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Full text of "Bulletin, Graduate Catalog"

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Appalachian State University 




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Graduate Catalog 1971/72 



APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 
IS AN ACCREDITED MEMBER OF 



The Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools 

The National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education 

The American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education 

The American Council on Education 

The Council of Graduate Schools in the United States 

The North Carolina Association of Colleges and 
Universities 

The National Association of Schools of Music 

The American Association of University Women 

The National Association of Business 
Teacher Education 

The American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities 



BULLETIN OF 

APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 
Graduate School 



Announcements for 

1971-72 



Boone, North Carolina 
28607 



Volume LXIX Number 3 September, 1970 

December, 1970 

March, 1971 

June, 1971 

Published quarterly by Appalachian State University. Entered as second- 
class matter at the Post Office at Boone, North Carolina, under the Act of 
Congress, August 24, 1912. Postage has been paid at Boone, North Caro- 
lina. Address corrections to the Office of Academic Affairs, Appalachian 
State University, Boone, North Carolina 28607. 



Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


8-9 


Sept. 


10 


Sept. 


11 


Sept. 


15 


Sept. 


18 



;. 11 


-15 




23 


v. 


2 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR 1971-1972 

FALL QUARTER 1971 

Monday, 6:00 p.m. — Official opening, first faculty meeting. 
Monday, 8:00 a.m. — Dormitories open. 
Monday, 12:00 Noon — First meal in cafeteria. 
Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. — Orientation of new faculty and depart- 
mental meetings. 

Wednesday and Thursday — Registration. 
Friday, 8:00 a.m. — Classes begin. 
Saturday — Attend Thursday classes. 
Wednesday — Last day to add a class. 

Saturday — Registration and first class meeting of Saturday 
classes. 

Sept. 21 Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. — Meeting of students expecting to do 

student teaching winter quarter, Chapell Wilson Audi- 
torium. 

Mid-term week. 
Saturday — Homecoming. 

Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. — Meeting of students (last name begin- 
ning with letters "A" through "H") expecting to do student 
teaching 1972-73, Chapell Wilson Hall. 

Nov. 3 Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. — Meeting of students (last name be- 

ginning with letters "I" through "Q") expecting to do stu- 
dent teaching 1972-73, Chapell Wilson Hall. 

Nov. 4 Thursday, 7:30 p.m. — Meeting of students (last name begin- 

ning with letters "R" through "Z") expecting to do student 
teaching 1972-73, Chapell Wilson Hall. 
Wednesday — Classes end. 

Thursday-Wednesday noon — Final Examinations. 
Thanksgiving Holiday and Quarter break. 

WINTER QUARTER 1971-1972 

Monday-Tuesday — Registration. 
Wednesday — Classes begin. 

Saturday — Registration and first class meeting for Satur- 
day classes. 

Tuesday — Last day to add a class. 

Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. — Meeting of students expecting to do 
student teaching spring quarter, Chapell Wilson Audi- 
torium. 

Saturday, 12:00 Noon — Christmas Holiday begins. 
Monday, 8:00 a.m. — Classes resume. 
Mid-term week. 
Tuesday — Classes end. 

Wednesday-Tuesday, noon — Final examinations. 
Wednesday-Sunday — Quarter Break. 

SPRING QUARTER 1972 

Monday-Tuesday — Registration. 
Wednesday — Classes begin. 

Saturday — Registration and first class meeting for Satur- 
day classes. 

Tuesday — Last day to add a class. 

Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. — Meeting of students expecting to do 
student teaching fall quarter, Chapell Wilson Auditorium. 
Thursday, 6:00 p.m. — Easter Holiday begins. 
Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. — Classes resume. 
Mid-term week. 
Friday — Classes end. 
Monday-Thursday — Final examinations. 
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m. — Commencement. 

SUMMER QUARTER 1972 

June 7 June 7-August 15 — Summer school. 

ii 



Nov. 


17 


Nov. 


18-24 


Nov. 


24-28 


Nov. 


29-30 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


18 


Jan. 


3 


Jan. 


17-21 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


23-29 


Mar. 


1-5 


Mar. 


6-7 


Mar. 


8 


Mar. 


11 


Mar. 


14 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


30 


Apr. 


4 


Apr. 


10-14 


May 


19 


May 


22-25 


May 


30 





CALENDAR 


FOR 197 1 




JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


JULY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 






CALENDAR 


FOR 1972 




JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


JULY 

S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 
CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

To facilitate prompt attention, inquiries should be directed to the fol- 
lowing : 

ADMISSIONS 

Clarence H. Gilstrap, Director of Admissions 

ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

Robert E. Snead, Director of Alumni Affairs 

ANNUITIES AND GIFTS, PUBLIC RELATIONS 
Robert T. Allen, Jr., Director of Public Affairs 

EMPLOYMENT OF STUDENTS, STUDENT LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS, 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 

Steve R. Gabriel, Director of Financial Aid 

FACULTY APPOINTMENTS AND INSTRUCTION 
Paul Sanders, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

GRADUATE ADMISSIONS, CURRICULUM, AND REQUIREMENTS 
Cratis D. Williams, Dean of Graduate School 

HOUSING 

Richard Tickle, Director of Housing 

INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 

Robert E. Reiman, Director of Institutional Research and Development 

LIBRARY 

Al Corum, Dean of Learning Resources 

PLACEMENT 

Robert L. Randall, Director of Placement 

RECORDS, CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS, CURRICULUM RE- 
QUIREMENTS, AND ALL TRANSCRIPTS 
W. Dean Meredith, Registrar 

STUDENT WELFARE 

Braxton Harris, Dean of Student Affairs 

UNIVERSITY POLICY 
Herbert Wey, President 



The University telephone number is 264-8871, area code 704. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

The University 1 

Location 1 

Purpose 1 

History 2 

Campus 3 

Organization 3 

Enrollment 6 

Degrees Conferred, 1970 6 

Admissions 7 

Expenses and Financial Aid 7 

Student Life 17 

The Graduate School 24 

History and Purpose 24 

Summary of Procedures for Graduate Degree Students 26 

Admission: Master's Degree Programs 26 

Election of Graduate Courses by Seniors 28 

Admission Status 29 

Advisers 29 

Admission to Candidacy 30 

Requirements for Graduation 32 

Master of Arts Degree for Teachers and Other School Personnel 36 

Master of Arts Degree 44 

Master of Science Degree 46 

Second Master's Degree 47 

Sixth-Year Programs for School Administrators 47 

Certificate of Advanced Study 47 

The Specialist's Degree 48 

Course Numbering 49 

Language Requirements 49 

Application for the Degree 49 

Commencement 50 

Academic Regulations 50 

Registration 50 

Full-Time Resident Student 50 

Auditors 50 

Unclassified Graduate Student 51 

Employed Students 51 

Foreign Students 51 

Class Attendance 52 

Student Responsibility 52 



Table of Contents — Continued 

Page 

Adding and Dropping Courses 52 

Withdrawal 53 

Suspension and Dismissal 53 

Grades 53 

Changing Grades 54 

Changing Majors 54 

Examinations 54 

Library Carrels 55 

Independent Study 55 

Extension Classes 55 

Saturday, Late Afternoon, and Evening Classes 56 

Internship 56 

Transfer Credit 57 

Expenses and Financial Aid 57 

Expenses 57 

Fellowships and Assistantships 58 

Loans 59 

Housing 59 

Refunds 59 

Transcripts 60 

Courses of Instruction 61 

Administration, Supervision, and Higher Education 61 

Art 67 

Biology 69 

Chemistry and Physical Science 74 

Economics and Business 76 

English 81 

Foreign Languages 85 

Geography and Geology 90 

Health and Physical Education 92 

History 95 

Home Economics 97 

Industrial Arts 98 

Library Science 102 

Mathematics 105 

Computer Science 109 

Music 110 

Philosophy and Religion 114 

Physics 115 

Political Science 116 



Table of Contents — Continued 

Page 

Psychology 120 

Sociology and Anthropology 125 

Special Programs 127 

Audiovisual Specialist 127 

Counselor 128 

Reading Specialist 130 

Special Education 132 

Speech 135 

Teacher Education 140 

Graduate Assistants, 1969-1970 143 

Graduate Fellows, 1969-1970 145 

Graduate Faculty 146 

Graduate Council 159 

Board of Trustees 160 

Board of Visitors 160 

Administrative Officers 161 

Index 163 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletingraduate1972unse 



The University 

LOCATION 

Appalachian State University is a part of the system of public 
higher education of the State of North Carolina. It is located at 
Boone, county seat of Watauga County, North Carolina, on the 
crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains at an elevation of 3,333 feet, 
the highest elevation of any four-year college east of the Mis- 
sissippi River. Situated in an area of great natural beauty, near 
the Blue Ridge Parkway which connects the Shenandoah and the 
Smoky Mountain National Parks, Boone is easily accessible 
over United States Highways 221, 321, and 421, which intersect 
in and lead out from the town. 

PURPOSE 

Within the framework established by the North Carolina 
State Board of Higher Education, Appalachian State University 
is dedicated to the total development of its constituency through 
instruction, research, and service. 

In pursuit of this purpose, Appalachian pledges itself : 

To nurture an intellectual climate in which truth is sought and 
respected. 

To provide a liberal education for all its students. 

To offer, within the scope of its programs, pre-professional and 
professional education to those students who desire it. 

To maintain a faculty dedicated to teaching and scholarship. 

To advance the frontiers of knowledge through research. 

To be cognizant of new knowledge and prepared to meet the chal- 
lenge of new ideas. 

To expand cultural horizons and develop appreciation of ethical 
and aesthetic values. 

To make its resources available to the people within its sphere 
of influence. 

To serve as a force for social improvement. 

To cooperate with all institutions and agencies which are dedicated 
to the betterment of mankind. 



Z. THE UNIVERSITY 
HISTORY 

Appalachian's antecedent, Watauga Academy, was created by 
its founders, B. B. and D. D. Dougherty, to bring educational 
opportunity to the people of North Carolina. Appalachian Train- 
ing School, created by the General Assembly of 1903, was con- 
ceived and founded to prepare teachers for an expanding public 
school system, and especially to prepare better teachers for the 
public schools of the isolated section of the northwestern part of 
the state. Within a little more than twenty years Appalachian 
Training School became Appalachian State Normal School and 
began its involvement in the total complex program of public 
education. 

As the functions of the public schools changed, with the emer- 
gence of new technologies, and with the rising predominance of 
industry over agriculture, public school education became more 
diversified in North Carolina. To help meet the demand for new 
and different kinds of teachers for the region, Appalachian 
evolved from Normal School to Teachers College. The change 
took place officially in 1929, and the institution began to expand 
its sphere of influence into the more populous Piedmont section 
of the state. During the early 1940's, graduate education for 
teachers was added to the program, and in 1965, Appalachian 
was authorized to begin the development of the Sixth-year Pro- 
gram for school administrators. At the same time the institution 
abandoned its long-held single-purpose concept and developed 
programs leading to degrees for those not wishing to prepare 
for teaching. 

The 1967 General Assembly of North Carolina designated 
Appalachian a regional university and changed its name to 
Appalachian State University. This change brought with it addi- 
tional responsibilities. The 1969 General Assembly enunciated 
these responsibilities as follows : 

"The regional universities shall provide undergraduate and 
graduate instruction in the liberal arts, fine arts, and sciences, 
and in the learned professions, including teaching, these being 
defined as those professions which rest upon advanced knowledge 
in the liberal arts and sciences; and said regional universities 
shall provide for research in the liberal arts and sciences, pure 
and applied. The regional universities shall provide other under- 



THE UNIVERSITY O 

graduate and graduate programs of instruction as are deemed 
necessary to meet the needs of their constituencies and of the 
State. Regional universities insofar as possible shall extend their 
educational activities to all persons of the State who are unable 
to avail themselves of their advantages as resident students by 
means of extension courses, by lectures, and by such other means 
and methods as may seem to the boards of trustees and adminis- 
trative officers as most effective." 

CAMPUS 

The central campus of Appalachian State University covers 
60 acres of the Blue Ridge Mountains. In addition, the University 
owns 330 acres of land, not immediately adjacent to the central 
campus, which is being considered for expansion of its services. 
Almost all of the buildings on the central campus are new or have 
been recently renovated. These modern facilities set against the 
backdrop of Rich Mountain and Howard's Knob give Appa- 
lachian a physical plant of superior utility and beauty. 

ORGANIZATION 

The functional organization of the University comprises four 
administrative divisions under the general direction of the Presi- 
dent and the faculty. The divisions of Business Affairs and 
Public Affairs support and facilitate operations of the other 
divisions. The division of Student Affairs includes the Office of 
the Dean of Student Affairs, the Offices of the Deans of Men and 
Women, the Office of Student Financial Aid, the Student Housing 
Office, the Office of Placement Services, and the University 
Health Services. 

For purposes of instruction, the division of Academic Affairs 
is made up of the General College, the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the College of Business, the College of Education, the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts, and the Graduate School. It 
also includes the Summer Session, the Library, the Extension 
Division, the Office of the Registrar, the Office of Admissions, 
and certain auxiliary agencies such as the Computer Center and 
the Audiovisual Center which contribute to the instructional and 
research programs administered by the division of Academic 
Affairs. 



^f THE UNIVERSITY 

THE GENERAL COLLEGE provides, during the freshman 
and sophomore years, guidance and instruction in the general 
education areas required of all students. In addition, the student 
in the General College may take courses required by the par- 
ticular college from which he plans to graduate. All transfer 
students below the junior level are admitted to the General 
College. A transfer student who does not satisfy the conditions 
for admission to the upper level college from which he plans to 
graduate may be admitted to the General College. 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES provides in- 
struction through the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Eng- 
lish, Foreign Languages, Geography and Geology, History, 
Mathematics, Philosophy and Religion, Physics, Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology and Anthropology. Each of these 
departments offers a major leading to the Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree. The Departments of Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign 
Languages, History, Mathematics, and Physics offer majors 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with teacher certifica- 
tion in cooperation with the College of Education. It is also 
possible for a student to earn the Bachelor of Science degree 
with teacher certification in science with concentration in 
biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics. A student may earn 
the Bachelor of Science degree with teacher certification in social 
science with concentration in geography, political science, or 
sociology and anthropology. 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS was established July 1, 1970. 
During the 1970-71 academic year the faculty of this college is 
engaged in a study to determine the appropriate organizational 
structure for the college. Opportunity is provided to earn the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with 
concentration in accounting, economics, finance, management, 
and marketing. The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
economics is available. In cooperation with the College of Educa- 
tion majors are offered leading to the Bachelor of Science degree 
with teacher certification in comprehensive or basic business. It 
is also possible to concentrate in economics in the social science 
major for the Bachelor of Science degree with teacher certifi- 
cation. 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION offers instruction through 
the Departments of Teacher Education; Special Programs; 



THE UNIVERSITY sJ 

Library Science; and Administration, Supervision and Higher 
Education. The college has primary responsibility for the. prepa- 
ration of young men and women as teachers, librarians, super- 
visors, and administrators for the public schools of North Caro- 
lina. The College of Education offers the Bachelor of Science 
degree with teacher certification in the fields of elementary edu- 
cation, library science, and special education in the area of 
mental retardation. The Bachelor of Science degree with teacher 
certification jnay be earned in each of the following fields: art; 
biology; chemistry; economics and business; English; French; 
health and physical education; history; home economics educa- 
tion ; industrial arts ; mathematics ; music ; physics ; science with 
concentration in biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics; 
social science with concentration in geography, political science, 
sociology and anthropology, or economics ; Spanish ; speech ; and 
special education in the area of speech and hearing by taking a 
major in the College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Fine 
and Applied Arts. The College of Education has the responsi- 
bility for administering the program leading to the Bachelor of 
Technology degree. This program is for selected graduates of 
technical institutes and community colleges in business and engi- 
neering technology. It does not lead to teacher certification. 

THE COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS offers in- 
struction through the Departments of Art, Health and Physical 
Education, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Military Science, 
Music, and Speech. The College of Fine and Applied Arts offers 
the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in art, music, and 
speech. It offers the Bachelor of Science degree without teacher 
certification with majors in health and physical education, home 
economics in business, industrial arts, and music: piano peda- 
gogy. In cooperation with the College of Education, the degree 
of Bachelor of Science with teacher certification in art, health 
and physical education, home economics education, industrial 
arts, music, social science with concentration in speech, and 
special education in the area of speech and hearing is offered. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL is organized to provide facilities 
for advanced study leading to the Master of Arts degree, the 
Master of Science degree, the advanced certificate for the sixth- 
year program for school administrators, the Specialist in Edu- 
cation degree, and the Specialist in Science degree. The Master 



6 



THE UNIVERSITY 



of Arts degree may be earned with majors in audiovisual educa- 
tion, biology, chemistry, counseling, economics and business, 
English, elementary education, foreign languages, industrial 
arts, library science, mathematics, music, physical education, 
reading, educational administration and supervision, social 
science, special education, history, geography, general psy- 
chology, clinical psychology, and political science. The Master 
of Science degree may be earned in chemistry and biology. The 
Specialist in Education degree is offered in educational leader- 
ship, elementary education, and higher education. The Specialist 
in Science degree may be earned in biology. 

ENROLLMENT, FALL QUARTER, 1970 

Freshmen 1,847 

Sophomores 1,416 

Juniors 1,403 

Seniors 1,313 

Special 74 

Graduates 612 

Extension 423 

Total Number Enrolled 7,088 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1970 

June 1970 August 1970 

Bachelor of Arts 62 20 

Bachelor of Science 720 241 

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 75 18 

Master of Arts 88 302 

Total Number of Degrees Conferred 945 581 



Admissions 

Applicants are admitted whose preparation, ability, interest, 
character, and general fitness indicate that they can do success- 
ful work. Applicants must submit their social security number 
and, if applicable, their selective service number and number 
and address of their local draft board. Appalachian admits stu- 
dents at the beginning of the fall, winter, spring, summer quarter, 
or either session of summer school. Early application is advisable 
for any student since these applications are considered first. 

Out-of-state applicants must meet the same admissions criteria 
as required of North Carolina residents. 

The complete medical history of each applicant must be sub- 
mitted on the medical form supplied by the Admissions Office 
after approval has been given. 

All correspondence concerning admissions to the Graduate 
School should be addressed to the Dean of the Graduate School, 
Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, 28607. 



Expenses and Financial Aid 

The application for admission must be accompanied by an 
application fee of $10.00, which is not deductible or refundable. 

A fee of $116.00 for students entering Appalachian for the 
first time or 850.00 for a student already enrolled must accom- 
pany the application for a room reservation. The room reserva- 
tion fee is deductible from the room rent charge at the opening of 
the first quarter of residence. 

All students living in university dormitories are required to 
purchase the minimum number of meal tickets at the time of 
registration. Mealbooks are redeemable only during the academic 
year in which they are issued. The cost of meals may vary con- 
siderably according to individual needs and desires. The cafeteria 
is on the main campus and meals are available at moderate 
prices, for cash payment or mealbook tickets. 

With the approval of its governing bodies, the University re- 
serves the right to change these fees any time that it becomes 
necessarv. 



8 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Day Students 

Regular day students pay all regular expenses except for room 
rent, cafeteria meals, laundry and dry cleaning. 

Foreign Students 

Foreign students are considered out-of-state students and, 
therefore, have to pay the out-of-state rate unless they have a 
graduate assistantship. 

Part-time Students 

Students who register for less than a full load pay the follow- 
ing charges : 

One through three hours, $30.00; four through six hours, 
$43.00 ; more than six hours, full charges. 

Out-of-State Students 

The following statement governs a student's classification as a 
resident or nonresident of North Carolina with respect to tuition 
payment. 

1. General: The tuition charge for legal residents of North 
Carolina is less than for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state 
tuition, a legal resident must have maintained his domicile in 
North Carolina for at least the six months preceding the date 
of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher 
education in this state. 

2. Minors: The legal residence of a person under twenty-one 
years of age at the time of his first enrollment in an institu- 
tion of higher education in this state is that of his parents, 
surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where parents 
are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the 
father will control unless custody of the minor has been 
awarded by court order to the mother or to a legal guardian 
other than a parent. No claim of residence in North Carolina 
based upon residence of a guardian in North Carolina will 
be considered if either parent is living unless the action of the 
court appointing the guardian antedates the student's first 
enrollment in a North Carolina institution of higher educa- 
tion by at least twelve months. 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 7 

A minor student whose parents move their legal residence 
from North Carolina to a location outside of the state shall be 
considered to be a nonresident after six months from the date 
of removal from the state. 

For the purpose of determining residence requirements 
under these rules, a person will be considered a minor until 
he has reached his twenty-first birthday. Married minors, 
however, are entitled to establish and maintain their resi- 
dence in the same manner as adults. Attendance at an institu- 
tion of higher education as a student cannot be counted as 
fulfilling the six-month domicile requirement. 

3. Adults: A person twenty-one years of age or older is eligible 
for in-state tuition if he has maintained continuous domicile 
in North Carolina for the six months next preceding the date 
of enrollment or re-enrollment, exclusive of any time spent in 
attendance at any institution of higher education. An in-state 
student reaching the age of twenty-one is not required to re- 
establish residence provided that he maintains his domicile 
in North Carolina. 

4. Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that 
of her husband, except that a woman currently enrolled as an 
in-state in an institution of higher education may continue as 
a resident even though she marries a nonresident. If the hus- 
band is a nonresident and separation or divorce occurs/ the 
woman may qualify for in-state tuition after establishing her 
domicile in North Carolina for at least six months under the 
same conditions as she could if she were single. 

5. Military Personnel: No person shall be presumed to have 
gained or lost in-state residence status in North Carolina 
while serving in the Armed Forces. However, a member of 
the Armed Forces may obtain in-state residence status for 
himself, his spouse, or his children after maintaining his 
domicile in North Carolina for at least six months preceding 
his or their enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of 
higher education in this state. 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for 
permanent residence may establish North Carolina residence 
in the same manner as any other nonresident. 



10 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of 
taxes to the State of North Carolina apart from legal resi- 
dence will not qualify one for the in-state tuition rate. 

8. Change of Status: The residence status of any student is 
determined as of the time of his first enrollment in an institu- 
tion of higher education in North Carolina and may not 
thereafter be changed except; (a) in the case of a nonresi- 
dent student at the time of his first enrollment who, or if a 
minor his parents, has subsequently maintained a legal resi- 
dence in North Carolina for at least six months, and (b) in 
the case of a resident who has abandoned his legal residence 
in North Carolina for a minimum period of six months. In 
either case, the appropriate tution rate will become effective 
at the beginning of the term following the six-month period. 

9. Responsibility of Student: Any student or prospective stu- 
dent in doubt concerning his residence status must bear the 
responsibility for securing a ruling by stating his case in 
writing to the admissions officer. The student who, due to 
subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classifica- 
tion, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, has 
the responsibility of immediately informing the Director of 
Business Affairs and Registrar of his circumstances in writ- 
ing. Failure to give complete and correct information re- 
garding residence constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. 

Student Welfare and Activities 

This fee supports such services and activities as health care, 
student government, concerts and lectures, class dues, popular 
programs, forensics, dramatics, intramurals, student publica- 
tions, attendance at all athletic events on campus, and transcript 
fee. 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

Laundry of linens and personal clothing, pressing, and dry 
cleaning are provided at the university laundry. Students whose 
laundry service is in excess of the minimum charge will settle the 
account with the Cashier's Office. All students should have per- 
manent name markings in every article to be laundered or dry 
cleaned. 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



11 



Auditing 

A person, except one on university appointment or a student 
registered for a full schedule, who audits a class pays the regular 
registration and tuition fees. Auditors do not take tests, 
examinations, or receive grades or credit. 

Hospitalization and Accident Insurance 

A hospital and accident insurance coverage is available on a 
voluntary basis to all students at a low cost. For married or 
widowed students a family plan is also offered. This insurance 
will pay a substantial part of charges for hospitalization, surgi- 
cal procedures, treatment for accidental injuries, diagnostic 
tests, and medical emergencies. The insurance policy is effective 
for twelve months between September first and August thirty- 
first and provides coverage both on campus and off. Each stu- 
dent is urged to purchase this protection. In addition, the Uni- 
versity Health Services will pay the first $25.00 toward the 
hospital bill of any student admitted to Watauga County Hos- 
pital in Boone. 

Change of Course 1.00 

For each course change initiated by the student after registra- 
tion day he must pay a fee of $1.00. 

Change of Room 2.00 

For change of dormitory room initiated by the student after 
registration day. 

Diploma 

Bachelor's degree 6.00 

Graduate degree 10.00 

Certificate of Advanced Study 10.00 

Graduate Record Examinations 

Aptitude Test 8.00 

Advanced Test 9.00 

or 

Aptitude Test and one Advanced Test 15.00 



12 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Late Registration 10.00 

A student who does not complete his registration during the 
announced registration date is charged a $10.00 fee. 

National Teacher Examinations and Miller Analogies Test 

National Teacher Examinations (common 

and a teaching area) 13.00 

Common Examinations only 10.00 

One Teaching Area 9.00 

Late registration fee 3.00 

Miller Analogies Test (individual 

administration) 7.50 

Physical Education Activity 

Per Quarter 

Bowling 8.00 

Skiing 50.00 

Golf 14.00 

SPECIAL NOTE 

Before taking final examinations at the close of each quarter, 
a student is expected to settle accounts. A student may not 
register for a new quarter until all charges have been paid or 
arranged for and until all textbooks are returned to the Uni- 
versity Bookstore. A student cannot receive a degree, certificate, 
or transcript of credits until all accounts, except current, and 
loans have been paid. 

REFUND OF FEES 

Room reservation fees from new students for the fall quarter 
are refundable upon notification on or prior to May 10 and from 
returning students on or prior to June 15. Requests for refunds 
should be made to the Director of Housing. 

If a student withdraws from the University before the close 
of the registration period, one-half of the room rent and tuition 
and a proportionate part of the amount paid for meals will be 
refunded. If a student withdraws after the close of the registra- 
tion period, a proportionate part of the amount paid for meals 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



13 



will be refunded. Refunds will be calculated from the date of the 
official withdrawal from the University. Students who are 
suspended for disciplinary reasons or who do not formally with- 
draw are not eligible for a refund. 

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Opportunities for financial aid, though not unlimited, are 
within the reach of almost every student who can show both 
superior academic achievement and definite financial need. The 
student who realizes that he will be unable to meet university 
expenses without assistance should determine the approximate 
amount of assistance needed per quarter and take early initiative 
in seeking information from the Director of Student Aid and 
should file applications for at least one of the principal types of 
financial aid indicated below. 

Aid applications for the following academic year must be sub- 
mitted by April 15. In addition, applicants interested in receiving 
a National Defense Loan, Work-Study, or an Education Oppor- 
tunity Grant administered through the University should also 
have their parents submit a Parents' Confidential Statement. 

Information to Veterans 

The University is approved for providing training under pro- 
visions of Chapter 34, Title 38, U. S. Code, G. I. Bill effective 
June 1966; Chapter 35, Title 38, U. S. Code, the children of* de- 
ceased or disabled veterans; and Public Law 894, for disabled 
veterans. 

Students enrolling under provisions of Chapter 34 and 35 will 
pay fees at the time of registration but receive a monthly educa- 
tion and training allowance from the Veterans Administration. 
Since the first check is usually delayed, a veteran should make 
his arrangements early. 

Students may contact the Veterans Administration Regional 
Office, 301 North Main Street, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 
for information and necessary forms. Approval from The 
Veterans Administration regarding eligibility should be re- 
ceived by the student before entering school. The approval form 
{certificate of eligibility) should be submitted to the Financial 
Aid Office for completion after the verteran enrolls. 



14 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Student Employment Programs 

The student employment programs enable eligible students to 
help pay college expenses while attending classes full time. Stu- 
dents participating in the programs are employed in the cafe- 
terias, library, administrative offices, and in the various colleges 
and departments of the University. 

The student employment programs consist of The Appalachian 
State University Self-Help Program and The University Work- 
Study Program ; the latter is of federal assistance under Title I 
of The Economic Opportunity Act. A student returning to school 
for the summer session only is not eligible to work under this 
program. 

Generally, a student may work up to 15 hours per week. A 
student's work schedule will depend upon class schedules and will 
be arranged by the student and his work supervisor. The amount 
of compensation the student receives depends upon the program 
for which he qualifies. Many students earn as much as one third 
of the total necessary expenses of the year. 

Jobs off campus are not assigned by any committee or division 
of the University, but such jobs do exist. Whenever possible, the 
Director of Student Aid will help the student find one of these 
jobs. 



Student Loan Programs 

College Foundation, Inc. 

Applicant must be a bona fide resident of North Carolina to be 
eligible for a loan from this source. 

A student may borrow up to $1,500 per year at a rate of 7 
percent on the unpaid principal balance. The federal government 
will pay the 7 percent interest during the in-school period for 
students from families with adjusted incomes less than $15,000 
per year. The borrower will assume the full 7 percent interest 
rate upon termination of his education in addition to Vi of 1 per- 
cent insurance premium, which he pays during both in-school 
and repayment periods. 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



15 



Information and applications may be obtained by writing the 
Director of Student Financial Aid. 

National Defense Student Loan Program 

Appalachian participates in the National Defense Student 
Loan Program, which is a part of the National Defense Educa- 
tion Act of 1958. The amount of the loan committed to a student 
is based on the financial need of the student. Graduate students 
may borrow as much as $2,500 per year to a maximum of 
$10,000. The repayment period and the interest do not begin 
until nine months after the student ends his studies. The loans 
bear interest at the rate of 3 percent per year and repayment of 
principal may be extended over a ten-year period, as long as a 
minimum repayment of $45 per quarter is met. 

If a borrower becomes a full-time teacher in an elementary or 
secondary school or in an institution of higher education, as 
much as half of the loan may be forgiven at the rate of 10 per- 
cent for each year of teaching service. Borrowers who teach in 
certain eligible schools located in areas of primarily low-income 
families may qualify for cancellation of their entire obligation 
at the rate of 15 percent per year. 

A graduate student returning to school for the summer session 
only is not eligible for a loan under this program. 

University Consolidated Loan Fund 

When a student borrows money from any of the loan funds, he 
signs a promissory note and makes arrangements for repayment 
satisfactory to the Office of the Controller. Arrangements may be 
made to repay the loan and interest in installments over a rea- 
sonable period of time after graduation or discontinuance of 
study. A student who receives a loan should understand that 
loan funds are revolving funds and that the University has the 
same interest in protecting them as it had securing them. 

The following loan funds have been established for the benefit 
of worthy students who need financial aid : 

Nora E. Edmondson Loan Fund of $500 was donated in 1956 
by Mrs. Bertie E. Perkins in memory of her sister, Miss Nora E. 
Edmondson, who at the time of her death was the oldest graduate 



16 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



of the University, and who from her first visit in 1942 until her 
death, was one of its most loyal and devoted friends. This fund 
is available to graduate students only. 

W. J. Waters Graduate Loan Fund of $500 was donated in 
1958 by S. J. Waters, alumnus of Appalachian, for graduate 
students only. 

Tan Beta Emergency Loan Fund was established during the 
winter quarter of 1969, to aid students with short term emer- 
gency financial needs. This fund is intended to be a revolving 
fund to aid as many students as possible during their stay at 
Appalachian. 

Dr. W. Amos Abrams Loan Fund. Established in 1970 by 
members of the North Carolina Education Assocation in honor of 
Dr. Abrams, the first chairman of Appalachian's Department of 
English. Loans available to graduate students preparing to teach 
English in North Carolina public schools. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The J. D. Rankin Memorial Scholarship was established in 
1966 in memory of the late Dr. Rankin, who was Dean of 
Appalachian for more than thirty years, and was Dean Emeritus 
at the time of his death. He also served as interim President. The 
scholarship is unrestricted. 

The G. P. Eggers Scholarship was established in 1969 by the 
faculty of the Department of English to honor Dr. Eggers upon 
his retirement as chairman of the department. Dr. Eggers began 
his tenure at the University in 1927. The scholarship is restricted 
to seniors and graduate students in English who earned the 
undergraduate degree at Appalachian. 

Graduate Alumni Scholarship. Established in 1970 from con- 
tributions of Appalachian Graduate Alumni. $450 scholarships 
are available to well qualified full-time graduate students in 
financial need. Not available for summer study. 

The Captain E. F. Lovill Fund. A number of graduate fellow- 
ships and scholarships are available from the income on funds 
left to Appalachian State University from the estate of Captain 
E. F. Lovill's daughter, Mrs. Margaret Lovill Brawley, who 
formerly resided in Greensboro. Not available for summer study. 



Student Life 

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Recognizing the importance of first-hand acquaintance with 
man's cultural heritage, the University sponsors a wide variety 
of social and cultural activities throughout the year. 

As a complement to its instructional program, the University 
brings to the campus each year a variety of outstanding concerts, 
art exhibits, plays, lectures, recitals and films which involve stu- 
dents and faculty in both classical and contemporary expression 
of the fine arts. All of these activities are open to students, 
faculty and visitors in order to extend cultural opportunities to 
the university community. 

The John Hiliary Workman Memorial Lectures, established in 
1960, by Dr. John Hiliary Workman and his sister, Miss Sarah 
Workman of Cherryville, North Carolina, brings a nationally 
known speaker in the field of economics to the campus each year 
for lectures. In addition to special programs, a student-faculty 
committee presents outstanding programs of convocations, 
lectures, and concerts. 

The Popular Programs Committee of the Student Government 
Association sponsors a series of pop concerts during the acad- 
emic year, which brings to campus nationally known popular 
entertainment groups. 

During the academic year, the Art Department presents a 
series of outstanding art exhibits of prints, paintings, and sculp- 
ture by distinguished contemporary artists. The artists' works 
are exhibited for public enjoyment, and since the gallery is lo- 
cated in the Art Department, the works are available for the 
student body. Students and faculty are encouraged to exhibit 
their work throughout the year. The department sponsors 
special art programs such as the Senior and Faculty Art 
Exhibits. 

Frequent recitals are given by the students and faculty of the 
Music Department and by the various musical organizations ; on 
occasions the department features outstanding professional 
musicians as guest soloists in choral, band, and symphony 
concerts. 

The social calendar also includes formal and informal dances, 
parties, receptions, dinners, teas, fashion shows, and interclass 
parties. 



18 



STUDENT LIFE 



UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES 

The responsibility for assuring healthful conditions for study, 
work, and personal life must be shared by all members of the 
academic community. Appalachian recognizes its responsibility 
to provide students access to means of assuring their optimum 
physical, emotional, intellectual, and social well being. 

The Medical Center provides physicians, nurses, and labora- 
tory facilities aimed toward prevention of illness, and the treat- 
ment of disease. The Medical Center is open 24 hours daily while 
the University is in session. Students may be admitted to the 
Medical Center Infirmary for brief treatment of minor illness. 
Persons requiring general hospital care are admitted to Watauga 
County Hospital. 

The Psychological Services Center aims to stimulate a climate 
which nourishes essential human relationships and which reduces 
intrapersonal and interpersonal conflicts among all members of 
the community. Clinical psychologists, guidance counselors, a 
psychiatrist, and others provide personal counseling and psycho- 
therapy for students. 

The Testing Division of Psychological Services has the re- 
sponsibility for organizing and administering individual and 
group tests for the university community. Tests available range 
from individual psychological tests to large group tests such as 
the Graduate Record Examination. 

A hospital and accident insurance coverage is available on a 
voluntary basis to all students at a low cost. For married or 
widowed students a family plan is also offered. This insurance 
will pay a substantial part of charges for hospitalization, surgical 
procedures, treatment for accidental injuries, diagnostic tests, 
and medical emergencies. The insurance policy is effective for 
12 months between September first and August thirty-first and 
provides coverage both on campus and off. Each student is urged 
to purchase this protection. In addition, the University Health 
Services will pay the first twenty-five dollars toward the hospital 
bill of any student admitted to Watauga County Hospital in 
Boone. 

All contacts with the University Health Services are con- 
sidered confidential. Records are maintained separately for use of 



STUDENT LIFE 



19 



health personnel only and are not available to the administration, 
faculty, or anyone else. In case of serious illness or injury in 
minors, the parents or guardians will be notified. The Health 
Services do not issue "excuses" for class absences. 

Students who withdraw from the University for reasons of 
health must receive medical clearance through the University 
Health Services before being readmitted. Before clearance is 
granted the student must present evidence that the condition 
which necessitated withdrawal has improved and that there is 
reasonable expectation of his ability to participate in university 
life. The Health Services will offer assistance aimed toward help- 
ing students with a health impairment successfully attend the 
University. 

MOTOR VEHICLES 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of the University 
who operate or park or drive a motor vehicle on the university 
campus or its environs must register their motor vehicles with 
the University before they are allowed to park or drive on the 
campus. This includes commuting students. 

Application for parking privileges may be made on Registra- 
tion Day. THIS IS DONE AS A PART OF ACADEMIC 
REGISTRATION. The parking decal should be affixed to the 
motor vehicle by the first day of classes at which time any out- 
of-date parking decals must be removed. 

Any student requiring the use of a motor vehicle after Reg- 
istration Day for any period, however short, must immediately 
register his motor vehicle before he is allowed to drive or park 
on the campus. All vehicles not registered on Registration Day 
must be registered at the University Traffic & Security Office. 

A student may not register a vehicle that was or is owned or 
used by another student, unless ownership of the vehicle has 
been transferred and proof to that effect can be shown. A gradu- 
ate student, staff member, or faculty member may not register a 
vehicle for a freshman or sophomore student. 

POSTAL SERVICE 

Appalachian's Post Office is located on the first floor of the 
W. H. Plemmons Student Center. All students living in a resi- 



20 



STUDENT LIFE 



dence hall on campus are pre-assigned a post office box. No addi- 
tional charge is required for this service. Boxes are not available 
for off -campus students. 

When a student moves off campus or leaves Appalachian, it is 
very important that he check by the Post Office window and leave 
his correct forwarding address. 

The hours for the mail room are 8:00-5:00 Monday-Friday 
and 8:00-12:00 Saturday. 

As part of the Post Office a United States Contract Station 
offers to the students any services available at the main U. S. 
Post Office. The hours for the Contract Station are as follows: 
8:30-4:00 Monday-Friday, 8:30-11:30 Saturday. 

PLACEMENT AND CAREER PLANNING SERVICES 

Appalachian maintains a central Office of Placement with a 
Director and staff whose function is to assist students and 
alumni in choosing and securing a suitable position. The total 
placement function of the University is the responsibility of this 
office. All commercial, industrial, governmental, and educational 
placement is handled by this one office. All qualified students and 
alumni who have completed or expect to complete any one of the 
degree programs register for permanent placement and career 
planning services. Referrals are made to the University Health 
Services Psychological Center for testing and counseling. 

Although the Office of Placement cannot guarantee profes- 
sional appointments, every effort is made to study the profes- 
sional qualifications and interests of the student and to assist him 
in obtaining satisfactory employment. Relationships have been 
established with outstanding school systems, colleges, industries, 
and local, state, and federal governmental agencies throughout 
the country. The office maintains accurate and up-to-date infor- 
mation regarding vacancies, certification and license require- 
ments, and qualifying examinations, and arranges for interviews 
with prospective employers. 

The office maintains membership in the Southern College 
Placement Association, the College Placement Council, and the 
State and National Association for School, College and Univer- 
sity Staffing. Students and alumni of member institutions are 



STUDENT LIFE 



21 



entitled to reciprocal placement services and nationwide com- 
puterized service. 

GRADUATION 

Degrees are conferred at the close of the spring and summer 
quarters. Candidates for degrees and/or teaching certificates 
must file application for degrees and North Carolina certificates 
on blanks provided by the Dean of the Graduate School on reg- 
istration day of the quarter in which graduating requirements 
will be completed. At the time of filing the application all re- 
quirements except current work should be completed. 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

Since the beginning, summer sessions have been an integral 
part of Appalachian's programs. During the summer of 1970, 
there were over 5,000 registrations in the summer sessions. 
Courses are offered on a full quarter basis, in two consecutive 
five-week terms, and in four two-weeks terms. 

The primary purpose of the summer session is to provide op- 
portunities for students to accelerate their progress toward de- 
grees by attending college year-round. The schedule of graduate 
classes is designed for graduate students from Appalachian and 
other colleges and universities who desire to accelerate their 
programs, and for teachers and school administrators who de- 
sire to advance professionally. 

The schedule of courses to be offered during the summer 
quarter is published as a part of the summer sessions bulletin in 
March of each year. Copies of the bulletin, or information about 
the summer sessions, may be had by communicating with the 
Registrar, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, 
28607. 

LIBRARY 

The library is the center of academic life at Appalachian 
State University. The Carol Grotnes Belk Library building is 
designed to accommodate approximately 400,000 volumes and 
contains 86,000 square feet of floor space. The building is modern 
in design and equipment, offering space for maximum use to 
faculty and students. 



22 



STUDENT LIFE 



In addition to the book collection, the library has an extensive 
collection of non-book materials. These include microfilms, peri- 
odicals and newspapers, slides and filmstrips, maps, recordings, 
and sheet music. The library is well equipped for graduate study 
in a number of fields. It has a well-rounded collection in art, 
biology, business, chemistry, economics, education, English and 
American literature, French, geography, geology, health and 
physical education, history, home economics, industrial arts, 
library science, mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political 
science, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, and speech. The 
library maintains four special collections : the Juvenile Collec- 
tion, the Curriculum Laboratory, the Library Science Profes- 
sional Collection, and the Music Library. Each of these libraries 
is supervised by a professional librarian. The library is admini- 
stered by a staff of 13 professionally trained librarians. A refer- 
ence librarian is available at all times to aid students in locating 
materials that are needed. 

The past few years at Appalachian's library can best be classi- 
fied as a period of gratifying growth and use. With increased 
financial support from the state and grants from other sources, 
the holdings of the library have increased considerably. The in- 
creasing demands placed on the library by students and faculty 
have resulted in its maximum use. 

AUDIOVISUAL CENTER 

The Audiovisual Center provides : films and other instruc- 
tional materials and equipment which are checked out by depart- 
ments; a central clearing office for requesting and renting ma- 
terials available from off -campus sources; facilities permitting 
faculty members to preview, audition and evaluate new ma- 
terials; local production laboratories for producing classroom 
teaching materials not commercially available; and the repair 
and maintenance of all equipment on campus. 

Audiovisual materials and supplies are stored in and issued by 
the central audiovisual office, which is located on the first floor 
of Edwin Duncan Hall. Audiovisual equipment is assigned as 
needed to the departments, and the chairman is responsible for 
its care and safety. The staff of the Audiovisual Center is avail- 
able to give instruction in the use and care of audiovisual equip- 



STUDENT LIFE 



23 



ment and to assist in renting off-campus films to be used in 
classes. 

The materials center includes 8 and 16 mm films, filmstrips, 
slides, phonograph records, and pre-recorded tapes for use on 
campus. A central catalog and file of all materials available are 
maintained. 

Production services available include mounting of pictures 
(wet and dry), photocopying, tape recording and duplication, 
and the production of transparencies for overhead projectors. 

COMPUTER CENTER 

The Computer Center serves as a laboratory for instruction 
in computer science and data processing. In addition, it serves 
as a supportive agency for the administration and for the Office 
of the Registrar. 

READING CENTER 

The University maintains a reading center for university stu- 
dents and others who desire and need assistance in becoming 
more proficient readers. Diagnostic and remedial services are 
available through the center for university students, high school, 
and elementary age pupils. The center serves as a laboratory for 
teacher preparation at the undergraduate and graduate levels. 



The Graduate School 

Graduate courses and workshops taught by nationally known 
educators were made available to teachers attending summer 
school at Appalachian as early as 1937. Graduate study leading 
to the Master's degree was first offered during the summer of 
1942 with fifty-one students enrolled in the graduate division. 
Work offered during the summers of 1942-47 was on a coopera- 
tive basis with the University of North Carolina with that insti- 
tution giving full credit toward the Master's degree. 

Beginning with the summer of 1948, Appalachian accepted 
qualified students as candidates for the Master of Arts degree in 
Education. At first, a candidate for the degree majored in edu- 
cation and completed a minor in a teaching field. By 1957 majors 
were available in eight academic fields. At present, majors are 
available in fifteen academic fields for persons preparing to teach 
and six fields for those who do not plan to teach. Sixth-year 
programs leading to Advanced Certificates for School Admini- 
strators were approved in 1966. 

At the beginning of the summer of 1970 a total of 4338 
Master's degrees had been awarded. There were 2662 persons 
enrolled in Graduate School in the summer of 1969 and 1022 in 
the fall quarter of 1969-70. The national reputation of the 
Graduate School is reflected in the facts that graduates of 102 
colleges and universities were among the 388 awarded the 
Master's degree in 1969 and that only 109 of those receiving the 
degree had graduated from Appalachian State University. 

On February 26, 1949, graduate study at Appalachian was ap- 
proved by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education. Programs leading to certificates based on the Mas- 
ter's degree are approved by the National Council for Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education. The Graduate School has been a mem- 
ber of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States since 
1961. 

The Graduate School, organized to provide facilities for ad- 
vanced study leading to Master's degrees, Certificates of Ad- 
vanced Study, and Specialist degrees, offers programs of grad- 
uate work during the summer session and the three quarters of 
the regular session. A maximum of nine quarter hours may be 
earned in a five-week summer term and fifteen quarter hours in 
a quarter in the regular session. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



25 



The primary purpose of graduate study is to offer capable 
students opportunities and facilities for advanced study and re- 
search in their fields of specialization. The graduate programs 
are designed to develop or extend significantly specialization in 
academic, professional, or interdisciplinary areas. One of func- 
tions of the Graduate School is to prepare master teachers, super- 
visors, and administrators. Accordingly, work leading to the 
Master of Arts degree is designed to prepare teachers for the 
following types of positions : Superintendent, Principal, General 
Supervisor, Supervisor of Student Teaching, School Librarian, 
Secondary School Teacher, Elementary School Teacher, School 
Counselor, School Musician, Reading Specialist, Audiovisual 
Specialist, Junior College Teacher, Special Education Teacher, 
Speech Correction Specialist. A second function is to give an 
opportunity for academic training beyond the bachelor's degree 
to persons not interested in professional education. For these, 
programs leading to the Master of Arts degree in English, geog- 
raphy, history, mathematics, political science, psychology, or 
clinical psychology and the Master of Science degree in biology or 
chemistry have been approved and others are being developed. 

Specialist in Education programs are offered in Educational 
Leadership, Elementary Education, and Higher Education. The 
Specialist in Science degree may be earned in biology. 

Courses which have been approved for graduate credit by the 
curriculum committee of the college, the Academic Policies Com- 
mittee, and the Graduate Council constitute the graduate offer- 
ings. Majors are provided in Audiovisual Education, Biology, 
Chemistry, Counseling, Economics and Business, English, Ele- 
mentary Education, French, Geography, Higher Education, 
History, Industrial Arts, Library Science, Mathematics, Music, 
Physical Education, Political Science, Psychology, Clinical Psy- 
chology, School Administration, School Supervision, Special 
Education, Speech Correction, Reading Specialization, Super- 
vision of Student Teaching, Social Science, and Spanish. Minors 
are available in Art, Junior College Education, Philosophy and 
Religion, Physics, Secondary Education, Sociology, Speech and 
Drama. 



26 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR GRADUATE 
DEGREE STUDENTS 



SUCCESSIVE STEPS 

1. Application for admission to 
Graduate School. 

2. National Teacher Examination, 
Graduate Record Examination, 
or Miller Analogies Test. 



3. Consultation with Departmental 
Adviser. 

4. File with the Departmental 
Adviser three copies of the 
application for candidacy and 
the program of study leading 
to the degree or certificate of 
advanced study. 

5. Clearance and application for 
degree. Obtain necessary forms 
and instructions from the Grad- 
uate Office. 



6. Comprehensive examination on 
major field. 



7. Completion and defense of 
thesis. 



8. Filing of unbound copies of 
thesis and abstracts in the 
University Library. 

9. Conferring of degree. 



TIME 

1. At least one month prior to 
student's first registration. 

2. An acceptable score on the NTE 
or GRE at least one month prior 
to student's first registration; 
an acceptable score on the MAT 
by the middle of the first 
quarter. 

3. During registration and about 
two weeks later. 

4. Prior to the close of the first 
quarter, or the term in which 
the first 12 quarter hours of 
graduate work will be com- 
pleted. 



5. Have program of study cleared 
in the Graduate Office prior 

to or during registration for 
the last quarter of work. File 
application for degree by end 
of the first week of final 
quarter. 

6. During last quarter and at 
least ten calendar days before 
graduation. 

7. Completed at least one month 
prior to date set for defense 
of thesis. Thesis must be 
defended prior to seven days 
before graduation. 

8. Immediately after approval of 
thesis committee and acceptance 
by the Dean of Graduate School. 

9. June or August commencement. 



ADMISSION: MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS 
Requirements 

1. A baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recog- 
nized standing. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



27 



2. An undergraduate background appropriate for graduate 
study in the proposed field. If the student intends to become 
a candidate for the Master of Arts degree with a major or 
minor in education, he must present a minimum of twenty- 
seven quarter hours of undergraduate credit in education and 
related courses. For prerequisites in his academic field he 
should consult the chairman of the graduate advisory com- 
mittee in that field. 

3. A satisfactory undergraduate academic record. For uncondi- 
tional admission, one must have either an overall average of 
at least C+ or at least an average of B for his last two years 
of undergraduate work and at least an average of B in his 
undergraduate major. However, a student with lower 
averages whose record reflects progressive improvement as 
he moved through undergraduate school and whose average 
for the senior year was at least B might be approved if his 
application is supported by excellent letters of reference and 
scores from both of the required tests that place him at or 
above the 50th percentile on a nationwide basis. A student 
with a lower academic average may be admitted for one 
quarter on probation if his references recommend him and his 
score from one of the required tests is satisfactory. Upon the 
satisfactory completion of one quarter of work, a student ad- 
mitted on probation may make application for admission to 
candidacy. 

4. A report of scores from the National Teacher Examinations 
Weighted Common and appropriate Area. If it is not possible 
for the applicant to take the NTE between the time he applies 
and the time he proposes to begin his graduate program, he 
may offer a score from the Miller Analogies Test instead and 
take the NTE during his first quarter on campus. The MAT 
is administered by appointment at the testing centers on the 
campuses of most universities and many senior colleges. Ap- 
plicants for admission to the programs for preparing junior 
college teachers may offer scores from the Graduate Record 
Examination Aptitude and the appropriate Advanced Sec- 
tions instead of the NTE. Applicants for admission to the 
Master of Arts program in English, geography, history, 
mathematics, political science, psychology, or clinical psy- 
chology or the Master of Science program in biology or 



28 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



chemistry will offer scores from the GRE Aptitude and the 
appropriate Advanced Sections. 

5. An application for admission made on a special form, obtain- 
able on request, and submitted with a complete transcript of 
all previous college work, unless done at Appalachian, at 
least one month before the candidate plans to begin graduate 
study. 

6. Two reference ratings, one of which must be from a college 
administrator or the head of the department in the candi- 
date's undergraduate major field of study. 

7. Freedom from serious physical, personality, or speech defects. 

8. Approval of the chairman of the department or division in 
which he intends to major. 

9. A record of successful teaching experience or satisfactory 
completion of student teaching is required for one applying 
for admission to a program leading to a certificate to work 
in public schools. Such an applicant must hold, or be eligible 
to hold, a North Carolina A teaching certificate in his chosen 
field or the comparable certificate in another state. 

ELECTION OF GRADUATE COURSES BY SENIORS 

Provided he is otherwise qualified for admission to graduate 
study, a senior at Appalachian State University who is within 
twelve quarter hours of graduation besides student teaching 
may apply to the Dean of the Graduate School for permission to 
carry up to twelve quarter hours of graduate course work while 
completing the baccalaureate degree. Such a student may not 
register for more than fifteen quarter hours for a regular 
quarter nor nine quarter hours for a summer term. Credit earned 
in this manner may not be used to meet requirements for the 
baccalaureate degree and, at the same time, be applied toward a 
master's degree. 

A senior who wishes to enroll in a graduate course as an elec- 
tive for undergraduate credit requirements for a major for the 
baccalaureate degree may apply to the chairman of his depart- 
ment and the Dean of the Graduate School to do so. However, 
any graduate course approved for this purpose may not later 
be applied toward a master's degree. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



29 



ADMISSION STATUS 

Regular. Regular admission to the Graduate School is granted 
to students who meet the established requirements for en- 
trance. 

Provisional. A student who does not have all the prerequisites 
for admission, or who has deficiencies, but is otherwise ad- 
missible may enter on a provisional basis. 

Probationary. A student who does not meet established require- 
ments for admission but who supplies sufficient evidence to 
show that he is capable of doing satisfactory graduate work 
may be admitted on a probationary basis for one quarter. If 
his work is satisfactory, he may then be permitted to apply 
for admission to candidacy for the master's degree. 

High Risk. A student with a good-to-excellent undergraduate 
record and who is highly recommended by the references but 
whose scores on required tests are below the normal cutoffs for 
admission to candidacy may be admitted as a "high risk" 
graduate student. If his GPA is at least 3.20 for the first 
quarter of graduate work, he may apply for candidacy. 

Unclassified. A student who does not plan to work for the mas- 
ter's degree may be permitted to register for graduate courses 
for self -improvement or to be used for renewing his certificate 
or changing his certification pattern. Such work, however, may 
not later be applied toward the degree. Unless the student al- 
ready holds the master's degree, he is normally encouraged to 
apply for admission in order to assure a dual use of his grad- 
uate credits. 

Transient. A student enrolled in another recognized graduate 
school may be permitted to register for a limited number of 
graduate credits at Appalachian provided the dean of the 
graduate school in which he is enrolled submits a statement 
that he is in good standing. 

ADVISERS 

Each student admitted to a program of graduate study at 
Appalachian State University is assigned an academic adviser or 
advisory committee from the department in which the student 



30 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



plans to complete the major portion of his work. The student is 
expected to meet with his adviser during the first term on campus 
for the purpose of developing a graduate degree program. 
Changes in this program can be made only with the approval of 
the adviser and the Dean of the Graduate School. Course work 
taken without the approval of the adviser will not automatically 
be applicable towards the degree. A list of advisers for each 
graduate major offered follows : 

Audiovisual Education John A. Pritchett, Jr. 

Biology F. Ray Derrick 

Chemistry George B. Miles 

Counseling J. Edward Harrill 

Economics and Business Orus Sutton 

English Loyd Hilton 

Elementary Education Richard E. Robinson 

Foreign Languages J. Roy Prince 

Geography Julian C. Yoder 

History Roy Carroll 

Industrial Arts Frank R. Steckel 

Junior College Leland Cooper 

Library Science Doris W. Cox 

Mathematics Harvey R. Durham 

Music William G. Spencer 

Physical Education Lawrence E. Horine 

Political Science Richter H. Moore 

Psychology Basil G. Johnson, Jr. 

Reading Specialist Uberto Price 

School Administration N. W. Shelton 

Nathaniel H. Shope 
Social Science Julian C. Yoder 

A. M. Denton 
Special Education Betty Jean Winford 

Speech Correction 

Speech Pathology Charles E. Porterfield 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

Admission to graduate study does not carry with it admission 
to candidacy for the master's degree. Admission to candidacy 
for the degree is acted upon after one quarter of graduate study 
in the University. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



31 



1. Admission to candidacy is contingent upon the recommenda- 
tion of the applicant's adviser and the approval of the Grad- 
uate Council. 

2. Before being accepted as a candidate for the degree, an appli- 
cant will be expected to have demonstrated ability to do 
satisfactory and creditable work at the graduate level. A stu- 
dent must have at least a B average at the time his application 
for candidacy is presented. 

3. Before filing application for admission to candidacy, the appli- 
cant shall have taken the Miller Analogies Test and the 
Common and the Area of the National Teacher Examinations. 
Admission is contingent upon acceptable scores. The cutoff 
scores are 30, 550, and 550 respectively. An applicant for 
admission to the junior college program may offer scores on 
the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude and the Ad- 
vanced Test in his Area in lieu of the National Teacher 
Examinations. An applicant for admission to the Master of 
Arts programs in English, geography, history, mathematics, 
political science, or psychology, or the Master of Science pro- 
gram in biology or chemistry must offer scores on GRE Apti- 
tude and the appropriate Advanced Test and the Miller 
Analogies Test. 

4. Each student shall file with his adviser a program of study 
and an application for admission to candidacy before the end 
of the quarter in which he will complete twelve quarter hours 
of resident graduate credit at Appalachian. Forms for this 
purpose may be obtained either from the adviser or from the 
Office of the Dean of the Graduate School. At the time the 
application is presented to the Graduate Council by the ad- 
viser, the student shall have completed the research course 
required in his major field and at least one other course in his 
major field. In all cases the student must complete at least 
fifteen quarter hours of credit after he is admitted to candi- 
dacy. 

5. The application for admission to candidacy shall be accom- 
panied by a proposed program of study approved by the appli- 
cant's advisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Normally, the program of study will include a major 
of not less than thirty-six quarter hours in biology, chemistry, 



32 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



counseling, economics and business, education, English, 
French, geography, history, industrial arts, library science, 
mathematics, music, physical education, political science, 
psychology, social sciences, or Spanish and a minor of not less 
than nine quarter hours in education if the proposed major is 
in a field other than education. 

6. Except for those preparing to teach in junior college or mov- 
ing toward the Master of Arts in English, geography, history, 
mathematics, political science, or psychology, or the Master 
of Science in biology or chemistry, students are required to 
present a minimum of twenty-seven quarter hours of under- 
graduate credit in education and related courses. The appli- 
cant's academic field shall be based upon a prerequisite of an 
undergraduate major in that field. Persons preparing in ele- 
mentary education for the N. C. Intermediate Certificate and 
majoring in an academic area must present a minimum of 
twenty-one hours of undergraduate work in the academic field. 
Those preparing for the N. C. Graduate Early Childhood 
Education Certificate may spread the academic graduate 
work over as many of four fields with at least nine hours of 
academic work in a single field. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Master of Arts, Master of Science, Specialist in 
Education, or Specialist in Science may be conferred upon a stu- 
dent who has completed creditably the program of work sub- 
mitted to the Graduate Council at the time his application for 
admission to candidacy was approved. Except in M.S. programs 
in biology and chemistry, and non-teaching M.A. programs in 
English, geography, history, political science, and psychology the 
candidate may, with the approval of his adviser and the Graduate 
Council, elect not to write a thesis. Hence, either of two programs 
for a master's degree may be followed. 

With Thesis: 

1. Thirty-nine acceptable quarter hours of graduate course work, 
exclusive of the thesis, completed in residence at Appalachian. 

2. A minimum residence of one academic year (36 weeks) or 
its equivalent in the summer. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



33 



3. A thesis in the major field of interest, for which the candidate 
shall register for credit not exceeding six quarter hours. 

4. All graduate credit offered for the degree must have been 
earned with a limit of six calendar years. By special per- 
mission of the Graduate Council, however, a student may 
validate by examination credit earned within a limit of ten 
calendar years. All work to be credited toward the degree, 
except that being taken currently, must be completed and 
grades recorded at least four weeks before the degree is 
awarded. 

5. Not more than fifteen quarter hours offered toward the degree 

may be credit earned in courses with catalog numbers below 
500. 

6. Grades on course work may not average lower than B. No 

graduate course with a grade below C will be credited toward 
the degree. 

7. An acceptable performance on a comprehensive examination, 

either oral, or written, or both, on the major field is required 
of every candidate for the degree. The comprehensive must 
be scheduled during the last one-third of the residence period 
and at least ten calendar days prior to the date on which the 
candidate receives the degree. 

At least four weeks (two weeks in the summer session) before 
he is scheduled to defend his thesis before his examining com- 
mittee, the candidate must submit a preliminary copy to each 
member of his committee. Within ten days (five days in the 
summer session), other members of the committee shall return 
the thesis to the chairman of the thesis committee with written 
criticism and statements of conditional or tentative approval. 

Prior to seven calendar days (five in the summer session) 
before he expects to receive his degree, the candidate will de- 
fend his thesis in an oral examination by his committee. 

Immediately after the approval by the thesis examining com- 
mittee, four typewritten copies of the thesis, the original and 
the first three carbons, must be filed in the University Library, 
together with the costs of having them bound. 



34 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Four copies of the approval sheet must be prepared by the 
student. One copy is bound with each copy of the thesis. 

Four copies of an abstract of the thesis must be filed with the 
thesis after the abstract has been approved by the chairman of 
the thesis committee. The abstract, not to exceed two typewritten 
pages, shall give the problem, the procedure, and the conclusions 
reached in the thesis. 

Thesis: 

The subject of the thesis must be within the major field. The 
thesis should show : 

1. Ability of the candidate to work independently on an ap- 
proved problem. 

2. A reasonably wide familiarity with the literature of the field 
of specialization. 

3. A practical working knowledge of research methods. 

4. Conclusions supported by data. 

The student must have presented a prospectus to his adviser 
and received approval of his proposed topic before he is per- 
mitted to register for the thesis. The candidate's thesis adviser 
and two graduate faculty members of the department will con- 
stitute his thesis committee. The department chairman may 
appoint any member of the graduate faculty of his staff to act 
as chairman of the thesis committee and to supervise the writ- 
ing of the thesis. 

The latest edition of Campbell's FORM BOOK FOR THESIS 
WRITING is the approved guide for form. With the approval of 
the Dean of the Graduate School and the thesis committee, the 
form may be varied to meet the requirements of the discipline in 
which the thesis is being written or of publishers if the manu- 
script is to be printed. One planning to write a thesis should 
request from the chairman of his department a copy of "Pro- 
cedures for Writing a Thesis." 

Without Thesis: 

1. Fifty-four acceptable quarter hours of graduate course work, 
forty-five of which must be completed in residence at Appa- 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



35 



lachian. A candidate may, with the permission of his adviser 
and the approval of the Graduate Council, offer up to nine 
quarter hours of graduate credit from another graduate school 
or nine quarter hours of graduate extension credit from Ap- 
palachian or a combination of up to nine quarter hours, but 
in no case may the residence at Appalachian be less than one 
academic year (36 weeks). 

2. A minimum residence of forty-two weeks or its equivalent 
in summer sessions, except that up to six weeks of residence 
may be waived if as much as nine hours of extension and/or 
transfer credit is accepted toward the degree. 

3. All graduate credit offered toward the degree must have been 
earned within a limit of six calendar years, or, if earned 
within a limit of ten years, validated by examination. Gradu- 
ate credit transferred from another institution may not be 
validated by examination. All work to be credited toward the 
degree, except that being taken currently, must be completed 
and grades recorded at least four weeks before the degree is 
awarded. 

4. For candidates majoring in education, not more than eighteen 
quarter hours offered toward the degree may be credit earned 
in courses with catalog numbers below 500. For candidates 
completing an academic major of thirty-six hours, up to 
twenty-four hours of upper division undergraduate work 
may be approved, provided that not more than eighteen 
quarter hours of it is offered in the major. 

5. Grades on course work may not average lower than B. No 
graduate course with a grade below C will be credited toward 
the master's degree. 

6. An acceptable performance on a comprehensive examination, 
either oral or written or both, on the major field is required 
of every candidate for the degree. The comprehensive must 
be scheduled during the last one-third of the residence period 
and at least ten calender days prior to the date on which the 
candidate receives the degree. 



36 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE 
FOR TEACHERS AND OTHER SCHOOL PERSONNEL 

The following programs, which lead to the Master of Arts 
degree in education curricula, are designed for school personnel. 
Many of the programs do not provide an opportunity for writing 
a thesis. 

In those programs which provide for a thesis, a student may 
elect not to write the thesis. If he does not write a thesis, he will 
with the assistance of his adviser select five courses (15 quarter 
hours) in lieu of the thesis, which may be in education, an 
academic field, or both, depending on the student's needs. 

An academic major is required of the candidate preparing to 
teach in secondary schools. Eighteen hours or more of the work 
of candidates preparing to teach in elementary school will be in 
academic areas. 

Audiovisual Specialist 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

547. Social Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 491. Philosophical Foundations 

Education 
or Education 535. Philosophy of Education 

466. Instructional Materials 3 

475. Audiovisual Instruction 3 

502. Organization and Administration of the Secondary 

School 3 

or Education 504. Organization and Administration 
of the Elementary School 

505. Supervision of Instruction 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

528. Production and Care of Audiovisual Materials 3 

532. Use and Care of Machines and Equipment 3 

537. Organization and Administration of an 

Audiovisual Program 3 

549. School Building Planning 3 

544. Radio and Television in Instruction 3 

Approved courses related to audiovisual education or an academic 

minor 18 

School Administrators 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

547. Social Foundation of Education 3 

591. Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 535. Philosophy of Education 
501. Public School Administration 3 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



37 



502. Organization and Administration of the 

Secondary School 3 

504. Organization and Administration of the 

Elementary School 3 

505. Supervision of Instruction 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

575. Internship in School Administration 6 

or Education 525. Problems in Public School 
Administration 

Cognate discipline (Social Sciences) 9 

Electives . ... 15 

Cognate courses to be selected in conference with the student's 
adviser for the purpose of gaining competence in academic areas 
related to educational administration. 

Elective courses to be selected in conference with the student's 
adviser for the purpose of gaining competence in academic or 
professional areas related to educational administration. 



General Supervisor 

Prerequisites : North Carolina A Certificate or its equivalent 
from another state; a minimum of three years of successful 
teaching experience. 

For departmental requirements in the secondary academic 
major, see the appropriate department. 

One preparing for General Elementary Supervision must com- 
plete all courses required in the program leading to a Graduate 
Intermediate or Earlv Childhood Education Certificate. 



Education 500. Research in Education (Elementary Major) 3 

502. Organization and Administration of Secondary 

Schools 3 

or Education 504. Organization and Administration 
of the Elementary School 

505. Supervision of Instruction 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

517. School Supervision 3 

Psychology 501. Psychology of Late Childhood 3 

or Psychology 502. Psychology of Adolescence 

455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

Library Science 467. Correlating Teaching with the Library 3 

Academic major including academic research (Secondary Major) 33 

Academic concentration (Elementary Major) 21-24 
Electives 0-9 



38 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Supervisor of Student Teaching 

A supervisor of student teaching must qualify for graduate 
certification as either an elementary or secondary teacher. The 
program must include Education 505, 515, and 516 or 576. 

Education 500. Research in Education (Elementary Major) 3 

505. Supervision of Instruction 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

456. Measurement and Assessment 3 

515. Organizing and Planning Student Teaching 3 

516. Supervision of Student Teaching 3 

or Education 576. Internship for Supervising Teachers 

Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

Academic major including academic research (Secondary Major) 36 

Academic concentration (Elementary Major) 21-24 

Electives 0-12 

School Librarian 

Prerequisite : 27 hours in Library Science, including 301, 302, 
305, 306, 307, 401, 402, and 475 (403) and an undergraduate 
grade-point average of 2.75. 

Education 466. Instructional Materials 3 

or Education 475. Audiovisual Instruction 

535. Philosophy of Education 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

Psychology 501. Psychology of Late Childhood 3 

or Psychology 502. Psychology of Adolescence 
Library Science 450. Organization and Administration of 

Non-Book Materials 3 

451. Literature of the Humanities 3 

or Library Science 452. Literature of the Social 

Sciences and the Fine Arts 
or Library Science 453. Literature of Science 
and Technology 

454. Literature for Young Adults 3 

or Library Science 456. Critical History of 
Children's Literature 

500. Research Methods in Librarianship 3 

503. Reading Interests and Guidance 3 

512. Use of Materials with Students and Teachers 3 

513. Problems and Trends in School Libraries 3 

Electives — with thesis (6) 6 

without thesis 15 

Electives 0-15 

Junior College Librarian 

Prerequisites: Library Science 301, 302, 305, or equivalent, 
and an undergraduate grade-point average of 2.75. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



39 



Education 542. Instruction Program of the Two-Year College 3 

544. Seminar on the Two-Year College 3 

Library Science 451. Literature of the Humanities 3 

452. Literature of the Social Sciences and the 

Fine Arts 3 

453. Literature of Science and Technology 3 

475. Cataloging and Classification 3 

500. Research Methods in Librarianship 3 

501. American Library Resources 3 

505. Advanced Cataloging and Classification 3 

510. Organization and Administration of the College 

Library 3 

Electives — with thesis (6) 9 

without thesis 18 

Electives 0-6 

Elementary School Teachers 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

546. Elementary School Curriculum 3 

or Education 506. Curriculum Construction 

547. Social Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 491. Philosophical Foundations of 

Education 

456. Measurement and Assessment 3 

511. Investigations in Reading 3 

513. Teaching the Language Arts 3 

Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

or Psychology 501. Psychology of Late Childhood 

Library Science 467. Correlating Teaching with the Library 3 

Mathematics 459. Foundations of Arithmetic 3 

Electives in academic fields (K-3), or academic concentration (4-9) 18 

Electives 3-9 

At least 9 hours of academic work must be in a single field for the Early 
Childhood Education Certificate. For the Graduate Intermediate Certificate, 
the candidate may complete 18 hours in a single field or 12 hours in each 
of two related fields. 

Secondary School Teacher 

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major in the teaching field; 
a North Carolina A Certificate or its equivalent in another state. 

For required courses in the academic field, see the appropriate 
department. 

Education 456. Measurements and Assessment 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

547. Social Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 491. Philosophical Foundations of 

Education 
or Education 535. Philosophy of Education 
Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 



40 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



or Psychology 502. Psychology of Adolescence 

Academic major including academic research — With thesis (6) 33 

—Without thesis 36 

Electives 0-6 



Junior College Teacher 

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major in the teaching field. 
For required courses in the academic field, see the appropriate 
department. 

Education 542. Instruction Program of the Two-Year College 3 

544. Seminar on the Two-Year College 3 

or Education 545. Practicum in College Teaching 
or Education 574. Teaching Internship in the Two- 
Year College 
Academic 500. Bibliography and Research 3 



Two-Year College Administration 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

501. Public School Administration 3 

552. Supervision of Instruction in the Two-Year College 3 

518. Public School Finance 3 

553. Planning the Community College 3 

560. School Law 3 

Business 516. Personnel Administration 3 

Education 542. Instruction Program of the Two-Year College 3 

543. Organization and Administration of the 

Two-Year College 3 

Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

Education 479. Group Methods and Processes 3 

541. Student Personnel Services 3 

584. Administrative Internship in the Two-Year College 3-9 

Cognate Areas plus electives 9-15 

Total 54 



Music Teacher and Music Supervisor 

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major in music; a North 
Carolina A Certificate or its equivalent; music proficiency ad- 
mission requirements. 

All entering graduate music majors will demonstrate by 
examination their skills and abilities in music theory, music 
history and literature, performance music, and music education 
where it applies. Any deficiency noted may require courses or 
individual study in the area of the deficiency prior to admission 
to candidacy for the master's degree. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



41 



Education 455. Social Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 491. Philosophical Foundations of 

Education 
or Education 535. Philosophy of Education 

456. Measurement and Assessment 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

529. Organization and Administration of School Music 3 

Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

or Psychology 501. Psychology of Late Childhood 
or Psychology 502. Psychology of Adolescence 

Music 500. Bibliography and Research 3 

531. Seminar in Music 3 

Music History and Literature 0-12 

Music Theory 0-6 

Applied Music 0-6 

Advanced Conducting 0-3 

Music 552. Graduate Ensemble 

Music electives — With thesis (6) Courses to complete 33 

— Without thesis Courses to complete 39 

Certified School Counselor 

Prerequisites: An A certificate; screening requirements. 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

478. Principles of Guidance 3 

491. Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 535. Philosophy of Education 

460. Educational Statistics 3 

514. Psychological and Educational Testing 3 

520. Occupational and Educational Information 3 

522. Counseling Theory and Techniques 3 

523. Organization and Administration of Guidance 

Services (H.S.) 3 

or Education 540. Guidance Services in the 
Elementary School (E.S.) 

538. Supervised Practicum in Counseling 3, 3 or 6 

Psychology 450. Psychology of Personality 3 

455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

519. Analysis of the Individual 3 

Electives in Psychology, Sociology, Economics, Education 12 



Junior College Counselor 

(Student Personnel Worker) 

Prerequisite : Screening requirements. 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

478. Principles of Guidance 3 

520. Occupational and Educational Information 3 

Psychology or Sociology 456. Intermediate Statistical Methods 3 

Education 514. Psychological and Educational Testing 3 

522. Counseling Theory and Techniques 3 



42 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Psychology 450. Psychology of Personality 3 

519. Analysis of the Individual 3 

Education 538. Supervised Practicum in Counseling 3-9 

Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

502. Psychology of Adolescence 3 

Education 541. Student Personnel Services 3 

542. Instruction Program of the Two-Year College 3 

or Education 544. Seminar on the Two-Year College 
Elected Academic Minor 9-15 

Reading Specialization 

A graduate student who plans to pursue the curriculum for the 
Reading Specialist in Elementary or Secondary Schools must 
have had basic preparation in the foundation of reading instruc- 
tion and reading in the elementary or secondary school. 

Reading Specialists in the Elementary School 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

547. Social Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 491. Philosophical Foundations of 
Education 

456. Measurement and Assessment 3 

or Psychology 514. Psychological and Educational 

Testing 
or Psychology 526 or 527. Individual Intelligence Testing 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

or Education 546. Elementary School Curriculum 
Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

or Psychology 501. Psychology of Late Childhood 
Education 561. Curriculum and Evaluation in Reading 3 

472-473. Diagnosis and Remedial Reading 6 

508. Clinical Problems in Reading 3 

Nine hours from among: 

Education 558. [477] Teaching of Reading 3 

511. Investigations in Reading 3 

548. Independent Study 3 

551. Field Experience in Teaching Reading 3-9 

Academic concentration, including Mathematics 459. Foundations 

of Arithmetic 18 

Reading Specialist in Secondary School 

Education 547. Social Foundations of Education 3 

or Education 491. Philosophical Foundations of 

Education 
or Education 535. Philosophy of Education 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

Psychology 455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

or Psychology 502. Psychology of Adolescence 

Education 561. Curriculum and Evaluation in Reading 3 

462. Reading in High School 3 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



43 



472. Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 3 

Nine hours from among: 

Education 473. Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 3 

558. [4771 Teaching of Reading 3 

508. Clinical Problems in Reading 3 

511. Investigations in Reading 3 

548. Independent Study 3 

551. Field Experience in Teaching Reading 3-9 

Academic major, including academic research 27 



Special Education 

MENTAL RETARDATION 

Prerequisite : Education 320. 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

506. Curriculum Construction 3 

451. Educable Mentally Retarded 3 

452. Trainable Mentally Retarded 3 

509. Reading and the Mentally Retarded 3 

454. Curriculum for the Mentally Retarded 3 

519. Education of the Physically Handicapped 3 

572. Internship in Special Education 9-15 

Psychology 460. Psychology of the Handicapped 3 

Industrial Arts 458. Crafts for the Handicapped 3 

Speech 460. Speech Problems for the Classroom Teacher 3 

Electives 3-9 

Education 521. Vocational Planning for the Handicapped 3 

527. Organization and Administration of Special 

Education 3 

530. Education of the Gifted 3 

570. Readings and Research in Special Education 3 

Psychology 450. Psychology of Personality 3 

501. Psychology of Late Childhood 3 

or Psychology 502. Psychology of Adolescence 

510. Psychology of the Gifted 3 

512. Psychology of the Socially and Emotionally 

Maladjusted 3 

526 or 527. Individual Intelligence Testing 3 

455. Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

530. Theories of Personality 3 

532. Evaluation of Exceptional Children 3 



SPEECH CORRECTION AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY 

Prerequisite: North Carolina A Certificate or equivalent 

Education 500. Research in Education 3 

Speech 550. Research and Thesis 6 

Courses prescribed by adviser — With thesis 34 

Without thesis 45-54 



44 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Master of Arts Degree 



The academic Master of Arts degree is offered with majors in 
English, geography, history, mathematics, political science, and 
psychology. The requirements for this degree are essentially the 
same as those for the Master of Arts degree for teachers, with 
the following exceptions : 

(1) A thesis is required. 

(2) A reading knowledge of a foreign language, normally 
French or German, is required. 

(3) The oral defense of the thesis may not be substituted 
for the required comprehensive examination. 

(4) No courses in professional education may be included 
in the degree program. 

ENGLISH 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in English. 

English 500. Bibliography and Research 3 

466. History of the English Language 3 

512. Literary Criticism (Prior to 1900) 3 

or English 521. Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism 

550. Thesis 6 

Electives in English 21-30 

Electives in Allied Disciplines 0-9 

Total 45 

GEOGRAPHY 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in geography 

Geography 500. Bibliography and Research 3 

502. Urban Geography 3 

506. Geographic Aspects of World Affairs 3 

550. Thesis 6 

Approved electives in geography and geology 18 

Related minor 12 

HISTORY 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in history. 

History 524. European Historiography 3 

or History 512. American Historiography 
500. Bibliography and Research 3 

540. Seminar 3 

550. Thesis 6 

Approved electives in history 18 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



45 



Related minor 9 

Elective in humanities 3 

MATHEMATICS 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in mathematics. 

Mathematics 511-512-513. Real Variables 9 

521-522-523. Abstract Algebra 9 

531-532-533. Topology 9 

550. Thesis 6 

Approved electives in mathematics 12 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in Political Science. 

Political Science 500. Bibliography and Research 3 

501. Readings and Research in Political Behavior 3 

540. Seminar 3 

Thesis 6 

Electives in Political Science 21-30 

Electives in Allied Disciplines 0-9 

Total 45 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major or minor in psychology. 

Psychology 500. Research Problems 3 

534. Advanced Statistics 3 

457. Physiological Psychology 3 

550. Thesis 6 

Approved electives in psychology 18 

Minor (Sociology, Physical or Biological Sciences) 9 

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major or minor in psychology. 
Two years are required to complete the program. 

CORE COURSES 

Psychology 500. Research Problems (3 quarters) 1-1-1 

457. Physiological Psychology 3 

528. Theories of Learning 3 

534. Advanced Statistics 3 

550. Thesis 6 

Elective in Psychology 3 

CLINICAL COURSES 

Psychology 512. Psychology of the Emotionally and Socially 

Maladjusted 3 

526. Individual Intelligence Testing: Wechsler 3 

527. Individual Intelligence Testing: Binet 3 
530. Theories of Personality 3 



46 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

535. Advanced Abnormal Psychology 3 

536. Theories of Phychotherapy 3 

551, 552, 553. Clinical Practicum I 1-1-1 

554. Clinical Practicum II 3 

555. Advanced Developmental Psychology 3 

556. Experimental Analysis of Mental Defects 3 

557. Clinical Psychology 1 

558. Projective Techniques 3 

559. Advanced Psychology Assessment 3 

560. Internship (6,6) 12 

Total 70 

Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science degree is offered with majors in chem- 
istry and biology. Requirements for this degree, essentially the 
same as for the academic Master of Arts degree, include : 

(1) A thesis. 

(2) A reading knowledge of German, French, or Russian. 

(3) An orientation examination during the first two weeks of 
the program. 

(4) A comprehensive examination. 

(5) An oral defense of the thesis. 

CHEMISTRY 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in chemistry. 

Chemistry 450. Qualitative Organic Analysis 4 

452. Advanced Analytical Chemistry 4 

504. Chemical Bond Theories 3 

506. Organic Reaction Mechanisms 3 

510. Chemical Thermodynamics 3 

513. Optical Methods of Chemical Analysis 4 

or Chemistry 514. Electrical Methods 

530. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 

550. Research and Thesis 6 

Approved Electives in Chemistry 15 

(Candidates who completed Chem. 450 and 452 as undergraduates select an additional 
eight quarter hours of electives in chemistry.) 

BIOLOGY 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in biology. 

Biology 454. Genetics 3 

455. Plant Physiology 4 

500. Bibliography and Research 3 

501. Advanced Animal Ecology 3 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



47 



503. Bacteriology of Food, Water, Milk, Sewage 3 

505. Animal Physiology I 3 

506. Animal Physiology II 3 

514. Plant Anatomy and Morphology 3 

550. Research and Thesis 6 

Approved Electives in Biology, Chemistry, and Geology 14 

SECOND MASTER'S DEGREE 

A student holding a master's degree may earn a second mas- 
ter's degree in another discipline. For admission to a second 
master's degree, the student files an application and submits 
transcripts and score reports on the appropriate examinations. 
He files an application for candidacy during the first quarter and 
takes a comprehensive examination near the close of the last 
quarter of the program. He plans his program of forty-five 
quarter hours with his adviser and may or may not include a 
thesis for six hours of credit. If he includes a thesis, all of the 
work must be completed at Appalachian. If he does not write 
a thesis, he may include up to nine quarter hours of graduate 
work not more than six years old from another approved gradu- 
ate school or nine quarter hours of extension work completed 
through Appalachian. One who writes a thesis may meet resi- 
dence requirements in thirty weeks. One who does not write a 
thesis and offers up to nine hours of transfer or extension credit 
may meet residence requirements in twenty-four weeks. 

SIXTH YEAR PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS 

The College of Education offers sixth-year programs for the 
preparation of school administrators. Patterns of study are 
available which prepare students successfully completing the 
programs to qualify for Advanced Certificates as superintendents, 
assistant superintendents, or principals. Details concerning these 
programs may be secured from the Dean of the College of Educa- 
tion, Duncan Hall, or the Dean of the Graduate School. 

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED STUDY 

One who holds a master's degree and wishes to extend his 
knowledge in the area of his degree or achieve breadth in related 
disciplines may apply for admission to advanced study and plan 
a program to include forty-five quarter hours, up to nine hours 
of which may be completed at another approved graduate school 



48 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



or in Appalachian's extension program. A minimum of twenty- 
four weeks of residence is required. He files an application for 
admission to candidacy during the first quarter and takes a com- 
prehensive examination near the close of the last quarter of his 
program. One completing the program may apply for a Univer- 
sity Certificate of Advanced Study to be awarded at commence- 
ment. Whether the University Certificate of Advanced Study 
will qualify teachers for salary increments in their respective 
states will depend on the programs completed and the salary 
policies followed by the school systems. 

THE SPECIALIST'S DEGREE 

The specialist's degree is intermediate between the master's 
and the doctor's degrees. Three Specialist in Education and one 
Specialist in Science degree programs have been approved for 
1971-1972. 

To get into one of these programs, a student must have a mas- 
ter's degree from an approved institution and satisfy admission 
requirements of the Graduate School. Regulations and procedures 
governing the master's degree also apply to the specialist's de- 
gree. Nine quarter hours taken beyond the master's degree at 
an approved institution may be transferred. Course require- 
ments range from 45 to 54 quarter hours of graduate work be- 
yond the master's degree and 36 weeks of residence are required. 

Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) programs are offered in three 
fields: (1) Educational Leadership, (2) Elementary Education, 
and (3) Higher Education. The Specialist in Science (Spec. Sc.) 
is offered in biological sciences. 

The program in Educational Leadership prepares one in school 
administration, supervision, or curriculum. The program in Ele- 
mentary Education prepares one to teach in the primary school 
(K-3) or the intermediate school (4-9). The program in science 
provides for preparation for teaching in a public school or in a 
college. A program in Education is flexible. One may include in 
it a minimum of 18 additional hours in the teaching field, or 
reading, or guidance and counseling, or educational media pro- 
vided the program is based on and related to the major at the 
master's level. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



49 



Interested students are requested to write to the Dean of the 
Graduate School for further information and application forms. 

Course Numbering 

Graduate students may be admitted to courses designated 450 
to 499 if they did not take them as undergraduate students. No 
more than five such courses may be included in a thesis program 
and, normally, no more than six in a program that does not in- 
clude a thesis. Courses designated 500 and above are limited to 
graduate students only. 

Language Requirements 

Candidates for the Master of Arts degree in English, geog- 
raphy, history, mathematics, political science, or psychology and 
for the Master of Science degree in biology or chemistry will be 
expected to demonstrate by examination a reading knowledge of 
a modern foreign language, usually French or German. (A lan- 
guage other than one normally required may be substituted with 
the approval of the student's adviser and the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate school.) Two years of successful college study in a language 
will meet the requirement. One who has not completed two years 
of college credit in a language must take a language examination. 

The student should apply for the language examination directly 
to the Chairman of the Department of Foreign Languages not 
later than three weeks before the date the examination is 
scheduled. The Chairman of the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages, after reviewing the student's examination paper, will 
submit to the Dean of the Graduate School a report of the stu- 
dent's performance. The Dean of the Graduate School will in- 
form the student and his adviser by mail whether the student 
has passed the examination. The student must have passed the 
examination in a foreign language before he is permitted to file 
an application for a master's degree. 

Application for the Degree 

The graduate student must file with the Dean of the Graduate 
School an application for the master's degree, the specialist's 
degree, or the Certificate of Advanced Study the first week of his 
final registration period. The application form may be secured 



50 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



from the Graduate Office. If he has qualified to apply for a cer- 
tificate to teach in North Carolina, the candidate may also file 
an application for a certificate. This form, too, may be secured 
from the Graduate Office. 

Commencement 

Candidates for graduate degrees and Certificates of Advanced 
Study are expected to be present at any commencement to re- 
ceive the degree in person unless excused in writing by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Registration 

Graduate students register at the time specified on the uni- 
versity calendar. Initial registration is continguent upon the 
receipt and approval of transcripts of all work completed in 
other institutions and a report of acceptable scores on either the 
National Teacher Examinations Common and Area or the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination Aptitude and Advanced. Registration 
material is provided by the office of the Registrar. A fee will be 
charged for late registration. See Special Fees. 

Full-Time Resident Student 

For full-time resident credit a student must be registered for 
a minimum of twelve quarter hours (six in a summer term) un- 
less he is a graduate teaching fellow or assistant. Graduate stu- 
dents may not register for more than sixteen hours a quarter 
or nine for a summer term. 

Auditors 

Regular fees are charged for auditing. A student may register 
as an auditor for a course with the consent of the instructor and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. Classes audited shall count as 
part of the student's load, but he will receive no credit and no 
grade will be assigned. An auditor is expected to be regular in 
class attendance but may not participate in class discussions 
unless he is invited to do so. He is not required to take tests and 
examinations. An auditor who finds it necessary to discontinue 
his class attendance should formally drop the course. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



51 



Auditors may not register for research courses, seminars, 
practicums, and workshops. 

Unclassified Graduate Students 

A student doing graduate work but who has not applied for 
admission to Graduate School and who is not working on a 
definite program of graduate study leading to a graduate degree 
or a Certificate of Advanced Study has no assurance he may be 
able later to count such work as fulfilling course requirements 
for the degree. 

Employed Students 

Public school personnel employed on a full-time basis may not 
take more than three quarter hours during any one quarter or 
a total of nine quarter hours from September 1 to June 1. A full- 
time university instructor may not take more than three quarter 
hours during one registration period. 

Foreign Students 

Foreign students are encouraged to apply for admission to 
master's degree programs starting in September rather than at 
the beginning of the winter or spring quarter. Applications 
should be received in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate 
School by April 1 and all supporting documents and credentials 
by May 15. Applicants whose native language is not English 
should arrange to take Test of English as a Foreign Language in 
October in order for the University to receive the score by April 
1. A foreign student whose native language is not English should 
request that a report of his score be sent before he asks for 
application forms, for application forms are sent only to foreign 
students with a score of 500 or higher on Test of English as a 
Foreign Language. 

Appalachian State University has no scholarship program for 
the support of foreign students. Even out-of-state fees may not 
be waived. After a foreign student has studied at Appalachian 
State University for one quarter, he may apply for a graduate 
assistantship. If he is awarded an assistantship, out-of-state fees 
will be waived while he is an assistant. 



52 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



The foreign student must submit a Confidential Statement on 
Finances before his application for admission to Graduate School 
will be considered. All foreign students must have health insur- 
ance before they can be admitted. 

Foreign students enrolled in other colleges and universities in 
the United States will not be admitted to Appalachian until they 
have completed, or are about to complete, study leading to a 
degree in the college or university they are attending. 

Unmarried foreign students live in university residence halls 
and may take their meals at the University Cafeteria. Expenses 
for one academic year (9 months) for the foreign student are 
approximately $2100. 

Class Attendance 

Attendance by all graduate students must be regular. Responsi- 
bility for class attendance rests with the student. In all cases work 
missed through absence must be made up, but permission to 
make up work is not automatic and is given at the discretion of 
the instructor. Excuses for absence from class meetings are 
granted by the instructor and at his discretion. A student whose 
attendance in classes is unsatisfactory to his instructor, his ad- 
viser, or the Dean of the Graduate School may be excluded from 
a course, a final examination, or a graduate program. 

Student Responsibility 

The graduate student is entrusted with the responsibility for 
his own progress. He keeps an up-to-date record of the courses 
he has taken in his proposed program and checks periodically 
with his adviser. Responsibility for errors in his program or in 
interpretation of regulations rests entirely with the student. 

Adding and Dropping Courses 

A course may be added or dropped without penalty, with the 
approval of the student's adviser, prior to the last day of the 
registration period. A course may be changed from Audit to 
Credit prior to the last day of the registration period but not 
afterwards. A course may be dropped with a grade of W (with- 
drawn) prior to the fifth week of classes in a quarter or the 
middle of the third week in a summer term with the approval of 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



53 



the instructor and the student's adviser. After that date a grade 
of F is assigned, unless an exception is granted by the Dean of 
the Graduate School, in which case a grade of W is assigned. 

Withdrawal 

Requests for complete withdrawal from graduate school must 
be made by letter to the Dean of the Graduate School. A student 
who has completely withdrawn from a graduate program may 
not resume his studies unless he has been formally readmitted. 
Students who withdraw without approval receive grades of F. 

Suspension and Dismissal 

Appalachian reserves the right to exclude at any time a gradu- 
ate student whose conduct is deemed improper or prejudicial to 
the best interest of the University. 

A graduate student who fails to maintain grades of at least 
B in the courses for which he is registered in any term may not 
be permitted to re-register as a candidate for the master's degree. 
However, a student may petition the Dean of the Graduate 
School for consideration in extenuating circumstances which may 
constitute a justifiable exception to this regulation. If the Dean 
of the Graduate School approves, the student may be permitted 
to register at his own risk for an additional quarter. 

Grades 

In the Graduate School, the grades A, B, C, F, and / are used 
to report th quality of credit. A is superior graduate accomplish- 
ment, B is average graduate accomplishment, C is below average 
but passing, and F is a failing grade. A grade of / is reported for 
a student who has not completed the quantitative requirements of 
a course. Graduate credit accepted in fulfillment of the require- 
ments for a graduate degree or a Certificate of Advanced Study 
shall average not lower than B, and no credit toward the degree 
shall be granted for a grade below C. Course work reported 
"Incomplete" must be completed within a year of the official 
ending of the course. A graduate student is permitted to repeat 
not more than one course to improve his grade. A grade of F 
is assigned to a student who arbitrarily discontinues meeting a 
class or who withdraws without making proper arrangements 
with the Dean of the Graduate School. 



54 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Changing Grades 

Once an instructor has reported a grade to the Registrar, it 
cannot be changed except in case of error in reporting or record- 
ing. Any change made must also be reported to the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Changing Majors 

A student who has been approved by one department but who 
wishes to change to another must have the approval of the Dean 
of the Graduate School and of the department into which he 
proposes to transfer before the change may be made. In addi- 
tion, the chairman of the department from which the student 
wishes to transfer must certify that the student is eligible to 
continue as a degree candidate in that department. 

Examinations 

In addition to the Miller Analogies Test and the National 
Teacher Examinations Common and Area or the Graduate Rec- 
ord Examination Aptitude and Advanced, which are required by 
all departments, qualifying examinations are administered by 
several departments to determine the student's qualifications for 
graduate study. In addition, all departments require comprehen- 
sive examinations in the major near the termination of the 
graduate program. These examinations may be written, oral, or 
a combination of the two. Composition of committees for com- 
prehensive examinations is determined by the chairman of the 
major department. Each examining committee must have at least 
three graduate faculty members from the major department. 
It is the responsibility of the degree candidate to arrange with 
his department chairman a date for the comprehensive examina- 
tion, which may not be taken before the student has been ad- 
mitted to candidacy or completed at least two-thirds of his course 
work. 

Oral examinations are required of all students presenting thesis 
or research projects. Thesis committees are composed of at least 
three graduate faculty members from the major department. At 
the discretion of the department, the oral examination on the 
thesis may be substituted for the comprehensive examination. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



55 



Library Carrels 

Library carrels are available to graduate students who are 
working on thesis and special research projects. Applications for 
carrels are made on a quarterly basis to the Librarian. 

Independent Study 

With the approval of the instructor, the department chairman, 
the dean of the college, and the Dean of the Graduate School, a 
graduate student who has been admitted to candidacy may regis- 
ter for independent study in his major field. Students registered 
for independent study must be scheduled for regular conference 
periods at least weekly. As much as six quarter hours of inde- 
pendent study may be applied toward a graduate degree. 

Extension Classes 

Based upon requests from the administrators of school systems 
in northwestern North Carolina, business and industry, and 
hospitals, Appalachian offers in-service courses for teachers and 
other personnel. The course is given at a central place in the 
school unit or industry which has requested the in-service train- 
ing. For graduate students who register for extension work, up 
to nine quarter hours of graduate credit may be counted toward 
a graduate degree. Extension work applied toward the degree 
will not reduce the minimum residence requirements, but it can 
be used to replace the six weeks of additional residence required 
of students who do not write a thesis. The cost of extension work 
including tuition and fees, is $33 for three hours. A student 
registering at Appalachian for the first time must pay a registra- 
tion fee of $10. 

A student enrolled in a degree program in which a thesis is 
not required may be permitted to include up to nine quarter 
hours of extension credit provided the work is approved by the 
adviser and the Dean of the Graduate School and is taught by 
Appalachian State University faculty. One may transfer some 
credit from another graduate school and complete some extension 
credit, but the combined total may not exceed nine quarter hours. 
Correspondence courses are not accepted for graduate credit. 



56 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Saturday, Late Afternoon, and Evening Classes 

Appalachian also schedules Saturday, late afternoon, and even- 
ing graduate courses on campus during the fall, winter, and 
spring quarters. By attending a Saturday or evening class during 
any one quarter, the graduate student may earn three hours of 
graduate credit. Six weeks of residence is recognized for six 
hours of graduate credit for Saturday classes. As much as eigh- 
teen quarter hours of credit earned in Saturday classes may be 
applied toward a graduate degree. The cost of Saturday work, 
including tuition and fees, is $30 for three quarter hours. Books 
and supplies cost approximately $10. A student registering for 
the first time must pay a registration fee of $10. 

Internship 

In addition to internships in junior college teaching, qualified 
applicants may serve internships in school administration and in 
supervision of student teaching. To be eligible for an internship 
an applicant must : 

1. Hold a valid North Carolina A certificate or better. 

2. Have successfully completed three or more years of teaching 
with at least one year in the school system in which he plans 
to do his internship. 

3. Have the recommendation of his principal and/or superinten- 
dent. 

4. Have been admitted to candidacy for or hold the master's 
degree. 

The following administrative policy governs internships. 

1. An applicant for an internship must be working within a 
reasonable distance of the university. 

2. The number of registrants for Education 575 and 576 is 
limited. 

3. The intern must work under a fully certified supervisor. 

4. The supervisor must express a willingness to supervise the 
work and provide the experiences necessary for the intern. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



57 



An internship in the supervision of student teachers is avail- 
able to supervising teachers who have successfully supervised at 
least one student teacher during the past two years. The program, 
designed to permit teachers to participate while regularly em- 
ployed in a school system, carries three hours of credit during the 
quarter. Further details of this program may be secured from 
the Office of Student Teaching. 

Transfer Credit 

A student enrolled in a degree program in which a thesis is not 
required may be permitted to transfer from another graduate 
school up to nine quarter hours (six semester hours) of appro- 
priate graduate credit provided grades earned are at least B and 
provided the credit will not be more than six years old at the 
time the degree or the Advanced Certificate is awarded. 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Fees are charged by the quarter and are due and payable in 
advance at the beginning of each quarter. Any special arrange- 
ment for the payment of expenses must be made at the time of 
registration with the Controller's Office. 

It is the desire of the University to hold expenses to the mini- 
mum. The charges for one quarter in Graduate School are as 
follows : 

Resident of Non-Resident of 
North Carolina North Carolina 

Tuition and Fees $ 145.91 $ 395.91 

Room, Board and Laundry 

Men $ 244.00 $ 244.00 

Women $ 239.00 $ 239.00 

The University reserves the right to make changes in these 
charges when circumstances require. 

The application for admission must be accompanied by an 
application fee of ten dollars, which is not refundable. 

Graduate students purchase their textbooks and supplies. 

Graduate students may not secure dormitory rooms on campus 
until all undergraduates have been placed. 



58 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Fellowships and Assistantships 

Approximately one hundred teaching fellowships and assistant- 
ships are available for the regular session. Five research fellow- 
ships carrying stipends of $1200 each are available to qualified 
applicants. Half-time fellows and assistants will devote twenty- 
four hours a week to laboratory instruction or other service to 
the University. Third-time and quarter-time assistants give 
proportionately less time to their assistantships. Assistants re- 
ceive annual stipends of $1800 to $3600 and are permitted to 
carry a quarterly academic load of nine, twelve, and fifteen 
quarter hours depending upon the classification of the assistant- 
ships. Appalachian offers only a limited number of graduate 
assistantships for the summer quarter, the stipends ranging 
from $200 to $250 for each term. 

Teaching fellowships are available in the laboratory schools 
and in the University. Departments in which fellows and assist- 
ants may work are biology, chemistry, economics and business, 
education, English, French, geography, history, industrial arts, 
library science, mathematics, music, physical education, political 
science, psychology, social science, sociology, Spanish, and speech. 
In addition, twelve dormitory counselorships are available. 

Up to forty work-study assistantships paying up to $900 for 
the academic year and $300 for the summer are made available 
to qualified applicants through the Economic Opportunity Act. 
Students interested in a work-study assistantship are advised to 
write to the Director of Student Financial Aid, Appalachian 
State University, before April 15 for both the summer school 
and the succeeding academic year. 

For the preparation of junior college teachers, Appalachian 
offers a two-year program which combines graduate study with 
supervised college teaching experience in any one of the follow- 
ing fields: audiovisual education, biology, chemistry, economics 
and business, English, French, geography, history, industrial 
arts, library science, mathematics, music, physical education, 
political science, psychology, social science, sociology, Spanish, 
and student personnel services. Twelve appointments in this pro- 
gram are maintained each year. An applicant is required to have 
at least an average of B on his undergraduate work. Teaching 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



59 



experience is desirable. The junior college teaching fellow re- 
ceives a total stipend of $4800 to $5400 paid on the basis of 
$1200 to $1800 during the first year and $3600 to $4000 during 
the second. 

Anyone wishing to apply for an assistantship or a teaching 
fellowship should write the Dean of the Graduate School for 
application forms and return them properly filled out, and he 
should submit a complete transcript of his college work not later 
than July 1. Applications for assistantships, teaching fellowships, 
and work-study assistantships are considered only after appli- 
cants have been approved for admission to the Graduate School. 
Loans 

Graduate students who have been admitted to candidacy for 
the degree are eligible to apply for loans not exceeding $500 a 
quarter. Preference for these loans, most of which are made 
available through the National Defense Education Act, is given 
to graduate students who do not hold fellowships or assistant- 
ships. Applications for loans should be submitted to the Director 
of Student Financial Aid by April 15 for both the summer school 
and the succeeding academic year. 

Housing 

Campus living accommodations for graduate students are 
limited. Spaces are provided in Workman Hall for a few gradu- 
ate women. Spaces for a few graduate men are provided in 
Justice Hall. No facilities for married students are available on 
campus. For further information about residence halls and pro- 
cedures for applying for a room, write the Dean of Men or the 
Dean of Women. Lists of off -campus living facilities are provided 
by the offices of the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. There 
is no supervision or approval of these listings, most of which 
are within walking distance of the campus. 

Refunds 

If a graduate student withdraws from the University before 
the close of the registration period, one-half of his tuition fees 
and room rent and a proportionate part of the amount paid for 
meals will be refunded. If a student withdraws after the close 
of the registration period, none of his fees and room rent will be 



60 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



refunded, but a proportionate part of the amount paid for meals 
will be refunded. Students who do not formally withdraw are not 
eligible for a refund. The date of withdrawal is the day on which 
the student makes his intention known to the Dean of the 
Graduate School, not the last day he attends classes. 

Transcripts 

The student will be allowed to receive a transcript of graduate 
credits earned at Appalachian only when his financial accounts 
are completely paid. No fee is charged for a transcript, but no 
more than three transcripts will be issued at any one time. Tran- 
scripts should be requested from the Office of Academic Records 
and Transcripts. The Graduate office does not issue transcripts. 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, /L 1 
AND HIGHER EDUCATION tJ I 

DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, 
SUPERVISION, AND HIGHER EDUCATION 

N. Shope, Chairman, W. Anderson, G. Bolick, R. Blanton, 
L. Cooper, P. Federoff, B. Harris, A. Hooks, B. Horton, J. Jack- 
son, N. Miller, R. Randall, N. Shelton, H. Wey. 

The Department of Administration, Supervision, and Higher 
Education is responsible for organizing and providing instruc- 
tional programs leading to certification of personnel for ad- 
ministrative and supervisory positions in education, organizing 
and providing related courses, programs, and services designed 
to meet the needs of administrative and supervisory personnel 
in elementary and secondary schools and in higher education, 
and organizing and providing programs and services designed 
in cooperation with schools or other agencies relating to any 
areas of improvement and progress in educational institutions. 
The department also provides advisory and administrative serv- 
ices essential to the effectiveness of its program, 

For graduate degree plans, see pages 36-42. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN ADMINISTRATOR 
SUPERVISION, AND HIGHER EDUCATION 

306. The Technical Institute (3).W. 

A background in the philosophy, goals and purposes of vocational and 
tecnical programs in postsecondary institutions. Emphasis is placed 
on the role of the technical institute. 

491. Philosophical Foundations of Education (3).S;SS. 

Classical and modern philosophies are analyzed for their influences on 
educational practices. 

495. Teaching in the Occupational Programs (3).F. 
A study of effective methods and techniques of teaching vocational and 
technical subjects. Attention is given to class organization, student- 
instructor planning, methods of teaching manipulative skills and re- 
lated information, shop laboratory safety, and evaluation. 

496. Internship in Occupational Programs (15). W. 
A full-time teaching internship for one quarter under the supervision 
of experienced personnel in a community college or technical institute. 

497. Seminar on the Technical Institute (3).S. 

Discussion and analysis of the problems, research, and recent trends 
in the technical institute. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, 
AND HIGHER EDUCATION 



500. Research in Education (3).F;W;S 
A study of various types of research and the logical organization of 
research and reporting; required in first quarter for persons working 
for Master of Arts Degree in any area in education and industrial 
arts. Staff. 

501. Public School Administration (3).F;SS. 

A study of basic structure, organization, and administration of Ameri- 
can public education; the role of the various agencies and administra- 
tive personnel; financial support; special problems. Prerequisite: three 
years' teaching experience. Hooks, Shope. 

502. Organization and Administration of the (3).F;SS. 
Secondary Schools 

A study of secondary education and administration, research, cur- 
riculum, schedule making, opening and closing of school. Prerequisite: 
three years' teaching experience. Hooks. 

503. Problems of the Public School Administrator (3).SS. 

A study of the practical problems involved in administering the public 
schools. Prerequisite: three years' teaching experience. Randall. 

504. Organization and Administration of the (3).W;SS. 
Elementary School 

A study of the role of the administrator in modern elementary educa- 
tion. Prerequisite: three years' teaching experience. Hooks. 

505. Supervision of Instruction (3).S;SS. 
A study of the nature and function of supervision, recent trends, 
teacher participation in policy formation, the organization and plan- 
ning of supervision. Prerequisite: three years' teaching experience. 
Federoff. 

506. Curriculum Construction (3).F;S;SS. 
A study of principles, effective practices, and techniques appropriate 
for overall curriculum planning. Federoff. 

510. Extra-Curricular Activities (3).F;SS. 

A study of extra-curricular activities which modern schools are ex- 
pected to carry out as a part of their educational program. Randall. 

512. Junior High School Curriculum and Organization (3).SS. 
A study of the junior high school in terms of its origin, functions, 
curriculum, and organization. Hooks. 

517. School Supervision (3).SS. 

This course is planned for students preparing for positions as general 
county and city supervisors. Shope. 

518. Public School Finance (3).S;SS. 
A study of educational theory and operating principles which will 
contribute to the understanding of the nature of problems of public 
school finance. Prerequisite: Three years' teaching experience. Shelton. 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, Z. O 
AND HIGHER EDUCATION UO 

525. Problems in Educational Administration (3 or 6).F;W;S. 

A study of current trends, issues, and problems related to the organi- 
zation and administration of the instructional program. The course is 
designed for school administrators and other present and prospective 
educational leaders. May be offered as a six-hour field study. Shelton. 

535. Philosophy of Education (3).F;SS. 

Current educational issues and decisions are analyzed from the view- 
point of the philosophical bases which may underlie them. Miller. 

539. Core Curriculum (3).SS. 

A study of the development and organization of the core curriculum 
with consideration given to objectives, methods, activities, and evalu- 
ations of this type of curriculum. Shelton. 

542. Instruction Programs of the (3) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 
Two-Year College 

An analysis of the curriculum and techniques of instruction in the 
comprehensive community college. Attention is also given to studying 
the philosophy and purposes. L. Cooper. 

543. Organization and Administration of the (3).SS. 
Two-Year College 

A study of the various types of two-year colleges and how they are 
administered at the state and local levels. Emphasis is placed on 
North Carolina's community colleges. Harris. 

544. Seminar on the Two-Year College (3).F;W;S;SS. 

Discussion and analysis of the problems, research, and recent trends 
in the two-year college. L. Cooper. 

545. Practicum in College Teaching (3).F;W;S. 

Supervised experience in college teaching. Open only to graduate 
assistants and graduate fellows. L. Cooper. 

546. Elementary School Curriculum (3).SS. 

A study of the elementary school curriculum in modern schools; 
recent trends in curriculum revision and organization. Anderson, 
Hooks. 

547. Social Foundations of Education (3).F;SS. 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the role of 
the school in relation to its social setting and organization. Staff. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (Variable Credit) .F;W;S;SS. 

549. School Building Planning (3) .W ;SS. 
Emphasis upon educational planning of teaching space and facilities, 
planning buildings for newer instructional equipment, power require- 
ment, efficient use of existing facilities, economical housekeeping and 
maintenance programs. Reynolds. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6).F;W;S. 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, 
AND HIGHER EDUCATION 



552. Supervision of Instruction in the (3).SS. 
Two-Year College 

Organization and planning of supervision, the development of skills 
in cooperative planning, and the evaluation of activities for the col- 
lege student. L. Cooper. 

553. Planning the Community College (3).S. 

Analyzing communities and determining aims and objectives in plan- 
ning curricula in general education and vocational education for the 
community college. L. Cooper. 

560. School Law (3).W;SS. 

The purpose of the course is to analyze the fundamental principles 
underlying the relation of the state to education and to reduce to 
systematic organization the principles of the case or common law 
which are applicable to practical problems of school organization and 
administration. The course will also consider the duties and responsi- 
bilities of personnel in the school system. Shelton. 

562. Secondary School Curriculum (3).SS. 

A study of the modern secondary school curriculum; development, 
recent trends, and organization; including the philosophy and psy- 
chology upon which these practices are based. Miller, Hooks. 

574. Teaching Internship in the (6-9).F;W;S. 
Two-Year College 

Supervised experience in a community college or technical institute. 
Open to graduate students in the junior college program who have 
completed one-half or more of their course work. L. Cooper. 

575. Internship in Education Administration (6).F;W;S. 

Leadership and management experiences under the dirction of com- 
petent principals, supervisors, superintendents or other appropriate 
administrators. Shelton. 

580. History of American Education (3).S;SS. 

A study of the historical development of education in the United 
States. Special emphasis is given to educational concepts and practices 
as they relate to political, social, and cultural developments in the 
growth of a system of public education. Melton. 

581. Programs for Adult Education (3).F:SS. 

An introduction to principles involved in the teaching of adults. The 
role of adult education in society, the historical development of adult 
education in America, and the nature of the adult learner are consid- 
ered. Staff. 

582. Organization and Administration of (3).SS. 
Learning Laboratories 

This course is designed to acquaint teachers and administrators with 
the unique nature of learning laboratories. Particular emphasis will 
be given to organization and administration of learning laboratories 
and programmed materials centers in community colleges. Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, /L fZ 
AND HIGHER EDUCATION UJ 

584. Administrative Internship in the (3-9).F;W;S. 
Two-Year College 

Supervised administrative experience in a community college or tech- 
nical institute. Open to graduate students in the junior college pro- 
gram who have completed one-half or more of their course work. 
Bo lick. 

585. Computer Applications in Educational (3).S;SS. 
Administration and Finance 

An investigation of the use of packaged programs related to adminis- 
trative problems; e.g., scheduling, registration and student records 
and their use in facilitation of innovation in instruction. In addition 
to the examination of prepackaged software, the course will consider 
the design of systems for unique local situations. Staff. 

586. Computer Applications in (3).S. 
Instructional Programs 

An overview of computer-assisted instructional programs and learning 
theories related to the development of such programs. Staff. 

587. Statistical Applications in Education (3).W;SS. 
Statistical methods and analysis as applied to education. A study of 
measures of reliability, variability, correlation, central tendency, and 
problems of sampling. Maynor. 

588. Method and Process in Community Relations (3).F. 
Analysis of the interactive process within and between groups, em- 
phasizing the formation and functioning of groups, development of 
skills essential for effective leadership, techniques of school-community 
relations. Attention is given to parent contacts, citizen participation, 
press, radio, television, printed materials, and other media. Shope. 

600. Seminar in Research Design (3-6). S. 

The application of research techniques in the investigation of educa- 
tional problems. This course is of particular value in the definition and 
design of the research required for advanced graduate degrees. 
Maynor. 

601. Seminar in Educational Leadership. Shope. (3 or 6).F;S. 

618. Seminar in Finance and Taxation (3).F;SS. 

Advanced studies in taxation, statutory programs for school support, 
budget making, fiscal management and business operation of school 
systems. Shope. 

625. Advanced Problems in Educational (3-6).F;W;S. 

Administration 
Open to sixth -year students only. Shelton. 

648. Independent Study (3-6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

Directed individual study at the post-master's level. This course may 
give three to six hours credit and may allow investigation of one or 
more areas on an individual basis with faculty direction. Staff. 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, 
AND HIGHER EDUCATION 



649. Seminar in Facilities and Maintenance (3).S;SS. 

Planning the modern school plant, design and nature of functional 
educational facilities, personnel involvement, maintenance, determin- 
ing the needs of the community, factors in the selection of sites, archi- 
tecutral and contractual services. Reynolds, Shope. 

660. Seminar in Legal Problems in Education (3-6).S;SS. 

Legal bases for organizing and conducting public and private school 
systems, statutes and court decisions affecting educational functions. 
Shope. 

682. Programs for Continuing Adult Education (3).F. 

A study of the continuing nature of learning, how adults learn and 
how adult education programs are organized for effective operation. 
Staff. 

683. Post-Secondary Technical and Vocational (3).W;SS. 
Education 

A study of the role of technical and vocational education in society. 
Consideration is given to determining needs for specific training in a 
given community and developing programs appropriate to meet those 
needs. Staff. 

684. The General Education Program for (3).S;SS. 
Higher Education 

An overview of general education and its place in post-secondary edu- 
cation. Emphasis is given to building on earlier educational experi- 
ences in constructing a viable college general education program. 
Harris. 

686. Higher Education in America (3).F. 

Historical approach to the development of higher education from 
colonial colleges to the present. L. Cooper. 

687. Seminar in College Administration (3-6).S;SS. 

A study of the governance of higher educational institution. Con- 
sideration is given to legal bases, organizational patterns, development 
politics, administrator and faculty responsibilities. Harris. 

690. Seminar in Education for the Disadvantaged (3-6).W;SS. 

A study of problems related to education of the culturally different 
and educationally disadvantaged student and the administrative facet 
of these problems. Modification in curriculum in the development of 
compensatory and remedial programs are prime concerns. Shope. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 
DEPARTMENT OF ART 



67 



L. Edwards, Chairman, H. Carrin, W. Dennis, L. Force, 
N. Long, F. Petersilie. 

An academic concentration in art leading to the Master of 
Arts degree for elementary school teachers consists of 24 quarter 
hours including Art 525, 550, 560 ; three quarter hours from any 
500 level Art History; three quarter hours from any 500 level 
studio course and nine additional quarter hours in electives from 
studio and/or art history on the 500 level. 

An academic minor in art leading to the Master of Arts 
degree for elementary school teachers consists of 12 quarter 
hours including Art 525, 560 ; three quarter hours of a graduate 
level studio course selected from the areas of painting or graphics 
or sculpture or constructive design ; three quarter hours in gradu- 
ate level art history. 

Additional professional requirements are listed in the section 
for the Master of Arts degree for elementary school teachers. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN ART 

450. Problems in Art (3-6).F;W;S. 

Individual problems or projects. No more than three hours may be 
taken in a quarter. Admission on approval of chairman. 

451. Seminar (3-6). S. 

A specialized course involving advanced study by small groups in 
selected areas. Students may enroll twice for credit totaling six quar- 
ter hours, but may not receive credit for a seminar which duplicates 
the content of one for which they have previously received credit. 

501. Ancient and Medieval Art (3).F. 

An intensive investigation of art forms from pre-history through 
Medieval period. A graduate research paper will be required. Lecture 
three hours. Edwards. 

502. Renaissance Art (3).W. 

Advanced study emphasizing the European involvement with art 
during the Renaissance. A graduate research paper will be required. 
Lecture three hours. Dennis. 

503. Modern Art 19th Century (3).F. 

The development of art as it grew towards modernism, mainly in 
France, during the nineteenth century. A graduate research paper 
will be required. Lecture three hours. Long. 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 



504. American Art (3).W. 

Relationships between United States history and the development of 
American art from colonial times to the present. A graduate research 
paper will be required. Lecture three hours. Dennis. 

506. Modern Art 20th Century (3).S. 
A study of the art of the twentieth century as a worldwide phenom- 
enon. Special emphasis is given to recent trends. A graduate research 
paper will be required. Lecture three hours. Long. 

507. Painting (3).F. 

Development of the individual painter's aesthetic through advanced 
studio work. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Dennis. 

508. Sculpture (3).W;S. 

Special problems as related to selected materials and techniques. The 
emphasis will be on individual student experimentation on an ad- 
vanced level. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Carrin. 

509. Constructive Design in Fabric (3).F;W;S. 

An extension of Art 400 plus related research. Lecture one hour, 
laboratory five hours. Force. 

513. Printmaking (3).F;W;S. 

Advanced studio work in printmaking designed to develop an indi- 
vidual sense of graphic form. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 
Long. 

520. Philosophy and Problems of the Craftsman (3).S. 

An extension of Art 420 plus individual research in one constructive 
design area. Lecture three hours. Carrin. 

525. Teaching-Learning Process in Art Education (3) .F ;S. 

An extension of course material in Art 425 plus related research and 
bibliography. Lecture three hours. Force. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

550. Problems in Art (3-6).F;W;S. 

Individual problems or projects for the graduate student. No more 
than three hours may be taken in a quarter. Admission on approval of 
chairman. Staff. 

555. Constructive Design with Plastic Media (3).F;W;S. 

An extension of Art 355 plus related research. Lecture one hour, lab- 
oratory five hours. Petersilie. 

An examination of the current theories and trends in art education in 
560. History and Philosophy of Art Education (3) .F ;W ;S. 

relationship to their involvement in history and to future develop- 
ments. Lecture three hours. Petersilie. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



69 



R. Derrick, Chairman, I. Carpenter, J. Cornell, S. Glover, F. Hel- 
seth, R. Henson, W. Hubbard, H. Hurley, J. Martin, F. Montaldi, J. 
Randall, K. Robinson, T. Vergeer. 

A major in biology for the master's degree consists of a mini- 
mum of 36 quarter hours in biology. Required courses include 
Biology 454, 455, 500, 501, 503, 505 or 506, 514. 

A major in biology for a Specialist in Science Degree consists 
of a minimum of 36 quarter hours in biology. Required courses 
include 610 and 612. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN BIOLOGY 
AND GENERAL SCIENCE 

450. Nature Study (3).SS. 
Observation of common plants and animals, methods of collecting, 
organizing, and presenting nature study materials in the grades. Not 
open to biology majors for credit. Robinson. 

451. Ornithology (3).S;SS. 
An introduction to the anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and 
identification of birds. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. 
Randall. Each morning and at least one Saturday all day field trips 
are required. 

452. Microtechnique (3).F;SS. 

Technical methods used in preparing materials for microscopic study; 
practical training in preparation of permanent slides of small or- 
ganisms and tissue of higher organisms. Lecture two hours, labora- 
tory four hours. Carpenter. 

453. Histology (3).W;SS. 

Miscroscopic anatomy of the vertebrate body, including a study of the 
principal tissues and organs. Prerequisite: Senior standing and 
twenty-four quarter hours of undergraduate biology. Lecture two 
hours, laboratory two hours. Derrick. 

454. Genetics (3).F;S;SS. 
A study of principles of variation and heredity governing plants and 
animals, with special reference to man. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102- 
103. Derrick. 

455. Plant Physiology (4).W;S;SS. 

A study of the basic principles of plant physiology and fundamental 
processes such as cell properties, water relations, growth, photosyn- 
thesis, respiration, and mineral nutrition. Prerequisites: Biology 204- 
205,206 and Chemistry 101-102-103. Lecture three hours, laboratory 
two hours. Hurley. 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



457. Ichthyology (3).S;SS. 

Taxonomy, distribution, and ecology of fresh-water fishes of eastern 
North America. Management practices will be emphasized. Prerequi- 
site: Senior standing and twenty-four hours of undergraduate biology. 

458. Radiation Biology (3).W;SS. 

A study of the use of radioisotopes in biological systems. Laboratory 
six Tiours. 

459. Mammalogy (3).W;SS. 

The natural history, adaptations, taxonomy, and economic importance 
of mammals. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. Field projects 
are required. 

475. Anatomy and Physiology of the Receptors (3).F;SS. 

and Voice Mechanism 

For special education majors, speech majors, and also an elective for 
biology majors. The study of the organs and tissues involved in human 
communication, normal and defective. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F;SS. 

A study of bibliographical problems, types of research, the literature 
and methods of scientific writing. Required in the first quarter of 
beginning graduate students. Cornell. 

501. Advanced Animal Ecology (3).F;SS. 

Population analysis, population dynamics, simulated environments, 
community ecology, wildlife management, and environmental modifi- 
cations and adaptations. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. 
Randall. 

502. Fresh Water Biology (3).SS. 

A study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting 
productivity in lakes, ponds, and streams. Largely a field course deal- 
ing with various approved methods of studying fresh water. Lecture 
two hours, field work two hours. Derrick. 

503. Bacteriology of Water, Milk, Food, (4).W;SS. 
and Sewage 

Laboratory and field methods dealing with the sanitary aspects of 
foods and food handling; sources and kinds of bacteria in milk, water, 
and sewage with their sanitary significance. Prerequisite: three hours 
of undergraduate bacteriology. Lecture three hours, laboratory two 
hours. Montaldi. 

504. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (3) .SS. 

A study of the gross structure, reproduction, and development of the 
spermatophytes. Special emphasis is placed upon the classification and 
nomenclature of the spermatophytes. Lecture two hours, field work 
two hours. Carpenter. 

505. Animal Physiology I (3).W;SS. 

Physiology of the sensory, nervous, muscular, and circulatory systems; 
laboratory experiments, reports, and readings. Lecture two hours, 
laboratory two hours. Vergeer. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



71 



506. Animal Physiology II (3).S;SS. 

Physiology of respiration, elimentation, excretion, reproduction and 
hormone coordination. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. 
Vergeer. 

509. Evolution (3).F;SS. 

Evidences of organic evolution will be considered and evaluated from 
the paleontological, morphological, and physiological standpoints. 
Randall. 

510. Entomology (3).SS. 
Biology and systematics of the Insecta and related Arthropoda with 
emphasis on techniques of collecting, rearing, and identifying com- 
mon insects. Collection required. Lecture two hours, laboratory two 
hours. Cornell. 

512. Local Flora (3).SS. 

A course designed specifically for elementary school teachers. A study 
of the common flora and economic plants of North Carolina including 
the collection, common name identification, and methods of preserva- 
tion. Lecture two hours, laboratory and field work two hours. Robin- 



514. Plant Anatomy and Morphology (3).S;SS. 
A general survey of the external and internal structure of plants; 
detailed study of anatomy and morphology of representative plants 
from all the divisions. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. 
Carpenter. 

515. Plant Ecology (3).SS. 
A study of units of vegetation and plant succession; factors of the 
habitat; soils and climate; taxonomy of local flora and preparation of 
the herbarium material. Lecture, laboratory, and field work five hours. 
Hurley. 

517. Parasitology (3).F;SS. 

A survey of protozoan, helminthic and arthropod parasites with em- 
phasis on causation and prevention of disease. Lecture two hours, 
laboratory two hours. Vergeer. 

518. Advanced Genetics (3).W. 
A review of basic genetic concepts and an extensive investigation of 
recent advances in animal and plant genetics. Lecture two hours, 
laboratory two hours. Martin. 

519. Comparative Invertebrate Embryology (3).F. 

An advanced course in comparative embryology of the vertebrates. 
Derrick. 

520. Cellular Physiology (3).W;SS. 

A study of the fundamental physiological processes at the cellular 
level. Hubbard. 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



522. Cryptogamic Botany (4).S. 

Taxonomy, Morphology, and Ecology of the cryptogamic flora ex- 
clusive of the fungi. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Car- 
penter. 

524. Advanced Plant Physiology (5).F. 

Prerequisite: Biology 455. An advanced treatment of the physiology 
of growth and development of higher plants, with emphasis on the 
biochemistry of the essential elements. Helseth. 

530. Seminar (1).F;W;S. 

Presentation of one research paper for each year of full-time gradu- 
ate study. One hour credit given during quarter in which paper is 
presented. Required of all graduate students. 

535. History of Biology (3).S;SS. 

A survey of the history of biology with special emphasis upon experi- 
ments which have led to the discovery of the more important biologi- 
cal principles and concepts. Robinson. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

Graduate students with an approved subject of investigation may 
register for this course. The work is subject to their individual 
needs. Limit of eight hours credit. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6).F;W;S. 

601. Biogeography (3).F. 

The biological, climatological, geographic, and geological factors 
which effect the distribution of animals and plants. Patterns of distri- 
bution will be studied in relation to various sizes of geological units. 
Randall. 

603. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology (3).W. 

Morphology, physiology, life cycles, systematics, and ecology of in- 
vertebrates (exclusive of insects). Lecture two hours, laboratory two 
hours. Henson. 

605. Mycology (3).S. 

An investigation of the fungi with particular reference to the tech- 
niques of working with these organisms. Lecture two hours, labora- 
tory two hours. Carpenter. 

607. Plant Growth and Development (4).S. 

Growth regulatory substances, morphogenetic stimuli, quantitative 
interpretations of growth, totipotency and diversification in cultured 
cells. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Helseth. 

610. Advanced Seminar (3).W. 

Lectures, readings and discussions dealing with biological principles 
and theories. Staff. 

612. Advanced Independent Study (3).F;W;S. 

Student selects an area of investigation which must be approved by 



nstructor and advisor. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



73 



614. Comparative Animal Physiology (4).W. 

A study of physiological adaptations among phyla of animals, includ- 
ing basic principles of irritability, coordination and regeneration, hor- 
monal control, and responses to environmental factors. Hubbard. 

616. Principles of Animal Taxonomy (4).F. 

A treatment of modern evolutionary systematics emphasizing numeri- 
cal phenetics, serology, cladistic theories of Henning, and practical 
problems of using the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. 
Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Cornell. 

618. Advanced Bacteriology (4). 

Modern techniques and procedures in bacteriology, including instru- 
mental and biochemical methods of analysis and interpretation of 
data. King. 

624. Insect Physiology (4).S. 

Special physiological processes peculiar to insects and other arthro- 
pods. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Glover. 

APPROVED ELECTIVES FROM CHEMISTRY 

454-455. Biochemistry 

506-507. Organic Reaction Mechanisms 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

450. Science in the Elementary School (3).SS;Ex. 

A course designed for teachers with limited science background. Basic 
concepts, use of simple materials for demonstrations, and the problem 
solving approach are stressed. Lecture and demonstrations three 
hours. Available as a workshop. 

507. Science in the Junior High School (3).SS;Ex. 

A laboratory course designed to aid junior high school personnel in 
developing an experimental approach to science. Emphasis will be 
placed upon personnel gaining appropriate skills, and academic com- 
petency to motivate open-ended investigations for groups and indi- 
viduals. Available as a workshop. 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND 
PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

G. Miles, Chairman, H. Bowkley, J. Jonhson, D. Olander, D. Sink, R. 
Soeder. 

In the Master of Arts degree in the junior college teaching pro- 
gram, a major in chemistry consists of a minimum of 45 quarter 
hours of credit. The 45 quarter hours credit includes a thesis for 
six hours credit. A minimum of six quarter hours credit is re- 
quired in education and psychology (12 quarter hours credit 
required for secondary certification). The following chemistry 
courses are required: 450 or equivalent; 460, 502 (to be taken 
fall term of first year) ; 504; 506; 510; 513 or 514; and 550. 

In the Master of Science degree program, a major in chemistry 
consists of 45 quarter hours of courses including six quarter 
hours credit for research and thesis. The following chemistry 
courses are required of all candidates for this degree: 450 or 
equivalent; 504; 506; 510; 513 or 514; 530 and 550. The remain- 
ing quarter hours, for a total of 45 quarter hours, will be elected 
from courses in chemistry numbered 450 and above, Physics 
453 and Mathematics 461 and 462. 

All graduate students are required to participate in weekly 
seminar discussion periods each quarter in residence. 

All master's degree candidates must pass comprehensive exami- 
nations in the four major fields of chemistry: inorganic, organic, 
analytical and physical. Each must present and defend his thesis 
before the chemistry faculty. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN CHEMISTRY 

450. Qualitative Organic Analysis (4).F. 

A systematic procedure for the identification of organic compounds. 
Laboratory practice in identifying pure organic compounds and mix- 
tures. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201-202-203. Lecture two hours, lab- 
oratory six hours. 

452. Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4).W. 

A study of some of the modern instrumental methods of analysis, 
including electrochemistry, spectrophotometry, magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 210. 
Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE 



75 



453. X-ray Analysis of Crystal Structure (4).S. 

Introduction of the theory of space groups and x-ray diffraction by 
crystalline solids. Laboratory work in the application of principles. 
Prerequisite: Analytical geometry, Differential and Integral Calculus, 
Physics 150-151, 152. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 

454-455. Biochemistry (4-4). W-S. 

Properties and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins; 
chemistry of body fluids; biologically active compounds. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 201-202-203. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 

457. Laboratory Preparations (1).F;W;S. 

Three hours of laboratory. 

460. [509] History of Chemistry (3).S. 

A study of the development of Chemistry as a science with emphasis 
on the development of basic concepts, ideas and theories. Lecture three 
hours. 

502. Chemical Literature (1).F. 

To be taken fall term of first year. Lecture one hour. Staff. 

504. Chemical Bond Theories. Sink. (3).F. 

506-507. Organic Reaction Mechanisms. Soeder. (3-3). F-W. 

510. Chemical Thermodynamics. Johnson. (3).W. 

511. Quantum Chemistry (3).W. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302-303. Johnson. 

513. Optical Methods of Chemical Analysis (4).F. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 452. Lecture three hours, laboratory three 
hours. Olayider. 

514. Electrical Methods of Chemical Analysis (4).S. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 452. Lecture three hours, laboratory three 
hours. Olander. 

515. Electro Chemistry (4).F. 

Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Johnson. 

518. Radiochemistry (4).S. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302-303. Lecture three hours, laboratory 
three hours. Olander. 

520. Chemical Kinetics (3or4).F. 

Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours (optional). Johnson. 

523. Colloidal Chemistry. Johnson. (3).S. 

530. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Bowkley. (3).S. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (Variable Credit) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis. Staff. (6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 



76 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

0. Sutton, Chairman, R. Angell, J. Brashear, W. Brown, J. Courbois, 
B. Elledge, S. Harris, M. Hawkinson, R. Hopkins, J. Jones, T. Muker- 
jee, W. Muse, J. Riner, C. Speer, R. Stretcher, E. Taylor, N. Trivette, 
K. Tully, R. Weber, R. West, G. Zuckerman. 

A graduate major in economics and business consists of thirty- 
six quarter hours, including Business 500, a course numbered 
500 or above in Marketing or Finance, Business 515, and a course 
numbered 500 or above in economics. The remaining twenty-four 
quarter hours will be selected with the approval of the graduate 
adviser. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

ECONOMICS 

452. Comparative Economic Systems (3).S. 

A critical analysis of the theory and practice of the economic sys- 
tems of Capitalism, Communism, Socialism, and Fascism. Prerequi- 
site: Economics 201-202-203. Brashear. 

453. Economic Fluctuations (3).F. 

An analysis of the causes, consequences, forecasting, and control of 
cyclical fluctuation. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202-203. Weber. 

455. Public Finance and Taxation (3).F. 

Government revenues, expenditures, budgets, and financing taxes; 
shifting and incidence of taxation, public debts; and economic effects 
of government monetary and fiscal policies. Prerequisite: Economics 
201-202-203. Hodgson. 

456. Statistics for Business Control (3).S. 
Statistics as a tool for decision-making as employed in the fields of 
accounting, market research, production management, economics, and 
other areas of business. Staff. 

460. Seminar in Economics (3).S. 

An extended investigation of some specific topic with a view to giving 
training in methods of research and studying intensively some sub- 
ject in the field of economics. Prerequisites: Economics 201-202-203, 
302, and nine hours of economics, senior classification. (Offered on de- 
mand). 

502. Economic Problems of Developing Countries (3).S. 

An analysis of the economic problems of current importance in de- 
veloping nations. Prerequisite: Economics 201, 202, 203. Courbois. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



77 



516. Analysis of the American Economy (3).F. 
An examination of the actual operations of the American economy 
and an analysis of the findings in terms of economics theory. (By per- 
mission only). Brashear. 

517. Economics of the Disadvantaged (3).S. 

Special emphasis will be placed on the study of the economic prob- 
lems of rural and inner-city disadvantages and their possible contri- 
butions to the individual and local, regional, and national economics. 
(Offered on demand). Sutton. 

518. Monetary Theory (3).S. 

The development of theories of money and its value. Controversy 
over the quantity theory. The role of interest rates. Policy implica- 
tions. Prerequisite: Economics SOI. Brashear. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

Sutton. 

551 [501], 552. History of Economic Thought (3).F;W. 

Origin, development, and meaning of current conflicts in economic 
theory. A study of merchantilist, classical, neo-classical, and Key- 
nesian economics. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202-203. Brashear. 

BUSINESS 

451. Office Management (3).W. 
A study of principles of scientific management as they relate to the 
office. 

452. Income Tax Accounting (3).W. 
A presentation of the underlying principles of income taxation and 
the special accounting problems involved in the calculation of federal 
and state liability, with emphasis on the individual return. Prerequi- 
site: Business 204-205-206. 

453. Cost Accounting (3).F. 

Principles of manufacturing and distribution cost accounting. Ma- 
terial, labor, and overhead costs in job order and process cost account- 
ing. Business procedures and their adaptation to business situations 
and needs of management. Prerequisite: Business 204-205-206. 

454. Government Accounting (3).S. 

Application of principles of accounting and budgeting to municipal, 
state, and federal governmental units. Prerequisite: Two quarters of 
accounting on the 300 level. 

455. Corporate Tax Accounting (3).S. 

A further study of tax accounting with special emphasis placed on 
corporations, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: Business 452. 

457. Managerial Cost Accounting (3).W. 

Attention is given to internal reporting of product costing, personnel 
responsibility, alternatives, and competitive conditions. Prerequisite: 
Business 453. 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



458-459. Principles of Finance (3,3). F;W. 

Survey of the financial area from the standpoint of the individual 
business corporation. Consideration of both internal financial man- 
agement and external relationship with money and capital markets, 
financial planning, sources of funds, classes and types of securities, 
valuation of business enterprises. Prerequisites: Business 204-205-206 
and Economics 203. 

460. Personnel Management (3).W. 

Principles and policies governing present-day employment and em- 
ployer-employee relationships. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202-203. 

461. Credits and Collections (3).F. 

An analysis of the principles and practices in business consumer 
credit and collection. Topics studied include sources of credit, use of 
credit instruments, financial analysis, and sources of credit informa- 
tion. Prerequisite: Business 458. 

462. Investment Management (3).W. 

A study of investment principles and practices. Emphasis is placed 
on the understanding of risks and the establishing of investment 
policies for both individual and institutional investors. Prerequisites: 
Business 204-205-206, Economics 201-202-203. 

463. Production Management (3).S. 
An analysis of the managerial problems involved in the areas of 
product developing, plant and equipment, manufacturing planning, 
and controls, production standards, forecasting, routing, scheduling, 
dispatching and material control. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202- 
203. 

465. Introduction to Automated Data Processing (3).F. 
Card designing, key punching, sorting, tabulation, and preparation 
of reports. Application to problems in business and economics. 

466. Advanced Business Data Processing (3).W. 

Advanced problems in the use of the computer. Preparation of flow 
charts and system design. Prerequisite: Business 465. 

467. Business Systems Analysis (3).S. 
Designing data processing systems to satisfy business system's re- 
quirements. Prerequisite: Business 466. 

470,471, 472. Industrial Psychology (3,3,3). F;W;S. 

See Psychology 470, 471, 472. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

481. Principles of Life Insurance (3).F. 

This is a course in fundamentals of legal reserve life insurance, 
company organization and operation, insurance associations, and 
state supervision and regulation of companies and associations. Pre- 
requisites: Business 400 and Economics 201-202-203. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



79 



482. Principles of Property and Casualty Insurance (3).W. 

Topics include casualty insurance, fire insurance, marine insurance, 
liability insurance, insurance carriers, underwriters associations, and 
state supervision and regulation. Prerequisites: Business 400 and 
Economics 201-202-203. 

485. Principles of Real Estate (3).S. 

The course covers the following areas: economics of real estate; 
legal instruments used in real estate transactions; the real estate 
market; the real estate business; and the public and real estate 
activities. Prerequisites: Business 400, and Economics 201-202-203. 

490. International Finance (3).S. 

Financial procedures and practices of firms engaged in international 
trade of goods, services and capital as well as institutional operations 
of international finance are considered. Special attention is given to 
problems of the balance of payments, the foreign exchange mecha- 
nism, and currency convertibility. Prerequisite: Economics 305. 

492. Theory and Auditing (3).F. 
Basic principles of auditing with emphasis on analyzing and verifying 
records and reports. Prerequisite: Business 204, 205, 206. 

493. [504] C.P.A. Problems (3).S. 

A study of complex accounting problems under simulated C.P.A. ex- 
amination conditions. Recommended only for those who are preparing 
to take the C.P.A. examination. Prerequisite: Business 306 and 307 
or 308. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F. 

A study of bibliographical problems, types of research, and organiza- 
tion and reporting of research. Required in the first quarter of all 
beginning graduate students. Sutton. 

501. Corporation Finance (3).W. 

An intensive survey of the instruments and procedures of corporate 
finance. The internal and external sources of funds available to a 
business and corporate capital structures are analyzed. Mergers, re- 
capitalizations, and intercorporate structures are discussed. Prerequi- 
site: Business 458. Weber. 

502. Marketing Problems and Policies (3).W. 
Problems involving marketing organizations and methods with em- 
phasis upon functions, institutions, and channels and their relation- 
ship to the consumer. Prerequisite: Business 320 or equivalent. Staff. 

503. Advanced Business Law (3).W. 

Law as it applies to the everyday business transactions of individuals 
and the organization and operation of a business enterprise. West. 

505. Current Problems in Business Education (3).W. 

Problems in organizing and administering business education pro- 
grams. Riner. 



80 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



506. Instruction of the Secretarial Subjects (3).SS. 
Trends and research in the teaching of shorthand, typewriting, and 
related subjects. Tully. 

507. Instruction in the Basic Business Subjects (3).S. 
Objectives, organization of the curriculum, instructional materials, 
and methods of instruction of the basic business subjects. Riner. 

508. Business Report Writing (3).F. 
A study of principles and functions of communications for a business 
enterprise. Tully. 

512. Materials, Methods, Equipment in Business (3).SS. 

Education 

Investigations and demonstrations of recently developed materials, 
methods, and equipment used in teaching the business subjects in 
secondary schools. Offered as workshop on demand. Hawkinson. 

515. Business Management (3).S. 
Background, principles, techniques and basic problems of business 
management; budgeting and purchasing policies; emphasis on inter- 
dependence and interrelationship of management activities and 
functions. Sutton. 

516. Personnel Administration (3).S. 
Problems and practices in personnel management. Jones. 

517. Seminar in Accounting Sutton. (3).SS. 
548. Independent Study Sutton. (Variable Credit) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 
550. Master of Arts Thesis (6) .F ;W ;S. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



81 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



L. Hilton, Chairman, L. Brashear, R. Coulthard, M. Dunlap, D. 
Frantz, M. Harris, H. Heymann, M. Higby, O. Holton, D. Hurley, H. 
Lilly, S. Logan, M. Moore, L. Reed, J. Trimpey, C. Williams, H. Wil- 
liams, J. Williamson. 

The Department of English requires as a prerequisite for 
graduate work an undergraduate major in English equivalent to 
that available at Appalachian State University. Two master's 
degrees are offered, the Master of Arts degree for teachers 
wishing courses in professional education as well as English, 
and the Master of Arts degree for persons wishing courses in 
English alone or with an optional minor in a related academic 
field. 

For the Master of Arts for teachers, a minimum of 36 quarter 
hours (33 with a thesis) of English must be offered, including 
English 500, Bibliography and Research; English 466, History 
of the English Language; and either English 512, Literary 
Criticism or English 521, Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. 

For the Master of Arts degree, a minimum of 45 quarter hours 
of graduate credit must be offered. These may include a minor 
of up to nine quarter hours in a related discipline. They also 
will include six quarter hours credit for the thesis, which is re- 
quired. Required courses in the field are English 500, Bibliog- 
raphy and Research; English 466, History of the English Lan- 
guage; and either English 512, Literary Criticism or English 
521, Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. In addition to course 
work, each candidate will demonstrate proficiency in reading a 
foreign language. 

For requirements concerning the final comprehensive exami- 
nation on the thesis, see the discussion of these elsewhere in this 
bulletin, or consult the chairman of the department. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN ENGLISH 

450. Medieval Literature (3).S. 

451. Chaucer (3).F. 

Reading and interpretation of selections from The Canterbury Tales. 



82 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



452. Shakespeare's Comedies (3).F. 

An analytical study of four representative comedies; oral and written 
reports on additional comedies and collateral reading. 

453. Shakespeare's Tragedies (3).W. 

An intensive study of Macbeth, Hamlet, King Lear, and Othello; oral 
and written reports on additional tragedies and collateral reading. 

454. Literature of the Romantic Period (3) .W. 

A study of the writings of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, 
and Keats, with some attention to the minor authors of the period. 

455. Poetry of the Victorian Period (3).S. 

A study of the poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Rossetti, Swin- 
burne, and others. 

456. Milton (3).S. 

Rapid reading of Milton's poetry, with major emphasis on Paradise 
Lost and Paradise Regained. Collateral readings from the prose 
works. 

457. English Literature, 1660-1744 (3).F. 

English literature, exclusive of the drama, from the Restoration to 
the death of Pope. 

458. English Literature, 1744-1798 (3).W. 

English literature, exclusive of the drama, from the death of Pope to 
the beginning of the Romantic period. Supplementary reading from 
the major novelists. 

460. Seminar in Western Drama (3).F. 

A study of Continental, British, and American drama from Ibsen to 
the present, with emphasis on social and literary values. 

462. Shakespeare's Histories (3).S. 

463. Studies in World Literature (3).S. 

Selected topics from European and Non-Western literature in trans- 
lation. 

464. Introduction to Linguistics (3).F. 

Basic survey of Phonetics, Morphemics, and Syntax. 

466. History of the English Language (3) .F ;W ;S. 

469. [504] The American Novel from Its (3).W. 
Beginnings to 1900 

470. [513] The English Novel from Its Beginnings (3).F. 
to 1832 

471. [514] The Victorian Novel (3).W. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



83 



500. Bibliography and Research (3).F;SS. 

A study of bibliographical problems, types of research, organiza- 
tion and reporting of research. Required in the first quarter of be- 
ginning graduate students. Trimpey. 

501. English Drama, 1500-1600 Williamson (3).F. 

502. English Drama, 1600-1642 Williamson (3).W. 

503. Non-Dramatic Literature of the (3).W. 
Elizabethan Period 

Trimpey. 

505. Southern Literature (3).F. 

A study of the major Southern writers and their contribution to 
American Literature. Coulthard. 

506. Studies in the Romantic Period (3).S. 
Heymann or Hilton 

507. Victorian Prose (3).W. 

A study of selected writings by Macaulay, Newman, Carlyle, Ruskin, 
Arnold, and Pater. Moore. 

508. American Literature (3).F. 

Studies in American literature from its beginnings to 1830. Hilton. 

509. American Literature (3).W. 

Studies in American literature, 1830-1870. Hilton. 

510. American Literature (3).S. 

Studies in American literature, 1870-1914. Hilton. 

511. American Literature (3).S. 

Studies in American literature, 1914 to the present. Coulthard. 

512. Literary Criticism (3).F. 

The history of literary criticism from Aristotle to the end of the 
nineteenth century. Moore. 

515. Seventeenth-Century English Literature (3).S. 

Trimpey. 

520. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (3).S. 
Higby. 

521. Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism (3).S. 
Moore. 

522. Twentieth-Century American Novel (3).S. 

Logan. 

523. Twentieth-Century English Novel (3).S. 

Holton. 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



524. Studies in Linguistics (3).S. 

Theoretical and procedural studies in Descriptive Linguistics. Pre- 
requisite : English 464 or equivalent course. Harris. 

540. Seminar (3-6).F;W;S;SS. 

An opportunity for the graduate student to study a topic in consid- 
able depth. Subject matter will vary from term to term depending on 
interest and need. A student may enroll twice in the course providing 
the content does not duplicate that of a previous seminar. Prerequisite : 
graduate status or permission of instructor. On demand. Staff. 

548. Independent Study Staff (Variable Credit).F;W;S;SS. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis Staff (6).F;W;S;SS. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



85 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



R. Prince, Chairman, J. Amaro, P. Bonin, R. Diaz, W. Evans, B. 
Kinsey, E. Powell, T. Ross. 

The Department of Foreign Languages requires as a pre- 
requisite to graduate work 36 quarter hours of language study 
above the elementary level. A graduate student who does not 
have adequate undergraduate credits may begin graduate study 
if at the same time he is building up his undergraduate hours to 
the required level. For the master's degree, 36 quarter hours are 
required in the major field, French or Spanish, 6-12 in education, 
and 6-12 in electives. The latter may be in the major field, in 
another language, in education, or in another field, such as Eng- 
lish. The only required course is Bibliography and Research, but 
there are several preferred electives. For further advice, consult 
the Chairman of the Department of Foreign Languages. 

THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE LABORATORY 

The Department of Foreign Languages has a 54 booth elec- 
tronic language laboratory. In the laboratory, students listen 
and respond to prerecorded tapes which deal with the material 
covered in their courses. The main purpose of the laboratory is 
to increase the student's ability to pronounce, speak, and under- 
stand the language. The department believes that the laboratory 
increases the efficiency of language learning and that the extra 
hours spent in the laboratory can be the student's most produc- 
tive study time. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

451. French Phonetics and Diction (3).S;SS. 

An analysis of the phonetic system of French, studying the physical 
and linguistic basis of French sound production. Use of the labora- 
tory for ear training, along with constant study and practice in the 
proper manner and production of French sounds. Offered 1971 SS. 

453. History of the French Language (3).F;SS. 

A general study of the development of the French language from its 
beginnings to the present day with special emphasis on formation from 
Latin along with the other elements which contributed to it. Some 
readings from Old French texts. Consideration of the elements which 
cause linguistic change. Offered in 1973 SS. 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



456. Advanced Conversation (3).F;SS. 

A course designed to improve the students' fluency of expression in 
French so that they may have vocabulary and syntax sufficient to 
express their thoughts in conversation at normal speed with good 
pronunciation. Offered 1972 SS. 

459. Linguistics and Language Analysis (3).W;SS. 

A course designed to give a knowledge of descriptive, comparative 
and structural linguistics in relation to Romance languages, enabling 
students to apply these principles to language structures in French, 
and be better able to analyze the learning problems of their students. 
Offered 1973 SS. 

463. French Poetry of 16th and 17th Centuries (3) . W ;SS. 

Beginning with Marot, this course will cover the Pleiade poets, and in 
the seventeenth century La Fontaine and Boileau. Offered 1972 SS. 

465. Nineteenth Century Drama (3) .F ;SS. 

A study of the Romantic drama, the pieces a these, the naturalistic 
and the symbolistic drama. Other plays written up to World War I 
will be included. Offered 1971 SS. 

467. Eighteenth Century Drama (3).W;SS. 

A study of the successors to Moliere and the plays of Marivaux 
Lesage, Voltaire, Beaumarchais and their contemporaries. Offered 
1972 SS. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F;SS. 

A study of the bibliographic problems, the types of research, the 
literature, and methods of writing in the language field. Required of 
all students in the first quarter of graduate study. Amaro or Prince. 

506. French Literature to 1500 (3).W;SS. 

Covers the Medieval and Middle French periods. It begins with the 
Chansons de Geste, and other early writings, including poetry and 
drama. Offered 1972 SS. Bonin. 

508. French Drama to 1650 (3).W;SS. 

A study of French drama from the beginning of the sixteenth century. 
Most emphasis will be placed on Corneille and his contemporaries. 
Offered 1973 SS. Evans. 

509. Classic Drama: Moliere and Racine (3).S;SS. 

A thorough study of the plays of Moliere and Racine showing how 
they exemplified Classicism. Other minor dramatists of the period will 
be touched. Offered 1971 SS. Evans. 

512. Prose Literature of 16th and 17th Centuries (3).F;SS. 

A study of the works, ideas, and influence of Rabelais, Montaigne, 
Calvin, Descartes, La Rochefoucauld and Pascal. Consideration will 
be given to the effects of the Renaissance on literature and on the 
Classic Period. Offered in 1971 SS. Evans. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



87 



514. The French Novel up to 1820 (3) .W ;SS. 

This course will begin with L'Astree and will include novels of Mme. 
de Lafayette, Lesage, Marivaux, Prevost, Rousseau, Bernardin de St. 
Pierre, Chateaubriand and Benjamin Constant. Offered 1973 SS. 
Prince. 

518. The Eighteenth-Century Philosophes (3).SS. 

A study of the development of free thought after the age of Louis 
XIV. The influence of the lives, works, and ideas of Voltaire, Rous- 
seau, Montesquieu, and Diderot and the compilation of the Encyclo- 
pedic. The manner in which this age of enlightenment shaped history 
is emphasized. Offered 1971 SS. Prince. 

520. Nineteenth Century Poetry (3).W;SS. 

A study of the main poetic movements of the century and the poets 
who illustrate them: Lamartine, Hugo, Vigny, Musset, Baudelaire, 
Verlaine, Rimbaud and Mallarme. Offered 1973 SS. Powell. 

522. Nineteenth Century Novels (3).F;SS. 

A study of the main novels and novelists of the period: Hugo, Stend- 
hal, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola and Maupassant. Offered 1972 SS. Powell. 

523. Twentieth-Century Novels (3).S;SS. 

A study of the novels and novelists from 1900 to the present. Empha- 
sis is placed on recent or present-day writers, including Andre Gide, 
Marcel Proust, Andre Malraux, Francois Mauriac, Julien Green, 
Antoine de St. Exupery, Albert Camus. Offered 1973 SS. Powell 

525. Twentieth-Century Drama (3).S;SS. 

Plays of the first part of the century are studied, such as those of 
Claudel and Romains. Emphasis is on the present or recent dramatists 
such as Giraudoux, Cocteau, Sartre, Anouilh, Camus, Becket, and 
Ionesco. Consideration is given to the present state of the French 
theatre. Offered 1972 SS. Powell. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

in French 

SPANISH 

451. Spanish Phonetics and Diction (3).S;SS. 

An analysis of the phonetic system of Spanish, studying the physical 
and linguistic basis of Spanish sound production. Use of laboratory 
for ear training, along with constant study and practice in the proper 
manner and production of Spanish sounds. Offered 1971 SS. 

453. History of the Spanish Language (3).S;SS. 

A general study of the phonological and morphological development 
of the Spanish language from Latin to the present. Lectures and 
readings from the old texts to trace the origin, evolution and develop- 
ment of the Castilian language and that now spoken in South 
America. Consideration of the elements which cause linguistic change. 
Offered 1973 SS. 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



456. Advanced Conversation (3).F;SS. 

A course designed to improve the students' fluency of expression in 
Spanish so that they may have vocabulary and syntax sufficient to 
express their thoughts in conversation at normal speed with good 
pronunciation. Offered 1972 SS. 

457. Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3).S;SS. 
A course designed to give the students an enlightened understanding 
of the general culture of Spain and the Spanish-American countries 
and increase their knowledge of the geography, history, art, educa- 
tional system, government and social customs of the Hispanic people. 
Offered 1971 SS. 

459. Linguistics and Language Analysis (3).W;SS. 

A course designed to give a knowledge of descriptive, comparative 
and structural linguistics in relation to Romance languages, enabling 
students to apply these principles to language structures in Spanish, 
and be better able to analyze the learning problems of their students. 
Offered 1973 SS. 

461. Nineteenth-Century Prose (3).F;SS. 

The non-dramatic fiction of the nineteenth century with special em- 
phasis on the Regional novel. Readings from Pedro A. de Alarcon, 
Perez Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Valera, Pereda, Blasco Ibanez, and others. 
Offered 1970 SS. 

463. Contemporary Spanish Literature (3).W;SS. 

A study of the modern renaissance of the artistic and cultural life of 
Spain, impelled by the Generation of '98. Also a study of the poetry of 
Garcia Lorca and Juan Ramon Jimenez, the plays of Casona and 
Buero Vallejo and the modern novels of various writers. Offered 1973. 
SS. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F;SS. 

A study of the bibliographic problems, the types of research, the 
literature, and methods of writing in the language field. Required of 
all students in the first quarter of graduate study. Amaro or Prince. 

512. The Picaresque Novel (3) .F ;SS. 
A study of the origin and development of the picaresque novel and 
its impact on world literature. Readings from the outstanding pica- 
resque novels such as Lazarillo de Tormes, Guzman de Alfarache, La 
Vida del Buscon, La Picara Justina and Marcos de Oregon. Offered 
1971 SS. Amaro. 

513. Cervantes (3).S;SS. 

A study of the life and works of Cervantes, with particular emphasis 
on the Quijote. Offered 1971 SS. Amaro. 

514. Golden Age Drama I (3).W;SS. 

Lope de Vega and his contemporaries. Beginning with the precursors 
of Lope de Vega, Juan del Encina, Torres Naharro, Lope de Rueda 
and Juan de la Cueva, the course covers the outstanding works of 
Lope de Vega and some of the plays of Tirso, Alarcon, and Guillen 
de Castro. Offered in 1971 SS. Amaro. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



89 



515. Golden Age Drama II (3).S;SS. 

Calderon and his contemporaries. Calderon de La Barca, Rojas Zorilla 
and Augustin Moreto are studied with emphasis on the important 
Works of Calderon, including his autos sacramentales. Offered 1972 
SS. Amaro. 

519. Nineteenth-Century Drama and Verse (3).S;SS. 

An intensive study of Spanish theatre and verse from Romanticism 
to the Generation of '98, including works of Espronceda, Becquer, 
Campoamor, Zorilla, Duque de Rivas, Hartzenbusch, and others. 
Offered 1972 SS. Amaro. 

522. Spanish-American Literature to 1888 (3).F;SS. 

The extension of Spanish peninsulan literature in the colonies, begin- 
ning with cartas and relaciones of the Conquistador es, the epic and 
lyric poets, and all literature down to Modernismo. Emphasis is given 
to the gauchesca literature. Offered 1972 SS. Diaz. 

523. Contemporary Spanish-American Literature (3).SS. 
The birth of modernismo, and its influence on the world literature. 
The maturing of Spanish-American prose, novela and cuento, in the 
twentieth century with readings from various novelists. Offered 1973 
SS. Diaz. 

525. The Spanish-American Novel and Drama (3).S;SS. 

Representative works of outstanding authors from the Wars of In- 
dependence to the present — including Isaacs, Rivera, Azuela, Gui- 
raldes, Asturias, Sanchez, Usigli and others. Offered 1972 SS. Diaz. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

in Spanish 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

J. Yoder, Chairman, T. Epperson, O. Gade, W. Imperatore, F. Mc- 
Kinney, R. Reiman, F. Webb. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN GEOGRAPHY 
AND GEOLOGY 

GEOGRAPHY 

450. Geographic Influences in American History (3).W. 
Man's reaction to and use of environmental factors as he occupied 
the territory of the United States. 

451. Geography of the South (3).W. 

An intensive regional study of southern United States. Special atten- 
tion is given to climate, soils, land use, minerals, industries, and cur- 
rent cultural patterns. 

452. Geography of Manufacturing (3).F. 

A survey of world manufacturing, emphasizing distribution, com- 
modity production, and plant site location theory. 

460. Development of Geographic Thought (3).S. 

Series of topics selected in order to acquaint the geography major 
with the basic literature and evolution of the broad field of geography. 
Prerequisite: Geography major or consent of the instructor. 

482. [455] Geomorphology (4).W. 

Same as Geology 482. 

500. Bibliography and Research Yoder. (3).F;SS. 

502. Urban Geography (3).S. 

An analysis of urban centers from historical development through 
the contemporary city. Emphasis is placed on classification, site, 
situation, distribution, functions and patterns of land use, culminat- 
ing in urban problems, trends, and city planning. Epperson. 

506. Geographic Aspects of World Affairs (3).S. 

A geographic analysis of major world movements and events asso- 
ciating the physical environment with social, political, and racial 
factors. Yoder. (Same as Political Science 517). 

507. Geography of Eastern United States (3).F. 

The physiography, climate, soils, minerals, and the associated eco- 
nomic activities of the Eastern United States. Yoder. 

508. Geography of Western United States (3).W. 
The physiography, climate, soils, minerals, and the associated eco- 
nomic activities of the Western United States. Yoder. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 



91 



509. Concepts in Geography (3).F. 

Investigation and discussion of selected geographic concepts, both 
physical and cultural, which apply to man's utilization of earth-space. 
Open, with consent of instructor, to graduate non-majors. Reiman. 

540. Seminar (3-6). S. 

A specialized course involving advanced study, research, and writing 
by small groups in selected areas. Students may enroll twice in this 
course for credit totaling six quarter hours, but in no case shall 
students receive credit for a seminar which duplicates the content of 
one for which they have previously received credit. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

in Geography 

A program involving advanced study, research, and writing adapted 
to serve students with exceptional interests. The project must be 
approved by the instructor and chairman of the department. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 



GEOLOGY 

450. Earth Science (3).W;SS. 

Study of the earth in space with emphasis on the solar system; the 
effects of weathering, erosion, and diastrophism on the lithosphere. 
Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Not open to geology majors. 
Lecture : three hours. 

461. Introduction to Geochemistry (4).F. 

Chemical constitution of the earth, distribution of elements, and geo- 
chemical prospecting. Prerequisites: Geology 313 and Chemistry 103. 
Lecture: two hours; laboratory: four hours. 

462. Introduction to Oceanography (3).W. 

A study of physical, chemical, biological, and geological oceanography 
and their interrelationships. Prerequisites: At least two of the follow- 
ing courses: Physics 103, Chemistry 103, Biology 103, Geology 103. 
Lecture: three hours. 

463. Appalachian Geology (3).S. 

Study of tectonics and stratigraphy as exemplified by the central and 
southern Appalachian mountain system. One or more field trips 
required. Prerequisites: Geology 331 and Geology 341. Lecture: two 
hours; laboratory: three hours. 

472. [4511 Economic Geology (3).W. 

Principles, processes, and distribution of major metallic and non- 
metallic mineral deposits with type illustrations. Prerequisites: Ge- 
ology 313, Geology 331, and Geology 341. Lecture: three hours. 

473. Seminar in Earth Science (l).On Demand 
A survey of sources and uses of materials and aids for earth science 
teachers. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 



92 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



482. [455] Geomorphology (4).W. 

Origin and recognition of landforms; descriptive and quantitative 
aspects supplemented by means of maps, aerial photographs, labora- 
tory, and field study. Prerequisites: Geology 101-102-103. Lecture three 
hours; laboratory; three hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

L. Horine, Chairman, E. DeGroat, J. Elliott, M. Gruensfelder, F. 
Hoover, E. Larson, R. Light, C. Meeks, R. Thomas, R. Tomlinson, E. 
Turner, J. H. Williams. 

A major in health and physical education leading to a Master 
of Arts degree consists of a minimum of 36 quarter hours se- 
lected by the student in consultation with and certified by his 
major adviser. Physical Education 500 must be taken at the 
beginning of graduate work. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

453. Football Coaching (3).S;SS. 

Lectures and discussions on modern methods of training, play pat- 
terns, game strategy and seasonal planning. Open to experienced 
coaches only. 

454. Basketball Coaching (3).SS. 

A study of modern team and individual offense and defense. Lectures 
and discussions. Open to experienced coaches only. 

455. Advanced Track and Field Coaching (3).SS. 
Lectures, discussions, study of training for all events. Open to ex- 
perienced coaches only. 

457. Advanced Modern Dance (3).SS. 

Study and analysis of the techniques and basic philosophy of the 
dance, choreography, composition, comparison of various "schools", 
settings, costuming, music, and exhibitions. 

465. Seminar in Individual and Dual Sports (3).W;SS. 
A study of individual and dual sports except aquatics, track and field. 

466. Seminar in Team Sports (3).F;SS. 

A study of team sports except basketball and football. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F;SS. 

A study of bibliographical problems in the field, types of research, 
resources, organization and reporting, documentation of graduate 
writing and application to term projects. Turner, Thomas. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH OQ 

AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION TO 

501. Scientific Bases of Health and (3) .W ;SS. 
Physical Education 

Current findings and theories in various disciplines and specialties 
and their application to health and physical education. Thomas, 
Meeks. 

502. Curriculum Development in Health (3).F;SS. 
and Physical Education 

Study and evaluation of curriculum, program, and construction of 
plans for health and physical education for grades one through 
twelve. Meeks, Larson, Gruensf elder. 

503. Analysis of Neuromuscular Activity (3).S;SS. 
Anatomical, physiological, psychological, and mechanical principles 
applied to the analysis of skills and conditioning of the human in 
motion. Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in anatomy, physiology, 
kinesiology. Thomas, Meeks. 

504. Philosophies Related to Health (3).S;SS. 
and Physical Education 

A study of the outstanding leaders and ideas of the past and present 
as they apply to health, fitness, and recreation. Larson, Gruensf elder. 

505. Interpretation of Data (3).W;SS. 

Analysis and interpretation of test and measurement results and re- 
search findings in health and physical education. Hoover. 

506. Measurement and Evaluation in Health (3).S;SS. 

and Physical Education 

A course on measurement, evaluation, statistics, analysis of methods, 
test selection, construction and administration. Hoover. 

507. Organization, Administration, and (3).W;SS. 

Supervision of Health and Physical Education 

Study and analysis of the organization, administration, and super- 
vision of programs, trends, theories, and current practices. Hoover, 
Larson, Turner, Horine. 

508. Administration of Athletics (3).F;SS. 
Analysis and comparison of various methods of operating athletics 
in schools and universities: schedules, contracts, purchasing, storage, 
travel, insurance, training problems, officials, evaluation. Hoover, 
Horine, Larson. 

509. Seminar in Physical Education (3).S;SS. 
Lectures, discussions, case studies and summary of the fields of 
physical education for experienced teachers. A problems course. 
Horine, Meeks, Thomas, Turner, Gruensf elder. 

510. Athletic Facilities (3).S;SS. 
The planning, construction, budgeting, and maintenance of indoor 
and outdoor facilities for athletics, physical education and recreation. 
Turner, Horine. 



94 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



511. Conditioning of Athletes (3).F;SS. 

Methods of training, conditioning and reconditioning. Larson, Thomas. 

512. Seminar in Dance and Rhythmics (3).W;SS. 

For students with background and experience in dance. E. Thomas. 

519. Public Recreation (3).F;SS. 

A problems course for those in the field of public recreation. DeGroat, 
Horine, Tomlinson, Gruensf elder. 

520. Comparative Health and (3).F;SS. 

Physical Education 

A study of present and past programs of health and physical educa- 
tion, of a comparison of various cities, states, countries, and systems. 
Analysis of current practices and projection of trends. Horine. 

521. Physical Education for the Retarded (3).W;SS. 

Current programs and discoveries on the use and contribution of 
physical activity for increasing the potential of the mentally retarded. 
Meeks. 

522. Seminar on School Health Programs (3).S;SS. 
A problems course for experienced teachers. Horine, Williams. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

For those capable of independent study and research in health, physi- 
cal education or recreation. Staff. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 



95 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 



R. Carroll, Chairman, G. Antone, C. Blackburn, H. Bond, J. Dixon, 
E. Drozdowski, J. Fish, E. Gibson, L. Green, D. Heisser, W. Kinsey, P. 
Petschauer, R. Ramsey, A. Reinerman, C. Ross, S. Simon, I. VanNoppen, 
E. Wu. 

For a Master of Arts degree, a graduate student should take 
33-37 quarter hours of work in history, including History 512 or 
524, History 500 and, if a thesis is not submitted, History 548. 
A program of studies will be determined through counseling to 
meet the needs and interests of the student. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN HISTORY 

452 [475, 476]. United States (4).F. 

Cultural-Intellectual History 

A study of American ideas and civilization as expressed in religious 
developments, social reform thought and movements, science, art and 
architecture, higher education, and American-European cultural inter- 
action. 

454. North Carolina History (4).W. 

A study of North Carolina history from its establishment as a colony 
to the present. 

455 [485, 486]. The Afro-American Experience (4).W. 

From slave origins to the present, with emphasis on the period since 
Emancipation. 

462, 463 [468]. History of Central Europe (4,4). F;W. 

A survey of social, political, and intellectual developments in Central 
Europe: to 1815; since 1815. 

472, 473, [457, 458]. History of Russia (4,4). F;S. 

A survey of imperial Russia from the 15th Century to 1917; the Rus- 
sian revolution and the Soviet state since 1917. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F;SS. 

A study of bibliographic problems, types of research, and organiza- 
tion and reporting of research. Required in the first quarter of all 
beginning graduate students. Van Noppen, Dixon. 

501. Interpreting American History (3).SS. 
A review of American history through study of conflicting interpreta- 
tions of great issues. Dixon. 

502. Formation of the American Union (3).F. 

A study of the period 1763-1800 in American history. Emphasis is on 
the American Revolution, the Articles of Confederation, and on vary- 
ing historical interpretations of these events. Dixon. 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 



504. Jacksonian Democracy (3).S. 

Political, social, and cultural changes in the United States during the 
second quarter of the nineteenth century and the forces which pro- 
duced the changes. Van Noppen. 

506 [503]. Studies in Civil War and Reconstruction (3).S. 

Van Noppen, Drozdowski. 

507. Studies in the History of the South Van Noppen (3).W. 

509. Studies in 20th Century United States Antone, Fish. (3).S 

510. Studies in U. S. Foreign Policy Dixon, Blackburn. (3).W. 

511. Studies in American Intellectual History Drozdowski. 

(3).W. 

512 [491]. American Historiography (3).F. 

A study of the writing of American history from the 17th Century to 
the present, with emphasis on the historical philosophies, interpreta- 
tions, and careers of the major nineteenth and twentieth century his- 
torians. Drozdowski. 

514. Studies in the English Democratic Tradition (3).S. 

Carroll, Hanft. 

516. Studies in 16th and 17th Century Europe Green. (3).F. 

519. Studies in 18th Century Europe Petschauer. (3).W. 

521. Studies in 19th Century Europe Reinerman. (3).F. 

522. Studies in 20th Century Europe Reinerman. (3).S. 
524 [490]. European Historiography (3).W. 

A study of the development of historical writing in the West from 
ancient Greece to the present, with some attention to methodology, 
primary sources, and the philosophy of history. Carroll, Green. 

530. Studies in 20th Century China Wu. (3).S. 

540. Seminar (3).W;S. 

A specialized course involving advanced study, research, and writing 
by small groups in selected areas. Barring duplication, a student may 
enroll twice for credit totaling six quarter hours. Staff. 

545. Seminar in Teaching of History in College (1).F;S. 

Required of graduate students in the Junior College program. Staff. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit.F;W;S ;SS. 

Supervised individual reading and research. The student pursues a 
project approved by the instructor, department chairman, Dean of 
the Graduate School, and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy. Staff. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis Staff (3-6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 
DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 



97 



M. B. Allgood, Chairman, L. Hamilton, V. Irons, J. Lewis, M. Rhyne, 
C. Roten, J. Stines, V. Welborn, J. Whitener. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN HOME ECONOMICS 

451. Teaching Family Development in the Secondary (3).SS. 
School 

Designed to aid the teacher in guiding students in self-understanding, 
preparation for marriage, and growth in knowledge of the develop- 
mental stages of family living. 

452. Fashion in the Teaching of Clothing (3).SS. 
Designed to aid the teacher in analyzing and improving the students, 
the subject matter, the class environment and herself by gearing the 
program to fashion. Emphasis on the improvement of taste and cre- 
ating an awareness of good design and the current trends in clothing. 

453. Innovations in Home Economics (3).SS. 
Exploring and executing current teaching techniques with emphasis 
on creativity and response. 

454. Cultural Foods (3).SS. 

Cultural aspects of food as related to family meals; economic con- 
siderations; application of scientific principles in distinctive cuisine. 
Individual problems. 

455. Special Projects (1-6) 

Designed for individual or group experiences in selected areas of 
Home Economics. On demand and with approval of the chairman. 

459. The Demonstration— A Teaching Tool (3).SS. 
The study and application of good techniques for the development of 
the demonstration as one teaching device. 

460. Nutrition in the Elementary School (3) .Arr by Chairman 

A study of nutrition as it applies to the child and ways in which the 
elementary teacher can interest the child in proper diet. May be used 
for certificate renewal. 



98 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

F. Steckel, Chairman, R. Banzhaf, C. Owen, G. Ragan, D. Rigsby, J. 
Short, J. Sloop. 

A major in industrial arts leading to the Master of Arts degree 
includes 512, 514, 517, 520, and electives in Industrial Arts to 
total 36 quarter hours. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

452. Contemporary Industrial Finishing (3). On Demand. 

The course consists of the care and maintenance of finishing equip- 
ment; the selection and use of spray equipment and the preparation 
of the surface to be finished; staining, filling, undercoating, top coat- 
ing as well as rubbing out the final coat; application of simple and 
synthetic finishes. Each student should bring a small piece of furni- 
ture, such as an end table, coffee table, or small wood object for 
finish. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

454. Period Furniture (3). On demand. 

The study of furniture and its importance, design and periods. The 
student designs and constructs a piece of period furniture. Prerequi- 
site: nine quarter hours of woodworking or its equivalent. Lecture 
one hour, laboratory five hours. 

455. Contemporary Furniture (3). On demand. 

The design and construction of classic contemporary furniture and 
the work of contemporary furniture designers, with emphasis on 
Scandinavian design. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

456. Communications (3).SS. 
Elements of television, radio, telemetry, and associated communica- 
tions phenomena. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

458. Crafts for the Handicapped (3.S;SS 
Basic craft activities and occupational skills for the handicapped. 
Practical experiences in materials and methods. 

459. Graphical Analysis of Drafting Problems (3). On demand. 

Techniques of presenting data for the solution of scientific and tech- 
nical problems through the use of graphic computations and the direct 
(and indirect) methods of descriptive geometry. Prerequisite: Indus- 
trial Arts 102. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

460. Industrial Design (3).S. 

Design as applied to the industrial product. Lecture one hour, labora- 
tory five hours. 

461. Industrial Illustration (3). On demand. 

Practice with the various media used in technical illustrations for re- 
production and publication to acquaint the student with the steps in 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



99 



developing technical manuals, brochures, and similar industrial pub- 
lications. Prerequisites: Industrial Arts 101, 102. Lecture one hour, 
laboratory five hours. 

462. Materials (3). On demand. 

The structure and characteristics of common industrial materials; 
laboratory work in the same area of stress-strain hardness testing 
and the heat treatment of metals. 

463. Care and Maintenance of Equipment (3).SS. 
The installation, care, and maintenance of power equipment and 
motors, including complete rebuilding, adjusting, and full utilization 
of the rebuilt machine. 

464. Problems in Leather Techniques (3).F;W;S;SS 

An analysis of functional design and production methods of leather 
work. Individual projects designed to employ various technical and 
commercial methods of production. Lecture one hour, laboratory five 
hours. 

465. Problems in Ceramics Techniques (3).F;W;S;SS. 

An analysis of functional design and production methods of ceramics. 
Individual projects, designed to employ various technical and com- 
mercial methods of production. Lecture one hour, laboratory five 
hours. 

466. Problems in Art Metal Techniques (3).W. 

An analysis of functional design and production methods of art metal 
techniques. Individual projects designed to employ various technical 
and commercial methods of production. Lecture one hour, laboratory 
five hours. 

467. Problems in Jewelry Techniques (3).F;S 
An analysis of functional design and production methods of jewelry. 
Individual projects designed to employ various technical and com- 
mercial methods of production. Lecture one hour, laboratory five 
hours. 

468. Transportation (3). On demand. 

Theory and application of internal combustion engines, turbines, and 
turbo jets to transportation. 

469. Machine Tool Operation (3). On demand. 

The cutting and shaping of metals using the common machine tools 
of the school of industry. 

470. Advanced Machine Tool Operation (3). On demand. 

Advanced laboratory practice in setting up and operation of standard 
and production type machine tools. Prerequisite: six hours of metal. 
Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

471. General Shop (3).F;W;S. 

The combining of the various unit shops into one physical setting. 
Development of course materials suitable for use in the types of 
general shops found in the public schools. Lecture one hour, labora- 
tory five hours. 



100 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



475. Problems and Processes of Industrial Arts (1-3).F;W;S 

Individual research on problems determined by the students needs. 

480. General Shop: Graphic Arts (3). On demand. 
An analysis of techniques and laboratory practice in all areas of 
Graphic Arts. Areas include photo-offset lithography, letterpress 
printing, silk screen printing, block printing, and book binding. Lec- 
ture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

481. Advanced Offset Lithography (3). On demand. 

Advanced laboratory practice in composition, industrial photography, 
plate manufacturing techniques, and offset press set-up and opera- 
tion. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

482. Advanced Letterpress Printing (3). On demand. 
Advanced laboratory practice in composition, make-ready, presswork, 
and finishing techniques, including special operations in the platen 
press and related technology. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 

483. Office Reproduction Techniques (3). On demand. 

The study of the various methods modern businesses use to reproduce 
printed or duplicated copy. The course includes secretarial practices 
of cold type composition, offset lithography, electro-static printing 
and auxiliary operations. 

504. Machine Design and Construction (3). On demand. 

The elements of machine design including the construction of a 
powered machine. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Ragan. 

505. Industrial Tools and Processes (9). On demand. 

A survey of the basic materials, elements, and machines of industry 
to develop an understanding of industrial nomenclature, methods, and 
processes. Lecture, demonstration, and field trips. Prerequisite: six 
hours of metal. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Ragan. 

506. Electronics Component and Systems (3). On demand 

A laboratory course largely devoted to the construction of electronic 
gear. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Shop. 

507. Industrial Electronics (3). On demand. 

This course covers, through lecture, demonstration and experiments, 
control devices such as thyratrons, relays, timing devices, synchros, 
and motor controls. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Sloop. 

508. Digital Computer Circuits (3).SS. 

Through experimentation and demonstration, this course offers rea- 
listic practice with digital logic circuits; the application of digital 
computers in business; the arithmetic unit, memory elements, input- 
output devices, and the control element. Lecture one hour, laboratory 
five hours. Sloop. 

509. Transistor Workshop (3).SS. 

An intensive course devoted to the application of transistors and in- 
volving techniques of testing in regard to DC parameters and inter- 
pretation of transistor manufacturer's data sheets. Lecture one hour, 
laboratorv five hours. Stcckcl. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



101 



510. Industrial Arts for Elementary School Teachers (3).SS. 

Development of basic skills through elementary work in woods, metals, 
and other materials easy to obtain. Adaptation of work to classroom 
situations. Planning for creative work with limited equipment. Not 
open to majors in industrial arts. Lecture one hour, laboratory five 
hours. Sloop. 

512. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education (3).F;SS. 
The philosophy of industrial education from its beginning in manual 
training through contemporary programs in industrial arts and voca- 
tional education. Steckel. 

513. Industrial Arts Curriculum Development (3). On demand. 
Planning and development of course content for the major areas of 
industrial areas, incorporating the prevailing philosophy and objec- 
tives of school systems. Steckel. 

514. Design and Equipping of Industrial Arts 

Facilities (3).W;SS. 

Factors of school shop planning, equipment selection, layout and 
arrangement, and architectural considerations. Steckel. 

517. Design Method and Techniques 

for Industrial Arts Laboratories (3).S;SS. 

The role of the project as a vehicle for learning. Preparation of 
instructional materials, record keeping, budget construction, and 
requisitioning of supplies. Steckel. 

520. Skill Development in Major Areas (3-6). On demand. 

Individual or group work in area competence. Technique and process 
in the craftsmanship of the transformation of materials. Prerequisite: 
Must have been admitted to candidacy. Staff. 

521. Woodworking Jigs and Fixtures (3). On demand. 
The design and construction of jigs and fixtures for machines com- 
monly found in industrial education shops. The use of common 
school shop machines for production by adapting them with jigs 
and fixtures and special cutters. Prerequisite: one wood and one 
metal class for Appalachian. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 
Rigsby. 

522. Specialty Woodworking (3). On demand. 

Wood carving on flat, turned, and curved surfaces. Inlaying with 
synthetic and natural woods. Veneering flat and curved surfaces. 
Laminating with wood and veneer both flat and curved. Design of 
projects using the above. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. 
Rigsby. 

526. Advanced Ceramics (3).F;W;S;SS. 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of ceramics design, pro- 
duction, and finishes. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Owen. 

527. Advanced Jewelry (3).F;S. 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of jewelry design, pro- 
duction, and finishes. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Owen. 



102 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 



528. Advanced Leather (3).F;W;S;SS 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of leather design, pro- 
duction, and finishes. Lecture one hour, laboratory five hours. Owen. 

530. Special Problems in Industrial Education (1-3).F;W;S. 

Individual research. Areas to be determined by need, background, and 
interest. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted to candidacy. Staff. 

531. Photo-Offset Lithography (3). On demand. 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of industrial photography, 
film and lithographic plate preparation, cold type composition, and 
offset press techniques. Banzhaf. 

533. Letterpress Printing (3). On demand. 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of hot type composition, 
make ready, die-cutting, finishing and letter-press techniques. Ban- 
zhaf. 

536. Problems in Bookbinding (3). On demand. 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of binding loose pages 
pamphlets, magazines, and miscellaneous printed materials, with 
special emphasis on finishing and cover materials. Banzhaf. 

537. Silk Screen Printing (3). On demand. 

Individual problems in the advanced phases of silk screening multi- 
color on various media using the techniques of hand-cut, photo, and 
acid etching processes. Banzhaf. 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

D. Cox, Chairman, M. Busbin, Jr., I. Justice, L. McGirt, M. Newman, 
E. Query. 

The chairman of the Department of Library Science should be 
consulted for information on prerequisites to graduate courses 
in library science. 



For graduate degree plans, see pages 38-39. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

450. Organization and Administration 

of Non-Book Library Materials (3) .F ;SS. 

Acquisition, preparation, housing, and circulation of non-book library 
materials. 

451. Literature of the Humanities (3).F;SS. 
A survey of special reference works, bibliographies, and landmark 
books in the areas of literature, philosophy and religion. Prerequi- 
sites: Library Science 302, 305. 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 



103 



452. Literature of the Social Sciences 

and the Fine Arts (3) .W ;S ;SS. 

A survey of special reference works, bibliographies, and landmark 
books in the areas of biography, history, travel, the social sciences, 
and the fine arts. Prerequisites: Library Science 302, 305. 

453. Literature of Science and Technology (3).W;S;SS. 

A survey of special reference works, bibliographies, and landmark 
books in the pure and applied sciences. Prerequisites: Library Science 
302, 305. 

454. Literature for Young Adults (3).W;S;SS. 

Discussion and evaluation of contemporary literature, both adolescent 
and adult, available for young adults. Comparison between classic and 
modern books for youth. 

455. Interpreting Books to Readers (3).F;S. 

Storytelling, annotations, book reviewing, the book talk, radio, tele- 
vision, story recordings. Prerequisite: Library Science 304 or 307. 

456. Critical History of Children's Literature (3).F;SS. 
A survey of the origins and development of literature for children in 
England and America from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. Critical 
analysis of what has endured and why. 

457. School Library Workshop. (3).SS 

458. Junior College Library Workshop. (3).SS 
467. Correlating Teaching with the Library (3) .F ;S ;SS. 

Planned to help the classroom teacher understand better the function 
and use of the school library as a means of vitalizing teaching. Not 
open to library science majors. 

475. Cataloging and Classification (3).F;W;SS. 

Study of the principles of cataloging and classification of books and 
non-book materials. Preparation of a practice file and manual. 

476. Children's Literature Workshop (3).SS 

500. Research Methods in Librarianship (3).F;SS. 

A survey of scientific methods of research with application to specific 
problems in librarianship. Cox. 

501. American Library Resources (3).W;SS. 

A survey of agencies, activities, materials, methods, and devices which 
support, assist, or develop libraries and librarianship. Staff. 

502. Administration and Supervision of School 

Library Systems 

Designed for the experienced school librarian in preparation for su- 
pervisory positions in large units of school library service. Involves a 
critical study and analysis of problems in organization and adminis- 
tration of city, county, and state school library systems. Cox. 



104 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 



503. Reading Interests and Guidance (3).S;SS. 
Implications of research in reading interests of children and young 
people. Methods and materials for guidance in their use. Open to 
non-majors. Busbin, Cox. 

504. Advanced Reference and Bibliography (3).W;SS. 
Special reference problems, methods and materials for the large school 
library and the college library. Includes cooperative aspects of li- 
brarianship, the development of national and international bibliogra- 
phy, and the implications of automation in libraries. Staff. 

505. Advanced Cataloging and Classification (3).S;SS. 
Specialized cataloging and classification problems and processes. Staff. 

506. History of Libraries (3) .F ;SS. 

The development of the library as a cultural institution in ancient, 
medieval and modern times. Justice. 

507. History of Books and Printing (3) .S ;SS. 

The development of books and other records from ancient times to the 
present. Includes the history of writing materials, the alphabet, man- 
uscripts, printing, illustrating, and modern book production. Justice. 

508. The Library and the Community (3).F;SS. 
The place of the library, school, college and public, in the community 
and its relation to the agencies and resources of the community. 
Query, Staff. 

510. Organization and Administration of the (3).S;SS. 
College Library 

511. Government Publications (3).SS. 

The nature and scope of United States government publications, with 
some attention given also to state, municipal, foreign, and interna- 
tional publications. Problems in their acquisition, organization, and 
use. Justice. 

512. Use of Materials with Students and Teachers (3).F;SS. 

Materials and methods for more effective use of library resources in 
various curriculum areas in the school. Cox. 

513. Problems and Trends in School Libraries (3).S;SS. 
An advanced course to consider recent developments in curriculum, 
teaching techniques, physical facilities, and innovations in library 
service, that affect the school library. Cox. 

540. Seminar. Staff. (Variable Credit) .F;W;S. 

545. Practicum (Variable Credit). F;W;S. 

546. Library Science Institute (3).SS. 

547. Library Science Institute (9).SS. 

548. Independent Study. Staff (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 
550. Master of Arts Thesis (6).SS. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



105 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



H. Durham, Chairman, J. Boyte, G. Buckland, M. Carter, R. Curd, M. 
Eargle, R. Ensey, R. Graham, W. Hawkinson, E. Lane, H. Paul, A. 
McEntire, L. Perry, R. Richardson, P. Sanders, R. Schalk, J. Smith, 
J. F. Williams. 

A student beginning a graduate program of study leading to a 
master's degree in mathematics must have the equivalent of an 
undergraduate major in mathematics. The Department of Mathe- 
matics offers graduate programs in secondary school teaching 
and junior college teaching as well as a general academic gradu- 
ate degree program. Specific information regarding degree re- 
quirements for these programs may be obtained by contacting 
the Chairman of the Department of Mathematics. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN MATHEMATICS 

311-312-313. Differential Equations (3-3-3). F-W-S. 

A study of methods of solution of ordinary differential equations. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 211. 

321-322. Modern Algebra (3-3). F-W. 

A study of rings, integral domains, integers, fields (rational, real, and 
complex), groups, and polynomials. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211 or 
permission of the instructor. 

325. A Study of Integers (3) .S. 

A study of the integers beginning with the Peano postulates and in- 
cluding the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, Diophantine equa- 
tions, congruences, Fermat's and Wilson's theorems, perfect numbers, 
Euler's theorem, Fermat's conjecture, and the Goldbach conjecture. 
Emphasis will be on the historical as well as the theoretical develop- 
ment of the subject. Prerequisite: Mathematics 321 or permission of 
the instructor. 

331-332-333. Mathematics for 

Elementary Teachers (5-5-5). F-W-S. 

A study of the area of mathematics related to the modern elementary 
school curriculum. To be included are topics from abstract algebra, 
geometry, number theory, mathematical logic, trigonometry and in- 
tuitive calculus. Not open to mathematics majors. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 101. 

341. History of Mathematics (3).F. 

A study of the development of mathematical thought. 

343. Mathematics of Finance (3).S. 

A study of simple and compound interest, annuities, amortization, 



106 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



sinking funds, depreciation, bonds, stocks, and life insurance. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 108. 

348. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

361-362. Introduction to Geometry (3-3). F-W. 

A study of the development of Euclidean geometry including both the 
synthetic and the metric approach. Topics to be considered include 
parallelism and similarity, measurements, ruler and compass con- 
structions, and consideration of at least one non-Euclidean geometry. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 211 or permission of the instructor. 

371. Introduction to the Application of Mathematics (3).S. 

A survey of problems in the physical, engineering, biological and man- 
agement sciences in which undergraduate level mathematics is useful 
in the formulation and solution. 

414. Introduction to Numerical Methods (3).F. 

The analysis and application of selected numerical methods for the 
solution of polynominal equations, systems of linear equations, and 
differential and integral equations. The student should have some 
familiarity with differential equations and computer programming. 

316. Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems (3).W. 

A study of several systems of orthogonal functions and how these 
systems are used to solve certain partial differential equations occur- 
ring in mathematical physics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 313. 

417. Intermediate Differential Equations (3).S. 

A study of the theory of ordinary differential equations emphasizing 
the existence and uniqueness of solutions to certain classes of dif- 
ferential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 312. 

440. Undergraduate Seminar (Variable Credit). F;W;S. 

(Permission to register must be given by the department chairman.) 

453. Mathematical Logic (3).S. 

A study of the sentential calculus, the calculus of classes, the re- 
stricted predicate calculus, and the extended predicate calculus. 

456. Geometry for Elementary School Teachers (3).S;SS. 

An informal treatment of aspects of geometry which are relevant to 
the elementary school curriculum. The topics considered include con- 
gruence, measure of segments and angles, constructions, parallels and 
parallelograms, similarity, space geometry, areas and volumes, and 
measurements related to circles. Not open to mathematics majors. 

459. Foundations of Arithmetic (3).SS;Ex. 

A study of the law of arithmetic, concept of number, postulational 
treatment of number systems, logical reasoning. Not open to mathe- 
matics majors. 

461-462-463. Introduction to Real Variables (3-3-3). F-W-S. 

A rigorous treatment of the concepts of sequences, series, limit, con- 
tinuity, differentiation, integration, and sequences and series of func- 
tions. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



107 



466-467. Introduction to Complex Variables (3-3). W-S. 

An introduction to the study of complex variables to include such 
topics as line integrals, the Cauchy theorem, the Cauchy integral 
formula, Morera's theorem, and the Laurent Series. 

471-472. Introduction to Abstract Algebra (3-3). F-W. 

A study of certain concepts from set theory, semi-groups and groups, 
rings, integral domains, fields, elementary factorization theory, groups 
with operators, modules and ideals, and lattices. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 322. 

474-475. Introduction to Linear Algebra (3-3) .W-S. 

A study of vectors, vector spaces, matrices, linear mappings, deter- 
minants, scaler products, orthogonality, bilinear maps, characteristic 
polynomials, Hamilton-Cayley theorem, spectral theorem, Schur's 
lemma, and multilinear products. Prerequisite: Mathematics 322. 

477-478. Introduction to Topology (3-3) .F-W. 

A study of the basic concepts of general topological spaces including 
such topics as elementary point set topology, product spaces, metric 
spaces and continuous functions. 

481. Foundations of Geometry (5).F;S. 

A treatment of projective geometry including both the synthetic and 
the analytic approach. Also to be considered is a study of the relation 
of Euclidean, affine and hyperbolic geometries to projective geometry. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 362 and linear algebra. 

491-492-493. Probability and Mathematical (3-3-3) .F- W-S. 

Statistics 

A study of probability and statistics based on discrete and continuous 
sample spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. 

511-512-513. Real Variables (3-3-3). F-W-S. 

A study of the Lebesgue Integral leading to the proof and applications 
of the Lebesgue-Radon-Nikodym theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
462. Graham, Richardson. 

516-517-518. Applied Mathematics (3-3-3). On demand. 

A study of Fourier series, series solutions of ordinary differential 
equations, Laplace and Fourier transforms, solutions of partial differ- 
ential equations by separation of variable, boundary value problems. 

519-520. Functional Analysis (3-3). W-S. 

A course to include the study of normability and metrizability of 
topological spaces, the category theorems, the closed graph theorem, 
convexity, and dual topologies. Prerequisite: Mathematics 472 and 
478. Durham. 

521-522-523. Abstract Algebra (3-3-3). F-W-S. 

A study of groups, rings, modules, Galois theory, and representation 
theory to include an introduction to homological aglebra and the 
theory of categories. Prerequisite: Mathematics 472. Perry, Smith, 
Eyisey. 



108 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



525-526. Theory of Numbers (3-3). W-S. 

A study of the properties of integers, Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine 
equations, prime numbers, congruences, residues of powers, quadratic 
residues, and quadratic forms. Smith. 

527-528-529. Linear Algebra ( 3-3-3 ).F-W-S. 

Linear spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, ori- 
ented linear spaces, tensor-algebra, exterior algebra, duality, inner 
product spaces, linear mappings of inner product spaces, symmetric 
bilinear functions, quadrics, unitary spaces, and invariant subspaces. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 475. Perry. 

531-532-533. Topology (3-3-3) F-W-S. 

A study of such selected topics as Peano spaces, metric spaces, char- 
acteristics of arcs and simple closed curves, Euclidean topology, com- 
binational topology, and algebraic topology. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 478. Durham, Curd. 

537-538-539. Complex Variables (3-3-3). F-W-S. 

A course to include the residue calculus, algebraic and elliptic func- 
tions, conformal mappings, and the study of entire and meromorphic 
functions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 467. Richardson. 

540. Graduate Seminar (Variable credit). F;W;S. 

548. Independent Study in (Variable credit). F;W;S;SS. 

Mathematics 

Independent reading and research done under the supervision of a 
designated member of the staff. Prerequisite: 18 hours of graduate 
mathematics. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6).F;W;S. 

559. Investigations in the Teaching of Mathematics (3).SS. 

An examination of recent research and experimental programs in the 
teaching of secondary school mathematics. 

567. Computer Applications in the High School (3).SS. 

An examination of ideas fundamental to computers and data proc- 
essing together with programming experience. Effects of the com- 
puter on the high school curriculum and as a teaching aid will be 
discussed. Use of a computer will be included. 

568. Mathematical Applications in the High School (3).SS. 
Disciplines 

An examination of mathematical theories with respect to their appli- 
cations to other high school disciplines such as biology, chemistry and 
physics. 

569. Special Topics in Mathematics Education (1-6).SS. 

A flexible program of reading, study, planning, and writing designed 
to meet the needs of individual teachers or groups of teachers in the 
field of secondary school mathematics. Prerequisite: 18 hours of 
graduate mathematics education courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 



109 



A minor in computer science consists of eighteen quarter hours. 
251. Fortran Programming (2).F;S;SS. 

A study of FORTAN programming language and flowcharts as ap- 
plied to scientific problems. Intended for any student having a need 
for computer assistance. No prerequisite. 

351. Introduction to Computer Science (4).F. 

A study of the basic ideas of computers and their use, with emphasis 
on digital computers. Topics include number systems, boolean algebra, 
stored program concepts, system configurations, and current state of 
the art, 

352. Technical Programming (5).W. 

Compiler languages and their applications to linear programming, 
numerical analysis, and other topics are considered. Students will op- 
erate a computer or a remote terminal to run some programs. Pre- 
requisite: Computer Science 351. 

353. Computability (5).F.S. 

A study of the use of computers in simulators. Monte Carlo methods 
of analysis, linear programming, and management information sys- 
tems. Prerequisite : Computer Science 352. 

354. Individual Study in Computer Science (4).F;W;S. 

Independent reading or research in the area of computer science un- 
der the direction of a staff member. Prerequisite: Computer Science 
352. 

356. Current Computer Use (1-6). On demand. 

This course consists of work done with a cooperating institution which 
makes use of computers. This work is to be part of the total com- 
puter-oriented activity of the cooperating institution so that it will 
contribute significantly to the student's background in the field. Per- 
mission to register must be given by the department chairman. 

357. Research Support (1-6). On demand. 

This course consists of assisting in research activities of various types 
and is aimed at the design and implementation of research which de- 
pends on the computer for computations. The student must be directly 
involved in providing the computer support phase of the research. 
Permission to register must be given by the department chairman. 



110 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

W. Spencer, Chairman, W. Cole, M. Disbrow, N. Erneston, E. Fox, C. 
Isley, A. Justice, J. Logan, W. Mears, W. Newton, S. Rogers, H. Safrit, 
M. Smith. 

The Department of Music is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Schools of Music. The requirements set forth in this 
catalogue are in accordance with the published regulations of 
the National Association of Schools of Music. 

A major in music leading to the Master of Arts degree consists 
of 33 to 39 quarter hours, including 500, 522, 531. The graduate 
student must demonstrate proficiency or take courses in music 
history and literature, theory, applied music, conducting, and 
music education. 

All music majors are required to attend a weekly performance 
seminar and each major is required to perform on the seminar at 
least twice during the academic year. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS AND PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS 

All entering graduate music majors will demonstrate by 
examination their skills and abilities in music theory, music 
history and literature, performance major and music education 
where it applies. Any deficiency noted may require courses or 
individual study in the area of the deficiency prior to admission 
to candidacy for the degree. 

RECITALS AND CONCERTS 

Student recitals are held each quarter to provide students 
with experience and poise in public performance. Seniors and 
other advanced students present individual or joint recitals to 
fulfill requirements for graduation. Frequent concerts are given 
by faculty members, various musical organization, and visiting 
artists. 

It is desirable that music majors, undergraduate and graduate, 
attend all concerts and recitals sponsored by the music depart- 
ment. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Individual music instruction is offered in piano, organ, voice, 
and all orchestral and band instruments. Courses in applied 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



111 



music are required of all music majors and may be elected for 
general college credit by students not majoring in music. 

Piano. The piano major or principal should develop the ability to 
sight read, play accompaniments in a musical manner and per- 
form representative works from all periods of music, from the 
pre-Bach to the present. 

Voice. The voice major or principal should be able to sing on 
pitch and show musical aptitude. Study will include good posture, 
relaxation, diaphragmatic breathing, good diction and vocal 
exercises, and appropriate songs adapted to the student's needs. 

Organ. Piano facility which satisfies the instructor is a prere- 
quisite for study in organ. The study includes pedal scales, hymn 
playing, appropriate selections from the works of Bach, Men- 
delssohn, Franck, and Widor, as well as contemporary European 
and American compositions. 

Brass and Woodwind Instruments. This study emphasizes proper 
breath control, embouchure, and position, as well as good tone 
production and intonation. Materials and literature will be 
chosen on the basis of the student's ability and progress. 

String Instruments. The purpose of string instruction is to pro- 
mote in the student the basic techniques of good intonation, 
clarity and refinement of fingering and bowing styles, and the 
development of tonal beauty. Emphasis is placed upon the im- 
portance of phrasing and interpretation. 

Percussion Instruments. The student expecting to major in this 
area should have a background of the basic rudiments in snare 
drum and sufficient experience and preparation of the other per- 
cussion instruments to play a standard band composition. The 
first year of study emphasizes the snare drum and the twenty-six 
rudiments along with suitable solo literature. The remainder of 
the time is devoted to the tympani and other traps and equip- 
ment, with the main emphasis placed upon the marimba. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC 

451. Choral Literature (3).S;SS. 

A study of choral literature for mixed chorus, girls' glee club, boys' 
glee club, small ensembles, and church choirs. 



112 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



452. Piano Literature (3).W or S;SS. 
The study of the literature for piano from the pre-Bach to the pres- 
ent day through performance, analysis, and recordings. 

453. Concert Band Literature (3). On demand ;SS. 
A study of the development of the Wind Band and its literature. 
Significant original compositions and transcriptions with emphasis on 
20th Century works. 

454. Problems in Elementary School Music (3).S;SS. 
Music teaching in the primary and grammar grades; research and 
demonstrations of methods of teaching elementary school children. 

455. Instrument Repair and Adjustment (3).S;SS. 
The repair and care of string, wind, and percussion instruments. 

456. Opera Literature (3).SS. (On demand) 
Operatic development and literature from the Baroque period to the 
present day. Representative works will be studied visually and aurally. 
Attendance at live performances required. 

457. Chamber Music Literature (3).SS. (On demand) 
Instrumental ensemble music from the early 18th Century to the 
present, with special emphasis on the development of the string quar- 
tet as a musical form. 

458. Symphonic Literature (3). On demand ;SS. 
A comprehensive study of the development of the symphony from the 
Mannheim school to the present through analysis of a selected works. 

460. Band Pageantry (3).W;SS. 

A study of the fundamentals of marching, precision drilling, forma- 
tions, and maneuvering; the planning of football shows and parades. 

461. Piano Workshop (3).SS. 

462. Instrumental Workshop (3).SS. 

469. Music Education Workshop (3).SS. 

An intensive course in modern methods of music education for super- 
intendents, principals, supervisors, music teachers, classroom teachers, 
and physical education teachers. 

491. Honors Project in Music (3) .F ;W ;S. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3) .F ;SS. 
A study of bibliographical problems, types of research, and organi- 
zation and reporting of research. Required in the first quarter of all 
beginning graduate music students. Logan. 

501. Survey of Music to 1600 (3) .F ;SS. 
A study of the development of music from that of the ancient Greeks 
through that of the Renaissance. Erneston. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



113 



502. Music of the Baroque Era (3) .W ;SS. 
A comprehensive study of the music of western civilization during 
the Baroque Era, from the Camerata through Bach and Handel. 

Erneston. 

503. Music of the Classic and Romantic Periods (3).S;SS. 

A comprehensive study of the music of western civilization during 
the Classic and Romantic periods, from the Mannheim school through 
Wagner. Erneston. Alternate years. 

504. Music of the Twentieth Century (3).S;SS. 
A comprehensive study of contemporary music from Impressionism 
and Realism to the present day. Erneston. Alternate years. 

505. Advanced Conducting (3).W;SS. 

Emphasis upon the critical examination of both choral and instru- 
mental scores, with development of conducting skills necessary in se- 
curing the desired effects. Spencer. 

506. Analytical Technique I (3).F;SS. 

A comprehensive review of theory and the development of techniques 
for analysis of music from the Baroque to Mozart through counter- 
point, melodic structure, harmony and form. Five hours per week. 
Disbrow. 

507. Analytical Technique II (3).SS.(On demand) 

A continuation of Music 506 from Beethoven to early contemporary. 
Five hours per week. Disbrow. 

510-511-512. Applied Music ( 1-1-1 ).F-W-S;SS. 

One 30-minute individual lesson and six practice hours a week. Before 
being admitted to graduate standing in applied music, the student 
must demonstrate a graduate level of performance before a music 
faculty committee. Staff. 

513-514-515. Applied Music (2-2-2). F-W-S;SS. 

Two 30-minute individual lessons and twelve practice hours a week. 
Before being admitted to graduate standing in applied music, the 
student must demonstrate a graduate level of performance before a 
music faculty committee. Staff. 

516. Music Activities in the Elementary School (3).F;SS. 

Designed for the classroom teacher and covering a five-point pro- 
gram for children; singing, playing, creating, listening, and rhythmic 
activities. Fox, Mears, Justice. 

517. Music in Secondary Schools (3).SS. 
A study of the function and role of general music in modern second- 
ary schools, including music curriculum problems, instructional ma- 
terials, and methods. Mears, Fox. 

518. American Music (3).SS. 
The development of American music from the Puritan psalm singers 
to contemporary jazz with particular attention given to those musical 
concepts and practices which are distinctly American. Logan. 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 



519. String Pedagogy (3).SS. 
Fundamental principles in playing and teaching orchestral stringed 
instruments. Designed for the graduate student who has had little or 
no training in strings but who wishes to prepare himself for begin- 
ning string work. Erneston. 

520. Woodwind Pedagogy (3).SS. 

Survey of techniques, practices and materials for teaching the wood- 
wind instruments. Spencer. 

521. Brass Pedagogy (3).SS. 

Survey of techniques, practices and materials for teaching the brass 
instruments. Isley. 

522. Graduate Ensemble (0).F;S;SS. 

Participation in one of the instrumental or choral ensembles. Staff. 

531. Seminar in Music (3).F;SS. 

A review of the philosophy and practice in music education; reading 
of current studies, articles, books. Logan, Spencer. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (Variable Credit) .F;W;S;SS. 
550. Master of Arts Thesis. Staff. (6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

C. Davis, Chairman, R. Humphrey, R. Ruble, J. Stines, W. Strickland, 
K. Webb, G. Wingard. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

PHILOSOPHY 

451. Seminar: Studies in the History of Philosophy (3).W. 

An intensive study of one philosopher or philosophical movement. The 
subject of this course will vary from year to year and barring dupli- 
cation of subject matter a student may repeat the course three times 
for credit. Prerequisite: Philosophy 189 or 201 or permission of in- 
structor. Not offered 1971-72. 

460. Seminar : Special Problems in Philosophy (3).S. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to undertake a 
thorough investigation of one major idea or problem of philosophical 
import. The topic will vary from year to year and barring duplication 
may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Philosophy 189 or 201 or 
permission of instructor. 

461. Independent Study (3-6).F;W;S. 

Intensive reading, research, and student-faculty conference on special 
subjects for advanced students. By permission of the department and 
individual approval of the instructor concerned. On demand. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 



115 



RELIGION 

450. Seminar: Studies in the Nature of Religion (3).F. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Not offered 1971-72. 

455. Seminar: Studies in the Major Religious (3).W;S. 

Traditions of the World 

Prerequisite : Consent of instructor. 

460. Seminar: Studies in Religion and Culture (3).S. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Not offered 1971-72. 

490. Independent Study (1-6).F;W;S. 

Intensive reading, research, and student-faculty conferences on spe- 
cial subjects for advanced students. By permission of the department 
and individual approval of the instructor concerned. On demand. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

W. Connolly, Chairman, R. Franks, G. Lindsey, R. Nicklin, J. Wat- 
son. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS 

450. Seminar (Maximum credit 3) .F ;W ;S. 

A study of current physics research results. 

453. Electronics (4).W. 

Simple alternating current theory; vacuum, gas discharge tubes and 
transistors; thermionic emission; space charge phenomena; circuit 
analysis; electron ballistics; voltage and current amplifiers. Prerequi- 
site: Physics 303. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 

455. Introduction to Statistical Physics (3).W. 

A study of entropy, Maxwell's Thermodynamic equations, Maxwell- 
Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Develops macro- 
scoptic thermodynamic relations from microscopic models. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of instructor. Lecture three hours. Offered on de- 
mand. 

460-461. Quantum Mechanics (3-3). F-W. 

Non-relavistic quantum theory, including the Bohr theory, the Schro- 
edinger theory, and perturbation theory. Constant potential problems, 
the hydrogen atom problem, and the harmonic oscillator problem will 
be considered in detail. Lecture three hours. 

462. Quantum Mechanics (3).S. 

Taught on demand. Prerequisite: Physics 460-461. Lecture three 
hours. 



116 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



470, 471. Physics for High School Teachers (3,3). S.S. 

A study of the fundamental laws of physics with emphasis on dem- 
onstrations and methods. Designed for those currently teaching high 
school physics and for those planning to teach high school physics. 
Lecture three hours. Not an approved elective for physics majors or 
minors. 

480. Introduction to Solid State Physics (3).S. 

Elementary crystal structure, x-ray analysis of crystals, band theory 
of solids, study of electronic properties of metals and semiconductors. 
Lecture three hours. 

490, 491, 492. Theoretical Physics (3,3,3). F,W,S. 

Each quarter will be independent and will be devoted to separate 
topics such as: electric circuit theory, vector analysis and coordinate 
transformations, partial differential equations of physics, theory of 
relativity, waves, Fourier series and orthogonal functions. Lecture 
three hours 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

R. Moore, Jr., Chairman, J. Barghothi, M. Hoffman, A. Hughes, R. 
Moy, A. Rahhal, D. Sutton, M. Williamson. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

450. Democracy and Communism (3).F;Ex. 

A course designed for teachers with a limited political science back- 
ground. An analysis of the basic concepts of democracy and com- 
munism and of the materials available for classroom instruction deal- 
ing with these competing ideologies. 

451. Governments and Politics of Asia (3).F. 

A study of the policies and institutions of the major Asian govern- 
ments. Primary emphasis is given to the political evolution and cur- 
rent implementation of the major internal and foreign policies of 
Japan, China, and India. 

452. Latin American Government and Policies (3).F. 

The structure and dynamics of Latin American political institutions. 
Attention is given to formal institutions and to basic social, economic, 
and cultural factors. 

454. The Electoral Process (3).S. 

An examination of the factors which contribute to an electoral choice. 
Both sociological and psychological influences are considered. 

455. American Political Thought (3).W. 

A study of the main currents of political thought in the United States 
from 1776 to the present. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



117 



456. Intermediate Statistical Methods (3).W. 

Same as Psychology 456. 

457. International Law (3).W. 

An examination of the nature, scope, sources and sanctions of inter- 
national law; the rights and duties of states and individuals. 

458. International Organizations (3).W;SS. 

An examination of the development and functioning of world organi- 
zations with special emphasis on the United Nations and its special- 
ized agencies. 

460. American Foreign Policy (3).S;SS. 

A study of the political process by which contemporary foreign policy 
is made and executed. 

462, 463. Constitutional Law of the United States (3,3). W,S. 

An intensive study of the court decisions which have contributed to 
the contemporary interpretation of the American Constitution. 

465. Principles of Public Administration (3),W;SS. 
A study of administrative organization, relationships, and controls in 
the United States with emphasis on national public administration. 

466. Administrative Law (3).S. 

This course stresses the legal principles and practical doctrines in- 
volved in the work of administrative tribunals vested with quasi-legis- 
lative or quasi-judicial powers, or both. 

467. Public Personnel Administration (3).S;SS. 

A study of public personnel systems in the U. S. with major concen- 
tration on the national civil service system. Special emphasis is given 
to current research in the areas of leadership, informal organization, 
motivation and small group theory. 

470. Political Sociology (3).S. 

Same as Sociology 470. 

473. Politics of Developing Nations (3).S. 

An examination and analysis of the political processes in the develop- 
ing areas of the world, consideration of stresses of change, the in- 
ternational interactions and behavior of nations in their struggle 
toward political modernization. 

475. The Governments and Politics of (3) .F. 

Western Europe 

A survey of the Governmental institutions and political process in the 
parliamentary democracies of Western Europe with special emphasis 
on Great Britain, Federal Republic of Germany and France. 

476. [453] Governments and Politics of Eastern Europe (3).W. 
A survey of the governmental and party institutions, practices, and 
procedures in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. 



118 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



478. Governments and Politics of Africa (3).S. 

South of the Sahara 

A study of the governments and political institutions, domestic and 
international politics of the independent states of sub-Saharan Africa. 

480. Internship in Public Affairs (3-6).F;W;S;SS. 

Field work in the office of a governmental agency; city, county, state 
or national. Under certain circumstances, it might be the office of a 
political party organization or in that of some organized pressure 
group. The type of internship and place of organization in which it 
is taken must be satisfactory to the student and to the department. 
A research paper in which the student correlates his academic knowl- 
edge with his practical experience is required. 

481. The Political Novel (3).S. 

An examination of the contributions of the novelist in creating a 
political model that can be used to effectively explain and describe 
political behavior. 

482. Political Leadership (3).W. 

An examination of the factors responsible for the development of the 
political leader; the influence of third persons, health, family back- 
ground, personality, social class, and the accidents of history that 
place a particular individual in a position to assume leadership. 

490. Seminar: Scope and Methods of (3).F;W;S. 

Political Science 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F. 
Hoffman. 

501. Readings and Research in Political Behavior (3).W. 
A comparative analysis of the factors influencing political behavior, 
political socialization and political participation. Hoffman. 

504. Seminar in American Government and Politics (3).F;SS. 
Special investigation of selected topics in American government and 
politics. The topic will vary from year to year and barring duplication 
may be repeated for credit. Moore, Sutton. 

505, 506, 507. Readings and Research in (3,3,3). F,W,S. 
Empirical Political Theory 

An in-depth analysis of Political Belief Systems, recent Democratic 
Theories, and Political Personality. Barghothi. 

508. Readings and Research in Public Law and (3) .S. 

Judicial Behavior 

An examination of the multiple roles of law and the judicial system 
in the formulation and execution of public policy to include the role 
of the judiciary in politics and government with emphasis on varia- 
bles affecting judicial decision making. Moore. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



119 



510. Democratic and Totalitarian Systems (6).SS. 

A comparative analysis of constitutional democracy and totalitarian 
systems. Offered as a summer institute. Hughes, Moy. 

513. Readings and Research in International (3).W;SS. 

Relations 

This course will concern itself with in-depth treatment of the prob- 
lems and policies of Developing- Nations, the issues of Colonialism, 
Imperialism, Nationalism, and an examination of current methodo- 
logical trends in the exploration of these problem areas. Barghothi, 
Moy. 

515. Problems of Public Administration (3).F;SS. 

Graduate seminar dealing with the development of contemporary 
organization and management theories. Use will be made of case 
studies in relating theory to administrative practices. Rahhal. 

517. Geographic Aspects of World Affairs (3).S. 

A geographic analysis of major world movements and events associ- 
ating the physical environment with social, political, racial factors. 
Yoder. (Same as Geography 506) 

525. Seminar in Comparative Government and Politics (3) .S ;SS. 
An examination of selective areas of Comparative Governments. The 
topic will vary from year to year and barring duplication may be 
repeated for credit. Moy. 

535. Problems in State and Local Government (3).W;S. 

Research on selected topics and American state and local government. 
The topic will vary from year to year and barring duplication may be 
repeated for credit. Williamson. 

540. Seminar (3). On Demand 

Staff. 

548. Independent Study in Political Science (Variable Credit) . 

F;W;S;SS. 

Staff. 
550. Master of Arts Thesis (3-6).F;W;S;SS. 



120 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

B. Johnson, Chairman, W. Brigner, D. Clark, J. Crouch, B. Dowell, 
D. Duke, P. Fox, H. Gilley, G. Hubbard, I. Kauffman, R. Levin, H. Mc- 
Dade, W. Moss, M. Powell, W. Snipes, R. Steenland, G. Wesley. 

The Master of Arts degree in General-Theoretical Psychology 
consists of 45 quarter hours, including six quarter hours credit 
for research and thesis. Required courses include Psychology 
457, 458, 500, 534, and 550. A candidate may take any four of the 
following courses : Psychology 466, 528, 529, 530, or 531. A read- 
ing knowledge of an approved foreign language is required of all 
candidates for the degree. The candidate may select a minor field 
in sociology or the physical or biological sciences. 

The Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology consists of 
70 quarter hours of graduate credit, including six quarter hours 
of research and thesis. Required courses include Psychology 
500, 534, 550, 551 through 554, and 560. In addition to course 
work, thesis practicum, and internship, each candidate shall 
demonstrate reading proficiency in an approved foreign lan- 
guage. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN PSYCHOLOGY 

450. Psychology of Personality (3).F. 
A study of factors involved in the development of personality. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 201. 

451. Social Psychology (3).W. 

A study of social implications and applications of group stimulation, 
response, interaction, change and sometimes disintegration. 

452. Abnormal Psychology (3).S. 

A study of various abnormal phases of behavior; prevention and 
treatment of certain social-emotional problems; examination of re- 
cent clinical and experimental findings. Prerequisite: Psychology 201 
or 303. 

455. Advanced Educational Psychology (3).F;W;S. 

The psychology of learning as it applies to the learner, the learning 
process and the teaching situation. 

456. Intermediate Statistical Methods (3).W. 

Depth study of analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, correla- 
tion and regression, relationships to basic research and experimental 
design. Prerequisite : Psychology 205 or equivalent. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 



121 



457. Physiological Psychology (3).S. 
An examination of the biological correlates of behavior, structure and 
functions of the sensory and motor systems, endoctrine and metabolic 
processes. Prerequisite: Psychology 202 or permission of instructor. 

458. History and Systems of Psychology I (3).F. 
An overview of the origins and development of psychological con- 
cepts, movements and fields of study existing before and during the 
early 1900's. Emphasis placed on an understanding of the philosophi- 
cal thought lying behind current psychological systems. Prerequisites: 
Twelve hours of psychology. 

459. History and Systems of Psychology II (3).W. 

A depth study of twentieth century psychological systems and 
theories. Emphasis placed on an understanding of current psycho- 
logical issues, formulations and methodologies. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 458. 

460. Psychology of Disability (3).S. 

Examination of the physical, psychological, and sociological problems 
associated with handicapping conditions. Prerequisite: Psychology 
201, 375 or permission of instructor. 

461. Field Work in Vocational Rehabilitation (3).S. 
Supervised field placement in a rehabilitation facility or district office 
to expose the student to contemporary problems and issues of the 
physically, mentally, and socially handicapped and provide him an 
opportunity to apply the basic principles of vocational rehabilitation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

466. Comparative Psychology (3).S. 

Covers psychological processes in infrahuman organisms, the place of 
animal experimentation in psychology and animal research. Prerequi- 
sites: Psychology 201 and 205 or equivalent. 

470, 471, 472. Industrial Psychology (3,3,3). F,W,S. 

A survey of potential and actual applications of psychological prin- 
ciples and methods to the problems of business and industry. Atten- 
tion given to the structure and dynamics of organizations, labor man- 
agement relations and employee and consumer behavior. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

499. Psychology of Early Childhood (3).F. 

A study of the origin of life and the principles of growth operative 
during the prenatal, postnatal, infant and early childhood periods; the 
first five years of life. The laboratory is offered in conjunction with 
the Nursery School and gives opportunity for the student to develop 
understanding through systematic observation and individual case 
history studies. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. Prerequi- 
sites: Nine hours in psychology. 

500. Research Problems (1) (1) (1).F;W;S. 

A study of research problems, types of research, organization and 
reporting of research. Required in the first three quarters of graduate 
study. (Meets two hours every other week.) Staff. 



122 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 



501. Psychology of Late Childhood (3) .W. 

A study of childhood behavior from the ages of five through ten. 
Physiological, emotional, social and intellectual aspects are examined. 
Prerequisites: Nine hours of psychology or permission of instructor. 
Snipes, Crouch. 

502. Psychology of Adolescence (3).S. 

A consideration of the physical, intellectual, social and emotional 
changes expected during adolescence. Prerequisite: Nine hours of 
psychology or permission of instructor. Snipes, Crouch. 

510. Psychology of the Gifted (3).W. 

A study of the identification, needs, and motivation of the gifted and 
of research conducted with this group. Winford, Hubbard. 

512. Psychology of the Socially and Emotionally (3).W. 

Maladjusted 

Characteristics, identification and programs of prevention and re- 
education for both the emotionally disturbed and the socially mal- 
adjusted. Wesley, Moss. 

514. Use and Interpretation of Group Tests (3).F;S. 

Same as Education 514. 

519. Analysis of the Individual (3).W. 

An application of psychological principles and guidance techniques of 
self-appraisal of the personality of others. Prerequisite: Psychology 
450. Wesley, Gilley, Levin. 

526. Individual Intelligence Testing — Wechsler Scales (3).W. 

A study of the development, standardization, administration and in- 
terpretation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. Supervised practice 
in administration. Prerequisite: Psychology 514 or equivalent. John- 
son, Levin, McDade. 

527. Individual Intelligence Testing — Stanford-Binet (3).S. 

A study of the development, standardization, administration and in- 
terpretation of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale. Supervised 
practicum in administration. Prerequisite: Psychology 514 or equiv- 
alent. Johnson, Levin, McDade. 

528. Theories of Learning (3).F. 

A course designed to promote understanding of the theories of learn- 
ing of historical and current value. Prerequisite: Psychology 364 or 
455. Brigner, Kauffman, Fox, Moss. 

529. Advanced Experimental Psychology (3).S. 

The application of experimental methods to a variety of psychological 
phenomena. Emphasis will be placed upon each student conceiving, 
conducting, and reporting an experiment. Prerequisite: Psychology 
365 or equivalent. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. Brigner, 
Kauffman, Fox. 

530. Theories of Personality (3).S. 

A critical study of individual theories of personality structure and 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 



123 



development with their characteristic research and influence. Clark, 
Gilley. 

531. Advanced General Psychology (3).F. 

A critical study of some of the major experimental and research 
findings and methods in contemporary psychology. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 202 and nine hours psychology. Brigner, Duke, Kauffman, 
Moss. 

532. Evaluation of Exceptional Children (3).F. 

A study of special diagnostic procedures with children who have 

physical, intellectual, sensory impairments. Prerequisite: Education 
456 or equivalent. Hubbard, Winford. 

534. Advanced Statistics (3).W. 

A continuation of 456. Statistical estimation, inference, hypothesis 
testing, scaling, and the use of quantitative models in design and 
analysis of research. Prerequisite: Psychology 456 or equivalent. 
Dowell, Kauffman, Fox. 

535. Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3).F. 
A critical examination of major theories and data concerning the 
emotionally handicapped. Emphasis placed on recent findings and 
experimental research. Prerequisites: Psychology 450 or 530, 452 or 
permission of instructor. Johnson, Gilley. 

536. Theories of Psychotherapy (3).S. 

A critical evaluation of major theories of psychotherapy, including 
cross cultural studies, current applications and research findings. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 535. Gilley, Levin, McDade. 

540. Seminar in Psychology (3).S. 

Consideration of some of the contemporary research issues in psy- 
chology. Opportunity for graduate students to consider a particular 
aspect of psychology in depth. Topics vary from year to year depend- 
ing upon the interests of students. Prerequisite: Graduate status or 
permission of instructor. Staff. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (Variable Credit) .F;W;S;SS. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis. Staff. (6) .F ;W ;S. 

551, 552, 553. Clinical Practicum I (1,1,1). F,W,S. 

Introduction to interdisciplinary team approach to problems in voca- 
tional and emotional areas; directed observation of staffings, inter- 
views, psychotherapy and psychological assessment at the Psychologi- 
cal Services Center. Prerequisite: Admission to MA program in 
clinical psychology. Clinical Staff. 

554. Clinical Practicum II (3).F. 

Progressive assumption of clinical responsibility in psychotherapy, 
psychological testing, referral procedures; supervision in these areas 
by licensed psychologists at the Psychological Services Center or other 
designated practicum locations. Prerequisites: Clinical Practicum I. 
Clinical Staff. 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 



555. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3).F. 

Study at advanced level of developmental stages throughout the 
course of life, from conception through old age. Special attention will 
be given to current theories, to methodology, and to illustrative areas 
of research. Prerequisite: Psychology 205 and preceded by, or taken 
concurrently with, Psychology 457. Fox, Gilley, Snipes. 

556. Experimental Analysis of Mental Deficiency (3).W. 
Research, etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and behavior modification in 
the area of mental deficiency. Prerequisite: Psychology 555. B. John- 
son. 

557. Clinical Psychology (1).F. 
Seminar on issues in professional clinical psychology; licensing, eth- 
ical and legal considerations in clinical psychology, role relations with 
other professions. Prerequisite: Clinical Practicum I. Clinical Staff. 

558. Projective Techniques (3).S. 
Theory, research findings and clinical applications of major projective 
techniques, with emphasis on Rorschach and TAT. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 526, 527, 535. Gilley, Levin, McDade. 

559. Advanced Psychological Assessment. (3).F. 
Advanced supervision in techniques of individual psychological evalu- 
ations, including interview techniques, behavioral observations and 
assessment of personality and intellectual functioning in persons with 
behavior disorders; the writing of meaningful psychological reports, 
including appropriate recommendations for treatment or referral. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 526, 527, Clinical Practicum I. 551, 552, 
553. Gilley, Levin, McDade. 

560. 561. Internship (6,6). W,S. 

Six months full time placement in mental health setting under super- 
vision of a licensed psychologist; psychological evaluation, individual 
and group psychotherapy; work with interdisciplinary team; consul- 
tation with community agencies, schools, and work in institutional 
settings. Prerequisite: Completion of course work in MA Clinical 
Psychology program. Clinical Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



125 



A. Denton, Chairman, L. Brown, R. Jack all, L. Keasey, F. Lovrich, 

B. PURRINGTON, S. WESTFALL. 

The Master of Arts degree with a major in sociology is offered 
in the program for secondary school teachers and in the program 
for junior college teachers. An undergraduate major in sociology 
is prerequisite for either program. 

The major consists of a minimum of 33 quarter hours in 
sociology, six hours of which may be for the thesis if the candi- 
date elects to write a thesis. Courses in sociology that are re- 
quired are Sociology 500, Bibliography and Research; Sociology 
456, Intermediate Statistical Methods; and Sociology 525, Con- 
temporary Sociological Theory. If the candidate has not had the 
equivalent of Sociology 205, Statistical Methods, and Sociology 
461, The Development of Sociological Theory, in his undergradu- 
ate program, he must take them and will receive graduate 
credit for 461. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN SOCIOLOGY 
AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 

450. Race Relations (3).F. 

Analysis of intergroup relationships; the bases of conflict, accommo- 
dation and assimilation; the nature and consequences of prejudice 
and discrimination; evaluation of proposals for reduction or elimina- 
tion of prejudice and discrimination. Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or 
203. 

451. Social Psychology (3).W. 

A study of the behavior and experience of the individual in social 
contexts. 

456. Intermediate Statistical Methods (3).W. 

Depth study of analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, correla- 
tion and regression, relationships to basic research and experimental 
design. Prerequisite : Sociology 205 or equivalent. 

461. The Development of Sociological Theory (3).W;S. 

Development of sociological theory from Auguste Comte (19th cen- 
tury) to the present. 

470. Political Sociology (3).S. 

Social influences on political behavior; the relationship between po- 
litical and other institutions. (Same as Political Science 470.) 



126 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



480. Sociology of the Family (3).S. 

The origin and development of the family as a social institution; the 
contemporary family in various cultures; the relationship of the fam- 
ily to the economic, political, religious, and educational institutions in 
American society. 

500. Bibliography and Research (3).F. 

Brown. 

502. Concepts in Sociology (3).F. 

Systematic survey and critical analysis of selected sociological con- 
cepts and theories. This course is for graduate students who have a 
limited background in sociology. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor or department chairman. Denton, Keasey, Jackall. 

508. Urban Sociology (3).W. 

Urbanism as a way of life. Growth and development of urban areas, 
urban social organization, change and problems, ecological pattern- 
ing, urban planning and social controls. Denton, Westfall. 

510. Social Structure (3).S. 

An analysis of social stratification, its nature and function, caste, 
estates, classes, rank and prestige; community power structure; bu- 
reaucratic organization. Denton, Brown. 

515. Complex Organizations (3).F. 

An examination of theories of large-scale organizations with a sub- 
tantive, comparative analysis of types such as bureaucratic, prison, 
hospital, industrial, scientific, and voluntary organizations. Jackall. 

520. Demography (3).S. 

A systematic survey and analysis of major theories of population 
growth and change. Intensive analysis of world population trends. 
Denton, Brown. 

525. Contemporary Sociological Theory (3).S. 

A review and assessment of the works of leading contemporary so- 
ciologists with critical analysis centering around the nature of socio- 
logical explanation. Westfall. 

540. Seminar (3-6). On Demand 

A specialized course involving advanced study, research, and writing 
by small groups in selected areas. Students may enroll twice in this 
course for credit totaling six quarter hours, but in no case shall 
students receive credit for a seminar which duplicates the content of 
one for which they have previously received credit. Staff. 

548. Independent Study: Directed Reading (Variable Credit), 
and Research F ;W ;S ;SS. 

549. Field Experience; Internship (Variable Credit) On Demand 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



127 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



465. Folk and Peasant Cultures of the Modern World (3).S. 
Descriptive and theoretical analysis of modern folk and peasant cul- 
tures in different areas of the world. Emphasis on problems of social 
change and urbanization. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

G. Bolick, Chairman, R. Culyer, E. Dedmond, M. Farris, E. Harrill, 
M. Hubbard, I. Jones, P. LaBach, R. McFarland, H. Padgett, U. Price, 
J. Pritchett, D. Robinson, D. Smith, E. Stoddard, J. Winford. 

The Department of Special Programs is responsible for or- 
ganizing and providing instructional programs leading to certifi- 
cation of personnel in specialized school services in counseling 
and guidance, reading, audio-visual media, and special education. 
The department is responsible also for advisory and administra- 
tive functions essential to the effectiveness of the programs. 

For graduate degree plans in special programs, see pages 
36-43. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Audiovisual Specialist 

466. Instructional Materials (3).F;W;S;SS. 

Considers the process of using a wide variety of teaching and learn- 
ing resources in improving instruction. Emphasizes the location, se- 
lection and evaluation of materials; the role of instructional materials 
in teaching and learning; preparation and administration of instruc- 
tional materials. 

474. Photography (3).W;SS. 
Basic theory, principles and techniques of black and white, and color 
picture photography. 

475. Audiovisual Instruction (3) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

An introductory study of a variety of major audiovisual media which 
encompasses the selection and practical classroom application of ma- 
terials; laboratory experience in the operation of equipment; and the 
production of basic visual materials. 

476. Cinematography (3).S;SS. 

Basic theory, principles and techniques of motion picture photography. 

500. Research in Education (3).F;W;S. 

A study of the various types of research and the logical organization 
of research and reporting; required in first quarter for persons work- 



128 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



ing for Master of Arts Degree in any area in education and industrial 
arts. Staff. 

528. Production and Care of Audiovisual Materials (3).F;SS. 
Includes design and use of graphic and photographic production tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Education 475. Pritchett. 

532. Use and Care of Machines and Equipment (3).W;SS. 

A study of operating techniques of projection and audio devices, 
cameras, electronic laboratories, teaching machines; preventive 
maintenance and minor repairs. Prerequisite: Education 475. Pritch- 
ett. 

536. Programmed Instruction (3).S;SS. 
An introductory course in the design, preparation and validation of 
programs for instruction; provides laboratory experiences in pro- 
grammed learning. McFarland. 

537. Organization and Administration of an (3).S;SS. 
Audiovisual Program 

Selection and evaluation of materials and equipment, including an 
analysis of the adequacy and effectiveness of audiovisual programs 
in school and college systems. Prerequisite: Education 475. Pritchett. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (3-6).F;W;S;SS. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis. Staff. (6) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

554. Television in Instruction (3).W;SS. 
Techniques of using television as a teaching device. Covers production 
and utilization with emphasis on the use of portable videotape re- 
corder. Survey of programming available to schools from all sources. 
Stoddai'd. 

555. Seminar in Problems in Audovisual Instruction (3).S;SS. 

For audiovisual majors only. Pritchett. 

556. Practicum in Audiovisual Programs (3) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 
Prerequisite: Completion of all other audiovisual courses and ap- 
proval of instructor. McFarland. 

564. Advanced Production of Audiovisual Materials (3) .W ;SS. 

Continuation of 528 in breadth and depth. Emphasis on project pro- 
ductions for mass distribution. Prerequisite: Education 475 and 528. 
Pritchett. 



Counselor 

There are two programs in counselor education : one designed 
to meet certification requirements and to prepare students pri- 
marily for work in public schools, elementary and secondary; the 
other program admits persons without an A certificate who 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



129 



prefer counseling in a non-public school setting such as junior 
colleges, employment and rehabilitation counseling, mental 
health centers and pastoral counseling. 

460. Educational Statistics (3).F;S;SS. 

A study of the statistical procedures in education. 

478. Theory and Practice of Guidance (5) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 
An introductory study of public school guidance and counseling pro- 
grams and practices, including purposes, philosophy, organization and 
other important aspects of a guidance program. 

479. Group Methods and Processes (3).F;W;SS. 

A study of group dynamics, experimentation in groups, leadership 
roles, applicability to other settings. 

500. Research in Education (3).F;W;E. 

A study of the various types of research and the logical organization 
of research and reporting; required in first quarter for persons work- 
ing for Master of Arts Degree in any area in education and industrial 
arts. Staff. 

514. Psychological and Educational Testing (3) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

A study of the rationale which underlies group testing with emphasis 
upon the Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests and 
Manuals. Prerequisite : Education 460 or permission of the instructor. 
(Also Psychology 514.) Staff. 

520. Occupational and Educational Information (3).F;S;SS. 

Designed to acquaint teachers and counselors with sources and uses 
of vocational and educational information. D. Robinson. 

522. Counseling Theory and Techniques (3).W;S;SS. 

Designed primarily for students certifying in guidance and counsel- 
ing; emphasis on theory and practice. Prerequisites: Education 478, 
Psychology 450. E. Harrill. 

523. Organization and Administration of (3). On Demand 
Guidance Services 

Primarily designed for those who desire to study the methods of in- 
troducing and establishing a school guidance program. D. Robinson. 

524. Seminar in Guidance (3).F;W;SS. 

Each individual will select some phase of guidance work, according 
to his special interests, for research and study. Prerequisite: Ap- 
proval of instructor. Staff. 

538, 539. Supervised Practicum in Counseling (3,3).F;W;S;SS. 

Practice in the application of counseling techniques. Available pri- 
marily for Appalachian State University counseling degree candi- 
dates. Credit and setting to be decided upon in consultation with 
practicum supervisor. Prerequisite: Approval of adviser. Six quarter 
hours — two separate quarters — are required by Appalachian State 



130 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



University for the certification program. Three quarter hours for 
non-certificate program. Staff. 

540. Guidance Services in the Elementary School (3).F;SS. 

Designed primarily for those who are preparing to become counselors 
at the elementary school. Emphasis is given to philosophy, organiza- 
tion, maintenance and use of records, variety and use of tests, play 
therapy concepts, consultation with teachers and/or parents. D. 
Robinson. 

541. Student Personnel Services (3).W;SS. 

This course is designed for students interested in preparing them- 
selves for college work in a non-instructional capacity. Emphasis is 
given to philosophy, organization, staffing, and services which com- 
prise adequate student personnel programs: orientation, records, 
counseling, testing, health, recreation, housing, and placement. Pad- 
gett. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (Variable Credit) .F;W;S;SS. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6) .F ;W ;SS. 

569. Readings and Research in Guidance and (3).SS. 

Student Personnel 

Individual programs of readings and research for students in guid- 
ance and student personnel work. Primarily for students who want 
advanced credit toward certification. E. Harrill. 

670. Individual Behavior (3).F;SS. 

Staff. 

672. Advanced Group Methods and Processes (3).W;S;SS. 

Staff. 

679. Practicum in Group Methods and Processes (3).S;SS. 

Staff. 

Reading Specialist 

Reading courses are designed to meet the requirements of a 
second academic concentration and certification for elementary 
education majors and graduate certification on the master's 
level. 

460. Educational Statistics (3).F;W;S;SS. 

A study of the statistical procedures in education. Staff. 

462. Reading on High School and (3).F;W;S;SS. 

Advanced Levels 

Reading problems encountered on the high school level; reading in 
the content areas of the curriculum; the total school responsibility in 
reading improvement. Opportunities for practical application pro- 
vided. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



131 



463. Reading in the Content Areas (3).W;SS. 

For elementary and high school. 

464. Workshop in Teaching Reading (3).SS;Ex. 

465. Linguistics and Reading (3).S;SS. 

472. Diagnostic and Remedial Reading I (5).F;W;S. 

For the classroom teacher. How to locate causes of reading difficulties 
and prescribe corrective procedures. Prerequisites: 401 or 402 or 462. 

473. Diagnostic and Remedial Reading II (5) .F ;W ;S. 

Students are assigned to individual or small groups for diagnostic 
and remedial teaching. Prerequisite: Education 472. 

477. Psychological Bases of Reading (3).F;SS. 

This course is designed to pursue in depth the psychological basis of 
reading and the reading act, motivation and learning. 

489. Reading and Communicating (3). On Demand 

500. Research in Education (3).F;W;S. 

A study of the various types of research and the logical organization 
of research and reporting; required in first quarter for persons work- 
ing for Master of Arts Degree in any area in education and in indus- 
trial arts. Staff. 

508. Clinical Problems in Reading (3-6).W;SS. 

Deals with clinical techniques used in the diagnosing and treatment 
or reading problem. Prerequisite: Education 472, majors. Farris. 

511. Investigations in Reading (3).F;SS. 

Investigations are made of the literature and research dealing with 
the teaching of reading. Price, Jones. 

548. Independent Study. Staff. (3) .F ;W ;S. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6) .F ;W ;SS. 

551. Field Experience in Teaching Reading (3 to 9) .F ;W ;S ;SS. 

Students register only by permission. Price. 

557. Reading Curriculum: Organization (3). On demand and SS. 
and Supervision for Reading Majors 

Students in this course will study reading curriculum designs and de- 
sign a "curriculum" in reading and study ways and means of imple- 
menting and supervising reading programs. Prerequisite: Must have 
24 hours in reading or permission of advisor in reading. Price, Farris. 

558. Teaching of Reading (3).S;SS. 

A study of current practices, materials, and philosophy of teaching 
reading on all levels. Price. 



132 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



559. Advanced Course in Methods & (3). On demand and SS. 

Materials in Reading 

Students will learn techniques of designing, making, and utilizing 
instructional materials for specific teaching purposes and methods. 
Prerequisite: 18 hours in reading and/or permission of graduate ad- 
visor in reading. Culyer. 

561. Evaluation and Assessment in Reading (3).SS. 

A study and evaluation of select curricula and programs in reading 
and the planning of a total school reading program. Open only to 
students specializing in reading, or by permission. Farris. 

567. Current Literature in Reading (3) .On demand and SS. 
This course will involve both intensive and extensive reading of cur- 
rent periodicals and journals dealing with materials, methods, and 
theory of current trends and practices in reading. Prerequisites: 18 
hours in reading, teaching experience, approval of reading adviser. 
Price and Dedmond. 

568. Research Problems in Reading (3).F;SS. 

In this course students will do research on critical areas of reading. 
Prerequisite: Open only to reading majors who have 18 hours in read- 
ing. Jones, Price, Farris. 

571. Seminar in Reading (3).F. 

The seminar is planned to meet the needs of specific groups in read- 
ing. Students can register only by permission. Price. 

Special Education 

A student preparing to teach special education with emphasis 
on mental retardation must complete Art 201 ; Education 202, 
301, 302, 303, 320, 401 or 402, 403, 404, 451, 452, 454, 455, 456; 
General Science 401 ; Health 401 ; History 206 ; Industrial Arts 
458; Library Science 304; Music 301-302-303; Physical Educa- 
tion 353 ; Psychology 301, 302, 303, 460 ; Sociology 201 ; Speech 
304, 305. The student is required to take the Common Examina- 
tion and the area examination in Mental Retardation of the Na- 
tional Teacher Examinations. 

451. Educable Mentally Retarded (3).F;W. 

Characteristics and problems of children in the upper levels of re- 
tardation. Survey of studies in regard to causative factors, com- 
munity and educational problems, and diagnosis. Prerequisite: Edu- 
cation 320 or equivalent. 

452. Trainable Mentally Retarded (3).F;S. 

Classification, diagnosis, characteristics, education and care of chil- 
dren in the trainable range of intelligence. Includes a study of insti- 
tutional care. Prerequisite: Education 451. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



133 



454. Curriculum for the Mentally Retarded (3).W;S. 

Curriculum development at different levels of maturation ; organiza- 
tion, planning, adaptation of activities, materials, and methods. Pre- 
requisite: Education 451 or equivalent. 

455. Experimental Approaches to the Education of (3).W;S. 
the Mentally Retarded 

480. Auditory Training for the Acoustically (3).W. 
Handicapped 

A study of the re-education of the hearing of acoustically handicapped 
children. Principles and methods of training residual hearing; use of 
amplifying devices; demonstration and practice. Given at the North 
Carolina School for the Deaf. (Not offered 1970-72). 

481. Communication for the Deaf Child (3).W. 

A study of the methods of teaching communication skills to the 
acoustically handicapped; training residual hearing; use of amplifi- 
cation; symbol systems, oral and non-oral, by which language is 
acquired by the deaf child, including the language of signs, finger 
spelling, cued speech. Observation and participation. Given at the 
North Carolina School for the Deaf. (Not offered 1970-72). 

482. Teaching Language to the Deaf (3).W. 

Principles and techniques used in developing language, teaching 
composition and idiomatic expressions. Preparation of sequentially 
graded materials and lesson plans for children of various academic 
levels and abilities. Remedial procedures. Observation and participa- 
tion. Given at the North Carolina School for the Deaf. (Not offered 
1970-72). 

483. Teaching Speech to the Deaf (3).W. 

Study of factors influencing intelligibility and of techniques for de- 
veloping voice quality, breath control, stress and accent, inflection and 
rhythm. Emphasis on the elementary and secondary grade levels. 
Observation and participation. Given at the North Carolina School 
for the Deaf. (Not offered 1970-72). 

485. Teaching Elementary School Subjects to the Deaf (3).W. 
Multi-media methods of teaching elementary school subjects to the 
deaf child. Integration of subject matter with speech, speech reading, 
auditory training, and development of language. Program planning. 
Emphasis on primary and lower elementary grades. Observation and 
participation. Given at the North Carolina School for the Deaf. (Not 
offered 1970-72). 

486. Teaching Secondary School Subjects to the Deaf (3).W. 

Multi-media methods of teaching secondary and upper elementary 
school subjects to the deaf. Program planning at the level of concen- 
tration. Observation and participation. Given at the North Carolina 
School for the Deaf. (Not offered 1970-72). 

500. Research in Education (3).F;W;S. 

A study of the various types of research and the logical organization 
of research and reporting; required in first quarter for persons work- 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



ing for Master of Arts Degree in any area in education and industrial 
arts. Staff. 

507. Education of the Acoustically Handicapped (3).F. 

(Speech 507) 

History of the education of hearing handicapped persons and a survey 
of current problems; guidance for the deaf as related to their role in 
contemporary society, including consideration of problems of social 
and vocational adjustment. Meador. 

509. Reading and the Mentally Retarded (3).S. 

A study of the techniques in teaching reading to the mentally re- 
tarded. For special education teachers only. Staff. 

519. Education of the Physically Handicapped (3).W. 

A study of muscle, skeletal, neuromuscular and health impairments 
and the educational adaptations required. Prerequisite : Education 
320. Winford. 

521. Vocational Planning for the Handicapped (3).SS. 

Vocational planning and work preparation for the handicapped. In- 
cludes consideration of basic occupational skills, work training and 
sheltered workshop programs. Hubbard. 

527. Organization and Administration of Special (3).S. 

Education 

The implementation of special education programs at the national, 
state, and local levels. Effective public school programming. Winford. 

530. Education of Gifted (3).SS. 

A survey of educational programs for the gifted including curricu- 
lum, methods, and administrative educational adjustments. Hubbard. 

548. Independent Study. Staff- (Variable Credit) .F;W;S;SS. 
570. Readings and Research in Special Education (3).SS. 

Individual programs of reading or research for students majoring in 
the education of exceptional children. Winford. 

572. Internship in Special Education (9-15).F;W;S. 

Supervised experience with handicapped children. Wmford. 

573. In-Service Internship in Special Education (3-9). SS. 

Designed for the master's degree candidate who has had previous 
successful teaching experience and is working on certification or de- 
gree requirements. Winford. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



135 



C. Porterfield, Chairman, J. Auston, J. Carpenter, C. Hopkins, C. 
Martin, M. Meador, C. Palmer, E. Pilkington. 

Two graduate programs are offered. The Master of Arts in 
Speech Correction leads to North Carolina Certification in 
Special Education : Speech and Hearing. To enter this program a 
student must hold or be eligible for a North Carolina A Certifi- 
cate in elementary, secondary, or special education. The program 
requires 54 acceptable quarter hours of graduate work. A mini- 
mum of 27 quarter hours must be in courses open to graduates 
only. Consult the department for further details. 

The Master of Arts in Speech Pathology is also offered. To 
enter this program a student must have completed a minimum 
of 18 quarter hours in courses acceptable toward certification 
by the American Speech and Hearing Association. To receive 
this degree the applicant must meet the academic requirements 
for certification by A. S. H. A. This stipulation may require a 
student to take more than 45 hours including a thesis or 54 hours 
without thesis, the minimum required of all graduate students. 
Consult the department for further details. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN SPEECH 

450. Rehabilitation of Articulatory Defects (3).W. 

Study of etiologies, diagnosis, and treatment. Prerequisite: Speech 
304 or permission of instructor. 

451. Rehabilitation of Voice Disorders and Cleft Palate (3).S. 
Study of etiologies, diagnosis, and treatment of these and related 
disorders. Prerequisite: Speech 304 or permission of instructor. 

452. Rehabilitation of Stuttering and Allied Disorders (5).F. 

Review of modern theories and therapies; nature, causes, development 
diagnosis, and treatment of stuttering. Prerequisite : Speech 304 or 
permission of instructor. 

453. Audiometric Testing (3).F. 
A study of the fundamentals of audiometric testing; the nature, 
causes, and diagnosis of hearing difficulties; programs and methods 
employed in the conservation of hearing. Supervised practice in basic 
audiometric procedures. 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



456. Creative Dramatics (3).S. 

A course designed to aid the elementary teacher in using drama as a 
creative teaching technique. Practice in selecting and acting out 
stories and poems. Not offered in 1971-72. 

457. Professional Standards and Procedures (1).F;W;S. 

The ethical responsibility of the professional in speech with special 
consideration given to non-academic requirements and practices. May 
be repeated for a total of two (2) hours. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

458. Clinical Practice in Speech Correction (1-3).F;W;S;SS. 

Supervised observation, planning, and practice in therapy. A mini- 
mum of thirty hours in the clinic is required for each academic hour 
of credit. May be repeated for a total of six quarter hours. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of instructor. 

459. Student Practice in Speech (6).F;W;S. 

Experience in the practice of speech correction in a school setting 
under supervision approved by the Director of the Speech Clinic. 
Required of students seeking certification as a special education 
teacher of speech and hearing. Thursday afternoons, 3:30 to 5:00, 
must be kept free for critiques with the supervising clinician. Pre- 
requisite : Speech 458 or consent of instructor. 

460. Speech Problems of Exceptional Children (3).W. 

Speech problems associated with mental retardation; neuromuscular 
disorders, hearing loss. Prerequisite: Speech 304 or consent of in- 
structor. 

461. Speech Correction for the Classroom Teacher (3).F;SS;Ex. 

A survey of the speech and hearing problems of school children. 
Required in majors in special education who have not had Speech 304. 

462. Workshop in Educational Theatre 

Techniques (3-9). On demand. 

Three intensive studio courses designed to teach production tech- 
niques to those who produce plays in high schools and junior high 
schools; one studio course in acting, another in directing, and a third 
in technical theatre production. Lectures daily plus afternoon and 
evening laboratories and rehearsals. 

463. Advanced Acting (3).W. 

Intense concentration on analysis and creation of the role. Prerequi- 
site: Speech 303, creation of two roles in University Theatre produc- 
tions and/ or permission of instructor. 

464. Advanced Play Directing (3).S. 
Correlation of the director's analysis of the script with the play- 
wright's intention, the stage space and the actor. Direction of an act 
of a play and/or extended scenes. Prerequisite: Speech 402, partici- 
pation in at least two University Theatre productions, and/or per- 
mission of instructor. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



137 



466. Introduction to Hearing Rehabilitation (3).W. 

Survey of auditory training 1 procedures, methods of amplification and 
the teaching- of speech reading to children. Prerequisite: Speech 453 
or consent of instructor. 

471. Development of Language for the Deaf (3).F. 

Development of language in deaf children compared to that of normal 
children. Study of the leading systems of teaching language to the 
deaf. Observation and participation at the North Carolina School for 
the Deaf. 

472. Development of Speech for the Deaf (3).F. 

Development of speech in deaf children compared to that of normal 
hearing children. Study of the leading systems of teaching language 
to the deaf. Observation and participation at the North Carolina 
School for the Deaf. 

475. Modern Forensic Program (3) 

Designed to prepare students to conduct a forensic program including 
planning, coaching, and judging at the secondary level. On demand. 

479. Speech Composition (3) 
Intensive practice in composition and delivery of various types of 
speeches for different occasions. Emphasis on speech structure and 
oral style. On demand. 

480. Communication Theory (3).F. 

Treats listening theory, discussion theory, general semantics, the 
philosophy of measurement and new dimensions in speech as reported 
in the literature of the field. Not offered in 1971-72. 

481. History and Criticism of American (3).S. 
Public Address — I 

A critical study of American speakers from the Revolutionary period 
to 18G5. Emphasis is given to the rhetorical craftsmanship exhibited 
in the speeches and the effect of the speeches upon American history. 
Not offered in 1971-72. 

482. History and Criticism of American (3).S. 

Public Address — II 

A critical study of American speakers from 1865 to 1920. Emphasis 
is given to the rhetorical craftsmanship exhibited in the speeches and 
the effect of the speeches upon American history. Not offered in 1971- 
72. 

500. Research and Bibliography (3). 

A study of the procedures, designs and methods of reporting in 
speech research. Required in the first quarter of graduate study. On 
demand. Staff. 

501. Development of Language and Speech (3).F. 

Language growth from the first vocalization to the expression of 
abstract thought, including a consideration of factors that interrupt 
or hinder language acquisition, methods of encouraging development, 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



and guidance for parents. Prerequisites: Speech 305, and 451 or 452 
or consent of instructor. Auston, Palmer. 

502. Psychology of Communication (5).W. 

A study of the origin of speech and language, the psychological 
aspects of speech, the inter-relationships between speech and per- 
sonality. Auston, Palmer. 

503. Rhetorical Theory (3). 

Study of classical, medieval and modern rhetorical theoreticians from 
Corax to Whately. On demand. Porterfield. 

507. Education of the Acoustically Handicapped (3).F;SS. 
History of the education of hearing handicapped persons. Study of the 
social development of the hearing impaired from birth through adult- 
hood. (Same as Education 507). Palmer. 

508. Advanced Clinical Practicum (1-3).F;W;S;SS. 

Supervised clinical practice requiring a minimum of thirty-five hours 
in the clinic for each hour of credit. Emphasis is on evaluating and 
improving both the student's techniques and his interpersonal rela- 
tionships. May be repeated for a maximum of nine quarter hours. Pre- 
requisite: Speech 458 or consent of instructor. Staff. 

509. The Bases of Speech and Hearing (5).F. 

Survey of the sciences as they relate to speech and hearing; physi- 
ology, neurology, physics, linguistics, genetics, psychology, phonetics, 
and semantics. Auston, Palmer. 

510. Rehabilitation of Language Disorders in Children (5).S. 
A survey of causes, principles of differential diagnosis, and treat- 
ment. Prerequisite : Permission of instructor. Palmer. 

515. Rehabilitation of Hearing I (3).W. 

Study of the physics of sound, hearing disorders, auditory training, 
and methods of amplification. Prerequisite: Speech 453 or permission 
of instructor. Meador, Palmer. 

516. Rehabilitation of Hearing II (3) .S. 

Study of the problems involved in speech reading, methods of instruc- 
tion, preparation of lession plans for children and for adults. Pre- 
requisite: Speech 515 or permission of instructor. Meador, Palmer. 

520. British Public Address (3). 

Historical-Critical Study of leading British speakers from Pitt to 
Churchill with emphasis upon how their speaking affected English 
History. On demand. Auston. 

522. Contemporary Public Address (3). 

Critical analysis of outstanding speakers of the 20th century with 
special reference to the influence of their rhetoric on the issues of 
the period. On demand. Porterfield. 

530. Linguistic Foundations of Speech (3). 

Study of structural linguistics, the evaluation of language, and the 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



139 



theories of the development of spoken language in the race. On de- 
mand. Auston. 

531. Semantics (3). 

Study of the psychology of meaning in language with special refer- 
ence to emerging disciplines and theories. On demand. Auston. 

535. Voice Science (3). 

The psycho-physics of speech, experimental phonetics, methods and 
levels of measurement in speech. On demand. Meador, Palmer. 

540. Seminar in Speech Pathology (3). 

Reports of research projects, recent developments, current literature 
and trends. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for 
a maximum of nine hours. On demand. Staff. 

545. Methods of Diagnosis (3-6) .F ;W ;S. 

A combination of study and practice in the procedures and techniques 
involved in the diagnosis of speech disorders, preparation of case 
history and speech evaluation reports. Problems of sharing informa- 
tion with other disciplines. Observations in other disciplines. Two 
hours of lecture and discussion, and for each additional hour of credit 
a two hour laboratory period consisting of observing and participating 
in both diagnostic procedures and staffing. Prerequisite: Speech 450, 
451, 452, or consent of instructor. Meador. 

548. Independent Study (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

Graduate students with an approved subject of investigation may 
register for this course. May be repeated for a maximum of six quar- 
ter hours. Staff. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis (6).F;W;S;SS. 

Staff. 



I 4U DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

L. Reynolds, Chairman, B. Bosworth, B. Campbell, W. Cooper, W. 
Fulmer, G. Graham, S. Jackson, G. Lilly, W. Maynor, J. Melton, E. 
Putnam, R. Robinson, S. Round, K. Smathers, B. Strickland, E. Wads- 
worth, L. Woodrow. 

The primary purpose of the Department of Teacher Education 
is to develop the professional competencies of classroom teachers. 
Through its programs of classroom instruction, direct experi- 
ences, and advising, the department prepares students for certifi- 
cation in the various curriculum areas and grade levels in elemen- 
tary and secondary schools. In addition to meeting the minimal 
requirements for certification, the department maintains pro- 
grams of instruction, research, and field services for the con- 
tinuous improvement of curriculum development, educational 
materials, and methods of teaching. 

For graduate degree plans, see pages 39-40. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

450. Science in the Elementary School (3).SS;Ex. 

Same as General Science 450. 

453. Art Education Workshop (3) .SS ;Ex. 

Same as Art 453. 

456. Measurement and Assessment (3).F;W;S;SS. 

Basic course for elementary, secondary and junior college teachers 
which stresses the construction and use of teacher-made tests. 

457. 458. Mathematics for the Disadvantaged Child (3).S;SS. 

459. Nursery — Kindergarten Curriculum (3).F. 

Development and organization of the curriculum with emphasis placed 
on such areas as communicative skills, science, and social learnings. 

461. Nursery — Kindergarten Instruction (3).W. 

Selecting, planning, and utilizing the materials, methods, activities, 
and facilities for programs suited to the young child. Laboratory ex- 
periences required. 

490. Education of the Disadvantaged (3).W;SS. 

A study of the educational needs of the disadvantaged child. Consid- 
eration is given to identification, curriculum, methods of teaching, and 
materials. The course is designed for administrators and instructional 
personnel. 



DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 



141 



500. Research in Education (3).F;W;S. 

A study of the various types of research and the logical organization 
of research and reporting; required in first quarter for persons work- 
ing for Master of Arts Degree in any area in education and industrial 
arts. Staff. 

513. Teaching the Language Arts (3).SS. 

The course deals with problems in oral and written communications 
in the elementary school. Lilly. 

515. Organizing and Planning Student Teaching (3).F;SS. 
A study of the origin and development of student teaching, including 
present status and trends, experiences prior to student teaching, 
selection of schools and supervising teachers, selection and placement 
of student teachers. Staff. 

516. Supervision of Student Teaching (3).S;SS. 

A study of general techniques of a supervising teacher, including 
observation, guiding student teachers in planning, orientation of stu- 
dent teachers, student teacher participation, and evaluation. Avail- 
able as a workshop by invitation. Staff. 

529. Organization and Supervision of (3).W;SS. 

School Music 

The responsibilities of the music supervisor in relation to the class- 
room teacher, the music teacher, and the school administration. 
Spencer, Mears, Fox. 

548. Independent Study Staff. (Variable Credit). F;W;S;SS. 

550. Master of Arts Thesis Staff. (6) .F ;W ;S. 

576. Internship for Supervising Teachers (3).F;W;S. 

A program designed for regularly employed public school teachers in 
which experiences will be provided to enable a supervising teacher 
to do a better job of supervising the work of a student teacher. Staff. 

613. Language Development (3). 
The normative aspects of speech and language acquisition, applica- 
tion of linguistics and learning theory concepts; communication in 
lower animals; language and cognition. 

614. Independent work in Elementary Education (3-6). 
Study, analysis, and evaluation of schoolroom procedures used in a 
school or schools with a view to giving experiences in reconstructing 
educational programs of the elementary school. 

615. Advanced Seminar in Elementary Education (3-6). 
Consideration of group and individual investigations in elementary 
education. 

616. Field Study in Curriculum Problems (3-6). 

This is to assist students in developing a conceptual framework based 
on general system theory for guiding, developing, and evaluating 
elementary school curriculum improvement. 



142 



DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 



631. Analysis of the Teaching Process (3). 

Examination of the teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil interaction in the 
classroom through study of original relevant research in disciplines 
concerning human behavior and society. Special attention is given to 
the efforts of teacher approaches to children. The organization of 
curriculum materials and the structure of the classroom society on 
the accomplishment of educational objectives. 

636. A Survey of Research in Child Development (3). 

and Its Implication for Teaching 

The physiological, sociological, and psychological bases of human be- 
havior with emphasis upon research dealing with the normal school 
child in his environment. 

646. Issues, Trends, and Problems in (3). 

Elementary Education 

Analyses of current practices, problems, and trends in elementary 
education with emphases in improved programs. 

647. Continuous Progress and Nongraded Elementary (3). 
Schools 

A study of materials, techniques, and processes of individualizing in- 
struction in the elementary schools. 

690. Seminar on Education for the Disadvantaged (3). 

A study of problems related to education of the culturally different 
and educationally disadvantaged student and the administrative facet 
of these problems. Modification in curriculum in the development of 
compensatory and remedial programs are prime concerns. 



143 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1969-1970 
GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1969-1970 

NAME DEPARTMENT BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM 

Abrams, Virginia Beatrice Biology Western Carolina University 

Alexander, Julia Marilyn Guidance & Counseling Appalachian State University 

Alexander, William Cecil Biology Wilmington College 

Allen, Martha Carol English Mars Hill College 

Asbell, Cornelia Ann Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Ashe, James Stephen Biology University of North Carolina-Greensboro 

Bailey, John C, III Physical Education Guilford College 

Ballard, Carl Norman Economics & Business Appalachian State University 

Barber, Julia Ann History Appalachian State University 

Bare, Lois Hartsoe Biology University of North Carolina-Greensboro 

Black, Augustus Melton Administration Campbell College 

Blankenbaker, Harley Joe Physical Education Ball State University 

Bledsoe, Maynard T Economics & Business Atlantic Christian College 

Blue, Ronald Calvin Psychology Appalachian State University 

Bostian, Steve Wayne Economics & Business Appalachian State University 

Bradford, William W Chemistry Appalachian State University 

Branson, Randy Long Reading Appalachian State University 

Bratton, Linda Dianne Social Science Appalachian State University 

Brooks, Susan Shepherd Primary Education University of Virginia 

Bucks, Betsey Long Spanish Meredith College 

Burns, John II., Jr Chemistry Lenoir Rhyne College 

Bush, Lynne Lisbeth Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Callison, Thomas Moore Reading Appalachian State University 

Carter, Douglas Trent History Campbell College 

Carter, Paul Richard Elementary Education Florida State University 

Cason, Miriam Crutchfield Library Science Columbia College 

Clitherow, Ronald Harper Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Conley, John Wayne Mathematics Appalachian State University 

Cooke, Jean Faye Physical Education North Carolina State University 

Cox, Joe Mac Social Science Lincoln Memorial University 

Danner, Linda Durham French Appalachian State University 

Daves, Norris Wayne History Appalachian State University 

Dellinger, Alvin Gene History Appalachian State University 

Dennis, Mary Kate English Blue Mountain College 

Dimsdale, Carolyn Ann English Appalachian State University 

Dunagin, Joyce Marie Economics & Business University of North Carolina-Greensboro 

Evans, Myra Lee History Appalachian State University 

Exarhos, Diana Lynn Economics & Business Appalachian State University 

Fritts, George Allen Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Fugate, Charles W Economics & Business Emory and Henry College 

Gardner, James David Biology Campbell College 

Garrison, Lanny Bruce Spanish Mars Hill College 

Gillespie, Brenda Nancy English Lenoir Rhyne College 

Good, Dennis Wayne Economics & Business Lenoir Rhyne College 

Goodwin, Stuart Lind Industrial Arts Appalachian State University 

Granger, Henry Garland Mathematics Atlantic Christian College 

Green, Bertie Elaine Spanish Winthrop College 

Griffith, Gretchen Holsopple Reading Appalachian State University 

Gwaltney, John Maurice Chemistry Appalachian State University 

Ilargrave, Marshall Edwin Audiovisual Education Oklahoma Baptist University 

Harper, Cheryl Ann Social Science Warren Wilson College 

Harper, Elois Jones Chemistry Bennett College 

Harrell, Raymond Wayne Student Personnel Services Abilene Christian College 

Hartley, Ernest Bernard Spanish Appalachian State University 

Hartley, Jerry Daniel Industrial Arts Appalachian State University 

Hartley, Peggy Johnson Spanish Appalachian State University 

Hartsell, Wriston A Social Science Campbell College 

Hawkins, Linwood Tony Counseling & Guidance Mars Hill College 

Hendricks, William II Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Ilenson, Ramona Elizabeth Social Science Appalachian State University 

Hodges, John Dempsey Social Science Bob Jones University 

Huang, Chou-Chin Social Science National Cheng-Chi University 

Hunter, Jairy Cornelius Economics & Business Appalachian State University 



144 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1969-1970 



NAME 

Johnston, James Marion, Jr. 

Jones, Kyle Chester 

Kazazes, Barbara Anne 

Keener, Brenda Kay 

Keesling, Emory Garland 

Kollar, Joseph Blaine 

Kyles, Judy Karol 

Lamm, Joy E 

Lee, Frank Warner 

Leithiser, Harriett Anna 

Lemons, Wallace Lee 

Lowder, Jewel Annette 

Martin, Elizabeth Ann 

Matthews, Charles Odell, II 

Mauldin, Billy Joe 

Mayhew, Georgianna Lynn 
McCorkle, Stephen Raymond 

McGhee, Pearlie Jean 

Mills, Roger Austin 

Morehead, Mary Warde 

Morton, Gwendolyn Cevillia 

Moser, Ronald D 

Munger, Philip Worman 

Munn, Walter Daniel 

Murphy, James Patrick 

Noble, Julie Ritchley 

Odom, John Gary 

Odom, Sylvia Southard 
Palmer, Leonard Sanders, Jr. 

Parks, William M 

Patrick, Richard Bates 

Payne, John William 

Peacock, Edith Campbell 

Perry, Ted Allen 

Pete, James Ronald 

Peterson, Carol Shockley 

Pike, Thomas Rogers 

Price, Jane Louise 

Priviteria, James Michael 

Quagliotti, Carol Ann 

Raetsch, Frederick C 

Raine, Robin Kristin 

Rogers, James Marshall, Jr. 
Rogers, Joseph Michael 

Roney, Carroll Oakley 

Ross, Betsy Carolyn 

Roten, Jack William 

Russell, James William 

Russell, Ronald Bernard, Jr. 

Rutledge, Mary Margaret 

Sanders, Robert Leslie 

Schoolfield, Sara Stearns 

Scruggs, Russell Lee 

Shumate, Rosalie Fox 

Sipe, Doris Elaine 

Slager, James Benjamin 

Smathers, Joan Werner 

Smith, Linwood Earle 

Smith, William Ellsworth 

Sorrells, Joyce Jeanette 

Spaulding, Dane Travis 

Speas, Donna Spencer 

Stallard, Carmen Etta 

Stanley, James Charles 

Starr, Cynthia Park 

Suddreth, Mary Camilla 
Tamer, Joseph George 



DEPARTMENT 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM 



Miami University 
Appalachian State University 
Wake Forest University 
Presbyterian College 
Catawba College 
Appalachian State University 



Biology East Carolina University 

Economics & Business East Carolina University 

Student Personnel Services Guilford College 

English Bob Jones University 

Economics & Business University of Georgia 

6th-Year Administration 

Physical Education 

English 

Psychology 

English 

Mathematics 

Economics & Business Western Kentucky University 

English West Virginia University 

Student Personnel Services Davidson College 

Physical Education Appalachian State University 

French Appalachian State University 

History Appalachian State University 

Elementary Education High Point College 

Geography Appalachian State University 

Physical Education Florida State University 

Guidance & Counseling Appalachian State University 

Speech Appalachian State University 

Administration Florida State University 

Student Personnel Services University of West Florida 

Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Spanish Ohio University 

Social Science Lenoir Rhyne College 

Psychology Wesleyan College (Ga.) 

Biology High Point College 

Physical Education Concord College 

Psychology Presbyterian 

Physical Education University of Tampa 

English Appalachian State University 

Physical Education Atlantic Christian College 

Industrial Arts Bowling Green State University 

Mathematics Radford College 

Economics & Business High Point 

Biology Erskine College 

Audiovisual Education SUNY-Buffalo 

Psychology Appalachian State University 

Reading Western Michigan University 

Guidance & Counseling Lenoir Rhyne 

History N. C. Central University 

Music Appalachian State University 

Physical Education Troy State University 

Social Science Appalachian State University 

Physical Education Appalachian State University 

Physical Education Florida State University 

Industrial Arts Purdue University 

History Arkansas College 

Physical Education Carson-Newman College 

Primary Education Appalachian State University 

History University of Richmond 

Audiovisual Education University of North Carolina-Charlotte 

Geography Concordia College 

Student Personnel Services Hope College 

English University of Massachusetts 

Economics & Business High Point College 

English Appalachian State University 

English Mars Hill College 

Biology Appalachian State University 

Physical Education University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill 

English East Tennessee State University 

Economics & Business North Carolina State University 

Audiovisual Education Appalachian State University 

Biology Appalachian State University 

History Appalachian State University 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1969-1970 



145 



NAME 

Teagarden, Philip K. 
Trexler, Colleen Amelia 
Uche, William Ukaonu 
Wacks, Virgil Quinton, Jr. 
Walker, Lenna Frances 

Wells, Thomas Lynn 

White, Joan Lynn 

Williams, David Ainsvvorth 
Williams, Douglas Davis, Jr 
Wilson, Albert Dillion 
Wilson, Mikki Delores 
Wooten, Janet Cynthia 

Wooten, Wayne E 

Wright, Florida Colmant 
Wright, Victor D 



DEPARTMENT BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM 

Biology Florida State University 

Mathematics Appalachian State University 

Administration Warren Wilson College 

Sociology Lincoln Memorial University 

Psychology East Tennessee State University 

Industrial Arts Western Carolina University 

Music Youngs town University 

Biology University of Georgia 

Guidance & Counseling U. S. Naval Academy 

Speech Appalachian State University 

Elementary Education Appalachian State University 

French St. Andrews Presbyterian College 

English St. Andrews Presbyterian College 

French Jacksonville State University 

Chemistry Lincoln Memorial University 



GRADUATE FELLOWS, 1969-1970 
TITLE ll-B FELLOWSHIPS IN LEARNING RESOURCES 



NAME 

Andrikopoulos, Judy K. 

Barnes, Carolyn Jane 

Bass, Kathryn F 

Briggs, Richard L 

Burns, Max L 

Elledge, Doris E 

Glover, Gwendolyn L. 

Goodwin, Lyndia W 

Hobbs, Jane G 

Holt, Mary E. 

Lebelle, Anne L. 

Logan, Nellie K 

McGough, Willie B.. Jr. 
Milcarek, Loretta O. 
Milford, Katherine L. 
Morrison, Mildred W. 

Patrick, Barbara C 

Peterson, John W 

Stoneham, Robert K. 
Ward, Ann B 



DEPARTMENT BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM 

Library Science University of Wyoming 

Library Science East Carolina University 

Library Science University of Tennessee 

Library Science Berea College 

Library Science Northwestern Oklahoma State College 

Library Science Appalachian State University 

Library Science Columbia College 

Library Science East Carolina University 

Library Science Mississippi Southern College 

Library Science St. Cloud State College 

Library Science Emory University 

Library Science College of Idaho 

Library Science Stetson University 

Library Science Western Colorado State College 

Library Science Auburn University 

Library Science Hollins College 

Library Science Alabama State College 

Library Science Florida Atlantic University 

Library Science Belmont Abbey College 

Library Science University of North Carolina-Greensboro 



TITLE ll-B FELLOWSHIPS IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Settle, Mary A Library Science Madison College 

Underwood, Connie G Library Science North Carolina Methodist College 

TITLE V-C PROSPECTIVE TEACHER FELLOWSHIPS 

Allen, Leslie A French Lincoln Memorial University 

Johnson, Sandra L French Longwood College 

Nicholson, Rosalind K. French Georgetown College 

Spratt, Judy G. French Appalachian State University 



PUBLIC LAW 85-926 FELLOWSHIPS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION, DEAF 



Covalinski. A. Richard Special Education, Deaf 



Hill. Linda J. 
Jackaway, Paul L. 
Lowe, Elizabeth L. 
Rostan, June M. 
Williams, Pamela J. 



Special Education, Deaf 

Special Education, Deaf 

Special Education. Deaf 

Special Education. Deaf 

Special Education, Deaf 



University of Florida 
Samford University 
Warren Wilson College 
Wake Forest University 
Maryville College 
Appalachian State University 



146 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

The members of the faculty are listed alphabetically with the year of appointment 
given after each name. 

JOSE ANTONIO AMARO (1967), Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Institute of Secondary Education; M.S., Kansas State Teachers College; LL.D., 
Doctor of Pedagogy, Havana University. 

WARREN G. ANDERSON (1967), Associate Professor of Education and 
Principal of Appalachian Elementary School 

A.B., University of Richmond; M.Ed., D.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

ROBERT J. ANGELL (1968), Instructor in Economics and Business 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.B.A., University of Virginia. 

GEORGE PETER ANTONE (1967), Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Brown University; Ed.M., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

JOHN TRUMBULL AUSTON (1968), Professor of Speech 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver. 

ROBERT ARTHUR BANZHAF (1966), Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Arts 
B.S., M.Ed., University of Miami. 

JAWAD BARGHOTHI (1969), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University. 

CHARLES B. BLACKBURN (1969), Associate Professor of History 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ball State University. 

ROY RUSSELL BLANTON, JR. (1948), Professor of Education and Di- 
rector of Extension 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

GERALD M. BOLICK (1969), Associate Professor of Education and Chair- 
man of Special Programs 
B.S., M.S., North Carolina State University; Ed.D., Duke University. 

HUGH LAWRENCE BOND (1970), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Lambuth College; B.D., Duke University Divinity School; Ph.D., Duke University. 

PATRICIA LEE BONIN (1969), Assistant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages 
B.A., University of Chattanooga; M.A., University of Georgia. 

BEN GESS BOSWORTH, JR. (1960), Professor of Education 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Virginia. 

HERBERT LEWIS BOWKLEY (1965), Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.C., University of Michigan; M.S., Missouri School of Mines; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University. 

JAMES MONROE BOYTE (1970), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

JOHN HIBBS BRASHEAR (1967), Associate Professor of Economics and 
Business 
B.S., M.A., University of Florida. 

LUCY MOORE BRASHEAR (1967), Associate Professor of English 

A.B., M.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

WILLARD LEON BRIGNER (1968), Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., DePauw University; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Duke University. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



147 



LOUIE ANDERSON BROWN (1970), Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Piedmont College; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

WOODBRIDGE C. BROWN (1970), Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business 
B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., Clemson University. 

GOLDEN THADDEUS BUCKLAND (1948), Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University. 

HENRY B. BURTON (1969), Associate Professor of Psychology and Di- 
rector of University Health Services 
B.C.E., Clemson University; M.D., Medical College of South Carolina. 

O. MELL BUSBIN, JR. (1967), Assistant Professor of Library Science 
A.B., High Point College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

BEULAH CATHERINE CAMPBELL (1957), Associate Professor of Edu- 
cation 
A.B., M.A., Western Kentucky State University. 

IRVIN WATSON CARPENTER, JR. (1953), Professor of Biology 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 

JESSIE LUELLA CARPENTER (1954), Assistant Professor of Speech 
A.B., DePauw University; M.S., Purdue University. 

HAROLD WILMER CARRIN (1970), Associate Professor of Art 
B.M.Ed., M.S., Florida State University; Ed.D., Arizona State University. 

ROY CARROLL (1969), Professor and Chairman of History 
B.A., Ouachita Baptist University; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

MICHAEL CLEVELAND CARTER (1970), Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 
B.S., M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

DONALD L. CLARK (1969), Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., George Washington University; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of Florida. 

WALTON SMITH COLE (1951), Associate Professor of Music 
A.B., Southwestern at Memphis; M.Mus., University of Arizona. 

WALTER CURTIS CONNOLLY (1963), Professor and Chairman of 

Physics 

A.B., Miami University; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., The Catholic University 

of America. 

LELAND ROSS COOPER (1967), Professor of Education 

B.S., Clemson University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
Ed.D., University of Florida. 

WILLIAM M. COOPER (1967), Professor of Education 
B.S., Berry College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University. 

JAMES F. CORNELL, JR. (1968), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: M.S., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

A. RONALD COULTHARD (1968), Assistant Professor of English 
B.S., Concord College; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

JEAN-PIERRE COURBOIS (1968), Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business 
B.S., Georgetown University; M.A., American University. 

DORIS WALKER COX (1968), Professor and Chairman of Library Science 
A.B., Florida State College for Women; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University. 



148 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



JOYCE G. CROUCH (1967), Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., M.A., Tennessee Technological University; Ed.D., University of Tennessee. 

RICHARD COWTAN CULYER, III (1966), Instructor in Education 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

RUDY L. CURD (1969), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Lincoln Memorial University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

CHARLES T. DAVIS, III (1967), Assistant Professor and Chairman of 
Philosophy and Religion 

B.S., University of Alabama; B.D., Candler School of Theology; Ph.D., Emory 
University. 

ERIS A. DEDMOND (1968), Instructor in Education 

B.S., Western Carolina University; M.S., Florida State University. 

ERIC BROOKS DeGROAT (1959), Assistant Professor of Health and 
Physical Education 
B.S., Springfield College; M.A., New York University. 

WARREN CAMERON DENNIS (1965), Associate Professor of Art 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; M.F.A., University of Mississippi. 

ALFRED MAXEY DENTON, JR. (1962), Professor of Sociology and 
Chairman of Sociology and Anthropology 

B.S., Oklahoma State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

FINNIS RAY DERRICK (1946), Professor and Chairman of Biology 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

RAMON DIAZ (1970), Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
BAC, Oviedo; LIC, DR. FIL. y LET., University of Barcelona. 

MacWILLIAM DISBROW (1966), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., M.Mus., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. 

JEFFERSON MAX DIXON (1956), Professor of History 

A.B., M.A., Emory University; Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

BOYD MAX DOWELL (1967), Professor of Psychology 
B.S., Bob Jones University; M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 

EUGENE CHRISTOPHER DROZDOWSKI (1961), Professor of History 
B.A., Alfred University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

JOHN DANIEL DUKE (1968), Professor of Psychology 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

MARY MONTGOMERY DUNLAP (1970), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Converse College; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of 
South Carolina. 

HARVEY RALPH DURHAM (1965), Associate Professor and Chairman 
of Mathematics 
B.S., Wake Forest University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

G. MARVIN EARGLE (1969), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

LAWRENCE FIELDING EDWARDS (1966), Associate Professor and 
Chairman of Art 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; M.F.A., University of Mississippi. 

BARRY W. ELLEDGE (1969), Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business 

B.S., Berea College; M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



149 



JOHN CLEVELAND ELLIOTT (1970), Associate Professor of Health 
and Physical Education 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.D., Medical College of Alabama; M.S., Ohio State 
University. 

RONALD J. ENSEY (1969), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Hardin-Simmons University; M.S., Ph.D., New Mexico State University. 

TERRY ELMER EPPERSON, JR. (1962), Professor of Geography 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University 
of Tennessee. 

NICHOLAS ERNESTON (1948), Professor of Music and Dean of the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts 

B.Mus.Ed., Shenandoah Conservatory; M.Mus., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music; 
Ph.D., Florida State University. 

WILLIAM MORRIS EVANS (1968), Assistant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages 
B.A., M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

MARJORIE F. FARRIS (1970), Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Miami; M.S., Kansas State College; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

PAUL FEDEROFF (1970), Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., Wayne State University. 

JOHN O. FISH (1968), Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Lambreth College; M.A., Memphis State University; Ph.D., University of 
Georgia. 

LORRAINE FORCE (1968), Associate Professor of Art 

B.S., Southwest Missouri State; M.Ed., University of Miami; Ph.D., Florida State 
University. 

ELIZABETH FOX (1957), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., M.Mus. Ed., North Texas State University. 

PAUL A. FOX (1970), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Hofstra University; M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University. 

ROBERT KENNETH FRANKS (1969), Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., Carson-Newman College; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

DONALD HOWE FRANTZ, JR. (1970), Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Redlands University; Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

WILLIAM EDMUND FULMER (1955), Professor of Education and Di- 
rector of Student Teaching 

A.B., Catawba College; Ed.M., University of South Carolina; Ed.D., University of 
Missouri. 

OLE GADE (1970), Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.A., M.S., Florida State University; ABD, Michigan State University. 

EDWARD HIRAM GIBSON, III (1959), Professor of History 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

HOYT MELVYN GILLEY (1969) , Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Duke University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

SANDRA JEAN GLOVER (1969), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Northwestern State University of Louisiana; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of 
Georgia. 

GEORGE LOGAN GRAHAM (1967), Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., West Texas State University; M.Ed., LL.D., Hardin-Simmons University. 

RAY LOGAN GRAHAM (1963), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., West Texas State University; M.A.T., Ph.D., New Mexico State University. 



150 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



LOWELL C. GREEN (1968), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Wartburg College; B.D., Wartburg Seminary; Dr. Theol., University of Erlangen. 

MELVIN H. GRUENSFELDER (1969), Assistant Professor of Health 
and Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois. 

MARTHA GREY HAWKINSON (1955), Assistant Professor of Economics 
and Business 
B.A., B.S.S.A., Queens College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

WALTER AXEL HAWKINSON (1945), Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Washington and Jefferson College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

DAVID HEISSER (1969), Instructor in History 

B.S., College of Charleston; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

JAMES EDWARD HARRILL (1961), Professor of Education 

A.B., Berea College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

JAMES BRAXTON HARRIS (1958), Professor of Education and Dean of 
Student Affairs 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., Indiana 
University. 

MAC SHERMAN HARRIS (1970), Instructor in English 

B.A., North Texas State University; M.A., Texas Technological College. 

STANLEY AUSTIN HARRIS, JR. (1965), Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Business 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.A., New York University. 

FRANK A. HELSETH (1968), Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

RICHARD NELSON HENSON (1970), Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., Lamar State College of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 

HANS G. HEYMANN (1969), Professor of English 

B.A., Friedrick Willheim College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Frankfurt. 

MAYNARD JOHN HIGBY (1967), Associate Professor of English 
B.S., Clemson University; M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

LOYD H. HILTON (1969), Professor and Chairman of English 

B.A., Wayland Baptist College; M.A., Texas Technological College; Ph.D., University 
of Texas. 

MARVIN K. HOFFMAN (1970), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., University of Georgia. 

OSCAR DILE HOLTON, JR. (1968), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Wayland College; M.A., Ph.D., Texas Technological University. 

ALVIN R. HOOKS (1970), Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

FRANCIS LENTZ HOOVER (1945), Professor of Health and Physical 
Education 

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; Dir. P.E., D.P.E., Indiana University. 

CAROLYN GREGORY HOPKINS (1967), Instructor in Speech 
B.A., M.A., University of Missouri. 

ROBERT M. HOPKINS (1967), Instructor in Economics and Business 
B.B.A., Oklahoma University; M.A., Northeast Missouri State Teachers College. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



151 



LAWRENCE EDWARD HORINE (1968), Associate Professor and Chair- 
man of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.A., Ed.D., University of Colorado. 

BEN HASKELL HORTON, JR. (1948), Professor and Dean of the College 
of Education 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., Florida State University. 

GUY FORREST HUBBARD (1967), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.B.A., M.Ed., North Texas State University. 

MAMIE LOU HUBBARD (1967), Instructor in Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Texas Woman's University. 

WILLIAM RALPH HUBBARD (1969), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

PEYTON ALBERT HUGHES (1968), Assistant Professor of Political 
Science 
B.A., M.A., Mississippi State University. 

RICHARD ALAN HUMPHREY (1970), Associate Professor of Philosophy 
and Religion 
B.A., Cornell College; B.D., Ph.D., Drew University. 

HOMER H. HURLEY (1965), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., North Carolina State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; Ph.D., George Washington University. 

WILLIAM IMPERATORE (1969), Assistant Professor of Geography 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.A., Ed.D, University of Georgia. 

CHARLES LEE ISLEY, JR. (1958), Associate Professor of Music 
B.S., Davidson College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

G. ROBERT JACKALL (1970), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Fordham University; M.A., St. John's University. 

JAMES W. JACKSON (1970), Associate Professor of History and Educa- 
tion, Assistant to the President, and Dean of Educational Innovation 
and Change 
B.A., M.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Miami. 

SHEILA JACKSON (1969), Instructor in Education 
B.E., University of Miami; M.Ed., University of Kansas. 

BASIL GARRELL JOHNSON, JR. (1967), Associate Professor and Chair- 
man of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A., University of Tulsa; Ed.D., Oklahoma State 
University. 

JAMES EDWIN JOHNSON (1962), Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Emory and Henry College; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

ISABEL FLEMING JONES (1953), Professor of Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Virginia. 

JAMES FREDERICK JONES (1956), Associate Professor of Economics 
and Business 
A.B., Elon College; M.A., East Carolina University. 

BARBARA ADELE JUSTICE (1965), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

ILA TAYLOR JUSTICE (1949), Associate Professor of Library Science 
A.B., Berea College; B.S. in L.S., M.S. in L.S., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

IRVIN MORRIS KAUFFMAN (1969), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Alabama. 



152 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



LESTER D. KEASEY (1967), Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Gettysburg College; B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary; A.M., New York 
University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

WINSTON L. KINSEY (1969), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Baylor University; Ph.D., Texas Technological University. 

PATRICIA A. LaBACH (1970), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.Mus., M.Mus., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Kent State University. 

ERNEST PAUL LANE (1970), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Berea College; M.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Purdue University. 

EDGAR OLE LARSON (1968), Professor of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.S., Washington State University; Ed.D., University of 
Oregon. 

RICHARD HERBERT LEVIN (1970), Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

ROBERT G. LIGHT (1957), Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education 
B.S., M.S., Washington University. 

GRACE GREENE LILLY (1967), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

HENRY TRACY LILLY (1967), Professor of English 

B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Princeton University; Litt.D., Presbyterian College. 

J. GORDON LINDSAY (1969), Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

JOSEPH C. LOGAN (1966), Professor of Music and Assistant to the Presi- 
dent 
B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Georgia; PhD., Florida State University. 

SUSAN H. LOGAN (1966), Associate Professor of English 
A.B., M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

NOYES CAPEHART LONG (1969), Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A., Auburn University; M.A., University of Missouri. 

FRANK M. LOVRICH (1965), Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Southeastern Louisiana State College; M.A., University of South Dakota; 
Ph.D., South Dakota State University. 

HENRY McDADE (1970), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Seton Hall University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

ARNOLD D. McENTIRE (1963), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

ROBERT B. McFARLAND (1961), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

LOIS BLAKE McGIRT (1970), Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., University of Richmond; B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

F. KENNETH McKINNEY (1968), Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.S., Old Dominion College; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

CHARLES ALLEN MARTIN (1970), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.S., Millersville State College; M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

JACK CORBIN MARTIN (1967), Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., M.S., East Tennessee State University. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



153 



WALTZ MAYNOR (1970), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Pembroke State College; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., Duke 
University. 

MILLARD M. MEADOR (1969), Associate Professor of Speech 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

WILFRED G. MEARS (1968), Professor of Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; 
Ed.D., Florida State University. 

CARL GARNETT MEEKS (1958), Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 

B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ed.D., 
Columbia University. 

JACK ROBERT MELTON (1950), Professor of Education 

A.B., M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

GEORGE BENJAMIN MILES (1961), Professor and Chairman of Chem- 
istry 
B.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

NAPOLEON ANDREW MILLER (1965), Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion and Principal of Watauga High School 

B.S., Western Carolina University; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ed.D., University of 
Tennessee. 

FRANCIS MONTALDI (1970), Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

MARY R. MOORE (1967), Associate Professor of English 
B.S., Western Michigan College; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana University. 

RICHTER H. MOORE, JR. (1970), Professor and Chairman of Political 
Science 
B.S., LL.B., University of South Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

WILLIAM TRUETT MOSS (1970), Associate Professor of Psychology 
A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Ph,D., University of Georgia. 

ROLAND F. MOY (1970), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.S., Wisconsin State University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

TRIDIB K. MUKHERJEE (1970), Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business 
B.A., University of Calcutta; M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

WILLIAM V. MUSE (1970), Professor of Economics and Business and 
Dean of the College of Business 
B.S., Northwestern State College; Ph.D., University of Arkansas. 

MAYRELEE NEWMAN (1969), Associate Professor of Library Science 
B.A., Washington State University; M.L.S., University of Washington. 

WILLIAM JACKSON NEWTON (1967), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus.Ed., Southern State College; M.Mus.Ed., North Texas State University. 

ROBERT CLAIR NICKLIN (1967), Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., South Dakota School of Mines; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

DONALD P. OLANDER (1969), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Washburn University; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Nebraska. 

CLYDE CHARLES OWEN (1962), Associate Professor of Industrial Arts 
B.S., M.S., Texas College of Arts and Industries. 

HARRY GILMORE PADGETT (1967), Associate Professor of Education 
B.A., Furman University; B.D., Th.M., Southeastern Seminary; M.Ed., Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 



154 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



CHARLES E. PALMER (1967), Professor of Speech 

B.A., Depauw University; B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin. 

HOWARD WILLIAM PAUL (1970), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Capital University; M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

LYNN McIVER PERRY (1968), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.A.M., Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

FRANK PETERSILIE (1969), Assistant Professor of Art 
B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State College. 

PETER PETSCHAUER (1968), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Washington Square College of New York University; M.A., Ph.D., New York 
University. 

EDWARD LEE PILKINGTON (1970), Assistant Professor of Speech 
B.F.A., Ithaca College; M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

CHARLES ELLINGTON PORTERFIELD (1968), Professor and Chair- 
man of Speech 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern University; M.A., State University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
Louisiana State University. 

ELTON GEORGE POWELL (1968), Assistant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages 

A.B., Florida Southern College; B.D., Emory University; M.A., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

MARY LOU POWELL (1967), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
A.B., M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

UBERTO PRICE (1955), Professor of Education 

B.S., Eastern Kentucky University; M.A., Western Kentucky University. 

JAMES ROY PRINCE (1960), Professor and Chairman of Foreign Lan- 
guages 

B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

JOHN ALFRED PRITCHETT, JR. (1956), Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion 
A.B., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

BURTON LEWIN PURRINGTON (1970), Assistant Professor of Anthro- 
pology 
B.A., Carleton College; M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

C. ELIZABETH PUTNAM (1967), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

MARY EUNICE QUERY (1947), Associate Professor of Library Science 
A.B., Duke University; A.B. in L.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
M.A., Appalachian State University. 

GEORGE C. RAG AN, JR. (1969), Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

AS'AD ADIB RAHHAL (1970), Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.A., M.A., American University of Beirut; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

ROBERT WAYNE RAMSEY (1966), Professor of History 

A.B., M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

JOHN FRANK RANDALL (1960), Professor of Biology 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



155 



ROBERT LEE RANDALL (1960), Professor of Education and Director 
of Placement 

B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; C.A.S., Ed.D., Harvard University. 

LAURIE TULLY REED (1966), Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

ROBERT ELLIS REIMAN (1963), Professor of Geography and Director 
of Institutional Research and Development 
B.S., M.A., Florida State University. 

ALAN JEROME REINERMAN (1970), Professor of History 
B.S., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D., Loyola University. 

LEE FRANCIS REYNOLDS (1946), Professor of Education and Chair- 
of Teacher Education 
B.S., M.A., Ball State University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

ROBERT LEE RICHARDSON (1966), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Castleton State College; M.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., University 
of Florida. 

DAVID A. RIGSBY (1961), Professor of Industrial Arts 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College; M.S., University of Kentucky. 

JANE MARGARET RINER (1956), Associate Professor of Economics and 
Business 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

DAVID THOMAS ROBINSON (1966), Professor of Education 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee. 

KENT ROBINSON (1956), Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

RICHARD ELLIOTT ROBINSON (1969), Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion 

B.A., Catawba College; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., University of 
Tennessee. 

SAMUEL KIRBY ROGERS (1970), Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Stetson University; M.Mus., New Orleans Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Florida 
State University. 

CARL AUGUSTUS ROSS, JR. (1968), Associate Professor of History 
A.B., Berry College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

TOLLIE C. ROSS (1969), Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of Georgia. 

SAMUEL L. ROUND (1970), Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., Florida State University; M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Florida. 

RAYMOND S. RUBLE (1970), Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Re- 
ligion 
B.A., M.A., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

WILLIAM HOYT S AFRIT (1950), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University. 

PAUL SANDERS (1962), Professor of Mathematics and Vice President 
for Academic Affairs 
B.A., Southeastern State College; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 

RICHARD JOSEPH SCHALK (1965), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Maryland; M.A., University of Arkansas. 

NOLLIE WILBOURNE SHELTON (1959), Professor of Education 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 



156 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE SHOPE (1966), Professor of Education and 
Chairman of Administration, Supervision, and Higher Education 
A.B., Otterbein College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

JAMES HERRINGTON SHORT, JR. (1968), Assistant Professor of In- 
dustrial Arts 
B.S., East Texas State University; M.Ed., Texas A & M University. 

STEPHEN JOSEPH SIMON (1970), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Xavier University. 

DONALD WOODFIN SINK (1968), Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., Catawba College; Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

JOSEPH GRAYSON SLOOP (1968), Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Arts 
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

KEENER McNEAL SMATHERS (1969), Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion 
B.A., Wofford College; M.A., Ed.D., Duke University. 

CHARLES DAVID SMITH (1968), Instructor in Education and Assistant 
Dean of the General College 
B.A., William and Mary College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

H. MAX SMITH (1969), Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Missouri; M.Mus., University of Oklahoma; Doctor of Sacred 
Music, Union Theological Seminary. 

JAMES REAVES SMITH (1968), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

WALTER THOMAS SNIPES (1964), Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Oglethorpe University; M.Ed., Mercer University; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

ROBERT WALTER SOEDER (1967), Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware. 

CHARLES CAUDILL SPEER (1970), Instructor in Economics and Busi- 
ness 
B.S., M.B.A., East Tennessee State University. 

WILLIAM GILBERT SPENCER (1951), Professor and Chairman of 
Music 
B.Mus. Ed., Northwestern University; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

FRANK RICHARD STECKEL (1962), Professor and Chairman of In- 
dustrial Arts 
B.S., M.S., University of North Dakota. 

ROGER L. STEENLAND (1969), Associate Professor of Psychology and 
Director of Psychological Services 
A.B., Calvin College; Ph.D., Purdue University. 

WILLIAM LEROY STEINBRECHER (1970), Associate Professor of 
Health and Physical Education 
A.B., B.S., M.S., Valparaiso University; Ed.D., Florida State University. 

JAMES WILLIAM STINES (1968), Associate Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion 

B.A. - , Wake Forest University; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Duke University. 

EDWARD HORDER STODDARD (1966), Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion 
B.S., Troy State College; M.Mus. Ed., North Texas State University. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



157 



ROBERT H. STRETCHER (1970), Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business 
B.S., Western Carolina University; M.S., The University of Tennessee. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STRICKLAND (1962), Professor of Education 
and Assistant Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., Wake Forest University; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

WILLIAM CLAUDIUS STRICKLAND (1966), Professor of Philosophy 
and Religion and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
A.B., Stetson University; B.D., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

CARL DAVID SUTTON (1970), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Manchester College; C.P., Indiana University. 

ORUS RICHARD SUTTON (1956), Professor and Chairman of Economics 
and Business 

B.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute; M.A., Northwestern University; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. 

EDWIN D. TAYLOR (1969), Assistant Professor of Economics and Busi- 
ness 
A.B., LL.B., J.D., University of Miami. 

ROGER EVAN THOMAS (1950), Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 
B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College. 

REBECCA McCOTTER TOMLINSON (1960), Assistant Professor of 
Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
Dir. P.E., Indiana University. 

JOHN ECCLES TRIMPEY (1968), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Ball State University; M.A., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Ohio University. 

NED REEVES TRIVETTE (1957), Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business and Vice President for Business Affairs 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Florida State University. 

KATHRYN CROFT TULLY (1955), Associate Professor of Economics .and 
Business 
A.B., Concord College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

EDWARD THOMAS TURNER (1968), Assistant Professor of Health and 
Physical Education 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

INA FAYE WOESTEMEYER VAN NOPPEN (1947), Professor of His- 
tory 
B.A., University of Kansas; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

TEUNIS VERGEER (1960), Professor of Biology 
A.B., Calvin College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

ERWING WINNINGHAM WADSWORTH (1968), Professor of Education 
B.S., Troy State University; M.S., Ed.D., Auburn University. 

JAMES WATSON, JR. (1967), Instructor in Physics 
A.B., Elon College; M.S., University of South Carolina. 

FRED WEBB, JR. (1968), Assistant Professor of Geology 
A.B., Duke University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

OMRI KENNETH WEBB, Jr. (1962), Professor of Philosophy and Relig- 
ion and Dean of the General College 

B.A., The Citadel; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 



158 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



REGINALD THEODORE WEBER (1968), Professor of Economics and 
Business 

B.S., Louisiana State University; M.B.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., New York 
University. 

GEORGE R. WESLEY (1963), Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Houston; M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver. 

ROBERT HOLT WEST (1967), Associate Professor of Economics and 
Business 
A.B., Duke University; M.Ed., Temple University; J.D., University of Miami. 

SUSAN CLARK WESTFALL (1970), Instructor in Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Western Kentucky University. 

HERBERT W. WEY (1969), Professor of Education and President of the 
University 
B.S., M.A., Indiana State University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

CRATIS DEARL WILLIAMS (1942), Professor of English and Dean of 
the Graduate School 
A.B., M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., New York University. 

HUBERTIEN HELEN WILLIAMS (1970), Associate Professor of English 
B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University. 

JOHN F. WILLIAMS (1966), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., M.A., University of Tennessee; Ed.D., Columbia University. 

JOHN H. WILLIAMS (1969), Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education 

B.A., University of Denver; M.S., University of Washington; Ed.S., Bowling Green 
State University; M.S. in Public Health, University of California at Berkeley. 

JERRY WAYNE WILLIAMSON (1970), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Wayland College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Utah. 

MATT WINN WILLIAMSON (1970), Associate Professor of Political Sci- 
ence 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

RICHARD BURTON WILSON (1967), Assistant Professor of Education 
A.B., M.E., M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

BETTY JEAN WINFORD (1967), Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Roanoke College; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., University of Virginia. 

GORDON G. WINGARD II (1970), Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion 
A.B., Sulpician Seminary of the Northwest; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

LARRY W. WOODROW (1966), Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A.T., Ed.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

ELLSWORTH TIEN-WEI WU (1968), Associate Professor of History 
B.A., University of Nanking; B.D., Westminster Theological Seminary; Th.M., 
Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

JULIAN CLIFTON YODER (1933), Professor and Chairman of Geogra- 
phy and Geology 

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

GILROY JOEL ZUCKERMAN (1970), Instructor in Economics and Busi- 
ness 
B.A., Harpur College; M.S., North Carolina State. University. 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 
GRADUATE COUNCIL 



159 



Cratis D. Williams, Ph.D., Chairman Dean of the Graduate School 

I. W. Carpenter, Ph.D. Professor of Biology and 

Chairman of the Graduate Faculty 

Roy Carroll, Ph.D. Professor of History and 

Chairman of the Department 

Alvis L. Corum, Ed.D. Dean of Learning Resources 

Boyd Max Dowell, Ed.D. Professor of Psychology 

Nicholas Erneston, Ph.D. Professor of Music and Dean of the 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Ben H. Horton, Jr., Ed.D. Professor of Education and Dean 

of the College of Education 

Joseph C. Logan, Ph.D. Professor of Music 

Dean Meredith, M.Ed. Registrar 

William Muse, Ph.D. Professor of Economics and 

Business and Dean of the College 
of Business 

J. Roy Prince, Ph.D. Professor of Foreign Languages 

and Chairman of the Department 

O. Paul Sanders, Ph.D. Vice President for Academic 

Affairs 

Ben F. Strickland, Ed.D. Professor of Education and 

Assistant Dean of the Graduate 
School 

William C. Strickland, Th.D. Professor of Philosophy and 

Religion and Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences 

Julian C. Yoder, Ph.D. Professor of Geography and 

Chairman of the Department of 
Geography and Geology 



160 



PERSONNEL 

Personnel 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Mr. William B. Rankin, Chairman Lincolnton, North Carolina 

Mr. George Corn Shelby, North Carolina 

Mr. D. Dwight Crater Wilkesboro, North Carolina 

Dr. Hugh Daniel Waynesville, North Carolina 

Mr. John P. Frank Mount Airy, North Carolina 

Mr. E. G. Lackey Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Mr. Lester P. Martin, Jr. Mocksville, North Carolina 

Mr. Dwight W. Quinn, Vice Chairman Kannapolis, North Carolina 

Mr. Wayne H. Shoaf Lexington, North Carolina 

Mrs. Jean L. Rivers Boone, North Carolina 

Mr. John H. Vickers Charlotte, North Carolina 

Mr. W. R. Winkler Boone, North Carolina 

Mr. William J. Conrad, Chairman Emeritus, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
The President of the University serves as Secretary to the Board of 
Trustees and its committees, and the Vice President for Business Affairs as 
Treasurer. 



THE BOARD OF VISITORS 

Mr. Claude C. Armfield, Jr. Asheville, North Carolina 

Mr. C. Alden Baker Raleigh, North Carolina 

Mr. Irwin Belk Charlotte, North Carolina 

Mrs. Paul Broyhill Lenoir, North Carolina 

Mrs. Harry B. Caldwell Greensboro, North Carolina 

Mr. Charles A. Cannon Concord, North Carolina 

Mr. J. E. Collette Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Mr. William J. Conrad Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Mr. Edwin Duncan, Jr. Sparta, North Carolina 

Mr. John M. Ehile, Jr. Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Mr. Gordon L. Goodson Lincolnton, North Carolina 

Mr. Grover C. Greene Milton, Delaware 

Dr. L. H. Hollingsworth Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Mr. Lewis Jenkins North Wilkesboro, North Carolina 

Mr. Harry Robbins Blowing Rock, North Carolina 

Mr. Terry Sanford Durham, North Carolina 

Dr. T. Edgar Sikes Greensboro, North Carolina 
Mr. Walter E. Wiles Chicago, Illinois 



PERSONNEL 



161 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



Herbert W. Wey, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. (1969) President 

Paul Sanders, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1962) Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Ned Reeves Trivette, B.S., M.A. 

(1956) Vice President for Business Affairs 

J. Braxton Harris, A.B., M.A., Ed.D. (1958) Dean of Student Affairs 

Robert Trawick Allen, Jr., A.B. (1960) Director of Public Affairs 

Cratis Dearl Williams, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1942) Dean of the Graduate School 

Omri Kenneth Webb, Jr., B.A., B.D., Ph.D. 

(1962) Dean of the General College 

William C. Strickland, A.B., B.D., Th.D. 

(1966) Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

William V. Muse, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. 

(1970) Dean of the College of Business 

Ben H. Horton, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. 

(1948) Dean of the College of Education 

Nicholas Erneston, B.Mus.Ed., M.Mu^., Ph.D. 

(1948) Dean of the College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Alvis L. Corum, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. (1970) Dean of Learning Resources 

Robert Ellis Reiman, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

(1963) Director of Institutional Research and Development 

James W Jackson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

(1970) Dean of Educational Innovation and Change »and 

Assistant to the President 

Joseph C. Logan, B.F.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. (1966) Assistant to the President 

Roy Clogston, B.A., M.A., (1969) Director of Athletics 

Barry Rogers, B.A., M.A. (1970) Director of Continuing Education Center 

James M. Cole, B.S., M.Ed. 

(1963) Assistant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Benjamin F. Strickland, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. 

(1962) Assistant Dean of the Graduate School 

C. David Smith, B.A., M.A. (1968) Assistant Dean of the General College 

Roy R. Blanton, Jr., B.S., M.A., Ed.D. (1948) Director of Extension 

W. Dean Meredith, A.B., M.Ed. (1962) Registrar 

Clarence Hazel Gilstrap, B.A., M.A. (1964) Director of Admissions 

Maxie Greene Edmisten, B.S., M.A. (1956) Dean of Women 

Ronnie Leonard Brooks, B.S. (1957) Dean of Men 



163 



INDEX 



Academic regulations, 50-57 

Accident insurance, 11 

Accounts, settlement of, 12 

Accredited membership (cover) 

Activity fees, 12 

Adding courses, 52-53 

Administration, 36-37, 61-66 

Administration, Supervision, and 
Higher Education, Department of, 
61-66 

Administrative officers of the uni- 
versity, 161 

Admission, 7, 26-28 

Admission status, 29 

Admission to candidacy, 30-32 

Advanced Certificate for School Ad- 
ministrators, 47 

Advisers, 29-30 

Anthropology, 127 

Application fee, 57 

Application for admission, 28 

Application for a degree, 49-50 

Application for a teaching certifi- 
cate, 50 

Applied music, 110-111 

Art, 67-68 

Arts and Sciences, College of, 4 

Assistantships, 58-59 

Audiovisual Center, 22-23 

Audiovisual specialist, 36, 127-128 

Auditor, 11, 50-51 

Biology, degree requirements, 39-40, 
46-47, 69 

Biology, Department of, 69-73 

Board and room, 57 

Board of Trustees, 160 

Board of Visitors, 160 

Books and supplies, 57 

Business, see economics 

Business, College of, 4 

Calendar, iii 

Calendar, university, ii 

Campus, 3 

Campus, map of (inside of back 
cover) 

Candidacy, admission to, 30-32 

Career planning services, 20-21 



Certificate of Advanced Study, 47-48 

Certification programs, 36-43 

Change of course, 11 

Change of room, 11 

Changing course grade, 54 

Changing majors, 54 

Chemistry, degree requirements, 39- 
40, 46,74 

Chemistry, Department of, 74-75 

Class attendance, 52 

Clinical psychology, degree require- 
ments, 45-46 

College of: 

Arts and Sciences, 4 
Business, 4 
Education, 4-5 
Fine and Applied Arts, 5 

Commencement, 50 

Comprehensive examinations, 26, 33, 
35, 44, 46, 47, 48, 54 

Computer Center, 23 

Computer Science, 109 

Concerts, 110 

Contents, table of, v-vii 

Correspondence directory, iv 

Counseling and Guidance, 128-130 

Counseling and Guidance, degree re- 
quirements, 41, 128-129 

Course numbering, 49 

Courses of instruction, 61-142 

Cultural activities, 17 

Day students, 8 

Defense of thesis, 26, 33, 44, 46 

Degrees conferred, 6, 24 

Departments of: 

Administration, Supervision, and 
Higher Education, 61-66; Art, 67- 
68; Biology, 69-73. Chemistry, 74- 
75; Economics and Business, 76- 
80; English, 81-84; Foreign Lan- 
guages, 85-89; Geography and Ge- 
ology, 90-92; Health and Physical 
Education, 92-94; History, 95-96; 
Home Economics, 97; Industrial 
Arts, 98-102; Library Science, 102- 
104; Mathematics, 105-109; Music, 
110-114; Philosophy and Religion, 



164 



INDEX (continued) 



114-115; Physics, 115-116; Politi- 
cal Science, 116-119; Psychology, 
120-124; Sociology and Anthro- 
pology, 125-127; Special Pro- 
grams, 127-134; Speech, 135-139; 
Teacher Education, 140-142 

Diploma fees, 11 

Dismissal, 53 

Dropping courses, 52-53 

Early Childhood (K-3) certificate, 
39 

Economic and business, degree re- 
quirements, 39-40, 76 

Economics and Business, Depart- 
ment of, 76-80 

Education, College of, 4-5 

Educational Leadership, Ed. S., 48 

Election of graduate courses by sen- 
iors, 28 

Elementary Education, Ed.S., 48 

Elementary teacher program, 39 

Employed students, 51 

Employment programs, 14 

English, degree requirements, 39-40, 
44,81 

English, Department of, 81-84 

Enrollment, 6 

Evening classes, 56 

Examinations, 54 

Expenses, 7-13, 57 

Extension classes, 55 

Extension class fees, 55 

Extension credit, 55 

Fees, 57 

Fellowships, 58-59 

Financial aid, 13-17 

Fine and Applied Arts, College of, 5 

Foreign Language Laboratory, 85 

Foreign language requirement for 
master's degrees, 49 

Foreign languages, degree require- 
ments, 39-40, 85 

Foreign Languages, Department of, 
85-89 

Foreign students, 8, 51-52 

French, 85-87 

Full-time resident student, 50 

General College, 4 

General science, 73 



General supervisor program, 37 

Geography, degree requirements, 39- 
40, 44 

Geography and Geology, Department 
of, 90-92 

Geology, 91-92 

Grading system, 53 

Graduate assistants for 1969-1970, 
143-145 

Graduate Council, 159 

Graduate Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (k-3) Certificate, 39 

Graduate Faculty, 146-158 

Graduate fellows for 1969-1970, 145 

Graduate Intermediate Grades (4-9) 
Certificate, 39 

Graduate Record Examinations, 11, 
26, 27, 31, 54 

Graduate School, 5-6, 24-25 

Graduation, 21 

Graduation requirements, 32-35 

Health and physical education, de- 
gree requirements, 39-40, 92 

Health and Physical Education, De- 
partment of, 92-94 

Health services, 18-19 

Higher education, degree require- 
ments, 38-39, 40, 41-42 

Higher Education, Department of 
Administration, Supervision, and, 
61-66 

Higher Education, Ed.S., 48 

High risk admission, 29 

History, degree requirements, 39-40, 
44-45, 95 

History, Department of, 95-96 

History of Appalachian State Uni- 
versity, 2-3 

History of Graduate School, 24 

Home Economics, Department of, 97 

Hospitalization insurance, 11 

Housing, 59 

Independent study, 55 

Industrial Arts, degree require- 
ments, 39-40, 98 

Industrial Arts, Department of, 98- 
102 

Intermediate Grades (4-9) Certifi- 
cate, 39 



INDEX (continued) 



165 



Internships, 56-57 

Junior college administration pro- 
gram, 40 

Junior college counselor, 41-42 

Junior college librarian, 38-39 

Junior college teacher program, 40 

Language requirements, 49 

Late registration, 12 

Laundry and dry cleaning, 10 

Library, 21-22 

Library carrels, 55 

Library Science, degree require- 
ments, 38-39 

Library Science, Department of, 
102-104 

Loan program, 14-16, 59 

Location of university, 1 

Map of campus (inside back cover) 

Master of Arts degree requirements, 
44 

Master of Arts in Education degree 
requirements, 32-35 

Master of Science degree require- 
ments, 46 

Mathematics, degree requirements, 
39-40, 45, 105 

Mathematics, Department of, 105- 
109 

Mental retardation program, 43 

Miller Analogies Test, 12, 26, 27, 31, 
54 

Motor vehicles, 19 

Music, degree requirements, 40-41, 
110-111 

Music, Department of, 110-114 

Music supervisor program, 40-41 

Music teacher program, 40-41 

National Defense Student Loan Pro- 
gram, 15 

National Teacher Examinations, 12, 
26, 27, 31, 54 

Oral defense of thesis, 26, 33, 44, 
46, 54 

Oral examinations, 26, 33, 35, 44, 46, 
54 

Organization of university, 3-6 

Orientation examinations, 40, 46 

Part-time students, 8 



Philosophy and Religion, Depart- 
ment of , 114-115 

Physical education activity fee, 12 

Physical Education, see Health and 
Physical Education 

Physics, Department of, 115-116 

Placement services, 20-21 

Political science, degree require- 
ments, 39-40, 45 

Political Science, Department of, 
116-119 

Postal service, 19-20 

Probationary admission, 29 

Procedures for graduate degree stu- 
dents, 26 

Procedure for writing a thesis, 34 

Programs for M.A. degree, 44-46 

Programs for M.A. in Education, 36- 
43 

Programs for M.S. degree, 46-47 

Programs for Specialist degree, 48 

Program of study, 31 

Provisional admission, 29 

Psychology, degree requirements, 40, 
45-46, 120 

Purpose of Appalachian, 1 

Purpose of Graduate School, 25 

Qualifying examinations, 54 

Reading Center, 23 

Reading specialist programs, 42-43, 
130 

Recitals, 110 

Refunds, 12-13, 59-60 

Registration, 50 

Regular admission, 29 

Religion, Department of Philosophy 
and, 115 

Requirements for graduation, 32-35 

Residence halls, 52, 57, 59 

Residence requirements, 32, 35, 47, 
48 

Room rent, 57 

Saturday classes, 56 

Saturday class fees, 56 

Scholarships, 16 

School administration program, 36- 
37 

School counselor program, 41 



166 



INDEX (continued) 



School librarian program, 38 

Second master's degree, 47 

Secondary teacher program, 39-40 

Seniors, election of graduate courses 
by, 28 

Settlement of accounts, 12 

Sixth-year program for school ad- 
ministrators, 47 

Social activities, 17 

Sociology and Anthropology, De- 
partment of, 125-127 

Sociology, degree requirements, 40, 
125 

Spanish, 87-89 

Special education: mental retarda- 
tion, 43, 132-134 

Special education, degree require- 
ments, 132 

Special Programs, Department of, 
127-134 

Specialist in Education degree, 48 

Specialist in Science degree, 48 

Speech correction, 43 

Speech, degree requirements, 43, 135 

Speech, Department of, 135-139 

Speech pathology, 43, 135 

Student employment, 14 

Student financial aid, 13-16, 58-59 

Student personnel worker, 41-42 



Student responsibility, 52 

Student welfare and activities, 10 

Summer sessions, 21 

Supervisor of student teaching, 38 

Supervision, 37, 61-66 

Suspension, 53 

Teacher Education, Department of, 
140-142 

Telephone number of university, iv 

Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage, 51 

Textbooks and supplies, 57 

Thesis committee, 54 

Thesis requirements, 34 

Transcripts, 60 

Transfer credit, 57 

Transient students, 29 

Tuition and fees, 57 

Two-year college administration, 40 

Unclassified admission, 29 

Unclassified graduate students, 51 

University calendar, ii 

University Consolidated Loan Fund, 
15-16 

University personnel, 160-161 

Validation of out-of-date credit, 33, 
35 

Veterans, information to, 13 

Withdrawal, 53 



APPALACHIAN 



BOONE,iK) 




0i' :y 



1. President's Home 

2. Bowie Hall 

3. Stadium Fieldhouse 

4. Governor and Mrs. 0. Max Gardner Residence Hall 

5. D. J. Whitener Residence Hall 

6. Justice Hall 

7. Newland Hall 

8. Duncan Hall 

9. Rankin Science Building 
10. Smith-Wright Hall 



11. D. D. Dougherty Library 

12. Carol Grotnes Belk Library 

13. Watauga Hall 

14. Cafeteria 

15. Gymnasiums-Broome-Kirk/Varsity Gym 

16. Power Plant 

17. Physical Plant & Laundry 

18. I. G. Greer Hall 

19. B. B. Dougherty Administration Building 

20. Infirmary 



TATE UNIVERSITY 



ORTH CAROLINA 




21. Administration Building Annex 


31. Faculty Apartments 


22. East Hall 


32. Workman Hall 


23. Sanford Hall 


33. Lucy Brock Nursery School 


24. Lovill Hall 


34. Lillie S. Dougherty Home Economics Building 


25. Charles A. and Ruth Coltrane Cannon 
Residence Hall 


35. W. H. Plemmons Student Center 


26. Hoey Hall 


36. Bookstore 


27. Doughton Hall 


37. Appalachian Elementary School 


28. White Hall 


38. Chapell Wilson Hall 


29. Moses H. and Bertha Cone Residence Hall 


39. W. Kerr Scott Industrial Arts Building 


30. Home Management House 


40. Campus Reservoir 



Dr. Fulmer 
Education