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J/fy^^f,:2. ^^'•.vAWl,l«^1^- 




fJ^arbarH College ILt&rars 



..r.i.?Yw..v ..V. >. 



T ^nr .VI. .(^loa.G 

Import Duties 

of Salvador. 



Derechos de Importacion 

en Salvador. 



Bureau of the American Republics, 

Washington^ U, S. A, 



Bulletin No 23. October, 1891. 



LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 



1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. i. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-Mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 

9. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12^ Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Director}' of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 






Import Duties 

• of Salvador. 



■{/ ■> -/9- / 



Derechos de ImportaciOn 

en .Salvador. 



BURKAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 



Washington^ U. S. A, 

Bulletin No 23. October, 1891. 



J/f/^^f,i ^l..vAWl,l?r^a..' 




HarbarK CoUege l/tfrrarg 

FROM 

....irVVV.,.,. X > tilA^tC^ , 

d[..laAW.ftJbByv.^.ifeik 




Import Duties 

of Salvador. 



Derechos de Importacion 

en Salvador. 



Bureau of the American Republics, 

IVashtngion^ U, S. A. 



Bulletin No 23. October, 1891. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ABTICLE OF MSBCHANDISE. 



Brocades or tissues, woven, em- 
broidered, or embossed with 
gold, silver, or other metat 

Bromides. (See mediciues) 

Brooms and brushes, of straw or 
esparto, all classes 

Bronze and copper, bars 

Bronze, etc., alphabets and nu- 
merical tables, and in other 
forms not specified 

Bronze and copper boilers for 
agricultural use 

Bronze, etc., counters as checks 
for use on farms, per 100 pounds 

Bronze, and copper nails, tacks, 
and brads 

Bronze, etc., jewelry, leaf, and in 
books 

Bronze and copper in pieces, 
nickel plated tor any purpose. . 

Bronze and copper ornaments of 
all classes, holders for curtains, 
rings, hooks, scales, hinges, 
knobs for furniture, furniture 
and door locks, padlocks, 
cradles, beds, bolts, crosses, 
bells, cow bells, chains, spurs, 
stirrups, mountings for sad- 
dles, statues, hasps, railings, 
cages, weights, faucets, door- 
knockers, candlesticks, rivets, 
screws, doorknobs, wire cloth, 
writing utensils, cooking and 
domestic utensils 



Datyper 
potmdin 
U.S. cur- 
rency. 



Bronze and copper plates, sheets, 
and wire, from 4 millimeters in 
diameter downward 



Bronze and copper scientific in- 
struments. - 

Bronze and copper stills 

Brushes, clothing, hair, tooth, 
nail, and others similar 

Brushes, paint, of every kind 

Brushes for shoes, horses, and 
other common kinds 



Dollars. 



.82 
.066 

.033 
066 



.197 
.098 
.164 

.131 
.197 
.328 



I 



.197 



.115 



.as3 

.164 

.197 
.197 

.049 



ARTtCULO DK MERCANCtA. 



Brocatos 6 ttzdes tejidos, borda- 
dos 6 realzados c(m oro, plata 
it otro metal 

Bromuros. (V^ase medicinas) . . 

Escobas y cepillos de paja 6 es- 
partoy de toda clase 

Bronce y cobre en barras 

Bronce y cobre en abecedarios y 
numefaciones y en cualquier 
otra fonna no especificada 

Brcmce y cobre en peroles para 
la agricultura 

Bronce y cobre en fichas ]>ara 
contrasefias de fincas de agri- 
cultura los 100 kilos. - 

I Bronce y cobre en clavos, 

I I tachuelas 6 puntillas 

Bronce y cobre en joyeria, en 

liojas y en libret«s 

Bronce y cobre en piezas nique- 

ladas'x>ara cualquier uso 

Bronce y cobre, en piezas, como 

adorn'os de toda clase, abraza- 

deras para cortinas, argollas, 

fauchos, balanzas, bisagras, 
otones para muebles, cerra- 
duras para muebles 6 puertas, 
candados, cnnas, camas, cer- 
rojoscruces, campauillas, cas- 
cabeles, cadenaA, espuelas, es- 
tribos para gal^pagos, filetes 
para sill as de montar, esta- 
tuas, fallebas, galerfas,j aulas, 
pesas, Haves para pipas, 
llamadores de puertas, palma- 
torias, candeleros, pasadores, 
remaches, tomillos, tiradores 
para muebles, tejidos de 
alambre y utiles de escritorio, 
en piezas 6 jiara baterfas de 
cocina 6 uso dom<5stico 

Bronce y cobre manufacturado 
en planchas, l^minas y alam- 
bre desde cuatro milimetros de 
di^metro, inclusive para abajo . 

Bronce y cobre, instrumentos 
cientificos 

Bronce y cobre en alambiques . . 

Cepillos para ropa, cabeza, dien- 
tes, ufias y otros semejantes . . 

Brochas de cnalquiera clase 

Cepillos para zapatos, caballos 
y otros semejantes ordinarios. 



Derechos 
por kilo- 
^ramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
reAa. 



l*esos. 



2.50 
.20 

.10 
.20 



.60 
.30 

.50 

.40 

.60 

l.OO 



.60 



.35 

.01 
.50 

.60 
.60 

.15 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Bugles, gold or silver embroidery 
wire, thread, andspaugles, che- 
nille, imitation spangles, etc., 
gilded or plated 

Buckles, wrought iron, tinned or 
japanned. (See iron ) 



Buckles of all other classes or 

materials 

Buckskin. (See leather) 

Butter. (See foods) 



Buttons, mother-of-pearl, silk, or 
wool 

Buttons, pla^d or gilded 

Buttons, all other classes not 
specified 

Cables or ropes of hemp, and 
tarred cordage 

Cages for birds, wire 

Cambric, linen. (See flax) 

Camphor. (See medicines) 

(*auary seed. (See foods, etc) . . . 

Candles, stearine 

Candles, tallow 

C/dudles, wax 

Caneci, with handles of ivory, tor- 
toise shell, mother-of-pearl, sil- 
ver, or gold, with or without 
sword 

Canes, of every other sort, with 
or without sword 

Canvas or Russia duck, of flax, 
pure or mixed. (See flax) 

Caps and head dresses for men, 
women, and children, of all 
kinds not specified 

Cafiers. (See foods, etc) 



" Carbolineo avenarius," 

per 100 pounds. . 

Cards, playing, fine or common.. 

CardlMiard, in articles for domes- 
tic use or in any other form not 
specified. (See paper) 

Cardboard, boxes, or in sheets 
for bookbinding, lithograph- 
ing, photographing, and other 
industrial uses. (See* paper) . . 

Cardboard, white, notsized, and 
colored for printing purposes. 
(See paper) 







Derechos 


Duty per 
poand in 
U . S. cur- 


ARTtCULO DE MERCANCtA. 


por kilo- 
gramo en 
moneda 


rency. 




Salvado- 
refia. 


Dollars. 


CaQutillo, escarche, gnsanillo, 
briclio, hojuela, lentejuela 


Pesos. 






.197 


falsa, dorada 6 plateada ...... 


.60 


Hevillas de hierro forjado esta- 




.066 


fiadas 6 charoladas. (V^ase 






hierro) . 


.20 




Hevillas de toda clase 6 materia. 


.60 


.197 






.066 


Ante. ( V^ase cueros) 


.20 


.066 


Mantequilla. (V^ase alimen- 






tos) 


.20 




Botones de concha-niicar, seda 




.197 1 
.492 


6 lana -... 


.60 


Botones plateados 6 dorados 

Botones de cualquier otra clase 


1.50 






.098 


no denominada 


.30 




Cables 6 cuerda« de ctffiamo 6 




.016 


embreados 


.05 


.098 


J aulas para piijaros, dealambre. 


.30 


.492 


Cambrayesdelino. (V^aselino). 


1..50 


.066 


Alcanfor. (V<$ase medicinas) .. 


.20 


.049 


Alpiste. ( V^ase alimentos, etc) . 
Velas de estearina 


.15 


.059 
.033 
.328 


.18 


Velas de sebo 


.10 


Velas de cera 


1.00 


Bastoues con mangos de marfil, 






carey, conch a-n^car, plata (i 






oro, con 6 sin estoque 


4.00 


1.31 


Bastoues de cualquier otra clase, 




.656 


con 6 sin estoque 

Lona 6 Rusias de lino, puro 6 


2.00 


.164 


mezclado. (V^ase lino) 

Gorras y cofias para hombres, 
mujeres y ninos de toda clase 


.50 


.492 


no especificada 


1.50 


.066 


Alcaparras. (V^ase alimentos. 






etc) 


.20 




Carbolineo avenarius, 




.164 
.098 


los 100 kilos.. 


.50 


Naipes finos it ordinarios 


.30 




Cart6n, en objetos de uso domes- 






tic© 6 cualquier otra forma no 




.098 


especificada. ( V^ase papel ) . . 

Cartdn,cajas6 en hojas, para en- 

cuaderuaci6n, litograffa, foto- 


.30 








graffa y para otros usos indus- 




.009 


triales. ( V^ase ])apel ) 

Cart6n, bianco, sin cola, y de co- 


.03 








lores ])ara iniprentnr. ( V^ase 




.033 


papel) 


.10 



IMPORT DUTIES OP SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Cardboard, ooijaimon. (See paper). 

CardcaseS; -of tortoise shell, 
mother-of-pearl, coral, ivory, or 
silver 

Cardcases, of any other material 
not specified 

Carpets, mats, or rugs^ woolen. 
(See wool) 

Carts and wneelbar^ows, wooden, 
per 100 pounds . . 

Cases for instruments, ofall kinds 
and materials, with or without 
contents 

Castor oil . (See medicines) 



Castors, with or without glass 

cruets 

Celluloid, in any form 

Chains, ivory, tortoise shell, or 

mother-of-pearl 

Chains, watch guards of every 

material not specified ^. . . 

Chalk, for schools or billiards . . . 
Chandeliers. (See illuminating 

articles) 

Chimneys and globes for lamps, 

when imported with lamps. 
. (See illuminating articles) 

Chimneys and globes for lamps, 
when imported separately, pay 
the same as hollow glass 

Chloroform. (See medicines) . . . 

Cigars 

Cigar cases of tortoise shell, 
ivory, silver, or mother-of- 
pearl. (See purses, etc) 

Ci^ar cases of any other mate- 
rial not specified 

Cinnamon, of all kinds 

Clocks, mantel, and other kinds 
not specified 



pouDfl in 

U. S. CUT- 

rency. 



Clocks, tower 

Cloth, woolen, cassimore, broad- 
cloth, alpaca, challis, cur- 
tains, damask, serge, flannel, 
*'grano de oro," muslin delaine, 
merino, and any other fabric 
of wool, pure or mixed, not 
specified 



DoUars. 
.009 



.164 
.164 
.164 



.656 
.033 



.492 

.197 

.656 

.197 
.033 

.082 
.082 



.033 
.066 
.656 



.656 I 

.197 
.131 i 

.164 

.082 



.328 



ARTtCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Cart'dn , ordinairio. ( V ^ a s e 
papel) 

Tarjeteros de carey, concha-na- 
car, coral, marfil 6 plat-a 



otra 



Tarjeteros de cualquler 
materia no denominada 

Alfombras, tripe 6 mantillones 
de lana. ( Vease lana) 

Carros y carretillas de madera, 
los 100 kilos.. 

Estuches 6 enseres de toda clase 
6 materia, con 6 sin titiles 



Aceite de castor. (V^aae medi- 
cinas) 

Frasqueros de toda clase, con 6 
sin (itiles de vidrio 

Celuloideen cualquiera forma.. 

Cadenas de marfil, carey 6 
concha-n^ar 

Cadenas 6 leontinas de cualqui- 
era materia no denominada. . . 

Yeso para escuelas 6 billares 

Arafias. (V^ase articulos de 
alumbrado) 

Tubos y globos para l^mparas 
viniendo con l^mparas. 
(V^ase articulos de alum- 
brado) 

Tubos y globos para l^Kmparas, 
cuando vengan solos, pa- 
gartf n como vidrios huecos 

Cloroformo. (V^asemedicinas). 

Puros 

Cigarreras de carey, marfil, 
plata 6 concha-n^ar . ( V^ase 
porta-monedas, etc) 

Cigarreras de cualquier otra 
materia no denominada 

Canela y caneldn 

Relojes de mesa y otros de cual- 
quiera otra clase no de- 
nominados 

Relojes para torres 

Tela de lana, como casimire, 
pafio, alpaca, chaoly, corti- 
nas, damasco, filaila, franela, 
grano de oro, lanilla 6 muse- 
Una, merino y otras tela« de 
lana, pura 6 mezclada, no de- 
nominada^ 



Derechos 
por kilo- 
gramo en 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refla. 



Pesos. 
.03 
2.00 

.50 
.50 
.50 

2.00 



.10 

1.50 
.60 

2.00 

.60 
.10 

.25 



.25 



.10 

.20 

2.00 



2.00 

.60 
.40 



.50 
.25 



1.00 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISB. 



Duty per 
ponnain 
U. 8. cur- 
rency. 



Cloth, caflsimere, cassinettes, or 
other similar goods of wool, 

Sure or mixed, with warp of 
nen or cotton 

Clothin^i ready made, cotton, of 

all kinds, for men or women, 

not specined. (See cotton) 

Clothing, ready made, woolen. 

(See wool) 

Clothing, ready made, silk. (See 

silk) 

Cloves. (See foods, etc) 

Coaches and carriages, of all 
kinds, and all their parts 

Cocoa. (See foods) 

Cocoannt oil 

Cocaine. (See medicines) 

Codfish, dried, salted, or smoked. 
(See foods) 

Cod liver oil, pure or in emul- 
sions. ( See medicines) 

Cognac 

CoUars and cuffs, linen, pure or 
mixed. (See flax) 

Cologne 

Combs, of all kinds, of mother-of- 
pearl, ivory, or tortoise shell. . 

Combs, etc., of any other material. 

Concertinas of all classes and 

sizes. (See accordions) 

Coral, manufactured in any shape 

Coral, unmanufactured 

Cordage of all kinds 

Cordials. (See spirits) 

Coriander seed. (See foods, etc) . . 

Corks, of all kinds 

Corkscrews, of all kinds not 
specified 

Cornstarch (maizena). (See 
foods) 

Corsets, bustles, crinolines, and 
other similar articles 

Cotton, raw 

Cotton bedspreads, towels, ^'pe- 
rr^jes," ponchos, scrapes, ham- 
mocks, napkins, tablecloths, 
and material for the same 



DoOars. 

.a28 
.656 



1.97 
.049 



.066 

.033 
.026 
.328 

.049 

.033 
.197 

.492 
.098 

.656 

.197 



.066 
2.30 

1.64 
.066 
.197 

.049 
.197 

.115 

.013 

.492 
.007 



.164 



ARTf CTJLO DE MERCANCf A. 



Pafio, casimir, casinetes y otros 
g^neros semej antes de lana 

fmra 6 mezclada con cada de 
ino 6 algoddn , 

Ropa hecha de algodon, de toda 

clase, para hombre6mujer, no 

especincada. (V^ase algod6n) 
Ropa hecha de lana. (Y^ase 

lana) 

Ropa hecha de seda. (V^ase 

seda) 

Clavos de olor. ( V^ase alimen- 

tos) 

Coches 6 carruajes de toda 

clase 6 cualquiera parte de 

ellos 

Cacao. (Y^ase alimentos) 

Aceite de coco 

Cocaina. ( V^ase medicinas) . . . 
Bacalao, secado, salado 6 ahu- 

mado. ( Y^ase alimentos) 

Aceite de bacalao puro 6 emul- 

sianado. ( Y^ase medicinas) . 

Cognac , 

Cuellos y pufios, de lino puro 6 

mezclado. (Y^ase lino) , 

Agua de colonia 

Peines, peinetas, peinetillas y 

escarmenadoresde concha-nl^ 

car, marfil 6 carey 

Peines, los mismos, de cualquier 

otra clase , 

Concertinas de toda clase 6 

tamafio. (Y^ase acordiones). 
Coral labrado en cualquiera 

forma 

Coral en bruto 

Jarcia de toda clase 

Mixtelas, cremas. (Y^ase agu- 
ardientes) 

Culantro. (Y^ase alimentos) . . 

Corchos de toda clase 

Tirabuzones declasesnoespeci- 

ficadas 

Maicena. ( Y^ase alimentos. ) . . . 

Corses, polisones, crinolinas y 
otros postizos semej antes 

Algod6n en rama 

Algod6n en colchas, tohallas, pe- 
rrajes, ponchos, zarapes, ha- 
macas, servilietas, manteles y 
en g^nero para ^stos 



Derechos 
per kilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Saivado- 
refia. 



Pesos. 



1.00 

2.00 

3.00 

6.00 

.15 



.20 

.10 

.08 

1.00 

.15 

.10 
.60 

1.50 
.30 



2.00 

.60 

.20 

7.00 

5.00 

.20 

.60 
.15 
.60 

.35 
.04 



1.50 
.02 



.50 



10 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHAKDISE. 



Cotton cloths, bleached, plain, 
without sewing, work, or em- 
broidery of any kind, as ma- 
dapollans, bogotanas, calico, 
family cloth, croidon, ^'estri- 
billas," canvas, embroidering 
canvas, creas, and other simi- 
lar goods 

Cotton cloths, unbleached, such 
as ^^manta and manta d^i^^ .. 

Cotton, drills of all classes, such 
as piqu6, canton, manta-dril, 
bleached or colored, and simi- 
lar goods 

Cotton, handkerchiefs and 
shawls of all kinds , 

Cotton, laces, embroidered edg- 
ings, and insertions 

Cotton match ropes for smokers. . 

Cotton, "rebozos" and cloth for 
the same, in imitation of cloth 
of the country , 

Cotton, sandles, cretons of all 
classes, plain or worked, and 
all other similar cloths 

Cotton, shirtfi, with bosoms and 
cuffs of linen 

Cotton, stockings, socks, shirts, 
undershirts, drawers, and in 
general all kinds of under- 
wear, without embroidery or 
lace of any kind 

Cotton, tapes, plain or twilled, 
white or colored, for shoe> 
makers and harness-makers, 
and " Castile tape" 

Cotton, tapes, braids, fringes, 
galloons, cords, belt«, sashes, 
garters, and in general all 
classes of ornaments and man- 
ufactured articles not men- 
tioned 

Cotton thread for sewing or em- 
broidering, all classe-s and col- 
ors 



Duty i)er 
poand in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



DoUars. 



.148 



.197 

.226 

.82 
.262 

.82 

.197 
.328 

.262 
.164 



.328 
.164 



ARTtCULO OF MERCANCtA. 



Al^od6n en telas blanqueadas, 
lisas, sin costura, labrado ni 
bordado alguno, como las co- 
nocidas con los uombresde ma- 
dapolliin, bogotana, called, 
genero de .familia, croiddn, 
estribillas, lonas, caHamazo 
para bordar, creas y otras 
semejant-es 

Algod6n en telas crudas, como 
manta y manta-dril 

Algoddn en driles de toda clase, 
en pan ilia, can tuna, manta- 
dril, blanqueada 6 color, y 
otros semejantes 

Algoddn en paflnelos y paftolo- 
nes de toda clase 

Algodon en encajes, tiras bor- 
uadas y embutidos 

Algod6n en mechas de algoddn 
para fuma<lore8 

Algodbn en rebozos y telas para 
rebozos, imitando'los del pais. 

Algoddn en s^ndalo, zarazas de 
toda clase, lisos 6 labrados y 

I denids telas semejantes 

i Algod6n en camisas con pechera 

! ypunosdelino 

Algoddn en medias y calcetines, 
en camisas, camisetas, calzon- 
cillos y en general toda clase 
de ropa interior sin encaje ni 

' bordado alguno 

I Algoddn en cintas 1 isas 6 asarga- 
das, blanca« 6 de color, para 
zapaterfas y talabarterfas, y 
en ciuta liama<la 'Me Cas- 

tilla" 

Algoddn en cintas, trencillas, 
necos, galones, cordones, fa- 
jas, ciuturoues, ataderas y en 
general toda clase de adomos 
y objetos fabricados no men- 

cionados 

Algoddn en hilo para coser 6 
bordar de toda clase y color. . 



Deroohos 
por kilo- 
gnuno en 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 

Pesot. 



.45 
.30 

.60 
.80 

2.50 
.80 

2.50 

.60 
1.00 

.80 

.50 



1.00 
.50 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



11 



ABTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Cotton velvet, white or colored 
cloths, without needlework or 
embroidery of any kind, as 
cambrics, eauze, lace, bishop's 
lawn, holTand, muslin, and 
other similar goods 

Cotton yams, colored, for weav- 
ing 

Cotton yam, bleached or un- 
bleached, for weaving and in 
cords 

Oottou-seed oil 

Crayon for drawing 

Cream of tartar. (See medicioes) 

Crockery, pieces for domestic 
purposes and other forms not 
expressed. By crockery is un- 
derstood ware that is not trans- 
parent 

Crockery, toys, flowers, or statu- 
ettes 

Crosses ^nd crucifixes, of mate- 
rial not specified 

Cuff-buttons or sets of buttons, 
silver, tortoise shell, ivory, or 
mother-of-pearl 

Cuff-buttons, or sets of buttons 
of any other material not speci- 
fied 

Curry powder. (See foods, etc). 

Cumin. (See foods, etc) 

Daggers. (See iron) 

Daggers, with leather scab- 
bards. (See iron) 

Daggers, with ivory, tortoise 
shell, silver, or mother-of-pearl 
handle 

Damask, linen. (See fiax) 

Damask, silk. (See silk) 

Damask, woolen . (See wool) 

Dates. (See foods) 

Diamonds and other precious 
stones. (See jewelry) 

Diamonds, mounted for cutting 
glass 

Distilling apparatus of all kinds. 
(Seefifiers) 

Doors, wooden. ( See wood) 

Drawing, copies. (See paper) . . . 



Duty per 
pound in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



DoUars. 



.328 



.033 



.016 
.026 
.197 
.066 



.026 
.098 
.197 

.656 



.262 
.066 
.049 
.066 

.131 



.656 
.328 
1.64 
.328 
.066 

3.28 

.656 

.003 
.016 

.016 



ARTtCULO DE MERCANClA. 



Algod6n en pana, telas blancas 
o de color, sin costurani bor- 
dada alguno, como oambray 
clarfn, gasas, ptlnto, cambray 
de Obispo, hol^, muselina, 
cambray pirujo y otros seme- 
jantes 

Algod6n en hilo de color para 
tejer 

Algoddn en hilo crudo 6 
blanqueado para tejer y en 
cordelas 

Aceite de algod6u 

Carboncillo para dibujo 

Cr^mor. (V^ase medicinas) 

Loza fabricada en piezas de ser- 
vicio dom^stico y en otras for- 
mas no expresadas. £nti^n- 
dase por la loza ]a que no sea 
trasparente 

Loza en juguetes, flores 6 figu- 
ras 

Cruces 6 crucifijos de materias 
no denominadas 

Mancuemillas 6 juegos de bo- 
tones de plata, carey, marfil 6 
concha-n^car 

Mancuemillas 6 los mismos de 
cualqnier otra materia noMe- 
nominada 

Curri6. (V6ase alimentos) 

Comino. (Y^ase alimentos) 

Dagas. ( V^ase hierro) 

Dagas, con vainas de cuero. 
( V^ase hierro) 

Dagas, con mango de marfil, 
carey, plata 6 coucha-n^car. . . 

Damasco de lino. ( V^ase lino) . . 
Damasco de seda. ( Vdase seda) . 
Damasco de lana. (V^ase lana) . 

D^tiles. (V^ase alimentos) 

Diamantes y dem^ piedras pre- 

ciosas. ( V^ase Joyerfa) 

Diamantes montados para cor- 

tar vidrios 

Destiladera de toda clase. 

( V^ase filtros) 

Puertaa de madera . ( Vdase ma- 

dera) 

Modelos para dibujo. (V^^ase 

papel) 



Derechoe 
por kilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvaclo- 
refia. 

PewM. 



1.00 
.10 



.05. 
.08 
.60 
.20 



.08 
.30 
.60 

2.00 



.80 
.20 
.15 
.20 

.40 

2.00 

1.00 
5.00 
1.00 



10.00 

2.00 

.01 

.05 

.05 



12 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Drills, crude, white or colored. 

(See flax) 

Drugs. (See medicines.) 
Elastic, of every kind," for shoes 

or other purposes 

Emery powder, for polishing and 

other uses 

Envelopes. (See paper) 

Epaulets, gold or gilded 

Epaulets, silver or silver plated. . 

Epsom salts. (See medicines) . . . 

Essences for flavoring spirits 

Eyelets for clothing, shoes, and 
other uses. 

Fans, with frame of ivory, 
mother-of-pearl, metal, or tor- 
toise shell 

Fans, paper or palm 

Fans, every other class not speci- 
fied 

Feathers, of all kinds, for orna- 
ments 

Feather dusters of all kinds 

Figs. (See foods) 

Filt>ers, distilling apparatus of all 
kinds 

Firecrackers (Chinese) and fire- 
works 

Fish, dried, salted, or smoked. .. 

Fish, prepared in vessels of tin, 
glass, or earthenware. (See 
foods) 

Flannel. (See wool) 

Flasks, glass, plain. (See glass) . 

Flax (linen), pure or mixed, can- 
vas or Russia duck 

Flax, pure or mixed, crude drills, 
white or colored 

Flax, pure or mixed, fine dress 
goods, such as Irish linens, cam- 
brics, batistes, and all other 
material for dresses and other 
uses, handkerchiefs, under- 
shirts, drawers, stockings. 




DoUars. 
.164 

.164 il 

.033 
.065 

1.64 
.656 
.013 

3.28 

.197 

1.31 
.098 

.656 

1.64 
.262 

.066 

.003 

.197 
.049 

.066 
.328 
.009 

.164 
.164 



Driles, crudos, blancos j6 de 

color. (V^aeelino) 

Drogas. (V6a«e medicinas.) 
El^tico de toda cla«e para cal- 

zado -6. otros usos 

Esmeril en polvo para plateros 

<i otros usos 

Cubiertos 6 sobres para cartas. 

( V^ase papel) 

Charreteras de oro 6 sobre-dora- 

das 

Charreteras de plata 6 platea- 

das 

Sal de Ingleterra. (V^ase medi- 

cinas) 

Esencias para confeccionar 

aguardientes 

Ojetes de metal para ropa, cal- 

zado y otros usos 

Abanicos, con armazon de mar- 

fil, concha-n^ar, metal, earey 

Abanicos, de papel 6 palma 

Abanicos, de cualquier otra 

clase no denominada 

Plumas de toda clase para ador- 

nos 

Plumeros para sacudir, de toda 

clase , 

Higos. (V^ase alimentos) . . . .. 
Filtros, destiladera de toda claae 

Cohetillos chinos y fuegos arti- 
ficiales , 

Pescados, secados, salados 6 
ahumados. (Vi^ase alimentos) 

Pescados, preparados en botes 
de lata,vidrio 6 barro. ( V^ase 
alimentos) , 

Franela. ( V^ase lana) 

Frascos de vidrio liso. (y6a8e 
vidrio) 

Lino, puro 6 mezclado en lonas 
6 rusias , 

Lino, puro 6 mezclado, en driles 
crudos, blancos 6 de color 

Lino, puro 6 mezclado, en telas 
finas, como Irlandas, cam- 
brayes, batistas y toda otra 
tela para vestidos li otros usos, 
pafiuelos, camisetas, calzbn- 
cillos, medias, calcetines Ces- 



Derechoe 
porkilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



13 



ARTICLE OF MERCHAITDISE. 



socks, cuffs, collars, meu's 
shirts, and other similar arti- 
cles not specified 

Flax or hemp, pure or mixed, 
laces, embroidered edgings, 
and insertings 

Flax or hemp, pnre or mixed, 
nankeens 

Flax, pnre or mixed, plain or 
worked goo<ls, whit« or colored 
(except crude drills), such as 
crash, silesia, damask, or other 
goods for tablecloths, towels, 
bedspreads, sheeting8,mattress 
covers, and for other similar 
purposes not specified, without 
any needlework or embroidery 



Flax or hemp, pure or mixed, 
ready-made clothing, and all 
classes of articles orobject«not 
specified 

Flax or hemp, ropes, cables, or 
tarred cordage 

Flax, pure or mixed, sacks, bags 
(empty); in canvas, tarred or 
not, and hemp thread, not 
twisted, for sewing bags 

Flax or hemp, pure or mixed, 
tapes, braids, fringes, and other 
similar articles not specified. . 

Flax or hemp, pure or mixed, 
sewing thread 

Flax, or thread of agave, 
twisted 

Florida water 

Flour. (See foods) 

Flowers, artificial, of cotton, or 
any other material not speci- 
fied 

Flowers, artificial, prepared ma- 
terial of all kinds for, not speci- 
fied 

Food, bonbons, pastilles, choco- 
late, and other sweetmeats 

Food, brandied fruits 

Foods, cinnamon of all kinds 





1 


Derechos 


Duty per, 
pouna in , 
U. a car- 1 




porkilo- 


ARTfCULO DE MERCANCf A. 


gnuuoen 
moneda 


rency. i 




Salvado- 






refia. 


1 
IktUars. 


carpines), puAos y cuellos, 
camisas para hombre y otros 
semejantes no expresados 


Peso$. 


.492 


1.50 




Lino 6 c^fiamo, puro 6 mezcla- 






do,en encajes, tiras bordadas 




.984 


y embutidos 


3 00 




Lino 6 c^namo, puro 6 mezcla- 




.l&l 


do, en coletas 


.50 




Lino, puro o mezclado, en telas 






lisas 6 labradas, blancas 6 de 






color (exceptuiSndoselos driles 






crudos), como las creas, pla- 






tillas, alemanisco, 6 sea g6- 






nero para manteles, tohallas. 






cobertores para cama, g^uero 






para s^banas y para forros de 




.328 


colch6n y los dem& semejan- 
tes no expresados, sin costura 
ni bordado alguno 






1.00 




Lino 6 c^Qamo, puro 6 mezclado, 






en ropa hecha y eu toda clase 






de titiles 11 objetoB no denoml- 




.82 


nados 


2 50 




Lino 6 c^Qomo^en cnerdas, cables 




.016 


6 embreados 


.05 




Lino puro 6 mezclado en sacos, 






costales vacfos, en ci^fiamo 6 






canamazo, embreados 6 sin 




.016 


embrear y en hilo de c^fiamo 






sin torcer, para coser sacos 


.05 




Lino 6 clbfiamo, puro 6 mezclado. 






en cintas, trenciUa, flecos y 




.492 


demtfs semejantes no especifi- 






cados 


1.50 




Lino 6 c^fiamo puro 6 mezclado 




.262 


en hilos para coser 


.80 


.066 
.098 


Lino, 6 pita de cdfiamo torcida. 


.20 


Agua de florida 


30 


.013 


Harina. (V^ase alimentos) . . . . 

Flores artificiales, de algodon 

6 de cualquier otra materia 


.04 


1.64 


no denominada 


5.00 




Flores artificiales (material pre- 






pardo para), de toda clase no 




.328 


denominada 


1.00 




Alimentos, confites, pastillas, 
chocolat-e y otros dulces 




.066 


.20 


.082 


Alimentos, fnitos en aguardiente 


.2.-) 


.131 


Alimentos, canela y caueldn 


.40 



14 



IMPORT DUTIES OP SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 




Foods, common salt 

Foods and condiments, fresh 
fruits, onions, beans, pulse, len- 
tils, potatoes, and all kinds of 
vegetables in their natural 
state without preparation 

Foods, com starch, vermicelli, 
and macaroni 

Foods, dour, vinegar 

Foods, herrings, cod, and other 
fish, not further prepared 
than dried, salted, or smoked, 
and meats of all kinds hot con- 
tained in vessels of glass, tin, 
or other material 

Foods, lavender, canary seed, 
aniseed, cloves, cumin, corian- 
der seed, and pepper 

Foods, mustard, powdered, nut- 
megs, and tea 

Foods, olives, capers, pick- 
les, mustard prepared, curry, 
sauces of all kinds, vegetables, 
truffles, butter, fish, and meat 
of all kinds prepared in vessels 
of tin, glass, earthenware or 
canvas covered ; dried fri^its, 
shelled, raisins, figs, prunes, 
and dates; fruits preserved 
in water and syrup ; biscuits of 
all kinds, dry and sweet ; cheese 
of all kinds ; sugar 

Foods, saffron, edible 

Foods, sago, tapioca, and other 
flours and alimentary pastes; 
cocoa; syrups without alcohol ; 
fruits with shells, such as 
almonds, filberts, nuts, and 
others similar, and lard 

Fooils, wheat, oats, barley, and 
all other cereals not speci- 
fied 

Fountains or fonts, iron. (See 
iron) 

Fountains, iron, japanned. (See 
iron) 

Fountains, marble. ( See marble) . 



DoUars. 
.006 



.006 

.013 
.013 



.049 

.049 
.098 



.066 
.984 



.033 

.006 

.026 

.131 
.007 



DerechoB 
por kilo- 
graanoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



AlimentoH, sal comun 

Alimentos y condimentos, fnitas 
frescas, cebollajs, habas, gar- 
banzos, lentejas, papas y toda 
legumbre en estado natural sin 
preparar 

Alimentos, maicena, fideos y 
macarrones 

Alimentos, harina, vinagre 

Alimentos y condimentos, aren- 

3ne8, bacalao ti otros pesca- 
os, sin m^ preparaciCn que 
secados, salados 6 ahumados, 
y cames de toda clase no con- 
tenidas en botes de vidrio, 
lata 6 de otra materia 

Alimentos, albucema, alpiste, 
an is, clavo de olor, comino, 
culantro y pimienta A 

Alimentos, mostaza en polvo, 
nuez-moscada y t^ 

Alimentos, aceitunus, alcapa- 
rras, encurtidos, mostaza pre- 

Sarada, currid, salsas de to- 
a clase, legumbres, trufas, 
mantequilla, pescados y cames 
de toda clase, preparados en 
botes de lata, vidrio, barro 6 
brin ; frutassecas sin c^scara, 
pasas, higos, ciruelas, ddtiles ; 
frutas conservadas en agua y 
almibar; galletas de toda 
clase, secas y dulces ; quesos 
de toda clase ;. azficar 

Azafr^n de comer 

Alimentos, sagd, tapioca ^' 
dem^ harinas y pastas ali- 
meuticias ; cacao ; Jarabes sin 
alcohol, frutas con c^scara, 
como almendras, avellanas, 
'nueces y otras semej antes; 
manteca de puerco 

Alimentos, trigo, avena, cebada 
y deimis cereales no deno- 
minados 

Fuentesopilasdehierro. (V^ase 
hierro) 

Fueutes de hierro, charolado. 
( V^ase hierro) 

Fuen tes de in^rmol . ( V^ase mar- 
mol) 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



15 



ABTICLE OF MERCHAimiSE. 



Forks. (See knives) 

FiingeSy cotton. (See cotton) . 



Fringes, silk. (See silk) 

Fringes, woolen. (See wool) 

Fruits, brandied. (See foods).. 

FmitB, driedyShelled. (See foods) . 

Fmits with shells, such as al- 
monds, filberts,nats and others. 
(See foods) 

Fruits, fresh. (See foods) 



Fmits, preserved in water and 

syrup. (See foods) 

Furnaces, assaying. (See iron) . . 

Furniture, bronze or brass. (See 

bronze) 

Furniture, iron. (See iron) 



Furniture, wooden, of all kindH. 

(See wood) 

Galloons or threads of silver or 



6^ 



old. 
oons, cotton. (See cotton). . 



Galvanized or tinned iron for 

roofs. (See iron) 

Garters, cotton. ( See cotton ) 



Garters, silk. ( See silk ) 

Gasoline. (See oil) 

Gasometers and illuiuinatiiig ap- 
paratus, excluding lamps. (See 
iron) per 100 pounds. . 

Grauzes, cotton. (See cotton) 

Gauzes, with silver and tinsel 
thread 

Gin. (See spirits) 

Ginger ale 

Giroies, silk. (See silk) ^ . . 

Glass and glassware, common 
bottles, plain flasks, large bot- 
tles and demijohns, empty 



Glans, etc., hollowed glassware, 
in vases, tumblers, cups, gob- 
lets, tubes, flower shades, 
plates, and all other articles of 
glass not specified 



DntyMr I 
poiina in | 
U. S. cur- 
rency, j 



DoUart, 



1.97 
.983 
.065 

.066 



.033 
.006 

.066 
.164 



.197 
.033 



.066 

.82 

.328 



.098 
.197 
.009 
.984 



.009 



.033 



AUTlCTJLO DE MEKCANCtA. 



.164 
.328 

.984 
.026 



.164 
.328 



Tenedores. (V^ase cuchillos).. 
Frai\i as de algod6n . ( Vdase al- 

goa6n) 

Fnuijas de seda. ( V<^ase seda) . . 
Fraiijas de lana. (V^^ase lana) . . 
Jf'rutas en aguardiente. (V^ase 

alimentos) 

Frutas secas, sin ctf scara. ( Y^ase 

alimentos) 

Frutas con c^cara, oomo al- 

mendras, avellanas, nueces y 

otras. (V^ase alimentos) 

Frutas frescas. (Y^ase alimen- 
tos) 

Frutas conservadas en agua y 

almi bar. ( Y^ase alimentos) . . 
HomiUas para ensayos. ( Y<^e 

hierro) 

Muebles de bronce 6 la ton. 

( V^ase bronce) 

Muebles de hierro. (Y^ase 

hierro) 

Muebles de madera de toda class. 

( Y^ase madera) 

Galones 6 hilos de plata tl oro. . . 

Galones de algoddn. ( Y^ase al- 
goddn) 

Hierro galvanizado 6 estafiado 
para techos 

Ataderas de algodon. (Y^ase 
algod6n) 

Ataderas de seda. ( Y^ase seda) . 

Gasolina. ( Y^ase aceite) 

Gasometros y aparatos de alnm- 
brado, excluyendo las 1l(mpa- 
ras. (Y^asehierro)]o8l00kilos. 

Gasas de algod6u. (Y^ase algo- 
ddn) 

Gasas abrillantadas, con tejidos 
de plata d oro false 

Ginebra. ( Y^ase aguardientes) . 

Cerveza de jengibre 

C inturones de seda . ( Y^ase seda) 

Yidrio y cristaleria, hotel las 
comunes, frascos de vidrio 
liso, botelloues 6 damajuanas 
vacf OS 

Yidrio y cristalerfa, cristal 6 
vidrio hueco, en vasos, copas, 
garrafas, tubos, floreros, 
platos y todo artlcnlo de 
solo vidio 6 cristal, no de- 
nominado 



Derechos 
por kilo- 
irnunoen 
monoda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Pews, 



1.00 
6.00 
3.00 

.25 

.20 



.10 

.02 

.20 

.50 

.60 

.10 

.20 
2.50 

1.00 

.50 

1.00 

3.00 

.08 



.50 
1.00 

.30 

.60 

.03 

3.00 



.03 



.10 



16 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Glass, lamps, etc. (See ilhimi- 
nating articles.) 

Glass, ♦^tc, mirrors, with or with- 
out frames, toys, buttons 

Glass, etc., tiles, plate glass, 
white and colored, without 
painting or silvering 

Glass, etc., watch crystals 

Glasses, cupping. (See medi- 
cines) 

Glasses, opera and field, mounted 
in silver, tortoise shell, mother 
of pearl, or ivory 

Glasses, opera and field, mounted 
in any other material 




Gloves, buckskin, and gauntlets, 
for fencing. (See leather) 



Gloves, kid, and other kinds of 

fine gloves. (See leather) 

Gloves, woolen. (See wool) 

Glue, of all kinds 

Gold, jewelry 

Gold leaf, for gilding 



Gum arable. (See medicines) . . . 
Guns, breech-loading 



Guns, muzzle-loading, of all 
kinds, with or without appur- 
tenances 

Grains not specified 

Gypsum, calcined, in powder 

Hair, horse, loose or m pillows, 
mattresses, cloth for furniture, 
and in any other form not spec- 
ified.. 

Hair, human, genuine or imita- 
tion, manufactured or not 

Hairpins. (See pins, etc) 



Hammers. (See tools) . 



Hammocks, cotton. (See cotton) . 

Handkerchiefs, cotton. (See cot- 
ton) 

Handkerchiefs, linen. (See flax) . 
Handkerchief, silk. (See silk) . . 



.016 
.328 

.066 



1.31 
.656 

.328 



.82 
.656 
.033 
3.28 
2.62 

.066 

.656 



.328 
.006 
.006 



.098 

3.28 
.197 



.164 



.226 
.492 
1.64 



ARTlCULO DE MERCAKCIA. 



Vidrio en artf culos de alumbra- 
do. (Y^ase esta palabra.) 

Vidrio, espejos con 6 sin mar- 
cos, juguetes, botones 

Vidrio^ etc., tejas de vidrio, 
vidnos pianos, blancos y de 
color sin piiitura ni estafio 

Vidrio para relojes. 

Ventosas. ( V6ase medicinas) . . . 



D<n-echos 

porkilo. 

gramo en 

I moneda 

I Salvado- 

refia. 



Pe809. 



Anteojos para teatro 6 de larga 
vista, guarnici6n de plata, 
carey, concha-nitcar 6 marfil.. 

Anteojos para teatro 6 de larga 
vista, con gnamici6n de cual- 
quier otra materia 

Guantes de ante y manoplas para 
juegos de florete. (V^ase 
cueros) 

Gnantes de cahritilla y otras 
clases finos. ( V^ase cueros) . . 

Guantes de lana. ( Vease lana) . 

Cola de toda clase 

Oro en joyas 

Oro manufacturdo en hojas para 
dorar 

Goma ar^biga. (Vease medi- 
cinas) 

Escopetas de cargar por la rec^ 
mara 

Escopetas de piston de toda 
clase, con 6 sin utiles 



Cereales no mencionados 

Yeso calcinado en polvo 

Cerdas 6 crines sueltas 6 en al- 

mohadas, colchones, telas, 

para muebles y en cualquier 

otra forma no denomiuada 

Cabello 6 pelo humano 6 de imi- 

taci6n en bruto 6 en adonio . . 
Horquillas. (V6ase alfileres, 

etc) 

MartiUos. (Vdase herramien- 

tas) 

Hamacas de algod<5n. (V^ase 

algod6n) 

Pafiuelos de algonddn. (V^ase 

algod6n) 

Patiuelos de lino. (V^aselino).. 
Pafiuelos de seda. ( V^ase seda) . 



.30 



.Go 

1.00 

.20 



4.00 
2.00 

1.00 

2.50 

2.00 

.10 

10.00 

8.00 

.20 

2.00 

1.00 

.02 
.02 



.30 
10.00 



.50 

.80 
1.50 
6.00 



IMPORT DUTIES OP SALVADOR. 



17 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Hamefises. (See leather) 

Hats, esparto grass, for ladies 
and children^ with or without 
ornaments 

Hats, Panama and palm 

Hats, bonnets, or caps for ladies 
or children, of any other kind 
not specified 

Hats, caps, and headdresses of all 
kinds not specified, for men 
and children 

Hatchets. (See iron) 

Hemp. (See flax) 

Henbane. (See medicines) 

Hooks and eyes and clasps of 
wire of every kind 

Hooks, fish. (See iron) 

Hoops, wooden, and hoop poles. 
(See wood) . . .per 100 pounds. . 

Houses, iron, portable. (See 
iron) per 100 pounds. . 

Hydrometers 

Illuminating articles, chande- 
liers, lanterns, lamps of glass, 
crystal, porcelain, etc.. chim- 
neys, clobes, shades, wnen im- 
ported with lamps 

Illuminating articles, chimneys 
and globes for lamps, when im- 
ported separately, pay the same 
as hollow glassware 

Uluminating articles, holders, 
brackets, bottoms, stands, 
burners, and other accessories 
for lamps, not otherwise speci- 
fied 

Illuminating articles, cotton and 
wicks for lamps 

Images and dolls of all kinds and 
materials not specified 

India rubber, unmanufactured. . 

India-rubber belts or pieces for 
machinery per 100 pounds . 

India-rubber covers for floors 
and wagons , 

India-rubber articles not speci- 
fied 

India rubber, waterproof coats, 
shoes, boots, and other similar 
articles of every kind 

India rubber, valve packing, 
per 100 pounds. 

Bull. 23 2 



pounctin 

U. S. cur- 

roncy. 



Dollars. 
.229 



.492 
1.64 



.492 



.492 
.115 

.033 

.197 
.115 

.164 



.164 
.066 



.082 



.033 



.082 

.098 
.033 

.164 

.026 

.197 

.328 
.164 



ARTtCULO DB MERCANCtA. 



Derochos 
por kilo- 
jH^mo en 
moneda 
Salvado- 
rena. 



Ameses. (V^ase cuero; 

Sombreros de esparteria, para 
seQoras 6 nifios, con 6 sin 
adornos 

Sombreros de junco y jipijapa.. 

Sombreros 6 gorras para se&oras 
6 nifios de cualquier otra 
clase no denominada 

Sombreros y gorras 6 cofias de 
cualquiera clase no denomi- 
nada, para hombres y nifios . . 

Hachuelas. ( V^ase hierro) 

Cl&fiamo. ( V^se lino) 

BeleRo. (V^ase medicinas) 

Broches 6 corchetes de alambre 
de cualquiera clase 

Anzuelos. ( V6ase hierro) 

Arcos de madera y flejes para 
bariles. (V^ase madera) 
los 100 kilos.. 

Casas desarmadas de hierro. 
(V^ase hierro) . .los 100 kilos. . 

Pesa-licores 

Alumbrado (artfculos de), ara- 
fias, faroles y l^mparas de vid- 
rio, cristal, porcelana, etc., 
tubos, globos, pantallas, vi- 
niendo con l(tmparas 

Alumbrado (artfculos de), los 
tubos y globos paral^mparas, 
cuando vengan solos, pagarau 
como vidrios huecos 

Alumbrado (artfculos de), re- 
cipientes, dep6sitos, brazos, 
arcos, quemadores y todo ac- 
cesorio para l(tmparas, no de- 
nominado 

Alumbrado (artfculos de), pa- 
bilo y mechas para Ittmparas. . 

Figuras y mufiecas de toda clase 
y materia no denominada 

Caucho en bruto 

Caucho en fajas 6 piezas para 
maquinarias los 100 kilos . . 

Caucho para pisos y toldos de 
carreta 

Caucho manufacturado en ob- 
jetos no especificados 

Caucho en capas, zapatos, botas 
y otros semejantes de toda 
clase 

Caucho para empaques de v^l- 
vulas los 100 kilos. . 



Pewt. 
.70 



1.50 
5.00 



1.50 



1.50 
.35 

.10 

.60 
.35 



.50 

.50 
.05 



.25 
.10 

.25 

.25 

.30 
.10 

.50 

.08 

.60 

1.00 
.50 



18 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



India rubber, waterproof for ta- 
ble covers and other purposes 

Ink, for printing or Iitno|^aph- 
ing 

Ink, for writing or marking 

Inkstands, wooden. (See wood) 

Instruments, musical, such as 
pianos, organs, etc 

Instruments, musical, of any 
other class, not specified 

Instruments, scientific, not speci- 
fied 

Instruments, surgical, with or 
without case. (See iron) 

Iron articles, such as adzes, 
braces, bits, augers, gimlets, 
drills, chisels, gouges, trowels, 
Jackplanes, planes, channeling 
planes, hammers,screwdrivers, 
squares, plumbs, compasses, 
and all other fine tools, with or 
without wooden handles, for 
artisans 



Iron articles, such as kettles, an- 
vils, hand vises, hammers, and 
pinchers for blacksmiths, por- 
table forges, bottle-carriers, 
traps for moles and rats, rivets, 
stone-hammers, spikes, and all 
other tools and implements of 
this kind not specified 



Iron gratings 

Iron, bits for animals, spurs, stir- 
rups, thimbles, links, steels, 
hatchets, fishhooks, wrenches, 
corkscrews, and all other ob- 
jects of this kind not specified. 



Iron, cast, cookstoves, cooking 
utensils, fountains or fonts, 
flower and plant vases, ovens, 
portable stoves, mortars, hand 
mills for coffee and other uses, 
letter presses, platform scales, 
balances, hand tools, statues. 



Duty per 

pouhd in 

tJ. S. cui - 

rency. 



Dollars. 

.131 

.003 
.033 
.082 

.066 
.131 

.328 



.115 



.033 
.026 

.115 



ARTtCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Caucho en ahulados 6 encerados 

para carpetas u otros usos 

Tintapara imprentao litograAa 

Tinta para escribir 6 marcar . . , 

Tinteros de madera. (Y^ase 
madera) , 

InstrumentoB de mdsica, como 
pianos, 6rganoB, etc 

Instrumentos de mtisica de 
cualquier otra clase no de- 
nominada , 

Instrumentos cieutificos no de- 
nominados , 

Instrumentos de cirugla, con 6 
sin estuche ( Vdase nierro) . . 

Hierro en piezas, como azuela^, 
berbi<iues, brocas, barrenos, 
taladros, tarrajas, escoplos, 
formones, gurvias, trullas, (6 
Bean cucharasde albafiil), gar- 
lopas, garlopiues, cepillos, 
guiamenes, acanaladores, 
martillos, destomilladores, 
escuadras, plomadas, com- 
pases y demiis herraniientas 
finas, con 6 sin mango de ma- 
dera, para artesanos 

Hierro en piezas, como peroles, 
yunques, entanallas, mazos y 
pinzas para herreros, fraguas 
portatiles, por ta-botellas, 
trampas para topos 6 ratas, 
remaches, martillos para rom- 

Eer piedra, pernos y denies 
erramieutas y utiles por el 
estilo, no denominados 

Hierro en verjas 

Hierro en piezas, como frenos 
para bestiiis, e«puelas, estri- 
boss, para galftpagos. dedales, 
eslabones, afiladoras, haohue- 
las, anzuelos, Haves ma«stras, 
tirabuzones y demas objetos 
por el estilo, no especificados . 

Hierro fundido en piezas, como 
cociuas, baterfas de cocina, 
fuentes 6 pilas, vasos para 
flores 6 plautas, hornillas, 
anafes, almireces, molinos 
para caf6 u otros usos, pren- 
sas para cartas, romauas de 



DerechoB 
por kilo- 
gramo en 
mnneda 
Salvado- 
refin. 



Pesos. 



.40 
.01 

.10 

.25 

.20 

.40 
1.00 
1.00 



.35 



.10 
.08 



.35 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



19 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



tailors' irons, and other similar 
objects 



Iron, cast, enameled, in articles 
for domestic and other uses — 

Iron, bars, plates, and sheets 

Iron, cast, sadirons and weights. 

Iron, cooking utensils 



Iron, japanned, mannfactured in 
articles such as waiters, su- 
gar bowls, tra.vs, cash boxes, 
basins, water pipes, table cas- 
ters, fountains, fruit stands, 
watering pots, and all other 
objects for domestic and other 
uses 



Iron, knives, daggers, or pon- 
iards, with ivory, tortoise 
shell, silver, or mother of pearl 
handle 

Iron, machetes, daggers, knives, 
and poniards 




rency, 



DoUart. 
.026 

.039 
.013 
.016 
.066 



Iron, the same, with leather ' 

scabbards 

Iron, mattocks, shovels, rakes, 

Eicks, bars, crowbars, sickles, 
atchets, pruning knives, 
sxes, plow points, and all other 
ordinary implements of this 
kind , 



Iron, nails, tacks, and brads of 
all kinds 

Iron, cradles, beds, cots, camp 
stools, sofas, and other arti- 
cles of furniture 

Iron, locks for doors, windows, 
or furniture, padlocks, rings, 
bolts, hasps, door knockers 
and furniture knobs, hiuges, 
screws, and other iron arti- 
cles for windows, doors, and 
furniture 



Iron, the same, of any other class 
not specified 



.131 

.656 
.066 

.131 

.033 
.033 
.033 

.098 
.098 



ARTlCULO DE MERCANCIa. 



Derechos 
I por kilo- 
gramo en 
moneda 
SalTsdo- 
refia. 



plata-forma, balanzas, m a- 
quinitas de mano, estatuas, 
planchas para sastre y dem^ 
objetos por estilo 

Hierro fuudido, esmaltado, ma- 
nufacturado en piezas para uso 
dom^tico y otros usos 

Ilierro en barras, l^minas, plan- 
chas 6plauchuelas 

Hierro en planchas para plan- 
chadores y pesas 

Hierro en utiles para baterfa de 
cocina 

Hierro charolado. manufactu- 
rado en piezas, como azafates, 
azucareros, canastillas, caji- 
tas para valores y otros usos, 
agua-maniles, tubos para 
agua, talleres de mesa, fu- 
entes, fruteros, regaderas y 
dem^ obj e tos para uso dom^s- 
tico y otros usos 

Hierro, cuchillos, dagas 6 pu- 
fiales, con mango de marfil, 
carey, plata 6 concha-nl(car . . 

Hierro manufacturado en ma- 
chetes, dagas, cuchillos y 
punales 

Hierro, los mismos,convainasde 
cuero . . ., 

Hierro manufacturado en piezas 
como azadones, palas, ras- 
trillos, picas, piochas, ma- 
canas, barretas, hoces, poda- 
doras, hachas, puntas para 
arador y demtfs herramientas 
ordinarias por el estilo 

Hierro en clavos, tachuela 6 
puntilla de totla clase 

Hierro en pieza6, como cunas, 
camas, catres, silletas, sof^ y 
dem^ muebles por el estilo . . 

Hierro en piezas, como cerradu- 
ras para puertas, ventanas6 
muebles, candados, argoUas, 

Sasadores, fall etas, cerrojos 
e aldabas, llamadores de 
puertas y muebles, bisagras, 
tomillos y demits hernges 
para puertas, ven tanas 6 

muebles 

HieiTO en los mismos de cualqui- 
er otra clase no denominada. . 



PeMot. 



.08 

.12 
.04 
.05 
.20 



.40 
2.00 

.20 
.40 



.10 
.10 

.10 



.30 
.30 



20 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Iron, penknives, with one blaCKi, 
wooden or horn handles 



Iron, penknives and razors, with 
handles of mother of pearl, 
ivory, tortoise sheU, or silver. . , 

Iron, penknives and razors of any 
other class 



Iron, pipes and tubes for water 
or steam ; sheets, tinned or gal- 
vanized, for roofs; chains for 
carts or naval purposes, chains 
for surveyors; sugar molds; 
pulleys; lifting jacks; large 
presses for iudustrial purposes ; 
speaking trumpets: tires and 
wheels tor carts, axles; wheel- 
barrows ; rails and spikes : ves- 
sels and parts thereof, ancnors ; 
towers, columns, or pillars; 
gasometers and illuminating 
apparatus, excluding lamps; 
telegraph wire ; lightning 
rods ; pumps for wells, mines, 
or other purposes ; machinery 
of all kinds for mining, agri- 
cultural, or manufacturing en- 
terprises ; motors of all degi-ees 
of power; water- tanks; masks 
for bee-keepers ; portable 
houses ; assaying furnaces ; 
levels ; magnets ; lithographic 
presses ; wire cloth for purify- 
ing coffee ; horse rakes ; cables 
and ropes of wire, either brass 
or iron per 100 pounds. . 



Iron, pointed knives, with bone 
or horn handle, and can- 
openers 

Iron safes 

Iron, shoes for animals and 
chains , 

Iron, steel vards of all kinds and 
spigots for casks 

Iron, surgical instruments with 
or without case 



Duty per 
poana in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



Dollars. 
.098 

.656 
.197 



.164 



.098 
.049 



.033 
.049 
.328 



ARTtCULO DE MERCANCtA. 



Hierro en corta-plumas de una 
sola cuchilla y mangos de ma- 
dera 6 cuemo 

Hierro en corta-plumas y 
nav^jas, con mangos de cou- 
cha-n^ar, marfil, carey 6 
plata 

Hierro en corta-plumas y navajas 
de cualquier otra clase 

Hierro, cafierf a y tuberfa para 
agua 6 vapor ; l^[minas, esta- 
nadas 6 galvanizadas, para 
techos, caaenas para carros 6 
usos navales, cadenas para 
agrimcnsores, moldes para 
azdcar ; garruchas ; gates para 
le van tar pesos ; p r e n s a s 
grandes para la inddstria; 
bocinas ; llantas y ruedas para 
carros, ejes; oarretillas de 
mano.; rieles y clavos para 
rieles ; embarcaciones 6 piezas 
para <$sta6, anclas, torres; 
columnas 6 pilares; gas6me- 
tros y aparatos de alumbrado, 
excluyendo las llUnparas ; 
alambre para tel^grafos ; para- 
rayos; bombas para pozos, 
minas li otros usos; maqui- 
naria de toda clase para em- 
presas mineras, agrlcolas 6 
fabriles ; motores de toda clase 
de fuerza ; tanques para agua ; 
caretas para castrar colmenas ; 
casas desarmadas; homillas 
para ensayos de metal; niveles; 
im^; prensas litogr^ficas; tela 
de alambre ^ara beneficio del 
caf(6 y rastriUos para fuerza 
animal; cables 6 cuerdas de 
alambre, de latdn 6 hierro, 
los 100 kilos. . 

Hierro en cuchillos depunto, 
con mango de hueso 6 cuemo 
y en cuchillos para abrir latas. 

Hierro manufacturado en cajas 
fuertes para guardar valores. . 

Hierro manufacturado en herra- 
dura« para bestias y en cadenas, 

Hierro en romanas de toda clase 
y Haves para pipas 

Hierro manufacturado en instru- 
nientos de cirugfa,con 6 sin es- 
tuche 



Derechos 
por kilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Pesos. 
.30 

2.00 
.60 



.50 

.30 
.15 
.10 
.15 

1.00 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



2r 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 




IioUf tablekniveSy forks, with 
handles of ivorv, tortoise shel], 
mother-of' pearl, or silver 



Iron, tablespoons 

Iron, tinned, articles such as 
pitchers, backets, basins, hip 
and foot baths, chandeliers, 
candlesticks, and other objects 
for domestic and other uses 

Iron, wire, 4 millimeters diame- 
ter and nnder 



Iron, wire cloth, cages, and all 
other wire articles not specified . 

Iron, wrought, enameled, cooking 
utensils, water pitchers, water 
jars, coffeepots, milk pitchers, 
dishes, plates, mugs, cups, boil- 
ers, forks, ladles, bathtubs, 
spittoons, chamberpots, pipes 
for water, and other articles 
of domestic and other use 



Iron, wrought, nickel-plated, in 
articles wt any use 

Iron, wrought, tinned, articles 
such as nails, tacks of all 
kinds, buckles, tinned or ja- 
pann€»d, and currycombs 

Ivory, all kinds of articles not 
specified 

Ivory, unmanufactured 

Jacks, for lifting weights. (See 
iron) 

Jewelry, gold or imitation 

Jewel^, silver. (See silver) 

Kerosene oil. (See oils) 

Knapsacks. (See leather) 

Knives. (Seeiron) 

Knives, with leather scabbards. 

(See iron) 

Knives, pointed, with bone or 

horn handle. (See iron) 

Knives and forks, with ivory, tor- 
toise shell, or silver handles.. . 



DoUarg. 



.656 
.098 

.066 
.039 
.098 



.082 



.164 



.066 

.656 
.328 

.164 

3.028 

.656 

.026 

.229 
.066 

.131 

.098 

.656 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCf A. 



DerechoB 
porkUo- 

|{raino en 

moneda 

Salvado- 

refia. 



Hierro en cuchiUos, tenedores, 
con mangos de marfil, carey, 
concha-n^ar 6 plata 

Hierro en cucharas de mesa 

Hierro esta&ado manufacturado 
en piezas, como ciiutaros, cu- 
bos, baldes, agua-maniles, ba- 
fios de asiento y de pi^. can- 
deleros, palmatorias y dem^ 
objetos para uso dom^stico y 
otros usos 

Hierro en alambre desde cuatro 
milim^tros de di^^etro inclu- 
sive para abajo..^ 

Hierro en tela de alambre, j au- 
las y dem^ objetos en alam- 
bre no especificados 

Hierro forjado, esmaltado, ma- 
nufacturado, eu pieza8,para ba- 
terla de cocina, agua-matiiles, 
jaros para agua, cafeteras, 
lecheras, fuentes, platos, va- 
sos, tasas, pail as, tenedores, 
cucharones, bafios de asiento 
6 de pi^s, escupideras, bacini- 
caS) tubos para agua y demas 
fitiles deuso domestico y otros 
usos 

Hierro foijado, manufacturado 
en objetos niquelados para 
cualquier uso 

Hierro,fonado, esta&ado, manu- 
facturado, en piezas, como cla- 
vos y tachuelas de toda clase, 
hevillas,estaaadas 6 charola- 
das, y almohazas 

Marfil fabricado en toda clase 
de objetos no especificados . . . 

Marfil en bruto 

Gatos para levantar pesos. 
( V^ase hierro) 

Joyerf a de oro 6 de dubl6 

Joyas de plata. (V^ase plata) . 

Aceite de kerosina. (V^ase 
aceites) 

Mochilas . ( V^ase cueros ) 

Cuchillos. (V6a8e hierro) 

Cuchlllos con vainas de cuero. 
(V^ase hierro) 

Cuchillos de punto, con mango 
de hueso 6 cuemo. (V^ase 
hierro) 

Cuchillos 6 tenedores, con man^ 
gos de marfil, carey 6 plata. . . 



Pesos. 



2.00 
.30 



.20 
.12 
.30 



.25 
.50 

.20 

2.00 
1.00 

.50 

10.00 

2.00 

.08 
.70 
.20 

.40 

.30 
2.00 



22 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ABTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



KniYes and forks, all other kinds. 

Knives, with ivory, tortoise shell, 
silver, or mother-of-pearl han- 
dles. (Seeiron) 

Laces, cotton. (See cotton) 

Laces, linen. (See flax, etc) 

Laces, silk. (See silk) 

Laces, woolen. (See wool) 

Lamps. (See illuminating arti- 
cles) 

Lanterns. (See illnminating arti- 
cles) 

Lard. (Seefoods) 

Lavender. (See foods, etc) 

Lavender water 

Lawn, cotton. (See cotton) 

Lead, in bars 

Lead, bullets or drop shot 

Lead, pipes, or sheets for roofing. 

Lead, toys and other objects 

Leather, belts for machinery 

Leather, belts, of leather or 
patent leather, with or without 
gilded or silvered ornaments, 

for swords and sabers 

Leather, boots, shoes, and leg- 

fings of all classes not speci- 
ed 

Leather, calfskins and patent 
leather for shoes and carriages. 

Leather, dressed sheepskins, mo- 
rocco, buckskin, chamois, soles 
for shoes, tanned cowskins, 
and other skins without hair 
or enamel, not specified 

Leather, gloves of buckskin, 
gauntlets for fencing and for 
ball-playing 

Leather, kid and other kinds of 
fine gloves 

Leather, saddles, harnesses, 
straps, headstalls, halters, 
covers, holsters, bridles, reins, 
powder flasks, and other sim- 
ilar articles 



poandiii 

U.S. cur 

rency. 



DoUan. 
.098 



.656 
.82 

.984 
L97 



.082 

.082 
.033 

.049 

.098 
.328 

.013 
.026 
.013 

.098 

.098 



.492 

.656 
.098 

.066 
.328 



.229 



ABTlCULO DE MEBCANClA. 



CuchilloB 6 tenedores de cnalqui- 

er otra clase 

Cuchillos con mangos de marfil, 

carey, plata 6 concha-n^ar. 

( V^ase nierro) 

Encajes de algoddn. (V^ase 

algoddn) 

Encajes de lino. (V^ase lino) . 
Encajes deseda. (V^aseseda) . 
Encajes de lana. (V^ase lana) . 
Li&mparas. (V^ase alumbrado). 

Faroles. (Y^a. alumbrado) . . . 

Man teca de puerco. ( V^ase ali- 
mentos) 

Alhucema. (V^ase alimentos, 
etc) 

Agua de lavanda 

Cambray de obispo. (Vdase al- 
god6n) 

Plomo en barras 

Plomo en balas 6 munici^n 

Plomo mannfticturado en cafie- 
rf as 6 l^uinas para techos 

Plomo en juguotes ti otros ob- 
jetos 

Cueros en fajas para maquinaria. 

Cueros, cinturones de cuero 6 de 
charol, con 6 sin guamiciones 
doradas 6 plateadas, para 
sables 6 espadas 

Cueros, calzado y sobre-botas de 
cualquiera clase no denomi- 
nada 

Cueros, becerros y cueros charo 
lados para calzado y camiajes. 

Cueros, badanas, tafiletes, ga- 
muzas, antes, zuelas para cal- 
zado, vaquetas y otros cueros 
sin pelo y sin charol, no de- 
nominados 

Cueros, guantes de ant.e, mano- 
plas y juegos de florete para 
pelotas 

Cueros, guantes de cabritilla y 
otras clases, finos 

Cueros, siUas de montar, arci- 
ones, arneses, bajadoras, ca- 
bezadas, jliquimas, fundas, 
pistoleras, riendas, tenedoras, 
polvorines y otros seme- 
jantes 



DereohoB 
porkilo- 
gnmoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Pews. 



.30 



2.00 

2.50 
3.00 
6.00 
3.00 
.25 

.25 



.10 

.15 
.30 

1.00 
.04 
.08 

.04 

.30 
.30 



1.50 

2.00 
.30 



.20 

1.00 
2.50 



.70 



IMPOET DUTIES OP SALVADOR. 



23 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Leather, saddlebags, knapsacks, 

and traveling bags 

Leather, suspenders, or of patent 

leather 

Leather, trunks or valises of 

leather or imitation 

Leather, undressed sheepskins, 

skins cured with hair on, and 

for robes 

Leather, visors for caps, and 

other similar articles 

Leather, manufactured in any 

form not speciiied 



Leeches ... 

Lemonade 

Letter presses. 



(See iron) 



Levels, not specified 

Lightning rods. (See iron) 
per 100 pounds. . 

Linen. (See flax, p. 12.) 

Linen, fine dress goods, Irish 
linens, cambrics, batistes, and 
all other material for dresses. 
(Seeflax) 

Linen, in plain or worked goods, 
white or colored (except crude 
drills), creas, silesia, damask, 
or other goods for tablecloths, 
towels, bedspreads, sheetings, 
mattress covers, and for other 
similar purposes, not specified, 
without needlework or em- 
broidery. (Seeflax) 



Lithographic presses. (See iron) 
per 100 poimds . . 

Looking glasses, with or without 
firames 

Macaroni. (See foods) 

Machetes. (See iron) 

Machetes, with leather scab- 
bards. (See iron) 

Machinery of all kinds for min- 
ing, agricultural, or manufac- 
turing ent-erprises. (See iron) 
per 100 pounds. - 

Machinery of all kinds not speci- 
fied - - . .' per 100 pounds. . 

Magnets. (See iron) 
per 100 pounds. . 



Duty per 

pounain 

U. S. cur. 

rency. 



DoUars. 
.229 
.229 
.229 

.162 

.328 

.229 

.013 
.009 
.026 

.098 

.164 



.492 



.164 

.098 
.013 
.066 

.131 



.164 
.164 
.164 



AETlCTJLO DE MERCANCtA. 



Cueros, bolsones, mochilas y sa- 

cos de viaje 

Cueros, tirantes de cuero 6 de 

charol 

Cueros, baiiles 6 maletas de 

cuero 6 imitacidn 

Cueros, zaleas, pieles con pelo 

y pellones 



Cueros, viceras para kepi, gorros 
y otros semejantes 

CneroB en artfculos fabricados 
en cualquiera forma no de- 
nominada 

Sanguijuelas 

Limonada 

Prensas para cartas. (Y^ase 
hierro) 

Niveles, no denominados 

Para-rayos. ( V6ase hierro) 
loslOO kilos.. 

Lino. (V^ase lino, p. 12.) 

Lino, en telas finas, Irlandes, 
cambrayes, batistas y toda 
otra tela para vestidos. 
( V^ase lino) 

Lino en telas lisas 6 labradas 
blancas 6 de color (exceptuiin- 
dose los driles crudos), creas, 
platillas, alemanisco 6 sea 
g^nero para manteles, tohallas, 
cobertores para cama, g^uero 

Sara slibanas y para forros 
e colch6n y los demite seme- 
jantes no expresados, sin cos- 
tnra ni bordado alguno. 

( V^ase lino) 

Prensas litogr^ficas. (V6ase 

hierro) los 100 kilos.. 

Espejos con 6 sin marcos 



Macarrones. (V^ase alimentos) . 

Machetes. ( Vease hierro) 

Machetes, con vainas de cuero. 

( V6ase hierro) 

Maquinaria de toda clase para 

empresas mineras, a^ricolas 

6 fabriles. (Vease hierro)... 

los 100 kilos. . 

M^uiuas de toda clase no de- 

nominada los 100 kilos . . 

Imto. (V^ase hierro) 

los 100 kilos.. 



Derechos 
por kilo- 

granio en 
moneda 

Salvado- 
Nfia. 



Pe$o$. 
.70 
.70 
.70 
.50 

1.00 



.70 
.04 
.03 



.08 
.30 

.50 



1.50 



LOO 

.50 
.30 

.04 
.20 

.40 



.50 
.50 
.50 



24 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Marble, in slabs, for furniture 
tops, tiles, tablets, statuary, or 
pieces for the same, or for 
fountains 

Marble, in any other form not 
specified 

Matches of all kinds 

Match ropes, for smokers. (See 
cotton) 

Matting, of rushes, straw, cocoa, 
palm leaf, or other material 
not specified 

Mattocks. (See iron) 

Mattresses, wool, horsehair, or 
other material 

Measures, of all kinds 

Medallions or breast pins, tor- 
toise shell, mother-of-pearl, 
ivory, or silver 

Medallions or breastpins of any 
other material not specified 

Meclicines, bicarbonates of soda 
and potassa 

Medicines, bromides of potas- 
sium, sodium, ammonium, lith- 
ium, etc. ; phosphate of lime, 
soda, and potassia; cream of 
tartar ; tartaric, oxalic.andphe- 
nic acids ; white extracts, dry 
or fluid; camphor; balsam of 
copaiba : manna of all kinds; 
gum arabic in pieces or powder ; 
plasters and adhesive cloths; 
chloroform; sulphuric ether; 
pastilles, pastes, drops, pill^, 
and globules ; iodides of potas- 
sium, sodium, ammonium, lea<l, 
etc. ; suspensories, trusses, or 
any other bandage ; syringes of 
all classes, absorbent cotton 
for surgery ; nursing bottles, 
breast pnmps, and cupping 
glasses 

Medicines, medicinal flours, such 
as sago, tapioca, lactated or 
other similar kinds not speci- 
fied 

Medicines, medicinal wines, such 
as of quinine, pep ton a, pepsin, 
lacto-phosphate of lime, and 
others not specified 



ponnu in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



Dollars. 



.007 

.098 
.066 

.262 



.033 
.033 

.098 
.098 



.197 
.033 



.066 



.033 



.033 



ARTlCULO DE MERCANCU. 



Murmol en tablas. para cnbier- 
tas de muebles, ladrillos, lapi- 
das, est^tuas 6 en piezas para 
^stas 6 para fuentes 

Murmol en cualquier otra forma 
no denominada 

F6sforos de toda clase 

Mechas de algod6n para foma- 
dores. ( Vease algoddn) 

Esteras de jnnquillo, paja, coco, 
palma ti otras materias no de- 
nominadas 

Azadoues. ( V^ase hierro) 

Colchones de lana, cerdatl otra 
materia 

Medidas de toda clase 

Medallones 6 prendedores de 
carey, concha-n^car, marfil 6 
plata 

Medallones de cualquier otra 
materia no expresada 

Medicinas, bicarbonatos de sosa 
y potasa 

Medicinas, bromurosde potasio, 
Bodio, amonio, litio, etc; foB- 
fato de cal, soda y potasa; 
cr^mor; ^ido tart^rico, oxfi- 
lico, f^nico; extractos blan- 
cos, secos6 fluidos; alcanfor; 
b^samo de copaiba; man^ 
de toda clase ; goma arlibiga, 
enterad en polvo; emplastos 
y telasemphisticas; clorofor- 
mo ; ^ter eulf6rico ; pastillas, 
pastas,^ajeas,p(ldoras,gr^nu- 
los; yodurosde potasio, sodio, 
amonio, plomo, etc. ; suspen- 
sories, bragueros d cualquier 
otro vendaje ; jeringas de toda 
clase, al^odones mediciuales 
para lacirugfa; mamaderas, 
tira-leches y ventosas 

Medicinas, harinas medicinales, 
como sagti, tapioca, lacteada 
y otras semejantesuo denomi- 
nadas 

Medicinas, vinos medicinales, 
como de quina, peptona, pep- 
slna, lacto-fosfato de cal y 
otros no expresados .* 



DerechoB 
por kilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Pesos. 



.02 

.30 
.20 

.80 



.10 
.10 



.30 

2.00 
.60 
.10 



.20 



.10 



.10 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



25 



ABTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 




Medicines, salts of strychnia, 
aconite, atropia, digitalis, ver- 
atrine, morphine, quassia, co- 
csaine, and other fdkaloids; 
salts of gold, silver, and pla- 
tinum 

Medicines, sulphate of copper, 
sulphate of zinc ; sal ammoniac ; 
medicinal oils, such as almond, 
castor, palma christi, cod liver 
(pure or in emulsions); hen- 
bane; belladonna; soothing 
syrup ; liquid ammonia ; spirits 
oftorpentine; vaseline; leaves, 
flowers, buds, seeds, barks, 
roots, and scrapings 

Medicines, sulphate of magnesia 
(Epsom salts), chalk or car- 
bonate of lime, sulphate of 
iron J alum, sulphate of soda, 
muriatic, sulphuric, nitric, and 
acetic acids 

Medicines, tar beverages, such as 
"Goudron de Guyot" and oth- 
ers not specified 

Medicines, not specified 

Mercery, of all kinds not specified . 

Merino. (See wool) 

Mills, hand, for coffee and other 
uses. (See iron) 

Moldings, gilded, painted, or var- 
nished. (See wood) 

Moldings, not gilded or var- 
nished. (See wood) 

Morocco. ( See leather) 

Mother-of-pearl buttons. (See 
buttons^ 

Mother-of-pearl, unmanufactured 

Mother-of-pearl in any other form 
not specified 

Motors oi all degrees of power. 
(See iron) 

Musical instruments, such as 
pianos, organs, etc 

Musical instruments of any other 
class not specified 

Muslin, cotton. ( See cotton) 

Moslin, silk. (See silk) 



IhOarM. 



.328 



.013 

.049 
.098 

.197 

.328 

.026 

.082 

.016 
.066 

.197 
.066 

.656 

.164 

.066 

.131 
.328 
1.64 



Medicinas, sales de estricnina, 
aconitina, atropina, eserina, 
digitalina, veratrina, morfina, 
quasina, cocaina y dem^ alca- 
16ides; sales de oro, plata y 
platino 

Medicinas, sulfato de cobre, de 
zinc; sal amoniaco; aceites 
medicinales, como de almen- 
dras, castor, palmacristi, ba- 
calao (puro 6 emulsionado) ; 
belefio: belladona; biQsamo 
tranquilo ; amoniaco liquido ; 
agiias-ras: baselina: hojas, 
flores, foliculos, semillas, cor- 
tezas, raises, rasuras 

Medicinas, sulfato de magnesia 
(sal de Ingla terra), creta 6 
carbonate ae cal, sulfate de 
hierro, alnmbre, sulfato de 
soda, ^cido muri^tico, sul- 
ftirico, nitrico y ac^tico 

Medicinas, bebidas alquitrana- 
das, como "Goudron de Guy of 
y otros no dcuominadas 

Medicinas, no denominadas en 
la presents tarifa 

Mercerfa, de toda class, no de- 
nominada 

Merino. (V^aselana) 

Molinos para caf6 6 otros uses. 
( V^asenierro) 

Molduras, doradas, pintadas 6 
baruizadas. ( V^ase madera) 

Molduras, sin dorar ni bamizar. 
( V6ase madera) 

Tafiletes. ( V^ase cueros) 

Concha-nlUsar en botones (figu- 
ran en botones) 

Concha-n^ar en brnto 

Concha-n6car en cnalquiera otra 
forma no denominada 

Motores de toda class de fuerza 

Instmmentos de mtisica, como 
pianos, 6rganos, organillos, 
etc 

Instrnmentos de musica, de cual- 
quier otra class no denomi- 
nada 

Muselina de algoddn. (V^ase 
algoddn) 

Muselina de seda. (Y^ase seda) 



PeMs. 



1.00 



.10 



.04 

.15 

.30 

.60 
1.00 

.08 

.25 

.05 
.20 

.60 
.20 

2.00 
.50 



.20 



.40 

1.00 
5.00 



26 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ABTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Mnstard, powdered. (See foods) 

Mustard, prepared. (See foods). 

NailSyiron. (See iron) 

Kails, tacks, and brads, of bronze 
or copper. (See bronze) 



Nankeen. (See flax) 

Naphtha. (See oil) 

Necklaces, glass, composition, or 

other similar material 

Necklaces, ivory, tortoise-shell, 

or mother-of-pearl 

Needles of all classes and sizes. . 
Nipples for guns or, pistols 



Nursing bottles. (See medi- 
cines) 

Nuts. (See foods) 

Nutmegs. ( See foods) 



Duty per 

poana in 

U.S.cur- 

reDoy. 



Oakum per 100 pounds.. 

Oars for boats. ( See wood) 

per 100 pounds. . 

Oats 

Oil, cocoanut 

Oil, cotton-seed 

Oil, gasoline 

Oil, kerosene 

Oil, linseed 

Oil, naphtha 

Oil, olive 

Oil, petroleum 

Oil, rape seed 

Oil, whale 

Olives. (S«e foods) 

Organs. (See ins tr uments, 

musical) 

Oxalic acid. (See medicines) — 



Paints, mixed 

Paints, in powder 

Paper, blank books of all sizes, 
with or without ruling 

Paper and cardboard, in articles 
for domestic use or in any 
other form not specified 

Paper, cardboard, blotting pa- 
per, brown or other common 
wrapping paper 

Paper and cardboard, white, not 
sized and colored, for printing. 



DoOars. 
.098 

.066 

.066 

.131 

.164 
.026 

.197 

.656 
.197 
.197 



.066 
.033 
.098 

.162 



.164 
.006 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.026 
.066 



ARTtCULO DE MERCANCtA. 



.066 
.066 



.016 
.065 

.098 

.009 
.033 



(Y^ase all- 
(V^aseali- 



Mostaza en polvo. 
mentos) 

Mostaza preparada, 
mentos) 

Clavos de hierro. ( V^ase hierro) 

Clavos, tachuelas 6 puntillas de 
bronce 6 cobre. (V^ase 
bronce) 

Coletas. (V^aselino) 

Naphta. ( V^ase aceites) 

Collares de vidrio, composioidn y 
otras materias semejantes 

Collares de marfil, carey 6 con- 
cha-n^ar 

A^jas de toda clase 6 tamafio. 

Chimeneas para escopetas 6 pis- 
tolas 

Mamaderas. (Y^ase medicinal } . 

Nueces. (Yease alimentos) 

Nuez-moscada. (Y^ase alimen- 
tos) ,: 

Estopa para calafatear, 

los 100 kilos.. 

Remos para embarcaciones. 
( Y^ase madera) . per 100 kilos . . 

Avena 

Aceite de coco 

Aceite de algoddn 

Aceite de gasolina 

Aceite de kerosina 

Aceit« de liuaza 

Aceite de naphta 

Aceite de olivas 

Aceite de petr61eo 

Aceite de nabo 

Aceite de ballena 

Aceitunas. (Y^ase alimentos) . 

Organos. (Y^ase instrumentos 
de musica) 

Acido ox^ico. (Y^ase medi- 
cinas) 

Pintura preparada 

Pintura en polvo 

Papel, libros en bianco de todo 
tamano, rayados 6 sin rayar. . 

Papel y cart6n en objetos de 
U80 dom^stico 6 cualqnier 
otra forma no especificada 

Papel en cart6n, en secante, de 
estraza it otro ordinario para 
empacar 

Papel y carton bianco sin cola 
y de colores, para imprentar. 



Derechos 
por kilo- 

gramo en 
moneda 

Salvado- 
refia. 



Pesos. 
.30 



.20 
.20 



.40 
.50 
.08 

.60 

2.00 
.60 



.20 

.10 

.30 

.50 

.50 
.02 

.m 

.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.20 

.20 

.20 
.10 
.05 

.20 



.30 

.03 
.10 



IMPORT DUTIES OP SALVADOR. 



27 




Paper, cardboard, emptv boxes, 
or in sheets, for bookbinding, 
lithographing, photograph- 
ing, and other inaostrial uses. 

Paper, cigarette paper of all 
Kinds 

Paper, copies for drawing and 
maps , 

Paper, for flowers, or any other 
Kind not specified 

Paper, gilded, silvered, or enam- 
eled, for making flowers or 
other similar uses 

Paper, playing cards, fine or 
common 

Paper, sandpaper of all kinds. .. 

Paper, wall paper and marbled 
and colored paper for book- 
binders or other uses 

Paper, writing paper of all kinds 
and envelopes 

Paraffin, in cakes 

Paraffin, manufactured in any 
form 

Parchment, in sheets 

Passementerie of metal or enam- 
eled bugles, for embroidery 

Pearls, tine 

Pearls, imitation, of wax, paste, 
or glass 

Pens, gold , 

Pens, of every other class not 
specified 

Pencils of all kinds not specified 

Pencil cases, ivory, tortoise shell, 
or mother-of-pearl 

Pencil cases or any other kind 
not specified 

Penknives. ( See razors) 

Pepper. (See foods) 

Percnssion caps, for firearms 

Perfumery of all kinds not spec- 
ified 

Pewter spoons, ladles, forks, and 
other articles for domestic use. 



Phenic acid. (See medicines) . . . 
Phosphate of lime, soda and po- 
(See medicines) 



DoUart. 



.009 
.098 
.016 
.065 

.164 

.098 
.019 

.082 

.065 
.033 

.049 
.197 

.82 
3.28 

.197 
3.28 

.263 
.098 

.656 



.049 
.197 



.098 
.098 

.066 
.066 



Papel, cartdn en c^jas vacias 6 

en hojas para encuaderna- 

I ci6n, litograf[a, fotografla y 

para otros uses industriales . 

Panel de fumar para cigarrillos 
(te toda clase 

Papel, modelos para dibi]go y 
mapas 

Papel para flores 6 de cualqni- 
er otra clase no denominada. . 

Papel, dorado, plateado 6 esmal- 
tado, para hacer flores d otros 
semejantes 

Papel en ilaipes fiuos^ii ordina- 
ries 

Panel, en papel de lija de toda 
clase 

Papel para tapizar y el Jas- 
pea<lo u pintado para forros 
de libros il otros uses 

Papel para escribir de toda 
clase y en cubiertas 

Parafino en marqueta 

Parafino elaborado en cnabjui- 
era forma 

Pergamino en hojas 

Hecortes de metal 6 bombilla 
de esmalte para bordar 

Perlas finas 

Perlas, falsas, de cera, pasta, 6 
vidrio 

Plumas de oro para escribir 

Plumas para escribir, de cualqui- 
er otra clase no denominada. . 

Lapices de toda clase no especi- 
ncados 

Lapiceros de marfil, carey, 6 
concha-ndcar 

Lapiceros de cualouier otra 
clase no denominados 

Corta-plumas. ( V^ase navaj as. ) . 

Pimienta. ( Vdase alimentos. ) . . 

Fulminantes, para armas de 
fuego 

Perfumerf a de toda clase no de- 
nominada 

Peltre, mannfacturado en cu- 
charas, cucharones,tenedores, 
y dem^ objetos para uso do 
m^stico 

Acidofi6nico. (V^^asemedicinas) 

Fosfato de cal, soda y potasa. 
( V^ase mediciuas) 



Peaot. 



.05 
.20 

.50 
.30 
.06 

.25 

.20 
.10 

.15 

.60 

2.50 
10.00 

.60 
10.00 

.80 

.30 

2.00 

. .30 

.15 

.60 

.30 



.30 
.20 

.20 



28 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 




Pianos. (SeoinstraineDts, mnsi- 
cal) 

Pickles. (See foods) 

Pictures of all classes and mate- 
rials, with or without frames.. 

Pillars or columns, iron. (See 
iron) per 100 pounds. . 

Pillows and beds of feathers 

Pillows and mattresses, wool, 
horsehair, or other material 

Pins, common, large pins and 
hairpins of all classes and 
forms 

Pipes or cigar-holders, with real 
or imitation meerschaum 
mouthpiece, with or without 
amber ' 

Pipes, etc., of any other material. 

Pipes and tubes, iron, for water or 
steam. (See iron) 

per 100 pounds. . 

Piqu6, silk. (See silk) 

Pistols, breech loading, and re- 
volvers 

Pistols, muzzle loading 

Pitch, common 

Pitch and rosin 

Plants, living, per 100 pounds . . . 

Plated ware, tableware, of 
nickel, copper, bronze, brass 
or white metal, silver plated 
or gilded, such as tea and coflfee 
sets, travs, milk pitchers, tea- 
pots, coffeepots, sugar bowls, 
plates, dishes, napkin rings, 
spoons, ladles, forks, sugar 
tongs, stands, preserve dishes, 
butter dishes, fruit dishes, 
saltcellars, vases, c a n <1 1 e- 
sti^ks, cuspidors, pitchers, 
basins, cups and bowls, purses, 
inkstands, crucifixes, crosses, 
ci^ar cases, stoppers, card re- 
ceivers, flowerpots, bells for 
animals, hand bells, and other 
articles of same materials not 
specified 

Poison for skins, per 100 pounds. 

Porcelain statuettes, flowers, or 
toys 

Porcelain in any form not speci- 
fied. Porcelain includes all 
transparent chinaware 



.656 
.262 



.164 
1.64 

1.64 , 
.328 ! 
.013 I 
.016 ' 
.164 



.656 
.164 



ARTtCULO DE MERCANCtA.. 



Pianos. (V^ase instrumentos 
de milsica) 

Encurtidos. (V^ase alimentos) . 

Cuadros de toda clase y materia, 
con 6 sin marcos 

Pilares 6 columnas de hierro. 
(V^ase hierro). .los 100 kilos. . 

Almohadas y colchones de plumas 

Almohadas y colchones de lana, 
cerda ti otra materia 

Alfileres comunes, zancas ti hor- 
quillas de cualquiera clase 6 
lorma 

Pipas 6 fumadores, con boquiUa 
de espuma de mar 6 de imita- 
ci6n, con 6 sin limbar 



Pipas, etc., de cualquier otra 
materia 

Cailerfa y tuberfa para agua 6 
vapor (V^ase hierro) 
los 100 kilos.. 

Piqu^ de seda. ( V^ase seda) . . . 

Pistolas de retrocarga y rev61- 
veres 

Pistoles de pist6n 

Brea comtin 

Pez y resina 

Plantas vivas, los 100 kilos 

Vajilla de niquel, cobre,bronce, 
lat<3n 6 metal bianco plateado 
6 dorado, como servicios para 
t^ y caf6, bandejas, lecheras, 
teteras, cafeteras, azucareros, 
platos, fuentes, anillos para 
servilleta, cucharas, cucha- 
rones, tenedores, pinzas para 
azticar, asientos, dulceras, 
mantequilleroB, fruteros, sa- 
leros, vasos, candelero8, p^- 
matorias, escupiderais, jar- 
ros, agua-maniles, tasas y pai- 
las, porta-monedas, tint>eros, 
crucifijos, cruces, cigarreras, 
tapones, tarjeteros, floreros, 
cascabeles, campanillas y 
otras de la misma materia no 
denominados 

Veneno para cueros, los 100 kilos. 

Porcelana en figuras, flores 6 ju- 
guetes 

Porcelana en cualquier otra 
forma no denomiuada. De- 
nomfnase porcelana toda losa 
trasparente 



DerechoB 
por kilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Pesos. 
.20 
.20 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



29 



ABTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Portfolios or pocketbooks, of 
any material not specified 

Portfolios or pocketbooks of card- 
board. (See paper.) 

Powder flasks, with horn of 
metal, horn, or leather 

Pumps, iron, for wells, mines, and 
other purposes. (See iron) 
per 100 pounds.. 

Pnmps, wooden. (See wood) 
per 100 pounds. . 

Parses or cigar cases of tortoise 
shell, ivory, silver, or mother- 
of-pearl 

Purses, etc., of any other material 
notspecified 

Rails and spikes. (See iron) 



..per 100 pounds, 
f o( ' ' 



Raisins. (See foods) 

Razors and penknives of one 
blade, with wooden or horn 
handle 

Razors and penknives, with han- 
dles of mother-of-pearl, ivory, 
silver, or tortoise shell 

Razors and penknives, of any 
other class not specified 



Revolvers . ( See pistols) 

Ribbons. (See silK) 

Ropes, hemp. (See flax, etc) — 

Ropes or cables, wire, either 
brass or iron. (See iron) 
per 100 pounds. , 

Rosaries, coral, mother-of-pearl, 
tortoise shell, or silver 

Rosaries, all other kinds not 
specified 

Rosin 

Rum 

Rash, straw or palm, for furni- 
ture or other uses , 

Rush, straw or palm, for ham- 
mocks and otner forms not 
mentioned 

Russia duck, of flax, pure or 
mixed. (See flax) 

Sacks. (See flax) 

Saddles 

SAftron, edible. (See foods) 



poandin 
17. S. cur- 
rency. 



Saffron^ flower of, for dyeing pur- 
poses 



ARTlCULO DE MERCANCIa. 



BoUart. 
.197 

.164 
.164 

.656 

.197 

.164 
.066 

.098 

.656 

.197 

1.64 
1.97 
.016 

.164 

.656 

.197 
.016 
.197 

.066 

1.97 

.164 
.016 
.229 
.984 

.164 



Carteras de materias no deno- 
miiiadas 

Carteras de cartdn. (Vdase pa- 
pel.) 

Polvorines con asta de metal, 
cuemo a cuero 

Bombas para pozos, minas ti 
otros uses. (V^ase hierro) 
los 100 kilos.. 

Bombas demadera. (V^ase ma- 
dera) loslOO kilos. 

Porta-monedas 6 cigarreras de 
carey, marfil^ plata 6 concha- 
n^ar 

Porta-monedas de cualquier 
otra materia no denominada. . 

Rieles y clavos para rieles. ( V^- 
ase hierro) los 100 kilos. . 

Pasas . ( y^ase alimen tos) 

Navigas 6 corta-plumas de una 
sola cuchilla, de mango dema- 
dera 6 cuemo 

Navajas 6 corta-plumas, con 
mangos de concha-n^ar, mar- 
fil, plata 6 carey 

Navajas 6 corta-plumas de cual- 
quier otra clase no denomi- 
nada 

Revdlveres. ( V^ase pistolas) . . 

Cintas. (V^ase seda) 

Cuerdas. ( V6ase lino, etc) 

Cuerdas 6 cables, alambre de 
laton 6 hierro. (V^^^ase hierro) 
los 100 kilos . . 

Rosarios de coral, concha-n^car, 
carey 6 plata 

Rosarios de otra clase no de- 
nominada ■ 

Resina 

Ron 

Junco, paja 6 palma, para mue- 
bles i1 otros usos 

Junco en hamiCcas y en otras 
formas no denominadas 



Rusias de lino puro 6 mezclado. 

( V^ase lino) 

Sacos. ( V^ase lino) 

SiUas de montar 

Azafri(n de comer. (Y^ase ali- 

mentos) 

Alazor (flora azafr^ romi) para 

teSir 



Derechos 
por kilo- 

gramoeu 
moneda 

Salvado- 
refia. 



Petot. 
.60 

.70 

.50 
.50 

2.00 

.60 

.50 
.20 

.30 

2.00 



.60 
5.00 
6.00 

.05 



.50 

2.00 

.60 

.05 

•.60 

.20 

.60 

.50 
.05 
.70 

3.00 

.50 



30 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Sago 

Sashes for windows 

Sauces of all kinds. (See foods) . 

Scales, bronze or copper 

Scales, iron, platform or other 
kiiioB 



Scarfs, silk, embroidered or plain 
Scientiiic instruments, not speci- 
fied 

Scissors of all kinds 

Seeds of all kinds not specified. . 



(See wool) 

Shawls, cotton 

Shawls, silk, plain or embroid- 
ered 

Shawls, woolen. (See wool) ... 
Sheetings. (See linen) 



Duty per 

pound in 

17. S. cur- 

roncy. 



Ship timber per 100 lbs. . 



Shirts, cotton 

Shirts, cotton, with bosoms and 
cuffs of linen 

Shirts, linen 

Shoe horns, of horn or bone 

Shoes, India rubber 

Shoes, leather 

Shoes, silk, of all kinds 

Silesia. (See linen) 

Silk, cravats, girdles, garters, 
suspenders, or any other simi- 
lar article of silk not specified. 

Silk, curtains, belts, scarfs, em- 
broidered or plain, or any 
other similar article of silk 
not specified 

Silk, floss 

Silk goods, alpacas, buratos, 
chalTis, crdpe, damask, gros, 
faille, muslin, piqu^, tulle, 
satin, serge, satinette, taffeta, 
velvet, or any other pure or 
mixed silk material not speci- 
fied 

Silk, material of, for sieves or 
strainers 

Silk, ornaments, ribbons, laces, 
blondes, cords, plush, tassels, 
fringes, " sashes, passemente- 
ries, and any other silk orna- 
ment not specified 



ARTlCULO DE MERCANCtA. 



DoUar/t. 
.033 
.016 
.066 

.197 

.026 
1.64 

.328 
.131 
.003 

.328 
.226 

6.56 

.98 



.164 

.262 

.328 
.492 
.197 
.328 
.656 
.984 
.328 



.984 



1.64 
.82 



1.64 
.197 

1.97 i 



Derechoft 
porkilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Vidrieras 

Salsas de toda clase. (V^ase 
alimentos) 

Balanzas de bronce 6 cobre 

Romauas de plata-forma y ba- 
lanzas de hierro 

Bandas de seda, bordadas 6 lisas . 

Instrumentos cientfficos no de- 
uominados 

Tijeras de toda clase 

Semillas de toda clase no es^teci- 
ficadas 

Filaila. (V^ase lana) 

Pa!\olone8 

Chales de seda, lisos 6 bordados. 

Chales de lana. (Ydase lana) . . 

66nero para sdbanas. (Vease 
lino) 

Madera para embarcacioues, 
los 100 kilos. . 

Camisas de algod6n 

Camisas de algodon con pechera 
y punos de lino 

Camisas de lino 

Calzadores de asta 6 hueso 

Zapatos de caucho 

Zapatos de cuero 

Calzado de seda de toda clase . . 

Platillas. ( V^ase lino) 

Seda, corbatas, cinturones, li- 
gas, tirantes 6 cualquier 
otro artfculo de seda seme- 
jante, no denominado 

Seda, cortinas, fajas, bandas 
bordadas 6 lisas, 6 cualquier 
otro artfculo de seda por el 
estilo, no expresado 

Seda floja 

Seda gdneros, alpacas, burato, 
chaly, cresp6n, damasco, gr6, 
falla, muselina, pinu^, punto, 
raso, sarga, sarguilla, tafetlEu, 
terciopelo 6 cualquier g^nero 
deseda puro 6 mezclado no 
denominado 

Seda, enrejados de seda para 
cedazos 

Seda, adomos, cintas, encajes, 
blondas, cordones, felpas, 
flecos, franjas, listones, pasa- 
maneria, y cualquier adomo 
de seda, no denominado 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR 



31 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Duty per 
poiiiia ill 
tJ. 8. cur- 
rency. 



Silk, pure or mixed, ready-made 
cIotDing, wraps, scarfs, gowns, 
blouses, fichus, jackets, c^aks, 
vests, coat«, mantles, shawls, 
with or without embroidery ; 
dr<»ses, for men, women, or 
children, of any other class, 
with or without ornaments, 
and all kinds of ready-made 
clothing not specified 

Silk, shawls or rebozos, plain, 
worked, or embroidered, or 
material for them 

Silk, stockings, socks, drawers, 
nndershirts, and all other gar- 
ments of silk stockinet 



Silk, thread of all kinds, 

nls or cards 
wrist 

Silver jewelry 

Silver leaf for plating 



Silver table services 

Silver thread, or imitation 

Skins, rabbit or hare, and other 

skins for making hats 

Slates, and slate pencils 

Slates, for roofing, per 100 pounds . 



Slippers, Chinese straw 

Smalt, or enamel, in sheets 

Soap, in cakes, perfumed. (See 
perfumery) 

Soap, ordinary, not perfumed 

Soda or caustic potasli, for indus- 
trial purposes 

Soda water 

Spars for masts. (See wood) 

per 100 pounds.. 

Spectacles and eyeglasses, 
mounted in gold 

Spectacles and eyeglasses, 
mounted in silver, ivorj-, or tor- 
toise shell 

Spectacles and eyeglasses, 
mounted in any other material 
not specified 

Spermaceti, in mass 

Spennaceti, manufactured in any 
form 



DoUart. 



1.97 
6.56 
1.64 



.82 
.984 
.656 
.656 

.656 
.82 

.006 
.016 
.164 

.23 



.098 
.033 

.013 
.009 

.164 

3.28 

.656 



.197 
.066 



ARTfCrLO DE MERCANCf A. 



Seda pura 6 mezclada, en ropa 
hecha, abrigos, bufandas, ba- 
tas, blusas, fichiis, jaiques, 
capotes, chalecos, casacas, 
mantillas, paHolones borda- 
dos 6 sin bordar, tr^es para 
hombres, mujeres 6 nifios, de 
cualquiera clase. adomados 6 
sin adomos, y toda clase de 
ropa hecha no especificada. . . 

Seda, chales 6 rebozos, lisos, la- 
brados 6 bordados, 6 g^neros 
para ellos 

Seda, medias, calcetines (es- 
earpines), calzoncillos, cami- 
setas y todo objecto fabrica- 
do en tela de punto de seda. . . 

Seda, hilo de toda clase en ca- 
n-etas de palo 6 en cart6n 

Seda torcida 

Plata en joyas 

Plata maniifacturado en hojas 
para platear 

Plata manufactnrada en vajilla. 

Hilo de plata pura 6 falsa 

Pelo de conejo 6 liebre y otros 
pelos para hacer sombreros . . . 

Pizarras y pizarrines de piedra . 

Pizarras en Mminas para techos, 
los 100 kilos.. 

Chimelas chinas de paja 

Esmalte en hojas 

Jab6n, en panes, con perfume. 
( V^ase perfumerfa) 

Jabdn ordinario, sin perfume . . . 

Soda 6 potasa c^ustica para la 
iudtistria 

Agua de soda 

Palos para enarboladura. (V^ase 
madera) los 100 kilos. . 

Anteojos6 antiparras, montados 
en oro 

Auteojos, etc., montados en 
plata, marfil 6 carey 

Auteojos montados en cual- 
quierotra materia no denomi- 
nada 

Espemia de bayena en pasta . . . 

Esperma elaborada en cual- 
quier otra forma 



Derechos 
porkilo- 
liprainoeii 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Pesos. 



6.00 
20.00 

5.00 

2.50 
3.00 
2.00 

2.00 
2.00 
2.50 

.02 
.05 

.50 

.70 

1.00 

.30 
.10 

.04 
.03 

.50 

10.00 

2.00 



.60 
.20 



.30 



32 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Spirits, strong or sweet, as cog- 
nac, absintne, mm, gin, cor- 
dials, whisky, rosoli, and oth- 
ers not specified 

Sponges of all kinds 

Spoons, with ivory, tortoise shell, 

or silver handle 

Spoons, all other kinds 

Stationery articles not mentioned . 

Statnary, bronze or copper 

Statuary, iron 

Statuary, marble 

Statuary of material not specified 

Staves for barrels per 100 pounds . . 

Stearin, in mass 

Stearin, manufactured in can- 
dles or other forms 

Steel, in bars, sheets, or plates . . 

Steel, handsaws, files, rasps, 
measuring tapes, and other ar- 
tisans' tools 

Steel, large saws, for sawyers 

Steel wire of every thickness, 
4 millimeters and under 



Steel, woven-wire cloth 
springs for mattresses 



and 



Stones, flint 

Stones, whetstones and grind- 
stones, for sharpening razors, 
tools, etc 

Stockings and socks, cotton 



poaud in 
tr. S. cur- 
rency. 



Stockings and socks, silk 

Stockings and socks, woolen. 

(See wool) 

Stoves, cooking, and others 

Strings of all kinds for musical 

instruments 

Strops of all kinds 



Susar 

Sulphates of copper and zinc. 

(See medicines) 

Sulphates of magnesia, iron, 

soda. (See medicines) 



DoUart. 



.197 

1.64 

.656 
.098 
.197 

.197 
.026 
.007 
.197 

.164 
.026 

.059 
.033 



.115 
.033 

.098 

. 131 
.016 

.006 
.262 

1.64 

.656 
.026 

.197 
.197 

.066 

.033 

.013 



AKTfCULO DE MERCANCtA. 



Aguardientes fuertes 6 dulces, 
como cognac, ajenjo, rou, 
ginebra, mixtelas, cremas, 
wisky, rosoUs y otros no es- 
pecincados 

Esponjas de toda clase 

Cucharas con mangos de marfil, 
carey 6 plata 

Cucharas de cualquier otra clase- 

titiles de escritorio no araucela- 
dos 

Estatuas de bronce 6 cobre 

Estatuas de hierro 

Estatuas de mlirmol 

Estatuas dematerias no denomi- 
nadas 

Duelas para barriles, los 100 kilos. 

Estearina en bruto 

Estearina elaborada en velas y 
otrasformas 

Acero. en barras, i;(minas 6 
planchas 

Acero, en sierras 6 serruchos de 
mano, limas, escofinas, cintas 
para medir y demtfs herrami- 
entas para artesanos 

Acero manufacturado en sierras 
grandes para labradores 

Acero, en alambre de todo grue- 
so, desde cuatro milfmetros 
de di^metro, inclusive para 
abajo 

Acero manufacturado en tela 
para colchones y resortes para 
colchones , 

Piedras de chispa 

Piedras para afilar navajas 6 
mollejones para afilar herra- 
mientas 

M<^dias y escarpines de algo- 
d6n 

Madias y escarpines de seda — 

Madias y escarpines d e 1 a n a 
( V^ase lana) , 

Cocinas y anafes , 

Cuerdas de toda clase para in- 
strumentos de miisica 

Asentadores para navajae de 
todaclase 

Azncar 

I SulfatoB de cobre y zinc. (V^ase 
! medicinas) 

I I Sulfatos de magnesia, hierro y 

soda. ( Vdase medicinal) 



l>erechoB 
porkilo 
gnuno en 
moneda 
Salvado- 
re&a. 



Pesos. 



IMPORT DUTIES OP SALVADOR 



33 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Suspenders, silk 

SuspeiuleTs, wooleu 

Snspeusories, trusses, or other 
bandages. (See medicines) 

Swords or sabers of all kinds — 

Syringes of all classes 

Syrups of all kinds, without al- 
cohol 

Tablecloths, linen 

Tallow, candles 

Tallow, crude or fats 

Tallow, pressed or refined 

Tapioca 

Tar of all kinds 

Tea 

Terra cotta figures or toys 

Terra cotta in any other fonn . . . 

Thimbles, material not specified. 



Thread, cotton 

Thread, linen. (See fiax, etc)... 
Tin, bars or plates, pure or mixed. 



Duty per 
pound in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



.984 l! 
.656 'l 

l| 
.066 f 
.492 I 
.066 I 

.033 
.328 ' 
.033 , 
.009 
,023 ;i 
,033 
.013 
.098 ' 
.098 I 
.016 
.197 ' 

.262 
.066 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCtA. 



Derechos 
por kilo- 
gramoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



Tin foil, for wrappings 

Tin, manufactured in articles for 
domestic or other uses 



Tin plate, articles of, for domestic 
or other uses 



Tin plate, in sheets 

Tobacco, leaf 

Tobacco, manufactured in cigars. 

Tobacco, in any other form not 
snecified 

Toilet waters of every class con- 
taining alcohol-, as Florida, Co- 
logne, Divine, kananga, lav- 
ender, melissa, and others simi- 
lar 

Tools, agricultural, as mattocks, 
shovels, rakes, sickles, axes, 
plo-wpoints, pruning knives, 
and all others of tnis kind. 
(See iron) 



ToohsL fine, for carpenters and 
artisans. (See iron) 



Tools, stone-hammers, tools for 
blacksmiths, and others not 
specified. (See iron) 



Bull. 23 3 



Tirantes de seda 

Tirantes de lana 

Suspensories, braqueros 6 otros 

vendajes. ( Vdase medicinas) . 

Espadas 6 sables de toda clase. . 

Jeringas de toda clase 

Jarabes de toda clase sin alcohol . 



Manteles de lino 

Sebo elaborado en velas . . . 
Sebo en bruto 6 mantecas 
Sebo preusado 6 refinado. 

Tapioca 

Alqiiitr^n de toda clase . . . 
T^ 



.098 



.098 



.026 : 

.164 
.656 I 

.328 



.098 

.033 
.115 

.033 



Barro en figuras 6 juguetes 

Barro en cnalquier otra forma. 

Dedales de materias no denomi- 
nadas 

Hilo de algoddn 

Hilo de lino. ( V^ase lino) 

Estafio en barras o planchas, 
pure o mezclado 

EstaAo en panel para envolver. . 

Estaflomanufacturado enpiezas 
para uso dom6stico ti otros 
uses 

Hoja de lata manufacturada en 
piezas para uso dom^stico \\ 
otros usos 

Hoja de lata en hojas 6 pliegos . 

Tabaco en rama 

Tabaco elaborado en puros 

Tabaco en cualquier otra forma 
no expresada 

Aguas do olor de cualquiera 
clase con alcohol, como de 
florida, de colonia, divina, 
kananga, de labanda, melisa 
y otras semejantes 

Herramientas para agricultura, 
como azadones, palas, rastri- 
Uos, hoces,hachas,puntaspara 
arador, podadoras y demfo 
herramientas ordinarias, por 
el estilo. ( V €ase hierro) 

Herramientas tinas para car- 
pinteros y artesanos. (V^ase 
hierro) 

Herramientas, martiUos, para 
romper piedras, herramientas 
para herrcros y otros por el 
estilo no denominados. ( vease 
hierro) . . . ; 



PMOt. 

3.00 
2.00 

.20 

1.50 

.20 

.10 

1.00 
.10 
.03 
.07 
.10 
.04 
.30 
.30 
.06 

.60 
.50 
.80, 

.20 
.30 



.30 



.30 

.08 

.50 

2.00 

1.00 



.30 

.10 
.35 

.10 



34 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



ABTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Toothpicks, tortoise shell, ivory, 

. or mother-of-pearl 

Toothpicks, any other kind not 
specified 

Tortoise shell in sheets or unman- 
ufactured 

Tortoise shell, manufactured in 
any form not specified 

Towels, cotton 

Towels^ linen 

Toys 01 all classes not specified . . 

Traps for moles and rats 

Trusses 

Umbrellas, sunshades, and para- 
sols, of cotton, of all kinds 

Umbrellas, etc., silk, pure or 
mixed 

Umbrellas, etc,, wool, pure or 

mixed 

. Varnishes of all kinds 

Vegetables in their natural state. 

Vegetables, prepared in vessels 
of tin, glass, or earthen ware.. 

Velocipedes of all classes 

Vermicelli 

Violins, small, mouth harmonicas, 
dulcimers, and other similar 
articles 

Vinegar 

Wafers 

Watches, gold 

Watches, silver 

Watches of any other metal 

Waters, sparkling, artificial, 
without alcohol, as ginger ale, 
lemonade, soda, and others 

similar 

• Wax candles 

Wax, flowers, firuits, or in other 
forms 

Wax, sealing, for letters 

Wax, sealing, ordinary, for bot- 
tles 

Wax, vegetable 

Wax, winte or yellow 

Weights, bronze or copper 

Weights, iron 

Whalebone, manufactured or not. 



Wheat 

Wheels for wagous, etc 

Wheelbarrows, iron or wooden, 
per 100 pounds. 



Duty per 
ponnff in 
tr. S. cur- 
rency. 



DoUarg. 

.&56 

.197 

.328 

.656 
.164 
.328 
.098 

.033 
.066 

.098 

.656 

.262 
.066 
.006 

.066 
.164 
.013 



.098 
.013 
.197 
3.28 
1.64 
.656 



.009 
.328 

.492 
.197 

.066 
.197 
.197 
.197 
.016 



.007 
.164 

.164 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Limpia-dientes de carey,marfil 
6 coucha-udcar '. 

Limpia-dientes de cualquier 
otra clase no denominada 

Carey en hoja 6 en concha 



Derechos 
por kilo- 

gramo en 

nioiieda 

Salvado- 

refia. 



Carey manu&oturado en cual- 

ouiera forma no denominado . . 

Toiiallas de algoddn 

Tohallas de lino 

Juguetes de cualquiera clase uo 

denominada 

Trampas para topos y ratas 

Bragueros 

Paraguas, paraguitas y sombri- 

llas de algod6n de toda clase. . 
Paraguas, los mismos, de seda 

pura 6 mezclada 

Paraguas, los mismos, de lana 

pura 6 mezclada 

Bamices de toda clase 

Legumbres, en estado natural . . . 
LegumbreSr preparados en botes 

de lata, vidrio 6 barro 

Velocipedos de toda clase 

Fideos 

Violinetas, arm6nicas de boca, 

dulzainas y otras semejantes. . 

Vinagre 

Obleas '. 

Relojes de bolsillo, de oro 

Relojes de bolsillo, de plata 

Relojes de cualquier otro metal . . 

Aguas artificiales espumosas sin 
alcohol, como cerveza de jen- 
gibre, limonada, soda y otras 
semejantes 

Cera labrada en velas 

Cera en flores, frutas 6 en otras 
formas 

Lacre para cartas 

Lacre ordinario para botellas. . . 



Cera, vegetal 

Cera blanca 6 amarilla 

Pesas, de bronce 6 cobre 

Pesas, de hierro 

Barbas de ballena, labradas y 

sin labrar 

Trigo 

Ruedas para carretas, etc 

Carretillas de mano, de hierro 

6 de madera . ..los 100 kilos.. 



Pesou. 

2.00 

.60 
1.00 

2.00 

..50 

1.00 

.30 
.10 
.20 

.30 

2.00 

.80 
.20 
.02 

.20 
.50 

.04 

.30 

.04 

.60 

10.00 

5.00 

3.00 



.03 
1.00 

1.50 
.60 
.20 

.60 
.60 
.60 
.05 

1.00 
.02 
.50 

.50 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



35 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Whisky 

Wines of all classes, such as 
Mnscatel, Pajarete, Sherry, 
Malaga, Port, Vermouth. jSan 
Raphael, Saint Miguel, Cnam- 
pagne, and all others not spec- 
ified 

Wines, red, table 

Wood, doors, windows, lattices, 
sashes, moldings not vajrnish- 
ed or gilded 

Wood, embroidery frames, lasts 
for shoemakers, blocks for hat- 
ters and wig-makers 

Wood, fnmiture of all kinds, 
with or without marble, mat- 
tresses, veneers for fdrniture, 
rollers or casters, trunks, 
traps, billiard tables without 
accessories, spigots for bar- 
rels, blinds, hat racks, book 
shelveB, hand bottling ma- 
chines, and every other ob- 
ject of this kind not specified. 

Wood, moldings, gilded, painted, 
or varnish^, boxes of all 
shapes, varnished or lacquered, 
ornaments of wood composi- 
tion, card cases, inkstands, 
vases, trays, dishes, and any 
other forms not specified 

Wood, planed and tongued and 
grooved 

Wood, staves, hoops and hoop 
polee for barrels, pumps, carts, 
wheelbarrows, pipes, bee- 
hives, wood for matches, ships 
or ship timber, spars for masts, 
oars K)r boats, wneels for wag- 
ons or wheelbarrows, 
,.. .per 100 pounds. . 

Wool, bands, straps, belts, sns- 
penders; garters, cravats, 
gloven, or any other similar 
article not specifie<l 

Wool, pure or mixed, blankets, 
coanterpanes, carpets, mats, or 

TOgS 




.033 
.016 



.016 
.007 



.066 



.082 
.007 



.164 

.656 
.164 



Wiskey 

Vinos, generosos, de toda clase, 
como Moscatel, P%j arete, Je- 
rez, MlQaga, Oporto, Ver- 
mouth, San Rafael, San Mi- 
guel, Champagne y cualqui- 
er otro no denominado 

Vinos, tinto de mesa 

Madera en pnertas, ventanas, 
celosfas, vidrieras, molduras 
sin bamizar ni dorar 

Madera, bastidoresparabordar, 
estacas para calzado, para 
sombreros y para pelncns 

Madera en muebles de toda 
clase, con 6 sin ml[rmol, col- 
chones, chapas de madera 
para muebles, arganillas 6 
scan talleres de mesa, batiles, 
trampaSf billares sin iitiles. 
Haves para barril, persianas, 
capoteras, estantes, m^Ujui- 
nas de mano para tapar bo- 
tellas y todo otro objeto por 
el estilo, no especificado 

Madera en molduras doradas, 

Sintadas, 6 bamizadas, c^jas 
e madera de toda forma, con 
bamiz 6 gomalaca, adomos de 
pasta de madera, tarjeteros, 
tinteros, vasos, azafates, fuen- 
tes y en cualquier otra forma 
no denomiuada 

Madera, acepillada y machi- 
hembrada 

Madera en duelas, arcos y flejes 
para barriles, bombas, carros, 
carretillas, cafios, casas para 
colmeua, madera para f6Hfo- 
ro8,en embarcaciones 6 madera 
para ^stas, en palos para enar- 
Doladura, remos para embar- 
caciones y ruedas para carre- 
tas 6 carretillas . . los 100 kilos . . 

Lana en fiEgas 6 bandas, cintu- 
rones, tirantes, ligas, corbatas, 
gnantes 6 cualquier otro ob- 
^ta semej ante no denominado . 

Lana pura 6 mezclada en fraza- 
das 6 colchas, alfombras, tripe 
6mautillones 



Derechos 
por kilo- 
jEramo en 
inoneda 
Salvado* 
refia. 



Pesot. 



.60 



.10 
.05 



.05 
.02 



.20 



.25 
.02 



.50 

2.00 
.50 



36 



IMPORT DUTIES OP SALVADOR. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Wool, pure or mixed, cloth, such 
as cassimeres, broadcloth, al- 
paca, challis, curtains, damask, 
serge, flanuel, ''grano deoro,'' 
muslin delaine, merino, and 
other similar woolen cloth, not 
specified 



Wool, pure or mixed, such as cas- 
simeres, cloths, or other similar 
goods, with warp of linen or 
cotton 

Wool, pure or mixed, ornaments 
of, such as tapes, laces, blondes, 
braids, cords, plush, tassels, 
borders, firing:es, listing, ana 
any other similar articles not 
specified 

Wool, pure or mixed, ready-made 
clothinff, wraps, mantillas, 
capes, hchus, dressing ffowns, 
jackets, blouses,cloaks,shawls, 
coats, vests, headdresses, 
shirts, curtains, petticoats, 
overcoats, dresses for men, 
women, and children, with or 
without ornaments, shawls, 
plain or with silk fringe, em- 
broidered or not, and all other 
pieces of clothing not specified . . 



Wool, pure or mixed, stockings, 
socks, undershirts, drawers, 
and all other articles or objects 
of stockinet 

Wool, thread, for sewing or em- 
broidering , 

Wool, pure or mixed, goods not 
specified , 

Wool, lamb's wool , 

Work boxes, small, with or with- 
out accessories 

Zinc, alphabets or numbers for 
marking , 

Zinc articles for domestic and 
other uses 

Zinc bars, sheets, or plates 

Zinc ornaments, statues, or 
bronzed figures 



Duty per 
pound in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



DoOars. 



.328 



.328 



ARTlCULO DE MERCANCf A. 



.983 



.656 

.328 

.328 
.049 

.492 

.098 

.098 
.019 

.115 



Derechoe 
porkilo- 
gnimoen 
moneda 
Salvado- 
refia. 



I 



Lana pnra 6 mezclada en g^nero, 
com<r casimires 6 pafkos, al- 

I»acas, balsarinas, balleta, ba- 
let6n, chaoly, cortinas, da- 
masco, filaila, franela, granode 
oro, lanillas 6 muselina, meri- 
no y otras telas de lana seme- 
jante no denominadas 

Lana pura 6 mezclada en casi- 
mires, casinetes, pafias y otros 
g^neros semejantes, con cade- 
na de lino 6 aigoddn 

Lana pura 6 mezclada en ador- 
nos, como cintas, encajes, 
blondas. trencillas, cordones, 
felpas, flecos, frai^jas, listones 
6 cualquier otro semejante no 
denominda 

Lana pura 6 mezclada, en ropa 
hecha, abrigos, mantillas, bu- 
fandas, fichiis, batas, chaque- 
tas, blusas, jaiques, capas, 
capotes, casaca«, chalecos, 
chaies, cofias, camisas, cor- 
tinas, fustanes, enaguas. le- 
vitas, vestidoe para hoinbres, 
mu^jeres 6 ninos, decualquiera 
clase, adornados 6 sin adomos, 
panolones, lisos 6 con fleco de 
seda, bordados y sin bordar, 
y dem^ piezas de ropa de 
toda clase no denominada 

Lana pura 6 mezclada en medias, 
calcetines (escarpines), cami- 
setas, calzoncillos y todo ob- 
jeto en tela de pun to de 
media 

Lana en hilo para coser 6 bordar. 

Lana, pura 6 mezclada, en g^- 

nero no denominados 

Lana, en vell6n 

Costureros pequeRos, con 6 sin 

utiles 

Zinc en abecedarios 6 numera- 

ciones para marcar 

Zinc manufacturado en piezas, 

para uso dom^stico y otros usos . 
Zinc en barras, Itoinas, 6 plan- 

chas 

Zinc en adomos, estatuas 6 

figuras bronceadiis 



Pesos. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



37 



FREE LIST. 

Anchons and f^rt linen. 
AuimalSy dissected. 
Animals, living, for breeding. 
Apparatus for producing electric light or 
gas. 

Sftggage, passengers' : by this is under- 
Btooa objects for tneir individual use 
and the indispensable instruments of 
their art or profession, in quantities 
proportionate to the class and circum- 
stances of the owner. 

Beans. 

Boats, launches, rigging, sails, chains, 
and other articles for vessels for use in 
the harbors, lakes, and rivers of the 
republic. 

Books and pamphlets, printed. 

Cement, roman, and hydraulic lime. 

Coal. 

Com, Indian. 

Crucibles, for foundries and fire bricks. 

Diamonds and other precious stones not 
mounted. 

Effects brought by diplomatic officers 
residing in the country for their own 
use when similar privileges are granted 
in tfle foreign countries, when the legal 
requisites are complied with. 

Fnmaces and other instruments for as- 
saying. 

Fuse for mining. 

Gold and silver, in bars, dust, or coin. 

Guano and other fertilizers. 

Hay and other fodder not specified. 

Hops. 

Houses, wooden or iron. 

Kettles, iron, and molds for sugar-manu- 
facture. 

Magnets. 

Models of machines and buildings. 

Molds for making flowers. 

Music paper and pieces of music. 

Paper, printing, for periodicals. 

Periodicals, loose or bound. 

Photographs. 

Pier mat-erials and accessories. 

Plants, exotic. 

Plows. 

Printing presses and their appurtenances. 

Portraits belonging to families residing 
in the country. 

Quicksilver. 

Quinine (sulphate of). 

Railway supplies. 

Rice. 

Rye. 



ARTICULOS LIBRES. 

Anclas y andaribeles. 

Animales disecados. 

Animales vivos para raza. 

Aparatos para producir el alumbrado 
electrico 6 ^1 de gas hidrdgeno carbo- 
nado. 

Equipi^e de pasajeros; entendi^ndose 
por tal los objetos de su nso individu- 
al y los instrumentos indispensables 
de su arte ti oficio, todo en cantidad 
proporcionada ^ la clase y circunstau- 
cias de su dueQo. 

Fryoles. 

Botes, lauchas, Jarcia, velamen, cadenas 
V demlte iltiles de buques para uso de 
los puertos, lagos y rios de la Repdb- 
lica. 

Libros y foUetos impresos. 

Cimento romana, cai hidrtfulica. 

Carb<Sn de piedra. 

Mafz. 

Ladrillos refractarios y crisoles para fun- 
dici6n. 

Diamantes y dem^ piedras preciosas sin 
montur. 

Efectos que para su uso introduzcan por 
su cuenta los ministros diplomaticos, 
residentes en la Repdblica, siempre 
que haya rociprocidad v se cumpla con 
los requisitos establecidos por la ley. 

Hornillos y dem^ instrumentos para 
eusayos de metales. 

Gufas para minas. 

Oro y plata en barras, on polvo 6 acu- 
fiado. 

Guano y demlKs abonos. 

Heno y dem^ forriges no denominados. 

Ltipulo. 

Edificios de madera 6 de hierro. 

Peroles de hierro y moldes para fabricar 
azticar. 

Imlbi. 

Modelos de m^uinasy edificios. 

Moldes para fabricar nores. 

Papel de solfa y piezas de miisica. 

Papel de imprenta para peri6dicos. 

Peri6dicos sueltos y emp'astados. 

Fotograffas. 

tltiles para muelles. 

Plantas ex6tica8. 

Arados. 

Impreutas y sus titlles. 

Retratos pertenecientes ^ familias resi- 
dentes en el pais. 

Azogue. 

Sulmto de quinina. 

Utiles para ferro-carriles. 

Arroz. 

Ceuteno. 



38 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



FREE LIST— Continued. 

Samples of merchandise the duty on 
which does not exceed 72 cents. 

Seeds of plants not cultivated in the re- 
public. 

Sla^, mineral. 

Stills for spirits and their appurtenances. 

Telegraph and telephone articles. 

Timber, unmanufactured. 

Wire, barbed, and hooks for fencing. 

Wreckage. 

PROHIBITED ARTICLES. 

Ai( gnns. 

Apparatus for making coins. 

Arms and other munitions of war. In- 
cluded in this prohibition are rifles of 
all classes and revolvers of caliber .44 
and cartridges for the same. 

Counterfeit money. 

Gunpowder of all kinds. 

Nitrate of potassia or saltpeter. 

Nitroglycerine and dynamite, except 
upon special concessions of the Gov- 
ernment. 

Obscene prints and figures. 

NOTES. 

1. All articles not mentioned in the 
present tariff shall pay the same as the 
most similar articles according to their 
material and form. 

2. In every package which contains 
several articles having different assess- 
ments, the tare shall be calculated in 
relation to the total of the charges on the 
contents; this proportion will be ob- 
tained by multiplying the total charges 
on the articles weighed with their respec- 
tive coverings by the weight of the tare 
and the product divided by the total of 
the net weight, and the quotient will be 
the appraisement of the tare. 

3. When an appraised article contains 
others it shall pay according to the tare 
of the latter, in addition to that which 
corresponds to it in the tariff. 



ARTfCULOS LIBRES— Contintia. 

Muestras de mercaderias, cuyos derechos 

no excedan un peso. 
Seraillas de plantas no cnltivadas en la 

Repdblica. 
Brozas miuerales. 
Aparatos de destilaci6n de aguardiente 

y sus accesorios. 
Ctiles de tel^grafos y teMfonos. 
Madera sin lahrar. 
Alambre espigado y sus ganchos para 

cercas. 
Fragmentos de bnques nl^ufragos. 

ARTfCULOS PROHIBIDOS. 

Escopetas de viento. 

Aparatos para fabricar moneda. 

Armas y dem^ elementos de guerra, ^ue- 
dando compreudidos en esta prohibi- 
ci6n, los rifles de toda clase y loe re- 
v61vere8 calibre .44 y sus correspondi- 
entes cartuchos. 

Moneda falsa. 

P^dvora suelta de toda clase. 

Nitrsto de potasa 6 sal de nitro (salitre). 

Nitro-gliserina y dinamita, salvo las con- 
cesiones esx)eciales del Gobiemo. 

Estampas y figuras obcenas. 
NOTAS. 

l.<* Todos los art>lculos no mencionados 
en la presente tarifa pagar&n como los 
m& semej antes por su materia y forma. 

2.^* En todo hulto que contenga varies 
artfcnlos de diferentes aforos, la tarasertf 
valorada en relacidn del total de aforos 
del cout-enido; esa proporcidn se tomar^ 
multiplicando el aforo total de los artica- 
los, pesados con su respectivo en vase, por 
el peso de la tara, y el producto se divi- 
dir^ por el total del peso neto aforado, y 
el cuociente ser^ el aforo de la tara. 



3.* Cuando nn articulo aforado venca 
conteniendo otros, pacar^ como tara de 
^■stos, con m^s lo que le corresponda por 
la tarifa. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF SALVADOR. 



39 



EXPORT DUTIES. 



(Taken from Tarffa de Aforos 6 Impuestos, by Francisco Boquin, Sonsouate, 1889.) 
[The export daty of 2 per cent is charged on the following ralaatioua of the articles named.] 



ARTICLES. 



Official 
valua- 
tion. 



Starch per pound. . 

Bice do 

Black balsam do 

Coffee per 100 pounds. . 

Cocoa do 

India rubber do 

Hides, of cattle each.. 

Hides, deer, goat, or sheep, 

per pound . . 

Honey do 

Molasses for making spirits, 

perpound.. 

Gold 

Silver 

Melon seeds per pound. . 

Cinchona and c o p a i o b 1 , 

perpound.. 

Tobacco, smoking de 

Sarsaparilla do 

Mineral slag 

Indigo per 150 pounds. . 



DoUara. 
.029 
.022 
.723 
.090 
.146 
.217 
1.446 
.217 

.072 

.014 
Ad val. 
Ad val. 

.072 

.181 

.108 

.181 

Ad val. 

2.434 



ARTfCULOS. 



Almiddn libra. . 

Arr6z Ubra. . 

B^samo negro libra . . 

Caf(6 quintal.. 

Cacao de pais quintal . . 

Caucho 6 hule quintal . . 

Cnero de res cada uno. . 

Cuero de venado, cabro 6 car- 
nero libra. . 

Mieldeabeja libra.. 

Melaza para fubricar aguardi- 
ente libra. , 

Oro sobre sn valor integro 

Plata sobre su valor integro — 

Pepitas de mel6n libra. , 

Quina y copalchl libra . . 

Tabaco picado libra. . 

ZarzaparrUla libra. . 

Brozas minerales - 

Aflil zurron de 150 libras . 



Aforo. 



Pesos. 

.04 

.03 

. 1.00 

•m 

.20 

.30 

2.00 

.30 
.10 

.02 

Ad val. 

Ad val. 

.10 

.5:5 

.15 

.25 

Ad val. 

3.37i 



Import Duties 

of Honduras. 



Derechos de Importacion 

en Honduras. 



BaRBAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington^ U. S. A. 



Bulletin No. 24. November, 1891. 



Import Duties 

of Honduras. 



Derechos de Importacion 

en Honduras. 



i ° 



Bu reat; op the American Republics, 

Washinglotiy U. S. A. 



Bulletin No 24. November, i8gi. 



1 r'AR ' ] ^^ 
\ ■ ■ ■ 



\ 



BUREAU OF THE AMEWCAN REPUBLICS, 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINGTON, D. C, U. 8. A. 



Director. — William E. Curtis. 

Secretary. — Henry L. Bryan. 

Statistician. — Carlos Federico Adams-Michelena. 

Portuguese Translator. — John C. Redman. 

S/>anish Translators. — Josi Ignacio Rodriguez. 

Mary F. Foster. 
Clerks. — John T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer. — Imogen A. Hanxa. 



LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLLTINS. 

1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. i. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-Mark Laws of Americ:i. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 

9. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 



While the greatest possible care is taken to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary respjii ibiliiy on account of inaccuracies that may 
occur therein. 

CO 



Import Duties of Honduras. 



DERECHOS DE IMPORTACldN EN HONDURAS. 



The official tariff of Honduras is arbitrarily divided into eleven- classes, according to 
the rate of duty charged per pound, which is assessed on the gross weight of the mer- 
chandise. The following schedules have been arranged alphabetically and include all 
the articles expressed in the tariff. 

The valuations expressed in English are calculated on the basis of the official valua- 
tion of foreign coins issued by the Director of the Mint of the United States, October 
I, 1891, in which the peso is valued at 72.3 cents, United States currency. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Acetic acid 

Acid, sulphuric 

Adzes. (See instruments or tools.) 

Aerated water 

Albums. (See portfolios, cigar- 
cases, etc.) 

Almond oil 

Almonds, unshelled or shelled.. 

Alpaca. (See cloth, pafiete, etc.) 

Altar-cloths. (See chasubles, etc.) 
Altar linen. (See chasubles, etc.) 

Alum, crude 

Ammunition, small shot, and bul- 
lets 

Anatomical instruments. (See in- 
struments of surgery, etc.) 

Anchors. (See iron, manufactured, 

etc.) 

Animals, dissected 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Doilars. 
.058 
.0145 
.0145 

.0145 

.2175 
.0145 
.029 

.3625 

.58 
.58 

.058 

.029 

.087 



.0145 
.058 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



I Derechos 
j por libra 
I en raone- 
,da hondu- 
refta. 



I 



Acido ac6tico 

Acido sulffirico 

Azuelas. (V6ase herramientas 6 

instrumentos, etc.) 

Aguas gaseosas 

Albums. (V6ase carteras, taba- 

queras, etc.) 

Aceite de almendras 

Almendras, con ciscaras 6 mon- 

dadas 

Alpaca. (V6ase paRo, paftete, 

etc.) 

Manteles. (V6ase casullas, etc.) 
Pafiosparacubrircdlices. (V6ase I 

casullas, etc.) , 

Alumbre crudo 

Municiones, perdigones y balas. 

Instrumentos de anatomia. 
(V6ase instrumentos de ciru- 
gla, etc.) .• 

Anclas. (V6ase hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) , 

Animales disecados , 



Pesos. 

.oS 



.02 
.02 

.30 
.02 

.04 

.50 

.80 

.80 
. oS 
.04 



.02 
.oS 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Aniseed, caraway seed, cinna- 
mon, cumin, cubebs, cloves, 
marjoram, pepper, and other 
spices used for seasoning food . 



Anodynes 

Anvils. (Seeinstrumentsortools, 

etc.) 

Appliqu^ work. (See laces, 

stripes, etc.) 

Areometers of all sorts 

Articles not specified 



Articles of German silver or its 
imitations, such as waiters, 
trays, bits, muzzles, spurs, stir- 
rups, hinges, buckles, chande- 
liers, lamps, candlesticks, and 
others 

Articles of iron or other metals, 
gilt or silver-plated 

Articles wholly or in part of gold 
or silver ^ 

Augers. (See tools for arts, etc.) 

Augers and borers for perforat- 
ing stones and logs 

Awls. (See tools for arts, etc.) . 

Axes. (Seeinstrumentsortools, 
etc.) 

Baby carriages. (See baskets, 
etc.) 

Bacon, when not canned 

Bags or pouches for hunters 

Bags, traveling, of all sorts 

Baize and ratteen in blankets or 
by the piece 

Balances of copper, or of which 
copper is the chief material. . . , 

Balances,steelyards,and weights, 
excepting those made of copper 
or of which copper forms the 
chief material 

Balconies, iron. (See iron, 
manufactured, etc.) , 

Balusters. (See iron, munufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Barley, hulled or ground 



Duty per 

pound 

In U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.058 

.1305 

.0145 

.58 
.1305 
1.088 



.3625 
.174 
1.088 
.029 



.0145 
.029 



.0145 

.058 
.0145 
.1305 
.029 

.2175 

.029 



.0145 
.0145 

.0145 
.0145 





Derechos 


ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 


por librft 

en mone- 

da hondu 

rcfta. 


Anis en grano, alcaravea, canela, 
canel6n, comino, cubeba, 
clavos, or6gano, pimienta y 
demas especias que sirven 
para sazonar 6 condimentar 
los alimentos 


Pews, 

.08 


Anodinos 


18 


Bigornias. (V6ase herramientas 
6 instrumentos etc.) 


02 


Embutidos. (V6ase encajes, 
tiras, etc.) 


.80 


Are6metros de todas clases 

Alguno 6algunosotros articulos 
que no esten comprendidos en 
las clases anteriores 


.18 
1.50 

.50 
.24 

1.50 
.04 
. 02 


Efectos de plata alemana 6 metal 
bianco y sus imitaciones, como 
bande jas, azafates, f r e n s, 
bozales, espuelas, estribos, 
charnelas, hebillas, araflas, 
Umparas, candeleros fi otros. . 

Efectos de hierro d otro metal, 
dorados 6 plateados 

Los articulos de oro 6 plata, 6 
los que tengan algo de alguno 
de estos metales 


Barrenos, (V6ase instrumentos 
Dara artes etc.V 


Barrenosy taladros para perforar 
piedras 6 troncos 


Leznas. (V6ase instrumentos 
para artes, etc.) 

Hachas. (V6ase herramientas 
6 instrumentos, etc.) 


.04 

« 02 


Cochecitos para niflos. (V6ase 
canastos, etc.) 


.C8 


Tocino, cuando no viene en latas. 
Bolsas 6 sacos para cazadores . . 
Sacos de viaje, de todas clases. . 
Bayeta, bayetilla y ratina en 
Diezas 6 frazadas 


.02 
.18 
.04 

.30 

.04 

. 02 


Balanzas de cobre 6 que tengan 
la mayor parte de este metal . . 

Balanzas, roipanas y pesos, ex- 
cepto los de cobre 6 que ten- 
gan la mayor parte de este 
nietal : 


Bal cones de hierro. (V6ase hi- 
erro manufacturado, etc.) 

Balaustres. (V6ase hierro ma- 
nufacturado, etc.) 


.02 

• 02 


Cebada mondada 6 molida 


.02 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Barometers 

Baskets, baby carriages, and 
other articles of osieror rushes, 
there being included in this 
classification all baby carriages 
of whatever material 



Batiste. (See muslin, batiste, 
etc.) 

Batiste or cambric, of linen or of 
linen mixed with cotton, or any 
other fine fabric of linen or linen 
mixed with cotton, not included 
in other classes 



Battens, picture frames, or mold- 
ings of wood, painted, var- 
nished, gilded, or silver plated. 

Beads and bugles of glass, porce- 
lain, steel, wood, or any other 
material, excepting gold and 
silver 

Bedspreads. (See huckaback 

etc.) 

Beer of all sorts, however put up, 

Bell metal. (See steel, copper, 
etc.) - 

Bellows of all sorts. (See instru- 
ments .or tools, etc.) 

Belts, cotton. (See ribbons 

braids, etc.) 

Belts, linen, etc. (See laces 

stripes, etc.) 

Belts, woolen, etc. (See under- 

stockings, stockings, etc.) 

Bench-screws. (See tools for 

arts, etc.) 

Bene seed 

Billiard balls of ivory, when im- 
ported without the table 

Billiard-cue tips 

Billiard cushions 

Billiard tables, with all their ap- 
purtenances, including the balls 
and the cloth for each billiard- 
table, when imported with the 
cable 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars, 
.174 



.058 

.58 

1.088 
.029 

•1305 

.087 
.0145 

.029 
.0145 

.174 

.58 

•2175 

.029 

.0145 

1.088 
.058 

.058 
.058 . 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
por libra 
en raone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Bar6metros 

Canastos, canastillos, cochecitos 
para nifios y otras piezas de 
mimbre 6 junco; quedando 
inclusos en este clasificaci6n 
los cochecitos para ninos, de 
cualquier materia que sean . . . 

Batista. (V6ase muselina, ba- 
tista, etc.) 

Holdn batista 6 claron de lino 6 
mezclado con algodon, 6 cu- 
alquiera otra tela fina de lino 
6 mezclada con algodon, no 
incluida en las clases anteri- 
ores 

Listones, cafluelas, cenefas 6 
molduras de madera,pintadas, 
barnizadas, doradas 6 platea- 
das 

Abalorios, cafiutillos y cuentas 
de vidrio, porcelana, acero, 
madera y cualquiera otra ma- 
teria, excepto las de oro y 
plata • 

Colchas. (V6ase alemanisco, 
etc.) 

Cerveza de todas clases y en 
cualquier envase 

Metal cam panil. (V^ase acero, 
cobre, hierro, etc.) 

Fuelles de todas clases. (V6asc 
herramientas 6 instrumenios, 
etc.) 

Fajas de algodon. (V6ase hela- 
dillas 6 cintas, etc.) 

Fajas de lino. (V6ase encajes, 
tiras, etc.) 

Fajas de lana. (Vfease calcetas, 
medias, etc.) 

Tornos y tornillos de banco. 
(V6ase instrumentos para 
anes, etc.) 

Ajonjoli 

Bolas de marfil para bil lares, 
cuando vengan sin estos 

Puntas de suela para los tacos 
de billar 

Bandas de billar 

Billares con todos sus enseres, 
inclusas las bolas y el pafio 
correspondientes k cada mesa 
de billar cuando vengan junta- 
mente con los billares 



Pesos. 



.24 



.08 
.80 



1.50 
.04 

.iS 
. 12 
.02 
.04 

.02 
.24 
.So 
•30 



.04 
.02 

1.50 

.08 
.o3 



.08 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Bi nodes. (See eyeglasses, etc.). • 

Bits. (See articles of German 
silver, etc.) 

Bits. (Sjee iron, manufactured, 
etc.) 

Bituminous applications of all 
sorts 

Blank books 

Blankets, cotton. (See hucka- 
back, etc.) 

Blankets or ccJverlets of wool or 
mixed with cotton, white or 
colored 

Blondes. (See laces, stripes, blon- 
des, etc.) 

Blunderbusses. (See swords, 
sabres, etc.) 

Boar's bristles, for shoemakers. . . 

Bombazine. (See cloth, pafiete, 
etc.) 

Boneblack 

Bone, ivory, mother-of-pearl, jet 
and its imitations, tortoise shell 
and its imitations, rubber, gum 
elastic, horn, and talc, manu- 
factured into articles not in- 
cluded in other classes 

Bonnets. (See jerkins or doub- 
lets, etc.) 

Books. (See blank books.) 

Boot hooks 

Bosoms, paper. (See paper lan- 
terns, etc.) 

Bottle-stands 

Bougies 

Bows. (See understockings, 
stockings, etc.) 

Boxes, candy. (See figures, orna- 
ments, etc.) 

Boxes for watches or jewelry, 
even when empty and sepa- 
rately imported 

Boxes, money. (See iron, in 
wire, etc.) 

Brabant. (See canvas, brabant, 

etc.) 

Braids. (See laces, stripes, etc.). . 



Duty pel 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency . 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Dollars. 
.3625 



.3625 

.0145 

.0145 
.0145 

.087 

.174 

.58 

.3625 
.058 

.3625 
.0145 



.174 

.1305 
.0145 

.058 

.058 
.087 
.1305 

.2175 

.058 

1.085 
.0145 



.058 
.58 



Dere hos 
por libra 
en mune- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Gemelos 6 bin6culos. (V6ase 
anieojos. etc.) • 

Frenos. (Vfease efectos de plata 
alemana, etc.) 

Brocas. (V^ase hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) 

Betunes de todas clases, excepto 
61 de calzado 

Libros y libretines en bianco 

Frazadas de algodon. (V6ase 
alemanisco, damasco, etc.) 

Frazadas, mantas 6 cobertores 
de lana 6 mezclada con algo- 
don, blancas 6 de color 

Blondas. • (V6ase encajes, tiras, 
etc.) 

Trabucos. (V6ase espadas, sa- 
bles, etc.) 

Cerda de jabali para zapateros. . 

A16pin. (V6ase paflo, paflete, 
etc.) 

Carbon animal 

Hueso, marfil, ndcar, azabache 
y sus imitaciones, carey y sus 
imitaciones, caucho, go ma 
elastica, asta 6 cuerno, y talco 
manufacturado en cualqui^r 
forma, no comprendidos en 
otras clases 

Gorras. (V6ase almillas, etc.). . 

Libros y libretines. (V6ase li- 
bros y libretines en bianco.). . 

Tirabotas 

Pecheras de papel. (V6ase 
farolillos de papel, etc.) 

Porta-botellas 

Candelillas 6 sondas 

Lazos. (Vfease calcetas. me- 
dias, etc.) 

Envases para dulces. (V6ase 
figuros, adornos, etc.) 

Las cajitas vacias preparadas 
para relojes y prendas finas, 
aunque venganpor separado. . 

Cajas para guardar dinero. 
(V^ase hierro manufacturado, 
etc.) 

Bramante. (V6ase caflamazo 
crudo, etc.) 

Trenzas. (V6ase encajes, tiras, 
etc.) , 



Pesos. 

.50 

.50 

.02 

.02 
.02 



.24 
.80 
.50 

.oS 

.50 
.02 



.24 

.iS 



.02 

.08 

.OS 
. 12 
.iS 

•30 
.08 

I. K> 

.02 
.08 
.80 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Braids, cotton 

braid, etc.)* • 
Brass, manufactured 

copper, etc.), 

Brass, un wrought. (See 

bronze, etc.) 

Breast-pumps 

Bricks, bristol or scouring 

Bristles. (See boar's bristles.) 



(See ribbons, 

(See steel, 

steel. 



(See 



Bristol brick 

Bronze in powder and in little 

books, for bronzing 

Bronze, manufactured. 

steel, copper, etc.) 

Bronze, unwrougbt. (See steel, 

copper, etc.) 

Brooches. (See pins, etc.) , 

Brooms and brushes of bristles. .. 

Brooms of palm, rushes, or vege- 
table material 

Brushes. (See tools forarts, etc.). 

Brushes, common, for animals. . 

Brushes for the teeth, the head, 
the clothes, the shoes, and for 
any other use, excepting those 
included in the third class. . . . , 



Brushes of palm, rushes, or other 
vegetable material , 



Brushes, painters', of all sorts . . . 

Buckles. (See articles of German 

silver, etc.) 

Bullets. (See ammunition, etc.). 
Burins. (See tools for arts, etc.). 

Busts, iron. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, et(r.) 

Butter 

Buttons of all kinds, excepting 
those of silk, shell, silver, or 
gold 

Buttons, shell 

Cables 

Cages for birds. (See wire, man- 
ufactured, etc.) 

Calendars, perpetual 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Dollars, 

.174 

.029 

.0145 
.1305 
.0145 
.058 

.0145 
.3625 
.029 

.0145 

.087 

.058 



.0145 
.029 

.029 



.087 

.0145 
.1305 

.3625 i; 

.029 

.029 



.0145 
.029 



.1305 
.2175 
.0145 I 

1 
.087 

.087 I 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refta. 



Pesos. 



Trencillas de algodon. (V6ase 
hiladillos 6 cintas, etc.) .24 

Laton 6 az6far manufacturado. 
(V6ase acero, cobre, etc.) .04 

Lat6n en pasta, etc. (V^ase 
acero, bronce, etc.) .02 

Mamaderas .18 

Ladrillosparalirhpiarcubiertos. .1 .02 

Cerda. ( V6ase cerda de jabali, | 
etc.) I .08 

Ladrillos para limpiarcubiertos . . ' .02 

Bronce en polvoy libritos, para 
broncear .50 

Bronce manufacturado. (V^ase 
acero, cobre, etc.) .04 

Bronce, en pasta, etc. (Vfease 
acero, bronce, etc.) * .02 

Broches. (V6ase alfileres, etc.). • 12 

Escobas, escobillas y escobi- 
llones de cerda ' .08 

Escobas de palma, junco ix \ 

otra materia vegetal ! .02 

Cepillos. (V6ase instrumentos | 

para artes, etc.) | .04 

Cepillos ordinarios 6 bruzas 
• para las bestias .04 

Cepillos para los dientes, la ca- 
beza, la ropa, el calzado,' y 
para cualquier otro uso, ex- 
cepto los comprendidos en la 
tercera clase 

Escobas, escobillas y escobi- 
llones de palma, junco d otra 
materia vegetal 

Brochas y pinceles de todas 
clases 

Hebillas. (V6ase efectos de 
plata alemana, etc.) 

Balas. (V6ase municiones, etc.) 

Buriles. (V6ase instrumentos 
para artes, etc.) 

Bustos. (V6ase hierro manu- 
facturado. etc.) 

Mantequilla 

Botonesde todas clases, excepto I 
los de seda, concha, plata y { 
oro ' 

Botones de concha 

Cables i 

J aulas para p&jaros. ( V 6 a s e | 

alambre manufacturado, etc.). .12 

Calendarios perpetuos ' .12 



. 02 

.18 

.50 
.04 

.04 

.02 
.04 

. 18 
.30 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Cambric, lace, zephyr, linen 
tarlatan, muslin, and any 
other fine linen fabrics made 
up into neck-cloths, ruchings, 
caps, skirts, sleeves, capes, 
chemisettes, gowns, or other 
articles not included in other 
classes : 

Cambric, linen 

Camera lucida or camera obscura, 
for drawing or photography, 
and other such apparatus 

Canary seed 

Candlesticks, not specified. (See 
chandeliers, globes, etc., arti- 
cles of German silver, etc.). 

Candles, sperm, paraffin, or stear- 
in 

Cane, unmanufactured 

Canes 

Canned foods. (See sausages, 

etc.) : 

Canvas and raven's duck of 

cotton , 

Canvas, brabant, and other similar 

ordinary cloths 

Canvas, cotton, for embroidering 

Canvases prepared for portraits 
and pictures in oil, and also 
stumps for drawing 

Cap-boxes, for hunters 

Capers 

Capes. (See cambric, etc.). . . . 

Capes. (Seejerkins or doublets, 
etc.) 

Caps, fulminating. (See swords, 
sabers, etc.) 

Caps, linen. (See cambric, ba- 
tiste, etc.) 

Caps, woolen. (See understock- 
ings, stockings, etc.) 

Capstans. (See instruments or 
tools, etc.) 

Capsules. (See swords, sabers, 
etc.) 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 



1.088 
.174 



.1305 
.0145 



.1305 

.029 
.029 

.1305 

.058 

.058 

.058 

.087 



.058 

•1305 
.029 
1.088 



.1305 
.3625 
1.088 
.2175 
.0145 
.3625 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Detechos 
pot libra 
en m one- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Hol&n batista,clarin, punto, c6n- 
ro. lino, tarlatdn, muselina y 
cualesquiera otras telas finas 
de lino, preparadas en gorgue- 
ras, ruches, gorras, faldellines, 
manquillos, pelerinas, cami- 
sitas, camisones fi otras piezas 
fi adornos no incluidos en las 
clases anteriores 

Cambray del obispo 

Cdmaras claras (1 oscuras, para 
dibujo 6 fotografia, y demas 
aparatos semejantes '. 

Alpiste 

Candeleros n o especificados. 
(V6ase aranas, bombas, etc., 
efectos de p 1 a t a alemana, 
etc.) 

Velas de esperma, de parafina, 
de composici6n 6 estearicas . . 

Juncos 6 junquillos, sin manu- 
facturar 

Bastones 

Conservasalementicias en latas. 

(V6ase salchichones, etc.) 

' Lona y loneta de algodon 



Cafiamazo crudo, b ram ante y 
otras telas ordinarias seme- 
jantes 

Caflamazo de algodon para bor- 
dar 

Telas preparadas para retratos 
y pinturas al 61eo, y tambien 
el esfumino para dibujos 

Pistoneras 

Alcaparras 

Pelerinas. (V6ase hol^n ba- 
tista, clarin, etc.) 

Birretes. (V6ase almillas, etc.). 

Fulminantes 6 pistones. (V6- 
ase espadas, sables, etc.) 

Gorras de lino. (V6ase h6ldn 
batista, clarin, etc.) 

Gorras de lana. (V6ase calce- 
tas, medias, etc.) 

Cabrestantes. ( V^ 6 a s e herra- 
mientas 6 instrumentos, etc.). . 

Capsules. (V6ase espadas, sa- 
bles, etc.) 



PtiOS. 



1.50 
.24 



.18 
.02 



.04 

.04 

.04 
. iS 

.oS 
.o3 



.03 
. 12 



.oS 
.18 

1.50 
.04 
.18 



.50 

1.50 
.30 
.02 
.50 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Caraway seed. (See aniseed, 

etc.) 

Carbonate of lead 

Cardboard, fine, or thick paper, 
for offices, for cards, or for any 
other use. including imperme- 
able paper for presses 



Cardboard, manufactured or pre- 
pared for boxes, large or small, 
and in any other form except 
in toys for children, in masks, 
in boxes for watches or fine 
jewelry, and in some other arti- 
cles which, like the foregoing, 
are included in other classes. . . 



Card cases. (See ponf olios, ci- 
gar cases, etc.) 

Cards, playing 

Cards, visiting 

Carpenters' braces. (See tools 
for arts, etc.) 

Carpets, of wool, separate or by 
the piece, and footcloths of all 
kinds- : 

Cartridges. (See swords, sabers, 
etc.) 

Cases containing small articles 
for embroidery, toilet, drawing, 
painting, and other purposes. . 



Cassimere. (See cloth, paflete, 
etc.) 

Chains. (See iron, manufactured, 
etc.) 

Chalk for polishing and also for 
billiard cues 

Chalk, tailors* 

Chalk, white or red, crude or 

pow^dered 

Chalks for slates , 

Chandeliers. (See articles of Ger- 
man silver, etc.) , 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.058 
.0145 



.029 




.058 



.2175 
.087 

.2175 
.029 



.2175 
.3625 

.174 

.3625 

.PI45 

.029 

.0145 



.0145 
.0145 

.3625 



Alcaraboa. (V6ase anis en 
grano, etc.) 

Alba5'alde 6 carbonato de plo- 
mo 

Cart6n fino 6 papel grueso para 
escritorio, para tarjetasy para 
cualquier otro uso, incluy- 
endo en esta clasificaci6n el 
papel impermeable para 
prensa 

Cart6n manufacturado 6 pre- 
parado para cajas y cajitas, y 
en cualquier otra forma, ex- 
cepto en jug^etes para niflos, 
en mdscaras, en cajitas prepa- 
radas para relojes de faltri- 
quera y prendas finas y en 
algunos otros articulos que 
como los anteriores estdn 
comprendidos en otras 
clases 

Tarjeteros. (V6ase carteras, 
tabaqueras, etc.) 

Naipes 6 barajas 

Tarjetas para visita 

Berbiqufcs. (V6ase instrumen- 
tos para»artes, etc.) 

Alfombras sueltas 6 en piczas, 
de lana, y gualdrapas de to- 
das clases 

Cartuchos. (V6ase espadas, 
sables, etc.) 

Estuches con piececitas de 
acero, cobre d otro metal, 
para bordar, para limplar la 
dentadura, para las ufias, para 
dibujos 6 pinturas, etc 

Casimir. (V6ase paflo, pafSete, 
etc.) 

Cadenas. (V6ase hierro ma- 
nufacturado, etc.) 

Pasta 6 tizate para lustrar, y 
tambien 61 que sirve para las 
puntas de los tacos de billar. 

Jabon de piedra, llamado de 
sastres.'. 

Creta blanca 6 roja en piedra 6 
polvo 

Tizas do pizarra 

A raflas. ( V6ase ef ectos de plata 
alemana, etc.) 



Derechos 
por libra 
en m one- 
da hondu- 
refta. 



Pesos, 
.08 
.02 



.04 



.08 

.30 
. 12 
.30 

.04 



.30 
.50 

.24 
.50 
.02 

.04 

.02 

.02 
.02 

.50 



8 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 




Chandeliers, globes, glass shades, 
candlesticks, lanterns, lamps, 
excepting those made of gold 
or silver, which belong to the 
nth class, and those of Ger- 
man silver, gilt or silver 
plated, which belong to the 9th; 
all adjuncts or accessories to 
said articles to be appraised 
with the latter when imported 
with them 



Charcoal powder 

Chasubles, capes, corporals, al- 
tar-cloths (frontales), dalmd- 
ticas, stoles, maniples, altar 
linen, bands, and other orna- 
ments for priests and churches. . 



Dollars. 



Cheeses of all sorts 

Chemicals not specified under 
other classes. (See drugs, medi- 
cines, etc.) 

Chemicals for preserving skins. . 

Chemises. (See muslins, fine, etc.). 

Chemisettes, linen. (See cam- 
bric, etc.) 

Chess, checkers, dominoes, rou- 
lette, and other such games 

China ink 

China or porcelain ware, or imi- 
tation of it in any form 

Chintz, calico, cretonne, collars 
or ruching (carlancanes), '* bri- 
llantina," French plaids, *'mal- 
vinas," **lustrillos,'' and any 
other fabric of cotton colored 
similar to those indicated and 
mentioned in other classes 

Chisels. (See tools for arts, etc.). 



Chloride of lime. . 
Chromate of lead. 



.029 

.0145 

.58 
.029 



.174 

.0145 

.2175 



1.088 

.1305 
.0145 
.029 



Chronometers . 



.1305 
.029 

.0145 
.058 

.174 i 



Arafias, bombas,briseras,cande- 
leros, candelabros, fanales, 
girdndulas, Umparas, linter- 
nas, palmatorias.guardabrisas 
y quinqu^s, con excepci6n de 
los que tengan oro 6 plata, 
que corresponden & la 11* 
clase y los de plata alemana, 
dorados 6 platcados, que co- 
rresponden d la novena; debi- 
endo aforarse en las clases k 
que correspondan los articu- 
los expresados, todo lo que 
les corresponda 6 sea anexo 
k dichos articulos cuando ven- 
gan junto con ellos 

Carbon vegetal en polvo 

CasuUas, caputs pluviales, bolsas 
de los corporales, manteles 6 
frontales, dalm&ticas, estolas, 
manipulos, paflos paracubrir 
cdlices, bandas y demasorna- 
mentos para uso de los sacer- 
dotes y las iglesias 

Quesos de todas clases 

Froductosquimicosno incluidos 
en las clases anteriores. (Ve- 
ase drogas, medicinas, etc.) . . . 

Venenos para preservar pieles. . . 

Camisetas. (V6ase muselinas 
finas, etc.) 

Camisitas delino. (V^aseholdn 
batista, etc., preparada.) 

Juegos de ajedrez, de damas, de 
domin6, de ruleta <i otros se- 
mejantes 

Tinta de China 

Loza de china 6 de porcelana, 6 
sus imitaciones en cualquier 
forma 

Zarazas, calicones, cretonas, car- 
lancanes, brillantina, listado 
frances, malvinas, lustrillos; 
y cualquiera otra tela de al- 
godon de color, semejante d 
las indicadas y mencionadas 
en otras clases 

Escoplos. (V6aseinstrumentos 
para artes, etc.) 

Cloruro de cal 

Amarillo ingl6s 6 cromato de 
plomo 

Cron6metros 



Pesos. 



.04 
.02 



.80 
.04 

.24 
.02 

.30 
1.50 

.18 
.02 

.04 



.iS 

.04 
.02 

.08 
.24 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Cijfar-cases. .(See portfolios, 
cifj^ar-cases, etc.) 

Ciji^arette-cases. (See portfolios, 
cigar-cases, etc.) ^ 

Cigarettes, of paper or corn- 
leaves 

Cinnamon. (See aniseed, etc.) . . 

Clay, glazed or unglazed, in any 
shape 

Cloaks (ponchos). (See sleeves, 
sheepskin garments, etc.) 

Cloaks. (See understockings, 
etc.) 

Clocks, table or wall, alarm, and 
any other, not including watches 
or steeple clocks 

Cloth. (Seehandkerchiefs,shawls, 
etc.) 

Cloth or knit-goods for slippers, 
excepting those of silk 

Cloth, "pafiete, ' cassimere, "ca- 
sinete," muslin, satin, I ace, flan- 
nel, bombazine, alpaca, "cam- 
br6n," merino, serge, "cObica" 
and damask, of wool or wool 
mixed with cotton, and any 
other fabric of wool, or of wool 
mixed with cotton, not men- 
tioned in other classes 

Clothing. (See skirts, fustians, 
etc.) 

Clothing, ready-made. (See shirts, 
linen, etc.) 

Cloths ortextiles of cotton, hemp, 
"esparto," or linen, for cover- 
ing the floor, though they may 
contain some wool 

Cloves. (See aniseed, etc.) 

Clyster pumps 

Coats. (See shirts, linen, etc.) . . 

Cocoa in the grain 

Cocoanut oil % 

Cod-liver oil. (See train oil, etc.). 

Coffee 

Collars, paper. (See paper lan- 
terns, etc.) 

Collars, shirt-bosoms, and cuffs 
of linen or cotton for men 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.2175 

.2175 

.58 
.058 

.0145 

.174 

.2175 

.174 

.58 
.2175 



.3625 

.174 

.2175 



.058 
.058 
. 1305 
.2175 

.0145 
.0145 
.0145 

.0145 

.058 

.2175 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



I Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Tabaqueras. (V6ase carteras, 
tabaqueras, etc.) 

Cigarreras. (V6ase carteras, ta- 
baqueras, etc.) 

Cigarrillos de papel (i hoja de 
maiz 

Canela. (V6ase anis en grano, 
etc.) 

Barro vidriado 6 sin vidriar, en 
cualquier forma 

Ponchos. (V6ase mangas, cha- 
marras, etc.) 

Abrigos. (V6ase calcetas, me- 
dias, etc.) 

Relojes de mesa 6 pared, des- 
pertadores y cualquiera otra 
clase de reloj, excepto los de 
faltriquera y los de torres 

Pafios. (V6ase pafiuelos, paflo- 
lones, etc.) 

G6neros y tejidos para chinelas, 
excepto los de seda 

Paf^o, paflete, casimir, casinete, 
muselina,raso, franela, alepin, 
alpaca, cambr6n, merino, 
sarga, cdbica y damasco, de 
lana 6 mezclado con algodon, 
y cualquiera otra tela de lana 
6 mezclada con algodon, no 
mencionada en otras clases. . . 

Ropa. (V^ase enaguas, fustancs, 
etc.) 

Ropa hecha. (V6ase camisas 
hechas, etc.) *. 

Telas 6 tejidos de algodon, cafia- 
mo, esparto 6 lino, para cubrir 
el suelo, aunque tengan alguna 
mezcla de lana 

Clavos. (V6aseanisen grano, etc.) 

Clisobombas 

Casacas. (V6ase camisas he- 
chas, etc.) 

Cacao en grano 

Aceite de coco 

Aceite de higado de bacaldo. 
(V6ase aceite de pescado, etc.). 

Caf6 en grano 

Cuellos de papel. (V6asefaro- 
Ijllos de papel, etc.) 

Cuellos, pecheras y puf^os de 
lino 6 de algodon para hom- 
bres 



Pesos. 
.30 
.30 
.80 
.08 
.02 
.24 
.30 

.24 
.80 
•30 



.50 

.24 
.30 

.08 

.08 
.18 
.30 
.02 
.02 

.02 
.02 

.08 
.30 



10 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Columns. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Compasses. (See tools for arts, 
etc.) 

Compasses, magnetic, of all sorts. 

Cook-stoves, portable, of iron 
or other material 

Copal 

Copper, manufactured. (See 
steel, copper, etc.) 

Copper, old, in odd pieces. .',,.,. 

Copper, unwrought. (See steel, 

bronze, etc.) 

Copes. (See chasubles, etc.) .... 

Coral in any form, except when 
set in gold or silver 

Cordage 

Cords, linen. (See laces, stripes, 
etc.) 

Cords, woolen. (See under- 
stockings, stockings, etc.) 

Corduroy, cotton plush, velvet- 
een, by the piece or in strips. . . 

Cork, in tablets or stoppers, or 

any other form 

Corkscrews 

Corporals. (Sec chasubles, etc.). 

Corsets of all kinds ; . . . 

Cosmoramas. (See stereoscopes, 

etc.) .' 

Cotton. (See curtains, hangings, 

etc., laces, strips, etc.) 

Cotton. (See muslin, batiste, 
etc., handkerchiefs of linen, 
etc., handkerchiefs, shawls, 
etc.) 

Cotton.' (See neckties of cotton, 
etc.) 

Cotton. (See shirts, linen, etc.) . 

Cotton. (See textiles or fabrics, 
ordinary, etc.) 

Cotton clothing. (See skirts, fus- 
tian, etc.) 

Cotton fabrics, not specified 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars . 
.0145 

.029 
.174 

.0145 
.087 

.029 
.0145 



.0145 

.58 



.3625 

.0145 

.58 

.2175 

.174 

.058 
.058 

.58 

.3625 
.1305 
.58 



.58 

.58 
.2175 



.087 

.L74 
.ob7 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Columnas. (V6ase hierro manu- 

facturado, etc.) 

Compases. (V6ase instrumentos 

para artes, etc.) 

Biiijulas de todas clases 

Cocinas portatiles de hierro ix 

otra materia 

Resina de copal 

Cobre manufacturado. (V6ase 

acero, cobre, etc.) 

Cobre viejo en piezas inutiliza- 

das 

Cobre en pasta. (V6ase acero, 

bronce. etc.) 

Capas pluviales. (V6ase casu- 

llas, etc.) 

Coral en cualquier forma, ex- 

cepto cuando venga montado 

en oro 6 plata 

Corderia 6 mecate 

Cordones de lino. (V6ase en- 

. cajes, tiras, etc.) , 

Cordones, de lana. (V6ase cal- 

cetas, medias, etc.) , 

Pana, panilla, y felpa de algo- 

don, imitaci6n de terciopelo, 

en piezas 6 en cintas 

Corcho en tablas, en tapones 6 

cualquier otra forma , 

Tirabuzones 

Bolsas deloscorporales. (V6ase 

casullas, etc.) 

Corses de todas clases , 

Cosmoramas. (V6ase estereo- 

scopios, etc.) 

Algodon. (V6ase cortinas, col- 

gaduras, etc., encajes, tiras, 

etc.) 

Algodon. (V6asemuselina, ba- 

tista, etc., pafluelos de lino, 

etc., pafluelos, paflolones, 

etc.) 

Algodon. (V6ase corbatas de 

algodon, etc.) 

Algodon. (V6ase camisas he- 

chas, etc 

Algodon. (V6ase telas or tcji- 

dos ordinaries, etc.) 

Ropahechade algodon. (V6ase 

enaguas, fustanes, etc.) 

Telas de algodon, no especifica- 

das 



Ptsos. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



11 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Cotton fabrics, white, such as 
m a d a p olams. ' * estrivillos,'* 
fajnily goods, "bogotanas/* 
jeans, croydon, imperial, 
glazed, lining ("holandilla"), 
Rouen, Irish, and other similar 
fabrics 

Cotton linings. (See lutestring, 
etc.) 

Cotton, raw 

Cotton stnffs. (See drills, jeans, 
etc.) 

Counterpanes. (See huckaback, 
etc.) 

Coverlets. (Sec huckaback, etc.). 

Covers or stoppers with crowns 
of metal, glass, crystal, or 
porcelain , 

Crackers of all sorts 

Crayons and charcoal pencils for 
drawing , 

Creas. (See drills, linens, creas, 
etc.) , 

Crockery, ordinary , 

Cruet stands, excepting those 
which are wholly or partly of 
gold or silver, which belong to 
the eleventh class, and those of 
German silver, gilded or silver- 
plated, which belong to the 
ninth class , 

Cruppers 

Cubebs. (See aniseed, etc.) 

Cuffs, linen or cotton. (See col- 
lars, shirt*bosoms, etc.) 

Cuffs, paper. (See paper lanterns, 
etc.) , 

Cumin. (See aniseed, etc.) , 

Cupping glasses 

Curtains, etc., wool , 

Curtains, hangings, and musquito 

net, of linen or cotton , 

Curtains, etc., silk 

Cushions, not including those 
made of silk. (See billiard 
cushions.) 

Oaggers. (See swords, sabres, 
etc.) 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 



.087 

.1305 
.0145 

.087 

.087 
.087 



.087 
.0145 

.0145 

.1305 
.0145 



.087 

.3625 
.058 



.2175 

.058 
.058 

.1305 
.3625 

.58 
r.o88 



.058 
.3625 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
piif libra, 
en m one- 
da hondu- 
refla. 



Tejidos blancos dealgodon, co- 
mo madopollanes, estrivillos, 
g^nero defamilia, bogotanas, 
coquillo, croydon, imperial, 
holandilla, ruan, irlanda, y 
otros semejantes 

Forros de algodon. (V6ase sdn- 

dalos, lustrinas, etc.) 

Algodon en rama 

Tejidos de algodon. (V6ase 

d riles, coqui, etc.) 

Sobrecamas. (V6ase a 1 e m a - 

nisco, etc.) 

Cobeitores. (V6ase alemanis- 

co, etc.) 

Tapas con coronillas de metal, 

vidrio, cristal 6 porcelana. . . . 

Galletas de todas clases 

Creyones y carboncites para 

dibujar 

Creas. (V6asedriles, creas, etc.), 

Loza ordinaria 

Aceiteras, angarillas 6 agua- 
deras y porta-vinagreras, ex- 
cepto las que sean 6 tengan 
algo de oro 6 plata, que cor- 
responden & la 11* clase, y 
las de plata alemana, doradas 
6 plateadas, que corresponden 
d la 9* clase 

Gruperas 

Cubeba. (V6ase anis en grano, 
etc.) 

Puftos de lino 6 de algodon. 
(V6ase cuellos, pecheras, etc.). 

Puflosde papel. (V6ase faroli- 
Uos^de papel, etc.) 

Comino. (V6ase anis en grano, 
etc.) 

Ventosas. . .' 

Cortinas, etc., de lana, etc ... . 

Cortinas, colgaduras y mosqui- 
teras de lino 6 de algodon . . . 

Cortinas, colgaduras, etc., |de 
ceda, etc 

Cojines, excepto los de seda. 
(V6ase bandas de billar.) 

Puflales. (V6ase espadas, sa- 
bles, etc.) 



Pesos. 



.18 
.02 

. 12 

. 12 

. 12 

. 12 

.02 

.02 

.18 



. 12 
.50 

.08 

.30 

.08 

.08 
.18 
.50 

.80 
1.50 

.50 
.50 



12 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Dalmaticas. (See chasubles, etc.) . 
Damask. (See cloth, paflete, 6tc.). 

Damask, cotton. (See hucka- 
back, etc.) 

Dates, dried. (See prunes, 
dates, etc.) 

Dioramas. (See stereoscopes, 
etc.) 

Dish-covers, wire 

Door-mats 

Doors, iron. (Sec iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Doors, iron 

Drawers, cotton stockinet. (See 
jerkins or doublets, etc.) 

Drawers, others. (See shirts, 
linen, etc.) 

Dress patterns of cotton prints. 
(See sleeves, sheepskin, etc.). . . 

Dressing and traveling cases 

Drills, jeans, napped stuffs (bor- 
I6n), sheeting, satin, satinet, 
"mantadril," ticking, "manta- 
lona,!' and other similar cotton 
textures 

Drills, linens (creas), pure or 
mixed, tablecloths, napkins, 
and hand-towels, of linen or 
mixed with cotton 

Drugs, medicines, and chemical 
products not specified under 
other classes 

Dusters 

Dye. (See hair-dye.) 

Dynamite for blasting 

Earthenware. (See clay, glazed, 

etc.) 

Earthenware, glazed or unglazed. 

Elastics for shoes 

Emery stone or powder 

Engravings on paper 

Envelopes for letters 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.58 

.3625 



.087 

.058 

.1305 
.087 

.0145 

.0145 
.0145 

.1305 

.2175 

,174 
.174 



.087 



1305 



.174 
.087 

.0145 
.0145 



.. 0145 
.0145 

.087 

.0145 

.174 
.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCf A. 



Dercchos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Dalm&ticas. (V6ase casullas, 
etc.) 

Damasco. (V6ase paflo, paflete, 
etc.) 

Damasco de algodon. (V6ase 
alemanisco, etc.) 

Ddtiles pasados. (V6ase cirue- 
las pasas, etc.) 

Dioramas. (V6ase estereosco- 
pios, etc.) 

Tapaderas de alambre para las 
viandas 

Felpudos 6 limpiapi6s 

Puertas de hierro. (V6ase hierro 
manufacturado, etc.) 

Puertas de hierro 

Calzoncillos de puntode media 
de algodon. (V^ease almillas, 
etc.) 

Calzoncillos. otros. (V6ase ca- 
misas hechas, etc.) 

Cortes de cot6n. (V6ase man- 
gas, chamarras, etc.).., 

Indispenjsables y neceseres de 
viaje 

Driles, coqui, borl6n 6 granode 
oro, coti, brin crudo, raso, 
rasete, mantadril, c o t i n e s , 
mantalona y cualquier otro 
tejido de algodon semejante. 

Driles, creas puras 6 mezcla- 
das. manteles, servilletas y to- 
allas de mano, de lino6mez- 
clado con algodon 

Drogas, medicinas y productos 
quimicos, no incluidos en las 
clases anteriores 

Plumeros para limpiar 

Tinta. (V6ase tinta de tefiir el 
pelo.) 

Dinamita para esplotaci6n de 
minas y canteras 

Loza de barro. (V6ase barro vi- 
driado, etc.) 

Loza de barro vidriado 6 sin 
vidriar 

Cinta de goma 6 el&stica para 
el calzado 

Esmeril en piedra 6 polvo 

Ldminas 6 estampas en papel. . 

Sobres para cartas 



Pesos. 
.80 
.50 
. 12 
.oS 
.18 



IMPORT DUTIES OK HONDURAS. 



»3 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Epaulets. (See understockings, 

stockings, etc.) 

Epsom salts 

Essences and extracts of all sorts. 

Extracts. (See essences and ex- 
tracts, etc) 

Eyeglass cases. (See portfolios, 
etc.) 

Eyeglasses, spectacles, binocles, 
spyglasses, lenses, telescopes, 
and microscopes, excepting 
those framed in gold or silver, 
including the crystals or lenses 
when separately imported 

Eyelets. (See pins, etc.) 

Eyes, artificial 

Fabrics of materials other than 
silk, if containing some admix- 
ture of silk. (See silk, pure 
or mixed, etc.), 

Fans, ivory 

Fans of all kinds, excepting 
those of ivory, which belong to 
the nth class 

Feathers for ornamenting hats, 
caps, etc 

Fencing foils, masks, breast-pro- 
tectors, and gloves 

Figs, dried. (See prunes, etc.) . 

Figures, ornaments, and boxes 
for candies, of any sort 

Filberts, shelled or unshelled . . , 

Files. (See tools for arts, etc.). . 

Filters 

Filters, water 

Firearms. (Sec swords, sabres, 

etc.) 

Fire-crackers 

Fire-works 

Fish-glue 

Fish, pickled, salted, or smoked 

Flannel. (See cloth, paflete, etc.) 

Flat-irons. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 



Duty per 

pouad 

in U.S. 

currency. 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Dollars. 

•2175 
.0145 

.174 



.174 
.2175 



.3625 



.087 
1.088 



1.088 
1.088 



.3625 
1.088 

.1305 
.058 

.058 

. 029 

. 029 

.1305 
.0145 

.3625 

.087 

.1305 

.0145 
.3625 

.0145 



Charreteras. (V6ase calcetas, 
medias, etc.) 

Sal d'Epson 

Esencias y extractos de todas 
clases 

Extractos. (V6ase esencias y 
extractos.) 

Cajitas para anteojos. (V6ase 
carteras, etc.) 

Anteojos, espejuelos, gemelos6 
bin6culos, catalejos, lentes, 
telescopios y microscopios,ex- 
cepto los que tengan guarni- 
ci6n de oro 6 plata, quedando 
incluidos en esta clase los cris- 
tales 6 lentes cuando vengan 
por separado 

Pjetes. (V6ase alfileres, etc.) . . 

Ojos artifiGiales. ^ 

Telas 6 tejidos de materias que 
esten mezxladas con seda. 
(V6ase seda pura 6 mezclada, 
etc.) 

Abanicos de marfil 

Abanicos de todas clases, ex- 
cepto los de marfil que corres- 
ponden d la ii*^ clase 

Plumas para adorno de som- 
breros, gorras, etc » . . 

Floretas, mdscaras, petos y 
guantes para esgrima 

Higos (pasados). (V6asc cirue- 
las, etc.) 

Figuras, adornos y envases para 
dulces, decualquier clase que 
sean 

Avellanas, con cdscara 6 mon- 
dadas 

Limas. (V6ase instrumentos 
para artes, etc.) 

Mangas 6 filtros 

Aparatos 6 filtradores de agua. . 

Armas de fuego. (V6ase espa- 
das, sables, etc.) 

Triquitraquis 

Fuegos artificiales 

Cola de pescado 

Pescado salpreso, salado 6 
ahumado 

Franela. (V6ase paflo, paAete, 
etc.) 

Planchasparaaplanchar. (V^ase 
hierro manufacturado, etc.) . . . 



DcrechoH 

por libra 

en mone- 

da hondu- 

r6fla. 



Pt*os. 



.30- 
.02 

.24 

.24 

.30 



.50 

. 12 

1.50 



1.50 
1.50 



.50 

1.50 

.18 

.08 

.08 
.04 
.04 

.13 
.02 

.50 
. 12 

.18 
.iS 

.02 

.50 

.02 



H 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Flax, raw 

Flints 

Flower-pots, iron. (See iron, 
manufactured, etc.) 

Flowers, artificial. (See lute- 
string, sandalos, etc.) , 

Flowers, artificial, and the mate- 
rials for making them 

Foot-cloths, (See carpets, of 
wool, etc.) 

Forges. (See instruments or 
tools, etc.) 

Forks, not specified 

Forks, plated, etc. (See knives 
and forks, etc.) 

Frames, for pictures, etc. (See 
battens, picture frames, etc.). . . 

French linen, (See linen fab- 
rics, medium fine, etc.) 

Frieze blouses. (See sleeves, 
sheep-skin garments, etc.) 

Fringes. (See ribbons, braid, 
etc.) 

Fringes. (See understockings, 
stockings, etc., laces, stripes, 
etc.) 

Frock-coats. ^See shirts, linen, 
etc.) 

Fruits, artificial 

Fruits, including nuts, dried, 
with the shell or shelled .«. . 

Fruits, such as prunes, dates,figs, 
and raisins. (See prunes, etc.). . 

Frying-pans. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc) 

Funeral crowns and other such 
ornaments 

Furniture, iron. (See iron, man- 
ufactured, etc.) , 

Furniture of wood, of osier, 6{ 
straw, or of cane 

Fuses for blasting 

Fustians, cotton. (See skirts, fus- 
tians, wrappers, and gowns, etc. 

Fustians, linen. (See skirts, etc., 
linen, etc.) 

Galloons. (See wire, spangles, 
etc;) 

Garters of all kinds 

Gasoline 

Gelatin of all kinds 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.0145 
.0145 

.0145 

.1305 

.58 

.2175 

.0145 
.1305 

.3625 

.029 
.174 
.174 
.174 

.2175 

.2175 
.58 

.029 

.058 

.0145 

.3625 

.0145 

.0145 
.0145 

.174 

.3625 

.3625 
.3625 
.0145 
.029 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derecho» 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Lino en rama 

Piedras de chispes 

Floreros (de hierro). (V6ase 

hierro manufacturado, etc.). . . 
Flores artificiales. (V6ase sdn- 

dalos, lustrinas, etc.) 

Flores artificiales y los materi- 

ales para las mismas 

Gualdrapas. (V6ase alfombras 

sueltas, etc.) 

Fraguas. (V^ase herramientas 

e instrumentos, etc.) 

Tenedores, no especificados . . . . 
Tenedoresde plata alemana, etc. 

(V6ase cuchillos y tenedores, 

etc.) 

Cenefas. (V6ase listones, ca- 

fluelas, etc.) 

Royales, (V^ase tejidos entre- 

finos de lino, etc.) 

Gerga. (V6ase mangas, cha- 

marras, etc.) 

Fluecos. (V^6ase hiladillos 6 

cintas, etc.) 

Fluecos. (V6ase calcetas, me- 

dias, etc., encajes, tiras, 

etc.) 

Levitas. (V6ase camisas he- 

chas, etc.) 

Frutas artificiales 

Frutas secas con cdscara6mon- 

dadas 

Frutas. (V^ase ciruelas, etc.). . 

Sartenes. (V6ase hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) 

Coronas fdnebres fi atros ador- 
nos funerarios semejantes 

Muebles de hierro. (V6ase hi- 
erro manufacturado, etc.) 

Muebles de madera, de mimbre, 
de paja 6 de junco 

Espoletas para esplotaci6n de 
minas y cameras 

Fustanes. (V6aseenaguas,etc., 
de algoddn) 

Fustanes. (V^aseenaguas, etc., 
delino) 

Galones. (V^ase alambrillos, 
lanteiuelas, etc.) 

Ligas de todas clases 

Gasolina 

Jelatina de todas clases 



Pesos, 
.02 
.02 

.02 

.18 

.80 

.30 

.02 
.18 

.50 

.04 

.24 
.24 
.24 

.30 

.30 
.80 

.04 
.OS 



.02 

.50 

.02 

.02 

.02 

.24 

.50 

.50 
.50 
.02 
.04 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



»5 



ARTICLE OK MERCHANDISE. 



German silver. (See articles of 
German silver, etc.) ; . 

German silver in any form not 
specifically mentioned 

Girths 

Glass or crystal manufactured in 
in any shape, not specified in 
other classes 

Glass or goblet stands 

Glass shades. (See chandeliers, 
globes, etc.) 4 .... , 

Glass sheets without mercury. . . . 

Glauber salts 

Globes. (See chandeliers, 
globes, etc.) , 

Gloves. (See jerkins and doub- 
lets, etc.) 

Gloves. (See laces, stripes, etc.). 

Gloves. (See understoc kings, 
stockings, etc.) 

Gloves, kid 

Gloves of skins, for driving 

Glue, common , 

Gold, articles of 

Gold, imitation. (See wire, span- 
gles, etc.) 

Gold lace imitation. (See wire, 
spangles, etc.) 

Gold leaf. (See wire, spangles, 
etc., gold or silver leaf, etc.) . . . 

Gold or silver leaf, real or imita- 
tion, in little books, for gild- 
ing or plating 

Gold thread, imitation 

Gouger. (See tools for arts, etc.). 

Gowns. (See cambric, etc.) 

Gowns. (See skirts, fustians, 
wrappers, pillowcases, etc.). . . . 

Gowns, cotton. (See skirts, fus- 
tians, wrappers, andgowns,etc.), 

Gratings. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Gridirons. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

1 75 A 2 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollar*. 

.3625 

.3625 
.3625 

. . 0145 
.087 

.029 
.0145 

.0145 
.029 

' . 1305 
.58 

.2175 

1.088 

.58 

.087 

1.088 

.3625 

.3625 

.3625 



.3625 
. 3625 
.029 

1.088 



.3625 

.174 
.0145 

.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derecbos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Plata ale man a. (V6ase efectos 
de plata alemana. etc.) 

Plata alemana en cualquiera for- 
ma no especificada 

Cinchas 

Vidrios 6.cristalosmanufactura- 
dos en cualquier forma, no 
comprendidos en otras ciases. 

Portavasos 

Briseras. (V^ase araflas, bom- 
bas, etc.) 

Vidrios 6 cristales pianos sin 
azogar 

Sal de Glauber 

Bombas. (V6ase arafias, bom- 
bas, etc.) 

Gus^ntes. (V6ase almillas, etc.). 

Guantes. (V6ase encajes, tiras, 
etc.) 

Guantes. (V6ase calcetas, me- 
dias, etc.) : 

Guantes de cabritilla 

Manoplas de piel para camino . . 

Cola ordinaria '. 

Los artlculos de oro, etc 

Oro falso. (V6ase aJambrillo, 
etc.) \ 

Galones 6 pasamaneria de oro 
falso. (V6ase alambrillo, 
etc.) 

Hojilla de oro. (V6ase alam- 
brillo, etc., libritos con hojil- 
las, etc.) 

Libritos con hojillas de oro 6 
plata, finos 6 fsilsos, paradorar 
6 platear 

Hilade oro falso 

Formones. (V6ase instrumen- 
tos para artes, etc.) 

Camisones. (V^ase hol&n ba- 
tista, clarin, etc.) 

Tfinicos. (V^ase enaguas, fus- 
tanes, fustansones, etc.) 

Tfinicos de algodon. (V6ase 
enaguas, fustanes, batas, etc.) . 

Rejas. (V6ase hierro manufac- 
turado, etc.) 

Parrillas. (V^ase hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) 



Peso*. 



.50 

.50 
.50 



.02 
. 12 

.04 

.02 
.02 

.04 

.18 



.80 

.30 

1.50 

.80 

. 12 

1.50 

.50 



.50 

.50 

.50 
.50 

.04 

1.50 

.50 

.24 

.02 

.02 



i6 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



1 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Gum arable 

Gum elastic. (See bone, ivory, 

etc.) 

Gums or resins not included in 

other classes 

Gufta percha, worked or u n - 

worked 

Gypsum, in pieces or powdered . . 

Hair. (See horse-hair.) 

Hair-dye 

Hair, human, or its imitations, 

manufactured or not 

Hairpins. (See pins, etc.) 

Hairsprings. (See hands, etc.) . . 

Hammers. (See instruments or 
tools, etc.) 

Hammers. (See tools for arts, 
etc.) 

Hammocks. (See huckaback, 
etc.) 

Hams 

Handkerchiefs, cotton. (See 
skirts, fustians, etc.) , 

Handkerchiefs of linen or of 
linen mixed with cotton , 

Handkerchief^, shawls, scarfs, 
cloth, carpets, shirts, and jer- 
kins or underwai s t c o a t s, of 
wool or wool mixed with cot- 
ton, plain or embroidered with 
any material 

Hands, keys, regulators, springs, 
and other parts of the works of 
clocks or watches, not of gold 
or silver 

Hatboxes of sole leather 

Ratchets. (See instruments or 
tools, etc.) 

Hats and caps of all sorts of 
plush, of straw or felt, for men, 
women, or children, and of any 
material not specified, except- 
ing those with high crowns, 
which belong to the loth class, 
and those of rushes, which be- 
long to the nth class 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.0&7 

.174 
.087 

.087 
.0145 

.0145 

1.088 
.087 

.2175 

.0145 

.029 

.087 
.029 

.174 

.58 



.58 

.2175 

.087 

.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



174 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Goma aribiga 

Goma eldstica. (V6ase hueso, 

marfil, etc.) 

Toda clase degoma 6 resina, no 

comprendida en otrasclases. . . 
Guta-percha, labrada6 sinlabrar. 

Yeso en piedra y en polvo 

Pelo. (V^ase cerda (1 crin.) . . . . 

Tinta de teflir el pelo 

Cabello 6 pelo humano y sus imi- 
taciones, manufacturado 6 no. 

Horquillas. (V6ase alfileres, 
etc.) , 

Muellecitos de relojes. (V6ase 
minuteros, etc.) 

Mandarrias. (V^aseherramien- 
tas 6 instrumentos, etc.) 

Martillos. (V6ase instrumen- 
tos, para artes, etc.) 

Hamacas. (V6ase alemanisco, 
damasco, etc.) 

Jamones 

Pafiuelos de algodon. (V6ase 
enaguas, fustanes, batas, etc.) . 

Paftuelos de lino 6 mezclado 
con algodon 

Pafiuelos, pafiolones, chales, pa- 
flos, carpetas, camisas, y al- 
millas 6 guarda-camisas de 
lana 6 mezclado con algoddn, 
lisos 6 bordados en cualquier 
materia 

Minuteros 6 manecillos. Haves, 
muelecitos, resortes y otras 
piezas para el interior de los 
relojes, que no sean de oro 6 
plata 

Cajas de suela para sombreros. , 

Hachuelas. (V^ase herramien- 
tas 6 instrumentos, etc.) 

Sombreros y gorras de todas 
clases de felpa, sombreros de 
pajaydefieltro, parahombres, 
mujeres y nifios, y de cual- 
quiera otra materia no especi- 
ficada, con excepci6n de los 
concopa alta, que pertenecen 
A laio*clasa, y los de junco, 
que corresponden & la 11*. ... , 



Pesos. 



. 12 
.24 

. 12 
. 12 

02 

02 

1.50 

. 12 

.30 

.02 

.04 

. 12 
.04 

.24 
.80 



.80 



.30 

. 12 



.24 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



>7 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Hats of black silk stuff, with high 
crowns, known as black silk 
hats, and all other hats of the 
same shape, whatever their ma- 
terial or color 

Hats of rush or Panama hats . . . 

Head stalls 

Hemp. (See textiles or fabrics, 

ordinary, etc.) 

Hemp or oakum, in the fiber or 

twisted, for calking 

Hinges. (See articles of German 

silver, etc.) 

Holsters , 

Hones for sharpening razors 

Honey 

Hooks. (See pins, etc.) 

Hops 

Horn. (See bone, ivory, etc.). . . 

Horse-hair 

Horse-hair fabrics for covering 
furniture 

Huckaback, damask, piqu6, cov- 
erlets, blankets, carpets by the 
piece or rugs, towels, bed- 
spreads, counterpanes, ham- 
mocks, napkins, tablecloths, 
and any other damasked or 
quilted cotton cloth 

Hydrochloric or muriatic acid 

Hydrometers 

Illuminating oils , 

Images or effigies not made of gold 

or silver , 

Implements, domestic. (See iron, 

manufactured, etc.) , 

Incense , 

India-ink 

Ink of all sorts, except printing 

ink 

Ink powders for writing 

Inkstands , 

Ink, writing , 

Insertings. (See ribbons, braid, 

etc.) 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S.* 

currency. 



Dollars. 



.58 

i.oSd 
.3625 

.087 
.0145 

.3625 
.3625 
.087 

.0145 
.087 
.0145 I 
.174 

.058 

.087 



.087 

.058. 

.174 
.0145 

.087 

.0145 

.058 
.0145 

.0145 
.0145 
.0145 
.0145 

.174 



ARTIcULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Dcrecho? 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Sombreros de felpa de seda ne- 
gra, copa alta, llamados som- 
breros de pel o negro, ylos de- 
mas sombreros de esta misma 
forma, de cualquier materia y 
color que sean 

Sombreros de junco 6 jipijapa . . 

Cabezadas 

C&flamo. (V6asetelas6 tejidos 
ordinarios,-^tc.) 

Cdfiamo 6 estopa en rama 6 tor- 
cida para calafatear 6 estopar. . 

Charnelas. (V6ase efectos de 
plata alemana, etc.) 

Cafioneras 6 pistoleras 

Piedras finas para amolar nava- 
jas 

Miel de abejas 

Anzuelos. (V6ase alfileres, etc.) 

Lfipulo 6 fior de cerveza 

Asta 6 cuerno. (V6ase hueso, 
marfil, etc.) 

Cerda 6 crin 

Telas de cerda para forrar 
muebles 

Alemanisco, damasco, piqu6, 
cobertores, frazadas, alfom- 
bras sueltas6en piezas, pafios 
demano, colchas,sobrecamas, 
hamacas, servilletas, toallas 
demano, manteles y cualquier 
otro tejidoadamascado6acol- 
chado de algodon 

Acido hidrocl6rico 6 muriatico. . 

Hidr6metros 

Aceites para alumbrar 

Im&gines 6 efigies, que no sean 
de oro 6 de plata 

Utensiliosparaelserviciodomfes- 
lico. (V6ase hierro manufac- 
turado, etc.) 

Incienso 

Tinta de China 

Cualquiera clase de tinta, ex- 
cepto la de imprenta 

Polvos de tinta para escribir. . . . 

Tinteros , : 

Tinta para escribir 

Tiras bordadas y caladas. (V6ase 
hiladillos6 cintas, etc.) 



Pesos. 



.80 

1.50 

.50 

. 12 

.02 

.50 
. .50 

. 12 
.02 
. 12 
.02 

.24 

.08 

. 12 



. 12 
.08 
.24 
.02 



.02 
.08 
.02 

.02 
.02 
.02 
.02 

.24 



i8 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Instruments of surger}\ and also 
anatomical and mathematical 
ones, and scientific instruments 
generally, not incl u d e d in 
other classes 

Instruments or tools for agricul- 
ture or other uses, with or with- 
out handles, such as spades, 
adzes, pruning hooks (chicu- 
ras, chicurones), levers, weed 
hooks, axes, hatchets, mache- 
tes, mallets, hammers, shov- 
els, picks (tasies), capstans, 
forges, bellows of all sorts, 
jacks for lifting weights, grind- 
stones, large screws for black- 
smiths' anvils, and all similar 
tools or instruments 



Instruments, such as barometers, 
hydrometers, chronom e t e r s, 
etc 

Iron, manufactured: in wire, ex- 
cept for fences; in chains and 
anchors for ships; in boxes for 
keeping money; in mortars; in 
furniture; in presses for copying 
letters and stamping paper; in 
nails, tacks, bits, rivets, tarpau- 
lin nails; balconies,doors,balu- 
sters, gratings, and columns; 
statues, urns, flower- vases, 
busts, and any other such orna- 
ment for house or garden; 

• weights for weighing; flatirons 
for ironing; posts for railings; 
stoves, "budares," kettles, 
gridirons, pots, frying pans, 
and all other domestic imple- 
ments, whether tinned or not 
and with or without a lining of 
porcelain 

Iron manufactures. (See steel, 
copper, etc.) 

Iron, round or square, in sheets, 
plates, or other form of the raw 
material, and old iron in odd 
pieces • 



Duty per 

pouud 

In U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars, 



.087 



.0145 



.174 



.0145 



.029 



.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Instrumentos de cirugia, y tam- 
bien los de anatomia, mate- 
mdticas y otras ciencias, no 
incluidos en otras clases 



Derechos 
por libra 
en nif.nc- 
da hundu- 
refla. 



Pesos 



Herramientas 6 instrumentos 
para agricultura (1 otros usos, 
con cabos 6 sin ellos, como 
azadas, azuelas, calabozos, 
chicuras, chicurones, barras, 
escardillas, hachas, hachue- 
las, machetes, mazos, manda- 
rrias, palas, picos, tasies, ca- 
brestantes, fraguas. fuelles de 
todas clases, gatos para le van- 
tar pesos, mollejonestornillos 
grandes para herreros, bigor- 
nias, yunques, y toda otra 
herramienta 6 instrumento 
semejante i. los indicados . . . 

Instrumentos semejantes k los 
bar6metros, hidr6metros, etc. . 

Hierromanufacturado: en alam- 
bres excepto los de cercos; 
en cadenas y anclas para 
buques; en cajas para guar- 
dar dinero; en morteros 6 
almireces; en muebles; en 
prensas para copiar cartas y 
timbrar papel ; en clavos, 
tachuelas, brocas, remaches y 
estoperoles; en balcones de 

* hierro, puertas, balaustres, 
rejas y columnas; en estatuas, 
jarrones, floreros, bustos y 
cualquier otro adorno seme- 
jante para casas y jardines; 
en pesas para pesar; en plan- 
chas paraaplanchar; en postes 
para empalizadas, y en anafes, 
budares, calderos, parrillas, 
ollas,sartenesy toda otra pieza 
para el servicio dom^stico, 
esten 6 no estafladas, y ten- 
gan 6 no baflo de loza 

Manufacturas de hierro. (V6ase 
acero, cobre, etc.) 

Hierro redondo 6 cuadrado, en 
platinas, en planchas 6 Umi- 
nas y en cualquiera otra forma 
bruta y el hierro viejo en pie- 
zas inutilizadas 



IMPORT DUTIES Ot HONDURAS. 



19 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Iron wire, excepting for fences . 

Ivory. (See bone, ivory, etc.) . . 

Ivory. (See fans, ivory.) , 

Jackets. (See shirts, linen, etc.). 

Jacks for lifting weights. (See 
instruments or tools, etc.) , 

Jeans. (See drills, jeans, etc.). . 

Jerkins or doublets, scarfs, caps, 
understockings, drawers, trou- 
sers, stockings,bonnets, gloves, 
and all fabrics of cotton stock- 
inet 

Jet, crude 

Jet, manufactured. (See bone, 
ivory, etc.) 

Jewels 

Kerosene oil 

Kettles, iron. (See iron, manu- 
factured, etc.) 

Keys, watch. (See hands, etc.). 

Knives and forks, excepting those 
with handles covered with gold 
or silver leaf, which belong to 
the nth class, and those of 
german silver, or silver plated, 
or gilt, which belong to the 
loth class . « 

Knives and forks with handles of 
german silver or white metal, 
gilded or silver plated 

Knives, hunting. (See swords, 
etc.) 

Knives, sharp pointed, with or 
without sheath 

Knives with handles of wood or 
other common material, for 
fishermen, shoemakers, belt- 
makers, and, generally, all such 
as are used in the arts or trades 

Labels, printed or lithographed . 

Lace. (See cambric, etc.) 

Lace. (See cloth, paflete, etc.). . 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.0145 

.174 
1.088 

.2175 

.0145 
.087 



.1305 
.087 

.174 
I. 088 

.0145 

.0145 
.2175 



.1305 

.3625 
.3625 
.1305 

.058 
.2175 
1.088 
.3625 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIa. 



Hierro manufacturado en alam- 
bres, excepto los de cercos . . , 

Marfil. (V6ase hueso, marfil, 
etc.) 

Marfil . (V6ase abanicos de mar- 

fii.) 

Chaquetas. (V6ase camisas 
hechas, etc.) 

Gatos paralevantar pesos. (V6ase 
herramienta's 6 instrumentos, 
etc.) 

Coqui. (V6ase driles, coqui, 
etc.) 

Almillas 6 guarda-camisas, ban- 
das, birretes, calcetas, calzon- 
cillos, pantalones, medias, 
gorras, guantes y todo tejido 
de punto de media de algodon 

Azabache en bruto 

Azabache, manufacturado. 
(V6ase hueso, marfil, etc.). . . 

Joyas, alhajas 

Aceite de kerosene 

Calderos de hierro. (V6ase 
hierro, manufacturado, etc.) . 

Llavesde reloj. (V6ase minu- 
teros, etc.) 

Cuchillos y tenedores, excepto 
los que tengan manga de ho- 
jilla de oro 6 plata, que cor- 
responden & la 11* claise, y los 
de plata alemana, plateados 
6 dorados, que corresponden 
k la lo* clase , 

Cuchillos y tenedores con man- 
go de plata alemana 6 metal 
bianco, plateados 6 dorados . 

Cuchillos de monte. (V^ase es- 
padas, etc.) 

Cuchillos de punto, con vaina 6 
sin ella 

Cuchillos con mango de madera 
d otra materia ordinaria, para 
Pescadores, zapateros, talabar- 
teros, jardineros, tabaqueros 
y en general los que se em- 
plean en las artes ii oficios . . 

Etiquetas y r6tulos impresos 6 
litografiados 

Punto. (V^ase hol&n batista, 
clarin, etc.) 

Punto. (V6ase paflo, paftete, 
etc.) 



Derechos 
por libra 
en m one- 
da hondu- 
refta. 



Ptsos. 

.02 

.24 

1.50 

.30 

.02 
. 12 



.18 
. 12 

.24 

1.50 

.02 

.02 
.30 



.18 

.50 
.50 
.18 



.oS 

.30 

1.50 

.50 



20 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Lace or tulle, of cotton or pita, 

plain or embroidered 

Laces. (See ribbons, braids, etc.) . 

Laces. (See understoc kings, 
stockings, etc.) 

Laces, strings, and twisted cords 
of all kinds 

Laces, stripes, blondes, appliqu6 
work, ribbons, sashes, purses, 
shoulder straps, tassels, cords, 
fringes, socks, belts, braids, 
gloves, and trimmings, of linen 
or of linen mixed with cotton. . 

Lampblack 

Lamp-chimney cleaners 

Lamps. (See articles of German 

silver, etc.) 

Lamps. (See chandeliers, globes, 

etc.) 

Lancets 

Lanterns. (See chand e 1 i e r s , 

globes.etc, paper lanterns, etc., 

stereoscopes, etc.) 

Lard 

Lavender , 

Lawn, long. (See linen fabrics, 

medium fine, etc.) 

Lead. (See steel, copper, etc., 

steel bronze, etc.) 

Lead, carbonate 

Leather tips for billiard cues 

Lemonades 

Lenses. (See eyeglasses, etc.). . , 
Levels. (See tools for arts, etc.), 

Levers. (See instruments or tools, 

etc.) , 

Linen. (See drills, linens, etc.). . 

Linen. (See shirts, linen, etc.) . . 

Linen. (See textiles of fabrics, 
ordinary, etc.) 

Linen. (See curtains; hangings, 
etc., laces, stripes, etc.) 

Linen. (See cambric, etc.) 



Duty per 
pound 
In U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.2175 
.174 



.2175 
.3625 



.58 

.0145 
.087 

.3625 

.029 

.1305 
(029 
■^.058 
( ■ 1305 

.029 
.029 

.174 
j.029 

/ .0145 
.0145 
.058 

.0145 
.3625 
. 029 



.0145 
.1305 

.2175 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



.087 

.58 
1.088 



Punto 6 tul de algod6n 6 pita, 

liso 6 bordado 

Encajes. (V6ase hiladillos 6 

cintas, etc.) 

Encajes. (V6ase calcetas, me- 

dias, etc.) 

Cuerdas y entorchados de todas 

clases 

Encajes, tiras, blondas, embuti- 

dos, cintas, bandas, bolsaspara 

dinero, charreteras. borlas, 

cordones, fluecos, escarpines, 

fajas, trenzas, guantesy pasa- 

manerla de lino 6 mezclado 

con algod6n 

Negro humo 

Limpiadores para tubos 

Ldmparas. (V6ase efectos de 

plata alemana, etc.) 

n&mparas. (V6ase araflas, bom- 

bas, etc.) 

Lancetas 

Fanaies, lanternas 6 farolillos. 

(V^ase aranas, bombas, etc., 

farolillos de papel, etc., este- 

reoscopios, etc.) 

Manteca 

Alhucema 6 espliego 

Estopillas. (V6ase tejidos en- 

trefinos de lino, etc.) 

Plomo. (V6ase acero, cobre, 

etc., acero, bronce, etc.) 
Albayalde 6 carbonatode plomo. 
Puntas de suela para los tacos 

de billar 

Limonadas 

Lentes. (V6ase antcojos; etc.). . 
Niveles. (V6ase instrumentos 

para artes, etc.) 

Barras. (V6ase herramientas 6 

instrumentos, etc.) 

Lino. (V6ase driles, creas puras, 

etc.) 

Lino. (\^6ase camisas hechas, 

etc.) 

Lino. (V6ase telas 6 tejidos 

ordinarios, etc.) 

Lino. (V6ase cortinas, colgadu- 

ras,"etc., encajes, tiras, etc.) . . . 
Lino. (V^6aseholdn batista, cla- 

rin, etc.) 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Pesos. 
.30 
.24 
.30 
.50 



IMPORT DUTIES OF. HONDURAS. 



21 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Linen fabrics, medium fine, such 
as nankeen, French linen, Irish 
linen, long lawn, "bretaflas," 
and other similar goods 

Linen fabrics not specified in 
other classes 

Linseed, in the grain or ground. . 

Linseed oil 

Lint for wounds 

Liquor-flask stands, of any ma- 
terial other than German silver, 
the latter belonging to the nth 
class 

Liquor-flask stands of German 
silver 

Liquors, various kinds, such as 
cognac,absinthe,rum,gin, "ros- 
solis," **mistea," champagne, 
chartreuse, and others not spec- 
ified, and bitters of all sorts 



Litharge 

Lithographic stone 

Locks, gun. (See swords, etc.). . 

Looking glasses. (See mirrors, 
etc.) 

Lutestring, *'sAndalos,"and other 
such cotton fabrics used for 
linings and flowers 

Macaroni 

Machetes. (See instruments or 
tools, etc.) 

Machines and apparatus nojt spe- 
cified in the first class 

Machines for aerated waters 

Magic lanterns. (See stereo- 
scopes, etc.) 

Magnets 

Maizena(fine corn meal, prepared). 

Mallets. (See instruments or 

tools, etc.) 

Manganese, mineral 

Maniples. (See chasubles, etc.). 
Marjoram. (See aniseed, etc.). . . 

Marking ink 

Masks ox false faces, of all sorts. 

Match boxes. (See portfolios, 
etc.) 



Duty per '| 

pound I 

in U.S. i. 

currency.. 



ARTlCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



■I 
Dollars, ii 



.174 

.3625 
.0145 
.0145 

.1305 



.087 
.58 

.058 

.058 

.0145 

.3625 

.058 



.1305 
.029 

.0145 

.0145 
.087 

.1305 
.1305 
.0145 



.0145 
.058 
.58 
.058 

.0145 
.058 



.2175 



Tejidos entrefinosde lino, como 
coletillas, royales, irlandas, 
estopillas, bretafias y otros 
semejantes 

Tegjidos de lino no especificados 
en otras clases 

Linaza en grano 6 molida 

Aceite de linaza 

Hilos para heridas 

Licoreras de cualquiera materia, 
con excepci6n de las de plata 
alemana, que pertenecen d la 
lo* clase 

Licoreras de plata alemana 

Aguardiente fuerte 6 dulce,como 
cof\ac, agenjo, ron, ginebra, 
rosolio, mistela, champagne, 
chartreuse y otros no especifi- 
cados, y amargos de todas 
clases 

Litargirio 

Piedras de litografiar 

Llaves de las armas de fuego. 
(V6ase espadas, etc.) 

Espejos. (V6ase espejos de to- 
das clases.) 

Sdndalos, lustrinas y demas 
telas semejantes de algodon 
que se usan para forros y flores 

Macarrones 

Machetes. (V6ase herramientas 
6 instrumentos.) 

Mdquinasyaparatos no especifi- 
cados en la primera clase 

Mdquinas para aguas gaseosas. . 

Linternas mdgicas. (V6ase este- 
reoscopios, etc.) 

Imdn 

Maicena, 6 sea harina fina de 
maiz preparada 

Mazos. (V6ase herramientas 6 
instrumentos.). 

Manganesio mineral 

Manipulos. (V6ase casullas.etc). 

Or6gano. (V6aseanis en grano, 
etc.) 

Tinta de marcar 

Mdscaras 6 caretas de todas cla- 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Pesos. 



ses , 



I Fosforeras. (V6asecarteras, etc.).] 

I I 



.24 

.50 
.02 
.02 
.18 



. 12 
.80 



.08 
.08 
.02 

.50 
.08 

.18 
.04 



.02 
. 12 

.18 

.18 



.02 
.08 
.80 

.oS 
.02 

.08 
.30 



22 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Match rope for blasting 

Match sticks 

Matches of wood, wax, or tinder. 

Mathematical instruments. (See 
instruments of surgery, etc.). . . 

Mats for the table 

Matting, floor 

Mattresses 

Measures, of leather, tape, or pa- 
per, with or without cases 

Meat, salt, pickled, or smoked, 
when not canned 

Medicines. (See drugs, medi- 
cines, etc.) 

Mercury 

Merino. (See cloth, paflete, etc.). 

Metallic articles, gilded or silver- 
plated 

Microscopes. (See eyeglasses, 
etc.) 

Millet 

Mills for coffee, corn, etc 

Millstones. (See instruments or 
tools, etc.) 

Mineral waters 

Minium. (See red lead) 

Mirrors of all sorts, framed or 
not 

Molasses 

Moldings. (See battens, picture 
frames, etc.) 

Mortars. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Mosquito net. (See curtains, 
hangings, etc.) 

Mother-of-pearl. (See bone, 
ivory, etc.) 

Mufflers, cotton *. : 

Music books 

Musical instruments and their 
parts, of all kinds, excepting 
pianos and organs ,, 

Muskets. (See swords, etc.) .... 
Muslin. (See cloth, paflete, etc.). 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.0145 

.0145 
.058 



.087 

.0145 
.0145 

.029 

.029 

.0145 

.174 

.0145 

.3625 

.174 

.3625 
,0145 
.0145 

.0145 
.0145 
.058 

.058 
.0145 

.029 

.0145 

.58 

.174 
.087 
.058 

.087 

.3625 
. 3625 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Mechas para esplotaci6n de 

minas y canteras 

Palitos parahacer f6sforos 

F6sforos de palillo, de cerilla 6 

de yesca 

Instrumentos de matem&ticas. 

(V6ase instrumentos de ciru- 

gia, etc.) 

Esterilla para mesas 

Estera, esterilla y petate para 

pisos 

Colchones y gergones 

Medidas de cuero, cinta 6 papel, 

suelt^s 6 en estuches 

Carne salada, salpresa 6 ahu- 

mada.cuando novieneenlatas. 
Medicinas. (V6asedrogas,medi- 

cinas, etc.) 

Azogue 6 mercuric vivo 

Merino. (V6ase paflo, paflete, 

etc.) 

Efectos de metal, dorados 6 pla- 

teados 

Microscopies. (V6ase anteojos, 

etc.) 

Mijo 

Molinos para caf6, maiz, etc 

Piedras de molino. (V6ase her- 

ramientas 6 instrumentos, etc.). 

Aguas minerales 

Mlnio. (V6aseazarc6n 6minio). . 
Espejos de todas clases y laslu- 

nas azogadas 

Miel de azdcar. 

Molduras. (V6ase listones, ca- 

fluelas, etc.) 

Morteros. (V6ase hierro manu- 

facturado, etc.) 

Mosquiteros. (V6ase cortinas, 

colgaduras, etc.) 

NAcar. (V6ase hueso, marfil, 

etc.) 

Rebozos de algodon 

Colecciones de mfisica 

Instrumentos de m<isica 6 cual- 

quiera de sus partes 6 acceso- 

rias, exceptuandose los pianos 

y 6rganos 

Escopetas. (V^aseespadas, etc.). 
Muselina. (V6ase paflo, pa- 
flete, etc.) 



Derechot 

por libra 

en inone- 

da. hoDdu- 

refia. 



/Vmw. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF. HONDURAS. 



23 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Muslin. (See cambric, etc.) .... 

Muslin, and any other fine fabric 
of linen mixed with cotton, un- 
bleached or in colors, by the 
piece or cut for dresses 

Muslin, book 

Muslins, fine, dotted or embroid- 
ered with wool or cotton, by the 
piece or cut, chemises, yokes, 
and other such articles, em- 
broidered, large cotton shawls 
of all sorts 

Muslins, smooth, embroidered, 
white, or printed 

Mustard 

Muzzles. (See articles of Ger- 
man silver, etc.) 

Nails, iron. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Nankeen. (See linen fabrics, 
medium fine.) 

Napkins. (See drills, linens, 
etc.) 

Napkins. (See huckaback, etc.) 

Napped cotton stuff. (See drills, 
jeans, etc.) 

Neck-cloths. (See cambric, ba- 
tiste, etc.) * 

Neckties of cotton, horse-hair, 
or wool 

Needles. (See pins, etc.) 

Nets. (See ornaments for the 
head, etc.) 

Netting of iron wire, not included 
in other classes 

Nipple glasses 

Nipples, gun. (See swords, etc.). 

Nipples tor nursing bottles 

Nursing bottles , 

Nitrate of pots^h , 

Nitric acid or aquafortis 

Nutmeg 

Nuts, with the shell or shelled . . 
Oakum. (See hemp or oakum, 

etc.) 

Oars, when not imported with the 

boats or launches 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 
1.088 



.58 
.174 



.2175 

.174 
.029 

.3625 

.0145 

.174 

.1305 
.087 

.087 

1.088 

.58 
,087 

1.088 

.058 

.1305 
.3625 
• 1305 
.1305 
.0145 
.058 

.1305 
.029 

.0145 

.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCf A. 



Muselina. (V6ase holan ba- 
tista, clarin, etc.) 

Muselina, batista y cualquiera 
otra tela finade lino mezclado 
con algodon, cruda6 decolor, 
en piezas 6 en cortes de ves- 
tido 

Linoes 

Muselinas finas de mota 6 bor- 
dadas con lana 6 algodon, en 
piezas 6 en cortes, camisetas, 
golds y demas piezas bordadas 
semejantes; paflolones de al- 
godon de todas clases 

Gasas lisas, labradas, blancas 6 
estampadas 

Mostaza en grano 6 molida 

Bozales. ( V6ase efectos de plata 
alemana, etc.) 

Clavosde hierro. (V6asehierro 
manufacturado, etc.) 

Coletillas. (V6ase tejidos en- 
trefinos, etc.) 

Servilletas. (V6asedriles, creas, 
etc.) 

Servilletas. (V6ase alemanisco, 
damasco, etc.) 

Borl6n. (V6ase d riles, coqui, 
etc.) 

Gorgueras. (V6ase holdn ba- 
tista, clarin, etc.) , 

Corbatas de algodon, cerda 6 
lana.. 

Agujas. (V6ase alfileres, etc.). . 

Redecillas. (V6ase adornos de 
cabeza, etc.) 

Telas 6 tejidos de alambre de 
hierro, no comprendidos en 
otras clases 

Pezoneras 

Chimeneas. (V6aseespadas,etc.). 

Picos de teteros 

Teteros 

Potasa, nitrato 6 sal de nitro 

Acido nitrico 6 agua fuerte 

Nuez moscada 

Nueces, con c&scara 6 mondadas . 

Estopa. (V6ase c^fiamo 6 esto- 
pa, etc.) 

Remos para embarcaciones, cu- 
ando no vengan con los botes 
6 lanchas 



Derechos 
per libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Pesos. 
1.50 



.80 
.24 



.30 

.24 

.04 

.50 

.02 

.24 

.18 

. 12 

. 12 

1.50 

.80 
. 12 

i.5<5 



.08 
.18 
.50 
.18 
.18 
.02 
.08 
.18 
.04 

.02 



.03 



^4 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Duty per 
pouDd in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Octants 

Oil, almond 

Oilcloth, in any shape 

Oil, cocoa 

Oil, drying, for painters 

Oil, kerosene , 

Oil, linseed 

Oil, palm or drying, for painters. 

Oil, spurge 

Oil, train or codliver , 

Oils and soaps, perfumed 

Oils, illuminating 

Oils not included in other classes 

Oil, sweet (olive) 

Oleic acid 

Olives 

Orange-flower water 

Organs. (See pianos and organs, 
etc.) 

Ornaments. (See figures, orna- 
ments, etc.) 

Ornaments, cotton. (See rib- 
bons, braid, etc.) 

Ornaments, ecclesiastical. (See 
chasubles, etc.) 

Ornaments, head, of all kinds . . 

Ornaments, iron, for house or 
garden. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Osier, unmanufactured 

Paints, common, prepared with 
oil 

Paints not included in other 
classes 

Paletots. (See shirts, linen, etc.) 

Palm, unmanufactured 

Panoramas. (See stereoscopes, 
'etc.) 

Paper lanterns: paper collars, 
bosoms, and cuffs, including 
those lined with cloth 



Dollars. 
.174 
.0145 
.058 

.0145 
.0145 
.0145 
.0145 
.0145 

.0145 
.0145 

.087 

.0145 
.087 

.0145 
.029 
.029 
.0145 

.029 

.058 

.174 

.58 

1.088 



.0145 
.029 

.0145 I 

.029 
.2175 

.029 
.1305 



.058 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Octantes 

Aceite de almendras .' 1 . . 

Encerados6hules, en cualquiera 

forma 

Aceite de coco 

Aceite secante para pintores 

Aceite de kerosene 

Aceite de linaza 

Aceite de pal ma 6 aceite secante 

para pintores , 

Aceite de tdrtago 

Aceite de pescado 6 de higado 

de bacalao , 

Aceites y jabones perfumados., 

Aceites para alumbrar 

Aceites no comprendidos en las 

clases anteriores 

Aceite de comer 

Acido ol6ico , 

Aceitunas 

Aguas de azahares , 

Organos. (V6ase pianos y or- 

ganos, etc.) 

Adornos. (V6ase figuras, ador- 

nos, etc.) 

Adornos de algodon. (V^ase 

hiladillos 6 cintas, etc.) 

Ornamentos para uso de las 

iglesias. (V^ase casullas, 

etc.) 

Adornos de cabeza y redecillas 

de todas clases , 

Adornos para casas y jardines. 

(V6ase hierromanufacturado, 

etc.) 

Mimbre sin manufacturar 

Pinturas ordinarias preparadas 

en aceite 

Colores 6 pinturas no inclui- 

dos en otras clases 

Palt6s. (V6ase camisas hechas, 

etc.) 

Pal ma sin manufacturar 

Panoramas. (Vease estereosco- 

pios, etc.) 

Farolillos de papel, cuellos, 

pecheras y puftos de papel, 

inclusos los forrados en g6- 

nero 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu* 
lefia. 



tesos. 
.24 
.02 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



25 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Paper manufactures not included 
in other classes. (See paper 
lanterns, etc.) 

Paper of every sort, not included 
in other classes 

Paper, gilded or silver-plated, 
stamped wiih figures in relief, 
and tinted or colored for flowers . 

Paper-cutter 

Paper, wall 

Paraffin, crude 

Parasol frames. (See wire man- 
ufactured into frames, etc.) . . . . 

Parasols, cotton or linen. (See 
umbrellas, large or small, etc.). 

Parasols, silk. (See umbrellas, 
parasols, etc.) 

Parasols of wool 

Parchment and its imitations, in 
any form, not included in other 
classes 

Pasteboard, in sheets 

Paste for sharpening razors 

Pastes, such as vermicelli, maca- 
roni, etc 

Peanuts, with the shell or shelled. 

Pearls and imitation precious 
stones, unmounted or mounted 
in any metal other than gold or 
silver 

Pencil-cases 

Pencils of all kinds 

Pencils, slate 

Penknives 

Pens 

Pepper. (See aniseed, etc.) 

Percales 

Perfumery of all sorts 

Perfumes for the toilette 

Petroleum, crude 

Pewter. (See steel, copper, etc.). 

Phosphorus 

Photographs 

Pianos and organs, or any of their 
parts, when they come separate- 
ly, including the piano stools. ., 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 

.058 
.029 



.174 
.0145 
.087 
.029 

.087 



.174 

.087 
.1305 



.058 

.0145 
.087 

.029 
.029 



.174 

.0145 

.0145 

.0145 

.1305 

.0145 

.058 

.174 
.087 
.058 

.0145 
.029 

.174 
.1305 



.029 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Papel manufacturado no espe- 
cificado en otras clases. 
(V6ase farolillos de papel, etc.). 

Papel de cualquier clase, no 
especificado 

Papel dorado 6 plateado, el es- 
tampado & manera de relieve, 
y el pintado para flores 

Cuchillas para papel 

Papel pintado para tapiceria 

Parafina en pasta ". 

Armaduras para quitasoles. 
(V^ase alambre manufactu- 
rado, etc.) 

Sombrillas, de lino 6 algod6n. 
(V6ase paraguas, paragUitos, 
etc.) 

Sombrillas. (V6ase paraguas, 
sombrillas, etc.) 

Sombrillas de lana 

Pergaminos y sus imitaciones 
en cualquier forma, no com- 
prendidos en otras clases 

Cart6n en pasta 

Pasta para afilar navajas 

Pastas semejantes d las de fideos, 
macarrones y talladnes 

Manis, con cdscara 6 mondados. 

Perlas y piedras falsas, sin mon- 
tar 6 montadas en cualquier 
metal que no sea oro 6 plata. . 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 

da hondu- 
refia. 



Ptsos. 



Lapiceros 

Ldpices de todas clases 

Lapices de pizarra 

Cortaplumas 

Plumas 

Pimienta. (V6ase anis en grano, 
etc.) 

Percales 

Perfumeria de todas clases 

Aguas de olor para el tocador. . . 

Petr6leo bruto 

Peltre. (V6ase acero, cobre, etc.) . 

F6sforo en pasta 

Fotografias 

Pianos y organos 6 cualquiera 
de sus partes, cuando vengan 
por separado, quedando in- 
cluidos aqui tambien los ta- 
buretes 



.08 
.04 



.24 
.02 
. 12 
.04 



. 12 



.24 

. 12 
.18 



.08 
.02 
. 12 

.04 
.04 



.24 

.02 
.02 
.02 
. iS 
.02 

.o3 
.24 
. 12 
.o3 
.02 
.04 
.24 
. iS 



.04 



26 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Pickles, in vinegar or in brine. . 

Picks. (See instruments or tools, 
etc.) 

Pictures and portraits upon cloth, 
wQod, paper, stone, or other 
material 

Pillowcases. (See skirts, fus- 
tians, wrappers, etc.) 

Pillows, not including those 
made of silk 

Pincers. (See tools, etc.) 

Pins, needles, eyelets, brooches, 
hooks, thimbles, hairpins, and 
buckles for shoes, for hats, and 
for vests and trousers, except- 
ing those made of silver or gold 

Pipes, mouthpieces, and cigar 
holders, of amber, porcelain, or 
any other material, excepting 
those made of gold or silver 
and those mentioned in the 4th 
class , 

Pipes and mouthpieces, of clay 
or ordinary earthenware, with- 
out any other material , 

Piqu6. (See huckaback, etc.). . . , 

Pistols. (See swords, sabers, 
daggers, etc.) , 

Piston glands 

Pistons 

Pitch, black 

Pitch, white or light 

Planes, jack. (See tools for art, 
etc.) 

Plaster of Paris 

Plaster of Paris, manufactured 
into any articles except toys 
for children 

Plumes for funeral coaches or 
hearses, when imported sepa- 
rately 

Plush, cotton. (See corduroy, 
cotton plush, etc.) 

Plushes. (See understockings, 
stockings, etc.) 

Pocket-books. (See portfolios, 
etc.) 

Poisons. (See chemicals for pre- 
serving skins.) 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency 



Dollars. 
.029 



.0145 

.058 

.174 

.029 
.029 



.087 



► 174 



.058 
.087 



.3625 
.1305 
.1305 
.0145 
.0145 

.029 
.0145 



.029 

1.088 
.174 
. 2175 
.2175 
.0145 I 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



DerechoB 

por libra 

en mone- 

da hondu- 

refia. 



Encurtidos, en vinagre 6 en 
salmuera 

Picos. (V6ase herramientas 6 
instrumentos, etc.) 

Pinturas y retratos sobre lienzo, 
mad era, papel, piedra fi otra 
materia 

Fundas de almohadas. (V6ase 
enaguas, fustanes, etc.) 

Almohadas, excepto las de seda. 

Alicates. (V6ase instrumentos 
para artes, etc.) 

Alfileres, agujas, ojetes, broches, 
anzuelas, dedales, horquillas 
y hebillas para el calzado, para 
los sombreros y para los chale- 
cos y pantalones, excepto las 
de o'ro 6 plata 

Cachimbas, boquillas y pipas 
•para fumar, de ambar, de por- 
celana 6 de cualquiera otra 
materia, excepto las de oro 6 
plata y laCs denominadas en la 
4' clase 

Cachimbas, boquillas y pipas 
de barro 6 de loza ordinaria 
sin ninguna otra materia 

Piqu6. (V6ase alemanisco, da- 
masco, etc.) 

Pistolas. (V6ase espadas, sa- 
bles, etc.) 

Collares 

Embolos 

Brea negra 

Pez blanca 

Garlopas. (V6ase instrumentos 
para artes, etc.) 

Yeso mate 

Yeso manufacturado en cual- 
quier forma, excepto en ju- 
guetes para niflos 

Plumeros para coches ftinebres, 
cuando vengan separada- 
mente 

Felpa de algodon. (V6ase pana, 
panilla, etc.) 

Pel pas. (V6ase calcetas, me- 
dias, etc,) 

Portamonedas. (V6ase ca r t e - 
ras, etc.) 

Venenos. (V6ase venenos para 
preservar las pieles) 



Pesos. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



27 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



! Duty per 
I pound in 

U. S. 
' currency. 



Polishes of ail sorts, excepting 
shoeblacking 

Polishing stone 

Portfolios, etc 

Portfolios, snuff boxes, pocket- 
books, cigarette-cases,eyeglass- 
cases, match-boxes, card-cases, 
albums, and other similar arti- 
cles, excepting those made of 
or containing gold or silver. . . . 

Portraits. (See pictures, por- 
traits, etc.) 

Posts, iron, for railings. (See 
iron, manufactured, etc.) 



Potash, common or calcined. 
(See nitrate of potash.) 



Pots. (See iron, manufactured, 
etc.) 

Powder-flasks 

Presses, letter. (See iron, manu- 
factured, etc.) 

Presses, stamping, for paper. 
(See iron, manufactured, etc.). . 

Prunes, dates, and figs, dried, 
raisins, and other similar 
fruits 

Pruning hooks. (See instru- 
ments or tools) 

Purses. (See laces, stripes, etc.). 

Racks for clothes or hats. (See 
wire manufactured into frames, 
etc.) 

Raisins. (See prunes, etc.) 

Rattan, unmanufactured , 

Ratteen. (See baize and ratteen, 
etc.) 

Raven's duck. (See canvas, etC;) 



Razor-strops , 

Razors 

Red lead 

Reed-mace, unmanufactured. 

Reins 

Resin, pine 

Resins not included in other 
classes 



Dollars. 

.0145 
.0145 
.0145 



.2175 

.058 
.0145 

.0145 

.0145 
.1305 

.0145 

.0145 

.058 

.0145 

.58 



.087 
.058 
.029 

.2175 
.058 

.087 

.1305 

.058 

.029 

.3625 

.0145 

.087 li 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
por libra 
eii ittone- 
da hundu- 
refia. 



Betunes de todas clases, ex- 
cepto el de calzado 

Piedra de pulir 

Bultos y portafolios 

Carteras, tabaqueras, portamo- 
nedas, cigarreras, cajitas para 
anteojos, fosforeras, tarjeteros, 
albums y cualquiera otro ar- 
ticulo semejante, excepto los 
que sean 6 tengan algo de oro 
6 plata 

Retratos. (V6asepinturas, etc.). 

Postes de hierro para empali- 
zadas. (V6ase hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) 

Potasa comun 6 calcinada. 
(Vease potaso, nitrado 6 sal 
de nitro.) 

OUas. (V6ase hierro manufac- 
turado, etc.) 

Polvoreras 

Prensas para copiar. (V6ase 
hierro manufacturado, etc.). . . 

Prensas para timbrar papel. 
(V6ase hierro manufacturado, 
etc.) 

Ciruelas pasas, ddtiles 6 higos 
pasados, pasas 7 demas 
frutas semeiantes 

Calabozos. (V6ase herramien- 
tas 6 instrumentos, etc.) 

Bolsas para dinero. (V6ase 
encajes, tiras, etc.) 

Armadores 6 perchas paravesti- 
dos 6 sombreros. (V6ase 
alambre manufacturado, etc.) 

Pasas. (V6ase ciruelas, etc.). . 

Bejucos sin manufacturar 

Ratina. (V6ase bayeta, etc.). . . 

Loneta. (Vease lona y loneta, 
etc.) 

Asentadores de navajas 

Navajas 

Azarcon 6 minio 

Enea sin manufacturar 

Riendas 

Resina de pino 

Toda clase de resina no com- 
prendida en otras clases 



Pesos. 



.02 
.02 
.02 



.30 
.08 



.02 

.18 



.02 

.08 
.02 
.80 



. 12 

.08 
.J04 
.30 



.08 
. 12 
.18 
.08 
.04 
.50 
.02 

. 12 



28 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Retorts 

Revolvers. (See swords, etc.) . . . 

Ribbons. (See laces, stripes, 
etc.) 

Ribbons. (See understockings, 
stockings, etc.) 

Ribbons, braid, laces, fringe, 
belts, insertings of cotton, or 
any other such article or orna- 
ment pot included in other 
classes 

Ribbons **de reata" 

Rice, ground 

Rigging 

Rivets. (See iron, manufactured, 

etc.) 

Rosin 

Rubber. (See bone, ivory, etc.). . 

Rubber, for erasing 

Ruching. (See cambric, batiste, 

etc.) 

Sabers. (See swords, etc.) 

Sacks. (See shirts, linen, etc.) . . 

Sacks, traveling, of all sorts 

Sadd.e-frames 

Saddles, riding 

Saflfron 

Sago 

Sails, of canvas, raven's duck, or 
*'cotonia" 

Saltpeter 

Salts, Epsom 

Salts, Glauber 

Sand for drying writings 

Sardines, pressed, in oil, or in 
any other form 

Sashes, linen. (See laces, stripes, 
etc.) 

Sashes, .woolen. (See under- 
stockings, stockings, etc.) 

Satin. (See cloth, paAete, etc.) . . 

Satin. (See drills, jeans, etc.). . . 
Satinet. (See drills, jeans, etc.). 
Saucer of all sorts 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 
.1305 
.3625 

.58 

.2175 



.174 

.087 

•0145 
.0145 

.0145 
.0145 

.174 
.0145 

1.088 
.3625 
.2175 

.029 

.029 

.3625 
.2175 
.0145 

.029 

.029 

.0145 

.0145 

.0145 

.029 

.58 

.2175 
.3025 

.087 

.087 

.029 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Retortas 

Revolvers. (Vease espadas, etc.) 

Cintas. (Vfease encajes, tiras, 
etc.) 

Cintas. (V6ase calcetas, me- 
dias, etc.) 

Hiladillos 6 cintas, trencillas, 
encajes, flecos, fajas, tiras 
bordadas y caladas, de algo- 
don, y cualquiera otro articulo 
6 adorno semejante, no com- 
prendido en otras clases 

Cintas de reata 

Arroz molido 

JarcSar 

Remaches. (Vease hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) 

Brea rubia 

Caucho. (V6ase hueso, mariil, 
etc.) 

Goma para borrar 

Ruches. (V6ase hol&n batista, 
clarln, etc.) 

Sables. (V6ase espadas, etc.). . 

Sacos. (V6ase camisas hechas, 
etc.) 

Bolsas para viaje, de todas 
clases 

Fustes 6 armazones para mon- 
turas 

Sillas de montar 

Azafrdn 

Sagd 

Velas de lona, loneta 6 cotonia 
para embarcaciones 

Salitre 

Sal d'Epson 

Sal de Glauber 

Arenilla 

Sardinas prensadas, en aceite 
6 en cualquiera otra forma. . . 

Bandas (delino). (V6ase enca- 
jes, tiras, etc.) 

Bandas (de lana). (V6ase cal- 
cetas, medi-as, etc.) 

Raso. (V6ase paflo, pafiete, 
etc.) 

Raso. (V6ase driles, coqui, 
etc.) 

Rasete. (V6ase driles, coqui, 
etc.) 

Salsas de todas clases 



J*€SOt, 

.18 
.50 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



29 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 




Sausa^s and all sorts of food 
conserves in tins, not included 
in the foregoing classes 

Saws. (See tools for arts, etc.) . . 

Scales. (See balances, steel- 
yards, etc.) 

Scirfs. (See handkerchiefs, 
shawls, etc.) 

Scarfs. (See jerkins or doublets, 
etc.) 

Scientific instruments. (See in- 
struments of surgery, etc.) 

Scissors and *'chambetas'* 

Screens of metal, of paper, of 

cloth, etc 

Screws, large, for blacksmiths. 

(See instruments or tools.) . . . . . 

Sealing wax 

Sealing wax, ordinary, in cakes. 

Seals and stamps for letters 

Serge. (See cloth, pafiete, etc.). 

Sextants 

Shaving cases 

Shawls. (See handkerchiefs, 
shawls, etc.) 

Sheepskin garments. (See sleeves, 
etc.) 

Sheepskin robes or rugs 

Sheetings. (See drills, jeans, 
etc) 

Shells, loose or put together into 
articles or ornaments 

Shirt-bosoms. (See collars, etc.) . 

Shirtings, cotton, unlaundered, 
plain, and of any kind and 
width 

Shirts. (See handkerchiefs, 
shawls, etc.) 

Shirts, linen, or of cotton with 
some linen, and trousers, 
waistcoats, jackets, drawers, 
coats, paletots, sacks; frock 
coats, and any other article of 
ready-made clothing for men, 
made of linen, wool, or cotton, 



Dollars. 

.058 
.029 

.0145 

.58 

.1305 

.087 

.1305 

. 1305 

.0145 

.0145 
.029 
.0145 
.3625 

.174 
.174 

.58 

.174 
.3625 

.087 

.174 
.2175 

.087 
.58 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIa. 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Salchichones, chorizos y toda 
clase de conservaralimenticiar 
en latas, no incluidas en las 
clases anteriores 

Sierras y serruchos. (V6ase 
instrumentos para artes, etc.). . 

Balanzas. (V6ase balanzas, ro- 
manas, etc.) 

Chalos. (V6ase panuelos, etc.). 

Bandas. (V6ase almillas, etc.). 

Instrumentos de ciencias. 
(V6ase instrumentos de ciru- 
gia, etc.) 

Tigeras y chambetas 

Fantallasde metal, depapel, de 
tela, etc 

Tornillos grandes para herreros. 
(V6ase herramientas 6 instru- 
mentos, etc.) 

Lacre 

Lacre en panes 6 zulaque 

Sellos y timbres para cartas 

Sarga. (V6ase paflo, pafiete, 
etc.) 

Sextantes 

Cajas 6 neceseres para afeitar. . 

Pafioloiies. (V^ase pafiuelos, 
etc.) 

Chamarros. (V^ase mangas, 
etc.) 

Pellones 6 zalear 

Erin crudo. (V6ase driles, 
coqui, etc.) 

Caracoles y conchitas sueltas 6 
formando piezas 6 adornos.. 

Pecheras. (V6asecuellos, etc.). 

Mantas crudas, lisas y de toda 
clase y ancho 

Camisas. (Vease^panuelos,etc.). 

Camisas hechas de lino, 6 las 
de algodon que tengan algo 
de lino, y los pantalones, 
chalecos, chaquetas, calzon- 
cillos, casacas, paltos, sacos, 
levitas y cualquiera otra pieza 
de ropa hecha, para hombres, 



Pesos. 



.08 

.04 

.02 
.80 



. 12 
.18 

.18 



.02 
. 02 
.04 
.02 

.50 
.24 
.24 

.80 

.24 

.50 



.04 
.30 

. 12 

.80. 



30 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



excepting cotton shirts, which 
belong to the 7th class 



Shirts made of cotton , 

Shoeblacking 

Shoe laces 

Shoes and boots, etc., made up or 

in pieces 

Shot belts 

Shot, small. (See ammunition, 

etc.) 

Shoulder straps. (See laces, 

stripes, etc.) 

Shoulders (bacon) , 

Shovels. (See instruments or 

tools, etc.) 

Side arms. (See swords, etc.) . . . 

Sieves of copper wire, of horse- 
hair, or of silk 

Sieves of iron wire 

Silk, pure or mixed with other 
material, manufactured into 
articles of any sort, and fabrics 
of other materials mixed with 
silk, excepting those articles 
which are specially included in 
other classes, such as umbrel- 
las, parasols, church ornaments, 
and others 



Silver, articles of 

Silver, imitation. (See wire span- 
gles, etc.) 

Silver lace, imitation. (See wire 
spangles, etc.) 

Silver leaf. (See wire spangles, 
etc., gold or silver leaf, etc.). . 



Silver thread, imitation 

Skeins, white or colored 

Skins, tanned, not manufactured, 
such as patent-leather, calfskin, 
etc., excepting white and red 
sole leather, which belongs to 
the second class 

Skirts. (See cambric, etc.) 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars, 
.2175 



.174 
.058 
.087 

.2175 
.1305 

.029 

.58 
.029 

.0145 
.3625 



.087 
.0145 



1.088 

1.088 

.3625 

.3625 

.3625 

.3625 
.174 



.087 
1.088 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



de lino, lana 6 algodon, ex- 
cepto las camisas de algodon, 
que corresponden & la 7* 
clase , 

Camjsas hechas de algodon 

Betfin para el calzado 

Cintas de botin 

Calzado hecho 6 en corte 



Municioneras 

Perdigones. (V6asemuniciones, 
etc.) 

Charreteras. (V6ase encajes, 
tiras, etc.) 

Paletas 

Palas. (V6ase herramientas 6 
instrumentos, etc.) 

Armas blancas. (V6ase espadas, 
etc.) 

Cedazos de alambre de cobre, de 
cerda 6 de seda 

Cedazos de alambre de hierro. . . 

Seda pura 6 mezclada con otra 
materia, manufacturada en 
cualquiera forma, y las telas 6 
tejidos de otras materias que 
esten mezcladas con seda, con 
excepci6n de aquellos articu- 
los que especial mente est&n 
determinados en otras clases, 
como paraguas, sombrillas, 
ornamentos de iglesias y otros 
mis 

Los articulos de plata, etc 

Plata falsa. (V^ase alambrillos, 
etc.) 

Gal ones 6 pasamaneria de plata 
falsa. (V6asealambrillo, etc.). 

Hojilla de plata. (V6ase alam- 
brillo, etc., libritos con hoji- 
llas, etc.) 

Hilo de plata, falso 

Madej6n bianco 6 de color 

Pieles curtidas manufacturadas, 
como charoles, becerros, etc., 
excepto la suela blanca 6 colo- 
rada, que corresponda & la 
2» clase 

Fal del lines. (V6ase hoUn ba- 
tista, clarin, etc.) 



Derechos 
por libra 
en ni one- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



31 




Skirts, fustians, wrappers, and 
gowns, made up or in pieces, 
and any other article of cloth- 
ing, made of cotton, for ladies, 
and all kinds of cotton hand- 
kerchiefs 

Skirts, fustians, wrappers, pillow- 
cases, and gowns, of linen or 
mixed with cotton, except those 
of cambric of linen or mixed 
with cotton, which belong to 
the eleventh class 



Slate books, chalks, and pencils 

Slates, with or without frames. . . 

Sleeves. (See cambric, batiste, 
etc.) 

Sleeves, sheep-skin garments, 
frieze blouses, dress patterns 
of cotton prints, and cloaks 
(*• ponchos ") of wool 

Slippers. (See cloth or knit- 
goods, etc.) 

Soap, common 

Soaps, perfumed 

Soapstone or tailors' chalk 

Socks. (See laces, stripes, etc.) 

Socks. (See understocking^, 

stockings, etc.) „ . . . 

Soda 

Soda, carbonic, crystallized 

Solder 

Sole leather, white or red, not 

manufactured 

Spades. (See instruments or 

tools, etc.) 

Spangles. (See wire, spangles, 

etc.) 

Spatulas 

Spectacles. (See eyeglasses, etc.) 

Spermaceti 

Sponges 

Springs, watch. (See hands, etc.) 

Spurge oil 

Spurs. (See articles of German 

silver, etc.) 

Spyglasses. (See eyeglasses, 

etc.) 

175 A 3 



Dollars, 



.174 



.3625 

.0145 
-0145 

1.088 



.174 

.2175 
.0145 
.087 
.0145 

.58 



.2175 

.058 

.058 

.058 

.0145 

.0145 

.3625 
.1305 
.3625 

.029 

.3625 

.2175 

.0145 

.3625 

.3625 



Enaguas, fustanes, batas ytfini- 
cos, hechos 6 en cortes, y cual- 
quiera otra pieza de ropa hecha 
de algodon para sefloras, y 
toda clase de pafiuelos de al- 
godon 

Enaguas, fustanes, fustansones, 
batas, fundas de almohadas y 
tfmicos de lino 6 mezclado con 
algod6n, excepto los de holdn 
batista 6 clarin de lino 6 mez- 
clado con algodon, que co- 
rresponden d la ii* clase 

Librosde pizarra, lapices y tizas. 

Pizarras con marcos 6 sin ellos. 

Manquillos. (V6ase holdn ba- 
tista, clarin, etc.) 

Mangas, chamarras, gerga, cor- 
tes de cot6n y ponchos de 
lana 

Chinelas. (V6ase g6neros y te- 

jidos para chinelas, etc.) 

Jabon comun 

Jabones perfumados 

Jabon de piedra Uamado de sas- 

tres 

Escarpines. (V^ase encajes, 

tiras, etc.) 

Escarpines. (V6ase calcetas, 

medias. etc.) 

Soda 6 sosa comun 6 calcinada. 
Soda 6 sosa carb6nica cristali- 

zada 

Preparaci6n para soldaduras 

Suela colorada 6 blanca, no 

manufacturada 

Azadas. (V^ase herramientas 6 

instrumentos, etc.) 

Lanteiuelas. (V6ase alambrillos, 

etc.) 

Esp&tulas 

Espejuelos. (V^ase ante6jos, 

etc.) 

Esperma de ballena 

Esponjas 

Resortes (de reloj). (V6ase 

minuteros, etc.) 

Aceite de t&rtago 

Espuelas. (V^ase efectos de 

plata alemana, etc.) 

Catalejos. (V6aseanteojos, etc.). 



Pesos. 



.24 



.50 
.02 
.02 

1.50 
.24 



.30 
.02 
. 12 

.02 

.80 

.30 
.08 

.08 

.08 

.02 
.02 

.50 

.18 

.50 
.04 
.50 

.30 
.02 

.50 
.50 



32 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE.' 



Staples or buckles covered with 
leather 

Starch 

Statues, iron. (See iron, manu- 
factured, etc.) 

Stays of all kinds 

Stearic acid 

Stearine, or tallow prepared for 
stearine candles 

Steel, bronze, copper, brass, tin, 
pure or alloyed ; lead and zinc 
unwrought ; in bars ; in ingots ; 
in filings; in plates, even 
though these be punctured or 
bored 

Steel, copper, iron, brass, tin, tin- 
plates, bell-metal, bronze, lead, 
pewter, and zinc, manufactured 
into forms not included in other 
classes, polished, japanned, 
tinned, bronzed, or not , 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency . 



Steelyards. (See balances, steel- 
yards, etc.) 

Steelyards of copper or of which 
copper is the chief material. . . 

Stereoscopes, cosmoramas, dio- 
ramas, panoramas, magic lan- 
terns,and other such apparatus 

Sticks for making matches 

Stirrups. (See articles of German 
silver, etc.) 

Stockinet fabrics. (See jerkins 
or doublets, etc.) 

Stockings, cotton 

Stockings, woolen 

Stockings, linen or of linen 
mixed with cotton , 

Stockings, silk , 

Stoles. (See chasubles, etc.) 

Stones, precious •. . , , 

Stohes, such as flints, touch- 
stones, lithographic stones, and 
polishing stones, not included 
in other classes 

Stoves for cooking, portable^ of 
iron or other material 

Stoves. (See iron, manufactured, 
etc.) 



Dollart. 

.087 
.0145 

.0145 
.3625 
.029 

.0145 



.0145 



.029 

.0145 
.029 

.1305 

.0145 

.3625 

.1305 

, . 1305 

.2175 

.2175 
1.088 

.58 
1.088 

.0145 

.0145 
.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia 



ArgoUas y hebillas forradas en 
cuero 6 suela , 

Almidon 

Estatuas de hierro. (V^ase hie- 
rro manufacturado, etc.) 

Cotillas de todas clases 

Acido estearico 

Sebo preparado para bujias, es- 
te&ricas 6 estearina 

Acero, bronce, cobre, lat6n, es- 
taflo puro 6 ligado, plomo y 
zinc en pasta 6 en bruto, en 
barras, en cabillas, en rasura 
6 en liminas, aunque estas 
dltimas esten taladradas 6 
agujereadas 

Acero, cobre, hierro, lat6n 6 azo- 
far, estaflo, hoja de lata, metal 
c&mpanial, bronce, plomo, pe- 
tre y zinc manufacturados en 
cualquiera forma, no compren- 
didos en otras clases, esten 6 
no est6n pulidos, charolados, 
estaflados 6 bronceados 

Romanas. (Vease balanzas, ro- 
manas, etc.) 

Romanas de cobre 6 que tengan 
la mayor parte de este metal . . 

Estereoscopios, c o s m oramas, 
dioramas, panoramas, linter- 
nas mdgicas y demas aparatos 
semejantes 

Palitos para hacer f6sforos 

Estribos. (Vfease efectos de 
plata alemana, etc.) 

Tejidos de punto de media. 
(V6ase almillas, etc.) 

Medias de algodon 

Medias de lana 

Medias de lino 6 mezcladas con 
lana 6 algod6n 

Medias de seda 

Estolas. (V6ase casullus, etc.). 

Piedras finas 

Piedras semejantes k las de 
chispa, de toque, de litografiar 
y de pulir, no incluidas en 
otras clases 

Cocinas port&tiles de hierro fi 
otra materia 

Anafes. (V6ase hierro manu- 
facturado, etc.) 



Pesos. 



. 22 

.02 

.02 
.50 
.04 

.02 



.03 



.04 
.02 
.04 



.18 
.02 

.50 

. 18 
. 18 
.30 

.30 
1.50 

.80 
1.50 



.02 
. 02 
.02 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



33 



ARTICLE OF MEKCUANDISB. 



Straw, unmanufactured 

Strips. (See laces, stripes, etc.) . 

Stumps for drawing. (See can- 
vases, prepared, etc.) 

Sugar, white or brown 

Sulphate of copper 

Sulphate of iron or copperas 

Sulphur, in flowers or (^akes , 

Sulphuric acid 

Sunshades. (See umbrellas, large 
or small, etc.) 

Sunshades. (See umbrellas, par- 
asols, etc.) , 

Sunshades, wool 

Surgical instruments. (See instru- 
ments of surgery, etc.) 

Suspenders of all sorts , 

Suspensories 

Sweetmeats of all kinds , 

Swords, sabers, daggers, and fine 
hunting knives, blunderbuss- 
es, pistols, revolvers, mus- 
kets, capsules, f ul m i n a t i n g 
caps, vents, locks, cartridges, 
loaded or empty, and every- 
thing connected with sidearms 
or firearms, excepting those 
adopted for the army of the 
republic, whose importation 
by private individuals is pro- 
hibited 

Syphons and machines for 
aSrated waters , 

Syringes , 

Syrups of all sorts, except those 
of a medicinal character 

Table cloths. (See drills, linens, 
etc.) 

Table cloths. (See huckaback, 
etc.) 

Table covers. (See h a n d k e r- 
chiefs, shawls, etc.) 

Tacks. (See iron, manufactured, 
etc.) 

Talc. (See bone, ivory, etc.) 

Tallarin 

Tallow, crude, in cakes, or 
pressed 

Tape, plain or worked, of any 
color » 



Duty per 
pouna io 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 
.029 

.58 



.058 

.0145 

.058 

.058 

.058 

.0145 

.174 

.087 
.1305 

.087 
.3625 

.1305 
.029 



.3625 

.087 
.1305 

.029 

.1305 

.087 

.58 

.0145 

.174 
.029 

.0145 

.087 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Paja sin manufacturar 

Tiras. (V6ase encages, tiras, 

etc.) 

Esf uminos para dibujos. (V6ase 

telas preparadas, etc.) 

Azdcar bianco 6 prieto 

Sulfato de cobre 6 piedra lipis. 
Sulfato de hierro 6 caparrosa. . . 

Azufre en flor 6 en pasta 

Acido sulfdrico 

Quitasoles. (V6ase paraguas, 

paragtlitos, etc.) 

Quitasoles. (V6ase paraguas 

sombrillas, etc.) 

Quitasoles de lana 

Instrumentos de cirugia 

Eldsticas 6 tirantes de todas 
clases 

Suspensorios 

Dulces de todas clases 

Espadas, sables, puflales y cu- 
chillos finos de monte, trabu- 
cos, pistolas, revolvers, esco- 
petas, cdpsulas, fulminantes6 
pistores, chimeneas, Haves, 
cartuchos cargados 6 . vacios, 
y todo lo concerniente & las 
armas blancas y de f uego, con 
excepci6n de las adoptadas 
para el ej6rcito de la repdb- 
lica, cuya importaci6n es pro- 
hibida k, los particulares 

Sifones y mdquinas para aguas 
gaseosas 

Geringes 

Jarabes de todas clases, excepto 
los medicinales 

Manteles. (V6ase driles, creas 
puras, etc.) 

Manteles. (V6ase alemanisco, 
etc.) 

Carpetas. (V^ase pafluelos, 
pafiolones, etc.) 

Tachuelas. (V6ase hierro 
manufacturado, etc.) 

Talco. (V^asehueso, marfil,etc.) 

Tallarines 

Sebo en rama, en pasta 6 pren- 
sado 

Hiladillos lisos 6 labrados de 
cualquier color 



Derech'^s 
por libra 
eo mone- 
da liondiU 
refia. 



/Vmt. 



.04 

.80 

.08 
.02 
.08 
.08 
.oS 
.02 

.24 

. 12 
.18 
. 12 



.50 
.18 
.04 



.50 

. 12 
.18 

.04 

.18 

. 12 

.80 

.02 
.24 
.04 

.02 

. 12 



34 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Tapioca 

Tar, mineral or vegetable 

Tarlatan. (See cambric, etc.). . . 

Tarpaulin nails. (See iron, man- 
ufactured, etc.) 

Tassels. (See laces, stripes, etc.) 

Tassel s. (See understoc kings, 
stockings, etc.) 

Tea 

Teeth, artificial 

Telescopes. (See eyeglasses, 
etc.) 

Textiles or fabrics, ordinary, 
hemp, linen, or cotton, for fur- 
niture, manufactured, in broad 
strips or in any other shape . . 

Thermometers 

Thimbles. (See pins, needles, 
etc.) 

Thread, coarse, of hemp, of pita, 
of linen, or of cotton 

Thread, linen or cotton, for sew- 
ing, embroidering, or knitting. 

Thread, shoemakers' 

Tin, in the rough. (See steel, 
bronze, etc.) 

Tin, manufactured. (See steel, 
copper, etc.) 

Tin-plates. (See steel, copper, 
etc.) 

Tinder-boxes, and the tinder or 
wick therefor when imported 
with them 

Tinsel. (See wire, spamgles, etc.) 

Tissue and fabrics of any ma- 
terial interwoven with real or 
imitation gold or silver, except- 
ing the ornaments for churches 
and priests, which belong to 
the loth class 

Tobacco, in the leaf or cut 

Tongs. (See tools for arts, etc.). 

Tongues, smoked or salted, when 
not canned 

Tools for arts or trades, with or 
without handles, such as pin- 
chers, burins, augers, com- 
passes, masons* trowels, chisels 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 
.0145 
.0145 

1.088 



.0145 
.58 



.2175 

.087 
1.088 

.3625 



.087 
.174 

.087 

.087 

.087 
.029 

.0145 

.029 

.029 



.058 
.3625 



1.088 

.3625 
.029 



.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Derechos 
por libra 
enmune- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Tapioca 

Alquitr&n mineral 6 vegetal. . . 
Tarlatdn. (V^asehol&n batista, 

clarin, etc.) 

Estoperoles. (V6ase hierro 

manufacturado, etc.) 

Borlas. (V6ase encajes, tints, 

etc.) 

Borlas. (V^ase calcetas, medi- 

as, etc.) 

T6 

Dientes artificiales 

Telescopios. (V6ase anteojos, 

etc.) 

Telas 6 tegidos ordinaries de 

cdnamos, lino 6 algodon, para 

muebles, manufacturados, en 

cinchones 6 en otra forma 

Term6metros 

Dedales. (V6ase alfileres, etc.) 

Hilo gnieso decaflamo, de pita, 
de lino 6 de algodon 

Hilo de lino 6 de algodon, para 
coser, para bordar, y para t^jer 

Hitaza 6 hilo de zapateros 

Estaflo en bruto, etc. (Vfease 
acero, bronce, etc.) 

Estaflo, manufacturado. (V^ase 
acero, cobre, etc.) 

Hoja de lata. (V6ase acero, 
cobre, etc.) 

Yesqueros 6 eslabones y yesca 
6 mecha para los yesqueros 
cuando venga con ellos 

Oropel, (V6asealambrillo, etc.) 

Tisd y las telas de cualquier 
materia que esten mezclados 6 
bordados con plata fi oro, fino 
6 falso, excepto los ornamen- 
tos para las iglesias y sacerdo- 
tes, que corresponden k la 10* 
clase 

Tabaco en rama 6 picado 

Tenazas y tenacillas. (V6ase in- 
strumentos para artes, etc.) . . , 

Lenguas ahumadas 6 saladas, 
cuando no vienen en latas. . . 

Instrumentos para artes d oficios, 
con cabos 6 sin ellos, como 
alicates, buriles, barrenos, 
com pases, cucharas para 



Pesos. 



.02 
.02 

1.50 

.02 

.80 

.30 

.12 

1.50 

.50 



► 12 

.24 
.12 



. 12 
.04 

.02 

.04 

.04 

.o3 
.50 



1.50 
.50 

.04 
.02 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



35 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



gouges, levels, **g(irbias", 
jack planes, "gullames,"awls, 
files, hammers, saws, tongs, 
bench - screws, **rep lanes," 
brushes, carpenters' braces, 
and other similar tools, and 
wooden boxes containing 
any of these 

Toothpick-holders 

Tortoise -shell, manufactured. 

(See bone, ivory, etc.) 

Tortoise-shell, unmanufactured.. 

Touchstones 

Towels. (See drills, linens, etc.) 

Towels. (See huckaback, etc.) . . 

Toys of all sorts for children. . . . 

Train oil or cod-liver oil 

Trays. (See articles of German 
silver, etc.) 

Trimmings. (See laces, stripes, 
etc.) 

Trimmings. (See understock- 
ings, stockings, etc.) 

Trousers. (See jerkins or doub- 
lets, etc.) 

Trousers. (See shirts, linen, etc.) 

Trowels, masons'. (See tools for 
arts, etc.) 

Trunks containing articles, 
will pay the duties assessed on 
the contents 

Trunks, traveling, of all sorts. . . . 

Trusses 

Tulle. (See lace or tulle, etc.). . . 
Turpentine 

Turpentine, common or Venetian. 

Umbrella frames. (See wire 
manufactured into frames, etc.). 

Umbrellas, large or small, sun- 
shades and parasols, of silk or 
mixed with wool or cotton 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 



.029 

.0145 

.174 
.174 
.0145 
.1305 

.087 

.087 

.0145 

.3625 

.58 

.2175 

.1305 
.2175 

.029 



.029 

.1305 
.2175 
.0145 

.0145 
.087 

.174 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



albafiiles, escoplos,formones, 
niveles, gdrbias, garlopas, 
guUames, lesnas, limas, mar- 
tillos, sierras, serruchos, tena- 
zas y tenacillas, tornos y tor- 
nillos de banco, replanes, 
cepillos, berbiquies \i otros 
semejantes, y las cajas de 
madera con algunos de estos 
instrumentos 

Palilleros 

Carey manufacturado. (V6ase 
hueso. marfil, etc.) 

Carey sin manufacturar 

Piedras de toque 

Toallas de mano. (V^ase driles, 
creas puras, etc.) 

PaAos de mano. (V^ase ale- 
manisco, etc.) 

Juguetes de todas clases para 
ninos 

Aceite de pescado 6 de higado de 
bacalao 

Azafates. (V6ase efectos de 
plata alemana, etc.) 

Pasamaneria. (V^ase encajes. 
tiras, etc.) 

Pasamaneria. (V6ase calcetas, 
medias, etc.) 

Pantalones. (V6ase almillas, 
etc.) 

Pantalones. (V^ase camisas 
hechas, etc.) 

Cucharas para albafiiles. (V^ase 
instrumentos para artes, etc.) 

Baules conteniendo efectos. 
pagarin el aforo de los de- 
rechos que contengan , 

Baules para viaje, de todas 
clases 

Bragueros 

Tul. (V6ase punto 6 tul, etc.). 

Aguarras 6 espiritu de tremen- 
tina 

Trementina comun 6 de Vene- 
cia 

Armaduras para paraguas. (V6- 
ase alambre manufacturado, 
etc.) 

Paraguas, paragUitos, quitasoles 
y sombrillas de seda 6 mez- 
clada con lana 6 algodon 



Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 
da hondu- 
refia. 



Pesos, 



.04 
.02 

.24 
.24 
.02 

.18 

. 12 

. 12 

.02 

.50 

.80 

.30 

.18 

.30 



.04 
.18 
.30 

.02 

.02 

. 12 
.24 



36 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 




Umbrellas, parasols, and sun- 
shades of linen or cotton 

Umbrellas, woolen 

Understockings. (See jerkins or 
doublets, etc.) 

Understockings, stockings, 
fringe, tassels, lace, ribbons, 
sashes, cords, trimmings, 
plushes, caps, cloaks, belts, 
bows, epaulets, socks, and 
gloves of wool or mixed with 
cotton 

Uriderwaistcoats, wool. (See 
handkerchiefs, shawls, etc)... 

Underwaistcoats, cotton. (See 
jerkins, etc.) 

Urns, iron. (See iron, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Valises, traveling, of all kinds. . . 

Vanilla 

Varnishes not included in other 
classes 

Velocipedes of all sorts 

Velveteen. (See corduroy, cot- 
ton plush, etc.) 

Vermicelli 

Vermicelli paste, broken 

Vests. (See shirts, linen, etc.). . . 



Vinegar 

Wafers 

Waiters. (See articles of Ger- 
man silver, etc.) 

Wall-paper 

Watches, of whatever material . . 



Water. aCrated 

Water-filters 

Water of orange flowers 

Waters, mineral 

Wax, manufactured into articles 
of any sort, excepting toys for 
children 

Wax, shoemakers' 

Wax, white, pure or mixed, un- 
worked 

Weed-hooks. (See instruments 
or tools, etc.) 

Weights. (See balances, steel- 
yards, etc.) 

Weights, iron. (See iron, manu- 
factured, etc.) 



Dollars. 

.087 
.1305 

.1305 



.2175 

.58 

.1305 
.0145 

.029 
.087 

.029 
.087 

• 174 

.029 

.0145 

.2175 

.0145 
.0145 

.3625 
.087 
1.088 

1.088 
.0145 
.0145 
.0145 



.1305 
.0145 

.058 

.0145 
.0145 

.0145 



Paraguas, sombrillas y quita- 
soles de lino 6 de algodon. . . 

Paraguas de lana 

Calcetas. (V6ase almillas, etc.) 

Calcetas, medias, fluecos, bor- 
las, encajes, cintas, bandas, 
cord ones, pasamanerla,felpas, 
gorras, abrigos, fajas, lazos, 
charreteras, escarpines y gu- 
antes de lana 6 mezclados 
con algodon , 

Guarda-camisas de lana. (V^ase 
pafiuelos, paflolones, etc.) 

Guarda-camisas de algod6o. 
(Vease almillas, etc.) , 

Jarrones de hierro. (V6ase 
hierro manufacturado, etc.) . . 

Maletas de viaje, detodas clases. 

Vainilla 

Bamices no incluidos en otras 
clases 

Velocipedes de todas clases 

Imitaci6n de terciopelo. (V6ase 
pafia, paflilla, etc.) 

Fideos 

S6mola quebrantada .para hacer 
fideos 

Chalecos. (V6ase camisas he- 
chas, etc.) 

Vinagre 

Obleas 

Bandejos. (V6ase efectos de 
plata alemana, etc.) 

Papel pintado para tapicerfa. . . . 

Los relojes de faltriquera de 
cualquiera materia que sean . 

Aguas gaseosas 

Aparatos 6 filtradores de agua . . 

Aguas de azahares 

Aguas minerales 

Cera manufacturada en .cual- 
quiera forma, excepto en ju- 
guetes para niflos 

Cerote para zapateros 

Cera blanca, pura 6 mezclada, 
sin labrar 

Escardillas. (V^ase herrami- 
entas 6 instrumentos, etc.) 

Pesos. (Vfease balanzas, ro- 
manas, etc.) 

Pesos de hierro. (V6ase hi- 
i erro manufacturado, etc.) 



PesM. 



.30 

.80 

.18 

.02 
.04 
. 12 

.04 
. 12 



.02 

.30 
.02 
.02 



1.50 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.02 



.oS 
.02 
.02 
.02 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



37 



ARTICLE OF MBRCHANDISB. 



Weights of copper or of which 
copper is the chief material . . . . 

Whips , 

Whiting, in pieces or pow- 
dered 

Wicks for lamps 

Wicks, or cotton twisted for 
wicks , 

Wicks, pocket, for smokers . . . . . 

Wig frames. (See wire, manufac- 
tured, etc.) 

Window-blinds 

Window-glasses 

Wines of all sorts , 

Wire, excepting for fences. (See 
iron manufactured, etc.) 

Wire-cloth. (See netting of iron 
wire, etc.) , 

Wire manufactured into frames 
for wigs, cages for birds, racks 
for clothes or hats, or other 
similar appliances, and also 
the frames of umbrellas and 
parasols 



Wire spangles, ** relumbr6n," 
tinsel, gold or silver leaf, gal- 
loons, gold or silver lace, and 
any other article of gold or sil- 
ver, imitation, for sewing or 
embroidering 

Wood, fine, for making musical 
instruments, cabinet work, etc. . 

Wood in leaves or panels for 
veneering 

Wood, manufactured, in any form 
not included in other classes. . . 

Wool. (See handkerchiefs, shawls, 
etc.) 

Wool. (See neckties of cotton, 
etc.) 

Wool. (See skirts, linen, etc.) . . . 

Wool, raw, 

Wool, spun or twisted, for em- 
broidering and other uses 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 

.029 
.1305 

.0145 
.087 



.087 
.174 

.087 
.029 
.029 
.0145 



.0145 
.058 

.087 



.3625 
.0145 

.0145 
.0145 

.58 

.58 
.2175 

.029 
.2175 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



I Derechos 
por libra 
en mone- 

da hondu* 
refia. 



Pesos de cobre 6 que tengan la 
mayor parte de este metal . . . . 

Ldtigos y foetes 

Tiza 6 greda blanca en pedazos 
6 en polvo 

Mechas y torcidos para Idmpa- 
ras 

Pibilo 6 algodon hilado para 
pdbilo 

Mechas para fumadores 

Armaduras para pelucas. (V6ase 
alambre manufacturado, etc.) . 

Celosias para ventanas 

Transparentes para ventanas 

Vinos de todas clases y en cual- 
quier envase , 

Alambre. (V6ase hierro manu- 
facturado : en alambres, ex- 
cepto los de cercos, etc.) , 

Telas 6 tejidos de alambre de 
hierro 

Alambre manufacturado en ar- 
maduras para pelucas, enjau- 
las para p&jaros, en armado- 
res 6 perchas para vestidos 6 
sombreros d otros aparatos 
semejantes, y tambien las ar- 
maduras para paraguas y 
quitasoles 

Alambrillo, lantejuelas, relum- 
br6n, oropel, hojilla, galones, 
pasamaneria, y cualquier otro 
articulo de oro 6 plata, falso, 
para coser 6 bordar 

Madera fina para construir instru- 
mentosde mdsica, ebanisteria, 
etc 

Madera en hojas 6 sean chapas 
para encapar , 

Madera manufacturada en cual- 
quiera forma, nocomprendida 
en otras clases 

Lana. (V6ase pafiuelos, paflo- 
lones, etc.) 

Lana. (V6ase corbatas de algo- 
don, etc.) 

Lana. (Viase camisas hechas, 
etc.) ". 

Lana en bruto 

Lana hilada 6 torcida, para bor- 
dar y otros usos 



Ptto*. 



.04 
. i3 



. 12 
.24 

. 12 
.04 
.04 



.08 



.50 

.02 
.02 

.02 
.80 
.80 

.30 
.04 

.30 



38 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Woolens. (See cloth, pafSete, 
etc.) 

Work-baskets or boxes 

Worsted 

Wrappers. (See shirts, fustians, 
wrappers, etc.) 

Yokes. (See muslins, fine, etc.) 

Zephyr. (See cambric, etc.). . . . 

Zinc, unmanufactured. (See steel, 
bronze, etc., unwrought) 

Zinc, manufactured. (See steel, 
copper, etc., manufactured.). . . 

Zinc, white, and white bole 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency . 



Dollars. 

.3675 

.174 

.174 

.174 
.2175 

1.088 



.0145 

.029 
.0145 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCfA. 



Telas de lana. (V6ase pafio, 

paRete, etc.) 

Costureros 

Estambre en rama 

Batas. (V6ase enaguas, fus- 

tanes, etc.) 

Golas. (V6asemuselinas finas, 

etc.) 

C6firo. (V6ase holdn batista, 

clarin, etc.) 

Zinc. (V6ase acero, bronce, 

etc., en pasta) 

Zinc. (V6ase acero, cobre, etc., 

manufacturados) 

Blanco de zinc y bolo bianco . . 



Derechos 
por libra 
ec mone- 
da hondu 
refUu 



Fesos. 



.50 
.24 
.24 

.24 

.30 

1.50 

.02 

.04 
.02 



MERCHANDISE FREE OF DUTY. 

Agricultural machines. 

Alabaster, cut or polished, in any shape, 

not elsewhere specified. 
Alabaster, in the rough. 
Anchors, for boats and launches, when 

imported therewith. 
Animals, live. 
Apparatus for electric lighting. 

Apparatus, machines, and utensils for 
printing offices. 

Articles imported for account of the gov- 
ernment of the Republic, for the use of 
municipalities, and for any public 
work. 

Asphalt. 

Axles for coaches, cars, and carts. 

Baggage (personal), including only cloth- 
ing and foot-wear, jewels and table serv- 
ice, printed books, and food, all for the 
use of the owner, in quantity propor- 
tioned to the latter's rank and circum- 
stances, but not including furniture, 
even when already used, nor whole 
pieces of any sort of cloth. 

Balconies, iron, in pieces. 

Barrels, in pieces or put together. 

Beans. 

Beans, kidney. 

Boats, in pieces or put together. 

Books, printed. 

Bottles, common, of black glass or ordi- 
nary white glass, for bottling liquors. 



MERCANCf AS LIBRES DE DERE- 
CHOS. 

Mdquinas para la agricultura. 

Alabastro, labrado 6 pulido, en cualquiera 
forma, no mencionado en otra clase. 

Alabastro en bruto. 

Anclas, para botes y lanchas, cuando ven- 
gan con ellos. 

Animales vivos. 

M&quinas 6 aparatos para alumbrado el6c- 
trico. 

Mdquinas, aparatos y fitiles para impren- 
tas. 

Articulos que se importen por cuenta del 
gobierno de la repfiblica, para uso de 
las municipalidades y para cualquiera 
obra de interns pdblico. 

Asfalto. 

Ejes para coches, carros y carretas. 

Equipaje, entendi^ndose por tal s61o la 
ropa y calzado, las alhajas y bajillas, 
libros impresos y comestibles, todo para 
el uso del dueflo, en una cantidad pro- 
porcionada & la clase y circunstancias 
de este; pero no los muebles, aunque 
sean usados, ni las piezas enteras de 
cualquier tejido. 

Balcones de hierro.desarmados 6 en piezas. 

Barriles armados 6 sin armar. 

Frijoles. 

Habichuelas. 

Botes armados 6 en piezas. 

Lib.ros impresos. 

Botellas comunes de vidrio negro 6 de 
vidrio claro ordinario para embazar* 
licores. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



39 



MERCHANDISE FREE OF DUTY— 
Continued. 

Bran. 

Bricks. 

Bridges, with their chains, flooring, and 
other belongings. 

Cardboard, impermeable, for roofing build- 
ings. 

Carriages intended exclusively for rail- 
ways. 

Carriages of all sorts. 

Carts of all sorts. 

Cement, Roman. 

Chaises. 

Charcoal. 

Charts, hydrographic. . 

Charts, navigation. 

Clocks for towers, including the dials and 
bells. 

Coaches. 

Coal, mineral. 

Collections of driedplants. 

Copies, writing andrdrawing. 

Corn. 

Crucibles of all sorts. 

Demijohns, empty. 

Doors, iron, in pieces. 

Effects of foreign ministers and diplo- 
matic agents accredited to the govern- 
ment of the Republic and of diplo- 
matic agents of the Republic returning 
to Honduras, when brought with them 
for their own use, and such as may be 
introduced for the use and consumption 
of the President of the Republic and of 
the Ministers of the Administration. 

Eggs, birds'. 

Electric-lighting machinery or apparatus. 

Filtering stones. 

Firewood. 

Flags or tiles of baked clay, of marble, of 

jasper, or of any other material, for 

floors. 
Flour, potato. 
Flour, wheat. 
Flours, not specified. 
Foods, unprepared. 
Fountains of iron, marble, or any other 

material. 
Fruits, fresh, not specified. 
Garden stuff. 
Gas machines and apparatus. 

Gigs. 

Globes or spheres, celestial or terrestrial. 
Gold, unmanufactured abd also in law- 
ful money. 



MERCANCIAS LIBRES DE DERE- 

CHOS— Conlinda. 

Afrecho. 

Ladrillos. 

Puentes, con sus cadenas, pisos y demds 

adherentes. 
Cart6n impermeable para techar edificios. 

Carruajes destinados exclusivamente para 
caminosde hierro. 

Carruajes de todas clases. 

Carretas de todas clases. 

Cimento romano. 

Calesas. 

Carbon vegetal. 

Cartas hidrogrdficas. 

Cartas de navegaci6n. 

Relojes para torres, incluyendo las mues- 
tras y campanas. 

Coches. 

Carbon mineral. 

Colecciones de plantas secas. 

Muestras de escrituray dibujo. 

Maiz. 

Crisoles de todas clases. 

Damesanas 6 garrafones vacios. 

Puertas de hierro, desarmados6 en piezas. 

Efectos que traigan consigo para su uso 
losMinistros Pdblicosy Aagentes Diplo- 
m&ticos extranjeros acreditados cerca 
del Gobierno de la Repdblica, y los 
Agentes Diplom&ticos de la Repdblica 4 
su regreso d Honduras, y los que se 
introduzcan para uso y consumo del 
Presidente de la Repdblica y de los 
Ministros del Despacho. 

Huevos de aves. 

Mdquinas 6 aparatos para alumbrado el6c- 
trico. 

Piedras de destilar. 

Lefia. 

Losas 6 baldosas debarro cocido, dem&r- 
mol, de jaspe 6 de qualquiera otra ma- 
teria, para pisos. 

Harina de papas. 

Harina de trigo. 

Harinas no especificadas. 

Comestibles sin preparar. 

Fuentes 6 pilas de hierro, mdrmol 6 de 
cualquiera otra materia. 

Frutas frescas no especificadas. 

Legumbres. 

Mdquinas y aparatos para alumbrado poi 
gas y para producirlo. 

Quitrines. 

Globos 6 esferas celestes 6 terrestres. 

Oro sin manufacturar y tambien en mo 
neda legitima. 



40 



IMPORT DUtlES or HONDURAS. 



MERCHANDISE FREE OF DUTY— 
Continued. 

Granite, cut or polished, in any form, not 
elsewhere specified. 

Guano. 

Harness, carriage. 

Hogsheads, in pieces or put together. 

Hoops, of iron or wood, for casks, hogs- 
heads, barrels, or sieves. 

Houses, iron, in pieces. 

Houses, wooden. 

Ice. 

Ink, printing. 

Jasper, cut or polished, in any form, not 
elsewhere specified. 

Launches, in pieces or put together. 

Lime, common. 

Lime, hydraulic. 

Lumber, ordinary, for building. 

Machinery or apparatus for electric light- 
ing. 
•Machines and apparatus for lighting by 
gas and for manufacturing gas. 

Machines, apparatus, and utensils for 
printing offices. 

Machines for agriculture and mining. 

Maps of all kinds. 

Marble, cut or polished, in any form, not 
elsewhere mentioned. 

Marble, in the rough. 

Materials, building, not included in other 
classes. 

Materials intended exclusively for rail- 
ways. 

Mining machinery. 

Motors, steam, of any kind, with all their 
accessories. 

Oars for boats and launches, when im- 
ported with them. 

Oats. 

Pamphlets. 

Paper, white, printing, without sizing or 
glazing. 

Periodicals. 

Pine or other ordinary woods for build- 
ing. 

Pipes (casks), in pieces or put together. 

Pipes or conduits of iron or lead. 

Plants, dried, collections of. 

Plants, living, of all kinds. 

Potatoes. 

Printing ink. 

Printing-office machines, apparatus, and 
utensils. 

Printing paper, white, without sizing or 
glazing. 

Pumice stone. 



MERCANCf AS LIBRES DE DERE- 

CHOS— Continfia. 

Granito, labrado 6 pulido, en cualquier 

forma, no mencionado en otra clase. 
Huano. 

Ameses para los carruajes. 
Bocoyes armados 6 sin armar. 
Arcos 6 fleges de hierro 6 de madera para 

pi pas, bocoyes, barriles 6 cedazos. 
Edificios de hierro desarmados 6 en 

piezas. 
Edificios de madera. 
Hielo. 

Tinta de imprenta. 
Jaspe, labrado 6 pulido, en cualquier 

forma, no mencionado en otra clase. 
Lanchas armadas 6 en piezas. 
Cal comun. 
Cal hidr&ulica. 

Maderas ordinarias para edificios. 
Mdquinas 6 aparatos para alumbrado el6c- 

trico. 
Mdquinas y aparatos para alumbrado por 

gas y para producirlo. 
M^quinas, aparatos y dtiles para las im- 

prentas. 
Mdquinas para la agricultura y minerla. 
Mapas de todas clases. 
Mdrmol, labrado 6 pulido, en cualquier 

forma, no mencionado en otra clase. 
M4rmol en bruto. 
Materiales de construcci6n no incluido en 

otra clase. ' 
Materiales destinadosexclusivamente para 

caminos de hierro. 
M^quinas para la mineria. 
Motores de vapor de cualquiera clase, con 

todos accesorios. 
Remos, para botes y lanchas cuando ven- 

gan con ellos. 
Avena. 

Cuademos y folletos. 
Papel bianco de imprenta, sincola6 goma. 

Peri6dicos. 

Pino ii otras maderas ordinarias para edi- 
ficios. 

Pi pas armadas 6 sin armar. 

Cafierias 6 conductos de hierro 6 plomo. 

Colecciones de plantas secas. 

Plantas vivas de todas clases. 

Papas. 

Tinta de imprenta. 

Mdquinas, aparatos y dtiles para las im- 
prentas. 

Papel bianco de imprenta, sin cola 6 goma. 

Piedra p6mez. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



4J 



MERCHANDISE FREE OP DUTY— 

Continued. 

Pumps, hydraulic, with their pipes and 

other parts. 
Refractory stones for foundry furnaces. 

Rice. 

Roots, edible. 

Sacks for coffee. 

Sails, for boats and launches, when im- 
ported therewith. 

Salt, common. 

Samples of merchandise, in small pieces, 
not exceeding 25 pounds in weight. 

Sawing machines. 

Seeds for planting. . 

Shingles. 

Silver, unmanufactured, and also lawful 

money. 
Springs for coaches, cars, and carts. 
Stages. 
Staves for barrels, pipes, and hogsheads, 

imported separately. 
Steam motors of every sort, with all their 

accessories. 
Stone, of all kinds, in the rough. 
Stone, such as marble, alabaster, jasper, 

and granite, cut or polished in any form, 

not elsewhere specified. 

Stones for filtering. 

Stones of all kinds and in any shape, for 

grinding or sharpening. 
Stones, refractory, for foundry furnaces. 

Tiles, for roofs, of clay or slate. 

Tires, for coaches, cars, and carts. 

Type, printers*. 

Utensils intended exclusively for railways. 

Vegetables. 

Wheels, for coaches, cars, and carts. 

Wire, iron, of any shape, for fences. 

Wood, for burning. 

Wood, ordinary, for building. 

Wood intended for building vessels. 



TARIFF CLASSIFICATION. 

Merchandise from foreign countries 
which is introduced into the custom- 
houses of the Republic is divided into 
eleven classes, as follows : 

1. Free of duty. 

2. Paying two cents a pound. 



MERCANCIAS LIBRES DE DERE- 

CHOS— Continda. 

Bombas hidrdulicas con sus tubos y de- 

mds piezas. 
Piedras refractarias para hornos de fundi- 

ci6n. 
Arroz. 

Raices alimenticias. 
Sacos para caf6. 
Velas para botes y lanchas, cuando ven- 

gan con ellos. 
Sal comun. 
Muestras de mercancias en pequefios pe- 

dazos, cuyo peso no exceda de veinti- 

cince libras. 
M&quinas para aserrar. 
Semillas para sembrar. 
Tejamanil. 
Plata sin manufacturar y tambien moneda 

legitima, 
Resortes para coches, carros y carretas. 
(Omnibus. 
Duelas de barriles, pi pas y bocoyes, 

cuando vengan por separado. 
Motores de vapor, de cualquiera clase, con 

todos sus accesorios. 
Piedras de todas clases, en bruto. 
Piedras semejantes al m&rmol, alabastro, 

jaspe y granito, labradas 6 pulidas en 

cualquiera forma, no mencionadas en 

otra clase. 
Piedras de destilar. 
Piedras de todas clases y en cualquiera 

forma, paramoler y para amolar. 
Piedras refractarias para hornos de fundi- 

ci6n. 
Tejas de barro 6 de pizarra. 
Llantas para coches, caros y carretas. 
Tipos de imprcnta. 
Utensilios destinados exclusivamente para 

caminos de hierro. 
Mortal iza. 

Ruedas para coches, carros y carretas. 
Alambre de hierro en cualquiera forma para 

cercos. 
Lefia. 

Maderas ordinarias para edificios. 
Madera i. proposito para la construcci6n 

naval. 

CLASIFICACI6N ARANCELARIA. 

Las mercaderi&s procendentes del ex- 
tranjero que se introduzcan por las Adua- 
nas de la Repdblica se dividen en once 
clases : 

1. Que no pagard derecho alguno. 

2. Que pagari dos centavos por libra. 



42 



IMPORT DUTIES OF HONDURAS. 



TARIFF CLASSIFICATION— Con. 

tinued. 

3. Paying four cents a pound. 

4. Paying eight cents a pound. 

5. Paying twelve cents a pound, 

6. Paying eighteen cents a pound. 

7. Paying twenty-four cents a pound. 

8. Paying thirty cents a pound. 

9. Paying fifty cents a pound. 

10. Paying eighty cents a pound. 

1 1 . Pay i ng one dollar and a half a pound. 




CLASIFICACI6N ARANCELARIA— 

Continda. 



ue pag;ard cuatro centavos por libra, 
ue pagard ocho centavos por libra, 
ue pagard doce centavos por libra, 
ue pagard diez y ocho centavos por 



7. Que pagard veinte y cuatro centavos 
por libra. 

8. Que pagard treinta centavos por libra. 

9. Que pagard cincuenta centavos por 
libra. 

10. Que pagari ochenta centavos por 
libra. 

11. Que pagard ciento cincuenta centa- 
vos por libra. 



Import Duties 

of Ecuador. 



Derechos de Importacion 
en Ecuador. 



BtntEAU or THE American Republics, 

JVasktngton^ U, S. A. 



Bulletin No 25. November, 1891. 



I 

[ 



o(oA .<. U^occ 'Y ,:'^ .1 ' r :^ ;}i.' l/C ^^ ; .c'. ^ \.'i ^^^ 



Import Duties 

of Ecuador. 



Derechos de ImportaciOn 
en Ecuador. 



o o 
BURKAIT OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 



\ 



Washington^ U, S. A. 
Bulletin No 25. November, 1891. 



BUREAU CF THE AMERICAN (^PUBLICS, . 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINGTON, D. C, U. S. A. 



Director. — William E. Curtis. 

Secretary. — Henry L. Bryan. 

Statistician, — Carlos Federico Adams-Michelena. 

Portuguese Translator. — John C. Redman. 

Spanish Translators. — Josfe Ignacio Rodriguez. 

Mary F. Foster. 
Cy^r>b.— John T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer. — Imogen A. Hanna. 



LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 

1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. i. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 

9. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 

24. Import Duties of Honduras. 



While the greatest possible care is taken to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau ot the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that may 
occur therein. 

(II) 



CONTENTS. 



Paire. 

Tariff of import duties i 

Notes 9 

Free list lo 

Prohibited articles 1 1 

Light dues 12 

Pilotage 12 

Port charges 12 

(III) 



Import Duties of Ecuador. 



DERECHOS DE IMPORTACI6n EN ECUADOR. 



In addition to the rates given below, there are charged extra duties amounting to 30 
per cent, on the duties expressed. 

Equivaients, 
I Peso = $ o. 736. 
I Kilo = 2. 2046 pounds. 



Articles. 



Duty per 
pound in 
U. S. cur- 
rency. 



Albums 

Articles not enumerated. 



Almonds 

Alum ■ 

Anchors 

Aniseed 

Annatto 

Antimacassars and all other cro- 
chet and netted articles 

Axles, of iron, for carts, wagons, 
and trucks 

Bagging for sacks and other pur- 
poses 

Bags, hemp, empty, of every de- 
scription 

Barley 

Barometers 

Barrels, pails, pipes, and tuns, 
empty 

Beads and bugles, glass 

Beer in any kind of vessel 

Beils. hand and harness 

Beverages in general 



Dollars. 

.5007 
.0835 

.0167 
.0167 
.0067 
. 1669 
.0167 

.3338 

.0067 

.0167 

.0167 
.0067 
.0167 

.0167 

.3338 

.0167 
. 1669 
.0167 



Artfculos. 



Albums 

Todos los articulos no com- 

prendidos en las diez clases. . 

Almendras 

Alumbre 

Anclas 

Anis 

Achiote 

Antimacazares y cualquier otro 

articulo de red 6 al crochet . . 
Ejes de hierro para carros, car- 

retas 6 carretillas 

Crudo 6 cafiamazo para sacosy 

otros (itiles 

Sacos de caflamo, vaclos, de to- 

da clase 

Cebada 

Bar6metros 

Barriles, baldes, pipas y tone- 

les, vaclos 

Abalorios y chaquiras 

Cerveza en cualquier envase. . . 

Campanulas y cascabeles 

Chicha en general 

I 




.05 

.05 
.02 
.05 

.05 
1. 00 
.05 
•50 
.05 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Billiard tables and appliances . . . 

Boats and small lighters 

Bonnets and caps, all sizes 

Books, account, and blank regis- 
ters 

Books and pamphlets, printed . . . 

Boots and shoes of fine quality 
with ornaments 

Bottles, jugs, and demijohns, 
empty , 

Bran , 

Braid and binding tapes , 

Brass, manufactured 

Bricks, common clay 

Bronze, manufactured 

Broom straw , 

Brooms, with or without handles. 

Butter 

Buttons 

Cables of iron for ships and small 
craft , 

Canary seed 

Candles of every description 

Cardboard for book-binding 

Cardboard, ordinaiy or bitumi- 
nized and for binding purposes. 

Cards, playing, and dice , 

Carob pods for fodder , 

Carriages, fitted or not, and their 
detached parts 

Cartridges 

Carts and wheelbarrows , 

Cement, Roman 

Cigar and cigarette holders and 
snufT-boxes 

Charcoal 

Chicha (drinks of fermented corn 
or fruits) 

Chinaware or porcelain of fine 
quality not intended for table 
service, toilet sets, and other 
domestic purposes 

Chufio (kind of fecula prepared 
in Peru) 

Cocoa 

Cocoanuts, fresh or dried, like 
those from Guayaquil 

Cocoanuts, small, from Chile. . . . 

Compasses, mariners' 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.0334 
.0033 
.3338 

.0334 
.0067 

.3338 

.0033 
.0033 
. 1669 
.0334 
.0033 
.0334 
.C167 
.0167 

.0334 
. 1669 

.0167 
.0167 
.0334 

.0167 



.0066 
.6677 
.0033 



.0167 
.6677 
.0067 
.0033 

.5007 
.0033 

.0167 



Articulos. 



Bil lares y accesorios 

Botes y embarcaciones menores . 

Gorros, gorras y gorritas 

Libros de comercio y registros 

en bianco 

Libros y folletos impresos 

Calzado fino con adornos , 



Botellas, botijas y damajuanas 

vacias' 

Afrecho 

Trencillas y reatas 

Lat6n manufacturado 

Ladrillos de barro ordinarios . . . 

Bronce manufacturado 

Paja para escobas 

Escobas con mango 6 sin 61 . . . . 

Mantequilla 

Botones 

Cadenas de hierro para buques 

y embarcaciones menores 

Alpiste 

Velas de toda clase para alum- 

brado 

Cartones para encuadernaci6n 

de libros 

Carton ordinario 6 embetunado, 

y para encuadernaci6n 

Barajas y dados 

Vainilla de algarrobo para ali- 

mento de animates 

Carruajes armados 6 desarnia- 

dos y sus piezas sueltas 

Capsulas 

*Carretas y carretillas 

Cemento romano 

Boquillas para f u mad ores ytaba- 

queras 

I Carbon de madera 

Chicha en general 



.0167 1 



Loza fina 6 porcelana no para 
servicios de mesa lavatorios 
y otros utensil ios dom^sticos. . 



Chufto. 



.0167 
.0167 

.0033 
.0167 
.0167 



' Coca 

. Cocos, frescos 6 secos, como Ios 

11 de Guayaquil 

I Coquitos de Chile 

, Brujdlas 



DerechoB 
por kilo 
en mone- 
daecua^ 
torkna. 



Pesos. 
. 10 
.01 
I. 00 

. 10 

.02 

I. 00 



.01 
.01 
.50 
. 10 
.01 
. 10 
.05 
.05 
. 10 
.50 



.05 
.05 



.05 

.02 
2.00 

. 01 

.05 

2. 00 

. 02 

. 01 

1.50 
. 01 
.05 



.05 

.05 

.05 

. 01 
.05 
.05 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Copper or bronze, manufactured 
or in perforated sheets 

Copper, bronze, or brass in the 
rough, or sheets not perforated, 
and waste pieces 

Copy-books, Garnier's system of 
calligraphy 



Coral, manufactured or unmanu- 
factured 

Cordage, cotton 

Cordage of sisal and manila 

Corkscrews . . , 

Corks for bottles 

Com 

Corsets 

Cotton, filament or waste 

Cotton, raw, with or without seeds. 

Crockery, common, for table use 
and toilet sets 

Crowbars for agricultural pur- 
poses 

Crucibles 

Cumin seed 

Demijohns, bottles, and jugs 
(empty) 

Dyewoods 

Dynamite or blasting powder for 
mines, under legal requirements. 



Earth for casting purposes. 

Emery and sand paper 

Enamel 

Envelopes 

Epaulets 

Fancy articles 

Fans 

Feathers for trimming . . . . 
Felt, tarred for ships' use . 
Fire^vorks 



Duty per 
pound 
In U. S. 

currency. 



Dcllart. 
.0334 

.0067 
.0067 



.5007 

.0334 
.0167 
. 1669 

.0334 
.0067 

.3338 
.0167 
.0167 

.0067 

.0067 
.0167 
.0167 

.0033 
.0067 

.0033 

.0033 

•0334 
. 1669 

.0334 
.5007 
.3338 
.5007 
.5007 

.0334 
. 1669 



Fish, salted, like that imported j 
from Peru 

Flour of wheat, .maize, or any 
other grain 

Flowers, artificial 

Fountains of marble or of iron. 
with their appliances 

Fruits, dried, and other unpre- 
pared provisions 

Funeral crowns and other orna- 
ments 



.0067 

.0167 
.5007 

■0033 
.0167 

.6677 



Artfculos. 



Cobre 6 bronce, manufacturado 

6 en planchas perforadas , 

! Cobre, bronce 6 lat6n en bruto 
6 en planchas no perforadas y 
en piezas inutilizadas , 

Cuadernos, sistema Garnier, 
para la ensefianza de la cali- 
graf ia , 

Coral, bruto 6 manufacturado. . . 



Jarcia de algodon 

Jarcia de sisal y manila 

Tirabuzones 

Corchos para tapones debotellas. 

Maiz 

Cors6s 

Hilacha 6 escoria de algodon. . . 
Algodon con pepas 6 sin ellas. . 
Loza, ordinaria, como la de ser- 

vicio y la\'atorios 

Barras para agricultura 



Crisoles 

Cominos 

Damajuanas, botellas y botijas 

(vacf as) 

Palos para tinte 

Dinamita 6 p61vora para minas, 

observdndose 1 a s prescrip- 

cioneslegales 

Tierras para fundici6n 

Lija en papel 

Esmalte 

Sobres para cartas 

Charreteras 

Objetos de fantasia 

Abanicos 

Plumas para adornos 

Felpa embetunada para buques. 
P6lvora manufacturada en fue- 

gos artificiales 

Pescado salado como 61 que 

viene del Peril 

Harinas de trigo, maiz 6 cual- 

quier otro grano 

Flores artificiales 

Piias de mdrmol 6 de hierro y 

sus dtiles 

Frutas secas y mds comestibles 

no preparadas 

Coronas y otros adornos fune- 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
daecua- 
toriana. 



Pesos, 



.02 



.02 
1.50 

. 10 

.05 
.50 

. 10 

.02 

1. 00 

.05 
.05 

.02 
.02 

.05 
.05 

.01 
.02 



.01 
.01 
. 10 

.50 

. 10 

1.50 

1. 00 

1.50 
1.50 

. 10 

.50 

.02 

.05 
1.50 

.01 

.05 

2.00 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Furniture of every description, 
whether put together or in 
pieces, of whatever material 
made or upholstered 

Galloons, gold and silver 

Games not otherwise mentioned . 

Garlic 

Gas retorts of clay 

Glass in the rough 

Glass, in sheets, unsilvered 

Glassware, common, for table, 
toilet, and other domestic pur- 
poses 

Glassware, of fine quality, for 
table, toilet, and other domestic 
uses 

Globes, geographical and astro- 
nomical 

Gloves of all kinds 

Gold and .silver articles and pre- 
cious stones 

Gold and silver leaves 

Gold and silver twist 

Grease for machinery 

Guns, breech-loading 

Hair or fur, natural or artificial. . 

Hammocks of all kinds 

Hams 

Harmoniums 

Harness for cart horses 

Harrows 

Hats 

Hats ^d bonnets, trimmed, for 
ladies and children 

Hay or grass for animals 

Hides of cattle, dried or fresh, 
not prepared 

Hoes, spades, shovels, and plow- 
shares for agricultural pur- 
poses 

Hoop-iron for barrels 

Hops 

Houses, wooden or iron, in parts, 
with all their requisites 

Indigo 

Ink, printing 

Ink, writing 



Duty per 
pound 
in U. S. 

currency. 



Doliars. 



.0334 

■5007 

. 5007 j 

.0033 I 

.0067 I 

.0033 I 

.0167 I 



.0167 



•0334 

.0067 
.3338 

.6677 
.5007 
.5007 
. 0167 
• 3338 
.5007 
.3338 
.0167 

.0334 
.0167 
.0067 
■3338 



Artfculos. 



Derechos 

por kilo 

! ec mone- 

I daecua- 

toriana. 



.5007 
.0033 



.0033 

.0067 I 
.0067 

.0067 I 

I 

.0033 , 

I 
•0334 j 
.0067 I 
.0167 



Muebles de toda clase, armados 
6 desarmados, cualquiera que 
sea la materia de que est^n 
construidos y el forro que los 
cubre " 

Galones 

Juegos no mencionadosexpresa- 
mente 

Ajos '. 

Retortas de barro para gas 

Vidrio en bruto 

Vidrios pianos, no azogados. . . . 

Cristaleria ordinaria para ser- 
vicios de mesa, lavatorios y 
otros utensilios dom^sticos. . . 

Cristaleria fina para servicio 
de mesa, lavatorios y otros 
utensilios dom^sticos 

Globos, geogrdficosy astron6mi- 
cos 

Guantes de toda clase 

Objetos de oro 6 plata y piedras 
preciosas 

Hojuela ^ 

Briscado 

Grasas para mdquinas 

Escopeta^ de retrocarga 

Cabello 6 pelo natural 6 artificial . 

Hamacas ^e toda clase 

Jamones 

Armoniums 

Ameses para carretas 

Rastrillos para agricultura 

Sombreros 

Sombreros y gorras, adornados, 
para sefloras y nifios 

Pasto seco, 6 yerba para ani- 
males 

Cueros secos 6 frescos de gana- 
do mayor, no preparados 

Azadones, lampas, palas y rejas 
para la agricultura 



Pesos. 



Flejes de hierro para aros de 
barriles 

Lfipulo 

Casas de madera 6 de hierro, de- 
sarmadas 6 en piezas, con 
todas sus (itiles 

AfUl 

Tinta de imprenta 

Tinta para escribir 



. 10 
1.50 

1.50 
.01 
.02 
.01 
.05 



•05 



.02 
1. 00 

2.00 

1.50 

1.50 

.05 

1. 00 

1.50 

1. 00 

.05 

. 10 

.05 

.02 

1. 00 

1.50 

.oi 

. 01 

. 02 



. 02 
. 02 



. 01 
. 10 
. 02 
.05 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Iron, in the rough, plain sheets, 
bars, corrugated for roofing, 
and pig-iron for casting pur- 
poses 

Iron, manufactured 

Ivory, manufactured 

Jars and pitchers of earthenware, 
ewelry, imitation, of any de- 
scription 

Jugs, bottles, and demijohns 
(empty) 

Kerosine of and above 150 
degrees 

Lace and trimmings of wool or 
cotton 

Lard or butter 

Lavender 

Lead, manufactured 

Lead, pig 

Lime 

Linseed . ." 

Machetes of all descriptions , 

Machinery, complete, for agricul- 
tural or manufacturing pur- 
poses 

Maizena, or corn starch 

Marble dust 

Marble slabs, forming part of 
furniture 

Marjoram 

Matches , 

Masks 

Matting, Chinese 

Meats, salted 

Monuments, or tombstones of 
over one meter in height 

Musical instruments exceeding 
one meter in height 

Music, manuscript, printed or 
lithographed 

Mustard 

Nails, all kinds of metal 

Niter, not refined , 

Nuts, walnuts, and almonds, and 
in general all food not enume- 
rated 



Oakum of all kinds 

Oil for machinery , 

Oilcloth for floors 

Oils, linseed, olive, castor, and 
almond 



Duty per 
pound 
mU.S. 

currency. 



Dollars . \ 



.0334 
.5007 i 
.0167 

.3338 

.0033 

.0167 

.3338 
.0334 
.0167 

•0334 
.0167 
.0067 
.0167 
.0167 



.0033 
.0167 
. 00C7 

•0334 
.0167 

.0334 
.6677 
.0334 
.0167 

.0167 

.0334 

.0167 

.0334 
.0067 
.0167 



.0334 

.0167 
.0167 
.0167 

.0334 



Artfculos. 



Fierro en bruto, en planchas 
lianas, varillas 6 acafialado 
para techos y en lingotes para 
fundici6n 

Fierro manufacturado 

Marfil manufacturado 

Tinajas y jarros de barro 

Alajas, falsas, de cualquiera 
materia 

Botijas, botellas y damajuanas 
(vacias) 

Kerosine de 150 6 mas grados 
de potencia 

Encajes y randas de lana 6 hilo 

Manteca de puerco 6 vaca 

Alhucema 

Plomo manufacturado 

Plomo en bruto 

Cal 

Linaza 

Machetes en general , 

Mdquinas completas para la 
agricultura 6 la industria. . . . 

Maicena 

Polvo de m&rmol , 

Piedras de' m&rmol que formen 

parte de muebles 

Or6gano 

F6sforos 

Mdscaras 

Petate" de la China 

Carnes saladas 

Mausoleos 6 piedras de mas de 

un metro 

Instrumentos de mdsica de mas 

de un metro de alto 

M<isica manuscrita, impresa 6 

litografiada 

Mostaza 

Clavos de toda clase de metal. . 

Salitre no refinado 

Avellanas,nueces y almendras, 

y en general todos los artScu- 

los alimanticios no mencio- 

nados expresamente 

Estopa de toda clase 

Aceite para mdquinas 

Hule encerado para pisos 

Aceite, de linaza, de oliva, de 

castor y de almendras 



Derechoti 
por kilo 

en mone- 
daecua- 
toriana. 



Pesos. 



.02 

. 10 

1.50 

.05 

I. 00 



.05 
I. 00 

. 10 
.05 
. 10 
.05 
.02 
.05 
.05 

.01 

.05 
.02 

. 10 
.05 
. 10 
2.00 
. 10 
.05 

.05 

. 10 

.05 
. 10 
.02 
.05 



. 10 
.05 
.05 
.05 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles.* 



Olives in any kind of vessel 

Onions 

Opium 

Organs, church 

Ornaments for dresses, shoes, 
hats, and for distribution at 
baptisms, etc 

Paints, in powder, paste, or in 
any other form 

Paper, all kinds, for printing. . . . 

Paper, brown, wrapping, for 
packing goods and sheathing 
vessels 

Paper, writing, and other kinds 
of paper not enumerated 

Penknives 

Percussion caps 

Perfumery 

Pickles 

Picks and hammers 

Pipes and tubes of iron, lead, 
clay, and earthenware 

Pipes, iron, earthenware, or clay, 
measuring inside over 12 cen- 
timeters diameter 

Pipes, iron, measuring inside 
less than 12 centimeters in 
diameter, provided they form 
part of machinery 

Pistols and revolvers 

Pitch 

Pitchers of fine earthenware 

Plaster of Paris, manufactured.. 

Plows 

Pocket-books and cigar cases. . . . 

Poisonous solutions for curing 
hides 

Potatoes 

Potatoes (sweet) 

Powder-flasks 

Precious stones 

Printing presses and appliances. . 

Propeller screws 

Pruning hooks or mattocks 

Pumps, hand 

Purses and pocket-books 



Duty per 
pound 
ID U. S. 

curr«acy. 



Dollars. 
.0334 
.0033 

.6677 
.0167 



.3338 

.0334 
.0067 



Artfculos. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da ecua- 
toriana. 



Raisins 

Rakes I 

Rapiers, foils, swords, and dag- | 
gers , 



.0067 

.0334 
. 1669 
.6677 
.5007 

•0334 
.0067 

.0067 



.0067 



.0067 

.6677 
.0067 
.0334 
.0334 
.0033 
.5007 

.0167 
.0033 

.0033 
.6677 

.6677 
.0033 
. 0067 
.0067 
.0067 
.6677 

. 0167 
. 0067 

.6677 



Aceitunas en cualquier envase 

Cebollas 

Opio 

Organos para iglesias 

Adornos confeccionados para 
vestidos, calzado, sombreros, 
medios para bautizo, etc 

Pintura en polvo, pasta 6 cual- 
quier otra clase 

Papel de toda clase para im- 
prenta 

Papel de estrazaparadespacho, 
empaque y forro de buques . . . 

Papel para escribir y o t r a s 
clases no determinadas 

Cortaplumas 

Fulminantes 

Perfumeria 

Encurtido 

Picos y combas 

Cafterias y tubos de hierro, 
plomo, barro 6 loza 

Tubos y cafterias de hierro, loza 
6 barro, de mas de 12 centi- 
metres- de didmetra interior. . . 

Tubos de hierro de diametro 
menor de 12 centimetros, 
siempre que formen parte de 
maquinarias 

Pistolas y rev61vers 

Brea 

Cantarillas finas de barro 

Yeso manufacturado 

Arados 

Carteras y cigarreras 

Aguas envenenadas para cueros. 



Papas 

Camotes 

Polvorines 

Piedras preciosas 

Imprenta y sus fitiles 

Helices para buques de vapor. . . 

Podones 6 podaderas 

Bombas mec&nicas de mano. . . . 
Bolsas para dinero y portamo- 

nedas 

Pasas 

Rastrillos para agricultura 

Espadas, floretes, sables y pu- 

fiales 



Pesos. 

. 10 

.01 

2.00 

.05 



1. 00 
. 10 
.02 
.02 



. 10 
.50 
2.00 
1.50 
. 10 
.02 

.02 



.02 
2.00 
.02 
. 10 
. 10 
.01 
1.50 



. 01 
.01 
2. 00 
2. 00 
. 01 
. 02 
. 02 
. 02 

2. 00 
.05 
. 02 

2. 00 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Duty per 
pound 
in U. S. 

currency. 



Artfculos. 



Razors 

Rice 

Ridge-plates, 



iron, for roofing. . 



Roman cement 

Rope yarn or marline, different 
sizes 

Rouge and face powders 

Rubber overshoes and other arti- 
cles of India rubber 

Sago 

Salt, refined, for table use 

Sausages 

Scissors, penknives, and razors . . 

Shawls, not containing silk 

Sheep and goats* skins, uncured . 



Shoe pegs 

Shoes and boots of every descrip- I 

tion, except mariners* I 

Shot ' 

Silvered or gilt metallic thread. . .{ 

Slates, for roofing j 

Slates and slate pencils | 

Soap, common I 

Soda I 

Soda, caustic | 

Soda water apparatus i 



Spangles and tinsel { 

Spectacles and lenses of all kinds.' 

Spurs and bridles I 

Starch of every kind i 

Statues of wood, marble, etc., ex- ' 

ceeding i meter in height j 

Staves for casks 

Stearine, not manufactured 

Steel I 

Steel, unwrought ' 

Stereoscopes and views 

Stones for filtering water > 

Stones of every kind not enumer- i 

ated ' 

Stoves, iron, cooking 

Straps and other manufactuied 

articles of saddler}' 

Strings for musical instruments. . 



Dollars. 

. 1669 

.0033 

.0067 

.0033 
.0334 

.6677 

. 1669 
.0167 
.0167 
. 1669 
. 1669 
. 1669 
.0167 

.0334 

. 1669 

.6677 
.3338 
.0033 

.0067 

.0167 1! 

.0067 I 
.0067 ll 
.0167 

i 

.5007 I 

. 3338 1 

. 1669 ll 

.0.67 j 

.0167 ll 

.0067 I 

.0334 ll 
.0334 I 

.0067 I 

.3338 I 

. 0067 , 

.0167 ll 

.0167 ll 

ll 

. 1669 ' 

. 5007 i 



Navajas 

Arroz 

Caballeteras de hierro para te- 

jados 

Cemento Romano 

Piolas, piolones y piolillas. . . . 



Sugar 

Sugar refuse. 



I 



.0167 
.0167 



Afeites 

Zapatones y demds objectos de 

caucho 

Sag(i 

Sal refinada para mesa 

Salchichas 

Tijeras, cortaplumas y navajas. . 
Pafiolones en que no entra seda. 
Cueros de ganado menor no 

preparados 

Estaquillas para calzado 

Calzado de toda clase,con excep- 

ci6n del de marinero 

Municiones 

HiliUo 

Pizarras para tejados 

Pizarras para escribir y sus 

Idpices 

Jab6n ordinario 

Sal de soda 

Soda cdustica 

Aparatus para fabricar agua de 

soda 

Lentejuelas y oropel 

Anteojos y lentes de toda clase. 

Espuelas y frenos 

Almidon de toda clase 

Est^tuas de madera, mdrmol, 

etc., de mas de un metro 

Duelas para toneles 

Esterrina en bruto 

Acero 

Acero en bruto 

Estereoscopios y las vistos para 

6stos 

Piedras para filtrar agua 

Piedras de toda clase no deter- 

minadas 

Cocinas de hierro 

Correas y demds objetos manu- 

facturados de guarnicioneria. . 
Cuerdas para instrumentos de 

mdsica 

Azficar 

Chancaca 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
daecuA- 
toriana. 



Pesos. 
.50 
.01 

.02 
.01 
. 10 

2.00 

•50 
.05 
.05 
.50 
.50 
.50 

.05 
. 10 

.50 
2.00 
I. 00 

.01 

.02 
•05 
.02 
.02 

.05 

1.50 

I. 00 

•50 

.05 

.05 
.02 
. ID 
. 10 
.02 

I. 00 
.02 



.05 
.05 

.50 

1.50 
.05 
.05 



8 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Sulphur 

Sweet potatoes 

Sirups 

Tacks, iron 

Tallow, rough 

Tapioca and 'other farinaceous 

preparations 

Tar 



Textures and articles of crape or 
lace 

Textures of all kinds containing 
silk, silver, gold, or metallic 
threads in imitation of same. . . 

Tiles, clay, for roofing 

Timber, unwrought, in pieces for 
building purposes, beams and 
planks, although they may be 
planed and dovetailed, must pay 
I cent for 2 kilograms. 



Tinware 

Tin, manufactured 

Tin, rough or in plain plates. 



I 



Tin. unmanufactured 

Tobacco, leaf 

Tobacco, manufactured 

Tools, for artisans 

Tortoise shell, manufactured . . . . 

Toys and dolls 

Troughs and fonts of marble, iron, 

or other substance 

Trunks 

Turpentine, spirits of 

Twine for sewing sacks or sails. . 

Umbrellas and parasols 

Varnish 

Vegetables, fresh, of all kinds, 

not prepared 1 

Vermicelli 

Vinegar 

Wagons and cars 

Walking canes 

Walnuts 

Water jugs, of clay, common 

Waters, mineral, such as Vichy 

and others 

Waters, poison, for curing hides. 

Wax, in the rough 

Weeding hooks 

Wheat 



Duty per 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.0334 
.0033 
.0334 
.0067 
.0167 

.0167 
.0067 

.3338 



.3338 
.0033 



.0334 
.0334 
.0067 

.0067 
.3338 
.6677 
.0334 
.5007 
. 1669 

.0167 

.0334 
.0167 

.0334 
. 1669 

.0334 

.0033 
.0167 

.0334 
.0067 
.3338 
.0167 
.0167 

. 0167 
.0167 

.0334 
.0067 
.0067 



Artfculos. 



Azufre 

Camotes 

Jarabes 

Tachuelas de hifcrro 

Sebo en rama 

Tapioca y otras feculas 

Alquitran 

Telas y objetos de cresp6n 6 de 
punto 

Toda clase de tejidos en que en- 
tra seda, plata, oro 6 hilosme- 
tdlicos 6 imitaci6n de 6stos. . . 

Tejas de varro para techos 

Maderas sin labrar, en trozos, 
para construcciones, vigas y 
tablas, aunque esten acepilla- 
das y machihembradas, paga- 
r&n un centavo por cada dos 
kil6grdmos. 

Hojalata manufacturado 

Estafto manufacturado 

Hojalata en bruto 6 planchas 
lianas 

Estafto en bruto 

Tabaco en rama 

Tabaco manufacturado 

Herramientas para artesanos 

Carey manufacturado 

Juguetes y mufiecas 

Pilas de m&rmol, hierro d otra 
materia 

Baules 

Aguarr&s 

Hilos para cosersacos 6 vclas. . . 

Paraguas y parasoles 

Barniz 

Legumbres frescas y mepestras 
de toda clase, no preparadas. . 

Fideos 

Vmagre 

Garros 

Bastones 

Nueces 

Cantarillas ordinarias de barro. . 

Aguas minerales, como las de 
Vichy y otras 

Aguas envenenadas para cueros. 

Cera en bruto 

Escardillas para agricultura . . . . 

Trigo 



Derechos 
por kilo 

en roone- 
daecua- 
toriana. 



Pesos. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



Articles. 



Wheels and spare parts for ma- 
chinery used in agriculture and 
manufacture 

Wheels for carts and trucks 

Wines in any kind of vessel 

Wire, barbed, and staples for in- 

closures 

Woolen goods, whether woven 

or not 

Zinc, manufactured or in perfo- 
rated sheets 

Zinc, unmanufactured or in sheets 
not perforated 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Doiiars. 

.0067 
.0067 

.03^4 
.0067 
. 1669 

.0334 
.0067 





Derecbos 




por kilo ' 


Artfculos. 


en nione> 




< da ecua- 







Ruedas y piezas para las maqui- 
narias de agricultura 6 indus- 
tria 

Ruedas para carretas y carreti- 
Uas 

Vinos en cualquier en vase 

Alambre y grapa^ para cercas. . . 

Todos los articulos de lana teji- 
dos 6 sin tejer, sin trama 6 con 
ella 

Zinc manufacturado 6 en plan- 
chas perforadas 

Zinc en bruto 6 en planchas no 
perforadas 



Pesos. 



.02 
. 10 
.02 



•50 
. 10 
.02 



NOTES. 

Clothing, ready-made, such as shirts, chemises, dresses, frock-coats, waistcoats, etc., 
with the exception of flannel or stockinet undershirts and drawers, and socks and 
stockings, shall pay an additional tax of 25 per cent, on the duties of their class accord- 
ing to the material of which they are made. 

For the distinct purposes specified by the law there will be imposed a surcharge of 
20 per cent, on import duties. 

For the liquidation of the national foreign debt there will be imposed an additional 
duty of 10 per cent, on the import taxes. 

This surcharge will go into operation six months after the signing of an agreement 
for the liquidation of the English debt. 

In rating articles formed of various materials, the classification will be according to 
the chief component material, it being understood that the principal component is that 
which enters more largely into the manufacture of an article and thus determines its 
nature. 

If in the same package there should be found articles belonging to distinct classes, 
the whole contents shall be rated as of the class paying the highest duty. 

If the same package should be found to contain articles not dutiable with those 
which are, there will be levied upon the entire contents the duty to which the latter are 
subject. 

If the same package should contain prohibited as well as articles not prohibited the 
whole contents shall be confiscated. 

In order that the provisions of this article have effect, there must be shown omission 
to express in detail on the manifest all the requirements therein prescribed. 

Should the contents of a package be entirely different from that described in the 
manifest and declaration, double duty will be levied thereon. 



lO 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



FREE LIST. 

Articles destined for the promotion of pub- 

• lie instruction or for the use of charitable 
institutions, under authorization of the 
Government, who shall grant it at the 
request of the head of the respective 
department or establishment. 

Articles for foreign religious institutions 
established in the country, and which by 
virtue of contracts made before the pas- 
sage of this law enjoy this privilege. It 
will not be accorded when said contracts 
are renewed. 

Articles imported by the Government for 
public use or ornamentation. 

Articles imported for church service and 
the Catholic worship, if the order be 
issued by the Government upon appli- 
cation certified to by the diocesan prel- 
ate or his vicar-general, accompanied 
by the bill of lading and copy of the 
invoices. 

Articles intended for the personal use of 
foreign diplomatic agents accredited to 
the Government of Ecuador, provided 
reciprocity is accorded by the nations 
they represent. 

Bridges, iron, and accessories. 
Buoys of iron. 

Carbolic acid and chloride of lime. 
Coal, and animal charcoal. 
Coin, legal, of silver or gold. 

Eggs. 

Fire-engines and apparatus and all neces- 
sary parts. 

Fruit, fresh. 

Gold-dust and ingots. 

Guano. 

Hose for fire engines. 

Life-preservers. 

Lint for wounds. 

Live stock. 

Luggage of travelers up to 92 kilos for 
each person, provided that the traveler 
and baggage arrive in the same vessel. 
Duty will be collected on the excess. 
By luggage are meant articles intended 
for personal use, such as clothing, boots 
and shoes, bedding, saddlery, arms, and 
the instruments used in the profession 
of the traveler, even if they have not 
been previously used. 

Metallic cocoa-dryers. 

Peru, natural or manufactured products 
of, of legal trade and not prohibited by 
Ecuador, when imported overland. This 



LIBRES DE DERECHOS. 

Los articulos destinados al fomento de la 
instrucci6n pdblica 6 al servicio de casas 
de caridad, previa 6rden del Gobierno, 
que la dictard d pedimento de la au- 
toridad superior del respectivo ramo 6 
establecimiento. 

Los articulos para los institutos religiosos 
extrangeros establecidos en el pais, y 
que, en virtud de contratos anteriores d 
esta ley, gocen de esta concesi6n. No 
se reiterard 6sta cuando se renueven 
dichos contratos. 

Los efectos que vengan por cuenta del 
Gobierno destinados 4 unobjetodeutili- 
dad 6 adornos pdblicos. 

Los articulos que se introduzcan para ser 
vicio de las iglesiasy del culto cat61ico 
previa 6rden del Gobierno, i. pedimento 
autorizado por el respectivo prelado 
diocesano 6 por su vicario general y 
acompafiado del conocieminto y copia 
. de la factura. 

Los efectos destinados al uso personal de 
los ministros pOblicos 6 agentes diplo- 
mdticos extranjeros, acreditados ante el 
Gobierno del Ecuador, siempre que haya 
reciprocidad de parte de las naciones 
que representen. 

Puentes de hierro y sus (itiles. 

Boyas de hierro. 

Acido f6nico y cloruro de calcio. 

Carbon de piedra 6 animal. 

Monedas de ley de plata fi oro. 

Huevos de ave. 

Bombas y aparatus para apagar incendios; 
sus {itiles y repuestos. 

Frutas frescas. 

Oro en polvo 6 en barras. 

Guano. 

Mangueras para bombas de incendios. 

Salvavidas. 

Hilas para curar heridas. 

Animales vivos. 

Los equipajes de los viajeros hastael peso 
de 92 kil6gramos por persona, siempre 
que 6sta y aquellos vengan en el mismo 
buque. Por el exceso se cobrardn dere- 
chos. (Entiendese por equipajes 1 os ob- 
jetos aplicables al uso personal, como 
ropa, calzado, cama, montura, armas ^ 
instrumentos de la profesi6n del viajero, 
aun cuando no hayan comcnzado d usar- 
se.) 

Tendales met&licos para secar cacao. 

Los productos natu rales 6 manufactura- 
dos del Perd, de licito comercio y no 
prohibida introducci6n en el Ecuador, 



IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 



11 



FREE LIST—Continued. 

exemption shall remain in force so long 
as Ecuadorian products enjoy the same 
privilege in Peru . So soon as reci proci ty 
ceases this exemption shall also cease in 
Ecuador. 

Pitch, tar, tackle, copper, canvas, and 
other articles imported for the building 
or the repair of vessels, provided an es- 
timate thereof be signed by the captain 
of the port and approved by the Board 
of Finance. 

Plants, live. 

Railway material of all kinds and all the 
accessories. 

Samples of dry goods, small wares of no 
value, and an odd one of such articles 
as are sold and used in pairs. 

Seeds of every description for sowing. 

Silver in mass or bars. 

Sulphur for vines. 

The executive power is authorized to allow 
the importation, free of duty, of articles 
intended by the municipalities for light- 
ing or any other public use, whether the 
work be executed by contract or by the 
municipalities themselves. 

Timber for making masts and yards. 
Trade advertisements. 
Vessels, built or in parts. 

PROHIBITED ARTICLES. 



Carbines, rifles, musketoons, rockets, reg- 
ulation pistols, and other weapons of I 
warfare. 

Counterfeit coin or money not sanctioned > 

by law, copper and nickel coin. . 

Drinks or potions and food containing ' 
poisonous substances or anything injuri- < 
ous to health. 

Dynamite and other similar explosives. 

Kerosine under 150". 

Machinery or apparatus for coining. 
Powder. 

Prints, statues, paintings, books, writings, 
etc., contrary to morality or religion. 

Rifle balls, shells, grenades, metallic cart- 
ridges for rifles, and other munition of 
war. 

Rum and all liquors made from cane juice. 

Salt which has been embargoed during 
the period of embargo. 



LIBRES DE DERECHOS— Continfia. 

cuando sean importados por los puertos 
secos 6 de tierra. La exenci6n durard 
mientras las producciones ecuatorianas 
gocen de la misma en el Perd. Luego 
que cese la reciprocidad cesard igual- 
mente esta exenci6n en el Ecuador. 

Brea, alquitran, jarcia, cobre, lona y de- 
mas artkulos que se introduzcan para la 
construcci6n 6 carenade buques, previo 
presupuesto visado por el capitdn del 
puerto y aprobado por la junta de ha- 
cienda. 

Plantas vivas. 

Ferro-carriles de toda clase y sus (itiles. 

Muestras de g6neros, articulos pequeflos 
que no tengan valor, y las fracciones de 
articulos que se venden y usen por pares. 

Semillas de toda cUse para siembras. 

Plata en pasta 6 en barras. 

Azufre para viftas. 

Se autoriza al poder ejecutivo para que 
permita la importaci6n, libre de dere- 
chos, de objetos destinados por las mu- 
nicipalidades para el alumbrado 6 cual- 
quier otro uso pfiblico, bien sea que los 
trabajos se ejeciiten por empresa 6 direc- 
tamente por aquellas. 

Palos para arboladura de buques. 

Avisos de fdbricas. 

Buques armados6en piezas. 

ARTICULOS PROHIBIDOS. 

Carabinas, fusiles, tercerolas, cohetes, 

pistolas de munici6n y demas armas de 

guerra. 
Moneda falsa 6 no tolerada por la ley, 

moneda de cobre y niquel. 
Bebidas y articulos alimenticios que con- 

tengan sustancias t6xicas 6 nocivas d la 

salud. 
Dinamita y demds sustancias explosivas 

andlogas. 
Kerosine de menos de 150 grados de po- 

tencia. 
M&quinas 6 aparatos para amonedar. 
P61vora. 
Estampas, estatuas, pinturas, libros, escri- 

tos, etc., contrarios 4 la moral 6 d la 

religi6n. 
Balas, bombas, granadas, cartuchosmetdl- 

icos para fusiles y dem^s municiones de 

guerra. 
Aguardiente de cafla y sus compuestos. 
Sal de la sometida al estanco, mientras 

dure el estancamiento. 



12 IMPORT DUTIES OF ECUADOR. 

LIGHT DUES. 

Sailing vessels entering the ports of the Republic must pay, on each ton register, a 
duty of five cents of a sucre for each light-house which they pass in entering the ports. 
Steamships will pay half of the aforesaid duty. 

PILOTAGE. 

No vessel of more than thirty tons register can enter or leave the Guayaquil River 
without a pilot, and shall pay the proper duty as far as the island of Pun&. 

Pilots* dues will be levied according to the number of feet of draft of each vessel, as 
follows: 

From Santa Clara to Guayaquil, $2.50 per foot. 

From Pundto Guayaquil, $2.50. This duty shall be levied on entering. 

PORT CHARGES. 

Every vessel, national or foreign, which arrives from a foreign port shall pay $4.80 to 
the captain of the port. 

Every vessel, national or foreign, of over thirty tons register, except national coasting 
vessels, shall pay $1.80 for the crew list. 



i 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



OF THE 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 




L 



BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington, U. S. A. 
illetin No. 26. November, 1891. 



'- ^^=^^.^-: 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



OF THE 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 




BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington, U. S. A. 
"etin No. 26. November, 1891. 



LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 



1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. i. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-Mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 
Q. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory- of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 

24. Import Duties of Honduras. 

25. Import Duties of Ecuador. 



r 6u \co ^^ a/. V . J^ ' ^' '(^'^'a ^L^ .ic ' i^ '^^ ^ 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



OF THE 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



D o 
Bureau op the American Republics, 



U^ashington^ U. S. A. 
Bulletin No. 26. November, 1891. 



: •^ \ 1 '•'> 






BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINGTON, D. C, U. 8. A. 



Director. — WiLLiAM E. Curtis. 

Secretary, — Henry L. Bryan. 

Statistician. — Carlos Federico Adams-Michelena. 

Portuguese Translator. — ^JOHN C. REDMAN. 

Spanish Translators. — Josft Ignacio Rodriguez. 

Mary F. Foster. 
CZpr>fef.— John T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer, — Imogen A. Hanna. 



While the greatest possible care is talcen to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that may- 
occur therein. 

(a) 



In compliance with the request of many merchants and manufacturers who 
desire to send Catalogues and Circulars to importers and dealers in Mexico, 
Central and South America, the Bureau of the American Republics has under- 
taken to publish a series of Commercial Directories of the several countries and 
colonies. The difficulty of securing the names and addresses of merchants has 
been greater than was anticipated, particularly those in cities and towns where 
there are no consular officers of the United States, and the lists herein given 
will be found incomplete. They are, however, as complete and accurate as the 
Bureau can make them with the present facilities at its command, and will 
doubtless be found useful to those who desire to introduce their wares to the 
knowledge of buyers on the southern continents. Any additions and correc- 
tions for subsequent publications will be appreciated. 

3 



Argentine Republic. 



HAlTTA BLANCA. 

Banks. 

Banco dB la Provincia. 

Merchants. 

Belloni, Manuel, iron, timber, etc. 
Chabaneau, Paris & Co., comestibles, wines, 

and spirits. 
Duprat, C&rlos, comestibles and soft fi^oods. 
Ferro y Hnos., J., timber and iron. 
Forgues & da., P., paints, varnish, etc. 
Garay, Lorenzo, comestibles and soft goods. 
OoodhaIl,E.P., explosives. 
Goodhall Hnos., private bankers and general 

agents. 
Helguera, Gerardo, comestibles and soft 

goods. 
Hayo y Leiton, soft goods. 
Huggeridge & Co., saw mill and timber yard. 
Parte, Manuel de la, comestibles and soft 

goods. 
Tardieu, A. , chemist. 
Raiteri, saddler and harness maker. 

BUENOS AYBS8. 

Bankers. 

Daguerre & Co. 
Fernandez, Joe6. 
Hale & Co., 8. B. 
Hogg & Co., David. 
Santiago & Co., Miguel. 

Banks. 

Banco Nacional. 
Banco de la Provincia. 
Banco Hipotecario Nacional. 
Banco Hipotecario de la CapitcU. 
Banco Municipal de Pr6stamos y Caja Muni- 
cipal 
Banco AgricolaComercial del Riode la Hata. 
Banco Aleman Transatlibitico. 
Banco de Buenos Aires. 
Banco Carabaaaa y Ca. 



BUEHOS ATBE8— Continued. 

Batite— Continued. 

Banco de Cobranzas y Anticipos. 

Banco Colonizador Nacional. 

Banco Comercial de la Plata. 

Banco del Comercio. 

Banco Cr6dito Real. 

Banco Constructor de la Plata. 

Banco Espafiol del Rio de la Plata. 

Banco Franc6s de Montevideo. 

Banco Frances del Rio de la Plata. 

Banco Industrial y Constructor. 

Banco Inmobiliario. 

Banco lngl68 del Rio de la Plata. 

Banco Ingl6s de Rio de Janeiro. 

Banco de Italia y Rio de la Plata. 

Banco de L6ndree y Rio de la Plata. 

Banco Popular Argentino. 

Banco Provincial de Entre Rio. 

Banco Sud-Americano. 

Caja de Descuentas. 

Nuevo Banco Italiano. 
BajBa>ar8. 

Alemany Hnos. 

Almeida, Roberto. 

Andr6, Jules. 

Anglade 6 Hljos, Juan. 

Baron 6 Hijo, Yda. de. 

Barnes y Cia., A. 

Barusso, Nicol&s. 

Bazan, Lorenzo. 

Benza y Pagliono. 

Bertuzzi, Domingo. 

BisoUiHnos. 

Bondschedler, R 

Bono y Bruschi. 

Bouch6, Victor. 

Bourcier y Cia. 

Braun, Alberto. 

Buireo, Roque. 

BuUrich, Rodolf o. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUENOS ATBES— Continued. 

Bazaar*— Continued. 

Calderon, Meliton. 

Canciello, Antonio. 

C6nepm Ifiguel. 

Cazalas y Cia.; Alfredo. 

CasteUetd, Luis. 

CastieUa J CisneroB. 

Castro, Ramon. 

Contreda, Francisco. 

Costa yCia.,Fco. 

Cotta,Jo66. 

Datey.J. 

Dardignac y Torassa. 

Donis, Pedro. 

Escajadillo, ManueL 

Espfasse, Isidoro. 

Eyrard,C&rlo6. 

Galan Hnos. 

GalU,Jer6nimo. 

Geslin, Viuda de. 

GiaoomettifLuie. 

Grafiayaa.,F.M. 

Guilbert, Enrique. 

Hanriey Cia. 

Japi Hnos. y Cia. 

Kern, Jorge. 
' Laborde, Adolfo. 

Larese, Antonio. 
* Lorenzone 6 Hi jo, Clemente. 

Lusardi,A 

Lutcher,A.E. 

Marengo, Jo66. 

Blartinez, Robustiano. 

Maz6res.F. 

Menidre Hnos. 

Mflet,Jo66. 

Miranda, DanieL 

Moreno, S. 

Naris, Pedro. 

Neira,C. 

Noyoa,Jos6. 

Nye, Jorge A. 

Ojam,C&rlo6. 

Ouielhe, Domingo. 

Paganani, Vicente. 

Pelteer,J.A. 

Pencoy Hnos.,J. 

Fefiaforte, Rlcardo B. 

Pesado, Nlcolte. 

Puig.G.F. 

Rivero, Olando. 

Rocha, Ant. M. 

Rodriguez, Jo66. 

Roldan, N. 

Rouger,P. 

SachsdHnos. 



BUENOS AYBE8— Continued. 

Basaar«— Continued. 
^ Sanguines, Antonio. 
* Santafd y Hno., Benito. 

Simons y Cia., C.R. 

Soneira Casanegra Hnos. y da. 

Soucy y Cia. 

Souza, CAndido de. 

Tatlock. Alfredo. 

Taurel, Agustin P. 

Thenon, Maria. 

Ugarte, Antonio. 

Vega y Cia., J. 

Vidal y Camelino. 

Vieira y Cia., Ernesto. 

Vignes y Cia., Alberto. 

Weyl, Eduardo. 

Wilkes y da. 

Boot and shoe dealers. 

Balaguer, Antonio. 

Beltram 6 Hijo, Benedict. 

Cersosimo, Vicente. 

Dausay Costa. 

Del Bueno, Pascual. 

Kauert,R. 

Loi8el,J. 

Loriniy Hno.,F. 

Prunell, Antonio. 

Richard, Celestlno. 

Rodriguez y Pico. 

Smart, James. 

Solc& Hnos. 

Temagfai y da. 
ChemisU and druggUts, 

AcetiyCiroUi. 

Aiardi,Juan. 

Ambrosioni,L. 

Amoedo, Rafael E. 

Anf osso, ComeUo. 

Ardy,Jos6. 

ArizAbalo y Minicucci. 

Assorati, Pablo. 

Astiz.C&rlos. 

Ayestaran, Joaquim. 

Bacigalupo y Vattuone. 

Badia y Almat6, L. 

Balzari,P. 

Banon, Te6fllo. 

Barabino, Nicolas. 

Barth,C&rlosG. 

Battillana, Agustin. 

Battilana, Federioo. 

BattUana,LuisM. 

Bellati,C6rlos. 

Befretti,Amaldo. 

Baize, E.de la. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



jsuJuiOS AYRTW Continued. 

ChemisU and druggitU—Oontanaed. 
BerriyHna^C. 
Beruti,Jofl6. 
Berronelli, H6ctor. 
Beslo.F. 
BesBon. Luis. 

Beasone Pedro y C&rlos, Camotocth. 
Bianchi, Gloyanni 
Boeri, Silvia. 
Bottari,J. 
Boozetti, Domingo. 
Cardalda, J. 
Carlevero Hnos. 
Cairo, Pablo. 
Cattaneo.LuisE. 
OeUa, Eugenio. 
Coboe,F. 
Cobo8,S. 
Cobos, Franciaco. 
Colombato, Jofl6. 
Conf orti HnoB. 
Convene, Frandsoo. 
Couget,L. 

Cranwell j Cfa., G. A. 
Cranwell, E. £. 
Criaciiolo, L. 
Comtchet, Blacedonio. 
Danu880,C.A. 
De Paula, H6ctor. 
Denuurcbi y Cia., FarodL 
Denevi, Ernesto A. 
Dentone, E. 
DOlon, Juan. 
Di Marino, Luis. 
Dio8dado,Jo66. 
Dupuitren,J. 
Faggiotti, ConstAntino. 
Fe]izia,Luis. 
Fernandez, Frco. 
Ferris, C. 
FiI]ia,F. 

Florini, Anacleto. 
FoUet,J. 
Fontana, Manuel. 
France, A. 
Qallerl, Pedro. 
GaIlo,Segundo T. 
GalTan,H. 
GarbiBo, Martin V. 
GarDfalo,M.A. 
Gensana, Ctear. 
Gentile, A. 
Gibson, Rolon y Cia. 
GiI,Pa8cual. « 

Gilardi,C. 
GouloyCia. 



BUENOS AYBE8 — Continued. 

ChemisU and dru0(^f«— Continued. 
Grandinetti y Barberis. 
Grafia,Tom&8. 
Guillen y Harismendy. 
HarluoeayCia.,R. 
fiermida y Diaz. 
Hennida, Manuel M. 
Hospital Italiano. 
Ibarluoea y Cia. 
Imperiale,Jo86. 
Imperiale,C&rlo8. 
Kelly, Enrique S. 
Krauss, Enrique. 
Lasarte, Tom&s. 
Lascano.C.F. 
Lavarino, C&rlos. 
Lopez, Enrique. 
Luca y Galdi. 
Magnasco, C&rlos. 
Magnasco y Cia. , M. 
Magnasco, Marcos. 
Magri, E^idio. 
Maione,Arturo. 
Malatesta, Pablo. 
Malvagne,C&rlos. 
Malvigne, Pedro. 
Malvigne Hermanos. 
Mariani, Ventura. 
Marino, Luis Di. 
Marrazo, R. 
Marsan, M. 
Martinez, Faustino. 
Maspero, Francisco R. 
Mermier, Joe6. 
Mey y Cia., J. 
Misuraco, R 
Moetzel.V. 

Moine Hi JOB, SouUgnac y da. 
Morales. Florencio M. 
Mosquera, Juan P. 
Mujica, Adolfo. 
Mujica Hnos. 
Mujica, R. 
Murray y Aikens. 
Murray y Seedorff. 
Navarro, Manuel F. 
Neyer, Adolfo. 
Olombrada. Mat! as. 
Oneto, Juan. 
Orsini, NicolAs. 
Paganini, F. 
Paquien y Cia., A. 
Pastor, Vicente. 
Perez, Norberto. 
Perroney Cia., L. 
Petray,C.C. 



8 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUENOS ATBB^— Continued. 

Chemists and druggists— OonUaaod. 
Pianavia, P. A. 
Piantelli, E. F. 
Pisa, Manuel. 
Popolizo, J086. 
Ragosza, Josd. 
Rauch, Giullermo. 
Ravetta y ila., Eugenio. 
Roble, Jos6 J. 
Rueda, Eduardo. 
Ruiz, Francisco. 
Sainta«7ie y Cia., P. 
Sal^eiro, Ramon. 
Sanabria, R. Lujan. 
Sanchez, Adolfo. 
Sanchez, C4rlo6. 
Santini, Julio. 
Sagastume, J. 
Savaris, Serafln. 
Sicardi, Jacinto. 
Spangenberg, E. 
Tebaldi, A. 
Tegami, Alfonso. 
Vaccaro, A. 
Vaccaro, Juan F. 
Vacarro, Julio D. 
Vallebella, Jer6nimo. 
VaUebella, Josd A. 
Veronelli y Fillia. 
Vidali, Evasio. 
Vogler y Oaedclce. 
Weissenbach, A. 
Ynurrigarro, N. 
Zanchi, Julio D. 
Zumarraga, A. 

Cigar dealers and manufa^urers. 
Alvarez y Cia., M. Cortes. 
Amills, Luis. 
Brisson.J. 
Canter, Juan. 
Capra, Domingo. 
Cruz, Juan. 
Delbaso, Josd. 
Dirube y Cia., B. 
Duran y Cia., M. 
Fernandez, Manuel. 
Foesati, Felix. 
Fuster, Manuel. 
Krauel y Cia., Augusto. 
Nadelmann, S. 
Naya, Vicente. 
Nogud8,J. 
Patifio,Juan D. 
Pianos Hnos. 
Parry & Co. 



BUENOS ACTES— Continued. 

Cigar dealers and manufacturers— Oontinued. 
Pefielya, Francisco. 
Pifieyro, Pujadas y Cia. 
Posse y Cia., J. 
Reuther Oitale y Cia. 
Ravenscroft & Rowland. 
Schttren, OuiUermo. 
Sociedad F&brica Nacional de Tabacos *'E1 

Telegrafo." 
Somay y Cia., Pedro. 
Steenken y Cia., Adolfo. 
Tarando, Antonio. 
Terbeck, A. 
Volkmann, Adolfo. 
Wasinski, Adolfo. 
Wiese, Claudio. 
Zozay yCia.,F. 

Commission merchants. 
Acosta y Alkaine. 
Aguirre, Pedro. 
Aicardi, Heynes y Ca. 
Albaicero.P. M. 
Albert, Luis F. 
Alvarez, A. F. 
Alvarez, Domingo. 
Amaral, Santiago. 
Aran, Mariano. 
Arginbau, M. 
Arias yCa., A. 
Arias, Francisco. 
Arias, Rafael. 
Arvigo, Lorenzo. 
Arzeno, B. D 
Ayos, Simon. 
Baraldo, Antonio. 
Bamiti, Manuel. 
Basail, Eduardo. 
Beaumarie, MarquSz y Ca. 
Becher.E. C. 
Beduwe y Wathelet. 
Beltran y Calvo. 
Benguria, Francisco. 
Benguria, M. 
Benso, Fco. L. 
Bergia, Jorge. 
Bernardo y Hno., D. 
Bilbao y Cerujo Hnos. 
Bilbao, Lavieja y Ca. 
Bisesti Hermanos. 
Bista, Andr6s. 
Blanche y Ca., E. 
Bohm, B. 
BoUini y Alkaine. 
Bonnement, J. B. 
B6veda Hnos. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



jsuJUiOS AYB1M ■Continued. 

ComtniMion merchants— CoutimxoA. 

BcMBZoy Odla. 

Bradley y Ca., B. 

Braly.C. A. 

BronJlon, Juan M. ' 

Bruzzone y Booo. 

Riihf fr «m ^ Ramon. 

Burgos, Juan L. 

Bustamantef F. 

Cabrero, Eusebio. 

Calvo, Julio. 

Cainpis y Dresco. 

C4nepa y Pezzo. 

Canfleld y Thompson. 

Cardoso, A. 

Garozid, Ulises. 

Garrefio, J. T 

Casaban, Alejandro. 

Castafio, Jos6 F. 

Castellanl y Cabrera. 

Clarfeld, Federico. 

Ooulon, J. 

CuUoli, J. 

Curto, Pascual. 

Dallmann y Ca., F. 

Daoust, J. M. 

Daries, M. 

Demaria, P. M. 

Descalzo. 

Despoy, B. 

Dewey, Enrique D. 

Diaz, M. N. 

Domingvez y Agulrre. 

Donnewald, B. G. 

Dufour, A. 

Duplany Ca. 

Durante y Roca. 

Eborall, Arturo E. 

Elizalde y Fernandez Hnos. 

Bspinosa, Luis E. 

Fabis y Ca., J. 

Fascia y Degailes. 

Ferrari Hnos. 
• Ferrari y Ca., E. 

Ferreira, A. Jos6. 

Figarol, Juan. 

Fiorini y Ca., L. 

Fogel Cailliat y Ca. 

Ftanoe, Pefia y Ca. 

Franck, Alberto. 

Franco, R6mulo. 

Frestee, F. 

FriasHnos. 

Furst, Ch. 

Fusoni, Pedro. 

Galan, F. C. 



BUENOS AYBES— Continued. 

CommisHon mercftanto— Continued. 
Galbiati Hnos. 
Games y Dewftz. 
Gandelfo y Ca., D. 
Garcia, L. G. 
Garibay y Ca., M. N. 
Gamaud, Frdres. 
Gibelli, E. G. 
Godoy y Zabala. A. 
Gomez, Alfredo. 
Gondra y Ca., A. 
Gonzalez, Dimas. 
Gonzalez, E. R. 
Gonzalez y Ca., Piro K 
Gonzalez, Tom6s. 
Golba y Ca., A. 
Guimaraes, A. 
Gutierrez Hnos. y Ca. 
Haimes, J. 
HasUfiruera, S. 
Hill, Pascual. 
Hodgett y Adelson. 
Hoerle y Franhein. 
Huergo, M. 
Jacobs y Ca. 
Jamardo, Jos^ M. 
Jofre y Hno., J. 
Johnson Hnos. y Ca. 
Keny, Eduardo. 
Kierman, B. 
Knees y Yillate. • 
Kraemer, F. F. 
Lagerioy Lossi. 
Lanusse, J. J. 
Larrosa, P. 
Lascano Hnos. 
Laurencena y Plot. 
Levicgton, F. C. 
Lichtenhahn, E. 
Li i"fy i R»<^ , Pascual. 
Lodia, Fco.W.N. 
Lombardi Hnos. 
Lopez, Isidoro. 
Loubet, G. B. 
Loy, C&rlos. 
Macchiavelli, Juan. 
MacLennan y Ca., J. 
Magnanif , G. 
Mango, Roberto C. 
Maquiovelli, S. 
Marcenaro y Ca., B. 
Marinovich, Justo. 
Blariscotti y Landuci. 
Mariott, B. 
Marti y Font. 
I Martin, E. 



lO 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUXVOB AYBE8— Continued. 

Oammittion m«rcAant*-€k>ntinued. 
Massini, Publio. 
M&thotyCa.,B. 
Medica, Adolfo. 
MeiUyRoesU. 
Mendiondou, E. 
Mendizabal, R. E. 
Hdry, Rout y Ca. 
Mlguenz, A. B. 
Milhas, Bernardo. 
Miranda^ Pedro F. 
Mohr-BeU, J. 

M oleres, Marcoartf o y Cia. ' 
Holinari, A. 
Montes de Oca, A. 
Moro,C.A. 
MuUer, Juan S. 
Mufioz y Lara. 
Muflsich y Dias Veles. 
Naon y Nicholson. 
Nopp y Meyer. 
Neumann, Julio. 
Nioolau HnoB. 
Niiio, J. M. 
Nooett, Angel. 
NocolAs, Nicola. 
Nowel y Harm's. 
Obejero, J. 
OcampoyCia. 
Ochoa^E. 
Oderigo y Cia. 
01azabal,M. J. 
OUv^ira, J. R. 
Ortiz, Antonio. 
OrUifio,Gregorio. 
Ottolengbi, M. 
Paez, J. A. 
PalazueloB y Cia. 
Papuocio y Cia., L. 
Parlse, Aquiles. 
Pein y Cia., A. 
Peltzer y Prasger. 
Peretti y Pestagalli. 
Pereyra, Ximenez y Lowengard. 
Perrera, Jos*. 
Perugonia y Cia., G. 
Piera, Manuel. 
Popper, M&zimo. 
Portela, Gonzales y Cia. 
POrth y da., N. F. 
Puodo, R. 
Querencio y Cia., C. 
Quintana, Manuel. 
Ricart, Nemesio. 
Rjgle, Miguel J. 
RiBBO, Patron P. 



jsujsrOB AYRTW Continued. 

ComnUanon m«roton<»— Continued. 

Ristempart, Enrique. 

Robinson, E. 

Rocamora, Joe6. 

RocatagUata, B. 

Rock,C&rlo8. 

Roldan y Eieman. 

Roman Hnos., J. 

Romer,R.W.W. 

Rosales, Pbdro. 

Rosas y da., Juan. 

Ruette y Cia. 

Ruggeroni y Cia. 

Saenz y Loca. 

Salguero y da., F. 

Balinger.G. 

Sanchez, P. E. 

Sansoni y Cia., F. 

Sarmiento, H. P. 

8atg«, Luis. 

Sauerbeck y Hoff&uum. 

Sayal, J. E. 

Schlafflno y da. 

Sootti, Manuel. 

Scotti, Pedro. 

Segarra, Job6. 

Serrahima, Tbrent. 

Smith, Lion. 

Solari y Andrels. 

Somoza y da., K 

Sosa,F. R 

Sosa, Juan B. 

Soto y Calvo. 

Surra yCa. 

Sussman, M. L. 

Tartarone, P. 

Tatloch Hnos. 

TerryCa., E. 

Tito y Carrere. 

Torres, Agdero y Ca. 

Tuber y Ca., A. 

Trinnmer, A. 

Trucco-Fabarro, M. 

Tucker, Diego. 

Underwood, Alfredo. 

Van Harpen y Ca. 

Vasques, D. R 
■ Veochio, Oscar L. 

Velazquez, J. M. 

Vercellino, E. 

Vemet, L. Emillo. 

Vidal, Agustln. 

Videla, Gregorio. 

Wlar, H. Deljo. 

Viter, H. 

Vinay y Ca. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



11 



AYBE8— Continaed. 



Oommiasion merchants— OoDtiaaitd. 

VioJayCa. 

VaOe,aa8tou. 

Vudnasy Ca. 

Zime «e8. 

TanJs, Bicardo. 
Cantiffneet. 

Aoebai, Diaz j Ga. 

Aoevedo y Pinto. 

Aicanli y HeyneB. 

AtgeltyCa.,H. 

Alyares,M. 

Aspita, Bernardo. 

Balestrasa, A. 

BaUetoyBidart. 

BasavabaBO, Rufino. 

BenitezHnoa. 

BkmdiyHasneUL 

Boerr, Juan C. 

Bonneaserre, J. C. 

Bouquet, Boldan y GulfianL 

B6Teda Hnoe. 

Bradley , Bicardo. 

Bunge, Emilio. 

BurigoB, L. 

Cartwni, Jo86. 

Caaal y Hno., E: 

Cascallari y OlazabaL 

Castagnino y Florea. 

Catoni y Oa., F. 

OebaUos, Manuel. 

Oemadaa, Pedro M. 

Costa, Galindes. 

Coatay Diaz. 

Coata Qulmo y Martinez. 

Cuffni, Juan. 

CutielloB, Manuel 

De Alberti Hnoe. 

De Andreis, Richini y Ca. 

Delpiano y Qotuaso. 

Devoto y Ca., B. 

Diaz, M. Joe6. 

DicUniion. 

Dimas, Gonzalez. 

EloftU, Joa6. 

Esquivel, Dionislo. 

Etchefsaray y Ca., L. 

F&bregas y Ferreira. 

Fernandez, M&xlmo. 

Fernandez y Ca., N. 

Franchi, J. 

Franea, Juan. 

Fuentea, Jo86. 

Fortado y Butler. 

Galarce y Ca., V. 

Oarbino, Domingo. 



BUSVOB ATBTW Continued. 

Otm«^0fiiee»— Continued. 
Garcia, Manuel £. 
Genoud, Martelli y Ca., B. 
Ghiraldo y Murature. 
Ghigliazza, M. A. 
Ginocbk) y Podeet4. 
Gonzalez, Dimas. 
Gowlard, Maximo. 
Gramajo, W 
Gutierrez y Mufioz. 
Ham, P. 

Herrara, Onagoity y Ca., R, 
Hoz, Martinez de. 
Kelaey y Ca., G. 
Koch y Haealoop. 
Laguerre, PauL 
LaportlllayCa., R.R. 
Laaso, Eloy y Ca. 
Lastra, Jo86 R 
I^guerlo y Roaai. 
Loubet, G. B. 
MacKeaa, Cecelio. 
Madema, Alejandro. 
Maltheua, Richards y Ca. 
Matthey, P. T. K 
Muasich y Diaz Velez. 
Nolte, German. 
Ocampo, Samanto, M. 
O'Connor y Ca., J. 
Paz. Fuentea. 
Paz y Ca., Max. 
PazyRofleU6. 
Peluffo, B. 
Perez y Cueto. 
Pettigrew, F. P. 
Poyredier, J. 
Piaggio, Juan. 
PlerayCa. 
Pietranera, Tancredi. 
PIfiero, Juan. 
Pocamora, Joa6. 
Podesta,H. 
Pommez y Ca. 
Porth6, F. 
Pono, Juan. 
RaUl,A.M. 
Reepen y Ca., F. 
Relnojo, Ludo. 
Repetto, L&zaro. 
Richeri y Ca. 
Rivera 6 Hijos, J. 
Rodriguez y Ferrer. 
Roja8yCa.,F. 
RoJasyCa., M.Z. 
Rothes y Kern. 
Safichez y Roca. 



12 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



isuJukOS AYBE8 — Continued. 

Coiisiffnees—CkmtiJivLed. 

Sansinena, F. 

Sard&, Rafael. 

Schiafflno y Ca., Nic. 

Selasco 7 Berta. 

Serantes. A. 

Soafirey Ca.,S. 

Sobrado, B. 

SoriaDO, F. Oarcia. 

Soulignac y Ca. 

Surra y Ca. 

Torres, Agt^ero y Gascon. 

Udaondo, M. 

Unzu6, Bat. 6 Hijos. 

Urlburo, F. 

Vazquez, Juan. 

Vela, Angel. 

Vela. Pedro. 

Velardo y Naon. 

Videla,M. 

Viejobueno, Anot. 

Wei8ieke,J. 

Weisieke, Teodoro. 

Yof re y Labarridre. 

Ysern y Garibay. 

Zanatta, I. 

Zorraquin,J.R. 
Consignees of vessels. 

Acufia, Cabral y Ca. 

Moaao, Santiago. 

Sbaw Hnos. 
Dealer in church supplies, 

Froc, Robert. 
Dealers in explosives. 

Evans, Llvock & Co. 

Moore & Tudor. 

Dealers in shoe findings. 
Adamo y Dellepiane, H. 
Astraldi, Mariano. 
Blestcher y Cia. 
BoUo, F. 
Bollo, Sebastian. 
Brunacci y Cia., Ricardo. 
Cailloux, A. 
Cetr&ncolo, Vicente. 
Ciappe, B. 
Colombo y Cia. 
Curuchet, Pedro. 
Darda^ol, Pablo. 
Etcheto.Estevan. 
Etcherers, Graciano. 
Fortunato, Francisco. 
Giusto, Juan. 
Irigaray y Campori. 
Irigaray , Lopez y Cia. 



BUENOS ATBEB— Continued. 

Dealers in shoe ^ndtnijw— Continued. 

Iraola, Miguel. 

Laborde, J. M. 

Josty Cia.,Teofllo. 

Monta^^na, A. , y Brunacci, R. 

Montagna, B. 

Pecoraro, Victor. 

Ste. Marie, Simon. 

Videla, Juan. 
Dry goods. 

Auld,A. 

Bradford & Co., G. 

English Hosiery and Outfitting Store. 

Gebbie, Albert & Co. 
Exporters. 

Amiiig, Brauss y Cia. 

Azevedo, Jos6 P. de. 

Barrozo y Cia. 

Bates, Stokes y Cia. 

Bean y Cia. , Andrew C. 

Bechem, Andrew y Ca. 

Bertram, Wilhelm. 

Best y Hnos., Juan. 

Bonich y Cia., Luis P. 

Borzone y Cia. 

Bossis y Camoyrano. 

Bowers y Cia., C.S. 

Brachty Cia.,Th. 

Brandt, Eduardo. 

Bunge,E.A. yT.B. 

Burgos y Cia. * 

Burmeister, German. 

Buschmann y Ca. 

Camartino y Hno., Francisoo. 

Canosay Ca., J. M. 

Carboni, Catt6 y Ca. 

Caude y Ca., Decoussin Th. 

Caulliez, Henry. 

Cholat, Victor. 

Cibils, Buxareo Jaime. 

Cinzano y Ca., F. 

Cohen, Giacomo. 

Collins y Ca., Fraser T. 

Coplane y Ca., Juan. 

Dagnlno y Ca., Federico. 

Delavigne y Ca., I. 

Drabble Hnos. y Ca. 

Dreyfus y Ca., J., Frdres. 

Duquennoy, Adolfo. 

Eicken, H. H. yon. 

Etchegaray y Ca., C. 

Funcky Ca.,Th. 

Fuhrmann y Ca., H. 

Oinouves y Ca., B. 
.GreffierFils. 

Hardt, Engelbert y Ca. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



»3 



isuJukOS ATBES— Continued. 

JEiporters— Continued. 
HiU,BeUamyyCa. 
Koch y Haesloop. 
LAhusen y Ca. 
Lamarque y Ca., A. 
Ledesma Hnos. 
Lombardini Hnos. 
Lopez y Ca., Antonio. 
Lothiois Frdres. 
LJoreda y Ca., Mayner. 
Malimann y Ca. 
Marco del Pont A. 
MasurelFils. 
Mendez y Ca., Francisco. 
MiJbas y Ca., Bernardo. 
Moller y Ca. 
Moores, H. G. 
Navas, Rafael de. 
Negrinellj, A. Remo. 
Nery y Ca., F. 
Nogues, Ninet y Ca. 
Northmann y Ca., M. 
Ortufio. Oregorio. 
08twaldyCa..S. 
Fater8onyCa.,R.C. 
Payrfta, F. 
Peltsery FOs. 
Pierea y Navas. 
Perry, Gardner B. 
Pettis y Calzado. 
Quatref ages y Paillard. 
Beye Hnos. y Ca. 
Bigal,R. 

Roberts y Ca., C. F. 
Roca y Santamaria. 
RoUei, Domingo. 
Rossi, Frandsoo. 
Schiimann y Zemik. 
Solan, C4rlo8. 
Stondty Ca. 
Steen y Ca. 
Surra, Aurel N. de. 
Tay, Henry. 
Tfty, William H. 
Theobald y Ca., J. K. 
TI6man y Ca., Cols. 
Tomquist y Ca., E. 
Trinquier y Ca., G. 
Vfllat6 Hnos. 
Waetse y Scblidf . 
Wattinne, Boesut & Fils. 
Wensy Ca. 
Wiengreen y Ca. 

Fumitwrt decUers and manvfactwrerB. 
Adamoli, Bernard. 
Ader, Bernardo. 



isuJukOS ATBES—Continued. 

SSimitwre dealers and manHfochirera— Cont'd. 
Allemandi, Constando. 
Alpini Quirino y Cia. 
Amibale, Santo. 
Baccaro,Juan. 
Bancalari, Jo86. 
Barcel6, Mariano. 
Barsellini, Leopoldo. 
Batista, Pascual. 
BergadA, Jos6. 
Bernardo, Luigi. 
Beni, Juan. 

Binaghi y Cia., Antonia. 
B6,Jos6. 

Bogni y Hno., Alejandro. 
BoloelU, Mariano. 
Bosch, Antonio. 
Botelli, Victor. 
Bottaro, Antonio. 
Burghi, Angel. 
Bristow & French. 
Calachati, Juan. 
Calcatera, J. 
C&mpora, Antonio. 
Cami)os, Anto. 
Carraffa, Miguel. 
Carlevari, S., y Gustavino, N. 
Car6, Juan. 
Carsi, Jo86. 
Casale,S. 
Casamiquela, J. 
Casella, BwilHu. M. de. 
Cassajus, Alejandro. 
Cassina, Jo86. 
Castagnino, Bernardo A. 
Castillone, Pascual Catoira Manuel. 
Ceruti, J. 
Changhea, C&rlos. 
Chiodi, Juan. 
Chirelle, Cesare. 
Ciolina, Emilio M. de. 
Ciovina, A. 
CipoUa Hnos., Froo. 
Cipolla, Juan. 
CirelB, Agustfn. 
Colombari, Francisco. 
Colombo, Antonio. 
Confolonleri, P. 
Copello y Hno., J. 
Correge, Felipe. 
Cort6i y Cia., Francisco. 
Costa, Jaime. 
Costa, Jo66. 

Craviotto y da., Bartolom6. 
Davi, Amalia. 
Debot, Celestino. 
Debatista, Ambrosio. 



H 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUEHOS ATBIM Continued. 

Jikimiture dealers and manvfacturer^-CouVd. 
Debemava, Jo86. 
Dedini 7 Cia. 
DediDi, Julio. 
Dejean y da., D. C. 
Delavela, Luis. 
Delbueno, Jo86. 
Delean, Feniando. 
Delflno Hnos. 
D^ Rio, Andi^. 
Denerl, Juan B. 
Deacotte, Maximo. 
De Vita, Criaando. 
Devoto y Cia., B. 
Dldore, Aui^ustiiio. 
Do Mato, Manuel. 
Domingues y Cia., Roque. 
Farnetano, Angel. 
Ferrari, Angel. 
Ferrigno, Juan. 
Fialo, Joaquin. 
Fideres, Roqu6. 
Florentino y Lecourae. 
Fontan, Manuel. 
Fonteroea, Manuel. 
Foms, Feliciano. 
Fortunato, Vicente. 
Oandolfo, Pedro. 
Garcia y Cia., Luis. 
Genovesio, Leonor. 
GhireUe, Cesate. 
Giachetti, Juan. 
Gilardi, Enrique. 
Giliberti, Pascual. 
Ginepro, Victorlo. 
Gonzalez, Manuel. 
Grampa, Miguel. 
Grampa y Radioe. 
Granett, A. 
Greco, Leonardo. 
Green & Co., Juan. 
Griet Hnos. 
Gritti, Frandsoo. 
Gross, Francisco. 
Guanziroli, Joe6. 
Guastavino, Nicola. 
Guldo, Tom6s. 
Herment y Cia., A. 
Jacob, Pedro y Vicente. 
Jaood, J. 

Jttrgenson, Pedro. 
Julllera y Cia. 
Klein, Felipe. 
Laborandi, AngoL 
LanaU, Bartolo. 
Lanatta, Juan. 



BUEHOS ATBEO— Continued. 

Furniture dealers and mani^octttren— Coated. 
Laurent, Augustina de. 
Lavang, Joe6. 
Lerca, Juan. 
Lorenzini y PerettL 
Maggione, D. 
Marasco, Jo86. 
Maroolli, C&rlos. 
Maroora, Jo86. 
Marrone, Benito. 
Marsioo, Jo86. 
Martindale, W. G. 
Marzorati y Maodo. 
Mascazzlai, A. 
Mascheroni, Jos6. 
Ma8tai,Jo66. 
Mattaldi, Leandro. 
Meretta, Jo86. 
Mohimont, Viuda de P. 
Molern, R 
Molteni, Lucas. 
Molteni, lAiis. 
McDonald, J. J. 
Molteni, Pedro. 
Monaco, Vicente. 
Moneta, A. 
Monier, Juan. 
Moreau,L. 
Mounier, Juan. 
Murino, Vicente. 
Musso, Benito. 
Navarrete, Ramon. 
Naveiro y Parada. 
NicoleUo, Juan. 
Nioolini, S. 
Nocera, Domingo. 
Novas, M. R. 
Novo, Cedlio. 
Nulli.Oreste. 
01ivo6,Juan. 
Osorio, Ricardo. 
Ottonello, Miguel. 
Pacano, Rafael. 
Paez, Jacinto C. 
Pagani, Ramon. 
Fagano, R. 
Palacio, Pascual. 
Palazzo, J. P. 
Pallares, Gabriel. 
Farenti, Santo, y Hno. 
Pasel y Cia., M. 
Pastore, Antonio. 
PazoB y Aznar. 
Pazos, Pascual A. 
Pech, Marius y Carranza. . 
Peretti y Hnos. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



15 



jiujuiOB AYBTM Continued. 

jPVtmihire decUert and manufacturert—OonVd. 
PiiioU,C&rio8. 
Pimii,Roooo. 
PfBano, J. 
Ponti, J086. 
Popa, Joe6. 
Porro, Napoleon. 
P0X08, PMcual Arturo. 
Pt«lter, Oufllerxno. 
Prevo8t,V. 
RabolUni, AngeL 
Radioe, Enrique. 
Rebuflo, A. F. 
RJlla, Francisco. 
Rlmoldl, Cesar. 
Blveray da. 

Rocca y da., TomAs Rodte Severo. 
Rodrigues, Francisco. 
KoigyOortte. 
Bosiano, B. 
Rotta, Antonio. 
Rubio y Merlo. 
Rubio, Salustiano. 
Ruggero, Onofrio. 
Ruiz, Anto. 
Rulzy da., J086. 
Saenz, Sandalioyda. 
Salvador, Teodoro. 
Santoparenti y Hno. 
Santoyanni, PascuaL 
Scarpatt A. 
Scarpati, Vicente. 
Scarsl,Vda.deM. 
ScfameU 6 Hijo, H. 
Seng 6 Hijo, J. D. 
Serratyda. 
SUvetti y Hnos., J. B. 
Simonetti Hnoe. 
Sodedad Fca.de Muebles. 
Solares, Antonio. 
Solely da., Hebert. 
Souza, Antonio. 
Spadafore y da., S. 
Spinetto, Luis. 
Sneyro, Juan. 
Tavelli, Pablo. 
Tettamanti, Vluda de. 
Texo y Cia. 

Thompson y da., H. C. 
Tigles y Amor. 
Tonelli Hnos. 
Toppi y Maffiolini. 
Trazande, Benito. 
Vadone, Francisco. 
Vaggiy Rossi. 
Valent^, Luis, u 



BUBNOS AYBIM Continued, 

Furniture dealers and mani^ac(ttrer«>-Oont'd. 

Vannoniy da.,P. 

Vazquez, Jos6. 

Veghi, Angel. 

Veroni, Domingo. 

Vicano^ Hno. 

Vierci, Juan. 

Vincent, J. 

Viola, Luis. 

VismaraHnos. 

Viz y da. 

Zancarini, Ellas. 

Zara, J086. 

Zucchi, Luis. 

Zucchi y MoltenL 

Zurutuza,Jos6. 
Importers of— 
books and paper, 

distez,Luis. 

dioUat y Ouillot. 

Mackem y McLean. 

Parellada,Jiian. 
brewery fixtures. 



Bua y Bachmann. 

Heinemann, Kley y Cia. 
huiiders' matericUs. 

Oinouy6syda.,B. 

Mirey y da. 

Rib6 y Hno., Augosto. 

Van Harpen y Cia. 
carpets. 

Romero, Diaz y Toresano. 
chemicals. 

Savelkoul y Ca. 
ctucory coffee. 

Caude-Decaussin y Ca. , Th. 
cider. 

Cueli, Eduardo. 
cigars and tobacco. 

Aparicio y da. 

PareIlada,Juan. 

Bello, Abelardo D. 

Bonani y da. 

Charro y Cia., F. de. 

Noceti, Cesar. 

Roman! y Cia., J. 

Van Harpen y da. 
cloths, clothes, etc. 

Blotte, Satumlno. 

Bonnaud y Qottre. 

Bullrlch, Rodolfo. 

Figueroay da.,N. 

Hir8,Joe6N. 



i6 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUEirOS AYRB8— Continued. 

Importers of— 
cloths, clothes, etc.— Oontiimed. 
Liguez y Cla., C. 
liacCaUam y Cia. 
Fortes y Benquez. 
Molinero y Cia. 
Schlieper Herm. y Cla. 
Seligman y Baudon. 
Staudt y Cia. 
Viademonte, Harguixidey. 
VidieUa y Cia. 
Zuberbahler y Cia. 
coal, coke, etc. 
Roma, Due y Cia. 

corks. 

Molinafl y Ca., T. 
diamonds, jewelry, and clocks, 

Anezin Hnos. 

Benchimol, J. 

Black y Ca., William. 

Bompet y Hnos., F. 

Campod6iiloo, Leonard! y 0&. 

Franchi, A. 

Ger8onyHno6.,A. 

Hoch, J. jeune. 

Imbert, R. 

Jacard y Ca., H. E. 

Lambert, Levy y Ca. 

Levaillant y Ca., A. 
Levy, Oscar. 
Matthey Hnos. 
Rouiina, Ch. 
Seguinguan. 

Silberberg, Muhlrad y Pozmanskl 
SottoyCa., Joseph. 
Steinheuer, Jacobo. 
Tabemig, Dussauet. 
Wuille, Billey Bloch. 
fancy notiojis. 
Clarf eld, Federloo. 
Gtass, Luis. 
Greenway y Ca., D. 
Haurie y Ca. '^ 

Jowey Frdres. 
Kaufmann, R. 
Kruger y Ca., R 
Penoo y Hnos., Juan. 
Repetto, Nocetti y Ca. 
Weyl, Eduardo. 
furniture. 
Ader, B. 

Green y Ca., Juan. 
Orlet Hnos. 
Solei, Hebert y Ca. 
Thompson y Ca., H. H. 
Wilkes y Ca. 



BUBHOfl AYBEB— Continued. 

Importers of— 
gcu fixtures. 

Cerini y Heinlein. 

Gaas, Luis. 

Rib6 y Hno., Agustin. 

Sanchez y ViUL 

Stomi Hnoa y Ca. 
ffenercU merchandise. 

Acevedo y Ca. 

Acherley y Ca., E. 

Alzaga, C&rios de. 

Ancizar Hnos. y Ca. 

Aparteguy Frftres. 

Apheca y Suzanne. 

Arambarri, Rodriguez, Gonzalez y Oa. 

Aretz y Ca. 

Arizmendi y Ca., M. 

Aming, Brauss y Ca. 

Artagaveytia Hnos. y Ca. 

Artaza y Landera. 

Asworthy Ca. 

Baratty Hnos. 

Barclay, Mackintosh y Co. 

Barros y Lafont. 

Bates, Stokes yCa. 

Beligard, Leopoldo. 

BembergyCa., Otto. 

Ben y Brusch. 

BennetyCa., J. A. 

Berisso Hnos. y Scala. 

BerUner, Horacio. 
Bemheim, J. A. 
Beukelaer y Ca. 
BianchetU y Ca. 
Blanchi y Ca., E. 
Bianchi y Ca. 
Blanchard, P. 
Blanchereau. 
Blanco, M. Ramon. 
Boie Hnos. y Ca. 
Bonani y Ca., A. 
BonnaudyOoffre. 
Borel,L. 
Borro, Lorenzo. 
Borzone y Ca. 
Boyd, John P. 
Bozzo, Antonio. 
Brambilla, C. 
Brandos y Ca., E. 
Brownell y Ca., R. P. 
Burgaud, Senet y Porte& 
Camino y Ferrer. 
Carbone, Plo. 
CarbonI, Catto y Ca. 
Cardinali y Ca., P. 
Carlisle y Ca., R. J. 
Castiella v Cisnen». 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



17 



BUENOS AYBES— Continued. 

bnporten of— 
general merchandUe—Continvisd. 
Caude, Decaussin y Ca., Th. 
CazalAs y Ga., A. 
Chaldneto, Figari y Ca. 
CharostyCa. 
Ch4s 6 Hijos, F. 
ChaUily Ca. 
Chauvel, Saul. 
Cfaavanne y Roux. 
Chaves, Fazio y Ca. 
Chayla y Ca., E. 
Checchinl, A. P. 
Chevrot y Ca., R. 
Chide y Phllipot. 
Clark y Ca., Juan N. 
Cobas, Benito. 
Cobos, R. 

Codiua, Bartolom6. 
Codino Hnos. y Ca. 
Coelho y Halbach. 
Collins y Ca., T. Fraser. 
Cordero y Ca., V. 
Corradi, Artiut). 
OostayCa.S. 
Dagnino y Ca. 
Dfijaer Frdres. 
Delaye y Ca., A. 
Delia Cha, £. 
Dell' Acqua y Hno., E. 
Dematteis y Ca., C. 
Denis y Ca. 
Descoure, A. 
DevUle y Ca., J. A. 
Devotto y Hno., A. 
DevottoyCa., 8.F. 
Devotto y Ca., S. 
Dieckmann y Malher. 
DiBenius y Ca., O. 
Donato y Ca., B. 
Drabble Hnos. y Ca. 
Drouet, Camille y Ca. 
Duasddorp y Ca., M. H. 
Englebert y Ca. 
Fetey Ca. 
Ferrer, V. 
Font, J. Juan. 
Friednuuin, Mauricio. 
Furt, Emilio. 
Funn, Butler y Ca. 
GalU Hnos. 
Oalup, S. 
Gamble y Ca., M. 
Garbarcino y Ca., A. 
Garbolino, C&rlos. 
Garcia y Ca., N. 

1 89 A 2 



I BUEVOB AYBE8— Continued. 



Importers of— 
general wiercAandtae— Continued. 
Garcia y Soro. 
Garibaldi, Fratelli. 
Garibaldi y TiUi. 
Garr6y Ca., J.B. 
Gaulhiac, Eduardo. 
GetllDK y Ca. 
Giuliani Hnos. 
Goicoechea y Ca. 
Gomez y Rodriguez. 
Gondret, Juan. 
Gonzalez y Ca., E. 
Grambiny Ca.,A. 
Hale y Ca., Samuel B. 
Hall y Ca., Juan O. 
Hardy y Ca. 
Hegenbarth, T. 
Helguera y Ca. 
Herrmann, E. 
Hill, Bellamy y Ca. 
Hodsoll, John. 
HoUmann y Muller. 
Hopmann y Ca., A. 
Jagmetti, Luis G. 
Jardon y Ca., J. M. 
Jones y Herschel. 
Joseph, Henri. 
Jo8u6yCa.,C. 
Kalko, Th. Hilarius. 
Kauert, R. 
Kirschbaum Hnos. 
Krabsay Ca., H. 
Kristufec y Ca. 
Kuliche y Ca., Carlos. 
Lacaille, Alejandro. 
Lacanette y Ca., J. 
lAcau y Ca., A. 
Laclaustra, Saenz y Ca. 
Lafont. Camille. 
LAhusen y Ca. 
LAmarque y Ca. 
Lapedagne y Soropon. 
Laray Ca., F.G. 
Larco, Verrazz. 
Larrouy y Ca., J. 
Lavagno, Gregorio. 
Lavall6e y Ca., J. 
Lawson y Ca. 
Ledesma Hnos. 
Lenguas y Ca., H. 
Levy, Oscar. 
LinkyCa., A. C. 
Lohmann y Ca. 
Lopez y Ca., A. 
Loubet.G. B. 



i8 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



isuJukOB AYBE8— Continued. 

lmporter8 of— 
general merc^ndise— Continued. 
Lozano, Emilio. 
Luders y Ca. 
Macgregor, Aitken y Ca. 
MacKechnie, G. 
Mahler, D. 
Maine, A. 
Blalatesta y Ca., P. 
Marcodi y Vanderr^e. 
Margenat y Ca., Jos6. 
Marguerie, L. 
Martinez, Roberto. , 
Martinez y Ca., G. 
Martini y Roasi. 
MafBUCO, C&rlo6 R. 
Matheron, A. 
Matthewsy Ca., R. 
Matthey, P. T. E. 
Mendez y Ca., F. 
Menet y Ca. 
Meyer y Schaub. 
MlUigan y Williamson. 
Miranda, Matias J. 
Molina y Ca., J. Juan. 
Molina, M.E. 
Molino. Alfredo. 
Monsegur y Ca. 
Montes y Ca. 
Montesino, J. S. 
Moreno, Manuel J. 
Moreno y Femandes. 
Munyo, Manuel. 
Naveira y Carro. 
Neel, Le Bas y Ca. 
Negrao, Vidarte y Ca. 
Negrevemis y Ca. 
Negrinelli, A., Remo. 
Nery y Ca., F. 
Nothmann y Ca., M. 
Nouche, Vilaplana y Ca. 
Novar6, TomAs. 
Oddo, Raja y Ca. 
Oest, J. W. 
Olcott y Ca. 
Olivari y Ca., T. 
Orlando y Ca., R. 
Orsolini, Miguel. 
Pages, G. F. 
Palina y Bemasooni. 
Palma, Feijo y Garcia. 
Parlane, Graham y Ca. 
Pearson y Ca. 
Peck, William E. 
Pellerano y Ca., B. 
Perea y Navas. 
Perez Mendoza, H. y J. 



BUEHOfl ATBTM Continued. 

ImporterB of 
general m«rcAandi«e— Continued. 
Perez, Serra y Ca. 
Perez yCa. 

PeriBs^, Cbkiuirrin y Barre. 
Perotti, Jo86. 
Petero Hnoa. 
Petri y Valenti. 
Pettis y Calzada. 
Pietranera, G. y A. 
Pietranera, T. 
Porth y Ca., N. F. L. 
Prieur, Poput, Taran y Ca. 
Queirolo, F. G. 
Ramirez, V. A. 
Ramos, A. F. • 
Rasche, R. S. 
RathJe,A. 
Rehn, Ernesto. 
Rey y Ca., L. 
Reynecke, B. 
Reyre Hnos. y Ca. 
Rhotes y Kern. 
Ribero y Ca., O. 
Rigal, R. 

Roca HnoD. y Rivarola. 
Rocha Hnos. y Ca. 
Rocha, J. P. 
Rode8,E.F. 
Rodriguez, Javier M. 
Rodriguez y Ca., M. 
Robner 6 Hijos. 
Roig y Ca., L. 
Rolleri y Ca., D. 
Ropes, Franklin S. 
Rosas, A.G.de. 
Rosciano y Piriz. 
Rosenthal, G. y C 
Rossi, F. 
Rousseau, P. 
Roux y Ninet. 
Robelle,G. 
Ruiz, Garcia 6 HiJos. 
Ru8ca,A 
Ruscheweyb, G. 
Ru8coni,A. 
8abatt6yCa..J.F. 
Salterain y Ca. 
Samper y Ca.,A. 
Savemier, P. R. 
Scherff Hnos. 
C)Chiavoni,Juan. . 
Schneidewind y Ca., W. 
Schulte, Roberto. 
Segarra, Jos6 R. 
Seaniglia y Crovetto. 
Sehlmeyer y Vogt 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. I9 

BUEirOB AYBEB— Continued. BUKMOS ATBEB— Continued. 



baportert of— 
general mercAan«i&M— Ck>iitinued. 

Senillosa 7 Bomero.P. 

Seqiieira.v Rosa. 

ShawHnos. 

Shaw y Ca., Juan. 

Shaw, Miller 7 Ca. 

SneUyCa. 

Sola 7 Ca., R 

SoUo 7 Ca., Joseph. 

SpiiiiK 7 Ca. 

Stefano.Questa. 

Steier 7 RosensteiD. 

Stevens, Condn 7 Ca. 

Storni, Trayerso 7 Ca. 

Sturia Hnos.7 Torres. 

8a»gain^Juan. 

Sundb]ad7Ca.,C. 

Surra, Aurelia N. de. 

Tatlock Hnofl. 

Theobald 7 Ca., J. K. 

Thompson 7 Ca. 

Thompson 7 Torras. 

Tracer 7 Ca.,H. 

Tronco80 7Ca. 

Uribe7Ca.,J.A. 

Umitia, Ma^rdalena. 

Valenthi, Pedro. 

Verazzi 7 Laroo. 

Vergara 6 Hljos. 

Vidal7Ca.,B. 

Vidal7Ca.,M.G. 

Vives,J. 

Yulbeno, S. 

Watson 7 Ca., C. 

Widenouiyer, Romero y Cia. 

Widmer 7 Salntot 

Williams, Gaudencio 7 Ca. 

Williams 7 dchero. 

Wipperlin^, Kirchhofer 7 Ca. 

Wolff, Adolf o. 

Wolff, Sigismundo 7 Ca. 

Wood 7 Ca. . Tom As. 

WoolIe7 7 Ca. 
f^astware, ehinatoare, and porcelain. 

Arredondo 7 Ca., R. 

darf eld, Federico. 

Kruger7Ca., R. 

Penoo 7 HnoB., Juan. 

Wilkes 7 Ca. 
groceriea and proviMon*. 

Banes, Hulcsar. 

CarideHnos.7Ca. 

Crooe 7 Pfsani. 

Crovetto 7 Ca., C. O. 

OandoIfi,Moe8 7Ca. 

Gin>u.Om<9r. 



Importers of— 
groceries and provinona— Continued. 
Laguerre, Paul. 
Lanus7Ca.,J. 
Lanusse, Pedro 7 A. 
LaTie,Sema7Ca. 
Levi, G. A. 
Logan, Beatt7 7 Ca. 
Loguegara7, Luis. 
Marc6, del Pont £. 
Marin 7 Ca., Juan A. 
Marini7Ca. 
Maupas 7 Ca.. Juan. 
Necol Hnos. 7 Ca. 
Paat8 7Ca., W. 
Parr7 7Ca. 
Pavero, Fdliz. 
Pas7Ca.,J.F.de. 
Pesagno, SUvestre. 
Peter8]Hnos. 

Repetto, Parpaglione^ Ca. 
Re7reHnos.7Ca. 
Spinetto 7 Ca., Juan. 

hatters* articles. 

Franchini 7 Ca., C. 

PesisBd 7 Jardon. 
household goods, paints, and hardwart. 

Belloni 6 Induni. 

Caasels, King 7 Ca. 

Demerengo 6 Hijo, J. 

Dilleraann 7 Ca., P. 

Dellazoppa. 

Font, Juan 7 Jaime. 

Hasenplever 7 Ca. 

Homps 7 Ca., A. 

I^Tsaght, John. 

Mieres, Forres 7 Ca. 

Nicholson, Bametche 7 Ca. 

Pini 7 Roca. 
irrni. 

Bell 6 Hijos, Joige. 

Cassels, King 7 Ca. 

Descours, A. 

Medina, Antonio. 

Steen7Ca. 
leather. 

Fontan Free 7 Ca. 

Levi, G. A. 
machinery. 

Adde, A. E. 

Agar, Cross 7 Ca. 

Bertuch 7 Ca. , F. 

Carmen, Diego M. 

Chauanard, G. 

DrTsdale 7 Ca., Juan 7 Jos^. 

Dr78dale 7 Ca., Tom&s. 



20 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUENOS ATBES — ^(Dontinued. 

Importers of— 
machinery— Continued. 
Earnest, W. 
Hansenclaver y Ca. 
Heinemann, Kley y Ca. 
Hornsby & Sons, R. 
Lanari y Ca., C. 
Lanus, M. 
Le jeune y Detrois. 
Mecks y Ca., S. J. 
Moore y Tudor. 
Osborne yCa. 
Portalis Frdres. 
SantoB Hno8. 
Shanks Hijos y Ca., A. 
Shaw 6 HiJos, Juan. 
Villafafie, O. 
Walsh, Lovett y Ca. 
York y Ca., Samuel. 
Wyssmann y Prevot. 
men''8 articles. 
Gath y Chaves. 
Manicot y Perissd. 

mosaics. 
Allende, Santiago. 
Arechavalena y Ca., M. J. 

naval stores. 
Bossl, Rugero y Ca. 
FuU6 y Ca., E. 
Pint y Roncoroni Hnos. 
Repett, Nocetl y Ca. 

paints, paper, and glass. 
Aublne y Despaux. 
Bonnemort, 6. 
Quesnel 6 Hijos, P. 
Savelkoul y Ca. 
Van Harpen y Ca. 

perfumei'y. 

Caude, Decaussin y Ca., Th. 

Bianchi y Sobrinho, F. 

Lafontaine y Ca., L. 

Monreu, H. 

Rivera, Ganuza y Ca. 

Sabatt6yCa.,J. F. 
photographers'' supplies. 

Boote, Samuel. 

Demarchi, A. 

Stein, H. 
plantation supplies. 

Alzaga, C. 

printers'' supplies. 
Demarchi, A. 
Estrada y Ca. 
Hoffmann, Gotardo. 



BUENOS ATBE8 — Continued. 

Importers of— 
printers^ supplies— Continued 

Ostwald y Ca., S. 

Wiengreen y Ca. 
ranges, firepUices, and stoves, 

Cassels, King y Ca. 

Green y Ca., Juan. 

Jones, Latimer E. 

Wilkes.y Ca. 
saddlery and harness. 

Astoul Hnos. 

Irigaray y Bametche. 

Widner y Sahitot. 
small wares and notions. 

Amant y Doublet. 

Belgrano y Ca., J. B. 

Bellon y Challe. 

Berdoy, Calle y Ca. 

Beye Hnos. 

Bum chon y Ca., J. 

Carrera y Ca., J. 

Capdevile, A. 

Caplane Hnos. 

Challe, J. M. 

Challe, Jo86. 

Chiappara, Tencone y Oa. 

Coqueteaux, A. 

Dartey Ca., Julio. 

Echevarria, J. P. 

Esquerr^ y Ca. 

Fernandez, Glorialdo y Segundo. 

Gomez y Migone. 

Grunhut y Ragozza. 

Gudenschwager, Kessler y Ca. 

Guen6n, Gustavo. 

Herbin Frftres. 

Laserre, C. 

Moureau, H. 

Menet y Ca. 

Milan, Eusebio. 

Nothmann, M. 

Puy" P. G. 

Schnickel, Jos6. 

Siegrist, Baader Hijos y Ca. 

Sommer, Christian. 

Villamieva, Leguineche y Ca. 

Zorraquin, C&rlos. 
sole leather. 

Blecu^her y Ca. 

F&brica Nadonal de Calzado, Sociedad An6- 
nima. 
tailors^ articles. 

Deville y Ca., J. A. 
white clothing. 

Adhemar y Ca., L. 

Bafio y Ca., M. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



21 



BUEHOS AYBE8— Continued. 



BUKMOS ATBES— (Continued. 



Mportera of— 
wines and liquors. 

Alinari, Francisco. 

Allec, J. P. 

Allende Santiafco. 

Amadeo, Joly y Ca. 

Aparicio y Ca. 

Aymar, Marti y Ca. 

Barca y Pefiasco. 

BaziUe, J. 

BazzoDi, A. G. 

BoDomi, Jo6u6. 

Boasany, Julio y Ca. 

Brunelli y Gatti. 

Breuer y Hnos., Gustavo M. 

Bumichon y Ca., J. B. 

Buasaud Frdres. 

Charpentier y Ca., A. 

Campbell, Colin. 

Cinzano y Ca., Froo. 

ConceiQao, A. J. 

Dagnino, Federico. 

DeU' Acqua y Hno., E. 

Domanico, Taoonianni y Ca. 

Bomenech, Baudilio. 

Echezarreta y Fernandez. 

Fernandez, Gayol S. 
Fernandez y Ca., Ricardo. 
Gandolfi, Moes y Ca. 
Jolly y Ca., A. 
Jones y Ca., 8. H. 
KriBtufec, Julio. 
Laborde, Auras J. 
Laborde, Alexis. 
Lesina y Bajetto. 
Letri, G. A. 
Lomay Ca. 
MagnanoyCa. 
M antegazza y Ca. 
Marino y Ca., £. 
Ortei^a, BeoTide, Cibeira y Ca. 
Piscione, Monaco D. 
Portals y Ca., E. R. 
PressianiyCa., J. B. 
Queirolo y Ca., J. L. 
Ramos yCa.,B. 
Romat 6Hijo8,M. 
flaborido Hnos. 
Staudt yCa. 
Steiner-Richter, A. C. 
Tonazzi y Hno., A. 
Van Harpen y Ca. 
Zeppi y Ca., A. 
Liquor merdiants. 
Campbell, Colin. 
Fnuer & Co., T. Collins. 
Laf out, Brutus. 



Liquor mercAant«— Continued. 

MacLean & Mulvany. 
! Moore & Tudor. 
I Paats&Co.,Wm. 

Parry & Co. 

Pontais, Calvert & Co. 

Machinery depots. 
A^r, Cross & Co. 
Bertuchy Cia.,F. 
Bash Hnos. y Cia. 
Blanch, Pedro. 

Chouanard, G., "Aux Forges de Vulcaln." 
Drysdale & Co., John & Joseph. 
Earnest, W. 
EbersteinyCia.,!.. 
Foley y Cia. , Thomas G. 
Hasenclever y Cia. 
Heinemann, Kley y Cia. 
Hornsby & Sons, R. 
Lanariy Cia.,C. 
Lanus, Miguel. * 

Moore & Tudor. 
Phillips, E.T. 
Reinard, Julio. 
Serra Mateo Hnos. 
Shanks 6 Hijo, Alejandro. 
Sodedad Casa Amarilla. 
Shanks Sons & Co. 
Shaw 6 Hijo, Juan. 
Symes y Cia., Enrique. 
Turner, Juan E. 
Walsh, Lovetty Cia. 
York y Cia., Samuel. 

Manufacturers of photographers^ apparatus. 
Autheman, Gustavo. 
Boote, Samuel. 
Da Costa. Gaston. 

Merchants^ general. 

Acosta,Gardo88e Manuel. 
Acufia, Francisco. 
Acufla. Juan N. 
Andrew, F. E. 
Aribas, Alberto. 
Arruf o, Javier. 
Arseno, Manuel. 
Arzeno.Juan. 
Badgalupo, Luis. 
Balcarce, Jos6. 
Bagley & Co., M. 8., grocer. 
Baker, Edward L. 
Ballauf , Ernesto. 
Barcelo, Domingo F. 
Barras, Lorenzo. 
Barreiro,Juan. 
Barrera, Antonio. 



22 



ARGENTINE REPUBLJC. 



BUKNOS ATBEB— Continued. 

Merchant8, pen«ra2— Continued. 
Barrios, Jofi^de. 
Barserque, M. 
Bartram, W. B. 
Baumann.G. 
BelaustfOgui, Francisco. 
Bell & Sons, George. 
Berasateg^ui, Martin. 
Bemberg&Ck>.,0. 
Bei:g:alleni,Juan. 
Bemasconi, Ernesto S. 
Bieckert's Brewery Co. 
Binae;hi, Julio M. 
Bissone, P. 
Bolla, Vicente P. 
Bonorino, Martiniano. 
Boote, Samuel, paints. 
Borasategui, Martin. 
Borxone, Esteban. 
Bowers & Co., Charles 8. 
Bradford & Co., J , manufacturers of boys' 

clothing. 
Bradley, Ernesto. 
Brillabrille, Apolinario. 
Broucas, B. 
Burmester, I. W. 
Busana, David. 
Cadret, Manuel. 
Cafferata, N. 
Calvino,Jos6. 
Camosusi, Juan B. 
CarbaI]o,M.Jo86. 
Carranza, Acosta Adolf o. 
Carreras, Manuel de las. 
Carreras, S&bas P. 
Casanova, Cayetano. 
Ca8anovas,Jos6. 
Casaretto,Juan. 

Cassels, King & Co. , stoves, coal, etc. 
Castillo, Manuel. 
Caulliez, Henry. 
Cayol.E. 
Cestaro Hnos. 

Childs, Saunders y Cia., cutlery. 
Chiquierin, Francisco. 
Cildoz y Cia., Martinez. 
Clarfeld. Frederico. 
Close & Son, J. H. 
CoU, Fco. 
Conazzi, C&rlos. 
Contratti, Pedro, jewelry. 
Coolc, Federico A. M. 
Comejo, Luis F. 
Comejo, Pedro. 
Cowes & Browne. 
Crassiello, A. 



BUBNOS ATBE8 — Continued. 

Merchants^ general— Continued. 
Croc6, Santiago. 
Crowther&Co. 
Curtin, J. Clai-k, petroleum. 
D'Acosta, M. 
Debat, Pedro. 
Delflno, A. M. 
Devoto, Bocha & Co. 
Diaz, Jos6 A. 
Diego de Castro. 

Drysdale, Thomas, general hardware. 
Duhalde, Santiago J. 
Duprat, C6rlos. 
Duprat, Luis. 
Durao, Jorge. 
Eamshawy Cia. 
English Book Exchange. 
Fernandez, Baldomero. 
Fem&ndez, Enrique. 
Fernandez, Manuel. 
Ferro, Jos4. 
Tigueroa, Juan. 
Fortune, M. G. 
Gcunbaudi, Sebastiano. 
Garat, Luciano. 
Gerlach, Eugenie. 
Gomez, Gerardo. 
Gonzales, Agustfn. 
Goth, G., arms and ammunition. 
Grandolfl & Moss. 
GrQnbein, A. 
Haitze, Juan B. 
Hale & Co., S. B. 
Hall & Cia., Juan O., teas. 
Hamonet, Gustave, florist. 
Harilaos, R. y H. 
Hasselmann, Enrique L. 
Henry, Fay Co. 
Hemes, Apesteguy*. 
Hodsall, John, hardware. 
Homes, Acebal & Co. 
Howard, L. F. 
Hoymer, Juan. 
Hoecker, Maximo. 
Isla, J. Juan. 
Jerran, Eduardo. 
Kaufihan, Gustave. 
Krabb6, Higgins y Cia. 
Lafont, Bmtus, teas and coffees. 
Lamarque, Juan. 
Lanus, Miguel. 
Lanusse, A. 
Lara, Pedro. 
Lascano, Benito. 
Lasso, Eloy. 
Lauth, Juan P. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 23 

BUEHOS ATBTM Continued. BUEVOS ATBES^Continued. 



Merchants^ 0en«ra^-Ck)iitinued. 
Laxaro, P. 
Leslie, A. 
Loekwood, C4rlo8. 
Lopes, Alek). 
Lppes, Daniel. 
Lopex, J086. 
Luaoes, Manuel. 
Luque, Honorio F. 
MacKeghnie, Ouillermo. 
Mackem, Wm., stationer. 
Maffei, Luis. 
Malbran, Tristan A. 
Malm, CArlos. 
MalTicini, Bartolo. 
Marenco&Co. 
Martin, Francisco. 
Martlta, Matias. 
Martinez, Bamitti & Cia. 
Martinez, J086 C. 
Martinez, Pedro. 
Massini, Esteban. 
Mata, J086, 
Mattaldi, Torenato. 
Matthews, Richards y Cia. 
Maxuach, Joe6 T. 
Merlo, Francisco. 
Mertens y Cia. 
Meyer, Leopoldo A. 
Meyer, NicolAsA. 
Miranda, MiKueL 
Moine, Eduardo. 
Mortall y Cia., W. L. 
Mufioz, Gervasio. 
Murray & Lanman, perfumeries. 
Navarro, E. 

N^fliaur & Co.. Julius, 8t£itiouers. 
NeOdyCia. 
Neri, Domingo. 
Nicholson, Bametche & Co. 
NoRueras, E. 
Novetti, Frco. 
Noguesy Cia. 
Ochoa, Indalesio. 
Ocampo, Sackman & Co., lumber. 
OHven, Manuel. 
Ortiz, J066 M. 
Paez, Pastor B. 
Palacios, Sastre Ignacio. 
Parpaglioni, Juan. 
Pascual, Pablo. 
Pearson's Piano Store. 
Ferea y Navas. 
Ponez, Fernando. 
Perez, Patricio. 
Perfumo & Co., F. 



MerchantSy general—Coutiaiie&, 
P6ris86, Luis. 
Philippe, J. 
Pichot, Emilio. 
Pifiero, Melchor. 
Pingel, Juan. 
Pitkin, J. R. 8. 
Podest6,S. 

Portalis Frdres & Oarbonier. 
Pulg, Antonio. 
Puig, Martin. 
Queiro, Alberto G. 
Rabicini, Antonio. 
Raggio, Lorenzo. - 
Ramirez, V. 
Rasche, R. 8. 
Ravenscroft & Rowland. 
Rebello, Cesar. 
R^cht Hnos. 
Regunaga, ManueL 
Reyna Toribia B. 
Richards y Cia., M. 
Riglos, Javier. 
RiUo, Bonifacio. 
Roas, Francisco. 
Roca, Ataliva. 
Rocca, Manuel. 
Rocca,Juan. 
Rocca, Santiago. 
Rodger, G.D. 
Rodriguez, Gabriel. 
Rodriguez, Gregorio. 
Rodriguez, Luis C. 
Rodriguez, Tom&s. 
Rojas,Lui8. 
Rotaasi, Fco. 
Roviralta, Teodoro. 
Ruiz, L. 

Runciman y Cia. 
Ruscheweyh, G. 
Sallgi'ri, Zucchi N. 
Salterain & Co. 
Sanford.C.H. 
SchilTy Cia.,L, 
Schnabl & Co. 
SchrSder, Gulllermo. 
Semena, Bernardo. 
Servais, Lonhienne. 
Shaw Bros. 
Sif redi, Modesta. 
Sllva, Federico. 
Silva, Garreton C&rlos. 
Silveyra, Augustin. 
Smite, C&rlos. 
Spinetto, Ardr6s. 
Spraggon, Guillermo. 



H 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUENOS ATBE8— Continued. 

Merchants, general— ContinvLed. 

Stagno Bacigalupo C&rios. 

Stevens, Corwin & Oo. 

Strongr, William. 

Tao, Francisco. 

Torrado, Francisco. 

Trella,Juan. 

Tronconi, Jo86. 

Turner y Oia., Juan £.-» builders' duppliea. 

The Gourock Ropework Co. 

Viejobueno, Aatalio. 

Vig^nale, Juan. 

Vilar6, Juan Foo. 

Vilatte Hno6. 

Vitale, Jo86. 

Vivar. C&rlos. 

Volpe, Luis, umbrellas and canes. 

WUkes y Cia. 

Wood & Co., Thomas, engineers and contrac- 
tors' stores. 

Zwingen, Antonio. 
B^reaeif,tative8 of foreign houses. 

Adde, E. A. 

Allard, E. 

Bazzoni, Giunio. 

Boisot. C. V. 

Bouwer, N 

Burmester, William. 

Busch, Walther. 

Cabardos, Eugenio. 

Carassiano y Cia., A. 

Clemente, M. de.,fUtros Pasteur. 

Caillon y Cia.. Ernesto. 

Catuna, M. 

OoUin8.J.H. 

Coquet des ills, James. 

Costa, Pablo. 

Coulon, F., y Crdvecoeur, E. 

Duplaquet ComptoirsCommerciaux Frangais. 

Dupont et Fils, P. 

Favrot, Ch. 

Fischer, M. 

Fischer y Schlatter. 

Forgues, L. D. 

Groenewoud, S. 

Hauck, Emilio. 

Hauser, Ricardo. 

Httchel, German. 

HoUman y MilUer. 

Howard, L. F. 

Hupfeld.C.F. 

India Rubber, Gutta-Percha and Telegraph 
Works. 

Joubert, Pablo. 

Lassaletta y Marichalar. 

Kaufmann, G. 



BUE1I06 ATBES— Continued. 

Rqn-esentatives of foreign hottse^^-Oontmned. 

Kristuf eck , Julio. 

Leech, J. 

Letzgus y Qia. 

IJoyd, Ernesto H. 

Lottermoser, GulUermo. 

MacCracken, William H. 

Malm, Godofredo. 

Mitau, J. y E. 

Naar.F.F. 

Ortuno, Gregorio. 

Ovando y Cia. 

Payton y Cia. 

Peck, William E. 

Perrel, C 

Pietsch y Cia. 

Plaut, George. 

Potter, Eduardo. 

Ramell, J. 

Rodriguez, Marcos. 

Sattler, L. 

Scharnitz, H. y Alejandro. 

Schneider y Cia. 

Schuerer Stolle, Juan. 

Schwob Hnos. 

SgroBSo, G. y I. MartignettL 

Steam, F. 

Sternberg, Luis. 

Stevens, Corwin y Cia. 

Surra, A. N. de. 

Symes y Cia., Enrique. 

Tatlock Hnos. 

Thomson, C. G. 

Torrella, Pedro. 

Vaucher y Pachon. 

W^auer, William. 

Weil y Cia., Hugo. 

Wollwerber, W. 

Woodgate, G. M. 

Zeppl y Cia., A. 
Sandal manufacturers. 

Andia, F. 

Apesteguia, Domingo. 

Amal, Dionisio. 

Ascarat, Martino. 

Asco, Manuel. 

Avendafio, Fermin. 

Bameche, Salvador. 

Bidondo, Bernardo. 

Campolongo, Sra. Recfaela. 

Carasa, Francisco. 

Carrique, Simon. 

Casamayor. P. 

Cesario y Cia., M. 

Courtes, Bernardo. 

De Diego, Francisco. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



25 



BUKNOS -AYBTai Continued. 

Sandal nianvfacturerB---Conti[nied. 

Domin^ez, HnoB. 

Ecbave. Martin. 

EsDola, Jofi6 Maria. 

Etcbe^aray y Fraaer. 

Fourcade, Bautista. 

Fumoda, demente. 

Grela, Andr^. 

Hernandez y Mira. 

Lafuente, J. 

Lastiri, Pedro J. 

Marafion, Jenaro. 

Marti, Prudencio. 

Marton, B. 

Maiton, Pedro. 

Morea, Aniceto. 

MorenOf Fernando. 

OUmendi. J. M. 

Otamendi, J086. 

Redondo, Maria. 

Bendo, Domingo. 

Rivera, Evaniu. 
San Gil, Ubaldo. 
Senteler, L. 
Socledad Andnima. 
Sotres, Salvador. 
Ugaidia, Juan. 
Vega, Servando. 
Zubillaga, Bias. 
Skip chandlers. 

Badaracco 6 Hi job, Josd. 

Blanch, l^edro. 

Bmzzone, Joan. 

Canova Hnoe. 

acosl, Ruggero y Cia. 

Cichero, Domingo. 

Deacon, T. T. 

Francioni, Francisco. 

Fulle y Oa., Emilio. 

Quizzetti y Garrone. 

Maranga, J. 

Massone, C&rlos. 

Meincke 6 Hijo, Enrique. 

Mortola, Canevari. 

Pini, J., y Roncoroni Hermanos. 

Pitre, Francisco. 

Repetto, Noceti y Cia. • 

Rizzi, J066. 

SHvenmtths. 
Batrica, J. 
Benaasi, Luis. 
Benatar, L. 
Biondi, Beneditto. 
Biondi, B., y J. Sauciat. 
Bonthoux, P. y E. 
Oantalupi, Salvador. 



BUEH06 AYBE8 Continued. 

Silversmiths— Continued. 
Capra, J.,'y G. A. Fagioli. 
Costa, Julio. 
Cubelli6 HiJo. 
Cuomo, Felipe. 
D'Atri, Carmelo. 
Diaz, Melanio. 
Fernandez y Casal.' 
Ferrari, Agustfn. 
Franco, M&ximo. 
Frugonl, D. 

Fuchs, C&rloB, y Frco. PomL 
Krfimer, Simon. 
Krftmer, Isaac. 
Kempter y Straube. 
Macucho, Domingo. 
MarinelU, J086. 
M^galeyCia.. B.J. 
Mina, A. G. 
Molinari, Vicente. 
NasBo, D., y G. Dezcalzo. 
Odoricio, Felipe. 
Omstein, R. 
Pet: agnani, Jos6. 
Pietrafesa, Antonio. 
Pietrafesa, Juan. 
Pietrafesa, Miguel. 
Podest^, A. 
Podest&, Enrique. 
Pomi, Frco. 
Rachetti, C6aar. 
Puiz, Leonardo. 
Putra, Miguel. 
San Martino, Angel. 
Servi, J086 de. 
Suviria, Eusebio. 

SurgiccU instrument manufaeturer. 
Belleza,A. 

Tailors. 

Amills, Luis. 
Ash, Henry. 
Brown, J. 
Damas, A. 
McMlUan<&Co.,J. 
Murray, A. 
Smart, James. 

Wool depositories. 
Beautemps, F. 
B^cat, Eugenio P. 
Casado, P. 

De Barrera, Masia y Cia. 
Fougue y Dhios. 
Guirand, Emilio. 
Jalabert, Fermtn. 
Mafii, Domingo. 



26 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



BUEVOS AYBES — Continued. 

Wool (ieponfories— Continued. 
Marcou, Calisto. 
Orfoiscay, C&rlos. 
Perez, Jerdnimo. 
Sanchez, Pedro. 
T&ullard, A. 
Urrutia, G., y DurraU, J. 

Wool and produce. 
Garrahan & Bros.,L. 
Kelsey & Co., G. 
Kenny, Eduardo. 
Ramsay, James T. 

CATAMASCA. 

Bcmka. 

Banco Nacional, Sucunsal del. 

Banco de Sta. F6, Sucursal del. 
Merchants^ general. 

Abarra, Miguel. 

Bazan, Luna. 

Caravatl, Luis. 

Carranza, Mauricio. 

Carreras, Clpriano. 

Casneros, Juan. 

Cubos, Francisco. 

Femiro, Callxto. 

Flgueroa, Casto. 

Figueroa, Molaz & Oo. 

Franco, Luis. 

Lascano Hermanos. 

Mescado, Wellinton. 

Molaz Hermanoe. 

Molina Hermanos. 

Navarro, Manuel. , 

Navarro, O. 

Rodriguez, Severe. 

Terum, A. 

GOBDOBA. 

Banks. 

Banco Agrlcola Comercial del Rio 

Plata. 
Banco Hipotecario de la Provinda. 
Banco Nacional, Sucursal del. 
Ailende y Cia., Jos^. 
Castro, V. 

Cordeiro, Abelardo 6 Hijo. 
Debreza y Cia., E. 
Flandin, T. 
Peilolosa y Velez. 
Pitt, J. J. 

Salvarezza y Giacbino. • 
Sanguinet, E. 



de la 



OOBDOBA—Continued. 

Merthants, importers. 
Abarca, Jaime. 
AcessatyFary. 
Acoeta y Arguello. 
AUende, Pedro. 
Alvarez, Javier. 
Boggild y Petersen. 
Bressler, A. 
Caeiro, P. 
Carranza,N. 

David y Antenor Carreras. 
Deheza, Eduardo. 
Damarcet, Jos6. 

Ferdinand Givaudant, Dean Funes. 
Fernandez, Jos6. 
Flandin, Theod. 
Gavier, Ehirique. 

Gavier, Pedro. 

Goioohechea, Mariano J. de. 

Heina, Kurth y Cia. 

Kama Pablo y Cia. 

Lazcano y Cia. 

Leila, Teodomiro. 

Martinez Bogelio y Cia. 

Mendez, Jo86 M. 

Obregon, S. 

Oulier y Darlay. 

Prieto y Cii^. 

Roman y Hermanos, J. 

Romillon, Marin y Cia. 

TagUaferri, G. 

Thome, John M. 

G0BBIENTE8. 

Bank and bankers. 

Banco Nacional, Sucursal deL 

Sootte, Augusto L. 

Onieva, Desiderio. 
Merchania^ commission. 

Agueret, HipoUto. 

BiUinguret & Sotero. 

Fontana, Manuel. 
Merchants^ general. 

AguirrB& Co. 

Birrastaln, Pedro. 

Cremente & Queirel. 

Decoud, Antonio. 

Desimoni & Nicolinl. 

Elena & Co., Joa6. 

Figueroa & Co., L. 

Qiorgeti, Viuda de. 

Gustuzo & Guerello. 

Moreno, Francisco. 

Persini Hermanos. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. T] 

COBEIKHTEB— Continued. LA PLATA— Continued. 



IfercAanto, ^enero^-Oontlnued. 
Sala&Co. 

Santa Manna, Narciso. 
Vaffes & Co., Juan. 
Villa, Lute. 

LAFLAIA. 

Banco Comercial de La Plata. 

Banco de Italia y Rio de La Plata. 

Banco de la Provincia. 

Banco Hipotecario de la Qrovincla. 

Banco Hipotecario Nacional. 

Banco MercantU del Rio de la Plata. 

Banco Nuevo Italiano. 
Utrchani*. 

Ahr &, Olivera, timber. 

Alvarez, Desidero, paving contractor. 

Ambrosis 6 Hijoe, timber. 

Amoretti, C4rlo8, vermicelli factory. 

Anganuzzi, Baltaaar, iron foundry. 

Arecbavaleta & Cia., moaaics. 

Artigue, Enrique, artificial stone factory, 

bricks and moeaics. 
Asnaghi, Luis, timber and general merchant. 
AttUio, Rafael, marble works. 
Barbero, Joe6 R., carriage factory. 
Basset Frdres, nursery gardens. . 
■ Bianchi, Spont, Delpino y Cla., timber and 

general import merchants. 
Bianchi, E^steban y Ca., wholesale grocery 

and import house. 
Bizzozero Hermanos, furniture makers. 
Boggiano, V. M., wholesale grocery. 
Botel & Cia., Felipe, furniture and general 

hardware importers. 
Oarbone Maesani & Cia., timber. 
Casseii Hnos., piano factory. 
Oassels, Fra cis, electric-light deposit workH. 
Oereale, Juan, wholesale grocery. 
Gfaalier, Augusto, lithographing establish- 
ment 
Cisneros, Jo86, timber. 
Oolomb, C, dyeing works. 
Colombo Hermanos, brewers. 
Corderiola Hnos. & Cia., grain merchants. 
Deydier & Kattner, millers. 
Diaz de Vivar, R.. lime factory. 
Etchart, Qeronimo, cigars. 
Flablet, Julio, wines. 
Ferrari, Esteban, timber. 
Florini, Pedro, contractor. 
Gentfle, Manuel, silk factory. 
OianI, Angel E., harLess and saddlery factory. 
Glanaal y Tainana, brewers. 
Guardo, Daniel, cattle dealer. 



JfercAan/«~Continued. 

Guichon 6 Hijos, grocery importers and 
brewers. 

Lanteri, Geronimo, com merchant. 

Lanusse & Cia., J. J., private bankers and 
conunission agents. 

lAn ns He y Mendes, maritime agents. 

Lanza, Domingo, general importer. 

Llobet 6 Hijo, timber and ironmongery. 

Manri, Salvador, building contractor. 

Manzoni, Virgilio, leather and general mer- 
chant. 

MauU, Jorge, com and hay. 

Mendizabel Hnos., ironmongery. 

Moroni y T jnesi, furniture makers. 

Nocetti y Gallino, paving contractors. 

Palma y Zappettini, Umber. 

PMemonte 6 Hijo y Cia. , buildhig contractors. 

Pedemonte y Rupprich, steam carpentery 
worka 

Perez. Roque, dry goods. 

Petit, Te6fllo, shipping contractor. 

Penser, Jaoobo, stationery and printing works. 

Puleston, E. T., general commission agent. 

Rezabal, Ricardo, general grocery. 

Riosa, Francisco, furniture factory. 

Rozas, Insmaralde & Co., general hardware. 

Sdurano y Cia., Manuel F., timber. 

Segoria & Co., J. M., contractors and general 
merchants. 

Serra, Leopoldo, hats and dry goods. 

Szelagowski, Miguel, cloth merchant. 

Tewes, Adolf o, com and hay. 

Toyos HnoH. & Cia., grocery importers. 

Urrea & Cia., match factory. 

Valarch6 & Cia., wine merchants. 

Valle, Nocetti y Vila, Italian warehousemen. 

Veneroni, C, notion warehouseman. 

Zunda y Beranger, barge owners. 

pasahA. 

BanJbs. 

Banco Hipotecario Naciona 

Banco Nacional. 
Commxanim. m«rcftante. 

Amaret, Alexis. 

Badello Hermanos. 

Brugs & Hijos, AngeL 

Gaura. Dionisio. 

Guard & Co. 

Palme & Hijos. 

Perez & Co. 

Predolini y Neifiez. 
MeTdmnUy general. 

Amestegul, GuUlermo. 



28 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



PABAHA— Continued. 

Merchants, genera/— Continued. 
CoU, Mariano. 
Comas, Justo. 
Cortaveria, Juan. 
Dalurzzo.Juan. 
Gaureguiza, Esool&stico. 
Otafio, Joaquin. 
Palma, Ger6nimo. 
Palma, Pedro. 
Palma, Santiago. 
Pianello, Job6. 
Pietro, Mariana 
Raffo, Santiago. 
ScheaMni, Luis. 
Solari, Juan. 
ToiTMi, Baltaaar. 
Vinas, Pedro. 

B08ABI0. 

Banks. 

Banco de Espafia y Rio de la Plata. 

Banco de Italia y Rio de la Plata. 

English Bank of River Plate, limited. 

National Bank. 

Provincial Bank. 
Commisaion merchants. 

Alvarado y Puccio. 

Frugoni, Juan. 

HerU & Minvielle. 

Lorzano, Federico. 

Machain & Co. 

McKem & McLean, stationers, importers. 

Munoz & Co., Rodriguez. 

Orgaz Florentino & Co. 

Palacios & Co. 

Paz & Co., Jos6. 

Paz & Co., Manuel F. 

Rodriguez, Enrique. 

Tietjen & Co. 

Zuider & Co., A. 
Exporters. 

Davies & Co., E., general produce, wheat, 
maize, hides, bones, etc. 

Lodesma Bros., exporters of produce. 

Machain & Co., exporters of produce. 

Maspoii, Chiesa & Co., exporters of produce. 

Omarini Bros., exporters of produce. 

Sabatathie Fils, importers of wines and ex- 
porters of produce. 
Importers. 

Amelong & Co. 

Avallo & Pan, groceries. 

Avallo y Cia. 

Bemberg, Heimendahl & Co., dry goods. 

Bljrthe, Le Bas & Co., hardware. 



B08ABI0— Ck)ntinuecL 

/mpor£er«— Continued. 

Crosta, Borelly & Co. 

Day Hermanos, drugs. 

Deurer & Co., hardware. 

Dimarchi, Parodi & Co., drugs. ' 

Eggington, John, dry goods. 

Gay & Co., E., drainage, water, and gas mate- 
rials. 

Kropf , Enrique, crockery and fancy wares. 

L^udisdorf & Co., Martin, machmery for agri- 
culture. 

Mantels & Pf eiffer. 

Maspoii, Chiesa & Co., machinery and gen- 
eral hardware. 

Ortiz & Co., Emllio. 

Ottone 6 Hijo, Giorgio, dry goods. 

Pinasco & Castignino, ship purveyors. 

Schiffkier & Co., general hardware. 

Schlieper & Co., Herman, dry goods. 

Senac & Co., Adolf o. 

Sociedad Cooperativo, groceries. 

Travella & Ghirlanda. 

Merchants, general. 

Acevedo y E^ntos, importers of provisions and 
liquors. 

Abbaladejo, C&rlos, dealer in produce. 

Allendo, Miguel, importer of provisions and 
liquors. 

Alvarado y Pucio, commission agents. 

Amelong y Co., importers of dry goods. 

Bamett & Co., Lloyd's agents. 

Barraco, Domingo, general imp rter. 

Baker, Wil Js £. 

Bemasconi. Jos^, importer of pianos. 

Berganini, H., architect. 

Bianchi, A., gilder. 

Bianchi.S., furniture importer. 

Blythe & Co. , genelnl importers of machinery- 
hardware, crockery, fancy notions. 

Brignardello 6 Hijo, Ventura. 

Broqua, Scholberg & Co., gunsmiths and plate 
waies. 

Browning, Robert, florist. 

Caberja, Rossi y Co., importers of boots and 
shoes. 

CaiTerena. E., ship broker and agent. 

Canals Dam & Co.. contractors and oommia^ 
sion agents. 

Chiesa Hermanos, general importers and ex- 
porters. 

Clark & Walker, brokers. 

Cautero. Juan, tailor. 

Chute & Brooks, photographers. 

Coffin, H.B., commission agent and exporter 
of Droduce. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 



29 



BOSABIO— Continued. 



B08ABI0— Continued. 



Merchants, genera/— Continued. 

Colombres & Co.^conuniasion agents and ex- 
porters of produce. 

Coutteret, Luis. 

Curry, H. F. , stationer. 

Davis & Co., E. 

Day Hermano, chemist and druggist. 

Deroto, M., importer of furniture. 

Deurer y Co., importers of provisions and 
liquors. 

Diary, Joaquin, receiver of produce. 

Dimarciii, Parodi y Co. , wholesale druggists. 

Dreyfus Frdres, importers, exporters, and 
general commission merchants. 

Eggington, John, importer of dry goods, 
wholesale. 

Egurvide y Vallarino, Importers of dry goods, 
wholesale and retail. 

Etchesortu y Casas, commission agents. 

Ferguson, H. S., steamship agent. 

Firmat, Ignacio. 

Fisher, Henckler & Co., wholesale and retail 
ironmongers and agricultural implements. 

Frey , E. , carriage builder. 

Frugoni, Papaglioni & Co., wholesale import- 
ers of provisions and liquors. 

Garcia, F., dealer in produce. 

Qay & Co., E., plumbers. 

Qilliea, A., pianos, etc. 

Gogeascoechea S: Co. 

Gomez y Teran, retail dry goods. 

Hall & Co., Alanson 8. 

Henrich, Marquadt & Co., grain brokers and 
shippers of grain. 

Homao, E., broker. 

Horler, Schultz & Co., wholesale importers of 
dry goods. 

Hume Bros., railway contractors. 

Kropf y Co., E., importers of general mer- 
ehaodise, hardware. 

Lac Prugent, J., consignee. 

Lavarello y Co., shipping agents. 

Lavendera, A., wholesale importer of pro- 
visions and liquors. 

Leinenweber & Co., general hnporters. 

McCallum & McCrae, importers of dry goods. 

McKern, R., bookseller and general stationer. 

Machado & Co., J., wholesale merchants and 
importers of provisions. 

Maebain & Co. 

Mallet, H., land and commission agent 

Marlscany & Co., wine merchants. 

Marmol, Lanus & Co. 

ICaumas y Dodero, ship brokers. 

Mayor, Pedro, foundry works. 

Keiggy Son & Co., engineers and contractors. 



Merchants, general— pontinued. 
Moore & Tudor, explosives. 
Obieta, ToreUo & Co., bag manufacturers. 
Omarini Bros., shippers of produce, and con- 



Orgaz & Co., general commission merchiuits. 

Ortiz, C, provision merchant. 

Ortiz, E. D., general importer and exporter. 

Otero & Co., Jos^. 

Paul, William Taylor, pharmacist. 

Paz, Jos6 F., commission merchant. 

Paz & Co.. M. J., commission merchants and 
exporters. 

Pinto, Nicol&s, y Hermano. 

Poirano & Co., Andrade, confectioners. 

Portalis Frdres, general importers and ex- 
porters. 

Puente & Co., Alonso, dry goods. 

Recagno, Olcese & Cazeneuve. 

Rivas & Co., Fernando, hardware. 

Roulllon, Marini & Co. 

Rufener & Co. 

Sabathie, Juan. 

Samson & Co., shipping agents and brokers. 

Santiago & Co., Alonso, grocers. 

Schiffener & Co., agricultural machinery and 
general hardware. 

Schelhas, J., opticians' materials. 

Schlieper & Co., importers of dry goods. 

Sel & Ifiarra, floiu: and grain. 

Senac & Co., A., importers. 

Servine Bonifacio & Co., dry goods. 

Sixbixthie 6 Hijos, I. 

TIetjen & Co., general importers of hardware, 
exporters of produce, and commission mer- 
chants. 

Thomas & Davis, provisions. 

Timmermann & Co., jewelers. 

Tixier, Armando, watches, clocks, and jewels. 

Travella & Ghirlander, ironmongers. 

Vila Nlcasio & Co., importers general pro- 
visions. 

Vizcaya Hermanos, jewel and diamond mer- 
chants. 

Wildermuth Bros., dealers and exporters of 
grain. 

Wolff, Schorr, bazaar and fancy knickknacks. 

8AHTA it 

Banks. 

Banco de la Provincia de Santa F6. 

Merchants. 

Forster & Co. 
Reyes, J. M. 
Sigel Bros. 



' 



;i 



Import Duties 

of Colombia. 



Dereclios de Importacioii 
• en Colombia. 



; Bureau of the American Republics, 

Washington, U. S. A, 



Bulletin No 27. November, 1891. 






LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 



1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. I. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and' Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics, 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil, 
g. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo, 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 

24. Import Duties of Honduras. 

25. Import Duties of Ecuador. 

26. Commercial Directory of Argentine Republic. 






Import Duties 

of Colombia. 



Derechos de ImportaciOn 
en Colombia. 



^ o 
BUR gAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 



Washington^ U. S. A. 
Bulletin No 27. November, 1891. 



I r ^ / p ^ 






BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBUC8, 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WA8HINQT0N, D. C. U. 8. A. 



Director. — William E. Curtis. 

Secretary, — Henry L. Bryan. 

Statistician. — Carlos Federico Adams-Michelena. 

Portuguese Translator, — John C. Redman. 

Spanish Translators, — ]o^t Ignacio Rodriguez. 

Mary F. Foster. 
Cfirr^fef.— John T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer, — Imogen A. Hanna. 



While the fj^reatest possible care is taken to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that majr 
occur therein. 

(II) 



CONTENTS. 



Food and condiments i 

Liquors 2 

Other liquids 2 

Cotton 2 

Hemp and flax 3 

Wool 4 

Silk : 5 

Various goods and threads 5 

Robber 5 

Hides and fur *$ 

Earthenware 6 

Ciystal and glass 6 

Articles for illuminating and other uses 6 

Drugs and medicines 7 

Perfumery and soap 7 

Paper and cardboard 7 

Wood 8 

Sisal hemp, osier, etc 10 

Iron and steel 10 

Copper or bronze 13 

Tin '. 13 

Lead 13 

Zinc 14 

Quicksilver 14 

Gold 14 

Silver 14 

Powder 14 

Stones, building material, etc > 14 

Miscellaneous iS 

Consular regulations 16 

(III) 



Import Duties of Colombia. 



DERBCHOS DB IMPORTACI6N BN COLOMBIA. 



This classification conforms to the official tari£f of the Republic of Colombia, which 
* differs materially from that of the United States. 

Equivaltnts: 

s iflT-er peso =10.736 United States QvXy z, 1891). 

z Ulo = fl. 0046 pounds. 



Articles. 



7ood and oondimeati. 

Potatoes of all varieties, onions, 
com, rice, peas, beans, and all 
classes of fresh vegetables and 
fruits 

Gariic ' 

Flour, including sago, arrowroot, 
tapioca, corn meal, and all sim- 
ilar products 

Codfish and meats in brine, and 
all fresh fish and meats 

Sugar 

Hazelnuts, nuts, and almonds in 
the shell, and generally all un- 
prepared food not mentioned . 

Vermicelli and other pastes 

Prepared food, such as pickled 
or smoked meats, salmon,hams, 
sweetmeats, confections, pre- 
served and dried fruits, etc., 
and all pickles and condiments, 
not specially mentioned 

Olives, in barrels 

Tea 



Duty per 
pouna in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 



0.003 
.017 

.017 
.017 
.017 



.033 
.033 



.067 

.033 
.234 



Artfculos. 



Batatas 6 camotes, papas, cebo- 
llas, maiz, arroz, garbanzos, 
lentejas, fri soles 7 toda clase 
de legumbres y hortalizas y 
frutas frescas , 

Ajos •. , 

Harinas,comprendiendo el sagd, 
arrow-root, tapioca, maicena 
y dem4s semejantes , 

Bacalao y carnes en salmuera, y 
en general los pescados y car- 
nes que se hallen sin preparar. 

Azficar 

Avellanas, nueces y almendras, 
con ciscara, y en general to- 
dos los alimentos sin preparar 
no mencionados 

Fideos y dem4s pastas 

Alimentos preparados, come 
mortadelas, salm6n, jam6n; 
losdulces, confites, frutas con- 
servadas y frutas pasas, etc., y 
los encurtidos y condimentos 
de todas clases no menciona- 
dos especial mente 

Aceitunas en barriles 

T6 

I 



Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone- 
da Oo- 

lombiana. 



Ptsot, 



0.01 
.05 



.05 



.05 
.05 



.10 
. 10 



.20 

. 10 
.70 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 


Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 


Articulos. 


Derechos 
poi^kilo 

en mone- 
daCo- 

lorobiana. 


Food and candimenti— Continued. 
Cinnamon 


Dollar*. 
.10 
.40 
.067 
.033 
.40 

.017 

.008 

.008 

.017 
.134 
.134 

.017 
.033 
.033 

.017 
.033 

.003 
.067 

.134 
.167 


Alimentos y oandimentot— Cont. 
Canela 


.30 
I. 20 


Saffron 


Azaf r4n 


Anise • 


AnJs 


. 20 


Ice 


Hielo 


. 10 


Salt per each I2>^ pounds. . 

liquon. 
Beer and other fermented liquors. 


Sal por cada I2>^ kilos. . 

BoUdBs. 

Cerveza y demds bebidas fer- 
mentadas 


I. 20 
.05 


Barley malt, or other fermented 
or unfermented materials, li- 
quid or solid, for making beer, 
and condensed beer 


Mosto de cebada 6 de otra ma- 
teria fermentada 6 infermenta- 
daliquida 6 s61ida, para hacer 
cerveza y la cerveza conden- 
sada 




.02^ 


Wines, claret, common, in pipes, 
barrels, and demijohns 

Wines, white, sweet and dry, in 
pipes and barrels 


Vino tinto comfin, en pipas, ba- 
rriles v damaiuanas 


. 02s 


Vinos blancos, dulces y secos, 
en pipas 6 barriles 


.05 
.40 

.40 

.05 
. 10 


Wines, all other 


Los demds vinos 


Spirits generally 

Other liquids. 
Vinegar, in barrels 


Bebidas espirituosas, . como 
brandy, rou, etc., etc 

Otros Hquidos. 

Vinairre en barriles ............ 


Olive oil 


Aceite de olivas 


Linseed oil, for preparing paints . 


Aceito de linaza para preparar 
la pintura 


. 10 


Black writing ink 


Tinta negra para escribir 

Tinta de colores para escribir. . . 

Tintas para imprenta, encuader- 
naci6n y litografia (liquidas 6 
s61idas) 


.05 
10 


Colored writinff ink . > . 


Printers' ink, for printing and 
lithographing, liquid and solid. 


. 01 


Liquids generally, except per- 
fumery and others specially 
mentioned 


Liquidos en general, except© la 
perfumeriay los demds especi- 
ficados 


. 20 


Cotton. 

Cotton goods, unbleached, with- 
out white or colored parts and 
without figures or needle- 
work 


Algoddn. 

Algod6n manufacturado en telas 
crudas, sin ninguna parte 
blanca ni de color, y sin labra- 
do ni costura 


.40 
.50 


Blue fulas, white goods, or un- 
bleached, with white parts plain, 
without printing, needlework, 
or embroidery, such as those 
known as bogatanas, calicoes, 
and liencillos, madapollams, 
croydons, and others of the 
same kind 


En fulas azules y en telas blan- 
cas, 6 crudas con parte blanca, 
lisas, sin pinta labrado, cos- 
tura ni bordado alguno, como 
lasconocidas con los nombres 
de bogotanas, calic6s, lienci- 
llos, madapollanes, bramantes 
1 y otros de igual calidad 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 


Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 

Dollars, 
.20 

.234 
.267 

.30 

.40 

.134 

.20 

.30 

.067 

.033 
.067 

.008 
.033 

.10 


Artfculos. 


Derechos 
per kilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombiana. 


Ootton — Continued. 

Drills and other cotton fabrics, 
white or colored, not enumer- 
ated 


Algoddn— Continda. 

En driles y demAs telas blancas 
6 de color no mencionadas. . . . 
I 

; En colchas, marsellas y telas 

1 labradas 6 adamascadas no 

1 comprendidas en otro grupo, 

i y en panas, hiladillos y cintas . . 

En pafluelos con 6 sin bordado 

comfin y ordinario, en pafla- 

lones y ruanas, y en g6nero 

! para hacer estas 


Pesos. 
.60 


Quilts, marseilles, and *brocades 
or damasks not included in any 
other group, and velveteens, 
tapes, and ribbons 


.70 


Handkerchiefs, with or without 
common embroidery, shawls 
and ponchos and stuffs for mak- 
ing them 


.80 


Stockings and all kinds of stock- 
inet-goods, such as undershirts, 
drawers, and gloves; muslins 
and lawns, etc., damask, toble- 
cloths, and hammocks; and 
ready-made clothes without 
embroidery, laces, and other 
trimmings subject to a higher 
dutv 


1 En medias y demis tejidos de- 
nominados comunmente de 

1 punto de media, como cami- 
sas, calzones interiores y 
guantes; enmuselinas,linones 
y demis telas diif anas; en da- 
mascos, carpetas y hamacas; 
y en ropa hecha, sin bordadas, 
encajes ni otro adorno que sea 

1 demercaderiassujetasAmayor 

1 impuesto 






.90 
I. 20 


Embroideried goods, all kinds, 
or lace work and imitations 
thereof, including laces, inser- 
tions, and the like, and ready- 
made clothing not mentioned . . 

White thread 


En toda clase de telas bordadas 

1 6 de punto y sus imitaciones, 

inclusive encajes, metidos y 

demis semejantes, y en ropa 

hecha no mencionada 


' En hilo bianco 


.40 


Colored thread 


En hilo de color. « 


.60 


Fringes, galloons, cords, braids, 
tassels, and other similar goods. 


En flecos, galones, cordones, 
j trencillas, borlas y demAs ob- 
' ietos semeiantes 


.90 
. 20 


Wicks for lamps and tinder boxes . 


En mechaspara lAmparas y yes- 
queros 


Wicks for candles, tapers and 
matches 


j En mechas y pabilo para bujlas, 
velas 6 f6sforos 


. 10 


Reins, for bridles, etc 


En cuerdas propias para rien- 
das 






. 20 


Hemp and flax. 

Empty bags made of hemp, tarred 
or not, with or without water- 
proof paper, and common stuffs 
for making them 


Caflamo y lino. 

En sacos 6 costales vacios de 
caflamazo, embreados 6 sin 
embrear, con 6 sin papel im- 
permeable, y en telaordinaria 
de la misma clase para ellos. . . 

En coleta 




Nankeen 


.025 
. 10 


Common unbleached cloth, such 
as osnaburgs, brown hoi lands, 
ducks, canvas, and materials 
for making awniiigs, with the 
exception of drills 


En telas crudas ordinarias, como 
crehuelas, brines, lonetas, ca- 
serillos y genero para toldos, 
con excepci6n de los driles. . . 


.30 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 



Hemp and flax— Continued. 

White and striped osnaburgs, or- 
dinary 

Fine unbleached cloth, with the 
exception of drills and other 
stuffs mentioned in succeeding 
groups 

Drills, unbleached, bleached, or 
colored, creas, silesia, diapers, 
fabrics for tablecloths, nap- 
kins, and towels, bed covers, 
mattress covers, tapes, sheet- 
ing, and the like, not enu- 
merated, without needlework 
or embroidery of any kind . . . . . 



Handkerchiefs, caps, stockings, 
gloves,britannias, jeans, lawns, 
picardies, Irish linen, silesias, 
warandofs, batistes, and prin- 
ted stuffs, in imitation of cotton ; 
fringes, galloons, tapes, braids, 
cords, tassels, and such other 
goods; readymade clothes with- 
out embroidery or lace or any 
other trimming subject to higher 
duty 

All kinds of embroidered stuffs 
or lacework, and imitation 
thereof, including lace, inser- 
tions, and the like; and ready- 
made clothing not mentioned. . 

Thread 

Tarred cordage, and cables 

Cordage not mentioned 

Varnished fabrics for roofing cot- 
tages and bridges 

Ordinary oilcloth, for floors, 
and waterproof cloths for car- 
riages, not including that used 
for table covers 

Wool. 

Unmanufactured wool 

Blankets 

Yarns 

Carpets and rugs 

Baize, friezes, and flannels 



Duty per 
pound in 

U. S. 
currency. 



Dollar*. 
.134 

.20 



.267 



.334 



.40 

.134 
.017 

.067 

.017 

.067 



.017 

.167 

.20 

.234 

.30 



Articulos. 



Cinamo y lino — Continda. 

En crehuelas blancas 6 rayadas, 
ordinarias 

En telas crudas finas, con ex- 
cepci6n de los driles y las de- 
mis telas mencionadas en los 
grupos siguientes ! 

En driles crudos, blancos 6 de 
color^s, creas, platillas, ale- 
manisco, g6nero para mante- 
les, servilletas y toallas, co- 
bertores de cama, forros de 
colch6n, cintas, g6nero para 
s&banas, y los semej antes k 
todos estos que no est6n espe- 
cificados, todos sin costura 
ni bordado alguno 

En pafluelos, gorros, medias, 
guantes, bretafias, coquillo, 
estopillas, picardias, irlandas, 
1 abates, warandofs, batista, y 
listados que imit6n los de al- 
god6n; enflecos,galones,fajas, 
trenzas, trencillas, cordones, 
borlas y demis objetos seme- 
jantes; y ropa hecna sin bor- 
dados, encajes ni otro adomo 
que sea de mercaderias suje- 
tas k mayor impuesto 

En toda clase de telas bordadas 
6 de punto y sus imitaciones 
inclusive encajes, metidos y 
demds semejantes; y en ropa 
hecha no mencionada 

En hilo 

En cuerdas embreadas y en ca- 
bles 

En cordaje no mencionado 

En tela barnizada para techos de 
iiabitacionesruralesy puentes. 

En tela ordinaria preparada 6 
barnizada para pisos, y el 
huleordinario para coches, no 
comprendiendo el decarpetas . 



Lana sin manufacturar 

En frazadas 

En hilo 

En alfombras 6 ta petes 

En bayetas, bayetones y baye- 
tillas 



Derecbos 
porldio 

en moao- 
daCo- 



.40 



.80 



1. 00 



X.20 

.40 

.05 
.20 



.0$ 



.20 



.05 
.50 

.60 
.70 

9<> 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 


Duty per 
pouna in 

'u.s. 

curreocy. 


Artfculos. 


Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombiana. 


Wool— Continued. 

Light dress goods, all kinds of 
embroidered and lace work, 
and imitation thereof, includ- 
ing laces, insertions, and the 
like, and ready-made clothes. . 


Dollar*. 

.40 
.334 

.40 

.40 
.20 
.20 
.003 

.134 
.267 

.017 

.033 
.20 

.134 
.334 

.067 


Laiui— Continda. 

En telas claras 6 di&fanas ; en 
toda clase de telas bordadas 6 
de punto y sus imitaciones, 
inclusive encajes, metidos 
y demds semejantes; y en 
ropa hecha 


Ptaot, 
X. 20 


All other goods and stuffs not 
mentioned • 


En cualquiera otra tela dobjeto 
que no est6 mencionado 

soda. 

Seda en hilos. telas. etc 


I. CO 


auk. 

Silk in threads, fabrics, etc 


I. 20 


Ytiiou goods and threads. 

Brocades and other stuffs 
woven with gold, silver, or 
other metals ; also, thread, etc., 
made of the same materials. .. . 


TdM 6 hiloi varioi. 

Los brocatos y demAs generos de 
oro, plata (i otros metales, asi 
como los hilos, etc. ,de las mis- 
mas materias 


I. 20 


Goods made of horsehair and 
other material not mentioned . . 


Tela de cerda (i otra materia no 
mencionado 


.60 


Oilcloths for furniture and table 
covers, not mentioned 


Hule para muebles y carpetas 
no mencionado 


.60 


Small samples not weighing more 
than 25 kilograms 


Muestras en pequenos pedazos 
hastael peso de 25 kilogramos. 

Cavoho. 

Caucho sin manufacturar 

En zapatos, botas,y todaespecie 
decalzado; ensalvavidas;yen 
tela para zamarros y ruanas 
que no tenga Is^na 6 seda 

En tubos, mangos y canales pro- 
pios para bombas, cafios y te- 
chos; y el preparado para 
maquinaria y para pisos; ex- 
cepto las mangas para bom- 
bas de apagar incendios que 
estan gravadas s61o con un 
centavo por kilogramo 

En tapas 6 tapones para envases . . 

En resorte para calzado '. . . . 

En botones sin forro 


.01 


Bnbbor. 

Unmanufactured India rubber. . . 

Shoes and boots of all j^inds, life- 
preservers, materials for mak- 
ing leggings,and oilcloth cloaks 
that contain neither wool nor 
silk 


.40 
.80 


Tubes, pipes and hose for pumps, 
drains, and roofs ; material pre- 
pared for machinery and floors, 
except hose for fire engines, 
which shall pay .003 cent per 
pound a^. 




Corks and bottle stoppers 

Elastic for shoes 


.05 
. 10 
.60 


Buttons, not covered 


. 40 


Manufactured in any other form . . 


Manufacturado en cualquiera 
otra forma 


I. 00 


Eidoi and ftirs. 

Hides and furs, unmanufactured, 
except patent leather 


Caeros 6 piolot. 

Cueros 6 pieles sin manufac- 
turar, excepto los charolados. . 


.20 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 



HidM and ftin— Continued. 

Patent leather, unmanufactured . 

Shoes 

Gloves, caps, furs for trimming 
dresses, etc., pocketbooks, 
cigar cases, pouches and simi- 
lar objects 

Manufactured in forms not speci- 
fied * 

Harness for carts and carriages. 



Earthmware. 

Common earthenware and stone- 
ware in any form 

Porcelain and Talavera-warc. . . . 

Jars or pans, bottles (large and 
small, empty), and generally 
common crockery 

Pipes, handles, and conduits for 
pumps, drains, and roofs 



CiyiUl and glaaa. 

Demijohns and common bottles 
of black glass or of light-col- 
ored glass, for liquids 

Flasks and vials of common glass 
for liquids 

Plain glass, not quicksilvered . . 

Looking-glasses, not larger than 
25 centimetres 

Looking-glasses, larger than 25 
centimetres 

Beads, pearls, quills, bugles, in 
the form of stones or jewels, 
and glass for watches and spec- 
tacles, and the like 

Glass in any other form , 

ArtlolM for illrnniiiatang and other 



Wax (white, yellow, and laurel- 
colored), not manufactured. . . , 
Wax, in candles, etc 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 
. 10 
.334 



.40 

.334 
.033 



.033 
.067 



.008 



.017 



.003 

.008 
.017 

.067 
.134 



. 20 
.067 



. 10 
.134 



Articuloe. 



Cnana 6 pielea— Contintia. 

Charolados sin manufacturar. . . 

En calzado 

En guantes, cachucas,pieles para 
adornos detrajes, etc.,carteras 
tabaqueras, garnieles y dem&s 
objetos semejantes 

Manufacturados en formas no 
expresadas 

Guamiciones para carros y 
carruajes 

Loza comfin 6 de pedemal, en 
cualquiera forma 

Id. de porcelena y talavera 

Tarros 6 potes, botellas, frascos 
y frasquitos de barro vacios 
destinados k envases, y en 
general la loza ordinaria de 
barro 

En tubos, mangos y canales pro- 
pios para bombas, cafios y 
techos 

distal y vidxio. 

En damajuanas y botellas co- 
munes, de vidrio negro 6 de 
vidrio claro ordinyio para en- 
vases 

En frascos y frasquitos de vidrio 
ordinario para envases 

En vidrio pianos sin azogar 

En espejos del tamaflo hasta de 
25 centimetros 

En espejos de mis de 25 centi- 
metros 

En cuentas, perlas, avalorios, 
canutillos, en forma de piedras 
6 joyas, en vidrios para reI6jes 
y lentes, y otros semejantes. . 

En cualquiera otra forma 

Artiouloa para alnmbrado y otroa 



Cera blanca,amarilla 6 de laurel, 

no manufacturada 

Id., en bujlas d otra forma 



Derechos 
porkilo 

en moae- 
da Co- 

lombiana. 



Pesos. 
.30 
I. 00 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 



Axtittlat fn illmnlnating md oCher 

VMM — Continued. 

Spennaceti, not manufactured . . 

Spermaceti, in candles, etc 

Stearin and paraffine, not manu- 
factured 

Stearin and paraffine, in candles, 
etc 

Tallow, not manufactured 

Tallow candles, or others not 
specified 

Stearic acid 

Petroleum 

Wooden matches 

Wax matches 

l>nigi and madieiiiei. 

Drags and medicines generally . , 

Sulphur and alum 

Sulphuric and stearic acid and 
saltpeter , 

Potash, caustic soda, soda ash 
and salts, pine resin, and sub- 
carbonates of potash and soda . 



PixftuiMxy and loap. 

Florida, divine, and Kanangua 
waters 

AH otherarticlesof perfumery and 
for the toilet, such as essences, 
soaps, creams, razor strops, 
tooth and clothes brushes, etc., 
not mentioned 

Common oil soap 

Common rosin or tallow soap. . . 

Paper and eardboard. 

Periodicals, pamphlets, and 
prints sheets of paper 

Paper, white, unsized, and col- 
ored, for printing 

Paper, brown, and other common 
paper, for wrapping and 
packing 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
cunrency. 



Dollars, 
.067 



.017 

.067 
.003 

.067 

.003 

.033 
.067 

.134 



. 10 
.067 

.017 



.008 



. 10 



.40 

.067 
.017 



Free. 
.017 

.017 



Artfculos. 



ArtionlM para almnbrado 7 otrot 

TiiO»— Continda. 

Espermadeballena no manufac- 
turada 

Id. en velas, etc . ; i 

Estearina 6 parafina sin manu- 
facturar 

Id. en velas, etc 

Sebo, sin manufacturar 

Velas de sebo, (i otros cuyos de- 
rechos no est6n asignados es- 
pecialmente 

Acido este&rico 

Petr61eo 

F6sforos en palitos 

Id. en cera 

Drogai y mcdicinaa. 

Drogas y medicinas en general. 

Azufre y alumbre 

Acidos sulffirico y estedrico y 
el salitre 

Potasa 6 soda cadstica, las ceni- 
zas y sales de soda, la resina 
de pino y los subcarbonatos 
de potasa y de soda 

Perftuneria y jabonet. 

Aguas de Florida, divina y de 
Kananga 

Los dem^s articulos de perfu- 
meria y de tocador,como esen- 
cias, jabones, cremas, asen- 
tadores de navajas, cepillos 
para dientes y ropa, etc., no 
mencionados 

{abon ordinario de aceite 
ab6n comdn de resina 6 sebo . . 

Papel y oart^. 

Papel en peri6dicos, folletos y 
hojas impresas 

Blanco, sin cola, y de colores, 
para imprenta 

De estraza d otro ordinario 
para envolver y empacar 



Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombiana. 



Pesos, 

.20 
.30 

.05 
.20 



. 20 
.01 
. 10 
.20 
.40 



.30 
.20 

.05 



.025 



.30 



1.20 
.20 
.05 



Libre. 
.05 
.05 



8 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 


Duty per 

pound in 

U.S. 


Articulos. 


Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombiana. 


Paper and eaxdboaxd— Continued. 
Sandpaper. . .• 


Dollar*. 
.017 
.017 

.067 
.033 
.10 

.134 
.033 

.134 
.134 

.067 

.017 

.067 

Free. 

.003 
.067 

.10 

.017 


Papel 7 carte— Continiia. 
Delija 


.05 
.05 

. 20 


Paper for cigarettes 

Paper, writing, envelo pes, and 
other writing material not spe- 
cified 


De fumar, para cigarrillos 

Para escrib r, en cubiertas, y el 
de cualquiera otra clase no 
mencionado 


Paper, superfine 


Papel florete 


. 10 


Paper ruled for music 


Rayado para mdsica 


.30 

.40 
. 10 


Blank books, ruled and unruled, 
and memoranda 


En libros en bianco, rayados 6 
no, y libretines 


Printed books 


En libros impresos. 


Pictures, maps, and engravings 
of all kinds, and music (written 
or printed) •. . 


En l&minas.mapas y grabados de 
todo clase, y mdsica escrita 6 
impresa 


.40 
.40 

. 20 


Paper, gilt or silvered throughout. 

Paper, wall, and paper marbled 
or stained for bookbinding and 
other purposes 


Dorado 6 plateado por entero. . . 

De colgadura y jaspeado 6 pin- 
tado para forros de libros fi 
otros usos 


Cardboard for printing, book- 
binding, lithography, and other 
industrial uses 


Cart6n para imprenta, encuader- 
naci6n, litografia y otros usos 
industriales 

Cartonaje en toda otra forma, 
excepto en naipes, que paga- 
ran $1.20 por kil6gramo 

Xadm. 

Maderas de construcci6n, como 
varas, vigas, piezas para dur- 
mientes de ferrocariles, cuar- 
tones y tablas sin cepillar 6 
afinar 


.05 
.20 


Cardboard in other forms, ex- 
cept in plajring cards, which 
shall pay 40 cents per pound. . . 

Wood. 

Woods for building, such as 
>oles, beams, ties for railways, 
oists, and boards not planed 
or polished 




Libre. 


Common woods, planed, and 
wood for cabinetwork, planed 
or unplaned, not worked, 
except veneering 


Maderas comunes cepilladas y 
maderas de ebanisteria cepi- 
lladas 6 sin cepillar, que no 
est6n labradas, excepto las 

Idminas para enchapados 

En Uminas para enchapados 

En molduras, esculturas, y ador- 
nos para muebles, y en mar- 
cos dorados 6 no 




Wood, veneering 


.OI 

. 20 


Moldings, carvings, and orna- 
ments for furniture, and gilt 
and ungilt frames 


.30 


Bedsteads, large dining tables, 
wardrobes, and large bureaus 
for clothes and other uses, 
without mirrors, carvings, or 
inlaid work 


En camas. grandes mesas para 
comedor, armarios 6 grandes 
com6das para ropa fi otros 
usos, sin espejos, esculturas 
ni adornos denominados de 
embutido 




.10 


.05 
.30 


Furniture of all kinds, with mir- 
rors, carvings, inlaid work, or 
woolen or silk upholstering. . . . 


En muebles de todas clases, 
con espejos, esculturas, em- 
butidos, 6 forros de lana 6 
seda 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 




Wood— Continued. ^ 

Furniture not mentioned 

Statues, images, and altars for 

churches 

Organs and pianos 

Harmoniums, hand organs, and 

harps 

Other musical instruments 

Pencils (office and carpenters') . . . 

Molds and rules for the useful 
arts..* 

Bellows for forges , 

Bellows of all kinds, except large 
ones for forges 

Saddletrees, not covered 

Buckets and bowls 

Barrels, pipes, and casks mount- 
ed or otherwise for dry goods 
or liquors 

Spigots for barrels and pipes. . . , 

Common wooden boxes, rough- 
made, made up or not, for 
packing 

Small boards for match boxes, 
and wood for matches 

Cars and carriages for railways . . 

. Carts and wheelbarrows for car- 
lying merchandise, etc 

Coaches and carriages of all 
kinds 

Velocipedes 

Boats, set up or in pieces, in- 
tended for navigation of Colom- 
bian streams 

Oars for boats 

Houses, in pieces 

Windows, doors, etc., when im< 
ported separately '...., 

Machinery for vessels, the useful 
arts, industries, and for agricTul- 
tural and mining purposes 

Walking canes, without swords.. 

Forms of wood not mentioned. . . 



Dollar*. 
.067 

.067 
.033 



.067 
.267 
.067 



.067 
.017 

.067 
.067 



.017 

.008 
.017 

.008 



017 

Free. 



.008 



.017 
.134 



.003 

.017 

Free. 

.017 



.017 
.267 
.134 



Xadem— Continda. 

^n muebles no mencionados. . . . 

En estatuas 6 im&genes y en 
altares para iglesias. , 

En instrumentos de mdsica de- 
nominados 6rganos, y en 
pianos 

£n armoniums, organillos de 
mano y arpas 

En otros instrumentos de mdslca, 

En lapices (dtiles de escritorio 
y para carpinteros) 

En hormas y cartabones (instru- 
mentos de artes y oficios) 

En fuelles grandes para fraguas. 

En fuelles de todas clases, ex- 
ceptolos grandes para fraguas 

En fustes de madera desnudos 
para galilpagos y sillas de 
montar 

En baldes 6 bateas 

En barriles, pipas y toneles, ar- 
mados 6 no, para empaques y 
envases , 

En Uavas para barriles y pipas. . 

En cajas de madera ordinarias y 
trabajadas en bruto, armadas 
6desarmadas, para empaques 

En tablitas para cajetas de f6s- 
foros y en palitos para 6stos . < 

En carruajes y carros para fe- 
rrocarriles , 

En carros y carretillas para 
trasporte de mercaderias d 
otros usos semejantes , 

En coches y carruajes de todas 
clases , 

En velodpedos 

En buques, armados 6 en piezas 
que se traigan para navegar en 
las aguas interiores del terri- 
torio colombiano 

En remos para embarcaciones. . . 

En casas desarmadas 

En ventanas, puertas, etc., cuan- 
do vienen solas , 

En mdquinas para buques, artes 
y oficios industrias y trabajos 
de campo y minas , 

En bastones sin estoque , 

En formas no designadas 



Ptscs, 

.20 



.20 



. 10 

.20 
.80 



.20 
.05 

.20 



.20 
.05 



.025 
.05 



.025 
.05 
Libre. 

.025 

.05 
.40 



.01 

.05 

Libre. 

.05 



.05 
.80 
.40 



lO 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 


Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 


Artteulos. 


Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone- 
<U Co- 

lomblmna. 


SiMd hemp, Oder, ud the like. 

Empty sacks made of sisal hemp, 
tarred or not, with or without 
water-proof paper, and the 
material for making them 


Dollars, 

.008 

.003 
.017 

.017 

.067 
• .017 

.003 
Free. 

.017 
.003 

.008 
Free. 

.017 
Free. 

Free. 
Free. 

.008 

.003 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 


Ffque, mimbra y otrot axtioiilM 
semejantes. 

Sacos 6 costales vacfos de fique 
6 jeniqu6n, embreados 6 sin 
embrear, con 6 sin papel im- 
permeable,y la tela de la mis- 
ma clase para ellos 


/Vsntr. 

.025 
. 01 


Hay and straw, unmanufactured . 

Palm leaf for making hats 

Mace reed, straw, and common 
rattan, unmanufactured or in 
brooms 


Heno y tamo en bruto 


Palma para hacer sombreros 

Espadafia, paja y bejuco ordi- 
nario sin manufacturar 6 en 

escobas 

Canastos de mimbre <i otro be- 
juco 


.05 

..05 
. 20 


Baskets made of osier of any 
kind 


Mattings of all kinds 


Esteras 6 esterillas de todas 
clases 






.05 
.01 


Iran and steal 
Iron not manufactured 


Hi«m yaoaro. 

Hierro en bruto 

En rieles, clavos para rieles, y 
demas piezas para las vfas 
f^rreas de uso pdblico 

En rieles para vias que no sean 
de uso pfiblico 


Rails, spikes, and other pieces for 
railways for the public use . . . 

Rails not intended for the public 
use 


Libre. 

.05 
.01 

.025 


Boats, or pieces for same 

Anchors and grapnels for small 
boats 


En buques 6 en piezas para ellos. 
En anclas y en rezones para em- 

barcaciones menores 

En puentes para caminos pdbli- 

cos 


Bridges for public roads 






Libre. 


Bridges not intended for public 
roads 


En id. que no sean para cami- 
nos pdblicos 


.05 
Libre. 
Libre. 


Gasometers, apparatus,tubes, and 
lamps for public purposes 

Works intended for the construc- 
tion or repair of public peniten- 
tiaries 


En gas6metros, aparatos, tubos, 
y faroles para el alumbrado 
pfiblico de las poblaciones . . . 

En obras que hayan de colocarse 
en las casas penitenciarias al 
construirlas 6 refaccionarlas. . 

En alambre para tel6grafos de 
uso pfiblico 


Telegraph wires for public uses . 


Libre. 


Wire for private uses 


En id. de uso particular 6 pri- 
vado 

En alambre de hierro 6 acerado 
para cercas 




Wire, iron or steel for fencing 


.02$ 
.01 


Railings forg ornamenting public 
buildings and squares 


En verjas cqn destino al ornato 
de los edificios y plazas pfi- 
blicas 






Libre. 


Lightning rods 


En pararrayos 


Libre. 


Pipes for public aqueducts and 
public fountains 


En cafterias para los acueductos 
pdblicos de los distritos, y las 
fuentes 6 pilas para el uso 
pdblico 






Libre. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



II 



Artidea. 



Um and itoel — Continued. 

Light-houses, and towers and 
lantenfs for same 

Clocks for towers, including dials 
and bells 

Houses, and galvanized tiles or 
sheets for covering roof 

Balustrading for buildings, 

doors, and windows 

Fire engines , 

Hydraulic pumps and engines, 
with pipes and other pieces 
belonging thereto #. . . 

Machinery for manufacturing and 
mining 

Machinery for agricultural pur- 
poses 

Machinery for the useful arts and 
industries 

Machinery not mentioned, the 
weight of which shall not ex- 
ceed i,ooo kilograms 

Machinery of every kind, the 
weight of which exceeds i,ooo 
kilograms 

Presses for printing, bookbind- 
ing, and lithographing 

Engines of every class and ca- 
pacity 

Tin-plates 

Monitors and large pipes for 
coffee cleaning machines, etc . 

Large boilers 

Tanks for drinking water 

Ore crushers 

Anvils and pulley blocks 

Plows 

Plates and rods not comprised in 
unmanufactured iron ; bed- 
steads, large chains, iron safes, 
nails, French nails, cooking 
utensils (with or without tin 
lining), smoothing irons; and 
heavy tools for agricultural, 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollars. 
.003 



.008 



.003 



.017 
.003 



.017 
.003 
.008 
.017 

.017 

.003 

.ooS 

.008 
.017 

.008 

.017 
.003 

.017 



.017 
.008 



Artfculoi. 



Hieno y aooro — Continfia. 

En torres para faros y fanales, y 
6stos , 

En relojes para torres, inclu- 
yendo las muestras y campa- 
nas , 

En casas y galvanizado en plan- 
chas 6 laminas para cubrir los 
techos 

En balaustradas para edificios 
y puertas y ventanas, etc 

En bombas 6 miquinas para 
apagar incendios 

En bombas y mdquinas hidriu- 
licas cop sus respectivostubos 
y demis piezas 

En miquinas para empresas fa- 
briles 6 mineras 

En mdquinas para la agricul- 
tura 

En mdquinas para artes y oficios 
t industrias 

En m&quinas no mencionadas, 
cuyo peso no exceda de 1,000 
kilogramos 

En mdquinas de cualquiera 
clase cuyo peso total exceda 
de 1,000 kilogramos 

En prensas para imprenta, en- 
cuadernaci6n y litografia 

En motores de cualquiera clase 
y fuerza.. 

Estaflado en Uminas fi hoja de 
lata 

En monitores y en grandes tubos 
para m&quinas de beneficiar 
caf 6 

En grandes calderos 

En tanques para dep6sito de 
aqua potable 

En pisones para los molinos 6 
bocartes de que se hace uso 
para la trituraci6n del mineral 
extraido de las minas de veta. 

En yunques y garruchas 

En arados 

Manufacturado en planchas 6 
varillas, no comprendidas en 
el hierro en bruto; en camas, 
cadenas gruesas,cajas 6 cofres 
fuertes, clavaz6n y puntillas, 
bateria de cocinasin estanar6 
estaflada s61o por dentro, y 



Derecho» 
por kilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombiADA^ 



Pesos, 
.01 

.02s 

.01 
•OS 
.01 

.05 

.01 

.02S 
.05 

.05 

.01 
.02s 
.02s 
.05 



.02s 
.05 

.01 



.05 
.05 
.02s 



12 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Artfculos. 



Derechoi 
porldlo 

en mone> 
da Co- 

lombiana. 



Iraii and itoel^Continued. 

quarrying, and mining pur- 
poses, such as hoes, crowbars, 
coffee diggers, shovels, axes, 
large augers, spades, stone- 
hammers, picks, drills, and 
chopping knives, and other 
machetes for felling timber. . . 



Tools for blacksmiths, stone 
masons, carpenters, and brick- 
layers ^, 

Molds for the useful arts 

Wire, rings, butts, hinges, screws, 
and springs, for furniture 

Furniture 

Tires, wheels, axles, springs, and 
hubs for carts and carriages. . . 

Levers, weights, and 8teel3rards, 
weighing more than loo kilo- 
grams 

Levers, weights, and steel3rards, 
weighing up to lOO kilograms. . 

Currycombs and currybrushes . . . 

Kitdien utensils and other ob- 
jects tinned inside and outside. 

Knives for the useful arts, such 
as are used for bookbinding 
and shoemaking 

Cutlery not mentioned 

Side arms, firearms, etc., includ- 
ing guns 

Pocketknives and scissors (fine 
and medium), knives and forks 
with handles of ivory, mother- 
of-pearl, electroplate, and brit- 
annia ; gun barrels, beads (gilt 
or silvered), pencil cases, jew- 
els, and all objects gilt or sil- 
vered or such as are known as 
German silver or electroplate 
(fine or medium) 



Dallart, 



.017 



.067 
.067 



.067 
.067 
.017 

.033 
.067 
.067 

.067 



.067 
.134 

.334 



• 334 



Hierro y aeero— Continfui. 

planchas para aplanchar ropa ; 
y en herramientas gruesas 6 
voluminosas para la agricul- 
tura, la canteria y la mineria, 
como azadas, y azadones, ba- 
rras, barretones d ho3raderas, 
garlanchas, hachas, grandes 
barrenos,palas,almildenas, pi- 
cos, taladros, y calabozos, 
agtlinches y dexnis machetes 
para desmontar 

En herramientas para herreria, 
canteria, carpinteria y alba- 
fSileria 

En horma% (instrumentos para 
artes y oficios) 

En alambre, argollas, bisagras, 
goznes, tornillos y resortes 
para muebles 

En muebles 

En llantas, ruedas, ejes, resortes 
y conas para carretas y carru- 
ajes 

En bisculas, pesos y romanas 
que arrojen m&s de 100 kilo- 
gramos de peso 

Sn b&sculas, pesos, y romanas 
que arrojen nasta 100 kilogra- 
mos de peso 

En peines para caballos y almo- 
hazas 

En bateria de cocina y dem&s 
objetos de lat6n 6 fierro esta- 
fiado por dentro y fuero 

En cuchillos para artes y oficios, 
como los de encuademaci6n 
y zapaterfa 

En cuchilleria no mencionada. . 

Armas blancas, de fuego 6 de 
cualquiera otra clase, inclu- 
sive las escopetas 

Navajas y tijeras finas 6 entrefi- 
nas, cuchillos y tenedores 
con mangos de marfil, ndcar, 
el ectro-pTatay metal brit^ico; 
chimeneas para armas de fue- 

fo ; cuentas doradas '6 platea- 
as, lapiceros, joyas 7 todo 
objeto dorado 6 plateado 6 de 
los q«e se llaman de plata ale- 
mana 6 electro-plata, fino 6 
entrefino 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



n 



Articles. 



Iran and itael — Continued. 

Steel in bars or rods for manu- 
facturing purposes, and drills. 

Iron and steel, manufactured, not 
designated 



Copper or bnun. 

Copper or brass, manufactured, in 

bars or ingots 

In plates or sheets of every weight . 

Pans or boilers or other articles 
whose weight exceeds 25 kilo- 
grams 

Objects whose weight exceeds 500 
grams and does not exceed 25 
kilograms 

Objects whose weight does not 
exceed 500 grams 

Jewelry, beads, tape, spangles, 
fringes, bugles, threads, and 
other like objects, and electro- 
plated objects and cartridges. . 



Statues for public buildings and 
squares 

Tin. 

Ingots 

Plates and all other objects 

Powder and sheets 

Let 

Ingots for mines 

Ingots not intended for mines; 
sheets, tubes and other forms 
exceeding 5 kilograms in 
weight ; shot and printing type 



Toys and lead paper or thin sheets , 



Covers for bottles. 

All other forms. . . 

No. 27 2 



Duty per 
poancl in 

U.S. 
currency. 



Dollar*. 



.067 



134 



.033 
.033 



.067 



134 
,167 



.334 



Free. 



.033 
•134 
.167 



.008 



.017 



.234 

.033 
.134 



Articulos. 



HiexTO y aoero— Continda. 

Acero en barras 6 varillas propio 
para manufacturar, y en tala- 
dros 

Hierro 6 acero manufacturado 
en formas no designadas 



Cobro 6 bronoe. 

Cobre 6 bronce en bruto, en ba- 
rras 6 lingotes 

En planchas 6 Idminas, sea cual 
fuere su peso 

En paiUs 6 calderos 6 articulos 
de otra clase cuyo peso ex- 
ceda de 25 kilogramos 

En objetos cuyo peso en cada 
pieza exceda de 500 gramos y 
no pase de 25 kilogramos. . . . 

En objetos cuyo peso en cada 
pieza no exceda de 500 gramos . 

En joyeria, cuentas, galones, 
lentejuelas, flecos, canutillos, 
hilos, y dem&s objetos seme- 
jantes y en piezas de electro- 
plata y cdpsulas para armas 
de fuego 

En estatuas con destino al or- 
nato de los edificios y plazas 
pdblicas 

Estaflo en lingotes 

En platos y en todo otro objeto 
En polvo y en hojas 

Plomo. 

Plomo en lingotes para minas. . < 

Plomo en lingotes que no sean 
para minas, en planchas, tubos 
y dem^s objetos cuyo peso 
exceda de 5 kil6gramos, y en 
mun1ci6n y objetos de im- 
prenta , 

En juguetes y en papel 6 I&minas 
delgadas , 

En cdpsulas para envases 

Ea cualquiera otra forma 



Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombiana. 



Pesos. 

.20 
.40 



. lO 

. 10 



.20 

.40 
■ 50 



Libre. 



. ID 

.40 
.50 



.025 



.05 

.70 
. 10 
.40 



H 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 




Zine. 

Zinc, unmanufactured; in sheets 
or plates, including that inten- 
ded for roofing, and in tubes. . . 

Manufactured in any other form . , 



ihiidkBilTor. 

Quicksilver for mines r . . 

Quicksilver for other u$es 

Odd. 

Gold in bars 

Coin, not less than 90 per cent, 
fine 

Gold manufactured in other arti- 
cles 

ffilTer. 

Silver in bars 

Coin, not less than 90 per cent, 
fine 

Silver manufactured in other arti- 
cles 

Powder. 

Powder, coarse or common, for 
mines, in barrels or other pack- 
ages, whose gross weight ex- 
ceeds 2 kilograms 

Powder, fine, in cans and other 
packages, not specified 

Gun cotton (called "tonito") for 
mines 

Fireworks 

BtoaeB, Iraildixkg mateiials, etc 

Filters 

Lithograph stones, whetstones, 
and pumice stones 

Flints 

Marble and jasper in paving 
stones and bricks 

Marble and jasper not for pav- 
ing stones nor bricks, nor for 
lithography 



Dollars. 

.017 

.134 



.ooS 
.067 



.008 

Free. 

.40 

.008 

Free. 

.40 



.003 

.20 

.017 
.234 



.008 

.017 
.033 

.003 
.067 



Artfculos. 



Zinc,no manufacturado,en plan- 
chas 6 l&minas, inclusive las 
de cubrir los techos, y en 
tubos 

Manufacturado en cualquiera 
otra forma 

Axogne. 

Azogue para minas 

Azogue para otros usos 

Oro. 

Oro en barras 

£n monedas que no sean de ley 

inferior & lade 900 mil6simos. , 

En cualquier otro objeto 

Plata. 

Plata en barras. ..,...". 

£n monedas que no sean de ley 

inferior k la de 900 milesimos. 

En cualquiera otra forma 



Pdlvora. 

P61vora gruesa y ordinaria para 
minas,en barrilesfi otro envase 
cuyo peso bruto pase de 2 kil6- 
gramos 

P61vorafina(mostacilla).entarros 
{1 otro envase, no especificado . 

** Tonito " para minas 

En fuegos artificiales 

Piedrai, mateiias de oomtraeeifti y 
otraa materiaa pximas. 

Piedras de filtrar 

Piedras de litografia, de afilar y 
p6mez 

Piedras de chispa : . . 

M&rmol y jaspe en baldosas y la- 
drillos 

M&rmol y jaspe que no este en 
baldosas ni ladrillosni en pie- 
dras de litografia 



Dercchot 
porldlo 

OD mooe- 
da Co- 

lombitna. 



Pesos. 



.05 
.40 



.025 
.20 



.025 

Libre. 
1.20 



.025 

Libre. 
1.20 



.60 

.05 

.70 



.025 

.05 
.10 

.01 



.20 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



15 



Articles. 



Stanaf, bdldiiig matoiiali, eto. — 
Continued. 

Marble in powder, clay, earth, or 
reman cement, lime, gypsum 
(unmanufactured or in powder), 
chalk, feldspar, silicion, mas- 
sicot, kaolin, bone dust, and 
other raw materials for making 
crockery ware 

Marble, in statuary and monu- 
ments for public buildings and 
places 

Roofing, slates 

Clay tiles 

Shingles 

Building materials, such as un- 
wrought stone, clay bricks, and 
paving tiles made of burnt clay 
and stone 

Gypsum manufactured in any 
form not specified 

Colored clay for building pur- 
poses '. . . I 

Alabaster in any form 

Crucibles for smelting 

KfoeUaaeoQi. 

Live animals 

Mineral coal 

Pitch 

Tar for ship building 

Resin 

Common glue 

Tow, or rope-yarn, and felt for 

packing 

Varnishes 

Paints, in powder or prepared . . . 

Common paint brushes 

Cuny brushes and blacking 

brushes : . . 

Blacking for shoes 

Asphaltum 

Seeds, shoots, and sprigs of plants 

and live plants 

Guano 

Hops 

Tobacco, in the leaf and cut for 

cigarettes ; 

Tobacco, chewing 

Tobacco, manufactured 



Duty per 
pound in 

U.S. 
cttrrency. 



Dollars, 



.003 
Free. 



.003 

Free. 

.003 



Free. 
.033 

.017 
.067 
.017 



Free. 
.003 
.003 
.017 

.003 
.067 

.017 
.067 
.067 
.067 

.067 
.067 
.017 

.003 
.017 
.033 

.033 
. 10 
.20 



Artfculoe. 



Piadru, mateziM de oonftroooidii y 
otrat mataziit pximaa — Continda. 

Mirmol en polvo, barro, tierra 6 
cimiento romano, cal, yeso 
bruto 6 en polvo, tiza, feldes- 
pato, silice, massicot, kaolin, 
hueso en polvo y demds mate- 
rias primas para la fabricaci6n 
de loza 

Mdrmol en estatuasy monumen- 
tos con destinoal ornato de los 
edificios y plazas pdblicos. . . . 

Pizarras para techos 

Tejas de barro 

Tejamanil 

Materiales de construcci6n,como 
piedras brutas, ladrillos de 
barro y baldosas de barro co- 
cido y de piedra 

Yeso manufacturado en cual- 
quiera forma no especificada. . 

Tierra de colores para edificios. . 

Alabastro en cualquiera forma. . 
Crisoles para fundir 

Xiaoe] 

Animales vivos 

Carb6n mineral 

Alquitr4n 

Brea negra aplicable k la con- 

strucci6n de embarcaciones . . 

Fez rubia 

Cola ordinaria 

Estopa 6 fildstica y el fieltro para 

empaques 

Barnices 

Pintura en polvo 6 preparada . , 

Brochas ordinarias 

Cepillos para caballos 6 botas . . 

Bola 6 betdn para botas 

Cera negra 

Semillas, barbados y mugrones 

de las plantas, y plantas vivas . 

Huano 

Ldpulo 

Tabaco en rama 6 en picadura 

para cigarillos 

Tabaco preparado paramascar. . 
Tabaco, manufacturado 



Derechos 
por kilo 

en mone* 
da Co- 

lombiana. 



Pesos, 



.01 



Libre. 

.01 
Libre. 

.01 



Libre. 

. 10 
.05 

.20 
.05 



Libre. 
.01 
.01 

.05 
.01 
. 20 

.05 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 

.20 
.05 

.01 
.05 
. 10 

. 10 
.30 
.60 



i6 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. 



Articles. 



MisoelUmaoiu — Continued. 

Bones and horns, unmanufac- 
tured 

Tubes, handles, and pipes of 
wood, India rubber, earthen- 
ware, clay, or metal, used for 
pumps, drains, and roofing, 
except for fire engines 

Slow matches for mines 

Cork, in sheets, and bottle stop- 
pers, etc 

Objects for chemical laboratories 
and meteorological instru- 
ments 

Common buttons, made of bone, 
horn, vegetable ivory, and 
paste, without covering 

Common pearl buttons 

Common horn combs 

Slates, and slate pencils for writ- 
ing 

Precious stones 

Umbrellas 

All articles not mentioned 




.017 
.017 

.033 
.033 



.134 
. 20 

.134 

.017 
.40 
.267 
.334 



Articulos. 



Ifiiceliaeci— Continfia. 
Hueso y cuerno sin manufactuar . 

Tubos, mangos y canales de ma- 
dera, caucho, loza, barro 6 
metal, propios para bombas, 
caflos y techos, excepto las 
bombas de apagar incendios. . 

Mechas para minas 

Corcho en tablas 6 en tapas para 
botellas, etc 

Articulos para laboratorios qui- 
micos 6 instrumentos de me- 
teorologia 

Botones comunes de hueso, 
cuerno, tagua y pasta, sin 
forro 

Botones comunes de n^car I 

Peines de cuerno ordinarios. . . . 

Pizarrasyl&picesdepizarrapara I 
escribir 1 

Piedras preciosas 

Paraguas I 

Todos las arliculos no mencio- I 
nadas 



Derechos 
porkilo 

en mone- 
da Co- 

lombUna. 



Pesos. 
.05 



.05 
.05 



.10 



.10 



.40 
.60 
.40 

.05 

I. 20 

.80 

I. 00 



CONSULAR REGULATIONS. 

Every captain or master of vessel or steamer bound for Colombian ports must pre- 
sent to the respective consul at the port of shipment, to be certified by him, a manifest, 
signed by the captain or master, in triplicate form, which shall contain the following 
details: 

(i) The port of clearance, the port of destination; 

(2) The class, nationality, name, and tonnage of the vessel; 

(3) The name of the agent, the name of the shippers, and of the consignees; 

(4) The marks and numbers of each package and the gross weight of each shipment; 

(5) The number of packages of every shipment. 

Merchants shipping goods to the ports of Colombia must present to the respective 
consul an invoice in Spanish, in triplicate form, stating therein: 

(i) The name of the shipper, the port of shipment, the name of the consignee, the 
port of destination, and the name of the vessel or steamer; 

(2) The mark, number, kind, description of contents, and gross weight of each pack- 
age. In regard to packages of the same kind and contents it is sufficient to give only 
their total weight; 

(3) The total value of the invoice, it not being necessary to specify the value of each 
package. 



IMPORT DUTIES OF COLOMBIA. I7 

It is not necessary to number such articles as bricks, tiles, lumber, undressed stone, 
wood for building purposes, grindstones, lime in barrels or sacks, .sea salt, lead in 
sheets or bars, pig and sheet iron, rods, hoops, chains, anchors, iron stamps for mines, 
empty demijohns, large iron and copper boilers, and live stock. 

In order to describe the contents of packages, it is sufficient merely to specify the 
name, quality, quantity, and materials composing the merchandise, but when an article 
is classified in the tariff according to its quality, or any other circumstance which dis- 
tinguishes it from any other mentioned under a different class, such quality or circum- 
stance should be expressed in the respective invoice. 

If a manifest or invoice not containing the above requirements is presented to the 
consul, he must return it, without certification, to the interested party, stating the details 
which are wanting; but if the interested party insists upon having the consular certifi- 
cation, the consul will extend it, expressing therein the circumstances under which he 
has done so. 

The consular fees are the following: 

For certifying manifests for each port of destination. $20. 00 

For certifying invoices of 4 packages and under 4. 00 

For certifying invoices of 8 packages and over 8. 00 

Manifests for the free ports of Panama, Colon, and Bocas del Tore are not subject 
to any consular fee. 

o 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



OF 



CENTRAL AMERICA. 




^REAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 
Washington, U. S. A. 
B\ «n No. 28. December, 1891. 



LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 



1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. i. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-Mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 
Q. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Director>' of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 

24. Import Duties of Honduras. 

25. Import Duties of Ecuador. 

26. Commercial Directory of Argentine Republic. 

27. Import Duties of Colombia. 



r 

COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



or 



COSTA RICA, GUATEMALA, 



HONDURAS, 



NICARAGUA, SALVADOR. 



o o 

Bur eau of the American Republics, 

Washington^ U. S. A. 

Bulletin No. 28. December, 1891. 









r'u.. 



BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINQTON, D. C, U. a A. 



Director, — William E. Curtis. 

Secretary, — Henry L. Bryan. 

Statistician. — Carlos Federico Adams-Michelena. 

Portuguese Translator,— ]qhs C. Redman. 

Spanish Translators, — ^Josft Ignacio Rodriguez. 

Mary F. Foster. 
Clerks,— ]oH'ii T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer.— \w)oiSM A. Hanna. 



While the {rrefttest possible care is talcen to insure accuracy in tbe publication! of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that may 
occur therein. 

(2) 



In compliance with the request of many merchants and manufacturers who 
desire to send Catalogues and Circulars to importers and dealers in Mexico, 
Central and South America, the Bureau of the American Republics has under- 
taken to publish a series of Commercial Directories of the several countries and 
colonies. The difficulty of securing the names and addresses of merchants has 
been g^reater than was anticipated, particularly those in cities and towns where 
there are no consular officers of the United States, and the lists herein given 
will be found incomplete. They are, however, as complete and accurate as the 
Bureau can make them with the present facilities at its command, and will 
doubtless be found useful to those who desire to. introduce their wares to the 
knowledge of buyers on the southern continents. Any additions and correc- 
tions for subsequent publications will be appreciated. 

3 



Costa Rica. 



ALAJUJSUL 

Bantttrndhanken, 

Banco de Costa Biea. 

Ci^a de Ahorrot. 

O^a de DesoaentOB. 

Saenzsal del Banco Anglo. 
Oofee groww and eBBporttn. 

Alftro, Pedro. 

Canansa, Is. de. 

GonaAles, Deodono. 

MontealeKre A> Co. 

Homtenegro, FlorentlBO. 

Sandoyal, ManneL 

Soto, J. 

Soto, Jo86 H. 

Tonmon A Co. 

Yaaoor Jos6 L. , 
DruggiaU. 

Cortoa&PadlUa. 

Ocampo, Gabriel JooA 

Bois, PompiUo. 

Siiva, Octavlo. 
Grocerist and prov%$icn$. 

Alvares, Magdaleno. 

Araaa, Procopio. 

Ardon, Apolinar. 

CagigsJ, Cayetano. 

CoIto a Sobrmho. 

Colvo, Alfredo. 

ColTo, Joan. 

Fmtoa, Jo«6 D. 

Moya A, hennanes. 

Paa, Manuel de la. 

Bozabal, Bartolom6. 

SandoTfO, Jos6 Maria. 

SibiO^ S. & FernAndei. 

Soto, Mamilio. 

Vargas, J. M. 

Villegas, Artnro. 
Jmportera q^ dry goods, 

Alfaro, Pedro. 

Ardon, Bodolfo. 

Barqoero, Ignacio. 

Blanco, Martin. 

CalTo Sc Sobrinbo. 



ALAJTJELA. — Continued. 

Importen of dry ^oodf— Continued. 
Jinesta, Soto Francisco. 
Lopes, Migael. 

Sandoval, ManneL 

Soto&Sib^ja. 
RfUiil geMTol fMrehantt. 

Aoosta, Paulino. 

Alfaro A, Co. 

Barquero, Ignacio. 

Blanco, Martin. 

Bonilla, Bicardo. 

Calvo, Ansehno. 

Caglgal, Cayetano. 

Fmtos, Jo86 Dolorea. 

Gonz&les, Jos6. 

Qdmez, Luis. 

Giiell, Santiago. 

Herrera, Vicente. 

L6pez, Migael. 

Odnbert, F. 

Buiz, Espiritn Santo. 

Umafia, Job6 C 

Vargas, Bagenio. 

Vargas, J. M. 
WholeaaU import and expert merchant, 

Arana, Procopio. 

Montenegro, Florentine. 

Sandoval, Manuel. 

Soto, Francisco J. 

Soto, Jo86 Mannel. 

A8EBBL 

Druggiit. 

BadiUa, Joaqnin. 

ATENA8. 

Vruggitt. 

Esqnlvel, Guillermo. 
Importer, 

Bojas, Geronimo. 

CA&TAOO. 

J>ruggttt». 

Escoto, Joan A. 
Guier, E. A. 
Saenz, Ezequiel. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



CA&TAOO— Continued. 
ImporUn and exporUn. 

Agxiilar, Kamdn. 

Carransa, J. 

Casasola, NicoUs. 

Garcia, J. 

Garcia, M. 

Garcia, Pedro. 

Guzman, Simeon. 

Himenez, M. D. 

Jegel, GoiUermo. 

Jimenez, F. &. N. 

Jimenez, J. M. 

Morales, Bafael. 

Pachero, J. 

Peralto, Bernardino. 

Peralto & Co., Mestre* 

Pinto, L. F. 

Bodrigaez, Jaan. 

Rojaa, Heroedee J. 
Retail general n%ertkaiU9. 

Alvarado, Pmdencio. 

Avendafio, Juan. 

Caaasola, NicoUa. 

Gnrdiltn, Salvador. 

Li, Allan. 

Pacheco, ihiiVaaio. 

Rodriguez, Juan. 

ZtUiiga, Tobias. 

DSflAMPASASOS. 

DruggiiU. 

Urefia, Isidro. 

GBSCIA. 

Oogee grow€r$ and exporteri. 

Esclante, M. 

Fernandez, P. D. 

QncJadA,R. 
M^ehantt, exporUrt. 

Maroto & Co. 

Quc^ada, B. 

Vega,D. 
Mtrehantt, importen. 

Ellinger Sc hennanos, Luis. 

GXrAHACASIE. 

DruggitU. 

Acnfia, Juan. 
Betail general merehanU. 

Bolivar, Matias. 

Rivera, RafJMl, 

Santos, Salvador. 

TaUc^os, Matilde. 

HEBEDIA* 

Oofee growere and exportere, 
Carazo, F. 
Lizano hennanos. 



HEBEDIA— Continued. 

Cofee groioere and exportere— Continued, 

Lizano, Joaquin. 

Hora,M. 

Morales, BrAulio. 

Ortiz, Paulino. 

Trejos hermanos. 
Druggists. 

Flores, M. J. 

Flores, Juan F. 

Zamora, Juli&n. 
Importers and exporters and wholesale merchants. 

Chaverria, ManoeL 

Chaverri, Mariano. 

Flores &. Monies. 

Lizano, Joaquin. 

Morales, Br&ulio. 

Moya, F. J. 

Ortiz y h\)o, Paulino. 

Pacheco y hermano. 

Pasopera, Salvador. 

Rivera, Manuel. 

Rosabel, Amado. 

Torres, Juan M. 

Tre;jos hermanos. 

Ulloa &. Zamora. 

Zamora, Jos6 Maria. 

Zamora, Manuel. 
Retail general merchants, 

Argeredas, RamOn. 

Fem4ndez, Fernando. 

Ortiz, Paulino. 

P^rez. Francisco. 



T.TRKKTA. 



DruggiMs. 

Rojas, Toribio. 

lik6k 

Cwnmission merchants. 

Brown, Agencia. 

Taylor, T. L. 

Wichman, Luis. 
Importers and exporters and %ehoUsals merehanU. 

Brown, A. K. 

Compafiia de Agendas. 

Keith, Minor C. 

Lareprade, Leon S. 

Lindo, Aug. A. 

Taylor, W. 

TTnckles, V. 
Retail general merchants, 

Aguay, Sara. 

Amado, Elisa. 

Dohaney, Sofia. 

Miller, A. C. 

Silbano, Elisa. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



KABAHJO. 



Druggiitt, 

Chinchfa, Antonio. 
Hidalgo, Jos^. 
Sanctaes, Jo»6 Maria. 



HIOOTA. 



DrugffittM. 

KamoB, Gaadiila]>e. 
Sanctaes, Manuel 6. 

FUVTA AXES AS, 

Bank. 

Banco Nacional. 
Comfni*ti<m merchanti, 

Esqnivel, Artnro. 

Eaqnivel & Co., F. 

Gil Msyorga, Francisco. 

Romagoaa, Jnan £. 

Rohrmoeer, Francisco. 
Ihrvggitig, 

Brenes, Miguel. 

Sarmiento, Ignado. 

Toledo, Nardflo. 

Grocen. 

Alvarez, Petra. 

Castillo, Martin. 

Cort^, Joe^. 

Darce, Silveetre. 

Mora, Dolores 0. de. 

Nufiez, Encamaci6n. 

Sanches, Nardsa. 

Taldivieda. 
Importer* and exporttri arid whoU$alt mtrtihanU. 

Brackett, Eagene A. 

Brenes, Miguel. 

Busloa, Antonio. 

ClATera, Frandsoo. 

Compafiia de Agencias. 

Cms, Frandsoo. 

Dent, Rafael. 

Dnprat, J. 

Esqnivel y Vega. 

Harley, Peter. 

flerrcro & Co., G. 

Jenkins, Jnan. 

McAdam, John. 

Man, Cfaong, Sing Sl Co. 

Lizano y Hno. 

Mencia, In6s Sra. 

Pefia &. Co., N. 

Rios, Juan. 

Rohnnoser, F. 

Rohrmoser St, Revelo. 



FUSTA ABXHAB^Continued. 

ImporUriandexpwrteri andwhoUtaUmerehaiUt-^ 
Continued. 

Sufiol, Juan. 

Walle, S. De. 

Wing, Chong, Sing &, Co 
Retail general merchanU. 

Baldonado, Ram6n. 

Darce, Silvestre. 
'- Diax, Jo8«. 

Ellis, Janny. 

Figueroa, Anibal. 

BU'oertmitht, 

Barraeta, Francisco. 

Marroqnin, Manuel. 
Bpeeial manvfacturen. 

Angulo, Jos6, tortoise-shell goods. 

Anduray, Manuel, tortoise-shell goods. 

Castro, Mercedes, salt. 

Conde, Jos6 A. 

Flores, Jos^, salt. 

Guevara, Juan, salt. 

Marroquin, Manuel, tortoise-shell goods. 

Mora, Petronila, salt. 

Obando, Roque, salt. 

Ramires, Jorge, salt. 

Rodrigues, Rafael, salt. 

Salas, Melchor, salt. 

Yillalobos, Feliciano, salt. 

8AK JOSl 

BamkM and hanken. 

Banco Anglo-Costariense. 

Banco de Costa Rica. 

Ban?x) de la Unidn. 

Banco Nadonid. 

Harrison, Percy G. 

Le Lacheur, Dent Sc Co. 

Tinoco & Co. 
Book»eUer9 and rtaiUmert. 

Lines, Vicente. 

Molina, Guillermo. 

Montero, Joaquin. 

Morrel y Ca. 

Urefia, Sixto A. 
Commiuion merchanU. 

Bennett, Jaime. 

Echeverria, Francisco. 

Field, W. J. 

L^jan & Montealegre. 

Montlifar, Rafael. 

Pisa, Benjamin. 

Price, D. C. 

Ross, J. Jaime. 

Sharpe, Cecil. 



8 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



BAV JOSi— ContinaecL 

I>ru0gitti. 

Bansen, MaxImlHano. 

Botica de San Jofl6. 

Carballo, Florontino. 

Calder^n, ManaeL 

Carraaza, Bruno. 

Darin & Nufies. 

Fich, Guillermo. 

Herman, W. 

Hennann & Zoledon. 

Iglesias, Pedro. 

Jimenez, Mariano. 

Macls, NiooUs. 

Nofiez Jimteez, Franciaoo. 

Qaezada, Francisoo. 

Rojas, EUas. 

Bojaa J Soto. 

Bucabado, Jenaro. 

Saso, Maoricio. 

Salazar, Miguel. 

Silva, Carlos J. dA. 

Valverde, P. J. 

Zeleddn, Joe6 C. 
Bngravtrt and iculptort, 

Baldomero, Id. 

Blanco, Cms. 

M6rida, BafaeL 

Sanchez, BafaeL 
Export&rt qf cof«4. 

Alfaro, J. 

Bennett, Jaime Q. 

Calsamlglla, B. 

Coronado, Jo86 Andres. 

Cubero & Bohandi. 

Dent, Teresa. 

Duran, Jo86. 

Bllinger Sc Hno. 

Esquivel, A. 

Esqoivel, Fabian. 

Esqaivel, M. N. 

GaUardo, A. & F. 

Garcia, Jes6 M. 

GonzHez, Alberto. 

Herran & Hno. 

Hernandez, Joan. ^ 

Jim6nez, A. £. 

Keith & Tinoco. 

Millet, F. N. 

Montealegre, M. L. 

Peralta, F. 

Sohroeter St Co., O. von. 

Sharpe, Cecil. 

Toamon & Co., Hto. 
Qroceri. 

Andres, Marcelino. 



SAK JOBi— Continued. 

^roMTt— Continuedd 
Artavia, Joe6. 
Arddn, Paulino. 
Almu^la, Agustin. 
Arana, Telftsforo. 
Alvarado, Julio. 
Azoona, Bibiaaa. 
Alvarado, Bleodoro. 
Calvo, Maria Manuela. 
Casasola, Bafael. 
Carv^Jal Jlm6nez, Teodoxo. 
Castro, Bartolo. 
Cagigal, Francisco. 
Escalante y Hno. 
Fuentes, Gregorio. 
Flores, Francisco. 
Frias, Jo86. 
Garbanzo, Salvador. 
Gutierrez, Concepci6n C. da. 
Gutierrez, Yanuario. 
Gum6n, Bafael. 
Hnrtado, Pedro. 
Hidalgo, Jos6. ^ 
Incera, Jsidro. 
Leiva, Apolonlo. 
Ldpez, Felix. 
Liquidano, Laureano. 
Lara, Fermina. 
Ldpez, Bosendo. 
Mora, Ignacio. 
Moya, Le6n. 
Martin, Al^o. 
Mora, Jo86. 
Mo^Je, Gregorio. 
Millet, Miguel. 
Marquez, Abraham. 
Mnfloz, Bamdn. 
Mora, J. M. 
ll^avarro, Ciro. 
Odlo, Ismael. 
Pagto, Cafias & Co. 
P6rez, Sebaati&n. 
Paniagua, Miguel. 
Palacios, Job6. 
Peraza, Jo86. 
Prada y Gonziles. 
Price, David C. 
Salazar, Flbdelfo. 
Solano, Agustin. 
Subaldia, Carlos. 
Solas, Agustin. 
Soborio, Napole6n. 
Solano, Jo86 Maria. 
Vicente, Ensebio. 
Yillavicencio, Bodolfo. 
Vals, Pedro. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



SAV J08£— Continued. 
Hattert. 

AntiI16n, Franciaoo. 

EAqnivel, Job6. 

Etqniyel, Alberto. 

Yfilga Ldpez, M. 
Hardv»re and toolt, 

Argnella, M. 

Carago, ManueL 

Denty Ca. 

HoreUyCa. 

H^afioa, Jos6. 
ImpwrUn cf drugt, 

Banaien, Dr. Max. 

I>nTaii & Niifies. 

Hermann & Zoledon. 

Soto & Giiutmiani 

Bojas, Elias. 

Valverde, Dr. Panfilo. 
Importen ^f dry goods, 

Alfiuo, J. 

Calsamiglia, B. 

Castro, Teodoelo. 

Coronado & Hno. 

Cabero St EchandL 

SUinger Sc Hno., Luis. 
Importert qf dry good*. 

Goioochea & Co., F. 

HenULndez, Juan. 

Herrero ic Co., G. 

KnShr, Jnan. 

Lerskowicz 8c hijo. 

MqHoz 8l Aco8tas. 

Scbroeter &. Co., O. von. 

Steinworth & Co., W. 

Troyo A, Co., J. B. B. 

Weidel Sc Veiga. 
Imporier$ of hardware. 

Bradway, Wm. 

Lahmann, F. H. 

Macaya & Bodrlgaes. 

Morrell&Co. 
Importert o/provUiont. 

AlmnellA, AugoatiiL 

Benedlcto, G. 

Bradway A. Co. 

EaqniTel & Canas. 

Eeqnirel A Garvanzo. 

HorreU Sc Co., Arthur. 

Perez & Co., S. 

Ortano ic Co. 

Bodriguez & ICaoaya. 

Terres, Pedro. 

Tr^os Sc Co. 
Import and export and whoUedU mereharUt. 

Adiego, MigneL 

Alandete & PradiUa. 



SAK J0S6~Continued. 

Import and export and whoUeale merehante— Cent, 
Alfaro&Co. 
Bansen, M. 
BenedictU, G. do. 
Berry, James. 
Bradway, G. 
Calsamiglia, Bartolom6. 
Castro, Teodosio. 
Carranza, Bnino. 
Collan, AdriAn. 
Cubero 6 l^jos. 
Dent, Le Laoheor Sc Co. 
Dent & Co., R. W. 
Denne, H. A. 
Darin, Jo86. 
Doprat &. Co., F. 
Echeverria, Juan F. 
Ellinger & hermano, Lnls. 
Esqnirel, ll^arciso. 
Esqnivel Sc Cafias. 
Fernandez y Tristan. 
Fields Co., W.J. 
Fonseca, Mariano. * 
Goecoohea Sc Co. 
Gutierrez, EzeqoieL 
Hernandez, Juan. 
Herrera y Ca., G. 
Jager, J. 
Jim6nez, A. E. 
Jimenez, Roberto. 
Joumon Sc Co., H. J. 
Keith, M. C. 
Kn6hr, Juan. 
Lahmann, F. 
Lara, Salvador. 
Levskowicz, Isidro. 
Levbkowicz Sc Son, J. 
Lizano y hermano. 
Liyan Sc Montealegre. 
Macaya y Rodriguez. 
Mata, Juan R. 
Mata Sc Lnjan. 
Melgarejo, Antonio G. 
Menendez, C. 
MUlet, J. Napole6n. 
Monastel, Cleto. 
Montealegre, Francisco. 
Montealegre, Mariano. 
Morrell Sc Co. 

Montealegre Sc hermano., J. XT. 
Mufioz Sc Aoosta. 
^ant6, Mauricio. 
Ortufio, Gaspar. 
Pag6s, Cafias Sc Co. 
Peralta, Francisco. 
Piza Sc Co. 



lO 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



BAN JOS£— Continued. 
Import and export and wholesale merchantt—Cont^ 

Robles, K. A. 

Rohrmoser, Francisco. 

Rohrmoser & Co., £. 

Ross, Robert. 

Rodd, Harrison N. 

Sacripanti, Jos6. 

Schroter & Co., Otto von. 

Steinworth & Co., W. 

Torres, Pedro. 

Tourman & Co., H. 

Thompson & Co., Gma 

Trejos y Aqnilar. 

Troyo&Co.,J.R.R. 

Uribe &. BataUa. 

Yella & Co., Felice. 

Victor y Hoey. 

Yillaftnnca, Francisco. 

TillaAranoa, bermano y Ca. 

YiUaiVanca, Rafael D. 

Wenceslao de la Guardiik 

Wingfield, Richard J. 

Witting, Gmo. 
Photographeri, 

Rndd,H.N. 

Valiente y MarlcbaL 
BetaU general merehants. 

Alfaro Sc Co., T. 

Almnella, Agnstfn. 

Audrain, Constant. 

Audrain, Leoncio. 

Bradway, Gnillermo. 

Cabello, Francisco. 

Carazo, Sefkoritas. 

Chavarria, Locas. 

Carranza, Mannel J. 

Carraaco, Rodrigo. 

Carramo, Tonjl&s. 

Caglgal, Francisco. 

Cardona & hermano, A. 

Cerhiin, C. 

Cepa, Abelardo. 

Coronado y hermano. 

Cnbero 6 h^os, J. J. 

Bay, Carlos. 

DnrAn, Jos4. 

Elizondo, Procoplo. 

Esqnivel, Joe6. 

Esquivel, Arturo. 

Esqnivel, Narciso. 

Esqnivel, Roberto. 

Esqnivel, Alberto. 

Esc^ante y hermano. 

Flores, Francisco. 

Goicoechea A Co., F. 



8AV JOBfi— Continued. 
Betail general nMroAonllf— Continued. 

Gons&lez, Pedro. 

Gntierres, Roaario. 

Herrera St Co., Gorgonlo. 

Hnrtado, Pedro. 

Incera, Isidro. 

I^ahamann, Federioo. 

Landerer, Pablo. 

Leiva, Apolonio. 

LevBko\ricz 6 14Jo, J. 

Marques, Abraham. 

Moneetel, Qeto. 

Mascuel, Manuel. 

Mena y hermano, MigncL 

MiUet, Miguel. 

Moya, Le<in. 

Montealegre y Carazo. 

Odio, Ismael. 

Qnezada, Francisco. 

Quiroz, J. Teodonco. 

Rawson, Dolores Q. do. 

Uribe y Batalla. 

Villavicencio, Rodolfo. 

Vicente, Estanislao. 

Veiga, Manuel. 
BOveremithe. 

C6rdova, Job6. 

Jardin, Aroencio. 

Valle, Andr6s del. 
Waiehmakert andjeweUn, 

Antillon, Sotero. 

Garda, Venancio A. 

Siebe, Luis. 

Saena, Adolfo. 

Si^o, Santa Ana. 

Soto y Ramirea. 

SAKSAXtiH. 

DruggUti. 

Guerrero, Mannel Maria. 
Jurado, R. B. 
LoboB, Rudecindo. 
Miranda, Valeriano. 
Rodrigues, Luia. 
Urrutia, Pedro. 

SANTO DOmrGO. 

Druggiett, 

Chao6n, Jos6 B. 
Flores, Juan. 

TBEBBBML 

Druggittt. 

Garcia, Pedro A. 
Pacheco, Eufracio. 
Rqjas, Alejandro. 



Guatemala. 



AKAHTLAH. 

WhoUidU import and Mport vurehanti. 
BarfflA«,lf. 
Cfttalant A. Ck>. 
M<nit6iT0Ba» H. B. 

ImporUrw. 

Axango, Jo«6 H. 
Bedondo, Jos6 y Alvaxm. 

CSHAXFEBIOO. 

Commiation m&rchanii. 
Al^andro, P. C. 
Tennis, Hugo. 

CHIQITDIEULA. 

BdaU general merehantt. 

Cms, Jnana. 

Loboa, Antonio. 

Penlta, Joan B. 

PortiUo, Dolores B. 

Sagastnme, Pablo. 
WhoUaaU import and export merehanti. 

Aldana^P. 

Herbragor, FraaclBCO. ' 

Nuilo, A. 

Ortega, Pbrnando. 

Porta, Pio. 

Portal, B. 

Signl, Jorge. 

Tenacena, Daniel. 

OOBAV (Alta Vera Pu.) 
WhoUeaU impoH and eaeport merehanU. 
BojerftOo.,B. 
Cordona, lino. 
Cbampney Sc Bird. 
CoiiBtant,C. 
Diaaeldorff Sc Co., H. B. 



OOBAH (Alta Vera Fas)— Continued. 

WhoUtaU import and eaeport iiMreAaatf— Cont'd*. 
Dieeeldorfl; W. A. 
Domadien, A. 
Leger, Jorge. 
Linarea, S. Y. J. 
Moulds, W. B. 
Planas, Joan. 
Sarg hermanoa. 
Sierra, M. 
Trabanino, Vicente C. 

EBCUIMTLA. 

Retaifl general menihanU, 
Alvarado, KanaeL 
Amado, Paala. 
Aparido, FranolBOO. 
Asnrdia, J. 
Bolafioa, J. 
Caatro, Felisa. 
Qae^ara, Maria. 
Hnrtado, Maria. 
QuintaniUa. 
Ztifiiga, Aparido, 

SOoertmiUk, 

Mota, Silvano. 
WhoUetOt import and export merehant$» 

Baor, Jnan. 

Gomar. 

Bnckwardt, Manuel. 

EMlinFUIAS. 



Sagaatome, Catarina, V . do. 

Hatter. 

Toledo, Francisoo. 

Photographer. 
Bednoe, Abd. 

II 



12 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



EBilUlFULAB — Continaed. 

WhoUtaU import and export morchantt. 
Benavides, Sooorro de. 
Palencia, Franoiaoo. 
SagMtnme, Trixuito. 
Yfll^a, Antonio. 

OUATEKALA. 

Bankt and bankort. 

Angulo & Co., D4ma80. 

Angxdo, Manuol. 

Angnlo, Bafael. 

Banco Colombiano. 

Banco de Guatemala. 

Banco Intemadonal. 

Calvo, Carlos^ 

EcheveRia Yald^s, ManaeL 

Eyssen & Co. 

Eisher A Co. 

IbargiLen, Bnflno. 

Jaramillo, Carloa. 

London Bank of Mexico and Soath America, 
Limited. 

Martin, B.H. 

Muydan & Prinz. 

Urrnela, ManneL 

Villa, Bicaredo de. 
BookteU&n and atatkmert, 

Capella, Jnan. 

Carifiee, Mariano. 

Ooaband, E. 

Ortiz Urraela, Joan Franclaco. 

Partegaa, Antonio. 
Boott and »ho€$. 

Agnirre&Co. 

Bran, Victor. 

Cabrera, Sime<in. 

Cdrdova, Mariano. 

Franco, Sime<in. 

GranadoB 7 hermanoa. 

GozmAn, Manuel. 

Marroquin, Juan. 

Mendosa, Eugenie. 

Mil&n, Jos6 Maria. 

Bamirez 7 hermano, Vicente. 

Boaalea 7 hermano, Ignaoio. 

Salazar, Saturnine. 

VAaquez, Santos. 
Oommu9Um merchantM, 

Alrarado, Alfredo F. 

Ar6valo, Guillermo. 

Asturiaa, Kleizaro. 

Balcaroel, J. TomAa. 

CarriUo, MigueL 

Castejdn, Javier. 

Castillo 6 14jo, Domingo. 



OUAIEICALA— Oontinaed. 

OomimAuion ffwreAanCt—Continned. 

Cebos, Kioolia. 

Cruz, Salrador. 

Fernandez, Franoiaoo. 

Garcia, FeUciano. 

Garcia, Ignaoio. 

Gimes, Eduardo. 

LarreTnaga, ManneL 

L6pez, Bicardo. 

Morales, Seirando. 
. Ozeata, JuliAn. 

PaLacios, Victor. 

Palomo, TomAa. 

Polanoo, Francisco. 

Blvaa, Valentin. 

Boiz, Bei^amin. 

Sama7oa, Francisco. 

Sandoral, Gregorio. 

Schmid, Bodolfo. 

ViTia, Eduardo. 

ZAfliga, Felipe^ 
Oopp«r9mUh9. 

Berduo, Pedro. 

Contreras, Domingo. 

CbinchlUa, J086 Maria. 

Garcia, Barbaro. 

Garrido, Comello. 

Ghranado, Ignacio. 

Herrera, Vicente. 

Iriarte, Pedro. 

Lopez, Higino. 

Marroquin, Pantale6n. 

Minora, Seiapio. 

Ortega, Juan. 

Paloma, Manuel Joa6. 
DruggiMtt. 

Ardvalo, Federico. 

Aatnriaa, Bodrigo. 

Castellanoa, Prudencio. 

Castillo hermanoa. 

Dard6n, F61ix. 

Escobar, Jos6 Maria. 

Gallardo, BafaeL 

G4lTez, Jos6 Maria. 

Gandara, Isidro. 

GonzAlez, MigueL 

Gonzalez, Jos6 L. 

GtonzlUez Mora, BafbeL 

Manoilla, Leopoldo. 

Madriz, Francisco. 

Moreno, Juan B. 

Monge, ManueL 

Montiel, Joaquin. 

Morales, Federico. 

Montenegro, Marianai 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



13 



eirATEKAIA— Continued. 
DruggiiU—ConiinxMA, 
(hiiz, Hanuel. 
Orantes, Fernando. 
Rodrignes, Kannel Gi 
Saravia, Salvador. 
Saravla, Jos6 C. 
Sierra, Isaac 
Solaree, Joaqnin. 
Soaa, Frandaoo. 

Zdaja, J096 Mariik 
Z«fiiga^Co. 
Engrofftn. 

Ayala,Mat«o. 

Chaves, J086 AngeL 

Eapa&a, ApoUnario. 

Herrera, Pr^spero. 
Fovndert. 

Artea y ofldos, eacaela dei 

Carraaza, Etadlio. 

Chinchilla, BaikeL 

Eecobar, AngeL 

Garibaldi, Jos6. 

Klee, Jnan. 

Biveora, Naaarlo. 
Furniture merehantt, 

Anaoeto, Bafael. 

Gonziles, Klcardo. 

Gntierres, Wencealaa 

Santamaria, Yicentaw 

Taracena, C. 

Yasqaea, Lucila. 
GfWienm 

Aoeitono, Lniaa. 

Aculla, Los. 

Ai^ilar, Concepci6n. 

Agnflar, Sebaatiana. 

Alvarado, Ana. 

Al^os, Frandaoo. 

Alrares, Los 7 Lorensik 

Amado, Rafaela. 

Aquino, Asuncion. 

ArriolA, Tereaa^ 

AraicAn, J. y H. 

AranA, Josefa. 

Aj6vb1o, Meroedea. 

AreUaao, Lonisa 6. da 

Arjnieta, Frandaoo. 

ArriolA, Frandaoa 

Arroyo, Maria. 

Aroche, Lnz. 

Aategnieta, Emilia. 

Avaloa, Jnata. 

AvendaBo, Maria. 

AvilA, Juliana. 

Acmitia, Clara. 

Barillaa, Maria. 



GUATEMALA— Conti nued. 
6^roMrt— Continued. 

Barrientoe, Maria. 

Barrioa, Maria. 

Bedoya, Soaana. 

Bolanos, Tadea. 

Bolafioa, Manuda y Dolorea. 

t/aballeros, Angela. 

CAoeree, Ci^etana. 

Calderdn, Andrea. 

Caraballo, Martina. 

Cardona,Lna. 

Cftrdenaa, Ale|jandra» 

Caxrera, Dolorea. 

Caetdlanos, Ana. 

Caatellanoa, Juana. 

CaatiUo, Benita. 

Caatillo, Bafiaela. 

Caatio, Briglda. 

Cema, Joaefa. 

Centano, Maria F. 

L6pez, Socorro. 

L5pez, Florendo. 

L6pe8, Ciriaca. 

Moralea, Abelina» 

Moralea, J. 

Monterroaa, BafaelAk 

Molina, Adda. 
Hardware merdumt. 

Beaoampa, Edmonda 

Houoffumithing goodie tinvKire, ffti. 

Aragon, Eatanialao. 

GonxAlea, Mariana 

Ijriondo, Fregorio. 

Iriondo, Juan. 

L6pes, Pedro. 

Molida, Bamon. 

Moran, EufraalOi 

Moran, Pedro. 

Poggio, Bamon. 

Bivera, Alberto. 

Bivera, Nasario. 

Santa Cruz, Yaleriano. 

Santamaria, Frandaca 

Storm, Sebaatian Y. 

Ylllaloboa, Pedro. 
Hatteri, 

BAtrea, I^randaoo. 

Bedoya, Fernando. 

Bedoya, Jorge G. 

Floree, J086. 

Franoo, Juan. 

Leal, J. Frandaoo. 

Luna, Manuel E. 

Moralea, Maximo. 

Ortega, Luia. 

Sanchea, Frandaoo. 



t4 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



GUATEMALA— Continued. 

JAthographert. 

Castro, Pedro. 

Cms, Emeeto. 

Salvatiexra, Yivlano. 
Military goods. 

Alvares, ManueL 

Estrada, CaBimiro. 

Gomes, ManaeL 
J*ainti^ oili, and vamithei, 

Caballeroa, Sinforoao. 

Castillo. JuUo. 

Ceballos, Paulino. 

Diaz, Jos6 Karia. 

Morales, RamdiL 

Obaodo, F61ix. 

Rojel, F6lix. 

Salvatierra, Viyiano. 

Soto, Cecilio. 
Perfumery and/anoy goodt, 

Aranda, RafaeL 

Beecher, WiUiam. 

Grau, Adolfo. 

Gaerra, Mariano. 

Morales, Fernandow 

Morales, Salvador. 

Ortis, Francisco. 

Ory, Luis* 

Paz, Julian. 

Sanchez, TomAs. 

Santa Cruz, Francisco. 

Sevilla^ Al^andro de. 

Yillalobos, Isidro. 

Zavala, F61ix. 
PhotograpJiert. 

Gano, F. y Mnfiis. 

Frener, Camilo JL 

Herbruger, E. 

Jas, Juan J. 

Eildare, E. J. 

Pianoi and sewing maehiinsi, 
. Aranda, RafiaeL 

Maroquin, Manuel. 

Guerra, M. . 

Yalenznela^ GabrleL 
Planters. 

Agulrre, Ramon. 

AstunAs, Luis. 

Bertholin, Aristideo. 

Escamilla, J. M. 

Gonzalez, ManueL 

-Guardiola, Jos6. 

Heirera, M. M. 

Lopez, Emllio. 



GUATEMALA— Continued. 

Hetail genereU merehants. 
Acain, Joaquin. 
Agnilar, Salvador. 
Aguirre, Ram6n. 
Ayau, RafaeL 
Ayado, ManueL 
AreUana, NicoUs. 
Asturias, Eduardo. 
Asturias, Rubio MigueL 
Azpnru, Francisco. 
Barrios, Pedro J. 
Bermeijo, JosA. 
Bolafios fanos. 
Broks, Josefa. 
Castafleda, Martin. 
Castillo, Joaquin. 
Cema, IsmaeL 
Cervantes, ManueL 
Biaz, Joaquin. 
Donovan, Maria. 
DurAn, Teodora. 
Echeveiria Yaldds, Juan. 
Echeverria Yald6s, ManneL 
Estrada, Eduardo. 
FemAndez, J. 
Gaegauf; Hugo. 
Garcia, Ramdn. 
Garcia Moreno, Juao. 
Garcia, Jos6. 
Geering, Eduardo. 
Gonzalez, AngeL 
Gonzalez Yald6s, J096. 
GonzAlez, Pablo. 
Granados, Guillermo. 
Herbruger, Alfredo. 
Herran, Emilio. 
Herrera, Julio. 
Irigoyens, Carlos F. 
Rock, Sofus. 
Kauffinann, J. A. C. 
Khissmann, Ludolfo. 
Labin, ManueL 
Larreynaga, Al^Ob 
LowentbaL 
Ldi>ez, Dolores. 
Maegli, Juan. 
Magee, Juan & Alfredo. 
Mazorra, Miguel 6c Jacinto. 
Macbuca Yargas, Antonio. 
Maria, Francisco. 
Mediua, Juan. 
Monterrosa, Rodolfo. 
Muttini, Enrique. 
Nl^era, Fernando y Manod, 
Kovella, Julio. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



13' 



GUAIEXAIA— Continued. 
SetaU Mneral meroAarUf— Continiied. 
X<m, Antoxiio. 
Ortiz, GniUermo. 
Penado, ManaeL 
PetriUi, EhniliiL 
Piflol, CAnneiL 
Prinz, HermaiL 
Qniflones 6 14Jo, RafBoL 
Kheiner, Jnnn. 
Bicaaens, KanneL 
Roque, JO06 Maria. 
Romero, Maria. 
Sarg, Francisoo C. 
Schaeffer, Pablo. 
Schewer, Gustavo. 
Soaa, Francisoo. 
Stampf, Otto. 
Tielemans, Carlos. 
Yaldeavellano, Karcisa 
Valenzuela, Jos6. 
VaUe, ISmeterio. 
Targas Maohticft, Antonio. 
Tazquez, ManaeL 
Wyld, Ernesto. 
Wyld, Jorge. 
SUotrtmithg. 

Argueta, Marcelo. 
C&ceres, Antolln. 
Estrada, Alejo. 
Estrada, Manuel. 
Grageda, Gregorio. 
Iiiarte, Ram6n. 
Manzor, J. - 
Minero, Salvador. 
Mafioz, Jos6 Dolores. 
Rodriguez, Valentin. 
Valle, Miguel. 
gptciulfnanMfaeturen. 

Azurdia, Bam6n, mattresses. 
Barillas, Guadalupe, chocolate. 
Barreda, Antonio, wicks and fuses. 
CaBtmo, Dorotea, chocolate. 
Castillo, David, furniture. 
Castillo, Joaquin, shirts. 
Caznpo, Manuel, wicks and fuses. 
Campo, Manuel, rubber stamps. 
Gastellanos, Prudencio, sulphuric acid. 
Chavez A hno., Luis, wooden combs. 
Crax, Dolores, mattresses. 
Dies, Domingo, shirts. 
Pahsen, Pascasio, furniture. 
Falla, Dolores, white lead. 
Frener, Camllo, rubber stamps. 
Garrido, Pedro, violins. 
Giovannetti, Antonio, shirts. 



GUATEMALA — Continued. 
Special wiant^/^Bcewrert— Continued. 
Gil, Venancia, mattresses. / 

Garcia, Joaquin. 
Gutierrez, Wenceslao, furniture. 
Herrera, Beliiuirio, furniture. 
Hem&ndez, Clemonta, furniture. 
Inmgaray, Dolores, chocolate. 
Izaguirre, Gertrudio, mattresses. 
Mayorga, Luz, mattTesses. 
Mathen, Manuel, mattresses. 
Pinagel, Angusto, furniture. 
Romero, Pedro, chairs. 
Ruiseoo, F61ix, shirts. 
Yasseanx, Javier, carriages. 
Zapatal, Isidro G., umbrellas. 

Special merehantt, 

Aguiere, Juana M. de, sugar. 

Aguilar, Angela, boots and shoes. 

Alfiredo, Rosa, sugar. 

Anzueta, Rafael, furniture. 

Anguiano, Manuel, china and glass ware. 

Asturias, Luis, boots and shoes. 

B&tres, JuliAn, sugar. 

B&tres, Palomo Miguel, sugar. 

Bazar, Sociedad de Artcsanos, furniture. 

B&tres, Dolores, gunpowder. 

Beauchtoe, Pedro, gunpowder. 

Beteta, Carmen A., china and glass ware. 

Beltramena, Bernardo, china and glass ware. 

Bravaix, Carlos, china and glass ware. 

Castro, Jos6 Maria, artificial flowers. 

Cdrdova, Mariano, boots and shoes. 

C*rocker, Concepcidn, boots and shoes. 

David, Joseflna de, perfumes. 

Estrada, Viotoriano, sugar. 

Escobar, Yictoriauo, boots and shoes. 

Estrada, Luisa, boots and shoes. 

Femtodez, Dionisio, sugar. 

Eigueroa, Carmen F. de, woods. 

Garza, Carmen, dorist. 

GaMn, Manuel, tobacco. 

Galto, Brigido, tobacco. 

Gir6n> Isabel M., woods. 

Gonz^ez, Basilio, sugar. 

Gonz&lez Pi&ola, Ricardo, furniture. 

GonzAlez, Miguel, china and glass ware. 

Gonzalez, Baildo, woolen goods. 

Grima, Dolores L. de, chfaia*and ghisa ware. 

Guerra, Cruz G. de. sugar. 

Gutierrez, Wenceslao, furniture. 

Guzm&n, Maria, boots and shoes. 

Herrera, Patrooinio, woolen goods. 

Izquierdo, Juan, gunpowder. 

Laguaidia, Dolores, sugar. 

Landero, Luz, gunpowder. 



i6 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



OTJATEMALA— Continued. 
Special merehantt^ConXinnod.. 

Lara, Maria, boota and shoes. 

Machado, Mauael, sugar. 

Hazaragos, In68, boots and shoes. 

MAntara. Jaana, florist 

Mencoa, Francisco, woods. 

Morales, MAximo, woolen goods. 

Molina, Manuel, woods. 

Mnrga, Ram6n, sugar. 

yannini, Aurelio, pianos. 

Ortiz, Juan, woods. 

Ortia, Miguel, church ornaments. 

Orellana, Isabel de, woolen goods. 

Padilla, Ram6n, woods. 

Pax, JuliAn, fianoy articles. 

Peralta, Vicente, sugar. 

Pi&ol, Carmen, boota and shoes. 

Pineda, Maroelino, woods. 

Porras, Manuel C. de, boots and shoes. 

Polanco, Antolina, boots and shoes. 

Recinos, Ramon, ooiflns. 

Reyes, J., furniture. 

Rodriguez, Guillermo, sugar. 

Rodas, Francisco, furniture. 

Samayoa, Jos6 Maria, sugar. 

Samayoa, Doroteo, sugar. 

Storm Sc Whitney, gunpowder. 

Teil, d'avler Du, sugar. 

TJrrutia, Christina, florist 

Yasquez, Manuel, woods. 

Vasqnez, Pilor R. de, salt 

Yalle, Miguel, coffins. 

Yalle, Josefa, sugar. 

Yasquez, Lucila, furniture^ 

YillagrAn, Magdalena. 
Watchmaken andjewtUn. 

Arriola, Francisco. 

Bravaiz, Carlos. 

Castro, J. M. 

DurAn, Ram6n. 

Oaurin, Enrique. 

Guerrero, Salvador. 

Motlet, Maroelino. 

Kl^era, Diego B. 

Rosembwg, ISmllio. 

Rodeman, Jorge. 

Widmer, Federioo. 

WhoUioXe import and export m9rchant». 
Abrahamson ic Co., Rosenthal. 
Agniere & Go. 
Alfaro & Co. 
Arenzana & Llarena. 
Arrechea, Luis. 
Ascoli &. Co., £. 
Arrechea, Jos6 RafaeL 
Baltramena, BemardOb 



GUATEMALA— Continued. 

WhoUtale import and export merehants—Oamt'L 
Bertrand A Co. 
Benito & Co., J. B. 
Becker & Eyssen. 
Beltramena, ManueL 
Blenler Sc Co., Otto. 
Boyd, Gustavo. 
Colama, MigueL 
Camaoho, Francisco. 
Compania de Tel6fonos de Guatemala 
Bescald & Co. 
Descamp, Eduardo. 
Eyssen 6c Co., Lorenso. 
Estrada, Y. M. 
Fisher 6L hnos. 
Ganadara, Urruela Sc Co. 
Godoy, A. 
Grote, German. 
Grotewald A Co. 
GuiUarel, Casimlro. 
Heinst, J. C. Yander. 
Herrera & Co. 
Hockmeyer & Co. 
Jaramillo, Juan N. 
Jump, Thomas. 
Kriemler & Co., Juan. 
Kuhsick, Guillermo. 
Lambert, Walter C. 
Llarena, Antonio. 
Maegli, Gaegauf &, Co. 
McIlwainQ, Jo86. 
McNiver, Stanley. 
Mathew & Co., Federlco. 
Mathew & Co., Yictor. 
Meyer Sl hnos. 
Meyer & Co., Luis Da Costa. 
Minondo & Co., Joaquin, 
ll^anne, Guillermo. 
Newman & Co., J. 
Payens, Shulita. 
PetrelU, E. 
Pineda & Grotts. 
Pierri, Juan. 
Ponciano, J. F. 
Prado, Miguel. 
Prinz &. Co., Enrique. 
Rivero & hnos., S. 
Rivero & Co., ManueL 
Rottman, Eduardo. 
Rosenberg, Emlllo. 
Rosenthal Sc Sons, A. 
Ruiz Sc Co., J. & M. 
Sanchez & Co., Pedro. 
Saoripanti, Jos6. 
Samayoa, Jos^ M. 
Schwartz & Co. 
Sinibaldi, Alejandro M. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



17 



GUATEMALA— Continued. 
WhoUnUe import and export fnerchantf—CoiiVd. 
Silva, Yasconcelos. 
SiDibaldi, Safiwl C. 
Smyth, £. K. 
Sona, Franoisco. 
Steinborth & Co., W. S. 
Telf grafoA Nacionales de Guatemala. 
Torriello, Goronel Enrique. 
Ugarte &, Co., R. 
Urrnela, Gandaaa Sc Co. 
rrmela Sc. Co., M. 
Yald^tt, Manuel Ecbevenrla. 
Valdcavellano, A. G. 
Van l>er Henst, J. E. 
Van Der Pute & TertzweiL 
Villa, Enrique V. 
Vuqnes, Manuel J. 
Whilne«, Stoun S. V. 
Whitney &, Co. 
Wolf, Jacobo. 
Zadik & Co.. A. 



HUEHUErENAHQO. 

Boots and shoea. 

Arg^neta, Martin. 

Chaves, Valeriano. 

Sooa, Antonio. 
Druggists. 

Agailar, Porflrio. 

flernAndes, CeleatJno. 
Groeer. • 

Argueta, Gregoria. 
Hatter. 

Herrera, Pedro. 
BetaU general merehaiU, 

Galindo, J. 
aOeeremiOis. 

Castillo, Engenio. 

Mata, EUaa. 
Special merehanU. 

Carddn, Apolinario, wagons and carts. 

Jlrta. Manuel, manufacturer of hammocks. 
WhoUeale import and export merchant. 

Axriola, J. 

TZATntT^ 

Wkoleeals import and expoH merekanU, 
Ferguson, Samuel. 
GonsAles, CristobaL 
Knight k, Potto. 
Pott, T. J. 

JALAPA. 

Moeis and tkoee. 

GazmAn, Vicente. 
Montenegro, Mariana 
21 8a 2 



JALAPA— Continued. 
Druggist. 

Cifuentes, ]<Yanoisco. 
Oroeers. 

Campos, Juana. 

Campoa, Epifania. 

Marroquin, Josefa. 
BetaU genenU merchant*. 

Argueta, Ignacio. 

Bonilla, Jo86 Antonio. 

Sandoval, Juan. 

JUTIAPA. 

Wholeeaie import and export meehante. 
Castell, J. 
Champnej' & Bird. 
Gudiel. F. 

LA AHnOUA. 

Wh<^esale import and escort merchanii. 
Mathew Sc Co. 
Palomo, M. 
Vargas, M. 
Vivas, E. 

LiynrosTOH. 

Wholesale import and export merehant$, 
Clarck, Joseph. 
Gonzalez y Porta. 
Martinez & Ferguson. 
Rich, Isidro. 
Tisne, Laveryant. 
Wardland, S. Henry. 

MATAQUESCUIHTLA. 

Boots and shoes. 

Florin, Eulogio. 
BetaU general merchant 

Aquino, Cecilio. 

KAZATHfAHGO. 

Drvffgist 

Monzan. Gabriel K 
Wholesale import and export merchant*. 

Alvarado, D.F. 

Barras & hermanos. 

Garcia, F. 

DeLedn, J. M. 

Martinez, E. 

QTJEZALIEirAKQO. 

Banker. 

Rivera, Antonio. 
Druggist. 

C%ia8, Doroteo. 



i8 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



QTTEZALTEKAirOO— Continued. 

Jeweler», 

Le<}ii, Jo86. 

Oltramare, GabrieL 
"PhoU^grapher. 

Vernlcer, P. K 
Printing eitablUhmenU, 

El Bien Ptiblico. 

Tipografia de la'Industria. 
'Wholetaie import and export morehantt. 

Avail 4 h^os. 

Enriquez, H. 

Galindo, K. 

GuUerrez, Doroteo. 

Jnlia, Jos6. 

Koch hnos. Sc Co. 

Lacier, Rodolfo. 

Mej ^r & Co., Adolfa 

Molino, A. 

Ortega, L. 

Pagan ini hnos. 

Pacheco, Qnlrino. 

Pieniccini & Pierri. 

Rigaiul & Metze. 

SancheH hiioa. 

Zadik & Cheeamaa. 

Zadik & Co.. A. 

RETALHULEir. 

WhoUtdU import and export mtrekanU, 
Alvarado, G. 
Andino, Manuel. 
Audino, Vicente. 
C^kerea, Jo86 i&L 
Briones, F. 
Lacisz & Co. 
PalacioH, F. L 
Palacios, Te6fllo. 
Sologaistoa, G. 
Zd&iga, L. 

SALAHl. 
Boott and ihoes. 

Ascencidn, Hermeneglldo. 

Leal, Narciso. 

Bodrigaez, Joa6 Maria. 
Qroeere. 

C6rdova, Dolores J. de. 

Martinez, Paula. 

Bamos, Sabinade. 
HatUn. 

Jimenez, Francisoa 

Mendozo, Kafael. 
Retail general merehantt, 

Belloso, Juan S. 

Chavarria, Bosa. 



.—Continued. 
RetaU general m«rcftan£«— Continued. 

Coronado hno., ^ieandra. 

Garcia hno., Braulia. 

Leal, Adelaida. 

Marcalea, Margarita de. 

Naroiao, Sebastian. 
SHoeremiiih, 

Hendosa, Juan. 
Waiehmakeir andjetoeUr, 

Presa, Francisco. 
Wholeeale import and export merehanL 

Callmeyer, David. 

8AH XABCOB. 

Wholeeale import and export merehanti. 
Barrios, Juan. 
Corzo, MigueL 
Coronado, Manuel. 
Ledn, F. de. 
Maldonado, F. 
Kivaa, Rafael 
Sanches, F. 
Tenorio, Juan. 
Vazquez, Padre J. 

SANTA CRUZ. 

Wholeeale import and export merehanL 
Leiva, Samuel. 

tecpAh. 

WhoUeale import and export merchantM, 
Acufia, Jos6. 
Aguirre & Co. 

totohicapAh. 

Booti and ehoet. 

Arriola, J. M. 

Contifio, Fruto. 

Ledn, Mariano de. 

Pereira, Julito. 
I>ruggieti. 

Gutierrez, Joe6 G. 
Bngravere, 

Avila, Valentin. 

Herrera, PnSspero. 
Oroceri. 

Amezquita, J. E. de. 

Arriola, Ana Maria. 

Arriola, Teresa. 

C4rdenas, Mercedes. 

Monzdn, Maria Antonia. 
Satter. 

Culebro, Leopoldo. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



19 



TOTOHICAPAH— GoBtinaed. 
^ SihertmWu. 

C6rd0Tfi, Delfino. 
C6rdova, Mlgnel. 
Cordova, Jo«6 Maria. 
Poneo, Antonio £. 
Porrea, Fermin E. 
^I>ecial fnafni^a^ur§r9. 

Aypi^A, Manuel, galloons. 
Cbnc, Manael, galloona. 
WiOekmaker and jeweler. 
C6rdova, Delflno. 

IHioleiaU import and eaqH>rt merehanit, 
Caioey, David. 
Coronado, Angel B. 
Enriqaez, LAcaa. 
Estrada. F. 
Sanches, Petrona. - 

TUKBAOOB. 

WholreaU import and export merehanL 
Soliz, Franciaoo. 

ZAGAPA. 

Boots and ehoee. 

Huezo. Franciaco, 

L6peB, Agapito. 

Navaa, EaeqoieL 
Druggists. 

Elee, Bosendo J. 

:Siiwti, Salvadoi; 



ZACAPA— C ou tinuecL 

Oroeers, 

Caatafieda, Dolores P. da. 

Flores, Candelaria. 

Paz, CAndida. 

Rosael, Dolores G. 
Butters. 

Goto, Mannel. 

Esquivel^ Abelino. 

OOmes & hno., CayetOBO. 

Molina, Manuel. 
Sttoersmiths. 

Agnirre, Juan Garda. 

Porres, Antonio E. 
Special mant^faeiurer qf spirits of turpentiiM., 

P6res, Santos. 
BpeeiaX msreluiinU. 

Antony, Horaoio, boots and shoes. 

Barrientos, Domingo, tobacco. 

Castafieda, Eduardo, sugar. 

Castafleda, Federioo, sugar. 

Peralta, Antonio, tobacoo. 

Salguerro, Juan B., tobacoo. 

WhxAesole import and export msrehantit, 
Castafieda & Co. 
Cms, Maria. 
Garcia, Juan. 
Nuflo. JO86. 
Palacios, Jos6 Mail^ 
Sosa, Vicente. 
Wlndelberg A, Co. 



Honduras. 



fLlKkVkJ.k. 

Bank, 

Banco de HondnrM. 
(kmmistion merehanU. 

Dnbdn, Agnstfs. 

Kohncke, Teodoro. 

BoMner, Jo86. 

Drvgffitt. 

Dub6ii, Agnslln. 
Hatter. 

Flores, ManneL 
RetaU general merehanti. 

Abadie & Co., P. 

Dub6n, Agustin. 

Roemer, Joa6. 

Sosa, A. 
Wholesale import and eaepoH msrehamU, 

AlMuUe & Co., Pedro. 
^Bardalea, General Santos. 

Dnb^n, Agnfitin. 

Gattorno 6 I4JO0, J. B. 

GnsmAn, F. 

Heyliger, Cornello. 

Kohncke, Teodoro. 

Moncada, S. 

Bomner & Co., J. 

Bndolph, C 

BOHAOGA. 

Importer. 

Bayly, WilUam. 

CHOLUTECA. 

BooU and $hoe§. 

Samches, Fanato. 
WhoUeaU import and eatport morehante, 

Gattorno, J. B. 

GuiU^n, J.B. 

Midence, Antonio. 

Bodrigues bnoa. 



COMATAGXrA. 

Boots and shoes. 

Alvarado, Leandio. 

Morales, Cmz. 
Dntgs. 

Munth, Jnllo. 

Reina, Toribio. 
Retail general merehants. 

Agnirre, AdiUi. 

Araqne, Maria. 

Castillo &, hnoa., Matias. 

Mendoxa, Teodoro. ' 

Ucles, Encamacidn. 

niloa, Tomaaa. 
Wholesale import and egport merchants, 

Agnirre, AdAn. ' 

Ariaa, Cello. 

Berlios, Victorino. 

Cafttillo 6 hjJoH, H. 

Delpech & Co., M. 

Dnbdn, Tiburcio. 

Fiallos, Jnan Francisco. 

FiaUos, J. M. 

Henden, Santiago. 

Mnndt, Julius. 

Becarle, Feliciana. 

Reina, Toribio. 

Valensuela, Alonzo. 

Valenzuela &, Co., R. 

VeUsquez, Ochoa. 

DANU. 

Wholesale import and export merchants, 
Castillo, Jacobo. 
Gamero, M. 
Yeida, Matilde. 

XRANBIQUS. 

Wholesale import and export m^rehant. 
Mufioz, £. 



22 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



0EACIA8. 

Wholesale import and export merchantt. 
Cisneroft, Job6 Maria. 
HernAndez, G. 
Mnfioz, Rosa. 
Pineda, Naxario. 
Trejos, Eiiloglo. 
VUlAla, Belisario. 

OTJAHAJA. 

WholeeaU import and wport merehantt. 
Sinclair, John. 
Torres, Dioniaio. 

oiTnroFB. 

Import0r9 and eoeportrnv, 

Barradanee A, Co., general merohandiae. 
Torres, Francisco, general merohandiae. 

JTJTIGALPA. 
Booti and ihoM. 

Beoerra, RafaeL 

Riyas, Fernando. 
Sav$rtmith. 

Mercadad, Marooe. 

WhoUiole import and export merehanti. 
Bertrand, P. 
C4Ub, F. 
Fortin, Castro. 
Fortin, Carlos F. 
Gardela, 6. 
Morales, Florencio. 
Rosalos, A. 
Zelaya, J. M. 
Zelaya, I. 

LA BSFERAirZA. 

WhoUtaU import and export merchantt. 
Alvarez Castro, J. A. 
L6pez, A. 
Mejia, V. 

LA PAZ. 

W?u>leeale import and eeeport merchantt, 
Alvarado, Casimiro. 
Colindres, Mannel. 
Salinas, Martin. 
Suarez, B. 
Yasquez, Toriblo. 

yATM!AT.a 

WhoUtaU import and export merchant, 
Ramirez, C. 

KACAOME. 

Wholetale import and export merchant. 
Cisne, JosA. 



OOOIEFEQUS. 



BooU and thoet. 

Biiezo, Ramon. 

Coto, Salvador. 

Diaz, Samuel. 

Rraso, Luoiano. 

Flores. Marcelino. 

MoraUya, Manael. 

Sandoval, BrauUo. 

Salgaero, Lino. 

Torres, Leandro. 
I>n*ggittt. 

Bocanegra, Joan. 

Buqne, Jorge. ' 

Soliz, Marcial. 

Umafia, ^^nnfiL 
Oroeert, 

Ard5n, J. 
Ldpez, Franoisoo. 
BetaU general merchantt. 
Ard6n, J. 

Carrania, Francisco. 
Chinchilla, Victor. 
Fuentes, Pedro. 
Hernandez, Franclaoo. 
Madrid, Juan. 
Morales, Sixto. 
Ortiz, Juana T. do. 
Rodrignes, Maximo. 
Soils, Carlos. 
ITmafia, Francisco. 
Umafia, Florencio. 
Umafia, Dolores. 
YaUe, Gertmdis. 
Vidal. Joana. 

WhoUtale import and export m«rdUNlt 
ViUela, Juan J. 

olahchho. 

WhoUtale import and export merchmntt, 
ArriAga, Cristobal. 
Castro, TomAs. 

OXOA. 

Booti and thoee. 

Rodriguez, Andr6B. 

Wholesale import and export merchantt, 
Cosales, Pedro. 
Cabus, Jos6 Maria. 
Rstap«, Luis. 
£stap6 Sc Casaels: 
Rivera, Jos6 Angel. 

FEB8PIRB. 

Importert. 

Molina, MardaU 
Jivon & Medina. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



23 



FUXBTO COATtl. 

Cmmitrionmerehantt, 
Alger & De Ledn. 
Merilees, J.W. 

DntggiiL 

Panting, Jorge. 
Bihenmith. 

Bosalefi, Juan. 
WktiUiale import and Mport nurchanti, 

Algor & De Le6a. 

Belisle, J.J. 

Brown, Hnberto. 

CMtro, Praxedes. 

Debrot hnoo. . 

De Leto, Reglnaldo. 

Harmon, Le6nWnL 

Kraft, lidnardo. 

Ldva, noreneia 

Merreilles, John. 

Prince, Pedro C. 

Seymour, Henry. 

Stain, SamneL 

XTgarte hnoa. 

Vidaurreie, ^rdapero. 

BOATAH. 

DruggitL 

Ganmer, Geo. F. 
WMmoU import and export merehanU, 

Agnirre, Federioo. 

Bnrchard, W. C. 
. Flynn, E. H. 

Isaguirre, David. 

Rivera, J. 

SoareB,B. 

BAJT JXrAHdHTO. 

Importer. 

Jaooby, K.A. 

8AH FEDBO SULA. 

Commi$tion msrchant». 
Carraccioli, Joaquin. 
Hartinea, Le6n. 
Reynard, Jos6 Maria. 
Rich, Jaime. 

Druggist, 

Guild, W. 
Retail general merchanti, 

Mejta, Abraham. 

Ramos, Franclaoo. 
gpeeial manufacturer. 

Amoux &. Co., Hugar. 
WhaleeaU import and export merchanta. 

Amoux ic Co. 

Am and &Co., P., general merchundiHe. 



SAN FEDBO SULA — Continned. 
Wholesale import and export merehantt—ConVd. 
Bfihr, Jorge. 
Cabna, Martin. 
Colliera, GniUermo. 
Eapafia, Lorenso. 
Fiallos Sc Co., Francisco. 
Funes, Caeear, general merchandise. 
Girbal, Federico. 

Goet Sc Mahler, general merchandise. 
Hemindea & Co., Simedn. 
Ingles, Lorenzo. 
L6pez, W. L. 
- Maradiaga y Garcia. 
Martines, Le6n. 
Meza, Rafaeb 
Mitchell, Dr. J. M., dmgs. 
Panting & Co., general merchandiaa. 
Pedrosa, Carlos. 
Prince, Pedro C. 
Ramos, Francisco. 
Yalensuela, Jofl6 Maria. 

SAHTA BARBARA. 

Boott and ehoee. 

Aguilar, Joe6 Maria. 

Flores, Adolfo. 

MufioK, ManneL 
Hattere. 

Baide, Luis. 

Barahona, J086 Maria. 
Photographer. 

Yeroy, Francisco. 
Retail general merehanti, 

Fletes, Evaristo. 

Gusmin, Ignacio. 

IngI6s. Lorenzo. 

Laurent y Alfredo. 

ParedBA, Andr6s. 

Paredes, Salvadot. 

Paz, Onofre. 

Paz, Fidel. 

Rivera, Lucio. 

Rodriguez, Gregorio. 

Romero, Paz. 
SHveremith. 

Ortega, Albino. 
WholesaU import and export merohantt. 

Aguilar, Vicente. 

FtOardo, Julian. 

Pineda Mejia, J086 Maria. 

SAHTA BOSA. 

Boots and shoes. 
Caledonio, J. 
Contreras, Alonzo. 



24 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



&AHTA BOSA— Oontinaed. 
Boots and «Ao««— Continued. 

Orellana, Antonio. 

San Martin, Bodolfo. 
Drvggiit. 

Arias, Juan A. 
Retail general fn£refiantt, 

Buezo, Julio. 

Cobos, Indaleoio. 

Erazo, David. 

Esquivel, Iilorondo. 

Httnriqnez, Macedonia 

Henrfquez, Trinidad. 

Lopez, Fiilgencio. 

Madrid, Tomis. 

Madrid, A giintin. 

Madrid, Rafael. 

Macedonio. Antonio. 

Medina. Antonio. 

Meliton, Conlova. 

Penado, Roe«ndo. 

Portillo, TeodoTO. 

Rios, Leoncio. 

Toledo, Mtinael. 
Wholetale import and export merchants. 

CaAtellauos, Yictoriano. 

C41iz, Jiisto. 

Fiallos, Francisco. 

Guist, Constantino. 

Meliton, Cordova. 

Milla y hnos. 

Rich, Jaime. 

Rosendo, Agustin. 

Tenorio, MigueL 

Villa, JosA Maria. 

TEOUCIGALPA. 

Bank. 

Banco de Honduraa. 
Books and stationery. 

VigU, Jo86 L. 
Boots and shoes. 

Andino, Beivjamln. 

Irias, Mariano. 

Ztkfiiga, FlorenciOb 
Commission merchants, 

Grau, Jnlio F. 

Streber, Ricardo. 
Druggists. 

Agaelera y Ca., J. 

Angolo, M. 

Arias, Pedro. 

Bemhard, Geo. 

Diaz, Joaqnin. 

Botica del fionpitaL 

Midence y buo., Ram6iL 



TEOUCSOALPA— Continued. 

7>rtij7j7Mto— Continued. 

Streber, M. 

Udea, J. 
Oroeer. 

Reyes, Gervacia de. 
Hardware and tools. 

Balette, Jnlio. 

Reyna, Jose Maria. 

Sotero, Jos^ Lazo. 

Zelaya herraanos. 
Photographer. 

Aguirre, JVancisco. 
Printing establishment. 

Tipografla XacionaL 
Retail general merchants, 

Cnbas, Dionisio. 

Gnardiola, Gonzdles. 

Molina, Cipriano. 

Retes, Tomasa. 
Silversmiths. 

Aguilar, Antonio. 

Ordofiez, Tinioteo. 
Watchmaker and jeweler. 

Bohlander, Juan. 
Wholesaie import and export merchants. 

Agurcia Sc Soto, general inercluuidis& 

Aguirre, J. T., photographer. 

Ayeatas, Vicente. 

Ariza, Francisco. 

Baker. Alden H. 

Bemhard, Albert, drugs. 

liemhard, George, commission. 

Beyer & Backer, A. H. 
Bogran, I>on Luis. 
Bohlander, Juan. 

CastUlo 6 h^os. 

Diaz, Joaquin, drags. 

Diaz hnos. 

Estrada, J., general merchandise. 

Estrada, Jacobo, general merchandise. 

Fenuindez, Benito, general merchandise. 

Femdndez, Ramiro, general merchandise. 

FiiUloB, Rafael, drugs. 

Fontecha, Dr. R., wines, liquors, etc. 

Fritzgartner, Dr. R. 

Gamero 8c Co. 

Gutierrez, Jos6 Maria. 

Gutierrez Sc Co., Ldpei. 

Hilder, F. F. 

Jir6n, Quintin. 

Laines, Samuel, general merchandise. 

Liipez, Antonio, general merchandise. 

Lagos & Co. 

L6})ez, Antonio, genexM merchandise. 

L^^pez, Rafael. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



TEGUdOALPA— Continued. 

WMesaU import and eooport m«reAanto— Cont'd. 
Lozano, Julio, general merchandise. 
Martinez, Florencio. 
Matiite, T. 

Medina, Jnan Antonio. 
Mesa, S. 
Midence, E. 
Midence, Kani6n, general merchandise, drugs, 

liqaors, paints. 
Molina, M. 
Morlan Sl Wainwright, jewelry, clocks, and 

musical instniments. 
PlanaH, Francisco, general merchandise. 
Planas, Lcdo. Pondano. 
Rubles, D. 
Sm*ber, Ricardo, general merchandise and 

liquors. 
Sevilla, Leopoldo, general merchandise. 
Sti«ber & Znrcher. 

Traviesa, Federico, general mei-chandise. 
Toledo, Ensebio. 

roles, Alberto, general merchandise. 
Ugarte, Tomasa de, general merchandise. 
Valentine, W. S. 
Vigil ManueL 

Vigil, Ram6n, general merchandise. 
Vigil, Marcial, general merchandise. 
Vigil Joe6 L. 

VillatVanca & Sons, general merchandise. 
Wuchner, Henry. 

Zelaya, Abelardo, general merchandise. 
ZAfliga, Miguel general merchandise. 
Ztifiiga, Alberto. 
ZiUiiga, Biego. 

TBHriBAB. 

WhoUmU import and eooport mercharU, 
Fmardo, JoliAn. 

TBUJILLO. 

BankM and bankert. 

Agnan Nar. St, Lnp. Gou 
Hnrley, ThonuM H. 



TEUJULO— Continued. 
Banks and bankerg—Cantinued. 

Onl, Joseph. 

VeUsqnez, Cipriano. 
Drvga. 

Dillet, Alfonso. 
Wholetale import and export merchanU. 

Betancourt, Fernando. 

Binney, Melbado &. Co. 

Castillo, J. 

Castillo, Prospero. 

Castillo hnos. 

Debrot, Federico. 

Dillet, Motute. 

Billet & Ruis. 

Font, J. 

Glynn, C. & J. 

Izaguirre & Co., D. M. J. 

Julia, D. Jo86. 

lAfitte, Juan. 

Melhado, W. M. 

Ord, Joseph G. 

Sosa, Donaldo. • 

Trist4, Carlos L. 

unLA. 

Wholetale import and export fMrehanta. 
Fhipps & Co. 
Rivera, Bias. 
Torres, Seraflo. 
VToodville, R. 

yuscabAh. 

WholeeaU import and eooport merehante. 
Baxrantes, Rafael. 
Castillo, Matilde. 
C6rdo va, M6nico. 
Gradiz, Trinidad. 

TOBO. 

WholeeaU import and eooport merehantM, 
Quiroz, J. 
Uimeneta, TomAa. 



Nicaragua. 



AOOTAPA. 

WMesdU impoTt and eaoport merchant, 
SevillA. Cirilo. 

BLUSFIELD8. 

Impentn, 

Brown & Harris. 

Levy ti, Levis. 

Sargent, J. I. 

Sbnmona, John H. 
JfenfiAante. general msrehandiie, 

aerici, A. 

Ebenaperger 8l Go. 

Friedlimder, J. 

Ingram, H. Clay. 

Sing, C. M. 

Thomas A Nephew, J. 0. 

WeU 8c Co., S. 

Wilson & Belanger. 

BUSKOS ATBS8. 

BttiaU general vurehanti. 
Chamorro, Doroteo J. 
Salamanca, Gregorio. 

inninn oAT.P A. 

Maekinery. 

Deshon & Pineda. 

CHIKAirDEOA. 

Bankers. 

Call^as ic Baoa. 
JhvggitU. 

Baca, Frandsoo. 

Granera, Inocente. 

Kavarro, Angel. 

TQerino, Toriblo. 
MetaUganBralfnerehanti. 

ITaTarrete hnos., Ignacio. 

Kayanete hno.. Sinforosa. 



GHnrAHSEOA— Continned. 
BetaU general tnereAonte— Continned. 

NaTarro, Crna. 

Reyes, Jos^. 

Salinas, Jnan. 

Sanson, Gertrudis y Ssteflmla. 

T^erino hnos. 
Ba»erwmiih, 

Mesa, Enrique. 
Machinery, 

Baca, Mannel Antonio. 
WhoUtale impart and eoppart marahantB. 

Callejas, Santiago. 

OaU^as, Joan F. 

Gasteozoro, T. M. 

Goriero, Juan. 

Groriero 6 li^o. 

CHOLUTECA. 

WkdeedU import and export merfihanL 
Lagos, C^sar. 

COBIHTO. 

OommisHon merchanie. 

Brenes, Pedro. 

Monterey y Co., Jos6. 

Palado, L. 
Oommiuion merchante and eoBportart, 

Pala£io&Co.,E. 

Wasmer & Lutsner. 
BetaU general morehatUi. 

Yalle, Salvador. 
WhoUeale import and eaq>ort merekante. 

Jericho, Guillermo. 

Palazio, Henry. 

PaUizio & Co., E. 

Valle, Narciso. 

Vargas, Francisco. 

Wassmer & Von Lutzow. 



=7 



28 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



GRANADA. 

Banks and bankerti. 

Arana, Salvador. 

Chamorro y Zabala. 

Morales, Santiago. 

TJrbine, ManueL 

VargaH, Juan. 

Banco de Nicaragua. 
Boots and shoes. 

Romero, MigneL 

Commission merehants. 

Espinosa, G. 

Garcia & Co., Jos6 Maria. 

Martinez, Abraham. 

TraBa, J. Luis. 
Druggists. 

Alvarez, F. 

Barrios, Te6filo. 

Guerrero, Alfonso. 

Gnzniiln, HoraciOw 

Guzm&n, V. 

Lacayo, Alberto. 

Morales, Jose Maria. 

Pasos. Agnstin. 

Urtecho, Juan IgnaciOb 

Vargas, Pedro B. 

Exporters eoffef, hides, and dye woods* 
Arguello, Luis. 
ArgueUo, Manuel. 
Arguello, Mariam. 
Barillas, Bei^amin. 
Barillas, Carlos. 
CastriUo, David. 
Cesar & Chamorro. 
Chamorro &, Bro., Femnndo. 
Cuadra & Sons, Virginia. 
Derbyshire, Fred. 
Espinoisa, Gonzalez. 
Gomez & Bpns, Josefa. 
Lacayo, Alberto. 
Lacayo, Delflno. 
Lacayo, Fernando and ManueL 
Lacayo, Paaifllo. 
Lacayo St Bro., Alfi^do. 
Morales, Santiago. 
Pellas, A. E. 
Sandoval, Beqjamin. 
Vargas, Jnan. 
Vaughn Bros. 

Batter. 

Palacio, Casimiro del a 

Importers drugs and ehemieaU, 
Alvarez, F. 
Barbema, Narciso. 
Chamorro, Filadelfo. 



ORANADA— Continued. 
Importers drugs and 0/i«f}»iea2«— Continued. 

Guzman, Virgilio. 

Henriques, Maximiliano. 

Lacayo, Alberto. 

Lcjarez, Sefior Don. 

Martiney, Sefior Don. 

Monteil, Luis. 

Morales, Jos^ Maria. 

Pasos, Agustin. 

Urtecho, Juan Ignacio. 

Vargas, Pedro K. 
Importers general msrehandise, 

Arguello, Luis. 

Arguello, Mariano. 

Cesar 3c Chamorro. 

Chamorro & Co., Salvador. 

Chamorro & Bro., Fernando. 

Coronel, Manuel A. 

Lacayo, Fernando and ManuoL 

Quadra6 Hjjos, Virginia de. 

Pasos & Co., P. 

Peter & Co., Alberto. 

Wolff & Co., S. 

Ximenes & Bro., Salvador. 
Photographers. 

Alfaro Bernardo. 

Cassinelli, Antonio. 

Sanson & Co., Fernando. 

Planters, general. 

Arellano, Faustino. 

Baez, Rito. 

Berard, Agustin G. 

Costigliolo y Zalala. 

Guzman, Fernando. 

Lacayo, Daniel. 

Lacayo, Fernando. 

Quadra, Vicente y Joaquin. 

Zelaya, Leandro. 
Planters, sugar. 

Costlgliolo y Zabbala. 

Espinola y Ca. 

Planters, eoeoa. 

Arguello, Jo86. 

Chamorro hermanos. 

Menier, E. 

Quadra, C.y J. 
Planters of coffee, 

Aviles, A. 

Bermndez, Josfi T. 

Brown hnos. 

Espinola, Francisco. 

Lacayo, Daniel. 

Lacayo, F. y M. 

Lacayo, Tomils. 

Itoman, Desidcrio. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



29 



6BAHADA— Continned. 

Planteu qf eo/ee— Continued. 
Vagnan y hemumos. 
Vegii, Jnan. 

Frinten. 

Cnadra, J. de J. 
Kivaa, Anselmo H. 
Bomero, MigueL 
R9iaU general merchant, 
Bendafia, Eemando. 
^leertmith, 

Boix, Alberto. 
Special manrnfaeturen. 

Barcenaa, J. J., coffee maoUnery. 

Lacayo, Liaimaco, castor olL 
Spe^al merehanU. 

Km, Adolfo, wineg and liquors. 

Downing (k, hnos., cigars. 

GnzmiHn, Enrique, sugar. 

Lacayo, Boberto, woods. 

Ortega, Salvador, liour. 
WaUhmakere andjetoelert. 

Chamorro, Martin. 

Lacayo, Joa6. 

Lacayo, Roberto. 

Palavacini, Vicente. 

Bamires y Ca., P. 

Ryo«. Felipe. 
Wholetale impint and export mertkantt. 

Argnello, Luis. 

Arguello, Mariano. 

Avil6s & Co. 

Avil6i^, Mercedes. 

Bermudes, J. Ignaolo. 

C6sar Sc Chamorro. 

Chamorro, Fernando. 

Chamorro, B. &. F. 

Chamorro, Dionisio. 

Chamorro, Al^andro. 

Chamorro, Adela. 

Chamorro, Pedro J. 

Chamorro, Salvador & Co. 

Chamorro Se, Zavala. 

Cheanaj, Emilio. 

CoUado, Guillenno. 

Coronol, Mannel Antonio. 

Costigliolo, J. S. 

Cnadra, £. A. S. 

Cnadra 6 hUo#, Virginia de. 

Downing, A. A. 

Eaplnosa, Sebastian. 

Fialloa, Mariano. 

Gonaain, Hilarie. 

Lacayo, Fernando & Manuel 

Lacayo, Carlos A. 

Lacayo A Co., Manuel 



OBAVADA— Continned. 

Wholesale import and export meMhantt— Cont'd^ 
Lacayo &, Co., Boberto. 
Lacayo & hno.. Alfredo. 
Lacayo, Pastora V. de. 
Lacayo, Lisimaco F. 
Lacayo, Satumino. 
Laniiui & Co. 
Lugo, Alberto. 
Marenco, Constantino. 
Martinez, Bernardo. 
Martinex, Dr. J. J. 
Martines 6 h^os, Esmeralda de. 
Mejia h^o, Luis. 
Morales, Santiago. . 
Morales, Celedonio. 
Morales, Trtlnsito. 
Morales, Herculono. 
Morenoo, Federico. 
Oc6n, Trinidad. 
Paaos & Co., P. 
Quadra 6 h^os, V. de. 
Quadra 6 hnos., Manuel 
Quadra, Esequiel y Salvador. 
Quadra, Vicente. 
Bivas, Asuncidn P. 
Bocha it, Co. 

Rutishauser it, Co., Antonia 
Sequeira, Narciso. 
Selva, Hilario. 
Tefel, Teodoro. 
Ubago hnos. 
Vargas, Juan. 
Vargas, Jnstiniano. 
Vaughau hnos. 
Vela, Serapio. 
Vivas h^o, Rosario. 
Ximenez 6t, Co., Torres. 
Zavala, Joaquin. 
Zelaya ic Co., Victor. 

GBEYTOWV. 

Banki and bankert. 

Banco de Nicaragua. 

Hoadley, Ingalls & Co. 
Oommisnon merehante. 

Nicaragua Navigation and Trading Ca 

PeUas, J.A. 

Saens ic Co. 

Scott ic Co., C. D. 
MerehaiUe, general merehandUe, 

Bergmann, C. F. 

Cohen, S. 

D'Soosa ic Co., K L. 

Euriquez ie. Smith. 

Gosdensk, J. 

Hatch &, Brown. 



30 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



OBETTOWN — Continned. 

Merchants^ general tnerehandUs — Continued. 

Nicaragua Navigation and Trading Co. 

Saenz, L. E. 

Solomon & Harrin 
Wholesale import and export nurchanti. 

Bergmann, J. J. 

Hatch Sc Brown. 

Mongrio y Aragim. 

PeUas, F. A. 

Saenz &, Co. 

D'Sousa & Co., £. L. 

mOTEGA. 

Importere. 

Chavez & Kogaero. 

JINOTEGA. 

Importer. 

Cardenal, Cms. 

JINOTSFE. 

DruggUL 

Zdfiiga, L. 
Importers qf general merehandite, eacportert of hidee 
and coffee. 
Roman Sc Co., Jos6 Leon. 

JUIGALPA. 

Dniggiit. 

Gutierres, Eliseo. 
Retail general merekanL 

Baes, David. 

LEOK. 

Banks and bankere. 

Banco Agric^la MercantiL • 

Banco de Nicaragua. 

Aguero Coronado de Maria. 

Lacajo, Leonardo. 

Lacayo, Karciso A Cow 

Midence, Jnsto. 

Orosco, Espiridion. 

Perez, ManueL 
Boots and ahoee. 

AgUero, Federico. 

Bnstos, Antonio. 

Delgado, Cipriano. 

Gonzalez, Trinidad. 

Gr^alva, Tomis. 

liontalvan, Franoisoo. 

Salmer6n, Atanacio. 

Sequeiro, Alejandro. 

Soto y hno., KafaeL 

Zapata, Manuel. 
Oommiseion mereliants, 

AugHtln, John S. 

Fiallos, Mariano. 



LEOH — Coontinued. 

Druggists. 

Argiiello, David. 

Herdocia, Rodolfo F. 

Hospital, Botica deL 

Marin, BasiUo. 

Midenoe Sc Co., importers. 

Pallaia, Deaiderio. 

Telleria, TomAs. , 
Sngraver. 

Rodas, Rosendo. 
Foundries. 

Lindo, Paator. 

Osornp, Vicente. 

Rocha u h^o, Josefa. 
Hardware and tools. 

Ardila, Benito. 

Banegas, Gregorio. 

Calderon. Trinidad. 

Cisne, Leo])olda 

Leon, Lucinno. 

Mungua, Salvado. 
Hatters. 

Cartin,Lni8. 
* Sanabria. Angel. 

Santeli, Jos^. 

Sequeira, Bernardo. 

Toruno, Ramon. 
Hides and leatJter. 

BfUladare», Paula^ 

Baneto, DeHiderio. 

Escorc'ia, Sebaetian E. 

Granera, Fcli]>e. 

Gutierrez, Salvador. 

Mayorga, Coronado. 

Montalban, Venanoio. 

Ooepo, Vicente. 

Valle, Sinforoao. 
Paints and varnishes, 

Molina, DemetriO. 

Zapata, ManueL 
Photographers. 

Godoy, Manuel. 

Lazarenco, Al^andio. 

Perez, Roman. 

Sedilez, SamueL 

Printers. 

Gross, Constantine. 

Gurdian, J. CAstulo. 

Hernandez. Benito. 

Orue, Antonio. 

Ruiz, Joaquin. 
BetaU general merchants* 

Aleiiuln. P. E. 

Boquin, lYanclsca 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY Of CHNTRAL AMERICA. 



3' 



UBOH— Continued. 

JttlaU general m«rcAanto— Continued. 

Granera, Miguel 6. 

Gotierres, Camilo. 

Herdocia, Francisco L. dei 

Mayorga, Cleto. 

Saens, Jenson. 

Sarria,Jo8«. 

Torrea, Aurora. 
BOtemnitk: 

Argefial, Fhmciaca 

Qoifionex, Andr6a. 

Zamora, Joe^. 

Zapata, Gregorio. 
Special maw{faeturer». 

Bayle, Luis de, machinery. 

Ghesnay. dyes. 

Salgado, Carmen, oil. 
^TSMvare and house-fumiihing goodi. 

Breneo, Antonio. 

Bobelo, Sinfuriana. 

SoUs,NazaTio. 
WhoUmU import and export merehanit* 

AlTarado, Federioo. 

Alvarado h^o, Pedro J. 

Arana, Eleodoro. 

Argiiello & Prado. 

Balladares, F. and L. 

Balladares, ManueL 

Blume, Lotto. 

Boyes. P. R. 

Cardenal, Salvador. 

Chica, Ilamon. 
Eisensteick St Co., P. 
Dreyfus, Jorge. 
Florke Sc Co., Emilia 
Gntierres & Co., Marf n, S. B. 
Guerrero &. Montenegro. 
Hansen, B. 

Lacayo 6 h^os. Gabriel. 
Lacayo &, Co., N. 
Lacayo, Narciso. 
Mayorga, Fulgencla 
Marin. Goronado A. de. 
Morris, G. A. E. 
Montalvana, Y. 
Motter, Iloerck ScQo, 
Karas, Ticente^ 
P6res, Juan. 
Poten, Schubert & Ca 
Salinaa, Bafaei St Al^andra 
Beyes, Salvador. 
Boquin, Francisco. 
Sacaaa, Antiooo. 
Salamanca, Paulino. 
Sehneegans & Co., Federioa 
Saliiias Sc Co., Domingo. 



lEOK— Continued. 

Wholesale import and export moreJumts—CkaiVd. 
Salinas, Norberto. 
Sotohnos.,RafaeL 
Telleria, TomAs. 
Teran, Justo. 
Thomas, James. 

MAHAGUA. 
Banki and bankerg. 

Banco de Nicaragua. 

Uirchen y Ca. 

Rivas, Francisco Gomez. 
Bookeellere and atatumert. 

Barcenas, Joaquin. 

Mc^ia, J. 
Boott and ahoet. 

Contreras, J. 

Guerrero, FranciAOO. 

Kobleto, J. Angel. 

Bobleto, Narciso. 
Commietion merehanti, 

Campo, FranclHCO. 

Denegri, Remotti A. 

Navarro, Tibiircio. 

Olivares, Juan Flurencio. 

Olivares, Francisco). 

Silva, Silvestre. 

Soldrzano, Federico. 

Zavala, Luis. 
Druggist*. 

Bengoechon, J. C. 

Bravo. Jorge. 

Bustamaute, L. 

Cabrera, Rafael. 

Cardenas. AdHn. 

Gomez, Luciano. 

Groumeyer, P. 

Hedrano. Manro. 

Ramirez, Ger6nimo. 

Vega, Francinco. 

YeUisquez, Mdrcos E. 
Engraver. 

Montes de Oca, J. 
Bseportere coffee, hides, dye woods, sU, 

Arguello, P. P. 

Bengoechea, J. C. 

Bermudez, Salvador. 

Blume, Otto. 

Burlet, Pedro. 

Cardenas, Adan. 

Cliamorro & Co., Salvador. 

Elizondo &, Son, Joaquin. 

Frlxione, Daniel. 

Gomez, Luciano. 

Grpmneyer, & Co., P. 



32 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



MAHAOUA— Continued. 

Exporters coffee, hides, dye wood*, «te.— Continued. 
Guisto, Pablo. 
Hj'den & Co., Morris. 
Jericho, Guillermo. 
Lopez, Luis E. 
Martinez, Tomas. 
Mejia, Bemabe. 
Mejia & Marenco. 
Ortia, Pedro. 
Paez, Ignacio. 
Peter &. Co., Alberto. 
Saminez, Alberto. 
Raminez, Pedro R. 
Remotti, Alessandio. 
Rivas, R, A. 
Kivas, Rodolfo. 
Robleto, Jos6 A. 
Rodriquez, J. B. 
Saballos, HipoUto. 
Saenz & Co., Adan. 
Saenz, Ramon. 
Solorzano, Antonio. 
Solorzano, Carlos. 
Solorzano, Francisco. 
Subr, Adolfo. 

Grocers. 

Aranda, Teresa. 

Bone, Maria J. 

Diaz, Felipa. 

Fonseoa, Gabriela. 
Importen qf drugs and ckemiealg. 

Bengoechea, Sefior Don. 

Bravo, Dr. 

Ci^ina, aeto. 

Gomez, Luciano. 

Guerro, Benito. 

Guerro, Pastor. 

Lembke & Co., Gostaro 0. 

Mayorga, Jon6 Dolores. 

Murillo, Carlos A. 

Obando, Pablo J. 

Ortega, Luciano. 

Velasquez St Ca. 
ImporUn of general merehandit$, 

Blume St Co., Otto. 

Chamorro St Co., Salvador. 

Elizondo 6 H^o, Joaquin. 

Gaicia 6 H^o, Reroigio. 

Gronmeyer & Co., P. 

Hernandez, Zacarias. 

Hyden St Co., Morris. 

Jeriobo St Co., Guillermo. 

Low & Co., H. E. 

Martinez, Tomas. 

Mcjia, B. 

M^jia & Marenoo. 



MAHAOUA— Continned. 

Importers qf general merchandise — Continued. 

Nufiez, J. A. 

Ortiz St Co., Pedro. 

Peter St Co., A. 

Robleto St Co., Jostf A. 

Saenz, Adan. 

Schnegans St Co., Federioo. 
Photographer, 

Maritano, Fernando. 
Plantert qf coffee. 

Baneki, Julio. 

Bermudez, Francisco. 

Bermudez, Salvador. 

Cabrera, Rafael. 

Castrillo, Salvador. 

Cunrlra, Asuncion. 

Cnadra, Jofd dc la Paz. 

Chamon, Salvador. 

Garmendia, Lsabel. 

Friccione, Daniel. 

G6mez, Luciano. 

Lacayo, Fernando. 

Laoayo, Lisimaco. 

Lacayo, PAnfilo. 

Navas, Vicente. 

Portocarrero, BernabA. 

Portocarrero, Fernando. 

Saenz, Luis Sc Ramon. 

Savallos, Hipdlito. 

Soldrzano, Antonio. 

Sol6rzano, Ramon. 

Tritione, Daniel. 

Vega, Juan. 

Vigil, Vicente. 

Zelaya, Santos Frandsoo^ 
Printers. 

Arias, Juan P. 

Burgos, Guadalupe. 

Cantillo, Justo J. 

Garcia, Manuel M.. Pio M. T., F^lixy F. 

GronzAlez, B. 

Hemtodez, J. 

Silva, R. Ramon. 

Vargas, Concepcldn. 

Zelaya, F6lix P. 
Betail general merchants. 

B&rcenas, Joaquin. 

Calder6n, Manuel. 

C&rdenas, Adin. 

Ciiadra, J. de la Pas. 

Chamorro, Rodolfo. 

Chamorro, Salvador. 

Chamorro, Emilio. 

Che«nay» Emilio. 

Elisondo, Joaquin. 

Elisondo, Benjamin. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



33 



MAHAOUA— Cohtinned. 
Setail general m^rcAanU— Gontinaed. 

Espinoza, Migael. 

florke Emil. 

Gronmeyer, Pablo. 

Jansen, Carlon. 

Lacayo, LLaimaco. 

Low, Enrique. 

Martinex, Tom48. 

Morales, Francisca 

Poriocarrero, Fernando. 

Rivaa, Rafael A. 

Robleto, J. Angel. 

Saenz, XAAn. 

Siran, Jnan B. 

Wells, Dolores S. de. 
SUt«r»mith$. 

Silva, SUvestre. 

Soils, Bmno. 
yCatchmaken andjeweUn. 

BArcenas, Joaquin. 

Portngn6s, Juan J. 

Robleto, T. A. 
WkoUiale export and import merchantM» 

Adam, Jos^. 

Bahlike, Julio C. 
' BArcenas, Joaquin. 

Calderdn, hyo St Co., Manuel. 

Chamorro, Salyador. 

Cuandra, J. de la Paz. 

Estrada, Dionisio. 

Gabarrete, MAzimo. 

Gabarrete, Agapito. 

Ginsto, Pablo. 

Jansen, Carlos. 

Jericho Sc Co., Guillerma 

Lacayo, Lisimaco F. 

Larios, GUberta 

Low, H. £. 

Hacauley, D. Bernard. 

Morales, iYandsGO B. 

Murray, D. L. 

OrtlE & Co., Pedro. 

Peter Sl Co., Alberto. 

Robleto, Jo86 Angel. 

Saenz, AdAn. 

Sol6rzano, Z. Francisco, 
^rood mfreKanL 

Moreira, £. 

ICASATA. 

Boot» and thoee. 

Abannza, Jnsto. 
Commtttion merehanL 

Carrion, Fernando Z. 
21 8a 3 



KA8ATA— Continaed. 
I>ruggiit. 

ArgneUo, L. 
HxporUri, coffee^ hides, and dye voodt. 

Cardoze Bros., Iguatdns. 

Oquel, Luis. 

Ortega, Luis. 

Pimentel, Gil. 

Ramirez, Mercedes. 

Rosalez, Claudio. 

Ximenes Bros., P. 

Zelaya, Benito. 

Importert of drugt and chemicals. 
Baca, Jos^ A. 
Bolafios, Alejandro. 
Cesar, Julio. 
Ruis, Pedro J. 
Seqnelra, Anselmo. 
Wasner, Francisco. 

Importers cf general merehandiss. 
Arceyut, P. Joaquin. 
Abaunza, Bei^jamiu. 
Brenes, Fernando. 
Carrion, Al^andro. 
Carrion, Fernando Z. 
Castrillo, Petrona. 
Lopez, Bias. 
Luna, Audato. 
Martinez & Co., Dolores. 
Hariinez. Maria de J. 
NuSez, Carmen. 
Prado, Jacobo. 
Solorzano, Enrique. 
Zuniga, Francisco. 

Wholesale import and escort merchants, 
Cardoza hnos., J. 
Lacayo, Mariano. 
Martinez, TomAs. 
Cesar, Octaviano. 
Climie, Wm. 
Nufiez, Filadelfo. 
Nufiez, J. A. 
Oreamnno & C6sar. 
Pimentel, Gil. 
Resales, Leandro. 
So16rzano, CArlos. 
Soldrzano, Federico. 
Vega, Antonio. 
Zurita, Rafael. 

MATAGALPA. 

Druggist. 

Alanis, L. 
Importer. 

Chavez St h^o, IgnacJo. 



34 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



MOMOTOMBO. 

Merchant and manv/aeturcr. 
Arguello Sc Ck>., Penalva. 

OOOTAL. 

Boott and thoei. 

Gutierrez, ManueL 

Morazte, Juan. 
Retail general merchanti. 

Pagiiaga, Jos6 Maria^ 

Irias, Benito. 

Calder6n, Francisco. 
Bilvertmiih. 

Villacorta, Juan V. 
Wholetale merehant and importsr, 

Loro, Pastor. 

POTOSI. 

Retail general merchant; 
Abarca, Apolinar. 
Lemus, Jos6. 

REALEJO. 

Merchante. 

Brennes, Pedro. 

Garcia & Deshon. 

Montealegre, M. 

Monterey & Co. 

Xavarro, Pantale6n. 

Thompson. 

Van Muller & Co. 

BIO GRANBE. 

WhoUidU import and export merchanti. 
Pictora, Alcine. 
Smith, Enrique. 

BIVA8. 

Banker. 

Maliafio 6 h^os, Maria V. de. 
Boot* and thoet. 

Galarza, Leandro. 

Hurtado, Ger6nimo. 

L6peK, Satiumino. 
Druggists. 

Barrioft, M. J. 

Flint, Earl. 

Maliafio, Donoso. 

YeUsquez, Zacarias. 
Oroeen. 

Carmona, Juana. 

Leiva, Mercedes. 

Pineda, Josepha. 

Sandino, Pantaleona. 

Talavcra, Modesta Ana. 



BIVAfr— Continued. 

Importers of drugs and chemicals. 

Canton &. Guerra. 

Central Botica. 
RetaU general merchants. 

Agiiilar, Manuel A. 

Bendafia, Josd. 

Chamorro, Marquezo. 

Gallegos, Filadelfo. 

Guerra, Leonidas. 

Llancs, Elias. 

Martinez, Francisco. 
Silversmiths. 

Ferrer, Joaquin. 

Bios, Tgnacio. 

Abaunza, Pastor. 

Alvarez, Lino. 
Watchmaker and jeweler. 

Serra, Juan B. 
THiolesale import and export merchants. 

Carazo, Manuel A. 

Fuentes, Virginia Torres de. 

Goodman, H. 

Jimenez & Co., Torres. . 

L6pez & Maliafio. 

Maliafio 6 hijos, Maria D.de. 

Maliafio, Dr. Donoso. 

Martinez, Nemesio y Luis. 

PadiUa, Francisco. 

Sacasa, Simona H. de. 

TJrouyo, Vicente. 

Urcuyo, Macario. 

SAN JOBOE. 

Importer. 

Marin, Felipe. 

Retail general merchant 
Arcia, Juan C. 

SAN JUAN BEL SUB. 

Commission merchatits. 

Chrisman, C. A. R. 

Murray, D. L. 

Sacasa, Daniel. 
Wholesale import and export merchants. 

Hofftnan, Ferdinand. 

Holman, Carlos. 

Pizzi & Co., Carlos. 

TIPITAPA. 

Commission merehant. 
Chamorro, Damaso. 



Republic of Salvador. 



ACAJUTLA. 

InpoTtert. 

Compafiia de Agencias. 

Mitchel, W. J. 
MerdianU. 

Compafiia General del Paoifioo. 

Blanco & Tiigaeros. 

Caraxo &. Ramirez. 

Dorantes & OJeda. 

Compafiia del Mnelle, Brevon Sl Co. 

Gomar, Joaquin. 

Helendez, Mannel. 

M^ia, £ncamaci6n. 

Peralta, Joe6 Maria. 

Parraza Sc Prado. 

Rnano, Emeterio. 

Talle Sc Co., Andrto. 

ahuachapAk. 

Booti and shoes. 

Gonzalez, Margarito. 

Garrido, Isidro. 
I>rugffigt». 

Carballo, Valentin. 

Magafia, Sime6n. 
Oroeen. 

Alfaro, Margarlto. 

ChaA-ez y hno., Claudiai 

DuT^n, ILnisa G. de. 

FloreM, Andrea. 

Gnerra, Dlonisio. 

Goerra, Virginia. 

Linares, J. 

Kelgar, Sulalia. 

Mendoza^ Rafaela. 

Somero, Mercedes. 

BatUrs. 

Garcia, Estanlslao. 

Velarde, Federico. 
RHaU general merchantt. 

Airiaze, Dolores. 

Gadenas, Eosebia 



AHUACHAPAN— Continned. 

Retail general m«reAanto— Continued. 

Contreras, Romualdo. 

Gr6mez, Juana. 

Gaerra, Maria. 

Herrera, Nicanor. 

Henrera, Isabel. 

Llanos, Mariana M. de. 

Mena, Leonor M. de. 

Moscoso, Lnisa. 

Bivas, Mercedes. 

Vasquez, Aparicio. 
SUver»mith». 

Cai^ara, J. 

Duarte, Onofire. 
Wholesale import and export merchants, 
. Durin, Onofre. 

Mordn, Fabio & Co. 

Miiller, Federico. 

Samayoa, Ana. 

Valdivieso, Samnel. 

AHAMOB68. 

Merchant. 

Zepeda, Felipe. 

ABMENIA. 

Qrocsr. . 

Eomillo, Jos^. 
Retail general msrohants, 

Garcia, David. 

Molina, Arcadia. 
^ Torres, Jaan. 
WhoUtaU import and export merchant 

Mayer, Zeferino. 

CHALATENANGO. 

Boots and shott. 
Cort68, Claro. 
Torres, Lorenzo. 



35 



36 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



CHALATENAHGO— Continued. 

Druggittt. 

Garcia, Jo86 J. 

Morales, Jos6 Maria. 

Pefia, Miguel. 

Tobias, ImnaeL 
Grocer. 

Ortiz, Balbina. 
SilvfrtmUha. 

Bairerra, Modesto. 

Obando, Esteban. 
Whole§ale import and export nurehant 

Alvergue, Fernando. 

CHALCE1TAPA. 

Boott and thoeM. 

LdpeK, Manuel. 

Xovoa, Albino. 

Pineda, Jo86 P. 
Photographer. 

Baxter, Enrique. 
Retail general merehantt. 

Ahivja hnos. 

GoetBchull, Solom6n. 

Hidalgo, Cruz. 

Lizamdde, Eduardo de. 

Martino. Jos6 Maria. 

Pefiate, Eleodoro. 

Trcjo, Francisco. 

OOATEFEQUE. 

Boots and ihoet. 

CienfuegoH, Petronilo. 
Grocers. 

Arbizd, Pilar. 

Cardoua, Mercedes. 

Cardona, Paula. 

Castrillo, Eleodoro. 

Cienfuegos, Adelaida. 

Delgado, Sofia. 

Men6ndez, Soooro. 

Ruano, Anastacio 
Retail general merchant. 

Barrientos, Balbino. 

COJTJTEFEQTJE. 

Banlcer. 

Diaz, l^arciso. 
Druggists. 

Castellanos, Crescencio. 

Escobar, Camilo. 

Palma, Apblonio. 

Revelo, Joaquin. 

Grocers. 

Auiaya, Maxima 
CAceres, Adela. 



OOJ UTJ£F£Q1JE— Con tinned. 

6^roear«— Continued. 

Diaz, Joaefa. 

Diaz, Sara. 

Figueroa, Josefa Antonia. 

Ingl6s, Mercedes. 

Mineros, Lngarda. 

Mufioz, Josefa. 
HatUrs. 

Anzueta, Anton. 

Hemindez, Salvador. 

Martinez, Esteban. 

Pleit6s, Esteban. 
SUversmithi. 

Malt6z, Jos6 Maria. 

Obando, Carlos. 
Watehmaher andjewHer. 

Castellanos, Alberto. 
Wholesale import and export merchants. 

Amaya, Miximo. 

BazAn. Albino. 

Bustamante, Guadalupe. 

Contreras, Juan. 

Diaz, Narciso. 

Nulla, Ventura. 

Vila Sc Sigtienza. 

OOlCAflAGnA (La libertad). 

Mant^faedirer cf coffee maehinsry, 
Komer, Felipe. 

BOLOBES (Cabafias). 



Boots and shoes, 
Colocho, Pedro. 



GOTERA. 

Druggist. 

Rovelo, Norberto. 
Grocers. 

Cruz, Amelia. 

66mez, Esteban. 

Mendoza, Lazaro. 

Molina, Anita. 

Rosa, Francisco. 

Rosa, Paz. 

Bomera, Leandra. 

GUATABAL 

Wholesale import and export merchant 
Panamefio, Eusebio. 



IL0BA800. 



Boots and shoes. 
Rodas, Juan. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



37 



ILOBABOO— Continaed. 

CMtellanos, Ram6n. 
EleoA, Siiue6n H. 
Portillo, Dolores. 
RttaU general mercKantt. 
Barbdn, Jo«6 G. 
Cboto, Ba&el. 
Cordova, Francisco. 
Gont&lez, Margarito. 
Ldpes, Manuel. 
Orellana, Encamacidn. 
Pefia, Joa6 Maria. 
Somero, Ana I. 

^heritnith. 

Alvarenga, Daniel. 
WhoUmU import and export merehant 

Bosas, Leandro. 

IZALOO. 

Boott and thoes, 

Herrera, Victor. 
Druggitt. 

Li6vaao, Jos6 Maria. 

Alvarez, Rosa. 
Men6ndez, Lauriano. 
Ramos, Juana. 

Retail general merchants, 

Barrientos y hermano, TrAnsito. 

Craik, Mercedes de. 

Ramos y hermano, Josefa. 

Vega, Joaqnina. 
WkoUsdU import and export merehant, 

VeUsqnez, Felipe. 

JATAQUE. 

Man%faeturer itf coffee machinery. 
Mel6ndez, Mannela. 

JAGfUAFA. 

Banker. 

DnrAn, Macedonio. 
Boota and ehoet. 

Castillo, ManneL 

Cms, Manuel. 

CnuE, Gnillermo. 

Monica, Teodosio. 

Rosalea, Pedro. 
CommisHon merehantt, 

Dorlln, Macedonio. 

Escobar, Tiberio. 
I>ntggieL 

Burgos, RaiaeL 



JAGfUAPA— Continued. 



Oroeere. 

Castillo, Margarita de. 

Castillo, Ramona. 

Jurado, Angela. 

Sandoval, Nloolasa. 
Betail general m>erehanti. 

Arawjo, Maria. 

Bantista, Maria de. 

Castro, Jos6 Maria. 

Galvez, In6A. 

Gutierrez, Josefa. 

Gutierrez. Carlos. 

Gutierrez, ManneL 

Mora, Miguel. 

Montoya, Mercedes. 

Rosales, Daniiana. 
Silveremith. 

Orantes, MAximo. 

LA IIBEBTAD. 

Chmmiition msrehant. 

Blanco, Trigneros. 
Druggieti. 

Marcenaro, NiooUs. 

Veils, Felipe J. de. 
Oroeert. 

Calder6n, C. 

Gnzmdn, Eloisa G. de. 

Prieto, Gcrtrudio. 
Hatter. 

Torres, Gregorio. 
Wholeaale import and export merehantt. 

Couriade, Emilio. 

Flamenco, Maria. 

Marcenaro, NicoULs. 

Huezo, Vicente. 

Vargas bnos., Diego. 

LATJVI6H. 

Boote and ahoee. 

Palada, E. Gutierrez. 

Ramirez, Benito. 
Commiation merchant. 

Marcenaro & Co., Juan Bantista. 

Orocera. 

Andino, Leonarda P. de. 
Courtade, Carmen P. de. 
Huezo, Santos P. de. 
Huezo, Mercetles. 
L6pez, Salvador. 
Perry, Elena. 
Rosales, J. G. de. 
Zaldivar, HortenMia P. de^ 



3« 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



LA TJinOir— Continued. 
Mant^faeturert of tortoite-theU good*. 

Amaya, Ignacio. 

Echeverria, AbeL 

L6pez, IK>lore8. 

Sanchez, Federico. 
Retail general merehants, 

Haezo, Gregorio. 

PadiUa, Isabel Y. de. 

Salazar, Manuela. 

Sosa, Bosa T. de. 
Silvertmith, 

Garcia, Salvador. 
Wholegale import and export merchantt. 

Marcenars &. Co., J. B. 

Padilla, Eetnigio. 

Rodriguez, Pablo. 

Vicente y Ca. 

Vila, Francisco. 

MEIAPAK. 

Chroeert. 

Aguilar, J. 

Castro, Domingo. 

Daarte, Paulina do. 

Hemdndez, Bibiano. 

Leiva, Jos6. 

Lemus, Manuel. 

Montoya, Felipe. 

Kuiz, Juan. 
Retail general merchants, 

Quintana, RafaeL 
Wholeictle import and escort merehantt. 

Lima hermanos. 

Sosa, Bonifacio. 

NEJAPA. 

Manufacturer €f coffee maehinery. 
Andrade, Mannel: 

OLOCUILTA. 

Wholeeale import and export merchant 
Gonzalez, Ootavio. 

QT7EZALTEPEQUE. 

Grocen. 

Boijas, Estebaaa. 

Castro, Benigna de. 

C4cereB, Santos C. de. 
Batter. 

Urrutia, Salvador. 
Manufacturer. 

Cort^z y hno.. Cornelia 



8. jnUAir (Bomonate). 

Merchant 

Romero, Victor. 

SAK AHDBiS. 

WhoUtale impoH and export merchant. 
Mufioz, Ednardo. 

SAH MIGUEL 

Banker. 

Padilla, Remigio. 
Boote and thoee. 

Axias, Juan. 

Bastillo8,Jo8£< Maria. 

Colindres, Vicente. 

Lara, Juan. 

Mayorga, Guillermo. 

Morales, David. 
Druggiett. 

Cano, J. 

Celari6, Jos6 Mario. 

Uoltmeyer bnos. 

Hegg, Manuel. 

Meardi, Mauricio. 

Mufioz, Brigido. 

Rosales, Enrique II. 
Oroeeri. 

Aguirre, Felipa. 

Araya, Ana Josefa. 

Avila, Anita B. de. 

Balmaceda, Miguel. 

Barreyro, Isabel de. 

Bado, Mauricia de. 

Cabrera, Sefiorita. 

Femdndez, Adela. 

Flores, Agimlin. 

Gnzm&n, Virginia. 

Heirera, Pastor. 

Hemtodez, Dolores B. de. 

HemAndez, Maximo. 

Mena, Sim6n. 

Medina, AjMlonio. 

Molina, Victoria. 

Morales, David. 

Peraza, Josefa. 

Reyes, Beatriz. 

Rosales, Mercedes P. do. 

Suay, Cipriano. 

SuArez, Francisco. 

Valenznela, Ercilia F. de. 

Battert. 

Abendano, Ram6n. 
Aguado, Jos6 Maria. 
Cariaa, Baltazar. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



39 



SAir MIOUEIr— Continued. 

IlatUrs— Continued. 

Lopez, Gregorio. 

Reyes, Esteban. 
Photographeri. 

Gnerrero, Vicente. 

Hena, Baxnon. 

Sol, Eloy. 
Printers. 

Ariafl, Timoteo. 

Herrera, Pedro P. y Rito. 

Imprenta del Instiiiito de Occidente. 
Retail genial merehantg. 

Alvarez, Francisco B. 

Avila, Carmen. 

Coadra, Carmen R. de. 

Diaz, Antonio. 

IMnarte, Sime<yn J. de. 

G6mes, Dolores. 

Hemilndez, Carlos. 

Lastra, Ram6n. 

Meardi, Mauricio. 

Eosales, Enrique B. 

Schonenberg, Juan. 

V jfierta, Joeefa G. de. 

Zelaya, Ledn. 
SOvertmUhM. 

Anduray, Anreliana 

Avila, Daniel. 

Osorio, Modesto. 

Roeales, Manael. 

Salmerdn, Gregorio. 

Salmer6ii, AgnHtin. 

Tebes, Tam&a. 

Vargas, Leonidas. 
Special numvfaeturert. 

Gdmez, C6sar, tortoise-shell goods. 
Paz, Martin, tortoise-shell goods. 
Paz, Santos, tortoise-shell goods. 
Haezo, Ireneo M. de, tortoise-shell goods. 
Rosales &, Alvares, mineral waters. 
Whole§aJe import and escport merchants. 
Alvarez, Francisco V. 
ArgiieUo, Jos6. 
Argiiello, Bam6n. 
ArgiieUo, Marcelino. 
Briqueto y Charlaix. 
Canesaa, Antonio &. Co. 
Caneaaa, Cayetano. 
Caneeaa y Ca., Ambrosio. 
Calvo, Manael. 
Dardano, Pedro. 
Demutti, Antonio. 
Dlaa, Antonio. 
Femibidez, Antonio J. 
Haltmeyer, Emilio. 



SAN MIGUEL— Continued. 



Wholesale import and export m>erehants—CoiiVd. 
Hnngentobler St, Haltmeyer. 
Mazzini, Miguel. 
Mirino & Manent. 
Mendoza, Anselmo. 
Mendoza, Jacinto. 
Miardi 6c De Mutti. 
Mufioz & Co., B. 
MuHoz, Brigido. 
Padilla, Remigio. 
Palacios & Co., Francisco. 
PohU, Alfonso. 
Prieto, Carlos G. 
Quiros hermanos. 
Rivera, Ruano. 
Romero, Carmen. 
Schdneuberg, Jium. 
Suay, Cipriano. 
Vila & Vila. 

SAir AALVADOB. 

Banks and hankers. 

Banco Intemacional. 

Banco OccidentaL 

Banco Particular. 

Blanco & Trigueros. 

Blanco y Lozano. 

Duke^hUo, J.M. 

Lagos, MigueU 

Lagos, Pilar. 

Rosales, Jos6. 
Booksellers and stationers. 

Cousin, Ansebno. 

Anguelo, M. 

Goubaud, Emilio. 

Herrera & Co., ManneL 

Mathias hnos. 

Pozo &, Gutierrez. 

Prado & Co., Federico. 

Rivera, Desiderio. 
Boots and shoes. 

Agnilar y Serrano. 

Cirino, Morales. 

Sagrera y Ca., Jos6. 

Preto hnos. y Ca. 
Dniggists. 

Aranjo &. Co. 

Araivjo &. Bustaniente. 

Avalos, F.Pablo. 

C&ceres &, Vaquero. 

Li6vano, Juan. 

Luna, David. 

Niebecker, Otto von. 

Pidomo &, Co., M. 

Rivera, Carlos. 

Rivera hermanos. 



40 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



SAH BALVASOBn-Contiuued. 

GroeerM. 

Agailar, Jcmefa. 

Alfaro, Diego. 

Ar6valo, Ana«tacia. 

Castellaoos, Dolores. 

Cisneros, Mannela. 

Monterroso. Regina. 

Palacios, Mogflalena. 

Palacios, Asuncidn. 

Pena, Emilia. 

Quijano, Jaci^nta. 

Quitefio, Mercedes. 

Kamos, Anita. 

Keales, Kamona. 

Serrano, Bemab6. 

Valencia, Francisca. 

Vega, Leocadia. 
ffardicare, ctUlery, and todlt, 

Angnilar, Francisco. 

Kalette, Sullo. 

Anbuisson j Ca., D. 

Dorautea y OJeda. 
HatUrt. 

Avila, Clemente. 

Blanco, MigueL , 

BonUla, Luis. 

Moreno, Rafael. 

Molina, Domingo. 

Murillo, EHas. 

Ruiz & Co., J. M. 

Ruiz, Luis A. 
Lithographer. 

Guevara, Te6dnlo. 
Photographen. 

Imerj- hermaoo^. 

Somelian, AgiiMtin. 
rianten, general. 

Aguilar, Manuel. 

Alvarez, Kmiliu. 

Boguen, l-YaiiclHOO. 

Borgia, Bustainento. 

Ce«lier, A. 

D^rdano, Felix. 

DorantoH y Ojedo. 

Lozano, Cruz. 

Ruano, Emetrio S. 

XJUoa, Cruz. 

Zaldivar, Rafael. 
Printing officen. 

Grande, Pedro. 

Imprenta del Cumercio. 

Imprenta de la Juveutad. 

Imprenta Nacional. 

Mir6n, Francisco y Alejandro. 

Vaquero, I^Yancisco. • 



SAH BALVASOBr-^^ontiuucd. 

BUrertmitht. 

Camacho, Leoncio. 
Campos, Harcelino. 
Cami>08, Gregorio. 
Campos, Cre«cencio. 
Cruz, NicolAs. 
Flamenco, Joaquin. 
Garcia, Vicente. 
Platero, Fernando. 
Rivas, Anastacio D. 
Sanchez, Carmen. 
Sol6rzano, Justo. 
YillarAn, Manuel. 
Zamora, Rafael. 

Special mannfaetureri. 

Ellis, Benito, phosphorus. 

Gdngora & Co., Manuel, phosphoros. 

Ereitz, Teodora, coffee machinery. 
Special merehantt. 

Arrazola, Concepci6n, woods. 

Carrera, Pablo, woo<ls. 

Cousin, Anselmo, church ornaments. 

Cuon, Vallon, silks. 

De Ledn, Venancio, woods. 

G^ez, Cecilio, woods. 

Soils, Francisco, woods. 

Tonfo-Cfa6n, silks. 

Tan-Hlnlon, silks. 
Watehmakert and jeicelerg, 

Cilsati, Carlos B. 

Dreyfus & Cohen. 

Escamilla. Manuel. 

Escamilla, Rumulo. 

Glasser & Co., Marcus. 

Imeri, Karciso. 
Wholewle import and export merehantM, 

Aguilar, J. F. 

Alvarez, Emilio. 

Ambrogi, Constantino. 

Arrazola, M. 

Balette & Goens. 

Blanco y Trigueros. 

Blanco d: Lozano. 

Bloom, Baruch 8c Co. 

Bontneau, A. 

Bousquet, Pablo. 

Bustamante y hermano, Mariano. 

Castro, Emigdio. 

Cohen & Dreyfus. 

Conrtade, Emilio. 

Cousin, Anselmo. 

Cronmeyer, A. 

D'Aubuisson, G. 

D'AnbuiHson, Carlos. 

Durtour, Jorge. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



41 



f 



BAH SALYASOB— Continued. 
WkoUtdle import and expoH mercfccnto— Cont'd. 
Dominguez y hermano, D. 
Ponmtes & Ojeda. 
Dnke Sc Son. J. Mauricio. 
Ellis h^o & Co. 
Glaser, C. & M. 
Gonbaud, £. 
GonjUilez, J086 Antonio. 
Gonzalez y Ca., J. O. 
Haaa Sc Co., B. , 

Hoephl, O. 
LagOB A. faernianos. 
Levy, G. 
Madrid & Co., B. 
Manning, Moffatt St Co. 
Mata, Juan. 
M^ia, Escobar & Co. 
Melendez, Carloa. 
Melendez y Perez. 
Mena, Edoardo. 
Mendoza, Dioniaio. 
Merlos, Dionisio. 
Moffatt & Blair. 
Moffat, John. 
Niebecker, A. 
Faloma & Co., M. 
Pawaki, L-W. 
Perez, P&rraga & Co. 
Prado & Co., F. 
Peralta, Antonio. 
Perez. Alonzo. 
Prieto hermanos. 
Bevelo, A. J. 
Rivera berroanos. 
KivaH & Soior. 
Rniz 6c Co., J. ManaeL 
Sagrera herinanos. 
Salinas, Alberto. 
Salazar, Emeterio. 
Selva, Julian. 
Serrano, Pedro. 
Schonenberg, Koberto. 
Soundy, A. I. 
Tunatall, Thomaa T. 
Ungo, M. 
TAdice & Co. 
Zaldivar, £. 
Zaldivar, Mariano. 

SAN Vm CENT. 

SooU and shoes. 

Barrera, Jose Maria. 

Guerrero, Matias. 

Ldpes, J. ManueL 
DrvgffUtM. 

Amaya., Kioolfta. 



BAN VINCENT— Continued. 

I>ru47^ri«te— Continued . 

G&lvez, Vicente. 

Miranda, Lnia. 
Retail general merehantt. 

LagOB, Manuela. 

Mcgia, Leona. 

Mineros, SebastlAn. 

Bamirez, Vicente. 

Bevelo, Abelina. 

Samayoa, Vicente. 

Valencia, Ignacia. 
SilversmUhs. 

Pinol, Bodrigo. 

Pino, Jos6. 

Saragoza, Antonio. 

Salinas, Ciriaco. 

Sosa, Manuel. 
Watehmaker and jeweler. 

Miranda, Gnadalupe. 
Wholesale import and export merchants. 

Angulo, KiooUs. 

Carranza, Camilo. 

Figneroa, Josefa. 

G&lvez, Vicente. 

Miranda, Octavio. 

SANTA ANA. 

Banker. 

Alvarez, Francisco. 
Boots and ehoes. 

Aguirre, Jos^. 

Calder6n, Esteban. 

Erazo, Sinidn. 

Francisco, Antonio. 

Rivas, Carlos. 

Rosales, Salvador. 

Sanabria, Ram6n. 

Taboada, Jos6. 
Commiseion merchant 

Alstcbul, Eniilio. 

Dnigffists. 

Carballo, Miguel. 

Guillen, FranciKCO. 

Haecker, Francisco E. 

Interiano, Julio. 

Lara, Manuel L. 

Rodriguez, AnaMtacio. 

Trabanino, Tadeo. 

Vides, J086 Maria. 
Engraven. 

Agnilar, Lario. 

Alfaro, Kosalio. 

Lecree, Andr6s. 

Boca, Antonio B. 



42 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



SANTA AKA— Continued. 
HatUrt. 

Dur&n, Asuncito. 

Morales, Maximo. 

Torre, Juan V. de la. 
Photographert. 

Guerrero. Salvador. 

Becinos, Abel. 

Shevliu, Santiago. 
Printing office. 

Mart6nez, Alberto. 
Watchmaker and jeweler. 

Guerrero, Salvador. 
Wholesale import and eoBport merchanta. 

Aepli & Gross. 

Agacio, A. B. 

Agacio, Antonio. 

AltAchul, Emilio. 

Alvarez de Tiscara, Maria. 

Alvarez hermanos. 

Argeta, V. 

Augsburg, A. W. 

Belisinelis, £. 

Berkfeld & Rhode. 

Bloom, Baruch & Co. 

Carazo y Ramirez. 

Casanova, Eduardo. 

Casin, M. 

Cichero, Sebastian. 

Cienfuegos, Elias. 

Cohen & Dreyfus. 

I»elllpiane &. Daglio. 

Dfaz, Santiago. 

Escobar, Jo86. 

Garma, L. 

Goldtree, Liebes k. Ca 

Haas &. Co., B. 

Libert! & Co., Angel. 

Maten, P. 

Mathies & Co., C. G. 

Mathen, P. 

Matheu hermanos. 

Martinez & Co., Jos6 Maiia. 

Martinez, Macario. 

Menas E. 

Mtodez, Alberto. 

Montalvo, ManueL 

Pirraga, Manuel A. 

Pena y Ca., Francisco. 

Rodriguez, Brigido. 

Rodriguez, Isidoro. 

Rodriguez, J. & S. 

Sichero, S. 

Subia, Daniel. 

Valle, Andres. 

Yalle, Jos6. 



SANTA ELENA (Usnlatibi). 
Engraver. 

Munguia, Saturnine. 

SANTA TECLA. 

BootM and thoei. 

Barahona, TomiLa. 

Goto, Mariano. 

M^ndez, Leoncio. 

Merino, Francisco. 
I>niggia9. 

Nufiez, J. F. 

Sol, Manuel. 

T^erino, Kicoliis. 
Engraver. 

Hernandez, DanieL 
Founder. 

Luner, Valeria. 
Grocert. 

L6pez, Bernardino. 

Melendez, Adela de. 

Olivares, Ignacia de. 

Olivares, Dolores. 

UUoa, Adela de. 

Villaltayhno., S. 
Retail ^ercU merehantt, 

Ambrosio, Evaxisto. 

Angulo, Roman. 

Arrieta, Reyes. 

Garcia, Asnnsidn. 

Molina, Ismael G. 

Molina, Jos6 G. 

Rugama, Elias. 
Silvertmitht. 

Burgos, Miguel. 

Gonz&lez, Andres. 
Special manvfacturert. 

Alcaine, Matias, machinery. 

Fernandez, Jos6 Maria, machinery. 

Flamenco, Rufino^ rubber stamps. 

Mason, James, machinery. 

OreUana, Pablo, machinery. 

Ulloa, Cruz, machineiy. 

Wholeeale import and export merchants. 
Gonz&lez, Jos6. 
Lemus & Sanchez. 
Mason, Phillips & Co. 
Mel6ndez, Manuel. 
Orozco, Benito. 
Rivas, Tomis. 
Soto, Enrique. 

SANTIAGO DE MAAfA (Uinliitfii). 
Merchant 
Flores, J. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 



43 



SEKSmrTEPEQUE. 

Boots and thoet. 

Ayala, Patricio. 

Blanco, CiprianOb 

CYaz, Marcos. 

Faentes, Carloe. 

Henriquez, Pedro. 

Lara. Fernando. 

Lacayo, Samuel. 

Navarrete, MAximo. 

Bivaa, Henndgenes, 

Romero, Jacinto. 
DmggisU. 

]>aw8on, Job6. 

Hernandez, Joaquin. 

Novoa, Serafin. 

Yelaaco, Dioniaiow 
Engraver. 

Peralta, David. 
Qro^ert. 

Amaya, Gregorio. 

Ayala, J. 

Ayala, Margarita. 

Echeverrfa, Plo. 

Echevenia, Job6 Maii^ 

Ircheia, Victor. 

L6pez, Nicolaaa. 

M^ndez, Mignel. 

Novoa, Adolfo. 

Parra, Gertradia. 

Parra Moreno, Jo86 D. 

P6rez, Bami&n. 

Rodrigaez, Seraflo. 

HaUert. 

Albayero, Agapito. 

Femilndez, Bernardo. 

Sanchez, Enst^uio. 
Photographert, 

Letona hennuioe. 
JUtaU general merdiantt. 

Bonilla, Martina. 

Castro, Pascnal. 

Hemindez, Eater. 

Hem&ndez, C6fora. 

Lacayo, Jnato. 

Lacayo, Rosa. 

Mayorga, Dolores. 

Parra, Gertmdis. 

SUveremitk, 

HemAndez, Daniel. 
WhoUeaU import and expoH merehanL 

Hem4ndez, Joaquin. 



SONSOlfATE. 

Boots and shoes. 

Alpinez, Eusebio. ^ 

BeltrAn. Manuel. 

Choto, Daniel. 

Montes, MArcelino. 
Druggists. 

Garcia, Francisco A. 

Lievano, Ciriaco. 

Rivera, Abraham. 
Engravers. 

Castaneda, Mariano. 

Castaneda, Jos6 Maria. 

Qroeers. 

Calder6n. Maria. 

Cea, Carlos. 

Cea, Petrona. 
Printing office. 

Vel&squez, Jos6 Maria. 

Retail general merchants. 

Calderdn. Maria. 

Mencia, Yictoriano. 

Rodriguez, Jacoba. 

Yega, Ambrosio de la. 
Wholesale import and export merehcnU, 

Agacio, Antonio B. 

Ahnja St, hermanos. 

Casin, M. 

Cea, Francisco Orantes. 

Claude, A. 

Dardano, Guillermo. 

Demorro, Rafael. 

Montis, Rafael. 

Ramagoza 6 h^Jo. 

Ruiz & Co., J. & M. 

Rivero hermanos. 

Rodriguez, Isidoro. 

Sosa, Martin F. 

Soria, Juan. 

Spies ic Miiller. 

Yega, Ambrosio de la. 

Yilanova, Y. 

SUCHITOTO. 

Boots and shoes. 

Bonillo, Bartolo. 

Durtin, Le6n. 

Padilla, RafaeL 

Umafia, Ram6n. 
jyruggist. 

Martel, Jos6 Maria Pelia. 



44 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF. CENTRAL AMERICA. 



SUGHITOia— Continued. 

Qrooert. 

Aguirre, ^lores P. de. 

Martel, Ger^nima A. de. 

Pefia, JnanaM. de. 
HaU&rs. 

Pefia, Ignacio. 

Rivera, Ruperto. 
Photoffrapher, 

Soldnano, GaiUermo. 
RetaU general merehants. 

Araqjo, Gerardo. 

Arrasola, Mercedes T. do. 

Prieto, Carlos. 

Vaquero, Niool&s. 
JS&vertmith. 

Ramos, Kemesio. 
WholeitUe import and export merehanti. 

Aguilar, Francisco. 

Vaquero, Kicol43. 

TECOFA. 

OeneraX merehanL 
Bautista, Clara. 

TSOTEFEQUE. 

OenenU merchant. 

Cienfuegos, Ceferino. 
WhoUtaU import and export merehantt. 

Corleto, Jos6 Antonio. 

TONACOTEFBaUE. 

Boot* and Mhoea. 

MArmol, Dolores. 
I>rvggi9t. 

Bennett, Francisco. 
Orain merchant. 

Cort6z, Joaquin. 
Grocers. 

Calder6n, Santos. 

Estrada, Refugio de. 
Jlianvfacturert qf drum*. 

Gonzalez e h^os, MiuiueL 



Boot* and *hoet. 

Avalos, Alejandro. 

Sanches, Pio. 
DruggicU 

G6me£, Felipe. 
MetaU general merchant*. 

Angulo, Rita de. 

Aparicio, Josefa. 

Chavez, J. de. 

Civallero, Luis. 

Goto, Ramona. 

Flores y hermanos, Anita. 

Ochoa & Co., Rosa. 

Penado, Guadalupe. 

Rosales, Marcelina de. 
SHveremith. 

Fiines, Tenancio. 
WJuile*ale import and export m^chanU 

Mungula, Ricardo. 

ZACATECOLUCA. 

Boot* and *hoe*. 

Zaldafia, Rodolfo. 

DruggiMt*. 

Carrillo, ManuoL 

Carrillo, Rafael. 

Rodriguez, J. 

Rodriguez, Adrian. 
Retail general merchant*, 

Molino, Francisco. 

Molino, Mariana A. 

Rodriguez, J. 

Rodriguez, Adrian. 

Villacorta, Seraiina. 
Siloergmith*. 

Mena, Gerdnimo. 

Yillagrdn, Mariano. 

ZARAGOZA. 

Wholesale import and export merchant. 
P6rez, Alonzo. 



r 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



OF 



HAITI AND SANTO DOMINGO. 




BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington, U. S. A. 
"iletin No. 29. December, 1891. 



LIST OF PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 



1. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. i. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 2. 

3. Patent and Trade-mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 

9. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia, 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

20. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico, 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 

24. Import Duties of Honduras. 

25. Import Duties of Ecuador. 

26. Commercial Directory of Argentine Republic. 

27. Import Duties of Colombia. 

28. Commercial Directory of Central America. 



! 

J 



r 






COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY 



OF 



HAITI AND SANTO DOMINGO. 



Q 

Bureau of the American Republics, 



Washtfigton^ U, S, A. 
Bulletin No. 29. December, 1891. 



I r/ \p \ V '•? ! 



V 



■. ;\n • i ^ ^- 



' /' / 



^l i)^.^/. ^^/v. 



BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINGTON, D. C, U. 8. i 



Director. — William E. Curtis. 
Secretary, — Henry L. Bryan. 
Portuguese Translator, — John C. Redman. 
Spanish Translator, — JosE Ignacio RODRIGUEZ. 
OW-^j.— John T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer, — Imogen A. Hanna. 
Distributing CAr/t.— Henrietta P. Dunn. 
Copyists, — TiLLiE L. Phillips. 
Lucretia Jackson. 

ROSABELLE S. RiDER. 



While the greatest possible care is taken to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that may 
occur therein. 

(a) 



In compliance with the request of many merchants and manufacturers who 
desire to send Catalogues and Circulars to importers and dealers in Mexico, 
Central and South America, the Bureau of the American Republics has under- 
taken to publish a series of Commercial Directories of the several countries and 
colonies. The difficulty of securing the names and addresses of merchants has 
been greater than was anticipated, particularly those in cities and towns where 
there are no consular officers of the United States, and the lists herein given 
will be found incomplete. They arc, however, as complete and accurate as the 
Bureau can make them with the present facilities at its command, and will 
doubtless be found useful to those who desire to introduce their wares to the 
knowledge of buyers on the southern continents. Any additions and correc- 
tions for subsequent publications will be appreciated. 



Haiti. 



AQirnr. 

importers. 

Durand A Co., J. B. 

AVX GATES. 

Iferehantt. 

Blanchet A, Co., H. 
Cond6 fils A, Co., D. 
Jacobaen, Jobs. 
Hnndmeyer A Co., H. 

Boberts, Dutton A Co., agents Banqne N»> 
ttonale d'Hidti. 

CAFE HAyTUKH. 
Bank, 

Brancb of the Banqne Nationale d' Haiti 

Bankers. 

Noltlnjir & Co. 

Importers of dry goodt. 

Arnaud, Pbil^aa. 

Chitarin, A. 

Elie &, Co., F. 

Laroohe, Bobert. 

Terlonge, A. 
Importers of dry goods, htmJber, and provisions, 

Czaykowski &. Cb., C. 

Burand, P. F. 

BtfT^, Reine k Co. 

Etienne Sc Co., H. 

Irvin, Francois. 

Lyon & Co., £dw. 

Mompoint jne. & Co. 
Importers of dry goods atid provisions. 

Acacia, J. J. 

Alti^ry, Leroy & Co. 

Aii^uiite. Baonl. 

Anguate, Seymour. 

Blain, J. B. 

Blot fr^res. 

ClATi6, TboinaB. 

Deepen, R. £. & V** Castaing. 

Dearochea, Edonard. 



CAFE HAyTUKH— Continned. 

Iwporters qf dry goods and provisions— OmV A. 

Bearoohea, Fabre. 

Daga6, Periolto. 

Hector &. Maokenda. 

Jimenes &. Co. 

Kampmann, Edward. 

Laratte fila. 

Laroche, T. L. 

Latortue, A. Jnliaa. 

Lenoir, Isaac. 

Leveme,Bdri8. 

Martin, Edouard. 

Mary, Vohiey. 

Montretkil, Josias. 

Montretdl Sc Co., Edonard. 

Penette A Co., C. 

Schomberg & Co., B. 

Schiitt & Co., Ottou 

Trott, Ezekiel. 

Weaten, Jules. 
Importers qf French goods, 

Albaret,V'«.A 

Augnste, Dannier. 

Dnpuy, Mde. M. B. 

Fabre, Albert. 

GasiMird &. Co., A. 

Laroche, £. T. 

Laroche, Y** Jh. 

Laroche, Bobert. 

Martin, Ed. 

Terlonge, A. 
Importers qf hard tears, glass, etc. 

Augnste, J. D. 

Pierre, F. W. 

QOKAlTEB. 

Banks and bankers. 

McGuflie A. Co., James M. 

National Bank of Haiti. 

OBler,J. 

Biboul A fils, Y^ D. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF HAITI. 



OOWAifVBS--Continued. 
Jferchants. 

Coen HIh. C. exporter of logw^ood. 

Entwisle, V. 

Etieime &. Co., G. A. 

Hurmann & Co., F., importers of dry goods 

and exporters of prodnoe. 
Eeitel Sl Co., importers and exporters of gen- 
eral merchandise and prodace. 
Kelly Bros., importers of provisions. 
Kraiise & Co., P. 

Lancelot Sc Co., Vre P., importers of dry goods 
McGuftte, E. J. 
McGaffle & Co., J. B. 
Osier. John H. 

Sterlin, L. and C, importers of dry goods. 
Wulif & Co. 

JACXEL. 

Sank. 

Branch of National Bank of HaitL 
MtrehamJUy importers and exporten, 

Bemier, G. F. 

Denis, M. 

Feron, F. 

Lalonb^re & Co., A. C. 

Mundmeyer, Nephew & Co. 

Poux, M. 

Simmonds Brothers. 

Vital, J. B. 

WSltgo. 
MerehanU, general. 

Barlets, Gerhard. 

GoBtalle&;COnV- 

Margron, G. 

Eoazier, L. T. 

Sansaricq, 0. 

KntAGOAHE. 

Merthants, general. 
Merentie ic Co., J. 
Mitohell, F. W., exporter. 

PETIT GOATBi 

MerehanU, general. 
Ewald,C. 
Merentie. H. 
Merentie & Co., F. 

POBT AU FBOrCS. 

BanH and hankere, 
Ahrendts, Ang. 
Bieber Sc Co., Otto. 



POBT ATT PRnrCE— Continued. 

Banke and &anl;«r»— Continued. 

D*Anbigney & Co. 

Dt^Jardin, Luders Sc Co. 

Klie&Co., F. 

Hermann 8c Co., F. 

Keitel & Co.. G. 

Mlot fr^res &. Co. 

Miot, Scott & Co. 

Xatinnal Bank of HaitL 

Simmonds frdres. 

Vienx ic Laraqae. 

V^eber & Co. 

Weymann, Ch. 

WooUey & Co., F. 
Exportere. 

Bieber & Co., Otto. 

Boatin k, Co., N. 

D'Anbigney &. Co. 

D^ardin, Laders & Ca 

D6sir6, Lefebie tc Co. 

GaStiJens &, Ribonl. 

Herman & Co., F. 

Eeitel ib Co., G. 

Miot, Scott & Co. 

Simmonds f^res. 

Weber & Co. 

Weymann, Cb. 
Importers of eroehery and ehinawara. 

Bran, J. C 
Importers qf drugs. 

Pohlmann St Go. 
Importers qf dry goods. 

Angnste, TaaorMe. 

Amand. Phiteas. 

Baptiste, Baool J. 

Bertoni ic Co., J. 

Boutin A, Co., N. 

C*rr6 A, Co., N. 

GaSliJens & BibouL 

Giordani,«T.P. 

Hodelin L., merchant tailor. 

Jaeger, E. 

Lahens&Co., Th. 

Lalew, C. de. 

Liidecke, Fred. 

McGuffie, R. 

Mevs A Co., H. S. 

Miot, Annibal. 

Faquin, Pascal 8c Co. 

Pratelli, CopeUe 8c Co. 

Pr6zeau, B. 

KeTCst, G. 

Riviere, P6tion. 

Sylvain, M., clothier. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF HAITI. 



FOBT ATT FBIirGB--Continued. 

Importers <if dry doodf— Continued. 

Sehickhardt8& Co., Aug. 

Vorbe, C. 

Weymann, Cb. 
Importers qf Freneh goods. 

BriMOD, Th. 

Can-alho, C. F. 

Castera, Ernest. 

Castera Sc Co., F. 

Case, J. C. 

Colee, F.B. 

Feres A Co. 

Guerin, A. L. 

Gnyot, A. 

Laroche, E. P. 

Menoa St. Co., G. 

Boy, Herald. 

Boy, Potion. 

Wdl &. Co., Simon, French olotbing; 
Importer qffumUuire. 

Stark, Wm. 
Impwriers qfgsnsiral morehandite, 

Andftiii, J.J. 

Ftoee'&Co. 

Qceen, Kenaebel ic Co. 

Meva ie. Co., H. S. 
Imparlsrs qf €hrman goods, 

Bodewalt ic Co. 
Impifrters qf hardwars, 

Flambert, M. 

Green, Kenaebel & Co. 

Heva& Co., H.S. 

Meva, Sierig & Co. 

Pratelli, CopeUo & C<K 

Bodewaldt & Co. 

Starlc, Wm. 

Steeker & Co., B. 
JmporUrs qflumbsr. 

Flamb^K. 

Green, Kenaebel A, Co. 

P6I011X & Co., L. 
Importers qf provistons. 

Angnste, Tanorftd*. 

Barthe 4t Co., Ed. 

Bigaud & Co., E. 

Boui^joDy, A. 

Boaaelmann, M. 

C^leatin, Boeelva. 

Chefdrtie & Co., B. 



PORT AJJ PSmCE— Contluued. 

Importers o/provMonf— Coatinaed. 

Cineaa flls & Co. 

Cutba & Co., Oliver. 

Demenran Se, Co., B. 

Etienne flla. 

Gaercy Sc Co., Albert 

Guercy A, Co., Aug. 

Huttinot, L. G. 

JeaneAme, J. A. 

Leroy, L. 

Lota A Co., N. 

Maroelin & Co., Ed. 

MarteUy &, Co., A. 

Menoa & Co., G. 

M6renti6 & Co., F. 

Mermantin, D. 

Miot &. Co.. H. 

Paillidre, Painson St, Ca 

PaillitoefilB. 

Painaon A Co. 

P6I0UX Sc Co., L. 

PhilUpa, Thos. A. 

Boux & Delinois. 

Rlgaud, Cand. 

Rigaad & Co., B. 

St Macary, Eug. 

St. Borne, A. 

Sergile& Co., A. J. 

Yii^oint it Co., A. 
Importers qfrum, paint, ets. 

Barbanoourt Sc Co. 
Importer qf stationery. 

Guyot, A. 
Importsfrs qfmateJus, etoekSt eto, 

Milkedl&Co. 

PORT DXr PADL 

Importers. 

EUaee, E. St. A. 
Merchants, general. 

Kainer Sc Co., G. 

Poiterien Sl Co. 



8T. XABa 

Importers. 

Bontln St Co., K. 
Grullon, Adrlaao Si Co. 
Thorby & Co., V. 



Santo Domingo. 



AZUA. 



Importer, 

Vicini, J. B. 



KOHTE CHBI8TL 

General import and eoeport merchantt. 
Baodny, Snriqne. 
Eepin, Antonio. 
Jipienes Se, Co., J. G. 

FUXBTO PLATA. 

Agricultural implementt. 
Heinsen Sb Co. 

Ale and beer. 

Batne, Cosme. 

Chiodi A, Co., Q. 

Cooco, Manuel. 

Ginebra hennanoe. 

Kliisener Sc Co., 0. 

l.omaB, Diego. 
Banks. 

Banco Nacional de Santo Domingo. 

£1 Banco de la Compa&ia de Credlto. 
Beokaeller and HatUmer. 

Gastellano, Manuel. 

Boots and shoes. 
Araaline, M. 0. 
Cliiodi &, Co., G. 
Ginebra hermaaos. 
Payana, B. B. 
Simpson, C 
Vivos & Caballero. 

DetiHsis. 

B«rranoo, Yirgillo. 

Jones, G. W. 
Drvgffists. 

Botica del Mercado. 
■ Botica San Jo»6. 

Fraser, C. A. 

Levy. T. G. 



PUERTO PLATA— Oontinncd. 
Dry goods. 

Amabile, M. G. 

Barrera herroanos. 

BatUe, Coanie. 

Chioill & Co., G. 

Ginebra hermanoii. 

JOiisener &. Co., C. 

Puyans. R R. 

Yivee Sc Caballero. 
Oeneral merehants. 

BatUe, Cotnne. 

Chiodi & Co., G. 

Cocoo, ManueL 

Ginebra hermanos. 

Klusener Sc Co., C. 
Broceriee and provisions* 

Amabile, M. G. 

Barrera hermauos. 

Batlle, Coflme. 

Canto, J. M. deL 

Chiodi Sc Co., G. 

ColBon, J. H. 

Cocoo, ManueL 

Ginebra hermanoa. 

Kliiseuer &. Co., C. 

Loinaz, Diego. 

Mir, Felipe. 

Piola Sc Co., E. 

Piola Sc Co.. M. 

Puyans, B.E. 

Yiyes Sc Caballera 
Hardware and tool*. 

Chiodi & Co., G. 

Ginebra hermauos. 

Heinsen &. Co. 

Vives Sc Caballero. 
Importers^ exportere, and commission merehants. 

Amabile, M. G., provisions aud dry goods. 

Barrera, A., provisions and dry goods. 

Batlle, Cosme, general. 

Botica San Joa6, drugs. 

9 



lO 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF SANTO DOMINGO. 



PUBHTO PLATA— Continued. 



Importen, exporUrt, and wmmistum merchanU— 
Continued. 

Chemin de For Central Dominicaln, raOroad- 
building. 

Chiodi & Co., G., provisions, dry goods, bard- 
ware, and lumber. 

Fraser, C. A., drugs and medicines. 

Ginebra & Co., Job6, general. 

Heinsen & Co., W., provisions and hardware. 

Klnsener tc Co., C, provisions and hardware. 

Levy, T. G., drugs and medicines. 

Lithgow, Washington. 

Loinac, Diego, provisions and lumber. 

Manecke, H. J., provisions. 

Pimentel, Aguilar & Co., provisions. 

Plola ic Co., D., provisions and dry gootls. 

Pnyans, B. K., provinions and dry goods. 

Senior, Jr., W., provisions and dry goods. 

Vives & Caballero, provisions and dry gcjods 
Physioiant. 

Garrido, P. K. 

Lellundi, U. 
Plant9r». 

Barranco, F. 

Boitel, Manuel. 

Ginebra hermanoa. 
Lithgow Bros. 
Shnlta,H. 
Printing offiMS, 

Castellano, ICanneL 
Journal of Commercei 
Porvenir. 
Taylor, H. A. 
Beicing maehinet, 
Amabile,M.G. 
Batlle, Cosme. 
Chiodi &, Co.. G. 
Ginebra hermanos. 
Eliisener & Co., 0. 
Puyans, B. R. 
Vives & Caballero, 
Soap man%factUTer, 

Compart, J. L. 
Telegraph company. 

Compafiia Telegrafloa de las AntfUas, M. Rou 

sell, agent. 

Truiik-tnanvfacturer. 
Brea, Y.MeUo. 

SAKAVA. 

Merehantt, import and export 
Baucalari, Gisbert. 



8A1CAVA— Continued. 

Slerehants^ import and export—ConUauio^ 
Boimare, P. 
Ceranda, Caanto. 
Carravelli, Antonio. 
Sturla, A. 

SAHCHEZ. 

^ferchanu, impoH and export, 
Batlle. Cosme. 
Baucalari, Gisbert 
Boiman, P. 
Caravelli, Antonio, 
Cemuda, Canuto. 
Ginebra & Co., Joa^ 
Morrilo, Matthew. 
Storla, A. 

8AV FEDBO BE KAOOBIb. 

Importers. 

Bass, Wm. L. 
Castro, Juan F. de. 
FriedheJm, Ehlers Sl Co. 
ilellor, Santiago "W. 
Pardo, Julio. 

SANIO DOiairGO CIIT. 

Exporters, 
Hohlt, F. 
Lemos, J. de. 
Leyba & Co., ^. M. 
Pou & Co., M. 
Ratto hermanos. 
Vicini,J.B. 

Importers cf American, EngUsk, Frmeh, and Ger^ 
man goods and provisions, 

Alfonseca &. Co., T. 

Aybar, Andres & Co. 

Aybar hermanos. 

Bazile, Isldoro. 

Cambraso hermanos. 
' Curiel &, Co., SamueL 

Damiron & Co.. A. 

Delgado, Angel. 

Delgado, R., drugs. 

De Lemoe, J. 

De Marchena, EUas. 

De Marchena, Eugene. 

Farrand & Co., J. "W. 

Galvan, Rafael, drugs. 

Garcia & Co., H., druga. 

Goossaid, B., druga. 



COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF SANTO DOMINGO. 



11 



8AinO SOMIHOO CITT-- Continued. 

Jmporterg qf AmeHean, EnglUh, French^ and Oer- 
man goods and pro ruiaii^—Contiiiued. 
Heiiriqnes & Co., SbC 
Hohlt, Federico. 
Laiuarche, drugs. 
lAsyha & Co., J. M. 
Ijevy, Baes & Co. 
Mainias & Co. 
Jdausfield, George. 
Marchena A Co. 
liarcheiui hermanos. 



SAirrO SOMIHOO CITT— Contlnned. 

Importers qf Ameriean, JEngU^ JVmmA, and € 
man goods and provisions— Continvuod. 
Penha, E. L. 
Pettalaga, Salvador. 
Pinedo, Bodolfo. 
Pinedo & Co., fnriqne. 
Pou 4t Co. , MigaeL 
Bicart, Bnriqne A. 
Sooha&Co. 
Yentara, GioranL 
Yloiiii,J.B. 



^ 



r 



1 



^ 



BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 



FIRST 



ANNUAL REPORT, 



1 891. 



Informe Anual. 



Bulletin No. 30. January, 1892. 



'KTf 



I ^ 






BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINGTON, D. C, U. 8. A. 



Director. — William E. Curtis. 
Sectary. — Henry L. Bryan. 
Portugese Translator. — John C. Redman. 
Spanish Translator. — Josfe Ignacio RODRIGUEZ. 
Clerks. — John T. Suter, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer. — Imogen A. Hanna. 
Distributing CV/r^t.— Henrietta P. DuNN. 
Copyists. — Tillie L. Phillips. 
Lucretia Jackson. 

ROSABELLE S. RiDER, 



While the greatest possible care is taken to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that may 
occur therein. 

(a) 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, 



TRANSMITTING 



A letter of the Secretary of State^ inclofting the first annual rejiort of the 
Bureau of American Republics. 



December 16, 1891. — Read, referred to the Committee on Foreign Kelations, and 

ordered to be printed. 



7\} the Senate and House of Representatives: 

I transmit herewith for your information, a letter from 
the Secretary of State, enclosing the first Annual Report, 
and copies of the Bulletins of the Bureau of the American 
Republics. 

BENJ. HARRISON 

Executive Mansion, 

December i6, i8gi. 



Department of State 
Washington, December i6, i8gi. 
To the President: 

I have the honor to submit herewith for transmission to 
Congress, the first Annual Report and copies of the Bulletins 
of the Bureau of the American Republics, organized in this 
city under the provisions of the Act making appropriations 
for the Diplomatic and consular service of the United States 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, approved July 14, 
1890; in pursuance of the recommendations of the Interna- 
tional American Conference. 

Respectfully submitted 

JAMES G. BLAINE 



ANNUAIv RKPORX 



Bureau of the American Republics 



Bureau of the American Republics, 

Washington, D, C, October j/, i8gi. 
The Honorable, the Secretary of State, 

Sir: I have the honor to submit for your information and 
approval a report of the first year's work of this Bureau, with 
confidence that it has found a field of usefulness in making 
known the resources, the progress, and the commercial op- 
portunities of the Latin-American Republics, and in bringing 
to the attention of their people the advantages offered them 
in the markets of the United States. 

The necessity of such an agency was recognized by the 
recent International American Conference, when, on the 20th 
of March, 1890, by a unanimous vote, it provided for the 
establishment of an association, under the tide of **The Inter- 
national Union of American Republics for the Prompt Collec- 
tion and Distribution of Commercial Information,** to be 
represented at Washington by a Bureau, under the super- 
vision of the Secretary of State, for a period of 10 years; 
and, if found profitable to the nations participating in its ad- 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 



vantages, to be maintained for successive periods of lo years 
indefinitely. 

THE PLAN AND PURPOSE OF THE BUREAU. 

The purpose of the Bureau, as defined by the Conference, 
is the preparation and pubHcation of bulletins concerning the 
commerce and resources of the American Republics, and 
other information of interest to manufacturers, merchants, 
and shippers. It was also provided that the Bureau should 
at all times be available as a medium of communication for 
persons applying for reasonable information pertaining to 
their customs tariffs and regulations, and to their commerce 
and navigation. 

It was stipulated that the expense of maintaining the Bu- 
reau should not exceed the sum of $36,000 annually, and that 
this expense should be shared by the several Republics in 
proportion to their population. The Government of the 
United States was requested to advance annually this amount 
of money, and upon the ist day of July of each year to assess 
each of the other Governments for its share, according to the 
following estimate : 



Country. 



Amount. 



Country. 



Argentine Republic ^$1,462.50 Mexico ^3,900.00 



Amount. 



Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia... 
Costa Rica- 
Ecuador 

Guatemala.. 

Haiti 

Honduras... 



450 . 00 
5,250.00 

937.50 
1,462.50 
75.00 
37500 
525.00 
187.50 
131-25 



Nicaragua.. 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Salvador 

United .Stales., 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



Total.. 



187.50 

93.75 
975.00 

243.75 

i8,So6.oo 

225.00 

825.00 



36,000.00 



REPOET OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 7 

In accordance with the request of the International Amer- 
ican Conference, the Congress of the United States, in the 
"Act making appropriations for the support of the diplomatic 
and consular service of the United States for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1891,'* approved July 14, 1890, appropriated 
the sum of $36,000 for the purpose indicated, and the Bureau 
of the American Republics was organized under your super- 
vision. 

A circular in the Spanish and English languages was is- 
sued by the Department of State, announcing the organization 
of the Bureau and setting forth in detail the purposeis for 
which it is intended. Copies of this circular were forwarded 
to commercial organizations throughout the American Re- 
publics, and the number and character of the responses dem- 
onstrated at once the necessity and usefulness of such an 
instrument in promoting commerce by the dissemination of 
information both of a general and specific character. Appli- 
cations for the bulletins of the Bureau were received from the 
United States alone to the number of thirty-eight thousand, 
and a corresponding number were received from the other 
Republics. 

CHARACTER OF INQUIRIES RECEIVED. 

Inquiries for specific information concerning commercial 
matters to the number of seven hundred were received and 
answered during the first four months, and have continued in- 
cessantly. These inquiries come, in the greater part, from 
merchants and manufacturers of the United States who are 
seeking to extend their trade in the southern Republics, and 



8 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

desire information that will enable them to do so. Many 
millers, packers of provisions and other food products, makers 
of agricultural and mining machinery and implements, manu- 
facturers of railway supplies, wagons, furniture, paper, hard- 
ware, leather goods, jewelry, drugs and chemicals, and those 
engaged in other lines of industry have sought information 
as lo the demand for their productions, the rates of duties 
imposed upon them, and particulars relative to climate, geo- 
graphical and social features which would assist them in 
determining whether their articles are adapted for use in 
those markets, as well as to enable them to modify them in 
such a way as to suit the peculiar conditions of the trade. The 
Bureau has kept in active communication with the various 
lines of steamers specially engaged in American waters, in 
order to reply to the numerous questions about sailing dates, 
freight rates, the ports reached, and the means of interior 
transportation. 

EMIGRATION STIMULATED. 

A large number of letters have also been received from 
persons in Europe, as well as in the United States, who are 
desirous of removing to the southern countries to engage in 
commercial, mechanical, or agricultural* pursuits, and who 
seek information concerning business opportunities and ad- 
vantages, the demand for skilled and ordinary labor, the wages 
paid, the cost of living, the methods of agriculture, the price 
of lands, the laws governing immigration, the profits derived 
from various crops and the cost of their cultivation, the cost of 
building, the rates of taxation, the protection of personal 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 9 

rights and property, the location of mineral lands and the 
method of obtaining them, the laws governing mines and min- 
ing, the advantages offered for pastoral industry, the value of 
sheep and cattle, the routes of travel, and concerning many 
other topics of a similar character that need not be enume- 
rated; all of which give ample evidence of an awakened in- 
terest in the commerce and the conditions of the neicrhborinor 
countries, that is encouraging to those who are endeavoring 
to promote the social and commercial relations of the Ameri- 
can Republics. 

RAPIDLY INCREASING EXPORT TRADE. 

It is also gratifying to know that this interest is increas- 
ing, and that the information communicated by this Bureau 
has already been the means of extending, to a certain de- 
gree, commercial and social intercourse between the United 
States and the Latin-American nations. This fact is demon- 
strated not only by the rapid grow^th of exports, but also by 
the long paj:senger lists of the steamers plying between this 
country and the ports of Central and South America and by 
the enormous increase in the weight of the mails. Many 
manufacturers of the United States who have never attempted 
to sell merchandise in the southern continent are now send- 
ing agents into those markets to introduce their goods, to 
make the acquaintance of importing merchants, and to estab- 
lish permanent agencies and systems of credit. Three new 
lines of steamships have been established between the United 
States and the ports of the southern Republics, and the exist- 
ing companies have been compelled to increase the number 



10 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

and size of the vessels they have had engaged in the trade 
and to make more frequent voyages to meet the demand for 
freight and passenger accommodation. 

The merchants of Mexico and the cities of Central and 
South America, who have heretofore purchased their goods 
in Europe exclusively, are now coming to the United States 
and invariably discover that they can find here nearly every 
article they need, of a better quality and at a price as low as 
can be obtained in Great Britain, Germany, and France ; and 
the recentiy negotiated reciprocity arrangements afford them 
advantages that are beginning to be understood and appre- 
ciated. Not long ago the agent of one of the largest establish- 
ments in Brazil, which is operating upon European capital 
and has heretofore obtained its supplies entirely in Great 
Britain, visited the United States on his way to purchase 
goods in Europe. He found that he could do better here, 
both in quality and in price, and went no further. His pur- 
chases, which .amounted to several hundred thousand dollars* 
worth of manufactured merchandise, are now being shipped 
from New York. 

POSTAL . STATISTICS. 

It may not be inappropriate here to call attention to the 
statistics of postal communication between the United States 
and the southern Republics for the last fiscal year, as com- 
pared with those of previous years. 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 
Table showing the weight of letter mails. 



11 



Year. 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

Total 



Central America. 



Grammes. 
1,274,869 

1,360,925 
1,698,566 

2,339.953 

2,751,076 

3.332,821 

^,175,41^ 

19,933.621 



West Indies. 



Grammes. 
6,131,428 

5.783,715 
6,217,331 
6,630,161 
7,260,761 
8,044,146 
10,042,020 

50,109,562 



South "America. 



Grammes. 
4,718,625 
3,670,402 
5,040,574 

5,879,271 
6,374,454 

6,953,443 
7,919,943 



Total. 



Grammes. 
12,124,922 
10,815,042 

12,956,471 
14,849,385 
16,386,291 
18,330,410 
25.137.374 



40,556,71a : 110.599.895 



Table showing the weight of printed matter. 



Year. 



'Central America West Indies. South America. 



Grammes. 

1885 16,751,068 

1886 19,455,594 

1887 20,360,695 

18PS ' 25,611,295 

1889 1 33.702,155 

1890 1 39.037.056 

189I 73.441 ,235 



Grammes. 

50,905,092 

57,070,472 

58,436,256 

64,085,508 

71,990,081 

81,703.195 
101,446 962 

Total , 228,359,098 j 485,637.566 



Grammes, 

62,508,438 

64,933.003 

78,856,167 

87,509,160 

103,876,152 

116,148,222 

140,647,853 I 



Total. 



Grammes. 

130,164,598 

141,459,069 

157,653,118 

177,205,963 

209,568,388 

236,888,473 

315.536,050 



I 



654,478,995 



1,368,475,659 



. I take the liberty to suggest, at the solicitation of many 
merchants engaged in the trade, that commerce between the 
United States and the other American Republics can be 
greatly facilitated by the extension of the postal money-order 
and parcel-post systems, which now exist with only a very 
few of them. The lack of direct banking facilities, the high 
rates of exchange, the cost and risk of sending money in the 
mails, and the enormous cost of shipping small packages by 



12 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

express, practically prohibit what might develop into a large 
and profitable trade if the convenience of forwarding money 
and parcels through the postal service might be afforded. 
This would enable the merchants of the United States to send 
samples of goods at a small cost into the southern markets, 
and thus place a large line of merchandise within the reach of 
buyers who now have access to the manufacturers of such 
articles only through commission houses. 

BULLETINS PUBLISHED DURING THE YEAR. 

The first bulletin of this Bureau was a ** Handbook of the 
American Republics** (No. i), published in January last, 
which was illustrated with maps and charts, and contained 
much information of value, including a review of the proceed- 
inofs of the International American Conference; historical 
sketches about America and interesting geographical informa- 
tion ; a summary of the credit systems of the American Re- 
publics ; a condensation of their trade-mark laws ; commercial 
statistics ; a review of the trade in breadstuffs, fruits, nuts, sugar 
and coffee ; a table of coinage, weights, and measures ; a regis- 
ter of the officials of the American Republics and their diplo- 
matic and consular representatives; their port charges and 
customs regulations; a travelers' guide; a postal and cable 
guide, etc. 

The second bulletin, ** Handbook of the American Repub- 
lics'* (No. 2), is a volume of 486 pages, and contains a concise 
review of the condition and commerce of each of the American 
Republics and colonies ; an official register ; a list of diplomatic 
and consular officers; the text of the reciprocity arrangement 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF TUE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 13 

with Brazil; a chapter concerning ihe Latin-American depart- 
ment of the World's Columbian Exposition ; important com- 
mercial statistics; the coinage, weights, and measures, the 
patent and trade-mark laws, the port charges, and the consular 
fees and regulations of the American Republics ; a travelers' 
guide ; a list of steamship lines ; a table of rates of transporta- 
tion ; a postal guide, and much other useful information. It 
also contained eighteen maps and illustrations. 

A Spanish translation of this handbook, corrected to Octo- 
ber I, is now in press and will soon be ready for distribution. 

It is the purpose of the Bureau to republish this handbook 
annually in English and Spanish, revised and corrected to the 
1st of January of each year. 

These publications were followed by a series of bulletins, 
twenty-eight in number to this date, the character of which 
will be shown by the following list : 

1. Handbook of the American Republics (No. i). 

2. Handbook of the American Republics (No. 2). 

3. Patent and Trade-mark laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Re- 
publics. 

5. Import duties of Mexico (tariff of 1888). 

6. Foreign commerce of the American Republics, 

7. Handbook of Brazil. 

8. Import duties of Brazil. 

9. Handbook of Mexico. 

10. Import duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import duties of Santo Domingo. 



14 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

13. Commercial directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial directory of Peru. 

17. Commercial directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, 
and Uruguay. 

20. Import duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import duties of Mexico (tariff of 1891). 

22. Import duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import duties of Salvador. 

24. Import duties of Honduras. 

25. Import duties of Ecuador. 

26. Commercial directory of the Argentine Republic. 

27. Import duties of Colombia. 

28. Commercial directory of Central America. 

THE TARIFF CODES AND COMMERCIAL DIRECTORIES. 

The customs tariffs of the several Republics have been 
published in English and Spanish in parallel columns, and that 
of Brazil in English and Portuguese, the rates of duty being 
expressed in the money of each country respectively and also • 
in the money of the United States, calculated upon the rates 
given in the quarterly circular of the Director of the Mint of 
the United States. The series will be continued until it in- 
cludes the tariffs of all the American Republics and colonies, 
when the several bulletins will be bound in a single volume 
for free distribution among manufacturers and merchants in 
the trade. 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 15 

The commercial directories are intended for the use of 
manufacturers and merchants in forwarding catalogues and cir- 
culars and in opening correspondence with tradesmen on the 
southern continents ; and the enormous demand for them dem- 
onstrates an eagerness on the part of those for whom they are 
intended to introduce their wares into markets that have hith- 
erto been practically unsought. The directories are necessa- 
rily incomplete, because of the great difficulty in obtaining the 
proper material, but new editions will be issued as circum- 
stances justify, and it is hoped and intended ultimately to se- 
cure complete and accurate lists of all principal merchants in 
Mexico, Central and South America, and the West Indies. 

BULLETINS IN PREPARATION. 

The series of handbooks will be continued until it includes 
all of the American Republics and colonies, with accurate maps 
and attractive illustrations. As will be seen from the above 
list, handbooks of Brazil and Mexico have already been pub- 
lished. A handbook of Costa Rica is in press, and similar 
volumes concerning Colombia, Guatemala, Venezuela, and 
Nicaragua are in course of preparation. The other countries 
will be taken up in order. It is gratifying to notice the de- 
mand for these handbooks from the public schools through- 
out the country. In many of them especial attention is now 
being given to the study of South American affairs, but the 
limited funds at the disposal of the Bureau prohibit the publi- 
cation of editions of more than five thousand copies each, 
which must be distributed as impartially as possible through 
eighteen Republics, with a population of i io,ocx),ooo. It is 



16 KEPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

earnestly recommended that special editions be ordered by 
Congress for the use of the schools and libraries of the United 
States. At present the Bureau is able to supply only a very 
small portion of the eleven thousand public libraries through- 
out the country, in each of which there should be at least two 
copies of the several handbooks already issued and those it 
is intended to publish. 

There is also in preparation a bulletin devoted to the trade 
in breadstufifs ; a compilation of the laws of the several Amer- 
ican Republics relating to mines and mining, the sale and 
settlement of the public lands ; and the laws relating to immigra- 
tion, which will be published during the coming year. There 
is an enormous demand for information of this character, and 
a considerable portion of the inquiries received by the Bureau 
come from persons in the United States and Europe who are 
attracted by the rich mineral and agricultural resources of the 
southern Republics. 

THE CODE OF NOMENCLATURE. 

The recent International Conference recommended the 
publication of a code of nomenclature of articles of merchan- 
dise exported and imported, which has been undertaken under 
the direction of this Bureau and is now more than half com- 
pleted. This will be a commercial dictionary, containing be- 
tween twenty-five and thirty thousand terms used to desig- 
nate articles of commerce between the American Republics, 
arranged alphabetically, with their equivalents in English, 
Spanish, and Portuguese. Local terms used in the several 
countries to designate the same articles are inserted in smaller 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE Al^fERIOAN REPUBLICS. 17 

type in their proper place. At this writing the work has been 
carried to and including the letter **m'' and the proof sheets 
have been read and corrected as far as the letter **h." 

The necessity and value of this code can be fully realized 
only by those who have had actual experience in commerce 
with people speaking a different language and having their 
own peculiar terms to designate every article of trade ; and it 
is frequently the case that the same term that is used to des- 
ignate a particular article in one country is applied to an en- 
tirely different article in another. A merchant in South Amer- 
ica who sends an order to a merchant or manufacturer in the 
United States naturally writes in his own language and uses 
the terms that are common to the country in which he lives. 
The manufacturer in the United States, being unfamiliar with 
that language, is unable to fill the order properly, and that 
fact has been the cause of serious misunderstanding, financial 
loss, and a great obstacle to the extension of trade. It is 
hoped, when the commercial dictionary is completed, to se- 
cure its adoption by the several American Governments as an 
official guide in making out consular invoices and manifests, 
which will relieve merchants and manufacturers of serious 
inconvenience and embarrassment. 

The expense of publication will be so great, however, that 
the free distribution of the volume will scarcely be justified, 
and I take the liberty to recommend that the Public Printer 
be directed to issue an edition of one thousand copies for 
the use of the customs and consular service of the United 
States, five hundred copies to be presented to the Govern- 
ments of the several American Republics, and that he be 
S. Ex. 8 2 



18 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

authorized to furnish copies to the public, on application, at 
the cost of publication, plus lo per cent. 

INFORMATION FURNISHED THE PRESS. 

Another important duty of this Bureau has been the fur- 
nishing of information concerning the American Republics to 
the press. Manifold copies of paragraphs of interesting cur- 
rent news have been supplied daily to the several press 
associations of the United States, Mexico, Central and South 
America, the West Indies, and Europe during the past year, 
and also to individual newspapers which have applied for 
them, and by this method the public has been kept informed 
of events transpiring throughout the American hemisphere. 
This information has been derived from both official and 
unofficial sources, but has been confined to commercial 
topics, such as the translation or digest of laws or decrees 
important to shippers, merchants, manufacturers, or vessel 
owners ; making known discoveries of new agricultural, min- 
eral, and mechanical methods, products, and materials; not- 
ing changes in such executive officials as are of general 
interest, and the movement of trade. All questions of con- 
troversy and political matters have been carefully avoided, 
but an attempt has been made to secure information of com- 
mercial and general importance. In this manner several 
thousand newspapers on both sides of the Atlantic have been 
made instrumental in promoting the commercial and social 
intercourse of the American Republics and in conveying 
intelligence concerning their resources, their condition, and 
their affairs. 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 19 

The Bureau has already accumulated a valuable library of 
official and general literature concerning those Republics, 
many volumes having been contributed by the several Gov- 
ernments interested, and receives regularly the principal 
periodicals and newspapers published in the Latin-American 
countries and colonies. The latter are kept on file for the 
convenience of the members of the diplomatic corps and 
other persons interested, and are frequently consulted. 

The director of the Bureau has also during the past year 
made a number of public addresses upon topics relating to 
its work, in response to invitations from commercial organ- 
izations and lecture bureaux throughout the country. 

EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

The following is a statement of the expenditures of the 
Bureau for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1891 : 

For rental of office rooms |(i, 750.00 

For furniture, equipment, and repairs 2,177.28 

For stationery, fuel, and other supplies 2,612.76 

For books of reference, maps, illustrations, and {periodicals 2,458.75 

For compensation of employes 14,941.40 

For printing and binding bulletins 9»956.99 

For distribution of bulletins and miscellaneous expenses 2,098.28 

Total 35,995-44 

ORGANIZATIONS OF SIMILAR AGENCIES IN EUROPE. 

That the importance and influence of this Bureau in the 
promotion of American commerce has been recognized in 
Europe, as well as in America, is shown by the establishment 
of similar agencies in England and France. In a recent num- 
ber the Panama Star and Herald refers to this fact as follows: 

The several consuls-general of the South American Republics in London 
have inaugurated a movement for the establishment in that city of a bureau 
of information concerning South American affairs similar to the Bureau 



20 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

of the American Republics which was established in Washington on the 
recommendation of the International American Conference and a similar 
bureau which has recently been organized in Paris. The object of this 
bureau, like those in Paris and Washington, is to make known the resources 
and commercial advantages of the Central and South American Republics 
and to furnish specific information on commercial subjects when applied 
for. The gentlemen who have inaugurated this movement in their announce- 
ment say : 

"The advantages conferred on trade through chambers of commerce, 
which have been established in all parts of the world, are universally admitted, 
and there can be no question that the enormous trade which, during the last 
50 years, has arisen between this country and the States of Central and South 
America and Mexico could be still further developed if their products and 
requirements could be brought more directly to the notice of manufacturers 
by means of a chamber of commerce dedicated especially to trade interests 
between Great Britain and those countries.*' 

The States proposed to be represented in the bureau are seventeen in 
number, viz, the Argentine Republic, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa 
Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicara- 
gua, Paraguay, Peru, San Salvador, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The bureau 
will include the following departments : 

1. Reading rooms, with a complete collection of South American papers 
and reviews. 

2. Library containing the official publications of the South and Central 
American Governments, codes, and other South American works. This 
library would often save merchants from incurring costs and expenses when 
they have legal questions in hand. 

3. Commercial museums, in which to exhibit the products, etc., of each 
of the seventeen States. These museums will contain the products already 
known and also those not yet introduced to the English market. 

4. Club room for subscribers, in which light refreshments could be sup- 
plied and the latest English and foreign publications on South America 
consulted (books and periodicals). 

5. Review in Spanish for those countries, edited by the chamber of com- 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 21 

merce, which would be widely circulated and present to that community 
the advertisements of the English commerce and industry. This review will 
comprise, as far as possible, everything concerning Latin America that is 
moving in the United Kingdom and in such a way that it might truly be 
called an Anglo-South American repertory of information. 

6. Members and other competent persons will be invited to lecture on 
Spanish- American matters, and arrangements could be made for the recep- 
tion of distinguished individuals connected with these countries. 

LATIN-AMERICAN REPRESENTATION AT THE EXPOSITION. 

Recognizing in the proposed Exposition that is to cele- 
brate the four-hundredth anniversary of the discovery of 
America an unprecedented opportunity to promote social 
and commercial intercourse between the United States and 
the sister Republics, with your approval this Bureau under- 
took the work of interesting the Governments and people of 
Latin America in that great enterprise. Officers of the army 
and navy, selected for their peculiar qualifications, were sent 
as commissioners to the several countries and colonies south 
of the Gulf of Mexico and the Rio Grande to convey letters 
from the President of the United States, inviting them to par- 
ticipate in a commemoration that is of peculiar interest to 
them, and to encourage and aid them. in the preparation of 
exhibits that shall display their resources and products. The 
result has surpassed the most sanguine expectations. The in- 
vitation has been cordially accepted by every Republic and 
colony, commissioners have been appointed, and appro, 
priations have been made to pay the expenses of represen- 
tation that exceed in the aggregate the sum of $2,000,000 — 
more than has been provided for the same purpose by the 
States of the United States, with the State of Illinois excepted. 



1 



22 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

The companies operating lines of steamships between the 
United States and the ports of Latin America have joined 
heartily in the enterprise and have made most generous con- 
cessions in rates of transportation. They have agreed to 
carry free of cost all articles intended for exhibition, with the 
exception of such as may be offered for sale, and will return 
to the port of shipment without charge all that are not dis- 
posed of at the close of the Exposition. They have agreed, 
also, to reduce their rates for passengers ; and it is be- 
lieved that these concessions will induce and enable a very 
large number of the citizens of the southern countries to 
visit the United States during the Exposition. 

Nearly every one of the southern Republics will erect 
upon the grounds of the Exposition a building of its own, 
upon a design typical of its peculiar architecture, and sur- 
round it with practical illustrations of the life and industries 
of its people. It has been arranged, also, to secure the attend- 
ance of groups of people representing every type of the 
native races of America, from the Pueblo Indian of Mexico 
to the savages of Tierra del Fuego. 

THE PROPOSED HISTORICAL EXHIBIT. 

By means of a generous appropriation by Congress, this 
Bureau has been enabled to prepare for exhibition at Chicago 
a historical collection of great interest and educational value, 
illustrating the discovery, the conquest, and the settlement of 
Latin America, the colonial period, and the epoch of the 
Revolution for Independence. An officer of the navy, detailed 
for that purpose, is now in Spain superintending the construc- 
tion of a caravel which is to be an exact facsimile of that in 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 23 

which Columbus made his first voyage of discovery. It is to 
be equipped in the same way and manned by Spanish sailors 
in the costume of 400 years ago. This vessel will be com- 
pleted and brought to the United States in time to participate 
in the naval review that is to take place at New York in 
April, 1893, and will be towed through the lakes to Chicago 
to remain during the Exposition. It will then return to 
Washington and be permanently moored in the river south of 
the Executive Mansion. 

THE PROPOSED COMMERCIAL EXHIBIT. 

It is also proposed to prepare a commercial exhibit illus- 
trating the various classes of merchandise best adapted to the 
wants, and most acceptable to the tastes, of consumers in 
Mexico, Central and South America, and the West Indies. 
It is conceded that one of the greatest obstacles in the way 
of the extension of trade in that direction is the lack of 
knowledge on the part of the merchants and manufacturers 
of the United States concerning the peculiar requirements of 
the markets, and it is believed that this obstacle may be 
overcome, to a considerable degree at least, by illustrating 
fully, for the information of such manufacturers, in what their 
European competitors surpass them ; to show by actual 
samples what classes of merchandise are most salable ; what 
patterns, designs, and materials are most useful and popular; 
the manner in which they should be put up to attract the 
trade, and the method in which they should be packed to 
insure safe and convenient transportation in the interior dis- 
tricts when there are neither railways nor cart roads, and to 



24 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

avoid the payment of unnecessary customs duties, which are 
usually assessed upon the gross weight of packages. 

Abundant space has been reserved for such a display, and 
the special commissioners of the Exposition now in the south- 
ern Republics and colonies, as well as the diplpmatic and 
consular officers of the Government, have been asked to aid 
in the work of securing the exhibits. Explanatory cata- 
logues and circulars will be prepared by writers familiar with 
the markets of the several countries, and experienced men 
will be in attendance to answer inquiries and furnish such in- 
formation as may be desired. 

In this endeavor the Bureau of American Republics is 
receiving the heartiest cooperation and encouragement from 
merchants actively engaged in the trade, and is indebted to 
their superior knowledge and experience for valuable sugges- 
tions and assistance. It is proposed that this exhibit shall be 
permanently established at the close of the Exposition either 
in Washington, in connection with this Bureau, or at some 
convenient place in New York, and renewed from time to 
time by the introduction of new articles for which a demand 
may be created in the southern markets, and its usefulness 
extended as changing conditions and circumstances may re- 
quire. 

With the hope that the Bureau may continue to be a factor 
in the promotion of fellowship and in the development of 
commerce between the American Republics, 

I have the honor to be your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM E. CURTIS, 
Director Bureau of the American Republics. 



INFORME ANUAI^ 



DE LA 



OFICINA DE LAS REPUBLICAS AMERICANAS. 



Oficina DE LAS Republicas Americanas, 

Washington, D. C, Octubre 31 de i8gi. 
Al Seiior Secretario de Estado de los 

Estados Unidos de America. 

SeSor : Tengo el honor de .someter al examen y aproba- 
ci6n de V. el informe de las tareas de esta Oficina durante el 
primer ano de su existencia, y al hacerlo me cabe la satisfac- 
cion de poder decir con confianza que en el se ha demostrado 
cuan amplia es la esfera de utilidad de esta Oficina, en cuanto 
a dar i conocer, aqui, los recursos de las Republicas latino 
americanas, el grado de progreso a que han llegado, y las 
oportunidades que ofrecen a nuestro comercio, y hacer tam- 
bien alia, y en cada una de ellas, que se pongan de manifiesto 
las ventajas que para la venta de sus productos les ofrecen 
los mercados de los Estados Unidos. 

La necesidad de esta agencia fue reconocida por la Con- 
ferencia internacional americana celebrada recientemente. 
En ella se recomendo, por voto unanime de las naciones 

25 



26 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

representadas, que se constituyese una "Union internacional 
de las Republicas americanas para la pronta compilacion y 
distribucion de datos sobre el comercio,*' que esa. Union 
estuviese representada en Washington por una Oficina bajo 
la vigilancia del Secretario de Estado de los Estados Unidos, 
y que el tiempo de su duration fuese diez anos, con calidad 
de prorrogarse indefinidamente, por periodos iguales, si a 
las naciones componentes de la Union les pareciere prove- 
choso hacerlo. 

PLAN Y OBJETO DE LA OFICINA. 

El objeto de la Oficina, como lo explico la Conferencia, 
es publicar Boletines relatives al comercio y recursos de las 
Republicas americanas, con noticias de interes para los fabri- 
cantes, comerciantes, y embarcadores, disponiendose tambien 
que ella sirviese en todo tiempo de medio de comunicacion 
para proporcionar a quien lo solicitase, cuantos datos 6 in- 
formes fuere razonable pedir en materia de aranceles y 
reglamentos de aduanas y en todo lo concerniente al comer- 
cio y navegacion de dichas Republicas. 

Se estipulo que los gastos para el sostenimiento de la Ofi- 
cina no excediesen de $36,000 al ano, y que esta suma se satis- 
ficiese por las diferentes Republicas, proporcionalmente a su 
poblacion, suplicandose ademas al Gobierno de las Estados 
Unidos que la anticipase anualmente, y que en 1° de Julio de 
cada ano cobrase de cada Gobierno contribuyente la cuota que 
le correspondiese satisfacer con arreglo a la tabla siguiente ; 



REPORT OP BUREAU OP THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 



27 



Gobiemo. 


1' 
Cuota. |{ Gobierno. 

ll 


Cuota. 


Rep6blica Argentina. 


iti.d62.(;o r Haiti 


$187.50 

131.25 

3,900.00 

187.50 

93.75 
975.00 

243.75 
225.00 
525.00 


Bolivia 


450.00 1 Honduras 


Brasil 


C 2C0 00 J Mexico 


Colombia 


1.A.62.C0 1 Nicaracrua.... 


Costa Rica. *. 


7^ 00 II Paracuav 


Chile 


jj.\j\j 1 *«»»n^w«»J 

Q'?7.<!o , Perii 


Ecuador.. 


yji'D^ ) **"»** •••• • 

77C 00 Salvador 


Estados Unidos 


18,806 00 1 Uruguay 


Guatemala 


525.00 !i Venezuela 







De conformidad con esta suplica de la Conferencia Inter- 
nacional Americana el Congreso de los Estados Unidos de 
America determino en la Ley de presupuestos aprobada el 14 
de Julio de 1890, y destinada a proveer a los gastos del servicio 
diplomatico y consular de los Estados Unidos en el ano fiscal 
terminado el 30 de Junio de 1891, que se abriese con el 
objeto indicado un credito de $36,000 ; y la Oficina de las 
Republicas Americanas quedo desde luego organizada bajo 
la vigilancia y supervision de V, 

Expidiose en seguida por el Departamento de Estado, en 
los idiomas ingles y castellano, una circular anunciando el 
establecimiento de la Oficina, y explicando en detalle sus 
propositos. Copias de esta comunicacion fi.ieron tambien 
suministradas k diversas juntas de comercio y corporaciones 
mercantiles de las Republicas de America, y por el numero 
y el caracter de las respuestas quedo demostrada desde el 
primer momento la necesidad y utilidad de este centro, que 
fomenta el comercio diseminando informes utiles y datos 
de importancia general 6 particular. De los Estados Unidos 
solamente se ban recibido treinta y ocho mil solicitudes en 



28 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

que los firman tes piden que se les remitan los Boletines dela 
Oficina, y son en numero correspondiente las que con el . 
mismo obJQto han venido de las demas Republicas. 

NATURALEZA DE LOS INFORMES PEDIDOS. 

Durante los primeros cuatro meses recibio la Oficina sete- 
cientas comunicaciones, a que se dio contestacion cumplida, 
solicitando informes sobre diversos puntos relacionados con 
el comercio. Son muchas las que han venido despues de 
aquel periodo y continuan llegando incesantemente. 

La mayor parte de estas consultas ha procedido de comer- 
ciantes y fabricantes de los Estados Unidos, deseosos de 
extender sus negocios y entrar en relaciones con las Republicas 
latino-americanas, e interesados, por lo tanto, en obtener dates 
que pudiesen servirles de gula ; y son en grande numero los 
harineros, embarcadores de provisiones y viveres, fabricantes 
de maquinaria e instrumentos para la agricultura y la mineria, 
y los de utiles de todas clases para ferro-carril, incluyendo los 
carros y los coches para los viajeros, duenos de fabricas de 
muebles y papel, y comerciantes en ferreteria, objetos de cuero, 
joyas, drogas y productos quimicos, asi como tambien las per- 
sonas dedicadas k otros ramos de industria, que han ocurrido 
en busca de noticias que necesitaban y que les era provechoso 
obtener. Unas veces quisieron enterarse de la demanda que 
podria haber para sus respectivas producciones 6 manufacturas 
en el pals donde intentaban emprender negocios, otras veces 
desearon conocer los derechos de aduana que sus articulos 
tendrian que satisfacer al ser importados en la misma nacion. 
Unos pedian informes sobre el clima, y las peculiares condi- 



EEPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 29 

ciones geograficas y sociales de algun pais de America a fin, 
de determinar si sus manufacturas y producciones de cualquier 
genero serian 6 no susceptibles de consumo en aquel mercado, 
y en su caso modificarlas 6 alterarlas de tal manera que se 
adaptasen satisfactoriamente a las costumbres y gustos de la 
localidad. Y en lo que respecta a fechas de salidas de 
los vapores, precios de los fletes, puertos k que se puede 
ir directamente, y medios de transporte interior en los dife- 
rentes paises, la Oficina ha tenido necesidad de ponerse con 
frecuencia en comunicacion activa con las diversas lineas de 
vapores que hacen el servicio en aguas americanas, a fin de 
poder contestar satisfactoriamente las numerosas preguntas 
que se le han hecho. 

ESTIMULO PARA LA IMMIGRACION. 

Tan to de Europa como de los Estados Unidos se ha 
recibido un gran numero de cartas, expresivas del deseo de 
los que las escribieron de trasladarse a las Repiiblicas latino- 
americanas y dedicarse alii al comercio, la agricultura, 6 las 
artes mecanicas. En esas cartas se ha pedido a la Oficina que 
suministre informes, no solo con respecto k las oportunidades 
favorables que respectivamente podrian ofrecerse en ellas 
para el negocio 6 industria de que se trataba, sino tambien en 
lo relativo a la abundancia 6 escasez de brazos, y a la demanda 
mayor 6 menor de trabajo esmerado, precio de los jornales, 
costo de la vida, metodos de agricultura, precio de las tierras, 
leyes relativas k la immigracion, y ganancias rendidas en 
g-eneral por las cosechas. Otras veces la investigacion se ha 
propuesto determinar los gastos de un cultivo, 6 el costo de 



30 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

fabricar los edificios, los tipos de las contribuciones que paga 
el pueblo, el grado de proteccion que se dispensa a las personas 
y k las propriedades, la localidad en que se encuentran minas, 
y el modo de adquirir aquellas tierras en que puedan explo- 
tarse, y las leyes relativas al ramo de mineria. Otras, en fin, 
se ha preguntado que ventajas se ofrecen para la industria 
pecuaria, y cu^l es el valor de los carneros y el ganado vacuno, 
que medios de comunicacion existen en el pais, y cual es el 
modo usual de hacer los viajes, y multitud de cosas m^s 6 
menos por el mismo estilo, que no hay necesidad de enumerar. 
Todo esto es buena prueba del interes despertado en favor 
del comercio con los paises vecinos y del mejor conocimiento 
de sus condiciones especiales y del impulse dado al fomento 
de las relaciones sociales y comerciales con las Repiiblicas 
americanas. 

RApIDO CRECIMIENTO DEL COMERCIO DE EXPORTACION. 

Es igualmente satisfactorio observar que este interes sigue 
en aumento, y que la Oficina de las Repiiblicas americanas 
ha contribuido con sus informes y noticias a aumentar en 
grado muy notable las relaciones comerciales y sociales entre 
los Estados Unidos y las demas paises de este hemisferio. 
Se demuestra este hecho, no solo por el rapido crecimiento 
del comercio de exportacion, sino tambien por las largas 
listas de pasajeros de los vapores que navegan entre nuestros 
puertos y los de Centro America y la America del Sud, y por 
el enorme aumento del peso y volumen de la correspondencia 
transmitida por el correo. Hay muchos fabricantes de di- 
versos productos en los Estados Unidos que jama's habian 



EEPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 31 

pensado para sus hegocios en los paises del Sud, y que estan 
ahora tratando, por medio de agentes enviados al efecto, de 
introducir sus generos y manufacturas en aquellos mercados, 
de entrar en conocimiento y relaciones con las casas importa- 
doras de la localidad, y de establecer corresponsales perma- 
nentes y sistemas de credito. Tres nuevas lineas de vapores se 
han establecido ya entre esos paises y el nuestro, y las antiguas 
companias se han visto obligadas a aumentar el numero y la 
capacidad de sus buques, y a dar los viajes con mas frecuen- 
cia, a fin de hacer frente al incremento del trafico, tanto en 
el ramo de pasajeros como en el de carga. 

Y por virtud de un movimiento analogo, muchos comer- 
ciantes de Mexico, y de Centre America, y la America del Sud, 
que invariablemente habian efectuado todas sus compras en 
Europa, se hallan ahora visitando los Estados Unidos, y des- 
cubriendo sin cesar que aqui pueden encontrar mas baratos 
y de mejor calidad que en la Gran Bretana, Alemania, y 
Francia casi todos los artlculos que necesitan. Por otra parte 
los arreglos de reciprocidad comercial recientemente celebra- 
dos les han hecho ver y comprender las grandes ventajas que 
estos pueden proporcionarles. 

No hace mucho que un agente de una de las casas mas 
grandes del Brasil, cuyas operaciones se hacen con capital 
europeo, y que hasta ahora se habia surtido de todo en la 
Gran Bretana, estuvb aqui de camino para Europa k donde 
iba a hacer sus compras. Encontro, sin embargo, que entre 
nosotros podia proveerse de todo con mayor ventaja, tanto 
en precios como en calidad, y desistio de continuar su viaje. 
Las mercancias que compro aqui, y que representan un valor 



32 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 



de varies centenares de miles de pesos, estan ahora embar- 
candose en New York con destine al Brasil. 



ESTADISTICAS POSTALES. 

No es inoportuno llamar la atencion a los resultados que 

arroja la estadistica respecto de la comunicacion postal entre 

los Estados Unidos y las Republicas del Sud, durante el 

ultimo ano fiscal, comparandolos con los de los anos antece- 

dentes. 

Peso de las cartas calculado en gramos. 



Afio. 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

Total 



Centro America. 



Gramos, 
1,274,869 
1,360,925 
1,698,566 

2,339.953 
2,751,076 
3,332,821 
7,175,4" 



19*933,621 



Antillas. 



America del Sud, 



Gramos. 
6,131,428 

5,783,715 
6,217,331 
6,630,161 
7,260,761 
8,044,146 
10,042,020 



Gramos. 

12,124,922 

10.815,042 

12,956,471 
14,849,385 
16,386,391 
18,330,410 
25, 137,374 

50,109,562 I 40,556,712 I 110,599,895 

I I 



Gramos. 

4,718,625 

3,670,402 

5,040,574 

5,879,271 

6,374,454 

6,953,443 

7,9*9,943 



Total. 



Peso de los peribdicos i impresos transmitidos por el correo. 



Afio. 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

Total., 



Centro America. 



Gramos. 
16,751,068 

19,455,594 
20,360,695 
25,611,295 
33,702,155 
39,037,056 
73,441,235 



Antillas. 



America del Sud. 



Gramos. 
50,905,092 
57,070,472 
58,436,256 
64,085,508 
71,990,081 

81,703,195 
101,446,963 



Gramos. 
62,508,438 

64,933,003 

78,856,167 

87,509,160 

103,876,152 

116,148,222' 

140,647,853 



Total. 



Gramos. 
130,164,598 
141,459,069 
157,653, "8 
177,205,963 
209,568,388 

236,888.473 
3i5»536,o5o 



228,359,098 485,637*566 I 654,478,995 I 1,368,475,659 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 33 

Me tomo la libertad de indicar, a solicitud de muchos 

comerciantes, que seria muy conveniente para facilitar el trafico 

entre los Estados Unidos y las demas Republicas de America, 

hacer extensivo k estas ultimas el sistema de giros postales, 

y el de remitir paquetes 6 encomiendas por el correo, los 

cuales no se hallan establecidos en este hemisferio sino con 

muy corto numero de naciones. La carencia absoluta de 

facilidades baricarias directas, el alto tipo de los cambios, el 

riesgo que se corre enviando el dinero directamente, y lo 

mucho que cuesta hacerlo, y en cuanto a los paquetes 6 bultos 

pequefios el grande gasto que ocasiona su remision, hacen 

practicamente imposible el desenvolvimiento de un trafico 

que bajo otras .circumstancias seria indudablemente muy 

activo y de mucho provecho. Los comerciantes de los 

Estados Unidos podrian entonces enviar, a poca costa, sus 

muestras a todos los mercados del Sud, y ofrecer de este 

mode k los ojos de aquellos pueblos multitud de articulos 

que hasta ahora no han podido conocerse sino indirectamente 

por el intermedio de agentes, 6 casas comisionistas. 

BOLETINES PUBLICADOS EN ESTE a5JO. 

El primer Boletin de esta Oficina fue un ** Manual de las 

Republicas americanas'' (No. i), publicado en ingles en Enero 

ultimo. El libro salio ilustrado, con mapas y cartas, y esti 

Ueno de noticias importantes. En el se hizo una resena de 

los trabajos de la Conferencia internacional americana, y se 

dieron varias noticias hist6ricas con respecto a America, ana- 

diendose interesantes noticias geograficas, un sumario de los 

sistemas de credito de las diferentes Republicas, un extracto 
S. Ex. 8 3 



34 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

de las leyes que en ellas estan vigentes spbre marcas de 
fabrica, multitud de datos estadisticos relativos al comercio 
en general, y en particular al de cereales, y de frutas, nueces, 
azucar y cafe, tablas indicativas de las diferentes monedas, 
pesos y medldas, una lista de los funcionarios mas elevados 
del Gobierno de cada nacion, y de sus representantes diplo- 
maticos y consulares, una explicacion detallada de los derechos 
de puerto que en cada cual se cobran, y de los reglamentos y 
formalidades que seobscrvan en sus respectivas aduanas, una 
Guia del viajero, otra postal y telegrafica incluyendo el servicio 
del cable, etc. 

El segundo Boletin, que se titulo *' Manual de las Repu- 
blicas americanas*' (No. 2), es un volumen de 486 paginas, 
tambien en ingles, que entre otras cosas contiene una noticia 
concisa pero comprensiva del comercio de cada una de las 
Republicas y posesiones coloniales de America, y del estado 
y condicion en que respectivamente se encuentran, un Re- 
gistro Oficial, una lista de todas los empleados diplom&ticos y 
consulares, el texto del arreglo comercial de reciprocidad 
celebrado con el Brasil, un capitulo relativo al Departamento 
latirto americano de la Exposicion Universal Colombina, mul- 
titud de importantes datos estadisticos sobre el comercio, una 
explicacion de las monedas pesos y medidas de cada pais, de 
sus leyes de privilegios de invencion, y de marcas de fabrica, 
de los derechos consulares y de puerto que en cada uno se 
cobran, y de sus reglamentos aduanales, una Guia del viajero, 
una lista detallada de las diversas lineas de vapores que dan 
viajes en America, tablas explicativas de las diferentes tarifas 
de fletes, y gastos de transporte, una Guia postal, y varios 



KEPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 35 

otros dates interesantes. Acompanan a este tome, entre 
mapas y grabados, diez y echo laminas. 

De este libro se ha hecho una traduccion al castellano, que 
esta en prensa, y que pronto podra distribuire, corregida 
hasta el 1° del corriente Octubre. 

Tiene la Oficina el proposito de publicar todos los anos 
una nueva edicion de este Manual, en ingles y en castellano, 
revisada y corregida hasta el i° de Enero. 

Los dos Manuales que se han nombrado, y los diferentes 
Boletines que sucesivamenta han ido apareciendo despues 
forman un conjunto de veinte y ocho publicaciones en el orden 
siguiente : 

1. Manual de las Reptiblicas americanas, No. i. 

2. Manual de las Republicas americanas, No. 2. 

3. Leyes sobre patentes de invencion y marcas de febrica 
en los paises de America. 

4. Las monedas, pesos y medidas de las Republicas ameri- 
canas. 

5. Los derechos de importacion en Mexico (arancel de 
1888). 

6. El comercio extranjero de las Republicas americanas. 

7. Manual del Brasil. 

8. Arancel de aduanas del Brasil. 

9. Manual de Mexico. 

10. Los derechos de importaci6n en Cuba y Puerto Rico. 

1 1 . Los derechos de importacion en Costa Rica. 

12. Los derechos de importacion en Santo Domingo. 

13. Directorio comercial del Brasil. 

14. Directorio comercial de Venezuela. 



36 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

15. Directorio comercial de Colombia. 

16. Directorio comercial del Peru. 

17. Directorio comercial de Chile. 

18. Directorio comercial de Mexico. 

19. Directorio comercial de Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, 
y Uruguay. 

20. Los derechos de importacion en Nicaragua. 

21. Los derechos de importacion en Mexico (arancel de 

1891). 

22. Los derechos de importacion en Bolivia. 

23. Los derechos de importacion en Salvador. 

24. Los derechos de importacion en Honduras. 

25. Los derechos de importacion en el Ecuador. 

26. Directorio comercial de la Republica Argentina. 

27. Los derechos de importacion en Colombia. 

28. Directorio comercial de Centro America. 

LOS ARANCELES DE ADUANAS Y LOS DIRECTORIOS COMERCIALES. 

Los aranceles de aduanas de las diversas Republicas en 
que se habla el castelkno han sido publicados en esta lengua 
y tambien en ingles, en paginas de dos columnas paralelas. 
El del Brasil lo ha sido del mismo modo en portugues y en 
ingles. Los importes de los derechos, que estan natural- 
mente expresados en el arancel de cada pais en la moneda 
que es alii la corriente, se han puesto en la traduccion inglesa 
en el valor equivalente en moneda de los Estados Unidos, 
segun los tipos que determina cada trimestre la circular pu- 
blicada al efecto por el Director de las Casas de Moneda de los 
Estados Unidos. La serie de estos Aranceles se ira conti- 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 37 

nuando hasta que esten dados al publico todos los que se hallen 
en observancia en America, sea en las nacionesindependientes, 
sea en las posesiones coloniales. Y entonces se formara con 
todos ellos un tomo que se circulara gratuitamente entre los 
fabricantes y comerciantes a quienes interese. 

Los Directories comerciales tienen por objeto auxiliar a 
los mismos fabricantes y comerciantes en la distribucion de 
sus circulares y catalogos, y ayudarles tambien a entrar en 
correspondencia con los hombres de negocios de los diversos 
paises. El enorme pedido que se ha hecho de estas publica- 
ciones demuestra el vivisimo interes que se ha despertado en 
favor del comercio, en que hasta ahora practicamente no se 
habia pensado nunca, con las Republicas de este hemisferio. 
Estos Directorios, por virtud de la gran dificultad de conse- 
guir el material adecuado, son y tienen que ser necesaria- 
mente incompletes ; pero en cada nueva edicion que se haga, 
segun lo exijan las circumstancias, se anadira y enmendara 
lo que sea del caso ; y es de esperar que llegara a obtenerse 
con ellos un catalogo complete y fidedigno de los principales 
comerciantes de Mexico, Centre America, la America del 
Sud, y las Antillas. 

BOLETINES EN PREPARACI6n. 

La serie de los Manuales destinados a dar k conocer las 
diferentes Republicas de America y las posesiones coloniales 
en ella existentes se ira continuando hasta que cada uno de 
esos paises tenga su propio libro, adornado con las correspon- 
dientes laminas y mapas. Como aparece de la antecedente 
lista ya estan publicados los del Brasil y Mexico. El de 



38 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

Costa Rica esta en prensa, y los de Colombia, Guatemala, 
Venezuela y Nicaragua se hallan en preparacion. Los de los 
demas paises se redactaran segun vayan completandose los 
datos, que se han pedido. 

Es satisfactorio observar que de todas partes del pais 
se han recibido numerosas solicitudes pidiendo estos Manua- 
les para las escuelas piiblicas, en muchas de las cuales se 
esta dedicando ahora especial atencion al estudio de los paises 
de la America del Sud. Los limitados fondos de que dispone 
esta Oficina no le han permitido hacer ediciones de mas de 
cinco mil ejemplares de cada una de estas obras, los que ha 
tenido que distribuir imparcialmente entre diez y ocho 
Republicas con cien millones de habitantes. Es de reco- 
mendarse eficazmente al Congreso que se sirva ordenar una 
edicion especial para las escuelas y bibliotecas publicas de 
los Estados Unidos. Estas ultimas son en niimero de once 
mil, y cada una debiera tener por lo menos dos ejemplares 
de cada Manual. Se comprende sin necesidad de mcis ex- 
plicacion que hasta ahora le haya sido imposible k esta Oficina 
corresponder sino de una manera muy imperfecta a tan gran 
pedido. 

Estan igualmente en preparacion un Boletin especial 
sobre el comercio de cereales de este continente, y otros en 
que se trata de las minas y leyes de mineria de las diferentes 
Republicas americanas, de las leyes que regulan la venta y 
aprovechamiento de las tierras publicas, y de todo lo relativo 
^ immigracion, incluyendo las disposiciones dictadas para 
fomentarla. Todos estos libros quedaran publicados el ano 
entrante. Hay un enorme pedido de datos y noticias sobre 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 39 

todos estos asuntos, y la atencion de esta Oficina ha tenido 
y tiene que ocuparse frecuentemente respondiendo & las 
preguntas que acerca de estos particulares se le hacen, asi de 
los Estados Unidos como de Europa, por multitud de per- 
sonas interesadas en sacar ventaja de las inmensas riquezas 
minerales y agricolas de las Republicas meridionales. 

EL CODIGO DE NOMENCLATURA. 

La Conferencia internacional americana, que estuvo recien- 
temente en sesion, recomendo que se formara y publicara un 
Codigo de nomenclatura comercial, destinado a uniformar los 
nombres de las diferentes mercaderias exportadas e importa- 
das. La Oficina emprendio esta obra, y la tiene muy adelan- 
tada. A esta fecha esta ya completa mas de la mitad del tra- 
bajo. 

Este Codigo sera un Dicionario comercial en ingles, cas- 
tellano y portugues, y contendra de veinte y cinco a treinta 
mil vocables, arreglados alfabeticamente. En el se encontra- 
ran todos los terminos con que en las Republicas de America 
se designan los articulos en que comercian unas con otras. 
Las expresiones distintas y puramente locales con que en 
algunos puntos se designan los mismos articulos, iran tambien 
insertas aunque en tipo mas pequeno, en el lugar que les cor- 
responda. A la fecha en que se escribe este Informe esta ya 
completa en manuscrito la letra *'m;'' y se han corregido 
pruebas impresas hasta llegara la letra '*h/' 

La necesidad e importancia de esta obra solo pueden apre- 
ciarse debidamente por los que tienen conocimiento practico 
de las dificultades con que tropieza el comercio cuando se hace 



40 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

entre pueblos de diferentes lenguas, 6 entre los que hablando 
una misma se encuentra sin embargo que cada cual designa 
& su manera la misma clase de mercancia. Sucede tambien 
con frecuencia que el nombre que se aplica en un pais a un 
objeto dado, esti en uso en otro para un objeto enteramente 
distlnto. Y como es natural que el comerciante de la America 
del Sud, al hacer sus pedidos al comerciante de los Estados 
Unidos, escriba en su propia lengua y emplee los terminos 
locales que estan en uso en su pais, resulta muchas veces que 
su pedido no se entiende, 6 se entiende mal No hay necesi- 
dad de mucho esfuerzo para demostrar que de no cumplirse 
las ordenes, 6 de cumplirlas imperfectamente, resultan desa- 
grados y perdidas, que en ocasiones pueden ser graves, y 
que siempre perjudican considerablemente la expansion del 
comercio. 

Una vez concluido este Diccionario se le someterii, segun 
determino la Conferencia, & la aprobacion de los diferentes 
Gobiernos de America, encareciendoles que tengan k bien 
adoptarlo. Si asi lo efectuaren, se tendra entonces con grande 
beneficio para los comerciantes de America, una guia oficial, 
segura, respecto de la terminologia que debe usarse asi para 
el aforo y cobranza de los derechos de aduana, como para la 
redaccion de los manifiestos, facturas consulares, pedimentos 
de despacho, y demas documentos del caso. Con esto, por 
lo menos, se evitaran multitud de dificultades serias con que 
en el dia tienen que luchar muchos comerciantes y fabricantes 
de los Estados Unidos. 

El costo de publicacion de esta obra ha de ser necesaria- 
mente tan grande que no permita distribuirla gratuitamente. 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 41 

Y por esta causa me atrevo a proponer que se den las ordenes 
oportunas al Impresor del Gobierno para que tire una edicion 
muy numerosa, que permita destinar mil ejemplares para el 
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, con el objeto de repartirlos 
entre sus diferentes aduanas, y entre los consulados que tiene 
establecidos en los diversos paises de America, y quede sin 
embai^go suficiente numero para poder regalar quinientos 
ejemplares a cada uno de los Gobiernos de America y ven- 
der el resto al publico, al costo de impresion con el recargo 
de un diez por ciento. 

NOTICIAS SUMINISTRADAS A LA PRENSA PUBLICA. 

Uno de los importantes deberes de esta Oficina, consis- 
tente en suministrar noticias a la prensa publica con respecto 
a las naciones de America, ha sido desempefiado con esmero, 
proveyendose diariamente, en todo el transcurso del ano, a las 
diferentes asociaciones periodisticas 6 de noticias, que estan 
establecidas asi en este pais, como en Mexico, las Republicas 
de Centro America y de la America del Sud, y las Antillas, y 
tambien en Europa, de cortos sueltos, 6 articulos explicativos 
de cuanto ha acontecido de importancia en el Nuevo Mundo, 
6 se ha creido de interes para el publico. Eso mismo se ha 
hecho con todos los periodicos que lo han pedido individual- 
mente. Y de esta manera se ha mantenido al publico perfec- 
tamente infonnado de cuanto ha ocurrido en este hemisferio 
relativamente al comercio y la legislacion, asi en el ramo de 
aduanas, como en muchos otros, y de todas las novedades 
cuyo conocimiento importa a los comerciantes, fabricantes, em- 
barcadores y navieros, 6 se han introducido en materias de 



42 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

patentes de inventos, 6 en agricultura, mineria, 6 las artes 
mecanicas. Se ha procurado tambien tener al publico al cor- 
riente de los cambios que se han efectuado en el alto personal 
de algunos Gobiernos cuando dichos cambios tuvieron impor- 
tancia general. Y siempre se ha cuidado de que estos in- 
formes, recibidos unas veces de fuente oficial, y procedentes 
en otros casos de origen particular, en nada aludan a asuntos 
politicos, 6 a materia alguna de controversia en los diversos 
paises, poniendose particular empeno en dar solamente al 
publico lo que es de importancia comercial, 6 general. De 
esta manera se ha logrado que muchos miles de periodicos, 
en ambos lados del Atlantico, diseminando informes sobre los 
recursos de las Repiiblicas de America y el verdadero estado 
actual de sus negocios, hayan contribuido constantemente a 
fomentar el cofnercio con ellas y favorecer sus intereses so- 
ciales. 

Tiene ya formada esta Oficina una Biblioteca de bastante 
valor compuesta de muchas obras relativas a estas Republicas, 
y a ella han contribuido en gran parte los diferentes Gobier- 
nos con importantes regalos de libros y publicaciones oficiales 
de todas clases. Tambien recibe regularmente los principales 
periodicos de la America latina, incluyendo las posesiones co- 
loniales, y es frecuente que vengan a consultarlos 6 leerlos, los 
diferentes miembros del cuerpo diplomatico americano u otras 
personas interesadas en conocer lo que acontece en aquellos 
pueblos. 

A este trabajo de difusion de conocimientos respecto de 
las Republicas meridionales puede agregarse el que per su 
parte ha llevado a cabo personalmente el Director de la Ofi- 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 43 

cina, en las diversas lecturas 6 conferencias publicas que sobre 
asuntos de la incumbencia de la misma, ha dado en varios 
lugares del pais, a invitacion de asociaciones comerciales, 6 
de otra clase. 

GASTOS. 

Los gastos de la Oficina durante el ano fiscal termlnado 
el 30 de Junio de 1891 han sido como sigue: 

Alquiler de casa ^i,75o.cx) 

Mobiliario, instalaci6n y reparaciones 2,177.28 

Gastos de escritorio, combustible y otros efectos 2,612.76 

Libros de consulta, mapas, ilustraciones y peri6dicos 2,458.73 

Sueldos deempleados 14,941.40 

Impresibn y encuademacida de los boletines 9>956-99 

Gastos de distribuci6n y otros miscelanicos 2,098.28 

Total ^ 35,995-44 

ESTABLECIMIENTO EN EUROPA DE OFICINAS ANAlOGAS A ESTA. 

La importancia de esta Oficina y la influencia ejercida por 
ella en el fomento del comercio americano se demostrarian 
satisfactoriamente con solo el hecho de que a imitacion suya 
se han establecido, y tratan de establecerse otras del mismo 
genero en Inglaterra y en Francia. 

En un reciente numero del diario de Panami titulado 
the Panama Star and Herald se encuentra lo que sigue: 

Los C6nsules generales de las diferentes Republicas latino americanas en 
Londres han inaugurado un movimiento que tiene por objeto establecer en 
aquella capital una Oficina de informaci6n, analoga a la que esta funcionado 
en Washington, y destinada a compilar y publicar datos y noticias intere- 
santes a sus respectivos paises. Otra Oficina de la misma clase se encuentra 
ya establecida en Paris. En ambas, lo mismo que en la de Washington, se 
tiene por objeto difundir el conocimiento de los recursos con que cuentan 



44 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

las mencionadas Republican de America, y hacer publicas las ventajas que 
ofrecen para el coraercio, dando ademas informes especificos, cuando quiera 
que se soliciten, sobre asuntos relacionados con el comercio. Los Consules 
que ban inaugurado este movimiento se expresaron como sigue : 

** Es un hecho universal men te admitido que el establecimiento de Camaras 
de Comercio en las diferentes partes del mundo ha producido un beneficio 
inmenso, y no puede disputarse por un moment© que el enorme trafico que 
ha tenido lugar durante los ultimos cincuenta afios entre este pais (Inglaterra) 
y los Estados de Centro America, la America del Sud y Mexico, se harla 
mucho mayor todavia, si los articulos que alll se producen, y los que alii se 
necesitan para satisfacer diferentes necesidades, pudieran conocerse mejor, 
6 de una manera mas directa, mediante la acci6n de aquellps cuerpos. 
Ellos estan dedicados especialmente a fomentar el comercio entre los men- 
cionados pueblos y la Gran Bretafia." 

Son diez y siete los Estados que estaran representados en la nueva 
Oficina, a saber: la Repiiblica Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, 
Costa Rica, la Republica Dominicana, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, 
Mexico, Paraguay, PerCi, Salvador, Nicaragua, Uruguay y Venezuela. Y 
la Oficina se compondra de los siguientes departamentos : 

1. Uno en que habra salon es de lectura, con colecciones completas de 
todos los periodicos y revistas de los paises de la America latina. 

2. Una Biblioteca, donde se encontraran todas las publicaciones oficiales 
codigos, etc., de los referidos paises. Esta Biblioteca podra con frecuencia 
evitar gastos a los comerciantes cuando se encuentren envueltos en cuestiones 
legales y necesiten informes aut^nticos. 

3. Un Museo comercial, en que habra muestras de todos los productosde 
las diez y siete Republicas, incluyendo no solo los que estan ya conocidos 
en el mercado ingles sino tambi^n los que todavia no se han introducido 
end. 

4. Un departamento en que habra salas de reuni6n para los que se 
suscriban con ese objeto, y en que podran suministrarse ligeros refrigerios, 
y consultarse las Ultimas publicaciones inglesas y extranjeras (peri6dicos y 
libros) sobre los referidos paises americanos. 

5. Uno destinado a la redaccion y publicaci6n en lengua castellana de 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 45 

una Revista, que se procurara circule profiisamente en los mencionados paises, 
y donde se den 4 conocer, y se anuncien, todos los articulos que pueden 
producir 6 poner de venta la industria y el comercio de la Gran Bretafta. 
Esta Revista debera abrazar tan extensaraente como sea posible, dentro de su 
esfera y limites, todo lo que se gestione en el Reino Unido con relacion a la 
America latina, y estara redactada de tal manera que pueda realmente con- 
siderarsela como un repertorio anglo-sudamericano de datos y noticias 
sobre aquellos pueblos. 

6. Otro departamento donde se d6n conferencias 6 lecturas p6blicas 
sobre asuntos latino americanos, ya sea por individuos pertenecientes a la 
Oficina, ya por otras personas que al efecto sean invitadas, y donde tambien 
puedan tener lugar reuniones, 6 recepciones de ceremonia, en honor de 
cualesquiera personas distinguidas de los mismos paises que visiten la gran 
metropolis. 

REPRESENTACION LATINO AMERICANA EN LA EXPOSICION. 

Reconociendo el hecho cierto de que la proxima Ex- 
posicion Universal, con que va a conmemorarse el cuarto 
centenario del descubrimiento de America, suministrara una 
oportunidad sin ejemplo para el mayor ensanche y fomento 
de las relaciones comerciales y sociales entre los Estados 
Unidos y sus hermanas las demas Republicas de este hemis- 
ferio, acometio esta Oficina, con la aprobacion de V., la tarea 
de interesar a los gobiernos y pueblos de las dichas Republi- 
cas en favor de aquella empresa. Se escogieron para este 
objeto algunos oficiales del Ejercito y la armada de los 
Estados Unidos que por sus conocimientos especiales y sus 
circumstancias se estimaron mas a proposito, y se les invistio. 
con el caracter de Comisionados de la Exposicion, proveyen- 
dolos de cartas del Presidente de los Estados Unidos para 
los diferentes Gefes del Gobierno de los pueblos de America 



46 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

invitandolos a participar en el gran certamen. Todos ellos 
se encaminaron desde luego a los diferentes paises, que se 
encuentran al Sud del rio Grande y del Golfo de Mexico, 
donde habran de empenarse en conseguir la formacion de 
colecciones de cuanto articulo pueda servir para dar a conocer 
las producciones del suelo y de la industria local, y su remi- 
sion a Chicago. El resultado ha sido muy superior a cuanto 
podia esperarse. Todas las invitaciones se aceptaron con la 
mayor cordialidad. En todas partes se nombraron Comi- 
siones para la mejor representacion posible del pais. Y los 
creditos que para este efecto se han abierto en los diversos 
presupuestos nacionales exceden en conjunto la cantidad de 
dos millones de pesos. Es un hecho que bajo el punto de 
vista pecuniario, mas han contribuido estos paises a favorecer 
la ExDosicion universal, que todos los Estados de los Esta- 
dos Unidos, exceptuando a Illinois. 

Las Companias de vapores, cuyos buques navegan entre 
los puertos de los Estados Unidos y los de las mencionadas 
Republicas y colonias, tambien han coadyuvado eficazmente 
al proposito de la Exposicion, otorgando generosas conce- 
siones y rebajas en los precios de fletes y pasajes. Han 
convenido en transportar libres de costo todos los articulos 
destinados a la Exposicion, excepto los que vengan para 
venderse, y conduciran de retorno a los puertos de su pro- 
cedencia, libres tambien de gasto, todos los que no hubieren 
sido vendidos durante el concurso. Han convenido igual- 
mente en reducir los precios de pasaje de tal manera, que lo 
que cobren sea simplemente lo necesario para cubrir los gastos 
de manutencion y subsistencia de los viajeros. Se cree que 



REPORT OP BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 47 

con estas ventajas sera facil para un grande numero de los 
habitantes de los paises del Sud venir a los Estados Unidos a 
visitar la Exposicion. 

Casi todas las Republicas americanas tendran en los ter- 
renes de la Exposicion un edificio especial construido por 
alias mismas, que sera tipico de su arquitectura local, y en 
que se reunira cuanto pueda mostrar practicamente el ca- 
racter especial de su pueblo, su manera de vivir y su industria. 
Esta ademas convenido que figuraran en la Exposicion grupos 
de individuos y familias de las diversas razas nativas, desde 
los llamadas indios de pueblo de Mexico hasta los salvajes de 
la Tierra del Fuego. 

LA EXPOSICION HISTORICA. 

Merced & un credito liberal que concedio el Congreso ha 
podido esta Oficina preparar para la Exposicion en Chicago 
una coleccion historica de gran interes, y de mucho precio 
bajo el punto de vista escolar, ilustrativa del descubrimiento, 
conquista y poblacion de la America latina, el periodo colo- 
nial, y la epoca de las guerras de su independencia. Un 
oficial de marina de los Estados Unidos se encuentra en estos 
momentos en Espafia, donde fue enviado con ese objeto, 
atendiendo a la construccion de una carabela que sera un 
exacto facsimile de la que trajo a Colon en su primer viaje. 
Estari equipada y tripulada de todo punto como aquella, y 
BUS tripulantes vestirin los mismo trajes que hace cuatro- 
cientos anos estaban en uso. El buque estar^ concluido en 
tiempo suficiente para permitir que se le traiga a los Estados 
Unidos k tomar parte en la revista naval que ha de efectuarse 



48 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

en New York en el mes de Abril de 1893, despues de lo 
cual sera remolcado por los canales y lagos hasta Chicago 
donde permanecera durante la Exposicion. Concluida esta 
se le traera a Washington, donde quedara al ancla en el 
Potomac frente a la fachada meridional de la Mansion del 
Ejecutivo. 

LA COLECCION COMERCIAL. 

Se tiene proyectada igualmente la formacion de una co- 
leccion comercial ilustrativa de las diferentes clases de mer- 
cancias mas adaptables a los gustos y necesidades de los 
consumidores en Mexico, las Americas del Centro y del Sud, 
y las Antillas. Es bien sabido que una de las causas que 
mas estorban el mayor desarrollo del trafico con esos paises, 
consiste en la carencia de conocimientos, por parte de los co- 
merciantes y fabricantes de los Estados Unidos, de la verdadera 
cualidad y naturaleza de los articulos que alii se desea con- 
sumir ; y este obstaculo, que es sin duda muy grande, podra 
sin embargo allanarse, si no del todo al menos en mucha parte, 
presentando k la vista de todos, cuales son los articulos y mer- 
caderias en que nuestros competidores de Europa nos llevan 
la ventaja. 

AUi se mostrara practicamente, por medio de muestras, 
cuales son las mercaderias que tienen mas demanda y pueden 
venderse con mayor vefttaja en aquellos mercados, cuales los 
patrones, dibujos y materiales que mas se usan, 6 disfrutan de 
mayor popularidad, cual el modo de arreglar las mismas mer- 
cancias para que atraigan mas la atencion de los compra- 
dores, y que metodos deben adoptarse para su empaqueta- 



REPORT OF BUREAU OP THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 49 

miento, 6 envase, k fin de transportarlas sin riesgo al interior 

de los paises donde no hay ferro-carriles ni carreteras, y de 

ahorrar al mismo tiempo el pago innecesario de derechos de 

importacion, que generalmente se calculan sobre el peso bruto 

de los fardos 6 cajas. 

Se ha reservado abundante espacio para esta coleccion, y 

los Comisionados especiales que la Exposicion ha enviado d 

las diferentes Republicas y colonias de este hemisferio, lo 

mismo que los diversos empleados del cuerpo diplomitico y 

consular de los Estados Unidos en los mismos paises, se esfuer- 

zan, como se les ha pedido que lo hagan, en que se remitan 

abundantes muestras de esta clase. Se formaran los opor- 

tunos catalogos explicatorios, y se redactaran las circulares 

que sean del caso, valiendose al efecto de escritores familiari- 

zados con los mercados de los respectivos paises, y habra 

ademds siempre a mano, y dispuestas a dar cuantos informes 

se necesiten, y se les pidan, personas competentes y de cono- 

cimiento practico en el asunto. 

En todos estos esfuerzos la Oficina de las Republicas ameri- 

canas esta recibiendo active apoyo y cooperacion cordial de 

parte de muchos comerciantes, a quienes debe indicaciones 

provechosas fundadas en su larga experiencia y mayores cono- 

cimientos. Se tiene el proposito de que estas colecciones 

con tinmen exhibiendose permanentemente, despu6s que se 

termine la Exposicion Universal, bien en Washington, y en 

conexion con esta Oficina, bien en New York, renov&ndose 

de tiempo en tiempo, d fin de que figuren en ellas todos los 

articulos nuevos que se hayan introducido en los mercados 

del Sud, 6 est6n en. uso en el pueblo, y manteni6ndose de 
S. Ex. 8 i 



50 REPORT OF BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

este modo, en todo tiempo, y con arreglo a las diferentes 
epocas y circumstancias, el caracter de ensenanza practica y 
de utilidad para el comercio que se tiene en mira en todo esto. 
Con la esperanza de que esta Oficina continue siendo un 
factor de importancia en el fomento de relaciones cada vez 
mas estrechas con las Republicas de America, y en el aumento 
del comercio con ellas, tengo el honor de suscribirme de V., 
muy atento servidor, 

WILLIAM E. CURTIS. 



o 



BUREAU OP THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

WASHINOTON, U. 8. A. 



. I . C/c/2 .(o 



COSTA RICA. 



BULLETIN NO. 31. JANUARY, 1893. 



1 



LIST OP PREVIOUS BULLETINS. 



X. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. z. 

2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. a. 

3. Patent and Trade-mark Laws of America. 

4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the American Republics. 

5. Import Duties of Mexico. 

6. Foreign Commerce of the American Republics. 

7. Hand Book of Brazil. 

8. Import Duties of Brazil. 

9. Hand Book of Mexico. 

10. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Rico. 

11. Import Duties of Costa Rica. 

12. Import Duties of Santo Domingo. 

13. Commercial Directory of Brazil. 

14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela. 

15. Commercial Directory of Colombia. 

16. Commercial Directory of Peru. 
. 17. Commercial Directory of Chile. 

18. Commercial Directory of Mexico. 

19. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguaj. 
ao. Import Duties of Nicaragua. 

21. Import Duties of Mexico. 

22. Import Duties of Bolivia. 

23. Import Duties of Salvador. 

24. Import Duties of Honduras. 

25. Import Duties of Ecuador. 

26. Commercial Directory of Argentine Republic. 

27. Import Duties of Colombia. 

28. Commercial Directory of Central America. 

29. Commercial Directory of Haiti and Santo Domingo. 

30. Annual Report, 1891. 



Q 



BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

WASHINGTON, U. S. A. 



COSTA RICA. 



o 



BULLETIN NO. 31. JANUARY, 1892. 




r(\w • 6 . 'S^tA/^^ 



BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUARE, WASHINGTON, D. C, U. 8. A. 



Director. — WiLLL\M E. CuRTls. 
Secretary.— Hv^yiYCi L. Bryan. 
Portuguese Translator. — JoHN C. Redman. 
Spanish Translator. — Josfe Ignacio RODRIGUEZ. 
Clerks.— ]o\iii T. SuTER, Jr. 
Leonard G. Myers. 
Stenographer. — Imogen A. Hanna. 
Copyists, — Tillie h. Phillips. 
Lucretia Jackson. 
Rosabelle S. Rider. 



While the greatest possible care is taken to insure accuracy in the publications of the Bureau of the 
American Republics, it will assume no pecuniary responsibility on account of inaccuracies that may 
occur therein. 
II 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Chapter I. Introductory i 

II. Physical and Geographical Features — Political Divisions 4 

III. Climate and Seasons 12 

IV. Provinces and Principal Cities 16 

V. Mineral Resources and Mining Laws 23 

VI. The Forests of Costa Rica 28 

VII. Agricultural and other Resources 32 

VIII. Foreign Commerce 49 

IX. The Interoceanic Canals 59 

X. The Constitution and Laws — Money and Taxation 65 

XI. Transportation and Postal Facilities 76 

XII. Immigration 80 

XIII. Historical and Bibliographical Notes 80 

XIV. The Import Duties of Costa Rica 93 

XV. Parcels Post Convention 127 

XVI. Commercial Director}' 135 

Index 146 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 

Map of Costa Rica Frontispiece. 

Crater of Volcano Irazu 4 

Crest of Volcano Irazu 6 

Executive Mansion, San Jos6 10 

Orchid ** Queen of the Night " 14 

Native Musicians iS 

Port Limon 20 

« 

Mining Camp 23 

Entrance to Los Quemados Mine 25 

' Bread Fruit Tree 28 

Coffee Berry 32 

III 



IV ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page. 

' Coffee Patio 34 

' Drying Coffee 36 

' Shipping Bananas 40 

' Garden Scene 42 

' Country House near the Volcano Irazu 46 

^ Grand Hotel 52 

' Central Park, San Jos6 56 

^ Government House 60 

' . Pier at Puntarenas 68 

^ Students of Young Ladies' Seminary 72 

/ Ox-Shoeing •. 76 

/ A •* Ready-Made " House 80 

La Merced Church 86 

Wholesale Store 93 



Chapter I. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The territory now known as the Republic of Costa Rica was 
discovered by Columbus on the 5th of October, 1502. It was 
called La Costa Rica (the rich coast) on account of the quantity 
of gold the Spaniards found there. If this name of the Re- 
public should need in any way to be confirmed, ample justifica- 
tion therefor would certainly be found, not only in the auriferous 
sands carried by her famous river, called in colonial times La 
Estrella^ now Tilorio, or Changuinola, and in the wealth of her 
mines, especially those of the Aguacate Mountains, which, accord- 
ing to the expression of a distinguished writer, might more properly 
be called Gold Mountains {Monies de ord)^ but also in the wealth 
of her soil and her forests, and in the singularly privileged position 
she occupies in the central part of the American hemisphere, facing 
both oceans and bordering, more or less actually or directly upon 
the great interoceanic canal to be opened either through Panama or 
Nicaragua, or both, which will cause the commerce of the world 
to pass by Costa Rica and pay her tribute. 

The learned Costa Rican writer, Senor Don Joaquin Bemardo 
Calvo, from whose valuable works a considerable part of the infor- 
mation contained in this handbook is derived, has taken pains to 
ascertain the exact date in which the name of his country begins 
to appear in official records. He speaks of a report of certain 
expeditions under the command of Martin Estete, who in 1 529 
explored the San Juan River, then called El Desaguadero (the 
c R 1 J 



2 COSTA RICA. 

outlet), and also of a real cedula (royal ordinance) dated May 
14, 1541, where the name of Costa Rica appears as officially 
given to that section of the New World. * 

In colonial times Costa Rica was a province of what was called 
the Kingdom of Guatemala.t But the uprising of that country 
against Spain, and the proclamation of its independence on the 
15th of September, 1821, secured for her an autonomic govern- 
ment. On the 22d of November, 1824, she became a State of 
the United Provinces of Central America (Las Provincias Unidas 
de Centro-America) ; but upon the dissolution of that confederacy 
she assumed her own sovereignty (August 30, 1848), and has been 
ever since an independent republic. 

The time seems to be rapidly approaching when Costa Rica, 
because of the homogeneous and progressive character of her popu- 
lation, will be called to enjoy the glorious days which Bolivar pre- 
dicted. 

" Her magnificent position," as he said, " between the two oceans, 
may make her in time the emporium of the universe." The inter- 
oceanic canal, whether on the north or the south of her territory, 
or on both sides, while shortening the distances of the world and 
rendering the commercial ties between Europe, Asia, and America 
closer and stronger, will attract to her territory the wealth and the 
enterprise of all parts of the globe. " Perhaps," Bolivar added, "the 
future capital of the earth will be established there, and hold that 

•The works of Seftor Calvo on Costa Rica, which no one who wishes to become 
familiar with that country should fail to study, are: (i) La Repfiblica de Costa Rica. 
Apuntamientosgeogrdficos, estadisticos6hist6ricos. San J os6de Costa Rica. 1887. (2) 
The Republic of Costa Rica. Some facts and figures. Washington, D. C. 1890. 
(3) The Republic of Costa Rica. Chicago and New York. 1890. Another important 
work on Costa Rica is that written in Trench, by Mr. Paul BioUey, and translated into 
English by Mr. Cecil Charles, under the title of •* Costa Rica and her Future." Wash- 
ington, D. C. 1889. 

f The Dictionary of the Castilian language, published by the Royal Spanish Academy, 
twelfth edition, 1884, seems still to consider Costa Rica as a part of Guatemala. In 
defining the word Costa Rican, in Spanish Costarriqueflo, says: ** Natural de Costa Rica. 
Perteneciente 4 este Estado de la RepCiblica de Guatemala." (A native of Costa Rica, 
belonging to this State of the Republic of Guatemala.) 



COSTA RICA. 3 

very station which Constantine wanted for Byzantium when he 
established in it the seat of the empire." 

The fact may be mentioned here that as far back as 1830 the 
name of Costa Rica appears prominently connected with the work 
of an interoceanic canal across the Isthmus of Nicaragua. As 
shown by an appendix to Report No. 145, House of Representa- 
tives, Thirtieth Congress, second session, the government of the 
Central American Republic granted a Dutch company (Decem- 
ber 18, 1830) a concession to open the said canal, and pledged 
itself and the govemors of the provinces of Nicaragua and Costa 
Rica to aid as far as practicable the execution of the work. 

Five years before, Don Antonio Jose Cafiaz, the diplomatic 
representative of Central America in Washington, had written to 
Henry Clay, Secretary of State of the United States, inform- 
ing him that his Government had resolved to carry the enterprise 
to success; that "a company formed of American citizens of 
respectability was ready to undertake the work as soon as a treaty 
with the United States insuring the cooperation of the latter was 
signed ; that he was ready to enter into negotiations for the treaty, 
and that nothing would be more pleasant for Central America than 
to see the generous people of the United States joining her in the 
opening of the canal, sharing the glory of the enterprise, and en- 
joying the great advantages to be derived from it." * 

The famous Danish scientist, Andreas Oersted, so well known 
for his discoveries in natural philosophy and other branches of 
science, made, in 1851, at the request of the Costa Rican Govern- 
ment, a survey for a canal through the river Sapoa to the port of 
Salinas, or Bolanos, in Costa Rica, and suggested some plans 
which, if carried on, might prove, perhaps, to be of immense ad- 
vantage to the country.f 

* Report No. 145, House of Representatives, Thirtieth Congress, second session, 
page 245. 

fThe text of Oersted's report was printed in English, in London, in 1851, by Clowes 
& Sons. 



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COSTA RICA, y 

end to end in a straight line, without taking into account the 
numerous and sometimes deep indentations which it presents and 
are particularly noticeable in the proximity of Colombia, gives 
her a frontage of 180 English miles. Her Pacific coast, if meas- 
ured in the same way from Salinas Bay to Punta Burica, would 
make an ocean front of 270 miles; but as the Gulf of Nicoya, 
on the upper or northern part, and the gulf called Golfo Dulce, 
on the southern or lower end, considerably increase the length 
of the shore line, no exaggeration can be incurred in stating, with 
BioUey and other writers, that it is at least twice as long as that 
of the Atlantic. 

The principal ports of the Atlantic side are five, as follows : 
(1) The Bay of San Juan del Norte, which Costa Rica owns in 
common with her neighbor, the Republic of Nicaragua,* and 
seems to have been selected finally to be the Atlantic end of the 
Nicaragua interoceanic canal. (2) The mouth of the Colorado, 
often spoken of as the best place for the said Atlantic entrance of 
the canal. (3) The port of Moin, at about 70 miles south of 
San Juan del Norte. (4) The port of Limon (Puerto Limon), 
now the terminal point of several lines of steamers, one from 
New Orleans, another from New York, and also from various 
European ports, and which is connected by a railway with San 
Jose, the capital, and other cities of the Republic. (5) Bocas del 
Toro, a large bay near the Colombian limit, formed and protected, 
like the Bay of New York, by a number of islands. 

The principal ports on the Pacific coast are ten, as follows : (1) 
The magnificent Bay of Salinas, which Costa Rica owns in com- 
mon with Nicaragua,t and has been suggested by many as the 
best and most adequate entrance for the Nicaragua interoceanic 

* Article VII of the treaty above cited reads: "Art. vii. The Bay of San Juan del 
Norte, as well as the Salinas Bay, shall be common to both Republics, and, therefore, 
both the advantages of their use and the obligations to contribute to their defense shall 
also be common." 

,t Article vii of the treaty of April 15, 1858, above quoted. 



COSTA RICA. 

canal on the Pacific side.* (2) The port of Santa Elena. (3) The 
port of Murcielagos. (4) The Bay of Culebra, also spoken of as 
an advantageous terminus for the interoceanic canal on the Pacific 
side. (5) The Bay of Los Cocos. (6) The port of Ballena. (7) 
Puntarenas, a port connected by railway with the city of Esparza. 
(8) The port of Herradura. (9) Various ports in the Golfo Dulce, 
among which the great Bay of Pavon claims special mention. (10) 
The great Bay of David, near the southern end of the Republic. 

The mountains which cross the territory of Costa Rica in every 
direction appear to be composed of volcanic, or at least eruptive 
masses, surrounded by sedimentary formations of greater or lesser 
depth and cohesion, according to the localities. The country owes 
to them the diversity of its productions, and its beautiful, pictur- 
esque appearance. The highest mountain of the Republic is 
Pico Blanco (the White Peak) which rises to 11,800 English 
feet above the level of the sea.f Of the six volcanoes which are 
to be found in her territory, two (Irazu and Barba) have not 
given in many years any sign of activity. The other four are 
called Turrialba, Poas, Orosi, and Miravalles. The highest vol- 
cano is Irazu, which reaches an elevation of 1 1,600 English feet 
above the level of the sea. The Miravalles, which is the lowest, 
rises to 4,700 English feet 

The entire territory is crossed by rivers and streams of all sizes, 
which give the soil extraordinary fertility, and supply sufficient 
power for all kinds of industry. Some of them empty into the 
of Nicoya, and receives several affluents, the principal of which is 

* Diego Mercado, in his report to King Phillip III of Spain, dated Guatemala, Janu- 
ary 23, 1620; Oersted, in his "Survey for a canal through the River Sapod to the port 
of Salinas, or Bolafios, in Costa Rica," printed in London, 1851 ; Mr. Felix Belly, in 
his work on the Canal of Nicaragua ; Mr. Thom6 de Gammond, and others. The Nica- 
ragua Transit Company selected also Salinas Bay as its terminal point on the Pacific ; 
and Mr. Thomas C. Reynolds, of the South American Commission, in his highly inter- 
esting report to the President of the United States, dated June 3, 1885, spoke with favor 
of the same idea. 

f Prof. E. D. Cope, in the Journal of the Academy of Natural Science, Philadelphia, 
1875. 



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(The only point on the continent fronn which both oceans are visible.) 



COSTA RICA. 7 

Atlantic Ocean, others into the Pacific, others into the Lake of 
Nicaragua, and others are affluents of the San Juan River. The nav- 
igable rivers of the Republic directly emptying into the Atlantic 
Ocean are the following: (i) The San Juan River, which runs 
along the northern frontier of Costa Rica, and marks her limit 
from Punta de Castilla to a point 3 miles distant from Castillo 
Viejo.* This river was called originally El Desaguadero (The 
Outlet), because it was thought, although erroneously it seems, 
that it carried the waters of the Lake of Nicaragua into the At- 
lantic. Nicaragua has the exclusive dominion and sovereign juris- 
diction over the waters of this river; but the Republic of Costa 
Rica has the perpetual right of free navigation of those waters be- 
tween the two places above named.f The bank itself, between 
the said limits, is Costa Rican territory. (2) The Colorado River, 
which is a branch of the San Juan. Its mouth appears conspicu- 
ously mentioned in many of the plans for the interoceanic canal, 
as its best and most practicable and desirable terminus on the 
Atlantic side. J (3) The Rio de la Estrella, which, as stated in 
the preceding chapter, was famous from the early days of the dis- 
covery on account of its auriferous sands. (4) The river named 
Teliri, or Sixiola. (5) The Changuinola River. 

The principal rivers which directly empty into the Pacific are 
thje following: (1) The Tempisque, whose mouth is on the Gulf 

♦Article ii of the treaty of April 15, 1858, between Costa Rica and Nicaragua, above 
cited. 

+ Article vi of the treaty of April 15, 1858, between Costa Rica and Nicaragua : "The 
Republic of Nicaragua shall have exclusively the dominion and sovereign jurisdiction 
over the waters of the San Juan River, from its origin on the lake to its mouth on the 
Atlantic ; but the Republic of Costa Rica shall have the perpetual right of free naviga- 
tion on the said waters between the said mouth and the point three English miles dis- 
tant from Castillo Viejo." 

t The special report on Costa Rica of the South American Commission (March 3, 
1885) says : ** More important still is the Colorado River, which runs through one por- 
tion of this plain, conducting in its deep channel the waters of the San Juan River to 
the ocean. . . . The harbor at the mouth of the Colorado has deepened and im- 
proved by the additional water that river was discharging from the San Juan." (Ex. 
Doc. No. 50, House of Representatives, Forty-ninth Congress, first session, page 128.) 



8 COSTA RICA. 

the Las Piedras River, navigable for a certain distance. (2) The 
Barranca River, which empties into the ocean at the south of 
Puntarenas. (3) And the Rio Grande, whose mouth is at Tar- 
coles, a little north of Herradura. 

The most important rivers which empty into the Lake of Ni- 
caragua are the following: (1) The Sapoa, which has been men- 
tioned in connection with the' western division of the interoceanic 
canal, and is one of the elements in the demarkation of the dividing 
line with Nicaragua. (2) The Rio Frio, which reaches the Lake 
of Nicaragua, near the place where the San Juan River begins. 

The direct affluents of the San Juan River, which according to 
some writers * furnish (and not the lake) the volume of its waters, 
are the following: (1) The San Carlos River, which has been 
called "the pride of Costa Rica," and is navigable for steamships 
for 60 miles inland from its mouth at the San Juan.f No doubt 
is entertained as to making it navigable for a greater distance, and 
for larger vessels, and thereby adding considerably to the pros- 
perity of that fertile region, only by removing the trunks of trees 
and other obstacles which its current has carried down from the . 
mountains. (2) The Sarapiqui River, which runs almost parallel 
to the San Carlos, at a distance of 20 miles towards the Atlantic, 
and has also a large volume of water. 

The water courses of the northern part of Costa Rica are, ac- 
cording to BioUey, the most important of all, on account of their 
volume and of the advantages they afford to navigation and com- 
merce. The San Carlos and the Sarapiqui are destined to be the 
principal arteries of commerce for the cities of Alajuela and He- 
redia, the former furnishing to a great extent the volume of water 
for the Ochoa dam of the Nicaragua Canal. 

* Among them the distinguished Costa Rican historian and diplomatist, Don Manuel 
M. de Peialia. 

f In the special report on Costa Rica, above mentioned, page 128, the Commissioners 
(Thomas C. Reynolds and Solon O. Thacher) said: "From this head of navigation 
(the junction of the two rivers) there is an easy and practicable route for a railroad to 
Alajuela, where it would meet a railroad now in operation to San Jos6." 



COSTA RICA. 



Politically and for the purposes of government, Costa Rica is 
divided into seven departments, or districts, five of which are 
called "provincias," and the other two "comarcas." The differ- 
ence between the former and the latter seems to consist chiefly in 
the number and density of their respective population. 

The provincias and their capitals are as follows: (i) San Jose; 
capital San Jose, which is at the same time the capital of the Re- 
public and the seat of the Government. (2) Alajuela; capital 
Alajuela. (3) Cartago; capital Cartago. (4) Heredia; capital 
Heredia. (5) Guanacaste; capital Liberia. 

The comarcas, with their respective capitals, or chief towns, are 
as follows : (1) The Comarca de Limon, a long strip of land, about 
50 miles wide in the widest part, forming the whole front of Costa 
Rica on the Atlantic side ; capital, Puerto Limon. (2) The Co- 
marca de Puntarenas, which runs along the Pacific coast of the 
Republic from the Gulf of Nicoya to the Colombian boundary, 
and is very narrow on its northern and central parts, but about 40 
or 45 miles wide near the southern frontier; capital, Puntarenas. 

According to the historian Juarroz, the population of Costa 
Rica in 1778 was 24,536 inhabitants; when the census of 1826 
was taken, the number was 61,846; and 74,565 in 1835. The 
ibllowing statement shows the population of the Republic by Prov- 
incias and Comarcas, according to the census of 1844^ 1864, 1893, 
and 1888:* 



Provinces. I 1844. 



1864. 1SS8. 1888. 



San Jos6 25, 949 I 37, 206 



Alajuela 10, 837 

Cartago ' 19, 884 

Heredia 17, 236 

■Guanacaste j 5, 193 

Puntarenas ' 883 

Limon ; 



27. 171 
23,064 

17. 791 

10,431 

4,836 



56, 162 


63,406 


45. 205 


51.087 


30, 428 


33. 887 


25.818 1 


29,409 


14.902 


16, 323 


7,700 


8,409 


1,858 


1.770 



Total 79, 982 



120, 499 182, 073 204, 291 



♦According to official statistical information, the total number of negroes in Costa Rica 
«t the present time is 839, most of them laborers on the railroads and natives of Jamaica. 



lO COSTA RICA. 

According to the Anuario Estadistico de la Repiiblica de Costa 
Rica for 1890, which is a Government publication, the population 
of the country on the 31st of December, 1890, was 238,782. 
This includes about 3,500 Indians in the district of Talamanca, in 
the Comarca of Limon, and in that of Guatusos, in the northern 
part of the province of Alajuela, near the Lake of Nicaragua. 

A most important feature of the population of Costa Rica con- 
sists in its ethnical constitution and its decided homogeneous 
character. Different in this respect from many other nations of 
Spanish America, Costa Rica has scarcely any negroes, and while 
among the elements of her population some specimens of mixed 
Spanish and Indian races are found, the great majority consists of 
white people, and as robust, healthy, intelligent, honest, and law 
abiding as can be found anywhere else in the world. 

The number of foreigners in Costa Rica, according to the Anua- 
rio Estadistico above cited, is 7,049. Prominent among them 
are the Italians, who number 1,317, and represent, therefore, much 
more than one-sixth of the total. The total number of Spanish- 
speaking foreigners. Central Americans, Mexicans, South Ameri- 
cans, Cubans, Porto Ricans, and European Spaniards, is 3,256. 
The citizens of the United States established in the country, as 
given by the census, are only 258, and the subjects of Her British 
Majesty (from the United Kingdom, 259, and from Jamaica, 907) 
are, in all, 1,166. 

As Costa Rica is mostly an agricultural, or perhaps still more 
properly, a coffee-growing country, a large part of her people consist 
of farmers and farm laborers, cart drivers, and muleteers. Senor 
Calvo gives the following figures: Farmers and planters, 7,479; 
day laborers, 18,278; cart drivers, 1,924; muleteers, 123; total, 
27,804 males; while among the females are included domestic 
servants (2,819), washerwomen (5,300), cooks (3,947), and linen- 
ironers (890), making a total of 1 2,956. 

Significant features of the census are that 17,174 inhabitants of 
the Republic are inscribed as students of higher branches; that the 






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COSTA RICA. 1 I 

pupils of the primary schools, both public and private, number 
23,000; and that there are 366 teachers and 360 governesses. Of 
lawyers there were only 78; physicians 25, pharmacists 44, and 
clergymen 119. 

As shown by the figures above printed, San Jose is now, and 
has been at all times, the most populated province of Costa Rica, 
as more than one-third of all the inhabitants of the Republic are 
settled within its limits. But, relatively speaking, that is, taking 
into consideration the area of the province and the relation between 
its extent and the number of inhabitants, Heredia is more densely 
populated than San Jose. In the whole Republic the ratio is 10 
inhabitants (Indians included) to the square mile. 

The provinces are subdivided in cantones (cantons), as follows : 

San Jose, seven cantones: San Jose, Escasu, Desamparados, 
Puriscal, Aserri, Mora, and Tarrazu. 

Alajuela, seven cantones: Alajuela,San Ramon, Grecia, Atenas^ 
San Mateo, Naranjo, Palmares. 

Cartago, three cantones: Cartago, Paraiso, La Union. 

Heredia, five cantones: Heredia, Barba, Santo Domingo, Santa 
Barbara, San Rafeel. 

Guanacaste, six cantones : Liberia, Nicoya, Santa Cruz, Bagaces^ 
Las Canas, and Carrillo. 

The Comarca of Puntarenas comprises three cantones, which 
are Puntarenas, Esparza, and Golfo Dulce. 

The Comarca of Limon forms only one canton, which carries 
its own name. 

The Republic of Costa Rica is divided into eight judicial dis- 
tricts, with a court of first instance for each. The judicial districts 
have the same extent, limits, name, and capital as the provinces 
or comarcas themselves; but San Jose is divided into two districts. 

Ecclesiastically, the whole territory of the Republic constitutes 
a diocese of the Roman Catholic Church, at whose head there is 
a bishop, residing at San Jose. The diocese is divided into forty- 
two parishes. 



Chapter III. 



CLIMATE AND SEASONS. 

Although Costa Rica, geographically, is a tropical country, her 
climate is not tropical, except on the coasts, and even there the 
heat is not excessive except at unusual times, being tempered 
by trade winds and sea breezes. In respect of climate the Re- 
public may be divided into three different zones or regions, which 
the people have very appropriately designated with the names of 
iierras calientes (hot lands), tierras templadas (temperate lands), and 
tierras frias (cold lands). 

The hot lands are those which form the low region, and extend 
from the seashore on the east and west, and from the right bank 
of the San Juan River, on the north, to a line in the interior of the 
country on the skirts of the mountains, 3,000 feet above the level 
of the sea. There the mean annual temperature, generally higher 
on the Pacific than on the Atlantic side, varies from 72° to 82° 
Fahrenheit. This region, which comprises almost one-third of the 
whole territory of the Republic, is admirably adapted to the culti- 
vation of the banana, cocoa, vanilla bean, sugar cane, and other 
tropical plants. 

The temperate lands, which form the second region, extend 
from the above-mentioned line, 3,000 feet above the level of the 
sea, to another line towards the top of the mountains, at an altitude 



COSTA RICA. 13 

of 7,500 feet. This section of the country the South American 
Commissioners of 1884-85' described as follows: 

The valley and lower slopes of the mountains of Costa Rica, constituting its 
tierra templada, are the populous portions of the State. They possess a climate 
of wonderful salubrity, are well watered and very fertile. There is grown the 
great staple of export of the country, coffee. The country surrounding San Jos6, 
the present capital, and Cartago, the old Spanish seat of government, is very 
largely devoted to this branch of farming. Other products of the temperate 
zone flourish here, but coffee is the chief crop, and it is the principal source of 
revenue to the planters of the country. Sugar cane and fine tobacco also flour- 
ish in this altitude, and are raised in sufficient quantities to supply the domes- 
tic demand, but not for export. The coffee estates arc small, generally from 
10 to 80 acres in extent; the tree is raised without shade trees, save that when 
the plants are small, banana trees are planted to protect them; but as soon as 
the coffee well covers the ground no further protection is needed. The fields, 
however, are all fenced with high hedges, usually of palmetto, cactus, and other 
flowering shrubs, and these rows serve to break the winds and to some extent 
modify the rays of the sun. 

Interspersed with the coffee fields are pastures, patches of corn and bananas, 
beans, and vegetables, while orange trees are seen here and there laden with 
fruit. 

The houses of the people are near together, built of large sun-dried adobe 
brick, roofed with tile, the common covering of all houses in Spanish America, 
and are comfortable abodes for the laborers of the land. The valleys are not 
plains, but uneven, broken through with numerous swift-flowing streams, and 
the inclosing mountains are not abrupt, and their declivities are generally tilled 
to their summits. 

It would be difficult to imagine a more lovely landscape, a more beautiful 
blending of streams, fields, villages, white and glowing, among the green foliage 
of coffee plantations, and mountain slopes dotted with the vivid green of sugar 
cane, and the gray and brown pastures of fields of corn, than can be seen in the 
valley of San Jos6.* 

The third section, or cold lands, extend from the altitude above 
mentioned, 7,500 feet above the level of the sea, to the top of the 
mountains. The difference between the temperature of day and 
night is felt here most keenly. Not infrequently the ground 

♦Special report on Costa Rica, March 3, 1885. Ex. Doc, No. 50. House of Rep- 
resentatives, Forty-ninth Congress, first session, page 129. 



14 COSTA^ RICA. 

appears covered with hoar frost in the morning. Snow, however, 
is extremely rare. 

The mean annual temperature in the temperate lands varies from 
57° to 68° F. 

There are only two well-defined seasons in Costa Rica, and are 
called verano (summer) and invierno (winter). The summer is 
the dry season, and generally begins in November and ends in 
April. The rainy season, or winter, extends from May to the end 
of October. On the Pacific side rains are less frequent and copious 
than on the side of the Atlantic. Tempests, cyclones, hurricanes, 
and other calamities which afflict periodically other lands are 
unknown in Costa Rica. The topographical conditions of the 
country also exempt her people from any fear of floods. Even 
the earthquakes, to which all volcanic countries are more or less 
frequently subject, are not as severe in Costa Rica as in other parts 
of Central America. One of the severest ever felt was that of 
December 30, 1888, which shook several public buildings at San 
Jose, and caused great damage in some other cities. 

According to the Anuario Estadistico of 1890, the number of 
deaths which occurred that year was 5,485, or 1 to every 38 in- 
habitants. The fact has been observed for many years that the 
mortality of children under the age of 10, represents 50 and some- 
times 60 per cent of the total. According to Seiior Calvo, BioUey, 
and other writers, the explanation of this is to be found, not in any 
climatic peculiarity, or in anything which might be construed as 
poverty, or lack of means in the people, but in many erroneous 
ideas about the proper way of nursing and taking care of the 
children which prevail among the peasants. The statistics often 
show a great number of cases of longevity. The census of 1883 
recorded 140 people over 90 years of age, and 21 who had passed 
the age of 100. 

The study of the climatology of Costa Rica has made great pro- 
^gress in the last years, owing to the intelligent attention given to 



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Orchid, ** Queen of the Night." 



COSTA RICA. 15 

it by the Government. The Meteorologic Institute of San Jose 
has been enlarged and organized so as to make it a physico- 
geographical and meteorologic establishment, and according to what 
BioUey says, the professor who has been placed at its head, Mr. H. 
Pittier, is a most competent person, having all the necessary quali- 
fications to satisfactorily perform the duties which are intrusted to 
him. An interesting bulletin was published in 1890 by Mr. Pit- 
tier, under the title of Notes on the Climate and Geography of the 
Republic of Costa Rica. 



Chapter IV. 



PRINCIPAL CITIES AND PROVINCES. 

San Jose, the capital, is in every respect the most important city 
of the Republic. It is not only (ever since 1823) the seat of the 
National Government, but also the capital of the province of San 
Jose, and the most populous of all. It is situated at an altitude 
of 3,868 feet above the level of the sea, and has a population of 
24,000 inhabitants. It stands in a beautiful valley, whose area is 
of about 2,000 square kilometers, and in the immediate neighbor- 
hood of two small rivers, the Torres and the Maria Aguilar. Its 
latitude is 9° 56' north, and its longitude 84° west of Greenwich. 

San Jose has been much visited by strangers and is provided with 
hotels which offer the traveler all desirable comforts. The most 
important of its public buildings are the National Palace, the 
President's Palace, the Palace of Justice, the Bishop's Palace, the 
old University of St. Thomas, with its museum, its library, and 
its archives, the Zion College, the Ecclesiastical * Seminary, the 
Young School, the Lyceum of Costa Rica, the Hospital of St. 
John of God, founded in 1799 by Bishop Tristan, the Asylum for 
the Insane, the Orphan Asylum, the Market House, the Bank of 
the Union, the National Liquor Factory, and the Military Barracks. 

The Cathedral is an imposing edifice, and next to it the Church 
of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (Nuestra Senora del Carmen) 
commands attention. San Jose has some other churches, and also 
a Masonic Temple built in 1868, and one Protestant place of 
worship which is attended by residents of all denominations. 
16 



COSTA RICA. 17 

The city is lighted at night with electricity. It has an aqueduct 
provided with all the necessary appurtenances, filters, fountains, 
etc., built according to modern methods and with material sent 
from the United States. 

San Jose is connected by rail with the port of Limon on the 
Atlantic and soon will be united also with the port of Puntarenas 
on the Pacific. The railroad depot, storehouses, workshops, etc., 
are admirably adapted for their purposes. The cemeteries are fine, 
and beautifully kept, and also the parks, especially the Central 
Park, and the Park of Morazan. The houses in. the principal 
streets are one and two stories high, and have a pleasant appear- 
ance. They are built in the Spanish fashion, with patios or court- 
yards, generally adomed with plants and flowers, and sometimes 
with a fountain in the center. The police are organized under 
strict military discipline. 

From a commercial point of view San Jose is also the most im- 
portant city of the Republic. It is the residence of the wealthiest 
merchants, and the center of business. It has many first-class 
stores, three breweries, several factories, and all sorts of shops and 
commercial establishments. The National Liquor Factory has no 
rival in Central America. 

The San Jose University has a library, which is also the national 
library, with thousands of interesting books. The Intemational 
Club, which has commodious quarters and counts among its mem- 
bers almost all noted Costa Ricans, has also a library of 5,000 vol- 
umes. The San Jose Philharmonic Society is a very popular 
association, which has worked with considerable success to secure 
the cultivation of music and the musical taste which is noticed 
in the country. There is also a National School of Music, sup- 
ported by the Govemment. 

The principal hotels are The Gran Hotel, C. de Benedictis, pro- 
prietor; Hotel Frances, Jose Vigne, proprietor; Hotel Victor, 
Victor Aubert, proprietor; Hotel de Roma, Jose Sacripanti, 



18 COSTA RICA. 

proprietor; the Cafe and Restaurant de Paris, Messrs. Rava & 
AUard, proprietors; and others. 

Desamparados, situated about 5 kilometers southeast of San 
Jose, is the chief town of the canton of its name. It has fine 
streets, handsome churches, good, comfortable houses, and is the 
center of a very rich agricultural district. 

Escasu is the chief town of another canton, to which it also gives 
its name, and is situated about 5 miles southwest of San Jose. It 
is the center of a district where coffee of the most excellent qual- 
ity is abundantly raised, and has a delightful and healthy climate. 

Puriscal, which is the principal center of population of its can- 
ton, is situated 47 kilometers southwest of San Jose, and is pro- 
gressing rapidly. The lands which surround it are noted for their 
wonderful fertility. It also possesses, near by, some coal mines, 
which are said to be rich. 

The town of Aserri, situated about 12 kilometers southeast ot 
the capital of the Republic, is the center of a flourishing coffee- 
growing district, and the chief town of the canton of its name. 
It was founded before the days of the Spanish rule. 

Pacaca is the chief town of the canton of Mora. It is situated 

19 kilometers southwest of San Jose, and is also an old Indian 
town. The canton of Mora is remarkable, among other things, for 
the beauty of the pita straw hats manufactured there. 

San Marcos is the chief town of the canton of Tarrazu. It is 
situated about 70 kilometers south of San Jose, in a very moun- 
tainous region, and is a healthy and invigorating resort, frequented 
by sick people. 

PROVINCE OF CARTAGO. 

The city of Cartago, the capital of the province of its name, 
situated in the beautiful Cartago Valley, in olden times the Guarco 
Valley, at the foot of the volcano Irazu,4,93o feet above the level 
of the sea, is one of the best located cities of Costa Rica. 



.n' 



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Native Musicians. 



COSTA RICA. 



19 



Its Streets are beautiful and its climate excellent. It is on the 
line of the railroad to the Atlantic and has a population of 7,800 
inhabitants. Its churches and other buildings, both public and pri- 
vate, are worthy of attention. 

Cartago was founded in 1563 by Don Juan Vazquez de Coro- 
nado, and was the seat of the Government until 1823. It is about 
13 miles east of San Jose, and is connected by a tramway with 
the celebrated Bella Vista hot springs, at the foot of the Irazu, which 
are visited every year by great numbers of people. The tramway 
is 3 miles long, and the trip is made in half an hour. The water 
of these hot springs {aguas calientes) has a temperature of 135° 
Fahrenheit, and, according to the general belief, is a sure remedy, 
used externally in baths, for rheumatism, gout, and diseases of all 
kinds in the skin. The following is the analysis of the Bella 
Vista water, made in September 2, 1881, in New York City, by 
Mr. C. F. Chandler, a doctor of pharmacy : 

Grains in one United States gallon (231 cubic incites). 



Sodium chloride 61. 2922 

Bicarbonate lithiu^i Traces. 

Bicarbonate sodium 15. 1568 

Bicarbonate nagnesium 13. 0165 

Bicarbonate calcium 56. 0627 

Bicarbonate barium o. 2624 

Bicarbonate strontium Traces. 

Bicarbonate iron i. 3588 

Bicarbonate copper Traces. 

Bicarbonate manganese Traces. 



Sulphate potass ium 2. 5775 

Sulphate sodium 37. 7258 

Phosphate sodium o. 1108 

Biborate sodium i. 7669 

Arsenite sodium Traces. 

Alumina sodium o. 1166 

Silica sodium 3. 6157 

Organic matter, Traces. 



Total 193. 0627 



The town of Paraiso, which is the principal center of popula- 
tion in the canton of the same name, is comparatively modern, as 
it was founded in 1832. The lands of the canton are fertile, and 
have been devoted to the cultivation of coffee and sugarcane and 
to the raising of cattle. 

La Union is the chief town of the canton of its name. It is a 
beautiful, healthy, and flourishing city. Its importance rapidly 



20 COSTA RICA. 

increases, not only on account of its climatic conditions and the 
beauty of the location, but also because it is the center of one of 
the richest coffee districts of the Republic. 

PROVINCE OF ALAJUELA. 

The city of Alajuela, which is the capital of the province, and 
also the chief town of its own canton, is situated at about 18 kilo- 
meters from the capital of the Republic, and has a population of 
7,250 inhabitants. It is on the line of the railroad to the Atlantic^ 
and about 45 miles from the Pacific coast. It has a high school, 
well organized, and supported by the Government. 

Grecia is the chief town of the canton of its name, and the cen- 
ter of a rich agricultural district, which excites attention, among 
other things, for the flourishing sugar plantations which are found 
within its limits. Coffee is largely cultivated here, and much atten- 
tion is paid also to the raising of cattle. 

San Ramon is also the chief town of a canton which bears the 
same name. It is the center of a rich district, and has a public 
library and some newspapers. 

Naranjo is the chief town of the canton of the same name, and 

deserves special mention, not only for the fertility of the country 

which surrounds it, but for the energy and public spirit of its 

• inhabitants. This canton is now in rapid progress and stands 

within the rich and famous valley of San Carlos. 

PROVINCE OF HEREDIA. 

The city of Heredia, the capital of the province, has now a popu- 
lation of 7,300 inhabitants, a good high school, and many build- 
ings of importance. It is connected by rail with the provinces of 
San Jose, Cartago, and Alajuela and with the port of Limon on 
the Atlantic. 

In 1751 it contained only 93 houses (24 adobe and tile-rooted 
buildings, and 69 thatched houses) and one church; but now it 



It .\. 



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COSTA RICA. 21 

is one of the most flourishing cities of the Republic. It covers 
more than loo manzanas^ and has two very imposing churches, a 
fine waterworks system, and a literary and scientific association, 
called " El Estudio,** which has attained great reputation in the 
country. 

The town of Barba is the principal center of population of its 
canton, and one of the oldest cities in Costa Rica. Its proximity 
to the source of the river Sarapiqui insures for it commercial ad- 
vantages of great importance. 

The town of Santo Domingo, said to be the home of the most 
beautiful women of Costa Rica, is the chief town of the rich can- 
ton of the same name. 

Santa Barbara, situated between Barba and Alajuela, is another 
town looking forward to a great future when it shall have easy 
communication by the San Carlos and the Sarapiqui with the 
San Juan River and all ports on the north. 

San Rafael is the chief town of the fertile canton of the same 
name. 

PROVINCE OF GUANACASTE. 

The extensive province of Guanacaste is an important section 
of the Republic, not only for the variety of its products, but for 
its topographical position. It is divided into five cantons, Liberia, 
Nicoya, Santa Cruz, Bagaces, and Las Canas. The city of* 
Liberia is the capital of the province, and its central location and 
advancement have made it so. Its population is 5,692. Santa Cruz 
and Nicoya, which follow it in importance, are both in the penin- 
sula which forms one side of the Gulf of Nicoya, and have respect- 
ively a population of 5,697 and 4,588 inhabitants. Stock-farm- 
ing and the felling of timber are the principal occupations of the 
inhabitants. 

COMARCA OF PUNTARENAS. 

The city of Puntarenas is the capital of this comarca, and has a 
population of 3,500 inhabitants. It was for a long time the 



22 COSTA kICA. 

principal port of entry of the country ; but now, owing to the de- 
velopment of the commerce on the Atlantic side, its harbor is not 
as often visited by foreign vessels as formerly. Puntarenas enjoys 
a healthful climate the greater part of the year, and in spite of its 
tropical temperature serves as a pleasure resort for well-to-do fami- 
lies of the interior, during the dry season. It is connected by rail 
with Esparza, and soon will be with Alajuela. It has good build- 
ings and an excellent iron pier. 

COMARCA OF LIM6n. 

Puerto Limon is the capital of this comarca. It is connected 
by rail with the cities of San Jose, Cartago, Heredia, and Ala- 
iuela. The city is growing rapidly and in a way entirely differ- 
ent from everything found elsewhere in Central America. The 
houses, some of them 3 stories high, are built in the American 
style. The largest steamers can come alongside the pier, a con- 
venience unknown elsewhere in Central America. 



V 



MIN^RM. R>:...OUf'C: 



'Nil i.'. 1. 



i-. rich m!:if- <»r :!:" T;j\^h-co\ rt? <: . 
'..irl\' expl-^i.uioris \'i\.,A* at TalriiiLiiH i 
.'.J (»1 *.!'!( LN*-h;iUi-" ot ]' iiKt'na. ri-:>i • 

« I ^6^, (Milt'H'ii an. ^ ^:».' '.:'■'/" To . .1 
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I-.'.r'iii livfTS vh'^ h tip.Dtv \\\u,' iiir * .. .; 
oi thr \rlaTnii. 'r^iunu!- ^ar..i>. 

Tlir j^oi(l iir:ir> of i\)>* \ Ki("a .v'iiJi liavr -m i..i 
;,:• ar<^:-t or!'!>r:rv. w.idm iy, th<' iii'iit ^ or 'h.' .Xl: '•• ? • 

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iSi >'. vvhci' l)i>hnj» (larc'/u ill' ri pn lafc » ! ;>i-'', 






24 COSTA RICA. 

locality, and told his attendants that he had noticed everywhere in 
that country the most valuable ores. An examination soon after 
made, showed the accuracy of Bishop Garcia's observations, and 
in 1825 two rich mines, respectively named. La Sacra Familia and 
San Miguel, commenced to be worked. No labor was under- 
taken in the real Monte del Aguacate mines until after Costa iTica 
became an independent nation. 

It may be said, however, that this great wealth, which consists 
not only in gold but also in silver, copper, and lead, is not yet de- 
veloped. TKe mining industry of the Republic is still in its 
infancy. It has had to struggle with all sorts of difficulties, and 
the wonder is how it has been able to survive. In the first place 
it had to pass through the severe ordeal which more or less intensely 
befell all the nations of Spanish America while struggling for their 
independence. In the second place, it had to overcome obstacles 
which might be called insuperable, and depended in some instances 
upon the lack of skilled labor, or proper machinery and improved 
appliances, and in some others upon the scanty supply of quick- 
silver or its high price. In all cases the difficulties and the cost 
of transportation, especially in the days when no railroads existed 
in the country, acted also as a check to enterprise, and prevented 
capital from being invested in mines, particularly when agricul- 
ture offered a field more ample, more remunerative, and less 
difficult to operate. It is, therefore, much to the credit of Costa 
Rica that she can make such a fine exhibit of her efforts in this 
respect, as appears from her Anuario Estadistico of J 890, the 
reports of the United States consuls, and the books of Sefior 
Calvo and Mr. BioUey. Up to 1890 the gold mines of Aguacate 
alone had yielded about $7,000,000. 




Los QuEMADOS Mine. 



r I' 






te-.:.. J 



COSTA RICA. 



25 



The following schedule shows the names, situation, and kinds 
or quality of the mines thus far worked in the Republic : 



Name. 


Canton. 


Situation. 


Minerals. 


La Trinidad 


Esparza 

Alajuela 

Puntarenas . . 

Alajuela 

do 

...do 

..%.do 

do 


Upper end of fiver Ciruelitas. 

Mount of Aguacate 

Bank of river Seco . 

Mount of Aguacate 

Corralillo 

....do 

do 


Gold and sflver. 


Sacra Familia 

La Uni6Q 


Do. 
Do. 


La Minita 


Do. 


Mina de los Castro 

San Rafael 

Mina de los Oreamuno. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Ouebrada-Honda 


Quebrada-IIonda 

Corralillo 


Do. 


Machuca 


do 


Do. 


Trinidad del Aguacate. 
Pena Grande 


do 


do 


Do. 


San Ram6n. 
do 


Hill of San Ram6n 


Do. 


Mina de Acosta 


Banks of river Jesus 

Banks of river Agua-caliente. 
Cordillera of Aguacate 

Sardinal Coast 


Do. 




Cartago 

San Ram6n. . 

Sardinal 

do 


Copper. 
Gold, silver, and 

lead. 

Copper 

Do. 


Palmares 


Mancuerna 


Mata-Palo 


....do 

....do 

do 


Puerta de Palacio 

Hoja Chiques 

Chapernal 


....do 

....do 

....do 


Do. 
Do. 


do 


Do. 







Great efforts have been made in gold mining in the Ciruelitas 
districts ever since 1888. These mines are 18 miles north of the 
port ot Puntarenas, and are situated at an altitude varying from 
1,500 to 2,000 feet above the level of the sea. The climate is 
salubrious, water and timber are abundant, and the roads are in good 
condition. The proximity to the sea dispenses with the necessity 
of having only high-grade quartz gold. 

Mr. Beckford Mackey, United States consul at Jose, Costa Rica, 
in an interesting report, dated April 13, 1891, on the mines and 
mining laws of that country, expresses himself as follows : 

The Andean spur of the Pacific is the mining re^on of Costa Rica. Min- 
ing has not as yet had a fair chance in this country, as prior to a very recent 
date the methods in vogue were of the crudest and most unscientific description. 
Within the last four years several English companies have embarked their capi- 
tal in Costa Rican mines. The prospect is reported to be encouraging. The 
mines of Mount Aguacate have been worked by various companies during a 



26 COSTA RICA. 

period extending over many years, and have yielded almost all the gold that 
this country has produced. The Trinidad and the Tres Hermanos are owned 
by English companies. There is a 20-stamp mill at La Uni6n, and another at 
Los Tres Hermanos. La Trinidad has a 40-stamp mill. 

The mining laws of the Republic are the same old Spanish 
ordinances, more or less^ changed in the year 1830. The code is 
diffuse, verbose, technical, and so obscure as to be at times scarcely 
intelligible. A considerable portion of the laws is obsolete. The 
policy of the Government is exceedingly favorable to the mining 
industry, as it is indeed to every enterprise of public utility, and 
foreigners are in every respect allowed the same privileges as citi- 
zens of the country. No permission or license from the Govern- 
ment is required to work a mine ; but denouncement is necessary 
to obtain a perfect title. The first denouncer acquires the owner- 
ship of the mine. Mines may be denounced either on public or 
private lands by any person whatever. When a mine is situated 
on private lands the denouncer will have to indemnify the land 
owner for the damages caused to his property, as assessed by experts 
appointed by the parties. The legal extent of a mining claim is 
200 varas* in length by 100 in breadth. If the mine is situated in 
a region where no others had been discovered before, the discoverer 
will be allowed to denounce three claims on the main vein and 
one claim on every minor vein. In all other cases no person is 
entitled to more than one claim, and what is called the "contin- 
uation " thereof, that is, the right to follow the vein through one 
additional contiguous claim. Mines abandoned for one year be- 
come vacant and are again denounceable. The denouncement of 
all mines is to be made by written memorial addressed to the judge^ 
called "de lo Contencioso Administrativo," who has jurisdiction ia 
cases in which the Government is interested as a party to the trans- 
action. This memorial shall set forth the name, residence, place of 
birth, and occupation of the denouncer, and shall contain as minute a 

*One vara is about 33 inches. 



COSTA RICA. 27 

description of the locality in which the mine is situated, and of all 
its distinctive marks and signs, as is required to perfectly identify 
the claim denounced. A notice of the denouncement must be pub- 
lished three times in the official gazette, and all persons interested 
summoned to appear and set forth their objections, if they have any. 
If no contestant appears, the denouncer is given sixty days time 
to sink a shaft on the mine at least 10 varas deep, so as to en- 
able the Govemment engineer to do as explained hereafter. As soon 
as the sixty days are over the judge will appoint an engineer, who 
will go to the place and measure, examine, and draw a plan of the 
mine. If no difficulty arises, the denouncement is then complete. 
The only expenses attendant on this process are the fee and ex- 
penses of the engineer. 

Mining machinery is admitted without the payment of custom 
duties. There is no Government or municipal tax levied on mines. 
The law makes no distinction between the mines of precious and 
the other metals. 



Chapter VI. 



THE FORESTS OF COSTA RICA. 

Costa Rica, like all the other countries of Central and South 
America, has in her fojests incalculable wealth, but up to the pres- 
ent time, and owing to various reasons, among which the sparseness 
of population and the ever-increasing demands of the coffee indus- 
try are prominent, but little attention has been given, and only 
in the localities near the sea, to this great element of prosperity. 

The Costa Rican forests abound in mahogany, cedar, rosewood, . 
lignum-vitiE, granadillo, and many other precious woods suitable 
for cabinet-making and building purposes. In recent times dye- 
woods have decreased in value, owing to the low price of mineral 
colors. But there are trees of this class in Costa Rica which, if 
properly cultivated, would amply pay for the efforts ma4e. Prom- 
inent among these are the annotto^ much in use for coloring but- 
ter, cheese, and all kinds of food ; the curcuma (a root similar in 
appearance to ginger); the indigo, and the famous Brazil wood. 
The indigo of Central America is of a superior quality and brings 
a high price in all markets. The native industry utilizes the 
<:oloring properties of a great number of other plants which have 
no commercial value. 

Medicinal plants also abound in all parts of the country. Among 
them mention may be made of the castor bean, the croton, the 
cassia, the sarsaparilla, the ipecacuanha, the gingef, the rhubarb, 
the tamarind, the licorice, and a host of others, which might well 
attract the attention of botanists and chemists. The trees called 

28 



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'if* .» .^- •' • » . • '■• Jt-i.-- . ' i }ii ••* 




Bread Fruit Tree. 



COSTA RICA. 29 

quinquinas falsas contain in their bark abundant quantities of 
quinine. 

The india rubber gathered in the Costa Rica forests is obtained 
from the Castilloa elastica. In former times the method of gather- 
ing the rubber frequently resulted in the complete destruction of 
the tree. But the Government has taken the matter in hand, and 
by granting premiums to the planters, and other adequate meas- 
ures, has succeeded in securing a great improvement. 

There are also a vast number of resinous plants. Several species 
oi quiebrahacha produce a gum similar to gum arable. The copal 
resin is abundant everywhere in the lowlands of the north, and on 
the Pacific coast various species of the myroxylum plant, which 
yields the well-known balsam of Peru and Tolu, have been found 
recently in large quantities. This brief review of the forestal 
wealth of Costa Rica, sufficient to show what a vast field for for- 
eign enterprise, intelligence, and capital is found there in this line, 
will be aptly supplemented by an interesting report of Mr. John 
Schroeder, United States consul at San Jose, dated March 28, 
1885, which reads as follows: 

Augmented trade between manufacturing countries seeking markets for their 
overproduction, and countries whose income principally depends upon the sale 
of the natural products of their soil, can only take place when these primitive 
products find reciprocal customers. 

As the consumption of the Central and South American hard-wood materials is 
yearly increasing, and these countries are in steady need of American goods, it is 
timely to call the attention to the magnificent hard woods of Costa Rica, especially 
in the San Carlos and adjoining valleys. Undoubtedly equally good timber regions 
exist in other States, for instance in Bluefield Valley, Nicaragua, but this and 
other territories lie outside my consular district, and I shall therefore here only 
make a statement of the San Carlos timber region. 

The first condition for successful export of logs and lumber, if not always an 
easy, is a feasible transportation from the woods to the shipping place. Through 
the northern part of Costa Rica a number of rivers run from the Andes in a 
northerly direction and empty into Lake Nicaragua, and Rio San Juan del 
Norte, whose water, through the deep channel of the Rio Colorado, empties 



30 COSTA RICA. 

into the Atlantic. The whole territory from the foot of the Andes to the Rio 
San Juan forms a sloping level, without intervening mountain ranges between 
the more or less parallel-flowing rivers. 

From its principal river this territory is generally named San Carlos Valley. 
The whole valley is covered with hard woods, counting more than thirty differ- 
ent sorts. 

With exception of the Guatusos, an Indian tribe 800 strong, and a few settlers 
in and near the Andes Mountains, this territory is unpopulated. Still its tim- 
ber has not been untouched, as thievish bands, often to the number of several 
hundred, for scores of years have scoured the San Carlos Valley, destroying 
nearly all the valley rubber trees and shipping to Greytown materials of hard 
wood growing near the river banks. The damage done foots up to millions of 
dollars, but there is nevertheless an almost incalculable amount of first-class 
hard wood left, as the depredators have not operated with regular lumber camps 
and machines. 

San Carlos Valley, with surrounding territory, contains about one-sixteenth 
part of the whole of Costa Rica, or about 2,000 English square miles, equal to 
1,280,000 acres, and by an estimate of 1,000 cubic feet hard wood per acre the 
above number of acres will give 1,280,000,000 cubic feet. In lumber yards at 
New Orleans or New York this would sell at 75 cents per cubic foot, making 
the total value of the product equal to $960,000,000. 

The outlet for this timber is independent of the Nicaraguan or any other 
canal schemes. Nature has already formed the necessary canal for steamers 
and vessels. The Heredia for instance, a flat-bottomed iron steamer of 290 
tons burden, plying between New Orleans and Limon, can, from the Atlantic, 
through the Colorado, San Juan, and San Carlos Rivers, go into the very heart 
of the timber region. The distances and depth of these canal rivers are as fol- 
lows: 

The channel in the bar leading from the Atlantic or Caribbean Sea along the 
left bank, from 20 to 30 feet. The harbor formed by the river Colorado, 60 
feet deep. The river Colorado, 60 feet deep and 1 2 English miles long from 
the Atlantic to the point east where the same stream is called the river San Juan. 

San Juan River, from the Colorado to the river San Carlos, has in the dry 
season 1 2 feet and in the wet season 24 feet of water. Distance from the upper 
end of the Colorado to the mouth of the San Carlos River, 5 1 miles. At the 
mouth of the San Carlos River the water has also, according to seasons, from 1 2 
to 24 feet depth. Distance from mouth of the San Carlos due south to the first 
rapids, 62 miles, and its water during the dry season 6 feet deep. 

The dry season in San Carlos Valley includes February, March, April, May, 
• and the first part of June. 



COSTA RICA. 31 

All sorts of transports, flats, tugs, and flat-bottomed salt-water steamers can^ 
consequently, move from the ocean to the Upper San Carlos, a distance of 125 
English miles. The current running from Nicaragua Lake, San Juan proper, 
carries considerably less water until it reaches San Carlos River. The small 
ocean steamer Heredia got stuck in this part of San Juan River about two years 
ago during the dry season, but regular flats can pass at any season. The above 
statements may prove the existence of a natural and feasible canal outlet and 
shipping place for logs and lumber grown in San Carlos Valley. 

This report will not treat of the fertility of the soil and the vegetation. It 
will state nothing in regard to crops that can be successfully grown, but will 
only give figures in regard to crops that are already ripe for harvesting, namely, 
the timber in this valley. Suppose a party or company with limited capital in- 
vested in lumber operations and trade, the enterprise would probably give the 
following practical result. One man chops and prepares per day 30 cubic feet. 

Expenses for a gang of \i men, freii^ht, sale, etc. 

10 choppers, at $1.50 per day Si 5. 00 

2 scalers and sawyers, at $2. 50 per day 5. 00 

Tools and repairs per day 3. 00 

Stationery (no export duty) .30 

Freight, etc., hauling and raftin*?, at 12 cents per cubic foot 36. 00 

Freight per steamer to New Orleans or New York, at 15 cents per cubic foot. 45. 00 

Insurance of 300 cubic feet per day .20 

Handling in New York or New Orleans 10. 00 

Defects or losses by transport or handlinirs 10. 00 

Sale commission 10 per cent of $225 • 22. 00 

Total expenses 146. 50 

300 cubic feet, sold at 75 cents per foot 225. 00 

Total expenses 146. 50 

Profit on 300 cubic feet 78. 50 

Or 26 cents per cubic foot. 

Calculating 9 months, at 26 working days per month, for actual operations in 
the timber (the remaining months being rain months) the expenses in round 
numbers would reach 36, 000 

Income by sale durinpr one year, nine months' produce. 52, 650 

Yearly profits 16, 650 

(United States Consular Reports, Vol. XVI, No. 53, p. 122.) 



Chapter VII. 



AGRICULTURAL AND OTHER RESOURCES.* 

Coffee was first planted in Costa Rica in the year 1796, from 
seed brought fi"om Havana by Francisco Xavier Navarro, dur- 
ing the administration of the Spanish governor, Don Jose Vas- 
quez y Tellez. The first grains were planted at Cartago, where 
the original trees, fi"om which all the coffee of Costa Rica, and 
even of Central America, has been derived, can yet be seen, it is 
said, in a flourishing condition. The development of the valuable 
industry was largely due to the efforts of a Catholic priest. Father 
Velarde, who lived during the administration of the Spanish gov- 
ernor, Don Tomas Acosta (1797-1810). Since the independ- 
ence it has been the unbroken policy of the Government to favor 
coffee production. Don Juan Mora, the first President of Costa 
Rica (1824-1833), exempted coffee fi-om export duties and 
granted special privileges to its cultivators. President Carrillo, in 
1840, caused model coffee plantations to be established, and Presi- 
dent Don J uan Rafael Mora ( 1 849- 1 859), by constructing many im- 
portant roads, especially the wagon road leading to Puntarenas, 

*Most of the information contained in this chapter has been taken from the valuable 
report of Mr. J. Richard Wingfield, United States consul at San Jos6, dated October 
i8, 1887, who quoted literally the preceding part from one of Senor Calvo's works. 
Due attention has also been paid to the book of Mr. Biolley, and the Anuario estadis> 
tico de Costa Rica for 1890. 
32 



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COSTA RICA- 33 

vastly contributed to the development of this important branch of 
agriculture and commerce. Notwithstanding the war against 
Walker, and the cholera which followed that war and decimated 
the population of Costa Rica, the exportation of coffee reached, in 
1861, 100,000 quintals* The prices paid ever since for Costa 
Rican coffee, especially in England, have caused almost all other 
branches of agriculture to be abandoned, and in 1884 360,000 
quintals of coffee were exported. 

For starting a coffee plantation, if the fermer makes his own 
nursery, as is generally the case, the seeds must be planted in May, 
so as to be ready for setting out also in May on the following year. 
Two years afterwards there will be a sprinkling of coffee and at 
the end of three years there will be a foir crop. The yield will 
continue to increase each year until the grove is seven years of age, 
when a full crop is produced. In setting out groves the trees are 
spaced from 10 to 15 feet each way, making as an average 500 
trees to the acre. The coffee is a delicate plant, and needs protec- 
tion from wind and sun. To this end bananas and a quick-growing, 
wide-branching tree called poro bianco are planted. The latter 
is also planted in close hedges around the field. The first year 
small crops, such as potatoes and beans, between the rows, are not 
considered injurious. Where the land is very fertile the young 
tree is topped when one year old, and two branches allowed to put 
out,, which are topped at the end of the second year, and each 
allowed to throw out two branches. This topping is to prevent 
the trees from growing so tall as to make it inconvenient to gather 
the fruit ; but it is not practiced so much now as it was formerly. 
After the plantation begins to bear from five to six weedings are 
needed each year. This is done altogether by hand labor, and the 
culture must be very shallow. I mmediately before the coffee-picking, 
season, a laborer provided with a sharp wide spade, and going not 
more than an inch deep, turns over the land, throwing it from the 

* One quintal is equivalent to zoo pounds. 



34 



COSTA RICA. 



middle of the row towards the trees. This process, called " aporcar," 
gives a smooth clean surface around the trees, so that all coffee 
dropped in picking may be saved. Near the close of the dry sea- 
son, which lasts from December to April, the second labor, which 
consists in scraping the soil with long knives, is carefully performed. 
This process, called " raspar," is repeated at intervals of six weeks 
to two months. An incidental benefit of this operation is that 
the grass and leaves are collected in a heap in the middle of the 
row, where they rot and make good manure. The annual cost 
per acre of working a coffee plantation varies in different localities, 
according to the nature of the soil, but the average may be stated 
at $6. 

Taking a series of years the average annual yield of the coffee 
plantations of Costa Rica may be placed at 25 quintals per acre. 
Statistics collected at the taking of the census in 1890 show that 
at that time there were 8,130 coffee plantations, with 26,558,251 
coffee trees. The crop was 333,632 quintals. Coffee is grown 
successfully in Costa Rica between the limits of 2,500 and 5,000 
feet elevation above the sea level, but at about 4,000 feet elevation 
the best results are obtained. The statistics of the crop of i889~'90 
sustain this view. 



Provinces. 



San Jos6 
Alajuela. , 
Cartago . 
Heredia. . 



Total 



Elevation. 



Number of 
estates. 



Feet. 

3.800 

2, 500 

5.000 

3,000 to 4,000 



2.777 

1,877 

974 

2,052 



7,680 



Number of 
trees. 



17, 798, 105 
5. 721. lit 
2, 999, 266 

7, 039, 104 



26, 558, 251 



Crop yield. 



Quintals, 

141, 190 

72. 878 

30,419 

89. 145 



333. 632 



In the province of Heredia there are two sections, one called 
Lower Heredia, about 3,000 feet high, which does not yield much 
better crops than Alajuela; but the other, called Upper Heredia, 
about 4,000 feet high, gives better crops than San Jose. It is 



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COSTA RICA. 35 

claimed that while Cartago does not yield so much coffee per acre 
as Heredia and San Jose, the flavor and quality of its berry 
are better. In the provinces of Heredia, Alajuela and San Jose» 
almost all the lands well suited for coffee-growing have already been 
brought into cultivation ; but between Cartago and the Reventa- 
zon Valley, on the Atlantic side, there are vast lands, said to be 
better adapted for the growth of coffee than even those of Heredia 
and San Jose. 

The price of coffee continues to rise every year. In 1884 ^^ ^^^ 
$10 per quintal; in 1885, $12.50; in 1887, $18, and lately $20 
and $22. This is due, not only to the recognized excellence of 
the product, but also to the increase of consumption and the con- 
siderable decrease of the crops in Brazil during the last years. 

The preparation of coffee for the market constitutes the princi- 
pal industry of the country, and the establishments where this work 
is accomplished usually consist of a series of buildings' for the 
various processes through which the grain has to pass before becom- 
ing marketable. The preparation of coffee, as practiced in Costa 
Rica, consists of the following operations : 

(1) The coffee berries are ground lightly, and washed in run- 
ning water, in tanks, where the fermentation begins. This grind- 
ing frees the berry from a portion of its pericarp, and the washing 
takes away the pulpy portion which otherwise would adhere tena- 
ciously to the bean and render its immediate desiccation difficult. 
The grinding is not always done, but the fermentation process is 
absolutely necessary to obtain what is called washed coffee. 

(2) After the coffee berries are freed from the pulp and removed 
from the tank they are spread out in the open air in great patios, 
or court yards, and left there exposed to the sun until the grains 
are dry. This drying operation is the most important of all, and 
so a rainy summer is considered as one of the direst calamities 
which can befall the country. Drying machines have lately been 
introduced, to replace the action of the sun in unfavorable seasons; 
but this manner of curing is too expensive. 



36 COSTA RICA. 

(3) When the coffee is removed from the patios the grains will 
be either hidden in the dry pericarp, if the berries were not ground 
at the beginning, or covered with a horny substance if they were 
ground. In either case the coverings must be broken, and this is 
done by means of a mill properly constructed for the purpose, 
formerly, moved by oxen, but now by hydraulic power. 

(4) Before the coffee is ready to be sent to the market it has still 
to undergo another operation. It must be freed from the fine skin 
which covers each grain ; and this is done by means of a very 
simple machine, composed of two cylinders of rough surface 
moving in opposite directions. 

(5) The coffee thus prepared must then be sorted; the grains 
are to be arranged according to their size and quality, and the 
broken or damaged ones are to be removed. This sorting is done 
either by machine or by hand; in the latter case women and chil- 
dren are employed. 

BANANAS. 

In Bulletin No. 1 of the Bureau of the American Republics a 
very important paper was published, under the title of "The Trade 
in Fruits and Nuts; Where Bananas come from, and how they are 
Produced," which was prepared by Mr. Richard Villafranca, for- 
merly the consul of Costa Rica in San Francisco, Cal., and one 
of the secretaries of the delegation of Honduras in the Interna- 
tional American Congress, who is fully equipped to speak authori- 
tatively on the subject. It appears from that paper that the im- 
portation of bananas in the United States has been constantly in- 
creasing; and that, after the British West Indies and Cuba and 
Honduras, Costa Rica is the country which furnishes the United 
States with this fruit. 

But, as shown by the Anuario Estadistico of Costa Rica for 
1890, the United States is not the only country to which she sends 
bananas, nor the country which buys them from her in the largest 



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COSTA RICA. 37 

quantity. The returns of the Puerto Limon custom-house show 
that 1,034,765 bunches of bananas were exported during the year 
1 890, and that their value there was $622,67 1 . But, as each bunch 
is sold in the United States sometimes at $3 and never at less than 
$1, the value here was fi-om $1,034,765 to $3,104,295. 

The first cargo of bananas ever sent from Costa Rica to the 
United States was shipped on board the steamer Earnholm^ which 
on the 7th of February, 1880, left Limon for New York. This 
cargo consisted of no more than 360 bunches. Before that time 
the banana trees were thought of only as proper plants to be used 
in the coffee estates, both for shading the young coffee trees and 
for protecting the coffee berries, before ripening, against the wind. 
The banana itself was either used to feed the pigs or allowed to 
go to absolute waste. Four years later, in 1884, there were 350 
banana estates with 570,000 trees, and the bunches exported were 
425,000. Subsequently, and owing to the establishment of fruit 
companies which fitted out steamers and built a trade of this kind 
between the United States and the countries on the Gulf of Mex- 
ico and the Caribbean Sea, bananas became valuable as an article 
of commerce, and plantations were started in great number, espe- 
cially on the banks of the rivers and other localities of easy access. 

The lands better suited for this purpose are those rich in alluvial 
deposits, consisting chiefly of blue clay, with a considerable quan- 
tity of decomposed vegetable matter and some common salt. On 
the largest, richest, and best organized banana estates the trees are 
planted from 1 2 to 1 5 feet apart, in cuadros, or square areas of dif- 
ferent extent. The banana tree grows best in the localities where 
the rain is abundant or water is plentifully supplied by other 
means. It is generally at the end of nine months that the plants 
mature, and after that time the fruit can be gathered every week 
in the year, provided the plantation has been well kept and has 
had a good start. The bunch of fruit consists of from 4 to 1 2 of 
what are termed "hands," each hand having 8 to 1 2 bananas on it. 



38 . COSTA RICA. 

A bunch of 8 hands or clusters is counted a full bunch, while 
those that have from 5 to 7 are taken as a half bunch. Bunches 
with less than 5 hands are styled third class, the others respectively 
first class and second class. From the root of this tree several 
shoots or suckers sprout, each of which in turn becomes a tree and 
bears a bunch of bananas, or may be transplanted. 

The manner in which the banana is cultivated requires very 
little skill or labor, nature doing almost all the work. The first 
cost of planting an acre of land is from $50 to $60, and the prod- 
uct is from 600 to 800 bunches to the acre, which makes a cost 
of about 7 to 8 cents per bunch, and they are sold at the planta- 
tations to the American fruit companies for from 50 to 60 cents, 
American gold. They in turn sell them in this country for from 
$1 to $3 per bunch. 

It is calculated that a vessel of 1,000 tons can carry a cargo of 
20,000 bunches. The loss, during the voyage, rarely exceeds 1 5 
per cent. Therefore, if the balance is sold, even at the low price 
of $ 1 per bunch, the net profit in one trip on the cargo of bananas 
only, without calculating what could be yielded by the carrying of 
passengers and mails, would be no less than $7,000. 

The loss of 15 per cent., above referred to, could be greatly 
diminished by establishing better means of transportation. The 
bananas intended for exportation must be cut green and stowed 
in the vessel in such a way as to permit the air to circulate freely 
and prevent the rays of the sun from falling on the fruit and ripen- 
ing it before reaching its destination. Any slight bruise on the 
skin of a banana, although apparently insignificant at first, develops 
in the ripe fruit into a black spot, which tends to lessen the value 
of the fruit in the market. It is generally the case that the fruit 
finds ready purchasers at the plantations, and that those purchasers 
take it to their own vessels and transport it to the United States 
on their own account, sharing the risks with the insurance com- 
panies. 



COSTA RICA. 39 

To better illustrate this profitable business, an estimate of the 
expenses and probable yieldings of a plantation of 69 acres (40 
manzanas), taking into consideration all the difficulties to be over- 
come, such as bad roads, scarcity of labor, high prices of seed, etc., 
was made by Mr. Richard Villafianca, and submitted to the su- 
perintendent of the Costa Rica Railroad. His approval having 
been obtained, the said estimate was published in Bulletin No. 1, 
above cited, in the following terms : 

Expenses of planting a manzana of land {1.72^ acres) first year, 

(i) Cutting down the underbrush, burning, and clearing $35. oo 

<2) Price of 270 suckers, at $25 per thousand 6. 75 

Five weed clearings, at %^ each 35* 00 

Total cost for the first year 76. 75 

Expenses made on 40 manxanas (69 acres) of land according to the foregoing estimate. 

Clearing, planting, etc., on 40 manzanas, at $76.75 each $3, 070. 00 

Board and other expenses of an overseer for 12 months, at $30 a month .... 360. 00 
(3) Interest on $3,430 in 12 months, at 6 per cent a year 205. 80 

Total cost for the first year 3, 635. 80 

Board and other expenses of an overseer for 12 months 360. 00 

Four weed clearings, at $280 each i, 120. 00 

Cutting down 54,000 bunches, at 2% cents each i, 350. 00 

Cost of a portable house i, 000. 00 

Plows and other agricultural implements 500. 00 

Interest on $7,965.80, at 6 per cent ayear 477. 95 

Total cost at the end of second year $8, 443. 75 

Income derived from the above plantation 

40 manzanas, with 270 suckers each, equal to 10,800 suckers ; 10,800 suck- 
ers, yielding 5 bunches each, equal to 54,ooobunches ; 54,000 bunches, sold 
at 50 cents each $27, 000. 00 

Deducting expenses in the two years 8, 443. 75 

Leaves a net profit at the end of the second year of $18, 556. 25 

The cost of $76.75 per manzana is incurred only when the land 
is to be cleared, burned, etc., before planting; but it would only 



40 COSTA RICA. 

amount to $60 or $65 if the planting is done first and the clear- 
ing after. 

The best results are obtained when the trees are planted 18 feet 
apart; 270 suckers are required for each manzana. 

The plantation to which this estimate refers is supposed to be 
started by a person who, having money enough to buy the land, is 
compelled to mortgage his property to raise funds to improve it. 
Therefore it is calculated that he is paying an interest of 6 per cent 
a year. 

The weed clearings of the second year are neither frequent nor 
expensive, as the banana plant is fully developed and the shad- 
ing of it stops to some extent the growth of the weed. 

The cost of 2% cents for cutting each bunch is greatly exagger- 
ated, as a man can easily cut down a bunch in less than half a min- 
ute ; but giving the laborers, who usually work ten hours a day 
ample time to rest, smoke, and take their meals, it has been sup- 
posed that they only cut down one bunch every fifteen minutes, 
or 40 per day, for which work they get $1. Thus the cutting of 
one bunch costs 2% cents. 

The amount of $ 18,556.25 represents the clear profits made at the 
ejid of the second year. In this estimate are not included either 
the profits derived from sale of bananas between the tenth and the 
twenty-fourth months, or from the raising of other fruits, such as 
lemons, limes, pineapples, cocoanuts, oranges, maranones, cocoa, 
etc., all of which hardly necessitate any extra expense to be kept 
in good condition, and give the most flattering results. 

OTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIONS. 

Independently of coffee and bananas Costa Rica could be rich 
and prosperous by properly developing her other agricultural 
resources. Agriculture, says Seiior Calvo, is called by nature to 
operate a transformation in the country. Whoever casts a glance 
upon the map observes the position which Costa Rica occupies in 



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Shipping Bananas. 



COSTA RICA. 41 

the center of the world, and forms an idea both of the exuberant 
vegetation of her immense territory, which is still to a great ex- 
tent uncultivated, and of the variety of her natural productions^ 
will understand at once that the foundation of the brilliant future 
which awaits her chiefly consists in agriculture. " Whether the 
commerce of the world," Senor Calvo says, "continues to bestow 
its favor upon the Costa Rican coffee, or whether the Costa Rican 
coffee is doomed to be replaced by some other, the productive ca- 
pacity of the Costa Rican soil will always be so wonderful as to 
cause the Republic to rank again among the most privileged na- 
tions of the world." Sugar cane, tobacco, cocoa, the textile plants, 
and many other agricultural productions will come to take the place 
now exclusively occupied by almost impenetrable forests and bar- 
ren lands. 

The sugar cane grows luxuriantly in several localities of the 
Republic, and promises to be as great a source of wealth for Costa 
Rica as it has been for other countries. According to the Anuario 
Estadistico for 1890 the production of sugar during that year was 
as follows: Sugar, 639,086 kilos ; dulce, 6,959,608 kilos. 

They call sugar the white article after it has been deprived of 
the molasses, and dulce the more or less brown unrefined sugar. 
The same Anuario estimates at $1,512,960 the value of the crop 
of 1890. 

Reciprocal commercial arrangements with the United States, 
which, according to all indications, Costa Rica is ready to make, by 
which sugar of all kinds and descriptions would be admitted free 
into the United States, would no doubt operate as a powerful 
stimulus and raise the sugar industry in Costa Rica to a prominent 
station. Up to the present moment there are no more than 7.538 
manzanas of land * devoted to the cultivation of the sugar cane. 

Cocoa is cultivated on both the Atlantic and the Pacific 
coasts, and in the valley of San Carlos. It is in general of 

*One manzana is equivalent to 10,000 square varaSf the vara being 2,742 feet. 



42 COSTA RICA. 

excellent quality ; but that of Matina, in the comarca of Limon, has 
a great reputation, and advantageously competes with the cele- 
brated Soconusco cocoa. It sells from 60 to 75 cents per pound 
at the localities where it is raised. With a view to encourage the 
cultivation of this tree the Government has granted premiums 
varying from $2,000 to $5,500 to those who, with success, will 
engage in this business. The Anuario Estadistico for 1890 gives 
the following information: number of cocoa plantations, 183; 
number of cocoa trees, 56,748; cocoa crop 3,129 quintals; value 
of crop, $156,450. 

In 1737, when Costa Rica had only a population of 24,000 in- 
habitants, there were 273,138 cocoa trees at Matina. This culti- 
vation decreased in proportion to the increase of the attention paid 
to coffee industry. 

The Costa Rican tobacco is generally strong and very aromatic. 
It was formerly cultivated extensively, and constituted an impor- 
tant branch of commerce. It appears from Senor Calvo's book, that 
in 1771, and many years thereafter, Costa Rican tobacco was ex- 
ported to Mexico. The amount exported in 1771 was 302,161 
pounds. Subsequently to that date the cultivation of tobacco de- 
clined, owing to the more remunerative character of the cultiva- 
tion of coffee, and to other causes. The tobacco industry in Costa 
Rica is monopolized by the Government, as is the case in Spain 
and in other countries and the crop produced throughout the 
country must be disposed of to the agents of the Government 
However, any one may engage in the manufacture of cigars and 
cigarettes, and even in the cultivation of the tobacco in certain 
localities, on condition that the crop has to be either sold to the 
Government or exported. The report of the Costa Rican secre- 
tary of the treasury for 1890, shows that this monopoly furnished 
the Government in 1888-89 a revenue of $558,139.08, and 
$597,844.94 in 1890-91. 

Recently a concession has been granted to some private 




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COSTA RICA. 43 

individuals for the purpose ot* bringing to Guanacaste, on the 
Pacific side of the Republic, a Cuban colony of tobacco farmers, 
who will probably as other Cuban colonies have done in this very 
same line in Mexico and Paraguay, build there a large trade. 

Corn in Costa Rica, as everywhere else in America, is one of 
the principal articles of food f6r the people. The crop in 1890 
amounted to 22,979,744 liters. Wheat, which formerly was cul- 
tivated in a vast scale, can scarcely be seen, except in the provinces 
of Heredia and Alajuela, where it is raised in small quantities. 
The comparatively cheap prices of the American flour and the 
increasing demands of the coffee trade have united in discourag- 
ing the cultivation of wheat. Beans are also a very important 
factor in the sustenance of the people. The crop of 1890 was 
3,294,160 liters. 

Cotton has been raised in Costa Rica since the early days of 
the discovery. The natives used to spin it, and in colonial times 
there were mills, especially at Cartago, where very good cloth was 
made. It grows well in many localities, but the demands of the 
coffee industry, as well as foreign competition, have caused its cul- 
tivation to be continued only on a very small scale. Among the 
other textile plants which might be made the subject of flourish- 
ing industries are the junco (rush), the linaza (flax), the maguey 
(agave), the pina (pine apple), the pinuela (a variety of the pine 
apple), the pochote (cedrela pachira), the soncoUo (anona muri- 
cata), and others. Ramie is raised in the country with little ex- 
pense and no difficulty, and will no, doubt make in a short time 
a valuable branch of national production. 

Besides indigo and other useful plants which at present have no 
great commercial importance, the yuca, or sweet manioc, and other 
farinaceous roots should be mentioned. The yuca is very useful 
from an industrial point of view on account of the starch which is 
made out of it. The name (yam) and the sweet potato are usu- 
ally cultivated near the coasts, but they thrive also very well on 
the plateaus. 



44 COSTA RICA. 

The papa (potato) is cultivated principally in the province of 
Cartago, at the base of the Irazu volcano. Its production is large 
and its quality excellent The high price paid in the market for 
potatoes renders their cultivation profitable. In 1890, 1,412^58 
liters of potatoes were gathered, out of which 1,382,695 came firom 
the province of Cartago. Potato cultivation will soon assume 
greater importance because the Reventazon branch of the railroad 
is now completed, and potatoes can be made an object of com- 
merce with Colombia and other States which need to import 
them. 

Vanilla grows wild in the virgin forests of the hot lands. 

The edible fruits are not objects of special culture in the coun- 
try. Everywhere in the plantations, oranges, limes, peaches, figs^ 
quinces, pomegranates, etc., are found abundantly. All the fruits 
of Europe thrive on the plateau. The indigenous tropical fruits 
are the pineapple, aguacates, anones, zapotes, mangoes, and a host 
of others of less importance. 

CATTLE RAISING. 

Cattle raising is an important industry in Costa Rica. The 
country does not produce beef in sufficient quantities to meet the 
necessities of its ever increasing population, and it has to be im- 
ported both from Nicaragua and from Colombia. The Costa 
Rican oxen as a rule are remarkable for their size and handsome 
appearance. They possess great strength, and are admirably 
adapted for labor. According to BioUey, the usual price of these 
animals, from three to four years of age, imported from Nicaragua 
or Colombia, varies from $30 to $40 a head, but a good team of 
Costa Rican oxen can be sold for $ 1 70. The Government has 
made of late many efforts to improve the breeds of cattle, and one 
of the most efficient has been to reimburse the farmers what they 
may expend in bringing well-bred animals from the United States 
and Europe to their farms in Costa Rica. The Agricultural 



COSTA RICA. 



45 



School, which, as will be seen elsewhere, was established and is 
supported by the Government, has done also a good deal to pro- 
mote this industry. 

The principal breeds so far i;itroduced to improve the native 
cattle are the Durham, Jersey, and Dutch. There are also a num- 
ber of head of Swiss cattle of the Schuytz breed which have been 
imported either directly from Europe or from the United States. 
The price of an ordinary cow varies from $30 to $80. Young 
animals of foreign breeds recently brought into the country bring 
exceedingly high prices. For a bull of from one year to one year 
and a half $300 and $400 also are often paid. The dairy indus- 
try is as yet in its infancy. Excellent butter is made, nevertheless, 
in some provinces, especially in Cartago. Hides are an article of 
commerce of which the exports reach many thousands of dollars. 
As yet horns, hoofs, and bones are not utilized. 

The breeding of horses is progressing slowly. The horses of the 
country are of no special character or breed, but they are strong 
and usefiil for the mountain roads. An ordinary horse is worth 
from $40 to $70. Good mules cost more, but pretty fair ones 
may be found at prices varying from $60 to $80. 

Sheep are very scarce and of a kind hardly worthy to be men- 
tioned. A sheep is worth about $10. 

The Anuario Estadistico for 1890 gives the number of cattle in 
Costa Rica in each province as follows: 



Provinces. 



Homed 
cattle. 



Hones. Sheep. 



Total. 



San Jos6 . . . 
Alajuela . . . 

Cartago 

Heredia.. . . 
Guanacaste 
Piintarenas 
Limon 

Total 



48,744 

55» 046 

45»75:'. 

32, 830 

122,026 

9»432 

3,082 



I5» 164 

14, 205 

8,786 

5.274 

22, 148 

1,623 

238 



1,456 

126 

564 

42 

260 



65,364 
69.377 
55,115 
38, 146 
144, 434 
11.055 
3,320 



316, 925 



67,438 



2,448 



386, 8ri 



46 COSTA RICA. 



PEARL FISHING. 



A natural production worthy in all respects to be mentioned 
among the elements of wealth is the Costa Rica pearl. It abounds 
on the Pacific coast of the Republic, especially in the vast gulf of 
Nicoya, where many specimens have been obtained of such perfec- 
tion and beauty as to secure the price of $1,000 apiece. One of 
these gems was sold in London, not long ago, for ;^8oo. Pearl 
fishing is not allowed during a certain season, and in no case can 
it be undertaken except with the permission of the government, 
and on such conditions as it may deem to be advisable. At present 
the industry is in the hands of a Mexican company under a con- 
cession granted to it by the government for a limited time. 

Another maritime production is a shellfish, also found on the 
Pacific coast of Mexico, which secretes a viscid liquor of a purple 
color (Bucanum lapillus) and is supposed to be the substance of 
the famous Tyrian dye. 



MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. 



No great manufacturing industry exists as yet in Costa Rica. 
The few factories which are found in the country give employment 
only to a limited number of workingmen, and their products are 
not sufficient for the country's needs. Agriculture occupies all the 
hands and absorbs all the attention of the people. The flour 
industry is represented by a single steam mill at San Jose belong- 
ing to a foreign company. There are in all in the country two 
or three starch factories and over one hundred brick yards. Clay is 
abundant, and bricks are always in demand. The high price of 
stone causes nearly all the buildings to be made of brick, and brick 
making is therefore very profitable. 

There are a number of tanning establishments producing ordi- 
nary leather. This is used for the manufacture of saddles, alforjas 
or saddle-bags, straps, and all kinds of harnesses. 

There are also some soap factories which supply the trade with 



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COSTA RICA. 47 

an article good only for laundry purposes, and some candle fac- 
tories which also furnish candles of inferior quality. 

Two foundries established at San Jose do great service, espe- 
cially in the repairing line. 

A cotton mill, established several years ago at Heredia, is fairly 
successful. The ordinary cotton cloth which it makes can com- 
pete with the imported. The Heredia factory gives special atten- 
tion to the manufacture of rehozos or shawls of bright color, made 
out of silk, which the women of the poorer classes use to cover 
their shoulders when they are in the street, or wear in church over 
their heads. 

Other industries have been started in the country. Chocolate, 
perfumery, ice, gaseous waters, beer, etc., are manufactured to some 
extent, with machinery brought from Europe or the United States. 
To encourage these industries the Government has exempted the 
machinery imported from customs duties. 

There is a Remington cartridge factory conducted by the Gov- 
ernment, and it supplies the army with this necessary article. The 
imported cartridges are soon affected by the moisture. 

The various shops of the railroad company are well equipped 
and do credit to the country. 

Costa Rica offers the most encouraging inducements for the in- 
troduction of new manufactures, or the improvement of those al- 
ready established in the country. Her numerous rivers can furnish 
all the power required. And as her population grows rapidly, and 
with it the demands of manufactured goods which the neighbor- 
ing republics can not, as a rule, supply, men with trades can be 
sure to make there a good living. A good carpenter easily earns 
$3 per day. A cabinet maker or an upholsterer would easily earn 
twice as much; for, although a great deal of furniture is im- 
ported, that which is made in the country with imperishable woods 
has always the preference. Pastry cooks, pork butchers, tailors, 
shoemakers, and bakers who went ten years ago to the country 



48 COSTA RICA. 

without any capital are well off to-day. Good salaries and con- 
stant work can be assured to good watchmakers, printers and book- 
binders, stone-cutters, masons and house painters, blacksmiths, ma- 
chinists, coppersmiths, saddlers, umbrella-makers — in short, to all 
those possessing good practical knowledge and a determination to 
persevere in any industry, great or small. 

The Government has reserved for itself two monopolies, the sale 
of tobacco and the manufacture of liquors. The cigar industry is 
reduced at present to the manufecture of common cigarettes and 
not very fine cigars, but has yielded to the Government, as stated 
elsewhere, over half a million of dollars annually. 

The manufacture of liquors is centered at San Jose in a large 
establishment. The distillery apparatus is excellent and the prod- 
ucts are usually of a fine quality. Besides the aguardiente, or pure 
brandy, made out of the sugar cane, a kind of white brandy scented 
with anise seed, and called anisado^ is made also. The national 
factory produces also some other liquors which are not largely con- 
sumed. Foreign brandies and liquors can be and are imported in 
the country, but very heavy duties are levied upon them. The 
liquor monopoly gave the Government in 1890 no less than 
^1,402,160. 



Chapter VIII. 



FOREIGN COMMERCE.* 

The commerce between Costa Rica and the United States has 
been constantly increasing since the visit to the former country of 
the South American Commission in 1884. The following fig- 
ures, from official Costa Rican sources, show the value of mer- 
chandise from the United States imported into Costa Rica dur- 
ing the last six years : 



1885 $856,645 

1886 1, 010, 490 

1887 1, 440, 729 



1888 $1,773,877 

1889 1, 780, 156 

1890 2, 255, 138 



The rapid and uninterrupted increase proves on the one hand 
the popularity which the goods of the United States enjoy in 
Costa Rica, and on the other hand shows that it would be easy 
for the United States to secure full control of that trade. Refer- 
ring to this matter, the Report of the South American Commis- 
sion of 1 884-85 has the following : 

It is a source of congratulation to know that not only are American wares 
and merchandise increasingly consumed here (Costa Rica), but there is a grow- 
ing desire on the part of the people to establish more cordial relations, commer- 
cial and international with our country To this end several causes contribute : 

First. The exalted position of our country in wealth, arts, and civilization 
is a constant light, drawing the attention of those who have moulded their do- 
mestic institutions on ours. The Monroe doctrine is as ^ycll understood, and 
is as grateful to the people of Costa Rica, as it is fixed among the theories of 
our own country. Beyond doubt the increasing attention in the United States 

*The figures relating to the foreign commerce are taken from Costa Rican official 
documents and are expre^ed in the money of the country. According to data from 
the Bureau of Statistics at Washington, the exports of merchandise from the United 
States to Costa Rica were, in 1890, $1,098,952, in 1891, $1,098,952. 

c R 4 49 



50 COSTA RICA. 

to the economy, industry, and commerce of Latin America has already met a 
cordial response in Costa Rica. 

Second. A most important consideration is the increase of faithfulness on the 
part of American merchants in studying the wants of the consumers, their 
habits and tastes, and also in sending just such goods as the dealers here send 
for. While serious damage to our trade has flowed from evasions of the plain- 
est principles of fair dealing on the part of some American commission men, of 
late there has been less friction from this cause, and with it has come enhanced 
confidence here in sending to our country orders for goods. 

Third. The nearness of our market, the superior quality of nearly all our man- 
ufactures, and especially their adaptability, are all in our favor. There is also a 
growing recognition of the value of prompt and nearly cash payment for goods 
over the credit system. Meantime a more active canvass on the part of our 
merchants, through competent agents, has been going on in California goods, 
especially the grape products. Canned fruits and flour are finding their way 
into quite general use, and successfully compete with the like importations from 
any source. 

Fourth. To these influences is to be added the eflfect of the railroad towards 
the interior from Port Limon. The banana trade is wholly depending upon it, 
while outgoing products by that port go to the United States in far larger per- 
fection than do those by Punta Arenas. We confidently believe that the exten- 
sion of the railroads of the country, so as to form continuous lines from ocean 
to ocean, will result in ampler facilities for commercial relations with the United 
States. 

The exports of Costa Rica into the United States since 1884 
have been as follows : 

1885 $1. 058, 519 

1886 1, 023, 030 

1887 2, 478, 8oi 

1888 3, 871. 192 

1889 3, 035, 288 

The exports of 1889 consisted of the following: 

CofTee $2, 339, 020 

Bananas 569; p20 

Hides 56, 755 

Skins i6, 207 

Cocoanuts 13, 434 

Other article J 23, 244 

Coin 17, 608 

Total 3, 035, 288 



, COSTA RICA. 51 

In 1889 ^^ ^^^y country which led the United States in the 
commerce with Costa Rica was Great Britain. The imports from 
that nation were $1,862,280, against $1,780,156 from the United 
States, and the exports to Great Britain were $3,647,427, against 
$3,035,288 to the United States. All other nations, as will be 
seen in the following pages, are, and have been for some time, 
represented by lesser figures. But in 1890 the United States took 
the lead even over Great Britain. The exports from the United 
States into Costa Rica were, as stated, $2,255,138, and those of 
Great Britain $1,426,317. 

To-day 1 1 steamers per month enter regularly the port of Limon, 
as follows : 

One belonging to the British Royal Mail Company, direct from 
Europe. 

One belonging to the Spanish Transatlantic Company, direct 
from Europe. 

Four belonging to the Atlas Company, sailing from New York. 

Four belonging to the Costa Rica Steamship Line, sailing from 
New Orleans. 

On the Pacific side the commerce is conducted through the port 
of Puntarenas by steamers belonging to the Pacific Mail Com- 
pany sailing between San Francisco and Panama, touching each 
way every ten days. A German line of steamers from Ham- 
burg also touch at Puntarenas each way every month. 

When the South American Commission above referred to 
submitted their special report on Costa Rica (March 3, 1885), 
they noticed the singular fact that the cost of transportation of 
merchandise from San Jose to London, and vice versa^ by way of 
Puntarenas, on the Pacific, was cheaper than from San Jose to 
New York, and that the cost between Port Limon and Lopdon 
and Port Limon and New York was only a little higher. 



COSTA RICA. 



The report says: 

To carry a ton of freight from San Jos^ to London, via Puntarenas, costs 
$40.40, and to New York $42, and the cost of transporting a ton of freight 
from San Jos6, via Port Limon, the Atlantic port of Costa Rica, to London is 
$37.40, and to New York $36.40. 

While such a condition of things existed it was not difficult 
to understand, independently of other reasons, how the exports to 
Great Britain were in larger quantities than to the United States. 

The well-founded remarks which close the report so often 
referred to, of the South American Commission of 1884 -'85 are 
appropriate here : 

Our countrymen can secure the trade with this Republic by the aid of a 
judicious reciprocity treaty, and the practice of the same sagacity and fair deal- 
ing which characterizes their English and German competitors. The people of 
Costa Rica will welcome every advance our people will make in the direction 
of closer commercial and international relations with the greatest sincerity and 
cordiality. 

DIVISION OF COMMERCE BY NATIONS. 

The countries, other than the United States, with which Costa 
Rica holds commercial relations of any importance are Great 
Britain, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Belgium, Colombia, 
Ecuador, Mexico, and the other Republics of Central America. 
The following list shows the value of the imports from tliose 
countries during the year 1890, according to the Anuario Esta- 
distico : 



Mexico $10, 586 

Belgium 13, 051 

Jamaica 22, 259 

Italy 35. 347 

Cuba 61, 534 

Ecuador 94, 020 

Spain •. 175, 119 

Other Central American Re- 
publics 2i3, 721 



Colombia $268, 028 

FraYice 773, 492 

Germany i, 261, 79S 

Great Britain i, 426, 317 



Total 4, 360, 272 



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COSTA RICA. 53 

By comparing this total with the total value of the merchandise 
imported from the United States into Costa Rica during the same 
year, which was $2,255,138, the following conclusions are reached : 
First, that the United States exports more merchandise, or mer- 
chandise of more value, to Costa Rica than any other single nation 
in the world. Second, that the value of the merchandise imported 
from the United States into Costa Rica in 1890 represents more 
than 34 per cent of the total imports ; and third, that, as stated by 
the South American Commission of 1884-85, a judicious reci- 
procity treaty could secure for the United States almost the entire 
trade of Costa Rica. 

The Anuario Estadistico for 1890 contains in detail the num- 
ber of packages, the weight in kilograms, and the value of the 
goods from each country imported into Costa Rica ; and a study 
of at least its principal statements might prove of some importance. 

Barbed and other wire for fences is greatly in demand in Costa 
Rica, and was imported, that year, to the amount of $109,872; 
but Great Britain and Germany contributed the most of this total, 
the former furnishing $41,295 and the latter $32,627, or $73,922 
together, which is about 75 per cent on the whole. 

Beer was imported to the amount of $109,031. Great Britain 
contributed $6,529, Germany $55,328, and France $8,123, or 
$69,980 between the three. This represents 60 per cent on the 
total imported. 

Shoes were bought by Costa Rica to the amount of $62,814. 
But Great Britain furnished $12,981, Germany $14,628, and 
France $7,893. Their total, $35,502, represents more than one- 
half of the whole. 

Cassimeres were imported to the value of $278,252. Germany 
contributed $105,802, and France $142,628. This makes 
$248,430, and leaves the United States the poor share of $29,822. 

Drugs and medicines were imported to the amount of $201, 107. 



54 COSTA RICA. 

The shares of Great Britain, $37,421, Germany $52,327, and 
France $32,647, make a total $122,395, which is about 70 per 
cent of the whole. 

Out of $316,411 worth of railroad material bought by Costa 
Rica, Great Britain sold $125,428. 

The ordinary soap which Costa Rica bought in 1890 amounted 
to $22,432, Great Britain furnished $ 12,890, and Germany, $7,223. 

Ordinary crockery was imported to the amount of $1 9,343. 
The share of Great Britain was $8,792, the share of Germany, 
$8, 1 29, and the share of France, $609. This left the United States 
only $1,813. 

The value of the candles imported in 1890 was $45,20 1 . Great 
Britain contributed $34,892, and Germany, $8,008. This leaves 
the United States but $2,301. 

House furniture was bought by Costa Rica to the amount of 
$45,085. Great Britain's share was $5,897, Germany's $16,823, 
and France's $2,327. This makes $25,047, more than one-half 
of the whole. 

The printed cotton goods called zarazas were imported into Costa 
Rica to the amount of $407,460, Great Britain sent $165,893, 
Germany, $ 1 67,827, and France, $ 29,849. This makes $363,569, 
and reduces the share of the United States to only $43,891. 

Out of $296,682 worth of wines which Costa Rica imported 
in 1890, $48,325 were sent by Great Britain, $27,895 by Ger- 
many, $69,827 by France, and $1 14,450 by Spain, This makes 
$260,497, and leaves a balance of $36,185 for the United States. 
As the United States is a wine-producing country, which Great 
Britain is not, and as the United States is nearer Costa Rica than 
Great Britain, it seems unnatural that Great Britain should fur- 
nish wine to an amount ($48,325) larger than the United States. 

The Anuario Estadistico for 1890 has failed to give the same 
detailed information in regard to the exports which it furnishes in 



COSTA RICA. 



55 



regard to the imports. It says that the exports were $10,063,765, 
($3,098,394 more than in the previous year), and that the princi- 
pal articles were represented as follows; 



Coffee $9, 196, 202 

Bananas 622, 671 

Cocoa 13, 267 

Hides 85, 786 

India rubber 10, 197 



Gold bullion $28, 500 

Skins 12, 300 

Grinding stones 8, 682 

Mulberry wood 556, 040 



But it does not state what portion of these goods comes to the 
United States. 

During the previous year, 1889, the exports from Costa Rica 
to the diflFerent countries were as follows : 

United States $3, 035, 288 

Great Britain 3, 647, 427 

Germany 201, 079 



France 

Colombia 

Chile 

The other Republics of Central America. 



17,959 
12,613 

1.843 
49, 162 



Total 6, 965, 371 

Shippers of merchandise destined for the Republic of Costa 
Rica must remember that the invoices for each shipment of goods 
should contain the names of the vessel, port of destination, and 
consignees; the date of shipment, the signature of the shipper, the 
marks of each package, the number (in figures and in writing) Oi 
bales, cases, barrels, bundles, or packages in which the merchan- 
dise is contained, the name and kind of merchandise shipped, and 
the gross weight in kilograms of each package, except when con- 
taining machinery, iron, lumber, etc., in which case the total gross 
weight shall only be required. When a package contains more 
than one kind of merchandise, the articles of each kind must be 
put up in separate bundles and the gross weight of each bundle 
must be stated separately. Invoices must be made out in triplicate ; 



56 COSTA RICA. 

two copies shall be retained by the consul, and the third one shall 
be returned to the shipper, with a receipt for the other two ; the 
copy returned and the consul's receipt are to be sent by the shipper 
to the consignee at the port of destination ; the invoices should be 
made out in the Spanish language. No invoices will be admitted 
with erasures, alterations, or interlineations. 

All invoices for Costa Rica presented for certification must ex- 
press also the amount of charges paid, or to be paid, for carrying the 
merchandise to the port of destination, such as freight, insurance, 
commission, etc. These charges can be set forth either in separ- 
ate items or in a lump sum, under the head of "charges to the port 
of destination." 

The captain of every vessel or steamer touching at any of the 
ports of Costa Rica is bound to prepare and file a general manifest 
of the cargo destined for that port, said manifest to be written in 
the Spanish language and to contain the name, class, and nation- 
ality of the vessel, the registered tonnage of the same (both in 
figures and in writing), the names of the captain, the ports of de- 
parture and destination, and the consignee, the marks and number 
(in writing and in figures) of bales, cases, barrels, bundles, or other 
packages on board, the names of the shippers and of the consignee 
of the fnerchandise on board, the date of the manifest, and the 
signature of the captain. 

The Government of Costa Rica has decreed that the same fines 
and penalties which are imposed on the captains and owners of ves- 
sels, when not presenting their papers and manifests in accordance 
with the requirements of the law of 14th of July, 1884, shall be also 
imposed on the owners or consignees of the merchandise imported 
into the Republic, when the consular invoices do not express the 
gross weight of each package separately, or whenever any other re- 
quirements of said law, as to marks, numbers, specified contents, 
and value of the packages are not complied with. 




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ci/<- ii\u :i. '. 'inf : C-- Vm' slitj : >f F- aiul oi i-i'^ t\ •. 

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-i.v. ■ , ;. 'T'^:..j * r il on liu. t.a}',a?P> ar : o^ T)' • -> v.-: 

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./« • '-: ' '• : .• !.a.':\ 1 a.-: liOt Lonu lic^ \v'»h. 



H! 




COSTA RICA. 57 

As the fines and penalties alluded to vary from $50 to $500 for 
each case of violation of the law, special care should be taken to 
see that the consular invoices of all shipments for Costa Rica are 
drawn up in strict compliance with the requirements of the law. 

The tariff on imported merchandise which is now in force in 
Costa Rica was promulgated on September 7, 1885. For the 
convenience of commerce it is given in the Appendix. 

But, as shown by inclosure C of the Special Report on Costa 
Rica submitted by the South American Commission of 1884-85, 
the Costa Rican Government made at that time the following dec- 
laration in regard to reciprocity with the United States: 

The undersigned minister of foreign relations of the Republic of Costa 
Rica, by virtue of a conference held to-day, has the honor to make the following 
declarations to the Commission of the United States of America : 

It is evident that between the United States of America and the Republic of 
Costa Rica there is a connection of political and material interests, and that 
from day to day the mutual commerce between said countries increases. Hence 
proceeds the advisability of strengthening their relations by means of reciprocity 
treaties, and the Government of Costa Rica is desirous that they be entered 
into. 

The same Government thinks that in the treaty to be entered into it should 
be expressly stated that it is a treaty of mutual compensation, so as to avoid the 
effect of the clause of " most favored nation," which may be found in existing 
treaties with other nations. 

It also thinks that the two clauses following must be considered essential : 

First. There shall be admitted, or remain free of duty, in the United States 
sugar, coffee, cocoa, peanuts, ginger, bananas, and other fruits, starch, potatoes 
and other similar roots used for food, pita straw, and other fibers, rubber and 
other gums, hides, dyewoods, timber for building purposes, whether sawed 
or not; provided that the said articles are the growth and production of 
the Costa Rican soil, sufficient evidence thereof being given at each importa- 
tion. 

Second. In compensation of the above there shall be admitted, or remain free 
of duty in Costa Rica, all kinds of cattle, salts, preserved meats, coal, petroleum, 
raw cotton, frame houses, bricks, clay tiles, lime for building purposes, agricul- 
tural implements, mining machinery ; provided also that the said articles are 



58 COSTA RICA. 

produced or manufactured in the United States, sufficient evidence thereof 
being given at each importation. 

The Government of Costa Rica is also willing to send one or more repre- 
sentatives to a congress of all the States of the continent, whose object it shall 
be to establish rules of private international law of America, and provide for 
whatever may be conducive to the peace and the common welfare of the 
nations of the New World. 

National Palace, San Jos^, February 27, 1885. 

[l. 8.] Jos^ Mama Castro. 



Chapter IX. 



INTEROCEANIC CANALS. 

As Stated by the learned author of one of the most important 
books which have ever been published on the subject of inter- 
oceanic communication* " the idea of opening a water way from 
the Atlantic, the ocean of Europe, to the Great Southern Sea, the 
ocean of Asia, of "Ormus and of Ind," may be said to be coeval 
with the earliest enterprises of colonization of the New World. 
It was in quest of such a water way that Columbus sailed from 
Palos in 1492; and Cortes planned the construction of it during 
his visit to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec forty years afterwards. 
The " secret of the strait " was the goad which drove so many sea- 
men from all the lands of Europe westward through all the earlier 
years of the sixteenth century, till Magellan found an answer to it 
far to the stormy south." 

The fall of Constantinople into the hands of the Turks, which 
had taken place thirty-nine years before the discovery of Amer- 
ica, and the always increasing power which the Mahometans had 
since then succeeded in securing, not only in eastern Europe, 
but also in all the countries of Asia and Africa bordering 
upon the Mediterranean, had endangered considerably the com- 
merce of the world, which was then concentrated chiefly into the 
hands of Venice, Genoa, and some other states. A safe and 
short passage to the rich regions of the East was the optimum 

* The Interoceanic Canal and the Monroe Doctrine, New York. S. P. Putnam & Sons. 
1880. Page 9. 

. 59 



6o COSTA RICA. 

desiderandum of commerce, and the discovery by Vasco de Gama 
of the Cape of Good Hope, and therefore of a neiv route to Asia, 
interested the world no less than the discovery of America, which 
had been made five years before. 

The last voyage of Columbus, in 1502, was undertaken 
expressly to find the western entrance to the Asian seas, and the 
Spanish navigators who succeeded him kept up an active search 
for a shorter route to the Indies. Says Prescott: 

The discovery of a strait into the Indian Ocean was the burden of e very- 
order from the government, and the discovery of a new route to India is the 
true key to the maritime movements of the fifteenth and first half of the six- 
teenth centuries. 

The discovery of the Pacific Ocean in 1513 by Vasco Nunez 
de Balboa, and the geographical researches which were subse- 
quently made, satisfied the Spaniards that nature had not provided 
the natural water way so anxiously looked for. But it must be 
said to their honor that simultaneously with their becoming con- 
vmced of this fact the idea grew upon their minds that the com- 
munication could be made artificially. In 1528 Antonio Galvan 
petitioned Charles V and suggested that a canal should be built 
from sea to sea across the Isthmus of Panama. And in 1591 
the governor of Costa Rica, Capt. Antonio Pereira, received 
instructions to organize an expedition under his command, and 
that of Capt. Francisco Pavon, to explore a way of communication 
by water between both oceans through the Desaguadero (San 
Juan River), the lake, and other rivers emptying into the Gulf 
of Nicoya. 

This expedition, in which Costa Rica appears so prominently^ 
and which was due to the far-sighted statesmanship of the licen- 
tiate Velasquez Ramiro, whom Philip II had sent as royal com- 
missioner to the provinces of Central America, and who always 
showed a great desire to have this great undertaking carried to 
success, was the first practical step ever taken in this direction. 
Thirty-nine years afterwards, Diego de Mercado submitted to the 



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CO 

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COSTA RICA. 61 

King (Philip III) his famous report of January 23,^620, and 
suggested that interoceanic communication should be established 
through the Desaguadero, the lake, and a cut across the Costa 
Rican territory, through what he called La Quebrada, or Barranca 
Honda, to the bay of Salinas, to which he gave the name of 
Puerto del Papagayo. 

For reasons which it is unnecessary to recite, this aspiration of 
Spain, and indeed of all the civilized nations of the world, could 
not find then its realization. And when the Spanish power passed 
away and the Central American confederation was organized, and 
Bolivar's voice was heard announcing that the interoceanic canal 
*' would bring to the new Republic the wealth and the enterprise 
of all parts of the globe," the desire to accomplish that purpose 
naturally received renewed attention. 

Brief mention has been made of the steps which the short-lived 
Republic of Central America hastened to take in this direction ; 
how a concession was granted to a Dutch company in 1830 to 
build the canal upon conditions which rendered that concession one 
of the noblest public papers ever issued by any nation of the 
world, and how the United States was invited by that Government 
to join it in the glory of the enterprise and in the enjoyment of 
the immense advantages to be derived from it. Allusion has been 
made also to the survey for a canal between the Sapoa River and 
the Bay of Salinas, which was made by order of the Republic of 
Costa Rica, in 1851, by the famous Danish scientist Andreas 
Oersted. But none of these steps came nearer practical success 
than when the two Republics of Costa Rica and Nicaragua, acting 
together, granted on May 1, 1858, to the distinguished French 
writer, Mr. Felix Belly, the canal concession which carried his 
name, or when the celebrated Ayon-Chevalier contract was entered 
into for the same purpose on the part of Nicaragua on the i6th of 
October, 1868, and on the part of Costa Rica on the i8th of June, 
1869. The hopes of the universe were nevertheless disappointed 
in both cases, as they were also when the Zavala-F^relinghuysen 



62 COSTA RICA. 

treaty of 1885 was negotiated in Washington and failed of ap- 
proval. 

Now, all the appearances tend to indicate that the moment is at 
hand in which Bolivar's dreams can be realized. Under the con- 
cession which Nicaragua granted on April, 1887, to Don Aniceto 
G. Menocal, the representative of the Nicaragua Canal Associa- 
tion of New York (the Cardenas-Menocal contract), and the con- 
cession which Costa Rica granted on the 31st of July, 1888, to the 
same gentleman, as the representative of the same association (the 
Zeledon-Menocal contract), the Nicaragua interoceanic canal has 
been begun, and up to this time more than $4,000,000 are said to 
have been expended in the works. San Juan del Norte, which 
is to be the entrance on the Atlantic, has been already improved 
to a considerable extent, and the work both there and on the river 
is being pushed with energy. According to the Menocal plans, 
which have been accepted, the canal, consisting of three parts or 
divisions, is to end on the Atlantic side at San Juan del Norte, and 
on the Pacific side at the port of Brito. The lake of Nicaragua 
will be the central part, and the San Juan River, properly improved, 
will form, if not the whole, at least a great portion of the eastern 
part or division. The western section will consist of a cut through 
the strip of land, comparatively narrow, which stands between the 
western shore of the lake and the Pacific coast. 

The Costa Rican Government has granted the Nicaragua Canal 
Company, among many other concessions of the most liberal char- 
acter, full permission to occupy fi-eely, for the purposes of the 
canal, all the lands and places within the territory of Costa Rica 
which may be necessary for the construction, and also the right to 
take, fi-ee of charge, from the lands belonging to the State all the 
material needed. 

If this canal proves to be the success which all its fi^iends hope 
for, Costa Rica will find herself in the center of a commercial 
movement parallel to which no other has perhaps existed in the 
world. No one can predict the development of which Costa Rica 



COSTA RICA. 63 

is capable when her extensive river front becomes one bank of the 
canal and when her immense and rich valleys of the San Carlos 
and the Sarapiqui abandon, as it may be said, their mediterranean 
position and assume a position of direct contact with the rest of 
the world. 

The following tables, showing the distances in miles between 
the most important commercial ports of the world, and the dis^ 
tances saved by this canal, will assist the mind in forming an idea 
of the great future which is in store for Costa Rica when this work 
is done : 



From New York to — 

San Francisco 

Mazatlan 

Hongkong 

Yokohama 

Melbourne 

New Zealand 

Sandwich Islands 

Callao 

Guayaquil 

Valparaiso 

From New Orleans to — 

San Francisco 

Acapulco 

Mazatlan 

Guayaquil 

Callao 

Valparaiso 

From Liverpool to — 

San Francisco 

Acapulco 

Mazatlan 

Melbourne 

New Zealand 

Hongkong 

Yokohama 

Guayaquil 

Callao 

Valparaiso 

Sandwich Islands 

From Hamburg to — 

Mazatlan 

Acapulco 

Fonseca 

Puntarenas, Costa Rica , 

From Spain to Manilla 

From France to Tonquin 



Via Cape 
Horn. 



Miles. 
19,000 
18,000 
18, 180 

17, 679 
13. 502 
12,550 
14. 230 
10, 689 
14.300 
12,900 

15.052 
13. 283 
13. 843 
11,683 
10,901 
9,962 

14,690 
12, 921 
13.481 
13. 352 
12,400 

18, 030 

I7» 529 
11,321 
10, 539 
9,600 
14,080 

I3»93i 
13. 371 
11.430 
II, 120 
16,900 
17. 750 



Via Cape of 
Good Hope. 



Mile*. 



15,201 
16, 119 

13, 290 

14. 125 



13,140 
13. 975 
15.051 
16,040 



13.951 
15.201 



Via Nicara- 
gua Canal. 



Mil4M, 

4,946 

3.682 

11,038 

9.363 
10,000 
8,680 
6.388 
3.701 
3.053 

4,688 

4.047 
4.409 
2,969 
2,340 
2,988 
3.987 

7.694 
5,870 
6,430 

12, 748 

11.349 
13,786 
12, III 
5,890 
6,449 
7,436 
9,136 

6,880 
6,320 
5.530 
5.515 

13. 520 
13. 887 



Distance 
saved. 



Miles. 

14.054 

14,318 

4.163 

6,827 

3.290 

3.870 

7.842 

6,988 

11,247 

7.837 

11,005 

10, 874 

10, 874 

9.343 

7.913 

5.975 

6,996 
7,051 
7,051 
392 
1,051 
1,265 
3,929 
5,431 
4.090 
2,144 
4,944 

7,051 
7.051 
5.900 
5.605 
431 
1,314 



64 COSTA RICA. 

The idea that a ship canal could be cut with more facility and 
at less cost through some portion of the Colombian State of Pan- 
ama than through any part of Mexico or Central Anierica has 
been entertained by many, both in ancient and recent times. Tra- 
dition attributes to a monk, who lived at the close of the last cen- 
tury, the qredit of practically solving this problem by connecting 
the headwaters of the river Atrato, which empties into the Carib- 
bean Sea, with the waters of a river named San Juan, which empties 
into the Pacific. In the article entitled Colombia, in Apple- 
ton's American Cyclopedia, it is said, in reference to this subject, 
that the connection was made near the city of " Quibdo, latitude 
5° 50' N., by which communication by boats is still maintained 
between the Atlantic and Pacific." The world knows well that a 
French company, formed by Viscount Lesseps, has undertaken to 
to dig a ship canal, 46 miles long, from Aspinwall to Panama, 
more or less parallel to the Panama Railroad. 

Without entering into any discussion regarding the success or 
failure of the Lesseps plan, or the engineering features which may 
give preference to the Panama routes over all the others north of 
Costa Rica, the fact remains undisturbed that if ever such a canal 
is made Costa Rica will derive from it a great benefit. She will 
be its nearest neighbor, and her territory will be, if not directly 
bordering upon it, at least at a short distance, and within easy 
access to its waters. The southern regions of Costa Rica, which 
now are almost uninhabited, will then be within easy reach of the 
immense current of wealth and trade which that canal will create. 



Chapter X. 



THE CONSTITUTION AND LAWS ; MONEY AND TAXATION. 

Costa Rica is a Republic, and the powers of its Government, 
are limited and defined by a written constitution, which was framed 
and adopted in 1 87 1 . U ni versal suffrage is the law of the country ; 
but no election of any kind can be made directly, but through a 
body of electors freely chosen by the people. 

Every citizen of Costa Rica has the right, if he chooses to ex- 
ercise it, of casting his vote within the appointed time, before the 
boards, or juntas, constituted for that purpose, in favor of the per- 
sons whom he wishes to form part of the electoral college. Those 
who receive a majority of votes are declared "electors," and meet 
at the appointed time and place, and elect, also by a majority of 
votes, either the President of the Republic, or the members of 
Congress, or the municipal officers of their respective localities, as 
the case may be. No one can be made elector unless he is 21 
years old, can read and write, has his domicile in the place where 
the vote in his favor was taken, and he must own property to the 
value of $500, or have an income of $200 a year. The position 
of elector can not be declined, and it is the duty of all electors 
to cast their vote at the election. Neither the President of the 
Republic nor the members of the cabinet, the justices of the 
high court, the governors of the provinces, or the bishop, can 
be electors as long as they are in office. 

The Government of Costa Rica is administered by the three 
supreme powers called there, as everywhere else, executive, legis- 
lative, and judicial. 

C R Z 65 



66 COSTA RICA. 

The executive power is vested in a President, whose term of 
service is four years, and who can not be reelected for the following 
immediate term. The qualifications for this office are the same 
as required for the office of elector, except that the President must 
be over 38 years of age and a Costa Rican, or at least a Central 
American by birth, and not belong to the ecclesiastical profession. 

The President is assisted by four secretaries of state, whose re- 
spective departments are called as follows: (1) Department of 
foreign relations, favors, justice, worship, public instruction, and 
beneficence. {Relaciones exteriores^ gracia^ justiciar culto^ instruccion 
publica y beneficencia^ (2) Department of the interior, police, 
and the promotion of the public welfare. {Gohernacion^ policia 
y fomento^ (3) Department of the treasury and commerce. 
{Hacienda y comercio?) (4) Department of war and of the navy. 
{Guerra y Marina^ 

The legislative power is vested in a Congress, consisting of only 
one house, and called " the Constitutional Congress." (Congreso 
Constitucional?) 

The members of this body are called deputies (diputados)^ and 
are elected for four years ; but one-half of the Congress is renewed 
by election every two years. Under the present law there is one 
deputy for every 8,000 inhabitants in each province ; but if the 
population of the province is such as to show an excess of 4,000 
or more, over and above the rate mentioned, one more deputy 
may be elected. There are now seven deputies for the province 
of San Jose, six for the province of Alajuela, five for the province 
of Cartago, four for the province of Heredia, and two for the prov- 
ince of Guanacaste. Each Comarca (Limon and Puntarenas) is 
represented by one deputy. Total number of deputies, 26. The 
qualifications for the position of deputy are, to be a native of 
Costa Rica or of Central America, or a naturalized citizen of Costa 
Rica who has resided within her territory for the period of four 
years subsequent to his naturalization ; to know how to read and 



COSTA RICA. 67 

write, and to own property to the value of $500, or have an annual 
income of $200. The Congress meets every year, but during the 
recess it is represented by a committee of its own choice, which is 
called Comision fermanente^ and has for its duty to attend to every- 
thing of urgent character. 

The judicial power is vested in a supreme court of justice 
{corte suprema de justicid) and in the other courts throughout the 
country, which are subordinate to it. The members of the supreme 
court are not elected by the people, but appointed by Congress. 

In Costa Rica there is no such position as that of vice-presi- 
dent of the Republic. The constitution provides that in case of 
death, or absence, or inability of the President, he shall be suc- 
ceeded by one of three persons designated by Congress to that ef- 
fect, at its first session in each presidential term. For this reason 
they are called designados. If the " designado " exercises the presi- 
dential functions at the call of the President himself, the choice 
will be at his will ; but if the " designado " becomes President 
ad interim^ on account of the death or inability of the President, 
the order in which the names were placed in their appointment by 
Congress must be followed. 

At the head of each province and comarca there is a governor 
appointed by the President, and in each canton there is a local 
executive authority, subordinate to the governor, also appointed 
by the President, who is called the "jefe politico." 

The whole Republic is divided into 75 municipalities {munici- 
ptos)^ each one provided with a municipal council, consisting gen- 
erally of five members, elected by the people, indirectly, as has 
been stated. It is unnecessary to explain what the functions of 
these bodies are. They are more or less the same as the city coun- 
cils and the boards of county commissioners of the Unite'd States. 

THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE. 

Justice is administered in Costa Rica by a well organized system 
of courts and tribunals, and under written laws as wise and well 



68 COSTA RICA. 

suited to the necessities of civilization as in any of the nations of 
the world. Capital punishment can not be inflicted. Private 
property can not be confiscated. No person can be tried by com- 
missioners or extraordinary courts. Individual liberty is guar- 
anteed by the writ of habeas corpus. Trial by jury is established 
for criminal cases ; and no discrimination or distinction of any kind 
between citizens can be made before the courts. 

There are a civil code, a code of civil procedure, and a judi- 
ciary law, which went into force on the ist of January, 1888. 
They all do credit to the Republic, and stand as high as the 
highest among the statute books of the Christian world. 

In each city or town of the Republic there are judicial function- 
aries, called alcaldes, who are appointed by the supreme court. 
According to the necessities of the locality these alcaldes may be 
one, two, or three, as the supreme court shall decide. They 
have jurisdiction in the first instance of all civil cases in which the 
amount involved does not exceed $250. They have also the 
power to settle the estates of deceased persons, should no con- 
tention involving a larger amount than $250 arise between the 
interested parties. They have also criminal jurisdiction, under 
the supervision and authority of the criminal court, but only so 
far as the preliminary steps of the prosecution are concerned. If 
the alcalde happens to be a man who does not belong to the legal 
profession, persons having business before him are entitled to ask 
him to appoint a lawyer to be his adviser (asesor) in the case. In 
each province, and in each comarca, there is a court of first 
instance for civil and criminal matters. These courts consist 
each of only one judge, appointed by the supreme court, and sit at 
the capital of the province or comarca, as the case may be. 

In San Jose there are two civil courts, and besides them a 
criminal court. Alajuela, Cartago, Heredia, Guanacaste, and 
Puntarenas have each one court of first instance, both for civil and 
criminal cases. In Limon there is no court, and the judicial au- 
thority is vested only in the alcalde. 



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COSTA RICA. 69 

The chief justice of the supreme court has just recommended 
(1890) that at Alajuela, Cartago, and Heredia, the civil and 
criminal jurisdiction be separated and exercised by different 
courts. 

At San Jose there is also a court analogous to the United 
States Court of Claims, to try cases in which the Government has 
to appear as a party. The court of appeals, or, as it is called 
there, the Supreme Court of the Republic, consists of fifteen justices, 
appointed for four years by Congress. This court acts in three 
different capacities : (1) As a court of appeals; (2) as a supreme 
court, to decide cases taken before it under a writ of error {corte 
de casaciori): (3) as what is called corte plena^ or full bench, or 
better still, the court in general term. 

When acting as a court of appeals, only three justices are 
necessary to form what is called a sala, or division of the courts. 
There are only two sajas, called, respectively, first and second, and 
each one has as full power as the whole tribunal, as far as the 
appeal is concerned. The division of first and second is made 
only to expedite business, and does not imply in any way any 
difference of rank or function. The president of the sala is 
chosen fi-om among themselves by the three justices who form the 
court. When exercising supreme jurisdiction under a writ of 
error, the court consists of five justices, who also elect their presi- 
dent fi'om among themselves. When acting in full {corte fiend) it 
is presided over by the president of the court of casacion. 

TAXATION, PUBLIC DEBT, CREDIT, AND MONETARY SYSTEM. 

Taxation in Costa Rica, except for local and municipal pur- 
poses, is generally indirect. The principal sources of revenue are 
the custom-houses, and upon them and the monopolies of tobacco 
and liquors the Government depends to meet its obligations. Ac- 



yO COSTA RICA. 

cording to the last report of the secretary of the treasury (1890), 
of a total amount of $4,928,87246 received on all accounts in the 
treasury, there were : 

Custom-houses receipts $i, 683, 312. 54 

Liquor monopoly i, 402, 160. 33 

Tobacco irtonopoly 599, 698. 59 

Total 3, 685, 171. 46 

The expenses of the Government in 1890. were $5,924,914.85. 

Municipal taxation is moderate. The owners of real estate 
alone are obliged to pay taxes for street lighting, the maintenance 
of the police, the supply of water, etc. 

The debt of Costa Rica in 1890 was as follows : Foreign debt, 
;^2,ooo, 1 1 6 1 J. 7^., or about $ 1 0,000,000 ; interior or domestic debt, 
$2,712,397.82. The foreign debt, contracted in England for the 
purpose of building the railroads and making other internal im- 
provements, is represented by 6 per cent bonds, which are quoted 
in London, at the lowest figures, at between 90 and 92 per cent. 
The interest, 5 per cent to the bondholders and 1 per cent addi- 
tional to form a sinking fund, has been thus far paid promptly and 
scrupulously, and the credit of the nation is therefore as high in 
the London market as can be desired. The interior debt consists 
of miscellaneous items, for public works, or services, each one of 
which is promptly paid on maturity. 

The money in general use in Costa. Rica is the paper dollar. 
Its value is nominally 100 cents, 5 fi-ancs, or 4 English shillings, 
but in reality it is worth only about 70 cents, 3.50 francs, 2 shil- 
lings 10 pence, gold being at a premium of from 30 to 50 per 
cent There exists a certain amount of old Government bills, but 
they diminish every year, and those in circulation to-day are nearly 
all issued by the Bank of La Union. The paper money is ac- 
cepted throughout the Republic without question, and the silver 
money of the country has no premium over it. The bills of high- 
est denomination are those of $100; the smallest is of $1. The 



COSTA RICA. 71 

fractional currency consists of silver pieces coined in the country, 
of the value of 5, 10, 25, and 50 cents. Their fineness is 750 
thousandths. The Government has issued a decrep providing 
that the fineness for the one dollar pieces should be 900 thous- 
andths, and for the fractional coins 835 thousandths. No gold 
coined before 1876 can be found now in the country, except with 
great difficulty. Nearly all has gone out of the country. The 
decimal system of money was adopted in 1863. The metric 
system of weights and measures was adopted in 1884, and has 
been in practice since July 1, 1886. 

BUSINESS REGULATIONS AND METHODS. 

Costa Rica was the first nation in Central America to establish 
a bank. That was the bank founded in 1857 '^y ^^^ Crisanto 
Medina. At present there are the following: 

The Anglo-Costa Rican Bank, established in 1863; the Bank 
of Costa Rica, established in 1867 ; and the Bank of *' La Union,'' 
established in 1877. They all are at San Jose. The usual rate 
of interest is 9 per cent. 

The Ley hipotecaria of Costa Rica, which is considered per- 
fect in its class, allows the mobilization, as may be said of the real 
estate, to all imaginable extent. The owner of a piece of land, 
duly registered in the office for such purposes established, can 
have the value of his property divided there into shares, and each 
share represented by a ceduta^ or bond, .and things are fixed in 
such way as to allow at any time, and with perfect safety for the 
bank or the money lender, funds to be raised on these " cedulas," 
and the latter to be used as collateral securities of the best char- 
acter. 

Joint stock companies, engaged in mining, agricultural, and 
other enterprises, abound in the country. 

No restrictions are placed in Costa Rica upon labor, or the ex- 
ercise of trades and commerce, or industry in whatever form. 



72 COSTA RICA. 

Immigration is encouraged, and business enterprise is given every- 
where as fair and ample chances as can be desired. 

RELIGION AND PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

The Roman Catholic apostolic religion is the religion of the 
State, but the exercise of all others is entirely free and tolerated 
under the constitution and the laws. There are undenominational 
Protestant churchs at San Jose and Port Limon. According to the 
report of the secretary of the treasury of the Costa Rican Republic 
for 1890, the sum of $19,440.04 was contributed that year, out of 
the public treasury, for the support of the church in the whole 
country. 

Public instruction in Costa Rica is in the hands of the Na- 
tional Government, under the direct supervision of the Secretary 
of that Department in some respects, and of the municipal boards 
or councils in all others. Primary instruction is compulsory and 
paid for by the nation. But every inhabitant of the Republic, 
whether Costa Rican or foreigner, is free under the constitution 
either to receive instruction or to give it as a teacher in private 
establishments. 

There were in 1890 the following primary schools supported 
by the Government: In the province of San Jose, 27 for boys 
and 27 for girls; total, 54. In the province of Alajuela, 42 for 
boys and 29 for girls; total, 71. In the^ province of Cartago, 19 
for boys and 20 for girls; total, 39. In the province of Heredia, 
17 for boys and 13 for girls; total, 30. In the province of Gua- 
nacaste, 19 for boys and 16 for girls; total, 35. In the comarca 
of Puntarenas, 3 for boys and 2 for girls ; total, 5. Grand total, 198. 

The number who attended these schools in 1890 was as follows: 
Boys, 5,182; girls, 4,307; total, 9,489. 

The cost of these schools to the national govemment in 1890 
was as follows : San Jose, $43, 189. 19 ; Alajuela, $26,938.66 ; Car- 
tago, $23,665-62; Heredia, $27,798.17; Guanacaste, $9,656.94 ; 
Punta Arenas, $6,429.19; total, $137,677.77. 



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The following list shows the number and cost in 1890 of the 
other establishments of public instruction which the Costa Rican 
Government supports: The Costa Rica Lyceum or University, 
$44,384.68; Young Ladies High School (San Jose), $13,891.68; 
the Alajuela High School, $20,821.47; the Cartago College, 
$1,540.84; the School of Agriculture, $6,391.17; total $87,029.84. 

In addition to the above the Costa Rican treasury paid in 1890 : 
Subsidy to the private college named La Esperanza, $200; sub- 
sidy to the private college named American Institute, $450; tuition 
and expenses of Costa Rican boys educated abroad, $7,634.66; 
and many other sums for the construction of schoolhouses and 
repairs of those already built, and for the support of the Physical 
and Geographical Institute, and the Meteorological Institute. 

The whole amount expended by the treasury in 1 890 in the item 
of public instruction was $447,220.23. The comparison of this 
expense with the total of the Government expenses ($4.9951343.32) 
shows the decided interest of the Costa Rican Government and peo- 
ple in favor of public instruction. The amount appropriated for 
1891, for the same purpose, is $546,035. 

TREATIES WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND DIPLOMATIC REPRESEN- 
TATION. 

Costa Rica has a treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation 
with the United States, concluded in the city of Washington on 
the 10th of July, 1851, and proclaimed on May 26, 1852, 

She has also entered into conventions of friendship, commerce, 
and navigation with Germany, the Hanseatic cities, Belgium, 
France, Great Britain, Italy, the Netherlands, Peru, and Ecuador. 

A treaty of friendship, peace, commerce, and arbitration was 
concluded between Costa Rica and Guatemala, Salvador, Hon- 
duras, and Nicaragua on February 16, 1887, and it was ratified 
and proclaimed by Costa Rica on the 27th of May following. 

In addition to the above, Costa Rica has a treaty of peace and 



74 COSTA RICA, 

friendship with Spain; atreaty of limits with Nicaragua; a treaty 
with Colombia to submit to arbitration the question of limits be- 
tween both Republics; extradition treaties with Italy, Peru, 
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Salvador; a naturalization 
treaty with Italy; a consular convention with Guatemala, Hon- 
duras, Nicaragua, and Salvador; a treaty for the establishment of 
uniform rules on matters of private international law with the 
Argentine Republic, Peru, Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador, Venezuela, 
Guatemala, and Uruguay, ratified and proclaimed by Costa Rica 
on August 4, 1879; ^ parcels post convention with Great Britain, 
ratified and proclaimed on November 8, 1887, and several other 
postal and telegraphic conventions. 

The diplomatic representation of Costa Rica in the United 
States has been as follows : 

DURING THE FEDERAL SYSTEM. 

(1) Don Manuel I. Arce and Don Juan M. Rodriguez, commissioners. Pre- 
sented credentials September 10, 1823. 

(2) Don Antonio Jos6 Canaz, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipoten- 
tiary. Presented credentials August 4, 1824. 

(3) Don Pedro Gojnzalez, charg6 d'affaires. Presented credentials November 
14, 1826. 

REPUBLIC OF COSTA RICA, 

(1) Don Felipe Molina, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary. 
Presented credentials March 24, 1851. Died in Washington February 1, 1855. 

(2) Don Luis Molina, charg6 d'aiFaires. Presented credentials June 14, 1855. 

(3) Don Napoleon Escalante and Don Luis Molina presented credentials on 
a special mission of friendship November 24, 1857. 

(4) Don Luis Molina, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary. 
April 10, 1858. 

(5) Don Ezequiel Gutierrez, charg6 d'affaires. Presented credentials Sep- 
tember 20, 1866. 

(6) Don Julian Volio, epvoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary. 
1868. 

(7) Don Ezequiel Gutierrez, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipoten- 
tiary. 1871 to 1874. 



COSTA RICA. 75 

(8) Don Manuel M. dc Peralta, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipo- 
tentiary. Presented credentials February 17, 188^. 

(9) Don Cleto Gonzalez Viquez, charg6 d'affsdres. 1885. 

(10) Don Pedro Perez Zeled6n, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipoten- 
tiary. Presented credentials July 26, 1887. 

(11) Don Federico Volio, charg6 d'affaires. 

( 1 2) Don Pedro Perez Zeled6n, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipo- 
tentiary. Resumed his fiinctions October 19, 1888. 

(13) Don Federico Volio, charg6 d'affaires. November i, 1889. 

(14) Don Anselmo Volio, charg6 d'affaires ad interim, upon the death of Don 
Federico Volio. 

(15) Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo, charg6 d'affaires. Presented credentials 
March 21, 1891. 

Costa Rica was represented in the International American Conference by Don 
Manuel Arag6n^ one of the leading financiers of Central America, with Don 
Joaquin Bernardo Calvo, the well-known author, as secretary. 

In the International American Monetary Commission Costa Rica was repre- 
sented by Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo. 



Chapter XL 



TRANSPORTATION AND POSTAL FACILITIES. 

The railway system of Costa Rica consists of the following : 
The Atlantic Railroad, from the port of Limon, on the Atlantic,, 
to Alajuela, 147^^ miles. This road has a branch which starts from 
a point about 40 miles distant from Puerto Limon and goes south- 
ward and then eastward until reaching Carrillo, a place at the foot 
of the Irazu mountains, 70 miles. 

The Pacific Railroad, from Puntarenas, on the Pacific, to the 
city of Esparza, at the foot of the Aguacate Mountains, a dis- 
tance of 14 miles. This line is now being continued to Alajuela^ 
a distance of 30 miles. 

Alajuela is already connected with Heredia, and Heredia with 
Cartago, by means of another railroad, 27 miles in length, and 
this line passes through San Jose, which stands between the two 
cities last named. So that, when the line from Esparza to Ala- 
juela is completed, there will be a continuous railway from the 
port of Limon, on the Atlantic, to the port of Punta Arenas, on 
the Pacific. 

All the lines will be the property of the Government when the 
time of the concessions — that is, ninety-nine years — has elapsed. 
In the mean time they are in the hands of the Costa Rica Rail- 
way Company, an English corporation domiciled in London. The 
Government owns one-third of the stock of the Atlantic Railroad 
Company. 
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Under a concession made August 3, 1888, to Mr. Minor C. 
Keith, a citizen of the United States, another railroad is to be 
built between the point in which the San Jose and Carrillo Rail- 
road crosses the river named Jimenez and the Rio Frio, which 
empties into the San Juan River. This line will establish prompt 
communication between Puerto Limon and the upper part of the 
San Juan, will permit the improvement of an enormous amount of 
very fertile land which now is almost unproductive, and will be in 
other respects of great advantage both for Costa Rica and Nicara- 
gua, her neighbor. 

Independently of the railroads there are in Costa Rica very 
good means of communication, consisting of excellent roads, which 
cross the country in every direction. 

Costa Rica is a member of the Universal Postal Union. On 
the 4th of February, 1890, there was negotiated a parcels post 
treaty between the United States and Costa Rica, the full text of 
which will be found in Appendix B, p. 127. 

The postal service between her and the United States is as 
follows : 

On the Pacific side, from San Francisco to Puntarenas, by the 
steamers of the Pacific Mail Company, the 3d, 13th, and 23d of 
each month. 

On the Atlantic side, fi^om New York to Puerto Limon, either 
directly by the steamers of the Atlas Steamship Company every 
two weeks, or by rail to New Orleans and thence by sea to Puerto 
Limon once a week. 

Also fi-om New York toPuerto Limon, via Aspinwall, by the 
steamers of the Pacific Mail the 1st, 10th, aud 20th of each 
month. If connection can be made at Aspinwall with either a 
steamer of the Royal Mail or some other going to Puerto Limon, 
the correspondence, as well as the passengers, may go that way. 
If not, they will be carried across the isthmus to Panama, and from 
there by the Pacific steamers to Puntarenas. 



78 COSTA RICA. 

RATES OF POSTAGE TO AND FROM COSTA RICA. 

Letters, — Five cents here and 10 centavos there for each half 
ounce, or fraction thereof. 

Postal cards. — Two cents here and 2 centavos there, each. 

Other mailable articles. — Two cents here and 2 centavos there 
for each 2 ounces, or fraction thereof 

Registration fee. — Ten cents here and 20 centavos there. 

Parcels post. — Articles of merchandise 12 cents here and 20 
centavos there for each pound or fraction thereof 

The postal service in Costa Rica is in a most excellent condi. 
tion. There are 92 post-ofRces in the Republic, which in 1890- 
'91 handled 2,101,428 pieces. 

The steamers of the Pacific Mail receive a liberal subsidy from 
the Government of Costa Rica. The others have been granted 
exemption of port dues, except hospital charges ($25), when 
touching regularly at Puerto Limon. 

Costa Rica was the first nation of Central America which had 
telegraphic service, and now has the cheapest rates; only 20 cents 
is charged for a message to any place in Central America. All 
centers of population of the Republic, whether large or small, are 
connected by wire with each other, and with the neighboring 
nations and the rest of the world. 

The nearest office of the cable company is at San Juan del Sur, 
in Nicaragua, but that office is connected by wire with the Costa 
Rican telegraphic system, and the service is done satisfactorily. 
The Government granted, in 1889, a concession to an European 
company, for a direct cable connecting Puerto Limon with the 
Atlantic lines. 

Telephonic service is established in San Jose, and the Govern- 
ment has entered into a contract with an American company for 
its extension throughout the. whole country. 

To reach Costa Rica from the United States the traveler has a 



COSTA RICA. 79 

choice of routes. He may take a Pacific Mail steamer from New 
York to Colon (fare, $90 first class, $40 second class; time, 8 
days), and there take a steamer of the British Royal Mail Com- 
pany to Puerto Limon, thence by rail to San Jose ; or he may take 
a steamer of the Atlas company at New York, and go direct to 
Puerto Limon, stopping at Kingston, Jamaica, en route ; fare, $80 ; 
time, 14 days. 

From New Orleans he may take a steamer of the Costa Rica 
line every Wednesday morning for Port Limon; fare, $50 first 
class, $40 second class, $25 steerage; time, 4^ days; or he may 
take a steamer of the Costa Rica and Honduras line every Wednes- 
day; fare, $50; time, 9 days; or by crossing the Isthmus from 
Colon he can take a Pacific Mail steamer to Puntarenas; fare, 
$115 first class. 

From San Francisco the Pacific Mail steamers leave three 
times a month; fare, $105 first class, $52.50 steerage; time, 20 
days. 



Chapter XII. 



IMMIGRATION. 

The problem to be solved not only in Costa Rica, but also 
in all that portion of Western Hemisphere which was settled 
either by Spain or Portugal, and upon which the full development 
of their immense resources of all kinds depends, is the problem 
of immigration. The real secret of the prosperity and advanced 
state of civilization which the Argentine Republic and the Ori- 
ental Republic of Uruguay have reached consists in the proper 
solution given there to this problem, and to the establishment of 
a steady and regular current of immigration which constantly in- 
creases the number of laborers, and adds to the productive forces 
of the country. 

Costa Rica, by reason of her geographical position, her climate, 
her institutions, the character of her people, the nature of her pro- 
ductions, the short distance from all the great centers of civilization, 
and the hearty welcome which her inhabitants give all foreigners, 
affords inducements, greater than many countries, for foreign cap- 
ital and labor to come to her territory and aid in the development 
of such wealth and prosperity as it is difficult to describe. 

The Government is conscious of the immense advantage whicK 
the country would derive from the increase, through healthy meth- 
ods, of its population, and without resorting to any artificial means 
has shown itself at all times .exceedingly liberal in its concessions 
in favor ot the immigrants. 
80 



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COSTA RICA. 81 

Foreigners as well as natives may acquire real estate, and public 
lands are granted to them without distinction, either by preemp- 
tion methods, or by sale at public auction. 

By preemption methods natives and foreigners can acquire the 
ownership of tracts of land of iio less than 50 hectares, or 80 acres, 
by merely fencing them and giving notice to the local authority 
that it is their intention to put them under cultivation. If this 
cultivation is actually carried on for two years, during which the 
settlers can not be disturbed in the possession of the land, the 
proper patent will be issued in their fevor. The patentees may 
then, if they so wish, take possession of another tract of land of 50 
hectares, and fence it, etc., on the same terms and conditions as 
before ; and so on indefinitely. 

But if the tract of land is not cultivated, or not cultivated to the 
extent and in the serious way contemplated by the law, then it 
will be open again to settlement, and other parties may acquire 
them on the same conditions; the new settlers, however, are re- 
quired to pay their predecessors a feir compensation for all the im- 
provements, whatever they may be, which they made on the prop- 
erty. 

At public auction foreigners and natives can acquire the owner- 
ship of tracts of public land, not exceeding 600 hectares for each 
person, by filing a petition requesting the commissioner of the 
land office to cause the tract of land which they desire to be ad- 
vertised for sale, the petitioners havmg the privilege to purchase 
the land at the highest price brought at auction. The lowest ad- 
missible bid is $5 per hectare of prairie lands ; $4 per hectare of 
wooded lands, containing India-rubber trees, vanilla, dye woods, 
etc. ; $3 per hectare of wooded lands not having those trees, and 
$2 per hectare of marshy, stony, or barren lands. 

But if these lands happen to be situated at a distance greater 
than 15 miles fi-om a town of 3,000 inhabitants, or from the track 
of a railroad, the prices above named will be reduced to one-half 
c It 6 



82 COSTA RICA. 

If the distance is between 30 and 60 miles, the price will be 
reduced to one-fourth ; and if it is larger than 60 miles, the price 
will be one-eighth of the regular one above given. 

The price can be paid, at the purchaser's option, either cash or 
within ten years. If the latter method is adopted, interest at 6 per 
cent, to be paid annually, will be added. But if at any time the 
purchaser can prove, by sufficient evidence, that the improvements 
made by him on the land thus purchased are worth twice as much 
as the amount of the interest still due, he will be exempted from 
paying the interest. And if the improvements prove to be worth 
twice as much as the price to be paid for the land under the terms 
of sale, the purchaser will be exempted from paying said price. 

The Costa Rican citizenship is not forced upon any immigrant ; 
but it can be acquired after one year's residence in the country. 

For the purpose of furthering immigration, the following con- 
cessions have been made : 

THE SAN BERNARDO DE TALAMANCA COLONY. 

Persons desiring to settle in this locality may be entitled, upon 
entering their names at the registry for that purpose kept at the 
proper office in San Jose, first, to free passage for them, their fami- 
lies, effects, and domestic animals, by rail to the port of Limon, 
and by sea from there to Old Harbor, and from there, on horse- 
back (six hours) to San Bernardo ; second, to the use of a house, 
at San Bernardo, and to a certain allowance for their support, 
within a certain period, until they can settle to work ; third, to 
the ownership in fee simple, and free from registration expenses, 
of a tract of land atf Talamanca of 6 hectares (about 10 acres) 
for each head of a family, and one additional tract of 6 hectares 
for each one of his children ; fourth, to be paid monthly the sum of 
$17 per family, for two years; and fifth, to be given a cow, a 
pig, a sow, a certain number of hens and chickens, a collection of 
seeds, and a set of the most necessary agricultural implements. 



COSTA RICA. 83 

Talamanca is a rich mining and agricultural district, well pro- 
vided with rivers and everything necessary to become a prosperous 
country. It has, nevertheless, the disadvantage of containing still 
within its limits some bands of uncivilized Indians, although not 
numerous. These Indians, however, have never shown themselves 
ho$tile to the settlers. 

THE BUENAVISTA COLONY. 

» 

Under a contract with the Atlantic Railroad Company and the 
River Plate Loan Trust Company of London 800,000 acres of 
land were granted for colonization purposes. Colonists of all na- 
tionalities, except negroes and Chinese, are admitted, and they are 
given liberally the ownership of fertile lands, in localities at be- 
tween 3,000 and 8,000 feet above the level of the sea, in the vicin- 
ity of the railroad, and not far from the centers of population of the 
Republic. 

THE NICOYA CUBAN COLONY. 

Under a contract with Don Antonio Maceo, and for the purpose 
of promoting and improving the cultivation of tobacco, the Gov- 
ernment has set apart a tract of land of about 24,000^ acres in the 
fertile territory of Nicoya. Senor Maceo has obtained for himself, 
as well as for the colonists, the most liberal concessions. 

THE MATINA RIVER COLONY. 

The adaptability of the soil of Matina for the cultivation of 
cocoa, which in former times rendered this locality famous, induced 
the Government to enter into a contract with Signor Attilio La- 
zaro Riatti, of Italy, for the purpose of bringing to Matina immi- 
grants of all nationalities, who should engage in the aforesaid cul- 
tivation and restore as far as practicable the former state of things. 
Signor Riatti has been given for that purpose 1,600 acres of land 



84 COSTA RICA. 

in the neighborhood of the Limon Railroad and in the localities 
which once were more renowned, and ample means and induce- 
ments to carry this plan to success have been granted to him. 

MR. Reynolds's American colony. 

An earnest effort is being made by Mr. W. H. Reynolds, of 
Homellsville, N. Y., to establish an American colony in the fer- 
tile territory of the Republic which borders upon the Atlantic, on 
lands where cocoa, coffee, sugar cane, cotton, and many other agri- 
cultural productions of great value can be copiously raised. The 
Government has given Mr. Reynolds 66,000 acres of land to carry 
out his scheme, and granted exemption of duties for three years 
on all goods and articles imported into the country for the use 
of his colonists, and many other privileges and advantages of recog- 
nized importance. 

Mr. Reynolds has bound himself to take to the aforesaid local- 
ity one hundred American families, in agricultural labors, of good 
moral standing and experienced, and settle them in the places, 
within the limits of the tract granted, which are best adapted for 
the kind of cultivation selected, providing them with a house, 
seeds, implements, and other things necessary. Sufficient area is 
to be set apart in these lands for the construction of a town. 

THE coco ISLAND GERMAN COLONY. 

A German subject by the name of August Gussler has entered 
into a contract with the Government by which he bound himself 
to take to the Costa Rican island named Coco, on the Pacific 
Ocean, a colony of fifty German families. An area of a square 
kilometer is to be reserved to build a town, and the rest of the 
territory is to be divided in lots of 16 hectares each, and arranged 
in such a way as to allow Mr. Gussler to have one and the Costa 
Rican Government the next, and so on equally and alternately. 



COSTA RICA. 85 

THE RODRIGUEZ COLONY. 

Under a contract with Don Eusebio Rodriguez, a rich land 
owner in the San Carlos Valley, some portion of the lands belong- 
ing to that gentleman, and situated in the immediate neighborhood 
of the Nicaragua Interoceanic Canal, is to be divided into lots 
and set apart for colonists, and devoted to agricultural purposes. 
Senor Rodriguez is given for a certain time the use of $25,000, 
to be advanced by the Government, and many other privileges of 
importance. 

OTHER CONCESSIONS. 

In its desire to promote agriculture, the Costa Rican Govern- 
ment has made other concessions, as follows : One to Don Vicente 
Guardia and Don Odilon Jimenez, for the establishment of a 
sugar plantation at Guanacaste; another to Don Jose Machado y 
Pinto, for the establishment of a bank, under the name of " The 
Costa Rican Loan, Trust, and Colonization Bank," with a capital 
of $5,000,000, divided into 5,000 shares of $1,000 each, the Gov- 
ernment guaranteeing a dividend of 4 per cent a year. 



Chapter XIII. 



HISTORICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES. 

The history of Costa Rica can be divided naturally into three 
different periods : 

(i) One which might be called colonial, and covers more than 
three centuries, from 1502, the year of the discovery, to 1821, the 
year of the declaration of independence from Spain; 

(2) Another of about twenty-seven years, between 1821 and 
1848, the latter being the year in which Costa Rica ceased to be 
a State of the Central American Confederation ; 

(3) And another from 1848 to the present date. 

Nothing particularly important — capable to single Costa Rica 
out of the other colonies of Spain in the New World — can be 
found in the first period. The Costa Rican soil was submitted 
to the same system of government as all the other dominions of 
Spain in America. And the sixty-two rulers who, whet, .vi with 
the name of governors or adelantados or alcaldes mayores^ exercised 
jurisdiction in Costa Rica, and succeeded each other during these 
three hundred and twenty years, were more or less the same as the 
other rulers and viceroys of Spain in Spanish America. 

Men of great ability can be found among them. Diego de 
Nicuesa, the first Spaniard who ever settled in Costa Rica, and 
was also its first governor, deserves to be remembered in history, 
Juan de Cavallon, Juan de Estrada Ravago, Juan Vazquez de 
Coronado, Rodrigo Arias de Maldonado, and others, occupy high 

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COSTA RICA. 87 

positions in the hearts and the esteem of the Costa Rican people. 
The last Spanish ruler was Don Juan Manuel de Canas, who in 
October, 1821 yielded to the inevitable, joined the independent 
movement, and became an officer of the new-born State. 

During the second period Gosta Rica witnessed all the events 
which took place between the 15th of September, 1821, in which 
Guatemala proclaimed its independence from Spain, and the 30th 
of August, 1848, in which she accepted the accomplished facts, 
withdrew from the Confederacy, ceased to be the State of Costa 
Rica, and began new life under the title which she still retains of 
the Republic of Costa Rica. 

During the third period Costa Rica has had the good fortune 
to live in peace, with no other disturbances than those produced 
by the invasion of Walker in Central America, during which she 
crowned herself with glory for her heroic and successful efforts 
to secure the independence of the common country. 

Her first President during this period was Don Jose Maria 
Castro, to whom the Costa Rican Congress decreed the title of 
Founder of the Republic. Don Juan Rafael Mora, who succeeded 
him, is one of the most conspicuous and meritorious figures in 
Central American history. The country owes him a great debt of 
gratitude. 

The administration of Don Bernardo Soto distinguished itself 
for its high spirit of progress and its earnest efforts in promoting 
the welfare of the country. 

Don Jose Joaquin Rodriguez is the present incumbent of the 
Costa Rican presidential chair. He was inaugurated on the 8th 
of May, 1890; and his administration has so far proved to be 
no less patriotic, farsighted, and acceptable to the country, than the 
most popular one which has ever existed in Costa Rica. 

The following list of publications, both official and unofficial, 
which by no means is claimed to be complete, will help the student 



88 COSTA RICA. 

in acquiring as foil a knowledge as may be desired of diat inter- 
esting country : 

COSTA RICAN OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 

Anuario Estadistico de la Repfiblica de Costa Rica (Yearbook of the Republic of Costa 
Rica). Published every year by the Costa Rican Bureau of Statistics at San Jos6. 

Memoria de la Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores, etc. (Report of the Secretary of For- 
eign Relations, etc.). Published every year at San Jos6. 

Memoria de la Secretaria de Hacienda (Report of the Secretary of the Treasury). Pub- 
lished every year at San Jos^. 

Memoria del Secretario de Guerra y Marina (Report of the Secretary of War and of the 
Navy). Published every year at San Jos6. 

Memoria de la Secretaria de la Gobernaci6n, etc. (Report of the Secretary of the Inte- 
rior, etc.). Published every year at San Jos6. 

Constituci6n de la Repdblica de Costa Rica (Constitution' of the Republic of Costa 
Rica). Grand edition. Madrid, 1889. 

C6digo Civil (Civil Code). San Jos6, 1887. * 

C6digo de Procedimientos Civiles (Code of Civil Procedure). San Jos6, 1887. 

C6digo Penal (Penal Code). San Jos6, 1880. 

C6digo Militar (Military Code). San Jos6, 1884. 

C6digo Fiscal (Code of Laws relating to the Treasury). San Jos6, 1885. 

Reglamento del Registro Publico (Rules for the Registration of Property). San Jos6, 
.1887. 

Arancel de Aduanas (Tariff). San Jos6. 

Reglamento Consular de la Repdblica de Costa Rica (Consular Regulations of the 
Republic of Costa Rica). San Jos6, 1852. 

Catilogo de los objetos que han figurado en la exposici6n nacional de 15 de Setiembre 
de 1886, redactado de orden del Gobierno por la Direcri6n general de estadistica 
(Official catalogue of the articles exhibited at the National Costa Rican Exhibition 
of 1886). San Jos6, 1886. 

Anales del Museo Nacional de la Repdblica de Costa Rica (Annals of the National 
Museum of Costa Rica). San Jos6, 1888. 

Boletin Trimestral del Instituto Meteorol6gico Nacional (Quarterly Bulletin of the 
National Meteorological Institute). San Jos6. 

UNITED STATES OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 

Report by Consul Morrell on the trade of Costa Rica (and the Costa Rican Railroad) in 

i879-*8o (February 15, 1881). In United States Consular Reports II, 5, 37a 
Report by Consul Morrell on the credit and trade system of Costa Rica (July 5, 1883). 

In United States Consular Reports XIII, 43, 434. 
Report by Consul Schroeder on the trade (tariff and coffee) of Costa Rica with the United 

States (December 26, 1884). In United States Consular Reports XV, 51. 476. 
Report by Consul Schroeder on the hard woods of Costa Rica (March 38, 1885). In 

United States Consular Reports XVI, 53, 122. 
Report by Consul Schroeder on the tariff of Costa Rica (February 2, 1885). In United 

States Consular Reports XVI, 53, 189. 



COSTA RICA. 89 

Report by Consul Wingfield on the production and trade of coffee in Costa Rica (Octo- 
beriS, 1887). In United States Consular Reports XXVIII, 98, 54. 

Report by Consul Wingfield on the recorded indebtedness of Costa Rica (July 19, 1889). 
In United States Consular Reports XXXI, no and in, 648. 

Report by Consul Wingfield on the agricultural products of Costa Rica. In United 
States Consular Reports XXXII, 113, 171. 

Report by Consul Mackey on Costa Rica and her commerce, geography, people, rail- 
ways, mines, agriculture, imports and exports, chief towns (April 30, 1890). In 
United States Consular Reports XXXIII, 116, 120. 

Report by Consul Mackey on the public lands of Costa Rica (July 18, 1890). In United 
States Consular Reports XXXIII, 119, 611. 

Report by Consul Mackey on the currency and finances of Costa Rica. In United 
States Consular Reports XXXIV, 123, 663. 

BRITISH OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 

Report by Consul Meugens on the trade and commerce of Costa Rica for the year 1878 

(February 13, 1879). In Reports from H. M.'s Consuls, Part II, 1879, 8. 
Report by Consul Sharpe on the trade and commerce of Costa Rica in 1889, in No. 694 

of Diplomatic and Consular Reports, 1890. 
Trade of Central America with the United Kingdom, in "Annual Statement of the 

Trade of the United Kingdom with Foreign Countries and British Possessions in 

the year 1884." 

UNOFFICIAL PUBUCATIONS. 

Calvo. Repdblica de Costa. Rica. Apuntamientos geogrdficos, estadisticos € hist6- 

ricos compilados y arreglados por Joaquin Bernardo Calvo. San Jos6, 1887. 
Calvo. The Republic of Costa Rica, by Joaquin Bernardo C^vo; translated from 

the Spanish and edited by L. de T., with introduction, additions, and extensions 

by the editor. Chicago and New York, 1890. 
Calvo. The Republic of Costa Rica. Some facts and figures compiled and arranged 

by J. B. Calvo. Washington, D. C, 1890. 
Fernandez. Historia de Costa Rica durante la dominaci6n espaflola — 1502 d 1821 — 

por Don Leon Fernandez. Madrid, 1889. 
Molina. Coup d'oeil rapide sur la R^publique de Costa Rica, par D. Felipe Molina. 

Paris, 1849. 
Molina. Bosquejo de Costa Rica, por Don Felipe Molina. London, 1851. 
Molina. Costa Rica and New Granada, por Don Felipe Molina. London, 1853. 
OsBjo. Lecciones de Geografla, por Don Rafael Francisco Osejo. 
Fernandez. Colecci6n de documentos para la historia de Costa Rica, recogidos por 

Don Leon Fernandez. San Jos6. 
Wagner. Die. Republik von Costa Rica in Central Amerika, bei Moritz Wagner. 

Leipzig, 1856. 
L.AUREV. Notice sur le Golfe Dulce dans I'Etat de Costa Rica (Am6rique Centrale) et 

sur un nouveau passage entre les deux Oc6ans, avec une carte, par M. Gabriel 

Lafond de Laurey, consul g6n6ral, charg6 d'affaires de Costa Rica en France. 

Paris. 1856. 



90 COSTA RICA. 

SciiERZER. Wandcrungen durch die Mittelamerikanischen Freistaaten, bei Karl 

Ritter Von Scherzer. Braunschweig, 1857. 
Froebkl. Aus Amerika, bei Julius Froebel. Leipzig, iSsy-'sS. 
MoRELOT. Voyage dans rAm6rique Centrale, par L. Morelot. Paris, 1859. 
Marr. Reise nach Centralamerika, bei N. Marr. Hamburg, 1863. 
CiNELLi. Compendio de Geografia, por D. Francisco Alfonso Cinelli. San Jos6, 

1865. 
KuRTZE. Interoceanic Railroad through the Republic of Costa Rica, by F. Kurtze. 

New York, 1866. 
ScHERZER. Statistisch-commerzielle Ergebnisse einer Reise um die Erde, by Karl 

Ritter von Scherzer. Leipzig, 1867. 
Boyle. Ride across a continent: a personal narrative of wanderings through Nicaragua 

and Costa Rica. London, 1868 
Belly. A travers TAmferique Centrale, par Felix Belly. Paris, 1872. 
Peralta. La R6publique de Costa Rica, par D. Manuel M. dc Peralta. Geneve, 

1870. 
Peralta. Costa Rica, its Climate, Constitution and Resources, by D. Manuel M. de 

Peralta. London, 1873. 
Peralta. ' Costa Rica, Nicaragua y PanamA en el siglo XVI, su historia y sus limiies, 

segdn los documentos del Archive de Indias de Sevilla, del de Simancas, etc., rc- 

cogidos ypublicados por D. Manuel M. de Peralta. Madrid, Paris, 1883. 
Peralta. El Rio de San Juan de Nicaragua. Derechos hist6ricosde sus ribereflos; las 

Repdblicas de Costa Rica y Nicaragua, segdn los documentos hist6ricos, por D. 

Manuel M. de Peralta. Madrid, 1882. 
Peralta. Costa Rica y Colombia, de 1573 & 1881, por D. Manuel M. de Peralta. Ma- 
drid, 1886. 
Peralta. El Canal InteroceAnico de Nicaragua y Costa Rica en 1620 y en 1887. Re- 

laciones de Diego de Mercado y Thos. C. Reynolds, por D. Manuel M. de Peralta. 

Bruselas, 1887. 
Ferraz. Aguas Termales de Cartago, Costa Rica. San Jos6, 1886. 
Kellnor. Reports to the Council of Foreign Bondholders, by Sir George Kellnor. 
Livesey. Report to the Directors of the Costa Rica Railway Company, by M. Livesey. 
Crrspi. Costa Rica and Central America: Commerce, climate, immigration, natural 

resources, by R. A. Crespi. San Jos6. 
ViLLAViCENCio. Repdblica de Costa Rica. Historia, geografia, reino mineral, reino 

vegetal, reino animal, poblaci6n, instrucci6n pdblica, cj6rcito, industrias, comer- 

cio, vias de comunicaci6n, rentas, gastos, deuda, por D. Enrique Villavicencio. 

San Jos6, 1886. 
Iglesias. La m&s pequefla de las Repdblicas americanas. San Jos6, 1887. 
JfMENEZ. Instrucci6n civica para el uso de las escuelas de Costa Rica, por D. 

Ricardo Jimenez. San Jos6, 1888. 
Biolley. Costa Rica et son avenir, par Paul Biolley. Paris, 1889. 
BiOLLEY. Costa Rica and her future, by Paul Biolley, translated from the French 

by Cecil Charles. Washington, 1880. 
Banco Agricola Colonizador dela Repdblica de Costa Rica. San Jos6, 1890. 
ScEiROEDER. Costa Rica como lugar para inmigrantes d los terrenos baldfos. Un 

folleto de observaciones personales, por John Schroeder. San Jos6, 1890. 



COSTA RICA. 91 

Barrantes. Geografia de Costa Rica, por Francisco Montero Barrantes. San Jos6, 

1890. 
PiTTiER. Apuntaciones sobre el clima y geografSa de la Repdblica de Costa Rica, 

per H. Pittier. San Jos6, 1890. 
POLAKOWSKY. Flora de Costa Rica, por H. Polakowsky, traducido del alem&n por 

D. Manuel Carazo Peralta y anotado por H. Pittier. San Jos6, 1890. 
Maluquer.. Repfiblica de Costa Rica. (Notas bibliogrdficas) por D. Jos6 Maluquer 

y Salvador. Madrid, 1890. 
Peralta. La propri6t6 fonci^re, par J. F. Peralta. Paris, 1890. 




o 
co 



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f .' 



\ ■ 



.!• : . •••f^.vi . ;, . ' 



u -- !>: VI 



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>1 .. . 



^ -f .- ■ -1 .. - 



-it- 



Appendix A. 
Import Duties of Costa Rica. 



DERECHOS DE IMPORTACI6N EN COSTA RICA. 

Equivalents: 

I silver peso = $0. 736 United States (J^^y 'i i^Qi)- 

I kilo = 3. 2046 pounds. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Agzimiltaral piodaets and pravi- 



Allspice 

Almonds 

Bacon, in tins or otherwise. 



Balsam, crude 

Barks, dyeing or tanning. . . , 

Barley 

Barley, pearl 

Beans 

Butter 

Cocao, in seeds 

Capers 

Carmine 

Cassia, raw or ground 

Cheese, in tins or otherwise 

Chestnuts 

Chocolate 

Cinnamon, raw or ground. . 

Cloves 

Cochineal 

Cocoa, ground 

Cocoa butter 

Comfits and sweetmeats 

Cork, unmanufactured 

Com 



Duty per 
pound L 
in U.S. 
currency. II 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Doiiars. 
.037 
.007 
.023 

. 109 
.013 
.007 
.023 
.007 
.013 
.023 
.043 
.179 
.037 
.023 
.007 

.043 
.073 

.073 
.073 
.043 
.073 

.043 
.037 
.007 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



ProdoetM de agiiooltiira y viverae. 

Jamaica 

Almendras 

Tocinos 6 tocinetas, vengan 6 no 

en latas 

Balsamo en estado natural 

Cortezas tintoreas 6 curtientes . . 

Cebada 

Cebada perlada 

Frijoles 

Manteca de vaca 

Cacao en grano 

Alcapanas 

Carmin 

Canelon en ramo 6 molida 

euesos, vengan 6 no en latas . . . 
astaflas 

Chocolate 

Canela en rama 6 molida 

Clavos de olor 

Cochinilla 

Cacao, molido 

Manteca de cacao 

Confites y confituras 

Corcho en bruto 

Maiz 



Pesos. 



. II 
.02 

.07 
.33 
.04 
.02 
.07 
.02 
.04 
.07 
.13 
.54 
. II 
.07 
.02 

.13 
.22 
. 22 
. 22 

.13 
.22 

.13 
. II 
.02 



NOTB.—A reciprocal commercial arrangement entered into between the United States and 
Costa Rica, which awaito the confirmation of the Congress of the latter country, will make ma- 
terial changes in some of these rates. In consideration of the free admission of Costa Rican 
sugar, cofliee, etc., into the United States, certain agricultural and other products of the United 
States will enjoy reduced rates, and in some instances will be admitted free into Costa Rica. 

93 



94 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Agrionltural prodooti and pzovi- 
riani— Continued. 

Dollars. I 

Crackers and biscuits, 6ne and 

common 023 j 

Cumin seeds 037 li 

Extract of beef 043 

Feculae used in manufactures 037 

Fish, with or without oil, in tins 

or otherwise 023 

Flour, of oats, wheat, corn, etc . . . 013 

Fruits, dried, all kinds 043 

Fruits, fresh, not preserved, with 

or without shells 007 

Fruits in brandy and sirups, not 

medicinal 073 

Fruits, preserved in their own 

juice or sirup 043 

Gallnuts 037 

Gelatin 037 

Grain, not specified, such as corn, 

wheat, etc 007 

Hams, in tins or otherwise 023 

Hay and other kinds of forage. . . .007 

Indigo 073 

Ivory, vegetable and crude 007 

Ivory, vegetable, crude 007 

{ellies of all kinds 043 
.ard 013 

Linseed, in grain or ground 007 

Macaroni oi vermicelli 023 

Malt of barley or any other fer- 
menting substance 013 

Meats of all kinds, smoked, dried, 

or in brine 013 

Meats, preserved or potted, with 
or without oil, in tins or other- 
wise 023 

Milk, condensed 033 

Mustard, powdered, in grain or 

compounded 043 

Must of barley or other ferment- 
ing substance 013 

Nutmeg 073 

Nuts 007 

Nuts, hazel 007 

Oats 007 

Olives 043 

Pastilles of sugar and gum 043 

Pepper, ground or whole 031 

Pickles 043 




Prodaotoe de agrionltan y viverw— 
Continda. 

Galletas finas (i ordinarias 

Cominos 

Extracto de came 

Feculas de uso industrial 

Pescado, en 6 sin aceite, vengan 

6 no en latas 

Harina de trigo, avena y maiz, 

etc 

Frutas secas de toda clase 

Frutas frescas, no confitadas, 

con 6 sin cascara 

Frutas en aguardiente y jarabes 

no medicinales 

Frutas azucaradas, conservadas 

en su propio jugo 6 en miel . . . 

Nuez agalla 

Gelatina 

Granos no especificados, como 

maiz, trigo, etc 

Jamones, venga'n 6 no en latas. . 
Heno y otros pastos y forrage. . . 

Afiil 

Corozo A marfil vegetal en bruto. 

Marfil vegetal en bruto 

Jaleas de todas clases 

Manteca de cerdo 

Linaza en grano 6 molida 

Fideos 6 macarrones 

Ldpulo y mosto de cebada y 

cualquiera sustancia fermen- 
table 

Carnes de todas clases, ahuma- 

das, secas 6 en sal mu era 

Carnes conservadas 6 condimen- 

tadas, con 6 sin aceite, vengan 

6 no en latas 

Leche condensada 

Mostaza en polvo, granos 6 com- 

puesta 

Mosto de cebada 6 de cualquiera 

otra sustancia fermentable. . . . 

N uez moScada 

Nueces 

Avellanas 

Avena 

Aceitunas 

Pastillas de azficar y de goma. . 

Pimienta molida 6 en grano 

Encurtidos 



PtSM. 



COSTA RICA. 



95 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Agrienltural 

gioni— Continued. 

Potatoes, fresh 

Preserves 

Preserves of all kinds not speci- 
fied 

Rice 

Rye 

Saffron 

Sago, powdered or in grain 

Salt, ordinary 

Sauces of all kinds 

Sausages 

Seeds and barks, medicinal 

Seed, canary 

Seeds of vegetables, flowers, and 
plants 

Shellfish, preserved, with or with- 
out oil, or with condiments in 
cans or otherwise 

Spices, not mentioned 

Starch 

Starch of yucca 

Substances of nutritious fecula, 
not specified 

Sugar, brown 

Sugar, brown, in loaves 

Sugar, refined 

Sugar, unrefined 

Sweetmeats and pastilles of su- 
gar and gum 

Sirups, not medicinal 

Tagua, or vegetable ivory, crude . . 

Tea 

Vegetables, fresh 

Vegetables, fresh 

Vegetables in vinegar or brine. . . 

Vinegar, ordinary '. 

Wheat 

Armf and ammmiiticni. 

Ammunition for hunting 

Bladed arms 

Blades, for swords, etc 

Bullets and buckshot 

Carbines, each 

Cartridges, loaded, for all kinds 
of arms 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollart. 
.007 
.043 

.043 
.023 
.007 

.073 
.023 
.007 

.043 
.023 
. 109 
.023 

.003 



.023 
.037 
.037 
.023 

.023 
.007 
.007 

.037 
.023 

.043 
-073 
.007 
.073 
.007 
.007 
.043 

.023 
.007 



.023 
1.629 

1. 629 
.023 

2. 205 

2.173 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Prodaetot de agrionltcira y viveret— | 
Continda. 



Papas f rescas 

Almlbares 

Conservas de todas clases no 
especificadas 

Arroz 

Centeno 

Azafran 

Sagii en polvo 6 en grano 

Sal comun 

Salsas de todaclase 

Salchichones 

Semillas y cortezas medicinales. 

Alpiste 

Semillas de legumbres, fiores y 
plantas 

Mariscos ronservados, en 6 sin 
aceite, 6 condimentados, ven- 
gan 6 no en latas 

Especias, no especificadas , 

Almidon 

Almidon de yuca 

Sustancias feculentas alimenti- 

cias no especificadas 

I Panela 

! Dulce en panela 6 marqueta 

j Aziicar, refinada 

! Aziicar, sin refinar 

I Dulces y pastillas de az<icar y 

I goma 

I Jarabes no medicinales 

I Tagua en bruto 

T6 

I Legumbres f rescas 

' Hortalizas, frescas 

Hortalizas en vinagre 6 sal- 
muera 

Vinagre comun 

Trigo 



Annas y mnnicidn. 



Munici6n de caza 

Armas blancas 

Hojas para armas blancas 

Balas y balinas 

Carbinas, cada uno 

Capsulas 6 cartuchos fulminan- 
tes, cargados, para toda clase 
de armas 



Pesos. 



.02 
.13 

.13 
.07 
.02 
.22 
.07 
.02 

.13 
.07 
.33 
.07 



.07 
. II 
. II 
.07 

.07 
.02 
.02 
. II 
•07 

.13 
. 22 
.02 
. 22 
.02 
.02 

.13 
.07 
.02 



.07 
4.89 
4.89 

.07 
3.00 



6.52 







COSTA RICA, 



ARTICLE OF MBRCHANDISS. 



Amu and ammiiiiiti0Ei — Continued. 

Cartridges, or fulminating caps, 
not loaded, for all kinds of 
arms 

Daggers 

Daggers 

Firearms , 

Foils 

Nipples for firearms 

Fulminating caps for nipple fire- 
arms 

Hammers for firearms 

Pieces of metal, loose, for fire- 
arms 

Revolvers each. , 

Sabers 

Shotguns each. 

Side arms 

Swords 

Swords, small, metal 

Triggers, for firearms . . . . : 



BeveragM. 

Aniseed rum of " mono," in bar- 
rels 

Aniseed rum of ** mono," in bot- 
tles 

Beer, in barrels or in bottles. . . . 

Brandy, in barrels or demijohns. 



Brandy, in any other vessel. 



Cider, in bottles or barrels . . 
Gin, in barrels or demijohns. 



Gin, in bottles 

Gin, in clay bottles, deducting 
the difference corresponding in 
weight, between these bottles 
and those of glass 

Liquors, not prohibited, in bar- 
rels or demijohns , 

Liquors, in any other vessel, not 
prohibited , 

Mistelas (sweet wines), in barrels 
or demijohns 

Mistelas (sweet wines), in bottles, 

Whisky, in barrels or demijohns. 

Whisky, in any other kind of 
vessel , 



Doty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 



2.173 
1.629 

1. 629 

•999 
1.629 

2.173 

2.173 

2.173 

2.173 

2. 205 
1.629 
2.205 
1.629 
1.629 

. 109 
2.173 



.199 

.149 
.023 
.267 

.199 

.023 
.367 

.199 



.199 
.267 

.199 

.199 

.149 

267 

.199 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
pot kilo 
en mooe- 
da de Co»- 
uRica. 



Annas 7 munioidn— Continda. 

Capsulas 6 cartuchos fulminan- 
tes, sincargar, para toda clase 
de armas 

Punales 

Dagas 

Armas de fuego 

Floretes 

Chimeneas para armas de fuego. 

Capsulas fulminantes, para chi- 
meneas de armas 

Llaves para armas de fuego . . . 

Piezas de metal, sueltas, para 
armas de fuego 

Revolveres cadauno. . 

Sables 

Escopetas cada uno. . 

Armas blancas 

Espadas 

Espadines, metal 

Gatillos para armas de fuego. . . . 

Bebidas. 
Anizado del mono, en barriles . . 
Anizado del mono, en botellas. . 

Cerveza, en barriles 6 en botellas. 

Cognac, en barriles 6 dama- 
juanas 

Cognac, en cualquiera otra en- 
vase 

Sidra, en botellas 6 barriles 

Ginebra, en barriles 6 dama- 
juanas 

Ginebra, en botellas 

Ginebra, en 2>otellas de barro, 
haciendo la deduccidn corre- 
spondiente entre el peso de 
estas botellas y las de Vidrio. . 

Licores de licita introducci6n, 
en barriles 6 damajuanas 

Licores de licita introducci6n, 
en cualquier otro envase 

Mistelas, en barriles 6 dama- 
juanas 

Mistelas, en botellas 

Whiskey, en barriles 6 dama- 
juanas 

Whiskey, en cualquier otro en- ' 
vase 



FesM, 


6.52 


4.89 


4.89 


3.00 


4.89 


6.52 


6.52 


6.52 


6.52 


3.00 


4.89 


3.00 


4.89 


4.89 


.33 


6.52 


.60 



COSTA RICA. 



97 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



BevengM— Continued. 
Wines of all kinds, in bottles. . . 

Wines of all kinds, without being 
bottled, in hogsheads, demi- 
johns, jars, or casks, etc 

Wines, red, in demijohns, jars, or 
barrels 

Wines, red, table, in bottles . 

Chemioal pzoduflti, drngt, and me- 
didiial preparatiims. 

Acids, acetic, nitric, oxalic, sul- 
phuric, tartaric, citric, salicylic, 
phenic 

Albumen , 

Alcohol, absolute, for the use of 
drug stores, in quantities not 
exceeding i6 litres 

Alum 

Ambergris 

Ammonia, liquid or salts , 

Aniline 

Aqua fortis and aqua regia 

Azotate , 

Balsam, compounded 

barks, medicinal 

Bicarbonate of soda, powdered. . 

Bitter drops 

Borax 

Candles, sperm or composition. 

Capsules, medicinal 

Carbonate of soda, crystallized. . 

Citrate of magnesia 

Coal oil 

Coal, vegetable, of Belloc 

Colors, prepared 

Comfits, medicinal 

Court-plaster or healing plaster. 

Dextrin 

Drugs, not specified 

Essences, concentrated 

Extracts, dyeing 

Extracts, such as patchouli, 
ylang-ylang, and other articles 
of perfumery 

Globules and homeopathic medi- 
cines 

Gunpowder, in pyrotechn i ca I 
mixtures 

C R 7 



Duty per 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.0.29 



.043 

.017 
.01 



.037 
.037 



053 
037 
363 
037 

179 
037 
013 

499 
109 

073 
109 

073 
037 

109 

037 
1O9 

037 
499 
073 
073 
109 
037 
179 
449 
073 



.363 
.499 
.363 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechot 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Bebidat—Continfia. 

Vinos de todas clases embote- 
llados 

Vinos de todas clases, sin em- 
botellas, en pipas, garrafones, 
botijuelas 6 barriles 

Vinos tintos, en garrafones, boti- 
juelas 6 barriles 

Vinos tintos de mesa, en botellas. 

Produotof qnixnioo^ drogM 7 pxepa- 
raoiiaies medioinalM. 

Acidos, ac6tico, clorltico 6 mu- 
ri&tico, nitrico, oxdlico, sulffi- 
rico, tartirico, citrico, salici- 
lico y f^nico 

Albumina 

Alcohol, absoluto, para las boti- 
cas hasta la cantidad de 16 
litros 

Alumbre 

Ambargris 

Amoniaco, sal 6 liquido 

Anilinas 

Agua forte y agua regia 

Azotato 

Balsamo compuesto 

Cortezas medicinales 

Bicarbonato de soda en polvo.. 

Gotas amargas 

Borax 6 atmcar 

Velas de esperma 6 de compo- 
sici6n 

Capsulas gelatinosas medicinales 

Carbonato de soda, cristalizado. . 

Citrato de magnesia 

Petroleo 

Carbon vegetal de Belloc 

Colores pre parados 

Confites medicinales 

Tafetan 6 esparadrapo 

Dextrina 

Drogas, no expresadas 

Esencias concentradas 

Extractos tintoreos 

Extractos,como patchouli, ilang- 
ilang y otros articulos de per- 
f umeria 

Globulos y medicinas homeopi- 
ticas ! . . 

P6lvora en mistos pirot^cnicos. 



Ptsos. 



.09 



.13 

.05 
.03 



. II 
. II 



.16 
. II 

1.09 
. II 
.54 
. II 
.04 

1.50 
.33 
. 22 

.33 
.22 

. II 

.33 
. II 

.33 
. II 
1.50 
. 22 
. 22 

.33 
. II 

.54 

4.35 

. 22 



1.09 

1.50 
1.09 



98 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Chemieal prodnoti, dngi, and me- 
dicinal preparations—Continued. 

Gunpowder, unprepared 

Ink, indelible. . . « 

Ink, writing, in any kind of 
vessel 

Lampblack for ink 

Lozenges, perfumed 

Medicines, homeopathic 

Medicines of quinine or ferrugi- 
nous, patented or otherwise. . . . 

Medicines of quinine or ferrugi- 
nous, patented or not 

Medicines, patented 

Mixtures, pyrotechnical 

Moxie 

Musk, natural or imitation 

Nitrate 

Oil, almond and croton 

Oil, castor or palma christi, lin- 
seed, olive, and any other 
natural oils, without mixture 
and not patented 

Oil, cod-liver , 

Oil, mineral 

Oils, perfumed 

Opiates , 

Oxide of zinc 

Paints prepared with oil . 

Pastilles, medicinal , 

Perfumery not specified 

Pill machines and all other uten- 
sils and instruments, metallic, 
used in drug stores 

Pills, patented and compounded, 
other than ferruginous pills 

Plasters, healing , 

Poison for hides, ants, flies, etc. , 



Duty per 
pnund 
in U.S. 

currency. 



Pomades 

Purpurin 

Putty , 

Resin 

Salt, nitric , 

Salts, ammoniacal 

Salts of fruit 

Salts, Glauber, Epsom or E^lish. 



Salts, Rochelle 

Sarsaparilla, prepared 
Sarsaparilla, Bristol . . 
Soap, fine, perfumed. . 



Dollar*. 

.216 
.073 

.037 
.037 
.363 
•499 

.037 

.037 
.499 
.363 
.037 
5.776 
.013 
. 109 



.037 
.037 
.363 
.363 
.363 
.037 
.037 

.073 
.363 



.037 

.501 
. 109 
.037 

.363 
.363 
.023 
.007 

.073 
.037 
. 109 
.073 

.073 
.179 
.179 
.363 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



DerecboB 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



ProdnetM qnimieoa, drogaa 7 prepa- 
rado&M medidxialet — Continda. 

P61vora sin elaborar 

Tinta indeleble 

Tinta para escribir en cualquiera 
clase de envase 

Negro de humo para tinta 

Pastillas de perfumeria 

Medici nas homeop&ticas 

Medicinas de quina 6 ferrugS- 
nosas, sean 6 no de patente . . 

Medicinas de quina 6 ferrugi- 
nosas, sean 6 no de patente. . . 

Medicinas de patente 

Mistos pirot6cnicos 

Moxie (double extrait) 

Almizcle, natural 6 imitado 

Azotato 

Aceite de almendrasyde croton. 

Aceite, de castor 6 palma-cristi, 
de linaza, oliva y toda otra 
clase, que sea producto natu- 
ral, sin mezcla. ni de patente. . 

Aceite de bacalao 

Aceite mineral 

Aceites de olor 

Opiatos 

Oxido de zinc 

Pintura preparada con aceite 

Pastillas medicinales 

Perfumeria no especificada 

Pildoreros y demAs dtiles 6 in- 
strumentos metdlicos para uso 
de las boticas 

Pildoras de patentey compuestas 
no siendo ferruginosas 

Esparadrapo 

Veneno para cueros, hormigas, 
moscas, etc 

Pomadas 

Purpurina 

Masilla 

Pez resina 

Sal de nitro 

Sales amoniacales 

Sales de f ruta 

Sales de Glauber, Epson 6 de 
I ^glaterra 

Sal de Rochela 

Zarzaparrilla, preparada 

Zarzaparrilla de Bristol 

Jabon, fino, perfumado , 



Petos. 
.65 
. 22 

. II 

. ir 

1.09 

1.50 

. II 

. II 
1.50 
1.09 

. II 

17.39 
.04 

.33 



.11 

. II 

1.09 

1.09 

1.09 

. II 

. II 

.22 

1.09 



I. 51 

.33 

.11 
1.09 
1.09 
.07 
.02 
.22 
.11 
.33 

.22 
.22 
.54 
.54 
1.09 



COSTA RICA. 



99 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Duty per 

pound 

In U.S. 

currency. 



Chemioal pfodnoti, dnigi, and me- 
diemal preparatiau— Continued. ! 

Soap, ordinary 

Soap, ordinary, perfumed 

Soda, caustic 

Soda, purgative or refeshing 

Sozodont 

Sulphur 

Sirups, patented 

Tricopheros 

Turpentine 

Varnish, all kinds 

Vaseline, not perfumed 

Vinegar, toilet 

Waters, Florida, lavender, Co- 
logne, divine, Kananga, laurel, 
bay rum, and other aromatic. 

Waters, mineral and gaseous 

White lead 

Wines of quinine or iron, patented 
or not 

Wines, medicinal, patented, other 
than of iron or quinine 

Wines not patented 

Cloeki, jtwalxy, and preoioiu metala. 

Bars of gold or silver 

Clock, wall or table 

Cord, gold 

Cord, silver 

Diamonds, glazier 

Ear rings, false 

Epaulets, gold 

Epaulets, silver 

Gold in eyeglasses 

Gold in galloons, epaulets, and 
other similar objects 

Gold, made into jewelry and 
small fancy and ornamental 
articles, with or without pearls 
or stones 

Gold in watches 

Hourglasses, of sand or water . . . 

Jewelry and ornaments, false 

Jewelry, false 

Jewelry, false, of any other metal. 

Jewelry of gold, with or without 
stones 



Dollars. 
.029 

.179 
.013 
. 109 

.179 
.037 
.499 
.179 
.037 
.073 
.037 
.179 



.179 
.013 

.037 
.037 
.499 
.037 



Free. 

.363 

2.893 

1.449 

.363 

.363 

2.893 

1.449 

2.893 

2.893 



2.893 
2.893 
. 109 
.363 
.363 
.363 



2.893 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
porlcilo 
en mone- 
dadeCos- 
uiRica. 



Produetoa qvSmiooi, drogas 7 prepa- 
— Continfia. 



Jabon ordinario comun 

Jabon ordinario perfumado . . 

Sosa c&ustica 

Soda, purgante 6 ref rescante . . 

Zozodonte 

Azufre 

Si ropes, patentados 

Tricofero 

Aguarras 6 trementine 

Barniz, de todas clases 

Baselin, sin perfume 

Vinagre de olor para el tocador . 

Aguas, Florida, lavanda, Colo- 
nia, devina, Kananga, laurel, 
bay-rum y otras arom&ticas. . . 

Aguas minerales y gaseosas . . . . 

Albayalde 

Vinos de quina 6 ferruginosos, 
sean 6 no de patente 

Vinos medicinales de patente, 
no siendo ferruginosos 6 de 

quina 

Vinos que no sean de patente. 

BekjM, alhi^aa y metalaa predMoa. 



Barras de oro 6 plata 

Relojes de pared 6 de mesa . . . . 

Cordones de oro 

Cordones de plata 

Diamantes para cortar vidrio . . . 

Aretes falsos , 

Charreteras de oro 

Charreteras de plata 

Oro en anteojos , 

Oro en galones, charrateras y 
objetos semejantes 

Oro en alhajas y objetos peque- 
fios, de lujoyadorno, tengan 
6 no piedras 6 perlas 



Oro en relojes de bolsa , 

Relojes de agua y arena 

Aderezos y adornos falsos , 

Alhajas falsas 

Joyeria falsa de cualquier otro 

metal 

Joyeria de oro, con 6 sin piedras 



PtSM. 

.09 

.54 
.04 

.33 
.54 
. II 
1.50 
.54 
. II 
.22 
. II 
.54 



• 54 
.04 
. II 

.11 



1.50 
.11 



Libre. 
1.09 
8.68 

4.35 
1.09 
1.09 
8.68 

4.35 
8.68 

8.68 



8.68 

8.68 

.33 
1.09 
1.09 

1.09 
8.68 



lOO 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Duty per 
pound 
l«U.S. 

currency. 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
enmoDe- 
dade Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Cloeki, jewelry, and precioiu met- 
alfl—Continued, 

Jewelry of gold, with or without 
stones or pearls 

Jewelry of silver, with or without 
stones 

Jewelry of silver, with or without 
stones or pearls 

Pearls, fine, unmounted 

Precious stones, unmounted 

Silver made into jewelrj' and ob- 
jects of ornament and fancy, 
though having stones or pearls 

Springs, for watches or clocks . . 

Tassels, gold 

Watches, gold 

Watches, silver 

Watches of any other metal 



Crookory, earths, earthenware, glan, 
and poroelain. 

Bottles, common and ordinar}" 
glass 

Breastpins, glass or crystal 

Buttons, clay or china 

Buttons, glass 

Candlesticks, clay or china 

Chalk 

Cements 

Chalk or marl 

Chimneys, glass, for lamps 

Crockery, common 

Crucibles, clay 

Crystal and glass in balls, paper- 
weights, fancy inkstands, knobs, 
and other similar objects 

Crystal and glass in objects of 
ornament 

Crystal and glass in rods 

Crystal and pane glass, colored 
or otherwise, and that called 
"muselina" 

Crystals or glasses, quicksil- 
vered, with or without frame. . . 

Cups, earthenware and china . . . . 

Demijohns, clay or china 

Dishes, clay or china 

Demijohns, clay, empty .* 

Demijohns, glass, empty 



Dollars. 

2.893 
1.449 

1.349 
33. 332 
33. 332 



1.449 

.363 
2.893 
2.893 
1.443 

.363 



.007 
.363 
• 179 
.363 
.037 

.023 
.003 
.023 

.037 
.023 
.003 



.179 



.179 
.037 



.037 

.179 
.037 

.003 

.037 
.003 
.007 



Belojes, alhijas y metalei pre- 
oioaas— Continda. 

Alhajas de oro, tengan 6 no pie- 
dras 6 perlas 

Joyeria de plata, con 6 sin pie- 
dras 

Alhajas de plata. tengan 6 no 

. piedras 6 perlas 

Perlas finas sin montar 

Piedras preciosas sin montar. . . 

Plata en alhajas y joyeria y en 
objetos de lujo y adorno. aun- 
que tengan piedras 6 perlas. . 

Muelles para relojes 

Borlas de oro 

Relojes de oro para bolsillo . . . 

Relojes de plata para bolsillo. . 

Relojes de bolsillo de cualquier 
otro metal 

Loia, eriftalena 7 poroelana. 



Botellasde vidrio comun y ordi- 
nario 

Prendedores de vidrio 6 cristal , 

Botones de barro 6 loza 

Botones de cristal , 

Candcleros, barro 6 loza , 

Tiza 

Cimentos 

Creta 6 greda 

Tubos de vidrio para alumbrado. 

Loza ordinaria 

Crisoles de barro 

Cristal 6 vidrio enbolas, pisapa- 
peles, tinteros de fantasia y 
lujo, perillas y otros objetos 
semejantes . . .' 

Cristal 6 vidrio en objetos de 
adorno 

Cristal y vidrio en varillas 

Cristales y vidrios pianos sean 
6 no de color y los llamados 
de muselina 

Cristales 6 vidrios azogados, con 
6 sin marco 

Tazas de barro 6 loza 

Garrafones de barro 6 loza . , 

Fuentes de barro 6 loza 

Damajuanas de barro, vacias . . 

Damajuanas de vidrio, vacias. . 



Pesos. 

8.63 
4 35 

4-35 
100.00 
100.00 



4 35 
i.og 
8.68 
8.68 
4.35 

1.09 



.02 
1.09 

■54 
1.09 
. II 
.07 
.01 
.07 
. II 
.07 
.01 



.54 

.54 
. II 



.II 

.54 

. II 
.01 
. II 
.01 
.oa 



COSTA RICA. 



101 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Croekeiy, •arihs, earthenware, glasiy 
•ad poroelain— Continued. 

Earthenware, all kinds of crock- 
ery, as cups, plates, dishes, 
jars, pitchers, chamber pots, 
mortars, wash-basins, drug- 
store jars, etc 

Earthenware, articles for illumi- 
nating, as globes, reflectors, re- 
ceivers, and candlesticks , 

Earthenware balls busts, han- 
dles, buttons, ink wells, stat- 
uary, pipes, mouthpieces, and 
fancy ornamental articles 

Earths employed in construction, 
in the arts and in industries . . . 

Emery, in stone or powder for 
polishing , 

Eyes, artificial, of glass or crystal. 

Filters, metal, for water 

Fixtures of clay or china for 
illumination, sifch as globes, 
reflectors, etc 

Flasks, ordinary, without engrav- 
ing 

Fuller's earth or chalk 

Glass knd cr>'Stal in all kinds of 
articles for personal use 

Glass and crystal in fancy objects 
and of ornament, such as ink- 
stands, paperweights, knobs, 
and having parts of metal or 
not, other than gold and silver. 

Glass and crystal, in panes, col- 
ored or otherwise, and the one 
called "museline" 

Glasses for watches (watch crys- 
tals) 

Glass, hollow, ordinar>% such as 
bottles, demijohns, flasks, and 
covered or otherwise 

Glass, imitation of crystal in ob- 
jects for table services and 
illumination, such as bottles, 
tumblers, chimneys, globes, etc. 

Glass or crystal, quicksilvered, 
with or without frame 

Glass, thick and ordinary, in the 
- form of plates, and tiles for sky- 
lights 



Duty per 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars, 

.037 
.037 

.179 
.003 

.037 
.363 
.023 

.037 

.003 
.023 

.363 

.179 

.037 
.363 

.007 

.037 
.179 

.007 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Losa, eriitalena 7 poroelaiift— Con- 
tiniia. 

Barro 6 loza en toda clase de va- 
jilla, como tazas, fuentes, pla- 
tos, jarroz,picheles, bacinillas, 
moteros, palanganas, pomos, 
etc 

Barro 6 loza en utiles para alum- 
brado, como bombas, reflecto- 
res, recipientes y candeleros. 

Barro 6 loza en bolas, bustos, 
perillas, botones, escribanias, 
esculturas, pipas 6 boquillas y 
en objetos de fantasia y adorno 

Tierras impleadesen laconstruc- 
ci6n, las artes y la industria . 

Esmeril, en piedra 6 polvo para 
pulir 

Ojos artificiales de vidrio 6 cristal 

Filtradores de metal para agua. 

Utiles de barro 6 loza para al um- 
brado, como bombas, reflec- 
tores, etc 

Frascos, comunes, sin talladura 
alguna , 

Greda 6 creta 

Vidrio y cristal en todo g^nero 
de prendas de uso personal . . . 

Vidrio y cristal en objetos de fan- 
tasia y lujo, y los de adorno, 
como tinteros, pisapapeles, 
perillas y entre 6 no algiin 
metal en su formaci6n no 
siendo este oro 6 plata 

Vidros y cristales planos» sean 6 
no de color, y los llamados de 
** muselina ** 

Vidrios para relojes , 

Vidrio, hueco, comfin d ordi- 
nario, como botellas, dama- 
juanas, frascos, y forrados 6 
sin forrar 

Vidrio, imitaci6n de cristal en 
objetos para servicio de mesa 
y alumbrado, como botellas, 
vasos, tubos, bombas, etc 

Vidrios 6 cristales azogados, con 
marco 6 sin 61 . '. 

Vidrio grueso ordinario en forma 
de planchas y tejas para luz. . . 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Pesos, 

.11 

.II 

.54 
.01 

. II 

1.09 

.07 



.02 

.07 

1.09 



.54 

. II 
1.09 



.02 

. II 

.54 
.02 



102 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Crookory, eartbi, earthenware, glasiy 
and poroeUdn^Continued. 

Inkwells of clay or china 

Jars, earth or china 

Knobsof glass or crystal and simi- 
lar objects 

Lenses 

Measuring glasses 

Mortars, clay, china, or marble . . 

Nursing bottles, glass 

Pane glass, thick and ordinary, 
for tiles and skylights 

Pictures with frame and glass 

Pipes of clay 

Pitchers of clay or china 

Plaster of Paris 

Plates of clay or china 

Pipes or mouthpieces of clay or 

china 

Pipes, smoking, of wood 

Pots of clay or china 

Receivers of clay or china 

Rock crystal 

Reflectors of clay or china 

Rods of glass or crystal 

Services for the table, objects for 
illumination, and articles made 
of hoUow crystal, or glass to imi- 
tate it, such as bottles, glasses, 
goblets, tubes, etc 

Stone for building,for the arts and 
trades 

Soup tureens of clay or china. . . 

Syringes, glass 

Table services of clay or china, 
such as cups, dishes, plates, 
iars, etc 

Tiles, glazed 

Tiles, paving 

Tiles of clay for building 

Tiles of thick, ordinary glass . . . 

Waiters, metal 

Washbasins of clay or china . 

Water jars of clay 

Fanoy artidee and email waree. 

Alabaster, manufactured into ar- 
ticles of more than 2 kilos 
weight 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.179 
.037 

.179 
.367 
.073 
.037 
.073 

.007 

. 109 
.003 

.037 
.007 

.037 

.179 
•363 

.037 
.037 
.363 
.037 
.037 



.037 

.003 
.037 
.037 



.037 
.003 
.003 
Free. 
.007 
. 109 
.037 
.037 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



.007 



Loia, oiietaleria y poroelana — Con- 
tinfia. 

Escribanias, barro 6 loza 

Jarros de loza 6 barro 

Perillas de vidrio 6 cristal 6 ob- 
jetos semejantes 

Lentes 

Medidas de cristal 

Morterosde barro, ioza omarmol. 

Mamaderas de cristal 

Planchas de vidrio grueso, ordi- 
nario para iumbreras 6 traja 
luz 

Cuadros con marco y vidrio . . , . 

Tubos de barro 

Picheles de barro 6 loza 

Yeso 

Platos de barro 6 loza 

Pipas 6boquillasdebarro61oza. 

Pipas 6 cachimbas, madera, para 
fumar 

Ollas de barro 6 loza 

Recipientes de barro 6 loza 

Rocalla de vidrio 

Reflectores de barro 6 de loza. . . 

Varillas de vidrio 6 cristal 

Servicio de mesay alumbrado, en 
obietos de cristal hueco y 
vidrio que lo imite, como bo- 
tellas, vasos, copas, tubos, etc . 



Derechoa 
porkilo 
enmone- 
dade Cos- 
ta Rjca. 



Pesos. 



Piedras paralaconstrucci6n, las 
artes y la industria 

Soperas de barro 6 loza 

Jeringas de cristal 

Vajilla en objetos de barro 6 
loza, como tazas, fuentes, pla- 
tos, jarros, etc 

Azulejos de barro 

Baldosas y baldosines de barro . 

Tejas de barro para construcci6n. 

Tejas de vidrio grueso ordinario. 

Bandejas. metal 

Palanganas de barro 6 loza 

Cantaros, barro, para agua 



Mereeria. 

Alabastro, en objetos manufac- 
turados de m4s de 2 kilos de 
peso 



.54 
. II 

.54 

.09 
. 22 
. II 



.33 
.01 
. II 
.02 
. II 
•54 



1.09 
. II 
. II 

1.09 
. ir 
.11 



.or 
. II 

. IX 



. II 
.01 
.01 
Libres. 
.02 

.33 
. 11 
. II 



.02 



COSTA RICA. 



103 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Vmaaj «rtiol« and imall w a g M 
Continued. 

Alabaster, manufactured into ob- 
jects of less than 2 kilos, 
weight 

Albums of more than 2 kilos 
weight 

Albums of less than 2 kilos weight 

Amber, .manufactured 

Articles, gilded and silver-plated, 
for table service and others . . . . 

Beads of metal, other than gold 

or silver 

Bottle cases 

Buckles for saddlers' articles. . . . 

Bugles, metal 

Buttons, vegetable ivory 

Candlesticks and small lamps, 
metal 

Chains for dogs and horses 

Eyeglasses, mounted in silver 

Eyeglasses, with any kind of metal 
except gold or silver 

Fans, metal or wood 

Feathers for adorning 

Fruits, artificial wax 

Galloons, gold 

Galloons, silver 

Garters, cotton 

Garters, silk 

Gold leaf 

Gutta-percha in ornamental ob- 
jects 

Haberdashery in all objects not 
specified 

Hairpins, metal 

Ivory, vegetable, in buttons and 
in every kind of trinkets 

Ivory, vegetable, made into but- 
tons, and all kinds of trinkets. . 

Key rings 

Metal in articles not specified, 
weighing not less than 2 kilos. . 

Metal in articles not specified, 
weighing less than 2 kilos 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars, 

.363 

.179 
.363 

.723 
.267 



.363 
.179 
.179 

.363 
.363 



.073 

.073 

1.449 

.363 
.363 
.723 
.363 
2.893 

1.449 

.363 

1.086 

2.893 

.363 

.363 
.363 



.363 

.363 
.363 

.037 



.179 



ARTfCULO DB MERCANCIA. 



Derechoa 
por kilo 
en mone- 
dadeCot- 
URica. 



1C0IMIU— Continda. 



Alabastro, en objetos manufac- 
turados de m6nos de 2 kilos de 
peso 

Albums, de m&s de 2 kilos de 
peso 

Albums de m6nos de 2 kilos de 
peso 

Ambar en merceria 

Articulos, dorados 6 plateados, 
para servicio de mesa fi otros 
usos 

Cuentas de metal que noseaoro 
6 plata 

Frasqueras 

Hebillas para objetos de talabar- 
teria 

Canutillos, metal 

Botones de tagua, corozo 6 marfil 
vegetal 

Candeleros y lamparillas, metal . 

Cadenas para perros 6 cabal los. . 
Anteojos montados en plata. . . . 
Anteojos, en cualquiermetalque 

no sea oro 6 plata 

Abanicos, metal 6 madera 

Plumas para adornos 

Frutas artificiales de cera 

Galonesde oro 

Galones de plata 

Ligas de algodon 

Ligas de seda 

Oro en hojas para dorar 

Gutaperchaen objetos de adorno . 

Quincalla comun en todos los 
objetos no especificados 

Horquillas de metal para el pei- 
nado 

Corozo en botones y en todaclase 
de quincalla 

Marfil vegetal en botones y en 
toda clase de quincalla 

Llaveros, metal 

Metal in articulos no especifica- 
dos cuyo peso no baje de 2 
kilos 

Metal en objetos no especificados 
de m6nos de 2 kilos de peso. . 



PU0t, 



1.09 

.54 

1.09 
2.17 

.80 

1.09 

.54 

.54 
1.09 

1.09 

.22 

.22 

4.35 

1.09 
1.09 
2.17 
1.09 

8.68 

4.35 
1.09 
3.26 
8.68 
1.09 

1.09 

'1.09 

1.09 

1.09 
T.09 

. II 

.54 



104 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MBRCHANDISB. 



FUL07 aitielef and imall waiee— 

Continued. 

Metal made into all kinds of trin- 
kets, ordinary, not specified. . . . 

Metal thread 

Ribs of metal for fans and corsets. 

Spangles , 

Statuary , 

Steel for flints 

Tagua or vegetable ivory manu- 
factured into buttons and all 

kinds of trinkets 

Tassels, silver 

Vials for use in drug stores 

Fun, hidei, leather, and mann&c- 
of. 



Ammunition cases, leather 

Belts, leather 

Belts of leather or rubber for ma- 
chinery 

Buckets, leather 

Buttons, leather 

Dressitig cases, leather 

Gloves or gauntlets, of skin 

Hand bags, leather 

Harness 

Hides and skins, not tanned 

Hose, leather, for drawing water 

Leather, for soles and uppers. . . 

Morocco 

Patent leather 

Pocketbooks, of skin , . . . 

Portemonnaies, leather 

Rawhides or whips, leather 

Razor strops, leather 

Saddle covers 

Saddle covers of skin 

Saddles, leather 

Sheepskins, etc., dressed 

Sheepskins and morocco, cut in 

strips for hat linings 

Shoes of leather, with or without 

elastic and uppers ready for 

soles 

Skins, common, for soles, patent 

leather, etc 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



DoUara. 

.363 
.363 
.363 

.363 
.179 
.363 



.363 

1.449 

.032 



.179 
.109 

.CO3 
.029 
.363 
.179 
.723 
.109 
. 109 
.023 
.029 



.037 
.037 
.033 
.179 
.179 
.179 
. 109 

.143 
.143 
.109 

.037 
.179 



.217 
.037 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
dadeCos- 
taKica. 



MeroeziA— Continfia. 



Metal en toda la quincalla co- 
mun, no especificada 

Alambrillo 

Varillaje de metal para abanicos 
y corses 

Lentejuclas, metal 

Esculturas 

Eslabones, metal 

Tagua en botonesy en todaclase 
de quincalla 

Borlas de plata 

Pomos para uso de las boticas. 

Peleteria 7 otjetoe de eaero. 



Municioneras de pie! para caza- 
dores 

Fajas de cuero 

Fajas de cuero y de hule para 
maquinaria 

Baldes de cuero 

Botones de cuero 

Neceseres de piel 

Guantes 6 manoplas de piel 

Maletas de cuero 

Ameses 

Pellejos 6 cueros sin curtir 

Mangueras de cuero para sacar 
agua 

Hojas de suela 6 vaquetas 

Cordobanes 

Charoles (pieles) 

Carteras de piel 

Portamonedas, cuero , 

Latigos, cuero 

Suavezadores, cuero 

Zaleas , 

Pellones y zaleas , 

Monturas, cuero 

Badanas 6 baldeses , 

Badanas 6 tafiletes cortados en 
forros para sombrero 

Calzado de cuero, con 6 sin 
eldstico y el preparado para 
ponerle suela 

Pieles ordinarios en hojas de 
suela, charoles, carneros, etc . 



COSTA RICA. 



105 



ARTICLE OF MBRCHANDISE. 



Fdzb, hides, leather, and mannfao- 
tnree of— Continued. 

Skins, fine, with hair, or imitation 
of these 

Skins, manufactured into trunk- 
makers' articles, not specified . 

Sole leather, ordinary , 

Straps, leather 

Strops, razor, leather 

Trunks or valises, leather 

Whips, of leather 

Whips, of leather or of any other 
animal substance 

Maohmeiy. 

Alembics, or stills, introduced 
with the consent of the Gov- 
ernment , 

Hand mills, metal , 

Machinery for mining and agri- 
culture 

Machinery, metal, and parts of, 
for agriculture, printing, etc . . 

Machinery, metal, for the indus- 
tries, including those for grind- 
ing com aiid other grains 

Machinery, wooden, for agricul- 
ture and vessels 

Machinery, wooden, for indus- 
tries , 

Pumps, metal, for drawing water. 

Saws of all kinds , 

Scales, to weigh more than 46 
kilograms 

Ships , 

Metals, wrought and nnwrooght. 

Adzes 

Anchors, for vessels 

Andirons, for chimneys 

Anvils 

Augers , 

Axes 

Awls 

Bath tubs 

Bars 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.143 

.109 

.037 
.109 
.109 

. 109 
.179 

.179 



.289 
.023 

Free. 
Free. 

.007 

Free. 

.007 
.037 
.037 

.037 
Free. 



.037 
.037 
.037 
.007 

.037 
.037 
.037 

.073 
.007 




Derechoa 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Coft- 
taRica. 



Peleteria y olgetoe de oaero— Con- 
tinda. 

Pielesfinas con su pelo6 imita- 
ci6n de estas 

Pieles manufacturadas en ob- 
jetos de talabarteria, no espe- 
cificados 

Vaquetas ordinarias 

Correas de cuero 

Asen tad ores y suavizadores, 
cuero 

Baules 6 maletas de cuero 

Foetes de cuero 

Chilillos de cuero 6 de cual- 
quier otro despojo animal . . . 

Kaquinaha. 

Alambiques 6 alquitaras, intro- 
ducidas con permiso del Go- 
bierno 

Molinillos, metal 

Maquinaria para la industria 
minera y agricola 

Maquinaria, metal, para la agri- 
cultura, imprenta y sus utiles 

M&quinas, metal, para la indus- 

. tria, inclusive las de moler 
maiz y otro granos 

Maquinaria de madera para la 
agricultura y embarcaciones . 

Mdquinas de madera para la in- 
dustria 

Bombas, metal, para sacaragua 

Serruchos de todas clases 

Romanas para pesar mas de 46 
kilos 

Embarcaciones 

Metales. 

Azuelas 

Anclas para buques 

Morrillos para chimeneas 

Yunques 

Barrenos 

Hachas 

Estaquilladores 6 lesnas de me- 
tal 

Bafios y bafladeras, metal , 

Barras 



P*90t, 



.43 



.33 
. II 

.33 

.33 
.33 
.54 

.54 



.87 
.07 

Libre. 

Libre. 

.02 

Libre. 

.02 
. II 
. II 

. II 
Libres. 



. II 
.02 
. II 
.02 
. II 
. II 

. II 
.22 
.02 



io6 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Ketala, wioiight and nnwioiight— 
Continued. 

Beams of metal, large and small . 

Beds, cots, or cradles, 

Bells, weighing more than i kilo. 

Bells, weighing less than i kilo. . 



Bistouries, 

Bits, for horses 

Blowpipes 

Boilers, heaters, and radiators. . 



Bolts 

Boxes or safes, iron . . . , 

Brasiers 

Breast bits 

Buckets 

Buckles 

Buckles, saddlemakers'. 



Duty per 
pound 
In U. S. 

currencj. 



Burins 

Cables, wire 

Carving knives and forks 

Chains for hangings 

Chains, for vessels, machinery, 

and agriculture 

Chairs 

Chimneys, for kitchens 

Chisels 

Cigarrette cases 

Coffeepots, iron 

Copper, old 

Covers 

Cramp irons , 

Crosses and crucifixes 

Cruet stands 

Cushions 

Daggers 

Demijohns 

Demijohns 

Doorknockers 

Evaporating pans 

Files 

Fixtures for lighting 

Flasks 

Foil 

Forceps, dentists' 

Formers and fleams 

Furniture, metal, of all kinds 

Grates, iron 



ARTfCULO DB MBRCANCIA. 



Dollars . 
.007 

.037 
. 109 

.179 

.037 
.179 
.037 
.023 

.073 
.037 
.023 

.037 
.037 
.363 
.179 

.037 
.007 

.179 I 
. 109 j 

.007 ' 
.037 
.073 
.037 
•179 i 
.023 
.007 
.179 
.037 
.367 
.179 
.037 
1.629 
.037 
.037 
.073 
.023 
.037 
.073 
.023 

.363 
• 037 
.037 
.037 
.037 



DerechoB 
por kilo 
en mone- 
dade Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Metalo 



-Continda. 



Vigas y viguetas 

Camas, catres 6 cunas 

Campanas de i kilo de peso, 

arriba 

Campanas de m6nos de i kilo 

de peso 

Bisturis 

Frenos 

Sopletes 

Calderos, calentadores ycalori- 

feros 

Pasadores • 

Cajas 6 areas de hierro 

Braseros 

Berbiquis 

Baldes 

Hebillas 

Hebillas para objetos de tala- 

barteria 

Buriles 

Cables de ahimbre 

Trenchantes y tenedores 

Cadenas para colgaduras 

Cadenas para buques, maquina- 

riay agricultura 

Sillas 

Chimeneas para cocina 

Escoplos 

Cigarreras 

CsSeteras de hierro 

Cobre, viejo 

Cubiertas 

Lirones 

Cruces y crucifijos 

Angarillas 

Cojines 

Gumias 

Damaiuanas 

Garraiones 

Aldabas 

Pailas de hierro 

Limas 6 hileras 

Utiles para alumbrado 

Frascos 

Hoj uela 

Gatillos (herramienta) 

Formones y flemes 

Muebles metal de todo gen6ro. . 
Cocinas de hierro 



COSTA RICA. 



107 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



ICetala, wnniglit and nnwioiiglit— 
Continued. 

Griddles 

Gridirons 

Half masks, metallic 

Hammers 

Hatchets 

Hawkbells or harness bells , 

Hinges 

Hoes and adzes 

Hooks and eyes 

ingots 

Inkwells 

Iron safes 

Kitchen utensils of metal, such 
as frying pans, kettles, and not 
specified elsewhere, other than 
those made of tin plate 

Knives, forks, and spoons, tea- 
spoons, carving knives, etc 

Knives, table and kitchen 

Knives, with or without handles, 
for trades and arts 

>Iachetes 

Lamps, metal, and other articles 
for illuminating 

Lancets 

Lightning rods 

Locks, and keys for same 

Lock-plate , 

Mortars 

Nails 

Ovens, metal 

Padlocks 

Pails 

Pans, frying 

Pans of iron, for evaporating 

Pencil cases 

Pickaxes 

Picklocks 

Picks 

Pillars and large pieces of iron 
for bridges and every kind of 
structure , 

Pincers , 

Pincers for tam pering or drawing 
wire for fences 

Pincers 

Piping and tubing, iron 

Planes, rabbet 

Plates , 



Duty pei 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.023 
.037 
.363 
.037 
.037 
.363 
.073 
.037 
.037 
.007 

.179 
.037 



.023 

.179 
.179 

.037 
.037 

.073 

.037 
Free. 

.073 
.073 
.037 
.023 

.037 
•073 
.037 
.023 
.023 
.179 
.037 
.073 
.037 



.007 
.037 

Free. 

.037 
.01 

.037 
.007 



ARTfCULO DE MBRCANCIA. 



Derechos 
porkilo 
en tn one- 
da deCoft- 
URica. 



-Contintia. 



Comales 

Parrillas 

Caretas metdlicas 

Martillos 

Hachuelns 

Cascabcles , 

Bisagras 

Azadones y azadores 

Corchetes 

Lingotes 

Escribanias 

Areas de hierro 

Utensilios de cocina, dc metal, 
cazuelas, calderos, y no es- 
pecificados en otras partidas, 
excepto los de hoja de lata . . . 

Cuchillos, tenedores, cucharas, 
cucharetas, trinchantes, etc . . . 

Cuchillos de mesa y de cocina. . 

Cuchillos para artes y oficios, 
con 6 sin pufio 

Machetes 

Lam paras de metal y otros arti- 
culos para alumbrado 

Lancetas 

Pararrayos , 

Cerraduras y sus Haves 

Palastros 

Morteros y almireces 

Clavos 

Fogones 

Candados , 

Cubos 

Cazuelas de hierro , 

Pailas de hierro 

Lapiceros 

Alcotanas 

Picaportes 

Picos 

Pilares y piezas grandes de 
hierro para puentes y todo 
g^nero de construcciones . . . 

Alicates 

Estiradores 6 tenazas para tem- 
plar alambre de cerca 

Pinzas 

Tubos de hierro para cafleria. . 

Guillames 

Chapas 



Pesos. 
.07 
. II 

1.09 
. II 
. II 

1.09 
.22 
. II 
. II 
.02 

.54 
. II 



.07 

.54 
.54 

. II 
. II 

.22 

. II 
Libre. 
. II 
. 22 
. II 
.07 
. II 
.22 
. II 
.07 
• .07 

.54 
. II 
. 22 
. II 



.02 
. II 

Libre. 
. II 
.03 
. II 
.02 



io8 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Metaliy wioaght and nnwronght — 
Continued. 



Pots of iron or brass 

Pruning knives 

Pulley blocks of less than 2 kilos 

weight , 

Pulleys of less than 2 kilos 

weight 

Punches 

Rails 

Rivets 

Rollers and casters for furniture, 

Sadiron heaters 

Sadirons 

Saucepans 

Scales to weigh more than 46 kilos. 

Scales, to weigh as much as 46 
kilos 

Scissors, pocket, tailors', and for 
other uses, except for agricul- 
ture and industries 

Screw-drivers 

Screws 

Scythes 

Sharpening or smoothing instru- 
mentsof metal 

Shears for pruning 

Sheet iron ! 

Shoes, for horses and oxen 



Shovels 

Sickles 

Sifters , 

Spades 

Spikes , 

Spurs, of iron or other metal, ex- 
cept gold or silver 

Staples 

Stirrups 

Stoves 

Strings, metallic, for instruments 



Tacks 

Tenter-hooks 

Tiles or roofs of galvanized iron. 



Tinder boxes 

Tin, manufactured in objects 
weighing less than 2 kilos 



Duty per 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.023 
.037 

.179 

.179 
.037 
.007 
.023 

.179 
.023 

.037 
.023 

.037 



.109 



.179 
.037 
.023 
.037 

. 109 

.037 
.007 
.023 

.037 
.037 
.037 
.037 
.023 

.179 
.023 

.179 
.037 
.723 

.023 

.179 
.007 

.363 

.073 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
porkilo 
en mone- 
dadeCc»> 
taRica. 



Ketalei— Continda. 



Ollas de hierro 6 bronce 

Navajas podadoras 

Motones de m6nos de 2 kilos 

de peso 

Poleas de m6nos de 2 kilos 

de peso 

Sacabocados 

! Carriles 6 rieles 

Remaches 

Roldanas yruedasparamuebles. 
Plantillas para calentar planchas . 

Planchas para aplanchar. 

Sartenes 

Balanzas 6 romanas para pesar 

m&s de 46 kilos 

Balanzas 6 romanas para pesar 

hasta 46 kilos 

Tijeras de bolsillo y de costura 

y de otros usos que no sean 

de agricultura 6 la industria . . 

Destornilladores 

Tornillos 

Guadanas 

Afiladores 6 asentadores de 

metal 

Tijeras podadoras 

Planchas de hierro 

Herraduias para caballos y 

bueyes 

Palas 

Hoces 

Zarandas 

Azadas 

Pernos 

Espuelas de hierro (1 otros me- 

tales que no sean oro 6 plata . 

Redoblones 

Estribos 6 homillas 

Estufas 

Cuerdas de metal para instru- 

mentos 

Tachuelas 

Escarpias 

Tejas 6 techos de hierro galva- 

nizado 

Yesqueros 

Lata manufacturada en objetos 

de m6nos de 2 kilos de peso . . 



Ptsos. 
.07 
. n 



COSTA RICA. 



109 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



MetalB, wTought and nnwiooght — 
Continued. 

Tin plate in objects weighing 

less than 2 kilos 

Tongs, metal 

Tongs or cramp irons 

Tongs, to strech wire for fences. . 

Tools of all kinds, for trades and 
arts, not otherwise specified. . . . 

Trays 

Tubes of metal , galvanized or not, 
or covered with brass-. 

Wire 

Wire, barbed, for fences , 

Wire cloth and its manufactures. 

Minerals. 

Alabaster, cut in blocks for pave- 
ments, stairways, or other simi- 
lar uses 

Alabaster, rough or in blocks, 
squared or trimmed, and pre- 
pared to give them form 

Asphalt 

Camphine 

Coal and coke, for every 10 kilos. 

Flint stones 

<7old bullion, bars, dust, or coin. . 

Jasper, cut in blocks for pave- 
ments, stairways, or similar uses. 

Jasper, made into slabs for tombs, 
statues, and utensils of any 
kind, with ornaments and chis- 
elings of more than 2 kilos 
weight 

Jasper, manufactured into objects 
of less than 2 kilos weight 

Jasper, rough or in block, or 
trimmed or prepared to give 
them form 

Lime, common and hydraulic. . . . 

Mineral oils 

Marble, cut in slabs for pave- 
ments, stairways, and similar 
uses, of any size, polished or 
not 



Duty per 

pound 

inU.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.069 

.037 
.037 

Free. 



.037 
. 109 

.037 

.023 
Free. 
.037 



.003 



.003 
.007 
.037 
.003 
.007 
Free. 



.003 



.007 
.363 



.003 
.003 
.037 



.003 



ARTlrULO DB MBRCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mon^ 
dAdeCos- 
tJiRlca. 



Metalea— Continda. 



Hoja de lata en artlculos de m6- 
nos de 2 kilos de peso 

Tenazas 

Gatos 6 lirones 

Estiradores 6 tenazas para tem- 
plar alambre de cercas 

Herramientas de todas clases 
para artes y oficios que no se 
hayan especificado 

Azafates 

Tubos de metal, est6n 6 no gal- 
vanizados 6 chapeados de 
laton 

Alambre 

Alambre con puas para cercar. . 

Telas alambre y sus artefactos. 

Miiieha. 

Alabastros, cortadas en losas 
para pavimentos, escalones y 
usos semejantes 

Alabastros, en tosco 6 en trozas, 
devastados,escuadradosypre- 
parados para darles forma. . . 

Asfalto 

Canfin 

Carbon y coke, por cada 10 kilos 

Piedras de chispa 

Oro en pasta, barras, polvo 6 
moneda 

Jaspes, cortados en losas para 
pavimentos, escalones, y usos 
semejantes 

Jaspes, labrados en losas para 
sepulcros, estatuas, y uten- 
sil ios de cualquiera clase, con 
adornos 6 cinceladuras de m&s 
de 2 kilos de peso 

Jaspes, manufacturados de m6- 
nos de 2 kilos de peso 

Jaspes en tosco 6 en trosos, es- 
cuadrados y preparados para 
darles forma 

Cal, comun 6 hidr61ica 

Aceites minerales 

Marmol, cortado en losas para 
pavimentos, escalones, y usos 
semejantes, de cualquier ta- 
maflo, sean 6 no pulimentados 



Pesos, 

. 21 
. II 
. II 

Libre. 



. II 

.33 



. II 

.07 

Libre. 

. II 



.01 



.01 
.02 
. II 
.01 
.02 

Libre. 



.02 
1.09 



.01 
.01 
.11 



.01 



1 lO 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Minenli— Continued . 

Marble made into objects of less 
than 2 kilos weight 

Marble made into slabs for tombs, 
statues, and objects of any- 
kind, with ornaments, foliage, 
or chisel ings, not specified, and 
of more than 2 kilos weight. . . . 

Marble, rough or in block, squared 
or trimmed, and prepared to 
give them form 

Mercury for mining 

Salt, natural and mineral, of all 
kinds, for the manufacture of 
waters not specified 

Schist 

Slate for roofing 

Slate made into slabs for pave- 
ments and other similar uses. . . 

Slabs of marble, jasper, alabaster, 
for pavements, stairways, etc . . . 

Slabs of marble, jasper, or alabas- 
ter, for tombs, statues, and with 
ornaments, foliage, and chisel- 
ings, of more than 2 kilos 
weight , 

Slabs of slate for roofs, pave- 
ments, etc 

Stairways of marble, jasper, or ala- 
baster 

Statues, marble, jasper, or alabas- 
ter, oif more than 2 kilos weight < 

Statues, marble, jasper, alabaster, 
of less than 2 kilos wei^t. . . . . 

Talc in slabs , 

Talc, mineral 

Utensils of marble, jasper, or ala- 
baster, with ornaments, leafage, 
and chiselings, not specified 
elsewhere and of more than 2 
kilos weight 

Utensils of marble, jasper, or ala- 
baster, with ornaments, leafage, 
and chiselings, not specified 
elsewhere and of less than 2 
kilos weight 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollar*. 
.363 



.007 



.003 
.003 



.037 
.007 
.003 

.003 

.003 



.007 
.003 
.003 
.007 

.363 

.363 
.179 



.007 



.363 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
enmone- 
dadeCos. 
taRica. 



Kmeria — Continda. 

Marmol, manufacturado en ob- 
jetos de m^nos de 2 kilos de 
peso 

Marmol labrado en losas para 
sepulcros, estatuas, y uten- 
silios decualquiera clase, con 
adornos, foliages 6 cincela- 
duras, no especificadas y de 
mis de 2 kilos de peso 

Marmol en tosco y en trosos, de- 
vastados y preparados para 
darles forma 

Azogue para mineria 

Sal mineral natural de todas 
clases, para fibrica de aguas 
no especificadas 

Esquistos 

Pizarras para techos 

Pizarras en losas para pavimen- 
tos y otros usos semejantes. . . 

Losas de marmol, jaspe, alabas- 
tro, para pavimentos, escalo- 
nes, etc 

Losas de marmol, jaspe, 6 ala- 
bastro, para sepulcros, esta- 
tuas, y con adornos, foliages y 
cinceladuras de mis de 2 kilos 
de peso , 

Losas de pizarras, para techos, 
pavimentos, etc , 

Escalones de marmol, jaspe, 6 
alabastro 

Estatuas de marmol, jaspe, 6 
alabastro, de mis de 2 kilos de 
peso 

Estatuas de marmol, jaspe, 6 
alabastro de m^nos de 2 kilos 
de peso 

Talco en hojuela 

Talco mineral 

Utensil ios de marmol, jaspe, 6 
alabastro, con adornos, folla- 
jes, y cinceladuras no exprc- 
sadas en otras partidas y de 
mis de 2 kilos de peso 

Utensilios de marmol, jaspe, 6 
alabastro, con adornos, folla- 
jes, y cinceladuras no expre- 
sadas en otras partidas y de 
m6nos de 2 kilos de peso . . . 



1.09 



COSTA RICA. 



Ill 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



I ff^ ffi ^ ] instnundzitiu 



Accordions 

Harmoniums 

Harps 

Instruments, musical, not speci- 
fied, such as accordions, har- 
monicas, violins, etc 

Instruments with keyboard, not 
specified 

Music boxes, of chords and 
springs 

Music boxes, with crank 

Organs and other instruments 
with keyboard 

Pianos 



FiRper, pxinted matter, and f t»- 
tioiiDry* 

Bags, paper, for packing 

Books, blank, ruled or not 

Books, printed 

Boxes, pasteboard, for games, 

such as loto 

Boxes, pasteboard, such as those 

used in drug stores 

Cards of paper and pasteboard . . 

Collars, paper or pasteboard 

Copy books for schools, ruled or 

without ruled 

Designs, paper, for ornamenting 

fans 

Flowers of paper or pasteboard . 

Inkstands, metal 

Inkstands of glass or crystal, 

fancy 

Labels of pasteboard or paper . . 
Lanterns of paper or pasteboard. 

Maps, geographical , 

Maps or charts 

Masks and half masks, paper. . . 

Music, printed 

Paper, brown, in sheets or reams. 

Paper, colored, for flowers, 
globes, or typographical im- 
pressions , 

Paper for filtering and blotting. . . 

Paper, for letter copying, loose or 
in books , 



I>uty per 
pound 
in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.073 
.073 
.073 



.073 

.073 

.363 
.179 

.073 
.073 



.007 
.037 
.007 

.179 
.007 

.363 
.073 

.007 

.363 
.363 
.179 

.179 
.179 

.073 

.007 
.007 

.363 
.007 
.007 



.037 
.007 

.037 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Lutmmentos d« mtUoa. 

Acordiones 

Armonios 

Arpas 

Instrumentos de mdsica, no es- 

pecificados, como acordiones, 

dulzainas, violinBs, etc 

Instrumentos de teclado, no es- 

pecificados 

Cajas de mdsica de cuerda y re- 

sorte 

Cajas de mdsica con ciguena . . 
Organos 3' demds instrumentos 

de teclado 

Pianos 

Papel, etc. 



Sacos de papel para en vases 

Libros en bianco, rayados 6 no . . 

Libros, impresos 

Cajas de carton para juegos, 
como loteria, etc 

Cajas 6 cajetas de carton para en- 
vases, tales como las usadasen 
boticas 

Tarjetas de papel y carton 

Cuellos de papel 6 de carton . . . 

Cuadernos de escritura para es- 
cuelas, rayados 6 sin rayar . . . 

Disefios de papel para vestir 
abanicos 

Flores de papel 6 carton 

Tinteros de metal 

Tinteros de vidrio 6 cristal, de 
fantasia 

R6tuIos de carton 6 papel 

Paroles y lintemas de papel 6 
carton 

Cartas geogrificas 

Mapos 6 pianos geogrificos 

Caretas 6 m&scaras de papel 

Mdsica impresa 

Papel de estraza, sea en pliegos 
6 resmas 

Papel de colores para flores, 
globos 6 impresiones tipogrd- 
ficas 

Papel de filtrar y secante 

Papel para copiar cartas, suelto 6 
en libros 



Peso*. 
.22 
.22 
.22 



. 22 
. 22 

1.09 

.54 

.22 
.22 



.02 
• II 
.02 

.54 



.02 

1.09 

.22 

.02 

1.09 

1.09 

.54 

.54 
.54 

.22 
.02 
.02 
1.09 
.02 

.02 



. II 
.02 



112 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISB. 



Paper, printed matter, and fta- 
tioneiy — Continued. 

Paper for wrapping 

Paper for writing 

Paper in fancy articles or of orna- 
ment 

Paper in strips for telegraphy 

Paper gilded, plated, or enameled 
(imitation) 

Paper manufactured into flowers, 
pictures, prints, and designs to 
ornament fans 

Paper manufactured in wearing 
apparel, as collars, cufTs, shirt 
fronts, etc 

Paper ruled for music 

Paper, sand and emery 

Paper, smoking, in reams or 
books 

Paper, wall 

Paperweights, of glass or crj'stal . 

Paper, white, for printing, lithog- 
raphy, drawing, or binding 

Papier-mach6 in fancy articles or 
of ornament 

Papier-mach6 in the form of ar- 
ticles of table service or domes- 
tic use, ornamented with figures 
or gilding 

Papier-mach6 manufactured in 
the form of articles of table ser- 
vice or domestic use, painted 
or varnished, without figures, 
gilding, or ornamentation 

Papier-mach6 manufactured in 
the form of articles of table ser- 
vice and other objects of domes- 
tic use, ornamented with figures 
or gilding 

Papier-mach6, manufactured into 
dishes and other articles of do- 
mestic use, painted or varnished, 
without figures, gilt, or orna- 
ments 

Parchment or imitation, for writ- 



ing . 



Pasteboard and colored paper for 
flowers, globes, or lithographic 
prints 

Pasteboard and paper for print- 
ing, drawing, lithography, and 
bookbinding 



Duty per 
pound 
in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.007 

.179 
.007 

.179 



.363 

.073 
.007 
.007 

.037 
.037 
.179 

.007 
.179 



.179 



.007 



.179 



.007 
.073 



.037 



.007 I 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Papel, etc.— Continda. 



Papel para envolver 

Papel de escribir 

Papel en objetos de fantasia, 
lujo y adorns 

Papel en tiras para el tel^grafo. . 

Papel dorado, plateado 6 esmal- 
tado (falso) 

Papel manufacturado en flores, 
estampas, cuadros y diseflos 
para vestir abanicos 

Papel manufacturado en prendas 
del vestido, como cuellos, pu- 
fios, pecheras, etc 

Papel rayado para mdsica 

Papel de lija 6 esmeril 

Papel para fumar en resmas 6 
libretos 

Papel de entapizar 

Pisapapeles de vidrio 6 cristal . . 

Papel bianco de imprenta, lito- 
grafla,dibujoyencuadernaci6n. 

Carton piedra en objetos de fan- 
tasia, lujo y adorno 

Carton piedra en vajilla y otros 
objetos de uso dom^stico, con 
dibujos 6 doraduras 



PttQX. 

.02 
.02 



Papier mach^, manufacturado en 
forma de vajilla y otros obje- 
tos de uso dom^stico, pintado 
6 barnizado, sin dibujos, do- 
rados ni adornos 

Papel y carton piedra manufac- 
turado en forma de vaiilla y 
otros objetos de uso ciom6s- 
tico, adornado con dibujos y 
doraduras 

Carton piedra (papier m&ch6) 
manufacturado en vaiilla y 
otros objetos de uso aom6s- 
tico, pintado 6 barnizado, sin 
dibujo, doraduras 6 adornos. . . 

Pergamino 6 imitaci6n para es- 
cribir 

Carton de col ores para flores, 
globos 6 impresiones litogri- 
ficas 

Carton de imprenta, dibujo lito- 
grafia y encuadernaci6n 



COSTA RICA. 



113 



ARTICLE OF MBRCHANDISE. 



FiRper, pzinted nuttter, and ita* 
tionery— Continued. 

Pasteboard and paper for wrap- 
ping 

Pasteboard in fancy cards 

Patterns and ruled lines for 
writing 

Pens, metal, for writing 

Pictures for ornamenting fans, of 
paper 

Pictures on pasteboard or paper. . 

Playing cards. . .* 

Playing cards 

Quill pens for writing 

Shades or ruled lines for writing. . 

Spheres, wooden 

Table services and other objects of 
domestic use, manufactured of 
papier-mach6, painted or var- 
nished, without figures, gilt or 
ornamentation 

Table services and other objects 
of domestic use, of papier- 
mach6, adorned with figures 
and gildings 

Toys of paper or pasteboard 

TeztUot. 

Cotton goods. 

Batistes 

Bedspreads, cotton 

Bedticking 

Braids, cotton 

Braids, cotton or linen . . .^. 

Cambric 

Cambric, fine, and similar goods, 

though mixed with cotton 

Canvas, cotton 

Canvas, for embroidery 

Carpets, not containing wool 

Carpets, pressed, which do not 
contain wool 

Carpets, woven of cotton, wool, 
linen, or any other material, 
other than silk 

Chintz 

Collars, cotton 

Cotton goods, mixed with silk or 
wool and silk, except ribbons. . 



-8 



Duty per 
pound 
in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars, 

.007 
.363 

.179 
.363 

.363 
.363 
.179 
.179 
.363 
.179 
.007 



.C07 



.179 
.179 



.179 
.143 
.143 
.363 
.363 
.179 

.216 
.087 
.073 
.087 



.087 



.087 

.179 
.289 

.363 



ARTfCULO DB MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos^ 
taRica. 



Papol, eto.— Continfia. 

Carton y papel para en vol ver. . . . 

Cartultnas de fantasia 

Pautas 6 sombras 

Plumas de metal para escribir. . 

Cuadros de papel para vestir 
abanicos , 

Estampas de carton 6 papel 

Naipes 

Barajas 6 naipes 

Plumas de ave para escribir . . . , 

Sombras 6 pautas de papel , 

Esferas, madera 

Vaiilla y otros objetos de uso 
dom6stico m a n u facturados 
de carton piedra, pintado 6 
barnizado, sin dibujos, dora- 
dos ni adornos 

Vaiillo y otros objetos de uso 
dom6stico, de carton piedra, 
adornados con dibujo y dora- 
duras 

Juguetes de papel 6 carton 

Tejidot. 

Algodoms, 

Batistas 

Colchas, algod6n 

Cotines 

Trencillas, algod6n 

Hiladillas, algod6n 6 lino 

Cambray 

Holanes y telas an&Iogas, aun- 

que tengan mezcla de algod6n . 

Lonas 

Cafiamazo (tela para bordar) 

Alfombras para pisos, que no 

tengan lana 

Carpetas prensadas para pisos, 

que no tengan lana 

Carpetas, finas, sobre tejidos de 

algod6n, lana, lino, d otra 

materia que no sea seda , 

Tarazas 

Cuellos, algod6n 

Algod6n, en tejidos mezclados 

con seda 6 con lana y seda, 

excepto las cintas 



Pesos. 
.02 

1.09 

.54 

1.09 

1.09 
1.09 

.54 
.54 

1.09 

.54 

.02 



.54 

.54 



.54 

•43 

.43 

1.09 

1.09 
.54 

.63 

.26 

.22 
.26 
.26 



.26 

.54 
.87 



1.09 



114 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Textiles— Continued. 

Cotton goods — Continued. 

Cotton goods, mixed with wool . . . 

Cotton, prepared for surgery 

Cotton, raw, without seeds 

Cotton, raw, with seeds 

Cotton velvet, smooth or worked. 
Crinolines, cotton 

Cuffs, cotton 

Curtains, cotton 

Drawers, cotton 

Drills 

Elastic, of cotton, for shoes 

Gauze 

Gloves, cotton 

Goods of cotton or linen, damask- 
like, for tablecloths, napkins, 
towels, and other domestic 
uses 

Hammocks, cotton or linen 

Handkerchiefs, cotton 

Handkerchiefs, cotton, mixed with 
silk 

Hose, cloth, sewed or nailed . . . . 

Laces, cotton or linen 

Leaves of cotton or linen, cut for 

flowers 

Linings for hats, cotton or linen . 

Lino 

Lint 

Long lawns and other analogous 
goods, though mixed with cot- 
ton 

Lutestring 

Madapollams (percales) 

Mixed cloths 

Muslins 

Muslins, embroidered 

Muslins, smooth 

Napkins, cotton or linen 

Night gowns, cotton 

OilcloUis, on ordinary cloth, for 
floors 

Ornaments of cotton and linen.. 

Osnaburgs, cotton 

Parasols, cotton, without mixture 

. ofwoolorsilk 



Duty per 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.289 

.023 

.013 
.007 
.217 
.363 

.289 

.363 
. 216 

.143 
.249 

.179 
.289 



. 216 
.179 
.217 

.363 
.013 

.363 

.363 
.289 

.179 
.023 



.216 

.179 
. 109 

.143 
.143 
.289 

.179 
.216 
.289 

.013 
.363 
.179 

.143 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
taRica. 



Tejidot— Continda. 
Aigodones — Continda. 

Algod6n, en tejidos mezclados 
con lana 

Algod6n, preparado para ciru- 
gia 

Algod6n, sin semillas 

Algod6n, con semillas 

Panas lisas 6 labradas 

Crinolinas 6 zagalejos de algo- 
d6n : 

Puflos de algod6n 

Cortinas, algod6n 

Calzoncillos de algod6n 

Driles 

Eldstico de algod6n, para boti- 
nes 

Gazas 

Guantes, algod6n 

G^neros de algod6n61ino, ada- 
mascados para manteles, ser- 
villetas, toallas y otros usos 
dom6sticos 

Hamacas de algod6n 6 lino. . . . 

Pafiuelos de aIgod6n 

Pafiuelos de algod6n sedados. . 

Mangueras de g^nero, cosidas 6 

claveteadas 

Encajes de algod6n 6 lino 

Hojas de algod6n 6 lino corta- 

das para flores 

Forros de algodon 6 lino para 

sombreros 

Lin6es 

Hilas para cirugia 

Estopillas y telas andlogas, aun- 

que tengan mezcla de algod6n 

Lustrina 

Madapolanes 

Mezclillas 

Estribillas 

Muselinas bordadas 

Muselinas lisas 

Servilletas de algod6n 6 lino. . . 

Camisolas de algod6n 

Encerados para pisossobre telas 
ordinarias 

Adornos de algod6n 6 lino 

Crehuelas de algod6n 

Sombrillas de aIgod6n sin mez- 
cla de lana 6 seda 



Pesos. 



COSTA RICA. 



AI5 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



TextilaB— C onti n u ed . 
Cotton goods — Continued. 

Patterns or uppers for shoes of 

cotton, with or without elastic. . 
Percales and bookbinders' muslin. 

Piqu6s 

Ready-made clothes, cotton, 

stockinet 

Ready-made clothes, of cotton, 

other than stockinet 

Ribbon, cotton or linen 

Ruffles, cotton 

Russia duck 

Sailcloth 

Sashes, cotton 

Sashes, cotton or linen 

Shawls, cotton 

Shawls (rebozos), cotton mixed 

with silk 

Shawls, cotton mixed with wool, 

or embroidered with silk, or 

having silk fringe 

Shawls (rebozos) of cotton with 

silk fringe 

Shawls (rebozos), of pure cotton. . 

Sheetings 

Sheetings, bleached, cotton 

Sheetings, cotton, smooth or 

twilled. 

Shirt fronts, cotton 

Stockings of cotton 

Shoes of woolen or cotton cloth, 

with or without elastic, and 

uppers ready for soles 

Suspenders, cotton 

Tarlatans, smooth or worked 

Tapes or ribbons 

Thread in skeins, hanks, and 

spools 

Umbrellas, cotton, without 

mixture of wool or silk 

Undershirts, cotton, stockinet. 

Wicks for candles 

Wicks for lamps and tinder boxes. 



Hemp^ jute^ linen^ and manufac- 
tures of. 

Agave, aloe, crude, in the leaf . . , 

Aloe, fiber, manufactured into 

hats, cigar cases, and other like 

objects 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.363 
.179 
.179 

.216 

.363 
.363 
.289 
.087 
.087 
.217 
.217 
.217 

.363 



.363 

. 289 
.217 
. 109 
. 109 

.087 
.289 
.217 



.363 
.363 
.179 
.363 

.073 

.143 
.217 

.023 
. 109 



. 007 



.723 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Tejidot— Conti nda. 

Algodones — Continfia. 

Cortes calzado de aIgod6n, ten- 
gan 6 no eldstico 

Percales y percalinas 

Piqu6es 

Ropa hecha de algod6n de pun- 
to de media 

Ropa hecha de algod6n que no 
sea de punto de media 

Cintas de algod6n 6 lino 

Golas de aIgod6n 

Rusias 

Brines 

Bandas de algod6n 

Fajas, algod6n 6 lino 

Pafiolones, algod6n 

Rebozos de algod6n sedados. . . 

Pafiolonesde aIgod6n con mez- 
cla de lana, 6 bordados con 
seda, 6 con fleco de seda . . . . . 

Rebozos de algodon con guarda 
de seda 

Rebozos de puro algod6n 

Lienzos 

Mantas lavadas 

Mantas crudas, lisas6asargadas 

Pecheras de algod6n 

Medias de algod6n 

Calzado de g6nero de lana 6 

algod6n, con 6 sin eldstico, y 

preparado para ponerle suela 

Tirantes de algod6n 

Tarlatanas, lisas 6 labradks , 

Reatas 6 hiladillas 

Hilo en madejas, ovillos y car- 

reteles 

Paraguas algod6n, sin mezcla 

de lana 6 seda 

Camisetas algod6n de punto de 

media 

Pabilo 

Mechas para lamparas y yes- 

queros 

Caiiamo. 

Pita 6 cabuya en rama 

Pita manufacturada en sombre- 

. ros, cigarreras y objetos so- 

mejantes 



Derechos 
por kiln 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Pesos. 



1.09 
.54 
.54 

.65 

1.09 
1.09 
.87 
.26 
.26 
.65 
.65 
.65 
1.09 



1.09- 

.87 
.65 
.33 
.33 
.26 



.87 
.65 



1.09 
1.09 

.54 
1.09 

.22 

.43 

.65 
.07 

.33 



2.17 



ii6 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 


Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 


ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 


Derechos 
porkilo 
en mooe- 
dadeCos- 
URica. 


Textiles— C ontinued . 

Hemp, lintn^ etc, — Continued. 

Bags, hand, of vegetable fibers. . 


Dollars. 
.179 

.013 
.179 

.723 
.109 

.013 
.007 

.073 
.023 

.216 
.723 

.217 
.013 
.013 

.723 
.007 
.007 
.217 
.179 

.007 
.023 

.217 
.007 
.007 

1.086 
1.086 

•499 
.723 


T^idoi— ContinUa. 
G2«fl«w— Continda. 

Sacos de noche de fibras vege- 
tales 


Pesos, 


Brushes of vegetable fibers 


Brusas 6 cepillos de mimbre 6 
fibras vegetales 


. 04 


Carpets of vegetable fibers 

Cigarrette cases and like objects 
of aloe fiber 


Alfombras de fibras vegetales. . . 

Cigarreras de pita y objetos se- 

mejantes 


.54 
2. 17 


Cordage of vegetable fibers 

Cordage, ship 


Cordeles de fibras textiles vege- 
tales 

Jarcia 


.33 
.04 


Esparto grass 


Esparto en rama 

Fibras, textiles, vegetales en 
ovillos, madejas 6 carreteles. . 

Fibras, textiles, vegetales, hila- 
das en pavilo 6 para coser 
sacos 


.02 


Fibers, textile, vegetable, in 
skeins, hanks, and spools 

Fibers, textile, vegetable, made 
into wicks or thread for sewing 
bags 


.22 
.07 


Grass cambric, and similar goods, 
with or without mixture of 
cotton 


Yerbillas y telas analogas, aun- 
que tengan mezcla de algod6n . 

Sombreros de pita 6 jipijapa 

Lino en telas, como irlandas. 
yerbillas, etc., aunque tengan 
mezcla de alfirod6n 


.65 


Hats of aloe fiber, Panama 

Linen cloth, such as fine Irish 
linen, grass cambric, etc., 
though with a mixture of cotton . 

Mats esoarto 


2.17 

6^ 


Esteras de esparto 


. Ql 


Mats of osier or vegetable fibers. 


Petates de mimbre 6 fibras vege- 
tales 


. 04 


Ready-made clothing of linen, 
woven in any manner or form . . 
Rushes unmanufactured. . 


Ropa hecha de lino de cualquier 
tejido y forma 


2. 17 


Tunco sin manufacturar. ..»,.,-, 


02 


Sacks made for coffee 


oacos hechos para caf6 


.02 


Sandals of hemo 


Alpargatas(calzado) 


.6f 


Sandals of vegetable fibers 

Tarpaulin and ordinary oilcloth, 
for Dackinflf 


Sandalos de fibras vegetales 

Encerados comunes para enfar- 
dar 


.54 

. 02 


Thread, in balls, to sew bags 


Hilo en pabilo 6 para coser sa- 
cos 


.07 


Towels, linen or cotton 


Toallas, lino 6 algod6n 

Estopas de toda clase 


.65 


Tow of all kinds 


.02 


Tow, tarred 


Estopas alquitranadas 


.02 


Silk and manufactures of. 
Braids, silk 


Seda, 
Trencillas de seda 


3.26 

3.26 
I. ^0 


Cloth, silk, of all kinds, mixed 
or unmixed with other mate- 
rial, not elsewhere specified 


Telas de seda de toda clase aun- 
que tengan parte de otra ma- 
teria en su fabricaci6n, no 
comprendidas en otra parte 
del arancel 


Elastic, silk, for shoes 


Eldstico de seda para calzado. . . 
Hamacas de seda 


Hammocks, silk 


2.17 



COSTA RICA. 



117 



ARTICLE OP MBRCHANDISB. 



Textilat— Continued. 
SilJk and manufactures i^/— Cont'd. 

Laces, silk 

Ornaments and articles of fancy 
work of pure silk or mixed. . . 

Parasols of silk or mixed with 
silk 

Patterns or uppers for shoes, of 
silk, with or without elastic. . . 

Ready-made clothing of silk, 
though having linings and or- 

' naments of oSier materials 

Ribbons of silk or mixed silk. . , 

Sashes, silk 

Sash ribbons, silk 

Shoes of silk cloth, or imitation, 
with or without elastic, and 
uppers ready for soles 

Silk in uppers for shoes, with or 
without elastic 

Silk made into all kinds of cloth, 
ribbons, tapes, garters, sus- 
penders, and ornaments and 
objects of fancy work, even 
though such articles should be 
made partially of another ma- 
terial not elsewhere specified 
in this tariff 

Silk, raw, and floss silk 

Silk, twisted, loose or in thread. 

Suspenders, silk 

Tulles, smooth, stamped, or 
flowered 

Umbrellas, silk or mixed with 
silk 

Wool and manufactures of 

Alpaca, wool 

Blankets of wool , 

Blankets, rough, wool .' 

Braids, woolen 

Baize, woolen 

Carpets or shags, woolen 

Cashmeres 

Cassimeres 

Cloaks, woolen 

Cloth, woolen, in pieces or cut, 

pure or mixed 

Cord 

Dalmaticas of tissue, wool, or 

any other substance 

Damasks, wool , 



Duty per 

pound 

inU.S. 

currency. 



ARTfCULO DB MBRCANCIA. 



Derechot 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
uRica. 



D0lUrt. 
1.086 

1.086 

.289 

.733 



1.449 
1.086 
1.087 
1.086 



■723 
.733 



1.087 
.723 
.723 

1.087 

.363 
.289 



.289 
.179 
.179 
.723 
■179 
.289 
.289 
.363 
.179 

.363 
.723 

.723 
.289 



Ti(iidM^Contin<ia. 
5;fi]fis— Continda. 



Encajes, seda 

Adornos y objetos de pasama- 

nerla de seda pura 6 mezclada. 

Sombrillas de seda 6 sedados. . . 

Cortes de calzado de seda, ten- 
gan 6 no el4stico 

Ropa hecha de seda, aunque 
tengan forros y adornos de 
otros materiales , 

Cintas de seda 6 sedadas 

Banda^ de seda 

Listones de seda 

Calzado de g6nero de seda 6 se- 
dado, con 6 sin el^tico, y el 
preparado para ponerle suela. 

Seda en cortes para calzado, ten- 
gan 6 no eldstico , 

Seda en toda clase de telas, lis- 
tones, cintas, tirantes y ador- 
nos y objetos de pasamaneria, 
tengan 6 no parte de otra ma- 
teria en su fabricaci6n, y no 
comprendidas en otra parte 
de este arancel , 

Seda y borra en rama 

Seda hilada, suelta 6 torcida. . . . 

Tirantes de seda , 

Tuleslisos, estampados 6 florea- 

dos 

Paraguas de seda 6 sedados . . . , 



Lana, 

Alpacas, lana 

Frazadas de lana 

Chamarras, lana 

Trencillas de lana 

Bayetas, lana ' 

Alfombras 6 tripes, lana 

Cachemiras 

Casimires 

Mantas de lana 

Paflos de lana,en piezas 6 cortes, 

puros 6 mezclados 

Cordones 

Dalmaticas de tisfi, lana 6 cual- 

quiera otra materia 

Damascos de lana 



3.26 

3.26 
.87 



2.17 



4.35 
3.26 
3.26 
3.26 



2. 17 
a. 17 



3.26 

2.17 
2.17 
3.26 

1.09 

.87 



.87 
.54 
.54 

2.17 
.54 
.87 
.87 

L09 
.54 

1.09 
2.17 

2.17 
.87 



ii8 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Textiles— C ontin ued . 
Wool and manufactures <>/^— Cont'd 

Drawers, woolen, of stockinet or 

not 

Elastic of wool, for shoes 

Felt, for hats and similar uses . . . 

Felt for roofs, walls, and similar 
uses 

Flannels, woolen 

Garters, wool 

Gloves, woolen 

Goods of wool, damasked 

Goods of wool mixed with silk, 
or cotton and silk, other than 
ribbons 

Laces, woolen 

Mantles, woolen , 

Mattresses of wool or horsehair . 

Merinos, wool 

Parasols, woolen 

Patterns or uppers for shoes of 
wool, with or without elastic. . . 

Pillows of wool or hair , 

Ready-made clothing of wool, 
though lined and ornamented 
with other materials , 

Saddle blankets of wool or cot- 
ton , 

Sashes, wool 

, Shag, woolen , 

Sashes, woolen , 

Shawls and handkerchiefs of 
wool 

Shirts, woolen, stockinet or not. 

Stockings of wool 

Tassels, wool 

Umbrellas, wool 

Undershirts, woolen, stockinet or 
not 

Velvet, woolen 

Wool, all kinds, crude 

Wool in cloth mixed with silk, 
or with cotton and silk, except 
ribbons 

Wool in cloth, smooth or twilled, 
such as alpacas, merinos, etc., 
in pieces or patterns, pure or 
mixed, other than silk , 

Wool in hanks, skeins, or thread. 

Wool, trimmings 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency . 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
porkilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Dollars. 

.363 
.333 
.013 



.013 
.363 
.723 
.363 
.289 



.363 
.723 
.179 
.073 
.289 

.179 

.363 
.073 



.723 

.117 
.723 
.363 
.723 

.289 
.363 

.363 
.723 
.179 

.363 
.289 

.037 



.363 



.289 
.073 

.723 



Tejidoe — Continda. 
Lana — Continiia. 

Calzoncillos de lana, sean 6 no 
de punto de media 

Eldstico de lana para calzado . . . 

Fieltro para sombreros y usos 
semejantes 

Fieltro para techos paredes y 
usos semejantes 

Franelas de lana 

Ligas de lana 

Guantes de lana 

G6neros de lana adamascados . . 

Tejidos de lana mezclados con 
seda, 6 algodon y seda, m^nos 
las cintas 

Encajes de lana 

Mantillas de lana 

Colchones de lana 6 crin 

Merinos lana 

Sombrillas de lana 

Cortes calzado de lana, tengan 
6 no el&stico 

Almohadas de lana 6 crin 

Ropa hecha de lana, aunque 
tengan forros y adomos de 
otras materias 

Mantillones de lana 6 algod6n. . 



Bandas de lana 

Jergas de lana 

Fajas de lana 

Paflolones y pafluelos de lana . . 

Camisas de lana sean 6 no punto 
de media 

Medias 'de lana 

Borlas de lana 

Paraguas de lana 

Camisetas, lana, sean 6 no de 
punto de media 

Terciopelo de lana 

Lanas de toda clase en rama. 

Lana en tejidos mezclados con 
seda 6 con algod6n y seda, 
except© las cintas 

Lana en telas lisas 6 asargadas, 
como alpacas, merinos, etc., 
en cortes 6 piezas, puros 6 
con mezcla que no sea seda. . . 

Lana en madejon, hilada 6 tor- 
cida 

Lana en objetos de pasamaneria. 



PesM. 



COSTA RICA. 



119 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Duty per 

pound 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Textilei — Continued. 
Wool and manufactures of— QonX'^. 

Wool made into wearing apparel, 
such as stockings and shirts, 
of stockinet or not, though 
mixed with some silk 363 

Tobacco and mannfactnrot of. 

Cigarettes 726 

Cigars and cut tobacco 726 

Snuff 727 

Tobacco manufactured into cigar- 
ettes, cigars, snuff, and smok- 
ing tobacco 727 

Vehidas and parts thereof. 

Axles of wood 037 

Berlins 073 

Carriages . . .* 073 

Cars for railways and tramways . . . 073 

Carts, handcarts, wagons, and 
wheels and other parts 013 

Materials, wooden, for carts, 
wheelbarrows, wagons, etc 013 

Omnibuses or carriages, not spe- 
cified 073 

Passenger cars for railways or 
tramways 073 

Springs for carriages or wagons . . . 037 

Springs, metal, of less than 2 kilos 
weight, other than those for 

wagons and watches 179 

Tires, iron 01 

Wheel-boxes, iron 01 

Wheels and axles for carts 007 

Wheels for sharpening instru- 
ments 037 

Wheels, metal, for wagons 007 

Wheel tires and boxes, of iron. . . .01 

Wood and mannlJMtnres ol 

Bagatelle tables . 109 

Barrels and hogsheads, empty ... . 007 
Boards, planks, and every kind 

of wood for building 013 

Beams and joists of wood, for 

building 013 

Beds 037 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
uRica. 



Tqidcc — Continda. 
Zaff^i— Continda. 

Lana en piezas de ropa, como 
medias y camisas, sean 6 no 
de punto de media, aunque 
tengan algo de seda 

Tabaco. 

Cigarrillos 

Puros y picadura de tabaco 

Rapfe 

Tabaco elaborado en cigarrillos, 
puros, rap6 y picadura 

Vehicnloi. 

Ejes de madera 

Berlinas 

Coches 

Vehiculos de ferro-carriles y 
tramvias 

Carretas, carretillos, carretones 
y sus ruedas y demds utiles. . . 

Utiles de madera para carretas, 
carretillos, carretones, etc 

Omnibus 6 carruages, no expre- 
sados 

Muelles para carruages y wa- 
gones 

Carruages para viajeros en ferro- 
carriles 6 tramvias 

Muelles de metal de m6nosde 2 
kilos de peso, que no sean para 
wagones 6 relojes 

Llantas de hierro 

Bocinas de hierro 

Ruedas y ejes para carretas 

Ruedas pa~a afilar instrumentos. 

Ruedas de metal para wagones . . 
Llantas & bocinas de hierro 

Kadera. 

Bagatelas 

Barriles y tonelei.Yacios 

Tablas, tablones^ toda clase de 

madera de construcci6n 

Vigas y viguetas de madera para 

construcci6n 

Camas 



Pesos. 



1.09 



2.18 
2.18 
2.18 

2.13 



. II 
. 22 
.22 

.22 

.04 

.04 

.22 

. II 

.22 



.54 
.03 
.03 
.02 
. II 

.02 
.03 



.33 

.02 

.04 

.04 
• II 



120 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Duty per 
pound 
inU. S. 

curreocy. 



ARTfCULO DB MERCANCIA. 



Dereohos 
porkilo 
en mone- 
dadeCoe- 
taRica. 



Wood and maanfaetimt of— Cont'd. 

Billiard tables 

Blinds, lattices, and Venetian 

blinds 

Blocks, for hats and shoemakers' 

lasts, etc 

Boxes, made of shavings, used in 

drug stores 

Boxes to keep shawls, fancy or 

otherwise 

Boxes, fancy, of more than 2 

kilos weight 

Boxes, fancy, of less than 2 kilos 

weight 

Boxes, for chess 

Boxes for keeping shawls, fancy 

or otherwise 

Buckets 

Buttons 

Card cases 

Chairs...: 

Combs 

Combs for cloth 

Dressing cases 

Furniture 

Globes or spheres 

Handles, for axes, brooms, and 

every kind of tools 

Handles, for pens and pencils. . . . 

Hogsheads, empty 

Hoop poles 

Hoops 

Instruments, wooden, for agricul- 
ture and industry 

Lasts 

Levers • 

Matches 

Moldings, gilt or not, with or 
without varnish or polish 

Pipes 

Plummets 

Rat traps or traps 

Razor strops 

Rocking chairs, of any form 

Rules 

Shingles 

Shovels 

Sofas 

Statues and sculptures, of more 
than 2 kilos weight 



Dottar*. 
.109 

.109 

.007 

.037 

.037 

.179 

.363 
.179 

.037 
.013 

.363 
.179 
.037 
.179 
.013 
.179 
.037 
.007 

.007 
.179 

.007 
.007 
.007 

.007 
.007 
.013 
.073 

.037 
.363 
.013 

.037 
. 109 

.037 
.037 

.013 
.013 
.037 
.037 



Kadom — Continfia. 

Billares 

Celosias, venecianasy persianas. 

Hormas para sombreros, zapa- 

tos, etc 

Cajitas de viruta, usadas en las 

boticas 

Cajas para guardar pafiolones, 

sean 6 no de fantasia 

Caias de fantasia 6 lujo, de mds 

ae 2 kilos de peso 

Cajas de fantasia 6 lujo, de m6- 

nos de 2 kilos de peso 

Cajas para juegos de ajedrez 

Cajas para guardar pafiolones, 

sean 6 no de fantasia 

Baldes 

Botones 

Tarieteras 

Sillas 

Peines 

Peines para tejidos 

Neceseres 

Muebles 

Globos 6 esferas 

Mangos, para hachas, azadas, 

escobas y para toda clase de 

herramientas 

Cabos y mangos para plumas 6 

lapices 

Toneles, vacios 

Flejes de madera 

Arcos de madera 

Instrumentos, madera, para la 

agricultura 6 industria 

Hormas para zapatos 

Palancas zapatos 

F6sforos 

Molduras, con 6 sin dorado, 

barniz 6 charol 

Cachimbas 

Plomadas 

Ratoneras 6 trampas 

Suavizadores 

Poltronas, de cualquiera forma. . 

Reglas para rayar 

Teia manil 

Palas 

Sofas 

Estatuas y esculturas, de m^s de 

2 kilos de peso 



Pesos. 

.33 

•33 



COSTA RICA. 



121 



ARTICLE OP MBRCHANDISB. 



Wood and maimfMtiirM of— Cont'd. 

Statues and sculptures, of less 

than 2 kilos weight 

Staves 

Strips of wood, for building 

Strops, razor 

Tools and implements for agricul- 
ture and industry 

Trays 

Trunks, with or without covers . . 

Utensils, not specified, for the 
arts and trades 

Venetian blinds 

Waiters 

Walking sticks and canes, of ev- 
efy kind 

Wardrobes, wooden 

Wood, cabinet, in logs or pieces. . 

Wood for construction, such as 
boards, joists, beams, etc 

Wood made into doors and win- 
dows, with or without hinges 
or locks 

IDsoeUaneons. 

Abacus and Level's apparatus . . . 
Amber, in pieces or manufactured. 

Amber, manufactured 

Articles and instruments of metal, 

for the use of the drug stores. . . 

Articles for printers 

Articles gilded or plated for table 

services and other uses 

Bags, hand, traveling 

Bags, hunting, or ammunition 
cases for hunters, or bags for 
other uses 

Barometers and compasses 

Baskets of osier and vegetable 
fibers 

Baskets of rush 

Bellows 

Bitumen 

Blacking, shoe 

Bolts for doors 

Bone, in combs, etc 



Duty per 
pound 
in U.S. 

currency. 



DolUrs. 

.363 
.007 

.013 
.109 

.007 
.109 
.073 

.013 
.109 
.109 

.723 
.037 
.037 



.013 
.037 



.007 
.363 

.733 

.037 
Free. 

.267 
.179 



.179 
.037 

.013 

.073 
.013 
.007 
.037 
.073 
.179 



ARTfCULO DB MBRCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mono- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



]Iad«r»— Contintia. 

Estatuas y esculturas de madera 

de m^nos de 2 kilos de peso, 

Duelas 

Reglas d« madera para construc- 

ci6n 

Asentadores y suavizadores 

Utiles de madera para la agricul- 

tura 6 industria 

Azafates , 

Baules, forrados 6 sin forrar. . . , 
Utensilios, no especi fi c a d o s, 

para artes y oficios 

Venecianas 

Bandejas 

Bastones y cafias de toda clase. . . 

Roperos , 

Madera paraebanisteriaen tron- 

cos 6 pedazos 

Madera de construcci6n, como 

tablas, vigas, viguetas etc. 

Madera en puertas y ventanas, 

traigan 6 no bisagras, cerra- 

duras, etc 

Olgetos diyenoe. 

Abacos y aparatus de Level 

Ambar en pedazos 6 manufac* 

turado 

Ambar manufacturado 

Utiles 6 instrumentos metdlicos 

para uso de las boticas 

Utiles de imprenta 

Artfculos dorados 6 plateados 

para servicio de mesa fi otros 

usos 4 

Bolsas 6 sacos dc noche 

Bolsas para municioneras ii 

otros usos 

Barometros y brujulas 

Canastas de mimbre y fibras vege- 

tales 

Canastas de junco 

Fuclles 

Betunes 

Betunes para calzado 

Cerrojos 

Hueso en peines, etc 



Pesos. 



1.09 
.02 

.04 

.33 

.02 

.33 



.04 

.33 

.33 

17 

. II 

. II 

.04 



.02 

1.09 
2.17 

. II 

Libres. 



.80 
.54 

.54 
. II 

.04 
.22 
.04 
.02 
. II 
.22 
.54 



122 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



IGaceUaneoai — Continued. 

Boots, rubber 

Boxes, ladies' work 

Boxes, paint 

Bricks, Bath, for cleaning knives 

and forks 

Bricks, building 

Brooms, osier or other vegetable 

fibers 

Brooms of rush or cane 

Bristles and horsehair, raw , 

Brushes, paint, for any use 

Brushes, for workmen 

Brushes of bristle, horsehair, for 

cleaning animals, floors, and 

shoes 

Brushes, of hair or bristle, for the 

clothes, hair, teeth, nails, etc . 

Cages of all kinds 

Candles, tallow 

Candles, wax 

Canvas for embroidering 

Caps, of every kind, with or with- 
out trimmings except those of 
agave and Panamas 

Caps for bottles 

Celluloid, manufactures of 

Chains, surveying 

Cloth, waterproof, to protect carts 

and coffee in the drying courts 

(patios) 

Coats, rubber 

Combs, gutta-percha 

Combs, horn or bone 

Copperas 

Corks, for bottles 

Corsets or stays 

Corkscrews 

Creams, all kinds 

Dress goods , 

Embroidery borders 

Eyeglasses, mounted in gold. . . 

Feather dusters , 

Feathers, loose, for mattresses 

and pillows 

Fillers, water 

Flowerpots, for gardens 

Frames of all shapes, with or with 

out gilt, varnish, or polish. . . . 
Fringes, silver 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.179 
.179 
.179 

.003 
.003 

.013 
.073 
.037 
.179 
.037 



.037 

.179 

.179 
.023 

.179 
.073 



.363 
.073 
.363 

.037 



.007 
.179 
.179 
.179 
.037 
.073 
.363 
.179 
.363 
.289 

.363 
2.893 

.073 

.073 
.003 
.003 

. 109 
1.449 



ARTfCULO DB MBRCANCIA. 



Derechok 
por kilo 
en moae- 
da.de Cos- 
ta, Rica. 



OlgetM diyeraof— Continda. 

Botos de hule 

Costureros 

Cajas con colores para pintor . , 
Ladrillos para limpiar cubiertos 

Ladrillos de construcci6n 

Escobas de mimbre (1 otras fib- 
ras vegetales 

Escobas de junco 6 cafla 

Cerdas y crines en rama 

Pinceles para cualquier uso . . . 

Brochas para artesanos 

Brusas 6 cepillos de crin, pelo 6 
cerda para limpiar bestias, pi- 
sos y calzado 

Cepillos de crin, pelo 6 cerda 
para ropa, cabeza, dientes, 
ufias, etc 

Jaulas de toda clase 

Velas de sebo 

Velas de cera 

Telas para bordar (cafiamazo). . 

Gorras de toda clase, con 6 sin 
adomo, excepto los de pita y 
jipjjapa 

Capsulas para botellas 

Celuloide, manufacturado en 
obietos de cualquiera clase. . . 

Cadenas para medir 

G6nero impermeable, para pro- 
tejer de la lluvia, carros, caf6 
en los patios, etc 

Capas, hule 

Peines de gutapercha 

Peines de cuerno y hueso 

Caparrosa, verdc 

Corchos para tapar botellas 

Cors6es 6 apretadores 

Sacacorchos 

Cremas de toda clase 

Lanillas 

Tiras bordadas 

Anteojos mo'ntados en oro. . . . 

Plumeros para sacudir 

Plumas de ave para col chones y 
almohadas 

Filtros para agua 

Macetas de barro para jardin. . 

Marcos de toda forma, con 6 sin 
dorado, barniz 6 charol 

Flecos de plata 



COSTA RICA. 



123 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Mifoelluieoiis— Continued. 

Fuses for mines 

Fishhooks 

Glue 

Gongs 

Greases, and fats, not specified . . 

Gum arabic. solid or liquid 

Gutta-percha in objects not orna- 
mental I . 

Gutta-percha in objects not speci- 
fied for the use of drug stores. . 

Hair, human or imitation, loose 
or made into wigs 

Hair of all kinds, with the refuse 
of same, except human hair. . . . 

Hairpins and hooks for the hair. . 

Hair, braided, in manufactures 
not specified 

Handbags, traveling 

Hats of all kinds, with or without 
ornaments 

Hooks for wardrobes and other 
uses 

Horn, manufactured into combs 
and other similar objects 

Horsehair, in mattresses or pil- 
lows 

Horsehair, woven 

Hose or sprinklers, gutta-percha. . 

Hunting bags, or ammunition 

cases, or bags for other uses . . . 

Incense 

Instrument cases 

Instruments, metallic, used in 

drug stores 

Instruments, scienrific 

Instruments, surgical 

Ivory, crude 

Ivory, manufactured 

Jet, manufactured 

Knives,forks,and spoons for table 

service, gilded or plated 

Knives,forks,and spoons fortable 

use, gilded or silver-plated. . . . 

Lanterns, glass 

Levels 

Looking-glasses, with or without 

frames 

Loto, pasteboard 



Duty per 
pound 
in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 
.007 
.367 
.037 
.037 
.013 
.073 

.1*79 
.179 

.723 
,037 

.363 

.179 
.179 

.363 

.179 

.179 

.073 
.179 
.029 



.179 
. 109 

.179 

.037 
.037 
.179 
.013 

.723 
.723 

.267 

.267 

.037 
.013 

.179 
.179 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en mone- 
da de Cos- 
ta Rica. 



Olsrjetot diyeraof— Continda. 

Mechas para minas 

Anzuelos 

Cola 

Gubias 

Grasas, no especificadas 

Goma ar&biga, solida6 liquida. . 
Gutapercha en objetos que no 

sean de adorno 

Gutapercha en objetos no speci- 

cados para boticas y drogue- 

rias 

Pelo humano 6 imitaci6n, suelto 

6 man u fact urado en pelucas. . 
Pelos de todas clases, en rama 

6 sus desperdidas, excepto 

el pelo humano 

Ganchos para el peinado 

Pelo trenzado en manufacturas 

no especificadas 

Bolsas 6 sacos de noche 

Sombreros de toda clase, con 6 

sin adornos 

Ganchos para roperos y otros 

usos 

Cuemo, manufacturado enpei- 

nes y objetos semejantes 

Grin en colchones 6 almohadas. . 

Grin en tejidos de todas clases. . 

"Manguerasb regaderas de guta- 
percha 

Bolsas para municioneras fi 
otros usos 

Inciensa 

: Estuches 

Instrumentos metdlicos para uso 

, de las boticas 

I Instrumentos cientificos 

Instrumentos de cirugia 

Marfil en bruto 

I Marfil manufacturado 

Azabache, manufacturado 

I Cubiertos dorados 6 plateados 
para servicio de mesa 

Cubiertos para servicio de mesa, 
dorados 6 plateados 

Faroles de vidrio 

Niveles , 

Espejos, con 6 sin marcos 

t Loterias de carton 



Pesos. 



.02 
.09 
. II 
. II 
.04 
.22 

.54 



.54 
2.17 



. 11 
1.09 

.54 
.54 

1.09 
.54 

.54 
. 22 

.54 
.09 

.54 
.33 
.54 

. II 
. II 
.54 
.04 
2.17 
2. 17 

.80 

.80 
. II 
.04 
.54 

.54 



124 



COSTA RICA. 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



lOaoelluieoai^Continued. 

Madder 

Magnets, artificial , 

Matches, wax 

Meerschaum, in pieces or manu- 
factured 

Mosquito nets 

Mother-of-pearl, manufactured. . . 

Muzzles, wire 

Needles 

Nipples of gutta-percha 

Osier, crude 

Osier, manufactured 

Pantographs, metal 

Paste for billiard cues 

Penholders and pencil cases 

Penknives 

Penknives and pocketknives . . . . 

Pictures with frame and glass 

Pictures used by "The Equita- 
ble" for advertising 

Pictures used to advertise **The 
Equitable" 

Pillows of feathers 

Pitch 

Pitch and tar 

Portemonnaies, metal 

Printers* supplies 

Printing presses and their appara- 
tus 

Pulleys 

Razors 

Razor strops, metal 

Rat traps or traps, metal 

Samples of all kinds without 
value 

Scalpels, metal 

Sealing wax, fine, for letters 

Sealing wax, ordinary, for stop- 
ping bottles 

Shags 

Shoes, gutta-percha 

Sieves 

Skirts 

Slates, with frames, for schools . . . 

Soap, ordinary perfumed 

Spermaceti, crude 

Spoons, knives, and forks for 
table use, gilded or silver- 
plated , 



Duty per 

pound 

in U.S. 

curr«ncy. 



DoUars. 
.073 
.037 
.109 

.363 
.363 

.723 
.179 
.363 
.179 
.007 
.013 

.179 
.023 

.179 
.179 
.179 
.109 

.007 

.007 
.109 
.087 
.007 

Free. 

Free. 
. 179 
.179 
. 109 

.073 

.007 
.037. 
.179 

.073 
.289 

.179 
.037 

.363 
.007 

.179 
.023 

.267 



ARTfCULO DE MBRCANCIA. 



Oljetof diyenof— Continiia. 

Grancina 

Imanes artificiales 

F6sforos de cera 6 cerillos 

Espuma de mar, en pedazos 6 

manufacturada 

Mosquiteros 

Nacar manufacturado 

Bozales de alambre 

Agujas 

Chupones de guta^percha 

Mimbre en rama 

Mimbre manufacturado 

Pant6grafos, metal 

Pasta para tacos de billar 

Cabos para plumas y lapiceros. 

Cortapliimas 6 cuchillas 

Navajas de bolsa y cortaplCimas 
Cuadros con marco y vidrio . . . 
Cuadros de anuncios para "La 

Equitativa" 

Cuadros de anuncios para "La 

Equitativa" 

Almohadas de plumas 

Breas 

Alquitranes 

Portamonedas, metal 

Utiles de impredta 

Imprentasy sus utiles 

Garruchas 

Navajas de afeitar 

Suavizadores, metal 

Ratoneras 6 trampas de metal . . 

Muestras de toda especie sin 
valor 

Escalpelos, metal 

Lacre fino para cartas 

Lacre ordinario para tapar bote- 
llas 

Tripes 

Zapatos de guta-percha 

Cedazos, cribas harneros y za- 
randas 

Zagalejos 

Pizarras con marco para uso de 
las escuelas 

Tabon, ordinario, perfumado. . . 

Esperma de ballena, en rama . . 

Cucharas, cuchillos y tenedores 
para el servicio de mesa, do- 
rados 6 plateados 



Derechot 
porkilo 
enmooe- 
da de Co*- 
taRica. 



FesM, 
.22 
. II 
.33 

1.09 
1.09 
2.17 

.54 
1.09 

.54 
.02 
.04 

.54 
.07 

.54 

.54 
•54 
.33 

.02 

.02 

.33 
.26 
.02 

.54 
Lib res. 
Libres. 

.54 
.54 
.33 
.22 

.02 
. II 
•54 

.22 

.87 

.54 

. II 

1.09 

.02 
.54 
.07 



.80 



COSTA RICA. 



125 



ARTICLE OF MERCHANDISE. 



Idoellanaoni— Continued. 

Spoons, teaspoons, forks, knives, 
carving knives, etc 

Sprinklers or hose, of gutta- 
percha 

Stereoscopes , 

Stones and wheels for sharpening 
instruments , 

Stopcocks , 

Strings, metallic, for instruments, 
with filliilg of silk 

Strings of gut, for instruments . . , 

Strings of silk, for instruments. . , 

Syringes, gutta-percha , 

Tallow, or greases^ not specified. . 

Thimbles, metal 

Tissues of all kinds 

Toys of all kinds 

Traps, or rat traps, metal 

Tubs 

Tumblers, gutta-percha 

Tortoise shell, crude 

Tortoise shell, manufactured. 

Velocipedes of any size and 

weight 

Vestments for priests, of tissue, 

wool, or any other material 

Wafers, medicinal or otherwise. 

Walking sticks, animal substan- 
ces 

Walking sticks of metal or bam- 
boo 

Wax, elaborated in any way, other 
than candles ' , 

Wax, white or yellow, not manu- 
factured 

Whalebone, crude 

Whalebone, manufactured i n 
any way except as canes 



Duty per 

pouad 

in U. S. 

currency. 



Dollars. 

.179 

.029 
.179 

.037 
.037 

.363 
.723 

.723 

.179 
.013 

.363 
.723 
.179 
.073 
.013 

.179 
.109 

.723 
.289 

.723 

. 109 

.723 

1.629 

.363 

.073 
.179 

.179 



ARTfCULO DE MERCANCIA. 



Derechos 
por kilo 
en m one- 
da de Co»- 
uRica. 



Ol^etM div< 



Continda. 



Cucharas, cucharitas, tenedores, 
cuchillos, y trinchantes, etc . . . 

Regaderas 6 mangueras de guta- 
percha 

Estereoscopios 

Piedras y ruedas para afilar in- 
strumentos 

Llaves para grifos 6 cafieria 

Cuerdas entorchadas con alma 
de seda 

Cuerdas de tripa para instrumen- 
tos 

Cuerdas de seda para instrumen- 
tos 

Jeringas de guta-percha 

Sebo y grasas no especificadas. . 

Dedales, metal 

Tisdes de toda clase 

Juguetes de todas clases ... 

Trampas 6 ratoneras, metal 

Bafladeras de madera 

Vasos de guta-percha 

Carey en bruto 

Carey manufacturado I 

Velocipedos decualquier tama- 
flo y peso 

Vestiduras sacerdo t a 1 e s , de 
tisfi, lana 6 cualquieraotra ma- 
teria 

Hostias, sean 6 no medicinales. . 

Bastones de despojos de ani- 
males 

Bastones met&licos 6 bambues. 

Cera labrada en toda forma que 

no sea en candelas 

Cera blanca 6 amarilla sin labrar. 



Ballena en bruto 

Ballena preparada para cual- 
quier objeto m6nos en bas- 
tones 



Pesos. 

.54 

.09 
.54 

. II 
. II 

1.09 
2.17 

2.17 
.54 
.04 

1.09 

2.17 
.54 
. 22 
.04 
.54 
.33 

2. 17 

.87 



2.17 
.33 

2.17 
4.89 



1.09 
.22 

.54 
.54 



Appendix B. 



PARCELS POST CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA AND COSTA RICA. 

For the purpose of making better postal arrangements between the United 
States of America and the Republic of Costa Rica, the undersigned, John Wan- 
amaker. Postmaster General of the United States of America, by virtue of 
authority vested in him by law, and Federico Volio, charg6 d'affaires ad interim 
of the Republic of Costa Rica at Washington, duly empowered thereto by the 
President of the Republic of Costa Rica, have agreed upon the following articles 
for the establishment of a parcels post system of exchanges between the two 
countries. 

Article I. 

The provisions of this Convention relate only to parcels of mail matter to be 
exchanged by the system herein provided for, and do not affect the arrangements 
now existing under the Universal Postal Union Convention, which will con- 
tinue as heretofore; and all the arrangements hereinafter contained apply ex- 
clusively to mails exchanged under these articles. 

Article II. 

1. There shall be admitted to the mails exchanged under this Convention, 
articles of merchandise and mail matter, except letters, post-cards, and written 
matter, of all kinds that are admitted under any conditions to the domestic 
mails of the country of origin, except that no packet must exceed five kilograms 
or eleven pounds in weight, nor the following dimensions : greatest length in any 
direction sixty centimeters, or two feet; greatest girth one hundred and twenty 
centimeters, or four feet ; and must be so wrapped or enclosed as to permit their 
contents to be easily examined by postmasters and customs officers. 

2. The following articles are prohibited admission to the mails exchanged 
under this Convention: 

Publications which violate the copy-right laws of the country of destination; 
liquids, poisons, explosive or inflammable substances, fatty substances, those 
which easily liquefy ; live or dead animals, not dried, insects and reptiles ; con- 
fections, pastes, fruits and vegetables which will easily decompose, and substances 

127 



128 COSTA RICA. 

which exhale a bad odor; lottery tickets or circulars; all obscene or immoral 
articles ; other articles which may destroy or in any way damage the mails, or 
injure the persons handling them. 

3. All admissible articles of merchandise mailed in one country for the other, 
or received in one country from the other, shall be free from any detention or 
inspection whatever, except such as is required for collection of customs duties, 
and shall be forwarded by the most speedy means to their destination, being sub- 
ject in their transmission to the laws and regulations of each country respectively. 

Article III. 

1. A letter or communication of the nature of personal correspondence must 
not accompany, be written on, or enclosed with any parcel. 

2. If such be found, the letter will be placed in the mails if separable, and if 
inseparably attached, the whole package will be rejected. If, however, any 
such should inadvertently be forwarded, the country of destination will collect 
double rates of postage according to the Universal Postal Union Convention. 

3. No parcel may contain parcels intended for delivery at an address other 
than the one borne by the parcel itself If such enclosed parcels be detected, 
they must be sent forward singly, charged with new and distinct parcels post 
rates. 

Article IV. 

1. The following rates of postage shall in all cases be required to be fully 
prepaid with postage stamps of the country of origin, viz : 

2. In the United States: for a parcel not exceeding four hundred and sixty 
grams or one pound in weight, twelve cents, and for each additional four hun- ' 
dred and sixty grams or one pound or fraction thereof, twelve cents, and in 
Costa Rica : for a parcel not exceeding four hundred and sixty grams or one 
pound in weight, twenty cents; and for each additional four hundred and sixty 
grams or one pound, or fraction thereof, twenty cents. 

3. The packages shall be promptly delivered to addressees at the post offices 
of address in the country of destination, free of charge for postage; but the 
country of destination may, at its option, levy and collect from the addressee for 
interior service and delivery a charge not exceeding five cents on each single 
parcel of whatever weight, and if the weight exceeds four hundred and sixty 
grams or one pound, a charge equal to one cent for each one hundred and fifteen 
grams or four ounces, of weight, or fraction thereof. 

Article V. , 

1 . The sender will, at the time of mailing the package, receive a receipt of 
mailing from the post office where the package is mailed, on a form like Form I 
annexed hereto. 



COSTA RICA, 129 

2. The sender of a package may have the same registered by paying the reg- 
istration fee required for registered articles in the country of origin. 

3. An acknowledgment of the delivery of a registered article shall be returned 
to the sender when requested; but either country may require of the sender pre- 
payment of a fee therefor not exceeding five cents. 

4. The addressees of registered articles shall be advised of the arrival of a pack- 
age addressed to them^ by a notice from the post office of destination. 

Article VI. 

1. The sender of each package shall make a Customs Declaration, pasted 
upon or attached to the package, upon a special Form provided for the purpose 
(See Form 2 annexed hereto) giving a general description of the parcel, an accu- 
rate statement of the contents and value, date of mailing, and the sender's signa- 
ture and place of residence, and place of address. 

2. The packages in question shall be subject in the country of destination to 
all customs duties and all customs regulations in force in that country for the 
protection of its Customs Revenues; and the customs duties properly chargeable 
thereon shall be collected on delivery, in accordance with the customs regula- 
tions of the country of destination. 

Article VII. 

Each country shall retain to its own use, the whole of the postages, registra- 
tion and delivery fees, it collects on said packages ; consequently, this Conven- 
tion will give rise to no separate accounts between the two countries. 

Article VI II. 

1. The packages shall be considered as a component part of the mails ex- 
changed direct between the United States of America and the Republic of Costa 
Rica, to be despatched by the country of origin to the other at its cost and by 
such means as it provides, in ordinary mail sacks to be marked ** Parcels Post " 
and to be securely sealed with wax or otherwise as may bcr mutually provided 
by regulations hereunder. 

2. Each country shall return to the despatching office by next mail, all bags 
or sacks used in the exchange of parcels. 

3. Although articles admitted under this Convention will be transmitted as 
aforesaid between the exchange offices, they should be so carefully packed as to 
be safely transmitted in the open mails of either country, both in going to the 
exchange office in the country of origin and to the office of address in the 
country of destination. 

c R 9 



130 



COSTA RICA. 



4. Each despatch of a parcels post mail must be accompanied by a descriptive 
list in duplicate, of all the packages sent, showing distinctly the list number of 
each parcel, the name of the sender, the name of the addressee with address of 
destination; and must be enclosed in one of the sacks of such despatch under 
the Form of Form 3, annexed hereto. 

Article IX. 

Exchanges of mails under this Convention shall, until otherwise mutually 
agreed upon, be effected through the Exchange Post Offices at New Orleans 
and Port Limon, under such regulations relative to the details of the exchanges 
as may be mutually determined to be essential to the security and expedition of 
the mails and the protection of the Customs Revenues. 

Article X. 

1. As soon as the mail shall have reached the exchange office of destination, 
that office shall check the contents of the mail. 

2. In the event of the Parcel Bill not having been received, a substitute should 
at once be prepared. 

3. Any errors in the entries on the Parcel Bill which may be discovered, shall, 
after verification by a second officer, be corrected and noted for report to the 
despatching office on a Form, ** Verification Certificate," which shall be sent in 
a special envelope. 

4. If a parcel advised on the bill be not received, after the non-receipt has 
been verified by a second officer the entry on the bill should be canceled and the 
fact reported at once. 

5. Should a parcel be received in a damaged or imperfect condition, full par- 
ticulars shall be reported on the same form. 

6. If no " Verification Certificate " or note of error be received, a parcel mail 
shall be considered as duly delivered, having been found on examination cor- 
rect in all respects. 

Article XI. 

If the packages cannot be delivered as addressed, or if they are refused they 
should be reciprocally returned without charge, directly to the despatching office 
of exchange, at the expiration of thirty days from their receipt at the office of 
destination, and the country of origin may collect from the sender for the return 
of the parcel, a sum equal to the postage when first mailed. 



COSTA RICA. 131 

Article XII. 

The Post Office Department of either of the contracting countries will not be 
responsible for the loss or damage of any package, and no indemnity can con- 
sequently be claimed by the sender or addressee in either country. 

Article XIII. 

The Postmaster General of the United States of America, and the Director 
General of Posts of the Republic of Costa Rica, shall have authority to jointly 
make such further regulations of order and detail, as may be found necessary to 
carry out the present Convention from time to time; and may by agreement 
prescribe conditions for the admission to the mails of any of the articles prohib- 
ited by Article II. 

Article XIV. 

This Convention shall be ratified by the contracting countries in accordance 
with their respective laws, and its ratification shall be exchanged at the City of 
Washington as early as possible. Once ratified, and its ratifications exchanged, 
it shall take effect, and operations thereunder shall begin within thirty days after 
the exchange, and shall continue in force until terminated by mutual agreement, 
but may be annulled at the desire of either Department, upon six months pre- 
vious notice given to the other. 

Done in duplicate, and signed at Washington the 4th day of January, one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

[l. s.] Jno. Wanamaker, 

Postmaster- General of the United States of America, 
[l. s.] Federico Vouo, . 

Encargado de Negocios ad interim de la 
Rep^blica de Costa Rica. 

The foregoing Parcels Post Convention between the United States of Amer- 
ica and the Republic of Costa Rica, has been negotiated and concluded with my 
advice and consent, and is hereby approved and ratified. 

In testimony whereof* I have caused the Great Seal of the United States to 
be hereunto affixed. 

[Great Seal of U. S.] Bbnj. Harrison. 

By the President : 

James G. Blaine, 

Secretary of State. 

Washington, D. C, March 27, 1890. 



132 COSTA RICA. 

The undersigned, John Wanamaker, Postmaster-General of the United States, 
of America, and Federico Volio, charg6 d'affaires ad interim of the Republic 
of Costa Rica at Washington, having met together in the Post office Depart- 
ment for the purpose of exchanging the ratifications of the Parcels Post Conven- 
tion concluded between the United States of America, and the Republic of Costa 
Rica, and signed at Washington on the 4th day of January, 1890, and having 
carefully compared the ratifications of said Convention, and found them exactly 
conformable to each other, the exchange took place this day in the usual form. 

In witness whereof they have signed the present protocol of exchange, and 
have affixed thereto the seals of their arms. 

Done at Washington this first day of April one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety. 

[Seal of Post office Dep. of U. S.] Jno. Wanamaker, 

Postmaster General of the United States of America, 

[Seal of Costa Rican Legation.] Fedekico Vouo, 

Encargado de Negocios ad interim dc la Republica de Costa Rica, 



COSTA RICA. 

Form No. i. 
Parcels Post, 



133 



4 parcel addressed as under has been posted here this day. 










Office 
stamp. 
















This certificate is given to inform the sender of the posting of a parcel, and does not 
indicate that anj liability in respect of such parcel attaches to the Postmaster General. 



Date 

Stamp. 



Form No. 2. 
Parcels post between the United States and Costa Rica, 

FORM OF CUSTOMS DECLARATION. 



Place to 
which the 
parcel is ad- 
dressed. 



Description 
of parcel: 
[State wheth- 
er box, bas- 
ket, bag,etc.] 


Contents. 


Value. 


Per 
cent. 


Total 
customs 
chaiges. 




Total. 


% 




« 


% 




$ 



Date of posting: , 18 . . ; signature and address of sender \ 

^^* For use of Post Office only, and to be filled up at the office of exchange. 
Parcel Bill No ; No. of rates prepaid ; Entry No 



^34 



COSTA RICA- 

Form No. 3. 



Date stamp of 

the United 

States Post. 

Office. 



Parcels from the United States far Costa Rica, 



Date stamp of 

the Costa 

Rica Posi 

Office. 



Parcel Bill No dated. . . . 18. . ; per S. S. ". . . 



♦Sheet No 



o 
c 



Origin of parcel. 



Name of addressee. 



Address of parcel. 



Remarks. 



When more than one sheet is required for the entry of the parcels sent by the mail, 
it will be sufficient if the undermentioned particulars are entered on the last sheet of 
the Parcel Bill. 

lbs. 

♦Total number of parcels sent by the ♦ Total weight of mail 

mail to Costa Rica 

♦Number of boxes or other receptacles ♦Deduct weight of receptacles 

forming the mail 

Signature of dispatching officer at the ♦ Net weight of mail 

United States Post-Office 

Signature of receiving officer at Costa Rica Post-Office. 



Appendix C. 

MERCANTILE DIRECTORY. 



ALAJUELA. 
Banks and bankert. 

Banoo de Coata Bica. 

CiOa de Ahorroa. 

Ci^a de Deacnentoa. 

Sacnraal del Banco Ani^a 
Cofu grower* and exporttrt , 

Alfaro, Pedro. 

Cananza, la. de. 

Gonziilez, Deodono. 

Montealegre Sc Co. 

Montenegro, Florentfna 

Sandoval, ManaeL 

Soto, Jesus. 

Soto,Jos6M. 

Soto, Manriltio. 

Tonmon ic Co. 

Vasco, Jo86 L. 
Druffgittt. 

Cortes & Padilla. 

Ooampo, Gabriel JoaA 

Bala, Pompilio. 

Silva,OotaTio. 
Oroc&riet and provisiotu, 

Alvarez, Magdaleno. 

Arana, Procopio. 

Ardon, Apolina. 

Cagigal, Cayetano. 

Calvo Sc Sobrino. 

Cairo, Alfredo. 

Calvo, Juan. 

Calvo, M. Santlaga 

Frutos,Jos6D. 

Moya Sc hermanos. 

Pas, Manuel de la. 

Bozabal, Bartoloui6. 

Sandoval, Jos6 Maria. 

Sib^ja, S. &, FemAndea. 

Sib^a, Martinez Joaq. 

Soto, Maiirilio. 



ALAJmSLA—Continned. 

GroeerUi and prooMona— Continued. 
Vargas, J. M. 
Tillegas, Artnro. 

ImpcrUrt qf dry goodt. 
Aliisro, Pedro. 
Ardoil, Bodolfo. 
Barquero, Ignaoio. 
Blanco, Martin. 
Calvo Sc Sobrino. 
Jinesta, Soto Franoiaoo. 
Lopes, MigneL 
Sandoval, Manuel. 
Soto Sc Sihaia. 

Jietail gvMraH inerthantM. 
Acosta, Paulino. 
Alfsro&Co. 
Barquero, Ignaoio. 
Blanco, Martin. 
Bonilla, Bioardo. 
Calvo, Anselmo. 
• Cagigal, Cayetano. 
Erutos, Jos6 Doloiea. 
Gonzalez, Jos6. 
G6mez, Luis. 
Guell, Santiago. 
Herrera, Vicente. 
L6pes, LigueL 
Odubert, P. 
Buiz, Espiritu Santo. 
UmaAa, Jos6 C. 
Vargas, Eugenic. 
Vargas, J. M. 

Wht^ewU import and export mmxikanU, 
Arana, Procopio. 
Montenegro, Florentino. 
Sandoval, Manuel. 
Soto, Francisco J. 
Soto, Jos6 MunueL 

135 



136 



COSTA RICA. 



A8EBB1 



Druggi&L 

Badilla, Joaquin. 



ATEHAfl. 

DruggitL 

EsqnlTal, G-aillernKK 
ImporUr, 

BaJm, Gerouimo. 
BetaU general merchantt. 

AiiM, Pedro B. 

YenkiB, Juan. 

CABTAOa 

Bankt and bankere. 

Banco Anglo Co8tarric«nsflk 

GusmAn. Simedn. 

Jimenes, Manuel J. 
Druggiite. 

Escoto, Juan A. 

Guier, E. A. 

Saenz, EzequieL 
Importert and eaepotiera, 

Aguilar, Raxndn. 

Blanoo, Manuel Y. 

CaTran2a,J. . 

Casa«ola, NicoLU. 

Garcia, J. 

Garcia, M. 

Garcia, Pedro. 

GuxmAn, Simeon. 

Jegel, Guillemia 

Jimenez, M. D. 

Jimenez, F. &. K. 

Jimenez, J. M. 

Morales, BafaeL 

Pachero, J. 

Peralta, Bernardino. 

PeralU d& Co., Meatre. 

Pinto, J. F. 

Rodriguez, Juan. 

Rojas, Mercedes J. 

Trojo,Bam6n. 

Tpoyo &. Co. 
Betail general meretuinU^ 

Alvarado, Pmdenuio. 

Avendafio, Juan. 

Casasola, Nicolte. 

Centeno, Kigobeito. 

Coto, Yalorio. 

Li, AUan. 

Pacheco, Eufrasia 

Bodrignez, Juan. 

Z6fiiga, Tobias. 



DE8AMPASAD08. 

Druggiet. 

TJrefia, Isidro. 
lietail general merehanU, 

Cruz, Antonio. 

Iloree, Antonio. 

Gaiela,Joaqain. 

6BECIA. 

Oofee grewera and ezporUrt. 

£8clante,M. 

Fernandez, P. D. 

Qnezada, Bam6n. 
MerehanU, exporUra. 

Maroto, Esteban. 

Maroto & Co. 

Quezada, Bamdn. 

Vegi^D. 
Merehantt, imporUrt. 

Ellinger & hermanos, Lnia. 

Fernandez, Pio J. 

Cloth numt^facturera. 

Troyo, J. Ram^n. 

Velarde, Fe<lerico. 
Chffee growera and exporUre, 

Carazo, F. 

Lizano hermanos. 

Lizano, Joaquin. 

Mora,M. 

Morales, Briulio. 

Ortiz, Paulino. 

Tr^os hermanos. 
DniggUU. 

Flores, M. J. 

Flores, Juan F. 

Zamora, Juliin. 
Importer* and exportera and whoUeaU 

Chaverria, MauueL 

ChaTerri, Mariano. 

Flores & Morales. 

Lizano, Joaquin. 

Morales, BrAullo. 

Moya,F.J. 

Ortiz y biljo, Paulino. 

Pacheco y hermana 

Pasapera, JSalvador. 

Bivera, Manuel 

Bosabal, Amado. 

Torres, Juan M. 

Tr^os hermanos. 

Xnioa & Zamora. 

Zamora, Jos^ Maria. 

Zamora, ManueL 



COSTA RICA. 



137 



HEREDIA— Continned. 



BetaU general merehantt, 
Arguedas, Bam^n. 
Femindes, Fernanda 
Ortis, Paalino. 
P6rez, Franciaco. 



TiTBKRTA. 

DruggUl. 

Acufia, Jnan. 

Alvarado, Bodolfo. 

Sqjas, Toribio. 
Retail general merchante, 

Bolirar.Matiaa. 

Rivera, BafkeL 

Santoa, Salvador. 

VaUf^Joa, Matilda. 

uml6b. 

Commieiion merehanU. 

Brown, Agencia. 

Taylor, T. L. 

Wichman, Lais. 
Importert and eccportert and whoUeaU nMroAante. 

Brown, A. E* 

CompaAia de Agendas. 

Kcitb, Minor C. 

Laprade, Leon S. 

Lindo, Aug. A. 

Taylor, W. 

Unckles, V. 
Retail general merehanta. 

Aguay, Sara, 

Amado, Elisa. 

Dohaney, Sofia. 

Miller, A. C. 

Silbano, EUaa. 

KABAHJO. 

l>rvggUt9 and retail general merohantt. 
Chlnchia, Antonio. 
Hidalgo, Joa6. 
SanoheZf J086 Maria. 

HICOTA. 

Druggiete and retail general merehantt. 
BamoB, Gnadalnpe. 
Sanchez, Manuel G*. 

FUNTABEKAS. 

Bankt. 

Banco Kacional. 

Banco Anglo Coatarrioensa. 



FUHTABEFAS— Continued. 

Commieeion merehante. 

Brenes, Miguel. 

Eaqnivel, Arturo. 

Esquivel A, Co., F. 

Gil Mayorga, Franciaco. 

Bomagoaa, Juan £. 

Bohnnoaer, Francisco. 

Zdfiiga, Dario. 
I>ruggiete. 

Bienee, Miguel. 

Sarmiento, Ignacio. 

Toledo, Nasario. 
Oroeert. 

Alvarez, Petra. 

Castillo, Martin. 

Cortes, Jos6. 

Darce, Silvestra. 

McAdam, J. 

Mora, Dolores C. de. 

Kufiez, Encamaoidn. 

Sanchez, Narcisa. 
Importert and eaapwUfre and teAolMa2« merehanU, 

Bracket!, Eugene A. 

Brenea, Miguel. 

Bustos, Antonio. 

Clavera, Francisco. 

Compa&ia de Agendaa. 

Cruz, Franciaco. 

Bent, Bafael. 

Duprat, J. 

Esquivd y Vega. 

Harley, Peter. 

Herrero & Co., Q. 

Jenkins, Juan. 

Lizano y Hno. 

McAdam, John. 

Man, Chong, Sing ic Co. 

Mata, Juan Bta. 

Mencia. In6s Sra. 

Pefia iL Co., N. 

Bios, Juan. 

Bohrmoser, F. 

Bohrmoser Sl Bevelo. 

Sufiol, Juan. 

Walle, S. De. 

Wing, Chong, Sing & Co. 
Bxta\X getiertU merehantt. 

Baldonado, Bain6n. 

Darce, Silvestre. 

Diaz, J086. 

EUis, Janny. 

Figueroa, Anibal. 
SUreremitht. 

Barraeta, Francisco. 

Marroquin, Manuel. 



t38 



COSTA RICA. 



FUNTASEKAB— Oontinned. 



Special marnvfe^^wrtn. 

Angalo, Jo86, tortoiBe-sheU goods. 

Andinuy, Manael^ tortoise-shell goods. 

Castro, Mercedes, salt. 

Conde, Job6 A. 

Flores, Jos6, salt. 

Guevara, Juan, salt. 

Marroquin, Manuel, tortoise-shell goods. 

Mora, Petronila, salt. 

Obando, Koque, salt. 

Ramiree, Jorge, salt. 

Rodrigues, Rafael, salt. 

Salas, Melchor, salt. 

Yillalobos, FeUciano, salt. 

SAH JOS^ 

Bantt and banker^. 

Uanco Anglo-Costarrioeme. 

Banco de Costa Rica. 

Banco de la Unidn. 

Banco Nacional. 

Collado, A. 

Crus, Antonio. 

EHquivel, Aniceto. 

Harrison, Percy G. 

Hem&ndes, Juan. 

I^e Laohenr, Dent & Co. 

Mora Sc Co., Juan C. 

Ortnfio, Caspar. 

Peralta, Francisco. 

Rohrmoeer, Ernest. 

Rojaa, Juan. 

Tinoco & Co. 
Breweriet. 

l)eugo, Manuel Y. 

Richmond, Gregorlo. 

BookteUera and ttationert, 

liines, Vicente. 

Molina, Guillermo. 

Montero, Joaquin. 

M()rrel y Ca. 

UreQa, Sixto A. 
Ck>mini*Hon merehatUt. 

Bennett, Jaime. 

Calvo, Rafael Fouseca. 

Kcheverria, FranciMco. 

Eoheverria, Santiago Q. 

¥ieU\, W. J. 

Lujan A: MontealegTB. 

Mendoz, Jenaro Castro. 

PiHS, Beujnmin. 

Price, D. C. 

Ross, J. Jaime. 

Sbarpe, Cecil. 

Villafranca hennanos. 



8AK JOSk — Continaed. 



DruggUtt. 

Bansen, Mazimiliano. 

Botica de San Joe6. 

Carballo, Florentine. 

Calder6n, Manuel. 

Carranza, Bruno. 

Burin &. Xn&ez. 

Hermann &. Zeledon. 

Iglettias, Pedro. 

Jimenez, Mariano. 
. Macis, NicoUs. 

Kufiez Jim6nez, Fraaciaoo. 

Quezada, Francisco. 

Rojas, Elias. 

Rojas y Soto. 

Rucabado, Jenaro. 

Saso, Mauricio. 

Salazar, Miguel. 

Sllva, Carlos J. de. 

Valverde, P. J. 

Zeled6n, Jo86 C. 
Engraven and teulptan, 

Baldomero, Llela. 

Blanco, Cruz. 

M6rida, RafaeL 

Sanches, RafaeL 
Exporten qf cqfee. 

Alfaro, J. 

Alvarade, Santiago. 

Bennett, Jaime G. 

Calsamiglia, B. 

Coronado, Jos6 Andres. 

Cnbero & Echandi. 

Dent, Teresa. 

Duran, Joa6. 

E^'heverria, Juana A. de. 

Elliuger & Hno. 

Esquivel, A. 

Esquivel, Fabian. 

Esquivel, M. N. 

Gallardo, A. & F. 

Garcia, Jos^ M. 

GonzAlez, Alberto. 

Herran & Hno. 

Hernandez, Juan. 

Jim6nez, A. E. 

Jimenez, Lesmes. 

Keith & Tinoco. 

Lt\)An. Manuel. 

Mata, Juan R. 

Millet, F. N. 

Montealegre, M. L. 

P6ralta, F. 

Piza, Julio. 

Santiago, FederloL 

Sohroeter Sc Co.. O. von. 



COSTA RICA. 



139 



SAH JOCnfc— Continued. 

Exportert qf eojfe^— Continued. 

Sharpe, Cecil. 

Toumon &. Co.. Hto. 

Vargas, M. Jos^. 
Sundries. 

Deugo, Manuel V. 

Fundicidn de San Joa6. 

KoAH & Morales. 
iSroeerg. 

Almuella, AgUHtln. 

Alvarado, Eleodoro. 

Alvarado, Julio. 

Andr68, Marcel i no. 

Arana, Tel^sforo. 

Ard6n, Paulino. 

Artavia, Jos6. 

Azcona, Bibiana. 

Cagigalf Francisco. 

Calvo, Maria Manuel*. 

Carvi^al Jimenez, Teodoro. 

CaiMMola, Rafael. 

Caatro, Bartolo. 

Escalaute y Hno. 

Ijlorea, Francisco. 

Frias, J086. 

Fuentes, Gregorio. 

ixarbanso, Salvador. 

Ouilldn, Bafael. 

Gntierres, Coucci)ci6n C. d6. 

Gutierrez, Yainuirio. 

Hidalgo, Joa6. 

Hurtado, Pedro. 

Inoera, Isidro. 

Xara, Fermina. 

Leiva, Apolonio. 

Xiquidano, Laureano. 

Ldpes, Fdix. 

X6pez, Bosendo. 

Martin, Al^o. 

Marques, Abraham. 

Millet, Miguel, 

Mox^e, Gregorio. 

Mora, Josd. 

Mora, Ignacio. 

Mora, J. M. 

Moya, Ledn. 

Miifioz, Ramdn. 

Navarro, Ciro. 

Odio, lamael. 

Pag68, Cafias & Co. 

Palacios, J086. 

Paniagua, MigueL 

P6rez, Sebastian. 

Peraza, J086. 

Price, David C. 

Prada y GonzAlec. 



8AK JOSti— Continued. 
(7roeer«— Continued. 

Salasar, Filadelfo. 

Solano, Agustin. 

Solas, Agustin. 

Soborio, Napoledn. 

Solano, Joad Maria. 

Subaldia, Carlos. 

Vals, Pedro. 

Vicente, Eusebio. 

Villavicencio, Rodolf6. 
natters. 

Antilldn, Francisco. 

Ksquivel, Jos^. 

Esqnivel, Alberto. 

YeigaLdpez, M. 
Hardware and toolt, 

ArgHello, M. 

Carazo, Manuel. 

Cubero, Jesus. 

Benty Ca. 

Lahmann, Fedo. 

Morell y Ca. 

Mufios, Jos6. 
Importerg qf drufft, 

Bansen, Br. Max. 

Dnran Sc Nufiez. 

Hermann A. Zeledon. 

Soto & Ginstiuiani. 

Rojas, Elias. 

Valverde, Dr. Panfilo. 
Importers qf dry goods. 

Alfaro, J. 

Calsamigliu, B. 

Castro, Teodosio. 

Coronado &. Hno. 

Cubero &. Ecbandi. 

Eliinger Sc Hno., Luis. 

Goicochea Sc Co., F. 

Hemdndez, Juan. 

Herrero & Co., G. 

Knolir, Juan. 

Levskowicz Sc b\{o. 

Muiioz & Acostas. 

S5chroet«r 6c Co., O, von. 

StoiuMorth Sc Co., W. 

Troyo Sc Co., J. R. R. 

Weidel Sc Veiga. 
[mportsrs qf hard wars. 

Biadway, "Wm. 

Lalunann, F. H. 

Macaya Sc Rodriguei. 

Morrell Sc Co. 
Importers qf provisions, 

Atmuella, Agustin. 



140 



COSTA RICA. 



SAH JOSi— Continued. 

Importer* e(f provinons— Continued. 
Benedictis, G. 
Brad way &, Co. 
Escalante Sc Hernio. 
Eaquivel &. Cafiaa. 
Esqnivel St, Grarvanzo. 
Morrell Sl Co., Arthur. 
Pag68 &, Cafiaa. 
Perez & Co., S. 
Ortuno & Co. 
Rodrigaez & Maoaya. 
Soley, Antonio. 
Terrte, Pedro. 
Tr^fofl & Co. 

Import and export and tohoUedU msrvhanU. 
Adiego, Mignel. 
Alandete & PradiUa. 
Alfaro & Co. 
Bansen, M. 
Benedictis, G. d6. 
Berry, James. 
Bradway, 6. 
Calsamiglia, Bartolomdi 
CalTO, Manuel M. 
Castro, Teodosio. 
Carranza, Bruno. 
CoUado, Adrian. 
Cubero 6 h^os. 
Dent, LeLacheur A Co, 
Dent & Co., K. \V. 
Denne, H. A. 
Durin, Joa^. 
Duprat & Co., F. 
Echevorria, Juan P. 
Ellinger &. hermano, Luii. 
Esqnivel, INarciso. 
Esquivel Sc Cafiaa. 
Facio, Jnsto A. 
Fernandez y Tristan. * 

Field &Co., W.J. 
Fonseca, Mariano. 
Goicochea Sc Co. 
Gutierrez, EzequieL 
Hernandez, Juan. 
Herrera y Ca., G. 
Jager, J. 
Jimenez, A. E. 
Jimenez, Roberto. 
Joumon & Co., H. J. 
Keith, M. C. 
Knohr, Juan. 
Lahmann, F. 
Lara, Salvador. 
Levskowicz, Isidro. 
Levskowicz & Son, J. 
Lizano y hermano. 



8AK JOS^Continued. 

Import and eaBportandtokoUtalemerhanta—Cant'^. 

Jjuian. & Montealegre. 

Macaya y Bodriguez. 

Mata, Juan R. 

Mata &, Jjojtm. 

Melgarejo, Antonio G. 

Menendez, C. 

Millet, J. Napoledn. 

Monastel, Cleto. 

Montealegre, FranciHco. 

Montealegre, Mariano. 

Morrell St, Co. 

Montealegle St hermano. J. U. 

Mufioz Sc Acosta. 

Kaut6 Mauricio. 

Ortufio, Caspar. 

Pag6s, Cafias ic Co. 

Peralta, Francisco. 

Piza St Co. 

Bobles, M. A. 

Rohnnoser, Francisca 

Rohrmoser St, Co., £. 

Ross, Robert. 

Rudd, Harrison N. 

Saoripanti, Jos6. 

Sohroeter St Co., Otto von. 

Steinworth & Co., W. 

Terras, Pedro. 

Toumon & Co., H. 

Thompson &, Co., Gmo. 

Trejos y Aquilar. 
Troyo & Co., J. R. R. 
TJribe St Batalla. 
Vella & Co., Felice. 
Victor y Hoey. 
ViUafhinca, FranoiaoOb 
V£Uafranca hermanoa. 
Villafiranca, Rafael B. 
Wencealao de la Guardia. 
Wingfleld, Riohaid. 
Witting, Gmo. 
FhotograpJtsr*. 

Calder6n, Prospero. 
Rndd, H. N. 
Yaliente y MarichaL 
Zamora, Fernando. 
E*taU general merehants. 
Alfaro St Co., T. 
Atmella, Augustin. 
. Audrain, Constant 
Audrain, Leoncio. 
Bradway, Guillermo. 
Cabello, Francisco. 
Carazo, Sefiorltis. 
Chavarria, Lucas. 
Carranza, Manuel J. 



COSTA RICA. 



141 



8AK J08E->Contmued. 
detail general merehante—Ckmiimiodi. 
Carrasco, Bodrip:o. 
Carruco, Tom&s. 
Cagigal, Francisco. 
Cardona Si heriuuno, A. 
Cerlain, C. 
Cepa, Abelardo. 
CoTouado y hennano. 
Oiibero 6 hyos, J. J. 
Day, Carlos. 
Darin, Jos6. 
£lizondo, Procopio. 
Esqnivel, J086. 
EsqulTel, Arturo. 
EsqalTel, Narciso. 
Esqnivel, Roberto. 
EsquJvelf Alberto. 
Escalanto y hennano. 
Florea, Francitico. 
•Goicoechea & Co., F. 
Gonzalez, Pedro. 
Gutierrez, Itosario. 
Herrera ic Co., Gorgonio. 
Hartado, Pedro. 
Incera, Isidro. 
I^ahmann, Federico. 
Landerer, Pablo. 
. Leiva, Apolonlo. 
Levskowicz 6 hSjo, J. 
Marqnez, Abraham. 
Jklonstol, Cleto. 
Maacael, Manuel, 
liena y hermano, MigaeL 
MiUet, Miguel. 
Moya, Le6n. 
Montealegre y Caraso. 
-Odio. Ismael. 
Quezada, Francisco. 
<^iroz, J. Tedorico. 
Sawson, Dolores Q.do. 



SAH JOSE— Continned. 

Retail general mercAante— Continued. 
Uribe y Batalla. 
Ylllavicencio, Bodolfo. 
Vicente, Estanislao. 
Yeiga, Manuel. 

SilveremWu. 

C6rdoTa, Jos6. 

Jardin, Arenclo. • 

Sojo, Santana. 

Valle, Andr6z deL 
Watehmakert and jetoelerg, 

Antillon, Sotero. 

Garda, Y enancio A. 

Siebe, Luis. 

Saenz, Adolfo. 

SoJo, Santa Ana. 

Soto y Bamires. 

8AK BAM6H. 

Druggitts and retail general merehamU. 
Guerrero, Manuel Maria. 
Jurado, R. B. 
Miranda, Yaleiiano. 
Lobos, Budeoindo. 
Bodriguez, Luis. 
Urrutia, Pedro. 

SAHTO DOUDTGO. 

Druggiete €md retail general merehanie. 
Chacdn, Job6 B. 
Flores, Juan. 

TBE8 BIOS. 

Druggiete and retail general merohantt. 
Garcia, Pedro A. 
Mora, Juan A. 
Paoheco, Euirado, 
Bojas, Alejandro. 
Z^iga, Tobias. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Agricultural resources 32 

Alajuela, list of merchants 135 

Alajuela, province, description of. 20 

American colony 84 

Animal statistics 45 

Area of the Republic 4 

Artisans, demand for 47 

Aserri, list of merchants 136 

Atenas, list of merchants 136 

Atlantic coast, ports on 5 

Atlantic Ocean, rivers emptying 

into 7 

B. 

Banana, cultivation of 36 

exportation of 37 

plantation, estimate of expen- 
ses 39 

profits of raising 39 

shipping (illustration) 40 

BellaVistaSpring,analysis of water. 19 

Bibliographical notes 88 

Bolivar,description of Costa Rica by 2 

Boundary treaties and controversies 4 

Bread fruit tree (illustration) 24 

British official reports on Costa Rica 89 

Buena Vista colony 83 

Business methods 71 

C. 

Cable communication 78 

Canal. {Sfg Interoceanic Canal.) 

Cantons, division into 11 

Capitals of provinces 9 



Page. 

Cartago, list of merchants 136 

province, description of 18 

Cattle-raising 44 

Central America, United Provinces 

of, formed 2 

Central and South American Com- 
missioners, report of, on tem- 
perate lands 13 

report on trade relation by 49 

reciprocity propositions to, by 
the minister of foreign rela- 
tions 57 

Central Park, San Jos6 (illustra- 
tion) 56 

Cities, descriptions of 16 

! Climate, description of 12 

j Cold lands, products of 13 

j Cocoa, cultivation of 41 

Coco Island, German colony 84 

Coffee berr>' (illustration) 32 

cost of raising 34 

drying (illustration) 36 

introduction of 32 

method of cultivation 33 

patio (illustration) 34 

preparation for market 35 

prices of 35 

statistics of crops 34 

yield of 34 

Coins, in use 71 

Colombia, disputed boundary with. 4 

Colonies, description of 82 

Colonists, allowances to 82 

Columbus, discovery of Costa Rica 

by I 

143 



144 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Comarcas and their capitals 9 

Commerce, classification of imports 

of, 1890 53 

exports for 1890, by articles 55 

exports for 1890, by countries. 52 

im ports from the United States . 49 
requirements for invoices and 

manifests 55 

steamship lines 5i» 79 

tariff duties 93 

Commercial Directory 135 

Congress, powers and constitution 

of 66 

Constitutional provisions 65 

Consular reports on Costa Rica ... 88 

Com, cultivation of 43 

Costa Rican Loan,Trust and Coloni- 
zation Bank, concessions to 85 

Cotton, cultivation of 43 

Country house (illustration) 46 

Courts, constitution of 68 

number of 11 

system of 67 

Cuban colony 83 

D. 

Debt, national, amount of 70 

Desamparados, list of merchants . . 136 

Diplomatic representatives 74 

Discover}' of Costa Rica by Colum- 
bus I 

Drying coffee (illustration) 36 

Duties on imports 93 

Election proceedings 65 

Entrance to Los Quemados mine 

(illustration) 25 

Executive mansion (illustration) . . 10 

powers 66 

Exports by countries, 1890 52 

to the United States for 1889, 

classified 50 

for five years 50 

Foreign commerce 49 

Poreigners, number of 10 



P«|rfL 

Foreigners, settlement of lands by. . 81 

Forests, description of 28 

Freight transportation 51 

Fruit culture 44 

G. 

Garden scene (illustration) 43 

Geographical features 4 

German colony 84 

Gold mines 23 

Government house (illustration) ... 60 

Governors under Spanish rule .... 86 

Grand Hotel, San Jos6 (illustration). 52 

Grecia, list of merchants 136 

Guanacaste province, description of 21 

Guardia, Vicente, concessions to.. 85 

Guatemala, Costa Rica a province of 2 

Gussler, August, concessions to. . . 84 

H. 

Heredia, list of merchants 136 

Heredia province, description of. . 20 

Historical notes 86 

Hot lands, productions of 12 

I. 

Illustrations : 

Map of Costa Rica Frontispiece. 

Crater of Volcano Irazu 4 

Crest of Volcano Ira»u 6 

Executive mansion, San Jos6. 10 

Orchid, *' Queen of the Night " 14 

Native musicians 18 

Port Limon 20 

Mining camp 23 

Entrance to Los Quemados 

mine 25 

Bread fruit tree 23 

Coffee berry 32 

Coffee patio 34 

Drying coffee 36 

Shipping bananas 40 

Garden scene 42 

Country house near the Vol- 
cano Irazu 46 

Grand Hotel 52 

Central Park, San Jos6 56 



INDEX. 



145 



Page. 

Illustrations — Continued. 

Government house 60 

Pier at Puntarenas 68 

Students of Young Ladies' Sem- 
inary 72 

Ox-shoeing 76 

A *' ready-made " house 80 

La Merced church 86 

Wholesale store 93 

Immigrations, advantages for 80 

Import duties 93 

Instruction, system of 72 

Interoceanic Canal, Ayon-Chev- 

alier, contract for." 6i 

Cirdenas-Menocal contract 62 

explorations for 59 

Belly concessions 61 

preliminary concessions for.. 3 

survey for, by Andreas Oersted 3 

tables of distances saved by. . 63 

Zavala-Frelinghuysen treaty. . . 61 

Zeled6n-Menocal contract 62 

Invoices, requirements of 55 

Irazu crater (illustration) 4 

crest of (illustration) 6 

highest volcano 6 

J. 

Jimenez, Odil6n, concessions to. . . 
Judicial tribunals 

La Merced church (illustration) . . . 
Lands. {Sfe Public Lands.) 

Liberia, list of merchants 

Limon, city, list of merchants 

Limon comarca, description of ... . 

Liquor monopoly 

List of merchants 

Lumberbusiness, estimate of profits 
in 

Machado y Pinto, Jos6, concessions 

to 

Mails, exchange of parcels with 

United States 

number of post-offices 

c R 10 



85 
67 

86 

137 

137 

22 

48 

135 

31 



85 

127 

78 



rage. 

Manifests, requirements of 55 

Manufacturing industries 46 

Map of Costa Rica Frontispiece. 

Matina River colony 83 

Medicinal plants 28 

Merchants, list of 135 



Meteorology 

Mineral resources 

Mines, table of 

Mining camp (illustration). 

laws 

Money in circulation 

Mountain ranges 

Municipal governments 



15 
23 

25 
25 
26 
70 
6 
67 



N. 



Name of Costa Rica first officially 

given I 

Naranjo, list of merchants 137 



70 

18 
7 

79 

79 
4 



62 



8 



National debt, amount of 

Native musicians (illustration) 

Navigable rivers 

New Orleans, steamship communi- 
cation with 

New York, steamship communica- 
tion with 

Nicaragua, disputed boundry with. 

Nicaragua canal. (5>^ Interoceanic 
Canal.) 

Nicaragua Canal Company, conces- 
sions to 

Nicaragua Lake, rivers emptying 
into 

Nicoya, list of merchants 137 

Nicoya Cuban colony 83 

O. 

Occupations of inhabitants 10 

Official publications of Costa Rica. 88 
Ox-shoeing (illustration) 76 

Pacific coast, ports on 5 

Pacific Ocean, rivers emptying into . 7 

Parcels Post Convention 127 

Pearl fishing 46 

Physical and geographical features. 4 

Pico Blanco, highest mountain 6 



146 



INDEX. 



Pier at Puntarenas (illustration). .. 68 

Political divisions 9 

Population . 10 

Port Limon (illustration) 20 

list of merchants 137 

Ports of the Republic 5 

Postage rates 78 

Postal service 77 

exchange of parcels with (he 

United States 137 

Potato, cultivation of 44 

Productions, agricultural 13 

Provinces and their capitals 9 

subdivisions of 11 

Public lands, mode of acquiring . . 81 

preiSmption laws 81 

prices for 81 

Publications, official 88 

Puntarenas City, list of merchants.. . 137 
Puntarenas Comarca, description of 3t 

Puntarenas^pier (illustration) 68 

R. 

Railroad concessions 76 

Rates of postage 78 

Ready-made house (illustration)... 80 
Reciprocity propositions to Central 

American Commissioners. . . 57 

Religion ii, 72 

Republic, formation of 2 

Revenues, sources of 69 

Reynolds's American colony 84 

Reynolds, W. H., concessions to. . 84 

Rivers 6 

Rodriguez colony 85 

S. 

San Bernardo de Talamanca colony. 82 
San Francisco, steamship communi- 
cation with 79 

San Jos6 City, description of 16 

list of merchants 138 

San Jos6 province, description of . 16 

San Ramon, list of merchants 141 

Santo Domingo, list of merchants. . 141 

School statistics 72 



P««e^ 
Schroeder, John, report on forests 

by 29 

Seasons, extent of 14 

Shipping bananas (illustration) 40 

requirements of invoices and 

manifests 55 

Spain, independence from, secured . 2 

Steamship communication 79 

lines 51 

Students of Young Ladies' Seminary 

(illustration) 72 

Sugar, cultivation of 41 

T. 

Tariff qj 

Taxation, system of 69 

Telegraph facilities 7S 

Telephonic service 78 

Temperate lands, products of 12 

Textile plants, growth of 43 

Tobacco, cultivation of 42 

industry, regulation of 42 

Trade, freedom from restrictions.. 71 

Transportation, system of 76 

Travelers' Guide 79 

Treaties with foreign nations 73 

Tres Rios, list of merchants 141 

XJ. 

United Provinces of Central Amer- 
ica, formation of 2 

United States, exports to Costa Rica 

from, for six years 49 

steamship communications 

with 77 

V. 

Vegetables, growth of 43 

Villafranca, Richard, estimate for 

a banana plantation by 39 

Volcanoes 6 

W. 

Wheat, cultivation of 43 

Y. 
Young Ladies' Seminary (illustra- 
tion) 73 



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