industrial fuel 
specialist. His services are at the disposal 
of any gas company desiring help in pro- 
motion ot its industrial fuel activities. He 
is prepared to establish a department for 
industrial fuel business, to inaugurate cam- 
paigns for increased sales, to demonstrate 
the installation of apparatus, and to give 
whatever advice may be needed (Ap '16) 
Uruguay — Government has effected an impor- 
tant saving by substituting petroleum for 
coal in its electric power house at Monte- 
video. Because of the shortage of coal, two 
local steamers are being converted into oil 
burners, and 50 locomotives of the Great 
southern railway are being modified so as to 
permit the use of petroleum instead of coal 
as fuel (Ap 20 '16) 
Fumigation 
Hydrocyanic acid gas: its practical use as 
a routine fumigant. R. H. Creel. U S Pub 
Health Repts 30:3537-50 D 3 '15 
Fur trades 

Surveys 

Clinical and sanitary study of the fur and 
hatters' fur trade. N Y City Health Dept 
Bui 5:267-85 O 15 



108 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Gambling , , 

Oklahoma supreme court has declared mop- 
erative th6 anti-gambling law of 1913, which 
put an end to the operation of slot ma- 
chines, punch boards and dice shaking at 
cigar stands; held that when the law was 
referred to the people no sample ballots or 
printed arguments for or against the bill 
were distributed among the voters as pre- 
scribed by law. The decision nullifies also 
the anti-race track gambling law of 1913 
(Press rept Ja 11 '16) 

Legislation 

Virginia general assembly has passed the 
Mathews anti-gambling bill, which supple- 
ments tJie Stephenson bill passed earlier in 
the session. The Mathews bill prohibits 
all forms of betting and provides jail sen- 
tences for violations. It relates to any 
sum no matter how small. Previously a 
minimum was named (Mr 23 '16) 

Game 

Georgia court of appeals has held that smce 
that portion of the state game law which 
prohibits the shooting of doves and other 
game birds over baited fields carries no 
penalty for violation, convictions thereunder 
are null and void. It is expected that the 
general assembly will provide a penalty be- 
fore the opening of the next gunning season 
(Press rept Mr 26 '16 ) 

Laws 

Alabama— Game and fish laws in force Nov. 
1, 1915. 47p '15 Ala. dept. of archives and 
history 

Cahfornia fish and game laws, 1915-1917. 18th 
ed 144p maps '15 Cal. bd. of fish and 
game comrs.. Mills bldg., San Francisco 

Iowa fish and game laws, federal migratory 
bird regulations and the Lacey bird law 
(federal law), in force July 4, 1915. 46p '15 
la. fish and game warden, Spirit Lake 

Michigan — Game and fish laws and laws rela- 
tive to destruction of noxious animals. 278p 
'15 Mich. sec. of state 

New York (state) — Conservation law in rela- 
tion to fish and game and to lands and 
forests as amended to the close of the 
regular session of 1915. 303p '15 N. Y. 
conservation comm. 

Ohio — Fish and game laws. Ohio Agric Comm 
Official Bui V 6 no 3 p 25-46 D '15 

Oregon fish and game laws, 1915-1916. 190p '15 
Oregon state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 

Pennsylvania — Digest of the game, fish and 
forestry laws. J. Kalbfus, ed. 342p '15 J. 
Kalbfus, sec. Pa. game comm. 

Legislation, Comparative 

* Game laws for 1915: a summary of the pro- 

visions relating to seasons, export, sale, 
limits, and licenses. T. S. Palmer and others. 
Farmers' Bui no 692 64p S 14 '15 

* Laws relating to fur-bearing animals, 1915: a 

summary of laws in the U. S. and Canada, 
relating to trapping, protection, propagation 
and bounties. D. R. Lantz. Farmers' Bui no 
706 24d F 23 '16 

License 

* Attorney general's opinion about issuing hunt- 

ers' licenses by city clerks in New York 
state. N Y State Bur Municipal Informa- 
tion Rept no 92 2p F 7 '16 (Typew 10c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Protection 

* Farmer's interest in game protection. E: H. 

Forbush. Mass Agric Circ no 31 lip F '15 
Garages 
Garage at the office door: Cincinnati's latest 
garage established in the down-town busi- 
ness district. C. C. Myers. Horseless Age 
38:141-2 Ag 15 '16 



[Municipal regulation of garages: case-note to 
People V. Ericsson.] Ann Cas 1915C 186 

Ordinances 

* Yonkers, N. Y. — [Ordinance relative to the] 

maintenance and use of garages. 8p (Typew 
40c) 

Ordinances, Proposed 

* Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended for pas- 

sage by the committee on buildings and city 
hall concerning public garages: character of 
building construction. (Pam no 583) Ip Je 2 
'16 Chicago munic, ref. lib. 
Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended for pas- 
sage by the committee on judiciary, in re- 
gard to garages and repair shops: records 
of vehicles to be kept. (Pam no 549) p 2 Mr 
27 '16 

Safety regulations 
See Inflammable liquids 

Garages, Cooperative 
New York (city) — The first cooperative garage 
will soon be erected in New York city and 
will be called the Owners' West 66th st. 
garage. It will be managed by the Wiley 
Carey co., so that the stockholders may be 
enabled to receive their supplies and acces- 
sories at cost, thereby eliminating the high 
cost of upkeep, besides insuring efficient ser- 
vice (Jl 14 '16) 

Garages, IVIunicipal 
Cleveland, O. — Municipal garage has been built 
on a vacant lot adjacent to the city hall. 
The lot is sufficiently large for a public park- 
ing, ground, so the city instituted a charge 
of 15 cents a day for parking. All of the 
repair work of the city departments is now 
being done at this garage at greatly reduced 
figures. The income for the year 1915 was 
$2,262 (Ag '16) 
New York (city) — Department of plant and 
structure has organized a municipal garage 
which will serve to standardize the purchase 
of automobile equipment for general city 
use. It also makes possible the standardiza- 
tion of repair and maintenance and conse- 
quently a reduction in expense. Under cen- 
tral control, buying may be better regulated 
with reference to the city needs. The mu- 
nicipal garage does not control the cars 
operated for the presidents of the five bor- 
oughs, the public service commission or the 
police department (Jl 10 '16) 
Systematized municipal garage, [Oakland, 
Cal.] il Horseless Age 37:258-60 Ap 1 '16 

Garbage. See Piggeries, Municipal; Refuse and 
refuse disposal 

Garden and farm almanac, 1916. 25c Garden 
City, N. Y. (Agricultural directories) 

Garden contests 
How one city improved its gardens. R. B. 
Woodward, il Garden Mag (Garden City, 
N. Y.) 23:333-5 Jl "16 15c 

Gardens. See Market gardening; Window gar- 
dens 

Gardens, Municipal 
Bradford, Eng. — Vacant lots, waste lands, 
portions of suburban parks and other prop- 
erties owned by the municipality have been 
let at a nominal figure to be used as vege- 
table market gardens. The parks com. has 
surveyed 592 plats, of which 557 have al- 
ready been occupied. Each plat, consisting 
of 200 square yards is rented for ten shil- 
lings yearly and no taxes are assessed 
thereon. No more than three plats may be 
taken by one tenant and no buildings may 
be erected without the consent of the com- 
mittee. The city supplies adequate water 
thru taps and standpipes (My 10 '16) 
Garden suburb movement in the United States. 
A. C. Comey, City Plan (19 Congress St., 
Boston) 1:13 Ja '16 25c 

Fragmentary list of operations of com- 
panies organized with limited dividend or 
in other ways not primarily for profit 

Garment industry. See Clothing industry 

Garnishment 
Willys-Overland company, Toledo, 0.,.thru its 
legal department, successfully conducts a 
branch to deal free of charge with cases of 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



109 



Garnishment — Continued 

garnishment and attachment among- its em- 
ployees. F. J. Kessel, an attorney with ex- 
perience in such cases, is in charge of the 
branch. The work was started to protect 
the men from unjust attachment of wages, 
especially by dishonest collection agents (Ap 
21 '16) 

Gary school system. See Schools — Gary system 
Gas 

* Manufacture and distribution of gas. U S Bur 

of Stand Circ no 32 3d ed p 173-90 '15 

Gives: Constituents of gas; Methods of 
manufacture, carburetted gas, mixed gas, 
advantages of coal and water gas, oil gas; 
Distribution methods. Appendix contains 
tables giving Gas production and value, Kind 
of gas made by companies of various size, 
Distribution data for companies of various 
size, Gas main pressures, Heating value, 
Candlepower 

Accounting 

See Uniform accounting 

Analyses 

* Analysis of natural gas and illuminating gas 

by fractional distillation at low temperatures 
and pressures. G. A. Burrell and others. U S 
Bur Mines Tech Pa no 104 41p il '15 

Bibliography 

* Bibliography of the chemistry of gas manu- 

facture. W. F. Rittman and M. C. Whitaker. 
U S Bur Mines Tech Pa no 120 29p '15 

Operating costs 
Cost of supplying illuminating gas in the 
smaller American cities, exclusive of re- 
turns to capital invested. J. C. Dickerman. 
Utilities Mag 1:19-23 N '15 

Contains a table giving statistics for 74 
cities 

Rates 
Comparative rates for gas in American cities. 
In Los Angeles, Cal. Bd. of public utilities. 
Report, 1915, p 36 '15 

* Flat rates for gas for illuminating purposes 

[in New York state cities]. N Y State Bur 
Municipal Information Rept no 112 2p Mr 9 
'16 (Typew 10c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

* Gas rates: a communication from the Union 

gas and electric company to the city coun- 
cil of Cincinnati, O. 24p My 1 '16 Union 
gas & electric company, Cincinnati, O. 
Gas [rates in Texas cities]. Univ of Texas Bui 
1915 no 45 (Munic research ser no 10) p 97- 
111 Ag 10 '15 

* Massachusetts. Bd. of gas and electric light 

comrs. Report relative to the price of gas 
and rate of dividends as applied to the Bos- 
ton consolidated gas company and known as 
the "London sliding scale." (House no 1925) 
57p map Weight 3 oz Enclose postage '16 
Mass. supt. of doc. 

* Report on gas rates of the Union gas & 

electric co., Cincinnati, Ohio. A. C. King, 
engineer, Chicago. 52p postage 5c tables diag 
'16 City clerk. Cincinnati 

Bibliography 
[References on gas rates with special refer- 
ence to regulation]. U. S. Library of con- 
gress. Special Libraries 7:24-5 F '16 

Investigations 
Chicago, 111 — Edward W. Bemis has been em- 
ployed by the council committee on gas, oil 
and electric light to investigate the gas com- 
pany preparatory to fixing new gas rates in 
August, 1916 

Reports 

* Massassachusetts. Bd. of gas and electric light 

comrs. Report relative to the price of gas 
and rate of dividends as applied to the 
Boston consolidated gas company and known 
as the "London sliding scale." (House no 
1925) 57p Postage 2c Mr '16 Mass. supt. of 
doc. 



Reports 

* Philadelphia utility problems: report for 1914 

[of the] bur. of gas, Philadelphia, lllp pi '15 
Maintains that 65 cent gas to the con- 
sumer is a possibility, by a fair deal, and 
that Philadelphia would profit bv a live 
utilities bureau 

Service 

*. Standards for gas service. U S Bur of Stand 
Circ no 32 3d ed 197p Mr 10 '15 

Pt. 1, Discussion of technical specifica- 
tions; pt. 2, Enforcement of technical regu- 
lations; pt. 3, Proposed forms for regula- 
tions; pt. 4, Summary of laws in force; pt. 5, 
Manufacture and distribution of gas 

Gas, Natural 

* Introduction of natural gas into the city of 

Baltimore and its supply to consumers: 
proposition from the Columbia gas and elec- 
tric company to the board of estimates of 
Baltimore city. 40p Baltimore dept. of leg. 
ref. 

* Natural gas resources of parts of North 

Texas: gas in the area north and west of 
Fort Worth, by E. W. Shaw; Gas prospects 
south and southeast of Dallas, by G: C. 
Matson; with notes on the gas fields of cen- 
tral and southern Oklahoma, by C. H. 
Wegemann. figs maps U S Geol Survey Bui 
no 629 129p '16 

* "Twice as hot": natural gas service for Balti- 

more [furnished by the Baltimore natural 
gas company]. S: S. Wyer. 16p il Baltimore 
dept. of leg. ref. 
See also Gas leases — ^Valuation 
Analyses 
Analysis of natural gas and illuminating gas 
by fractional distillation at low tempera- 
tures and pressures. G. A. Burrell and others. 
U S Bur Mines Tech Pa no 104 41p il '15 

* Composition of the natural gas used in twenty- 

five cities; with a discussion of the proper- 
ties of natural gas. G. A. Burrell and G. G. 
Oberfell. U S Bur Mines Tech Pa no 109 22p 
5c '15 U. S. supt. of doc. 

Investigations 
Louisville, Ky. — With a view to introducing 
natural gas into the city, J. F. Thrift, city 
comptroller, has made a thorough investi- 
gation from the point of view of the lay- 
man, of the efficacy of natural gas in vari- 
ous cities of the Middle west. C. W. 
Hendricks, chief engineer, made an investi- 
gation, from a technical point of view, of 
the question of pumping the product to 
Louisville (Mr 17 '16) 

Rates 

Kansas — U. S. circuit court of appeals has re- 
cently held as unconstitutional and confis- 
catory the rate of 28 cents a thousand cubic 
feet for natural gas fixed by the public utili- 
ties commission for the Kansas natural gas 
company. The court fixed a rate of 32 cents 
a thousand as a minimum and ordered a 
permanent injunction against the commis- 
sion. It is expected that the case will be 
carried to the U. S. supreme court (Press 
rept Je 7 '16) 

Gas companies 

Conferences 
Canadian gas assn. Convention, Quebec, Aug. 
16-17, 1916. Program includes the following 
papers: Gas lighting, by J. P. Conroy; What 
is a gas meter, by J. B. McNary; Compari- 
son of modern coal carbonization systems, 
by Vernon Baker; Is industrial fuel business 
worth while, by H. E. G. Watson; Rela- 
tionship between the accounting and oper- 
ating departments, by H. K. Tennant; Some 
wrinkles on distribution, by P. B. Lamp 

■* National commercial gas assn. Proceedings of 
the 11th annual convention. Washington, 
D. C, Nov. 30-Dec. 3, 1915. 487p il The Assn., 
61 Broadway, N. Y. 

Regulation, IVIunlcipal 
Proposed city ordinance; [Compilation of gas- 
ordinance requirements to January. 1913. and 
a few regulations adopted since that time, 
which are now in force in cities larger than 



110 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Gas companies — Regulation, Municipal — Cont. 
25,000 population, relative to candiepower, 
heating value, purity and pressure of gas, 
the accuracy of gas meters, and the methods 
of enforcement or inspection provided]. U S 
Bur of Stand Circ no 32 3d ed p 104-116, 162- 
72 '15 

Regulation, State 
Rules proposed for the use of state commis- 
sions; Summary of laws now in force: reg- 
ulation by states or state commissions. U S 
Bur of Stand Circ no 32 3d ed p 95-104, 117- 
161 '15 

Compilation of all such legislation as re- 
lates to the candiepower, heating value, pur- 
ity, and pressure of the gas and the testing 
of gas meters, p 122-61 
Gas engine plants, Municipal 
Operating costs for municipal gas-engine 
plant. H. T. Melling. Power 44:13-14 Jl 4 
'16 
Gas leases 

Valuation 

Principles of natural-gas leasehold valuation. 
S. S. Wyer. Am Inst Min Engineers Bui (29 
W. 39th- St., N. Y.) 112:747-60 Ap '16 |1; to 
members, public libraries, and educational 
institutions, 50c 

Gas meters 

Reports 

* Massachusetts. Bd. of gas and electric light 

comrs. Report relative to the inspection and 
testing of gas meters. (House no 1636) 18p 
il postage Ic Ja 6 '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 
Gas plants 

Regulation 
Electric, gas and heating utilities. In F. L. 
Holmes. Regulation of railroads and public 
utilities in Wisconsin, p 170-92 '15 
Gas wells 

Laws 
'* California — Laws regulating the drilling of 
petroleum and gas wells. 34p '15 Cal. state 
mining bur., Ferry bldg., San Francisco 
Gasoline 

* Gasoline and oil inspection, with results of 

analyses made in the state laboratory. (Bui 
no 56j 209p Ag '15 S. C. dept. of agriculture, 
commerce and industries 

See also Inflammable liquids; Inflammable 
mixtures 

Ordinances 

* St. Louis, Mo. — Ordinance relative to automo- 

bile filling stations. (Ord 28612 Approved 
Mr 9 '16> 2p St. Louis munic. ref. lib. 

Price 

* Investigation of the price of gasoline: a pre- 

liminary report of the federal trade comm. 
relative to an investigation of gasoline prices. 
15p Ap 10 '16 Federal trade comm. 

Pumps 

Springfield, Mass., bd. of supervisors is inves- 
tigating the question of gasoline pumps on 
the sidewalks, with a view to suppressing 
further permits for them. It is alleged that 
they are installed by the Standard oil co. 
for a nominal lease of a dollar or two a 
year to further the sale of the company's 
oil. The supervisors agree it is not logical 
to protest against trolley poles on the 
streets and allow the pumps to obstruct the 
sidewalks. The investigation was under- 
taken as a result of Mayor Curley's action 
in refusing such permits in Boston, which 
forced inquirv into the question in Spring- 
field (O 12 '15) 

Springfield, Mass., bd. of supervisors issues 
permits for the installation of sidewalk gas- 
oline pumps wherever they think such a 
pump would not seriously interfere with 
the proper regulations and maintenance of 
trafl^c. A fee of $25 is required for each 
permit issued. A neat appearing sign must 
be attached to each pump stating the kind 
of gasoline being sold from the pump (S 
'16) 

General property tax. See Credits— Taxation 
Gift enterprises. See Trading stamps 



Gilbreth, Frank B. 

Motion study for the crippled soldier. Frank B. 
Gilbreth, 77 Brown st.. Providence, R. I. 
(Motion study) 
Girls 

Girls' protective league. M. E. Miner. In 
Nat. conf. of charities and correction. Pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 260-7 

— Same. (Reprints 1915 no 58) 7p 7c Nat. conf. 
of charities and correction 
Sec also Child labor 

Housing 

New York (city) — As the result of an investi- 
gation into the housing of self-supporting 
working girls in New York city, a "socialized 
apartment house" is to be built, where each 
girl may have a home of her own, a place to 
express her own personality, free from the 
unnecessary restrictions imposed by "insti- 
tutionalized" boarding houses. 600 girls of 
various ages were interviewed during the in- 
vestigation and all denounced the semi- 
charity home where they paid little and lost 
much of their self-respect and independence 
(F 17 '16) 
See alsa Women — Employment — Housing 
Reports 

Jewish assn. for \he protection of girls and 
women. Report for the year ending Dec, 31, 
1914. 119p '15 S. Cohen, sec, 59 Mansell St., 
Aldgate, London, E. 

* New York probation and protective assn. 6th 

annual report for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1914. 84p il Maude E. Miner, sec, 130 E. 
22d St., N. Y. 

The objects of the association are: To 
maintain a home or homes for persons re- 
leased from the courts on probation or 
paroled in the custody of probation officers; 
To encourage the development of the proba- 
tion system and to assist in other ways in 
the reformation of offenders and the pre- 
vention of crime 
Report of Girls' protective league, E. H, Bliss, 
il In N. Y. probation and protective assn. 
Report, 1914, p 47-55 

Going value. See Public utilities — Valuation — 
Going value 

Golf links. Municipal 

* Municipal golf. 3p 25c '16 Munic. ref. lib., 

Portland, Ore. 

Gives information as to operating ex- 
penses, number of holes, fees, number of 
players in season, and revenues of munici- 
pal links in eighteen cities 

— Same. Oregon Voter. (Portland, Ore.) v 5 
no 6 p 28 Je 10 '16 10c 

Municipal golf: a widespread form of public 
recreation; some suggestions for instituting 
and supervising it. Tom Bendelow. il Am 
City 15:1-8 Jl '16 

* Municipal golf links. N Y State Bur Municipal 

Information Rept no 156 3p Je 14 '16 (Typew 
15c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. L S. 
Gonorrhea 

* Efficiency test of dispensary treatment of 100 

cases of gonorrhea. H: L. Sanford. lip '13 
Henry L. Sanford, Cleveland, O. 

Reprint from the Cleveland Medical Jour- 
nal, December issue, 1913, v. 12, p. 813 

Gordon, Edgar B. 
Bulletin on community music and drama, out- 
lining a plan for the development of a series 
of "home talent entertainments." Je '15 Bd. 
of education, Winfleld, Kan. (Music, Munic- 
ipal) 

Government 

* Changing order: essays on government, mon- 

opoly, and education, written during a period 
of readjustment. G: W. Wickersham, 287p 
*$1.25 '14 Putnam 

* Comparative free government. Jesse Macv 

and J: W. Gannaway. 754p *$2.25 D '15 
Macmillan 

The purpose of the author is not pri- 
marily a comparative study of existing 
governments, but a study of the various 
processes and institutions by which free 
government is being attained 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



111 



Government —Continued 

Constitutional imperialism in Japan. E. W. 
Clement. Proc Acad Pol Sci v 6 no 3 104p 
Ap '16 

Bird's-eye view of the progress and posi- 
tion of constitutional government and repre- 
sentative institutions in Japan 

Government and politics of the German em- 
pire. Fritz-Konrad Kriiger. 340p $1.20 '15 
World bk. co. 

On the economics of government or the evolu- 
tion of public business. In C. C. Plehn. Gov- 
ernment finance in the United States, p 6-19 
'15 

* Pan American scientific congress. 2d con- 

gress, Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1915- 
Jan. 8, 1916. Program of section VI: in- 
ternational law, public law, and jurispru- 
dence. 22p '15 Jclm Barrett, sec. gen.. Pan 
American union, Washington, D. C. 

Lists the following addresses: Rela- 
tions between the judicial and legislative 
powers, by E3. R. Pineres, of Colombia; 
Same, by Carlos Bravo, of Colombia; 
Presidential and parliamentary gov^ernment 
on the American continent in state and 
nation, by J. G. Schurman, Cornell univ., 
Ithaca, N. Y., and T. I. Parkinson, Colum- 
bia univ., N. Y. ; La dictature r^publicaine 
et le gouvernement Bresilien, by A. D. R. 
Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Govern- 
ment and responsibility, by J. E. J. de 
Arechaga, Montevideo, Uruguay 
People's government. J. M. Rice. 148p *^1 '15 
Winston 

Maintains that our system of checks and 
balances is wrong and suggests a new divi- 
sion of powers and duties 
Political thought of social classes. W: F. Og- 
burn and Delvin Peterson. Pol Sci Q 31:300- 
17 Je '16 

Shows the effect of heterogeneity of so- 
ciety upon the problem of government 

* Principles of constitutional government. F. J. 

Goodnow. 396p *$2 '16 Harper 

Based on lectures which were delivered in 
the year 1913-14 before the students of the 
Peking University. Appendices contain the 
constitutions of the United States, France, 
Germany, Belgium, and Japan 
Public administration and partisan politics, 
Ann Am Acad v 64 no 153 xiii,273p Mr '16 

Discusses: Cost of partisan politics in 
the work of the government; Movements to 
free public administration from partisan 
politics; Public policies in a responsible 
government 

>See also Boss rule; County government; 
Municipal government; State government; 
United States — Government 

Bibliography 

Critical bibliography [on German government]. 
In Fritz-Konrad Kriiger. Government and 
politics of the German empire, p 277-309 '15 
Government ownership 

State-owned railways; Canals, waterways, 
and free ports; Harbors and river shipping; 
Mines, forests, and agricultural lands. In 
F: C. Howe. Socialized Germany, p 95-160 
•15 

See also Municipal ownership; Public utili- 
ties — Municipal ownership: Railroads — Gov- 
ernment ownership; Street railroads — Muni- 
cipal ownership: Telegraph — Government 
ownership; Telephone — Government owner- 
ship 

Investigations 

United States senate has adopted a resolution 
providing for a joint committee to consist of 
five senators and five representatives, to 
investigate the matter of government owner- 
ship of railroads, telegraphs^ express com- 
panies and other utilities engaged in inter- 
state or foreign commerce (F 24 '16) 
Government regulation of industry 

Are governmental activities hampering Amer- 
ican progress? A. J. Frame. Econ World n s 
11:784-8 Je 17 '16 

Extent of regulation of ocean and Inland water 
transportation by the federal government. 
G. G. Huebner. Ann Am Acad 55:17-47 S '14 



Government and business, by R: T. Ely; Work 
of the Federal trade commission, by J. E. 
Davies; Services of railways and the func- 
tions of government in relation thereto, by 
S: O. Dunn. In Wisconsin commercial and 
industrial congress. Papers and discussions, 
p 165-93 '16 

* Government and business. S: O. Dunn. 18p Ry. 

Age Gazette, 608 S. Dearborn av., Chicago. 

An address before the Transportation club 
of Louisville, Ky., at Louisville, Oct. 19. 
1915 

* Legislative situation. J; A. Emery. (Bui no 

41) 26p Nat, assn. of manufacturers of the 
U. S. A., 30 Church st., N. Y. 

An address delivered May 20, 1914, at the 
19th annual convention of the Nat. assn. of 
manufacturers. New York 

* National industries and the federal govern- 

ment. Ann Am Acad v 63 no 152 322p Ja '16 
Pt 1, Federal trade commission and its 
problems; pt 2, Federal reserve board and its 
accomplishments; pt 3, Interstate commerce 
commission and its work; pt 4. Other fed- 
eral departments in their relation to Amer- 
ican industries 
Spread of federalization. Unpopular Review 
(35 W. 32d St., N. Y.) 6:1-15 Jl-S '16 75c 

* Will the prevailing trend toward government 

control of industry destroy initiative in our 
young men? J: E. Bennett. 16p Business 
men's economic assn., 1310 Humboldt bank 
bldg., San Francisco. Cal. 

Address delivered before an assembly of 
business men at the San Francisco chamber 
of commerce on the evening of April 14, 1915 

See also Monopolies — Regulation, Federal; 
Public utilities — Regulation 
Government research 

Institute for government research has been 
established at Washington, D. C, to make 
critical analyses of the operations of the 
federal government accompanied by special 
suggestions lor methodical improvements. 
It performs tor the people of the U. S. a 
service similar to that done by the various 
bureaus of municipal research for the people 
of the cities in which they are located. The 
bureau is supported by private contribu- 
tions, and is governed by a board of twenty 
trustees, which includes three distinct ele- 
ments; men of academic attainment, suc- 
cessful executives in large business affairs, 
and men of experience in governmental ser- 
vice. Frank J, Goodnow of Baltimore is 
chairman (Mr 25 '16) 

See also Political research 
Governors 
Massachusetts, Maryland. Kentucky and Mis- 
sissippi elected governors at the elections, 
Nov. 2. 1915. Samuel W. McCall, Republican, 
was elected in Massachusetts; former state 
controller Emerson C. Harrington, Democrat, 
in Maryland; Representative Augustus O. 
Stanley, Democrat, in Kentucky and Theo- 
dore G. Bilbo, Democrat, in Mississippi 
Governors' messages, 1916 

* Address of his excellency Samuel W. McCali 

to the two branches of the general court of 
Massachusetts at an extra session assem- 
bled on Sept. 12, 1916. (S doc no 1) 7p pos- 
tage 2c '16 
Governors' conferences 

* Conference of western governors. Proceedings 

of the meeting, held at Seattle. Wash.. May 
18-20, 1915, and at Portland, Ore., Sept. 22, 
1915. 98p Office of the governor, Olympia, 
Wash. 

Sessions were devoted to national defense, 
water power, and federal aid for highways 
5th annual governors' conference has been 
postponed owing to the military situation. 
Half the governors would have been unable 
to attend on account of the President's call 
for state troops. The conference will prob- 
ably be held in the fall (Je 19 '16) 

Grade crossings. See Railroads— Crossings 

Graft 

* Bankrupting a great city: (the story of New 

York). H: H Klein. 187p 11 75c; pa 40c post- 
paid '15 Henry H. Klein, Tribune bldg., 
N. Y. 



112 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Graft —Continued ^ , , 

Graft prosecutions: 1914-1915. A. M. Holden. 
Nat Munic R 4:572-86 O '15 , . 

Takes up the question by cities; Election 
frauds stand out pre-eminent in number and 
in seriousness 
See also Municipal government — Corruption 

Grain , „^ ^ 

* Prices and shrinkage of farm grains. W. L.. 

Burlison and O. M. Allyn. Univ of 111 
Agric Exp Sta Bui no 183 26p il N '15 Univ. 
of 111., Urbana, ill. 

Statistics 

* Statistical notes on the production, imports 

and exports, prices and maritime freights of 
cereals. 39p 5c '15 International inst. of 
agric, Rome, Italy 

Grain dealers 

Conferences 
Grain dealers' nat. association. 19th annual 
meeting, Peoria, 111., Oct. 11-13, 1915. The 
most important address was that by R. W. 
Moss on his grain trades act. The bill pro- 
vides for the preparation and publication 
of uniform standards of quality and condi- 
tion of grain by the national government, 
the co-ordination of all existing systems for 
grain inspection with the newly created fed- 
eral system, and the establishment of a gen- 
eral supervision by the federal government 
over all grain moving in interstate and for- 
eign commerce for the detection and publi- 
cation of all fraudulent practices. The 
American Co-operative Journal (230 S. La 
Salle St., Chicago 10c) Nov. 19, 1915, quotes 
from Mr. Moss's address and from an address 
by Dr. J. W. T. Duvel, chief of standardiza- 
tion, U. S. dept. of agric, on Standardiza- 
tion of grades for wheat and oats 

Grain elevators 
Country grain elevator and warehouse system: 
the local grain market; Primary and seabord 
grain markets: the terminal elevator sys- 
tem. In G. G. Huebner. Agricultural com- 
merce, p 29-93 '15 
Elevators: local and terminal. In Nat. conf. 
on marketing and farm credits. Marketing 
and farm credits, p 245-98 '15 

Contains papers on: Advantages of state- 
license system, by J. C. F. Merrill; Far- 
mers' elevator movement in United States, 
by H. W. Danforth; Local warehouse prob- 
lems, by G. W. Lawrence; A producer's 
view of railroads, by W. J. Ray; Banks and 
local elevators, by H. J. Farmer; Diffi- 
culties of state terminals, by J. E. Boyle; 
Problems of a cooperative terminal sys- 
tem, by J. M. Anderson; Canadian terminal 
fights, by G: F. Chipman 

* Farmers' elevators in Minnesota. L. D. H. 

Weld. Univ of Minn A^ric Exp Sta Bui 152 
24p map Ag '15 University farm, St. Paul 

* Patronage dividends in cooperative grain com- 

panies. J: R. Humphrey. U S Dept Agric 
Bui no 371 lip My 23 '16 

* Seattle's public terminals and their relation to 

northwest wheat. Robert Bridges, pres. port 
of Seattle comm. 23p '16 Seattle pub. lib. 

Address given at 10th annual convention of 
the Washington state grain growers, ship- 
pers and millers' assn., Pullman, Wash., 
Jan. 4-6, 1916 

Accounting 

* System of accounts for primary grain eleva- 

tors. J: R. Humphrey and W. H. Kerr. U S 
Dept Agric Bui no 362 30p My 6 '16 

Conferences 

Unprejudiced report of the 5th annual confer- 
ence of the Nat. assn, of managers, Kansas 
City, Mo., May 25-27, 1916. F. M. Myers, Am 
Co-operative J (230 S. La Salle st., Chi- 
cago) 11:1010-12 Je '16 10c 

Reports 

* North Dakota. Bd. of control of state institu- 

tions. Report on terminal grain elevators. 
31p 

Contains: Specific information required by 
chapter 279, 1913 session laws; Summary of 
the experience of Canada in the ownership 
and operation of provincial and government 



grain elevators; General review of the pro- 
posal for the state of North Dakota to es- 
tablish and operate a system of terminal 
elevators in the states of Minnesota and 
Wisconsin 

Grain inspection 

Legislation 
United States grain standard act which be- 
came a law Aug. 11, 1916, requires the sec- 
retary of agriculture to establish standards 
for grain, and stipulates that when 90 days 
have elapsed after the promulgation of a 
standard, interstate and foreign shipments 
by grade must conform to the standard and 
be inspected by a person licensed under 
federal authority 

Grant, Luke 

Wages and hours of railroad employees. Assn, 
of western railways, 608 S. Dearborn St., 
Chicago (Hours of labor — Railroads) 

Graphic methods 

Reports 

* Joint com. on standards for graphic presenta- 

tion. Preliminary report published for the 
purpose of inviting suggestions for the ben- 
efit of the committee. 8p lOc; discount in 
quantities Willard C. Brinton, chm., Am so- 
ciety of mechanical engineers, 7 E. 42d St., 
N. Y. 
— Same. Am Statis Assn 14:790-7 D '15 

Gravel roads. See Roads, Gravel 

Great Britain. IVIinistry of munitions. Health 
of munition workers committee 
Reports. 7 pams n p '16 (Women — Employ- 
ment) 

Greek letter societies. See College fraternities; 
Fraternities; High school fraternities 

Groat, George Gorham 
Introduction to the study of organized labor 
in America. *$1.75 '16 Macmillan (Trade 
unions) 

Gross earnings tax 
Portland, Ore. — Oregon supreme court has held 
void an ordinance levying a license of 3 per 
cent on the gross receipts of concerns sell- 
ing electricity, and another requiring a simi- 
lar license on concerns selling gas; held that 
the city cannot levy a property tax for gen- 
eral purposes except on the property and in 
the manner pointed out by the general laws. 
City of Portland v. Portland railway, light 
and power company; City of Portland v. 
Portland gas and coke company (My 11 '16) 
See also Express companies — Taxation; In- 
j^urance. Life — Taxation — Gross receipts tax 

Ground water. See Water, Underground 

Guaranty of bank deposits. See Banks — Guar- 
anty of deposits 

Guilds 

At a recent conference of the School of social 
study at Glasgow university, G. D. H. Cole 
spoke in favor of national guilds. He advo- 
cated the establishment of a guild for each 
trade that would permit the freedom and 
independence of the worker, the foreman of 
each to be elected by the members; and 
advised the formation of a joint committee 
of producers and consumers, the latter to 
consist of representatives of Parliament. 
Upon the deliberations of this committee 
would depend the selling prices of things 
(Ja 5 '16) 
Gynecology 

* Female-weakness cures and allied frauds. 99p 

10c '15 Am. medical assn. 



H 



Handicapped 

Series of articles on the industrially handi- 
capped appeared in the National Magazine. 
Industrially handicapped; cripples, by J. I. 
Belyea appeared in the October, 1915, number 

Employment 
Baltimore, Md. — An experimental community 
work shop for the physically handicapped 
has been successfully operated for the past 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



113 



Handicapped — Employment — Continued 

six months. The scheme originated with 
*he social service department of Johnr 
Hopkins hospital, where the necessity for 
providing suitable work for the physically 
handicapped has been repeatedly felt (Jl 8 
'16) 

Bihliography 

* Employment of the handicapped. Russell Sage 

found. 3p Ap 8 '15 (Typew 15c) 
Harbors 

Baltimore, Md. : port, terminal and general 
business advantages; facts about a great 
city with a greater future. Munic. factory 
site comm., Baltimore, Md. 78p il '16 Balti- 
more dept. of leg. ref. 

Development of the port of New Orleans. 
F. J. Springer. 11 Sci Am 115:111 Ag 5 '16 

Development of the port of New Orleans. 
Martin Behrman. In League of American 
municipalities. Proceedings, 1915, p 81-92 '16 

Economic advantages resulting from port 
development. G: H. Davis. In League of 
American municipalities. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 9-19 '16 

* — Same. Reprinted. 10 p '16 G: H. Davis, New 

Orleans, La. 
Harbors and river shipping. In F: C. Howe. 

Socialized Germany, p 133-45 '15 
Navigable waters. E. P. Goodrich, il In John 

Nolen, ed. City planning, p 227-63 '16 
New York harbor and the nation's foreign 

trade: the advantages and the handicaps of 

the port that handles half of the foreign 

commerce of the U. S. W. C. Brinton. 

World's Work 31:203-20 D '15 

* Port of London authority. Abstract of accounts 

for the year ended March 31, 1915. 2p Jl 6 
'15 Frank Ayliffe, sec, Port of London au- 
thority, 109 Leadenhall st., E. C, London 

* Port of Seattle comm. Proposed public belt 

line: information for voters, special election, 
March 7, 1916. 16p il '16 Seattle pub. lib. 
The proposition was lost at the election 

* Problems of port development. E: F. Mc- 

Sweeney, chm., Mass. directors of the port of 
Boston. 29p '15 Mass. state hb. 

Presented at the fourth annual conven- 
tion of the American assn. of port author- 
ities at Los Angeles, Cal., Sept. 13-15, 1915 

* Rhode Island. Harbor comrs. General plan 

and suggestions in reference to the devel- 
opment oi Providence harbor. 15p map Ap 
28 '15 

Seattle and King county. Wash. — In the elec- 
tion, Dec. 6, 1915, port proposition no. 1, pro- 
viding for the inclusion of the belt line 
railroad in the general scheme of port devel- 
opment, was adopted. However, the four 
propositions providing for bond transfers, by 
means of which it was proposed to obtain 
funds to construct the belt line, did not se- 
cure the 60 per cent vote required to vali- 
date bond issues 

Terminal railway and new piers at port of 
Philadelphia, map Eng N 76:260-1 Ag 10 '16 
t^ee also Docks; Free harbors; Piers; Ter- 
minals 

Bibliography 

Docks and harbors. /« W: B. Munro. Bibliog- 
raphy of municipal government in the U. S., 
p 158-62 '15 

Conferences 

* Pacific coast assn. of port authorities. Report 

of the 2d annual meeting, San Francisco, 
Sept. 20-21, 1915. 94p '15 The Assn., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Contains: Publicly operated warehouses 
and cold storage plants as part of the har- 
bor system, by C. E. Remsberg; Port of 
Vancouver and its organization, by S. Mc- 
Clay; Free ports and foreign trade, by C. M. 
Gordon; Harbor development as applied to 
the city of Tacoma, by T. H. Martin; Pier 
construction in San Francisco harbor, by 
Jerome Newman; Necessity of common ter- 
minals, by J. B. Ziegler; Resolution in regard 
to public ownership in Portland 

Investigations 

New York (city) — Central mercantile assn. 

has been asked to aid the U. S. house rivers 

and harbors com. in drawing up plans for 

the improvement of N. Y. harbor. The as- 



sociation will study the needs of the water- 
front and submit recommendations in the 
form of a report to the committee (Je 19 
'16) 

Reports 

* California. Harbor comrs. Biennial report for 

the fiscal years commencing July 1, 1912, and 
ending June 30, 1914. il tables maps 124p '14 
The Comrs., San Francisco 

Contains a report on the general condi- 
tion of the state water front property of 
San Francisco and its administration, and 
one on types of pier construction 
Digest of a report to the foreign trade com- 
mittee of the Merchants' association of New 
York on A comparative study of the eco- 
nomic, industrial and commercial conditions 
in the free ports of Europe and the port of 
New York. P. B. Kennedy. 55p '14 Mer- 
chants' assn. of N. Y., 233 Broadway, N. Y. 

* Port of Boston. Directors. Report for the year 

ending Nov. 30, 1915. (Mass pub doc no 94) 
108p Weight 10 oz Enclose postage '16 Mass. 
supt. of doc. 
"■ Port of London authority. Sixth annual report 
for the year ended March 31, 1915. 15p 6d Jl 
29 '15 Frank Ayliffe, sec. Port of London 
authority, 109 Leadenhall st., E. C, London 

* Ports of the U. S.: report on terminal facili- 

ties, commerce, port charges, and adminis- 
tration at 68 selected ports. G. M. Jones. 
IT S Bur For and Dom Com (Misc ser no 
33) 431p maps 75c '16 

* Rhode Island — Report to state harbor improve- 

ment comm. on improving the harbor facili- 
ties of Providence and vicinity, June, 1915. 
W: D. Bullock. lOp plan '15 R. I. leg. ref. lib. 
Hart, Albert Bushnell 
Monroe doctrine. '^$1.75 '16 Little (Monroe doc- 
trine) 
Hartford, Connecticut. Juvenile commission 
7th annual report to the mayor and court of 
common council for the year ending April 
30, 1916. 30p '15 (Children— Charities, pro- 
tection, etc. — Reports) 
Hay-fever 

Ordinances 
First hay-fever ordinance. Am City (T and C 
ed) 15:85 Jl '16 

Gives text of ordinance recently adopted 
in New Orleans, La. 
New Orleans commission council has passed 
an ordinance, with a view to stamping out 
hay-fever, forbidding tenants or owners of 
property to allow weeds or grass to grow 
more than two feet high on their lots and 
more than one foot high along the adjoining 
sidewalks (F 20 '16) 

Prevention 

* Hay-fever, its prevention and cure. W. C. 

Hollopeter. 347p bibl "^$1.25 '16 Funk 
United States public health service has in- 
augurated a campaign to relieve the malady 
of hay fever. The service will attend to 
having state legislatures and citizens gen- 
erally cooperate in suppressing vegetable 
grow'th known to spread and intensify hay 
fever (Jl 24 '16) 

Hazardous occupations. See Accidents, Indus- 
trial; Occupational diseases 

Headlights. See Locomotives— Headlights; Mo- 
tor vehicles — Headlights 

Health. See Public health 

Health boards 

Powers 
Quasi-legislative powers of state boards of 
health. U. G. Dubach. Am Pol Sci R 10:80-95 
F '16 
Health certificates. See Marriage— Health certi- 
ficates; Physical examinations 
Health insurance. See Insurance, Health 

Health officers 

See also Public health 

Policemen 
Ordinances 

* Cooperation between the police and health 

authorities, especially in the matter of 
sanitary inspection. St. Louis munic. ref. 
lib. 6p D 1 '15 (Typew 30c) 



114 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Health officers— Con finwed 
Powers 

* Exercise of sanitary police powers in Rhode 

Island. L.. B. Snippee. R I L-eg Ref Bur Bui 
no 8 36p Ja '16 
Quasi-judicial powers of state health offlcers 
and remedies against their official action. 
U. G. Dubach. Am Law R (14 S. Broadway, 
St. Louis, Mo.) 50:415-24 My-Je '16 $1 
Salaries 
Sec Salaries — Health officers 
Training 

* Public health work as a career. J: A. Ferrell. 

6p '14 J: A. Ferrell, International health 
comm., 61 Broadway, N. Y. 

Address delivered at the commencement 
exercises of the Medical college of Virginia, 
Richmond, June 2, 1914. Reprinted from The 
Journal of the American Medical Assn., Aug. 
22, 1914, V. 43, p. 653-5 
Heating 

Ideating a Chicago office building. S M. Bush- 
nell. il Am Soc of Heating and Ventilating 
Engineers J (29 W. 39th St., N. Y.) 22:94-103 
Ja '16 $1 

Gives a practical illustration of the heat- 
ing requirements of a modern office building 
and shows the relation between theoretical 
calculations and the actual results under 
typical operating conditions 

Heating and ventilating plant. Equitable build- 
ing, [N. Y.] W. H. Driscoll. il Am Soc of 
Heatin.g and Ventilating Engineers J (29 W. 
39th St., N. Y.) 22:73-86 Ja '16 $1 

Heating and ventilating systems in the North- 
western mutual life insurance building. Dom 
Eng 76:320-3 S 2 '16 

Ventilation is provided on every floor in- 
dependent of the heating system 

Requirements for model compulsory heating 
and ventilation laws: minimum provisions 
for public and semi-public buildings pro- 
mulgated by the American society of heat- 
ing and ventilating engineers. Heating and 
Ventilating Mag (1123 Broadway, N. Y.) 
13:32-7 Ap '16 luc 

Gives the full text of the minimum re- 
quirements 

Conferences 

American society of he'ating and ventilating 
engineers. Proceedings of the 22d annual 
meeting. New York city, Jan. 18-20. 1916. 
Am Soc oi Heating and Ventilating Engi- 
neers J (29 W. 39th St., N. Y.) 22:115-98 Ap 
•16 $1 

Synopses and discussions of papers are 
given 

Cost 

Cost of operating heating plants. G: W. Mar- 
tin, il Am Soc of Heating and Ventilating 
Engineers J (29 W. 39th st., N. Y.) 22:104-13 
Ja '16 $1 

Education 

Notable institution for the advancement of the 
heating and ventilating art. A. K. Ohmes. 
il Am Soc of Heating and Ventilating Engi- 
neers J (29 W. 39th St., N. Y.> 22:3-15 Ja '16 
|1 

Describes the Testing in.stitute for heating 
and ventilation appliances at the Berlin uni- 
versity 

Ordinances 

Furnace installation ordinance, Columbus, 
Ohio. Metal Work (239 W. 39th St., N. Y.) 
85:636-8 My 12 '16 

The ordinance, passed April 17, 1916, pro- 
vides that all hot-air furnaces in new resi- 
dences erected for sale and in public build- 
ings must be of sufficient size to heat the 
entire building. The measure also requires 
a permit and a fee of $2 for the installation 
of new furn'^ces 

* Milwaukee, Wis. — Ordinance relating to heat- 

ing apparatus. (Ord 326 Passed Ap 10 '16) Ip 
City clerk, Milwaukee 

Regulates installation of kitchen or laun- 
dry ranges or stoves in buildings other than 
private residences and reouires a permit 
from the inspector of buildings before pro- 
ceeding with the construction or alteration 
of any boiler, furnace, oven, or range in 
such buildings, exceeding $50 in cost 



Heating from central stations 

Central station heating; the method of the fu- 
ture. A. Williams. Heat & Ven (Heating 
and ventilating magazine co., 1123 Broadway, 
N. Y.) 13:13-16 Ag '16 10c 

From an address before the National dis- 
trict heating association 

Central-station heating plant operation in Mil- 
waukee. O. M. Rau. il Elec W 68:218-20 Jl 29 
'16 

Central station heating with special reference 
to Minnesota. J: V. Martenis. il Am City 
15:164-7 Ag '16 

Central station steam heating. G. C. Pruett 
Munic Eng 51:2-4 Jl '16 

* District heating: a brief exposition of the de- 

velopment of district heating and its posi- 
tion among public utilities. F. B. Orr. 290p 
il charts tables diags $3 '15 Am City 

Engineering and cost data relative to the 
installation of steam distributing systems 
in a large city. F. H. Valentine. Am Soc of 
Heating and Ventilating Engineers J (29 W. 
39th St., N. Y.) 22:1-4 Ap '16 $1 (to be cont) 

Large combination steam and forced hot water 
heating plant; New York state reformatory 
for women, Bedford Hills, N. Y. il Heating 
and Ventilating (1123 Broadway, N. Y.) 12: 
26-35 D '15 10c 

Comparative information 
Central station heating in Minnesota. Minne- 
sota Municipalities (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1: 
24 F '16 25c 

Table giving information, by cities 
Data on central station neating in thirteen 
Minnesota cities. Eng & Contr 45:356-7 Ap 
12 '16 

Conferences 

National district heating assn. Proceedings 
of 8th annual convention. New York, May 
16-19, 1916. il Heating and Ventilating Mag. 
(1123 Broadway. N. Y.) 13:27-38 Je '16 10c 

Heating plants 

Regulation 
Electric, gas and heating utilities. In F. L. 
Holmes. Regulation of railroads and public 
' utilities in Wisconsin, p 170-92 '15 
Hedges, Anna Charlotte 
Wage worth of school training. $2 '15 Teach- 
ers college (Women — Employment) 
Height of buildings regulations. See Buildings — 

Height 
Henry Phipps institute for the study, treatment, 
and prevention of tuberculosis 
11th report: a study of the housing and social 
conditions in selected districts of Philadel- 
phia. '15 The Institute, 7th and Lombard 
sts.. Philadelphia (Housing — Surveys) 
Hepburn, A. Barton 
History of currency in the United States. $2.50 
'15 Macmillan (Banking and currency) 
Heredity 
Heredity. William Bateson. Jn Smithsonian 
institution. Bd. of regents. Annual report, 
1915. p 359-94 '16 

Two addresses delivered, August 14 and 
20, 1914, at the Australia meeting of the 
British assn. for the advancement of sci- 
ence. Reprinted by permission from author's 
pamphlet copy, London, 1914 
Sec also Eugenics 
High school fraternities 
High school hydra. H. B. Latham. Educ R 50: 

360-8 N '15 
Kansas court has handed down a decision de- 
claring that secret sororiti'es or organiza- 
tions in high schools are unlawful, inasmuch 
as they were forbidden by the legislature in 
1907, which has not repealed its act since. 
Local boards or school authorities have no 
power to change the acts of the legislature. 
High school sorority girls v. Topeka bd. of 
education (Press rept Mr 11 '16) 
High schools 

* American school: a study of secondary educa- 

tion. W. S. Hinchman. 232p *$1 '16 Double- 
day 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



115 



High schools— Continued 

* Changes needed in American secondary edu- 

cation. C: W. Eliot. (Occasional pa no 2) 
29p '16 General euuc. bd. 

A plea for more attention to observa- 
tional studies anc to tne acquisition by 
every pupil ot some sort of bodily skill 

* History of education in lovv^a. C. R. Aurner. 

V 3 464p $2 '15 State historical society of 
Iowa, Iowa City 

Discusses secondary education. Contains: 
Incorporated academy; Unincorporated acad- 
emy; Institutions for special instruction; 
Secondary schools under sectarian domina- 
tion; Public high school; Courses of study in 
the high school 
Modern city's high-school system, Los Angeles. 
A. M. Fenwick. School R 24:116-29 F '16 

* Needed changes in secondary education. 

C: W: Eliot and Ernesto Nelson. U S Bur 
Educ Bui 1916 no 10 32p '16 

Two papers presented at the Pan-Ameri- 
can scientific congress, Washington, D. C, 
Dec. 27, 1915-Jan. 8, 1916 

Present practices and tendencies in the sec- 
ondary education of girls. Winifred Rich- 
mond. Pedagogical Seminary (Worcester. 
Mass.) 23:184-98 Je '16 $1.50 

Record of elimination and survival in the first 
three terms of New York city high schools 
for 14,158 pupils. In New York (city). Dept. of 
educ. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1915, p 63- 
72 

Secondary education. T: H. Briggs. In 
U. S. Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 
p 127-57 '15 

Contains: General survey; Why improve- 
ment of high schools is slow; Pioneer ef- 
forts at improvement; The high school in 
the surveys; The junior high school 

Secondary education. T: H. Briggs. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 113- 
30 '15 

Contains: Extension of opportunities for 
secondary education; Reorganization of 
courses of study; Influence of state inspec- 
tors of high schools; Provisions for economy 
of time 

Teaching in the high schools [of Buffalo]. In 
N. Y. (state). Dept. of educ. Examination of 
the public school system of the city of 
Buffalo, p 119-50 '16 

Tendencies in secondary education in the mid- 
dle west. W. A. Jessup, School R 23:621-30 
N '15 

Uses of the term "secondary" in American 
education. B. F. Pittenger. School R 24:130-41 
F '16 

See also Junior high schools; Vocational 
guidance 

Administration and organization 
Los Angeles, Cal. — Manual arts high school 
has a student government organization, 
which includes all the students and the fac- 
ulty. Its officers are chosen from the student 
body, with the exception of the auditor and 
the treasurer who are appointed by the prin- 
cipal; the treasurer is under $2,000 bond. 
The government of the school is practically 
in the hands of the students, but the prin- 
cipal has the right to interfere when he 
deems it necessary. Courts are held, where 
offenders who plead "not guilty" are tried: 
counsel represents both sides and a student 
jury gives decisions. Laws may be estab- 
lished by initiative and referendum, and the 
recall may be invoked against any elected 
oflficer. The organization transacts $50,000 
worth of business a year, the profit going 
into the treasury for the use of the school. 
The book exchange, school printing plant 
and cafeteria are among the enterprises 
(Mr 27 '16) 

Coeducation 

Detroit, Mich. — Authorities in the Central high 
school have roused a protest from students 
by segregation of the sexes. It is felt that 
such a plan is unjust to the children, to 
parents who pay taxes expecting the best 
possible returns, and to the public which 



expects well developed normal human beings 
to take active part in the world's affairs 
(Je '16) 

Conferences 

* Illinois high school conference. Proceedings 

of the conference, Nov. 18-20. 1915. Univ of 
111 Bui no 15 356p Ja 24 '16 

Curricuium 

Curriculum of the secondarv school. School 
and Soc 4:42-9 Jl 8 '16 

A review of a pamphlet by Dr. Abraham 
Flexner, A modern school, published by the 
General education board 

High school courses. In Milwaukee, Wis. Bd. 
of school directors. 56th annual report, 1915, 
p 72-9 

Recommends making the courses of study 
fit the needs of the pupils, thru the abolish- 
ment of rigid courses which fit the pupil for 
college, and the substitution of the "indi- 
vidual course of study" 

* Oregon. State dept. of education. Courses of 

study for the high schools, 1915-16. 112p '15 
Oregon state lib. 

Furnished only on exchange accounts 

* Syllabus for secondary schools, 1910, Univ of 

the State of N Y Bui no 607 492p il Ja 15 '16 
What high-schools studies are of most worth. 
C. A. Herrick. School and Soc 4:305-9 Ag 
26 '16 

Economy of time 

* Economy in secondary education. W: F. Rus- 

sell. 71p 35c '16 Houghton 

Attempts to examine in a fair and impar- 
tial way our own system and certain espe- 
cially successful features of the systems of 
foreign countries, estimating each in terms 
of relative worth 

Foik high schoois 

* Danish people's high school, including a gen- 

eral account of the educational system of 
Denmark. Martin Hegland. U S Bur Educ 
Bui 1915 no 45 182p '15 

Gives a comprehensive account of the folk 
high schools of Denmark and other Scandi- 
navian countries. Appendixes contain sta- 
tistical tables and a bibliography 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] secondary education: 
high schools and academies. U S Bur Educ 
Bui 1916 no 47 p 655-92 '16 

Statistics 
Public and private high schools. In U. S. Comr. 
of education. Report, 1914, v 2 407-48 '15 

Tuition 

* University of the state of New York: [circular 

letter specifying the conditions under which 
the state will pay the tuition of nonresident 
academic pupils]. 7p S 1 '15 

Highway engineering 

■* Elements of highway engineering. A, H. 
Blanchard, 514p il *$3 '15 Wiley 

A book written at the suggestion of several 
professors of civil engineering who desire to 
use a didactic text, covering the principles 
of highway engineering, of such length as 
to be suitable for one-semester courses in- 
cluded in civil engineering curricula. Speci- 
fications, per se, and detailed cost data have 
been omitted, as such material is not con- 
sidered, essential to a broad general knowl- 
edge of the science of highway engineering. 
The book discusses: Economics, administra- 
tion and legislation; Preliminary investiga- 
tions; Surveying, mapping and design; Grad- 
ing, drainage and foundations; Various kinds 
of roads and pavements; Street cleaning and 
snow removal; Sidewalks, curbs and gutters; 
Highway structures 

Highway officers 

Civil service 
How to take the roads out of politics, by R: H: 
Dana; Sound administration of public ser- 
vice, by G: R, Wales; Adaptability of the 
merit system to the engineering service; 
with discussion, by A, M. Swanson, In Pro- 
ceedings of the Fourth American road con- 



116 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



JHighway officers— Civil service— Continued 

gress, under auspices of American highway 
assn. [and] American automobile assn.. 1914, 
p 81-110 '15 

Directories 
Directory of state highway officials. Good 
Roads n s 12:87-90 Ag 5 '16 

Names and titles of the chief highway offi- 
cials in each of the several states 

Highway structures „ -r^, i, ^ 

Highway structures. In A. H. Blanchard. 

Elements of highway engineering, il p 421- 

Discusses: Bridges and culverts; Highway 
signs; Car tracks; Pipe systems; Repaying 
trenches 

See also Bridges; Subways (streets) 

iHighways. See Roads 

JHistory 

Study and teaching 

* History consultation service designed to aid 

teachers in the public schools. Ind Univ Bui 
(Univ exten div; v 13 no 12 31p N '15 

Appendix contains: Report of a survey of 
the history program in the Kokomo public 
schools; Report on the history instruction in 
the public schools of South Bend; Opinions 
of school superintendents 

* History teaching in the secondary schools: 

district conference held at Gary under the 
auspices of the Indiana university extension 
division, Feb. 26-27, 1915. il Ind Univ Bui v 
13 no 10 118p S '15 50c Univ. bookstore, 
Bloomington. Ind. 

* Local and Nebraska history in Nebraska pub- 

lic schools. C. N. Anderson. Neb Leg Ref 
Bur Bui no 8 15p O 1 '15 

A paper read before the Nebraska history 
teachers' assn., Lincoln, May 8, 1915 
fHoboes. See Labor, Casual 

Hog choiera 

* Suggestions relative to the prevention of hog 

cholera. J. H. Kastle and others, il 
Agric Exp Sta Circ no 10 70-80p D '15 Ky. 
agric. exp. sta.. State univ,, Lexington 
Holding companies 

Holding companies for utilities: why they differ 
from those which formerly existed in the 
commercial and industrial field. H. C. Clark. 
Aera 4:842-7 Mr '16 
Holidays 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] school holidays. U S 
Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 516-18 '16 
Holmes, Fred L. 
Regulation of railroads and public utilities in 
Wisconsin. *$2 '15 Appleton (Railroads — 
Regulation, State) 
Home economics. See Demonstration work in 

domestic science; Domestic science 
iHome labor 

Brief on law prohibiting certain manufacture 
in tenements. In N. Y. (state). Factory in- 
vestigating comm. Fourth report, 1915, v 1 
p 371-85 

People V. Balofsky, in the matter of the 
manufacture of children's wearing apparel 
in tenements 

* Tenement home work and the courts. Jo- 

sephine Goldmark. (Women in industry ser 
no 12) 3p postage 2c '16 Nat. consumers' 
league, 289 4th av., N. Y. 

Editorial reprinted from The Survey, Feb. 
19, 1916 
':Home making 

Home education. E. C. Lombard. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1915, v 1 p 361-9 
'15 

Contains: The problems; Home making 
promoted by the government; Home educa- 
tion in the territories and dependencies; 
Home education promoted by organizations 
Vocational training of girls in the state of 
New York. A. C. Hedges, il bibl N Y State 
Univ Bui no 612 41p Ap 1 '16 Univ. of state 
of N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 
Home rule. See County home rule; Municipal 

home rule; Taxation — Home rule 
Home study. See Schools — ^Home study 



Home teachers. See Visiting teachers 

Homesteads 
Overhaul the homestead law. Rex Baker. Univ 

of Texas Bui 1915 no 39 p 56-65 Jl 10 '15 
U. S. dept. of public lands has handed down a 
decision upholding the homestead law as made 
by Register of public lands Sanford in the 
settlement of the Bahn-Wiss case concern- 
ing the possession of land held by Bahn for 
30 years and claimed by -Wiss. Text of San- 
ford's law appears in the San Francisco Bul- 
letin D 10 '15 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
Massachusetts — Giving general court authority 
for the taking over of land in country dis- 
tricts for the purpose of establishing home- 
steads for those who may wish to escape 
from the more congested quarters of the 
citv. Constitutional amendment. Adopted. 
Yes 284,568 No 95.148 N '15 

Regulations 

* Oregon — Rules and regulations of the desert 

land board pertaining to the reclamation of 
lands accepted by the state under the pro- 
visions of the Carey act; also rules and 
regulations for operating and maintaining 
Tumalo project. 16p '14 Oregon state lib. 
Furnished only on exchange accounts 

Soldiers' rights 

Laws 
Soldiers' additional homestead rights. In J. W. 
Thompson, comp. United States mining 
statutes, annotated, v 2 p 1237-8 
Hookworm 
Control of hookworm disease by the Pacific 
mail steamship company, by Herbert Gunn; 
Are there harmful and harmless hookworm 
infections? by V. G. Heiser. In Am. acad- 
emy of medicine. Medicine an aid to com- 
merce: proceedings, 1915, p 14-24, 35-40 '16 
Horticulture 

* Orchard survey of Jefferson county. R. R. 

Jeffries. West Va Univ Agric Exp Sta Bui 
147 31p il map N '15 

See also Agricultural pests; Apples; Farm- 
ers' cooperative movements; Nursery in- 
spection 

Accounting 
Orchard accounting system that works. J. R. 
Mattem. Country Life in Am (Garden City, 
N. Y.) 29:45 F '16 35c 

Disinfection and destruction of trees 

Field experiments in spraying apple orchards. 
Univ of 111 Agric Exp Sta Bui 185 (Abstract) 
12p il F '16 

* Profits from spraying twenty-five Missouri 

orchards in 1914. Univ of Mo Agric Exp Sta 
Bui no 124 285p il Ja '15 

* Six vears of experimental apple spraying at 

Highmoor Farm. W. J. Morse. Maine Agric 
Exp Sta Bui no 249 96p Mr '16 Maine agric. 
exp. station, Orono 
Spraying farm orchards by the club plan. K. D. 
Jay. Ohio Agric Exp Sta Circ no 148 45-52 p 
D 1 '14 Agricultural experiment station, 
Wooster, O. 

* Stone-fruit spray made from hydrated-lime 

and sulphur. G. C. Starcher. Virginia Agric 
Exp Sta Bui no 210 14p Mr '16 Va. agric. exp. 
station, Blacksburg 

Cost 

Cost of dusting and spraying a New York ap- 
ple orchard. C. R. Crosby. J Economic En- 
tomology (Am. assn. of economic entomolo- 
gists, Concord, N. H.) 9:375-6 Je '16 50c 
Hosiery industry 

Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and 
underwear industry, 1907 to 1914. U S Bur 
Labor Statistics Bui no 177 153p Ag '15 

Wages of women in hosiery and knit goods 
factories in Massachusetts. Mass Minimum 
Wage Comm Bui no 10 37p Ja '16 
Hospital social service 

Medical social service; with discussion. J: H. 
Huddleston. In N. Y. city conference of 
charities and correction. Proceedings, 1915, 
p 25-49 '16 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



117 



Hospitals 

* Building of the hospital: org-anization and 

methods. O. H. Bartine. 14p '15 Oliver H. 
Bartine, supt., N. Y. soc. for the relief of 
the ruptured and crippled, 321 E. 42d St., 
N. Y. 

Read before the Hospital alliance of the 
city of New York, Academy of medicine, 
Dec. 1, 1914. Reprinted from The Modern 
Hospital, Feb. 1915, v. 4 no. 2 
New kind of county hospital. W. A. Dyer. 
World's Work 30:605-9 S '15 

Tells how an Iowa doctor, with a personal 
realization of a vital need, started a big 
movement that has already found expression 
in a new law and the first two public hos- 
pitals in rural counties 
Social responsibilities of the hospital: Duties 
of a hospital to the public health, by W: W. 
Welch; Report of the chairman of the com- 
mittee on health, R. C. Cabot; Social re- 
sponsibility of the hospital, by Katharine 
Tucker; Pay cHnics for persons of moderate 
means, by M. M, Davis, jr. Jn Nat. conf. 
of charities and correction. Proceedings, 
1915, p 209-36 

See also Tuberculosis sanatoriums 
Accounting 
Forms 

* Forms and records used in accounting system 

recently installed in Bellevue and allied 
hospitals. '15 Bellevue hospital, E. 26th st., 
N. Y. 

Construction 

* Building of the hospital: construction, by 

O. H. Bartine: Discussion, by D. D. Kim- 
., ball. 35p '15 Oliver H. Bartine, supt., N. Y. 
soc. for the relief of the ruptured and crip- 
pled, 321 E. 42d St., N. Y. 

Read before the Am. hospital assn., San 
Francisco, Cal., June 24, 1915. Reprinted 
from The Modern Hospital, Oct. 1915, v. 5 
no. 4 

Discrimination 
Laws 

* Open hospital. C: J. Hill and H. J. Farlee, 

comps., R. I. leg. ref. bur. 3p (Typew B 15c> 
Extracts from laws relating to discrimina- 
tion against physicians and patients 

Equipment 

* Mechanical equipment of hospitals, by D. D. 

Kimball; Discussion, by O. H. Bartine. 27p 
'15 Oliver H. Bartine, supt., N. Y. soc, for 
the relief of the ruptured and crippled, 321 
E. 42d St., N. Y. 

Read before the Am. hospital assn., San 
Francisco, Cal., June 24, 1915. Reprinted 
from The Modern Hospital, Oct. 1915, v. 5 
no. 4 

Legislation 
Committee on legislation of the American 
hospital assn., Dr. H. T. Summersgill, chm., 
has sent letters to hospital people, request- 
ing information on all new state laws en- 
acted in their states since Jan. 1, 1915, 
which are of interest to hospitals and in- 
stitutional workers. Inquiry was made 
as to whether the various states have any 
law governing the working time of hos- 
pital employees or nurses, and whether it 
is considered advantageous or not. The 
data obtained will be presented as a report 
at the next conference of the association 
(D 17 '15) 

Lighting 

* Artificial illumination in hospitals: discussion 

of M. J. Sturm's paper on artificial illumi- 
nation in hospitals, as read before the 
American hospital assn. at St. Paul, Minn., 
Aug. 28, 1914. O. H. Bartine. 6p '15 Oliver 
H. Bartine, supt., N. Y. soc. for the relief 
of the ruptured and crippled, 321 E. 42d st., 
N. Y. 

Reprinted from American Hospital Assn 
Transactions v. 16, Aug. 1914; The Modern 
Hospital, Jan. 1915, v. 4 no. 1 

Repels 
Report on investigation [of the] bureau of 
hospitals, baths and lodging houses. In Chi- 
cago, 111. Civil service comm. Reports on the 



Investigation into organization and admin- 
istration [of the] department of health, p 
116-28 '15 

State aid 
Appropriations to hospitals. In Maryland. Bd 
of state aid and charities. Eighth biennial 
report, 1914-1915, p 20-31 '15 

Outhnes the practices of the several states 
Hospitals, Municipal 
Municipal hospital a community asset. How- 
ell Wright. Ohio Bui Char & Correc v 22 
no 3 p 96-104 Je '16 
Hospitals, Railroad 
Hospital organization of railway systems; 
with discussion. C. W. Hopkins. In Am. 
academy of medicine. Medicine an aid to 
commerce: proceedings, 1915, p 149-64 '16 
Hotels 
Ontario, Canada— With the consent of the 
government a special citizens' committee 
will make a survey of all the hotels in the 
province to insure that proper hotel ac- 
commodations will be provided after Sept. 
16, 1916, when prohibition goes into effect 
See also Laundries; Prostitution — Hotels 
Laws 

* Minnesota — Hotel inspection, laws. 21p '16 

Minn, hotel inspector 

* West Virginia — Act creating the office of 

hotel inspector and providing for the in- 
spection of hotels and restaurants 
(Passed F 21 '13. In effect My 22 '13); 
Rules governing hotei inspection (Pre- 
scribed by the state bd. of health. Ap- 
proved Je 18 '15) 8, Ip W. Va. hotel in- 
spector, Huntington 
Hours of business. See Restaurants — Hours of 
closing 

Hours of labor 

* Rates of wages, hours of labor and fluctua- 

tion of employment in Ohio in 1914, (Dept of 
investigation and statistics rept no 16) 317p 
Weight 2 lb Enclose postage S 15 '15 Ohio 
industrial comm. 
Shorter hours for men as a public welfare 
measure. Monthly R v 2 no 6 p 23-9 Je '16 
■* Wages and hours of labor in the boot and 
shoe industry: 1907 to 1914. U S Bur Labor 
Statistics Bui no 178 89p Ag '15 

* Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, 

woolen and silk industries, 1907-1914. U S 
Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 190 (Wages and 
hours of labor ser no 21) 241p My '16 

* Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and 

underwear industry, 1907 to 1914, U S Bur 
Labor Statistics Bui no 177 153p Ag '15 

* Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel 

industry, 1907 to 1913. U S Bur Labor Statis- 
tics Bui no 168 328p Ap '15 

* Wages and hours of labor in the manufacture 

of paper products in Massachusetts. Mass 
Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 109 146p Jl 1 '15 
Part VI of the annual report on the statis- 
tics of labor for 1915. The statistics herein 
presented were gathered from 170 estab- 
lishments and cover 12,203 wage-earners. 
Does not take account of rates of wages, 
but shows the actual earnings of the em- 
ployees in the representative week for 
which the data were taken from the pay- 
rolls of the mills 
*■ Wages and hours of labor in the men's cloth- 
ing industry, 1911-1914. U S Bur Labor 
Statistics Bui no 187 (Wages and hours 
of labor ser no 20) 130p Mr '16 

Eight-hour day 
American federation of labor has indorsed the 
eight-hour day law for women and chil- 
dren, but, under President Gompers' influ- 
ence, has refused its approval to state and 
federal legislation for an eight-hour day for 
men, taking the stand that man labor is 
better off wher it obtains the shorter day 
by "economic pressure" rather than by leg- 
islation. It also urges a nation-wide cam- 
paign for an eight-hour day, to better the 
material, physical and social conditions of 
working-people. In addition to the demands 
of the railroads, the metal trades dept. of 
the Am. federation of labor has started a 
campaign for an eight- hour day in the ship- 



118 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Hours of labor — Eight-hour day — Continued 

building industry, and the Journeyman 
horse-shoers union of San Francisco has 
demanded an eight-iiour day (Mr 8 '16) 

Commissioner of labor Wilson is reported to 
have said in reference to the working day: 
"If the war lasts another year, the big in- 
dustries of this country will be run on an 
eight-hour day" (Jl '16) 

Eight hour day. C. J. Morrison. Engineer- 
ing Mag (140 Nassau st., N. Y.) 50:363-6 D 
'15 25c 

Proves that more goods can be made and 
at lower cost on eight-hour basis 

Eight-hour law in Uruguay. Monthly R v 2 no 
4 p 84-5 Ap '16 

Labor centre assn. of New York is conducting 
a vigorous campaign for a universal eight- 
hour day. All organized labor unions and so- 
cial welfare organizations thruout the coun- 
try have been supplied with propaganda 
from the central bureau. Stamps bearing the 
slogan "For the eight-hour day; a movement 
toward justice" are being distributed in 
every state. Clergymen are being urged to 
preach sermons on "Nearer to justice: the 
eight-hour day" 

Letter on subject of the eight-hour day. 
Samuel Gompers. Cong Rec 53:3899-900 Mr 
1 '16 

Ninety-four per cent of the members of four 
great unions of railway operatives voted 
tor a general railway strike, if their de- 
mands tor an eight-hour day were not con- 
ceded. Federal board of mediation and con- 
ciliation attempted to mediate, but was un- 
successful. It also asked the unions to 
arbitrate which they refused to do. Presi- 
dent Wilson then acted promptly calling into 
conference the chairman of the Nat. railway 
conference com. and the four brotherhood 
heads in order to make a final effort to pre- 
vent a strike. Later he invited the presi- 
dents of the principal railroads of the coun- 
try to come to Washington. They were 
in conference for several days and finally 
rejected the President's demand that they 
make eight hours instead of ten hours, the 
basis of a day's pay, and the labor unions 
having tentatively ordered a strike on all 
railway lines beginning Sept. 4, 1916, the 
President asked congress immediately to 
pass temporary legislation to control the 
threatened strike. Legislation passed, pro- 
vides for an eight hour day as the legal 
basis of work and wages for railway em- 
ployees engaged in interstate transportation 
and the appointment of a commission to 
report to congress on the effect of the eight- 
hour day 

Sudden spread of the eight-hour day: within 
the past ten months 100,000 wage-earners 
have won a new leisure. Ruth Pickering, 
Survey 36:5-7 Ap 1 '16 

Twenty-four hour day. C. J. Morrison. Eng 
Mag (140 Nassau st., N. Y.) 50:910-13 Mr '16 
25c 

* U. S. Dept. of the interior. Instructions re- 

garding eight-hour law. 3p '15 

See also Hours of labor — Public works; 
Hours of labor — Women and children — 
Eight- hour day 

Investigations 
Wisconsin— E. E. Witte of the Univ. of Wis- 
consin, is to have charge of an investigation 
of an eight-hour day in the factories of the 
state. The inquiry is at the request of a 
petition presented by 33 manufacturers of 
Milwaukee to the state railroad commission 
asking for an investigation of the situation 
relating to hours of labor in competitive or 
similar industries in the state (Je 1 '16) 
Legislation, Comparative 
Eight-hour laws. World Almanac, 1916, p 
121-2 

Fire departments 

* Chicago, 111. — Ordinance recommended for pas- 

sage by the com. on schools, fire, police and 
civil service. (Pam no 555) Ip Ap 6 '16 Chi- 
cago munic. ref. lib. 

Investigations 
Massachusetts — Legislature has appointed a 
recess committee to study the subject of 



social insurance, old-age pensions and the 
condition of workers in industries that oper- 
ate continuously for 24 hours (Je 2 '16) 

Legislation, Comparative 

Hours of labor. In J: R. Commons and J: B. 
Andrews. Principles of labor legislation, p 
200-60 '16 

Contains: Maximum daily hours; Rest pe- 
riods 

[Review of legislation • of 1915 relative to 
hours of labor in public and private em- 
ployment]. Am Labor Leg R 5:729-34 D '15 

Limitation 

* Bunting, Franklin O. v. State of Oregon. Brief 

for Defendant in error in the case for the 
shorter work-day, by G: M. Brown and J. O. 
Bailey. b9p '16 Attorney general of Oregon, 
Salem 

In the supreme court of the U. S., October 
term, 1915, no. 228, October term, 1914, no. 
602 

* Bunting, Franklin O. v. State of Oregon. 

Brief for the defendant in error in the case 
for the shorter work-day, by Felix Frank- 
furter and Josephine Goldmark. 2v 1020p 
postage 25c '16 Nat. consumers' league, 289 
4th av., N. Y. 

In the U. S. supreme court, October 
term, 1915, no. 228. The brief bases the 
argument on physical and economic facts. 
It takes up the argument, legislation limit- 
ing the hours of labor for men, and the 
world's experience upon which the legis- 
lation limiting the hours of labor is based. 
Under this head are discussed: Menaces to 
national vitality; Dangers of long hours; 
Shorter hours the only protection; Economic 
aspect of reducing hours; Uniformity of re- 
striction needed for justice to competing 
employers; Progress of the shorter day; 
Need of legislation: instances of excessive 
hours of labor. Appendixes contain a dis- 
cussion of hours of labor and realism in con- 
stitutional law, and an index of authorities 
quoted. This brief was prepared under the 
direction of Mr. Louis M. Brandeis, until 
his nomination as associate justice of the 
supreme court obliged him to withdraw 
from the case 
Outlawing exhaustion: the United States su- 
preme court to decide on the length of the 
workingman's day. J: A. Fitch. Survey 36: 
73-4 Ap 15 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
Legislation limiting the hours of labor for 
men: [American legislation and foreign 
legislation.] In Bunting, Franklin O., v. 
State of Oregon. Brief for the defendant in 
error in the case for the shorter work- day, 
by Felix Frankfurter and Josephine Gold- 
mark, p 1-10 '16 

Municipal employees 
Milwaukee, Wis. — U. S. district court has 
sustained the validity of the city's eight- 
hour ordinance in the case of Con Rauff, 
jr., a contractor, who permitted some of his 
men to work more than eight hours on 
work for the city; held that the act could 
not be declared unconstitutional, as there 
was no clear and reasonable doubt of. its 
validity (Press rept Mr 24 '16) 

Nurses 
Legislation 
Committee on legislation of the American hos- 
pital assn.. Dr. H. T. Summersgill, chm., 
has sent letters to hospital people, request- 
ing information on all new state laws en- 
acted in their states since Jan. 1, 1915, 
which are of interest to hospitals and 
institutional workers. Inquiry was made 
as to whether the various states have any 
law governing the working time of hos- 
pital employees or nurses, and whether it 
is considered advantageous or not. The 
data obtained will be presented as a report 
at the next conference of the association 
(D 17 '15) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



119 



HoJirs of labor — Continued 

Public employees 

* Massachusetts. Comni. on economy and effi- 

ciency. Report relative to the hours of labor 
of public employees and to Saturday half 
holidays. (House no 1672) 58p postage 2c 
Ja '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

Public utilities 

Memorandum addressed to the joint legislative 
com. investigating the N. Y. public service 
commissions on the need of legislation em- 
powering the commissions to regulate hours 
of work and wages of employes of public 
utility companies. 47p 10c Ap 1 '16 Nat. 
consumers' league, 289 4th av., N. Y. 

Public works * 

Laws 

* California — Labor laws pertaining to public 

works. 4p Bur. of labor statistics, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Railroads 

Brotherhoods of train service employees re- 
jected both the proposal to refer the recent 
wage controversy with the Nat. conference 
com. of the railways to the interstate com- 
merce commission or to arbitrate under the 
Newlands act. The brotherhoods have an- 
nounced their intention of taking a strike 
vote of the employees. The Pennsylvania rail- 
road company has sent out a notice to em- 
ployees calling attention to the strike ballot 
and calling for volunteers to serve in case of 
a strike to keep the road running. The 
present alternatives seem to be either a 
backdown on the part of the train service 
employees, arbitration by some impartial 
tribunal or a strike (Je 23 '16) 

Eight-hours for railway crews. W. J. Lauck. 
New Repub 6:173-5 Mr 18 '16 

Massachusetts supreme court has declared 
unconstitutional the law providing that 
employees in and about steam railroad sta- 
tions shall not be employed for more than 
nine hours in ten hours' time. The decision 
was based on cne given by the U. S. 
supreme court that such a statute was an 
illegal interference with individuals' rights 
to make their own terms in regard to hours 
of labor. Massachusetts v. Boston and M. R. 
R., 101 N E 264 

Negotiations were begun between the railways 
and the four organizations of train em- 
ployees on June 1, 1916 in the auditorium 
of the Engineering societies building, New- 
York. Eight-hour basic day was the key- 
note of the demand of the train men. Con- 
ferences were open to the public. Terms of 
the demands as well as the position of the 
railroads appear in Railway Age Gazette 
Je 9 '16 

Official statement on the shorter work day and 
time and one-half for overtime, issued by 
the grand chief of the Brotherhood of loco- 
motive engineers, the president of the Order 
of »-ailway conductors, the president of the 
Brotherhood of locomotive firemen and en- 
ginemen, and the president of the Brother- 
hood of railroad trainmen, appears in the 
Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Wash.) Mr 12 
•16 

Session of the grand lodge and international 
officers of the five railroad brotherhoods in 
Boston, Oct. 31, 1915, resulted in a launch- 
ing of a countrywide movement for an 
eight-hour day and double pay for overtime 
for every man who has to do with the 
movement of freight and passenger trains 
thruout the United States. At the joint 
conference of the four railway brotherhoods, 
in Chicago, it was determined that demands 
for an eight-hour day be submitted to 
a referendum vote of every member before 
being presented to the employers. In pre- 
vious instances the men have been per- 
mitted to vote only on the question of 
strikes after demands have been submitted. 
The demands as submitted appear in the 
N Y Sun Ja 23 '16 



* Wages and hours of railroad employees. Luke 

Grant. 8p Assn. of western rwys., 608 S. 
Dearborn St., Chicago 

Reprint of an article published in the Feb- 
ruary issue of Chamberlin's Magazine, Chi- 
cago 

Sec also Hours of labor — Eight-hour day 
Reports 

* Maryland. Ten hour law bur. Second report, 

January, 1914-January. 1915. 41p '15 

This bureau was established for the pur- 
pose of enforcing the law technically called 
Hours of labor for females, commonly known 
as the Ten hour law for women 

Saturday 
Massachusetts. Comm. on economy and effi- 
ciency. Report relative to the hours of labor 
of public employees and to Saturday half 
holidays. (House no 1672) 58p postage 2c 
Ja '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

Six-hour day 

At the convention of the building trades dept. 
of the American federation of labor a reso- 
lution was introduced suggesting a six-hour 
(lay for all union building mechanics in the 
U. S. as a solution of the problem of unem- 
ployment (N 25 '15) 

Stationary firemen 
Louisiana supreme court has annulled the 1914 
law declaring it to be a misdemeanor to 
employ a stationary fireman more than eight 
consecutive hours in one day in a city of 
50,000 population or more; as being unjustly 
discriminatory between employers located in 
different cities and using different kinds of 
fuel. State vs. Legendre, 70 S 70 

Summer conditions 
Vacation time: bulletin on summer conditions 
in retail stores. 2p My 17 '16 Consumers' 
league of N. Y., 105 E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Table giving information as to vacation 
policy, Saturday closing, daily closing of 
N. Y. stores 

Union hours 

* Union scale of wages and hours of labor, in 

Ohio on May 15, 1915. (Dept, of investigation 
and statistics rept no 20) 107p postage 4c D 
14 '15 Ohio industrial comm. 

* Union scale of wages and hours of labor. May 

1, 1914 [in the principal trades and occupa- 
tions in 41 important industrial cities in the 
United States]. U S Bur Labor Statistics 
Bui no 171 336p Ag '15 

* Union scaie of wages and hours of labor. May 

1, 1915. U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 
194 295p My '16 

Gives statistics for principal trades and 
occupations in 47 important industrial cities 
in the U. S. For purposes of comparison, 
the scale on May 1, 1914, is given in parallel 
columns. The figures cover 676,571 union 
members. In an appendix a tabulation is 
given of the rates of wages and hours of 
labor in the printing and binding trades in 
26 cities, as drawn from the pay rolls of 179 
representative establishments 

Women and children 

Great Britain. Ministry of munitions. Health 
of munition workers com. Reports. 7 pams 
49p n p '16 Eyre and Spottiswoode 

Memorandum no. 4 takes up: Employment 
of women, (cd 8185) lOp l^d; no. 5. Hours 
of work, (cd 8186) 9 p iy2d; no. 6, Canteen 
construction and equipment. (cd 8199) 7 p 
4d; no. 7, Industrial fatigue and its causes; 
no 8, Special industrial diseases; no. 9. Ven- 
tilation and lighting of munition factories 
and workshops; no. 10, Sickness and injury 

Wisconsin supreme court handed down a de- 
cision. May 2. 1916, holding that the hours 
of labor of women working part day and 
part night hours must not exceed 10 hours, 
the number fixed by law as the length of 
time a woman may be employed in one day; 
held that if workers were allowed more than 
10 hours the legislative intent would be 
defeated: also held that the industrial com- 
mission has the power to rule in such cases 
(Press rept) 



120 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Hours of labor — Women and children — Continued 
Working hours of women in Chicago. I. J. Gra- 
ham. J Pol Econ 23:822-31 O '1.^ 

* — Same. Reprinted. Juvenile protective assn., 

816 Halsted st., Chicago 

Eight-hour day 

* Women in industry: the eight hours day and 

rest at night upheld by the U. S. supreme 
court. Florence Kelley. (Women in industry 
ser no 13) 4p Ic My '16 Nat. consumers' 
league 

Legislation, Comparative 

Hours of labor: [analytical table showing leg- 
islation by states]. U S Children's Bur Pub 
no 10 (Industrial ser no 1) p 226-319 '15 

Laws limiting the hours of women's work. 
I7i National women's trade union league of 
America. Proceedings, 1915, p 42-3 

Table giving the hours of labor by states, 
together with the establishments included 
under the laws and the year enacted 

Mental pursuits 
Massachusetts supreme court has ruled that 
the law limiting the employment of woryien 
to 54 hours a week applies to those engaged 
in mental pursuits as well as to laborers 
(Press rept N 30 '15) 

Sun-ei/s 

U. S. pub. health service will make a survey 
of Wisconsin women workers to determine 
their proper hours of labor, and the Wis- 
consin industrial commission will act on its 
suggestions. Dr. Robert Oleson of the Pitts- 
burgh office will have charge of the survey. 
Wisconsin is the first state to pass a law 
proposing such limitation. Rept. will prob- 
ably not be published until the winter of 
3917 (Jl '16) 
Household accounting 

Household accounting. Laura Comstock. In 
Mass. Bd. of agriculture. 62d annual report, 
1914. p 78-90 '15 
Housing 

A-B-C of housing, bibl In Cal. Comm. of im- 
migration and housing. 2d annual report, 
1916, p 279-92 

Boston, Mass. — Appellate division of supreme 
court has filed a permanent injunction pre- 
venting the erection of a Boston fiat in 
Northview terrace. Charles Wyand v. Hil- 
dred K. Tallman and others (Press rept Mr 
16 '16) 

California— W. B. Rohl, a delegate to the state 
institute of housing, called recently by the 
Cal. comm. of immigration and housing at 
Los Angeles, urges strengthening and unify- 
ing the housing laws making them more 
reasonable, simple and specific so that they 
cannot be misinterpreted. His discussion of 
the various needs appears in the Sacramento 
Union. Je 15 '16 

* City housing, past and future. John Ihlder. 

(Nat housing assn pub no 28) 14p 5c Jl '15 
Nat. housing assn. 

Home of the street urchin. B. J. Newman. 
Nat Munic R 4:587-93 O '15 

Housing. In J. S. McNutt. Manual for health 
oflficers, p 421-34 '15 

Need of better housing. F. G. Smith, il Nat 
Real Estate J 14:64-6 Ag '16 

New York (city)— Frank Williams of the New 
York city plan commission, declares that 
the experience of New York demonstrates 
the falsity of the old contention that swift 
and convenient methods of transportation 
will solve the housing problem so far as 
congestion is concerned. Speaking from the 
residential standpoint, New York remains 
a six storied city, while Chicago is a three 
storied city, largely because no one in Chi- 
cago is allowed to build an apartment house 
over three stories high of material that is not 
fire-proof and in New York the height to 
which an apartment of non-fireproof mate- 
rial may rise is six stories; fire-proof mate- 
rial is expensive (Mr 21 '16) 

* Otto Grimer vs. Tenement house department 

of the city of N. Y. and others; memoran- 
dum in behalf of Tenement house com. of 
the Charity organization society of the city 



of N. Y., intervening by permission of the 
court as amicus curiae on motion for re- 
argument. 29p Lawrence Veiller, 105 E. 22d 
St., N. Y. 

Petition for reargument made to the court 
of appeals in the case to decide whether or 
not apartment houses come under the tene- 
ment house law. Appendix contains ex- 
cerpts from reports of tenement house 
commissions, statutes of N. Y. state and 
sanitary codes and ordinances of N. Y. city 

Slums in the city of Bombay. Local Self- 
government Gazette (Park Town, Madras 
15s a year) 1:877-86 O '15 

[Tenement house commission.] In N. J. 
Comm. upon the reorganization and consol- 
idation of the different departments of the 
state government. Fourth report, p 7-14 '16 

Reoommends enforcement of act, by the 
state commission method, but that the cost to 
the state be limited to expenses incident to 
the maintenance oi the required organiza- 
tion, and that the balance be apportioned 
among the municipalities in which the com- 
mission's work is done 

Tuberculosis and bad housing, by Mrs. A. F. 
Bacon; House infection: a potent source of 
tuberculosis, by I: W. Brewer; Relative pre- 
valence of tuberculosis under good and bad 
housing conditions, by C: J. Hastings; Hous- 
ing and tuberculosis: a legislative pro- 
gramme, by L. Veiller. Outdoor Life J (28^ 
4th av., N. Y.) 13:65-79 Mr '16 10c 

Washington, D. C— Ellen Wilson homes com- 
pany has been incorporated by congress, 
its dividends limited to 5 per cent net, to 
build attractive, sanitary houses for work- 
ing men. This has been done in view of 
the law passed by congress, which goes in- 
to effect July 1, 1918, by the terms of 
which all alley dwellings in the District of 
Columbia must be abandoned (Ap 26 '16^ 

*S'ce also College students — Rooming condi- 
tions; Cooperative housing; Girls — Housing; 
Homesteads; Immigrants — Housing; Indus- 
trial cities; Negroes — Housing; Workmen's 
homes 

Alleys 

Alley problem. C: B. Ball. Nat Real Estate J 
12:284-8 O '15 

Text of paper presented to the fourth 
National conference on housing in America 
at Minneapolis, Minn., Oct. 8, 1915 

— Same. In Nat. conference on housing. Hous- 
ing problems in America: proceedings. 1915» 
p 131-48 

Sanitary housing in Washington. D. C. E. F. 
Brown, il Southern Workman 44:590-7 N 
'15 

Shows what has been done from time to 
time by groups of philanthropic people to 
alleviate the conditions in alleys, either by 
changing the alleys themselves or by en- 
ticing the occupants to move into the more 
attractive houses outside 

Bibliography 
Congestion of population: its causes and 
remedies; and Housing reform. In W: B. 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S.. p 262-80 '15 

Conferences 
Housing problems in America: proceedings of 
the fourth National conference on housing, 
Minneapolis. Oct. 6-8. 1915. 222p $1.50 post- 
paid '15 Nat. housing assn. 

Contains: The next step in health work, 
by W. A. Evans; Housing and police power, 
by A. B. Hall; Land sub-division and its 
effect upon housing, by John Nolan; Causes 
of bad housing, by E. S. Forbes; Effects of 
bad housing, by J: J. Murphy; Outdoor 
closets and vaults: why they should be 
abolished, by E. W. Dinwiddle; Land sub- 
division from the point of view of a devel- 
opment company, by F. L. Olmstead; Tax- 
ation and housing, by C. B. Fillebrown and 
E. R. A. Seligman; House plans, by W. H. 
Kilham; Best mechanism for administra- 
tion, by J. F. Edwards; Round table on the 
Needs and opportunities of Minneapolis; 
The place of housing work in a health de- 
partment, by G. B. Young; The alley prob- 
lem, by C: B. Ball; The promoting of garden 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



121 



Housing — Conferences — Continued 

suburbs for working men; Standards for 
Jiousing codes; Round table on Woman's 
part in the housing- movement 

Land subdivision and its effect upon housing, 
by John Nolen; Same, by L. J. Ninde; Hous- 
ing and the police power, by A. B. Hall; 
Evil effects of bad housing, by J: J. Murphy; 
The alley problem, by C: B. Ball; The causes 
of bad housing, by JE. S- Forbes. Nat Real 
Estate J 12:25y-88, 295-8 O '15 

Consists of papers and excerpts from pa- 
pers read before the fourth National con- 
ference on housing in America, Minneapolis, 
Minn., Oct. 6-8. 1915 

National housing assn. Conference, Provi- 
dence, R. I. Oct. 9-11, 1916. This program 
includes the following papers: The state and 
housing, by S. G. Dixon; Local health de- 
partments and housing, by F. E. Fronczak; 
How to get garden suburbs in America, by 
L. J. Ninde; The districting of cities, by 
Lawson Purdy; How to get low cost houses. 
by Grosvenor Atterbury; Housing and dis- 
ease, by James Ford; Essentials of good 
management, by Allan Robinson; Industrial 
housing, by E. H. Gary, and others; Indus- 
trial housing: what types of houses to build, 
by P. R. MacNeille; Focusing community in- 
terest, by E. A. Moree; How to educate the 
tenant, by Bleecker Marquette; Providence's 
housing needs, by John Ihlder; The menace 
of the three-decker, by P. F. Hall; Shall 
we encourage or discourage the apartment 
house? by B. J. Newman 

New York congestion com. Annual meeting, 
Feb. 18, 1916. The following addresses were 
delivered: Present status of distribution of 
population, by Mrs. V. G. SimKhovitch; 
Menace of dark rooms and cellar dwellings, 
by Haven Emerson; Congestion in New 
York, by J: J. Murphy; Next step in hous- 
ing reform, by William Emerson; City plan- 
ning in New York city, by F: L. Ackerman; 
Relation between taxation and distribution 
of population, by C: H. IngersoU; Iftdustrial 
congestion, by G: M. Price 

Taxation and housing, by C. B. Fillebrown; 
Housing and the untaxing of buildings, by 
E: R. A. Seligman; Discussion of papers on 
taxation and housing, by E. T. Hartman; 
Land sub-division and its effect upon hous- 
ing, by E: H. Bennett; The causes of bad 
housing, by C: C. Stillman. Nat Real Estate 
J 12:320-7. 339-44 N '15 

Papers and discussion presented at the 
fourth National conference on housing in 
America, Minneapolis, Oct. 6-8. 1915 

Laws 

* New York (state) — Tenement house law and 

chapter 19a of the greater N. Y. charter 
in relation to the tenement house depart- 
ment of the city of N. Y. 89,lxvip '15 Tene- 
ment house dept., N Y. 

Legislation, Proposed 

* Massachusetts — Bill for an act relative to the 

construction, alteration and maintenance of 
buildings used as places of abode. (House 
no 1071) 62p postage 2c Ja 18 '16 Mass. supt. 
of doc. 

Ordinances 

* Building code, part 2, or the housing code of 

the city of Syracuse, adopted December 13, 
1915. 31p '16 Bur. of building, Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

Periodicals 

National housing assn. will only distribute its 
quarterly bulletin Housing Betterment free 
of charge to its members. The annual dues 
are $5 a year and in addition to the bulletin 
members receive the book "Housing prob- 
lems in America" published by the assn. (Jl 
22 '16) 

Rents 

Rents for dwellings fixed by law, W: C. 
Downes. Nat Real Estate J 13:169 An '16 

Synopsis of a bill introduced into the par- 
liament of New South Wales on August 19, 
1915 

Reports 

California. Comm. of immigration and hous- 
ing. 2d anniial report, Jan. 2, 1916. 396p il 



lig. Weight 1 lb. 9 oz. Enclose postage '16 
The Comm., Underwood bldg., San Fran- 
cisco 
Includes reprints of pamphlets 

New Jersey. Board of tenement house super- 
vision. 12th report. 117p '15 The Bd., 9-15 
Clinton st., Newark, N. J. 

New York (state). Comm. to investigate the 
housing of people m cities of the second 
class. Report. (S doc no 25) 29p Ja 21 '15 
N. Y. state lib. 

Recommends empowering the comr. of 
health to appoint a sanitary inspector for 
cities of the second class and, upon refusal 
of local health officers, to remove or remedy 
unsanitary conditions 

[Review of] housing reports. John Ihlder. Nat 
Munic R 5:349-51 Ap '16 

State aid 

Massachusetts — Two bills were introduced in 
the legislature to provide homes for the 
people and to teach them agriculture. Land 
in the suburbs will be sold at its nominal 
value and public instruction given to owners 
on how to get the most out of their holdings. 
Such a plan has been successfully tried in 
Australia and Germany, and has kept down 
land prices and provided whole families with 
comfortable quarters. The bills accompan- 
ied the recommendations of the Homestead 
comm. and the one authorizing the teaching 
of agriculture became chap. 185 of the 1916 
acts (Je '16) 

Surveys 

Bristol, Conn., chamber of commerce has 
appointed a committee to investigate hous- 
ing conditions in the city and to consider 
how to meet the need of additional dwell- 
ings. Com. on social survey, Burlington, Vt., 
under which Udetta D. Brown made her in- 
vestigation of housing conditions, is draft- 
ing a housing code. Dallas, Texas, dept. of 
sanitation, at the request of the state uni- 
versity, has made a housing study of one 
block along Mill creek. It is now proposed to 
appoint a sociological commission to study 
the question of race segregation, including 
a study of social and housing conditions in 
Dallas. Erie, Pa., board of commerce is mak- 
ing a study of housing needs with regard to 
low rent houses. Michigan state housing 
comm. is investigating conditions thruout the 
state (Ja '16) 

Chicago housing conditions: Greeks and Ital- 
ians in the neighborhood of Hull House. 
Natalie Walker, il Am J Soc 21:285-316 N '15 

Henry Phipps institute for the study, treat- 
ment, and prevention of tuberculosis. 11th 
report: a study of the housing and social 
conditions in selected districts of Philadel- 
phia. 89p charts '15 The Institute. 7th and 
Lombard sts., Philadelphia 

Plan for a housing survey. In Cal. Comm. of 
immigration and housing. 2d annual reoort, 
1916, p 293-304 

Providence, 11. I. — Expert survey of housing 
conditions in Rhode Island, with particular 
attention paid to the Providence metropoli- 
tan district, was begun May 1, 1916, by 
John Ihlder, formerly of the National hous- 
ing association. It is expected to have the 
survey and a publication of its results com- 
pleted in time for the conference of the 
National housing association, which is to be 
held in Providence in October. The survey 
is calculated to give a more exact knowledge 
of existing conditions, to carefully note the 
tendencies of home development, and to 
permit the making of recommendations 
based upon a study of the facts revealed 

Report of housing inspections made by thf 
commission, il In Cal. Comm. of immigra- 
tion and housing. 2d annual report, 1916, 
p 205-78 

Fresno, Stockton, T,os Angeles, San Fran- 
cisco are discussed. The Los Angeles inves- 
tigation consisted of a housing and general 
social survey of Macy street school district, 
including Chinatown 

Report on housing conditions in the Oranges. 
E. R. Hall, field sec. 45p il S '15 Civic com- 
mittee, Women's club of Orange, E. Orange, 
N. J. 



122 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Housing — Surveys —Continued 
Survey of the city of Burlington: its chanties 
and its housing conditions. 85p il postage 
oc '15 Com. on social survey, Burlington, Vt. 
Wateroury (Conn.) American, April 20, 1916, 
contains the main features of the report by 
John Nolen on the recent housing survey in 
Waterbury. It is doubtful whether the re- 
port will be published 
Housing, Cooperative. See Cooperative housing 
Housing, IVIunicipal ^ 

Financing English housing. J: Ihlder, Am City 
13:291-8 O '15 
See also Lodging houses, Municipal 
Howe, Frederic C. 
Socialized Germany. *$1.50 '15 Scribner (So- 
cialism) 
Hoxie, Robert Franklin 
Scientific management and labor. *$1.50 '15 
Appleton (Scientific Management) 
Huebner, Grover G. 
Agricultural commerce. *$2 '15 Appleton (Mar- 
keting) 
Hunting. See Game 
Hydrants. See Waterworks — Hydrants 
Hydraulic engineering 

* Water power engineering: the theory, in- 

vestigation and development of water 
powers. D. W. Mead. 2d ed rev & enl 843p 
il *$5 '15 McGraw-Hill book co., inc., 239 
W. 39th St., N. Y. 
Hydroelectric plants 
Combined operation of steam and hydraulic 
power in the Pennsylvania water and power 
company system. J: A. Walls. Am Inst E E 
Pro 34:2299-306 O '15 

Relates the experience of a large hydro- 
electric development on an erratic river, and 
makes a plea for drawing up power con- 
tracts in a fashion to encourage effective 
combined operation of hydroelectric plant 
with customer's existing steam equipment 

* In re applicants: Hydro-electric company of 

West Virginia, and West Virginia develop- 
ment company: brief for remonstrants on 
power dams in public rivers. 280p il '15 
W. Va. pub. serv. comm. 

Pt. 1, Whether the Cheat is a public 
river; pt. 2, Who owns the public waters? 
who has right to regulate? to use? to sell? 
to destroy them? where is the title for these 
purposes respectively? pt. 3, Other related 
and pertinent matters. The conclusion. 
Appendixes contain the hydro-electric act 
of West Virginia, 1913; federal act of June 
23, 1910 

Hydroelectriclty. See Farm power 

Hygiene. See Industrial hygiene; Mental hygiene: 
Military hygiene; Dental hygiene; Physical 
examinations; School hygiene 

I 

Ice 

Regulation 
Kansas — At a regular quarterly meeting of 
the state board of health, held in the city of 
Fredonia, Oct. 4, 1915, resolutions regulating 
the collection of samples and analysis of ice 
for domestic consumption were unanimously 
adopted. The text of the resolutions ap- 
pears in the Kan State Bd of Health Bui 
no 10 p 294 O '15 
Ice cream. See Soda fountains 
Ice patrol 
International ice patrol. P. T. McGrath. R of 
Rs 54:305-8 S '16 
Ice plants, Central 
Economy of ice plants operated from central 
station. Am Soc of Refrigerating Eng J (258 
Broadway, N. Y.) p 57-8 table My '16 n p 
Ice plants, Municipal 
Municipal ice plants. H. J. Cooper. Kan 
Munic 1:1-3 Ag '15 

Address by Hugh J. Cooper, comr. of 
pub. utiUties, Weatherford, Okla., before 
6th annual convention. League of Kansas 
municipalities 



Sandusky, O. — Bond issue referendum provid- 
ing for $100,000 funds to build a municipal 
ice plant has been defeated by nearly two 
to one. Of the 2,047 votes cast, only 758 
favored the measure. The promoters of the 
project declared that ice could be manufac- 
tured and delivered by the city for $5 per ton 
and that a good operating profit could be 
made (Ag '16) 
Identification of criminals. See Crime and crim- 
inals — Identification 

Illegitimacy 

Children act, infant life protection, infant life 
protection visitors. In H. T. Ashby. Infant 
mortality, p 184-93 '15 
Good girl with a first baby, who is not feeble- 
minded, by C. V. Shuman; Girl with a sec- 
ond or third illegitimate child, by H. I. 
Curry, Unmarried mother of border-line 
mentality, by Herman Newman; Case of 
illegitimacy, where mother and baby have 
been dealt with separately, by A. M. Dona- 
hue. In Nat. conf. of charities and cor- 
rection. Proceedings, 1915, p 114-26 
Just flickerings of life. W. D. Lane, il Sur- 
vey 36:157-60 My 6 '16 

Describes the practices of two institutions 
found by the Baltimore vice commission 
that made a business of separating illegi- 
timate babies from their mothers 
Philadelphia municipal court ruled on April 
11, 1916, that the father of a child born out 
of wedlock must support him until he is 
sixteen years ot age; held that as the child 
labor law prevents a child under sixteen 
from working, he must necessarily be sup- 
ported; and as the law devolves the duty of 
support on the father, he must be compelled 
to support the child until he shall have 
reached the age ot sixteen years (Press 
rept) 

Investigations 
U. S. children's bureau is making a study 
of ftiethods of caring for illegitimate chil- 
dren in the state of Massachusetts (F '16) 

Reports 

Court work with illegitimate families. L. S. 
Bryant, chief of women's division of the 
criminal department, tables charts In Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Municipal court. Report, 1915, 
p 54-103 '16 

Illinois high school conference 

Proceedings of the conference, Nov. 18-20, 
1915. Univ of 111 Bui no 15 356p Ja 24 '16 
(High schools — Conferences) 

Illinois. Rivers and lakes commission 

Report on the Illinois river and its bottom 
lands with reference to the conservation of 
agriculture and fisheries and the control of 
fioods. J: W. Alvord and C: B. Burdick. 
141p il maps '15 The Comm., 130 N. 5th 
av., Chicago (ed exhausted) (Rivers — Re- 
ports) 

Stream pollution and sewage disposal in Illi- 
nois with reference to public policy and leg- 
islation, by L. K. Sherman. (Bui no 16) 
D 1 '15 The Commission, Chicago (Sewage 
disposal) 

Illinois. Senate vice commission 
Report. '16 Hon. Barratt O'Hara, lieutenant- 
gov., Springfield, 111. (Prostitution — Reports) 

Illinois municipal league 
Proceedings, 1915. Univ of 111 Bui v 13 no 18 
Ja 3 '16 (Municipal leagues — Conferences) 

Illiteracy 
Illiteracy and democracy. Winthrop Talbot. 

No Am 202:873-8 D '15 
Moonlight schools. C. W. Stewart, founder 
moonlight schools, pres. Kentucky illiteracy 
comm. Survey 35:429-31 Ja 8 '16 
Wiping out illiteracy in Kentucky. W: F. De 
Moss. Illustrated World (Drexel av. & 58th 
St., Chicago) 24:828-32 F '16 15c 

Tells of the work of the illiteracy commis- 
sion and the "Moonlight" schools 
See also Immigrants — Education 

Imbeciles. See Feeble-minded 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



X23. 



Immigrants 

Immigration. In Pa. Dept. of labor and in- 
dustry. 1st annual report, 1913, p 221-75 '15 
An exhaustive study covering a large part 
of the commonwealth and developing two 
important weak spots needing correction: 
first, the lack of rapid acquirement by our 
aliens of the English language and a knowl- 
edge of the fundamental elements of our 
government; second, that there are no sysr 
tematic, scientific and businesslike agencies 
to enable aliens to be placed at labor where 
they will be most efficient as producers for 
the commonwealth, and for the support of 
themselves and families 
Lo, the poor immigrant! F. A. Kellor, Atlan 

117:59-65 Ja '16 
Pittsburgh, Pa.— Special bureau to deal with 
the immigration question in Pittsburgh was 
opened May 1, 1916, by the Civic club of 
Allegheny county. The bureau plans to act 
as a clearing house or central information 
bureau to systematize and bring into co- 
operation the work of the agencies already 
established. The object of the bureau is to 
bring the city to realize its responsibility to 
the immigrant and the value that may be 
added to it by the residence within its limits 
of these foreign-born peoples, and to reach 
out for the immigrant as he comes to the 
city and endeavor to persuade him to take 
advantage of the facilities offered by na- 
tional, state, municipal and private agencies 
to improve and Americanize himself. On 
account of serious labor difficulties and lack 
of funds, the work has not developed as was 
expected 

See also Alien labor; Citizenship; Expatria- 
tion; Insane — Aliens; Italians — Surveys; Jap- 
anese; Woman suffrage 

Americanization 

Americanization. Royal Dixon. 196p *50c '16 
Macmillan 

Americanization: a conservation policy for in- 
dustry. F. A. Kellor. Ann Am Acad 65:240- 

3 My '16 

Americanization by industry, by F. A. Kellor; 
National Americanization, by C. N. Goodwin; 
Report of the committee on immigration of 
the Chamber of commerce of the U. S. A., 
by Frank Trumbull; Night schools for Amer- 
icanizing immigi-ants; National conference 
on Immigration and Americanization; Ad- 
dress of Governor Whitman before the 
Americanization committee in Schenectady. 
Immigrants in Am R 2:15-46, 51-4 Ap '16 

Americanization of our alien workmen: report 
of the committee on immigration of the Nat. 
chamber of commerce. Nation's Business v 

4 no 2 pt 2 p 71, 83 F '16 

Call to national service. 8p Ja 15 '16 Nat. 

Americanization com., 20 W. 34th St., N. Y. 

Tells why the committee was formed, 

what it is, its object, and contains program 

of work, clearing-house agencies 

Difficulties of Americanization, by Caroline 
Hedger; The Levantine Jew, by S. M. Auer- 
bach; Americanizing immigrant homes, by 
Joseph Mayper. Immigrants in Am R 2:26- 
31, 47-60 Jl '16 

National Americanization com. is a body of 56 
American citizens who believe that Ameri- 
canization, a deeper, broader sense of na- 
tionalization, is the need of the hour and 
that it should be a nation-wide movement 
in every hamlet. The committee is con- 
ducting an America first campaign to facili- 
tate the naturalization of foreign-born citi- 
zens, an English language campaign for 
getting immigrants into schools, an efficiency 
campaign to conserve the labor supply and 
lessen labor disturbances, a thrift campaign 
to encourage immigrants to deposit their 
savings, an American standard of living cam- 
paign to Americanize foreign-born women, 
and a citizens' training camp movement as 
a means of bringing together American and 
foreign-born citizens in a patriotic relation- 
ship of loyalty and discipline. Frank Trum- 
bull, chm., 18 W. 34th St.. N. Y. 

Social attitudes of the peasant and the prob- 
lem of his Americanization. Florian Zna- 
niecki. Immigrants in Am R 2:32-8 Jl '16 

Read at the conference of Polish social 
workers, Indianapolis, May 11, 1916 



* ^^^^^^^V'^iT^^^^^L^ ^^^^ to national service. 

F. A. Kellor. 193p Je '16 50c Macmillan 

See also Citizenship; Immigrants— Educa- 
tion 

Bibliography 

* H^,t o.f references on the Americanization of 

the immigrant. U. S. Library of congress. 
^P^l^ . ^ (Typew Cost of copying 20c> 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Bibliography 
I"i™igrant and municipal problems. In W- B 
Munro. Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 372-4 '15 ei^v«"i 

Confepences 

National conference on immigration and Amer- 
icanization, Philadelphia, Jan. 19-20, 1916 
American business and labor in their rela- 
tion to national preparedness, social and eco- 
nomic, were discussed from various angles. 
Colonel Roosevelt spoke on nationalism in 
American business, and Mr. Fahey, president 
of the U. S. chamber of commerce, discussed 
one of the aspects of Americanization, The 
proceedings were not published separately 
but appeared in the April 1916 issue of Im- 
migrants in America Review, p 38-46 

Crime 

Immigration ana crime: report of committee 
G of the Institute. Grace Abbott. J Crim 
Law 6:522-32 N '15 

Education 
Americanization of our alien workmen: report 
of the committee on immigration of the 
nat. chamber of commerce. Nation's Busi- 
ness V 4 no 2 pt 2 p 71, 83 F '16 
* Americanizing a city: the campaign for the 
Detroit night schools, conducted in August- 
September, 1915, by the Detroit board of 
commerce and board of education, under the 
auspices of the National Americanization 
committee and the Committee for immi- 
grants in America. 23p D 15 '15 Nat. Amer- 
icanization com., 20 W. 34th St., N. Y. 
California commission of immigration and 
housing is publishing a series of Immigrant 
education leaflets. No. 1 contains the re- 
sult of an investigation in Los Angeles; no. 
2 gives statistics in regard to evening 
schools in Los Angeles; no. 3 discusses the 
relations between the state and the immi- 
grant and gives statistics on illiteracy. The 
Comm. 525 Market st., San Francisco 
Education of the immigrant: education of 
immigrant adults and evening schools for 
foreigners. F. B. Lenz. Educ R 51:469-77 
My '16 
Immigrant education, il In Cal. Comm. of 
immigration and housing. 2d annual report, 
1916, p 118-96 

Discusses English education, citizenship 
education, labor camp education, home edu- 
cation fqr women 
Night schools for adult aliens at Columbia 
university, the East Side, in the Bronx, 
Brooklyn, Jersey City, Newark, and Pat- 
tei'son, where large numbers of foreign-born 
are found, are recommended by President 
Nicholas Murray Butler in his annual re- 
port to the Columbia university trustees, 
Nov. 1915 
•Night schools for foreigners [in New York 
state cities]. N Y State Bur Municipal In- 
formation Rept no 20 Ip O 12 '15 (Typew 5c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Promoting Americanization. H. V. Boswell. 
Ann Am Acad 64:204-9 Mr '16 

Maintains that the public schools should 
hold special classes for immigrants, espe- 
cially alien mothers 
Recent progress in the education of immi- 
grants. H. H. Wheaton. In U. S. Comr. of 
education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 425-54 '15 

Contains: 1. The problem: 2, Legislation 
affecting immigrant education; 3, Special 
administrative features: 4, Content of Eng- 
lish instruction; 5, Methods of teaching: 6, 
Private agencies and immigrant education; 
7, Special organizations; 8, Adult immigrant 
education in Canada 
—Same. Reprinted. 425-54p '15 U. S. bur. of 
education 



124 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Immigrants— CowfiMMtti f^A^.r^ 

* School and the immigrant. HA. Miller (Cleve- 
land education survey; 102p 16 25c Survey 
com., Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 

Contains: Cleveland as a foreign city; 
School children from non-English-speaking 
homes; Efforts of national groups to preserve 
their languages; Characteristics of national 
groups; Problem of education for the foreign 
children; Adult immigrant and the school 

Your government of t lie United States: mak- 
ing new Americans. World's Work 32.30-3 
My '16 

TeacJiers 

Detroit, Mich.— Institute for evening school 
teachers was held the week of June 5 1916, 
under the auspices of the board of educa^ 
tion. Courses dealt with countries from 
which immigrants come, and their racial 
traits and prejudices, the immigrant as an 
individual, various methods of instruction 
for aliens, necessary qualifications of teach- 
ers and federal regulations, court procedure, 
and assistance to be obtained from city and 
federal officials 

Housing 

Housing and health problems among immi- 
grants. Immigrants in Am R 2:39-46 Ag 16 
Contains: Public health nursing, by Caro- 
line Hedger; Immigrant housing and Amer- 
icanization, by Albion FeUows Bacon; Hous- 
ing and Americanization, by Morris Knowles 

Immigrants in America Review announces a 
prize competition and public exhibition of 
plans, sketches, grouping and arrangement 
for the housing of immigrants in America. 
Prizes are offered by the Roosevelt America 
first fund and are divided into two groups: 
(1) Housing plans; (2) Plan for a railroad 
construction gang boarding car. The first 
prize for group I is $1,000, for group II, $200 
(Ja '16) 

Legal status 

Gentle art of alienating aliens. Elizabeth Read. 
Immigrants in Am R 1:70-9 S 'lo 

Outlines the legal status of the immigrant 
in the various states 

Legislation 
Legislation. In Cal. Comm. of immigration 
and housing. 2d annual report, 1916, p 331-^ 
Brief digests aimed to promote the general 
welfare of the state, particularly with ref- 
erence to immigration problems 

Reports 

* Immigrants' protective league. 6th annual 

report for the year ending Jan. 1, 1915. 35p 
'15 Grace Abbot, sec, 920 Michigan av., Chi- 
cago 
Immigration _ ^ ^^ ^^ 

Immigration after the war. F: C. Howe. Econ 

World n s 12:109-11 Jl 22 '16. 
Immigration, by S. A. Hughes; Value of im- 
migration to the railways, by H. W. Byerly. 
In Railway development assn. Proceedings, 
1915, p 38-40, 57-8 

* India's appeal to Canada or an Account of 

Hindu immigration to the Dominion. A 
Hindu-Canadian. 16p 10c '16 Sec, Canada 
India com., room 3, Richmond St., W., To- 
ronto, Canada 

U. S. chamber of commerce is conducting a 
campaign to obtain reliable information con- 
cerning the probabilities of immigration to 
this country after the close of the European 
war. Circulars have been sent to divisions, 
traveling and city passenger agents of all 
railroads, asking them to co-operate in ob- 
taining information on the subject from the 
subagents in this country of transatlantic 
steamship companies. The data will be 
used in making plans to handle any large 
influx of immigration or increase in emi- 
gration to Europe (D 14 '15) 

U. S. house of representatives passed the 
Burnett immigration bill, with the literacy 
test, March 30, 1916, by a vote of 307 to 
87. The much discussed literacy test pro- 
vides that immigrants over 16 years of 



age must read at least 30 words in some 
language or dialect, including Hebrew or 
Yiddish, chosen by the immigrant. Ex- 
ceptions to this test are made in the case 
of an immigrant's father or grandfather 
over 55 years of age, his wife, mother, his 
grandmother, or his unmarried or widowed 
daughter. Democratic senators in a caucus 
July 31, 1916 voted to postpone action on the 
immigration bill until the next session of 
congress and adopted by a vote 38 & a 
resolution binding all Democratic senators 
to that decision 

Conferences 
National conference on immigration and 
Americanization. Immigrants in Am R 2:39- 
46 Ap '16 

Education test 
Case for the literacy test. The Unpopular Re- 
view (35 W. 32d St., N. Y.) 5:153-70 Ja-Mr 
'16 75c 

* Literacy test for immigrants: a debate, Uni- 

versity of Chicago. 62p bibl $1 '16 Delta 
Sigma Rho. Univ. of Chicago chapter 

Periodicals 
Immigration Journal, a monthly magazine de- 
voted exclusively to immigration and close- 
ly related subjects, W. W. Husband, editor, 
is published by the Immigration journal 
company, Washington, D. C. The first num- 
ber appeared March, 1916. The purpose of 
the Journal is to discuss impartially all 
phases of the problem, including immigra- 
tion after the war and Oriental immigra- 
tion; to present without prejudice current 
information concerning the immigration 
movement and the immigrant as a factor 
in the population of the United States; to 
report the activities of the federal govern- 
ment with relation to immigration and na- 
turalization; the progress of immigration 
legislation in congress; the acts of state 
and municipal governments concerning 
aliens; the work of the various organizations 
interested in immigration and immigrants; 
and court decisions relative to all phases; 
and to support every movement that is sen- 
sibly and honestly directed toward Ameri- 
canizing the immigrants and developing the 
best that is in them. The subscription 
price of the Journal is $1 for the U. S., 
and $1.25 for foreign countries 

Reports 

* California. Comm. of immigration and housing. 

2d annual report. Jan. 2, 1916. 396p il fig 
Weight 1 lb. 9 oz. Enclose postage '16 The 
Comm. Underwood bldg., San Francisco 
Includes reprints of pamphlets 

Restriction 

U. S. supreme court has rendered a decision 
to the effect that an immigrant, individually 
qualifying under the law, cannot be refused 
entrance to this country on the ground that 
there is a surplus of labor in the community 
to which he is bound (Press rept O 27 '15) 
improvements 

Taxation 

* Exempting buildings from municipal taxation; 

for the mayors taxation com. Stewart 
Browne, pres.. United real estate owners 
assn. 8p O 25 '14 Com. on taxation, N. Y. 
Mr. Browne's conclusion is that building 
tax exemption in New York city would be 
ruinous to everyone, because it would revo- 
lutionize everything 

* Exemption of improvements from taxation in 

Canada and the U. S. : a report prepared for 
the com. on taxation of the city of N. Y., 
by R: M. Haig. 291p '15 Com. on taxation, 
N. Y. 

Pt. 1 is an effort to state concisely all 
the available facts which may aid in under- 
standing the system of taxation in force in 
the various cities or throw light upon its 
effects; pt. 2 is devoted to an analysis of 
the material presented in part one; an at- 
tempt is made to summarize the evidence, 
to make comparisons and to draw deduc- 
tions. List of select references, p 281 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



125 



I mprovements — Taxation — Con tinued 
Physical depreciation of buildings as related 
to basis of assessments. W. H. Richardson. 
Nat Real Estate J 13:352-6 Je '16 

Text of a paper presented at a recent 
meeting of the Milwaukee real estate assn. 

* Pittsburgh tax plan. W: N. McNair. 6p '16 

William N. McNair, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

* Some probable effects of the exemption of 

improvements from taxation in the city of 
N. Y. : a report prepared for the com. on 
taxation of the city of N. Y., by R: M. Haig. 
254p '15 Com. on taxation, N. Y. 

An attempt to secure from an analysis of 
the assessment rolls for 1914 as much in- 
formation as possible about the probable 
effects of the adoption of the plan to re- 
duce the tax rate on buildings. The rela- 
tionship of building value to the value of 
improved land in the given assessment sec- 
tion was ascertained; then, a homogeneous 
group of parcels was sought, whose rela- 
tionship of building to land value approxi- 
mated that of the assessment section in 
which it was located 

Statements relative to untaxing of buildings; 
Exhibits relative to untaxing of buildings, 
including questions prepared by the commit- 
tee to be considered in connection with pub- 
lic hearings and briefs submitted on the un- 
taxing of buildings; Testimony taken at 
hearings on the untaxing of buildings; Cor- 
respondence between Delos F. Wilcox and 
Richard M. Hurd. In N. Y. (city). Com. on 
taxation. Final report, p 17-60, 127-376 '16 

The committee recommended that the tax 
on buildings should not be decreased 

Taxation and housing, by C. B. Fillebrown; 
Housing and the untaxing of buildings, by 
E. R. A. Seligman; Discussion of papers on 
taxation and housing, by E. T. Hartman. Nat 
Real Estate J 12:320-7 N '15 

Papers and discussion presented at the 
fourth National conference on housing in 
America, Minneapolis, Oct. 6-8. 1915 

Urban land tax reform schemes, and the so- 
called "Houston plan." J. Runge. Univ of 
Texas Bui 1915 no 39 p 154-64 Jl 10 '15 

Improvements, Municipal. See Municipal im- 
provements 

Income 

Who gets America's wealth? W: E. Walling. 
Intercollegiate Socialist (70 5th av., N. Y.) 
tables v 4 no 2 (Special sup) 14p D '15 Ja '16 

Income tax 

Federal income tax. C. C. Plehn. In Cal. 
state bd. of equalization. Report. 1913-1914, 
p 197-213 
Income tax, Federal 

* Discussion of questions raised by proposed 

amendment of the federal income tax law 
by repealing the collection- at- source provi- 
sions and substituting therefor personal re- 
turn supplemented by a system of informa- 
tion-at-source as recommended in the 
report of the income tax committee of the 
Nat. tax assn. 40p Je '16 Nat. tax assn., 15 
Dey St., N. T. 

Income tax: majority report. In N. Y. (city). 
Com. on taxation. Final report, p 61-72 '16 
Income tax com. recommends a state in- 
come tax 

New income and inheritance taxes for the 
U. S. W: E. Walling. Intercollegiate So- 
cialist (70 5th av., N. Y.) v 4 no 4 section 
2 15p Ap-My '16 10c 

Series of articles by Basil M. Manly, on the 
income tax appeared in the Sacramento 
Star, Toled6 News-Bee, Grand Rapids Press, 
Wisconsin State Journal and Cleveland 
Press simultaneously Ap 27-28, 30, My 1-4 '16 

United States supreme court has declared the 
federal income tax law constitutional. Brus- 
haber v. Union Pacific (Press rept Ja 24 '16) 

United States supreme court has upheld the 
constitutionality of the income tax law, es- 
pecially as applied to the tax imposed on the 
income of mining companies. Counsel 
against the law held that the tax on the 
profits of a mine reduced the actual physical 
value of the property and that it was a 



property tax; court held that even under 
such a contention, the tax would be lawful 
(Press rept F 22 '16) 
^ee also Municipal bonds — Taxation 
Laws 

* Federal income tax law, affecting individuals 

and corporations; with an analysis of the 
act and explanatory notes. L, F. Speer. 11 Ip 
25c Corporation trust CO., Colorado bldg.. 
Washington, D. C. 

* Federal income tax law with features of the 

law and rulings affecting individuals and 
fiduciaries. (1916 ed) 67p '16 Guaranty trust 
CO. of N. Y., 140 Broadway, N. Y. 

Legislation 
France— Income tax law, passed in July, 1914, 
and becoming effective this year, provides 
that every person living in France, whether 
a citizen or a foreigner, must pay a 2 per 
cent tax on the taxable portion of his in- 
come if it amounts to $1,000 or over. The 
taxable portion is 20 per cent of incomes of 
$1,000 to $2,000 a year; 40 per cent of in- 
comes ranging from $2,000 to $3,000; 60 per 
cent of incomes from $3,000 to $4,000, and 
80 per cent of any amount over $5,000. As 
adopted the income tax is additional to all 
others (Ja 20 '16) 
Income tax, State 

* Massachusetts income tax. 57p '16 Old Colony 

trust company, 17 Court st., Boston; National 
tax assn., 15 Dey st., N. Y. 

Contains an article on the Massachusetts 
income tax, by C: J. Bullock; a summary of 
the income tax and the text of the law 

* Next step in tax reform. E. R. A. Seligman. 

22p '15 Nat. tax assn., 15 Dey st., N. Y. 

Presidential address delivered at the ninth 
annual conference of the National tax assn., 
San Francisco, August 11, 1915. Recom- 
mends a state income tax 

* State tax on incomes, 15p Ja '16 National 

Shawmut bank, 40 Water St., Boston 
>Sfcc also Ability tax 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
Massachusetts — Permitting general court to 
impose a classified tax on incomes. Consti- 
tutional amendment. Adopted. Yes 269,871 
No 97,856 N '15 

Legislation, Proposed 
Income tax; Proposed bill. In Mass. Special 
comm. on taxation. Report, 1916, p 37-80, 
107-26 

* Massachusetts — Bill for an act to provide for 

the taxation of incomes. (S 282) 21p Weight 
1 oz Enclose postage '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

Provides for a tax on incomes exceeding 
$1,500 
New York (state)— Prof. Seligman of Colum- 
bia university has suggested a plan for a 
state income tax that favorably impresses 
the legislative committee now conducting 
hearings on the subject of how to increase 
state revenues. He proposes to tax every 
unmarried man with an income of over $1,200 
a year at the rate of 1 per cent up to $2,200, 
1*/^ per cent on incomes between $2,200 and 
$3,200. For married men he exempts from 
taxation incomes up to $1,600, with a further 
exemption of $200 for every child. Up to 
$2,600 he would tax them 1 per cent; be- 
tween $2,600 and $3,600, 1^^ per cent; and 
all incomes above $3,600, 2 per cent flat. His 
plan taxes those incomes that are exempt 
from the federal tax, that is, incomes under 
$2,000 for unmarried persons and under 
$4,000 for married, with a flat rate on all 
over those figures (N '15) 
Indeterminate sentence 
District of Columbia board of charities sug- 
gests in it annual report for 1915, that in- 
determinate sentence, with parole for those 
who give evidence of a desire to reform, 
be provided for persons who are now given 
sentences of from ten to thirty days in 
the workhouse. The board believes that re- 
form is impossible by short sentences, which 
may be often repeated, but that under a 
system of indeterminate sentence incentive 



126' 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Indeterminate sentence— Continued 

to reform is given the prisoner by making 
the length of his sentence depend upon his 
good behavior 

* Indeterminate sentence and parole law: a 

study of eighteen years' operation in Indi- 
ana. A. W. Butler. Indiana Bui Charities 
and Correction Special no lOp Ja '16 
— Same. J Crim Law 6:885-93 Mr '16 
Indeterminate sentence and parole system for 
the department of correction; with discus- 
sion. K. B. Davis. In N. Y. city conference 
of charities and correction. Proceedings, 
1915, p 116-26 '16 
See also Parole 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 

Maryland — Conferring upon the legislature 
power to provide for suspension of sentence, 
indeterminate sentence and parole. Consti- 
tutional amendment. Adopted. Yes 49,338 
No 25,886 N '15 

Legislation, Comparative 

Indeterminate sentence, release on parole and 
pardon: report of committee F of the Amer- 
ican institute of criminal law and criminol- 
ogy. Edward Lindsey. J Crim Law 6:807-14 
Mr '16 

Presents a review of the changes in legis- 
lation 

* National committee on prisons and prison 

labor, Broadway and 116th St., N. Y., issues 
a series of leaflets on various phases of 
prison problems. " First issue, April, 1915, 
contains a table of the laws of the different 
states in regard to sentences, giving char- 
acter of sentence law, when eligible for 
parole, per cent making good 

Indian lands 

United States supreme court has handed down 
a decision to the effect that Northern Pacific 
railroad has no right to the odd sections of 
land along its right of way thru the Spokane 
Indian reservation; held that a treaty signed 
40 years ago granting the disputed lands to 
the Indians as a reservation is still effective. 
The text and the history of the treaty and 
its results appear in the Spokesman-Review 
(Spokane, Wash.) F 20 '16 

Laws 

Indian lands: minerals, reservations, allot- 
ments, classifications, etc; coal, oil, and as- 
phaltum lands, leases. In J. W. Thompson, 
comp. United States mining statutes, an- 
notated, V 2 p 952-1037 '15 

Indiana. Fire marshal 
Report, 1915. '16 (Fire marshals — Reports) 

Indians 

Administration of the Indian office. Munic 
Research no 65 117p sup 13p S '15 $1 

Contains: Report to the joint commission 
of congress to investigate Indian affairs; 
Critical appraisal of present organization 
and methods; Description of present organ- 
ization, methods and procedure 

Indian appropriation bill. P. D. Norton. Cong 
Rec 53:2327-24"-^ F 4 '16 

Speech in the house of representatives, 
Jan. 31, 1916. Contains a detailed statement 
of expenditures, Indian service, 1915 

Indian- white amalgamation: an anthropomet- 
ric study. A. E. Jenks. (Studies in the social 
sciences no 6) 24p 50c Mr 31 '16 Univ. of 
Minnesota library, Minneapolis 

* National protection for Oklahoma Indians: 

dangerous legislation proposed affecting the 
five civilized tribes. (In re H R 108) 7p Ja 
20 '16 Indian rights assn., 995 Drexel bldg., 
Philadelphia 

New York (state)— Governor Whitman desig- 
nated May 13, 1916, as American Indian 
day, and J: H. Finley, state comr. of educa- 
tion, asked all schools to celebrate it by 
appropriate exercises the day before and 
urged all children to spend the day 'itself 
out-of-doors, with special thought of those 
whose hunting grounds they inherit 



* Society of American Indians. Platform of the 

fifth annual conference adopted at Law- 
rence, Kan., Oct. 2, 1915. 4p '15 The Soc, 
106 Barrister bldg., Washington, D. C. 

The society is a national organization of 
Americans 

Conferences 
Indian rights assn. held its 33d annual meet- 
ing in Philadelphia, Dec. 15, 1915. Addresses 
were made by the Rev. Carl E. Grammer, 
pres. of the assn.; Arthur C. Parker, on Ele- 
ments and factors in the Indian problem; 
William A. Brown on the importance of a 
commission for the administration of Indian 
affairs; S. M. Brosius, Matthew K. Sniff en 
and Herbert Welsh. Matthew K. Sniffen, 
sec, 995 Drexel bldg., Philadelphia 

* Lake Mohonk conference on the Indian and 

other dependent peoples. Report of the 33d 
annual conference, Oct. 20-22, 1915. 200p '15 
H. C. Phillips, sec, Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 
Mohonk conference. W: L. Brown. South- 
ern Workman 44:584-9 N '15 

Conference considered the reorganizing of 
the Indian administration 

Education 

Statistics 

* Industrial schools for Indian children: instruc- 

tors and students, 1913-14; property and ex- 
penditures, 1913-14. U S Bur Educ Bui 1915 
no 19 p 38, 74-7 

Presents the statistics of 80 industrial 
schools for Indians; many of the schools 
of this group do not report students of high- 
school grade 

Reports 

* Indian rights assn. Executive com. 33d annual 

report for the year ending Dec. 15, 1915. 102p 
il '15 M. K. Sniffen, 995 Drexel bldg., Phila- 
delphia 

Contains the platform adopted by the 
Society of American Indians at its fifth an- 
nual conference in Lawrence, Kan., Sept. 
28-Oct. 2, 1915, and a r6sum6 of its beliefs 
and wishes 
Industrial accidents. See Accidents, Industrial 
Industrial arbitration. See Arbitration, Indus- 
trial 

Industrial boards and commissions 
Statement addressed to Hon. Charles S. Whit- 
man, governor, upon the failure of the in- 
dustrial commission to enforce the labor 
law, with particular reference to the fire in 
Diamond factory, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 
on Nov. 6, 1915. 73p '16 Nat. consumers' 
league, 289 4th av., N. Y. 
See also Labor bureaus 
Conferences 
Convention of industrial commissioners, Co- 
lumbus, O., April, 1916. Wayne C. Williams 
discussed the Colorado law which provides 
for compulsory investigation of industrial 
disputes, and forces employers or employees 
who wish to change wages or hours to give 
a thirty-day notice to each other and to the 
industrial commission, during which period 
employees cannot strike, nor can employers 
lock them out. The law has been very 
successful in lessening the number of strikes 
and has shown the relative injury due to 
them, while both employers and their men 
agree that it makes for industrial peace and 
has brought them together in a reasonable 
spirit of conciliation 

Legislation, Comparative 
Administration [of labor legislation]. In J: R. 
Commons and J: B. Andrews. Principles of 
labor legislation, p 415-64 '16 

Contains: The executive; The legislature; 
The judiciary; The industrial commission r 
Penalties and prosecutions; Cooperation by 
pressure 

Reports 

* Wisconsin. Industrial comm. Report on allied 

functions for the two years ending June 30, 
1914. 102p Ag 31 '14 

Discusses: Safety in factories, building 
code, boiler code, employment offices, mini- 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



127 



Industrial boards and commissions; — Continued 
mum wage, compulsory education, appren- 
ticeship, arbitration, old age pensions, liquor 
statistics, etc. 

* Wisconsin. Industrial comm. Report on allied 

functions for the year ending June 30, 1915. 
51p O 1 '15 

Industrial cities 

Gary, Ind., big steel trust plant forms a com- 
plete industrial city, which has its own gas 
and waterworks, electric lighting plant, tele- 
phone and telegraph offices and passenger 
and freight traffic system. It has practically 
every branch of government possessed by a 
progressive city. The supt. of the plant, 
William P. Gleason, is mayor and meets 
daily with his cabinet, the 29 higher officials 
of the plant, to discuss the problems of the 
community. A school is conducted, with 
special instruction at noon and night for 
foreigners; there are improved streets, and 
an adequate system of water supply and sew- 

• age disposal. There is no democracy at the 
plant, but the government is not hampered 
by an antiquated charter nor the state leg- 
islature (F 2 '16) 

Industrial town that's fit to live in. J. E. 
Wright, il Am City (T and C ed) 13:388-90 
N '15 

Description of Midland, Pa., founded in 
1906, by the Midland steel company 

Kistler Industrial Village, Pa., is to be laid out 
under the direction of the Mt. Union refrac- 
tories company by John Nolen, landscape ar- 
chitect, for the benefit of employees. Dallas 
News, June 18, 1916, contains an outline of 
the plan as worked out so far by Mr. Nolen 

Morgan park: a beautiful steel-mill town; the 
"model city," built by the Minnesota steel 
company, unique in natural and artificial 
attractiveness; design of houses detailed. 
Iron Age 97:48-52 Ja 6 '16 50c 

♦ Satellite cities: a study of industrial suburbs, 

1915. G. R. Taylor. (Nat munic league ser) 
333p il $1.65 N '15 Nat. munic. league 

Deals with the civic consequences of forc- 
ing factories -to city limits and beyond and 
the opportunity in these outskirts for com- 
munity development in accordance with the 
new science of city planning. Various cities, 
such as Pullman, Granite city, Gary and 
Fairfield are discussed in detail. Jane Ad- 
dams has a* chapter on the Pullman strike, 
and the final chapter describes a practical 
plan for the development and maintenance 
of an efficient community 

Wisconsin-Minnesota light and power com- 
pany has established, near Wissota, Wis., 
a model city, housing over 1,000 persons. 
Provision is made for strict sanitation, ob- 
servance of the Sabbath, the barring of 
liquor, a well- equipped hospital, and educa- 
tional movies (D 13 '15) 

See also War-boom towns; Workmen's 
homes 
Industrial commission, Federal 

New unofficial committee on industrial rela- 
tions has been organized, with Frank P. 
Walsh as chairman. Its purpose is to work 
for the attainment of social and industrial 
justice (N 9 '15) 

See also Industrial unrest 

Reports 

Manly report: an editorial review; summary 
of findings subscribed to by Commissioners 
Walsh, Lennon. O'Connell and Garretson; 
conclusions and recommendations presented 
largely in the words of the report and with- 
out indicating the weight attached to the 
statements by the reviewer. Survey 35:320-3, 
326-33 D 18 '15 

Probing the causes of industrial unrest: re- 
view of reports issued by the U. S. comm. on 
industrial relations. J: A. Fitch. Survey 35: 
317-19, 395-400, 432-4 D 18 '15, Ja 1-8 '16 

Pt. 1, Introductory; pt. 2, The Commons 
report; pt. 3, The tactics of violence 

United States. Commission on industrial re- 
lations. Final report 448p '15 

Report assembles the facts from the rec- 
ords of the public hearings and the reports 
of the investigators, under the direction of 
Mr. Basil M. Manly. Copies may be obtained 
thru congressmen and senators 



Industrial conditions 
Calitornia casual and his revolt. C. H. Par- 
ker. Q J Econ 30:110-26 N '15 
New York state bur. of statistics and infor- 
mation has announced that 1,300 representa- 
tive manufactures in that state, employing 
approximately 500,000 persons, are paying 27 
per cent more in wages than a year ago 
(Ja 25 '16j 

Industrial conferences 

[Proceedings of a conference of the associated 
manufacturers and merchants of New York 
state with five members of the state indus- 
trial commission. Syracuse, March 29, 1916.1 
N. Y. State Industrial Commission Bui v 1 
no 9 p 16-26. 28 Je '16 
W^isconsin commercial and industrial congress, 
Madison, Feb. 14-18, 1916. Addresses were 
delivered on: Unemployment, by J: R. Com- 
mons; Practice of scientific management, by 
F. S. Gilbreth; Some aspects of industrial de- 
velopment in central Wisconsin, by George 
Hambrecht; How national advertising helps 
the retail merchant, by C: L. Benjamin; Eco- 
nomic justification of the middleman, by 
R. S. Butler; Education for business, by W: 
A. Scott; Business and citizenship, by Joseph 
Messerschmidt; Business ideals of a student, 
by H. M. Van Auken; Keeping in touch with 
the university, by E. A. Dettman; Learning 
from hard knocks, by Morris Fox 

Industrial disputes. See Arbitration, Industrial; 
Conciliation; Protocol agreements; Strikes 

Industrial education 
Aims and work of the National society for 
the promotion of industrial education. Cleo 
Murtland. J Home Econ 8:10-16 Ja '16' 

* Building trades. F. L. Shaw. (Cleveland edu- 

cation survey) 107p il 25c '16 Survey com., 
Cleveland found., Cleveland, O. 

Recommends a school giving strictly trade 
courses of two years; and raising of compul- 
sory attendance age to sixteen years 

Effect of technical education upon the leather 
industry: how the tanning industry has bene- 
fited thru the application of science. Allen 
Rogers. Scientific American (233 Broadway, 
N. Y.) 114:14-15 Ja 1 '16 15c 

Experiments in industrial education in New 

York city. Child Labor Bui 5:107-21 Ag '16 

Based on an investigation by Sophie D. 

White, special agent. National child labor 

committee, in February and March, 1916 

Industrial education; Co-ordination of indus- 
trial studies with traditional subjects in the 
high school curriculum. In Boise, Ida. Supt. 
of schools. Special report of the public 
schools, p 71-89 '15 

Industrial education and wages: [replies to 
letters of inquiry to a selected list of em- 
ployers and educators, on the relation of in- 
dustrial training to wages]. In N. Y. (state). 
Factory investigating comm. Fourth report, 
1915, vl p 846-87 

• Industrial education in Columbus, Ga. R. B. 

Daniel. U S Bur Educ Bui 1913 no 25 30p il 
'13 5c U. S. supt. of doc. 

Industry and its educational needs. In J: A. 
Lapp and C. H. Mote. Learning to earn, 
p 60-88 '15 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Local union of the Inter- 
national assn. of machinists has estabUshed 
a school for mechanics, with a completely 
equipped shop that takes work at stand- 
ard rates, paying wages and having working 
hours consistent with the best union con- 
ditions sufficient to make the school self- 
supporting. Two members of the union 
were chosen as instructors and have been 
quite successful in this work. The school 
aims to help not only members who have 
secured work in certain unfamiliar branches 
of the trade, but also to help in Improving 
the best mechanics (Ap '16) 

Relation of industrial commission to industrial 
education. C. H. Crownhart. In Institute or 
teachers [of the] Wisconsin public indus- 
trial, commercial, continuation and evening 
schools. Outlines of lessons. 1915, p 294-8 

Seville, Spain— Chamber of commerce has re- 
cently published a notice to the effect that 
the Junta Central de Patronato de Inge- 
nieros y Obreros has been authorized, by a 
government order of March 27, 1916, to open 
examinations for Spanish persons who are 



128 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Industrial education — Continued 

to be sent abroad to learn various trades. 
Grants are provided for fifteen young men to 
study agriculture, wine making, oil produc- 
ing, and animal husbandry; twelve to learn 
the textile industry, including silk culture, 
cotton growing, and dyeing; seven mechan- 
ics; five electricians; three bookbinders; two 
gold-braid makers and watchmakers; and 
one decorative furnisher 
Sphere of the scientific and technical press in 
relation to technical education and research. 
William Garnett. Illuminating Eng (32 Vic- 
toria St.. London. S. W.) 9:154-66 My '16 Is 
* Training for industrial life. A. E. Dodd. 4p il 
Chamber of commerce of U. S. A. 

Reprinted from The Nation's Business 
for November, 1915 
Training of men for positions in pulp and 
paper mills. R. H. McKee. In Maine. Dept 
of labor and industry. Report, 1913-1914, p 
149-59 '15 

Describes a new pnase of industrial train- 
ing along paper and pulp lines lately under- 
taken by the University of Maine 
A'ocational education and industrial efficiency. 
W: C. Redfield. Nation's Business v 4 no 2 
. pt 2 p 26-8, 43 F '16 

Address before the 4th annual meeting 
of the Chamber of commerce of U. S. A. Feb. 
8-10. 1916 

t^ee also Continuation schools; Corporation 
schools; Indians — Education; Moving pic- 
tures in education; Printing trades; Sales- 
manship — Training; Trade schools; Voca- 
tHonal education 

Conferences 
National society for the promotion of industrial 
education. 9th annual convention, Minne- 
apolis, Jan. 20-22, 1916. Discussion of the 
report on the survey of Minneapolis for dis- 
tribution of the Dunwoody trust fund for in- 
dustrial education was an important feature. 
Program contained addresses on: Some pre- 
dictions as to the future of vocational educa- 
tion based on Massachusetts' experience, by 
David Snedden; Trade union ideals and voca- 
tional education, by Sarah Conboy; Greeting 
from the American home economics associa- 
tion and future cooperation possibilities witli 
the National society, by S. L. Arnold; De- 
partment store as a training school, bv L. W. 
Prince; Short unit courses in the girls' trade 
schools, by H. R. Hildreth; Problems of in- 
dustrial education under public administra- 
tion, by F. V. Thompson; Possibilities and 
accomplishments of trade agreements in in- 
dustrial education, by G: E. Barnett; De- 
velopment of part-time work in New York, 
by A. D. Dean; How the high school can best 
serve industrial education, by A. S. Hurrell. 
Sessions, were devoted to the organization, 
methods, recommendations and special 
phases of the Minneapolis survey, and to 
National aid to vocational education, and 
Training of teachers of industrial subjects; 
sectional meetings, as follows: Industrial 
vocational and trade preparatorv schools. 
Evening vocational schools. Household arts 
as vocational education, Trade and technical 
schools. Industrial part-time and continua- 
tion schools, Training women for wage 
earning 

Home work 
School credit for home work. L. R. Alderman. 
181p il $1 '15 Houghton 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] technical, industrial, 
and vocational schools: elementary and sec- 
ondary. _ U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 

Pre-vocational work 
Curriculum 
Industrial arts: state course of study for the 
pubfic schools of Indiana. Ind Dept of Pub 
Instruction Bui no 19 (Vocational ser no 12) 
43p Ag '15 

Reports 
National assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 
A. Com. on industrial education. Report 
presented at the 21st Annual meeting, New 
York city. May, 1916. 18p '16 The Assn., 
30 Church st., N. Y. 



Report of committee on industrial education. 
In Nat. assn. of manufacturers of the U. S. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 68-87 

Report of committee on transfer of pupils to 
all day industrial school. In Institute of 
teachers [of the] Wisconsin public indus- 
trial, commercial, continuation and evening 
schools. Outlines of lessons, 1915, p 16-20 

Report of the Minneapolis survey for voca- 
tional education. Nat. soc. for the promotion 
of industrial education. (Bui no 21) 697p 75c 
ea or 50c when ordered in lots of 5 or more. 
'16 The Soc, 140 W. 42d et., N. Y. 

State aid 
Vocational education under state control. F. L. 
Glynn. Am Industries (30 Church st„ N. Y.) 
V 16 no 10 p 23-5 My '16 

From an address delivered at the annual 
convention of the Master sheet metal con- 
tractors' assn. of Wisconsin, at Milwaukee, 
March 17, 1916 

Statistics 

* Statistics of certain manual training, agricul- 

tural, and industrial schools, 1913-1914. U S 
Bur Educ Bui 1915 no 19 79p '15 

This bulletin presents the statistics of 479 
manual training schools, agricultural schools, 
and industrial, trade, and vocational schools 
for 1914. It also presents a list of 1,414 public 
high schools having 55,946 students in man- 
ual training, 19,909 in courses in agriculture, 
and 67,521 in courses in domestic economy 

Surveys 

Concerning industrial education. In New Or- 
leans, La. Public schools. Annual report, 
1913-1914, p 107-26 

Survey of industrial education at Gary, In- 
diana. 4p (Mim) My 5 '16 Bd. of education, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Teachers 

iS'ce Teachers' institutes 
Industrial efficiency. See EflSciency, Industrial 

Industrial expositions 

* Industrial exposition, Dayton, O., Jan. 14-22 

1916. The exposition included under one 
roof an automobile show, pure food show, 
machinery hall, building materials show, 
electrical show, flower show, mercantile 
style show, advertising exhibit, business ap- 
pliance show, and a municipal show. Its 
purpose was to display goods made and sold 
in Dayton. Advertising material and the 
rules of the exposition have been issued by 
the assn. 

Industrial hygiene 
Commission supervision of industrial hygiene. 

W. D. Yaple. Am J Pub Health 6:369-73 Ap 

'16 
Conference board of physicians in industrial 

practice. Monthly R v 1 no 6 p 43 D '15 
Heart disease and its industrial relation. 

Warren Coleman. Am J Pub Health 6:452-7 

My '16 
Read before the industrial hygiene section 

of the Am. public health assn., Rochester, 

N. Y., Sept. 9, 1915 
Industrial hygiene. In J. S. McNutt. Manual 

for health officers, p 434-8 '15 
Industrial hygiene: a plan for education in 

the avoidance of occupational diseases and 

injuries. J. W. Schereschewsky. U S Pub 

Health Repts 30:2928-35 O 1 '15 
Industrial hygiene of special processes. E. R. 

Hayhurst. il Ohio Pub Health J 7:25-9, 

154-9 Ja-My '16 
Continued from Dec, 1915, issue 
* Industrial poisons used in the rubber indus- 
try. U S Bur Labor Statistics Bui no 179 

64p il O '15 
Social aspects of industrial hygiene. D. B. 

Armstrong. Am J Pub Health 6:546-53 Je 

'16 

Read before the Industrial hygiene sec- 
tion. Am. Public health assn., Ro(aiester, 

N. Y., Sept. 10, 1915 

See also Dust removal; Mines — Wash 

rooms; Occupational diseases 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



129 



Industrial hygiene — Continued 
Bibliography 
Books and periodicals on accident and dis- 
ease prevention in industry in the library 
of the bureau of labor statistics. 23p '16 
U. S. bur. of labor statistics 

Investigations 

Wisconsin — Dr. Robert Oleson of the U. S. 
public health service is making an official 
study of the question whether fatigue is an 
industrial health hazard for women workers 
in Milwaukee and other Wisconsin cities (Ag 
■16) 

Legislation 

Synopsis of the laws of Pennsylvania relating 
to industrial hygiene. Pa Dept Labor and 
Industry Bui ?:4-7 Ja '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
Safety and health. In J: R. Commons and 
J: B. Andrews. Principles of labor legisla- 
tion, p 295-353 '16 

Contains: Reporting; Prohibition; Regula- 
tion 

Reports 

* Five years' work and progress of the Joint 

board of sanitary control in the cloak, suit 
and skirt, and the dress and waist industries: 
an experiment in industrial self-control, Oct. 
31, 1910-Oct. 31, 1915. (Bui no 7) 15p '15 Joint 
bd. of sanitary control 

Surveys 

* Clinical and sanitary study of the fur and 

hatters' fur trade. N Y City Health Dept 
Bui 5:267-85 O '15 
Industrial relations. See Industrial commission, 
Federal; Industrial unrest; Protocol agree- 
ments 
Industrial research 

American electrochemical society. ■ Meeting 
at Washington, D. C, April 27-29, 1916. 
The questions of industrial research and 
preparedness were particularly considered, 
and speakers emphasized the great value of 
cooperation between the university and the 
professional society, the government and 
the corporation 

Bureau of industrial research, the first such 
institution on the Pacific coast, has been 
established at the University of Seattle, 
Washington, under the direction of Dr. 
Henry K. Benson, professor of industrial 
chemistry. One fellowship dealing with a 
problem of the iron and steel industry and 
amounting to $2,000 has already been es- 
tablished (Je '16) 

Newlands bill and national research. W. R. 
Whitney. Met & Chem Eng 14:621-3 Je 1 '16 

Organization of industrial scientific research. 
C. E. K. Mees. Science n s 43:763-73 Je 2 
'16 

U. S. chamber of commerce is endeavoring to 
establish co-operation between educational 
institutions, industries and government in 
the matter of industrial research. The mat- 
ter has been submitted to a special com- 
mittee to formulate a plan (O 18 '15) 
Industrial surveys 

Industrial survey as a corrective. C: W. 
Lansing. Am City 14:83-5 Ja '16 

Results of industrial survey. In Institute of 
teachers [of the] Wisconsin public indus- 
trial, commercial, continuation and evening 
schools. Outlines of lessons, 1915, p 62-83 

Contains: Methods of making an indus- 
trial survey, by A. R. Graham; Industrial 
survey data: results gained through a partial 
industrial survey made in the city of Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, by A. W. Siemers; Local 
industries and school organization, by L. P. 
Whitcomb 

Surveys and tests. In New York (city). Dept. 
of educ. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1915, p 
130-50 

Contains: A summary of the year's sur- 
veys; Cincinnati survey of the printing 
trades; Business survey of the Minneapolis 
school system; Chicago school survey; Re- 
cent applications of tests 



What is an industrial survey? Wallace Hatch, 
Am City 13:385-6 N '15 

Gives a brief outline for an industrial 
survey 

Bibliography 

* Investigations of industries in New York city 

1905-1915: a list of published reports. H. R. 
Walter. 24p 10c My '16 Com. for vocational 
scholarships, Henry Street settlement. 205 
Henry st., N. Y.; Com. on women's work. 
Russell Sage found. 

* List of references on industrial surveys. U. S. 

Library of congress. 3p Ja 13 '16 (Typew 
Cost of copying 15c> 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Individual surveys 
Chicago, III.— Western efficiency society, co- 
operating with the College of commerce and 
administration. University of Chicago, is un- 
dertaking an industrial survey of Chicago. 
Four questionnaires have been prepared 
dealing with the subjects of purcnasing, stock 
handling, organization and time and motion 
study, including methods of wage payment. 
The questionnaires are to be circulated thru 
the medium of personal calls by univer- 
sity students, who will receive college cred- 
its for their work. Copies of the survey will 
be furnished to all members of the society, 
to all firms contributing information to be 
used in these reports and copies to be used 
for text books by the university. No general 
distribution will be made. The Soc, 327 La 
Salle St., Chicago (Ag '16) 

* Industrial conditions in Springfield, 111.: a sur- 

vey by the committee on women's work and 
the department of surveys and exhibits of 
the Russell Sage foundation. L. C. Oden- 
crantz and Z. L. Potter. (Springfield survey: 
Industrial section) 173p il 25c Je '16 Dept. of 
surveys and exhit)its, Russell Sage found. 

Industrial education [in Buffalo]. In N. Y. 
(state). Dept. of educ. Examination of the 
public school system of the city of Buffalo, 
p 153-67 '16 

Industrial Hoboken. R. D. Wyatt. Hoboken Bd 
of Trade Bui (Hoboken, N. J. $1 a year) 
V 5 no 3 p 1-7 Je '16 

Industrial survey. U S Bur Labor Statistics 
Bui no 162 p 31-326 '16 

Report of the industrial survey made in 
connection with the vocational education 
survey of Richmond, Va. 

* Industrial survey of Cincinnati: vocational 

section; printing trades. 141p 55c F '15 Cin- 
cinnati chamber of commerce 

Findings of this survey show that the 
trade is suffering from a lack of proper 
training of beginners; that the shop should 
train in manipulative skill and for the most 
part in trade knowledge; that the school 
should supplement the work in the shop. It 
gives constructive recommendations for vo- 
cational education for printers 

New York (city) bd. of estimate has provided 
for a general survey of industrial conditions 
with reference to the development of voca- 
tional training in the public schools. The 
action was taken In response to a request 
from the Conference of organized labor on 
vocational training, which contends that 
pupils should be informed of wages and op- 
portunities in the various trades before mak- 
ing a permanent choice of vocation, and 
that without this supervisory direction of 
vocational training hundreds will be gradu- 
ated into overcrowded and underpaid trades. 
A recommendation has been made to the 
board of aldermen to make a special reve- 
nue issue to raise the required funds, and 
to the mayor to appoint a general survey 
committee to have power to expend the ap- 
propriation in a survey of industrial edu- 
cation. Report will not be ready until 1917 

San Francisco chamber of commerce has been 
working for the past six months thru a 
special committee in preparation for a sci- 
entific, unbiased and non-political industrial 
survev of San Francisco and the bay region. 
Dr. B. M. Rastall has been secured to col- 
laborate the data that the information and 
statistical department of the chamber has 
been gathering for the past two years. The 
chamber of commerce is preparing a map 



130 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Industrial surveys — ^Individual surveys — Cont. 
of San Francisco on a scale of 100 ft. to 
1 in. and there are 27 sections 6 ft. square 
covering the industrial district of the city 
alone. A prospective manufacturer can be 
furnished with information as to the cost, 
size, rent, taxes, insurance, interest, the 
owner and other data relative to available 
factory sites and buildings. For the past 
year data have been gathered as to the com- 
parative cost of factory sites, transporta- 
tion, taxes, insurance, labor, rent, leases, 
raw materials, light, heat and power in the 
Pacific coast manufacturing centers. General 
functional outline of the survey is as fol- 
lows: Stage of development; Industrial 
analyses; Civic and social analyses; and 
Government analyses Jl '16 
Seattle chamber of commerce, the United 
States bureau of foreign and domestic com- 
merce, and the Manufacturers' assn. of Seat- 
tle are making an industrial survey of 
Seattle and vicinity (Ja 31 '16) 
Social science dept. of Fargo college, Fargo, 
N. D., is conducting a labor and industrial 
survey, some phases of which may be pub- 
lished soon (D 9 '15) 
U. S. bur. of foreign and domestic commerce 
has transmitted instructions to American 
consular and commercial representatives in 
foreign countries, calling for exhaustive re- 
ports on industrial organization and the re- 
lations between industry and government, 
the reports to cover business organizations, 
manufacturing and producing efficiency, mer- 
chandising methods, business and industrial 
laws; special instructions call for reports on 
the "cartel" system of business organization. 
The data will form the basis for a thoro 
investigation of industrial and business sys- 
tems thruout the world undertaken by the 
federal trade comm., with the co-operation of 
the bureau. The reports will also be avail- 
able for use by the bureau and commission 
in efforts to extend the foreign trade of the 
U. S. The trade comm. also plans a sup- 
plementary world-wide inquiry thru squads 
of special investigators ( O 4 '15) 

Industrial towns. See Industrial cities 

Industrial unrest 

* An erroneous view-point. J: E. Bennett. 18p 

John E. Bennett, 1310 Humboldt bank bldg., 
San Francisco, Gal. 
Business man's reflections on labor problems, 
by an arbitrator. Am J Soc 21:446-57 Ja '16 
The writer, an official in a large manu- 
facturing corporation, until recently has paid 
no attention to academic theories. His own 
observations of industrial unrest have lately 
led him into the courses of thinking indi- 
cated in this paper. As an index of reac- 
tions among men of his type the discussion 
is important 

* Industrial unrest. J: E. Bennett. 70p John E. 

Bennett, 1310 Humboldt bank bldg., San 
Francisco, Cal. 
Industrial workers to the number of 497,800, 
at the end of April, 1916, were involved in 
strikes or labor discussions involving wage 
increases or shorter hours of labor (Press 
rept) 

See also Arbitration, Industrial; Concili- 
ation; Guilds; Industrial commission. Fed- 
eral; Trade agreements 

Reports 

In a special report on economic causes of in- 
dustrial unrest made by E. Jett Lauck to 
the U. S. comm. on industrial relations, Mr, 
-Lauck enumerates the causes of the present 
industrial unrest and outlines the funda- 
mental problem of developing better indus- 
trial relations and a larger measure of 
industrial peace, as follows: equity in the 
distribution of industry by proper regula- 
tion of the corporation organization of 
industry; industrial education for the devel- 
opment of productive efficiency; the adop- 
tion of better agricultural methods of pro- 
duction and distribution and the reduction 
of wasteful habits of consumption among all 
classes of population. It is not certain that 
the report will be published (D 18 '15) 



Manly report: an editorial review; summary 
of findings subscribed to by Commissioners 
Walsh, Lennon, O'Connell and Garretson; 
conclusions and recommendations presented 
largely in the words of the report and with- 
out indicating the weight attached to the 
statements by the reviewer. Survey 35:320-3, 
326-33 D 18 '15 

National erectors' assn, and the International 
assn. of bridge and structural ironworkers. 
Luke Grant. 192p '15 U. S. comm. on 
industrial relations 

The report points out that application of 
physical force will neither establish nor 
maintain just and fair relations between 
employers and employees; that they must 
get together with the idea of making con- 
cessions on both sides. The facts unearthed 
tend to prove that in the bitter fight be- 
tween the steel workers and the employers 
both sides were equally to blame 

Probing the causes of industrial unrest: re- 
view of reports issued by the U. S. comm, 
on industrial relations. J: A. Fitch. Survey 
35:317-19, 395-400, 432-4 D 18 '15, Ja 1-8 '16 

Pt. 1, Introductory; pt. 2, The Commons 
report; pt, 3 The tactics of violence 

United States. Commission on industrial rela- 
tions. Final report. 448p '15 

Report assembles the facts from the rec- 
ords of the public hearings and the reports 
of the investigators, under the direction of 
Mr. Basil M. Manly. Copies may be ob- 
tained thru congressmen and senators 
Industrial welfare. See Social legislation; Wel- 
fare work (in industry) 
Industry 

Industrial commission has been appointed in 
France for the study of plans for the re- 
habilitation of its industries affected by the 
war. In Germany, an organization, headed 
by Dr. Dernberg, has been formed for the 
development of plans for a trade conquest 
of South America after the war shall have 
ended (Ap 8 '16) 

Newark, N. J. — Manufacturers' and merchants' 
taxation league, with headquarters in New- 
ark, is actively at work advocating legisla- 
tion that will encourage industry, reduce 
rents and make it easier to establish and 
maintain a business or a home in New 
Jersey. The league is urging the exemp- 
tion of machinery, merchandise and house- 
hold goods from taxation, the reduction of 
the tax on buildings and an increase in the 
tax on land similar to the plan adopted in 
Pittsburgh and Scranton, Pa. (Ja '16) 

See also Efficiency, Industrial; Government 
regulation of industry; Home labor; Labor; 
Welfare work (in industry); also names of 
various industries 
Inebriates 

Inebriate hospitals: an historical note. T. D. 
Crothers. Medical Record (51 5th av,, N, Y.) 
88:873-5 N 20 '15 15c 

Inebriety and crime. G. M. Linthicum, In Nat- 
conf. of charities and correction. Proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 407-11 

• Modern treatment of inebriety, I, H, Neff. 

463-71p '14 Irwin H. Neff, supt., Norfolk 
state hospital, Pondville, Mass. 

Reprinted from Proceedings of the Amer- 
ican medico-psychological assn., 70th annual 
meeting, Baltimore, Md., May 26-29, 1914 
National wholesale liquor dealers' association, 
at their 21st annual convention at Louis- 
ville, Ky., May 9-11, 1916, launched a cam- 
paign against drunkenness 

* Practical treatment of inebriety in a state in- 

stitution. L H. Neff. (Reprints 1915 no 39) 
lip '15 8c Nat. conf. of charities and correc- 
tion 

— Same. In Nat, conf, of charities and correc- 
tion. Proceedings, 1915, p 398-407 

Report of the com. on industrial sanitation of 
the Am. medical assn. holds that employers 
can finally solve the problem of drunkenness 
by refusing employment to the alcoholic (Je 
14 '16) 

Farms 
New policy towards drunks and vagrants. 
Max Watson. Nat Munic R 4:621-6 O '15 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



131 



Infant mortality 

• American medical assn. has issued a standard 

score card for babies and an anthropo- 
metric table for male and female children 
from six to forty-two months old based on 
the measurements of three thousand, four 
hundred and forty-eight normal babies in 
twenty-three states 

♦ Infant mortality. H. T. Ashby. (Cambridge 

pub health ser) 229p $3.25 '15 Putnam 

Discusses the meaning, distribution and 
causes of infant mortality, the effects of bad 
housing, alcohol and the employment of mar- 
ried women, and some ways in which infant 
mortality can be lowered, including better 
milk, ante-natal hygiene, notification of 
births act, protection of illegitimate children, 
education of girls in domestic science and 
the regulation of the sale of foods and drugs 
for infants. Purpose of the book is to try 
thruout the country to awaken more interest 
in the prevention of infant mortality. The 
practical side of the question has been kept 
in view thruout, all purely medical and tech- 
nical details being omitted 

Infant mortality and the population. A. V. 
Johnson. Dubhn R (17 S. Broadway, St. 
Louis; 158:324-35 Ap '16 

Influence ot economic and industrial condi- 
tions on infant mortality. H: H. Hibbs, jr. 
Q J Econ 30:127-51 N '15 

Influence of prenatal conditions on infant 
mortality. H: H. Hibbs, jr. In Southern 
sociological congress. New chivalry: health; 
proceedings, 1915, p 176-90 

Mother and infant mortality. H: H. Hibbs, jr. 
Am Statis Assn n s 113:66-79 Mr '16 

Other factors in infant mortality than the milk 
supplv and their control. G. L. Meigs. Am J 
Pub Health 6:847-53 Ag '16 

Read before the Public health administra- 
tion section of the Am. public health assn., 
Rochester, N. Y., Sept. 10, 1915 

Present position of infant mortality: its recent 
decline in the U. S. H. H. Hibbs, jr. Am 
Statis Assn 14:813-26 D '15 

Recent public health work in the United States 
especially in relation to infant mortality. 
J. S. Neff. Am J Pub Health 5:965-81 O '15 
References, p 980-1 

Baby weeks 

* Baby- week campaigns: suggestions for com- 

munities of various sizes. (Misc ser no 5, 
Bur pub no 15) 64p '15 U. S. children's bur. 

General federation of women's clubs, acting in 
cooperation with the federal children s bu- 
reau, designated March 4-11, 1916, as Baby 
week. The object was to give parents an 
opportunity to learn facts in regard to the 
care of babies and to emphasize the need of 
permanent work for their welfare. Wiscon- 
sin proposed a statewide campaign to place 
emphasis on adequate nursing care and in- 
struction of prospective mothers; North Da- 
kota held as essay contest in the public 
schools. Child welfare exhibits were pre- 
pared by women's clubs in Omaha and Lin- 
coln. In Manila and on two of the Indian 
reservations, conferences on baby welfare 
were held. Boston, San Francisco, Washing- 
ton and other large cities prepared pro- 
grams. New York and Milwaukee observed a 
baby week later in the spring 

"Good fare, good care and fresh air for every 
Pittsburgh baby." E. G. Routzahn. il Am 
City 13:415-8 N '15 

Describes baby week in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
June 27-July 3, 1915 

—Same. Am City (T and C ed) 13:415-8 N '15 

Conferences 

American assn. for the study and prevention 
of infant mortality. Convention, Milwaukee, 
Wis., Oct. 19-21, 1916. Program includes a 
discussion of measles and pertussis, a sym- 
posium on governmental activities and vital 
and social statistics in regard to infant wel- 
fare, and discussion of public school educa- 
tion for the prevention of infant mortality 
and of nursing and social work in rural 
communities. The Assn., 1211 Cathedral 
St., Baltimore, Md. 



* American assn. for study and prevention of 

infant mortality. Transactions of the 6th 
annual meeting, Philadelphia, Nov. 10-12, 
1915. 474p $3 Weight 1 lb 7 oz Enclose post- 
age '16 The Assn., 1211 Cathedral St., Bal- 
timore, Md. 

Contains the following topics: Are babies 
worth saving? infant welfare work: its pur- 
poses, opportunities and agencies, by Homer 
Folks, pres. ; Pediatrics; Obstetrics; Eco- 
nomic aspects of infant welfare. Eugenics; 
Care of homeless babies; Nursing and social 
work; Report of the committee on prenatal 
care records; Reports of affiliated societies 

Institutions 

Care of dependent infants in boarding homes, 
by E. ' D. Solenberger; Discussion: infant 
mortality, by J. H. M. Knox. In Nat. conf. 
of charities and correction. Proceedings, 
1915, p 126-34 

* Infant mortality in institutions, Philip Van 

Ingen. (Reprints 1915 no 41) 7p 7c Nat. con- 
ference of charities and correction 

Reprint from the Proceedings of the 42d 
annual meeting of the National conference 
of charities and correction 
— 8ame. In Nat. conf. of charities and cor- 
rection. Proceedings, 1915, p 126-31 

Reports 

* 44th annual report of the Local government 

board, 1914-1915; supplement containing a 
report on maternal mortality in connection 
with childbearing and its relation to infant 
mortality. 7s 6d '16 King 

Statistics 
Some statistics regarding infant mortality; 
with discussion. W. H. Price. In Interna- 
tional assn. of dairy and milk inspectors. 
Third annual report, 1914, p 95-104 
*■ Statistical report of infant mortality survey 
of U. S. cities. Ip N. Y. milk com., 105 E. 
22d St., N.. Y. 

. Contains a table showing infant mortality 
statistics for 144 U. S. cities for the past 
two years; a chart showing comparative 
infant mortality rates in U. S. cities, 1915; 
and a table showing by year the city having 
the lowest and the city having the highest 
infant mortality rate and per cent of deaths 
under one year of total deaths for the cities 
reporting 

Surveys 

* Infant mortality: results of a field study in 

Johnstown, Pa., based on births in one cal- 
endar year. Emma Duke, pi tables U S 
Children's Bur Pub no 9 (Infant mortality 
ser no 3) 93p '15 

United States children's bureau assigned ten 
trained women agents to the house-to-house 
visiting for the bureau's study of infant 
mortality in Baltimore. It was expected 
that 1,204 mothers would be visited during 
the four weeks beginning Feb. 15, 1916 
Infantile paralysis 

City, state and federal agencies are uniting 
over the country to curtail the spread of in- 
fantile paralysis. Experts are studying the 
disease and making experiments, altho to a 
certain extent they feel they are working in 
the dark, for they only know certain media 
by which the disease is transmitted. New 
York and Brooklyn have had the largest 
number of cases and every effort has been 
made to check the disease from spreading to 
other communities. A report from all states 
shows about 12,000 cases. Total number of 
deaths in New York city, 2,260 on Sept. 27, 
1916 

Control of the next epidemic of infantile paral- 
ysis. F. Bobbins, bibl Med Rec 90:328-30 
Ag 19 '16 

Health News for Aug. 1916, is an Acute an- 
terior poliomyelitis number. Contains: Na- 
ture, manner of conveyance and means of 
prevention of infantile paralysis; Treatment 
of infantile paralysis; List of cases of in- 
fantile paralysis in New York state (exclu- 
sive of New York city) 

* Infantile paralysis: cause, cure and preven- 

tion. Edmund Neiswanger. 16p 25c '16 
R. E. Sherwood, 19 John st., N. Y. 



132 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Infantile paralysis— Continued 

Infantile paralysis: its nature, manner of con- 
veyance and means of prevention. Simon 
Flexner. Sci Am Sup 82:82-3 Ag 5 '16 
Nature, manner of conveyance and means of 
prevention of infantile paralysis. Simon 
Flexner. Science n s 44:73-81 Jl 21 '16 

Substance of an address before New York 
academy of medicine, July 13, 1916 

* — Same. 20p '16 Rockefeller institute for medi- 

C3.1 rGSGfirch N^. Y. 
Summer play 'in spite of an epidemic. Wanda 

Greineisen. Survey 36:501-2 Ag 12 '16 
Treatment of infantile paralysis with especial 

reference to the earlier stages. R. W. Lov- 

ett. Econ World n s 12:311-13 S 2 '16 

Conferences 

State health officers and representatives of the 
U. S. Public health service held a conference 
in Washington Aug. 17-18, 1916 to discuss the 
infantile paralysis situation. A report was 
adopted containing a set of rules intended to 
check the interstate spread of the disease. 
As a first step the report recommends that 
the situation should be put in the hands of 
the U. S. Public health service 

Reports 
Report on infantile paralysis. Science n s 44: 
234-5 Ag 18 '16 

Report made to the N. Y. comr. of health 
Infants 

Care and hygiene 

* Kansas State Board of Health Bulletin for 

June, 1916, is a child hygiene number. Con- 
tains the first annual report of the division 
of child hygiene, outline for the study of 
child welfare, bibliography, etc. il 375-420p 
'16 The bd., Topeka, Kansas 
Nursing and social work. In Am. assn. for 
study and prevention of infant mortality. 
6th annual meeting. Transactions, 1915, p 
279-356 '16 

Bibliograpliy 

* Baby's rights, from birth to third year: a list 

of some of the best books for mothers and 
nurses. Free public lib., Newark, N. J. 12p 
10c '15 Wilson 

Pt. 1, Baby's health; pt. 2, Motherhood; pt. 

3, Helping the baby to play and to learn; pt. 

4, The baby's surroundings; pt. 5, The baby's 
mind 

* List of books and pamphlets on Infant wel- 

fare. E. L. Bascom and D. R. Mendenhall, 
comps. 8p '16 Wis. lib. comm. 

Placing In homes 

Scheme of state control for dependent infants. 
H: D. Chapin. Medical Record (5th av., 
N. Y.) 89:1081-4 Je 17 '16 15c 

Advocates boarding homeless babies out in 
the surrounding country 
Infectious diseases 

Communicable disease. In J, S. MacNutt. 
Manual for health officers, p 101-295 '15 

Discusses various diseases and the meth- 
ods to combat them. Classifies diseases ac- 
cording to the way in which they are spread 

Communicable diseases. In C: V. Chapin. Re- 
port on state public health work, p 97-135 
'16 

Diseases due to infection through the alimen- 
tary tract; Diseases due to infection through 
the respiratory tract; Insect-borne diseases. 
In P. M. Ashburn. Elements of military hy- 
giene, p 223-311 '15 

* Infectious diseases: their administrative con- 

trol in different cities of the U. S. S. D. Hub- 
bard. (Reprint ser no 35) 20p O '15 Dept. of 
health, N. Y. 

Is the control of measles and whooping-cough 
practicable? F. G: Curtis. Am J Pub Health 
6:265-8 Mr '16 

Read at a general session of the Ameri- 
can pub. health assn., Rochester, N. Y.. 
Sept. 10, 1915 

Need of better control of some neglected con- 
tagious diseases. J. E. Lane. Am J Pub 
Health 6:244-53 Mr '16 

Read before the New Haven medical assn., 
Sept. 15, 1915 



Part played by hospitals in the control of 
contagious diseases. R. J. Wilson. Am J 
Pub Health 6:261-4 Mr '16 

Read before a general session of the 
American pub. health assn., Rochester, 
N. Y., Sept. 10, 1915 
Principles of administrative control of com- 
municable diseases in large cities. J: S. Bil- 
lings. Am J Pub Health 5:1204-8 D '15 
*— Same. N Y City Dept Health Bui no 46 
(Reprint ser) 7p Ap '16 
Recent advances in our knowledge of the in- 
fectious diseases. Aaron Arkin. Am J Pub 
Health 6:323-33 Ap '16 

Read before section on public health of 
Southern medical assn., on Nov. 9, 1915, at 
Dallas, Texas 

See also Disinfection and disinfectants; 
Food handlers — Infectious diseases; Infantile 
paralysis; Sexual diseases; Towels; Vac- 
cination; also names of various diseases 

Carriers 

Disease carrier on train and steamboat. 
W. A. Sawyer, In Am. academy of medi- 
cine. Medicine an aid to commerce: pro- 
ceedings, 1915, p 180-8 '16 

Transportation of insects, with special ref- 
erence to disease carriers; with discussion, 
by V. L. Kellogg. In Am. academy of medi- 
cine. Medicine an aid to commerce: proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 198-211 '16 

See also Food handlers; Typhoid fever — 
Typhoid carriers 

Laws 

[Sections of the public health law of the state 
of New York governing the quarantine ser- 
vice of the port of New York.] In N. Y. 
(state). Health officer of the port of New 
York. Annual report, 1916, p 325-37 '16 

Notification 
Registration of communicable diseases with 
special reference to the out of town case. 
F. M. Meader. Am J Pub Health .5:1238-41 D 
'15 

Read before the American public health 
association, Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1, 1914 

Ordinances 

* Milwaukee, Wis. — Ordinance requiring dealers 

to report to the commissioner of health all 
sales of diphtheria antitoxin and smallpox 
vaccine. (Ord 207 Passed Ja 3 '16) Ip City 
clerk. Milwaukee 

Ordinances 

* St. Louis, Mo. — Ordinance relating to infec- 

tious and contagious diseases, defining the 
duty of the health commissioner, physicians, 
etc., relative to such diseases. (Ord 28832 
Approved Je 6 '16) 16p St. Louis munic. ref. 
lib. 

Reports 

* New York (state). Health officer of the port 

of New York. Annual report [with quaran- 
tine laws and regulations]. 363p il '16 

Statistics 

Notifiable diseases: prevalence during 1914 in 
cities of 10,000 to 100,000; cases reported, 
case rates per 1,000 population, and fatality 
rates per 100 cases. U S Pub Health Repts 
30:3389-3417 N 19 '15 

Data were obtained from the health de- 
partments of the respective cities 

Inflammable liquids 

Storage, sale and handling of gasoline and ex- 
plosives; with discussion. R. W. Wallace. 
In Fire marshals' assn. of North America. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 77-87 

Ordinances 
* New York (city) — Code of ordinances relating 
to garages, dry cleaning and dry dyeing es- 
tablishments, motor vehicle repair shops, 
mineral oils, inflammable mixtures, combus- 
tible mixtures, paints, varnishes and lac- 
quers. (Extracts from chap 10) 64p '15 Bur, 
of fire prevention, N. Y. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



133 



Inflammable liquids— Continued 

Rules and regulations 

• National bd. of fire underwriters. Regulations 

for the Installation of containers for hazard- 
ous liquids (storing and handling); recom- 
mended by the Nat. fire protection assn. 23p 
15 

• Wisconsin. Fire marshal. Regulations gov- 

erning the storage of volatile liquids and of 
explosives. Ip F 1 '16 
Inflammable mixtures 

• Inriammability of mixtures of gasoline vapor 

and air. G. A. Burrell and H. T. Boyd. U S 
Bur Mines Tech Pa 115 18p il '15 
Information bureaus 

American Library Association Bulletin for 
March, 1916, under the caption of Sponsors 
for knowledge, gives a list of authorities on 
different subjects who will be responsible 
for information in tneir particular field. 
G, W. Lee, librarian. Stone and Webster 
Corp., Boston, is responsible for the idea. 
These lists, by subject, will be printed in the 
bulletin occasionally as additions are made 

Chicago Daily News has established an in- 
formation bureau in Washington from 
which to disseminate facts about the gov- 
ernment and knowledge collected by gov- 
ernment agencies. The service is tree to 
all readers (April '16) 

International society for intercommunication 
under the direction of Eugene F. McPike, 
1200 Michigan av., Chicago, has been organ- 
ized. It is devoted to the promotion of 
ways and means to facilitate the interchange 
of useful information. An official magazine 
is published monthly, which contains the 
addresses of members and an indication of 
their individual pursuits or chosen depart- 
ments of study. Fee for membership is $3 
a year (Je 1916) 

Springfield Union (Springfield, Mass.) has es- 
tablished a free information bureau at 
Washington, D. C:, for the purpose of an- 
swering readers' inquiries in regard to all 
lines of government activities (My 20 '16) 

ISee ulso Accidents, Industrial — Prevention 
— Information bureaus; Legislative refer- 
ence work; Municipal reference work; 
School service bureaus 
Inheritance tax, Federal 

California, with twenty other states, is pro- 
testing against bills in congress providing 
for a federal inheritance tax. It is felt that 
such a matter should be left to the states, 
for it would be difficult to devise a system 
equally applicable to each state. In those 
states where an inheritance tax is now col- 
lected, interference by the government in a 
successful system is strongly opposed (My 
14 '16) 

New income and inheritance taxes for the 
U. S. W: E. Walling. Intercollegiate So- 
cialist (70 5th av., N. Y.) v 4 no 4 section 2 
15p Ap-My '16 10c 
Inheritance tax, State 

Georgia supreme court has handed down a de- 
cision in which it upholds the constitution- 
ality of the inheritance tax law, on the 
ground that the tax is not upon property, 
but upon the right to receive property trans- 
mitted to one by devise, inheritance or deed, 
intended to take effect in possession or en- 
joyment after the death of the grantor or 
donor (Press rept Ja 18 '16) 

[Rules for construction of inheritance tax 
statutes: case-note to In re Ulmann's es- 
tate.] Ann Cas 1915C 322 

Wisconsin — U. S. supreme court handed down 
a decision on April 10, 1916, holding that 
securities and similar properties owned by 
a resident of Wisconsin are subject to the 
state inheritance tax law, even though the 
property has never been brought within the 
state; held that personal property, such as 
securities, follows the owner and is taxable 
at his domicile. George BuUen v. State of 
Wisconsin (Press rept) 

Conferences 

Transfer tax attorneys and appraisers of New 
York state. Conference at the office of the 
state controller in New York city, April 14- 



lo, 1916. The purpose of the conference was 
to discuss every feature of the transfer tax 
law with the object of making some radical 
amendments and submitting them to the 
legislature at the 1917 session 

Laws 

* California— Inheritance tax laws in effect Au- 

gust 8, 1915, with digest of previous laws. 
62p '15 Cal. state controller 

* Rhode Island— Inheritance tax act of 1916. 24d 

R. I. leg. ref. bur. 

Reports 

Special report on new sources of revenue. In 
Rhode Island. Bd. of tax comrs. Fourth an- 
nual report, 1916, p 41-80, 91-106 

Contains the history and analysis of in- 
iieritance tax laws in the various states, a 
proposed act, and tables giving a brief re- 
sum6 of the inheritance tax laws of the 
several states and territories of the U. S., 
showing classes, rates and the amount of 
exemptions 
Initiative and referendum. See Referendum 
Injunctions 

Chicago, 111. — Circuit court of Cook county has 
issued against striking tannery workers an 
injunction prohibiting them to utter any 
word or print any line that can be construed 
as interfering with or as attempting to in- 
jure the business of their former employers. 
The workers, well organized and associated 
with the Chicago federation of labor, are 
striking against a wage of $7 a week for a 
twelve hour day in a very hazardous occu- 
pation (Press rept Je 4 '16) 

Massachusetts supreme court, May 19, 1916, 
declared unconstitutional a state law pro- 
viding that judges cannot issue injunctions 
in labor disputes unless it is apparent that 
irreparable damage will be caused by their 
failure to act (Press rept) 

Bibliography 

Select list of references on the legal aspect 
of trade unions, boycotts, injunctions, pick- 
eting, etc. U. S. bur. labor statistics. 4p 
Ja 18 '16 (Typew 20c) 
Insane 

* How the state provides for its mentally ill. 

L. V. Briggs. 17p '16 Mass. state bd. of 
insanity 

Delivered at the dept. of clinical research 
in preventive medicine, Evans memorial, 
Boston, March 28, 1916 
Protection of the person and the property of 
the insane. F: A. Fenning. il Case & Com 
22:993-6 My '16 

* The state as alienist. Homer Folks. 16p 

Postage 2c '16 State charities aid assn.. 105 
PI 22d St.. N. Y. 

An impartial review of 25 years of state 
care of the insane in New York and a can- 
did discussion of the future of the state hos- 
pital system 

* Who is insane? Stephen Smith. 285p $1.25 '16 

Macmillan 

Contains: Who is insane and what is in- 
sanity; Critical periods of life predisposing 
to insanity; Care and treatment of the in- 
sane; The lesson applied to the feeble- 
minded and criminal; A new institution: the 
dawn of a better day 

See also Crime and criminals— Laboratories; 
Feeble-minded; Mental hygiene 

Aliens 
Insane aliens. Immigrants in Am R 2:5-7 Ap 
'1 fi 

Plea for just treatment of the alien whose 
insanity is due to his experiences in this 
country 

Commitment 
Commitment of sane and normal persons to 
state institutions. Inst Q 7:8-13 Je 30 16 

Farm colonies 
New hope for God's unfortunates. A. J. 
Jovce. il Forecast (Flanders bldg., Philadel- 
phia) 10:341-4 N '15 lOo 



134 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



1 n sa n e — Con tinned 

Reports 

* Great Britain. Board of control. 1st annual 

report for year 1914: pt. 1 Lunacy and men- 
tal deficiency. (House of Commons pa no 6) 
93p 5y2d '16 Eyre & Spottiswoode. London 

* Report to the governor on the institutions for 

the insane of the state of West Virginia, 
1914. C. F. MacDonald. 42p '15 Executive 
dept., Charleston 

Keport includes a few general considera- 
tions respecting the importance of insanity, 
a cursory summary of the essentials of the 
general care and treatment of the insane, 
and a draft of a proposed insanity lavi^ 

Alcohol and insanity, by J. H. Lloyd; Relative 
death-rates of self-declared abstainers and 
moderate drinkers from the actuaries' view- 
point, by E: B. Phelps. In U. S. brewers' 
assn. Year book, 1915, p 259-82 

Alcohol in its relation to insanity in the male 
sex. C. G. Ellis. Inst Quar 6:115-20 S 30 '15 

Case and Comment, for May, 1916, is devoted 
largely to insanity. It contains: Legal prob- 
lems and mental abnormality, by William 
Healy; Protection of the person and prop- 
erty of the insane, by F: A. Fenning; In- 
sanity and criminal responsibility, by E. R. 
Keedy; Genius and insanity, by Josiah 
Morse; Modern conceptions of insanity, by 
Bayard Holmes . , 

Chicago, 111., is to have an institute of medical 
research for the express purpose of studying 
dementia praecox. The institute, the only 
one of its kind in the world, is backed fi- 
nancially by the funds of the Sprague me- 
morial institute. Over $20,000 will be spent 
annually in investigating the cause of de- 
mentia praecox and discovering a cure (F 25 
'16) 

* Clinical studies in the relationship of insan- 

ity to crime. P. E. Bowers. 104p $1.50 O 15 '15 
Dr. Paul E. Bowers, Indiana hospital for 
insane criminals, Michigan City, Indiana 
Prevention of mental and nervous diseases. In 
P. M. Ashburn. Elements of military hy- 
giene, p 335-43 '15 

* Why should so many go insane? Some facts 

as to the extent, causes, and prevention of 
insanity. (Pub no 121) lip '15 State chari- 
ties aid assn.. 105 E. 22nd St., N. Y. 
Insecticides 

* Phenolic insecticides and fungicides. G: P. 

Gray, il Univ of Cal Agric Exp Sta Bui no 
269 p 329-81 Ap '16 Agricultural experiment 
station, Berkele5% Cal. 

Report of such examinations and analyses 
as were made of the samples of phenolic 
insecticides and fungicides collected during 
the fiscal years July 1, 1911, to June 30, 
1913, with comments, description of meth- 
ods of examination and information concern- 
ing these products that seem of interest 
Institute of teachers [of the] Wisconsin public 
IndustPiai, commercial, continuation and 
evening schools 

Outlines of lessons. (Bui no 10) '14 Warren E. 
Hicks, State dept. of public instruction, 
Madison, Wis. (Teachers' institutes) 

Outlines of lessons. (Bui no 11) '15 Warren E. 
Hicks, State dept. of public instruction, 
Madison. Wis. (Teachers' institutes) 
Institutional libraries. See Libraries, Institu- 
tional 
Insurance 

Australasian insurance. Alan Thodey. Econ 
World n s 12:85-7 Jl 15 '16 

Author is editor of the leading Austral- 
asian economic paper, Australasian Insur- 
ance and Banking Record 

Extent of the insurance business in Switzer- 
land. F. B. Keene. Econ World n s 11:825- 
8 Je 24 '16 

Insurance in Switzerland. F. B. Keene. U S 
Commerce Repts no 148 p 1138-43 Je 24 '16 

Wherein have insurance conditions improved 
during the past twenty years: in the field of 
state supervision, by C. F. Nesbit, District 
of Columbia; in the field of life insurance, 
by H: D. Appleton, deputy supt. of insur- 
ance of N. Y. ; in the field of fire insurance, 
by M. J. Cleary, Wisconsin; in the field of 



casualty insurance, by G: F. Steele, Idaho; 
in the field of fraternal insurance, by T. M. 
Henry, Mississippi. In Nat. convention of 
insurance comrs. Proceedings of the 46th 
session, 1915, p 89-119 

See also Savings bank insurance; Work- 
men's compensation 

Agents 

Conferences 
National assn. of insurance agents. Convention, 
Indianapolis, Oct. 4-6, 1915. Program contains 
special reports on: Standards of association 
membership, by A. H. Zimmerman, Wausau, 
Wis., chm.; Return commissions in defunct 
companies, by W. J. Carey, Cincinnati, chm.; 
addresses on: Contingent commissions, by 
David Rumsey, N. Y., vice-pres. and counsel 
Continental & Fidelity-Phenix; Better in- 
surance salesmanship, by Frederick V. 
Bruns, Syracuse, N. Y., local agent; Fire 
prevention and service department for 
agents, by L. H, Stubbs, Chicago; The larger 
view, by John T. Stone, Baltimore, pres. 
Maryland casualty; The dignity of labor in 
the insurance business, by George D. Webb, 
Chicago, pres. Nat. assn. of casualty & sure- 
ty agents; State insurance and local agents, 
by Mark T. McKee, Detroit, Mich., sec. Nat. 
council insurance federation executives; and 
discussions on: Cooperating list; overhead 
writing; floaters and schedules; improved 
risks association; agents expirations; resi- 
dent agency laws 

Amortization 

* Some notes on amortization of interest to 

executors and trustees. 12p Guaranty trust 
CO., N. Y. 

Bibliography 

* Insurance Library Bulletin (Insurance lib. 

assn., 141 Milk st.. Boston) for January, 1916, 
contains an excellent bibliography of insur- 
ance literature arranged by subjects and 
authors 

Conferences 

Convention of insurance commissioners, held 
early in December, 1915, in New York city, 
went on record as favoring a requirement 
that insurance companies maintain a re- 
serve for the payment of workmen's com- 
pensation liabilities. It also expressed an 
opinion against special deposits, such as are 
required by Philadelphia and other cities, 
where an insurance company is required to 
put up deposits with the city for the risks 
carried in that city. The special deposits 
will no longer be given credit as an asset of 
the companies carrying them in the reports 
as made to the state commissioners (D 11 '15) 

* Insurance institute of America. Proceedings of 

the seventh conference held at Memphis, 
Tennessee, June 15-17, 1915. 140p Benjamin 
Richards, sec, 141 Milk St., Boston 

* National convention of insurance comrs. [Pro- 

ceedings of] adjourned meeting, held at New 
York, Dec. 7, 1915. 37p '16 F. H. McMaster, 
sec, Columbia, S. C. 

Contains the following committee reports: 
Report on fidelity and surety companies; 
Preliminary report of committee on valua- 
tion of securities; Report of committee on 
reserves other than life; Report of commit- 
tee on workmen's compensation insurance 

* National convention of insurance comrs. Pro- 

ceedings of the 46th session, Del Monte Cal., 
Sept. 21-24, 1915, and of adjourned meetings 
in N. Y., Dec. 8, 1914. and in Chicago, 111., 
April 12, 1915. 261 + 58+22p $1; pa 75c '15 
F. H. McMaster, sec, Columbia, S. C. 

* National convention of insurance comrs. 

[Summary of proceedings] of the 46th an- 
nual meeting, Del Monte, Cal., Sept.. 1915. 
The Standard (141 Milk st., Boston, Mass.) p 
321-5 S 25 '15 5c 

At the opening session, President Darst 
discussed contingent commissions and com- 
pulsory investments. Other sessions were 
devoted to a review of improvements made 
in state supervision and In the various 
branches of the insurance business during 
the past twenty years; rate making bureaus 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



133 



Insurance — Conferences ^—Continued 

and the supervision and regulation of fire 
rates; prevention or reduction of fire losses; 
reciprocal insurance, savings bank life in- 
surance, and capitalizing mutual companies; 
report of the special committee on new mor- 
tality tables; standard benefits in health and 
accident policies 
World's insurance congress was held in San 
Francisco, CaL, Oct. 4-16, 1915 

Deposits 

Legislation, Comparative 
Substance of the laws of the various states 
requiring special deposits, with contentions 
made regarding them. In Nat. convention of 
insurance comrs. Proceedings of the 46th 
session, 1915, p 2-4 

Foreign companies 
Taxation 

Fees and taxes imposed by other states on 
New York state companies. In N. Y. (state). 
Superintendent of insurance. 56th annual re- 
port, pt 5 p 1138-84 '15 

New York supreme court has ruled that for- 
eign fire insurance companies carrying on 
business in New York city must pay the two 
per cent tax on its business to the fire de- 
partment pension fund, as required by law. 
Decision was rendered in the suit brought by 
the fire commissioner against the Munich 
(Ger. ) reinsurance co., the company protest- 
ing that as it did only reinsuring business 
it was not amenable to the laws of N. Y. 
The decision affects twenty-two companies 
(Press rept F 22 '16) 

Inter-insurance 

Reciprocal insurance. J: S. Patterson. In Nat. 
convention of insurance comrs. Proceedings 
of the 46th session, 1915, p 220-7 

Laws 

* Alabama — Insurance laws, 1915. 134p '15 Ala. 

dept. of archives and history 

* Connecticut — Public acts of 1915 relating to 

insurance and insurance companies, comp. 
by insurance dept. 31p Ag '15 Conn, state lib. 

* Michigan — Laws relating to insurance, revision 

of 1915. 383p '15 Mich. dept. of state 
New York — Insurance and related laws of 
1915, In N. Y. (state). Superintendent of 
insurance. 56th annual report, pt 5 p 11-98 
'15 

* Utah — Insurance laws, 1915. 71p Utah insur- 

ance dept. 

Legislation 
Insurance legislation of 1915. In N. Y, (state). 
Superintendent of insurance. Report, 1915, 
p 44-6 '16 

Legislation, Proposed 

Recommendations for legislation. In Nat. 
convention of insurance comrs. Proceedings 
of the 46th session, 1915, p 19-58 

Policies 

Standard benefits in health and accident 
policies. J: T. Winship. In Nat. convention 
of insurance comrs. Proceedings of the 46th 
session, 1915, p 240-5 

Reinsurance 

* New York (state). Insurance dept. Report on 

examination of the Excise reinsurance assn., 
New York city, as of Sept. 30, 1915. 15p '16 

Reports 

* New York (state). Insurance dept. Report on 

examination of the U. S. branch of the Gen- 
eral accident, fire and life assurance corpora- 
tion, limited, Perth, Scotland. 16p '16 
Return assurance companies: pt. a. Life insur- 
ance; pt. b. General insurance. Great Britain. 
Board of trade. 2v (nos 49, 49-1) 6s 4d. 4s 8d 
'15 Wyman & sons, London 

Statistics 

* Statistical tables compiled from annual state- 

ments for the year 1915 as filed by life, 
casualty, credit, fidelity and surety, real es- 
tate title and mortgage guaranty insurance 
companies, assessment associations, fraternal 



orders and town and county co-operative 
fire insurance corporations. 20p '16 N. Y. 
state insurance dept. 

Taxation 

See Insurance — Foreign companies — Taxa- 
tion 
Insurance, Accident. See Employers' liability; 
Insurance, Casualty; Insurance, Liability; 
Workmen's compensation 
Insurance, Air raid 
Great Britain — Government scheme, conducted 
by the general post office, insures property 
to the value of $375, on payment of a sum 
not exceeding 37c, against destruction or 
damage resulting from bombardment by air- 
craft or from the effect of anti-aircraft guns 
(N 14 '15) 
Insurance, Aircraft 
Aircraft insurance in Germany. Econ World 
n s 11:406 Mr 25 '16 
Insurance, Automobile 
Development of automobile insurance. C: R. 
Stone. Econ World n s 12:667-9 My 20 '16 
Insurance, Casualty 

See also Employers' liability; Insurance, 
Liability; Workmen's compensation 

Accounting 
Cost accounting in casualty insurance. C. E. 
Scattergood. Econ World n s 11:538-40 Ap 
22 '16 

Insurance, Fire 

* Fifty years of a civilizing force: an historical 

and critical study of the work of the Na- 
tional board of fire underwriters. H. C. 
Brearley. 323p *$2.50 '16 Stokes 

Contains an introduction by Wilbur E. 
Mallalieu, general manager of the National 
board of fire underwriters, and historical ap- 
pendices compiled by Daniel N. Handy, libra- 
rian of the Insurance library of Boston 

Fire insurance liability and explosion losses: 
a study of the law on the subject. W: B. 
Ellison. Econ World n s 12:245-7 Ag 19 '16 

Protecting congested districts in cities. R. M. 
Potts. In Nat. convention of insurance 
comrs. Proceedings of the 46th session, 1915, 
p 213-20 

Relation of fire marshal's department to in- 
surance companies, by R. W. Hargadine; 
Relation of fire marshal departments to in- 
surance companies, by G. E: Myers; Dis- 
cussion. In Fire marshals' assn. of North 
America. Proceedings, 1915, p 105-23 

Bibliography 

* Insurance Library Assn. of Boston Bulletin. 141 

Milk St., Boston, contains in each issue an 
index of current fire insurance and related 
subjects literature 

Conferences 

American druggists' fire insurance companies. 
Convention, Cincinnati, May, 1916. Inter-in- 
surance, or reciprocal insurance was dis- 
cussed, and the fact brought out that a 
great amount of such insurance is written 
without state supervision 

* National bd. of fire underwriters. Proceed- 

ings of the 50th annual meeting. New York, 
May 25, 1916. 170p il '16 The Bd., 76 Wil- 
liam St., N. Y. 

The subjects of legislation, standard code 
of insurance laws, uniform accounts, etc., 
are discussed in the president's address. 

Legislation 
Report of the com. on laws. In Nat. bd. of 
fire underwriters. Proceedings, 1916, p 72-81 

Legislation, Proposed 
Kentucky fire insurance commission has re- 
commended to the legislature a bill termed 
the "contingent, profit-sharing commission 
law," together with a complete fire insurance 
code. The bill would allow agents of fire 
insurance companies a 15 per cent flat and a 
10 per cent contingent fee on the agency loss 
ratio and an added 5 per cent on the state 
loss ratio. The effect of the measure would 
be to reduce excessive fire losses in Ken- 



136 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Insurance, Fire — Legislation, Proposed— Con*, 
tucky and to base an agent's profits upon his 
services to the community as reflected in low 
fire losses (Ja 6 '16) 

Municipal 

* Insuring public buildings [in New York state 

cities]. N Y State Bur Municipal Informa- 
tion Rept no 44 3p D 1 '15 (Typew 15c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Municipal fire insurance. M. F. Phillips. Jn 
League of American municipalities. Proceed- 
ings. 1915, p 50-2 '16 

Municipal fire insurance in Great Britain and 
the United States. R. H. Blanchard. Econ 
World n s 12:87-9 JI 15 '16 

—Same. Nat Munic R 5:430-6 Jl '16 

Rates 

Attitude of investigating committees regarding 
ratemaking bureaus. E. H. English, Iowa. 
In Nat. convention of insurance comrs. Pro- 
ceedings of the 46th session, 1915, p 119-44 
Takes up the committees by states 

♦ Fire waste and the insurance cost. W. H. 

Bennett, pres., Fire marshals' assn. of 
North America. 24p '15 111. fire marshal 
dept. 

Address before the Illinois state fire pre- 
vention assn. and commercial club at 
Streator, 111., Sept. 22, 1915 

Oklahoma supreme court has upheld the con- 
stitutionality of the fire rating statute re- 
cently enacted. The statute is very similar 
to the new Iowa law, which enables fire 
insurance rates to be based upon physical 
construction of the buildings insured, the 
hazards of occupancy and location, and 
character of fire protection afforded. Power 
and authority to make rates is taken away 
from the local agent, and requirement made 
that all rates charged shall be public and 
filed with the state, and that all property 
of the same class and degree of protection 
and hazard shall be entitled to the same 
rate. The Oklahoma law differed from the 
new Iowa law in that a commission was 
created to supervise and regulate rates, 
while the Iowa statute confers this duty on 
the insurance commissioner. The ruling was 
given in the test suit of the Insurance co. of 
North America contending that the law in- 
fringed upon the constitutional powei's of the 
state insurance commissioner (Press rept 
D 3 '15) 

South Carolina law regulating insurance com- 
panies and empowering the insurance com- 
missioner to fix rates is so stringent that 
insurance companies have decided not to re- 
new licenses in that state (Mr 11 '16) 

• Supervision and regulation of fire insurance 

rates and rate-making. J. S. Phillips. 5n 
Jesse S. Phillips, Supt. of insurance, Albany, 
N. Y. 

Delivered at 46th session of National con- 
vention of insurance commissioners, as New 
York state contribution to a symposium by 
states, Monterey, Cal., Sept. 22. 1915 
Supervision and regulation of fire insurance 
rates and ratemaking by the insurance 
comrs. of Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minne- 
sota, New Hampshire, New York, North 
Carolina, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, 
Wisconsin. In Nat. convention of insurance 
comrs. Proceedings of the 46th session, 1915, 
p 144-65. 181-7 

Insurance, Forest 
Forest insurance in Finland. E. F. Wrede. 
Econ World n s 12:23-4 Jl 1 '16 

Insurance, Group 
Meritorious features of group life insurance. 
L. C. Woods. Gas Age (Vanderbilt concourse 
bldg., 52 Vanderbilt av., N. Y.) 37:702-4 Je 
15 '16 

Insurance, Health 
American assn. for labor legislation is strongly 
in favor of compulsory health insurance on 
wage-earners by legislation. It maintains 
that such legislation is just, it is successful, 
it increases general prosperity, provides 
needed relief and diminishes illness. The 
association is working for legislation of this 
character particulai-ly in New York, New- 
Jersey and Massachusetts and Ohio (Mr 15 
'16) 



American medical assn. Annual meeting, 
Detroit, Mich., June, 1916. Dr. B. S. Warren 
of the U. S. public health service, and Dr. 
I. M. Rubinow of New York strongly urged 
compulsory health insurance under either 
federal or state authority, as a weapon In 
combating preventable disease caused by 
poverty and lack of cooperation and system- 
atic effort by health-conserving agencies 

Brief for health insurance: special articles; 
representative comment; select bibliography. 
Am Labor Leg R v 6 nd 2 275p Je '16 $1 

Contains: Is health insurance "paternal- 
ism"? by William Hard; Compulsory health 
insurance in Great Britain, by O. S. Halsey; 
Tendencies in health insurance legislation, 
by M. A. Hobbs; Voluntary health insurance 
in New York city, by Anna Kalet; Brief for 
health insurance; Health insurance stand- 
ards; Tentative draft of an act; Select crit- 
ical bibliography on health insurance 

Compensation and vocational disease: highest 
Connecticut court refuses an award, oppo- 
site view taken by supreme bench of Massa- 
chusetts. Iron Age 97:1398-9 Je 8 '16 

Compulsory health insurance. R. M. Easley. 
Am Gas Light J 104:209-10 Ap 3 '16 

Compulsory state-wide health insurance and 
its relation to the medical service. E. R. 
Hayhurst. Modern Hospital (Metropolitan 
bldg., St. Louis, Mo.) p 420-4 Je '16 25c 

Contains carefully prepared data on the 
advisability of providing national health in- 
surance and reasons for adopting health in- 
surance and standards for the measure with 
an epitome of the plan 

Conference on tuberculosis, arranged by the 
National assn. for the study and prevention 
of tuberculosis, the State charities aid, and 
the N. Y. state dept. of health, was held at 
Albany in November, 1915. Dr. John B. An- 
drews, sec. of the Assn. for labor legisla- 
tion, stated that research had shown that 
tuberculosis among wage earners varies with 
the nature of the dust to which they are 
exposed and in accordance with the quan- 
tity they are compelled to breathe. As a 
measure to prevent needless loss of life, he 
urged the introduction of a health insurance 
scheme, which would embrace all wage- 
earners, who would be assured of medical 
care, cash benefits in time of sickness, and 
funeral expenses. To pay for these benefits 
employers and workmen would contribute 
equally, while the state would contribute 
one-fifth of the total. Proceedings were 
not published 

Federation of state medical boards of the 
U. S. Meeting at Chicago, February. 1916. 
Dr. Otto V. Huffman, sec, N. Y. state bd., 
advocated compulsory sickness insurance. 
He proposed a plan under which all reputa- 
ble physicians would have an assured in- 
come. The plan contemplates a tax of $2 
a year on all wage earners whose income is 
less than $1,200. Each would have the privi- 
lege of selecting his own doctor, but no 
physician would be allowed to carry more 
than 2,000 names (F 8 '16) 

* Health insurance: its relation to the public 

health. B. S. Warren and Edgar Syden- 
stricker. U S Pub Health Bui no 76 76p Mr 
'16 

Contains: Prevalence and cost of sickness 
among wageworkers; Conditions causing 
sickness among wageworkers; Responsibility 
for conditions causing disease; Cooperative 
action needed for relief and prevention of 
sickness; Health insurance: a health mea- 
sure. Appendixes contain: British and Ger- 
man health insurance systems; Typical sick 
benefit funds in the United States; Health 
insurance standards recommended by the 
com. on social insurance of the American 
assn. for labor legislation; Recommendations 
as to health insurance from the staff report 
to the U. S. comm. on industrial relations 

* Health insurance: standards and tentative 

draft of an act, submitted for criticism and 
discussion. 2d ed 28p D '15. Com. on social 
insurance. Am. assn. for labor legislation 
Health insurance: the spread of the movement. 
I. M. Rubinow. Survey 36:407-9 Jl 15 '16 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



137 



Insurance, Health — Continued 

* Health insurance and the prevention of tuber- 

culosis. J: 13. Andrews. lOp '16 John B. 
Andrews, sec, Am. assn. for labor leg., 131 
E. 22d St., N. Y. 

Reprinted from the Medical Record, Feb. 
26, 1916 

How health insurance prevents disease. J: B. 
Andrews. Forecast (Forecast pub. cc, Phila- 
delphia) 12:125-30 Ag '16 10c 

National civic federation vigorously opposes 
the effort in some states to force a system 
of compulsory health insurance on wage- 
earners by legislation. The league claims 
that in foreign countries where compulsory 
health insurance has been established it is 
not successful, and that in the United States 
the benefits secured would be so small as 
to be almost worthless to the average work- 
man (Mr 14 '16) 

National safety council at its annual confer- 
ence in Philadelphia, devoted nearly a whole 
session to the question of compulsory medi- 
cal examination of employees and of those 
seeking employment; it was repeatedly as- 
serted that some method of health insurance 
must be devised before long (D 25 '15) 

• Sickness insurance: a study prepared for the 

committee on social and industrial justice 
of the Progressive national service. 60p 
Progressive nat. service, 20 W. 34th st., 
N. Y. 

The committee annexes a tentative schedule 
of broad standards of legislation and a 
draft of a plan for an organization to admin- 
ister the insurance 
Social cost of sickness, by Haven Emerson; 
Organization of medical service, by M. M. 
Davis; Plan for a health insurance act, by 
H: R. Seager; General discussion. Am Labor 
Leg R 6:11-37 Mr '16 

Bibliography 
Select critical bibliography on health Insur- 
ance. Am Labor Leg R 6:269-75 Je '16 $1 

Investigations 

California commission on social insurance, 
authorized by the last legislature to investi- 
gate and recommend legislation as to the 
extension of the principle of social insurance, 
will investigate sickness insurance, or in- 
surance against illness for the benefit of 
wage earners and salary earners, and will 
recommend to the 1917 legislature specific 
action on the matter (Mr 11 '16) 

New York — Mills bill creating a commission 
to investigate health insurance for working- 
men was passed by the 1916 legislature. The 
commission will report to the 1917 legis- 
lature. The measure provides that the 
commission shall consist of two senators, 
two assemblymen and four other members 
to be appointed by the chairman. It carries 
an appropriation of $25,000 and supplants a 
health insurance measure introduced by 
Senator Mills. This was opposed by Presi- 
dent Gompers and the New York state 
federation of labor because of its mandatory 
features 

Legislation, Proposed 

♦ Health insurance: standards and tentative 

draft of an act, submitted for criticism and 
discussion. 3d ed 32p 10c My '16 Com. on 
social insurance. Am. assn. for labor legis- 
lation 
— Same. Am Labor Leg R 6:239-68 Je '16 ?1 
Massachusetts — First hearing on a proposal for 
a compulsory health insurance bill was held 
in the State house at Boston, March 1, 1916. 
The bill is discussed in The Survey, March 
11, 1916 
Insurance, Liability 
Pennsylvania — Under the new industrial com- 
pensation law all classifications of risks and 
ratings, or the basic rate and schedule of 
merit rating, must be approved by the comr. 
of insurance before taking effect, and it is 
within the power of the state comr. of in- 
surance to declare the minimum premium 
rate. Mutual companies are subject to the 
same supervision and approval. The ma- 
jority of insurance companies operating un- 
der the new laws are taking steps toward 



the formation of a central bureau which 
shall standardize the practice of rating and 
administration, including the establishment 
of a schedule of premiums (D 2 '15) 

See also Employers' liability; Insurance, 
Casualty; Workmen's compensation 
Insurance, Life 

Insurance and annuities for college professors. 
M. A. Linton. Econ World n s 12:119-21 Jl 
22 '16 

Life insurance for professors: a study of the 
problem of protection for the families of 
salaried men. C: E. Brooks. Univ of Cal 
Pub in Economics v 4 no 2 p 83-113 25c Ap 

Probable future evolution of insurance medi- 
cine. H. E. Macdojiald. Medical Record 
(William Wood and Co., 51 5th av., N. Y.) 
90:286-7 Ag 12 '16 15c 
Speculative life insurance. I. M. Hamilton. 
Econ World n s 11:344-7 Mr 11 '16 

Address delivered at tne 6th mid-year 
meeting of> the medical section of 'the 
American Ufe convention, Birmingham, Ala., 
March 1, 1916 

See also Savings bank insurance 
Conferences 

* Assn. of life insurance presidents. Proceed- 

ings of the 9th annual meeting. Hotel Astor. 
New York City, Dec. 9-10. 1915. 146p '15 
The Assn., 165 Broadway, N. Y. 
Life underwriters of Minnesota, Iowa, Ne- 
braska, Wisconsin, and North and South 
Carolina. Conference in Minneapolis and St. 
Paul, May 25-27, 1916. Addresses included: 
Welfare insurance, by W. M. Horner; San- 
ity, by S. D. Works: Social value of life in- 
surance, by M. H. O'Brien; Medical selec- 
tion from the medical director's standpoint, 
by J. W. Fisher; Co-ordination, by A. C. 
Larson 

* National assn. of life insurance presidents held 

its annual meeting in New York, Dec. 9-11, 
1915. Rough Notes (220 E. Ohio St., Indian- 
apolis 10c), Dec. 16, 1915, contains the fol- 
lowing addresses: Address of Chairman Wil- 
liam D. Wyman; Relation of life insurance 
investments to city development, by William 
F: Dix; Relation of the railroad and its secu- 
rities to land values [extracts], by Fairfax 
Harrison; Relation of the agent to life in- 
surance investments, by E: A. Wood. A 
summary of a report by Robert Lynn Cox 
and addresses on life insurance investments 
with special reference to farm mortgages 
appear in The United States Review (411- 
413 Walnut St., Philadelphia 5c) Dec. 16» 
1915 
Northwest congress of life underwriters. Con- 
ference, St. Paul, May, 1916. A resolution 
was unanimously adopted suggesting to the 
legislatures of the various states the passage 
of a law requiring agents to first obtain a 
license issued by the commissioner of insur- 
ance of each state before they may write life 
insurance policies. The program included 
the following addresses: Sanity, by S: D. 
Works; Ideal agent, by F. T. McNally; What 
I don't know about life insurance, by J: T. 
Baxter: Life insurance as related to religion, 
by H. P. Dewey. The 1917 meeting of the 
association will be held in Des Moines, la. 

Education 

Is there unnecessary loss in the selection and 
training of life insurance salesmen? E. A. 
Woods. Econ World n s 12:118-19 Jl 22 '16 

Life insurance education. S. S. Huebner. 
Econ World n s 12:54-6 Jl 8 '16 

Investments 

Life insurance investments with special refer- 
ence to farm mortgages. R: L. Cox. 18p 
maps '15 Assn. of life insurance presidents, 
165 Broadway, N. Y. 

Report submitted Dec. 9, 1915, at the ninth 
annual meeting of the Assn. of life insurance 
presidents 

Relation of the agent to life insurance invest- 
ments. E. A. Woods. In Assn. of life in- 
surance presidents. Proceedings, 1915. p 59- 
66 



10 



138 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Insurance, Life — Investments — Continued 

Texas — ^An effort is being made to secure the 
repeal of the Robertson compulsory invest- 
ment law for life insurance companies, 
which makes it possible for the state to col- 
lect taxes on premiums collected by com- 
panies which withdrew from Texas prior to 
the Robertson law becoming effective. It is 
held by the opponents of this law that the 
companies have no local business liable to 
taxation in the state, because premiums are 
remitted directly to the offices in the state 
to which they have withdrawn. A parallel 
situation came up in Kentucky and the U. S. 
supreme court held for the insurance com- 
panies (Ja 7 '16) 

United States Review (411-413 Walnut st., 
Philadelphia 5c) for Dec. 16, 1915, contains 
a summary of the proceedings of the ninth 
annual meeting of the Nat. assn. of life in- 
surance presidents, at New York, Dec. 9-11, 
1915. It contains part of a report by Robert 
Lynn Cox on Life insurance investments 
with special reference to farm mortgages; 
an address on investments, by William D. 
Wyman, pres., Berkshire life insurance co., 
Pittsfield, Mass.; Relation of the a^ent to 
life insurance investments, by E. A. Wood; 
Pittsburgh; Relation of life insurance invest- 
ments to city development, by William F. 
Dix, sec, Mutual life insurance co., N. Y. ; 
and Getting closer to the farmer, by Charles 
G. Taylor, jr. vice-pres. and actuary, Atlan- 
tic life insurance co., Richmond, Va. 
Regulation 
State 

Relation of the state to the investments of 
Insurance companies. Burton Mansfield. In 
Assn. of life insurance presidents. Proceed- 
ings, 1915, p 86-95 

Taxation 

Economic and social unwisdom of an income 
tax on life insurance. G: W. Paterson. 
Econ World n s 12:309-11 S 2 '16 

Protest against the additional taxation of life 
insurance in the federal revenue bill. Econ 
World 12:217 Ag 12 '16 

Gross receipts tax 

* Life* insurance, the state and the premium 

tax: a critical analysis of how life insurance 
is taxed for performing functions of gov- 
ernment in the field of dependency. W: J. 
Graham. 6p '16 Assn. of life insurance presi- 
dents, Broadway, N. Y. 

Address delivered before the 5th state 
conference on taxation, under the auspices 
of the Michigan state tax assn., at Grand 
Rapids, Mich., on March 1. 1916 
Insurance, IVIarine 
Our facilities for marine insurance during the 
war. J. M. Hamilton. Econ World n s 11: 
604-5 My 6 '16 
Reprinted from The Americas 
Insurance, IVlaternlty 
Maternity insurance. L. K. Frankel. bibl In 
Am. assn. for study and prevention of infant 
mortality. 6th annual meeting. Transac- 
tions, 1915, p 173-95 '16 

♦ —Same. 28p D 18 '15 Metropolitan life insur- 

ance CO., 1 Madison av.. N. Y. 

Read at the meeting of the National assn. 
for the study and prevention of infant mor- 
tality, Philadelphia, November 10, 1915. Re- 
printed from the New York Medical Journal, 
Dec. 18, 1915 

Maternity insurance. New Repub 7:5-6 My 6 
'16 
Insurance, Mutual 

Capitalizing mutual or assessment companies. 
Joseph Button. In Nat. convention of insur- 
ance comrs. Proceedings of the 46th session. 
1915, p 234-6 

New York boat owners assn. has organized a 
mutual insurance company to insure men in 
the employ of such operating companies as 
are members in order to secure relief from 
high compensation insurance rates, which 
they consider unjust (Ag 30 '15) 
Conferences 

• Condensed minutes of the proceedings of the 

20th annual convention of the Nat. assn. of 
mutual insurance companies, Minneapolis, 



Aug. 17-20, 1915. Mutual Insurance J of Penn- 
sylvania (Lebanon, Pa.) S '15 p 1615-23 10c 
Following addresses were given: Fed- 
eral taxation of mutual companies, by Sen. 
A. B. Cummins; Excise, income and war 
stamp taxes, by G. A. A. Pevey, Boston; 
Field for mutual insurance, by S. D. 
Works, comr. of insurance, Minnesota; 
Legislation past and future, by J. C. Ad- 
derly, Chicago; Inspection of farm risks; 
National supervision of mutual insurance 
companies, by W. M. Deisher, Reading, 
Pa.; True and false economy in mutual 
insurance, by V. N. Valgren, U. S. dept. 
of agric; Rodding the White House, by 
Allan Farquhar, Sandy Spring, Md.; Hu- 
man element in the fire hazard, by V. E. 
Butler, Minneapolis; and Mutual insurance 
journalism, by G. T. Ingham, Mutual In- 
surance Journal of Pennsylvania 
Insurance, Postal 

Japan — Legislation is pending to put into ef- 
fect a new form of life insurance to be writ- 
ten thru the post office. The plan allows any 
person between 12 and 60 years of age to 
be insured and draw his policy at any time 
without receiving medical examination. The 
amount for which a person may be insured 
ranges from $149.55 down to $9.97. The 
object of the scheme is to promote the in- 
terest of the middle and lower classes by 
making life insurance more easily obtainable 
(My 6 '16) 
Insurance, Social 

American medical assn. has appointed a com- 
mittee on social insurance, the immediate 
work of which will be in the direction of 
educational propaganda, primarily among 
the medical profession in the U. S. The com- 
mittee hopes, also, to make a careful study 
of the medical aspects of the problem, of 
the relation between the physician and in- 
surance systems in all European countries, 
and will also gather information on the eco- 
nomic status of the medical profession in 
this country (My 20 '16) 

Relation between private and social insurance. 
I. M. Rubinow. Econ World n s 12:729-32 
Je 3 '16 

Social insurance and social democracy. In 
F: C. Howe. Socialized Germany, p 192-207 

* Social insurance in California: brief survey of 

field investigation now under way through 

commission appointed by Governor H. W. 

Johnson. 7p '16 Social insurance comm. of 

Cal., 525 Market st., San Francisco, Cal. 
Social insurance in Germany. Monthly R v 2 

no 5 p 71-8 My '16 
Social insurance, old age pensions and poor 

relief. R: M. Woodbury. Q J Econ 30:152-71 

N '15 

Bibliography 

• List of recent references on industrial insur- 

ance, with special reference to accident in- 
surance. U. S. Library of congress. 6p O 9 
'15 (Typew Cost of copying 30c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Investigations 

California social insurance commission has 
been recently organized to arrive at some 
* practical way to provide an insurance plan 
for workers. Particular attention will be 
paid to sickness and death benefits, old age 
and invalidity pensions, maternity and 
mothers' pensions, and the workmen's com- 
pensation law. The commission is making 
an exhaustive study of conditions in Cali- 
fornia and will present a report to the next 

. legislature (Mr 18 '16) 

Com. on insurance of the N. Y. chamber of 
commerce is perfecting arrangements for a 
comprehensive investigation into all essen- 
tial phases of the subject of social insurance, 
before the next meeting of the N. Y. legisla- 
ture (.Te '16) 

Massachusetts — Legislature has appointed a 
recess committee to study the subject of so- 
cial insurance, old-age pensions and the 
condition of workers in industries that op- 
erate continuously for 24 hours (Je 2 '16) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



139 



Insurance, Social — Investigations — Continued 
National assn. of insurance commissioners 
and superintendents, at their convention in 
New York city, Dec. 7-8, 1915, adopted a 
resolution to appoint a committee to 
recommend legislation governing social in- 
surance 
New York chamber of commerce, thru its 
committee on insurance, is to make a com- 
prehensive investigation into all essential 
phases of social insurance, before the next 
meeting of the legislature, with special re- 
gard to health insurance. The inquiry w u 
extend not only to the actual developments 
in countries where health insurance has 
made some progress, but is intended also to 
include a critical examination of the condi- 
tions, causes and effects of the different 
systems with a view to their availability to 
American communities. Dr. J. F. Crowell. 
executive oflficer of the chamber of com- 
merce, (65 Liberty St., N. Y.) will have 
charge of the inquiry (My 6 '16) 

Legislation 
Social insurance. In J: R. Commons and J: B. 
Andrews. Principles of labor legislation, p 
354-414 '16 

Contains: Industrial accident insurance; 
Health insurance; Old age and invalidity in- 
surance; Widows' and orphans' insurance; 
Unemployment insurance 
Insurance, State 
Italy — Since the establishment of the state 
life insurance monopoly, which began oper- 
ating on Jan. 1, 1913, nine Italian companies 
and fourteen foreign companies operating in 
Italy have ceded their business to the state 
in accordance witn the provisions of the en- 
acting law (My 13 '16) 
State fire insurance. McKee Sherrard. Econ 
World n s 11:633-4 My 13 '16 

From a paper read before the 40th annual 
meeting of the Fire underwriters' assn. of 
the Pacific 

See also Workmen's compensation 
Insurance, Strike 
Strike insurance in Germany. Monthly R v 1 
no 4 p 77-85 Ag '15 
Insurance, Unemployment 
Insurance against unemployment. In A. C. 

Pigou. Unemployment, p 203-27 '15 
Present status of unemployment insurance on 
the basis of official sources and of reports 
prepared for the general convention at 
Ghent of the International assn. on unem- 
ployment. In Am. assn. of public employ- 
ment offices. Proceedings, 1913-1915, p 163-77 

• Unemployment insurance for Massachusetts: 

draft of an act with an introduction and 
notes. (Bui no 2) 26p Ja '16 Mass. com. on 
unemployment, 75 State St., Boston 

Unemployment insurance under the British 
national insurance act. Monthly R 3:50-62 
Jl '16 

Investigations 

California commission on social insurance, 
authorized by the last legislature to investi- 
gate and recommend legislation as to the 
extension of the principle of social insur- 
ance, will also investigate unemployment 
insurance, and recommend to the 1917 legis- 
lature specific action on the matter (Mr 11 
'16 

Legislation, Proposed 

• Unemployment insurance for Massachusetts: 

draft of an act with an introduction and 
notes, bibl Mass Com on Unemployment Bui 
no 2 26p Ja '16 The Com., 75 State st., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 
Intangible personal property 
Taxation 
See Credits — Taxation 
Intercollegiate athletics. See Athletics 
Interest 
Income and the principle of service. V. S. Yar- 

ros. Am J Soc 21:317-33 N '15 
Neglected factors in the problem of normal 
interest. F. H. Knight. Q J Econ 30:279-310 
F '16 

See also Debts, Public 



Legislation, Comparative 

Interest laws and statutes of limitations. 
World Almanac, 1916, p 176 

. Rates 

* Abstract of interest charges permitted by 

state law and provisions of a few municipal 
ordinances with reference to interest. Cleve- 
land munic. ref. lib. Ip Mr 22 '16 (Typew 5c) 

Bibliography 

* List of references on the factors which deter- 

mine rates of interest. U. S. Library of con- 
gress. 5p S 8 '15 (Typew Cost of copying 25c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Interlocking directorates. See Banks — Inter- 
locking directorates 
Internal improvements. See Roads 
International arbitration. See Arbitration, In- 
ternational 
International association of chiefs of police 
Proceedings, 1915. '15 C. G. Kizer, sec, Nor- 
folk, Va. (Police — Conferences) 
International association of dairy and milk In- 
spectors 
3d annual report, including papers read at 
the annual convention in Chicago, Oct. 23-24, 
1914. $1 Ivan C. Weld, sec.-treas., 1116 Con- 
necticut av., Washington, D. C. (Milk in- 
spection — Conferences) 
4th annual report, 1915. $1 I. C. Weld, sec.- 
treas., 1116 Connecticut av., Washington, 
D, C. (Milk inspection — Conferences) 
International congress of women 
Report, 1915. il 60c postpaid International 
women's committee for permanent peace, 
Amsterdam (Women-Conferences) 
International law 

Periodicals 

* International Law Notes is a monthly bulletin 

of matters of interest to practitioners in pri- 
vate international law. Vol. 1 no. 6 for 
June, 1916, contains: Late information; Mar- 
riage and wills, by W. E. Wilkinson; German 
law, lawyers and courts, by J: H. Vickery; 
The rights of belligerents; The prescription 
law of Holland, by Dr. A. Nicol-Speyer; 
Notes in brief; Bibliography; Monroe doc- 
trine and other articles, a review; Recent 
decisions (English). Subscription: 9s 6d a 
year. On sale by Baker, Voorhis and CO., 
N. Y. 
International relations 

See also League of American republics 
Bibliography 
Library of the Carnegie endowment for inter- 
national peace has 10,000 cards written and 
classified for the periodical literature be- 
tween Jan. 1 and June 30, 1915 on inter- 
national affairs. The secretary is contem- 
plating a printed bibliography but a more 
carefully selected one may be decided upon 

* List of references on the international rela- 

tions between the U. S. and Russia. U. S. 
Library of congress. 5p D 7 '15 (Typew Cost 
of copying 25c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
International sunshine society 
9th and lOth annual reports of the dept. of 
the blind, 1913-1914. '15 The Society, 96 5th 
av., N. Y. (Blind— Reports) 
Internationalism 

Bibliography 

* List of references on internationalism. U. S. 

Library of congress. 8p My 11 '16 (Typew 
Cost of copying 40c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 

Interstate commerce. See Child labor— Interstate 
commerce; Intoxicating liquors — Interstate 
shipments 

Interstate commerce commission 
Interstate commerce commission and the rail- 
roads, by S: O. Dunn; Federal valuation of 
utilities, by C: A. Prouty; Federal valuation 
of railroads in the U. S., by T: W. Hulme; 
Conflict between state and federal regulation 
of railroads, by W. D. Hines; Recent finan- 
cial investigations by the interestate com- 



140 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Interstate commerce commission — Continued 

merce commission, by E. R. Dewsnup; Do 
"cost of transportation" exliibits in railroad 
rate cases show cost, by A. S. Olmsted, 2d; 
Accounting system prescribed for railroads 
by the interstate commerce commission, by 
W: E. Hooper. Ann Am Acad 63:155-231 
Ja '16 

Intoxicating liquors 

* Alcohol and crime. Robert Blackwood. 6p '16 

Nat. wholesale liquor dealers assn. 

Reprinted from the Forum, August, 1916 
Alcoholic as seen in court. V. V. Anderson. J 

Crim Law 7:89-95 My '16 
Alcoholism. In W: A. Bqnger. Criminality 

and economic conditions, p 357-73 '16 

* American issue publishing company, Wester- 

ville, O., has published a series of pamphlets, 
at 10c each, on various phases of the liquor 
problem. The titles are: Alcohol and mental 
work, by A. Smith; University man and the 
alcohol question, by Emil Kraepelin; Alcohol 
question, by G. Von Bunge; Alcohol and 
crime, by J. Gonser; Causes of alcoholism, 
by A. Cramer and H. Vogt; Industrial phases 
of the alcoholic question, by A. H. Stehr; 
Alcohol question in the light of social ethics, 
by B. Stehler; Effects of alcohol on resis- 
tance to disease and offspring, by Taav 
Laitinen; Race welfare, by Max Gruber; 
Attitude of the Socialist party toward the 
alcohol question, by Emile Vandervelde; 
Influence of alcohol upon the race, by Al- 
fred Ploetz; Influence of alcohol upon the 
functions of the brain, by Rudolf Wlassak; 
Alcohol's ledger in industry, by C. F. Stod- 
dard 
How business fights alcohol. B. J. Hendrick. 
Harper's M (Harper and Brothers, N. Y.) 
133:425-31 Ag '16 

* Liquor problem in Russia. W: E. Johnson. 

230p il map $1 '15 Am. issue pub. co., West- 
erville, O. 

Contains: The romance of the Russian 
people; Political organization of the empire; 
Russian charity; The rise and fall of serf- 
dom; The story of Finland; The Baltic prov- 
inces; The vodka monopoly; Russian drink- 
ing conditions; The great fight for reforms; 
The overthrow of the monopoly 

Relation of alcoholism to poverty and crime, 
by E. C. Dinwiddie; The alcohol question and 
social justice, by C. F. Stoddard. In South- 
ern sociological congress. New chivalry: 
health; proceedings, 1915, p 114-37 

Social aspects of drink; with special atten- 
tion to the prohibition argument. John 
Koren. Atlan 117:75-86 Ja '16 

■See also Inebriates; Insanity; Local option; 
Prohibition; Prostitution — Relation to intoxi- 
cating liquors; Saloons 

Advertisements 

Illinois — Municipalities have power to regulate 
the construction and use of signs within the 
corporate limits. Such regulation, being the 
exercise of the police power, must be reas- 
onable and must not invade the personal 
rights or liberties of citizens. A city in anti- 
saloon territory has no authority to adopt 
an ordinance prohibiting the display of any 
sign or advertisement of any wholesale or re- 
tail liquor dealer upon any vehicle or build- 
ing, where the ordinance is not limited to 
advertisements for the sale of liquor within 
the municipality, nor for orders for the sale 
and delivery of liquors in such city, and has 
no reasonable connection with the power to 
prohibit the sale of liquor. Haskell v. How- 
ard, 109 N E 992 

Montevideo, Uruguay — All advertisements 
posted or distributed in the city are subject 
to a municipal impost. Advertisements of 
alcoholic beverages are subject to an addi- 
tional tax of 10 per cent of the regular sched- 
ule (Mr '16) 

Temperance society of the Methodist church, 
Deets Pickett, research sec, Richmond, Va.. 
has been conducting an investigation to find 
out what papers do not permit advertise- 
ments of liquors. 840 daily papers in the 
U. S. refuse to accept liquor advertising, 
while a number of others that do accept 
them are considering a change of policy as 
soon as their contracts with liquor dealers 



expire. Alabama, Washington, Oklahoma, 
Oregon, West Virginia, North Dakota, Colo- 
rado and Maine have anti-advertising laws 
while Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia and 
Mississippi have passed such laws, which be- 
come effective soon (Mr 13 '16) 

Bibliography 
Liquor problem. In W: B. Munro. Bibliography 
of municipal government in the U. S.. p 314- 
18 '15 

* List of references since 1900 on the liquor 

question in its hygienic, economic and social 
phases. U. S. Library of congress. 25p N 15 
'15 (Typew Cost of copying $1.25) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
National wholesale liquor dealers association 
is sending each week to the names on its 
mailing list, a postal card calling attention 
to the "wet" and "dry" articles in periodi- 
cals of the past week. The Assn., 301 United 
bank bldg., Cincinnati 

Compensation to liquor interests 

Legislation 
Review of laws compensating the beer and 
liquor trade. In U. S. brewers' assn. Year 
book, 1915, p 203-33 

Conferences 

* National wholesale liquor dealers assn. of 

America. Proceedings of the 20th annual 
convention, held at Cincinnati, O., June 8- 
10, 1915. National Bui (pub. by the Assn.) 
351p Jl '15 10c 

Addresses were given on the following sub- 
jects: Look at the bottom, not at the top; 
Government interference in business; The 
prohibition agitator an enemy to general 
business; Cohesion or disintegration of allied 
in.terests; Prohibition: its philosophy, fallacy, 
humbug and hysteria; A new attitude 
towards trade organizations; Regulation of 
the liquor traflfic; Honest versus fake pub- 
licity; Which is the better soldier, volunteer 
or conscript; Humanities of temperance; 
What is the Anti-saloon league 

* National wholesale liquor dealers' assn. of 

America. Proceedings of the 21st annual 
convention, Louisville, Ky., May 9-11, 1916. 
National Bui (published by the Assn.) 261- 
386p Je '16 10c Joseph Debar, sec, Cincin- 
natti, O. 

The special purpose of the conference was 
to continue the fight against prohibition and 
intemperance, particularly that form which 
prevails in dry territory 

* U. S. brewers' assn. Year book, 1915, contain- 

ing the reports delivered at the 55th annual 
convention held in Springfield, Mass., Octo- 
ber 13-16, 1915, and added chapters on effi- 
ciency and drink, industrial accidents, eu- 
genics, alcohol-mortality, compensation laws, 
licensing reform and the economic effects of 
prohibition. 360p il '15 The Assn., 50 Union 
sq., N. Y. 

Conveying law 
West Virginia supreme court handed down a 
decision, April 18, 1916, holding that it is not 
unlawful for a citizen to carry or transport 
one- half a gallon of intoxicating liquors, 
without a statutory label, or more with such 
label, on and along any public highway, to his 
home for his personal use there; held that 
a warrant charging that intoxicating liquors 
are being manufactured, sold, exposed, kept 
or stored for sale, or bartered in a certain 
suitcase, trunk or other container, in the 
possession of any person in the roads, streets 
and alleys, or remain in the county, does not 
charge the person in whose possession it 
is alleged to be with manufacturing or 
selling, nor with any other offense under 
the statute. F: J. Emsweiler v. J. B. Wal- 
lace; State V. F: J. Emsweiler; State v. J. J. 
Jenkins (Press rept) 

Dispensaries 

See Dispensaries (liquor) 

Interstate shipment 
Arizona supreme court has upheld the right of 
citizens to import liquor for personal con- 
sumption only (Press rept Mr 28 '16) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



141 



Intoxicating liquors — Interstate shipment — Cont. 

Attorneys general of 15 states filed with the 
U. S. supreme court a joint argument in 
support of the constitutionality of the West 
Virginia liquor law prohibiting the receipt 
and possession of intoxicating liquors for 
personal use, and of the federal Webb-Ken- 
yon liquor law prohibiting the shipping of 
intoxicating liquors into states for use in 
violation of state laws. The states repre- 
sented were Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, 
Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina, North 
Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, 
Tennessee, Virginia, Washington and Ala- 
bama (F 22 '16) 

District of Columbia excise board ruled, May 
25, 1916, that persons driven out of business 
bj' prohibition laws of other states cannot 
establish mail order houses in Washington 
for the purpose of shipping liquor into dry 
states (My 25 '16j 

Georgia — Anti- shipping law providing that a 
person may receive from outside the state 
only two quarts of liquor, one gallon of wine 
and forty- eight pints of beer in each month 
is so stringent that the Southern express 
company, the only common carrier of liquids 
in small packages in Georgia, announced 
that it would refuse to accept liquors for 
shipment into the state after May 1, 1916 
(when the law became effective) the rate 
which could be charged for transportation 
of the small quantity of liquor not justify- 
ing the expense 

Kansas — U. S. supreme court held that a man 
who ships liquor from one state to another 
without labelling it as such, in violation of 
law, may be prosecuted in either state. It 
reverses the judgment of the Kansas federal 
court in the case of Joseph Freeman, who 
was charged with shipping trunks full of 
liquor, unlabelled from Joplin, Mo., to Chero- 
kee, Kan. (N 15 '15) 

North Carolina supreme court upholds the con- 
stitutionality of the act of the legislature 
prohibiting the delivery of more than one 
quart of whiskey or five gallons of beer to 
any person oftener than every 15 days, also 
the constitutionality of the Webb-Kenyon act 
(Press rept D 3 '15) 

St. Louis Globe Democrat. June 23. 1916. con- 
tains the text of an opinion filed by Judge 
P. B. Divelbiss of the circuit court of Clay 
county on the interpretation of the Webb- 
Kenyon law regarding the transportation of 
intoxicating liquors by railroads and express 
companies in local option counties, and de- 
nying application for an order restraining 
the railroads and express companies from 
this practice. State of Missouri v. Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St Paul rwy. co. et al 

See also Bootlegging; Intoxicating liquors 
— ^Webb-Kenyon law 

Investigations 

Chicago city council has passed an ordinance 
for an appropriation of $10,000 to defray 
the expenses of a commission to study and 
report on the liquor question in the city (Mr 
17 '16) 

Laws 

* Connecticut — Laws relating to the sale of 

spirituous and intoxicating liquors, 1915. 95p 
'15 Conn, state lib. 

* Federal and state laws relating to intoxicat- 

ing liquor. W. B. Wheeler, comp. 96p 50c; 
pa 25c '16 Am. issue pub. co., Westerville, O. 

Legislation 
Fight for more anti-liquor legislation. L. J. 
Vance. Case & Com 23:38-46 Je '16 

Legislation, Comparative 

Further restriction of liquor traffic is provided 
by 1916 legislation in Georgia, Florida, South 
Carolina, Mississippi. Georgia at its extra 
session in the fall of 1915 enacted three li- 
quor laws. Florida legislative houses de- 
feated a bill for a constitutional amendment 
providing state-wide prohibition. In South 
Carolina the governor failed to sign a bill 
making it unlawful to ship more than two 
ciuarts of liquor or 60 pints of beer to any 



individual within any calendar month, but 
did sign one providing prison sentence for 
selling liquor. Mississippi legislature passed 
bills limiting liquor shipments and one pro- 
hibiting liquor advertising. Massachusetts 
passed a law prohibiting the transportation 
of liquor from a licensed community to a 
non-licensed community. A bill providing 
for a vote on state-wide prohibition in Ken- 
tucky failed to pass but one which virtually 
abolishes Sunday liquor selling was passed. 
Maryland passed a local option law for all 
the wet territory to be voted on November, 
1916. Virginia passed a bill putting into ef- 
fect methods of enforcement of the prohibi- 
tion law, passed in 1914, which becomes ef- 
fective, November, 1916 

License 

Apportionment of receipts from liquor licenses 
and taxes. In U. S. Census, Bur. of. General 
statistics of cities, 1915, p 39-40 '16 

Liquor traffic: dealers in, bottlers of, and 
manufacturers of, intoxicating liquors, clas- 
sified by type of license held, together with 
annual license rate, by civil divisions, 1915. 
In U. S. Census, Bur. of. General statistics 
of cities, 1915, p 116-41 '16 

Liquor trafl^c and prohibition states: liquor 
licenses and fees. World Almanac, 1916, p 268 

New Zealand's plan. In U. S. brewers' assn. 
Year book, 1915, p 158-64 

Declares prohibition a failure and advo- 
cates license and control by the government 

Election returns, 1916 
Duluth, Minn. — Prohibition was carried at 
the election, June 19, 1916, by a vote of 
7,604 to 7,226 

Referendum measures, 1915 
Ohio — Act to provide for license to traffic in 
intoxicating liquors and to further regulate 
the traffic therein. (Am senate bill no 307 
Approved Je 5 '15) 16p '15 Ohio leg. ref. dept. 
This law, known as the McDermott act, 
was referred to the people and rejected. 
Yes 242,671 No 355,207 N '15 

Near beer 
Seattle, Wash. — Superior court handed down a 
decision, April 22, 1916, holding that the 
state prohibition law, forbidding the sale 
of malt liquor, included all liquids of malt 
origin or containing malt extract. The case, 
will probably be taken to the Washington 
supreme court in May for a final decision 
(Press rept) 

Package law 

Florida's package law, which forbids drink- 
ing intoxicants upon the premises where 
publicly sold, was in effect Oct. 1, 1915. 
Under its provisions liquor may be bought 
in containers of not less than half a pint. 
It further provides that saloons must re- 
main closed from 6 p. m. until 7 a. m. 
The constitutionality of the law will be 
tested, principally upon the contention that, 
while regulation is attempted, prohibition 
is effected (O 1 '15) 

Possession 

[Power to prohibit the keeping of intoxicat- 
ing liquor irrespective of any intention to 
sell it in violation of law: case-note to 
Commonwealth v. Smith.] L R A 1915D 172 

Poster campaign 
Anti-alcohol com. of the Boston associated 
charities is putting out a silhouette poster 
thru the women's clubs of Massachusetts, 
asking that they place it in schools, libra- 
ries, and shop windows. It is considered by 
the Boston advertising men the best poster 
in the campaign against alcohol. It is 3 feet 
9 inches long and 10 inches high and may 
be obtained for 10c at the Committee's head- 
quarters, 11 Mason St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Regulation 
Alleged "moral" objection to direct state con- 
trol of the liquor trade. Arthur Sherwell. 
Contemp R (Leonard Scott pub. co., 249 W. 
13th St., N. Y.) 100:174-9 Ag: '16 50c 



142 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Intoxicating liquorsi — Regulation— Continued 
Constructive temperance reform. John Koren. 
Atlan 117:197-207 F '16 

Reviews some of the principal elements in 
our liquor legislation, suggesting that the 
deterioration of the saloon has resulted from 
the environment created for it by legislation 
and reform efforts, and suggests a program 
of reform 

Regulation, Municipal 

Illinois— Supreme court held June 22. 1916, that 
a city has no authority under the state laws 
to prohibit the individual use of intoxicating 
liquors; held that legislation was directed, 
not against private drinking or individual 
use of such liquors, but against the traffic 
in them. Jacksonville v. Chicago & Altofi 
ry CO. (Press rept) 

Restricted localities 

Election returns, 1916 
Dallas, Texas — Barring the sale of liquor at 
the fair park. Initiated charter amendment. 
Adopted. Yes 6,921 No 5,392 Ap 4 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 
[State laws relating to] prohibition districts. 
U S Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 371 '16 

Sale 

British board of liquor control has issued an 
order curtailing the sale of intoxicants in 
greater London. The trade is limited to five 
and a half hours on week-days and five 
hours on Sundays (N 19 '15) 

Work of the central control board, T: P. Whit- 
taker. Contemporary Review (249 W. 13th St., 
N. Y.) 109:273-87 Mr '16 40c 
See also Bootlegging; Dispensaries (liquor) 

Laws 
* Connecticut — Laws relating to the sale of spir- 
ituous and intoxicating liquors, 1915. 95p 
'15 Conn, state comptroller 

Ordinances, Proposed 
Seattle, Wash. — Twelve proposed amend- 
ments to curtail the illicit liquor traffic, 
particularly the sale of liquor by drug stores, 
appear in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer Ap 
16 '16 

Social clubs 
Florida — U. S. circuit court at Jacksonville has 
held that the Davis package law, prohibiting 
the sale of liquor except in sealed packages 
containing one-half pint or more, does not 
repeal the social club license law of 1913, 
which permits the sale of liquor to club 
members and their guests; held that the 
Davis law applies only to sales, and sales in 
clubs are not deemed sales. State ex rel v. 
St. Charles social club. The full text of the 
opinion appears in the Jacksonville Times 
Union Mr 23 '16 

Statistics 

Liquor traffic. In U. S. Census, Bur. of. Gen- 
eral statistics of cities, 1915, p 33-40 '16 
Tables p 108-41 

Taxation 

Birmingham, Ala. — Supreme court has ren- 
dered a decision holding unconstitutional the 
liquor inspection ordinance, requiring every 
package of liquor shipped into the city to 
be taken before the inspector, and payment 
of 50 cents for the inspection; held that the 
ordinance burdened the privilege the legis- 
lature assured adults, namely, that they 
might receive, without qualification of any 
sort, the limited quantity of intoxicants dur- 
ing a specified period. G: B. Ward et al. v. 
D. H. Markstein (Press rept My 26 '16) 

Texas— U. S. supreme court, April 24, 1916, 
held that the statute of 1907. imposing an 
annual tax of $5,000 on each place handling 
liquor C. O. D., was unconstitutional, as an 
interference with interstate commerce. The 
decision arose before the passage of the 



Webb-Kenyon law and did not involve it in 
any way. Abram Rosenburger v. Pacific 
express company (Press rept) 

Transportation and delivery 
* Argument before committee on mercantile af- 
fairs [of the Massachusetts legislature] on 
house bills nos. 472 and 565 to regulate the 
transportation and delivery of intoxicating 
liquors. S: L. Powers. lOp Mass. state lib. 
See also Intoxicating liquors — "Conveying 
law"; Intoxicating liquors — Interstate ship- 
ment 

Treating 
Great Britain — Formal order was issued, Oct. 
1915, declaring London and surrounding 
districts to be an area, under the Defense 
of the realm act, in which the practice of 
treating is prohibited and a further dilu- 
tion of spirits is allowed. No order was 
made regarding the hours of opening and 
closing public houses. The measure became 
effective on Oct. 11 (N '15) 

Webb-Kenyon law 

Kansas supreme court, in an opinion rendered 
against the Wisconsin-Pacific railroad com- 
pany, has upheld the validity of the Webb- 
Kenyon act (N 10 '15) 

North Carolina supreme court has upheld the 
validity of the Webb-Kenyon act (Press 
rept D 3 '15) 

[Validity and construction of Webb-Kenyon 
law: case-note to Adams express co. v. 
Kentucky.] Ann Cas 1915D 1171 

See also Intoxicating liquors — Interstate 
shipments 
Intoxication. See Inebriates 
Investment companies 

See also Stocks and bonds 
Decisions 

"Blue sky" laws of Iowa, Michigan, South 
Dakota and West Virginia have been de- 
clared unconstitutional. This does not mean 
that legislation of this kind is practically 
impossible, but that the legislatures of those 
states went too far in their efforts to curb 
the sale of worthless and fraudulent stocks 
and securities. The reference for the Michi- 
gan decision is N. W. Halsey & co. v. Mer- 
rick. 228 Fed 805 

Ohio — ^U. S. district court, Columbus, O., 
has held invalid the Ohio "blue sky" law 
regulating the issuance of all except public 
utility corporation securities; held that it is 
unconstitutional because it violates the 
commerce clause of the federal constitution; 
that it violates the due process clause of the 
constitution, in that it interferes with the 
right to contract; and that it violates the 
provisions of the constitution which guaran- 
tee the equal protection of the law. The 
case will be taken to the U. S. supreme 
court for final decision. The Enquirer, Cin- 
cinnati, O., F 11 '16, discusses the law and 
gives in part the text of the court's opinion 

Regulation 
Shall the government regulate the sale of 
securities. Hastings Lyon. Ann Am Acad 
63:255-62 Ja '16 
Investments. See Insurance, Life — Investments 
Invisible government. See Boss rule 
Iowa. Department of finance and municipal 
accounts 
Report: statistics of cities and towns. '15 
(Municipal finance — Statistics) 
Iowa. Laws, etc. 
Iowa fish and game laws, federal migra- 
tory bird regulations and the Lacey bird Jaw 
(federal law), in force July 4, 1915. la. fish 
and game warden. Spirit Lake (Fish — Laws) 
Recent temperance legislation of Iowa. 2d ed 
'16 la. dept. of justice (Prohibition — Laws) 
Iron and steel industry 

* National erectors' assn. and the International 
assn. of bridge and structural ironworkers. 
Luke Grant. 192p '15 U. S. comm, on in- 
dustrial relations 

The report points out that application of 
physical force will neither establish nor 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



143 



Iron and steel indu&try —Continued 

maintain just and fair relations between em- 
ployers and employees; that they must get 
together with the idea of making conces- 
sions on both sides. The facts unearthed 
tend to prove that in the bitter fight between 
the steel workers and the employers both 
sides were equally to blame 

Present situation and future possibilities in 
the steel industry. Econ World n s 11:391-3 
Mr 25 '16 

Safety rules for iron and steel plants: proposed 
code of the industrial commission of Ohio for 
coke ovens, blast furnaces, steel works and 
rolling mills. Iron Age 97:546-8 Mr 2 '16 

United States steel corporation, because of the 
prosperity of the iron and steel trade, has 
increased the rates of common labor about 10 
per cent. In other departments increases 
have been equitably proportioned. Adjust- 
ments in wage rates in the mining compan- 
ies are under consideration (Ja 7 '16) 

Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel 
industry, 1907 to 1913. U S Bur Labor Sta- 
tistics Bui no 168 328p Ap '15 

Investigations 

Japan — Imperial ordinance was promulgated 
in Japan, May 7, 1916 providing for the or- 
ganization of the iron industry investigation 
commission. The fundamental problem is 
to investigate the possible sources of ore 
suplies and devise plans for the acquisition 
of the same 

Testing 

* Strength of webs of I-beams and girders. 

H. F. Moore and W. M. Wilson, il charts 
Univ of 111 Engineering Exp Sta Bui no 86 
50p My 8 '16 30c 
Irrigation 

* Experiments on the economical use of irriga- 

tion water in Idaho. D. H. Bark, il fig U S 
Dept Agric Bui no 339 (Professional pa) 58p 
Ap 21 '16 

Irrigation and dry- farming. In T. L. Lyon 
and others. Soils, p 682-717 '15 
Contains short bibliography 

Rural credits necessary if irrigation enter- 
prises are to succeed. Edward Gillette. Eng 
Rec 72:789-90 D 25 '15 

Slow rate of utilization of irrigation works. 
R. P. Teele. Eng N 76:202-3 Ag 3 '16 
See also Dry farming 

Bibliography 

Agricultural experiment stations, irrigation, 
drainage: list of U. S. government publica- 
tions. (Price list 42 7th ed) 24p N '15 U. S. 
supt. of doc. 

Conferences 
Plan is under way to establish a permanent 
irrigation congress to be held annually either 
at Salt Lake City, Ogden, or Boise. It is 
hoped to hold the first congress in January, 
1917. On August 12, 1916, D. H. Anderson, 
editor of Irrigation Age, started on a tour, 
with the object of inducing all the Water 
users' assns. to join the American federa- 
tion of water users 

Constitutional amendments 
Oregon — Proposed amendments permit the state 
to bond itself up to $18,000,000 for the pur- 
chase of irrigation and drainage district bonds 
where the interest on same is guaranteed 
by the county in which the district is sit- 
uated and permit the county to guarantee 
the interest. Administrative details are left 
to the legislature (Je 24 '16) 
Italians 

Surveys 

* Italians in Milwaukee, Wisconsin: general sur- 

vey. G. La Plana. 85p 40c post paid '15 
Associated charities. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Discusses the Italian colony in Milwaukee 
under the following headings: Italian popu- 
lation; Occupation and salaries; Woman and 
child labor; Housing; Boarders; Food and 
household expenses; Health conditions; Dis- 
eases of the children; Hospital care; Educa- 
tion; Delinquency; and then takes up Public 
and private charities and Italians on farms 



Jails 

Crime in Chicago. New Repub v 5 no 53 p 7-8 N 

R6sum4 of the report of the Chicago city 
council committee on crime, March, 1915. 
Protest against keeping men in jail because 
they are too poor to furnish bail or pay a fine 

— Same. Reprinted. 4p '15 Juvenile protective 
assn., 816 S. Halsted St., Chicago 

Jail problem. In Pa. Penal coram. Employ- 
ment and compensation of prisoners in 
Pennsylvania: report, 1915, p 65-78 '15 

Extracts concerning county jails, present- 
ing the opinions of men who are well quali- 
fied to speak of the jail as an institution for 
the detention of prisoners, are given 

Model jail architecture. W. C. Zimmerman. J 
Crim Law 6:717-23 Ja '16 

Real jail problem. Edith Abbott. 8p '15 Ju- 
venile protective assn., 816 S. Halsted st., 
Chicago 

Maintains that the real problem is not so 
much a question of the jail building as of the 
prisoners, and that most of the prisoners are 
there because they are too poor to furnish 
bail or pay fines. Recommends probation 

Investigations 

Study of 287 boys in the Cook county jail: in- 
vestigation made under the direction of the 
Cook county bureau of public welfare, Ame- 
lia Sears, director. Inst Q v 6 no 4 p 14-23 D 
31 '15 

Reports 
Institution Quarterly for March 31, 1916, v. 7, 
no 1, has been devoted almost exclusively 
to a study of the jails, almshouses and re- 
lief agencies of Illinois. It contains a re- 
port upon every jail and almshouse in the 
state, except those of Peoria and St. Clair 
counties, which were inspected early in the 
year, an account of the relief measures and 
methods of every county in the state. The 
commission favors the district or the state 
penal farm for petty offenders; the exten- 
sion of the system of probation for men 
and women who cannot give bail; a monthly 
grand jury in the populous counties; the 
prohibition of the per diem system of feed- 
ing prisoners, and the power, reposed in 
the governor, to close any almshouse or 
jail which fails to meet the requirements 
of decency, sanitation and humanity in its 
administration; also, a law which will per- 
mit two or more counties to join in the 
erection and maintenance of a district alms- 
house; a law to prohibit the letting of the 
superintendency of the county farm to the 
highest bidder on the land, and the lowest 
on the keep of the inmates; a law requir- 
ing the filing with a central state author- 
ity of duplicates of all orders for relief, 
issued by overseers of the poor or super- 
visors 
Japanese 

♦ "Japan's message to America" (a reply). J: E. 

Bennett. 33p John E. Bennett, 1310 Hum- 
boldt bank bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Discusses a book compiled by Mr. Naoichl 
Masaoka. designed for circulation in the 
U. S. and entitled "Japan's message to 
America" 

Some of the economic aspects of Japanese 
immigration. H. A. Millis. Am Econ R 5:786- 
804 D '15 
Jessup, Walter A. 

Teaching .staff. 25c '16 Survey com., Cleve- 
land found., Cleveland, O. (Teachers) 
Jewish association for the protection of girls 
and women 

Report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1914. '15 
S. Cohen, sec, 59 Mansell St., Aldgate, Lon- 
don, E. (Social service — Reports) 

Jews 

• Organization problem of Jewish community 

life in America. M. D. Waldman. 15p '16 
Morris D. Waldman, ex. dir.. United He- 
brew charities. N. Y. 

Address delivered at the Nat. conference 
of Jewish charities. Indianapolis. Ind. 

See also College students 



144 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Jitney boats 

San Francisco, Cal. — State railroad commis- 
sion recently declared that it was powerless 
to regulate the "water jitneys," irregular 
craft plying the bays and rivers about San 
Flrancisco. At a hearing on the matter, 
owners of bay and river steamers asserted 
that they could not afford to give the 10 
per cent increase in wages demanded by the 
Bay and river steamer men's union unless 
the jitney boats were regulated (My 20 '16) 

Jitney buses 

California— It is claimed that jitney buses are 
injuring mail service, by cutting into the 
business of railroads and thereby causing a 
reduction of train service and a consequent 
curtailing of mail service; jitneys will not 
take mail contracts, as that would compel 
regularity and continuity of service, which 
would deprive the operators of their free- 
dom to run or stop when they choose. As 
a remedy for the injury, the development 
of good roads is urged, that the people who 
own the highways may have it in their 
power to demand recompense from jitney 
owners in the form of mail serVice (Ap 29 
'16) 

Economics of the jitney. L. R. Nash. Elec Ry 
J 47:1184-5 Je 24 '16 

* Evolution of the jitney bus showing the present 

situation in the principal cities in the U. S. 
and Canada. 31p My 10 '15 Fidelity trust 
company, Charles and Lexington sts., Balti- 
more 

Letter of June 12, 1916, from the company 
states that it is advised that the number of 
jitneys in practically all the cities have 
steadily decreased, and with a few excep- 
tions they are not now considered a material 
factor in the trolley situation 

Jitney bus and its future. W: J. Locke. Nat 
Munic R 4:604-10 O '15 

Jitney situation on the Pacific coast: first an- 
niversary of the movement finds the business 
declining, with still more stringent regula- 
tion in sight. Elec Ry J 47:497-8 Mr 11 '16 

"Jitneys" in British Columbia were largely the 
product of business depression and are not 
now very profitable; legislation was slow in 
coming and is still being laxly enforced. 
George Kidd. il Aera 4:1330-6 Jl '16 

Prospect of the jitney. H. S. Cooper. Elec Ry 
J 47:39-40 Ja 1 '16 

The writer urges railway managers to find 
the reasons which have kept the jitney on 
the streets, in spite of its manifest draw- 
backs and lack of profits 

Recent jitney data from Los Angeles, il Elec 
Ry J 48:139 Jl 22 '16 

Accidents 

Oakland, Cal., passed an ordinance creating a 
forbidden zone in the heart of the city, 
where jitneys are not allowed, owing to the 
number of accidents that have occurred. 
With the entry of the jitneys into traffic 
systems in Los Angeles, street accidents in- 
creased 22 per cent, in Portland, 400 per 
cent. In other cities the number in one year 
increased rapidly and included many fatali- 
ties. The increase is laid at the door of a 
desire for speed in delivering passengers and 
a consequent recklessness in driving (My 19 
•16) 

Bonds 

San Francisco, Cal. — Fraternal alliance be- 
tween the Guardian casualty and guaranty 
company and the jitney drivers' union proves 
to be a profitable arrangement for the union. 
The casualty company will no doubt finance 
the jitney men in carrying out their plans 
to invoke the referendum against the pro- 
posed ordinance excluding them from Mar- 
ket street between 10 a. m. and 4 p. m. Offi- 
cials of several other leading casualty com- 
panies have refused to handle jitney bonds, 
maintaining that the jitney is too risky for 
sound insurance investment (Je 24 '16) 

Regulation 

* Baltimore, Md. — Ordinance providing a tax 

upon the privilege of operating., jitneys, 
automobiles and motor cars for the carriage 
of passengers for hire; regulating the opera- 



tion of jitneys and requiring a license there- 
for, and providing a penalty for the viola- 
tion of this ordinance. (Ord 10, Approved Jl 
9 '15) Second Branch Council J Jl 6 '15 p 1-5 
Sec. 5, as herein written, was struck out 
July 8, 1915 

California supreme court has not yet decided 
the case of Michelson who secured an in- 
junction in the lower courts against the city 
ordinance regulating the jitney. Soon after 
the decision granting the injunction was 
made by the superior court, the city attorney 
filed an appeal in the supreme court and the 
case has not been decided (Ag '16) 

Dallas, Texas— Proposed amendment to the 
jitney bus ordinance w^ould require a record 
showing the name of the driver of a jitney 
at all times, so that, in case of accident, the 
city may ascertain just who was driving 
the car at the time (Ap 19 '16) 

Dallas, Texas — Providing for the repeal of the 
present jitney ordinance, passed July 30, 
1915, and substituting therefor a measure 
drawn by the jitney men. Initiated ordi- 
nance. Rejected. Yes 5,447 No 5,700 Ap 4 '16 

Jitney as state and city issues: four jitney 
cases before the Illinois commission, Atlan- 
tic city bill killed. Elec Ry J 46:1057-60 N 
20 '15 

Kokomo, Ind. — Jitney ordinance has been 
passed, providing that the owners must 
make application to the city clerk for a li- 
cense and state the number of passengers 
to be hauled. Cars with a capacity of five 
passengers will pay a license fee of $15 a 
year and give a bond of $1,500 a year. No 
car may carry more than the number of 
passengers permitted in the license and no 
one is allowed on the running board or sit- 
ting on the doors. Ordinance provides that 
the price to be charged for hauling of pas- 
sengers must be designated in the applica- 
tion for license (Jl '16) 

New Jersey— Jitney law, recently passed, pro- 
vides that drivers may not operate their 
vehicles for hire until they have first se- 
cured the consent of the local authorities; 
that a $5,000 insurance policy must be filed 
as security for the indemnification of per- 
sons bringing damage suits for injuries or 
death; and that monthly statements of re- 
ceipts must be filed and that five per cent 
of such receipts be paid to the local author- 
ities as a franchise tax (Mr 20 '16) 

New Orleans, La. — Ordinance went into effect 
June 1, 1916, requiring all jitney owners to 
give $5,000 bond. An appeal to the courts 
has been made by the jitney owners against 
the ordinance 

Pawtucket, R. I. — Decision of the superior 
court in refusing the petition of local jitney 
bus owners and operators, who asked that 
the city clerk and chief of police be re- 
strained from putting into effect the ordi- 
nance passed by the city council in Febru- 
ary, 1916, has ended the objections of the 
jitney men. The ordinance has been 
amended so as to permit individual bonding 
of motor buses in accordance with the ex- 
pressed wishes of owners and operators of 
motor buses (Jl '16) 

Portland, Ore. — City council has passed unani- 
mously an amendment to the jitney ordi- 
nance requiring jitneys to operate 8 hours a 
day and most of this time during the morn- 
ing and evening rush hours. Jitney licenses 
will be issued quarterly instead of monthly, 
and during the quarter but one change of 
route on which a machine is operated, will 
be granted. A car in need of repair will be 
tagged by the jitney inspector and the 
owner will not be allowed to operate it until 
it is placed in proper condition (My 18 '16) 
* St. Louis, Mo. — Ordinance to regulate the use 
and operation of motdr vehicles employed as 
carriers of passengers for hire, providing 
for the licensing thereof, etc. (Ord 28505 
Approved Ja 7 '16) 6p St. Louis munic. ref. 
lib. 

Topeka, Kan. — Jitney operators' organization, 
May 19, 1916, adopted resolutions favoring 
municipal regulation of jitney service over 
established routes, on definite schedules, 
with a universal transfer system 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



145 



Jitney buses — Regulation — Continued 
Digest of ordinances 
Further analysis of ordinances governing the 
operation of jitneys in various cities of the 
United States and Canada. W. A. House. 
Aera 4:1034-40 Ap '16 

Public utilities commission decisions 
-California railroad commission has dismissed 
the suits brought by the United railroads, of 
San Francisco and the Western assn. of 
short line railroads against competing motor 
bus lines on the ground that it has no con- 
trol over jitneys and motor buses. It held 
however that such vehicles are common car- 
riers. Common carriers are public utilities 
and subject only to regulation as provided 
by the legislature, and so far no such regu- 
lation has been provided (O 3 '15) 
Hillsboro, 111. — Illinois public utilities commis- 
sion has rendered a decision holding that 
jitney buses as operated in Hillsboro are 
not pubhc utilities (Ap 6 '16) 
Pennsylvania public service commission has 
handed down a decision to the effect that no 
jitney buses may operate until their owners 
hold certificates of public convenience, except 
in rare instances where operated by legally 
constituted common carriers; held that a 
jitney is a common carrier and the owner, 
though but an individual, is a "public ser- 
vice company" within the meaning of the 
public service company law. As the deci- 
sion says nothing about the issuance of a 
certificate, several operators plan to apply 
for one, to find out their exact status (Mr 
19 '16) 

Public utilities commission rules 
Jurisdiction and rules adopted by the Public 
service commissions of certain states in re- 
gard to jitney buses. C. L. King, Utilities 
Mag 1:23-7 N 'Id 
Pennsylvania — Public service commission is- 
sued a general ruling governing all auto-bus 
lines or jitneys in the state on May 9, 1916. 
It provides that certificates of public con- 
venience evidencing the approval of the 
commission will be limited to the route and 
number of cars, and particularly to each 
automobile or auto-bus designated in the 
certificate; application may be made for the 
approval of additional cars, but certificates 
will be non- transferable; automobiles or 
auto-buses authorized to be common car- 
riers shall have painted on each side of the 
vehicle three lines, containing the name of 
the person to whom the certificate is issued, 
the words auto-bus and the number of the 
public service certificate; persons holding 
certificates will not be allowed to carry more 
persons than the seating capacity of the 
designated car, and the filed rates and 
charges must be posted in each car. The 
commission reserves the right to revoke any 
certificate 

Validity of laws and ordinances 
Arkansas supreme court has upheld the legal- 
ity of the Fort Smith ordinance regulating 
the operation of jitney buses and placing 
their owners under bond; holds that the leg- 
islative act, giving cities the power to con- 
trol the use and occupation of their streets, 
makes valid regulations restricting the num- 
ber of passengers, stops, etc.; that the pro- 
vision requiring a bond is valid; and that 
the ordinance is not discriminatory nor in 
restraint of trade (Press rept Ja 11 '16) 
Iowa supreme court has handed down a deci- 
sion holding that jitney buses, which are 
automobiles carrying passengers between 
fixed termini, are common carriers doing an 
intrastate business, and, as such, are sub- 
ject to reasonable regulation and control, 
which control involves the right to license or 
tax. Huston v. City of Des Moines et al., 156 
N W 883 (My '16) , ^ ,^ 

Kalamazoo, Mich.— Michigan circuit court has 
handed down an opinion holding that jitneys 
are subject to reasonable regulation provided 
by ordinance; held that owners of jitneys 
could have no fixed rights, established or 
vested, in the use of the streets, as common 
carriers, which were not subject to control 



and regulation by the authorities. The case 
will be appealed to the supreme court (My 
18 '16) 

Kansas supreme court upholds ihe validity 
of the Wichita city ordinance declaring that 
a city may charge operators of motor buses 
a heavy additional license for use of desig- 
nated streets (Press rept D 12 '15) 

Portland, Ore., ordinance regulating jitneys has 
been declared constitutional by the Oregon 
supreme court; held that the state constitu- 
tion provides for the emergency clause on 
emergency legislative measures, and that the 
classification is not unreasonable since jit- 
ney buses are in a class entirely distinct 
from vehicles excepted. Thielke et al. v. 
Albee, Mayor, 153 P 793 

Tennessee supreme court handed down a de- 
cision Oct. 23, 1915, holding that a street 
railway company, although owning a non- 
exclusive franchise to operate in a city, has 
a property right that will entitle it to en- 
join the competitive operation of jitnevs 
without legislative or municipal authority. 
Mempnis street railway company v. Rapid 
transit company et al. 179 S W 635. P. U. 
R. 1916 A, 834 

Washington supreme court, on March 29, 1916, 
held constitutional the jitney bus bonding 
law, passed by the 1915 legislature and up- 
held the conviction of the Seattle taxicab 
& transfer company of a gross misdemeanor 
for its failure to obtain an indemnity bond 
of $2,500 as required by the law; held that 
the law does not violate either the state or 
federal constitution, as was claimed, and 
that requirement of a bond of indemnity was 
justified (Ap 8 '16) 

Youngstown, O. — Court of appeals of Ohio has 
upheld the right of the city of Youngstown 
to demand a $5,000 bond of jitneys and 
otherwise to regulate them; held that the 
right to demand a bond had recently been 
settled in a decision by the supreme court in 
a similar case in Independence; that, if the 
jitney ordinance was in conflict with the 
taxicab law, as was claimed, the city had the 
right to pass the ordinance in spite of con- 
flict. J: B. Evans v. City of Youngstown (Ap 
8 '16) 

Relation to street railroads 

Atlantic City and Shore railroad company 
has passed into the hands of a receiver, 
due, according to the Electric Railway Jour- 
nal for Dec. 4, 1915, to the effect of un- 
regulated jitney competition. The Journal 
quotes an explanation of the lack of regu- 
lation put forth by the city commissioners 
and endorsed by a committee representing 
the Chamber of commerce, the Hotel men's 
assn. and the Rotary club of Atlantic City, 
in which they say the street railroad is 
"simply facing a condition that has con- 
fronted every means of transportation since 
history began," and that the present prob- 
lem of competition will work out in time. 
Atlantic City Comm. Govt, for November, 
1915, contains an article by the commission 
on the Jitney- trolley controversy 

California electric railway assn., W. V, Hill, 
general manager, Los Angeles, Cal., has 
been formed to gather data cooperatively 
on California electric traffic conditions and 
tax matters, to foster better relations be- 
tween the public and the electric railways, 
and to develop California industries thru 
proper suburban freight transportation. 
Electric railway utility legislation and the 
work of the state railroad commission will 
also be matters of interest to the associa- 
tion. The organization is expected to prove 
a powerful enemy of jitney buses (Ap 20 
•16) 

Cahfornia railroads loose more than $4,000,000 
through jitneys. Elec Ry J 47:1206 Je 24 '16 

Chester. Pa.— As a result of the city council's 
recently passed ordinance requiring owners 
of jitneys to file a bond of $2,000 and to ob- 
serve other conditions which practically 
were impossible to fulfill, a large number of 
people are forced to walk several miles to 
reach their places of business. The street 
railway oflficials have not provided for the 
extra traflElc and Mayor McDowell has stated 



146 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Jitney buses — Relation to street railroads r^Cont. 
that unless the necessary car service is 
given, he will begin action to have the jitney 
ordinance repealed (My 18 '16) 
Current tendencies in the railway business: 
author discusses effect of jitneys on financ- 
ing and earnings, danger of jitneys in 
strikes, according to analogy based on 1907, 
revival in gross and net earnings is to be 
expected. Thomas Conway, jr. Elec Ry J 
48:10-12 Jl 1 '16 
Long Beach, Cal. — According to a statement 
made by Paul Shoup, president of the Pa- 
cific electric railway. Long Beach city has 
reached a point when it must choose be- 
tween the jitney bus and the electric railway. 
He declared that electric lines have fallen to 
where they not only fail to pay ordinary op- 
erating expenses, but do not even pay trans- 
portation expenses, that is, the power to 
move the cars over the track. Some tracks 
have already disappeared and others must 
go (Ap 8 '16) 
Memphis, Tenn. — Memphis street railway 
company has presented a petition contain- 
ing 568 names to the city clerk, asking that 
a special election be held in regard to 
whether or not the recently enacted jitney 
franchises shall be approved (Ap 28 '16; 
Railway attempts jitney service: five jitney 
buses operated by the Bakersfleld & Kern 
electric railway in Bakersfield, (jal., pile up 
a $7,000 loss in seven months. Elec Ry J 
48:39 Jl 1 '16 
Rochester, N. Y. — N. Y. public service com- 
mission nas denied the application of jitney 
bus operators for certificates covering 14 
routes substantially parallel to the trolley 
lines of the city; commission held that the 
operation of 136 jitneys would not meet the 
demands of public convenience and necessity, 
as well as would improvements in the street 
railway service. The dismissal of the jit- 
ney applications was coupled with a vigor- 
ous demand for improvement in the service of 
the street railway and a threat to the effect 
that unless the recommendations of the 
commission were complied with by the N. Y. 
state railways, Rochester lines, within 30 
days, formal proceedings would be taken to 
enforce them, and should these fail another 
application for jitney operation in competition 
with the street railway would meet with 
more favor (My 19 '16) 

Validity of laws and ordinances 

Following decisions have been rendered up- 
holding the constitutionality of the regula- 
tions imposed requiring license, bond, etc. 
of jitney owners: Huston v. City of Des 
Moines, 156 N W 883; State v. Seattle taxi- 
cab and transfer co., 156 P 837; Hazelton v. 
City of Atlanta. 87 S E 1043; City of New 
Orleans v. Le Blanc. 71 S 248 

Johnsen, Julia E., comp. 

Unemployment. *$1 '15 Wilson (Unemploy- 
ment) 
Journalism 

• Better newspaper. Univ of Wash Exten Bui 

no 10 (Gen ser 81) 181p 30c My '14 

Addresses on news, editorial, advertising, 
circulation, and printing given at the second 
newspaper institute at the University of 
Washington, Jan. 15-17, 1914 

• Newspaper production. Univ of Wash Exten 

Bui no 15 (Gen ser 93) 72p 25c Ap '15 

Addresses on editorial, jurisprudence, ad- 
vertising, and printing, given at the third 
newspaper institute at the University of 
Washington, Jan. 14-16, 1915 
Possibilities of journalism, from the point of 
view particularly of cooperation with the 
teachers, in influencing good taste in read- 
ing, was discussed by Oswald Garrison 
Villard, before the Schoolmasters' assn. of 
N. Y. and vicinity. Nov. 19, 1915 

• Supplementary lectures in journalism. Univ of 

Wash Exten Bui no 11 (Gen ser 81) 83p 25c 
Je 15 

Addresses on various phases of newspaper 
work by active newspaper men and women 
before the dept. of journalism, college year 
of 1913-14 

See also Newspapers 



Bibliography 

* Journalists' library: books for reference and 
reading. Univ of Mo Bui (Journalism ser no 
13) Ja 16 School of journalism, Columbia, 



Mo. 



Conferences 



National editorial assn. 31st annual meeting. 
New York, June 19-23, 1916. Addresses were 
delivered on Americanism and the presi- 
dential campaign, by J; M. Chappie; The 
press and the people, by J: A. Sleicher. The 
. report of the president reviewing legislation 
pending that is of interest to newspapers 
appears in the N. Y. Evening Post, June 19, 
1916. L. J. Rountree, pres., Georgetown, 

J. 6X3«S 

Judges 

^ee also names beginning Courts 

Conferences 

Kansas district judges' assn. Ninth annual 
meeting, Topeka, Jan. 26, 1916. Questions 
discussed included: The law-breaking tran- 
sient; Everpresent divorce problems; Ex- 
changing places, pro tempore; Uniform rules 
for all courts; A public defender; Codes 
made by the judges; Is two years too long 
for appeal in criminal actions; Should de- 
fendants be at large during appeal; In- 
formal general advice to the jury; Failure 
of defendant to testify; Fees of receivers 
and attorneys; Paroles from the penitenti- 
ary without notice to the trial judge 

New York state assn. of magistrates. Pro- 
ceedings of the 6th annual conference, held 
at Albany, January 19-20, 1915. In N. Y. 
(state). Probation comm. Report, 1914, p 
269-366 '15 

Addresses: President's address, by C: H. 
Piper; Treatment of habitual drunkards and 
dru^r users, by C: F. Stokes; Adjustment of 
punishment to crime, by George Addington; 
Relation of the magistrate's court to the 
city administration, by R. N. Cox; Present 
and future status of the magistrates' courts: 
what changes are desirable, by William Mc- 
Adoo; Children's court problems, by B. J. 
Shove; What changes are desirable as affect- 
ing the functions, powers and procedure of 
the lower courts, by Peter Cantline; Relation 
of the district attorney's office to the magis- 
trates' courts, by F. M. Ackerson 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 

California — Making term of office of superior 
judges twelve years except judges elected to 
fill unexpired terms; and declaring them sub- 
ject to recall, impeachment and removal 
provisions relating to judges. Constitu- 
tional amendment. Rejected. Yes 47.229 
No 213,067 O '15 

Recall 

See Recall of judges 

Salaries 

iSee Salaries — Judges 

Selection and retirement 

* Proposal for judges by governor's recommen- 

dation: recommendation by the governor sub- 
ject to confirmation by the people; and sub- 
mitted by the New York short ballot organi- 
zation to the senate and assembly of the 
^i?*?.,o^ ^- Y- lip H. S. Gilbertson. sec, 
381 4th av., N. Y. 

* Selection, tenure and retirement of judges. 

J. P. Hall. Am Judicature Soc Bui 10 32p '16 
Address before Ohio state bar assn. at 
Cincinnati, Dec. 29, 1915 
Taking judges out of politics. Herbert Harley. 
Ann Am Acad 64:184-96 Mr '16 

Discusses popular election of judges and 
suggests a plan of appointment by a judi- 
cial manager who is responsible for the due 
administration of justice. Address before 
Ohio state bar assn. at Cincinnati, Dec. 29, 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



147 



Judges — Selection and retirement — Continued 
U. S. Senate judiciary committee has voted 
to report favorably to the senate the Smith 
(Georgia) bill empowering the president 
to appoint substitute judges for federal 
district or circuit judges, seventy years of 
age, who fail to retire after ten years of 
service. The bill was the first to be reported 
out of any senate committee during the 
session (D 16 '15) 

BiUiography 

♦ List of references on the selection of judges: 

appointment vs. election. U. S. Library of 
congress. 7p Mr 13 '16 (Typew Cost of copy- 
ing 35c) 

Obtained only thru P. A. L S. 

Vacancies 

Constitutional amendments, 1915 
California — Providing that when term of office 
of judge of supreme court, district court of 
appeal or superior court expires on first 
Monday in January following general elec- 
tion, person appointed by governor to fill 
vacancy therein shall hold for remainder of 
unexpired term for which such judge was 
elected or appointed. Constitutional amend- 
ment. Rejected. Yes 124,610 No 125,124 O 
'15 
Judicial procedure. See Criminal procedure; Pro- 
cedure 
Judicial review of legislation. See Courts — Judi- 
cial review of legislation 
Junior colleges 
Junior college; with discussion. A. R. Hill. In 
Nat. assn. of state univ. in the U. S. A. 
Transactions and proceedings, 1915, p 122-36 
Junior high schools 

Junior high school. T: H. Briggs. In U. S. 
Comr. of education. Report, 1914, v 1 p 135- 
57 '15 

Incomplete list of junior high schools, p 
148-9 
Junior high school. C: H. Johnston. J Educ 

84:91 Jl 27 '16 
Junior high school. C: H. Judd. School R 24: 
249-60 Ap '16 

Presented as the affirmative of a debate 
before the department of superintendence of 
the National education association on Feb. 
23, 1916 

• Junior high school: a statement of the work 

done in the high school training department 
of the state normal school and a report of an 
investigation of the junior high school move- 
ment made by Prof. C. M. Hill, of the 
department of mathematics. Mo State Nor- 
mal School Bui V 10 no 3 48p O '15 Fourth 
district state normal school, Springfield, Mo. 
Furnishes accurate information concerning 
the junior high school movement and shows 
what part the Springfield state normal 
school is taking in it 

Junior high school: [Rochester, N. T.] H. S. 
West. School R 24:142-51 F '16 

Junior high school administration. C: H. 
Johnston. In Illinois high school conference. 
Proceedings, 1915, p 32-42 '16 

Junior high school and the college. ' G. E. 
Snavely. Educ R 51:40-9 Je '16 

Junior high school and the six-and-six plan. 
In New York (city). Dept. of educ. Semi- 
annual report, July 1, 1915, p 90-108 

Junior high school in Houston, Texas. P. W. 
Horn. El School J 16:91-5 O '15 

The writer tells of the particular means 
by which he thinks the junior high school 
will meet the needs of the pupils 

Junior high school plan, by F. C. Touton; 
Junior high school: the course of study, by 
L. McCartney; Junior high school, by J. D. 
Elliff. Mo State Teachers' Assn Bui (Co- 
lumbia, Mo.) v 1 no 4 p 29-36 O '15 25c 

Obstacles to be encountered in the establish- 
ment of the junior high school. I. T. Chap- 
man. J Educ 83:537-41 My 18 '16 

Paper read Feb. 19, 1916, at the annual 
meeting of the Alumni assn. of Teachers 
college, Columbia university 



Bibliography 

• Junior high school. Library Poster no 11 n 2-a 

Ap 12 '16 Seattle pub. hb. 
A list of references with descriptive notes 

Investigations 
General education board has authorized a 
study of the junior high school, which is be- 
ing widely experimented with in different 
sections of the country. The study will be 
made by Prof. Thomas H. Briggs of the 
Teachers college, Columbia university, who 
will devote at least six months to visiting 
these institutions (Jl 24 '16) 
Junk dealers 

Ordinances 

• Regulation of junk dealers [in New York 

cities: digest of ordinances]. N Y State Bur 
Municipal Information Rept no 104 5p F '1ft 
(Typew 25c) 
Obtained only thru P. A. I. S. 
Junk shops, iVIunicipal 

Toledo, O., plan for Clean-up provides for the 
establishment of a municipal junk shop, 
where paper and rubbish collected in the 
streets and alleys can be sorted by work- 
house prisoners and sold, the money to be 
added to the street cleaning department 
funds (Mr '16) 
Juries 

Judge Barnes, at a recent meeting of the Il- 
linois bar assn., advocated the abolition of 
the grand jury system as the first step to- 
ward preventing the miscarriage of justice, 
and further urged making possible the 
amendment of criminal charges and proce- 
dure by information, reforming methods of 
jury selection, and removing delay in exe- 
cution of sentence (Je 5 '16) 

U. S. supreme court held May 22, 1916, that 
juries of less than twelve men, when re- 
quired by common law, and verdicts by 
less than the entire jury, when provided 
for by state law, are vaUd in cases, even 
those arising under federal law. The de- 
cision upheld the Minnesota law permiting 
five- sixths of a jury to return a verdict after 
being out twelve hours, and a Virginia sta- 
tute authorizing trials before seven jurors. 
Judgments awarded in Oklahoma and Ken- 
tucky, where fractional verdicts by three- 
fourths of the jury are authorized^ were 
also affirmed by the court 

/See also Administration of justice; Ver- 
dicts 

Reports 

Jury system in Cuyahoga county: [report of 

. an investigation made by the Civic league of 
Cleveland]. Municipal Bulletin (Civic league, 
Cleveland, O.) p 1-13 Ja '16 5c 

Selection 

Some needed reforms in the methods of se- 
lecting juries. W. B. Perkins. Michigan 
Law Review (Univ. of Mich., Dept. of law, 
Ann Arbor. Mich.) 13:391-400 Mr '15 35c 
Juvenile courts 

Children's court of the city of New York. 
C. F. Collins. Legal Aid R (Legal aid so- 
ciety, 239 Broadway, N. Y.) v 14 no 2 p 1-9 
Ap '16 

• Children's court problems. B: J. Shove. 8p '15 

N. Y. state probation comm. 

Address delivered at the sixth annual con- 
ference of the N. Y. state assn. of magis- 
trates, Albany, Jan. 20, 1915 

Legal problems involved in the establishment 
of the juvenile court. J. W. Mack. In S. P. 
Breckinridge and Edith Abbott. Delinquent 
child and the home, p 181-201 '16 

Tennessee — Under an act providing for the 
disposition, care, protection, etc., of delin- 
quent children, a child may be committed to 
the state reformatory notwithstanding the 
fact that such child has not been held on 
any charge by presentment or Indictment; 
held that processes before a Juvenile court 
do not amount to a trial of a child for a 
criminal offense, the court merely under- 
takes to remove him from bad Influences 
and to make such disposition of him as to 
eradicate evil propensities by education, 
wholesome training and moral Instruction. 
Childress v. State of Tennessee, 179 S W 643 



148 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION SERVICE 



Juvenile courts— Continued 

Testimony of Judge Merritt W. Pinckney, 
given before the Cook county civil service 
comm., Nov. 22-23, 1911. In S. P. Breckin- 
ridge and Edith Abbott. Delinquent child 
and the home, p 202-46 '16 

Quotes his statements with reference to 
the history of juvenile court legislation in 
Illinois, the methods and practice of the 
court in Cook county, the resources avail- 
able, the limitations endured, and the lines 
of development to be followed 
See also Probation — Children 
Bibliography 
Municipal and juvenile courts. In W: B. 
Munro, Bibliography of municipal govern- 
ment in the U. S., p 307-11 '15 

Laws 
IVashington juvenile court law. In Seattle, 
Wash. Juvenile court. Reports, 1915, p 31-43 
Ja 1 '16 

Legislation, Comparative 

Abstract of juvenile court laws. Grace Abbott. 

In S. P. Breckinridge and Edith Abbott. 

Delinquent child and the home, p 247-66 '16 
.[State laws relating to] juvenile courts. U S 

Bur Educ Bui 1916 no 47 p 819-29 '16 

Reports 

•Composite report [and individual reports] of 
the children's courts for the counties of 
New York, Kings, Queens, Richmond and the 
Bronx, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1914. In 
N. Y. (city). Court of special sessions. An- 
nual report, 1914, p 27-129 '15 

Juvenile court division. Raymond MacNeille. 
In Philadelphia, Pa. Municipal court. Re- 
port, 1915. p 117-22 '16 

* Massachusetts. Comm. on probation. Report 

relative to the juvenile law. (Senate no 330) 
43p postage 2c F '16 Mass. supt. of doc. 

* Seattle, Wash. Juvenile court. Reports for the 

year 1915; Washington juvenile court and 

• mothers' pension laws. 47p il Ja 1 '16 Seat- 
tle pub. lib. 
Juvenile delinquents 

Home of the street urchin. B. J. Newman. 
Nat Munic R 4:587-93 O '15 

Juvenile delinquency in a small city. E. W. 
Burgess. J Crim Law 6:724-8 Ja '16 

Problem of boys in institutions. E. B. Hillard. 
Ungraded 1:194-8 Ap '16 

Study of deviate children. E. E. Jones. Un- 
graded 1:159-62 Mr '16 

Treatment of delinquent boys, by T. G. Ken- 
ney; Treatment of the delinquent girl, by 

E. A. Claxton. In Southern sociological con- 
gress. New chivalry: health; proceedings, 
1915, p 204-15 

Y'outhful offenders: a comparative study of 
two groups, each of 1,000 young recidivists. 
William Healy. Am J Soc 22:38-52 Jl '16 

See also Ability tests; Negroes — Delin- 
quent girls 

Conferences 

J^Jational conference on the education of tru- 
ant, backward, dependent and delinquent 
children. Conference, Indianapolis, Ind., May 
8-9, 1916. Program includes the following 
addresses: Standardization of child saving 
agencies, by F. J. Sessions; Vocational 
training in boys' schools, by Guy Hanna, 

F. H. Nibecker and H. H. Todd; Use of 
mental tests in social and institutional 
work, by H. T. Woolley; Value of mental 
tests in reformatories for women, by Dr. 
Eleanor Little; Industrial schools for delin- 
quents by A. J. Hutton; Children's work in 
a third of a century, by M. V. Crouse; Parole 
work of institutions for delinquents, by Dr. 
Kenosha Sessions and E. N. Burleigh; Ca- 
nadian methods in child saving, by Mr. and 
Mrs. William Duncan; A children's code, by 
J. A. Brown. H. H. Todd, sec. Flushing, 
L. L 

Detention homes 
Juvenile delinquents: the problem of their dis- 
position by the children's courts, with special 



relation to short term remands. L. M. Wall- 
stein. 31p '15 Comr. of accoimts, N. Y. 

A report on the need of a detention home 
for New York city. Exhibit "G" takes up 
briefly detention homes in other cities 

Legislation, Comparative 

* Survey of legislation relative to detention 

homes for juvenile delinquents and de- 
pendents. C: J. Hill, comp., R. I. leg. ref. 
bur. 43p