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Full text of "Bulletin, Admissions Catalog"














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Appalachian State University 
Admissions Catalog 



1971-1972 



APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN 
FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 
1971 -1972 




Volume LXVIII 



BOONE, NORTH CAROLINA 

28607 

Number 4 



June, 1970 



Published quarterly by Appalachian State University. Entered as second-class matter at the 
Post Office at Boone, North Carolina, under the act of Congress, August 24, 1912. Postage 
has been paid at Boone, North Carolina. Address corrections to the Office of the Provost, 
Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina 28607. 



NOTE 



It is not intended that this publication should act in lieu of the Appalachian 
State University General Catalog. This Bulletin should function only as a guide 
and source of general information to prospective students. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1971-1972 



FALL QUARTER 1971 



First Faculty Meeting 


Monday 9 A. M. 


August 30 


Orientation of New Faculty 


Monday 1 P. M. 


August 30 


Registration 


Tuesday-Wednesday 


Aug. 31-Spet. 1 


Classes Begin 


Thursday 


September 2 


Classes End 


Wednesday 


November 10 


Reading Day 


Thursday 


November 1 1 


Final Examinations 


Friday-Thursday 


November 12-18 


Thanksgiving Holiday and 






Quarter Break 


End of Exams-Sunday 


November 20-28 


WINTER QUARTER 1971-72 




Registration 


Monday-Tuesday 


November 29-30 


Classes Begin 


Wednesday 


December 1 


Christmas Holiday 


Noon Saturday-Sunday 


December 18- Jan. 2 


Classes Resume 


Monday 


January 3 


Classes End 


Tuesday 


February 22 


Reading Day 


Wednesday 


February 23 


Final Examinations 


Thursday-Wednesday 


Feb. 24-March 1 


Quarter Break 


Thursday-Sunday 


March 2-5 


SPRING QUARTER 1972 




Registration 


Monday-Tuesday 


March 6-7 


Classes Begin 


Wednesday 


March 8 


Easter Holiday 


Thursday 6 P.M .-Monday 


March 30-April 3 


Classes Resume 


Tuesday 


April 4 


Classes End 


Thursday 


May 18 


Reading Day 


Friday 


May 19 


Final Examinations 


Saturday-Thursday 


May 20-25 


Commencement 


Sunday 


May 28 



APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 
CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

To facilitate prompt attention, inquiries should be directed to the following: 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Paul Sanders, Provost 

ADMISSIONS 

C. H. Gilstrap, Director of Admissions 

ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

Robert E. Snead, Director of Alumni Affairs 

ATHLETICS 

Roy Clogston, Director of Athletics 

FINANCIAL AID 

Steve R. Gabriel, Director of Financial Aid 

GENERAL COLLEGE 

O. Kenneth Webb, Dean of the General College 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Gratis D. Williams, Dean of the Graduate School 

HOUSING 

Richard Tickle, Director of Student Housing 

PRESIDENT 
Herbert W. Wey 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Robert T. Allen, Director of Public Relations 

REGISTRATION 

W. Dean Meredith, Registrar 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Braxton Harris, Dean of Student Affairs 

The university telephone number is 264-8871 , area code 704. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

THE UNIVERSITY 9 

Location 9 

Purpose 9 

History 10 

Campus 10 

Organization 11 

Enrollment 11 

ADMISSIONS 13 

Freshman 13, 14 

Transfer 14, 15 

Special 15 

Graduate 15 

Auditors 15 

Procedure 16 

Advanced Placement 16 

Information for Veterans .16,17 

Foreign Students 17 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 19 

Expenses 19 

Refund of Fees 19 

Student Financial Aid 24 

Student Employment Programs 24, 25 

Student Loan Programs 25, 26, 27 

Grants-in-Aid and Special Talent Awards 27, 28 

Scholarships 28, 29, 30 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 31 

Undergraduate Degree Programs 31, 32, 33 

Pre-Professional Programs 33 

Graduate School 34 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps - Army 34 

STUDENT LIFE 35 

Student Government 35 

Standard of Conduct 35 

Student Officers and University Representation 36 

Social and Cultural Activities 36 

Student Publications 37 

Clubs and Professional Societies 37 

Religious Life 37 

Athletics and Intramural Sports 37, 38 

Speech Activities 38 

Musical Activities 38, 39 

University Health Services 39,40 

Student Housing 41, 42, 43 

Motor Vehicles 43 

Post Office 44 

Placement Services 44, 45 

News Bureau 45 

Alumni Association 46 

APPENDIX A 47, 48 

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APPALACHIAN 



I STATE. 
^tlNfVERSlTI 



THE UNIVERSITY 



LOCATION 

Appalachian State University is a part of the system of public higher educa- 
tion of the State of North Carolina. It is located at Boone, county seat of 
Watauga County, North Carolina, on the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains at an 
elevation of 3,333 feet above sea level, the highest elevation of any four year 
college east of the Mississippi River. Situated in an area of great natural beauty, 
near the Blue Ridge Parkway which connects the Shenandoah and the Smokey 
Mountain National Parks, Boone is easily accessible over United States Highways 
221, 321, and 421, which intersect in and lead out from the town. 

PURPOSE 

Within the framework established by the North Carolina State Board of 
Higher Education, Appalachian State University is dedicated to the total 
development of its constituency through instruction, research, and service. 

In pursuit of this purpose, Appalachian pledges itself: 

To nurture an intelligent climate in which truth is sought and respected. 

To provide a liberal education for all its students. 

To offer, within the scope of its programs, pre-professional and professional 
education to those students who desire it. 

To maintain a faculty dedicated to teaching and scholarship. 

To advance the frontiers of knowledge through research. 

To be cognizant of new knowledge and prepared to meet the challenge of 
new ideas. 

To expand cultural horizons and develop appreciation of ethical and aesthetic 
values. 

To make its resources available to the people within its sphere of influence. 

To serve as a force for social improvement. 

To cooperate with all institutions and agencies which are dedicated to the 
betterment of mankind. 



HISTORY 

Appalachian's antecedent, Watauga Academy, was created by its founders, B. 
B. and D. D. Dougherty, to bring educational opportunity to the people of 
North Carolina. Appalachian Training School, created by the General Assembly 
of 1903, was conceived and founded to prepare teachers for an expanding public 
school system, and especially to prepare better teachers for the public schools of 
the isolated section of the northwestern part of the state. Within a little more 
than twenty years Appalachian Training School became Appalachian State 
Normal School and began its involvement in the total complex program of 
public education. 

As the functions of the public schools changed, with the emergence of new 
technologies, and with the rising predominance of industry over agriculture, 
public school education became more diversified in North Carolina. To help 
meet the demand for new and different kinds of teachers for the region, Appala- 
chian evolved from Normal school to Teachers College. The change took place 
officially in 1929, and the institution began to expand its sphere of influence 
into the more populous Piedmont section of the state. During the early 1940's, 
graduate education for teachers was added to the program, and in 1965, Appala- 
chian was authorized to begin the development of the Sixth-year Program for 
school administrators. At the same time the institution abandoned its long-held 
single -purpose concept and developed programs leading to degrees for those not 
wishing to prepare for teaching. 

The 1967 General Assembly of North Carolina changed the status of Appala- 
chian and designated it Appalachian State University. This change brought with 
it additional responsibility. The General Assembly charged Appalachian not only 
with the responsibility for the preparation of public school personnel and of 
offering instruction in the liberal arts and sciences including the preparation for 
the master's degree, but also with a responsibility for programs of research, with 
the responsibility for service to the people within its sphere of influence, and 
with the responsibility for such other programs as are deemed necessary to meet 
the needs of its constituency and of the state. 

Appalachian welcomes these additional responsibilities and pledges itself to 
discharge them with vigor. 



CAMPUS 

The central campus of Appalachian State University covers sixty acres of the 
Blue Ridge Mountains. In addition, the university owns 330 acres of land, not 
immediately adjacent to the central campus, which is being considered for ex- 
pansion of its services. Almost all of the buildings on the central campus are new 
or have been recently renovated. These modern facilities set against the back- 
drop of Rich Mountain and Howard's Knob give Appalachian a physical plant of 
superior utility and beauty. 

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ORGANIZATION 

The functional organization of the university comprises four administrative 
divisions under the general direction of the President and the faculty. The divi- 
sions of Business Affairs and Public Affairs support and facilitate operations of 
the other divisions. The division of Student Affairs includes the Office of the 
Dean of Student Affairs, the Offices of the Deans of Men and Women, the Office 
of Admission, the Office of student Financial Aid, the Student Housing Office, 
the Office of Placement Services, and the University Health Services. 

For purposes of instruction, the division of Academic Affairs is made up of 
the General College, the College of Business, the College of Arts and Sciences, 
the College of Education, the College of Fine and Applied Arts, and the Grad- 
uate School. It also includes the Summer Session, the Library, the Extension 
Division, the Office of the Registrar, and certain auxiliary agencies such as the 
Computer Center and the Audiovisual Center which contribute to the instruc- 
tional and research programs administered by the division of Academic Affairs. 



ENROLLMENT, FALL QUARTER, 1969-1970 

Freshmen 2,1 85 

Sophomores 1 ,370 

Juniors 1 ,204 

Seniors 909 

Special 34 

Graduates 546 

Extension 581 

Total Number Enrolled 6,833 

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ADMISSIONS 



Appalachian State University recognizes its responsibility to render every 
service possible toward the advancement of education. Some people find it 
inconvenient or impossible to enter at the beginning of the academic year. In an 
attempt to be of greater service, Appalachian admits students at the beginning of 
the fall, winter, spring, summer quarter, or either session of summer school. 
Early application is advisable for any student since these applications are con- 
sidered first. 

The university admits applicants whose preparation, ability, interest char- 
acter, and general fitness indicate that they can do successful work. Applicants 
must submit their social security number and, if applicable, their selective service 
number and number and address of their local draft board. 

Out-of-state applicants must meet the same admissions criteria as required of 
North Carolina residents. 

All unmarried freshmen, except for bona fide residents of Boone and vicinity, 
are required to live in university residence halls. Since space is limited, this is a 
factor which must be considered in freshman admissions. 

All correspondence concerning admissions to the university should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions, Appalachian State University, Boone, 
North Carolina, 28607. 



FRESHMAN STUDENTS 

Applicants will be considered for admission to the freshman class upon meet- 
ing the requirements specified below. The phrase "will be considered" means 
that beginning with the 1971-1972 freshman class, the university intends to 
institute an early or selective admissions procedure. In effect, those students 
who have demonstrated the greatest probability of success will be given priority 
in the selection of the freshman class. (Please consult your secondary school 
Guidance Counselor concerning acceptance dates.) 

Our requirements are as follows: 

1 . Graduation from an accredited high school and rank in the upper seventy-five 
per cent of their graduating class. If the applicant is not a high school grad- 
uate, a high school Equivalency Certificate is required. 

2. Satisfactory recommendation by the high school principal and/or guidance 
counselor. 

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3. Presentation of at least two units of high school mathematics (2 units of 
algebra or 1 unit each of algebra and geometry). 

4. Satisfactory scores on the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic 
Aptitude Test. 

This test is required of every applicant for freshman admission and is given in 
November, December, January, March, May, and July. End-of-junior year (in 
high school) scores are used to determine eligibility for freshman admission 
when reported with early applications. It is recommended that the test be 
taken at the end of the junior year of high school and repeated early in the 
senior year of high school. 

A student wishing to take this test should procure an application form from 
his secondary school or should write directly to the College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey, for the Bulletin of Informa- 
tion, which includes an application form and is available without charge. The 
Bulletin lists test centers and gives complete information concerning tests. 

The student must make his own arrangements well in advance of a selected 
testing date so that his application is received in Princeton before the deadline 
for filing applications. 

5. A satisfactory health record. The complete medical history of each applicant 
must be submitted on the medical form supplied by the Admissions Office 
after approval has been given. 

NOTE: Prospective students who have attended an accredited college but who 
have earned less than 45 quarter hours of credit, must meet both fresh- 
man and transfer admission requirements. This means that in addition to 
following procedures for freshmen they must present a transcript show- 
ing an overall "C" average on all college course work attempted. In 
addition, such applicants must be eligible to return to the institution last 
attended. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

1. Students seeking to transfer from other colleges or universities must 
furnish official transcripts of records from all institutions attended. 
These transcripts must show eligibility to return to the institution last 
attended and an overall 2.00 or "C" average on all course work 
attempted. Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited institu- 
tions are evaluated in terms of the curriculum selected at Appalachian. 

2. Junior college graduates must meet the scholastic requirement as listed 
above. 

3. Transfer applicants must meet the same proficiency tests in reading, 

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speech, and written English as required of regular sophomores at Appala- 
chian. 

4. Transfer applicants must submit a satisfactory health record. The com- 
plete medical history of each applicant must be submitted on the medical 
form supplied by the Admissions Office after approval has been given. 

NOTE: Prospective transfer students with less than sophomore standing (45 
quarter hours of earned credit), must meet all entrance requirements for 
freshmen, including satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 
This is in addition to meeting all transfer admission requirements. 

PROSPECTIVE TRANSFER STUDENTS SHOULD REFER TO 
APPENDIX A OF THIS BULLETIN FOR GENERAL EDUCATION 
(FIRST TWO YEARS) REQUIREMENTS AT APPALACHIAN. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

1. Applicants who are mature and who may not meet admission requirements 
but who have a satisfactory record of experience and education may be 
admitted to courses which they may be able to pursue with profit. 

2. Such applicants may be required to present evidence of having earned a 
college degree or evidence of the need for specific courses. Applicants who 
are regularly enrolled students at other institutions may be admitted as 
"visiting" students provided the appropriate official at their institution 
authorizes their attendance at Appalachian, approves the course work 
selected, indicates the individual is in good standing at that institution, and 
otherwise approves the transfer >f credits taken at Appalachian back to that 
institution for degree purposes. At the end of one quarter's work visiting 
students must transfer to Appalachian or withdraw from the university. 

3. Special students who desire to become candidates for a degree from Appala- 
chian must satisfy appropriate admission requirements. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

For admission and graduation requirements, write Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

ADMISSION OF AUDITORS 

1. Students enrolled at the university or students admitted with satisfactory 
records of experience and education may enroll for specific courses as 
auditors with the consent of the Dean of Student Affairs and the instructor 
concerned. 

2. Students who audit courses must register in the Registrar's Office, must be 
regular in attendance, but will not receive grades or credit. 



PROCEDURE 

Students who wish to be considered for admission to the university as fresh- 
men will obtain from the office of the Director of Admissions an application 
packet, consisting of an application form, high school principal's transcript and 
recommendation form, and instructions for completing and submitting these 
forms. 

All application forms are to be accompanied by an application fee of ten 
dollars which is not refundable. 

Applicants should request the Education Testing Service to send results of the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test to the Director of Admissions. 

Students who desire to transfer to Appalachian from another college or uni- 
versity will obtain from the office of the Director of Admissions an application 
packet consisting of an application form, dean of men or dean of women rec- 
ommendation form, and instructions for completing and submitting these forms. 

After all papers have been filed and evaluated, a statement of eligibility for 
admission or a statement of shortages to be removed before admission can be 
approved will be sent to the applicant. 

Instructions for reserving dormitory space will be included in the letter of 
approval sent to each qualified applicant. 

Prior to the date of registration, information such as room assignment, 
opening date, and orientation program will be sent to the students from the 
Dean of the General College. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Appalachian participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Freshmen who have demonstrated their achieve- 
ment on specific College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement 
Tests may have the results submitted to the university for consideration with 
regard to placement in advanced courses and for college credit. Taking these 
tests is optional on the part of the freshman applicant. Freshmen may also 
qualify for advanced placement and credit by being invited (selection is by the 
Director of Admissions) to take departmental tests in their areas of extensive 
specialization during freshman orientation. Based upon these test results, the 
amount and nature of the credit granted is determined by the Committee on 
Academic Policies and Procedures and the pertinent department of instruction. 

INFORMATION FOR VETERANS 

The university is approved for providing training under Public Laws 358, G. I. 
Bill effective June 1966; Public Law 634, the children of deceased or disabled 

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veterans; and Public Law 894, for disabled veterans. APPROVAL FROM THE 
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION SHOULD BE RECEIVED BY THE STU- 
DENT BEFORE ENTERING SCHOOL. 

Student may contact the Veterans Administration Regional Office, 301 
North Main Street, Winston-Salem, North Carolina for information and 
necessary forms. 

Children of disabled or deceased veterans may receive assistance in payment 
of tuition, room, meals and other university feed. For information regarding 
eligibility and application forms students should write to the North Carolina 
Veterans Commission, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

FOREIGN STUDENT ADMISSION: 

A student wishing to apply for undergraduate admission as a foreign student 
should first make arrangements through the American Consulate in his own 
country to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL Test). No 
student can be approved (even if he meets other requirements) until a satisfac- 
tory score is received. 

Since Appalachian is a state-supported institution, it is not permitted to offer 
financial assistance to foreign students. Therefore, arrangements for all expenses 
should be made before a student leaves his own country. 







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EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 

EXPENSES 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE FEE STRUCTURE INDICATED ON THE 
FOLLOWING PAGES IS APPLICABLE ONLY TO THE 1970-1971 
ACADEMIC YEAR. IT IS NOT ASSUMED THAT SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES 
WILL OCCUR. THE UNIVERSITY, HOWEVER, RESERVES THE RIGHT TO 
MAKE CHANGES IN THESE CHARGES WHEN CIRCUMSTANCES RE- 
QUIRE. 

Fees are charged by the quarter and are due and payable in advance at the 
beginning of each quarter. Any special arrangement for the payment of expenses 
must be made at the time of registration with the Controller's Office. 

It is estimated that the average student who is a North Carolina resident 
incurs necessary expenses of approximately $1,150.00 for room, meals, tuition, 
and fees during an academic year. 

FEES PAYABLE EACH QUARTER FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



Tuition and fees for residents of North Carolina 

Tuition and fees for non-residents of North Carolina 

Board, room, and laundry 
Men 
Women 



The application for admission must be accompanied by an application fee of 
$10.00, which is not deductible or refundable. 

A fee of $116.00 for students entering Appalachian for the first time or 
$50.00 for a student already enrolled must accompany application for a room 
reservation. The room reservation fee is deductible from the room rent charge at 
the opening of the first quarter of residence. 

All students living in university dormitories are required to purchase the 
minimum number of meal tickets at the time of registration. Mealbooks are 
redeemable only during the academic year in which they are issued. The cost of 
meals may vary considerably according to individual needs and desires. The 

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Dormitory 
Students 


Day 
Students 


$144.71 


$144.71 


$394.71 


$394.71 


$244.00 
$239.00 







cafeteria is on the main campus and meals are available at moderate prices, for 
cash payment or mealbook tickets. 

With the approval of its governing bodies, the university reserves the right to 
change these fees any time that it becomes necessary. 

DAY STUDENTS 

Regular day students pay all expenses except room rent, cafeterial meals, 
laundry and dry cleaning. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Foreign students are considered out-of-state students and, therefore, have to 
pay the out-of-state rate unless they have a graduate assistantship. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Students who register for less than full load pay the following charges: 

One through three hours, $30.00; four through six hours, $43.00; more than 
six hours, full charges. 

OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS 

The following statement governs a student's classification as a resident or 
nonresident of North Carolina with respect to tuition payment. 

1 . General: The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less than 
for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident must have 
maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least the six months pre- 
ceeding the date of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of 
higher education in this state. 

2. Minors: The legal residence of a person under twenty-one years of age at the 
time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in this state 
is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where 
parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the father will 
control unless custody of the minor has been awarded by court order to the 
mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim of residence in 
North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian in North Carolina will be 
considered if either parent is living unless the action of the court appointing 
the guardian antedates the student's first enrollment in a North Carolina 
institution of higher education by at least twelve months. 

A minor student whose parents move their legal residence from North 
Carolina to a location outside of the state shall be considered to be a non- 
resident after six months from the date of removal from the state. 

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For the purpose of determining residence requirements under these rules, a 
person will be considered a minor until he has reached his twenty-first 
birthday. Married minors, however, are entitled to establish and maintain 
their residence in the same manner as adults. Attendance at an institution of 
higher education as a student cannot be counted as fulfilling the six-month 
domicile requirement. 

3. Adults: A person twenty-one years of age or older is eligible for in-state 
tuition if he has maintained continuous domicile in North Carolina for the six 
months next preceding the date of enrollment or re-enrollment, exclusive of 
any time spent in attendance at any institution of higher education. An 
in-state student reaching the age of twenty-one is not required to reestablish 
residence provided that he maintains his domicile in North Carolina. 

4. Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that of her husband, 
except that a woman currently enrolled as an in-state student in an institution 
of higher education may continue as a resident even though she marries a 
nonresident. If the husband is a nonresident and separation or divorce occurs, 
the woman may qualify for in-state tuition after establishing her domicile in 
North Carolina for at least six months under the same conditions as she could 
if she were single. 

5. Military Personnel: No person shall be presumed to have gained or lost in- 
state residence status in North Carolina while serving in the Armed Forces. 
However, a member of the Armed Forces may obtain in-state residence status 
for himself, his spouse, or his children after maintaining his domicile in North 
Carolina for at least six months next preceding his or their enrollment or 
re-enrollment in an institution of higher education in this state. 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence 
may establish North Carolina residence in the same manner as any other 
nonresident. 

7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the 
State of North Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for the 
in -state tuition rate. 



Change of Status: The residence status of any student is determined as of the 
time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in North 
Carolina and may not thereafter be changed except; (a) in the case of a 
nonresident student at the time of his first enrollment who, or if a minor his 
parents, has subsequently maintained a legal residence in North Carolina for 
at least six months, and (b) in the case of a resident who has abandoned his 
legal residence in North Carolina for a minimum period of six months. In 
either case, the appropriate tuition rate will become effective at the beginning 
of the term following the six-month period. 

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9. Responsibility of Student: Any student or prospective student in doubt con- 
cerning his residence status must bear the responsibility for securing a ruling 
by stating his case in writing to the admissions officer. The student who, due 
to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification, whether 
from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of imme- 
diately informing the Director of Business Affairs and Registrar of this cir- 
cumstances in writing. Failure to give complete and correct information re- 
garding residence constitutes ground for disciplinary action. 

STUDENT WELFARE AND ACTIVITIES 

This fee supports such services and activities as health care, student govern- 
ment, concerts and lectures, class dues, popular programs, forensics, dramatics, 
intramurals, student publications, attendance at all athletic events on campus, 
and transcript fee. 

RENTAL OF TEXTBOOKS 

A textbook rental fee entitles a student to receive textbooks used in each 
course for which he registers. Notebooks, workbooks, manuals, and the like are 
not included. These and other supplementary materials will be purchased by the 
student. At the end of each quarter textbooks that are not needed further are 
returned. A student who desires to own his textbooks may purchase them by 
paying the difference between the rental fee and the purchase price. 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING 

Laundry of linens and personal clothing, pressing, and dry cleaning are pro- 
vided at the university laundry. Students whose laundry service is in excess of 
the minimum charge will settle the account with the Cashier's Office. All stu- 
dents should have permanent name markings in every article to be laundered or 
dry cleaned. 

AUDITING 

A person except those on university appointment and students registered for 
a full schedule who audits a class pays the regular registration and tuition fees. 
Auditors do not take tests, examinations, or receive grades or credit. 

HOSPITALIZATION AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

A hospital and accident insurance coverage is available on a voluntary basis to 
all students at a low cost. For married or widowed students a family plan is also 
offered. This insurance will pay a substantial part of charges for hospitalization, 
surgical procedures, treatment for accidental injuries, diagnostic tests and medi- 
cal emergencies. The insurance policy is effective for twelve months between 
September first and August thirty-first and provides coverage both on campus 
and off. Each student is urged to purchase this protection. In addition, the 

22 



University Health Services will pay the first twenty-five dollars toward the hospi- 
tal bill of any student admitted to Watauga County Hospital in Boone. 

LATE REGISTRATION 5.00 to 10.00 

A student who does not complete his registration during the announced 
registration date is charged a $5.00 fee, with an increase of $1.00 for each 
additional late day of registration, the total not to exceed $10.00. 

MUSIC PER QUARTER 

One thrity-minute individual lesson a week, any 

instrument or voice 1 5.00 

Two thirty-minute individual lessons a week, 

any instrument or voice 30.00 

One class lesson a week, any instrument or voice 9.00 

Practice rooms, voice, piano, organ, first 

quarter hour 5.00 

Each additional quarter hour 2.50 

Practice rooms, strings, wind, percussion, 

first quarter hour 2.50 

Each additional quarter hour 1.25 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY 

Per Quarter 

Bowling 8.00 

Skiing 50.00 

Golf 14.00 



REFUND OF FEES 

Room reservation fees from new students for the fall quarter are refundable 
upon notification on or prior to May 10 and from returning students on or prior 
to June 15. Requests for refunds should be made to the Director of Housing. 

If a student withdraws from the university before the close of the registration 
period, one-half of the room rent and tuition and a proportionate part of the 
amount paid for meals will be refunded. If a student withdraws after the close of 
the registration period, a proportionate part of the amount paid for meals will be 
refunded. Refunds will be calculated from the date of the official withdrawal 
from the university. Students who are suspended for disciplinary reasons or who 
do not formally withdraw are not eligible for a refund. 

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STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Opportunities for financial aid, though not unlimited, are within the reach of 
almost every student who can show both superior academic achievement and 
definite financial need. The student who realizes that he will be unable to meet 
university expenses without assistance should determine the approximate 
amount of assistance needed per quarter and take early initiative in seeking 
information from the Director of Student Aid and should file applications for at 
least one of the principal types of financial aid indicated below. 

Aid applications for the following academic year must be submitted by April 
15. In addition, applicants interested in receiving a National Defense Loan, or an 
Educational Opportunity Grant administered through the university should also 
have their parents submit a Parents' Confidential Statement. Forms may be 
obtained from one's high school and should be submitted to the College Scholar- 
ship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey. 

INFORMATION TO VETERANS 

The university is approved for providing training under provisions of Chapter 
34, Title 38, U. S. Code, G. I. Bill effective June 1966; Chapter 35, Title 38, U. 
S. Code, the children of deceased or disabled veterans; and Public Law 894, for 
disabled veterans. 

Students enrolling under provisions of Chapter 34 and 35 will pay fees at the 
time of registration but receive a monthly education and training allowance from 
the Veterans Administration. Since the first check is usually delayed, a veteran 
should make his arrangements early. 

Students may contact the Veterans Administration Regional Office, 301 
North Main Street, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, for information and 
necessary forms. Approval from The Veterans Administration regarding eligi- 
bility should be received by the student before entering school. The approval 
form (certificate of eligibility) should be submitted to the Financial Aid Office 
for completion after the veteran enrolls. 

Children of disabled or deceased veterans may receive assistance in payment 
of tuition, room, meals, and other university fees. For information regarding 
eligibility and application forms, students should write to the North Carolina 
Veterans Commission, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS 

The student employment programs enable eligible student to help pay college 
expenses while attending classes full time. Students participating in the programs 
are employed in the cafeterias, library, administrative offices, and in the various 
colleges and departments of the university. 

24 



The student employment programs consist of The Appalachian State Univer- 
sity Self-Help Program and The University Work-Study Program; the latter is of 
federal assistance under Title I of The Economic Opportunity Act. 

A student returning to school for the summer session only is not eligible to 
work under this program. 

Generally, a student may work up to fifteen hours per week. A student's 
work schedule will depend upon class schedules and will be arranged by the 
student and his work supervisor. The amount of compensation the student re- 
ceives depends upon the program for which he qualifies. Many students earn as 
much as one third of the total necessary expenses of the year. 

Jobs off campus are not assigned by any committee or division of the univer- 
sity, but such jobs do exist. Whenever possible, the Director of Student Aid will 
help the student find one of these jobs. 



STUDENT LOAN PROGRAMS 

COLLEGE FOUNDATION, INC. 

Applicant must be a bona fide resident of North Carolina to be eligible for a 
loan from this source. 

A student may borrow up to $1500 per year at a rate of 7 percent on the 
unpaid principal balance. The federal government will pay the 7 percent interest 
during the in-school period for students from families with adjusted incomes less 
than $15,000.00 per year. The borrower will assume the full 7 percent interest 
rate upon termination of his education in addition to 1/2 of 1 percent insurance 
premium, which he pays during both in-school and repayment periods. 

Information and applications will be forwarded, upon request, by writing the 
Director of Student Financial Aid. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

Appalachian participates in the National Defense Student Loan Program, 
which is a part of the National Defense Education Act of 1958. An under- 
graduate student may borrow up to $1,000 per year to a total of $5,000. The 
amount of the loan committed to a student is based on the financial need of the 
student. Graduate students may borrow as much as $2,500 per year to a maxi- 
mum of $10,000. The repayment period and the interest do not begin until nine 
months after the student ends his studies. The loans bear interest at the rate of 
three percent per year and repayment of principal may be extended over a ten 
year period, as long as a minimum repayment of $45 per quarter is met. 

25 



If a borrower becomes a full time teacher in an elementary or secondary 
school or in an institution of higher education, as much as half of the loan may 
be forgiven at the rate of ten percent for each year of teaching service. Bor- 
rowers who elect to teach in certain eligible schools located in areas of primarily 
low-income families may qualify for cancellation of their entire obligation at the 
rate of fifteen percent per year. 

A graduate or undergraduate student returning to school for the summer 
session only is not eligible for a loan under this program. 

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOLARSHIP LOAN FUND FOR 
PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS 

Established by act of the Legislature of North Carolina in 1957, and amended 
in 1967, for capable students who are preparing to teach in the public schools of 
North Carolina, this fund makes available a loan up to $600 a year. Students 
with good high school or college records may be eligible for a loan for each of 
four years. One annual loan is automatically cancelled for each year that the 
student teaches in the public schools of North Carolina. If the student does not 
teach, the loan must be repaid at four percent interest. For application forms, 
interested students should write directly to the State Department of Public 
Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina. Applications should be submitted before 
March 1 , preceding the fall enrollment at an Institution of Higher Learning. 

SCHOLARSHIP LOAN FUND FOR PROSPECTIVE 
TEACHERS OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED 

This loan fund was established by an act of the Legislature of North Carolina 
in 1963 and revised in 1967, for capable students who are preparing to teach the 
mentally retarded, makes available a loan up to $900 per academic year. A 
student may also qualify for $300 during the summer term or $150 per six 
weeks term. Students with good high school or college records may be eligible 
for a loan for each of four years. One annual loan is automatically cancelled for 
each year the student teaches the mentally retarded in North Carolina. If the 
student does not meet these requirements, the loan must repaid at four percent 
interest. For application forms, interested students should write directly to the 
State Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



UNIVERSITY CONSOLIDATED LOAN FUND 

When a student borrows money from any of the loan funds, he signs a 
promissory note and makes arrangements for repayment satisfactory to the 
Office of the Controller. Arrangements may be made to repay the loan and 
interest in installments over a reasonable period of time after graduation or 
discontinuance of study. A student who receives a loan should understand that 
loan funds are revolving funds and that the university has the same interest in 
protecting them as it had in securing them. 

26 



The following loan funds have been established for the benefit of worthy 
students who need financial aid: 

Nora E. Edmondson Loan Fund of $500 was donated in 1956 by Mrs. Bertie 
E. Perkins in memory of her sister, Miss Nora E. Edmondson, who at the time of 
her death was the oldest graduate of the university, and who from her first visit 
in 1942 until her death, was one of its most loyal and devoted friends. This fund 
is available to graduate students only. 

Frances L. Goodrich Loan Fund was contributed by the Trustees of Asheville 
College. Loans are restricted to $300 per year and are available only to juniors 
and seniors. 

TheB. H. Harman Loan Fund amounting to $2,500 was established by Mr. 
Harman and members of his family in 1968. Now living in Phoenix, Arizona, Mr. 
Harman is a native of Watauga County and many of his relative have attended 
Appalachian. He established the Loan Fund "in gratitude for what the university 
has done for my people" in the county and the area. A maximum of $250 a year 
may be borrowed, with a student being eligible for a maximum of $750 for his 
four years at the university. 

Library Science Loan Fund was donated in 1953 by Miss Eunice Query and 
Miss Mabel Brister of the Appalachian faculty. The loan is available only to 
majors in library science. 

Mark Davis Loan Fund of $1 100 was donated in 1967 by Mark Davis. 

Student Loan Fund of approximately $5,000 was donated over a period of 
years by graduating classes. 

W. J. Waters Graduate Loan Fund of $500 was donated in 1958 by S. J. 
Waters, alumnus of Appalachian, for graduate students only. 

Tau Beta Emergency Loan Fund was established during the winter quarter of 
1969, to aid students with short term emergency financial needs. This fund is 
intended to be a revolving fund to aid as many students as possible during their 
stay at Appalachian. 



GRANTS-IN-AID AND SPECIAL TALENT AWARDS 

It is believed that special recognition should be given to those with demon- 
strated special talents, and it is also believed that the university should continue 
to strive for improvement of representative groups in the Performing Arts. 

Student who feel they might qualify for these awards are encouraged to 
make application. 

27 



Several fields of student activity, including dramatics, art, forensics, industrial 
arts, music, baseball, basketball, football, and other activities, have been 
approved for grants-in-aid and talent awards. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS 

This program is part of the Higher Education Act of 1965 with the purpose 
being to assist in making available the benefits of higher education to qualified 
high school graduates of exceptional financial need. Students who qualify may 
be eligible for a grant of up to $1000 per year for a period of four academic 
years. The recipient must maintain satisfactory progress in his course of study 
and be a full-time student during the academic year. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Army ROTC Scholarship Program is designed to offer financial assistance 
to outstanding young men in the four-year ROTC program who are interested in 
the Amiy as a career. Each scholarship provides free tuition, textbooks, and 
laboratory fees. Scholarships are awarded for a period of two years to students 
who have completed the first two years of ROTC and are selected for the 
Advanced Course. Application must be made through the Department of 
Military Science prior to the completion ofMSII. 

Four-year scholarships are available to qualified high school seniors. Applica- 
tions should be initiated through guidance counselors in the first month of the 
applicant's senior year in high school. 

Students who are interested in a special talent award should write to the 
appropriate department chairman for information. Athletes should write to the 
coach of the sport in which they are interested in participating while attending 
the university. 

Alpha Gamma Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma awards a scholarship of 
approximately $100 or more to a worthy student from Avery or Watauga 
Counties. 

James G. K. McClure Scholarships, established in 1958 by the James G. K. 
McClure Education Foundation, provides four scholarships of $500 each to 
freshmen from designated western counties who give promise of high intellectual 
attainment, who show evidence of Christian character, and who are in need of 
financial aid. 

Legislative Scholarships are awarded by an act of the General Assembly of 
North Carolina. A number of tuition scholarships are awarded each year in the 
amount of $150 each and are awarded on the basis of need and merit. 

28 



Endowment Scholarships were made available in 1957 by the Board of 
Trustees from the income of Endowment Funds. Approximately 200 scholar- 
ships valued at $125 upward are available to men and women who excel in 
scholarship, who are needy, and who give promise of leadership at the university. 

Living Endowment Fund for Scholarships, initiated by the class of 1956 and 
continued by succeeding classes, provides fifteen to twenty scholarships annually 
with an average value of $200. These scholarships are available to men and 
women who are scholastically in the upper quarter of their class and who need 
financial aid. 

Voactional Rehabilitation Scholarships are available to students who have 
physical disabilities which constitute vocational handicaps. These students are 
eligible for scholarships from the North Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation 
Department. These scholarships are available for four years provided the student 
maintains a satisfactory record. For information, qualified students should write 
to the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



The John Hilary Workman Memorial Scholarships, were established in 1960 
in memory of Dr. John Hilary Workman, Professor of Economics from 1946 
until his death in 1960. The scholarships were established by his sister, Miss 
Sarah Workman, of Cherryville, North Carolina, from funds will by Dr. Work- 
man to the Endowment Fund of the university, to be used in assisting needy and 
capable students. 

Kenneth B. Linney Memorial Scholarship was established in 1961 in memory 
of Kenneth B. Linney by contributions from friends and immediate family. The 
scholarship of $ 1 50 is made available by annual auditions to high school seniors 
who wish to major in voice, who have excellence of scholarship, seriousness of 
purpose, financial need, and who show professional promise. The scholarship is 
renewable by application. 



The Collegiate Civic Club Scholarship, provides $100 annually to a student of 
need and outstanding academic ability. The recipient of the award is selected by 
the club from recommendations made by the Faculty Committee on Student 
Financial Aid. 

Presser Foundation Scholarship, established in 1965, provides $400 annually 
for a music major who shows the greatest promise as a prospective teacher, who 
exhibits music talent, and who has financial need. 



The J. D. Rankin Memorial Scholarship was established in 1966 in memory of 
the late Dr. Rankin, who was Dean of Appalachian for more than thirty years, 
and was Dean Emeritus at the time of his death. He also served as interim 
President. The scholarship is unrestricted. 

29 



Superior Student Awards. Fifteen o\' lliese scholarships are awarded each year 
to selected applicants who rank in the upper 10% of their secondary school 
graduating class and score at least 1200 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. The 
award is in the amount of $1 200, $300 per academic year. 

Watauga Savings and Loan Scholarships, established in 1907, provides two 
$250 scholarships each year for a young man and young woman graduate of 
Watauga High School, teach scholarship will be awarded on an annual basis, 
subject to renewal for each of three additional years if the recipient continues to 
meet the requirements established for scholarship holders. Applicants will be 
chosen with consideration being given to their high school record for both 
scholarship and leadership, evidence of Christian character, intellectual promise 
and demonstrated ambition. 

The G. P. lagers Scholarship was established in 1969 by the faculty of the 
Department of English to honor Dr. Eggers upon his retirement as Chairman of 
the Department. Dr. loggers began his tenure at the University in 1927. The 
scholarship is restricted to seniors and graduate students in English who earned 
the undergraduate degree at Appalachian. 

The Dr. J. li. H again an, Jr., Memorial Scholarship was established in 1969 by 
the Trustees of the University in honor of Dr. Ilagaman with whom they had 
served for several years. It is for students majoring in science, and preferably 
preparing for careers in medicine. 




30 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 



The following represents a summary listing of the various programs of study 
currently available (1970-1971) at Appalachian. Please note that any university 
curriculum is a cumulative process. In effect, the listing of programs and majors 
that follows may not be inclusive for the 1971-1972 academic year - the univer- 
sity may add programs and majors not indicated below. 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. This is a liberal arts degree and requires a minor. Il 
also requires two years of a foreign language or the equivalent for graduation. 
Majors and minors in this degree are as follows: 

Majors 

Art Mathematics 

Biology Music 

Chemistry Philosophy & Religion 

Economics & Business Physics 

English Political Science 

French Psychology 

Geology Sociology & Anthropology 

Geography Spanish 

History Speech 

Minors 

Art Industrial Arts 

Biology Library Science 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Computer Science Military Science 

Economics & Business Music 

English Philosophy & Religion 

French Physics 

Geography Political Science 

Geology Psychology 

Health & Phys. Educ. Spanish 

History Sociology & Anthropology 

Home Economics Speech 

31 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC. This is a professional degree program which offers a 
flexible curriculum that can be tailored to fit the needs of the individual student. 
Programs other than those listed below such as concentrations in music 
literature and/or theory are available by consulting the Music Department Chair- 
man. An outside minor is not required in this degree program. Programs offered 
include: 

Music Education - leading to teacher certification 
General - Voice or Piano 
Instrumental 

Performance Major 
Piano, Organ, Voice 

Piano Pedagogy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. This degree 
offers depth of study in the areas of Economics and Business. A minor is re- 
quired. 

Major 

Economics and Business 

Minors 
Same as Bachelor of Arts 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (Program A ) This degree program requires a 
minor. Majors and minors are offered as follows: 

Majors 

Health & Physical Education Industrial Arts 

Home Economics 

Minors 

Same as Bachelor of Arts 
32 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (Program B) This is a professional degree leading 
to teacher certification. AN INDIVIDUAL SEEKING THIS DEGREE IS NOT 
ALLOWED TO HAVE AN OUTSIDE MINOR. (A student with this degree has 
automatically minored in Education.) Majors in this degree are as follows: 



Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Elementary Education 

Fconomics & Business 

English 

French 

Health & Physical Education 

History 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Library Science 

Mathematics 

Physics 



Science - With a concentration in 
Biology, Chemistry, Earth 
Science, or Physics 

Social Science - General or with 
a concentration in Geography, 
Political Science, Economics, or 
Sociology & Anthropology 

Spanish 

Special Education 

Speech 

Speech Pathology 



BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY/THIS IS A NEW DEGREE PROGRAM 
OPEN ONLY TO GRADUATES OF TWO-YEAR PROGRAMS IN 
TECHNOLOGY. Application procedure is similar to that required of transfer 
students with the exception that only a limited number of students will be 
admitted to the program each year. The university will be highly selective, 
therefore, in admitting students to this program. A minor is not required with 
this degree. Programs offered in this degree are as follows: 



Majors 



Business Technology 
Engineering Technology 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

The university currently offers pre-professional programs in the following 
areas: 



Law 

Medicine 
Dentistry 
Engineering 



Forestry 

Pharmacy 

Nursing 



33 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

A graduate program is offered leading to the Master of Arts and the Master of 
Science degrees. The university also offers work leading to the advanced certifi- 
cate in school administration and the certificate of advanced study. Both of 
these programs call for one year beyond the Master's degree. Please refer to a 
Graduate Catalog for detailed information concerning admission requirements, 
expenses, and programs offered. 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS - ARMY 

The university currently offers an ROTC program for young men interested 
in obtaining a commission in the U. S. Army upon graduation. This program 
offers a four-year schedule open to freshmen and a two-year schedule open to 
junior college transfers. 




34 



STUDENT LIFE 

The university seeks to be aware of the problems and needs of students as 
they adjust to the university community and become a part of it. To create an 
environment conducive to happiness and good work and to provide 
opportunities for the maximum development of each student, the university 
supports a variety of activities and services to supplement the academic pro- 
gram. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Government Association is the governing agency of the Student 
Body, acting within the framework of university policies and regulations. The 
association is the representative voice of the student body and is divided into 
three distinct branches: the Executive, the Legislative and the Judicial. 

As the voice of the students, the organization serves as the foundation of 
self-government and acts as a clearing house for student opinion. It has the 
responsibility of communicating with students, faculty, administration, staff 
and community leaders. In effect, all undergraduate students of the university 
are members of the Student Government Association and may serve on Senate 
Committees to make their wishes known. More than any other co-curricular 
group, the student government must accept the responsibility which comes 
from the entire student body, a responsibility encompassing concern for stu- 
dent opinions, grievances, accomplishments and discipline. 

STANDARD OF CONDUCT 

The foundation of self-government at Appalachian State University rests on 
the honor of its students. As a condition of acceptance and attendance at 
Appalachian, students are required at all times to maintain a high standard of 
private and public conduct both on and off campus. To lie, cheat, steal or break 
one's word of honor under any circumstances is recognized as intolerable 
conduct. Violation of other commonly accepted rules of behavior, whether or 
not covered by specific regulations, will be subject to disciplinary action. 

University officials reserve the right, with due process observed, to require 
any student whose conduct is considered unsatisfactory to withdraw. Claims of 
ignorance of such high standards and commonly accepted rules or of specific 
regulations will not be accepted as an excuse for their violation. 

35 



STUDENT OFFICERS AND UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATION 

Members of the student council, class and club officers, nominees for class 
or campus honors, athletic managers, members of the publications staffs, parti- 
cipants in public programs, cheerleaders, debaters, and any persons other than 
athletic teams representing the university off campus, must be selected from 
those students who have at the time of their election and who maintain through 
their terms of office a grade point average of 2.0 or higher and freedom from 
general probation. 



SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Recognizing the importance of first hand acquaintance with man's cultural 
heritage, the university sponsors a wide variety of social and cultural activities 
throughout the year. 

As a complement to its instructional program, the university brings to the 
campus each year a variety of outstanding concerts, art exhibits, plays, lectures, 
recitals and films which involve students and faculty in both classical and 
contemporary expression of the fine arts. All of these activities are open to 
students, faculty and visitors in order to extend cultural opportunities to the 
university community. 

The John Hiliary Workman Memorial Lectures, established in 1960, by Dr. 
John Hiliary Workman and his sister, Miss Sarah Workman of Cherryville, North 
Carolina, brings a nationally known speaker in the field of economics to the 
campus each year for lectures. In addition to special programs, a student- 
faculty committee presents outstanding programs of convocations, lectures, and 
concerts. 

The Popular Programs Committee of the Student Government Association 
sponsors a series of pop concerts during the academic year, which brings to 
campus nationally known popular entertainment groups. 

During the academic year, the Art Department presents a series of outstand- 
ing art exhibits of prints, paintings and sculpture by distinguished con- 
temporary artists. The artists' works are exhibited for public enjoyment, and 
since the gallery is located in the Art Department, the works are available for 
student study. Students and faculty are encouraged to exhibit their work 
throughout the year. The department sponsors special art programs such as the 
Senior and Faculty Art Exhibits. 

Frequent recitals are given by the students and faculty of the Music 
Department and by the various musical organizations; on occasions the depart- 
ment features outstanding professional musicians as guest soloists in choral, 
band and symphony concerts. 

36 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Appalachian, the university newspaper, is published weekly by the stu- 
dents. The Rhododendron, the university yearbook, is compiled during the 
academic year and is distributed to the students in the spring quarter. A student 
staff prepares and edits the Student Handbook, Mountaineer Reflections, which 
contains information on student life and organizations, Qualified students are 
elected by students to the editorial and business staffs of the publications, 
which offer opportunities for students to develop their literary and journalistic 
interests and abilities. 

CLUBS AND PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES 

The university supports a diversified program of club activities and interest 
groups. There are over eighty different student organizations representing pro- 
fessional and honorary societies as well as social, service and interest clubs. 
Please consult the official student handbook for a complete listing of these 
organizations. 

All student organizations on campus are chartered and supervised by the 
Student Government Association and the Student Life Committee. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Many and various opportunities of a religious nature are available to stu- 
dents. There are eight churches in Boone within easy walking distance from 
campus - Advent Christian, Baptist, Church of Christ, Episcopal, Lutheran, 
Methodist, Presbyterian and Catholic. 

Through campus organizations, local churches and church affiliated groups, 
such as the Baptist Student Union, Canterbury Club, Lutheran Student Associa- 
tion, Newman Club, Wesley Foundation, and Westminster Fellowship, students 
have opportunities for worship, fellowship, study groups, and campus and 
community service. 



ATHLETICS AND INTRAMURAL SPORTS 

Amateur athletics are encouraged as an outgrowth of the physical education 
program of the university. Athletic teams are not developed solely to win 
games, but to create and develop a great interest in true sportsmanship and 
keen competition. 

Appalachian maintains athletic teams that compete in the following inter- 
collegiate sports: baseball, basketball, football, golf, soccer, fencing, cross- 
country, swimming, tennis, track, and wrestling. A faculty Council on Athletics 
regulates the intercollegiate athletic program. A member of an athletic team 
may not represent the university if he is on general probation. 

37 



The university maintains an extensive program of intramural sports. All 
students are encouraged to participate in the program to benefit from physical 
exercise and to develop good sportsmanship, self-reliance, and to gain ex- 
perience in group participation and competition. Schedules of games are 
arranged from season to season in many sports, such as archery, badminton, 
basketball, horseshoes, soccer, softball, speedball, swimming, flag football, 
tennis, track and volleyball. 

SPEECH ACTIVITIES 

The Department of Speech provides opportunities for students to gain valu- 
able experiences and recreation through participation in a variety of activities. 

Dramatics. A program of dramatic activities offers the student opportunities 
to gain experience in all phases of theatre production. All regularly enrolled 
students are eligible to participate in a program that includes major produc- 
tions, student directed plays and readers theatre. Childrens Theatre productions 
and musicals are produced. Students are invited to join the Playcrafters, a 
continuing social and service organization for those interested in theatre activi- 
ties. Consistent participation may lead to membership in Alpha Psi Omega 
National Honorary Dramatic Fraternity. 

Forensics. A full program of forensics provides opportunities for students to 
develop their abilities in public speaking and debate. The student has a chance 
to learn both from academic work and from travel. Scholarships are available 
for those interested and qualified. An Executive Committee composed of mem- 
bers of the speech faculty supervises the activity and a coordinator of forensics 
arranges debating schedules, prepares student for debate tournaments and 
directs the intramural and inter-collegiate forensics. Membership in Pi Kappa 
Delta National Forensic Recognition Society is available to interested students. 

Radio Workshop. Students interested in various aspects of radio broad- 
casting are eligible for membership in the groups to be organized in 1970-71. 
The extent of the activities will be determined by the anticipated development 
of facilities. 

For further information concerning any of the speech activities, inquire at 
the Department of Speech. 

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 

The Department of Music provides many organizations and activities in 
which students may gain valuable instruction, experience, and recreation. 

The Marching Band, an all-university organization, functions in close 
cooperation with the Athletic Association during the football and basketball 
seasons. 



38 



The Concert Band,an all-university organization open to any student with 
experience in playing band instruments, gives several campus concerts each 
year, including a "pop" concert. 

The University Symphony Orchestra, open to all students who have ability 
and experience in playing any orchestral instrument, appears in several concerts 
during the years. 



The University Singers accepts students who read music and sing well. Audi- 
tions are open to all students. Emphasis is places on fine choral literature of all 
periods, with particular emphasis given to the works of outstanding composers. 
A major oratorio or opera is presented each year, and concerts are given locally 
and throughout the state. 

The Wind Ensemble is open to all students by audition. Emphasis is placed 
on a high degree of musical performance. Concerts are given on campus during 
the year, and a tour is planned each spring. 

The Women's Glee Club is open to all women students who desire to sing. 

The Men's Glee Club is open to all male students who are interested in 
singing. 

The Madrigal Singers is composed of eight selected voices, four women and 
four men. 

The Stage Band is open to all students by audition. Emphasis is placed on 
developing a variety of popular music styles. This group performs for several 
university -sponsored concerts and occasional off-campus school dances. 



UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES 

The responsibility for assuring healthful conditions for study, work, and 
personal life must be shared by all members of the academic community. 
Appalachian recognizes its responsibility to provide students access to means of 
assuring their optimum physical, emotional, intellectual, and social well being. 

The Medical Center provides physicians, nurses and laboratory facilities 
aimed toward prevention of illness and the treatment of disease.The Medical 
Center is open twenty-four hours daily while the university is in session. Stu- 
dents may be admitted to the Medical Center Infirmary for brief treatment of 
minor illness. Persons requiring general hospital care are admitted to Watauga 
County Hospital. 

39 



The Psychological Services Center aims to stimulate a climate which 
nourishes essential human relationships and which reduces intrapersonal and 
interpersonal conflicts among all members of the community. Clinical psycho- 
logists, guidance counselors, a psychiatrist, and others provide personal 
counseling and psychotheraphy for students. 

The Testing Division of Psychological Services has responsibility for organiz- 
ing and administering individual and group tests for the university community. 
Tests available range from individual psychological tests to large group tests 
such as the Graduate Record Examination. 

A hospital and accident insurance coverage is available on a voluntary basis 
to all students at a low cost. For married or widowed students a family plan is 
also offered. This insurance will pay a substantial part of charges for 
hospitalization, surgical procedures, treatment for accidental injuries, diagnostic 
tests and medical emergencies. The insurance policy is effective for twelve 
months between September first and August thirty-first and provides coverage 
both on campus and off. Each student is urged to purchase this protection. In 
addition, the University Health Services will pay the first twenty-five dollars 
toward the hospital bill of any student admitted to Watauga County Hospital in 
Boone. 

All contracts with the University Health Services are considered confidential. 
Records are maintained separately for use of health personnel only and are not 
available to the administration, faculty, or anyone else. In case of serious illness 
or injury in minors, the parents or guardians will be notified. The Health 
Services do not issue "excuses" for class absences. 

Students who withdraw from the university for reasons of health must re- 
ceive medical clearance through the University Health Services before being 
readmitted. Before clearance is granted the student must present evidence that 
the condition which necessitated withdrawal has improved and that there is 
reasonable expectation of his ability to participate in university life. The Health 
Services will offer assistance aimed toward helping students with a health im- 
pairment successfully attend the university. 



40 



STUDENT HOUSING 

The university has fourteen residence halls housing approximately thirty- 
seven hundred single undergraduate students, with a limited number of spaces 
reserved for graduate students. 



RESIDENCE HALLS 

The residence halls are staffed and supervised by professional personnel. 
These staff members are responsible for the interpretation and implementation 
of university policies and regulations established to insure the best interest and 
welfare of the total group. 

Each room is equipped with the basic furniture, but the student is expected 
to supply linens, blankets, rugs, pillow, curtains, and other personal furnishings 
according to individual tastes. Each student is expected to observe residence 
hall regulations and take care of the furnishings of the room. Students may not 
have in the room any cooking appliances, refrigerators, or any other electrical 
appliances except lamps,radio, record player, sewing machine, hair drier, razor; 
nor may they place any attachments to the walls, plumbing, or electric wiring. 
The university reserves the right to inspect the residence halls regularly. Occu- 
pants of each room are responsible for any damage to furnishings or room. 
Damage in public areas will be assessed to all occupants of a residence hall or 
part thereof involved, until such time as those causing the damage can be 
determined. 

The residence halls are closed during vacation periods indicated in the uni- 
versity calendar, and no occupancy of rooms will be permitted during this time. 
If a student finds it necessary to remain in Boone during a vacation period, the 
Deans of Men and Women will assist in securing a room. 

HOUSING POLICIES 

All single freshment under 21 years of age are required to live on campus 
unless they live in Boone or the near vicinity with a close relative. To live off 
campus all students under 21 years of age must have their parent's permission 
in writing on file with the Dean of Men or Dean of Women. 

A student must be registered for at least 12 quarter hours to be eligible for a 
room on campus. 

All students reserving rooms are subject to an academic year housing con- 
tract (three quarters). Regulations concerning this contract are as follows: 

A student who reserves a room for the fall or winter quarters is obligated to 
pay room rent for the subsequent quarter (s) of that academic year as long as 
he is enrolled, unless another student from a waiting list occupies the space. 

41 



If a residence hall student plans not to enroll for a subsequent quarter he 
must notify the housing office by one week prior to examination week at the 
end of the current quarter. If he does not give such notification, he will be billed 
for a quarter's room rent even though he is not enrolled, and his accounts with 
the university will not be clear until the bill is paid. 

Unless a student notifies the housing office that he will be late, the residence 
hall space must be occupied by the night of the first day's classes in each 
quarter. Otherwise, the reservation for that space will be cancelled, and he will 
be billed for a quarter's rent. Exceptions: 

(1) A residence hall student in the fall quarter who student teaches in the 
winter or spring quarters is not obligated to pay room rent for that quarter, but 
he ,i£ obligated to notify the housing office of his intention not to occupy the 
room in a coming quarter by one week prior to examination week at the end of 
the current quarter. Otherwise, he will be billed for the rent. 

(2) A residence hall student who gets married during the year will not be 
obligated to pay for a space in the quarter subsequent to the marriage, if the 
student wishes to move off-campus. However, he is obligated to give notice to 
the housing office of his intention not to occupy his room prior to examination 
week at the end of the current quarter. Otherwise, he will be billed for the rent. 

(3) A student who is suspended by action of university authorities will not be 
obligated to pay room rent for a subsequent quarter in which he is not enrolled. 

(4) Other exceptions may be made upon recommendation of the Deans of 
Men or Women in case of extreme emergency. 

The university reserves the right to require an occupant to vacate his space in 
the residence hall if this is deemed to be in the best interests of the university. 




42 



ROOM RESERVATIONS 

Room reservation forms should be requested from the Office of Student 
Housing, and the completed form should be mailed directly to the university 
cashier with a check or money order for reservation deposit payable to Appala- 
chian State University. The reservation deposit is deducted from the room rent 
charge for the first quarter in residence. 

RESIDENCE HALL REFUNDS 

Reservation fees from new students for fall quarter are refundable upon 
notification on or prior to May 10, and from returning students on or prior to 
June 15. Request for refunds should be made to the Director of Housing. 

If a student withdraws from the university before the close of the registration 
period, one half of the room rent and tuition and a proportionate part of the 
amount paid for meals will be refunded. If a student withdraws after the close of 
the registration period, room rent will not be refunded, but a proportionate part 
of the amount paid for meals will be refunded. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

Because of limited residence hall space, some students may find it necessary 
to secure privately owned housing in the university area. A listing of available 
privately owned housing may be obtained from the Office of Student Housing. 
Men and women who plan to live in privately owned housing and who are not 
living at home or with close relatives must receive permission from the Dean of 
Men or the Dean of Women to do so. All students enrolled in the university, 
whether living on campus or off campus, are subject to the rules of good citizen- 
ship and exemplary conduct as administered and supervised by the university 
administration and Student Government Association. 



MOTOR VEHICLES 

All students, faculty, staff, and employees of Appalachian State University 
who operate or park a motor vehicle on the university campus or its environs 
must register his or her motor vehicle with the university before he is allowed to 
park on the campus. This includes students attending as commuters. 

All members of the freshman and sophomore classes not residing with 
immediate relatives, all students on academic or disciplinary probation, and all 
students who have an academic average below "C'\ are prohibited from register- 
ing, maintaining, or operating any type of motor vehicle on the campus or its 
environs. 

43 



Application for parking privileges may be made at Registration on Registra- 
tion Day. THIS IS DONE AS A PART OF ACADEMIC REGISTRATION. The 
parking decal should be affixed to the motor vehicle by the first day of classes at 
which time any out-of-date parking decals must be removed. 

Any student requiring the use of a motor vehicle after Registration Day for 
any period, however short, must immediately register his or her motor vehicle 
before he is allowed to drive or park on the campus. All vehicles not registered 
on Registration Day must be registered at the University Traffic & Security 
Office. 

A student may not register a vehicle that was or is owned or used primarily 
by another student, unless ownership of the vehicle has been transferred and 
proof to that effect can be shown. 

POST OFFICE 

Appalachian has a new and modern Post Office located on the first floor of 
the Plemmons Student Center. All students living in a residence hall on campus 
are pre-assigned a post office box. No additional charge is required for this 
service. Boxes are not available for off-campus students. 

When a student moves off campus or leaves Appalachian, it is very important 
that he check by the Post Office window and leave his correct forwarding 
address. 



PLACEMENT SERVICES 

As one of it student services, Appalachian maintains a central Office of Place- 
ment with a Director and staff whose function is to assist students and alumni in 
securing suitable positions. The total placement function of the University is the 
responsibility of this office. All commercial, industrial, governmental, and educa- 
tional placement is handled by this one office. All qualified students and alumni 
who have completed or expect to complete any one of the degree programs 
register for permanent placement services. 

Although the Office of Placement cannot guarantee professional appoint- 
ments, every effort is made to study the professional qualifications and interests 
of the student and to assist him in obtaining satisfactory placement. Relation- 
ships have been established with outstanding school systems, colleges, industries, 
and local, state and federal governmental agencies throughout the country. The 
Office maintain accurate and up-to-date information regarding vacancies, certifi- 
cation and license requirements, and qualifying examinations, and arrangements 
for interviews with prospective employers. 

44 



The Office of Placement maintains membership in the Southern College 
Placement Association, the College Placement Council, and the State and 
National Association for School, College and University Staffing. Students and 
alumni of member institutions are entitled to reciprocal placement services and 
nationwide computerized service. 

NEWS BUREAU 

The university's news bureau gathers, compiles and distributes all newsworthy 
facets of campus life to appropriate news media organizations. Some 400 news- 
papers, radio stations and television stations, most of which are located in 
Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina, are kept continually 
aware of the Appalachian activities which are of interest to the general public. 

The news bureau is responsible for preparing releases to keep the public 
informed about all phases of the university, including coverage of the institu- 
tion's athletic teams. The department also handles the publication and distribu- 
tion of various brochures. Complete photographic service, including a full-time 
photographer and darkroom facilities, functions as a major asset to the overall 
news bureau operation. 




45 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

All graduates, former students who have attended for one year or earned 
twelve (12) hours of credit, and personnel officially associated with the univer- 
sity are members of the Alumni Association. The purpose of the Association is 
to promote and encourage fellowship and friendship among its members; to 
foster good will on the part of its members and others toward the university; and 
in general to aid and assist the university through implementing such projects 
and undertakings as the Association shall from time to time adopt. 

There are no membership dues in the Association; however, many alumni 
express their active interest in the university by contributing voluntarily to the 
"Heartline Fund," which stimulates the growth of every school activity. Dona- 
tions to the Fund are solicited annually by means of a direct mail campaign to 
all alumni of the university. 

Active alumni chapters are organized in the following North Carolina 
counties: Alamance, Alleghany, Ashe, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Catawba, Cleveland, 
Davie, Forsyth, Gaston, Guilford, Iredell, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Moore, 
Randolph, Rowan, Rutherford, Surry, Union, Wake, Watauga, and Wilkes. In 
addition there are active alumni chapters in the southeastern and western dis- 
tricts of North Carolina; in Florida; in Danville, Virginia; and in Washington, D. 
C. 

OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION ARE: 

Jim Whittington, Salisbury, N. C President 

Mark Davis, Hickory, N. C President Elect 

Harold Lawing, Lenoir, N. C Vice-President 

Carolyn Harmon, Charlotte, N. C Secretary 

T. Roy Phillips, Carthage, N. C Past President 

Robert E. Snead, Boone, N. C Director of Alumni Affairs 



46 



APPENDIX A. 

The following is a list of General Education requirements currently necessary 
for admissions to the upper division colleges at Appalachian. THE PROSPEC- 
TIVE TRANSFER STUDENT SHOULD CONTACT THE APPROPRIATE 
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT AT APPALACHIAN TO DETERMINE HIS 
COURSE SCHEDULE WHILE ATTENDING JUNIOR COLLEGE. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 59-64 q.h. 

Courses in communication, humanities, mathematics, social science, natural 
science, and behavioral science are designed to give a student competence in 
communication and logical thinking, a broad acquaintance with the various com- 
ponents of human knowledge, and understanding of our cultural and social 
heritage, and an opportunity to develop value judgments, constructive attitudes, 
and the ability to function purposefully in a democratic society. A student 
should make every effort to complete this program early in his college career. 

For all baccalaureate degrees, a student shall complete the following require- 
ments in General Education: 

a. Communication - 9 q.h. 



ENGLISH 101-102-103 either must be completed or proficiency at the level 
of the courses demonstrated by examination. If proficiency is demonstrated 
by examination appropriate credit will be given without grade. 

Students who are candidates for teacher certification must also take Speech 
101. 

b. Humanities*- 18 q. h. 

Courses must be elected from at least three areas listed below. Two of the 
courses must be in literature. Approved courses in literature are underlined. 

ART 217, 301 , 302, 303, 304, 306 

ENGLISH, any course in literature 

FRENCH 301, 302, 303; 305, 306; 401, 402, 403; 461, 462,463,465, 467 

MUSIC 21 7; 304-5-6 

PHILOSOPHY, any course subject to stated prerequisites 

RELIGION, any course subject to stated prerequisites. The following satisfy 

the literature requirement: 201, 203, 205; 301, 304 ; 402 

SPANISH 30^, 302, 303; 305, 306; 401_, 402,^03; 457; 461, 463, 466, 471 

SPEECH 206;217;310, 311, 312;406 

c. Social Sciences - 15-17 q.h. 

47 



HISTORY 101, 102, 103 either must be completed or proficiency at the level 
of these courses demonstrated by examination. If proficiency is demonstrated 
by examination, appropriate credit will be given without grade. 

In addition, two courses must be selected from the list below. The courses 
must be from different areas. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 210, 315 

ECONOMICS, any course subject to stated prerequisites 

GEOGRAPHY 101, 102,203,216 

POLITICAL SCIENCE, any course subject to stated prerequisites 

SOCIOLOGY, any course except 205 and 206, subject to stated prerequisites 

PSYCHOLOGY 201, 202;450, 451 

d. Biological and Physical Sciences** - 9 - 12 q.h. 

Courses must be selected from one of the areas listed below, subject to stated 
prerequisites: 

BIOLOGY (except 297, 303, 450, 45 1 , 452, 457, 459, 475) 

CHEMISTRY 

GEOLOGY 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

PHYSICS 



e. Mathematics - 5 q.h. 

MATHEMATICS 101 or 107 either must be completed or proficiency at the 
level of these courses demonstrated by examination. If proficiency is demon- 
strated by examination, appropriate credit will be given without grade. 

f. Physical Education - 3 q. h. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY COURSES 

*Foreign language courses taken to meet other bachelor's degree graduation 
requirements may not serve to meet general education requirements. 

**In the program for applied music, this will be satisfied by a five quarter 
hour course in acoustics and sound offered by the Physics Department. 

Further requirements for the degrees are listed under the programs of the 
degree granting colleges. 

48 



PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS AND SCREENING 

All students who are candidates for teacher certification must pass pro- 
ficiency tests in reading, speech, and written English. Tests are given in speech 
and reading during the freshman and/or sophomore years and in written English 
during the sophomore year. Transfer students also must pass these tests. 

Transfer students who have completed two full years of college will be 
required to pass the tests in reading and written English within the first two 
quarters after they are admitted. They must pass the test in speech within the 
first three quarters after they are admitted. If they do not pass the tests within 
the allotted time, they will be required to withdraw from the university. 

The proficiency requirements and screening are administered by the Dean of 
the General College. 



49 



50 



INDEX 

Accrediting Associations, member of 60 

Admission 13 

Auditors 15 

Foreign Students .'.17 

Freshman 13 

Special 15 

Transfer 14 

Advanced Placement Program 16 

Aliens 21 

Alumni Association 46 

Appalachian 10 

State Normal School 10 

State Teachers College 10 

Training School 10 

Athletics 37 

Board and Room 19 

Calendar for University 1971-72 3 

Campus, description of 10 

51 



Cars 43, 44 

diurches 37 

College Entrance Examination Board 14 

Colleges of the University 11 

Concerts 36 

Conduct 35 

Contents, Table of 5 

Correspondence Directory 4 

Cultural Activities 36 

Day Students 20 

Degrees Offered 31, 32, 33 

Dry Cleaning 22 

Employment, student 24, 25 

Enrollment 11 

Exhibits 36 

Expenses 19 

52 



Fees 19 

Financial Aid 24 

Foreign Students 20 

Forensics 38 

Freshman Admission 13 

General Education Requirements 47 

Appendix A 47, 48 

Grants 27, 28 

Housing 

Off campus 43 

On campus 41 

Policies 41 

Instructional Programs 31 

Insurance, 

Hospital and accident 22 

Intramural sports 37 

Laundry 22 

Lectures 36 

53 



Loans 25, 26, 27 

Location of University 9 

Mail, student 44 

Medical Center 39, 40 

Member of Accrediting Associations 60 

Motor Vehicles 43, 44 

Musical Activities 38 

News Bureau 45 

Non-resident 20 

Organization of the University 1 1 

Parking 43, 44 

Part time, students 20 

Placement 44, 45 

Post Office 44 

Pre-Professional Programs 33 

Proficiency Requirements 49 

5* 



Programs, instructional 31 

Psychological Services 40 

Publications, student 37 

Purpose of University 9 

Refunds, Housing 43 

Registration 23 

Religious life 37 

Requirements 

Admission 13, 14 

Freshman .13, 14 

Housing 41, 42, 43 

Transfer 14, 15 

Proficiency Reservations for housing 41 , 42, 43 

Residence 

Freshman requirements 41 

Status change 21 

R.O.T.C 34 

Scholarship 28, 29, 30 

Scholastic Aptitude Test 14 

55 



Social Activities 36 

Societies, professional 37 

Special Talent awards 27, 28 

Standard of Conduct 35 

Student 

Government 35 

Life 36 

Officers 36 

Transfer 14, 15 

Eligibility 14, 15 

Students 14, 15 

Tuition 19 

University organization 11 

Veterans 1 6, 24 

Visiting Students 15 



56 



57 



«.&»#r&X' " ri 



M 







APPALACHIAN STATE 



LEGEND 



1 President's home 

2 Bowie Hall 

3 Stadium Fieldhouse 

4 New Men's Residence Hall 

5 New Men's Residence Hall 

6 Justice Hall 

7 Newland Hall 

8 Duncan Hall 

9 Rankin Science Building 



10 Smith-Wright Hall 

11 Old Library 

12 New Library 

13 Watauga Hall 

14 Cafeteria 

15 Gymnasiums — Broome- Kirk/Varsity 
Gym 

16 Power Plant 

17 Physical Plant & Laundry 

18 I.G. Greer Hall 

19 B.B. Dougherty Administration 
Building 



58 



I--. 

-1 * 



%*• • 







V 









: r 









» • • 



UNIVERSITY CAMPUS 



20 Infirmary 

21 Administration Building Annex 

22 East Hall 

23 New Classroom Building 

24 Lovill Hall 

25 New Women's Residence Hall 

26 Hoey Hall 

27 Doughton Hall 

28 White Hall 

29 New Women's Residence Hall 

30 Home Management House 

31 Faculty Apartments 



32 Workman Hall 

33 Lucy Brock Nursery School 

34 Lillie S. Dougherty Home Economics 
Building 

35 W. H. Plemmons Student Center 

36 Bookstore 

37 Appalachian Elementary School 

38 Chappell-Wilson Hall 

39 W. Kerr Scott Industrial Arts Building 

40 Campus Reservoir 

All Letters— Parking areas 



59 



Appalachian State University 
Is An Accredited Member Of 

THE SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

THE NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF 
TEACHER EDUCATION 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES FOR 
TEACHER EDUCATION 

THE AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION 

THE COUNCIL OF GRADUATE SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES 

THE NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND 
UNIVERSITIES 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF MUSIC 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF STATE COLLEGES AND 
UNIVERSITIES 



60