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Full text of "Bulletin, Lycoming College"

BULLETIN 



LYCOMING 
COLLEGE 

WILLIAMSPORT, PENNA. 




Catalogue Number 
1953-1954 



BULLETIN 
LYCOMING COLLEGE 

Entered at the Post OflSce at Williamsport, Pa., as second class 
matter under the Act of Congress, August 24, 1912. Issued six 
times a year, January, February, April, July, October, and November. 

Vol. 6 February 1953 No. 2 

CATALOGUE NUMBER 



Martha B. Clarke Memorial Building 
Rich Hall at Left 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bulletinlycoming62lyco 



OFFICIAL 
BULLETIN 



Lycoming College 

( Formerly WILLI AMSPORT-DICKINSON ) 
WILLIAMSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA 

Register For 195 2-19 J 3 

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF COURSES 
1953-1954 



tm 



Approved to Grant Baccalaureate Degrees 
by the Pennsylvania State Department of Public Instruction 



Accredited 

by 

The Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 

The University Senate of the Methodist Church 

The National Commission on Accrediting 



Member 

of 

Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities 

National Association of Schools and Colleges 

of the Methodist Church 

Association of American Colleges 



CALENDAR 



1953— SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, Monday, 8:30 A. M. — Registration 

February 3, Tuesday — Classes Begin 

March 27, Friday after Classes — Easter Recess Begins 

April 6, Monday — Easter Recess Ends 

April 7, Tuesday — Classes Resume 

June 5, Friday — Final Examination Period Ends 

June 7, Sunday — Commencement 

1953— SUMMER SESSIONS 

June 19, Friday — Registration and Class Organization 

July 3-4, Friday and Saturday — Fourth of July Recess 

July 6, Monday — Classes Resume 

July 25, Saturday — First Session Ends 

July 27, Monday — Registration and Class Organization 

August 29, Saturday — Second Session Ends 

1953-1954— FIRST SEMESTER 

September 15, Tuesday — Freshman Orientation Begins 

September 1 7, Thursday — Registration of Freshmen and Other New 
Students 

September 18, 19 — Friday at 9 A. M. Until Saturday Noon — Regis- 
tration of Upperclassmen 

September 20, Sunday — Matriculation Service 

September 21 — Classes Begin 

November 25-29 — Wednesday Noon Until Sunday — Thanksgiving 
Recess 

November 30, Monday — Classes Resume 

December 18, Friday After Classes — Christmas Recess Begins 

January 3, Sunday — Christmas Recess Ends 

January 4, Monday — Classes Resume 

January 29, Friday, 5 P. M. — First Semester Ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 1, Monday — Registration 

February 2, Tuesday — Classes Begin 

April 9, Friday After Classes — Easter Recess Begins 

April 19, Monday — Easter Recess Ends 

April 20, Tuesday — Classes Resume 

June 4, Friday — Final Examination Period Ends 

June 6, Sunday — Commencement 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 
CALENDAR 4 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 6 

COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 7 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 8 

FACULTY 8 

GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

The College, Location, History, Aim, Buildings, Library, 
Audio- Visual Services. 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 21 

General Expenses, Payments, Loans, Self-Help, Endow- 
ment Scholarships, Scholarships, Prizes. 

STUDENT LIFE 33 

Provisions for Freshmen, Religious Tradition, Cultural In- 
fluences, Student Government, Student Activities, Recrea- 
tion and Health, Resident Student Life, Discipline, Regu- 
lations. 

CURRICULUM INFORMATION 39 

Application Information, Requirements for Admission, 
Terminal Education, Guidance, Placement Service, Pro- 
vision for Veterans, Advance Standing, Classification of 
Students, Grading System, Normal Student Load, Over- 
load, Probation, Dismissal, Attendance, Graduation. 

PROGRAMS FOR STUDY 45 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 107 

INDEX 108-109 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OFFICERS 

Hon. Robert F. Rich President 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps Vice President 

Rev. L. Elbert Wilson Secretary 

Mr. Kenneth E. Himes (not a director) Treasurer 

TERM EXPIRES 1953 

Mr. Alfred A. DiCenso Williamsport 

Judge Don M. Larrabee, LL.D Williamsport 

Dr. Charles A. Lehman Williamsport 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, LL.D Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Seth W. Russell, Ph.D. State College 

Mr. Spencer S. Shannon Bedford 

Mrs. H. Marshall Stecker Mount Carmel 

Mr. George W. Sykes Conifer, N. Y. 

Rev. W. Galloway Tyson, D.D Drexel Hill 

Rev. G. Cecil Weimer Williamsport 

TERM EXPIRES 1954 

Mr. Harold A. Brown Williamsport 

Mr. Ivan E. Garver Roaring Springs 

Mrs. Layton S. Lyon Williamsport 

Mr. John H. McCormick Williamsport 

Rev. Elvin Clay Myers, D.D. Bloomsburg 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps Williamsport 

Hon. Robert F. Rich Woolrich 

Mr. George L. Stearns, II Williamsport 

Mr. Carl F. Stroehmann Williamsport 

Judge Charles Scott Williams Williamsport 

TERM EXPIRES 1955 

Mr. Charles V. Adams Montoursville 

Rev. William W. Banks Jersey Shore 

Bishop Fred P. Corson Philadelphia 

Mr. Frank Dunham Wellsboro 

Mr. Paul G. Gilmore Williamsport 

Mr. Ralph E. Kelchner Jersey Shore 

Rev. a. Lawrence Miller, Ph.D Williamsport 

Rev. W. Edward Watkins, D.D Harrisburg 

Rev. L. Elbert Wilson Waynesboro 

6 



COMMITTEES OF THE 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The President of the Board of Directors and the President of 
the College are ex-officio members of all standing committees. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Judge Charles S. Williams Chairman 

Reverend G. Cecil Weimer Secretary 

Mr. Harold A. Brown 

Mr. Paul G. Gilmore 

Judge Don M. Larrabee, LL.D. 

Rev. Elvin Clay Myers, D.D. 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps 

Hon. Robert F. Rich 

Mr. George L. Stearns, II 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Mr. Harold A. Brown Chairman 

Mr. Kenneth E. Himes Secretary 

Mr. Charles V. Adams 

Mr. John H. McCormick 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps 

Mr. Carl F. Stroehmann 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 

Mr. Ralph E. Kelchner Chairman 

Rev. W. Edward Watkins, D.D. 
Mr. George W. Sykes 

ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 

Rev. W. W. Banks Chairman 

Rev. Elvin Clay Myers, D.D Secretary 

Mr. Charles V. Adams 

Mr. Frank Dunham 

Judge Don M. Larrabee, LL.D. 



ADMINISTRATION OFFICERS 

John W. Long, A.B., D.D., LL.D President 

Lawrence W. Lykens, B.S., S.T.B. Assistant to the President 

William S. Hoffman, B.S., M.S Dean 

G. Heil Gramley, B.S., M,A Dean of Men 

Director of Admissions and Registrar 

Elizabeth B. Miller, B.S., M.Ed Dean of Women 

Kenneth E. Himes, B.S., G.S.B., Treastirer and Business Manager 

Oliver E. Harris, A.B., M.S. Director of Guidance 

Noreen C. Blum, A.B., B.S. in L.S Librarian 



John W. Long, President (1921) 

A.B., D.D., Dickinson College; LL.D., Western Maryland; Drew 
Theological Seminary. 

William S. Hoffman, Dean (1949) 

B.S., M.S., The Pennsylvania State College. 

G. Heil Gramley 

Dean of Men, Director of Admissions, Registrar (1950) 
B.S., Albright College; M.A., Bucknell University. 

Elizabeth B. Miller, Dean of Women (1950) 

B.S. in Ed., Slippery Rock State Teachers College; M.Ed., The Penn- 
sylvania State College. 

Kenneth E. Himes, Treasurer (1948) 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology; G.S.B., Rutgers University. 



LoRiNG Benson Priest, Divisional Director, Social Science (1949) 

Professor of History 
Litt.B., Rutgers University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Eric V. Sandin, Divisional Director, Humanities (1946) 

Professor of English 
B.S., Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; Pii.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

George S. Shortess, Divisional Director, Science (1948) 

Professor of Biology 
A.B., Joiins Hopkins University; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University. 

J. Milton Skeath (1921) Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., The 
Pennsylvania State College. 



Joseph D. Babcock (1931) Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Bucknell University. 

Mabel K. Bauer (1942) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Robert H. Ewing (1947) Associate Professor of History 

A.B., College of Wooster; M.A., University of Michigan. 

Phil G. Gillette (1929) 

Associate Professor of German and Spanish 
A.B., Ohio University; M.A., Columbia University. 

Oliver E. Harris, Director of Guidance (1948) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
A.B., M.S., The Pennsylvania State College. 

George W. Howe (1949) Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B,, M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Claude C. Kiplinger (1949) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Western Reserve University; M.S., Ohio State University. 



Walter G. McIver (1946) Associate Professor of Voice 

Mus.B., Westminster Choir College; A.B., Bucknell University. 

Robert F. Smith, Director of Athletics, Basketball Coach (194-6) 

Associate Professor of History 
B.S., Lock Haven State Teachers College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania 
State College. 

James W. Sterling (1924) Associate Professor of English 

A.B., M.A., Syracuse University. 

Armand J. L. Van Baelen (1947) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
College Communal, Tirlemont, Belgium; B.S., Agric College, Gembloux, 
Belgiimi; M.S., Rutgers University. 

Helen Breese Weidman (1944) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
A.B., M.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 



NoREEN Chalice Blum, Librarian (1949) 

Librarian with Rank of Assistant Professor 
A.B., Cornell College; B.S. in L.S., Illinois University. 

Roger Earle Cogswell (1946) Assistant Professor of French 

A.B., Sorbonne University, Paris, France; M.A., The Pennsylvania 
State College. 

J. MiLNOR DoREY (1947) Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., M.A., Dickinson College; M.A., Harvard University. 

W. Arthur Faus (1951) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Dickinson College; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston University. 

Samuel Good (1949) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., Emory University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

John P. Graham (1939) Assistant Professor of English 

Ph.B., Dickinson College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State College. 

10 



John G. Hollenback (1952) 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Frances E. Knights (1947) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., M.A., Bucknell University. 

Mary Jane Marley, Divisional Director, Second Semester, Business 
Administration (1946), Assistant Professor of Secretarial 
Studies 
B.S., M.S., Bucknell University. 

Donald George Remley (1946) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Physics 
A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Mary Landon Russell (1936) 

Assistant Professor of Organ, Piano 
Mus.B., Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music. 

Henry H. Shissler, Director of Tovpn and Country Work (1950) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., Millersville State Teachers College; S.T.B., Westminster Theo- 
logical Seminary; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State College. 

John A. Streeter, Divisional Director, First Semester, Business 
Administration (1946) Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., M.A., The Pennsylvania State College. 

Merton J. Strong, Jr. (1952) Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.Ed., Plattsburg State Teachers College (N. Y.) ; M.S., Syracuse 
University. 

Clair J. Switzer (1945) Assistant Professor of Religion 

A.B., Juniata College; A.M., Bucknell University; B.D., Susquehanna 
University Theological Seminary. 



George Lee Baer, Assistant Basketball Coach and Trainer (1947) 

Instructor in Physical Education 
B.S., University of Delaware; M.Ed., Bucknell University. 



11 



Lulu Brunstetter (1925) 

Assistant Librarian with Rank of Instructor 
Bloomsburg State Normal. 

John W. Chandler (1952) Instructor in Art 

A.B., St. Anselem's College; Ed.M., Boston University. 

Hazel B. Dorey (1943) Instructor in Piano 

Honor graduate, Philadelphia Music Academy; graduate work, Colum- 
bia University. 

Helen M. Felix (1948) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State Teachers College. 

Marjorie S. Peterson (1952), Reference Librarian with Rank of 
Instructor 
A.B., Lycoming College; M.S. in L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Sarah Eleanor Roher (1952), Catalogue Librarian with Rank of 
Instructor 

A.B., College of Liberal Arts, American University; B.S. in L.S., School 
of Library Science, Columbia University. 

James W. Sheaffer (1949) Instructor in Music 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Doris Coombs Teno (1950) Instructor in Secretarial Science 

B.S., Bucknell University; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State College. 



12 



PART TIME INSTRUCTORS 

Carl S. Bauer (1946) Engineering Drawing 

B.S., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State College. 

Merl G. Colvin (1951) Pathologist 

B.S., Bucknell University; M.D., University of Pennsj'lvania ; Fellow 
of American College of Physicians; Fellow of College of American 
Pathologists. 

George M. Hoffnagle (1952), Assistant Basketball Coach and 
Statistician 
B.S., Lock Haven State Teachers College; M.S., Bucknell University. 

Don L. Larrabee, Attorney at Law (1945) Business Law 

A.B., Allegheny College; Wharton Graduate School of the University of 
Pennsylvania and Law School of the University of Pennsylvania. 

Mary E. Meyers (1950) Anatomy and Physiology 

B.S., Bucknell University; R.N., Kings County Hospital, School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fred C. Stiner (1952) Greek 

A.B., Bucknell University; B.D., Reformed Episcopal Seminary; S.T.B., 
Westminster Theological Seminary. 

Donald T. Williamson (1949) Accounting 

A.B., Dickinson; C. P. A. (Pennsylvania). 



13 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 

Bessie L. White Recorder 

Clara E. Fritsche Accountant 

James L. Gleason, A.B Assistant to Director of Admissions 

Donald G. Remley, A.B., M.A Placement Bureau Director 

Jean G. Davies, A.B Publicity Director 

Lulu Brunstetter Assistant Librarian 

Marjorie S. Peterson, A.B., M.S. in L.S. Reference Librarian 

Sarah Eleanor Roher, A.B., B.S. in L.S Catalogue Librarian 

Nellie F. Gorgas Secretary to the President 

Rosemary Ford, A.B. Secretary to the Dean 

June Ruffhead Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Emily C. Biichle Secretary to the Business Manager 

Patricia A. Neff Secretary to the Librarian 

Dorothy J. Streeter Bookstore Manager 

Frederick C. Lechner, M.D. College Physician 

Doris H. Cotner, R.N College Nurse 



14 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



THE COLLEGE 

Lycoming College is a liberal arts institution. It is co-educa- 
tional and provides facilities for both day and boarding students. 
The four year program offers courses of study leading to Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. In addition, certain two- 
year terminal programs are available. 

LOCATION 

The college is located near the center of the city of Williams- 
port, Pennsylvania, on a slight eminence, which causes the institu- 
tion to be affectionately referred to as "The College upon the Hill- 
top." Its stately elms, maples, and numerous shrubs form an attrac- 
tive setting for the college buildings. 

Williamsport itself is known as "The Queen City of the West 
Branch of the Susquehanna River," and is on the famed Susque- 
hanna Trail, midway between Buffalo, New York, and Washington, 
D. C. It is famed for its picturesque scenery, its beautiful homes, 
and the culture and kindness of its people. The Pennsylvania and 
Reading railroads, with their fast trains, and the Lakes-to-Sea and 
the Greyhound busses put it within two hours of Harrisburg, four 
and a half hours of Philadelphia, and six hours of Pittsburgh and 
New York. Capital, TWA, and American Airlines place the time at 
forty minutes to Harrisburg, an hour and ten minutes to Philadel- 
phia, one hour and fifteen minutes to New York, and about three 
hours to Boston. 

HISTORY 

Lycoming College has a long and varied history of service in the 
educational field. Founded in 1812, it was known for a period of 
thirty-six years as Williamsport Academy. In 1848 a group of men 

15 



of Williamsport, under the leadership of Reverend Benjamin H. 
Crever, hearing that the Academy was about to be discontinued, 
proposed to accept the school and conduct it as a Methodist educa- 
tional institution. Their offer was accepted, and completely reor- 
ganized with a new president and faculty, it opened September, 
1848, as Dickinson Seminary, under the patronage of the old Balti- 
more Conference. It was acquired in 1869 and is still owned by the 
Preachers' Aid Society of the Central Pennsylvania Conference of 
the Methodist Church, and is regularly chartered under the laws of 
the state of Pennsylvania. It is a non-profit institution. All of its 
earnings as well as the generous gifts of its friends have been spent 
for maintenance and improvements. 

During a large part of its history, its curriculum covered the 
work now included in a high school course and at the same time 
included about two years of college work. By its original charter 
it was empowered to grant degrees, which authority was for a time 
exercised. In 1912 it began to confine itself to the college prepara- 
tory field and continued in that field until 1929. From that date 
until June, 1947, it operated as a preparatory school and junior 
college. 

The increased college attendance following the war and trends 
in higher education in recent years clearly indicated a need for more 
four year colleges. After giving the matter careful consideration, 
the Board of Directors, at a special meeting January, 1947, author- 
ized and set in motion plans to adopt a four year college program. 
The college preparatory department was discontinued June, 1948. 
In the same year, after approval of the Pennsylvania Department 
of Education, the charter was amended to include the power to 
grant Baccalaureate Degrees. The name of the institution was 
then officially changed to Lycoming College. Lycoming is an Indian 
name closely associated with this region from early colonial days. 

AIM 

It is the aim of Lycoming College to provide to qualified stu- 
dents education of such a nature as to supply the background for 
a more intelligent understanding and appreciation of the economic, 
political, historical, social, scientific, esthetic, and religious aspects 

16 



The Gymnasium 



of life. In addition to the broad, general education, courses pre- 
paratory to specialization in law, medicine, dentistry, engineering, 
and business, or courses preparatory to graduate work in some field 
of concentration are offered. Terminal education is available in 
Art, Medical Technology, Medical Secretarial, Music, and Secre- 
tarial Science. 

BUILDINGS 

OLD MAIN. The Main Building is an imposing structure of 
brick occupying the central part of the campus. In this building 
are administrative and faculty offices, class rooms, men's day room, 
lounge, and dormitories for men. 

RICH HALL. Dedicated October 15, 1948, Lycoming's modern, 
brick, women's dormitory is of Georgian Colonial style and fireproof 
in construction. This beautiful building houses 120 young women. 
Each suite of two rooms has private bath facilities which are shared 
by four students. Lounges are conveniently located for entertain- 
ing guests and for small student meetings. Also located in the 
building are the Infirmary and nurse's quarters, game rooms, and 
the women's day room. The building has been completely furnished 
with new and attractive furnishings. 

EVELAND HALL. Eveland Hall is also of red pressed brick, 
and is a modern fire-proof building. The basement houses the 
heating plant. A modern chemistry laboratory and class rooms 
occupy the first floor. The second and third floors contain dormi- 
tories. 

FRANKLIN STREET HALL. A large private home has been 
converted into dormitory and living quarters, arranged to accom- 
modate approximately twenty men. It is currently occupied by 
the colony of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. 

CLARKE MEMORIAL. This building was made possible by the 
bequest of Miss Martha B. Clarke, of the class of 1862, as a 
memorial to her brothers and herself. It is designed in colonial 
style, is of fireproof construction, and houses tlie chapel and the 
dining hall. The chapel which seats six hundred, has excellent 
acoustics, provides facilities for devotional services, assemblies, 
dramatics, concerts, and lectures. 

17 



The dining hall, on the first floor, is arranged with separate 
entrances and with coat rooms and wash rooms for men and women. 
It opens on a terrace overlooking the campus and athletic field. 
Effort has been made to produce a comfortable, home-like room. 
Either table service or cafeteria service is possible. 

The erection of this building fits into the plan of an attractive 
quadrangle. On the north the open campus extends to Washington 
Boulevard. 

JOHN W. LONG LIBRARY. The John W. Long Library was 
dedicated and formally opened October 20, 1951. Constructed of 
brick in Georgian Colonial style, this imposing building is located 
on the east side of the campus directly across the athletic field from 
Rich Hall. The interior is so designed that floor space is adaptable 
to various modifications in arrangement. The library has space for 
100,000 volumes and seats 250 students. It is excellently equipped 
throughout and is illuminated by lights of the newest design which 
are located in ceiling panels. 

The large reading room, periodical and reference rooms, offices, 
typing room, and beautifully furnished recreational reading room 
are located on the first floor. On the ground floor is a faculty 
reading room. Two audio-visual rooms, one to accommodate sev- 
enty-five students and one for twenty students, with a film projec- 
tion booth and storage room between, are located on the second floor. 
They are equipped with film projectors for showing films, filmstrips, 
slides, and other visual material. Two rooms designed for listening 
to records and equipped with turntables for group and individual 
listening are also on the second floor. The rare book and historical 
data room, seminar rooms, and individual study and typing rooms 
occupy one wing of this floor. 

There are now more than 26,500 volumes in the library, and 
this number is being augmented rapidly. An excellent list of 
reference works has been provided. A group of books for general 
reading has also been included in oi'der to stimulate student interest 
in books not directly related to specific courses. 

The library currently subscribes to 260 periodicals which cover 
all subject fields offered by the college; ten newspapers, including 

18 



three in foreign languages ; and seven periodical indexing and 
bibliographical services. 

There are 280 albums of literary, foreign language, dictation, 
social science, and musical recordings. This record collection is in 
the library for the use of various departments and the students. 

A full-time professionally trained librarian, three assistant 
librarians, and a secretary to the librarian are in charge of the 
library. Student assistants are employed as needed. This staff is 
available to help in locating reference material and in preparing 
bibliographies. 

BRADLEY HALL. Bradley Hall, a four story building, is con- 
structed of red brick^ and contains the Dramatic Studio, the Lundy 
Radio Broadcasting Studio, the Business Administration offices and 
one floor of men's dormitories. 

MEMORIAL HALL. Memorial Hall was dedicated on Novem- 
ber 1, 1947. It is a three-story building and has floor space of 8,000 
square feet. It contains class rooms, departmental offices, and the 
biology and physics laboratories. This building, erected through 
the cooperation of the college and the Federal Works Agency, is 
attractively faced with red brick. 

FINE ARTS. The Fine Arts building is located at the northern 
end of the campus. Three large studios and several smaller prac- 
tice rooms on the first floor are occupied by the Music Department. 
The Art Department is located on the second floor and has the 
advantage of northern lighting. There also are private studios and 
conference rooms for members of the faculty. The building is well 
equipped and attractively furnished throughout. 

THE GYMNASIUM. Lycoming is fortunate in having a splendid 
modern gymnasium, which is a popular center of activities. The 
building is 110 feet by 88 feet, beautifully designed and of semi- 
fireproof construction. 

The basement includes a modern swimming pool 20 by 60 feet, 
equipped with a sterilization and filtration plant. 

19 



There are also two bowling alleys of latest design, and separate 
rooms and showers for both home and visiting teams. Provision is 
made for private dressing rooms and shower rooms for women. 

The gymnasium floor proper is 90 by 65 feet with a stage at the 
easterly end. The main floor can readily be converted into an audi- 
torium suitable for recitals or more pretentious productions. 

ATHLETIC FIELD. Built partially on the site of the old 
athletic field, the new field runs north and south, beginning directly 
behind the gymnasium and dining hall, and extending to the terrace 
just off Washington Boulevard on the north. Ample room is pro- 
vided for tennis courts and football field and other intramural sports 
with bleachers which accommodate 1,000 people. 

THE PRESIDENT'S HOME. The architectural style of the 
President's Home harmonizes with the Fine Arts building and with 
it forms an imposing unit at the northwest corner of the campus. 

AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES 

Special audio-visual equipment includes a 16 mm. sound moving 
picture projector, a silent projector, one two-by-two slide projector, 
one combination two-by-two slide and 35 mm. filmstrip projector, a 
radio, a tape recorder, a wire recorder, two public address systems, a 
micro-film reader, a micro-card reader, and four turntables for rec- 
ords. Connected with two turntables are ear-phones which makes it 
possible for several students to listen to different records at the 
same time without disturbing one another. 

A collection of films, filmstrips, micro films, micro cards, and 
records is being built which is being used in connection with classes, 
special groups on the campus, and for the pleasure and relaxation of 
students. One-half of the second floor of the new John W. Long 
Library is equipped to carry on the audio-visual program. 

Through the generosity of the Lundy Construction Company, 
a Radio Studio has been installed on the ground floor of Bradley 
Hall where students may be trained in radio speech, announcing, 
and script writing. The equipment is linked with the local radio 
station, WRAK, an NBC afl^liate. 

20 



FINANCIAL 
INFORMATION 

GENERAL 

In considering the expenses of college, it is well to bear in 
mind that no student actually pays the full cost of his education. 
State colleges are enabled to keep the cost of tuition within reason- 
able limits by grants from the public treasury ; independent colleges 
achieve this by voluntary contributions supplemented by income 
from their invested endowment funds. At Lycoming College, a non- 
profit institution, the tuition fee which each student pays represents 
approximately three-fourths of the total instruction cost. Tuition 
is kept at the lowest possible minimum consistent with adequate 
facilities and competent instruction. 

Tuition at Lycoming is $225.00 per semester, plus certain fees 
which are listed on the following pages. The present cost of Room 
and Board per semester is $275.00 for women and $260.00 for men. 
(The academic year comprises two semesters of approximately six- 
teen weeks each.) 

Regularly enrolled students carrying a normal schedule of from 
12 to 15 hours of class or laboratory pay the full tuition charge. 
Those students taking fewer than 12 hours of work per semester, 
or fewer than 6 hours of work per semester in the summer session, 
are charged $15.00 per credit hour. Additional credits beyond 
the normal schedule of 15 hours are charged at the rate of $15.00 
for each semester hour credit. Because of the individual attention 
needed, instruction in music and art is charged on a different basis, 
as is indicated on page 22. 

APPLICATION FEE AND DEPOSIT 

Every student who desires admission is required to send a 
registration fee of $10.00 with the application. This payment 
partially covers administrative costs of handling the application. 
The fee is not refundable. 

21 



After a resident student is notified that he has been accepted 
for admission by the college, he must send a payment of $35.00 to 
the Director of Admissions. This payment is applied against the 
general charges of the semester and serves as a room reservation 
deposit. It will not be refunded unless notice is received at least 
30 days prior to the beginning of the semester that the student will 
be unable to attend. 

In order to reserve the room selected by a returning student, 
the student must have a room deposit of $25.00 paid on or before 
July 15, 1953. This amount will be applicable to the general 
charges of the semester. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

A modern book and supply store is conveniently located on the 
campus. Books and supplies are purchased by the individual stu- 
dent. The estimated cost is approximately $50.00 per year, but 
will vary somewhat in accordance with the course of study which 
the student is pursuing. Terms are cash. The bookstore is open 
registration day and daily thereafter. 

ACTIVITIES FEE 

In support of student activities, including athletics, health, stu- 
dent publications, student organizations, lectures, entertainment, 
and the Greater Lycoming Banquet, and for use of the library and 
gymnasium, a yearly fee of $25.00 (payable $15.00 first semester, 
$10.00 second semester) is charged to the residents and $20.00 to 
day students (payable $10.00 each semester). 

ART AND MUSIC 

Tuition for art and music majors is higher than the other 
courses of study. In these programs best results are obtained by 
individual instruction ; consequently the expense is greater. The 
cost in excess of the normal tuition varies according to the student's 
program of study but does not exceed $50.00 per semester. The 
exact cost is determined at the time of registration. 

Special or part time music students are charged $40.00 per 
semester for one one-half hour lesson per week. 

22 



A charge of $5.00 per semester for piano and $10.00 per semes- 
ter for organ is made when these instruments are required for 
practice. These rates are for one period per day for each lesson 
scheduled. 

Special or part time applied art students will be charged $50.00 
for six class periods per week (three credit hours). 

DAMAGE CHARGES 

Wherever possible, damage to dormitory property will be 
charged to the person or persons directly responsible. Damage and 
breakage occurring in a room will be the responsibility of students 
occupying the room. 

Halls and bathroom damage will be the responsibility of all 
students of the section where damage occurs. Actual cost of repairs 
will be charged. 

EXPENSES IN DETAIL PER SEMESTER 

DORMITORY STUDENTS 
Men Per Semester 

Tuition (Normal Schedule) $225.00 

Room 60.00 

Board 200.00 

Basic cost per semester* $485.00 

Women 

Tuition (Normal Schedule) $225.00 

Room 75.00 

Board 200.00 

Basic cost per semester* $500.00 

NON-DORMITORY STUDENTS 

Tuition (Normal Schedule) $225.00 

Basic cost per semester* $225.00 

SPECIAL CHARGES 

Laboratory Fees per semester: 

Biology, Chemistry, Physics $10.00 to $30.00 

Office Practice (Secretarial Course) 7.50 

Office Machines 10.00 

Activities Fees — Dormitory Students (per year) 25.00 

— Non-Dormitory Students (per year) 20.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

* Does not include activities fee, laboratory fees and extra credit hours, 
if any. 

23 



Additional Credit Per Semester Hour 15.00 

Key Deposit (for each key required) 50 

Tray Fee (for meals served in rooms per tray) 20 

Freshman Orientation, Room and Board 10.00 

Diplomas— for A.B. or B.S. degree 10.00 

Certificate 5.00 

Caps and Gowns (rental at prevailing cost) 

SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS 

All remittances should be made payable to Lycoming College on or 

before registration day of each semester as follows: 

Resident Students $325.00* 

Non-Resident Students 175.00 

Bills are not sent for the initial payment, but at mid-semester an 

itemized statement, showing all charges and payments, will be mailed to 

the person who is responsible. On receipt of the bill the balance of term 

charges will be due and payable. 

All discounts, scholarships, and earnings from college employment will 

be applied to the student's account at the end of the semester. 

* Less reservation deposit. 

PARTIAL PAYMENTS 

For the convenience of those who find it impossible to follow the sched- 
ule of payments as listed above, registration may be made on partial pay- 
ment. However, permission to do so must be obtained in advance from the 
President or Treasurer and arrangements made to liquidate the entire bill 
by the end of the semester. 

WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

The date on which the Dean of the College approves the student's with- 
drawal sheet is considered the official date of withdrawal. In the case of 
minors, the approval of the parent or guardian Is required before the with- 
drawal is approved and before any refund is made. 

Room rentals have been fixed on a semester basis. Consequently, stu- 
dents leaving college prior to the ending of a semester will not be entitled to 
any refund on room rent. Board will be pro-rated by the week over the 
period of attendance. 

Refund of tuition will be made to students who withdraw voluntarily 
from the College while in good standing and is fixed on the following basis: 
Students leaving during the first four-week period are charged 30%; during 
the second four weeks 60% ; during the third four weeks, 90% ; after twelve 
weeks, full charge. 

Dropping a subject from the original schedule after the second week of 
either semester will not justify any claim for refund of tuition charges. 
Written permission to drop the subject must be obtained from the Admis- 
sions Office. No refund will be made to those students who are asked to 
withdraw from college. 

Other fees cannot be refunded for any reason whatever. 

PENALTY FOR NON-PAYMENT OF FEES 

A student will not be registered for courses in a new semester if his 
account for previous attendance has not been settled. 

24 



No grades will be Issued, no diploma, certificate, transcript of credits, 
or certification of withdrawal in good standing will be granted to any stu- 
dent until a satisfactory settlement of all obligations has been made. 

GUESTS 

Parents or guardians visiting students are the guests of the College for 
the first twenty-four hours. Other guests may be entertained if their stu- 
dent hosts pay the regular rates for their entertainment. In all instances, 
the Business Office should be notified in advance of expected guests, whether 
parents or other friends, and payment should be made at that time. Faculty 
and students remaining at the College during vacations will be charged in 
accordance with prevailing rates. 

DISCOUNTS 

Special discounts are allowed for the following: 

(1) Two students from the same family at the same time. 

(2) Children of ministers. 

(3) Students preparing for the ministry or missionary work. 
Not more than one discount will be allowed to any student. 

The college reserves the right to withdraw any discount from a student 
whose scholarship or behavior is unsatisfactory. 

No discount is allowed on Music and Art, whether taken as extra-sub- 
jects in connection with a regular course or whether the student is majoring 
in one of these subjects. 

LOANS 

A limited number of worthy students, members of the Methodist 
Church, may secure loans from the Student Loan Fund administered by the 
Board of Education of that Church. Christian character, satisfactory 
scholarship, promise of usefulness, financial responsibility, and the recom- 
mendation of the church to which the applicant belongs are essential to a 
loan. Each borrower must sign an interest-bearing promissory note. 

There are also loan funds in the Philadelphia and the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Conferences of the Methodist Church for students from these con- 
ferences on practically the same terms as above. 

The income from $10,000.00, from the Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Rich Loan 
and Prize Fund, is available to a limited number of students. Each 
borrower must sign an interest-bearing promissory note. The recipients 
are selected by the President. 

Donald Robert Ahn Memorial Fund in Music. The principal of the 
Memorial Fund is available for loans to worthy students who are major- 
ing in music. Recipients shall be recommended by the Chairman of the 
Music Department to the President. 

Detailed information may be secured from the President. 

SELF-HELP 

There are opportunities in the College for self-help for a number of 
women students. Also some men students are able to earn part of their 
expenses in various ways at the College, and there are frequent opportuni- 
ties for student work in the city. 

25 



ENDOWMENT SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Margaret A. Stevenson Powell Scholarship, the gift of her children. 
Endowment, $1,200. 

The Pearl C. Detwiler Scholarship, bequeathed by her to the Endow- 
ment Fund, $500. 

The Frank Wilson Klepser Memorial Scholarship, given by his parents. 
Endowment, $5,000. 

The Benjamin C. Bowman Scholarship, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Walton Bowman. Endowment, $5,000. 

The Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Young Scholarship. Endowment, $10,000. 

The Miriam P. Welch Scholarship. Endowment, $500. 

The Wilson Hendrix Reiley Memorial Scholarship. Endowment, $500. 

The Mrs. Margaret J. Freeman Scholarship. Endowment, $1,000. 

The Agnes L. Hermance Art Scholarship. Endowment, $2,000. 

The Grace Stanley Dice Memorial Scholarship, the gift of Willis C. 
Dice, husband. Endowment, $1,000. 

The Clarke Memorial Fund of about $100,000, provided by gift and 
bequest by the late Miss Martha B. Clarke, of Williamsport, Pa., a former 
student, in the interest of the development program of Lycoming College. 
This was applied to the erection of the Clarke Building. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Over two thousand dollars is awarded annually in scholarships and 
prizes. This not only encourages scholastic attainment, but also afifords 
generous help to needy, worthy students. The list of scholarships and prizes 
follows, together with the awards in each case made at Commencement, 1952. 

THE DeWITT BODINE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late DeWitt 
Bodine, of Hughesville, Pa. 

The entire expenses of board and tuition to that pupil of the graduat- 
ing class of the Hughesville High School who shall excel in scholarship and 
character. 

Reta a. Smith R. D. 4, Muncy, Pa. 

THE EDWARD J. GRAY SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Rev. Dr. 
Edward J. Gray, for thirty-one years the honored president of this insti- 
tution. 

The interest on $1,000 to be paid annually, in equal amounts, to the two 
applicants who attain a required rank highest in scholarship and deport- 
ment in the Senior Class. 

Nancy R. Hall South Williamsport, Pa. 

Elizabeth A. Welch Williamsport, Pa. 

26 



THE ALEXANDER E. PATTON SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late 
Hon. Alexander E. Patton, Curwensville, Pa. 

The interest on $1,000 to be paid annually, in equal amounts, to the two 
applicants who attain a required rank highest in scholarship and deport- 
ment in the Junior Class. 

C. Daniel Little Picture Rocks, Pa. 

Margaret A. Maconaghy Prospect Park, Pa. 

THE GEORGE W. HUNTLEY, JR., SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the 
late George W. Huntley, Jr., Emporium, Pa. 

The interest on $6,350.00 is available to help defray the tuition and ex- 
penses for the first year only of any graduate of Emporium High School 
who meets provisions as set forth in the trust agreement. The selection 
is made by the Superintendent of Schools, Cameron Co., Pa. 
Not awarded. 

THE ELIZABETH S. JACKSON SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the 
late Mrs. Elizabeth S. Jackson, of Berwick, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be paid annually to the applicant who attains a 
required rank highest in scholarship and deportment in the Sophomore 
Class. 

Edward P. Donnell Williamsport, Pa. 

THE DONALD C. WOLFE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Mrs. 
Nora E. Wolfe, of Williamsport, Pa. 

The interest on $4,000.00 to be paid annually to a worthy ministerial 
student to be selected by the trustees of Lycoming College. 

George C. Kramer^ Jr. Lansdowne, Pa. 

THE WILLIAM WOODCOCK SCHOLARSHIP, founded by William L. 
Woodcock, Esq., of Altoona, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be paid annually to the applicant who attains a 
required rank second in scholarship and deportment in the Sophomore Class. 
William M. Cooxer Watsontown, Pa. 

THE HIRAM AND ELIZABETH WISE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by 
Hiram Wise, Montoursville, Pa. 

The interest on $500.00 to be paid annually to that ministerial or mis- 
sionary student who because of present circumstances and promise of 
future usefulness shall, in the judgment of the President, be deemed 
worthy of the same. 

Ruth A. Thompsox Prospect Park, Pa. 

27 



THE MRS. JENNIE N. RICH SCHOLARSHIP of $5,000, the gift of her 
son, John Woods Rich, the interest on which is to be used in aiding worthy 
and needy students preparing for the Christian ministry or for deaconess 
or missionary work. 

John D. O'Neiix Lansdowne, Pa 

RtjTH A. Thompson Prospect Park, Pa. 

THE Mcdowell scholarship, founded by Mr. and Mrs. James E. 
McDowell, of Williamsport, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be awarded annually by the President and 
Faculty to that ministerial student of the graduating class who shall excel 
in scholarship, deportment, and promise of usefulness, and who declares his 
intention to make the ministry his life work. 

Paul W. Brouse South Williamsport, Pa. 

THE DAVID GROVE AND WIFE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the 
late David Grove, of Lewistown, Pa. 

The interest on $2,040 to be given to worthy, needy students studying 
for the ministry, the holder or holders thereof to be appointed by the said 
Lycoming College. 

H. Emebson Abram Hastings, Pa. 

Jay W. House Williamsport, Pa. 

THE MARY STRONG CLEMENS SCHOLARSHIP FUND of $2,500 
donated by the late Chaplain Joseph Clemens, of Manila, P. I. 

The interest to be used as scholarship, or scholarship loan aid, for the 
benefit of a student or students of Lycoming College who are preparing for 
the Christian ministry, or for deaconess work, or its equivalent, in the 
Methodist Church. Beneficiaries may be named by Mrs. Mary Strong 
Clemens, or in the absence of such recommendation the recipient or recip- 
ients shall be named by the President of the school. 

Mary Lou Miller Lewistown, Pa. 

THE BERYL CLINE GLENN SCHOLARSHIP. 

The interest on $1,000.00 to be paid annually to a worthy student in 
the Music Department. The selection is made by the President and 
Faculty. 

Virginia E. Giles Salem, N. J. 

E. Jane Kbyte Montoursville, Pa. 

THE BISHOP WILLIAM PERRY EVELAND MEMORIAL SCHOL- 
ARSHIP, founded by the Alumni of Lycoming College who were students 
during the administration of Bishop William Perry Eveland and in his 
honor. 

The interest on $1,250.00 to be paid annually to a needy, worthy student 
or students who shall make the most satisfactory progress in scholarship 

28 



and give promise of future usefulness and who by loyalty, school spirit, 
and participation in school activities is considered by the President and 
Faculty to most fully represent the standards and ideals of Lycoming 
College. 

Ralph Mariok, Jr. Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

THE AMOS JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Rev. Amos 
Johnson, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

$500 to be held and invested by Lycoming College and the income aris- 
ing therefrom to be used for the education of ministerial students of limited 
means. 

Joseph H. Wellbank Tremont, Pa. 

THE BENJAMIN C. CONNER SCHOLARSHIP, the interest on $500 
given by an alumnus of the college to be awarded to that graduating student 
who has had at least 24 hours of mathematics beyond Mathematics 100 and 
whose average is highest for the mathematics courses taken beyond Mathe- 
matics 301. 

Not awarded. 

THE RICH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND of $5,000, provided in 
the will of the late Hon. M. B. Rich, the interest of which is to be awarded 
annually to worthy young men or women who intend to devote their lives 
to the preaching of the Gospel, the missionary cause, or the work of a dea- 
coness. The beneficiary shall be named by the Faculty with the approval 
of the Board of Trustees. 

Dolores J. Hunsinger Hazleton, Pa. 

C. Mark Pheasant Kulpmont, Pa. 

Marjorie a. Steele Altoona, Pa. 

THE C. LUTHER CULLER SCHOLARSHIP, the interest from an en- 
dowment of $5,000 provided in the will of C. Luther Culler, of Williamsport, 
a graduate of Lycoming College in the Class of 1876. Awarded on schol- 
arship. 

Harold P. Neff Williamsport, Pa. 

Mary Wentzler Montoursville, Pa. 

THE CLARA KRAMER EATON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, 
founded by the late Clara Kramer Eaton, of Trevorton, Pa. 

The interest on $8,000 to be awarded annually to that student in the 
graduating class at Trevorton High School attaining the highest average in 
scholarship, for the purpose of defraying the expenses of a year of instruc- 
tion at Lycoming College. 
Not awarded. 

29 



THE ELISHA BENSON KLINE SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE IN MATH- 
EMATICS, founded by I. Clinton Kline, Sunbury, Pa., In honor of his elder 
brother who graduated from the College in 1868. 

The interest on $1,000.00 to be paid to a student or students at the 
discretion of the President of Lycoming College. 

Edward P. Doxnell Williamsport, Pa. 

THE NATIONAL METHODIST SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS,- author- 
ized by the General Conference of The Methodist Church, are granted on 
the basis of financial need, promise of usefulness, leadership ability, and 
scholarship, to Methodist students enrolling as full-time students in an ac- 
credited Methodist college or university. 

Lois V. Dere Muncy, Pa. 

Nancy R. Hall South Williamsport, Pa. 

C. Daniel Little Picture Rocks, Pa. 

Margaret A. Maconaghy Prospect Park, Pa. 

Lee H. Pannebaker Lock Haven, Pa. 

THE 1952 $1,000 COMPETITIVE TRUSTEE SCHOLARSHIPS. 

A reduction in tuition of $125.00 per semester for four years to the 
three contestants receiving the highest scores in a competitive examination 
held at the college in May, 1952. 

Wayne A. Frey Benton, Pa. 

Coleen B. Jenkins Northumberland, Pa. 

Bernadine Wilmarth Canton, Pa. 

PRIZES 

THE RICH PRIZE of $25.00, given in honor of the late Hon. and Mrs. 
M. B. Rich, of Woolrich, Pa., to the student in the Freshman Class who 
shall attain a required rank highest in scholarship and deportment. 

Menno E. Good Blue Bell, Pa. 

Edmond J. Van Baelen Williamsport, Pa. 

THE METZLER PRIZE of $10.00 for superior work in Junior English, 
given by the late Rev. Oliver Sterling Metzler, of the Central Pennsylvania 
Conference. 

Margaret A. Maconaohy Prospect Park, Pa. 

THE RICH PRIZES of $10.00 and $5.00 each, given in honor of the late 
Hon. and Mrs. M. B. Rich, of Woolrich, Pa., to be awarded to the two 
students who at a public contest shall excel in reading the Scriptures. 

Mary Lou Miller Lewistown, Pa. 

John D. O'Neill Lansdowne, Pa, 

30 



THE RICH PRIZES of $15.00 and $10.00 each, given in honor of the late 
Hon. and Mrs. M. B. Rich, of Woolrich, Pa., to be awarded to the two 
students who shall excel in writing and delivering an original oration. 

J. Earl Cavanaugh Philadelphia, Pa. 

O. Gayle Miller Montoursville, Pa. 

THE ART DIGEST PRIZE, given by the Head of the Art Department, a 
year's subscription to The Art Digest, to that student who has shown the 
most improvement. 
Not awarded. 

THE C. B. RIDALL PRIZE of $10.00, given by P. L. Ridall, B.S., M.D., of 
Williamsport, Pa., of the Class of 1923, in memory of his father and mother, 
the late Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Ridall, of Berwick, Pa., to be awarded to that 
student or students who shall be judged to have done the best work in Bible 
during the year. 

Geraldine G. VanderBurgh Williamsport, Pa. 

THE BETA PSI SORORITY PRIZE. A gift of $5.00 to be awarded to 
that student who by the charm of her personality and self-sacrificing spirit 
has made a most outstanding personal contribution to Lycoming. 

Lois V. Dehr Muncy, Pa. 

THE FACULTY PRIZE, awarded to that day student whose scholastic 
record has been satisfactory and who, in the opinion of the faculty, has been 
outstanding in the promotion of school spirit through participation in 
school activities. 

Josephine Babcock Warrensville, Pa. 

THE 1930 DART PRIZE, the interest on $300.00 to be given to that stu- 
dent or students in the Art Department according to the recommendation 
of the Head of the Art Department. 
Not awarded. 

THE KAPPA DELTA RHO FRATERNITY PRIZE of $25.00 to that 
college organization which during the past year best exemplied an ideal 
of Kappa Delta Rho; athletic prowess, social grace, or intellectual achieve- 
ment. To be awarded, by a majority vote of the brothers, in June, 1953. 



31 



Rich Hall 



m^,t>^ ■ * ^i^ 






HKMM. 



STUDENT LIFE 



PROVISION FOR FRESHMEN 

The college recognizes the need for giving the freshmen assist- 
ance in making desirable adjustments to the college situation. A 
special program has been prepared for the orientation of freshmen. 

All freshmen are required to come to the college several days in 
advance of the upper-classmen. During this time various tests are 
given which will aid the college staff in advising the student in his 
choice of courses. During this period problems of freshmen ad- 
justment are discussed, and directions for study, tlie use of the 
library, and other instructional aids are given. Provision is also 
made for recreation and a wholesome social life. 

RELIGIOUS TRADITION 

Lycoming College is a Methodist educational institution. How- 
ever, it is non-sectarian. A check of the Board of Directors, the 
faculty, and the student body indicates membership in twenty dif- 
ferent denominations including Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish. 
Traditionally, the college attempts to help students of all faiths find 
the place of religion in their lives. Students attend Sunday morning 
services at churches in the city. Each student is encouraged to be 
loyal to the church of his choice. 

The college aims to stress the development and practice of a 
Christian philosophy of life. Courses in Religion (optional with 
non-Protestants) include a systematic study of the Bible. Religious 
emphasis week brings to the college campus outstanding religious 
leaders. Many of the chapel and assembly programs are religious 
in nature. The Student Christian Association, membership open 
to all undergraduates on the campus, meets weekly at Rich Hall. 
Speakers include many prominent civic leaders, faculty members, 
and national figures. This group sponsors many and varied activi- 
ties which aim to promote fellowship and spiritual life among the 
faculty and students. 

33 



The John Wesley Club is composed of students preparing for 
the ministry or other forms of religious work. Through regular 
meetings and deputation teams, they gain valuable training and ex- 
perience in religious work. 

Through the generosity of the late Honorable M. B. Rich, for 
eighteen years President of the Board of Directors, a Depa'rtment 
of Religion has been established at the College. The department 
head gives a large portion of his time to promoting a helpful relig- 
ious atmosphere at the institution and to aiding students toward 
a successful solution of personal problems which arise while they 
are on the campus. 

CULTURAL INFLUENCES 

Lycoming aims to develop in its students an easy familiarity 
with the best social forms and customs. Young men and women 
meet in the dining hall, at receptions and other social functions. 
These contacts, together with frequent talks by instructors, do much 
to develop poise and social ease. Persons of prominence are 
brought to the school for talks and lectures, and excellent talent is 
provided by community organizations which bring outstanding 
artists to the city. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The college aims to develop in each student a sense of loyalty 
and responsibility to good citizenship. To this end there is estab- 
lished a Student Government representing the entire student body 
with the purpose of promoting the general welfare of the college 
and of providing a more perfect understanding between students 
and administration. 

Certain phases of dormitory life are supervised and regulated 
by student dormitory governments. In this way students are pro- 
vided the experience of sharing the responsibilities which are the 
outgrowth of living closely with each other. The Dean of Women 
and the Dean of Men exercise an over-all supervisory influence on 
dormitory life. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

CAMPUS GROUPS. In addition to the John Wesley Club, Stu- 
dent Christian Association, and the Student Government, there are 

34 



many and varied organizations on the campus which provide stu- 
dents with an interesting and wholesome social life. These are 
organized and conducted by the students in cooperation with the 
faculty. Some of these are as follows : The International Rela- 
tions Club, which is the campus focus for discussion of world 
affairs ; the Foreign Language Club, which supplements class work 
by aiding students to understand the folklore of the various peoples 
and facilitates ease of conversation in the language; The Lycoming 
College Players, which affords opportunity for acting and directing 
plays as demonstration of the work in the dramatic courses of the 
curriculum; The Psychology Club, which schedules lectures dis- 
cussions, and movies in this field ; the Varsity Club, which is com- 
posed of lettermen, promotes college spirit in sports. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS. There are four college publica- 
tions. The Lycoming Courier is the official student paper, devoted 
to local interests of the student body, reporting current campus 
events. The Arrow, the college year book, is published in May 
and presents a record of student life during the current academic 
year. The staffs of both publications are composed of students 
interested in gaining more knowledge and experience in journalism 
and business practices. The Alumni Bulletin, issued six times a 
year, keeps the alumni posted on current happenings at the college 
and on alumni activities. The Guidepost, published by the Student 
Government, is a student handbook of regulations and miscellaneous 
information which is distributed during the first week of school. 

MUSIC. The Music Department offers several organizations for 
students interested in music. A College Choir, Men's Glee Club, 
and Women's Glee Club are open to all students desiring to join. 
The Lycoming Singers, Women's Quartette, Men's Quartette, and 
an A Cappella Choir are formed of selected voices and represent the 
college at many events. A String Ensemble gives instrument 
players an opportunity to enjoy the fellowship of good music to- 
gether. In addition, there are the College Band and Symphony 
Orchestra, which meet several times each week for practice. These 
furnish the college with music for many entertainments, athletic 
events, and celebrations throughout the year. 

35 



FRATERNITIES. Five Greek letter groups on the campus pro- 
vide a means of bringing to men students the advantages of a 
fraternal organization. They include the Psi colony of Kappa 
Delta Rho, Lambda Chi Alpha colony, and the Nu chapter of 
Alpha Gamma Upsilon, as well as two locals, Zeta Delta Kappa 
and Zeta Tau Beta, a professional business fraternity. 

The Inter-Fraternity Council coordinates the activities of the 
fraternities. 

RECREATION AND HEALTH 

INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS. The college offers an attrac- 
tive program of intercollegiate athletics. Varsity teams represent 
the college in competition with other four year institutions in such 
sports as basketball, baseball, and tennis. Lycoming is a member 
of the Middle Atlantic Athletic Conference and the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association. 

RECREATION. An extensive program of intramural athletics 
affords opportunity for every student not a member of a varsity 
team to participate in one or more sports. These are run in con- 
nection with the required physical education program. Basic in- 
struction in game techniques is given in physical education class, 
and the intramural program affords opportunity for individual and 
team competition. Some of these sports are tennis, swimming, 
basketball, handball, badminton, bowling, volleyball, softball, and 
table tennis for both women and men; rhythmical activities, field 
hockey and archery, for women; boxing, touch football, and water 
polo for men. 

In addition to the athletic recreation program, various organi- 
zations on the campus, the Lecture Series, motion pictures, and 
numerous social affairs offer programs of interest. 

STUDENT INSURANCE. By a special group plan, our students 
are able to secure accident insurance covering medical and hospital 
expenses for injuries received on the campus. Reimbursement will 
be made up to $500.00 for each accident. All students are advised 
to carry this protection. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION. A physical examination of all 
students is required. This examination is conducted by the stu- 

36 



dent's own physician and a report each year made on a standard 
form supplied by the College. This report is presented on Regis- 
tration Day to a faculty member from the Physical Education 
department. 

In connection with the physical examination, all entering stu- 
dents must have a chest X-ray. If this cannot be arranged before 
entering, the Tuberculosis Society will take chest X-rays at a nomi- 
nal cost. The student bears the expense of the X-ray. 

INFIRMARY SERVICE. The infirmary fee, included in the 
over-all activities fee, covers the following medical service: the 
college nurse holds infirmary hours each day, except Sunday, that 
the college dormitories are open; she is also available for first aid 
treatment and will call to the attention of the college physician any 
case demanding special treatment. 

Such service, however, shall not be interpreted to include X- 
rays, surgery of more than minor nature, care of major accidents 
on or off campus, immunization for colds, examination for glasses, 
doctors' calls, cases of serious chronic disorder, or other extraor- 
dinary situation. 

Each student is entitled to three days of infirmary service per 
school year, including routine nursing and ordinary medicines. 
There will be a charge of $2.00 per day for each additional day or 
fraction thereof beyond the allotted days. 

Special nursing service and special medicines and prescriptions 
will be at the expense of the student. Parents will be notified by 
the College when students are confined to the infirmary with serious 
illnesses. 

RESIDENT STUDENT LIFE 

Living quarters are provided on the campus for 140 women and 
215 men. Efforts are made each year to keep the dormitories in 
such repair that they constitute comfortable and attractive homes 
for tlie students. 

Rooms at Lycoming are furnished as follows : desk, bureau, 
chair, single bed, mattress, and pillow. Students must supply their 
own bed linen, blankets, study lamps, and alarm clocks. 

The students will make their own arrangements for laundry ser- 
vice. A local laundry has a representative on campus for the con- 

37 



venience of all boarding students. It is recommended that the 
student bring a minimum of six sheets (single bed), three pillow 
cases, and two double blankets. 

DISCIPLINE 

The discipline of the College is firm, reasonable, and sympa- 
thetic. All students are considered responsible citizens and mem- 
bers of a Christian community. Any student who is antagonistic 
to the spirit and general purpose, or who fails to abide by the 
regulations set up by the College, may be asked to withdraw from 
the College at any time during the school year. 

REGULATIONS 

It is understood that students entering Lycoming do so with the 
intention of making an honest effort to do satisfactory work in every 
respect. When a student is not able to conform to the school pro- 
gram, the parents or guardians are asked to withdraw the student 
from the school. 

The College regulations, in addition to those published here, are 
furnished each student upon matriculation. Announcements dur- 
ing the year by college authorities maj^ amend or supplement the 
catalogue regulations and are to be adhered to as such. 

Students from a distance are required to reside in the dormi- 
tories. Permission for any exception to this rule must be obtained 
from the administration. When such permission is granted, the 
place of residence and living accommodations must be approved by 
the Dean of Women or the Dean of Men. 

Money and valuables should be placed in the school safe; other- 
wise the College will not assume responsibility. 

No intoxicants or drinking of intoxicants is permitted. 

Permission to maintain automobiles on the campus must be 
obtained from the administration. License numbers must be record- 
ed during registration. 

Firearms for hunting must be deposited with the Dean of Men 
while on the campus. 

Dormitory students are expected to vacate their rooms during 
the vacation periods. 

38 



CURRICULUM 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Complete application forms for admission to Lycoming may be 
obtained from the Director of Admissions. Included with these are 
directions for making applications. 

A registration fee of $10.00 is required with each application. 
This fee is not refunded. Veterans under Public Law 346 or 16 
will be reimbursed by the Veterans Administration. 

Applicants who are accepted will receive a statement evaluating 
their high school credits and granting proper classification. Those 
rejected will be notified. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

A candidate for admission must be of good moral character and 
show evidence of ability and preparation to pursue the program of 
his choice at Lycoming. The usual evidence of preparation is a 
certificate showing satisfactory completion of 15 units of high 
school work or its equivalent as follows: 

English His' 

+A.B. Degree 3 (4 yrs.) 

*B.S. Degree 3 (4 yrs.) 

Medical Sec 3 (4 yrs.) 

Lab. Tech 3 (4 yrs.) 

Sec. Science 3 (4 yrs.) 

Art 3 (4 yrs.) 

**Music 3 (4 yrs.) 

t Pre-eiigineering students and mathematics majors must include plane geometry 
as one of the two units of mathematics. 

* Business Administration requires 1 unit of mathematics and 9 elective units. 

** A letter of recommendation from the applicant's private teaclier and /or High 
School Music Supervisor should accompany the application. 

39 



tory 


Math 


Sci 


ence 


Elec 




2 




1 


8 




2 




1 


8 




2 




1 


8 




2 




1 


8 












11 












11 












11 



Applicants ranking in the upper three-fifths of their high school 
class or presenting a certificate showing all grades of college cer- 
tificate value may be admitted without examination. 

Candidates for entrance who do not meet the above require- 
ments for admission may be accepted upon making a satisfactory 
score on the college entrance examination or upon a satisfactory 
college board examination rating, 

TERMINAL EDUCATION 

In addition to programs leading to the Baccalaureate Degree, 
Lycoming offers certain two-year terminal courses in Art, Music, 
Medical Secretarial, Medical Technology and Secretarial Science. 
Upon satisfactory completion of these courses, the student is award- 
ed a certificate at the graduation exercises. 

GUIDANCE 

An advantage of a small college is the rich experience gained by 
the close association of students and faculty. In addition to this 
valuable personal relationship, which affords students the opportu- 
nity to discuss various problems with their instructors, Lycoming 
has a well-rounded guidance program for its students. Under the 
direction of the Dean of the College, this program includes areas 
as represented by the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, and the 
Guidance Director with his group of faculty advisers. The program 
begins with a personal interview between the Director of Admis- 
sions and the candidate for admission. These interviews are suf- 
ficient in length to obtain a picture of the student, his background, 
and his plans for the future. When the student enters the College 
as a Freshman, he is given the opportunity to take aptitude and 
psychological examinations. On the basis of preparatory or high 
school records, aptitude and psychological examination scores, and 
various interviews, an evaluation of the student can be formed. 

Additional information is obtained as the student progresses 
through his college life. His welfare is the sole purpose of the 
guidance program, which stands ready to help him make an intelli- 
gent decision regarding his vocational choice and solve important 
personal problems. 

40 



SUPERVISION FOR STUDENT PASTORS 

In cooperation with tlie Department of Town and Country 
Work of the General Board of Home Mission and Church Extension 
and with the Town and Country Commission of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Conference of the Methodist Church, a Director of Rural 
Training was appointed June 1, 1950. The Director, Assistant 
Professor of Sociology, will teach courses in rural sociology, conduct 
a weekly seminar for student pastors, supervise accepted student 
supply pastors of the Conference in the work of their parishes, be 
available for counseling ministerial students, and assist in other 
rural church work. Projects such as student deputation teams, 
demonstration parishes, church and community surveys, and work- 
shops will give students practical experience and professional guid- 
ance in their choice of and preparation for their vocation. Through 
such projects students will represent the College and will make a 
contribution to the church and community of town and country areas. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The Placement Bureau maintains a register listing the talents 
and major interests of students and recent alumni. Literature 
from businesses and industrial associations is kept available. Con- 
sultations with the Placement Director assist students toward wise 
selection of a profession. Interviews are then scheduled when 
students meet and confer with representatives from companies in 
which they are interested. The goal of the Bureau is to make the 
best possible connection for each graduate. Lycoming graduates 
are usually placed before commencement. 

There are many diversified businesses in Williamsport. These 
firms give students at Lycoming splendid opportunities for visits, 
tours, and career conferences. They also afford our student body a 
variety of part-time jobs during each college session. The Place- 
ment Bureau serves as a clearinghouse for part-time employment 
and can usually find work for every student needing it. Normally 
the demand exceeds our supply of available workers. 

PROVISION FOR VETERANS 

Lycoming is fully approved for the educational program for 
Veterans under Federal Public I-aws 346. 16, and 550. 

41 



ADVANCED STANDING 

A student may be admitted to Lycoming with advanced standing 
provided he has earned satisfactory credit at an approved college. 
Application for advanced standing must be supported by an honor- 
able dismissal and an official transcript of the college previously 
attended. A student admitted with advance standing must satisfy 
graduation requirements to be awarded a degree. 

Some academic credit may be allowed for training courses and 
educational experiences in the armed services according to the 
general pattern recommended by A Guide to the Evaluation of 
Educational Experiences in the Armed Services, issued by the 
American Council on Education, provided such courses or experi- 
ences are appropriately related to a college of liberal arts. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Freshman: See requirements for admission. 

Sophomore: Not fewer than 24 semester hours. 

Junior: Not fewer than 54 semester hours. 

Senior: Not fewer than 86 semester hours and a reasonable chance 

of completing all requirements for graduation. 
Unclassified: Students who do not wish to enter upon a regular 

course of study may pursue studies offered for which their 

previous training, in the opinion of the College, fits them. 

Only a limited number of unclassified students are accepted. 

Such students are not admitted to candidacy for a degree. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

A credit hour is defined as one hour of classroom work, or the 
equivalent, each week during a full term of sixteen weeks. Ordi- 
narily two hours of laboratory work are rated as one credit hour. 

The number system of grading with the corresponding quality 
points is used. "3" indicates work of the highest excellence, show- 
ing a superior grasp of the content, as well as independent and 
creative thinking in the subject. "2" signifies better than average 
achievement wherein the student reveals insight and ability. "1" is 
given for satisfactory achievement on the college level when work in 

42 



the course has been conscientious and has shown no considerable de- 
ficiency in either quality or quantity. "0" indicates that work in 
the course has met the minimum essentials. "-1" is failure. Work 
failed must be repeated satisfactorily before any credit can be 
obtained for that course. 

Scholastic rank is determined on the quality point system where 
"3" counts 3 quality points per credit hour, "2" counts 2 points per 
hour, "1" counts 1 point per hour, "0" carries no point value, and 
"-1" counts -1 point per hoiir. 

NORMAL STUDENT LOAD 

The normal load per semester for students is from twelve to 
fifteen hours of academic work, one-half hour of assembly and 
chapel, and one hour of physical education during the first two years. 

OVER LOAD 

Students who wish to carry in excess of the normal load are 
charged $15.00 per credit hour. A schedule of more than seventeen 
hours of academic work may be taken if the student has an average 
of 2.0 for all previous work and obtains written permission from 
the Dean of the College or has an average below 2.0 and receives 
the written permission of a special committee. 

PROBATION 

Students whose grade-point average falls between .00 and .5 are 
placed on probation. Students on probation must maintain an 
average of 1.0 for a normal load for a semester, or during a summer 
to be removed from probation. 

DISMISSAL 

Freshmen who fail to maintain an average of at least .00 the 
first year shall be asked to withdraw from the College. The 
College also reserves the right to deny admission to any applicant 
or to dismiss any student at any time if the administration considers 
such action to be for the best interests of the student or the College, 
Students dismissed for academic reasons may request reinstatement 
after one semester. 

43 



ATTENDANCE 

The program at Lycoming is built on the assumption that there 
is value in class and assembly and chapel attendance for all stu- 
dents. Therefore, all students are expected to attend all classes 
and a specified number of assembly and chapel exercises. 

Specific regulations as to permissible absences and penalties for 
excessive absences are announced from time to time. Responsi- 
bility for learning and complying with these regulations rests with 
the student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The college offers courses of study leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. For either degree the 
minimum requirements are: 
120 academic hours, including required courses and one major of 

at least 24 hours. 
120 or more academic quality points on the basis of: "3" — 3 points 

per credit hour; "2" — 2 points per credit hour; "1" — 1 point 

per credit hour; "0" — points per credit hour. 
4 semester hours credit of physical education (not included in the 

120 academic hours). 
Chapel credit for each fall and spring semester of attendance at 

Lycoming College (% of number of chapel periods per 

semester). 
One course in Bible for all Protestant students. 
All financial obligations incurred at the college must be paid. 
The work of the final year is to be taken at this college, except in 

the case of students enrolling in the cooperative programs 

in engineering or forestry as outlined on page 65. 



44 



PROGRAMS FOR STUDY 



Lycoming is anxious to aid its students to prepare for living a 
normal, well-adjusted life, as well as to prepare them for a variety 
of careers. The growing belief in professional schools that the 
best preliminary training is a broad cultural education has added 
new emphasis to the type of program now offered by Lycoming. 
This program offers a general education, conceded as necessary to a 
well-rounded individual living in today's ever smaller world, and 
yet is equipped to add more specialized courses so that a student 
looking forward to a particular career may specialize in the field 
of Iiis vocational interest. 

Choosing one's life work is an important and serious matter. 
In this selection, Lycoming, as a liberal arts college, plays an im- 
portant role. While some students enter college with a well-defined 
aim, many others are far from settled in their minds as to their own 
particular vocation. The first two years of a liberal arts course 
give the student glimpses into many fields and thus by the beginning 
of his third or Junior year, the student with this background and 
with the advice of the faculty, usually is well prepared to indicate 
his field of specialization. 

The following pages contain some of the programs offered at 
Lycoming. Others are available upon sufiicient demand. It is 
recommended, therefore, that the student discuss his proposed plan 
with the Registrar, or, if a returning student, with his adviser. 



43 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

A candidate for this degree selects graduation requirements 
from the three general divisions as follows: 

Division I: Humanities 

English Composition 6 hours 

Literature 6 hours 

Foreign Language 6 or 12 hours 

Philosophy and Religion 6 hours 

Appreciation of Art 3 hours 

Appreciation of Music 3 hours 

Chapel and Assembly hours* 

*AssembIy and chapel credit for each fall and spring semester that the 

candidate is in attendance at Lycoming College. 

Division II: Social Science 

European History 6 hours 

American History 6 hours 

Psychology 3 hours 

Political Science 3 hours 

Division III: Sciences 

Physical Sciences and 3 hours 

Biological Sciences, or 3 hours 

A Laboratory Science 8 hours 

Physical Education 4 hours 

The candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree chooses a major 
of at least 24 credit hours from one of the following fields : Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, History, Language, Math- 
ematics, Music, Political Science, Psychology, Science, Social 
Science, and Sociology. (Fields of concentration in Social Science 
may be selected in Economics, History, Sociology, Political Science, 
and Psychology.) 

a. The major in Science consists of (1) first level courses in 
Chemistry (101-102), Mathematics (101-102), and Physics (101- 
102), and (2) two years beyond the first level courses in either 
Mathematics or Physics. 

b. The major in Social Science consists of (1) 18 hours in one 
field of concentration (beyond the 100 level in the case of History), 
and (2) 18 hours in at least three of the related Social Science fields. 

46 



CURRICULUM FOR A.B. DEGREE 
BASIC SCHEDULE 



First Semester 

English 101 3 

History 101 3 

♦Science 101 3 

fForeign Language 3 

Music 130 3 

^Physical Education 101 or 111 



15 



Freshman Year 
Hrs 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 102 3 

History 102 3 

•Science 102 3 

fForeign Language 3 

Religion 101 3 

^Physical Education 102 or 112 



15 



Sophomore Year 



English 201 or 203 3 

History 201 3 

Psychology 201 3 

fForeign Language 3 

Political Science 201 3 

^Physical Education 201 or 211 



15 



English 202 or 204 3 

History 202 3 

Art 180 3 

fForeign Language 3 

Philosophy 207 3 

^Physical Education 202 or 212 



15 



* A laboratory science may be substituted. 

f French, German, Spanish, or Greek may be elected. 

ff No academic credit is granted for physical education. 

A candidate for the A.B. degree must complete four semesters of a 
foreign language, or two years of foreign language on the high school level 
with two semesters of the same language on the college level. 

Junior and Senior Years 

Students select prescribed courses and electives to complete degree 
requirements as outlined in the previous section. Special curricula are 
listed on following pages. 



47 



PRE-MEDICINE 

The modern physician or surgeon is no longer one who has studied 
merely medicine. He is a man with a broad cultural training, capable of 
treating more than physical ailments. Therefore, medical authorities are 
recommending a full four years of liberal arts program and are requiring 
certain specific subjects in preparation for medical school. 

Basic schedule, page 47. 

Adjustment of basic freshmen schedule: 

Chemistry 101-102 for Science 101-102. 
Mathematics 101-102 for History 101-102. 

Adjustment for basic sophomore schedule: 

Chemistry 202-203 for Psychology 201 and Art 130. 

Biology- 101-102 for Political Science 201 and Philosophy 207. 

History 101-102 for History 201-202. 

If foreign language requirement is met in freshman year, substitute 
Music 130 and an elective. 

Junior Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Urs. 

Biology 201 4 Biology 202 4 

Chemistry 301 4 Chemistry 302 4 

History 201 3 History 202 3 

Political Science 201 8 Physics 101 5 

Sociology 201 3 

17 16 

Senior Year 

Physics 102 5 Psychology 201 3 

Biology 301 or 802 4 Biology 401 or 402 4 

Economics 201 3 Philosophy 207 3 

Art 130 or Elective 3 Elective 3 

15 13 



48 



The Fine Arts Building 



^,s%J/.i'w'K% 




v^ 



V 



PRE-DENTISTRY 

The American Council on Dental Education has fixed a minimum of 
two full years of college work as a requirement for entrance to dental 
schools. However, a four-year course is recommended and the trend to- 
ward this has been very rapid following World War 11. 

Basic schedule, page 47. 

Adjustment of basic freshman schedule: 
Chemistry 101-102 for Science 101-102. 

Adjustment of basic sophomore schedule: 

Chemistry 202-203 for History 201-202. 

Biology 101-102 for Political Science 201 and Philosophy 207. 

Junior Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Chemistry 301 4 Chemistry 302 4 

Biology 201 4 Biology 202 4 

History 201 3 History 202 3 

Mathematics 101 3 Physics 101 5 

Mathematics 102 3 

17 16 

Senior Year 

Physics 102 6 Philosophy 207 3 

Biology 301 or 401 4 Electives 12 

Economics 201 3 

Political Science 201 3 

15 15 



49 



PRE-LAW 

Many law schools are at present requiring the Bachelor of Arts degree 
for admission. Training in law is not only basic to the practice of law 
but also makes possible many other forms of public service. 

Basic schedule, page 47. 

Adjustment of basic sophomore schedule: 
Political Science 202 for Art 130. 

JuxiOR Yeah 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

History 302 3 History 305 3 

Economics 201 3 Economics 202 3 

Sociology 202 8 Sociology 201 3 

Political Science 301 3 Political Science 302 3 

Speech 101 3 Art 130 3 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Political Science 303 3 Political Science 304 3 

Economics 3 History 3 

History 3 Electives 9 

Electives 6 

15 15 



PRE-MINISTERIAL 

In a statement on pre-seminary studies issued by the American Asso- 
ciation of Theological Schools, it is suggested that a student acquire a total 
of 90 semester hours in the areas listed below. A major in English, history, 
or the social sciences is recommended. 

English ( Composition, Literature, Speech ) 12-18 sem. hrs. 

Philosophy (Introduction, History of Philosophy, Ethics, 

Logic) 6-12 sem. hrs. 

Bible and Religion 3- 6 sem. hrs. 

History ^. 6-12 sem. hrs. 

Psychology 3 sem. hrs. 

Foreign Language (Greek, French, German) 12-15 sem. hrs. 

Natural Sciences (Physical or Biological) 4 sem. hrs. 

Social Sciences (Sociology, Political Science, Social 

Psychology) 3- 6 sem. hrs. 

60 



Basic schedule, page 47. 

Adjustment of basic sophomore schedule: 
Sociology 101 for Political Science 201. 

Junior and Senior Years 

Political Science 201 should be scheduled in the junior year. 

Sociology 211 required of students serving charges. 

The schedules for the junior and senior years should be based on the 
requirements of the theological school of your choice and the advice of 
the instructor in charge of counseling ministerial students. 

It is suggested that most electives include those subjects which con- 
tribute the greatest to the ministry and which are not offered In the theo- 
logical seminary. 

ART MAJOR, A. B. DEGREE 

A major in Art consists of 30 hours of which 9 hours are courses in 
art theory. 

Basic schedule, page 47. 

Adjustment of basic freshman schedule: 
Art 105-106 for Science 101-102. 

Adjustment of basic sophomore schedule: 

Art 131-132 for Political Science 201 and Philosophy 207. 
Art 231-232 or 235-236 for Psychology 201 and Art 130. 

Junior Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Science 101 3 Science 102 3 

Psychology 201 3 Philosophy 207 3 

Political Science 201 3 *Art 3 

♦Art 3 Electives 6 

Electives 3 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Art 401 3 Art 402 3 

Electives 12 Electives 12 

15 15 

* Three hours each semester of art history, selected from Art 309, 311, 
403, and 405. 

61 



MUSIC MAJOR, A. B. DEGREE 

The major in music consists of 31 hours, of which 12 are to be in the 
300 and/or 400 level, with 19 hours in principles and history, and 12 in 
applied music. 

Basic schedule, page 47, 

Adjustment of basic freshman schedule: 

Music 121-122, Applied Music (3 credit hours), and Ensemble (1 credit 
hour), for History 101-102 and Science 101-102. 

Adjustment of basic sophomore schedule: 

Music 221-222, Applied Music (3 credit hours). Ensemble (1 credit 
hour), for Psychology 201, Political Science 201, Art 130, and 
Philosophy 207. 

History 101-102 for History 201-202. 

Junior Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Science 101 3 Science 102 3 

History 201 3 History 202 3 

Psychology 201 3 Political Science 201 3 

Music 311 3 Art 130 3 

Applied Music IVz Applied Music iVz 

Ensemble Vz Ensemble Vz 

Electives 3 

14 17 



Senior Year 

Philosophy 207 3 Electives 15 

Music Electives from 300-400 

offerings 9 

Electives 3 

15 15 



52 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 
A.B. DEGREE 

Eighteen hours in the field of education are required for certification 
in Pennsylvania. These must include Introduction to Teaching, 3 hours; 
Educational Psychology, 3 hours; Practice Teaching, 6 hours; and 6 hours 
of electives in education. The Department of Public Instruction requires 
a basic course in American and Pennsylvania History, a requirement sat- 
isfied by History 201 or 202. 

In Secondary Education, majors are offered in English, French, 
German, Spanish, history, social science, mathematics, biology, chemistry, 
and science (mathematics and physics.) In addition to the eighteen 
prescribed hours of education, twenty-four hours are required for a major, 
and serve as the first teaching field. Eighteen hours are required in each 
additional teaching field. 

The State gives certification to teach the social studies, (namely, 
history, civics, Problems of Democracy, economics, and sociology) by 
taking 9 hours of history and 3 hours each of political science, economics, 
and sociology, totaling eighteen hours. Certification is also given to teach 
science (namely, physics, chemistry, biology, and general science) by 
taking 9 hours of Physical Science, divided into 6 hours of chemistry and 
3 hours of physics (or vice versa), and 9 hours of Biological Science, 
divided into 6 hours of zoology, and 3 hours of botany (or vice versa). 

Basic schedule, page 47. 

Adjustment of basic sophomore schedule: 
Education 201 for Political Science 201. 
Psychology 309 for Philosophy 207. 

Junior Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Political Science 201 3 Philosophy 207 3 

Educational Elective 3 Educational Elective 3 

Electives 9 Electives 9 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Electives 15 Practice Teaching 6 

Electives 9 

15 16 

Students planning to teach mathematics or the sciences will consult 
with Director of Admissions before registering for their first semester. 
All others desiring certification should report to the Director before begin- 
ing their sophomore year. 

Associate Professor Robert F. Smith will be the Director of the 
Education Department when the curriculum is inaugurated in Sep- 
tember, 1953. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

A candidate for this degree selects graduation requirements from four 
divisions as follows: 

Division I: Humanities 

English Composition 6 hours 

Literature 6 hours 

Philosophy and Religion 6 hours 

Appreciation of Art 3 hours 

Appreciation of Music 3 hours 

Chapel and Assembly hours* 

Division II: Social Science 

European or American History 6 hours 

Psychology 3 hours 

Political Science 6 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

Division III: Sciences 

Physical Science and Biological Science 6 hours 

Physical Education 4 hours 

Division IV: Business Administbation and Economics 

Accounting Principles 6 hours 

Principles of Business 3 hours 

American Economic History 3 hours 

Business Mathematics and Statistics 6 hours 

Business Law 8 hours 

Economic Principles and Problems 6 hours 

Economic Geography 6 hours 

* Assembly and chapel credit for each fall and spring semester that the 
candidate is in attendance at Lycoming College. 

The candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree may select a major 
of at least 24 hours from one of the following fields: Accounting, Banking 
and Finance, Economics, Retail Distribution, General Business Adminis- 
tration. 



54 



Majors will be granted in the fields of Accounting, Banking and 
Finance, Retail Distribution, and Economics upon the completion of 24 
hours in elective courses listed below. For those persons not desiring any 
particular major 24 hours must be elected in the field of Economics and/or 
Business Administration. 

1. Majors in Accounting — 24 hours 

Sophomore year — elect Business 215 and 216 (Accounting). 
Junior year — elect Business 311, 312, and 318 (Accounting). 
Senior year — elect Business 423, 424, and 425 (Accounting). 

2. Majors in Banking and Finance— 24 hours 

Sophomore year — elect Business 206 and 207 (Money and Banking). 

Junior year — elect Business 304 (Credits and Collections), Business 
307 (Organization and Finance Management), and Business 401 
(Real Estate). 

Senior year — elect Business 308 (Investment), Business 405 (Public 
Finance), and Business 406 (Bank Policies and Administration). 

3. Majors in Retail Distribution — 34 hours 

Junior year — elect Business 341-342 (Principles of Retailing I and II), 
Business 345 (Retail Advertising and Sales Promotion), Business 
346 (Retail Salesmanship), Speech 101. 

Senior year — elect Business 441 (Retail Buying and Merchandising), 
Business 443 (Retail Personnel Management), Business 445-446 
(Retail Problems I and II). 

4. Majors in EcoTwmics — 24 hours 

Junior year — elect Economics 305 (Labor Problems), Economics 306 
(Labor Legislation), Economics 304 (Consumer Economics), and 
Economics 402 (Transportation). 

Senior year — elect Economics 403 (History of Economic Thought), 
Economics 404 (Advanced Economics), Economics 405 (Public 
Finance), Economics 406 (Principles of Public Utilities). 



65 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Business Administration Course contains highly practical courses 
in the field of Business and Economics. In addition, the elements of a 
broad, cultural background, valuable in preparation for positions of an 
administrative and executive nature are retained. 



BASIC SCHEDULE 
Fbeshman Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 101 (Composition) 3 

Music 130 3 

Business 101 (Accounting) 3 

Business 103 (Principles) 3 

Business 110 (Mathematics) .... 3 

biophysical Education 

15 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 102 (Composition) 3 

Religion 101 3 

Business 102 (Accounting) 3 

Business 104 (Economic Hist.) 3 

Business 111 (Statistics) 3 

#Physical Education 



15 



Sophomore Year 



English 201 or 203 (Literature) 3 

Economics 201 (Principles) 8 

*Economics 301 (Geography) .... 3 

History 3 

Art 130 3 

^Physical Education 

15 



English 202 or 204 (Literature) 3 

Economics 202 (Problems) 3 

*Economics 302 (Geography) 3 

History 3 

Philosophy 207 3 

^Physical Education 



15 



Junior Year 



Political Science 201 3 

Science 101 3 

Business 302 (Law) 4 

Psychology 201 3 

Electives 3 



Political Science 202 3 

Science 102 3 

Business 303 (Law) 4 

Sociology 201 3 

Electives 3 



16 



16 



Electives 



Senior Year 
...15 Electives 



15 



16 



15 



* Majors in Accounting substitute Business 216-216 (Accounting) and take 
Economics 801-302 in junior year. 

* Majors in Banking and Finance substitute Business 206-207 (Money emd 
Banking) and take Economics 301-302 in junior year. 

If No academic credit is granted for physical education. 

56 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

(Formerly listed as Laboratory Technology) 

It Is the aim of this course to supply an academic background of the 
basic science courses and then a year of practical work in the field, leading 
to the B.S. degree in Medical Technology and greater professional oppor- 
tunities in the medical and hospital laboratories. 

At least 16 semester hours in Biology are required, including General 
Biology (8 semester hours). Additional courses may be chosen from the 
following: Microbiology, Physiology, Anatomy, Embryology, and Histology. 

In Chemistry General Inorganic Chemistry (8 semester hours), and 
Quantitative Analysis (4 semester hours) are required. Organic Chemistry 
and Bio-Chemistry are recommended but not required. 

Freshman" Yeak 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Chemistry 101 4 Chemistry 102 4 

Biology 101 4 Biology 102 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

^Physical Education ^Physical Education 

14 14 

Sophomore Year 

English 201 or 203 3 English 202 or 204 3 

*Biology 4 *Biology 4 

Religion 101 3 Chemistry 203 (Quantitative) .... 4 

Electives 6 Electives 6 

^Physical Education ^Physical Education 

16 17 

* Select from these courses: Biology 103, 104, 201, 202, 302. 

JuxioE Year 

The junior year will consist of an internship of a full calendar year 
at a hospital accredited in the Registry of Medical Technologists of the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists. The College will not give credit 
for the year unless it is informed that the student has successfully passed 
the examinations given by The Registry of Medical Technologists of the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists. The College will not charge 
any tuition for the work of the junior year. 

Senior Year 

Political Science 201 3 Political Science 202 3 

Psychology 201 3 Sociology 101 3 

Art 130 3 Music 130 3 

Electives 6 Philosophy 207 3 

Electives 3 

15 16 

Jjf No academic credit is granted for physical education. 

67 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 
B. S. DEGREE 

Students desiring to major in education may elect the Bachelor of 
Science curriculum which parallels the program outlined on page 53. No 
foreign language is required but additional courses in education are 
substituted and courses in speech are recommended. 

An interview with the Director of the Education Department should 
be scheduled before registering for the first semester. 

CHURCH WORK CURRICULUM 
B. S. DEGREE 

The course is organized to insure a depth and breadth of general cul- 
tural education, the essentials of religious education, and a major in a field 
of desired specialization. The program is flexible enough to allow a student 
to seek training for a definite position in a specific church if desired. 

Information about this curriculum may be secured from the Registrar. 



58 



TWO-YEAR COURSE 

PRE-ENGINEERING 

This course is designed to give the student basic pre-professional 
courses in the field of engineering. The course recommended below is for 
all engineering students except chemical engineers. Chemical engineers 
will consult with the Director of Admissions or Head of the Science 
Division. 

To meet requirements of Engineering schools, the student must carry 
more than the normal load each semester. 

Freshman Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 101 3 

Chemistry 101 4 

Mathematics 101 3 

Mathematics 102 3 

Drawing 101 3 

^Physical Education 

16 



Second Semester Hrs, 

English 102 3 

Chemistry 102 4 

Mathematics 201 4 

Physics 101 5 

Drawing 103 3 

^Physical Education 

19 



Sophomore Year 



English 201 or 203 3 

Economics 201 3 

Mathematics 202 4 

Physics 102 5 

Religion 101 3 

^Physical Education 

18 



Speech 101 3 

History 202 3 

Mathematics 301 4 

Physics 201 3 

Electives 6 

^Physical Education 

19 



H No academic credit. 

Note: The 5-year cooperative engineering programs offered by Lycoming 
College in conjunction with Bucknell University and The Pennsylvania 
State College are outlined on page 65. 



S9 



TERMINAL COURSES 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Lycoming offers a two-year course in Secretarial Science. This course 
provides students with the opportunity to develop office skills required for 
secretarial work. 



Freshman Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 101 (Composition) 3 

♦Business 105 (Shorthand) 2 

♦Business 107 (Typing) 2 

Business 114 (Computations).... 3 

Economics 201 3 

Religion 101 3 

^Physical Education 

16 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 102 (Composition) 3 

♦Business 106 (Shorthand) 2 

♦Business 108 (Typing) 2 

Business 115 (Computations) .... 3 

Economics 202 3 

Business 116 (Bookkeeping) 3 

^Physical Education 

16 



Sophomore Year 



Business 205 (Correspondence) 3 

Business 231 (Shorthand) 2 

Business 235 (Typing) 2 

Business 302 (Law) 4 

Business 223 (Office Machines) 3 
^Physical Education 

14 



Business 222 (Office Practice) 3 

Business 232 (Shorthand) 2 

Business 236 (Typing) 2 

Business 303 (Law) 4 

Electives 3 

^Physical Education 

14 



♦Examinations may be taken during the freshman orientation week to 
prove competence in either or both of the subjects by students who have 
completed high school courses with high grades. If test results are satis- 
factory, electives may be substituted. 

If No academic credit. 



60 



MEDICAL SECRETARIAL 

The Medical Secretarial Course oflFers students a basic science back- 
groimd in addition to secretarial skills. This course is especially desirable 
for those preparing for Medical or Dental Secretarial positions. 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Ers. 



English 101 8 

Biology 101 4 

Business 105 (Shorthand) 2 

Business 107 (Typing) 2 

Chemistry 103 4 

^Physical Education 



16 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



English 102 3 

Biology 102 4 

Business 106 (Shorthand) 2 

Business 108 (Typing) 2 

Business 214 (Med. Shorthand) 1 

Biology 104 3 

^Physical Education 

15 



Sophomore Year 



Business 243 IVs 

Business 205 (Correspondence) 3 

Business 214 (Med. Shorthand) 1 

Business 231 (Reg. Shorthand) 2 

Business 235 (Typing) 2 

Psychology 201 3 

Religion 101 3 

^Physical Education 

ISVs 
# No academic credit. 



Business 244 IVz 

Business 116 (Bookkeeping) . 3 
Business 214 (Med. Shorthand) 1 
Business 232 (Reg. Shorthand) 2 

Business 236 (Typing) 2 

Business 222 (Office Practice) . 3 

Sociology 201 3 

^Physical Education 



61 



ART 

The art course is designed primarily to give tlie best possible founda- 
tion for further study in any of the specialized fields of art; to give thor- 
ough training in artistic creation; and to guide in developing the power of 
discrimination in general aesthetic appreciation. 

For a certificate of achievement a minimum of thirty hours in art sub- 
jects is required plus a sufficient number of academic hours to make a 
total of 60, 

The department reserves the right to retain representative examples of 
student work for purposes of exhibition. This is an acknowledgement of 
superior ability and assists the department in maintaining a high standard 
in its classes. 



SUGGESTED TWO-YEAR COURSES 

(Leading toward work in Ckimmercial Art) 

Freshman Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Art 105. Design 3 

Art 209. Sketch 1 

Art 231. Commercial 2 

Art 233. Costume Illus. 3 

Art 235. Painting 2 

English 101 3 

^Physical Education 

14 



Second Semester Hrs, 

Art 106. Design 3 

Art 110. Sketch 1 

Art 232. Commercial 2 

Art 236. Painting 2 

English 102 3 

Academic Elective 3 

^Physical Education 

14 



Sophomore Year 



Art 130. Appreciation 3 

Art 305. Design 3 

Art 209. Sketch 1 

Art 331. Commercial 3 

Art 435. Painting 3 

Art 131. Drawing and Comp. .. 3 
jjfPhysical Education 



16 



jf No academic credit. 



Religion 101 3 

Art 306. Design 3 

Art 210. Sketch 1 

Art 332. Commercial 3 

Art 436. Painting 3 

Art 132. Drawing and Comp, 3 

^Physical Education 

16 



62 



(Leading toward work in tlie Fine Arts) 



Fheshmax Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Art 105. Design 3 

Art 109. Sketch 1 

Art 131. Drawing and Comp. .. 3 

Art 235. Painting 2 

Englisli 101 3 

Academic Elective 3 

^Physical Education 

15 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Art 106. Design 3 

Art 110. Sketch 1 

Art 132. Drawing and Comp. 3 

Art 236. Painting 2 

English 102 3 

Academic Elective 3 

^Physical Education 

15 



Sophomore Year 



Art 130. Appreciation 3 

Art 305. Design 2 

Art 209. Sketch 1 

Art 401. Advanced Study 3 

Art 435. Advanced Painting .... 3 

Academic Elective 3 

^Physical Education 



15 



jjl No academic credit. 



Religion 101 3 

Art 306. Design 2 

Art 210. Sketch 1 

Art 402. Advanced Study 3 

Art 436. Advanced Painting 3 

Academic Elective 3 

^Physical Education 



15 



63 



MUSIC 

The two-year Music Course is open to those who are regularly enrolled 
at Lycoming College. Other students attending Lycoming who are not 
registered in the Music Course or the Music Major, A. B. degree curricu- 
lum, may enroll for music courses with the consent of the Dean of the 
College and the Department Chairman. 

Musical excellence in both the fields of fine technical musicianship and 
artistic performance is sought in every branch of musical work at Lycom- 
ing. Special attention is called to the advantages of the thorough-going 
fundamental training afforded students who desire to matriculate in a 
regular professional school of music. Class and public recitals are held 
frequently to afford students the opportunity to achieve poise in per- 
formance. Instrumental and vocal ensemble work hold an important place 
in the curriculum and are therefore required. Class sessions and private 
lessons are taught in conformity to the college calendar, and absences are 
dealt with in accordance with the college policy. 

Freshman Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Music 121. Theory 4 Music 122. Theory 4 

Applied Music 1^2 Applied Music IV2 

Ensemble ^^ Ensemble V2 

Music 130. Appreciation 3 Religion 101 3 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

*Academic Elective 3 *Academic Elective 3 

^Physical Education ^Physical Education 

15 15 

Sophomore Year 

Music 221. Theory 4 Music 222. Theory 4 

Applied Music IV2 Applied Music IV2 

Ensemble Va Ensemble Vz 

Music 311. History of 3 fMusic Elective 2 

English 201 3 English 202 3 

Academic Elective 3 Academic Elective 4 

^Physical Education ^Physical Education 

15 16 

* Foreign language for voice majors. 

t Selected from Music 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, and 317. 

jl No academic credit. 



64 



The John W. Long Library 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS OF 
COLLEGIATE EDUCATION 

ENGINEERING 

Lycoming College furnishes a program for engineering students which 
combines the advantages of the smaller liberal arts college with the train- 
ing to be secured at a large engineering school. By arrangement with 
Bucknell University, and The Pennsylvania State College, the College 
offers a five-year course, the first three years of which are spent at 
Lycoming, the final two at Bucknell or The Pennsylvania State College. 
A student may secure a degree in liberal arts and a degree in engineering 
by this program. 

The student's three years at Lycoming include prescribed work in 
English, foreign language, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. At Buck- 
nell University, or The Pennsylvania State College, the student will 
specialize in his chosen field in engineering or applied science for the 
remaining two years. 

Candidates for this program should indicate to the Director of 
Admissions of Lycoming College that they wish to apply for the coopera- 
tive program and specify the institution where they wish to complete 
their engineering work. 

FORESTRY 

Lycoming College furnishes a program for forestry students which 
combines a strong liberal arts and science background with professional 
training in forestry at the Duke School of Forestry, Duke University, 
Durham, North Carolina. 

The program as established is of five years duration. A student 
electing to pursue this program of study will spend three years at Lycom- 
ing where he will meet the liberal arts degree requirements, including 
such subjects as English, foreign language, biology, chemistry, physics, 
mathematics, and economics. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of these three years' work at 
Lycoming, the student will apply for admission to the Duke School of 
Forestry for one summer and two years of training in forestry. At the 
end of his first year at Duke, his record will be sent to Lycoming when, 
if the work is satisfactory for this fourth year in college, the bachelor 
of arts degree will be awarded. Upon the satisfactory completion of 
the second year in the forestry school, the professional degree. Master of 
Forestry, will be awarded by Duke. 

Candidates for this program should indicate their intentions to the 
Director of Admissions when applying for admission. 

65 



COURSES OF 
INSTRUCTION 



The courses of instruction are arranged in four divisions and 
a department of education. 

DIVISIONS 

GROUP I. HUMANITIES. 

Art, English, French, German, Greek, Music, Philosophy, Religion, 
Spanish, Speech. 

GROUP II. SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology. 

GROUP III. SCIENCE. 

Biology, Chemistry, Drawing, Mathematics, Physical Education, Phys- 
ics, Science. 

GROUP IV. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 

Business Administration, Economics, Secretarial Science. 



In a detailed description of the courses that follow, the courses 
of instruction are listed alphabetically by subject matter for the 
convenience of the reader. 

Courses numbered in the one hundreds are commonly first year 
subjects; those in the two hundreds are second year subjects; the 
three hundreds are third year or junior subjects; and the four 
hundreds are fourth year or senior subjects. 

The college reserves the right to withdraw any course for which 
there are fewer than ten students enrolled. 

67 



ART 

A major in Art consists of 30 hours of which 9 hours are in art theory. 

105-106. DESIGN. Deals with organization of line, form, and tone to 
produce two-dimensional and three-dimensional design in which volume and 
space as well as flat patterns are accounted fundamentals. Six class 
periods each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

109-110. SKETCH I. Devoted to acquainting the student with a variety 
of techniques and materials. Two class periods each week. 
One hour credit each semester. 

130. APPRECIATION OF ART. Devoted to acquainting the student 
with art history, philosophy, and methods. Emphasis on the appreciation 
of great works of art. Three hours lecture each week. 
Three hours credit. 

131-132. DRAWING AND COMPOSITION. Study of form and color. 
Invaluable training for advanced work in painting. Six class periods 
each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

209-210. SKETCH II. Continuation of Sketch I. Two class periods each 
week. 

Prerequisite, Art 109-110. 

One hour credit each semester. 

231-232. COMMERCIAL ART. Study of letter forms and practice in 
the execution of freehand pen and brush letters. Study of good spacing and 
layout in advertising technique. Six class periods each week. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

233. COSTUME ILLUSTRATION. Study of the costumed figure and 
rendering of fabrics and textures as applied to commercial illustration. 
Six class periods each week. 
Three hours credit. 

235-236. PAINTING. Devoted to oil and watercolor. Painting problems 
in landscape, still life, and figure. Four or six class periods each week. 
Two or three hours credit each semester. 

305-306. APPLIED DESIGN. Practical application of design problems 
and techniques. Four or six periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Art 105-106. 

Two or three hours credit each semester, 

68 



307. INTERIOR DESIGN. Study, rendering, and designing of interiors. 
Six class periods each week. 
Tiiree hours credit. 

309. ANCIENT TO MEDIEVAL. A historical survey of visual art 
forms from earliest beginnings to the medieval period. Assigned readings, 
slides, and lectures. 

Three hours credit. 

311. RENAISSANCE TO MODERN. A historical survey of visual art 
forms from the Renaissance to the modern era. Assigned readings, slides, 
and lectures. 

Three hours credit. 

331-332. COMMERCIAL ART. Continuation of Art 231-232. Six class 
periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Art 231-232. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

401-402. ADVANCED STUDY. A required course for all art majors 
with specialized study in the particular field of choice. Advanced project. 
Six class periods each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

403. AMERICAN ART. A history of the visual arts in America and 
their relation to American life, from the Colonial Period to modem times. 
Three hours credit. 

405. CONTEMPORARY ART. A study of contemporary artists and 
their work, and the influences leading to trends in the visual arts of the 
present era. 

Three hours credit. 

435-436. ADVANCED PAINTING. Continuation of Art 235-236. Six 
class periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Art 235-236. 

Three hours credit. 

BIOLOGY 

24 hours of biology are required for a major in this field. 

101. GENERAL BIOLOGY (Botany). An introduction to the prin- 
ciples of biology, including a systemic study of characteristic types of 
plants. Two hours lecture and recitation and two two-hour laboratory 
periods each week. 
Four hours credit. 

69 



102. GENERAL BIOLOGY (Zoology). An introduction to the prin- 
ciples of biology, including a systemic study of characteristic types of 
animals. Two hours lecture and recitation and two two-hour laboratory 
periods each week. 

Four hours credit. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. This course emphasizes the study of micro- 
organisms that aflFect mankind, especially those that cause diseases. Lab- 
oratory exercises deal with elementary bacteriological techniques and plant 
and animal parasites. Three hours lecture and recitation and one two-hour 
laboratory period each week. 

Four hours credit. 

104. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. A basic knowledge of the skele- 
tal, circulatory, digestive, nervous, and excretory systems of the human 
body. 

Three hours credit. 

107. BOTANY. More specialized and advanced study of plants than 
is offered in General Biology. Two hours lecture and recitation and two 
hours laboratory each week. 

Three hours credit. 

108. BOTANY. A study of the classification of plants and their distri- 
bution. Two hours lecture and recitation and two hours laboratory each 
week. 

Three hours credit. 

114. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY. Three hours 
laboratory each week. Biology 104 is a corequisite. 
One hour credit. 

201-202. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY. Deals with 
dissections of representative vertebrates, including the cat. Two hours 
lecture and recitation and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

301. PHYSIOLOGY. A study of the physiological processes of the 
human body. Two hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 201-202. 

Four hours credit. 

70 



302. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. The study of the development 
of an amphibian, the chick, and a mammal, from fertilization of the egg to 
fully formed embrj'o. Two hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory 
periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 

Four hours credit. 

401. HISTOLOGY. The study of cells and tissues of the human body. 
Two hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 201-202. 

Four hours credit. 

402. GENETICS. A study of the principles of inheritance and their 
application to human biology and to the improvement of plants and ani- 
mals. 

Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 

Three hours credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Majors of 24 hours each are outlined on page 55. 

101-102. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING. An introductory course in 
which no prior knowledge of accounting is assumed. The course introduces 
the theory of balance sheet; problems of classification and interpretation of 
accounts; preparation of financial statements; and accounting for single 
proprietorship, partnership and corporation. Manufacturing accounts are 
also presented. Two hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period 
each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

103. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS. This course is designed to show 
the student how each division of a business enterprise is dependent upon 
other divisions and how the various functions are unified and co-ordinated 
by competent management. It treats briefly but thoroughly such inter- 
related business functions as financing, management, purchasing, adver- 
tising, cost accounting, selling, merchandising, and labor control, thus 
providing the student with an excellent survey of business functions before 
approaching specialized work. 

Three hours credit. 

71 



104. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY. This course is designed to 
show the student the picture of American economy. Developments in the 
major sub-divisions of our economic life have been integrated by giving 
specific attention to measuring the adaptation and performance of the 
economy as a whole. 

Three hours credit. 

105-100. ELEMENTARY SHORTHAND. Study of the complete theory 
of Gregg shorthand by the functional method. Dictation and introduction 
to transcription. Class meets four times each week. 

Two hours credit each semester. 

107-108. ELEMENTARY TYPEWRITING. Complete mastery of the 
touch system of typewriting with emphasis upon attainment of accuracy 
and speed. Typing of artistic business letters and of other business forms 
is stressed. Class meets four times each week. 

Two hours credit each semester. 

110. BUSINESS MATHEMATICS. Designed primarily for students in 
the curriculum of Business Administration. Review of elementary algebra, 
linear and quadratic functions, logarithms, progressions, permutations and 
combinations, and the elementary theory of probability. Commercial appli- 
cations. 

Three hours credit. 

111. BUSINESS STATISTICS. An introduction to the elementary theory 
of statistical analysis with applications. Central tendency, dispersion, skew- 
ness, trends, correlation, and index numbers. 

Prerequisite, Business 110. 

Three hours credit. 

114-115. BUSINESS COMPUTATIONS. The fundamentals as well as 
the more advanced aspects of business calculations. Short methods and 
checks, percentages, interest, depreciation, and other matters usually 
treated in commercial and business arithmetic. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

116. SECRETARIAL BOOKKEEPING. A course designed to give 
vocational training in the principles of bookkeeping to those secretarial 
students preparing for positions in the offices of attorneys, doctors, lawyers, 
and other professional people. The fundamental principles of accounting 
are developed and applied through the medium of practice sets. 

Three hours credit. 

72 



117. SECRETARIAL BOOKKEEPING. The accrual basis of account- 
ing as applied to mercantile and trading enterprises is developed in this 
course. Actual practice of the theory will be obtained through the medium 
of practice sets. 

Three hours credit. 

205. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE. A review of basic English 
grammar with emphasis upon its use in modern business letter writing. 
Actual practice in the writing of all major forms of business communica- 
tions with special attention given to the preparation of application letters 
and data sheets. 

Three hours credit. 

206-207. MONEY AND BANKING. A study of the nature and func- 
tions of money ; the quantity theory ; paper and deposit currency ; collection 
of checks and the thorough study of the bank statement. The Federal 
Reserve System and its monetary policies; and a study of other contem- 
porary financial institutions. 

Prerequisite, Business 102. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

214. MEDICAL SHORTHAND. The course is designed to develop a 
good working knowledge of medical terminology which is used in the 
physician's office, the hospital, the laboratory, and the insurance office. 
Class meets two times each week. 

One hour credit each semester, with a maximum of three hours credit. 

21.5-216. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING. This course carries the 
fundamentals of accounting presented in Elementary Accounting into the 
advanced field. It presents an intensive study of accounting statements 
with a consideration of special analytical accounting procedures and an 
emphasis upon corporation stock and bond accounts. 

Prerequisite, Business 102. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

222. OFFICE PRACTICE. Designed to give the student actual practice 
in applying the knowledge and skills which are acquired in the theory course 
to problems which arise in typical office situations. Two hours a week of 
practical experience secured in the faculty and administrative offices. 

Three hours credit. 

223. OFFICE MACHINES. Demonstration by the instructor of the 
proper techniques for operation of various business machines. Students 
obtain actual practice in the use of these machines in order to develop skill 
and speed. Class meets five times each week. 

Three hours credit. 

73 



231-232. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND. Review of theory and the 
development of speed in the writing and transcribing of Gregg shorthand. 
Special training to acquire technical vocabularies in the fields of advertising, 
agriculture, banking, insurance, and law. Class meets four times each week. 

Prerequisite, Business 105-106. 

Two hours credit each semester. 

235-236. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING. Development of speed 
typewriting with a high degree of accuracy. Instruction and practice in 
typing all business letters and forms, tabulations, manuscripts, legal docu- 
ments. Mimeograph stencils and Ditto master sheets. Class meets four times 
each week. 

Prerequisite, Business 107-108. 

Two hours credit each semester. 

243-244. MEDICAL OFFICE TECHNIQUE. Medical ethics, patient 
psychology, and personal conduct in a medical office are included. The 
Pathologist and Bacteriologist of Williamsport Hospital provide demon- 
strations of procedures. First Aid, sterilization and care of instruments, and 
the maintenance of adequate office records. Observations are made in the 
hospital of such procedures in actual operation. Designed for the Medical 
Secretarial Students. During the second semester, actual observation work 
in a doctor's office acquaints the student with procedures. 
One and one-half hours credit each semester. 

302. BUSINESS LAW. Lecture course on the fundamentals of the law 
relating to business transactions: contracts, agency, negotiable instruments. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

303. BUSINESS LAW. Lecture course on the fundamentals of the law 
relating to partnerships, corporations, sales, personalty security contracts, 
guaranty and suretyship, insurance, and real estate. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

304. CREDITS AND COLLECTIONS. The fundamentals of credit, 
investigation and analysis of risks, collection plans and policies. The 
organization of credit and collection agencies is studied. 

Prerequisite, Business 102. 
Three hours credit. 

305. MARKETING. Retail, wholesale, and manufacturing trade chan- 
nels; types of middlemen and functions; cooperative associations; market- 
ing functions of policies of retailer, wholesaler and manufacturer; produce 
exchanges and other markets. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration. 
Three hours credit. 

74 



307. org:Cnization and financial management of bus- 

NESS UNITS. This course deals with the financing of business; the 
sources of capital and financial agencies such as note brokers, mortgage 
banks, investment bankers, commercial banks and commercial paper houses. 
An analysis of business promotions, reorganizations, mergers and consoli- 
dations, and the manner in which they are financed. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration. 

Three hours credit. 

308. INVESTMENTS. This course deals with the leading types of in- 
vestments, tests, investment programs, financial reports, forecasting meth- 
ods and agencies, stock exchanges, brokerage houses, methods of buying 
and selling securities, etc. Laboratory work and case studies. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Accounting. 
Three hours credit. 

311-312. COST ACCOUNTING. Methods of accounting for material, 
labor and factory overhead expenses consumed in manufacturing are intro- 
duced. Practice sets are used to illustrate job order and process costing. 
The recent development of the use of standard costs is introduced and 
illustrated through problems and a practice set. The application of cost 
principles to the distributive and administrative functions of a business is 
also presented. 

Prerequisite, Business 216. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

313. FEDERAL INCOME TAX LAW AND ACCOUNTING. An anal- 
ysis of the Federal income tax law and its application to individuals, 
partnerships and corporations. Actual cases, problems and forms are used 
to illustrate the law and to determine the taxpayer's liability to the 
government. 

Prerequisite, Business 102. 
Three hours credit. 

341-342. PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING I AND II. Survey of the 
field of retailing; history and development of different types of stores; 
advantages and disadvantages of each type; store location, layout, and 
organization; duties and functions of the different departments; coopera- 
tive movements in retailing; selection, training, and supervision of em- 
ployees. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

345. RETAIL ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION. Funda- 
mental principles of the science of advertising; advertising media, copy, 

75 



appeals, layouts, type, illustration, art, psychology; and fundamental 
principles of sales promotion and coordination of all forms within the 
organization. 

Three hours credit. 

346. RETAIL SALESMANSHIP. Fundamentals of efficient selling. 
Problems affecting the customer and the store; meeting customer needs; 
preparation and presentation of merchandise manual; sales demonstration. 
Three hours lecture per week. 
Three hours credit. 

401. REAL ESTATE. The fundamentals of the real estate business in- 
cluding a study of titles, mortgages, leases, advertising, sale, purchase, 
development, and management of real estate. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration numbered above 200. 
Three hours credit. 

402. INSURANCE. The fundamentals of fire, marine, health, accident, 
casualty, and social insurance. Commercial and governmental plans. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration numbered above 200. 
Three hours credit. 

403. INSURANCE. Life insurance and annuities. Fidelity and surety 
bonds. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration numbered above 200. 

Three hours credit. 

406. BANK POLICIES AND PROCEDURES. This course is designed 
to afford a more specialized and practical knowledge of banking and related 
financial institutions. The course will emphasize actual organization and 
operation of the institution under study. The study will be supplemented 
by field trips and lectures in the classroom by various operating officers. 

Prerequisite, Business 207. 

Three hours credit. 

423-424. AUDITING. This course deals with the science of verifying, 
analyzing, and interpreting accounts and reports. An audit project is pre- 
sented, solved and interpreted throughout the year. 

Prerequisite, Business 312. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

425. C. P. A. PROBLEMS. This course is intended to meet the needs 
of those interested in professional accounting and in preparation for 
Certified Public Accountants Examinations. The problems presented 
throughout the course are taken from past C. P. A. and American Institute 

76 



of Accountants examinations and require in their solution a thorough 
knowledge of the subject matter of prerequisite courses taken. 

Prerequisite, Business 312. 

Three hours credit. 

431. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING. This course offers an extended 
treatment of the functions and applications of accounting for those who 
wish additional accounting background in preparation for entrance into 
the accounting profession. It treats such special problems as partnerships 
and joint venture accounting; installment and consignment sales; branch 
and home office accounting; corporate combinations; and the preparation of 
consolidated statements. 

Prerequisite, Business 216. 
Three hours credit. 

433. CURRENT FEDERAL INCOME TAX LAW PRACTICE. An 
advanced course in tax law and accounting, based on analysis and treat- 
ment of a large variety of problems encountered in current tax practice. 
Consideration is given to the tax specialist's approach in choice of forms 
of business, securities and real-estate sales, family partnerships and excess 
profit. 

Prerequisite, Business 313. 
Three hours credit. 

441. RETAIL BUYING AND MERCHANDISING. Problems of mer- 
chandising. Responsibilities of the buyer; what, when, where and how to 
buy; types of merchandise, pricing, leased departments, sales planning and 
merchandise control; importance of volume, mark-up, mark-down, and 
turnover; emphasis on making a profit; actual store problems. 
Three hours credit. 

443. RETAIL PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. Organization and re- 
sponsibilities of the personnel department: selection, training, welfare work, 
methods of payment, incentives for better work, morale, personnel prob- 
lems connected with the retail store. 
Three hours credit. 

445-446. RETAIL PROBLEMS I AND II. A survey of current issues 
confronting retail management and examination of the management, mer- 
chandising and publicity activities of retail stores. Current trends and 
differences in store practices are stressed; emphasis is given to govern- 
mental regulations, labor, and employee-employer relations. The case 
method is used extensively in the development of the course. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

77 



CHElMISTRY 

A major requires 24 hours of Chemistry in addition to General 
Chemistry. 

101-102. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. The course comprises a systematic 
study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry in connection 
with the most important metallic and non-metallic elements and their com- 
pounds. Two hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each weeis. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

103. APPLIED CHEMISTRY. A brief survey of general chemistry 
designed to prepare the student for an understanding of some of the many 
applications of cliemistry to the home, to nutrition, and to nursing. Three 
hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. 
Four hours credit. 

201. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. An elementary course in the study 
of modern theories of solutions of electrolytes and their applications to 
cation and anion analj^sis. Two hours lecture and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods each week. 
Four hours credit. 

202-203. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. A presentation of the funda- 
mental methods of elementary gravimetric and volumetric analysis together 
with practice in laboratory techniques and calculations of these methods. 
Two hours lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

205. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. A one semester course in simple 
quantitative analysis given more briefly than course 202-203. The course is 
designed chiefly for laboratory technician students. Two hours lecture and 
two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Four hours credit. 

301-302. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. A systematic study of the com- 
pounds of carbon including both aliphatic and aromatic series. The lab- 
oratory work introduces the student to simple fundamental methods of 
organic synthesis. Three hours lecture and one four-hour laboratory period 
each week. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

401-402. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. A study of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of theoretical chemistry and their applications. The laboratory 
work includes techniques in physico-chemical measurements. Three hours 
lecture and one four-hour laboratory jieriod each week. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

78 



405, BIOCHEMISTRY. A general course dealing with the chemical 
composition and metabolic processes and significance of carbohydrates, 
lipids, proteins, and biocatalysts in living tissues. Three hours lecture and 
one four-hour laboratory period each week. 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 301-302, Biology 101-102. 

Four hours credit. 

CHURCH WORK 

401-402. TRAINING EXPERIENCE. A laboratory course with fac- 
ulty supervision of student work in churches of the Williamsport area. 
Careful coordination with the pastor and the faculty advisor is maintained. 
One hour instruction and a minimum of six hours practical work per week. 
Three hours credit each semester. Not offered 1953-1954. 

DRAWING 

101. ENGINEERING DRAWING. The principles of orthographic pro- 
jection, axiometric drawing, and perspective through instrumental and free 
hand exercises. Vertical lettering, free hand sketches, uses of drawing 
instruments, drafting room practice in conventional representations, prac- 
tice in pencil and ink tracing, sections, theory of dimensioning, detail and 
assembly drawings and the reading of working drawings. Class meets 
three two-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Three hours credit. 

103. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY. Graphical solution of the more 
advanced space problems, both theoretical and practical and those encoun- 
tered in engineering practice; practice in inclined free hand lettering. 
Problems involve the measurement of angles and distances and the generation 
of various surfaces, together with their sections, developments and inter- 
sections. In each project visualization and analysis lead to a logical and 
efficient solution. Class meets three two-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Three hours credit. 

ECONOMICS 

Twenty-four hours of economics are required for a major in this field. 

201-202. PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF ECONOMICS. A study 
of the organization of the economic system and principles and problems 
that govern economic activity. Major topics covered include: produc- 
tion, consumption, exchange, distribution, risks of enterprise, banking, 
international trade, profits, rent, wages and social reforms. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

79 



MONEY AND BANKING. (See Business Administration 206-207). 

301-302. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. A general survey course, showing 
the relation of physical environment to man's economic and cultural 
achievements. Emphasis is placed on the part the United States plays in 
the occupations of man, as contrasted to other producing areas of the 
world. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

304. CONSUMER ECONOMICS. The place of the consumer in the eco- 
nomic system, forces back of consumer demands, governmental controls to 
aid the consumer, consumer economic education and private aids. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Economics. 
Three hours credit. 

305. LABOR PROBLEMS. A study of the American labor movement 
and the position of the worker in modern industrial society. Unemploy- 
ment, wages, hours, child labor, woman in industry, the aged worker, unions, 
and industrial peace are among the problems considered. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Economics. 
Three hours credit. 

306. LABOR LEGISLATION. A continuation of labor problems. Labor 
and the courts; federal regulation of capital-labor relations; the work of 
federal labor boards. 

Prerequisite, Economics 305. 
Three hours credit. 

INVESTMENTS. (See Business Administration 308). 

402. TRANSPORTATION. Problems and policies of railroads, busses, 
inland waterways, air and ocean transportation. The economic importance 
and significance of transportation are emphasized. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Economics. 
Three hours credit. 

403. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. An advanced course 
which deals with the origin, growth and significance of economic institutions 
with emphasis upon those of Europe and the United States. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Economics numbered above 200. 
Three hours credit. 

404. ADVANCED ECONOMICS. Intended to co-ordinate the work of 
the special courses taken in the field of economics. More comprehensive 
analyses of economic forces than were taken in the elementary economic 
courses. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202 and six hours in Economics numbered 
above 200. 

Three hours credit. 

80 



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405. PUBLIC FINANCE. Public revenue and expenditures; preparation 
of budgets; public taxation; public borrowing. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration numbered above 200 
and Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

406. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC UTILITIES. Public utility character- 
istics, organization, management, financing, combination, and accounting; 
regulation, valuation, and rate-making are stressed. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

409. THE BUSINESS CYCLE. History and general nature of the 
business cycle ; its causes and its relation to the economic process as a whole ; 
possible remedies, public and private; source materials and current 
literature. 

Prerequisite, Economics 202. 

Three hours credit. 

411. SOCIAL INSURANCE. An analysis of the extent and incidence of 
involuntary unemployment, industrial accidents, occupational diseases, 
sickness resulting in absenteeism, other hazards of working groups, an 
appraisal of the principles involved in devising programs of protection 
against them. 

Prerequisite, Economics 202. 

Three hours credit. 



EDUCATION 

201. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION. This basic course intro- 
duces the student to the social values of public education, the changing 
conception of the purposes of education, the problems facing the schools; 
and to fields of professional activity. Required of all students desiring 
certification for teaching. 

Three hours credit. 

203. PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING. This course is designed to intro- 
duce the work of classroom teachers, direction of learning, development 
of ability to use common procedures in teaching, planning instruction, 
efiFective teaching qualities. 

Three hours credit. 

81 



301. PROBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. Designed to aid 
the student in dealing with such problems as the place and function of 
the secondary school; the relation of secondary education to elementary 
and higher education; the organization, administration, curricular and 
extra-curricular activities of the secondary school. 
Three hours credit. 

EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. (See Sociology 302). 

303. AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION. A study of the value, design, 
construction, and application of the visual and auditory aids to learning. 
Practical experience in the handling of audio-visual equipment and mate- 
rials is provided. 

Three hours credit. 

305. EDUCATIONAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. A study of 
the history and philosophy of measurements in education with the construc- 
tion, use, and interpretation of educational, standardized, and classroom tests. 
Three hours credit. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. (See Psychology 309). 

401. PRACTICE TEACHING. Teaching experience in a junior or 
senior high school in the greater Williamsport area; observation of the 
teaching of veteran teachers; gradual acceptance of the full responsibilities 
of the teacher. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 309. 

An average of at least 1.0 in all college work is prerequisite for student 
teaching. 

Six hours credit. 



ENGLISH 

A major in English consists of a minimum of 24 semester hours, ex- 
cluding 101-102, in courses offered by the department; at least 6 hours must 
be in American Literature and at least 15 hours in courses numbered 300 
and above. 

101-102. COMPOSITION. The two-fold purpose is to teach the student 
to read good prose of ordinary difficulty, both critically and appreciatively, 
and to organize his ideas in logical, connected discourse. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

201. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. A study of the major 
movements and authors from their beginnings to 1798. 
Three hours credit. 

82 



202. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. A study of the major 
movements and authors from 1798 to contemporary period. 

Three hours credit. 

203. HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE. A survey of our 
literature from the colonial period to I860. 

Three hours credit. 

204. HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE. A survey of our 
literature from 1860 to the contemporary period. 

Three hours credit. 

211. FUNDAMENTALS OF JOURNALISM. Introductory course in 
practical newspaper work. 

Three hours credit. Not ofiFered 1953-1954. 

301. ROMANTIC MOVEMENT. A study in the English Romantic 
poets, Wordsworth to Keats. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1964. 

303. VICTORIAN POETRY. The major poets from Tennyson to Hous- 
man. 

Three hours credit. 

304. VICTORIAN PROSE. Emphasis is placed on the attitudes of the 
leading essayists toward the many and varied problems of the Victorian 
Age. 

Three hours credit. 

311, SHAKESPEARE. A study of representative plays, as to content, 
dramatic quality, diction. Outside readings. 
Three hours credit. 

313-314. HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF THE DRAMA. A 
study of the drama from the Greek beginnings to the present day, as to 
types, subject matter, and technical structure. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

316. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE. A study of the major trends 
in American and English Literature of the recent past. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

317. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE. A study of the Psahns, the 
Book of Job, and other selected portions of the Bible with special em- 

83 



phasis upon their literary value. The spiritual significance of this litera- 
ture of the Old Testament will be emphasized. 
Three hours credit. 

320. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Consent of the instructor; limited 
to 15 students. 

Three hours credit. 

(At least junior standing and 9 hours in English above the freshman 
year required for 400 courses). 

4.01. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL. From Defoe to Jane 
Austen. 

Three hours credit. 

402. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL. From Dickens to Gals- 
worthy. 

Three hours credit. 

404. AMERICAN REGIONAL FICTION. Study in development of 
local color and regional literature after the Civil War. 

Three hours credit. 
410. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Some knowledge 
of Latin and one modern language will prove helpful. 

Three hours credit. 
415-416. STUDIES IN LITERATURE. Conferences, oral and written 
reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge of 
English and American Literature. Limited to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

FRENCH 

A major in French consists of 24 hours beyond French 12. 

11-12. BEGINNING. Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar; 
practice in reading, conversation, and composition. 

Three hours credit each semester. 
101-102. INTERMEDIATE. Review of grammar. Study of modern 
texts; practice in conversation and composition. Reports on outside reading. 

Prerequisite, French 11-12 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

201-202. THIRD- YEAR FRENCH. Reading and oral reproduction of 
nineteenth and twentieth century drama. Outside reading and written 

84 



reports. One-third of the time is devoted to further study of grammar 
and of idioms, with special emphasis on writing in French. 

Prerequisite, French 101-102 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301-302. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. Thorough study of grammar. 
Cours de style: French "from the inside," practice in composition and 
development of literary writing. 

Prerequisite, French 201-202 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

303-304. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION. Study of the phonetic 
symbols for a better pronunciation. Conversation based on events of Paris, 
customs, manners, and politics of France. 
Three hours credit. 

351-352. MODERN DRAMA. Study of the principal dramatic move- 
ments of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, beginning with Victor 
Hugo and the Romantic School. 

Prerequisite, French 201-202 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

401-402. SURVEY. A study of representative works from the earliest 
monuments to modern times. Analysis of the texts and their relations to 
other literatures. Introduction to graduate methods of research and prep- 
aration. Required of all majors. 

Prerequisite, French 301-302 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

415-416. STUDIES IN LITERATURE. Special studies for majors. 
Conference hours and reports to be arranged. 

Prerequisite, French 401-402. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

GERMAN 

A major in German consists of 24 hours beyond German 12. 

11-12. BEGINNING. Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar; 
practice in reading, conversation, and composition. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

101-102. INTERMEDIATE. Review of grammar. Study of modern 
texts; practice in conversation and composition. Reports on outside reading. 

Prerequisite, German 11-12 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

85 



201-202. ADVANCED. Reading of classical and modern texts; outside 
readings and reports. Study of principal literary movements and civiliza- 
tion. 

Prerequisite, German 101-102 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301-302. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. Thorough review of German gram- 
mar, stressing word order, declension, passive voice, subjunctive mood, and 
idioms of high frequency. 

Three hours credit each semester, 

331-332. DIE NOVELLE. Readings and discussions of representative 
short stories, with emphasis on the more modern authors; study of relations 
with other literatures. 

Prerequisite, German 201-202 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

401-402. SURVEY. A study of representative works from the earliest 
monuments to modern times. Analysis of the texts and their relations to 
other literatures. Introduction to graduate methods of research and prep- 
aration. Required of all majors. 

Prerequisite, German 301-302 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

415-416. STUDIES IN LITERATURE. Special studies for majors. 
Conference hours and reports to be arranged. 

Prerequisite, German 401-402. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



GREEK 



207-208. NEW TESTAMENT READINGS. Fundamentals of New Tes- 
tament Greek grammar. Readings from the Gospels according to St. Luke 
and St, Matthew. 

Open to students in Sophomore year or above, except by special 
permission. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

307-308. ADVANCED NEW TESTAMENT READING. Readings from 
the Gospel according to St. John, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Epistles. 

Prerequisite, Greek 207-208, 

Three hours credit each semester. 



HISTORY 

A major in history consists of a minimum of 24 semester hours beyond 
History 101-102. 

101. MODERN EUROPE TO 1815. A survey of Europe from the six- 
teenth century to the Congress of Vienna, with special attention to selected 
cultural, political, and economical movements of the era. 

Three hours credit. 

102. MODERN EUROPE SINCE 1815. A continuation of History 101 
with emphasis upon the Liberal and Nationalist movements of the nine- 
teenth century, and the background and history of World Wars I and II. 

Three hours credit. 

201. UNITED STATES AND PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY TO 1865. 
A course in the political, economic, and social factors in the history of the 
United States and the Commonwealth. (Satisfies state requirements for a 
teaching certificate.) 

Three hours credit. 

202. UNITED STATES AND PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY SINCE 
1865. A continuation of History 201, with special attention to interna- 
tional relations, the problems of labor, education, and corporate control, 
and postwar activities. (Satisfies state requirements for a teaching 
certificate.) 

Three hours credit. 

203. ANCIENT CIVILIZATION. The origin and character of the 
civilizations of antiquity, with special emphasis upon those elements of 
Greek and Roman culture which have been incorporated in the structure 
of western civilization. 

Three hours credit. 

204. HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE. The development of Euro- 
pean political, social, and religious institutions and cultural patterns from 
the collapse of the Roman Empire to 1500. 

Three hours credit. 

301. THE COLONIAL PERIOD AND THE AMERICAN REVOLU- 
TION (1492-1789). A concentrated course on the discovery of the con- 
tinent, and the events leading up to the Revolution and the adoption of 
the Constitution. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

87 



302. AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS. A study of the most sig- 
nificant diplomatic problems arising out of wars, westward expansion, and 
colonial possessions, with special attention to the evolution of the United 
States as a world power. 
Three hours credit. 

304. THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION. A study of the 
intellectual, artistic, and commercial developments from the fourteenth to 
the seventeenth century, together with the origin of the Protestant tradition 
and related political factors. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

305. MODERN ENGLISH HISTORY. The rise and development of the 
British Empire from Tudor times to the Commonwealth of Nations, cover- 
ing political and social reforms, the growth of the cabinet system, and 
imperial developments. 

Three hours credit. 

308. CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION. Emphasis is placed on 
the events leading up to the war; the various campaigns of the war and the 
return to peacetime activity are considered. 
Three hours credit. 

317. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND THE NAPOLEONIC ERA. 

An analysis of the political, social, and intellectual backgrounds of the 
French Revolution, a survey of the course of revolutionary development, 
and an estimate of the results of the Napoleonic conquests and adminis- 
tration. 

Three hours credit. 

320. PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY. A history of Pennsylvania from 
its founding to the present day. All phases of life in the colony and com- 
monwealth are treated. 

Three hours credit. 

321. AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY TO 

1860. The rise and development to 1860 of American ideas, ideals, and 
social standards. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

322. AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY SINCE 
1860. The changes produced in American ideas, ideals, and social stand- 
ards by the Civil War and the course of their development since that time. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

88 



401-402. CONTEMPORARY EUROPE. A study of diplomatic, social 
and economic developments since 1914, with special reference to the rise 
of fascist states, international rivalries, the Soviet and Nazi revolutions, 
and world peace organizations. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

403. RECENT HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (1896-PRES- 
ENT). The development of the United States in the twentieth century. 
The problems and reforms of Theodore Roosevelt; Wilsonian doctrines; the 
First World War; the New Deal, its objectives, principles, and practices; 
the Second World War and its problems to the present. 
Three hours credit. 

405-406. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES. This course presents an analysis of American political philoso- 
phy, constitutional origins, and Supreme Court decisions in their influence 
upon economic and social problems. 

Three hours credit each semester. Not oflFered 1953-1954. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. (See Political Science 405-406.) 

415-416. STUDIES IN HISTORY. Conferences, and oral and written 
reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge 
of history. Limited to qualified majors. 
Three hours credit each semester. 



MATHEMATICS 

For a major in mathematics, 24 hours are required, excluding 75 and 100. 

75. GENERAL MATHEMATICS. An introduction to basic ideas of 
mathematics and the relation of these ideas to industry, science, art, and 
philosophy. This course will not serve as a prerequisite for any other 
courses in mathematics. No college credit toward a major. 
Three hours credit. 

100. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA. For students presenting only one 
year of high school algebra and desiring further work in science or engi- 
neering. No college credit toward a major. 

Three hours credit. 

101. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. After a rapid review of quadratic equa- 
tions, this course deals with the binominal theorem, permutations and combi- 
nations, probability, series, determinants, and theory of equations. 

Three hours credit. 

89 



102. TRIGONOMETRY. An introductory course in plane trigonometry 
dealing with the use of logarithms in the solution of plane triangles, to- 
gether with the trigonometric functions of an angle and the fundamental 
identities connecting its functions. 
Three hours credit. 

201. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. A study of the graphs of various 
equations; curves resulting from simple locus conditions with stress on the 
loci of the second degree; polar co-ordinates, and co-ordinates of space. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 102. 
Four hours credit. 

202. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. Usual course including the ele- 
ments of diflferentiation and their applications, maxima and minima, curve 
tracing, rates, curvature, and diflferentials, etc. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 201. 
Four hours credit. 

301. INTEGRAL CALCULUS. Integration as the reverse of differen- 
tiation. Integration as a process of summation. Formal and numerical 
integration. Practical applications: areas, volumes, pressure, work, lengths 
of arcs, etc. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 202. 
Four hours credit. 

302. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. A first course in ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Includes diflferential equations of first order with 
applications to physics, mechanics, and chemistry; linear equations with 
constant coefBcients, simultaneous equations, and some special higher order 
equations. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 301. 
Three hours credit. 

401. ADVANCED CALCULUS, Includes a short course in solid ana- 
lytic geometry, partial dififerentiation, power series, Maclaurin and Taylor 
series, multiple integrals. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 301. 

Three hours credit. 

402-403. HIGHER ALGEBRA. First semester includes the elementary 
theory of equations. Second semester includes the study of the binomial 
theorem for any index, the summation of series, mathematical induction, 
elements of the theory of numbers, indeterminate equations, and proba- 
bilty. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

90 



415-416. STUDIES IN MATHEMATICS. Conferences, and oral and 
written reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's 
knowledge of mathematics. Limited to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit. 



MUSIC 

The major in music consists of 31 hours, of which 12 are to be in the 
300 and/or 400 level, with 19 hours in principles and history, and 12 in 
applied music. 

A. PRINCIPLES 

75. THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. A course designed to present the 
elements of music and musicianship. Students, other than those majoring 
in music, participating in Applied Music are advised to take this course. 
One hour, first semester. 

121-122. THEORY. An integrated course in the fundamentals of music 
and musicianship including written harmony, sight singing, ear training, 
and keyboard harmony. Class meets 5 times each week. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

221-222. THEORY. A continuation of the integrated course in music 
and musicianship. Class meets 5 times each week. 

Prerequisite, Music 121-122. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

321. ADVANCED HARMONY. Altered chords and a thorough review 
of seventh, ninth and eleventh chords, with analysis of material used in 
modern music. Continued work at the keyboard. 

Prerequisite, Music 221-222. 

Three hours credit. 

322. COUNTERPOINT. A study of the five species in two, three, and 
four part writing. 

Prerequisite, Music 221-222. 

Three hours credit. 

401. ORCHESTRATION. A study of modern orchestral instruments, 
an examination of their use by the great masters with practical problems of 
instrumentation. 

Prerequisite, Music 221-222. 
Three hours credit. 

91 



402. COMPOSITION. Creative writing in smaller vocal and instrumental 
forms. The college musical organizations serve to malie performances 
possible. 

Prerequisite, Music 322. 
Three hours credit. 

403. FORM AND ANALYSIS. A study of harmonic and contrapuntal 
forms, with analysis of representative works of music literature. 

Prerequisite, Music 222. 
Three hours credit. 

B. HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

130. MUSIC APPRECIATION. A general study of concert repertory 
designed to stimulate enjoyment and taste through the development of 
good listening techniques. 
Three hours credit. 

223. MUSIC AND LIVING. An advanced study of great masterpieces 
in musical literature designed for those desiring to become better acquainted 
with the role of music in our civilization. 

Prerequisite, Music 130. 

Three hours credit. 

309. HYMNOLOGY. A study of the hymnody of the Christian Church. 
Emphasis is directed toward an appreciation of the Church's finest hymns. 

Three hours credit. 

311. HISTORY OF MUSIC. A survey of the history of music which 
seeliS to relate the developmental character of music to social change. 

Three hours credit. 

312. CLASSIC AND BAROQUE MUSIC. A study of the development 
and growth of music and musical forms during the 17th and 16th centuries. 
The emergence of opera, oratorio, the sonata, the symphony, the concerto 
and the modern orchestra. 

Prerequisite, Music 311. 

Two hours credit. 

313. ROMANTIC MUSIC. Music of the 19th century with emphasis on 
subjectivity, nationalism, and virtuosity for program music. 

Prerequisite, Music 311. 

Two hours credit. 

92 



314. MUSIC OF THE 20TH CENTURY. A study of music written in 
the 20th century with an examination of musical trends since 1900. 

Prerequisite, Music 311. 
Two hours credit. 

315. DRAMATIC MUSIC. A study of the growth of dramatic music 
from ancient to modern times. 

Prerequisite, Music 311. 
Two hours credit. 

316. MUSIC OF THE CHURCH. A survey of the Church's musical 
heritage from plainsong to contemporary times. Both instrumental and 
vocal compositions are studied. 

Prerequisite, Music 311. 
Two hours credit. 

317. THE GOLDEN AGE OF POLYPHONY. A survey of the musical 
literature of the 15th and 16th centuries with time given to the singing of 
great polyphonic compositions. 

Prerequisite, Music 311. 
Two hours credit. 

415. SENIOR STUDIES. Herein opportunity is afforded to the senior 
majoring in music to develop a project in research. Such work is under- 
taken in consultation with a faculty advisor. Emphasis is directed toward 
the development of creative thinking. 
Three hours credit. 

C. APPLIED MUSIC 

131-132. PIANO CLASS. A beginning class in piano designed primarily 
for the voice and instrumental majors. Not more than 8 students to a class. 
Two classes each week. 

One hour credit each semester. 

135-136. PRIVATE PIANO INSTRUCTION. Training in the funda- 
235-236 mentals of technique. Progressive studies are used to make pos- 
335-336 sible a study of the world's finest piano literature. Participa- 
435-436 tion in recitals is part of the course. Senior recital. 
One half or one hour credit each semester. 

141-142. VOICE CLASS. Group instruction for beginning voice stu- 
dents. Emphasis on personal requirements with opportunity for individual 
performance. Two classes each week. 
One hour credit each semester. 

93 



145-146. PRIVATE VOICE INSTRUCTION. Training in the funda- 
245-246 mentals of good singing with a study of various styles of song 
345-346 literature. Performance in recitals is required once each semes- 
445-446 ter, with fourth year voice students presenting a major recital 
before graduation. 

One half or one hour credit each semester. 

151-152. BAND INSTRUMENTS CLASS. Group instruction at the 
beginning level in band instruments. Two classes each week. 
One hour credit each semester. 

155-156. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN BAND INSTRUMENTS. 

255-256 Training in the fundamentals of performance on one or more in- 
355-356 struments of the band. Progressive studies offer the opportunity 
455-456 for the student to advance to the level of recital performance. 
Senior recital required. 

One half or one hour credit each semester. 

165-166. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN STRINGS. Training in the 
265-266 fundamentals of performance on one or more of the string 
365-366 instruments. Progressive studies make possible advancement to 
465-466 the level of recital performance. Senior recital required. 
One half or one hour credit each semester. 

175-176. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN ORGAN. Satisfactory back- 
275-276 ground in piano is required to study organ. Additional work 
375-376 in piano may be required at the discretion of the department 
475-476 head. The organ student is given the opportunity to work with 
progressive studies in both church and concert repertory. Senior recital. 
One half or one hour credit each semester. 

325-326. CHORAL AND/OR INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING. A 

study of the fundamentals of conducting with frequent opportunity for 
practical experience. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

334. PIANO ENSEMBLE. A course designed to explore piano litera- 
ture for four and eight hands. Required of piano majors. Open to any 
qualified student. Two classes each week. 
One hour credit. 

344. VOCAL METHOD CLASS. A study of anatomy relative to vocali- 
zation; diction is studied through phonetic spelling. Practical application 
is made by singing individually and as a class. Required of voice majors. 
Open to any qualified student. Two classes each week. 
One hour credit. 

94 



364. INSTRUMENTAL METHOD CLASS. A course designed to study 
instrumental method. Required of instrumental majors. Open to any 
qualified student. Two classes each week. 
One hour credit. 

♦ENSEMBLE 

137-138, 237-238, 337-338, 437-438 Men's Glee Club 

139-140, 239-240, 339-340, 439-440 Women's Glee Club ' 

147-148, 247-248, 347-348, 447-448 College Choir 

149-150, 249-250, 349-350, 449-450 A Cappella Choir 

157-158, 257-258, 857-358, 457-458 Lycoming Singers 

159-160, 259-260, 359-360, 459-460 College Band 

163-164, 263-264, 363-364, 463-464 College Orchestra 

* Vz hour credit per semester for music majors. The 100, 200, 300, and 400 
numbers refer to the freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years respec- 
tively. 

PHILOSOPHY 

207. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. This basic course intro- 
duces the student to the philosophical spirit as distinguished from the 
scientific; the criteria of truth based upon the synoptic method as a 
coherent organic whole; comparison of ideas to reality with major consider- 
ation of universals and values. 
Three hours credit. 

209. PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY. The study of the chief philo- 
sophical world views with the aim to develop a perspective for the inter- 
pretation of experience. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 207. 
Three hours credit. 

210. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. A study of the philosophical 
foundations of religion, with special emphasis on the intellectual bases for 
the belief in God, the problem of good-and-evil, human personality, relig- 
ious experience, and human immortality. 

Three hours credit. 

303. ETHICS. The central purpose of this course is to give constructive 
guidance in areas of vital concern to modern youth in college life. The 
modern problems of personal conduct and social ethics are considered in 
the light of the principles of moral obligations. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 207. 

Three hours credit. 

95 



305. LOGIC. An introduction to the principles of reasoning based upon 
the methods of inductive and deductive logic with a major consideration of 
the laws of thought, the syllogism, fallacies, methods of science, and criteria 
of truth. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 207. 
Three hours credit. 

401. HISTORY OF ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY. A 
study of the ancient and medieval philosophers and their major contribu- 
tions. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 207. 
Three hours credit. 

402. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY. A study of modern 
philosophy beginning with Francis Bacon and the development of empiri- 
cism, rationalism, idealism, positivism, pragmatism, and personallsm. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 207. 
Three hours credit. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

It is the aim of the physical education department to provide a suitable 
and useful program for the development of reasonable skill and perma- 
nent interest in wholesome activities; to stimulate the formation of regular 
health habits; and to develop in each student a high degree of physical 
fitness. 

The specific requirement for graduation consists of successful com- 
pletion of four semesters of required physical education. In case of a 
physical disability, limited participation upon the recommendation of a 
physician and with the consent of the department head will be arranged 
if practicable. 

101-102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Men). Basic instruction in fun- 
damental activities such as soccer, swimming, badminton, tennis, bowling, 
volleyball, basketball, Softball, boxing, touch football, calisthenics, gym- 
nastics, etc. Passing a proficiency test in swimming shall be required. 
Two hours each week. 

111-112. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Women). Basic instruction in the 
fundamentals of "carry over" sports such as: swimming, tennis, badminton, 
bowling, volleyball, basketball, softball; plus calisthenics, informal gym- 
nastics, folk dancing and character dancing. Two hours each week. 

201-202. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Men). More advanced work in 
the activities offered freshmen. The student is encouraged to utilize the 

96 



basic fundamentals and to become a skillful enthusiast in the voluntary 
program of intramural activities conducted by the department. Two hours 
each week. 

211-212. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Women). More advanced work in 
activities offered freshmen. The student is permitted to express a pref- 
erence for the sports she likes best and encouraged to become a skillful 
enthusiast in the activities of her choice. A reasonable degree of proficiency 
in a sport of her choice shall be required. Two hours each week. 



PHYSICS 

101-102. GENERAL PHYSICS. A course in the first semester covering 
mechanics, heat, and sound; and in the second semester, magnetism, elec- 
tricity, and light. Lectures and recitations based on a standard text ac- 
companied by a systematic course In quantitative laboratory practice. 
Three hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or equivalent. 

Five hours credit each semester. 

201. STATICS. The division of mechanics which includes the fundamen- 
tal conception of a force, the resolution of a force into components, and the 
composition of forces into a resultant. Both the analytical and the graphic 
solutions are used. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102; Physics 101. 
Three hours credit. 

202. STRENGTH OF MATERIALS. The application of analytical and 
vector methods to mechanical systems, including moment and shear dia- 
grams. 

Prerequisite, Physics 201. 
Three hours credit. 

207. TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEYING. Field and drafting room 
practice in the use of the compass, transit, and level. Computations and 
map-making are included in the course. Six hours class and laboratory 
each week. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101 and 102. 
Three hours credit. 

301. DYNAMICS. A division of mechanics including forces which act 
on a body to cause a change in its motion. 

Prerequisite, Physics 201. 

Three hours credit. 

97 



302. METEOROLOGY. A study of basic principles pertaining to the 
observation and recording of weather data, and the basing of future 
weather predictions on them. 

Three hours credit. 

303. LIGHT. A study of the tlieories of physical optics and an introduc- 
tion to modern spectroscopy. 

Prerequisite, Physics 101-102. Conference on mathematical background 
required. 

Three hours credit. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

A major in political science consists of a minimum of 24 hours in the 
courses listed below: 

201. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. An inquiry into tlie structure and 
functions of the various organs of national government, with special refer- 
ence to their expansion to meet the problems of a modern society. 

Three hours credit. 

202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. A comparative study of 
the organization and functions of the states and their subdivisions, their 
relationship to tlie federal government, and the newer concept of the work 
of state administration. 

Three hours credit. ' 

301. PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. A study to acquaint 
the student with the functions of the modern state, the development of 
political thought, individual liberty under the law, and the nature of 
political parties. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

302. POLITICAL PARTIES AND PRESSURE POLITICS. A study 
of political parties in the United States with emphasis upon factors of con- 
trol, campaign techniques, propaganda, and their relationship to pressure 
groups. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 
Three hours credit. 

AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS. (See History 302.) 

BUSINESS LAW. (See Business Administration 302 and 303.) 

98 



303. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. An analysis of several govern- 
ments of the world, affording a comparison between democratic and authori- 
tarian states, with particular attention directed to changes resulting from 
World War II. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

304. MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. An analysis of different forms of 
city government in the United States, the relation of the city to the states, 
city politics and elections, and the problems of municipal administration. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

401. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. A study of the principles, organ- 
ization, and procedures of public administration, with special attention to 
the location of authority, analyses of objectives, and the problems of re- 
sponsible bureaucracy. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

405. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. The setting for the struggle for 
power and peace in our time: evolution of the national state system; the 
arts of diplomacy; imperialistic rivalries; the quest for a world wide rule 
of law. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. (See 
History 405-406.) 

406. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. The postwar crisis in world 
politics: the new role of the great powers of yesterday; the two-bloc system 
and the ideological conflict; the problem of peace in the middle 20th century. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

409. INTERNATIONAL LAW. A study by the case method of the na- 
ture and scope of the rules governing the conduct of states with one another 
during peace, war and neutrality. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1964. 

415-416. STUDIES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. Conferences, and oral 
and written reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's 
knowledge of the Political Sciences. Limited to qualified majors. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

99 



PSYCHOLOGY 

A major In psychology consists of 24 hours of the following courses: 

201. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. A brief study of the nervous system, 
sensory processes, and the physiological drives in behavior. Textbook, 
lectures, readings, and experiments. 
Three hours credit. 

204. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. The behavior of the individual with 
reference to the group. Social factors in personality, such as imitation, 
suggestion, attitudes, ideals, etc. Reciprocal effect of group behavior on 
the individual. 

Three hours credit. 

205. HUMAN RELATIONS. A study of the social and psychological 
interaction of people with emphasis upon the conditions for, and diagnosis 
of, harmonious relations. Basic study materials are cases drawn from 
everyday experiences, supplemented by selected readings from a wide 
variety of sources. Class discussions, reports, few lectures. 

Three hours credit. 

206. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. A continuation of Psychology 201 for 
students specializing in Psychology. 

Three hours credit. 

301. INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. The application of the principles 
to vocational guidance, problems of personality, problems of employment, 
advertising, the professions, and physical efficiency. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 201. 
Three hours credit. 

302. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. A general survey of the principal 
forms of mental abnormalities with emphasis upon symptoms, causes, and 
treatment. 

Prerequisite, two courses in Psychology. 
Three hours credit. 

303. MENTAL HYGIENE. Technique for diagnosing personality, study 
of personality. 

Prerequisite, three hours in Psychology. 
Three hours credit. 

308. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. Aims to study behavior from birth to 
maturation; principles in harmony with normal, wholesome development of 
childhood; consideration of intellectual, emotional, social, physical, and 
vocational adjustments of youth. 
Three hours credit. 

100 



309. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. A survey of the general psy- 
chological principles as applied to learning and the development of per- 
sonality. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 20L 

Three hours credit. 

401. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. Practical survey course of the 
field of tests, and measurements; deals with development of tests, principles 
involved in construction, administration, uses, and misuses of tests in 
school, industry, and court. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 201, 309, and 411. 

Three hours credit. 

402. SYSTEMATIC PSYCHOLOGY. A study of the various theories of 
Psychology, with regard to their agreements and conflicts. 

Prerequisite, three hours in Psychology. 

Three hours credit. 

411. STATISTICS. Numerical trends, curve, index, correlations, inter- 
pretation of charts and graphs. 

Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN PSYCHOLOGY. Conferences, and oral and writ- 
ten reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge 
of psychology. Limited to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



RELIGION 

101. THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS. A critical approach 
to the life and teachings of Jesus according to the Gospel of Luke and 
its historical background. A comparison of tlie other synoptic gospels in 
an effort to give an integrated life of the Master. 
Three hours credit. 

205. GROWTH OF THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH. A general 
survey of the literature of the New Testament with the Act of the Apostles 
considered as the basic source followed and integrated by the writings of 
Paul. The literature will be studied in both the historical and literary 
approach with reference to dates, background, authorship, and general 
teachings. 

Three hours credit. 

101 



206. THE LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT. A survey of 
the most important works of the Old Testament concerning the nature of 
authorship and the general teaching of these books. 
Three hours credit. 

209. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF RELIGIOUS EDUCA- 
TION. A survey of the entire field of religious education will be made in 
its growth and development, including Judaism, Graeco-Roman, and Chris- 
tian education, paralleling the history of the Church, with particular em- 
phasis upon the period from Luther to the present. 

Three hours credit. 

210. EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE CHURCH. A course designed 
to develop an understanding of the objectives, organization, and program 
of religious education. Adaptation to age groups, training of leaders, 
cooperation with the total church program. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

305. THE PROPHETS. A consideration of the prophetic movement in 
Israel beginning with the pre-literary prophets and including the works of 
Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and the prophets of the Restoration. 

Prerequisite, Religion 206. 
Three hours credit. 

306. COMPARATIVE RELIGION. A comparative study of the re- 
ligious beliefs and practices of mankind as they are represented in the 
living religions of the present day. 

Three hours credit. 

401. CONTEMPORARY RELIGIONS IN AMERICA. A study of the 
religious life in the United States with special reference to the Protestant 
church, but also including the Roman Catholic church, Judaism, and the 
sects. Members of various religious groups will be invited to present their 
views to the class. 

Three hours credit. 

SCIENCE 

Science 101-102 satisfies the science credit for graduation, but may not 
be counted toward any science major. 

101. SCIENCE. Survey course in the principles of the Physical Sciences. 
Three hours credit. 

102. SCIENCE. Survey course in the principles of the Biological Sciences. 
Three hours credit. 

102 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

105-106. ELEMENTARY SHORTHAND. See Business 105-106. 
107-108. ELEMENTARY TYPEWRITING. See Business 107-108. 

114. BUSINESS COMPUTATIONS. See Business 114. 

115. BUSINESS COMPUTATIONS. See Business 115. 
116-117. BOOKKEEPING. See Business 116-117. 

205. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE. See Business 205. 

214. MEDICAL SHORTHAND. See Business 214. 

222. OFFICE PRACTICE. See Business 222. 

231-232. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND. See Business 231-232. 

235-236. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING. See Business 235-236. 



SOCIOLOGY 

A major in sociology consists of a minimum of 24 hours of the follow- 
ing courses: 

101. INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY. Introduction to principal con- 
cepts, methods, and terminology centering upon a study of society, culture, 
the group, institutions, and the principles and processes of human inter- 
relationships. 

Three hours credit. 

201. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. A survey of certain problems of the con- 
temporary social order including: the social hazards of modern industrial 
life; urbanization; social security; unemployment; illegitimacy; city plan- 
ning; social settlements; social effects of the labor movement. 

Three hours credit. 

202. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY. A study of the background 
and contemporary aspects of the modern American family covering: cultural 
backgrounds of the modern family; historical phases of the modern family; 
contemporary family problems— biological, economic, and psychological; 
family disintegration and reorganization. 

Three hours credit Not offered 1953-1954. 

204. SOCIAL PATHOLOGY. A survey of the more serious pathological 
maladjustments of contemporary American society including: poverty; drug 
addiction; alcoholism; mental disease; prostitution; neglected children; dis- 
ablement; and old age. One or more preliminary courses in Sociology 
desirable. 

Three hours credit. 

103 



211. WORKSHOP IN THE CHURCH. A discussion of the problems 
of parish workers, and a study of the techniques of administration, public 
worship, preaching, visitation, evangelism, finances, religious education, 
conducting weddings and funerals and other pastoral functions. Required 
of those serving charges while enrolled at Lycoming College. This course 
is also offered to students in the Church Work curriculum. 

One hour credit each semester, with a maximum of three hours credit. 

213. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. A study of different cultures, 
particularly of primitive man, but including consideration of modern 
society. Deals with technology, social organization, basic institutions, and 
the process of change. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

302. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. The aims, goals, and purposes of 
education as interpreted from the sociological viewpoint including: the 
school as a social institution; the home and education; the community and 
education; improvement of teaching service; educational guidance; disci- 
pline; and moral education. 

Three hours credit. 

303. URBAN SOCIOLOGY. A study of functions of cities and social 
processes in urban areas. 

Three hours credit. 

310-311. RURAL SOCIOLOGY. A study of the nature of rural social 
systems with emphases on the family and informal groups; neighborhood 
groups; social strata; rural service agencies; religious, educational, political, 
and occupational groups. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

313. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. General survey of the 
history and present status of the chief types of social work. Social work 
skills are not taught in this course. Field trips to various social agencies 
are part of the course experience. 
Three hours credit. 

321. PROGRAM OF THE CHURCH. The place, function, and pro- 
gram of the church with particular emphasis upon worship, organizations, 
and administration as they enable the church to contribute to society. 
Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

401. CRIMINOLOGY. An introductory course including the nature and 
causes of crime; criminal detention and court procedure; the punishment 
of crimes; parole; and crime prevention. 
Three hours credit. 

104 



402. RACIAL AND MINORITY PROBLEMS. A study of the adjust- 
ments which the minority racial and national groups in our population are 
making; the contributions of these groups to the culture patterns in the 
United States; and immigration and naturalization problems. 
Three hours credit. 

413. RURAL COMMUNITY. A study of the various types of small 
American communities. A survey of the patterns of interaction, competi- 
tion, and cooperation within them and a discussion of the needs and methods 
for their cultural and Christian improvement. 
Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN SOCIOLOGY. Conferences, and oral and written 
reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge of 
Sociology. Limited to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit each semester. Not oflfered 1953-1954. 

417. CONCEPTS OF RURAL LIFE. An analysis of the fundamental 
features underlying rural life, with a critical evaluation of the relation of 
country life to the whole of American society. The most effective means of 
developing the best features of rural life will be discussed. 

Three hours credit. Not offered 1953-1954. 

421. LEADERSHIP. An analysis of the opportunities for and problems 
of leadership in rural and urban areas. The personal qualities necessary 
for such responsibilities will be discussed to encourage more effective 
leadership. 

Three hours credit. 



SPANISH 

A major in Spanish consists of 24 hours beyond Spanish 12. 

11-12. BEGINNING. Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar; 
practice in reading, conversation, and composition. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

101-102. INTERMEDIATE. Review of grammar. Study of modern 
texts; outside reading and reports; practice in conversation and composi- 
tion. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 11-12 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

106 



201-202. ADVANCED. Reading of Golden Age and modern texts; out- 
side readings and reports. Study of principal literary movements and 
civilization. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 101-102 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

203-204. COMMERCIAL. Study of business letters and practice in writ- 
ing replies. Business terminology and trade relations with Spanish-speak- 
ing countries, dictation of typical business material. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 101-102 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301-302. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. Spanish style illustrated by reading 
representative modern authors. Difficult points of grammar and usage 
studied. Drill on idioms and verb forms of high frequency. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 201-202, 203-204 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

303-304. CONVERSATION. Study of customs, manners, and conditions 
in Latin America. Representative works are read and discussed in Spanish. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

305. CERVANTES. Lectures on the thought and prose literature of the 
Golden Age in Spain, comparison with trends in other literatures. Study of 
the Novelas ejemplares and Don Quijote of Cervantes. Readings and 
reports. 

Prerequisite, two years of college Spanish. 
Three hours credit. 

306. GOLDEN AGE DRAMA. Lectures on the history of Spanish 
drama, comparison with the drama of other countries. Study of plays by 
Lope de Vega and Calderon. Readings and reports. 

Prerequisite, two years of college Spanish. 

Three hours credit. 

401-402. SURVEY. A study of representative works from the earliest 
monuments to modern times. Analysis of the texts and their relations to 
other literatures. Required of all majors. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 301-302 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

41.5-416. STUDIES IN LITERATURE. Special studies for majors. 
Conference hours and reports to be arranged. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 401-402. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

106 



SPEECH 

101. PUBLIC SPEAKING. Development of assurance in public appear- 
ance through prepared and impromptu speaking. Training in voice produc- 
tion, body control, enunciation, pronunciation, use of correct English. 
Elementary training in speaking over the radio. Voice recordings. 

Three hours credit. 

102. PUBLIC SPEAKING. Advanced course in types of public ad- 
dresses, panel discussions, debating, choral reading, and in outline making. 
Training in speaking on the radio, construction of addresses for radio 
demands. 

Prerequisite, Speech 101. 
Three hours credit. 

201. RADIO SPEECH. Introduction to proper radio speech technique, 
microphone practice, criticism, voice recordings, interpretation of radio 
dramatic material. Local broadcasts. Instruction in use of panel and 
controls. 

Three hours credit. 

302-303. PLAY PRODUCTION. Fundamentals of acting, stage design, 
costume, and make-up. Study of content of various types of plays from 
production point of view, and laboratory work with production of plays 
the final goal. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



107 



INDEX 



Accrediting 3 

Activities Fee 22 

Administrative Assistant 14 

Administrative OflScers 8 

Admission Requirements 39 

Advance Standing 42 

Aim 16 

Application Procedure 39 

Art 22,51,62,68 

Atiiletics 36 

Attendance 44 

Audio-Visual Services 20 

Biology 46,69 

Board of Directors 6 

Board of Directors 

Standing Committees 7 

Books and Supplies 22 

Buildings 17 

Business Administration 54, 71 

Calendar 4 

Chemical Engineering 59 

Chemistry 46,78 

Church Work 58,79 

Clarke Memorial 17 

College, the Location 

and History 15 

College Publications 35 

Cooperative Programs 65 

Contents, Table of 6 

Courses of Instruction 67 

Art 68 

Biology 69 

Business Administration 71 

Chemistry 78 

Church Work 79 

Drawing 79 

Economics 79 

Education 81 

English 82 

French 84 



PAGE 

German 85 

Greek 86 

History 87 

Mathematics 89 

Music 91 

Philosophy 95 

Physical Education 96 

Physics 97 

Political Science 98 

Psychology 100 

Religion 101 

Science 102 

Secretarial Science 108 

Sociology 103 

Spanish 105 

Speech 107 

Cultural Influence 34 

Curriculum Information 39 

Degrees 46,54 

Directors, Board of 6 

Directors, Committees of 7 

Discipline 38 

Discounts 25 

Dismissal 38,43 

Divisions 67 

Dormitories 17 

Drawing 79 

Economics 46,79 

Education 53,58,81 

Engineering 65 

English 46,82 

Expenses 23 

Faculty 8 

Fees 21 

Financial Information 21 

Forestry 65 

Fraternities 36 

French 84 

Freshmen, Provisions for 33 



108 



INDEX — Continued 



PAGE 

General Information 15 

German 85 

Grading System 42 

Graduation Requirements 44 

Greek 86 

Grounds and Buildings 17 

Guests 26 

Guidance 40 

Gymnasium 19 

Health 36 

History 15,87 

Infirmary Service 37 

Insurance 36 

Library 18 

Loans 26 

Location 15 

Mathematics 46,89 

Medical Secretarial 61 

Music 22,35,64,91 

Organ 64,94 

Overload 43 

Payments, Schedule of 24 

Philosophy 96 

Physical Education 96 

Physical Examination 36 

Physics 97 

Piano 64,93 

Placement Service 41 

Political Science 98 

Prizes 30 

Probation 43 

Programs for Study 45 

Suggested Curriculum for 

A.B. and B.S. Degree 46,54 

Art Major 61 

Business Administration 64 

Church Work 68 

Education 53,58 



Music Major 52 

Pre-Dentistry 49 

Pre-Engineering 59 

Pre-Law 50 

Pre-Medicine 48 

Pre-Ministerial 60 

Art 62 

Medical Technology 67 

Secretarial Science 60 

Medical Secretarial 61 

Music 64 

Psychology 100 

Recreation 36 

Regulations 38 

Religion 101 

Religious Tradition 33 

Resident Student Life 37 

Rich Hall 17 

Scholarships 26 

Science 102 

Secretarial Medical 61 

Secretarial Science 60, 103 

Self-Help 26 

Sociology 103 

Spanish 106 

Speech 107 

Suspension 24 

Student Activities 34 

Student Government 34 

Student Life 33 

Students, Classification of 42 

Student Publications 35 

Students, Summary of 110 

Supervision for Student Pastors 41 

Table of Contents 5 

Terminal Education 40 

Veterans, Provisions for 41 

Violin 64,94 

Withdrawals 24 



109 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

Summer Session 1952 

College Enrollment 
Total Students 102 

Fall Semester 1952 

Arts and Science 182 

Business Administration 103 

P re-Engineering 26 

Secretarial Science 20 

Medical Secretarial Science 19 

Church Work 4 

Laboratory Technology 12 

Art 6 

Music 16 

Nurses (41) and Special Students (21) 62 

Evening School 105 

Less Duplications 8 

Total 547 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

Extension of many of the services rendered by the 
College must depend upon the generosity of private bene- 
factors. A gift or bequest in any amount will be helpful 
in advancing human knowledge and in providing addi- 
tional educational opportunities for the youth who attend 
Lycoming College. 

The President of the College will be glad to discuss 
the needs and projects of the College with interested 
persons, and to suggest means for achieving the object 
of their benefactions. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

To the Trustees of Lycoming College, I give and 

bequeath the sum of $ to be used by said 

Trustees for the uses and purposes of said Corporation. 

110 



Preliminary Enrollment Blank 
Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 



Date 

Name 

Address 

Phone Number Sex Age ... 

Years of High School Work Completed 

Name of High School 

College Work Completed (If any) 

When do you expect to enter Lycoming? 

Which curriculum do you wish to study? 

Are you enclosing registration fee of $10.00? 

If a veteran, check Public Law under which you are eligible 
for training: 346 16 550 



Mail appropriate blank to: 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

LYCOMING COLLEGE, WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



Application for Admission to Summer Sessions 
Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 



Name .... 
Address 



is a student in good standing at 
College 

Location 

and has permission to enroll in the following courses at Lycoming College: 

Seme.iter Hours 



Signed 

Date Dean or Registrar 



GRIT PRl NT