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PubUskt'd monthly by the 



BVLLErriN .)t4 



Ji KB Xi)04 



New York State Museum 



Bulletin 63 
PALEONTOLOGY 7 



•^^^^' 






STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC MAP 

OF 

CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



BY 

JOHN M. CLA RK K 
State Paleontologist 

ami 

D. DANA LUTHER 

Field assistant 



PAOK I PAGE 

Intrwluction 3 ! Suct^ession of fussil faunas 40 

Formations 6 | Index 67 

Siluric '» Map rover page 8 

Devonio 11 



Mpix3m-Ja4-»7«> 



ALBANY 

UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW VORK 
1904 



Ptka 2S ctxA.% 



University of the State of New York 

REGENTS 
With years when terms cji]»irc 

1913 Whitelaw Reid M.A. LL.D. Ctiaucellor - New York 

1906 St Clair McKelway M.A. L.H.D. LL.D. D.C.L. 

lice Chancellor^ Brooklyn 

1908 Daniel Beach Ph.D. LL.D. - - - Watkins 

1914 Pliny T. Sexton LL.D. - _ « _ Palmyra 
1912 T. (kiLFORU Smith M.A. C E. LL.D. - - Buffalo 
1905 Albert Vander Veer M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. M.D. Albany 

1907 William Nottingham M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. - - Syracu.se 

1910 Charles A. Gardiner LL.B. M..-\. Ph.D. LL.D. New York 

1915 Charles S. Franlls B.S. - _ _ _ Troy 

1911 Edward Lauterbach M.A. _ _ - _ New York 

1909 Eugene A. Philbin LL.B. - - _ _ New York 



commissioner of education 
1910 Andrew S. Draper LL.D. 



University of the State of New York 



v-.-'i-^^ 



New York State Museum 

»i rector 
I THE NEW YORK- 

|P03LICtlBRARY, 



Frederick J. H. Merrill Director 
John M. Clarke State PaleontclaoisL 



Bulletin 63 
PALEONTOLOGY 7 



A8TOP»LBWOX.AK0 
ft t9f« •, 



STRATIGRAPJIIC AND PALEONTOLOGIC MAP 

OF 

CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



INTRODUCTION 

The region covered by these maps is a classical one in the 
history of New York paleontology. In the days of the original 
ffnii-xey of the old fourth district, 1830 to 1843, Prof. James Hall, 
the district geologist, frequently made headquarters on the 
beautiful shores of Oanandaigua lake and both then and in 
later years the richly fossiliferous shale beds exposed along the 
lake fthore and in its ravines, afforded to him inexhaustible re- 
sources fi>r <*olloc1ing their organic remains. As representative 
of the strata embraced within the " Hamilton group " no scries 
of exposures in the State has been so thoroughly exploited as 
these. Canandaigua and its lake, 70 years ago, were easily .ac- 
cessible and so were the numerous villages scattered through 
northern Ontario county, but about the latter the rock ex- 
posures have always been few and hard to find because of the 
great thickness of the drift mantle. Southern Ontario was more 
remote and though the township of Naples was reached by Hall 
it was for a brief visit only, and its splendid exposures and in- 
teresting faunae were left for subsequent researches. 



4 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

Canandalgua was the writer's home town and Naples the 
home of his pioneer ancestors in western New York. Dioring 
the early years of youthful enthusiasm for geologic study the 
rocks of Canandaigua and vicinity were the subject of prolonged 
and careful analysis. In the days from 1870 to 1880 the entire 
faitea was studied in such detail that the vertical range of 
every known species, and many before unknown, of the Hamilton 
stage was established and from other formations large accre- 
tions to known facts were made. So productive were the in- 
vestigations of this period in increasing our knowledge of these 
faunas that in the '' Monograph of the North American Devonian 
Crustacea," published at a later date as volume 7 of the 
Paleontology of New York nearly 200 figures were given of trik)- 
bites and other crustaceans collected by the writer during this 
time and in this region. 

The Portage strata of the township of Naples, a» a result of 
careful researches begun then aud continued till the present, 
opened up a virtually new fauna in the New York series. The 
study of the Portage fauna, desultory at first, began seriously 
only when in coinj»anionship with Mr D. Dana Luther, it was 
attacked with unremitting assiduity and in this companionship 
the exploitation of this fauna has been carried forward through- 
out the entire extent of this formation in the State. For 20 
years no circumstances were permitted to interfere with the 
yearly joint attack on this problem, and tliouj;:li this long 
standing companionship in the field has been latterly inter- 
rupted by force of circumstance, Mr Luther has diligently 
carried on the refined stratigraphic study of the Naples 
rocks and their equivalents while the writer has been more 
specially concerned in the solution of the paleontologic and 
bionomic problems to which the faunas have given rise. 

In 1885^ the writer published a geologic map of Ontario 
county. Up to that time the rock formations of the region had 
not been delineated in greater detail than given on the old 



»N. Y. state Geol. 4th An. Rep't. 



CANANDAIOUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES O 

state map of 1843. This map, which was the smnmation of some 
years of observation, served a useful purpose and has been the 
basis of the maps herewith presented. .Accompanying the map of 
1885 was a brief account of the variations of the faunas ac- 
cording to the formations represented. Our present data enable 
and require us to analyze in cjoser detail variations in sedimen- 
tation sometimes accompanied and sometimes unaccompanied 
by variations in faunation. It was made clearly apparent by 
the writer's long study of the changes in the fauna of the Hamil- 
ton shales and limestones that very few variations of material 
importance in the composition of the fauna throughout the en- 
tire series of these deposits were tangible and this same condi- 
tion has been shown to prevail in the deposits of this period 
wherever the sediments maintain the singularly homogeneous 
character shown in this section.^ 

We have introduced a considerable diversity of coloration on 
these map sheets but such refined distinctions in sedimentation 
are now essential to the complete understanding of bionomic con- 
ditions and stratigraphic changes during the period of deposi- 
tion of these strata. They are essential also as an aid to the 
correlation of the rock section here given to that in adjoining 
regions of the State. Many of the names may prove to serve 
only a local, perhaps some of them only a temporary, puq)OHe. 
Certain of the divisions have however a higher value and indi- 
cate periods of uniform deposition over wide areas in western 
and central New York. An apology or excuse for the refine- 
ment of these stratigraphic subdivisions is not necessary. 
The multiplication of local names as formation terms is one 
of the imperative accompaniments of progress in the interpre- 
tation of ancient marine conditions. 



*The attempt thus made many years ago to determine a basis of subdi- 
vision In these homogeneous sediments on the basis of the range of the fos- 
sils, proved as inconsequent as similar eflforts subsequently made in this 
series of sediments. Were one concerned to construct a doll's philosophy 
flrom imaginary laws conceived to govern the association of species into 
famiales the extraordinary uniformity of faunation in these beds should 
afford an oppugnant problem. 



6 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



FORMATIONS 

The rock formations here represented as units of sedimentation 
may be groiij)ed in broader divisions in the manner following: 



Neo- 
devonio 



' Cliautauquan g^oup 



SeueciiQ group 



Meso- 
devonic 



Eriau group 



Paleo- j Ulsterian group 
devonic '( Oriskanian group 
Silurio ^ 

or J-Cayugan group 
Ontario J 



ChemuDg be<ls 
Ithaca beds 



Portage beds 

Genesee beds 
Tully limestone 

Hamilton beds 

Marcellus beds 

Onondaga be<ls 
Oriskany l^eds 
CobleskiU beds 

Salina l)eds 



Prattsburg 
( West hill 
/ Grimes 
fHatc^h 

Khinestreet 

Cashaqua 
Pamsh (lentil in 
Casha(|ua) 
^ Middlesex 

Standish 

West river 

Genundewa 

Genesee 

Tully 

Moscow 
Menteth (lentil in 
Moscow) 

Tichenor 

Canandaigua 
^ Skaneateles 
(Cardiff 
\ Stafford 
[ Marcellus 

Onondaga 

Oriskany 

Cobleskill 
j Bertie 
I Camillas. 



SILURIC 

General observations. All these fonuations aiv so deeply 

buried under a continuous drift mantle that their vanations can 

be studi(Hi only at a disadvantage. We have indicated the contact 

lines of ihvm^ as well as the lower Devonic formations as ap- 

pimded, by slightly undulating lines traversing the region in a 

nearly ea^t and we«t dii'ection. It is our belief that such linc«^ 

l>ound (he i»alpable outcroi>s over a irgioii which l>efoix* becoming 

envelo[jed in the drift was not deeply channeled and by the 

rigidity of its rocks was able to i-esist the erosion which 

further south has broken up the softer formations into projections 

and outliers. 

Camillus shale 

The lowest formation in the rock series and northernmost on 

the (.'anandaigua shwt is that subdivision of the Salina group of 

formations which cojisists of soft gypseous shale or plaster rock, 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 7 

dark when fresh but bectoniing light ashen gray on exposure. 
These beds ai'e both underlain and overlain by thin light gray 
magnesian limestones or platten dolomites. Entire thickness 50 
f€et. 

On account of the meagerness of the exposures throughout the 
northera ai'ea of the Canandaigua quadrangle the exact position 
of the contact line between the red or Vernon shales and the 
gypseous Camillus shales, which is the equivalent of the I'ock beds 
of western New York, is not apparent. The lowest rock exposures 
are along Mud creek below Bix)wnsville and in the bed of Ganar- 
gua creek just to the north of the north line of the sheet. Here are 
two outcrops, one just above and the other about 25 rods below 
the bridge, which show a few feet of very fine hard dark bluish 
drab limestones characterized by needle cavities or styliolites, 
which mark the magnesian limestones of the gypseous deposits of 
the Salina group elsewhei'e. These Layers are easily broken into 
small and regularly shai>ed blocks. Between the dolomites are 
thin layers of bluish clay shales. In the Goose Egg, an oval hill 
1 mile south of Brownsville on the west side of Ganargua creek 
there occurs the most northerly outcrop of the upjKir gypsum or 
plaster bed. The exjK)sure is a small and isolated one and is 
obscured by drift find disintegrated shale. Gypsum was form(»rly 
<iuarried here. One mile farther south the gypsum outcn^ps at 
the foot of the declivity on the west side of the (iauargua ciH^k 
channel and " land plaster " has bcn^'n.quaiTied here for many 
years and ground in Conover's mill near by. In consequence of the 
expense attending the stripping of the heavy covering of drift, 
l\0 to 40 feet thick, the small amount of j blaster produced in 
ivcent years has been mined, access to the IhmI being had through 
a horizontal tunnel at the base of the hill. The breast of the mine 
is 14 feet high. The gypsum is purest at the l>ottom. This l)ed 
iH a continuation of the one fi'om which **Onondaga land ])laster '* 
is obtained in Onondaga county; 'M.'ayuga i>laster'' in the 
vicinity of Union Springs, Cayugji co., and ^* Vienna plaster " 
along the Canandaigua outlet in the western jiart <»f the town of 
Phelps. It is 30 to 40 feet thick in this ivgion and is composed 



8 NEW YORK 8TATB MUSEUM 

of the hydrous sulfate principally in the impure condition and not 
infrequently api>ears crystallized as selenite and in flaky condition 
mixed with very soft dark bluish clayey shale. Where the gyp- 
sum predominates the rock has a distinctly crystalline appear- 
ance but where the proportion of shale is greatest the lines of 
sedimentation are ver^- apparent and it has every resemblance to 
ordinary soft dark shale. Joints occur everywhere throughout 
the rock beds and through these the percolating waters have had 
access to the gypsum deposits and have frequently removed them, 
thereby causing a settling of the shale material adjacent and 
leaving hemispheric masses between the resultant depressions. 
Doubtjees the present hummoc*ky condition of the beds, not alone 
in this region but throughout the area of surface exposure of 
Camillus shales is largely due to causes connected with the change 
from anhj-drite to the hydrous sulphate or gypsum. There are a 
few thin even layers of hard magnesian limestone interstratified 
with the gypsum and at the top of the bed there are 8 to 10 feet 
of soft blocky shales containing but very little gypsum. This lat- 
ter bed is exi)osed at the east end of the Lehigh Valley Railroad cut 
1 mile east of the village of Victor, and also in the bed of Mud 
creek near the Lehigh Valley Railroad bridge and at Fredon or 
East Victor. The more productive development of the gypeum in- 
dustry in this region however is in the territory just east of the 
quadrangle in the town of Phelps, where for more than 70 years it 
has been produced on a large scale, though the production has 
now notably fallen away. 

Bertie waterlime 

This term, derived from Bertie township in western Ontario, is 
specially characterized by the abundant presence of the crusta- 
ceans Eurypterus, Pterygotus and Ceratiocaris. It consists 
chiefly, in the Oanandaigua region, of hard dark impure hydraulic 
limestone in thick layers separated by thin seams of dark and ap- 
parently carbonaceous matter. The rock weathers to a light 
brown or buff. Thickness 40 feet. 

The passage from the Camillus shales into these beds now termed 
Bertie waterlime is a very gradual one, the loss of gypsum being 



CANANDAI6UA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 9 

replaced by the addition of alumina and carbonate of magnesia, 
so that the succeeding stratification becomes highly dolomitic. 
The distinguishing mark of the division as already noted, is the 
presence of merostome and phyllocarid crustaceans, which at- 
tained at this time their culmination of development. 

Along the creek for 10 rods below the bridge at East Victor 
are from 30 to 40 feet of hard compact dolomites with dis- 
tinct lines of sedimentation, having a characteristic clink 
and oonchoidal fracture. The dark blue of the rock changes 
rapidly on exposure to a light, dark or ashen gray. The 
same horizon appears in the Lehigh Valley Railroad cut 1 mile 
east of Victor, though the exposure here is for only about 6 feet 
at the bottom, just over the Oamillus shales. Eastward also in 
the adjoining quadrangle occasional exposures are seen. Remains 
of the crustaceans referred to are by no means as common here as 
at thew^ll known localities to the west at Buffalo and to the east 
in Herkimer county but the horizon is doubtless the same, and 
8^;ments, heads and appendages of these creatures are not un- 
common. With them is frequently found a Leperditia, probably 
L. alt a Conrad and the brachiopods Whitfieldella 
1 a e V i s Vanuxem and Leptostrophia varistriata 

Conrad. 

Cobleskill shale and dolomite 

This is a rather obscure representative of a formation which 
has recently been shown by the investigations of Hartnagel to ex- 
tend without interruption from eastern New York to Buffalo and 
beyond. It is regarded as deposited soon after the close of the 
period of the Salina and it here consists of dark, hard shale and 
straticulate, impure limestone, succeeded by a thick bed of mas- 
sive dolomite, the top of tlie formation consistinj^ of platten dolo- 
mites. The thickness ascribed to these beds is approximately 42 
feet, of which 18 feet are assigned to the shale, 20 feet to the 
heavy dolomite and 4 feet to the platten dolomite on top. 

The section at East Victor exposes the massive beds of this 
horizon, immediately below the topmost layers constituting 
platten dolomite. In the high bluff on the east bank of the creek 



10 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

in the rear of A. B. Cooper's residence there are beds of dolomite 
which, aggregating 8 feet in thickness at the base, ai-e succeeded 
by 15 feet of dark bluish shale and these ai-e overhiin by 6 feet 
of dolomite like that below. Overlying these layers and exposed 
for many rods in the bed of the creek is a mass of tough 
argillaceous limestone 15 feet thick that bears Stromal opora quite 
abundantly and seems to indicate a western continuation of the 
well known Sti-omatoiiora bed at this horizon in Onondaga 
county. It is dark brownish gray when freshly broken and 
usually takes on a darker tinge of brown for a time owing to 
the exudation of a minute quantity- of jKitroleum but finally 
turns to a light yellowish drab. It contains many small aggre- 
gations of selenite crystals, and the boulders from it by reason 
of their peculiarly tough character have survived glacial transpor- 
tation and grinding and are strung in great numbers over the 
contiguous territory to the south, have many small cavities and a 
general scraggy appearance due to the weathering out of these 
crystals. 

A bed of shaly dolomite 4 feet thick is the highest member of the 
group. This appears in the west bank of the creek a short distance 
below a low fold 60 rods north of the New York Ck^ntnil Railroad 
bridge at Mertensia. There are several small exiK>aui*es of these 
upper beds in this vicinity, the most extensive of whi<*h is in the 
section afforded in the Hog hollow or Great brook ravine on the 
west side of Boughton hill, whei*e 25 feet of the toj) layei-s ai-e well 
displayed. The two upper membere appear ^ mile east of Fredon 
and have been quarried on the land of A. B. Cooi)er and Hiram 
Powell, and at the latter place there are the ruins of two limekilns 
where material from the Stromatopora layer was fonnerly burned 
and then hauled to Conover's mill and ground for cement; 
there are several other abandoned kilns in the vicinity in which 
quicklime was once produced from the purer layers below. No 
other exjwsures of these beds have been observed in this western 
portion of Ontario county, but they are of more frequent occur- 
rence eastw^ard, just beyond the line of the quadi*angle and are 
there more freely worked and contain organic nnnains in greater 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLBS 11 

number. The fossils occurring here, besides the Stroniatopora, are 
Leperditia alt a Conrad and L. s c a 1 a r i s Jones, 
Cyathophyllum hydraulicum Simpson, S p i r i f e r 
e r i e n s i s Grabau and Whitfieldella sulcata 
Vanuxem. Fragments of Euryptenis also occur at this horizon. 

DEVONIC 

Oeneral observations. The division line between the great Siluric 
and Devonic systems is very well marked here on account of the 
entire absence of the Helderbergian limestones, which, in the 
eastern part of the State, represent the incipient stages of Devonic 
deposition. There is good reason to believe that the uppermost 
Siluric beds which we have just considered were for a time ex- 
posed above water to the action of aerial decomposition and 
erosion before the later sediments were laid down on them. This 
has been found to be the case in Erie county, where the eroded 
upper surface of the Cobleskill dolomite is overlain by a regular 
deposition of the following formations. 

Oriskany sandstone 
In eastern New York this formation takes on, in cerlain places. 
the character of an arenaceous limestone but it is an interrupted 
deposit in its course across the State from east to west, though 
in places tremendously abounding in fossils. At Oriskany Falls 
and at Union Springs it assumes the character of a more or less 
friable whitish sandstone. The formation constantly thickens 
and thins, forming lenses, as in Cayuga county, sometimes 20 or 
more feet thick and then again thinning to actual disappearance. 
As it becomes thin it usually assumes the character of a hard com- 
pact qnartzite composed of silicious grains cemente<l by a deposit 
of silica. Throughout western New York Ihis Ihin bcnl fre<pH»ntly 
contains angular masses, evidently washed from Ihe hydraulic 
limestone l>eneath and thus forms a breccia. In Ontario county 
the exposui-es of this rock are largely eonlined to the townshi]» 
of Phelps a few miles to the east of this (juadraugle. From its 
uneven thickness and general apj^earance at thi*< phue and the 
fact that it fails entirely within a half mile on the east and a 



12 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

mile on the west it would indicate here as elsewhere, that it was 
a deposit of a Band bar running out from the irregular coast line of 
the time. This deposit in the town of Phelps is the last of the len- 
tils which the formation assumes in western New York. It is 6 
feet, 6 inches thick and consists of several distinct layers. In the 
upper part of the top layer there are many elongate rounded peb- 
bles and cobbles of black quartzite embedded in the light sandstone 
and the rest of the deposit is largely of coarse sand with a lumpy or 
slightly concretionary structure. In these outcrops the only evi- 
dence of fossils is the presence of a few obscure corals. On Mud 
creek 50 rods below the railroad bridge at Mertensia, there is an 
exposure of the same material but more quartzitic, containing 
the waterlime pebbles, the layer being 6 to 8 inches thick. 
In Phelps the sandstone was at one time (luarrled for lirestone 
for use in the glass furnaces at Clyde. 

Onondaga limestone 
In general character this important deposit is a compact, dark 
bluish gray limestone frequently carrying interbedded layers of 
chert nodules, the limestone itself being bedded in layers from 
(i inches to 3 feet in thickness. It contains a large amount of 
carbonaceous matter, which appears on the surface of the layers 
and in the shale partings between them and discolors most of the 
strata, frequently giving them a decidedly black appearance. It 
is removed by gradual decomposition on exposure and the rock 
slowly assumes a very light bluish gray color. The chert or horn- 
stone is usually nearly black and slightly translucent, but some- 
times lighter colored and bluish. It is very unevenly distributed 
in the beds in some of which it predominates and in others is 
entirely absent. The nodular layers in which it lies are frequently 
continuous for long distances and owing to their resistance to de- 
composing agencies, old exposures of the beds and the innumerable 
boulders and fragments from them strewn over the region south 
of the escarpment formed- by this formation, have a peculiarly 
ragged and scraggy appearance. At some of the outcrops one or 
more of the layers are shaly but only a small proportion of the 
formation is of this character and all of the remainder, wherever 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 13 

the amount of chert is not too laj^, is compact and durable and 
exceedingly valuable as building stone and for the production of 
quicklime. If the chert is entirely absent the limestone is easily 
quarried and makes very handsome dark gray cut stone building 
material, and the cherty masses have been extensively worked for 
bridge abutments, canal locks, retaining waills and kindred pur- 
poses. 

This formation covers a belt 1 to 3 miles wide across the towns 
of Mendon, Victor and Parmington and some exposures of the 
uppermost beds occur also in Canandaigua. The more striking 
outcrops of the rock and those which have long been most avail- 
able for exploitation are in the region just to the east, specially 
in the towns of Manchester and Phelps. In a general way it may 
be stated that at the base of the formation there are from 3 to 5 
feet of limestone, very rich in corals and without any chert. 
The rest of the formation which attains a total thickness of about 
120 feet has both chert and shaly layers scattered through tlie 
limestones at irregular intervals. 

In Farmington the lower beds crop out on the north side of the 
road leading from Manchester to Victor and have been extensively 
quarried, the stone used in the construction of the Erie canal 
locks at Macedon having been obtained from this locality. 

In the bed of Mud creek the base of the formation appears about 
60 rods below the railroad bridge at Mertensia, in a low anticline, 
the axis of which crosses the stream diagonally. Here it rests 
on the Oriskany sandstone and the lower 5 feet are free of chert 
and are crowded with corals, the stratuui being identical in 
character and appearance with the basal layer farther east. 
These layers are capped by a series of chert-bearing beds, together 
aggregating 5 feet in thickness. Above the bridge there is an 
extensive picturesque cascade and an exposure of 40 to 50 feet of 
the middle and upper beds, the outcrops extending though not 
continuously, 100 rods south of the cascade. The rock at this 
place has been worked for construction stone. 

In the section along Great brook or Hog hollow at Victor the 
lower layers appear overlying the Oriskany and at this point the 



14 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

iYK*k was formerly quarried both for building stone and for burn- 
ing. In the ledges of the (TiH?k above the (piarry are some of the 
higher eherty layers. 

For the most jwrt however the formation is buried under the 
drift and from this jwint to the western limit of the sheet no 
other outciHjp has b(*en found. 

The higher layers of the limestone, lying with glaciated surface 
lienejiih the soil cap, are seen in the old (iiddings quarry, now 
known as the Bacon quarry just to the east of the edge of the 
map. 

In general it may l)e said that this formation forms the most 
important rejmsitory of valuable building material within the 
region covei'e<l by the ma]), and furthermoi-e in the harder chert 
layers is a convenient and inexhaustible source of road material 
not inferior in quality to the field stone that has l>een generally 
utilized in the county in recently constructed roads. 

Harcellns shale 
The term Marcellus shale has Irmmi g(»nerally applied in New 
York geology to a black and dark blue shale formation lying im- 
mediately on the Onondaga limestone. The lower iHUindary of 
the formation is always perfectly clear but not so with the upi)er, 
for the mass passt^s gi'adually into the lighter gray shales of the 
Hamilton ginnip above. At Mar<H*llus village, Onondaga co., 
from whi<*h pla<e the name is derived, only the lower layera of 
this black shale ai*e well exjiosed and our observations both in 
that n^gion and thence westward indicate the desirability of re- 
stricting the term Marcellus to these lower shales, which ai-e 
typically exemjililied in the original l<K*aIitj' but ai'e better 
delimited upward in Ontario county by the pi-es^^ue here of a 
limestone cai>--the Stafford limestone. Using the term in this 
I'eslricted sense the Onondaga limestone is overlain everywhere 
by black slaty shah* with a few thin calcareous layer's and i\)ws 
of spheric calcai\H)us conci-etions. The shales aii^ highly im- 
jiervious and argillaceous and withstand exiH)Sure so well that 
their outcroiw are usually vertical or overhanging cliffs in a 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 15 

region where there has been but little deep stream-cutting. 
Owing to their rigidity they are highly jointed and rhomboidal, 
triangular and diamond-shaped slabs being characteristic of all 
surface ex[)oeures. It is difficult to estimate the thickness of this 
hed but it api)eai*8, from comj^arison of outcrops here with the 
total thickness afforded by the Livonia salt shaft section where it 
was 43 feet with a slight tendency to increase eastward, to be 
about 50 feet. The actual contact of these beds with the underly- 
ing Onondaga limestone has not been observed, but the lowest out- 
crop of the formation on this quadrangle appeal's on the west 
eide of the fill on the New York Central Railroad, just north of 
the cut near Padelford. The higher beds are well exi)osed in this 
same cut where they are densely black shales with some thin 
limestone layers. The same beds appear along Mud creek about 
a mile south of Merten-sia. 

The distinctive character of this shale as an initial imrt of the 
beds which have heretofore generally been assigned to the Mar- 
cellus stage, is its uniformly bituminous nature and consequent 
dark color and its very small proportion of lime content ex<ei>t 
in the thin calcareous beds themselves. 

Stafford limestone 
The grouj) of strata which have customarily l)een incorporated 
within the general term Maw^ellus shale embraced an interesting 
limestone layer, the jiresence of which was early noted by Pro- 
fessor Hall and which was termed by the writer some years ago 
Stafford limestone, on account of its high development at Stafford 
in Genesee county. This is a dark choi'olate and somewhat nodu- 
lar limestone, verj' hard when fresh but breaking easily into 
angular fragments on exposure. We have shown in various pub- 
lications that this formation extends eastward with a diminish- 
ing thickness and we know that its last surface appearance is 
along Flint creek in the southwestern part of the town of Phelps, 
Ontario co. Though not exposed to the eastward it is evident 
that the formation in slight thickness (it has a thickness of about 
8 inches in Phelps) occurs as a thinning wedge through this area, 



16 NBW YORK STATB MUSBUM 

fop the very characteristic blocks of this rock are quite freely 

scattered south of the line of outcrop and specially in the east 

bank of Mud creek. Two miles south of Mertensia the blocks are 

80 common and in such a condition as to indicate very slight 

removal from place. 

Cardiff shale 

The upper beds, heretofore generally included in the old 
term Marcel lus and termed by Vanuxem the " Upper shales 
of Marcellus" are finely shown in and about the village of 
Cardiff, Onondaga co. As we have restricted the former term, 
it seems best to adopt for the succeeding layers a name derived 
from these excellent exposures near the typical region, as in 
Ontario county they are nowhere seen to so good advantage. 

The Stafford limestone is overlain by a series of dark calcare- 
ous and black slaty shales with thin layers of fossiliferous 
limestone. Both limestone and shales weather to a light ashen 
gray on long exposure. So far as the fossil contents are con- 
cerned they are not essentially unlike those of the darker shales 
below but the gray aspect of the beds and their much higher 
calcareous content indicate a distinctive difference, which is 
readily marked throughout this region. Outcrops of these lay- 
ers are again very few. The best of them is in the bed and sides 
of Mud creek at its confluence with Shaffer creek in the north- 
eastern comer of the town of East Bloomfield. They are also 
exposed in the upper part of the railroad cut section just south 
of Padelford station. Directly over the line of the quadrangle 
to the east is an exi>osure on the east bank of the Ganandaigua 
outlet below Ohapinville, and here some of the harder layers 
were at one time quarried for flagstone and used in the 
village of Ganandaigua but they proved to check very rapidly 
under exposure and wear. For a quarter of a mile this exposure 
is continued in the bank of the outlet. At no exposure is the 
entire thickness of this bed revealed. The heaviest mass of 
material shown at any one place is in the section on Flint 
creek just south of Phelps, Ontario co., where there lie on top 
of the Stafford limestone about 50 feet of these shales, the cal- 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLD8 QUADRANGLB8 17 

careous material increasing toward the top though the dark 
shales predominate throughout. The gradual increment of lime 
content makes the passage from this bed into that following 
essentially imperceptible, but there are accompanying notable 
distinctions in the composition of the fauna. Taking into ac- 
count a proper allowance for dip it is estimated that the thick- 
ness of the Cardiff shales is here about 100 feet. 

Skaneateles shale 
This term was applied by Vanuxem to the beds immediately 
overlying the upper Marcellus, and exposed on both sides of 
Skaneateles lake at the north end. They are evidently con- 
tinuous into the Canandaigua area without essential contrac- 
tion or change and hence the early term is now employed for 
them rather than the designation Shaffer shale incidentally 
used in a recent tabulation of these formations. With the in- 
crease in calcareous matter the shales become hard, blue black, 
in places quite black, passing into light and softer beds above 
with layers of soft impure limestone. For a thickness of 125 
feet this shale bed keeps its distinctive characters across the Can- 
andaigua sheet though the distinction is based on comparatively 
few exposures. These deposits are exposed in the bed of Mud 
creek south of the highway bridge near the junction of Shaffer 
creek, i mile north of Wheeler and also along Shaffer creek at 
i to I mile south of Wheeler. A slight exposure of the black 
shales is also shown in a small drainage section just below the 
Robertson quarry adjoining the New York Central Railroad on 
Fort hill in the eastern part of the village of Canandaigua. They 
are shown in nearly full strength in Miles gully in the town of 
Hopewell, just east of the east line of the quadrangle. 

Canandaignia shale 
Including the Centerfleld limestone at the base 

Two terms which have become ingrained by long usage in the 
nomenclature are the Hamilton group and the Ludlotoville shales. 
The former, introduced by Vanuxem in 1840, was at no time em- 



18 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

ployed by the original state geologists in any other form and it is 
evident that the significance here of the term group is its refer- 
ence to the variability of the strata in the typical Madison county 
sections where they are sandstones, ai'enaccH)us and argillaceous 
shales, not a comiKxsition of defined Hthologic units. In other 
words the term is iised with the same breadth of meaning as other 
unit terms of the series and not as the word was subsequently em- 
ployed in the final ivjiorts of the geologists nor in the widely dif- 
ferent sense made use of by Dana and generally current. The 
division was clearly defined and its place in the series is precisely 
that ascril>ed to the Ludlowville shales in the Cayuga lake section 
as was defined by Hall in 1839. Ludlowville was not altogether 
well chosen as exemplifying the latter division, for the Tully lime- 
stone is present in the village and the Moscow shales beneath; one 
must go afield to find the true Ludlowville strata, but it is evi- 
dent that Professor Hall's conviction at that early day that 
these were the representatives of the Ludlow shales of Eng- 
land, influenced his choice of name. We would reject neither 
name in favor of tlie other. Each expresses essentially the 
same interval but a differing series of sediments and some 
marked distinction in fauna. Each will be found to have a 
definite meridional value. Hence further west and in the area 
here under consideration we find still other differences ex- 
pressed in this interval both Hthologic and faunal and are 
constrained to express these by the tenns employed above. 

The Canandaigua shale is constituted of soft, dark bluish 
and gray calcareous shales with impure limestone beds at the 
bottom, and irregularly nodular calcareous beds abounddng in 
corals towai*d the middle of the formation. Tliis is a highly 
fossil if erons mass and its distinction from the beds beneath 
lies not alone in the nature of its Hthologic character, but 
essentially in the abrupt manifestation of the highly profuse 
and tyiiical Hamilton fauna. The Skaneateles and Cardiff shales 
have been regarded as a kind of transition de])osit from 
the typical bituminous Marcellus shales indicating the 
gradual approach and encroachment of normal Hamilton 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 19 

conditions together with the advance of the Hamilton fanna. 
Tlie estimated thickness of the Oanandaigiia shale is 
about 125 feet. It is excellently exposed along Shaffer creek 
immediately south of the exposui-e referred to above and about 
a mile north of the village of Centerfteld. At this locality the 
lower calcareous layers and the shale overlain by the coral 
beds are admirably exposed and have been a most prolific 
source of fine fossils. These beds also appear within the village 
of Ganandaigua, there being exposures of the impure calcareous 
beds on east Gibson street at the now abandoned Maggs 
quarry and also in the more recently o])ened quai'ry on the 
Robertson ja^perty south of the Ohapinville road. Here the 
beds, when fresh, 'dm a fairly compact limestone but their 
schistose character soon checks the^in on exi>osurf*, and they 
have never proved a satisfactory construction stone*. They are 
however enormously prolific in corals and represent the coral 
reef l>etter exjK>sed on Shaffer creek. It is probable that beneath 
them lie the shaly beds, but the limestones which lie near the 
bottom on ShalTer creek And which are of more compact char- 
acter, though somewhat more argillac<x>us in composition, may 
prove to be al^sent here. Below the Robertson quarry, to the 
New York Central Railix>ad tracks, is a small drainage way 
which gives indications of the underlying beds down to the blue 
black Skaneateles shale. The exposure however is not sufficiently 
clear to demonstrate the presence of the limestone beds referred to. 
If they are here they would serve as a more substantial building 
stone for rough jiurposes such as foundations and cellar walls, 
than the stone above, that is now or has l)(^»n worked for this 
purpose. These lower limestones, which are specially character- 
ized by their fossil contents and have produced some species which 
have not been found elsewhere, have been designated in a sub- 
sidiary sense as the Centerfield limestone. 

The upper l>eds of the Canandaigua shale outcn)p on the east 
shore of Canandaigua lake at Cottage City and in th6 ravine of 
Gage's creek and Deep run. On the w(*st side of the lake the shale 
beds are well shown in the dilTs between Tichenor and Men- 



20 NBW YORK 8TATB MUSEUM 

teth points below the Tiehenor limegrtone, and from Tichenor 
point northward there are several small outcrops along the 
side hill as f ai^ as Hope point and over the region to the west- 
ward; lying just at the lower, declivity of the rise of land the 
rock appears where the drift mantle is thin. 

This mass of sediments is probably equivalent in part to the 
Ludlovyville shales of Hall, but at Ludlowville a limestone called 
by Hall the Encrinal limestone was taken as a line of division 
between the shale masses, the upper being called the Moscow and 
the lower the Ludlowville. It is yet to be determined whether that 
Encrinal limestone is continuous with the Encrinal or Tichenor 
Kmestone of the section under consideration and for the present 
we can not employ here the name Ludlowville with entire security. 
Hence the term Canandaigua shale is employed on behalf of 
more accurate, though perhaps provisional expression. 

Tichenor limestone 
This name is applied to a compact layer of hard bluish gray 
often crinoidal limestone which has a thickness of about 1 foot. 
It is separately designated for the reason that it is a continuous 
formation across this area and well to the east and west beyond it. 
It contains some of the characteristic fossils of the rock but they 
are not specially abundant and are frequently replaced by depo- 
sitions of strontianite. This rock has been commonly known as 
the Encrinal limestone, a name applied to it by Hall as long ago 
as 1839 and has been used by many writers in application to 
limestone layers lying at actually distinct horizons in these rocks, 
specially from the meridian here under consideration to Lake 
Erie. On comparison of this section with that on Cayuga lake 
where the Ludlowville shales were originally defined and the typi- 
cal exposure of the Encrinal limestone was located, it was found 
that there is no concurrence in the horizons indicated there and 
here by the same term. In view of the various limestone strata 
that have been referred to under this name and its extraordinarily 
frequent employment throughout all geologic formations with a 
great variety of stratigraphic meanings, it is best to abandon the 



CANANDAIOUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 21 

term altogether. At Tichenor point the limestone is exposed 
along the roadside at the opening of the ravine and it reappears 
on the shore of the lake just south of Tichenor point where it 
forms a low but well marked anticline cut off at one end by a 
slight displacement. Here it dips under the water and reappears 
at the north side of Menteth point forming a broad platform at 
the water level. 

These are the best outcrops of the formation known in Ontario 
county and the rock also appears slightly in the lower part of 
the Miles gully in Hopewell and on Flint creek south of Castle- 
ton. A limestone of similar character is exposed in the bed of 
Beebe brook, West Bloomfield, but it is not altogether certain 
that it belongs to this horizon. 

Moscow shale 
The Tichenor limestone is overlain by a mass of mostly soft, 
light bhiish gray calcareous shales, becoming darker toward the 
upper part. Thin layers of limestone usually extending but a few 
rods and irregular calcareous lenses largely composed of fossils 
are of frequent occurrence. At the base of the mass lying im- 
mediately on the Tichenor limestone the shale is very compact 
and highly calcareous and breaks out in irregular slabs. This 
portion of the deposit is verj' persistent over a wide area and is 
characterized by the abundance of crinoids which it contains in 
the most admirable preservation. Indeed this is the horizon 
which has furnished all the superior crinoid material from these 
rocks in this part of the State. It is this layer, which with the 
Tichenor limestone has in previous reports, specially the descrip- 
tion of the geology of Ontario county published by the writer, been 
designated as the Encrinal band. An exposure of this layer on 
the farm of Mr Sisson, not far from the village of Muttonville, 
now Vincent, in the northern part of the town of Bristol, afforded 
to the collectors of the State Museum in 18(50, 0. A. White anil 
C. Van Deloo, an immense amount of fine material, constituting 
the best presen-ed and most complete series of crinoid calyxes 
ever obtained from the rocks of this State. This exposure is 



22 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

no longer accessible and appears to have bwn ovei-grown by v^e- 
tation with the drying np of the brook. 8eventy-five feet above 
the Tichenor limestone is another limeRtone layer lying in the 
midst of this shale mass. This is here designated as the 

Menteth limestone, and is worthy of special remark for sev- 
eral reasons. It is a well defined bench mark in these Moscow 
shales entii^ely across the map. As a rock it is a compact layer 
about a foot in thickness and nsnally very pure bnt in places it 
proves to be quite argillaceous and nodular. It is a notable re- 
positorv' of the fossils of the fauna and tlietie aiv very frequently 
replaced by silica with a degree of delica^'y and perfection 
seldom equaled ; perhaps not elsewhere in the paleozoic rocks of 
the State nor in rocks of ancient date from any locality known to 
the writer is this replacement so satisfactory to the student of 
the biologic problems of paleontologA'. The etching of the purer 
part of this layer has afforded a most beautiful stories of the 
species of the fauna and as these are retained not alone in adult 
condition but from the earliest shell-bearing stage on, the ma- 
terial has already been the subject-matter of several important 
treatises on phylogeny, ontogeny and the systematics of different 
groups of organisms. We may refer to the pai^ors of Beecher on 
the trilobites and on certain of the coi*als, to Grabau's in\^stiga- 
tion of the corals, to the writei'^s publications on some of the 
brachiopods, etc. An indication of the delicacy of these replace- 
ments is afforded by some of the shells of the brae hiopod Produc- 
tella in which the hairlike spines on the body of the shell 
projecting for a length greater than the diameter of tlie shell 
itself, are [)reserved without defect. This Menteth limestone 
forms the first falls in the ranne at Tichenor point and also in that 
at Menteth point. It and the shales beneath ai*e well exposed in 
these places and the shales themselves si)ecially along the shore 
of the lake between the two points. On the opposite or east side 
of the lake both shales and limestone are found in Gage creek 
and Deep run, and again on the east side from Menteth point 
southward to Foster ]>oint. Farther north is an exposure of the 
limestone and some of the underlying shales at Hope point ravine. 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADBANGLBS 23 

The upper part of the Moscow shales is exposed on the east side 
of the lake in the (iage creek ravine where, about 50 feet above 
the Menteth limestone, a series of nodular layers of limestone 2 
feet thick form a low cascade. Also in the ravines of Bennett's 
landing, Gooding landing. Long point and along the lake road and 
shore to the Oorham-Middlesex town line. The same series is 
displayed on the west side of the lake from i mile south of Black 
point northward to Foster point, and in the upper parts of the 
Menteth, Tichenor and Hope point gullies. They are shown in the 
bed of Shaffer creek I mile north of the Gooding schoolhouse 
near the western boundary of Canandaigua township and also 
in the Bristol valley in several small ravines on the east side be- 
tween South Bloomfleld and Vincent, and in the lower part of the 
i-avine on the east side of Baptist hill. 

Tnlly limestone 
Ontario county includes the westernmost and final appearance 
of this important, though relatively thin, rock formation. In the 
towns of Geneva and Seneca to the east and also in Gorham, 
except close on the shore of the lake, this limestone appears with 
constantly diminishing thickness, and its last appearance is in 
Gage creek about 40 rods east of the eastern boundary of the map. 
Here it is a bed of dark bluish gray, hard, brittle limestcme and at 
its last exposure attains a, thickness of 2 feet and 8 inches. Doubt- 
less the stratum extends a mile or more beyond this point to the 
southwest, as some loose blocks 8 inches thick, apparently but 
slightly displaced, lie in the bottom of the small gully at the side 
of the road leading eastward up the hill from Beimel t's landing. 
Eastward of this region and throughout central New York as far 
as Chenango county the Tully limestone is prominently developed 
and attains at its maximum a thickness of from 20 to 30 feet. On 
the Canandaigua sheet at all other exposures except those men- 
tioned, the Moscow shales beneath and the Gorham shales above 
are in contact or separated by lenticular discontinuous layei'S of 
iron pyrites from 10 to 50 feet on the edge and 1 to 4 inches in 
thickneBB, the material of which is very hanl and in damp places is 



24 NBW TORK STATE MUSBUM 

not affected by exposure but in cliff faces is usually disintegrated. 
This singular deposit is exposed in the ravines on the east side of 
the lake from Gooding landing southward to Fishers and in the 
shore cliffs to the Gorham-Middlesex boundary. On the west side 
from just south of Black point along the shore and northward in 
ravines at Grange landing, Victoria glen, Foster point and Men- 
teth point; also following the Moscow shales in the localities in 
the Bristol valley already cited. This layer of iron pyrites is con- 
tinuous from this region westward to Lake Erie and indicates 
with striking persistence the horizon of the Tully limestone as a 
plane of division between the Hamilton group of formations be- 
neath and the Genesee above. 

The Tully limestone itself as exposed in Ontario county locali- 
ties to the east is a very dark bluish gray rock weathering at first 
to lighter shades of blue and after long exposure to an ashen gray. 

It is in two or three layers that are very hard and apparently 
compact when freshly quarri^. On exposure the rock checks 
along irregular seams and develops a tendency to split into irregu- 
lar angular fragments an inch or two in diameter. It has been 
used for construction stone and at one time was burned for quick- 
lime near the village of Gorham. On Fish creek IJ miles directly 
east of Reed Corners, where the highway crosses a small brook, is 
an exposure showing 4 feet and 2 inches of the limestone, and this 
exposure seems to have been noted in the report by Professor Hall 
on the geology of this region in 1843, then regarded as the most 
westerly appearance of the rock. A more extensive exposure is 
shown however on lot 53, 1 mile southwest of Reed Comers where 
the north and south " middle road " crosses a small brook flowing 
west into Canandaigua lake from a ravine about 40 feet de^ and 
50 rods long above the highway. Here the limestone forms a floor 
in the ravine for 2 rods and produces a cascade 8 feet high. The 
exposure continues for 10 to 12 rods on both sides of the gully 
and at the cascade the total thickness is 5 feet, 10 inches. Still 
another outcrop is found 2 miles south of the latter on the lake 
road from Rushville to Canandaigua near the residence of Mr 
Merritt Cole. This is the outcrop referred to as being near the 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 25 

eastern limit of this map and here the exposure shows not only 
the black Gorham shales above but the soft Moscow shales beneath. 
It is separated by a thin shaly seam into two layers, and in the 
lower layer iron pyrites is highly abundant in nodules, probably 
representing the commencement of the pyrites layer, which from 
here westward is the sole representative of this formation. The 
place of the Tully where the limestone is wanting and the pyrite 
layer not clearly apparent is always well defined by the sharp 
line of contrast between the gray Moscow shales beneath and 
the overlying black Gorham shales. 

The Tully limestone, as has been recognized since the observa- 
tions by Conrad in 1836-37, is distinguished by the presence 
of the species Rhynchonella or Hypothyris cuboides 
and the equivalency of this geologic horizon with the Cuboides 
zone of Europe has been a fact of general recognition for more 
than half a century. This fossil is very abundant in the outcrops 
in Ontario county but the rest of the fauna is essentially that of 
the underlying beds of the Hamilton group, specially the Moscow 
shale. We shall presently note in more detail that the fossils 
contained in the pyrite layer have all been singularly dwarfed by 
the unfavorable conditions of growth and are regarded as repre- 
senting stages of arrested development of Hamilton species, the 
characteristic Hypothyris cuboides not having been 

found therein. 

Genesee shale 

This term was originally applied by Hall to a division on the 
lienesee river section consisting of very dark bituminous beds at 
the base becoming lighter colored and more sandy upward. The 
highly; bituminous beds a'Te distinctly defined by their character 
and their definition at the top by the Genundewa limestone. It 
was clearly this excessively black mass of shale that it was in- 
tended to distinguish by the name Genesee and as it is now im- 
portant to refine the subdivision of this series of sediments for 
more exact correlation, it is here proposed to restrict the term Gen- 
esee to this lower member only. 

Directly over the Tully limestone, or its horizon when absent, 
lies a mass of densely black bituminous shale beeomm^ ^e^T^ 



26 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

fissile on exi>08ure and splitting into large flat plates. Owing to 
their rigidity these shales ai'e travei'sed by |>arallel series of 
joints intei-secting each other at different angles and producing 
in cliff exposures striking masonry effects like buttresses and 
bastions and on the surface of horizontai exposure equally strik- 
ing teseelations, triangles, rhomboids, diamonds and kindred 
forms. Intermingled with these beds are well defined hori- 
zontal rows of calcareous concretions. Occasionally a thin 
plate of limestone is shown. The beds also contain iix>n pyrites in 
nodules and nodular layers. This mass at once I'ecognized by 
its structural character as indicated has a thickness of 95 feet 
and is terminated by the Styliola limestone or as here designated, 
the Genundewa limestone. All these shales are extremely sparse 
in fossils, more highly bituminous beds showing remains of plants 
and Conodont teeth, and where the beds become a little bluer and 
slightly calcai^eous are Lingulas and Orbiculoideas with P tero- 
chaenia fragilis. 

These strata are finely exposed all through the upper parts of 
the ravines on the east side of the lake from Gooding landing 
southward to Fishers and in the shore cliffs to (lenundewa which 
lies at the base of Bare hill as it is termed on the map; on the 
opposite side of the lake in the shore cliffs from llicks point north- 
ward to Black point, and in the lower jKirt of the ravine at Seneca 
point and the ui»per parts of ravines biick of Grange landing, 
Victoria glen and Foster point, and thi'oughout most of the rock 
section in the Menteth ravine back of the village of Cheshire. In 
the Bristol valley the upper parts of all the ravines heretofoi-e 
mentioned from South Bloomtield to Vincent and also at Baptist 
hill show these rocks. They appear as far north as the ui)p<'r 
reaches of Shafl'er ci^^k near the western town line of Canan 
daigua, and west to Baptist hill along the valley of Beebe brook. 

Genundewa limestone 
A dark gray limestone in layers of from 2 to 10 inches in thick- 
ness separated by dark or black shale. Some of the layers are 
even and fiaggy, others are concretionary and nodular. Where 
purest the limestone is almost wholly composed of the shells of 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 27 

Stjliola (Styliolina) fissurella and from that fact 
has taken the name of Styliola limestone, bv which it has been 
generally known. The horizon is well marked and divides the 
mass of Genesee deposits into nearly equal parts in this section. 
It is a persistent stratum and has been traced to the east as far 
as Seneca lake and westward to L#ake Erie. The character of this 
rock is well displayed at the typical outciH)p on the shore of the 
lake at the foot of Bare hill or, as it should be termed, Genundewa. 
Here it consists of three layers of rather soft and slightly shaly 
limestone, the rock being impregnated throughout with myriads 
of the shells of Styliola; is highly bituminous and hence very 
dai'k when fresh. The lowest of these layers is 8 inches thick, 
the second, 7 feet higher, is 6 inches and the third, G feet above, 
10 inches, making the total thickness of the entire band including 
the interv^ening shales, 15 feet. These layers increase in thick- 
ness westward, become less shaly and more nodular, and are event- 
ually consolidated. On account of the durability of this rock 
it is a permanent feature in all exposures of this horizon and as 
its peculiar character makes them easily i-ecognizable the 
Genundewa limestone is important as a stratigraphic bench 
mark. The rock is of singular interest from a paleontologic point 
of view as will be noticed hereafter. Its calcareous nature being 
largely due to fossil remains it has afforded a fauna of consider- 
able scope. We find the best exposui-es of this limestone in the 
county in the cliffs north of Hicks point and in the Seneca point 
ravine where it produces the first cascade, also in the Victoria 
glen and Foster ravine and on the south branch of the Mentetli 
brook where it produced the high cascade ij mile south of 
Cheshire. The point last named is the spot at which the rock 
was originally located by the writer, though specimens from it 
had been generally known to students for some time l)efore. It is 
also displayed admirably at the mouth of the Wilder ravine at 
Bristol Center and in the ravine on the opposite side of the 
Bristol valley. In Mill creek or Mill gull in the town of Rich- 
mond there is an exx>osure several rods long in the bed of the 
Btream and the limestones are well developed and highly fossili- 
ferous. 



28 NEW TORK STATE MUSEUM 

West River shale 

Fine, blue black or dark gray shales with thin bands of black 
slaty shale at intervals of 2 to 6 feet. Spheric or oblong con- 
cretions are common, occurring singly or in rows. A few thin, 
sandy flags occur in the upper part of the beds. These shales 
aie contrasted with the Genesee shale below by their lighter shade 
i^nd their much less bituminous character, for the most part l>eing 
highly fissile and breaking out into thin, sharp but small 
laminae. The lighter parts of the mass are easily eroded, being 
tenuous and clayey and the streams that flow down the hillside 
have cut numberless narrow, deep gullies in them, the sides of 
which are steep slopes of slippery shale. The concretions in the 
shale are frequently highly characteristic and are the source of 
most of the very abundant specimens of these bodies which are 
found scatteiv^d over the region and have l)een collected by the 
residents on account of their curious forms, suggestive of 
turtles, human skulls, hats and various other rounded objects. 
They not infi-equently carry fossils in much better condition than 
found elsewhere in the beds, and these fossils of the concretions 
are more in accord with the singular fauna of the Genundewa 
limestone than are those of the shales. In the shales organic re- 
mains are of more frequent occurrence than in the Genesee shales 
iK'ueath but they are seldom abundant. 

This rock is shown in the lower part of all the ravines in the 
Middlesex valley north of the Goodrich gully. There is also a 
small outcrop by the roadside half a mile north of Rushville and 
along several small brooks in the southwest part of the town 
of Gorham. In the Snyder gully just above Woodville at the 
head of Oanandaigua lake they are well shown, and al»o in the 
lake cliff at Woodville where their peculiar blocky structure, 
due to numerous joints, is finely displayed. The deeper parts 
of the ravines at Coye, Granger, Lapham, Cook and Hicks 
points and all of the other gullies between the head of the lake 
and Seneca i)oint are in these shales; also the Seneca point 
ravine above the first cascade and the upper ]>art of Victoria 
glen and Foster gully. Northerly exposures are also shown in 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 29 

the bed of the creek at Cheshire. They enter largely into the 
composition of the lake wall on the east side from Gennndewa 
south to Woodville, but here the rock exposures are extensively 
overgrown. In the Bristol valley they are displayed in the large 
ravine of Wilder creek and from there southward in the Reed 
and Packard ravines and in several other smaller gullies on both 
sides of the valley. The south branch of Beebe brook in the 
northwest corner of Bristol township flows through a small 
gully cut in the shales of this horizon, and in the town of Rich- 
mond the rocks are exposed in the cliffs of Mill gull. Here, a 
short distance above the outcrop of Genundewa limestone, the 
cliff walls are handsomely banded by alternating layers of black 
beds recurring among the blue gray layers. 

Standish flags and shales 

Thin, uneven, bluish gray flags and olive shales. This is a 
thin bed of rocks probably not exceeding 15 feet in thickness, 
but it has seemed entitled to distinctive designation because it 
marks a transition from the argillaceous shales of the West 
River beds into the arenaceous sedimentation, characterizing 
for the most part, the mass of the Portage strata. The beds 
were originally designated by the writer " transition shales " in 
recognition of the fact referred to. It is not a persistent deposit 
for any great distance from the region immediately under con- 
sideration. The mass, thinning out toward the west, disappears 
altogether in the Genesee valley and by its absence the over- 
lying bed of black shales (Middlesex shales) is brought directly 
on the West River beds. The beds show some difference from 
those below in faunal content. Exposures are seen in the locali- 
ties already mentioned where the outcrops are sufficiently con- 
tinuous, specially in the Middlesex valley in the ravine 50 rods 
north of the Lee schoolhouse and in other ravines at the north 
to Middlesex Center, and on the west side of the valley in the 
Goodrich gully running up into South hill and ravines to the 
north; in the Canandaigua lake valley, in the Standish gully and 
the ravines from Woodville to Oook point, and in the upper 



30 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

reaches of the ravines farther north; in Bristol hollow near the 

lower part of the Randall gully and also in the Reed and Wilder 

ravines. 

Middlesex black shale 

It has been custouiary to regard the Genesee group of strata as 
closing with the foregoing and to place the Middlesex shale at the 
base of the Portage series. This Middlesex shale is a very black, 
somewhat shity shale with thin arenaceous gray flags in the upi>er 
and lower portions. When Professor Hall introduced the desig- 
nation Genesee shale for the black shales in the Genesee river swv 
tion, he exjiressed the opinion that eventually it might be found 
advisable to include them within the limits of the Portage foi-ma- 
tion. We have shown that on paleontologic grounds this is neces- 
sary, and it is clearly apparent that the geologic character of the 
deposit shows that the Genesee black shales are but an intro- 
ductory phase of Portage sedimentation repeated in the Middle- 
sex and Rhinestreet bands. The Middlesex shale attains a thick- 
ness of 35 feet where fully exiK)sed in the Middlesex valley and 
decreases westward to 25 feet in the valley of Iloneoye lake, just 
l)eyond the wei*t line of these maps. 

Fossils am of great rarity. Plant remains occur in the shales, 
and these have also afforded a single specimen of the goniatite 
H a n d 1) e r g e r o c e r a s s y n g o n u m. Orcasitimally a char- 
acteristic lamellibranch of the Cashaqua shales above apjK^ars in 
the gray flags of the lower beds. This mass of black shale is con- 
tinuous westward to Lake Erie but it decro^ises gradually in thick- 
ness till on the Lake Erie shore at the mouth of Pike creek there 
are but about fwt of it remaining. The rock is well exposed 
in the Middlesex valley in most of the ravines between the Lee 
schoolhouse and the village of Middl<*sex. It is seen on the road- 
side on the east side of the swamj) at the head of the lake and in 
the Canandaigua lake valley by the ixwd IJ miles south of 
Woodville, also on the road leading west at the head of the lake 
and in the Standish, Coye, Granger, Lapham, Cook, Hicks point 
and Seneca point ravines, by the side of the Academy road 1 mile 
south of Cheshire. In the Bristol valley it may be observed in 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 31 

all the ravines already mentioned and in the Uamilton gully, Mill 
gull and Jason gull in the ^'alley of Honeoye lake. 

Cashaqua shale 

This name was introduced by Professor Hall for the characteris- 
tic olive gray shales with occasional flags and sandstone as devel- 
ojied along the Cashaqua creek, a confluent of the Genesee river. 
As these beds are continuous from that point eastward to the area 
under consideration the tenn is completely applicable hei*e. 
In this area this mass of shales attains a thickness of about 230 
fei^t, and is mostly bluish gray and olive shale with a few thin dark 
layers and with two bands of thin sandstone and numerous flags 
in the lower part. Calcareous concretions and discontinuous con- 
cretionary layers occur in the upper part. As a whole the deposit 
in Ontario county is more arenaceous and less calcareous than 
that in the Genesee river section. In the lower 75 feet the more 
Ran<Jy beds are rarely fo«siliferoue, showing occasional lignites and 
frequently the objei^t termed F u c o i d e s g r a p h i c u s . At 
about the middle of the series the shales become softer, and here 
the characteristic fauna of these Portage rocks is typically devel- 
oi>ed with numerous goniatites, Bacttites and lamellibranchs of 
the genera Buchiola, Lunulicardium, Ontaria etc. The character 
of this fauna is referred to in a subsequent paragraph. Above 
these more highly fossiliferous beds is a band of compact sand- 
stone and hard shales which is succeeded by 57 feet of soft, blue 
and olive clay shales, characterized by nodular structure due to 
irregular concretions of lime carbonate of small size. Six feet 
above the sandstone is a singular concretionary limestone which 
is continuous in character, attains a thickness of about G inches 
and is a mass of red and greenish knunenzel abounding in gonia- 
tites and Orthoceras. This layer is so distinctive, both on account 
of its color, its contents and its composition that it is here desig- 
nated as the 

Parrish limestone. It appeare first on the western l>oundary of 
the Naples valley and is continuous fi\)m there eastward as far 
as Big stream and Glen Eldredge on Seneca lake. Its place in 



32 NEW TORK 8TATB MUSBUM 

the BuccesBion is apparently indicated in the western part of the 
quadrangle by a row of fossiliferous spheric concretionB which 
ap|)ear in the Bristol and Honeoye valleys. 

The Cashaqua shale, flags and calcareous beds constitute the 
principal situs of the fauna of the rocks and their exposures can be 
studied to best advantage in the admirable outcrops on the east 
side of the Naples valley, specially in the great Parrish gully at 
Tarrish, the Caulkins gully and other small ravines cutting back 
into Hatch hill. The rocks are also shown in the face of Hatch hill 
behind the fair-ground and southward. The west side of this 
valley also afFords some admirable exposures as in the Lincoln 
gully and- thence northward on the western slope of Canandaigua 
lake in scores of ravines and gullies and along the dugway roads 
as far north as Cheshire. They are also displayed in the upper 
parts of all the gullies in Bristol Center southward to nearly 
the end of the valley and along Egypt brook and its various 
branches in South Bristol and also in the upper part of Jason 
gull. In the Honeoye lake valley the decreasing proportion of 
the arenaceous layers toward the west is noticeable, the shales 
becoming more calcareous and concretionary. The Briggs and 
Hamilton gullies near the west line of the map in the Honeoye 
valley afford particularly favorable outcrops for study. Nearly 
all the Cashaqua shales are to be seen under specially favorable 
conditions along the Whetstone brook west of Honeoye village 
from the Livonia road to the falls at the Devil's Bedroom. East- 
ward of Naples they are found in Italy hollow at the mouth of the 
ravine which crosses the road at the Big Tree schoolhouse. In 
the Middlesex valley they are well seen in the Clark and Mower 
gullies and also in the Lee, Goodrich and other small ravines 
farther north toward Middlesex Center. In fact in these high 
lands of the southern part of the map wherever the relatively 
thin drift mantle has been transected by streams these beds are 
brought to light. 

Bhinestreet black shale 

Black slaty shale with a small proportion of blue shale and oc- 
casionally thin but lenticular sandstones. Thickness 18 feet on 
the eastern boundary of the quadrangle increasing to 30 feet at 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLBS QUADRANGLES 33 

the western. This tendency to increase westward is manifested 
beyond the area of the map, for we find the bed to be continuous 
from here to Lake Erie, where its thickness is more than 200 feet. 
It may be traced eastward to Seneca lake, where its thickness is 
but 1 foot. 

The rock is essentially devoid of organic remains with the excep- 
tion of fragments of plants, specimens of Spathiocaris, teeth 
of Conodonts and a tew small Lingulas. These rocks are to be 
seen in Italy hollow in the ravine already referred to near the Big 
Tree schoolhouse, in the Naples valley at the foot of Hatch hill 
near the salt well, on both sides of the Naples and Middlesex val- 
leys to Middlesex Center, and on the north side of Genundewa. The 
formation takes its name from the exposure on the road running 
from Naples to Seaman hill, on the west side, which is known 
locally as Rhinestreet and along which there are constant expo- 
sures of this formation. They may be seen also in the upper part 
of all the large ravines on the west side of Canandaigua lake to 
the iron bridge over the Foster gully, 2 miles south of Cheshire ; 
in the Bristol valley in the ravines on both sides as far north as 
Bristol Center and about i mile north of Boswells Comers; in the 
Honeoye valley in all the ravines between the Hancock farm and 
the foot of the lake. 

Hatch shale and flags 

Blue and olive shales with frequent thin layers of black shale 
and thin sandstones. The sandstones become more frequent 
and thicker in the upper part of the formation ; the lower layers 
carry very symmetric calcareous concretions from 2 inches to 2 
feet in diameter. This mass immediately overlying the Rhine- 
street black shales, or the second black hand of some of our 
reports, attains a thickness of 290 feet and its resistant char- 
acter, due to the presence of many layers of hard sand- 
stone and flags, is the fundamental cause of the highlands on 
the Naples quadrangle. These beds are equivalent in part to 
the Qardeau beds of Hall in the Genesee valley section, but 
there are reasons for not applying the latter term in the Naples 
meridian as it can not be employed with exactitude. 



34 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

These upper beds occaflionally carry the fossils of the Oaaha- 
qua frhale, but in no place are they of frequent occurrence except 
occasionally in replaced condition in the calcareous concretions. 
Toward the more sandy middle and upper portions of the series 
plant remains are not infrequent and fnom these beds has been 
obtained a Ijepidodendron of commanding: proportions, taken 
from a horizon at the mouth of Grimes gully, Najiles, 74 feet above 
the Rhinestreet shales. The specimen when taken out measured 
15 feet in length from the root upward. 

Exposures of these beds are found throughout the Naples 
valley and constitute the entire lower part of Hatch hill, in the 
Tannery gully just south of Naples and in the Grimes gully on 
the west side, also in the higher* parts of the Oaulkins, ParriA, 
Hoecker and Lincoln gullies and in all accessible ravines of iHie 
Naples and southern parts of the Middlesex valley. Along Can- 
andaigua lake they are seen in the upper parts of the deeper 
i-avines on the west side, south of the Academy tract, in Bris- 
tol valley in the upi)er parts of all the ravines between Boswells 
Corners and Bristol Center and in the Honeoye valley just west 
of the sheet between Hunts hollow and the Briggs gully. 

Grimes sandstone 
Compact or laminated, light bluish gray sandstones in layers 
4 inches to 3 feet thick, separated by hard, blue gray shales. 
In the vicinity of the Tannery gully, ^ mile south of the village 
of Naples, a part of the sandstone is highly calcareous owing 
to the presence of masses of molluscan shells, mostly in 
comminuted condition. Thickness about 50 feet. In the face 
of the precipice at the third falls of the Grimes gully and ex- 
posed in the escarpment on the east side of the ravine 10 feet 
above the water, is a thin layei* of soft shale which has been 
found to contain Bucliiola retrostriata, Mantico- 
ceras pattersoni, Bactrites and other tyi)ical members 
of the Naples fauna. This is its highest appearance in this sec- 
tion. Twenty-four feet higher and feet below the crest of the 
falls occurs the Grimes sandstone which bears a brachiopod fauna 
with Liorhynchus, Atrypa reticularis, Productella, 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 35 

Ambocoelia, Leptostrophia mucronata, etc.; the 
firet appearance of this fauna in thi« section and to be re- 
garded as an incursive appearance of the Ithaca fauna lying 
farther to the east. This formation lies 599 feet above the 
base of the Middlesex black shale and this is the thick- 
ness to be ascribed to the Portage formation in this merid- 
ian as formerly defined. In the Tannery gully on the 
east side of the Naples valley the upper beds have afforded a 
number of singular organisms associated together but not con- 
curring with species of the characteristic Naples fauna. These 
are specially noted elsewhere and consist of the fossil Parop- 
sonema, believed to be an aberrant echinoid, some forms of 
annelids described as Protonympha and Palaeochaeta, also a large 
Orbiculoidea, some strange and undescrihed linguloids, etc. The 
division occurs also at the Naples reservoir, in the escarpment on 
Hatch hill, in the Caulkins gully and the quarry near it, at the 
top of the dugway on the Hunts hollow road, in the road near 
Freeds and along the hillside northward to Rhinestreet, also 
near the Muck place on Seaman hill and in the small ravine near 
the Gardner property, 2 miles north of Bristol Springs. In 
Bristol hollow it appears in the upper parts of the Randall and 
Reed gullies and on the north side of Worden hill; in the 
Honeoye valley on the hillside above E. Alger's i)roperty and 
northward to the upper part of the Briggs gully. 

West Hill flags and shale 
Light bluish gray sandstones or flags from 2 to 12 inches thick, 
separated by beds of dark blue, olive or black shale. The sand- 
stones are sometimes quite calcareous owing to the presence of 
crinoid stems and other fossils usually in fragmentary condition. 
Thickness 550 feet. This heavy mass of arenaceous deposits like 
the Hatch beds below is partially equivalent to the Qardeau 
series of Hall as developed in the Genesee valley. It has however 
undergone a change faunistically, and remains of the Naples 
fauna are now no longer seen, though the rocks contain fossils 
in some measure; but these are largely brachiopodous and indi- 
cate continued presence of the Ithaca fauna. The sandstones are 



36 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

quite sbari»ly distingiiislied from the Grimes sandstones below 
on account of their thinner bedding and bluish color. This divi- 
sion is ex|>os(Hl in Italy hollow at the south end along Flint creek 
and in the Italy gully, in the Naples valley in the Tannery gully 
«and Grimes gully. It is found on the south side of the road 
leading easterly across Deyx) basin ^ 2 miles south of Naples, 5 or 
6 rods from the Ingleside I'oad and near the foot of the hill. Here 
it is an isolated exjxxsure and its stratigniphic position can not 
be ascertained with precimon. It is however not far from 
100 feet alH)ve the toj) of the Grimes sandstx>ne. At this spot 
it has produced a number of interesting fossils; Hydno- 
ceras tuberosum, H. variabile, Ceratodictya 
c i n c t a , llysteracanthus, 8 p i r i f e r m e s a c o s t a 1 i s , 
Atrypa hystrix, Productella, Ambocoelia etc. The same 
horizon is found near the residence of Charles S. Sutton on the 
north side of the road leading from Nai)lcs to West hollow and 
here also brachiopods are found. The same beds are seen on the 
lands of the Pottle estate, 1^ miles north of the last named ex- 
posure. One of the sandstones here contains fossils in great 
abundance, principally of the same species as found in the 
Deyo basin and on the West hollow road. A survival of the 
Naples fauna is notable here in the presence of the species 
Manticoceras oxy. In the road leading northward on 
the top of Worden hill a ledge of sandstone is exposed on both 
sides that contains masses of brachiopods. This locality is about 
1 mile north of the south line of Bristol township. On Hatch 
hill are outcix)ps in the lower part of the so called Three Cornered 
clearing near the top. The rocks «are also seen at the upper end 
of the Hoecker and Lincoln gullies and on the hill north of the 
Seaman schoolhouse, and in many small ravines on the sides of 
High point. Frost hill and Gannett hill. They are also the sur- 
face rock over the principal part of the town of Canadice to the 
west of the sheet and extend over the tops of the ridges on both 
sides of the Bristol valley for a mile or two into the town of 
Bristol. 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES <3UADRANGLBS 37 

Highpoint sandstone 
Liglit gray SiHidstoiies in layers from 3 inches to 4 feet in- 
thickness separated by thin beds of hard blue shale. Some of 
the layers of the rock are compact and calcareous but the larger 
portion is laminated and sometimes shaly. I^enticular beds of 
iin]>ure limestone composed of crinoid stems and other fossils 
(HMur at High ])oint and other outcrops. These sandstones are 
thinner and softer toward the east. Thickness 100 feet. These 
beds are nowhei*e sufficiently exposed to admit of detailed exam- 
ination of the entire series and the upper and lower contact, 
but 50 to 75 feet of the formation project in the cliff at the 
south end of High point at an elevation of 1850 to 1025 feet A. T., 
and the talus that covers the strata at the base of the hill is 
I)rinripally com[>osed of fallen slabs and blocks of the sandstone. 
In structure, texture and general appearance they differ from 
the (5 rimes sandstone only in being somewhat coarser and weath 
ering to a lighter color but they likewise differ notably in their 
fossil contents. Fucoides verticalis, which is not seen 
in the lower rocks, is common throughout these beds. The most 
striking fwiture of this exposure consists of an irregular stratum 
of calcareous sandstone and conglomerate 7 feet thick where 
thickest and thinning out gradually around both sides of the hill. 
This is a mass of brachiopods, corals and crinoid stems cemented 
into a hard, compact layer that resists the effects of weather and 
at one jdace projects 12 feet beyond the soft sandstone beneath it. 
Several fallen slabs of this calcareous layer 10 to 15 feet across 
are to l>e seen at the foot of the escarpment and many others 
have l»een broken up and utilized in the construction of firei»laces 
in the ]»ioneer days and later in the arches of furnaces beneath 
steam boilers, its resistance to the disintegrating effect of heat 
making the "Iligh Point finestone " highly esteemed for these 
pur]r>oses in this locality. It has, however, now fallen into 
disuse. This highly fossiliferous layer is about 50 feet below 
the top of the sandstone. In it a well defined Chemung fauna 
with S p i r i f (» r d i s j u n c t u s ocrurs together with s]>ecies 



38 NEW TORK 8TATB MUSEUM 

which were originally described from the upper Devonic beds 
of Iowa, and attention is here directed to a more complete state- 
ment of the fossil contents of these beds in a subsequent para- 
graph. The rock is not exposed on the south or west sides of 
the depressions that isolate High point, though calcareous layers 
of somewhat similar character occur at about the same horizon 
in the clifF on the northwest end of Knapp hill and also in the 
escarpment near Mr J. Eldridge's residence on the road from 
Garlinghouse to Atlanta. Hard, dark shales and thin sandstones 
come in again at the top of the High point bluff and are slightly 
exposed in the fields above but no fossils were observed in them 
and nothing but their position distinguishes them from those 
below. On the south side of the Naples valley the Highpoint 
beds appear in some isolated outcrops on the north slope of Pine 
hill and in the bluff on the west side of Knapp hill and the thick 
sandstones that form the escarpments above the talus in the 
vicinity of McClarie's quarry on the dugway road just east of 
North Cohocton are in the same horizon, but the rock here is 
almost barren of fossils. They are also to be seen in Lyons hol- 
low by the side of the road leading east, 2 miles south of Ingleside; 
in the upper part of Italy gully and on the tops of Worden and 
Gannett hills. Careful stratigraphic work has determined that 
the Highpoint sandstone is continuous with the original Portage 
sandstones of the Genesee valley, which in Professor Hall's sec- 
tion capped the Portage section there. It has also been pointed 
out that while these horizons are stratigraphically continuous 
the fauna is very different in the two sections. The Portage 
sandstones still carry the Naples fauna, while in the Naples region 
that fauna has long before this date been extinguished by the 
appearance, first of the Ithaca, then of the Chemung fauna from 

the east. 

Prattsburg sandstone and shale 

In the lower part of this division the sandstones are mostly 
olive-gray, rather soft and schistose or in thin even layers, and 
the shales are in part soft and blocky, similar in appearance to 
the Ca-shagua shales. Layers of blue, olive and black shales occur. 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 39 

Thickness from 200 to 225 feet. These beds lie in the horizon of 
the Wiscoy shales of the Genesee river section, which are beds 
there overlying the Portage sandstones but still carrying the 
Portage fauna though somewhat modified in character. There 
also they are overlain by strata carrying the Chemung fauna 
which appears first at Ix)ng Beards riffs with S p i r i f e r 
disjunctus. 

The upper part of the Prattsburg beds in the Naples region arc 
light bluish gray sandstones, usually in lentils and compact or 
uneven layers. The interstratifled shales are mostly blue and 
hard, but black and slaty layers occur frequently. These beds 
have a thickness of 300 to 400 feet in the higher land of the 
southern part of the quadrangle. The lower portion, or the 
equivalent of the Wiscoy horizon, is exposed in a small outcrop 
on the road leading from Marsh's Comers southward up Pine hill 
near the top, and a mile still fari:her east on the road leading from 
Ingleside to Lent hill is another exposure in approximately the 
same horizon, from which Manticoceras oxy has been 
obtained. Whitney's quarry' on the southwest side of Pine hill, 
which has produced a large amount of flagstone laid for sidewalks 
in the village of Naples and adjoining towns, is in this horizon. 
It is exposed also along the dugway road leading up Lent hill 
southwest from Ingleside near the road on the east side of Pine 
hill, in the Woodworth quarry 2 miles south of North Cohocton, 
on Lent hill in the ravine west of the Wheaton farm, in the upper 
part of the Italy gully, and by the roadside 2 miles north of 
Prattsburg. The upper beds are seen in the Wheaton quarry 
on the hill south of Atlanta, by the roadside in several places in 
the vicinity of Lent Hill church and in numerous small outcrops 
on the high ridge between the Prattsburg valley and Lyons 
hollow. 



40 NEW YOniv STATE MUSEUM 

SUCCESSION OF FOSSIL FAUNAS 

Camillus shale 

We know of no traces of organisms in these de])osits except 

an occasional ostracode shell (Leperditia) and a trail made on 

the soft mud bv such an organism. The sediments were laid 

down in a sea too shallow and too strongly saturated with brine 

vand alkalis to encourage the existence of life. 

Bertie waterlime 
The fauna of these beds is that peculiar association of crusta- 
ceans which has made this horizon one of the most interesting 
in the entire series of the New York formations. Occasionally 
in the outcrops and more freely in the loose blocks of this rock 
scattered over the country south of the line of outcrop, are 
specimens of Euryi)terus rem i pes Dekay and Cerat- 
iocaris acuminata Hall, with abundant Leperditias, 
Lingulas and an occasional Orbiculoidea. Westward of this 
region specially in the exiK)Sure in the quaiTJes of the Buffalo 
Cement Co. at Buffalo, and eastwai*d in the towns of Sauquoit 
and Litchfield, Herkimer co., these cnistaceans with others are 
found in great abundance and perfection, but in the intervening 
region they have thus far proved of rarer occurrence. The fauna 
of these merostome crustaceans is widely known as one marking 
the closing stages of Siluric time through northern latitudes on 
lK)th hemispheres. 

Cobleskill shale and dolomite 

The fauna here is sjmrse but indicative of tlie relation of the 

horizon to its more typical eastward out<rops. The list of species 

at present known is : 

Eurypterus, occasional fragments 
Leperditia alta Conrad 
L. scalaris Jonca 
Whltfieldella sulcata Vanuxem 



Spirifer erieusis Orahau 
Cyathophyllum liydraulicum Simp- 
son 



Oriskany sandstone 
This rock carries no fossils in this district. At Ihiion Springs, 
Cayuga co. is the nearest point where the characteristic fauna 
of the arenaceous deposits is developed with Spirifer are- 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 41 

n o 8 u s CJonrad, Hipparionyx proximus Vaiiuxem, 
Meristella lata Hall, Chonostrophia com pi a - 
n a t a Hall, etc. A few imperfect fossils have been found in the 
outcrops on Flint creek near Phelps .Junction but mostly when the 
rock takes on the form of a thin quartzite or breccia as here it is 
devoid of fossils. 

Onondaga limestone 

Throughout the exposures of this rock fossils are abundant but 
they are not easily obtained because of the difficulty in setting 
them free of the matrix. Experience has shown that the endeavor 
to acquire the remains from the unweathered exiK^sui'es is for the 
most x>art fruitless as well as arduous except where there are shale 
masses intercalated between the limestone beds. The fauna is 
sjfeiially jirofuse in corals but the agglomerations of these or- 
giinisms which are seen in the lower beds of this district become 
immense coral plantations farther westward in the vicinity of 
Leroy, Genesee co. Nature has helped to solve the difficulties at- 
tending the extraction of these fossils by scattering over the 
county and through the soil southward innumerable blocks of 
this rock. The corals are partially silicified in the bed and on 
exposure become more so and the dissolution of the calcareous 
matrix makes the occurrence of silicified corals of this format iou 
extremely comm«on over much of the region covered by this map. 
The layers of the limestone that are associated with and more 
or less impregnated by the chert, weather into all sorts of irreg- 
ular shapes according to the degree of dissemination of the lime 
throughout them and when this silicious rock has become 
thoroughly " rotten," that is, has lost all its lime, the silicious 
residuum retains with minutest i)recision the impressions of the 
organic contents. By the examination of such masses of rotten 
stone has the fauna in an important degree been made out, and an 
illustration of their significance is seen in the fact that these 
masses from Ontario county [>i^duced speciihens of trilobites 
alone of which 55 drawings were made for the monogi*ai)h of these 
organisms published as' volume 7, Palaeontology of Xeiv York. 

In these weathered blocks students of this fauna will find their 
material in most suitable form for study; these will not however 



42 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



contribute to a knowledge of the zonal distribution of the 8{)ecies. 
Of this condition we know little; probably variations in range 
are so slight that the effort to ascertain them would produce a 
result in no way commensurate with the labor involved. 

The student may expect to find in the Onondaga limestone of 
this district the following species: 



Fishes 
Machaeracanthus peracutus New- 

berry 
M. Bulcatus Newberry 
Onychodus sigmoides Newberry 

Crustaceans 
Acidaspis caUicera Hall d Clarke 
Beyrichia subquadrata Jones 
Bollia bilobata Jones 
Cyphaspls diadema Hall d Clarke 
C. hybrida Hall d Clarke 
C. minuscula Hall 

C. stephanophora Hall d Clarke 
Dalmanites aegeria Hall 

D. ancbiops Oreen 
D. bifldus Hall 

D. calypso Hall 

D. corona tus Hall 

D. diurus Orccn 

D. myrmecophorus Orcen 

D. pygiuacus Hall d Clarke 

D. selenurus Conrad 

Eurychilina? reticulata Ulrich 

Leperdltia cayuga Hall 

Licbas contusus Hall d Clarke 

L. dracon Hall d Clarke 

L. eriopis Hall 

L. gryps Hall d Clarke 

L. hispidus Hall d Clarke 

Moorea kirkbyi Jones 

Palaeocreusla devonica Clarke 

Phacops bombifrons Hall 

P. oristatfi var. plpa Hall d Clarke 

Pbaetbonides gcmmaeus Hall d 

Clarke 
P. naviceUa Hall d Clarke 
Primitia clarkei Jones 
Proetus clarus Hall 
P. crassimarginatus Hall 
P. folliceps Hall d Clarke 



P. microgcmma Hall d Clarke 
P. ovifrons Hall d Clarke 
P. steiiopyge Hall d Clarke 
P. verneuili Hall d Clarke 
Turrilepns cancellatus Hall d Clarke 
T. fiexuosus Hall d Clarke 

Ccphalopods 
Cyrtoceras cituin Hall 
Gompboc-eras absens Hall 
G. eximium Hall 
Gyroceras cyclops Hall 
G. laciniosum Hall 
G. matberi Conrad 
G. trivolve Conrad 
G. undulatum Vanuxem 
Orthoceras geueva Clarke 
O. inoptatum Hall 
O. profundum Hall 
O. sceptmm Hall 
O. thoas Hall 

Pieropods 
Ilyolitbiis ceratopbilus Clarke 
11. Ugea Hall 
Tentaculites scalariformis Hall 

Gastropods 
BeUerophon curyilineatus Conrad 
B. pelops Hall 
Callonema licbas Hall 
Diapborostoina lineatiim Conrad 
D. turbinatum Hall 

D. unisu lea turn Conrad 
Euompbalus decewi Billings 

E. laxus Hall 
Loxonema laxum Hall 
L. pexatum Hall 

L. robustum Hall 
L. siciila Hall 

Muroliisonia intorcedeus Hall 
Natlcopsis coiiipacta Hall 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



43 



Platyceras ammon Hall 

P. argo HaU 

P. carinatum Hall 

P. concaYnm Hall 

P. crassum Hall 

P. cymbinm Hall 

P. dentalimn Hall 

P. dnmosum Conrad 

P. erectnm Hall 

P. fornicatum Hall 

P. nodosum Hall 

P. perelegans Hall 

P. rectum JIo« 

P. subrectum Hall 

P. undatimi ffaZI 

Pleurotomaria adjutor Hall 

P. delicatula Hall 

P. hebe ITaZI 

P. lucina Hall 

P. plena J7a{2 

P. quadrillx Hall 

P. unisulcata Conrad 

Stropbostylus varians Hall 

Turbo shuniardi de Vemeuil 

Lamellibrancha 
Aviculopecten pectlniformls Conrad 
A. Ignotus Hall 
Gonocardium cuneus Conrad 
C. trigonale Conrad 
Cypricardinia indenta Conrad 
Limoptera pauperata Hall 
Lyriopecten dardanus Hall 
Megambonla cardliformis HaU 
Modiomorpha clarens Hall 
Nyassa elliptica Hall 
Palaeopinna recurva Hall 
Panenka multiradiata Hall 
Paracyclas elliptica Hall 
Pterinopecten insons Hall 
P. undoeus HaU 

Brachiopod8 
Amphigenia elongata Hall 
Atrypa reticularis IAnn6 
Camarotoecbla biUlngsl HaU 
C. inequiplicata Hall 
C. royana Hall 
C. tethys Billings 
Gentronella glansfagea BUlinga 
Chonetes acutlradiatus Hall 



C. arcuatus Hall 

C. lineatus Hall 

Cbonostropbia reversa Whitfield 

Coelospira Camilla Hall 

Leptaena rhomboidalis Wilckens 

Leptocoelia acutiplicata Conrad 

Leptostrophia perplana Conrad 

Llngula desiderata Hall 

Meristella doris Hall 

M. nasuta Conrad 

M. scitula HaU 

Orthothetes pandora BilHnga 

Pentagonia unisulcata Conrad 

Pentamerella arata Conrad 

Productella navicella Hall 

P. sbumardiana Hall 

lihipidomella lenticular is Vanuxem 

R. semele Hall 

Schizopboria propinqua Hall 

Splrifer ac\unlnatus Conrad 

S. arctosegmentus Hall 

S. disparilis Hall 

S. divaricatus HaU 

S. duodenarius Hall 

S. fimbriatus Conrad 

S. gregarius Clapp 

S. macer Hall 

S. macrotbyris Hall 

S. manni Hall 

S. raricosta Conrad 

S. varicosus Hall 

Stropheodonta ampla HaU 

S. concava Hall 

S. demissa Conrad 

S. bemisphaerica Hall 

S. inequiradiata Hall 

S. inequlstrlata Conrad 

8. patersoni HaU 

S. textills HaU 

Terebratula lens Hall 

Crinoids 
Codaster pyramidatus HaU 
Cyatbocrinus bulbosus Hall 
Ekiriocrinus pyriformis Hall 
Myrtlllocrinus americanus Hall 

Corals 
Alveolites squamosus Billings 
Aulacopbyllum princeps HaU 
Cladopora cryptodens Billings 



44 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



C. laqueata Rominger 

C. labioaa Billings 

Cyathophyllum corniculuin Edwards 

d Haimc 
C. juvenis Rominger 
C robustiim Hall 
C. validum Hall 

Cylindrophyllum elongatmn Simpson 
Cystiphyllum scalatum Hall 
C. sulcatum Billings 
Eridophyllum simcoense Billings 
Favosites canadensis Billings 
¥. emmonsi Rominger 
F. epidermatus Rominger 
F. hemispbaericus Troost 



F. tuberosus Rominger 

Holiophylluni annulatum Hall 

II. cancellatum Hall 

H. exlguum Billings 

Micbelinia cyliudrica Edwards d 
Haime 

Pleurodictyum convexum d^Orhigny 
' Ptycbopbyllum striatum Hall 
, Syringopora nobilis Billings 
I S. perelegans Billings 

Zaphrontis coinplanata Hall 
I Z. fastigata Hall 

Z. gigantea Edwards d Haime 

7j. tabulata Hall 



Harcellufl sliale 

With the close of the limestone epoch there was an abrupt 
change in the sedimentation, and here begins a new series of 
sediments and very distinct aggregate of faunas. The Marcellus 
shale introduces black, carbonaceous and pyritous sedimentation, 
evincing a deepening of the waters and a foul bottom, over which 
but few forms of life prevailed and these depauperated in size 
and of very tenuous shell. All the species here found are the 
apparent proi)er accompaniments of such bionomic conditions; 
Liorhynchus limitaris, which puts in an appearance 
during this stage of the Devonic wherever the sediments become 
highly charged with bituminous matter ; Chonetes mucro- 
n a t u s, C. 1 e p i d u s, S t r o p li a 1 o s i a t r u n c a t a, P 1 e u- 
rotomaria rugulata, Styliolina fissurella and 
Ort hoc eras subulatum also follow these conditions. 
Occasionally members of the congeries have apparently dropped 
into the deposits from the higher and more prolific zone of life. 

The exposures at Padelford and along Mud creek have fur- 
nished the following: 

Ortboceras subulatum Hall c 

btyliolina fissurella Hall cc 

Pleurotomaria rugulata Hall c 

Nuculites oblongatus Conrad c 

Chonetes lepidus Hall c 



C. mucronatus Hall r 

Strophalosia truncata Hall cc 

Liorbynobus limitaris Vanuxem.. .cc 
L. multicosta Hall r 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



45 



Stafford limestone 

We have shown in papers relating specially to this deposit^ that 
its very extensive fauna is that of the Skaneateles, Canandaigua 
and Moscow shales in unusually favorable development. It was 
the first appearance in this region of that fauna, but for western 
New York as a whole, the second invasion of this Hamilton fauna 
from the west into the Appalachian basin. For a full account 
of the formation and its contents where best developed, refer- 
ence is made to the papers cited and to Elvira Wood's discussion 
of the fauna of the Stafford limestone at Lancaster, Erie co. 
[Bui. 49, p.l39]. The absence of outcrops of the rock over the 
ai-ea of this map restricts the representation of its fauna to 
such species as are to be found in the loose blocks, but the fol- 
lowing is a list of the species which may be expected from the 
formation. 



Undetermined plates and scales of 
fishes 

Worms 
Spirorbis 

Crustaceans 

liomalpnotus dekayi Cfrecn 

Pbacops rana Oreen 

(Yyphaeus boothl Oreen 

C. boothi var. caUiteles Oreen 

Proetus macroccphalus Hall 

Cyphaspis craspedota Hall d Clarke 

if'rimitiopsis punctulifera Hall 

Cephalopods 
Nautilus liratus Hall 
N. of, magister Hall 
Nephrlticeras bucinum Hall 
Orthoceras subulatum Hall 
O. aegea Hall 
O. marcellense Vanuxem 
O. fenestnilatom Clarke 
O. staffordense Clarke 
O. eriense Hall 

Pteropods 
Tentaculites gracilistriatus Hall 
StylioUna flssurella Hall 



Gastropods 
Platyceras attcnuatum Hall 
P. bucculentuin Hall 
Cyrtolites miteUa Hall 
Bellerophon lyra Hall 
Diaphorostoma liuoatum Conrad 
Pleurotomaria hioina Hall 
P. rugulata Hall 
P. ityfi Hull 
P. capillariu Conrad 
P. sulcomarginata Conrad 
Loxonema hamiltoniae Hall 
OnyclKK-hilus iiitidnlus VUirle 

Lamrllihranchs 
Pterinopecton exfoliatns Hall 
Actinopteria muricata Hall 
Liopteria laevls Hall 
Cyprioardinia indenta Conrad 
Panenka mollis var. rostata Hall 
P. radians Conrad 
Pteroehaenia fragilis Hall 

Brachiopods 
Terebratula llncklaeni Hall 
Cryptonella planirostris Hall 



*N. Y. State Geol. 8th An. Rep*t. 1889. p.GO; and N. Y. State Mus. Bill. 
49. 1901. p.130. 



46 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



C. rectirostrls Hall 

Cumarotoechia sappho Hall 

C. horsfordi Hall 

C. doUs Hall 

C. proliflca Hall 

C. pauciplicata Wood 

Spirifer andaculus Conrad 

S. flmbriatus Conrad 

S. snbmnbona Hall 

Ambocoelia nana Cfrahau 

Meristella barris] Hall 

Trematospira gibbosa Hall 

StropbaloBia truncata Hall 

Productella spinulicosta Hall 

P. sbumardiana Hall 

Chonetes mucronatus Hall 

C. scitulus Hall 

C. lepldus Hall 

Tropldoleptus carina tus Conrad 

Stropheodonta inaequistriata Conrad 

Leptostrophia perplana Conrad 



orthothetes chemungensis Conrad 

O. arctostriatus Hall 

Khipidomella vanuxemi Hall 

U. cyclas Hall 

Crania crenlstriata Hall 

O. recta Wood 

Craniella hamiltoniae Hall 

Bryozoana 
Ilederella canadensis Nicholson 
U. drrhosa Hall 
Keptaria stolonifera Rolle 

Blastoids 
Nucleocrinus lucina Hall 

CoraU 
Favosites placenta Hall 
Stereolasma rectum Hall 
Striatopora linibata Conrad 
Romingeria 
Anlopora 



CardifF shale 
The darker beds which chiefly comprise this mass beai* but 
few traces of organic remains. Conditions here as in the Mar- 
cellus shale were not favorable to life. Its species are 
Orbiculoidea mlnuta Hall \ Liorhynchus limltaris Yanuxem 

The more calcareous and upper beds, which form blue black 
harder layers, show an addition of representatives from the 
constantly nearer zone of prolific life in the overlying shales. 
These have been taken from the beds at Chapinville and along 
Mud creek and are : 



Rhinocaris veneris Hall d Clarke, r 

Phacops rana Oreen r 

Orthoceras nuntloides Clarke, .... r 
Gomphoceras mitrlforme Clarke., r 

Bactrites clavus Hall c 

Tornoceraa discoideom Conrad c 



btyliolina flssurella Hall c 

Pleurotoniarin nigiilata Hall c 

Nuculites oblongatus Conrad c 

liuchiola stuprosa Clarke r 

Pterochaenia fragills Hall r 

Stropbalosia truncata Hall c 



Skaneateles shale 
The fauna of these beds is very sparse, a few species charac- 
teristic of the black beds intermingled with some from the more 
calcareous beds above. As the mass represents essentially a 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



47 



phase oi transition from the condition of the black sediments to 
those of shallower and clearer water deposit, the fauna is also 
mixed and transitional. It contains: 



Phacops rana Oreen rr 

Styliolina fissureUa Hall c 

Pleurotomaria rugulata Hall c 

Lauulicardium cortum Hall r 

Nuculites oblongatus Conrad c 



Chonetes setlger Hall c 

Spirifer mucronatus Conrad r 

Ambocoelia iimbonata Conrad, ... c 

Liorhynchiis limitaris Vanuxem. c 

L. multicosta Hall c 



Canandaigna shale and limestone 

With these beds begins the profuse development of the cal- 
careous Hamilton shales. Though the rocks of this stage are 
treated as a unit on the map their faunas may be here con- 
sidered in two divisions, that of (1) the Centerfield limestones 
or the calcareous beds at the base, (2) the upper division or the 
Canandaigna shales. 

1 In the Centerfield limestones, best developed on Shaffer 
creek and underlying all the northern part of the village of 
Canandaigna, the following species have been noted: 



Worms 

Arabellites r 

Oenonites r 

Eunicites r 

Spirorbis angulatus Hall c 

Cornulites tribulls Hall r 

Crustaceans 

Phacops rana Green cc 

Dalmanites boothl Oreen cc 

D. bootbl var. calliteles Oreen. . , cc 

l*roetU8 rowi Oreen cc 

P. maerocephalus Hall 
Cyphaspis ornata Hall 
C. ornata tar. baccata Hall d 

Clarke 
C. craspcdota Hall d Clarke 
Turrilepas devonica Clarke 
T. squama Hall d Clarke 
T. nitidula Hall d Clarke 
T. foliata Hall d Clarke 
T. tenera Hall d Clarke 
Schizodlscus capsa Clarke 

Gastropods 
Bellerophon pelops Hall 



Cyrtolites mitella Hall 

Platyceras auriculatum Hall. ... c 

P. syinmetricum Hall c 

P. thetis Hall c 

F. subspinosum Hall 
Pleurotomaria itys Hall 
P. lucina Hall 

P. dlsjuncta Hall r 

Loxonema delphicola Hall 
L. bamiltoniae Hall 

LameUibranehs 

Mytllarca ovlformis Conrad c 

Microdon bellistriatus Conrad 
Conocardium crassifrons Conrad 
Cypricardinia indenta Cuurad... c 
Actinopteria deciissata Conrad. . c 
Aviculopecten princeps Conrad. . c 

Lingula leana Hall r 

L. densa Hall 
Crania crenistria Hall 

Craniella bamiltoniae Hall c 

Rbipidomella penelope Hall c 

Brack iopods 
R. vanuxemi Hall c 



48 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Orthothotes arctostriatus Hall. . c 
Siropheodonta concava Hall 

S. demissa Conrad c 

S. inequistriata Conrad c 

Fholidostrophia nacrea Hall c 

Leptostrophia perplana Conrad 

Chonetes coronatus Conrad c 

C. deflectus Hall 
Productella navicolla Hall 
r. spinulicosta Hall 

Spirifer angustus Hall r 

S. divaricatus Hall 

S. finibriatus Conrad c 

S. audaculus Conrad c 

S. luucronatus Conrad 
S. eoiisobrinus d'Orhigny 
Amboooelia uuibouata Conrad.., c 

Nucleospira cx)nclnua Hall cc 

Trematospira hirsuta Hall 

Meristella baskiusi Hall cc 

Atrypa reticularis Linnd 
Camarotoechia dotis Hall 

C. horsfordi Hall ' c 

C. prolifica Hall 

C. sappho Hall 

Pentamerella pavilionensis Hall 

(^ryptonella plaiiirostris Hull 

i\ rectirostris Hall c 



Crinoids 

Platycrinns eboraceus Hall r 

iMegistocrinus Ontario Hall r 

Corals 
Zapbrentis ball! Edwards d 

Haime c 

Z. simplex Hall 

Cystipbylluin rarians Hall 

C. conifollis Hall 

C. ainericanum Edwards d 

Haime cc 

Cyatbopbyllum robustum Hall. .. c 
C. nanimi Hall 

C. conatiiin Hall o 

Amplexiis bamiltoniae Hall 
Heliophyllum balli Edwards d 

Haime oc 

II. balli var. irregulare Hall c 

11. balli var. reflexuni Hall 
II. obcoiiieuin Hall 

H. confluens Hall r 

Favosites placenta Rominger cc 

F. arbusciilus Hall 

F. argus Hall c 

Alveolites goldfussi Hillings c 

rieurodietyum stylopora Eaton 
Striatopora limbata Eaton c 



Canandaigua shales proper 
The beds above the " basal limestones " as they wei*e originally 
termed by the writer, carrv' a less profuse fauna. The species 
assembled in the following list are from more numerous outcrops 
than the foregoing but, save at the very top of the formation just 
beneath the Tichenor limestone, they are seldom if ever as abund- 
ant in any single locality. There are some noteworthy differ- 
ences in the com]iosition of the faunas of these two parts of the 
Canandaigua beds, which are below singled out in special lists. 
The fossils herein are: 



Crustaceans 
Pbacops rana Orecn 
Dalnianites bootbi Oreen 
Proetus macrocepbalus Hall 
Ostracodos of tbo genera 

Boyricbia, Entoniis, Priniitia 
and Bollia in tbe lower shales, cc 
Estberla puJex Clarke, r 



Worms 
Spirorbis angulatus Hall 
Crphalopods 
Ortboceras exile Hall 

O. nuntium Hall c 

O. crotalns Hall r 

Gyroceras liratum Hall 
Tornoceras uniangulare Conrad. . r 
Bactrltes tenuicinctus Hall 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



49 



Pteropods 
Styliolina fissurella Hall. 
Hyolithus aclis Hall 



Oastropods 

Bellerophon leda Hall 

B. lyra Hall 

B. acutilira Hall 

Cyrtolites niitella Hall 

IMiityceras symmetricmn Hall,.. 
V. ereetum Hall 

P. conicum Hall 
V. attenuatum Hall 
V. thetis Hall 

F. bucculentuin Hall 

P. cariuatum Hall 

I*. CK'hiiiatum Hall 
Pleurotoniaria capillaria Conrad. 

P. itys Hall 

P. trilix Hall 
Loxonema delphicx>la Hall 
Diaphorostoma lineatum Conrad. 
Cyclonema hamiltoniae Hall 

C. multilira Hall 
Euouiphahis rudis Hall 

Murehisonia turricula Hall 

MacTOcbeilus hebe Hall 

LnmcUihranchs 
Mytilarca oviformis Conrad 
Macrodon bamiltoniae Hall 
Microdon bellistriatus Conrad 
Bucbiola balli Clarke 
Cypricardinia indenta Conrad 
C. pygmaea Hall 
Grammysia arcuata Hall 
Goniophora acuta Hall 
ModioiDorpha complanata Hall 
M. concent rlea Conrad 
M. macilenta Hall 
Nuculites oblongatus Conrad 
Aviculopecten princeps Conrad 
Palaeoneilo constricta Conrad 
P. emarginata Conrad 
P. fecunda Hall 
P. plana Hall 
P. tenuistrlata Hall 



Brachiopods 
Cranlella bamiltoniae Hall 

Khipidomella penelope Hall c 

R vanuxemi Hall cc 

Ortbotbetes pandora BilUngs 
Stropheodonta concava Hall 

S. inequistriata Conrad cc 

S. jiinia Hall..% c 

Pholidostrophia nacrea Hall 
Leptostrophia perplana Conrad., cc 

Cbonetes coronatus Conrad c 

C. lepidus Hall 
C. deflectus Hall 
C. scitulus Hall 
Productella navicella Hall 
P. tullia Hall 
Spirifer angustus Hall 

S. fimbriatus Conrad c 

b. granulosus Conrad c 

S. audaculus Conrad 
S. marcyi Hall 

S. mucronatus Conrad c 

S. consobrinus WOrhigny 
Ambocoelia umbonata Conrad... cc 
A. praeumbona Hall 
Cyrtina hamiltonensls Hall 

Nucleospira conclnna Hall cc 

Trematospira hirsuta Hall c 

T. nobilis Hall 
Trigeria lepida Hall 
Meristella baskinsi Hall 

Athyris splriferoides Eaton c 

Camarotoecbia congregata Con- 
rad 

C. sappbo Hall 

Liorhyncbus multicosta Hall. ... r 

L. quadricostatus Vanuxcm r 

Pentamerella pavilionensis Hall., c 
Cryptonella rectirostris Had 
Terebratula lincklaeni Hall 
Tropidoleptus carinatus Conrad. . cc 

Crinoids 

Nucleocrinus hicina Hall 
Dolatocrinus glyptus Hall 

D. liratus Hall 



On comparing these lists of species we find that while they are 
essentially homogeneous there are certain characteristic 
differences. 



50 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Centerfield limestone 

Profusion of Trilobites reprefienting 
all species of the Hamilton fauna 
except Homalonotus de- 
k a y i . Girripedes and Schizodis- 

CUB 



Cephalopods rare or absent 



Bellerophon pelops 



Platyceras c 

Pleurotomaria lucina 
P. disjuncta 



Actlnopteria decussata 



Lingulas c 

Pholidostrophia nacrea cc 

Leptostrophia perplana r 

Spirifer divaricatus 



Corals very abimdant forming a well 
marked plantation 



Canandaigua shale 

Trilobites relatively rare, the only 
common species P h a c o p s 
ran a, Dalmanites boothi, 
Proetus macrocephalus, 
H. dekayi. Other Crustacea, 
except ostracodes rare or absent 

Orthoceras, Gyroceras, Bactrites, 
Tornoceras 

U. leda 

B. lyra 

B. acutilira 

Platyceras cc 



Diaphorostoma lineatum c 

Murchisonia 
Macrochllus 
Cyclonema 

Modiomorpha complanata 
M. concentrica 
M. macilenta 
Goniophora acuta 
Grammysia arcuata 
Palaeoneilo constrlcta, emarginata, 
fecunda, plana, tenuistriata 

P. nacrea r 

L. perplana cc 

Trematospira nobilis 
Athyris spiriferoidee 
Trigeria lepida 
Tropidoleptus carinatus 
Ck>rals quite rare 



Future investigations may obliterate some of these differences 
yet there will doubtless remain a distinction in the upper and 
lower elements of this fauna though these are bound together 
by a multitude of identities. 

Tichenor limestone 

Fossils are extremely few in this layer of semicrystalline gray 
limestone. They are frequently replaced wholly or in part by 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



51 



celestite and hence at times make very striking s][)ecimens. 
are: 



They 



Phacops rana Oreen 
Orthoceras caelamen Hall 
O. exile Hall 



Lyrlopecten orblculatus Hall 
Spirlfer inncnmatus Conrad 
Spirophyton typus Hall 



The last named object covers surfaces of the rock when inclined 
to be shaly. 

Moscow shales 

Lower division 

The Moscow shales are well divided into subequal parts by 
the Menteth limestone and as there is a lithologic difference in 
the two on account of the gradual loss of calcareous content, we 
mav contrast the faunas of these divisions. Lower beds : 



.ccc 
. ..e 



Crustaceans 

Pbacops rana Qreen 

Dalmanltes boothl Qreen,., 
Prootns maerocephalus Hall 
Homalonotus dekayi Hall 

Worms 
Spirorbis angulatus Hall 

Cephalopods 
Orthoceras nuntlum Hall 
Gyroceras liratum Hall 
Tomoceras oniangulare Conrad 
Bactrites tenuiciiictiis Hall 

Pteropods 
Tentacnlites bellulna Hall 
HyoUthus aclis Hall 

Gastropods 
Bellerophon leda Hall 
B. patTilus Conrad 
B. tbalia Hall 
Platyceras carlnatmn HaU 
P. conicum Hall 
P. tbetis HaU 
Plenrotomaria Itys Hall 
Loxonema delphlcola Hall 
Diaphorostoma Ilneatmn Conrad. ccc 
Cyclonema trilix Hall 

Lamellihranchs 
Mjrtilarca oviformls Conrad 
Macrodon hamiltonlae HaU 
Microdon belUstrlatus Conrad 
Cyprieardinla Indenta Conrad 



C. pygmaea Hall 

Grammysia arcuata Conrad 

G. bisulcata Conrad 

Goniophora acuta Hall 

Modlomorpha concentrica Conrad 

Aviculopecten pariUs Conrad 

Palaeoneilo fecunda Hall 

P. muta HaU 

P. plana Hall 

P. tennlstriata Hall 

Actlnopteria decussata HaU c 

Brachiopods 
Cranlella hamiltonlae Hall 
Crania crenlstrla Hall 
Pholldops hamiltonlae Hall 
Rhipidomella penelope Hall 

R. vanuxemi Hall c 

Stropheodonta concava Hall c 

S. Ineqnistriata HaU c 

S. junia Hall c 

Leptostrophla perplana Conrad. . .cc 

Chonetes coronatus Conrad 

C. deflectus HaU 

Productella papulata Hall 

P. splnulicosta Hall 

Spirlfer marcyi HaU 

S. mncronatus Conrad c 

S. consobrimis. d*OrUgny 
Ambocoella umbonata Conrad 
Nncleosplra concinna HaU 
Trematospira glbbosa Hall 
Meristella haskinsi HaU 
Athyrls spiriferoldes Eaton c 



52 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Atrypa reticularis Linni c 

Camarotoecbia congregata Conrad 

C. prolifica Hall 

rentainorella pavillonensis Hall, .cc 
Cryptonella planirostrls Hall 
C rectirostris Hall 
Tropldoloptus carinntus Conrad, .cc 

Crinoi(l8 
Platycrinus ap. 
Megistocrinus depreesus Hall 
M. Ontario Hall 
Thylacocriiius clarkei W. d 8. 
Ancyrocrlnus bulbosus Hall 
Dolatocrinus liratus Hall 

D. intermedius Hall 
D. glyptus Hall 

D. troosti Hall 



Aorocrlnus cauliculus Hall 
A. pocillum Hall 
A. praecursor Hall 
Eleutberocrinus wbitfieldi Hall 
Geimaeocrinus eucbaris Hall 
G. nyssa Hall 

Gilbertsocrinus spinigerus Hall 
Melocrinus gracilis W. d 8. 
Poteriocrinus diflTusus Hall 
P. nereus Hall 
P. iiycteus Hall 
Poteriocrinus sp. 
Rbodocrinus gracilis Hall 
K. spiuosus Hall 
K. nodulosus Hall 
Nucleocrinus lucina Hall 
Pentremites leda Hall 



Henteth limestone 

In this thin layer the species of the fauna are crowded together 
in great numbers. Several years ago the late Prof. Charles E. 
Beecher of Yale University collected at the localities of this inter- 
esting formation, and the etchings from the material thus gathered 
have been studied and identified by Percy E. Raymond of the 
Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg. Mr Raymond is about to publish 
some account of the fauna and he has permitted me to give here 
his list of si)eciee determined to which I have added a few not 
recognized by him. 

Worms 
Spirorbis angulatus Hall 
S. spinuliferus Nich. 
Cornulites tribulis Hall 
Cornulltes sp. nov. 
Autodetus lindstroenii Clarke 
Autodetus sp. nov. 
Proetus rowi Oreen 
P. macrocepbalus Hall 
Cypbaspis ornata Hall 
Homalonotus deliayi Cfreen 
Pbacops rana Qrecn 
Crypbaeus bootbi Green 

Crustaceans 
Primitiopsis punctilifora Hall 
Kirlvbya parallela Vlrich 
Strepula slgmoidalis Jones 



Isocbilina lineata Jones 
I. (?) fabacea Jones 
Priniitia seminulus Jones 
Octonaria stigmata Vlrich 
Ctenobolina papillosa Ulrich 
Boyricbia kolmodini Jones 
Halliclla rctifera Vlrich 
Moorea bicornuta Vlrich 
Ostracoda — several unidentified spe- 
cies 

Cephulopods 

Ortbo<.eras sp. iud. 

Ptcropods 

Styliola sp. vnd. 
Tentaculites bellulus Hall 
Hyolitlies aclis Hall 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADBANGLBS 



63 



Oaairopods 
lioxonema hamlltoniae Hall 
Plenrotomaria caplllaria Conrad 
Cyclonema hamlltoniae (?) Hall 
Bellerc^hon leda Hall 
Platyceras bucculentum Hall 
P. carlBatum Hall 
P. symmetricum Hall 
P. theds Hall 
Diaphorostoma lineatnm Conrad 

Lamellibranchs 
Nnculites oblongatus Conrad 
N. trlqueter Conrad 
Nucula corbuliformis Hall 
Palaeoneilo contricta Conrad 
Conocardium eboraceum Hall 
Actinopteria decussata Hall 
Aviculopecten exacutus Hall 
A. princeps Conrad 
A. scabridns Hall 
Pterinoi)ecten Intermedius Hall 
P. bermes Hall 
P. regnlaris Hall 
P. conspectus Hall 
Lyriopecten orbicnlatns Hall 
Modiomorpha alata Conrad 
Cypricardella l)ellistriata Conrad 
Cypricardlnia Indenta Conrad 
Nyassa argnta Hall 

Brachiopods 
Lingnla punctata Hall 
Lingula 8p. ind. 
Pbolldops oblata Hall 
P. hamlltoniae Hall 
Crania crenistriata Hall 
Craniella hamlltoniae Hall 
Camarotoechia congregata Conrad 
C. horsfordl Hall 
C. sappho Hall 
Trlgeria lepida Hall 
Eunella llneklaenl Hall 
Tropidoleptus carinatus Conrad 
Atrypa reticularis Linn. 
Cyrtina bamlltonensls Hall 
Spirlfer mucronatus Conrad 
S. audaculus Conrad 
S. granulosus Conrad 
S. consobrinus d*Orb, 



S. sculptis Hall ' 

S. flmbrlatus Conrad 

Ambocoelia umbonata Conrad 

Nucleosplra conclnna Hall 

Athyrls spirlferoldes Eaton 

Stropheodonta concava Hall 

S. demlssa Conrad 

S. Inequlstriata Conrad 

S. Junla Hall 

Leptostrophla perplana Conrad 

Pholidostrophia lowensis Oicefi. 

Orthothetes chemungensls pectlna- 

ceus Hall 
O. chemungensls arctlstrlatus Hall 
O. bellulus Clarke 
Chonetes coronatus Conrad 
C. mucronatus Hall 
C. scltulus Hall 
C. deflectus Hall 
C. robustus Raymond 
Strophalosia truncata Hall 
Productella spinulicosta Hall 
Rhlpidomella penelope Hall 
R. vanuxeml Hall 

Bryozoana 
Ascodlctyum stellatum N. d E. 
Pinacotrypa plana Hall 
Monotrypa frutlcoea Hall 
Monotrypa «p. und. 
Fenestella emaclata Hall 
Reteporina striata Hall 
Isotrypa ap. und. 
Hemltrypa cribosa Hall 
Polypora flstulata Hall 
P. multiplex Hall 
Rhombopora tortalinea Hall 
Streblotrypa hamiltonensis Nich. 
Ptilodictya plumea Uall 
Cystodicta incisuratn Hall 
Taeniopora exigua Nich. 
Acrogenla prollfera Hall 
I Llchenalla stellata Hall 
Palescbara reticulata Uall 

Corals 
I Heliophyllum halli E. d H. 
I Micbelinia stylopora Eaton 
, Aulopora serpens Goldf. 
' Ceratopora dlcbotoma Qrahau 
I C. Jaclcsoni Qrabau 



54 



NBW YORK STATB MUSEUM 



Hosoow shales 
Upper division 
Fossils in these beds are lees profuse though more numerous 
in 8i)ecies. They are quite uniformly distributed through the 
lower portion but farther up become arranged in thin beds sepa- 
rated by more or less wide intervals of barren shales. 

Thin layers of limestone in these upper shales carry agglomer- 
ated masses of fossils. 



Crustaceans 

Phacops rana Cfreen 

Cryphaeus booth! Oreen 
Proetus macrocephalos Hall 
HomalODotus dekayi Oreen 

Worms 
Spirorbis angulatus Hall 

Ccphalopods 
Orthoceras exile Hall 
O. cmaceratum Hall 
O. Duntium Uall 
O. crotalus Hall 
Gyroceras liratum Hall 
Bnctrites tenuiclnctus Hall 

Pteropods 
Styliolina flssurella Hall 
Ilyolithus aclis Hall 

Gastropods 
Bellerophon leda Hall 
Platyceras carinatum Hall 
P. echlnatum Hall 
P. erectmn Hall 
P. rectum Hall 
P. symmetricum Hall 
Pleurotomaria capillaria Conrad 
P. itys Hall 
P. lucina Hall 
P. rotalia Hall 
Loxonema delphicola Hall 
Diaphorostoma lineatum Conrad 

Lamellihranchs 
Macrodon hnmiltoniae Hall 
Microdou bcllistriatus Conrad 
Cypricardinia indenta Conrad 
Grammysla arcuata Hall 
G. bisulcata Conrad 
Goniophora hamiltonensis Hall 



Modiomorpha macilenta Hall 
Nucula corbuliformis HaU 
N. lirata Conrad 
Nuculites oblongatus Conrad 
OrthoDota earinata Conrad 
O. parvula Hall 

O. undulata Conrad cc 

Palaeoneilo coiiatricta Conrad 
P. tenuistriata Hall 
Pboladella radiata Hall 
Pbtbonia nodocostata Hall 
Sanguinolites solenoides Hall 
Tellinopsis subemarginata Conrad 

Brarhiopods 

Lingnla punctata Hall cc 

Dignomia alveata Hall 
Cranlella hamiltoniae Hall 
Crania crenistriata Hall 

Pholidops hamiltoniae HaU c 

P. oblata Hall 
Rhipidomella penelope HaU 

R. vanuxemi Hall c 

Orthothetes pandora BUUngs 
O. arctostriatus Hall 
Stropheodonta ctmcava HaU 

S. demissa Conrad rr 

8. inequistriata Conrad 
S. Junia Hall 

Pholidostrophia nacrea Hall 
Chonetes aurora Hall 

C. eoronatus Conrad c 

C. defiectus HaU c 

C. lepidus Hall c 

C. seituliis Hall c 

Spirifcr granulosus Conrad 

S. marcyi Hall 

S. audaculus Conrad 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 65 



S. tulUus Hall C 

S. eatoni Hall 

Cyrtiiia bamiltonensis Hall 

Ambocoelia umbonata Conrad cc 

Nncleospira concinna Hall c 

Trematospira hirsuta Hall 
Meristella haskinsi Hall 

Athyria spiriferoides Eaton cc 

Atrypa reticularis Linn6 cc 

A. spinosa Hall c 

Camarotoechia congregata Conrad 



C. dotla Hall 
C sappho Hall 
Crj'ptonella rectlrostrls Hall 
Eunella lincklaeni Hall 
Tropldoleptus carinatus Conrad 

Crinoids 

Nucleocrlnus luclna Hall 
Forbesclocrlnus lobatus Hall 
Calceocrinus darus Hall 
Platy^rlnus eboraceus Hall 



The contrasts in the faunas of these upper and lower beds are 
not deep seated. There is in the former as a most striking feature 
the profuse development of the crinoids associated with an almost 
equal profusion of Phacops rana, Diaphorostoma 
lineatum and Pentamerella pavilionensis with 
Productella papulata; in the upper beds lamellibranch 
species such as Orthonota undulata, parvula, 
carinata, Phthonia nodocostata, Pholadella 
r a d i a t a and specially Tellinopsis subemarginata 
which are rare or absent below. There are also here thin beds 
wholly composed of Ambocoelia umbonata but on the 
whole the distribution of the fauna throughout the Moscow shales 
is quite uniform. 

The Moscow shales are exposed in detail in the ravine at 
Tichenor point where the succession from the bottom up is 
essentially as follows: 

At the base the uppermost beds of the Canandaigua shales with 
Eridophyllum archiaci, Heliophyllum and other 
cyathophylloids in abundance. 

Tichenor limestone 

1 Blue calcareou-s shale with crinoids, Pentamerella 
payilionensiSy Diaphorostoma lineatum, 
Phacops rana,2 feet, passing into a thin limestone 8 inches 

2 Bluish shale with Tropldoleptus carinatus, 30 
feet 

3 Menteth limestone, 1 to IJ feet 

4 Bluish shale with Tropldoleptus carinatus 

5 Olive shales with Cryphaeus boothi 



56 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

6 Arenaceous shale with Homalonotus dekayi, Or- 
thonota, abounding in grotesque calcareous concretions and 
passing into a thin limestone above, 12 feet 

7 Olive shale 

8 Very' soft light gray shales with Auibocoelia, Chouetes, 
Athyris and Phacops in distant thin layers 

9 Olive shale 

Tally pyrite 

Genesee shale 

Tnlly limestone and pyrite 

What little Tally limestone is here represented carries the 
indicial species Hypothyris cuboides Sowerby (sp.) 
identified originally by Conrad with Sowerby's Rhyncho- 
nella cuboides and subsequently described by Hall as 
R. venustula. 

The species R. cuboides was long ago referred by King 
to the genus Hypothyris. This world-wide species is here a 
newcomer into the Devonic faunas and is associated through- 
out the exposures of the Tully with an assemblage essentially 
consisting of Hamilton species, though slight yariationB from 
Hamilton types are indicated and there are a few additional 
species present like the very characteristic trilobite B r o n - 
teus tullius Hall & Clarke. For at least a half century 
Hypothyris cuboides has been recognized as indicative 
of lowest upper Devonic age and the Bronteus associated with 
it is likewise of early Devonic type (ThysanopcItiH), The fact 
that these species accompany an essentially unmodified fauna 
of earlier age does not argue that age for the limestone but 
serves to emphasize if anything the introduction of new types 
indicative of fundamental change. 

The fauna of the pyrite layer is a parvifauua with aflfinities 
wholly or essentially with that of the Hamilton shales. It is 
in fact a series of forms which have as a whole suffered an 
arrest of development, and its species are immature stages of 
those preceding though they are actually in adult condition. 
The conditions of growth while this pyrit(» was being precipi- 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLBS 



57 



tated, were so unfavorable that the organisms were able to 
advance but a little in the line of sjyecies development and yet 
they apparently acquired the power of reproduction and mani- 
fested themselves in these arrested conditions probably for 
several generations. These fossils were studied by the writer 
some years ago, and have been more exhaustively examined of 
late by Dr F. B. Loomis from material collected all along the 
line of outcrop of the layer. 

The specimens are to be extracted from the rock only with 
great labor but it is to be expected that forms present at 
one place will appear at others and hence the entire list of the 
known species is here appended. It will be observed that the 
designations used in Dr Loomis's list here given indicate muta- 
tions only from the types of Hamilton species and not deep seated 
specific differences. 



Crustaceans 
Beyrichia dagon Clarke 
Entomis prosephiiia Loomis 
Cryphaeus booth! var, calUteles 

Oreen 

Ccphalopods 
Bactrites («p.) ? fnut. parvus Loomis 
B. («/>.) mut, pyginaeus Loomis 
Ortboceras nuntium Hall 
O. scintilla (?) mut. mepbisto Clarke 
O. subulatum mut, pygmaeum 

Loomis 
Tomoceras uniangulare mut, astarte 

Clarke 
T. uniangulare Conrad 

Pteropods 
Tentaculites bellulus? mut. stebos 

Clarke 
T. graeilistriatus mut. asmodeus 

Clarke 

Gastropods 
Loxonema delpbicola mut, molocb 

Clarke 
rieurotomaria 

P. itys mut. pygmaca Loomis 
P. capillaria mut, pygmaea Loomis 



Macrocbilina bamiltoniae mut. pyg- 
maea Loomis 
M. bebe mut. pygmaea Loomis 
Diapborostoma lineatum mut. belial 
Clarke 

Lamellibranchs 

Conocardium eboraceum mut. pyg- 
maeum Loomis 
Bucbiola retrostriata mut. pygmaea 

Lootnis 
Grammysia constricta mut. pygmaea 

Loomis 
Paracyclas lirata mut. pygmaea 

Loomis 
Palaeoueilo constricta mut. pygmaea 

Loomis 
P. plana mut. pygmaea Loomis 
Leda rostellata mut. pygmaea 

Loomis 
Nuculites oblongatus mut. pygmaeus 

Loomis 
N. triqueter mut. pygmaeus Loomis 
Nucula varicosa mut. pygmaea 

Loomis 
N. corbuliformis mut. pygmaea 

Loomis 
N. lirata mut. pygmaea Loomis 



58 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Brachiopods 
Trigeria lepida mut. pygmaea Loomia 
Produetella spinulicosta mut. pyg- 

maea Loomi8 
Strophalosia truncata mut, pygmaea 

Loomis 
Tropidoleptus carinatus mut, pyg- 

maeus Loomis 
Ambocoelia umbonata mut, pluto 

Loomis 
A. umbonata mut, pygmaea Loomis 
Nucleospira concimia mut, pygmaea 

Loomis 



Cyrttna hamiltonensis mut. pyg- 
maea Loomis 
Spirifer mareyi mut, pygmaeus 

Loomis 
S. granulosus mut, pluto Clarke 
S. tullius mut, belphegor Clarke 
S. media lis tnut. pygmaeus Loomis 
S. mueronatus mut, hecate Clarke 
S. fimbriatus mut, pygmaeus Loomis 
S. fimbriatus mut, simplicissimus 

Loomis 
Crinoid stems 
Pentremites leda Hall 



Genesee shale 

This shale carries only a sparse fauna and its fossils are not 
well preserved. In the densely black layers there is rarely any- 
thing to be obtained, but lignites sometimes of considerable 
length, occasionally Lepidodendron and conodont teeth have also 
been found herein. 

The less bituminous shales contain: 



Pleurotomaria rugulata Hall 
Styliolina fissurella Hall 
Pterochaenia fragilis Hall 
Lingula spatulata Hall 
Orbiculoidca lodensis Hall 



Liorhynchus quadricostatus Hall 
Probe loceras lutheri Clarke (occa- 
sionally) 
Bactrites aciculum Hall 



Oenundewa limestone 

The fauna here appearing is, as we have explained on pre- 
vious occasions, the first appearance in this district of the 
Portage or Naples fauna of the beds overlying. It is thus a 
prenuncial fauna announcing the invasion and occupancy of the 
field by a congeries of species not before known in New York. 
It is evident that this fauna came in from the west and covered 
for a short time only, the whole area from here westward to 
Lake Erie. We have shown elsewhere the probability that the 
rock itself, which is largely composed of the pteropod Stylio- 
lina, represents a deep water deposit of pteropod ooze and its 
associated organisms are also those of deep water habit. The 
fauna and ttoni of this limestone are as follows and in this list the 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



69 



names in roman are of species reappearing in the higher faunas 
(Cashaqua); those in antique not occurring elsewhere. 



Dlnicthys newberryi Clarke 

Echinocariflt longicauda HaU 

Hpatbiocaris emersoni Clarke 

CardioeariB 

ICantiooceras pattenoni Hall rar. 

Btylioplilliim Clarke 
M. contractum Clarke 
M. fascioulatmn Clarke 
IC nodif er Clarke 
Gephyroceras genundewa Clarke 
Tomocerai uniangulare Conrad var. 

compressum Clarke 
Ortlioceras atreiu Hall 
Styliolina fissurella Hall 
TeDtaculites gracilistriatus^a^I 
Pleurotomaria genundewa Clarke 
BellerophoD koeneni Clarke 
B. denckmanni Clarke 
Phragmostoma natator Hall 
P. incisum Clarke 
Loxonema noe Clarke 
Macrochilina pygmaea Clarke 
M. seneca Clarke 



Diaphorostoma pugnus Clarke 
Frotooalyptraea styllophlla Clarke 
Lunulicardliiin hemioardioldes Clarke 
L. encrinitum Clarke 
Pterochaenla fragilis Hall 
P. sinuosa Clarke 
Honeoyea styliophila Clarke 
H. simplex Clarke 
Ontaria suborbicularis Hall 
Buchiola retrostriata v. Bach 
B. livoniae Clarke 
B. scabroBa Clarke 
Faracardium doris Hall 
P. delioatiauiii Clarke 
Lingula spatulata Vanuxem 
Lingulipora wllliamsana Girty 
Aulopora annectens Clarke 
Cordaeoxylon clarkei Dawson 
Cladoxylon mirabile Unger 
Cyolostlgma affine Dawson 
Lepidodendron gaspianum Dawson 
L. primaevum Rogers 



Taken as a whole the assemblage is rich and interesting and 
there are not more favorable opportunities for its examination 
than are afforded on Ganandaigua lake. Specially noteworthy 
are the remains of plants of genera and species which have been 
found elsewhere only in corresponding horizons of Europe. 

West Biver shale 
In these beds we find a return of the shale fauna beneath 
(Genesee) with a few additional species. The distinctive char- 
acters of the division are essentially lithologic. Its fossils are: 

Bactrites adcQlmn Hall (?) 
Gephyroceras sp,l 
Pleurotomaria rngulata Hall 
Buchiola retrostriata v. Buck 
Panenka 9p. 

Embedded in these shales not far' above the Genundewa 
limestone is a thin and, over the region of this map, continuous 
limestone which is a mass of the crinoid Melocrinus 



Pterochaenia fragilis Hall c 

LuDulicardium curtum HaU 
Lingula spatulata Vanuxem 
Oruiculoidea lodensis Vanuxem 



60 NBW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

c 1 a r k e i Hall. Over this surface tor a brief period flourished 
a plantation of these crinoids and their substance has largely con- 
tributed to the lime content of the rock containing them, 

Standish shales and flags 
Fauna very sparse and chiefly that of the beds below. 



Bactrites aciculum Hallt 
Gephyroceras sp. 
Pleurotomaria cognata Clarke 



Pterochaenia fragilis Hall 
Ontaria suborbloularis Hall 



Middlesex shale 

These densely bituminous deposits, similar in all respeots to 

the Gehesee shale bear only the most meager evidences of organic 

life. Indeterminable plant remains occasionally appear and with 

them are: 

Ck>nodonts | Ontaria suborblcularis Hall 

Sandbergeroceras syngonum Clarke \ 

The aflfinity of the fauna with that of the Cashaqua shales i» 

herein evident. 

Cashaqua shale 

In these soft shale beds, with their accompanying flags and 
sands, the peculiar western Portage fauna attains its culmina- 
tion. This interesting congeries of fossils has been termed the 
Naples fauna for it is here that it attains its best development. 
The term has been employed because of the indefiniteness of the 
term Portage as applied to the fauna, for the faunas existing 
in Portage time are known to differ highly according to their 
geographic location; brackish in eastern New York (Oneonta), a 
profuse brachiopod fauna in central New York (Ithaca) and in 
western New York a fauna essentially devoid of brachiopods 
but characterized by its abundance of cephalopods and lamelli- 
branchs. In our latest studies of this fauna in its extent 
throughout western New York it has become evident that, in 
this western Portage province covering the field occupied by the 
fauna from Cayuga lake west to Lake Erie, the Genesee prov- 
ince as it has been designated, there are actually two subprov- 



CANANDAIQUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



61 



inceSy an eastern (Naples subprovince) into which only the ad- 
vance guard penetrated on its invasion from the west, and a west- 
ern or Chautauqua subprovince. These two subfaunas of the 
Genesee provinces are knit together by unity of generic and to 
some extent of specific characters, but differ moi'e in respect to 
predominant species. 

We have then in the rocks before us the typical development 
of the fauna of this Naples subprovince or the Naples fauna in 
its proper sense. 

The species are: 

Crustaceans 
Eleutherocaris wbitfleldi Clarke 
Stylonurus? wrightianus Dawson 
Spathiocaris emersoni Clarke 
Dipterocaris 



Ccphalopodt 
Manticoceras pattereM)ni Hall 
M. apprimatuin Clarke 
M. tardum Clarke 
M. aecelerans Clarke 
M. vagans Clarke 
I»robelocera8 lutherl Clarke 
I'.? naplesense Clarke 
Beloc-eras iynx Clarke 
Tornoceras uniangulare Conrad 
T. uniangulare var, obesum Clarke 
Cyrtoclymenia neapoUtana Clarke 
Bactrites gracillor Clarke 
B. aciculum Hall 
Orthoceras pacator Hall 
O. Ontario Clarke 
O. fllosum Clarke 

Pteropods 
Uyolithus neapolis Clarke 
Tentaculites gracilistriatus Hall 
T. tenuicinctus Roemer 
Styliolina fisaurella Hall 
Protoepirialis minutissima Clarke 

Gastropods 
Loxonema noe Clarke 
Macrochilina pygmaea Clarke 
Palaeotrochus praecursor Clarke 
Diaphorostoma rottindatum Clarke 



Pleurotomaria cognata Clarke 
P. ciliata Clarke 

Protocalyptraea marshalli Clarke 
Pliragmostoma natator Hall 
P. incisum Clarke 
P. cf, triliratum Hall 
Tropidocyclus hyalinus Clarke 
Bellerophon koeneni Clarke 

Lamelli})ran<-hs 

Ijunulicardium acutirostruiu Hall 

L. ornatum Hall 

L. olymeniae Clarke 

L. benilcardioides Clarke 

L. vela turn Clarke 

L. finitimum Clarke 
I L. sodale Clarke 
' L. pilosum Clarke 
I L. parunculus Clarke 
j Pteroohaenia fragilis Hall 

P. fragilis var. orbicularis Clarke 

P. perissa Clarke 
I Honeoyea erinacea Clarke • 
I H. majora Clarke 
, Paraptyx Ontario Clarke 
I Ontaria suborblcularis Hall 
' O. clarkei Beushauscn 
' O. afliliata Clarke 

O. balli Clarke 

Buc'biola retrostriata r. Burh 

R. scabrosa Hall 

B. con versa Hall 

Paracardium dor is Hall 

Palaeoneilo petlla Clarke 

P. muricata Clarke 



62 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Brachiopods 
Productella speciosa Hall 
Chonetes scltulus Hall 
Lingula triquetra Clarke 
L. llgea Hall 

Corals 
Aulopora -annectens Clarke 



Crinoids 
Melocrinus clarkei Hall 

Plants 

Cordaeoxylon clarkei Dawson 
LepidodendroD gaspianum Dawson 
L. prlmaevum Rogers 



In the midst of these Cashaqua beds is the 

Parriih limestone 

which has frequently been referred to in our publications 
because, first, of its singular composition of greenish and red- 
dish calcareous nodules, which are usually fused into a continu- 
ous mass and resemble the kramenzel so characteristic of some 
of the European Devonic beds of equivalent age, and again 
because the abundance of Ooniatites which it contains chiefly 
of the species Manticoceras pattersoni, Torno- 
ceras uniangulare and Probeloceras lutheri, 
together with Orthoceras pacator, some singular and 
undetermined fish remains and myriads of the pteropods Stylio- 
lina and Protoapirialis. The rock is continuous nearly across 
the map and beyond it to the east. 

Bhinestreet shale 

In these recurrent beds of black shale the fauna is again very 
much curtailed. Only the following have been obtained from it: 



rolygnathus dublus Hinde 
rrioDiodu3 spleatus HUide 
P. erraticus Hinde 
Palaeoniseus deyonlcus Clarke 
Aeanthodes prlstis Clarke • 



Spathlocarls emersoni Clarke 
Lunulieardlum velatum Clarke 
Pterochaenla fraglUs Hall 
Lcptodomns multiplex Clarke 



Hatch flags and shales 

The fossils in these arenaceous beds are all representatives of 
the Cashaqua shale fauna but in very much decreased quantity. 
Goniatites, specially Manticoceras pattersoni and 
Probeloceras lutheri occur in the flagstones, also occa- 
sional specimens of Lunulicardium ornatum and L. 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



63 



acutirostrum, Honeoyea desmata and Buchi- 
ala retroBtriata, Palaeotrochus praecursor 
and Bactrites. In certain layers fragments of plants abound, 
chiefly of Lepidodendron. 

Orimes sandstone 

The Portage or Naples fauna has now disappeared except for 
a few straggling and modified representatives in the higher rocks 
and with the Grimes sandstone api>ears a well defined though 
somewhat sparse brachiopod fauna. We originally regarded 
this small fauna of the Grimes sandstone as a representative of 
the Chemung fauna but have subsequently expressed the view 
that it is rather the invading Ithaca fauna from the east. The 
distinction is a refined one; it would be extremely difficult to 
indicate at what time or horizon in the succession the term Che- 
mung is to be applied to the homogeneous fauna occupying the 
field of central New York during the upper Devonic. 

The fauna of the Grimes sandstone is as follows: 



Protonympha devonica Clarke 

PalaecK-baeta salieifolia Clarke 

Cooularia of. continens Hall 

Paracyclas sp. 

Grammysia subarcuata Hall 

Aviculopecten cf. cancellatus Hall 

Sphenotus sp, 

Orbiculoidea 

Schlzophoria impressa Hall 



Leptoetrophia mucronata Yanuxem 
Chonetes lepidus Hall 
Liorhynchus mesacoetalis Hall 
L. globuUformls Vanuxem 
Productella lacbrymosa Hall 
Ambocoella umbonata Conrad 
Atrypa spinoea Hall 
Paropsoiiema cryptophyum Clarke 
Dictyospongla haplea Hall d Clarke 



West Hill flags and sandstone 

The fauna of these beds is a continuation of the brachiopod 
fauna of the Grimes sandstone with sopie interesting additions. 
Nowhere are the fossils abundant and none are specially dis- 
tinctive of the Chemung fauna so that we may regard these beds 
also as a continuation of the Ithaca invasion from the east. 
The fossils recorded are as follows: 



Manticoceras oxy Clarke 
Palaeotrochus praecursor Clarke 
Avlcalopecten cancellatus Hall 



Grammysia elliptica Hall 
Pboladella cf. parallela Hall 
Leptodesma robustum Hall 



64 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Stropheodonta cayuta Hall 
Leptostrophia perplana Conrad var. 

nervosa Hall 
Orthothetes chenningensis Conrad 
Productella lachrymosa Hall 
Spirifer mucronatus Conrad mut 
S. niesacostalis Hall- 
Atrypa hystrix Hall 



Ambocoelia umbonata Conrad 
Cyrtina hamiltonensls Hall 
Liorhynchus mesacostalis Hall 
Hydnoceras tuberosum Conrad 
H. variabile Hall d Clarke 
H. legatum Hall d Clarke 
Ceratodictya annulata Hall 
Hydriodictya cylix Hall d Clarke 



High Point sandstone 

The interesting faana of the calcareous or firestone layer of 

this formation was studied some years ago by the writer and its 

species have not been increased by later observations. These 

occur in the beds on High point, Naples: 

Rhynchodus «p. 

Cladodus sp, 

Pterinea sp. 

Orthis Infera Calvin 

Schizophoria iowensls Hall 

Stropheodonta cayuta Hall 

S. arcuata Hall 

S. canace Hall d Whitfield 

S. variabilis Calvin 

S. exUis Calvin 

Strophonella reversa Whitfleld{l) 

Orthothetes chemungensis Hall 

Chonetes setiger Hall 

Productella speciosa Hall 

P. dissimilis Hall 

Spirifer disjunctus Sowerhy 



S. orestes Hall d Whitfield 

S. subattenuatus Hall 

S. mesacostalis Hall 

S. bimesialis Hall 

Ambocoelia umbonata Conrad 

Atrypa aspera Hall 

A. hystrix Hall 

A. reticularis Linn6 

Camarotoechia contracta Hall 

Hypothyris pugnus Martin 

Fistullpora occidens Hall d Whitfield 

Polypora sp. 

Fenestella sp. 

Zaphrentis sp. 

ReceptacuUtes sp. 

Dadoxylon clarkei Dawson 



In this unusual congeries we find the earliest appearance of 
Spirifer disjunctus, which may be taken as indicating 
the advent of the true Chemung fauna. It is also important to 
note the very marked representation of species which were orig- 
inally described from the upper Devonic of Iowa and have been 
observed nowhere else in the Appalachian region except spas- 
modically. 

Exact correlation of the stages of the lowan Devonic with 
that of New York is not practicable as the Siluric continental 
barrier between was the cause of great differences in sedimen- 
tation and fauna on its east and west sides, but this invading 
western fauna intercalated in the normal Chemung fauna of 



CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 65 

this district may be regarded as an indication of the fact that 
the continental barrier was temporarily down and the western 
fauna migrated to the east. 

Frattsburg sandstone 

In these beds the fanna, which is fairly profuse in certain 
layers, does not materially differ from that of the West Hill 
beds. The lowan »x>^ies occurring in the High Point fauna are 
not present or if so are of extremely rare occurrence and certain 
species are abundant such as 



Spirifer mesastrialis Hall 
S. mucroDAtus conrad var. posterus 
Hall d Gierke 



Atrypa hystrix Hall 
A. reticularis LinnC 
Stropheodonta cayuta Hall 



In certain of the beds from the upper part of the division 
occurs the trilobite Bronteus senescens Clarke, which 
has also been found as far south as Avoca, Steuben co. in the 
continuation of the same formation. Associated with it is the 
spiny criuoid Ilystricrinus depressus Wachsmuth & 
Springer which is known only from these beds. 



I NDEX 



Acanthodes pristis, 62. 
Acidaspis callicera, 42. 
Aerogenia prollfera, 53. 
Actinopteria decussata. 47, 50, 51, 
53. 

muricata, 45. 
Alveolites goldfussi, 48. 

squamosus, 43. 
AinbiXH^elia, 35. 3(5, 56. 

nana, 46. 

praeumbona, 49. 

uuibonata, 47, 48, 49, 51, 53, 55, 
63, 64. 
mut. pluto. 58. 
iiiut. pyguiaea, 58. 
Amphigenia elongata, 43. 
Amplexus hanilltonlae, 48. 
Ancyrocrinus bulbosus, 52. 
Aoroorinus cauliculus, 52. 

pocillum, 52. 

praecursor, 52. 
Arabellites, 47. 
Ascodictyum stellatuni, 53. 
Athyris. 56. 

splriferoides, 49, 50, 51, 53, 55. 
AtrjT>a aspora, 64. 

hystrix. 36, 64, 65. 

reticularis, 34, 43, 48, 52. 53, 55, 
04. 65. 

spinosa, 55, 63. 
Aulacophyllum prioceps, 43. 
Aulopora, 46. 

annectens, 59, 62. 

serpens, 53. 
Autodetus «p. nov., 52. 

lindstroemi, 52. 
Aviculopecten cancellatus, 63. 

exactus« 53. 

ignotus, 43. 

parllis, 51. 

pectiniformis, 43. 

princeps, 47, 49, 53. 

scabridus, 53. 



Baotrites, 31, 34, 50, 63. 

sp.f mut, parvus, 67. 

8p, mut, pygmaeus, 57. 

acieulum, 58, 59, 60, 61. 

clavus. 46. 

gracilior, 61. 

teuuicinctus, 48, 51, 54. 
Beecher, Charles E., cited, 22; men- 
tioned, 52. 
Bellerophon acutllira, 49, 50. 

curvilineatus, 42. 

denckmanni, 59. 

koeneni, 59, 61. 

leda, 49, 50, 51, 53, 54. 

lyra, 45, 49, 50. 

patulus, 51. 

pelops, 42, 47, 50. 

thalia, 51. 
Beloceras lynx, 61. 
Bertie waterlime, 6, 8-9; thickness, 

8; fossils. 40. 
Beyrichia, 48. 

dagon, 57. 

kolmodini, 52. 

subquadrata, 42. 
Blastoids, 46. 
Bollia. 48. 

bilobata, 42. 
Brachiopods. 43, 45-46, 47-48, 49, 

51-52, 53, 54r-55, 58, 62. 
Bronteus senescens, 65. 

tullius. 56. 
Bryozoans, 46, 53. 
Buchiola, 31. 

conversa, 61. 

halli. 49. 

llvoniae, 59. 

retrostriata, 34, 59, 61, 63. 
mut. pygmaea, 57. 

scabrosa, 59, 61. 

stuprosa, 46. 



i\S 



NEW YORK S^TATE MUSEUM 



Calceocriniis elarus, 55. 
Callonema lichas, 42. 
Camarotoeebia billingsi, 43. 

coDgregata, 40, 52, 53, 55. 

contracta, 64. 

dot is. 46. 48. 55. 

horsfordi, 46, 48, 53. 

inequiplicata. 43. 

pauciplicata, 46. 

proliflca. 46, 48, 52. 

royana^ 43. 

sappho, 46. 48, 49, 53, 55. 

tethys, 43. 
Gamillu^ shale, 6-8; thickness, 7; 

fossils, 40. 
Canandaigua shale, 6, 17-20; thick- 
ness, 19; term, 20; fossils, 47-49, 

50. 
Cardiff shale, 6, 16-17, 18; thickness, 

17; fossils. 46. 
Cardiocaris. 59. 
Cashaqua shale, 6, 31-32; thickness, 

31; fossils, 60-62. 
Cayugan group, 6. 
Centerfield limestone, 17; fossils, 

47, 50. 
Centronella glansfagea, 43. 
Cephalopods, 42, 45. 48, 50, 51, 52, 

54, 57. 61. 
Ceratiocaris, 8. 

acuminata, 40. 
Ceratodictya annulata, 64. 

cincta. 36. 
Ceratopora dichotoma, 53. 

Jackson i, 53. 
Chautauquau group, 6. 
Chemung beds, 6. 
Chonetes, 56. 

acutlradiatuR, 43. 

arcuatus. 43. 

aurora, 54. 

coronatus, 48, 49, 51, 53, 54. 

deflectus, 48, 49, 51, 53, 54. 

lepidus, 44, 46, 40, 54, 63. 

lineatus. 43. 

mucronatus, 44, 46, 53. 

robustus, 53. 

soitulus, 46. 40, 53, 54. 02. 

setiger, 47. 64. 



Chonostrophia complanata, 41. 

reversa, 43. 
CirriiK^des, 50. 
Cladodus «/)., 64. 
Cladoiwra cryptodens, 43. 

labiosa. 44. 

laqueata, 44. 
Cladoxylon mirabile, 50. 
Cobleskill shale and dolomite, 6, 9- 

11; thickness, 9; fossils, 40. 
Codaster pyramidatus, 43. 
Coelospira Camilla, 43. 
Conocardlum crassifrons, 47. 

cuneus, 43. 

eboraceum. 53. 

mut. pygmaeum, 57. 

trigonale, 43. 
Conodonts, 33, 60. 
Conularia cf. continens, 63. 
Corals, 43-44, 46, 48, 50. 53, 62. 
Cordaeoxylon clarkei, 59, 62. 
Cornulites 8p. tMv., 52. 

tribulis, 47, 52. 
Crania crenistriata, 47, 51. 

crenistriata, 46, 53, 54. 

recta, 46. 
Craniella hamiltoniae, 46, 47, 49, 51, 

53, 54. 
Crinoid stems, 58. 
Crinoids, 43, 48, 49, 52, 55, 62. 
Crustaceans, 42, 45, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 

54, 57, 61. 

Cryphaeus boothi, 45, 52, 54, 55. 

rar. ca Hi teles. 45, 57. 
CYjrptonella planirostris, 45, 48, 52. 

rectirostris, 4(5, 48, 49, 52, 55. 
Ctenobolbina papilJosa, 52. 
Cyathocrinus bulbosus. 43. 
Cyathophylloids, 55. 
Cyathophyllum conatum, 48. 

corniculum, 44. 

hydraullcum, 11, 40. 

juvenis, 44. 

nanum, 48. 

robustum. 44, 48. 

validum, 44. 
Cyclonoma, 50. 

hamiltoniae, 49. 53. 

multilira, 49. 

trillx, 51. 



INDEX TO OANAXDAIGrA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



09 



Cyolostigma affine, 59. 
(\vlindrophylluni eloiigatuiii, 44. 
Cyphaspis craspedota, 45. 47. 

diadenia, 42. 

hybrida, 42. 

nilnusciila, 42. 

ornata, 47. 52. 
tor. baccata. 47. 

stephanophora, 42. 
Cypricardella belllstriata, 53. 
Cyprlcardinla indonta, 43, 45, 47, 49, 
51. 53, 54. 

pygmaea, 49, 51. 
Cyrtina hamiltouensis, 49, 53, 55, G4. 

mut. pygmaea, 58. 
Cyrto<*era scMtum, 42. 
CyrtfK'lymenia neapolitana, 61. 
Cyrtolites initella, 45, 47, 49. 
Cystiphyllum americanuDi, 48. 

eonifollis, 48. 

sea la turn, 44. 

sulcatum, 44. 

varians« 48. 
Cj'Rtodictya incisurata, 53. 

Dadoxylon clarkei, G4. 
Dalinanites aegeria, 42. 

anehiops, 42. 

bifldus. 42. 

boothl, 47. 48, 50, 51. 
rar, oalliteles, 47. 

calypso, 42. 

coronatus, 42. 

diurus. 42. 

mynnecophorus, 42. 

pygmaeus. 42. 

selenurus, 42. 
Dana, cited. 18. ' 
Dovonic and Siluric system, division 

line, 11. 
Diaphorostoma lineatum, 42, 45, 49. 
50. 51, 53, 54, 55. 
WM^ belial, 57. 

pugnus, 59. 

rotundatum, 61. 

turbinatum, 42. 

unisulcatum, 42. 
Dictyospongia haplea, 63. 
Dignomia alveata, 54. 
DiDlchtbys newberryi, 59. 



Dipterocaris, CI. 
Dolatocriuus glyptus, 49, 

iutermedius, 52. 

liratus, 49, 52. 

troosti. 52. 



Echinocaris ? longicauda, 59. 
F^driocrinus pyriformis, 43. 
Eleutherocaris whitfleldi, 61. 
Elcutlierocrinus whitfleldi, 52. 
Kncrinal limestone, 20. 
Entomis, 48. 

prosephina. 57. 
Erian group, 6. 
Eridophyllum archiacl, 55. 

simcoense, 44. 
Estheria pulex, 48. 
Eunella lincklaeui, 53, 55. 
Eunicites, 47. 
Euompbalus decewi, 42. 

laxus, 42. 

rudis, 49. 
Eurychillna ? reticulata, 42. 
Eurypterus. 8, 11, 40. 

remipes, 39. 

Favosites arbusculus, 48. 

argus, 48. 

canadensis, 44. 

emnionsi. 44. 

epiilerniatus, 44. 

liemlspliaerlcus, 44. 

placenta, 46. 48. 

tul>erosus, 44. 
Fenestella ^/>., 64. 

emaclata, 53. 
Fishes. 42. 

Fistulipora occidens. (>4. 
Forhesiocrinus lobatus, 55. 
Fucoides graph icus, 31. 

vert ica lis, 37. 

Gardeau be<ls, 33. 

< Gastropods, 42. 45, 47, 49, 51, ,^3. 54. 
57, 61. 

Genesee shale, 6, 25-26, 56; thick- 
ness, 26: fossils, 58. 

(Jennaeocrlnus eucbaris, 52. 
nj'ssa, 52. 



70 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Genundewa limestone, 6, 26-27; 

thickness, 26, 27; fossils, 58-59. 
Gephyroceras sp, ?, 59, 60. 

genundewa, 59. 
Gilbertsoerinus spinigerus, 52. 
Gomphoceras absens, 42. 

eximium, 42. 

mitrlforme, 46. 
Goniophora acuta, 49, 50, 51. 

hamiltonensis, 54. 
Gorham shales, 23, 25. 
Grabau, cited. 22. 
Gramniysia arcuata, 49, 50. 51, 54. 

bisulcata, 51, 54. 

constricta mut. pygmaea, 57. 

elliptica, 63. 

subarcuata, 63. 
Grimes sandstone, 6, 34-35; thick- 
ness, 34; fossils, 63. 
Gypsum quarries, 7. 
Gyroceras, 50. 

Cyclops, 42. 

laciniosum, 42. 

liratum. 48. 51, 54. 

matheri, 42. 

trivolve, 42. 

undulatum, 42. 

HaU, James, cited, 15, 20, 24, 30, 31. 

Halliella retifera, 52. 

Hamilton beds, 6. 

Hamilton group, term, 17. 

Hartnagel, cited, 9. 

Hatch shale and flags, 6, 33-34; 

thickness, 33; fossils, 62-63. 
Hederella canadensis, 46. 

cirrhosa, 46. 
Heliophyllum, 55. 

annulatum, 44. 

cancellatum, 44. 

confluens, 48. 

exiguum, 44. 

halli, 48, 53. 
v<ir. irregulare, 48. 
var. reflexum, 48. 

obconicum, 48. 
Hemitrypa cribosa, 53. 
Highpoint sandstone, 37-38; thick- 
ness, 37; fossils. 64. 



Hipparionyx proximus, 41. 
Homaionotus dekayi. 45, 50, 51, 52, 

54^ 56. 
Honeoyea desmata, 63. 

erinacea, 61. 

major, 61. 

simplex, 59. 

styilophiia, 59. 
Hydnoceras legatum, 64. 

tuberosum, 36. 64. 

variabile, 36, 64. 
Hydriodictya cyiix, 64. 
Hyolithus aclis, 49, 51, 52, 54. 

ceratophiius, 42. 

ligea, 42. 

neapolis, 61. 
Hypothyris, 56. 

cuboides, 25, 56. 

pugnus, 64. 
Ilysteracanthus, 36. 
Hystricrinus depressus, 65. 

Isochilina ? fabacea, 52. 

iineata, 52. 
Isotrypa sp. und., 53. 
Ithaca beds, 6. 

Xing, cited, 56. 
Kirkbya paraliela, 52. 

Lamellibranchs, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 

54. 57, 61. 
Leda rostellata mut. pygmaea. 57. 
Leperditia, 40. 

alta, 9, 11, 40. 

cayuga, 42. 

scalaris, 11, 40. 
Lepidodendron, 34, 58, 63. 

gasplanum, 59, 62. 

primaevum, 50, 62. 
Leptaena rhomboidalis, 43. 
Leptocoelia acutiplicata, 43. 
Leptodesma robustum, 63. 
Leptodomus multiplex, 62. 
Leptostrophia mucronata, 35, 63. 

pen:>lana, 43. 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 53. 
tyir. nervosa, 64. 

varistriata, 9. 



INDEX TO CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



71 



Lichas contusus, 42. 

dracoD, 42. 

eriopis. 42. 

gryps, 42. 

hispidus, 42. 
Liehenalia stellata. 53. 
Limoptera pauperata, 43. 
Lingula, 26, 33, 40, 50. 

sp. und., 53. 

densa, 47. 

desiderata, 43. 

Ic^na, 47. 

ligea, 62. 

punctata, 53, 54. 

spatulata, 58, 59. 

triquetra, 62. 
I^ingulipora williamsana, 59. 
I^iopteria laevis, 45. 
Liorhynchus, 34. 

globuliformis. 63. 

limitaris. 44, 46, 47. 

mesacostalis, 63, 64. 

mnlticosta, 44, 47, 49. 

quadricostatus, 49, 58. 
Ix>omis, F. B., mentioned, 57. 
lioxonema delphicola, 47, 49, 51, 54. 
mut. moloch, 57. 

hamiltoniae, 45, 47, 52. 

laxum, 42. 

noe, 59, 61. 

pexatum, 42. 

robustum. 42. 

sicula, 42. 
I^udlowTille shales, 18, 20; term, 17. 
Lunulicardium, 31. 

acutirostrum, 61, 62-63. 

clymeniae, 61. 

eurtum, 47, 59. 

encrlnitum, 59. 

flnitimum. 61. 

hemicardioides, 59, 61. 

omatum, 61, 62. 

parunculus, 61. 

pilosum, 61. 

sodale, 61. 

velatum, 61. 62. 
Luther, D. Dana, study of Portage 

fauna, 4. 
Lyriopeeten dardanus, 43. 

orbieulatus, 51, 53. 



I Machaeracanthus peracutus, 42. 

sulcatus, 42. 
I Macrocheilus hebe, 49. 
I Macroehilina hamiltoniae mut. pyg- 
I maea, 57. 

' hebe mut. pygmaea, 57. 

pygmaea, 59, 61. 

seneca, 59. 
Macrochilus, 50. 

Macrodon hamiltoniae, 49, 51, 54. 
Mantlcoceras accelerans, 61. 

apprimatum, 61. 

contractum, 59. 

fasciculatum, 50. 

nodifer, 59. 

oxy, 36, 39, 63. 

pattorsoni, 34. 61, 62. 
var. styliophilum, 59. 

tardum, 61. 

vagans, 61. 
Marcellus shale. 6, 14-15; thickness, 

15; fossils, 44. 
Megambonia cardiiformis, 43. 
Megistocrinus depressus, 52. 

Ontario, 48, 52. 
Melocrlnus clarkei, 59-60, 62. 

gracilis, 52. 
Menteth limestone, 6, 22-23; fosslis. 

52-53. 
Meristella barrisi, 46. 

doris. 43. 

haskinsi, 48, 49, 51. 55. 

lata, 41. 

nasuta, 43. 

scitula, 43. 
Michellnia cylindrica, 44. 

stylopora, 53. 
Microdon bellistriatus, 47, 49, 51, 54. 
Middlesex black shale, 6, 29, 30-31; 

thickness, 30; fossils, 60. 
Modiomorpha alata, 53, 

clarejis. 43. 

complanata, 49, 50. 

concentrica, 49, 50, 51. 

macilenta, 49, 50, 54. 
Monotrypa sp. und., 53. 

fruticosa, 53. 
Moorea bicornuta, 52. 

kirkbyi, 42. 



NEW YORK STATE MrSElM 



Moscow shale, G, 18, 21-23, 25; fos- 
sils, 51-52, 54-n56. 

Miirchisonia, 50. 
intercedens, 42. 
turrieiila, 49. 

Myrtlllocriniis americanus, 43. 

Mytilarca ovifonuis, 47, 49, 51. 

Naples fauna, term, GO. 
Natlcopsis coiupacta, 42. 
Nautilus liratus, 45. 

cf. magister, 45. 
Nephriticeras bucinum, 45. 
Xuoleoeriiuis lueina, 40, 40, 52, 55. 
Nucleospira concinna, 48, 49, 51, 53, 
55. 
mut. pygmaea, 58. 
Nucula corbullformis, 53, 54. 
mut. pygmaea, 57. 
llrata, 54. 

mut. pygmaea, 57. 
varleosa mut. pygmaea, 57. 
Nuculltes oblongatus, 44, 40, 47. 49, 
53, 54. 
mut. pygmaeus, 57. 
triqueter, 53. 
mut. pygmaeus, 57. 
Nyassa arguta, 53. 
elliptica, 43. 

Ootonaria stigmata, 52. 

Oenonites, 47. 

Olive shale, 56. 

Onondaga limestone, 0, 12-14; thick- 
ness,*" 12; fossils, 41-^4. 

Ontaria, 31. 
affiliata, 61. 
elarkei, 61. 
halli, 61. 
suborbicularis, 59, 60, 61. 

Ontario county, geologic map, 4. 

Onychochilus nitidulus, 45. 

Onychodus sigmoides. 42. 

Orbiculoidea, 26, 35, 40, 63. 
lodensis, 58, 59. 
minuta, 40. 

Oriskanian group, 6. 

Oriskany sandstone, 6, 11-12; thick- 
ness, 11: fossils. 40-41. 

Orthis infera, 64. 



Orthoceras. 31, .50. 

«/>. und., 52. 

aegea, 45. 

at reus, 59. 

caelamen. 51. 

crotalus. 48, .54. 

emaceratum, 54. 

eriense. 45. 

exile, 48. 51, .54. 

fenestrulatum, 45. 

fllosum, 61. 

geneva, 42. 

inoptatuni. 42. 

niarcellense, 45. 

nuntioides. 46. 

nuntiuni, 48, 51, 54, 57. 

Ontario, 61. 

pacator, 61, 62. 

profundum. 42. 

sceptrum, 42. 

scintilla (?) mut. mephisto, 57. 

staffordense. 45. 

subulatum, 44, 45. 
mut. pygmaeum, 57. 

thoas, 42. 
Orthonota carinata, 54, 55. 

parvula. 54, 55. 

undulata, 54, 55. 
Orthot betes arctostriatus. 46, 48. 53,. 
54. 

l>ellulus, 53. 

ehemungensis, 46, 64. 
pectinaceus, 53. 

pandora. 43, 49, 54. 
Ostracoda. 48, 50, 52. 

Palaeochaeta, 35. 

salicifolia, 63. 
Palaeocreusia devonica, 42. 
Palaeoneilo const ricta, 49, 50. 5.3, M. 
mut. pygmaea, 57. 

eniarginata. 49, 50. 

fecunda, 49, 50, 51. 

muricata, 61. 

muta, 51. 

petila. 61. 

plana, 49, 50, 51. 
mut. pygmaea, 57. 

tenulstriata. 49, 50. 51, JH. 
Palaeoniscus devonicus. 62. 



INDEX TO CANANDAIGUA AND NAPLES QUADRANGLES 



73 



Palaeopinna recurva, 43. 
Palaeotrochus praecursor, 01, 03. 
Paleschara reticulata, 53. 
I^nenka sp., 59. 

mollis rcir. costata, 45. 

multiradiata, 43. 

radians, 45. 
Paraeardiuiu delicatuliim, 59. 

doris, 59, 01. 
I'aracyclas sp., r»3. 

elliptica. 43. 

lirata mut. pyginaea, 57. 
Paraptyx Ontario, 01. 
Paropsonoma, 35. 

cryptophyuni, 03. 
Parrish limestone, 0, 31-32; fossils, 

02. 
Pentagonia unisulcata, 43. 
Pentamerella arata, 43. 

pavilionensis, 48. 49, 52, 55. 
Pentremites leda, 52, 58. 
Phacops, 56. 

lK>mbifrons, 42. 

CTistata rar. pipa, 42. 

rana, 45. 46, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 54, 
55. 
Pbaetbonides geumiaeus, 42. 

navieella, 42. 
Pholadella cf. parallela, 63. 

radiata. 54, 55. 
Pholidops hamiltoniae, 51, 53, 54. 

oblata, 53, 54. 
Pbolido8troi>liia iowensis, 53. 

nacrea, 48, 49, 50, 54. 
Pbragmostoma incisum, 59, 61. 

natator, 59, 61. 

cf. triliratum, 61. 
Pbtbonia nodocostata, 54, 55. 
Pinaeotr>T>a plana. 53. 
Pittsburg sandstone, fossils^ 05. 
Plants. 02. 
IMatyeeras, 50. 

ammon. 43. 

argo. 43. 

attenuatum. 45. 49. 

auriculatum, 47. 

bucculentum. 45, 49, 53. 

carinatum, 43, 49, 51. 53, TA. 

concavum, 43. 

conlcum, 49, 51. 



Platjx'eras (Tassum, 43. 

cyuibium, 43. 

dentalium. 43. 

dumosum, 43. 

echinatum, 49, 54. 

erectum, 43, 49, 54. 

fornicatum, 43. 

nodosum, 43. 

perelegans. 43. 

rectum, 43, 54. 

subreetum, 43. 

subspinosum, 47. 

symmetricum, 47, 49, 53, 54. 

thetis. 47, 49, 51, 53. 

undatum. 43. 
Platycrinus sp., 52. 

eboraceus, 48, 55. 
Pleurodlctyum convexum, 44. 

styloiwra, 48. 
Pleurotomaria, 57. 

adjutor. 43. 

capillaria, 45, 49, 53, 54. 
mut. pygmaea, 57. 

eiliata. 61. 

cognata, 00, 01. 

delicatula, 43. 

disjuncta, 47. 50. 

genundewa, 59. 

hebe, 43. 

itys. 45. 47, 49, 51. 54. 
mut. pygmaea. 57. 

luclna. 43, 45, 47, 50, 54. 

plena, 43. 

quadrilix. 43. 

rotalia, 54. 

rugulata. 44, 45, 40, 47. 58, 59. 

sulcomarginata, 45. 

triliv, 40. 

unisulcata, 43. 
Polygnathus dubius, ()2. 
Polyiwra sp., CA. 

flstulatii, 53. 

multiplex, 53. 
Portage beds, 0. 
Portage fauna, stu<ly of, 4. 
Poteriocriuus sp., 52. 

diffusa, 52. 

nereus, 52. 

nycteus, 52. 



74 



NEW YORK STATE MlSEl'M 



Prattsburg sandstone and shale, 6, 

3S-39; thickness, 39. 
Primitia, 48. 

clarkei. 42. 

seminulus, 52. 
Primitlopsis punctulifera, 45, 52. 
Prioniodus erraticus, G2. 

spicatus, 62. 
Probeloceras lutheri, 58. 61, 62. 

? naplesense, 61. 
Productella, 22, 34, 36. 

dissimilis, 64. 

lachrymosa, 63, 64. 

navicella, 43, 48, 49. 

papula ta. 51, 55. 

shumardiana, 43, 46. 

speciosa, 62. 64. 

splnulicosta, 46, 48, 51, 53. 
fnut. pygmaea, 58. 

tullia. 49. 
Proetus clarus, 42. 

erassimarginatus, 42. 

folliceps, 42. 

niacrocephalus, 45, 47, 48, 50, 51, 
52, 54. 

mierogeiuma, 42. 

ovifrons, 42. 

rowl, 47, 52. 

stenopyge, 42. 

verneuili, 42. 
Protocalyptraea marshalli, 61. 

styliophlla, 59. 
Protonympha, 35. 

devonica, 63. 
Protosplrialis, 62. 

miuutissima. 61. 
Pterinea «p.. 64. 
Pterinopeeten oonsq>ectus, 53. 

exfoliatus, 45. 

hernies, 53. 

insons, 43. 

intermedins, 53. 

regularis, 53. 

undosus, 43. 
Pterochaeuia fragllis, 26, 45, 46. 58, 

59, 60. 61. 62. 

tar. orbicularis, 61. 

perissa, 61. 

sinuosa, 59. 



Pteropods, 42, 45, 49, 51, 52, W, 57, 

61. 
Pterygotus, 8. 
Ptilodictya pluniea, 53. 
Ptychophyllum striatum, 44. 

Kaymond, Percy E., mentioned, 52. 
. Receptaculites sp., 64. 
Reptaria stolonlfera, 46. 
Reteporina striata, 53. 
Rhinestreet black shale, 6, 32-33; 

thickness, 32; fossils, 62. 
Rhinocaris veneris, 46. 
Rhipidoniella cyclas, 46. 

lenticular is, 43. 

I)enelope, 47, 49, 51, 53, 54. 

seniele, 43. 

vanuxenii, 46. 47, 49, 51, 53, 54. 
Rhodocrinus gracilis, 52. 

nodulosus. 52. 

spinosus, 52. 
Rhomboi>ora tortalinea, 53. 
Rhynchodus sp., 64. 
Rhynchonella. 25. 

cuboides, 56. 

venustula, 56. 
Roniingeria, 46. 

Salina beds, 6. 

Sandbergeroceras syngonum, 30, 60. 
Sanguinolites solenoides, 54. 
Schizodiscus, 50. 

capsa, 47. 
Schizophoria Inipressa, 63. 

iowensis, 64. 

propiuqua, 43. 
Senecan group, 6. 
Shaflfer shale, 17. 

Skaneateles shale, 6, 17, 18; thick- 
ness, 17; fossils, 46-47. 
Spathiocaris, 33. 

emersoui, 59, 61, 62. 
Sphenotus sp., 63. 
Spirifer acuminatus, 43. 

angustus, 48. 49. 

arctosegmentus, 43. 

arenosus, 40-41. 

au<laculus, 46, 48, 49, 53. 54. 

bimesialis, 64. 

consobrinus, 48, 49, 51, 53. 



INDEX TO CANAXDAItiUA AND NAPLES QlJADttANULES 



75 



Splrifer disjunctus, 37. 3tK VA. 

disparilis. 43. 

divaricatus, 43. 48, 50. 

duodeuurius, 43. 

eatoni, 55. 

erieusis, 11, 40. 

timbriatiis, 43, 40, 48, 41), 53. 
mitt, jiygumeus. 58. 
mat. simplk'issinuis. 58. 

jrrainiIo.<<iis, 40, 53, 54. 
mut. phito, 58. 

;rreijarius, 43. 

inacer, 43. 

iiiacrotliyris, 43. 

luanui. 43. 

inarcyi, 40, 51, 54. 
mut. pygmaous, 58. 

ineiLalis mut. pj'^rmaous, 58. 

int»sa<-o8tiilis, 3<>, 64. 

iiK»«astriaIis, i>5. 

imirmnatus. 47. 48, 40, 51. 53, 64. 
mnt. hocate, 58. 
var. pos torus, 65. 

orostes, i*A. 

rarirosta, 43. 

.»«'ulptili8, 53. 

subattouuatus, 64. 

subuinbona, 46. 

tiilliiis, 55. 
mitt. t)e)i>hegor, 58. 

varicosus, 43. 
8pirophyton typiis, 51. 
Si)ir<)rbis, 45. 

aii^ulatus. 47. 48. 51. 52, 54. 

spiimliferiis. 52. 
Stafford limestone. 6, 14. 15-U): 

thickness, 15; fossils, 45-46. 
Standish tlaps and shales, 6. 2JV-;!0: 

thiekneKS. 20; fossils, (jO. 
SlenH)lasnia reetum, 44>. 
Streblotrypa haniiltonens.s, 53. 
Strepula sii^moidalis, 52. 
Striatopora limbata, 46, 48. 
Stroniatoi>ora, 10. 
Strophalosia triincata, 44, 4*), 53. 

mut. py^maea, 58. 
Stropheodonta ampla. 43. 

areuata, 64. 

oanace, 64. 



Stropheodonta cayuta. t»3, r»4, r»5. 

coueava. 43, 48, 40. 51, 53, 54. 

demissa, 43, 48. 53, 54. 

exllls. i'A. 

hemisi)haerica, 43. 

ineciiiiradiata, 43. 

Inequistriata, 43. 46, 48, 40, 51. 
53. 54. 

Jiinia, 40, 51, 53, 54. 

pateisoni, 43. 

textilis, 43. 

variabilis, 64. 
Strophonella reversa, 64. 
Strophostyhis varians, 43. 
Styliola «/>. urnJ., 52. 

tissurella. see Styliollna flssurella. 
Styliola limestone, 26, 27. 
Styliolina, 62. 

llssurella. 27, 44, 45, 46. 47, 40, 54, 
58, 50, 61. 
Stylonnrus ? wrightianus, 61. 
Syringopora nobilis, 44. 

lK»relegans, 44. 

Taeniopora exijxua, 53. 
TeIIin(ipsis subemarginata, 54, 55. 
Tentaeulites bellulus, 51, 52. 
mut. stebos, 57. 
^raeilistriatus, 45, 50, 61. 

mut. asmodeus. 57. 
scalariformis. 42. 
tenuicinotus, (il. 
Terebratula lens, 43. 

lincklneni. 45, 40. 
Thylacocrinns clarkei, 52. 
Tliysanojieltis, 5r». 
Tichenor limestone, 6, 2<>-21; thick- 
ness. 20; fossils, 50-51, 55. 
Tornoeeras. 50. 
discoidenm. 46. 

uniangnlare, 48, 51, 57, 61, 62. 
mut. astarte, 57. 
rar. ('ompressnm. 50. 
vitr. obesnm. 61. 
Trematospira jribbosa, 46, 51. 
hirsntn, 48, 40, 55. 
nobilis. 40. .'»0. 
Trigeria lepida, 40, ."VO. .5;]. 
mut. pygmaea, 58 



76 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



TrilobltcB, 60. 
TropldcK'ychis hyalinus, 61. 
Tropidoleptiis carinatus, 46, 49, 50, 

52. 53, 55. 

vntt. pypmaeus, 58. 
Tully limestone. 6, 18, 23-25; thlck- 
■ ness, 23; fossils, 56-58. 
Tully pyrite, 56. 
Turbo shumardi, 43. 
Turrllepas cancellatus, 42. 

devonicus, 47. 

flexuosus. 42. 

foliatus, 47. 

nitidulus, 47. 

squama, 47. 

tener, 47. 

Xnsterian group, 6. 



Vanaxxem, cited, 16, 17. 

West Hill flags and shales, 6, 35-^6; 

thickness, 35; fossils, 63-G4. 
West River shale, 6, 28-29; fossils, 

59-00. 
Whitfleldella laevis, 9. 

sulcata. 11, 40. 
Wood, Elvira, cited, 45. 
Worms, 45, 47, 48, 51, 52, 54. 

ZaphrcBtis ap., 64 
complanata, 44. 
fastigata, 44. 
gigantea, 44. 
halli, 48. 
simplex, 48. 
tabulata, 44. 



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S Hall, James & Clarke, J: M. Paleozoic Reticulate Sponges. 350P. il. TOpl. 
iSp& Si, cloth. 
9 Clarke, J: M. The Oriskany Fauna ol Becralt MoMtvV^Vtv, CoVaxtW^ C^. 
N. K i28p. gpL Oct. 1900. 80c, 



MUSEUM PUBLICATIONS 

4 Peck, C: H. N. Y. Edible Fungi, 1895-99. io6p. 25pl. Nov. 1900. 75c- 

This includes revised descriptions and illustrations of fungi reported in the 49th, sxst and sad 
reports of the state bounist. 

5 Clarke, J: M. & Ruedemann, Rudolf. Guelph Formation and Fauna of 

New York Stete. 196?. 2ipL July 1903. $1.50, cloth. 

6 Naples Fauna in Western New York. 268p. 26pl. map. $2, cloth. 

7 Ruedemann, Rudolf. Graptolites of New York. Pt i Graptolites of the 
Lower Beds. In press. 

Felt, E. P. Insects Affecting Park and Woodland Trees. In preparation. 

natural lilstory of New York. 30V. il. pi. maps. Q. Albany 1842-94. 

DIVISION I ZOOLOGY. Dc Kay. James E. Zoology of New York; or, The 
New York Fauna; comprising detailed descriptions of all the animals 
hitherto observed within the State of New York with brief notices of 
those occasionally found near its borders, and accompanied by appropri- 
ate illustrations. 5v. il. pi. maps. sq. Q. Albany 1842-44. Out of print. 

Historical introduction to the series by Gov. W : H. Seward. 178P. 

V. I pti Mammalia. 13+146P. 33pl. 1842. 
300 copies with band-colored plates. 

V. 2 pt2 Birds. i2f38op. I4ipl. 1844, 
Colored plates. 

▼• 3 Pt3 Reptiles and Amphibia. 7+98p. pt4 Fishes. 15+41 Sp. 1842. 

pt3-4 bound together. 

y. 4 Plates to accompany v. 3. Reptiles and Amphibia 23p]. Fishes 79pl. 
1842. 

300 copies with hand-colored plates. 

V. 5 pt5 Mollusca. 4+271P. 4opl. pt6 Crustacea. 7op. I3pl. 1843-44. 

Hand-colored plates: pt5-6 bound together. 

DIVISION 2 BOTANY. Torrey, John. Flora of the State of New York; com- 
prising full descriptions of all the indigenous and naturalized plants hith- 
erto discovered in the State, with remarks on their economical and med- 
ical properties. 2v. il. pi. sq. Q. Albany 1843. Out of print. 

V. I Flora of the State of New York. I2f484p. 72pl. 1843. 

300 copies with hand-colored plates. 

y. 2 Flora of the State of New York. 572p. 89pl. 1843. 

300 copies with hand-colored plates. 

DIVISION 3 MINERALOGY. Beck, Lewis C. Mineralogy of New York; com- 
prising detailed descriptions of the minerals hitherto found in the State 
of New York, and notices of their uses in the arts and agriculture, il. pi. 
sq. Q. Albany 1842. Out of print. 

V. I pti Economical Mineralogy. pt2 Descriptive Mineralogy. 24+536P. 
1842. 

8 plates additional to those printed as part oi the text. 

DIVISION 4 GEOLOGY. Mather, W: W.; Emmons, Ebenezer; Vanuxem, Lard- 
ner & Hall, James. Geology of New York. 4v. il. pi. sq. Q. Albany 
1842-43. Out of print. 

V. I pti Mather, W: W. First Geological District. 37+653P. 46pl. 1843. 

V. 2 pt2 Emmons, Ebenezer. Second Geological District. iof437p. I7pl. 
1842. 

V. 3 pt3 Vanuxem, Lardner. Third Geological District. 3o6p. 1842. 

V. 4 pt4 Hall, James. Fourth Geological District. 22^3p. igpl. map. 
i84i 

DIVISION 5 AGRICULTURE. Emmons, Ebenezer. Agriculture of New York; 
comprising an account of the classification, composition and distribution 
of the soils and rocks and the natural waters of the different geological 
formations, together with a condensed view of the meteorology and agri- 
cultural productions of the State. 5v. il. pi. sq. Q. Albany 1846-54. Out 
of print. 

T. I Soils of the State, their Composition and Distribution. 11+371P. 2ipL 
1846. 

▼. 2 Analysis of Soils, Plants, Cereals, etc. 8+343+460. 42o\. i%^^ 

With Y^nd'Co}ored pUitea. 



^ UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

V. 3 Fruits, etc. 8+340P. 1851. 

V A Plates to accompany v. 3. 95pl. 1851. 

Hand -colored. 

V. 5 Insects Injurious to Agriculture. 8+272P. sopl. 1854. 

V\ itli hand -colored plates. 

DIVISION 6 PALEONTOLOGY. Hall, James. Palaeontology of New York. 

il. pi. sq. Q. Albany 1847-94. Bound in cloth. 
V. I Organic Remains of the Lower Division of the New York Syst 

23+338?. 99Pl. 1847. Out of print. 
V. 2 Organic Remains of Lower Middle Division of the New York Syst 

8+362P. i04pl. 1852. Out of print. 
V. 3 Organic Remains of the Lower Ilclderbcrg Group and the Orisk 

Sandstone, pti. text. 12+532?. 1859. [$3.5o\ 

pt2, I43pl. 1861. [$2.30] 

V. 4 Fossil Brachiopoda of the Upper Hclderberg, Hamilton, Portage 1 
Chemung Groups. 11+1+428?. 99?!. 1867. $2.30. 
' V. 5 pti Lamellibranchiata i. Monomyaria of the Upper Helderlx 
Hamilton and Chemung Groups. i8+268p. 45?!. 1884. %2.$0. 

Lamellibranchiata 2. Dimyaria of the Upper Helderberg, Hj 

ilton. Portage and Chemung Groups. 62»-293p. 51 pi. 1885. %2.$o. 

pt2 Gasteropoda, Pteropoda and Cephalopoda of the Upper Hek 

berg, Hamilton, Portage and Chemung Groups. 2v. 1879. v. i, Xs 
15+-492P. V. 2. i2opl. %2.so for 2 V. 
V. 6 Corals and Bryozoa of the Lower and Upper Helderberg and Hai 

ton Groups. 24+298?. 67pl. 1887. ^2.30. 
V. 7 Trilobites and other Crustacea of the Oriskany, Upper Helderbi 
Hamilton, Portage, Chemung and Catskill Groups. 64+236?. 46?1. \\ 
Cont. supplement to v. 5, ?t2. Pteropoda, Cephalopoda and Annel 
42?. r8pl. 1888. %2.30, 
V. 8 pti Introduction to the Study of the Genera of the Paleozoic Brat 

opoda. 16+367?. 44?1. 1892. %2.30. 
— ■" pt2 Paleozoic Brachiopoda. i6^^^394?- 84?!. 1894. $2.30. 
Catalogrne of the Cabinet of Natural History of the State of New York ; 
of the Historical and Antiquarian Collection annexed thereto. 242?. 
1853. 
' Handbooks 1893-date. 7J^xi2j4 cm. 

In quantities, i cent for eatli lO {)a^rs or Irss. Single opies po-itpaid as below. 

H5 New York State Museum. 52?. il. 4c. 

Outlines history and work ot the museum with list oi sl.ifT i<j.>.'. 

HIS Paleontolojjy. i2p. 2c. 

Brief ciuilinc of State Museum work in ]).ile«.»niolof;y un.lcr hoail^: Oeliniiion; Relalio 
biolofi^y; Relation tu ?>tratif;ruphy; History of p.ileontolog'y in \cw York. 

H16 Guide to Excursions in the Fossiliferous Rocks of New Yc 
I24p. ^c. 

Itineraries of 32 trips covering nearly the entire series of Paico/oic rocks, prepared spec 
for the use of teachers and students (icsirin>4 to acquaint themselves more intim.ttely will 
classic rocks of thi^ State. 

H16 Entomology. i6p. 2c. 

H17 Economic Geology. In press. 

H18 Insecticides and Fungicides. 20p. jc. 

H19 Classification of New York Series of Geologic Formations. 32?. 

Maps. Merrill, F: J. H. Economic and Geologic Map of the State of > 
York; issued as part of Museum bulletin 15 and the 4Sth Museum Rep 
V. I. 59x67 cm. 1894. Scale 14 miles to i inch. Separate edition ou 
print, 

Geologic Map of New York. 1901. Scale s miles to i inch. In a 

form $s; mounted on rollers $3. Loxver Hudson sheet 60c. 

ThCL lower Hudson she.:t, cctilofiically colored, comprises Rockland, Orange. Dutchess, Puti 
Weslchcster, New York, Richmond, Kiht;s, (Querns and Nassau couniiis, and parts of Sulli 
Ulster and. Suffolk counties;, also northeastern New Jersey and p.irt of west«'rn Connecticut. 

Map of New York showing the Surface Configuration and W 

, Sheds. TQoi. Scale 12 miles to I inch. 15c. 
, Clarke, J: M. & Luther, O. 1). Geologic Ma\> oi Ojlv\?lw^^;\\^w;5. ^tv^ "^^ 

Qiindranfrlei^. JQ04, joc. 
-issued am p»rt vf l*itlconidioffy 7. 





i^ 



r Kik« 



^ 





^ VXn'ERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

V. 3 Fruits, etc. 8+340p. 185 1. 

V 4 Plates to accompany v. 3. pspl. 1851. 
Han<l-ci>lurcd. 

V. s Insects Injurious to Agriculture. 8+2;2p. 50pl. 1854. 

Willi hand-Loli)rt'ii plates. 

DIVISION 6 PALEONTOLOGY. Hall. Jamcs. Palaeontology of New York. 

il. pi. sq. Q. Albany 1847-Q4. Bound in cloth. 
V. I Organic Remains of the Lower Division of the New York Sysl 

23f338p. 99pl. 1847. Out of trint. 
V. 2 Organic Remains of Lower Middle Division of the New York 

8+362P. i04pl. 1852. Out of print. 
V. 3 Organic Remains of the Lower Helderberg Group and the Oris! 

Sandstone, pti. text. 12+532P. 1859. i$3.5o] 

pt2. I43pl. 1 861. [$2.50^ 

V. 4 Fossil Brachiopoda of the Upper Helderberg, Hamilton, Portage 

Chemung Groups. 11+1+428P. ggpl. 1867. $2,50. 
' V. 5 pti Lamellibranchiata i. Monomyaria of the Upper Helderl 
Hamilton and Chemung Groups. i8+268p. 45pl. 1884. $2.50. 

Lamellibranchiata 2. Dimyaria of the Upper Helderberg, Hi 

ilton. Portage and Chemung Groups. 62+2Q3p. 51 pi. 1885. $2.50, 

pt2 Gasteropoda. Pteropoda and Cephalopoda of the Upper Hcl( 

berg. Hamilton, Portage and Chemung Groups, 2v. 1879. v. I, 
15+492P. V. 2. I20pl. $2.50 for 2 v, 

V. 6 Corals and Bryozoa of the Lower and Upper Helderberg and Hi 

ton Groups. 24+298P. 67pl. 1887. $2.50. 
V. 7 Trilobites and other Crustacea of the Oriskany, Upper Helderbi 
Hamihon, Portage, Chcnmng and Catskill Groui)s. 64+236P. 46pl, li 
Cont. supplement to v. 5, pt2. Pteropoda, Cephalopoda and Annelii 
42p. r8pl. 1888. $2.50, 
V. 8 pti Introduction to the Study of the Genera of the Paleozoic Brad 

opoda. 16+367P. 44pl. 1892. $2.^0, 
— ■— pt2 Paleozoic Brachiopoda. i6t-394p. 84pl. 1894. $2.50, 
Catalogue of the Cabinet of Natural History of the State of New York ai 
of the Historical and Antiquarian Collection annexed thereto. 242p. OL- 
1853. 
' Handbooks i8g3-(iate. 71^2x12% cm. ^ 

In (luaiiiitics, i cent fur tMcli 10 la^i'S or U->s. Single copiei ivKip>iiJ us below. rf 

H5 New Yoik State Museum. S2p. il. 4c. 

Outlines liistwry uiui work t>t the nui:>cuni wiili list i>i staff i.><o. 

HIS Paleontoloijy. I2p. 2c. 

Brict outline ot ."^latc Museum work in |>:iliri>nt</ioi;y un-lcr houik: Detinilion; Relatioo to 
bit)li.iKy; Relati'.m to strati Kr.ipliy: History ot i»ale<»nto!ogy in New York. 

H15 Guide to Excursions in the Fossiliferous Rocks of New Yorki 
I24p. 8c. 

Itineraries of yi trips covtrinj; nearly tin- entire series of Paleo/oic n»cks, prepared specully 
for tiiv use of teaihers and students liesiriufi to acquaint tlicmselvcs more intimately with ine 
classie rocks nf ilii> State. 

H16 Entomology. i6p. 2c. 

H17 Economic Geology. In press. 

H18 Insecticides and Fungicides. 20p. 3c. 

HIO Classification of New York Series of Geologic Formations. 32p. Jfm 

Maps. Merrill, F: J. H. Economic and Geologic Map of the State of New 
York; issued as part of Museum bulletin 15 and the 48th Museum Report 
V. I. 59x67 cm. 1894. Scale 14 miles to i inch. Separate edition out of 
print. 

' Geologic Map of New York. 1901. Scale 5 miles to i inch. In ailas 

fomi $s; mounted on rollers J5. Lower Hudson sheet 60c. 

The; lower Hudson she'^-t, ueoKi^rically t'oloied. comprises IvoLkUind, Orange. Dutchess, Putnam, 
WcMchesler, New Vurk, Richmoutl, KiiiRs, yueens and Nassau (outuies, and ^)arts of SulUran* 
Ulster and Suffolk counties;, alsi* northeastern New Jersey and part ot western Connecticut. 

Map of New York showing the Surface Configuration and Water 

. S/u'(U. ujoi. Scale 12 miles to 1 inch, i.sc 
CJ;irk\\ J: M. & Luther, D. I). Geologic Map oi C-a\\;vv\^;s\^^ ^tv^ '^<a:^lei 

Qu:idrHnf2rlc<. HJ04. ^Y)r. 
■fssucd at pan of PiUcutudlotiy?. 




.^ 



f.I^Lui 



^ 











' V. 5 pti 
Hami 

ilton, 

pt2 

berg, 
15+49^ 
V.6 Co 
ton Gj 

V. 7 Tr 

Hami! 

Cont. 

42p. I 
v.Spti . —^ 

opoda. L^'*^>t^ 

pt2 

Catalogue ** 

of th. « - 

1853. 
HandboolS^ 

In ({uanl M. 

H5 New "^ 

Outlines J»-. — — 

H13 Palc<: 

Briei dut > 

H15 Guia 
I24p. S 

Itineraries 
for ihc use " 
classic rocks • 

H16 Entoi 
H17 Econ» 
H18 Insecl 
HIO Classi 

Maps. Me 

York; is! 

V. 1. 592 

prtnt. 
Geolo. , 

form $3: 

The. lower I 
Weslclicti^r. ? 
Ulster and Suf 

Jasucd Ska part of ""^ p^j /• 



^NCW 



ScaleT2'n,ifeto"^x inch ^7^* Configuratio7;„7 W.ter 



University of the State of New York 



New York State Museum 

The New York State Museum as at present organized is the outgrowdi 
of the Natural History Survey of the State commenced in 1836. This was 
established at the exi)ressed wish of the people to have some definite and 
positive knowledge of the mineral resources and of the vegetable and 
animal forms of the State. This wish was stated in memorials presented 
to the Legislature in 1834 by the Albany Institute and in 1835 by the 
American Institute of New York city and as a result of these and other 
influences the Legislature of 1835 passed a resolution requesting the sec- 
retary of state to report to that body a plan for **a complete geological ^ 
survey of the State, which shall furnish a scientific and perfect account : 
of its rocks, soils and materials and of their localities; a list of its mineral , 
logical, botanical and zoological productions and provide for procuring 
and preserving specimens of the same; etc." - 

Pursuant to this request, Hon. John A. Dix, then secretary of state^ ] 
presented to the Legislature of 1836 a report proposing a plan for a com- 
plete geologic, botanic and zoologic survey of the State. This report 
was adopted by the Legislature then in session and the governor was 
authorized to employ competent persons to carry out the plan which was 
at once put into effect. 

The scientific staff of the Natural History- Sur\^ey of 1836 consisted of 
John Torrey, botanist; James E. DeKay, zoologist; Lewis C. Beck| 
mineralogist ; W. W. Mather, Ebenezer Emmons, Lardner Vanuxem and 
Timothy A. Conrad, geologists. In 1837 Mr Conrad was made paleon- 
tologist and James Hall, who had been an assistant to Professor EmmonSi 
was appointed geologist to succeed Mr Vanuxem, who then took charge 
of Mr Conrad's geological district. 

The heads of the several departments reported .annually to the gover- 
nor the results of their investigations, and these constituted the annual 
octavo reports which were published from 1837 to 1841. The final 
reports were published in quarto form, beginning at the close of the field 
work in 1841, and 3000 sets have been distributed, comprising four vol- 
umes of geology, one of mi neralogy, two of botany, five of zoology, five 
of agriculture, and eight of paleontology. 




Unlyfcfstty of tlie Stmtm of New York 



High 'School Department 

;;.irD1NG ACA0EMISM A|fD AUh imimW5r% OP i^lfCDNClAiV i(fUOATI«)H 



BuUetio 23 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 1903 



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Uni^er^ity of tfae State ol New York 
rtsacNTS 1000 

1878 WMlTkLAVr Kkid M.A, LUD. * ^/r Chamfihr, N(?w York 

1877 CiuuKcHY M. DiPKW LL,D. • 

ia77 CfiAm.Es E. Fitch LL.B* Mj\- ^^M.U. 

iMi William Ih VVati^ji M.A. M,n. ll.D, 

I Ml Humv E* Toipmii LUD 

18^3 SrCi^tft McKKLWAr M.A. L.li^a LUD. D.CX. 

1885 Daniel Ili:Aa I Pb^U/LL^D, - ^ , 

1S90 pLfjcrT.SEKTox LUD* - , . ^ - 

1^90 T. GuiLrofeD Smhh M.A, C.E* LUD. - 

1893 Lewi*! A_ SirMi^OK B.A* LL,D* M D, 

1S95 AniiJ*! VA.xiiift VtER M.A. VhS). M.D. 

ja^S QlAkiEs R. SiciKSEa M.A. LL,D. 

Supetinec^jdenioi FoliUc IfisUucuoiif tLJt uffieio 
1897 Chester S- Lo»d M,A. LL.D, . ^ * Brooklyn 

190G Teiei^jas a* HKriyntcic M*A, LL.U. - - Rochester 

1901 EcKjt^mTv B. Odcll jr LL.D. Go^ernDrt irx offidci 
1901 Roii£RT C, I'RurK M,A. , , ^ . 
1901 WiLiXASt NomNtittA.*! M«A. PIlD, LLJ1« 
1J03 Fkakk W, HrOGivs Lietjtimam Gotemori at 0RtQO 
1^03 John F. O'B rotary of Stat**, €% dlicio 

1303 Cll.im.El A. t H LL.B MA. Ph.D. Ll.^D 

1^05 Ciiahles S, Fiuifciff 0*^. 



New York 

Rochester 

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Nw York 
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SECBSTAJTf 

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1900 JAM^ RtfismLL Faksoits Jft M^ Ll^D. 



omECTons OP DtcPAfmncrrnB 
i^a MliLVii Ditw«y MA LUD, Si^£ library and /Am^ £4itmihm 
1890 Jahes Kusfi&Li* Parsons ir M.A< LUD* 

AJmmsirath% C^J^i umi ffigk StAmI J^rfiM 
1H95 FfiituilRlcic J. H. MESfULL Ph.D. ^ifia^ Afa^mm 



University of the State of New York 



High School Department 

HTCLUDING ACADEMIES ANI> ALL INTERESTS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Bulletin 23 
DIRECTOR'S REPORT 1903 



To the Regents of the University of the State of New York 

The following rej)oit of the High School Department for tlie 
year ending June 30, 1903/ was prepared under my direction by 
Head Inspector Charles F. Wheelock and Inspector Charles N. 
Cobb. 

Scope. This dei)aii:ment includes academies, jdaced under the 
Regents in 1784, and academic departments of union schools 
under their supervision by the original union fi-ee school act of 
1853^ with other interests of secondary education. 

ACTION BY THE REGENTS 
Charter amended. On unanimous request of the trustees, 
Voted, That the limited cliart<T of the University Preparatory 
School, Ithaca, be amended by substituting ?1 00,000 for 
f50,000 as the amount of capital stock. [Dec. 4, 1002] 

Voted, That the academic department of Savannah Union 
Bohool Ik* continued on the list of University institutions, the 
defect in the organization of the unicm school having b<*en 
corrected. [Dec. 4, 1902] 
Hames changed. On unanimous request of the trustc^es, 
Voted, That under authority of §20 of the University law. the 
name of Champlain Institute, Port Henry, Ik* chnng(Ml to Cham- 
plain Academy. [Dec. 4, 1902] 



*An fitatistk'S \n this roiwrt, unless otlionviso sixMiluKl. are for llie yeiir 
ending June 30, 1908. 



1*4 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Leases approved. Voted, That the lease of the Delaware 
Acadeni.y to the board of education of Union Free School 
District No. KJ of Delhi, and that of Delaware Literary Insti- 
tute to the board of education of Union Free School District No. 
10 of Franklin, and that of Munro Collegiate Institute to the 
board of education of Union Fnn* School District No. 9 of 
Elbridgc are hereby aj)j)roved. [Dec. 4, 1002] 

Contracts approved. Voted ^ That the contract between Union 
Free School District No. 10 of (>azenovia and Cazenovia Seminary 
under laws of 11)02, ch. 325, be and is hereby approved. [Dec. 4, 
1002] 

Voted, That a certificate of ap[)roval of the contract between 
Union Free School District No. 1 of the town of Randolph and 
Chamberlain Institute of Randolph under laws of 1902, ch. 325, 
be issued on receiving satisfactory evidence that Chamberlain 
Institute has paid in full its teachers for services rendered in the 
academic year ending June 30, 1902. [Dec. 4, 1902] 

Voted, That Scottsville Union School receive quota and attend- 
ance for 1903, since the application for its admission was filed and 
approved Sep. 1, 1902. [Dec. 4, 1902] 

Voted, That North Bangor Union School receive the |100 quota 
and f37.86 for attendance for tlie year 1902, as its failure to 
report 175 days in session was due to the fact that the school was 
closed by order of the board of health ; that West Eaton Union 
School receive the |100 quota and |9.80 for attendance for 1901, 
as it could not report 1000 days' attendance of academic students 
in 1901 for the same reason; that Dannemora Union School re- 
ceive the |100 quota for 1902 as owing to a misunderstanding 
they had been led to expect it as usual under the old rule; that 
Lyon Mountain Union School receive the flOO quota and f7.05 for 
attendance for 1902, as its failure to report 1000 days' attendance 
of academic students in 1901 was fully explained and was excused 
by the Regents July 2, 1902.1 [Dec. 4, 1902] 

^Subsequent inspection having sliown that this school was not maintaining 
satisfactory standards this apportionment was withheld. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r5 

Legislation. Voted, That the secretary be directed to apply to 
the Legislature for such amendment of the University law, and 
other needful legislation, if any, as will, in any case of contem- 
plated or decreed dissolution of a corporation by the Regents, on 
their application or that of the trustees of the corporation, au- 
thorize the courts to appoint a receiver to liquidate its business 
under judicial direction and customary or prescribed procedure. 
[ Dec. 4, 11)02] 

Voted. That the Legislature be requested to amend the code of 
civil procedure by enacting the following as part of title 10 of 
chapter 17 of the code of civil procedure : 

§2418 This title does not apply to any corporation whose name 
the Regents of the University might change under the University 
law. [Dec. 4, 1902] 

Voted, That the Legislature be requested to amend §2 of chap- 
ter 567 of the laws of 1890, so as to exclude from the operation of 
that section, cori)orations which might be incorporated by the 
Regents of the University. [Dec. 4, 1902] 

Corporate and local names. On motion of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, 

Voted, That the charter committee be instructed to make such 
inquiry as may be necessary concerning the powers of the Regents 
in granting special and local names to academic departments in 
union free school districts already incorporated under the general 
school laws of the State and also to report some plan which shall 
remove the confusion now existing in the use of corporate and 
local names. [Dec. 4, 1902] 

The charter committee reported that according to pn^sent 
practice the application for admission of academic depart- 
ments specifies clearly the corporate name, and that the cer- 
tificate of admission is issued under such name; that to pre- 
vent confusion the local name of the academic department, as 
given in the application, is also inserted in. the certificate. The 
committee reported further a prevalent custom of using as the 
local name of a school the name of a prominent individual (Wash- 



r6 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

ington Irving High School at Tarrytown, Peter Cooper High 
School of New York City, etc.) or benefactor (Parker Union 
School at Clarence, Haldane High School at Cold Spring, Rowena 
Memorial School at Palenville, etc.) . It is also customary to con- 
tinue the name of an academy adopted as the academic depart- 
ment of a union school (Canandaigua Academy at Canandalgua, 
S. S. Seward Institute at Florida, Delaware Literary Institute at 
Franklin, etc.), such continuation of the local name or of the old 
name of the academy aiding in identifying and protecting prop- 
erty rights in many cases. The certificate of admission is issued 
in the corporate name of the school and the local name is added 
as a means of further identification, the corporate name being un- 
known as a rule even to residents of the locality. [May 21, 1903] 

Normal College of the City of New York. Voted, That the high 
school department of the Normal College of the City of New York 
be admitted to the University when the trustees have perfected 
their application by filing a duly attested resolution requesting 
such admission and stating that the student body is distinct and 
sei)arate and that the high school department has also its separate 
faculty organization. [May 21, 1903] 

Hudson Kiver Institute. Voted^ That, the Hudson River Insti- 
tute having ceased to perform its educational work and its trus- 
tees having, as evidenced by their written certificate of June 20, 
1902, unanimously consented that the Regents of the University 
may dissolve the said corporation, which they now contemplate 
doing; and it appearing that such corporation is indebted to sev- 
eral creditors and is insolvent; the Regents hereby direct that, 
in their behalf, the Attorney General be requested to apply to the 
court for the appointment of a receiver of the property of the said 
corporation, to liquidate its business affairs, and the Chancellor 
and secretary, or either, are hereby authorized to take such steps 
and execute in behalf of the Regents such papers as shall be need- 
ful therefor. [May 21, 1903] 

Voted, That, the trustees of the Hudson River Institute, in 
anticipation of their desired dissolution of that corporation, 
having conveyed to the Regents of the University all of the prop- 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 F? 

erty of the said corporation, by a deed dated June 23, 1902, and 
recorded, at the instance of the said trustees, in the clerk's office 
of Columbia county in this State, on June 24, 1902, in liber 118 of 
deeds, at page 398; which deed the Regents never authorized to 
be made to them and the conveyance attempted thereby they have 
never consented to accept ; and the said deed constituting on the 
said record an apparent cloud on the title to the property of the 
said corporation; and the dissolution of such corporation being 
now contemplated by the Regents, and they having directed the 
taking of steps for the appointment of a receiver to liquidate its 
business affairs; the Chancellor and the seci-etary of the Board 
of Regents are hereby authorized and directed to execute, in the 
name and behalf of the Regents of the University, such instru- 
ment, or instruments, of release and quitclaim of all interest in 
the property of the said corporation which purported to be con- 
veyed to the Regents by the aforesaid deed, as the Attorney Gen- 
eral shall advise to be needful to remove the said cloud on the 
title to the said property and facilitate and confirm any sale 
thereof by its duly appointed receiver. [May 21, 1903] 

The following action was taken on motion of the Vice Chan- 
cellor: 

St Begifl Falls Union School. Voted, That St Regis Falls Union 
School receive the |100 quota and |65.03 for attendance for the 
year 1902, as its failure to report 175 days in session was due to 
the fact that the school was closed by order of the board of health. 
[May 21, 1903] 
Name changed. On unanimous request of the trustees. 
Voted, That under authority of §29 of the University law, the 
name of Charbonneau Institute, Rouse Point, be changed to St 
Patrick's Academic School of Rouse Point. . . [May 21, 1903] 

The following unanimous action was taken on motion of Regent 
Fitch : 

Normal College of the City of New York. As the Normal College 
of the City of New York has at all times been an integral part of 
the University of the State of New York and has fully complied 



r8 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

with the laws, ordinances, bylaws and regulations of the Univer- 
sity, and 

As the records of this department show that said college has 
conducted for years academic work or courses of study which 
entitle it on proper application to share in the funds distribut- 
able under the provisions of the Ilorton law, and which have been 
subject to the inspection and regulation of this board, 

Voted, That the high school department of the Normal College 
of the City of New York be allowed to participate in the next 
annual apportionment, and that it be certified to the comptroller 
as entitled to such grant. [June 29, 1903] 

STATISTICS OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Orowth. June 30, 1903, there were on the University roll 636 
academic departments of public schools and 144 chartered acad- 
emies, making a total of 780 institutions of secondary education, 
being an increase of 14 over the number reported in 1902. During 
the year 16 academic departments have been admitted ; of these 
Delhi Union School has leased the Delaware Academy, Franklin 
Union School the Delaware Literary Institute and Elbridge Union 
School the Munro Collegiate Institute, these three academic 
departments thus becoming the successors of the three academies 
named. 

During the year the number of full high schools has increased 
20, of senior schools 17; the number of middle schools has 
decreased 9 and the number of junior schools 12. Of the schools 
admitted during the year, 11 were of junior grade, 1 of senior 
grade and 3 of high school grade at the time of admission. It 
appears that 23 schools have advanced from junior to middle 
grade, 32 from middle to senior and 17 from senior to high school, 
a total of 72 advanced in grade during the year. 

In 1902-3, 4 academies have been incorporated with permanent 
charters. 

Expenditures. In 1902 the amount expended by 621 high schools 
was 14,445,083.17, an average of |57.34 for each student, an 
increase of |6.37. In 1903 the amount expended by 636 high 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r9 

schools was |5,007,055.02, an average of |61.73 for each student, 
an increase of |4^9 for each student over the average in 1902. 

In 1902 the 145 academies expended |2,182,625.49, or an average 
of 1151.93 for each student, a decrease of |2.52. In 1903 the 144 
ax^ademies expended |2,099,944.88, an average of |146.25 for each 
student enrolled, a decrease of |5.68. 

The expenditures of all secondary schools taken together were 
yr2.37 for each student in 1902 and |74.74 in 1903, an increase 
of 12.37. 

Students. The number of students instructed in the secondary 
schools of the State in 1903 was 95,096, an increase of 3513, or 
3-8;^, over the preceding year. 

The whole number of graduates holding four year or higher cre- 
dentials is 6654, a decrease of 136, or 2^, over the preceding year. 
The whole number of graduates is about 7^ of the whole number 
attending and indicates therefore that about 28^ of all the stu- 
dents attending secondary schools in the University complete four 
year courses of study. 

The number of advanced diplomas and certificates issued was 
2287, a decrease of 5.8;^ over the preceding year. 

The table of academic credentials issued in 1903 shows that 
the biennial fluctuations in the number of preliminary certifi- 
cates issued continues, the tendency to a decrease in the odd years 
and to an increase in the even years being maintained. The 
decrease in number of such certificates issued in 1903 as compared 
with 1902, was 1173, or 5.8^. The number of first year certifi- 
cates decreased 501 or 4.7;^. The number of second year certifi- 
cates increased 110, and of third year certificates 128. Only 59 
fourth year certificates and only 26 advanced certificates were 
issued, indicating that practically all of those who remain for a 
foil four year course arrange their work along definite lines lead- 
ing to a diploma instead of a certificate. 

The whole number of academic diplomas and fourth year cer- 
tificates issued was 4367, which is 27.1^ of the number of pre- 
liminary certificates issued in 1899, indicating that in schools 
taking Regents examinations 27.1^ of those who completed the 
grammar school course in 1899 remained to graduate in 1903. 



rlO UNIVERSITY OF TUE STATE OP NEW YORK 

EXAMINATIONS 

The number of examination papers written, claimed, allowed, 
with honors attained in each subject is shown in table E [p. r40]. 
It will l)e noted that this number is somewhat less than in the 
pi^cedin^ year. 

For some years the work of the schools in mathematics has 
been criticized on the ground that students were unable to make 
ordinary computations with accuracy. In an endeavor to pro- 
duce improvement in this direction the following instructions 
regarding the rating of papers in mathematics were issued Sep. 
24, 1902: 

Mathematics, For the purpose of securing a higher degree of aeouracy 
In all papers in mathematics, the following nUes will hereafter be observed 
in rating such papers in the Regents office : 

1 In business arithmetic nothing will be allowed for an incorrect answer. 

2 In all other papers in mathematics not more than 70% of the full value 
of any answer will be allowed if the answer is incorrect. 

3 Deductions will be made for lack of neatness and orderly arrangement 
of work, speciaHy in the c^omputations in trigonometry. 

The effect of this notice has already been evident. And, while 
there is still room for improvement, it is apparent that more 
attention is being given to accuracy of computation and neatness 
of work. 

Of the 84 subjects and divisions of subjects in which examina- 
tions were held, 54 show decreases in number of papers allowed 
and 30 show increases. All Greek papers show a decrease of 
222 or 13.2;^. All Latin papers show an increase of 363 or 2%. 
There is a total decrease of 1028 papers or llj^ in German and 
of 194 papers or 4.4;^ in French. While it is not safe to base 
any general conclusions on the increases or decreases of a single 
year, these figures would seem to indicate a growing tendency 
toward the study of Latin to the exclusion of other foreign 
languages. 

The table shows that 539,241 papers were written, 418,230 
claimed and 358,015 allowed, and of the latter 77,080 were honor 
papers standing at 90}^ or over. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPAETMBNT REPORT 1903 rll 

Grants to secondary schools. The amounts apportioned to 
secondary schools in the University for the fiscal year ending 
Sep. 30, 1903, were as follows: 

For ?100 quota |63 900 . . 

Attendance 208 260 59 

Books and apparatus 40 197 70 

1312 358 29 
Cost of inspection, travel and incidental expenses 

(190^3) 32 983 52 



1345 341 81 



In making these grants, the State has continued to recognize 
the importance of fostering secondary education. As a result 
of such aid, secondary education has been brought within the 
reach of many students who would otherwise have been deprived 
of all instruction beyond the elementary schools. 

The amount paid to denominational schools that submit to 
Regents examinations and inspection to meet local expenses of 
such examinations and inspection under the Constitution and 
laws of the State as interpreted by the Attorney Greneral, was 
110,808.16 for the fiscal year ending Sep. 30, 1903, as compared 
with 111,317.02 for the fiscal year ending Sep. 30, 1902. 

All grants to secondary schools are made as soon as pos- 
sible after the end of each fiscal year and are based on the 
report of that year. For example, in October 1903 were made 
all grants to secondary schools based on reports for the fiscal 
year ending Sep. 30, 1903, and no further grants are due till 
October 1904. 

INSPECTION 

The number of visits of inspection made by each of the in- 
spectors is shown in table H, p. r41 of the appendix ; and, in addi- 
Ucm, are shown the educational meetings at which inspectors 
have been present and assisted. 



rl2 UNIVEBSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Approval of laboratory courses. Sep. 24, 1902, the following in- 
structionfi regarding laboratory courses in science were sent to 
all secondary schools in the University. 

An allowance of 20 credits toward examinations in botany, zoolo^, 
physics and clieuiistry will be made to those students who have completed 
approved laboratory c*ourses. Because of the frequent changes in teachers, 
equipment and numbers in class, approval of laboratory courses is made for 
one year only. In all cases where approval is desired for the current 
year, the inclosed blank should be filled out and returned to the Regents 
ofDce not later than Oct 15. 

As soon as practicable after a request for approval is received, the school 
will be inspected. The inspector will consider (1) equipment of the labora- 
tory, (2) 8i>ecial qualifications of the teacher, (3) course pursued, (4) time 
spent in the work, (5) notebooks kept by students. If the course is satis- 
factory in all these respec^ts, a certificate of approval will be sent from the 
Regents office to the principal of the school, after the receipt of which 
students certified by the principal as having completed the course satis- 
factorily will be granted the allowance of 20 credits. Unless this certificate 
of approval has been received by the principal, all students should be 
instructed to answer 10 questions at each examination. 

The student, at the time of performing the exi)eriment, should enter 
in the notebook (1) number or title of exi)eriment, (2) object sought, 
(3) apparatus and materials used, (4) operations, (5) observations, 
(6) deductions. The teacher should review, noting by conventional sigusi, 
errors and omissions. The student should make corrections, leaving origi- 
nal entries legible, after which the teacher should mark each experiment 
approved. 

No allowance of less than 20 credits will be made on any examination 
paper. A candidate taking both parts of physics or of (Chemistry in one 
paper can not receive credit for laboratory work in one part only. Credit 
will not be given for a year's laboratory work done in a half year's time. 

An approved laboratory course must consist of at least 70 exercises for 
each year (35 for each half year) of at least 40 minutes each, and the 
school must provide adequate facilities and supervision for individual work. 
It is expected that the teacher will be present during the entire time of 
the required laboratory exercises. 

A purely textbook course demands from the student five periods for 
recitation and not less than five periods for study, making a minimum of 
10 periods each week. Therefore, in order that a laboratory course may be 
approved, provision must be made for at least 10 40 minute periods each 
w^eek, to be estimated by adding to the number of actual laboratory periods 
twice the nuiuber of actual recitation periods. 

The minimum equipment that should be provided l)efore application for 
approval, is indicated below: 

Botany and zoology 

1 A dissecting microscope for each student. 

2 A compound microscoiH* for each group of four students. 

3 A set of microscopic mounts adapted to the course. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl3 

4 A set Of charts adapted to the course — in zoology, charts illustrative 
of the frog, perch, mussel, crayfish, earthworm,- hydra, starfish, infusoria 
and animalcula; and in botany, charts illustrative of fresh-water algae, 
mucor, moss, fern, pine, pea, horse-chestnut, strawberry, buttercup and 
violet Other charts may be substituted for the last five in botany. 

Physics and chemistry 

Table space supplied if possible with running water and gas, and appa- 
ratus and supplies sufficient to enable each student, working in a group 
of not more than two. to perform each experiment of a course substantially 
equivalent to that outlined in the syllabus. 

Apparatus. The services of an inspector of apparatus may be had as 
far as practicable in accordance with the following terms; i. e. two days 
stt-vice without charge, all time in excess of two days to be charged at the 
rate of $5 a day. 

The whole number of applications for approval of laboratory 
courses under these regulations, the number approved and the 
number failing to meet the conditions are as follows : 

Physics Chemistry Botany Zoology Total 

No. applications 132 106 59 32 329 

No. approved 105 88 46 22 261 



No. failing of approval.. 27 18 13 10 68 



There was an increase over the previous year of 51 or 18^^ in 
the number of applications, and of 15 or 6^ in the number of ap- 
provals. These figures, though interesting, give only an imperfect 
conception of the improvement that has been wrought in the 
teaching of these four sciences as a result of approval of labora- 
tory work and the giving of credit for such work on Regents cre- 
dentials. Among the evident effects of this approval are the fol- 
lowing: better rooms for laboratories, better facilities for indi- 
vidual work, insistence on the preparation of good notebooks by 
the students and adequate sui)ervision of the work while it is in 
progress. Large expenditures have often been made to meet the 
requirements in these resi>ects, specially to provide larger and 
better rooms and additional teachers. 

In a system of examinations like those conducted by the 
Regents, where the questions are prepared and the answers rated 
by i»ersons other tlian the teachers, it is essential that this work 
should be done, or at least directed, by those who are in direct and 



rl4 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

frequent contact with the schoolroom. Any system of examina- 
tions that fails to recognisse this fundamental principle will sooner 
or later fail. Recognizing this fact, the inspectors of the Regents 
oflSce have been asked, as in former years, to prepare examination 
questions and to direct the rating of the answer papers. At the 
close of each examination the inspectors have been regularly 
called to the oflflce, where each takes charge of the work of a de- 
partment and superintends the rating of all papers in such depart- 
ment. Uniformity of rating is thus secured, but more important 
still is the rating in sympathy with the conditions that actually 
exist and which the insi)ector sees daily when engaged in visiting 
the schools. Each of the insi)ectors has spent about three months 
during the year in this work at tlie Regents office. In estimating 
the value that is to be given to the work of a student in one of our 
high schools three factors are therefore involved, viz : inspection, 
examination and certification. The inspection should determine 
whether the work is being carried on under suitable conditions 
and by competent teachers; the examination, controlled largely, 
as has been shown above, by the inspectors, should determine 
something of the student's power to think and ability to express 
himself; and the principaPs certificate to the examination report 
should be a certificate that in his judgment the student has done 
work that should entitle him to credit. Our inspection force has 
been so small that usually only one full visit to a school has been 
possible each year. It is believed that double the number of visits 
would be profitable. 

Grading of secondary schools. Feb. 8, 1894, the Regents took ac- 
tion regarding the classifying of the secondary schools in the Uni- 
versity and established four grades, high school, senior school, 
middle school and junior school. Since that date there have been 
admitted to the University 20 high schools, 5 senior schools, 18 
middle schools and 302 junior schools. The tables show that 
there are now in the University 393 high schools, 54 senior 
schools, 60 middle schools and 126 junior schools. The first grad- 
ing of the entire list was made in 1896, when it was found that of 
the schools of the University previous to Feb. 8, 1894, 220 were of 



Ulgh 


Senior 


Middle 


Junior 


220 


22 


33 


19 


20 


5 


18 


302 


240 


27 


51 


321 


393 


54 


60 


120 


+153 


+27 


+9 


-195 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl5 

high school grade, 22 of senior grade, 33 of middle grade and 19 of 
junior grade. Adding these numbers to the number in each grade 
admitted since Feb. 8, 1894, we find that, had there been no 
advance in grade, we should now have 240 high schools, 27 senior 
schools, 51 middle schools and 321 junior schools. Comparing 
these numbers with the present numbers in each gi*ade, we find 



IMvvious to Feb. 8, 1894 

Admitted since Feb. 8, 1894. . . 

Total 

^ Present number 



It was the expectation of the Regents that the schools admitted 
of junior grade would rapidly improve as a result of influence of 
inspection, examination and slight financial aid. That this ex- 
pectation has been fully realized and the action of the Regents in 
this matter fully justified, is shown by the figures given above. In 
fact it may be stated without fear of successful contradiction that 
no money ever expended by this State in aid of education has 
borne fruit so abundantly as has this; for, had these little schools 
not been thus encouraged, it is safe to assert that a large part of 
the State would still be without high school facilities, and thou- 
sands of young people would have been deprived of all opportu- 
nity of securing a high school education. Free tuition aids only 
those who are able to reach the schools giving it, and is only a 
small item in the cost of attendance at a high school. Unless the 
school is near at hand, the cost of board and of transportation is 
still prohibitive to a large number, even though the State pays 
the small item of tuition fees. 

Though public high schools have been widely established as a 
result of the policy adopted by the Regents in 1894, there are still, 
and must always be, some sections remote from such schools, and 

'Three special institutions not included in the above. 



rl6. UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

for the benefit of students living in such localities the academies 
still offer the best advantages and are a necessary supplement to 
the public high schools. Such academies are really a part of the 
public school system and should not be confounded with private 
schools. They usually offer board and rooms at moderate rates 
and provide a much needed supervision over the students outside 
the regular school hours. Their place in the system is an im- 
portant one and should be fully recognized. 

The policy of State aid to secondary education, both by assist- 
ing in the support of secondary schools and by paying the 
academic tuition of students to whom free tuition is not otherwise 
available, is well established. As early as 1871 the Regents advo- 
cated State aid in payment of nonresident academic tuition, and a 
convocation .committee was appointed to secure favorable legisla- 
tion. This resulted in the enactment of ch.642, laws of 1873, 
which authorized the Regents to pay the tuition of nonresident 
academic students in academies and academic departments of 
union free schools, and made an appropriation therefor. No 
further appropriation was made for this purpose, however, till 
1903, though the academic fund has always operated to lower the 
tuition charges to a point below the actual cost to the school. Of 
all the academic students found in the village schools 27^ are 
nonresidents. The following table shows the geographic distribu- 
tion of nonresident students in 1903. 

Diviaion of nonresident secondary students 

High schools Academies Total 

Greater New York 64 349 413 

Other cities 1459 329 1788 

Rural districts 2 131 235 2 366 

incorporated villages 7 515 819 8 334 



11 169 1 732 12 901 



If the high schools received |20 from the State for each non- 
resident in attendance, the cost to the State would be |223,380. 
If we add also the 1732 academy students at the same rate, the 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl7 

addittonal cost to the State would be |34,640, making the total 
cost to the State f258,020. But, as a considerable proportion of 
both classes of students attend only a part of the year, and some 
reside either outside the State or in districts which maintain 
free high schools, the state provision necessary at this rate to 
make academic instruction free to eligible students will fall far 
below this figure. This is shown clearly by approved applications 
for free tuition for the first semester under the new law [ch.542, 
laws of 1903], which include only 5826 nonresident students, 
making a total cost to the State at the maximum rate of |58,260 
for the half year. That tuition is not claimed for a larger number 
of the nonresident students is due also to some extent to the fact 
that the rate is not sufficient to cover the cost, and to the fact 
that academies are excluded from the benefits of the act, and 
that many academic departments have not received the approval 
of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

The incorporated villages with an aggregate population in 
1900 of only 709,592 are educating 65^ of the nonresident academic 
students, the rural districts 18ji^, the cities other than Greater New 
York 14^ and Greater.New York S^, These figures, taken in con- 
nection with the fact stated above, that the tuition charges are 
below cost, suggest the part borne by the incorporated villages in 
providing secondary education. This is shown more clearly by 
the following table. 

Population Secondary 

(census 1900) school students Ratio 

New York State 7 268 012 94 714 .013 

Rural districts 1 611 590 8 266 .0051 

New York city 3 437 202 27 407 .008 

Other cities 1 509 628 28 385 .019 

Incorporated villages 709 592 30 656 .043 

The value of free tuition to nonresident students depends on 
the nearness to their homes of the schools offering such free 
tuition. The great increase in secondary schools since 1894 has 
brought these schools within the reach of practically all the chil- 
dren of the State. 



rl8 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



The I-iegislature of 1903 in the closing hours of its session pro- 
vided for the payment at State expense of academic tuition for 
students residing in districts where free academic instruction is 
not provided by the local authorities. 

Under date of Sep. 5, 1903, the following circular was issued 
by order of the Chancellor of the University. (In this reprint 
the lists of schools are corrected to Jan. 21, 1904.) 

To the Principal 

Following are the academic schools fully approved both by the Siii>erin- 
tendent of Public Instruction and by the Chancellor of the Universit>', pur- 
suant to laws of 1903, chapter 542. Supplementary lists of such additional 
bchools as may meet all requirements of both departments will be issued 
later. 

Hifch school! 



Adams High School 
Addison High School 
Afton High School 
Akron High School 
Albion High School 
Alexandria Bay High School 
Alfred Union School 
Allegany High School 
Almond High School 
Amityville High School 
Andes High School 
Andover High School 
Angelica (Wilson Academy) 
Angola High School 
Antwerp High School 
Arcade High School 
Argyle High School 
Attica High School 
Avoca High School 
Babylon High School 
Bainbridge High School 
Baldwinsville High School 
Ballston Spa High School 
Batavia High School 
Bath (Haverling High School) 
Bay Shore High School 
Belfast High School 
Belmont High School 
Bergen High School 



Bolivar High School 
Boonvllle High School 
Brasher Falls (Brasher and Stock- 
holm High School) 
Brewster High School 
Bridgewater High School 
Brocton High School 
Brookfield High School 
Brown vi lie High School 
Brushton High School 
Caledonia High School 
Cambridge High School 
Camden High School 
Canajoharie High School 
Canandaigua Academy 
Canastota High School 
Candor High School 
Canisteo High School 
Canton High School 
Cape Vincent High School 
Carthage High School 
Castile High School 
Catskill Free Academy 
Cattaraugus High School 
Central Square High School 
Charlotte High School 
Chateaugay High School 
Chatham High School 
Cherry Creek High School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl9 



Cherry Valley High School 

Chester High School 

Chittenango (Tates High School) 

ChurchTille High School 

Clarence (Parker High School) 

Clayton High School 

Clayville High School 

Clifton Springs High School 

Clinton High School 

Clyde High School 

Cobleskill High School 

Cohocton High School 

Cold Spring (HaldaneHigh School) 

Cooperstown High School 

Copenhagen High School 

Corinth High School 

Cornwall-on-Hudson High School 

Coxsackie High School 

Cuba High School 

DansYllle High School 

Delevan High School 

Delhi (Delaware Academy and 

Union School) 
Deposit High School 
De Ruyter High School 
Dexter High School 
Dolgeville High School 
Dryden High School 
Dundee High School 
Earlvllle High School 
East Aurora High School 
East Bloomfield High School 
East Syracuse High School 
Edmeston High School 
Elizabethtown High School 
Ellenville High School 
Ellicottville High School 
Ellington High School 
Fabius High School 
Fairport High School 
Falconer High School 
Fayetteville High School 
Fillmore High School 
Fishkill-on-Hudson High School 
Fonda High School 



Fores tville Free Academy 
Fort Covington Free Academy 
Fort Edward High School 
Fort Plain High School 
Frankfort High School 
Franklin (Delaware Literary Insti- 
tute and Union School) 
Freeport High School 
Frewsburg High School 
Friendship High School 
Fultonville High School 
GlIbertSYllle High School 
Glen Cove High School 
Glens Falls High School 
Goshen High School 
Gouverneur High School 
Gowanda High School 
Granville High School 
Great Neck High School 
Greene High School 
Greenport Hi^h School 
Greenwich High School 
Groton High School 
Hamburg High School 
Hamilton High School 
Hammondsport High School 
Hancock High School 
Haverstrnw High School 
Hempstead High School 
Herkimer High School 
Highland Falls High School 
Hilton High School 
Hobart High School 
Holland Patent High School 
Holley High School 
Homer Academy and Union School 
Honeoye Falls High School 
Hoosick Falls High School 
Horseheads High School 
Huntington High School 
I lion High School 
Jamesville High School 
Jefferson High School 
Jordan Free Academy 
Keeseville High School 



r20 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



Kiuderliook High School 
Lake Placid High School 
Lake wood High School 
Lancaster High School 
Lawrence High Scho(^ 
Le Roy High School 
Lestershire High School 
Liberty High School 
Limestone High School 
Little Valley High School 
Livonia High School 
Luzerne High School 
Lyndonville High School 
Lyons High School 
Lyons Falls High School 
Macedon High School 
Madrid High School 
Malone (Franklin Academy) 
Mamaroheck High School 
Manlius High School 
Marathon High School 
Marcellus High School 
MargaretviUe High School 
Massena High School 
Matteawan High School 
Mayville High School 
MechanicviUe High School 
Medina High School 
Mexico Academy and High School 
Middleburg High School 
Middleport High School 
Milford High School 
Millbrook Memorial School 
Millerton High School 
Mohawk High School 
Montgomery High School 
Monticello High School 
Moravia High School 
Morris High School 
Morrisville High School 
Mt Kisco High School 
Mt Morris High School 
Naples High School 
New Berlin High School 
New Hartford High School 
Newark High School 



Newark Valley High School 

Newport High School 

North Ck)hocton and Atlanta Union 
High School 

North Collins High School 

Northport High School 

Norwich High School 

Norwood High School 

Nunda High School 

Nyack High School 

Oakfield High School 

Oneonta High School 

Onondaga Free Academy 

Ontario High School 

Orchard Park High School 

Ossiuiiig High School 

Otego High School 

Ovid High School 

Owego Free Academy 

Oxford Academy and Union School 

Oyster Bay High School 

Palmyra Classical High School 

Parish High School 

Patchogue High School 

Pawling High School 

Poekskill (Drum Hill High School, 
Oakslde High School) 

Penn Yan Academy 

Perry High School 

Phelps Union and Classical School 

Philadelphia High School 

Phoenix High School 

Piermont (Tappan Zee High School) 

Pike Seminary 

Pine Plains (Seymour Smith Acad- 
emy) 

Pittsford High School 

Port Byron High School 

Port Chester High School 

Port Henry High School 

Port Jervis High School 

Port Leyden High School 

Potsdam High School 

Prattsburg (Franklin Academy and 
High School) 

Pulaski Academy and Union School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r21 



Ravena High School 

Remsen High School 

Uhinebeck High School 

Richfield Springs High School 

Ripley High School 

Riverhead High School 

RockTille Center (South Side High 

School) 
Rouse*s Point High School 
Rnshford High School 
Sacket High School 
St Johnsville High School 
Salamanca High School 
Sandy Creek High School 
Sandy Hill High School 
Saranac Lake High School 
Saratoga Springs High School 
Saugerties High School 
Savannah High School 
Sayville High School 
Schaghticoke High School 
Schenevus High School 
Schoharie High School 
Schuylerville High School 
Seacliff High School 
Seneca Falls (Mynderse Academy) 
Sharon Springs High School 
Sherburne High School 
Sherman High School 
Shortsville High School 
Sidney High School 
Silver Greek High School 
Silver Springs High School 
Shiclairville High School 
Skaneateles High School 
Solvay High School 
South Glens Falls High School 
Southampton High School 
Spencer High School 
Spencerport High School 
Spring Valley High School 
Springville (Griffith Institute and 

Union School) 
Stamford Seminary and Union 

^School 

Stillwater High Sdiool "■■" 



Stony Point High School 

Tarry town (Washington Irving High 

School) 
Theresa High School 
Tlconderoga High School 
Tonawanda High School 
Trumansburg High School 
Tully High School 
Tupper Lake High School 
Unadilla High School 
Union High School 
Union Springs High School 
Valatle High School 
Valley Falls High School 
Vernon High School 
Victor High School 
Walden High School 
Walton High School 
Warner High School 
Warrensburg High School 
Warsaw High School 
Warwick Institute 
Waterford High School 
Waterloo High School 
Watklns High School 
Waverly High School 
Wayland High School 
Webster High School 
Weedsport High School 
Wellsvllle High School 
West WMufleld High School 
West field Academy and Union School 
Westport High School 
White Plains High School 
Whitehall High School 
Whitney's Point High School 
Williamson High School 
Wllllamsvllle High School 
Wlllsborough High School 
Wilson High School 
Windsor High School 
Wolcott (Leavenworth Institute and 

Wolcott High School) 
Worcester High School 
Wyoming (Mlddlebnry Academy and 

Union School) 



r22 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



AlK public schools in the University of full high school grade in the 
cities of the State are also to be included in the above list 



The Chancellor has approved all academic schools in the University that 
meet the Regents requirements to the extent indicated by the grade In 
each case; namely, high schools for four years, senior schools for three 
years, middle schools for two years and junior schools for one year; but 
all schools approved both by the Superintendent of Public Instruction and 
by the Chancellor are approved without limitation for the current year. 
Grades will be advanced whenever satisfactory evidence is submitted that 
the Regents requirements have been met In all cases tuition should be 
paid by the State only to the extent to which adequate instruction is given 
and suitable accomodations are provided. 

The following senior schools reported by the Superintendent as having 
met all his requirements are approved by the Chancellor to receive non- 
resident students for three years of high school instruction : 



Senior 
Alden Union School 
Alexander Union School 
Altmar Union School 
Arki)ort Union School 
Athens Union School 
Black River Union School 
Caldwell (Lake George Union 

School) 
Canaseraga Union School 
Carmel Union School 
Champlain Union School 
Cleveland Union School 
Constableville Union School 
Crown Point Union School 
Dal ton Union School 
East Hampton Union School 
East Randolph Union School 
Eldridge Union School and Academy 
Fair Haven Union School 
Farmer Union School 
Fort Ann Union School 
Guilford Union School 
Hannibal Union School 
Harrisville Union School 
Ilermon Union School 
Honeoye Union School 
Leonardsville Union School 



sohools 
Liverpool Union School 
Ludlowville Union School 
McGrawville Union School 
Machias Union School 
Madison Union School 
Middle Granville Union School 
Moira Union School 
Morristown Union School 
Newfleld Union School 
Oriskany Falls Union School 
Painted Post Union School 
Patterson Union School 
Pompc.T Union School 
Portville Union School 
Richburg Union School 
Round Lake Union School 
Rye Union School 
St Regis Falls Union School 
Savona Union School 
Scottsville Union School 
Shelter Island Union School 
Sodus Union School 
Springfield Center Union School 
Turin Union School 
Van Etten Union School 
Whitesville Union School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r23 



The following middle schools reported by the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction as having met all his requirements are approved by the Chan- 
cellor for two years of high school instruction : 



Xiddle 

Altamont Union School 
Ausable Forks Union School 
Baldwin Union School 
Buchanan Union School 
Camillus Union School 
Cato Union School 
Cincinnatus Union School 
Collins Center Union School 
Corfu Union School 
East Pembroke Union School 
Eden Union School 
Elmira Heights Union School 
Florida (S. S. Seward Institute) 
Freevllle Union School 
Greenville Free Academy 
Greenwood Union School 
Hartwick Union School 
Heuvelton Union School 
Holland Union School 
Lisle Union School 



schools 

Lysander Union School 
Middleville Union School 
Monroe Union School 
Munnsville Union School 
Nichols Union School 
North Tarrytown Union School 
Northville Union School 
Oriskany Union School 
Panama Union School 
Redwood Union School 
Roxbury Union School 
Rushville Union School 
South New Berlin Union School 
Southold Union School 
Three Mile Bay Union School 
Tuckahoe (Waverly Union School) 
Verona Union School 
Waterport Union School 
Youngs town Union School 



The following junior schools reported by the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction as having met all his requirements are approved by the Chan- 
cellor for one year of high school instruction : 



Amenia Union School 
Breesport Union School 
Broadalbin Union School 
Cayuga Union School 
Chautauqua Union School 
Chenango Forks Union School 
Coeymans Union School 
Colton Union School 
Easton Union School 
Elba Union School 
Gainesville Union School 
Gardenville Union School 
Great Valley Union School 
Hammond Union School 
Hunter Union School 



Junior schools 

Lafargeville Union School 
La Fayette Union School 
Lewiston Union School 
Livingston Manor Union School 
Longlake Union School 
Manchester Union School 
New York Mills Union School No. 2 
Northcreek Union School 
Parishvllle Union School 
Phllmont Union School 
Pleasantvllle Union School 
Poland Union School 
Port Washington Union School 
Red Creek Union Seminary 
Rensselaer Falls Union School 



r24 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YOBK 



Richmondville Union School 
Richville Union School 
Roscoe Union School 
Sauquoit Union School 
Schroon Lake Union School 
Schuyler's Lake Union School 
Sloan Union School 
Smyrna Union School 
South Dayton Union School 



Stockton Union School 
Suffern Union School 
Turner Union School 
Waddington Union School 
Walworth Academy 
West Hebron Union School 
Windham Union School 
Woodhull Union School 



The following school rei>orted by the Superintendent of Public Instruction 
as having met all his requirements is not yet approved by the Chancellor : 

Westmoreland Union School 



The following are approved by the Chancellor, but are not found on the 
list submitted by the Superintendent of Public Instruction: 

Hiffh schools 



Avon High School 

Cazenovia Union School (laws 1902, 

ch. 325) 

Cornwall High School 

Dobbs Ferry High School 

Irvington High School 

Islip High School 

Senior schools 



Lynbrook High School 
Mineville High School 
Port Jefferson High School 
Sag Harbor High School 
Waterville High School 
Whltesboro High School 



Bayport Union School 
Eaton Union School 
Mum ford Union School 



Allentown Union School 
Fishkill Union School 
Hinsdale Union School 
Hyde Park Union School 
Katonah Union School 
Knowlesville Union School 
Marlboro Union School 
Mt Upton Union School 



Adams Center Union School 
Apalachin Union School 
Berkshire Union School 
Berlin Union School 
BJoomlngdaJe Union School 



Palatine Bridge Union School 
Tivoll Union School 
Truxton Union School 

Kiddle schools 

North Bangor Union School 
North Brookfield Union School 
Orient Union School 
Palenville (Rowena Memorial 

School) 
Red Hook Union School 
South Byron Union School 
Washingtonville Union School 

Junior schools 

Bombay Union School 
Bradford Union School 
Brier Hill Union School 
Burdett Union School 
Callicoon Depot Union School 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r25 



Campbell Union School 

Center Moriches Union School 

Central Valley Union School 

Chaumont Union School 

Clymer Union School 

Dayton Union School 

Depew Union School 

East I slip Union School 

Elast Rockaway Union School 

East Worcester Union School 

Edwards Union School 

Erieville Union School 

Essex Union School 

Forestport Union School 

Freedom Union School 

Galway Union School 

Georgetown Union School 

Groveland Union School 

Hastings-on-Hndson (Fraser Union 

School) 
Henderson Union School 
Hicksville Union School 
Highland Union School 
Hillsdale Union School 
Hinsdale (Maplehurst Union School) 
Knoxboro Union School 



McLean Union School 

Mayfield Union School 

Meridian Union School 

Moscow Union School 

New Woodstock Union School 

North Lawrence Union School 

Oakdale Station (Oakdale Union 

School) 
Ocean Side Union School 
Orwell Union School 
Pehfield Union School 
Peterboro Union School 
Plalnville Union School 
Randolph Union School 
Smithville Union School 
South Otselic Union School 
Stonybrook Union School 
Tioga Center Union School 
Troupsburg Union School 
Tuxedo Union School 
Unadilla Forks Union School 
Wappingers Falls Union School 
West Carthage Union School 
West Eaton Union School 
Williamstown Union School 
Woodmere Union School 



The Chancellor included also in his list the nonsectarian academies, 
subject to the opinion of the Attorney General that they could properly 
be included under the terms of the law. That these nonsectarian academies 
should be included, as they are in other states, is manifest from the fact 
that for more than a century the Legislature has appropriated annually 
funds for their maintenance, and since the establishment of the public 
high schools the academies have shared equally with them in all state 
grants for secondary education. 

The Chancellor believes also that students living in districts with schools 
maintaining an approved academic course of less than four years should 
be allowed to complete the remaining years of the high school course in 
other approved schools; otherwise, owing to geographic and other con- 
ditions, many entitled to receive free tuition for a full high school course 
will not be able to avail themselves of this privilege. But the Attorney 
General holds that the wording of laws of 1903, chapter 542 clearly 
forbids this construction inasmuch as " academic department " in this 
statute is not modified and therefore includes every such department 
established by a board of education and admitted by the Regents of the 
University, regardless of the extent of its course of study. 

These defects in the law should be remedied at this session of the 
LeglBlatiire. 



r26 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Students entitled to the benefits of this act must meet the following 
conditions : 

1 Must reside in a district of New York State which does not maintain 
an academic department and which does not contract under laws of 
1903, chaptCT 265 with another district maintaining an academic depart- 
ment The Chancellor will regard schools not meeting University standards 
as not maintaining an academic department 

2 Must hold a Regents preliminary certificate or a ninth grade certificate 
signed by the State Superintendent or have a preliminary education 
approved by the State Superintendent and the Chancellor as fully equiva- 
lent (To avoid any disappointment such approval should be secured as 
early as practicable.) 

3 Must not be members of a teachers training class or a training school, 
for whose tuition therein the State has made other provision. 

4 Must attend an approved school for a period of not less than eight 
TT ceivB* 



Schools receiving nonresident pupils at state expense under this act must 
meet the following conditions: 

1 Maintain an academic department 

2 Maintain a course of study approved by the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction and by the Chancellor of the University. 

3 Make no further charge for the tuition of such students as receive 
nonresident tuition at state expense. 



This circular supplements information previously given and should be 

preserved for reference. 

By order of the Chancellor 

James Rubbell Pabsons jb 

Becretary 

In January 1904 the Superintendent of Public Instruction and 
the Chancellor of the University jointly issued the following: 

BEGULATIONS GOVEBNING THE PAYKENT OF NONHESIDENT TUITIOH 

Under laws of WOS, ch. 5^B 

Charles R. Skinnbb, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
William Croswbll Doanb, Chancellor of University of the State of New York 

Albany N, Y, 190k 

I, Charles R. Skinner, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and 
I, William Croswell Doane. Chancellor of the University of the State of 
New York, have jointly established the following rules and regulations 
regarding the payment of the tuition of nonresident academic pupils pur- 
suant to chapter 542 of the laws of 1903. 

Charles R. Skinner 

State Superintendent 
Wm Croswell Doane 

Chancellor 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r27 



1 The board of education of each school under this act Is to make out a 
claim In duplicate and file one copy with the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction and the other with the Chancellor of the University. 

2 The claim is to be presented promptly at the close of each semester on 
blank forms provided for that purpose. Certification will be made to 
the Comptroller as soon as the claims can be audited. 

3 The State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Chancellor of 
the University shall jointly pass on the eligibility of all students claimed. 

4 A Hegents preliminary certificate, a ninth grade certificate Issued by the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, any teacher*s license Issued 
under the authority of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex- 
cept a temporary or special license, or any other credential covering the 
elementary subjects accepted by these authorities as equivalent to any 
credential named above shall entitle the holder to the benefits of this act 
if other conditions are complied with. 

5 The State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Chancellor of 
the University shall jointly audit all claims for payment of tuition and 
certify the same to the Comptroller for the payment thereof. 

The State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Chancellor of the 
University have approved for the payment of nonresident tuition under 
chapter 542 of the laws of 1903 all the high schools in the cities of the 
State and the academic departments in the following villages : 



Adams 


Athens 


Brocton 


Addison 


Attica 


Brookfield 


Afton 


Ausable Forks 


Brownville 


Akron 


Avoca 


Brushton 


Albion 


Babylon 


Buchanan 


Alden 


Bainbridge 


Caldwell (Lake George) 


Alexander 


Baldwin 


Caledonia 


Alexandria Bay 


Baldwinsville 


Cambridge 


Alfred 


Ballston Spa 


Camden 


Allegany 


Batavla 


Camlllus 


Almond 


Bath 


Canajoharie 


Altamont 


Bay Shore 


Canandalgua 


Altmar 


Belfast 


Canaseraga 


Amenia 


Belmont 


Canastota 


Amityville 


Bergen' 


Candor 


Andes 


Black River 


Canlsteo 


Andover * 


Bolivar 


Canton 


Angelica 


Boonville 


Cape Vincent 


Angola 


Brasher 


Carmel 


Antwerp 


Breesport 


Carthage 


Arcade 


Brewster 


CastUe 


Argyle 


Bridgewater 


Cato 


Arkport 


Broadalbin 


Catsklll 



r28 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



Cattaraugus 

Cayuga 

Central Square 

Champlaln 

Charlotte 

Chateaugay 

Chatham 

Chautauqua 

Chenango Forks 

Cherry Creek 

Cherry Valley 

Chester 

Chittenango 

Churchville 

Cincinnatus 

Clarence 

Clayton 

Clayville 

Cleveland 

Clifton Springs 

Clinton 

Clyde 

Cobleskill 

Coeymans 

Cohocton 

Cold Spring 

Collins Center 

Colton 

Constableville 

Cooperstown 

Copenhagen 

Corfu 

Corinth 

Cornwall-on-Hudson 

Coxsaekie 

Crown Point 

Cuba 

Dalton 

Dansvllle 

Delevan 

Delhi 

Deposit 

De Uuyter 

Dexter 



Dolgeville 

Dryden 

Dundee 

Earlville 

East Aurora 

East Bloomfield 

East Hampton 

East Pembroke 

East Randolph 

East Syracuse 

Easton 

Eden 

Edmeston 

Elba 

Elbridge 

Elizabethtown 

Ellenville 

Ellicottville 

Ellington 

Elmira Heights 

Fabius 

Fair Haven 

Fairport 

Falconer 

Farmer 

Fayetteville 

Fillmore 

Fishkill Landing 

Florida 

Fonda 

Forestville 

Fort Ann 

Fort Covington 

Fort Edward 

Fort Plain 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Freeport 

Freeville 

EYewsburg 

Friendship 

Fultonville 

Gainesville 

Gardenville 



GilbertsviUe 

Glencove 

Glens Falls 

Goshen 

Gouvemeur 

Gowanda 

Granville 

Great Neck 

Great Valley 

Greene 

Greenport 

Greenville 

Greenwich 

Greenwood 

Groton 

Guilford 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 

Hammond 

Hammondsport 

Hancock 

Hannibal 

Harrisville 

Hartwick 

Haverstraw 

Hempstead 

Herkimer 

Hermon 

Heuvelton 

Highland Falls 

HUton 

Hobart 

Holland 

Holland Patent 

Holley 

Homer 

Honeoye 

Honeoye Falls 

Hoosick Falls 

Ilorseheads 

Hunter 

Huntington 

Ilion 

Jamesville 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r29 



Jefferson 

Jordan 

Keeseville 

Kinder hook 

I>afargeville 

Lafayette 

Lake Placid 

Lakewood 

I^neaster 

Lawrence 

LeonardsYille 

Leroy 

r^estershire 

Lewiston 

Liberty 

Limestone 

Lisle 

Little Valley 

Liverpool 

Livingston Manor 

Livonia 

Long Lake 

Ludlow vi lie 

Lnzerne 

Lyndonville 

Lyon Falls 

Lyons 

Lysander 

Macedon 

McGrawyllle 

Machias 

Madison 

Madrid 

Malcme 

Mamaroneck 

Manchester 

Manlins 

Marathon 

Marcellns 

Margaretville 

Massena 

Matteawan 

Mayvillo 

Mechanicrille 



Medina 

Mexico 

Middle Granville 

Middleburg 

Middleport 

Middleville 

Milford 

Millbrook 

Millerton 

Mohawk 

Moira 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Monticello 

Moravia 

Morris 

Morristown 

Morrisville 

Mount Kisco 

Mount Morris 

Munnsville 

Naples 

New Berlin 

New Hartford 

New York Mills No. 2 

Newark 

Newark Valley 

Newfleld 

Newport 

Nichols 

North Cohocton 

North Ck>lllns 

North Creek 

North Tarrytown 

Northport 

Northville 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Nunda 

Nyack 

Oakfield 

Oneonta 

Onondaga Valley 

Ontario 



Orchard Park 

Oriskany 

Oriskany Falls 

Osslning 

Otego 

Ovid 

Owego 

Oxford 

Oyster Bay 

Painted Post 

Palmyra 

Panama 

Parish 

Parishville 

Patchogue 

Patterson 

Pawling 

( Drum Hill 
Peekskill •< and 

( Oakside 
Penn Yan 
Perry 
Phelps 
Philadelphia 
Philmont 
Phoenix 
Piermont 
Pike 

Pine Plains 
Pittsford 
PleasantvlUe 
Poland 
Pompey 
Port Byron 
Port Chester 
Port Henry 
Port Jervla 
Port Leyden 
Port Washington 
Portville 
Potsdam (No. 8) 
Prattsburg 
Pulaski 
Ravona 



r30 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



RedOredc 
Redwood 
RemBen 

Rensselaer Falls 
Rhin^>eck 
Ridiburg 
Richfield Springs 
Richmond ville 
Richville 
Ripley 
Riverhead 
RockvUle Center 
RoBcoe 
Round Lake 
Rouses Point 
Roxbnry 
Roshford 
Rnshville 
Rye 

Sadcet Harbor 
St JohnsYille 
St Regis Falls 
Salamanca 
Sandy Creek 
Sandy Hill 
Saranac Lake 
Saratoga Springs 
Saugerties 
Sauquoit 
Savannah 
SaTona 
Sayville 
Schaghtlcoke 
Schenevus 
Schoharie 
Schroon Lake 
Schuyler Lake 
Schuylerville 
Scottsville 
Sea Cliff 
Seneca Falls 
- Sharon Spa 

Nov, 1, 190S 



Shelter Island 

Sherburne 

Sherman 

Shortsville 

Sidney 

Silver Creek 

Silver Springs 

Sinclairville 

Skaneateles 

Sloan 

Smyrna 

Sodus 

Solvay 

South Dayton 

South Glens Falls 

South New Berlin 

Southampton 

Southold 

Spencer 

Spencerport 

Spring Valley 

Springfield Center 

Sprlngville 

Stamford 

Stillwater 

Stockton 

Stony Point 

Suffem 

Tarrytown 

Theresa 

Three Mile Bay 

Ticonderoga 

Tonawanda 

Trumansburg 

Tuckahoe 

Tully 

Tupper Lake 

Turin 

Turner 

Unadilla 

Union 

Union Springs 



Valatie 

Valley Falls 

Van Etten 

Vernon 

Verona 

Victor 

Waddington 

Walden 

Walton 

Walworth 

Warner 

Warrensburg 

Warsaw 

Warwick 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Waterport 

Watkins 

Waverly 

Wayland 

Webster 

Weedsport 

Wellsville 

West Hebron 

West Winfield 

Westfield 

Westport 

White Plains 

Whitehall 

Whitesville 

Whitney Point 

Williamson 

Willinmsville 

Willsboro 

Wilson 

Windham 

Windsor 

Wolcott 

Woodhull 

Worcester 

Wyoming 

Toungstown 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r31 



STATEMENT OP CLAIM FOR NONRESIDENT TUITION 

[Place] [Date] 190 

Claim for tuition of nonresident pupils instructed In union free scliool 
district no of the town of under the pro- 
visions of chapter 542 laws of 1903, between [date] and 

[date] 

Three copies of this statement should be made immediately after the 
close of each semester ; one should be sent to the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction and one to the Chancellor of the University and one should be 
retained by the school for reference. 

DIRBCTIONS 

1 In filling out column 4 of the table, use the following abbreviations : 
p for preliminary certificate 

n For ninth grade certificate 

1 for first grade .certificate 

2 for second grade certificate 
S for third grade certificate 

i c for training class or training school certificate 
eq for equivalent credential (which must be submitted with the state- 
ment) 
In this column also give county and commissioner district in whiqh 
teacher's certificate was earned and name of school in which preliminary 
certificate or ninth grade certificate was earned, if not earned in your school. 

2 If the parents of any of the pupils are nonresident taxpayers of the 
district state in each case the amoimt of the tax paid the current year, and 
the number and grade of pupils of this family in your school. 

3 Report no nonresident who is a member of a teachers training class or 
a resident of a contracting district 



NAMB OF 
PUPIL 



nOMB SCHOOL 

district: num- 

BBR, TOWN 
AND COUNTY 



CREDENTIAL 

ON WHICH 
PUPIL IS AD- 
MITTED 



NO. 
WEEKS 
REGIS- 
TERED 



NO. 

DAYS 

ABSENT 



REASONfl FOR 
ABSENCE* 



»Uiider this head state whether or not the al)8enre was due to Kood and sufficient 
reasons. 



r32 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

To 

President Board of Education 

I certify to the accuracy of the facts as presented above 



Principal 

president of the board of education of 

union free school district no of the town of 

being duiy sworn deposes and says that on investigation he finds that the 
above record of nonresident pupils Is true and correct and that all require- 
ments relating to the course of study have been fully complied with ; that 
free tuition has been granted to these students in accordance with the pro- 
vision of chapter W2. Jaws of 1903 and that 

Is the duly qualified treasurer of this district, his postofflce address being 



Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 

day of 190 



SUMMARY OF APPENDIX 

For the convenience of the reader, the tables and some other 
information have been transferred to the appendix. These are 
described briefly as follows: 

A Secondary schools in the University 1893-1903, the decade's 
jp'owth and average annual increase in the number of schools, 
faculty, students, net property, receipts and expenditures. 

B Analysis of expenditures in secondary schools, the decade's 
growth and average annual increase. 

C Secondary schools classified by grades, 1897-1903, with the 
number of students in each, the growth and average annual 
increase. 

D Credentials issued in 1903. 

E Summary of academic examinations 1893-1903. 

F Summary of criticisms of question papers 1893-1903. 

Q Calendar of academic examinations. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r33 

H Summary of inspections, showing total number of visits 
made, to which is added a list of educational meetings partici- 
pated in by each inspector. 

I List of institutions haying name changed in 1902-3. 

J Summary of secondary schools chartered or admitted to the 
University in 1002-3. Permanent charters were granted to four 
academies, and cerUficates of admission were issued to 16 acad- 
emic departments. The total n<*t property of these institutions 
was ?839,631.62, the average net property |41,981.58. 

K Preliminary and academic studies table^ 

Respectfully submitted 

James Russell Parsons jr 

Director 
Regents Office, Albany N. Y. 

Mar. 5, 1904 



rU 



UNIVKESITY OP THE STATE OP NEW TOBK 



APPEN- 

A BECOHDART SCHOOLS 1S9S-1908, THE 





1893 


1894 


1896 


1896 


1807 


Number of schools 

High schools 


285 
1% 


314 
123 


378 
131 


421 
128 


465 


Academies 


119 






Total 


410 


437 


S04 


649 


584 






Faculty 

High schools 


1158 
383 
766 

lOSl 
376 
655 


liHl 
455 

866 

1116 

427 

689 


lltS7 
617 
920 

1 105 
444 
661 


17SS 

680 

1153 

low 

408 
632 


2 17S 


men 


636 


women 


1537 


Academies 


1 118 


men 


399 


women 


719 






Total 


2189 


2427 


2642 


2773 


8 291 






Students 

High schools 


29668 
12845 
17 823 
191S1 
5898 
6233 


SU058 
14 842 
19 216 
10 978 
5888 
6690 


S8 717 
17 267 
21460 
11220 
5658 
6562 


1*2 210 
18 814 
23396 
10 27S 

4 761 

5 512 


It3 916 


boys 


19 504 


Ifirls 


24;^ 


Academies 


it 51*8 


boys 


4653 


girls 


4893 






Total 


41799 


45 086 


49 987 


62 483 


53 464 






Net property 

High schools 


16519 517 
8198063 


r340 728 
8 712 552 


$7 506 655 
10062 838 




$7 464 234 

15 841548 


$7 667 883 


Academies 


16 493 519 






Total 


$14 712580 


$16033 280 


$17 668993 


$28306 782 


$23161 402 






Receipts 

High schools 








$1856659 
1825 535 


$1962 084 


Academies 








1896 967 












Total 


12 877 413 


$3.324 686 


$3143 825 


$3682194 


$3 328 901 






Expenditures 

High schools 


$1698 860 
1 141 422 


$1954 853 
1349 850 


$1803675 
1329 543 


$1813182 
1747 670 


$1 802 960 


Academics 


1891286 






Total 


$2 840282 


$3 304 708 


$3133 218 


$3500802 


$3 284 246 







HIGH SCHOOL DEPABTMBNT BEPOBT 1903 



r35 



DIX 

DBOASB'B ABOWIH A3n> ATESAOB AHOTAL IS0BZA8B 





1809 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


INCREASE 


1806 


















Decade 


Aver. an. 


514 


541 


565 


595 


681 


686 


361 


35 


131 


134 


140 


146 


145 


144 


19 


2 


645 


675 


705 


741 


768 


780 


370 


37 


SS9S 


t5h5 


S78S 


8053 


8936 


8606 


83k8 


935 


781 


888 


989 


1065 


llO) 


1157 


764 


76 


1512 


1657 


1844 


1996 


2116 


2349 


1584 


158 


99S 


im 


1105 


It IS 


lth5 


1888 


£57 


96 


373 


401 


430 


483 


609 


609 


133 


13 


eaa 


645 


675 


730 


736 


779 


124 


12 


3286 


8501 


3888 


4266 


4 481 


4794 


2605 


261 


55 076 


69989 


669t9 


70560 


77 515 


81108 


51kU0 


5 1kU 


28 482 


25862 


28 515 


80860 


88965 


34 024 


21679 


2168 


31568 


34270 


88 414 


40 200 


44 560 


47 064 


29761 


2976 


11 s& 


10 m 


U7tt 


1S6S6 


Ik 866 


Ik 359 


8898 


993 


629y 


4861 


5721 


5988 


6 213 


6098 


200 


JJO 


6022 


5283 


7001 


7648 


8153 


8 261 


2088 


203 


mdsi 


60 776 


a79 365 


a83796 


a91583 


a95096 


a53 297 


a5 3:jn 


|e8»586 


610486 416 


111124 461 


$10738 883 


$11619 389 


$14 400 278 


$7 880 761 


$788 076 10 


16 508084 


16866 991 


17 287 724 


18160206 


19106318 


19 370728 


11177 665 


1117 766 50 


IK 847 670 


827 358407 


828 412185 


$28888 589 


$90 725 707 


$33 771006 


$19 058 426' $1905 842 60 


12286512 


11903964 


$4140224 


$3 883 200 


$4 444 095 


$5 105 810 


b $3 249 151 


2) $464 164 43 


16M881 


1610065 


2066368 


2295167 


2 454 264 


2 200 314 


b374 779 


^53 539 80 


I38B1808 $3604089 


$6196698 


$6158 387 


$6 896 959 


r 306 124' 


$4 428 099 $442 869 90 


12 230286 


S3 708 196 


$4077 421 


$3(j96674 


$4 445083 


$5007 055| 


$3 306195 


$3:»819 50 


14W687 


1518689 


2018 954 


2106044 


2182 6IK 


2009 9451 


958 523 


95 852 30 


13728913 16226825 


$6096 375 


$5 708 718 


$6 627 708 


$7107 000. 


$4 260 718 


$426 671 80 



a Excluding duplicates. h Growtb and averaife for seven years. 



r36 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW TOBK 



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r38 



UNIVKBSITY OP THE STATE OP NBW TOBK 






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HIGH SCHOOL DBPABTMENT BEPOBT 1903 



r39 



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r4() 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



D OKEDEVTIALB 190S 

Pivliininary oertiflcateR 19 217 

Ist year " 10 069 

2d *^ " 7 487 

3d '' *^ 5 852 

4th '' " 59 

Advanced certificates 26 

Diplomas 4 308 

Advanced diplomas ' 2 261 



E BTIICMARY OF ACADEMIC EXAMIVATI0K8 1898.1908 
Including law and medical statistics 



1898 



Sch(x>ls taking examinations.! 893 

Papers written 810 538 

Papers clainietl |193 744 

Papers allowed 170 641 

Papers rejecte<l | 23 103 

Per cent of claimed papers 

allowe<l 

Per cent of papers claimed to 

total numl»er written . . . 
Per cent of papers allowe<l to 

total nuuHier written 

Per cent of honor |>a{K»r8 to 

total number accept e<l . . . 



1894 



871 

2r>2 

220 

81 



1H!)6 



1896 



1897 



1898 



417 467 517 557; 608 
876 405 557 419 802 445 285 470 471 
287,276 544 279 641 292 600 826 995 
8(W242 689 238 656 252 745 286 42(^ 



424 

88 
68 
59 
20 



83 855 40 985 



88 
68 
60 
21 



85 

I 

67, 

I 
67, 

20* 



39 855 
86 
66 
57 
19 



40 569 
88 
70 
61 
21 



E BTIICMARY OF ACADEMIC EXAMINATIONS 1898-1908 (concluded) 
Including law and medical statistics 





1899 


1900 


1901 


i9oe 


1908 


Schools taking examinations 

Pai)ers written 


639 

508 841 


672 
548 765 


699 
538 833 


726 

558 801 


780 
539 241 


Paners claimed 


361 329 


407 1871 411 089 488 047 


418 280 


Papers allowed 


312 652' 365 007 


358 939, 382 855 
57 100 55 192 

86 87 

76 78 

66i 69 


858 015 


Papers re jecteii 


48 677 


42 130 


60 215 


Per cent of claimed papers 
allowed 


87 
71 
61 
21 


90 
75 
67 
23 


86 


Per cent of papers claimed to 
total number written 


78 


Per cent of papers allowed to 
total number written 


66 


Per cent of honor papers to total 
number accented 


21 


23 


22 







HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 
F OBITICZSK OF QirEBTIOH PAPE&B 1898.1908 



r41 





Satisfactory 


Too longr 


Too short 


Too difficult 


Too easy 




1893 


87 V 


3.6\ 


.l.V 


9.1,V 


1.2/V 


100% 


1894 


91.2 


2.3 


.1 


5.5 


.9 


100 


1895 


92.2 


1.6 




5.6 


.6 


100 • 


1896 


91.2 


1.5 




6.9 


.4 


100 


1897 


88.1 


4 




7.4 


.5 


100 


1898 


92.9 


1.4 




5.5 


.2 


100 


1899 


92.5 


1.4 





5.7 


.4 


100 


1900 


94.7 


1 




3.9 


.3 


100 


1901 


98.9 


1.4 




4.6 


.1 


100 


1902 


95.1 


1 


.1 


3.6 


.2 


100 


1903 


95.3 


1 




8.7 


2 


100 



G CALENDAR OF ACADEMIC EXAMIVATIOKB 1908 



1903 
Jan. 26-30. 
Mar. 25-27. 
June 15-19. 



Place 



728 secondary schools. 

702 

731 



Subjects 



82 
30 

84 



H BTnCXARY 


OF IHSPECTIOKB 1908 










luearECTOK 


1 


1 


1 

5 


S's J 

II' 


i 

1 


if 

if 


1 


if 
II 


111 


•1 


1 


C. F. WheeJocfc. .,.,..,. 


6 

43 

100 

102 

m 

138 

188 

69 


1 

22 
20 
18 
10 
89 
9 
36 


... 


4 
3 
3 








13 


a K Cobb 


8 




1 




le 

2 

1 

4 

8 


_ 


9d 


A. G. Clement. 


185 


Charles Eiavidson. ,,,,». 




2 


lis 


E- W. Lyttle „ . , 


1 

2 
2 
1 


5 


1 


1 

2 




140 


S, D. Anna 


164 


E. J. Peck... 


1 


1 




14ft 


E. 8. Frisbe© 












loe 


W. R. Eastman, 














74 

250 


74 


W. F. Yust ,.. 




















256 


I. O.Criasy 


17 
115 
150 

20; 


S 
1 
5 
1 












87 




59 


J. H. Gibeon 












I 


'"■ 


117 


F, M. Baker.. 














155 


Other members of staflT. 


















21 
























1 020 


163 


e 


■•i 


8 


5 


18 


87 


27 


''330 


1 626 


Ubrairy inspections ,.,,....,..,,♦... 


380 


Other *' 


I 21W 



























a Including 19 not in Univeralty. 



p42 university op the state op new YORK 

Educationtd meetings. In addition to these visits to institu- 
tions, the in8i)ectors have attended and taken part in the exercises 
of educational meetings as follows: 

1902 Charles F. Wheelock 

Oct. 15 Albany, Council of Superintendents 
16 Albany, School Boards Association 
Canajoharie, county association 
Ithaca, high school 
Fonda, Tricounty Council 
Syracuse, Associated Academic Principals 



Oct. 


16 


Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


15 


Dec. 


29-31 


1903 


Jan. 


23 


Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


21 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


20 


Ap. 


3 


May 


14 



Union, dedication of school building 

Rockland Co. Teachers Association 

Watertown, Principals Council 

Plattsburg, Champlain Valley Educational Council 

Jamestown, county association 

Cornwall, address 

Schenectady, high school, address 
May 22-23 Avon, county association 
June 24 Waverly, commencement 
June 25 Middlebury, commencement 
June 26 Canajoharie, commencement 
July 6-11 Boston Mass., National Educational Association 

Charles KeweU Cobb 
Saratoga, State Teac^hers Association 
Albany, Council of City and Village Superintendents 
Albany, School Boards Association 
Caldwell, Warren Co. Teachers Association 
Albany, Hudson River Schoolmasters Club 
Fonda, Tricounty Council 

Baltimore Md., Association of Colleges and Prepara- 
tory Schools of the Middle States and Maryland 
New York, Educational Council 
Syracuse, Associated Academic Principals 
Syracuse, New York State Science Teachers Asso- 
ciation 



1902 


July 


23 


Oct. 


15-17 


Oct. 


15-17 


Oct. 


18 


Nov. 


7-8 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


28-29 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


30-31 


Dec. 


30-31 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT BEPOBT 1903 



r43 



1902, 
Dec-. 30-31 

1903 
Jan. 27-28 
Mar. 25 

Ap. 17-18 



1902 




Oct. 


18 


Dec. 


30 


1908 




May 


15 


June 


19 


June 


22 


June 


24 


June 


26 


July 


8 


1902 




Oct. 


10 


Dec. 8-12 


1903 




Ap. 


10 


May 


9 


May 


16 


May 


22 


May 


23 


June 


26 


1902 




Aug. 


17 


Sep. 


4 


Oct. 


25 


Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. -28-29 



Dec. 29-30 



Syracuse, Grammar School Principals Association 

Albany, School Commissioners Association 
New York, meeting of presidents of New York col- 
leges for men to consider Rhodes scholarships 
Albany, Hudson River Schoolmasters Club 

A. O. Clement 
Goshen, Orange Co. Teachers Association 
Syracuse, New York State Science Teachers Asso- 
ciation 

Hartwick, Otsego Co. Teachers Association 

Troy, La Salle Institute, commencement 

Margaretville^ commencement 

Cornwall, commencement 

Milford, commencement 

Boston Mass., National Educational Association 

^ Charles DaYldson 

Oswego, normal school, address 
Elmira, three teachers conferences 

Utica, Round Table Conference 

Pulaski, Teachers Association 

Williamson, Ontario Co. Teachers Association 

Syracuse, Schoolmasters Club 

Gouvemeur, St Lawrence Teachers Association 

Troy, St Joseph's Academy, commencement 

Eugene W. Lyttle 
Cliff Haven, Catholic Summer School 
New Hartford, dedication of high school 
Philadelphia, Jefferson Co. Teachers Association 
Canajoharie, Montgomery Co. Teachers Association 
New York, History Club 

Baltimore Md., Association of Colleges and Prepara- 
tory Schools of the Middle States and Maryland 
Syracuse, Associated Academic Principals 



p44 university op the state of new YORK 

1903 

riiiladelphia Pa., American Historical Association 

Sodus, dedication of high school 

Johnstown, teachers and parents meeting 

New York, Association of History Teachers of the 

Middle States and Maryland 
New York, reception Cliff Haven Summer School 
Albany, Hudson River Schoolmasters Club 
New York, City History Club 
Chatham, Columbia Co. Teachers Association 
Corinth, Memorial day exercises 
Albany, Unitarian Church 
Wilson, commencement 
Angola, commencement 
Clinton, Hamilton College, commencement 
Plattsburg, State Teachers Association 
Boston Mass., National Educational Association 

S. Dwight Arms 
Albany, New York State Council of School Superin- 
tendents 
Syracuse, Associated Academic Principals 

Rochester, Associated Academic Principals of Mon- 
roe and Orleans Counties 

Albany, State Association of School Commissioners 

Delevan, district meeting 

Rochester, Monroe and Orleans Co. Principals Asso- 
ciation 

Ashville, district meeting 

Olean, Educational Council 

Dunkirk, Chautauqua Co. Teachers Association 

Limestone, commencement 

Manchester, commencement 

Florida, S. S. Seward Institute, commencement 

Goshen, commencement 

Plattsburg, State Teachers Association 

Boston Mass., National Educational Association 



Jan. 


1-2 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


23 


Mar. 


14 


Mar. 


21 


Ap. 


13 


Ap. 


24 


May 


16 


May 


30 


June 


21 


Jnne 


22 


June 


23 


June 24-25 


July 


1-3 


July 


6-10 


1902 


Oct. 


16-17 


Dec. 


29-31 


1903 


Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


28 


Feb. 


11 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


27 


May 


9 


May 


22 


June 


19 


June 


22 


June 


23 


June 


24 


July 


1-3 


July 


6-10 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r45 



1902 Ezra J. Peck 

Nov. 15 Penn Yan, Interlake Council 

Nov. 20-21 Canandaigiia, Ontario Co. Teachers Association 

1903 

Feb. 14 Watkins, Interlake Council 

May 9 Penn Yan, Interlake Council 

May 30 Windsor, Memorial day exercises 

June 22 Honeoye, commencement 

X902 B- S. Frisbcc 

Oct. 25 Catskill, Hudson River Teachers Association 

Dec. 29-31 Syracuse, Associated Academic Principals 

1903 

July 1-3 Cliff Haven, State Teachers Association 

1902 I- 0. Crissy 

Elmira, Education day address. North Church 
Albany, State Association of School Boards 
Albany, Council of Superintendents 
New York, New York State Business School Asso- 
ciation 
Syracuse, Association of Academic Principals 

Buffalo, address on business education 
New York, New York Commercial Teachers Asso- 
ciation, address 
June 22 Watervliet, academy, address and presentation of 

diplomas 
July 1-3 Cliff Haven, State Teachers Association 
July 6-10 Boston Mass., National Educational Association 



Sep. 


14 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


16 


Nov. 


3 


Dec. 


30-31 


1903 


Jan. 


16 


Feb. 


6 



I KAMES CHANGED IK 1902-8 



From 



Champlain Institute (Port 
Henry) 

Charbonneau Institute (Rouse 
Point) 



To 



Champlain Academy 

St Patrick's Academic School 
of Rouse Point 



Date 

Dec. 4. 1902 
May 21, 1903 



r46 



UNIVERSITY OF TUE STATE OF NEW YORK 















'^'♦lO sS 



g 






I 



^1 



c 
e 



I 



S5 iS S 



CO 



a 
3 



i 



' IO|J^|«l£lf 



^piuo 



1 1§ § 



Si'" 



s§i § § m nnntu 

a - ** 

§§§ § § §§ iiig§§§§§ 






III . § §§ g§i§l§§§§ 



Hi p^ jA **p^»iie 



^ « B^ 



^^ 



>3 S^ a 



3 

5 



l§ 



CO S 




3 3? i> if =«3 ^?'Q «££"©.« 




^n 



n55^ fr -^"J uQN-<"^DJ*J*fl 









Him 




HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r47 

X PRSLDCnrABT AVD AOASEMIO BTITDIEB TABLE 



SUBJECTS 



J_ 



lIReading 

2 Writiiij^ 

3, Spelling ............. 

4 ElngHsh, elemeDtary. 

5 Arithmetic ...... 



as 

I 



6,Ge^^g^aphy 

7'Englisb, l.^t j&ar. , 

8 Eq^HsU, M year. . . 

9 EQgiish. 3d year... 
lOiEDglish, advanced. 



Ill Word ftDalysis 

13' English conn position 

13 Rhetoric 

14 Atnertcan selections 

Ii5 Eo g lish comp . , ad vanced . . 



1 6 , Ed gl ish selections . , . 

17|E^glif5h reading 

J8'Hi!fitory of literature. 
19|BimiDe;!tsi Eo^li^nh. . . . 
SOiGennaiii 1st year 

21 Gv:.!!!.!!!, 'Idjvar 

22 Grerman, M year . 
28" 
24 
25 

26 
27 

28 
29 
80 

81 
82 
88 
84 
85 

86 
87 



French, Ist year. 
French, 2d year . . 
French, 3d year . . 

Spanish, 1st year. 
Spanish, 2d year. . 
Spanish, 8d year.. 
Latin, Ist year . . . 
Latin, 2d year 



Caesar's Commentaries 

Latin, 3d year 

Sailust's Catiline 

Cicero's Orations 

Virgil's Aeneid 



40 



Virgil's Eclogues 

Latin composition 

Greek, Ist year 

Greek. 2d year 

Xenophon's Anabasis. 



1 589 
1 512 
1 621 

1 603 
437 
359 
148 

1 209 



SUMMARY or ciimcnsMW rait 1903 



FArroitT 



LONd 



102 
1201 



490 93.8,... 
92.11 8 
97 i 5 



416 
870 



339 
262 

190 

844 

508 
168 
327 
267 
161 

45 

42 

41 

156 

147i 

936| 
89. 
146! 
508| 
40;t 

83 
309 
156 

48 
185 



673 

557 
374 
325 
141 
136 



97.11 
a5.6l 
90. 5| 
95.3' 

94 i 



859 
406 
357 

211 
327 
235 
182 

813 

447 
159 
320 
258 
159 

45 
42 

41 
147 
147 



96.2 
97.6 
96.5 

95.9 
96.5 
89.7 
95.8 
96.3 

88 

94.6 
97.9 
9(5.6 

98.8 

100 
100 
KM) 
99.2 
KM) 



■TOO 
8HO»T 



HAKD 



TOO 



.1 

30 6.9 
25j7 
4'2.7 
11 .9 



102100 I 
104 98.6' 



.3 

1.8 

.7 

1.6 



1.2 
.8 

3.7 
.1 



917 98 ! 
891100 ,. 
144, 98.6 . 
500l 98.4 . 
401 1 99.5'. 

8a|l00 '. 
308| 99.71, 
149i 95.5,, 

47, 97.9 
183! 98.9 



1 .1 



|...|. 



70 4.4 

110 7.3 

40 2.5 



2.5 
9.6 
3.1 
2 

5.4 



I 



13' 1.2 
22 2.5 

7 1.7 
8, 2.2 



9i 

9 

25! 

30' 



4.1 
2.7 
9.5 
1.1 
3.6 



6112 
9i 5.4 
6, 1.8 
9 3.4 
2 1.2 



•I---I- 



.i...l. 



9 .8 



1, .1 



17 1.8, 



2 1, 
7 1, 



1 

7 4 
1 2, 
1 



1.8 
.2 
.2 

.2 



.1 



II '^ 



r48 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

X PRELDCIHABT AVD AOASEKIO BTITDIEB TABLE (concluded) 



SUIUBCrS 



C Ci, 

eg 



o 



M'MHAKV or CEnriClKMM VOli ISMB 



BATIH- 

J'Al-Pt>HV 



TOO 



3 
^ 



c 
- 9' 



I I 



TOO 
SHOUT 






TOO 
UAILD 



41 Honu»r s Iliml I 101 

42 (rnH'k. »(1 year ' 34 

48 (tret»k c<)niiM)siti()ii ; 81 

44 Arithmetic. a4lvam-e<l 854 

45 Algebra jl H15 1 



46 Algebra, advanced 

47 Plane geometry 

4H Solid geometry 

49 Trigonometry 

50 Business arithmetic 



51 Astronomy. 

52 Physics . .*. . 
58 r'hemistry . 
54 Physical geography. 



101 
84 
81 



KM) 
1(K) 
KM) 
279; 78.8 
2111 92.1 



198i 

1 1741 

822= 

145 

287. 

146! 

784 

292 

1 127 1 



146 75.6 
100 98.7 
278 H6.8 
119, 82.1 

245 85.4 



142 
747. 



10 

6 
29 
i: 



1.4 

.8 

8.1 
2.5: 
8.7i 



TOO 






28 15.9!. 
85,12.2:. 



li .8 



72 20.8 
89 6.8 

46'28.8| 

5:i 4.5l 
84 10.6 

7; 4.8;, 

11! 3.8| 



4 .8 

i ".i 

2 "A 



97.8 . 
95.8 



2841 97.8! 
060 94.1. 



55 (4e(dogy 832 828, 97.3 



56 Botany 

57 Zooh)gy 

58 Physiology and hygiene . 

59 Elem. U. S. hist, and civics 

60 Gre(»k historv . . 



61 Roman history 

62 Me<lieval history 

iVi Engli.sh history^ 

64 U. S. history, atlvanceil 

65 Civics 



66 Economics 

67 Commercial geograpliy 

68 Commercial law 

69 llihtor> !»f commerce 

70 Stenography, 50 word test. 

71 1 Stenography, 100 word test. 

78 Bo^*kke^?pi[lJ^^ advance<l 

74 Business practice, etc 

75 Business writing 



76 Typewriting 

77 Drawing 

78 Advance<l drawing. 

79 Psvchology 

SOjEtliics 



..I...'... 4 2.7|..!... 

.8i 86 4.6'.. ... 

..'...■... 8 2.7' 

.1!...:... 66 5.9 1 .1 

' 9 2.7| 



818: 

156. 
1 819il 
1 4851 

446! 



49^)1 
185 

626; 

4811 

1 14111 

624 

268 

94' 

72: 

116 

I 

87i 

710 

101. 

8li 

245 

109 

1 184 

598 

109 

54 



810 ^) 










8 


1 '..!... 


146i 98.6 


. . . i 


L.. 


10 


6.4J..i... 


281 
887 
4;^ 

488 
181 
587 
419 
110 


97.1 

m.i 

98.2 

97.8 

98.8 
97.2 
97 8 


1 

8 

1 

i 
3; 


'.2 
.2 

.6 
1.6 

.8 
.2 


1 

"i 


.1 


81 

42 

6 

12 
2 

86 
8 

80 

5 


2.4 
2.9 
1.3 

2.4 
1.1 
5.8 
1.9 
2.6 

8 


6 

? 

.2 

** 
8 


.5 
.2 
»> 

.4 

".7 


617 


iW.9 






21 .8 


258 
98 


W.l 










5 1.9 


1 


98.9 


i 




...1... 


1 
1 


1.1 
1.4 




71- m.Q 






! 




115 


WM 


1 .9 

1, 1.1 

41' 5.8 

1418.9 

1 1.2 

8 1.2 










84 
687 

87 


96.6 

89.7 
86.1 

98.8 
98.4 

97.2 
97.9 
92.6 
99.1 
100 


1 
1 


1.1 
.1 


i 


li 


*i 


';i 


80 














241 










1 

2 

1 


4 


106 






8 
18 
80 

1 


2.8 
1.6 
5 
.9 




110 
554 
108 


4 
18 

...1 


.4 
2.2 






.2 
.2 


54 


...!.::: 








1 

















INDEX 



Academic credentials issued, 40. 

Academic departments, included in 
work of High School Department, 
3; corporate and local names, 5-6; 
number admitted, 8; on Univer- 
sity roll, 8. 

Academic diplomas issued, 9, 40. 

Academic examinations, 10-11; rat- 
ing of answer papers, 14; calen- 
dar, 41; table, 47-48; 1893-1903, 
summary of, 40. 

Academic studies, table, 47-48. 

Academies, included in work of 
High School Department, 3 ; incor- 
porated, 8; on University roll, 8. 
See also Secondary schools. 

Admissions, 8; summary of, 46. 

Advanced certificates issued, 9, 40. 

Advanced diplomas issued, 9, 40. 

Answer papers, number written, 10; 
number claimed, 10; number al- 
lowed. 10. 

Appendix, summary of, 32-33. 

Arms, S. Dwight attendance at 
educational meetings, 44. 

Attendance grants, 11. 

Boolu and apparatus, grants for. 11. 

Calendar of academic examinations, 
41. 

Cazenovla Seminary, contract with 
union free school district ap- 
proved, 4. 

Certificates issued, preliminary, 9, 
40; first year, 9, 40; second year, 
9, 40; third year, 9, 40; fourth 
year, 9, 40; advanced, 9, 40. 
' Chamberlain Institute, Randolph, 
contract with town of Randolph 
approved, 4. 

Champlain Academy, Champlain 
Institute becomes, 3. 

Charbonneau Institute, name 
changed, 7. 

Charters, summary of, 46. 

Clement, A. G., attendance at edu- 
cational meetings, 43. 



Cobb, Charles N., report prepared 
by, 3; attendance at educational 
meetings, 42-43. 

Corporate and local names, 5-6. 

Credentials issued in 1903, 9, 40. 

Crissy, I. O., attendance at educa- 
tional meetings, 45. 

Criticism of question papers, 41, 
47-48. 

Dannemora Union School, quota, 4. 

Davidson, Charles, attendance at 
educational meetings, -43. 

Delaware Academy, Delhi, lease 
approved, 4. 

Delaware Literary Institute, Frank- 
lin, lease approved, 4. 

Delhi Union School, leased Dela- 
ware Academy, 4, 8. 

Denominational schools, amount 
paid to, 11. 

Diplomas issued, 9, 40. 

Educational meetings, 42-45. 

Elbridge Union School, leased 
Munro Collegiate Institute, 4, 8. 

E)xamlnations, see Academic exam- 
inations. 

Expenditures of secondary schools 
1902-3, 8-9; 1893-1903, 36-37. 

Franklin Union School, leased Dela- 
ware Literary Institute, 4, 8. 

Frlsbee, E. S., attendance at educa- 
tional meetings, 45. 

Grading of secondary schools, 14-18, 

38-39. 
Graduates, number, 9. 
Grants to secondary schools, 11. 

See also Nonresident academic 

tuition. 

High schools, increase during year, 
8; admitted during year, 8; ad- 
mitted since 189Ji, 14; approved 
for nonresident tuition, 18-22, 24. 
See also Secondary schools. 

Hudson River Institute, dissolution, 
6-7. 



1*"»0 INIVKKSITY or TlIK STATK OV NKW YOUK 

Incorporations, 4<>. l\»rt IIcDry, see Cliniiiplaiu Acad- 

In><lU'etinns. n-port ou. li;»L*; sum- I'lii}-. 

iiiary of, 41. rrrliiiiiiKiry certifioalos issued, 0. 

Inspectors, work on examination 40. 

papers. 14. rrellniinary sludios, table. 47-48. 
Ilhaca, sir I'niver.sity rreparal<»ry 

^«li^»»l- Question paiM»rs, criticism. 41, 47-48. 

Junior s.Ii.k.Is. tl.rre.'ise durin;; Randolph, m.' Chamberlain Inatl- 

year, s; adniitti*d durin;; yi'ar, 8: * . 



admit t«<l sinee /N.'>-'/. 14; approv«'d 
for nonresident lullion, 2.'MM. 24 
2r»; number and stud«'nts. oS-3JK 



Uejrouts, aelitm by, 3-8. 
Konse Point, ave St Patrick's Aca- 
demic Seliool of House Point. 



Laboratory courses. ai»pr«»val of. 1- 
j4 St Patrick's A<adomic School of 

Latin, jjrowinjr teutleney towani Kouse Point. 7. 

study of. 10. ^f lle^xis I'alls Union School, quota 

Legislation, r». and attendance jurauts. 7. 

Lyon Mountain Inlon Sehnul. quota Savannah Union School, academic 

an<l attendance irrants, 4. departnu-nt continued ou list, 3. 

Lyttle. Kuj^'cue \V.. attendance at Science, laboratory courses in. 12. 

i'ducatioiial nu*etinjrs. 4:M4. Scottsvillc Union St'hool. quota and 

' attendance grants, 4. 
Mathematics, rating uf papers. It). Secondary .schools, charters, 40; ex- 

Midille schools, decrease during peuditures lS9,i-n»J,i, 30-37; expen- 

yi.ar, S: admitted since liiVi. 14; ^^^^^j,^,^ j,j^,,_^^ j^,,. .^^.^^^^^^ 14.15^. 

appnived fnr nnuivsidcnt tuition. | elassilied by grades mi-JOOS, 

:2::, l»l; huuiIkm- and stutlents. lis- table, 38-31); grants to, 11; num- 

•••*• ber. 3S-3SI; statistics, 8-l>; students, 

Munn» UulbMriaie Institute. El | j,^ ...v^.j^cj. jso.i-nm, the decade'* 

bridL'c. lease approved. 4. growth and average annual In- 

__ r - *•• .• 1 I .1 crease, 34-.*»."i. 

Names of instiintions diaiiged. J. 

4n ; coriKuate and local. T. .J. " ^^'"^^"' ^^'hixA^, increase during year. 

Nonresident ncadeuiic tuition, i.ay . ^'^ ^''niittr-d during year, S; ad- 

meni of. ir.; list of approvcNl . "*»^^^'^* •'*^"^-^' ^''•^•*' ^^'^ aPl^roved 

schonl>. lvj.-;re'.:ulations:rovern- I *'"^ noniesid.Mil tuition, ->. 24; 

in;r p;,>m..nt of. 2.;::n; s.aiemen. I """'^»*'^' ^»"^ stiulents, 38-39. 

of claim ftir. :;i -:::.'. ' ^^'i^'* ••»'** bi sectiudarytKiucation. 10. 

Noni.Ml CnlU^^c ,.f il,e City of N.-w ' statist ;,-.> of senmdary schools, 8-9. 

York. iri;;li ^.-lio,.! .jcparlim'nt. I Students. J», 38-:.'»l». 



iMiiijliiiMUjil admi^siMii. <;•. grant to, 



I University Preiiaratory School. 



Nnrtli r.;mL'or minii .^.lioul. .piota I H Ija.-a. cliarter amended, 3. 

and .iiIimmImiu'"' .u:raiit<. 4. | 

j West Eaton I'nion School, quota and 

Parsons. .F.-imcs.- linsv,-!!. ir, n'p..rt as 1 aiii-iidaiice grants, 4. 

Hire'!..!- ::;:::. ' Wlm-lo.-u. ciiarles F.. n-port pre- 

I'r.k. W/y.i .!.. ;iii«i!-j:ii!.M. .11 iilii<:i I |-:jr.«i ii\. :',; .'ittcndaucc at eduoa- 

n.-:.-; iiLriiiiu"-. 1.'. I i:.mi.-i! MicMinir*'. 41*. 



University of the State of New York 



HIgb Scbool Department: 

PUBLICATIONS 







I'jwri amme*i ure tf jibctil by Uin 


E:^ ■ ■ 


■.at rcfKi 

1 \mTt Mt 


iiVf-r»My ri*pnff«, kiMiwri 



1 H?ch SclvjK^j DciisLrlii)efil^. 
Ei^aminauQii uepartineat utiiiifrcms i%|-9S. O. Cmimi^^d as 

B4 i) Re(x^tit» Ex i^. »jp. Nov. 1890. ok. 

i:.- ... 

B33 (fc^ ns 5) Repon of Escammwon Ll«|ianfDem 1JS95. 

X6 Report of £xaiDi£iatt0ti Depamncnt |R94« ti6p. Mar. 1II95* /.fr. 
X7 " Mar- 1895. 2jV. 

1 1 i Iters fur gtitdnnec of C9ndk)4iet. 

^^ .--.:..,. :..- .u^, jO|l. sapl,^ -^5^ 

by X^^ 

X9 Report of EstamioarioQ De|Mini»ait 1^95. io8p, Feb. 1S96, /ja 
XlO E }^aiiif nation Pj: Ocl iSg^. jc^/ ^maJi liu 

Xit D;^ 1 ML.nL^irTl^ Stale Map of Ncifr Yoik as an Alil 

to xh^ j«p. Nr*v, i%l s^* 

Sftio^jii .,„.,., „^ ;n pr^paraUoti tjf Uie UniU^ Slatr% Q&^ 

^i^iciii Stxri'cy* 

X12 Report of Enjonmtfon Dq>intQciit 189^. iT4p. Jan. 18^7. i;ff. 



X14 Etammaiioo Fapeni t%7^ 57 8p, AU45, tS^j, Jft^^ *« Xto, 
X15 Rc|KirtQf lijniicimaticin Ocpaitintrtt 1^97. tsop, Nctv. iHg?. zjr.^ 

X16 - 

Hit 

High 5diui*J Dcp. , . \5«r. 0. 7/^ if tv/. rA?^-#. 

Higli Scbooi Oepartmeiit Imlletixis i%S-4afa. Ih a^mce sti* 

X17 t High School 1) DiiiH^torV Report iSg^, laip Man ifi*fg. /Jr, 

X19 (High Sdtciol 5) A**od4tetI Academic Frindpalii, Prriceadin^ 

of the Mill Aiiouiit Omfeitiicct Dec, t%%^, 15611, * Dec 1 S99. ^Ja 



X20 {High Scbool 4) Aeademic E^amiaiitiofi Papers ^H^, 1°^!^ 

Oct - ^ .-ff, Sm^iiih^ 1^-5 S ♦£> fKt* 2jr/ kt%irth^§OC, 

Xll <Ii .:>l5) Pin?fiffr'AT<fn*^^^rf f^fjf^, yofr, Feb, 190^ /ar 

Xm (HijthSc»iool6) ;^ :>tU*. Pr 

of the t5lhAniiiinf s«., .*-- *v-|.,, i-.j-. KUr. 1 

X33 (High School 7) i*T?r«? TencJwfit Aj»oaa!ifm* Pi . i 

lift hi- FtxiJlli Armu*ili i " r. 1S99. jo^p* Miy 19&0. jji» 

X24 i^^i^ School S) A ^.*... j.^:abu3> it^p. Ap. igoo, ^sc- 

Til iff jl,r-j-!in^-. I, . r»'^-, .nitTi «■!..[ xir%':t^ k r**- .' , jq 1 1. -» I f vu-tL . {\.*il I,*.*' T I i i,« 

I,. , 

X25 ::.v*.. -^ 9) MaiitiAl TmiBiog Sflbtms. fep. M;ir 

l^QO, IOC* 

TSM (tifiih Scb/j*^l to) Academic EmmJiiAtion Papem TgpQ« 30^, 
Aug. 1900. I^ke, Mff Xio* 

X37 (High Sciioal ii) Dkeeiar'iBj^on tgoa. 3^^,. Ff^^i^ai* j^, 

X28 (ir ^ ' ^ jj Aieocbt€4 Aoulemie Frfnd{ri]ft, Pf * - 
ol ij Conference, flee- i9*>o» i6#p. A|f. 1 1 

X29 ill ieriAii'M!iatioti. iTuct-ed- 

ing* I , .._...., Dec, 1900, a^op* Mny 

X30 (HJ^h Schtxal 14.^ Auitcmic Etammailfici Fa|icci igoi. 3J2P 

Xjx (High School I s) Dircctor'i Report 1 go 1. ^\h Jan* igqa* tist, 

X32 (Hi^^ 0I16) A ' ■ • [mR Ptocecdiog^ 

o f tJ3 L iiuii Cciii ! Mar. 1 903. ^5 1* 

X33 (M -n. Pni 

X34 (High Schooi ip; ACiMicmx iLXAmmnuan rijci^ i^lu ;jtDp. 
July 4CI01. Jfi"; SiNinfM.^Of. 

X35 (1 H A»4n tVot^ei- 

oXllau .. ^1 Cou&rtu , ^ . , ^ J ine igoj, j^l 

X3fl ( Hi jjh School »o) Direutor%Rq»orl 1^1. jSp, July 1903. iOf. 

X37 (1 ) 5ta!cSctf: \:^ociitioiit Pm 

infi. . rmh Annun' Dec. im2. 1 

X38 (High School 3 2) Aca^ktuju nrajm^jjuutj i^^^i^rs iga^. 3»Sr 
July 1903. Jjr 

K3^ (High School 33) OIrt^clor*& Report 1903* 5ap. 1904, /jr. 

Question papers* For ihc acaikmir ■ -- -^-^ '^% t); 1893 (r. j); 

Fur i\^p-i ' s'. ■^'- . ^^ .. .' \- .L r M ... _,. 



Fuhliihfd wnihly hy the ' 

q^Zgga.&tHti.j'ttitt JT Miff .yarK 



New York State Museum 

Ephbaim Porter Fef-t Stato Entomologist 

Bulletin 76 
ENTOMOLOGY 21 

19th Report of THS^tate Entomologist 

OS ' » 

INJURIOUS AND OTHER INSECTS 



STATE OF NEW YORK 
1903 



l»A(iE 

Introduction 91 

General entomologie features . 01 

OfRce work «3 

Special iuTestigatious 92 

Publications 98 

Collections of insects 04 

Nursery inspection work 05 

Voluntary observers 06 

Acknowledgments 06 

Beneficial insects 07 

Synopsis ef certain genera of 
the Ophionini 97 

Injurious insects 125 

Notes for the year IJIO 

Plant lice 180 

Fruit tree insects 187 

Grapevine pests 142 

Garden insects ... 143 

Grain and house i»e8ts 145 



l*AiiE 

Notes for the year {contu\w*(li) 
Shade trees and forest insects. 147 

Beneficial insects IIJO 

Experimental work against Sau 

Jose scale insect 151 

Early s]>ring or winter appli- 
cations 151 

Siunmer washes 159 

Diseased and dying trees and in- 
sect attack 107 

Voluu tary entr nn oh igic servic^e . . 1 73 
List of publications of tlie ento- 

mcilogist 103 

Insect exuhanK<* 200 

Siwcicrs roceive«l in exchange. . 201 

Exchange list 207 

C<»ntributions to rollec^tion 313 

Kxplanation « ►f plates 221 

JMatesl-4 face 'I'll 

Inde.v 22« 



ALBANY 

UNiVER.srrv of ttik staif: np xkw york 

1904 



Meici6m-F4-i8oo 



Pt\e^\«^cfctte 



University of the State of New York 

REGENTS 1903 
With Vfara of election ^ 

1892 William Croswell Doane D.D. LL.D. Chancellor^ Albany 
1878 Whitelaw Reid M.A. LL.l). Vice Chancellor - New York 
1877 Chauncky M. Depew LL.D. _ _ • - N^ew York 
1877 Charles E. Fitch LL.B. M.A. L.H.D. - Roch^tcr 
1881 William H. Watson M.A. M.l). LL.D. - - Utica 
1881 Henry E. Turner LL.D. « - - « Lowville 
1883 St Clair McKelway M.A. L.H.D. LL.D. D.C.L. Brooklyn 
1885 Daniel Beach Ph.D. LL.D. _ - _ _ Watkins 
1890 Pliny T. Sexton LL.D. - _ - _ - Palmyra 
1890 T. Guilford Smith M.A. C.E. LL.D. - - Buffalo 

1893 Lewis A. Stimson B.A. LL.D. M.D. - « - New York 
1895 Albert Vander Veer M.A. Ph.D. M.D. - Albany 
1895 Charles R. Skinner M.A. LL.D. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex officio 
1897 Chester S. Lord M.A. LL.D. - _ _ - Brooklyn 

1900 Thomas A. Hendrick M.A. LL.D. - - - Rochester 

1901 BENJA.MIN B. Odelljr LL.D. Governor, ex officio 

1901 Robert C. Pruyn M.A. - _ _ - Albany 

1902 William Nottingham M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. - Syracuse 

1903 Frank W. Higgins Lieutenant Governor, ex officio 
1903 John F. O'Brien Secretary of State, ex officio 

1903 Charles A. Gardiner LL.B. M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. New York 
1903 Charles S. Francis B.S. - - - _ Troy 
One vacafuy 



SECRETARY 

Elected by RegenU 

1900 Ja.mes Russell Parsons jr M.A. LL.D. 

directors of departments 
1888 Melvil Dewey M.A. LL.D. Slate Library and Home Education 
1890 James Russell Parsons jr M.A. LL.D. 

Administrative^ College and High School Defts 
11890 Frederick J. H. Merrill Ph.D. State Museum 



University of the State of New York 



New York State Museum 

Frederick J. H. Merrill Director 
Bphraim Porter Felt State Entomologist 



Bulletin 76 
ENTOMOLOGY 21 

19th REPORT OF THE STATE ENTO- 
MOLOGIST 1903 

To the Regents of tJw Univef'sity of the State of New York 

I have the honor of presenting herewith my report on the injurl- 
out and other insects in the State of New York for the year ending 
Oct. 15, 1903. 

Oesenl entomologic featufies. The season of 1903 will long be 
known on account of the abnormal abundance of plant lice of 
various sjiecies, which have not only been exceedingly destructive 
to fruit trees in particular but the prolongation of their depreda- 
tions far beyond the usual date was sjxjcially injurious to young or 
recently set trees. The latter part of the summer the San Jose 
sc^aUs A s p i d i o t u s p c r n i c i o s u s Comst., bred so exces- 
sively that many trees were literally coveix»d with half grown scale 
inaei.ts toward the end of the season. The depredations of the 
elm leaf beetle, Galerucella lutcola Mtill., have con- 
tinaed in the Hudson river valley though the spraying operations 
of recent yeaft have reduced their numbcre very largely in Albany 
and Troy. An interesting feature of this insect's history was its 
presence in excessive numbers at Saratoga Springs, where it 
would undoubtedly have caused severe injury had it not been for 
the prompt spraying instituted by the village authorities. The. 
white marked tussock moth, Notolophus leucostigma 
Abb. & Sm., has caused less damage than usual in recent years 



92 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

though it was generally present at Buffalo on a great many horse- 
chestnut trees, partially defoliating thousiinds. The fall web- 
worin, ir y p h a n t r i a 1 e x t o r Ilarr., has, as a rule, been less 
injurious than in preceding years, except in a few localities. 

Office work. The gen(»nil office work has been conducted as in 
lu-eceding yeai*s and luis Immmi marked by many moitj demands 
for informati<»u, indicating an in(*i»eased interest. The determina- 
tions of scale insects for the commissioner of agriculture, in con- 
nection with the nurs(»ry insjiec^tion work of his department, has 
made somewhat extensive demands on the time of Assistant C. M. 
Walker, who has also had charge of most of the breeding cage 
work. Many i>hotogi'aphs of living insects or specimens of their 
work have ])een taken and a number of lantern slides added to 
the collection, greatly increasing its effectiveness in illustrating 
jjopular lectures. It is gratifying to KH»ord that there have been 
no changes in the office staff during the past year, and conse- 
quently the work has proceeded without interruption from this 
cause. Correspondence indicates a coptinued and healthy interest 
in our work, as is evidenced by the following figures: 2035 letters, 
784 postals, 490 circular letters and 1109 packages were sent 
through the mail during the past year. The reduction from last 
year in the number of postals and packages is due to the fact that 
but three publications were issued during the present year against 
four in 1903, and the last issued was not available for distribu- 
tion till very late, consequently a portion of the copies will be sent 
out next year. Mailing expenses have also been reduced by send- 
ing two or more publications by express, wherever that was 
economical, a total of 114 packages being shipped. 

Special investigations. The lines of work begun in earlier years 
have been continued and considerable progress made. The grape- 
vine root worm, Fidia viticida Walsh, has been the sub- 
ject of more extended investigations than last year, a large amount 
of exceedingly valuable data has been secured and we have demon- 
strated that collecting the beetles was a practical, the most 
reliable and probably the most economical method of controlling 
this pest. The details of this work will appear in a revised and 
extended bulletin on this insect. Tlie experiments with inseeti- 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 93 

cities for controlling the San Jos<^ scale have been carried on in 
the same orchard as in tlie past three years, and our earlier i-esults 
with rriide petroleum have been contirnied. Extended experi- 
nu^nts with lime-sulfur washes have also been conducted at War- 
wick with very gratifying results. An extensive series of experi- 
ments witli summer washes was made, Mr Walker having direct 
charge of the work and being responsible for most of the observa- 
tions. A second instalment of the beneficial Chinese ladybeetle, 
C h i 1 o c o r u s s i m i 1 i s Rossi, which may prove of value in 
suppressing this pernicious scale insect, was obtained from the 
Ignited States Department of Agriculture last August and estab- 
lished in an infested orchard at Kinderhook. It is hoped that 
they will survive in this latitude and prove of great value in con- 
trolling this dangerous pest. The extended forest fires in the 
Adirondacks early in the season offered an excellent opportunity 
for investigating the connection between them and insect attack. 
The results of this work are given on a subsequent page. Our 
general studies of forest and shade tree insects have been con- 
tinued and a number of valuable observations made. 

The present year has been marked by the appearance of a second 
rei>ort by Dr Needham on aquatic insects, which consists of a 
series of valuable original articles by himself, supplemented by 
imiwrtant papers from Messrs MacGillivray, Johannsen and 
Davis. Another report by Dr Needham, is now in preparation 
and will l)e devoted largely to a consideration of the May flies and 
midges (C h i r o n o m i d a e) of the State. 

Investigations on our native mosquitos have been continued, 
resulting in material additions to our knowledge. Collections of 
these little insects have been made in different sections of the 
State, and it was possible for Assistant D. B. Young to spend two 
weeks at Ix)ng Island, working in cooj>eration with the North 
Shore Improvement Association, which has become well and favor- 
ably known to all interested in this line of effort on account of its 
verj' efficient of>erations in subduing these i)ests in the vicinity of 
New York city. 

Publications. The principal publications of the entomologist, to 
the number of 70 are listed under the uauaV YiesidL, Tdl^^j; idl^^'c^ 



04 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

important of those issued during the i)a8t year are the following: 
Grapevine Root Worm (Museum bulletin 50), 18th Report of the 
Imitate Entomologist 1902 (Museum bulletin G4) and Aquatic Insects 
in yew York i^iate (Museum bulletin 08). In addition, the ento- 
mologist has contributed an imj)ortant jiaper on insects injurious 
to pine and oaks, for the seventh repoi-t of the Forest, Fish and 
Game Commission, and one on insecticides for the report of the 
Colorado State Board of Horticulture for 1002. 

Other important publications, which are either in the printer's 
hands or practically completed, are as follows: Grapevine Root 
Worm, a revised and ejctended edition of Museum bulletin 50, men- 
tioned above. A monograph of the genus Saperda, which includes 
some of our most destructive borers, has been prepai^ed by the 
entomologist in association with Mr L. IT. Joutel of New York 
city, and will form a small bulletin of about 80 pages illustrated 
by 7 colored plates. Dr Needham's third report, mentioned in the 
pre<^eding paragraph, is practically completed and will be an ex- 
tended work about the same size as Museum bulletin 68. There 
is also a memoir on insects injurious to forest and shade trees, an 
extensive publication illustrated with many halftones and 16 
colored plates, treating specially of those forms w^hich are destruc- 
tive to shade trees. 

Collections of insects. Very large additions have been made to 
the state collections during the past season. They are specially 
desirable because a considerable proportion have come from other 
sections of the State. Mr Young spent several w^eeks in the Ad- 
irondacks in special work on forest insects, and he has collected 
at inten^als throughout the season in coo[)eration with the Vassar 
Brothers Institute, at Poughkeepsie, and also at Long Island 
while engaged on mosquito investigations. The results have been 
large and exceedingly valuable additions to the state collections. 
Much progress has been made in arranging insects pi*eviously col- 
lected. The T^j»idoptera, which are in the care of Mr Walker, 
have all be<.»n referred to the pi-incipal groups and many deter- 
mined specifically. lie has also arranged the Coccidae, now 
represented by 08 s[)ecies and a host of 8|>ecimens, while Mr Young 
Aas been able to do considerable systematic work on the Tenthre- 



ftEPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 95 

(linidae, Ichneumonidae, Svrphidae, Tachinidae and Capsidae, 
besides making material progress in arranging the Coleoptera 
which, it is gi-atifying to state, are already in a fairly satisfactory 
condition. The exhibit collection has received valuable additions 
fiom time to time, and in all of our collecting an effort has been 
made to secure material desirable for this purpose. The museum 
was kindly remembered during the present year and bequeathed 
a small collection of insects by Miss Ellen L. Baker of Middle 
Granville N. Y. 

The past season a system of exchange was inaugurated with 
most excellent results. The museum possesses large series of cer- 
tain species. Lists were prepared and sent to entomologists in dif- 
ferent sections of this and other countries with a request for ex- 
changes, and as a result some exceedingly valuable additions have 
l>een made to the collection with practically no cost to the museum. 
The details of these exchanges together with a list of species 
available for this purpose will be found under a separate head. 

Nursery inspection work. Owing to the Virginia authorities re- 
fusing in the fall of 1902 to accept nursery inspection certificates 
issued by the State Department of Agriculture, even though 
officially indorsed by us, other means had to be devised to aid those 
who wished to ship nursery stock into Virginia. The state ento- 
mologist of Virginia was willing to accept a certificate based on 
insi)ection by an assistant working under our direction, and as 
an accommodation to our nurserymen, it was arranged to send an 
assistant to make supplementary inspections of only that stock 
which was destined for Virginia, the parties benefitcMl to pay his 
traveling expenses. Mr C. M. Walker was detailed for this work, 
which occupied nearly two weeks. It is very gratifying to state 
that the regular inspectors, in whom we have utmost confidence, 
kindly aided Mr Walker in his work. Mr H. C. Peck and Mr J. J. 
Barden, in whose territory most of the inspecting was done, were 
specially helpful. The following is a list of firms to whom these 
nursery certificates were issued between Oct. 21 and Nov. 1, 
respectively : Mt Hope Nurseries, Western New York Nursery Co., 
Thomas Bowman & Son, A. L. Wood, Allen Nui-sery Co., H. S. 
Taylor & Co., Charlton Nursery Co., all ol Tioc\iestet\ ^\k<^T«ii 



96 NKW YOtlK STATft MUSBUM 

Whok'sale Nurseries, (ieorge A. Hweet Nursery Co., Rogers Nur- 
KM\v, all of Dausville; Brown Bros. (Jo., Chase Bros. Co., First 
Natioual Nurseries, Perry Nursery Co., J. B. Nellis & Co., all of 
Brighton; I^wis Koesch, T. S. Hubbard Co., 0. S. Josselyn Co., 
fill of Fredonia ; Knight & Bostwic-k, Emmons & Co., and C. W. 
Btuart & Co., all of Newark. 

Voluntary observers. The work of the voluntary observers begun 
in 1899 has been continued, but owing to an unusually dry spell 
in the early part of the season followed by excessive rains, there 
has been comparatively little to report except injuries by plant 
lice, a group of insects on which the voluntary observers are not 
well qualified to report. As a consequence, there are not so many 
records as have been made in earlier seasons, though the sum 
total of their observations amounts to a material addition to our 
knowledge concerning some very important injurious insects. 
Summaries of these reports ai^e published under the usual head. 

Acknowledgments. The untimely death of our highly esteemed 
and gifted associate, the late Prof. V. H. Lowe of the State 
Agricultural Experiment Station at Geneva, is a source of deep 
regret and a severe loss to the science he loved so well. The ento- 
mologist has been favored by the cooperation of a number of pi^- 
fessional workers. To l)r L. O. Howard, chief of the division of 
entomology. United States Department of Agriculture, and his 
staff, special acknowledgments are due for the determination of 
a number of insects and for information regarding different 
species. Mr E. P. VanDuzee, of Buffalo, a w^ell known authority 
on Ilemiptcra, has kindly identified all our Pentatomidae and a 
number of related forms, and we ait^ indebted to Prof. Mel. T. 
Cook, of l)e Pauw University, Greencastle Ind., for the determina- 
tion of many insect galls. The appreciation of our work by the 
many friends of the ofiice is a source of pleasure, and the support 
given by those in authority is very gratifying. 

llespect fully submitted 

Ephraim Porter Felt 

State Entomologist 
Office of the State Entomologist 
Albany, Oct. 15, 1903 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 97 

BENEFICIAL INSECTS 

SYNOPSIS OF CERTAIN GENERA OF THE OPHIONINI 

The following account of species belonging to various genera 
of this group is the result of a study, extending over some years, 
originally begun at Cornell University under the auspices of 
Prof. J. n. Comstock, to whom the writer is under deep obliga- 
tions for assistance. The original assignment covered the species 
placed in this genus by Cresson, and owing to many other matters 
demanding attention, we have i*eluctantly decided to publish our 
results without attemi)ting to extend our studies so as to include 
all the members of this group, particularly because of lack of 
time, and specially since a number of genera are represented 
only by foreign species. We also take this opx)ortunity to express 
our obligations to Dr W. H. Ashmead, cuititor of the Hymenop- 
teni. United States National Museum, who in recent years has 
kindly loaned us specimens and afforded material aid in our sys- 
tematic study. 

This group includes some of our larger and more common para- 
sites, and to the species comprising it much credit is due for ma- 
terial aid in controlling a number of our insect pests. For ex- 
ample the long-tailed Ophion, Eremotylus macrurus 
Linn, is a common parasite of large cecropia larvae and allied 
sj^wies. These large caterpillars are rarely abundant enough to 
attract attention by their ravages, and one reason for this is un- 
doubtedly the activity of their parasites, foremost of which stands 
the long-tailed Ophion. 

Value as parasites 

The other species of this group have been reared from a large 
number of hosts, and there is no reason for regarding several of 
them as of less value than Eremotylus macrurus Linn. 
The following statistics will give some idea of their abundance 
and, as the life of the host with its attendant possibilities is de- 
stroyed as each develops, they also give some idea of the economic 
value of the species. Six trap lanterns were in operation- during 
the entire season of 1889 at Cornell Univei^sity for the purpose of 
ascertaining the value of lights for destroying insects, aiiA tl^^xV^ 



VO NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

GOO examples of ophionids were taken. Two species were well 
represented in this lot. There were none of the long-tailed 
Ophions, hence the figures give no idea of the relative abundance 
of this parjisite or of the other species not represented. The one 
by far the most abundant was Ophion bilineatum Say, 
the two-lined Ophion, which was represented by 450 examples. The 
species next in abundance was Ophion tityri Pack., which 
was represented by 118 examples, while Eniscopilus pur- 
gat u s Say was represented by but 23 individuals. It will be 
noticed that the two species taken moat abundantly are not well 
represented in most collections and but little is known of their 
habits. This record does not in the least reflect on the value of 
these two as panisites. It is possible that both are equally effi- 
cient in their own fields and it is most probable, seeing that they 
are crei)U8Cular or nocturnal in habit, that they breed largely in 
larvae which rarely fall into the hands of the collectors. The 
two-lined Ophion has been reared mostly from arctians or 
noctuids. Though records of this character are still far too 
scarce to permit the formation of a positive opinion, it is likely 
that this species does material service in keeping larvae belonging 
to these two families in check. The observations are even more 
meager regarding Ophion tityri. Here is certainly a field 

for investigation. 

General habits 

The different meml)ers of this gi'oup may usually be seen flying 
slowly about shrubbery and in the grass during bright days from 
early May till into October. In cloudy and wet weather they 
seek some sheltered place — at least this is true of the diurnal 
species. The long-tailed and the purged Ophions are the t\\^o 
taken most commonly in the day, and they are the best repre- 
sented in most collections examined. The trap lantern record 
would appear to indicate a great preponderance of the two-lined 
Ophion. This must be ascribed to the crepuscular or nocturnal 
habits of the latter form. The females are the more active and 
' are more abundant in collections. This might be expected, as 
on her devolves the labor of searching out a suitable nidus for 



REPORT OF THB STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 99 

her eggs. The large proportion of females is well shown in the 
trap lantera record, where but 87 males were taken to 485 females. 
The great activity of the females and the large number of them 
attracted to lights must diminish materially the value of the trap 
lantern as a means of destroying insect pests. 

Oviposition and larval habits 

The females possess a sharp ovipositor which is capable of in- 
flicting a slight wound. Its sharpness appears to be mainly for 
defensive purposes, as the eggs are deposited usually on the skin 
of the host, to which they firmly adhere by means of a cement 
or glue extruded at the moment of oviposition. The deposit of 
the egg by Eremotylus macrurus has been graphically 
described by TrouVelet as follows^ : " When an Ichneumon de- 
tects the presence of a worm, she flies around it for a few seconds, 
and then rests upon the leaf near her victim ; moving her antennae 
very rapidly above the body of the worm, but not touching it, and 
l>euding her abdomen under the breast, she seizes her ovipositor 
with the front legs, and waits for a favorable moment, when she 
quickly deposits a little oval white egg upon the skin of the larva. 
She is quiet for some time and then deposits another upon the 
larva, which only helplessly jerks its body every time an egg is 
laid." Eight to ten eggs are laid in this manner. A few days 
later they hatch and the larvae make their wJiy under the skin 
of their victim, feeding on the fatty portions of the host at first, 
but later most of the tissues are devoured. The miserable victim 
of these parasites drags out a weary existence and usually per- 
ishes in the pupal state, rarely before. As a single larva will 
provide sustenance for the development of but one or two para- 
sites, the weaker ones perish. 

There is on the front tibia of Ophion an articulated, apical 
spine, a structure common to many Hymenoi)tera, which is pos- 
sibly connected with the method of oviposition narrated above. 
This articulated spine is curved toward the tarsus near the apex, 
and might consequently Ik? used for holding tie ovipositor, be- 

M868 Am. Nat 1 :89-91. 



100 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

cause when ajijiosod to (he tarsus the bend is such as to allow 

the ovipositor to pass easily through a space between the two. 

It is worthy of note in this connection, as showing the method 

of depositing eggs by an insect belonging to the same family, that 

Thalessa has been seen ovipositing in a similar manner by reliable 

observers.^ 

Pupation and final transformations 

The larva of Eremotylus macrurus usually pupates 
within the cocoon of its victim. As this species preys largely on 
the saturnians, the larvae of which spin stout cocoons, the grub 
of the parasite on emerging from the remains of its victim finds 
itself in a well protected cocoon, and consequently has no need 
of looking for a moi-e secure place in which to undergo its final 
ti'ansformations. The same habit is probably common to other 
species infesting hosts spinning a stout cocoon, as, for example, 
E r e m . a r <; t i a e when preying on these moths. The cocoons 
of Eniscopilus purgatus ai'e found in the soil or 
under shelter near where its host has transformed. From the 
lack of evidence to the contrary, it may be presumed that such 
is the general habit of all the species infesting larvae that do not 
spin stout cocoons Ijefore pupation. 

Very few notes exist on the duration of the pupa state in this 

genus. Riley states that the imagos of Erem. macrurus 

commonly emei*ge in the spring, and rarely come forth in the 

autumn. This would appai-ently indicate that the normal habit 

of this insect is to pass the winter in the pupal stage. An example 

of Enis. purgatus has been known to pupate July 24, the 

imago emerging Sep. 13. 

Bibliography 

1862 Packard, A. S. Me. Sci. Sur. Rep't, p.20 (Comes to light) 

1869 Guide Study Ins. p.l95 (Brief notice) 

18C3 Norton, Edward. Ent See. Phila. Proc. 1 : 357-58 (Table of species) 
1879 Provancher, L'Ahh6 I. Nat. Can. 11:115 (Generic characters), 

p.l 10-17 (Table of species) 
1882 lintner, J. A. Ins. N. Y. 1st Rep't, p.103-10 (Parasitic on N e p h e - 

lodes violans) 
185)3 Ins. N. Y. 8th Kep't, p.238 (Mention) 



»1888 Lintner. Ins. N. Y. 4th Rep't, p.40-41. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 101 

1S84 Comstock, J. H. Kingsley^s Stand. Nat. Hist. 2 : 515 (Brief reference) 

18a> Manual Study Ins. p.G24. fig.750 (Notice) 

18S5 Jack, J. O. Can. Ent. 17:30 (Manner of oviiwsltion on Noto- 

donta concinna) 

188*; Ent. Soc. Ont. UMh Ilep't, p.l6 

1885 Webster, F. K. U. S. Dep't Agric. Rcp't 1884. p.389 (Parasitic on 

Neiuatus) 
1S88 Kiley. C. V. Insect Life, 1:171 (An external parasite) 

ISOl IiLsect Life, 3 :270 (Feeding Imbits of larvae) 

IKKi Ent. Soc. Wash. Proc. 2:403 (Ovipositlon) 

1800 Bmner, Lawrence. Neb. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bui. 14, p.G2 (Parasitic 

onAcronycta lepusculina) 

1801 Forbes, S. A. Ins. 111. 17th Rep't, 1889-90, p.44 (Parasitic on white 

grub) 
1801 Kiley, C. V. & Marlatt, C. I. Insect Life, 4:179 (Ophion? parasitic 

on Neniatus) 
1S!H Smith, J. B. N. J. Agric. Exp. Sta. Rep't, 1893, i».582 (General 

notice) 
These are references to the genua onlj', as defined by Cresson in 1887. 

Synopsis of genera treated 

a rubitodiscoidal nervure irregularly thickened, never api>cndiculate 

h Yellowish chltinous siwts in cubltodisooldal cell Eniscopilus Curtis 

hh No such si)ot8 in c\iblto<liscoldal cell Ereniotylus Forsivr 

aa Cubitodis<.*oidal nervure never irregularly thlckencil, usually api)endicu- 
late 

h Face normal .Ophion GravcnUorst 

hb Face elongated Genophion FcH 

Synopsis of species of Eremotylus 

fl (.'ubitodlscoldal vein usually strongly sinuate; hooks of hind wings 13-15; 
male clasps rather long. subrectang\ilar, obtusely rounded at the 

aiM^x ni a c r u r u s Linn. 

aa Cubitodiscoldal vein nearly arcuate; first and second nvurrent ner- 
vures nearly e<|ual ; hooks of hind wing 7-9; male clasps subrectangu- 

lar, acutely rounded arctiae Ashm. 

glabratus Say* 

Eremotylus macrurus Liun. 
Lonf/ tailed Ophion 
Tlii«, the largest American si^eeies of the genus, is closely allied 
to K r e m. arctiae Ashm., which has heen confused with it in 
<'ollertious. The two s|K»<ies are easily sejiarated from the others 
of tli(» genus hy their considerably larger size; the suiallest being 
jKTceptibly larg(»r than the hirgest of the other siKHi(»s, excepting 

'StK? ac*count of this species, p.lOC. 



102 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

Ophion fuliginipennis Felt; which belougs in a dif- 
ferent group. Ereni. macrurus may be separated from 
E r e m . a r c t i a e by its larger size, by the fulvous tinge of the 
wings and veins, by the second discoidal nervure being nearly 
twice the length of the first, and by there being from 13 to 15 
hooks on the hind wings. Other differences are detailed in the 
description of Erem. arctiae. 

Habits and life history. This species is an active, diurnal insect, 
being rarely if ever attracted to lights. It is the one most com- 
monly bred from the large saturnians, and is frequently referred 
to as a parasite of one or more of them. Its egg-laying habits 
and life history, so far as known, have been described in a pre- 
ceding paragraph. It has also been recorded as bred from some 
of the arctians, but it is probableJ:hat some of these records really 
pertain to E r e m . a r c t i a e . Dr C. M. Weed has recorded an 
instance in which 30 out of 50 pupae of Samia Columbia 
Smith were parasitized by this insect. The unusual abundance of 
V a 11 o 8 a 111 i a j) r o ni e t h e a Dr. is recorded in Insect Life, 
2:3S3, and also the interesting fact that fully two thirds of the 
pupae harbored this parasite. The observations of Dr Riley show 
that thi^s insect usually emerges in the spring, though occasionally 
individuals come forth in the autumn. 

This parasite has been reared from the following insects : I s i a 
i s a b e 1 1 a Abb. & Sm., Phil o samia cynthia Drury, 
Callosamia promethea Drury, Samia Columbia 
Smith, Samia c e c r o p i a Linn., Telia polyphemus 
Cram., Automeris io Fabr. and Apatelodes torre- 
f acta Abb. & Sm. 

Description. Fulvo-ferruginous, stigma almost obsolete; mar- 
ginal nervure sinuate, thickened toward the stigma; size large; 
body 31 to 38 mm long; wing spread 43 to 56 mm. Head small, 
antennae nearly as long as the body; ocelli prominent, black; 
head yellowish posteriorly; eyes black, rather small; mandibles 
bideutate, tipped with black. Mesolhorax convex; scutellum and 
postscaitellum prominent; anterior portion of metathorax de- 
jiressed; j)osterior portion rugose, liniiled anteriorly by a trans- 
verse carina; lateral carinae present. Wings hyaline; marginal 
nervure thickened, sinuate n«\r the small stigma; cubitodiscoidal 
nervure never appendiculate, usually strongly sinuate; third dis- 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 103 

coidal cell considerably wider at apex than base; hooks on hind 
wings 13 to 15. liegs long, honey yellow. Abdomen long, strongly 
compressed, usually darker at tip. Male claspers rather long, 
gubrectangular, obtusely rounded at apex. 

Described from 10 examples. 

Cocoon. The larva leaves the shriveled remains of its victim 
when full grown and pupates within the cocoon spun before the 
demise of its host. The cocoon is tough, oval, about 32 mm long 
and 17 mm broad, and occupies the larger portion of that spun 
by its prey. It is composed of silk agglutinated by a dark secre- 
tion. Exteriorly it is a dark brown color, with a faint yellowish 
or golden band around the center. The interior is thinly lined 
with a transparent substance and possesses a brilliant metallic 
luster. 

IMstribution. The recorded distribution of this insect is from 
New England to California and from Canada to Texas, indicating 
that the species ranges over practically the whole of the United 
States and north into Canada. It has been reported from the 
following localities: Canada, New England, New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, District of Columbia, Virginia; Louisiana, 
Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, Colorado, Texas, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia. 

Specimens have also been examined from the following locali- 
ties: Ottawa, Canada [Harrington]; New York city [Joutel] ; 
Dutchess county, N. Y. and Rock Creek park, Washington D. C. 
[U. S. Nat. Mus.] and from Maiden and Amherst Mass. [FernaldJ. 

Bibliography 

1840 BmUe, Angnste. Hist. Nat. Ins. IIymcnoi)t p.l38. (Described ns 
rugosus) 

18(rJ-<» Scndder, S. H. Bost. Soo. Nat. Hist. Proc. 0:188-80 (Mentionoil as 
O. cecropiae) 

If^iR Norton, Edward. Ent. Soo. Pliihi. Proc. 1 :359 

1863 Sanborn, P. O. Mass. State Bd Agric. Rep't, p.109 (Mentioned as 
O. cecropiae) 

18G3 Tronvclet. Amer. Nat 1:89-91, fig.l (Metbod of ovlposition, par- 
asitic on T e 1 e a p o 1 y p h e m u s) 

18G8 Smith. Ent. Soc. Lond. Proc. p.xxxii 

1809 Packard, A. S. Guide Study Ins. p.l95, iig.27 (Parasitic on T e 1 e a 
polyphemus) 

1870 EUey, C. V. Am. Ent 2:100, flg.63, 64 



104 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

1872 Ins. Mo. 4th Rept p.107-8, 129, flg.37, 38 (Parasitic on S a in i a 

ee c* r o p i a, oviposltion. habits of larva) 

1880 Am. Ent. 3 :134, fig.52 ( Parasitic onlsia Isabella) 

1870 Chambers, V. T. Am. Ent. 2 :15G ( From Telea poly ph emus) 

1873 Cresson, E. T. Am. Ent. Soc. Trans. 4:1(59 (From Texas) 

1875 Geol. and Geog. Sur. Ter. Uep't. Zool. 5:708 (From eastern 

Nevada ) 

1874 Sanndcrs, William. Ent Soc. Ont. 5th Rep't. p.25, flg.20, 21 (Para- 

sitic on Sam la cecropia, oviposition, habits of larva) 
1875 7th Rep't, p.42, flg.29, 42 (Parasitic on Telea poly- 

p hem us) 
1883 13th Rep't, p.l7, flg.ll (Same as preceding) 

1882 Can. Ent. 14:43, flg.7 (Same as preceding) 

1883 Ins. Inj. Fruits, p.78, 175, 212, flg.73, 74 (Habits, parasitic 

on Samla cecropla, Telea polyphemus and A u t o - 
mer is I o) 

1876 Worthingrton, C. E. Can. Ent 8 :220 (Parasitic on Telea poly- 

phemus) 
1879 Provanchcr, UAhhd I. Nat Can. 11:116, 117 (Table of species, de- 
scription) 

1883 Clarkson, Frederick. Can. Ent 15:162 (Describes cocoon, parasitic 

on Telea polyphemus) 

1884 Comstock, J. H. Klngsley's Stand. Nat Hist 2 .515, flg.643 (Habits, 

parasitic on T e 1 e a polyphemus) 
1884 Weed, C. M. Papilio, 4 :112 (Parasite of Samla Columbia) 
1887 Waterhonse. Ent Soc. Lond. Proc. p.33 (Parasite of Callo- 

samla promethea) 
1889 Fallon. Ent Soc. France Bui. 6. 9:cxxxil 

1889 Coqnillett, D. W. Insect Life, 1 :286 (Mention) 

1890 Ashmead, W. H. Ck)l. Biol. Ass'n Bui. 1, p.43 (Listed) 

1890 Am. Ent Soc. Trans. 23 :192 (Compared with Eremotylus 

a r c 1 1 a e) 

1890 Kiley, C. V. & Howard, I. 0. Insect Life, 2:383 (Parasitic on A t- 
tacus promethea), 3 :154 (Bred from Telea poly- 
phemus, Samla cecropla, Apatelodes torre- 
facta) 

1890 Brnner, Lawrence. Neb. Agrlc. Exp. Sta. Bui. 14, p.l4, 15, fig.4, 5 
(Parasitic on Sam I a cecropla) 

1890 Perkins, O. H. Vt State Bd Agrlc. 11th Rep't, separate, p.lO (Men- 
tion) 

1890 Smith, J. B. Cat Ins. N. J. p.25 (Listed) 

1893-94 N. J. Agrlc. Exp. Sta. Rep't p.582, fig.107. (Reference) 

1896 : Eco. Ent p.382, flg.440 (Mention) 

1900 Ins. JJ. J. p.580, fig.273 (Listed) 

1891 lintner, J. A. Ins. N. Y. 7th Rep't, p.228 (Parasitic on I si a 

Isabella) 

1891 Harrington, W. W. Ent. Soc. Ont 21st Rcp't, p.67, fig.31 (Parasitic 

on Telea polyphemus) 

1892 Osborn, Herbert. Part Cat Animals la. p.l5 (Listed) 

1894 Fyles, T. W. Ent Soc. Ont 25th Rep't, p.55, flg.38 (Transforms 

within hosts — Saturniidac) 
1800 EvBnd, J. P. Can. Ent 28:10 (LUted) 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 105 

Eremotylus arctiae Ashm. 

This species is by no means rare, though not recognized as a 
distinct form till 1890 owing to its having been confused with 
Ereni. macrurus, which it closely resembles. A critical 
examination of the material in the state collection, Dr Lintner's 
private collection, and that from Cornell University, lent by Pro- 
fessor Comstock, has resulted in the finding of several examples 
of this species. Two specimens were taken in the trap lanterns 
at Cornell ; one Aug. 3 and the other Aug. 22, 1889. Owing to the 
kindness of Messrs Howard and Ashmead, we have been per- 
mitted to examine a type of this si)ecies. 

Hosts. This species is parasitic mostly on some of the arctians, 
though it has also been reared fi-om saturnians. The following 
hosts are known : Ecpantheria deflorata Fabr., 
Diacrisia virginica Fabr., Automeris io Fabr. 
and Callosamia promethea Drury. 

Description. The following is Mr Ashmead's description : 

In Erem. macrurus, the wings have a decided fulvous 
tinge and the veins are fulvous; the second recurrent nervure is 
about twice as long as the first recurrent nervure, the third 
discoidal cell, therefore, is much wider at apex than at base; in 
Erem. arctiae, the wings are entirely without the fulvous 
tinge and the basal nervure, tips of median and discal nervures 
?ary from brown to black, or piceo-black; the second recurrent 
nervure is only slightly longer than the fii'st recuri-ent nervure, 
the cubital nervure being arcuate and the third discoidal cell, 
therefore, is about as wide at apex as at base; in Erem. 
macrurus, the transverse metathoracic carina is always more 
or less distinctly sinuated at the middle, in Erem. arctiae 
it is stiuight. In Erem. arctiae the hooks on the hind 
wings vary from se\^n to nine ;in Erem. macrurus they 
are from 13 to 15; in the former the claws are pectinate; in the 
latter simple. 

Male 26 mm long, wing expanse 35 mm ; female 20 to 28 mm 
long, wing expanse 36 to 40 mm. 

Figure 6 on plate 2 represents the wing characters of Erem. 
macrurus. In Erem. arctiae the cubitodiscoidal 
nervure is arcuate; in the type examined it was a nearly perfect 
arc, but in other specimens there was a slight tendency to tSzA 



106 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

sinuous course usually so marked in Erem.macruruB. The 
form of the third discoidal cell in the type was a little more regu- 
lar than in our 8[)ecimens and the first and second recun*ent ner- 
vures were more nearly of an equal length. The wings of E re m. 
a r c t i a e appear to be proportionately wider than in E r e m . 
macrurus. In a study of examples of Erem. macrurus, 
I find the claws pectinate as well as in Erem. arctiae. The 
claspers of the male in the former species are rather long, sub- 
rectangular and obtusely rounded at tip, while in the latter they 
are subtriangular and acutely rounded at tip. 

Distribution. This species is probably as widely distributed 
over this county as is Erem. macrurus. It is known to 
occur in New York, New Jersey, District of Columbia, Alabama, 
Mississippi and California, and specimens are before the writer 
from the following localities : Ottawa, Canada [Harrington] ; 
Maiden and Amherst Mass. [Fernald] ; Michigan, Onaga Kan., 
Santa Cruz mountains and bred from Halisidota agas- 
B i z i i by Coquillett, Ix)s Angeles Cal. [U. S. Nat. Mus.] There 
is a specimen from Pennsylvania and one from Texas in the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge Mass. 

Bibliography 

1890 Biley, C. V. A Howard, L. 0. Insect Life, 3:155 (Bred from I si a 

) sabella, Ecpantherla def lora ta , Au tomerls io 
from Cal., as O. arctiae Riley M. S.) 

1891 lintncr, J. A. Ins. N. Y. 7th Rep't, p.228 ( Bred from I s 1 a Isa- 

bella, as O. arctiae Riley M. S.) 
1896 Ashmcad, W. H, Am. Ent Soc. Trans. 23:192 (Original descrip- 
tion) 

Eremotylus glabratns Say 
This species is apparently quite closely related to Erem. 
arctiae Ashm. and it is i>ossible that this latter is a synonym 
of Say's species but that can be determined with certainty only 
by examining the type, which is apparently not in existence. A 
small example of Erem. arctiae corresponds very well 
indeed with the original description of this rare form. There is a 
cocoon in the Harris collection in the rooms of the Boston Society 
of Natural History, labeled "Ophion glabratum" but no 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 107 

adult accompanies it though a specinieu of O. bilineatum 
Say was in close proximity to the cocoon. There is apparently 
nothing in that collection which can be used in the identification 
of this species. A specimen in the United States national collec- 
tion has been labeled by Dr Ashmead as Eremotylus gla- 
bratus Say. It corresponds very closely with the description 
of Erem. arctiae. The most apparent differences are in 
its small size and the comparatively slender marginal or radial 
nervure with no distinct angle or tooth near the stigma, a 
character which is usually well marked in both Erem. m a c - 
r n r n 8 Linn, and Erem. arctiae. 

This species has undoubtedly been erroneously identified in a 
number of collections and the following references, except that of 
its original describer, in all probability relate to something else. 
Prof. G. C. Davis some years ago informed me that but one in- 
dividual of this species was known to be in existence and that was 
in his possession. Say's original description of this insect is 
reproduced below : 

Honey yellow ; a glabrous spot in the large cubital cellule. 

Body dull honey yellow; head bright yellow; antennae, mouth 
and stemmata honey-yellow; eyes blackish; wings, first cubital 
cellule beyond its middle with a longitudinally oval glabrous 
space, but destitute of any opaque spot; metathorax transversely 
wrinkled near the petiole of the abdomen. 

Length about { inch. 

Bibliography 

1835 Say, Thomas. Bost Jour. Nat Hist 1:239 (Original description ) ; 
same In CJompl. Wr. LeConte ed. 2:G95 

1802 Crcswn, E. T. Ent Soc. Phila. Proo. 1:200 (Listed) 

1803 Norton, Edward. Ent Soc. Phila. Proc. 1 ::J58 

1890 Kilcy, C. V. A Howard, I. 0. Insect Life, 3:155 (Bred from 

Hyphantria cunea) 
1890 Smith, J. B. Cat Ins. N. J. p.25 (Listed) 
1899 Ins. N. J. sup. State Bd Agric. 27th Rep't p.r>S0 (Listed) 

Table for separation of species of Eniscopilus 

a Larger chitinous si)ot in glabrous area of cubitmliscoidal cell, not ap- 

riendicnlate p u r g a t u s Say 

aa Larger ehitinous spot in glabrous area of eubitodiscoidal cell, appendieu- 
late 



108 



NEW YORK STATB MUSEUM 



J) Chitinous process extending from larger chltinous spot along the pos- 
terior margin of the glabrous area and partly around its distal por- 
tion. Male clasps obtusely rounded arcuatus Felt 

66 Chitinous process from the larger spot not extending beyond the mid- 
dle of the glabrous area. Smaller chitinous spot nearly circular 

and slightly posterior to the center of the glabrous area 

appendiculatus Felt 

Eniscopilns purgatns Say 

This species is easily recognized by the two opaque, chitinous 
spots in the cubitodiscoidal cell. The great tenuity and length of 
the basal two abdominal segments is very marked, and is fre- 
quently of service in identifying the insect, though this is also 
true of the much rarer Enis. arcuatus and E n i s . ap- 
pendiculatus. It is the species of this genus most fre- 
quently found in the East while collecting in the daytime and the 
one most common in collections. 

Life history and habits. The images fly from the last of June 
till the last of September. They are diurnal and probably cre- 
puscular in habit since they are attracted to lights to a certain 
extent, as is shown by the trap lantern experiments conducted at 
the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station in 1889. 

Trap lantern records 





1SS& mf2 




JCTKX 


JULY 


AUO. 


•"■• 


I 


- 
JULY 


ACO. 


'a 




» 


ffi 


» 


m 


1 


s 


IB 


» 


» 


£9 


U 


15 


m 


21 


m 


B 


n 


u 


13 


SO 


1» 


1 


Male 


I 








1 










J 






















1 




1 




" 


■ ' 


*'* 


, 


' 


*' - 






** ■ 


1.* i 




' ' ' 




' ■ ' 


'* ■ 








FetnuJe . , 


1 


1 


2 


I 


"' 


I 


1 




L^ 


s 


1 


1 


1 


t 


1 


1 


1 


.1 


» 


] 


„,, 


2 


8 



It will be seen by examining the record for 1889, that there 
are three distinct periods, separated by a space of about two 
weeks, in which this species was taken. Thus none were captured 
between July 5 and 18, July 24 and Aug. 15. These two non- 
productive periods may have been caused by climatic conditions, 
though it is hardly probable that unfavorable weather of any 
kind would prevent the species fi\)m flying by night for 13 con- 
secutive days, to say nothing of the other period of three weeks. 
It may he that this periodicity indicates three broods or at least 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 109 

periods when the iinagos are more abundant, but in the absence of 
more data nothing but a surmise can be advanced. 

The hirge nuinl)er of females taken in the trap lantern reduces 
its value as a means of destroying; noxious insects. l)r Packard 
observed that the bean-shap>ed egg of this insect was attached to 
the skin of the lanal host by a pedicle, and that the newly 
hatched grub does not entirely leave the eggshell till it has eaten 
a hole into the side of its victim. It would therefore appear as 
though the sharpness of the ovijwsitor was largely for defensive 
I)urposes. The females can inflict a slight sting that will smart 
for half a minute or more, but the i)ain is by no means severe. 

Hosts. This insect has been most frequently brought to notice 
as a parasite of the very destructive army worm, H e I i o p h i 1 a 
11 n i p u n c t a Haw. on which it is a very efficient check. The 
army worm was abundant in many localities throughout the 
country in 1896, when the numerous oblong, silken cocoons of this 
parasite attracted Professor Lugger's attention in Minnesota 
fields inft^sted by army worms. This is the best evidence obtain- 
able of its value as a parasite. We have reared it from the zebra 
caterpillar, Mamestra pi eta Ilarr. another injurious 
sp<H'i(»s, the grub emerging from the larva and puf)atiug July 24, 
the adult apiK'iiring Sep. 13. Records indicate this to be one of 
the most valuable si)ecies of the genus, since it preys on several 
insects of c^msidenible e<'onomic importance. It has been reared 
in additicm to those named above, from Mamestra t r i f o 1 i i 
Rott, S c o I i o p t e r y X 1 i b a t r i x Linn., S c h i z u r a c o n - 
c i n n a Abb. & Sm., and S. unicornis Abb. & Bm. It has 
also ]>een bred from a diptei^ous Solidago gall and several uni- 
dentified lepidopterous larvae. It probably has a number of other 
hosts. We have also seen a si)ecimen reared from the Polyphemus 
caterpillar, Telea polyphemus Cram., in the Museum of 
Comparative Zoolog}' at Cambridge Mass. 

Description. Fiilvo-ferriiginous; stigma small; two subtriangu- 
lar, opaque chitinous spots in the cubitodiscoidal cell. 

Head medium; antennae neiirly as long as the body; ocelli 
black, about e<iuidistant from each other and the eyes; dorsal and 
posterior portions of head yellow ; mandibles bidenlat^vvxiAlv^^fci&L 



110 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

with black. Thorax sericeous; niesothorax convex; scutellum and 
postscutelluni prominent; nietathorax slightly depressed anterior 
of the transverse carina; lateral carinae distinct. Wings hyaline; 
marginal nervure thickened and slightly sinuate near the stigma; 
cubitodiscoidal nervure usually strongly sinuate but not appen- 
diculate, its bulla scarcely one fourth the width of the third dis- 
coidal cell from its apex ; two subtriangular opaque spots occur 
in the glabrous area of the cubitodiscoidal cell, the larger one 
with no arcuate continuation along the margin of the glabrous 
area, though a small chitinous line may be seen near the smaller 
spot. 

Legs honey yellow; abdomen strongly compressed, darker at 
the tip; first and second segments remarkably long and slender; 
claspers of male subtriangular, obliquely truncate, acute poste- 
riorly. 

Length about 22 mm, wing spread about 26 mm. Described 
from numerous examples. 

The cocoon is a silken, brown, tough, oblong oval object. 

Distribution. The recorded distribution of this insect is as 
follows: New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Virginia, Carolinas, Florida, Alabama, Illinois, Tndiana, Missouri, 
Iowa, Colorado, Arizona, Nevada, California and Canada. Ex- 
amples of this species from Georgia, Oi*egon and Washington, in 
addition to some of the states named above, occur in the collection 
of the Academy of Natural Sciences at Philadelphia. Specimens 
of this species are now before the writer from the following local- 
ities: Kansas; California; Virginia; Fox Point, Alaska [Harri- 
man Expedition '99] ; Flatbush N. Y., Victoria Tex., St Louis Mo., 
Durham N. H., and Arizona, all being in the collections of the 
United States National Museum. Specimens from Colorado, Ijas 
Vegas N. M., Cheyenne Wy., and Michigan were lent to the 
writer by Professor Gillette. Specimens from New York were 
received from Mr L. H. Joutel, and Mr W. W. Harrington kindly 
sent exami)les from Grimsby Ont. (taken June 6), Toronto (taken 
July 27, Aug. 24 and Sep. 3), Winnipeg (taken in June), Osoyoos 
B. C. (taken in May) and from Ottawa, Canada. Specimens 
from Maiden and Amherst Mass. (taken Aug. 1, 2, 12 and 21) 
were lent to us by Prof. C. H. Fernald. The species is doubtless 
distributed over the whole of the United States and the larger 
portion of Canada. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 111 

Bibliography 

1835 Say, Thomas. Bost Jour. Nat. Hist. 1:238-39 (Original descrip- 
tion) 

1883 Compl. Wr. LeConte ed. 2:C94 (Same as preceding) 

184li Bmlle, Augruste. Hist. Nat. Ins. Uymcnopt.. p.l41 (As O. later- 
alis) 
18(13 Norton, Edward. Ent Soc. Phila. Proc. 1:206, 358 (Distribution) 
1870 Kllcy, C. V. Ins. Mo. 2d Rep't, p.53, fig.25 (General notice) 

1870 8th Rep't, p.54, fig.38 (Parasite of Heliophila 

unipuncta, habitat, cocoon described) 

1878 Mass. State Bd Agric. 25th Rep't, p.252 (Parasite of H. 

unipuncta) 

1883 U. S. Ent Com. 3d Rep't. p.l28, pl.2, fig.5 (Parasite of H. 

unipuncta; eggs, habits of larva dc»scribed) 

1S88 N. J. State Bd Agric. 15th An. Rep*t 1887, p.523, flg.l (Men- 
tion) 

1875 Cresson, E. T. Geog. and Geol. Sur. Ter. Rep't. Zool. 5:708 (From 
eastern Nevada) 

1879 Provanchcr, VAbU L. Nat. Can. 11 :117 (Table of siHJcics of Ophiou 

description) 

1887 1G:34 

1889 19 :248 

1884 Caulllcld, F. B. Can. Ent. 16:122-23 (Parasite of Mamestra 

p i c t a ; cocoon described) 

1885 Ent. Soc. Ont. 15th Rep't, p.41 (Same as preceding) 

1887 Fletcher, James. Cen. Exp. Farm (Can.) Rep't, p.29 (Parasite of 

Schizura concinna) 

1888 Lugger, Otto. Uhlv. Minn. Bien. Rep't Regents, p.3G6-67, fig.31 

(Parasites ofH. unipuncta) 
1896 Ent. Minn. Agric. Exp. Sta. 2d Rep't, p.l7, fig.lO (Abundant 

in fields with army worm) 

1896 Minn. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bui. 48, p.45, 46 (Same as preceding) 

1890 Webster, F. M. U. S. Dep't Agric. Div. Ent. Bui. 22, p.46 (Reared 

from Scoliopteryx libatrix) 

1893 O. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bui. 45, p.lG9 

1890 Ashmcad, W. H. Col. Biol. Ass'n Bui. 1, p.43 (Listed) 

1890 Kilcy, C. V. & Howard, L. 0. Insect Life, 2:382 (Reared from 

Scoliopteryx libatrix) 
1890 — 2:155 (Bred from Mamestra trifolia, Schizura 

unicornis et al) 
1890 Packard, A. S. IT. S. Ent. Com. 5th Rep't. p.269 (Parasite of 

Schizura unicornis) 

1890 Smith, J. B. Cat. Ins. N. J. p,25 (Listed) 

19<X) Ins. N. J. List, p.580. ng.274 (As Enicospilus) 

1891 Harrington, W. W. Eut. Soo. Ont. 2lst R(»p't, p.67 (Parasite of 

army worm) 

1892 Osbom, Herbert. Part. Cat. Animals la. p.l5 (Listed) 

1896 Evans. Can. Ent. 28:10 (Listed) 

1897 Panton. Ent. Soc. Ont 27th Rep't, p.5l (PatasVle ol wtks -« wm^ 



112 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM ^ 

EniscopilnB arcnatns Felt 

This comparatively rare species may be easily separated from 
E. p u r g a t u 8 Say, with which it has heretofore been confused, 
by the well marked chitinous, usually yellowish, arcuate con 
tinuation of the larger 0[)aque spot in the cubitodiscoidal cell. 
This structure extends along the posterior boi"der of the glabrous 
area in that cell to a point beyond the smaller opaque spot, it 
may also be recognized by the bulla of the cubitodiscoidal cell 
being at a distance equal to one half the width of the third dis- 
coidal cell from the apex of the same [pi. 1]. 

This si)ecies was described in the February issue of PsyclK^, 
1902, page 307-8, and its characterization is reproduced herewith : 

Light fulvo- ferruginous, the larger oi)aque chitinous spot of the 
cubitodiscoidal cell with a distinct arcuate continuation extend- 
ing along the hinder margin of the glabrous area and partly 
around the smaller chitinous spot. 

Head medium, yellowish posteriorly, face yellowish, antennae 
slightly longer than the body; ocelli black, equidistant; mandi- 
bles bidentate, fuscus apically. Thorax, sericeous; mesothorax, 
convex; scutellum and postscutelluni, i)rominent, the former yel- 
lowish ; metathorax slightly depressed in front of the transverse 
carina; lateral carinae distinct. Wings hyaline, having hardh' a 
trace of the fuscus visible in Ophion (Eniscopilus) 
purgatus Say; marginal nervure slightly thickened and sin- 
uate near the small stigma ; cubitodiscoidal nervure, weakly 
sinuate, not api>endiculate; its bulla one half the width of the 
third discoidal cell from its apex; two subtriangular opaque spols 
in the glabrous area of the cubitodisc^oidal cell, the larger one 
with a chitinous, usually yellowish continuation along the hinder 
margin of the glabrous area to a point beyond the smaller 
chitinous spot, which latter is anterior and lateral of the center 
of the glabrous area. Legs, honey yellow. Abdomen, strongly- 
compressed, slightly darker at the tip, the first and second seg- 
ments being very slender. The clasi>ers of the male are rounded 
apically. 

Length about 23 mm. Wing spread from 30 to 35 mm. 

Habitat, Albany N. Y. May fJ, ISTG [ W. M. Hill] ; Ithaca N. Y., 
July 10, 1889 [J. M. Stedman] ; New York city [L. H. Joutel] ; 
Maiden Mass. [C. H. Fernald] ; Poughkeepsie N. Y. [Young, col- 
lector] ; South Britain Ct. 1884 [O. F. Pierce]. 



BBPOBT OF TUB STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 113 

There ai-e examples of this species from Cambndge Mass. in 
<he collection of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, and from 
(ieorgia and New Hampshire in the collection of the Academy of 
Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. There is a specimen in the col- 
lef-tionsof the United States National Museum labeled "Coll. C. V. 
Kiley," and one in the Bolter Collection at the University of Illi- 
nois fi'om Illinois. Types ai*e in the New York State Museum 
and also at Cornell University. 

Eniscopilns appendiculatus Felt 
This form is even rarer than the pi'eceding. It was originally 
described from one specimen which came into my possession 
through the kindness of Dr J. B. Smith, New Brunswick N. J. 
This specimen probiibly came from New Jei*sey and is deposited 
as a type in the New York State Museum. A study of the collec- 
tions of othei*s has revealed two specimens in the collections of the 
United States National Museum, one marked " Collec»tion C. V. 
Kiley " and the other " From Selnia, October 1880, W. U. Patton." 
This form is evidently southern in its habitat and it may be sepa- 
i*ated from the preceding species by the following characteristics 
which were given in the February issue of Psych€/1902y page 308: 

Light fulvo-ferruginous, hunger opaque spot of the cubitodisi'oi- 
dal cell with a small extension on its posterior angle. The smaller 
chitinous spot is nearly circular, light yellow in color and slightly 
posterior to the center of the glabrous area [pi. 2, fig. 4]. 

This species ditfei*s in jiddition to the alwve characteristics 
from the preceding one in having the cubitodiscoidal uervure 
slightly angled and not sinuate. It is a smaller form, having a 
length of 18 mm and a wiug spread of about 27 mm. 

Table of species of Ophion 
a Wings hyaline 

b Body usually strongly compressed, eyes large, extending nearly to the 
base of the mandibles 
c Medium size, metathorax not areolated, male clasps snbtriangu- 

lar 1) i I i n e a t u m Say 

cc Small, metathorax usually strongly areolated, male clasps short, 

rounded apically t i t y r i Pack. 

bb Body stout, not strongly compresse<l, eyes small, distant from base of 
mandibles 



114 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

c Cubitodiscoidal ncrvure usually not appendiculate 

d Ferruginous or fulvous bifoveolatum BrulW 

dd Ferruginous varied with black and venter of mesothorax usually 

black nigrovarium Prov. 

cc Cubitodl8(roidal nervure appendiculate, appendix extending into 

second discoidal cell abnormum Felt 

aa Wings subhyaline 

h Wings distinctly ferruginous ferruginipennis Felt 

66 Wings yellowish, fuscous along apical costal margin, .c o s t a 1 e Cress 

OpUon bilineatum Say 
TwO'lined OpMon 

This species, next to the long-tailed and purged Ophions, is the 
most abundant in collections and the one most frequently noticed 
in entomologic literature. It may be easily separated from the 
other more common forms by its medium to large size, strongly 
compressed abdomen, by the subtriangular, obliquely truncate 
male clasps and the appendiculate cubitodiscoidal nervure. 

Life history and habits. Very little is recorded concerning the 
life history and habits of this sijecies. Its comparative rarity in 
col le<;t ions is probably explained by its crepuscular or nocturnal 
habits, since our trap lantern rec*ord indicates that it is one of 
the most abundant forms attracted to light. 

Trap lantern records 



1889 





JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 




4 

1 


80 


3 


MM 

1 4 2124|25 


2627 28 29*30 31 


1 
12 


.8 
2.. 


4!5 6'7 


1 1 

81112 


1314 

37 Si 


"1!" 


1819 


Male 


1 


1 


ll'l 


1 


1 


. J.. 

4 4 

1 


..' Ij 1. 2 


1 .. 


1.. 

I 


4 
13 


3 8 


*!- 


Female. 


20 e' 8 » 


n,«. 



1889 


1892 




a&PTeHBEK 


UCT. 


ALO. _ 

_ __ '^ 


MAT 


JUNK 


eEPTEMDEB 






30 
21 


n 


. 


1 


1 1 

TiyT 


a7 2» 


SO 


m 


1 
1 
9 


2 


G 


10 


^ 


I 


30 


© 


U 
"l 


14 
1 


1. 


19 


» 


a 


«:•:-' 


1 


MiUe..., 


1+ 


K 




3ft 




1 


1 


1 


jl 


^ 


I 


I 


1 


ff 




1|« 


3 


n 


1 








Female 


] 


1 S 


•; 


13 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 115 

It will be seen by the aliove, that there is some indication of 
jx^riodicity in the captures, though nothing but what might be 
caused by more or less favorable weather or the relative abund- 
ance of the insects. There is certainly no indication of more than 
one brood. It will be noticed that this species flies most 
abundantly from about the middle to the last of September, and 
may be found on the wing till nearly the middle of October. 

Hosts. Very little is known regarding the species on which this 
insect preys. The record is so meager that one can only surmise 
as to the economic value of this parasite. It has been reared from 
Diacrisia virginica Fabr. Feltia gladiaria 
Morrison, and Glaea inulta Grote. Dr Howard has re- 
corded this species as possibly a parasite infesting N o t o 1 o- 
phus leucostigma Abb. & Sm. to a limited extent. This 
bi ief record suggests that this species may be parasitic on some of 
the arctians and noctuids, and while the former are not of much 
economic importance, such is not true of many of the latter, and 
in the control of these, this species may play an important part. 

Description. Fulvo-fcrruginous, stigma well developed, medium 
size to rather large; length of body about 19 mm; wing spread 
about 30 mm. 

Head medium, antennae as long or longer than the body; 
eyes and ocelli black; lateral ocelli a little distant from the 
eyes; dorsal and dorsocaudal aspect of head yellowish; man- 
dibles bidentate and tipi>ed with black. Mesothorax convex; 
scutellum and jmstscutellum prominent f metathorax with incon- 
stant raised lines. Wings hyaline w-ith a glabrous elliptic spot 
near the stigma in the cubitodiscoidal cell ; cubitodiscoidal nerv- 
lire appendiculate [pl.2, fig.3], legs honey yellow. Abdomen 
rather strongly comjiressed, frequently a little darker at the ex- 
tremity; male claspers subtriangular, obliquely truncate, and 
acute posteriorly. 

Described from numerous specimens. 

There are some very small repi-esentatives of (his species from 
the Adirondack mountains that approach closely in size and gen- 
eral af)j>earance the following form. They may be separated, 
however, by the relatively shorter, more compressed abdomen and 
by the thorax being as dark as other portions of the body. 

Bistribntion. This insect has a wide distribution over the 
United States and the southern portion of Canada, though it has 



116 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

not been reported from every state in the Union. Its recorded 
distribution is as follows: New England, New York, New Jersey, 
Virginia, Maryland, Districft of Columbia, Florida, Louisiana, 
Michigan, Iowa, Missouri, Colorado, Texas, Montana, Nevada, 
Lake Winnipeg and Sudbury, Ontario. 

Bibliography 

1828 ^Bay, Thomas. Mael. Lye. Arts Scl. CJontrib. p.75 (Original descrip- 
tion) 

18ar> Bost Jour. Nat Hist 1:248 (Mention) 

1883 c:ouipl. Wr. I^Conte ed. 1 :378 (Habitat Indiana) 

18C2 Crcsson, E. T. Ent. Soc. Phila. Proc. 1:206 (Usted) 

187a Am. Ent. Soc. Trans. 4:1G9 (In Texas) 

1875 Geog. and Geol. Sur. Ter. Rep't Zool. 5:708 (From eastern 

Nevada) 

18C3 Norton, Edward. Ent Soc. Pbila. Proc. 1:358 (DistrlbuUon) 

18m Sanborn, F. 6. Mass. State Bd. Agric. Rep't, p.lGO (B i 1 i n e a t u s 
mentioned) 

1871 Riley, C. V. Ins. Mo. 3d Rep't, p.C9 (Parasite of Spilosoma 
virginica) 
N. Am. Fauna' no. 7, p.247 (Sonoma county, Cal.) 

1879 Provanchcr, L'Ahhd L. Nat. Can. 11 : 117-18, flg.4 (Table of si>ecies, 
description) 

1887 1G:34 (Listed) 

1882 Packard, A. S. Bost. Soc. Nat. Hist Proc. 21:19 (O. tity ri sepa- 

rated from this species) 

1883 Saunders, William. Ins. Inj. Fruits, p.273, flg.282 (Parasite of 

Spilosoma virginica) 

1888 Lintncr, J. A. Ins. N. Y. 4th Rep't, p.205 (At Coeyman N. Y.) 

1889 Scuddcr, S. H. Butterflies of N. Eng. 3 : 1880, pl.88, fig.8 (O. t i t y r 1 

supposed to be a variety) 

1890 EUcy, C. V. & Howard, L. 0. Insect Life, 3 : 156 (Bred from G 1 a e a 

inulta and Agrotis morrisoniana, habitat) 
1890 Ashmcad, W. H. Col. Biol. Ass'n Bui. 1, p.43 (Listed) 
1890 Perking, C. H. Vt. State Bd. Agric. lltb Rep't, separate, p.lO 

(Mention) 

1890 Smith, J. B. Cat. Ins. N. J. p.25 (Not common at Caldwell) 

1891 Harrington, W. H. Ent. Soc. Ont. 21st Rep't, p.G7 (Parasite of 

white miller moths) 

1892 Osborn, Herbert. Part. Cat. Animals la. p.l5 (Common) 
1890 Evans, J. D. Can. Ent. 28:10 (Listed) 

1897 Howard, L. 0. U. S. Dep't Agric. Div. Ent. Bui. 5, Tech. Ser. p.30 
( Possibly a parasite of Orgyia leucostigma) 

Ophion tityri Pack. 
This 8i)ecies resembles O. bilineatum Say closely in ita 
general appearance, and it may be an earlier occurring diuior- 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



117 



phic form but we have no evidence of this and for the present it 
iiinst !h? regarded as a distinct species. It may be separated from 
the prcM-eding by its smaller size, relatively shorter and flatter 
al)d(>men, and by the ditTerence in the form of the male genitalia. 
Life history and habits. Comparatively little is known of the 
life history and habits of this insect, since it has been so fre- 
ipiently confiiw»d with O. b i 1 i n e a t u m . There appears to be 
but one published notice of this parasite since its description in 
1882, and in that it is not recognized as a distinct form. This 
species can hardly be regarded ai^ rare, since over 100 individuals 
were taken in the trap lantern experiments at Cornell University 
and it has been friH|ueutly colliK-ted by the writer and also met 
with in other colle<*tions. 



Trap lantern records 



1888 



May 



Miilo .... 


5 


7 


8i 9 

ll.... 


10 


11 14 
1 2 


15 

2 


-: 


17 

9. 


18 
4 


19 
10 


2 
3 


21 

4 


22 
2 


24 

1 
~1 


25 
~~3 
~9 


26| 28 

21 1 




1 


1 


*i 




(Vimile . . 


! ' 


' 


i; 3 


9 


i 


1 


7 


aj.... 





















1889 




















June 


July 


Aua. 




> 3; 4 »; «; 8 


n 


13 


16 


17 


19 


27 


1 


l{ 2 


8 


23 


31 


1 


2' IT 


Male 




i;...i 


2 
1 








1 

3 


1 






1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 






. 


1 


' ' * * 1 ' ■ ' ' ' ' 


Female . . 


i 


., i| .| . 


2 


'i ' 


2 


^1 ' 







1889 










1892 






















27 


Sep. ; ^ May 

1 "^ 


June 


July 


Aug. 


"3 


Male 


30 H 26 
39 


1 1 

... 1 


_4j_5 
1 1 
1 ... 




i 


J? 


21' 28 


1 


6 


IG 
2 


17 


25 


26 


»;, 


6 


1 

7 




1_ 




~3 


1 1 


1 


~i 


1 


1 


~1 




~1 




Female .. 


1' 79 1 


1 


; 1 


16 



118 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

A glance at the above table will show that this insei't has a well 
defined period of flight, and one Ihat does not overlap the time 
O. b i 11 n e a t n m is abroad, except in the ease of scattering 
individuals. This species appears early in May, is most abund- 
ant the latter part of the month, and occurs somewhat rarely 
during June with belated individuals in July, August and Sep- 
tember, while O. b i 1 i n e a t u m does not occur till August and 
then only in scattering numbei's till the latter part of the month. 
This marked difference in the time of flight between these two 
parasites indicates that either they are two broods of the same 
insect or else that they are distinct species. The structural differ- 
ence to be described later must be regarded as proofs of their 
distinctness. The large eyes and nmny individuals taken in the 
trap lantern indicate a crepuscular or nocturnal habit. 

Hosts. This parjisite has been reared from E pa r gy reus 
t i t y r u s Fabr. Prof. G. C. Davis, when at the Michigan Agri- 
cultural College Experiment Station, wrote us tliat he had bred 
the insect repeatedly from H a 1 i s i d o t a c a r y a e Harris and 
Symmerista albifrons Abb. & Sm. It is probably para- 
sitic on a number of other related insects. 

Description. Ferruginous or fulvo-ferruginous with frequently 
a decidedly fulvous tinge on the thorax, which latter is shorter 
and the abdomen considerably shorter than in O. b i 1 i n e a t u s . 

Face ferruginous, or laterally fulvous; head medium; mandibles 
bidentate, tipped with dark brown, clypeal fossae deep, antennae 
usually longer than the body ; the fossae at their bases not deep ; 
eyes large, reaching nearly to the base of the mandibles. Ocelli 
black, nearly contiguous and the posterior close to the eyes. 
Thorax short, ferruginous or fulvo-ferruginous; mesothorax con- 
vex; scutelhim and postscutellum prominent; metathorax usually 
with very prominent carinae inclosing deep, four sided areas, and 
the pedicel of the abdomen surrounded by a high carina. Wings 
hyaline; cubitodiscoidal nervure strongly appendiculate. First 
recurrent nervure only about one third the length of the second; 
bulla of the latter close to the cubitodiscoidal nervure, and that 
of the latter nearer the second discoidal nervure than the appen- 
dix. Legs long, fulvo-ferruginous; abdomen much shorter than in 
O. bilineatus, very strongly compressed and the posterior 
segments usually darker in color. Clasps of male subtriangular, 
obtusely rounded, length 14 mm, wing spread 26 to 30 mm. De- 
scrJhed from numerous spectimens of both sexes. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 119 

Distribution. This species is widely and probably generally dis- 
tributed in the northern United States and southern Canada. It 
was described from Massachusetts, has been met with in numbers 
at both Albany and Ithaca N. Y. and was repeatedly reared by 
Professor Davis in Michigan. In addition we have specimens be- 
fore us from New York city [Joutel] ; Ottawa, May 19, 24 and 
June 8, Toronto, August 24, Grimsby, June 6, Port Hope, May 5, 
and Vancouver Island, May 3, all from Canada through the kind- 
ness of Mr W. H. Harrington. 

Bibliography 

lvSS2 Packard, A. S. Bost. See. Nat. Hist. Proc. 21:19 (Original descrip- 
tion) 

1889 Scnddcr, S. H. Butterflies N. Eng. 3:1872, 1880, pl.88, flg.8 (As 
O. bilineatum; parasite of Epargyreus tityrus) 

Ophion bifoveolatum Brull6 

This species is one of the more common forms belonging to the 
genus and if one may judge from trap lantern records, it is 
largely diurnal and not crepuscular or nocturnal as in the case 
of some of its close allies. This conclusion is further borne out 
by the reduced size of the eyes, being decidedly smaller than in 
related species and distant from the mandibles. This species 
occurred in the trap lantern material taken at Ithaca in very 
small numbers compared to those of the closely allied Ophion 
bilineatum Bay. It has a somewhat exceptional host in 
white grubs, compared with other members of the genus and so 
far a6 known to us has not been reared from any other species. 

Description. Fulvo-ferruginous with small eyes distant from 
mouth; costal vein inclined to black; cubitodiscoidal nervure 
rarely appendiculate ; bulla of the second recurrent nervure 
a.snally close to tip of cubitodiscoidal nervure and abdomen less 
compressed than in its close allies. 

Head medium; face frequently fulvous laterally, broad; man- 
dibles stout with black tips; clyi^eal fossae deep and usually 
black; antennae dark brown, stout and not as long as the body; 
ocelli black and equidistant. Thorax sometimes dark brown, 
finely punctured and with sutures more or less black; meso- 
thorax convex; scutellum and postscutellum prominent, the 
former sometimes a light ferruginous; dorsum of metathorax ie 
usually smooth. Wings hyaline; stigma well devetep^^ ^^»\5^ 



120 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



and adjacent reins inclined to black; ciibitodim-oidal vein usually 
smoothly arched and rarely append icii late; bulla of second re- 
current nervure usually close to tip of cubitodiscoidal nervure 
[pi. 2, fig. 2]. T^gs uniformly ferruginous; claws pectinate. 
Abdomen sometimes slightly darker at tip and not strongly 
compressed but relatively thic l:er and shorter. Male clasps stout, 
rather long, obliquely rounded and rather acute at tip. 
length about 15 mm. Wing spread about 28 mm. 

This species occurs abroad during the latter part of May and 

very early in June. Spe<Mmens are at hand from Ottawa, Canada 

taken May 30 and June 6 [Harrington] ; Fort T^ee N.J. taken May 

29 [Joutel] ; Maiden Mass. taken May 4 [Fernald] ; Belfrage Tex., 

Washington D.C., taken in May [United States National 

Museum] besides various New York localities. This species has 

been re(H)rded from the following localities: Mt Washington 

N. H., New Jersey, New York, Illinois, Iowa, Colorado and Texas. 

The record of captures in trap lanterns at Ithaca in 1889 and 1892 

is given below : 

Trap lantern records 





1889 








1892 














MAY 


JUNK 


1 


MAY 




JUNE 








ti 


J? 


3 


4 


8 


21 


« 


30 


1 


2 


3 


8 


11 


10 


» 


28 




Male 














1 
1 






1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
















.... 










' 


""l 




Female 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


7 


3 


' 


1 


» 



Bibliography 

1846 Brnlle, Angnste. Hist. Nat. Ins. Hymenopt p.l38 (Description) 

1862 Cresson, E. T. Ent. Soc. Phila. Proc. p.206 (Listed) 
1865 4:284 (From Colorado) 

1873 Trans. 4:169 (From Texas) 

1863 Norton, Edward. Ent. Soc. Pliila. Proc. 1:358 (Specific characters) 
1874 Provancher, IJAhU A. Nat. Can. 6:103 (Table of species) 

1879 11 : 117 (Table of species), p.ll8 (Description) 

1890 Ashmead, W. H. Col. Biol. Ass'n Bui. 1, p.43 (Listed) 

1890 Smith, J. B. Cat. Ins. N. J. p.25 (Listed) 

1892 Osborn, Herbert. Part. Cat. Animals la. p.l5 (Listed) 

1892 Eiley, C. V. Ent. Soc. Wash. Proc. 2 : 134 ( Parasite of Lachnos- 

terna fusca) 
1891-92 Forbes, S. A. Ins. 111. 18th Rep't 1894, p.l25 (Parasite of white 
gi'ub) 

1890 111. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bui. 44, p.272 (Same as preceding) 

1S94 Slosson, A. T. Ent. News, 5:4 (In alpine regions of Mt Washington) 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 121 

Ophion nigrovarinm Prov. 
This 8[KH*ies is iindoiibtedly closely related to the preceding 
form, tliough we liave lK»en unable to examine the original type. 
A few siKJt'inieus from Colorado which we provisionally assigned 
to O . b i f o V e o 1 a t u m , aw exceptionally highly colored, and 
they pi'obably belong to this si>ecies; in which event we are In- 
clined to believe that it is but a variety of the preceding. A 
translation of the original description is as follows: 

^ I^*ngth .(> inch (ponce). Yellowish red varied with black. 
Head yellow; base and tip of the mandibles, two punctures on 
the top of the clypeus, the fossa at the insertion of the antennae, 
with the eyes are of a more or less deep brown. Eyes short, with 
almost no slojie alwve. Posterior ocelli distant from each other, 
!)ut close to the eyes. Antennae stout and short, brown. A 
puncture before the tegulae; the scutellum pale yellow. 
Thorax yellow; superior Imrder of the pi-othorax, base of the 
scutellum, base of the metathorax, its sutun^, up^KT sides of 
nu^sothorax, bas4* of the four [H)8terior coxae, black. Metathorax 
without distinct cariuae. Wings slightly smoky ; costal nervures 
brown, stigma yellow. Feet yellow, the anterior coxae in front 
and the jwsterior coxae l)ehind more or less spotted with bi-own. 
First and second segments of abdomen bi\>wn; the jKxsterior seg- 
ment also brown on the inferior border. 

$Of a clearer yellow than the S . Coxae entii'ely yellow, ex- 
cept in their articulation with the body. Base and extremity 
of abdomen of a deep shade of brown. Otherwise like the male. 
I^escTibed from two specimens. Inhabits Canada. [Xat. Van. 
6 :104] 

Ophion abnormuin n.sp. 

A single specimen of this form was received fi-om Colorado 
through the kindness of Prof. C. P. Gillette, who labeled it 
no. 2103. This species is veiy closely allied to what we have 
considered a light form of O. b i f o v e o 1 a t u m Brull^. 

Description. Fulvous, with indistinct f(Truginous markings on 
the thorax and abdomen, except thnt the doi'sum of the thorax 
has two distinct submedian fulvous lines and its lateral margins 
are al.so bordered by strii^es of the same color. Wing spread 
18 mm, length of body about 15 mm. 

Head medium, face short, man<]ibles bidentate, tipped with 
dark brown or black; clyi)eal fossae deep, dark brown; antennae 
slightly shorter than the body; eyes blaek, small, somewhat dis- 



122 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

tant from the mandibles. Ocelli glassy or black, well separated 
and the jiosterior ones distant from the eyes; thorax glassy; 
mesothorax convex; scutellnm and {Kystscutellum conspicuous; 
metathorax evenly rounded with no carinae. Wings hyaline; 
nervures and stigma brown, the latter with fulvous markings; 
cubitodiscoidal nervure plainly appendiculate, the appendix ex- 
tending into the second discoidal cell ; bulla of second recurrent 
nervure close to the cubitodiscoidal nervure, and that of the 
latter nearly equally distant between the appendix and the sei^ond 
recurrent nervure [pi. 2, fig. 5]. Legs ferruginous; claws pec- 
tinate; abdomen stout, not strongly compressed. 

Described from one female from Colorado. 

Ophion ferruginipennis n. sp. 
One example of this unique form was in the collection of the 
United States National Museum and through the kind forbear- 
ance of Dr Ashmead its characterization has fallen on the writer. 
Another specimen was taken by Mr L. II. eToutel in the vicinity of 
New York city. 

Description. Ferruginous; wings ferruginous and with a spread 
of about 40 nmi; metathorax strongly areolated in much the same 
way as in O. t i ty ri Pack. 

Head medium; mandibles bidentate; black apically; clypeal 
fossae deep; antennae nearly as long as the body. The fossae at 
their bases are well marked. Eyes large, extending nearly to the 
mandibles; ocelli black and the posterior pair almost contiguous 
to the eyes; thorax sericeous; mesothorax convex; scutellum and 
postscutellum prominent. Metathorax with two well developed 
transverse carinae and a number of longitudinal ones radiating 
from the insertion of the first abdominal segment. Wings sub- 
hyaline with a distinct ferruginous and, in places, fuscous tinge, 
specially at their base and along the anterior margins. Cubito- 
discoidal vein with its appended vein stub extending one third 
across the cell from the well marked angle; bulla of second re- 
current nervure a little distance from the cubitodiscoidal vein 
f pl.2, fig.l] . Legs light ferruginous, concolorous ; claws pectinate ; 
abdomen strongly compressed and somewhat darker at the tip. 
Length about 25mm, wing spread about 40 mm. 

Described from two females. One is in the collection of the 
L'^nited States National Museum and the other in tbe New York 
State Museum, 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 123 

Ophion costale Cresson^ 

This rare sj>ecies is represented by only one individual, the 
iyiMi being in Mr Cresson's collection. It may be that this form 
is but a sport, though at present we can do no better than to allow 
it to stand as a distinct species. 

Description. Female. " Fulvo-ferruginous, shining, face broad, 
the middle closely punctured, subtuberculate immediately be- 
neath base of antennae;. clypeus strongly punctured, tips trun- 
cate, lateral sutui-es and tips of mandibles black ; cheeks swollen ; 
antennae shorter than usual, reaching about to tip of second ab- 
dominal segment; mesothorax convex, polished; scutellum very 
convex; metathorax confluently punctured, without transverse 
carina, sutures of thorax narrowly black; wings subhyaline, 
staineil with yellowish at base and with fuscous along apical 
costal margin, darkest at tip of marginal cell; basal margin of 
third and fourth abdominal and an oblique mark on sides of 
second segment, black." I^ength 13 mm. Habitat: Klamath 
county, Cal. 

" Readily distinguished from all other sjKJcies known to me by 
the ornamentation of the wings." [Cresson] 

Oenophion n. gen. 

This genus is projmsed to include certain forms remarkable for 
the development of the lower portions of the head, resulting in a 
very elongate face and considerable distance between the normal 
sized eye and the base of the mandible. This is specially marked 
in Oenophion gilletti Felt, the generic tyj)e. 

Table of species 

a Wlugs fulvo-fulij^inoiis gilletti Felt 

aa Wings with a distinct fulvous tinge coloradensls Felt 

Oenophion gilletti n. sp. 

This small form resembles O. coloradensls Felt, but may 
be easily separated from it by its shorter antennae, longer face 
and the dark fuscous coloration of the wings. It is described 
from one female from Colorado, no. 2565, kindly sent me by Prof, 
r. P. Gillette, in whose honor it is named. 

Description. Dark ferruginous, with the head and thoracic 
Butures black and the wings tinged with dark fuscous. Wing 
spread about 18 mm, length of body 9 mm. 



'1878 Cresson, E. T, Acad. Nat Scl. Phila. Proa p.306. 



124 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

Head large, face very long with a large, evenly rounded labrum ; 
mandibles stout, bidentate, tipped with dark brown or black, and 
with black at the extreme baae ; clypeal fossae black and almost 
connected with the base of the mandibles by black impressed 
lines; antennae shorter than the body, stout and with the first 
joint of the flagellum much longer and more slender than the 
second; antennal fossae ringed with black and with a conspicu- 
ous, impressed, black area above; eyes rather small, distant from 
the base of the mandibles ; ocelli glassy or black, the two lateral 
distant from the eyes and each connected therewith by a deep, 
impressed, black line. Thorax glassy with deeply impressed, jet- 
black sutures; mesothorax highly convex; scutollum and post- 
scutellum prominent; metathorax smoothly rounded and with 
no well developed carinae. Wings distinctly f ulvo-ferruginous ; 
cubitodiscoidal nervure uniformly arching, not appendiculate ; 
first recurrent nervure less than one fourth the length of the 
second ; bulla of the second recurrent nervure close to the cubito- 
discoidal nervure, and that of the latter distant from the second 
discoidal nervure by one half its length. Legs uniformly fer- 
ruginous, except the trochanter segments which are black at their 
base; claws pectinate; abdomen sti'ongly compressed, first seg- 
ment slender and gradually enlarging at its apical fourth. 

Gknophion coloradensh n. sp. 
This is a small form having somewhat the general appearance 
of O. t i t y r i Pack., but differing from it in a number of par- 
ticulars. It is described from two female specimens in the col- 
lection of the United States National Museum. 

Description. Ferruginous with the thoracic sutures black, wings 
tinged with fulvous, wing spread 20 mm, length 9 mm. 

Head medium; face long; mandibles bidentate, tipped with 
dark brown or black; clypeal fossae deep, dark brown; antennae 
about as long as the body, the fossae at their bases well marked 
and ringed with dark brown. Eyes medium, distant from the 
mandibles. Ocelli glassy or black, nearly contiguous, distant 
from the eyes ; thorax sericeous, with black sutures ; mesothorax 
convex; scutellum and postscutellum prominent. Metathorax 
with three well developed carinae, one dorsal, two lateral, radi- 
ating from the insertion of the firet abdominal segment. Wings 
subhyaline, with a distinct fulvous tinge, specially on the hind 
wings. Cubitodiscoidal vein variably appendiculate (in one only 
a notch and in the other well marked) ; first recurrent nervure 
less than one half the length of the second; bulla of second recur- 
rent nerMire near cubitodiscoidal nervure, that of the latter at 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 125 

proximal third of distance from the appendix to the second recur- 
rent nervure. I^gs light ferruginous, basal articulations variably 
marked with dark brown, claws pectinate. Abdomen strongly 
compressed, first segment slender, gradually enlarging at apical 
third. 

Described from two females from Colorado. 

INJURIOUS INSECTS 

Chrysanthemum lace J)ug 

Corythuca Inarmorata Uhler 

Ord. Hemiptera Family Tingitidae 

Members of this family have been characterized by Professor 
Comstock, in the following terms : " Dainty as fairy brides are 
these tiny, lace-draped insects. One glance at the fine, white 
meshes that cover the wings and spined thorax is sufficient to 
distinguish them from all other insects, for these are the only 
ones that are clothed from head to foot in a fine white Brussels 
net." This very fitting description applies to all members of the 
family, and where such insects are found on chrysanthemums, 
they are very likely to be this species. This group is not only 
unusual in appearance, but is also one rarely brought to the 
attention of the economic entomologist. This is particularly true 
of the species under consideration, concerning which compara- 
tively little is known. It was described in 1878 from North 
Carolina but with no indication of its food habits. The next 
re<*ord apj)ears in 1898 and relates to an attack the preceding 
yoar on chrysantliemiuns in Alabama. 

This insect was brought to our notice last July by Mr Harry 
6lauvelt of CoeymsLU, who stated that it had caused considerable 
injur}' the past two or three years, and that he feared a repetition 
of the attack this season. His brother, Mr Egbert Blauvelt, 
observed that it bred abundantly on ragweed and also on some 
other which he was unable to identify. Specimens of the insect 
were colonized on potted plants and the accuracy of the complaint 
established beyond question. The little pests fed vigorously on 
the foliage, laid numerous eggs, many young developed and soon 



126 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

one plant after another assumed an unhealthy appearance and 
died. The attack was characterized in particular by a discolora- 
tion of the leaves accompanied by a dark spotting, due to excre- 
ment, and the cast skins of the young were also abundant. The 
general appearance of a badly infested leaf is shown on plate 3. 

Life history. The breeding of this insect was placed in Mr C. M. 
Walker's charge, but owing to pressure of other work he was 
unable to give it all the attention desirable. He learned, however, 
that the eggs were laid on the underside of the leaf, being thrust 
under the epidermis along the larger leaves and veins, leaving 
only the small, yellowish, conical cap in sight. The eggs soon 
hatch and the young develop rapidly, since between June 11 and 
23 a life cycle was nearly completed. The feeding of the insect 
causes white, irregular blotches to ai)pear, and if the attack is at 
all severe, withering of the leaves. The various molts follow each 
other quickly and the cast skins soon become so abundant as to 
give the impression of a bad infestation, whereas only a few 
bugs may be present. The insects are very active and pass readily 
from one plant to another, though none of the adults were 
observed to fly. 

Description. This species has been the object of considerable 
study, and the following descriptions and the original illustrations 
were made under our direction by Mr C. ^I. W«alker. It is be- 
lieved that all stages are dc^cril^ed below iliough they wen* not 
obtained by close breeding. 

Egg [pl.4, fig.l]. length about .5 mm, width .25 mm. Ovate, 
somewhat fusiform; visible tip truncate, collared, within which is 
a small, yellowish, ridgiMl conical cap which is disj)laced by the 
young when it emergi^. 

Stage 1, TiCngth .5 mm, breadth one third of length; antennae 
stout, with numerous long spines; three segmented, the terminal 
segment being about twice the combined length of the first and 
second. Legs stout, and about as long as the insect. There are 
simple spines arising directly from the body [pl.4, fig.26], and 
also much shorter, compouiul ones originating from cone-shaped 
bases [pl.4, fig.2a]. Each, abdominal segment bears on its lateral 
margin a single somewhat trumpet-shaiMxl, compound spine on 
a conical base [pl.4, fig.3] . Two oval openings occur on the dorsal 
line of the {posterior margin of the third and fourth abdominal 
segments. These may possibly be analogous to the odoriferous 
glands which occur in certain other species of Heteroptera. 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 127 

Stage 2 [pl.4, fig.4]. Length 1 mm, width .4 mm. Form 
broader in proportion to length than in the first stage, and the 
legs are much shorter. The chief difference between this and the 
preceding stage, is in the size and number of spines. The dorsal, 
compound spines, which in stage 1 arose from conical bases, have 
become much thickened, taper to a point and are about one fourth 
the length of their bases, which latter are enormously developed 
and thickly studded with chitinous projections [pl.4, fig.Sa]. The 
long simple spines arising directly from the body, are shorter and 
their bases narrow [pl.4, fig.56]. The marginal, compound spines 
of each abdominal segment have lost all resemblance to their 
previous form. Their rugose, spined bases have become thickened 
and are about twice the length of the spine, which latter is nar- 
rowed to a, sharp point. 

Stage S. Length 1 mm, width .5 mm. The terminal segment 
of the antenna is about two and one half times the combined 
length of segments 1 and 2. In this stage the compound dorsal 
spines mentioned in the preceding have apparently suffered little 
change, but their bases have increased five times the length of the 
spines, and are correspondingly stouter and rougher [pl.4, fig.Ta]. 
The simple spines situated near these latter have not changed 
much, though they are somewhat longer than in stage 2 [pl.4, 
fig.76]. The bases of the lateral abdominal, compound spines are 
four times the length of the spines [pl.4, fig.8a], which latter 
have not changed in appearance. Contiguous to these, singly or 
in pairs, are other shorter compound spines on conical projections 
about twice their own length [pl.4, flg.86]. 

Stage 4 [pl.4, fig.9]. Length 1.5 mm, width .75 mm. Form 
ovate, tapering anteriorly. Head nearly as wide as long, obtusely 
rounded with the lateral margins behind the eyes arcuate, hind 
angles rounded. Antennae four segmented, segment 3 a little 
longer than the fourth, which is about equal to the combined 
length of 1 and 2, the last being about one half the length of 
the first. Rostrum stout, dark at tip and extending to about the 
base of the first abdominal segment. Head, bearing four groups 
of compound spines on tubercles or bases of varying size and length 
arranged as follows : a median pair at the anterior margin ; three 
directly back of these, the central one being smaller; two groups 
of five of various lengths, each a little behind the eye and halfway 
between the median line and the lateral margin. A long simple 
spine is also found at the base of each of these groups. 

Prothorax tapering anteriorly, three times as broad as long; 
with two median pairs of grouped compound spines at about 
equal distance from the anterior and posterior margins, the 
anterior pair with two smaller spines at their bases. Laterally 
there is a group of three compound spines at the apical a\i^^ 



128 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

of the prothorax, the central one largest, and another of five at 
the posterior angle, three being much larger than the others. 
The wing pads are seen for the llrst time and extend to th^ 
anterior margin of the second abdominal segment. There are 
two sublateral groups, each consisting of two compound spines, 
one larger, one smaller and a simple one, near the posterior 
margin of the mesothorax. The anterior lateral margin is armed 
with a stout spine similar to that on the preceding segment, and 
on the posterior angle there is a group of five compound spines 
similar to those on the prothorax. 

The abdomen consists of 10 segments, numbers 2 and 3 having 
a single lateral spine, while segments 4 to 8 are each ornamented 
with lateral groups of three compound spines [pl.4, fig.lO], one 
being nearly twice the length of the other two. Segment 9 bears 
only one on each side. There is also a slender, hairlike spine of 
considerable length at the base of each group of spines on seg- 
ments 2 to -8. Segments 2, 5, 6, 8 and 9 each bear a median pair 
of long, stout, compound spines [pl.4, fig.lla], each of which, with 
the exception of those on segments 2 and 9, has a simple spine 
at its base [pl.4, fig.116]. The so called odoriferous glands appear 
as in the younger stages on the dorsum of the third and fourth 
segments. Certain extremely minute projections, with enlarged 
extremities are scattered over the body, arising directly from its 
surface. There are also more numerous chitinous points gener- 
ally distributed and which give the body a brownish appearance. 

Stage 5. r^ength about 2 mm, width nearly 1 mm. The first 
two segments of the antennae are about equal in length. The 
third is longest and not quite twice the length of the fourth 
[pl.4, fig.l3]. The wing pads extend to the fifth segment of the 
abdomen, which latter is nearly fusiform, tapering anteriorly 
from the extremity of the wing cases. The dorsal spines are 
relatively much larger and more specialized and the lateral 
groups on the thorax and abdomen, excepting the last segment 
of the latter, are distinctly pediceled [pl.4, fig.l2]. This is also 
true of the anterior median pair of the prothorax, which almost 
coalesce, and of the median pair of the mesothorax. 

The original description of the adult is as follows: "Form 
smilar to that of T. arcuata Say. Body black, the humeral 
region and pleural margins sometimes paler, or piceous; the 
venter polished, minutely, transversely wrinkled. Bucculae 
highly elevated, white; antennae slender, the apical joint some- 
times dusky. Pronotal vesicle high, extending far forward, regu- 
larly arching over the head, abruptly compressed anteriorly for 
more than half its length; the meshes large, two larger ones 
occupying the basal breadth; the nervures more or less em- 
browned, that of the middle carinate, much elevated, entire. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 . 129 

Most of the nervures with short spines, which in some specimens 
are obsolete. Lateral lobes of pronotum short, prominent, semi- 
circular, having the same curve anteriorly as posteriorly; nar- 
rower than the base of the hemelytra, with large, rather regular 
cells; the nervures of the middle tinged with brown; a brown 
spot exteriorly and sometimes a second spot at the posterior 
margin ; the marginal spines long and slender. Processus divided 
into cells as far as the tip; only the base of the lateral margin 
elevated, the middle carina high, not so high as the pronotal 
vesicle, gradually declining to the tip, the base arched, bearing 
two large areoles surmounted by a series of smaller ones, the 
upper edge spinous. Raised margin of the sternum whitish, the 
metastemum circular, auriculate each side. Legs pale honey 
3'ellow, embrowned at tip and on the tarsi. Hemelytra rather 
quadrangular, with the basal angles very acute, very widely re- 
moved from the pronotal lateral lobes, the basal margin distinctly 
concave; lateral margins spinous until a little beyond the middle, 
the tips widened, bluntly, broadly rounded; areoles large, next 
to the apical series is a transverse row of three or four very large 
ones, usually connected with another large one in front exteriorly; 
vesicular elevations small, with a high carina, spinous, bearing 
posteriorly a brown spot ; a brown spot exteriorly near the basal 
angle, another submarginal near the middle, and a broad brown 
band at tip which omits the subapical series of large areoles. 
Length, 3 mm. Breadth at base of hemelytra, l^^ mm." 

Bemedies. This little pest being a sucking insect, can be con- 
trolled only in two ways. Clean culture will probably prove the 
most effective method of checking its depredations, since it would 
mean the destruction of weeds and various plants on which the 
insect could breed. There is little probability of the pest develop- 
ing in large numbers if the vicinity of a chrysanthemum field is 
kept clear of weeils. The pest may be severely checked, if not 
nearly destroyed by thorough spraying with a whale oil soap 
solution, using 1 j>ound to 9 gallons of water, according to Mr 
Egbert Blauvelt. It is very probable that i)yrethrum powder, or 
better still, hellebore could be used wherever a limited number of 
plants require treatment. 

Bibliography 

1878 Uhlcr, P. H. Bost. Soc. Nat Hist Proc. 19:415-16 (Original descrip- 
tion) 

1808 Howard, 1. 0. U. S. Dep't Agric. Div. Ent Bui. 10, n. s. p.99 (Inju- 
ries in Alabama) 



130 NEW YORK STATB MUSEUM 

NOTES FOR THE YEAR 

The seaBon of 1903 Las been marked in particular by an un- 
usually severe outbreak of plant lice of various species, some of 
which continued their depredations over an abnormally extended 
period. These insects were so destructive and generally present 
on vaidous plants in different sections, that observations relating 
thereto have been grouped under a separate head. Species depre- 
dating on other plants and products of value, have been grouped 
under convenient headings for the purpose of facilitating ready 
reference to the various accounts. 

Plant lice 

The season of 1903 may well be remembered on account of the 
exceeding abundance of these little insects, particularly of species 
of economic importance. This is an exceedingly interesting 
group, and their almost absolute helplessness and enormous pro- 
lificacy illustrate one of nature's provisions against the extermi- 
nation of a species. Despite their apparent weakness, these little 
creatures are well able to hold their own, as many farmers know 
to their cost. This group is at present represented in America by 
the relatively large number of 325 species, as given by Professor 
Hunter in a recently issued list. 

The conditions which control the abundance of these forms are 
not well understood, though in all probability they are largely 
climatic, supplemented by the beneficial work of various natural 
enemies. Some believe that dry weather is favorable to the in- 
crease of these little insects, and others attribute their abnormal 
development to a certain amount of moisture. It is very probable 
that a protracted dry spell, if not accompanied by excessive dust, 
is favorable to the development of a large number of species, and 
that violent rains at intervals, specially if they occur before the 
foliage is curled by the work of the pests, is very destructive to 
these little creatures. On the other hand, it is quite possible that 
a certain amount of moisture is desirable, and that the reports 
of certain persons, who have noted a coincidence between the ap- 
pearance of rains and the development of these forms, may be 
correct 



REPORT or THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 131 

It is undoubtedly true that natural enemies, prominent among 
which are ladybugs, syrphus flies and laoewing flies, serve as very 
useful checks on this interesting group of insects. Repeated 
observations in different countries, and extending over a series of 
years, have demonstrated that these insects multiply enormously 
during periods when plant lice are unusually abundant, and 
though it may require some time for the natural enemies to over- 
take their hosts, this is bound to occur in course of time. 

The attack of 1903 was not only characterized by excessive 
severity but also by an undue prolongation ; and this latter may 
have been in part due to unusual rains, which were not favorable 
to the comparatively unsheltered natural enemies and hindered 
their gaining an ascendancy over their hosts. The explanation 
for this is that the plant lice, before the appearance of the rains, 
had ample opportunity to curl the leaves and therefore provide 
themselves with shelter from almost any inclement weather. 
These retreats affordted admirable breeding places from which the 
insects could emerge and attack adjacent foliage, so that the 
usual destructive influence of showers would be modified to a 
considerable extent; on the other hand, the larger predaceous 
enemies would hardly reap an equal benefit from this protection, 
and consequently would be delayed in gaining the ascendancy. 

Appletree plant lice (Aphis m a 1 i Linn, and others) . These 
species commonly occur in greater or less numbers throughout 
the orchards of the State, and their abnormal increase depends 
on favorable climatic or other conditions. Such was character- 
istic of the spring and early summer of 1903, and as a result 
injuries by these species were not only much more marked than 
usual but also prolonged to a much later date. The worst af- 
fected trees, which were usually young, presented a very charac- 
teristic appearance, and the injury was so severe that very little 
growth was possible. Such a large amount of honeydew was ex- 
creted that the foliage was almost entirely blackened, and an 
examination of many trees showed that the growing tips were 
literally covered by hungry plant lice anxious to reach a tender 
spot. The severity of the attack began to be evident about the 
last of May, and was more so in June, continmiig m SxsX-j^ ^lAm 



132 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

some cases at least the plant lice were extremely abundant even 
to the middle of August. The worse infested trees lost a con- 
siderable portion of their foliage; the development of the fruit 
was severely checked in some instances and many trees were seri- 
ously injured. Complaints were received from a number of cor- 
respondents in different sections of the State, and almost every 
observer agreed in holding plant lice responsible for severe dam- 
age. Some quince bushes in Genesee county were reported by Mr 
J. F. Rose as bearing a mass of black, rolled leaves the latter part 
of June, and the observer in Dutchess county characterized the 
attack as being more severe than had been known for 10 years. 
The conditions in the nursery were no better than in the orchard, 
and a correspondent reports that plant lice obliged him to keep 
a gang of 15 or 20 men and boys at work continuously in the 
nursery with a whale oil soap solution, and some other nursery- 
men found themselves almost unable to cope with the insects, so 
severe and general was the injury. 

Plant lice, as is well known, must be controlled by the use of 
contact insecticides, the most valuable of which for present pur- 
poses are a whale oil soap solution, tobacco water and kerosene 
emulsion. Sonje growers prefer the tobacco solution to any other 
and attribute greater effectiveness to it, while others have ob- 
tained excellent results with a whale oil soap solution. The latter, 
in the case of the appletree plant louse, should be used at a 
strength of 1 pound to 6 gallons of water, or even 1 to 4, and in 
any case great care should be exercised to secure thorough treat- 
ment. The kerosene emulsion may be used in the same way as 
the whale oil soap solution, and in case of severe attacks the 
standard emulsion may be diluted with but 6 or 7 parts of water, 
since it is better to scorch the foliage a little than to allow many 
of the insects to escape. 

The severe and protracted injuries by plant lice led us to ex- 
periment with whale oil soap solution, 1 pound to 4 gallons, for 
the purpose of testing its effectiveness on the pest and also the 
liability of injuring the foliage. Apple twigs covered with the 
insects were dipped into the solution July 28, and on the 30th it 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 133 

was found that all were killed, while repeated observations up to 
Sep. 8 failed to reveal any injury to the leaves. We are, how- 
ever, inclined to believe that it is more important to make a very 
thorough application than to use a strong insecticide, and would 
therefore emphasize the former most strongly. 

Cherry plant louse (Myzus cerasi Fabr.) . This common 
species is likewise generally distributed throughout the State, 
and always occurs in greater or less numbers on cherrytrees. 
The past season has been marked by an excessive abundance of 
this insect, and in some cases sweet cherrytrees have been very 
seriously injured. We recall, for example, certain trees in Chau- 
tauqua county, which were so badly infested, that nearly one 
third of the leaf-bearing portion of twigs had the foliage so badly 
affected that it curled, died and dropped, and after a time new 
leaves were developed in their place. This injury was so great 
that one or two trees died, probably as an indirect result of the 
severe drain made on their vitality. The presence of these plant 
lice in large numbers began to be apparent the middle of May 
and continued through June and even into early July. Eeports of 
injuries were received from a number of counties in widely 
separated sections of the State, and were also observed by us in 
various localities. 

Thorough spraying, as in the case of other species, is the only 
method of controlling this insect, and when applications are 
necessary they should be timely so that the insects can not curl 
leaves and thus obtain shelter from the spray. 

Cabbage aphis (Aphis brassicae Linn.). This species 
is usually present in small numbers on various cruciferous plants, 
and only occasionally does it attract much attention on account 
of its abnormal abundance and consequent injury. Mr J. F. 
Rose of South Byron states that about the middle of August it 
was so abundant on early cabbages as to give them a white appear- 
ance, and Mr George S. Graves of Newport, Herkimer co., reports 
it as being numerous on turnips in early August. This species 
was observed by us in very large numbers on rape at Kinderhook 
the early part of the season. The insects were so abundant aa \<^ 



134 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

give a whitish color to portions of the plant and rendered walk- 
ing through the field extremely disagreeable. 

Chaitophorus aceris. The Nor^'ay maple has enjoyed up to 
recent years comparative immunity from insect pests, and it was 
therefore a serious disappointment to its admirers when this 
species of plant louse injured it so seriously in the last two or 
three years. The damage by this species has gradually increased, 
and whereas in 1900 or thereabouts many of the trees had their 
foliage somewhat disfigured by the sooty fungus growing in the 
honeydew and drops of this sticky substance occasionally fell on 
passersby or moistened the sidewalk beneath, in 1903 some of 
these unfortunate trees had their foliage almost ruined by this 
pest. Many of the leaves were so badly curled that they pre- 
sented only about one fourth of the usual surface, and this maple 
instead of being an object of beauty, was a monument of misery 
and an eyesore on the landscape. This was true not only about 
Albany but in various sections of the State. This plant louse 
can be controlled by thoroughly spraying with a contact insecti- 
cide, such as whale oil soap, taking special pains to hit the ineects 
on the undersurface of the leaves, and it looks as though some 
such treatment would have to be adopted in coming years if we 
are to keep this shade tree in good condition. This species was 
the cause of more complaint and incidentally gave more employ- 
ment to parties oi)erating a spraying outfit in Troy, than even 
the notorious elm leaf beetle (Galerucella luteola 
Miill.). 

Elm aphis (Callipterus ulmifolii Mon.) . This deli- 
cate species occurs somewhat generally on our American elms, 
and occasionally becomes exceedingly injurious, as was demon- 
strated in 1897 and again in 1903. This little plant louse was 
so abundant on many trees during the past summer that the 
foliage became badly smeared by the honeydew, lost its color and 
all but failed to perform its proper functions. This condition 
was somewhat general in the vicinity of Albany, at Palatine 
Bridge in the Mohawk valley, and a similar state of affairs was 
reported from Ogdensburg, St Lawrence co. The most of the 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 135 

damage appears to be inflicted in the latter part of June and 
during July. 

Drepanosiphuin acerifolii Thos. This delicate and really beauti- 
ful species when examined under a magnifying glass, is capable 
of causing considerable injury to various species of maple. Its 
work on hard maple was observed by us last July at Nassau, 
where it evidently caused considerable dropping of the foliage, 
and the young were to be found here and there along the veins 
on the underside of the leaves. Nearly full grown specimens are 
remarkable for being incrusted with a whitish secretion which 
nearly covers them. This species was met with by us in consider- 
able numbers on maples at Saratoga, where it has likewise caused 
some dropping of the leaves and injured the foliage to a con- 
siderable extent. It was also reported by Mr George S. Graves, 
as being on several varieties of maple at Newport, Herkimer 
CO., where it caused much dropping of foliage, and it was 
observed by Mr Young in small numbers at Poughkeepsie. 

Box elder plant louse (Chaitophorus negundinis 
Thos.). A number of specimens of what we believe to be this 
species, was submitted for examination by Mr George S. Graves 
of Newport, Herkimer co., who stated that it was exceedingly 
abundant and destructive to box elder or ash-leafed maples in 
that vicinity. The attack was first observed in early June and 
continued till September, possibly later. It is probably the 
same species which we observed at work in large numbers the 
latter part of September on some box eldertrees at Nassau. 

Beechtree blight (Pemphigus imbricator Fitch). 
This plant louse was exceedingly abundant on some beechtrees 
at Newport N. Y. Our correspondent, Mr George S. Graves, sent 
examples under date of Oct. 29, and from the appeamnce of the 
twigs we judge that the insect was pi'esent in enoimous numbers, 
and had the attack been earlier in the season, it would un- 
doubtedly have caused considerable injury. Mr Graves observed 
the habit of this species of clustering on the underside of the 
twigs, and adds that moderately cold weather does not seem 
to affect them^ since an inch of snow was seen on the hillside 



136 NEW YORK STATB MUSBUM 

only a short distance away, and the temperature during the pre- 
ceding two days had been quite cold. 

Wooly beech aphis (Phyllaphis fagi Linn.) . This in- 
sect has been unusually numerous on purple beech foliage in 
Washington park, where it was found in very large numbers, 
July 4. Its depredations on the same tree in Westchester county 
have also been brought to our attention. 

Birch aphis (Callipterus bet u 1 aecolen s Mon.). 
This little species is particularly injurious to the cut-leaved 
birch, and is occasionally very abundant. It was reported as 
being quite destructive at Newport, Herkimer co., by Mr George 
S. Graves, and evidences of its work were found by Mr Young 
at Poughkeepsie in the middle of July. The latter trees showed 
very plainly that the insect had been exceedingly abundant, since 
the foliage was badly discolored and well smeared with honey- 
dew. We also observed the work of this insect in the vicinity 
of Albany, and 8i)ecimens of very badly infested twigs were sub- 
mitted for examination by Mr E. P. Van Ness of East Green- 
bush. In this instance, as in the preceding, the attack was a 
very severe one and the tree had undoubtedly suffered greatly 
throughout July, if not earlier in the season. Some of the leaves 
bore a number of pupae of the two spotted ladybug, A d a 1 i a 
bipunctata Linn., w^hich had evidently fed on the plant lice, 
and reduced their numbers very largely. 

Pemphigus popularius Fitch. This species is rarely brought to 
notice, though a few infested leaves of the balm of Gilead, 
Populus balsamiferus, wei-e received from Lake Clear 
Junction through Mr C. R. Pettis. The leaves were drawn together 
and had much waxy matter on their surfaces, giving them the 
appearance of having been coated with a whitish powder. In 
some instances the insects foiiued a series of pseudogalls on the 
upper side of tlie leaves. The cavity pi-oduced by drawing the 
leaf together contained numerous winged plant lice, a few nymphs 
and many cast skins. Mr I'ettis states that all the trees in the 
vicinity were alfected by this species. Another poplar-infesting 
specties, Chaitophorus populicola Thos., was met with 
in considerable numbers on the common aspen at Kamer, July 24, 



REPORT OP THB STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 137 

Fruit tree insects 

Flam cnronlio (Gonotrachelus nenuphar Herbst). 
This little enemy of stone finiita is prevalent to a greater or 
less extent in most orchards of this State, and occasionally causes 
considerable injury. It is remarkable for existing in some locali- 
ties in such small numbers as to cause practically no damage, 
while in others a large proportion of the crop would be ruined 
unless collecting or other repressive measures were employed. 
Recent experiences by several growers in the State, go far toward 
showing that thorough and early spraying of the foliage with 
an arsenical poison affords considerable protection from this pest. 
This method is preferred by many to the more laborious one of 
collecting the beetles and is certainly worthy of further trial. 

Diplotaxis liberta Germ. This species is rarely brought to notice 
on account of its depredations and the same is true of its allies. 
A complaint was received Sep. 24 through the commissioner of 
agriculture from Mr John R. Crandall of Hauppauge, who stated 
that this beetle had stripped all the foliage from many young 
X)eachtrees in an orchard of about 30 acres. He added that they 
worked at night, burying themselves in the dirt under the trees 
daring the day, and that anywhere from 10 to 50 were found 
under each tree, apparently preferring Elbertas. The beetles oc- 
curred nowhere except in the peach orchard. This insect is 
closely related to our common May or June beetles and presum- 
ably has similar habits, the larvae probably living on grass roots 
and undoubtedly thriving best in light, sandy soils. Reference 
to literature shows that another si)ecies, D. frondicola 
Blanch., was recorded in 1871^ as being very injurious in June 
to leaves of rose, mountain ash and wild plum in an Iowa nursery. 
They were about nearly a month, feeding only at night, and were 
considered one of the worst pests of that year. An attack similar 
to the one we have recorded occurred in the spring of 1888,^ at 
Hemdon Va. in a young orchard which had been mostly planted 
the preceding year. The 12-spotted Diabrotica, Diabrotica 
12-punctata, was the principal depredator, though a species 

*Kridelbaugh. la. State Hort Soc. Rep't 1871. 1872. p.l61. 
'Ril^-Howard. Insect Life, 1:59. 



138 NBW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

of Diplotaxis was also present in small numbers. The plums and 
apricots near an old melon patch where the Diabrotica had bred 
were soon stripped of foliage and the insects spread over nearly 
the entire orchard. Another species of the same genus, D. h a r - 
peri Blanch., was reported May 24, 1894,^ as injuring straw- 
berry plants at Campbellsburg Ind. The account states that they 
attacked the smaller and weaker plants on a 2^ acre field and 
very quickly destroyed them. As many as 20 beetles or over were 
found at a time on a single plant. The insects appeared first in 
some wheat and when that became too tough migrated to the 
recently set strawberry field. The soil was a light, clayey loam 
and paris green was applied but without benefit. 

These little scarabaeids are difficult insects to control and in a 
general way may be classed in this respect with the closely related 
and well known May or June beetles, Lachnosterna, and 
rose beetles, Macrodactylus subspinosus Fabr. Any- 
thing that tends to make the foliage distasteful to the insects, 
such as dusting with air-slacked lime, wood ashes, etc. has some 
protective value, but comparatively little benefit results from 
spraying with an arsenical poison. It is possible that collecting 
the insects by jarring into a curculio catcher might prov6 of 
some value. This would have to be done in the evening when 
the beetles are on the trees, and in all probability it would 
require considerable shaking to dislodge them. The injury to 
the foliage late in ijie fall is of comparatively little importance 
compared with depredations in the spring, and apparently there 
is a prospect of this species causing some injury at that time, 
in which event it would pay to go to considerable expense in 
collecting the beetles or employing some other means to destroy 
them, so as to prevent severe injury to the trees by the destruc- 
tion of fruit and leaf buds early in the season. 

Appletree tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americana 
Fabr.) . This insect is more or less injurious each year, and during 
the present season has not been very destructive, though some- 
what abundant in various localities, specially where no effort has 
been made to control it. The injury, as a rule, has been less than 

» Da via Insect Life, 7:199 



BBPOBT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 139 

in the last two or three years, except in Cattaraugus county, 
where this species is reported as having increased very largely in 
the last two or three years. 

Codling moth (Carpocapsa pomonella Linn.) . It is 
well known that the larvae of this insect pass the winter in 
considerable numbers under the sheltering bark of trees, and that 
they gnaw pupal cavities in the outer dead bark. Our attention 
was recently called to a somewhat anomalous situation and an 
examination showed that a small tree had been badly injured 
by borers in preceding years and that codling moth larvae, de- 
scending the tree in the fall, had entered the galleries made by 
the borers and in excavating pupal cavities had not refrained 
from eating into living tissue where they caused considerable 
bleeding and at first sight lead one to suspect that the injury was 
due to the round-headed borer. The tree in question has a trunk 
about 6 inches in diameter and some 12 or 15 larvae were taken 
from several of the cavities. Three or four of the caterpillars 
were found contiguous to living tissue which had been recently 
eaten and from which considerable sap was flowing. The borings 
were conspicuous and many of the pellets were saturated with 
exuding sap. 

Pear Fsylla (Psylla pyricola Forst.). The season of 
1903 has been remarkable for the unusual development of plant 
lice, and this little jumping species is no exception to the general 
rule. It has been exceedingly abundant and destructive over a 
considerable portion of the State, and peartrees with blackened, 
scanty foliage or almost none at all, were common sights during 
the summer not only in the Hudson river valley but also in cen- 
tral and western New York. The injury was much more general 
and severe than has been observed before, and the explanation 
therefor is probably found in the unusually favorable climatic 
conditions. Evidences of great damage began to appear in June, 
and during July and August the affected trees presented a truly 
wretched sight. In some cases the injury was so severe that most 
of the fruit dropped. Mr H. D. Lewis of Annandale reports the 
crop of that section a failure, due to the work of this pest. 



140 NBW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

Early and thorough spraying with a whale oil soap solution, 
1 pound to 4 gallons, has been found thoroughly effective in the 
hands of Mr Albert Wood of Carleton Station, who states that he 
has succeeded in keeping the insect well in subjection by this 
means. Thorough work in the early part of the season will do 
much toward preventing subsequent injuries, and if the necessity 
arises of repeating applications, much better results will be ob- 
tained if the work is done just after a rain, which serves the use- 
ful purpose of washing away the honeydew and therefore exposing 
the growing insects to the deleterious action of the insecticide. 

San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) . This 
pernicious insect has become so abundant in some orchards in the 
State that its control is a serious problem, and anything bearing 
on its habits and disseminative powers is of interest. The latter 
part of the summer was marked by the development of very large 
numbers of insects, the bi*eeding being so rapid that in some 
places the bark of entire trees was covered. 

The rapidity of its spread in a locality is of great importance, 
and is undoubtedly influenced by a number of factors. In the 
first place, there is no doubt that the spread is much more rapid 
where the i)est is allowed to breed unrestricted than in localities 
where such is not the case; for example, the scale has been in 
the large orchard of Mr W. H. Hart of Poughkeepsie for 13 years, 
and yet it has failed to spread to any great extent, portions being 
practically free fi'om it even after the lapse of years. A close 
examination of the center of infestation existing at Clinton 
Heights shows that while the insect has been present there for 
about the same time there has been no extensive spread. The 
primary point of infestation is a little to one side of the center 
of an isosceles triangle, which has an altitude of J mile. This 
is bordered on one side by a public highway and on the other by 
a trolly line. Several contiguous orchards lie within this area, 
and the i>est has gradually made its way from one to the other, 
though the si)read has by no means been rapid. Aside from the 
point of original infestation, the injury to the trees has not been 
very marked, in fact, the spread through these small orchards 



BBPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 141 

has been so slow that those in the point of the triangle, less than 
half a mile from the original infestation, are still free from the 
pest. An examination of orchards just across the highway from 
near this center, failed to reveal any scale. It should be stated 
in explanation, that while the insect was allowed to breed in con- 
siderable numbers from about 1897 to 1899, since then earnest 
efforts have been made to keep it in check, and as a general thing, 
it has been controlled in a fairly satisfactory manner. It is true 
that there is one point of infestation a half mile southwest of the 
source of trouble, but investigation shows that in all probability 
the scale became established there by being carried on infested 
trees which were set in that vicinity. 

Investigations and inquiries in a peach-growing section, where 
the scale had become established in a few places 3 or 4 years 
ago, reveals the fact that the pest has already obtained a foot- 
hold in some orchards from 14 n^ile to 2 miles or thereabouts 
from others, and in this instance we are inclined to believe that 
these colonies established at a distance are due to the fact that 
no very adequate control of the insect has bieen maintained. It 
may also possibly be explained in part by the fact that young 
scales are fully as likely to crawl on peach foliage as on that of 
other fruit trees, and it would therefore stand a better chance of 
being conveyed by insects or birds. 

New York plnm scale (Eulecanium juglandis 
Bouch^) . This species is well known as a very destructive form 
to plumtrees in western New York, where it has at times been 
exceedingly injurious. Our attention was called in August to a 
plumtree at Kinderhook N. Y., which had the undersides of its 
branches literally covered with full grown scale insects and a 
great many young were found beside the parents. The tree itself 
had suffered serious injury though there were no signs of any 
numbers of the pest on those adjacent. This insect, as is well 
known, can be readily controlled by spraying in the fall or early 
spring with a contact insecticide, such as kerosene emulsion or 
whale oil soap solution, and we see no reason why the lime-sulfur 
wash, if it is to be employed in the orchard, would not be as eflSca- 



142 NEW YORK STATB MUSEUM 

cious in killing this species as it is in the destruction of the San 
Jos6 scale. 

Flnm mite (Phytoptus phlaeocoptes Nal.). The 
presence of this little mite on plumtrees at Marlborough, was 
brought to our attention some years ago, and an examination the 
present season shows that it exists in the locality only in very 
small numbers, and as a consequence is hardly likely to become a 
pest of any importantje. The owner has cut down the original 
tree and anticipates very little trouble in the future. 

Grapevine pests 

Grapevine sawfly (Blennocjimpa py gmaea Harr.) . The 
larvae of this species were met with rather plentifully July 28 
in the vineyard of Mr W. H. Van Benschoten, West Park N. Y. 
Tips of shoots, here and there, were partially defoliated, but in 
no instance was material injury caused. The larvae are usually 
rare in New York State vineyards, so far as our observations go, 
and in case of their appearing in very large numbers, they should 
be controlled by thorough spraying with an arsenical poison. 

Steely flea beetle (Haltica chalybea 111.) . This per- 
nicious Chrysomelid is well known to grape growers, and in some 
vineyards in the Chautauqua region it has caused considerable 
injury year after year ; particularly is this the case with certain 
vineyards located well up on the hill and back from the lake. 
The greatest damage is done by the beetles feeding on the unfold- 
ing buds, and the best method of checking the injury is undoubt- 
edly by very thorough spraying or even painting the unfolding 
foliage with a strong arsenical mixture, particularly pans green 
or london purple, because these substances act more quickly than 
does arsenate of lead. 

Grapeberry moth (Polychrosis botrana Schiff.) . This 
insect was not only destructive in Chautauqua county but devel- 
oped in such large numbers in some Ohio vineyards as to destroy 
one third of the crop as reported by Mr T. S. Clymonts. Our 
experiments have shown that one thorough spraying with an 
arsenical poison, preferably arsenate of lead, just after blossom- 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 143 

ing, will result in severely checking this pest [see New York State 
Museum Bulletin 72]. 

Garden insects 

Asparagus beetle (Crioceris asparagi Linn.). The 
common asparagus beetle as recorded in our 15th report, page 540, 
has attained a wide distribution over the State, though our 
records limit it almost entirely to the lower Hudson and Mohawk 
river valleys and the western portion of the State in the vicinity 
of the lakes. We were therefore somewhat surprised to receive a 
communication from Mr C. L. Williams of Glens Falls, Warren 
CO., accompanied by specimens, stating that this species had 
become well established in that vicinity and was known to occur 
in some numbers over an area several miles in extent. This is 
the northernmost locality known to us, for the sjiecies in New 
York. 

Cabbage maggot (Phorbia brassicae Bouch^) . This lit- 
tle pest of the market gardener was unusually abundant and 
destructive this season. Its depredations on early cabbages at- 
tracted considerable attention in Genesee county, it was credited 
with having destroyed one fourth of the crop in St Lawrence 
county, and with working to some extent in Cattaraugus county 
and other sections of the State. The life history of this little pest 
may be summarized briefly as follows: the adult insects appear 
in the early spring, the precise time depending somewhat on cli- 
matic and other conditions. They are, however, usually abroad 
in time to deposit eggs around early set plants, finding some crev- 
ice in which they may creep and place their eggs close to the stem. 
These remain unhatched for a period variously stated as from 4 
to 10 days when the young grubs issue, attack the surface of the 
root and rasp a burrow into its tissues. They destroy first the 
smaller rootlets and then begin operations on the main root. 
They are frequently found in slimy burrows just beneath the sur- 
face of the stem. There are usually so many maggots that all are 
unable to find retreats within the tissues, and consequently many 
of them lie near the surface, which is kept moist by the juices 
from the injured parts. The wilting of the plant is the most 



144 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

• 

characteristic indication of injury and on pulling it up, the re- 
mains of the roots and the whitish, slimy maggots are easily 
observed. 

One of the best methods for protecting cabbage plants from this 
insect is to surround them with a tarred paper collar about 2^4 
inches in diameter, which is so cut as to practically encircle the 
stem. These are readily adjusted about the plant, easily cut and 
form one of the most efficient methods of preventing the parent 
fly from depositing its eggs. 

A carbolic soap emulsion composed of 1 pound of hard soap dis- 
solved in a gallon of water, in which 1 pint of crude carbolic acid 
is then poured, emulsified and diluted with 30 parts of water, is 
very efficient in killing the maggots about infested plants. An 
application should be made shortly after the plants are set out, 
and repeated once a week or 10 days till after the middle of May. 
The standard kerosene emulsion diluted with 12 to 15 parts of 
water has also proved very successful. Either may be readily 
applied with a knapsack pump. It is possible to check the attack, 
where labor is cheap by removing the earth from the affected parts 
in the morning of a bright day and replacing it at night. The 
drying kills the maggots without injury to the plants. This is 
practised to some extent on Long Island, as stated by Mr F. A. 
Sirrine. 

Onion maggot (Phorbia ceparum Meigen) . This serious 
pest of market gardeners has, like its close ally, the cabbage 
maggot, been very injurious in portions of the State, particularly 
in St Lawrence county where it is credited with having destroyed 
one fourth of the onion crop. It has also caused considerable 
complaint in the vicinity of Albany. 

This insect, so far as known, has a life history very similar to 
that of the cabbage maggot, and may be controlled in like manner, 
except that it is impracticable to use the tarred paper collars 
though the carbolic soap wash can be employed to very good 
advantage. 

Tarnished plant bug (Lygus pratensis Linn.). This 
notorious and almost ubiquitous pest occurs on a great many 



BSfPOBT OF THB STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 145 

plants and causes more or less injury from year to year. Last 
July our attention was again called to it on account of its sucking 
the juices from tender aster shoots and thereby killing them. 
Mr Egbert Blauvelt of Coeyman, who made the complaint, states 
that the insects can be killed by thoroughly spraying with a whale 
oil soap solution, using 1 pound to 9 gallons of water. Clean cul- 
ture, not only in the garden but in adjacent fields, will do con- 
siderable toward reducing the numbers of this pest. 

Grain and house pests 

Saw-toothed grain beetle (Silvanus surinamensis 
Linn.) . This little grain beetle is a common species in prepared 
foods and various grains and though occasionally very abundant, 
it does not as a rule cause much annoyance in this country. This 
species was found last August literally overrunning a dwelling 
house in Albany. The beetles were so numerous that they made 
their way into everything and the housekeeper could sweep up 
nearly a pint almost every warm day. They were found in 
all parts of the dwelling, resting on ceilings, crawling on walls, 
under mats, tablecloths etc. and even invaded wearing apparel, 
articles of food, etc. Investigation showed that the source of the 
trouble was several thousand bushels of oats in the bin of a 
near-by brewery. The insects were breeding there very rapidly 
and on warm days appeared in large numbers and invaded near-by 
dwellings. The best remedy for such an outbreak is fumigation 
of the grain with carbon bisulfid and similar treatment of the 
dwelling houses or better still fumigating them with hydrocyanic 
acid gas. This latter, however, is a very dangerous poison and 
must be handed with extreme care. 

Fleas. The cat and dog flea (Ceratopsyllus serrati- 
ceps Qerv.) is a well known pest of domestic animals, and in 
the public mind is associated only with these animals. There 
are a number of records of this si)ecies propagating to a marvelous 
extent in houses closed for the summer, and the occupants on 
opening them in the fall would find their premises literally over- 
run by these annoying, active and most hardy pests. This has 



146 NEW YORK STATB MUSEUM 

been the experience of several Albanians in the past summer, 
and the most practical way of ridding the house of these vermin 
is by thorough fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas, using 1 
fluid ounce of sulfuric acid diluted with 2 fluid ounces of water 
and 1 ounce of high grade {9S^) cyanid of potassium for every 
100 cubic feet of space. A preliminary fumigation using half the 
above amounts and continuing the treatment two hours killed 
practically all the Psocids in the house and many fleas, while 
the usual amounts with a six hour fumigation destroyed all the 
fleas. The acid and cyanid are among our most deadly and 
virulent poisons and the same is true of the generated gas. Be- 
fore treating, tlie house should be first carefully examined and 
every orifice or crack which would allow the egress of air should 
be carefully stopped. All fluids and liquid foods should be re- 
moved from the house and arrangements made so that the build- 
ing can be opened from the outside after fumigation. The gas. 
is generated by dropping the cyanid in large earthenware vessels 
containing the proper amount of diluted acid. It will be found 
advisable to have one or two of these jars in each room or hall- 
way, and so arrange matters that the cyanid while still in the bag, 
can be dropped into one vessel after the other very rapidly, or 
else with a series of strings, dropped into all of the vessels 
at once. After the charge is set off the house should be care- 
fully guarded so that no person can enter, and if it be in contact 
with others in a row, those in adjacent dwellings should also 
be warned so that the rooms next the treated building may be 
well aired during the fumigation, which should last from one to 
several hours. The building should then be thoroughly aired by 
opening dioors and windows from the outside, and utmost pains 
taken to free the house of gas before any one be allowed to enter. 
The airing should last at least 30 minutes, and it will be prefer- 
able to extend this time to one, two or even thi-ee hours, depend- 
ent somewhat on the size of the building and the facilities for 
ventilation. One treatment should be suflScient but in the case 
of poorly constructed houses a second fumigation may be neces- 
sary a week or 10 days later. This dangerous operation should 



REPORT OF THB STATB ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 147 

be attempted only by those fully conversant with the nature of 
the materials with which they are dealing. 

Shade tree and forest insects 

Elm leaf beetle (Galerucella luteola Mull.). This 
species has won for itself a very bad reputation in the Hudson 
river valley on account of its extensive injuries to elms, parti- 
cularly the European species. It is still extending the area of 
its operation. Last year it was detected in a limited portion of 
Saratoga Springs, and this season we were sorry to observe that 
it had spread over practically the entire village and would have 
caused material injury to the shade trees had it not been for 
the systematic and continued spraying conducted by the village 
authorities. An examination July 16 showed that the grubs were 
full grown in that locality and that many had pupated. We 
are inclined to believe that the second brood, if any, would be 
very limited in that section. This species has also been re- 
ported as present in very large numbers at Schuylerville, only 
a short distance from Saratoga Springs. It has become estab- 
lished over a considerable portion of Schenectady, where it is 
causing considerable injury and is likely to inflict more in the 
next year or two unless adequate measures are taken for its 
suppression. This insect as noted in Museum bulletin 64, has 
obtained a foothold at Ithaca N. Y. and we are in hopes that it 
will not be allowed to inflict serious injury on the beautiful 
trees of that city as it has on those of some others in the State. 
A detailed account of this species api)ears in Museum bulletin 57. 

White marked tussock moth (Notolophus leucostigma 
Abb. & Sm.). This common enemy of shade trees annually at- 
tracts more or less attention on account of its ravages in dif- 
ferent cities of the State, in spite of the fact that it is a com- 
paratively easy one to control, not only on account of its eggs 
being deposited in conspicuous masses which may readily be 
removed from trees, but also because it is easily destroyed with 
arsenical poisons. In our preceding report we chronicled the 
abundance of this insect in Buffalo, and the present season has 



148 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

been marked by a repetition of the injury, though the attack 
was not so severe as that of the preceding summer. The causes 
for this latter condition may be in part due to repressive meas- 
ures adopted by citizens of that city, but on the whole we are 
inclined to believe that natural enemies or unfavorable climatic 
conditions were the most potent factors in reducing the numbers 
of this pest. The condition of the trees in that city is a most 
effective argument in favor of establisliing a paid forester or 
other official whose duty it shall be to look after the street trees 
as well as those in the parks and see that they are adequately 
protected from insect ravages. This matter is one of increasing 
importance, as our cities are growing rapidly in size, and as a 
consequence there is a greater massing of foliage and therefore 
more favorable conditions for the development of large numbers 
of a species. It requires but a few years for insects to destroy 
a tree which may have been from 10 to 50 or more years in 
growing, and in cities where this is allow^ed a deterioration of 
real estate values must follow, accompanied by an increase of 
various diseases and a higher mortality, because of the rapid and 
extreme temperature changes due to the absence of trees. 

This pest can be easily controlled in either one of two ways. 
Many of the caterpillars can be jarred or brushed from the in- 
fested trees, and their ascent prevented by the use of a band of 
loose* cotton tied around the tree or a band of tar on a piece of 
stout paper, the latter to prevent injury to the tree. Both of 
these materials are very effective, and in our judgment vastly 
superior to the brass bands seen on the trunks of so many shade 
trees in Buffalo. Bands, however, are of value only in keeping 
the caterpillars off the trees. The jarring of the pests is some- 
what laborious, and as the insects are readily detroyed by spray- 
ing with an ai"senical poison a pi-ompt application of some such 
material to the foliage is adWsable. Arsenate of lead is one 
of the best poisons. It may be applied at the rate of 4 pounds 
to 50 gallons of water. Use this insecticide only in the pre- 
pai'ed paste form, diluting to the proper extent, and under no 
conditions purchase the crystalline article. The older standard 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 149 

poisons, paris green, london purple and similar preparations are 
\'erv effective, though subject to washing bj rains. These latter 
substances should be used at the rate of 1 pound to 100 gallons 
of water, with 1 pound of recently slaked lime to protect the 
foliage from burning. Spray thoroughly in any event and aim 
to cover so far as possible every leaf with the poison. Protective 
measures should be adopted early or the injury will be beyond 
rei>air. It is hardly necessary to add that it is impossible to grow 
magnificent trees if they are defoliated year after year, as unhap- 
pily seems to be the case in some cities in recent years. 

Fall webworm (Hyphantria textor Harr.). This 
species appeared rather early in the season on various forest and 
fruit trees in different sections of the State, and in certain local- 
ities was somewhat abundant and destructive. Generally speak- 
ing it has not caused serious injury except in a few localities 
where no effort was made to check it. This species, like the two 
tent caterpillars, is readily controlled by spraying with an arsen- 
ical poison, and its conspicuous web nests, which serve as a retreat 
for the caterpillars, are easily removed from the tree and the 
inmates destroyed by crushing or burning. 

Forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hiibn.) . 
As noted in our preceding report. Museum bulletin 64, page 104, 
the ravages of this pest are on the decrease, and the present season 
has witnessed practically no injury by this insect. A few cater- 
pillars were observed in Rensselaer and Columbia counties but 
in no instance coming to our notice was a tree even partially 
defoliated. A lack of reports from other sections of the State 
indicates a like gratifying condition, and we are in hopes that 
this outbreak is practically ended and that the species will be com- 
paratively innocuous for a number of years. 

Walnut worm (Datana integerrima Grote & Rob.). 
The work of this insect is more or less evident each year, particu- 
larly in the western part of the State, and during the past summer 
our attention has been called to its ravages in Herkimer county, 
and we have observed a number of black walnut trees in Chautau- 
qua county which have been from one half to two thirds or entirely 
defoliated by this caterpillar. 



150 NEW YOIlK STATE AIFJSEUM 

Beneficial insects 

Chinese lady beetles (Cbilocorus similis Rossi) . The 
specimens obtained from the United States Department of Agri- 
cultare through the kindness of Dr L. O. Howard, and liberated 
in East Greenbush in August 1902 failed to survive the winter. 
A second shipment of 25 was received Aug. 13, 1903, again through 
the generosity of Dr Howard. These specimens were set at liberty 
at Kinderhook N. Y. on the estate of Mr L. L. Morrell, who is a 
large fruit grower. The tree selected was a large appletree badly 
infested with San Jos^ scale, near the barn and on the edge of the 
old orchard, close to his young pear orchard. There is an abund- 
ance of scale on the old trees, as well as on the young, and Mr 
Morrell has consented to refrain from treating these, in order to 
give the imported beetles an opportunity to demonstrate their 
value. 

An examination Sep. 23, 1903, of the appletree where these 
insects were placed last August showed that eggs had been laid 
and a number of young were easily found. Four adult beetles, 
probably descendants of those originally established and nearly 
20 larvae of varying size, from very young to nearly full grown, 
were found in the center of the tree. This is a quite large one and 
is very badly infested with the scale and there is every probability 
that there are many more ladybugs on it and near-by trees than 
were discovered, though a brief search failed to reveal any on the 
latter. The examination was purposely limited because of the 
difficulty of detecting the insects and the danger of crushing them 
in crawling about on the limbs. It certainly looks as though this 
introduction had been fully as successful as that of the preceding 
year and it is most earnestly hoped that some will survive the 
winter, in which event we may be able to demonstrate the utility 
of this insect in our climate. 

Little black lady beetle (Pentilia misella Lee.) . This 
little lady beetle is usually found toward the end of the season in 
orchards infested with San Josd scale, and we have on several 
occasions recorded its presence in some numbers. Anything relat- 
ing to the abundance and effectiveness of predaceous insects is of 
Interest, and it is gratifying to state that in October we found this 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 151 

little species, far more abundant than- we had observed it before, 
in a badly infested peach orchard in Orange county. The little 
beetles were so numerous that 20 or 25 could easily be counted on a 
small portion of the trunk of a peachtree, and undoubtedly some 
of them bore from one to several hundred of these little lady 
beetles. They were crawling actively over the infested tree and 
evidently looking here and there for insects suitable for their 
needs. It is a source of regret to state that in spite of the great 
abundance of these little lady beetles, there appears to be no very 
material diminution in the numbers of the scale insects, which 
literally swarmed on many of the trees. The worse infested ones 
were more attractive to the lady beetles than the others. We have 
yet to meet evidence showing that this species is very eflScient in 
reducing the numbers of this scale insect. 

EXPERIMENTAL WORK AGAINST SAN JOSE SCALE 

INSECT 

The control of this pernicious insect is a problem of consider- 
able importance in localities where it has become established. 
This work was begun by us in 1900, primarily for the purpose of 
testing the effectiveness and possibilities of crude oil applications. 
Our results show that a mechanical emulsion of this material can 
be used, and if great caution is exercised in its application, com- 
panitively little or no injury follows. So many, however, have 
met with such ill success that we have also experimented to a con- 
siderable extent with other materials, specially since in the last 
year or two we have observed some evidences of injury to the 
bark after the application of oil. This lirst appears as an enlarge 
ment of the lenticels, which is evidently followed by a great 
increase in thickness and a very rough, unsatisfactory condition 
of the bark, and this has led us to question the advisability of 
continuing such applications year after year, and also to make 
further tests of materials which were free from this objection. 

Early spring or winter applications 
20;^ mechanical crude petroleum emulsion. The work with this 
insecticide was continued the present season in the experimental 
orchard, the application being made Mar. 3, to ^Saoxsit "l^ Xx^^s^ 



152 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

representing a number of the more common varieties. It will be 
observed that the spraying was earlier than usual, and the weather 
conditions favorable, the day being dry with only a moderate 
amount of wind. This insecticide was applied as in the spring 
of 1902, to the following trees : numbers 15-28, 3447, 60-74, 79-91 
and 101-14 ; or in other words, to the western end of the experi- 
mental orchard, a map of which was published in our report for 
1900. The general character of the trees and their varieties have 
been previously published, and may be ascertained by referring 
to the above publication. Tests of the mechanical dilution were 
made while the work was in progress with the following results : 
at tree 18 slightly less than 20^; at tree 39, 26^; at trees 45 and 
46, 31^; at tree 84 slightly less than 20^ and at tree 101, 33^ 
of oil. The above figures represent more variation than is desir- 
able, and yet, so far as we were able to see, the trees suffered very 
little from the treatment. Inspection a few days after showed 
that all were well covered with oil, though in some cases where 
the bark was quite rough, it is probable that there were scales 
which escaped. 

Examination of these trees the latter part of July showed that 
while a number of them were rather badly infested by living young, 
a great many were relatively free. The following were rather 
badly infested : trees 15, 16, 22, 38, 41-44, 73, 79, 82 and 86. The 
foliage on tree 101 was light in color, small in size and the growth 
only fair. It looked as though it had suffered some injury, and 
undoubtedly the petroleum had hurt the bark to some extent. 
This injury was also noticeable to a lesser extent on some other 
trees, the most common indication being much enlarged lenticels, 
which seemed to be followed by an excessive development of outer 
bark and a corresponding roughness, so that trees in this condi- 
tion presented a somewhat bad appearance. 

A general examination of the experimental orchard Sep. 25, 
showed that the section sprayed with petroleum emulsion was 
generally in much better condition than that treated with the 
lime-sulfur wash. A few of the trees in the petroleum section, 
notably 23, 41 and 75, were badly infested by numerous living 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 153 

voung which had evidently developed within the last two or three 
weeks. 

The ultimate effect of successive applications of crude petro- 
leum to various fruit trees is of some interest, and on this account 
we purposely made annual applications to certain trees, and an 
examination of them is not without interest, since while it shows 
some injury, the damage is not so serious as it first appeared. 
For example, tree 101, a seckel pear, was very badly infested in 
1900, when it w^as sprayed with undiluted petroleum and seriously 
injured. The following year it was treated with a mechanical 
mixture consisting of 15^ oil and a whale oil soap solution, 1 
pound to 4 gallons, and in the spring of 1902 and of 1903, with 
20fl mechanical emulsion. The tree at the outset, as above noted, 
was in poor condition. It has been steadily improving, and last 
December had developed a large amount of new wood, and during 
the present season has made a fair growth, though the foliage is 
rather light in color and less than normal size. Tree 114, a pear 
of the same variety, received undiluted crude petroleum in 1900, 
but was not injured so seriously as 101. Each subsequent year it 
has been sprayed with a mechanical crude petroleum emulsion and 
is now in a vigorous condition and in much better state than three 
years ago, though the roughness of the bark on the trunk is becom- 
ing more pronounced. Tree 69, a Howell pear, was sprayed in 
1900 with the whale oil soap and petroleum combination, and with 
mechanical petroleum emulsions the three succeeding springs, and 
is now in as good condition as others which have not l>een sub- 
jected to annual applications of oil. The sjinic is practically 
true of tree 66, a Bartlett pear. Other instances might be cited, 
but enough has been given to show that ordinary fruit trees can 
stand at least four applications in successive years with- 
out much injury. The benefits resulting from this treatment 
in the vicinity of Albany, as compared with those accruing from 
the lime-sulfur combinations, were so marked that the owner has 
repeatedly urged us to apply the oil to the entire orchard, because 
the lime-sulfur wash had not proved satisfactory in controlling 
the scale. It is only fair to add that much better results have 



154 NBW YORK STATE MCJSLUM 

been obtained with this latter insectide in some other portions of 
the State. 

Lime-sulfur washes. Early experiments with this material were 
so unfavorable, that it was supposed to have no value in our east- 
em climate, though it had been used with great success in Cali- 
fornia. The matter was revived in later years, and recent tests 
have shown that under certain conditions, at least, very large 
proportions of the scale have been killed by the use of this insecti- 
cide. Our applications last year were somewhat unfortunate, in 
view of the fact that we failed to kill a satisfactory proportion of 
the insects, and in this respect our results were somewhat different 
from those obtained by other experimenters. The treatment was 
followed by continued heavy rains, and this, with oil from appli- 
cations the preceding year may account for the noneffective- 
ness of the wash. Further experiments were conducted the pres- 
ent season for the purpose of testing the value of the preparation 
more thoroughly, and also for determining, if possible, the best 
wash to be employed. The early spring experiments were at Clin- 
ton Heights, and at Warwick. Two formulas, in particular, were 
tested : one which may be known as the 30-30-30 combination to 
100 gallons, and the other the 40-15-20 to 60 gallons. Both gave 
excellent results at Warwick, where conditions were almost ideal 
for careful experimentation, and a modification possessing some 
advantages was also employed. This latter consists of 25 pounds 
of lime, 20 pounds of sulfur to GO gallons of water. Unfortunately 
the experiments at Clinton Heights though carefully performed 
failed to yield the results we desired, partly on account of unfavor- 
able conditions due to very large trees with rough bark being the 
only ones available. In our experimental orchard at Clinton 
Heights an application of lime-sulfur, using a 30-30-30 formula, 
was made to the same trees treated in this way the preceding year, 
and we regret to state that the results were not very satisfactory, 
though the application was more successful than that of 1902. 
The spraying was followed immediately by some snow and rain, 
and while this may have had a detrimental effect, it does not ac- 
count entirely for the failure. It is possible that the extremely 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 155 

rough bark on certain trees sheltered some of the scale insects 
from the application, and consequently it was only a short time 
before the trees were restocked by breeding. An interesting series 
of experiments was conducted at Warwick, the essential details 
of which are given in the table on page 156. Owing to diflSculties 
in application etc., it was not always possible to regulate closely 
the period of boiling, and while our intention was to rigidly test 
the long and the short boil in each formula, as a matter of fact 
there was some variation as will be seen on consulting the table. 
The destruction of the scale, however, was all that could be ex- 
IK.*cted, and it is very gratifying to state that Mr W. H. Hart of 
Poughkeepsie, whose large orchard is infested with this pest, was 
able bj the use of a wash composed of 30 pounds of lime, 20 
jMiunds of sulfur and 15 pounds of salt to 60 gallons of water to 
keep the insects in subjection in a very satisfactory manner in- 
deed, though some of his trees were of considerable size, being 18 
to 20 or more feet high. ATr Hart was careful to have the applica- 
tion made in the most thorough manner and he took pains to 
always work with the wind when spraying, and in this manner 
was able to obtain a maximum eflSciency with a minimum amount 
of labor. Comparisons on trees which were sprayed on only one 
side gave most gratifying testimony to the efficacy of the wash, 
the treated portions being practically free, while the untreated 
woi-e almost covered with the i)est. I^n Davis seems to be much 
more susceptible to the scale than the Thompkins County King. 
Mr Hart is of the opinon that a small amount of rain, particu- 
larly a mist for a day or two immediately after spraying, is of 
value because it brings the caustic wash into more intimate con- 
tact with the scale. Mr L. L. Morrell of Kinderhook has also had 
excellent results from use of a lime-sulfur wash and the same is 
true of Edward Van Alstyne of the same place. 

It is undoubtedly true that considerable variation is allowable 
without materially influencing the value of the application. A 
large amount of lime probably has some value because it forms a 
thicker coat over the branches and is therefore a more efficient 
mechanical barrier in preventing the establishment of young scale 



156 



NEW YUSK STATE MUSEUM 



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REPORT OF TOE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 157 

iusects. If too iiiiich lime is used it is liable to scale off; conse- 
(piently tlieit* is a limit to the amoimt wliicli can be employed, and 
for various practical reasons we are inclined to believe that 25 
pouuds of lime, 20 pounds of sulfur to GO gallons of water is a 
very good i)roportiou. The lime probably aids materially in hold- 
ing the sulfur and its sulfids (which latter are undoubtedly 
among the most valuable constituents of <he wash), and thus adds 
to the efficiency of the insecticide by preventing to some extent 
learhing of its active ingredients. Our experiments fail to indi- 
cate the necessity of prolonged boiling insisted on in so many 
formulas. In fact, it sihmus as though active boiling for 30 min- 
utes meets every reipiirement. A wash prejiared in this manner 
appears to be just as effective as one which has been boiled for a 
much longer time. Salt increases the specific gravity of the 
liquid and thus undoubtedly aids in keeping the solids in suspen- 
sion, but so far as chemical action and insecticidal properties are 
concerned, it ajipears to have no value, and the same is true of its 
effect on the adhesive qualities of the wash. So marked is this 
(hat we have omitted it friun the compositicm of the wash because 
of its very problematic value. We are still of the o])iuion that 
climatic conditions have considerable influence on the effective- 
ness of this insecticich', and believe that it should be applied when 
the trees are dry or nearly so, and that, in order to obtiiin satis- 
factory results, no large amount of rain should fall within three 
or four days after the si)raying. This insecticide gives very good 
results whei*ever it can ])e ai)plied thoroughly and has the advan- 
tage of being cheajier than any other winter wash, though it is 
<kridedly more injurious to apjiaratus and exceedingly disagree- 
uble to apply. 

The rc\sin solution [kScv p. J (JO for prepanititui] was added to 
several of the washes in hopcw that it would materially increase 
their adhesiveness and likewise their ins(»cticidal properties, he- 
<'aus(? such seemed to be the case in some jireliminary ind<x)r ex- 
I>eninents. Field tc^sts, however, failed to indicate any great ad- 
vantage resulting from the addition of this material, except 
Porhaps in the case of rains immediately following the applica- 



158 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

tion. It affeclcHl the washes by making them more or less flaky, 
increasing the amount of sediment, and if mueh more had been 
added it would j)rol>ably have seriously affected the ojK?ratiou of 
the pump. This material, if usckI, must be thoroughly diluted 
with warm water before being added to a cooler lime-sulfur wash, 
or it is likely to give trouble by gumming up the a})paratus. 

Summary. Our exjji^rience and experimental work may be sum- 
marized briefly, as follows: 

A mechanical 20;^ crude petroleum emulsion is a very effcH-tive 
insecticide, and if the pump can be relied on to deliver a constant 
proportion, there is very little danger of much injury from sev- 
eral annual early spring Jipplications. There is, however, some 
doubt as to the ultimate result, and the continued use of this 
material causes incivased thickness and I'oughiu^ss of the bark, if 
no other injury. 

Early sju'ing aj)plications of whale oil soap solution, even if 
only 1| pounds l)e usihI to a gallon, will control the insect in a 
very satisfactory manner, pi*ovid(Hl the spraying is thorough. We 
are by no means certain that this can be done on large trees, par- 
ticularly those with I'ough bark. 

The lime-sulfur combination is steadily gaining favor in the 
eastern states, and under certain conditions, at least, is fully as 
effective in checking the scale as either crude i>etroleum or a whale 
oil soaj) solution. Our experiments lead us to believe that 25 
poimds of lime and 20 pounds of sulfur to (JO gallons of water, are 
equally as effective as larger amounts, and we Ix^lieve it to Ik* an 
advantage to have a little more lime than sulfur. We fail to see 
any beneficial results from the use of salt in this combinati(m, 
and therefore have omitted it; and in our experience, active boil 
ing for 30 minutes, if the lime is slaked in hot water and the sulfur 
added at once, gives just ai^ effective a wa*sh as one which has been 
boiled for one and one half or two hours. 

In conclusion, the exi)eri(>nre of Mr Hart and other up to date 
fruit growers, hart demonstrated not only the jiossibility but the 
practicability of kcvpiiig this insert in contiiil in an ordinary 
commercial orchard. Our observations show beyond doubt, that 



REPORT OP THE STATE BNTOMOI.OGIST 1903 150 

this scale insect is a very serious enemy, and unless eflScient 

measures are promptly adopted for its supjiression, very great 

injuries may be caused. 

Summer washes 

This i)ernicious insect breeds with such extraordinary rapidity 
during the summer, that ordinary applications of whale oil soap 
or kerosene emulsion are not entirely satisfactory, since at the 
strengths usually employed only the crawling young and smaller 
wale insects are killed. It frequently occurs that an infesta- 
tion is disi^overed in midsummer and the owner wishes to do some- 
thing at once. The unsatisfa<tory results with the above named 
washes led Mr P. L. Tluesied, nursery iusi^ector of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, to experiment with a mechanical 20^ crude 
petroleum emulsion, which was applied in July with a kerowater 
sprayer to j)eachtrees. A test of this material was made in a 
very badly infested orchard in the summer of 1902, and beyond 
causing some of the foliage to drop where it was the thickest, par- 
ticularly in j)laces wheix* a 25*^ emulsion was used, as was the 
rase in certain arecOs, no serious injury to the trees followed the 
treatm(»nt. The results were so satisfactory that the same course 
was pui"sued last summer with equally gratifying elfect so far as 
injuring the trees was concerned, though at the time it did not ap- 
I»ear as if the application was elfective enough in killing the scale. 
Subsequent observations, however, have shown that it was more 
beneficial than at first supposed. In spite of this, we still feel 
some hesitancy in recommending this treatment in summer, ex- 
cept, perha|>s, where the pest is breeding in very large numbers. 

This condition of affairs led us to undertake a series of exi)eri- 
ments for the puriK)se of ascertaining if it wciv possible to make 
some combination which, while not injuring the foliage, would 
nMnain on the trees and be effective for some weeks after applica 
tion, and at least kill the crawling young as thev came from under 
the protecting scales of the females. The late I'rofessor Lowe 
conducted some experiments along this line, and cmr work has been 
a continuation of that with mo<lifications. It appeared to us as 
though a limersulfur combination, possibly without boiling, could 



IHO NEW YORK STATK MUSEUM 

\ye iiisule of a i)ii)iM»r ntreuji^th so tlial it would kill a large propor- 
tion of the younger Health, and we were in hopes that it would be 
IK)werful enough to destix)y individuals emerging from females 
sevenil weeks after application. The basis of these experiments 
was a standard wash whieh we had used the i)receding sfiriug 
with very gratifying results on dormant fruit trees. This wash 
cK>ntain(Ml 25 pounds of lime, 20 pounds of sulfur to fJO gallon^ 
of water. It was diluted to various strengths, and an effort made 
to ascertain whether boiling for 15 or 80 minutes had any material 
effe<'t (m the eiticiency of the wash. In addition, a resin solution 
was usimI, which is jiivpanMl as follows: dissolve 3 pounds of sal 
soda in 8 (piarts of wat(»r and add thereto 4 pounds of resin and 
boil till dissolved. While hot, make up to 5 gallons and keep boil 
ing till the resin is well in solution. The ivsin was added simply 
to incivas(» the adhesivent^s of the wash, in hopes that if tliis were 
done the efficiency of the combination would be materially in- 
creases!. In a few instances the lime-sulfur combination was used 
with the lM>rdeaux mixture for the pur[>ose of testing the value 
of this cond)ined wash. The j)reparation and apj)lication of the 
washes was the work of Assistant C. M. Walker, who is also re- 
sponsible for many of the ti(»ld obsiMwations. The following table 
gives in a summarized form th(» various ingre<lients of the ditTerent 
washes and their effects on trees and scale and also the conditions 
under whirh they an» applied. These experiments wei'e conducted 
in our experimental orchard at <'lint<m Heights near the western 
boundarv of Kast (li'eenbush. 



RRPORT OP THE STATE BNTOMOIX)GIST 1903 



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REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



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164 NEW YORK STATE MUSWIJM 

Series 1. Nine ddtFereiit waslien wei-e applied June 22 in this 
series, and observations made at intervals from eluue 26 to 8ep. 
28. Very small amounts were ust*d and the solutions allowed 
to stand two houi*s. DitTeivnt i*esults might have been secured 
if larger (luantities had Ihvu eiajdoyed and apjilieations made 
at ouee. The spraying was done with a fine hand atomizer and 
treatment limited to young, badly infested ajipletrees which bore 
all 8tag4»s of the scale. Thc^se trws had been set out only a few 
weeks audi rouseipiently made little gi'owth, though the foliage 
was in fair condition. The various washes did not injure the 
leaves, and it will Ik» noted that washes 1 to 5, which wen? either 
unboiled or very dilute, adhered poorly, while 6, 7 and 9 con- 
taining bordeaux were U^tter in this resi>ect, and 8, which was 
boiled and also contained bordeaux, was much lx*tter. None 
could be distinguished on the tree 10 days after aj^plication. All 
washes killed the nuijority of the ci-awling young but did not 
prevent the development of established scales or 4;he git)wth of 
young appearing after treatment. Theiv was very little appit?- 
ciable difference in th(? various washes, and on Sep. 8 all the 
trees were badly inft^sted by all stages, crawling young being 
specially abundant. 

Series 2. Six washes were applie<l July 28 in this series, and 
observations made from July 30 to Sep. 8. The washes were 
prepan^d in substantially the same manner as indicated' al>ove, 
and applied to the same lot of trees with the exception of a branch 
of a peachti*ee which was sprayed with 6. The condition of the 
foliage and scale infesitaticm was identical with that in series 1, 
and the weather conditions were similar. Ajiple foliage was un- 
injui^ed by any of the washes, but peach leaves wei*© slightly 
burned at the tips by wash 6. Washes 3 and 4 were boiled 15 
minutes, were more adhesive than the others, and Aug. 10 showed 
good color but on Sep. 8 no trace remained. The crawling young 
only were killed. 

Series 3. Washes in this series were a])])lied Aug. 14 and were 
similar to those of series 2. Observations wert» made from Aug. 
17 to Sep. 8, and the conditions, preparation, etc., were praeti- 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 165 

(•ally the same as in series 1. The ajuilieations were confined 
to jK)rtions of old appleti-ees except in cases of washes 5 and 6, 
which were also applied to peachtrces. The scale infestation was 
slight and the weather fair immediately following the treatment. 
Appleti'ei^ foliage was injnivd by wash 3, which ciiused the leaves 
to shrivel and fall off, and 4: burned them slightly. Wash 5 
burned tij^s of p(nich leaves, and G had the same effect. Numbers 
3 and 4 adhei-ed very well for three weeks. 

Series 4. The two washes used in this exi)eriment were applied 
Aug. 21 and ol)«ervations made from Aug. 27 to Oct. 20. Rela- 
tively large amounts were used and the applications madle im- 
mediately after pivparation. The cyclone nozzle used gave a 
somewhat coai-ser spray than the atomizer employed in the first 
three series. Pear, plum, fieach and mulberry trees were used 
ill this experiment and most of them were badly infested. The 
foliagi* was in good condition, the weather fair and remained 
so for a few days following the spraying. IMum and pear leaves 
were injured by wash 1, particularly in the cas<* of a pear where 
tlu^ treatment was si)ecially thorough. This latter dropped its 
lonves, while another, which received less of the mixture, did not, 
tlLougli the foliage was evidently injured. Wash 2 seriously 
injured peach leaves and causc^d slight burning of i)lum and mul- 
lH*rr;\' foliage. Wash 1 adhered very well and was present in 
thick layei-s Sep. 8 and tracers of color could be detected Oct. 20. 
The same w.is true to a lesser extent of wash 2. Oct. 20, number 
1 had diesti-oyed 75'^ of the scale on a peailretv, and the foliage 
was slightly bunied. A nund^r of limbs were dying on the 
tree, which had dropjied its lower foliage and on which the scale 
WHS entirely dead. Only about 15,1^ of the scale had been killed 
on the living branches. Wash 2 killed 40;?' of the scale on one 
tree and about 85;^ on the other, which latter was in very bad 
condition. 

Series 5. 8ix washes were aj)plied Sep. 4, and observations 
made at intervals from Sep. fi to Oct. 20. Small amounts of 
the washes w^ere used and the same nozzU* was employed as in 
series 4. Apple foliage was slightly burned by washes 1, 2 and 3^ 



166 NEW YORK STATE ML'HKLT.VI 

and |)ear leaves with wa«li 4. IMiim foliage was injured very 
8light1r by wasli 5, and nunilK»r (> bnnie<l tips of peach leaves to 
a slight extent but did not injure pear foliage. Washes 1, 2, 3 
and 4 adhered well, 5 and (> more so, G in particular being thickly 
incrusted on limbs andi foliage. Wa^h 1 killed So^ of the scale, 
and there was a marked contrast between sprayed and unsprayed 
branches. Wa»h 2 had no ettVci on tlie scale, while 4 killed 30^. 
The latter was boiled longer and this may account for its greater 
effectiveness. Variation in intervals b(»tween preparation and 
application apjieared to have no effect on the adhesive or insecti- 
cidal qualities of these washes. 

Snmmary. A mechanical 2(>'/ crude ])etroleum emulsion was 
api)lied in early July, two s^^asons in succession, to peachtrees 
witliout causing much injury l)eyond dropping some of the foliage 
where it was the thickest. It undoubtedly destroys a large 
amount of scale and w^riously che<*ks breeding, yet we hesitate 
to do moi^ than state what it has accomplished. It is perhaps 
the best thing that can be used where a very bad infestation is 
discovei-ed in midsummer. 

A whale oil soap solution, 1 pound to 8 or 10 gallons; a kerosene 
emulsion (standard formula diluted with to 10 parts of water), 
or a 15 or 20;* mechanical keixvsene emulsion can be used in 
midsummer for checking the San Jos6 scale, but none of these 
materials can be i*elied on to kill mueh moi-e than the ci-awling 
young, and breeding is soon almost as bad as before the appli- 
cation unless treatments are frequent. 

Our experiments with lime-sulfur combinations for a summer 
wash have not In^en as successful as was hoi>ed, though 25 pounds 
of lime, 20 pounds of sulfur to 240 gallons of water with a 15 
minute boil killed a large jK^rcentage of the scales on an old 
applet ree in early Sei)teml>er withon.t materially injuring the 
foliage. It is barely possible that a combination of about this 
strength can Ix^ used with iHMieticial i^esults, but nothing of the 
kind can Im recommended till further experiments have tested 
its practicability. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 167 

DISEASED AND DYING TREES AND INSECT ATTACK 

The connection existing between diseased and dying trees and 
insect depredations is not only one of interest, but also of con- 
siderable importance, since in some instances at least serious 
depredations have origin in a group of diseased or dying trees. It 
is well known for example that certain species exhibit a decided 
preference for trees in this condition, and when breeding there- 
from in very large numbers are liable io attack healthy trees, if 
nothing more suitable is within reach. It is very likely for ex- 
ample that the more serious injuries by the elm borer, S a p e r d a 
tridentata Oliv., and the elm snout beetles, M a g d a 1 i s 
a r m i c o 1 1 i s Say and M . b a r b i t a Say, begin in this manner. 
These three insects can at least complete their transformations in 
dead tissues and are known to work in those which are living, and 
it seems very likely that in some cases they first attack a sickly 
limb or tree, and then after becoming abundant are able to kill 
others which show no signs of lowered vitality. The same is true 
of certain bark borers belonging to the genus Tomicus which oper- 
ate exclusively in coniferous trees. Our largest species known as the 
coarse-writing bark beetle, Tomicus calligraphus Germ., 
usually breeds abundantly in diseased bark and instances have 
come under our observation where this species not only ran a few 
galleries in living tissues, but evidently took i)art in a primary 
attack on a tree in apparently normal condition. It was assistinl 
in this work by a smaller pine bark beetle, Tomicus p i n i Say, 
which operates in the thinner bark, about the middle portion of 
the trunk and on the larger limbs. This latter specties very likely 
has more to do in killing trees than the form previously mentioned, 
hut evidence at hand indicates that the larger as well as the 
smaller may have an important part in this destructive work when 
conditions an; favorable. The destruction of tR^es by insects 
breeding from a few dying ones was well illustrated in the sum- 
mers of 1900 and 1001, at whith time a number of jiines in the 
vicinity of Albany began to look unhealthy. Investigation showed 
that they were infested with bark borers, and later in the season 



168 NEW YORK STATE MUSriJM 

of 1900 and the following many of the borers emerged from these 
dying trees and entered o1liei*s, in which latter they were 
presumably the prime cause of death. The evidence at hand 
leads us to bi^lieve that in this cast* the bark heretics were j)rimari]y 
attracted to certain trees lK»iause of reduced vitality, possibly as 
a result of the excessive drouth of the prciedingyear, and that all 
subs(»<iuent injuries were due to their abnornuil abundance; since 
they issued from the infested trends in swarms and attacked those 
adjacent, and the insects breetling from the latter in turn invaded 
otheiv more remote fnun the center of infestation. The obtaining 
of data along these* lines is somewhat diflicult, since it is dependent 
on favorable conditions, and the f^ollowing account of (observations 
made during the past seas(m has ain important In^aring on one 
as[)ect of this subj<Ht. 

Forest fires and insect attack. The annals of entomology contain 
very little regarding the relationship existing betw(*en forest fires 
and insect attack, and the extended burnings last spring in the 
Adirondacks, pres<Mite<l a most favorable oppcu't unity feu* studying 
this question, so far as tiw»s occurring at that time of year are con- 
cemeil. The principal object was lirst to secure data on the 
rajudity with which insect injury followed fire, and second to 
learn if there was a connection between (extended fin^s and serious 
damage by ins<Hts in adjacent forests. It is very probable that 
the time of year when tin* tire occurs, has considerable bearing on 
the liability of insects entering the tr(*i*s and breeding in lai'ge 
numbers, and the same is true of the ctharacter of the fire. A 
forest fire which not only kills but burns trees so badly that there 
is a rapid drying of those standing is much less likely to be fol- 
lowed by insect attack than one where there is only sufficient burn- 
ing at the base to kill, sixnially if death is not rapid. Ap. 30, 
May 15 and June l\ there were somewhat (extensive fii'es in the 
vicinity of Big Moose, and investigations by assistant I). B. Young, 
July 2, showed that insect attarks had become nicely started in 
the burning of May 15, more advanc(*d in that of April 30, while 
practically no signs of insi'ct prewMu-e were observed in that of 
June 3. This would seem to indicate that the trees are not at- 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 169 

tacked till from four to six weeks after the initial injury. Mr 
Young's investigations showed that trees entirely killed by the 
fire were less subject to attack than those which had been so 
severely scorched as to be nearly dead or in a dying condition. An 
examination July 3 of a large tract at Big Moose, which was 
burned over June 3 and was extinguished on the 18tli, failed to 
8lio\^'any insectsworking on these trees; in faH, within the fire zone 
they were scarce, only a few common moths and a lady beetle 
being observed; just outside this fire zone, where trees had been 
felled to keep the fire from spreading, a few spruce bark beetles, 
Polygraph us rufipennis Kirby had begun to attack 
the spruce. The trees were attacked in the following order: pine, 
spruce, tamarack, birch, hemlock, balsam, beech and maple. 

Investigations by Mr Young on Aug. 12 of the area burned 
June 3 showed a remarkable scarcity of bark borers (scolytids) 
in the fire zone at Big Moose. This may possibly be explained by 
the fire o<»curring at a time when no brood of adults was able to 
take advantage of the favorable conditions, and it may also be 
that the injured trees were not attractive enough to the insects 
for some reason or other. In our own experience, we have come 
across several burnings where it would appear as though bark 
borers should be abundant, and yet examination has shown them 
to be present in very snmll numbers. The timber on the above 
mentioned area has been injured entirely by large buprestids men- 
tioned in succeeding paragmphs, which cause comparatively little 
injury to the luml)er. The section burned Ap. 30 was also ex- 
amined, and the principal damage here had evidently been caused 
by the ambrosia beetles (mentioned in following paragraphs), 
since they operate in sap^X)od and produce the black pin holes 
which seriously affect the commercial value of lumber. 

Pine. Investigations July 9 at I^ke Clear Junction, where a 
fli-e occurred May 18, showed that the pine bark borer, T o m i c u s 
p i n i Say, was working in the living tissues of a tree which had 
been injured by the fire. 

The work of this species should be followed soon by that of the 
sawyer, Monohammus confusor Kirby, or M. s c u t e 1 - 



170 NEW YORK STATE MUSKUM 

latus Say, which begins its operations by depositing eggs in 
large slits in the bark. The grubs tunnel the inner tissues of the 
bark and in the course of a short time enter the sapwood and by 
winter probably pierce the trunk to a considerable depth, materi- 
ally injuring the lumber for other purposes than firewood. Mr 
Young's investigations in both July and August disdosc^d no 
signs of injury by this species. Two specimens of R h y n c o 1 u s 
brunneus Mann, were taken by him July 9 at I^ake (Meur 
Junction from a pine injured by fire the previous year. 

Spmoe. This tree was first attacked by the spruce bark bcvtle, 
Polygraph us rufipennis Kirby, and the lined ambro- 
sia beetle, Xyloterus lineatus Kirby. The former is a 
very common insect in the Adirondacks and undoubtedly cansi^s 
a large amount of injury by killing trees, while the latter, working 
as it does in the sapwood and producing conspicuous black liolt-s, 
seriously affects the merchantable value of considemble lumber. 
July 3 almost every spruce in the area burned Ap. 30 at Big Moose 
was attacked by these two insects, the first working near the top of 
the tree, while the latter operated in the lower portions of the 
trunk. Another ambrosia beetle, Qnathotricus materi- 
a r i u s Pitch, was also observed in small numbers in the base of 
one or two trees. On another section, where the fire ociun-ed 
May 14, it was found that the spruce bark beetle, P o I y - 
graphus rufipennis Kirby, and the lined ambrosia bcn^tle, 
Xyloterus lineatus Kirby, had just begun work, and a 
species of Chrysobothris was also met with on spruce. Burned 
areas in the neighborhood of Lake Placid were also visited, and it 
was found that on the section where a very severe fire occurred 
April 30, the insects began oi)erations later than on the area 
burned over about the same time at Big Moose, where the f\re 
was not so injurious to the trees. The fire at Lake Pla(tid, iKcur- 
ring June 3, was less injurious than the one at Big Moose on the 
same date, and on July 9 the scolytids were just beginning to 
attack the spruce, indicating that trees which were merely 
scorched, but not so much as to kill them at once, are sooner 
attacked by insects. 



REPORT OP THE STATE KNTOMOrX)GIST 1903 171 

Investigations of spruce Aug. 12 on the tract at Big Moose 
which was burned June 3 showed that trees giving no evidence of 
insect attack on July 3 were infested with the larvae of a bupre- 
Btid, probably Ghrysobothris scabripennis Lap. & 
Gory. This record is of interest as showing when the trees are 
likely to be infested by this class of borers, which operate largely 
in the sapwood and do not seriously affect the value of the lumber. 
This beetle was fairly common on standing but badly burned 
spruce. The buprestid showed a decided preference for larger 
trees, though those which were badly scorched so that the inner 
bark had dried were not infested. Two or three specimens of 
Xylotrechus undulatus Say w^ere taken on spruce, and 
Phymatodes dimidiatus Kirby was also met with in 
sparing numbers. The bark borers noticed above had made con- 
siderable progress. 

Tamarack. Investigations July 9 of a section burned May 14 
at Lake Clear Junction resulted in finding a tamarack infested by 
a scolytid, possibly T o m i <• u s p i n i Say. A specimen of Lep- 
tura, L . s u b h a m a t a Kand., was also taken from a burned 
trunk. 

Birch. The yellow birches at Big Moose on the tract burned 
over A p. 30 were in early July, in many cases, slightly green 
at Ihe top and were being mined by Dryocoetes eich- 
lioffi Hopk. ; specially was this the case where the trunks 
wei'e srorched seriously enough to inteM-fere with the circulation 
of sap. The coninion flat -headed l^orer, Cli r y s o b o t h r i s 
fern o rat a Fa!)r., was taken on a fallen birch. The pigeon 
iKMnex, T. eolnniba Linn., was observed in small numbi^rs 
on birch, but investigations showed that its attack was confined to 
more or less decayed trees. This ins<»ct was also met with under 
the same ('onditions on nia])le and Ikm^cIi ti^ees. Birch trees were 
relatively fii^ from insect atta<'k in August, probably because 
the thin bark pennitt(»d rapid evaporation and the consequent 
drying wa>i unfavorable for boivrs, through Dryocoetes had made 
ronsidenible progress in the large ti'ecs. 

Hemlock. The (I-spotted l>n]»restid, M e 1 a n o p h i 1 a f u 1 - 
voguttata Harr., was numerous at Big Moose July 3 in the 



172 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

burning of Ap. 30, on largo hemlocks. Though they were some- 
what gi-eiMi, none were observedi on very small dead trees. 'A 
oenunbicid, X y I o t r e c h u s u n d u 1 a t u s Say, was observed 
in some nunil)ei*s. Examination of these trees Aug. 10 resulted 
in finding some infested which showed no evidence of insect at- 
tack July 3, the. larvae of Melanophila fulvoguttata 
Harr. i)roba!)ly !>eing (he principal offender. This is ]>erhaps 
to be explained by this Imprest id being on the wing mostly dur- 
ing July, and con**<»<piently there would not l)e a serious infesta- 
tion till after the adults had flown for a i)eriod. 

Balsam. Invi^stigations July 2 on an area near Hig Moose, 
burned over Ap. .*^0 ivsulted in finding s(»veral si>ecimens of 
(y h r y s o b o t h r i s p u s i 1 1 a l^iip. & (lory on this tree, while 
C . 8 c a b r i p e n n i K Lap. & ( Jory, were fairly common on the 
standing but badly burned balsams. Investigations Aug. 12 
showed that the U'llsiim compared with spruce was (juite exempt 
from attack, probably due to the thinness of the bark and con- 
sequently cpiick drying of the sai)wood. The lined ambrosia 
beetle, Xyloterus li neat us Kirby, was found in small 
numbers in July and its operations had progivssed but little in 
August. 

Poplar. Hxaminations July 7 of an area near Hig Moose 
burned over May 14 resulted in finding a large species of Xyle- 
borus in poplar. 

Conclusions. Investigations the present season have shown that, 
while a number "of insects are liable to attack burned trees 
within four to six w<H»k8 after injury, no very material injury is 
likely to result during the summer, except possibly from the 
work of ambi*osia beetles. The (Hher species either confine their 
oi>erations so largely to the bark or else occur in such small 
numlx^i^s that for the pivsent they may l>e neglected^ The am- 
brosia iH'etles rai-ely extend their operations to a gi-eater depth 
than 2 or l\ inches and as a consequence a considei^ble propor- 
tion of the luml>er will be free of injury. This would hardly 
jjrove to l)e the case if the trees are allowed to remain standing 
a second season, at which time they will undoubtedly offer at- 



REPORT OF TUB STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 173 

tmetive shelters for a ininil>pr of other boroi's, some of which 
may iXMietrate the wood to a considerable depth and damage it 
very materially for other than firewood purposes. While pix)mpt 
cutting of burned timber is advised wherever ju-actical, the evi- 
dence at hand is not sufficient to indicate any very urgent neces- 
sity of its l)eing removed prior to the winter following the attack. 
The insi'cts now in the burned tnK»s (if the latter are allowed 
to remain) will probably api>ear another spring and be numerous 
enough to cause considerable damage at least to weiiker trees 
in the vicinity of the burned airas, and their multiplication in 
such jdaccs may eventually lead to a considerable extension of 
the <lamage. This is particularly liable to l^e the ciise with ever- 
giHH»u trees, and in the vicinity of Albany we have observed 
wneral hMxilities whei'e bark lK>rer attack appeared to start with 
one or more infested trws, and the atTected an'a was gradually 
increased till a considerable numUM* of pines were desti'oyed. 

It is not only advisable to cut the burned ti'ees so far as i)OS- 
sible during the winter, but they should also l)e i-emoved from 
the land or at least gott(Mi into water, so that the insects now 
under the dead bark will be unable to emerge and continue the 
attack. The same end may be attaincMl in the case of bark boivrs, 
and they an^ the on(*s most likely to injure standing ti'ees, b}' 
{)eeling the bark from the logs. This will hardly Ik* ])ractised in 
this county, even if it were proti table — something ivquiring 
(lemonsti"ation. 

VOUTNTARY KNTOMOLOGK^. SKRVK^O OF NKW YORK 

STATK 

The work of the hist four yeai's has l)een continued and a num- 
l)er of valuable observations added* to our ])revious reports. The 
season of VM)2 was unfavorable for the development of certain 
forms of insect lif<N and the same has lieen true to even a more 
marked extent in 11)03. The latter, however, will prolyjibly go 
down in history as a season when plant lice or aphids were abnor- 
mally abundant and injurious to a givat many plants throughout 
the entire State. 3t> voluntary obstMvers weiv apiK)inted during 



174 NKW YOUK STATE MUSEUM 

iho season and but 21 of (hem ren(l(»red ro|)orf8. This is largely 
due to the gc*n(»ral seareity of forms which lend themselves readily 
to obsiTvation, and the depredations of plant lice are so similar 
that most observei^ weit* unable to report on the outbreak in 
a satisfactory manner. It will l)e note<l that the following re- 
IK)rts contain some negative statcMnents, which are of value 
becaus<^ they empha^izx^ the abnormal scarcity of various species. 
Too much dei>end(»nce can not l)e placed on these reports, becaus<» 
with some excvpticms they may be called local and not repiv 
sentative even of the county. Tt will also he obser\'ed that there 
aiv a numb<*r of contlicting statements, due to the belief by some 
parties that dry weather is favorable to the development of plant 
lice, while otliei*s state most clearly that the greiit increa.se in 
numlxTS of these ]K*sts was subseipient to the rains. It may Im* 
stated that we have not encmgh data to explain this ditferenci* 
and we are content at present to give opinicms as they are trans- 
mitted. The observei-s all agrcn^ in re])orting wry (*old, inclement 
weather in the e»arly part «)f the season, and this undoubtedly 
had considerable etTect in checking the a{^i>earance or in reducing 
the destruct iveness of some of our more common injurious species. 

Albany county [K. T. Schoonmaker, CtHlar Hill] — Forest tent 
caterpillai^ (Malacosoma disstria Hiibn.) hatched in 
limited numbers Ap. 2^5 and a])parently have not suffered by the 
freeze. These inse<ts caused practically no injury later in the 
S(*ason and consequently no re{)ort was made I'egarding the same. 
Elm leaf beetles ( G a 1 e r u c e 1 1 a 1 u t e o 1 a Miill.) occurre<l 
in limited numbers but were not abundant enough in the country 
to cause material damage. 

Cattaraugus county [C. K, Eldredge, ]A^on] — Complaint of a 
looper caterpillar, j)robably a species of canker worm, was re- 
ceived June 10 with the statement that th(\v had been observed on 
forest trees in that vicinity for several yeai-s, and that previously 
they had not appeared on appletrees. These insects were so n(»ar 
maturity that on June 17 no specimens were to be found. A soft 
scale (L e c a n i u m ? p r u i n o s u m Coq.) was taken in some 
numbers from a trumpet vine. The unusually cold, incleme^nt 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 175 

weather kept insects well in control, and as a consequence there 
Wixs comparatively little to report from this section. — June 10 

GattarauguB county [F. A. Fitch, Randolph] — Appletree tent 
caterpillars (Malacosoma americana Fabr.) appeared 
the latter part of April and were v(»ry abundant in neglected 
orchards, increasing immensely in numbers during the last two or 
three years. Squash bugs ( A n a s a t r i s t i s DeGeer) iniined a 
crof) of squashes in this section last year. Cabbage butterflies 
(P i e r i s r a p a e Linn.) api)eared about the middle of May, 
and the same was true of May bugs, specues unknown, and various 
moscjuitos. The white grub of the May beetle has not been as 
destructive as in former years. — 3fai/ 18, Potato beetles (D o r y- 
p h o r a 10-1 i n e a t a Say) , grasshoppers and the i)lum curculio 
lOonotrachelus nenuphar Hexbst.) made their appear- 
ance May 26. Early in June curculios were reported as being at 
work, potato beetles as laying eggs, and plant lice as being present 
on cherrytrees. The latter are the ordinary black species 
( M y z u s c e r a s i Fabr.) which has been unusually destructive 
and injurious in various sections of the State. Scpiash bugs ap- 
iH^ai-ed June 18, horn flies (llaemotobia serrata Rob. 
Hesv.) the second week in June, and rose beetles (M ac r o d ac - 
(ylus subspinosus Fabr.) wei*e very abundant on some 
rose bushes. Potato beetles are somewhat abundant and are lay- 
ing eggs on potatoes. So far this scai^n insects appeared to be 
k*ss injurious than usual, probably on account of cold rains. 
— June 22. Large, green hoi-seflies are (piite troublesome and 
young grasshoppers are numerous on lowlands. Insect de[)reda- 
tions are less than usual.— Vw/// S, There are few mosquitos in 
the village and on the farm we saw none where commonly there 
have been millions. Ditching the land has undoubtedly aided 
very much in reducing their numlK*r. Flies are also less abun- 
dant than usual. — July 22. The tirst cabbage butterfly was ob- 
served in the field Aug. 11. A single mosquito was observed re- 
cently, though none had been seen for weeks before. Cabbage 
maggots (Phorbia brassicae RoucIkT*) are working to 
some extent on cabbage, and the same is true of the cabbage louse 



170 NEW YORK STATE MUSEU-U 

( A ]> h i 8 b r a 8 8 i c a e Linn.) (Jrasshoppirs ai-e siairo aH well 
as most other injuriouH inseits.— .li/r/. 11 

Cayuga county [IMirley Mintuni, Locke] — Applelix^e tent eater 
jnllars (M a 1 a e o k o ni a a ni e r i e a n a Fabr.) weir observed 
for the tirst time May 5. Farmers have begun spraying. Very 
few injnrions in8t*<*ts apiK^arcMl owing probably to the extivmely 
cold and fi"osty nights. — May .7. Colorado |iutato l>eetles (Do r y- 
p h o r a 10-1 i n e a t a Say) are very plenty, and tlie small, black 
flea beetle (C r e p i d o d e r a c n c n m e r i s Ilarr.) is at work 
on potatoes and also fading on various weeds in the [»otato 
field. — June 11 

Chemung county [M. H. lUvkwith, Klmira] — Cabbage butter- 
flies (Pier is rapae Linn.) appeared Ap. 23. The Indian 
Cetonia (E u p h o r i a i n d a liinn.) was observed May 1, and 
appletree tent cateri)illars ( M a 1 a c o s o m a a m e r i c a n a 
Fabr.) the 2d. The latter di» not appear to Iw as numerous as 
usual at this season of tin* year. — May 8. Cun\ant worms 
(Pteronns ribesii Scop.) api>eared on gooseberries May 
8, asparagus bei^les (C r i o r e r i s a s p a r a g i Linn.) May 11 
and potato beetles ( I) o r y p h o r a 1 - 1 i n e a t a Say) were 
first observed May 10. Then^ were at this time no depredations 
of s[K?cial importance. — May 25. Plant lice have l)een very 
abundant on plum and cherry tre<»s but since the rains they are 
le§s numerous. Potato beetles are not very abundant and their 
eggs are developing slowly. — Jntic SO. This has been a most 
renmrkable season for insect depredations, as there have been 
very few sjuhmcs obsi»rved during the protract tni dry weather. 
Early in the summer plant lice were quite abundant on cheri*}- and 
plum trees and threatened for a time to cause consider-able injury, 
but the wet weather came soon enough to pi^event any givat dain- 
age. Currant worms were less numerous than last year and the 
second brood was very small. Potato beetles were less destruct- 
ive than usual and occurred in very small numbers. Cutworms 
were quite numenms, yet they caused less damage to plants than 
usual. Tobacco worms (Phlegethontius 5-maeu- 
1 a t u s Hiibn.) were very scarce, in fact, only two were met with 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 177 

this season, though much time was spent in tobacco fields. The 
striped cucumber beetle (Diabrotica vittata Fabr.) and 
the squash bug (Anasa tristis DeGeer) have been so few in 
number that their attacks were not noticed. The fall web worm 
(Hyphantria textor Harr.) was rather more abundant 
than last season. — Oct. 8 

Dutchess county [H. D. Lewis, Annandale] — ^Ap[)letree tent 
caterpillars (Malacosoma americana Fabr.) were firet 
observed Ap. 20, and forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma 
d i s s t r i a Hiibn.) on the 30lh. A very few bud moth larvae 
(Tmetocera ocellana Schiff.) were observed May 1. 
Cold weather has kept insects in check and no si)ecies is remark- 
ably abundant. — May ^. Tent caterpillars are, so far, much less 
abundant than for the [Kist five years. The weather continues 
cold and dry and insects and fungi are develo[)ing slowly. — May 
12. Tent catei'pillars of both 8i:ecies are reported as causing some 
injury. Plant lice (A phis m a 1 i Fabr. and Myzus cerasi 
Fabr.) are exceedingly abundant on apple and cherry trees 
respectively. — May 21. The latter have appeared recently and 
they are the only insects which are at all abundant. The weather 
continues cold and dry. — June 1. There is a great decrease in 
the number of caterpillars from last year and plant lice are 
exceedingly abundant. — June 1'). Plant lice are still increasing 
and are the only insects which are of much importance. Tent 
caterpillars, both si)ecies, arc ni>t nearly so abundant as in former 
years. The weather is very wet at present. — June 22. Apple 
plant lice are present in enormous numbers and more abun- 
dant than they have been for 10 years. There are a few cut- 
worms but other insects are scarce. The weather continues cold 
and very wet. — June 25. A very serious attack of pear psylla 
(Psylla pyricola Forst. ) has developed within the last 10 
days, and the crop will be seriously hurt. Apple aphis is still 
present in very large numbers, and potato beetles (Doryphora 
1 - 1 i n e a t a Say) are remarkable for their scarcity. — July 10. 
The apple aphis and the pear jisylla continued in great abundance 
and have inflicted very serious damage, specially the latter. The 



178 NEW YORK STATE MUSBl'M 

weather has been very wet and cold since June 1, and apparently 
favorable for the development of th(^ above insects. The peartreee 
have suffered extremely, all the young growth being killed, and 
they are now starting a new gi'owtli from next year's buds. This 
wood can not ripen and the rosultn must be very injurious. We 
visited one pear orchard of 600 trees where Psyllas were still very 
active and attacking the new growth as fast as it appeared. The 
pear crop in this section is ruined. -Aw^. 10 

Erie county [J. U. Metz, Swormville] — Striped asparagus beetle 
(Crioceris asparagi Linn.) was observed today for the 
first time. We have not been able to find any of the spotted 
species (C . 1 2 - p u n c t a t a Linn.) . Quite a little wheat is 
down but we have not been able 1o detect any work of the Hessian 
fly (Cecidomyia destructor Say). — May 28. Currant 
worms (Pteronus ribesii Srop.) were observed yesterday 
in numbers for the firet time. Rose l)eetles ( Macrodactylus 
subspinosus Fabr.) are exceedingly numerous Jind causing 
considerable dainugt^^. Both moth liirvae (Tmetocera ocel- 
1 a n a Schiff.) are quite numerous and causing some injury. Not 
a trace of Hessian fly has been observed. Many young shoots of 
blackberries are affected by the gouty gall beetle (Oberea 
bimaculata Oliv.). Potato l)eetles (Doryphora 10- 
line a t a Say) are numerous on c^arly potatoes. — June 11. Rose 
beetles are very numerous and in one instance were so abundant 
that some cherry trees were literal Iv covered with them and looked 
as though they had been scorched by flre; not only the foliage but 
also the fruit was affected, and the insects were not above eating 
the grass beneath the trees. Grajje vines are also being injured to 
some extent by these pests. — July it 

Genesee county [J. F. Rose, South Byron] — Cabbage butterflies 
(Pieris rapae Linn.) were Hi'st observed May 6, and potato 
beetles (Doryphora 1 - 1 i ii (mi t a Say) were first noticed 
May 7. Tent caterpillars (Malacosoma am eric ana 
Fabr.) are scarce as yet. The extiemely cold, inclement weather 
of early May has kept many ins(»cts in check. — May 11. Cab- 
bage worms were fii-st observed on plants the 22d. Asparagus 



EEPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 179 

beetles (Crioceris asparagi Linn.) are plenty. There 
are not many potato beetles as yet. Cigar case-bearers (C" o 1 e o - 
phora fletcherella Fern.) are very numerous in some 
orchards. Something has liapj)ene<l to tent caterpillars, as they 
are extremely scarce; so evident is this that it is a source of com- 
mon remark. There are no evidences of injury by cankerworm. — 
May 25. The cabbage root maggot (Phorbia brassicae 
Boiich<5) is unusually numei*ous and vei-y destructive to early cab- 
bages. The four-lined leaf bug (P o e c 1 1 o c a p s u s 1 i n e Ji t u s 
Fabr.) is quite abundant and, as usual, is indifferent as to what 
kind of plant it attacks, occurring with great imj^artiality on 
burdock, peppermint, sage, currant etc. Cjinkerworms are very 
scarce in this immediate vicinity, but are reported as having done 
considerable damage in orchards between here and Kochester. 
In a trip to Niagara Falls 1 observed several oivhards between 
LaBalle and that place, which were brown from the work of this 
pest. — June 3. There is practically no Hessian fly (Cecido- 
m y i a d e s t r u ct o r Say) as after inquiry at a grange meet- 
ing, only one farmer re{)orted any, and that was in a field of late 
sown no. 6 white wheiit. A similar inquiry regarding (tanker- 
worms and tent caterpillai*s resulted in statements that very few 
or none had been seen. Ther(» is some complaint of plant lice on 
plum and cherry iViH'H.—Junc 15. The black or cucumber flea 
beetle (Crepidodera cucumeris Harr.) is much com- 
plained of and has not only perfoi*ated potato leaves but is said 
to be at work on corn and Ix^ans as well as tomatoes. The striped 
cucumber beetle ( I) 1 a b r o t i c a v i 1 1 a t a Fabr.) is very 
numerous on squash, melon and cucuml)er vines, nc*arly destroy- 
ing them in some gardens. Following our severe drouth we have 
had three weeks of drizzling rain, and plant lice are very bad on 
fruit and other trees. We have never seen them on so many varie- 
ties of ti'ees till this year. Tlie young growth of quinces for fi 
or 8 inches on each shoot is a mass of lice, and the leaves are black- 
ened and rolled up. This plant louse outbre«ak has been exceed- 
ingly severe and injurious to a gi-eat many ])lants. There is a 
very general complaint amcmg cabl>age growers al>out the root 



180 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

maggot. The cabbage plant louse (Aphis brassicae 
Fabr.) is also abundant, curling the leaves and turning them 
blue. — June 29. Fall webwornis (Hyphantria textor 
Harr.) api)eai'ed July 2 and are now quite numerous. The squash 
bug (Anasa tristis DeGeer) has not appeared. There 
wtis a fair rrop of strii^ed cucumber lK»etles and they have now 
disapiK?ared. Cablwiges ai-e white with cabbage aphis. This is 
the first time this ins4H*t has lK»en a serious pest in this locality. 
Plant lice are also exceedingly abundant on fruit tree^. Pear 
psylla (P s y 1 1 a p y r i c o 1 a Foi^st.) is very abundant and 
seriously injuring the crop. — July 2. Fall webwomis are un- 
usually numerous, and potato growere have had little difficulty 
in controlling the potato l)eetle. Cabbages are very seriously 
atfeited by the a[)his. Not a squash bug has been seen. — Aug. 11 

Greene county [O. Q. Flint, Athens] — No injurious insects have 
been observed except tent caterpillars (Malaeosoma a m eri- 
ca n a Fabr.), wiiich appeared later than usual and are much 
scarcer at this date than has ever been known before. The 
weather was extremely dry and growers are spraying pear and 
plum trees. — May 20 

Herkimer county [George S. Graves, Newport] — Black butter- 
flies (probably K u v a n e s s a a n t i o p a Linn.) , were observed 
for the first time Ap. 25, and the same is true of the cabbage 
butterfly (P i e r i s r a p a e Linn.). Cold winds and cloudy 
weather seem to have delayed the apiKJiirance of insects. — Ap. 2S. 
Webs of the appletrei^ tent caterjjillar (Malaeosoma 
americana Fabr.) l>e}i;an to api>ear Ap. 30 and were by no 
means abundant May G. The weather has been too cold for any 
rapid increase in insect life. — May 7. Plant lice have appeared 
on wild chern trees, and the currant worm (Pteronus 
ribesi i Scop.) is Jit work, Iwth eggs and larvae being foimd. 
No nests of t(mt caterpillars have Ix^en observed this week. The 
weather is warm and dry. — May Vf. Potato beetles (l)ory- 
p h o r a 1 - 1 i n e a t a Say) were observed May 16, and cur- 
rant lice ( M y z u s r i b i s Fabr.) were just appearing on the 
leaves on the same date. — May 21. Black flea beetles (Crepi- 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 181 

(1 o d e r a c ii c n m oris ILirr.) ai-e appearing on [K)tato leaves, 
and some insect is feeding quite g(4ierally on plantains, (very 
probably D i b o 1 i a b o r e a 1 i s C'hev.) . Horn flies (H a e m a - 
tobia serrata Rob.-Desv.) are quite numerous on cattle. 
An examination shows that eggs of the currant worm are abun- 
dant. Kim foliage is full of holes, prokibly the work of larvae 
of the elm flea l>oe1 le ( 1 ) i s o n y c h a triangularis Say) . — 
Mai/ 27. Terminal leaves of elms are badly twisted and wrinkled by 
aphis attack, very pn)bably Schizoneura am eric an a 
Uiley. Potato In^etles ai'e very rai'ely seen, though uuiny eggs 
have b(H»n observe<l. The foliage of the few j»otatoes above 
ground is badly eaten by the black flea lK>etle. Nests of the 
appleti*ee tent caterpillar are very scarce and with but few 
tenants. Currant aphis continues abundant. — June 3. Rose bee- 
tles ( M a c r o d a c t y 1 u s s u b s [> i n o s u s Fabr. ) were ob- 
served for the first time on rosebushes June 4, and considerable 
damage lias lx*en inflicted. A species of plant louse (Chaito- 
p h o r u s n e g u n d i n i s Thos.) has apj^eaivd somewhat abun- 
dantly on the ash-leaf maple. (irasshoppei'<s «are becoming quite 
abundant in old i»asitures. The scarcity of potato beetles is 
cause for general comment, and the black flea lKH41es are ex- 
ceedingly numerous on potato and (omato vines. — June W, A 
few full-grown forest tent caterpillar larvae (Malacosoma 
disstria Uiibn.) were observed. Spittle insects are uncom- 
monly abundant on grass under a spreading shade tree. Rose 
beetles (Macro d .a c t y I u s s u b s p i n o s u s Fabr.) are 
abundant on a[)pletrees, on thoni apple, and veiy numerous on 
white daisy and dock. The daisy flowers are eaten off in many 
instances. — June 11. Potato beetle larvae were observed on one 
plant June 22, and a few striped cucund)er Ix^etles (Diabro- 
tica vittata Harr.) were noticed on lima be«ans. The cur- 
rant aphis (M y z u s r i b i s Fabr.) is causing v(»ry little damage, 
while tomato and ]M>tato vines ai*e considerably injure*] by the 
black flea lMH»tle. — June 2). ('urrant leaves a])i>ear as though 
they had Ikvu (»atcn by the sawfly, though no larvae have Ixvn 
observed. The little plant Icuise ( 1> r e p a n o s i p h u m ac e r i - 



182 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

f o 1 i i Thos.) api)cars to be quite conimon on a number of varie- 
ties of maple and is causing some injury. — July 1. Black-headed 
cabbage worms (Evergestis stramenalis Htibn.) are 
causing some injury to turnips. Rome caterpillars, probably fall 
webworms (IT y p h a n 1 r i a t e x t o r Ilarr.) have appeared in 
small numl)ors on an appletroe. Plant lice are abundant on many 
plants, such as apple, elm, l>ox-older, birch, wild cherry, burdock, 
pigw<^d and dock. Though potato l)eetles were never so incon- 
spicuous, then* ai'o plenty of grubs. — July .U, The maple aphis 
(D r e p a n o s i p h u m a c e r i f o 1 i i Thos.) a])pears to be the 
cause of much prematui'e falling of leaves, the |)ests being gen- 
erally distributed, occurring even in the tops of trees 60 feet 
high. Plant lice have appeared in some numbers on red rose 
bushes. — July 29. There is apparently another brood of black- 
headed cabbage worms at work, if size is any indication. Plant 
lice (probably Aphis brassicae Linn.), are numerous on 
tuniips. The appletree plant louse (Aphis mali Fabr.) is 
abundant and sc^riously injuring appletrees. The pests are spe- 
cially abundant on new, tender shoots. Cherrytrees are very 
little alTectcd, and plumtr(M»s more so, but in the latter case black 
knot is also ]»r(»valent. (irasshopi>ers are genei*ally scarce, though 
in a f<»w localiti(»s they ai-e abundant. Cabbage butterfly 
(Pier is ra])ae Linn.) has not been very abundant so far 
this season. — Autj. ), A ps(Mid (P s o c u s ? v e n o s u s Bunn.) 
was found in clustei*s of 2(H> or more on the trunks of maple, and 
a few w(»iH* also observed on appletrees. In some cases the bark 
of the tree seemed to be whitened as though it were partially eaten, 
probably by the ins(*cts gnawing away the lichens and outer por- 
tions of the bark. Larvae of the elm flea beetle (I) i s o n y c h a 
triangularis Say) are very plentiful on elmtrees near by 
and have severely injur<Hl the foliage. — Aug. 12, A small, yellow- 
ish leaf liopiKu* ( ? jassid) is abundant on beans and has apparently 
caused consi(l(»rabIe yellowing of the foliage. Yellow-necked ap- 
pletree worm ( 1> a t a n a m i n i s t r a Drury) is present in 
small numboi*s, and the same is also true of the fall webwonn. 
The brown and black woolly l>ears (P y r r h a r c t i a i s a b e II a 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 183 

Abb. & Sm.) wore uiuisiially iniinoroiis in a tiniotliy field. — Aug, 
12. Plant lice are numerous on l)eans, and on sunflowers there 
is a similar si)eries. Codlinji: moth larvae (C a r p o e a p s a 
p o m o i; e 1 1 a Schill.) have bej!;un'oiKn'ation8, and wormy apples 
are not uncommon. IMant lice continue abundant on pigweed. — 
Aug. W. Horn flies (II a e m a t o b 1 a serrata Kob.-Desv.) 
and horaeflies have bcH»n very ti^ublesome for the past two weeks. 
A few caterpillars of A p a t e 1 a a m e r i c a n a llarr. were 
observed on soft nuiph* today. Fall webworms ( H y p h a n t r i a 
t ex tor ilarr.) are api^irently more abundant than last year, 
occurring in some nundjcrs on apph»tre(^s. Hornet nests ai-e more 
numerous than usual. — Aug. 2-1. liutternut tives are very badly 
eaten in some j daces by 1 > a t a n a i n t e g e r r i m a (Jr. & Rob. 
Fall webworms continue* to be unusually abundant. — *9ep. 1. 
Plant li<'e (O h a i t o p h o r u s n e g u n d i n i s Thos.) still con- 
tinues abundant on box-elder. Ajjples are comparatively scarce 
this year and ap[)ear to l)e wormier than ever. A few webworm 
nests wei-e observed on lilac and alder today. — *SV/>. /(>. Pieris 
larvae are injuring foliage of cultivated nasturtiums to a <'onsid- 
erable extent. — Oct, 1 

Onondaga county [Mrs A. M. A. Jackson, Camillus] — Firat nest 
of an appletree tent caterpillar ( M a 1 a c o s o m a a m e r lean a 
Fabr.) was observed Ap. 2(1, and the present indications are that 
this insect will not Ik3 as abundant as usual. There is a report 
that Hessian fly ( t ' e c i d o m y i a d e s t r u (! t o r Say) is work- 
ing in some fields. — Ap. 28. The blue or meat fly is quite abundant 
about housi'S. ( -abbage butterfli<»s (Pieris r a p a e Linn.) are 
alMjut, though not numerous. Sjiotted lady Ix^etles occur on many 
weeds and plants, and though abundant do not ai)pear to be 
destructive. Tent cater[)illars are not numercms and ai-e causing 
very little injury. Cold, inclement weather has kept caterpillars 
and other insects in check. Examination of one wheat field 
showed no Ilessian fly, and growers state that thus far none has 
been met with. — May (L ('ankerworms apjK^ared May 12 and 
are quite abundant and destructive. The bud moth (Tmeto- 
cera ocellana Schifl.) is at work on appletrees, though 



184 NEW YORK OTATK MUSEUM 

not causing verv iniicli injurv. Tlie forosl tent raterpillar 
( iM a 1 a (• () s <) ni a ? (J i s s t I- i a lliihn.) has apiH'aivd iu very 
small nuinheison rhokerlieirv treses. Tlie weather is dry and warm 
and couse<]Uently favorable to (he development of inscvt life. Many 
clover leaves have small, round hoh»s eaten in them, possibly the 
work of the clover leaf wwvil ( 1* h y t o u o ni u s p u n c t a t us 
Fabr.). — May 13. ('ankerworms are developing ra]>i<lly and have 
caused a gi'eat deal of injury. Ants of several species are quite 
abundant. — Mai/ 20. Ked admiral butterllies i V a n e s s a a t a - 
lanta Linn.) have appeared but are not as abundant as 
usual. The appletive tent caterpillar is (piite scarce, (mly five 
webs or nt*sts being observed in a 5 miU* drive. Cankerwornis ait^ 
abundant, and while many trees have Ihm^u injured to a consider- 
able extent, none have luvn entirely d<»foliated. Potato beetles 
(1) o r J p h o r a 1 - 1 i n e a t a Say ) have appeare<l and depos- 
ited some eggs. Cold weather is ktvping iustvts in control. 
tiriHMi pliint lice ai\* somewhat abunihuit on rosebushes. Cur-^ 
rant worms ( P t e r o n u s r i b e s i i 8cop.) are prc*sent iu 
small numbei*s, though not causing much damage. Ked admiral 
buttertlies continue scaive and others nw} not so numei'ous as 
usual. lV>tato beetles and their eggs are very abundant 
on early potatot»s. A white frost occurrwl May 31 and 
June 1, but did not seriously affwt insects. — Jmw 1. Plum 
curculios ( (Jon o t r a c h e 1 us nenu])har llerbst.) have 
stung much fruit and considerable is dropping. CankerwKirms 
have about all disapi^eared and have not caused as much injury 
as in fornu^r years. Many farmers think that tent caterpillai*s 
hatchtnl during the warm days of March and wei*e killed by the 
cold weather which followed, or else perished from lack of food. 
This hardly seems probable, as instances have been recorded where 
eggs of this s])c\ies hatched in the fall and the caterpillars suc- 
cessfully survived the winter in the latitude of Missouri. — Jwie JO. 
There are but few cocoons of the tent caterpillars, and this 
appears to be due in part to the continuous wet weather of 1902, 
when the caterpillars ate but little, were not healthy and ap- 
peai^ed to be only partly grown at the time they spun up. A very 



\ 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 185 

few Hessian flies are to be found in the ** flaxseed " stage, though 
QO complaints of their work have been I'eiteived. A leaf miner, 
probably P e g o m y i a v i c i n a Lintn., is very abundant in a 
large field of beets. Spittle insects are quite common in certain 
ields of grass. Potato beetle eggs are hatching, but the grubs do 
lot appear to be as numerous as the old ont^s and are 
•ausing comparatively little damage. Black flea beetles 

C r e p i d o d e r a c u c u m e r i s Ilarr.) have caused some in- 
ury to both tomato and potato vines. Striped cucumber beetles 

Diabrotica vittata Fabr.) are present on pumpkin 
ines but are not causing much injury. No squash bugs 

A n a 8 a t r i s t i s DcGeer) have been observed this year, 
hough they are usually very abundant and destructive in this 
eition. Kose beetles (Macrodactylus subspinosus 
♦"abr.) are quite destructive to rose bushes, though late in appear- 
ng, and leaf hoppers have also caused some injury to rose bushes, 
•eas are more frcv from weevils ( B r u c h u s p i s o r u m Linn.) 
han usual, but the vines are being eaten by a green worm similar 

the cabbage worm. House flies are not as abundant as 
sual. — June 20 

Orange county [J. M. IJolph, Port Jervis] — A few mourning 
loaks ( l!i u v a n e s 8 a a n t i o p a Linn.) and sonjc Colias butter- 
ies have appeared. Many small bees are frequenting plum 
lossoms. — Api'il 23. Plant lice (Aphis mali Fabr. and 

1 y z u s c e r a s i Fabr.) are very numerous, siKxially on apple 
nd cherry trees and rose* bushes. Tomato plants are also affcHited 
y a «|KN-ies of plant louse which may be K hopa 1 os i p h u m 
olani Thos. In general there ai'o fewer insects than usual, 
ue probably to the ex(!eedingly dry wc^ather. — June 2. I'otato 
eetles (l)oryphora 10-lineata Say) have made their 
;)I>earance in considerable numbei*s, the first abrojid on May 20, 
Qd the first larvae being observed June 9. Hundreds of lady- 
?etles were found on a crimson rambler rose, thi-ee or four on a 
•af. We have never seen them in such great numbers In^fore. 
his bush had been badly infested by plant lice, and the lady 
setles were undoubtedly attx-actcd by their pi-ey. The currant 



186 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

worm (Pteronus ribesii Scop.) has caused some injury 
though it has not b(H*n abundaut as in former yeiirs. The spiny 
elm caterpilhirs ( IC u v a n o s s a a n t i o p a Linn.) have stripped 
the leaves from a numln^r of North (Carolina poj)!ai*s planted for 
shade tree puriK>ses. — June //. Striped cucumber l>eetles (D i a- 
brotica vittata Fabr.) have appeared in considerable 
numbers. Pear and cherry slug ( 10 r i o c a m p o i d e s 1 i m a - 
c i n a Ketz.) is inflicting mu<h injury on the foliage of i)eartrees. 
Rose beetles ( M a e r o d a c t y 1 u s s u b s p i n o s u s Fabr.) have 
been si>ecially numerous and abundant this year. The foliage of 
very few bushes has escaped iKMUg eat(»n or seriously disfigured. — 
June SO 

Bockland county [S. B. Huested, Blauvelt] — Appletree tent 
caterpillai's (Ma! a c o s o m a a m eric a n a Fabr.) appeared 
as usual but have not done as much injury as in former years. 
No potato beetles have api>eared, while plant lice (Myzus 
cerasi Fabr. and M. rib is Fabr.) are unusually abundant 
on cherry and currant bushes. (/Utworms ai*e imported rather 
plenty and cedar birds have been unusually numerous un cherry- 
trees, probably being more noticeable on account of the scarcity 
of fruit. — June 7 

St Lawrence county [i\ J. Ijocke, Ogdensburg] — June bugs and 
grubs were abundant May 1. 1)(W of the birch trees in this sec- 
tion an* allccicd by a bon^r, possii)ly the bronze birch borer 
(A g r i I u s a n X i u s T.e<-.), and an wpial proportion of poplar 
tre(^s an* also injured. Th(»se latter may possibly be atfei*ted by 
a bupn^slid, ihongli it is not improbable that considerable dam- 
age is caused by the pojdar borer (Saperda calcarata 
Say) . Tiie gouty gall Ix^et le ( () b e r e a b i m a c u 1 a t a Oliv.) 
is <'ausing considerable injury in blackberry jiatches. Appletree 
borers (S a pe r d a c a n d i d a Fabr.) are abundant and infest 
many ap])letrees. Woodpeck(4*s are at work on infested trees, 
and hav(» undcmbtedly d(»stroyed many grubs. — May 16. Mourn- 
ing cloiik buttertlit^ (10 u van ess a antiopa Linn.) were 
first observed May IS, and cabbage butterflies (Pier is rapae 
Linn.) on the ^2d, (.'urrant worms (Pteronus ribesii 



RKPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 187 

Seop.) put in appearance May 18, and the same is true of the 
appletree aphis (Aphis in a 1 i Fabr.) . — May 22. Eggs of the 
potato beetle 1 1) o v\ p h o r a 10 - 1 i n e a t a Say) were observed 
May 21, and shad flies or May flies, the 22d. Mosquitos were 
abundant on the 25th. Generally speaking, no iusec»ts are spe- 
cially injurious. — May 28. Cucumber beetles (Diabrotica 
vittata Fabr.) were very numerous June 4; same was true 
on the 10th of strawberry weevil (?Anthonomus signatus 
Say) and potato beetles. White grubs are abundant and totally 
destroying oats. — June 11. Cabbage worms appeared on the 20th, 
and onion maggots (Phorbia ceparum Meigen) were at 
work the 22d. This latter insect has destroyed one fourth of 
the onion crop. Cabbages have likewise suffered from the maggot 
(Phorbia b r a s s i c a e Bouch6) . Rose slugs were observed 
«it work on tlie 2r^d. — June 2o. A second brood of currant worms 
appeared July 1. Cabbage worms, cucumber beetles, plant lice 
and onion maggots are very numerous and destructive. The wet 
weather continues, accompanied by an increase of leaf-eating 
insects. The foliage of appleti-ees, plumtrees, maples and elms 
are all attacked by plant lice. Some aj>ples are dropping and 
Bhow no sign of injury except at the end of the stem, probably the 
work of the codling moth (Carpocapsa pomonella 
Schiff.). — July 9. Crane flies and dragon flies were numerous 
July 10, and a single si)ecimen of the tomato worm (Ph lege- 
t h o n t i u s 5 - m a c u 1 a t u 8 11a w.) was observed on the 15th. 
Cabbage worms, potato l)eetles and plant lice continue abundant 
and destructive. Mos<iuito8 are abundant and rains continue. 
Ktriped cucumber beetles and plant lice are attacking vines, egg 
plants and wild tansy. — July 10. White marked tusso<*k moths 
(N o t o 1 o p h u s 1 (MI c o s t i g m a Abb. & Sm.) were obsen'ed 
July 20, and dragon Hies on the 15th. Potato beetles are abund- 
ant and plant lice very numerous, moscjuitos are rare. Cool and 
wet weather has interfered with the successful application and 
efficiency of ins(H*ticides, and as a consequence caterpillars are 
abundant. Apples are dropping fnnn the tree, and only about 
one quarter of the crop will be saved. Most of the trouble ie 



188 NBW YORK STATE MUSBUM 

probably eauHod by the codling moth larvae. — July 30. Fall web- 
woriiiH (11 y p h a ii 1 r i a text o r llarr.) appeared July 15 on 
l>hnu, apple and ehu ti'ees, and a si>ei-ies of sawfly on asters. — 
Aug, 8. Potato beetles continue numerous and destructive. Cool, 
wet weather has not affected the leaf-eating caterpillai*s or plant 
lice, both of which continue abundant. — Au(/. IJf 

Saratoga county [O. W. Ferris, Schuyler] — Appletree tent cater- 
pillars ( M a 1 a c o s m a a m e r i c a n a Fabr.) are present in 
some numbers and were not injured by a frost, the mercury drop- 
ping to 24 F. on May 2. — May 5. Cherry aphis (M y z u s c e r a s i 
Fabr.) nvc abundant on sweet cheiTies, and a green plant louse 
is aff(Mting liosc peartrtn^s very seriously. — July 15 

Schenectady county [Paul Roach, Quaker Street, Schenectady 
CO.] — Appletree tent caterpillars (M a 1 a c o s o m a a m e r i - 
can a Fabr.) are just hatching on ti*ees in warm situations. 
Their numbei*s are small, and but few egg clusters have been 
observed. — May 1 

Schuyler county [Mrs Harriet S. IJpdyke, Ix>gan] — Appleti*ee 
tent caterpillars (Mai a c o s o m a a m e r i c a n a Fabr.) ap- 
peared for the firat time May 8. They have not caused as much 
damage as usual. — May 20 

Ulster county [G(H)rge S. ( •lark, Milton] — Appletree tent cater- 
pillars (Mai a <• o s o m a a m e r i c a n a Fabr.) have been at 
work for two weeks and were not affected by the frost of April 
12, even though they wei-e not prottrted by a web. — Ap. 23. 
Tent caterpillar uonin are present in large numbers except 
in localities where they wen* carefully destroyed the pre- 
ceding year. — Aj). SO. Tent caterjiillai^s c*ontinue to in- 
crease in size, and their nests ai"e becoming more con- 
spicuous. Aphis ( M y z u s c e r a s i Fabr.) are begin- 
ning to api»ear on cherry trees. Currant worms (Pteronus 
r 1 b e s 1 i Scop.) are abundant on bushes that were not sprayed 
last year, and a few occur on those that were treated. — May 14. 
There has been no increase in appletree tent caterpillars, and 
currant worms are few, specially on bushes that were sprayed last 
year. Plant iice (M y z u s c e r a si Fabr.) are increasing on 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOCJIST 1903 189 

cherrytrees, aud it is now too late to reach them because the 
leaves are so badly curled. Some plant lice (Aphis mali 
Fabr.) have developed on appletrees. The black flea beetle 
(C r e p i d o d e r a c u c u m e r i s Harr.) is working on potato, 
tomato vines and eggplants. Some caterpillars, probably those 
of the gartered plume moth (Oxyptilus periscelidac- 
t y 1 u s Fitch) are not doing much damage. — May 21. Tent cater- 
pillars are beginning to crawl, evidently preparatory to pupation, 
and are not moi^e than one quarter as abundant as last year. 
Plant lice are nuiuerous on cherrytrees, specially young ones. The 
red spider (Tetrany<;hus telarius Linn.) is abundant 
on roses. — May 28. A few potato bugs have just appeared, and 
l)lant lice are more abundant on cherrytrees than usual. Tent 
cater]>illars do not api)ear to be as energetic as usual, possibly 
they were weakened by the early frost. Elm leaf beetles 
(G a 1 e r u c e 1 1 a 1 u t e o 1 a Mtill.) are very scarce, not a sign 
of one could be found on a large tree which had its foliage entirely 
destroyed two years ago. — June 4. Heavy rains have washed 
many of the aphids from the trees. Many plant lice continue on 
rosebushes that have not been s])rayed. — June 12. The recent 
continued rains have prevented much damage from insect pests. 
Squash bugs (Anasa tristis DeGeer) are abundant enough 
to destroy the vim^ unless controlled. Some pear psylla 
(Psylla pyricola Forst.) has aiqieared on the trees in 
various pear orchards in this vicinity. — June 18. Pear psylla is 
injuring many trees and causing much of the fruit to drop. Plant 
lice are abundant on both young pear and apple ti-et^s. — July 2 

Warren county [C. L. Williams, Glens Falls] — May beetles ap- 
IK»ared in large numbers May 9. The asparagus bc*etle (Orio- 
ceris asparagi Linn.) was observed in considerable num- 
bers May U). It has bcM^ome distributed over a tract at least 8 
miles long and is abundant. — May 25. Rose beetles (Macro- 
dactylus subspinosus Fabr.) appeared about June 22, 
and the depredations of a gray cutworm attracted attention about 
the same time. The former are very abundant and feed on 
all kinds of vegetation. The ZiCbra caterpillar (Mam^%\.\^ 



190 NEW YORK 8TATB MUSEUM 

p i e t a HaiT.) was found at work on strawberry plants. — June 9. 
June iHM^tles are exccHnlinj^ly abundant; more so than we have 
known for veai-s. — Ju!i/ *L The stalk borer (Papaipenia 
nitela (lueu.) is at work in small num1)ers on various plants, 
and we have suceeeded in detecting a parasite on the same, which 
proves to l)e a taehinid. 

Wayne county [(/. 11. Stuart, Newark] — The fti'st aphids were 
observed on roses Mav 5, and comparatively few plants were 
infested. No tent laterpiUars or cankei-worms have been ob- 
served, and the spotted aspanigus beetle (<'rio<*eris 12- 
punctata Linn.) has disappeared, thoujifh the common species 
( C. as pa rag i Linn.) is ])resJ»nt in force. House flies are 
scaire and (x-cur only on the sunny side of buildings. — May 19, 
Plant lice began to appear the latter part of May, and have been 
more abundant than we have ever known them to be l>efore. 
They oblige us to k(H^j) a gang of 15 or 20 men and boys at work 
continuously in the nursery with a whale oil soap solution to 
kvv\i tluMH in ihcck. Larvae of lady In^etles are moi\» than usually 
abundant and are undoubtedly doing gcKMl service. On our 
hiwn the only tr(»cs or jilants that have es<aped plant lice mv 
poppies and evergiHH^ns ; everything else is literally covered with 
them, or at least was so a week ago. Now the lady iHM^tle® are 
beginning to ^vt the up})er hand of the pei^ts. — July 2 

Westchester county [F. K. Calkins, Ossining] — Elm leaf iKH^tles 
( Ci a 1 e r u c e 1 1 a 1 u t e o 1 a Mtill.) appeared May 3 and have 
bcH^n increasing rapidly but have causcnl no serious damage. — 
May //. liumble flower bwtles ( E u }> h o r i a i n d a Fabr.) 
were flying about in considerable numlKMs. Hundreds of them 
were observed, though there was no evidence of material injury. 
Grasshop[)(Ms were first s(»en May t> and have become very numer- 
ous. Striped cucumlK»r beetles (l)iabrotica vittata 
Fabr.) appeared in large numlH^s on the Sth. The first Colorado 
potato hect lc»s (Do r y j) h o r a 1() - 1 i n e a t a Say) were ob- 
served on the ir)th. Appletrcn* tent cater])illars ( M a 1 a c o s o m a 
a m eric a n a Fabr.) are causing a great deal of injury in this 
section, and sjKM-ies of plant lice are curling the leaves of various 
shrubs in this vicinity. — May 18, TVve mvv^ority of elms in this 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 l9l 

Re<*fion are in very Imd condition owin^ to the work of the elm 
leaf beetle. Strij^ed cuciunber l)eetles continue very niinierouB, 
and potato be(*tles have appeared in the past week in increasing 
numbers. It looks as thouj^h the appletree tent caterpillars had 
Ih^u destroyed by some climatic conditi(m; possibly the severe 
rains in May and June. Since we had 81 days of rain with hardly 
a ray of sunshine, the webs are empt}' and there are no signs of 
coioons. Mos(|uitos are somewhat scarce. The work of the pear 
midge ( I) i j) 1 o s i s j) y r i v o r a Kiley ) is very evident, and 
chtMry b<»rcrs (probably the fruit tree bark beetles Scolytus 
r u g u 1 o s u s Ratz.), have ruined some trees. — July IS 

Westchester county [Mrs Edwin 11. Mairs, Irvington-on-Hudson] 
— White marked tussock moth caterj^illars (Notolophus 
1 e u c o s t i g m a Abb. & Sm.) are injuring the foliage of a fine 
purple beech, which is also suffering severely from plant lice, 
probably the w(M)lly bee<h aphis ( 1* h y 1 1 a ]) h i s f a g i Linn.) . 
Mapletrees have dropped many leaves, probably because of plant 
lice injury. Very likely this is the work of Chaitophorus 
aceris Thos. — June 2/>. A curious worm (Seirodonta 
b i 1 i n e a t a Pack.) was found feeding on foliage of purple l)eech. 
Mos(|uitos ai-e more abundant than ever. Elm leaf beetle larvae 
(ii a 1 e r u c e 1 1 a 1 u t e o I a Mfill. ) are crawling along the 
trunks of infested trees, the foliage of which is turning brown. 
American, English, weeping and slippery elms are all attacked. 
Maple and Ix^ech trees are still sulTering from plant lice injury. 
Some red bugs ai*e pi*(»s(Mit on the infested trees. — Juhj 12 • 

Wyoming county [W. 11. Koeper, Wyoming] — Api)letree tent 
caterj)i liars ( M a 1 a c o s o m a a m eric a n a Fabr.) were first 
observed May 2. Th<»y are pres<»nt in small numbers, and some 
think this is due to the excessively cold weather. — May 9. Insects 
of various kinds are much scarcer than usual. — May 18. Tent 
caterpillar's are not causing much injury though canker- 
worms are working to some extent. The weather continues 
very cold at night, and it is exce(»dingly dry. — May 25. Cod- 
ling moth larvae (<' a r i)Oc a ]) sa pomonella Schitt".) are 
nnusually abundant in this locality, and apjde aphis (Aphis 
ui a 11 Fabr.) is very numerous and roW'mg tY\^ \v>\v\^% Vq vl ^wv- 



192 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

siderable extent. The injury is so sevi^re that it would not be sur- 
prising if a considerable proportion of the foliage dropped. 
PotatH) beeth^s (Do r y p h o r a 1(> - 1 i n e a t a Say) are present 
in large numbers. Plant lice are also working on forest trees in 
about the same way as on fruit trees. The weather continues very 
dry and apjiears to be favorable to plant lice. The apple crop 
will l>e only about one quarter its normal size, and i>ears are 
almost a failure. IMant lice continue to be the most destructive 
form in this section, and the injury is so severe that some trees 
have half their leaves badly curled by the pests. A good rain has 
benefited crops very much. — June 1^), Maple foliage is dropping 
to a considerable extent, jjrobably as a result of injury by plant 
lice (Drepanosiphum aeerifolii Thos.) — July S 

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS OF THE ENTOMOLOGIST 

The following is a list of the principal publications of the ento- 
mologist during the year 1(>()3. 70 are given w^ith the title,^ place, 
time of publication and a summary of the contents of each. 
Volume and page number are. separated by a colon, the first su- 
perior figuiH? tells the column, and the second the exact place in 
the column in ninths; e.g. fi7 .074^6 m(»ans volume G7, page 974, 
column 1, beginning in the sixth ninth, i.e. about two thirds of 
the way down. 

Turni])s.. Country Gentleman, Nov. 27, 1002. 07:07416 

Tlie work of the cabbage root maggot, Phorbia brassloae BoiirhC*, 
iu turnips is identified and renietlial measures discussed. 

Experimental Work in New York Slate against the Han Jose Scale 

[A s p i d i o t u s [» e r n i c i o 8 u s Comst.] TT. S. Dep't AgiMc. 

Div. Ent. l^ul. a7, n.s. 1002. p.ao :U] 

Discussion of results obtained with 20^ meebanloal crude petc'oleum emul- 
sion and whale oil soap. 

Notes for the Year in New York. IT. S. Dey^t Agric. Div. Ent. Bui. 

:^7, n.s. 1002. \)MV2-\\ 

Brief records of injury by graix^vine root worm, Fidla vltielda 
Walsh; grapevine leaf hopper, T y p h 1 o c y b a come s var. vitis Ilarr.; 

'Titles are given as publisbe<l. and in some instances they have been 
chnnged or supplieil by the e<litors of the various papers. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOCJIST 1003 193 

appletree tent caterpillar, Giisiocampa [Malacosoma] ameri- 
c a n a Fabr. ; forest tent caterpillar, Giisiocampa [Malacosoma] 
disstrla HObn. and fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea Drury 
[tex tor Harr.]. 

Observations on Certain Insects Attacking Pine Ti-oes. U. S. Dep't 

Agric. Div. Ent. Bui. 37, n.s. 1902. p.l034 

Records of injuries byTomicus calligraphus Germ., T. p i n i Say 
and also ofMonohammus confusor Kirby and Dendroctonus 
terebrans Ollv. 

Potato Wirew)nns. Country- Gentleman, Dec. 4, 1902, 57:9921^ 
General , remedial measures for wirewornis are briefly discussed. 

Crude Petroleum as an Insecticide. Soc. Promotion Agric. Sci. 

Proc. 23d An. Meeting 1902, p.8(>-95; separate p.1-10 received 

Dec. 24, 1902 

A review of experiments with crude petroleum and summary of results in 
controlling San Jos6 scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Gomst 

Maggots in Mushrooms. Country Gentleman, Jan. 1, 1903, 68:6^^ 

Brief aci^unt of species injuring mushrooms and remedies therefor, 
Phora agaric! Lint and species of Sciara being mentioned in par- 
ticular. 

Entomolog:^'. U. S. N. Y. Handbook 10, revised Dec. 1902, p.1-12, 
issued Jan. 3, 1903 



PAOB 

Definition 1 

Systematic entomology 1 

Economic entomology 2 

History of the division 3 

Investigations 4 

Collections 5 



Oontents 

PAOB 

Lectures 7 

Voluntary observers 7 

Publications 8 

Educational work 9 

List of entoniologic puhlifutions. 10 



Grapevine Root Worm [P i d i a v i t i c i d a Walsh]. N. Y. State 

Mus. Bui. iV.). 11MI2. 1L49-S4, 1 col.pl. 4 halftcmcs 

Issued Jan. 5, 1903. Republished in great part in issuers of Grape Belt 
[Dunkirk N. Y.] for Jan. 9, 13, 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10. 

Contents 

PAOB 

Preface 49 

Introduction 51 

Area infested 51 

Signs of insect's presence 52 



A native species 53 

AUies 54 

Present conditions in Ohio 54 

Early history 57 



PAOB 

Description 58 

Life history CO 

Habits of the beetle 01 

Eggs 63 

Habits of the larvae m 

Pupa 68 

Food plants 68 

NatnraX enem\e» ^ 



194 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

PAGE I PAGE 

Uoiiiedial ineaRuros 09 ' Ih^nieclial nieasur<»H ((^niinucd) 

Destroying the pupae 70 i ('riide petroleum 77 

Collecting beetles 71 Calcium carhid 77 

Arsenical poisons 73 | Kin -onnnendat ions 78 

Pulverizing the soil and \ Hibliography 78 

mounding 70 : Explanation of plates 81 

CarlMm blsulfld 70 Plates 1-0 face 81 

Kerosene emulsion 77 | Index 82 

CucuinlKM- licvtle. Country (leutleiiuui, Jan. 15, IDOa, 68:432* 

Remedial measures for the striped cucumber beetle, Diabrotica 
T It t a t a Fabr. 

Insecticides and Notes. Country (lentlenian, Jan. 15, 11)03, 68:47* 
Summary of results obtained with Insecticides against Snn Jos6 scale, 
Aspidiotus perniciosus CoiuBt., and notes on the Chinese ladybug, 
Chilocorus similis Rossi, and the grai>evine root worm, F i d i a 
Titicida Walsh. 

Beware the Pea Weevil. Country Oentlenian, Jan. 22, 1903, 68 :63« 

Injuries by B r u c h u a p 1 s o r u m TiUiu. in Canada and means of con- 
trolling. 

Legislation against Pests. Country Gentleman, Jan. 29, 1903, 

68:89» 

General discussion of the efficacy of nufsery inspection work with com- 
ments on present conditions. 

The San Jos6 Scale. Country Gentleman, Feb. 19, 1903, 68:158ii 

Comparative value of crude petroleum emulsion, lime, salt and sulfur 
mixture and whale oil soap for Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst 

Beneficial Insec^ts. (Country (ientleman, Mar. 5, 1903, 68:206^ 

General observati<»ns on the establishment of S c u t e 1 1 i s t a c y a n e a 
Motsch, Novlus cardinalls Mask, and C h i 1 o (! o r u s similis 
Rossi in the United States. 

Scale Insects. Worcester [Mass.] Evening (iazette, Mar. 12, 
1903, p.l 

Summary notice of scale insects with special reference to remedies for the 
San Jos6 scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst. 

Arsenate of Lead. Country Gentleman, Mar. 19, 1903, 68:252^7 
Formula and method of preparation. 

Ii00i>er Caterpillar. Country Gentleman, Mar. 19, 1903, 68:252" 

Description too brief to permit identification of the geometrld. 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 195 

Grapevine Root Worm. Country Gentleman, Mar. 19, 1903, 

as :255« 

Corrects reported error and gives estimates of damage byFidia vitl- 
cida Walsh. 

Recent Work with In8eeti<ide8 in the P^ast. Col. State Bd Hort. 

RepM 1902. 190;i. p.121-27 

Brief discussion of tbe value of arsenate of lead, crude petroleum, the 
lime, salt and sulfur mixture and whale oil soap as insecticides. 

Fleas. Country (ientleman. Mar. 20, 1903, 08:27616 
Brief account of life historj' with various repressive measures. 

Appletire Bark Ixnise. Country (ientleman. Mar. 26, 1903, 68 :2762^ 

Remedial measures for Mytilaspis pomorum Bouch6 [L e p 1 d o - 
saphes ulml Linn.]. 

Inse<ti(ides and Fnn^eides. T. S. X. Y. Handbook 18, p.l6 
More important formulas rei^onmiended with general directions for use. 

Pea Ween il. < N)untry (ientleman, Ap. 2, 1903, 68 :2m^ 

Discussion of rise in temperature in peas infested with B r u c h u s 
p i s o r u m Linn, and methiKls of controlling the pest. 

San Jos<' Seale. (Nuintry Gentleman, Ap. 2, 1903, 68:30012 

No danger of A s p i d i o t u s p e r n i c i o s u s Comst. spreading from 
infeste<l wood cut in early spring. 

• Elm Leaf Beetle. SeheiuH-tady Daily Union, Ap. 3, 1903, jkI 
Nearly the same in Evening Star [Schenectady] Ap. 3, p. 12. 
Extracts from Museum Bulletin r»7 on Galerucella luteola 
Aliill., with special reference to local conditions. 

Shade Tree Rating*. Street for(»8try report on the selection, 
planting, cultivation and care of street shade trees by Fred- 
eric Shonnard, Dep't Public Works, Yonkers, 1903 
Ratings of comparative inmiunity from insect enemies of various shade 

trees. 

Dust and Other Sjirays. (^)untry Gentleman, Ap. 16, 1903, 

68 :35023 

Brief discussion of various insecticides with spwial reference to scale 
inse<:ts and dry or dust si>rays. 

Advice about ^^j^raying. Country Gentleman, Ap. 30, 1903, 
68 :3922^ 
General directions for spraying with references to convenient literature. 



196 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

Aiwnate of Uud. (Country Gentleman, Mav 7, 1903, 68:410» 

Its preparation from arsenic, soda and sugar of lead not advisable. 
Directions are given for making it. 

Literature of American Economic Entomologj'. Am. Ass'n Eco. 

Ent. 15th An. Meeting, Presidential address, Washington D. C. 

JkM'. 2(;, 1U02. U. S. Dep't Agric. Div. Ent. lUil. 40, n.s. 1903. 

p.7-22 

Also published separately. 

After a general review with a few statistics regarding the amount of lit- 
erature relating to some of the more notorious insects, the following topics 
were discussed : Newspai»er and Minor Articles ; Reports ; Bulletins ; Jour- 
nals ; General Works and Indexes. 

Work and Observations in 1902. N. Y. State Fruit Growers 

Ass'n Rep't 1903, i).92-94. Rec'd May 15 

Results obtained with crude i>etroleuui, whale oil soap and lime, salt and 
sulfur against San Jos6 scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Conist. 
Notes on the establishment ofChllocorus similis Rossi and work 
of grapevine root worm, F i d i a v i t i c i d a Walsh. 

Elm Leaf Beetle Ravages. Argus [Albany] May 16, 1903; New 
York Times, May 17; Rensselaer Ctounty Standard [Hoosick 
Falls] May 22, 1903, p.l 
Summary of injuries by Galerucella luteola Miill. in Hudson 

river valley. 

New York Entomologic Service. Country Gentleman, May 21, 
1903, 08 :45136 
Smnnniry of rei)orts from voluntary observers. 

Diseases and Pests. N. Y. State Lib. Rul. 80. Review of Lt^is- 

lation 1002, i).837-38 

Summary of recent laws relating to plant diseases and Insect enemies. 

Imixortance of Injurious Insects Introduced from Abroad. Sot*. 

Promotion Agric. Sci. I'roc. 21th An. Meeting 1903, p.3948; 

separate, p.1-10 

Summarized account of injuries with classified lists of introducetl species 
and notes on the relative imiwrtance of various species. 

New York Entomologic Service. Country Gentleman, May 28, 
1903, 08:47133 
Summaries of reports from voluntary ohsorvers. 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



197 



18th Report of the State Entomologist on Injurious and Other In- 
serts of tlie State of New York 1002. N. Y. State Mus. Bui. 64. 
1003. p.80-198, 1 litli. 5 halftones 

Issued June 2. 

Contents 



PAQB 

Iiitroduetiou 89 

General entoniologic features. 89 

Office work 90 

SiKJcial investigations 91 

Publications 91 

Ck)llections of insects 92 

New quarters 93 

Voluntary observers ., 93 

Acknowledgments 93 

Injurious Insects 
E u p 1' o c 1 1 s c h r y 8 o r - 

r b o e a , brown tail moth. . 94 
Psila rosae, carrot rust 
fly 90 

Notes for tbe year 103 

Fruit tree i)ests 104 

Small fruit insects 105 

(»rass and grain Insects lOC 

Shade tree insects 108 

Forest insects 110 

Household insects 113 

Beneflcial insec»ts 114 

Injurious insects from abroad. . 110 



PAOB 

Injurious insects, etc. {continued) 
Species of primary economic 

importance 120 

Species which may become 

very destructive 122 

Other species 122 

Experimental work against San 

Jos6 scale Insect 126 

Fall applications 126 

Spring applications 131 

Summary 143 

Voluntary entoniologic service. . 144 

Sunmiaries of reports 144 

Faunal studies 153 

Coleoptera taken at Newi>ort, 

Herkimer co. N. Y 153 

List of publications of the ento- 
mologist 161 

Contributions to collection 170 

Explanation of plates 178 

Plates 1-6 face 179 

Index 181 



New York Entoniologic Service. Country Gentleman, June 4, 
1903, 68 :498i< 
Summary of reports from voluntary observers. 

Keniediea for Gi*ai)evine Root Worms. Grape Belt, June 16, 
1003, p.2 
Brief statement of remedial measures for F i d i a v i t i c i d a Walsh. 

New York Entoniologic Service. Coiintrv Gentleman, June 18, 
1903, 68:530»8 
Summary of reports from voluntary observers. 

Hints to Fruit Growers and Truckers. Am. Agric. June 20, 1003, 

71 :6482< 

Briefly discusses the grapevine root worm. F i d I a v 1 1 1 c 1 d a Walsh, 
injuries in Chautauqua grape belt and remedies for same, and also the 
plum curculio, asparagus beetles, and insect enemies of squash. 



198 NEW YORK STATK MUSEUM 

New York Kiitoiiiol4)^ir Service. Couiitrv (lentleiiian, June 25, 
1003, (>8:nnii-* 
Surainnry of roports from voluntary ol)st'rvtTs. 

Deflti'o.viii^ Flies. Coimtry (leiitleiiiaii. June 25, IIKKJ, (>8:5(>12i 

Dostrurtivo ami provt'iitivo measures for tlio hoiisi» lly. Musoa de- 
mos t i c* a Linn. 

Grapevine Root Wonn. (;rape \Mi. ,lnne 2(1, 11M)3. p.l, fi 

RtH?tles attack bent viiioyanls. no clt^'idtMl mijcration, tijcurw on oHk*ac*y of 
destroying pnpao and roniarks on vahir of biH»tlo catfliors and arsenical 
poisons for F 1 d i a v i 1 1 (? i d a Walsli. 

Mosquitos. N. Y. State Mns. fohler. Sp. 

Issued June 20, 1903. 

Brief description with discussion of lialdts. life liistory, genera and 
species, nietho<ls of controlling and collecting. 

Grapevine Uoot Worm. Grape Belt, June 30, 1003, j).4 

Results of bre<Hlinjc from entire vines and efficiency of beetle catchers for 
Fidia viticida Walsh. 

New York IOntoinolo^i<* Service. Country Gentleman, July 2, 1003, 

08 :57833 

Summary of reiK^rts from volimtary observers. 

Plant Lice, (^)untry Cienlleman, July 0, 1003, OSn^OO^^ 
Remedial measures for plant lice on fruit troths. 

Killinii: Ants, rountry Gentleman, July 0, 1003, 08:500^2 
MetlKMl of d(*stroyin^ ants in nt^ts. 

Rose Bwtles. i V)untry ( ientlenum, July 0, 1003. 08 %Mfi^ 

Methcxls of destroying the beetles, M a c r o d a c t y 1 u s s u b s p i u o s u s 
Fabr. 

New York Kntomolo^ic Service. <'ountry (Sentlenum, July 0, 1003, 
08 :50045 
Summary of rer>orts from voluntary observers. 

About Maple Tive lUu-ers. Rome* Daily Sentinel, July 10, 1003 

Methods of controlling the sugar maple borer, Plagiouotus^ 
s p e c i o s u s Say. 

riant Lice. INnintry <Jentleman, July 10, 1003, 08:0102^ 
romments on unusual abundance of plant lice and remedies for the same. 

New York Entomolojric Service. Country Gentleman, July 10, 
1003, 08:01(H^ 
Suwiuaty of rei>orts from voluntary observers. 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 199 

Mosquitos. Sunday [Albany] Press, July 10, 1903, p.6 
Reprint of iwrtions of mosquito folder. 

Spmy for Potatoes. Country Gentleman, July 23, 1903, G8 :G30i7 

Advises arsenate of lead for potato beetles and bordeaux mixture for 
fungus. 

New York Entoniologie Service. Country Gentleman, July 23, 
1903, 08 :G30« 
Summary of reports from voluntary observers. 

Plant Lice. Country Gentleman, July 30, 1903, (58 :6503^ 
KeuKHlies for the [lests. 

New York lOntomologic Service. Country Gentleman, July 30, 
1903, 00 :G50^^ 
Sunuuary of reports from voluntary observers. 

Forest Fires and Insect Atrtack. Am. ijumberman, Aug. 8, 1903, 
p.l5 
Preliminary report on investigations in burneil areas in tbe Adirondaeits. 

Aquatic Nematocerous Diptera by Oskar Augustus Johannsen. 

Keprint from N. Y. State Mus. nul. r,8. 1903. p.328-441 

Issued Aug. 11, 1003. 

'ihis i»aiHT includes a key to families of nematoi-erous diptera with 
accounts of the net-winged midgc»s (Blei)haroceridae), black Hies (.Simu- 
llidae) and mosquitos (Culicidae). 

Tulip Tree Scale. Country Gentleman, Aug. 20, 1903, G8 :71225 

Brief notice with remedies for L e c a n i u m [E u 1 e c a n i u mj tulip- 
i f e r a e Cook. 

Summary of Koot Worm Situation and Experiments. Grape Belt, 

Sep. 4, 1903, p.l; Jamewtown Journal, Sep. 4, 1903, p.l; Country 

Gentleman, Sep. 24, 1903, 08:828^ 

Brief suumiary of observations and exi)erimental work on F i d i a v i t i - 
cida Walsh in 11M)3. 

Mos<piit()S on High Ground. Country Gentleman, Sep. 10, 1903, 

08 :7812^ 

Brief comments on the breeiling habits and methods of controlling these 
insects. 

Aquatic Chrysomelidae and a Table of the Families of Coleopter- 
ous Lanae by Alex. I). IMacGillivray. Reprint from N. Y. State 
Mus. Bui. 08. 1903. p.288 331 
Issued Sep. 1*2, Vjo'X 

This paper includes a key to families of eoleoi)terous larvae and a mono- 
graph of the subfamily Donaciinae, family ChrysoiueWOLaft. 



200 NEW YORK STATK MUSEUM 

Aquatic Iiiseits of New York State. N. Y. State Mus. Bui. G8. 
1903. p.199-517, 52 pi. (3 col.) by James O. Needliam Pli.I)., 
professor of biology, Lake Forest Univ.; A. 1>. MacGillivray 
Ph. I)., instructor in eu(oniolog\', O. A. Jolianusen M.S., instruc- 
tor in civil engineering, both of Cornell I'niv. ; and K.O.Davis 
Ph.D., professor of horticulture. West Virginia Univ. 
I88ue<l Sep. 28, 1903. 

Contents 

PAQK PAGE 

Preface 199 l*ait 5 Aquatic ChrysonicHtlae 

Part 1 Station Worli of tlie I and a Table of the Families 

Summer of 1901. J. G. Need- ! of Coleopterous larvae. A. D. 

HAM 20U , MacGillivbay 288 



Part 2 Food of Brook Trout in 
Bone Pond. J. G. Neediiam . . 204 

Part 3 Life Histories of Odo- 
nata suborder Zygoi)tera. 
J. G. Neediiam 218 

Part 4 Some New Life Histo- 
ries of Diptera. J. G. Need- 
ham 279 



Part G Aquatic Nematocerous 

Diptera. O. A. Joh annsen . . . 328 
Part 7 Sialldidae of North and 
South America. K. O. Davis. 442 

Explanation of plates 487 

List of text figures 499 

Plates 1-52 face 499 

Index 501 



Sialididae of North and South America by K. (J. Davis. Reprint 
from N. Y. State Mns. iUil. GS. VMi. p.441-87 
Issued Sep. 30. 1903. 
A systematic and biologic account of this group. 

Two TrcKi IN^sts. Country (Gentleman, Oct. 1, 1903, r>8:852« 

Pear psylla, P s y 1 1 a p y r i c o 1 a Forst. probably weakened the pear 
trees at Hartley Hall l*a.. so that they wore attacked by the fruit tree bark 
beetle, S c o 1 y t u s r u g u 1 o s u s Hatz. Dosti'uction of the infested trees 
by fire is advisable. The maple is probably infested bySesia acerni 
Clem. Preventive measures are indicated. 

Chinese Lady Bugs. Country Gentleman, Oct. 8, 1903, 68:871^« 

Uecords establishment and breeding ofChilocorus simills llossi 
at Kinderhook N. Y. 

INSECT EXCHANGE 

The state colkn^-tion of insects contains large numbers of many 
local, and in some cases somewhat rare forms. This, in connec- 
tion with the fact that many spcH^ies are not represented, and 
specially in view of the economic imiwatauce of introduced insects, 
led us to inaugurate a system of exchanges the past summer. 
Those offei-ed for exchange are, in every case, only such as can be 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOI.OGIST 1903 201 

spared without detj'iment to the general collections, and in return 
it has been our desire to obtain, so far as possible, species of 
economic importance in other sections of this country or any other 
countries, specially those which might develop into injurious pests. 
A preliminary exchange list was sent out in the early summer, 
and the results have been very gratifying, since we have been 
able by this means, to make a number of extremely valuable addi- 
tions to the state collections. This is specially true in the case of 
Coccidae, and was largely possible through the kindness of Prof. 
V. L. Kellogg of LeUuid Stanford Jr UnivcM*sity, who was able 
to offer us some extremely desirable Californian and Japanese 
scale insects in exchange for some of our native forms. Another 
very desirable exchange was arranged with Prof. F. H. Snow 
of Kansas University, who sent valuable Diptera and some 
cotypes, all determined by the noted authority in this group, Dr 
S. W\ Williston. The species, 418 in number, acquired in this 
manner are listed below. 

SPECIES RECEIVED IN EXCHANGE 

The source of various species listed below, is indicated by 
superior figurc»s following the author of the species, as follows: 

1, from Pi-of. C. P. Gillette, Agricultural College, Fort Collin^5 
Col.; 2, from Prof. V. L. Kellogg, Leland Stanford Jr University, 
C-Jilifornia; 3, from E. M. Elirliorn, Mountain View Cal.; 4. from 
Prof. F. H. Snow, University of Kansas, Lawrence Kan.; 5, from 
Prof. E. A. Popenoe, state entomologist, Topeka Kan.; G, from 
Prof. H. Garman, Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington 
Ky.; 7, fix)m J. G. Sanders, 8, from Prof. Herbert Osborn, both of 
the Ohio State University, Columbus O. 



Hymenoptera 



lioiiibus sepnratus Crcss.^ 
B. Kylvicola Kirhy^ 
B. putnaml Creaa^ 
B. proximus Cress^ 
B. nevadensis Cress,^ 
B. morrisonii Cress. ^ 
B. luixtus Cress,^ 
B. juxtus Crcss^ 
B. tfavifrons Cress^ 



B. bifarius Cress^ 
B. appositus Crcss.^ 
Psltliyrus iiisularis Crcss,^ 
ADtboi)ora valloruin CklU 
A. urbana Crcss,^ 
A. smilbil Cress,^ 
A. occidentalls Crcss.^ 
Synba Ionia f rater Crcss,^ 
Melissodea obWqyxa Sotv"^ 



202 



NKVV YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Diadasia australis Crease 
I), dimiiuitn Crestt.^ 
Mogaohile montivaga Crats.^ 
M. fidelis Crc88.' 
Lithurgiis apicalifl Crcss.^ 
Autliidiuiu maoulifrons Smith^ 
A. interniptum Say^ 
CoolioxyH gilensis Ckill,^ 
Augocblora eoloradensis Tituif^ 
Ei»eolu8 robuHtiw Crvss.^ 
K. occ'ideii talis Ci'cas.^ 

IlylasteH luugus Lcc* 
Scc»lytU8 4-deiitatus »Siiy^ 
Pityogenos imiidrosae liopk.^ 
ToiiiicuH iuU*gt;r Eich.^ 
Calaudra oryzae Linn.* 
Baris streuua Lvv.^ 
Thysauociiemis helvolus Lvc.^ 
. T. fraxiul Lcc,^ 
ADthouoiuus squaino8U8 Lfc* 
Tachypterus 4-gibbu8 iSatr" 
Lixii8 iiiaeer Ltc* 
Ubyiichite8 hirtus Fahr," 
Epicauta corvina Lev.^ 
Cryuiode8 disclcoUis Lec.^ 
C. exiguu8* 

Brucbus fraterculus Horn^ 
B. discoideus iSdj/* 
B. 4-macubitii8 Fahr.^ 

B. mimu8 ^ay^ 
Spenuopbagus robiniae »SV7i.' 
Chelyuiorpha pbytopbagica C'/.' 
Cassida pallidubi Boh!' 

C. ellipsis Lcc* 
Diabrotica lemiiiscata Lcc* 
Moiiocesta coryli /S'ay* 
Liua lappouica Linn.* 
Colaspis favosa ^uy* 
Taria vlrldicyauea Cr.* 
A^'oclirous deiitioollis ^uy* 
Fidia lungii>es Melsh* 
Exoma conspersa Mann.* 
E. (lisl^ar Lcc.^ 

Saxiiiis oiiiogera Luc* 
Babia 4-giittata Oliv.* 
Cosciiioptora donrmicana Fabr. 
C. axillaris Lcc* 
Tetraopes ennesceus Jac.^ 
T. femora tu8 Lcc' 
DocU's Bpinoaus Sap* 



E. conoavus Crcss.^ 
E. eoinpaotus Creftg.^ 
Noniada ridlugsii CreMs} 
Vt»8pa oceideutalis Crcss.^ 
Polyl)ia flavitarsis Sauss.- 
Odynerus taos CrcHS.^ 
O. forainiuatus Sauss.^ 
Crabro (j-mai*ulatiis ^'aj/* 
Pbilaiitbus flavifrons Crcxs.^ 
EueerccTis fulvii)es CrcsH.^ 



Coleoptera 



Plectrodera sea la tor Fahr.^ 
Doreasebeiua alternatuni *SVi;/* 
D. wildii Lhlcr' 

Moiiobaninius oregonensis L<v-.' 

Mouileina aunulatuiu iSait 

Ixjptura cbrysoeouia Kirhy^ 

TyiK>eeru8 sinuatiis Seicni.* 

Neoelytus murleatulus Kirby* 

( ■yHene deeonis Oliv.* 

Tragidion fulvii>enne tilay* 

Bbopalojibora longii)e8 t<ay* 

Eburia 4-geiuinata Attf//* 

Callidiiiiii jantbimim Lee/ 

Prionus iiubrieornfs Linn.'' 

Eupboria keruii lialil.^ 

E. keriiii var.^ 

E. Ivernii black var.^ 

E. areata Fabr.'^ 

Dyuastes tityus Linn.* 

Strigoderiua arborieola Fabr.^ 

Polypbylla deeeinliueata »S*a|/* 

Boll)oeeras faretus Fabr.* 

Pliaiiaeus iialliatus^ 

Cautbou pratieola Lee.* 

llydiioeera tabida Lee.* 
II. subfaseiata Lee.' 

Clenis spbegeiis Fabr.* 

(\ iiigriventrls Lee.* 

C. iebneiiiiioiieiis Fabr.'^ 

C. spiuohie Lee.* 
A<inaeo<lera pulcbella Herb»t.^ 
Psiloptera dniuimondi Lap. <<• Gt.ry.^ 
(ilyas<!Utus obliteratus Lee.* 
Linionius camis Lee.* 
Elater apieatiis >s'rt//' 
('rytobyi)ims i»oetoraIis i^ay 
Plogaderus iiitidus Horn^ 
Ulster instratus Lec.^ 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTO.AIOLOaiST 1903 



203 



Dernicstos fasclatiis Lrc* 
Silvanus planatus Qerm.^ 
Languria laeta Lee.^ 
Hyi)eraspis lateralis Muls.^ 
Brachyaeaiitha dentlpes Fahr.* 
FiXoehoiuus contriatatus Muls.* 
E. aetliiops Bland.^ 
Cociinella abdoniinalis aSVij/* 
C aim(»c-tans C'r.* 
L'. iiioutiirola Mills.* 
V. transversoguttata Fahr.^ 



Cistogastor inmiaculata Macq.* 
Gymnosouia fuliginosa Dcsv.* 
Xautliomelana arciiata ;S'(iy* 
lleniyda aiirata Dcso.* 
Epigriuiyia luceus Town.* 
Belvoisia bifasciata Fahr.* 
B. unifasc'iata Dcav.* 
Oi'yptt'ra rarolinae Denv.* 
O. dosiades ^Valk\* 
Liiiiiaoniyia coiuta Fall.* 
Hlepbarii>eza adusta Locic* 
Hilan'lhi ixilita Town.* 
(iouia capitata iHfJ.* 
Spallaiizaiiia bebes Fall.* 
S. bespfM'idaniin Will.* 
Tric-oiibora ruficaiula v.d. \\'.* 
PolettTia robiista Wivd.* 
An-bytas aiialis Fahr.* 
A. alerriuia Dcsr.* 
A. bystrix WUd.* 
A. bitoralis Mavq.* 



Ilippodaniia sinuata Mtils.^ 
Olibnis vittatus Lcc.^ 
Homaliuui buinerosiiin Fanr.^ 
*Homalota lividipeiiDis Manfi.^ 
Dineutes assiniilis .4m 6c.'' 
Notbopus zabroides Lcc' 
( ■ymindis phmiiKJiinis Lcc.^ 
r^ebla atrk'Ops Lec.^ 
Anopbtbabnus bond Qarman^ 
Tetracba vlrgiiiica Linu.*' 



Diptera 



Kcbiiioinyia algens Wied.* 
E. doc'isa Walk.* 
E. bystricosa Will.* 
Epalpus bicolor Will.* 
E. signifera Will* 
Boiiibyliomyia abriii)ta Wied.* 
Dejeania voxatrlx (). iS'.* 
l*aradejeaiiia rutilioidos Jaen.* 
Jiiriiiella ainbigua Macq.* 
Syrpliiis artfiitatus Fall.* 
S. unibelbitarmn iivhincr * 
Mesograpta uiarginata 8a]^ 
M. i)olita aSm//"* 
Kbiiigia nasica Saif 
lloliopbihis bietiis Locw.* 
Tropidia quadra ta »S*(/|/* 
Spiloniyia longlooriiis Lorw.* 
Ciirysops <-allidiis O. *S.* 
C. i)bmgoiis Wied,* 
'J'abamis rbonibbnis <). *S.* 



LIST OF CULICIDAE FROM PROF. F. V. THEOBALD, ENGLAND 



Myzoiuybi rossi (J-ilca; ludia 
Pyrfitopbonis costalis Lovw; West 

Africa 
Myzorliyncbus barbirostris i*. (/. 

Wulp.; Mabiy states 
M. nigerriiuus (Hies; India 
M. sinensis Wied.; Mabiy states 
Xyssorbynclnis fuliginf>sus (Hies; 

India 
N. jauiesii Theob.; India 
N. nnu'idata Throh.; hulia 
X. master i ^kuse; Australia 
(.'ellia argyrotarsis Dcsr.; Soutb 

Lucia 
C. albipes Theoh.; New Amsterdam 



Jantliinosonia lutzii Throb.; Uio de 
Janeiro 

J. musiea *S'f///; Uio and New Am- 
sterdam 

Mneidus alternans Wrstic; Aus- 
tralia 

Eretmap<Hlites ipdncpK^vittata 

Throb.; I'ganda 

I)esvoi(b»a ol>turbans Walk.: India 

I), panaleetros (lilrs; Imlia 

Stegomyia fas<iata Fahr. 

S. scnteliaris Walk.; Malay states 

Scutoniyia (Stegomyia) uotowTipta 
t<kHsr; AustraUfli «i\\\i V\\\\^ 

ThiH>baU\\a au\\\\\\vU\ Mc\Q.;^\vsgiwvv^ 



204 



NKW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



T. incldens Thoftison; North America 
T. spathipalpis Rondani; Madeira 
Culcx alboanuulatus Macq.; Aus- 
tralia 
O. annulioris Theoh.; Transraal 
C. annuliroBtris Skusc; Australia 

and New Guinea 
C. canadensis Theoh.; Canada 
C. cantans Mcig.; Canada 
C. concolor Dcsv.; India 
C. confirmatus Arrib.; Rio de 

Janeiro 
C. cylindricus Thcob.; Australia 
C diversus Thcob.; Europe 
C. fatigttus Wicd. 
C. gelidus Theoh.; Malay states 
C. luteolateralis Theoh.; west and 

central Africa 
C. mimeticus A'od; India and Malay 

states 
C. occidental is Skuse; Australia 
C ochraceus Thcob.; centi'al Africa 
C. pulcri venter Oilcs; India 
C. sylvestris Theoh.; Canada 
C. taeniorbyncluis Wied.; Rio de 

Janeiro 
C. tigrii)es Grandprc; Mauritus 
C. viridiventer Oilcs; India 
C. vittiger Skusc; Australia 



Melaniconiou atratus Theoh.; Ja- 
maica 
(vrabliamia pygmaeus Theoh.; West 

Indies 
G. vittata Theoh.; New Mexico 
Taeniorliynchus aurlfer Theoh.; 

Uganda 
T. brevicellulus Theoh.; Malay 

states 
T. conopas Frau.; Malay states 
T. fasciolatus Arrih.; British Guiana 
T. fulvus Wied.; Para 
Mansonia annulifera Theoh.; India 
M. annulipes Walk.; Malay states 
AI. titillans Walk.; British Guiana 
M. uuiformis Theoh.; Malay states 

and Africa 
Deinocerites cancer Theoh.; West 

Indies and Uganda 
Urauotaenia socialis Theoh.; West 

Indies 
Aedeomyia squammipenna Arrih.; 

Malay states 
Phoniouiyia longirostris Theoh.; 

Trinidad 
Sabethes remipes Wied.; Brazil 
Linmtus durbamii Theoh.; para 
Tricboprosopon (Joblotia) nivipes 

Theoh.; Trinidad 



Anaea andria Scud.'^ 
Ceratomia catalpae Bdv.^ 
Eubnpbe rubicundarin Iliibii.' 
Aracbnis picta, Pack} 
Apautesis incorrupta Uy. Edw} 
Parasemia plantaginis Linn.^ 
Lapbyguia frugii^erda 8m. c€ Ahh.' 
Oucocuenjis august us Harv.^ 
Ilellotbis arniiger Uiihn.^ 
Autograplm brassicae Rilcif 
Syneda bowlaudii Orotc^ 
Ilonioptora nibi Uy. Edw.^ 



Lepidoptera 

Nycteola proteella Dyar^ 
llydriouiona np} 

Triprocris smitbsonianus Clcm.^ 
lioxostege sticticalis Linn.^ 
L. commixtalis Walk.^ 
li. coloradeusis Gr. Roh.^ 
Cornifrons simalis Qroie^ 
Crambus teterrellus Zinck.^ 
Tbauinatopsis repanda Qroie> 
Ilulstea uudulatella Clem.^ 
Ilomoeosonia electellum Hulst.^ 
Etbniia discH)strigella Ohamh.^ 



i 



Raphidia oblita Uag.^ 
Chrysopa ejcterna Hag.^ 



Neuroptera 



Bracbynemurus nigrilabris Hag.'^ 
Platyphylax deslgnata WaVk^ 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



205 



Hemiptera 



Honmloporus congruus Utd.^ 
Perl II us claudus 8ay^ 
Apateticus marginiventrls 8taV 
Cosmopepla conspicillaris Dallas^ 
Carpocoris lynx Fahr} 
Tliyanta custator Fahr,^ 
T. rugulosa Say^ 
Arcliimerus calcarator Fahr} 
Catorhiutha guttuhi Fabr,^ 
Ficana aplcalis Dallas^ 
Alydiis quluquespiuosus Say^ 
A. pluto LhU 

Dariiiistus subvittatus 8tal.^ 
Soolopocerus secundarius UhL^ 
Nysius mluutus Uhl,^ 
Orsillus scolopax 8ay^ 
Ischiiodenius falicus Say^ 
Geocoris pallens Stal^ 
Ileraeus inslguis U/ti/ 
Paiuera bilobata 8ay^ 
Trapezonotus nebulosus FalV 
Emblethis arenarlus Linn.^ 
Rhyparochromus floralis UhV 
Melauocorypbus bicrucls Say^ 
M. facetus Say^ 
M. admirabilis UtiL' 
Lygaeus reellvatus Say' 
I^rgus ciDctus H. Sch.^ 
Dysdercus uiiiuus Say' 
D. albidiveiitrls Stal."^ 



I Trigonotylus pulchcr Rent} 
Callimiris tarsalis Rent} 
Uesthenla iusignis Say' 
liomatopleura caesar Rent} 
Iladroiicma inilitaris VhV 
Pocclloscytus* 

Systratiotus americanus Rent.' 
Camptobrocbis uebulosus XJhV 
Capsus brachycorus VhV 
Tycnoderes 4-iiiaculatus Quer^ 
Labops besperius VhL'^ 
Dicypbus calif oruicus StaV 
Orectoderus^ 

Anthocoris nielanocerus Reut.' 
Coriscus kalmll Reut,' 
Uepipta taurus Fahr.^ 
Ai)iomerus pictlpcs H, Sch.'^ 
A. ven trails Say'^ 
Ilygrotrecbus reinigis Say^ 
Llmuotrecbus uiarglnatus Say' 
Ilebrus conclunus Uhl.'^ 
Cicada var. cassinil Fish,* 
Microvelia^ 
M. boruii Uhl' 
Salda inlerstitialis Say' 
S. pallipes Fahr} 
(ialguhis oculatus Fahr,' 
Aiilsops platycueiiiis Fich.' 
Coriaa abdouiinalis Say' 



Coccidae 



Parlatoria pergandii Comst.^ od 
Japanese orange; Stanford Uni- 
versity Cal. 

P. fiorinla- ; Gifu-Keu, Japan 

Lepidosaplios uhnl Linn.^ on apple; 
Stanford University Cal. 

L. newsteadi tokionis Kuw.* on Co- 
diaeum ; Tokyo, Japan 

L. gloverii Pack,- on orange; Klu- 
shiu, Japan 

L. crawll Ckll.^ Angio Saitama- 
Ken, Japan 

Odonaspis secreta Ckll,^ on bamboo ; 
Hikosan, Kiusbiu, Japan 

Cbrysompbalus rossi Alask.^ on A r - 
aucaria bidwillii; Stan- 
ford University Cal. 



C. obscurus ComstJ' on Q u e r c u s 
coccinea ; Columbus O. 

C. kelloggi Kuw,^ Cbikujo-gun, Kiu- 
sbiu, Japan 

C. aurantii cilrinus Coq.^ Mazatlan, 
Mexico 

C. aonldum Linn.* on fern; Tokyo, 
Japan 

Pseudaonidia paeoniae CklV on Aos- 
kia ; Hikosan, Kiusbiu, Japan 

Asi)idiotus rapax Corns/.*"''* on laurel; 
Stanford University Cal. 

A. perniciosus Comst* on peacb; 
Stanford University Cal. 

A. lataniae Sign.* Tokyo, Japan 

A. bederae Vail.* on Sequoia 
sempervirens; Stanford 

University C«l\. 



200 



NKW YOHK STATK MUSEUM 



A. glaiululifonis CklU on P I n u h 

8 y 1 V e 8 t r i s ; Co1uihI)Us O. 
A. ctmiforarum sbastae Cole- on cy- 
press; Lake c*o. Cal. 
A. callfornlcus Cole' on P i u u s 

p <> n d o r o 8 a ; ('obb Mt, Lake 

CO. Cal. 
A. acHi'iili Johns.^ on buck(»yo; San 

MattM) Cal. 
Lewa8pi8 kt'Uoggi Cole^ on Abies 

c o n o o 1 o r ; Mt Sbasta Cal. 
Polla8pi8 pin! Mask.^ on Abies 

f 1 r ni a ; Tokyo, Japan 
Aulacaspis rosar lionrlu^ on wild 

rose; Palo Alto Cal. 
A. pentagona Tanjr on clu'rry, phnn ; 

Tokyo, Japan 
A. crawl i tldlr on Ynnii ; Tokyo, 

Japan 
EpidiasI^is pyricola Del (Juvr.^ on 

pnnie; Miliken, Santa Clara i-o. 

Cal. 
Diaspis bronioliar Krni.- on palm; 

San Josi' <'al. 
Cbionaspis Hpartinae Comnt.- on 

Spartina s t r i cr t a ; l*alo 

Alto Cal. 
C salicis-niKrae WaWO on S a 1 i x 

<• o r d a t a ; Colnnibns (). 
C. qncrcus Co//<.v/.' on Q n v: v c n s 

<• b r y 8 o 1 e p i s ; Stevens creek, 

Mountain View Cal. 
C. lunifoliao Fitch^ on Torreya 

call f o r n i c a ; Stevens creek. 

Mountain View Cal. 
(\ orlbolobis Vonist.^ on dogwood ; 

Mountain View Cal. 
C. gleilitsiae SaiuL' on G 1 e d i t s i a 

t r i c a n t h o s ; Columbus (). 
C. americana Johns.' on U 1 m u s 

a m e r i c a n a ; Columbus (). 
Aclerda tokionis CA//.- ; Tokyo, 

Japan 
A. californica f.7n7/ .= on bu neb grass : 

Mountain View Cal. 
Pbysokerm(»s insignicola Crair.- <»n 

1* inns r a d i a t a ; San Mateo 

Cal. 
Saisst^tia oleae Bcrn.-.^ on vine: San 

Mateo Cal. 



nuk'canhnn quercitronls kernioideB 

Ttn.^ on Qnorcus agrlfolla; 

Mountain View Cal. 
E. armeulacum CVcic' on prime; 

Stanford University Cal. 
E. adenostoinae Kuic.^ on A d e u - 

o 8 1 o ni a f a s c i c u 1 a 1 11 m ; 

Hlack Mt C^al. 
CiM'cus liesiwridium Linn.^,^ on rose; 

Arcada Cal. 
Encalymnatus tessellatus Sign,* on 

fern ; San Francisco Cal. 
Ceroplastes ciTiferus And.* on tea 
IMdvinarla rbois Khrh.* on U bns 

d 1 v e r s i 1 o b a ; near Mountain 

View Cal. 
P. aurantii VkUr on tea; Kokura, 

Kiusbiu, Japan 
Pseudocoifus pseudonipae CkU.* ou 

palm; San Francisco Cal. 
Pbenacoccus dubia' on D i o s p y - 

r o 8 k a k i ; Kusatsn, Sbiga- 

Ken, Japan 
Dai'tylopins dudleyi (UAv.- on Cu- 

p r e 8 8 u 8 m a c n a b i o n a ; 

Sbasta Cal. 
I), sp. Cor/.- on cypress; Del Monte 

(^al. 
Eriococcus grannnis Mask.- on bam- 
boo ; (iifu-Iven, Japan. 
E. artemisiae Kuiv.^ on Arteme- 

8 i a <» a 1 i f o r n i c a ; Sauta 

Clara c<mnty Cal. 
E. araucariae Mask.* on Arauca- 

r i a e x c (» 1 s a ; Herkley Cal. 
E. adenostomae hJhrh.- on Adnos- 

t o m a f a 8 <• i c u 1 a t u ni ; Black 

Mt (^al. 
(iossyparia spuria Modccr.- on ebn; 

Stanford University Cal. 
Cerococcus cpiercns Cotnst.* on oak; 

Mountain View Cal. 
C. ebrborni CA7/.=' * on live oak; 

.Mountain View Cal. 
L<'c:iniodiaspis nuercus VkIL* on oak 
Aslen>le<anium (piercicola Boiich^ 

on t^uercus lobata, Stan- 
ford l^niversity Cal. 
I eery a piu'cbasi Mask.^ on ScHitcli 

broom ; Stanford University Cal. 



REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



207 



IlyiKKrblora alba Dotlge^ 
Cainpylacantlm olivacae ^rnd.^ 
IIe.sp(»rottotix viridis Thos? 
FI. prateiiRis Scud.^ 
II. spc<*iosiis Scud.^ 
Aoolophis roRalis Dodtjc^ 
INMlisnia dcxlgci Thos.^ 
Molanoplus lakiniis Scud.^ 
M. difforeiitialis Thos.* 
M. flabollifer Scud.' 
M. bowditcbi Scud.' 



Pt»rla epbyre Neirnu* 
P. lurida Hag.* 



Orthoptera 

M. flavidu« Srud.^ 

M. flabeHatus Scud.' 

M. packardii Scud.^ 

M. iiiinor Svud.^ 

M. liu'idus Dodtje^ 

M. bivittatus 8ay^ 

Pliootaliotos uobrasconsis (uobras- 

coiisls) Thorn. ^ 
P. nebrasoousis (voIucriH) Dodge^ 
ScliistfKHTca amoricaiia DrurU^ 

Plecoptera 

I P. xantbonos Say*^ 



EXCHANGE LIST 

Tbe folIowiii|]: is a partial list of tbe species of ins4^ts in the 
New York Stale MustMiiii which an* available for exchange pur- 
IM>ses. In return we are spc^iallv desirous, as almve stated, of 
siMuring specimens of e<<)noinie importance in different sections 
of this country and of foivign countries, and particularly of forms 
likelv to hwome desti-nctive if estahlished in this State. 



Boinbiis forvidus Fahr. 
B. tornarius Say 
B. torricobi Kirhy 
B. varans Smith 
XyhKopa virKinica Dniry 
M«»;racldle biliinaiius Say 
Aiidr«*iia viriiia Sniiih 
Vcsi)a aroiiaria Fahr. 
V. coiisoln'iiius Sausfi. 
V. dialK)lica Savss. 
V. inaculata L. 
Polistos pallipos *S^/ Fury. 
Oilynorus capra Saiiss. 
Pbibintbu.s soHvajrus Say 
Moncthila veutralls Say 
Bi'inbox fasciata Fahr. 
Cbalybion cacniUMiin Linn. 
Polopoens ceiiientarius Drury 
Aiuinopbila coiiiiniinis Cnss. 
A|K>rus bij^uttatus Fahr. 
A. iiiarginatiis Say 
Pelecinus iK)lyturator Drury 



Hymenoptera 

I Apantob's conj:roj;atus Say 

Lainpronota ain(Ti<-ana Crvss. 

Piinpbi ronqiii.sitor *S'f/// 
! P. incpiisitor Say 
I Tb<'ronia fiilvos<-eiis Cress. 

Kpbisiltc^s irritator Fahr. 
I Tbab^ssa hinator Fahr. 
j Paniscus jjcniinatiis Say 
! A noma Ion oxiU» Prov. 

Icbnoiinion ccntrator Say 

I. cincticornis frr'-^y. 
I I. conlirinatus (Vc'.v.v. 
' I. scck»stiis Cnss. 
, I. iniifascintorius Say 

I. bictus BruUr 

TrcnM'X cohnnba TAnn. 

Albintus l>asinaris Say 

Dtdcmis arvensis Say 

I), soriccus Say 

Ly«a(^ncniatn8 oricbsonii Ifartig 

Tricbi(H*anipus viniinalis Fallen 

Cinibox anierltana Leach 



208 



NEW YOUK STATE MUHEUM 



Coleoptera 



Cratoparis lunutus Fahr. 
Tomicus calllgrapliiis Orrm. 
T. cacographus Lcc, 
T. plni Say 
T. balsamcuB Lcc. 
Xylebonis (^clsus Ekh. 
X. dispar Fahr. 
CoKHoims Plata lea Say 
Calaiulra granaria Linn. 
Balaninus nasicus Say 
Mononyclius vuli)eculus Fahr. 
Crj'Ptorliyncbiis lapathi Linn. 
Conotrachelus iieuupliar llhst. 
GyiiHietroii tcter Fahr. 
Tacliypterus quadrfgibbus Say 
Magdalis arniic^ollis Say 
M. barblta Say 
M. perforata Horn 
Lixus (X)iK*aviis Say 
Ilylobius imles Hhst. 
Pissodes strobi Peck 
Pbytonoinus nigrirostris Fahr. 
P. punctatiis Fahr. 
Cypboniinnis dorsnlis Horn 
Paiidolotojiis bibu'is Hhst. 
Otiorbynduis ovatiis Linn. 
Rbyncbites bieolor Fahr. 
Epioauta vittata Fahr. 
E. cinorea Foist. 
E. peniisylvanica J)rQ. 
Macrobasis unicolor Kirhy 
Ilonous confcrtus Say 
Moloe aiigiisticollis Say 
Notoxus ancbora Hvntz. 
N. bifasciatus Lev. 
Mordolla iiiarginata Mclsh. 
Anaspis tlaviponnis Hahl. 
Nacordes iiiolanura Linn. 
Pytbo amoricamis Kirhy 
Molandrya striata Say 
(Mstebi scrkoa Say 
BoletotberuR bifurcus Fahr. 
Hoplocepbabi bicornis Oliv. 
Diaperis bydiii Fahr. 
Paratenetus punctatiis Sol 
Triboliuni ferniglneuni Fahr. 
Tenebrio tenebriodides Bcanv. 
T. Diolitor Linn. 
XyloplDUS saperdioides Oliv. . 



Scotobatos (*a lea rat us Fahr. 
Moriiius laevis Oliv. 
Iphthinius opacus Lcc. 
Nyctobates pennsylvanica DcG. 
P^leodes tricostata Say 
Bruebus obteetus Say 
Chclymorpba argus Lictit. 
Coptooyohi aurichalc*ea Fahr. 
Odontota rubra Wch. 
MicTorbopala vittata Fahr. 
IHholUx l)oroalis Chcv. 
Pbyllotrcta sinuata Stcph. 
Systona liudsonias Forst. 
S. frontalis Fahr. 
S. bitaeniata Lcc. 
CropidoibTa rufipes Linn. 

C. belxinos Linn. 
V. cucunioris Harr. 
Ilaltica biniargiuata Say 
Disonycba altornata ///. 
IX i)onnsylvanica III. 

I), collar is Fahr. 
(ialerucella d«H-ora Say 
Vm. lutoola Miill. 
Trirbabda canadensis Kirhy 
Diabrotica 12-pun(tata Olic. 
1>. vittata Fahr. 
Ccrotonia caminca Fahr. 
Lina script a Fahr. 
Gastroidca polygon! Linn. 
Cbrysonicla siniilis Rog. 
v.. clegans Oliv. 
0. bigsbynna Kirhy 
Dorypbora clivit-ollis Kirhy 

D. 10-lincata Say 
Prasocuris vnripos Lcc. 
N(Hlonota brunnca Fahr. 
N. tristis Oliv. 
Grapbops pubescous Mclsh. 
Metachronm luargiualis Cr. 
Tyi>op!iorns atcrriina Oliv. 
Cbrysocbns auratiis Fahr. 
Glyptoscelis pubcscens Fahr. 
Fidia viticida Walsh 
Xantbonia 10-notata Say 
Monacbus saponatus Fahr. 
Cblaniys plicata Fahr. 
Bal>ia 4-guttata Oliv. 
Criocoris asparagi Linn. 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



209 



C. 12-punctata Linn. 
Lema trilineata Oliv, 
Syneta ferruginea Oerm, 
Orsodachna atra Ahr. 
Donacia clncticornis Ncwm. 

D. rufa Say 

Tetraopes tetraophthalmus ForsL 
Saperda tridentata Oliv. 
Liopus alpha Say 
Mouohammus maculosus TIald. 
M. scutellatus Say 
M. coDfusor Kirby 
r^ptura lineola Say 
li. exigiia Neiom, 
L, cordifera Oliv. 
L. cauadensis Fahr. 
L. rubrica Say 
L. vagans Oliv. 
L. proxima Say 
L. vittata Oerm. 
Typocenis velutinus Oliv. 
Strangalla acuminata Oliv. 
RhagiuDi lineatum Oliv. 
Desmocerus palliatus Forat. 
Euderces picipes Fahr. 
Clytantlius ruricola Oliv. 
Neoclytus erythrocephalus Fahr. 
Xylotrechus colonus Fahr. 
Cyllene robiniae Forst. 
Molorobus bimaculatus Say 
lOlaphidion villosum Fahr. 
Callldiuin antennatuDi Ncwm. 
Prionus laticollis Drury 
Orthosoma brunneum Forst. 
Parandra brimnea Fahr. 
Trichlus affinis Oory 
Osinoderma scabra Beau v. 
O. eremicola Knoch. 
Euphoria inda Linn. 
Chalepus trachypygus Bunn. 
Pelidnota punctata Linn. 
Strigoderma arborlcola Fahr. 
Anomala lucicola Fahr. 
Lachnosterna fusca Froh. 
U trlstls Fahr. 

Macrodactylus subsplnosus Fahr. 
Serlca troclformis Burm. 
Dichelonycha elongata Fahr. 
D. alblcollls Burm. 
Hoplia modesta Hald. 



Geotrupes splendidus Fahr. 
Bolboceras farctus Fahr. 
Aphodius fossor Linn. 
A. fimetarlus Linn. 
A. granarius Linn. 
A. inquinatus Hhst. 
Outhophagus penusylvauicus Harold 
O. hecate Panz. 
Phauaeus carnifox Linn. 
Copris anaglyptfcus Say 
Cantlion laevis Drury 
Passalus coruutus Fahr. 
Ceriichus piceus Weh. 
Dorcus parallelus Say 
Enncartliron thoracicoruis Zeigl. 
Lyctus opaculus Lee. 
Sitodrepa panicea Linn. 
Ptinus quadrimaculatus Melsh. 
Clerus quadriguttatus Oliv. 
C. nigriventrls Lcc. 
C. analis Lee. 
Trichodes nuttali Kirhy 
Telephorus carol inus Fahr. 
T. scitulus Say 
T. rotundicollis Say 
T. bilfnentus Say 
Podabrus rugulosus Lee. 
Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus DcO. 
C. marginatus Fahr. 
L*hoturIs pennsylvanicus DeO. 
Pliotinus scintlllnuR Say 
Pyropyga nigricans Say 
p]llycbnia corrusoa Liun. 
Lucidota atra Fahr. 
Calopteron reticulatuni Fahr. 
Brachys ovata Weh. 
Agrilus anxius Oory 
A. ruflcollis Fahr. 
Acineodera pulcbella Hhst. 
Chrysobothris femora ta Fahr. 
C. floricola Oory 
C. dentipes Oerm. 
C. scabripennis Lap. d Oory 
C. pusilla Lap. d Oory. 
Buprestis macullventris Say 
Dicerca divaricata Say 
Chalcophora vlrginiensis Drury 
Asaphes decoloratus Say 
Oxygonus obesus Say 
I Corymbites luflatus Say 



210 



NKW YOUK STVTK MrTSEl^M 



V. cyllndrlformis Hbst. 
Liinonius oonfusiis Lrc. 
Melnnotus communis OylL 
Dolopius latornliH Esvh. 
Elator Dij^-li-ollls Hhst. 
K. obliquus Sap 
(Yyploliypnus planatus Lvc. 
Alans cxnilatUH I jinn. 
Tharops rnficornis Say 
TenobrioI(U^ cortical in Mrlsh. 
Ips (piadriKnttntnK Fabr. 
Oinoslta (-olon Linn. 
Nitidnla l>ipnstnlata Linn. 
Conotdns ohscnrns tJr. 
Colastns trnncatnH Rand. 
Ulster parallclus Say 
Anthrcnns scrophnlarlao Linn. 
A. verhascl Linn. 
AttMj?enns picons OUv. 
Dormcstc^s lardarins Linn. 
Bytnrns nnicolor Say 
Triphyllns linin<Tal!s Kirhy 
My<^-ot<>i)hagus pnnctatns Say 
M. flexuosns Say 
Silvanns surinaniensls Linn. 
Tritona tlioracica Say 
T. lunncralis Fahr. 
Lycoi»erdina fcrrnjrinca Leo. 
Epllacbna borcalls Fahr. 
Bracliyacaiitba nrsina Fahr. 
CbilfK'orns bivnlncrns Muls. 
Psyllobora 'JO-niacnlata Say 
Anatis ocollata Linn. 
Adalia biiaiuctata Linn. 
Coccinolla trifas<iata Linn. 
C. 0-notata llbf<t. 
V. transversa lis Malx. 
(•. san^uinca Linn. 
llippodanija lo-pnnctata Linn. 
II. parent licsis Say 
Mejrilla niaculata lUiH. 
Tacbinus fimbria tns Grav. 
Stenns flavicornis Fr. 
Pa Oder us littorarins Grav. 
Pliilontbus aen(»ns Ros.si 
Stapbylinus cinnamopterus Grav. 
S. macnlosns Grav. 
(^r(H)pbilus villosns Grav. 
Listotropbus (Unjjrulatns Grav. 
Sili)ba surinaniensis Fabr. 



S. lapponlca Hhst. 

S. inao<iuali8 Fahr. 

S. noveboracensls Forst. 

S. amoricana Linn. 

Necropborus nuirglnatus Fabr. 

X. pustulatUH II(*r8('h 

N. tomentiwus Web. 

Spbaeridium scarabaooides Linn. 

Ilydrobius fuscipos Linn. 

II. Klobosns Say 

llydnM'barls obtusatus Say 

llydropbilus triangularis 8av 

11. glal>or libst. 

Dineutes assimilis Attbe 

(iyrinus vontralis Kirby 

(i. picii>es Aubc 

.Vcilius semlsulcatus Aubc 

Dytlscns fasclventris Say 

(V)lymbetes sculptllis Uarr. 

Agabus punctulatus Am 6c 

llyblns biguttatus Germ. 

Deronectes griseostriatus DvG. 

Laccoi>bllus macnlosns Germ. 

Cnemidotus 12-punctatns Say 

Anisodactylus rusticns Say 

A. <liscoidens Dej. 

A. inters! itialis Say 

Hrady^-ellns rnpestris Say 

Hari)alus erraticus Say 

II. viridiaenens Bvaav. 

H. caliginosns Fabr. 

II. ixmnsylvanicns DvG. 

II. berbivagns Say 

AgonodtTUs pallipi*s Fabr. 

Cblaenins sericens Fornt. 

i\ tricolor Dvi. 

(\ pennsylvanicns Say 

i\ tomentosns Say 

Ii4'bia grandis Hcntz 

L. viridis Say 

Onlerita janus Fabr. 

(\'Uatbns gregarius Say 

Dicaehis elongatus Bon. 

•Vmara imimncticollis Say 

Ptcrosticbns stygicus Say 

\\ Incnblnndus Say 

r. corvinns Dej. 

V. patrnelis DcJ. 

P. femora lis Kirby 

Tatbys nanus Gyll. 



REPORT or THE STATE ENTOMOI.OGIST 1903 



21-1 



Bembidiuiii qiiadriinar*ulatum Lhni. 
Sea rites siibterranous Fahr. 
Paslmaohus olongatiis Lcc. 
Nebria sahlborjcl Fisch, 
Klaphrus rusoarius Say 
CaloHoina caliduui Fahr. 
Carabus viiictus TVc6. 
Oniophron ainericaiiinn Dej. 



Cicindela lecontel JTahL 
C. Roxjruttata Fahr. 
C. gencrosa 1>v). 
r. vulgaris Say 
C repanda Dej. 
O. purpurea Oliv. 
C. 12-guttata Dv}. 
V. punctulata Falvr. 



Diptera 



Physoef»pliala fureillata \VUL 
Drosopidla anii)elopbila JjOCW. 
Chloropisea varioeps Lorw. 
Piophila oasei Linn. 
Lauxania flaviceps Loew. 
Tryi)eta longipeniiis Wied. 
Rhagoletis cingulata Lone. 
Pborl>ia fusciceps Rondani 
Polleuia rudia Fahr. 
Belvoisia unl fascia ta Dest-. 
O-yptera carol inae Desv. 
Tachina mella Walk. 
Rchiuoniyia algens Wicd. 
Cruuia capitata DeG. 
Arobytas analis Fahr. 
Spiloniyia fusca Loew. 
Syritta pipiens TAnn. 
Ilelopbilus Rimilis Macq. 
Eristalis diiuidiatus TriV</. 



Papilio glauous turn us Linn. 
Poutia rapae Linn. 
EuryuHis pbilmlice Godt. 
Arg>'unis apbrmlite Fahr. 

A. atlantis Fjdw. 
Rrentbis inyrina Cram. 

B. bellona Fahr. 
Pbyci<xles tbaros Dm. 
Eugoida j-albuui Boisd. 
Eu Vanessa antiopa Linn. 
Vanessa atalanta Linn. 
Basilarcbia arthemis Dru. 
U. arcbippus Cram. 
Anosia plexippus Linn. 
Feniseca tarqulnius Fahr. 
UtHnh^a byi)opbleas Boisd. 
Samia ce<Topia fjinn. 
Catlosanila pronietbia Dru. 
Lycouiorpba pbolus Dru. 



E. tenax Limi. 

E. transversus Wied. 

Hliiugia nasi<*a Say 

Spbaeropboria cylindrica Say 

Mesograpta uiarginata Say 

Syrpbus lesueurii Macq. 

S. ribesii Linn. 

S. americanus Wied. 

Platyclierus quadratus Say 

Tabanus atrata Fahr. 

T. reinwardtii Mled. 

T. lineola Fahr. 

Tberioplectes inicrocepbalus O. .S*. 

Clirysops vittatus Wied. 

C. excitans Walk. 

C. niger Macq. 

Pangonia tranquilla O. S. 

Bibio albipennis Linn. 



Lepidoptera 

1 Ctenucba virginioa Char p. 
I Eubnpbe aurantiaca Huh. 

llaploa confusa Lyman 
i Estigniene acraea Dru. 
■ Isia isai)ella Sm. cC- Ahh. 
t.JMacrisia virginica Fahr. 
I Apnntesis virgo Linn. 
I A. partbenlce Stretch. 

Halisldota tessellaris Sm. rf Ahb. 
I II. caryae Ilarr. 

Alypia octoniaculata Fahr. 
I Iladena passer Guen. 

II. dubitans Walk. 

11. devastatrix Brace. 

II. arctica Boisd. 

Pyropbila pyraniidoidcs Guen. 

Adelpliagrotis praslna Fahr. 

Peridronia niargaritosa Ilarr. 

NiK'tua sniitbii SncU. 



212 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



N. bicarnea Oucn. 
N. c-nlgrum Linn, 
N. clandestiua Harr. 
Feltia subgotblca Fair. 
P. jacullfera Oucn, 
Paragrotis rocllniicula Morr, 
Mamcstra purpnriRRata Orote 
M. mcditata Orote 
M. renlgera Stcph. 
M. oUvacea Morr. 
Nephelodes minians Oucn. 
Ileliophila unlpuncta Haw. 
II. luteopallens Smith 
Trichollta Bignata Strcck. 
Gortyiia nictltans Bork. 
Orthosla helva Orote 
Pliisia aerea Hiibn. 
P. acroides Orote 



I Aiitograpba biinaculata Stcph. 
\ A. precationis Oucn. 

A. brassicae Riley 

A. roctangula KirJyy 
I A. u-aureum Oucn. 
j A. faldgera Kirhy 

Enstrotia carneola Oucn. 

Notoh)i)bii8 badia Hy. Edw. 

Ileinerocanipa leucostlgma Ahh. d 
8m. 

Eudule mendlca Walk. 

Cingilia catenarla Dru. 

Sabu lodes transversa ta Dru, 

Sesla tipuliformis Olerck, 

Desmla funeralis HUhn, 

Evergestis stramlnalis Huhn. 

Tholeria reversalis Oucn. 



Leptocerus resurgens Walk. 
ITydropsycbe scalaris Hag. 
Ilalesus guttifer Walk. 



Panorpa rufescens Ramhur 
P. maculosa Hag. 



Trichoptera 

Gonlotaulius dispectus Walk. 
Neuronla postica Walk. 

Hecoptera 

Bittacus strigosus Hag, 



Neuroptera 
Polystoechotes punctatiis Fahr. | Corj-dalls cornuta Linn, 



Hemiptera 



Cantliopborus cinctus Beau v. 
Podisus macullvenlris Say 
P. plaeidus Uhler 
Brochymena 4-pustulata Fahr. 
Cosmopepla carnifex Fahr. 
Eiiscbislus servua Sap 
E. tristignuis Say 
E. flssllis Uhler 
E. variolariiis P. B. 
Coeniis deli us Say 
Pentatonia junii)erana Lhin. 
Murgantia histrionica Hahn. 
Nezara bilaris Say 
Anasa tristis DeO. 
Alydus ourinus Say 
Leptocoris trivittatus Say 
Blissus leucoptcrus Say 



Lygaeus turclcus Fahr, 
I^optopterna dolobrata Linn. 
Calocoris rapidus Say 
Lygus pratensls Linn. 
Poccilocapsus lineatus Falir. 
CapsU^ ater Linn. 
Plesma cinerea Say 
Corytbuca arcuata Say 
Pbymata wolffli Bcr, Sch. 
Nabls rufusculus Rent, 
Acbolla multispinosa DeO. 
Limnotrecbus marginatus Say 
Belostonia aniericana Lcid. 
Notonecta undulata Say 
Cicada tiblcen Linn. 
C. septendeclm Linn. 
Publilia concava Say 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 



213 



p. bicinctus Chxig, 
Oresa bubalus Fahr. 
C. diceros Say 
Stictocephala inermis Fahr. 
Smilia cameliis Fahr. 
Telamona ampeloposidis Harr. 
Rnchenopa binotata Say 
Ormenis prulnosDS Say 
Aplirophoni saratogensis Fitch 



A. qiiadrangularis Say 
Clastoptera proteus Fitch 
Dicdrocephala niollipes Say 
I), coccinea Forst. 
D. noveboracensls Fitch 
rielochara communis Fitch 
Thamnotettix olitellarius Say 
Empoasca rosae llarr. 
Trioza tripiinctata Fitch 



Coccidae 



r^epidosaphes iilmi Linn. 
Aspidiotus porniciosiis Comat. 
A. ostreaeformis Curt. 
A. aiicylus Putn. 
A. abiotis Schr. 
Aulacasi)is rosae Bouch6 
Diaspis boisduvalii Sign. 



Chionaspis fiirfura Fitch 

C. euonymi Conist. 

C. amorioaiia Johns. 

Eulecn Ilium nigi'ofasclatum Pcrg. 

Pulvinarla innumerabilis Uathv. 

(Jossypjiria spuria Moilecr 

Kermes gallifornds Riley 



CDNTK TBI TT IONS TO COLLEOTION 0(^T. 10, 1902-OCT. 15, 

1903 

Hymenoptera 

B o ui b u s V a g a n s Suiitb, adult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, Saranac Inn N.T. 

Melissodes sphaeralceae Ckll., adult, Sep. 10, T. D. A. Cockerel!, 
Pecos N.^I. 

Megachile cleonii? Ckll, adult, Sep. 10, T. D. A. Cockerel!, Pecos 
N.M. 

M. s a p e 1 1 o n i ? Ckll., adult, Sep. 10, T. D. A. Cockerel!, Pecos N.M. 

M. monardarum Ckll., adult, Sep. 10, T. D. A. Cockerel!, Pecos N.M. 

Per d it a stotteri Ckll., adult, Sop. 10, T. D. A. Cockerel!, Pecos 
N.M. 

Camponotus herculaneus Linn., adult. May 21, P. R. Calkins, 
Ossining N.Y. 

C. var. pennsylv aniens DcO. largo black ant, work on balsam, 
Oct 31, Jonas H. Brooks, Albany N.Y, 

P t e r o m a 1 u s p u p a r u ni Linn., adult, from Euvanessa anti- 
op a Linn., Feb. 8, J. H. Cook, Albany N.Y. 

Biorbiza forticornis Walsb, oak fig gall on oak, Aug. 24, C. H. 
Peck, Albany N.Y. 

Urocerus tricolor Prov., adult, July 18, James Roy & Co., Troy 
N.Y. 

Dolerus arvensis Say, adult, Ap. 30, P. R. Calkins, Osslning N.Y. 

Emphytus cinctlpes Nort., July 11, C. J. Locke, Ogdonsburg N.Y. 

Coleoptera 

Pbytonomus nigrirostris Fabr., adult, on clover. Mar. 25, P. R. 
Calkins, Ossining N.Y. 

Mycetochares binotata Say, adult, July 11, C. J. Locke, Ogdons- 
burg N.Y. 



214 NKW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

S P o r in (> p h n j: 11 s r o b i n a o Srii.. adult, Juno 0, Reinlein Oatoline 
Torch Co., Mt Vonion 111. 

(Ml ol y mo r p ha arj;iis Liclit., argus bootlo, adult, June (>, C. J. 
Locke, Ojjdoiisburg N.Y. 

C' o p t () r y o 1 a b I o o 1 o r Fabr.. goldoii tortoise bootlo, adult on |>eacb 
loav(!H, May .'^0, Emma 8. Thomas, S<*holiarie N.T. Same, adult, June G, 
C. J. Locke, Op^lonsburK N.Y. 

<f a 1 o r u <• (» 1 1 a 1 u t o o 1 a Milll., olin loaf bootlo, a<lult on olui, May 25, 
P. R. Calkins, OsslniiiR N.Y. Sanio, opgs and larvao on elm, July 13, 
F. R. Calkins, DsHinhig N.Y. 

n i a b r o t I o a v 1 1 1 a t a Fabr., adult on wpiaHh, May 25, F. R. Calkins, 
OsslniiiR N.Y. 

(Ml r y s o m t' 1 a b i jr s b y a n a Kirby, adult, Juno 25, C. J. Locke, Og- 
donsburg N.Y. 

L) o r y p b o r a o 1 1 v i (m> 1 1 i s Kirby, adult, July 11, C. J. Locke, Ogdoiis- 
burg N.Y. 

C b r y s o <• b u s a u r a t u s Fabr., goldon gilt bootlo, adultn on dogl»aue, 
July ir», J. Jay Barden, Dansvillo N.Y. Same, adult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, 
Saranao Inn N.Y. 

I> i a b r o t i o a v i 1 1 a t a Fabr., strlpo<l cuoumbor bootlo, adult, June 
25, C. J. Locke, Ogdonsburg N.Y. 

(' r I o <• o r i g 12-p u n c t a t a Linn., 12-spottod asparagus bootlo, adult, 
Juno 3, C. H. Peck, Monnnds X.Y. 

('. asparagi Linn., asparagus bootlo, adult on asparagus. May 25, 
C. L. Williams, <;ions Fails N.Y. Same, adult on asparagus Sop. .S, W. I. 
Greene, Mt Vornon N.Y. * 

T o t r a o p o s t o t r a o p li thai ni u s Forst., adult, July 11, C. J. Locke, 
Ogdonsburg N.Y. 

() b r o a h i lu a o u i a t a Oliv.. raspberry cane girdlor work on rasp- 
l>orry ranos, Juno 24, John TJ. Metz, Swormviilo N.Y. 

Cent r o d o r a d t» <• <» 1 o r a t a Ilarr., adult on butternut, Jan. 5. G. S. 
Oraves, Nt»\viM)rl N.Y. 

I> e s in o (' o r u s p a i i i a t u s Forst., adult, Juno SlTi, C. J. Locke, Ogdons- 
burg N.Y. 

(\v i I o n o r o l> i n i a o Forst., i<K-ust borer, Oct. 18, W. C. Hitchcock, 
Pittstown N.Y. Sana', larvae on i<KUst, Juno 1(», M. T. Richardson, Brook- 
lyn N.Y. 

r r i o n u s i a t i <• o 1 1 i s Drury, broad-necked Prionus, adult, July 20, 
Miss M. J. Tyers, Dobl>s Ferry N.Y. 

L i g y r u s g i 1> l> o s u s l)c(;. adult, June «, Reinlein Gasoline Torch 
Co., Mt Vernon lii. 

r 11 d n o t a ]) u n c t a t a Tiinn., spotted grapevine l>oetlo, Oct. 18, 
W. C. Hitchcock, Pittstown N.Y. 

L a c b n o s t e r n a f u s c a Fnilil.. larva, Juno 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdons- 
burg N.Y. 

D i p 1 o t a X i s 1 i l» e r t a (;erm.,'aduits on peach, Sep. 24, J. R. Crandall, 
Ilauppauge N.Y. 

M a c r o d a <• t y i u s s u 1) s j) i n o s u s Fa!»r., rose bc»t»tlo, adult on fruit 
trees. June 10, H. A. Jordan, Co.xsackie N.Y. 

I) i c b i o n y c Ii a o 1 o n g a t a Fabr., adult, June G, C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y, 



REPORT OF THK STATR ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 215 

L y c t u 8 p a r a 1 1 c 1 o p i i> e (1 II 8 Melsh., adults in ash, July 10, Joseph 
P. McHuirh & Co., Now York. 

C o 1 1 o p 8 V i 1 1 a t u s Say, ndult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, Sarauac Inn N.Y. 

T e 1 e p h o r u 8 c a r o 1 i n u s Fabr., adult, June 25. C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y. 

P o d a b r u 8 r u g u 1 o s u s Iah*., adult, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg 
N.Y. Same, adult. July 11, C. J. Locke, OgdtMislmrg N.Y. 

I-jimpyrid, Inrva, June 12, George S. Graves, Ne\vi>ort N.Y. 

( Ml a 1 o i> h o r a v i r g i n i e n s i k Drury, adults, Oct. 18, W. C. Hitch- 
cock, Plttstown N.Y. 

M 1 a n o t u 8 c o ni m u n i s Gyll., adult, July 11, C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y. 

1> o 1 o p 1 u s lateralis Kscli., ailult, July 11, J. J. Locke, Ogdensburg 
N.Y. 

A 1 a u s o e u 1 a t u s Unn., owl lKH»tU», julult, July J». C. L. Daggett, 
Albany N.Y. Same, adults, July 27, Fred G. Games, ^V. ('hazy N.Y. 

A n t h r e n u s v e r b a s o i Linn., jidult. May 25, P. R. Calkins, Osslning 
NY. 

Cli II o <M) r u 8 b 1 V u 1 n e r u s Muls., twiec^stabbed ladyb€»etle, adult 
(feiHling on San Jose seale) June V,\, Mr Hotchkin, Hinghamtcui N.Y. 

A d a 1 i a b i p u n c t a t a Linn., (wo-spotte<l lady lK*etle, ailult. July IM, 
Ckorire S. Graves, Newi)ort N.Y. Same on Norway maple, June 12, M. P. 
Tiger, Tatehogue N.Y. Same, larvae on rose. Jmie ?u Mrs A. G. Dana, Far 
KfK'kaway N.Y. 

(' o e c i n e 1 1 a t r a n s v e r s a 1 i s Muls., adult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, 
Saranac Inn N.Y. 

<' . On o lata llerbst, ailult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, Sarana<- Inn N.Y. 

Hydrophilus triangularis Say, adult, June IG, Prances Mc- 
carty, Albany N.Y. 

Harp a 1 u s e r r a t i e u s Say, ndidt. July 24, C. R. Pettis, Saranac 
Inn N.Y. 

A g o n o d e r u s jui 1 1 i p e s Fabr., atlult., May 21, P. R. Calkins, Ossin- 
ing N.Y. 

P t e r o s t i <' h u s 1 u c u b 1 a n d u s Say, adult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, 
Sarana<* Inn N.Y. 

rieindela punctulata Fabr., adult, July 0, Richard Lohrmann, 
Herkimer N.Y. 

r. rei»anda I><'j.. adult. Junt» 25, C. J. Locke, Og<lensburg N.Y. 

<'. vulgaris Say, adult, July 24. C. R. Pettis, Saranac Inn N.Y. 

(A generosa Dej., adult, July r», Richard Lohrmann, Herkimer N.Y. 

C. r> - g u 1 1 a t a Fabr., adult. June 25, C. J. Locke, Og<lensburg N.Y. 

Siphonaptera 

C e r a t o p s y 1 1 u s s e v rati c e p s, cat tl<*a. adult, infesting hous<», 
Sep. 14, Otis Arnold, Albj{ny N.Y. 

Diptera 

Mowpiito. larvae and adults. July 11. C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg N.Y. 
1* s o r o p h o r a c i 1 i a t a Fabr., a<lult, Aug. <i, H. C. Weeks, Sheepa- 
liead Hay, Brooklyn .\.Y. 
Cbironoiuids, aduJt, Ap. SO, F, R. Calkins, Osslniivg^.X, 



216 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 

L n 8 i o p r e r a v i t i 8 ? O. S.» June 4, Francesco Landini, Now York. 

T h e r i o p 1 e t e 8 a f f i u i s adult, July 24, C. R. Pettii, Sarauac Iud 
N.Y. 

T u b a u u s a t r a t u 8 Fabr., luuuruiug horsefly, adult, July 7, Abraham 
Knechtel, Albany NA\ 

Syrpbus ribc8li Linn., adult, A p. 'Si\ F. R. Calkini, Ossining N.Y. 

Stratiouiyld. adult, May 25, C. L. Williams, Glons Falls N.Y. 

Tacbinid sp., iiuparium inf(\stiu^ stalk borer, July 15, C. L. Williams, 
Glens Falls N.Y. 

To 1 leu i a rudis Fabr., eluster lly, adults in bousi», Sei). 1, K. B. 
Christman, Hurtonvillc N.Y. 

r h (> r b i a b r a s s i c a e Houcbe, labbage root maggot, larvae in tur- 
nii»s, Nov. 18, J. J. Cormot, Tboenlx IJ.I. 

P. ceparuni Meigen. onion maggot, grubs t>n onions, Juue ID, lir 
VanOerzee, Kenwood N.Y'. Same. Mar. 25, F. R. Calkins, Ossiniug N.Y. 

Try pet a longipennis Weid.. adult, on Ueliantbus, Jidy 31, 
George 8. Graves, Newi)ort N.Y'. 

Lepidoptera 

F a p i 1 i o p o 1 y X e u e 8 Fabr., adult. Feb. 11, R. K. Colville, Keuwood 
N.Y. Same, larva, Juue 10, Mrs Humphrey, Watervliet N.Y. 

P i e r i s o 1 e r a e e a ilarr., cabbage butterlly, adult, July 14, Carl 
Heiser, Ma lone N.Y. 

B a s i 1 a r e h i a a r t h e m i s l>r. banded puri)le, adult, Juue 17, 
Mrs A. M. A. Jackson, Oamillus N.Y. 

Spbecodina abbotii Swains, Oct. 18, W. C. Hitchcock, Pitts- 
town N.Y\ 

S a m i a c e e r o p i a Linn., oeeropia moth, adult eggs, Juue 12, 
A. Sannders, lUdge road. Irondequoit N.Y'. 

T e lea p o 1 y p b e in u s Cramer, egg and eocoou, Juue G, C. J. Locke, 
Dgdensburg N.Y'. 

C t e n u e h a v i r g i n i c a Chari>., adult, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y. 

Fstigmene aeraea Dr. salt marsh caterpillar, adult, June D, 
George S. Graves, Newport N.Y. 

Alypia octomaculata Fabr., 8-spotted forester, larvae ou 
Virginia treeiKT, July ^20, Percy MacG. Allen, Albany N.Y". 

N o e t u a c 1 a n d e s t i n a Ilarr., adult, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdeus- 
burg N.Y. 

F e 1 1 i a s u b g o t h i c a ? Ila worth, larva on cabbage, June 25, C. J. 
Locke, Dgdensburg N.Y'. 

M a m e s t r a p i c t a Ilarr., zebra caterpillar, larva ou strawberry, 
June 9, C. L. Williams, Glens Falls N.Y. 

Ileliophila pseudargyria GuenCn*, adults. May 21, F. R. 
Calkins, Ossining N.Y'. 

X y 1 i n a 1 a t i c i n e r e a ? Grote, larva on peach. May 28, Henry G. 
Parsons, Milton N.Y. 

il e 1 i o t h i 8 A r m i g e r lliibn., corn worm, larva on corn. Aug. 25, 
Dr M. W. VanDenburg, Mt Vernon N.Y'. 

II e t e r o c a m p a b i 1 i n e a t a Pack., larvae on beech, July 12, £. H. 
Mairs, Irrlngtou N.Y. 



BEPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 217 

Notolophus antiqua LiuD., larva, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdoiis- 
burg N.Y. 

Tolype velleda? Stoll, lapi)et moth, larva ou apple, June 13, Mr 
Hotohkln, Blngbunitau N.Y. 

Hydria uudulata Linn., on cherry, Aug. 15, C. R. Pettis, Saranac 
Inn N.Y. 

P r i o n o X y s t u 8 V r u b i n i a e l*eck, larvae on beech. Jan. 5, 
Oeorire S. Graves,. Newjmrt N.Y. 

Sanninoidea exitiesa Say, Oct. 18, W. C. Hitchcock, Pittstown 
N.Y. 

S e s i a a c e r n i Clem., maple seslan, larva on maple, Sei). 18 W. C. H., 
Hartley Uall Pa. 

E v e r g o 8 t i 8 8 t r a m 1 n a 1 1 s HUbn., black headcMl cabbage worm, 
larvae on turnip, July 22, George 8. Graves, Newport N.Y. 

II y I) .s o p y g i a e o s t a 1 i 8 Fabr., clover hay worm, larvae. Mar. 1(5, 
J. Mace Smith, Ithaca N.Y. 

Archips rosaceana Harr., adult, June G, Reinlein Gasoline Torch 
Co., Mt Vernon N.Y. Same, July 11, C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg N.Y. Same, 
larva on rose, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg N.Y. 

Gelechia aceriella Clem., larva on maple, Aug. 27, George 8. 
Graves, Newport N.Y. 

Bucculatrix pomifoliella Clem., apple leaf Bucculatrlx, co- 
coon8 on apple, Nov. 17, L. L. Woodford, Berwyn N.Y. 

Tineola biselliella Hummel, clothes moth, larva in a mattress, 
June 25, Mrs P. N. Nicholas, Geneva N.Y. 

Neuroptera 

P80CU8 venosus Burm., on maple, Aug. 12, George 8. Graves, 
Newport N.Y. 

Sialis infumata Newm., alder fly, June G, C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y. 

Trichoptera 

M y s t a c i d e 8 nigra Linn., July 11, C. J. Locke, 0gden8burg N.Y. 

Plecoptera 

T a c n i o p t e r y X f a 8 c i a t a Burm., Mar. 25, P. R. Calkins, Ossinlng 
N.Y. 

Pteronarcys regalis Newm., adult, June 6, C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y. 

Hemiptera 

Canthopborus cinctus Beauv., adult, July 24, C. R. Pettis, Sara- 
nac Inn N.Y. 

?Nezara hilaris DeG., nymphs killing asparagus hoctle frmhs, 
Sep. 3, W. F. Greene, Mt Vernon N.Y. 

Leptopterna dolobrata Linn., on wheat, June 15, J. Jay 
Barden, Stanley N.Y. Same, adult, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg N.Y. 
Same, July 11, C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg N.Y. 

Calocorls rapldus Say, adult, June 25, C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg 
N.Y. 



218 NEW YORK STATK MUSEUM 

r o o 1 1 o <• a |» R 11 s 1 1 n o a t II R Fabr., Jiilj- 11. C. J. Locke, Ogdens- 
burg N.Y. 

* Caps us a tor Linn., adult. June 25, C. J. Locke. Ogilonsburg N.Y. 
Same. .July 11, C. J. Locke. OgibMisburg N.Y. 

A o a n t h i a 1 c <• t u 1 a r I a TJnn.. iHMlbug, July 24, C. R. Pettis, Sara- 
nac Inn N.Y'. 

(' o r y t b u c a ni a r ni o v a t a riih»r. adults on i'lirysautbt»uium, June 
1, Harry Blauvelt, Cot^vnian N.^". 

r <» r i 8 c u s sub v o 1 e o p t (» r u s KIrby, ailult. July 24, C. R. Pettif, 
Saranac Inn N.Y. . 

A V boll a ni u 1 1 i s p i n o s a IMi. nyinpbs on grape. May 25, P. R. 
Calkins, Osslning N.Y. 

C \ c a (! a t I b i <• e n Linn., barve.st tiy, adult. Aug. 12. George S. Graves, 
Newport N.Y. Sann*. Aug. 24, H. B. Taylor, Albany N.Y. 

Ceresa taurina Fiteli. tree boi)iK»r wars on apple, Ap. 24, Mr 
Niles. Cbatbani N.Y. 

T e 1 e ni o n a r e e 1 i v a t a ? Fiteb, July 1 1. C. J. Locke, Ogdensburg 
N.Y. 

r s y 1 1 a i> y r i r o 1 a Kiley, ])ear psylla. all stages on iH»ar. July 20. 
Jacob H. Wagar, <'roi>st\vvilIe N.Y. Same, nyinpbs on pear. Aug. 17. Miss 
M. L. Williams. Sberburne N.Y. Same, pupa on pear. May 25, G. P. White, 
Treston Hollow N.Y. 

('be r m e s j) i n i r o r t i r i s Fiteb, pine bark ebermes, eggs on wbite 
pine. May 2, C. R. Pettis, Sarnnae Inn N.Y. 

I* e m p li i g u s t <» s s e 1 1 a t u s Fiteb, larvae and adult on alder. Aug. 
2!>, C. R. Pettis, Saranae Inn N.Y. 

I* . p o !> u 1 a r i u s Fiteb. adult on poplar I* . b a 1 s a m I f e r a , July 
24. C. R. Pettis. Saranae Inn N.Y. 

II o r in a p b 1 s b a m a m e I i d i s Fiteb, galls on witeb bazel. Aug. 12, 
George S. Graves, Newi>ort N.Y. 

Sebizoneura a m e r i <• a n a Kiley. adults on elm, June 15, C. J. 
Locke, Ogden.sburg N.Y. 

Ti a e b n us v i m i n a 1 i s Fonse., adult. May 25, P. R. Calkins, Ossin- 
ing N.Y. 

I) r e p a n o s i p b u ni a e e r i f o 1 i i Tbos., a<lults on A e e r s ac - 
e b a r i n u m June 2r>, George S. Graves, Newport N.Y. 

A p b i s g o s s y p i i (J lover, adults and larvae on tomato, Aug. (J, C. H. 
Peck. Menan<ls N.Y. 

? N e e t a r o ]> bora till a e Monell. bjissw(M)d louse, eggs on basswood, 
Nov. 24. L. L. Woodford, Herwyn .N.Y. 

N e e t a r o p b o r a r u d b <» e k i a e Fiteb. adults on K u d b e e k i a 
1 a<* i n i a t a . June 25, G. G. Atwood, Albany N.Y. 

M y z us r i b i s Linn V on U i b e s :i u r e u m , July 8, W. H. Harrison, 
Lebanon Springs N.Y. 

M. eerasi Fabr., on eberry. May 25. P. R. Calkins, Osainlug N.Y. 
Same, larvae and adult on 1* r u n u s j) e n n s y 1 v a n i e a , July 24, C. R. 
Pettis, Saranac Inn N.Y. 

H b opal o s i ]) b u m s o 1 a n i Tbos., tomato louse, all stages, on 
tomato. June J>. J. M. Dolph. roil Jervis N.Y. 

Ca 1 1 i ]»t <» r u s b e t u 1 a e e o 1 e n s Fiteb. bireh leaf apbis on vu{ 
lenvvd birch. Aug. 8, J!, P, VanNe^s, Ka??t Greenbush N.T, 



REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 219 

Lepidosapbes ulml Linn., appletree bark louse, eggs on lilao. 
Mar. 17, T. 1. M., Staten Island N.Y. Same, adults on willow, May 2, M. T. 
Blchardion, New York. 

Cbrysompbalus tenebrieosus Conist, gloomy scale insect, 
on maple, Dec. 29, 0. W. Herrlck, VIcksburg Miss. 

Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst, San Jos6 scale, adults and 
young on apple, Nov. 3, Edward V. Cox, New York city. Same, adults and 
young on peach and plum, Dec. 29, O. W. Herrlck, Ellisville Miss. Same, 
adults on Japanc8e quince, Feb. 23, Albany N.Y. Same, young adults on 
Japanese quince. May 7, M. T. Klchardion, New York. Same, adults on 
apple. May IG, A. N. Cloud, Coxsackie N.Y. Same, adults on pear, June 9, 
Oeorge M. Adams, Spencerport N.Y. 

A. forbesi Johns., cherry scale insect, adults on cherry, Dec. 29, Glenn 
W. Herrlck, Meridian Miss. 

A. a n c y 1 u s Putn., Putnam's scale, young on apple (fruit) Nov. 10, 
C. H. Darrow, Geneva N.Y. Same, adult on white birch, Ap. 7, Prof. C. F. 
Hodge, Clark University, Worcester Mass. 

Poliaspis carlssae Ckll., adults on carissa, Deic. 22, T. D. A. 
Coekerell, East Las Vegas N.M. 

PhtMiacaspia uatalenais Ckll., adults on n.aui^o, Dec. 12, T. D. 
A. Coekerell, East Las Vegas N.M. 

Aulacaspis rosae Bouch6, rose scale insect, on blackberry, Nov. 24, 
L. 1. Woodford, Berwyn N.Y. 

Chionaspis euonynii Comst, euonymus scale, adults on euony- 
mus, Sep. 19, T. W. Baldwin, Nyack N.Y. 

C . 1 i n t n e r i Comst, adults on cornus, Ap. 27, H. C. Peck, Rochester 
N.Y. 

Eulecanium tulip ifereae Cook, tuliptree scale insect, adults 
and young on tulip, Aug. 2, Mrs W. H. Whitaker, Flushing N.Y. 

E. prunastri? Fonsc, New York plum scale, adults on pear, June 
12, E. L. MitchcU, Clarksville N.Y. 

E. nigrofasc latum Perg., black banded lecanium on peach. May 1, 
0. 8. Clarke, Milton N.Y. 

E . a r me n i a c u ni Craw., adults on crimson rambler rose, May 26, 
Myron 8. Wheeler, Berlin Mass. 

Coccus hesperidum Linn., on begonia, June G, C. J. Locke, Og- 
densburg N.Y. 

Lecanium sp., adult on trumpet vine, June 10, C. E. Eldridge, Leon N.Y. 

Pulvinaria innumerabllis Rathv., maple tree scale insect, 
adult on maple, June 20, M. T. Tyers, Dobbs Ferry N.Y. 

Halimococcus lamp as Ckll., adults on palm, Dec. 22, T. D. A. 
Coekerell, East Las Vegas N.M. 

Orthoptera 

Ceuthophilus maculatus Say, spotted wingless grasshopper, 
adult. May 15, C. E. Wieting, Cobleskill N.Y. 

Thysannra 

Achorutes packardi Folsm., adults on peartree bark Ap. 7, 
A. W. K. Lick, Germantown N.Y. 



220 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Araohnida 

Mierathena f^aglttata Walck., adult killing asparagus beetles, 
Sep. 3, W. F. Greene, Mt Vernon N.Y. 

Ixodes c r u (• i a r i u s Fitch, ti(*. Ap. 21. C. H. North, Dannemora 
N.Y. 

Deruiacentor americanus, the dog or wood tick, adult on dog, 
July 20, E. H. Hnyck, Rensselaervllle N.Y. 

(' hemes sanliorni Hagen, adult on house fly, Sep. 7, Dr H. E. 
Smith, Norwich N.Y. 

Trombidium muscarum Riley, adults on house fly, Sep. 7, Br 
H. B. Smith, Norwich N.Y. 

Phytoptus quadripes Shimer, galls on Acer dasycarpum, 
July 3, 0. O. Atwood, Albany N.Y. 

B r y o b i a p r a t e n s i h Garni., clover mite, eggs on peach, Nov. 17, 
L. L. Woodford, Berwyn N.Y. 

(Janiasiis h[k adult? May 21, F. R. Calkini, Ossining N.Y 

Myriapoda 

Scutigera forceps Raf ., house centipede, adults in house, Sep. 22; 
Chancey Whitmyre, Schenectady N.Y. 



The following is a small collection, except a few species which 
have not been determined, of insects kindly contributed by Mr 
J. R. de la Torre Bneno of New York city, who collected the same 
in that vicinity. 



Cossonus platalea Say 
Ceiitrinus picumnus HhsU 
C. scutellum-album Say 
Madarus undulatus Say 
Baris transversa Say 
Copturiis uiinutus Lee, 
Conotrachelus seniculus Lee. 
C. nenuphar Hhst, 
Gymnetron teter Fahr, 
Anthouonius signatus Say 
Otidocephalus chevrolatii Horn 
Phytonomus nlgrirostris Fahr, 
P. punctatus Fabr. 
Apion nigrum Hbst. 
Si tones flavescens Marsh 
S. hlspidulus Oenn, 
Aphrastus taeniatus OylL 
Otiorhynchus ovatus Linn, 
Phyxelis rigldus iSay 
Attelabus nigripes Lee, 
Rhynchites bicolor Fahr, 
Eugnamptus collaris Fahr, 
Rbiplphorua Jimbatus Fabr, 



Mordellistena aspersa MeUh, 
M. comata Lee, 
M. trifasciata Say 
Mordella niarginata MeUh, 

I Bruchus musculus Say 

I Cerotoma caminea Fahr, 

I Trichlus aflinis Gory. 

I Ligyrus gibbosus DeG, 

I Chalepus trachjrpygus Burtn, 
Anoniala lucicola Fahr, 
Macrodactylus subspinosus Fahr, 

I Chaiiliognathuspennsylvanicus DeO. 

I ruotinus consauguineus Lee, 
Luoidota atra Fahr, 
Calor)teron roticulatum Fahr, 
Adalia bipunctata Linn. 
Coccinella 9-notata Hhst, 
Hippodamia glacialis Fahr, 
Silpha surinamensis Fabr, 
Harpalus caliginosus Fahr, 
Casnonia pennsylvanica Linn, 
Clcindela punctulata Fabr. 



REPORT OB^ THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 221 

EXPLANATION OF PLATES 

PLATE 1 

Dorsal view ofEniscopilus arcuatus Felt 

PLATE 8 

OpMonid wings 
lOphion ferruginipennis Felt 
2 0phion bifoveolatum Brull6 
SOphion bilineatum Say 
4Eniscopilus appendiculatus Felt 

5 Ophion abnormum Felt 

6 Eremotylus macrurus Linn. 

PLATE 8 

Work of Chrysanthemum lace-bug, Oorythuca marmo - 
rata Uhler 

PLATE 4 

Chrysanthemnm lace-bng 
Corythuca marmorata Uhler 

1 Section of leaf showing insertion of eggs below the surface 

2 Dorsal spines of stage 1: a, arising from cone-shaped base, 

b, directly from the body 

3 Lateral abdominal spine of stage 1 

4 Dorsal view of nymph in stage 2 

5 Dorsal spines of stage 2: a, arising from cone-shaped base, 

by directly from the body 

6 Lateral abdominal spine of stage 2 

7 Dorsal spines of stage 3: a, arising from cone-shaped base, 

by directly from tlie body 

8 Lateral abdominal spines of stage 3 

9 Dorsal view of nymph in stage 4 

10 Lateral abdominal spines of stage 4 

11 Dorsal spines of stage 4: a, arising from cone-shaped base, 

by directly from the body 

12 Lateral abdominal spines of stage 5 

13 Antennae in stage 5 



THE NEWYORi' 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A8TrR, LFNOX AMD 



Plate 1 




Kniscopilus arouatut 



Plate 2 









Ophlonld wings 



1 «£ NEW YORr 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



TW-OtN fCUNDAT'O." . 



Plate 3 




Work of clirysaiithenniiii Inco biiR 



Plate 4 







CT^.V/.ntd. 



Cbrysanthemum lace bufi; 



^HE NEW YORK I 

PUBLIC library! 



r/LOtN FOUNO<.T'C. 



INDEX 



abnormum, Oi>blon, 114, 121-22. 

acorifolli, Drepanoslphum, 136, 181- 
82, 192. 

aceris, Cbaltophorus, 134, 191. 

acerni, Sc8ia, 200. 

Aeknowledgmeuts, 96. 

Adalia bipunctata, 136: 

Adirondacks, relation of forest fires 
to Insect attack, 168-69. 

Admiral butterflies, red, 184. 

agarici, Phora, 193. 

agassizii, Halisidota, 106. 

Agrilus anxius, 186. 

Albany county, summary of volun- 
tary reports from, 174. 

albifrons, Symmcrista, 118. 

Alder, webworm injuring, 183. 

Allen Nursery Co., certificate Issued 
to, 95. 

Ambrosia beetle, 169, 170, 172. 

American economic entomology, lit- 
erature of, 196. 

americana, Apatela, 183. 

americana, Malacosoma, see Mala- 
cosoma americana. 

americana, Schizoneura, 181. 

Anasa tristis, 175, 177, 180, 185, 180. 

? Anthonomus signatus, 187. 

antiopa. Euvanessa, 180. 185, 186. 

Ants, 184, 198. 

anxius, Agrilus, 186. 

Apatela americana, 183. 

Apatelodes torrefacta, 102. 

Apbids, see Plant lice. 

Aphis, apple, 131-33, 177, 182, 185, 
187, 189, 191. 
birch, 136. 

cabbage, 133-34, 176, 180, 182. 
cherrj', 133. 175, 177, 185, 186, 188. 
elm, 134-35. 
wooly beech, 136. 

Aphis brassicae. 133-34. 176, 180, 
182. 
mail. 131-33. 177, 182, 185, 187, 
180, 191. 



appeudiculatus, Eniscc^ilus, 108, 

113. 
Appletree, insects injurious to: 

Aphis mall. 177, 182, 185. 189. 

Hyphantria textor, 182, 183, 188. 

Macrodactylus subspinosus, 181. 

Myzus cerasi, 185. 

plant lice, 177, 182, 185, 187. 

Psocus ? venosus. 182. 

Saperda Candida, 186. 

Tmetocera ocellana, 183. 
Appletree aphis, 131-33, 177, 182, 

185, 187, 189. 191. 
Appletree bark louse, 195. 
Aa>pletree borer, 186. 
Appletree tent caterpillar, 138-39, 

175, 176, 177, 178, 180, 181, 183. 

184, 186, 188, 190, 191, 193. 
Appletree worm, yellow-necked, 

182. 
Apricots, Dlabrotica 12-panctata in- 
juring, 138. 
Aquatic Chrysomelidae, 199. 
Aquatic insects of New York state, 

93, 94, 200. 
Aquatic Nematocerous Dlptera, 199. 
Arachnida, contributions of, 220. 
arctiae, Eremotylus, see Eremotylus 

arctiae. 
arcuatus, Eniscopilus, 108, 112-13. 
armicollis, Magdialis, 167. 
Army worm, parasite of, 109. 
Arsenate of lead, 142, 148, 194, 195, 

196, 199. 
Arsenical poison, 137. 
Ash. mountain, Diplotaxis frondl- 

cola injuring, 137. 
Ashmead. W. H. acknowledgments 
to, 97, 105; cited, 104, 105, 106, 111, 

116, 120. 
asparagi, Crioceris, see Crioceris 

asparagl. 
Asparagus beetle, 143, 176, 178-79, 
180, 197. 

spotted, 190. 



224 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Aspen, Cbaitophorus popullcola In- 
juring, 136. 

Aspidiotus pernicloeus, 91. 140-41, 
151-06, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197. 

Aster, Insects Injurious to: 
Lygus pratensis, 145. 
sawfly, 188. 

atalanta, Vanessa. 184. 

Automerig io, 102. 105. 

Balm of Gilead, Pemphigus popu- 

larlus injuring, 136. 
Balsam, insects injurious to: 

Chrysobotliris pusllla, 172. 

Chrysobothrls scabrlpennis, 172. 

Polygraphus ruflpennis, 169. 

Xyloterus lineatus, 172. 
barbita, Magdalis, lG7. 
Barden, J. J., acknowledgments to, 

95. 
Bark beetle, coarse- writing, 167. 

pine, 167. 
Bark borers, 167. 
Beans, Insects injurious to: 

Crepldodera cucumeris, 179. 

leaf hopper, 182. 

plant lice, 183. 
Beech, insects injurious to: 

Pemphigus Imbricator, 135. 

plant lice, 191. 

Polygraphus ruflpennis, 169. 

Tremex columba, 171. 
Beech, purple, insects injurious to: 

Notolophus leucostigma, 191. 

Phyllaphis fagi, 136, 191. 

Seirodonta bilineata, 191. 
Beech aphis, woolly, 136, 191. 
Beechtree blight, 135-36. 
Beets, Pegomyia vicina injuring, 

185. 
Beneficial insects, 97-125, 150-51, 

194. 
betulaecolenfi, Callipterus. 136. 
blfoveolatum, Ophion, 114, 119-20, 

121. 
bilineata, Seirodonta, 191. 
bilineatum, Ophion, see Ophion 

bilineatum. 
bimaculata, Oberea, 178, 186. 
blpunctata, Adalia, 136. 



Birch, insects injurious.to: 
Agrilus anxius, 186. 
Chrysobothrls femorata, 171. 
Dryocoetes eichhoffi, 171. 
plant lice, 182. 
I Polygraphus ruflpennis, 169. 

Tremex columba, 171. 
. Birch, cut- leaved, Callipterus betu- 
I laccolens injuring, 136. 
' Birch aphis, 136. 

Birch borer, bronze, 186. 

Black flea beetle, 176, 179, 180, 181, 
185, 189. 

Black knot, 182. 

Black lady beetie, llttie, 150-51. 

Black woolly bear, 182. 

Blackberry bushes, Oberea bimacu- 
lata injuring, 178, 186. 

Blauvelt, Egbert, on Corythuca. 
marmorata, 125. 129; on Lygus 
pratensis, 145. 

Blauvelt, Harry, on Corythuca mar- 
morata, 125. 

Blcnnocampa pygmaea, 142. 

Blepharoceridae, 199. 

Bordeaux mixture, 199. 

borealis, Dibolia, 181. 

botrana, Polychrogis, 142-43. 

Bowman, Thomas & Son, nursery 
certificate issued to, 95. 

Box elder. Insects injurious to: 
Cbaitophorus negundinis, 135, 

183. 
plant lice, 182. 

Box elder plant louee, 135. 

brassicae, Aphis, see Aphis brassi- 
cae. 

brassicae, Phorbia, see Phorbia bras- 
sicae. 

Bronze birch borer, 186. 

Brown Bros. Co., nursery certificate 
issued to, 96. 

Brown tail moth, 197. 

Brown woolly bear, 182. 

Bruchus pisorum, 194, 195. 

Brull6, Auguste, cited, 108, 111, 
120. 

Bruner, Lawrence, cited, 101, 104. 

brunneus, Rhyncolus, 170. 

Bud moth, 177, 178, 183. 



INDEX TO REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 225 



Bumble flower beetle, 190. 

Buprestid, 6-8potted, 171. 

Burdock, plant lice on, 182. 
Poecllocapsus lineatus injuring, 
179. 

Butternut, Datana Integerrlma in- 
juring, 183. 

Cabbage, insects injurious to: 
Aphis brassicae, 133, 180. 
Pborbla brassicae, 143, 175, 179, 
187, 192. 

Cabbage aphis, 133-34, 175, 180. 

Cabbage butterfly, 175, 176, 178, 
180, 182, 183, 186. 

Cabbage maggot, 143-44, 175, 179, 
192. 

Cabbage worm, 178, 187. 
black-headed, 182. 

calcarata, Saperda, 186. 

calligraphus, Tomicus, 167, 193. 

Callipterus betulaecolens, 136. 
ulmifolii, 134. 

Callosamia promethea, 102, 105. 

Candida, Saperda, 186. 

Cankerworms, 179, 183, 184, 191. 

Carbolic soap emulsion, 144. 

Carbon bisulfld, 145. 

cardlnalis, Nt>yiuis, 194. 

Carpocapsa pomonella, 139, 183, 187, 
191. 

Carrot rust fly, 197. 

caryae, Hallsidota, 118. 

Case-bearer, cigar, 179. 

Cat flea, 145. 

Cattaraugus county, summary of 
voluntary reports from, 174-76. 

Caulfleld, F. B., cited. 111. 

Cayuga county, summary of volun- 
tary reports from, 176. 
Cecidomyia destructor, 178, 179, 183. 

cecropia, Samia, 102. 

Cedar birds, 186. 

ceparum, Phorbia, 144, 187. 

Oerambicid, 172. 
cerasi, Myzus, see Myzus cerasi. 
Ceratop^llus serraticeps, 145-47. 
CetoDia, Indian, 176. 



Chaitophorus aceris, 134, 191. 
negundinis, 135, 181, 183. 
populicola, 136. 
chalybea, Haltica, 142. 
Chambers, V. T., ci/ted, 104. 
Charlton Nursery Co., certiflcate 

issued to, 95. 
Chase Bros. Co., nursery certiflcate 

issued to, 96. 
Chemung county, summa;i-y of vol- 

xmtary report-s from, 176-77. 
Cherry aphis, 133, 188. 
Cherry borers, 191. 
Cherry slug, 186. 
Cherrytree, insects injurious to: 
cedar birds, 186. 

Macrodactylus subcipiniosiis, 178. 
Myzus cerasi, 133, 175, 176, 177, 
179, 180, 182, 185, 188-89. 
Chilocorus similis, 93, 150, 194, 196, 

200. 
Chinese lady beetle, 93, 150, 194, 

200. 
Chironomldae, 93. 
Chokecherrytrees, Malacosoma ?difik 

stria injuring, 184. 
Chrysanthemum lace bug, 125-29. 

explajiation of plate, 221. 
Chrysobothris »p., 170. 
femorata, 171. 
pusUla, 172. 
scabripennis, 171, 172. 
Chrysomelidae, aquatic, 199. 
c'hrysorrhoea, Euproctis, 197. 
Cigar case-bearer, 179. 
Clarkson, Frederick, cited, 104. 
Clisiocampa [Malacosonm] ameid- 
cana, 193. 
disstria, 193. 
Clover, Phytonomus punctatus in- 
juring, 184. 
Clover leaf weevil, 184. 
Clymonts, T. S., on Polychrosls 

botrana, 142. 
Coccidae, received in exchange, 
201, 205-6 ; available for exchange, 
213. 
Codling moth, 139, 183, 187, 188. 

191. 
Coleophora fletcherella, 179. 



226 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Coleoptera, taken at Newport 
N. Y., 197; received In exchange, 
202-3; available for exchange, 
208-11; contributions of. 213-15. 

Ck)leoptepou8 larvae, 190. 

Colias butterfly, 185. 

OoIIectionB of insects, 94-96; contri- 
butions to, 213-20. 

coloradensis, Genophion, 123, 124- 
25. 

Colorado potato beetle, see Potato 
beetle. 

columba, Treinex, 171. 

Columbia, Samia, 102. 

comes xxir. vitis. Typhlocyba, 192. 

Comstoclc, J. H.. aolcttowledgments 
to, 97; cited, 101, 104, 125. 

concinna, Schizura, 100. 

confnsor, Monohammus, 169, 193. 

CVmotrachelus nenuphar, 137, 175, 
184. 

CJoolc, M. T., aclcnowledgments to, 96. 

Coqnlllett, D. W., cited, 104. 

Ck>rn, Crepidodera cucumeris injur- 
ing, 179. 

Conx^spondouce. 92. 

Oorythuca mannorata. 125-29. 
explanation of plate, 221. 

eostale, Ophion, 114. 123. 

Crandall, John R., on Diplotaxis 
liberta, 137. 

Crane fly, 187. 

Crepidodera cucumeris, 176, 179, 
180-81, 185, 189. 

Cresson, E. T., cited, 104, 107, 111, 
116. 120, 123. 

Crimson rambler rose, lady beetles 
on, 185. 

Criocoris asparagi, 143, 176, 178, 
179, 189, 190. 
12-punctata, 190. 

Cucumber beetle, striped, 177, 179, 

180. 181, ia5, 186, 187, 190, 191, 
194. 

Cucumber flea beetle, 176, 179, 180, 

181, 185, 189. 

Cucumber vines, Diabrotica vittata 
injuring, 179. 

cucumeris, Crepidodera, see Crepi- 
dodera cucumeris. 



Culicidae, 199 ; received in exchange, 

203-4. 
Curculio, plum, 137, 175, 184, 197. 
Currant aphis, 180. 181. 
Currant bushes. Insects injurious 
to: 

Myzus ribis, 181. 

Poecilocapsus Hneatus, 179. 

sawfly, 181. 
Currant T^tmns, 176, 178, 180, 181, 

184, 185-86, 187, 188. 
Cutworms, 176, 177. 186, 189. 
cyuneu, Scutellista, 194. 
cynthia, rhliosamia, 102. 

Daisy, Macrodactylus subspinosus 
injuring. 181. 

Datana integerrima, 149, 183. 
ministra, 182. 

Davis, G. C, cited, 107, 118, 138. 

Davis, K. C, cited, 93, 200. 

decem-Mneata, Doryphora, see Dory- 
phora 10-lIneata. 

deflorata, Ecpanitheria, 105. 

Dendroctonus terebans, 193. 

destructor, Cecidomyia, 178, 179, 
183. 

Diabrotica 12-punctata, 137. 
harperi, 138. 

vittata, 177, 179, 181, 185, 186, 187, 
190, 194. 

Diacrisia virglnica, 105, 115. 

Dibolia borealis, 181. 

dinkidiatiis, Phymatodes, 171. 

Diplosls pyrivora, 191. 

Diplotaxis frondlcola, 137. 
liberta, 137. 

Diptera, received in exchange, 208; 
available for exchange, 211; con- 
tributions of, 215-16. 

Diseased and dying trees and In- 
sect attack, 167-73. 

Diseases and pests, 196. 

Disonycha triangularis, 181, 182. 

disstria. ^lalacosoma, see MalacoB- 
oma disstria. 

Dock, insects injuring, 181, 182. 

Dog flea, 145. 

domestica, Musca, 198. 



INDBX TO BBPOBT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 227 



Dorj'phora 10-lineata, 175, 176, 177, 
178, 180, 184. 185, 187, 190, 192. 

Dragon fly, 187. 

Drepanosiphum acerifolii, 135, 181- 
82, 192. 

Dryocoetes elchboflS. 171. 

duodecim-punctata, Diabrotica, 137. 

Dust and other sprays, 195. 

Dutchess county, summary of vol- 
untary reports from, 177-78. 

Ecpantheria deflorata, 105. 
Eggplant, insects injurious to: 

Crepldodera cucumeris, 189. 

Diabrotica vittata, 187. 

plant lice, 187. 
Ebrhorn, E. M., species received 

from, 201. 
eichhofli, Dryocoetes, 171. 
Elm, insects injurious to: 

Callipterus ulmlfolil, 134. 

Dlsonyclia triangularis, 181, 182. 

Galerucella luteola, 147, 191. 

Hyphantria textor, 188. 

plant lice, 182, 187. 

Schizoneura americana, 181. 
Elm aphis, 134-35. 
Elm borer, 167. 
Elm flea beetle, 181, 182. 
Elm leaf beetle, 91, 134, 147. 174, 

189, 190, 191, 195, 196. 
Elm snout beetle, 167. 
Emmons & 0>., nursei-y certlflcate 

issued to, 96. 
Eniscopilus, 101, 107. 

appendiculatus, 108, 113, 221. 

arcuatus, 108, 112-13. 
explanation, of plate, 221. 

purgatus, 98, 100, 107, 108-11, 112. 
Entomology-, handbook, 193. 
Epargyreus tityrus, 118. 
Eremotylus, 101. 

arctiae, 100, 101, 102, 105-6, 107. 

glabratus, 101, 106-7. 

macrurus, 97, 99, 100, 101-4, 105, 
106, 107, 221. 
Erie county, summary of voluntaiy 

reports from, 178. 
Eriocampoides limocina, 186. 



Eulecanium juglandis, 141-42. 
tullpiferae, see Lecauium [Eule- 
canium] tulipiferae. 
Euphoria inda, 176, 190. 
Euproctis chrysorrhoea, 197. 
Euvanessa antlopa, 180, 185, 186. 
Evans, J. D., cited, lOi, 111, 116. 
Evergestis stramenalis, 182. 
Exchanges, system of, 95, 200-13. 
Explanation of plates, 221. 

fagi, Phyllaphis, 130, 191. 

Fall webworm, 92, 149, 177, 180. 

182, 183, 188, 193. 
Fallou, cited, 104. 
Felt E. P., Monograph of Genus 

Saperda, 94. 
Feltia gladiaria, 115. 
femorata, Chrysobothris, 171. 
ferruginipennis. Ophion, 114, 122. 
Fidia viticlda, 92, 192, 193-94, 195. 

196, 197, 198, 199. 
First National Nurseries, certificate 

issued to, 96. 
Flea beetle, black or cucumber, 

176, 179, 180, 181, 185, 180. 
Fleas, 145-47, 195. 
Fletcher, James, cited. 111. 
fletcherella, Coleophora, 179. 
Flies, 175, 198. 

black, 199. 
Forbes, S. A., cited, 101, 120. 
Forest and shade trees, insects in- 
jurious to, 94. 
Forest fires and insect attack, 168- 

69, 199. 
Forest tent caterpillar, 149, 174. 177, 

181, 183, 184, 193. 
Forest trees. Insects Injurious to, 94, 

147-49. 192. 
frondicola, Diplotaxis. 137. 
Fruit growers and truckers, hints 

to, 197. 
Fruit growers association, work 

and observations in J902, 196. 
Fruit tree bark beetle, 191, 200. 
Fruit tree insects, 137-42. 
fuliglnlpennls, Ophion, 102. 
fulvoguttata, Mclanophila. 171, 172. 
Fyles, T. W., cited, 104. 



228 



NEW YORK 8TATB MUSEUM 



GaleruceUa lutcola, 91. 134, 147,174, 
189, 190, 191, 195, 196. 

Gall bwtle, gouty, 178, 18(». 

Garden infitH-ts, 143-4r». 

Garman, II., species received from, 
201. 

Gartered plume moth, 189. 

Genesee county, summary of yoluu- 
tary reports from, 178-80. 

G«nophlon, 101, 123. 
coloradensis, 123, 124-25. 
gilletti, 123-24. 

Gillette, C. P., species received from, 
201. 

gilletti, Genoplilon, 123-24. 

glabratus, Eremotylus, 101, 106-7. 

gladiaria, Feltia, 115. 

Glaea inulta, 115. 

Gnatbotricus materlarius, 170. 

Gooseberries, Pterouus ribesU in- 
juring, 170. 

Gouty gall bce«tle, 178, 186. 

Grain beetle, saw- toot bed, 145. 

Grain pests, 145-47. 

Grapel>erry moth, 142-43. 

Grapevine, insects injurious to, 142- 
43, 178. 

Grapevine leaf bopi>er, 192. 

Grapevine root worm, 92, 94, 192, 
193-94, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199. 

Grapevine sawfly. 142. 

Grasshoppers, 175, 176, 181, 182, 
190. 

Graves, George S., on Aphis braasi- 
cae, 133; on Chaitx>pboru8 negun- 
dinis, 135; o>n Drepanoeiphuin 
acerfolii, 135; on Pemphigus Im- 
bricator, 135; on Callipterufl 
betulaecolens, 136. 

Greene county, summary of volun- 
tary re(porta from, 180. 

Hacxnotobia serrata, 175, 181, 183. 
Halisidota agassizii, 106. 

caryae, 118. 
Haltioa chalybea, 142. 
barperi. Diabrotica, 138. 
Harrington, W. H., cited, 104, 111, 

116. 



Hart. W. H., experiments in con- 
trolling 6an Jos6 scale, 155. 

Hellophila unlpuncta, 109.^ 

Hemiptera, received in exchange* 
205; available for exchange, 212- 
13; contributions of, 217-19. 

Hemlock, insects Injurious to: 
Melanophila fulrogutlAta, 171, 

172. 
Polygraphus ruflpennls, 168. 
Xylotrechus undulatus, 172. 

Herkimer county, summary of vol- 
untary reports from, 180-83. 

Hessian fly, 178, 179, 183, 185. 

Horn flies, 175, 181, 183. . 

Hornets, 183. 

Horse-chestnut trees, Notolophus 
leucostigma Injuring. 92. 

Horseflies, 175, 183. 

House flies, 185, 190, 198. 

House pests, 145-47. 

Howard, L. O., acknowledgments 
to, 96, 105, 150; cited, 104, 106, 107. 
Ill, 115. 116, 129, 137. 

Hubbard, T. S. Co.. nursery certifi- 
cate issued to, 96. 

Huested, P. L., experiments In con- 
trolling San Jos6 scale, 159. 

Hunter, Prof., on number of plant 
lice, 130. 

Hydrocyanic acid gas, 145, 146. 

Hymenoptera. rteceived in exchange, 
201-2; available for exchange, 207; 
contributions of, 213. 

Hyphaatria cunea [texitor], 193. 
textor, 92, 149, 177, 180, 182, 183, 
188. 

imbricator, Pemiphigus, 135-36. 

Inda, Euphoria, 176, 190. 

Indian Cetonia, 176. 

Injurious Insects, 125-29; Intioduced 

from abroad, 196. 
Insect exchange, 95, 200-13. 
Insecticides, paper on, 94. 
Insecticides and fongicides, 195. 
Insecticides and notes, 194. 
integerrbma, Datana, 149, 183. 
inulta, Glaea, 115. 
io, Automeris, 102, 105. 



INDEX TO REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 229 



Isabella, Isia, 102. 

Pyrrharotia, 182. 
Isia Isabella, 102. 

Jack, J. G., cited, 101. 

Johannsen, Oskar Augustus, cited, 
93, 199, 20O. 

Josselyn, G. S. Co., nursery certifi- 
cate Issued to, 96. 
,Joutel, L. H., monograph of genus 
Saperda, 94. 

Juglandis, Eulecanium, 141-42. 

June beetles, 138, 186, 190. 

Xelloggy V. L., species received 
from, 201. 

Kerosene emulsion, 132, 141, 144, 
166. 

Knight & Bostwick, nursery certifi- 
cate issued to, 96. 

Kridelbaugh, cited, 137. 

I«acewing files, 131. 
Lachnostema, 138. 
Lady beetle, 131, 185, 190. 

Chinese, 93, 150, 194, 200. 

little black, 150-51. 

spotted, 183. 

two spotted, 136. 
Lantern slides, added tx> collection, 

92. 
Leaf bug, four-l&ned, 179. 
Leaf hopper, 182, 185. 
Leaf miner, 185. 
Lecanium ? pruinosum, 174. 

[Eulecanium] tulipiferae, 199. 
Legislation against pests, 194. 
Lepidoptera, received in exchange, 

204; available for exchange, 211- 

12; contributions of, 216-17. 
Lepldoeaphes ulmi, 195. 
Leptura subhamata, 171. 
leucostigma, Notolophus, see Notolo- 

phus leucostlgma. 
Lewis, H. D., on Psylla pyrlcola, 

139. 
libatrix, Scollopteryx, 109. 
liberta, Dlplotaxis, 137. 
Lights, value of for destroying in- 
sects, 97-98. 



Lilacs, web worm injuring, 183. 
Lima beans, Biabrotica vittata in- 
juring, 181. 
limacina, Eriocampoides, 180. 
Lime, air slacked, 138. 
Lime, salt and sulfur mixture, 194, 

195, 196. 
Llnio-sulfur wash, 93, 141, 154-58, 

159-60. 
llneatus, Poecllocapsus, 179. 

Xyloteinis, 170, 172. 
Lintner, J. A., cited, 100, lOi, 106, 

116. 
London purple, 142, 149. 
IxKxper caterpillar, 174, 194. 
Lowe, V. H., experiments, 159; 

death of, 96. 
Lugger, Otto, cited, 109, 111. 
luteola, Galerucella, see Galerucella 

luteola. 
Lygus pratensis, 144-45. 

Mac GUlivray, A. D., cited, 93, 199, 

200. 
Macrodactylus subspinosus, 138, 

175, 178, 181, 185, 186, 189, 198. 
Macrurus, Elremotylus, see Eremoty- 

lus macnirus. 
Magdalls armicollis, 167. 

barbita, 167. 
Maggots in mushrooms, 193. 
Malacosoma americana, 138-39, 175, 
176, 177, 178, 180, 183, 186, 188, 
190, 191, 193. 

disstria, 149, 174, 177, 181, 184, 
193. 
mail. Aphis, see Aphis mail. 
Mamestra plota, 109, 189-90. 

trifolil, 109. 
Maple, insects injurious to: 

Chaltophorus aceris, 191. 

Drepanoelphum acerifolii, 135, 
182, 192. 

plant lice, 187, 191. 

Polygraphus rufipennis, 169. 

Psocus ? venosus, 182. 

Sesia acernl, 200. 

Tremex columba, 171. 
Maple, ash-leaf, Chaltophorus 

negundinis Injuring, 181. 



230 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



Maple, soft, Apntvla nmericana in- 
juring, 183. I 

Maple aphis, 182. 

Mapletree borers. 108. 

Marlatt. C. L.. cited, 101. 

marniorata, Corythuca, 125-29. . 

materiarius. Gnathotricus, 170. | 

May beetles. i:?8. 175, 181). 

May fly, 93, 187. 

Meat fly, 18.'?., 

Mecoptera, available for exchange, 
212. 

Melanophila fulvoguttata, 171, 172. 

Melon vines. Diabrotica vittata in- 
juring, 179. 

Midges, net-winged, 199. 

minlstra, Datana, 182. 

misella, Pentilia, 150-51. 

Monohammus confusor, 169, 193. 
scutellatus, 169-70. 

Morrell, L. L., exi>erim'ents In con- | 
trolling San JosC* scale, 155. 

MosQuItos, 93, 175, 187, 191, 198, 
199. 

Mount Hoi)e Nurseries, nursery 
certificate issued to, 95. 

Mountain ash, Dlplotaxis frondicola 
injuring, 137. 

Mourning cloak butterflies, 185, 186. 

Musca domestica, 198. 

Mushi-ooms, maggots in, 193. 

Myriapoda. coatributions of, 220. 

Mytilaspis poniorum, 195. 

Myzus cerasi, 133, 175, 177, 185, 186, 
188. 
ribis, 180, 181, 186. 

Nasturtiums, Pieris rapae injuring. 

183. 
Needham, .Tames G., cited, 93, 200; 

report on May flies and midges, 

93. 
negundlnis. Chaitophorus, 135, 181, 

1S3. 
Nellls. J. li., & Co., nursery certifi- 
cate issued to, 96. 
nenupliar. Conotrachelus. 137, 175, 

184. 
Ni'ui*o|)tera. received in exchange, 

204; contributions of, 217. 



Now York entamologic service, 196, 
197, 198, 199. 

New York plum scale, 141-42. 

nigpovarium, Ophion, 114, 121. 

nitela, PapaJpema, 190. 

Norton, Edward, cited, 100, 103, 107, 
111, 116, 120. 

Norway maple, Chaitophorus aceris 
injuring, 134. 

Notes for the year, 130-51. 

Notolophus leucostigma, 91, 115, 
147-49, 187, 191. 

Novius cardinalis. 194. 

Nursery inspection work, 95-96; effi- 
cacy, 194. 

Oaks, insects injurious to, 94. 
Oats, white grubs injuring, 187. 
Ol>eTea bimaculata, 178, 186. 
ocellana, Tmetocera, 177, 178, 183. 
Office work, 92. 
Onion, Phorbia ceparum injuring, 

144, 187. 
Onion maggot 144, 187. 
Oi'ondaga county, summary of vol- 
untary reports from, 183-85. 
Ophion, 101, 113. 

long-tailed, 97, 101-4. 

two-lined, 98, 114. 
Ophion abnormum, 114, 121-22, 221. 

bifoveolatum, 114, 119-20, 121, 
221. 

bilineatum, 98, 107, 113, 114-16, 
117, 118, 119, 221. 

colorad'cnsis, 123. 

costale. 114, 123. 

ferruginiponnis, 114, 122, 221. 

fuliginkpennis, 102. 

glabratum, 106. 

nigrovarium, 114, 121. 

purgatus. spf Euiscopilus. 

tityri. 98, 113, 116-19, 122, 124. 
Ophlonid wings, explanation of 

pla/t<?, 221. 
Ophionini. value as parasites, 97-98; 

synopsis of certain genera, 97-138; 

general habits, 98-99; oviposltlon 

and larval habits, 99-100; pupa- 
tion and final transformations, 

100. 



INDEX TO RBPOBT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 231 



(Jrange county, summary of volun- 
tary reports from, 185-86. 

Ortboptera, received in excliange, 
207; contributions of. 219. 

Osborn. Herbert, cited. 104, 111, 116, 
120; species received from, 201. 

Oxyptilus periscelidactylus, 180. 

Packard, A. S.. cited, 100, 103, 109. 
Ill, 116, 119. 

Panton, cited. 111. 

Papaipema nitela, 190. 

Parasites, synopsis of certain 
genera of the Ophionini. 97-12r>. 

Paris green, 142, 149. 

Pea weevil, 194, 195. 

Peacbtree, Diplotaxis liberta injur- 
ing. 137. 

Pear midge, 191. 

Pear psylla, 139-40, 177, 178, 180, 
189, 200. 

Pear slug. 186. 

Peartree, inaects injurious to: 
Eriooampoldes limacina, 186. 
Psylla pyricola, 139, 178, 189, 200. 
Scolytus nigulosus, 200. 

Peartree. Bosc, green plant louse 
injuring, 188. 

Peas, insects injuring, 185. 

Pock, H. C. acknowledgments to, 
95. 

Pegomyia vlcina, 185. 

Pempbigus imbricator. 135-36. 
I)opulariu«, 136. 

Pentilia misella, 150-51. 

Peppermint. Poecilocapsus lineatus 
injuring, 179. 

I>erlscelidactylus, Oxyi>tilus, 189. 

Perkins, G. H., cited, 104, 116. 

pemlciosus, Aspldiotus, sec Aspidio- 
tus i)ernlciosu8. i 

Perry Nursery Co., nursery certifi- 
cate issued to, 96. j 

Petroleum, crude, 153, 193, 195. 196. 

Petroleum emulsion, 151-54, 158, 
159, 166, 192. 194. 

P(*ttls, C. R., on Pemphigus popu- 
lar ius, 136. 

Philosamia cynthia, 102. 

phlaeocoptcs, Pbytoptus, 142. | 



Phlegetbontius 5-maculAtu8, 176, 

187. 
Pbora agarlcl, 193. 
Pborbia brassicae, 143-44, 175, 179, 
187, 192. 

(feparum, 144, 187. 
Phyllapbis fagi, 136, 191. 
Pbymatodes dimldlatus, 171. 
Pbytonomus punctatus, 184. 
Pbytoptus pblaeocoptes, 142. 
picta, Mameetra, 109, 189-90. 
Pieris rapae, 175, 176, 178, 180, 182, 

183, 186. 
Pigeon tremex. 171. 
Pigweed, plant lice on, 182. 183. 
Pine, insects injurious to: 94, 193. 

bark Iwrers, 167. 

Monobammus confusor, 169. 

I'olygrapbus rufipenmis, 169. 

Rbyncolus brunneus, 170. 

Tomicus pini, 169. 
Pine b.'irk borer, 169. 
Pine sawyer, 169. 
pini, Tomicus, sre Tomicus pinl. 
pisorum. Brucbus, 194, 195. 
riagionotus specioeus, 198. 
Plant lice. 91. 130-36, 173, 175, 176, 
177, 179, 180. 181, 182. 183, 185, 
186. 187, 188. 189, 190, 191, 192, 
108. 109. 

green, 184, 188. 
Plantains, Crepidodera cucumerls 

injuring. 181. 
Plates, explanation of, 221. 
Pleooptera, received in exchange,. 

207; contributions of, 217. 
Plum curcullo, l.'^7. 175, 184, 197. 
Plum mite, 142. 
Plum tree, insect* injurious to: 

Aphis mall. 182. 

Diabrotica 12-punctata. 138. 

Kulecanium juglandis, 141. 

Hn^han-tiia textor, 188. 

Pbytoj^tus pblaeocoptes, 142. 

plant lice, 176, 179. 187. 
Plumtree. wild. Diplotaxis frondi- 

cola injuring. 137. 
Poecilocapsus lineatus, 179. 
Polychrosift botrana, 142-43. 
Polygraphus ruflpennis, 169, 170. 



232 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM 



polypheiuus, Telea, 102, 109. 
I>onionella, Carpocapsa, sec Can>o- 

oapsa pomonolla. 
pKnnoruin, Mytilaspis. 195. 
PaiMJiioe, E. A., species received 

from, 2i»l. 
Poplar, iiK<H»ct8 lujurious to: 

Ajrrilus anxiii8,18(). 

Euvan4»ssa antio^Mi, 180. 

Sai>orda caloanita, 18<). 

Xylobonis sp., 172. 
I>oplar l>orer, 186. 
popularius, Pempbigus, 136. 
pt>pulicola, Chaitophorus, 136. 
Populus l)alsamiferu8, 136. 
Potato l>eetle. 175, 176, 177, 178, 180, 

181, 182, 184, 185, 187, 188, 189, 

190, 191, 192, 199. 
Potato wire worms, 193. 
Potatoes. iusiH^'ts Injurious to: 

Croi)idodera eucumeris, 176, 179, 
181, 185, 189. 

I)oryi>hora 10-lineata, 175, 176. 
177, 178, 180, 184, 185, 187, 190, 
102. 
Potiitoes, spray for, 199. 
prateusis, Lygus, 144-45. 
promethea, Callosamla, 102, 105. 
Provaneher, VAhb^ L., cited, 100, 

1(M. Ill, 116, 120. 
? pruinosum, Locanium, 174. 
Psila rosao, 197. 
Psocus ? vonosus. 182. 
Psf/rJir. extract from. 112. 
Psylla pyricola, i:iO-40. 177, 180, 189, 

200. 
PtcM-onus ribosii. 176, 178, 180, 184, 

1S<), 188. 
Piiblirntions of ontoinoloj^lst 03-04, 

11)2-200. 
IMiinplvins, DIabrotica vittflta injur- 

hiir. 185. 
punr-tatus, Pbytonomus. 184. 
purj;atua, Eniscopilus, see Eniscopi- 

lus purjratus. 
Piin^io bfHH'h. Pbyllaplils fagi Injur- 
ing. 136. 
imsilla, Clirysobotaris, 172. 
pyemia oa. Blennocampa, 142. 
^pyricola, Psylla, see Psylla pyricola. 



pyrivora, DIplosis, 191. 
Pyrrharctia Isabella, 182. 

Quinces, plant lice injuring, 132, 

179. 
Qulnquemaculatus, Phlegethontius, 

176, 187. 

rapae, Pieris, see Pleris rapae. 
Hed admiral butterflies, 184. 
Bed spider, 189. 
Remedies and preventive® for: 

appletree plant louse, 132. 

asparagus beetle, 197. 

cabbage maggot, 144. 

Gbaitophorus aceris, 134. 

cberry plant louse, 133. 

cbrysanthemum lace bug, 129. 

Diplotaxis liberta, 138. 

fall web worm, 149. 

fleas, 146, 195. 

fruit tree bark beetle, 200. 

grapeberry moth, 142. 

grapevine root worm, 92, 194, 197, 
198. 199. 

grapevine sawfly, 142. 

maggots in mushrooms, 193. 

Now York plum scale, 141. 

poar psylla, 140. 

plant lice, 132, 133, 134. 190, 198, 
199. 

phim curculio, 137, 197. 

potato beetles. 199. 

San JosC' scale, 93, 151-66, 192, 
la*^, 104. 196, 197. 

saw-toothed grain beetle, 145. 

Sosia acorni. 200. 

sttH?ly flea beetle, 142. 

tarnished plant bug, 145. 

tussock moth, white marked, 148- 
49. 
Reniodies and preventives for in- 
sect depredations : 

arsenate of lead, 142, 148, 194, 195, 
196, 199. 

arsenical poiswi, 137. 

l>ands of tar or cotton, 148. 

bordeaux mixture, 199. 

earl)olic soap emulsion, 144. 



INDEX TO REPORT OF THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 233 



Remedies etc. (continued) 

carbon bisulfid, 145. 

dxaai and other sprays, 195. 

hydrocyanic add gas, 145, 146. 

kerosene emulsion, 132, 141, 144, 
166. 

lime, air slacked. 138. 

lime, salt and sulfur, 194, 195, 
196. 

lime-sulfur wash, 141, 154-58, 159^ 
06. 

london purple, 142, 149. 

I>ari8 green, 142, 149. 

I>etroleum, crude, 153, 193, 195, 
196. 

IK?troleum emulsion, 151-54, 158, 
ir)9, 166. 192, 194. 

tobacco water, 132. 

whale oil soap, 129, 132, 134, 140, 
141. 145. 158. 166, 190, 192, 194, 
195. 196. 

wood ashes, 138. 
Itei>ort of state entomologist, 197. 
Hhopalosiphum solani, 185. 
Rhyncolus brunneus, 170. 
ribosii, Pteronus, sec Pteronus 

ribesii. 
ribis, Myzus, 180, 181. 186. 
lUley, C. v., cited, 100. 101, 102, 

103-4, 106, 107, 111, 116, 120, 137. 
Rockland county, summary of vol- 
untary reports from, 186. 
RotMK*h. I^wis, nursery certificate 

l.<*Rued to, 96. 
Ropers Nursery, certificate issued 

to, 96. 
rosae, Psila, 197. 
Rose. J. F., on plant lice, 132; on 

Aphis brassicae, lt{S. 
Rose beetle, 138, 175, 178, 181. 185. 

18<i, 189, 198. 
Rose slugs, 187. 
Rosebushes, Insects injurious to: 

Diplotaxis frond icola. 137. 

loaf hoppers, 185. 

Macrodactylus subspinosus, 175. 
181. 185. 

Myzus cerasi, 185. _ 

plant lice, 182. 184, 185, 189, 190. 



Rosebushes etc. {continued) 
Tetranychus telarius, 189. 
rufipennis, Polygnaphus, 169, l70. 
rugulosus, Soolytus, 191. 

BeLge, Poecllocapsus Uneatus injur- 
ing, 179. 
St Lawrence county, summary of 

voluntary reports from, 186-88. 
Samia cecropla, 102. 

Columbia, 102. 
San .To6(^ scale, 91, 93, 140-41, 150, 

151-66, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197. 
Sanborn, F. G.. cited, 108, 116. 
Sanders, J. G., species received from, 

201. 
Saperda, monograph of genus, 94. 

calcarata, 186. 

Candida, 186. 
j trideutata. 167. 
Saratoga county, summary of vol- 
untary pciports from, 188. 
Saunders, William, cited, 104, 116. 
Saw- toothed grain beetle, 145. 
Sawfly, 181, 188. 

Say, Thomas, cited, 107, 111, 116. 
8cabrii)ennis. Chrysobothris, 171, 

172. 
Scale insects, 194; determinations 

of, 92; soft, 174. 
Schenectady county, summary of 

voluntary reports from, 188. 
Schlzoneura anun'lcana, 181. 
Schizura coucinna, 109. 

unicornis, 109. 
Schuyler county, summary of vol- 

untarj' reports from, 188. 
Sciara «/)., 103. 
Scolioptoryx libatrix, 109. 
Scolytus i-ugulosus, 191. 200. 
Scudder, S. H.. cited. 103. 116, 119. 
scutellatus, Monohammus, 169-70. 
Scutellista cyanea, 194. 
Seirodonta billneata, 191. 
serrata, Ilaemotobia, 175, 181, 183. 
Sesla acerni, 200. 
Shad flies, 187. 
Shade tree ratings, 195. 



NEW YORK STATE MUSEUai 



do tives. Injurious insects, 94, 
47-49. 

eeren Wholesale Nurseries, cer- 
tificates issued to, 95-90. 

alididae, 200. 

grnatus, ?Anthouomus, 187. 
»ilvanu8 surinnniensis, 145. 
limllis, Chllocorus, nee Chilocorus 

similis. 
Simuliidae, 199. 

Slphonaptera, contributions of. 215. 
Sirrine, F. A., on Phorbia brassicae, 

144. 
Slosson, A. T.. cited, 120. 
Smith, .T. B., cited, 101, 103, 104, lOY, 

111, 116, 120; aclcnowledgmenta 

to, 113. 
Snow, F. H., 8i>ecie8 received from, 

201. 
solani, Rhopalosiphum, 185. 
Special investigations, 92-93. 
speciosus, Plagionotus, 198. 
Spiny elm caterpillar, 18G. 
Spittle insects, 181, 185. 
Spraying, 195. See also Remedies. 
Spruce, Insects injurious to: 

Chrysobothrls sp., 170. 

Ohrysobothrls scabripennis, 171. 

Giiathotrieus materlarius, 170. 

Phymatodes dimldiatus, 171. 

Polygraphus ruflpennls, 109, 170. 

Xyloterus lineatus, 170. 

Xylotrechus undulatus, 171. 
Spnico bark beetle. 109, 170. 
S<iuash bug, 175, 177. 180, 185, 189. 
Squash vines, insects injurious to: 

Anasa trlstls. 175. 177. 180, 189. 

Dlabrotlca vittata, 179. 
Stalk borer. 190. 
Steely flea beetle, 142. 
stramenalls. Evergestis. 182. 
Strawl)erry plants. Insects injurious 
to: 

Dlabrotlca harperl. 138. 

Mamestra pi eta, 190. 
Strawberry weevil, 187. 
Stuart, C. W.. & Co., nursery certifi- 
cate Issued to, 90. 
subhamata, Leptura, 171. 



subspinosus, Macrodactylug, see 
Macrodactylus subspinosus. 

Summer washes. 159-00. 

Sunflowers, plant lice injuring, 183. 

surinamensis, Sllvanus, 145. 

Sweet, George A., Nursery CJo., cer- 
tificate issued to, 90. 

Symmerista albifrons, 118. 

Syn>hus flies, 131. 

Tamarack, insects injurious to : 
Leptura subhaniAta, 171. 
Polygraphus ruflpennis, 109. 
Tomlcus pini, 171. 

TarnisluHl plant bug, 144-45. 

'l^aylor, H. S.. & Co.. nursery certifi- 
cate issued to, 95. 

telarius, Tetranychus, 189. 

Telea polyphemus, 102, 109. 

terebans, Dendroctonus, 193. 

Tetranychus telarius, 189. 

textor, Hyphantria, see Hyphantria 
textor. 

Thorn apple, Macrodactylus sub- 
spinosus injuring, 181. 

Thysanura, contributions of, 219. 

Timoithy, Pyrrharctla Isabella injur- 
ing, 183. 

Tingis arcuata, 128. 

tityri, Qphion. see Ophdon tltyri. 

tityrus, Epargyreus, 118. 

Tmetocera ocellana. 177, 178, 183. 

l\)bacco water, 132. 

Tobacco worm. 170. 

Tomato worm, 187. 

Tomatoes, insects Injurious to: 
Cropi<lodora cucumeris, 179, 181, 

185. 189. 
Rlio>i)alosiphum solani, 185. 

Tomicus calligraphus, 107, 193. 
pini, 107, 109, 171, 193. 

torrefacta, Apatelodes, 102. 

Trap lantern records, 108, 114, 117, 
120. 

Treniex columba, 171. 

Triangularis, Disonycha, 181. 182. 

Trichoptera, available for exchange, 
212; contribuHons of, 217. 

tridentata, Saperda, 107. 

trifolii, Mamestra, 109. 



INDEX TO REPORT OP THE STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 1903 235 



tristis, Anasa, see Anasa tristls. 

Trouvelet, cited, 99, 103. 

Trumpet vine, Lecanium ? pruino- 

sum injuring, 174. 
Tulip tree scale, 199. 
Turnips, Insects injurious to: 

Aphis brassicae, 133, 182. 

Evergestis stramenalis, 182. 

Phorbia brassicae, 192. 
Tussock moth, white-marked, 91, 

147-49, 187, 191. 
Typhlocyba comes ixir. vitis. 192. 

Uhler, P. H., cited, 129. 
ulmi. Lopidosaphes, 195. 
ulmifolii, Callipterus, 134. 
Ulster county, summiary of volun- 
tary reports from, 188-89. 
undulatus, Xylotrechus, 171, 172. 
unicornis, Schizura, 109. 
unipuncta, Ileliophila. 109. 

Van Alstyne, E<lward, experiments 

in controlling San Jos6 scale, 155. 
Van Duzee, E. P.,' acknowle<lgmonts 

to, 96. 
Vanessa atalanta, 184. 
? venosus, Psocus, 182. 
vlcina. Pegomyia, 185. 
virginica. Diacrisia. 105, 115. 
viticida, Fidia, a<*e Fidia viticida. 
vittata. Diabrotica, ftee r>labrotica 

vittata. 
Voluntary enlomologic service* of 

New York state. 90. 173-92. 

Walker, C. M., determinations of 
scale . insects, 92; exi)orIments 
with summer washes, 93; exiieri- 
ments with lime-sulfur wash, IfiO- 
(>6; arrangement of collections, 
94; nursery inspection work, 95. 

Walnut trees, black, Datana in- 
tegerrima injuring, 149. 

Walnut worm, 149. 

Warren county, summary of vol- 
untary reports from. 189-90. 



Waterhouse, cited, 1(M. 

Wayne county, summary of volun- 

tiiry reports from, 190. 
Webster, F. :M., cited, 101, 111. 
Webworm, fall, 92, 149, 177, 180, 

182, 183, 188, 193. 
Weed, C. M., cited, 102, 104. 
Westchester county, summary of 

voluntary reports from, 190-91. 
Western New York Nursery Co., 

nursery certificate iSvSued to, 95. 
Whale oil soap. 129, 132. 134, 140, 

141, 145, 158, ir>6, 190, 192, 194, 

195, 196. 
Wheat, Diabrotica harperi injuring, 

138. 
White grubs, 187. 
Williams. C. L.. on Oioceris as- 

paragi, 143. 
Williston, S. W., determinations by, 

201. 
Wood. A. L.. nursery certificate is- 
sued to, 95. 
Wood, Albert, on Psylla pyricola, 

140. 
Wootl ashes. 138. 
Woolly bear, black, 182. 

brown, 182. 
Woolly be<H'h aphis, 136, 191. 
Worthiiigton. C. E.. cited. 104. 
Wyoming county, summary of vol- 
untary reports from. 191-92. 

Xyleborus sp., 172. 
Xyloterus lineatus, 170, 172. 
Xylotrechus undulntus, 171. 172. 

Young, D. R.. inv(»sMgations on 
m<>squitos, 1>3; work on forest in- 
sei'ts, 94; work on colleiHlons, 94- 
95; on Drepanosiphum a<i*rifolii, 
135 ; on Callipterus betulaecolens, 
136; investigations on forest flree 
and insect attack, 168-69. 

Zebra caterpillar, 109, 180. 



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PUBUC LIBRARY 



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University of the State of Njcw York ; 






College Department 

INCLUDINQ UrnVEBSITIES, PB0FE8SI0NAL AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS 



Bulletin 22 
DIRECTOR'S REPORT 1903 

To the Regents of the University of the State of New York 

I submit herewith the following report of the College Depart- 
ment for the year ending June 30, 1903/ prepared under my direc- 
tion by Director's Assistant Henry L. Taylor. 

Seope. This department, supported almost entirely by fees, 
includes universities, professional, technical and other special 
schools, and all matters pertaining to degrees or licenses. 

The work of this department is closely allied with that of the 
▲dministratiye and High School Departments and falls naturally 
into four divisions : administration, inspection, examination and 
registration. To avoid repetition, a concise statement of the 
administration of this department appears in the Secretary's 
Report 190S; of the insjiection and examinations, in the Director's 
Report of the High School Department 190S. 

Begistration. Educational institutions are registered in full or 
in part by the University of the State of New York as they main- 
tain proper educational standards, have resources, facilities and 
equipment for imparting either collegiate or high school training, 
and afford instruction under competent teachers in approved 
courses. A diploma certifying a degree carries with it the right 
to assume a title and is evidence of scholastic ability, a license 
the right to enter on the practice of a profession. Registered de- 
grees are of two classes as they meet the ordinances of the Uni- 



»AI1 statistics in this roport are for the year ending June 30, 1003, but 
Information is added touching the worlc of the department to Mar. 81, 
1004, when the report passed through the press. 



1*4 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YOBiK 

viM-sit V or 1Ik» rulos of the Court of Api^eals. Tliey give exemption 
from entrance requirements to professional studv, licensing exam- 
inati(Mis, and membcrsliip in learned bodies. 

University credentials. Thes(^ are of collegiate or high school 
grade as tli(\v evidence successful work completed in a registered 
college or high school. The college credentials include the course 
certilicate and the combined baccalaureate and medical c*ertificate, 
the fornuM* certifving to the registration of a baccalaureate degi'et*, 
\\w latter to a combined baccalaui'eate and medical degree; diplo- 
mas certifying to the degit^es of certain institutions of college 
rank iiicor|K»ral(»(i under s|MMial chartei-s; licenses to practise in 
the State of New York granted on examinations conducted by the 
rniv(Msity and the state boards of examiners. 

The high school credentials are of two series (1) the academic, 
issued oil lieg(Mits examinations only and (2) the equivalent, 
issu(»d for work com|>h»t<Ml in n*gister(*d institutions supple- 
mcMited, if nec(»ssary, by l^»g(Mlts examinations. 

Incorporation. The foHowing action was taken by the liegents: 

Liniifrd rhttrhrs (pantal. 1 K»c. 4, VM)'2, New York School of 
Jnurnalism, r»rooklyu; .May iM, WHKl, liiblc Teachers Tniiniug 
School, New York; Brooklyn Kastern District l>is|)en8ary and 
lIos|)ital Training School for Nurses; Fii*st Austrian Tahnud 
Torah Association, X<'w York; Highland IMnes Sanitarium Train- 
ing School for Nurs<»s, Corning; Janmica Training School for 
Nurses; Kabbi Jacob ^Joseph School, New York; Sanmritau Hos- 
|)ital Training School for Nurs<\s. Troy; Society of Ohel ToKih, 
New York. 

Association charters (jranirtl. I >ec. 4, 1JM)2, American Institute 
of Socifil Service, N(*w York; Ontario founty Historical Society, 
Canandaiguji ; ^lay 21, 11)0:5, Anthological Society, New Y'ork; 
Franklin County Historical Society, ^Malone; New Y'ork City 
Teachers Association, de[iartm(nt of univei*sity extension. 

Degrees conferred. Within the yc^ar the Regents have conferred 
the following degrci'S : [for lists of nanu»s sec Api»endix, 1] 

Bachelor of dirinitf/ on IS graduates of Union Theological 
Scminarv 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 TO 

Bachelor of arts on IH jjraduattm; of Adelphi College; on 2 
graduates of Keuka College 

Bachelor of science on 1 graduate of Adelphi College 

Bachelor of science in civil engineering on 3 graduates of Clark- 
ion School of TiMhnology; on 5 gi-aduales of Mackenzie ('ollege, 
^ao Paulo, Brazil. (There weiv also 2 gi-anted in 1900 not pre- 
•iously published.) 

Bachelor of science in electrical engineering on 2 graduates 
)f Clarkson School of Technology 

Bachelor of science in mechanical engineering on 1 graduate of 
Jlarkson School of Technology 

Bachelor of library science on 3 graduates of New York State 
^jibrary School 

Doctor of medicine on 8 graduates of the New York Medical 
IJollege and Hospital for Women 

Doctor of dental surgery on 48 graduates of the New York Col- 
lege of Dentistry^ and 10 graduates of the New York Dental 
!^chool 

Licenses. During the year the Hegents have licensed as a result 
!)f state examinations: [for lisis of names, see Appendix, 2] 633 
physicians (562 old school, 41 homeopaths, 30 eclectics) ; 176 den- 
tists; 17 veterinary surgecms; and 11 certified public accountants. 

Under exem[)tions in the professional laws the liegents have 
ilso licensefi during fhe year: [for lists of names, sec Api>endix, 
^] 69 physicians; 36 dentists; 6 veterinary surgeons; and 3 cer- 
tifleil public accountants. 

Extension courses. Tnder the charter of Greater New York, 
applicants for admission to the licensing examinations of the 
lepartment of education as teachers in certain i>o«itions in the 
schools of that city are recpiired to afford evidence of degi^ees 
regi8t(»red by the University of the State of New York. The 
extension courses of the University alford an opportunity for 
supplementing the work of thos<» not holding such registered 
iegrees. 



*The»e depre<'8 arc pmiitrd by the tnist(»cs and directors on the recoiu- 
iieodntion of the faculty with the consent of the Kegents of the Univcr- 
;ity. 



rG UNIVERSITY OF THE 8TATB OF NBW YORK 

In confor<»nre with the Bui)erintendent of public instnictioii 
of Great(»r New York, projijresB has been made toward the adop- 
tion of formal riilrs for Ihe rejristration of extension courses to 
nuM»t tlie ivtiuirenienfs of the. charier. Under the tentative rules 
for ivjjisiralion llie extension center (1) must possess satis- 
factory facilities in buildings and equipment; (2) must employ 
registered instructors; (^) must o(T(t approved courses meeting 
the minimum requirement of the department of education of 
Greater New York; (4) must require resident study evidenced by 
actual attendance on classn)oni ivcitations; (5) must be in- 
spected annually; ((>) must comi>lete courses with formal exami- 
nations. 

Kegistration. The study of credentialw from the United States 
and foreign countries continues to afford valuable information 
concerning the school systems and educational laws of the world. 

Among the credentials sitbm it ted for recognition during the 
year w(»re credentials froni 20 foreign countries and from 43 
l»olitical divisicms of the Union, in 18 languages, viz, Arabic, 
Armenian, Bohemian, English, French, (Jerman, Greek, Ilimgar- 
ian, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Marathi, Polish, Roumanian, Rus- 
sian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish. 

The credentials submitted and desiiH^d afford a clearer idea of 
th(» extent of this work, whi(;h not only involves accuimcy in 
details of administration to avoid indirection and inconsistency, 
but also requires wide knowledge of educational systems and 
legal requirenumts to ecpiate wis(»ly and justly. 

Examinations. The* dates, credentials and subjects of the exam- 
inations for the year [for details sve A])i)endix, 4] show the ex- 
tent of examinations conducted by the College DepaHment. The 
ex|)enses of examinations in medicine, dentistry, veterinar}' 
medicin(», public accounting and nursing are borne by the can- 
didates and involve no outlay whatever of state money. The 
subjects includ(^d academic, medical, dental, veterinary, elemen- 
. tary classification, elementary bibliography, nature study, busi- 
ness, certified public accounting, dictionary cataloguing, library 
extension and genetic psychology. 



^^^'^Z^tWi 






New York State 
Net \>ro\>eriy invested in higher institutions 
Colleges, [)rofessional and technical schools 



A^ 



^fe^tind/arr?^^ 



^r 




$ 86,375.792 
1903 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 v7 

Snmmary from annual reports of colleges, professional, technical 
and special schools. In 19(Ki Ihore were 118 institutions [for 
details see Appendix, 5] with a teaching force of 3308 men and 
563 women, total 3871, affording instruction to 25,029 men and 
14,689 women, total 39,718. A trifle over 10^ of these students 
graduated, as shown by the number of first degrees conferred 
on examination, 4041. The net projjerty of these institutions 
aggi^gated f86,375,792 and the year's exiK?nditures f 10,061,269. 

Compansans. During the year the number of institutions waa 
increased by four, the faculty by 325, the students by 5354, the 
graduates by 388, the net pro|K»rty by $3,444,217, the expenditures 
by f 1,352,571. 

During the decade 1893-1903 the number of these institutions 
[for details see Appendix, 6] was inci-eased by 27 (29^), the 
faculties by 1659 (75;^:), the students by 17,885 (82;^), the grad- 
uates by 1613 (i}i\'/), the net property by #31,387,040 (57;/), the 
exjienditures by |5,268,282 (109;*). The number of women on 
the faculty increased from 13.4;*' to 14.6;^; and the number of 
women students from 31.9;^ to 37>'. 

Comparison' of higher and secondary education. In 1903 there 
were 780 high schools and arademies [for details sec High School 
Department Directors Keixn-t 1003, p. r34, r35] with a teach- 
ing force of 1666 men, 3128 women, total 4791, affording 
instruction to 39,9*24 boys and 55,172 girls, total 95,096. About 
27^ [see Iligh School Department K(»iM)rt 1903, p. r9] of the 
pupils enrolled in the highest elementary' grade in 1899 (46,741) 
graduated in 1903, or 12,620 estimate. The net [jroperiy of sec- 
ondary schools aggregated $33,771,006 and the years ex|K»ndi- 
tures $7,107,000. 

As the eight yeai's of secondary and higher instruction presup- 
pose eight years of elementary, tlu* sum of these items of 
secondary and higher institutions will atford an interesting c*on- 
trast with elementary, 900 institutions; 8665 teachers; 134,814 
students; 16,661 graduates; $120,146,798 net proi)erty ; $17,168,269 
expenditures. 



r8 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Belative receipts and expenditures, with comparatiYe value of 

property 

Receipts. In tlu* liijjlic*!- institutions [for details see Apjjen- 
(lix, 7] the n»cei|>ts were $9J()0,2.*U) in 1902 as compared with 
.*Jll,07(;,r)l)4 in IIMK^, incivase |1 ,:{7(*,:555 ; in the secoudaiy in- 
stitutions [for details hvv High School Department Directors 
K<»|iort l!M):i, p. i:U, vWry] the receipts w<Me |7,8(M;,124 for 1903. 

Expenditures. In the higher institutions exiR*nditures were 
$SJ0S;(>9S in 1902 and |10,(M;1,209 in 1903, increase 11,352,571; in 
the scHxmdary institutions the exiK^nditui^es were f7,107,000 for 
1903. 

Buildings and grounds. The vahu? in higher institutions was 
$37,4S2,819 in 1902 and Jli;37,S47,127 in 1903, increase f3C4,368; 
in the serondary institutions the value was $24,804,727 for 1903. 

Library and apparatus. The value in higher institutions was 
f4,410,422 in 1902 and J|F4,51(;,I57 in 1903, increase |106,035; in 
the secondary institutions the value was f 1,859,203 for 1903. 

Other property. The value in higher institutions in 1902 was 
f48,591,002, in 1903, |51,S94,175, increase $3,303,113; in second 
ary for 1903, $9,01 (;,0S3. 

Total property. In higher institutions for l'902 this was 
$90,484,303, in 1903, $94,257,759, inci-ea.sci $3,773,456;- in second 
ary for 1903, $35,740,t»13. The iiii^reawe in total i)roi>erty for the 
year 1903 in the higher institutions is $3,773,450; in the second- 
ary, $3,190,452. 

COLLIXIES AND UNIVERSITIES 

Action by the Regents. Dec. 3, 1903, in acc*ordauce with bylaw 
34, the Regents voted unanimously by ballot in favor of the follow- 
ing resolution, the candidates for the honorary degree in question 
having be(»n n^commendcd thi^refor by the executive committee 
and the rerommendation appi-ovnl by the Regents at a meeting 
held June 29, 1903. 

WhcraiH, The faiulty and trustcM^s of Adelphi College have 
asked permission of the University to confer the honorary degi-ee 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r9 

of master of arts on William Ordway Partridge and Charlotte 
Morrill, 

Resoh'cxL That th(» Chaiu-ellor and the secretary be authorized 
to add their signatures to diplomas ronferring the said honorary 
degree of master of arts in thesc» two eases. 

Action by the director. Under r<H|uirements of the revised char- 
ter of Greater New York, three d(»grees in peilagogy were regis- 
tere<l in 1903. The School of Pediigogy of New York Univer- 
sity, desiring to raise the standing of the bachelor, master and 
doc^tor degi'ees in pedagogy to the rank genei*ally accorded cor- 
responding degrees in arts and science, established courses for 
these degrees that could be registered under University ordi- 
nances. As a result of several conferences, prolonged corres- 
pondence and careful considenition of the question in all its bear- 
ings, it was determined that (1) the first degree should re<piire at 
least a three year high school training or (Mjuivalent for entrance 
and four years of i-esident study for gi*Juluation, the last or senior 
year to be resident study in the institution granting I he degree; 
(2) the second and third degree should recpiire the first and second 
respectively and be granted on resident work only; (3) the unit 
of measure for a collegiate year should be at least 15 week hours 
for 40 wcM^ks or the equivalent; (4) the approved courses should 
be of collegiate grade, and 25%' should be the maximum allowance 
made professional courses for admission to advanced standing; 
(5) the pn)fessional schools of pedagogy should be regist(»red and 
their standing given on application. 

College training. The value of college training as a prejKiration 
for the S(»rvice of soci(»ty becomes increasingly evident as reliable 
datsi regarding successful men an* accumulated and <»xamined. 
Those who have deni(»d tlu* value, of this training have compared 
college men who faih'd to attain i)rominence in any pursuit with 
men who never attended a college but have become eminent, or 
they have not considered how snuill is the pn>portion of college 
graduates in a givc»n calling to the aggregate of persons engaged 
in it. Much exact information con<erning the educational advan- 
tages of Americans of prominence and influence has b(»en <*ol- 
lecteii; and the study of this material show^s that collegiate eduea- 



rlO UNIVERSITY OF THK STATE OF NEW YORK 

tion affords a valuable practical discipline, and that collie rank 
IS to a considerable extent an index to future distinction. The 
secretary's report for 1901 contained some calculations, based 
partly on the conijiilations in the biogi'aphic dictionary, Who*8 
Who in Amcnca, illustrating the fact that the proi)ortion of men 
of collegiate CMlucatiou who reach distinction greatly exceeds the 
proportion of their com|)etitors in the same fields. And in a 
recent numln^r of the Atlantic Monthly is an article, "College 
Rank and Distinction in Life," from which the following state- 
ments are taken: 

During the 10 years from 1809 to 1887 inclusive, graduation 
honors in spei'ial subjects at Harvard University were won by 
375 men, ** of whom 71, or cme in 5i^o% are in Who^a Who" Of 
the 81 students who attained highest honoi*s, " no less than 29, or 
more than one in thi*ee, are in Who'8 Who/' The proportion of 
men in Who's Who from the different categories of graduates in 
the classes from 18()9 to 1887 inclusive is as follows: 

Total graduates 224 out of 3239 or one in 14.46 

First seventh of class 67 " 473 " 7.05 

First scholar 7 " 19 " 2.71 

First four scholars 16 " 76 " 4.75 

Bowdoin prize men 18 " 89 " 4.94 

Honors in si)ecial subjects 71 " 375 " 5.28 

Highest special honors 29 " 81 " 2.79 



The records of success in life achieved by Yale graduates who 
gained the valedictory or salutatory honors of their classes are 
equally entitled to notice. The New York Evening Post has pub- 
lished some recent conclusions derived from these records. Of 
the 190 men who received one of these honors in a period of 05 
years, 17 who died within 10 years after graduating and 20 whose 
graduation is too recent to jiermit opportunity for distinction are 
excluded from consideration ; and it is stated that 85 of the re- 
mainder, or about 56;^, have commanded attention by success in 
some field of efl'ort. It is also said that *^ the 85 include 41 full 
professors, 13 college presidents, among them two presidents of 
Y;iJe, one of Columbia, and one of the University of California, 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rll 

five judges of high courts, including one, W. H. Taft, who has 
become secretary of war, and 26 in other branches of life work. 
. . . Five successive valedictorians, beginning with 1846, won high 
public eminence.'* 

Beg^stration. The question of the registration of the combined 
baccalaureate and medical degi-ees is discussed under Professional 
schools. A careful revision has been made of the list of colleges 
and univeiTsities registered as meeting the ordinances Of the 
Regents, class 1 ; or the rules of the Court of Appeals, class 2; or 
in part (class 3). 

The Court of Api>eals and the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York both refuse to recognize as a college or univer- 
sity an institution which, though taking the name, in reality does 
work of a lower grade. Colleges of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, 
business colleges and all similar professional and technical 
schools are not registered as colleges. By college is understood 
an institution which i-ecpiires for admission four years of aca- 
demic or high school prepjiration in addition to the preacademic 
or grammar school studies, and that gives four full years of col- 
lege instruction as a condition of graduation. Institutions with 
courses equivalent to thi'ee years of college work are sometimes 
n^gistered when they require three full years of academic prepara- 
tion, as are other institutions that admit after two years of prepa- 
nition but that require a minimum of four years of college work. 
In all cases the total of high school and college work must not 
be* less than six yeai*s in advance of grammar school studies or the 
institution can not be registered as giving a full college course. 

The court also I'efuses to nH'ognize as " study in a college " work 
in an academic or lower dej^artment conducted and supervised by 
a college. To be accei>ted as an equivalent by the Regents, the 
work must be of college grade. 

Comparison of TTniversity institntions, grouped in four olassea 
For details see Appendix, 8 
Liberal arts and science. This group includes the colleges for 
men, the colleges for women, the coeducatiowsil coW^*^ ^w^^'fe 



rl2 UNIVERSITY OF THE 8TATE OF NEW YORK 

graduate doimrtmenls. In 1003 the 88 institutions of this group 
reported lUlMJ men and L'32 women teachers — total 1458; 5300 
men, 5289 women students— total 10,589; 2020 graduates (as 
shown bv the tirst de«i:i-e(»s) ; :f54,372,121 net property; f 7,524,904 
ivceipts and |5(JJ20,684 expendityivs. 

Professional. This group in<*ludes the schools of theology, law, 
education, medi<ine, dentistry, ])harinacy, veterinary medicine, 
oj)hthalmology, library and commerce. In 1903 the 53 institu- 
ticms of this gnuip i-eportc^d 1795 men and 152 women teachers — 
total 1947; 9744 men, 2240 women students— total 11,990; 1573 
graduates (as shown by the first degrees); f22,015,041 net prop- 
erty; 12,754,422 receij>ts and 12,025,839 expenditures. 

Technical. This group inelud(»8 the schools of engineerinj;, 
technok)gy, architect ure, art, music, ceramics, agriculture and 
Pratt Institute. In 1903 the 20 institutions of this group re 
ported 449 men and i:>7 women teachers — total 586; 4456 men, 
4142 women students — total 8598; 397 graduates (as shown bv 
the first degr(M's); |!5,:U5,581 n(»t proi)erty; |495J01 receipts and 
1404,000 expenditures. 

Special. This grou]) includes American Institute of Phrenol- 
ogy, Catholic SuinnuM* Schcnd, Chautauqua Institution, Conrad 
Poi»p(Milniscn Association, CoopcT I'uion Night School, Hebrew 
Technical Institute, New York Trade School. In 1903 the 7 in- 
stitutions of this grou|» n*iK)rt(Ml 197 men and 42 w-oinen teach- 
ers—total 239; .^)S40 men, **>229 women stud<»nts — total 9075; 51 
graduates (as shown by tin* first degrivs) ; $4,043,049 net prop- 
erty; $302,047 receipts and $250, 0S(; ex]>enditui'e8. 

Rank in teachers, students, property and expenditures 1903 

For fiirthor details of tables 1-3 ffcc Appendix, 9 
Table 1 shows that Columbia Tniversity wa» fii-st in the 
nuinl>er of ollicers of instruction, the numlHa' of students, the net 
property and the annual expenditures, excluding grounds and 
buildings; (^ornell second; New York third, in stud«*nts fourth; 
Syracuse fourth, in students third; HulValo fifth in oftioers and 
students, sixth in property and expenditures; Union sixth in 



Mumbcr of hiVhcr students enrol lea In MewYorkSta-tc 

each year 1893 - 1903 
Colleges fijn'ivcr si-tiea J profession a\ jtzdnn'iCdJ and special schools 
Year Men Women Total 




Men Women 



EE^n 



7,963 



Pecades Increase 



Average annual increase 99^BJ796 




I 



TUE NEW YORK 

PU;iI.IC LIBRARY 

AST>GRi UEHOK AHD 






COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl3 

officers of iustrm-tion and numbers of ntudents, fifth in projrerty 
and oxi>enditure8. 

The four highest institutions in table 2, excluding th«ose given 
in table 1, are The College of the City of New York, which is 
first in officers of instruction, third in students, fourth in net 
property and third in annual expi^nditures; the Normal College 
of the City of New York, second in offi<»ers of instruction, first in 
the numlK?r of students, llMh in net property and seventh in 
annual expenditures; Vassar, third in officers of instruction, 
seciuid in tlie nuniln^r of students, first in net property, tind 
second in annual exj>enditures; Barnard, fourth in officers of 
instruction, fourth in numl)er of students, second in net proj)erty 
and first in annual exp(»nditures. 

The four high(»st institutiojis'lh fable 3 exchitling those given 
in table 1 are, N<»w York rostfjrm^jiQti^ Medical School, which is 
first in officcTS of instruction, -(Mghth in stud(4its, 19th in net 
proiwrtv and 18th in expenditures >;#fcLw, YtJFk Fjoivclinical Medi- 
cal School and riosi>ital, second ift-ofticers of instruction, 11th 
in 8tud<*nts, 41st in net projKM-ty, 22d in exi>endi(ur(»s; Teachers 
College, third in officers of instruction, fourth in students, fifth 
in net property, and first in expenditures; Pratt Institute, fourth 
in officers of instruction, second in students, second in net prop- 
erty, and third in exi>enditures. 

Gifts and bequests for education 1893-1902. A study of the gifts 
and bequests for educatiimal purposes (including hospitals) of 
15000 each and upward from Api)leton's annual c^'clojKHlias [for 
details see Api>endix, 10] shows that residents of New York State 
gave during the decade f2,r)89,l(;G to elementary education; f5,- 
395,000 to secondary; f 53,895,313 to college; |61,979,479 total; 
187,000 to law; 14,907,000 to medicine; |17,630,507 to hospitals; 
14,873,000 to theology; 127,557,507 total to professional educa- 
tion; 111,918,000 to technical; |12,157,940 to special; |23,069,708 
to librai-ies; f 47,145,048 total to technical. 

The gifts and bequests of the United Staters including New York, 
for the same period, were 111,477,210 to elementary; f 10,057,003 
to secondary; f 173,088,910 to college; f 201,823,195 total; |350,- 



rl4 UNIVERSITY OF TUB STATE OF NEW YORK 

000 to law; fS,474,(>(;G to niedieiiie; f 53,985,913 to hospitals; 
flO,151,l(U; to thcolojry; |72,04SJ45 total to professional; f22,- 
5)81,600 to technical; ?45,2(;2;.«)7 to 8])ecial; |39,125,155 to libra- 
v'lvs; 1107,309,152 total to tedinical. 

In brief, residents of New York State gjive 30^ of the general, 
l\H^ of the professional, 44;^ of the technical, and S{\^ of the total 
ji:ifts and bequests to education during? the decade 1893-1902. 

Net property invested in higher institntions of New York State. 
In contrast with the gifts and bequests made by !New York State 
for education during the decade, an interesting comparison may 
be instituted i-egarding the net proi)erty of higher institutions. 
There was invt^sted in coUeges and universities in 1893 f40,675,- 
346; in profei*sional schools f 8,418,261; in technical and special 
14,258,914. In 1003 tlie net property invested in colleges had 
increased to J54,32S,120; in professional to |21,235,951; and in 
technical to ?6,160,0r)6. Tlie average annual increase in the net 
I»roperty invented in higher institutions for the decade was for 
colleges ?1, 3(55,275: for i^rofessional |1,281,766; and for tech- 
nical and others $190,962. n 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

Combined baccalaureate and medical course. The principle 
announced at the University Convocaticm July 1, 1902, has gov- 
erned all api)licationa for admission to the medical licensing exam- 
ination, i. e. that an allowance of one year in term of study should 
be made only to tliose students that plainly meet in their combined 
course the full eijuivalent of the first medical year. During the 
year a continuation of the study of this important and somewhat 
complicated subject has been in progress. The various associa- 
tions of medical schools of the United States will doubtless take 
further action thereon in the near future. 

Examinations and certificates. A summary of the examinations 
and ccrtithntcs from 1S03 to 1903 is given in Appendix, 11. 

In l.'^93 there were seven examinations, in which 8067 answer 
j)aj>ers were written, of which 4965, or 61.5;i^, were accepted. In 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl5 

the four examinations of 1903 there were 41,507 papers written, of 
which 22,658, or 54.5j< were accepted. 

In 1893 there were 589 law student certificates issued, 02 on 
examination and 527 on equivalents; in 1903 there were 839 
issued, 461 on examination, 272 on equivalents, and 106 on partial 
equivalents; the partial equivalents began in 1900 with 30. 

In 1893 there were 28 academic equivalent certificates issued, 
two on examination and 20 on equivalents; in 1903 there were 
328 issued, 54 on examination, 209 on equivaJents, and 65 on 
partial equivalents; partial equivalents began in 1899 with 14. 

In 1893 there were 785 medical student certificates issued, 137 
on examination, 04S on equivalents; in 1903 there were 972 issued, 
346 on examination, 505 on equivalents, 121 on juirtial equiva- 
lents; partial e^piivalents began in 1899 with 3(>. 

In 1895 there were 17 dental student certificates issiUHl, 10 on 
examination and seven on equivalents; in 1903 there were 290 
issued, 134 on examination, 82 on equivalents, 74 on partial equiva- 
lents; the jiartial equivalents began in 1899 with six. 

In 1897 there were six veterinary student certificates issued, 
four on examinaticm and two on equivalents; in 1903 there were 
46 issued, 31 on examination, 12 on equivalents, three on partial 
equivalents; partial wpiivalents began in 1S99 with one. 

In 1893 the total numlHM* of certificates issued was 1402, on 
examination 201, on equivalents 1201; in 1903 the total number 
was 2475, on examination 1026, on eciuivalents 1080, on partial 
equivalents 369. 

The percentage of certificates issued on examination in 1903 
was 41.4, on equivalents 43.6, on partial etpiivalents 14.9 [for 
fuller information rcc Api)endix, 12]. 

Theology 

Action by the Regents. May 21, 1903, it was voted that on the 
receipt of the written ajjproval of the three trustees who have not 
signed the application, the trustees of Auburn Theological Sem- 
inary be granted the power to confer the d(»gre(» of bachelor of 
divinity on such of its graduates as shall have siitisfactorily com- 



rl6 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

pleted its regular course of study and shall be recommended by 
the faculty as l)eing duly qualiflo<l in all other respects and shall 
have passed all examinations and met all other requirements pre- 
scribed by law or by the University ordinances. 

Law 

Action by the Regents. May 21, 1903, the Regents approved the 
action of the trustees of St Lawrence University under their 
authority and under the special power granted by laws of 1869, 
chapter 28S, and consented to their establishment of a law depart- 
ment by tlie agr(H*uient filed with the Regents for the annexation 
to St Lawrence University of the Brooklyn Ijaw School now 
organized and under visitation of the Regents. 

Law students. In 1903 there were 133 students in Albany Law 
School, 461 in (Columbia, 224 in Cornell, 832 in New York Law 
School, 673 in New York University, 112 in St Lawrence, 123 in 
Syracuse, and 60 in Buffalo; total 2618 not including summer 
students. 

Law school summaries [for further details see Appendix, 13]. 
In J 893 the seven institutions employed 71 officers of instruc- 
tion for 1470 students (classed as graduates 54, in LL.B. course 
1261, unclas«iticd 155); in 1903 the eight institutions employed 
134 offi(»ors of instruction for 2618 students (classed as graduates 
55, in LL.B. course 2071, unclassified 492). 

In 1893, 427 students held 439 degrees, and the TjL,B. or LL.M. 
degrees were conferred on 434; in 1903, 787 students held 813 
degrees, and the LL.B. or LL.M. degrees were conferred on 535. 

In 1893 the libraries of the seven institutions contained 
43,206 volumes, the total property amounted to f63,383, receipts 
187,785, expendituN^s |82,382; in 1903 the libraries of the eight 
institutions contained 100,276 volumes, total property amounted 
to 11,140,598, receipts |254,432, exi>enditui'es |251,441. 

In comparison wiUi 1893, the law schools of the State show for 
1903 one more institution, 63 more officers of instruction, 1148 
more students (classed as graduat(*s 1, LL.B. course 810, un- 
classified 337). There were 360 more in attendance with degrees 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REF»ORT 1903 rl7 

and 121 more LL.B. and LL.M. degrees confeiT(»d. The number 
of volumes in the libraries shows an increase of 57,070, total 
property increased fl,077,215, receipts increased fl66,647, and 
expenditures f 169,069. 

Medicine 

Medical examiners. In accordance with the law, nominations 
were submitted to the Regents from the state societies and exam- 
iners were appointed May 21, 1903, for the ensuing year. 

Appoinimcnts, Kei)re8enting the Medical Society of the State 
of New York, William Warren Potter M.l)., Buffalo, William S. 
Ely M.D., Rochester, Maurice J. Ijcwi M.l)., New York; repre- 
senting the Homeopathic Medical Society of the State of New 
York, John M. Lee M.D., Rochester, J. Willis Caudee M.D., Syra- 
cuse, GcH)rge E. Gorham M.l)., Albany, William M. L. Fiske M.D., 
Brooklyn, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Wil- 
liam Morris Butler M.l).. Brooklyn; representing the Eclectic 
Medical Society of the State of New York, Lee H. Smith M.T). 
Buffalo, O. W. Sutton M.l). Batli, M. H. Nichols M.l). Worcester. 

Begistration of medical schools. The medical schools of the 
United States registered or accredited by the University of the 
State of New York fall into two groups. 

Group 1. Those registered or accredited for admission to the 
licensing examination after application authenticated by seal or 
affidavit and the signature of the executive officer [for list in 
force July 1, 1904, sco Ai)pendix, 14]. 

Group 2. Those registered or accredited for admission to 
registered medical schools. 

The ivgistration of the medical schools has reference to 
the lu'ofessional educational requirement and not to the general 
preliminary educational n»<iuiivment which must be met by candi- 
dates for admission to New York medical schools, and rec^eives 
independent action. 

Schools are registered in full or accredited in three classes. 

Registered, The schools registered in full include those 
requiring the full four year medical course and making no 
allowance whatever for admission to advanced standing to 



rl8 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

graduates of schools of dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine 
or osteopathy. 
Accredited. The accredited schools are of three classes: 

1 Those medical schools having a three year course and 
making no allowance whatever for admission to advanced 
standing, or those schools having a four year course and mak- 
ing an allowance for admission to the second class on advanced 
standing. These graduates are admitted to the licensing exam- 
ination on the completion of one year in a registered medical 
school if all other requirements are satisfactorily met. 

2 Those medical schools having a two year course and 
making no allowance whatever for admission to advanced 
standing, or a three year course and making an allowance for 
admission to the second class on advanced standing, or those 
medical schools meeting the requirements of a four year course 
and making an allowance to graduates of other schools for admis- 
sion to the third class on advanced standing. These graduates 
are admitted to the licensing examination on the completion of 
two years in a registered medical school if all other requirements 
are satisfactorily met. 

3 Those medical schools having a one year course and 
making no allowance whatever for admission to advanced 
standing, or a two year course and making an allowance for 
admission to the second class on advanced standing, or a three 
year course and making an allowance for admission to the third 
class on advanced standing, or a four year course and making 
an allowance for admission to the fourth class on advanced 
standing. These graduates are admitted to the licensing exam- 
inations on the completion of three years in a registered medical 
school if all other requirements are satisfactorily met. 

As medical schools are steadily advancing their requirements 
to meet the New York statute, registration is constantly 
changing. 

Uedical receipts and disbursements. Aug. 1, 1903, the secretary 
sent to the 21 state medical examiners the following statement of 
Ik 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl9 

receipts and expenditures connected with the administration of 
the medical laws from July 1, 1902, to July 30, 1903 : 

To the state medical examiners: 

I transmit herewith a summary of the records and vouchers (all 
of which are open to your inspection) of the receipts and expendi- 
tures connected with the medical examinations provided for by 
laws of 1800, chapter 507, and laws of 1893, chapter 661, §140-53, 
but not including the medical student examinations, the expenses 
of which are borne by the University. 

From July 1, 1902, to June 30, 1903, there were four examina- 
tions for license to practise medicine, at which 1144 candidates 
api)eared before the three boards, as follows : 

State Medical Society 1 Oil 

Homeopathic Medical Society 77 

Eclectic Medical Society 56 1 144a 



In accordance with law, tlie Regents have paid or set aside for 
payment the expenses i)roi)orly chargeable to these examinations, 
and have on hand at the end of the academic year f 10,800, less 
special exi)enses of each board as given below, which is to be ap- 
portioned among the thi-ee !)oard8 i)ro rata according to the num- 
ber of candidates examined by each. This gives to the 

State board |9 544 41 

Homeopathic board ., 726 92 

Eclectic board 528 67 |10 800 . . 



James Russell Parsons jr 

Secretary of the University 

Receipts 

17 |10 fees, July \ 1902, to June 30, 1903. . |170 

849 f 25 ** '' '.. 21 225 

2 f 15 *^ " *^ . . 30 



|21 425 



;> 



Fees returned 

1 |10 fee, July 1, 1902, to June 30, 1903. . flO 

28 f 25 fees, '' " . . 700 



710 



f20 715 



a Of these 19G different candidates were entitled to examination witliont 
additional fee, and many others bad two or more trials. 



r20 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Payments 

Expenses of examiners fl57 10 

Parchment for licenses and printing 670 75 

Salary of M. J. Ixjwi M.D. for services ren- 
dered to College l)ei>artment as recom- 
mended by conference of state boards of 
medical examiners Jan. 15, 1892, and Oct. 
16, 1901, and voted by Kegents Dec. 14, 
1892, from Aug. 1, 1902, to July 31, 

1903 725 . . 

Local expenses of conducting examinations 

at various j^oints throughout the State. . 1 294 43 
Salary of medical ilerk, Katharine L. Mc- 

Donough, Aug. 1, 1902, to July 31, 1903. . 1 070 . . 

Tin tulies 57 50 

Box 50 

Examination (^nveiops 10 . . 

Books 22 91 

Services of examiners and clerks in Albany 

in addition to medical clerk 3 935 . . 

Amount w»t aside for ])ostage and expivss. . 366 81 

Amount set aside for fixed salaries 1 605 . . 

f9 915 .. 

Balance to be apportioned "|10 800 . . 

Special note to state board of examiners 
Pro rata distributiim HH of »1 0,800 is f 9 544 41 

Exj>enses of secivtary, July 1, 1902, to June 30, 1903, 
as follows : 

Salary of secretary, M. J. \j}\vi fOOO . . 

Stenographer 3 55 

Telegrams 6 . . 

Clerk hii-e 182 . . 

Telephone 7 79 

Postage 32 76 

AflTidavits 7 28 

Messenger 20 

Transcript of ivcords 2 60 

Rubber bands and stamj) stand 30 

f/()f tliis amount tbe oxamiuers voted 0<*t. IC, 1901, to pay to the meiiibers 
of tbo question commit loo other than the secretary a per diem allowance 
of J^IO, when in session on call of the Kegents, (l)rs Gifford, Fowler, Tiel 
aud Smith $10 each) and to Dr I^wi $300 per year. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r21 

Traveling expenses of examinei's f272 42 

W. W. Potter, allowance for expenses as 
president, voted by board Jan. 29, 1900, 

for year ending June 30, 1903 200 . . 

f 1 314 90 



18 229 51 

fll7r).r»4 was apportioned to four examiners and 11175.(55 to 
thrw. 

Medical examinations 

Medical license. Examinations for license to practise medicine 
in tliis State have l)een or are to be held as follows: 

Dates 
1903 1904 

January 27-30 January 26-29 

May 19-22 May 17-20 

June 23-26 June 21-24 

SeptemlK»r 29-Oct. 2 September 27-30 

Places 
New York, Albany, Syracuse, Buffalo. Each candidate is 
notitie<] as to exact place. 

Daily progrram 
9.15 a. m. 1.15 p. m. 

Tuesday Anatomy Physiology and hygiene 

Wednesday Chemistry Surgery 

Thursday Obstetrics Pathology and diagnosis 

Friday Therapeutics 

Kedical students in New York State (excluding^ graduate schools). 
In 1903 there were 795 students in College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, 39G in Coraell University Medical College, 311 in 
University-Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 266 in Long Island 
College Hospital, 236 in University of Buffalo Medical Depart- 
ment, 165 in Albany Medical (;^olleg(s 140 in Syracuse University 
College of Medicine, 105 in New York Homeopathic Medical Col- 
lege and Hospital, 104 in Eclet-lic Medical College, 34 in New 



ms. 



r22 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

York Medical College and Hospital for Women; total under- 
graduate medical students 2552, graduate students 1055, making 
a total of 3607 medical students in the State not including 
summer students. 

Medical school summaries [for further details see Appendix, 15]. 
In 1893 the 15 institutions employed 704 officers of instruction 
for 3367 students (classed as graduates 881, in the M.D. course 
2352, unclassified 134) ; in 1903 the 13 institutions employed 
1179 officers of instruction for 3722 students (classed as grad- 
uate 1063, in M.D. course 2525, unclassified 134). 

In 1893, 1302 students held 1302 degrees, and M.D. degrees 
were conferred on 61!6; in 1903, 1575 students held 1575 degrees, 
and M.D. degrees were conferred on 513. 

In 1893 the libraries of tlie 15 institutions contained 13,343 vol- 
umes, total proi)erty amounted to |3,463,230, receipts |341,540, 
expenditures f 689,419; in 1903, the libraries of the 13 institutions 
contained 30,285 volumes, total property amounted to f6,543,642, 
receipts $520,065, expenditures $493,810. 

In comparison with 1893 the medical schools of the State show 
for 1903 two fewer institutions, 475 more officers of instruction, 
355 more students (classed as graduates 182, in M.D. course 173). 
There were 273 more in attendance with degrees and 113 fewer 
M.D. degrees conferred. The number of volumes in the libraries 
shows an increase of 16,942, total property increased |3,080,412, 
receipts $178,525, expenditures decreased $195,609. 

Results of medical licensing examinations [for details of New 
York schools see Appendix, 16]. 

An analysis of the results of the licensing examinations since 
Sep. 1, 1891, shows: 

That 8.9^ of the old school candidates were rejected in 1892, 
7A^ in 1893, 20.2^ in 1894, 26.5;i^ in 1895, 27.7j^ in 1896, 24.8j^ in 
1897, 24.9^ in 1898, 1HA\^^. in 1899, 22.2^ in 1900, 22.08^ in 1901, 
17.8j^ in 1902, and 15.7^ in 1903. 

That 25;^ of the homeoi)athic candidates wei*e rejected in 1892, 
9.5^ in 1893, 13.7>' in 1894, 13.3;^ in 1895, 19.6;^ in 1896, 17.7;^ in 
1897, 27.7;^ in 1898, 23.5;^ in 1899, 17.1^ in 1900, 162)i in 1901, 
^.5/ in 1902, and 4.6}^ in 1903. 



COLLEGB DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r2.3 

That 50^ of the eclectic candidates were rejected in 1892, 28.5j< 
In 1893, 50j^ in 1894, 9.09;^ in 1895, 5.5;^ in 1896, 23;^ in 1897, 20.8)1 
in 1898, 36.6j^ in 1899, 24.4j^ in 1900, 24.5;^ in 1901, 50;^ in 1902, 
and 34.7^ in 1903. 

During the 12 years 56, 267, 390, 606, 714, 772, 809, 738, 710, 
671, 610** and 667® old school candidates have been examined, 
8, 21, 51, 60, 56, 45, 36, 68, 58, 58, 53« and 43« homeopaths, and 
4, 7, 4, 11, 18, 13, 24, 30, 24, 20, 22« and 46« eclectics, making a 
total of 7790, of whom 1629 or 20.9^ were rejected. 

In these statistics each candidate who fails is counted as often 
as examined, though the failure is not charged more than once 
against the medical school unless the examinations are taken in 
different years. 

Comparison of medical schools in New York and other states and 

countries 

Table [see Appendix, 17] shows for 1903 the rejections by 
topics: group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools in other 
states; group 3, schools in foreign countries. Each applicant is 
counted only once in the nuinbor of candidates, but under the 
several topics each failure is indicated, excluding any answer 
papers not examined. 

Of the papers submitted by 390 graduates of New York schools 
only 70 were rejected, while 83 of those submitted by 99 gradu- 
ates of schools in other states, and 125 of those submitted by 50 
graduates of schools in forcMgu countries, were rejected. In addi- 
tion to these candidates from schools in which there was at least 
one failure, 35 graduates of 3 New York schools and 104 graduates 
of 46 schools in other states and ccmntries were examined. 

Average number of trials to each New York school candidate. 
Table 18 [see Appendix] also gives the number of candidates 
and the number of trials for each year and the per cent still 
rejected. By this table candidates appearing in different years 
are counted only once. 

a Not including candidates taking partial examination. 



r24 UNIVERSITY OF TUK 8TATK OF NEW YORK 

Summaries of minutes of state hoards of medical examiners 

Annual meeting of examiners representing the Medical Society of the 

State of New York 

RvijrntH Offivv. Albany N. Y. Jan. 26-29, 1903 

Present — All iiKMubtM's. 

Votedy TluU tli(» full rejKjrt as n^ad by the sc^cretary be printed 
and sent to every nieinb<»r of the Medical Society of the State 
of New York and to other persons suggested by Secretai-y Parsons 
or by the secivtary of the lM)ai*d. 

The following abstract of tin* report was oi-dered read before 
the Medical Society of the State of New York: 

I am instriict<'d by the State Board of Medical Examiners 
representing the Medical Soci(»ty of the State of New Y'ork to 
present to yon an alwtract of its annual reiK>rt for the academic 
year as follows: 
Total numlKT of candidates for license since 

the establishment of the boards 7 034 

Successful 5 528 or 78.5^ 

Unsuccessful 1506 or 21 A^ 

Total number of candidates from July 31, 1901, 

to Aug. 1, VM)2 928 

Of these there applied for full license 685 

of which number 558 were successful. 

Of the above numl)er, 601 took the full examination at one 
time. 84 of the number had ]U'eviously passed in the primaries 
an<l were* examined only in so called practical branches. 

Of the above number apjX'aring before this board, 17.8'^ were 
rejcM'ted. 

Of those* ap]M*aring before th(» homeopathic board, 13.2;f wen- 
re je< Med. 

Of those* appearing befon* tlu* eclectic boardi, 50-:^ were rejected. 

The above candidates for license appeared as follows: 
Before this lioard 610 successful 501 

liefore the homeopathic Iniard 53 successful 46 

Befoi-e the eclectic board 22 successful 11 

Candidates for the primary examinations, viz in anatomy, 
physiolog;v^ and hygiene and chemistry, who had studied these 
subjects for two years, apjM^ared as follows: 
Before this board 318 successful 314 99;^ 

Before the homeopathic board 35 successful 35 lOO^i^ 
Before the eclectic board 5 successful 5 100^ 



COLLBGB DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r25 

The average rejections in each of the seven topics was 47. 

The minimum rejections for the year, 34, were in obstetrics; 
the maximum rejections for the year, 57, were in pathology and 
diagnosis. 

The number of candidates for medical license in this State 
has been decreasing since 1898, at which time the maximum, 869, 
was reached. This year there were but 685. 

During the past 11 years the average per y(»ar appearing before 
the state board was 586+; before the homeopathic board 46+; 
before the eclectic board 16+. 

The advanced standards of New York State medical schools 
are evidently appreciated as manifested by the increasing num- 
ber of undergi'aduate medical students in this State, 2563; an 
increase of 248 over last yeai'. The graduate students number 
1072, an increase of 42 over last year. 

The state boards of examiners should not be compared with 
examining boards of the army, navy and hospital marine service. 
They serve different purposes; we to declare credentials suffi- 
cient, they to differentiate bc^tween those already declaimed 
competent. 

The board advocates (under proper suj>ervi8iou and by legis- 
lative action) the additioujil graduate degi*ee of D.P.n. (doctor 
of public health). 

Shall allowance for experience be made in examination of 
older practitioners coming from other states and countries, 
exempting them from the primary branches? The board l)elieves 
that some measure should be adopted to make less exacting the 
test for such practitioners. 

The reason for nonability to reciprocate with sister states is 
explained because of the lower standards of the latter. 

Written medical examination tests are not all that could l>e 
desired, but as administered by the Regents they are far j>refer- 
able to any system of bedside examination under which the 
identity of the candidate is nec(»ssarily revealed. 

Experience with cases now under advisement should indicate 
a proper rule of procedure in the recognition of credentials for 
admission to advanced standing in medical schools on the part 
of graduates of academic schools. We advise liberal treatment 
of these cases till such rule is formulated. 

The board will again strive to have the present arrangement 
of topics altered to conform with methods of teaching. 

I am also directed to state that the full report of the board, 
which after a decade of active experience, treats of various 
phases of medical education and of medical interest generally 
gleaned from that experience, is too long a document to read at 



r26 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

this time, and to w^qucst that this l>ody accept the abstract of 
the report as here presented, with the understanding that a copy 
of the full report will be mailed to each member and to each 
delegate of the 8o<-iety as soon as printed; and that the report 
itself will appear in its projier place in the transactions of the 
society. 

The following officers were elect (*d to serve till Aug. 1, 1904: 
president, William Warren Potter M.D., secretary, Maurice J. 
Lewi M.D., question committee, George R. Fowler M,D. and 
Maurice J. Ijewi. 

Dr Ix»wi presented documents containing specific charges 
against one F. R. Temple made by John Gordon Kellas of the 
Buffalo liCcieir, l)r T.ewi stated that Dr Temple was a graduate 
of the Albany M<*dical College, but was exempt from the licens- 
ing examinations; that his diploma had been indorsed by the 
Regents on his removal from the county in which he originally 
registered. 

The secretary, who had been directed to secure the opinion of 
the attorney general in reference^ to the case of Dr Temple, 
reported that he had been r(»ferred to Deputy Attorney General 
Slocum; that Mr Slocum had advised that, if the charges were 
put in legal form by the person making the same, it was the duty 
of the board to place said Temple on trial and, in answer to the 
communication from Dr Temple's counsel, to forward a copy of 
the charges; that, if the board found it inconvenient as a body to 
act on these charges, they might he considered by a committee 
duly appointed by the presid(^nt at a regular meeting. 

^'ot€dy That the charges be returned for correction and that 
on their receipt in proper form a copy be forwarded to Dr 
Temple's counsel. 

The secretary i)resented the facts in reference to the case of 
Dr Avila O. Boulay, and on invitation Dr Wilding and Dr Oliver 
appeared before the board. 

Voted, That the Regents be re(] nested to await the action of 
the grand jury in the case of Dr Avila O. Boulay before reporting 
the results of the examinations taken by him in January 1003. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 1*27 

Voted, That the secretai'v be instructed, in answer to the com- 
munications of candidate no. ^01, to state that his case had been 
considered at a full meeting of the board without any different 
conclusion being reached as to the merit-s of his examination; 
that the papers on file were public records, and tlTat full access 
would be given to them at any time, and that his only redi-ess 
was to retake the examinations at some future time. 

The secretary read a communication from the New Jersey State 
Board in regard to r(Hipro<i1y of licensure. 

Voted, That the secretary Ih» instructed to say that the si)ecific 
wording of jil48 of the New York medical practice act prevents 
the New York boards from ])ui*suing any policy other than that 
heretofore pursucnl in the inattor of indorsement of licenses issued 
by other state boards. 

Voted, That the recpu^st of Dr S. E. Gardiner for a reopening 
of his case be gininted, and that a committee be appointed to con- 
sider such new charges (concerning which there is now only 
desultory correspondence relative to his pi'ofessional conduct and 
moral character since the revocation of his license) as may be 
made against him in regular form; that a committee be appointed 
with i>ower to send for persons and papers, and that Dr Gardiner 
be i-equired to appear in pei'son before such committee at such 
time and pla<e lus the committee may determine. 

This committee was also authorized to investigate the charges 
preferred agfiinst Dr Temple when such charges are presented in 
legal form. 

The president apiK)inted as such committee Drs Beach, Potter, 
Lewi and Suiter. 

Voted, That Secretary l^ai-sons be requested to distribute the 
annual funds of the board as heretofore. 

Voted, That the annual dii(»s of ?10 to the Federation of State 
Boai-ds of Medical Hxaminei-s be continued, and that the secre- 
tary be authorized to <lraw a voucher for the same. 

Voted, That the allowance of $200 a year to the pn\sident of 
the board be continucnl. 

Voted, That the acticm of .7an. 2J), 1900, relative to clerical as- 
sistance to the secretary was and is intended to cover clerical 
services performed either by liiinself or by an assistant, and that 
this monthly allowance of $i:i minimum, f20 maximum be con- 
tinued. 



1*28 UNIVERSITY OP THK STATE OP NEW YORK 

Voted, Thai Ihe iiileivstn of higher ediicalioii denmnd that 
the WHoiidarv schools of the State of New York be supervised 
exclusively as far as pra<-1i<»able hy the Regents of the University 
of the Stale of New York, and that in the opinion of this board 
any funds appn>priat(Hl by tlie State for secH)ndary education 
should be admin ist(»i*e<l by the Keg(»nts. 

Voted, Tliat the syllabus connnittet* Im» abolished. 

Adjourned 

M. J. Lewi 

Secretary State Medical Board 

Arademi/ of Med'wlue^ New York City, Oct, IS-U, 190S 
Present — l)r Pott(M\ president. Drs Fowler, Ely, Suiter, Beach 
and T^wi, secretary. 

Voted, That the Ueg(»nts be requested to have all candidates 
for licenses, as far as sucli a pi'Oc<Hbii'e is iK)66ible, use ink and 
pen in examination work. 

Voted, That the Regents l)e re(|iic«ted to have all candidates 
for license write on but^ oik* side of single sheets of paper during 
examinations. 

Adjourned 

M. J. Lewi 

Secretary State Medical Board 

Annual meeting: of examiners representing: the Kedical Society of the 

State of New York 

Jx^etjents Office, Albany, Jan. 25-27, 190i 

Present —AM meinbers 

The secretary ])reseut(Hl the following report, which was 
ordertnl read at tin* fiiist sc**sion of the meeting of the Medical 
Society of the State of New York: 

During the academic yc^ar ending Aug. 31, 1903, four medical 
licensing examinations have Ikhmi held. The total number of 
candidates was 1144. Of this number 529 applied for full ex- 
amination, -1*7 appeaivfl for the final licensing examinations, 
having previously succ<»ssfully i^asiscnl in the preliminary medical 
branches, and .*>SS a]>peai*(Ml for partial examination. 

Of this total of Tr>(; candidal (>is for license, 
OC57 api^eared before the >state board 
43 ** homeopathic board 

4(5 '' eclectic lK)ard 

Of this number 123, or 1^.2G^, v^^ere rejected. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r29 

The state board rejected 105 or 15.7}< 

The hoiueoi>athic Ixwird rejected 2 " 4.6j< 

The eclectic board rejected 16 " 34.7j< 

Since the creation of the boards of examiners, 7790 candidates 
have been examined for license, of whom 1629, or 20.09;^, have 
been rejected. 

Under exemptions in the me(li<"al law the Regents have licensed 
during the year 69 j)hy«icians. On i-ecommendation of this 
board nine diplomas issued l)efore the law took effect have been 
legally indoi*sed, entitling the holdere to register in any county in 
the State. 

Attempts at standaixlizing the medieval examinations are being 
made, and a hopeful sign in this direction is the following com- 
munication : 

William Warren Potter M.D. 

President New York State Board of Medical Examiners: 

Sir: You are doubtless aware that appointmentB to the 
medic.nl deim-i-i^ments of the army and navy have in the past been 
made thwmgh competitive examinations. It is the desire of this 
office to standardize the examinations for the medical corps of 
the army with relation to those of state boards, and with this 
object in view I would be very ghid if you would inform this 
office of the numl)er of medical men that have appeared befoi'e 
your l)oard for examination during the i)«ast five years, and the 
peiventage of candidates thus examined that have been successful. 

I will be much gratifie<l if you will kindly send a set of ques- 
tions asked by your boanl whi<li you consider a fair sample of 
your standanl. 

Very ivspectfully 

R. M. (VReilly 

Surgeon General, United States Army 

This board stands prepai'ed to cooiKii'ate with the army au- 
thorities in the matter proiK>siMl by Surgeon O'Reilly and has so 
indicated. 

The qu(»!Stion of iutei'state recipixK'ity in medical licensure is 
still a fruitful topic for study on the part of medical educators; 
no plan -that can l)e sjiid to l>e fairly operative has yet been 
adopted by any numlxM' of similar Ixxiies, but the trend is clearly 
tow.ard the development of some system whi<h, while practically 
o|)erative, will not lower existing standards. Many difficulties 
still obtain. At the nnpiest of the officers of a neighboring state 
lK)aixl of medical (»xaminei's, this boai-d sent a repi-e^entative to 
determine whether their methods wei'e sufficiently advanced to 
have their licenses vis<^Hl by the New York State authorities. The 
investigation showed 



r30 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

1 That thoir academic* requirement© were not of equal 
standard with those in this state; 

2 That their inetho<l of eondnoting academic as well as 
medioal examinations was faulty, l)ecause it brought the medical 
examiner and the applicant in personal communication. Hence 
their system of safeguai-ding their examinations was defective. 

These* points left their status with us unchanged. 

The harmony which has pn»vailed l)etween the three boards in 
this state has continu(Hi unabated. We are in hopes that at 
8ome day in the n(»ar future there will be a unification of the 
profession in the State of New York, thus making necessary but 
one hoard. Such was the original i)roposition of the Medical 
Society of the State of New York and the consununation of that 
idea seems less ivmote. 

Voted, That Dr Suiter be instructed to pay the dues of this 
body to the Federation of State Boards of Medical Examiners. 

The report of the subcommittee to which was referred the 
I^etition of Sheridan K, Gardiner was presented, and it was 

Voted, That the lK)ai*d does not see its way clear at this time 
to alter its action whereby Dr Gardiner's license to practise 
medicine in the State of New" York was suspended. 

Voted, That tlu* deface<l license of William H. Lucas, issued 
Ap. 21, 1SJ)7, be destroyed and a new license issued. 

Voted, To rontinuc* th(» -If'JOO annual allowance to the president 
of the boaiHl for exjH^nses. 

The following otlitcrs were elected to serve till Aug. 1, 1905: 
preside/fit, William WarnMi Potter M.l).; secretary, Maurice J. 
Lewi M.l)., (piestion committee, George Ryerson Fowier M.D., 
M. J. Lewi. 



Adjourned 



M. J. Lewi 
Sevretari/ State Medi<^al Board 



Annual meeting: of examiners representing: the Homeopathic Kedioal 
Society of the State of New York 

Re<jent8 Ofpce, Albany, Feb. 10, 1903 

Present — l*resident L(h\ Drs Gorham, Gifford and Oandee, also 
Seci-etary Pai^)ns. 

The minutes of the last annual and the special meetings were 
read and ajipi'oved. 

Statistics of the examinations held during the academic year 
^ 1901-2, the Urst under the new system of divided examinations^ 



C0LLB6B DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 fSI 

were read, and divided examiuatioiis were pronounced satis- 
factory. 

The question of leniency in examinations in certain cases was 
genei-ally discussed. It was stated as being the sentiment of the 
old school examiners that answer [tapers should take the I'cgular 
coui-se. The |>oint in (juestion could l>e covered on I'eview. At- 
tention was directed to cviticisms on the severity' of the examina- 
tions and consecpient hard«hii»; said to have been wrought in 
some instances. 

T)r T^wi was cpioted as stating that such criticism exists in 
the old sc'hool ranks. ]>r Lee said the same is to be found 
among the home^patlLS. Mr Parsons said there is now very little 
criticism, and that mainly fi-om those approaching examination. 

The following ofticci"s were elected to serve till Aug. 1, 1904: 
prcsidevt, J. ]\r. Lee M.l). ; Hccretary, J^ W. Candee M.D. 

Adjourned 

J. Willis Cani>kk 

Secrctan/ Homeopathic Medical Hoard 

Annual meeting: of examiners representing: the Eclectic Kedical Society 
of the state of New York 

RcijiyntH Office y Albany, Ap. S, 1903 

rresent — Drs Smith, Denny, Knsign, Nichols, Nolan, Tiel. 

The secretary reported that 37 candidates presented 186 papers 
during the year, ;n of whi<h were rejected. 

6 certificates were granted on one examination, one of them 
gaining an honor mark ; 4 certificates were granted on two trials, 
:i certificates on three trials and 2 on four trials. There were 31 
failures in the lopics examined, as follows. Anatomy none, 
I)hysiology and hygiene 8, chemistry 2, surgery 7, obstetrics 2, 
pathology and diagnosis 5, <heraiK?utics, practice and materia 
medica 7. Total 31. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: presi- 
dent, Ix?e 11. Smith M.l).; sccrctan/, Arlhur K. Tiel M.l). 

Adjourned 

AuTFiru R. Tiel 

Secretary Eclectic Medical BoQ.Td 



r32 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Dentistry 

Exchangee of M.D.S. for D.D.S. May 21, 1!M)3, on motion of Vice 
Chancellor Keid, tlie Ke^euts voted to reconsider the action of the 
Hoard taken at its niet-ting of 1 >ec. 4, U>02. June 29, 1903, Regent 
Fitch pivsented a letter addressed to himself from the deputy 
attorney ji:eneral, and on motion it was ordered that the secretary 
be i-equested to procure this opinion from the attorney general in 
such form that it might l)e quoted in the i-ecords of tlie board's 
transactions. 

[Dec. 3, 1903] Kegcnt Fitch presented fnmi the colk»ge <om- 
mittce a ivport on the <|uestion of the substitution of the D.D.S. 
for th(» M.D.S. derive, which was ivceived and with the conclusion 
appi*oved. 

Report, The colh^ge committei^ to which was referred the ques- 
tion as to whether or not the Regents of the University shall 
exercise the authority vested in them, by chapter 215 of the laws 
of 1901, to confer on all i)ersons who have i*eceived the degree of 
master of dental surgery under the laws of the State, prior to the 
taking elFect of the law indicated, the degree of doctor of dental 
surgery in lieu of the master's degree, respectfully reports as 
follows : 

Imprimis, it is iiertinent to note the signal progress that den- 
tistry has made, both as an art and a science, within recent years, 
availing itself of wide and well ordered curriculums and utilizing 
scientific <lisc()V(Mies and devices. Its morale has appreciated 
inuneasurably. It has attained the dignity of a profession, as 
enlightened as ])ractical. Its high standing today, the knowledge 
it i)OSsesses, the skill with which it operates, the esteem in which 
it is held, must 1k^ attributed largely, if not wholly, to the molding 
of the schools — the education they furnish, including the requi- 
sites for admission thereto, the courses prescribed and the degrees 
l)estowed. While Xew York may not claim to be the pioneer in 
dental education — for Maryland chartered a college so early as 
1839 — she has been its earnest and efficient promoter and is now 
unquestionably the leading exponent of the best thought and the 
most ex])ert practice known to the profession. She has three 
excellent schools — the New York College of Dentistry, the College 
of Dentistry of the University of Buffalo, and the New York 
Dental School — the first named having been incorporated in 1865 
and the latter two in 1892. Each is well equipi)ed with proj)erty, 
jnechanical appliances and teaching faculty. The courses in each, 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r33 

covering a i^eriod of three jears embrace instruction in anatomy, 
physiology and liygiene, chemistry and metallurgy, oral surgery 
and pathology, operative dentistry, prosthetic dentistry, therajjeu- 
tics and materia medica and histology. Each crowns the courses 
pursued and the examinations i)assed with the degree of doctor 
of dental surgery; and the State has wisely enacted, with certain 
reservations relative to those who hold a diploma or license from 
a foreign country or who tiled a certificate of study under private 
preceptorship on or l)efore July 1, 1895, that no person shall be 
licensed to practise dentistry therein who has not had a pi'elimi- 
nary education equivalent to three years in a registered high 
school, and for matriculants after Jan. 1, 1905 to graduation from 
a four year high school course registered by the Regents, and 
unless he has either been graduated in course with a dental 
degree from a registered dental school, or else, having in coui*se 
been graduated from a registered medical school with the degree 
of doctor of medicine, has pui*sued thereafter a course of special 
study of dentistry, for at least two years, in a registered dental 
sc1km)1 and received therefrom its degree*. Such are the prescrip- 
tions of the schools and such the sj^feguards that the State has 
provided against ignorance and incom])etency. 

Whfit a contrast is revealed between the schools thus estab- 
lished Jtnd the profession thus munimented by law and the dental 
vocation of htalf a century ago, untutored, irresponsible and bung- 
ling, redeemed only from absolute contempt by the few who had 
had the training of the schools or by diligent study and excep- 
tional talent had accpiired proficiency outside of them. So late 
as June .*i, 1S7(>, the Ij<md(m Lancet siiid, *'it ai>peai"s that not much 
more than 50 of all the numerous body of so called dentists of 
the United Kingdom possessed in reality any medical or surgical 
diplonm at all.'' 

In this State, till 1868, the profession of dentistry, if by cour- 
tesy it could then be styled a profession, was disorganized and de- 
moralized, without cohesion of its reputable membei*ship and with- 
out requirements for admission to it which would shield it from 
pretension and charlatanry. Quacks and butchers, equally with 
learned, accomplished and upright practitioners, could hang out 
their signs and solicit patronage. Keform came from within the 
body itself, its intelligent and conscientious control, and at its 
instance the law of 18B8 was enacted. Under that law, the state 
and district societies were organized and authority was given to 
the State to confer the degree of master of dental surgery and to 
license pei^sons passing a satisfactory examination l)efore a board 
of censors, and whose eligibility as to moral character and prepa- 
ration of four years in the study of dentistry was certified to the 



r34 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

board by a district society. The board of censors, throughout its 
entire existence, was admirable both in its personnel and pro- 
cedure. Its members were of the best repute, and it is impossible 
to examine the proceedings, as your committee has had the privi- 
lege of doing, without sincere i'esi)ect for its capacity, fidelity to 
duty and high-mindedness. Its examinations were severe ordeals. 
Its records show that of 321 aj^plications for the degree of master 
of dental surgery, 160 wei'e granted and 161 were rejected, among 
the latter being several from holders of the degree of doctor of 
dental surgery. The degree of master of dental surgery is one 
honorably acquired and worthily worn, justifying doubtless, the 
opinion of I)r W. C. Bari-ett, dean of the dental department of the 
University of Buffalo, who says : " It carries with it something 
more than mere theoretic knowledge. It is a voucher for profes- 
sional standing, for ethical conduct, for experience and place in 
the councils of the profession." 

Meanwhile the college degree appreciated in significance and 
favor as the colleges enlarged and strengthened their curriculums, 
and it was clearly seen that the j)roi)er api)roach to the profession 
was through the avenue of the college ; and from the same inspira- 
tion that constrained the law of 1868 came the law of 1895, which 
resolved the censors into tlie state board of examiners and made 
it appointive by the Regents, on the nomination of the State 
Dental Society, imi)osed, as conditions precedent, on persons pre- 
senting themselves before the board for examination, that thej 
should have had a preliminary education equivalent to a high 
school course and been graduated with a dental degree from a 
registered dental school, and empowered the Regents to license 
those thus qualified to practise dentistry, on the certificate of the 
board of examiners, that they had ]»assed successfully its exami- 
nations. Clearly, it was the purpose of this law, a marked ad- 
vance in its sanctions over that of 1868, to compel the teaching of 
the schools instead of that of private preceptors and to attach 
value to the college degrees, as it was also clearly the purjmse to 
make the Regents the conservators, if not the grantors, of tliese 
degrees. By definition and elimination the degi*ee of doctor of 
dental surgery is the ado])ted and authoritative college degree in 
dentistry throughout the United States, the exceptions being those 
of Harvard University, which grants the degree of D.M.D. (den- 
tariae medicinae doctor) and the University of Minnesota. 

No other is recognized in New York, that of B.D.S., which for 
a time w^as issued by one institution, having some years since 
been abolished. It means what it says, that it is a college degree. 
It stands for a three years' residence and for the courses pursued 
in a college : and of the comparative worth of a New York college 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r35 

degree it is well to note that in 1901, of the 113 papers submitted 
to the New York board of examiners by graduates of New York 
Rchools, but 1(> failed of approval, while 23 of the 40 written by 
gi'aduates of schools in otlier states were rejected. It is not, 
indeed, without much of agitation and something of conflict that 
the integrity of the degree in American dent<al colleges has been 
assured. In earlier years, on pi-essui-e on them, they frequently 
granted it as a " reward of merit," or " recognition of service '' — 
as an honorary ai)pellation — but when Ji union of the dental facul- 
ties of the country was effected, in 1884, the sentiment against 
conferring it, except at the end of a college course had become 
paramount, and in 1890 the rule was made imperative against it, 
no violations of the same having occurred save that in 1892 one 
dental school ventured to transgress it and was rebuked sharply 
thei*efor, and the University of Buffalo in 1893, and the University 
of Pennsylvania in 1894, ju'obably in ignorance disregarded it, 
both however, rei^cinding their a<tion j)romptly at the demand of 
the Faculties Association. From the first, the Regents have re- 
frained studiously from l)estowing honorary degrees, except on 
rare occasions and on tliose eminently deserving, and they have 
also refused to grant as honorary a degree which has been desig- 
nated by the colleges or universities of the State as one to be 
earned at their hands by residence and study. The Regents dp 
not confer the degrc^es of bachelor of arts, or science, or letters, 
nor that of doctor of philoso]»hy. For some years they did confel 
the last named degi*ee, but at the unanimous request of the col* 
leges and universities, tliey have ceased to do so, and that on the 
principle stated. For some years also, the Regents conferred the 
degree of doctor of medicine on the i)ersons nominated to them 
by the state societies of the various medical schools respectively, 
but this was but the confirmation of the same degree previously 
obtained by them from the colleges, differing essentially from 
the exchange of dental degrees now proposed, and even this pre- 
rogative of the Regents has now been abrogated. 

Conchmon, Tn vi(»w of the foix^going considerations, the con- 
clusion of the committee is that the proposed substitution of the 
D.D.S. for the INl.D.S. degree is undesimble l)ecause tending to 
weaken the standing of college degi'ees. 

Voted^ That the S(M*retary be directed to transmit a copy of the 
report and action of the Regents to the secretary of the New York 
State Dental Society, to the secretary of the State Board of 
Dental Examiners, and to the dean of each of the dental schools 
of the State for their information respectively. 

Resolved, That the report, with accompanying conclusion, be 
printed in full in the re])ort of the College Department for 1903. 



r36 UNIVERSITY OP THB STATB OP NBW YORK 

Dental examiners. In accordance with the law nominations 
were submitted to the Regents from the Dental Society of the 
State of New York, and examiners were appointed May 21, 1903, 
for the ensuing year. 

Appointments. Frank French M.D.S., Rochester, O. J. Gross 
D.D.S., Seheneeiady, and A. R. Ck)oke D.D.S., Syracuse, to fill 
the vacancy in the unexpired term ending July 1, 1904, caused 
by the death of Dr S. B. Palmer, Syracuse. 

Pennsylvania license. Pursuant to section 168, chapter 215, 
laws of 1901, the Regents, on recommendation of the Board of 
Dental Examiners, agreed to issue their license to any applicant 
therefor who holds a license to practise dentistry granted by the 
State Board of Dental Examiners of Pennsylvania which had 
been indorsed by the Dental Society of the State of New York, 
provided that his preliminary and professional education has 
been not less than that required in this State. 

Agreement. 1 It is understood and admitted that the standard 
of the professional examination of each board is practically equal, 
and though different in detail is mutually acceptable. 

2 Licentiates of the Pennsylvania board, who have received 
the degree of D.D.S. or other recognized dental degree, are to be 
granted licenses to practise in New York State without examina- 
tion on payment of the regular licensing fee, provided the pre- 
liminary education of the candidate is equal to that required 
by the New York statute ; and licentiates of the New York board 
are to be granted licensees to practise in Pennsylvania under the 
same conditions. 

3 Immediately after any examination by either board complete 
sets of the questions used shall be mailed to the examiners of each 
state, to the Dental Council of Pennsylvania and to the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York. 

4 Applications for license under this interchange shall be in- 
dorsed, in New York State by the president and secretary of the 
board of examiners and by the secretary of the Regents, and in 
Pennsyh'ania by the president and secretary of the examining 
board and by the secretary of the Dental Council and shall be 
accompanied by the original or certified copies of certificates of 
preliminary education. 

5 The names of unsuccessful candidates in each state shall be 
sent to the secretaries of the examining boards, and to the Regents 
or Council as the case may be. 

6 All papers connected with the examinations shall be placed 
OD &le with the Regents or council, and shall be public records. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT RBPOET 1903 r37 

7 Those who haVe received a New York State license to prac- 
tise dentistry granted since 1895, or a Pennsylvania license 
granted since 1897 may apply for the interchange established by 
this agreement. 

Action by the director. Dec. 1, 1903, the following letter was 
addressed to the deans of the dental schools of the United States : 

We are carefully reregistering the dental schools of the United 
States, and our attention has been called to the. fact that some 
of the schools are not meeting the requirements of the National 
Association of Dental Faculties or of the ordinances of the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York, in that dental students are not 
required to attend the entire final year of the course for 
graduation. 

The standing resolution of the National Association of Dental 
Faculties (4) reads: 

"A graduate of a recognized dental college . . . shall com- 
plete one full course of instruction in said college and comply 
with all the other requirements of the senior class." 

The 8i)ecial committee of the State Board of Dental Examiners 
is unanimous in the opinion thjit this rule should be strictly 
adhered to in the registration of dental schools. Kindly inform 
me whether or not your dental school adheres strictly to this rule 
in all cases. 

Very truly yours 

Jamks Russell Parsons jr 

Begistration of dental schools [see Appendix, 19]. The dental 
schools of the United States registered or accredited by the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York fall into two gi'oups. 

Group 1. Those i-egistered or accredited for admission to the 
licensing examination after application authenticated by seal or 
affidavit and the signature of the executive officer [for list in 
force Ap. 1, 1904, see Appendix]. 

Group 2. Those registered or accredited for admission to 
registered dental schools. 

The registration of the dental schools has reference to the pro- 
fessional education requirement and not to the gc^neral prelim- 
inary education requirement which must be met by candidates 
for admission to New York dental schools and receives inde- 
pendent action. 

Schools are registered in full or accredited m X.^'O ^X^^^s^^^ ^^ 



r38 UNIVERSITY OF THB STATB OF NEW YORK 

the same prinriploH that apply to the registration of medical 
schools. 

Dental Council's recommendations. Feb. 20, 1903, the Dental 
Ooimcil met in N(»w York, all members being present. After full 
discussion the following i-eoommendations were made, based on a 
four year court^e which go<'S into effect October 1003: (1) That the 
state laws he anu^nded (if necessiiry) so as to iK»nnit final exam- 
inations in ceutain (appropriate) subjects of the state board 
exaininati(ms for license to practise, at the end of the third year; 
the remainder of the li(*ensing examinations to Ih^ taken at the 
end of the fourth year. (2) That, beginning with students matricu- 
lating for th(* session of 1003-4, all students bi» I'ecpiired to have 
24 academic ci)unts before the lM»ginning of the second year and 
the full 30 counts before the l>eginning of the third year. 
FANEriL 1). Wkissk M.l). President 

(.'iiARLEs Milton Ford M.D. Secretary 

Dental receipts and disbursements. Oct. 1, 1003, the secivtary sent 
to the eight state dental examiners the following statement of 
receipts and exiK^nditui*es (connected w^ith the administration of 
the dental laws from July 1, 1002, to June 30, 11M)3. 

To the {^tatr Hoard of Dmtal E.raminers 

I transmit h(»rewith a summary of the records and vouchers 
in this ottice (all of which are oiK»n to your insiK^ction) of the 
receipts and exiM^nditures c<mnected with th(» administration of 
the dental laws, but not including the dental student examina- 
tions, the exix'uses of which are borne by the Tniversity. 

Frcmi July 1, 1002, to Jun(» 30, 1003, there were four examina- 
tions for license* to ])ractise dentistry, at which 217 candidates 
ap]>eared. In accordance with the law the Regents have paid 
the* expensi's ]>roperly chargeable to these tests and have on 
hand at the close of the academic year 1020.48, which according 
to law is to be paid to the Dental Society of the State of New 
York. 

James Russell I*arsons jr 

Secretary of the University 
Receipts 
231 1525 fers |5 775 .. 

14 |25 fees r^eturned 350 .. 

$5425 .. 



COLLRGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rsn 



1629 10 
48 28 




192 19 

' 1 556 90 

117 52 




2 260 53 


|4 804 52 




1620 48 



Payments 

Parchment and engraving 699 licenses 

Printing 

Ijocal expenses of conducting examinations 
at various points throughout the State 

Services of examiners and clerks in Albany 

Papc»r, pencils and binding 

^Expenses of State Board of Dental Exam- 
iners 



Dental examinations 
Dental license. Laws of 1901, chapter 215, provide for dentisTs 
requirements as to license and registration similar to those fixed 
by law for physicians. 

Examinations for license to practise dentistry in this State 
have been or are to be held as follows: 

Bates 
1903 
January 27-31 
May 19-23 
June 23-27 
Septeml)er 29-Oetober 3 

Places 
New York, Albany, Syracuse, Buffalo. Each candidate is 
notified as to exact place. 

Daily protrram 
9.15 a. m. 1.15 p. m. 

Tti€8d4iy Anatomy PhysiiHogy and hygiene 

Wednesday Ch(»niistry and metal- Oral surgery and pathology 

lurgy 
Thursday Operative dentistry Prosthetic dc»ntistry 
Fridny Therapeutics and ma- Histology 

teria mediea 
Saturday Practical examination 
in prosthetic d4»n- 
tistry 



1904 
January 20-30 
May 17-21 
June 21-25 
Sept<»ml>er 27-October 1 



'Dr Jarvie $193: Dr Wright .$1JW;.50; Dr Holmes .^.370.82; Dr (Jross 
$175.96; Dr Burkhart $3<«.27: Dr Carr $244; Dr Cooke $91.49; Dr Taluier 
$121.17; Dr French $498.32. 



l40 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Dental students in New York State. In 1903 there were 488 stu- 
dents in New York College of Dentistry, 278 in University of 
Buffalo College of Dentistry, and 137 in New York Dental 
School, total 903. 

Dental school smnmaries [for further details see Appendix, 20]. 
In 1893 the three institutions employed 69 officers of instruction 
for 328 students (classed as graduates 8, in D.D.S. course 320); 
in 1903 the three institutions employed 115 officers of instruction 
for 903 students (cIuhwhI as graduates 22, in D.D.S. course 787, 
unclassified 94). 

In 1893, eight students held degrees, and D.D.S. degrees were 
conferred on 52; in 1903, 19 held degrees, and D.D.S. degrees 
were conferred on 124. 

In 1893, the libraries of the three institutions contained 150 
volumes, total property amounted to |123,996, receipts f34,268, 
expenditures 130,180; in 1903 the libraries contained 235 vol- 
umes, total property amounted to |247,067, receipts $145,364, 
expenditures fl33,475. 

In comparison with 1893 the dental schools of the State show 
for 1903, 46 more officers of instruction, 575 more students 
(classed as graduates 14, in D.D.S. course 467, unclassified 94). 
There were 11 more in attendance with degrees, and 72 more 
D.D.S. degrees were conferred. The number of volumes in the 
libraries shows an increase of 85, total property f 123,071, receipts 
1111,096, expenditures $97,295. 

Dental licensing examinations. The results of the dental licens- 
ing examinations [for further details see Appendix, 21] from 
1896 to 1903 show that the per cent of rejected candidates has 
steadily decreased, while the number of honor licenses issued has 
as steadily increased. 

Comparison of dental schools. The dental schools of New York 
State compare favorably with those of other states as shown by 
the licensing examinations [for further details see Appendix, 22]. 
The table shows for 1903 the rejections by topics: group 1, New 
York schools; group 2, schools in other states. Each applicant 
is counted only once in the number of candidates, but under the 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r4l 

several topics each failure is indicated, excluding any answer 
papers not examined. Of the papers submitted by 118 graduates 
of New York schools only 37 toere rejected, while 21 written hy 41 
graduates of schools in other states were rejected. In addition 
to the above, 23 candidates had filed evidence of study under 
private preceptor before Aug. 1, 1895, 13 of whose papers were 
rejected, and 17 candidates were graduates of schools against 
which no failure was charged in 1903. 

Summaries of minutes of State Dental Examiners 

Regents Office, Albany N. Y. May IS, 190S 

Meeting called to order at 9 a. m., all members of the board 
being present, also Secretary Parsons of the Regents office. 

Dr Holmes was elected acting president for the unexpired 
term of Dr Palmer. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read by Dr French 
and formally approved. 

Dr Carr made a statement concerning Charles L. Apfel and 
submitted a signed confession from said Apfel. 

Recwnmended, That Charles L. Apfel be permitted to take 
Regents examinations as a candidate for a law student cer- 
tificate. 

Dr Carr stated that to his certain knowledge many plates sub- 
mitted in prosthetic dentistry were not made by the candidates 
themselves as is required, in spite of their affidavit to that 
effect, and cited one or two cases that had come directly to his 
knowledge. 

Voted, That the examiner in prosthetic dentistry require an 
affidavit not only from the candidate but also from the demon- 
strator in the school or from the one in whose laboratory the 
work was performed stating that the plate was made by the 
candidate under his immediate supervision. 

Interchange of licenses. Dr Carr stated that he and Dr Jarvie 
had had a conference with the New Jersey board, which favored 
interchange of licenses, but felt that certificates of preliminary 
education furnished by their candidates should be accepted at 
face value. 



fc2 UNIVERSITY OF THE STAie. ^^ 

Mr Parsons said that under tlio laws and Regents rules a uni- 
brm interi>retation of credentials ei>v(*ring preliminary educa- 
tion was essential, and that the Regents could insure this only 
by considering in each case original cred<*ntials or certified 
copies. 

Dr Jarvie stat<*d that he and l>r Carr had had a conf(*renc<* 
with the Pennsylvania board of examiners and that articles of 
agre<Miient had Ikn^u drawn up regarding an exchange of licenses 
between New York and P(*nnsylvania. 

This agiM'enient was 8uhse«iu(»ntly amended and approved as 
ap{)esii'« at j). vIMj. 

Voted f That l)i*s Carr and Jarvie, with the ai)i>roval of Secre- 
tary' PanwHis, he eni|K>wered to enter into an agivement with 
Pennsylvania on the basis of the pi-oiKK^^nl artic^lc^. 

Divided examinations. Dr Jarvie stated that some of the 
schools thought that, inasniucli as the students conii>leted ceHain 
subjects at the end of tlieir tii-st or schnuhI yejir, they should then 
be examined in those suhje(*ts. After some dis<»ussion of this 
matter it was 

Voted, Tliat the <*<msi(leration of tlie qm^tion of divided ex- 
ejninations b(» <lefernMl for the piH^ent. 

Voted, Tliat all ni(*mlKM*s of the lM>ard consider themselves dele- 
gates to the mc<»tiug of the National AssiX'iation of IX*ntal Ex- 
aminei's, an<l that the annual dues of .^10 be paid fi'om the general 
fund. 

Dr Jarvie pivsented th(» following involutions on the death of 
Dr Palmer, which were unanimously adopt(»d : 

To tlie New York State Board of Dental Esaininers 

Gentlemen: The commit tiv appointed to jjrepare a minute 
on the death of our fellow memher and pin^sident, Dr Palme? 
would report a*s follows: 

Died at his home in Syracuse, on Monday. Mar. 30, 1903, I 
Stewart Bailey Palmer, in the Slst y(»ar of his age. 

Dr Palmer was l)orn in Pompey, now Lafayette, in this Sta 
on Sep. 1, 1S1>L\ In 1S4S \\e entered the oHice of Dr John 
Allen in Fabius as a student, and in isr)() began the }yractic< 
dentistry in Ivafayette. In isr^l he inoviMl to Tully and renmf 
"^^*a when he moved to Svracuse and associated hin 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r43 

with I)r Amos West cot t. In 18G8 be severed his connection with 
Dr Westcott and till a short time before bis death continued to 
practise in that city. 

Dr Palmer wtis one of the original members of the State Dental 
Soci^y and was the first to have conferred on him the degree 
of master of dental surgery, M.D.S., in July 1869. In 1873 he 
was elected a meml)er of the State Board of Censors and, when 
that board went out of existence in 1895 and became the State 
Board of Dental Examiners, connected with the UniA^ei'sity of the 
State of New York, he remained as a member of it. In 1898 he 
was elected president of the Iwiard and continued as such till his 
death. 

Dr Palmer was of a most gentle and lovable disposition, alw^ays 
tolerant of the views of othei-s yet firm in his own convictions, 
. as was shown in the contiM>vei'sy which was carried on for years 
regarding what was known as " the new departure." Ever a 
student, particularly of chemistry in its relation to dentistry, 
this board has had the benefit of his intimate knowledge of that 
branch of science in its examinations. 

In the death of Dr Palmer each member of our board has lost 
a beloved friend; the examining board one of its most efficient 
and faithful membei*s; and we shall sadly miss his genial presence 
at our meetings. 

Resolved, That this minute Ik* entered in full on the records 
and a copy of it sent to the family of Dr Palmer. 

William Jarvib 

Com^mittee 
Frank French 

Secretary 

Adjourned 

Annual meetinfl^ 

Reffcnfs Office y Alhanp N. Y, Oct. S, 1903 

Meeting called to order at 9.15 a.m., all members of the board 
being present, also Secretary Parsons of the Regents office. 

The minutes of the previous nuvting were read by Dr French 
and approved. 

Dr Jarvie stated that the committee on interchange of licenses 
had completed arrangements for an interchange of licenses with 
Pennsylvania on the basis of the agreement set forth in the 
minutes of the preceding meeting and that such interchange w^as 
now in oi)eration. 

Voted, That the action of the committee be approved. 



I 



r44 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Dr Jarvie stated further that, at the meeting of the National 
Association of Dental Faculties held at Asheville N. C. July 27, 
the following resolution was adopted : 

That an inteivhange of license to practise dentistry be and is 
hereby recommended to be observed by the various state boards on 
the following specific conditions : Any dentist who has been in 
active practice for five years or more, is a reputable dentist, is a 
person of good moral character, and is desirous of making. a 
change of residence, and has in his possession already a certifi- 
cate, may apply to the board of the state in which he is a resident 
for a new certificate, which certificate if granted may be deposited 
with the examining board of the state in which he proposes to 
reside, and said board in lieu thereof may grant him a certificate 
allowing him to practise. 

He stated that it was published in the dental journals that this 
resolution had been passed by the New Jersey, board and that two 
states, Ohio and Indiana, had already entered into an agreement 
on this plan. He raised the question as to whether New York 
wanted an interchange with other states pn thesie conditions. 
After some discussion it was 

Voted, That the inteirhange committee be instructed not to 
enter into arrangements for an interchange with any state which 
accepts licenses on the above condition®. 

Voted, That the New York State Board of Dental Examiners 
i9 desirous of entering into an interchange agreement with any 
other state that meets the New York standard. 

The following officei's were elected for the ensuing year: 
president, Dr A. M. Holmes, secretary, Dr Frank French, editor, 
Dr William Carr. 

The board then discussed the question of combined medical 
and dental coui-ses and it was 

Voted, That in the opinion of the board where a dental school 
has university connections and where the work for the first one 
or two years of the course is identical, the law permitting, the two 
degrees of M.I), and D.D.S. should not be secured in less than 
five years; that in other schools the combined course should be 
completed in not less than six years. 

Drs Jarvie and Carr were appointed a special committee on the 
registration of dental schools. 
Adjourned Frank French 

- Secretary 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r45 

Veterinary medicine 

Begistration of veterinary medical schools [see list Appendix, 23]. 
The veterinary medical schools of the United States registered or 
accredited by the University of the State of New York fall into 
two groups. 

Group 1, Those registered or accredited for admission to the 
licensing examination after application authenticated by seal or 
affidavit and the signature of the executive officer [for list in force 
July 1, 1904, see Appendix, 23]. 

Group 2. Those registered or accredited for admission to regis- 
tered veterinary medical schools. 

The registration of the veterinary medical schools has reference 
to the professional education requirement and not to the general 
preliminary education requirement which must be met by candi- 
dates for admission to New York veterinary medical schools and 
receive independent action. Schools are registered in full or ac- 
credited in two classes on the principles that apply to the regis- 
tration of medical schools. 

Veterinary medical receipts and disbursements. Oct. 1, 1903, the 
secretary sent to the New York State Veterinary Medical Exam- 
iners the following statement of receipts and expenditures con- 
nected with the administration of the veterinary medical laws 
from Aug. 1, 1900, to July 1, 1903: 

To the State Veterinary Medical Examiners: 

The statemeat of receipts and expenditures connected with the 
administration of the veterinary laws from Aug. 1, 1900, to July 1, 
1901, showed a balance of f41.42, but as this amount waa not 
sufficient to cover postage, express and other necessary office ex- 
penses, it was held on hand. 

Between July 1, 1901, and July 31, 1903, the Regents received 
39 fees of f 10 each, of which number 4 were returned, making the 
total net receipts for the period |350. 

For printing the bills amounted to f32.29, and for conducting 
examinations, to f 88.12, making total disbursements of f 120.41. 
Deducting this amount from the net receipts leaves a balance of 
f271.01, which obviously does not cover the office expenses, post- 
age, express, parchment and engraving licenses, and equitable 
parts of salaries of clerks conducting the correspondence and 



r46 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NBIW YORK 



handling the records. Nevertheless, it seems just to allow the 
examiners half, partly covering postage, express and necessary 
traveling exjjenses in jierformance of their official duties. 

James Uussell Parsons jr 

Secretary of the University 



Receipti 



Balance July 1, 1901 
39 f 10 fees 



4 flO fees returned 



141 42 
390 .. 

f 431 42 

40 .. 



f391 42 



Payments 
Trinting |32 29 

Local exi)en8es of conducting examinations at 

various points thi'oughout the State 88 12 

Part of necessary exi)ense8 at Albany 135 50 



255 91 



Apportioned 



$135 51 



Vcterinnn/ examinations 

Veterinary license. Laws of 1893, chapter 661, as amended in 
1895, 1896, 1900 and 1901, [u-ovide for veterinary requirements 
as to license and registration similar to those fixed by law for 
physicians. 

Examinations for li(*ense to practise veterinary medicine in 
this state have In^en or aiv to be held as follows : 



Datei 



1903 
January 27-30 
^ray 19-22 
June 23-26 
8epteml)er 29-()ct. 2 



1904 
January 26-29 
May 17-20 
June 21-24 
September 27-30 



Places 
New York, Albany, Syracuse, Buffalo. Each candidate is noti- 
fied as to exact place. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r47 

Daily program 

9.15 a. m. 1.15 p. m. 

Tuesday Comparative anatomy I'hysiology and hygiene 

Wednesday Chemistry Veterinary surgery 

Thursday Obstetrics Pathology, diagnosis and 



practice 



Friday Therapeutics and materia 

medica 



Veterinary medical students in New York State. In 1903 there 
wert^ 251 students in the New York State Veterinary College and 
58 in the New York American Veterinary College, total 309. 

Veterinary school summaries [for further details see Appendix, 
24]. In 1893 the two institutiims employed 31 officers of instruc- 
tion for 224 students (classed as graduates 1, in veterinary course 
223) ; in 1903 the two institutions employed 50 oflScers of instruc- 
tion for 251 students (classed a« graduates 3, in course 120, un- 
classified 128). 

In 1893, two students held degrees, ancf veterinary degrees were 
conferred on 73; in 1903, 12 students held degrees, and veterinary 
degrees wei^e conferred on 24. 

In 1893, the libraries of the two institutions contained 600 
volumes, total property amounted to f30,750, receipts fl4,l20, 
and exjienditures |14,120; in 1903 the libraries of the two institu- 
tions contained 3451 volumes, total proiH»rty amounted to |158,- 
191, receipts 134,079, ex[>enditures |;32,997. 

In comparison with 1893, the veterinary schools show for 1903 
the same numlier of institutions, 19 more oflicers of instruction, 
27 more students (classed as graduates 2, unclassified 128 and in 
veterinary' course 103). Thei-e were 10 more in attendance with 
degrees and 49 fewer veterinary degrees conferred. The number 
of volumes in the libraries shows an increase of 2851, total prop- 
erty increased |1 27,441, receipts f 20,559, expenditures f 18,877. 

Veterinary licensing examinations. The results of these exami- 
nations [for details see Apjiendix, 25] from 1890 to 1903 show^ a 
steady decrease in the {tev cent rejected and a gradual increase 



ViS UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

in the licenses issued. In 1903 the first honor licenses (two) were 
issued. 

Nnrsing 

The act. Ap. 27, 1903, the law took effect which amended the 
public health law by inserting article 12, entitled Registration of 
Nurses. 

Section 206 provides that any resident of the State of New York 
21 years of age, of good moral character, holding a diploma from 
a training school for nurses connected with a hospital or sana- 
torium giving a course of at least two years and registered by 
the Regents of the University of the State of New York as main- 
taining in this and other respects proper standards, and receiving 
from the Regents a certificate of his or her qualifications to prac- 
tise as a registered nurse, shall be styled and known as a regis- 
tered nurse, and no other person shall assume such title or use 
the abbreviation R. N.; that before beginning to practise nursing 
every registered nurse must record the certificate in the county 
clerk's office of the county of his residence; that during January 
1906 and every 36th month thereafter certificates must be re- 
corded with proof of identity; that nothing in this article confers 
any authority to practise medicine. 

Section 207 provides for a board of five examiners appointed by 
the Regents from 10 nominees of the New York State Nurses 
Association. 

Section 208 provides that the Regents may on the recommenda- 
tion of the board waive the examination of residents of the State, 
21 years old, of good moral character, (1) that have graduated 
from a training school for nurses registered by the Regents before 
' Ap. 27, 1903, or are in training on that date and graduate there- 
after; (2) that had three years- experience in a general hospital 
prior to Ap. 27, 1903, and were practising nursing on that date, 
who apply in writing for the certificate prior to Ap. 27, 1906; (3) 
that were engaged in the actual practice of nursing for not less 
than three years next preceding Ap. 27, 1903, that satisfactorily 
pass an examination in practical nursing before Ap. 27, 1906. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r4d 

Board of examiners. In accordance with the law, nominations 
were submitted to the Regents from the New York State Nurses 
Association as follows : Miss Annie Damer, Miss Mary E. Thorn- 
ton, Miss Julia E. Bailey, Miss Sophia F. Palmer, Mrs Sophia 
8. Caiimian, Mr L. Bissell Sanford, Dr Mary McMillan, Miss 
Dorothea M. Macdonald, Miss Jane E. Hitchcock, Miss Anna 
O'Neill. 

Appointmcrits: for one year L. Bissell Sanford, for two years 
Miss Annie Damer, for three years Miss Dorothea M. Macdonald, 
for four yeai-s Miss Sophia F. Palmer, for five years Miss Jane 
Elizabeth Hitchcock. 

Bequirements for registration in force Jan. 1, 1904-6 

Incorporation. The training school for nurses or the Institution of which 
it is a department must be incorporated. 

Hospital facilities. For registration a nurse training school must be 
connected with a hospital (or sanitarium) having not less than 25 beds and 
the number of beds must be from two to four times the number of students 
In the school, ^^pending on the character of the hospital's facilities for 
private or ward practice. 

Preliminary education. All training schools registered by the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York shall require of pupils applying 
for admission a certificate of gi*aduation from a grammar school or its 
equivalent preference being given to applicants who have had one year or 
more in a high school and to those who have taken a full course in domestic 
science in a recognized technical school. 

Subjects of state examination. Training schools for nurses registered 
by the Regents shall provide both practical and theoretical Instruction in 
the following branches of nursing: (1) medical nursing (including materia 
medica), (2) surgical nursing, with operative technic Including gynecologi- 
cal, (3) obstetrical nursing (eiich pupil to have had the care of not less 
than six cases), (4) nursing of sick children, (5) diet cooking for the sick 
including (a) 12 lessons in cooking in a good technical school, or with a 
competent diet teacher, (h) food values, and feeding in special cases, to be 
taught in classes not by lectures, (0) a thorough course of theoretical 
instruction in contagious nursing where practical experience is impossible. 

Training schools for male nurses shall provide instruction in genito- 
urinary branches, in place of gynecological and obstetrical nursing. 

Professional education. The period of instruction in the training school 
shall be not less than two full years, during which time students shall not 
be utilized to care for patients outside of a haspital. Training schools 
giving a three year course and wishing to continue the practice of utilizing 
their pupils to earn money for the hospital may send them out to private 
cases or for district work among the ix)or for a period not exceeding three 
months in the third year of their course. But training schools with a two 
year course wishing to continue the practice must extend their course to 
meet the above requirements. 



rSO UNIVBESITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YOEK 

Provisional requirements. The branches of nursing in which both prac- 
tical and theoretical iustructiou must l>e given by training schools applying 
for registration will remain in force till Jan. 1, 190(5. 

Suggested lines of development 

Preliminary education. ATter Jan. 1, 190G, all registered training schools 
for nurses must re«iulre the cnwupletion of one year of a high school course 
subse<iuent to an eight year grammar school course, or the e<iuivalent. 

Professional education. The c]al)orution of the curriculum to be 
developed by January IIKMJ and the lines on which this development may 
be expected, are: 

Preliminary training. The training schools should teach their proba- 
tioners before placing them at the Ixnlside of patients : 

a The various methods of making and chan^ring the lunl, with and with- 
out the patient ; 

h The temperature of baths, and the simple methods of administering 
tliem; 

The use and dangers of the hot water bag ; 

d The principles of sweeping and dusting ; 

e The setting of trays, etc. 

This instruction can be given easily in the nurses home by the superin- 
tendent of nurses or by a delegated imrse. instruction in these simple 
principles can not be given uniformly in the rush and pressure of busy 
wards. It demands no additional service or exi)ense on the part of the 
hospital and tends toward tlie preliminary training that is rapidly gaining 
favor in the schools of higher grade. It is not intended as a substitute 
for the bedside instructions, but as a iircparation for it. The patient 
should not be reipiireil to wait for an ordered poultice till the head nurse 
can show the probationer how to malvc one. Many similar facts can be 
taught separately the linal and all inii)oi'tant part coming at the bedside 
when these bits of deftness are api)lied to the relief and not to the embar- 
rassment of the patient Preliminary training in the leading schools covers 
a period of from one to six months, but tlie simple practical instruction 
here suggested is given in many schools that do not i)rofcss to have a 
regular preliminary course. 

tSniall classes. In i)lace of the clal>orate system of lectures given 
gratuitously' by members of the meilical staff, training schools should adopt 
more advanced methcKls, affording instruction in tlie same subjects to 
smaller classes by competent teachers and clinical demonstrations by mem- 
bers of the medical staff. Many schools publish an elaborate lecture course, 
but being dependent on busy medical men such instruction is frequently 
and unavoidably not given, to the great injustice to the pupil in training. 
Instruction in small classes In many schools unable to provide paid 
teachers is given by the j'ounger medical men afiiliatiMl with the hospital, 
who teach such subjects as bacteriology, anatomy, physiology, materia 
medica and chemistry, while the more im|K>rtant subjects of the care and 
management of acute cases are reserved for members of the regular staff. 

The State Hoard of Nurse Examiners as organized lor ltXJ3-4 with the 
year when the appointment expires and the address of each examiner is 
given for convenience of reference. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 V r5i' ^ 

1907 Miss Sophia F. Palmer, President, Uochester ^^'^^^--)19.?)S.- 

1908 Miss Jane E. Hitchcock, Sca'ctary, 205 Henry st. New York 

1904 L. Bissell Sanford, 217 E. 27th st. New York 

1905 Miss Annie Darner, 70 W. Iluron st. Buffalo 

1906 Miss Dorothea M. Maedonald, 90 Ilewes st. Brooklyn. 

This application [see Appendix, 20] and "Additional information " {see 
Appendix, 27] should be forwarded to the Director of the College and 
High School Departments, University of the State of New York, Albany 
N. Y. If returned with red ink nienioramlunis the inforniation called for 
is essential to registration. 

Blanks for use in applying for the certificate of registeretl nurse (li. N.) 
and the nurse registration law with notes will be forwarded on application. 

Action by the secretary. On the i-ecomiiiendation of the State 

Board of Nurse FiXaminers, the following letter was sent to all 

the superintendents of training schools for nurses in the United 

States. 

Regents Office, Albany N. 1\ September 1903 

To the superintendent 

Dear sir: In accord with the provisions of article 12, §206, 
public health law, inclosed, relative to the practice of nursing and 
on the recommendation of the State Board of Nurse Examiners, 
we are actively engaged in I'egistering the training schools for 
nurses in the United States. 

To avoid any misunderstanding, we are sending you a blank 
application for the registration of your training school for nurses. 
If you wish to secure the advantages of i-egistration or to have 
your institution placed on the accredited list of the University 
of the State of New York, kindly fill out in detail and return at 
your earliest convenience the application for registration duly 
signed by the executive officer of the school with seal attached. 
Be sure that your latc^st announcement of i-ecpiirements accom- 
panies the application and indicate its date on line of the appli- 
cation. If your printed announcement does not give the pro- 
grams or schedules of your year's work, kindly afford the same 
in manuscript. 

\'ery truly yours 

James Russell Parsons jr 

Summary of minutes of the meetings of State Board of Nurse 
Examiners Regents Office, Albany \. Y, Sep, /J, [903 

Present — Miss Darner, Miss Macdonald, Miss Palmer, Miss 
Hitchcock, Mr Sanford, Director Pai*sons and his assistant, H. L. 
Taylor. 



r52 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

The board organized by electing Miss Palmer as president and 
Miss Hitchcock as secretary. The board first considered and 
adopted a form of application for certificate as registered nurse. 

Voted, That the test in practical nursing include both a prac- 
tical demonstration and a written test involving the care of febrile 
cases, of patients before and after operation, of the mother and 
newborn babe in uornial and abnormal obstetrical cases, of treat- 
ment of emergencies, and a knowledge of drugs with regard to 
toxicological symptoms and treatment after poisonous doses ; tlunt 
male nurses be examined on genitourinary work as a substitute 
for obstetrical cases. 

Voted, That the practical demonstration be conducted by a 
member of the board of examiners, who must recommend the 
applicant for admission to the written test; that both practical 
demonstration and written test be held on the dates and at the 
places prescribed for Regents examinations in the other profes- 
sions; viz at New York, Albany, Syracuse and Buffalo, June 21, 
1904, Jan. 24, 1905, June 20, 1905. 

Voted, That, as the students in training schools prior to Ap. 
27, 1903, are exempt from the full examination, it is not necessary 
to prescribe the conditions for certificate with full examination 
for some time to come, that requirements for such certificates be 
announced later. 

Adjourn e<l 

Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock 

Secretary 

265 Henri/ st. Xew York City, Jan. 2, 1904 
Present — Miss Damer, Miss Hitchcock, Miss Macdouald, Miss 
Palmer. 

Object of meeting. The board met to determine the scope of 
education, both preliminary and professional, to be required of 
training schools for nurses in order to entitle them to recommend- 
ation to the Regents of the University of the State of New York 
for registration as maintaining proi)er standards. 

The curriculums of the training schools applying for registra- 
tion show that the practice of sending out pupils to earn money 
for the hospital is obsolete among schools of the highest grade. 
Some restriction should be placed on hospitals still following 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r53 

this custom that apply for the registration of their training 

schools. 

The recommendations as amended and approved are given 

above. 

Adjourned 

Jane E. Hitchcock 

Secretary 
Library School 

Credentials. In 1903 there were 449 passcards issued and 441 
instructors passcards; 12 certificates, of which 10 were with 
honor; aggregating in all 902. For a discussion of these tests 
see the report of the New York State Library School. 

[For further information see Appendix, 28] 

TECHNICAL 
Certified public aocoontant 
C.F.A. examiners. In accordance with the law Leonard H. 
Conant C.P.A. was appointed a state examiner for the term end- 
ing July 31, 1903, and John R. I^oomis C.P.A., John R. Sparrow 
C.P.A. and Ferdinand W. Lafrentz C.P.A. were appointed state 
examiners of certified public accountants, for the term ending 
July 31, 1904. 

C.F.A. certificate. Voted, That the preliminary education re- 
quirement for admission to the C.P.A. examination be waived 
on the certificate of the examiners that an applicant possessed 
at the time the original C.P.A. act was passed all the require- 
ments exacted by such law for the full C.P.A. certificate without 
examination. 

Public accountant receipts and expenses. The receipts and 
expc^nditures in connection with the administration of the 
statute relating to certified public accountants from Ap. 1, 1902, 
to Ap. 1, 1903, are reported as follows in accordance with the 
provisions of the laws of 1896, chapter 312, § 2. 

The receipts and expenditures in connection with the adminis- 
tration of the statute relating to certified public accountants 



r54 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

[laws of 1890, (11.312] from Ap. 1, 1002, to Ap. 1, 1903, were as 
follows: 

27 125 fees f 675 

2 f25 fees rt^urned 50 

Net ree(»ipts 1625 

Paymenti 

Printing fl5 20 

Part of cost to tlu* Tniversity of conducting examina- 
tions and of poHtage, (^xjiress, trav<*l and other 

n(M'e8sary oflrtc(? exiKMises 225 80 

Paid to two examiners for jiostage, express, travel and 
other oflkial exiw^nses 384 . . 

Total payments •. f 625 . . 



Certified puhUc accountant exatninations 

These* t(»sts hav<* bren or are to be held under laws of 1896, 
chaj)t<»r 312 as follows. 

Datet 
1903 1904 

January 27-28 January 28-27 

Jiinr 23-24 June 21-22 

Placet 

N(»w York, Albany, Hyracusi*, Buffalo. Each candidate is noti- 
fied as to exact place. 

Daily progrram 
9.15 a. m. 1.15 p. m. 

Tiu'sdaif Theory of accounts Practical accounting 

Wcdnvsdai/ Auditing accounts Commercial law 

Results of C.P.A. examinations. The results of these examina- 
tions [for further details see ApiH*ndix, 29] show from 1896 to 
1903 steadily increasing numlK^rs in examinations and a decreas- 
ing per cent of rejections. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r55 

Business education 

I. O. Crissy, inspector of business education, submits the fol- 
lowing report for the ai ademic year IJHK^. 

Private schools. The number of registered proprietary business 
schools at the end of the year was 81. Rworn reports have been 
received from these schools, from which it api)ears that the total 
value of the school pro|>erty (including buildings, w^hen owned 
by the school) was |4;:{0,909.27. The value of the business school 
equipment was f 158,282.2(3. The number of teachers giving full 
time to the w ork was 285, of whom 135 were women. The number 
of students in attendance during the year was 13,546, of whom 
6386 were women. The greatest number of days in actual session 
was 309, the least, 192. The greatest number of evening sessions 
was 252, the least, 69. Three schools did not hold evening ses- 
sions. 

Comparison of the above statistics with those for 1902 indicates 
a steady and healthy grow^th of the private business schools. There 
has been during the year an increase in business school equip- 
ment of $27,516.38, and in the total of business school property 
of fl30,867.38. There was an increase of 47 in the number of 
regular teachers and an increase of 2792 in the number of com- 
mercial students. Better still, the horizon of the private school is 
enlarging. Commercial geography and history of commerce were 
taught during the year by more than half of the registered schools, 
and more earnest attenlion'was given to English. 

Credentials. The ITniversity offers the following credentials 
based on Regents examinations in the undermentioned subjects: 

state business credentials! 
Advanced bookkeeping Business arithmetic 

Commercial law Business practice and office methodi 

Commercial geography History of conmierce 

Business English Business writing 

'Tbe cTedeutinls are: state ImsineHs cortiticato, state business diploma. 
For requirements in each case see Ilandbook 3. 



r56 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YOEK 

St^te ttenoirraphen oredentialti 
Typewriting etc. Business English 

Stenography (100 word test passed at 90^) 

Examinations for all credentials are held in January and June 
of each year. An examination in stenographers' subjects is held 
in March also. For exact dates see Handbook 3. 

Seventy-seven business credentials were issued during the year 
to candidates from 15 different schools. [For names of recipients, 
alphabetically arranged by schools, see Appendix, 30] 

Business examinations were taken in June by students from 
10 of the registered proprietary schools and from 500^ high schools 
and academies. This is an increase over 1902 of three private 
schools and 45 public high schools and academies. Of the high 
schools taking business examinations, 93 schools took five or more 
of the business subjects.^ 

High school courses. There are in this State 41 high schools 
and academies maintaining commercial courses of four years. 
There are two separate high schools of commerce in which all 
instruction, whether academic or technical, is given under one 
roof by teachers selected with a view to presenting each subject 
in the way that will make it most helpful to the commercial 
student. The Mount Vernon public commercial school, which was 
organized as a two year course, is now of high school grade, with 
a course of four years. 

NatiotMl and interstate meetings. Three important meetings 
in behalf of business education were held during the year: 
National Federation of Business Teachers, Milwaukee, December 
1902 ; Eastern Commercial Teachers Association, New York, April 
1903; department of business education. National Educational 
Association, Boston, July 1903. These meetings, each in its own 

^The credentials are: state stenographers certificate, state stenographers 
diploma. For requirements in each case sec Handbook 3. 
'Does not Include academic (elementary) bookkeeping. 



COLLBGB DBPARTMBNT RBPORT 1903 r57 

way, were believed to be the most helpful and satiefactory since 
the organization of the several bodies. 

The meeting of the department of business education, National 
Educational Association, was of special interest as marking the 
culmination of two years' work of a select committee of nine 
appointed to prepare a monograph on business education, includ- 
ing the formulation of a general course of procedure and detailed 
courses of study for business education in high schools. Papers 
by specialists in their line of work were read and discussed, and 
one entire forenoon was devoted by the committee to hearing a 
free expression of views from a large and representative body of 
business teachers.^ 

The monogi*aph is printed as a separate bulletin. 
Respectfully submitted 

James Russell Parsons jr Director 
Regents Offlce, Albany N. Y. Mar. 4, 1904 

APPENDIX 

1 DEOBEE8 00N7EBIIED BY THE nNIVZBBITT 

During the year the University has conferred the following 
degrees: 

Bachelor of divinity. On the following (18) graduates of Union 
Theological Seminary : 

Churchman, Arthur Brewer Langdon, Stephen Herbert 

Dunn, Alexander McCallum, John Archibald 

Field, Frank Edson Mangano, Antonio 

Fitch, Albert Parker Swift, Fletcher Harper 

Gleystien, William Henry Taylor, Harry Leroy 

Hoyt, John William, jr Tinker, Wellington Hutchinson 

Iverach, David Travis, Thomas 

Joseph, Oscar Loos Van Aken, Elbert Wayland 

Lang, David Williams, Daniel Jenkins 

'Sec Address and Proceedings National ESducational Association, 1903. 



r58 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Bachelor of arts. Ou the following (13) graduates of Adelphi 
College (literary roui-ne) : 

Aiiel, l^awline Marie Gniy, Teuii)erance 

Barber, Sam Matilda Greene, Katherine Sargent 

BlisH, Ida Ja)u Hodges, Kate Louise 

Burrows, Mary Hester MaeNary, Alice Beck with 

('oppins. Hazel Edna Mitchell, Marguerite 

Crane, William Albert Turner, Kate Estelle 
Frazer, Cii»orgt» 

On the following (2) graduates of Keuka College: 
Denicott, Grey Mason Hawks, Blanche I^oraine 

Bachelor of science. On the following graduate of Adelphi 
College: 

Kennerly, Martha Mason 

Bachelor of science in civil engineering. On the following (3) 
graduates of Clarkson School of Technology : 

Batchelder, Benjamin Franklin Sweet, George Gilbert 
Beswick, James Everett 

On the following (7) gi-aduates (2 in 1900 and 5 in 1903) of 
Mackenzie College, Sao Paulo, Brazil: 

Camj)ello, Hermillo Alvaro dos OrcMchia, Alexander Maurice 

Reis Saraiva, Eliejser dos Sanctos 

Cococi, Alexander Mariano Shaldei-s, Robert James 

Eppinghaus, Mario Hardt Sodi, Luiz Carlos 

Bachelor of science in electrical engineering. On the following 
(2) graduates of ( 'larkson School of Technology : 

Delack, Burton I^ewis Leiir, Fred Michael 

Bachelor of science in mechanical engineering. On the following 
(1) graduate of Clarkson School of Technology : 

Hodge, George Orvil 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r59 



Bachelor of library science. On the following (3) graduates of 
New York State Library School : 

Abbott, Etheldred Whitmore, Frank Hayden 

Hays, Alice Newman 

Doctor of medicine. On the following (8) graduates of the New 
York Medical College and Hospital for Women : 

Brant, Cornelia Chase Perry, Mabelle Jeanne 

Folley, Etta Potter, Mary Goddard 

Higbie, Annie S. Rosenfeld, Bertha Agnes 

Hull, Annie Melissa Wight, Lucy Osborne 

Doctor of dental surgery. On the following (48) graduates of 
the New York College of Dentistry^ : 



Beck, Louis I^eonard 
Beikel, Melville Jerome 
Bier, Sigmund 
Brown, Edwin Stanton 
Edwards, Le Roy Sherman 
Faupel, Charles 
Fiaschi, Piero 
Folkers, Oscar Herman 
Garner, William Francis, jr 
Got (fried, John Y. 
Grimm, Arthur 
Johnson, Emil John 
Ijevien, Edward Isaac 
Levy, Joseph 
Lichtenwalner, Charles 
Liebling, Samuel 
Lief, Jacob Feodor 
liOwenstein, Julius 
Luckie, Lorenzo Foster 



Mills, William Henry, jr 
Milsner, Henry 
Mork, Waldo Hutch ings 
Norcom, Clarence Martense 
Olsa, Victor 
Oi*tman, Max Jacob 
Oshalg, Isaac 
Kiinch^, Joseph Mota 
Rathfelder, Gottlieb Chris 
Raymond, Edward Holman, jr 
Schminke, Oscar 
Schwartz, Joseph Mortimer 
Schwarz, Frederick George 
Shnayerson, Edward 
Sloat, Julian Nicohis 
Smith, Augustus Collier 
Snitfen, Charles Peck 
Stillpass, William 
Stoney, Arthur Crawford 



^These degrees are j:rnnt(Hl hy t lie -trustees and directors on the reeoin- 
mendation of tbe faculty with fhe consent of the Repents of the University. 



r60 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



Tepper, Barney 
Tillou, Charles Wesley, jr 
Tomlinson, Edward Sperry 
linger, Nathan 
Wakefield, Robert 



Weinzweig, Isidor Charles 
Whaley, Edwin Grey 
White, Jacob 
Wolff, Simon Charles 
Zeitlen, Henry Morton 



On the following (10) graduates of the New York Dental 
School: 



Andrews, Marjorie 
Conkling, Walter Augustus 
Demarest, Harry Mott 
Fox, Charles Lewis 
Himowich, Esther 



Horwitz, Elizabeth Solomon 
Kuhl, Henry Andrew 
McCulloch, Earl C. 
McCulloch, Stephen 
Sabloff, Louis 



B UOEHBEB IBBXTED BY THE TTKIVEBBITY ON EXAMTHATIOH 

During the year the University has issued licenses as a result 
of state examinations to: 633 physicians (562 old school, 41 
homeopath, 30 eclectic) ; 176 dentists; 17 veterinarians ; 11 certi- 
fied public accountants. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r61 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Ang. 1, 1902-Tnly 31, 1903 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools in other states; group 3, 
schools in foreign countries. 

h means passed the examdnation with honor, i. e. at 90% or above in 
three fourths of the subjects. 



MASfE OF C ANlllPATK 




NEW YORK SCHOOLS 

Albany Medical College 

Bolt, Fre<l E , 

Boyd, Donald ^ 

Branan. J. Howurii 

Can^eld, John E, 

Chaniplin, El win. .,..............*.... 

Chamllen Henry Milligan , . 

ClemaDfi* Sylvester CornelK , . , , , . . 

Clute, Russell 

Faile<L 

Cullen. Archie Irving. , . 

Dougliva. Archibald John. 

Freutel , August John 

FftUed , 

Fail^. 

HofTman, Conmd Rowland 

Hovt, R. Burdett 

Hull. Harry Fisk. 

Johnwoiit Frank M ............................. . 

Keator, Frank ,,....... 

h MacDonald, Fretlerick Jcihn 

McGrane. Miles Ainbrpae. , 

Mar»li. Charles Richard. 

Maxon. Frank Clay, jr 

Ht^roliantk John Urapo. 

Merenes8, Harry Erie, jr 

O'Connor, Thomas Steplien AuguHtine 

O'Mi^ani. Mark M 

Hacette, Joseph Willian* 

Selleck, Virgil Dural 

Shafer, MillarJ Francis , 

Siblf*v^ Eldwio Forrest *...,♦... 

Sinitlt. tVank Templeton 

Bmith, Geori^e H ,..........,., ........ 

Vandttr Veer, James Newell ........ . ... 

Van Hoesent Iftaac Ernest 

Bdietrae Hospital Medical College, New York 
Hate, George Ray 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York 

Abel, Samuel 

Andrews, Warren Beecher 

Bama, Lewis 

Bayles, Howard Alfred 

Beck, Erich Carl Adolph 



i9as 

1008 

um 

11102 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1902 
1908 
1897 

igoa 

1903 
1699 

1898 
1903 
1003 

mm 

1908 
190JJ 
1908 
1903 
1908 

mm 

1898 

1908 
1308 
1003 
1903 
1908 
1908 
1908 



189H 



May 

May 

June 

Mav 

Sep. 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

May 

Jan. 

June 

June 

May 

May 

May 

Sep. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

Sep. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

Muy 

May 



St^p. 



1908 


June 


S 


1903 


June 


S 


1908 


June 


S 


1901 


June 


^ 


1908 


June 


s 



rG2 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (contmued) 



NAMB OP CANDIDATE 



a 


§ 




» 


^5 


^s 




CS 


®"S 


OflS 






5§ 


'4 

9i 


1 


•H 

o 
6 


1908 


Jiine 


S 


1 


1903 


Jau. 


S 


2 


1899 


Sep. 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1903 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


Sep. 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1900 


Sep. 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


May 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1900 


Jan. 


s 




1902 


Sep. 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1901 


Jan. 


S 1 


1908 


June 


S 1 


1908 


June 


S 1 


1908 


June 


s 


1 


1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1903 


June 


s 




1901 


Sep. 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


S 1 


1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


June 


s 




1902 


Sep. 


s 




1902 


Jan. 


s 




1894 


May 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


Sep. 


s 




1900 


May 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


Sep. 


s 




1903 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


Sep. 


s 




1903 


June 


s 





College of Phmieians and Surgeons (continued) 
Bentz, ( Jeorge Henrv 

Failetl * 

Bin^khead. James 

Blumgart. Leonard 

Bodenheimer, Milton * 

Borden, John Harvey 

Brennglass, Joiichini 

Brill, Abraham 

Brown, Alfred Jerome 

Brown, Frank ?>lwin 

Bugbee, Harry (Jreenwood 

Bullowa, Jesse (todfrey Moritz 

Burford, Mortimer Ciilliert 

Busck, Gunni Julius 

Chace, Arthur FreelK>rn 

Cochran, ( Juy Hunt 

Cocks, Gerhard Hutchison 

Cohen, Frank 

Corrigan, Henry John Cole 

David, Frank Haines 

Dodd, E<lward I^wis 

Doolittle. Willard Faster 

h Du Bois, Francis Ell)ert 

Dunseith, James Gracey 

Durham, Roger 

Erdwurm, l>auk 

Erskine, James Pendleton 

Fassett. Bryant Sloat 

Finch, Lew Henri 

Finn. Fre<leric Alovsiiis 

Failed '. 

Franklin. Louis 

Fried, Gustiiv Adolph 

Goldfrank. Freii 

Gould, (reorge Clifford 

Greif , Joseph 

Gross. Herman 

Failed 

Failed 

Huhn. (reorge Henry 

Hall, Diipree Meriwether 

Hamilton, Samuel Warren 

Hammer, Julius 

h Hauscom, Howard Chapin 

Harran, George Patrick 

Hart. George Graham 

h Haynes, Royal Storrs 

Hazay, Max 

Herlitzka, Louis 

// Higgius, Spencer Littlefield 

Hirsch, Isaac Seth 

Holdridge, Walter Henry 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r63 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (contituied) 



NAME or CANDIDATE 



College of PhusicianM and Surgeons (continued) 

Hort>witz, Israel 

h Huni^tlire V s. FretU-^rick Brown 

Hyde. James Samuel 

IrVitjg. Peter 

Kenti James Manniog 

h Kernan. Ji>]in Devereux, jr 

Kesself l^eo 

h KiDgsbury, Isaacs William 

Knipe, Joseph Bid ton 

Kuij)e, Willium Hugh Wellington 

Le Comte, John Kailwav 

Faile<l *. 

Leiter, Uorac-e Louis 

I^ent, Malcolm Foster 

Lesem. William Wolfe '. 

Failed 

Failed 

McCastlintv, William Henry 

Mr(,^>Hi>m, William K^ra 

:hIi-Fjii ImuL Williuut Uxof Irani 

Macnie. Jt>hu Silliman 

Meeker, Harold Deniuau r. 

Mitchell. Riibert Jai-k .' 

Mittendorf . William EtphinntoDo Keith 

Mortnn Elwood Stokes 

Mti^nthal. HeriKan Otto 

Murphy, Joseph Lk*ni.s 

Nelison. Natlmn William 

NicoU. Ijeonard Francris 

OwenK, Ge€:ir^e Coura<l 

Parkinson, James MiT >uvi(l 

Paterson. Douglas Camfibell 

Pelj^ramr tT©or(Bfp Oscar. 

Piers^^n, Henry Morton 

P**llak, Alfred William 

Quell, Jf *hn Adam 

Radin, Herman Theodore 

Recknagel. W^illiam E<lward 

Reinbardt. Emanuel 

Rigg>i. AusteiJ Fi ix. 

Eobms4m, Emanuel Marx 

RotlriguesCp Jc«epb A . Diazol 

Rokeacb, Aaron 

Eoeeottaum MorTi>* 

* Runyon, I^urance Phillip 

Saladino. Sebastian 

Scheina. Otto 

Bchenck. Garrett Kouweidioven W'illiamson 

Schnepel, George Augustus 

Seckel. Walter 

Silk, Morris 

Sinnott, Joseph John 




mm 
mm 
mrz 

UK)8 

mm 
mm 
iwm 
i9(m 
mm 

19i)« 

mm 
mn 

1VM)3 

mm 
mm 

1903 
1902 
1908 

mm 

1901 

\ms 

1902 

nm 

1H9H 
IHW 

mm 
mr2 
mm 
iwm 
mm 
mm 
mm 
mn 
mm 

UM)2 
UM)2 
1902 
1908 

nK)i 

1«.)02 
1908 
1895 
nK)8 
1908 
HK)8 
1W)8 

unm 

1901 
1908 
1902 
1902 
1908 



June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

Jan. 

Sep. 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sep. 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

Jan. 

Jime 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 



r64 



UNIVERSITY OP i;^B STATE OF NEW YORK 



Physioians licensed at ezaminationfl etc. (continued) 



NAME or CAN OIDATB 



a 

u 



c 
*- o 

SI 



I £ : = 

. 5 ' c 



OcikfK of Phj^metrimt ttnd Surgeons (continued) 

Smith* Darbon Het-rnmm'*.* 

Smith, T/^ff >v Jf^^riN**i 

Spanier. Louis 

Stern, Adolph 

Stork, Louis, jr 

Htryker, Fkljo^t^ da Mott. 

TavHs* Archibald William 

Tutiiek, I^iiilcin^ Sdimiim 

Twichell. iHivid Cue^hmaD 

Van Abtyiie* William IJeckiT 

Van Wart. PVanklin UriiHli 

Vftry Harvey Judson 

vonHiiffmatip Otto 

Walsh* Jama** Jtiwph Sebastian ^ 

Weygandt. Fred Gwjrge 

Wheeler. Alfreii W. . /. 

Wickham. Jt^^ph Nelstm 

Young, Jijseph WitJmm 

Zinsser, Hans 



mm 

19()3 

mn 

UH)8 
1908 
1903 
1902 
1903 
1908 
1908 
1901 
1W)1 
1902 
190;^ 
1908 



Conieil University Medical College, New York 

Banker, Ernest E liM)8 

Boettiger, Carl 1908 

Bugbee, Alice Gates 1\H)8 

Chapin, Charles Willard 1908 

Coryell, Clarence Catlin 1908 

Demarest. Ruth 1908 

Dolan, Paul 1908 

hh\K-A* ijL. Sijifmuml 1908 

/iFiiust. John Wt^h'V 1908 

Fi^lck^^ Harrv SHirk' 1908 

FisUer, Arcljf^ Max 1908 

Gettinger, Joseph Herman UH>8 

Gould, Chirk >SuTuner 1908 

Hertz, Julius Jacob 1908 

Hoeile. Hnriiri? PuiuiiT 1908 

Holt. CorlkH Mason 1902 

JacOiiiowit^, Maurice Arthur 1908 

Knaiiss. Clmrie.^ AVilliam 1902 

Kctnuaifl, Liiuis Moses ; 1908 

Ijevy. Abraham Aanm 1908 

Licht, Lull is Fii*ih*rick 1W>8 

Lippman, Thumfia Charles 1908 

Luflwig, RDl>ert Francis 1908 

— - ' " - 1908 

1908 
1908 
11M)8 
1903 
1903 
1\K)3 
1908 



ftMacle<Klt Murthtch Douglass. 
Mag]]], William Hemy. 
h Mosk ri witz , A t ir a ba oi . 

Pfeiffen William 

Quigley. James Knight. 
Romansky, Benjamin . . 
Rosenl>erg. Herman . . . 
Jluch, Valentine, jr 



Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jime 

June 

June 

June 

Jime 

Sep. 

Jime 

June 

Jime 

June 

June 

June 

Jime 

June 

June 

Jime 

June 

Jime 

June 

June 

June 



S 
S 

s 
-s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



8 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



COLLBGB DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rt>5 

Physicians licensed at examinations etc. {continued) 



NAME or CANDIDATE 




Cornell University Mediocd College (continued) 

SchwartKman, Saniyt?! 

Searing, B*.*njamiii Haff 

Seans, Keith , . , 

Sk»'r!ti'Wittrh. Abrahnm Marcus 

Smith. Jane Beck 

Stiefel. Isaac 

;?trac lihtt^n Abraham 

Sirei^p, Isaac 

Sullivan Micha^?! Just^ph 

Thorn ton » ^lary Frajices Deraismes 

Vi€ki*rif, Harry \ViJ!iam 

Vo^t, Walter Eugene 

?on 8buMx. Aniifi Tn^nf 

Vose, Royden Mandeville 



Weber, Etlward William 
Wilson, WiUets 
Wrigiit. Floyd Rt»bmH ... 
Zeiner, Eugeue Jerome . . 
h Z ticker, Mi:»rris 



1903 
1908 
1903 
1902 
1901 
1908 
1908 
1903 
1900 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1908 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 



Eclectic Medical College, New York 

Cohen, Louis 1903 

Dentsch Oiesar 1903 

h Dinciti. Hermnii 1901 

Frucha, Samuel Littman ! 1902 

Failed 1902 

Haas, Jacob 190:^ 

y^,.iT^^y ^nfrrrfrT .TntinTiT^ ' 1903 

Hollander. Frederick 11K)3 

h lanovici. Solomon | 1903 

h Kallmann Josepli I 1903 

Mills, Adelaiile . . . .- I 1903 

ScLwartx, Herman Benjamin j 1903 

St^hwarz. Wladrslsiw Josef Alfons I 1902 

Skou. Max Heiiry . . 1903 

iiturm, Maurice Arthur i 1902 

h Tienlcen, Henrietta Siebert ' 1903 

TurkeJ, Bertha Amelia 1903 



Ijmg Island College Hospital, Brooklyn 

Allen. lbaa€ Lathrrn' ; 1903 

Atwater, Henry Harrii*uu. jr 1902 

BackiLs, Harold* fiinieon , 1908 

Ba^-iin. Jolin Nicholas 1903 

liellowa, William Sanford 1900 

Bomiell, ClareiKt? Hornl>eck 1902 

Brown. Christopher William 1901^ 

Failed 1903 

Callalian, Dennis George 1903 

a Papers caacoled for attempted fraud. 

^ Examined in May 1901, Ikreiwe hoW fi»r voiuplet4on of requiremonts, 



June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 



May 

May 

May 

Sep. 

June 

June 

May 

May 

June 

May 

Mav 

May 

Sep. 

May 

Jan. 

May 

May 



June 

Sep. 

June 

May 

June 

May 

June 

June 

Jan, 



rC6 



UNIVERSITY OK TUB STATE OF NEW YORK 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



NAME OP CANDIDATK 



Long lalarul College Hospital, Brooklyn (continued 

Crawford. John Fancher 

Dexter. Thurston Hoj)kin.s 

D<x>ling. John FranciH 

Doyle, Francis Benedict 

Doyle. Francis Joseph 

Ellis, Alfred louder 

h Greeley, Horace 

(Iros^man. Max 

Henning, Walter Hannibal 

Hirsc^h, Henry 

Hirseinann, Walter Gotthard 

Johnston, Frank Alford 

Kirby, George H 

Konther, Adolph Frederick 

Lewis, Orville Nelson 

Long, John Hathaway 

Longmore, John Alva 

Failed 

Mclntyre, Henry Blodgett , 

h MacNaughton, Donald Stuart 

Panoff , Charles Edward 

Prendergast, Francis Aloysius 

Raphaelson, Samuel Joshua 

Rauh, Maximilian Thomas 

Rissmeier, Charles F 

Failed 

Schoenfeld. Morris 

Short. Samuel 

Taylor, Richard Augustus 

Telfair, John Hamilton 

/* Tilney, Frederick 

Tong, George William 

Trurapp, Theodore Frederic 

Van Winkle, Le Roy Powell 

Walker. Charles James 

/* Walling. William Fletcher . . . . 




New York Homeojxithie Medical College 

h Benson, Reuel Allan 

Blair, Thomas Dalzell 

Failed 

Chaml)ers, Merritt Go<Klricli 

Cook, Edgar Baldwin 

Datesman, Clarence Wilson 

Ekings, Frank Parker 

Folwell, Judson Kincaid 

Fox, Robert Campbell 

Gates, James Moseley 

Hicks, Thomas Sheldon , 

Ingalls, Orlando Du Bois , 

Johns, Miles Wendell ,.,,.,,.... 



1903 

1901 

1903 

1903 

1902 

1902 

1908 

1902 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1899 

1902 

1903 

1903 

1901 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1897 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1JK)3 

1901 ' 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 



1903 
1903 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1898 
1902 
1908 
1903 



June 

Sep. 

June 

May 

May 

Jan. 

May 

Jan. 

June 

May 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

May 

June 

Sep. 

June 

May 

May 

June 

May 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jime 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

May 

May 



June 

May 

Jan. 

May 

June 

May 

May 

May 

June 

May 

Sep. 

June 

June 



S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

8 

s 
s 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r67 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



NAME OP CANDIDATE 



New York Hanwopathu' Medical Collect (cont'd) 

Rella^g E<lwiri Welles 

LcHti, Francist^u Garcia Pereira 

NicIhjIs. Walter Edmond 

/* Perrin. William 

Richardson. Arthur W^y^ 

a h Hcott, Sidney L 

Tytler, James £*l^*in 

A'Wabh, Jaiiit^ , 

Wbitnoy t Jeorge Winter 

Wilkes. Arthm- Chalmt*rs. 



a 

<M O 



New Yfprk Medical College and Hospital for Women 

Brant, Cornelia C 

Klenk. 8oidiie Gottliel)e 

No * i^nski. Anna MaKd 

Perry, Blalielle Jeanne 

Potter. Marv Gijildard 

Koilenbiirg, Daisy T?<iit>elle Whittemore 

Roftimf eld,' Bertha Agnes 

Wight, Lucy Osborne 



New York University, medical department 
Failed 



Suraciise University, medical lU^partvumt 

At^aier. Ihivid Hajstirigs 

Bray ton. Harry J 

Cane. Howard Gregory 

Ouniss, Charles Erwiii 

Davis. Walter Waiiaui 

Foster, Penrl Mary 

GfuKJwin, Clinton EtUly 

Ball, wniiam Fitt. 

Hail' IT Welcome A 

Hart Ijisher 

Haviland, Frank Ross 

Lenalmn, lliigJi iia^^aii 

Levy Jacob JfJsUua . . , 

Neville, William Hurry 

Nichols, Fn^derick OerU 1 1 

Palmer, .lofiepU CoolidgP 

Qtim^kenbufi^kn CamilUfc, 

Rh hmond, Schuyler Parshall 

SeeJy, Jennie Gray .^ 

Short, John Wesley 

Smith, Fred*^rick William 

Steers. Cynthia 

Stephens George Henry , 

Stev\'art, Alexander MeLtiren 

Stone, Fr©<lerick Darwin 

W-ood, Karl Dwight 

a Also holds diploma from University of Virifinia IWl. 



1903 
liK)l 
1903 
liK)l 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 



1903 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1902 
1903 
1903 



1889 



1902 
1W)3 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
HK)3 
im^ 
1903 
ltK)3 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
nH)3 
nK)3 
liK)3 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 



ea 




^B 




^5 




OQ 




l\ 


1 





ffl 


June 


H 


Jan. 


H 


June 


H 


1 Jan. 


H 


Sep. 


H 


May 


S 


May 


H 


May 


H 


June 


H 


May 


H 


June 


H 


Sep. 


H 


Jan. 


H 


June 


H 


May 


H 


June 


H 


May 


H 


June 


H 


Jan. 


S 


Mav 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


Jime 


S 


June 


S 


June 


S 


June 


8 


June 


S 


Juno 


S 


June 


s 


June 


s 


June 


s 


June 


s 


Jmie 


s 


June 


s 


June 


s 


June 


s 


June 


s 


June 


s 


Juno 


s 



r68 



UNIVERSITY OF THB STATE OF NEW YOBK 



Physioians lioenied at examinations etc. (continued) 



NAME or CANDIDATB 




Univfjrsituand Hellevue Hasp. MetL Coll., Neio York 

AiiflpitK. Martiu 1903 

Ik^maOp Allyn Hoyt 1902 

BoYoe. William Edgar 1908 

failed 1903 

Caplof*, Byrou H 1903 

Failed 1903 

Failed 1903 

Dimovan^ John Jt.«eph 1902 

Edmonds, Fmiiris CharleH 1903 

ElkiuH, Charles Edwanl 1903 

Finleyp Clyde Alexander 1908 

FredorlckHJiri Victor 1902 

Qessner, Frank Edwanl 1903 

Failed 1903 

Golding, Joeepli Edwanl 1903 

Hathewaj, Ctat^not^ Morris 1903 

Heitliiijft^r, John Anthony 1903 

Herrinian, Rudolph Francis 1903 

Failed 1903 

Hogan, Austin 1902 

Horowitz, Nathan Meyer 1908 

Kahn, Moses 1903 

Karmiohl, Louis 1903 

Katzman. Adolph Samuel 1902 

Keller, Henry 1908 

Kim ball. Charles Denny . _ 1902 

lightetone, Abmharu 1902 

h MeQoTernp Ivouis Vint^ent 1902 

MoGowan* J**lin James , , , 1903 

h Mi^Kemia, Henry Jus«*plT 1901 

Manilel Arthur Rudolpli 1902 

Mendlowttx, Hi^rman , 1903 

Mucney, Ixniis Mor>;ati 1899 

Nagle,^ Jainei* Franklin 1903 

Nelson, Frederick I^wrence 1903 

Parce. Alexander Dwight 1908 

Perhnau Alax 1903 

Pick, Kudolph Emanuel 1903 

Potter, James Harry 1900 

Heese. Harvev Lawrence 1903 

h RichardSp Ealph Tu ylur 1908 

8c^idri>n. SamueJ Jerome 1908 

Schrift, Joseph i 1908 

Failed | 1908 

Schwartz, Herman ! 1908 

Btiles, Jame.s Walter, jr 1902 

Stolworthy WiHiam Clegg 19aS 

Strack, Gustave 1908 

Thome, WIllmTii Psiltf^rw>u 1902 

Tracy, Edwanl Murray 1908 

Faile<l 1908 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

Jime 

June 

June 

Jime 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 



COLLBGB DBPABTMBNT BBPOBT 1903 rG9 

Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



HiJU or OAN&IDATB 




Unii'ermtf/ and BeUetnw fff/sp. Med. Coil. (txiDtM) 
Wenger, Le Roy Joeeph ChartaH .................. 

WaMtoo, Henry R«^uben , ,...,., . , , . 

Wett*»rvik* Filip Johiui. 

Yoiuig, Warren Uaatiiigs, 



UHhytTttity of Btiffah, rneilicai tUiiMS;t'ifiieiit 
Ablxjtt. Charles E*lwartt 

Failed , , 

Bealfl* Oareoee 

R*llefK 

Bishop, John L , 

Bond^ Charles lisle , . , 

Bush, Elliot . - . 

Cole, Frouk Oliver 

Omniuings, Carlod Emmuns . . . . 



Faileil 

Drozeski, Edw^anl Henry .... 

Duohsoheren Clarem-e Uliriwtoplier , 
Eisenhart. James E. ............... , 

Fischer, George Louis 

Fraser* David Earl , 

Gibson, May , 

GilHck, Edward Eugene 

Graf, Hertnati F 

HappeU, Jaiaes McAndrew 

Hardy, Glenn H 

Hanifi, Albert Jabesh 

Horton, Eugene B , 

Jones, Frank ,,,,,.,.,.,.,,......,. 

Kyaor, Leon M 

Mead. Eva V..... .., 

Munri:*, John Wesley ,,,.,., 

Palmer, All*ert William , , 

Parme liter, Frederick James. 

Purcell, Fred Cole 

Putnam. Edwin David 

/* Re^ster^ Hyatt 

Eif^senfeld, Edwin Albert , 

Roberts. Carroll Jnlian , 

Roberts, Hibliert Rif?e 

Backrider, John Raymond . . , , . 

Shreve^ Owen Malcom 

h Himjiaon, Burton Thome 

Storct, Edward Hugo , 

A8ueas, Chris Lester. ..... . 

Swerdfeger, George Calvin 

Veeder, Willard Hall 

h Villiaume, L. Edward ........... 

Washburn, John LewiB 

Weed. Harry Milton ..-,.. 

a Papers canceled for attempted fraud. 



1903 

ittoa 

tOOB 
190B 



mm 

IIKIB 
180B 
1908 
1903 

mm 

190B 

190B 

1903 

190B 
1993 

190B 
190B 

mm 
mm 

IINJH 

mm 
nm 
mm 
mm 
mm 
mn^ 

1903 

iiKia 
mvs 
mm 
nion 
mxA 
mm 
mm 
mm 

1992 
1893 

190H 
19<)9 
I9«nj 
HKIB 
19(J3 
190B 
1903 
1903 



June 
June 
June 
June 



Jan . 

Jan. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

Juiie 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

Juno 

May 

Jan. 

May 

May 

8ep. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

Mar 

May 



1*70 UNIVERSITY OF TUB STATE OF NEW YORK 

Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



NAME OP <'AM»IDATK 



i *^o 
I mas 



OS3 

si 



Sl'llOOI^S IN OTHER STATES 

California 

rnin'i'Hitp of (Uilifnnua, nied. dcp't, San FrancmH} 
Diiikelspiel, E^lgar 



Colorado 

OrosH Medical Collcyv, I)eni*t'r 
Friesner, Isidort' 



Connecticut 

Yah' rnirersity, mrdical dcpdrtinent, AV/r Haven 

Costello. Patri(;k Vinront 

E<i\vanls, (rjuston EIolcouilx? 

Foster. Dean 

Maroney. William John 

Moore, John David 



District of Columbia 

Columbian I University. Washington 
C-ostello. Michael E 



Georgetown Cniversity. Washington 

Kingston, Augustine Thomas Vincent 

Walker. William Henry 



Howard University, Washington 



Georgia 

Atlanta Medical College 



Failed 
Morgan, William Alexander 



Georgia (^allege of Eclectic Med. and Snrg., Atlanta 
Durham, Arta Bowen 



University of Georgia, medical department, Augttsta 
Shapiro, Isiiiah Raphael 



Illinois 

American Medical Missionary College, Chicago 
Patterson, Louise 

Chicago Homeopathic Medical College 

Kendrick. Chalmers Nash 

dSandall Laurel B 



1HW> 



nm 



mn 

1902 
18^)9 
liKK) 

nm 



19(W 



1902 
1902 



1903 



1894 
1897 



1888 
1901 

1899 



1898 
1895 



Sep. 



Sc^p. 



May 
May 
Sep. 
Jan. 
Mav 



Mav 



May 
Jan. 



June 

Mav 
Sep. 

Jan. 
Jan. 

May 



May 
June 



I 



H 
S 



flPapenscanooled for attempted fraud. . ^. ^, , .^„ ^, ^.^ 
dAiao holds diploma from Detroit CoWog^ ol U<idVQ\xx^^l«\Oa\«wi>»A. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1003 

Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



r71 



' NAME OF CANDIDATE 




College of PhysicianH ami Sunjcons, Chicago 
(medical depart men t, Illinois University) 
Osness, Abraham M 



Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital of Chicago 
Faile<l 



Failed. 



Illinois Mcdicid College, Chicago 



Rusli Media 1 1 College, Chicago 

Bjiniesby, Perc^y Norman 

CToldl»erg, Josej)h I^njamin 

Jameson. Curtiss Nortcm 



FaiUni. 



Indiana 
Fort Wayne College of Medicine 



Iowa 

Drake (^niirrsify, medical dcjHirt men t, Des Moines 
Plummer, Harry E])liraiin 



Kentucky 

Ijonisville Medical College 

Anderson. John Cameron 

Jenkins. Amon R^ithbim 



Cnivt'rsily of Ijfnisrillc, medical deiMirtment 
Halsev. Bruce Frarv 



Maine 

Boirdoin College, medical deitartmcnt, Brunswick 
Failed ; 



Maryland 

Baltimore Mrdind ( 'ollege 

Allen. Wilmot B 

Carr. F-mory Ward 

Galla>i;her. James L 

Keating, John J(»sej)h 

Knight. Herliert AN ileox 

Nisonotr, Ix)uis I 

Osg<KMl. Walter Won Is worth 

Smith, Houghton Currier 

Tliomas. Emery Jordan 



1H82 I Jan. 

I 



mn June 



IHi»7 Mav 
lS^<l Jan. 



liK)l Jan. 



1892 ! June 



S 
S 



Baltimore l^nirersity Schottl of Medicine 

Blitzer, Nathaniel 

Levine. Louis Joseph 

Failed 

Rogers, Charles T. Gmham 



IHOH 
1902 
1902 
1898 

mn 

1902 

i9oa 

1902 



Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

May 

Jan. 

June 

Jan. 



I 



urn Sep. 
1898 1 June 
IIHK) June 



8 
S 
S , 



1 

11 
1 



p72 



UNIVBRSITT 07 THE 8TATB OF NEW YORK 



Phydcians lioenied at examinations etc. (oawtinued) 



NAME or CANDIDATE 


^1 


Date of 
examination 


1 


6 


Callfye of Phffmciam and Surgeons, Baltiftwre 
ColtifT. utHirgi* KirUy . 


1900 
1902 
1903 

1901 
1902 
1902 
1908 
1908 
1901 

1901 
1901 

1908 
1902 
1908 

1902 
1900 
1901 

1900 
1899 

1900 
1908 
1888 
1900 
1902 
1901 
1883 
1901 
1902 
1894 

1898 
1902 


Jan. 
May 
June 

Sep. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jime 

Jime 

May 

Sep. 
May 

June 

Jan. 

June 

Sep. 
Sep. 
Sep. 

Sep. 
Sep. 

June 

June 

May 

Sep. 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

Sep. 

May 

Jan. 

Jan. 
Sep. 


S 
S 

s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

s 
s 

s 
s 
s 

s 

H 

s 
s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

8 

s 
s 
s 
s 

s 
s 


1 


Doliin, Aiiiinnv John 


1 


h Sprague, F^lwanl Wharton 


1 


Johns Hopkins Unii^ersity, medicdl iiept, Baltimore 
Berry, John Mc Williams 


1 


Glt»nnv, W. Harrv 


1 


Karsted, Alfml * 


1 


h Lftiig, U^jni V [) 


1 


h Kainfortli. 8i4ilon Irwin 


1 


Warren, George William 


1 


Mariiland Mtfiiml College, Baltimore 


1 


BdtmMfftiJmeh, Arthur Jac^kHon Melchior 


7 


School of Med. of the T^in'v. of Maryland, Baltinupre 
Lakin, Harry Allen 


1 


Rosenthal, Morris 


1 


Villainil. Felix 


1 


Massachusetts 

Boston University, school of medicine 
Abbott, Sasan fkigar 


1 


Bamanl. Ksther Subia 


1 


Purmort, Jennie Grace 


1 


College of Physicians and Surgeons, Boston 
DaviH, Arthur Fletcher 


ft 


Failed 


1 


Harvard Unirersitif, medical school, Boston 
Bedell, Charles E f . . 


1 


Benner, Richard Stanwcxxl 


1 


Bryant, William S<ihier 


1 


/* Com well, Herbert Cerda de Vilarrestjin 


1 


h Feldsteiii, Samuel 


1 


A Griffltlifl, AUiLHt Faruswortli 


1 


HulibanL Kntu^ P 


1 


Moxom, Philip Wilfrid Travis 


1 


Faile<l 


2 


Warren, Hobjirt Endicott 


1 


Tufts College, medical school, Boston 
Oehris, Os<'ar Thompson 


2 


Michigan 

Detroit College of Medicine 
Power, William Thomas 


1 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r73 

Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



NAMS 07 OANDIDATB 



It 

SB 



a 
o-g 

|l 



University of Michigan^ Ann Airbor 

Allen, Florence Elizabeth 

Armstrong, William Coleman 

Beck, Edwin G. H 

Douglas, Sumner Egbert 

Findlay, Jessica W , 

Gleason, John E 

Inch, Greorge Franklin 

Neal, Thomas Alvin 

Failed 

Smith, De Verne Churton 

Wallace, George Barclay 



Minnesota 

CoU, of Homeo. Med. and Surg., Univ. of Minnesota, 

Minneapolis 
h Mitchell, Roy Ernest 



College of Med, and Surg., Univ. of Minnesota, 
Minneapolis 
Bebb, Rose Anne 



Missouri 

American Medical College, St Louis 
Gil)son, Helen Frances 



St Louis Med. Coll., med. dep*t of Washington Univ. 

St Louis 
De Lisser, Glenwood Medcalfe 



University of Missouri, medical dept, St Louis 
Munday, Bert 



Ohio 

Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College 

Warren, Richard Cornell 

Watson, Frederick CuHhman 



Medical College of Ohio 
(University of Cincinnati) 

Nye, Albert F 

Sturm, Max 



Oregon 

Willamette University, Portland 
Davis, Sherman T 



Pennsylvania 

Hahnemann Medical Coll. and Hospital, Philadelphia 

Hall. Edwin Perry 

SnodgrasSi Jolm Elmer 

Thomson, Thomas Leonard 



1899 
1893 
1908 
1908 
1889 
1908 
1895 
1901 
1870 
1903 
1897 



1901 



1897 



1901 



1897 



1899 



1903 
1896 



1897 
1889 



1885 



19a3 
1903 



May 

May 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

May 

June 

Jan. 



Jan. 
Sep. 

May 

Jan. 
June 



May 
Sep. 



Jan. 
May 



June 



June 
June 



H 



E 



H 
H 



1 
1 



rT4 



UNIVERSITY OP TUB STATE OP NEW YORK 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc 



NAMK OF ('ANDIDATK 



Jeffermu MedUnd College, Philadelphia 

Frietlmiin Aiirori 

Goildiirril. Knmris Wnylauiil 

Helil. IftiJure Williuin 

LttngstratJ Francis Wani, jr 

toalv^ Justin D 

Rkohartls. J* »Un David 

Wagner, John J 



Medico-ch inirgical College of Phdailelphia 

Bircliard, Fred Sherman 

Loutfian. John 



I tun r St Iff of PenuHi/hnnia, Philiidelphia 

AJbuFK^r, Henry Rihl 

AJlweitJ, John Howard 

Andrus. Waltf-r Hiisk*^ll 

Reir, Uy HtttM^ttlt^rK. . - - 

Bontet^iti, IJuwell Sy 1 ve?tter 

Clark, William I^umnct* 

Cullinnii, Hi/ury Molynoux. 

Fij*h, Harry S|jauldiiig 

Oreen, Herlwyn Huggles 

Howard, Tinker. .......,*. 

James, Harry >lurra7 

^1 Kflrsmert llrtwurd Tlioma** 

Kearney, James Anthony 

Lindsay, (Vorgc^ H unn 

Lippincott, Widtt*r Crbpin 

Lummis, Marshall Flower 

McCaskey, Donald (iill>ert 

>lt» lary \Sumuelr **d 

McKelway. John Irvine 

Muj'kimK'V, William Humphrey 

Mead. Kalph Kluknitr 

Nielsen, l>ouis Fi<^rnhard 

Pursel, William Dana 

Kiggin, Lev Litre 

KfiSH. Napoleon BertnLmL 

Say bolt. William Frydt*rit^ 

Shoemaker. Harlan 

Bkillern, Penu-Uaskell, jr. 

Smitlv, Lloyd Llewellyn 

Stimaon* George William. 

Tarl>cjx> Harry RuHnell 

Thoma?+. Ben jaiiiin Abniham 

ThompsJOn. Wellinj^on Andrew 

Van Dyke* Jost^ph Smith, jr , 

Wttiner, Albert Ferrt^ 

Woods, Arthur Uoy 

Young, James Harrington 



3. {continued 






c 

*1 


c 
o 

II 

•^ as 
0) 


2 
1 


o 

o 


1902 
11K)1 


Sep. 
June 


S 

s 


1 
1 


mrz 


S<»p. 


s 


1 


\sMn 


Jan. 


s 


I 


1H82 


Jan. 


s 


1 


1897 


Jan. 


s 


1 


1H97 


Jan. 


s 


2 


1908 


June 


s 


1 


1902 


Sep. 


s 


1 


1903 
1892 
1908 


Sep. 
May 
June 


s 
s 
s 


1 

2 

1 


1902 
1903 


Sep. 
Sep. 
June 


s 
s 
s 


1 

1 
1 


HK)3 


June 


s 


1 


190:^ 


June 


S ' 1 


11K)8 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




IWW 


Sep. 
June 


s 

s 




1908 


June 


s 




1902 


Mav 


s 




nK)8 


June 


s 




UK)1 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




iwm 


June 


s 




1897 


St»p. 


s 




liH)3 


June 


s 




HK)8 


June 


s 




19(W 


June 


s 




IVK)1 


Jan. 


s 




1900 
1908 


Sep. 
June 


s 
s 




nH)2 


Jan . 


s 




1902 


June 


s 




liK)8 


June 


s 




1901 


Jan. 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




HK)8 


June 


s 




UM)3 


June 


s 




UN)8 


June 


s 




1908 


June 


s 




1898 


Jan. 


s 




nK)8 


June 


s 




1«.M)1 


May 


s 





COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r75 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



NAME OK CANDIDATK 




M'cfttcrn l*cinisj/ft'ouia Medical CoUegCy Pittsburg 

Foster, Kli Norniaii 

SapirsKMii, Naliuni I^eon 

Womau's Mat. Coll. of PninHylvauia, Philfiflrlphia 

Itniicroft, Mrtbol Harvey Falk 

( 'onaiit. Mary Chilton 

Iliiitze. Anne An;;nsta .^ 

I*ottor. PMlen C'nlver * 

S|M'ncer. Klizabeth C 

Storm, Katliorino Ixniise 

Tennessee 

Cuivcrffitif of the Houthy Sviranre 

lUirk lo, Lonis 

I loenlierjr, Bornard 

Vandnbilt (■nirersitif, yaahvillc 
Jonos. Anizl 

Vermont 

I'uivn'Hitii of Vrnntmt, Burlington 

Avery, John Waile 

Crnnib, Jaynes Mott 

Finney. Franli Floyil 

FaiUni 

Preston, Franli 

Stafford, Jonathan Mather 

Virginia 

1 nivcrsity of Virginia, (liarlottcHrillr 

Re<-lvwith. Jnlian Unttin 

Mc<»av(K'k, Edward Pointer 

a 

Spiller, William II 

SCHOOLS IX FOU?:iCrN COUNTRIES 
Austria-Hungary 

Vnivcrsitg of Vienna, Aufttria 

Feucrstein, Elias Selig 

1 lusserl, Siegfried 

Canada 

MrGill Inirrrsitj/, Montreal 

naillie. Saninel Alexan<ler 

(Gardner. Robert Lome 

KiKsane. John William 

Maby, WMlliam John 

(KXeilK James Michael 

a Requirements not yet fully met. 



PJOH 
1892 



1899 
1903 
1908 
1903 
1893 



1901 
1901 



1900 



1897 
1902 
1902 
18^)8 
1903 
1896 



1899 
1893 
1899 
1894 



1887 
1900 



1902 
1901 
1903 
1903 
1903 



Jan. 
Sep. 

Sep. 



June 

Jan. 

Jiin. 

Jan. 

June 

Mav 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Sep. 



Jan. 
Sej). 



Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 



r76 



UNIVBRSITY OF THB 8TATB OF NBW YORK 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. {oontintied) 



NAMK or CANDIDATE 



Ontario Medical College tor Women^ Toronto 
Connor, Emma 



Queen^s University, Kingston 

Allison, David Menibery 

Bell, t^ederick McKelvey 

Gage, James Edgar 

Haskin, Byron 

Pritchard, John Albert 



^1 
II 

ft 



Trinity Medical College, Toronto 

Cook, Albert Herman 

Service, Herbert Ezra 



Trinity University, Toronto 
Farewell, Norman Engene 



University of Toronto 

Frederick, Ernest Victor 

Graef, Charles V 



190271 



1900 
1903 
1898 
1903 



Pirie, George Robinson. 
Smith, Everett Glbbs... 
Vivian, Reginald Percy. 



England 

Royal College of Surgeons 

Licensed Royal College Physicians, London 



MacLeod, James Alexander 

France 
Academy of Paris 



Goldman, Malca 

Germany 

University of Berlin 

Ewh, Eugene 

Gutmann, Hugo 

Heimann, Max 

Weis, Arthur U 



University of Giessen 
Heckmann, Jacob 



University of Kiel, Prussia 
Klein, Hugo Oswald , 



University of Munich 

Failed 

Failed 

Ruppert, Franz Caspar 

aUequlremeats not yot fully met. 



1903 
1902 



1897 



1903 
1896 
1903 
1901 
1892 
1899 



1902 
1902 



1891 
1896 
1896 
1901 



1896 
1897 



1903 
1892 
1899 



11 



1903 June 



Jan. 



Jan. 
June 
Sep. 
May 



June 
Jan. 



Jan. 



June 

Jan. 

June 

May 

June 

June 



[May 
May 



Sep. 
Jan. 
Sep. 
June 



Sep. 
Jan. 



June 
June 
June 



S 
S 
S 

s 

S 
H 



-3 



COLLBGB DBPARTMBNT BBPORT 1903 



r77 



Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



VAUm OF CANDIDATE 



d 


§ 




^5 


v.:p 




053 


00s 






II 




n 


1897 


Sep. 


E 


1898 


Jan. 


S 


1895 


Jan. 


E 


1902 


May 


S 


1897 


Sep. 


E 


1896 


Sep. 


S 


1898 


May 


E 


1898 


Sep. 


S 


1876 


June 


E 


1894 


June 


E 


1897 


Jan. 


E 


1888 


May 


S 


1908 


June 


S 


1908 


June 


S 


1892 


Jan. 


S 


1899 


June 


S 


1889 


Jan. 


s 


1895 


May 


s 


1891 


Jan. 


s 


1899 


June 


s 


1895 


Jan. 


E 


1900 


Sep. 


E 


1900 


June 


s 


1898 


May 


E 


1878 


May 


E 


1900 


Jan. 


E 


1898 


Jan. 


E 


1897 


May 


E 


1902 


June 


S 


1900 


Sep. 


S 


1898 


May 


s 


1886 


May 


s 


1900 


June 


E 


1901 


June 


s 


1895 


June 


s 


1898 


Jan. 


s 


1894 


Sep. 


s 


1891 


June 


s 


1900 


Jan. 


s 


1901 


June 


s 



Italy 

University of Bologna 
Righl, Simplicio 



University of Genoa 
Figallo, Agostino 



University of Naples 

Atonna, Carmine 

Albano, Giuseppe 

Capobianco, Lnigl 

Cavallaro, Antonino 

Failed 

Colacurcio, Nicola 

D'Auibrosio» Luigl 

D*Angelo, Raffaele 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

DeStefano, Oreste 

Donati, Giuseppe 

Doyno, Gennaro 

Fabiani, Vincenzo Giuseppe 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Mannarino, Vincenzo 

Mastroberti, Gaetano 

Failed 

Milite, German© ; 

Failed 

Sabatino, Achille 

Sammarelli, Gaetano Francesco 

Sparano, Crennaro 

Testa, Gustavo 

Failed 

Tppolito, Gennaro 

Viggiani, Michele 

Zito, Luigi 



University of Palermo 
Barabini, Gioachino 

Failed 

Busardo, Galcedonia 

Cassata, Giuseppe 

Purpura, Giuseppe A 

Failed 

Viola, Emanuele 



a Seven ejcamlnations before state board. 7> First eifflit examinations before state 
board, e First examination before state board, d First two examinations before state 
board.^ 'e First three examinations before state board. 



1-78 UNIVEKSITY OF TlIK STATE OF NEW YORK 

Physicians licensed at examinations etc. (continueil) 



NAMK OF (ANDIIIATK 


a 


^1 


1 


o 
c 


f uinrHity of Turin 
Colloni, Nicolo 


if iiil li 11 ill 1 if 


Jan. 
Sep. 

June 
June 
Jan . 
June 

Jan. 
June 

Jan. 
Jan. 

June 
May 
Jan. 

Jan. 
Sep. 


S 

s 

s 
s 
s 
s 

s 
s 

s 
s 

s 
s 
s 

s 
s 


»> 


Te<le«i-o, (iujjlielinu 


1 


Roumania 

f iiinrsitff of Ifurhartst 

Slelnl»acli, Olpi Knpystynska 

Steinlmcli, Simon 


1 

1 


Steiner. Saul 


1 


Failnl 


3 


! nirrrfiitjf of Yu-ssif 
(Jranet, A<lolf 


I 


MeiMel. Ainii A 


1 


Russia 

Imprrial I Hirrrsity of Jurivf (Dorpat) 

Frl(Mlnian. <riMllde Ahraiiani 

LaiKla, Micliael Saul <; 


o 
3 


Imprria! 1 inrrrsUff of Hfiarkor 

Lehman. Isaias 

Uacliii, Maurict* L * * . 

Kosenson. Leon 


1 
1 
1 


I iiircrsitjf of ^^^rs(nr 
KIs(»nsla<ll. Ahraiii Zundel 


1 


Scotland 

Rf^l/nl Coll. of r/ij/sirians and Sutf/cons, IJtlinhiirf/h 

FavuJtif of Phiffiicinns and Suifjrons, (ilasijoic 
Flaiiajran, Jolm ^ 


1 


• 





COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r79 



Candidates in partial examinations Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

(Jroup 1, New York schools; gi-oup 2, schools in other stiitos; group 3, 
schools la foreign countries 



NAME OF CANDIDATH 



NEW YORK SCHOOLS 
Albanif Mrdiral CoUvfjr 



Bas<h. Samuel II. 1?. 

Hhickfiiii, Kenneth Dnni*'! 

rotter, John Isaac 

C\>well, Walter Allen 

Croissant, Ch:irli'>< Aii^tjsttis. .. . 

l*tK-kj^lntlpr Theixlm-e UsivUl 

Lkiiuili'^e, Patrick J<>hr 

yiyiin. Thomas Joseph, jr 

(;arl«Mk. IVrlia Elijah 

Hacker, Charles William Louis. 

HemstnH*t. Chester Arthur 

Hull. Thurnian Alson 

llurh'y. Frank James 

Kline. Arthur Charles 

Larson, Oscar F 

FaiitMl 

FaiU»<l 

Howe, Henry S. jr 

Uulison. Harry 

S<-hnyh'r. A. Hamilton 

Singleton. Henjamin J 

Stjii»l(»ton, Edward Augustine... 

Sw(H^»t, Charles Clark 

Thoma.s, Arthur Wesley 

Wat<»rhury, Uoscih* Conkling. . . . 

Wilson, Edwin Harnes 

WilsdU. <;uy Vail 



CoH^ffc fff I*hi/siri(nis ami Sitrfjrfnts, \rir York' 

Ass<»idH'imer, Edward Minturn 

Harker. rrn^t^vn Mnrtin 

Uarrett, I'i'ederick Jani^-s 

Bartow. Jtireiire Wlillteniore 

Henn«'tt. John Alhert 

FaiUnl 

Blauner. Sanim»l 

RlfKk, Mark 




Bonynge, Henry Arthur 

Braun, Jacoh 

Br«*e<l, Robert Huntington 

Brown. Rolw»rt Meri<la 

Burrows. Water** Field 

By 111 Fnuit'U Otway 

Chauiherlntii, A inw Rending. .. 

Villi u A fre*l Elufitoiii 

Ctoninilskey, I^> Jahii Jost^ph. 
Cramp, Wiilkr Concemore 



June 

Mav 

May 

Juno 

May 

June 

June 

May 

June 

June 

May 

Mav 

Mav 

May 

May 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Mav 

May 

May 

Sep. 

Jan. 

May 

Jan. 

Mav 

MaV 

MaV 



Jan. 
June 
June 
June 
Juno 
June 
St*p. 
June 
June 
.June 

June 

s,.,,. 

Hei.. 

June 

May 

Sep. 

Sep. 



r80 



UNIVBB8ITY OF THB STATB OF NEW YORK 



Candidates in partial examinations etc. {continued) 



NAMB OF CANDIDATB 



College of Physicians and Surgeons (cont'd) 

De Klyn, Charles Campbell 

Emory, George Bache 

Fassett, EMwin Charles 

Fichter, Louis 

Finkelstein, Harry 

Friedman, Uarry Jacob 

Gellert, Samuel 

(Jerster, John Carl Arpad 

(loldstone, Karl Harold 

Graham, Henry Flack 

Harbeck, Charles John. 

Hardenberg, Daniel Sayer, jr 

Harrigan, Anthony Hart 

Harris, Louis Israel 

Hellman, Alfred M 

Holthausen, William Frederick 

Horowitz, Philip 

Hutchinson, Robert Hamilton, jr 

Hyman, Abraham 

Jacobs, Louis 

Jarcho, Julius 

Kaliskl, David John 

Keller, Sidney Clarence •. 

Knapp, Clinton Beecham 

Ijcvy, Julius 

Tjewis, Murney Edward 

TiOhman, William Henry 

Mabey, J. Corwln 

Failed 

Mount, Walter Barclay 

O'Connor, John Charles 

Schllvek, Kaufman 

Schulman, Maximilian 

Failed 

Stevens, Carol Tefft 

Stevens, Harry Harrington 

Valentine, Julius John 

Vandenberg, Joseph 

Ward, Wilbur 

Waterman, William Whitney 

White, Davenport 

Wilson, Frederic Hart 

Wise, Fred 

Woodruff, Isaac Ogden, jr 

Woolley, James Stanley 

Wright, Harold Walgrave 



Cornell University Medical College, New York 

Aranow, Harry 

Armstrong, Arthur Soper 

Becker, Damas Brough 

Berafeld, Samuel Joachim , 



a 
o 




3 


«1 




5 


II 


■§ 


^ 


Q H 


i 


o 


o 


& 


•P5 


June 


S 




June 


8 




Sep. 


S 




Sep. 


S 




Sep. 


S 




June 


S 




Sep. 


S 




June 


S 




Sep. 


S 




May 


S 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


S 




June 


S 




May 


s 




Sep. 


S 




June 


S 




Sep. 


s 




June 


S 




Sep. 


S 




June 


S 




Sep. 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




Sep. 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




Sep. 


s 




Jime 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 





COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r81 



Candidates in partial examinations etc. {continued) 



NAME OP OAMDIDATS 



Cornell Universittf Medical College (cont'd) 

BozoulJdrdt:, WJlliaiu Frederick 

BrtMler Charles. 

Cbapman, Mllian 

Clark, Zella M 

Cudmore^ John Homer 

Eoo, Harry 

Fancher, Eliza A. 

Farrell, Benjuuiin Peater 

FrLMxliuaii, Ijonls 

G«^Jiuu^, Lewell T 

GroeHbetkt Harvey Paterson 

HarriH, U€K>rge Francis 

iroiin Jo>iM Alfmi 

Hills. UoUin. V.V.'.V.'. 

Hinz, William 

Hubbell, Hiram Gaylord, 

Hutton, Robert LeKoy 

Isaacs, Harry ESzekiel 

Kerr, William Murray 

Klein, Morris James 

Liindon^, Julius, 

MjK<;refc't>r, HerlK^rt PaterBon ^ ...... ...... 

MiuKeJIar, JuQi^ Malcolm 

Maybaum, Jacob 

Murset, Charles William [.. 

Nei\'ton, Cieorge Air>ert 

Patterson, Robert H 

Phillijts, Earle W 

Uicbarit^, John 1 larold 

UoblnsoDi Haiph . . . , 

8mitln John Vjin Wa^iier 

Smithe, Percy Allis VVhians 

Stanley^ Grniit 

St^ln. Herbert Edwiird 

St'elner, Sydney 

Stigner, Per 

Wasch, Milton (Joodman 

Weighart Joseph B 

Wf^si:i>tt A^|( ]tnr May 

Wilcox. T'rwriif- s<]ntns 

Worts, Elizabeth Mannister 

Zimmer, Wilson Briggs ' 



Eclectic Medical College of the City of A'e?c York 

Fallick, MorriB 

Kes«net, Fraoee?^ 

I^wie. Sylvia 

Mendelson, Ida 

Vonck. Charlos rx)ul8 Herman Frederick. . . . . . . . . .' .' ! ] 

SeliDger CImrri'H II. S 

Vlllone, Nicholas '/ 



a 




,q 


|1 




1 






*H 


"i 


1 


o 

1 


June 


S 




June 


S 




June 


S 




June 


s 




June 


s 




Sep. 


s 




June 


s 




June 


8 




June 


S 




June 


S 




June 


S 




Sep. 


S 




June 


S 




June'* 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




June 


s 




June 


8 




June 


S 




June 


S 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




Sep. 


8 




June 
Sad 


8 
8 
8 




June 




June 


8 




June 


8 




Jime 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




June 


8 




May 


E 




June 


E 




May 


E 




May 


E 




May 


E 




May 


E 




May 


E 





1-82 



UNIVERSITY OP TUE STATE OP NEW YORK 



Candidates in partial examinations etc. (cofitimied) 



NAMB UF CANDIDATE 



LotHj Island ColUgr Hospital, Brooklvii 

Albers, FrwhTirk Martin 

Bast Oscar Aujoiwt 

Beck. An)ort William 

Bishop, David Troadwoll 

Bnx'kway, UolHM't Oriniston 

Cifaldl. Al«»xiH 

Doran, Willlani Tlioinas 

ElyHowitz, Salotiioii 

Frank, Sanau'I 

Gershenson. Etlwanl Harry 

Goffen, Abraham Marks 

Goldsmitli, Joscpli Washington 

G<HHlman, lltMiry 

Hoaj^o. David I vison 

Hover, Frank William 

Kaiser, Jacob 

Kaspor, Gerard 

Lewis, (leorjfc Hae 

Mootniok. Morris William. 

Rogers, William Henry, jr 

Thomson, AIch* NI(M)1 

Van Deinse. William Kre<lerlck. jr 

Vofiseler, Thecnlore Lnther 

W^olfs, Jean Fran<;ois 




AV/r York IlomroputhU' Medical College 

Cottrell. Willard 

Deyo, ('harh»s Knight 

Doniink'k, iJeorjre Carleton 

Easton, El\voo<l Merritt 

Gaines, John Strother, jr 

Gannett, GtM)rj:e John , 

Pettet, Edwin James de Len 

Sanders, Harold Armstrong , 

Sayre, Harry (Mint<m 

Strachan, David (Mark 

Taylor, George II(»rbert , 



AVir Yi)rk Medical College and Hospital fw Women 

Folley. Etta 

Higbie, Annie S 

Holm. Giidrnn 

Van deMark, (Jcrtrnde 

Wilensky, Eva 



Syracusr I'nirersity, medical department 

Bnrrett ( 'lande Ad<»llM»rt 

lUish. Archer Corbin 

Canna, Hicluir 1 Robert 

Carballeira y Canellas, ,Tosr» 

Cary, William Hollenback 

Dings, Elda Martin 

FJDch, Sarah Elizabeth 



May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

June 

May 

June 

Sep. 

June 

May 

May 

June 

Mav 

May 

June 

June 

June 

June 

May 

May 

Sep. 

June 

May 



Mav 

MaV 

Sep. 

May 

Sej). 

June 

Sep. 

May 

May 

June 

Mav 



June 

Sep. 

June 

May 

June 



June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
Sep. 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



H 

S 
S 

s 
s 
s 
s 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r83 



Candidates in partial examinations etc. {contitiAicd) 



NAME OF CANDIDATB 




Si/rarusc Imvcrsity, medical department (cont'd) 

Failed -. 

Harris, Holaud Charles 

Ileiman, Ji*sse Strauss 

Heliuer, Uoss Dorr 

Hurley, Allwrt Uiclimond 

Knoflf, Frederick Henry 

Mills. David M<-Falls 

Nichols. Charles Alhert 

Parker, Howard Koscoe 

Post, iMiarles Dayton .' 

Pritchard. Horace B 

Uaynor, Mortimer Williams 

Shaut, Frank ( 'arpenter 

Sheffield, Harry Joseph 

Shepard, Edwin He<ldon 

Teeter, r^orton Holden 

Woodruff, James Benjamin 



fnivrrftity and liellevue H(pifpitul Med. 

Belcher, Benjamin Hoyt 

I^rnstein, Louis 

Bonoff, Harold 

Claassen, Curtis P'rank 

Cn)we, Edwin Uaisl)e<*k , 

Holzapfel. William Henry 

Kempf, Frederick Martin 

Kurzweii, Periz Meier 

Lancaster, Nathanic*! Edgar 

Metz, Benjamin 

Prager, Jacob P»ernard 

Rosenfeld. Robert , 

Satehwell. Harry Herbert 

Scannell. John Matthew 

Schaub, (ieorg 

Shaftel, Sanniel 

Sharp, John Francis 

Tanner, Ernest Ket<*hum 

Warncke. Frank Herman 

Waxman, Marks Murray 

Zlinkoff, Joseph 



Coll., yew York 



l-niversity of Buffalo, medical department 

Andrews, Herman David May 

Foley, Thomas F June 

a Jan. 

Hannuond, Ilalley Waldo Jan. 

Hengerer, I^ouis June 

Lane, Arthur Gartield | June 

Learn, George Emerson Jan. 

Massey, Myrtle Ix^throp I June 

a Examination incomplete. 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



Jan. 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Sep. 

Sep. 

Sep. 

June 

Sep. 

June 

Jan. 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Sep. 



r84 



UNIVERSITY or THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



Candidates in partial examinations etc. (continued) 



NAMK OF OANDIDATB 




University of Buffalo, medical department (cont'd) 

Mehl, William M 

Morris, John Gray 

Mosshammer, Jesse O 

Mountain, Stephen V 

Rice, Victor Moreau 

Richards, Charles 

SCHOOLS IN OTHER STATES 

Connecticut 

Yale University, medical department. New Haven 

Clock, Ralph Oakley 

Ferris, Cleveland 

Nichols, Henry James 

Thompson, Hugh Currle 

Maryland 

Baltimore Medical College 
Hasseltlne, Hermon Erwin 

Baltimore University School of Medichw 

Failed 

Failed 

Johns Hopkins University, med. dep*t, Baltimore 

Glffin, Herbert Ziegler 

Hemenway, Josephine 

Stone, Charles Walter 

School of Med, of the Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore 
Rubinstein, Jacob liOiiis 

Michigan 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Baker, Harold Hill 

Bennett, Arthur King 

Graham, Corden T 

Merkle, Albert Edward 

Zimmerman, Ernstus R 

New Hampshire 

Dartmouth Medieal College, Hanover 
Bishop, Eliot 

Ohio 

Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College 

Thompson, Floyd Clayton 

Webster, Carlos Green 



June 
June 
Jan. 
June 
June 
June 



Jan. 
Sep. 
Jan. 
June 



May 



June 
June 



June 

Sep. 

June 



June 



June 

Sep. 

Sep. 

Jan. 

May 



May 



May 
May 



H 
S 
H 
S 
H 



H 
H 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



p85 



Candidates in partial examinations etc. (continued) 



NAMB or OANDIDATS 



Pulte Medical College, Oincinnaii 
Wollam, Everett Weston 

Pennsylvania 

Hahnemann Medical Coll, and Hospital, Philadelphia 

Dye, Adelbert David, jr '. . . 

Van Keureb, Jesse Philip 

Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia 
Thomssen, Herbert William 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Baker, George lilnvlUo 

Boardman, Carl 

Bradbury, Samuel, 3d 

Eliason, Eldrldge Lyon 

Gray, Clarence Hamilton 

Guthrie, George Donald 

Janney, Nelson Wilson . .• 

Lawrance, Jackson Stewart 

Moore, William Frederic 

Nicholson, Percival 

O'Neal, Alexander Hay 

Piersol, George Morris 

Prime, EYederlck, jr 

Woodward, William Wellington 

Western Pennsylvania Medical College, Pittsburg 
Smith, Harry P 

Wfjnian*s Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 

Moon, Rachel Tatnall 

Tracy, Martha 

Vermont 

University of Vermont, Burlington 

Faileil 

Shaw, Charles Jay 



June 



May 
June 



June 



June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



May 



June 
June 



June 
Jan. 



H 



H 
H 



o 



rSO 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



Dentists licensed at examinations Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

Group 1, New York wh<K)ls: jjcroui) 2, »<*ho()ls in other states; group 3, 
8ch(x>l8 In foreign countries. 

h means passtnl the examination with honor, i. o. 90*;:^ or above in three 
fourths of the subjectA 



NAMK OP OANUIDATB 



NFiW YOKK Si'IIOOLS 

Aril* Yark VftHnjr of Dentistry 

Arlvin, Samuel Jacol» 

He<'lv, Ij<mlrt I^^onard 

HiM'liel. Melvillt* Jerome 

Bier, Sigmund 

Bogen. Frank. Antliony 

Brown. Edwin Stanton 

Edwards, I^*' Itoy Sherman 

AFaniK*!. Cliarles 

Fias<hl. Piers 

Folkers, Osrar Hermann 

Franck. Jolin 

Garner. William l^Yaneis, jr 

<iottfrietl. John 

Grimm, Arthur 

//Johnson, Endl John 

I/4»vien. Edward Isaa<* 

Levy, Jos<'i)h 

Lieht«4iwalner, ( 'harh»s 

Liehling, Samuel 

Ijief, Ja<*ob I'tMMlor 

Lowenstein, Julius 

Mills, William Ilem-y, jr 

Milsner, Henry 

Mork. Waldo Ilulchings 

Norcom, (Maren«-e Martense 

Olsa, Victor 

Ortman, Max Ja(i>l) 

Oshlag, Isaar 

Handle. Jos4'pli Mnta 

Rathfelder, <iottliel) C 

Kaynumd. Edward Ilolman. jr 

/jSehminke. Oscar 

Scliwartz, Joseph Mortimer 

Schwarz, Frtnleriek iieorge 

Shnayerson, Edward 

Sloat. Julian Nichc^las 

Smith, Augustus Collier 

Sniffen. ( 'harles Tin-k 

Stillimss, William 

Stoney, Arthur Crawford 

T<»pi>(»r, P»arney 

/iTillou, Charles Wesley 

Tondinson, Edward Sperry 

Unger, Nathan 

Wakefield, Robert 




12 counts 
B. S. 

30 counts 
80 count*^ 
30 count ^^ 
4 yr II H. 
4 yr ]i. H, 
4 yr li. H. 
3 vr 1 1, s. 
Matrir. 
Matri(\ 

3 yr li. **, 

4 vr h. K. 
3 vrli. s. 
30ct)unts 
30 count a 
30 coiinH 
B. A. 
4yr li. s. 
3<> counts 
30 counts 
30 counts 
30 etmnts 
3 yr h. s. 
30 counts 
3 yr h. s. 
30 counts 
30 c(mnts 

3 yr h. s. 
30 counts 

4 yr h. s. 
3 yir h. s. 
30 c<mnts 
3() counts 
3() counts 
24 counts 
3 yr h. s. 
30 counts 
24 counts 
3 yr li. s. 
30 counts 
Acad. dip. 
3 yr h. s. 
30 counts 
3 yr h. s. 



BHm 

1WJ3 
XWA 
11X12 

\sm 
mn 

UH»3 

\m\^ 
\mt 
mm 
i\>m 
\m^ 
llHiii 
ll«)2 

mfi 

HHI3 
hH)3 

nH)3 

IH1J3 
IIX)3 

im)3 

1903 
1003 
1903 
11M)3 
1903 
1903 
UK)3 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
nM)3 
1902 
1<K)3 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 



Sep. 

Mav 

MaV 

May 

Sep. 

June 

Mav 

May 

Sep. 

Mav 

S^.p. 

May 

June 

Mav 

Mav 

Sef). 

Jan. 

June 

June 

May 

June 

June 

May 

June 

June 

June 

Mav 

May 

June 

May 

May 

May 

Mav 

May 

June 

June 

Mav 

Mav 

Sep. 

June 

June 

May 

May 

May 

June 



COLLEGE DEPAUTMENT REPORT 1903 



r87 



Dentists licensed at examinations etc. {continued) 



NAME OP CANDIDATE 



New York Colhtjr of Dentistry (cont'd) 

/iWoiiizwcl^, Isidor Charles , 

Wlialey t^lvviii Grey 

White. Jacoh 

WolfT. Simon CharU^ , 

Zeitleii, IL'irry Morton 



Preliminary 
education 




yew York Dental School 

Andrews, Marjorie 

ronklinjc, Walter Aujcnstus 

I)enian»st, Harry Mott 

Fox. < 'harh'S Ixnvis 

Iliniowich. Esther 

Ilorwitz. Elizabeth Solomon 

Kiihl, Henry Andrew 

McCulhM-h, Earl (' 

McCnlhK'h. St<'i)hen 

Sabloff, I^niis 

Shenier. Leib llirshaw 



*M\ counts 
8 yr li. s. 
M counts 
*M\ counts 
'MS counts 

86 counts 
8 yr h. s. 
8 yr h. s. 
8(f counts 
8 yr h. s. 
8<} counts 
8(J counts 
Acad. dip. 
Acad. dip. 
8(1 counts 
4 vr b. s. 



1908 May 
1908 ' June 
1908 1 May 
mn Jan. 

; \mi i June 

I 



I 

I nivrrsity of Huffnlo, dental department \ 

Al^rate, William Ward | 8 yr b. s. 

Badjrer. Ixv Allyn I 48 counts 

Aliiklecker Charles Fran<-is jj(i counts 

Bri'*kw«*<ldi\ <icH)r^e llem\v 8 yr b. s. 

Failed 24 counts 

Burlinj;ame, Frank Silas 8 yr b. s. 

Hurlinpanie, Koy William 48 counts 

Bush, William Watson ;Ui counts 

Cant well. Joseph Jefferson 8 yr b. s. 

TiCapron. Wintield Byron Acad. dip. 

Charles. Oscar U 8 yr b. s. 

Craner. Charles Mit<h(^ll Matric. 

I>eCeu. William McCMellan 3() coiuits 

1 )iefrenhach. Arthur Warren 8(i counts 

l>f)wnes. ClH>ster Richard Acad. dip. 

^Elliott. Henry E 8yr h. s. 

Ellis. WaltcT Ilealy 80 counts 

Eviinfi, Thoiium Edwnrd 24 counts 

Fish, JiinipM BUtueli^ird 80 counts 

Fyffe. William llumphorous Acad. dip. 

I^iiirdiicr (itnirt'*' Wilbur 80 counts 

/i<;uillaume. Harland Booster 80 counts 

Faile<l 48 counts 

Herblp. William J 80 coiuits 

Holdridjje. Percy A 48 counts 

Horton. Ernost F^lmer 8(i counts 

Jenkins. Frank Fayette Acad. dip. 

Landel, Christian Albert Matric. 

Lane. William Henry 80 counts 

lieek. Clarence A j 80 (H)unts 

Leonard, Ross Garfield | 80 counts 

Lewis, Charles Edward, jr i 48 counts 

a Ejuunined in June 19(X), license bold for completion of requirements. 



I 1908 , 
' 1908 
. 11M>8 I 

aiwm ' 

UM)3 
i 1W)8 

11K)8 1 
I 1908 
HK)8 
1903 
llMr2 

i 

, nM)8 i 

1908 ; 

19(K) 

15K)8 

im\ 

I 1908 , 

mrs j 

1908 I 

nM)8 

1908 
1908 

I 1908 , 
1908 
im)8 ' 

, 1903 

' 11K)8 
1908 
1908 

j 1908 
1908 , 

I 11M)3 
1908 
im)8 
UK)8 

■ 1908 

' 1908 
liK)8 

' 1898 
BM)8 

nm 

1908 
1902 



May 

May 

June 

June 

Jan. 

May 

May 

June 

Mav 

Mav 

May 

i May 

: May 

Sep. 

May 

June 

, June 

j May 

I May 

June 

May 

May 

, Mav 

May 

' Mav 

May 

May 

, June 

' June 

June 

, Mav 

May 

Mav 

May 

June 

May 

I May 

Mav 

Si»p. 

Mav 

May 

May 

Jan. 



r88 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Dentists licensed at examinations etc. (continued) 



N4)fl ar GJittrnDATK 



Prelim iiuiry 
eduoAtton 



a 


§ 


**o 


%^S 


o— 


Q** 


i4 


ss 


n 


H 

9 


!0O8 


M*iy 


t90S 


May 


I90S 


May 


mm 


June 


1003 


May 


190« 


June 


imt 


June 


i9oa 


May 


1908 


May 


190^ 


May 


19Qa 


May 


1903 


June 


190!J 


June 


1903 


May 


1908 


May 


190S 


June 


ifloa 


May 


1903 


MaV 


1903 


May 


t90H 


May 


1903 


May 


190a 


Mav 


mm 


M»v 


1003 


M»y 


1903 


May 


1903 


May 


1903 


Jan. 


IfiOJ 


Sep. 


1901 


Sep. 


1903 


Sep. 


1899 


Jan. 


1903 


May 


1900 


Jan. 


1903 


June 



Vniv^*r»iiy of Buffafo, nmM drpH (cont'd) 

Lockwood, John Augustna, . . , , 

McBlroy, Wiinnni We«c<jU, 

Mellroy, George Alton , * * 

Failed 

Main, David Talbot 

Maclatt Miltou Uma 

Mini**, Henry Clay 

Montgomery, Warren Ray 

MuIcnUy, r^awrent'e L^c 

Neweomb, Harvey Hotehkt^ 

Northrup, DoWJtt Clinton. , . , _.,... 

O'Brien* Thomas FraneiB , , 

Failed 

Uofip, Clifford Earn , ... 

Kowliind, Charles Edward. , 

a , 

ATnnnen Harry Flaglc^r. 

Tanner, WJlliam B. _ 

Tbotuae, Clarence H^voy , 

Failed 

Todd, Mwin La Fayette 

o ., , 

Turner, Richard V 

Vedder, Daniel James, jr. * . , 

WllBOD, Florence E. Wrean , , 

Wilson. Wiley Hardy 

SCHOOLS IN OTHER STATES 
District of Colunibui 

Columbian VnivrrsUy, Washington 
ft Stevens, Henry Tennep acker 

Illinois 

Vhicago College of Dental ^arffertf 

A Anderson, Gu^tave Adolpb 

O'Sulllvan, Joliu J 

Northwestern Vrtiv. Dental BcK^ Chicago 

Constable. Hoy Verner . . 

Hargett Arthur Vernon. , 

Maiytand 

BaUiniorr CoUrge of Detttal Surgery 

Allen, Bert Frank. /. 

Grace, Tbomas Merrltt 

ftMiiblc, Wiiliam Arba 

a RxaminutioD Incomplete. 



8yrh.a, 
3a counts 
4 yr h. s. 
36 Gottnta 
3yrh.H. 
Syrh. H. 
36 count*! 
48 counta 
48 counts 
Acad. ilip. 
Acml. dip, 
3 yr h. n. 
36 countM 
3yrb.&. 
3 yr h. s. 
BO counts 
Acad. dip. 
Acwl. dip. 
Acad. <lip. 
3yrh.fi. 
3 yr b. g. 
Acad. dip. 
36 ccant8 
3yr li. s. 
Acad. dip. 
3 yr h. a. 



3 yr h. ti. 



3 yr h. s. 
3 yr b. a 



4 yr h, s. 
Ma trie. 



3 yr li. s. 
3 yr h. s, 
4^ counts 



COLLEGB DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



p89 



Dentists licensed at examinations etc. {contimied) 



NAME or CANDIDATE 



University of Maryland, (lent, dep't, Baltimore 

Barr, George Wallace 

Becker, Charles Francis 

Bishop, Charles G 

Ide, Ira Charles 

Lynch, Charles Godfrey 

Norton, Oakley Worden 



Massachusetts 

Harvard University, dental school, Boston 

ACohen, Bernhard 

Failed 

Failed 

Tufts College Dental School, Boston 
AShaw, George Maurice 

Michigan 

Univ. of Michigan, dent, dept, Ann Arl)or 
Failed 



Ohio 

Cincinnati College of Dental Surgery 
Failed 



Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania Coll, of Dent. Surg,, Phila 
Bickelhaupt, Albert Charles 

Failed 

Herbst, Louis 

Hindes, Albert G 

Hodge, Harry B 

Pitcher, Frank Clifford 

Prichard, Joshua Thomas 

Solot, Morris L 

Philadelphia Dental College 
Failed 

Crisp, Harton Alfred 

DeGroot, Hugh Irving 

Feinberg, Cecilia. 

Hines, John Percy 

McKinley, George Collinson 

Storck, Stephen O 

Failed 



Preliminary 
education 




3 yr h. s. 
3 yr h. s. 
3 yr h. s. 
36 counts 
24 counts 
3 yr h. s. 



B. A. 

Matric. 

Matric. 



4 yr h. s. 



36 counts 



Matric. 



36 counts 
Matric. 
8 yr h. s. 
36 counts 
36 counts 
3yrh. s. 
3yrh. s. 
48 counts 



36 counts 
Matric. 
3 yrh.s. 
36 counts 
Matric. 
3 yr h. s. 

3 yr h. s. 

4 yr h. s. 



1903 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1902 
1900 



1903 
1898 
1899 



1903 



1903 



1898 



1903 
1898 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1902 
1903 



1902 
1902 
1908 
1900 
1898 
1902 
1900 
1903 



Sep. 

Jan. 

Sep. 

June 

Jan. 

Sep. 



June 
June 
June 



June 



June 



May 



May 

Jan. 

Jan. 

May 

May 

June 

Sep. 

May 



May 

Sep. 

June 

Jan. 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 



rOO 



UNIVERSITY OF TllK STATE OP NEW YORK 



Dentists licensed at examinations etc. (coutinuci!) 



NAME OV <'ANI>II).VTK 



Unic. (tf I^numylntnia, dent, dep't.. Phila. 

Baroiio, Walter A 

Hi)Clmiii. lAHm T 

BraHh. WiJliain WIuM^ler 

/iCaliaKliati. Charh^s Frank 

('onion, Thomas .T<»st>iili 

m» liana, Ii4»v«Mvtt Curt Ik 

/illortz. CMari»n<*(» Ilonry 

IIod»?kins, Nathan W 

Johnson, Lnclus Warron 

Kaiifniann. Charlos Maurlci* 

M<M*(»nt(»r, Henry 

Montfort. ( 'live WaK<*r 

Kowlcy. HonuM* Sexton 

S4H»ley, Hert 

S|»anKenher>r. Harry DnfTonl 

Stillnian. Krnest K 

/iSuffern, Kdward Russell 

FalhHl\ 

Wasley. L(»on Tucker 

White, William Dwijrht, jr 




Preliminary 
education 



SCHOOLS IN FOUKKJN ('OUNTKIKS 

France 

Avail nnji of Par in 
Diplonni sigmnl hy minister of puhllc 

instruetion 
iH^nibski. Rosalie 



Dnital School of Paris 
Hodel. Esther Livehitz 



Aejul. dip. 
8t(c<»unts 
4H counts 
4 yr h. s. 

3 vr h. s. 
Hyr h. s. 
H yr h. s. 

4 yr h. s. 
48 counts 
HO counts 
86 (*ounts 
8 yr h. s. 
8 yr h. s. 
4yi'ounts 
4 yr h. s. 
8 yr h. s. 
8 yr h. s. 
8 yr h. s. 
8 vr h. 8. 
8 Vr h. 8. 



Matric. 



8 vr h. 8. 



19()8 
IVKW 
10(K) 
190:^ 
ISW 
l«(h> 

mtz 

1W)8 
\WZ 

i\m 

1908 
1908 

HK)2 j 
1908 ' 
nM)8 
1902 
11K)1 



1H90 
19(K) 



Juni^ 

Jan. I 

June 

June : 

Jan. I 

June ' 

Sep. 

June 

June 

May 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

Jan . 

Sep. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Sep. 



Sep. 
Jan. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



r9l 



Dentists licensed at examinations Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

UNDER KXEMPTION LAWS 1805, 011.020. §1(>3 



NAMK OF CANDIDATK 



Kiniptoiu Karl Alpbeiis 

Sissonborgor, ( 'luirlos 

I:NI»EK KXEMI-riON LAWS 1002. rii. lilO 

Fnllwl 

Fassniann, Frank A 

Iluntor. Virgil I. 

Janofskv, Ant(m Kniainiol Marliiues 

FallcHl 

Lascell, Kniest U 

Maoiiaelieu, Arcliibaltl MertMlitb 

Mrriitosb, Cbarles Everett 

M iiitlling, Keniard 

Moyor, ilowanl llcTiiian 

Paxson, (rraeia Al>ipill Naomi 

a 

Failed 

Skiiiiier. JameH II 

FailcHl 

Falle<l 

FailtHf 

Failwl 

Watts, Cbarli^ nongie 

\Veiij:eiirotb. William Frcnleriek 

FailtH] 



c 

r- 



Sep. 
June 



June 

Jan. 

May 

Jan. 

June 

May 

May 

Mav 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 

Sep. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



(1 Ketiuircinentit not yot fully met. 



p92 univbbsity or the statIb or new yobk 

Veterinarians licensed at examinations Ang. 1, 1902-Jnly 31, 1903 



NAMB OF CANDIDATE 




NEW YORK SOHOOLS 

American Veterinary College, Tfeto York 

Failed 

Hazel, George Alexaudor 

Stark, Herman 



New York College of Veterinary Surgeons 

Failed 

aGllbert, Nlran O 



New York State Veterinary College, Ithaca 

Davenport, Miles Leroy 

Fehr, Frederic Frank 

Hughes, David Arthur 

Le Fevre, Daniel Du Bois 

ALooniis, Frank James 

Lueder, Charles Augustus. 



/iMlUen, Charles , 1908 

Simons, Fred Bertrand 

Smith, Ernest Ireland 

Stroud, Bert Brenette 

Wilbur, Bert Raymond 

b 



SCHOOLS IN OTHER STATES 

Illinois 

Chicago Veterinary College 
Spencer, Corte Jndson 



SCHOOLS Il4 FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Canada 

McGill University, veterinary dep*t, Montreal 
Greer, John 



Ontario Veterinary College, Toronto 
Nutting, I^wis A 



a Also holds diploma from Ontario Veterinary College, Toronto 1896. 
h Examination incomplete. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 r93 

C. P. A. certificates issued at examinations Aug. 1, 1902-Tnly 31, 1903 



NAME OF CANDIDATR 




Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Bayer, Walter Alonzo (junior certillfate) 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Tailed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

a 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Freeman, William Egerton (Junior certificate) . . 

Failed 

Failed 

named, B'rnnklln Moore (junior certJlicate) 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

B^alled 

Pelrce, Thomas Wentworth 

Failed 

Failed 

Rafter, Adolphe 

Rldgway, James r>awrence (Junior certificate) . . . 
Robinson, Kdward C. (waiting decision of board) 
&Rucker, Robert Hamilton 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Sinclair, George (Junior certflcate) 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Stellwagen, Frank W. (junior certificate) 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Thomas, Charles 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 

Failed 



June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

Jime 

June 

Jan. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

June 



a ExBrninrntlon incomplete, 
b Kxamined in June iflOBL 



rOt 



rXIVKUSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW TORK 



S LI0EH8E8 IBBUED BY THE XnOYERBITT WITHOTTT EXAMIKATIOH 

riidor oxoinptioiiM in tlio profossioiml lawH the Unlvorslty has also issueil 
Ikvnst's (lurhi): (ho year to: (K> phyHk-hms; 30 dentists; G veterinarians and 
3 cvrtiti«Hl pnl>lie accountants. 

Indorsement of medical diplomas Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

LAWS OF ISJia, ciiJMJl, §148, ^2 
To inakr valid imperfect reijint rat ions 



NAMR OF IMfVHICIAN 



MOW YORK SCHOOLS 

Hellenic Ifositital Medical Citllci/e, \eir York 
Marren, Itosenionnd WitliersiMHHi 



i'ollcije of l*hifsiciaiis and Surf/eons, Seir York 
lA'wis. William Jerauld 



Miller, <iiM)rj;e Vjishlnj^ton 



S<'1I(M)LS IX OTIlKll STATr:S 
Michigan 

.1' Itetroit rolletje of Medicine 



Inirersity of Michit;an, Ann Arbor 

(fleason. Adrle Amelia 

Me(fO\van. lliram 

Sheldon, VU*y{\ l*reston 



New Hampshire 

Dart month Medical t'olUye, JIanorer 

Land, Josei»h Foster 

Thompson, (icnu'^^r S<»eley 



Pennsylvania 

Hahnemann Medical (Udlajc and Hospital, Philadelphia 
Wilson, Thomas J 



Inirersity of l*ennsfflninia, Philadelphia 
Bennett, (i(H)rjce I> 



Texas 

7V.7v/f Medical College and Hospital, fiaireston 
OHrien, John A 



Vermont 
Inirersity of Vermont, Rnrlinyton 
IV)st, Henry Watrcms 



Dato 


Ikianl 


Oct. 


8 


July 


S 



Aug. 



Sep. 
Mar 
Oct. 



Oct. 
Julv 



Dec. 
Dec. 

Feb. 

May 



S 
S 
H 



H 

S 



H 

S 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT KEPOUT 1903 



r95 



LAWS OF 1893, cH.wn, §148 

Mdtriculatea in yew York atatc tnedical schools before June 5, 1890 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools hi other states 



NAME OF PHV8ICIAN 



NKW YOKK S('lI()OLS 



AVnniy Afedieul College 
Sto<-kwell, GtHjrge Arcliie 



Bellerue /fospital Medieal (-oUeue, Sew York 

Bennett, Porton Uivolo, jr 

l^ooniis. Albert Jerome 

-M<-l'urdy. Ira Jay 

Smith, Ethan 1 lem-y 



Date 



Julv 



June 
June 
July 
Mar. 



(■oUfffr of Phii'SiriauH and »Si//</f'o/ix. Sew York 
Jackson, John AU*xander 



Sew Ytnk Ilomeoiuithir Medical College 

Curran. E<lwin John 

I^'wis, Ekhm E 



Srir York I tiirersily, medical drpartnient 

Uankin, William David 

Wright, Joseph Bidmead 



KliracHMc Inirersitg, medical department 
Swartz, Herbert WiMHlworth 



SdlOOLS IN OTllEU STATES 
Georgia 

Cicorgia College of llclectic Medicine and Surgerg, Atlanta 



Stryker, Mary Frani-e* 



Ohio 

Medical (^ollege of Ohio 
(rniversity of CiTicinnati) 
Bowen, Arthur Hornier 



Western CoUcne of llomeogathic Medicine, Clcrcland 
Be<kwith, Seth K 



Nov. 



Feb. 
June 



May 
Ap. 



Aug. 

July 

Nov. 
Oct. 



r96 



UNIVERSITY OF THB STATE OF NEW YOBK 



LAWS OF 18d3, CH.061, §150 

For registry in anotfier county 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools in other states; group 3, 
foreign countries 



NAME OF PHYSICIAN 



NEW YORK SCHOOLS 

BvUcvuc Hospital Medical College, New York 

Cornelius. La Willa Mott 

Edmister, Frederick 

Fiske, William McL 

Jacobus, Arthur Middletou 

Morse, William U 

Rapp, Sauiuel 

Rosenb^g, Leopold 

Savage, Frederick A 



College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York 

Donovan, William Francis 

Frankel, Edward 

Gray, Joseph Francis 

(Juth, William Charles 

Mlchaelifl, Ludwig Mitchel , 

Rodger, David R 

Swift, Ezra L'Hommedieu 



Eclectic Medical College of the City of New York 

Davis, I^^ber E 

Hammond, William Randolph 



Preston, Byron I. 



Geneva Medical College 



New York University, medical department 

Brunner, WMlliam John 

Dunster, William Romanoff 

Fischer, Louis 

MacCauley, Henry A 

Morrow, Benjamin Rowland 

Muttart, Alder Charles 

Roberts, Lemuel Gardner 

Romero, Genaro Antonio 

Stone, William Fletcher 

Talmage, Thomas Goyn 

Tucker, Charles Joshua 

Wilson, George Edward 

Winter, Henry Lyle 



Niagara University, medical department 
Milbring, Edwin Andrew 



University of Buffalo, medical department 

Blanchard, Amos Flint 

Elliott Robert M 

Foy, Maud M 

Meeder, Elwood Daniel 

Meisburger, William O. L 

Pawling, Thomas H 



Date 



Nov. 

Sep. 

Feb. 

Ap. 

Ap. 

Dec. 

June 

Dec. 



Ot^t. 

July 

Feb. 

Mar. 

July 

Ap. 

Nov. 



June 
July 

Mar. 



Dec. 

Jan. 

Ap. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

.Sep. 

June 

Det\ 

Dec. 

Mar. 

Dec. 

Oct. 



Sep. 



at. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

June 

Aug. 

Dea 



COLLBQB DBPABTMBNT BBPOBT 1903 

For registry in another county (continued) 

NAME OF PHYSICIAN 

Censors certificate of Hudson River Ec, Med. 8oc., Poughkeepsie 
Jones, Edward Townsend 

Certificate from New York State Medical Society 
Goodell, Richard Henry 

SCHOOLS IN OTHER STATES 

Maryland 

School of Medicine of the University of Maryland, Baltimore 

Indorsed by Bellevue Hospital Medical College 
McKeeby, William Coe 

Michigan 

University of Michigan, Ann Arhor 
Spicer, Walter Erastns 

Ohio 

Cleveland Homeopathic Hospital College 
Rodenberger, Edwin M 



r97 



Date 



Mar. 
Nov. 



Jan. 



June 



Nov. 



r98 UNIVEKSITY OF TUB 8TATK OF NEW YORK 

Summary of medical diplomas indorsed Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

New York 

Albany Medical ( 'ollejro 1 

Holleviie Hospilal Mwliial (\>llej?e, New York 13 

r<)lloji:o of PlivHicians and Rni^H>n8, Now York 9 

KtkH-tic Medical Tollepfo of the C\i\ of New York 2 

(lenevii Medical College 1 

New York Homeopathic Medical College 2 

New York rnivei*sity, nie<lical depaHnient 15 

Niagjira Univei-sity, medical department 1 

Syracuse University, nuMlical department. 1 

Univei*Hity of Buffalo, medicnl department G 

Censors cei-tificate of the Hudson Hiver KcI(N*tic Medical 

Society, Poughkeepsie 1 

Certificate from New York State Miniical Society 1 

Other states 
Geoi-gia 

(ieorgia College of ?]ch»ctic M^nlicine and Surgery, 

Atlanta 1 

Maryland 

School of Medii'ine of the Univei-sity of Maryland, 

Baltimore 1 

Michigan 

Detroit College of Medicine ^ 1 

TTnivei'sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor 4 

New TTamiwhire 

Dai-tmouth Medical College, Hanover 2 

Ohio 

Cleveland Homeopathic Hospital College 1 

Medical College of Ohio (Univensity of Cincinnati) ... I 

Western College of Homeopathic Medicine, ('leveland. 1 

Pennsylvania 

Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Philadel- 
phia 1 

Univei'sity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 1 

Texas 

Texas Medical College and Hospital, Galveston 1 

Vermont 

ITniversity of Vermont, Burlington. , . . , 1 

Total , , 69 



COLUBGB DBPARTMBNT RBPOBT 1903 



r99 



Indorsement of dental diplomas Aug. 1, 1902-July, 31, 1903 

LAWS OF 1893, CH.661, AS AMENDED BY LAWS OP 1896, CH.6a6; 1896, CH.297 
On certificate of de^ital examuiera 



NAMB OF CANDIDATE 



NEW YORK SCHOOLS 

New York College of Dentistry 

Euler, George Henry (New Jersey license) 

Payne, John Gordon (New Jersey license) 



OTHER STATES 

Colorado 

University of Denver, dental department 
Raub, Herschel David 



District of Columbia 

Howard University, Washington 
Neal, Charles Arthur 



Illinois 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
Wilson, Lorenzo Shepherd 



Maryland 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
liSflln, Edward Grant 



Massachusetts 

Boston Dental College 
Russell, Burton Charles 



Michigan 

University of Michigan, dental department, Ann Arbor 

Bethel, Lou Prentiss 

Carmiehael, John Peter 

De Puy, Hiram 



Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia 
Angle, Edward Hartley 



University of Pennsylvania, dental department, Philadelphia 

Croll, William L 

Peter, Henry Herman ( New Jersey license) 

Singer, John Gray ( New Jersey license) 

Slade, Arthur Roland (New Jersey license) 

Stanley. Rolof Beuckert 

Wnlkor, Samuel Albert 



Tennessee 
VanderhUt University, dental department, Nashville 

Jordan, Hamet 

Winfrey, Clint Crockett 



Date 



Nov. 
Oct. 



Nov. 



Ap. 



Sep. 



Jan. 



Nov. 



Mav 
May 
Feb. 



Feb. 



May 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Dec. 



Ap. 
July 



rlOO 



UNIVEUSITY OF TUK 8TATK OF NEW YOBK 



Indonement of dental diplomas Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

LAWS OF m&3, CH.661 AS AMENDED BY LA^/V^S OF 1805, CH.626; 1896, CH.297 

For reifUtry in another county 



NAMB or CANDIDATE 



Beale, Jauu^ M. 

Byers, John Murray 

Knapp, James Franklin. 
Ludlum, Fred Willett. . . 



NEW YORK SCHOOLS 
New York College of Dentistry 



Transcript of registration in Allegany county 
Raub, Lewis M 



Transcript of registration in Erie county 
Mann, George E 



Transcript of registration in New York county 

Carlos, John W 

Huntington, William S 



Transcript of registration in Oneida county 
Lloyd, George H 



Trans(ript of registration in Oswego county 

Baker, Daniel Aimer 

Van Vleck, Charles H 



Trans(Tipt of registration in Tioga county 
Snook, Frederick M 



OTHER STATES 

Illinois 

Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
Cady, Frank William 



McNeiile, P. R 



Indiana 
Indiana Dental College, Indianapolis 



Maryland 



Vniversity of Maryland, Baltimore 
Williams, Maynard Elliott 



Tibbetts, Samuel 



Pennsylvania 
Philadelphia Dental College 



Vniversity of Pennsylvania, dental department, Philadelphia 
Lawton, Burtis B 



Date 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Mav 
Nov. 



Sep. 
June 



Aug. 
Mar. 



Mav 



Oct. 
Nov. 



Nov. 

Jan. 
May 

Mar. 

Ap. 
June 



^^ 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 ^^'l- ^^^^ 

Smnmary of dental diplomas indorsed Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

New York 

New York College of Dentistry 6 

Transcript of r^stration in Allegany county 1 

Transcript of registration in Erie county 1 

Transcript of registration in New York county 2 

Transcript of registration in Oneida county 1 

Transcript of registration in Oswego county 2 

Transcript of registration in Tioga county 1 

Other states 
Colorado 

University of Denver, dental department 1 

District of Columbia 

Howai-d University, Washington 1 

Illinois 

Chicago College of Dental Surgery 2 

Indiana 

Indiana Dental College, Indianapolis 1 

Maryland 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgeiy 1 

University of Maryland, Baltimore 1 

Massachusetts 

Boston Dental College 1 

Michigan 

University of Michigjin, dental dep't, Ann Arbor 3 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia. 1 

Philadelphia Dental College 1 

University of Pennsylvania, dental dep't, Philadelphia 7 

Tennessee 

A^anderbilt University, dental dep't, Nashville 2 

Total 36 



rl02 



UNIVKUSITY OF TUE STATE OF NEW YOBK 



Indonement of veterinary diplomas Aug. 1, 1902-Jiily 31, 1903 
LAWS OF 1893, CH.GGl, §179, ab amended by laws of 1895, OH.8G0 

Matriculates in New Yorls State veteriuary medical schools before July 

1, 1896 



NAMK OF c;ANI>II>ATK 



NEW YORK SCHOOLS 

Amerk*an Veterinary College^ New York 
Iluelseu, Julius 

Columbia Veterinary College, New York 
Johnston, David L 

New York College of Veterinary Surgeons 
Johnston, Alexander 



Date 



June 

Ap. 

Mar. 



laws of 18J)3. cii.0(»1, as amended by laws of 1895, §181 
For registry in another county 



NAME OP CANDIDATE 



NEW YORK SCHOOLS 

Columbia Veterinary College, New York 
Walton, Frank 



Tranaeript of registration in Chautauqua county 
Smith, Charles Willhiin 



Date 



Dec. 
Ap. 



LAWS OF 1893, CH.COl. as amended by laws of 1895. 1890, 1900 and 1901, §179 
On certificate of veterinary examiners 



NAME OF CANDIDATE 



Denison, Nathan H. 



Date 



June 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl03 

Smnmary of veterinary diplomas indorsed Aug. 1, 1902-July 31, 1903 

Neto York 

ADieric«in Veterinary College, New York 1 

Columbia Veterinary College, New York 2 

New York College of Veterinary Surgeons 1 

TransiTipt of registration in Chautauqua county 1 

Certifleate of veterinary examiners 1 

Total 6 



Certified public accoiintants 

During the year ending July 31, 1903, 3 C. P. A. certificates 
were issued without examination under the requirements of rule 4. 

Decker, Hiram E. Schneider, Frederick 

Dunning, Alden W. 



rl04 



TTNIYERSITY OP TIIR STATE OP NEW TORIC 



4 CALEKDAK OF 

Dates, credentials 



k 



DATE 


LAW, MEDK'AU 

DENTAL AND 

VETERINARY 

8TUDENT 


M.l>. 
UEfiREK 


D.ll.K. 

nnoRKE 


MEDirAL 
LK'ENSE 


DENTAL VBTBRINAHT 
LIC;ENME LirKNKB 


i9oe 

8 S86 


Albany, Buffa- 
lo, New York, 
Syracuse 






Allwny, 
Buffalo, 
New York, 
Synu'use 


Albany, !All»any, 
Buffalo, Buffalo, 
New York, ! New York, 
Syracuse . Syracuse 


N 17 






D 19 


1 






i 


!> » 


1 






' 


1908 
Ja i»ao 


Alltany, Buffa- 






Alliany, 
Buffalo, 
New York, 
Syracuse 


1 

Albany, Albany, 

Buffalo, Buffalo. 

New York, ' New York, 

Syracuse SyracuMC 
i 
1 


F 28 


lo, New York, 
Syracuse 






Mr a 27 


All»any, Buffa- 








i 


My 19 23 


lo, New York, 
Synicjuse j 


New York AihAnv 


Albany lA11ian<r 


My 23 









Buffalo, 
New York, 
Syracuse 

. _ 


Buffalo, 
New York, 
Syracuse 


Buffalo, 
New York. 
Syrat'use 


Je 16-19 


Alltany, Buffa- 
lo, New Yt>rk, 
Syracuse 




1 
! 


1 

! 


Je 20 












Je 2a^27 




New York 


Now York AUMnv 


Albany, 
Buffalo, 
New York, 
Syracuse 

\ 


Albany, 
Buffalo, 
New York, 
Syracuse, 
Ithaca 


1 




\ 


Buffalo, 
New York, 
Syracuse 

\ 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl05 



EXAXZVATIOHB 190S 
and subjects 



KXTRNSION 



New York. 



New York . 



New York. 



PUBLIC 

ACCOirNT- 

INO 



New York. 



New York, 
Buffalo 



BTATR BIT8INBSH 
CKEDRNTIAI^ 



AUian}' 
Albfiny 



Alliany., 
Alltany.. 



Albany, 
Buffalo, 
SjTacuse, 
and in 500 academies 
and hi^h scliools of 
the state 



Albany N. Y. 
New York N.Y. 
Wellesley Maw. 



Allmny. 



STi aL-adcmic, 7 tii«><li<3i1, 
Silent*l, T veterinary 



Rlf>incntflr3' claAiAcH' 

linn 
Elementary blbllo* 
gru|ihy 
NBtiire tludy 

07 Hcadcmic, Sims! new. 
7 niGilieat, S dentaf, 7 
^-olprlfiory, I C> P. A, 

A d vanooii d I ct ionary 
tiitaJciijiilnfr 
an acailomk-, tt lliimry, 
ft huMlneMS 

7 medfeal, 8 dental 



7 veterinary 

2 extension, 00 aca- 
demic, 9 business, 4 
C. P. A., 10 libmrj- 



Genetic psychologfy 
7 medical, 8 dental, 
7 veterinary 



rlOfj UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

6 OOXXEOEB, P&OFEBBIONAL, TEOHHIOAL AVD OTHE& BPEOXAL BCHOOLS 



CLASSI FICATION 


NUMBRR 


FACULTY 


Men 


KTITOKNT8 






IffS 


igo8 


Men 


Women 


Women 


Total 


CollegeH for men. . . 

ColleKes for women 

Colleges for men & 

women 


21 
5 

7 
16 
7 
8 
18 
8 
5 
2 
1 

6 
1 
8 
4 
all 
56 


21 
5 

7 
16 
8 
8 
18 
8 
5 
2 
1 

7 
2 
8 
4 
all 
c7 


598 
112 

249 

178 

183 

72 

1147 

114 

56 

50 

24 

226 

15 

82 

56 

a413 

cl97 


8 
186 

48 
8 

85 

82 

1 

2 

1 

" '25 

88 

alOl 

c42 


8 198 

1 885 
947 

2568 
755 

856H 

867 

689 

251 

6 

2 447 
185 
167 
245 

a2 827 
C6 846 


8 921 

1 103 
*2 
55 

1887 

154 

86 

30 

i 

14 

1 

1 106 

942 

a2 405 

C8 229 


8 198 
8 921 

2 488 


Theology 


969 


Law ^ 


2 618 


Education 


2 642 


Medicine 


8 722 


Dentistry 


908 


Pharmacy 


809 


Veterinary 


251 


Eye and ear 

Engineering and 

technologyj 

Architecture 

Art 


7 

2 461 

186 

1 278 


Music 


1 187 


Other 

Special 


a4 783 
c9 075 






Total 


114 


118 


d8 808 


563 


(f25 029 


dl4 689 


d39 7l8 



alnclnding the sraduate departments of Columbiat Cornell and New York uni- 
verslties. bNot includlncr Cnautauqua or New York branch of Catholic Summer 
School. rNot Including New York branch of Catholic Summer School. d Omit- 
ting Items duplicated. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl07 



Colleges, professional, technical etc. {continued) 



PIR8T DBOREBS GONFEHRED < 


3N EX A Mil 

igoe 


fATION 


eNET PROPERTY 


fEXPENUITURBS 


ClawiflcatioD 


1008 


1908 


1008 


Colleges for men 


591 

539 

405 

85 

531 

87 

404 

181 

258 

16 

1 

286 

8 

21 

8 

a814 

628 


580 
781 
876 

33 
521 
117 
513 
124 
212 

24 

8 

860 

18 

11 

8 

a819 

c51 


$81 550 809 . . 

6 275 621 54 

16 502 190 80 

11 271 627 12 

979 087 76 

2 587 085 12 

5 813 452 56 

124 467 98 

202 092 44 

158 191 46 

/lOOOOO .. 

1 888 156 56 

29 64b'ii 

69129 18 
a4 686 841 88 
c4 643 048 89 


$8 278 855 85 


Colleges for women 

Colleges for men & women . 
Theology 


1 780 912 80 

1 657 579 25 

811 300 09 


Law 


251 440 61 


Kclucation 


788 022 18 


Medicine 


498 810 12 


Dentistry 


188 474 70 


Pharmacy 


100 498 58 


Veterinary 


32 997 08 


Eye and ear 


890 .. 


Engineering & technology. 
Architecture *. . 


128 852 58 


Art 


25 010 28 


Music 


38 726 12 


Other 


a298 718 25 


Special 


C250 685 96 






Total 


8 658 


4 041 


m 875 792 80 


$10 061 269 25 







alncludinff the irraduate departments of Coluinbi&, Cornell and New York univeraities. 
hNot includiiiir Ohautautiua or New York branch of Catholic Summer School. cNot in- 
cludingr New York brancii of Catholic Summer School. ein this table several institu- 
tions with more than one department which failed to give separate statistics for each 
department are included. For example, the net property for collegres for men includes all 
departments of Columbia except law and medicine, the school of applied science of New 
York University, Hamilton Tneoloflrical Seminary, medical, pharmaceutic and prepara- 
tor\' departments of Syrian Protestant Colloflre. Under colleges for men and women is 
included property used by the collcf^es of fine arts and applied science of Syracuse 
University, acadoinic department of Keuka, and all departments of Cornell except 
forestry', medical, veterinary and law. The flffures for these dei>artments are of course 
omitted from the heads under which they should appear. /Proiierty of hospital and 
collefre used In common. 



rlOS 



IINIVKKKITV OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



I 










9 




eq 
1 


^ 


^<e 


^ 


1 


' 


^ 




I9 9l91^«>t!; 




8 




^ 

"^ 




1 


1 ' 










I 


I 


1 




T""' 


PT 


^^ 




^ to Qi CI m « «: 


' S 


B 




1 




















5i "i^ rt * ^''^ S* 


> 31 " 


i 




i-H 


N 




•4t9t-eOt-0Q90^iocVr^efir-'Q«^«-^« 


3 V 


^ 


1 


e* 1^ iF^ T-i 


.-J 






11 


H 
















M 




gj le t- » t* 09 « « 40 c^ -r-i o !-> OT ^ -^ a 


:, i- 




1 


«-i 


{J 




■■^ 


^ 












^ie«ot-M9»«!4ec?i^o^«^d&^ 


r i6~ 


B 


S 




H 


s 






P 




|j*OS5^t-3S2-©*CB5^lO^-^PIM*C6t' 


. e^ " 


■ 


1 


^ 


9 






P 








■4 


s 


«io«eot>'^io»io»***flo 


-o^^t^t^ 


■ $ 


o 






1-1 


s 

o 

OB 


M 








1 


g| e IS m ^- -^ 1$ AS ici Q9 ^ ee 


;^^t^« 




O 










s 


g«>«t-^josciS«^« 


^^r-« 


~l"~l' 


Q 










sti&<«ci[^fieieD9^'N*H« ^ 


i-H-#lO^ 


> 1 1- 


1 


Cl *-^ r-i 




, » 










s 




gjxi=2 










i 


t-fttieoS-^^T^Ol . 


^OOSSH 


' i 


i 








IH 










00 

o 

M 


1 


^1 1— 1 T^ ■ 


r-I^MJO-^ 


3 ; 


H 










► 




. » 
















, 




, 




, 




. 














































































(4 






































00 






































^ 






































M 






































M 








d 




























i 








i 

o 












1; 














s 








t3 












1: 


















V « 












■§ : 


















SM 












§ - 












S 




i? fe *^ 










"^bcg 












CD 




o o o 

V^ *-! 1^ 






E 


1 

a: 


l 








2 


1 


1 






1 


1 


^ 

^ 




^ 
W 


.c 


•I 


t 


a 

3 


i 


t 


i 






= 2 



>'2 

u 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT UEPORT 1903 



rl09 



I 



i 
I 

S 
% 



O 



4> 

o 

*<4 



CO 

o 

I 
CO 

00 



o 







4> 



O 



42 

o 
o 






^ 
^ 



s 

I 

§ 



f ^ c^ 7& 9? ^ e-" <^ i:-' !■':« ^ ^ ^ ^ oQ cj 



f =r t- rt t- L-^ -^ 

7 I 



CO *?( o l-- ry Ci CO 5* iO Oi CO CD 00 *-• CO O Oa 

t-i i.^ ^ ^ I CO 5i 



^•-^(OfflT-f-fflO-r'5^'^COOCOrHCOOa*-' 
5 I'- BO IC 1-" L'^ 1-" ^t 00 CO 



,-f!»i5ig-^t-'^^'»cor-iooc>^co'^co 

OC' — 5 ^1 X' 3D Q — i-'5 ^ • t' tH . IO « 



*-^ Q& C 35 = J?* » CJ 3D K-? CO O O 1-1 t-i »-( 3D 
IC m &1 'J* ^ 51 01 r-i 



tS ?> -Jl ■+ O ^ t?J 



O^ CO 30 
r-l O 

01 



S ^ ffl C* — c- t- 00 m rf -^ 

-* C'i « O O T-t ^t rH 



-f f- rt 3 1/^ S *-r 1-"^ .X) 

If £?* 03 ^ ie IF- ^;i 



'^ ^ "S- 5 ^ 3: "-^ ^ »o I.- 



? Q O '30 <- @ C^ t- ^ O^ 0< CO 
- T> TO OS 3i-i ^ 



r-t^^»iC-^QO&2cao^oo3& 

«^^ ^®ir^St*CCrH30 
-t CJ 30 -^ 10 1"" 



O O '^ 1-H 00 g| ic ♦* t.-. 
-^5^ 50 -^ ?£■ ^ 



ftH If 
^ § fl 



s s * § 



5 5 T'U 



>j.ri 






^ss 



^\ 




2^' S 



a 

•a 

o 



5 



e 

8 

of 

s 

9 

8 

o 

i 

•o 
9 



be 

c 



rllO 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Faculties of higher institutions 1893-1903, the 





1883 


18M 


1806 


1806 


Colleges for nit^n, men 




448 


549 


women 















1 


total 


487 


492 


448 


^9 






Colleges for women, men 






51 
121 


69 


women 






118 










total 


171 


191 


172 


187 






Colleges for men and women, men 






224 
18 


276 


women 






22 










total 


215 


215 


287 


298 






Theology, men 






74 
2 


131 


women i 






3 










total 


80 


88 


76 


133 






Law, men 






107 


181 


women 

















total 


71 


108 


107 


131 






Eilucation, men 






84 
50 


46 


women 






54 










total 


05 


71 


84 


100 






Medicine, men 




764 
54 


930 


women 






45 










total 


704 


838 


818 


965 


Dentistrv. men ....,.,., , - 






88 


100 


women 


















total 


69 


67 


88 


109 






Pharmaov, men 






82 

1 


45 


women 
















total 


26 


27 


88 


45 






Veterinary, men 






87 


38 


women .... 


















total 


81 


86 


87 

21 
2 


38 






Eve and ejir. men 




23 


women 
















total 


12 


12 


28 


23 


/ 





COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rill 



decade's growth and average annual increase 





1806 


1898 


1900 


1901 


190e 


1908 


TNCRKAHE 


1»7 


In eiflrht 
years 


Aver, 
annual 


589 
1 


515 


526 


558 


549 


576 
4 


598 
3 


155 
8 


19 












1 


540 


515 


526 


558 


549 


580 


601 

~~ ri2 

186 


/114 

61 
65 


/ll 


9fl 
127 


92 
145 


98 
148 


94 
169 


99 
178 


91 
198 


8 
8 


223 


287 

326 
35 


246 


263 

280 
19 


272 

236 
34 


289 

242 
82 


298 

249 
43 


/127 

25 
30 


/13 


84(( 
28 


823 
86 


8 
4 


869 


861 

"~" 131 

1 


859 


249 

195 

1 


270 


274 


292 

178 
3 


/77 

mi 

1 


fs 


150 
3 


169 

1 


171 
2 


186 
3 


12 


152 


132 

ri4 

1 


170 


196 

123 

1 


173 


189 

119 

1 


_ 1'^ 
188 

1 


/96 

2<i 

1 


/lO 


129 


119 

1 


122 

1 


~ 8 



129 


115 

57 
58 


120 

56 
52 


124 

70 

5H 


123 


120 

" m 


184 

72 

H5 


/63 


/6 


48 
57 


86 
60 


'88 
85 


5 
4 


100 


110 

957 
49 


lOH 

~ '978 
47 


12W 

1 085 
21 


14<( 

^054 
86 


148 


157 

1 147 
82 


/92 

883 
—22 


/» 


"' 908 
50 


1108 
27 


48 
—8 


958 


1006 


1 025 

m 


I 056 
102 


1 m) 

102 


1 180 
105 


1 179 

lii 

1 


/475 


f4H 


107 


1T3 
2 


26 
1 


8 














107 


115 
67 


104 
54 


102 


102 
'54 


105 
56 


115 /46; 


/r> 


49 


"52 


56 


24 
—1 


8 


















49 


57 


54 


52 


54 


56 
52 


56 


/30 
18 


/« 


52 


59 


54 
1 


48 
2 


45 
2 


50 


2 














52 


59 


55 


45 


47 


52 

26 
2 


50 /19 


/3 


20 


20 
2 


20 
2 


18 
2 


18 
2 


24 
2 


3 












20 


22 


22 


20 


20 


2S 


26| 


/t4 


/I 



/ Increase for 10 yean. 



rll2 ITNIVERSITY OF TIIR STATE OP NEW YORK 

Faculties of higher institutions 1893-1903, the 





1808 


1804 


1805 


1806 


Engineering and technology, 


men 






72 66 


women 












total 









. 




98 


72 


72 


66 








Architecture, men 




■-- 






women 






















total 














--^--■■-■^ 




(2 
d 




Art, men 


■■ " 


7 


women 






4 












total 


12 


14 


11 


11 








Music, men 






d 
d 


58 


women - 






42 












total 


47 


108 


86 


95 








Others, men 






d 
d 


elAQ 


women 






e96 














total 


210 


209 172 


e242 








Sj)ecial, men 






d 
d 


117 


women - 






18 












total 


a58 


180 


140 

62 150 
887 


185 


Total, men 






62 6^^ 


women 




401 












Clrand total 


62 212 


c2 668 62 487 


68 023 













a Not inchulinif Catholic Summer School. 

Ity. ((The i 

special were not classillod sepamtely. There was a total of 315 meo and 94 women in these 



;iu«nnif < 
duplicates in Columbia Univereity 
special were i 
four auctions. 



^OmittioiT duplicates. clncludiofr 
d The men and women in art, music, others and 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rll3 

decade's growth and average annual increase {continued) 





1896 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1908 


INCREASE 


18B7 


In eiflrht 
years 


Aver, 
annual 


88 

1 


96 

1 


199 

1 


200 
2 


206 
1 


214 

1 


226 

1 


154 
1 


19 


8^) 


97 


200 
9 


202 


207 


215 
6 


227 
15 


/134 


/18 




6 


6 


■ ~15 


2 






























9 


6 


6 

82 
21 


6 


15 

82 
25 


/15 

1/25 
^21 


/2 




14 
9 


6 
6 


14 

8 


31 

18 


33 
25 


9^ 


12 


23 


22 

43 
16 


49 


53 


58 


57 

56 

38 


/45 
9-^ 


/5 


38 
15 


44 
12 


54 

18 


52 

28 


^54 
80 


9 
9 


53 


50 

"~ 441 
104 


59 

410 

88 


72 


80 

389 
95 


84 

^429 
96 


94 

101 


/47 


/« 


294 

100 


370 
91 


^267 
9^ 


9r38 
9 


394 


545 

^144 
30 


498 

102 
26 


461 

90 
5 


484 

m 

4 


525 


514 

~ l97 
42 


/804 
1/24 


/80 


127 
33 


124 
2 


^4 
9^ 


160 


174 

"62~738 
444 


128 

62^^79 
427 


95 
5403 


, 127 

63 002 
6446 


126 

""63070 
6476 


239 


/186 

ri58 
226 


/19 


415 


63 308 
6568 


145 

28 


m 155 


m 182 


/>3 m\ 


m 823 


m 448 


68 546 


^>3 871 


/I 659 


/166 



e'Sot includingr the graduate faculties of New York and Cornell Universities. /In- 
crease for 10 years. o Increase for seven years. 



rll2 ITNIVERHITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORE 

Faculties of higher institutions 1893-1903, the 





1808 


1804 


1806 


1806 


Engine«^ring and technology, 


men 






72 


60 


women 










total 








. 




m 


72 


72 


(m 








Architecture, men 








women - - 






















total 














--^^-_- 




(2 
d 




Art, men 




1* 
1 


women 






4 












total 


12 


14 


11 


11 








Music, men 






d 
d 


68 


women 






42 












total 


47 


103 


86 


95 








Others, men 






d 
d 


fl46 


women 






696 














total 


210 


209 172 


6243 








Sj)ecial, men 






d 
d 

140 

62 150 
337 


117 


women - - ' 




18 












total 


: a58 


180 


185 


Total, men 






62 622 


women 




401 












Grand total 


'b2 212 


cQ 663>)2 487 


63 028 













a Not incluilinflr Catholic Summer Scrhool. hOmittiofr duplicates. clncUidinir 
duplicateft in Columbia University. flThe men and women in art, music, others and 
special were not classified sepamtely. There wasu total of B15 men and 91 women in these 
four sections. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rll3 

decade's growth and average annual increase (continued) 





1806 


1809 


1000 


1001 


looe 


1003 


INCREASE 


18B7 


In eight 
years 


Aver, 
annual 


88 
1 


96 

1 


199 

1 


200 
2 


206 
1 


214 

1 


226 

1 


164 
1 


19 


89 


97 


200 
9 


202 


207 


215 


227 
15 


/134 


/IS 




~6 


6 


15 


2 






1 





















9 


6 

81 

18 


6 

32 
21 


6 

88 
25 


15 

32 
25 


/15 

gr25 
flf21 


/2 




14 


6 
6 


14 

8 


9^ 


12 


28 


22 


49 


53 


58 

54 
30 


57 

56 

88 


/45 
9-^ 


fry 


38 

15 


44 
12 


48 
16 


54 

18 


52 

28 


9 
9 


58 


56 

441 
104 


59 

410 

88 


72 

870 
91 


80 

~" 389 
95 


84 

~ ^9 
96 


94 

418 
101 


/47 


/5 


100 


flr267 
9^ 


^88 
9 


804 


545 

" "l44 
80 


498 

102 
26 


461 
90 


484 

128 
4 


525 


514 


/304 


/80 


127 
88 


124 
2 


19"7 
42 


fir 80 
flf24 


firll 
1/3 


160 


174 

~62 788 
444 


128 

^2^879 
427 


95 

~m 920 
^>408 


, 127 


126 

~63'070 
6476 


239 

~m 808 
6568 


/186 

~1 158 
226 


/19 


;^'74b 
415 


~63~0(J2 
^446 


145 

28 


hH 155 


m 182 


68 80(5 


m 828 


m 448 


m 546 


68 871 


/I 659 


/166 



fiNot including: the graduate faculties of New Vork an<! Cornell rniverslties. /In- 
erease for 10 years. g Increase for seven years. 



rll4 



UNlVRRSirY or TUE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Stndenti of higher institutions 1893-1903, the 





1808 


18M 


1806 


1806 


Colleges for men, men 


2 969 
6 


8 824 

10 


8 489 

10 


8 207 


women 








total 


2 975 


8 884 


8 449 

2 

2 187 


8 207 






Colleg^H for women, men 


2 
2 078 


1 
2 116 

2 117 

1 718 
579 


_ 


women 


2 252 






total 


2 OHO 


2 189 


2 258 






Collegjes for men an<l women, men 


1 877 
761 


1 676 
665 


1 4H9 


women 


669 


toUil 


2 688 

588 
8 


2 292 
~ 662 


2 241 


2 158 


Theology, men 


813 


women 


7 14 


8 






total 


591 

10 


669' '^tYl 


8*^1 






_ 




Law, men 


oT 469 

17 


1572 
22 


1 ^{25 


women 


39 




total 


1 470 

Til 
517 


1 486 

80 
450 


1 594 


1 854 






£iduoation, men 


109 
560 


150 


w^omen 


Tift 






total 


681 


580 


669 

8 564 
192 


869 







ft 2»>1 




Medicine, men 


8 151 


8 674 
201 


women 


216; 199 

1 




total 


8 867 A i'X) 


8 756 


8 875 




827 

1 




Dentistry, men 


409 
4 


501 
4 


519 


women 


6 




total 


828 

467 
8 


418 

438 
4 


505 

500 
6 


505 


Pharmacv. men 


~ 610 
11 


women 




total 


470 
224 


487 

282 
1 


506 
i90 


621 
147 


Vptprinarv. men 


women 










total 


224 

7 
2 


288 

20 

1 

21 


190 

8 


147 

"7 


Eve and ear. men 


women 


8 




total 


9 


8 


10 





a Includinff summer students. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rll5 

decade's growth and average annual increase 





1808 


1890 


1900 


1901 
3 371 


190e 


1906 


INORSASX 


1897 


Decade 


Aver, 
an. 


3 257 


3 367 


3 513 


3 558 


3 228 


3 198 


229 
—6 


28 
















3 257 


3 367 


3 513 


3 558 


3 371 


3 228 


3 198 


223 

—2 
1 843 


22 


2 


2 
2 703 


2 

2 842 








2 217 


3 065 


3 282 


3 437 


3 921 


184 


2 219 


2 705 


2 844 


3 065 

~990 
744 


3 282 

"" 1 321 
859 


8 437 

1482 
1 013 


3 921 


1 841 


184 


1 584 
824 


1 667 
981 


973 
979 


1 385 

1 108 

2 488 

947 
22 


—492 
342 


—49 
34 


2 4()8 


2 648 


1 952 


1 734 


2 180 


2 495 

^964 
17 


—150 


—15 


757 
15 


814 
6 


787 
6 


955 

7 


927 

8 


869 
19 


36 
2 


772 


820 

~ 2 180 
38 


793 


962 

2 227 

41 


935 

~~2 316 
51 


981 


969 


378 


88 


1 m) 

42 


2 151 
48 


2 338 
5:^ 


2 663 
55 


1 108 
45 


110 
6 


2 041 


>2 218 

231 
1 026 


2 194 

278 
1 890 


2 268 

224 

1 548 


2 367 

270 
1 622 


2 391 
1 682 


2 618 


1 148 


116 


913 


756 

1 887 


641 
1 870 


64 
187 


1 111 


1 257 
3 376 

2m 


2 108 

iri29 
206 


1 772 

3~2(i2 

187 


I 892 


2 312 

~ 3 580 
164 


2 642 

3 568 
154 


2 Oil 


201 


235 


3 270 
158 


4T7 
—62 


42 
—6 


4 025 


3 582 


3 335 

487 
11 


3 449 

546 
10 


3 428 

685 
20 


3 744 

678 
21 


3 722 


355 

640 
35 


36 


499 
12 


426 
12 


867 
36 


54 
4 


51 1 


438 


498 

~ 531 
25 


556 

623 
25 


705 

~ 68l" 
36 


678 
35 


iM)3 
30 


675 


58 


023 
21 


610 
25 


172 

27 


17 
3 


644 


635 


556 


648 
76 


717 
99 


713 
~200 


669 


199 
27 


20 


119 


96 
1 


82 
1 


251 


3 






99 
3 


200 




27 

—1 
—1 




119 


96 


83 
1 


76 


261 


3 


2 


11 


3 


1 


6 
1 

7 










3 






2 


11 


4 


3 


' 


-2 





rll6 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Students of higher institiitions 18934903, the decade's 



• 


ISOR 
563 


1804 


18R6 


189B 


Rngineerinfj: and technology, men 


666 


572 


509 


women 














total 


663; 565 


573 


509 


Architecture, men 








women 




















totnl 





















Art, men 








women 


308 


266 


370 


280 






total 


308 


266 


270 


280 






Music, men 


54 
198 


208 
972 


h"34 

?898 


173 


women 


866 






total 


363 


1 180 


1 033 


1 038 






Others, men 


1 362 
3 743 


1 348 

2 118 


1 491 
3 151 


1 547 


wijnien 


2 01 S 






total 


m 864 


3 466 


3 643 3 562 






Special, men 


r3 173 
cl31 


c3 980 
C835 


3 833 3 470 


women 


1 949 1 6;W 






total 


c2 294 


c3 816 


5 782i 5 108 






hi 7 ft*>H 


Total, men 


bin 101 hm 898'M7 808 


women 


066 


7 678 8 928. 8 697 








grand total 


531 833 


'623 976'h2fi 731 


626 :^20 






1 





/> Omittintr duplicates. 

c Not including students attending the lei'turos at Catholic Summer School. 



COLLEGK DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 

growth and average annual increase (cantinued) 



Tin 





1808 


1800 


1000 


1901 


looe 


1008 


IN0RKA8X 


1807 


Decade 


Aver, 
an. 


549 


606 
108 


1 825 

12 


1 501 
58 


1 781 
6 


2 043 

8 


2 447 
14 


1 894 
14 


189 

1 


549 


714 


1 337 


1 559 

40 
3 


1 787 


2 051 


2 461 


1 908 


191 






42 

6 


49 
3 

52 


48 
2 


135 

1 


186 
1 


14 














48 


43 


50 


136 


186 


14 




... 










108 
973 


136 

1 038 


151 
1 186 


167 
1 106 


167 

798 


17 


236 


582 


601 


80 


236 


582 


601 

r97 
555 


1 081 

" " 197 

872 


1 174 

206 
924 


1 337 

^26 
876 


1 273 

245 
942 


965 

191 
744 


97 


155 
515 


190 
576 


19 
74 


670 


766 


752 


1 069 

1587 
1 617 


1 130 


1 102 


1 187 


935 


94 


1 896 

2 102 


1 507 
1 732 


1 605 
1 876 


1 940 

2 132 


2 186 
2 124 


2 327 
2 405 


^975 
—887 


98 
-84 


3 998 


3 239 

~4 732 
1 991 


3 481 


3 204 


4 072 


4 310 


4 732 


878 

3 673 

3 108 


88 


4 055 
1 97(^ 


4 703 
2 639 


3 919 
915 


4 230 

1 087 


4 832 
995 


5 846 
3 229 


367 
311 


6 031 


6 723 


7 342 

/>19 IW) 
Ml 691 


4 834 

el 9 798 
€\0 062 


5 317 


5 827 

'622~970 
Ml 394 


9 075 


6 781 


678 


9 108 


"79814 
9 987 


/21 268 
/ll 215 


625 029 
614 689 


9 922 

7 723 


992 
772 


im 007 


29 801 


Ixmi 490 


?/29 795 


632 203 


634 364 


639 718 


17 885 


1 789 



d Kot incluclinff 2iff2 students of Chautauqua Summer School. 

eOmittinflr aHaunlicates except 65 in Syracuse which were not reported separately as 
men and women. These ure, however, omitted in the total. 

/Omittlny all duplicates except 00 in Syracuse and 220 in Columbia which were not 
reported separately as men and women. 



rllS 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



i" ei o "^ i-H 00 "* o» r- r- • 't 
o»o oo^• r-iio 



1 

s 

s 

I 



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cc -i« oa o ♦ - CI 



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COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rll9 



n 

si 



I 



4> 

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g 

pa 



s 



g. 






CO 

o 

Oi 

»-^ 
I 
CO 
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' ^ ^ '^ S F SS ^ !2 ■ ;2 

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r. ^ lO ^ X;- T- -^ CI 5 'T^ ^ 
^ -** ^ si- ^ t- t- t-- t- c *o 

r- CO -30 s* n ^-1 ^ «> '3 ^ -f 

J-^ iC i-i-^ I ^ 



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1 






■^ C- T* 5 ** t- -^ t* f * 
iO lO » t- -f Ol -i* (T* -t< 

^ 1^ e * E^ t- l-i t- Q «^ 

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5 ^1 ^ Q TC afi 1^ « s ct 5 i'? 
O i^ CI -* ^ t- 3fr ti c* x> 2 TC 

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ir* c-i *r5 « ss ift X; ^ ?1 ^ ** 50 
^ t£^ ^ ^ ^1 K^ ^ 



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e*■x^ 



Q « cs 2 r: F^ =; r -^^ 99 
'^ w <:* ;3* o f- ■?& OS. 1^ 5 

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fTT -^ -r Tr o *-- LT? a cc ^^ ?& ^ 

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L- S ^ I?* 3 X- * t- ^ O O O 
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1-H flO I- O t- ^ -^ 00 50 ^ Cf a 
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UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW TOBK 



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rl24 



TTNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

8 EIOHSX UIBTlTUTlOire 



<'LA88TnrATI(>N 


NUMBER 


FACULTY 


8TUDEXT8 




1903 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Colleges for men 


21 
5 

7 
5 


598 
112 
249 
267 


8 

186 

43 


3 198 

* 1*885 
717 




Colleges for women 


3 921 


C^)llegeH for men and women 

(Graduate denartmentH 


1 103 
265 






Total 


88 

10 
8 
8 

18 
8 
5 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1226 

173 

183 

72 

1147 

114 

50 

50 

24 

18 

18 


282 


5 300 

~ 947 

2 563 

755 

8568 

867 

689 

251 

6 

15 

133 


5 289 






Theology 


8 
1 

m 

82 
1 

2 

28 


»>•> 


Law 


55 


Education 


1 887 


Meilicine 


154 


Dentistry 


36 


Pharmacy 


80 


Veterinary 




Eye an<l ear 


1 


Library 


61 


Commerce, accounts and finance 




Total 


58 


1 795 

226 
15 
82 
56 

120 


152 


9 744 


2 246 






Engineering and te<^hnoh>gy 

Architecture 


7 
2 
8 
4 
4 


1 

*'25 
88 
78 


2 447 
185 
167 
245 

1462 


14 
1 


Art 


1 106 


Music 


942 


Other . . . ^ 


2 079 






Total 


20 


449 


187 


4 456 


4 142 






Special 


7 


197 


42 


5 846 


3229 






(rrand total 


118 


8 808 


568 


25 029 


14 689 







0OLtE(^E DEPARTMENT REPORT ld03 
OBOUPED IK FOTTB CLASSES 



rl25 





FIRST I)B- 

ORKE8 CON- 

rEKRED ON 

EXAM. 


NET PROPERTY 


EXPENDTTURBB 


re(;eipts 


Total 


1903 


1903 


1903 


19q8 


3 198 
3 921 

2488 
982 


580 
7i81 
376 
283 


$31 550 809 . . 

6 275 621 64 

16 502 190 80 

44 000 .. 


$3 273 855 86 

1 780 912 80 

1 657 579 25 

8 336 27 


$3 614 892 99 

1896 208 86 

2006 630 64 

8 386 27 


10 589 


2 020 


* $54 372 121 34 


$6 720 684 17 


$7 524 963 75 


969~ 

2 618 

2 642 

8 722 

903 

669 

251 

7 

76 

133 


33 
521 
117 
513 
124 
212 

24 
3 
3 

23 


$11271627 12 
979 037 76 
2 587 085 12 
5 818 452 56 
124 467 93 
202 092 44 
158 191 46 
100 000 .. 
779 087 04 


$811 300 09 

261 440 61 

788 022 13 

493 810 12 

138 474 70 

100 493 53 

32 m>7 03 

890 .. 

3 129 54 

10 281 .. 


$896 571 34 

254 432 16 

807 361 49 

520 064 98 

145 364 17 

81562 28 

34 679 48 

890 .. 

3 214 68 

10 281 .. 








11 990 


1 573 

~360' 

13 

11 

3 

10 


$22 015 041 43 


$2 625 838 75 


$2 754 421 68 


2 461 
186 


$1 383 156 56 

29 540*ii 

69 129 18 
3 863 754 79 


$128 852 58 


$156 366 82 


1273 
1 187 
3 541 


25 010 23 

38 726 12 

271 971 44 


15 123 44 

89 690 30 

288 990 45 


8 598 


397 


$5 345 580 64 


$464 (KK) 37 


$495 161 01 


9 075 


51 


$4 643 048 8?> 


$250 685 96 


$302 047 36 


39 718 


4 041 


$86 375 792 30 


$10 W51 269 25 


$11076 593 70 



rr-'O 



rXIVEIlSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



1 ( 

2( 
»( 
4( 

r>( 



OKKICKUH or INSTKlT<-rrON 



6 ( 6. 



1 . 1) C .olumbm rr527 

2. 2) Corn**!! »94 

H, 8) New York 197 

4. 4) Svraruse l«l 

«, «) Buffalo 159 

5. 5) Union iKJ 



9 UIBTITUTIOVB 

Table 1 appears In full 
Plifures In curves sbow the rank 



1 CV>luni])ia al)5 122 

2C;ornell m 146 

B Svnwnim* hi 992 

4lrfew York b\ »«5 

6 Buffalo mn 

(\ Union 569 



1(8. 4. 8) Col. Citv of N. Y. . . . 115 

2(1,12. 7) Nor.Col.CitvofN.Y. 93 

8(2, 1, 2) Vassjir * W^ 

4(4, 2, 1) Barnard 57 

5 (19, 18, 10) HolH»rt 37 

6 ( 6. 28, 4) Adeli)bi 38 

7 (16, 8, 5) St John's, Fonlliani. . 82 

8 (14. 15. 9) Wells 82 

9 (21, U, 18) ManliattAn 81 

10 (27, 14, 20) (^anisius 29 

11 (24, 24, 1 1 ) Mackenzie 2i) 

12 (25, 27. 15) St Francis 27 

18 (11. 10, 14) C'ol.ofStFr'ncisXav. 28 

14 ( 7, 22. 19) Elmira 2;J 

15 ( 5, 5. 12) RocheHter , . . . . 21 

16 ( 9, 3, 0) CV>lKate 20 

17 (18. 9, IH) HolMirt 20 

18 (17, 20, 8) Polvteclmic, IVklyn.. 20 

19 ( 12. 16, 17) AlfHKi ". . . . 19 

20(8, 6. 16) Hamilton 19 

21 (15, 21. 23) St Bonaventures. ... 18 

22 (22. 26, 28) St John's, Bklvn. . . . 18 
23(13, 7, 25) Syrian ^ 18 

24 (20. 25, 24) Niagara 12 

25 (10, 19, 21 ) St lAwrenoe 12 

26 (26, 17, 26) Keuka 10 

27 (23. 18, 22) St Stephen's 8 

28 (28, 28. 27) Canton Christian. ... — 



Institutionfl in Table 2 exclnd- 

Table 2 appears In full 

1 Nor. Col. City of N. Y. 2 295 

2Vassar 864 

8 Col. City of N. Y 819 

4 liarnanl 445 

5 Ro<^hester 245 

6 A(leli>hi 228 

7 Elmira 201 

8 Hamilton 191 

9 Colgate 182 

10 St I Awrence 158 

1 1 Col . of St Francis Xav. . 129 

12 Alfred 128 

13 Syrian 121 

14 Wells 116 

15 St Bonaventure's Ill 

1 6 St John's, Fordham 110 

17 Polytechnic. B'khn. ... 108 
18Hobart \ 105 

19 Rolx^rt 104 

20 Niagara 77 

21 Mjinhattan 69 

22 St Johns, B'klyn 54 

23 St Steplien's 44 

24 Mackenzie 38 

25 St Francis 36 

26 Keuka 85 

27 C 'anisius^ 32 

28 Canton Christian — 



aincludlnfir statistics of Barnard and Teachers colleges, 
taking summer courses only. 



bNot Including those 



COLLEUK DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl27 



ZV TABLE 1 

In the bound report 

In the other three columns. 



NBT PROPERTY 



1 Columbia ri|;28 221 073 10 

2 Cornell 13 791 r>5« 32 

3 New York 3 506 740 34 

4 Syracuse 3 13r, 710 18 

5 Union 1 2.% 12H 72 

6 Buffalo 245 095 71 



ANNUAL KXPENDITITRBH EXOLUDINO 
GROUND8 AND BUILDINGS 



1 Columbia «/*3 553 649 54 

2 Cornell /920450 84 

3 New York 423 078 58 

4 Syracuse 293 161 57 

5 Union /136 648 55 

6 BuflFalo 81 528 99 



ing those g^ven in Table 1 

In the bound report. 

1 Vassar |RJ 644 732 22 

2 Barnard 2 387 637 93 

3 ColgaU* (-2 158 499 64 

4 Col. ( 'ity of N. Y . . . 1 6.55 300 . . 

5 Rot-hester 1 348 208 38 

6 Hamilton 1 167 328 . . 

7 Syrian ^H 101 739 (M$ 

8 St Johns, Fordham. 1 013 621 67 
9Hobart 793 583 66 

10 Col. St Francis Xav. 737 786 60 



11 Manhattan 

12Nor.Col.CitvofN.Y. 

13 Rol)ert 

14 CanisiiLs 

15 Wells 



16 Alfred 

17 Keuka 

18 St Stephens 

19 St l-Jiwrenc^e 

20 Polyte<hnic. B'klyn. 



21 St T^>na venture 

22 Elmira 

23 Adelphi 

24 Mackenzie 

25 Niagara 



s.. 



26 St John's. B'klyn . 

27 St Fnmcis 

28 Canton Oiristian . 



(598 595 53 
533 333 32 
528 658 21 
464 304 56 
449 168 07 

396 279 81 
e 346 366 OH 
341 039 27 
331 ((09 \^) 
329 092 53 

267 300 .. 
2(W) 750 . . 
228 59(i 87 
217 308 42 
216 530 .. 

170 (KM) .. 
KM 087 72 
124 403 11 



1 Barnanl $1 188 486 84 

2 Vas.Siir 369 773 94 

3 Col. Citv of N. Y . . . 815 072 59 

4 Adelphi' 211 030 78 

5 St John's. Fordham. 121 357 34 



6 Colgjite 

7Nor.Col.CityofN.Y. 
8 Polytechnic, Bklyn. 
9\Vt^ls 

10 Rolwrt 

11 Ma<"kenzie 

12 Rochester 

13 Manhattan 

14 Col. St Francis Xav. 

15 St Francis 



16 Hamilton 

17 Alfre<l 

18 Hobiirt 

19 Elmira 

20 Canisius 

21 St Lawrence 

22 St SU»phen*s 

23 St Bonaventure's 

24 Niagara 

25 Syrian 



2(^ Keuka 

27 Canton Christian 

28 St John's. Bklyn . 



70 285 36 
67 966 65 
65 351 93 
63 885 62 
63 704 19 

Hi2 337 04 
61 361 88 
55 044 51 
47 461 96 
46 331 45 

45908 .. 
39 190 37 
38 549 56 
31 151 76 
27 478 88 

22690 81 
22599 (55 
17 390 .. 
12 910 .. 
12 4(M) 53 

10 544 42 
9 854 10 

9 389 28 



rincludinfi: theological department. dlncUidlnf; niodical, pharmaceutic and pre- 
paratory departments. clncludlng academic department. ^Kxpendltures on 
grounds and buildings not being reported, the whole amount expended for Improve- 
ment and repairs Is deducted. 



rl28 



UNIVEttSlTY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



InBtitutionfl in Table 3 

Table 3 appears In full 
Plffures in curves show the rank 



OFFICBRH or INKTRUGTION 



8, 19, 18 
11.41.32 

4, 6, 1 

2, 2. 8 

3, 46, 50 

17.16,12 
29,11,28 
1, 8, 5 
10,27, 7 
88, 10. 48 

41.29.42 
12, 49. 51 
9.81,19 
28, 42. 24 
80, 32, 28 

5, 28. 20 
16,12, 8 

6, 9, 18 
48, 25, 46 
18, 43, 34 

32, 7,14 
13, 17, 16 
26, 4, 2 
44, 84, 41 
7,24, 6 

25, 1, 4 
22, 33. 30 
39, 48, 26 
19.36,27 
28, 45, HT) 

14, 23. 15 
24, 15, 17 
21, 6,10 
47,40,49 
85, 8, 9 

15,47,82 
20,20, 11 
43, 38, 38 
84, 14, 25 
36, 85, 87 



N. Y. PostKrad. Med. S. 223 
NY. Po'cl. Mwl. S.& H.<il28 

Teachers a)llege 128 

Pratt Inst 124 

CMiautAuqua Inst ri 102 



Ix>ng Island Col. Hasp . 
N.Y. Horn. Meil.C^&H. 
Cooijer Union, n. sch . . 
N. Y. Col. of Dentistry. 
N. Y. State Library Scli. 

N.Y.Med. Col. AHosp. 
Metropolit'n C. of Music 
N. Y. Col. of Music... 
N. Y. Dental School... 
Eclectic Med. Col 

Catholic Summer Si*h. . 
Rensselaer Pol v. Inst. . 
N. Y. Tra^leScho<il.... 
N.Y. Ophthalmic Hosp. 
Grand Con. of Music. . . 

Rochester Theol. Sem. 
N. Y. State Nor. Col... 

Union Theol. Sem 

Alfred Theol. Sera ... 
N. Y. Law School 



1 Cooi)er Union, night sch. 3 441 

2 Pratt Inst 3 210 

8 (.'hautaucjua Inst a2 847 

4 Teachers College 1 915 

5 Catholic Summer Sch. ... 61 517 



41jlO 

I 
40.11 
36 12 
35 13 
35 14 
34|15 

?>32'l6 
32 17 
30=18 
26 19 
2320 

2321 
22122 
1823 
17 24 
17 25 



General Theol. Sem. . . 
Brooklyn Col. of Phar. 
Hamilton Theol. Sem. . 
N.Y. Sch of A p. Design 
Brooklyn Law Sch 

C. of Ph. of City of N.Y. 

St Bernard's Sem . . 

St Joseph's Sem 

Am. Inst, of Phrenology 
Auburn Theol. Sem 



N. Y. Trade School 

N. Y. Iaw School 

N. Y. Postgrad. Med. S.. 

N. Y. Col. of Music 

N. Y. Col. of Dentistry. . 

N.Y. Polyclin. Med. S.& H. 
Metropolitan Col. of Music 

N. Y. State Nor. Col 

Col. of Ph. of City of N.Y. 
Cooper U. , Woman's Art S. 

Rensselaer Poly. Inst 

Long Island Col. Hosp. . . 
(irand Conserv. of Music . 
N. Y. Sch. of App. Design 
Hebrew Techmcal Inst . . 

St Joseph's Sem 

Brooklyn Col. of Phar. . . 

N. Y. Dental School 

St Bernard's Sem 

General Theol. Sem 



15 26 Union Theol. Sem 

14j27 Syrian Prot. Col., med. d. 

14128 Brooklyn I^w Sch. 

14 

13 



39 N. Y. Horn. Med. Col. & H. 
30 Eclectic Med. Col 



13i81 C'rad Poppenhusen Ass'n 

13!32 Rochester Theol. Sem 

13 33 N. Y. State Library Sch. . 
ll|34 T. S. Clarkson M. S. of T. 
11135 Auburn Theol. Sem 



Cooper U. , Wo'n's Art S. c\ 1 
Hebrew Technical Inst. 1 1 
N. Y. S. S. of Clay-work 10 
T. S. Clarkson M. S. of T. 10 
St Bonav. Col . , theol. d. 9 



36 St Bonav. Col., theol. dep. 

87 St John's Col., theol. dep't 

88 Sem. of Our Lady of Ang. 

39 Hamilton Theol. Sem 

40 Jewish Tlieol. Sem 



924 

d832 

639 

588 



a416 
401 
387 
325 

c518 

314 
266 

248 
248 

2;« 

155 
152 
137 
137 
127 

121 
115 
112 
105 
104 

95 

93 

(fie 

72 



45 
45 
44 
37 
36 



Taken from 1908 report, no flfrures beinjir reported this year, h Taken from 190? report, 
he report for this year was received too late for insertion in these tables. « Includinir 
:ist ics f or the schools of stenof^raphy and tyi)cwritingr and telegraphy. <} Not inciud- 
in§r those taking summer course only. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl29 



excluding those in Table 1 

in the bound report. 

in the other three colamns. 



NBT PROPERTY 



1 General Theol. Sem. . . .$3 916 133 33 

2 Pratt Inst e3 678 170 36 

a Cooper U., night sch. . ./3 333895 33 

4 Union Theol. Sem 3 436 895 09 

5 Teachers College 3 148 071 13 

6 St Joseph's Sem 1 333 398 37 

7 Rochester Theol. Sem . . 1 131 633 93 

8 Auburn Theol. Sch. ... 985 681 31 
9N. Y. Trade Sch 913313 11 

10 N. Y. State Library Sch. ^79 087 04 

1 1 N. Y. Horn. Med. C. & H . /t690 831 85 
13 Rensselaer Poly. Inst. . . 530 000 05 

13 Jevv-ish Theol. Sem 478 139 47 

14 T. S. Clarkson M. S. of T . 463 055 86 

15 St Bernard's Sem 440 481 47 



16 Long Island Col. Hosp . . 

17 N. Y. State Nor. Col . . . 

18 Canton Theol. Sch 

19 N. Y. Postgrad. Med. S. 

20 Hebrew Tech. Inst 



//354 9(J0 90 
350965 11 
34« 733 73 
333 664 16 
309 450 98 



21 C. Poppenhusen Assn. . 195 151 56 

22 St John's Col. , theol. d . . 153 000 

23 C. of Ph. of City of N. Y . 144 410 34 

24 N. Y. Law School 138 348 79 

25 N. Y. Ophthalmic Hosp . ilOO 000 

26 Christian Biblical Inst. 93 363 65 

27 N. Y. Col. of Dentistry. 86 907 13 

28 Catholic Summer Sch. . 682 538 92 

29 N. Y. Med. Col. & Hosp. ^75 819 02 

30 Sem. of Our Lady of Ang. 72 190 

31 N. Y. Col. of Music 68 080 

33 Eclectic Med. Col 49 677 

33 Brooklyn Col. of Phar . . 43 000 

34 Alfred Theol. Sem 32 416 99 

35 St Bonavent. S. , theol. d. 30 400 . . 

36 N. Y. Sch. of App. Design 29 540 11 

37 Hartwick Sem., theol. d 27 353 33 

38 N. Y. S. S. of Clay-work 19 965 

39 German M. Luther Sem. 14 909 77 

40 Am. Inst, of Phrenology 10 700 



RXPENOITURBS EXCLUDING OROUND8 
AKT> BUILDINGS 



1 Teachers College $466 389 99 

3 Union Theol. Sem 389 916 45 

3 Pratt Institute 353 768 10 

4 General Theol. Sem ... 133 668 53 

5 Cooper U., night sch . . 77 676 75 

6 N. Y. Law School 67 430 73 

7 N. Y. Col. of Dentistry 65 946 35 

8 Rensselaer Po'tec. Inst. 59 086 07 

9 Auburn Theol. Sem ... 57 633 78 

10 St Joseph's Sem 54 854 41 

11 Hebrew Tech. Inst. ... 46 340 75 

12 Long Island Col. Hosp. 45 778 88 

13 N. Y. Trade School .... 44 939 97 

14 Rochester Theol. Sem. 48 711 74 

15 C. of Ph. of City of N. Y 41 298 41 

16 N. Y. State Nor. Col . . . 39 315 29 

17 St Bernards Sem 38 083 05 

18 N. Y. Postg. M. S. & H. 36 348 35 

19 N. Y. Col. of Music. ... 29 687 . . 
30 Catholic Summer Sch. 627326 66 

21 Jewish Theol. Sem. ... 35 313 53 

23 N. Y. Polv. M. S. ife H. «23 504 68 

23 N Y. Horn. M. C. & H. 30 956 63 

34 N. Y. Dental School ... 17 470 33 

25 T. S. Clarkson M. S. of T. 17 003 84 



26 Hamilton Theol. Sem. . 

27 N. Y. S. of App. Design 
38 Eclectic Med. Col . . . . 
29 Syrian Prot. C, med. d. 
80 Brooklyn Col. of Phar. 

31 Canton Theol. School. . 

32 Cooi>er U., Wo'n's A. S. 

33 C. Poppenhusen Ass'n. 

34 Grand Con. of Music . . 

35 Brooklyn Law School . . 

36 St John's Col., theol. d. 

37 St Bonav. C, theol. d. . 

38 N. Y. S. S. of Clay- wk. 

39 Sem. of O'r L'dy of Ang. 

40 Cliristian Biblical Inst . 



16 442 24 


14 303 31 


12 968 .. 


12 612 87 


12565 .. 


13 337 18 


C10 659 78 


10 378 38 


8 551 33 


8 245 85 


8150 .. 


7800 .. 


7 367 85 


6 875 .. 


4 717 74 



f Including academic department. / Includinar all property owned by Cooper Union. 

frlncludinfrNewYorlc State Library which is used by tnc school and also by all teaching 
Dstitutf ons in the Universit;^'. h IncludiDjgr hospital, i Value of hospital and college takei; 
from 1901 report, 



tVM 



UNIVKBUITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

InBtitntioiiB in Table 3 



OFriCEllM OF INHTllirCTION 



41 (H7. 22. 80) St John's C!ol.. theol. d. 

42 (88. :M), «tt) S«»ni. of Or l/dvof An^. 
48 (27, 51, 29) Svriaii Pn)t. (C nied. tl. 

44 (4r). 18, «1) CViuton Theol. H<'h.... 

45 (46.20.44)) Cliristiau Hiblinil Iiist. 

4« (40. 18, 21 ) Jewish Tlu»<»l. 8. of Am. 

47 (81, 21. 8;i) Crad Popnhuson Assn. 

48 (42,50,44) Syrian Prot. C.d. of ph. 
4« (50.89,45) (German M. Luther Sem. 

50 (4V>, 87. 47) Hart wick Sem.. th'ol. d. 

51 (51, 44, 48) Anier. C^'ol. of Musicians 



»Tl'I»KNTS 



8 41 N. Y. Med. Col. & IIosp. . 84 

8 42 Syrian Prot. Co\., d. of ph. 80 

8 4:^ ^, Y. S Sch. of Clay-work. 26 

44 AlfrtHl ThtM)l. Sem 24 

45 Canton Theol. Sch 23 

46 C^liristian Biblical Inst. . . 15 
5 47 Am. Inst, of Phrt»nologv . 12 
5.48 N. Y. Ophthalmic Hosp. . 7 
4;49 Hart wick Sem., theol. d. 5 
2 50 (lerman M. Luther Sem. . 8 

..51 Amer. Col. of Musicians. 



^ 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 

excluding those in Table 1 (continued) 



rl31 



NET PROPERTY 


EXPENDITURES EXCLUDING GROUNDS 
AND BUIIiDINQS 


41 N. Y. Po'cl. Med. S. & H. 

42 N. Y. Dental School.... 

48 Grand Conserv. of Music 

44 Amer. Col. of Musicians 

45 Brooklyn Law Sch 

46 Chautauqua Inst 

47 Cooper U., Woman's A. S. 
4S Hamilton Tlieol. Sem. . . 

49 Metrop. Col. of Music . . . 

50 Syrian Prot. C, d. of pli. 

51 Syrian Prot. C, med. d. 


a$7 422 20 41 Alfred Theol. Sem 

^ 3 622 31 42 N. Y Med. Col. &Hosp. 

808 13143 N. Y. State Library S. 

241 05 44 Syrian Prot. C, d. of ph. 
13 . . 45 German M. Luther S. . 

a . . 46 N. Y. Ophthalmic Hosp. 
j . . '47 Hartwick Theol. Sem . . 
k . .'48 Am. Col. of Musicians. 
I . . |49 Am. In. of Phrenology. 

k . ..50 Chautauqua Inst 

k . . 51 Metrop. Col. of Music . . 


$8465 49 
8 218 98 
3129 54 
3 059 11 

1841 07 

890 .. 
800 .. 
188 80 
/ 
a 
I 



a Taken from IWB report, no flflrures being reported this year, j Given under niflrht 
school, h No separate statisticH reported for this department ; if iven under arts depart- 
ment. I Not reported. 



rl32 



UNIVBHSITY OV TUK STATE OF NEW YORK 



10 0IR8 

The following made up from Appleton's Annual Cyclopaedia shows the amount of gifts 

value for each year 



IBIIiTITUnONS 



Year 



1902. . . . 
1901... 
1900 .., 
1899 .. 
1898..., 
1897... 
1896. . . 
1895... 
1894. . . , 
1893... 

Total 



BLEMBIITABY 



New York 



$1496 338 

22 000 

80 000 
5 0(K) 

16 500 
590 000 

80 000 
129 333 
310 000 

10 000 



$2 689 166 



7.4 c. ft 



Ignited States 



!|;266 000 
115 000 
170 000 

1 555 000 
229 500 

1 313 250 
274 300 
621000 

4 060 000 
184 000 



18 788 050 



ZiJSic.tt 



Total 



$1 762 833 
137 000 
200 000 

1 560 000 
246 000 

1 903 250 
354 300, 
750 333' 

4 370 000 
194 000 



fOCONDARY 



New York United States 



$758 334 

1 094 666, 

539 000; 

674 250 

42 50()| 

847 500' 

133 500 

1 125 250i 

348 000, 

332 0001 



$431 480 
1 322 000 

1 185 500 
3 865 167 

2 850 250 
253 000 
474 166 
542 000 
218 500 
120 000 



$11477 216 $5 395 000 $11262 063 



81.6 c. ft 



14.8 c. ft 



81 eft 



INSTITUTIONS 


LAW 




MEDICI NB 




Year 


Total 


New York 


United 
iStates 


Total 


New York 


1902 

1901 


U. S. $60 000 


$1 025 000 

1 314 500 

80 000 

I 154 500 

1 740 000 
1000 


$1 201 000 

794 000 

12 000 

12 000 

115 000 


$2 226 000 

2 108 500 

92 000 

166 500 

1855 000 
1000 


$6 394 629 
1 545 000 


1900 

1899 

1898 


li. S. 2*5 OOO 
\ N. Y. 12 000 
} U. S. 125 000 


1062 000 

1 611 678 

815 000 


1897 


U.S. 115 000 


1 678 500 


1896 




266 500 


1895 




640 000 


105 000 

192 666 

76 000 


745666 

192 666 

88 000 


1 534 200 


1894 


U. S. 25 000 
N. Y. 75 000 


1 791 000 


1893 


12606 


1 432 000 


Total 


$437 000 


$4 967 000 


$2 507 666 
6.9 eft 


$8 474 666 
20.6 eft 


$17 680 507 




Total N.Y. $87 000 
•' U.S. $350 000 
N. Y. .2 c, ft 
1.2 c. ft 


13.6 c. ft 


48.5 eft 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl33 



AHD BSaTrSSTS 

and bequests for educational purposes (including hospitals) of $5000 each and upward in 
from 1808 to 1902. 





COTJiKQB 


OENEBAIi 


Total 


New York 


United States 


Total 


Total 


$1 189 814 


$9 235 933 


$9 537 175 


$18 773 108 


$21 725 255 


2 416 666 


17 207 500 


39 02(5 450 


56 238 950 


58 787 616 


1 724 500 


3 701000 


12 696 507 


16 397 507 


18 322 007 


4 539 417 


3 183 711 


25 050 000 


28 233 711 


34 333 128 


2 892 750 


2 194 000 


8 932 600 


11 126 600 


14 265 350 


600 500 


3 260 000 


6 324 166 


9 584 166 


12 087 916 


607 666 


2 033 500 


7 946 791 


9 980 291 


10 942 257 


1667 250 


4 343 255 


4 559 000 


8 902 255 


11 319 838 


566 500 


5 789 748 


3 219 414 


9 009 162 


13 945 662 


452 000 


2 946 666 


2 501 500 


5 448 166 


6 0i)4 166 


$16 657 063 


$53 895 313 


$119 793 603 


$173 688 916 
N. Y. total 


$201 823 195 
556.1 c. ft 




$61 979 479 


45.9 c. ft 


148.5 c. ft 


330.1 c. ft 


478.6 eft 


170.7 c. ft 



H08PITALS 




THEOrX)OY 


PROFES- 
SIONAL 


United States 


Total 


New York 


United States 


Total 

$3 150 000 
674 000 
734 666 

512 000 

180 000 
317 000 
279 500 
610 000 
684 000 
3 010 000 


Total 


$5 880 500 
7 630 635 
6 720 333 

1 483 058 

2990 000 

3 252 000 

4 576 667 
1 2a5 667 


$12 275 129 
9 075 635 
7 782 333 

3 094 736 

3 305 000 

4 930 500 
4 843 167 

2 819 8(57 

3 367 666 
2 491880 


$2 627 000 
357 000 
460 000 

372 000 

25 000 
297 000 
125 000 


$523 000 
317 000 
274 (566 

140 000 

155 000 

20 000 

154 500 

610 000 

79 000 

3 005 000 


$17 711129 

11 858 135 

8 633 999 

3 910 236 

5 340 000 
5 363 500 
5 122 6(57 

4 174 867 


1 576 (566 
1 059 880 


605 000 
5 000 


4 269 382 

5 664 880 


$36 355 406 
100.1 c. ft 


$53 985 913 
148.6 c. ft 


$4 873 000 
13.4 c. ft 


$5 278 166 
14.6 c. ft 


$10 151 166 

N. Y. total 
27.9 c. ft 


$72 048 745 
198.6 c. ft 

$27 557 507 
76.9 0. ft 



rl34 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



GZ1T8 AVD 



INSTITUTIONH 



Year 



1902. 
1901. 
1900. 
18«). 
1898. 
1897 
18im. 
1895. 
IH^M. 
1898. 



TBCHNICAL 



New York 



United Stat€e 



$1 680 000 

8 141 000 

8 175 (HK) 

a 007 000; 

10 (KK) 

00 000; 



i>25 (HK» 



1 rm) (MK) 



$1018 

1645 

290 

2 8:^5 

1 222 
795 
248 

70 
515 

2 425 



0001 

ooo! 
oooj 
oool 

OOOl 
(KX)' 
600' 
(KM) 
000 
000 



TotHl j *11 918 (K)0 



32.8 V. ft 



$11 068 600 



30.4 c. ft 



Total 



$2 698 000 

4 786 000 

8 465 000 

4 902 000 

1 282 000 

855 000 

248 600 

295 000 

515 000 

8 985 000 



$22 981 600 



e3.3 0. ft 



New York United States 



$2 2a5 940 
6 651 0001 
755 OOOl 
880 000' 
105 000 
898 000 

65 000 
825 500 

91000 
181 500 



$12 157 940 



33.5 c. ft 



$8 211 922 

218 000 

831 ms 

924 850 

6 225 (KK) 

12 210 000 

1 175 770 
985 000 
298 6(K) 

2 078 982 



$33 104 457 



91.2 c. ft 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 
BSaVSSTB (ameluded) 



rl33 







LnaABiBi 




OTK£B 


IIHAM1> 












l!OTAL 


Total 


New York 


Uaited States 


Total 


Total 




110 417 86$ 


|3ri30 000 


1^68 000 


«^s9Skaooo 


117 113863 


|;56&50 346 


6869 000 


18 06}! 8^ 


t 2U3 00() 


14 296 383 


joO^'^iBse 


96 507 084 


1586 9»8 


2 103 000 


1220 000 


3 833 000 


H HU mm 


a5 330d89 


limtm 


1 440 821 


442 067 


1392 438 


8 rm i^m 


46H42 703 


6^130 000 


^92 500 


097 000 


1 019 500 


8 5H1 500 


^iS 1^1^50 


12 606O00 


358 000 


2 818 000 


31TG000 


IfJ 039 000 


{U ^m no 


1240 770 


1 001 0(iO 


518 000 


1 519 000 


H 008 370 


1\} t*;:j ::>M 


I 760 500 


eOTjOOO 


1 »09 067 


2 694 067 


4 7.50 107 


20 244 872 


384 600 


257 0.54 


3 7^2 113 


4 049 167 


4 948 7fi7 


23 109 761 


2260 482 


220 000 


2 mi 000 


a 157 000 


9 402 482 


21 161 528 


1^^262^)7 


|23 069 708 


3116 050 447 


939 125 155 


1107 369 152 


$381 241 im 








N. Y. total 


~i47T45W8 9136 083 634 


mst.n 


m^cAt 


«^t\rt 


itfr.Bir.n 


isn-9<3,n 


a^aBi!, ft 



rl36 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

11 SmafARZES OF BXAMIVATIOVB 



«. 


1888 


18M 


Exiiininations 


nl 

8 067 

4965 

3 102 

61.5 

38.5 

689 

62 

527 


a6 


AllRWAr jvip'VM written 


18 968 


* ' acce})te<l 


9 830 


* ' ni ject<Ml 


4688 


Per cent i)ii])ers uco^^jiUmI 


66 8 


" rejected 


33 2 


Law Htudent certificates i&siUHl 

on examination 


475 
424 


** on e<|uivalents 


51 


** on ]uirtial e<iuivalents. . . . 




Total on all cniuivalents 


527 
89.5 


51 


Per c*»ut law stiuU'nt certifi<*ates issueil on equivalents 

" on jMirtial e<iuiv . . . 


10.7 


onall e<iuivalents. 

Ac4idemi(; (Hjuivalent certificates issued 

on examination . . . 

on etjuivalents 

" on partial ecjuiv . . 


89.5 
28 
2 

26 


10.7 
259 

24 
235 


TotAl on all equivalents. 

Per cent aciuU»mi<» equiv. cert, issued on equivalents 

on jmrtial equiv 


26 
92.9 


285 

90.7 


" on all e<iuivalents . . . 
Medical student c«»rtifi<*ates issue<l 


92.9 
785 
137 
648 

"'648* 
82.5 


90.7 


on examination 

'* on eijuivalents 


895 
652 


** on partial e(iuivalents. . 

Total on all equivalents 

Per cent me<lical student cert, issueil on ecjuivalent^ 

" on partial equiv .... 


**'552** 
58.3 


on all e<iuivalents . , 
Dental student certificiites issued 


82.5 


58.3 


on examination 






'* on equivalents 






*' on partial equivalents. . 






Total on all equivalents 






Per cent dental student cert. issu(*d on eijuivalents 






on partial eiiuiv 






" on all e<iuivalents . . . . i 




Vet^rinarv studtMit certificates is.sued ' 




" on examination 




on ecjuivalents 




** on partial equiv . . . . • 




Total on all e( uivalents. . ' 




Per cent veterinarv student cert, issued on equivalents. . . . 






' * ' on partial equiv. . . 






* * on all e<iuiv 






Total certifi<*ates issued 


1402 

201 

1201 


1681 


" on examination 


843 


' ' on equivalents 


838 


'• on partial equivalents 




" on all equivalents 


1201 
14.3 

85.7 


888 


Per cent total certificates issued on examinati(m 


50.1 


* * on equivalents 


49 9 


" on partial equivalents . . . 




" on all equivalents 


86.7 


49.9 



a Law and medical student examination. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 
AHD CERTIFICATES 1898-1908 



rl37 



IBOSi 


1896 


im 


1896 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1908 


W 


64 


d4 


(H 


(U 


di 


5 


5 


10612 


C23 080 


C23 694 


C23 647 


C27 359 


(^2 768 


C48 265 


C37 785 


1158 


C14 286 


C13110 


C14 434 


C15 658 


C19 908 


C24808 


C21684 


5154 


8 789 


10 573 


9 207 


11588 


12 854 


18 941 


16101 


69 


61.5 


55.3 


61 


57.2 


60.8 


56.2 


57.4 


81 


88.1 


44.6 


39 


42.4 


39.2 


48.8 


42.6 


721 


817 


780 


731 


878 


840 


788 


867 


500 


439 


381 


883 


499 


467 


488 


488 


221 


378 


399 


348 


379 


843 

80 

873 


293 

57 

350 


295 

89 


221 


378 


399 


348 


379 


884 


30.7 


46.3 


51.2 


47.6 


48.2 


40.8 

8.6 

44.4 


87.4 

7.3 

44.7 


84 
10 3 


30.7 


46.3 


51.2 


47.6 


43.2 


44.8 


285 


28,5 


295 


209 


222 


267 


271 


e277 


26 


(57 


28 


16 


30 


22 


30 


46 


259 


21H 


267 


193 


178 


210 


211 


192 










14 
192 


85 
245 


30 
241 


39 


259 


218 


267 


198 


231 


90.9 


76.5 


90.5 


92.3 


80.2 


78.7 


77.9 


69.8 










6.3 
86.5 


13.1 

91.8 


11.1 
89 


14.1 


90.9 


76.5 


90.5 


92.3 


83.4 


1256 


1 475 


1072 


914 


913 


1020 


1049 


1002 


656 


634 


899 


307 


298 


301 


349 


388 


600 


841 


673 


607 


584 


651 


617 


519 










86 
620 


68 
719 


83 
700 


100 


600 


841 


673 


607 


619 


47.8 


57 


62.8 


66.4 


64 


63.8 


58.8 


51.8 










3.9 
67.9 


6.7 
70.5 


7.9 
66.7 


10 


47.8 


57 


62.8 


66.4 


61.8 


17 


78 


161 


108 


1.54 


197 


217 


270 


10 


51 


88 


45 


58 


m 


94 


126 


t 


27 


73 


63 


90 


98 


95 


100 










6 
96 


14 
112 


28 
123 


44 


t 


27 


73 


63 


144 


41.2 


84.6 


45.3 


58.3 


58.4 


49.7 


48.8 


37 










8.9 
62.3 


7.1 
56.8 


12.9 
56.7 


16.8 


41.2 


34.6 


45.3 


58.3 


53.3 






6 
4 
2 


7 
2 
5 


25 
14 
10 

1 

11 
40 

4 

44 

2 192 


22 
11 
10 
1 
11 

45.5 
4.5 
50 
2 346 


26 
15 
11 


48 






28 






15 






5 






......... 

33.3 


5 
71.4 


11 
42.3 


20 






31.8 






10.4 






33.3 
2 314 


71.4 
1969 


42.3 
2 346 


41.7 


2 279 


2 655 


2464 


1192 


1191 


900 


753 


894 


88(5 


921 


1066 


1087 


1464 


1414 


1 216 


1241 


1812 


1227 


1121 










57 
1 298 


148 
1460 


198 
1 425 


277 


1087 


1464 


1414 


1216 


1398 


52.8 


44.9 


38.9 


38.2 


40.8 


37.8 


39.3 


43.3 


47.7 


55.1 


61.1 


61.8 


56.6 


55.9 


52.3 


45.5 










2.6 
59.2 


6.3 
62.2 


8.4 
60.7 


11.2 


47.7 


55.1 


61.1 


61.8 


56.7 



h Law, medical and dental student oxamination. c Including Chautauqua. d Law^ 
medical, dental and veterinary student examination. e^oX. Viic\\x^w^ Yl NaKo^A. Vast ^3i 
counts andjwveo for 86 counts. 



rl38 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 
It EXAIOHATIOVS AVD CEBTIFZOATEB IMS 



LAW, MBIUCAL, DENTAL AND VBTKBINABr STUDENTS 



Examinations 

Answer papers written 

ac<;epte<l 

*' reje<*te(l 

Per cent of papers ac<*^pted 

* * rejected 

Law student certificates issueil 

' ' on examination 

on e<{uivalents 

* ' on imrtial equivalents 

Per cent law student C4»rtiiicat«8 issueii on equivalents 

on partial equivalents. . 

Academic; equivalent certificates issued 

' * on examination 

* * on equivalents 

" on partial equivalents. . 

Per cent academic iH|uivalent certificates issued on equivalents. . 

on partial equiv. 

Medical student certificates issued 

on examination 

on equivalents 

* * on partial equivalents 

Per cent medical student certificates issued on equivalents 

*' on partial eciuiv. . . 

Dental student certificates issued 

* * on examination 

' * on eijuivalents 

' • on partial equivalents 

Per cent dental student certificates issued on equivalents 

on partial equivalents. 

Veterinary student certificates issued , 

on examination 

* * on equivalents 

on partial eiiuivalents . . . 
Per cent veterinary student certificates issued on equivalents. . 

on partial equiv . 

Total certificates issued 

on examination 

* * on equivalents 

' ' on partial equivalents 

Per cent certificates issued on examination 

* * on eiiuivaleuts 

' ' on partial equivalents 



1903 



4 
41567 
22 658 
18909 
54.5 
45.4 
839 
461 
272 
106 
32.4 
12.6 
328 
54 

2m 

65 

63.7 

19.8 

972 

346 

505 

121 
51.9 
12.4 

290 

134 
82 
74 
28.2 
25.5 
46 
31 
12 
3 
26.08 
6.5 
2 475 
1026 
1080 

369 
41.4 
43.6 
14.9 



COLLBOB DEPARTMBNT BBPORT 1903 



rl39 



© 




S 


fH 




g 


2 


1 


s i 


§ 


3 


i 




1 






f^ 


fe g s « 




• 2 


s g 1 


00 

6 


g i § i S 3 


i 




M 


M 


§ S iS s 




'- S 


«== s s 


s 


g § i i i s 


1 




r-t 


M 


s S S 8 




- S 


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rl40 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

14 MEDICAL 80H00L8 OF UNITED STATES, OAVADA AND OITBA KEGISTEEED 
OS AOCSEDITED JITLT 1, 1904 

Alphabetically arranged by atatea and proYincea 

TTnited States 
Alabama 

Group 8 For admiasion to Hew York medioal schools 

Birmingham Medical College — class 1 

N. 2l8t St. Birmingham, Dean B. L. Wyman 

Medical department, Alabama University — class 1 

St Anthony & State st. Mobile, Dean George A. Ketchnm 

Group 8 For admisBion to Hew York medioal lehools 
Medical department, Arkansas University — class 1 
2d & Sherman st. Little Rock, Sec. P. L. French. 

California 

Group 1 For admisBion to Hew York licensinir examination 
California Medical College; eclectic — class 1 

1422 Folsom st. San Francisco, Dean D. Maclean 
College of Medicine (Univ. of Southern California) — class 1 
Buena Vista st. (Ord & Alpine) Tx)s Angeles, Dean H. G. 
Brainerd 
Hahnemann Med. Coll. of the Pacific ; homeopathic — registered 
Sacramento & Maple st. San Francisco, Dean James W. 
Ward 
Medical department. University of California — registered 

South of Golden Gate park, San Francisco, Dean A. A. 
D'Ancona 
Oakland College of Medicine and Surgery — class 3 
Grove & 31st st. Oakland, Pres. Joseph L. Milton 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York medical fekooli 
Cooper Medical College — class 1 

Sacramento & Webster st. San Francisco, Dean Henry 
Gibbons jr 
Medical department, Coll. of Physicians & Surgeons — class 1 
14th St. (Valencia & Mission) San Francisco, Dean D. A. 
Hodghead 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl41 

Colorado 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing: examination 
Denver & Gross College of Medicine (Denver Univ.) — registered 

Arapahoe & 14th st. Denver, Dean Sherman G. Bonney 
Denver College of Medicine, University of Denver — registered 

Arapahoe & 14th st. Denver, Sec. Henry Sewall 
[iSfee Group 2] 
Medical department. University of Colorado — registered 

Boulder, Dean Luman M. Giffin 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York medical schools 
Denver Homeopathic College — registered 

Park av. & Humboldt st. Denver, Dean James P. Willard 
Gross Medical College (Rocky Mt University) — class 1 

W. 10th av. & S. Water st. Denver, Dean Thomas H. 
Hawkins 

United with Denver College of Medicine, med. department, Denver 
University 1902 to form Denver and Gross College of Medicine (Denver 
University). 

Connectiont 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Medical department, Yale University — registered 

York St. (Crown & Chapel) New Haven, Dean H. E. Smith 

District of Colmnbia 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Medical department, Columbian University — I'egistered 

1325 H St. Washington, Dean Emil A. de Schweinitz 
Medical department, Georgetown University — registered 

H St. N. W. (9th & 10th st.) Washington, Dean George M. 
Kober 
Medical department, Howard University — registered 

5th & Pomeroy st. N. W., Washington, Dean Robert 
R^bum 
Medical department. National Univer^ty — class 1 

1328 I St. N. W., Washington, Dean Howard H. Barker 

Georgia 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Georgia Collie of Eclectic Medicine and Surgery — class 1 

Tanner st. (near Edgewood av.) Atlanta, Pt^%» ^- ^. 
Tbomaa 



rl42 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Group 8 For admission to New York medioal fchools 
Atlanta College of Physicians & Surgeons — class 1 

Armstrong & Butler st. Atlanta, Dean W. S. Kendick 
Medical department, Georgia University — class 1 

Augusta, Dean De Saussure Ford 

Illinois 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensiniir examination 

American College of Medicine & Surgery, medical department. 

Valparaiso College; eclectic — class 2 

333-39 S. Lincoln st. Chicago, Dean H. S. Tucker 

American Medical Missionary College — registered 

28 33(1 1)1. <'hicago and Battle Ci^eek Mich., Pi^es. John H. 

Kellogg 

Chicago Homeopathic Medical College — class 1 

Wood & York st. Chicago, Dean W. M. Steams 

Hahnemann Medical Coll. & Hospital ; homeopathic — class 1 

2811-13 Cottage Grove av. Chicago, Registrar W. Henry 

Wilson 

Hering Med. Coll. & Hospital ; homeopathic — registered 

3832-34 Rhodes av. Chicago, Dean J. T. Kent 

Dnnhaiu united with Ilcriiig in 1902, and Midland University bf^anie 
Uuskin January 1903. 

Illinois Medical College — class 1 

182-84 Washington boulevard, Chicago, Dean B. Brindley 

Eads 

Medical department, Illinois University — class 1 

Congi'ess & Honore st. Chicago, Dean William E. Quine 

Rush Medical College (Chicago University) — registered 

W. Harrison st. (Hermitage av. & Wood) Chicago, Dean 

John M. Dodson 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York medical schools 

Bennett College of Eclectic Medicine & Surgery — class 1 

Ada & Fulton st. Chicago, Dean Anson L. Clark 

College of Medicine & Surgery of Chicago; ])hy8iomedical— 

class 2 

245 Ashland boulevard cor. Van Buren st. Chicago, Dean 

ir. Paxton kelson 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REl»OUT 1903 rl43 

Harvey Medical College — class 1 

167-71 S. Clark st. Chicago, Pres. Francos Dickinson 
Jenner Medical College of Chicago — class 2 

196-98 E. Washington st. Chicago, Sec. William Kittenhouse' 
Medical department, North westeni Univei'sity — class 1 

2421-37 Dearborn st. Chicago, Dean Nathan S. Davis 

Indiana 

Group 1 For adxnifcsion to Hew York licensing: examination 
Medical College of Indiana (Univ. of Indianapolis) — registered 
Senate av. & Market st. Indianapolis, Dean Henry Jameson 
l^hysio-medical College of Indiana — registered 

Alabama & North st. Indianapolis, Sec. C. T. Bedford 
Gronp 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Central College of Physicians & Surgeons — c'lass 1 

Pennsylvania & South st. IndianaiK)lis, Dean George D. 
Kahlo 
Eclectic Medical College of Indiana — class 3 

Indianapolis, Dean R. T. Laycock 
Fort Wayne College of Mexlicine — class 1 

Sui)enor st. (foot of Fulton), Fort Wayne, Dean Christian 
B. Stemen 
Iowa 

Gronp 1 For admission to New York licensing: examination 
Medical department, Dnike University — registered 

4th St. (near Meivy hosi)ital) Des Moines, Dean D. S. 
Fairchild 
Med. department. Stale Univ. of Iowa; liomeo]mtliic — class 1 
Iowa City, Sec. W. L. Bywater 

Oronp 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Keokuk Medical College — class 1 

7th & Blondeau st. Keokuk, Pres. George F. Jenkins 
Medical department. State University of Iowa — registered 

. Iowa City, Sec. E. W. Rock wood 
Sioux City College of Medicine — class 1 

14th & Jones st, Sioux City, Dean H. A. Wheeler 



rl44 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing' examination 
Kansas Mcnliial College, dep't Washburn College — class 1 

12th & Tyler st. Tojieka, Dean John E. Minney 
School of medicine, University of Kansas — class 2 

Mt Oread, Lawrence, Acting Dean C. E. McClung 
Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Medical department, Kansas City University — class 1 

Central & Simpson av. Kansas City, Dean J. E. Sawtell 

Kentucky 

Gronp 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Kentucky School of Medicine — registered 

Center st. (Walnut & Chestnut) Louisville, Dean William 
H. Wathen 
Louisville Medical College — registered 

1st & Chestnut st. I^uisville, Dean C. W. Kelly 
Medical department, Kentucky University — registered 

Broadway (1st & 2d st.) Louisville, Dean Thomas C. Evans 
Medical department. University of I^uisville — registered 
8th & Chestnut st. liOuisville, Dean J. M. Bodine 
Group 2 For admission to New York medical sckooli 
Louisville National Medical College — class 3 

1st & Green st. Louisville, Dean W. A. Burney 
Medical department, Central University of Kentucky — class 1 
Chestnut st. (opposite city hospital) Louisville, Dean P. 
Richard Taylor 
Southwestern ITomeopathic Medical College — class 2 
635 (Jth St. Louisville, Dean A. TiCight Monroe 

Lonisiana 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Medical department. New Orleans University — class 1 

Canal & Robertson st. New Orleans, Dean H. J. Clements 
Group 2 For admission to New York medical sckooli 
Medical department, Tulane irniversity of Louisiana — class 2 
New Orlcfins, Dean Stanford E. Chaill^ 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl45 

Maine 

Group 1 For admisBion to New York licensing examination 
Medical department, Bowdoin College — registered 
Brunswick, Ist & 2d years, Dean Alfred Mitchell 
Chadwick st. Portland, 3d & 4th years, Deputy Dean 
Charles O. Hunt 

Maryland 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Baltimore Medical College — registered 

Madison st. & Linden av. Baltimore, Dean David Streett 
Baltimore University School of Medicine — class 1 

21-29 N. Bond st. Baltimore, Dean Hampson H. Biedler 
College of Physicians & Surgeons — registered 

Calvert & Saratoga st. Baltimore, Dean Thomas Opie 
Medical department, eJohns Hopkins University — registered 

Washington & Monument st. Baltimore, Dean W. H. 
Howell 
School of medicine, University of Maryland — registered 

Lombard & Greene st. Baltimore, Dean R. Dorsey Coale 
Southern Homeopathic Medical College — class 1 

Mount St. (north of Riggs av.) Baltimore, Dean George T. 
Shower 
Woman's Medical College of Baltimore — registered 

McCulloh & Hoffman st. Baltimore, Dean R. H. Thomas 
Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Maryland Medical College — class 1 

1114-20 W. Baltimore st. Baltimore, Dean J. William Funck 

Massachusetts 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
College of Physicians & Surgeons — registered 

517 Shawmut av. Boston, Dean Charles H. Cobb 
Medical school. Harvard University — registered 

688 Boylston st. Boston, Dean William L. Richardson 
School of medicine, Boston Univ. ; homeopathic — registered 

E. Concord st. Boston, Dean John P. Sutherland 
Tufts College Medical School — registered 

416-30 Huntington av. Boston, Dean Harold WUUaxs«, 



rl46 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Kiohigan 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Dep't of medicine & surgery, Michigan Univ. — ^registered 

Ann Arbor, Dean Victor C. Vaughan 
Detroit College of Medicine — registered 

St Antoine, Catharine & Mullett st. & Gratiot av. Detroit, 
Sec. H. O. Walker 
Homeopathic medical school, Michigan Univ. — registered 
Ann Arbor, Dean Wilbert B. Hinsdale 

Oronp 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Detroit Homeopathic Medical College — class 2 

Lafayette av. & 3d st. Detroit, Dean D. A. MacLachlan 
Medical department, Grand Rapids Medical College — class 1 

132-34 East st. Grand Rapids, Dean Clarence White 
Michigan Colh*ge of Medicine & Surgery — rc*gistered 

Michigan av. & 2d st. Detroit, Dean Hal C. Wyman 
Saginaw V^allcy Medical College — class 1 

N. Baum & Tuscola st. Saginaw, Sec. D. B. Cornell 
Cousolidatcd with prefctliug school June 25, 1903, and under Its title. 

Hinnesota 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
College of Homeopathic Medicine & Surgery (Minnesota Univ.) 
— registered 

Minneapolis, Dean Alonz^o P. Williamson 
College of Medicine & Surgery (Minnesota Univ.) — registered 

Minneapolis, Dean Parks Ritchie 
Medical department, Hamline University — registered 

5tli & 7tli av. south, Minneai)olis, Dean George C. Barton 

Mississippi 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York Ucensing examination 
Medical department, University of Mississippi — class 2 
University P. O., Chanc. Robert B. Fulton 

Missouri 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Central Medical College — class 2 

9th & Felix st. St Joseph, Pi^s. T. E. Potter 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPOUT 1903 rl47 

Marion-Hiins-IJeauiiiont College of Medicine, dep't St Louis 
Univ. — class 1 

Grand av. & Caroline st. St Louis, Pres. Young H. Bond 
Medical department, Univeraity of Missouri — registered 

Columbia, Dean Andrew W. McAlester 
Medical department, Washington University — registered 

29th & Locust St. St I^uis, Sec. W. H. Warren 
Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
American Medical College; eclectic — class 2 

407 S. Jefferson av. St Louis, Dean E. Younkin 
Barnes Medical College — class 1 

Garrison & Lawton av. St Louis, Pres. C. H. Hughes 
Ensworth Medical College — class 1 . 

7th & Jule St. St Joseph, Dean Jacob Qeiger 
IJonieopathic Medical College of Missouri — class 1 

Jefferson av. & Howard at. St Ixniis Dc«n W. B. Morgan 
Hahnemann Medical College (Kansas City Univ.) ; homeo- 
pathic — class 1 

561 Cherry st. Kansas City, Dean W. H. Jenney 

Kansas City Homeopathic Medical College — class 1 

1020 E. 10th St. Kansas City, Dean Sam H. Anderson 
The two preceding s<liools united in 1902 under the title 

Kansas City Hahnemann Medical College — class 1 

1020 E. 10th St. Kansas City, Dean Sam H. Anderson 
Kansas City Medical College — class 1 

Washington & 7th st. Kansas City, Dean Andrew L. Pulton 
Medico Chirurgical College — class 2 

914-18 Independence av. Kansas City, Dean George O. 
Coffin 
St Louis College of Physicians & Surgeons — class 1 

Jefferson av. & Gamble st. St Louis, Dean Waldo Briggs 
University Medical College — class 1 

911-13 E. 10th St. Kansas City, Dean Charles P. Wainwright 
Woman's Medical College — class 2 

Missouri av. & Campbell st. Kansas City, Dean Nannie P. 
Lewis 



rl48 UNIVERSITY OF TUE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Hebraska 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensinir examination 
Medical department, University of Omaha — class 1 
12th & Pacific st. Omaha, Dean August F. Jonas 
In 1902 It became the 
College of medicine, University of Nebraska — registered 
Lincoln, Dean Henry B. Ward 
First and second medical years at both Omaha and Lincoln 
Third and fourth years at Omaha only 

Group 2 For admission to New York medical sckooli 
Medical department, Cotner University; eclectic — class 2 

121 R. 14th St. Lincoln, Dean Jerome M. Keys 
Medical department, Creighton University — class 1 

14th & Davenport st. Omaha, Dean D. C. Bryant 

New Hampshire 

Gronp 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Dartmouth Medical College — registered 
Hanover, Rec. Oilman D. Frost 

New York 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Albany Medical College (Union University) — registered 

Eagle St. (Lancaster & Jay) Albany, Dean Albert Vander 
Veer 
Coll. of Physicians & Surgeons (Columbia Univ.) — r^stered 
Amsterdam av. (59th & 60th st.) New York. Acting Dean 
John G. Curtis 
Eclectic Medical College of City of New York — registered 
239 E. 14th St. New York, Dean George W. Boskowitz 
Long Island College Hospital — registered 

Henry st. (near Atlantic av.) Brooklyn, Sec. J. H. 
Raymond 
Medical department, Buffalo University — registered 

High St. (near Main) Buffalo, Dean Matthew D. Mann 
Medical department, Cornell University — registered 

1st av. (27th & 28th st.) New York, De^w William M. Poll^ 
Ithaca, Sec. Abram T. Kerr 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl49 

Medical department, Syracuse University — registered 

Orange st. (E. Genesee & E. Fayette st.) Syracuse, Dean 
Henry D. Didama 
New York Homeopathic Medical College — registered 

East Boulevard (63d & 64th st.) New York, Dean William 
H. King 
New York Med. Coll. & Hospital for Women; homeopathic — 
registered 

17-19 W. 101st St. New York, Dean M. Belle Brown 
University & Bellevue Hospital Medical College — registered 
26th St. & 1st av. New York, Sec. Egbert Jje Fevre 

North Carolina 

Oroap 1 For admission to New York licensing: examination 
Medical school, University of North Carolina — class 2 
Chapel Hill, Dean Richard H. Whitehead 
Raleigh, Dean Hubert A. Royster [the two years at Raleigh 
not recognized] 
North Carolina Medical College — class 2 
Davidson, Pres. John P. Munroe 

Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Medical department, Shaw University — class 2 
Raleigh, Dean James McKee 

Ohio 

Gronp 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College — registered 

53 Bolivar st. Cleveland, Registrar A. B. Schneider 
Eclectic Medical Institute — registered 

Court & Plum st. Cincinnati, Sec. John K. Scudder 
Medical department, Ohio Wesleyan University — registered 

Central av. (cor. Brownell st.) Cleveland, Dean R. E. 

. Skeel 
Medical department, Western Reserve University — registered 

St Clair & Erie st. Cleveland, Dean Benjamin L. Millikin 
Ohio Medical University — registered 

Buttles av. & Park st. Columbus, Dean George M. Waters 



rl50 UNIVKUSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Pulte Medical College; homeopathic* — c-lass 1 

7lh & Moimd st. Oinciiinati, Dean J. 1). Buck 
starling Medieval College — registered 

IState & Oth St. Columbus, Dean Starling Ix)ving 
Group 8 For admission to Hew York medical schools 
Cincinnati College of Medicine & Snidery — class 1 

1625-27 Tine st. Cincinnati, Dean T. V. Fitzpatrlck 
KxtiiK-t iiKrj 

Laura Memorial Medical Collegi* — crlass 2 

618 W. 6th St. Cincinnati, Dean John M. Withrow 
AbsorbtHl by Miami Medical College 1903 
Medical department, University of Cincinnati — class 1 

McMicken av. (head of Elm st.) Cincinnati, Dean P. S. 
Conner 
Miami Medical College — class 1 

217 W. 12th St. (Elm & riuiii) Cincinnati, Dean J. C. Oliver 
TiuhT contract to graduate tlu» stiidonts of Laura Memorial Medical 
College 

Tole<lo Medical College — class 1 

Cherry & Page st. Toledo, Dean William A. Dickey 

Oklahoma 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Medical dei)artinent, Okhihoiiia Univei*sity — class 3 
Norman, Pivs. David K. Boyd 

Oregon 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Medical department, Willamette University — class 1 

Salem, Dean W. H. Byrd 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York medical schools 
Medical deiuirtment. University of Oregon — class 1 

Ix)vejoy & 2M st. l^ortland. Dean Simeon E. Josephi 

Pennsylvania 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Plahnemanii Med. Coll. & Hospital ; homeo])athic — registered 
Broad st. (above Race) Philadelphia, Dean Charles M. 
Thomas 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 ' V^f u/'lSl y 

Jefferson Medical College — registered 

10th & Walnut st. Philadelphia, Dean J. W. Holland 
Medical department, University of Pennsylvania — registered 

36th St. & Woodland av. Philadelphia, Dean Charles H. 
Prazier 
Medico Chirnrgical College — registered 

Cherry st. (ITth & 18th) Philadelphia, Dean Seneca Egbert 
Western Pennsylvania Medical College — registered 

Brereton av. & 30th st. Pittsburg, Dean J. C. Lange 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania — registered 

21st St. & N. College av. Philadelphia, Dean Clara Marshall 

Philippines 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York medical schools 
Medical Faculty (University of Santo Tomds) — class 1 
Manila, Rector Santiago Payii 

South Carolina 

Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Medical College of the State of South Carolina — class 1 
Charleston, Dean Francis L. Parker 

Tennessee 

Gronp 1 For admission to Hew York licensing: examination 
Medical department. Grant Univei'sity — class 1 

McCallie & Baldwin st. Chattanooga, Dean E. A. Cobleigh 
Medical depai*tment, Nashville University — registered 

Market & Elm st. Nashville, Dean William G. Ewing 
Medical department, Tennessee University — class 1 

612-16 Broad st. Nashville, Dean Paul F, Eve 
Medical department, Vanderbilt University — class 1 

Elm & Sumner st. Nashville, Sec. George H. Price 

Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 

Medical department, University of the South — class 2 

Sewanee, Dean John S. Cain 
Meharry Medical Deparlment, WaUlen University — class 1 

Maple & Chestnut st. Nashville, Dean G. W. Hubbard 
Memphis Hospital Medical (.^olleg(^ — class 1 

Union & Marshall av. & Myrtle st. Memphis, Dean W. B* 
Rogers 



rl52 UxMVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NKAV YORK 

Tennessee Medical College — class 1 

Cleveland st. & Dameron av. Knoxville, Dean Charles P. 
McNabb 
Texas 

Group 1 For admiuion to Hew York licensing examination 
Baylor University Medical College — class 1 

S. Ervay st. (opposite city park) Dallas, Dean Edward H. 
Cary 
Medical department, Texas University — registered 

Avenue B (9th & 10th st.) Galveston, Dean Allen J. Smith 
Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Medical department. Fort Worth University — class 2 
7th & Rusk St. Fort Worth, Dean Bacon Saunders 

Vermont 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Medical department, Vermont University — registered 

Pearl st. College park, Burlington, Dean H. C. Tinkham 

Virginia 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Medical College of Virginia — registered 

Marshall & College st. Richmond, Dean Christopher Tomp- 
kins 
Medical department, University of Virginia — registered 

University station, Charlottesville, Dean W. G. Christian 
University College of Medicine — registered 

Clay & 12th st. Richmond, Dean J. Allison Hodges 

West Virginia 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
^ledical department, West Virginia University — class 2 
Morgantown, Prea. D. B. Purinton 

Wisconsin 

Group 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Milwaukee Medical College — class 1 

9th & Wells St. Milwaukee, Dean W. Henry Earles 
Wisconsin College of Physiciaus & Surgeons — class 1 

4th St. & Reservoir av. Milwaukee, Pres. A. H. Levings 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl53 

Canada 
Manitoba 

Oronp 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Manitoba Medical College — registered 
Winnipeg, Dean H. H. Chown 

Nova Scotia 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing: examination 
Dalhousie University (faculty of medicine) — registered 

Halifax, Dean George L. Sinclair 
Halifax Medical College — registered 

Halifax, Registrar L. M. Silver 

Ontario 

Oronp 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Faculty of medicine, University of Toronto — registered 

Toronto, Dean R. A. Reeve 
Medical department, Western University — registered 

Waterloo & York st. London, Dean W. H. Moorhouse 
Ontario Medical College for Women (for degrees from Trinity 
or Toronto) — registered 
Toronto, Dean R. B. Nevitt 
Queens University Faculty of Medicine, Royal College of Physi- 
cians & Surgeons — registered 
Kingston, Dean Fife Fowler 
Trinity Medical College — registered 
Toronto, Dean Walter B. Geikie 

Oronp 2 For admission to New York medical schools 
Ontario Medical College for Women — class 1 

Toronto, Dean R. B. Nevitt 
Trinity University — class 1 

Toronto, Registrar William Jones 

Quebec 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing: examination 
Faculty of medicine, McGill University — registered 

Montreal, Dean Thomas D. Roddick 
Medical faculty, University of Bishop's College — registered 

Montreal, Dean F. W. Campbell 



rir>4 UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

Group 2 For admiuion to Hew York medioal schools 
Scliool of medicine & surgery, Laval Univefsity — registered 
Montreal, l>ean J. P. Rottot 

Cuba 

Havana 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York medioal schools 

Medioal department, Havana Univ., faculty of med. & pliar.- 

class 1 

Havana, Ke«-tor IjeoiK)ldo Herriel Y. Fern&ndez 



COLLEQB DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl55 



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rl56 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



16 REBTTLTB OF MEDICAL LIOENBIKO EXAXUT ATIO VB a 

New York schools for year ending July 31, 1903 



NAME 



Albany Me<lic*al College 

Bellevue Hospital Medicjil CA)llege 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

(k>rnell University, medical department 

1-iOng Island College Hospital 

h'Sew York F^clectic Medical ('olh^ge 

(•New York Homeopathic Medical College. . 
cNew York Med. Coll. and Hasp, for Women 

New York University, me<lical dep't 

Synwrnse Universitvl medical dep t 

tfniversity an<l Ikdlevue Hosp. Med. Coll. . 
University of Buffalo, medical dep't 



1 
1 


NUMBER 




, X 


1 


llK.rECTK|1 




fr 


1 1 

S3 












^ 


.o 


1 






^'i 


•s 1 


li 


g i 


1 = 


i 


b 


s 


c 












tt 


s \ 


w b 


J. 
i 






Bq 


£ 


ai 




-3 


1 


m.4 


1 




^>i 










\m 


128 




e' 




1 


7 


94.5 


51' 









1 


5 


fts.oa 


45 









3 


4 


m.s 


1(V 




1 







8 


m.7 


23! 




1 




a 


4 


fl5.6 


8 















urn 


1| 




11 







tl 





26! 




o' 










4oo 


55 




^1 




7 


8 


87.2 


46 




8 




1 


4 


91.1 



fiThis tabic would lie more si^fnitli'uut if all answer papers wcro rated by the same 
l>oanl. h Kolectic. r Homeopathic. 



New York schools 1891-1903 



NAME 



Albany Medicml C<»llege 

I^llevue Hospital Me<lical College 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Cornell University, medical department 

Long Island College Hospital 

a New York Eclectic Medi(uil College 

5 New Y^ork Homeoimthic Medical College 

h New Y'ork Medical College and Hosp. for Women 

New Y^'ork University, medieval department ' 

Niagara University, medical department j 

Syracuse University, medical <lepartment | 

University and Bellevue Hospital Me^licjil College 

University of Buffalo, medical department I 

Woman's Medical College of New York Infirmary! 





21 



81 


84.9 


16 


89.6 


146 


95.6 


28 


96.6 


16 


84.2 


12 


87.7 


72 


94.1 


11 


90.5 


22 


84.5 


i) 


85.9 


7 


95 


19 


92.5 


16 


90.7 


9 


93.6 



aEcfloctic. /> Hoiueopathic. 
examiDtttion. 



oinchidintf one candi<iatc w^ho failed to complete his 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl57 



REBTTLTS OF PARTIAL EXAMIKATI0K8 

New York schools for year ending July 31, 1903 



Allmny Medical College 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Cornell University, meilical department 

Long Island College Hospital 

New York Eclectic Medical College 

New York Homeoi)athic Medical College 

New Y'ork Medical College and Hospital for Women. 

Syracuse University, medical department 

University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. . . 
University of Butfalo, medical department 



27 
64 
46 
24 

7 
11 

5 

24 

21 

al4 



I? 



^C. 



92.5 
95.3 
100 
1(K) 
100 
O! 100 
Ol 100 



95.8 
100 



a Including one candidate who f^Uled to complete his cxainiuation. 



Per cent licensed^ 



EsaiuiucHl on graduation . 
Exaniineil aft**r out" yearns 

pracitice * 

EscaEiiined after two yciu*H' 

prac^tic** ....V. 

E:i:aiDiDed after from 3 to 40 

ytsan*' practice 



mA 
m.2 



im 


.m 


im 


xm 


189S 


im 


1900 


01 


m 


B7.B 


87.3 


89 Ji 


94.1 


96.4 


90 


mnmiA 


86 Jt 


89.1 


86.2 


fl7 85^93 


78.5 


78,5 


83.682.2 


77 


87 


■"■' 


75,5 


n 


76.2 


80.2 



I9r>i 



190S 



1 94.495.6 



1008 



95.2 



S|90,384.4.90.7 



S«5J 



85.7 



t75.7j79.4 



95.8 
82.2 



a Eai^h candidate who fails is counted only once. 



Eejections by topics 



imi 



Anatomy i 12 

Physiology and hygiene 12 

Chemistrv 18 .._ .^ .„ „.. „, 

Surgerv.*. ! 17i 30 00 56! 54| 39 

— ■ . ^ ^_ ^ ^^^. ^^^ 



1805 



48 
16 

62 



isea 



70 
31 
75 



J^ 



18»7 I 189f^ 

7o' 55 49 
58 4» 29 
73 67 



Olwtetrics ' 44 iu 5' 

Pathology and diagnosis I ii^S, *i5j Ml 

Therapeutics, practice and ma- 1 i j 

teria medica , 15 60, 70 



S3| ^ 
H8 78 



m 

51 



IBOO 1901 Il9ic'il9(0 



56, 61 5*1 32 

55 08 5"^ 63 

m\ 49 4i\ 33 

58; 46 4 35 

m 52| U 44 

74j 58 r>; 56 

S4| 4e| 45 34 



rl58 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



17 OOXFA&IBOH OF MSDIOAL 80H00L8 ZV HZW TOBK AND OTHER STATES 

AND OOUNTRIES 



New York schools 



VAUK. 


3 

m 

HI 

45 
16 
2B 
1 
55 
45 


1 


i 


1 
1 


1 


1 

i 


j 

1 


if" 


1 


Albany Meilical CoJJegt* , 


1 
1 


i 

7 


3 


1 






""g 


n 


College of Physiciiinrt aud Hurg. . . 
a Corn<*ll Univ4*rsitv .»--.*.*.,.,» 




m 


Long U\M\ii College Hospital 

K Y, Eelwtio ^^\v^l College. , . 
N. Y. Horn. Meni. CqI. uml Hosp. . 
N. Y. UniverBity. medk^l deij t. . 
XJniv, ami Ik^lltsvue Honp. Mwl C, 
University of BuffttLo. , 


i 
1 
I 

I 

* 's 


2 
1 


1 

1 


9 


« ^« A 


i; 2 


13 


< . ^ . 


6 

1 


I 


14 


Total 


899 


9| 16 


5 


11 4 


13i 13 


70 







Schools in other 


states 












s 

NAME ^ 


1 


1; 


^ ' 


1 


i 


1 

r 


1 


^ 


(I Howard University^ D. C I 


















Atlanta Med. Col. /Georgia 3 

Ga. Col. of Ekilec Med.and8urg.,Ga. I 




1 


I 








1 

a 










American Med. Missionary Coll. .111. 1 














College of Physicians and Surg. ,111. 1 

Hahnemann Metl. Coll. ,111 1 

Illinois Medieval College 1 

Rush Medical College. Ill 8 

Me<i. Coll. of Fort Wavne. Ind . . 1 




1 

"8 




8 


1 
1 

2 


30 




1 








1 




Bowdoin Med. Coll., Maine 1 


1 
1 






Baltimore Medical College, Md t* 

Baltimore Univ.. sch. of med., Md. 4 




2 
3 
I 
1 








3 
1 

1 




1 






Maryland Medic^il College 3 








College of Phys. and Surg.. Mass. . $ 
Harvard Univ. , Mass 10 










3 

1 
1 












Univ. of Michigan ' 11 

Willamette Univ. , Oregon 1 

University of Pennsylvania ' 37 




2 


1 


1 




1 




-- 


I 












Western tenn. Med. Coll 2 




1 










University of the South, Teun 2 

University of Vermont 6 










3 


*"i 








1 




' 
















Total 99 


lii| 16 la 


8 


6 


17 12 


S& 



a Papers ot one candidate canoeVed tot at\femv\fc^l«wA.. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT RBPOET 1903 



rl59 



Schools in f oreig:iL coimtries 



NAME 



Academy of Paris, France 

University of Munich, Germany 

University of Naples, Italy 

University of Palermo, Italy 

University of Turin, Italy 

Univt»rsity of Bucharest, Roumania. . . 
Imperial Jurief (Dorpat) Univ. Russia. 

Total 



50 



l! 



13 
i 



9 10 



10 



IB 

3 



5l^^ 



1 



2 



17 



S4 



4 

W 

4 



t 

m 

1 

5 
1 



26 



10 



1215 



rlGO 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



18 AYERAOE HTTMBER OF TRIALS 189M908 

New York schools. The following table shows the average 
number of trials to ench Now York school candidate. It also 
gives the innnber of candidates and the number of trials for each 
year and the \)0V cent still rejected. By this table candidates 
appearing in dilTercnt veal's are counted only once. 



NAME 



AllMiny MtMlical Co1U»k^ 



Bellevue Hospital M(Miioal College. . . 



College of Physicians and Surgeons . 



Cornell University, nied. dep't. 



sn-a 

98-4 
94-5 
«5-6 

m-i 

»8-9 

9*.M)0 

0()-0l 

01-02 

02-08 

91-2 

WZS 

98-4 

94-5 

95-(J 

96-7 

97-8 

98-9 

99-00 

(XM)! 

01-02 

02-03 

91-2 

92-3 

93-4 

94-5 

95-(i 

90-7 

97-8 

m-9 

l>9-00 

00-01 

01-02; 

02-08 

98-9 

99-00 

00-01 

01-02 

02-03 



1 
84 
88 
88 
87 
52 
44 
58 
26 
30 
27 
82 

2! 
23' 
43 
82 
42i 



I 



& 



1 

85; 

46 

48 
40 

m 

79 
84 
36 
33 
30 
35 
2 

81 
60 
48 
4<( 
52 62 
81 112 
38, 45 



40'; 



16 
4I 
6 
1 
1 
35 
46 



17 
4 
6 
1 
1 
88 
46 
119|182 
I34I14I 
109,125 
107132 



885 



116 

161 

127 

109 

124 

25 

51 

30 

46 

50 



121 
167 
184 
115 



134 1 187 
251 
64 
85 
49 
61 



-3 



& 



583 



429 



1286 



214 



-2' I 
■Si =2i 



14 1.8 !8.43 



5 1.281.49 

I 



101.08 



1.05 



.84 



.49 



COLLEGE DEPAttTMENT UEPORT 1903 



rl61 



New York schools (cantimied) 



NAME 








1 


1 


1 




1^ 




1 


1 


1 


5 

1 


** 


1 






\n-2 


















m-ii 


"3 


'^5 














9ii-l 


3 5 














ft4-^l 


7 7 














95*1 


20 31 














9r^7 


7 in 














U7-8 


1(1 19 














98-9 17 20 














tftMK) 15 


IN 














m-tn 11 


13 














0U02; 












Kciectic Medical College 


CH Oa 11 IH 


119 


145 


4 


1.31 


3.30 




91-2 1 


1 






92-3 20 22 














93-4 1 19 


2i 














94-6 1 36 


411 














95-6 ■ 57 


70 














9G-7 54 


78 














97-« 51 


101 














98-9 ftl 


94 














99-(K) 8^ 


m 














00-01 47 


67 














01-02 32 


52 












Long Island College Hospital 


02-03 42 


47 


458 


61)2 





1.44 


2.18 




91-2 1 


1 














92-3 H 10 














93-4 2-^1 


27 














94-5 83 


3? 














95-6 


24 


26 














96-7 


14 


20 














97-^ 


13 


14 














98-9 


29 


36 














99-00 


31 


32 














00-01 


24 


a4 














01-02 


31 


22 












New York Homeopathic* Mod. Col 


02-03 
91-2 
92-3 
93^ 

9r>45 
lMi-7 
97-^ 
98^0 

00-01 
Ul-03 


22 
1 
1 

12 
9 

5 
3 
5 

a 

12 
4 


23 

1 

1 

14 

11 

5 

5 

3 

G 

6 

18 

6 


244 


273 


1 


i.n 


.4 


N. Y. Med. Col. & Hos. for Women. . . 


02-03 


7 


8 


67 


77 





1.14 


. . « . 



rl62 



UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



New York schools (oonMnued) 











1 

1 

8 

1 




1 


:5 


~l 


NAME 




S 




^ 


S 




i 




1 


1 

i 


1 


1 


1 
6 
7^ 


Average 
each ca 

Per cent 




91-2 


2 


2 












9-,^^ 


89; 48 










98-4 1 44 


58 






i i 




94-5 ' 64 


92 








95-« 66 


71 




1 j 




96-7 85 


105 








• 


97-S 1 86 


112 




' 






98-9 ' 29 


48 






1 






99-00 9 18 






1 




oo-oi; 5 


5 










01-02 2 


2 








New York University, med. dep't 


02-08, 1 


1 


482 


547 


21;1.26i4.86 


• 


91-2 
92-8 










i 






8 


6 










98-4 


18 


14 














94-5 


8 


10 














95-6 


12 


18 














96-7 


11 


18 














97-8 


6 


7 














98-9 


1 


1 














99-00 2 


2 














OO-Ol! 1 


1 














01-02... 












Niagara University, med. dep't 


02-08 . . . 




67 


66 


2 1.15 


8.5 




91-2 










1 






92-8 


"6 


■*6 












98^ 


10 


15 














94-5 8 


8 














95-6 24 


24 














96-7 i 28 


25 














91S 24 


26 














98-9 ' 7 


10 












99-00 24 


25 












OO-Ol! 15 


15 










01-021 25 


25 






1 


Syracuse University, meil. dep't 


02-08' 25 
98-9 61 


26 
61 


191 


205 


11.07 .52 

1 




99-00, 49 


56 








1 




OO-Ol! 88 


89 








1 




01-02 88 


88 






1 


Univ. & Bellevue Hos. Med. Col 


02-08 54 


55 


280 


249 


81.08,8.47 




91-2 


2 


2 














92-8 


21 


24 














98-4 


14 


28 














94-5 


51 


62 














95-6 


51 


60 














96-7 


60! 78 














91S 


56ll04 














98-9 


89 


44 














99-00 


45 


50 














00-01 


41 


46 














01-02 


47 


50 












University of Buff alo» med. dep^V. 


\^JfiMJfi 


[^ 


l4fi 


^ 409 


684 


8 


1.24 


1.7 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl63 



New York schools (concluded) 













s 




t 


ll 1 












1 


-3 


is 




ȤMm 




at 




1 


^ 


**s . * 








1 

-a 
5 


1 


■3 
1 


1 


=3 

S!5 


f|i! 






91^2 




















02-3 


8 


8 
















ys-t 


8 


8 
















84^1 


19 21 
















95-6 


7 
16 


7 
















96^7 


16 
















97-8 


15 


16 
















9H^9 


12 


14 
















m-m 


5 


7 
















1K>-01 


, 1 


1 














CoL of N. Y. InfimK - 


01-03 






00 


97 


1 


1.07 




Woman's MeJ. 




.,. 


l.U 



rl64 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NEW YORK 

If DSHTAL 80H00L8 OF XTVITED STATES, OAVADA AND CTTBA BEOISTEXSD 
OR AOORSDITSD TULY 1, 1004 

Alplia)>etically arrange<l l>y states and provinces 

Tlnited States 
Alabama 

Group 1 For admiiiion to Hew York licentiiiff examination 
Birmingham Dental College — registered 

Avenue F & 20tli st. Birmingham, Dean Charles A. Merrill 

California 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
College of Dentistry, University of Southern California — regis- 
tered 
Junction Main, Spring & Temple st. Los Angeles, Dean 
Garrett Newkirk 
Dental department, College of Physicians and Surgeons — class 1 
14th St. (Mission & Valencia) San Francisco, Dean D. A. 
Hodghead 
Group 2 For admission to Hew York dental schools 
College of Dentistry, University of California — ^registered 

South of Golden Gate park, San Francisco, Dean Harry P. 
Carlton 

Colorado 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York dental schools 

Colorado College of Dental Surgery, University of Denver — 

class 1 

Arapahoe & 14th st. Denver, Dean W. T. Chambers 

District of Columbia 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Dental college of medical dep't, Howard University — registered 
5th & Pomei'oy st. X. W. Washington, Dean Robert Rey- 
burn 
Dental department, Columbian University — registered 
1325 H St. N. W. Washington, Dean J. Hall Lewis 
Dental department, Georgetown University — registered 

H St. N. W. (9th & 10th) Washington, Dean William N. 
Cogan 
Dental department. National University — class 1 

1328 9th St. N. W. Was\i\\igtou, Dean J. Roland Walton 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 Pl65 

QtOTgitL 

Group 1 For admitiion to Hew York liceiiBing examination 
Atlanta Dental College — registered 

38i Marietta st. Atlanta, Dean H. R. Jewett 
Dental department, Atlanta College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons — registered 
Opposite Grady hospital (near Union depot) Atlanta, 
Dean Sheppard W. Foster 

Illinois 

Gronp 1 For admission to New York licensing e^mination 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, department Lake Forest 
University — roistered 
Wood & Harrison st. Chicago, Dean Truman W. Brophy 
Dental department, Illinois University — registered 

813 W. Harrison st. Chicago, Acting Dean B. J. Cigrand 
Group 2 For admission to New York dental sohools 
Dental school, Northwestern University — registered 

Dearborn & Lake st. Chicago, Dean Greene V. Black 

Indiana 

Group 1 For admission to New York lioensinf examination 
Central College of Dentistry- — registered 

Illinois & Ohio st. Indianapolis, Dean S. E. Earp 
Indiana Dental College dep't of dental surgery, University of 
Indianapolis — registered 
Ohio & Delaware st. Indianapolis, Dean George E. Hunt 

Iowa 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 

Dental department. University of Iowa — registered 

Iowa City, Dean William S. Hosford 
Keokuk Dental College, dental dep't Keokuk Medical College 
— registered 

Keokuk, Dean B. C. Hinkley 

Eentncky 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Louisville College of Dentistry, dental dep't Central University 
of Kentucky — registered 
Brodk St. & Broadway, Louisville, T)eoLTi'^\W\^\s^^-^^^;xiX. 



rl66 UMVEESITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Lomsiana 

Group 2 For admiision to New York dental schools 
New Orleans College of Dentistry — class 1 
New Orleans, Dean A. G. Friedriclis 

Karyland 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery — registered 

Eutaw & Franklin st. Baltimore, Dean M. W. Foster 
Dental department, Baltimore Medical College — registered 
N. Howard st. (near Madison) Baltimore, Dean J. E. 
Orrison 
Dental department, University of Maryland — registered 
Lombard & Greene st. Baltimore, Dean F. J. S. Gorgas 

Kassachnsetts 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Dental school, Harvard University — registered 

N. Grove st. Boston, Dean Eugene H. Smith 
Tufts College Dental School — registered 

Huntington & Kogers av. (Courtland & Drisko) Boston, 
Dean Harold Williams 

Kichigan 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
College of dental surgery. University of Michigan — ^registered 

Ann Arbor, Dean Cyrenus G. Darling 
Department of dental surgery, Detroit College of Medicine — 

registered 
St Antoine, Catherine & Mullett st. & Gratiot av. Detroit, Dean 
Theo. A. McGraw 

Minnesota 

Group 1 For admission to New York lioensin^ examination 
College of dentistry. University of Minnesota — registered 
Minneapolis, Dean AVilliam P. Dickinson 

Missouri 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Kansa*s City Dental College — registered 

10th St. & Troost a v. Kansas City, Pre*. J. D. Patterson 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl67 

Marion-Sims Dental College — registered 

Grand av. & Caroline st. St Louis, Dean Milton C. Marahall 
Missouri Dental College, dental department Washington Uni- 
versity — registered 

27th & Locust St. St Louis, Dean John H. Kennerby 
Western Dental College — registered 

11th & Locust St. Kansas City, Dean D. J. McMillen 

Nebraska 

Group 1 For admission to New -York licensing examination 
Lincoln Dental College, Patron College of Dentistry, University 
of Nebraska — class 1 
15th & O St. Lincoln, Dean W. Clyde Davis 

Group 2 Por admission to New York dental schools 
Dental department. University of Omaha — class 1 
12th & Pacific st. Omaha, Dean A. O. Hunt 

ITcw York 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Dental department. University of Buffalo — registered 

25 Goodrich st. Buffalo, Dean George B. Snow 
New York College of Dentistry- — registered 

205-7 E. 23d st. New York, Dean Faneuil D. Weisse 
New York Dental School — registered 

216 W. 42d St. New York, Dean Charles M. Ford 

Ohio 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 

Cincinnati College of Dental Surgen^ — registered 

231-33 W. Court st. Cincinnati, Dean G. S. Junkerman 
College of dentistry. Western Reserve University — registered 

Bangor bldg. Prospect st. Cleveland, Dean Henry L. 
Ambler 
Dental department, Ohio'^Iedical University — registered 

Park St. & Buttles av. Columbus, Dean Louis P. Bethel 
Ohio College of Dental Surgery, dental dep't University of 
Cincinnati — class 1 

Central av. & Court st. Cincinnati, Dean H. A. Smith 



rl68 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Oregon 

Group 2 For admission to Hew York dental iohools 

North Pacific Dental College — registered 

15tli & Couch St. Portland, Dean Herbert C. Miller 

Pennsylvania 

Group 1 For admission to Hew York licensing examination 
Dental dep't, Philadelphia Medico Chirurgical College — ^regis- 
tered 
Cherry st. (17th & 18th) Philadelphia, Dean Robert H. 
Nones 
Dental dep't. University of Pennsylvania — registered 

33d St. (Spruce & Locust) Philadelphia, Dean Edward C. 
Kirk 
Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery — registered 

11th & Clinton st. Philadelphia, Dean Wilbur F. Litch 
Philadelphia Dental College — registered 

18tli St. (below Spring garden) Philadelphia, Dean S. H. 
Guilford 
Pittsburg Dental College, dental dep't Western University of 
Pennsylvania — registered 

1003 Penn. av. Pittsburg, Dean Walter H. Fundenberg 

Tennessee 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Meharry Dental Dep't, Walden University — ^registered 
Maple & Chestnut st. Nashville, Dean G. W. Hubbard 
Group 2 For admission to Hew York dental schools 
Dental dep't. University of Tennessee — class 1 

212-14 N. Spnice st. Nashville, Dean Joseph P. Gray 
Dental dep't, Vanderbilt University — registered 

N. Cherry st. Nashville, Dean D. R. Stubblefleld 

Virginia 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Virginia School of Dentistry, Medical College of Virginiar- 
registered 
Marshall & College st. Richmond, Dean Christopher Tomp- 
kins 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl69 

Group 2 For admission to New York dental schools 
Dental department, University College of Medicine — registered 
Clay & 12th st. Richmond, Proctor William R. Miller 

Wisconsin 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Dental department, Milwaukee Medical College — ^registered 
9th & Wells St. Milwaukee, Dean Henry L. Banzhaf 
Group 2 For admission to New York dental schools 
Department of dental surger}-, Wisconsin College of Physicians 
and Surgeons — class 1 
4th St. & Reservoir av. Milwaukee, Dean James T. Stuart 

Canada 
Ontario 

Group 2 For admission to New York dental schools 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons — ^registered 

93 College st. Toronto, Dean J. Branston Willmott 

Cuba 
Havana 

School of dental surgery, medical faculty, Havana University — 

not registered 

Havana, Rector Leopoldo Berriely Fernandez 



rl70 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



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COLLEGE DErARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl71 



21 BE8VLT8 OF DENTAL LICENSING EXAMINATIONS 





1886 


1887 


188B 


1809 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1908 


Examinations 


5 

162 

52 

82 

110 

7 


5 
264 
46 
17.4 

218 
17 


5 

268 

67 

25 

201 

43 


5 
222 

89 

17.5 
183 

67 


4 
154 

28 

18.1 
126 

36 


4 

194 

83 

17 

161 

23 


4 
284 

29 

12.3 
205 

41 


4 


Examined 


234 


Rejected 


58 


Per cent rejected 


24 7 


Licenses issue<i 


176 


Honor licenses issued 


18 







Per cent licensed 

Each candidate who fails is counted only once. 



Examined on graduation . . 
Examined after one years 

practice ] 

Examined after two years' 

practice 

Examined after from three to 

20 years' practice 



1886 


1897 


1896 


1880 


1900 
95 


1901 
93 


i9oe 


75.8 


93.6 


87.4 


96.1 


95.8 


88.3 


68.7 


92.5 


88 


94.1 


84.6 


94.4 


100 


100 


88.8 


75 


75 


90 


100 


40 


50 


80 


100 


100 


61.5 

1 


80 



1908 

93.5 
94.7 
75 



Rejection by topics 



Anatomy , 

PhyKJology and hy^it^ut^ .......... 

Chemistry and metallurij^y 

Oral surj^ery and path<jloKy 

Operative dentistrj^ * - 

Prosthetic dentistry 

Therajteutics and materia medica 
Histology . . , , *.,*,,,,,,. 



IHH 



21 

14 

a 

5 

4 

16 

25 

28 



mn 



14 
19 

1 

9 

6 

10 
19 



imA 



20 
23 

7 
11 
13 

8 
22 
26 



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11 

4 

15 
9 

13 
14 
16 



1900 



10 

4 


la 

3 

% 

8 
5 



1001 



8 
4 
2 
8 
1 
20 
10 
4 



i«oa 



13 
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1 
4 
4 



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5 
8 

n 

2 
13 

5f 24 



1 
10 



rl72 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



SM BEJSCTI0H8 BY BTTBJECTB 

New York schook 





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iJentlfttry „.„,.. 


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New York Bental 
School . . , „ , . 


















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a University of Buffalo, 






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a Two candidates exaniination incomplete. 



Schools in other states 





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Jep'U Mass ,..**-,** 


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Va\\% of Hichl^a, dent, 
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Otidnnatl Coll. of Dent. 
*'^iirg',. Ohlti 




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Pa. Coll. or lien t Surg... 

PhJla^lelpbln Dental Col< 

lege,,... 


1 

1 


1 

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SO 
23 


&1 
180 














UniveraJty of PennByl- 

vania- , 

Exemption lawa * . < . 


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COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl73 

28 VETERINARY XEDIOAL BCH00L8 OF ITHITED STATES A2n> OAKADA 
REGISTERED OR ACOREDITED JTTLY 1, 1904 

Alphabetically arranged by states and provinces 

XTnited States 
District of Colmnbia 

Group 2 For admission to New York veterinary schools 
United States College of Veterinary Surgeons — class 1 

222 C St. N. W. Washington, Dean C. Barnwell Robinson 

Illinois 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Chicago Veterinary College — registered 

2537-39 State st. Chicago, Pres. R. J. Withers 
McKillip Veterinary College — class 1 

1639 Wabash av. Chicago, Dean F. 8. Schoenleber 

Group 2 For admission to New York veterinary schools 
Indiana Veterinary College — class 2 

Market st. (Davidson & Pine) Indianapolis, Dean George 
H. Roberts 

Iowa 

Group 2 For admission to New York veterinary schools 

Veterinary department, Iowa State College — class 1 
Ames, Acting Dean W. M. Beardshear 

Michigan 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Grand Rapids Veterinary College — class 2 

Butterworth av. & Indiana st. Grand Rapids, Dean Will- 
iam A. McLean 

Xissonri 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
Kansas City Veterinary College — class 1 

1404-6 Holmes st. Kansas City, Dean Sesco Stewart 



rl74 UNIVKRSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Hew York 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
New York Ameriean Veterinary College, Ne\i' York University 
— registered 

141 W. r)4th St. New York, Dean Alexander F. Liautard 
New York State Veterinary College at Cornell University — 
registered 
East av. Ithaca, Dean James Law 

Ohio 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 

College of veterinary medicine, Ohio State University — class 1 
N. Iligh St. Columbus, Dean David S. White 

Pennsylvania 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 

Veterinary dei>artment, University of Pennsyh^nia — registered 
Woodland av. (Cleveland & Sprucp) Philadelphia, Dean 
Leonard Pearson 

Washington 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
School of veterinary science, Washington Agricultural College 
and School of Science — class 1 
Pullman, Pres. E. A. Bryan 

Canada 
Ontario 

Group 2 For admission to New York veterinary schools 

Ontario Veterinary College — class 2 

40-46 Temperance st. Toronto, Prin. Andrew Smith 

Quebec 

Group 1 For admission to New York licensing examination 
School of Comi>aratlve Medicine and Veterinary' Science 
(Laval University) — class 1 
185 St Denis st. Montreal, Director V. T. Daubigny 



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COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



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rl75 



rl7(» 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



U YETEBINABY LXCEVBUTO EZAIOHATIOHB 
Besults 1896-1903 





1996 


1887 ; 


1806 


1889 


1900 


1901 


1903 


190B 


Exam iiiiit ions 


6 
8 

60 
3 



12 
5 

41.6 

7 



5 
29 
21 
72.4 

8 




5 
21) 

8 
40 
12 




4 
14 

2 

14.2 
12 




4 
12 

5 
41.6 

7 



4 
15 

6 
40 

9 




4 


KxHiiiined 


22 


Reiecte<l *"' 


5 


Per cent rejecte<l 


22.7 


Licenses issue<l 


17 


Honor licenses issued 


2 



Rejections by topics 





1896 


1887 


1896 


1889 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


Anatomv 


2 

4 
2 
2 

1 

2 
2 



2 
2 

4 

3 

1 


2 

6 

7 
8 

10 

8 


4 


1 


1 



1 


1 

2 
1 


1 




2 
2 

4 
1 
4 

5 

2 


1 
2 
6 
1 


2 

1 


2 


Physiology and hygiene 

Chemistrv 


1 
4 


Surgery 

Obstetrics 

Pathology, diagnosis and 
practice 


1 
1 

2 


Therapeutics and materia 
met ica 


1 







COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl77 

26 APPLIOATXOV FOB BE0X8TBATI0V OB AOOBEDITIHO OF TBAIHIKO 
80E00L FOB VXnElBES^ 

This certifies that [legal titled 

. ' *a department of ro* !» i 

is not [ *" [Stated 

which was legally incorporated ldate'\ and is connected with 

1l _i >• * giving a course of at least two years in service under 
a sanitarium j- » — » 

instruction in said institution as shown by the accompanying program or 

schedule of course, in effect 190 to 190 

Application for registration with the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York as meeting the graduation standard fixed by statute for 
New York schools is hereby formally made and candidates for graduation 
from this school must (1) be»at least 21 years of age; (2) be of good moral 
character; (3) have studied nursing at least two full years. 

The latest announcement of requirements accompanies this application 
and additional information is given on the second page. 

In witness whereof, I hereunto set my hand and the seal 
of ' this 

day of 

[Bean 

{Signature of executive officer and title} 



27 ADDITIONAL nTFOBMATIOV 

1 There are inumberl students now in attendance, viz first 
year, second year, third year. 

2 There are beds in the hospital in which the nurses receive their 
training. 

3 The length of this period of training is years. 

4 Nurses receive practical or theoretical training or both in 

Practical Theoretical 

a Medical 

6 Surgical (with operating) 
c Gynecological 
d Obstetrical 

How many cases? 
e Children's diseases 
/ Ck>ntagious 
g Cooking 

Materia medlca 
6 Nurses are trained exclusively in the hospital. 

6 Nurses are sent out to private duty, in -j 3 [• * years of their training 
for weeks. ( ^ ) 

[Signature of the superintendent of the training school] 

'Cancel any statements that do not apply to your school. 



rl78 



rXIVERSlTY OF THE STATE OF NEW YOBK 
t8 LZBBA&Y SCHOOL 



EXAMINATIONS 



Papers 



General liteniture. . . 
information 
history 

Latin. 1st year 

German, 1st vear . . . 
2<1 ' •• ... 

French, 1st vear . . . 
2<1 ' •• ... 

Sjmnish, 1st year . . . 

Italian \ 



i9oe 



Written Accepted 



Elementary bibliography 

A(*cession (le]>artment work 

Elementary (cataloguing 

(lii'tionary cataloguing . . . 

Elementary classitic^atiim 

Elementary reference 

Shelf de])artineiit work 

Loan systems 

B<K>kbinding 

A(lvance<l bibliography 

Founding and government of libraries. 

LiV)rary buildings 

Ailvanced cataloguing • 

dictitmary (*ataloguing 

cla.Hsification : 

History of libraries 

Indexing 

Printing 

Reading 

Advan(red reference 



31 
29 

55 

3d 
36 
29 
24 
26 
20 
20 
16 
17 
15 
20 
21 
31 
2 

20 
20 



29 
29 

53 

38 
36 
29 
24 
28 
20 
19 
16 
17 
15 
20 
21 
24 
2 

20 
20 



Examinations ontside the State 

UNDER AUTHORITY GRANTED JUNE 11, 1891 AND DEC. 14, 1892 

Such tests are held only when satisfactory evidence is given that the rules will be 
strictly observed, that the Integrity and dignity of the examinations will be care- 
fully protected In every way, and that the compensation of the local examiner will 
not be a cliarge on the University treasury. 



PI^CE 


BUILDING 


EXAMINER 


Welleslev Mass 


Welleslev College Lib 


Carrie F. Pierce 







COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl79 



28 BESXTLTS OF C. P. A. EXAKINATI0V8 1896-1908 





Candidates 


Number 
rejected 


Per cent 
accepted 


1896-97 


14 
15 
17 
16 
17 
129 
68 


6 
9 

7 

7 

4 

82 

58 


57.1 


1897-98 


40 


1898-99 


58.8 


1O99-1900 


56.2 


1900-1 


76.4 


1901-2 


86.4 


1902-3 


14.7 






Total 


276 


178 


87.8 







Rejections by topics 



Theory of ac<?ouTits, , 
Fractical iK^couatiiig 

Auditing. 

Cummercial law .... . 



im 


im 

6 


im 
8 


laoo 
4 


2 


4 


4 


4 


6 


2 


2 


1 





6 


4 


a 


2 



1001 lOm 190B 



44 16 

3 m 58 

18 18 

3 23 8 



80 BUSINESS CREDENTIALS ISS17ED DVBINO 1908-8 

Browne's Brooklyn Business College 
lactate stenographers certificate 
Kilbride, Mary J. Struthwolf, Louise 

Nobbe, Lulu Waldron, Ethel 

Rosengreen, Frieda Williams, Jennie 

Schilgen, Amelia Wisnom, Ellen 

Charles Commercial School, Brooklyn 

l^tatc stenof/raphers certificate 
Johnson, Irene 

Egberts High School, Cohoes 

State business certificate 

Best, William J. Tanner, Ruth D. 

Pitts, CJora Belle 



rl80 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



State stcnogrdphers certificate 
Archiboldy Elizabeth B. Slocum, Anna May 



Best, William J. 
Link, Gertrude P. 
Much, Edith C. 
PittB, Cora Belle 



Frechette, Joseph 



Oerdes, John 



Symper, Arthur I. 
Tanner, Kuth D. 
Veigele, Bertha A. 

Franklin Academy, Halone 
State business diploma 

McMillan, Grace A. 

Heffley School, Brooklyn 
State business certificate 



State stenographers certificate 
Albers, Louis V. H. Ogilby, Anna 

Dwinell, George W. I. Kenton, Stanley Hamed 

Epworth, Florence May Khodes, Florence M. 

The Henley, Syracnse 

State business certificate 
Talbot, Lynn 

State stenographers certificate 
Bom, Marion M. King, Edith J. 



Davis, Elsie E. 
Domer, Arthur W. 
Egan, Frances A. 
Gallagher, Daisy E. 
Gifford, Lawrence J. 
Heck, Mabel L. 
Hyman, Florence D. 
Jacobsen, Marie 



Lang, Lillian M. 
Masten, 'Florence G. 
Moroney, Elizabeth Geraldine 
O'Hara, Agnes F. 
O'Reilly, Kathryn L. 
Park, George F. 
Rackett, Anna 
Raymond, Daisy 



La Salle Academy, New York 
State stenographers diploma 
Steinbugler, John, jr 

State stenographers certificate 
Rudershausen, Charles T. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 rl8l 

Leroy High School 

State business diploma 
Clarke, Levi M. 

Miller School of Business, New York 
State stenographers certificate 
Bruder, Lillie Smith, Eva R. 

Foster, Edna Warner, William E. 

Hanan, Rebecca Watson, Richard Percival 

Laemmle, Mary Wechsler, Olga 

Lewis, Laura L. Wilson, Charles Homer 

Reimer, Anna May 

New Ycrk Treparatcry School 

State business diploiita and state stenographers diploma 

Muller, Emilie 

Oneonta High School 

State business diploma 
Crowl, Elizabeth A. Lyon, Hudson H. 

State stenographers diploma 
Crowl, Elizabeth A. Foote, M^tta 

Disbrow, Laura Lee 

St Ann's Academy, New York 
State business diploma 
Mendes, Henry Eugene 

St John's Catholic Academy, Syracuse 
State stenographers certificate 
McCarthy, John V. 

St Patrick's Academy, Catskill 
State business diploma 
Hollenbeck, Estrella Elizabeth Walsh, Elizabeth 

State stenograph4irs diploma 
Hollenbeck, Estrella Elizabeth Walsh, Elizabeth 

Sherman Collegiate Institute, Horiah 

State business diploma 
Hill, Frederic C. 



INDEX 



Academic credentials, 4. 

Academic equivalent certificates 
isRued, 15, 13G-38. 

AccouDtaDts, see Certified public 
accountants. 

Accredited dental schoolH, list, 1(M- 
(59. 

Accredited medical schools, 17, 18; 
list, 140-54. 

Accredited veterinary schools, list, 
173-74. 

Adelphi College, degrees conferred 
on graduates, 5, 58; honorary de- 
gret»8 conferred, 8. 

American Institute of Social Serv- 
ice, New York, chartered, 4. 

Answer papers, number written, 
accepted and rejected, 14-15, 
130-38; per cent accepted, 14, 
130-38; per cent rejected, 136- 
38. 

Authological Society, New York, 
chartered, 4. 

Apfel, Charles L., may take Re- 
gents examinations, 41. 

Architecture, schools of, statistics, 
106-25. 

Army, examinations for mwlicnl 
corps, 29. 

Art schools, statistics, 106-25. 

Association charters, 4. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 
power to confer degree of bach- 
elor of divinity, 15. 

B. A. degree conferred, 58. 

B. D. degree, conferred, 57; Auburn 
Theological Seminary may con- 
fer, 15. 

B. L. S. degree conferred, 59. 

B. S. degree conferred, 58. 

Baccalaureate and medical course, 
combined, 14. 

Bible Teachers Training School, 
New Y^ork, limited charter, 4. 



Boulay. Avila O., case of, 20-27. 

Brooklyn Eastern District Dispen- 
sary and Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, limited charter, 4. 

Brooklyn law school, annexed to 
St Lawrence University, 16. 

Brooklyn, see also New York School 
of Journalism. 

Business credentials, 55; issued, 
179-81; 

examination for: 56; calendar, 
105. 

Business education, report on, 55- 
57; high school courses, 56; na- 
tional and interstate meetings, 
56-57. 

Calendar of examinations, 104-5; 
certified public accountant, 54; 
dental, 39; medical, 21; veteri- * 
nary, 46-47. 

Canandaigua, see Ontario County 
Historical Society-. 

Certificates, summary of, 14-15, 
13<5-38; total number issued, 15, 
13(>-38. See also Academic equiv- 
alent certificates; Certified public 
accountants; Dental student cer- 
tificates; Law student certifi- 
cates; Medical student certifi- 
cates; Veterinary student certifi- 
cates. 

Certified public accountants, 53-54; 
certificate, 53; certificates Issued 
at examinations, 5, 60, 93; certifi- 
cates issued without examination, 
liVi; examiners, 53; 

examinations: calendar, 54, 
105: receipts and expenses, 63- 
54: rejections by topics, 179; re- 
sults of, 54, 179. 

Charters granted, 4. 

Clark son School of Technology, de- 
grees conferred on graduates 5, 
58. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl83 



College, use of term, 11. 

College credentials, 4. 

College Department, scope, 3; di- 
visions, 3. 

College training, value of, ^11. 

Colleges, summary from annual re- 
ports of, 7; Regents action on, 
8^9; 

statistics: 7, 106-35; expendi- 
tures, 7, 8, 1^13, 107, 121^-2:^, 
127; faculty. 7, 12-13, 106. 110- 
13, 120; number, 106, 108; prop- 
erty, 7, 8. 12-13, 14, 107. 118-19, 
127 ; receipts, 120-21 ; students, 7, 
12-13, 106, 114-17, 126. 

Coming, see Highland Pines Sani- 
tarium Training School for 
Nurses. 

Credentials, University, 4; submit- 
ted for recognition, 6; Library 
School, 53. 

Crissy, I. O., report on business ed- 
ucation, 55-57. 

D. D. S. degree, pro];>osed exchange 
of M. D. S. degree for, 32-35; 
conferred, 59; examination for. 
calendar. 104. 

D. P. H. degree, propositi, ^. 

Degrees, registered, 3; conferred 
by University. 4-5, 57-00; con- 
ferred on examination. 107, 109; 
in pedagogy, 9; 

honorary: conferred by Adel- 
phi College, 8; Regents have re- 
strained from bestowing, 35. 
Flee aUo B.A. degree; B.D. de- 
gree; B.LS. degree; B.S. degree; 
D.D.S. degree; D.P.H. degree; 
M.D. degree. 

Dental council's recommendations, 
38. 

Dental degrees, see D.D.S. degree. 

Dental diplomas, indorsement, 99- 
101. 

Dental examiners, 36; summaries 
of minutes, 41-44; officers, 44. 

Dental licenses, interchange of. 41- 
42, 44; indorsement of Pennsyl- 
vania license, 36-37, 42, 43. 



Dental licensing examinations, cal- 
endar. 39, 104; list of candidates, 
8(»-91; dental council's recom- 
mendations, 38; divided examina- 
tions, 42; comparative standing of 
recent and older gi'aduates, 171; 
plates submitted in prosthetic 
dentistry, 41; riH'cipts and dis- 
bursements, 38-39; rejections by 
topics. 171-72; results. 40, 171. 

Dental schools, conil)inod mcMiical 
and dental courses, 44; compari- 
son of. 40-4t; list of registered or 
accredited. 104-00; committee on 
regist ration, 44; registration. 37- 
38; reregistration, 37; statistics. 
100-25; summaries, 40. 170; stu- 
dents. 40. 

Dental student certificates issued, 
15, 136-38. 

Dental student examlmitions, cal- 
endar, 104. 

Dental students in New York State, 
40. 

Dentistry. 32-44. 

Dentists licensed at examinations. 
5. (JO. 80-91. 

Diplomas certify conferment of de- 
gree. 3. 4. 

Eclectic MiHlical Society-, examin- 
ers. 17; meeting of examiners, 31; 
otHcers, 31. 

Education, schools of, statistics. 
KKV-2.-I. 

Engineering schools, statistics, 100- 
25. 

p]qulvalent academic credentials, 4. 

Equivalents, certificates issued on, 
15, 1:^0-38; partinl, 1,\ l.'^oas. 

Examinations. 0; calendar, 104-5; 
expenses, 0; subjects, 0; sum- 
mary of, 14-1."». l.*50-.'^8. ^cc alfto 
Business credentials; Certified 
public accountants; Dental licens- 
ing examinations : Medical licens- 
ing examinations: New YoVk 
State Library School ; Veterinary 
licensing examinations. 



rl84 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OP NBW YORK 



Expenditures of University Institu- 
tions. 7, 8. 12-13, 107. 122-23. 127. 
129. 131. 

Extension courses, registration of, 
5-6; exnminntions, cal^^ndar. 105. 

Eye and ear schools, statistics. 100- 
25. 

Faculty of I'niversity institutions, 
7. 12-13. 100, 110-13, 120, 128, 130. 

First Austrian Talmud Torah Asso- 
ciation, New Yorlc, limited char- 
ter, 4. 

Franlvlln County Historical Society. 
Malone, chartert^d, 4. 

Qardiner, Shoridau E., case of. 27. 
30. 

Gifts and bequests for education. 
1,V14, l.TJ-3r). 

Graduates iu University institu- 
tions, 7. 

High school credentials, 4. 

Higher and secondary education, 
comparison of. 7. 

Higher institutions, see Professional 
schools. 

Higher students enrolled in New 
York State lS9.i-1003, facing p.l2. 

Highland Pines Sanitarium Train- 
ing School for Nurses, Corning, 
limited charter. 4. 

Homeoimthic Medical Society, ex- 
aminers, 17; melting of examin- 
ers, 30-31; oflicers, 31. 

Honorary degree^',, .sec Degrees, hon- 
orary. 

Incorporations, 4. 

Indorsement of dental diplomas, 99- 
101; medical diplomas, 94-98; vet- 
erinary diplomas, 102-3. 

Jamaica Training School for 
Nurses, limited charter, 4. 

Keuka College, degrees conferred 
OD ^rraduates. 5. 58. 



Law schools. 16-17; students, 16; 
statistics, 106-25; summaries, 16- 
17. 139. 

Law student certificates issued, 15, 
13G-;5S. 

Law student examinations, calen- 
dar, 104. 

Library School, see New Y'ork State 
Library School. 

Licenses, give right to practise a 
profession. 3, 4; issued. 5; on ex- 
amination, 60-93; without exami- 
nation, 94-103. 

Lucas. William H., new license, 30. 

"I.D. degree, conferred. 51>; exami- 
ii.ition for. calendar. 104. 

M.D. S. degree, proposed exchange 
for O.D.S. degree, 32-35. 

.Mackenzie College, Sao Paulo. Bra- 
zil, degrees conferred on gradu- 
ates, 5, 58. 

>! alone, see Franklin County His- 
torical Society. 

Medical diplomas, indorsement, 94- 
98. 

Medical examiners. 17; minutes of 
state boards, 24-31. 

Medical licenses issued, 5, 60, 61-85; 
interstate reciprocity. 25, 27, 29- 
30. 

Medical licensing examinations, al- 
lowance of one year in term of 
study for admission to, 14; allow- 
ance for experience of older prac- 
titionei-s, 25; calendar, 21, 104; 
case of candidate number 301. 27; 
regulations for candidates, 28; 
candidates in partial examina- 
tions, 79-85; list of candidates, 
61-78; criticisms. 31; divided ex- 
aminations, 31; leniency in cer- 
tain cases, 31; receipts and dib- 
bursements, 18-21; rejections by 
topics, 157; report on. 24-25. 28- 
29. 31; results, 2^23. 156-57; at- 
tempts at standardizing. 29; com- 
parative standing of recent and 
older graduates, 157; average -^ 
number of trials to each New « 
\ X^tk school candidate, 23, IfKHQ. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT REPORT 1903 



rl85 



Medical schools, credentials for ad- 
mission to advanced standing in, 
25; In New York compared with 
those in other states and coun- 
tries, 23, 158-59; registration of, 
17-18; list of registered, 140-54; 
results of medical licensing ex- 
aminations, 22-23, 156-^7; statis- 
tics, 106-25; summaries, 22, 155; 
students, 2\; average number of 
trials to each New York school 
candidate, 23, 160-63. 

Medical student certificates issued, 
15, 136-38. 

Medical student examinations, cal- 
endar, 104. 

Medical students in New York 
State, 21-22. 

Medicine, 17-31. 

Music, schools of, statistics, 106-25. 

New Jersey State Board, reciproc- 
ity of medical licenses with, 27. 

New York City Teachers Associa- 
tion, department of university ex- 
tension, chartered, 4. 

New York College of Dentistry, de- 
grees conferred on graduates, 5, 
5»-60. 

New York Dental School, degrees 
conferred on graduates. 5, 60. 

New York Medical College and 
Hospital for Women, degrees con- 
ferred on graduates, 5, 59. 

New York School of Journalism, 
Brooklyn, limited charter, 4. 

New Y'ork State Library School, 
c^'eAentials, 53; degrees conferred 
on eraduates. 5,59; examinations, 
^"7?; calendar of examinations, 

Albs. 

New York, see also American Insti- 
tute of Social Service; Anthologi- 

. "^ cal Society; Bible Teachers Train- 
ing School; First Austrian Tal- 
mud Torah Association; Rabbi 

/ Jacob Joseph School; Society of 

V Ohel Torah. 



Nurses, 48-53; examinations, 52; ex- 
aminers, 48, 49; minutes of meet- 
ings, 51-53; registration of, 48; 
requirements for registration, 49- 
51; 

training schools: registration, 
51, 52; application for registra- 
tion or accrediting, 177. 

Ontario County Historical Society, 
Canandaigua, chartered, 4. 

Palmer, Dr, resolutions on death 
of, 42-43. 

Petlagogy, degrees in, 9. 

Pharmacy, schools of, statistics, 
106-25. 

Pliysiciaiis, licensed at examina- 
tions, 5. 60, 61-85; allowance for 
experience in examination of 
older practitioners, 25. See also 
Medical diplomas; Medical li- 

^ggpses; Medical licensing exami- 
nations. 

Professional schools, 14-53; sum- 
mary from annual reports of, 7; 
statistics: 12, 106-35: expendi- 
tiiros, 7, 8, 12-13, 107, 122-23. 129, 
131; faculty, 7, 12-13. 106. 110-13,' 
128, 130; number. 106. 108; prop- 
erly, 7, 8, 12-13. 14, 107, 118-39, 
120, 131; receipts. 120-21; stu- 
dents, 7, 12-33, 106, 114-17, 128, 
130. 
Pri)peity, of University institutions, 
7. 8, 12-13, 107, 118-19. 127, 129, 
131; invested in higher institu- 
tions of New York State. 14. 
Prosthetic dentistry, plates sub- 
mitted in, 41. 
Public accountants, see Certified 
public accountants. 

Babbi Jacob Joseph School, New 
York, limited charter, 4. 

Receipts of University institutions, 
8, 120-21. 

Regents, action by. 8-9, 15-16; con- 
trol of secondary education, 28, 



( 



risr; 



Mvi;i:siTv <ir tmk statk of new YORK 



KiuL^iiTid ilniiMi srliouls. list. KM- 

C'.i. 
Ki ;;Nlrrr(l liirilic.-il srllimls. list. 

M • .M. 
IIi'L'IsIt H'll Vrli'rill.'MV s<-liii(»ls, list, 

it:i 71. 
K. i:i>M;Hi..ii. ;; 1. i\, 11; tif roin- 
Iiiii«'<! Ii:H(':i);mm'< :iU' :iii'l iiiodical 
rcHirsr. 1 1; ul" <liMlI:il sclwHils, HI- 
l\S: i.r I'Mriisiuii iMMirsi's. ."i Ti; of 
liiiMllr;il si-Imnls. IT IS; uf Illll'SCS. 
1*^; ir.iiulim sclmuls I'lH* nurses. Tit, 
r.J. 177: i»r \»'liTiii;iry iiitMlical 
s.'InmN, [7t. 

St Lawrence riiivrr^ity. law <U*- 
p:iriiiM'iit. lii. 

SamaritMii llMs)iii:il Training; School 
Inr Nmsr>. Trny. liniii('<l rhartiT. 
1. 

Srrtiiiilary and lii;:ln'i- rdiicatioii, 
cnnipai'isnii iii'. 7. 

Soi-ii'iy uT ujirl Tiiiali. Ni'\% «,,.iw. 
liiuiird i-lianrr. 1. 

Sp.M-ial srlhMils. siMijiiiary fn)m aii- 
iiaal reports of. 7: 

siaii-iii'*<: 1L\ lo»i :;.*'»: exiM'udi- 
mn <. 7. s, 1L> i:i. H17, V2'2 2:\. 1L".>, 
i::i; la.uiiy. 7. lli VA. HMJ. ll4K-i:j. 
iL's. i::4i; imniJier. Iim;. los; prop- 
erty. 7, S, TJ |:;. 11. ln7, ll>c-ll». 
\.l\K l::i: r.'.<.:pis. lio-Ji: students. 
7. I'J i;i. iHj;. Ill 17. pjs. Kio. 

Stall' iin'ili« a! s niriy. I'xaniiniTS, 
17: niei'iiiiLr t^l' examiners. 124 W; 
oilircrs. *_••;. 

Sti-ni»;:ra|»li«T< rreilmiials, Tti\; js- 
<u.d. 171) M. 

Stndi'iits. Iil;,'luT. rnndhnl in Now 
York St;it«- /sii.i-imt.l, ffirinif p.12: 
in I'niver.NJty instlintiniis. 7, VJ- 
1:;. hm;. II 1-17. rj«;, vjs. va). 

Taylor, llrnry L.. report prepanwl 

l.y. :;. 
Te.'iehers, str l-'aeiiltv. 



Teeliiilml fR'hooIs, sumDi frov 
nil II mil reports of, 7; 

Htntistics: 12, lOG-35; ei^ieiidi 
tuH's. 7. 8. 12-13. 107. 122-2S, 129L 
i::i: fiitulty, 7, 12-13, 106, l]0-18i 
12s. i:{0; niiinl)er, 106, 108; prop- 
erty. 7. 8, 12-13. 14. 107, U8-lft 
12tM;{l; rocoipt 8, 120-21; studenti, . 
7. 12 -i:^ 100. 114-17. 128, 13CL- , 

Tetnplo. F. S., charges ag' '^,^0^ Xt 
27. - • '■ 



Th(H>lo);!rnl schools. 15-t», 'ti 

ties. 10«*»-2ri. v.- 

Tn)y. H€v Samaritan Qr **al Tnla- 

Iiiff Seliool for Nupvj. 

Union Theological Seminary, de- 

gnK^s conferred on gradoatea, 4, 

Til. 
^^lversitit^H, Regents action on, 8-9; 
statUtics: expcnditnres, 12-18, 

127: faculty. 12-13, 128; property, 

12-13, 14, 127; students, 12-18i 

120. 
rnlvcr»lty creileutinl^, 4. 
I'nivi^i'sity institutions, sunimaty 

fniiu annual fb ports of, T; coai- 

parison of, 11-12. 

Veterinarians lleeneed, 5. 00, 92. 

Vi»rerlnary (liploitias, indorsement, 
102-3. 

VetiTinary licencing eKfLUilnaUons,, 
cahndar. 4(J--»7. 104; li«t of «m- 
didatc^, 02; receipts^ and tMnhnrse^ 
ineiits. 45-40; rejeetions liy toplcSs, 
170: results. 47-48. 17a 

Vi'terinary mefll<'l»t\ 45^8. 

VetiMlnar>- nchools, r(?&lsti9llo9i •fi 
4.*»; list of regli^ti:^r<^'l or ^t-^^rM' 
ited. 17;i-74; sfatlstfta W«>--85j 
suniniaries. 47, 175; stiA^t^i^t 

Vet(?riuary student certlllcatei ^V 
Kuotl, 1."). 130-38. 

V(»ierinary student examl 
calendar, 104. 

Veterinary students In New T«rt 
State, 47. 




University of the State of New V 



College Der^^'^^'^rfu 

PUBLIC 
Eai^minaiioo Department r^pori^ %^f4^y^, O 



,i D^fMii*tm^iir ^Mllt^iins *K- 



B4 



Bio m* CVf iX<)j 






III III 



tU iiuUcUoi* «^^-, 



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1 



BVLLITIN 318 



'>r ?f:^*nr^ ' ^'^ \^ «■•*-■ 



eUru>^o^ the stale of N-Yj 



Subject no. 
016 

At'(,CST 1904 



New York, State Library 



Melvil Dewey Director 



Bulletin SSj-S^, 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 37 

« 

A SELECTION FROM THE 

BEST BOOKS OF 1903 

WITH NOTES 



Prefatory note 421 

Reference books 423 

Philosophy 423 

Ethics 424 

Religion 424 

Sociology 425 

Education 427 

Customs and folklore 428 

Natural science 428 

Useful arts 430 

Fine arts 431 

Music 434 

Amusements and sports 434 

Poetry 4,14 



Drama 435 

Essays, history of literature, etc. 435 

Description and travel 437 

History of foreign countries 440 

American history 440 

Biography 442 

Fiction 445 

Juvenile books 449 

Biography 452 

iMction 453 

New and enlarged editions 455 

Comparative table 456 

Author index 457 



Lx89ni-Mr4-35cx> 



ALPiAXY 

NEW YORK STATE EIH'CATIOX DEPARTMENT 
1904 



Price 10 cents 



>1 ATI'. "I Si \v Y'»UK 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Kcfi^cntK of the University 
Will; yt'iirs \v..cr. t«^rm^ expire 

191.^ Whuki.aw Khii) M.A. LL. I>. nuiKCtllor - - - New York 
i90(» Si Ci.AiR McKklway M.xV. L.H.D. LL.D. D.C.L. 

I 'iic Chancellor Brooklyn 

1908 Danjicl Heach Ph.D. LL.I). Watkins 

1914 Puny T. Skxton LL.D. Palmyra 

1912 T. (nriLFORi) Smith M.A. C.E. LL.D. - - - Buffalo 

1905 Aluert Vandkr Vehr M.A. Ph.D. M.D. - - Albany 

1907 William Nottix«;ham M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. - - Syracuse 

1910 Charle.s a. GARiiiNKR Ph.D. L.H.D. LL.D. D.C.L. New York 

1915 Charles S. Francis B.S. Troy 

191 1 Edward Lauterbach M.A. - New York 

1909 Eugene A. Philbin LL.B. LL.D. . . - . New York 

Commissioner of Education 

Andrew S. Draper LL.D. 

Assistant Commissioners 

Howard J. Rogers M.A. LL.D. First Assistant Commissioner 
Edward J. Goodwin Lit.D. Second Assistant Commissioner 
Augustus S. Downing M.A. Third Assistant Commissioner 

Secretary to the Commissioner 

Harlan H. Horner B.A. 

Director of Libraries and Home Education 

Melvil Dewey LL.D. 

Director of Science Work and State Museum 

John M. Clarke LL.D. 

Chiefs of Divisions 

Accounts, William Mason 
Attendance, James D. Sullivan 
Examinations, Charles F. Wheelock B.S^ 
Inspections, Frank H. Wood M.A. 
Law, Edwin M. Holbrook 
Records, Charles E. Fitch L.H.D. 
Statistics, Hiram C. Case 



University of the State of New York 



New York State Library 

Melvil Dewey Director ^ 

Bulletin 88 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 37 

A SELECTION FROM THE 

BEST BOOKS OF 1903 

WITH NOTES 



^ , - ., PBEFATOBT NOTE 

To the Librarian 

This is an annotated list of 250 books published in the United 
States in 1903, selected by the book board of the New York State 
Library and recommended to the public libraries of the State. 
To aid in choosing small collections of new books three classes 
are marked : books marked a. of which there are 20, are suggested 
to libraries which must confine their additions within narrow 
limits; 30 others marked h are also proposed to libraries that can 
buy 50 books ; and 50 more marked c may be added to a and h 
to make up 100 books. 

The remaining 150, including some reference books and a few 
more costly publications, are worthy careful consideration by libraries 
that can buy more than 100 books and by those wishing to 
enlarge resources in special subjects. Many of the unmarked 
works are of the highest merit. Decimal Classification numbers as 
used in the State Library are prefixed as a guide to libraries 
using this system. For convenience of libraries wishing to use 
them, Library of Congress printed catalogue card serial numbers 
are given in note type; also references to reviews. A short list 
of older books in materially altered editions, or transferred to 
other publishers, is appended. 

The following from the Journal of Nc7i' Jersey libraries, (Octo- 
ber 1903, applies ccjually to New York: 

Look at books before buying them, if possible. Advertise- 
ments and reviews are both untrustworthy, especially where any 
library's special needs are to be considered. 



422 NKW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Information about importing books, secondhand books, and 
even about new books which arc under consideration, is always 
cheerfully given, when asked, by the larger libraries in the State. 

Do not buy encyclopedias while in process of publication. 
They are aggravations until complete, and can always be bought 
more cheaply than they are at first offered a few months after 
publication. Read Eugene Field's story of th<i " Cyclopedy," 
and take warning. The same rule holds as to all subscription 
books. Avoid them. Shun books in parts. They cost more 
than they are worth to a library. They turn up in secondhand 
stores a few months after completion at low prices. Deluded 
purchasers find the;n white elephants and sell them. Finest 
Orations, Noblest Essays, Royal Flint Flams, Huge Anthologies, 
and the like all come to the secondhand man. Get them of him, 
if you must. In a small library they are generally almost useless. 
In subscription books, cases like this are not uncommon. 
Maspero wrote several large and learned volumes, in French, on 
Egypt and Chaldea. They were translated and published in three 
or four volumes in England, costing libraries in this country 
about $5 each. An American publisher reprints them in 12 small 
volumes with a few additional colored cuts, on heavier paper and 
in larger type and offers them through agents for $84 — and 
libraries buy them I 

Do not buy " sets " or complete editions of authors. Buy the 
volumes you need and as you need them. A complete set always 
includes several volumes you do not need. 

Sj)ecify the edition you wish of standard books when you can, 
unless you find a bookseller able and willing to select them wisely 
for you. 

While this list has been prepared with special reference to 
smaller public libraries, and some of these books are not recom- 
mended for school use, it will also be of much service to schools. 
Almost all the list is available. Any book under the heading 
** Juvenile " may be bought for academic libraries. But there 
are some hooks of fiction found here which serve a legitimate 
purpose in the public library by providing wholesome entertain- 
ment for a very different class of readers, yet have not enough 
positive value, either as literature or as a spur to historical study 
to justify their purchase by the school. 

Melvil Dewey 

Director 

Albany, July 9, ipo.f 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 423 

&EFEBEHCE BOOKS 

016.823 b Baker, E. A. Descriptive Guide to the Best Fiction, 
British and American. Macmillan $2.50 

3-8699 45CX) titles, grouped by period, with descriptive notes, publishers 

and prices; also lists of historical romances arranged chronologi- 
cally. Inclijdes chief translations of foreign novels. Fully indexed 
and surprisingly excellent in selection and annotation. 
Nation, 'jd 1249 ; Ath. 1903, 1 1402 ; Acad. 64 :22s 

027 Clark, J: W. The Care of Books: an Essay on the 

Development of Libraries and their Fittings from 
the Earliest Times to the End of the i8th Century. 

Macmillan $5 n 

2-10340 Concerned with buildings and methods of care and administration, 
not literary content. Deals largely with university and monastic 
types. Scholarly, sumptuously printed, 156 illustrations. 
Acad. 61:460; Ath. 1901, 2:624 

070 Shuman, E. L. Practical Journalism: a Complete 

Manual of the Best Newspaper Methods. 

Appleton $1.25 n 

3-19681 On the reporter's education, positions, salaries, ncwsgathering, the 
Siniday supplement, women in newspaper work, advertisements, law 
of libel and copyright, etc. Julian Ralph's Making of a Journalist, 
Harper $1.25 n., largely an account of his own experiences, is enter- 
taining and suggestive; Gavit's Reporter's Manual, J. P. Gavit, 
Albany, $1 n., is a compact, self-indexing pocket book of valuable 
suggestion to the untrained and useful reminder to the experienced. 
Nation, 77:306 

920.042 [?Lee, Sidney, cd. Dictionary of National Biograi)hy: 
Index and Epitome. Macmillan $6.25 n 

3-12075 Summary of moiuimental work in 66 volumes. Every person 
entered there receives here approximately one fourteenth of original 
space. 30,378 articles, 3474 cross references. Specially valuable to 
libraries unable to buy expensive set for authoritative sketches and 
characterizations of distinguished Englishmen. 
Ath. 1903, 1:559; Sat. R. 95:590; Nation, 76:476 

PHILOSOPHY 

133.9 Podmore, Frank. Modern Spiritualism : A History and 
a Criticism. 2v. Scribner $5 n 

3-5164 Likely to become the standard work on the subject. He is the 

most sceptical of psychical researchers, and possesses extensive and 
firsthand acquaintance with the evidence. Nation, 76:138 
Dial, 3470; Sat. R. 95:110; Spec. 90:216 

134 Myers, F: W. H. Human Personality and its Survival 

of Bodily Death. 2v. (42/ n) Longmans $12 n 

3-3539 Exhaustive array of the phenomena of genius, sleep, hypnotism, 

sensory automatism, phantasms of the dead, motor automatism, 
trance, possession and ecstacy, with elaborate argument to prove 
that personality survives death. 

Acad. 64:197; Critic, 42:461 (J: W. Chadwick), Sat. R. 95:424; 
Spec. 90:373 



424 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



ETHICS 



171 Keller, Helen. Optimism: an Essay. Crowell 75c n 

3-30975 Three brief chapters emhodying the cheerful and hopeful philoso- 
phy of the afflicted liut brave young author. 

177 c Bell, Mrs Hugh. The Minor Moralist. 

( Bell 4/ 6 n ) I^ngmans $ i .60 n 

3- 1 5 146 I'-ssays, characterized by g(X)d sense and lightened by touches of 
humor, on gtxxl manners, making a success of middle life, relations 
of mothers and daughters, beginning life with Jiigh ideals, merits 
and demerits of thrift, lot of the servant. 
Acad. 64 1246 ; Spec. 90 1366 

&ELIGIOV 

221 rMcFadycn, J: E. Old Testament Criticism and the 

Christian Church. Scribner $1.50 n 

3-12775 B«)ok about criticism, not critical book about Bible. Tries to 
show what criticism is, that it in no way imperils faith but rather 
hel[)s to bridge gulf between faith and reason. 
()utl(X)k, 74:431; Acad. 65:411 

221.95 Pinches, T. G. Old Testament in the Light of His- 
torical Records and Legends of Assyria and Baby- 
lonia. Ed. 2enl. (S. P. C. K. 7/6) 

Young $2.50 n 

Presents facts as recorded in cuneiform and hieroglyphic inscrip- 
tions side by side with Bible accounts, with no discussion and litUe 
expression of opinion. Popular, 16 plates. 

Ath. 1903, 1 1267 

230 Gordon, G: A. Ultimate Conceptions of Faith. 

Houghton $1.30 n 

3-^^733 Comprehensive statement of the working theology of a foremost 
representative of liberal orthodoxy. Mainly Yale lectures. 
Dial. 35:415 
240 Pcabody, F. G. The Religion of an Educated Man. 

Macmillan $r n 

3-27912 Lectures at Ilavcrford College, (i) Religion as Education. (2) 
Message of Christ to the Scholar. (3) Knowledge and Service. 

267.613 Clark, F. E: Christian Endeavor Manual. 

United Society of Christian Endeavor $1 

3-8670 By founder of Christian Endeavor Society. Covers its history, 

principles, theories and practice in various channels of work. Bibli- 
ography and appendixes. 

268 6 Mead, G: W. Modern Methods in Sunday-school 

Work. Dodd$i.5on 

3-27915 Has collected from current life and progressive work of modem 
Sunday schools their own account of their administrative methods, 
collating, presenting and explaining the essential details of various 
successful plans. 

Burton and Mathews's Principles and Ideals for the Sunday 
School, Univ. of Chicago pr. $1 n., deals less \vith specific plans. 
discussing aims, methods and ideals in connection with work of 
teacher and pastor. 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 425 

289.9 Elkinton, Joiseph. The Doukhobors, their History in 
Russia, their Migration to Canada. Ferris $2 

3-4773 Account by a Quaker sympathizer of the persecuted Russian 

" Spirit Wrestlers " and the peculiar religious beliefs which affect 
their citizenship. Numerous photographic illustrations. 
Nation, 76:382; Acad. 65:231; Ath. 1904, 1:204 

296 Joseph, Morris. Judaism — as Creed and Life. 

(5/n) Macmillan $1.60 n 

4-5976 Bk I, Beliefs ; bk 2, Ceremonial ; bk 3, Moral Duties. 

A view of Judaism midway between strict orthodoxy and extreme 
liberalism. The latter is represented in Montefiore's Liberal Judaism, 
Macmillan $1.25. The author of the latter says : " Written in the 
hope that it may render spiritual service to many who are uncer- 
tain whether, or how far, they are still Jews." 

Montefiore, Acad. 64 :247 ; Spec. 90 :824 

296 cRosenau, William. Jewish Ceremonial Institutions 

and Customs. Friedenwald Co. $1.50 

3-4774 Usage and significance in synagogue services, home customs, 

feasts, fasts, circumcision, marriage, divorce, ritualistic slaughtering, 
etc. Photographs of utensils, ceremonial robes, etc. 
Ath. 1903, 2:580; Nation, 7^:355 

BOOIOLOOT 

See also Juvenile, p. 449 and New editions, p. 45.S 

301 Tarde, Gabriel. Laws of Imitation. Holt $3 n 

y2\22i}t Translation of scholarly French study of social structure pub- 
lished 13 years ago. Based on fundamental thesis that *' society 
is imitation " and *' began on the day when one man first copied 
another." 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 23:360; Lit. W. 35:38 

304 c Morison, G : S. The New Epoch as Developed by the 

Manufacture of Power. Houghton 75c n 

3-281 5 1 Fundamental idea, that the present age marks the beginnings of a 
great ethical period to embody distinct advance and change in human 
civilization. Full of interest and suggestion. Nation, 78:38 

323 c Hadley, A. T. Freedom and Responsibility. (Yale 

Lectures on the Responsibilities of Citizenship) 

Scribner $1 n 

3-31885 Argues that relation between political privileges and moral re- 
sponsibilities of free citizenship is vital, and that legal or social 
theories which ignore this are likely to prove destructive. Pittsburgh 

325.26 a Du Bois, W: E: B. Souls of lUack Folk. 

McClurg $1.20 n 

3- 1 1 173 Contends for the spiritual uplifting of the negro as the necessary 
complement of Mr Washington's practical and material theories. 

Professor Du Bois is perhaps the most scholarly man of his race 
in America. Dial, 34:300 

Acad. 65:103; Nation, 76:481; Outlook, 74:214 



426 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

327.73 c Foster, J: W. American Diplomacy in the Orient. 

Houghton $3n 

3-4448 Taken in connection with his Century of American Diplomacy 

constitutes lirst systematic attempt to present a clear and concise 
discussion of questions of foreign policy arising out of our relations 
with countries of Far East. Annals of Amer. Acad. 22:221 
Texts of treaties and pn)t<)Ools in appendix. 
Amer. Hist. R. 9:180 (T. S. W(X)lsey) ; Dial, 35^34; Lit. W. 
34:115 

329 Woodbum, J. A. American Republic and its Govern- 

ment. Putnam $2 n 

Political Parties and Party Problems in the 

United States. Putnam $2 n 

3-4763 Form together a treatment of civil government in this country, 

3-9361 both theoretical and historical. The declared aim was to prepare 
a work intermediate between the elementary textbook and the com- 
prehensive treatises of Bryce and Ostrogorski. Dial, 34:3/8 
Nation, 7^):437, 77:3391 Lit. W. 34^115. 206 

330 a Brooks, J: G. The Social Unrest. Macmillan $1.50 n 

Special ed. pap. 25c 

3-1440 He has divested himself to an unusual degree from bias and 

class prejudice, and, on terms of familiarity and intimacy with leaders 
of both capital and labor, writes from fullness of experience. 

Ath. 1903, 1:680; Dial, 34:233; Polit. Sci. 2, 18:343; Atlantic, 
91 :569 (J. H. Gray) 

331.4 6 Van Vorst, Mrs Bessie & Van Vorst, Marie. The 

Woman Who Toils. Doubleday $1.50 n 

3-4201 Authors studied life of working women by sharing it in a Pitts- 

burg pickle factory, a southern cotton mill, a Lynn shoe factory, 
making clothing in Chicago, etc. 

Ath. 1903, 2:ji8; Critic, 42:375 (O. H. Dunbar); Dial, 34:402; 
Nation, 77 .39 

331 .87 c Mitchell, John. Organized Labor, its Problems, Pur- 
poses and Ideals. 

Amer. Book & Bible House $1.75 n 

3-27926 Tartizan in discussion of nearly every subject, despite indications 
that he strives to be fair-minded. However, he holds high ideals 
before the laboring class. Annals of Amer, s4cad. 23:546 
Lit. W. 34:339 

336.73 Dewey, D. R. Financial History of the United States. 

(Amer. Citizen Ser.) Longmans $2 

3-4764 Vrom cob^nial period to present. Historical, not didactic and 

cniiiHMitly fair in presenting various sides. Annotated bibliographies 
and 18 graphic charts. 

Jour, of Polit. Kcon. 2:487; Dial, 35:311; Nation. 77:121 

338.8 Meade, E: S. Trust Finance. (Appleton*s Business 

Ser.) Appleton $1.25 n 

3-11174 .Study of the genesis, organizaticm and management of industrial 
combinations. 

Extended examination of the United States Steel Corporation of 
particular interest. Jour, of Polit. Econ. 12:156 

Dial, 35*44; Nation, 77:191 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 4^7 

352.0747 Hodder, Alfred. A Fight for the City. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 

3-12528 Account of William Travers Jerome's campaign (1901) for office 
of district attorney for New York county. First published in Out- 
look, 

Nation, 77-^2] Dial, 35*129 

353.7 Long, J: D. The New American Navy. 2v. 

Macmillan $5 n 

3-31878 Short sketches of navy from Civil War to early eighties, history 
of new development and account of recent exploits and present 
condition. 

Lit. W. 35 139 ; Nation, 78 152 

364 r Booth, Mrs Maud Ballington. After Prison — What? 

Revell$i.25 n 

3-25751 Describes her personal work among prisoners and the results 
which have followed the methods advocated. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 23 1349 ; Bookman, 18 1645 ; Nation, 77 :S33 

385 Johnson, E. R. American Railway Transportation. 

(Appleton*s Business Sen) Appleton $1.50 n 

3-20360 Describes existing system, discussing questions connected with 
ownership, management, monopoly and competition, rates, fares, re- 
lations with state, etc. Semi-popular. Bibliographic references. 

Meyer's Railway Legislation in the United States (Citizen's Lib. 
of Economics and Politics). Macmillan $1.25 n., gives condensed 
analysis of private and public laws governing railways and of im- 
portant decisions affecting interstate commerce. 

Johnson, Nation, 77:531; Dial, 36:391; Meyer, Annals of Amer. 
Acad. 22 :345 ; Dial, 36 :393 

EDUOATIOK 

371.42 Baldwin, W: A. Tnclustrial-social Education. 

Milton Bradley Co. $1.50 

3-26889 Describes work being done at Hyannis Mass. with discussion of 
pedagogic reasons; chapters on weaving, raphia, rattan and splint 
baskets, hammock making, school gardens, sewing etc. Fully illus- 
trated. 

372.1 Buck, Winifred. Boys' Self-governing Clubs. 

Macmillan $1 n 

3-11651 Manual suggesting methods for organizing and conducting boys 

clubs ; based on 12 years' experience. Interesting chapter on crimi- 
nal acts in children. 
Spec. 90:944 
373.73 Adams, O. F. Some Famous American Schools. 

Estes $1.20 n 

3-19852 Popular papers on boys* schools — Nazareth Hall, Phillips Andover, 
Phillips Exeter. Lawrenccville, St Paul's, St Mark's, Shattuck, 
Groton and Helmont Nearly 50 photographic illustrations. 

379.11 a Eliot, C: W. More Money for the Public Schools. 

Doubleday $r n 

3-10062 Sums up ]>enetlts and shortcomings of present public education 

and urges need of fireproof and sanitary buildings, attractive school 
yards, medical inspection, pensions, improved curriculums, better 
equipped teachers, etc. 

Dial, 35 '93 1 Nation, 77 -.173 



428 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

OUBTOMB AVD FOLXLOBE 

See also Juvenile, p. 450 

391 rElarle, Mrs Alice (Morse). Two Centuries of Cos- 

tume in America, 1620-1820. 2v. Macmillan $5 n 
3-31011 Alive with gossip and anecdote of the time, with abundance of 
illustration, it is an invaluable book of reference for every detail 
of dress from 1620 to 1820. 

Ath. 1904, 1 1263; Dial, 36:46; Nation, 78:55; Spec. ^:^ 

NATURAL BCIEVOE 

See niso Juvenile, p. 450 and New editions, p. 455 

507 h Bailey, L. H. The Nature-study Idea. 

Doubleday $i n 

3-10055 Explains purpose and indicates spirit and methods which should 
prevail in putting children in touch with nature. Does not outline 
courses or give specific directions. 

Critic, 43:168 (D. L. Sharp) ; Dial, 34:405 

523. 13 Wallace, A. R. Man's Place in the Universe. 

McClure $2.50 n 

4-21 Considers evidence for or against the probable existence on other 

worlds of such organic life, specially human, as is found on the 
earth. Dial, 36:148 

Nation, 78:34; Spec. 92:54 

546 Hammer, W: J. Radium and other Radio-active Sub- 

stances. Van Nostrand $1 

3-16267 Most complete work on subject. (1903) Deals with radium, polo- 
nium, actinium, thorium, phosphorescent and fluorescent substances, 
applications of selenium, and treatment of diseases by ultra-violet 
light Bottone's Radium and All about It, Whittaker, 35c n., is 
much more popular, treating of scientific aspects only, not practical 
applications. 
Nation, 78:211 

551 Partsch, J. F. M. Central Europe. (Appleton's World 

Ser.) Appleton $2 n 

3-25895 Includes German empire, Austro-Hungary, the Balkans, Switzer- 
land. Treats physical features in detail and points out influence on 
national life and political and economic development 
Ath. 1903, 2:488; Acad. 64:583 

575 Metchnikoff, Elie. The Nature of Man: Studies in 

Optimistic Philosophy. Putnam $2 n 

3-26337 Elaborates the idea of functional harmonies and disharmonies 
with special consideration of influence on old age and death. 

Addressed to disciplined minds and in especial, to the biologist 

Preface 
Amer. Jour, of Soc. 9:580 (A. W. Small); Dial. 36:329 (A. K. 
Rogers); Nation, 78:56; Sat R. 96:802 

581.61 Snow, C: H. The Principal Species of Wood: their 
Characteristic Properties. Wiley $3.50 

3-9910 Primarily intended for workers in wood. Gives general descrip- 

tion of each genus, with full page plate generally showing detail 
of bark, leaf and wood, as well as general tree form. For each 
species is given scientific and various local names, locality, general 
features, color and appearance of wood, structural qualities, repre- 
sentative uses, weight etc. Describes about 125 species. 39 plates. 
Nation, 76:417 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 429 

581.973 cKcclcr, H. L. Our Northern Shrubs and How to 

Identify Them. Scribner $2 n 

3-1 1679 Popular guide on same general plan as her Our Native Trees, 
Each of 230 species analyzed scientifically and described popularly 
with special reference to its origin, history, hardihood and decora- 
tive possibilities. 205 plates from photographs. 35 drawings. 
Critic, 43:166 (D. L. Sharp) ; Dial. 34:367; Lit W. 34:i43 

587 . 3 c Waters, C. E. Ferns : a Manual for the Northeastern 

States. Holt $3 n 

3-20407 For amateur botanists. Outcome of 14 years* field study. Pro- 
vides a system of identification based on stem structure as well as 
that based on fructification. Remarkably beautiful and instructive 
collection of fern photographs. Too heavy for field use. 
Dial, 36:122; Nation, 77:382 

589.95 Conn, H. W. Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the Home. 

Ginn $1 

3-32453 For practical housekeepers and students of household economics. 
Deals with beneficent and destructive growths, conditions of produc- 
tion, preservation processes, control of contagion, etc. 

591 . 5 b Bostock, F. C : Training of Wild Animals. 

Century $1 n 

3-1626S By experienced trainer. Dwells on animal traits in captivity and 
hazardous lives of trainers, rather than details of methods of train- 
ing for show ring. 
Nation, 77:^35 

591 . 5 b Long, W : J. A Little Brother to the Bear, and other 

Animal Studies. Ginn $1.50 n 

3-27981 Observations and inferences wrought into excellent tales of bears, 
coons, woodcock, toads, wildcats, moose and other wild creatures. 
Attractively illustrated. 

Acad. 65:650; Dial, 35:468; Nation, 77:489 

591.5 Walton, M. A. A Hermit's Wild Friends. 

Estes $1.50 n 

3-2573^ Animal lore and woodcraft. Author somewhat widely known as 
the hermit of Gloucester. Illustrated. 
Dial, 35 :468 

595 • 7 ^ Comstock, A. B. Ways of the Six-footed. Ginn 40c 

3-^3361 On mosquitos, katydids, wasps, moths, ants and other common 
insects. Of value and interest as observations and attractive in 
literary quality and illustration. For adults, primarily. 

595 . 78 Holland, W : J. The Moth Book. Doiibleday $4 n 

3-3^233 Popular, compact descriptions of peculiar features, habits and 
distribution of North American species. 48 colored plates and 263 
text illustrations. Introductory chapters on life history, anatomy, 
capture, preservation and classification. Bibliography. 

Nation, 78:117; Dial. 36:41; Science, 19:188 (L. O. Howard) 

598.2 c Chapman, F. M. Color Key to North American Birds. 

Doubleday $2.50 n 

3-3^958 Systematic list of birds with over 800 sketches, diajaframmatic 
rather than lifelike, indicating characteristics and color of birds when 
seen at a distance, with brief notes to aid identification. Includes 
species and subspecies from Panama to the Pole. 
Nation, 78:111 



430 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

598.2 . a Weed, C. M. & Dearborn, Ned. Birds in their Rela- 
tions to Man : a Manual of Economic Ornithology. 

Lippincott $2.50 n 
3-14872 Discusses kind and quality of food, animal and vegetable, con- 
sumed by various species. Chapters on conservation and prevention 
of depredations. Annotated bibliography; illustrations. 
Dial, 35:128; Lit. W. 34:170; Nation. 77:136 

USEFUL ASTS 

Sff also Juvenile, p. 451 

613 . 7 h Benson, E : F. & Miles, E. H. Daily Training. (Ath- 
letic Lib.) Diitton $1.50 n 
yi6^6^ Concerning exercise, diet, stimulants, water, heat, sleep, rest etc 
under ordinary conditions. Thoroughly manly and practical. The 
joint authors agree on broad principles, though diflFering widely in 
personal practices. 

Ath. 1903, 1:179: Nation, 76:331 

613.7 c Hancock, H. I. Japanese Physical Training. 

Putnam $1.25 n 
3-3-2598 Describes "Jiu-jitsu," the system of exercises for acquiring 
strength and skill in self-defense, and Japanese habits as to diet, 
fresh air, use of water, etc. Photographic illustrations. 
Acad. 66:246; Dial, 36:302; Nation, 78:135 

613.81 Billings, J: S. ed. Physiological Aspects of the Liquor 
Problem. 2v. Houghton $4.50 n 

3-14025 4th subreport to committee of 50. Concludes that use of 
alchohol impairs mental work, lessens physical power, does not 
protect against cold and fatigue and diminishes resistance to in- 
fectious diseases. Condemns and exposes fallacy of some misdi- 
rected efforts to promote temperance. 
Nation, 77:52 

616.246 c New York Charity Organization Society. Handbook 
on the Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

N. Y. Charity Organization Society $1 n 
This book, prepared by specialists, is a magazine of information, 
in plain terms and for practical use, concerning evils to be eradicated, 
dangers to be guarded against and curative methods (not medical 
treatment) to be practised. Every town improvement society should 
be familiar with it, and families shadowed by consumption should 
have its help. It points to a day when this scourge shall be driven 
out. 

619 Mayo, N. S. Care of Animals. (Rural Science Ser.) 

Macmillan $1.25 n 
3-32828 Brief, popular advice on diseases and ailments of farm animals 
with directions about general care, quarters, care of pets, and judg- 
ing, handling and shoeing horses. 
Ath. 1904, 1:367; Nation, 78:130 

630 . 2 Burkett, C : W :, Stevens, F. L. & Hill, D. H. Agricul- 
ture for Beginners. Ginn 75c 
3-18728 Illustrated school manual. Treats of soil, plant growth, cross 
breeding, plant diseases and pests, domestic animals, dairying. Simi- 
lar in scope, less fully illustrated, with chapters on wind and weather, 
is Bessey, Bruner and Swezey's Nnu Elementary Agriculture for 
Rural and Graded Schools, Univ. Pub. Co. Lincoln Nch. 60c. 
Sat. R. 97 -24 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 43 ^ 

634 c Hcmenway, H. D. How to Make School Gardens. 

Doubleday $i n 
3-13729 Illustrated manual for teacher and pupil. Gives in the form of 
daily lessons, explicit directions for young pupils. Author director 
of Hartford School of Horticulture. Bibliography. 
Nation, 76 :523 

639 Laut, A. C. Story of the Trapper. (Story of the West 

Ser.) Applcton $1.25 n 

2-28285 Sketches qflforts of rival companies to control American fur field, 
describes trapper's daring and picturesque life, the wilderness train- 
ing and the ways of beasts. 
Dial, 34 :244 ; Nation, 76 139 

640 Clark, T. M. Care of a House. Macmillan $1.5011 
3-22845 Volume of suggestions by an architect to householders, house- 
keepers, landlords, tenants, trustees and others for the economical 
and efficient care of dwelling hou.ses. 

Acad. 65:470; Ath. 1904, 1:86; Nation, 77:491 

647 Pettengill, Lillian. Toilers of the Home. 

Doubleday $1.5011 
3-22107 Detailed and gossipy record of a college woman's experiences as 
domestic servant in five families within nine months. Presents no 
new conclusions but offers food for thought. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 23 :358 ; Nation, 78 :334 

652 Altmaier, C. L. Model Type-writing Instructor. 

Schoch $1 

3-21742 Handbook by teacher in Drexel histitute, with instruction as to 
touch, manipulation of machine, arrangement of material, etc. In- 
cludes drills for civil service examinations. Printing imitates type- 
written work. 

659 Scott, W. D. Theory of Advertising. Small $2 n 

3-Z^i^ Illustrated study of psychologic values in advertisements. A prac- 
tical aid to advertisers and interesting to many general readers. 

680 Hopkins, G: M. Home Mechanics for Amateurs. 

(Scientific Amer. Ser.) Munn $1.50 

3-26920 Wood- working, how to make household ornaments, metal-working, 
model engines and boilers, meteorology, telescopes and microscopes, 
electricity. Appeared in part in Scientific American. 

FIKE ASTS 

.S>/' also Juvenile biography, p. 452 

710 h Robinson, C : M. Modern Civic Art. Putnam $2.50 n 

3-13052 Practical, stating general principles, and applying to specific 
problems of convenience and beauty which confront cities. 
Critic, 4.1 --^^^J; Lit. W. 34:211 

716 h Ely, H. R. A Woman\s Hardy Garden. 

Macmillan $1.75 n 
3-3845 Remarkably practical, written from experience and exact in 

information. Many dated pholograplis taken in author's garden. 70 
miles fn^m New York. 

Ilcxi' to Make a I'hm'er Garden, Doubleday $1.60 n., a handsome 
quarto, consists of over 50 papers by various writers, with 100 beauti- 
ful photographic ilhislrations. 
Dial, 34:360; Nation, 76:293 



432 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

716.2 Weed, C. M. The Flower Beautiful. 

Houghton $2.50 n 
3-1250T Arrangement of flowers and their decorative value indoors. Con- 
siders relation (i) to each other, (2)to the receptacle. (3) to the 
environment. Beautifully illustrated and printed. 
Dial, 34:361; Lit. W. 34:229; Nation. 77:271 

720 a Sturgis, Russell. How to Judge Architecture. 

Baker &T. $1.5011 
3-27974 Attempts to assist layman to better appreciation of the qualities 
which raise a building into the domain of the fine arts. Nation, 
77:490 

Abundant illustrations. 
Dial. 36:161; Lit. W. 34^353 

720.738 Anderson, W: J. & Spiers, R. P. Architecture of 
Greece and Rome. 

(Batsford i8/n) Scribner $7.50 n 
7>-77^ Sketch of development. Popular, trustworthy, without effort to 

urge special theory, amply illustrated. Written out of full knowl- 
edge but neither very well ordered nor free from repetitions. 179 
excellent illustrations. 

Ath. 1903, 1 :472; Nation, 76:215; Spec. 90:157 

726.6 Miltoun, Francis. Cathedrals of Northern France. 

Page $1.60 n 

3-28875 In spite of shortcomings, a useful handbook for travelers having 

a not too profound interest in church architecture and history. Not 

so valuable for home study as Wilson's Cathedrals of France, 

Churchman Co. $3, with over 200 illustrations from photographs. 

Nation, 77 :4^ 

733 Murray, A. S. Sculptures of the Parthenon. 

(Murray 21/ nj Button $6.50 n 

3-16536 Brings together a series of photographic reproductions, small but 
clear and adequate, which include nearly everything still extant, sup- 
plemented by Carrey's drawings, made in 17th century, of those 
since destroyed. Text mainly for artist and general reader, but 
often suggestive even to special student of archeology. Ath. 1903, 

2:259 

Mach*s Greek Sculpture, Ginn $4.50. addressed to students of art, 
executing artists and general reader, treats of spirit and principles 
in familiarly instructive manner. Many halftone plates. Author 
intends to issue collection of about 500 reproductions of statues and 
reliefs in uniform size for use in further illustration. 

Murray, Atlantic, 93:413; Nation, 77:121 

735 c Taft, Lorado. History of American Sculpture. (His- 

tory of Amer. Art) Macmillan $6 n 

3-30499 Treats in chronologic order all our sculptors, famous and obscure, 
down to men still living, and avoids too enthusiastic or too severe a 
tone. Atlantic 93:4^^ 

12 photogravures. T04 halftones. 
Nation, 77'A^7\ Dial 36:150 

738 c Moore, Mrs N. H. Old China Book: including Staf- 

fordshire, Wedgwood, Lustre and other English 
Pottery and Porcelain. Stokes $2n 

3-13375 Mainly old English wares found in America. Profuse illustra- 
tion, descriptiorv, historical notes, value, lists of local views, etc 
Dial, 35-94; "NalVon, 77 ^S^ 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 433 

740 c Kelley, L. E. Three Hundred Things a Bright Girl 

can Do. Estes $1.20 n 

3-29591 Instruction in bead, worsted and thread work, joinery, wood- 
carving, pyrography, basketry, rug making, clay modeling, paper 
flowers, athletics, taxidermy, bee keeping, suggestions for entertain- 
ments, girls clubs, etc. 

745 Day, L. F. Pattern Design. 

(Batsford 7/6 n) Scribner $3 n 
4-7318 For students, treating in a practical way of the anatomy, planning 

and evolution of repeated ornament. Supersedes his Anatomy of 
Pattern. Fully illustrated. 
Nation, 78:69 

745 Wilson, V. T. Free-hand Lettering. Wiley $1 

3-29281 Treatise on plain lettering from the practical standpoint for use 
in engineering schools and colleges. Illustrated. 

L. F. Day's Lettering in Ornament, Scribner $2n., is an amply 
illustrated study of the decorative use of lettering, past, present and 
possible; it follows his Alphabets, Old and New (1899), which 
deals only with forms of letters, not their ornamental application 
in art. T. C. Brown's excellent Letters and Lettering (1902) deals 
with various matters treated more fully in these volumes, and would 
perhaps be the best single designer's handbook if library could buy 
but one. 
Wilson, Engineering Record, 49:32; Day, Nation, 76:292 

749 c Wheeler, Mrs Candace (Thurber). Principles of 

Home Decoration. Doubleday $1.80 n 

3-4677 Deals with theory and specific applications, art being understood 

to imply both appropriateness and beauty. 
Nation, 77:158 

750 Van Dyke, J: C: Meaning of Pictures. Scribner $1 n 
3-4678 Columbia University lectures at Metropolitan Museum. Aims to 

train popular understanding to nicer and more intelligent apprecia- 
tion. Suggestive, not didactic. 30 excellent reproductions illustrate 
text. Deals less definitely with specific pictures and schools than 
Witt's How to Look at Pictures (1902), being concerned with them 
rather as illustrating principles. 
Nation, 76:500; Dial, 34:406 

759.1 Way, T. R. & Dennis, G. R. Art of James McNeill 
Whistler. (Bell 10/6 n) Macmillan $3 n 

4-487 No adequate treatment of Whistler has yet appeared. This 

volume deals almost solely with his art, is illustrated by over 50 
halftones and has temporary value. Recollections and Impressions 
of James A. McNeill Whistler by A. J. Eddy, Lippincott $2 n., is 
a collection of anecdotes and miscellaneous data by an extravagant 
admirer, with 12 excellent plates. 

Way, Atlantic, 93:412; Sat. R. 97:120; Eddy, Ath. 1904, 1:312; 
Nation, 77:486; Dial, 36:110 

759.4 Mauclair, Camille. French Impressionists, i860- 1900. 
(Popular Lib. of Art) 

(Duckworth 2/n) Dutton 75c n 
3-16538 Discusses theory of impressionism, with critical estimates of work 
of Manet, Degas, Gaude Monet, Renoir, and briefer mention of 
many other impressionists aud neoimpressionists. 50 halftones. 
Dial, 35:176; Nation, 76:499; Ath. 1903. 1:727 



434 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Mxrtio 

780.3 Hughes, Rupert, cd. The Musical Guide. 2v. 

McClure $6 n 

3-26388 Contains a pronouncing and defining dictionary of terms, instru- 
ments etc., a biographic dictionary of musicians, stories of leading 
operas, short, signed critical or explanatory essays and paragraphs 
by authorities, charts, illustrative passages, etc. Useful reference 
book for libraries which can not afford the expensive works of 
Grove or Champlin and Apthorp. 
Lit. W. 35:14 

780.7 b Lavignac, Albert. Musical Education. (Appleton's 

Musical Ser.) Appleton $2 n 

3-IJ513 Takes up almost every question which confronts p&rents in con- 
nection with a child's musical training and gives practical advice 
in clear and even entertaining language. 
Nation, 76:520; Dial, 35:42; Critic, 43:191 

AlCUBEMENTS AND SPORTS 

793 c White, Mary & Sara. Book of Children's Parties. 

Century $1 n 

3-26321 For parents and guardians. Describes grejit variety of games and 
entertainments appropriate to each season. Suggests favors and 
menus. Illustrated. 
Nation, yy :449 

796 Athletics and Outdoor Six)rts for Women ; with an in- 

troduction by L. E. Hill. Macmillan $1.50 n 

3-11989 Chapters by specialists on physical training, gymnasium work, 
dancing, cross-country walking, skating, rowing, golf, running, 
tennis, hockey, basketball, equestrianism, fencing, bowling, track 
athletics. Illustrated, hitroduction by director of physical training 
at VVellesley. 
Nation, 76:416 

POETRY 

Sfe a/so Juvenik, p.451 

811.49 r Lewis, C. M. Gawayne and the Green Knight: a 

Fairy Tale. Houghton $i n 

3-231^^7 An agreeable reversion to a type of poetry now little cultivated. 
There is no mysticism here and there is a great deal of humor. U 
belongs to that school of English poetry of which the first and 
greatest is Chaucer. Atlatiiic, 93- ^^1 

811.49 Peabody, J. P. The ^Singing Leaves. Houghton $i n 

3-29648 A little book of little .songs wherein many childish dreams and 
fancies, graceful, tender and altogether alluring, find expression. 
Nation, 77A^7\ Dial, 35*476: Atlantic, 93 •"9 

811.49 Woodberry, G: E: Poems. Macmillan $1.50 n 

3-2(^22 Includes earlier volumes, My Country, Wild Eden, Players' Elegy, 
North Shore Watch, Odes and Sonnets, with some hitherto un- 
published verse. 
Nation, 77:488; Dial, 36:198 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 



435 



821 .89 b Kipling, Rudyard. The Five Nations. 

Doiibleday $1.40 n 

3-24544 Old and new poems including The Sea and the Hills, White 

Horses, The Feet of the Young Men, Truce of the Bear. The 

Palace, White Man's Burden, Our Lady of the Snows, The Lesson, 

Islanders, Piet, Boots, Recessional, etc. 

Acad. 65:319; Dial, 35^355; Nation. 77 '31^71 Ath. 1903, 2:474 



822 . 29 



3-9614 
3-27494 



822.8 



3-^333 



810.9 



3-15003 



DRAMA 

812.49 Cameron, Mrs Margaret. Comedies in Miniature. 

McCliire $1.30 n 
3-23877 II light parlor plays, dialogues and monologues, easily set. 
Characters mostly women. 

Everyman : a Moral Play. ' Fox, Duffield $1 

Everyman: a Morality Play; ed. with an introd. by 

M. J. Moses. J. F. Taylor $1 

The Fox, Duffield edition imitates old prints with cream laid 

paper and illustrations from i6th century edition, but uses modern 

spellings. The Taylor edition devotes 80 pages to introduction, 

notes and bibliography, gives text in old spellings and is illustrated 

from 12 photographs of modern stage settings. 

Fox, Nation, 76:314; Taylor, Lit. W. 35^43 

Mackaye, JPercy. The Canterbury Pilgrims: a Com- 
edy. Macmillan $1.25 
An acting play in blank verse, the characters being Chaucer and 
the Canterbury pilgrims. 
Lit. W. 34:124; Nation, 76:480 

ESSAYS, HISTORY OF LITERATVKE. ETO. 

Sff a/so New edition, P.455 

r Trent, W: P. History of American Literature, 1607- 
1865. (Short Histories of the Literatures of the 
World) . Appleton $1.40 n 

Excellent outline, packed with historical facts, critical evalua- 
tions, names and titles, deftly combined and discussed in an inter- 
esting style, lligginson's Reader's History of American Literature, 
Houghton $1.25 n., based on Lowell lectures and rich in personal 
reminiscence, is less comprehensive, but more readable ; Woodberry's 
Americirin Literature, Harper $1.50 n., consists of seven essays treat- 
ing chronologic or sectional groups, but forming a critical estimate 
rather than a history. 

Trent, Bookman, 18:414 (Richard Burton); Dial, 35:175; Nation, 
77:251; Higginson, Dial, 35:314; Nation, 78:136; VVoodberry, 
Acad. 66:13; Lit. W. 35:13; Nation, 78:18 

feAldrich, T: B. Ponkapog Papers. Houghton $1 n 
Brief essays, notebook paragraphs, occasional bits of verse and 
an appreciation of Robert Ilerrick. Exquisite in wit and expression. 
Dial, 35:3.S9; Nation. 77 0O9 

814.49 Brown, W: G. Foe of Compromise, and other Essays. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 
Other essays : A Defence of American Parties ; The Task of the 
American Historian ; Great Occasions of an American University. 
Nation, 78:50; Dial, 3^-323 



814.49 

3-26157 



3-28575 



43^ NKW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

814.49 2?Buckham, James. Where Town and Country Meet. 

Jennings $1 n 
3-1 1256 He writes about what he sees along the paths from his back door 
to his various fishing holes. Critic, 43:167 {D. L. Sharp) 

He uses the five senses and the sixth sense of sympathy, and 
does not bother with field glasses, or microscopes and technicalities. 

Ut. W. 34-149 
Dial, 34:365 

814.49 Chesterton, G. K. Varied Types. Dodd $1.20 n 

4-14141 On Charlotte Bronte, William Morris, Pope, Rostand, Stevenson, 
Tolstoy, Bret Harte, Alfred the Great, Queen Victoria, the German 
Emperor, Tennyson, etc Reprinted from London newspapers. 
Critic, 43*572; Nation, 77:509 

814.49 aCrothcrs, S: McC. The Gentle Reader. 

Houghton $1.25 n 
3-25285 II delightfully humorous and genial essays that suggest Charles 
Lamb and Oliver Wendell Holmes. Pittsburgh 
Mainly reprinted from the Atlantic, 
Critic, 44:557; Dial, 35:360 

814.49 Mabie, H. W. Backgrounds of Literature. 

Macmillan $2 n 
3-26146 Wordsworth, Emerson, Irving, Goethe, Blackmore, Whitman and 
Scott are treated in essays generally combining analysis of work 
with description of environment. Beautifully illustrated. 
Nation, 78:198; Dial, 35:425 

814.49 cTorrey, Bradford. Clerk of the Woods. 

Houghton $1.10 n 

3-22540 Brief papers which chronicle outdoor affairs from May to April. 

Reprinted from Boston Transcript and New York Mail and Express. 

Here is a prose poet who has the grace of walking and talking 

at the same time. Dial, 35-467 

Nation, 77:361 

818.4 Owen, Belle. A Prairie Winter. Macmillan $1 n 

3-8906 Record of quiet country life, by an Illinois girl alert to natural 

beauty and the charms of simple living. 

Lit. W. 34:126; Critic, 43:167 (D. L. Sharp) 

818.4 b White, S. E: The Forest Macmillan $1.50 n 

3-27957 Woodcraft, camper's lore, character sketches, description and 
analysis of the charm of out of doors, held together by the experi- 
ences of a canoe trip through the woods of Canada and northern 
Michigan. Illustrated. 

Bookman, 18:299; Nation, 77^430; Lit. W. 34^349; Spec 92:257 

820.9 Gamett, Richard & Gosse, E. W. English Literature: 
an Illustrated Record. 4v. 

(Heinemann each i6/n) Macmillan each $6n 
4-1596 V. I, From the beginnings to the age of Henry 8; v. 2, Henry 8 

to Milton ; v. 3, Milton to Johnson ; v. 4, Johnson to Tennyson. 

The abundance and excellence of the illustrations, including fac- 
similes of manuscripts, autographs, engravings, title-pages, portraits, 
views of places, buildings, etc. give it a quite peculiar value. Nation 
Volumes sold separately. 

Nation, 77:59, 7^-^77; Dial, 35:5, 36:158; Spec. 91 .205; Ath. 1903, 
2:113, 1904, 1:424 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 437 

823.83 cWard, H. S. & C. W. (Bames). The Real Dickens 

Land. (Chapman 10/6 n) Lippincott $3.50 n 

4-1916 Lovingly traces footsteps of novelist and his characters, in 

England. Fine photographs of associated buildings and scenes are 

reproduced on nearly every page. The full index goes beyond the 

book's actual content in providing a condensed directory to Dickens 

land. 

Ath. 1903, 2:582; Sat. R. 96:680 

824.89 Paget, Violet, " Vernon Lee " pseud. Hortus Vitae ; or, 

The Hanging Garden. (3/6 n) Lane $1.25 n 

Short essays of distinctly literary quality on Reading Books, 

Against Talking, On Going to the Play, The Blame of Portraits, 

Making Presents, etc. 

Acad. 65:493; Ath. 1904, 1:48; Spec. 92:161 

824.89 Yeats, W: B. Ideas of Good and Evil. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 
3-28146 Short essays on poetry, magic, William Blake, symbolism in 
painting and poetry, the theater, Ireland and the arts, the Celtic 
element in literature, etc. 

Nation,- 77 :52 ; Acad. 64:589; Ath. 1903, 1:807 

828.8 Phillpotts, Eden. My Devon Year. Macmillan $2 

4-2650 Series of nature pictures written in prose which is sometimes 

near poetry. Athenaeum 1904, 1:8 

38 chapters rarely exceeding six pages, independent but chrono- 
logically arranged, and each accompanied by an illustration. 
Acad. 65:531; Spec. 92:157 

851 Kuhns, Oscar. Great Poets of Italy. Houghton $2 n 

3-28120 The poets most fully represented are Dante, Petrarch, Ariosto, 
Tasso, Al fieri, Leopardi and Carducci. Forms a tolerably consecu- 
tive history of Italian poetry. 12 excellent portraits; copious ex- 
tracts in translations almost invariably good. Nation, 77-4^5 
Dial, 35:418 (W. M. Payne) 

DEBCRIPTIOH AND TKAVEL 

S*f also Juvenile, p. 451 and New editions, p. 455 

911.73 cSemple, E. C. American History and its Geographic 
Conditions. Houghton $3 n 

3-26624 Study of the dominant influence of geographic conditions on suc- 
cessive events of American history, and on the great factors of 
progress, railroads, immigration, distribution of cities, etc. Excel- 
lent maps. Brigham's more popular, illustrated Geographic Influ- 
ences in American History, Ginn $1.25, considers America's 
development from the geologist's point of view and is of more 
interest to the geograplier than to the student of history. 

Dial, 36:124: Nation. 77:534; Amcr. Hist. R. 9:57r (A. B. Hart) 

913.38 Gulick, C: B. Life of the Ancient Greeks: with 
Special Reference to Athens. (20th Century Text- 
books) Appleton $1.40 n 
3-734 Comprehensive handbook, copiously illustrated, by assistant pro- 
fessor of Greek at Harvard. Supplementary tables of references 
to Xenophon, and sources of illustrations, bibliography and indexes. 
The Private Life of the Romans, by Professor Johnston of Indiana 
University, Scott, F. & Co. $1.50 (Lake Classical Ser.), serves a 
similar purpose for students of Latin authors. 
Nation, 76 .-362 



438 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



913.38 Richardson, R. B. Vacation Days in Greece. 

(Smith & E. 7/6 n) Scribner $2 n 
3-23J98 Author lived 11 years in Greece and visited parts rarely seen by 
travelers. Chapters on Sicily and Dalinatia. Rich both in entertain- 
ment and instruction. Maps and illustrations. 
NaUon, 77:3J9 

913.569 rSanday, William & Watcrhousc, Paul. Sacred Sites 

of the Gospels. (Frowde 13/6 n) Oxford Univ. 

(Amer. branch) $4.50 n 

3'3^0^7 SS plates from photographs, many elaborate plans and maps with 

descriptive notes. Text on external aspect of Palestine in time of 

Christ, sites within and outside Jerusalem, recent literature and the 

temple of Herod. 

Ath. 1903, 2:196; Nation, 77^254; Sat R. 97*272 

914 Symons, Arthur. Cities. Pott $3 

4-7865 Impressionist sketches of Rome, Venice, Naples, Seville, Prague, 

Moscow. Budapest, Belgrade, Sofia, Constantinople. Eight photo- 
gravures from old pictures. 

Acad. 65:437; Ath. 1903, 2:641; Dial, 35^424; Sat. R. 96:674; 
Atlantic, 93:276 

914.38 rBrandes, Georg. Poland: a Study of the Land, Peo- 
ple and Literature. Macniillan $3 n 
3-25625 *' Impressions" written in four sections dated 1885, 1886, 1894, 

^^- . . . 

Fascinating mixture of history, philosophy, literary criticism and 

personal experience. Dial, 35:169 (W. M. Payne) 

Ath. 1903, 1:526; Critic, 42:559 (Christian Brinton) 

914.56 Chandlery, P. J. Pilgrim-walks in Rome: a Guide to 
its Holy Places. The Messenger $1.50 

4-133' I Fairly comprehensive illustrated handbook for Roman catholic 

pilgrims. Concerned with religious history, legend and local asso- 
ciations rather than secular and archeologic interests. 
Nation, 78:37 

914.7 a Gerrare, Wirt. Greater Russia. Macniillan $3 n 

3-7^77 One of the most readable of recent books on Russia. Largely 

a narrative of personal experience. Neither profound nor compre- 
hensive, but lively and well written. Pittsburgh 

Views Russian aggressions with alarm. Beveridge's Russian Ad- 
vance Harper $2.50 n., is a record of travel through Russia and 
Siberia and is strongly pro-Russian. 

Gerrare, Ath. 1903, 1:425; Dial, 35:224; Nation, 76:500; Spec. 
90 1705 ; Beveridge, Acad. 66 : 120; Dial, 36:111 ; Lit. W. 35 .y; ; Nation, 
78:135 

914.89 c Brochner, Jessie. Danish Life in Town and Country. 
(Our European Neighbors) 

(Newnes 3/6 n) Putnam $1.20 n 
3-^2P73 Like others of series, sets forth various aspects, .social, religious, 
educational, urban and rural. Excellent halftones really supplement 
text. 

Dial, 36:51; Lit. W. 34 •-^07; Nation, 76:496 



BEST BOOKS OF I9O3 439 

914.94 Rhodes, D. P. A Pleasure-book of Grindelwald. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 
4-708 Region between the Grosse Scheidcgg and Miirren. All the 

pleasures of Alpine life and leisure in winter and summer are here 
recalled. Good map and many attractive halftones. 
Dial, 36:156; Nation. 77^321 

915.15 Hedin, Sven. Central Asia and Tibet. 2v. 

Scribner $10.50 n 
3-33031 Record of journeys in 1899- 1901, covering 6000 miles. 428 illus- 
trations, 5 maps. 

Clear, simple, graphic, not deficient in human interest. Nation, 
78:112 

Dial, 36:194; Ath. 1903, 2:746; Spec. 92:156 

915.2 a Clement, E. W. Handbook of Modern Japan. 

McClurg $1.40 n 
3-28989 Birdseye view of Japan's characteristics and resources with refer- 
ences to works where abundant information may be found. Illus- 
trations and map. 

Dial, 36:25; Nation, 77:528; Ath. 1904, i :68r ; Sat. R. 97:365 

915.2 Gulick, S. L. Evolution of the Japanese — Social and 
Psychic. Revell $2 n 

3-15862 Study of Japanese race characteristics, social, mental and moral 
and of the possibilities of western influence. 

Nation, 77:467; Critic, 43:466 (Griffis) ; Ath. 1903, 2:444 

915.69 Butler, Elizabeth, lady. Letters from the Holy Land. 

(Black 7/6 n) Macmillan $3 n 
3- 15 13 1 Scries of impressions in colors and in words. There is no book 
which the tourist would be better advised to take with him were 
he starting for Palestine for the first time. Ath. JQ03, 2:214 

They breathe the spirit of the devout catholic, but the writer has 
no narrow exclusiveness in her sympathies. Sat. R. 1)6:5 (Supple- 
ment Oct. 17) 
Acad. 64:339 

917. 12 Stutfield, H. E. M. & Collie, J. N. Climbs and Explo- 
rations in the Canadian Rockies. 

(12/6 n) Longmans $5 
4-246 Personal experiences and historical resume; an epitome of all 

that is at present known of this Switzerland of America. Abundant 
photographic illustrations and valuable original map. 
Ath. 1903, 2:607; l>ial. 36:156; Sat. R. 97:85 

917.4 Bacon, E. M. Literary Pilgrimages in New England. 

Silver $2 
y^ Visits to homes of authors and to scenes associated with their 

writings. Compact with information and pertinent quotation. Map 
and many illustrations, well chosen as to subject but poorly exe- 
cuted. Katharine Abbott's Old Paths and Legends of New 
England, Putnam $3.50 n., deals in familiar style with historic and 
literary associations in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New 
Hampshire and is rich in beautiful halftones from photographs. 

Bacon, Nation. 76:209; Lit. W. 34:54; Abbott, Nation, 77:208; 
Lit. W. 34:263 



440 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

917.8 b Adams, Andy. Log of a Cowboy. Houghton $1.50 
3- 1 281 7 Narrative of a five months* trip with 3000 cattle, from Mexico 
to Montana, in 1882, with many interesting stories told by trailmcn. 
Critic, 43:474; Ath. 1903, 2:790; Acad. 65:563 

917.94 Austin, Mrs M. H. Land of Little Rain. 

Houghton $2 n 
3-26358 Chapters sketching arid region of southeastern California, its at- 
mosphere, birds, beasts, flowers, the Indian, greaser and gold hunter. 
Admirably illustrations. 
Dial, 35:421; Nation. 78:391 

HIBTOKT OF FOREIGH OOmiTRIES 
Sff also Juvenile, p. 45a 

944.08 Hanotaux, Gabriel. Contemporary France. 4v. v.i 

( 1870-1873) Putnam $3.75 n 

Belongs to class of histories whereof the work of Thucydides is a 

famous example — a contemporary's narrative of events set forth 

after a sufficient lapse of time to ensure some perspective. 

Nation, 77:96; Ath. 1903, 1:490; Sat R. 95:«>3 (Bodley) 

954 Poole, Stanley Lane-. Mediaeval India under Moham- 

medan Rule, 712-1764. (Story of the Nations) 

Unwin 5/ Putnam $1.35 n 

3-2200 Professor Lane- Poole is the master of an excellent English style 

and has strong human sympathies and an eye for the picturesque, 

combined with full knowledge of his subject. Amer, HisL^R, 9:139 

Nation, 76:249; Sat. R. 96:114; Dial, 35:93; Ath. 1903, 2:177 

980 r Dawson, T: C. South American Republics. 2pt. pt 

I, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil. (Story 

of the Nations) Putnam $1.35 n 

3-25616 Narrates separately the stormy histories of the four countries 

from earliest period to present. 

Dial, 36:205; Lit. W. 35:10 

AMERIOAir HISTORY 

Sre also Juvenile, p. 45a and New editions, p. 455 

970.4 James, G: W. Indians of the Painted Desert Region: 
Hopis, Navahoes, Wallapais, Havasupais. 

Little $2 n 
3-19707 Outcome of 20 years' study and personal observation during 
journeys in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, New Mexico and Arizona. 
Over 60 photographic illustrations. 
Nation, 78:156 

971.4 b Parker, Gilbert & Bryan, C. G. Old Quebec— the 
Fortress of New France. Macmillan $3.75 n 

3-25903 Consecutive history, based on Parkman and others, making no 
claim to originality. Photogravures, woodcuts, halftones, maps. 

Romance, pathos, stirring incident, noble characters, give vivid 
interest to every stage. Dial, 35:424 

Spec. 91:704; Sat. R. 96:646; Nation, 77:484 



BEST BOOKS OF I903 44I 

972.98 cHeilprin, Angelo. Mont Pelee and the Tragedy of 
Martinique. Lippincott $3 n 

2-30398 Study of the great catastrophes of 1902 with observations and 
experiences in the field. Photographic illustrations. 

Accurate and permanent record, by a trained geologist who writes 
from the closest personal observation. Sat. R. 9^:237 
Critic, A2:y7S\ Dial, 34:245; Nation, 76:152 

973 Adams, C: K. & Trent, W. P: History of the United 

States. (Allyn & Bacon's Ser. of School Histories) 

Allyn $1.50 

3-2705 Special aims to present fully and fairly (i) southern point of 

view in Civil War questions; (2) British side in Revolutionary 
period; (3) importance of the West in national development 
Chronologic table, bibliographic references, 200 illustrations, 35 maps, 
good index. 

Lamed's admirable History of the United States for Secondary 
Schools, Houghton $1.40 n., is also fully equipped with bibliographic 
aids, maps etc. 

Amer. Hist. R. 8:765 (F. H. Hodder) 

973.782 Avary, M. L. cd. A Virginia Girl in the Civil War. 

Appleton $1.25 n 
3-2700 Dramatic experiences of the young wife of a Confederate officer, 

in camp, hospital, blockade running, etc. 
Critic, 43:182; Dial, 34^275; Nation, 76:227 

973.782 a Gordon, J: B. Reminiscences of the Civil War. 

Scribner $3 n 

3-26356 Its manly tone, optimistic temper and cordial appreciation of 
opponents commend it to readers of all sections. 

Acad. 66 1296 ; Dial, 35 '.302 ; Nation, 78 1373 ; Spec. 92 -.667 

974.46 Howe, M. A. DeW. Boston, the Place and the People. 

Macmillan $2.50 n 
3-26974 Reviews salient historical facts but devotes major part to 19th 
century, three main topics being the unitarian controversy, the liter- 
ary leaders and the antislavery propaganda. Many well chosen 
illustrations. 

For the general reader, the best compact work on Boston which 
has yet been produced (1903). Atlantic, 93-279 

Bookman. 19 :20i ; Ath. 1904, i :20i ; Nation, 77 '.^71 

974-7 r Janvier, T: A. Dutch Founding of New York. 

Harper $2.50 n 
3-25273 An historical essay rather than a formal history of the beginnings 
of New York city. Illustrated. 

Will be useful in correcting the false impressions created by 
Irving's skilful and humorous misrepresentation of the Dutch. Dial, 
36:203 

Critic, 43:567; Lit. W. 34:301; Nation. 77'.Al^7 



442 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

BIOGKAPHT 

Sitr al$o Juvenile, p. 453 

Arhlay, Mmc d\ Dobson, Austin. Fanny Barney 

(Madame d'Arblay). (English Men of Letters, 

Amer. Ser.) (2/") Macmillan 75c n 

3-28862 A fascinating little biography, handled with that practised elegance 

of style, cunning of pictorial narrative, allusive deftness, and finished 

sense of proportion, in which he has scarce a rival. Acad. 65:^2 

Bookman, 18:641 (Richard Garnett) ; Dial, 36:207; Nation, 78:18; 
Spec. 91 :97i 

BcacoHsfield, carl of. Meynell, Wilfrid. Benjamin 
Disraeli. Appleton $3 li 

3-30490 Scrap book, rather than biography, furnishing no consecutive 
account or judicial estimate of his career. Will serve some future 
biographer as a source and meanwhile entertain the lover of per- 
sonal anecdote. 

Ath. 1903, 2:445; Dial, 35:461; Nation, 78:115; Spec. 91:654 

c Bccchcr. Abbott, Lyman. Henry Ward Beecher. 

Houghton $1.75 n 
3-28566 Portrays the great Brooklyn preacher from long personal acquain- 
tance, as a man, as pastor, as reformer and as patriot. 
Dial, 36:42; Nation, 77:530; Spec. 92:227 

Bridgman. Howe, Maud & Hall, F. H. Laura Bridg- 

man : Dr Howe's Famous Pupil