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Full text of "Bulletin of the American Library Association"

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



VOLUME XVI 
JANUARY-NOVEMBER, 1922 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

1922 



CONTENTS 

1922 

January MISCELLANEOUS 

March MISCELLANEOUS 

May MISCELLANEOUS 

July PROCEEDINGS OF THE DETROIT CONFERENCE 

September HANDBOOK, 1922 

November . .MISCELLANEOUS 



INDEX 



A separate detailed index of the Proceedings of the Detroit Con- 
ference is on pages 476-482 and its entries are not repeated here. 



Affiliated national organizations, 513 

The American Legion and the American 
Library in Paris, 74 

A.L.A. constitution and by-laws, state- 
ment by the committee, 65 

A.L.A. executive board action, A8 
The A.L.A. 1921, 26 
A.L.A. reading courses, 67 
Budget, 20 

"Can the banker help the librarian?" 
Puelicher, A16 

Charter, 484 
Committees, 500 
Constitution and by-laws, 486 
Council, 498 

Detroit conference, announcement, 2, 34, 
47; schedule of meetings, 48; program, 
49 

Editorials, 23, 42, 70, A10 
Endowment funds, 504 
Exhibits, A7 

Facts for trustees, 24, 43, 72, A12 
Financial reports, 19, 41, 69, A9 

Honor roll of attendance at conference, 
494 

Is your library organized for education, 
A19 

Library clubs, 517 
Library periodicals, 521 
Library schools, 520 
List of members, 522 
Memberships classified, 491 



Message, from Membership committee, 44; 
from President Root, 76; from President 
Utley, A20 

Mid-winter meetings, Chicago, proceedings 
1921, 4; program 1922, A2 

Necrology, 641 

New and forthcoming A.L.A. publications, 
AS 

New committees, 39 

New nominations, 39 

The next annual conference, 1923, A7 

Nominating committee's report, Note on, 
22 

Nominations, 66 
Officers, 1922-23, 497 

Openings in public health service and 
naval establishment, 69 

Other national library organizations, 514 
Past meetings and attendance, 493 
Past officers, 495 

Present status of library work with chil- 
dren, 21 

Publications, 505 

Purpose of the association, membership 
and dues, 485 

Reading lists and courses, 40 

Salary statistics, large public libraries, A13 

Sections and section officers, 511 

State and provincial library associations, 
515 

State and provincial library commissions, 
519 

Tentative rules for cataloging incunabula, 
A17 

Two-foot shelf for a country school, 68 



i 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



VOL. 16, No. 1 CHICAGO, ILL. JAITOABT, 1922 



The Next Conference 
Report on Nominations 
Mid-Winter Meetings 



PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR. FREE TO MEMBERS. 

Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



VOL. 16, No. 1 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



JANUARY, 1922 



CONTENTS 



A. L. A. Conference Announcement 2 

Nominating Committee's Report.. 

Chicago Mid-Winter Meetings 

Oouncil Meetings 4 

College Librarians of the Middle West!! 15 

League of Library Commissions 15 

Normal School Librarians 16 

University Librarians of the Middle 
West ifi 

Executive Board Action . . 17 



A. L. A. Financial Reports, 1921... ..19 

A. L. A. Budget, 1922 20 

Present Status of Library Work with Chil- 
dren 21 

Editorials 

Facts for Trustees '24 

The A. L. A. 1921 ' 9 6 

Sale, Exchange, Wants, Offers 30 

Announcements of Publications 31 



A. L. A. CONFERENCE 1922 



DETROIT, MICHIGAN, JUNE 26-JULY 1 

The FOBTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 
of the American Library Association will be 
held at the Hotel Statler, Detroit, Michi- 
gan, June 26-July 1, 1922. 

The tentative plans provide for a gen- 
eral session on Monday evening, June 26. 
Other general sessions will probably be 
held on the mornings of Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, Friday and Saturday. Thursday is to 
be a day of recreation but those who wish 
to make the most of their time will find on 
that day many opportunities for library 
visiting and for serious private confer- 
ences. 

A special train will probably be run from 
Detroit to Ann Arbor, leaving Detroit be- 
tween ten. and eleven in the morning and 
reaching Ann Arbor an hour later, in time 
for an early lunch at the University Union 
on the campus. The luncheon will prob- 
ably be followed by one or two talks by 
representatives of the University and after 
that the A. L. A. delegates will be at lib- 
erty to visit the library of the University 
in its new building or to roam about the 
campus at their leisure. The return trip 
will probably start about four thirty. 

Thursday evening is tentatively set aside 
for the groups which wish to arrange for 
dinner meetings library schools and oth- 
ers. Any groups which wish to hold meet- 
ings without dinner on that evening can 



probably be provided for in meeting rooms 
outside the Statler Hotel. 

A boat ride on the Detroit River and 
Lake St. Clair is tentatively scheduled 
for Friday evening at eight. The 'boat used 
will probably be a large ferry boat capable 
of accommodating two thousand people. 
Assuming that somewhere between a thou- 
sand and fifteen hundred people are in our 
party, there will be ample room for danc- 
ing or one-act plays or any other enter- 
tainment which the local or entertainment 
committees may see fit to provide. 

The afternoons of Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday and the evenings of 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday are 
available for meetings of affiliated soci- 
eties, sections and other groups. 

Most of the meetings, general sessions 
and others, can be held on the mezzanine 
floor of the Hotel Statler, which is given 
over almost entirely to the ball room, ban- 
quet halls and private dining rooms. There 
is ample room on this floor also for a reg- 
istration desk and for the official exhibits. 
Arrangements are being made for commer- 
cial exhibits in sample rooms on the thir- 
teenth or fourteenth floors. Commercial 
exhibitors should write to the manager of 
the Hotel Statler and make arrangements 
for desired space. Committees of the 
A. L. A. or affiliated groups desiring to 
make official exhibits should communicate 



with the secretary of the A. L: A. until 
some member of the local committee has 
been designated to have charge of the ex- 
hibits. 

In the vicinity of the Hotel Statler are 
numerous other hotels and it will be pos- 
sible for persons attending the conference 
to find the accommodations they want, pro- 
vided the reservations are made well in 
advance. A list of some of the hotels with 
rates follows and reservations may be made 
at once. We are asking the hotels to con- 
sider reservations received before Febru- 
ary fifteenth as arriving on the fifteenth. 
Although several hundred rooms have 
been tentatively set aside for members of 
the American Library Association, it is 
very important that the people who are 
expecting to attend this conference make 
their reservations several weeks or, per- 
haps, several months in advance, in order 
that the Statler and other hotels near by 
may make their plans to accommodate as 
many as possible of our delegates. 

Reservations of rooms should be made 
directly with the hotel in which you wish 
to stay. If the hotel cannot give you what 
you ask for, the letter will be referred to 
the local committee of which Adam 
Strohm, of the Detroit Public Library, is 
secretary. 

HOTELS 

European Plan. 

Hotel Statler (Headquarters) 

Washington Blvd. and Park 

Single room with shower $ 3.00-$ 3.50 

Single room (outside) with tub 

and shower 4.00- 8.00 

Double room with shower 5.00- 5.50 

Double room (outside) with tub 

and shower 6.00- 10.00 

Room for four, two beds 10.00- 14.00 

Hotel Wolverine 
Elizabeth and Witherell 

Single room $2.50-$6.00 

Double room 4.50- 8.00 

All rooms with tub bath. 

Hotel Toller 
Park and Adams 

Single room $2. 50-|5.00 

Double room 4.50- 7.00 

All rooms with bath. 

Hotel Charlevoix 

45 Park Blvd. 

Single room without bath $2.00 

Single room with bath $2.50-3.00 

Double room without bath 3.00 

Double room with bath 4.00- 5.00 

2 bedroom combination with bath: 

For 2 persons 3.00 each 

For 3 persons 2.50 each 

For 4 persons 2.00 each 

Hotel Addison 
Woodward and Charlotte 

Single room without bath $2.00-$2.50 

Single room with bath $2.50-6.00 

Extra $1.50 per person, two or more In room. 



Hotel Cadillac 

Washington Blvd. and Michigan 
Single room without bath... $2.00-$2.50 

Single room with bath $2.50- 3.50- 4.00 

Double room without bath.. 3.00- 3.50- 4.00 

Double room with bath 4.00- 5.00- 6.00 

Hotel Fort Shelby 

First and LaFayette 

Single room without bath... . $2.00 

Single room with bath $2.50- 3.00 

Double room with bath $3.00- 4.00- 5.00 

Hotel Norton 

Griswold and Jefferson 

Single room without bath $2.00 

Single room with bath $2.50- 3.00 

Double room without bath 3.50- 4.00 

Double room with bath 4.50- 5.00 

The Tuller is across the street from the 
Statler; the Charlevoix, Cadillac and Wol- 
verine, from two to four blocks away. 

In the main dining room at the Statler 
table d'hote meals are served at the follow- 
ing rates: Breakfast, $0.75; lunch, $0.85, 
and dinner, $1.50. There are also a grill 
room, a coffee room and a cafeteria. 

In other hotels and restaurants in the 
vicinity one may find meals at all prices. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE'S REPORT 

The undersigned Committee on Nomina- 
tions, American Library Association, begs 
leave to report unanimously the following 
nominations for officers for the ensuing 
year: 
President 

Belden, C. F. D. 

Jennings, Judson T, 

Keogh, Andrew. 
1st Vice-President 

Utley, George B. 

Rathbone, Josephine A. 

Strohm, Adam. 
2nd Vice-President 

Rose, Grace. 

Moore, Annie C. 

Wyer, Malcolm G. 
Treasurer 

Tweedell, Edward D. 

Krause, Louise B. 

Koch, Theodore W. 
Executive Board 

Bishop, W. W. 

Hadley, Chalmers. 

Hopper, Franklin F. 

Hyde, Jr., Dorsey W. 
Wyer, J. I. 

Hitchler, Theresa. 

Marvin, Cornelia. 

Donnelly, June R. 

Watson, William R. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Council 

Dudgeon, Matthew S. 
Gerould, James T. 
Guerrier, Edith. 
Mulheron, Anne M. 
Barr, Charles J. 
Brown, Charles H. 
Browning, Earl W. 
Compton, C. H. 
Greene, Charles S. 
Hamilton, W. J. 
Hazeltine, Alice I. 
Hirshberg, Herbert S. 
Doren, Electra C. 
Lester, Clarence B. 
Lowe, John A. 
Lydenfoerg, H. M. 
McCollough, Ethel F. 



MacDonald, Anna A. 

Rush, Charles E. 

Small, A. J. 

Thompson, C. Seymour. 

Webster, Caroline. 

Wood, Harriet A. 

Drake, Jeannette M. 

Clark, George T. 

Leupp, Harold L. 

Reece, Ernest J. 

Vitz, C. P. P. 

Wilson, Martha. 

Johnston, Esther. 

ABTHUB E. BOSTWICK, Chairman. 
EDNA M. SANDERSON, 
MILTON J. FEBGUSON, 
LINDA A. EASTMAN, 
EDWABD F. STEVENS. 
See note on page 22. 



CHICAGO MID-WINTER MEETINGS 



The Mid-Winter Library Meetings at 
the Hotel Sherman, Chicago, Illinois, were 
attended by 275 persons. 

The A. L. A. Council held three ses- 
sions; the League of Library Commissions, 
two sessions; the Bibliographical Society 
of America, one session; there were also 
meetings of the Executive Board, the Edi- 
torial Committee, the Committee on Edu- 
cation and informal conferences of uni- 
versity librarians, college librarians and 
normal school librarians. 

COUNCIL MEETINGS 

December 29-30, 1921 

First Session 

A meeting of the American Library As- 
sociation was held in the Hotel Sherman, 
Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, December 29, 
1921, 10 a. m. 
Azariah S. Root, President, presided. 

State Chapters 

A committee consisting of Edward D. 
Tweedell, Carl B. Roden and George B. 
Utley reported that the applications for 
chapter affiliation had been examined and 
recommended that the following state li- 
brary associations be formally affiliated 
with the A. L. A. as state chapters: 

Colorado Library Association. 

Connecticut Library Association. 



Illinois Library Association. 
Indiana Library Association. 
Indiana Library Trustees Association. 
Iowa Library Association. 
Kansas Library Association. 
Maine Library Association. 
Michigan Library Association. 
Minnesota Library Association. 
Montana Library Association. 
Nebraska Library Association. 
New Hampshire Library Association. 
North Carolina Library Association. 
Ohio Library Association. 
Pacific Northwest Library Association. 
Pennsylvania, Keystone State Library 
Association. 

South Dakota Library Association. 

The committee suggested that the 
phrase "Chapter of the American Library 
Association" be used following the name 
,of the state association on letterheads 
and other printed material. 

Henry N. Sanborn stated that it had 
not been the intention of the Committee 
on Constitution and By-Laws to make pos- 
sible the establishment of two chapters 
in one state. Mr. Tweedell answered that 
the constitution and by-laws do not seem 
to prohibit the establishment of two chap- 
ters in one state. 

It was 

Toted, That the report of the committee 
be approved and the chapters be estab- 
lished as recommended. 



BULLETIN 



Library Revenue* 

Samuel H. Ranck, as chairman of the 
Council Committee on this subject pre- 
sented the following resolution: 

The American Library Association de- 
clares that $1 per capita, of the popula- 
tion of the community served, Is a rea- 
sonable minimum revenue for the library 
in communities desiring to maintain a 
good modern public library with trained 
librarians. This sum should cover a 
main library with reading room facilities, 
branch libraries and reading rooms within 
easy reach of all the people in the larger 
communities, a registration of card hold- 
ers equal to thirty per cent of the popu- 
lation, and a considerable collection of 
the more expensive books of reference, 
with a home use of about five volumes 
per capita. Communities desiring their 
libraries to supply these needs exten- 
sively, will need to provide support be- 
yond the minimum of $1 per capita, and 
for the highest grade of service $2 per 
capita would be a reasonable sum. This 
would include extension work sufficient to 
bring home to the children, the foreign 
speaking people, business men, artisans, 
advanced students, public officials, and in 
general all classes of the people, the op- 
portunities that such a library Is not only 
ready but is able to afford, with a serv- 
ice that is administered by trained libra- 
rians having special knowledge in their 
particular departments. Such a service 
should lead to a registration of card hold- 
ers equal to fifty per cent of the popula- 
tion and a reading room attendance equal 
to or greater than the number of books 
issued for home use. 

The Committee recommends that fur- 
ther study be given to the whole subject 
of adequate support for high school and 
grade school libraries, and for college and 
university libraries, to be based on a 
knowledge of the existing situation with 
reference to such libraries. 

JUIJA A. ROBINSON: I wish that the reso- 
lution recognized the fact that the smaller 
communities need a larger per capita in- 
come than the larger communities. 

C. W. ANDREWS: I cannot believe that 
New York needs an income of nine mil- 
lion dollars a year to do its work. 

Mr. RANCK: Some of the cities do not 
have the necessary service. I think we 
ought to stand for more service in the 
large cities than is now given. 

E. H. Anderson said that the situation 
was much complicated in New York be- 
cause the Reference Department of the 



New York Public Library is not main- 
tained by the city and because there are 
many other libraries in the city. 

W. W. BISHOP: All of us have been asked 
to give out statements of what is a reason- 
able amount to maintain a library or a 
department in a library. One of the dif- 
ficulties under which we are laboring is 
the absence of any statement by an author- 
itative body. 

E. C. Richardson spoke in approval of 
the resolution and expressed the hope that 
the committee would continue its inves- 
tigation in the field of college and univer- 
sity library expenditures. 

Mary E. Downey urged state support 
and the development of a sentiment for 
equal library privileges for everybody. 

M. S. Dudgeon, George H. Locke, Wil- 
liam R. Watson, Henry N. Sanborn, George 
T. Settle and Joseph L. Wheeler took part 
in the discussion. 

At the suggestion of Mr. Ranck the mat- 
ter was referred back to the committee 
in order that some of the suggestions 
might be Incorporated in the resolution. 
(See page 11.) 

The Secretary read a letter from the 
National Association of Book Publishers 
on the subject of book buying funds of 
American libraries. 

Copyright Legislation 
M. L. Raney, chairman of the Book Buy- 
ing Committee, presented a detailed re- 
view of American Copyright Legislation, 
concluding with specific resolutions. The 
following is a summary prepared by Dr. 
Raney. 

In America copyright legislation is 
older than the Republic. It is specifically 
authorized in the federal Constitution of 
1787, as follows: 

"ART. I, SEC. 8 The Congress shall 
have power: To promote the progress of 
science and useful arts, by securing, for 
limited times, to authors and inventors, 
the exclusive right to their respective writ- 
ings and discoveries." 

Before that, all of the thirteen original 
States, except Delaware, had enacted a 
copyright law, between 1783 and 1786. Since 
then there has been a steady stream of 
bills and acts, from the First Congress 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



down. Their scope has ever broadened 
and the author been more and more 
fortified in his right. 

Yet there remains a question, and a 
grave one, for it involves the nation's good 
name. We have protected our own writ- 
ers, but have been slow to recognize the 
foreigner. For a century, he could not 
secure United States copyright at all, un- 
less he came here to reside. Even now 
there are such barriers that it is rarely 
sought. Under this stigma, high-minded 
men in and out of Congress have always 
smarted, and from Henry Clay to Grover 
Cleveland diligently sought its effacement. 
More than a half century, however, had 
to pass before the scoring of even partial 
success. 

It was always the printers who blocked 
the way. 

At length in 1891, a so-called Interna- 
tional Copyright Act did pass, but, while 
ostensibly removing the restrictions 
against foreigners, it provided that the 
typesetting and lithography must be done 
in the United States. And in the revision 
of 1909 the same manufacturing clause, 
with binding added, was retained, except 
that books in languages other than Eng- 
lish were exempted. This discrimination 
bars 143 from the International Copyright 
Union, founded at Berne in 1886. Its 
basic principle is that a single grant of 
copyright has validity, without further 
formality, throughout the Union. 

But a new situation has now arisen. 
Since less than one per cent of the Eng- 
lish books published are also copyrighted 
in the United States, the Typothetae have 
announced their consent to the repeal of 
the obnoxious clause (though at the same 
time they demand a higher tariff). 

The Authors' League of America set at 
once about preparing the necessary amend- 
ments for clearing the way to Berne. But 
at the moment of consummation the pub- 
lishers passed official resolutions that their 
approval would be given only on condi- 
tion, 

"That during the existence of the Ameri- 
can copyright in any book, work of art, 
or musical composition, the importation 
into the United States shall be prohibited, 
unless such importation is made with the 



consent of the proprietor of the American 
copyright." 

Since then their position has been 
somewhat modified, according to Mr. R. 
R. Bowker, who reports now their will- 
ingness to have institutions and individ- 
uals import, for use and not for sale, sin- 
gle copies of 

"any book as published in the country 
of origin with the authorization of the 
author, or copyright proprietor . . .pro- 
vided the publisher of the American edi- 
tion of such book has (within ten days 
after written demand) declined or ne- 
glected to agree to supply such copy." 

The effect of either text would be that 
the order for such a book must be given 
to the American publisher. To qualify as 
American publisher he need not have had 
the remotest connection with the actual 
issue of the work. He may merely en- 
gage a territory, then register and deposit 
a copy in Washington. In such instance 
he is in reality only a jobber, but one with 
a monopoly, and the libraries must pay 
"his price. 

What that price (sans competition) 
might be, past experience has taught us 
only too well, since, despite the fair 
charges of many dealers for their English 
stocks, certain important international 
publishers (rnaugre competition) have 
been found to list such books of theirs at 
prices 60/ to 165/ advance over Lon- 
don's. How many of these contracts be- 
tween European publishers and American 
dealers would be struck, one person's 
guess is as good as another's. So far as 
the proposed law is concerned, all foreign 
publications might be so handled. Cer- 
tainly the books of assured sale would be 
shining marks for profiteering, because of 
the depreciation of foreign currency. 

This is not the publishers' first attempt. 
They tried it in 1909. A strenuous cam- 
paign, in Congressional hearings and out, 
was conducted for five years, but they lost. 
In 1891, they came near taking the libra- 
ries in their sleep, and might have suc- 
ceeded but for the Senate's timely awaken- 
ing. Senator Sherman sounded the alarm 
in a speech delivered February 9, and 
others followed, with the result that when 
:he bill came to conference March 3, it was 



BULLETIN 



amended so as to insure to libraries the 
continuance of unhampered importation. 

The publishers' account of this momen-- 
tous decision is that thereby the United 
States swerved from its own, and the 
world's, consistent copyright practice; that 
Congress, while then granting the right 
as usual, introduced at the same time 
such exceptions as to vitiate its value and 
so to violate its principle. This calls for 
an examination of (1) American practice, 
(2) European practice, (3) the nature of 
copyright. 

American Practice 

Prior to 1891, our enactments, in the 
respect here considered, all followed that 
of 1790. The ultimate bill whence sprang 
this Act was introduced by a Representa- 
tive from Connecticut. Connecticut was 
the first of the original States to legislate 
on copyright. Here is the way this parent 
Act of January 1783 defined infringement: 

"If any person or persons within the 
said term of fourteen years as aforesaid, 
shall presume to print or reprint any such 
book, pamphlet, map, or chart within this 
State, or to import or introduce into this 
State for sale, any copies thereof, re- 
printed beyond the limits of this State, 
01 shall knowingly publish, vend and ut- 
ter, or distribute the same without the con- 
sent of the proprietor thereof in writing, 
signed in the presence of two credible wit- 
nesses, every such person or persons shall 
forfeit" etc. 

The prohibition is against importation 
for sale. Similarly spoke eight more of 
the twelve colonies legislating. 

Of the other three, the Maryland Act of 
April 21, 1783 is typical: 

"If any other person . . . shall print, 
reprint, import or bring into the State, or 
cause to be printed, reprinted, imported or 
brought into the State, any such book 
. . . without the consent of the proprietor 
. . . or knowing the same to be so 
printed, reprinted, imported or brought 
into the State, without the consent of the 
proprietors, shall sell, publish, or expose 
to sale, any such book . . . without . . . 
consent . . . such offender . . . shall 
forfeit" etc. 

The first Federal Act, May 31, 1790, fol- 
lows the second or more general form. In 
all cases, it is to be remembered, these 
pronouncements concern only works by 
authors resident in the United States. 



Now that the Connecticut and Maryland 
forms were not regarded by Congress as 
contradictory is clearly indicated in the 
text of the second Federal Act on copy- 
right, April 29, 1802, supplementary to the 
first, "and extending the benefits thereof to 
the arts of designing, engraving, and etch- 
ing historical and other prints," as stated 
in the title. Now these benefits are se- 
cured by calling it an infringement 

"if any print-seller or other person . . . 
shall engrave, etch or work ... or copy 
or sell, or cause to be engraved, etched, 
copied or sold ... or shall print, re- 
print, or import for sale, or cause to be 
printed, reprinted, or imported for sale, 
any such print . . . without . . . con- 
sent" etc. 

The founders of American practice for- 
bade the importation of an American 
author's book, if for sale, and freely al- 
lowed the importation of a foreign au- 
thor's works (unless here resident), even 
going so far as to deny him copyright. 
By implication, they allowed importation 
of any book, if for use, but this has never 
been tested in court. 

Foreign Practice 

Nor abroad does this point appear ever 
to have been under judicial review, accord- 
ing to the statement of foreign statute law 
(and commentaries) presented by request 
at the joint session of the Senate and 
House Committees on Patents, March 29, 
1908, by the Librarian of Congress. 

The British law of 1911 provides that 

"Copyright in a work shall also be 
deemed to be infringed by any person 
who . . . (d) imports for sale or Jiire 
into any part of His Majesty's dominions 
to which this Act extends, any work which 
to his knowledge infringes copyright or 
would infringe copyright if it had been 
made in His Majesty's dominions." 

If it be claimed that this is not specific, 
we then must fall back upon the Acts of 
1842 and 1844. The former prohibited im- 
portation for sale or hire of foreign re- 
prints of British works. The latter (not 
repealing this) prohibited all importation 
save from country of origin. In both in- 
stances, of course, we are here dealing with 
prints authorized, but imported without 
consent. These Acts came to court in 
1896, and while importation of foreign 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



books /or use was not in issue, it was re- 
marked upon and apparently by all four 
judges in the two courts regarded as Im- 
plicit in both Acts. 

Canada allows libraries etc. to import 
the English original. The individual must 
get his through the Canadian licensee, 
who, however, must charge at the English 
price. 

Belgium penalizes only the importation 
of the illicit edition for a commercial pur- 
pose, not one for private use. 

So Germany, by the law of 1870, though 
the present statutes omit the limitation. 
The best commentators, however, regard 
the privilege as still existent. 

The law of other countries is not ex- 
plicit, and the authorities are, accordingly, 
divided, or uncertain. 

For us, British practice outweighs all 
else. As to whether an Englishman can 
import an American author's book copy- 
righted on both sides, here is the opinion 
of the long-time Secretary of the English 
Author's League: 

"In answer to your questions, there is 
nothing whatever, so far as I can see, to 
prevent the importation into England of 
copies of the American edition, whatever 
price the American edition may have been 
published at. ... The remedy would 
be, of course, a remedy under the contract 
in the courts, and not under any statute." 

The Nature of Copyright 
Copyright is not an inherent, but a con- 
ferred right. Its terms are fixed by the 
law. There are other rights, with which 
it must dovetail. Its boundaries are sub- 
ject to adjustment from time to time, from 
country to country. The Legislature may 
restrict in any direction. The restriction, 
if placed, is imposed with the Idea of a 
larger good to be gained. The assign, the 
publisher, buys the author's product with 
full knowledge of these restrictions, and 
barters accordingly. 

Copyright, as any other investiture, has 
a purpose. That purpose, in the words of 
the Constitution is "to promote the prog- 
ress of science and useful arts." To such 
promotion, the restriction on the right may 
be as. potent as the exercise of its residue. 
Thus, Congress has never allowed Ameri- 
can publishers to corner European publica- 
tions as against educational foundations, 



though to the author, whom alone the Con- 
stitution would reward, such importation 
is not a lost sale, and, since for use, it 
breaks no seller's sealed area. Similarly, 
when Education returns to port, no duty 
is laid; at home, her domicile is free of 
tax. She comes to the author's market 
and pays his price, but she will not pay 
a publisher-jobber, no matter what his 
livery, for admittance at her own gates. 
We offer, therefore, the following 

Resolutions 

Whereas, The Authors' League of Amer- 
ica proposes national legislation, includ- 
ing repeal of the so-called "manufactur- 
ing clause" in the present copyright law, 
in order to pave the way for the United 
States' entry Into the International Copy- 
right Union; and 

Whereas, The American Publishers' 
Copyright League (now the Bureau of 
Copyright of the National Association of 
Book Publishers) went on official record 
at its last session as supporting such leg- 
islation only on condition that libraries 
and persons be prohibited by law from im- 
porting the foreign (tho authorized) edi- 
tions of works copyrighted also in the 
United States, except by permission of 
the American copyright owners; 

Be it resolved, That the Council of the 
American Library Association records its 
pleasure at the prospect of authors' se- 
curing, without expense or formality, the 
international protection that is their ad- 
mitted right; 

Resolved, further, That the Council re- 
affirm, however, the Association's wonted 
disapproval of any measure that would 
curtail or cancel the existing privileges 
of importation, supported, as they are, by 
American precedent and violative neither 
of the Federal Constitution nor of for- 
eign practice; 

Resolved, That the Committee on Book 
Buying and that on Federal and State Re- 
lations be and are hereby instructed to 
take every proper and feasible measure 
toward rendering these resolutions as ef- 
fective as possible. 

The meeting adjourned. 

SECOND SESSION 

The Second Session was held in the 
Hotel Sherman at 2:30 p.m., December 
29, 1921, President Root presiding. 
Copyright Law 

The president announced that the dis- 
cussion of the copyright law would be con- 
tinued. 



BULLETIN 



Frederic G. Melcher spoke in part, as 
follows: 

The bill to amend the American copy- 
right law, which is to be presented to 
Congress in January, has the approval of 
the authors, the printers, the publishers, 
and of independent authorities on copy- 
right. It has not been agreed upon by rea- 
son of any "bargain driven," (but because 
they believe in its soundness and justice. 
It has had the advantage in its drafting of 
the wisdom and experience of Eric Schuler, 
Secretary of the Authors' League, of R. R. 
Bowker, the deepest student of copyright 
in this country, of George Haven Putnam, 
Secretary of the Bureau of Copyright, of 
Thorvald Solberg, Register of Copyright 
a'! Washington. 

Except as to one feature, it seems to 
have the approval of those librarians who 
have studied it, and, as this feature has 
already had the approval of Dr. Rothlis- 
berger of Berne, the leading authority in 
the world on copyright, it may be assumed 
that it is not out of accord with good prin- 
ciples of copyright and of abstract jus- 
tice. 

The bill provides that copyright pro- 
tection in the United States shall be 
granted to authors of all countries within 
the Berne Convention from the moment 
their books are published in their own 
countries. American 'books must be de- 
posited and registered at Washington 
after publication, and books from foreign 
countries do not have to be deposited. If 
any American house arranges to publish 
in this country a book of foreign origin, 
he deposits and registers as for an Ameri- 
can book. Foreign editions of books by 
American authors can only be brought 
into this country with the consent of 
the American owner of copyright. Books 
of foreign authorship for which there is 
an American publisher can only be 
brought in by library or by individual 
through the agency of the owner of the 
American copyright, though probably 
ninety per cent of the books of foreign 
origin are never published in this coun- 
try and would be ordered direct. 

The libraries have not objected to the 
provision that keeps foreign editions of 



the six or seven thousand American books 
completely out of this market, but object 
only to the provision which, while not 
keeping out the competitive editions of 
the six or seven hundred English books 
for which American market has been ar- 
ranged, does make it necessary to order 
these through the American publisher who 
has contracted for this market. The au- 
thors believe that such provision is just, 
as it is decidedly to their advantage to be 
able to sell their rights territorially di- 
vided just as they have the right to sell 
dramatic, movie and serial rights sep- 
arately; the printers think this provision 
just, because they are foregoing a good 
deal in withdrawing their opposition to 
the manufacturing clause, and tariff gives 
them no protection in the case of libra- 
ries; the American publishers believe it 
just, because, having undertaken by con- 
tract with the foreign authors to promote 
their books here, and having invested time 
and money to do their part, they believe 
they should have the full responsibility 
for the field, or at least have the courtesy 
of having their very obvious property 
rights admitted by having orders for the 
foreign editions placed through their 
houses. It seems equally probable that the 
American public will gain by such a policy, 
as the book of foreign origin, English, 
Canadian, Continental or what not, which 
has a real value will get a better hearing 
in this country backed by an American 
publisher who has been able to contract 
for the same full American rights as he 
would be able to get for a book of Ameri- 
can authorship. 

Dr. Raney has said that this measure is 
"a distinctly selfish proposal," that "the 
publisher is trying to reap where he has 
not sown," and yet the most competent 
and unbiased of all authorities on copy- 
right, Dr. Rothlisberger, Secretary of the 
Berne Convention, said in November, as 
was indicated above: 

"When an American publisher becomes 
owner of the copyright (under the present 
American law) he does not in consequence 
possess an exclusive right to the home 
market. But importations can be made 
behind his back and against his wishes 
of copies of the European edition. 



10 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



"Now, the American publishers who 
have been complaining for a long time of 
these importation privileges have no inten- 
tion of asking that there be an absolute 
stop put to them, if anyone wants to own 
the overseas editions rather than theirs, 
but they realize that they should have con- 
trol of this traffic and that it should pass 
through their hands. In this they do not 
feel they are demanding anything unfair or 
unreasonable, since the English publish- 
ers having the rights to a work are in- 
vested with the exclusive right to that 
publication in their own territory and can 
also prevent the entrance into their coun- 
try of foreign editions of the work, for 
instance, continental editions of Tauchnitz. 

"The claim of the American publishers 
amounts to this, that they demand the ef- 
fective exercise of 'the right of publica- 
tion territorially shared.' We have sug- 
gested the same solution to the Canadian 
legislature in our comment on the new 
Canadian law, as the best means of safe- 
guarding the Colonial edition against the 
importation of concurrent editions, and 
what would be just in this case must be 
conceded equally when it is a matter of 
the American publishers, namely, the su- 
pervision by them of their own market 
whenever they have obtained from the 
author the right to publish an edition from 
overseas." 

The following communication from R. R. 
Bowker was read: 

I regret that I may not be present at 
the Council meeting to throw any light 
that I can on the proposed measure to per- 
mit entrance of our country into the Inter- 
rational Copyright Union. For more than 
thirty years I have tried to do my part to 
bring about this result, but it has been 
possible to do only partial justice to for- 
eign authors so long as the typographers 
insisted on "the manufacturing clause." The 
International Typographical Union has 
now withdrawn objection to its repeal, but 
success is not possible unless others spe- 
cially concerned are willing to waive sim- 
ilar "reservations." 

The present more serious contention is 
between the two classes of publishers and 
librarians. Publishers point out that they 
cannot negotiate "for the American mar- 
ket" unless they can make fair estimate of 
the number demanded, which, in the case 
of certain classes of books, may be largely 



a library demand, and that under the ac- 
cepted theory that copyright can be sold 
for a specified territory, as well as for a 
specified time or specified use, they may 
Justly claim the exclusive right to import 
books for which they arrange with the 
foreign author either directly or through 
his original publishing representative 
abroad. This view is supported by most 
of the copyright authorities, notably by 
Prof. Rothlisberger, director of the Inter- 
national Copyright Union, and Justice 
Lindley in the leading English case, deal- 
ing directly with books imported for sale, 
pointed out that the exclusive right of im- 
portation is most in accordance with legal 
principles and good sense, and that pro- 
tection by covenant with the original pro- 
prietor is by no means adequate. The 
British practice absolutely consigns to "the 
King's tobacco pipe" works published in 
the Tauchnitz edition, though these are 
not piratical but reprinted by arrangement 
in Germany, and I recall from rny London 
experience obtaining written consent from 
English authors for the importation for 
their own use of American reprints, 
though in those days these were piratical. 
It Is naturally pointed out on behalf of 
librarians that the present privilege of im- 
portation under the Copyright Act recog- 
nizes the right of the foreign author, and 
by prohibiting importation of piratical 
copies incidentally protects his pecuniary 
rights. 

The substitute for the present impor- 
tation clause permits copies of a foreign 
work, copyrighted without formalities un- 
der the terms of the International Copy- 
right Union, to be imported without ques- 
tion until American publication is regis- 
tered and copies deposited here, after 
which a library or an individual may im- 
port for use and not for sale, provided the 
American publisher within ten days after 
written demand declines or neglects to 
agree to supply the copy of the original 
edition demanded. The period of ten days 
thus defined has been accepted in place of 
the thirty days originally proposed to pro- 
tect libraries and other purchasers against 
unnecessary delay. This would seem to 
be a fair compromise between two inter- 
ests incidentally in conflict though in gen- 
eral having the same purpose of promot- 
ing the distribution of books. 

Question has been raised whether 
there should not be some limitation as to 
the price at which foreign editions when 
demanded should be sold by the American 
publisher, but it was found impracticable 
to make any definition of price. The 
phrase "at a reasonable price" which had 
been proposed is so vague that similar 
phraseology has sent such questions to the 
courts for difficult decision, and, of course, 



BULLETIN 



II 



no rate per shilling or per franc, especial- 
ly under present conditions of exchange, 
could be stated. There is every indication, 
however, that there would be fair play in 
this relation and that American publishers 
would not seek to take advantage of libra- 
ries in this respect. 

The instruction to the A. L. A. com- 
mittees proposed by Dr. Raney seems to 
require the committees to insist upon the 
privileges of importation by libraries in 
the present form, and I fear that this 
course, pressed in a spirit that would lead 
to acrimonious dissension, would prove 
the most serious obstacle in enabling us, 
after a generation's endeavor, to join the 
International Copyright Union. I hope, 
therefore, that the Council may decide to 
give the A. L. A. committees such general 
instruction as would enable them to accept 
reasonable compromise and thus keep the 
A. L. A. in line with the other classes con- 
cerned, which are each, from their own 
point of view, making reasonable conces- 
sions. 

Dr. Anderson moved the adoption of the 
resolutions and the motion was seconded. 
There was much discussion. The motion 
carried unanimously. 

Functions of A. L. A. Committees 
Carl B. Roden, chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Committees, presented the follow- 
ing resolutions:. 

Resolved, That the Council transmit to 
the Executive Board the accompanying re- 
port of the Committee on Committees, to- 
gether with the following recommenda- 
tions: 

1. That the observations and conclu- 
sions concerning the several committees, 
embodied in the report, be considered in 
detail with a view to determining the 
proper status of each as a standing or 
specific committee. 

2. That a by-law be formulated and sub- 
mitted to the Association for adoption, 
creating and enumerating the several com- 
mittees to be known as standing commit- 
tees of the A. L. A. and defining their 
powers, duties and jurisdiction. 

3. That the committees heretofore ap- 
pointed by the Council, or by the Presi- 
dent upon request of the Council, which 
are listed among committees of the Asso- 
ciation and are performing duties or ex- 
ercising powers for and in behalf of the 
Association, be reconstituted, reorganized 
or reappointed by the Executive Board, 
either as standing or special committees, 
or that they be merged with other exist- 
ing committees or discontinued, as the 
Executive Board may determine. And be 
it further 



Resolved, That committees created by 
the Council, or toy its presiding officer 
upon request of the Council, are limited, 
as to functions, to consideration of, or 
assistance in, the business of the Council; 
and, as to membership, to persons who 
are members of the Council. 

Mr. Roden moved the adoption of the 
resolution and the motion was seconded. 

In the discussion of the resolution Mr. 
Roden quoted from the report of the com- 
mittee which was submitted at the 
Swampscott conference. 

C. W. Andrews moved to strike out the 
last clause: "and as to membership to 
persons who are members of the Council." 
This amendment was accepted. 

Those who took part in the discussion 
were: Henry N. Sanborn, E. C. Richard- 
son, Margaret Mann and M. L. Raney. 

The resolution as amended was adopted. 

The meeting adjourned. 

THIRD SESSION 

An open meeting of the Council was 
held in the Hotel Sherman at 10:00 a.m., 
December 30, 1921. 

Library Revenues 

Samuel H. Ranck presented the follow- 
ing revised resolution: 

The American Library Association be- 
lieves that $1 per capita of the population 
of the community served is a reasonable 
minimum annual revenue for the library 
in a community desiring to maintain a 
good modern public library system with 
trained librarians. 

This sum should cover a main library 
with reading room facilities, branch libra- 
ries and reading rooms within easy reach 
of all the people, a registration of card 
holders equal to at least thirty per cent 
of the population, and a considerable col- 
lection of the more expensive books of 
reference, with a home use of about five 
volumes per capita per year. 

This allowance of per capita revenue 
may need modification in the case of very 
small or very large communities, or com- 
munities which are otherwise exceptional. 
Small communities may often obtain in- 
creased library service for the same ex- 
penditure per capita by enlarging the area 
of administration. The situation in large 
communities is often modified by the pres- 
ence of good endowed libraries free for 
public use. 

Communities desiring their libraries to 
supply these needs extensively and with 
I ho highest grade of trained service, will 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



find it necessary to provide a support 
much larger than the minimum of $1 per 
capita. This should cover extension work 
sufficient to bring home to the children, 
the foreign speaking people, business men, 
artisans, advanced students, public offi- 
cials, and in general all classes of the 
people, the opportunities that such a li- 
brary is not only ready but able to afford, 
with a service that is administered by 
trained librarians having special knowl- 
edge in their particular departments. 

The Committee recommends that fur- 
ther study be given to the whole subject 
of adequate support for high school and 
grade school libraries, and for college and 
university libraries, to be based on a 
knowledge of the existing situation with 
reference to such libraries. 

Mr. Ranck moved the adoption of the 
resolution and the motion was seconded 
and carried. 

National Certification 
In the absence of C. C. Williamson, 
chairman of the Committee on National 
Certification, P. L. Windsor presented the 
following resolutions: 

Whereas, Special committees of the 
American Library Association appointed 
for the purpose of studying and reporting 
on the proposal for a system of national 
certification for librarians have at two 
successive annual conferences reported 
unanimously in favor of the establishment 
of some such voluntary certification plan 
as has been presented in considerable de- 
tail in their successive reports, and 

WJiereas, In the system of national cer- 
tification as projected, the A. L. A., as the 
principal body of professional librarians 
in the country, will naturally have a pre- 
ponderant influence, and 

Whereas, It is desirable that such a cer- 
tification authority, in order to maintain a 
consistent policy and program over a long 
period of years, should possess the high- 
est degree of independence of thought and 
action consistent with amenability to the 
matured judgment of the members of the 
library profession, and 

Whereas, No practicable means of financ- 
ing the activities of a voluntary certifica- 
tion board are yet in sight, and it is there- 
fore inexpedient to organize such a board 
at once. 

Therefore "be it resolved, That the A.L.A. 

1. Approves in principle the plan and 
purpose of voluntary certification of libra- 
rians, as set forth in the report of the 
special committee on national certification 
presented to the Council of the A. L. A. 
at Swampscott, Mass., and printed in the 



volume of Annual Reports of 1920-1921, 
pp, 78-88, and 

2. Empowers and directs the Executive 
Board of the Association to appoint forth- 
with a special committee, which commit- 
tee, in co-operation with representatives of 
other bodies interested in standards of 
library service, shall be charged with the 
following specific duties and be required 
to report at the next annual conference 
of the Association, to wit: 

a. To prepare, with the aid of compe- 
tent legal advice, articles of incorporation 
for state or federal charter for a national 
certification board for librarians, in which 
board the A. L. A. shall always have the 
power to appoint a majority of the mem- 
bers; and, 

b. To report on ways and means of 
financing the activities of such a certifica- 
tion board. 

Mr. Windsor moved the adoption of 
these resolutions and the motion was sec- 
onded. 

Mr. Windsor explained that personally 
he did not approve any national scheme 
of certification but that if any national 
scheme were to be endorsed by the A.L.A. 
he would recommend the scheme proposed 
by the committee. His objection was not 
to the scheme itself but to the idea of hav- 
ing local educational affairs supervised in 
any degree from outside the state. 

Paul M. Paine had been invited to dis- 
cuss the resolution but was not present. 
In his absence Mr. Paine's statement was 
read by A. H. Shearer. 

After referring to the Lockwood Law, 
now in effect, providing for the establish- 
ment of standards of library service in 
New York State, Mr. Paine said that now 
is the time to guard certification against 
the confusion already existing in so many 
departments of law and public service be- 
cause of the conflicts of the standards of 
the separate states and a lack of uniform 
standards established under federal aus- 
pices. 

He emphasized strongly the importance 
of the national plan for certification and 
the value of consideration of the state 
plans by the American Library Associa- 
tion Committee. He considered the tenta- 
tive scheme proposed by Dr. Williamson's 
committee a wise and just one particularly 
after the clarifying of certain wording. 



BULLETIN 



He discussed the difficulty of applying 
broad and generous standards to certifica- 
tion but he considered this no argument 
against adopting such standards. The 
temptation to make iron clad rules and 
create an artificial distinction, a privileged 
and exclusive professional class, is a thing 
tc be guarded against. 

Mr. Paine considered that the place for 
national certification should make it clear 
that not only now but in the future the 
"equivalent" of the normal mode of en- 
trance into the profession is always going 
to be attainable by the persons who are 
needed in the profession. He said that 
certification would fall far from its ideal 
if It failed to provide for young workers 
in training class and apprentice courses, 
and those who are actively and accept- 
ably practicing their profession. 

The president called attention to the 
fact that the resolution does not involve 
the approval of the details of the plan of 
certification worked out by the committee 
"but commits the Association in principle 
to the plan in general and purpose of vol- 
untary certification." 

DB. SHEAKEB: For most professions there 
is only one grade. A man having been ad- 
mitted to practice medicine, or dentistry, 
or law, practices medicine, or dentistry, or 
law. The people as a whole pick out the 
good ones without any further certifica- 
tion. On the other hand we have here pro- 
posed several different grades. 

W. R. WATSON: The New York state 
law gives the regents power to establish 
standards of service. It is our hope in 
any plan which may be evolved to make 
a provision for advancement from the 
lower grades to the upper grades. In 
other words, the plan which we have out- 
lined requires people without technical 
training and experience, to take examina- 
tion to reach the higher grades; but it in 
no wise deprives anyone of that advance- 
ment. 

H. O. SEVERANCE: It seems to me the im- 
portant thing for us to do is to establish 
standards which can be made into laws in 
the different states. 

M. S. Dudgeon agreed with Mr. Windsor 
and Mr. Severance that the state is the 
logical unit for certification and pointed 



out the difficulties in any voluntary 
scheme. 

C. W. ANDREWS: I am opposed in prin- 
ciple to the policy of certification. I be- 
lieve the grading of people by the persons 
in immediate contact will be of much bet- 
ter service than under any national 
scheme of fixed requirements. 

Adam Strohm, referring to the resolu- 
tion previously passed on library revenues, 
spoke of the necessity of establishing 
higher standards of service to keep pace 
with increased income. He thought cer- 
tification would provide effective legal 
means of excluding from library work 
those who are incapable of rendering good 
service. 

Frank K. Walter advocated an examina- 
tion for everybody whether library school 
graduate or not. He said: "I am not so 
much afraid of certification as to think 
that as soon as certificates are issued the 
head librarians will immediately lose 
their initiative and their power of individ- 
ual judgment." 

MR. DUDGEON: A certificate will elimin- 
ate the absolutely ignorant person and 
will give the trustees a dignified reason 
for refusing to deal with those who are 
not qualified. 

HENBT N. SANBORN: There should be 
some national board for the certifying or 
grading of library schools and training 
classes and we should have the distinc- 
tion drawn between professional and cler- 
ical workers. 

O. S. RICE: State aid to public libraries 
based on the qualifications of the staff 
would help very much to make the cer- 
tification plan a success. I am heartily in 
favor of the certification of librarians by 
state authorities, but I believe the work 
of the A. L. A. -should be advisory. They 
should formulate standards which will 
help states in securing the right kind of 
legislation. 

Mr. Severance moved 

To recommit the resolution to the exist- 
ing committee with direction that it form- 
ulate standards of certification and provi- 
sions which are to be recommended for in- 
corporation into state laws and to suggest 
methods by which the Association can co- 
operate in securing the proper legislation. 

The motion was seconded. 



14 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Mr. Windsor, on behalf of Dr. William- 
son, called attention to the fact that the 
national scheme would make it easier to 
find financial support for a certification 
board and said that under a national 
scheme there would be an easier inter- 
change of librarians between the different 
states. 

Others who took part in the discussion 
were Mary E. Downey and Mary S. Saxe. 

The motion by Mr. Severance was car- 
ried. 
Resolution on the Death of Mrs. Fairchild 

The following minute was presented by 
June R. Donnelly, at the request of the 
president, and was unanimously adopted 
by a rising vote: 

The Council today joins with all who be- 
lieve in the high mission of the book, in 
grateful recognition of the work of one 
who was an ardent apostle of this belief, 
Mary Salome Cutler Fairchild, whose life 
of devoted service to library ideals ended 
on December 20th, in Baltimore. 

From 1892-98, and again in 1909-14 Mrs. 
Fairchild was an honored member of this 
body, giving wise counsel and taking her 
share of responsibility as conscientiously 
as she did every professional duty. 

There are few of us who did not have 
reason to thank her for inspiration and 
stimulus, and many of us know her to 
have been more than we guessed at the 
time the one who set our ambitions for 
library work in the mould they have taken. 

Though the condition of her health made 
it imperative for her to lay down in 1905 
the vice-directorship of the New York 
State Library School, which she had held 
since 1889, the tradition which she estab- 
lished of what library training should 
stand for is still one of the most potent 
influences in every institution which trains 
librarians. Though curricula may change 
with the times, if the spirit should change 
greatly from that which she believed 
should animate library service it would 
be a loss. 

"The right book for the right person" 
still sums up the essence of most of our 
most advanced library thinking and it was 
something she never lost sight of. 

She was born June 21, 1855, in Dalton, 
Massachusetts, the daughter of Artemas 
Hubbard and Lydia Wakefleld Cutler, and 
though much of her life was spent beyond 
its borders, she showed throughout many 
of the best characteristics of her native 
state, and of ier college, then Mt. Holyoke 
Seminary. 

Miss Cutler taught at Mt. Holyoke 1876- 
78, but later turned to library work and 



was the head cataloger at the Columbia 
University Library, 1885-89. Inevitably 
she was one of the leading spirits of the 
first library school, being instructor in 
cataloging at the Columbia Library School, 
1887-89. 

In all professional activities she took an 
active part. She was a life member of the 
A. L. A. and from 1889-92 was assistant 
secretary of the A. L. A. In 1894-95 she 
was second vice-president of the A. L. A. 
and in 1888-89 was vice-president of the 
:New York Library Club. 

One of her most important services was 
as chairman of the A. L. A. Committee in 
charge of the library exhibit of the World's 
Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 1893. 

Not only by her teaching but through 
frequent contributions to library publica- 
tions she spread her influence. 
She was also the author of 
Children's home libraries, 1894, 
Scientific study of philanthropy, 1894, 
Function of the library, 1901. 
Mrs. Fairchild's interest always went 
put to children and to those handicapped 
in any way, and especially toward the 
blind. From 1899-1905 she was librarian 
of the New York State Library for the 
blind. 

Though after 1905 Mrs. Fairchild did 
not again accept a permanent position, her 
health later permitted her for a few years 
to renew her active participation in some 
library work. 

On the death of Miss Kroeger in No- 
vember, 1909, Mrs. Fairchild was prevailed 
upon to act as interim Director of the 
Drexel Institute Library School and take 
charge of the negotiations for a permanent 
director. 

Her months there were few, only from 
November to January, but even in that 
short time she impressed the class in resi- 
dence with her own high spirit. 

In July, 1897, she was married to the 
Rev. Edward Milton Fairchild, and her 
happiness in her home life was a source 
of strength to her while in her profes- 
sional career as well as after her retire- 
ment. 

To her husband and to all who knew 
her, the Council sends its sympathy, but 
for her rejoices that she has entered upon 
a happy holiday from pain this Christmas- 
tide. 

Parcel Post Rate on Books 
At the request of J. I. Wyer the follow- 
ing resolution was presented: 

Resolved, That the American Library As- 
sociation again urge upon the Postmaster 
General the imperative need of such mod- 
ification of the initial pound parcel post 
rate on books passing between any prop- 
erly defined public library and its rural 



BULLETIN 



15 



population adjacent, as is clearly possible 
within the limit of a desired self-paying 
character of the postal service. 

The resolution was adopted. 
Preservation of Historical Archives, Relics 
and Trophies in the Naval Academy 

George B. Utley presented the following 
resolution and moved its adoption: 

Resolved, that the public interest and 
welfare of the national service make it ad- 
visable that the historical archives, relics 
and trophies in the Naval Academy be 
carefully preserved and accurately and 
fully recorded. 

The motion was seconded and the reso- 
lution unanimously adopted. 

Letter from National Association of Book 
Publishers 

The letter of December 10, 1921, which 
had been read at the First Session of the 
Council was brought to the attention of the 
Council by Mr. Ranck who moved that it 
be referred to the Executive Board for ac- 
tion. 

Mr. Dudgeon moved as a substitute that 
the president appoint a committee of three 
which shall make a suitable reply and re- 
port back to the Council. 

The motion was seconded. After some 
discussion it was adopted. 

The meeting adjourned. 

COLLEGE LIBRARIANS OF THE 

MIDDLE WEST 

The conference of the College Libra- 
rians of the Middle West held at the Hotel 
Sherman, December 30, was well attended. 
Ada M. Nelson of Knox College presided. 
A discussion was introduced by Miss 
Fairbanks of Cornell College on BUILDING 

UP OF A COLLEGE LIBBABY OUTSIDE THE IM- 
MEDIATE ROOK NEEDS OF THE IN8TBUCTOB, 

from which it appeared that the portion al- 
lotted to cultural purposes varied from 
one-tenth to one-half. 

Azariah S. Root, librarian of Oberlin 
College Library, spoke on HOW CAN THE 

COLLEGE LIBRARY MANAGEMENT HELP TO STIM- 
ULATE KESEABCH WOBK ON THE PABT OF THE 
STUDENT? 

A paper by Grace Perkins of Wilber- 
force University, on THE BELATION OF THE 

COLLEGE LIBBABIAN TO THE COLLEGE FACULTY 

was read and discussed. 



Other topics of interest to college libra- 
rians were considered, such as THE USE OF 

STUDENT HELP, EXCHANGE OF PEBIODICALS 
AND MAGAZINES, APPOBTIONMENT OF THE 
BOOK FUND AMONG DEPABTMENTS, and LIBRA- 
BY DEPOSIT TO COVEB FINES. 

Maud Mitchell of Milwaukee-Downer 
College read her paper on FIBST EDITIONS. 

The joint session of College and Univer- 
sity Librarians held Saturday morning, 
December 31, is reported with the Uni- 
versity Librarians' meetings. 

Eugenia Allin, librarian of Milliken Uni- 
versity at Decatur, Illinois, is chairman of 
next year's conference. Maud Mitchell of 
Milwaukee-Downer College was selected to 
assist her; these two will choose a third 
member of the committee. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 

The annual conference was held at the 
Hotel Sherman, Chicago, December 30-31, 
1921. Fifteen state commissions were rep- 
resented by twenty-seven delegates. The 
president, William R. Watson, presided at 
the two meetings. 

The Nominating Committee appointed 
by the president was: Clarence B. Lester, 
Julia A. Robinson, Clara F. Baldwin. Irv- 
ing R. Bundy was appointed to audit the 
Treasurer's accounts. 

The first address was SCHOOL AND LI- 
BRARY CO-OPERATION AS EXEMPLIFIED IN MIN- 
NESOTA by James M. McConnell, State 
Commissioner of Education for Minnesota, 
with discussion by Samuel H. Ranck, Mary 
E. Downey, Harriet A. Wood, Elizabeth H. 
West, Adeline B. Zachert, Mary Eileen 
Ahern, Anna May Price, Delia F. Northey 
and others. A motion was carried that 
Mr. McConnell's paper be offered to the 
library journals and the N. E. A. and that 
reprints be distributed to library commis- 
sions and state departments of education. 

Marie Finney of the Educational De- 
partment of the Victor Talking Machine 
Company spoke on THE USE OF PHONOGRAPH 

RECORDS IN EDUCATIONAL WORK. 

The second session was devoted entirely 
to reports of committees and other busi- 
ness of the League. 

A committee was appointed as follows, 
to interest the members of the state com- 
missions in the A. L. A. meeting at De- 



16 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



troit next June: Fannie C. Rawson, Wil- 
liam J. Hamilton, Willis H. Kerr, E. Kath- 
leen Jones and Charlotte Templeton. 

Book wagons, a uniform county library 
sign, and uniform telephone number for 
all libraries, were discussed. A motion 
was carried "that the League of Library 
Commissions go on record as opposed to 
the policy of closed sessions." 

Officers elected for the ensuing year 
are: First vice-president, I. R. Bundy; sec- 
ond vice-president, Elizabeth H. West; 
secretary and treasurer, Anna May Price; 
member of the extension committee, Har- 
riet A. Wood. Other officers are held over. 
(See A. L. A. Handbook, 1921). 

NORMAL SCHOOL LIBRARIANS 

The Normal School Librarians met in 
two sessions presided over by the chair- 
roan, Arthur Cunningham, who stated the 
aims of the meetings to be: 1) to discuss 
the question whether school libraries 
should be developed directly by the school 
or by the public library; 2) to inform our- 
selves as to what is actually being done 
in regard to the supervision and standard 1 - 
ization of school libraries in the various 
states. 

O. S. Rice made a strong plea for the 
school library as necessary to school suc- 
cess, and for the qualified teacher-libra- 
rian as essential to pupils' development. 
Delia F. Northey spoke on "Fitting Li- 
brary Service to School Needs," mention- 
ing the survey of high school libraries in 
Indiana made by a committee of the In- 
diana Library Association and recom- 
mendations regarding school libraries 
subsequently submitted to the State De- 
partment of Education. 

Adeline B. Zachert, Director of School 
Libraries for the Department of Educa- 
tion for Pennsylvania, outlined the Penn- 
sylvania program for school libraries and 
mentioned some of its accomplishments. 

Harriet A. Wood, supervisor of school 
libraries in Minnesota, spoke on the work 
in Minnesota, giving particular attention 
tc rural school libraries. 

The MEASUBINO STICK FOB NOBMAL 

SCHOOL LIBBABIES was explained by Willis 
H. Kerr. Discussion followed regarding 
the academic degree which should be a 



requirement for school librarians; and 
also on the relationship between public 
and school libraries. The discussion was 
participated in by many of those present. 
The second session was given over to 
the consideration of children's literature 
and library science. C. M. Curry of the 
Indiana State Normal School discussed 

STANDARDS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE; Mrs. 

Winifred L. Davis, instructor in the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin Library School, 

MAXIMUM RESULTS WITH MINIMUM INSTRUC- 
TION; and Bertha Hatch, teacher-librarian, 
Cleveland School of Education, THE NOR- 
MAL SCHOOL LIBRARY AND CHILDREN'S LITERA- 
TURE. Summary of reports from twenty- 
nine normal school libraries, compiled from 
a questionnaire on magazines, was pre- 
sented by Elva E. Rulon, librarian, State 
Teachers' College, Peru, Nebraska. 

Margaret Dunbar, librarian of Kent Nor- 
mal School, Kent, Ohio, was elected chair- 
man for the coming year. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIANS OF THE 
MIDDLE WEST 

The University Librarians of the Middle 
West held their fifteenth annual meeting 
December 31, 1921, in two sessions. The 
morning meeting was held in conjunction 
with the College Librarians. 

W. W. Bishop read a letter from W. 
Dawson Johnston offering the co-operation 
of the American Library in Paris in the 
matter of exchange of duplicates. Mr. 
Bishop also described some of his recent 
bookbuying experiences in Europe. 

M. L. Raney spoke for the bookbuying 
committee of the A. L. A. and read the 
brief regarding the Fordney Tariff bill, to 
be presented to Senator Smoot. The brief 
was endorsed by the meeting. 

Mr. Hanson spoke for the committee on 
co-operative cataloging whose recommend- 
ations were unanimously approved. 

Following a discussion initiated by H. 
W. Wilson, a resolution introduced by J. T. 
Gerould was adopted: 

Resolved, that the project for a union 
list of periodicals as presented by Mr. 
Wilson be approved and that the A. L. A. 
Executive Board be requested to appoint 
a committee of three which shall have 
power from time to time to act (1) in co- 
operation with Mr. Wilson in working out 



BULLETIN 



17 



a practicable plan of publication; (2) in 
an advisory capacity during the course of 
publication. 

Mr. Gerould described the new forms of 
university library statistics to be collected 
by the A. L. A., and explained certain 
changes. 

The afternoon session was in the form 
of a round table. 

Various technical devices to facilitate 
library work were discussed. 

P. L. Windsor presented a statement 
from the Conference of Eastern College 
Librarians in regard to the evaluation of 
Library Science degrees by the Associa- 
tion of American Universities, and intro- 
duced a motion urging that the Associa- 
tion of American Library Schools be re- 
quested to take up the matter with the 
Association of American Universities. 
Carried. 

Olive Jones, librarian of the Ohio State 
University, raised the question of titles 
of professional workers in college libra- 



ries. The meeting recommended that the 
Executive Board be asked to appoint a 
committee to take up the whole matter of 
ranking. 

A. H. Shearer representing both the 
American Historical Association and the 
A. L. A. spoke on the projected survey of 
resources of the American libraries. He 
introduced the following motion which was 
adopted: 

Resolved, that the Executive Board be 
requested to appoint a committee to confer 
with and to unite the national historical, 
scientific and other learned societies in an 
effort to secure a survey in each field of 
the available research materials and to 
base on such surveys a program of collec- 
tion which may be adopted by libraries. 

The committee appointed to arrange for 
the meeting next year consists of James 
A. McMillen, Washington University, St. 
Louis; Edward A. Henry, University of 
Chicago; and Frank K. Walter, University 
of Minnesota. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD ACTION 



December 28-31, 1921 

The following is a brief summary of the 
important business transacted by the Ex- 
ecutive Board at the two meetings held 
during the Mid-Winter Conference in Chi- 
cago. 

The Secretary was authorized to repre- 
sent the A. L. A. at the annual meeting of 
the National Association of Book Publish- 
ers in New York City, January 17, 1922. 
This was in response to an invitation from 
the publishers' association. 

Detroit was chosen as the place for the 
next annual conference provided adequate 
hotel accommodations can be assured. The 
date will probably be the week beginning 
June 26th. (See page 2.) 

E. D. Tweedell, Treasurer, presented the 
financial reports for all funds for the year 
ending December 31, 1921, and the reports 
were accepted and approved, subject to 
the approval of the Finance Committee 
and the auditors. (See page 19.) 

On the recommendation of the Treas- 
urer the Chicago Trust Co. was designated 
as Assistant Treasurer of the War Funds. 



A budget covering all funds for 1922 
was presented by the Secretary and the 
Chairman of the Finance Committee. On 
the recommendation of George B. Utley 
for the Finance Committee, the budget 
was approved as submitted. (See page 
20.) 

The President and Secretary were au- 
thorized to apportion the Committee Funds 
and the Secretary was authorized to pur- 
chase a new addressograph outfit for 
headquarters. 

The budget for the War Funds provides 
$24,000 for hospital library work in 1922, 
part of it to be available for incidental ex- 
penses of the hospital libraries under the 
U. S. Public Health Service, and part of it 
for library service in other hospitals where 
ex-service men are being cared for. 

The Board appropriated $50.00 for the 
work of the National Council of agencies 
engaged in rural social work, of which the 
A L. A. is a member. 

Publications. The following recommend- 
ations of the Editorial Committee were 
approved: 



18 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



That the Committee on the A. L. A. Man- 
ual of Library Economy be continued un- 
til the manuscripts for all chapters are in 
hand ; 

That when a list of library schools is 
included in any A. L. A. publication the 
Association of American Library Schools' 
list be used with the statement that it is 
the list of members of the Association of 
American Library Schools; 

That the A. L. A. Catalog be made to 
cover the years 1912-21; 

That the Executive Board agree to pub- 
lish the revised edition of Cannons' Bibli- 
ography of Library Economy, if advance 
subscriptions can be obtained in sufficient 
number to make possible the publication 
of the work without serious loss; 

That the Chairman of the Editorial Com- 
mittee be authorized to negotiate in a pre- 
liminary way for someone to write a book 
of biographical sketches of American li- 
brarians ; 

That the Executive Board approve in 
general the plans made by the Secretary 
and Harriet C. Long for a County Library 
handbook to be written by Miss Long for 
A. L. A. publication; 

That the graded list of books for schools 
compiled by a committee of the Library 
Department of the N. E. A. be published 
by the A. L. A.; 

That the new edition of "Guide to refer- 
ence books" by I. G. Mudge be published 
and that Miss Mudge be asked to finish 
the manuscript by April 1st; 

That the Executive Board authorize the 
preparation of a list of books for high 
schools by the Editorial Staff of The Book- 
list; 

That the propos'ed pamphlet by E. Kath- 
leen Jones on "Hospital Libraries" be pub- 
lished; 

That Sarah C. N. Bogle and Effie L. 
Power be asked to prepare a monograph 
on Children's library work; 

That the publication of "Books and 
Thrift" by the Headquarters Office be ap- 
proved ; 

That the Bookbinding Committee be au- 
thorized to arrange with the Hertzberg 
Bindery of Des Moines for the reprinting 
of the pamphlet "The care of books" with 
such revisions as the Bookbinding Com- 
mittee may think appropriate; 

That the list of books for children pro- 
posed by Clara Whitehill Hunt be ap- 
proved for publication; 

That the new list of "Popular books on 
science," submitted by George P. Bower- 
man, be used as a basis for a reading list 



to be printed and sold in bulk for distribu- 
tion; 

That the Secretary be authorized to ar- 
range for the publication of an adult 
Christmas list to be distributed next au- 
tumn; 

That increased attention be given to the 
publication and distribution of brief read- 
ing lists and reading courses, and that the 
Secretary be authorized to publish such 
lists without specific approval in each case 
by the Editorial Committee or the Execu- 
tive Board. 

On the recommendation of the Secretary 
and the Editor of The Booklist the Board 
authorized the employment of a publica- 
tions assistant for such time as may be 
necessary to push to completion the edi- 
torial work on the A. L. A. Catalog Sup- 
plement, to compile the list of books for 
high school libraries, to do the final edi- 
torial work on a graded list of books for 
schools, etc., under the supervision of the 
Editor of The Booklist the assistant to be 
paid from the funds set aside in the budget 
for publications. 

Dates for Committee Reports 

Voted, That the Secretary be instructed 
to inform all committees that their annual 
reports should be submitted on or before 
May 1, 1922, so that copies can be mailed 
to members of the Council one month be- 
fore the session of the Council at the an- 
nual meeting. 

The authority of committees to repre- 
sent the Association when not specifically 
instructed by the A. L. A., or the Council, 
was discussed as the result of questions 
asked by some committee chairmen, and 
the Board instructed the Secretary to "in- 
form the chairmen of committees who are 
in doubt as to what action they ought to 
take when confronted by a change of 
situation, that they should refer matters 
in question back to the President to be 
laid before the Executive Board for advice 
before taking action." 

The President was authorized to ap- 
point a committee to continue the investi- 
gation of the salary question and to fill va- 
cancies on committees. 



BULLETIN 



19 



A. L. A. FINANCIAL REPORTS, 1921 

Treasurer's Report for January 1, to December 28, 1921 



CfEHEKAL FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance, January 1 $ 7,389.45 

Membership Annual Dues -. . 13,575.30 

Life memberships 575.00 

War Funds (for year 1921) 8,300.00 

Income C a r n e g i e Endowment 

Fund 4,000.00 

Income Trustees' Endowment 

Fund 936.67 

A. L. A. Publishing Funds 4,600.00 

Interest January -November, in- 
clusive 

539,558.73 
Expenditures 

Bulletin $5,863.95 

Conference 1,225.33 

Committee 978.48 

Salaries 16,121.22 

Additional service 1,251.47 

Supplies 907.05 

Postage, telephone and 

telegraph 688.89 

Miscellaneous 545.39 

President's Contingent 

Fund 80.57 

Travel 657.18 

Publishing (Board) Funds 4,000.00 
Trustees' Endowment Fund 575.00 



32,894.53 



Balance, December 28. .$6,414.20 
Permanent balance Na- 
tional Bank of the Re- 
public 250.00 6,664.20 

" $39,558.73 

PUBLISHING rUNDS 
Receipts! 

Balance, January 1 $ 1,956.24 

A. L. A. Income Carnegie Endow- 
ment Fund 4,000.00 

Sales of Publications 21,921.27 

Sale of Books (Review copies) . . . 1,350.00 
Interest January-November, inclu- 
sive . 9.27 



$29,236.78 



Expenditures 

Salaries $7,386.77 

Printing Booklist 4,244,68 

Advertising 633.35 

Express and postage 1,199.91 

Supplies 1,216.69 

Incidentals 635.09. 

Travel 406.23 

Publications 8,240.27 

Auditing 75.00 

Royalty 149.46 

General Funds Headquar- 
ters Expense 1920 1,800.00 

General Funds Headquar- 
ters Expense 1921 2,800.00 

Balance, December 28th 



28,787.45 
449.33 



$29,236.78 

JAKES I.. WHITNEY FUND 

Principal and interest, Jan. 

1, 1921 $562.46 

Interest, Jan. 1, 1921 $ 8.34 

Sixteenth installment, Jan. 

21. 1921 32.44 

April 15, Liberty Bond Cou- 
pons 12.74 

Interest, July 1. 1921 1.06 

Seventeenth installment, July 

21. 1921 . . 34.41 



October 15, Liberty Bond 

Coupons 12.76 101.75 



Total 

Fund accounted for as follows: 

U. S. 4th Liberty Loan 
4^4 Bonds, par value 
$600 $530.68 

Cash in Savings Account 

Union Trust Company. 133.53 



$664.21 



$664.21 

WAR FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance, January 1 $ 72,815.62 

United War Work Campaign 107,933.75 

Refund from Enlarged Program.. 21,111.51 
Books for Everybody Fund for 

Hospital Work ' 312.50 

Books for Everybody Fund Books 

for the Blind 578.33 

American Security and Trust Co., 
Washington, D. C., balance ac- 
count 433.71 

Interest Liberty Bond coupons.. 1,251.85 
U. S. Government Certificate of 

Indebtedness 25,011.21 

Interest Certificate of Indebted- 
ness 676.29 

Interest on bank balance, Janu- 
ary-November, inclusive 1,309.99 

Miscellaneous (including sale of 

equipment) 10,089.64 

$241,524.40 
Expenditures 

Headquarters $ 8,300.00 

Books for the Blind 1,152.71 

Hospitals 50,975.69 

Paris 17,868.84 

Coblenz 4,180.89 

Philippine Islands 878.63 

Siberia 933.64 

Merchant Marine 7,336.69 

Navy 11,250.00 

Miscellaneous 10,538.26113,415.35 



U. S. Government Certifi- 
cate of Indebtedness. .$25,011.21 

Transferred to Books for 
Everybody Fund Books 
for the Blind 1,026.00 

American Library in Paris 

for Endowment 25,000.00 



51,037.21 



$164,452.56 

Cash on hand, December 

28th $44,786.09 

Liberty Bonds and War 
Savings Stamps (par 
value) 31,585.75 

Librarians and Agents.. 700.00 77,071.84 



$241,524.40 

BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY FUND 

Receipts 
Total contributions received to 

December 31, 1921, inclusive $51,229.99 

New cash contributions and pay- 
ments on pledges 11,666.22 

Transfer from Campaign Fund... 1,626.97 
Transfer from War Funds for 

Books for Blind 1,026.00 

Interest January-November, 

inclusive $539.12 

Less exchange 14.59 524.53 



$66,073.71 



20 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Expenditures 
Refunds to War Funds 

final payment on loan. $15, 074. 31 
Immigrant Publication 

Society 2,000.00 

Transferred to Campaign 

Fund (deposited in 

Books for Everybody 

Fund in error) 1,197.43 

Trustees of the Endow- 
ment Fund 

Cash $19,447.21 

Liberty Bonds 1,000.0020,447.21 



Refunds on pledges. 



1,404.31 40,123.26 



Salaries 

Books for the Blind 

Recruiting Committee. . . 

Library Extension 

Printing and Publishing. 

Book Publicity 

Supplies, postage, travel 

and miscellaneous 

Transfers for Merchant 

Marine $2,428.00 



1,561.16 
,514.85 
100.00 
101.80 
318.20 
113.15 

661.77 



Coast Guard.. 5.02 

Hospitals 312.50 2,745.52 



9,116.45 



$49,239.71 
Balance on hand, December 28... 16,834.00 



$66,073.71 

Note The expenditures may be divided 
among the different departments or kinds of 
work as follows: 

Library extension $1,366.34 

Booklists, Reading Courses, Book 

Publicity 1,594.99 

General library publicity 503.02 

Books and work for the Blind 2,514.85 

Recruiting 391.73 

Merchant Marine 2,428.00 

Hospitals 312.50 

Coast Guard 5.02 



$9,116.45 
Respectfully submitted, 

EDWAKD D. TWEEDELL, 
December 29, 1921. Treasurer. 



A. L. A. BUDGET, 1922 



ESTIMATED INCOME FROM ALL FUNDS 

not including 1 transfers from one 

fund to another 

Balance on hand January 1, 1922: 

General Funds $6,664.20 

Publishing Funds 449.33 

War Funds 77,071.84 

Books for Everybody 

Fund 16,834.00 $101,019.37 

Membership Dues 

Annual dues $19,500.00 

Life memberships 550.00 20,050.00 



Income from Endowment 

General Funds $ 1,400.00 

Carnegie Fund 4,500.00 

Accounts receivable 
Publishing Funds.... 

Publishing Fund Sales 

Publications $20,000.00 

Books (review copies) 1,800.00 

Books for Everybody 
Fund contributions. . . 

Interest on Bank Balances 

General Funds $ 100.00 

Publishing Funds 15.00 

War Funds 1,000.00 

Books for Everybody 

Fund 250.00 



5,900.00 



2,830.17 



21,800.00 



8,000.00 



1,365.00 



$160,964.54 

GENERAL FUNDS 

Estimated Income 

Balance, January 1, 1922 $ 6,664.20 

Membership Dues 

Annual dues $13.500.00 

Additional 6,000.00 

Life memberships 550.00 20, 050. 00 l 

Conference registration 1,200.00 

Publishing Funds 5 '5- 

Income Endowment Fund 1,400.00 

Income Carnegie Endowment . _ AA AA 

Fund 4,500.00 

War Funds 1 '99'25 

Interest 100-00 

$39,914.20 

J The assumption is that we can get enough 
new members to balance off the losses of old 
members (There was a net gain this year 



of 843) and that 3,000 members out of ap- 
proximately 5,250 will accept the $4.00 basis. 
But we should protect ourselves on this esti- 
mate by keeping a large contingent fund in 
the budget. No estimate is made of the pos- 
sible income from contributing and sustain- 
ing members, although undoubtedly some 
such members can be secured. 

2 The amount paid from the Publishing 
Funds to the General Funds for editorial, 
selling, mailing and bookkeeping expenses 
on publications has averaged about 20% of 
the amount received from the sale of publi- 
cations up to 1921. The 635 free Booklist 
subscriptions furnished to institutional mem- 
bers make an additional payment of more 
than 6% of the sales of publications. 

It is now proposed that the payment be 
25% of the amount received from the sale 
of publications, thus providing a varying 
amount for a service which varies with the 
number of publications issued and sold. 

Estimated Expenditures 

Bulletin $ 6,050.00 

Conference 1,200.00 

Committees 1,200.00 

Salaries 16,490.00 



service. 



Additional 

Supplies 

Postage, Telegraph, Telephone. . 

Miscellaneous 

President's Contingent Fund.... 

Travel 

Publishing Funds 

Endowment , 

Office equipment 

Contingent Fund 



1,200.00 

1,000.00 
650.00 
650.001 
100.00 
600.00 

4,500.00 
550.00 
262.50 

5,461.70 



$39,914.20* 

1 Includes $100.00 for expense of exhibit 
which is being prepared by Children's Sec- 
tion. 

2 The outstanding bills included in the 
above estimates are as follows: Bulletin, 
$1,050.00. 

PUBLISHING FUNDS 
Estimated Income 

Balance, January 1, 1922 $ 449.33 

Accounts receivable 2,830.17 

Income Carnegie Endowment 

Fund 4,500.00 

Sale of Publications 20,000.00 

Sale of books (review copies)... 1,800.00 

Interest 15.00 



$29,594.50 



BULLETIN 



21 



Estimated Expenditures PRESENT STATUS OF LIBRARY WORK 

Salaries $ 7,800.00 

Printing Booklist 4,000.00 WITH CHILDREN 

Advertising 650.00 

General Funds 5, 000.00 * As a result of comment and inquiry 

Suppfie S s and .. POS . tag . e :: :.".::::: Illoo'.oo reaching A. L. A. Headquarters a letter 

Sundries '.'.'.'.'..'.'.. was sent to the heads of eighteen chil- 

Auditing ............. ' .. '. ' .' . '. ' ' ' 15.00 dren's departments throughout the coun- 

Offlce Ca eqS?p S men{ ' \\ \ '. '. \ ! ! I '. '. I ^lIUo ^ relativ e to th * Present status of chil- 

- dren's library work. 

iSee note 2 under General Funds Esti- This letter stated that many people 

mated Receipts. thought progress had ceased and that the 

WAR. PUNDS children's library movement was at a 

Estimated Income 

Balance, January 1. 1922 $77,071.84* standstill; that few people were training 

Interest Liberty Bond coupons.. 1.200.00 f or children's work; and that librarians 

Interest on bank balance 1,000.00 

in general were not giving sufficient con- 

$79 271 84 

sideration to this special department. 
Estimated Expenditures 

Headquarters expense $ 1,000.00 Some suggestions were made to remedy 

Hospitals 24,000.00 tnis condition, if in the opinion of those 

American Library in Paris (en- 
dowment) 1,000.00 consulted, it really existed. 

PrSvInT War 'service' material ^jffioo The responses made very evident the 

Unappropriated 52,021.84 following outstanding facts. 

$79,271.84 (1) Children's library work is not at 

-TioTne few thousands are yet to be re- * B ^?J 1 t !J r b ? f t C * a f n ? ***.*! 
ceived but it is not possible to estimate the as a matter or course and a part of gen- 
amount, eral library work, with steady accomplish- 

BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY FUND ment. 

Estimated income (2) That while much is being done, 

Balance, January 1, 1922 $16,834.00 very much more needs to be done. A 

New cash contributions and pay- general impetus to the work at this criti- 

interSst n pledges 25000 cal time woul d accomplish much. The 

'. time is here for the next step forward. 

$25,084.00 (3) That there are not enough people 

Library ex?e S n s r o n te ^. EXP6nditUre8 $ 1,000.00* available to do the children's work of 

Booklists, reading courses, book the country, and that experts are abso- 

publicity M2S-52 I lutely necessary to successful work. 

General library publicity 1,000. 00 2 m That thpro tia<a 'hopn little ctnnri 

Books and work for blind 1,000.00 

Survey .* 500.00 ardization in organization, administration 

Certification 500.00 an( j salaries 

ecruiting 300 - 00 The consensus of opinions expressed 

* HK^r* would seem to indicate that the time is 

Endowment d,oOo.7o * 

Unappropriated 12,277.25 now here for the next step forward. There 

$25,084.00 is unanimity of opinion that this step 

r cAn nn should be hastened by publicity to be 
1 Balance due on pledges about $17,500.00. 

*The amounts in the special funds as of given library work with children through 

159.00 all available sources, but very largely 

4 '!oo:8o throu ^ h artlcles ln ^ eneral periodicals, 

3 it is proposed that the $9,300.00, if ap- and placing speakers on educational pro- 
propriated for the above purposes, be used ~ rQT v, c 

as follows (in co-operation with appropriate & ra ns. 

sllaHes^^ditorlal assistant and To further the work the Allowing were 

stenographer) $3,000.00 mentioned for special consideration : 

Publication of books for blind and -..,. _, , ,. ., . . .,, 

of list of books for Blind 1,000.00 (1) To do all that Is possible to re- 
Appropriation to Committees cruit for children's library work. 

Survey (Committee of 5)... $500.00 (2) T o encourage the establishment of 

National Certification 500.00 ,, ,,.,, ,, it _ . ,,, 

Recruiting 100.00 1,100.00 more facilities for the training of chil- 

Prlntlng and publications 2,600.00 dren's librarians. 

SU laneous postage> travel> mlscel " 1 600 00 (3) To secure better salaries for those 

' '_! ! engaged in children's work. 

$9,300 (4) To broaden the opportunities for 

4 This is one-half of the total receipts nrnfpciQinnnI nrlvanppmpnt rmon tn fhil- 
since March 1st when first endowment was 

set aside. dren s librarians. 



22 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



(5) To promote the extension of li- 
brary facilities to children in rural dis- 
tricts. 

(6) To encourage in head librarians 
their responsibility for library service to 
children. 

Some excerpts are given herewith which 
are of interest. 

"We * * * think that there is today 
more progress toward making the use and 
love of good books influential among boys 
and girls than there has ever been be- 
fore." This is evident "in the fact that 
the library is given the place it holds in 
public school work whether in city or 
state systems." Is it not "significant that 
the children's librarians can run a book 
store for children, or that the Booksellers' 
Association and the Boy Scouts of Amer- 
ica give country-wide publicity to book 
lists made by children's librarians?" 

"Fifteen or twenty years ago when chil- 
dren's library work was new and every- 
one was interested in even the smallest 
details of the work, children's librarians 
talked and wrote a great deal about what 
they were doing, and there was perhaps 
some little striving for spectacular effects. 
Then children's work sort of dropped from 
the lime light and was followed by high 
school library work, special libraries, etc. 

"Children's library work took its first 
step forward at that time, for out of all 
this discussion a sane, constructive pro- 
gram emerged, which has been and is still 
being carried out by a great many chil- 
dren's librarians throughout the country, 
and which can be made more effective and 
far-reaching when we have more well- 
trained children's librarians and more 
money for books and salaries." 



RECENT COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS 

W. N. C. Carlton has resigned from the 
Committee on International Relations and 
W. Dawson Johnston has been appointed 
to take his place. 

Killer C. Wellman has been added to 
the membership of the Book Buying Com- 
mittee. 



The following persons have been added 
to the Council Committee on Library Rev- 
enues of which Samuel H. Ranck is chair- 
man: Iva M. Butlin, James T. Gerould, 
W. H. Kerr, Clara E. Howard, Mabel Wil- 
liams. 

A new committee on Salaries has been 
created, consisting of Charles H. Comp- 
ton, Public Library, St. Louis, Missouri, 
Chairman; Mary E. Downey; F. F. Hop- 
per. 



NOTE ON NOMINATING COMMITTEE'S 
REPORT 

Members of the Association in reading 
the report of the Nominating Committee 
found on pages 3 and 4 of this Bulletin 
should refer to the new constitution, Sec- 
tions 11, 12, 18, 19 and 21, and to the new 
by-laws, Section 8, in the Handbook for 
1921, pages 264-267. 

It will be observed that the constitution 
provides in Section 11 that "at each an- 
nual meeting two members shall be elected 
to the Executive Board to serve for four 
years." This calls for the nomination of 
six persons. 

The vacancy created by the election of 
Mr. Root to the preseidency, was filled 
by the Executive Board for one year only, 
in accordance with Section 12 of the con- 
stitution; hence the nomination of three 
additional persons, or nine in all, three of 
whom are to be elected. 

The by-laws provide for a vote by mail. 
In accordance with this provision, official 
ballots will be mailed to each member of 
the Association about the first of May. 



An Oregon state law became effective 
on May 25th, which provides, along with 
several other things, "that it shall be un- 
lawful for a library board of a library 
having an income not in excess of $2,500 
a year, to purchase or to make accessible 
to the public any books except as recom- 
mended in the Booklist issued by the 
American Library Association, or any 
state library or school department." 



23 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Issued In 

January, March, May, July, September and 
November 

There is no subscription price and the 
Bulletin is sent only to members of the 
Association. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President Azariah S. Root, Oberlin College 
Library, Oberlin, O. 

First Vice-President Samuel H. Ranck, 
Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Second Vice-President Claribel R. Barnett, 
U. S. Depart, of Agriculture Library. 

Treasurer Edward D. Tweedell, The John 
Crerar Library, Chicago. 

Executive Board The president, vice-presi- 
dents, treasurer and Gratia A. Country- 
man; John Cotton Dana; George S. God- 
ard; Margaret Mann; H. H. B. Meyer; Carl 
B. Roden; Edith Tobbitt; George B. Utley. 

Secretary Carl H. Milam, 78 E. Washing- 
ton St., Chicago. 

Executive offices 78 E. Washington St., 
Chicago. 



IN THE first twenty-five days of 1922, 110 
new members joined the A. L. A. 14 
institutional members and 96 individual 
members. 

The membership on January 1st was 
5,307. How soon can we make it 6,000? 

AN INFORMAL statement of work done 
by the A. L. A. (and especially by the 
headquarters office) in 1921 is printed in 
this number of the Bulletin. Members are 
urged to read it and to make such criti- 
cisms and suggestions as may grow out of 
the reading. 

MANY positions are being filled each 
month through the employment service. 
These are in almost every field of library 
endeavor. Registrants and the A. L. A. 
would be saved embarrassment and em- 
ployers much trouble, if those registered 
would notify the Assistant Secretary who 
is in charge of employment when they 
have accepted a position or are not avail- 
able for one. 

It would be helpful also if geographical 
limitations were clearly defined at the 
time of placing registrations. 



The noticeable openings at the time of 
writing are for general assistants, catalog- 
ers, children's librarians and librarians to 
take charge of small libraries. Of course, 
the opportunity for specialized work oc- 
curs frequently. 

No inflation in salaries is evident but 
neither is a decrease noticeable. Many 
small libraries are offering better salaries 
than a year ago. 

EVERY librarian, who is interested in 
making the library meet the needs of 
the laboring man, should read "Workers 
Education in the United States," which is 
the report of the proceedings of the first 
national conference on workers education 
in the United States. It is published by 
the Workers Education Bureau of Amer- 
ica, 465 West Twenty-third Street, New 
York City. More than forty speeches have 
been reported, on such subjects as "The 
Education the Workers Want," "Obstacles 
in the Way of Labor Education," and "The 
United Labor Education Committee." 

The secretary of the Workers Educa- 
tion Bureau, Spencer Miller, Jr., is much 
interested in the educational opportuni- 
ties offered by public libraries to laboring 
men. It is suggested that librarians, who 
have assembled concrete instances show- 
ing the service of the library in the field 
of adult education, might well communi- 
cate some of these facts to Mr. Miller. 

The Adult Education movement is one 
in which librarians are naturally inter- 
ested. Many will be pleased to know that 
Albert Mansbridge, author of "An Adven- 
ture in Working Class Education" (pub- 
lished by Longmans, Green & Co., London, 
1920), chairman of the World Association 
for Adult Education, 13 John Street, Adel- 
phi, London, W. C. 2, is to deliver the 
Lowell Institute Lectures in March, 1922, 
in Boston. 

LIBRARIANS who have observed Chil- 
dren's Book Week will welcome the op- 
portunities which are being offered hi 
1922 for further book publicity in co-op- 
eration with booksellers and publishers. 
The "Calendar for Booksellers" for the 
first six months in 1922 lists many 



24 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



special features which librarians will 'be 
glad to emphasize. 

The features for February to June are 
as follows: 

February "America's Making told in 
Books." 

March "Find it in Books," with special 
emphasis on useful books for business and 
useful books for the home. 

April Religious Book Week, April 2-8. 
"Back to Nature" books are also to be em- 
phasized. 

May Books as graduation gifts and re- 
wards for school children. 

June Books for vacation reading and 
books for wedding presents. 

Detailed announcements and sugges- 
tions have been sent to booksellers by the 
National Association of Book Publishers, 
334 Fifth Avenue, New York, in a bulletin 
entitled, "Year-Round Bookselling News." 
This bulletin will be sent to libraries on 
request, 

A five-color lithographed poster for use 
in February is 'being prepared by the Na- 
tional Association of Book Publishers. 
Single copies will be sent to libraries on 



request. A colored poster is also being 
prepared for use in March and will be sent 
by the National Association of Booksellers 
on request. 

Libraries will naturally wish to have 
reading lists for free distribution as a 
part of their contribution to the book pub- 
licity. For February "The United States" 
list, compiled by Mrs. Elniendorf for the 
Buffalo Public Library and reprinted by 
the A. L. A., is most appropriate. 

For March we are expecting to compile 
and publish two short reading lists on 
"Useful Books for Business" and "Useful 
Books for the Home." 

A short reading course on religious edu- 
cation and Sunday school work is being 
prepared by the A. L. A. for use in April. 

Some of these lists may also appear in 
The Booklist from time to time and the 
library periodicals will, no doubt, an- 
nounce material which will be of value to 
libraries in their efforts to work with 
others who are engaged in promoting the 
use of books. 



FACTS FOR TRUSTEES 



LIBRARY TRUSTEESHIP* 
By M. F. Gallagher 
library trustees have an impor- 
1 tant responsibility. The duties and func- 
tions of government include the education 
no less than the protection of citizens. 
The fundamental need of America is more 
thorough and general education. Public 
libraries constitute one of the most ef- 
fective means of education, not second 
in importance to the schools and colleges 
but equal and supplementary. Libraries 
are for young and old alike. The library 
ideal is essentially democratic; it is, as 
Mr. Carnegie once remarked, "pure com- 
munism in the riches of the printed page." 
The war has left us with the huge prob- 
lem of reconstruction, and fortunately 
with a greater hunger for knowledge than 
ever before. The public library never had 
a greater usefulness or a greater work to 
do. There are now ten readers of a good 



book to one before the war. There never 
before was such an interest in science, 
history, geography or economics. The 
war has also made us realize the problem 
of illiteracy and the need of the very ele- 
mentals of education by 7.7% of our popu- 
lation. 

Ample funds are the prerequisite for 
meeting the new demand for library serv- 
ice. With governmental activities multi- 
plying rapidly there is danger that gen- 
eral education may be neglected for other 
public work less salutary and essential. It 
is up to the trustees of public libraries to 
secure adequate funds not only for main- 
tenance but for growth; they must see 
that library revenues are not curtailed in 
the present movement for economy. When 
favorable legislation is secured as in Illi- 
nois recently where the taxation rate was 
increased to a point assuring subsistence, 



*Resume of an address by Mr. M. F. Gallagher before the Indiana Library Trustees' 
Association. Indianapolis, November, 1921. 



BULLETIN 



the enactment was largely due to the tire- 
less efforts of the library trustees. 

Beside the devising of ways and means, 
it is one of duties of the trustees to bring 
home to the people and to government 
officials the importance of the library; to 
awaken a common realization of the edu- 
cational value of a book service in every 
community. 

Libraries are playing a large part in 
Americanization and general education, 
and they have a larger part to play. They 
have never had adequate facilities for 
covering their field. There are 6,000,000 
foreign born in this country who do not 
speak English, most of whom are eager to 
become competent citizens. There are 
60,000,000 people without reasonable libra- 
ry facilities; farmers are in need of li- 
brary extension service not only for tech- 
nical information but for recreation. The 
fact that even in cities equipped with 
libraries comparatively few people use 
them, shows the need of library publicity 
of making known the resources of the 
library to the community. 

The world's resources for reconstruc- 
tion lie within the library, and there is no 
greater task than to make them available 
to, and realized by, all the people. Trus- 
teeship of a library is an opportunity for 
the highest public service. 

THE American Library Association be- 
lieves that one dollar per capita of the 
population of the community served is a 
reasonable minimum annual revenue for 
the library in a community desiring to 
maintain a good modern public library sys- 
tem with trained librarians. 

This is the first paragraph of a signi- 
ficant resolution adopted by the American 
Library Association Council in Chicago. 
See page 11 for the resolution in full. 



A NEWSPAPER recently printed the fol- 
t\ lowing note: 

"The secretary of the Library 

Association keeps reiterating the sugges- 
tion that our citizens remember the libra- 
ry in their wills with gifts of money $50, 
$100, $500, $5,000, according to your cir- 
cumstances. Where could you possibly 
leave it to better advantage to your fel- 
low citizens?" 

And the secretary wrote to A. L. A. 
headquarters that "the next day after pub- 
lication of the library note a woman met 
me and said she had just made a new will 

and remembered the Library in 

it." 

CCA VERSION on the part of taxpayers to 
f\ meeting liberal levies for library 
purposes is generally caused by the popular 
belief that the main purpose of the library is 
to provide recreation for those who can find 
it in reading fiction. This is only one func- 
tion of a library and in many libraries it 
is a minor function. The principal educa- 
tional service of a library should be in 
providing ready access to books that will 
enable persons to improve their ability as 
workers. No library can approach this 
service without the money to spend for 
technical and reference works and this is 
where most inadequately equipped libra- 
ries show the greatest weakness. 

"The public library will reach its sphere 
of greatest usefulness when it takes on 
some of the attributes of a university 
without formal classroom instruction. The 
knowledge should be there for those who 
have the energy and patience to dig it out; 
and the staff should be equal to the duty 
of making the knowledge available. Pro- 
gressive librarians have this ideal in 
mind. They are working toward it, but 
they are hampered by inadequate funds 
and the money will be forthcoming only 
when the people realize that the library 
can be made to pay dividends upon a fair 
investment." Indianapolis News Editori- 
al. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



THE A. L. A. 1921 



This is an informal statement of some 
of the work done by the American Library 
Association in 1921, especially during the 
last few months of the year. The formal 
reports of the Secretary and of the vari- 
ous committees are made at the time of 
the annual conference, usually in June, 
and the annual financial reports will be 
found in the January Bulletin each year 

Membership. We have passed the five 
thousand mark. The 1921 Handbook shows 
a membership of 5,307. One thousand one 
hundred and seventy-eight new names were 
added and 335 members were lost by death 
or failure to renew their membership. The 
net gain was 843. This is a slightly larger 
net gain than that of the year 1919, when 
a special membership campaign was made. 
I have no doubt that some of the success 
of the 1921 efforts resulted from the pre- 
liminary work done in 1919. 

The number of library workers in the 
United States and Canada who are not 
members of the American Library Asso- 
ciation is probably somewhere between 
ten and twenty thousand, and we have 
among our members considerably less than 
one per cent of all the library trustees. It 
would seem, therefore, that the Associa- 
tion may look forward to a continuing in- 
crease in A. L. A. membership limited only 
by the ability of the present members to 
interest others in the Association's work. 

The Annual Conference of 1921 in the 
New Ocean House at Swampscott set a 
standard in size, local entertainment and 
in other ways which will be difficult to 
equal in 1922. 

Committee Reports. The Annual Reports 
printed for the conference in 1921 required 
112 pages as compared with 32 pages used 
for this purpose at the Colorado Springs 
conference, and the activities of the com- 
mittees were fairly Indicated, I think, oy 
the reports. 

Employment Service. The requests for 
recommendations for all sorts of positions 
were heavy until about the middle of Oc- 
tober. Since that time the requests have 
decreased somewhat, although they con- 
tinue to come in considerable numbers. 



Children's librarians are as much in de- 
mand as at any time at salaries which are 
slightly higher than a year ago. Other 
demands are for people with general 
training, especially for small public libra- 
ries, at salaries averaging from $1,500 to 
$1,800. Requests for librarians and as- 
sistants for business and other special li- 
braries are less frequent. The number 
of "live" registrations continues to run 
from 150 to 250. Personal visits to thfe 
Headquarters' office for the discussion of 
employment problems are frequent. 

Recruiting for Librarianship. The work 
done by A. L. A. Headquarters and the 
A. L. A. Committee last spring continues. 
There are constant requests for the leaf- 
lets and placards and many personal let- 
ters of inquiry and personal visits from 
people who are considering library work 
as a vocation. A renewal of the more ac- 
tive efforts in this field is contemplated 
early in 1922. 

New Library Buildings. A gratifying in- 
terest in the erection of library buildings 
is Indicated by the correspondence. Fre- 
quent requests are now received for blue 
prints and pictures and for suggestions 
about library .buildings. An investigation 
made through the library commissions of 
the various states, at the request of the 
President's Conference on Unemployment, 
shows a rather surprising amount of ac- 
tivity in this field. Our collection of build- 
ing plans and pictures is being brought up 
to date and duplicate copies of some of 
the best plans are being made to meet the 
needs. 

Library Establishment. Communications 
are received every few days from some 
community desiring to establish a library. 
Sometimes these requests come from 
states in which there are library commis- 
sions and need only a courteous answer 
and reference to their commission. More 
frequently, however, they come from 
states in which there are no library com- 
missions and require the sending of free 
publications and a careful, detailed letter 
of advice. There is a noteworthy and ap- 
parently spontaneous interest in library 



BULLETIN 



27 



establishment now in -the State of West 
Virginia. 

Requests for Books. Requests for books 
from communities in the South and South- 
west, and not infrequently from colleges 
and universities in foreign countries, are 
received occasionally and with a frequency 
that is depressing in view of the fact that 
absolutely nothing can be done to meet 
the requests. The Headquarters staff fre- 
quently wonders whether there are not 
libraries in the country which would wel- 
come an opportunity to get in touch with 
such communities and perhaps assume a 
more or less definite responsibility to send 
occasional gifts of books which would be 
collected for the purpose from the libra- 
ry's patrons or drawn from the library's 
collection of duplicates. 

A. L. A. Representation at Meetings. 
The Association has been represented in 
the last few months at the following con- 
ferences : 

Congress of Education, Honolulu, T. 

H. 

American Prison Association, Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 
American Country Life Association, 

New Orleans, La. 

Southern Co-operative League, Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

Conference for the discussion of the 
Towner-Sterling Bill at Washington, 
D. C. 

Ceremonies attending the burial of the 
Unknown Dead in Washington, 
D. C. 

The Association has been represented 
at the following state library meetings by 
the President: Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, 
New York; and by the Secretary or Miss 
Bogle or Miss Massee at the following: 

N. E. A., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Wisconsin Library Association, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Illinois Library Association, Urbana, 
111. 

Iowa Library Association, Ames, Iowa. 

The A. L. A. has also co-operated in 
Children's Book Week, is working with 
other organizations in the preparation for 
Thrift Week in January, and had some 
part in American Education Week in De- 
cember. 

There seems to be an increasing corre- 
spondence about library work from other 



national organizations, and there have 
been a few requests within the last few 
months for facts about library work for 
use in books on civics and citizenship and 
books of statistics. 

War Service. Although the Executive 
Board voted in July, 1920, instructing a 
committee to bring in detailed recommend- 
ations "looking to the termination of the 
Library War Service on January 1, li;21," 
the committee and the Board have not 
even yet found it possible to terminate 
all of this work. 

Coblenz. In response to a communica- 
tion from Ex-President Bishop, indicating 
a very great need for up-to-date books in 
Coblenz, $1,000 was spent on the author- 
ity of the Committee on the Transfer of 
Library War Service Activities. The li- 
brary equipment and responsibility for 
service had been formally transferred to 
the United States Government several 
months before that time. 

Merchant Marine. The books, equip- 
ment and responsibility for service to the 
Merchant Marine vessels were formally 
transferred to the American Merchant Ma- 
rine Library Association in August. Word 
has been received that Herbert Hoover has 
accepted the honorary vice-presidency of 
the new organization. Mrs. Henry How- 
ard is the active president. 

Paris. The constitution and by-laws of 
the American Library in Paris, Inc., as- 
sure a continuing connection through the 
provisions which require nomination of 
the librarian by the A. L. A. and the ap- 
pointment of five trustees annually by the 
A. L. A.; and the A. L. A.'s gift of $25,000 
for endowment was made with the under- 
standing that the appointee who is to be 
paid from the income from that fund must 
be selected with the approval of the Amer- 
ican Library Association. 

Hospital Service. Most of the work has 
been transferred to the Government, al- 
though the A. L. A. is continuing two 
salaries and still pays a few of the inci- 
dental expenses. But some of the men 
who are not directly under the Public 
Health Service must be served by the 
A. L. A. for a time. 



28 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Library War Service Historical Records. 
An effort is being made to assemble and 
put into permanent and accessible form 
the more valuable printed, mimeographed 
and multigraphed War Service lists, cir- 
culars, posters, photographs and other mis- 
cellaneous material. 

Publications. During the year 1921 
forty-three publications have been issued, 
counting separately the individual num- 
bers of the periodical publications. They 
range in size from four-page leaflets to 
bound volumes, and they comprise reading 
lists, programs, bibliographies, proceed- 
ings and pamphlets about various phases 
of library work for librarians and for the 
public. 

A cartoon poster, a book mark, a placard 
and seventy-eight sets of two rather elabo- 
rate exhibits were included in the year's 
publication and publicity work. 

Nine publications were reprinted, some 
of them thoroughly revised. 

There have also been numerous printed 
circulars about these publications not 
counted in the above figures. 

Of the 43 publications first mentioned, 
29 were prepared by the A. L. A. Head- 
quarters and Booklist staffs, or under 
their direct supervision. The exhibits 
were also prepared by the Headquarters 
staff. 

Several of the small publications were 
prepared to meet what seemed to be time- 
ly needs. The sales and the frequency 
with which these publications are used at 
Headquarters to answer direct inquiries 
show that they are serving a useful pur- 
pose. 

The total distribution of publications 
during 1921 is estimated at 276,000. 
New Publications, 1921 

A. L. A. Bulletin, six numbers 

A. L. A. Manual of library economy, 

chap. 19, The catalog 
Annual reports, 1920-1921 
Booklist, eleven numbers 
Booklist 4-page circular 
Booklist books, 1920 
Booklist of revised Braille, Vol. 1, Nos. 

4 and 5 

Books and a vocation 
Books and pamphlets on library work 

(envelope insert) 
Books and pamphlets on library work 

(for Trade List Annual) 
Books and thrift (1922 imprint) 
Book wagons 

Children's books for Christmas presents 
Conference program 



Conference attendance register 
(The) County library 

Library work an opportunity for col- 
lege women 

Mid-winter conference program, 1921 
New voter 
Plays for children 
Plays of today 

Resolutions on public questions 
Revised form for library statistics 
Viewpoints in biography 
Workshops for assembling business facts 
(The) United States 

Posters and Exhibits, 1921 

After college what 
Children's reading exhibit 
County library exhibit 
McCutcheon cartoon poster 
McCutcheon bookmark 

Reprints and New Editions, 1921 

A. L. A. Catalog rules 

A. L. A. Manual of library economy, 
chap. 4. College and university li- 
brary 

chap. 9, Library legislation 
chap. 13, Training for librarianship 

Binding for libraries 

Books for boys and girls 

Foreign people in the United States 

Mending and repair of books 

Why join the A. L. A. 

The Booklist. Subscriptions in May, 
1920, and November 15, 1921, are shown 
in the following table: 

May, Nov. 15, 

1920 1921 

Paid subscriptions 4,116 4,243 

Institutional members 579 635 

Free List 118 153 



Total 4,813 5,031 

The gain in paid subscriptions is only 
127, but perhaps we should be grateful not 
to have shown a loss in view of the one- 
third increase in price and the resulting 
loss of about 500 bulk subscriptions which 
had to be made up in individual subscrip- 
tions. 

Publicity. It will be observed that some 
of the publications issued during the year 
are primarily for distribution to the pub- 
lic. It may be assumed that the copies of 
these publications which were sold to libra- 
rians and book stores have largely reached 
the public by this time. 

Some of them, including the posters, the 
exhibits and certain of the leaflets and 
book lists, were made possible by the Books 
for Everybody Fund, and it was because 
they were prepared at the expense of this 
Fund that they were sold at prices which 
resulted in a fairly wide distribution. This 
Fund was also drawn upon for the expense 
of distributing free of charge several thou- 
sand copies of the reading lists, posters, 
county library and other leaflets and for 



BULLETIN 



29 



the loan sets of the exhibits which are be- 
ing used largely at meetings of other na- 
tional organizations. 

The character of the free distribution 
will be indicated by the following exam- 
ples: 

The Chairman of the Library Extension 
Committee of the General Federation of 
Women's Clubs has been kept supplied 
with such things as 

A county library 

Book wagons 

The new voter 

The United States 

and many others for use in her correspond- 
ence with club women throughout the 
United States; and we sent 

A county library 

Children's books for Christmas pres- 
ents 

Library work an opportunity for col- 
lege women 

Libraries in education (received from 

the N. E. A.) 

to the presidents and the library extension 
committee chairmen of the various state 
federations. 

Two hundred copies of A county library 
were given to the Central Division of the 
American Red Cross for the use of the In- 
formation Service Department. 

Five hundred copies were distributed to 
the Southern Co-operative League, Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee. 

Three hundred and ten copies were 
mailed to the members of all committees 
of the American Country Life Association 
or distributed at the conference. 

Two hundred and three copies were sent 
to farm papers with a circular letter. 

Several hundred were sent dfrectly or 
indirectly to the county superintendents of 
schools in the states without library com- 
missions. 

Several hundred copies of the Book 
Wagon pamphlet have been distributed /in 
similar ways. 

The list of Children's books for Christ- 
mas presents has for the most part been 
sold, but several thousand copies were dis- 
tributed free of charge to the faculties of 



normal schools and private schools, and to 
several national organizations interested 
in child welfare. 

Nearly 500 copies of Workshops for as- 
sembling business facts have been distrib- 
uted to the members of the National Fed- 
eration of Business and Professional Wom- 
en's Clubs, to commercial clubs and cham- 
bers of commerce, to business and trade 
magazines. 

A few hundred copies of the United 
States list have been distributed to people 
interested in Americanization. 

Sets of the exhibit on children's reading 
were sent free of charge to the U. S. Chil- 
dren's Bureau and the Children's Book 
Week Committee. 

Pictures. The picture collection which 
is maintained primarily for publicity pur- 
poses has been augmented during the year 
and the pictures have been used for ex- 
hibition, for reproduction in books, maga- 
zines and newspapers and in various other 
ways. 

Lantern Slides. More than one hundred 
lantern slides have been made or collected 
for use wherever they are needed. At the 
time of this writing the slides illustrating 
library publicity methods are being used 
in a series of lectures at the New York 
State Library School, and the slides on 
children's reading, children's library work 
and on public library work in general are 
being used by a commercial club which is 
making a campaign for the establishment 
of a library. 

Magazine and Newspaper Publicity. In 
this field the following items are men- 
tioned as typical: 

Information furnished to Country Gen- 
tleman for an article on county libraries, 
in response to a request. Similar informa- 
tion sent to several other farm papers. 

Large number of college papers supplied 
with copy on librarianship as a vocation. 

Notes sent frequently to school and li- 
brary periodicals. 

Article on hospital libraries furnished 
to The Nation's Health, in response to a 
request; also, a list of suggested articles 
by other librarians which is being used by 
the editor of The Modern Hospital. 



30 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Arrangements made with School Life, 
issued by the U. S. Bureau of Education, 
to use some library material in every is- 
sue and to publish a special library num- 
ber in March. Articles for these purposes 
are being assembled by A. L. A. Headquar- 
ters with the co-operation of the Commit- 
tee on Education, the Publicity Commit- 
tee and the School Libraries Section. 

Article on the library as a community 
center has been sent to The Community 
Center in response to a request, with a 
suggested list of articles on similar sub- 
jects by other librarians. 

Circularized entire mailing list of house 
organs in the United States with sugges- 
tions for a special book and library num- 
ber. Later sent articles to some in re- 
sponse to specific requests. 

Co-operated with state librarian of Cali- 
fornia in editing a special county library 
number of the Sierra Educational News. 

Arranged for the publication of A. L. A. 
lists and other book and library publicity 
material and of many conference papers 
in various magazines. 

Worked with the Publicity Committee 
for more extensive conference publicity. 

All of the above in close co-operation 
with the chairman of the Publicity Com- 
mittee and with others interested. 

Books for the Blind. The Booklist of 
Revised Braille, the fifth number of which 
has been issued, lists 64 books which have 
been brailled through the instrumentality 
of the American Library Association since 
the work began. Others are in press. This 
work is handled by the Committee on 
Work with the Blind, of which Mrs. Rider 
is Chairman. 

Office Library and the Storage Room. 
Some of the War Service files and much 
other War Service material which has been 
in storage for several months, have been 
moved to the basement of the Newberry 
Library, through the courtesy of the libra- 
rian and trustees of that library. We have 
also stored there a considerable number 
of publications, reserving at the A. L. A. 
Headquarters office a small working sup- 
ply. 



This has made possible the devoting of 
a larger space to the office library which 
has been, in part, tentatively organized and 
which we hope eventually to build up on 
a scale that will be somewhat adequate to 
meet the everyday requests for informa- 
tion on all phases of library work. 

Financial Situation. The receipts in the 
General Funds and the Publishing Funds 
have been larger in 1921 than in any pre- 
vious year, due to increased income from 
sales of publications and increased mem- 
bership. The net gain in receipts from the 
sale of A. L. A. publications for 1921 over 
1920 is $7,665.42 or 49 per cent. The gain in 
receipts from membership dues is $2,638.25 
or nearly 23 per cent. But the needs out- 
run the income. In spite of the reduction 
in the size of the Proceedings and of other 
economies, and of the unstinted energy 
and extra time put in by the staff, we 
have still been unable to do in a satisfac- 
tory way all the work which seems to be 
expected of the A. L. A. Headquarters 
Office. 

The employment work, the recruiting 
for librarianship, the growing activities of 
the committees, the increased sale of pub- 
lications all result in increased work. 

The growing interest in the establish- 
ment of libraries, especially county and 
school libraries, and in the erection of 
library buildings brings increased requests 
for information from other associations 
and from interested individuals who are 
not members of the A. L. A. 

CARL H. MILAM, 

Secretary. 
January 1, 1922. 



The National Dante Committee has is- 
sued an attractive pamphlet on Dante, 
which is intended as a further guide to a 
study of the life and work of the poet. It 
will prove a valuable syllabus to the stu- 
dent. 

Copies may be obtained by libraries at 
30 cents a copy of The National Dante 
Committee, 23 West 43rd street, New York 
ity. 



BULLETIN 



31 



SALE, EXCHANGE, WANTS, OFFERS 

Any library member of the Association 
may insert, without cost, a ten-line notice 
or' books or periodicals wanted, for sale, 
or for exchange. 

WANTED 

J. Bentley, Northbrook Courts, Washing- 
ton, D. C., wishes to locate a copy of the 
following book: Anthology of Russian Lit- 
erature from the earliest period to the 
present time, by Leo Wiener. Pt. 1. front, 
(port.) 23 l-2cm. 1902. Pt. 2. front, (port.) 
23 l-2cm. 1903. New York and 'London, 
G. P. Putnam's Sons. 

OFFERED 

Denver Public Library, Denver, Colorado, 
has four complete duplicate sets of the 
Western History of Hubert Howe Ban- 
croft, which will be given to the first four 
libraries applying. These 'books are in 
good condition and bear no library marks. 
Libraries wishing the gift must pay ex- 
pense of cartage and transportation and 
minimum packing charges. 



The report of the United War Work 
Campaign, Inc., September 30, 1921, will 
be of interest in some libraries. Copies 
may be obtained from J. I. Wyer, libra- 
rian, New York State Library, Albany. 



The President of the Library Depart- 
ment of the National Education Associa- 
tion, Dr. Sherman Williams, has issued a 
stirring letter to State Superintendents of 
Public Instruction regarding the meeting 
at Boston next July. In it he says: 

"It is hoped that a campaign will be 
undertaken that will not cease until every 
one in our country has ready access to a 
free library. 

"Our country like all democracies is in 
the long run controlled by public opinion, 
and it is all-important that it be an in- 
telligent public opinion. The great ma- 
jority of our people have to leave school 
young, far too young, and they must rely 
very largely upon the use of libraries for 
their after school education. What under 
such conditions is of greater importance 
than numerous and well-supported public 
libraries!" 



The new by-laws provide that life mem- 
bership dues shall hereafter be $50.00. 
Some of the persons who became life 
members on the $25.00 basis are volun- 
tarily paying an additional $25.00 as a 
contribution to the general endowment 
fund of the A. L. A. 



Ready Soon 

BOOKLIST BOOKS OF 1921 

A selection from the year's books, 
with descriptive notes for each, 
taken usually from The Booklist. 
About 300 titles chosen by library 
vote as best adapted to public 
library use. 

Single copies, 25c. 

10 to 50 copies, 10% discount. 

50 to 100 copies, 20% discount. 

100 or more copies, 33>$% discount. 



VIEWPOINTS IN ESSAYS 

BY MARION HORTON 

Brief notes on essays, old and new, 
grouped under such headings as 
Bed Books, Curry and Caviare, 
Masculine Attitudes, Hobbies, Gar- 
dens, Lands and Peoples. Only 
books ordinarily obtainable from 
libraries and booksellers are in- 
included. 

Uniform with Viewpoints in Biog- 
raphy. 
Heavy paper cover. 60c. 



These guides are designed for readers 
as well as for librarians. Order 

extra copies for your circulation 
shelves. 




AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 

78 E. Washington Street 
Chicago 



A. L. A. PUBLICATIONS, 1921 

DO YOU HAVE ALL THESE? 



PLAYS FOR CHILDREN: An 
Annotated Index. 

By ALICE I. HAZELTINE 

Cloth. $1.50. 

VIEWPOINTS IN BIOGRAPHY 
By KATHERINE TAPPERT 

Heavy paper cover. 60c. 

THE UNITED STATES 

By THERESA ELMENDORF 

10 copies, $1.00 ; 100 copies, $6.00 ; 500 
copies, $26.00 ; 1,000 copies, $45.00. 

PLAYS OF TODAY 

By FRANCIS K. W. DRURY 

Single copies, 15c ; 50 copies, $5.50 ; 100 
copies, $10.00. 

THE NEW VOTER 

100 copies, $1.50. 

WORKSHOPS FOR ASSEM- 
BLING BUSINESS FACTS 

By DORSEY W. HYDE, JR. 

20c a copy. Special prices in quantities. 

A COUNTY LIBRARY. 4-page 
leaflet 

30 copies, $1.00; 100 copies, $3.00; 1,000 
copies, $20.00. 

BOOK WAGONS. 8-page pam- 
phlet. 

100 copies, $1.00 ; special price in quan- 
tities. 

MENDING AND REPAIR OF 
BOOKS 

By M. W. BROWN. Rev. 1921 
by GERTRUDE STILES 

Single copies, 25c ; in lota of 100 or 
more, 20c. 



THE COLLEGE AND UNIVER- 
SITY LIBRARY 

By J. I. WYER. Rev. 1921 

Single copies, 20c ; in lots of 25 or 
more, 8c. 



LIBRARY LEGISLATION 
By WILLIAM F. YUST. Rev. 1921 

Single copies, 20c ; in lots of 25 or 
more, 8c. 



TRAINING FOR LIBRARIAN- 
SHIP 

By MARY W. PLUMMER. Rev. 
1921 by F. K. WALTER 

Single copies, 20c ; in lots of 25 or 
more, 8c. 

THE CATALOG 

By HARRIET E. HOWE 

Single copies, 20c ; in lots of 25 or 
more, 8c. 

COUNTY LIBRARY EXHIBIT. 
14 panels. 

$10.00 a set. 

CHILDREN'S READING 
EXHIBIT. 14 panels. 

$10 a set. 



McCUTCHEON CARTOON 
POSTER 

5 for 50c, 25 for $1.75, 100 for $5.00. 

McCUTCHEON CARTOON 
BOOKMARK 

100 for 50c. 500 for $2.00, 1,000 for $3.50. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

78 East Washington Street Chicago, Illinois 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

VOL. 16, No. 2 CHICAGO, ILL. MARCH, 1922 



The Detroit 
Conference 

Reading Lists 



PTJBLISHBD SIX TIMES A YEAR. FREB TO MEMBERS. 

Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



VOL. 16, No. 2 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



MABCH, 1922 



CONTENTS 



The Detroit Conference, June 26-July 1, 

1922 34 

General Sesions 34 

Council Meetings 34 

Affiliated Organizations 35 

Hotel, Travel and Local Announcements 36 

New Nominations 89 



New Committees 39 

Reading Lists and Courses 40 

A. L. A. Financial Reports .... 41 

Editorials 41 

Facts for Trustees 48 

Sale, Exchange, Wants, Offers .... 48 

Membership Committee Announcement . 44 



THE DETROIT CONFERENCE, JUNE 26-JULY 

r^LANS are being made for a big con- 
F ference in Detroit, June 26 to July 



1922 



in 

1, with headquarters at the Hotel Statler. 
There will be five general sessions and 
more than forty-five meetings of sections, 
round table groups and of affiliated and 
other national organizations. It is ex- 
pected that the conference will begin with 
an Executive Board meeting on Monday 
morning followed by a Council meeting in 
the afternoon and the first general ses- 
sion on Monday evening, June 26, and 
will close with section and other meetings 
on Saturday afternoon. 

GENERAL SESSIONS 

At the first general session on Monday 
evening it is expected that there will be 
greetings from Mayor James Couzens of 
Detroit and John C. Lodge, president of 
the Common Council. Dr. M. L. Burton, 
president of the University of Michigan, 
has accepted the invitation of the Pro- 
gram Committee to deliver an address and 
this will be followed by the presidential 
address of Azariah S. Root. After the 
meeting a general reception will be held. 

The second general session will follow 
on Tuesday morning, the general theme 
of the meeting being A. L. A. PUBLICATIONS. 
The plan is to have a talk on THE POLICY 

OF THE A. L. A. IN THE FIELD OF PUBLICA- 
TION followed by short talks and informal 
discussion on what needs to be published 
and the usefulness of A. L. A. publications 
from the standpoint of libraries of every 
sort. 

The subject for discussion at the third 



general session which will be held Wednes- 
day morning will be BECBUITING FOB LI- 
BBABY SERVICE. Here again the plan is te 
have several short talks by people who 
can represent every kind of library and 
almost every kind of work In a library, fol- 
lowed by informal discussion of the need 
for more and better people and a discus- 
sion of the methods by which people of 
ability can be attracted to the library pro- 
fession. 

The fourth general session will be held 
on Friday morning. Annual reports will 
be presented at this meeting and these 
will be followed by informal discussion of 
some subject based probably on some im- 
portant committee report. 

The fifth general session, Saturday 
morning, will be one of the most interest- 
ing and important of the week. The sub- 
ject is THE INDIVIDUAL'S BESPONSIBILITY TO 
HIS PBOFESSION. The program committee 
hopes to begin this meeting with an ad- 
dress by some distinguished speaker, to 
have it followed by brief talks by promi- 
nent librarians, and those followed again 
by informal discussion. 

COUNCIL MEETINGS 
There is now a Council Program Com- 
mittee which has under consideration the 
subjects for discussion at the two Council 
meetings which are planned for Monday 
afternoon and Wednesday evening. It is 
probable that these meetings will be de- 
voted to discussion of the most important 
of the committee reports. A vote of the 
Executive Board provides that all commit- 



BULLETIN 



35 



tee reports must be submitted in sufficient 
time to allow for their distribution to 
Council members well in advance of the 
first Council meeting at the Annual Con- 
ference. This is at the request of the 
Council itself and in order that the Coun- 
cil may intelligently and seriously con- 
sider the committee recommendations and 
so prevent filing them away without ac- 
tion when they call for action. 
AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS, SEC- 
TIONS, ROUND TABLE GROUPS 
American Association of Law Libraries 

The annual conference of the American 
Association of Law Libraries for 1922 will 
be held, as usual, in conjunction with the 
annual meeting of the A. L. A. 

The committee in charge hopes to pre- 
sent an interesting and instructive pro- 
gram. More detailed information will be 
given in the next issue of the Law Library 
Journal and the A. L. A. Bulletin. 

Suggestions for the program will be wel- 
comed by the President, Gilson G. Glasier, 
State Library, Madison, Wis. 

Important business matters will come up 
for solution and a full attendance is de- 
sired. It is especially urged that mem- 
bers give serious consideration to the prob- 
lems that have arisen with regard to the 
publication of the Index to Legal Periodi- 
cals as outlined by the committee on the 
Index, particularly on pp. 79-80 of the Oc- 
tober issue of the Law Library Journal; 
and that this committee may have the 
helpful co-operation of the members in at- 
tempting to solve such difficulties. 

Agricultural Libraries Section 
In accordance with instructions given 
by the section to the officers last year two 
meetings are being planned which are ten- 
tatively scheduled for Tuesday evening and 
Friday afternoon. 

Bibliographical Society of America 

The program this year will be of more 
general interest than has frequently been 
the case, for the Society will discuss the 
general topic of THE LIBRABY RESOUBCES 

FOR THE HISTORY OF THE GREAT LAKES RE- 
GION. All librarians know something of 
the fascinating history of this region and 
will welcome an opportunity to learn more 
about that history and about the historical 



resources of the libraries in Michigan and 
in the neighboring states and provinces. 

Catalog Section 

Two meetings are to be held, one some 
time Tuesday, the other Friday afternoon. 
Association of American Library Schools 

Two meetings will probably be held. 
Children's Librarians Section 

Two meetings are scheduled, one for 
Tuesday afternoon, the other for Wednes- 
day afternoon. 

This section has been unusually active 
since the meeting at Swampscott and the 
program will undoubtedly reflect some of 
this activity. The section is planning a 
very carefully selected exhibit of chil- 
dren's books, a list of which will be avail- 
able for distribution to those who attend 
the conference. 

College and Reference Section 

This section will hold one meeting, the 
time of which has not been definitely de- 
termined. One of the topics for discus- 
sion and probably the main topic will De 

THE RANKING OF LIBRARIANS AND ASSIST- 
ANTS IN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES. 

League of Library Commissions 

One meeting is scheduled for Tuesday 
evening. Another meeting of the members 
or governors of commissions, correspond- 
ing to trustees of public libraries, will be 
held on Wednesday evening. 

Lending Section 

Two meetings will be held, which at 
present are scheduled for Friday afternoon 
and Saturday afternoon. 

Library Buildings Round Table 
It is expected that another meeting of 
this group will be held in 1922, probably 
on Wednesday evening. Willis K. Stetson 
of the New Haven, Connecticut, Public Li- 
brary is in charge. 

Librarians of Religion and Theology 
A meeting is scheduled for Thursday 
evening. 

Library Workers Association 
The meetings are not yet planned. 

Michigan State Library Association 

A business meeting of this Association 
is to be held during the conference, prob- 
ably on Wednesday afternoon. 

National Association 'of State Libraries 
Meetings are being planned for Wednes- 



36 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



day afternoon and Thursday evening, and 
a joint meeting with the law librarians on 
Friday afternoon. 

Professional Training Section 
A meeting is scheduled for Tuesday eve- 
ning. 

Public Documents Round Table 
One meeting is tentatively announced 
for Tuesday afternoon. 

School Libraries Section 
Three sessions will be held. The meet- 
ing Tuesday afternoon, will be a high 
school librarians' round table, with May 
Ingles of the high school of commerce in 
Omaha presiding. It will be devoted to 
papers by school librarians on the rela- 
tionship of the library to different depart- 
ments of the school. On Wednesday eve- 
ning there will be some special speakers, 
including Arthur Pound, the Atlantic con- 
tributor from Flint, Michigan. The third 
session on Friday afternoon will be a round 
table for normal and elementary school 
librarians, with Bertha Hatch of Cleveland 
presiding. 

Small Libraries Round Table 
A meeting is announced for Tuesday 
evening. 

Special Libraries Association 

Four meetings have been tentatively 
scheduled for this Association, the first of 
which will probably be held on Tuesday 
afternoon. The dates for the others have 
not yet been determined. 

Training Class Instructors 

A meeting will be held Wednesday eve- 
ning. 

Trustees Section 

The meeting of this group will probably 
be held on Tuesday afternoon. 

University Library Extension Service 
Round Table 

This meeting will be held about 9:30 
Thursday morning, June 29, at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan Library, Ann Arbor. 
Persons interested in this conference will 
leave Detroit early Thursday morning 
(ahead of the special train) and the meet- 
ing will adjourn in time for luncheon at 
the University Union with the A. L. A. 
party. 

Three twenty minute papers are sched- 
uled, which will be followed by informal 



discussion. Arrangements are being made 
by Edith Thomas, in charge of the Library 
Extension Service at the University of 
Michigan. 

Work With the Foreign Born 

In response to numerous requests, ar- 
rangements have been made for a round 
table on this subject under the direction 
of the A. L. A. Committee on Work with 
the Foreign Born, Eleanor E. Ledbetter, 
chairman. This round table will be de- 
voted to live discussion of practical prob- 
lems, and the committee requests inter- 
ested librarians to send suggestions as to 
topics to the chairman immediately, so 
that those of most general interest may be 
chosen for presentation. Address Mrs. 
Eleanor E. Ledbetter, Broadway Branch, 
Public Library, Cleveland, Ohio. 

HOTEL, TRAVEL AND LOCAL 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

In addition to the hotels listed in the 
January Bulletin, the following are rec- 
ommended to members of the Association. 
They are within easy walking distance of 
the Hotel Statler which has been chosen 
for headquarters. At the Statler approxi- 
mately eight hundred delegates will be pro- 
vided for. 

The Madison-Lenox, at the corner of 
Madison and East Grand River Avenues, 
state that they will reserve rooms for 100 
people for the A. L. A. The rates they 
quote are as follows: 

Single room without bath $2.00 

Single room with bath $3.00, 3.50 

Suite of living room, bath and bed 

room $5.00, $6.00 and 8.00 

Above rates are for single persons; for 
double add $1.00. Reservations must be 
made two weeks before time of meeting of 
conference. 

How to Make Reservations 

Write at once to the hotel of your choice 
stating the kind of room you want, and 
if you have chosen a roommate, indicate 
that fact giving name and address. 

It is highly important that reservations 
be made early as the Detroit hotels are 
very likely to be crowded during the time 
o the conference. If the hotel to which 
you write cannot give you the accommo- 
dations you request, the hotel manager 
will turn your letter over to Adam Strohm, 



BULLETIN 



37 



secretary of the local committee, or to his 
representative. If you do not hear from 
your letter within a reasonable length of 
time, write again. 

Travel Notice 

The Central Passenger Association has 
authorized fare and one-half for round 
trip to Detroit. Other passenger associa- 
tions will probably follow this lead. 

There will probably be low summer ex- 
cursion rates this year from western 
cities to New York, Boston, and eastern 
seaboard points. These rates would allow 
a stop-over in Detroit for the conference, 
and tickets could be routed east via To- 
ronto and Montreal. (See post conference 
note below.) 

There is no longer any war tax on either 
railroad tickets or Pullman berths. 

One-way railroad fares and lower Pull- 
man rates, from principal points to De- 
troit are shown below: 

Rail 

From Fare 

Albany. N. Y ................ $19.69 

Atlanta, Ga ................. 26.68 

Baltimore, Md ............... 21.55 

Birmingham, Ala. ............ 26.89 

Boston, Mass ................ 26.92 

Buffalo, N. Y ................ 9.00 

Chicago, 111 ................. 9.81 

Cincinnati, Ohio ............ 9.38 

Cleveland, Ohio ............. 5.93 

Dallas, Texas ............... 41.79 

Denver, Colo ................ 47.09 

Des Moines, Iowa ............ 22.70 

Duluth, Minn ............... 26.22 

Indianapolis, Ind ............ 9.58 

Kansas City, Mo ............ 26.35 

Los Angeles, Cal ............. 89.25 

Louisville, Ky .............. 13.52 

Madison, Wis ............... 14.49 

Memphis, Tenn .............. 26.11 

Milwaukee, Wis ............. 12.87 

Minneapolis, Minn ........... 24.47 

Montreal, Que ............... 19.40 

New Orleans, La. ........... 39.66 

New York, N, Y ............. 24.82 

Omaha, Neb ................ 27.74 

Ottawa, Ont, ................ 16.40 

Philadelphia, Pa ............ 23.23 

Pittsburgh, Pa. ............. 10.65 

Portland. Ore ............... 87.24 

Rochester, N. Y ............. 11.48 

Salt Lake City, Utah ........ 64.88 

St Louis, Mo ............... 18.46 

St. Paul, Minn. ............. 24.08 

San Francisco, Cal ........... 89.25 

Seattle, Wash ............... 87.24 

Toledo, Ohio ................ 2.07 

Toronto, Ont ............... 7.90 

Washington, D. C ........... 21.55 

Winnipeg, Man .............. 41.16 

Worcester, Mass ............ 25.32 



Berth. 

$5.63 

8.25 

6.38 

11.25 
7.50 
3.00 
3.75 
3.75 
3.75 

14.25 

14.63 
7.50 
8.25 
3.75 
8.25 

27.38 



9.38 

..... 

7.50 

6.00 

13.88 

6.38 

8.25 

*5.25 

6.38 

3.75 

27.38 

3.75 

19.05 

4.50 

7.50 

27.38 

27.38 

f -75 

3.00 

6.38 

12.00 

7.50 



*From Smith Falls. fSeat. 

New England Party. From Boston an 
interesting route, for those not caring to 
go direct, is via Montreal and Toronto 
the railroad fare is the same but the trip 
takes longer. The convention rate of a 



fare and a half for round trip would prob- 
ably be good this way, provided the re- 
turn was made over the same route. From 
Buffalo It is probable that the steamer 
through Lake Erie to Detroit may be sub- 
stituted for the train Journey if desired, 
thus making a cool and restful night's 
trip available for delegates from Washing- 
ton, Philadelphia, New York State and 
New England points. The question of 
granting convention rates this way, includ- 
ing steamer trip, is now being considered 
by the railroads. 

It is proposed to run personally con- 
ducted parties from New England and the 
North Atlantic states to Buffalo, leaving 
Saturday afternoon or evening, June 24th, 
reaching Buffalo Sunday morning, June 
25th, where the day would be spent, includ- 
ing a visit to Niagara Falls. Leave Buf- 
falo Sunday evening, either by steamer, 
or by rail, due in Detroit Monday morning, 
June 26th. 

North Atlantic Party. A special party 
will be organized from New York, Phila- 
delphia, Washington and Buffalo. Arrange- 
ments for special Pullmans, steamer ac- 
commodations on the boat from Buffalo 
to Detroit will be announced later. 
Charles H. Brown, Bureau of Navigation, 
Navy Department, Washington, D. C., will 
be glad to answer any inquiries which may 
be received. 

The following are the round trip rates 
at present via Buffalo and boat to Detroit, 
returning all rail. These round trip rates 
will probably be greatly reduced by sum- 
mer excursion tickets. 
Washington to Detroit via Buffalo, 

returning all rail $48.66 

Philadelphia to Detroit, returning all 

rail 50.31 

New York to Detroit via Buffalo, re- 
turning all rail 50.51 

Middle West Party. A daylight special 
train is planned, leaving Chicago about 9 
a. m. on Monday, June 26th, arriving in 
Detroit at 4:00 o'clock p. m. in time to 
prepare for the first general session and 
reception in the evening. This plan ought 
to be attractive for middle west delegates 
and the Chicago party. Members of the 
Council will have to go on an earlier train 
if they are to reach Detroit in time for 
the Council meeting on Monday afternoon. 



38 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



It has been suggested that a boat be 
chartered by the Chicago, Milwaukee and 
other middle western librarians who may 
wish to go to Detroit by the water route. 
A boat leaving Chicago in the late after- 
noon of Friday, the 23rd, stopping at 
Milwaukee Friday evening, would arrive 
in Detroit in time for the Monday meet- 
ings. This would give an opportunity to 
spend three nights and two days on Lakes 
Michigan and Huron. Any persons inter- 
ested in joining such a party should com- 
municate at once with John F. Phelan, 
Chicago Public Library, member of the 
Travel Committee for the Middle West. 

Post Conference. The Travel Commit- 
tee is planning a post conference trip, 
personally conducted, leaving Detroit by 
sleeper Saturday night, July 1st, for To- 
ronto, where Sunday would be spent and 
Monday until 4 p. m., when steamer on 
Lake Ontario would be taken via Roches- 
ter, N. Y., and Kingston to some point in 
the Thousand Islands where Tuesday, 
July 4th, would be spent. Then on 
Wednesday down the St. Lawrence river, 
an all-day sail, "running" all the many 
rapids with their thrills, arriving about 
6 p. m. at Montreal where the party would 
remain two nights. Leaving Montreal 
early on July 7 for trip through northern 
New England by daylight, Boston would be 
reached for supper, and on Saturday, July 
8, at 6 p. m. the party would leave by 
steamer for New York City where the trip 
would end. 

A Great Lakes Excursion. A cruise for 
those desiring a most wonderful week's 
voyage on the great inland seas may be 
taken from Detroit. Palatial steamers 
leave at 10:30 p. m. Monday, Wednesday 
or Friday via Lake Huron, the Soo, and 
Lake Superior to Port Arthur, and Du- 
luth, with an all day stop at both Port 
Arthur and Duluth, arriving back at De- 
troit just one week from date of departure. 
Cost, including meals and berth, about 
$78.00 for seven days. 

Those desiring to take this trip one way 
only can do so at cost of about $42.00. 
Travel Committee, 

F. W. FAXON, 83 Francis Street, 

Boston, Chairman. 
CHARLES H. BBOWN. 
JOHN F. PHELAN. 



Official Exhibits 

Committees or others desiring to make 
library exhibits should communicate at 
once with the Secretary of the A. L. A. 
who will endeavor to assign suitable space 
on the mezzanine floor which is the floor 
on which most of the meetings in the Stat- 
ler will be held. 

Commercial Exhibits 
Space for commercial exhibits will be 
available in almost unlimited quantities 
on the thirteenth or fourteenth floors in 
the sample room. Applications for space 
should be made to the manager of the 
Statler. 

Conference Committees 
Detroit Local Committee: Adam Strohm, 
secretary. Other members yet to be ap- 
pointed. 

Ann Arbor Day Committee: 
W. W. Bishop, Chairman, 
Genevieve M. Walton, 
Nellie Loving, 
Francis L. D. Goodrich, 
Edith Thomas, 
Fredericka B. Gillette, 
Eunice Wead. 

Recreation 

The Board of Regents of the University 
of Michigan has extended an invitation 
to the American Library Association to 
spend one day of the week in Ann Arbor, 
adding, "The University will be delighted 
to have the members of the Association 
as its guests at luncheon on that day." 
The president of the A. L. A. has accepted 
this invitation and plans are being made 
to spend most of Thursday, June 29th, in 
Ann Arbor. 

It is expected that a special train will 
be run from Detroit late Thursday morn- 
ing arriving at Ann Arbor in time for a 
lunch at the University Union. Follow- 
ing the lunch there will be several short 
talks by University representatives, after 
which the delegates will be free to visit the 
university and public libraries on the Uni- 
versity campus. The train will return to 
Detroit in the afternoon starting probably 
about four-thirty. 

Dinner Meetings 

Thursday evening is set aside especially 
for dinner meetings, although some other 
meetings are being scheduled. All library 
schools, alumni associations or other 



BULLETIN 



39 



groups wishing to arrange dinner meet- 
ings are asked to communicate at once 
with the manager of the Statler. 

Friday evening is set aside for a boat 
ride on the Detroit River and Lake St. 
Glair. The boat will be big enough to ac- 
commodate everybody attending the con- 
vention and a variety of entertainment 
will be offered on board by the local and 
entertainment committees. 

The Society of Arts and Crafts of De- 
troit has extended an invitation to those 
who attended the A. L. A. conference to 
visit the building of the society while in 
the city and has expressed the hope that 
the A. L. A. will permit the Society to 
tender a reception and afternoon tea in 
the auditorium some day during the con- 
vention. 

"Beautiful and dynamic Detroit" is the 
title of a forty page booklet issued by the 
Detroit Convention and Tourists' Bureau. 
It tells about Detroit's history, industry, 
hotels, parks, roads, rivers, lakes, libra- 
ries and department stores, and illustrates 
most everything. It includes a map of 
the business section of Detroit, and one 
of most of the State of Michigan. 

NEW NOMINATIONS 

Some persons for very good reasons have 
declined nomination for office in the 
A. L. A. The Nominating Committee has 
therefore presented a supplementary re- 
port, as follows: " 

For President (in place of Messrs. Belden 
and Keogh) : 

Locke, George H. 

Utley, George B. 

For 1st Vice-President (in place of Mr. 
Utley, now nominated for President): 

Godard, George S. 
For Treasurer (in place of Miss Krause) : 

Elliott, Julia E. 
For Trustee of the Endowment Fund: 

Porter, Washington T., Cincinnati. 

Schick, Charles E., Chicago. 

Sheldon, Edward W., New York. 

NEW COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Union List of Se- 
rials, composed of Dr. Andrews and Dr. 
Bostwick, has presented the following re- 
port: 



At a meeting of Western University Li- 
brarians held in Chicago, December 30th, 
Mr. H. W. Wilson presented a plan for a 
national union list of periodicals to be 
issued in part on a subscription basis 
similar to that of periodicals. This plan 
your Committee thinks so worthy of con- 
sideration that we endorse the recommen- 
dation of the librarians' conference that 
the Executive Board appoint a committee 
to advise with Messrs. Wilson and Com- 
pany and supervise the execution of the 
plan. We further ask to be discharged 
from our duties. 

CLEMENT W. ANDREWS, 
ARTHUR E. BOSTWICK, 
Committee on Union List. 
In accordance with the recommendation 
of the committee which has just been dis- 
charged and in line with the recommenda- 
tion of the university librarians of the 
Middle West, the Executive Board has ap- 
pointed the following new Committee on 
a Union List of Periodicals: 
H. M. Lydenberg, Chairman. 
J. T. Gerould. 
Willard Austen. 
C. W. Andrews. 
A. E. Bostwiok. 

Other Committees recently appointed 
are as follows: 

Publishers' Co-operation (To answer a 
communication from the National As- 
sociation of Book Publishers). 

E. H. Anderson, Public Library, New 
York City, chairman. 

H. W. Graver. 
M. L. Raney. 

Resources of American Libraries: 
J. T. Gerould, Princeton University Li- 
brary, Princeton, New Jersey, chair- 
man. 

Willard Austen. 
W. W. Bishop. 

F. C. Hicks. 
Andrew Keogh. 
W. C. Lane. 

A. H. Shearer. 
P. L. Windsor. 

Salaries: 
C. H. Compton, Public Library, St 

Louis, Mo., Chairman. 
F. F. Hopper. 
Mary E. Downey. 



40 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



READING LISTS AND COURSES 



Reading lists are little catalogs. Like 
the special catalogs on groceries and 
ready-cut garages issued by mail order 
houses, they give special information to 
those who want it, and in convenient form. 

But they are more than catalogs. They 
are advertising circulars, so planned and 
printed (usually) that they will serve as 
invitations to the folks who do not use the 
library. 

As catalogs, given out to people who 
ask for them, or put out in the library 
where readers can pick them up, they are 
useful, for they give more information 
and, if well prepared, better information 
than the library assistant can take time 
to give in conversation; but their usefulness 
is much increased by those librarians who 
can get most of the copies into the hands 
and pockets of those who do not come reg- 
ularly to the library. 

Business books for profit and pleasure. 
just issued by the A. L. A., is an excel- 
lent list for outside publicity. It lists 40 
books which are suited to any business 
and any locality, compiled by Ethel Cle- 
land, Business Branch, Indianapolis Pub- 
lic Library. It is attractively printed, gen- 
erously spaced and easy to read. A fetch- 
ing little cut on the title page will tempt 
any business man or woman to pick it 
up and have a look at the inside. 

Why not mail copies to every member 
of the largest business club in the city; 
and put copies beside the plates at the 
next weekly luncheon of the Rotary, Ki- 
wanis, and Lions clubs, or mail copies to 
all the employees of the biggest business 
concern in town, just as an experiment? 

Useful books for the home is a choice 
little list selected by The Booklist staff 
for similar use among women whose chief 
business is home-making. It includes 24 
titles, interestingly annotated, and might 
well be sent to every woman in town 
who is not on the library's registration 
list but not to all at once. 

The business list has 12 pages, the home 
list 8 pages. Both are envelope insert 
size. Prices on Business books are $3.00 
per hundred, $20.00 per thousand. Use- 



ful books for the home is priced at $2.50 
per hundred and $18.00 per thousand. 

Booklist books, 1921, is more expensive 
but is being bought by some libraries in 
quantities for free distribution or sale to 
borrowers. Other libraries are purchasing 
several copies for circulation and for the 
use of the library staff. Prices on this are 
reduced this year to 25 cents a copy, with 
very generous discounts in quantity 
orders. 

The library revenue resolution adopted 
by the A. L. A. Council at the mid-win- 
ter meeting has been printed in large type 
under the caption What is a reasonable in- 
come for your library f Some commis- 
sions are buying it for distribution 
throughout the state. Prices are $6.00 a 
thousand, $1.00 for one hundred and fifty 
copies. 

For limited free distribution as an aid 
in recruiting, the A. L. A. has just reprint- 
ed from the New York Evening Post an in- 
terview with John Cotton Dana. The title 
is Library work for young men. 

Viewpoints in essays (uniform with 
Viewpoints in travel and View-points in 
biography) should be ready shortly after 
the Bulletin reaches the members. The 
compiler is Marion Horton of Los Angeles. 

A new edition of the A. L. A. Manual 
chapter on Book selection has recently 
gone to the printer. In the printer's hand 
also is a Graded list for children, compiled 
by an N. E. A. committee of librarians and 
teachers. It will be published in book 
form at perhaps $1.25, but will not be 
ready for several weeks. 

Short Reading Courses 

The following courses have been issued 
by the U. S. Bureau of Education, Wash- 
ington, D, Q. Copies for distribution 
should be on hand in every library. 

American history course. 

American literature. 

Great literature ancient, medieval and 
modern. 

Machine shop work. 

Master builders of today. 

Reading course for boys. 

Reading course for girls. 



BULLETIN 



41 



Reading course for parents. 

Reading course foreign trade. 

Reading course on dancing. 

Teaching. 

Thirty American heroes. 

Thirty books of great fiction. 

Thirty world heroes. 

Twenty books for parents. 

The world's great literary Bibles. 

Reading courses have been published 
also by the Library Extension Division of 
the Illinois State Library, on the follow- 
ing subjects: 

Minor branches of the modern drama. 

Child study and training. 

Psycho-analysis. 



Interior decorations. 

The Bible in the light of scientific re- 
search. 

Modern tendency to education. 

Development of the English novel. 

American painting. 

Appreciation of art. 

South American literature. 

Readers of this note who know of the 
existence of other reading courses (not 
simply lists) of a similar character, or 
of any character so long as the courses 
are brief, will confer a favor on the edi- 
tors of this Bulletin if they will communi- 
cate with A. L. A. Headquarters about 
such courses. 



A. L. A. FINANCIAL REPORTS 



January-February, 1922 



GENERAL FUNDS 



Receipt* 

Balance, January 1 $6,664.20 

Membership Annual dues 8,124.35 

Life Memberships 76.00 

War Funds (for year 1922) 1,000.00 

Interest, December, January and 

February 27.17 

$15,890.72 
Expenditure* 

Bulletin $1,637.83 

Conference 127.91 

Committees 97.25 

Salaries 2,733.32 

Additional service 217.05 

Supplies 528.28 

Postage, telephone and 

telegraph 127.75 

Miscellaneous 110.72 

Trustees' Endowment Fund 75.00 



5,655.11 



Balance, February 28th. . .$9,985.61 

Permanent balance, Na- 
tional Bank of the Re- 
public 250.00 10,235.61 

$15,890.72 



PUBLISHING FUNDS 
Receipt* 

Balance, January 1 $ 449.33 

Sales of publications 5,992.23 

Sale of books (review copies) 360.00 

Interest, December, January and 

February 6.26 

$6,806.82 
Expenditure* 

Salaries . ..$1,356.38 

Printing Booklist 547.69 

Advertising 286.96 

Express and postage 280.41 

Supplies 668.42 

Incidentals 118.53 

Publications 566.63 

Travel 321.92 



Balance, February 28th. . . 



4,136.74 
2,670.08 
$6,806.82 



WAR FUNDS 
Receipt* 

Balance, January 1 $77,071.84 

United War Work Campaign 9,737.60 

Miscellaneous 3.90 

Interest, December, January and 

February 214.67 



$87,027.81 
Expenditure* 

U. S. Gov. Certificate of 

Indebtedness $25,263.74 

Preserving War Service 

material 141.40 

Headquarters expenses. . 1,000.00 

Hospitals 2,456.71 

Paris 250.00 

Miscellaneous 366.47 $29,478.32 

Balance on hand, Febru- 
ary 28th $25,349.49 

Balance on hand, Liberty 
Bonds and Thrift 
Stamps 31,550.00 

Balance on hand, libra- 
rians and agents 650.00 57,549.49 



$87.027.81 

BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY FUND 
Receipts 

Balance, January 1 $16,834.00 

New cash contributions 
and payments on 
pledges 

Cash $3,036.13 

Liberty Bonds 1,000.00 4,036.13 

Interest, December, 
January and Feb- 
ruary $85.97 

Less exchange 88 86.09 



Expenditure* 

Library extension $ 146.90 

Booklist, reading courses 

and book publicity 643.91 

General library publicity. 210.33 

Books for the blind 127.73 

Recruiting 32.92 

Trustees' Endowment 

Fund 2,766.67 



$20,955.22 



3,927.46 



Balance, February 28th. .$16,027.76 
Liberty Bonds 1,000.00 



17,027.76 
$20,955.22 



42 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Issued in 

January, March, May, July, September and 
November 



There is no subscription price and the 
Bulletin is sent only to members of the 
Association. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President Azariah S. Root, Oberlin College 
Library, Oberlin, O. 

First Vice-President Samuel H. Ranck, 
Grand Rapids Biblic Library. 

Second Vice-President Claribel R. Barnett, 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture Library. 

Treasurer Edward D. Tweedell, The John 
Crerar Library, Chicago. 

Executive Board The president, vice-presi- 
dents, treasurer and Gratia A. Country- 
man; John Cotton Dana; George S. God- 
ard; Margaret Mann; H. H. B. Meyer; Carl 
B. Roden; Edith Tobbitt; George B. Utley. 

Secretary Carl H. Milam, 78 E. Washing- 
ton St., Chicago. 

Executive offices 78 E. Washington St., 
Chicago. 



IN JANUARY and February this year, 
192 members joined the A. L. A. In 
the same months of last year the number 
was 316. If we are to equal in 1922 the 
record made last year 629 new members 
in the first four months we must have 
437 applications between now and April 
30th. And why not? Are there not thou- 
sands of librarians and trustees who will 
join when they have a personal invitation? 



4 4 T TSEFUL books for business" and "use- 
LJ ful books for the home" are the 
slogans for March of the booksellers and 
publishers. Travel week is to be observed 
in New York, March 25-April 1. Religious 
book week is scheduled again this year 
for April 2-8, and back-to-nature books are 
to be emphasized during all of that month. 

READING lists issued by the Amercan 
Library Association within the last 
few months have had relatively good dis- 
tribution. Only Children's books for 
Christmas presents has sold to the extent 
of 65,000 copies but others have run into 
rather large editions. The advance orders 
for Business books for profit and pleasure 



justify a first printing of 15,000 copies, and 
the orders for Useful books for the home 
have led us to print 10,000 on the first 
run. 

But these figures are pitifully small 
when one remembers that there are more 
than 4,000 public libraries in America 
which might use these co-operative lists. 
The Editorial Committee and the Execu- 
tive Board believe that it is only a mat- 
ter of a few months until such lists will 
sell in editions of fifty, seventy-five or a 
hundred thousand. 

The lists are prepared by people who 
know the subjects and know the needs of 
libraries. They are offered to libraries 
with special imprints so that they look 
like a home-town product, or with the A. 
L. A. imprint to give them that authorita- 
tive character, if it is desired. They are 
attractively printed and sold at less than 
it would cost the library to reprint them 
in similar form. 

MANY libraries and some individuals 
have placed standing orders for all A. 
L. A. publicatiens. In that way they get 
one copy of everything as soon as it is 
printed and can make prompt and intel- 
ligent decision as to the number of addi- 
tional copies needed for the staff or for 
public distribution. 

A CALIFORNIA librarian asks whether 
f\ subscribing libraries are entitled to 
appropriate The Booklist notes for public- 
ity purposes in local newspapers without 
quotations. The answer is yes; the notes 
are not copyrighted and should be used 
as much as possible. We are pleased when 
a footnote is added to the effect that the 
notes are taken from The Booklist of the 
American Library Association but this is 
not essential nor always appropriate. 



The January Bulletin in its report of 
the mid-winter meeting of the League of 
Library Commissions announced E. Kath- 
leen Jones as one of the members of the 
committee appointed to interest members 
of the state commissions in the Detroit 
conference. The name announced should 
have been E. Louise Jones. 



BULLETIN 



43 



FACTS FOR TRUSTEES 

LIBRARY EXTRAVAGANCE* 

IS NOT the average human being worthy 
of as much as one dollar and sixty-five 
cents' worth of book privileges a year? 
Is that too much to be paid for all the 
wealth of mind and heart that has been 
stored up for him in books? A waste of 
public money to spend as much as that, in 
giving each person this essential means 
of continuing a life-long education? Can 
it be called eccentric for any community, 
which spends as much as $40 or $50 a year 
for the elementary education of each of 
its children, to spend one-thirtieth of that 
amount in providing the means of utiliz- 
ing and developing that education? 

What other institution that can at all 
compare with the library in range of serv- 
ice can fce maintained on any such sum 
as $1.65 a year for each of its possible 
beneficiaries? A church, open only one or 
two days a week, requires and receives 
an average of from $15 to $20 a year for 
its support. More than $10 a year is 
spent by the Y. M. C. A. for each of its 
members. The Boy Scout organization re- 
quires $10 a year for each boy benefited 
and the Girl Scouts about $7. Clubs, fra- 
ternities, Masonic bodies spend without 
thought of extravagance from $10 to $50 
a year for each of their beneficiaries. And 
yet the public library, providing all the 
conveniences and facilities for reading 
that the best clubs can offer and vastly 
more in range and quality, open for use 
every day and evening, offering an expert 
knowledge and service in the adaptation 
of books to human need that the most 
costly club and the most costly private li- 
brary can not give the public library, of- 
fering all this to each reader in the 
community, is called extravagant in spend- 
ing as much as $1.65 a year for each of 
its possible users! 

Just suppose that the community, 
charged with this extravagance, should ac- 
cept this judgment, tiring of this waste, 
and should close the library, leaving or 
putting in each man's pocket the $1.65 a 
year that the library had cost, to be spent 
on books for himself. He could then for 
this amount have just one book a year, 



and in the course of a lifetime of expendi- 
ture at this rate, he might have forty or 
fifty of his own. It would take five or 
ten years to secure the benefit of a good 
dictionary and more than a whole lifetime 
to secure a first-class cyclopedia. To have 
what he now has in the public library 
would cost him more than a thousand 
times the $1.65 that is now being paid on 
his account; or in other words, the pub- 
lic library is multiplying a thousand fold 
the value of his proportion of cost. 

Instead of being an extravagance, it rep- 
resents the most astonishing bit of econ- 
omy to be found in the entire range of 
his expenditures or investments. In real- 
ity, the city which is truly guilty of ex- 
travagance in the compulsion it puts upon 
its citizens is the one that inadequately 
supports its library, compelling vast num- 
bers of its people either to go without the 
benefits of desired reading or to pay for 
that reading ten to fifty times what it 
would cost them if provided in their li- 
brary. 



"These paragraphs are taken from a long and 
stirring editorial in New York Libraries for No- 
vember, 1921. 



SALE, EXCHANGE, WANTS, OFFERS 
Any institutional member of the As- 
sociation may insert, without cost, a ten- 
line notice of books or periodicals wanted, 
for sale, or for exchange. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE 
Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, 

offers for sale or exchange its publications, 
including its Collections, a Bulletin (quar- 
terly), Aboriginies of Minnesota, by N. H. 
Winchell, and A History of Minnesota, 
volume 1, by W. W. Folwell (just issued). 
It has also many duplicates for exchange 
on either priced or piece-for-piece basis and 
solicits duplicate lists from other libra- 
ries. 

WANTED 

American Library Association, 78 E. 
Washington Street, Chicago, wants The 
Booklist, volume 17, numbers 2 and 7. 



The name of the Keystone State Library 
Association was included in the list of 
state chapters on page 4 of the January 
Bulletin by mistake. That Association has 
not yet voted on this question. 



miinniumimnMminmraumiiMuiiuHnniniiiiiiiiiniiiiittiiiiiiiiinimiiiimuuKinuiHiutitinmituiiiiiuuuiiiiiimiiiniiiiuiiiMiitiHiiiniiiiitiMiuiuiHHiimiuiiHmiiiiiiniimtmiiuii 



Let Him Who Readeth Heed 

I 

The purpose of the AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION to 
foster the development of libraries and promote the use of 
books can only be fully accomplished by the loyal support 
of all members of the library profession and by the participa- 
tion of all in the affairs of this our own organization. 

i 

Each library and each librarian should make such con- 
tribution to the Association as is consistent with the oppor- 
tunities afforded to each for receiving from the Association 
the assistance adapted to professional needs. 

The American Library Association includes in one all- 
American professional fellowship many associations, institu- 
tions, organizations and individuals interested and engaged in 
every phase of library work. 

Through this community of interest the A. L. A. brings to 
its members the strength which results from united effort, the 
power which arises from consensus of opinion, and the knowl- 
edge which comes from interchange of thought. 

Every new member makes the Association richer in this 
strength, power and knowledge. Every new member interested 
in the same phases of library service as yourself adds vitally 
to the help which the A. L. A. can give you individually. Urge 
your colleagues, friends and assistants to join. 



MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE. 

WM. J. HAMILTON, Chairman. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

VOL. 16, No. 3 CHICAGO, ILL. MAY, 1922 



Conference Program 
Travel Announcements 
A. L. A. Reading Courses 



PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR. FREE TO MEMBERS. 

Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



VOL. 16, No. 3 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



MAY. 1922 



CONTENTS 



A. L. A. Forty-fourth Annual Conference, 

General Announcement 47 

Tentative Schedule of Meetings 48 

Detroit Conference Program, General Ses- 
sions 49 

Program of A. L. A. Council Meetings. .. .50 
Programs of Sections, Affiliated Organiza- 
tions and other groups 51 

Agricultural Libraries Section 51 

American Association of Law Libraries. 51 
Association of American Library 

Schools 51 

Bibliographical Society of America 51 

Catalog .Section 51 

Children's Librarians Section 52 

College and Reference Section 52 

Hospital Libraries Round Table 53 

League of Library Commissions 53 

Lending Section 53 

Library Buildings Round Table 53 

Library Workers Association 53 

Michigan Library Association 54 

National Association of State Libraries. 5 4 

Professional Training Section 54 

Public Documents Round Table 54 

Libraries of Religion and Theology 

Round Table 54 

Round Table on Work with Negroes. .. .55 

School Libraries Section 55 

Small Libraries Round Table 55 

Special Libraries Association 55 



Training Class Instructors Round Table. 56 

Trustees Section 56 

University Library Extension .Service 

Round Table 56 

Work with the Foreign Born Round 
Table 56 

Travel Announcements 57 

Special Rates 57 

Special Party Travel 57 

Post Conference Party 60 

Local Information 62 

Hotels and Outside Rooms 62 

Detroit 62 

v 

Ann Arbor 63 

Registration 64 

Exhibits 64 

A. L. A. Constitution and By-Laws 65 

Nominations 66 

A. L. A. Reading Courses 67 

Two-Foot Shelf fora Country School 68 

Committees 68 

A. L. A. Financial Reports 69 

Openings in Public Health Service and 

Naval Establishment 69 

Editorials 70 

Facts for Trustees 72 

The American Legion and the American 

Library in Paris 73 

Sale, Exchange, Wants, Offers 75 

President Root's Conference Announce- 
ment 76 



ASK your Board to send a trustee delegate to the Detroit 
Conference. Something of interest to trustees will be 
found in every day's program. An important conference 
of the Trustees Section is being planned for Tuesday after- 
noon. Frank Hervey Pettingell of Los Angeles is chairman 
of that Section. 



A. L. A. FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 

DETROIT 



JUNE 26 JULY 1, 1922 
GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



THE conference at Detroit will be a 
large one. More than 1100 persons 
have already made hotel reservations as 
against 375 at this time last year. Yet last 
year's conference was more largely at- 
tended than any in the history of the As- 
sociation. 

President Burton of the University of 
Michigan is to be the guest of honor at 
the opening meeting and reception Monday 
evening, June 26. The other principal 
speaker that evening will be President 
Root of the A. L. A. Mayor James Couzens 
of Detroit and Honorable John C. Lodge, 
president of the Common Council, will also 
be present to greet the delegates. Mr. 
Harold H. Emmons, president of the De- 
troit Board of Commerce, has accepted the 
invitation to take part in the conference 
program and will speak Saturday on the 
individual's duties to his profession. 

Detroit's central location and the re- 
duced railway rates offered this season to 
A.L.A. members will make attendance 
practicable for many; and the opportunity 
of reaching Detroit by water either from 
the East or West will make the trip as well 
as the objective desirable. The city's hotel 
facilities are exceptional. The conference 
committees are making every effort for the 
success of the conference and for the con- 
venience and pleasure for those who attend. 

The week's program includes, besides the 
first general sessions, some 40 meetings of 
sections, affiliated organizations and round 
table groups, which will touch nearly every 
phase and detail of library work. The 
schedule of meetings appears on p. 48. 
Time for recreation will also be well taken 
care of. The Entertainment Committee 



plans among other things, an evening boat 
ride on Lake St. Clair. All day Thursday 
will be set aside for a trip to Ann Arbor 
where the visiting librarians will be guests 
of the University of Michigan. The day's 
program will include luncheon at the Uni- 
versity Union, followed by short addresses, 
a visit to the new university library and 
other university buildings, and an organ 
recital. 

The new Public Library is one of De- 
troit's attractions. The building, erected 
at a cost of two million dollars, is beauti- 
ful and appropriate architecturally and its 
interior is made unique by mural decora- 
tions of Gari Melchers, and Edwin H. 
Blashfield. The building was dedicated 
less than a year ago and the staff is very 
glad to offer its hospitality to visiting li- 
brarians at the conference. 

The Travel Committee has planned two 
post conference excursions, one through 
the Soo to Duluth, the other to Toronto, 
the Thousand Islands and Montreal, which 
will round out a vacation trip to any one's 
satisfaction. 



Richard F. Bach, extension secretary of 
the American Federation of Arts (address 
Metropolitan Museum, New York) sug- 
gests the following topics for considera- 
tion at some section or round table 
meetings: The relation of the library to 
industrial art production, and The im- 
portance of the exhibition room as a part 
of the library in small communities. 

He hopes that some groups will think it 
desirable to include these topics on their 
Detroit program. 



48 AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS 

Morning sessions at 9 :30, afternoon sessions at 2 :30, evening sessions at 8 :00, with such excep- 
tions as are specifically noted below. 

(Detroit City Time.) 





Morning 


Afternoon 


Evening 


MONDAY 
June 26 


9:30 Executive Board 


2:30 Council. 


8 :00 First General Session. 
10 :00 Reception. 


TUESDAY 
June 27 


9 :30 Second General 
Session. 


2 :30 Am. Assn. Law Lib. 
Catalog Sec. 
Children's Lib. Sec. 
Trustees' Sec. 
Sch. Lib. Sec. High 
Schools Lib. 
Special Lib. Assn. 
Pub. Doc. Rd. Table. 
Work with Foreign 
Born Rd. Table. 


8 :00 Profess. Training Sec. 
Agric. Lib. Sec. 
League of Lib. Com. 
Special Lib. Assn. 
Group meeting. 
Small Libs. Rd. Table. 
Am. Assn. Law Lib. 
Hospital Libs. Rd. 
Table. 


WEDNESDAY 
June 2* 


9 :30 Third General 
Session. 


2 :30 Children's Lib. Sec. 
Natl. Assn. State Lib. 
College & Ref. Sec. 
Special Lib. Assn. 
Mich. State Lib. Assn. 
Assn. of Am. Lib. Sch. 
Hospital Libs. Rd. 
Table. 


8 :00 Council. 
Wk. with Negroes Rd. 
Table. 
Sch. Lib. Sec. 
Am. Assn. Law Lib. 
Joint session with 
Natl. Assn. of State 
Libs. 
Lib. Bldg. Rd. Table. 
Training Class In- 
structors Rd. Table. 
Public Doc. Rd. Table. 
League of Lib. Com. 
Special Lib. Assn. 
Group meeting. 


THURSDAY 
June 29 


Recreation Day- 
10 :00 Univ. Library Ex. 
Rd. Table at 
Ann Arbor. 
10 :30 Take train. 
11 :30 Arrive Ann Ar- 
bor. 
12:15 Lunch at Univ. 
Union. 
Addresses. 


-Visit to Ann Arbor. 
2 :00-4 :00 Visit to Univ. Lib. 
and Campus. 
4 :30 Take train for Detroit. 
4 :00 Bibliographical Society 
of America. 


6 :30 Lib. Sch. Dinners and 
other dinner meet- 
ings. 
8 :30 Lib. of Rel. & Theol. 
Rd. Table. 
Natl. Assn. State Lib. 
Lib. Workers Assn. 
Children's Lib. Sec. 
Business meeting. 
Special Lib. Assn. 
Group meeting. 


FRIDAY 
June 30 


9 :30 Fourth General 
Session. 


2 :30 Special Lib. Assn. 
Catalog Sec., Large and 
Small Libs. 
Sch. Lib. Sec., joint 
session with Chil- 
dren's Lib. Sec. 
Am. Assn. Law Lib. 
Agric. Lib. Sec. 
Lending Sec. 


Am. Assn. Law Lib. 
Banquet. 
8 :00 Boat ride. 
Dancing. 
Plays, etc. 


SATURDAY 
July 1 


9:30 Fifth General 
Session. 


2 :30 Assn. Am. Lib. Schools, 
Lending Sec. 





BULLETIN 

DETROIT CONFERENCE PROGRAM 

(Tentative) 
GENERAL SESSIONS 



49 



FIRST SESSION 
Monday, June 26, 8:00 p. m. 

Greetings Hon. James Couzens, mayor of 
Detroit; Hon. John C. Lodge, president 
of the Detroit Common Council. 

Address President M. L. Burton, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

President's address Azariah S. Root, 
Oberlin College. 

8:30 p. m. Reception. 

SECOND SESSION 
Tuesday, June 27, 9:30 a. m. 
Subjecc: A. L. A. publications. 

The policy of the Editorial Committee 
Killer C. Wellman, Springfield, Mass., 
chairman, Editorial Committee. 

Needs not yet fulfilled Harry M. Lyden- 

berg, New York Public Library. 
General discussion 

Adelaide R. Hasse, Washington, D. C., 
representing special libraries of all 
kinds. 

Marion Horton, Los Angeles Library 
School, representing school libraries 
and library schools. 

Andrew Keogh, Yale University Library, 
representing college and reference li- 
braries. 

Howard L. Hughes, Trenton Public Li- 
brary, representing popular libraries. 

THIRD SESSION 
Wednesday, June 28, 9:30 a. m. 

Subject: Recruiting for library service. 
Address Judson T. Jennings, Seattle, 

chairman, Recruiting Committee. 
Recruiting for public libraries in Canada 

George H. Locke, Toronto Public 

Library. 
College and university libraries W. E. 

Henry, University of Washington. 
Special libraries Miss Alice L. Rose, 

National City Financial Library, New 

York. 
School libraries Martha C. Pritchard, 

Detroit Teachers College Library. 



Children's libraries Clara Hunt, Brook- 
lyn Public Library. 

Library Schools Alice S. Tyler, Cleve- 
land. 

FOURTH SESSION 
Friday, June 30, 9 ! :30 a. m. 
Report of the Secretary. 
Report of the Treasurer and Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Reports of Committees. 
10:00 a. m. A primer of copyright M. L. 

Raney. 
10:30 a. m. Subject: National Library 

Week. 

The Committee's proposal Willis H. 
Kerr, Emporia, Kansas, chairman Pub- 
licity Committee. 

Indiana's experience E. L. Craig, 
trustee, Evans ville (Ind.) Public 
Library. 

Missouri's book week C. H. Compton, 
St. Louis Public Library. 
How publishers and booksellers are get- 
ting good national publicity Marion 
Humble, assistant secretary National 
Association of Book Publishers, New 
York. 

What a publicity week can do for a li- 
brary Herbert S. Hirshberg, State 
Librarian, Columbus, Ohio. 

FIFTH SESSION 
Saturday, July 1, 9:30 a. m. 

Subject: The individual's responsibility to 

his profession. 

Address Harold H. Emmons, attorney, 
president of the Detroit Board of 
Commerce. 

Talks on The librarian's duty to the 
profession. Carl B. Roden, Chicago 
Public Library; and Mary Emogene 
Hazeltine, University of Wisconsin 
Library School. 
Address Adam Strohm. 



bl) 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



PROGRAM OF A. L. A. COUNCIL MEETINGS 

Monday afternoon, June 26 and Wednesday evening, June 28 



Josephine A. Rathbone, of Pratt Insti- 
tute Library School, will give a talk at 
one of the sessions on the standardiza- 
tion of library positions. Much of the time 
of the two sessions will be devoted to 
committee recommendations. 

The Committee on Sponsorship for 
Knowledge recommends "that this report 
be considered final, the Committee dis- 
charged and the central office of the Amer- 
ican Library Association take measures 
necessary to officialize sponsorships to at 
least a hundred in number, during the year 
beginning July 1, 1922." 

The Committee on Library Training 
urges discussion and, if possible, action on 
its recommendations: 

That the regular library school offer 
summer school courses in special subjects, 
for which the same credit be given as for 
equivalent courses in the regular schools; 

That correspondence courses be offered 
in certain branches by some schools, with 
credit; 

That the various schools adopt a uniform 
system of credits. 

The Committee on Work with the For- 
eign Born has presented some "general 
conclusions" which might well be consid- 
ered as a basis for an A.L.A. platform on 
work with the foreign born. 

The Committee on Salaries suggests 
that the Council discuss the advisability of 
setting up an A.L.A. standard for a mini- 
mum beginning salary for trained library 
assistants. 

The Committee on Reciprocal Relations 
recommends (1) That the A.L.A. co-operate 
to the fullest possible extent with the 



American Press Association, made up of 
representatives of weekly newspapers in 
the United States in order to further the 
county library movement; (2) That the 
A.L.A. seek reciprocal relations with the 
American Farm Bureau Federation and se- 
cure the active aid and support of this 
strong organization in the interest of 
furthering the movement of the county 
library; (3) That the A.L.A. establish close 
alliance with the Booksellers' Association 
and the National Association of Book Pub- 
lishers and provide A.L.A. speakers for 
their programs from time to time. It also 
believes that the importance of a public 
library as a function of municipal govern- 
ment still needs to be impressed on muni- 
cipal executives and suggests that a show- 
ing at a conference of mayors would be 
valuable. 

Recommendations for the consideration 
of the 'Council are also being made by the 
committee on membership. 

(These and other committee reports will 
be in print by May 26th, and will be 
mailed to members of the Council. Copies 
will be available for distribution to mem- 
bers of the Association at the Detroit Con- 
ference and the reports will be reprinted 
with the Proceedings.) 



The County Library Committee is ar- 
ranging for a talk on national county li- 
braries to be broadcasted by the Detroit 
News radio and to be received at the Con- 
ference auditorium one evening of the 
week. 



BULLETIN 



51 



PROGRAMS OF 

SECTIONS, AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS, AND 
OTHER GROUPS 



AGRICULTURAL LIBRARIES SECTION 

Chairman, Lucy E. Fay, University of 
Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 

First Session, Tuesday evening, June 27 
Second Session, Friday afternoon, June 30 
Subject: The importance of a formulated 

policy for agricultural libraries. 
For program, see Public Libraries and Li- 
brary Journal of later date. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES 

President, Gilson G. Glasier, Wisconsin 
State Library, Madison, Wis. 

Seventeenth Annual Meeting 
First Session, Tuesday afternoon, June 27 
Address of Welcome Hon. Stewart E. 

Hanley, president Detroit Bar Associa- 
tion. 
Response Geo. S. Godard, state librarian, 

Hartford, Connecticut. 
Remarks of President. 
Reports of committees. 

Committee on New Members. 

Committee on Index to Legal Periodicals. 

Committee on Affiliation with American 
Bar Association. 

Mr. Small on printing list of Bar Asso- 
ciation Proceedings. 
Appointment of Committees. 
4:00 p. m. Round Table System in law 

libraries, led by William Alexander, 

New York City. 

Second Session, Tuesday evening, June 27 

Special program, devoted to biographies 
of law librarians. In charge of Vice- 
President Mettee. 

Third Session, Wednesday evening, June 28 
(Joint meeting with National Association 

of State Libraries.) 
Problems of a law book writer John R. 

Rood. 
History of Michfgan law libraries and their 

relation to Michigan general libraries 

Olive C. Lathrop, librarian, Detroit Bar 

Association. 



Round Table Indexing of statute law, 
Gertrude C. Woodward, chairman. 

Survey of state libraries, a report George 
S. Godard, state librarian of Connecticut. 

Report of joint committee on closer affil- 
iation between the two associations. 

Fourth Session, Friday afternoon, June 30 

Causes celebres Short sketches of unique 
cases within personal knowledge of 
members, such cases to be chosen for 
their human legal interest and the uni- 
versality of their appeal. 

Unfinished business. 

Election of officers. 

Fifth Session, Friday evening, June 30 

Annual Association dinner and entertain- 
ment, 6:30 p. m. 

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LIBRARY 
SCHOOLS 

President, Phineas L. Windsor, University 
of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 

First Session, Wednesday afternoon, 

June 28 

Program to be announced. 
Second Session, Saturday afternoon, July 1 

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF 
AMERICA 

President, W. W. Bishop, University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Thursday afternoon, June 29, 4:30, at 

Ann Arbor 

Subject: Resources for American history 
in libraries, public and private, of the 
Great Lakes region. 
Augustus H. Shearer. 
C. M. Burton, Detroit, Mich. 
William L. Clements, Bay City, Mich. 
George B. Utley, librarian, Newberry Li- 
brary, Chicago. 

Two other speakers to be announced. 
The President's address W. W. Bishop. 

CATALOG SECTION 

Chairman, Mrs. Jennie Thornburg Jen- 
nings, Public library, St. Paul, Minn. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



First Session, Tuesday afternoon, June 27 
The catalog situation: A study of present 
conditions in the light of last year's dis- 
cussion, F. K. Walter, librarian, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 

The training of catalogers: What it 
should be and what it lacks. 
J. C. M. Hanson, associate director, Uni- 
versity of Chicago Library. 
Sophie K. Hiss, Cleveland Public Library. 
Esther Betz, Carnegie Library, Pitts- 
burgh. From the standpoint of the 
person trained. 
Discussion: 

Charles Martel, Library of Congress. 
Harriet E. Howe, Simmons College. 
Mary E. Baker, Carnegie Library, 

Pittsburgh. 

Jennie D. Fellows, New York State 
Library, and representatives of other 
libraries and professional associa- 
tions. 

The catalog department and its biblio- 
graphical work outside the department. 
Mildred M. Tucker, Harvard University 
Library. 

Second Session, Friday afternoon, June 30 

Small Libraries Division 
Subject: Catalog problems in smaller li- 
braries. 

Round table discussion Ellen Hedrick, 
North Dakota Library Commission, 
presiding. 

Suggestions for solution of cataloging 

problems in smaller libraries Susan 

Grey Akers, Wisconsin Library School. 

Discussion by representatives of library 

commissions and smaller libraries. 

Large Libraries Division 
Cataloging the rarities of the Henry E. 
Huntington Library George Watson 
Cole, librarian, Henry E. Huntington Li- 
brary, San Gabriel, Calif. 
Lessons in Americanism learned through 
cataloging local historical material May 
Wood Wigginton, Denver Public Library. 
A selective catalog: Plans for making the 
large catalog usable. Ruth Rosholt, 

Minneapolis Public Library. 
H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress. 
Music cataloging, and a proposed index to 
songs and music. 



Report on questionnaire. 

Discussion: Agnes S. Hall, Denver 

Public 'Library. 
Maps, their care and cataloging. 

Rudolph Armbruester, Grosvenor Li- 
brary, Buffalo, New York. 

A. G. S. Josephson, John Crerar Library, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

CHILDREN'S LIBRARIANS SECTION 

Chairman, Clara W. Hunt, Public Library, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

First Session, Tuesday afternoon, June 27 

Some recent books for the story teller 
Margaret B. Carnegie, Carnegie Library, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Recent fiction for girls Annie I. M. Jack- 
son, Public Library, Toronto, Ontario. 

Recent fiction for boys Marion F. Schwab, 
Public Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Books for the older boys and girls Mary 
S. Wilkinson, Hackley Public Library, 
Muskegon, Mich. 

The growing adult interest in children's 
books Elizabeth D. Briggs, Public Li- 
brary, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Presentation of the John Newberry medal 
Frederic G. Melcher, New York. 

Second Session, Wednesday afternoon, 
June 28 

Why the children's librarian needs special 
training Mrs. Mary E. S. Root, Public 
Library, Providence, R. I. 

What our country is doing to train chil- 
dren's librarians Edith L. Smith, Public 
Library, Morristown, N. J. 

The possible future of school library work 
Jasmine Britton, librarian, Elementary 
School Library, Los Angeles, Calif. 

The demand for children's librarians 
Sarah C. N. Bogle. 

Third Session, Thursday evening, June 29 

Business meeting. 

COLLEGE AND REFERENCE SECTION 

Chairman, Charles J. Barr, Yale University, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Wednesday afternoon, June 28 
Reports: 

Committee on foreign periodicals. H. M. 
Lydenberg. 



BULLETIN 



53 



Committee on revised form for library 
statistics. J. T. Gerould. 

Printed cards for monograph series. J. 
C. M. Hanson. 

Document catalog and checklist. 
Inter-library loans: a policy. 

Anne S. Pratt, Yale University. 

E. D. Tweedell, The John Crerar Library. 

Fanny Borden, Vassar College. 
The James Jerome Hill Reference Library. 

J. G. Pyle, Librarian. 
The university librarian, his preparation, 

position, and relation to the academic 

departments of the university. 

Edith M. Coulter, University of Cali- 
fornia. 

P. K. Walter, University of Minnesota. 
Rental collections for students: Reserve 
books. 

E. A. Henry, University of Chicago. 

E. N. Manchester, University of Kansas. 
Preparing for a book-buying trip in Europe 

W. W. Bishop, University of Michigan. 
HOSPITAL LIBRARIES ROUND TABLE 
Chairman, Caroline Webster, U. S. Public 

Health Service, care C. H. Lavinder, 

Washington, D. C. 
Program to be announced. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 

President, William R. Watson, Library Ex- 
tension Division, State Education De- 
partment, Albany, N. Y. 

First Session, Tuesday evening, June 27 

Aunt Mary's new hat Anna G. Hall, H. R. 
Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Small library buildings John A. Lowe, 
Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Reports of committees. 

Second Session, Wednesday evening, 

June 28 

Meeting of members of state library com- 
missions or corresponding administrative 

boards. 

Leader Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool Earl. 
Subject: Potential functions and status of 

a library commission. 
Topics for discussion: 

Responsibilities assumed with the honor. 

Is there proper recognition of library 
commission work in your state? 

Adequate appropriations. 

Greater supervisory powers. 

Extending service throughout the state. 



LENDING SECTION 
Chairman, John A. Lowe, Public Library, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

First Session, Friday afternoon, June 30 
Subjects for discussion: 
Fitting books to readers. 
Book selection for the average branch 
library of a fair-sized system. 

a. Book needs of professional men. 

b. Technical and industrial books of 
today which every librarian should 
know. 

c. Essential books of drama in the 
schools. 

The Reserve Book System. 
Second Session, Saturday afternoon, July 1 
Subjects for discussion: 

Loan desk work from the borrower's 
viewpoint. 

Cures for mutilation and theft. 

Motion study at the loan desk. 

Psychology of work with the public. 

LIBRARY BUILDINGS ROUND TABLE 
Chairman, Willis K. Stetson, Free Public 

Library, New Haven, Conn. 

Wednesday evening, June 28 

It is proposed that the special topic for 
discussion shall be: Recent branch library 
buildings, smaller central buildings and 
town libraries. All persons interested in 
this topic or any particularly interested 
in having any other topic brought up are 
requested to communicate with Willis K. 
Stetson, librarian, Free Public Library, 
New Haven, Conn. It is also desired that 
information regarding any recent library 
buildings particularly deserving attention 
should be sent as soon as convenient to 
Mr. Stetson. 

LIBRARY WORKERS ASSOCIATION 
President, Catherine Van Dyne, 120 W. 

42nd Street, New York. 

Thursday evening, June 29 
Survey of present facilities for library 

education. 
Report on questionnaire on training offered 

by libraries and library schools. 
Report of committee on correlation of 

courses. 

What constitutes adequate library train- 
ing? And what constitutes the adequate 

library salary? 



54 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



The pension movement and other provi- 
sion for old age. 

Speakers to be announced. 

MICHIGAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President, Flora B. Roberts, Public Li- 
brary, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Wednesday afternoon, June 29 
Business meeting. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE 
LIBRARIES 

President, J. M. Hitt, State Library, 
Olympia, Wash. 

First Session, Wednesday afternoon, 
June 28 

The President's address J. M. Hitt, state 
librarian of Washington. 

Library administration, state and county 
M. J. Ferguson, state librarian of Cali- 
fornia. 

State library service to rural communities 
Clarence B. Lester, secretary, Free 
Library Commission of Wisconsin. 

The future of our Library Association 
Demarchus C. Brown, state librarian of 
Indiana. 

Business session. 

Second Session, Wednesday evening, 

June 28 

(Joint meeting with the American Associa- 
tion of Law Libraries) 
See program under American Association 

of Law Libraries, third session, p. 61. 
Third Session, Thursday evening, June 29 
Reception and dinner in honor of Mrs. 

Mary C. Spencer, state librarian of 

Michigan. 

During the convention week a round 
table on legislative reference problems will 
be arranged. 

In addition there will be a business ses- 
sion for the election of officers and for 
other purposes. The hours for both of 
these meetings will be announced during 
the period of the conference. 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SECTION 

Chairman, Sidney B. Mitchell, University 

of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Tuesday evening, June 27 
Correlation of library school and training 

class instruction Ethel R. Sawyer, di- 



rector, training class, Library Associa- 
tion, Portland, Ore. 

Discussion. 

Report of the work of the A. L. A. Com- 
mittee on library training Malcolm G. 
Wyer, chairman. 

Reports on new features of training by 
representatives of library schools and 
training classes. 

Election of officers. 

PUBLIC DOCUMENTS ROUND TABLE 
Chairman, H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 

Tuesday afternoon, June 27 

and 

Wednesday evening, June 28 
The sessions of the round table will 
center on the phenomenal document prog- 
ress of the year, and subjects of special 
interest to state, college and reference, 
school, and public libraries will be dis- 
cussed. Detailed program will appear in 
Library Journal and Public Libraries. 

LIBRARIES OF RELIGION AND 
THEOLOGY ROUND TABLE 

Chairman, 'Mrs. Mable E. Colegrove, Public 
Library, Newark, N. J. 

Thursday evening, June 29 

Subject: Religious books in the public 
library. 

Religious book week Marion Humble, 
executive secretary, Year-Round Book 
Selling Plan, New York. 

Selecting religious books for a public li- 
brary Frank G. Lewis, librarian, Buck- 
nell Library, Crozer Theological Semin- 
ary, Chester, Pa. 

Recent expository books useful for teachers 
of Bible classes Bernard C. Steiner, li- 
brarian, Enoch Pratt Free Library of 
Baltimore City. 

The correlation of books and stories with 
situations and needs in the religious life 
of children Edith M. Lehr, Union 
Theological Seminary, New York. 

The Bible Paul M. Paine, librarian, Syra- 
cuse Public Library. 

The church and the library The Reverend 
Gains Glenn Atkins, D.D., pastor of the 
First Congregational Church, Detroit. 



BULLETIN 



ROUND TABLE ON WORK WITH 
NEGROES 

Chairman, Ernestine Rose, Public Library, 
New York. 

Wednesday evening, June 28 

Discussion concerning permanent organi- 
zation. 

Questionnaire What are libraries doing 
for Negroes? 

Support and control of Negro libraries 
discussion. 

Segregation, separate libraries, etc. dis- 
cussion. 

Training discussion. 
Opportunities discussion. 
Election of officers of permanent organ 
ization. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES SECTION 

Chairman, Marion Horton, Public Library, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

First Session, Tuesday, June 27 
(Meeting to be held in Hutchins Inter- 
mediate School) 

Round table of high school librarians, May 
Ingles presiding. 

Subject: The relation of the high school 
librarian to the different departments of 
the school. 

History Rachel Baldwin, librarian, 
Deerfield-Shields Township high school, 
Highland Park, Illinois. 

Science Edith M. Schulze, librarian, 
high school, Redondo, Cal. 

English Bertha Carter, librarian, Oak 
Park and River Forest Township high 
school, Oak Park, 111. 

Home economics Mary J. Booth, li- 
brarian, Eastern Illinois Normal School, 
Charleston, 111. 

Technology and manual training Edith 
Cook, Technical high school, Cleveland. 

Vocational guidance Marion Lovis, li- 
brarian, Hutchins Intermediate School, 
Detroit. 

Discussion. 



Second Session, Wednesday evening, 
June 28 

Books and the iron man Arthur Pound, 
Flint, Mich. 

Books and children in the elementary 
schools Jasmine Britton, supervisor, 
elementary school libraries, Los Angeles. 

Books and high school students Speaker 
to be announced. 

Books and normal school students Grace 
Viele, teacher-librarian, State normal 
school reference library, Buffalo. 

Third Session, Friday afternoon, June 30 

(Meeting to be held in elementary school) 

Round table of elementary, normal schools 
and children's librarians, Bertha Hatch 
presiding. 

Children's reading C. C. Certain, vice- 
principal Northwestern high school, 
Detroit. 

Teachers and children's reading Margaret 
Wright, assistant supervisor, School de- 
partment, Cleveland Public Library. 

Reading in the elementary schools Ruth 
Paxson, head of the School department, 
Library Association, Portland, Oregon. 

Children's joy-reading Speaker to be an- 
nounced. 

SMALL LIBRARIES ROUND TABLE 

Chairman, Constance Bement, Public Li- 
brary, Port Huron, Mich. 

Tuesday evening, June 27 
Subject: Standards of good library work 
for small libraries. 

Discussion will be led by Katharyne 
Sleneau, librarian, McGregor Library, 
Highland Park, Mich. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 

President, Dorsey W. Hyde, jr., 3363 Six- 
teenth St., Washington, D. C. 
The Thirteenth Annual Convention of 
the Special Libraries Association, Detroit, 
Mich., June 26-30, will consist of three 
general sessions and three group meetings. 
The general subject or field to be covered 
will be: The special librarian, His per- 
sonality, his training and his objective. 
The general sessions will be held on the 
afternoons of June 27, 28 and 30, and the 



56 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



group meetings will be held on the eve- 
nings of the 27th, 28th and 29th. 

The general outline of topics to be cov- 
ered is as follows: 
The special librarian. 
His personality: character, talents, in- 
itiative. 

His training: education, experience, self- 
education. 

His objective: Less waste in industry; 
more scientific methods; higher busi- 
ness standards; more prosperous com- 
munities. 

There will be speakers from outside 
fields who are particularly interested in 
special library work as well as members 
of the Association to address these meet- 
ings, and the talks will be short, concise 
and to the point. All meetings will be held 
at the Hotel Statler which will be official 
headquarters of the Special Libraries As- 
sociation. 

TRAINING CLASS INSTRUCTORS 
ROUND TABLE 

Chairman, Julia A. Hopkins, Public Li- 
brary, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Program to be announced. 

TRUSTEES SECTION 

Chairman, Frank Hervey Pettingell, 736 
Citizens National Bank Building, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Tuesday afternoon, June 27 
Subject: What must be done to secure 
increased funds from taxation for the 
needs of public libraries. 
Speakers to be announced. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY EXTENSION 
SERVICE ROUND TABLE 

Chairman, Edith Thomas, University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Thursday morning, June 29 
Place: University of Michigan Library, 
Ann Arbor. 

Time: 10 o'clock eastern standard time. 

Greeting Professor W. D. Henderson, di- 
rector Extension Division, University of 
Michigan. 



Forum teaching and the package library: 
The Wisconsin Plan Almere L. Scott, 
secretary, Department of Debating and 
Public Discussion, Extension Division, 
University of Wisconsin. 
Library extension service to club women 
Mary Pratt, secretary, Bureau of Public 
Discussion, Extension Division, Uni- 
versity of Indiana. 

Sources of pamphlet material for library 
extension service LeNoir Dimmitt, ex- 
tension librarian, Extension Division, 
University of Texas. 

Organization and development of material 
for Bulletins to be used in library ex- 
tension service Louis R. Wilson, di- 
rector, Extension Division, University of 
North Carolina. 

Discussion of these papers will be led by 
O. E. Klingaman, director of the Ex- 
tension Division, University of Iowa. 
Persons who wish to attend this meet- 
ing should plan to leave Detroit on the 
Michigan Central train which leaves De- 
troit at 7:50 central standard time (8:50 
eastern standard time.) 

Note: Arrangements for a second ses- 
sion of this conference will be made later 
should occasion demand it. 



Chairman, Mrs. Eleanor E. Ledbetter, 
Public Library, Cleveland, 0. 

Tuesday afternoon, June 27 

(Mrs. Eleanor E. Ledbetter, chairman; 
Josephine Gratia, secretary.) 
The program Is designed to be informal 

and to present opportunity for discussion 

and exchange of views. The following 

topics will be presented: 

Address: Is the library democratic? The 
chairman. 

Symposium: Problems of book buying in 
immigrant languages. Individual lan- 
guages to be presented by librarians 
who have had experience, each with the 
language he presents. 

Paper: Translations of English texts into 
foreign, languages Esther Johnston, 
chairman, New York State Committee 
on Foreign Work. 



BULLETIN 



67 



TRAVEL ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SPECIAL RATES 

A special convention rate of a fare and 
one-half for round trip to Detroit has been 
granted by all railroads east of the Rocky 
Mountains in the United States and east 
of Fort William in Canada. 

To secure this rate delegates must plan 
to return home over the same lines by 
which they go, and must reach destination 
returning before midnight of July llth (ex- 
cept those from points in Colorado, Idaho, 
Montana, Utah, New Mexico and Wyoming, 
who will have a return limit of midnight, 
July 12th). 

This reduced round trip convention rate 
can only be secured by presenting to ticket 
agent an "identification certificate" which 
will be mailed to any member planning to 
attend the meeting if request is made for 
it to A.L.A. Headquarters, 78 E. Wash- 
ington St., Chicago. Get this identification 
certificate at once, it costs you nothing. 
The convention round trip tickets go on 
sale June 22nd at all ticket oflaces. 

As there may be various reduced fare 
trips and excursions offered by railroads 
in June, we advise consultation with local 
ticket agent before purchase of tickets. Be- 
tween Buffalo and Detroit, railroad tickets 
reading via Michigan Central, Wabash or 
Grand Trunk Railway will be accepted in 
either direction on the steamers of the 
Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Co. (See 
details below, under Special Party Travel 
and make reservation of stateroom berth 
before June 1 with F. W. Faxon, Boston 
17, Mass.). 

Detroit is run on eastern standard time. 
Central standard time is given by the rail- 
roads for Detroit and West, and eastern 
standard time, which is one hour faster for 
Windsor and all points east. 

Table of one-way railroad rates to De- 
troit from principal cities, and cost of 



Pullman lower berth one way. (Pullman 
upper will be four-fifths of price of lower) : 

Rail Lower 

From Fara Berth 

Albany, N. Y J19.69 $5.63 

Atlanta, Ga, 26.68 8.25 

Baltimore, Md 21.55 6.38 

Birmingham, Ala, 26.89 11.25 

Boston, Mass 26.92 7.50 

Buffalo, N. Y 9.00 3.00 

Chicago, 111 9.81 3.T5 

Cincinnati. Ohio 9.38 3.75 

Cleveland, Ohio 5.93 3.75 

Dallas, Texas 41.79 14.25 

Denver, Colo 47.09 14.63 

Des Moines, Iowa 22.70 7.50 

Duluth, Minn 26.22 8.25 

Indianapolis, Ind 9.58 3.76 

Kansas City, Mo 26.35 8.25 

Los Angeles, Cal 89.25 27.38 

Louisville, Ky 13.52 

Madison, Wis 14.49 

Memphis, Tenn. 26.11 9.38 

Milwaukee, Wis 12.87 

Minneapolis, Minn 24.47 7:50 

Montreal, Que. 19.40 6.00 

New Orleans, La 39.66 13.88 

New York, N. Y 

via standard lines 24.82 6.38 

via differential lines 23.29 6.38 

Omaha, Neb 27.74 8.25 

Ottawa, Out 16.40 *5.25 

Philadelphia, Pa 23.23 6.38 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 10.65 3,76 

Portland, Ore 87.24 27.38 

Rochester, N. Y 11.48 3.76 

Salt Lake City, Utah 64.88 19.05 

St. Louis, Mo 18.46 4.50 

St. Paul, Minn. 24.08 7.60 

San Francisco, Cal 89.25 27.38 

Seattle, Wash 87.24 27.38 

Toledo, Ohio 2.07 t -76 

Toronto, Ont 7.90 3.00 

Washington, D. C 21.&5 6.38 

Winnipeg, Man 41.16 12.00 

Worcester, Mass 25.32 7.90 

Prom Smith Falls. fSeat. 

For those who may wish to proceed 
East after the conference from Chicago 
and other middle western points we call 
especial attention to the possibility of a 
round trip rate between Chicago and New 
York City with stop-over at Detroit, and 
at a reduction from the regular fare. There 
may also be in force by June "circle 
tours" east, which may allow a route via 
Toronto and Montreal with the post con- 
ference party, and return direct. Watch 
for such rates either to Montreal or to 
some eastern resort points such as As- 
bury Park, Atlantic City, etc. (For route 
see under Post Conference Trip below). 

SPECIAL PARTY TRAVEL 

New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and 
Washington 

Register with Charles H. Brown, Bu- 
reau of Navigation, Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C., not later than June 12, 



58 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



sending him the amount mentioned be- 
low. Special Pullmans and probably a 
special train will be run leaving New York 
City, via Lehigh Valley R. R., from Pennsyl- 
vania Station at 8:10 p. m. standard time 
(9:10 daylight time), Saturday, June 24. 
From Philadelphia, Reading Terminal, 8:40 
p. m. standard time. From Washington, 
via Baltimore and Ohio R. R., 5:00 p. m. 
From Baltimore, Camden Station 5 : 55 p. m. 
The party will arrive at Niagara Falls 
Sunday morning, June 25, joining the Bos- 
ton party after breakfast, visit the falls, 
take the wonderful Gorge trollep trip and 
sail from Buffalo at 6 p. m. (7 p. m. day- 
light saving time), arriving at Detroit 
June 26, 9 a. m. eastern time. 

The Niagara Falls side trip will add but 
little to the expense and it is believed 
that the members will be glad of the op- 
portunity. The steamer trip from Buffalo 
will give a pleasant variation to the cus- 
tomary all rail travel, as the steamers are 
large and well arranged. 

Members of this party from New York, 
Philadelphia and points in the vicinity of 
these two cities are advised to buy the 
convention round trip tickets reading Le- 
high Valley Railroad Michigan Central 
Railroad. (A.L.A, identification certifi- 
cate required.) These rail tickets are 
good on the boat and may be used re- 
turning either by boat or all rail. Those, 
however, who do not wish to return to 
point of departure by July 11 or who wish 
to return by some southern route to New 
York or take post conference trip are ad- 
vised to buy one way tickets to Buffalo or 
summer excursion tickets to Niagara Falls 
and return via desired route. Mr. Brown 
will arrange party boat tickets for such 
members. 

Members from Washington and Balti- 
more are advised to buy summer ex- 
cursion tickets to Niagara Falls, arranging 
with Mr. Brown for tickets on the steamer 
from Buffalo to Detroit. From Washington 
the additional charge for travel to Detroit 
via Niagara Falls, Buffalo and the boat is 
about $7.00 over the all rail route. It will 
give, however, a pleasant variation with 
opportunities for sight seeing and visiting 
en route. 



Those who do not wish to spend all day 
Sunday at the Falls can visit in Buffalo 
during the afternoon. The Public Library 
and the Grosvenor Library will be glad 
to welcome all members. 

Hand baggage will be delivered directly 
to the boat at Buffalo and placed in the 
state rooms of the members. Tags will be 
furnished for the identification of such 
baggage. The Pullmans are switched off 
at Depew and run directly to Niagara 
Falls Sunday morning without going to 
Buffalo. The payment includes Pullman 
berth to Niagara Falls, breakfast and lunch 
at Niagara Falls, the Gorge trip, special 
trolleys to Buffalo and state room berth 
Buffalo to Detroit, with table d'hote dinner 
on the steamer June 25th. In registering 
please state with whom you wish to room 
or if you prefer that some one be assigned 
to you. The state rooms on the steamer 
accomodate two people. 

New York and Philadelphia 

Those who buy through rail tickets 
will send Mr. Brown by June 12th, 

including lower berth on train $11.10 

Including upper berth on train 10.35 

Those who buy excursion tickets to 
Niagara Falls, or one-way tickets 
to Niagara Falls, or one way tick- 
ets to Buffalo and desire party 
ticket on the boat should send in- 
cluding lower berth on train 17.10 

For upper berth on train 16.35 

If trip on boat Buffalo to Detroit and re- 
turn with special party July 1 is desired, 
send $24.70, or $23.95 which will include 
steamer transportation and berths back to 
Buffalo. 

Washington and Baltimore 
Members from Washington or Balti- 
more should send including lower 
berth on train on through Pullman 
Washington to Niagara Falls. ... .$11.85 
For upper berth on train 10.95 

The above amounts include all meals on 
Sunday, Pullman on train, one-half state- 
room on boat, Gorge trip, trolley from 
Niagara Falls to Buffalo, storage and 
transfer of hand baggage at Buffalo. If 



BULLETIN 



59 



rail tickets are bought only to Niagara 
Falls or Buffalo and boat tickets are de- 
sired from Buffalo to Detroit $6.00 should 
be added to above amounts for one way 
boat ticket or $11.50 for round trip boat 
ticket. 

The Lehigh Valley has arranged for a 
buffet lounge car from New York. Special 
Pullmans from Philadelphia and Washing- 
ton will be transferred to the special train 
at Bethlehem, Pa. at 10:36 p. m. The cost of 
the day at Niagara Falls, including meals, 
Gorge trip, etc., with the boat trip from 
Buffalo to Detroit is only $5.00 more than 
the through Pullman would cost all rail 
from New York to Detroit. It is believed 
that the Niagara Falls trip is easily worth 
this small difference. It is hoped that as 
many as possible will take advantage of 
this pre-conference trip arranged by the 
travel committee. It is very important, 
however, that Mr. Brown be informed as 
early as possible of those who intend to 
go with this party. Accommodations on 
the boat will be sold early and those who 
leave registration until the last week will 
probably be unable to be accommodated. 

NOTE: Members of this party wish- 
ing to take the post conference trip 
should purchase round trip tickets to Nia- 
gara Falls and specify via Toronto and 
Montreal, over route outlined below, or 
should buy one-way ticket to Buffalo only. 
(See Post Conference Party). 

Alternative route from Washington and 
Baltimore: Arrangements will also be 
made for members from Washington and 
Baltimore who wish to go all rail. Special 
Pullmans will be attached to the 12:18 p. 
m. B. & O. train Sunday, June 25, from 
Baltimore, 1:22 p. m. from Washington, 
arriving Detroit 7:15 a. m., Monday. Res- 
ervation for this train should be accom- 
panied with check for $6.38 for lower berth 
or $5.11 for upper berth and mailed to 
Charles H. Brown, Bureau of Navigation, 
Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 

New England Party 

Register with F. W. Faxon, 83 Fran- 
cis St., Boston 17, by June 1st if possible 
and not later than June 12th. 

This party will leave Boston (South 



Station) by Pullman sleepers June 24 at 
6:10 p. m. standard (7:10 daylight) time 
over Boston and Albany and New York 
Central Lines to Niagara Falls, where we 
shall join the New York party Sunday 
morning, and cover all points of interest as 
described above. Members may join party 
at Worcester, Springfield or Pittsfield. 

Those desiring to go with this party 
and return home direct from Detroit will 
obtain identification certificate from A. 
L.A. Headquarters, Chicago, and buy a 
fare and one-half convention ticket to De- 
troit and return, over Boston and Albany, 
New York Central, Michigan Central Rail- 
roads. (This ticket is good in either direc- 
tion on the Buffalo-Detroit steamers.) 

Send Mr. Faxon $15.00 which will cover 
lower berth Boston to Buffalo, breakfast 
and lunch at Niagara Falls, Gorge trip, 
trolley to Buffalo, dinner on steamer and 
stateroom berth (give name of room- 
mate) to Detroit and return July 1st, 5 
p. m. (If return is desired at some other 
time, so specify, that stateroom berth may 
be reserved. If upper berth Boston to 
Buffalo is used send only $14.10). Prices 
will be somewhat less from points west of 
Boston. 

Those who wish to take post confer- 
ence trip returning should buy circle tour 
ticket Boston to Niagara Falls, and re- 
turn via International Ry. Co. trolley to 
Lewiston, Canada Steamship Lines to Mon- 
treal and Central Vermont R. R. to Boston. 
Such delegates will send Mr. Faxon $25.00 
which will include the steamer ticket 
Buffalo to Detroit and return July 1. 
($24.10 if upper berth Boston to Buffalo 
is used.) 

Buffalo, Hamilton and Toronto 
Delegates from these cities and from 
western New York who desire to join the 
eastern parties from Buffalo to Detroit 
will make stateroom reservations, with 
Mr. Faxon, and be welcome to use our 
party ticket, if returning July 1. Register 
by June 1st Buffalo to Detroit and return, 
$11.50, stateroom berth $2.10 each way, 

Cleveland Party 
Register with Gilbert O. Ward, Pub- 



60 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



lie Library, Cleveland, Ohio, before June 
1 if possible, and in no case later than 
June 12. 

The cheapest and most comfortable 
route from Cleveland to Detroit is by the 
D. & C. Navigation Co., steamers leaving 
Cleveland 11 p. m. due in Detroit 6:15 
a. m. (eastern time). 

Pare $6.50 round trip, $3.60 one way. 
Berth in stateroom $2.10 each way. Three 
may occupy one stateroom, $4.20. In reg- 
istering give name of roommate, and 
specify day of going and day of return. 

Should twenty-five or more go and re- 
turn together a party rate would save 50c 
on the round trip. 

Chicago and the West 

Arrangements have been made for a 
daylight special train, via the Michigan 
Central R. R., leaving from the Central 
Station, Michigan Boulevard and Roosevelt 
Road (12th Street) at 9:00 o'clock (10:00 
o'clock daylight saving time) Monday 
morning, June 26; due to arrive in De- 
troit at 4:25 (5:25) p. m., which will allow 
ample time for dinner and the opening 
general session, scheduled for 8:00 p. m. 

The special train equipment will consist 
of club car, standard Pullman cars, ob- 
servation car, dining car, and steel day 
coaches, assuring comfort and convenience 
for the seven-hour journey to Detroit. 
Charge for seat in Pullman cars will be 
$1.50. 

Table d'hote luncheon will be served 
costing $1.25, and as certain guarantees 
are required for this service, you are re- 
quested to remit same with your applica- 
tion for space on special train. 

Register with John F. Phelan, Chicago 
Public Library, before June 15 Bending 
him fee of $1.25 to cover dining car serv- 
ice, plus $1.50, if you desire seat in Pull- 
man. 

St. Louis, Kansas City Party 
Delegates from the Southwest desiring 
to travel together should purchase tickets 
reading via Wabash R. R. from St. Louis 
to Detroit. It is possible that a summer 
excursion rate may be in force in June 



that will be less than the fare and a half 
convention rate. Inquire of local ticket 
agent before purchasing. 

The special party will leave St. Louis 
Sunday, June 25th, at 11:52 p. m. in spe- 
cial Pullmans, due in Detroit Monday, at 
1:35 p. m. 

Register with James A. McMillen, Wash- 
ington University Library, St. Louis, Mo., 
before June 12 if possible, sending him 
$4.50 for a lower berth or $3.60 for an 
upper. 



Under personal conduct of F. W. 
Faxon, Boston, Mass. Register before 
June 1, sending first payment of $10.00 
and pay rest at Detroit. Personal checks 
accepted. 

Itinerary, and what is included in ticket: 
July 1, 5:30 p. m. (eastern time). Leave 
Detroit by steamer, foot of Third 
Street ("Woodward Ave. Through" 
cars run from near hotels to Steamer 
dock). Transportation to Buffalo 
($6.00) not included, as nearly all 
will have to return steamer ticket. 
Berth in stateroom and dinner in- 
cluded. 

July 2, Sunday. Arrive Buffalo 8:30 
a. m. Eastern time (9:30 Daylight). 
Breakfast not included. 

High speed trolley to Niagara Falls, 
Gorge line to Lewiston, arriving at 
noon (daylight time), steamer on 
Lake Ontario to Toronto, arriving 
3 p. m. (daylight). Transportation 
Buffalo at Toronto ($2.47) not in- 
cluded as nearly all will have 
ticket. 

Lunch on steamer Is provided, and 
transfer to Waverley Hotel (near 
Public Library), evening dinner, 
room, and breakfast July 3, and 
sightseeing trip about the city. (Any 
who have not visited Niagara Falls 
or who wish to spend Sunday in Buf- 
falo, may remain behind the party 
and take 6:20 p. m. steamer from 
Lewiston, due Toronto 8:45 p. m. 



BULLETIN 



61 



July 3. Lunch at invitation of the Tor- 
onto Public Library (George H. 
Locke, librarian). Transfer Hotel 
to dock. Steamer on Lake Ontario 
leaves at 4 p. m. daylight time (3 
p. m. eastern standard time). Trans- 
portation Toronto to Montreal 
($12.65) not included as most of the 
party will have tickets. 
Evening dinner on steamer, and berth 
in outside stateroom included. 

July 4. Arrive 7:30 a. m. (daylight) at 
Thousand Island House, Alexandria 
Bay, Thousand Islands, N. Y. Break- 
fast lunch and dinner, and room in- 
cluded. 

July 5. Leave Alexandria Bay at 7:30 
(daylight). Breakfast on steamer. Ar- 
rive Prescott 10:00 a. m., where 
transfer to a Rapids Division 
steamer is made for the trip to 
Montreal through the many rapids 
of the St. Lawrence River. 
Lunch on steamer. 

Arrive Montreal 6:45 p. m. (daylight) 
and transfer to Queen's Hotel for 
evening meal, and room. 

July 6. Sightseeing trip provided, and 
all meals and room. 

July 7. Breakfast provided and person- 
ally conducted trip ends. 
Total cost of trip, as outlined above, 
'$43.00 to which must be added trans- 
portation, which most members will 
possess as part of original round 
trip purchase. 

There is one meal (breakfast July 
2) which is not included in this 
week. 

Send Mr. Faxon $10.00 before June 1st 
and pay him the rest at A.L.A. 
Headquarters, Hotel Statler, De- 
troit, Mich., June 27 or 28. 

For information of those who do not 
have transportation: 

Detroit to Buffalo $ 6.00 

Buffalo to Montreal 15.12 

Montreal to New York City 
via Lake George and Hudson 

River 11.66 

(Montreal to Boston by rail is 11.95) 



NOTE: Prices given are based on two in 
a room in staterooms and hotels, and 
room without bath at hotels. 

Those desiring to take a trunk will have 
the use of it at all hotels en route, but 
transfers of a trunk between Buffalo and 
Montreal will add $2.75 to the cost of 
trip. Each individual will see that his 
trunk is delivered to Detroit steamer. 

From Montreal such a choice of routes 
is presented that it seemed best to end 
our party trip there. 

Many will desire to visit Quebec, and 
others to go by rail direct to Boston or 
New York City. The most attractive re- 
turn to New York City is via Lake George 
to Albany, and Hudson River Dayline to 
New York City. This would mean a night 
at a hotel in Albany. 

If several wish this return excursion 
from Montreal to New York Mr. Brown 
will conduct it. 

A.L.A. Travel Committee, 

F. W. FAXON, Chairman, 
C. H. BROWN, 
J. F. PHELAN. 



At the organization meeting of the A. 
L.A. Unit, Women's Overseas Service 
League, a resolution was passed commend- 
ing highly the accomplishment of Miss 
Caroline Webster, library specialist, U. S. 
Public Health Service, in directing the li- 
brary work in hospitals during and after 
the war. A letter from the chairman of 
the unit conveying the resolution also car- 
ried with it an expression of interest in 
the work now and of desire to be of service 
at any time. 



It is suggested that members attending 
the Detroit Conference arrange to have 
letters and telegrams sent to them at their 
Detroit hotels, and not simply "care A.L. 
A., Hotel Statler, Detroit." Hotels handle 
promptly the mail and messages which 
come for their registered guests, but it is 
always difficult for the members of the 
A.L.A. Headquarters staff to deliver 
promptly the communications turned over 
to them for members of the Association. 



62 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



HOTELS AND OUTSIDE ROOMS 

Hotel announcements were made in de- 
tail in the January and March. Bulletins. 
The hotels recommended by the local 
committee are: Stabler (Headquarters), 
Wolverine, Tuller, Charlevoix, Addison, 
Cadillac, Norton, Madison-Lenox. The 
rates, European plan, are from $2.00 up. 

For rooms outside the hotels, applica- 
tion should be made to William Webb, 
Public Library, Detroit, Michigan. 



DETROIT 

Detroit is a city which has clinging to 
it more traces of an historic and adven- 
turous past than is usually known. Its 
French origin is stamped on its name De- 
troit, the Strait, as well as on other place 
names in the vicinity Grosse He, Grosse 
Pointe, River Rouge, Bois Blanc, Beaubien 
St., St. Antoine St., etc. 

Though it is known most widely today 
as the center of the automobile industry, 
it is still important as the City of the 
Straits, holding a 'strategic position on the 
important waterways of the Great Lakes, 
for which the French and Indians and the 
English fought bloody battles in the past. 
Through this strait went the canoes and 
sailing vessels of voyageur and explorer, 
where now pass the heavily loaded freight- 
ers which carry raw materials and finished 
products from West to East, and from East 
to West. The Strait, now the Detroit 
River, presents a busy scene in the sum- 
mer a changing panorama of ferry boats, 
freight boats and passenger boats. The 
Great Lakes voyages on comfortable 
steamers through the Detroit River, the 
St. Glair Flats and the Soo to Duluth at- 
tract many travelers. 

To the visitor with the tourist's eye, 
Detroit affords the spectacle of a rapidly 
grown city, with a population that more 
than doubled in the last decade, bringing it 
up to the fourth city in size busy streets 
crowded with motors, huge and diversified 
industries, beautiful residences, parks and 
waterways. 

Besides its internationally known motor 
factories, it has its adding machine works, 



LOCAL INFORMATION 

its stove works, its important chemical and 
drug industries. 

It stands at the gateway to vacation 
resorts in the Great Lakes states and 
Canada which may be reached by boat or 
train from Detroit. The shores of the 
lakes are fringed by well-known summer- 
ing places, such as Charlevoix, Petoskey, 
Mackinac Island, St. Ignace, Les Cheneaux 
Islands and others. A variety is accessible, 
ranging from the well-appointed summer 
resort to the camp or hunting lodge in the 
woods for roughing it. 



Local Committee 

The Local Committee has been at work 
for some time arranging for the pleasure 
of A. L. A. visitors. Its membership is 
as follows: 

Bernard Ginsburg, Board of Commerce, 
general chairman. 

Adam Strohm, librarian, Public Library, 
General Secretary. 

Blanche Tate (Transportation). 

Jessie Chase (Reception). 

Natalie Hutton (Information). 

William Webb (Hotels and exhibits). 

Frederick Goodell (Automobiles). 

Mrs. Madelene Hirth (Excursions, trips 
and entertainments). 

Marion R. Service (Hospitality, city 
clubs and country clubs). 

Edna Moore (Guide books and publicity). 

Elizabeth Knapp (District libraries). 

Local Transportation 

The Local Transportation Committee has 
arranged with the Studebaker Corporation 
for cars to meet the 9 o'clock boat from 
Buffalo on Monday morning on which the 
conducted party from the East will arrive. 
This is the courtesy of the Studebaker 
Corporation to the conference. This 
committee will maintain a booth at the 
Michigan Central Station to assist those 
arriving by train. 

Rates from D. & C. boats or Union 
Depot to downtown hotels are 3'5c to 46c 
per person and 20c for each additional 
person. 

Taxi rates from M. C. Depot to down- 
town hotels for one person average 65c to 



BULLETIN 



63 



65c. The rate is 20c for each additional 
passenger and most taxis will carry & 
people. 

The Detroit Taxicab and Transfer Com- 
pany has the concession for the M. C. R. R. 
Station. 

The Yellow Taxicab Company conces- 
sion covers the Union Depot and boat 
docks. 

Local committees will provide guide 
books and maps to the city and vicinity. 

Information Desk 

The Information Committee will have a 
desk on the ball room floor of the Hotel 
Statler. From 8 o'clock in the morning 
until 11 o'clock at night some one will be 
in charge to dispense information about 
the city and the conference. They will 
take charge of appointments for meetings 
for members of the conference. It is 
hoped that members will avail themselves 
of this service to arrange interviews with 
other members or visitors. 

Excursions 

During the convention week, the local 
committee has arranged for excursions to 
points of interest in the city the Ford 
factories and other industrial centers and 
the more beautiful residential suburbs. 
Boy 'Scouts will assist the Information 
committee in directing and guiding vis- 
itors. A number of automobile convey- 
ances will be available for drives around 
the boulevards and parks. 

Ferry boats ply between Detroit and the 
old Canadian city of Windsor, Ontario. 
Tourists to Detroit usually take advantage 
of the fact that they can take a "trip 
abroad" for ten cents. In a few minutes 
time, one can step upon foreign soil. 

Entertainments 

The S. S. Brittannia has been chartered 
for a moonlight excursion on the Detroit 
River and Lake St. Clair, Friday at 8 p. m. 
An orchestra will be provided for dancing, 
refreshments will be served and varied 
and lively entertainment is planned. 

Children's librarians are invited to a 
breakfast on Belle Isle at 8:30 Thursday 
morning. Information and registration 
sheet will be posted in the official bulletin 
board. The children's librarians of De- 



troit will be hostesses. Please register 
your acceptance on arrival. 

Tea will be served at the Detroit Public 
Library, by the staff in the staff dining 
room to guests at the main library each 
day from four to five o'clock. 

The Society of Arts and Crafts, 47 Wat- 
son Street, has extended a very cordial 
invitation to the A.L.A. to visit their 
building during the Conference. Architec- 
turally, the building is of great beauty and 
the Society offers much of interest to 
visitors. 

Entertainment Committee 

Mrs. Madelene Hirth, chairman. 

Mary Emogene Hazeltine. 

Flora B. Roberts. 

Gordon W. Thayer. 

Dinner Meetings 

Thursday evening is set aside especially 
for dinner meetings, although some other 
meetings are being scheduled. All library 
schools, alumni associations or other 
groups wishing to arrange dinner meet- 
ings are asked to communicate at once 
with the manager of the Statler. 

ANN ARBOR 

The special train for Ann Arbor will 
leave Detroit, Michigan Central Station, 
Thursday at 10:30 a. m. Detroit time (9:30 
railroad time). This hour is subject to 
change, but the departure will not be more 
than one-half hour later, and will not be 
earlier. The train will reach Ann Arbor 
about 11 : 30 or 11 : 45 Eastern time. Lunch- 
eon will be served at the Michigan Union 
to all members of the Association attend- 
ing. After the luncheon, there will be a 
brief program while the guests are seated 
at the table. This will consist of a word 
of welcome by the President of the Uni- 
versity, or his representative, and by 
Regent W. L. Clements, a reply by Presi- 
dent Root, and a talk on "Adult educa- 
tion, a common interest of libraries and 
universities," by Professor W. E. Hender- 
son, director of the University of Michi- 
gan Extension Service. 

After the luncheon, the guests are in- 
vited to inspect the University buildings, 
including the University library. At 3:30 
there will be a complimentary organ re- 
cital in Hill Auditorium; and the train will 



64 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



leave either at 4:15 or 4:30, arriving at 
Detroit within the hour, thus allowing 
plenty of tune for people to get to their 
hotels for dinner. 

The railroad has set a fare of $1.50 for 
the round trip, and tickets will be good re- 
turning on any train on June 29. This 
will enable the people to remain for the 
Bibliographical Society meeting if they 
so wish. There are trains at 6:00 and 
7:05, so that people who wish to go to 
the library school dinners can remain for 
the Bibliographical Society meeting, which 
will be over by 5:30. 

Those who attend the round table confer- 
ence of university library extension depart- 
ments will find it necessary to take an 
early train for Ann Arbor Thursday morn- 
ing. 

It will be necessary for all persons plan- 
ning to take the Ann Arbor trip to register 
for that trip with the Ann Arbor commit- 
tee, W. W. Bishop, chairman, at the Hotel 
Statler before Tuesday night, June 27. 

REGISTRATION 

A telegram just received from Detroit 
states that a number of people have re- 
served double rooms for the conference 
without giving the names of those they 
expect to room with, and asks that in the 
May Bulletin all such people be requested 
to send names of persons not listed so that 
register will be as nearly complete as pos- 
sible. Address William Webb, Public 
Library, Detroit. 

Advance Attendance Register 
In order to make the advance attendance 
register as complete as possible will all 
who are planning to visit friends, stay in 
clubs or boarding houses, or hotels not 
listed in the A. L. A. Bulletin, please send, 
as early as possible, their names and pro- 
posed Detroit addresses to William Webb, 
Public Library, Detroit. Those who 
expect to commute as well as local people 
who expect to attend one or more ses- 
sions are included in this request. The 
names of those who have made reserva- 
tions at the hotels listed in the January 
and March Bulletins will be secured from 
the hotels. The (Register goes to the 
printer June 15. 



Registration on Arrival 

All persons attending the conference are 
urged to register at A.L.A. Headquarters 
immediately upon arrival. The registra- 
tion desk will be on the ball room floor 
of the Hotel Statler in the assembly hall 
near the elevators. The programs, badges, 
attendance registers, etc., will be given 
each person upon registering. 

A registration fee of one dollar is now 
required of all who have not paid an in- 
itiation fee during the current year. 

An effort will be made by the Headquar- 
ters staff to keep an up-to-date local di- 
rectory of all persons attending the confer- 
ence. 

EXHIBITS 

A committee has been appointed by the 
A.L.A. and the League of Library Com- 
missions to prepare a county library ex- 
hibit. A sample room has been reserved 
on the 13th floor of the Hotel Statler and 
plans are under way to make the exhibit 
representative of national methods. 

Material of interest to those recruiting 
for library work or considering librarian- 
ship as a profession will be on display in 
the assembly hall. 

The exhibits by library supply houses, 
publishers, etc., will be on the thirteenth 
floor of the Statler Hotel. 

Those interested in the care of maps will 
want to see the index map from the Gros- 
venor Library, Buffalo, which will be ex- 
hibited at the conference. Cards by Mr. 
Ambruester, the geographical expert, will 
also be displayed. 

Committees or others desiring to make 
library exhibits should communicate at 
once with the Secretary of the A.L.A. 
giving full particulars as to needed space 
and such other information as will be use- 
ful in assigning suitable space. 



BULLETIN 



A. L. A. CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

Statement by the Committee 



The committee urgently recommends 
consideration by the Association of its 
proposed amendments to the present con- 
stitution as presented in its report of 1921. 
On account of lack of time, these recom- 
mendations were not considered at the 
Swampscott meeting. Some of the present 
By-Laws were framed with a view to the 
adoption of these amendments, and the 
committee believes they would operate more 
satisfactorily with a revised constitution. 

The committee recommends one change 
in the present By-Laws; namely, the omis- 
sion of the second sentence of paragraph 
three of section 11. This paragraph would 
then read: "Chapters may admit members 
who are not members of the A.L.A." The 
omitted sentence, "These members shall 
not be counted in determining the appoint- 
ment of delegates to the A.L.A. Council" 
was drafted to fit a provision for propor- 
tional representation in the Council in the 
amendment to the constitution recom- 
mended by the former report of the com- 
mittee. It can be restored to the By-Laws 
at any time when the amendment shall be 
adopted. 

Two important changes in the By-Laws 
have been suggested to the committee. The 
Secretary of the A.L.A. reports that sev- 
eral members of the Association have ex- 
pressed preference for a flat $3.00 individ- 
ual membership fee for annual dues. The 
number making the suggestion is so small 
probably not more than one-half of one 
per cent of the total membership that the 
committee does not feel justified in recom- 
mending this change. Upon review of the 
discussion of the matter of annual dues at 
Swampscott, one will recall that this fee 
of $3.00 was carefully considered by the 
Association, and by a considerable majority 
voted down. In view of the Secretary's 
report to the committee that about one- 
third of the members are voluntarily pay- 
ing the $4.00 fee, and that the present scale 
of dues has probably increased the receipts 
for the Association, the committee recom- 
mends that no change at present be made 
in the dues for individual members. 

At the last mid-winter meeting of the 



Council there was adopted on the motion 
of Carl B. Roden, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Committees, the following reso- 
lutions: 

Resolved, That the Council transmit to 
the Executive Board the accompanying re- 
port of the Committee on Committees, to- 
gether with the following recommendations: 

1. That the observations and conclu- 
sions concerning the several committees, 
embodied in the report, be considered in 
detail with a view to determining the 
proper status of each as a standing or 
specific committee. 

2. That a by-law be formulated and sub- 
mitted to the Association for adoption, 
creating and enumerating the several com- 
mittees to be known as standing commit- 
tees of the A.L.A. and defining their 
powers, duties and jurisdiction. 

3. That the committees heretofore ap- 
pointed by the Council, or by the Presi- 
dent upon request of the Council, which 
are listed among committees of the Asso- 
ciation and are performing duties or ex- 
ercising powers for and in behalf of the 
Association, be reconstituted, reorganized 
or reappointed by the Executive Board, 
either as standing or special committees, 
or that they be merged with other exist- 
ing committees or discontinued, as the 
Executive Board may determine. And be 
it further 

Resolved, That committees created by 
the Council, or by its presiding officer upon 
request of the Council, are limited, as to 
functions, to consideration of, or assistance 
in, the business of the Council. 

The purpose of the resolutions was to 
make provision in the By-Laws for clearer 
definition of the A.L.A. committees, and 
to prevent duplication of the work of com- 
mittees, and especially of committees of 
the Association and the Council. 

In the discussion of this resolution Mr. 
Roden stated that he was not present at 
the Swampscott meeting, and that he had 
not sudied carefully the new By-Laws. Sec- 
tion 18 of the By-Laws was drawn with 
great care after consultation with Miss 
Tyler, then President, to remedy confusion 
that Mr. Roden found existing. As a 
matter of fact, it was Miss Tyler who ap- 
pointed the Committee on Committees of 
which Mr. Roden is chairman. Instead of 
naming standing committees and defining 
their duties, it was considered better to 
let the Executive Board and the Committee 



66 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



on Committees do this. Conditions are 
likely to change so that a change in stand- 
ing committees will be desirable. If com- 
mittees are named and defined in the By- 
Laws, each change in a committee will 
necessitate a revision of the By-Laws. The 
committee feels that the desired reform 
has been better provided for in the present 
By-Laws, and recommends that it stand. 

The second resolution; viz.: 

Resolved. That committees created by 
the Council, or by its presiding officer upon 
the request of the Council, are limited, as 
to functions, to consideration of, or assist- 
ance in, the business of the Council, 
has not been so clearly covered by the 
By-Laws. The sense of the resolution that 
there should not be, for example, a commit- 
tee of the Association and another of the 
Council at the same time to investigate and 
consider library revenues seems reasonable. 
As the reports of all Association commit- 
tees are presented to the Council for con- 
sideration, and since the Council may re- 
quest the Executive Board to appoint any 
new committee, there need not be commit- 
tees of the Council to conduct investigation. 
According to the Constitution the Executive 
Board appoints all committees. For the 
sake of clearer definition, therefore, it 
seems wise to the committee to recommend 
the adoption of this resolution as an addi- 
tional paragraph to Section 18 of the By- 
Laws. 

One member of the Association has sug- 
gested that all chairmen of standing com- 
mittees of the Association shall be ex-officio 
members of the Council, on the ground that 
since the Council is the policy making body 
of the Association, committee chairmen 
should have the benefit of close association 
with the Council and a voice in its execu- 
tive sessions. Although the committee 
admits the advantages of the suggestion, 
it hesitates on account of increasing the 
size of the Council, to recommend this 
change. It prefers to let the suggestion 
come from the membership of the Asso- 
ciation at large. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HENBY N. SANBORX, Chairman, 
MALCOLM G. WYEB, 
M. S. DUDGEON. 



NOMINATIONS 

The ballot, which will be sent to &T. mem- 
bers within the next few days, will carry 
the following names: 

President 

Jennings, Judson T. 

Utley, George B. 

1st Vice-President 

Godard, George S. 

Rathbone, Josephine A. 

2nd Vice-President 

Rose, Grace 

Moore, Annie C. 

Wyer, Malcolm G. 

Treasurer 

Tweedell, Edward D. 

Koch, Theodore W. 

For Trustee of the Endowment Fund 

Porter, Washington T., Cincinnati 

Schick, Charles E., Chicago 

Mr. George H. Locke, who was nomi- 
nated for President, Mr. Adam Strohm, 
who was nominated for First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Miss Julia E. Elliott, wno was nomi- 
nated for Treasurer, and Mr. Edward W. 
Sheldon, who was nominated to succeed 
himself as Trustee of the Endowment 
Fund, have for good reasons declined nom- 
ination for these offices. 

The nominees for the Executive Board 
and for the Council remain the same as 
printed on pages 3 and 4 of the January 
Bulletin. 



BULLETIN 



67 



A. L. A. READING COURSES 

Why Courses Are Needed 



We believe that in every community 
there are men and women who would like 
to undertake definite courses of reading; 
that the individual who goes to the library 
for advice on a course of reading fre- 
quently fails to get all the advice and help 
he wants, because the assistant is not an 
expert on the subject in which he is in- 
terested, or because she cannot give suffi- 
cient time to any one inquirer to do the 
subject justice. Yet we believe that per- 
sons making inquiries of this sort deserve 
more help than any other class of readers. 

To enable even the smallest library and 
the least experienced assistant to give the 
best advice, we have begun the publication 
of a series of reading courses. Please note 
that these are more than reading lists. 

It is our plan to have each of the courses 
in this series prepared by an expert. When 
you put a copy of the course into the hands 
of an Inquirer in your library, you will 
know that you are giving that inquirer the 
very best advice obtainable anywhere. Be- 
fore publication all courses will be edited 
from the library standpoint. 

The courses will be short, limited usually 
to six or eight books when such limitation 
is feasible. They will be revised from time 
to time, but only when new publications in 
the field make revision necessary. Each 
course will have an attractive cover design 
and will be well printed on good paper. 

How to Use the Courses 

Keep a supply at the delivery and refer- 
ence desks, and instruct the assistants to 
give them out to persons who ask for in- 
formation on the subjects covered and to 
others who may be interested. Have the 
courses reprinted in full in the newspapers. 
Advertise the fact that the library has 
these courses and will gladly give them to 
anyone on request. 

Mail copies to persons In your com- 
munity who are known to be interested in 
the subjects (preferably to only a few at 



a time unless you have many copies of the 
books). Distribute copies at meetings 
where one of the reading course subjects 
is being discussed. Put copies into the 
hands of students who are interested in the 
vocational and other subjects covered. 

It is thought that the above uses will 
be as appropriate for university, college 
and high school libraries as for public li- 
braries. The distribution of the courses 
is in itself a service, even if the books can 
not always be supplied by the distributing 
agency. 

Some library commission secretaries 
have already indicated that they expect to 
use the courses as publicity for traveling 
library collections as well as for the guid- 
ance of readers. It is hoped also that the 
courses will be acceptable to bookstores, 
university extension departments and to 
trade and professional organizations. 

What better thing can you hope to do 
for your community than to help ambitious 
men and women along the way of a con- 
tinuing self-education? 

Now Ready 

A. L. A. Reading Courses on Accounting, 
by a professor of accounting in a large 
university. Eight pages, convenient size 
for mailing in a number 10 envelope; rec- 
ommends 8 books as essential. Prices: 8 
for 25c (in stamps); 100 for $1.75; 1000 
for |16.00. 

A. L. A. Reading Courses on Journalism, 
by the director of the school of journalism 
in a university. Four pages, uniform in 
size with accounting but on different col- 
ored paper; recommends 10 books. Prices: 
12 for 25c (in stamps); 100 for $1.00; 1000 
for $9.00. 

Similar courses on other subjects will 
follow. 



Herbert Baillie, librarian of the Public 
Library, Wellington, New Zealand, writes 
that his daughter hopes to attend the De- 
troit conference of the A.L.A. She is 
coming to America "to be a student for 
two years at the Cleveland Public Library." 
Mr. Baillie attended the A.L.A. Conference 
in 1908. 



68 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



TWO-FOOT SHELF FOR A COUNTRY SCHOOL 



A voting contest on the best 25 books 
for a two-foot shelf for a one-room country 
school will be held at the A. L. A. Detroit 
conference in June and at the N. E. A. 
meeting in Boston in July. Miss Marion 
Horton, chairman of the School Libraries 
Section of the A. L. A., is in charge of the 
contest at Detroit and Dr. Sherman Wil- 
liams, chairman of the Library Department 
of the N. E. A., will direct the contest at 
Boston. 

At Detroit ballots will be distributed the 
first day of the conference. The ballot 
will consist of a printed list of probably 
100 selected titles, making it easy for the 
voter to check the 25 he prefers. There 
will also be extra blank spaces in which 
titles not printed may be added. All books 
for general and supplementary reading for 
children in grades 1 to 8 may be voted 
upon. Encyclopedias and textbooks are 
excluded from the contest, and it is as- 
sumed that every school possesses a Bible, 
and a dictionary, so that these also will 
not be eligible for selection. 

The winning titles will be announced 
after the conferences in order that people 
everywhere may know what books are con- 
sidered by librarians and teachers as most 
interesting and useful for children in the 
elementary grades. If possible a prelim- 
inary announcement of the result will be 
made before the conclusion of the Con- 
ference. 

The contest is planned as propaganda 
for school libraries. Its effectiveness de- 
pends on its reaching small and remote 
communities. Librarians can do a great 
deal for the success of the scheme by giving 
it. as much advance publicity as possible 
in their own towns. A good way to do this 
is to get people locally prominent in edu- 
cational affairs to make their selection of 



the 25 most valuable books for a small 
school library and publish these lists in 
the newspapers. The results of the voting 
contests at Detroit and Boston will then 
be of much greater interest and news value 
when the community has already been in- 
terested and informed on the subject. The 
contests will thus have served to stimulate 
popular interest in good books for general 
reading and encourage the establishment 
and development of school libraries. 

COMMITTEES 
Bookbuying Committee 

The Bookbuying committee now consists 
of 

M. L. Raney, chairman. 

Asa Don Dickinson. 

C. Tefft Hewitt. 

H. C. Wellman. 

Purd B. Wright. 

A committee to prepare a county library 
exhibit for Detroit conference (Joint Com- 
mittee of A.L.A. and League of Library 
Commissions) consists of: 

Loleta I. Dawson, county librarian, De- 
troit Public Library, chairman. 

Helena S. Le Fevre. 

Harriet C. Long. 

Corinne Metz. 

Clarence W. Perley and Mary E. Baker 
have been added to Decimal Classification 
Advisory Committee of which C. W. An- 
drews is chairman. 



W. Dawson Johnston, librarian of 
the American Library in Paris, Inc., sends 
a cordial invitation from the trustees to 
all American librarians visiting Paris to 
make the library, No. 10 due de L'filys6e, 
their headquarters while in the city. The 
resources of the library are at their service. 
All Americans are urged to use the library 
which in addition to its book collection, has 
on file American magazines and news- 
papers. 



BULLETIN 



69 



A. L. A. FINANCIAL REPORTS 

March-April, 1922 



GENERAL FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance, March 1 $10,235.61 

Membership Annual dues 2,902.55 

Life Memberships 100.00 

Interest, March and April 28.03 

$13,267.19 
Expenditures 

Bulletin $ 177.38 

Conference 15.00 

Committee 31.75 

Salaries * '. 2,746.76 

Additional service ... .... 268.29 

Supplies 224.39 

Postage, telephone and tel- 
egraph 229.31 

Travel 56.77 

Miscellaneous 77.18 

President's C o n t i n gent 

Fund 19.66 

Trustees' Endowment Fund 100.00 3,946.49 

Balance, April 30 $9,070.70 

Permanent balance. Na- 
tional Bank of the Re- 
public 250.00 9,320.70 



WAS FUNDS 

Receipts 
Balance, March 1 $82,813. 2'3 



Miscellaneous 

Interest, March and April. 



158.20 
75.40 



$83,046.83 



Expenditures 

Hospital $ 3,368.23 

Preserving War Service 

material 158.33 

Miscellaneous 318.83 



3,845.39 



Balance on hand, April 

30 $21,862.70 

Balance on hand. Liberty 
Bonds and Thrift 
Stamps 31,550.00 

Balance on hand, U. S. 
Oovt. Certificates of 
Indebtedness 25,263.74 

Balance on hand, librar- 
ians and agents 525.00 



79,201.44 



$13.267.19 

PUBLISHING FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance. March 1 $2,670.08 

Sale of publications 3,593.29 

Sale of books (review copies) 540.00 

Interest, March and April 5.26 



Expenditures 

Salaries $1,299.98 

Printing Booklist 687.26 

Advertising 181.36 

Express and postage 351.38 

Supplies 225.27 

Incidentals 82.31 

Publications 1,811.41 

Travel 155.58 



Balance, April 30. 



$ 6,808.63 



4,794.55 
2,014.08 



$83,046.83 

BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY FUND 
Receipts 

Balance, March 1 $17,027.76 

New cash contributions and pay- 
ments on pledges 852.50 

Interest, Liberty Bond Coupons... 21.22 

Interest, March and April 50.31 

$17,951.79 
Expenditure* 

Books for the Blind $ 581.68 

Library Extension 153.24 

Booklist, Reading Courses 

and Book Publicity... 4-36.13 
General library publicity 118.02 
Recruiting 97.30 



1,386.37 



Balance, April 30 $15,565.42 

Liberty Bonds 1,000.00 



16,565.42 



$ 6,808.63 $17,951.79 

OPENINGS IN PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE AND NAVAL ES- 
TABLISHMENT 



tt is expected that a new civil service 
register will be established in May for va- 
cancies in the Naval Establishment and 
Public Health Service. Written examina- 
tion will probably be waived, applicants 
being required to write a short thesis and 
fill out an application blank. Positions to 
be filled are those of librarians in the 
Public Health Service, naval hospitals and 
naval and marine stations. 

Requirements for both services are prac- 
tically identical and one list will be estab- 
lished to fill vacancies in either service. 

Although the undersigned cannot speak 
with any official sanction, yet we person, 
ally believe that library service as estab- 
lished in the Public Health Service and the 
Navy will prove permanent. The positions 



offer opportunity for administrative work, 
requiring handling of personnel, tact and 
judgment as well as knowledge of library 
routine. 

The undersigned will be glad to answer 
any questions as to details. Copies of the 
civil service announcement of examination 
will be forwarded upon request. Copies 
may also be obtained when printed from 
the oflices of the Civil Service Commission 
in the various cities. 

CAROLINE WEBSTER, 
library specialist, Public Health 
Service, Washington, D. C. 

C. H. BROWN, 

library specialist, Bureau of Navi- 
gation, Sixth Division, Navy De- 
partment, Washington, D. C. 



70 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Issued in 

January, March, May, July, September and 
November 



There is no subscription price and the 
Bulletin is sent only to members of the 
Association. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

President Azariah S. Root, Oberlin College 
Library, Oberlin, O. 

First Vice-President Samuel H. Ranck, 
Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Second Vice-President Claribel R. Barnett, 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture Library. 

Treasurer Edward D. Tweedell, The John 
Crerar Library, Chicago. 

Executive Board The president, vice-presi- 
dents, treasurer and Gratia A. Country- 
man; John Cotton Dana; George S. God- 
ard; Margaret Mann; H. H. B. Meyer; Carl 
B. Roden; Edith Tobbitt; George B. Utley. 

Secretary Carl H. Milam, 78 E. Washing- 
ton St., Chicago. 

Executive offices 78 E. Washington SL, 
Chicago. 



LIBRARIANS who give one of the new 
A.L.A. reading courses to a reader 
will have the satisfaction of knowing that 
they are giving to that reader the same 
advice he would get in a half hour's per- 
sonal conference with one of the leading 
specialists in that subject. It will be ob- 
served that these courses are not simply 
annotated lists; they tell the students 
which book to read first and in what or- 
der the others should follow they are 
real courses of reading for men and 
women who want to educate themselves. 

MORE newspaper publicity has been 
given during the last few months to 
the dollar-per-capita statement adopted by 
the A.L.A. Council in December than to 
anything done by the Association in many 
months. Thousands of copies of the state- 
ment have also been distributed by li- 
brary commissions, especially to library 
trustees. For the use of the commissions 
and of libraries the statement has been 
printed as a broadside with the caption, 



What Is a Reasonable Income for Your 
Library? The printer did an unusually 
good job and used a good paper. The re- 
sult is an attractive broadside which will 
get attention in anybody's mail. Copies 
will be supplied at a nominal cost: $6.0(1 
per thousand, $1.00 for 150; or 20 cents 
(in stamps) for 12. Why not ask the 
staff and the trustees to make up a mail 
ing list of a hundred and fifty persons in 
your community who ought to be told 
what is a reasonable income for youi 
library, and then send. each one a copy ol 
this statement? 

FOR all members of the Association 
attending any regular conference, ex 
cept those members who have paid an in 
itiation fee in the current year, there shall 
be a registration fee of one dollar. By 
Laws, Section 1. This fee will be col 
lected at the registration desk where 
badges, programs, and attendance regis 
ters are given out. 

Each conference costs the Associatior 
from $1,000 to $2,000. The purpose of th( 
registration fee is to place the burden ol 
this expense on those who attend the con 
ference and share in its privileges rathei 
than on all members, including many whc 
have found it impossible to attend. 



THE Annual Reports of committees are 
to be printed and distributed to mem 
bers of the Council before the end of May 
Copies will be distributed at the Confer 
ence and then reprinted with the Proceed 
ings. 

THE best 25 books for a two-foot shell 
for a country school will be voted upor 
by those who attend the Detroit Conferenc< 
and at the N. E. A. meeting at Boston th( 
first week in July. Results of the two vot 
ing contests will be published in librarj 
and educational periodicals and in th 
press. The contest will be valuable ir 
helping to bring the school library idea ef 
fectively before school boards, trustees 
public oflicials and the public generally 
and in leading country school teachers tc 
demand more adequate library facilities. 



BULLETIN 



71 



BOYS' BOOKS, the newest A.L.A. read- 
ing list, is in great demand by Rotary 
clubs and libraries for distribution during 
Boys' Week, and promises to have a steady 
year-round popularity also. Sales will prob- 
ably have passed the 150,000 mark before 
this number of the Bulletin is issued. Boys' 
Books was compiled by Jessie Gay Van 
Cleave, a new member of the A.L.A. head- 
quarters staff, a graduate of Pittsburgh Li- 
brary School, and engaged until recently 
in children's work at the Rosenberg Li- 
brary, Galveston, Texas. Libraries which 
place standing orders for all A.L.A. pub- 
lications will receive free sample copies of 
new short reading lists as they appear. 

FIVE thousand, six hundred and ninety- 
three persons and institutions were 
members of the A.L.A. on April 30th, 
1922, as compared with 5,093 on April 30th, 
1921. 

OALES of A.L.A. publications in the 
O first four months of 1922 have been 
47.5% greater than in the corresponding 
months of 1921. Receipts from member- 
ship dues show an increase of 20.6%. 

TEN per cent discount is allowed to in- 
stitutional members on all orders for 
A. L. A. publications amounting to one 
dollar or more, not including The Booklist. 
For some libraries this discount more than 
pays the annual institutional membership 
fee. 



printed this year in some number of the 
Bulletin. It is probable that statistics 
will be printed only for those libraries 
which are institutional members of the A. 
L. A. Copies of the blanks will be sent 
on request, however, to any library. The 
Nebraska State Library Association has 
taken over a few hundred copies of the 
blanks for distribution to every library in 
the state. All libraries are urged to use 
this standard form for their printed re- 
ports in order that statistics of various 
libraries may be easily compared. 

A LETTER came to A. L. A. Headquar- 
r\ ters recently from a corporal in the 
U. S. Marine Corps stating that books were 
not available to the men in his station. The 
matter was brought to the attention of the 
proper authorities and we have learned 
that in addition to a smtell deposit collec- 
tion of 500 volumes for the use of the 
men in that particular field there is a post 
library of 10,000 volumes about one mile 
away with trained library service. From 
all accounts the service from that library 
is maintained on a much more adequate 
basis than in the average town with a 
population similar to that of the camp. 

A query came from a Marine Corps man 
in the Dominican Republic asking where 
books could be obtained, and we have been 
informed that four books per capita have 
been provided for the men there and that 
shipments of 250 new books are made 
quarterly by the Bureau of Navigation. 



MEMBERS of the A. L. A. are urgently 
requested to report changes of address 
to A. L. A. Headquarters promptly. This 
office is looked to for correct and up-to- 
date information of this sort. Obviously, 
we cannot give out up-to-date information 
unless the members themselves keep us in- 
formed. 

T^WO forms of statistical blanks have 
1 been recommended by the Committee 
on Administration and have been printed 
for distribution. Duplicate copies have 
been sent to all institutional members, 
which are asked to report to us by April 1st. 
It is hoped that the statistics can be 



From a report of a speech by Hugh Wai- 
pole, to a group of librarians in England: 

"He instanced the attitude of the Amer- 
ican public. No matter how small the town 
to which he went he was always taken first 
to the public library, which seemed to be 
regarded by the townsfolk as the hub of 
the universe. In the library there was in- 
variably a hall with flowers and pictures, 
and a screen on which was posted all the 
available information as to the celebrity 
of the moment." 

Library Association Record, Feb., 1922, 
p. 61. 



72 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

FACTS FOR TRUSTEES 



THE Trustees Section of the American 
Library Association is planning a 
meeting for Tuesday afternoon, June 27th, 
at Detroit. F. H. Pettingill of Los An- 
geles is president. Last year at Swamp- 
Scott the meeting was attended by nearly 
a hundred library trustees. The League 
of Library Commissions is arranging for 
a meeting of members of state library com- 
missions and state library boards on 
Wednesday evening, June 28th. 

INDIANA has just completed a most suc- 
1 cessful library publicity week. Almost 
every known method of advertising and 
publicity has been used and every phase 
of library work emphasized, from popular- 
izing reading to creating a public senti- 
ment which will favor increased library 
support. 

The idea of Indiana Library Week orig- 
inated not with librarians, but with 
trustees. The suggestion came from Ed- 
mund L. Craig of the Evansville Public 
Library Board when he was president of 
the Indiana Library Trustees Association, 
and has been carried out under the active 
leadership of that Association. Indiana is 
looked upon as one of the best library 
states in the country, and there is no doubt 
but that much of the library development 
in that state is due to the Indiana Library 
Trustees Association which for several 
years has been holding annual meetings 
and carrying on its propaganda and Its 
activities through the usual channels. 

The Trustees Section of the American 
Library Association was organized in 1890 
to afford an opportunity to library trustees 
in the United States and Canada to do a 
similar work. Meetings are held annually 
in connection with the conference of the 
American Library Association and increas- 
ing numbers of trustees are taking advan- 
tage of the opportunities offered by these 
meetings to talk things over with other 
trustees. The meetings of the Trustees 
Section at Detroit the last week in June, 
this year, will be devoted primarily to the 
discussion of library financing. Frank 



Hervey Pettingell of the Los Angeles L 
brary Board is arranging the program. Al 
trustees are invited to attend the meetinf 
and it is suggested that more librar 
boards might well do what some are doin 
that is, send as official delegate not onl 
one or more members of the staff, but a 
least one member of the board of trustee! 



WT. J. LEE, of the Public Librar 
Board of Toronto, Canada, speakin 
last year on the duties of a library truste 
urged that all trustees join the A.L.-d 
and that every board of trustees send 
delegate to every annual conference. 



THE American Merchant Marine Librar; 
Association, with headquarters at 8 
Beaver Street, New York, is gradually re 
opening the library service for merchan 
seamen. Carl Shattuck, formerly repr< 
sentative in Boston for the A. L. A., ha 
been engaged to handle the work again i: 
that port. Word that the service was t 
be resumed in Boston was sent to the ship 
at sea by wireless and many men were 01 
the lookout for "the book man" when the; 
reached port. Mr. Shattuck writes a mos 
enthusiastic account of the work and say 
that the men are more eager for books tha 
ever before. 

Committees are being organized in th 
large port cities and subscriptions are IK 
ing solicited especially from the steamshi; 
owners. 

Speaking of the need for books on th 
vessels, the president of one Steamshi] 
line says: 

On the passenger boats operated by u 
the crew even take books from the steam 
er's library without permission, and i 
strict watch of these books has to be kep 
in order to prevent their being taken a 
times when wanted by the passengers 
Also care has to be taken to keep mei 
from appropriating the books left along 
side steamer chairs or around the deck 
from time to time. The men are so keei 
to read and so anxious to secure goo< 
books that they will run the risk of dis 
missal in order to get them. 



73 



THE statistics given herewith were sent 
to A. L. A. Headquarters by their com- 
piler who thought the information would 
be of value to libraries of similar sizes. 



The geographical distribution of the cities 
represented is wide, and many types of 
libraries are included in the tabulation. 



SALARY STATISTICS OF 21 LIBRARIES IN CITIES OVER 50,000 AND UNDER 200,000 
POPULATION. 
(Amounts are given in round numbers.) 


Population 


Budget 


Salaries 


Dept. 
Heads 


Branch 
Librarians 


First 
Assistants 


Senior 

Assistants 


Junior 
Assistants 


Apprentices 


50,000-75,000 
A ...... 


$69,000.00 
57,800.00 
42,869.00 

69,000.00 
44,821.00 
27.919.00 
64.040.00 
73,419.00 
55.700.00 
55,000.00 

24,009.70 
76,659.00 
54,338.00 
57.522.00 
54.000.00 
98,000.00 
65,067.00 
45,000.00 

32,560.00 
60.350.00 
88,000.00 

{, periodic; 


$25,000.00 
34,750.00 
22,176.00 

41,438.00 
22,460.00 
14,147.00 
38,118.00 
41,328.00 
37,000.00 
30,633.00 

9.474.00 
48,329.00 
28.525.00 
33,263.00 
83,900.00 
43,000.00 
31,946.00 
19,000.00 

13,880.00 
33,695.00 

i la and pri 


$150-200 
125-165 
145 

120-130 
125 
105-110 
125-140 
160-210 
100-140 
120-146 

"l35-i65* 
120-140 
110-135 
130-140 
165 
135-160 
130-135 

4* <'! 

90-125 
150-160 
135-150 

nting paid 


$90-140 
85-105 
115 

100-115 
100 

"125^46' 
75-125 
80-100 
75-90 

115 




$120 
125-165 






g 


$125-165 
110-120 

120-130 
100 
80-100 
100-125 
70-110 
90-100 


$95-125 
90-110 

65-80 
75-80 
65-75 
60-80 




c 


$60- 

65-80 
25c hr. 


75,000-100,000 
p 


90-105 
90-100 

851105 ' 




F 


G 


10-35c hr. 
$2 da., 7 hr. 


H 


I 


78-81 
85-120 


65 

55-75 

65-110 
90 
70-90 
60-75 
111-118 
90-115 
75 
50-75 

60-85 
50-60 
60-80 


j 




100,000-150,000 
K 
L 


115 

120-140 
110-125 




90-115 
110-125 
80-105 
111-118 
125-135 
95 
85-100 

90-125 
60-90 
100-115 


$90 
25 
60 


M 


120-140 
110-185 
77-88 
120-125 
115 
80-100 

90-125 
75-126 
115-135 

by endowi 


N 


o 


111-118 


p 


60-75 
60 
60 

SO 
40 


Q 


115 
80-100 

90-125 
90-120 
125 

nents. 


R 


150,000-200,060 

s 


T 


U 
Books, bindin 





TO CALL attention to the possibility of 
having library books delivered to 
residences by parcel post the St. Louis 
Public Library Monthly Bulletin for Feb- 
ruary, 1922 reproduces a photograph of a 
postman delivering a book at the front 
door. The following caption appears be- 
low the picture: "Uncle Sam as a library 
messenger. Telephone your wants to the 
library and get your books by parcel post. 
Leave a small sum previously to cover 
postage. You will get your book when 
your turn comes." 



A LIBRARY board "should concern itself 
t\ generally with results; seldom with 
methods. Having selected a competent li- 
brarian, who stands to the board in the re- 
lation of both executive officer and expert 
adviser, it leaves him free to carry out 
the policy of the library in whatever way 



may seem to him best." Bostwick. Ameri- 
can Public Library. 

DR. WILLIAM ORR, who has been travel- 
ing in Europe for several months, says 
In a recent letter to Dr. Putnam: "I have so 
far found no place in my journeyings, and 
they have been somewhat extensive, where 
there are not books bearing the imprint of 
the. American Library Association War 
Service. This seed scattered so widely 
will, I am sure, bear a rich harvest in the 
development of libraries in these coun- 
tries." 

RADIO boardcasting service was the 
means of circulating a library speech 
made by A. E. Bostwick, during April. The 
speech was made at the invitation of the 
St. Louis Post Dispatch for their radio 
service, and it was heard at all receiving 
stations within 200 miles. 



74 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



THE AMERICAN LEGION AND THE AMERICAN LIBRARY 

IN PARIS 



The Paris Post No. 1, American Legion, 
at a general meeting recently heartily en- 
dorsed and approved the work of the 
American Library in Paris, Inc. The reso- 
lutions were transmitted to headquarters 
in Indianapolis and word has now been re- 
ceived that the need of the Paris Library 
for books has been called to the attention 
of each department. This information will 
probably be passed on to the several Legion 
posts and the hope is expressed that the 
result will be the donation of a great 
number of books. 

Good resolutions not being enough, the 
Paris Post has recently sent out to each 
of its seven hundred members in Paris, 
the following notice: 

KEEP YOUR BOOKS EMPLOYED 

In view of the increased demands upon 
the American Library for American and 
English books, the trustees ask all who 
have books which they are no longer using 
to present them to the Library. 

Any book which has been of use to you 
can be made of use to many others, either 
in the library here or in the other libraries 
of Europe where such books are needed. 
1'filysee, or write the librarian asking him 
leave them at the library, 10, due de 
filys6e, or write the librarian asking him 
to send for them, or telephone (l-blyse'e 
58-84 or 53-90). 

THE LIBRARY A MEMORIAL 

W. Dawson Johnston says: 

"This interest in the Library I may ex- 
plain, is due not merely to its direct use to 
members of the Paris Post, but also to their 
desire to see the library made a memorial 
to the American soldiers who died in France, 
one which may carry on the 'work which 
they began. The Alan Seeger Fund, the first 
contribution made toward the endowment 
of the library, was given with this in view. 
It is the hope and expectation of the 
trustees that other memorial funds of this 
character will be presented. 

"But they hope even more strongly that 
communities may be interested in the in- 
stitution, that as every man has two coun- 
tries, his own and France, even so it may 
come to pass that every one interested in 



popular education, in making the world 
ready for democracy may feel he has two 
libraries, his local public library and this 
library in France. 

"And they will have reason also to expect 
it wherever library officials and Legior 
officials are able to co-operate in the col- 
lection of funds and books for this purpose, 
It may not be possible at this time to se- 
cure funds, but it is always possible tc 
secure books which will be more useful in 
a public library than in a private one, and 
more useful in Europe than in America." 

This is Americanization work on a large 
scale. America is sending its authors tc 
Europe to give expression to America! 
ideals and tell about American achieve 
ments. 

The following books, chosen from the 
A.L.A. list entitled The United States ar< 
wanted by the Paris Library, and they il 
lustrate the kind of books which would be 
welcomed in response to the above sugges 
tion: 

Adams, Ephraim Douglas, 

The power of ideals in American history 
Andrews, Matthew Page, 

The American's creed and its meaning 
Cooper, Clayton Sedgwick, 

American ideals. 
Erskine, John, 

Democracy and ideals. 
Ross, Edward Alsworth, 

What is America? 
Abdy, H. Bennett, 

On the Ohio. 
Johnson, Clifton, 

What to see in America. 
Mills, Enos Abijah, 

Rocky mountain wonderland. 
Muir, John, 

Mountains of California. 
Stephenson, William B., 

The land of tomorrow. 

It is suggested that libraries willing tc 
contribute these or other books get in touch 
with local Legion officials and then com- 
municate with W. Dawson Johnston, 1C 
rue de I'filys6e, Paris, before making any 
shipments. 



BULLETIN 



75 



SALE, EXCHANGE, WANTS, OFFERS 

Any library member of the Association 
may insert, without cost, a ten-line notice 
of books or periodicals wanted, for sale, or 
for exchange. 

FOR SALE 

The Abbott Laboratories Library, 4753 
Ravenswood Ave., Chicago, III. Lehrbuch 
der organischen Chemie, by Meyer and 
Jacobson. Zweiter Band, Erster Teil. New. 
$5.00. 

A. N. Brown, 44 State Circle, Annapolis, 
Maryland. A.L.A. Papers and Proceed- 
ings, 8th to 43d Conferences, inc., 1885- 
1921. 38 volumes, paper. $20.00. 

Library Notes, volumes 1-3, number 9, 
June 1886-June 1888; volumes 5-6, 1893- 
1894. Boston, paper. $2.50. 

Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia, 
26 volumes and index, 27 volumes. Sheep. 
N. Y. 1870-1883. $6.00. 

Appleton's Annual Cyclopaedia, 1861- 
1886. 26 volumes. Sheep. $12.00. 

World Almanac, 1901-1902, 1908-1914, 
1917-1921. 14 volumes. Paper. $3.50. 
Carriage extra. 

Lydia A. Dexter, 2920 Calumet Avenue, 
Chicago, III. A.L.A. Papers and Proceed- 
ings, 1891, 1892, bound Morocco, gilt top, 
$3.00 each; 1894, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1905, 
1906, unbound, $1.00 each; 1900, 1901, 1902, 
1904, unbound, 35c each total $13.40. 

A.L.A. Bulletin, unbound, volumes 1-5, 
$2.50 each; volumes 6-9, $1.85 each; vol- 
ume 10, $2.50; volume 11, $1.60; volume 
12, $1.35; volume 13, $2.25; volume 14, 
$2.50; volume 15, $3.50. 

Would sell the complete set of Bulletins 
at $30.00, but would not like to break the 
volumes. 

WANTS 

Alma College Library, Alma, Mich. The 
Booklist, volume 11, number 1. 

American Library Association, 78 East 
Washington Street, Chicago, III. Bulletin of 
the American Library Association. Index to 
volume 12. 



J. C. M. Hanson, University of Chicago 
Library, Chicago, Illinois. Professor J. N. 
Manly of the University of Chicago is en- 
gaged in a study of Poe's work in Alex- 
ander's Weekly Messenger for the period 
1839-40. He has located a file of the per- 
iodical for 1839 hut has so far failed to find 
even a single number for 1840. Anyone 
who happens to know of a file or single 
issue for the year 1840 will confer a great 
favor on Professor Manly by sending word 
to the above address. 

Wells College Library, Aurora, N. Y., 
Eductational Review, Nov. 1920, volume 60, 
number 4. Journal of Egyptian archae- 
ology, July, 1915, volume 2, part 3. 

OFFERS 

The New York State Library, Albany, 
will give to any library requesting it a 
copy of The Italian universities and their 
opportunities for foreign students, by Ken- 
neth McKenzie. Rome, 1919. 

The New York State Library has been 
given for free distribution to libraries a 
number of Christian Science Monitors, 1916 
to April 1920, nearly complete for 1918 
and 1919. Details on request. Libraries to 
pay transportation. 



76 AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



imiiiiiimiiimiimiiimiimmii IIIMIIIIIIII i nun inn i iiiiiiiiiiiiiMimmiimimiiiiiiiimmimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiinii 





To the Members of the 
American Library Association: 



In planning the program for the coming meeting 
at Detroit it has been our endeavor to confine the 
topics to those problems which particularly present 
themselves for discussion at the present time. The 
program has been planned, as far as possible, to have 
representatives of the varied clientele of the A. L. A. 
and much time has been provided for general discus- 
sion. It is, of course, difficult in an association which 
is now so large to give representation to every group. 
We have tried, however, to provide representation of 
several groups and to leave plenty of opportunity for 
others to speak in the general discussions. 

Such a program depends for its success upon the 
hearty co-operation of the members of the Associa- 
tion. Three things we particularly ask of every mem- 
ber. First, attendance at the convention. Second, 
prompt attendance at the hour assigned for the begin- 
ning of each session. Third, perfect freedom to dis- 
cuss, suggest or criticize. If the members meet these 
conditions I am sure we shall have an interesting and 
a very profitable conference. 

AZARIAH S. ROOT, 
President. 



=iiiiiiiiinii iiiiiiiiiiiiillilillltillllilllilllllliillilinilllllllili minium ii mum iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiii iimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiimmmiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiliiiii 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

1921-22 



Detroit Conference 
June 26-July 1,1922 



CHICAGO 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 
1922 



ANNUAL REPORTS 
1921-22 



or THE 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



CONTENTS 



Secretary's Report 3 

Publications Costs and Sales 11 

Necrology 14 

American Library in Paris 15 

Committee Reports 17 

Bookbinding 17 

Book Buying 18 

Cataloging 21 

Civil Service Relations 21 

Committee on Committees 22 

Constitution and By-Laws 22 

Decimal Classification Advisory Commit- 
tee 22 

Editorial Committee 22 

Education 22 

Federal and State Relations 30 

Foreign Periodicals of the War Period 33 

Institutional Libraries 34 

International Relations 35 

Investigation of Manner in which Munici- 
palities are Meeting Obligations to 

Donors 35 

Joint Committee of Seven. , 35 

Legislation 35 

Library Administration 40 

Library Co-operation with Other Coun- 
tries 40 

Library Co-operation with the Hispanic 

Peoples 46 

Library Revenues 47 

Library Service 48 



Library Training 49 

Library Workers Association (No Report). 51 

Membership 51 

National Certification and Training (No 

Report) 53 

Nominating Committee 53 

Preparation of a Bibliography of Human- 
istic Literature 53 

Public Documents 53 

Publicity 54 

Reciprocal Relations with Other National 

Organizations 55 

Recruiting 55 

Resources of American Libraries 57 

Revision of Adams' Manual of Historical 

Literature 58 

Salaries 58 

Sponsorship for Knowledge 60 

Standardization of Libraries (No Report). 61 
Transfer of Library War Service Activi- 
ties 61 

Union List of Periodicals 63 

Ventilation and Lighting of Library Build- 
ings 63 

Work with the Blind 63 

Work with the Foreign Born 71 

Financial Reports 73 

Finance Committee 73 

Trustees of the Endowment Fundi 73 

Treasurer's Reports 77 



These reports will be reprinted in the Proceedings 
with corrections and necessary changes. 



SECRETARY'vS REPORT-PUBLICATIONS- 
AMERICAN LIBRARY IN PARIS 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



Some of the outstanding features of the 
year ending May 20, 1922, are : 
A constantly increasing membership, 
The largest conference in the history of the 

Association, 
A much enlarged distribution of A. L. A. 

publications, 

Increased emphasis on the co-operative print- 
ing of reading lists and other material to 
promote reading and the use of books, 
The beginning of a series of A. L. A. read- 
ing courses for use by libraries in promot- 
ing adult education, 
Further development of the Employment 

Service, 

The continuation of the recruiting-for-li- 
brary-service campaign and the resultant 
interest aroused in library training, 
An apparent increase in requests (in per- 
sonal visits and by mail) for information 
on book selection, budgets, library public- 
ity, library establishment and organiza- 
tion, the educational value of libraries, li- 
brary training, traveling libraries, county li- 
braries, school libraries, library buildings, 
etc., 

The assembling and preparation of typical 
publicity material comprising not only ar- 
ticles, but pictures, slides and exhibits; 
also scrapbooks, showing actual financial, 
book and library establishment campaigns, 
and 

The establishment of closer relations with 
other organizations and agencies which 
are in a position to help in the promotion 
of library interest and in the extension 
and development of libraries. 
Membership. Our records show 5735 
on May 20, a gain of 12% since May 1, 1921. 
Thousands of personal and form letters, 
printed leaflets and circulars, and member- 
ship application blanks have been distributed 



to the library profession to encourage mem- 
bership in the A. L. A. The Membership 
Committee, the officers of the Association 
and the Headquarters staff have worked to- 
gether in this campaign for new members, 
and other members of the Association have 
extended numerous personal invitations to 
join. 

The U. S. Census Bulletin on Occupations, 
according to the 1920 census, indicates that 
there were 15,297 librarians in the United 
States in 1920 as compared with 7,423 in 
1910. The membership of the A. L. A. in 
1920 was 4,464 as compared with 2,005 in 
1910. 

The geographical distribution of the A. L. 
A. membership, as listed in the 1921 Hand- 
book, is as follows: 

North Atlantic division 2026 

North Central division 1975 

South Atlantic division 348 

South Central division 255 

Western division 560 

All other 143 

Total, 1921 5307 

A beginning has been made in the recruit- 
ing of sustaining and contributing members 
in accordance with the provisions of the new 
Constitution and By-Laws. 

Employment Service. More and more 
libraries are turning to the A. L. A. Employ- 
ment Service for recommendations. Requests 
during the year have covered nearly every 
conceivable kind of position, with salaries 
ranging up to four or five thousand dollars ; 
and almost limitless geographical distribution 
not by any means comprised within the 
boundaries of the United States. The heavi- 
est demand is for library school graduates, 
but registrants who have had apprentice train- 
ing or satisfactory library experience are be- 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



ing placed also. There have been many in- 
quiries for part time positions which would 
allow opportunity for some college or library 
school work, and these have received spe- 
cial attention. 

Recruiting for Librarianship. John Cot- 
ton Dana's interview in the New York Even- 
ing Post on Library work for young men 
has been reprinted by the A. L. A. for dis- 
tribution. A little statement by Christopher 
Morley is in the printer's hands as this re- 
port is being prepared. It will be entitled 
The child and the book. Requests for 
the recruiting placard, for Library work an 
opportunity for college women, reprinted 
last year, and for Books and a vocation have 
continued. Through the courtesy of the H. 
W. Wilson Co., 1,000 reprints of M. E. Ha- 
zeltine's Recruiting for librarianship have 
been added to the material available at Head- 
quarters. A limited number of reprints were 
made from Public Libraries of F. K. W. 
Drury's The library as a detective agency. 
Several thousand copies of these pamphlets 
and leaflets suggesting the profession of li- 
brarianship have been placed in the hands of 
young men and women as the result of the 
work of the Recruiting Committee, the Head- 
quarters office and co-operating librarians. 
Some requests for these items in large quan- 
tities have necessitated putting prices on them 
for quantity distribution, although they are 
still distributed in small lots free of charge. 

Suggested articles and editorials on libra- 
rianship have been sent to hundreds of peri- 
odicals and the clippings show that in some 
cases, at least, the material has been printed. 
One of the most important contributions was 
C. H. Compton's article written at our request 
and published in The Open Road May, 1922. 
A few copies are available for distribution. 

Thousands of letters have been sent to vo- 
cational advisors, librarians and others. 

The Committee on Recruiting, and the 
Headquarters office have continued to work 
together. Further details will be found in 
the report of the Recruiting Committee. 

State Chapters. Seventeen state associa- 
tions were affiliated with the American Li- 
brary Association by Council action on De- 



cember 29, 1921, on the new basis. Several 
other state associations and one local club 
have made application for affiliation since 
then, and their requests will presumably be 
acted upon at the Detroit meeting. When 
all of the state associations have become chap- 
ters of the A. L. A. a very considerable num- 
ber of the Council members will be the state 
representatives. 

The object of this affiliation is to strength- 
en and unify library organization throughout 
the country. The state or local association 
ought to gain influence by becoming a mem- 
ber of an international organization just as a 
local Rotary club is stronger because it is a 
part of International Rotary; and the A. 
L. A. itself gains strength by having state rep- 
resentatives on its Council and by having an 
official connection with practically everybody 
in the library profession. From time to time 
the A. L. A. goes on record for certain things. 
If its statements to congressmen on tariff, 
copyright and government documents, and its 
statements to the general public on library 
revenues can be made in the name not only 
of a membership of five or six thousand li- 
brarians, but also in some measure, at least, 
in the name of all the members of all of the 
state and local associations, the A. L. A. is 
much more likely to gain its point. 

A. L. A. Representation at Meetings. 
The Association has been officially represented 
by officers, specially appointed delegates or 
members of the Headquarters staff at meet- 
ings of six national associations, five national 
or sectional conferences, eight meetings of 
state library associations ; and members of 
the Headquarters staff have made twenty- 
five or thirty talks to library school students, 
members of library staffs and other groups. 
Exhibits have been made at some of the 
general meetings and conferences, and at most 
of the meetings formal or informal talks 
have been made by the A. L. A. representa- 
tives. Further details are given in the report 
of the Committee on Reciprocal Relations 
with Other National Organizations, and in 
the January Bulletin, page 27. 

Library Establishment. The growing 
popular demand for the establishment of pub- 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



lie libraries where they do not now exist 
is clearly indicated in the requests for help 
which come from various towns and cities, es- 
pecially in the states without active library 
commissions. Opportunities have come to the 
A. L. A. during the last year which have 
enabled it to be of service in promoting the 
library cause in some of the largest cities in 
the country which are still without library 
service. In such cases the Headquarters of- 
fice frequently outlines in brief a whole cam- 
paign of publicity and propaganda to stimu- 
late and organize the local interest. A few 
publications are sent, and our miscellaneous 
publicity material is offered, with the result 
that there is usually a continuing correspond- 
ence until definite action has been taken. Al- 
ways, however, the things which might be 
done in such cases and which might help in 
the development of libraries for many thou- 
sands of people are limited by many routine 
things which must be done by the Headquar- 
ters office staff. It is largely because of this 
general library promotional work which is not 
the direct responsibility of individual mem- 
bers, that the Association welcomes the an- 
nual dues of sustaining and contributing mem- 
bers and gifts from various sources. 

Not infrequently libraries, and library agen- 
cies turn to the A. L. A. Headquarters for 
comprehensive suggestions for reorganization 
and extension or submit reorganization and 
extension plans for criticism. During the 
last year a few libraries and library agencies 
in widely separated parts of the country have 
profited by this service. Others desiring sim- 
ilar help have failed to receive it because of 
the many demands on the Headquarters staff. 

County libraries. The publicity for the 
county library movement and especially for 
that more spectacular phase of the county li- 
brary movement book wagons has resulted 
in a continual flow of correspondence from 
small towns and country districts. People 
want to know how library service can be 
brought to them. In the great majority of 
cases the requests come from states and 
provinces in which there are active library 
extension agencies and from persons who, ap- 
parently, have somehow been missed by the 



traveling library system which would be able 
to meet their needs in some respects. In not 
a few cases, however, the requests come from 
states or provinces in which there are no 
agencies equipped to meet the needs. Some- 
times the state laws have not authorized the 
development of any such agencies. In those 
cases the Headquarters office endeavors to 
put the inquirer into touch with the other 
people in the state interested in developing 
the necessary library departments, and to en- 
courage local efforts toward the establish- 
ment of a community library on a temporary 
basis. Such inquiries serve to keep in our 
minds the fact that there are still many peo- 
ple in North America who are wholly beyond 
or without the influence of libraries; and 
that there is no other national or internation- 
al agency than the American Library Asso- 
ciation to which they can turn for help. 

School Libraries. The school library 
movement is getting into full swing. Teach- 
ers' associations are adopting library plat- 
forms. State laws and regulations are be- 
ing made which require the maintenance of 
adequate libraries in schools and the teach- 
ing of the use of books and libraries as part 
of the curriculum. All this is reflected in 
the requests received at Headquarters for 
school library plans, outlines of organization, 
information on courses in the use of books 
and libraries, information as to library 
schools offering courses in school library 
work, qualifications for school librarians and 
recommendations for positions. The most 
frequently recurring request is for the out- 
line of a plan which will enable the public li- 
brary and the school to work together in 
meeting these growing and changing demands 
for an adequate library service for the school 
system in all its branches. 

Library War Service. The American 
Library Association continues to provide for 
some of the ex-service men in hospitals. Oc- 
casional requests for books and magazines 
come from hospitals which are not yet be- 
ing served through government channels. Sub- 
scriptions have been entered for this purpose 
to 275 magazines since January 1, 1922. The 
Association is also providing two regular em- 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



ployees for advisory service in connection 
with the hospital library work for the men 
in what were until recently Public Health 
Service hospitals (recently transfered to the 
Veterans' Bureau). Newly appointed hospital 
librarians and assistants are also usually paid 
for one or more months from A. L. A. funds 
in order to avoid the delay which would re- 
sult if forced to wait for government appoint- 
ment. Some incidental expenses are paid by 
the A. L. A. as necessary. In this way the 
hospital library service is being transferred 
gradually to the government with the pros- 
pect of a complete transfer not many months 
off. 

The A. L. A. continues to pay a small 
portion of the salary of the librarian of 
the American Library in Paris who is also 
the European representative of the American 
Library Association. 

During the last few months the more im- 
portant War Service printed reports, lists, 
bulletins and miscellaneous leaflets and post- 
ers, together with mimeographed material, 
photographs, slides, clippings, etc., have been 
assembled and prepared for binding or some 
other means of preservation for historical 
purposes. This material is at present stored 
in a vault at the Headquarters office in Chi- 
cago. Members who served on the War Serv- 
ice Committee and those who worked in 
camps, hospitals, dispatch offices or at Head- 
quarters are urged to visit the A. L. A. Head- 
quarters office and examine this material or to 
communicate with us if there is any possibil- 
ity that additional items may be found to be 
added to this file. 

Requests for information which have grown 
out of the war service work continue to come 
to the A. L. A. office from men who were in 
the service, secretaries of welfare organiza- 
tions who came in touch with the A. L. A. 
during the war, and from men and women 
throughout the world who look to the A. L. 
A. for suggestions, and not infrequently (but 
usually in vain) for books. 

More detailed statements will be found in 
the report of the Committee on the Transfer 
of Library War Service Activities, and in 
the statement of the librarian of the Ameri- 



can Library in Paris, appended to this report 
of the Secretary. 

Books for the Blind. The Booklist of 
Revised Braille issued two or three times a 
year for the Committee on Work with the 
Blind, records ten books done into braille 
this year through the instrumentality of the 
American Library Association. That there 
is a continuing and growing interest in this 
work is evidenced by the Committee's report 
and the Headquarters correspondence. 

Publications. It is estimated that 297,- 
000 copies of publications issued by the Amer- 
ican Library Association have been distributed 
during the year ended March 31, 1922. A 
large portion of this distribution has been 
of small reading lists compiled and published 
usually because of the timeliness of the sub- 
jects. 

Reading courses are another important feat- 
ure of the year's work. Two of the courses 
have been issued, one on Journalism by a 
Dean of a university school of journalism, 
and one on Accounting by a professor of 
that subject in a university school of com- 
merce. The plan is to have a series of 
courses on vocational and other subjects which 
will represent the best possible advice on 
these subjects, prepared by men or women 
who are specialists in their fields, and checked 
up by librarians in order that they may be 
usable in all libraries. The number of 
books selected will be kept down to six or 
, eight whenever that is feasible. The courses 
are to be prepared for the man or woman 
who wants to read several books to a definite 
end, not for the man or woman who wants to 
read simply one book. It is hoped that li- 
braries will find these a useful means of put- 
ting into the hands of inquirers expert ad- 
vice instead of the necessarily limited advice 
which must often be given out by assistants 
at the lending desk or even the reference 
desk. It is also hoped that libraries will find 
it possible to distribute these courses, per- 
haps by mail, to people who ought to be inter- 
ested in reading on the subjects, and so may 
eventually be able to report to the public 
that hundreds, perhaps thousands of persons 
are pursuing definite courses of reading 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



through the instrumentality of the libraries 
which ought to help libraries to convince the 
public that they are helping in the movement 
for adult and universal education. 

The Graded list of books for children 
is probably the most important item pub- 
lished during the year. It was compiled by 
a committee of school librarians and school 
teachers appointed by the Library Department 
of the National Education Association. Com- 
prehensive indexes have been prepared by the 
editorial staff at A. L. A. Headquarters and 
the book should be ready for distribution by 
the time of the A. L. A. conference. 

The number of new publications issued 
during the year ended May 20, 1922, counting 
separately the individual numbers of periodical 
publications, is SO. Thirty of them were pre- 
pared wholly or in large part at Head- 
quarters. Nine publications were reprinted, 
some of them thoroughly revised. Numerous 
printed circulars about these publications 
have been issued and distributed, many of 
them in large quantities. 

New Publications, 1921-22 

A. L. A. Bulletin, six numbers. 

A. L. A. Manual of library economy, chap. 
19, The catalog. 

A. L. A. Reading course on accounting. 

A. L. A. Reading course on journalism. 

Annual reports, 1920-21. 

The Booklist (11 numbers). 

Booklist books, 1921. 

Booklist of revised Braille, Vol. 1, Nos. 
5 and 6. 

Books and pamphlets on library work (en- 
velope insert). 

Books and pamphlets on library work (for 
Trade List Annual). 

Books and thrift. 

Books for vacation (now printing). 

Boys' books. 

Business books for profit and pleasure. 

The child and the book. 

Children's books for Christmas presents. 

Conference program. 

Conference attendance register. 

Graded list of books for children (now 
printing). 



Historical reading list for children. 

Home planning. 

Library work an opportunity for college 
women. 

Library work for young men. 

Mid-winter conference program, 1921. 

Plays for children. 

Plays of today. 

Resolutions on public questions. 

Revised form for library statistics ( for col- 
lege and reference libraries). 

Technical books 1921, A selection. 

The United States. 

Useful books for the home. 

Viewpoints in essays. 

Wanderlust book shelf (now printing). 

What is a reasonable income for your 
library ? 

Posters and Exhibits, 1921-22 

After college what? 
Children's reading exhibit. 
County library exhibit. 
McCutcheon cartoon poster. 
McCutcheon bookmark. 

Reprints and New Editions, 1921-22 

A. L. A. Manual of library economy, chap. 
16, Book selection. 

Binding for libraries. 

Book wagons. 

Books and a vocation. 

A County library. 

Foreign people in the United States. 

Mending and repair of books. 

Revised form for library statistics (for 
public libraries). 

Why join the A. L. A. ? 

Forthcoming Publications 

A. L. A. Catalog, Supplement, 1912-21. 

Essentials in library administration (new 
edition). 

Guide to the study and use of reference 
books (new edition). 

The Hospital Library. 

The Booklist. The following statement 
is submitted by May Massee, editor : 

"The Booklist completes the seventeenth 
year of its existence more firmly established 
than ever as a necessary factor of the work 



8 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



of the American Library Association. This 
is shown by the gradual but steady increase of 
circulation, all of which is now on an indi- 
vidual and paid basis and by the steady in- 
crease in the number of contributing librari- 
ans and in the quality of their contributions. 

"The influence of The Booklist on the trade 
is shown in the remark of a salesman, 'Well 
I doubled my order on that today when I 
told the buyer that it was a Booklist small 
library book.' Buyers recognize the fact that 
Booklist titles are those which people want. 
This must be true as they are chosen from 
the consensus of expert opinion which is con- 
stantly being tested and proved by actual con- 
tact with the reading public. 

"The addition of a children's librarian to 
the editorial staff of the Association strength- 
ens this feature of The Booklist and enables 
the staff to give more assistance in the prep- 
aration of the special lists. More of such 
lists have been prepared and are being pre- 
pared by the editorial staff than at any time 
in the history of the Association. Inquiries 
about books are increasing in number and all 
of them are referred to The Booklist staff. 

"The editor of The Booklist wishes to 
thank personally and officially all contribut- 
ing librarians and all the headquarters staff 
whose work makes The Booklist." 

Subscriptions in May 1920, May 1921, and 

May 1922, are shown in the following table: 

May May May 

1920 1921 1922 

Paid subscriptions .. 4,116 4,305 5,000 
Institutional members 
and affiliated asso- 
ciations 579 658 Dis- 
con- 
tinued 
Free List 118 119 115 



Total 4,813 5,082 5,115 

Library members and affiliated state asso- 
ciations formerly received The Booklist as 
part of their membership perquisites. This 
meant about 650 copies distributed each month 
without charge. On January 1, 1922, in ac- 
cordance with Executive Board action, there 
was a change in practice, and The Booklist 
is now issued on a regular subscription basis 



at $2.00 per year. About 400 of the institu- 
tional members have become subscribers. 

Publicity. Of the total distribution of 
A. L. A. publications in the year ended March 
31, estimated at 297,000, more than half 
(about 170,000) have gone directly or indi- 
rectly to the public. Reading lists and reading 
courses by the thousands have been put into 
the hands of possible readers and buyers of 
books. In one city fifty thousand copies of 
an A. L. A. list were distributed in one day. 
In all of the A. L. A. publicity to libraries 
about the reading lists and other book pub- 
. licity material the emphasis has been placed on 
distribution outside the library. Some of 
the reading lists, reading courses and other 
similar materials have been sent to hun- 
dreds of house organs, trade periodicals and 
other magazines as well as to press associa- 
tions and newspapers ; and in some cases the 
material and lists have been reprinted and 
thus made available to many thousands of 
persons, stimulating, we hope, the development 
and use of libraries and an increased distribu- 
tion of books. 

Library establishment. The pamphlets How 
to start a library and Why do we need a pub- 
lic library are used almost daily in answer- 
ing questions on these subjects. Many copies 
are distributed free of charge each year to 
communities attempting to establish libraries 
without the aid of library commissions, and 
many more hundreds are distributed by the 
library commissions and other similar agen- 
cies. 

County libraries. The pamphlets A comi- 
ty library and Book wagons continue to be 
popular with library commissions and are 
used frequently in answering questions from 
communities in states without commissions. A 
few thousand copies have been distributed to 
rural welfare workers, rural school officials, 
farm papers, club women and other persons 
and agencies interested in country life de- 
velopment. The County library exhibit 
through the 25 sets sold and through sets 
exhibited by the A. L. A. at other than li- 
brary conferences has reached many thous- 
ands of persons, with the county library idea 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



and with the suggestion that the people in 
the country want books. 

Business libraries. Workshops for assem- 
bling business facts, by Dorsey W. Hyde, jr., 
president of the Special Libraries Associa- 
tion, was written at our request and has been 
distributed by both the A. L. A. and the S. 
L. A. to large numbers of people. Copies 
have gone from the A. L. A. office to the 
members of the National Federation of Busi- 
ness and Professional Women's Clubs, to com- 
mercial clubs, chambers of commerce, house 
organs, business and trade magazines. It has 
been used successfully in answering questions 
from business men about the establishment 
and development of libraries for their officers 
and employees. 

School libraries. Several thousand copies of 
a little leaflet, entitled Constructive aids in 
school library work, were distributed to 
teachers, principals, superintendents and li- 
brarians in grade schools, high schools and 
normal colleges. The purpose was : first, to 
create an interest in school libraries, or to 
stimulate that interest where it already existed ; 
and second, to promote the sale of some of 
the A. L. A. publications which are of value 
to school libraries. During the year several 
hundred copies of the Certain pamphlet Stand- 
ard library organisation and equipment for 
secondary schools have been distributed to 
school officials. Plans have been made with 
the co-operation of the chairmen of the School 
Libraries Section of the A. L. A. and of the 
Library Department of the N. E. A. to con- 
duct voting contests at the Detroit confer- 
ence of the American Library Association 
and the Boston conference of the N. E. A. 
on the best 25 books for a "Two- foot shelf 
for a one-room country school." The purpose 
is to stimulate discussion of school libraries 
in rural districts, and the clippings which have 
come from different parts of the country as 
the result of the first announcement through 
the Associated Press indicates that the results 
will be gratifying. 

Library support. Nothing issued by the 
American Library Association in many years 
has been so widely reprinted as the library 



revenue resolution, adopted by the A. L. A. 
Council in December, 1921, and reprinted by 
the A. L. A. as a broadside under the head- 
ing What is a reasonable income for your 
library? Several thousand copies have been 
sold to library commissions for distribution to 
trustees, public officials, newspapers and oth- 
ers, and some copies have been distributed by 
the Headquarters office. The use of this 
statement in the newspapers of the country 
and the comment given it in editorial columns 
lead us to believe it commanded general at- 
tention. Surely all this will help to create a 
public sentiment which will demand better 
support for libraries. Scrapbooks illustrating 
the financial campaigns in two or three cities, 
either for library buildings or increased appro- 
priations, have been prepared by the Head- 
quarters office and have been used almost 
constantly in other communities as suggestions 
for similar campaigns. 

General book publicity. Reading lists issued 
during the year covered the following sub- 
jects: 

Home planning. 

Useful books for the home. 

Business books for profit and pleasure. 

The United States. 

Books and thrift. 

Wanderlust book shelf. 

Others are mentioned under Children's 
reading. 

Reading courses were published on Account- 
ing and Journalism. In addition to the dis- 
tribution which these obtained through libra- 
ries a few thousand copies have been distribut- 
ed directly to persons and agencies where 
they would receive special attention and where 
they might be brought to the attention of 
many others. There has also been a good 
distribution through libraries and otherwise of 
the McCutcheon cartoon poster and book 
mark, reprinted from the Chicago Tribune. 

Effort has been made to encourage libraries 
to have a part in every public movement. 
Nearly every week is now assigned to some 
cause or some movement, and the publicity 
which grows out of the observance of these 
"weeks" and "days" offers librarians ready- 
made opportunities to stimulate book distrib- 



10 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



ution. In a few cases relations have been es- 
tablished also between the A. L. A. Head- 
quarters and the headquarters f other organi- 
zations interested in these movements, in or- 
der that books might be given their place in 
the official program. 

Children's reading. Four important con- 
tributions to book publicity in this field have 
been made by the A. L. A. during the year : 
The Children's reading exhibit, Children's 
books for Christmas presents, Boys' books,and 
Books for vacation which is in the printer's 
hands as this report is being written. The 
45 sets of the exhibit which were sold and 
others lent by the A. L. A., have been shown 
to scores of large groups of people by libra- 
ries and library commissions, and the book 
lists have been distributed in large quantities, 
so that the first three items mentioned, the 
exhibit, the Christmas list and the boys' list, 
may presumably have brought the book idea 
to the attention of several hundred thousand 
people. An important fact is that the gen- 
eral reading lists and the children's reading 
lists are usually reprinted by one or more 
periodicals, so that the distribution is much 
in excess of the number of copies printed by 
the A. L. A. 

Recruiting for librarianship. This is large- 
ly publicity work but is reported in another 
paragraph. 

Library publicity. The growing recognition 
on the part of libraries of the importance of 
keeping the book idea and the library idea be- 
fore the public has resulted in the assembling 
at Headquarters of a considerable amount 
of material illustrating library and book pub- 
licity. This consists of scrapbooks showing 
how some libraries advertise, of pictures, re- 
ports, etc. all of which are available for 
loans to libraries. 

Nezvspapcr and 'magazine articles. The time 
which could be devoted to publicity during 
the past year has for the most part been given 
to the development of the reading lists and 
reading courses and their adequate distribu- 
tion through libraries and otherwise as stated 
above. Some dozens of articles have, how- 
ever, been written at our suggestion for the 
general magazines, and many newspaper 



stories have been given to the press associa- 
tions as well as to individual newspapers. Ma- 
terial for newspaper and magazine articles is 
being collected and organized at the Head- 
quarters office constantly and is being used 
by all sorts of reporters and writers. There 
would be much greater use if we were able 
to assemble more material. 

Photographs and slides. The collection of 
photographs available for exhibits and for 
reproduction in newspapers and magazines has 
now increased to several hundred and many 
of the best pictures have been reproduced in 
the form of lantern slides. The slides have 
been used during the year for lectures to 
library school students, for public addresses in 
communities conducting library campaigns, 
for library development and in other similar 
ways. 

A. L. A. Finances. The increased mem- 
bership and the increased dues have combined 
to produce an income for the General Fund 
somewhat larger than it has been in the past. 
The conference registration fee required by 
the new By-Laws should provide $1500 or 
$2000 more. To a large extent the additional 
funds will be absorbed by the increased ex- 
penses of a larger association and larger con- 
ferences and by minor increases such as those 
growing out of the new method of voting, 
etc. 

The Publishing Funds are much increased 
because of the increased sales of publications. 
The net gain in this item for 1921 over 1920 
was $7,665.42, or 49%. The gain in the twelve 
months ending April 30, 1922, over the twelve 
months ending April 30, 1921, was $9,056.64, 
or 50.9%. But the gain does not represent 
profit. The prices on A. L. A. publications 
are kept at a .figure which is meant to cover 
overhead, but not to provide a surplus. 

The fiscal year of the Association ends on 
December 31. The Treasurer's annual reports 
are found each year in the January Bulletin. 
Financial statements are also published in 
the various numbers of the Bulletin through- 
out the year, and a summary for January 1 
to April 30, 1922, is printed at the time of 
the conference. 

In the committee reports this year, and 



PUBLICATIONS 



11 



perhaps every year, will be found recommen- 
dations which would involve additional expen- 
ditures by the committees or by the Headquar- 
ters office, frequently by both. Unquestion- 
ably many of these recommendations would 
meet with the approval of members of the 
Association in general, and, if carried out, 
would help in the development of librarianship 
and of libraries. One committee recommends 
that Headquarters office be instructed to 
undertake a piece of work which was under- 
taken several years ago and which failed 
then as it will fail again unless the Headquar- 
ters office can put time and money into that 
work. Another committee is trying to do on a 
volunteer basis what would normally cost 
some $20,000 a year. And still another com- 
mittee specifically recommends that the A. L. 
A. employ an additional Headquarters assist- 
ant who shall be a specialist in a given field. 
The Headquarters office correspondence would 
disclose the need for similar specialists in 
other fields as well as many opportunities for 
service which the Association must now fore- 
go because of a lack of adequate resources. 
Our Chicago Host. The Association 



continues to be under obligations to the Chi- 
cago Public Library for tti e Headquarters of- 
fices. This courtesy is the more appreciated 
when it is understood that the Library itself 
is in need of space to meet the demands of its 
rapidly expanding work. The activities of 
the A. L. A. are growing rapidly also and 
the necessity for more space is a matter for 
early consideration. 

In General. The year's work of the 
American Library Association is told in the 
reports of committees and officers, in the A. 
L. A. Bulletin (including the Handbook and 
Proceedings), The Booklist, the other A. L. 
A. publications and in the library periodicals. 
Nowhere are all the facts, or even the out- 
standing facts, assembled. This report reviews 
simply the work of the Headquarters office 
with suggestions here and there of the work 
of others. 

Grateful acknowledgement is made to staff, 
officers, committees and other members whose 
combined efforts have made this a year of un- 
usual accomplishment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL H. MILAM, Secretary. 



PUBLICATIONS COSTS AND SALES 

Payments for Publications, April 1, 1921, to March 31, 1922 
Cost of publications: 

A. L. A. Catalog, 1912-1921, editorial expense $ 633.00 

A. L. A. List of subject headings, storage on plates 36.00 

Binding for libraries (reprintedi) 49.50 

Book wagons, A county library with rural book delivery 108.78 

Booklist 3,556.67 

Booklist books, 1920 434.80 

Booklist books, 1921 396.04 

Books for boys and girls (reprinted) 137.50 

Children's reading exhibit 451.71 

A county library (four-page leaflet) 103.50 

County library exhibit 493.96 

Graded list of books for children, editorial expense 155.00 

Guide to reference books (reprinted) 389.85 

McCutcheon bookmark 80.25 

McCutcheon cartoon poster 69.25 

Manual of library economy, chaps. 4, 9, 13 (revised) and 19, 

including storage on plates 840.50 

Mending and repair of books (reprinted) 92.00 

Plays for children 1,414.18 

Reading lists: 

Books and thrift 148.77 

Business books for profit and pleasure 205.37 

Children's books for Christmas presents 838.55 



12 



Home planning 102.10 

Plays of today 118.01 

The new voter 11.50 

The United States 254.25 

Useful books for the home 163.00 

1,841.55 

Viewpoints in biography 505.90 

What is a reasonable income for your library. 77.50 

Workshops for assembling business facts 66.22 

$11,933.66 

Sales of Publications, April 1, 1921, to March 31, 1922 

The Booklist: 

Subscription* $9,909.33 

Extra copies 271.44 

$10,180.77 

Handbook 5, Binding for libraries 221 31.11 

Handbook 6, Mending and repair of books 1,053 241.96 

Handbook 8, How to choose editions 80 11.64 

Handbook 9, Normal library budget 48 6.74 

Handbook 10, Manual for institution libraries 11 2.71 

Handbook 11, Some principles of business'-like conduct in 

libraries 176 42.63 336.79 

Tract 2, How to start a library. 59 6.06 

Tract 4, Library rooms and buildings 146 9.48 

Tract 5, Notes from the art section 10 .94 

Tract 10, Why do we need a public library 167 11.45 27.93 

Foreign lists, French fiction 14 1.32 

Foreign lists, French literature, recent 25 5.63 

Foreign lists, German' 7 3.15 

Foreign lists, Polish 6 1.38 

Foreign lists, Russian 7 3.40 

Foreign lists, Swedish 2 .48 15.36 

Reprints, Bostwick, Popularizing music through the library.. 4 .67 
Reprints, Buying list of books for small libraries, 3rd edition. 1,149 248.55 
Reprints, Certain, Standard library organization and equip- 
ment for secondary schools of different sixes 372 138.87 

Reprints, Inspirational influence of books in the life of 

children . 4 .19 

Reprints, Some present day aspects in library training 13 .75 

Reprints, Some recent features in library architecture 77 3.92 

Reprints, Making maps available 56 3.11 

Reprints, Statistics of libraries, 1917 1 .05 396.11 

League publications: 

Aids in library work with foreigners 33 4.72 

Directions for the librarian of a small library 47 6.83 

League Handbook, 1916 9 4.15 15.70 

A. L. A. Manual of library economy, chapters as follows: 

1, American library history 97 14.83 

2, Library of Congress 43 7.72 

3, The state library 43 7.52 

4, College and university library (revised) 375 56.36 

5, Proprietary and subscription libraries 31 5.39 

6, The free public library 48 8.61 

7, The high school library 230 34.49 

8, Special libraries . 71 12.55 

9, Library legislation (revised) 362 57.61 

10, The library building (revised) 198 25.73 

11, Furniture, fixtures and equipment 158 22.78 

12, Library administration 147 18.26 



PUBLICATIONS 



13 



13, Training for librarianship (revised) 1,016 142.21 

14, Library service 74 11.23 

16, Book selection 225 23.62 

17, Order and accession department 283 30.59 

18, Classification , 259 31.65 

19, The catalog 984 131.12 

20, Shelf department 182 22.69 

21, Loan work 232 25.86 

23, Government documents 124 18.62 

24, Bibliography 224 26.71 

25, Pamphlets and minor library material 230 32.96 

27, Commissions, state aid, etc 34 5.88 

30, Library work with the blind 48 8.34 $783.33 

Reading lists: 

Books and thrift 11,239 269.96 

Business books for profit and pleasure 9,111 218.40 

Children's books for Christmas presents 56,320 1,367.10 

Home planning 1,560 29.30 

Plays of today 997 108.26 

The new voter 1,402 17.70 

The United States 6,476 377.79 

Useful books for the home 12,729 226.70 2,615.21 

A. L. A. Bookbinding Committee: 

Lettering on library books 89 8.61 8.61 

A. L. A. Catalog, 1904-11 134 227.53 

A. L. A. Index to general literature 27 150.60 

A. L. A. Index to general literature, supplement 28 104.40 

An apprentice course for small libraries 182 176.65 

Book wagons, A county library with rural book delivery.. 1,670 135.01 

Booklist books, 1920 1,021 315.03 

Booklist books, 1921 2,094 410.09 

Books for boys and girls 324 76.18 

Catalog rules 582 534.76 

Cataloging for small libraries 278 522.20 

Children's reading exhibit sets 49 490.00 

Collection of social survey material 36 5.28 

County library, four-page leaflet 8,610 204.93 

County library exhibit sets 25 450.00 

Guide to reference books 608 1,680.70 

High school list 108 52.48 

H ints to small libraries 33 24.49 

Hospital list 22 6.49 

Index to kindergarten songs 25 41.68 

Index to library reports 5 4.80 

Library buildings 6 .75 

Library efficiency test 98 23.89 

List of economical editions 8 1.15 

List of music and! books about music 26 8.51 

List of subject headings 542 1,987.80 

List of 550 children's books 67 9.90 

McCutcheon bookmark 23,871 103.10 

McCutcheon cartoon poster 3,110 193.33 

Periodicals for the small library 342 78.56 

Plays for children 533 745.95 

Scientific management, List of books on 9 .85 

Shakespeare, Brief guide to the literature of 25 11.55 

Special indexes in American libraries 18 1.73 

Subject headings for catalogs of juvenile books 56 91.06 

Subject indx to A. L. A. Booklist, vols. 1-6 13 3.23 

Subject index to A. L. A. Booklist, vol. 7 32 3.03 

Viewpoints in biography 747 419.26 



14 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Viewpoints in essays (advance orders) 6 3.60 

Viewpoints in travel 228 123.69 

What is a reasonable income for your library 8,825 50.75 

Workshops for assembling business facts 289 54.33 

A. L. A. Bulletin and Proceedings 171 74.50 



9,603.82 
$23,983.63 



NECROLOGY (REPORT BY THE 
SECRETARY) 

During the past year the Association has 

lost by death twenty-six of its members. The 

list follows. Brief biographical notes will ap- 
pear in the Handbook of the Association for 

the current year : 

Edward B. Adams, librarian Harvard Law 
Library, Cambridge, Mass., died March 24, 
1922. 

James L. Autry, trustee Public Library, Hous- 
ton, Texas, died Sept. 28, 1920. 

Dr. Ida Clarke, president Board of Trustees 
Public Library, Youngstown, Ohio, died 
March 2, 1922. 

Joseph F. Daniels, librarian Public Library, 
Riverside, Calif., died September 17, 1921. 

Elizabeth B. Faucon, custodian Reading Room 
Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., died September 15, 1921. 

Walter Greenwood Forsyth, custodian Barton- 
Ticknor Department, Public Library, Bos- 
ton, Mass., died December 27, 1921. 

Grace E. Inman, 135 Parade Street, Provi- 
dence, R. L, died December 29, 1921. 

Dr. Frank S. Johnson, chairman Book Com- 
mittee, John Crerar Library, Chicago, Illi- 
nois, died April 23, 1922. 

John W. Jordan, librarian Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., died 
June 12, 1921. 

Mrs. Thomas L. Montgomery, Harrisburg, 
Pa., died Oct. 16, 1921. 

John Grant Moulton, librarian Public Li- 
brary, Haverhill, Mass., died July 8, 1921. 

Benonine Muse, assistant reference librarian 
University of Texas Library, Austin, Tex., 
died July 9, 1921. 

Eunice Rockwood Oberly, librarian Bureau of 
Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C, died November 5, 1921. 

Tomo-Saburo Sano, chief librarian Public 



Library, Yamaguchi, Japan, died May 13, 
1920. 

Mrs. Harriot H. (Pliny T.) Sexton, Palmyra, 
N. Y., died November 22, 1921. 

May Seymour, editor of Decimal Classifica- 
tion, Lake Placid Club, N. Y., died June 
14, 1921. 

Lindsay Swift, editor library publications, 
Public Library, Boston, Mass., died Septem- 
ber 11, 1921. 

Hamilton B. Tompkins, director and mem- 
ber of Book Committee, Redwood Library, 
Newport, R. L, died December 23, 1921. 
The following persons had formerly be- 
longed to the Association, although not mem- 
bers at the time of their death : 

William M. Bains, bookseller, 1213-15 Market 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa., died December 19, 
1921. 

John Vance Cheney, former librarian The 
Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois, died 
May 1, 1922. 

Lucinda McAlpine, former librarian, Public 
Library, Newton, Kansas, died January 31, 
1921. 

Mrs. Helen J. McCaine, Public Library, St. 
Paul, Minn., died March 30, 1922. 

G. B. Meleney, 1047 First National Bank 
Bldg., Chicago, 111., died March 5, 1922. 

W. P. Payne, formerly president Board of 
Trustees, Public Library, Nevada, Iowa, 
died October 21, 1921. 

Charles Delamater Vail, librarian Hobart Col- 
lege Library, Geneva, N. Y., died July 25, 
1921. 

Edward Harmon Virgin, former librarian 
General Theological Seminary Library, 
New York City, died Nov. 14, 1920. 

Nina T. Waddell, La Jolla, Calif., died June 
22, 1921. 
The above list was prepared by Mrs. Henry 

J. Carr. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY IN PARIS 



15 



AMERICAN LIBRARY IN PARIS 

The plans of my predecessor, Dr. Carlton, 
for the organization of the Library are de- 
scribed by him in an article in the Library 
Journal, October IS, 1921, entitled "The 
American Library in Paris, Inc." The his- 
tory of the Library during the year 1921 is 
contained in the Year-book of the Library 
just published. 

The immediate problems of the Libraryare: 
(1) The establishment of closer relations 
with other organizations interested in inter- 
national service, particularly the Carnegie en- 
dowment for international peace, and the 
Comite France-Amerique, both of which are 
especially concerned with a closer rapproche- 
ment between France and the United States, 
and also the establishment of closer relations 
with the University of Paris, the American 
University Union, and other institutions and 
societies interested in American thought and 
in American achievement. The most impor- 
tant action taken by any organization having 
international affiliations was the passage of a 
resolution by the Paris Post of the American 
Legion, recommending recognition of the Li- 
brary by the general organization. 

(2) The organization of national commit- 
tees to advise and assist in the development 
of the Library. With this in view, the Trus- 
tees at their meeting, December 13 last, 
passed an amendment to the constitution pro- 
viding for the appointment of an advisory 
committee, to be chosen from among the most 
distinguished French men of letters, states- 
men and publicists, an American committee, 
empowered to solicit endowments, donations 
and additions to the list of patrons and life 
members, and a British committee with sim- 
ilar powers. 

(3) The establishment of closer relations 
with other libraries in Paris. The aim of the 
Library is to supplement rather than duplicate 
other libraries in the community, and to trans- 
fer to them any material which may be of 
greater use as parts of their collections. 

(4) Establishment of such departments of 
service in the Library and of such branches 
of the Library in other parts of the city as 
will enable it to secure the largest circulation 



of its book collections and at the same time 
carry on its research work effectively and 
economically. 

Additional Resources and Publicity 

The most important addition to the finan- 
cial resources of the Library during the 
year was the gift of $25,000 from the Ameri- 
can Library Association to be added to the 
endowment fund. The largest and most im- 
portant contributions to the book collections 
were received from the Confederated South- 
ern Memorial Association, from the Univer- 
sity of California, and from the Aero Club 
of America Foreign Service committee. The 
first consisted of Southern history and litera- 
ture, the second included a complete set of 
the University's semi-centennial publications, 
and the third a carefully chosen library on 
aeronautics. 

Beginning January 23, the director has un- 
dertaken the editorial management of a week- 
ly book column in the Chicago Tribune, Eu- 
ropean edition, and beginning April 3, weekly 
contributions to the New York Herald, Eu- 
ropean edition, relating to the literature of 
subjects of current interest. Periodical notes 
on the contents of the current English reviews 
have been sent to the Daily Mail, Continental 
edition. 

Because of the inadequacy of the collec- 
tions, the limited staff, and the crowded con- 
ditions of the Library rooms, there has been 
no special publicity either among British or 
French readers. 

Use of the Library 

There are now 3075 registered card holders. 
Of these, 44 per cent are American, 25 per 
cent British, and 22 per cent French. In the 
use of the reference room also Americans lead, 
the French here coming second, and the Eng- 
lish third. The exact figures are Americans 
36 per cent, French 33 per cent, British 18 per 
cent The most interesting thing about these 
figures is that Americans do not form a ma- 
jority, and that compared with last year's 
figures they show an increase in the number 
of French card holders greater than that of 
either Americans or British. 



16 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



With the small staff it has been possible 
to do little research work, except as generous 
individuals have been found to do it for us. 
Still some service of importance has been 
rendered both to libraries, to government 
bureaus, to institutions and to societies, as 
well as to individual inquirers. 

International Service 

Important as this local service is, and im- 
portant as the service may become, particu- 
larly to the people of France, a much more 
important service may be rendered by assist- 
ing in building up American collections in 
French and other libraries in Europe, and by 
building up French collections in American 
libraries. With this in view, some studies 
have been made of the subject of internation- 
al exchange of scientific publications and of 
library duplicates of value in University and 
other reference libraries, and the assistance 
of the officers of the Cercle de la Librairie 
and the Maison du Livre, has been sought 
in working out a plan for the selection of 
current French publications most suitable for 
purchase by American public libraries. 

Books have been loaned to other libraries 
in different parts of Europe. The most note- 
worthy among these was a collection of con- 
temporary American poetry which made pos- 
sible a course in contemporary American 
poetry in the University of Strasbourg. 

Information has also been given to inquirers 
both European and American in regard to the 



publishers of individual books and the litera- 
ture of specific subjects. 

It is, however, out of the question for the 
library to supply either the books or the in- 
formation which it should until both its book 
collections and its staff are much enlarged. 

Members of the American Library Asso- 
ciation can probably do more than any one 
else to supply the need for books and maga- 
zines, particularly sets in bound form. 

A Library School 

More important even than its direct service 
to readers, either in France or other countries 
is its potential service to other libraries. The 
director has been elected a member of the As- 
sociation des Bibliothecaires frangais, and ex- 
pects to publish in its Bulletin an annual list 
of American library literature. He expects 
also to have exhibits of this literature, and 
of photographs and other material illustrative 
of American library methods. 

The Comite Frangais de la Bibliotheque 
Moderne, organized largely through the efforts 
of Miss Carson and members of the Ameri- 
can Committee for Devastated France, plan 
the establishment of training courses for 
those looking forward to work in the newer 
type of public library in which the members 
of the Comite are interested. It is their hope 
that with the assistance of the leaders in this 
progressive movement these courses may be 
given in the American Library. 

W. DAWSON JOHNSTON, Director, 
American Library in Paris, Inc. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS, 1921-22 



BOOKBINDING 

The activities of the A. L. A. Committee 
on Bookbinding for the year 1921-22 have 
consisted in part in the continuation of work 
included in the programs of previous years, 
with some new undertakings which have been 
developed in response to recognized needs in 
the course of our regular work. 

The bookbinding exhibits have been used 
with apparently no lessening of interest, in 
ten library schools, summer schools and li- 
brary institutes, in two state meetings, five 
public and three high school libraries, at the 
N. E. A. in Des Moines, and at the Iowa 
State Fair in connection with the exhibit of 
the Iowa Library Commission, twenty-two 
places in all. 

In response to inquiries from several of 
the smaller publishers, the binding specifica- 
tions for strong edition work, intended for 
the larger books of the reference type, which 
were prepared some years ago by the Book- 
binding Committee, have been revised, the re- 
vision being included in this report. The co- 
operation of ten or more practical library 
binders of high standing and of supervisors 
of binding in large libraries in the prepara- 
tion of details, has resulted in a set of work- 
able specifications which are being brought 
to the attention of publishers in general 
through the National Association of Book 
Publishers. The cordial co-operation of for- 
mer chairmen of the Bookbinding Committee 
in this work is gratefully acknowledged. 

As the result of an apparent need, a set of 
general instructions for library binders has 
been compiled, covering many details of prep- 
aration for binding which some binders over- 
look, but which are important from the li- 
brary standpoint. These were submitted to 
the same binders and supervisors as were the 
specifications for strong edition work, re- 
fered to above, and were approved in the main 
by all. 

The question of inferior paper and bind- 



ings in the books of recent years is calling 
protests from various quarters. Complaints 
have been sent to several publishers concern- 
ing the conspicuous defects in certain books, 
the replies being varied in character and 
rather unsatisfactory. The Bookbinding Com- 
mittee in co-operation with the Bookbuying 
Committee is taking the matter up in a more 
comprehensive way, with a view to securing 
the sentiment of a large number of librarians 
with specific examples of books whose lack 
of durability has attracted attention. With 
these specific examples as the basis of our 
appeal, it is planned to approach the publishers 
through the Secretary of the National As- 
sociation of Book Publishers in the interest 
of improved durability in forthcoming books. 

It must be recognized that, although the 
library trade may be a comparatively small 
item in book sales, libraries do introduce to 
large numbers of people and thus popularize 
the best books published, thereby indirectly 
increasing the sales through the regular book 
agencies to an incalculable extent. And we 
are confident that the publishers, knowing 
something of the value of the library trade, 
will give due consideration to our appeal for 
more serviceable books. 

The rapid introduction of the oversewing 
machine into library binderies indicates its 
general acceptance as a necessary part of up- 
to-date binding equipment, notwithstanding its 
expense, which with the scoring machine (an 
indispensable adjunct which insures a flat 
opening for books made from the heavier 
papers) is a little more than $4,000. 

The prices of binding supplies and the 
binders' wage scales show a considerable re- 
duction as compared with those of sixteen 
months ago, which is reflected in occasional 
revisions downward in binders' price lists. 

MARY E. WHEELOCK, Chairman 
FLORENCE DOWDEN 
SARAH L. MUNSON 



17 



18 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Appendix 

Binding Specifications for Strong Edition 
Work for Books of the Reference Type 

Compiled by the A. L. A. Committee on 
Bookbinding, March, 1922 

Paper. The quality of paper for reference 
books or other large volumes is of first 
importance, satisfactory binding being 
largely dependent on suitable paper. A de- 
sirable paper for such books is a light 
weight stock of firm, yet flexible quality, 
not highly calendered, but which takes il- 
lustrations well if illustrations are to be 
used. Inner margins should be not less 
than three-fourths of an inch in depth, and 
outer margins not less than five-eighths of 
an inch. 

Sewing. Signatures should be composed 
of eight leaves, sixteen pages. The Smythe 
machine is commonly employed for sewing 
books of the type under consideration. At- 
tention is directed, however, to the feasi- 
bility of the use of the oversewing machine, 
rapidly coming into use among binders do- 
ing work for libraries, and which produces 
an ideal sewing for large books having 
constant use. W. Elmo Reavis, 210 East 
Washington St., Los Angeles, Cal., will be 
able to furnish names of owners of over- 
sewing machines in different cities. 

A first-class grade of cotton thread 
should be used. The Intrinsic, Lock's and 
Myer's are three good makes. For the 
average sized book a No. 16 for the upper 
thread and No. 20 for the lower are com- 
monly used. 

A good length for stitches when the 
Smythe machine is used is one inch to 
one-and-a-half inches with space of five- 
eighths of an inch between stitches. 

Lining, Rounding and Backing. A good 
lining is made from a rather light grade of 
canton flannel, cut to cover the back of 
the book to within one-fourth inch of top 
and bottom, and extending over on each 
side one-and-a-half inches. After rounding 
and backing, the backs of the books are 
given a thin coat of flexible glue, and the 



strips of canton flannel are pasted and ap- 
plied with the nap side to the backs while 
the glue is fresh. A soft, though strong 
grade of sateen or muslin may be used 
for lining instead of canton flannel. Super 
is entirely inadequate. 

Joints. The lining thus adheres firmly to 
the back of the book; the part extending 
one-and-a-half inches on each side is 
pasted to the continuous end paper of some 
subdued tint, a tan kraft or soft gray, 
which has been stripped along the fold with 
a strong, although never stiff nor heavy 
muslin, thus making a double cloth joint 
which is entirely concealed when the book 
is finished. The cover is fastened to the 
book by means of the end papers, which 
are securely pasted in place with special 
care as to joints. 

Boards. The best quality of cloth board 
should be used, suited in weight to the 
size and weight of the book. 

Cover Cloth. Serviceable shades of buck- 
ram are the Holliston No. 91 (dark blue), 
and No. 92 (dark green) ; and the Inter- 
laken No. 305 (maroon), No. 307 (dark 
blue), No. 309 (dark green), and No. 320 
(green). 

Pressing. Books should remain in press 
not less than twelve hours, twenty-four 
hours is better, or until thoroughly dry. 

Finishing. All finishing should be done in 
XXD gold leaf. 

To summarize : The requisites for edi- 
tion work of a well made book of what- 
ever size are a fair grade of paper, with 
type of size and spacing so arranged as 
to be easily readable, good machine sewing, 
careful rounding, backing and lining, joints 
adequate to the size and weight of the 
volume, suitable boards and cover material, 
proper pressing, and tasteful and durable 
lettering. 

BOOK BUYING 

At the threshold of this year's work, the 
Association was handed two challenges one 
by the new tariff makers, the other by the 
Publishers' Copyright League. Each proposed 



BOOK BUYING 



19 



to resurrect a corpse buried these thirty years. 
To both of these menacing proposals our 
committees have given emphatic denial. 

On July 21 the House passed, virtually 
without debate, the so-called Fordney Tariff 
Bill. In reference to books, this bill reversed 
the leading features of the McKinley Act of 
1890, though of the same political origin. 
Under that Act, books in foreign languages 
had been put upon the free list, as also those 
for the blind. It had continued the policy, in- 
augurated in 1870, of freeing twenty-year old 
books ; that, started in 1816, of exempting 
institutions ; and finally the one of 1790, which 
lifted the duty from an immigrant's books 
and necessary household effects. 

In the four tariff enactments since that 
date, equally divided between the two Parties, 
there was further advance in liberalism, cul- 
minating in the Underwood-Simmons Act of 
1913, which reduced the rate (on English 
books under twenty years of age, not ordered 
by institutions) to 15% from the 25% pre- 
vailing since 1864, and removed textbooks 
from the dutiable list. 

The new measure raised the rate to 20%, 
on American valuation the estimated equiv- 
alent of 25%, on the accustomed foreign val- 
uation that is, restored the Civil War rate ; 
and closed the free list to all save institu- 
tions and the blind, even limiting the former 
to two copies. 

As this reversed our own national policy, 
which in turn falls short of the free trade 
in books general abroad, the Committee on 
Book Buying joined that on Federal and 
State Relations in protest to the Senate Com- 
mittee on Finance. Their statement was wide- 
ly seconded, with the result that in the Hear- 
ing of December 21, the Association's rep- 
resentative spoke in the name of the Ameri- 
can Council on Education and bore the written 
endorsement of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors, American 
Chemical Society, American Economic As- 
sociation, American Historical Association, 
American Philological Association, American 
Physical Society, American Political Science 
Association, Association of American Col- 



leges, Association of Urban Universities, 
College Art Association, Conference of East- 
ern College Librarians, Conference of West- 
ern University and College Librarians, Geolog- 
ical Society of America, Modern Language 
Association, National Education Association, 
as well as scores of educational institutions. 

In co-ordination with this Washington 
address, nation wide publicity was maintained 
through newspapers and in correspondence 
with persons prominent in the field of edu- 
cation, science, art and scholarship. Partic- 
ularly effective was the alliance with the 
American Council on Education, which ar- 
ranged for the Hearing and then printed and 
broadcast our brief in Congress, and with 
the American Association of University Pro- 
fessors, through which Faculty petitions, 
especially in pivotal States, were arranged. 
All the while, steady contact with the Capitol 
was maintained by conferences and corre- 
spondence. In fact the rate compromise was 
effected after the Bill had gone to press. 

These efforts have been gratifyingly suc- 
cessful. In the Senate Committee's revision, 
presented April 11, the rate is kept at 15%, 
on foreign valuation (25% if of American 
authorship), the limit on number of copies 
allowed free importation is removed, while 
the following are restored to the free list : 

1. Foreign language books. 

2. Books printed and bound more than 
twenty years. 

3. The immigrant's books (and necessary 
household effects). 

Duty-free textbooks are missed, but on this 
point reconsideration is probable, and it is 
but fair to add that the concession of un- 
limited importation was intended to meet this 
need. 

In contrast with the publishers and book- 
sellers, whose proposals, except where identi- 
cal with ours, did not gain the Committee's 
favor, the manufacturers (printers, litho- 
graphers, binders) teft distinct impression. 
Hence the rate compromise, the requirement 
also that the old book must not be in a new 
binding to escape duty, and the provision of 
a 45% duty on books the chief value of which 
lies in the leather binding. The Committee 



20 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



did not feel justified in jeopardizing the re- 
lief to serious readers by offering spirited 
advocacy of luxury items. The recognition 
accorded and the respect it seems to hold at 
the end confirm the wisdom of this initial 
decision. 

This tariff measure proved to have a hidden 
connection with the copyright proposal which 
has required an equal share of our attention. 
The Unions offered to concur in a movement 
to repeal an obnoxious clause of their author- 
ship in the Copyright Act if they could secure 
a higher and longer tariff wall. Under this 
clause, contrary to usage elsewhere, a for- 
eigner writing in English cannot secure 
United States copyright unless his work is 
manufactured here. As universal validity of 
an author's property right is a matter of ele- 
mentary justice, the American Library As- 
sociation is naturally interested to see that 
he gets it in America. There is satisfaction, 
therefore, that its tariff rate proposed, ac- 
cepted at the last moment by the Senate 
Committee, apparently paves the way to such 
result, without sacrificing the public interest, 
for, in imposing a higher rate on incoming 
books of American authorship than on bona 
fide foreign books it meets the Unions' fear 
that American publishers may send domestic 
work abroad to be done. 

The repeal of the manufacturing clause in 
the' copyright law would remove the major 
difficulty from the path of American entry 
into the International Copyright Union. To 
this end a bill was drawn by the Authors 
League of America, but at the moment of 
consummation the Publishers' Copyright 
League, at its final session, October 4th, be- 
fore reorganization as the Copyright Bureau 
of the newly formed National Association of 
Book Publishers, passed resolutions which 
threw the entire situation into confusion, and 
forced the League's acceptance of a proviso 
fraught with the greatest peril to American 
libraries and the users of foreign books. 

To this situation the Council gave consid- 
eration December 30 in executive session, and, 
after hearing publisher and committee spokes- 
men, voted unanimous condemnation of the 



former's proposal, while commending Amer- 
ican membership in the Union. 

In the language of the October 4th resolu- 
tions, the proposal was 

"That during the existence of the 
American copyright in any book, work of 
art, or musical composition, the impor- 
tation into the United States shall be pro- 
hibited, unless such importation is made 
with the consent of the proprietor of the 
American copyright." 

Under criticism the proposal was softened 
in form though not altered in substance, so 
as to allow institutions and individuals to im- 
port, for use and not for sale, single copies of 

"any book as published in the country of 
origin with the authorization of the au- 
thor, or copyright proprietor . . . pro- 
vided the publisher of the American edi- 
tion of such book has (within ten days 
after written demand) declined or neg- 
lected to agree to supply such copy." 

Stripped of its sanctimonious garb, this 
proviso simply means to place in the hands 
of American publisher-jobbers the oppor- 
tunity of monopolizing the country's book 
importations and of selling all foreign books 
on their own terms. This follows irrespective 
of whether the United States enters the 
Union or stops at repeal of the manufactur- 
ing clause. Inside, (virtually) all European 
books would enjoy American copyright. Out- 
side, such right would be established by 
mere compliance with the formality of notice, 
deposit, and registration. Without cost or 
for a dollar and a copy, according as we 
were in or out of the Union, the price of 
an edition would in a twinkling shift from 
the foreign price to the American. The de- 
preciation of foreign money would make sole 
agencies mutually alluring. What the inter- 
national publisher would do is not a matter 
of conjecture. His catalogs are already in 
print. It is an odd fact that, while in London 
he lists American books at American prices 
or less, he finds it necessary here to charge 
thirty to forty cents or more a shilling for 
his English books. Under the existing law, 
we can escape by buying abroad, but with 
his deadly proviso enacted, we must come to 
him or do without. As for the author, for 



CATALOGING 



21 



whom copyright law was called into existence, 
he is lost in the shuffle. 

The bill was introduced April 28 by Rep. 
J. N. Tincher, of Kansas, but hearings are 
not expected till the tariff situation clears 
for the Unions. Every library organization 
in the United States will do well to im- 
prove the interval by earnest study of this 
subject, so as to be ready at call for in- 
telligent pressure on Congress. 

Upon these two topics of tariff and copy- 
right, the Committee has issued six bulletins 
in the library periodicals of September, De- 
cember, January and February, while the 
tariff argument before the Senate Committee 
appeared also in the Educational Record 
vol. 3, no. 1, as well as in the Revised Hear- 
ings on Schedule 15. 

Four other bulletins, similarly published, 
carried advice in other directions. That of 
August, entitled "Plain English and Amer- 
ican," reported the revised terms of certain 
New York houses and presented a typical 
cost sheet. In October a fair price list for 
"Foreign periodicals of 1922" was presented ; 
also, the case of the Catholic encyclopaedia- 
supplement's paper. In November detailed 
directions, "How to import," were given, 
including an exhibit of twenty-five recent 
English titles, with London and New York 
prices in parallel columns (as kindly fur- 
nished by a western librarian). Finally, in 
April the new German export scheme, effec- 
tive April first, and generally trebling do- 
mestic prices to the United States, was ex- 
pounded, with approval. 

The year has been one of teamwork. This 
Committee has been intimately associated 
with that on Federal and State Relations in 
the legislation above discussed and wishes 
to record its keen appreciation of the friend- 
ly co-operation established by Dr. Wyer and 
his associates. 

And we have had cause in common with 
the Committee on Bookbinding. Miss Whee- 
lock will present important data, which we 
trust may result in improved standards of 
workmanship and materials. 

Of the Committee's private labors in cor- 
respondence, no report need be given. It is 



sensible of the confidence reposed, and can 
only regret that this work is, after all, an 
aside, and, however devoted, remains in char- 
acter circumscribed. 

M. LLEWELLYN RANEY, Chairman. 

ASA DON DICKINSON, 

C. TEFFT HEWITT, 

KILLER C. WELLMAN. 

PURD B. WRIGHT. 



The Committee has not been able to have 
a meeting during the past year, but has done 
much work by correspondence. A Sub-Com- 
mittee on the Cataloging of Incunabula met 
at Chicago in December and formulated ten- 
tative rules for the cataloging of incunabula. 
These rules have been presented not only to 
the members of the Committee, but to various 
other persons interested. So much diversity 
of opinion has been encountered that it seems 
unwise to print the rules, even in their tenta- 
tive form, until further discussion and con- 
ference can be had at the Detroit meeting. 

The Committee, therefore, submits this as 
a report of progress. It is hoped to publish 
rules for the cataloging of incunabula in 
agreement with the Committee of the [Brit- 
ish] Library Association early in the autumn. 

For the Committee, 
WM. W. BISHOP, Chairman. 

CIVIL SERVICE RELATIONS 

The removal to Paris during the course of 
the year of W. Dawson Johnston, Chair- 
man and most active member, has resulted 
in comparatively little activity on the part 
of the Committee and few results. 

Before he left the country Dr. Johnston 
wrote an article on "Standardization of the 
Federal Library Service" which well sum- 
marizes the efforts to improve the federal li- 
brary service. (Library Journal 46: 897-900, 
1 November, 1921). The pending reclassifi- 
cation legislation is not yet law at this writ- 
ing (May 1) but the bill has passed the 
House overwhelmingly, has been reported to 
the Senate, and is included in the Republican 
program of major items of legislation, so 



22 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



that prospects seem fairly good for its enact- 
ment. 

Efforts to get the case for exempting or 
excepting libraries from the strict and formal 
operation of civil service laws or for a more 
sympathetic administration of civil service 
laws as applied to libraries before the Na- 
tional Assembly of Civil Service Commis- 
sions have not been successful. At the com- 
ing meeting of that body at San Francisco 
permission has been given to present a brief 
in print, but without opportunity for discus- 
sion. It is thought that presentation of the 
case in that form would not be very helpful. 

Contacts have been established with the 
Institute for Government Research, Washing- 
ton, D. C. There is a possibility that that or- 
ganization will shortly make a comprehensive 
and detailed study of civil service relations, 
federal, state and municipal. In case this is 
undertaken assurances have been given that 
library civil service relations will be studied 
and reported upon. This prospect seems one 
of the most hopeful that the Committee has 
to offer. 

G. F. BOWERMAN, Chairman. 

C. F. D. BELDEN, 

M. J. FERGUSON, 

J. T. JENNINGS, 

C. B. RODEN, 

P. L. WINDSOR. 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

This committee is waiting for definite ac- 
tion by the Association on the resolution 
adopted by the Council at the mid-winter 
meeting. 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

This committee's report was printed in the 
May Bulletin. 

DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION AD- 
VISORY COMMITTEE 
As Chairman of the Committee on Decimal 
Classification, I report that the Committee 
held a meeting at Swampscott, having the 
advantage of the presence of Mr. Dewey, 
and considered plans for the reorganization 
of the work made necessary by the death of 
Miss Seymour. It was decided to ask for a 



more representative membership, and this has 
been secured by the addition of C. W. Per- 
ley, of the Library of Congress, and Mary 
Baker, of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 
It is hoped to secure in addition one other 
member to represent a large public library 
not using the system. 

Miss Fellows has been engaged as editor 
by Mr. Dewey to attend to Miss Seymour's 
work. 

Some matters which require the attention 
of the Committee will be taken up in the 
near future. 

Yours respectfully, 

C. W. ANDREWS, Chairman. 

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE 

This Committee has held one meeting dur- 
ing the year, at which time it voted numerous 
recommendations which were approved by the 
Executive Board. A list of those recommen- 
dations was printed in the January Bulletin, 
page 18. 

The members of the Editorial Committee 
have been kept in touch with the publication 
activities by correspondence and have con- 
sidered many questions which will result in 
recommendations later. 

The formal report on publications will be 
found in the Secretary's report and supple- 
ments thereto. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HILLER C. WELLMAN, Chairman. 

EDUCATION 

The Committee on Education had its in- 
ception in a desire to bring the two public 
educational systems, the schools (including 
state universities, colleges, normal schools, 
high schools, elementary schools, night 
schools and continuation schools) represented 
by the National Education Association and 
the libraries represented by the American Li- 
brary Association into satisfactory working 
relations in supplying suitable reading ma- 
terial to students and in teaching them how 
to use and to appreciate books and libraries. 

Primary emphasis can be laid upon co-op- 
eration between public schools of all kinds 
and public libraries of all kinds because both 
are supported by taxation. But account must 



EDUCATION 



23 



be taken of the fact that the N. E. A. and 
the A. L. A. have private educational insti- 
tutions in their membership which have an 
important bearing upon the problem. 

As the chief objective of the Committee's 
program, "Teaching the use and appreciation 
of books and libraries" will inevitably create 
heavy demands upon library resources and 
service and as library standards should be 
maintained, it is highly desirable that the li- 
brary and school educational leaders, both 
national and local, arrive at a common un- 
derstanding upon general policies. That the 
two national organizations are already mov- 
ing in the same direction is indicated in the 
statement addressed by Sherman Williams 
to the N. E. A. Library Advisory Board. 

"We need to keep clearly in mind that ours 
is not primarily a department of school li- 
brarians or public librarians, but an organiza- 
tion that is devoted to the task of making it 
possible for every one in our land to have 
easy access to a free library. 

"Whether this is done through school li- 
braries, public libraries, state libraries, county 
libraries, traveling libraries, or any combina- 
tion of such libraries is for each state, county 
or locality to determine for itself. 

"We should hold tenaciously to the general 
proposition that some provision should be 
made whereby every one may have easy ac- 
cess to books, leaving each state or locality 
to determine the methods best adapted to its 
conditions." 

Your Committee on Education has tried 
to give publicity to the program of the Li- 
brary Section of the N. E. A. (appended to 
the report) and to encourage the appoint- 
ment of a Committee on Education in each 
State Library Association. 

Questionnaires were sent to State Commit- 
tees on Education so that they could make a 
survey of the relations of public libraries, 
universities, colleges and normal schools ; 
state library commissions and state depart- 
ments of education to the school library prob- 
lem. No questionnaires were sent to local 
school boards because the N. E. A. Library 
Section has been working directly with 
school authorities with most excellent re- 
sults. Therefore it was thought best to at- 
tack the problem at other angles. 

These questionnaires differed according to 



institutions, but covered substantially the 
following points : 

(1) Is a supervisor of school libraries em- 
ployed with education, professional library 
training, status and salary equal to a teacher 
in a corresponding position? 

(2) Are adequate facilities provided for 
training school librarians? 

(3) Are students taught to use and appre- 
ciate books and libraries? 

(4) What is the attitude of your board or 
president on school library work? 

(5) What assistance can the state and A. 
L. A. Committees on Education give in this 
work? 

Reports on the questionnaires were re- 
ceived from twelve states and one Canadian 
province, scattered geographically and va- 
ried in conditions. 

The questionnaires for State Library Com- 
missions and State Departments of Educa- 
tion covered similar ground so that the re- 
plies have been combined. Six states em- 
ploy Supervisors of School Libraries either 
attached to the staff of the State Library 
Commission or the State Department of Ed- 
ucation Indiana, Minnesota, New Jersey, 
New York, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The 
Indiana position includes work in state in- 
stitutions. Massachusetts has asked the leg- 
islature to establish this position. British Co- 
lumbia may have such a worker within a 
year. These and several other states, notably 
California and Oregon, where the county 
library is such a factor, are carrying out a 
purposeful school library program. 

Vermont states : "It has been the policy of 
this Commission that in a state like Vermont 
with scattered population and scanty means 
it is a mistake to try to build up two sys- 
tems, one of school and one of public li- 
braries ; that the public library system in 
each town supplemented by such help as may 
be necessary can best serve both schools and 
public." 

The status of the Supervisor of School 
Libraries is on a par with other supervisory 
positions but the salary is usually lower. The 
duties of this position are: "Visiting high 
school libraries and stimulating organization; 



24 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



ultimately raising standards. Approving 
purchases of books made by schools, instruct- 
ing in library methods, aiding in re-organiza- 
tion, inspecting school libraries. 

"Duties divided into supervisory, advisory, 
bibliographical, training and conference. Su- 
pervise school libraries ; assign state aid, 
measure libraries by state standards, plan 
library rooms and administration, secure 
school librarians. Advise public libraries on 
work with schools, including contract and 
county plans. Compile state aid lists, courses 
on the use of the library for all schools, lo- 
cal report forms and biennial report. Teach 
in Library Institutes and County Teachers' 
Institutes and outline course for Rural 
Teacher Training Classes. Confer with Di- 
visions of State Department of Education : 
Rural, Graded elementary, High, Teacher- 
employment, Certification, Teacher-training, 
Buildings, Agriculture, Industrial, Home 
economics, Re-education ; and other state ed- 
ucational workers : Library and Education 
Associations, university, colleges, teachers' 
colleges, social workers." 

The question: "Where there is no super- 
visor how is the work cared for?" was an- 
swered as follows : 

"Work is not cared for." 

"Through town and city libraries." 

"By sending traveling libraries and ma- 
terial in answer to all requests." 

"Field librarian divides time between out- 
side and library, visits schools when possible, 
school organizer needed." 

"All we can do is to write letters of ad- 
vice and lend material." 

"By our regular staff, the secretary or- 
ganizes school libraries on request, traveling 
library department supplies special books to 
schools on request. This latter is a large 
part of our work." 

"State Reading Circle Board recommends 
lists of books for school libraries." 

"Approved list selected by Department of 
Public Instruction." 

"Our high school inspector gives some at- 
tention to high school libraries." 

"Left to local control." 



"Supervisor of rural and high schools, 
very poorly done." 

"We make certain requirements as to li- 
braries of all classified schools." 

The state boards seem to consider school 
libraries as vital according to the following 
replies : 

"Strengthening of school library service 
means ultimate benefit to public library." 

"They want a school librarian attached to 
this .staff." 

"Feel we are doing all we can financially 
by sending traveling libraries and the mate- 
rial." 

"Anxious to promote work but realizes 
impossibility of securing school librarian for 
a few years." 

"It is one of the highly desirable things 
which we hope will be reached some day." 

"Consider it of prime importance." 

"We are strongly for them." 

"State superintendent seems favorable." 

"That the great majority are very poorly 
cared for." 

"They should be brought to the highest 
degree of efficiency." 

"We need a state supervisor." 

"Our state superintendent may change and 
often does every two years." 

The questions, "W hat could State and A, 
L. A. Committees on Education do to help 
in this work?" brought these suggestions: 

"Send printed lists for school libraries." 

"Get appropriate legislation." 

"Help create the proper public sentiment." 

"Encourage summer courses. Secure in- 
terest of superintendent and principals." 

"Collect data from city superintendents re- 
garding the care of their libraries, publish 
it, and distribute it to school boards and 
city superintendents." 

"Acquaint state superintendent with work 
done in other states." 

"Emphasize the benefits derived from a 
good school library." 

"Endorse plan of state supervisor and 
work for it with the legislature." 

"A. L. A. Committee can do nothing ex- 
cept to spread propaganda for it." 



EDUCATION 



25 



"Educate teachers to use books and li- 
braries." 

"Send us any statistics about passage of 
similar bills in other states." 

"Continue to agitate." 

"Work up small exhibits for educational 
meetings, that will cost little for transporta- 
tion but will be effective." 

"Urge county libraries." 

"Emphasize the school library as service 
department of entire school system, also as 
training center in 'How to study.' Educate 
educators and general public." 

The replies from public libraries were 
chiefly from the medium sized and small li- 
braries. Virtually all report much time de- 
voted to students often at the sacrifice of 
other phases of library work. The general 
practice is for the children's and the ex- 
tension departments to work with the 
grades and the reference and circulation 
departments with the high schools. One 
librarian says, "It seems useless to try to 
answer most of the questions when there 
is so much needed before a school librarian 
could even be considered in most places in 
this state." An increasing number of li- 
braries, however, have school librarians 
either as assistants to the children's librarian 
or as heads of school divisions or school de- 
partments. As yet there are comparatively 
few definitely planned school library pro- 
grams adequately financed. 

The children's librarians having set very 
high standards of service, books, methods 
and equipment, it remains to bring every 
school into touch with these standards. 

In an encouraging number of cases the 
librarians are equal in education and train- 
ing with teachers in the community, but 
their salaries as a rule are lower. The zeal 
of these librarians is all out of proportion to 
their physical strength, their staff and gen- 
eral financial support. They appeal for bet- 
ter conditions, for a better understanding of 
their work and for school librarians especial- 
ly trained to care for the inevitably increas- 
ing demands. 

The question, "What is your local pro- 
gram?" brought the following responses: 



"None." 

"Watchful waiting." 

"Teaching the use of the library." 

"Supervision of home reading." 

"The school board has a contract with 
public library for service and pays half of 
expense." 

"A high school librarian on the staff to 
give all of her time to high school work 
subject to call for work in the central li- 
brary. The grade work done by the chil- 
dren's librarian." 

"School librarians employed by school 
board but appointed by library board." 

"Appointment of member of staff as school 
librarian." 

"Specialization of school work." 

"Have none. City superintendent wants 
high school library separate. Board opposed, 
feel that school should use public library, 
paying salary of assistant who would have 
position of high school teacher ; and buy all 
reference books used by schools." 

"A supervisor of work with children and 
schools, a thoroughly trained person to take 
charge of work in main library, all branches, 
all primary and grammar grades, etc." 

"More school branches." 

"As yet no financial help has been asked 
from schools." 

"Shall try to get more money and raise 
salaries." 

"Work for salaries." 

"School superintendent and library work- 
ing together." 

"Financing of school library by school 
system because it has the money." 

This detailed statement from a burdened 
librarian is illuminating: "We gave half a 
day each week to the grades and I personal- 
ly conducted two library classes at the high 
school each morning. I have long felt the 
need of a high school librarian. Only upon 
repeated requests from the school and 
school board did 1 give my consent to carry 
on this work this year. It means in ad- 
dition to my regular work a pretty heavy 
diet to continue. However, I was glad to 
do it this year. My compensation was $30 
per month estimated on one-fourth of the 



26 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



minimum high school wage. I am very 
much interested in the close co-operation of 
school and library and should like to see a 
school librarian secured for this town either 
giving half time to teaching and half to 
library work or as my assistant giving me 
half time and half to school work." 

The replies to the questions : 'What could 
thf State and A. L. A. Committees on Edu- 
cation do to promote this phase of your 
work?" were so similar that they have been 
combined : 

"Agitate." 

"Recruit for school librarians." 

"Standardize : training, qualifications, sal- 
aries." 

"Draw up standards for public library 
work with schools." 

"Raise salaries." 

"Publicity, particularly getting the stand- 
ards before school people, boards, superin- 
tendents, principals and teachers." 

"Library speakers at educational meetings." 

"Consider separate school department for 
public library." 

"Urge school board to contribute same 
amount as library board for school work." 

"Increased facilities for training." 

"Urge legislation for larger appropria- 
tions." 

"Work with State Education Commission 
to get school libraries into the scheme." 

"See that librarian has a hand in selecting 
books for pupils, reading circles and school 
libraries." 

"Publish lists and authoritative works on 
present day development." 

The question, "Would you favor increas- 
ing the state facilities for the training of 
school librarians?" brought favorable an- 
swers for the most part. 

"No; help our neighboring state do it." 

"Yes ; one state normal could do this." 

"I believe in increasing any facilities for 
training but I think care should be exercised 
in planning training of teacher-librarians so- 
called. The library part of the training is 
apt to be inadequate and superficial and to 
give false impressions." 

"Not informed." 



"Not prepared to assert." 

"Am not posted as to what is being done." 

"Indifferent." 

"Need to change present attitude of 'don't 
care.' University Library course never 
taken by more than four or six teachers." 

"I think I should prefer state legislation 
making mandatory larger appropriations for 
public libraries, leave training to libraries 
and library schools." 

"Working for a general library school at 
the university. Have library training for 
rural teachers at normal summer school." 

The question, "What is the attitude of 
the library board!"' revealed a disquieting 
lack of information and concern regarding 
school libraries especially when the large 
number of libraries making no reply is con- 
sidered : 

"Liberal as far as a small library can be." 

"Indifference, save as to cost, which it is 
insisted could be borne by the Board of 
Education." 

"Our board favors extending work with 
schools." 

"Both library and school board most gen- 
erous." 

"Favorable." 

"Meets the school board two-thirds of the 
way." 

"Library board is in favor of most earn- 
est co-operation with schools." 

"Library board interested in children's 
school work." 

"Board interested but lack of funds pro- 
hibits proper extension work." 

"Board is progressing in everything look- 
ing forward to greater efficiency." 

"Subject has never been presented to them." 

"Proposition has never been considered as 
yet." 

"It has never been discussed." 

"I do not know." 

"My trustees have asked school board for 
small sums to be used for extra help during 
school year." 

"Our staff is so inadequate and financial 
condition so "stringent that we have not con- 
sidered the question." 



EDUCATION 



27 



"Willing to back up librarian but she must 
take the initiative." 

''Library board not especially interested, 
possibly because members of board have 
never had their attention drawn to the need 
and value of this kind of work. An active 
campaign along extension lines would surely 
be helpful and stimulating." 

"Attitude favorable but lack necessary 
funds." 

"No telling." 

"Interested." 

"Open to suggestion." 

"Simply an attitude of helpfulness to- 
ward the local schools. No policy discussed 
or formulated on the general question. All 
actual practice left to librarian." 

"The library board acted favorably upon 
the librarian's recommendations which were 
based on the Certain Report." 

General statement from a member of a 
state committee : 

"I can see that many libraries consider 
their scope in this respect to be of little in- 
terest to the state, much less the American 
Library Association. 

"There is a lamentable lack of co-opera- 
tion with schools through inability to do so 
on account of meager funds. The desire is 
present but the wherewithal is lacking. 

"When the question of salaries is men- 
tioned, a note of bitterness is betrayed and 
it develops that this great state is a fertile 
field for the committee to organize a vigorous 
campaign, first to increase the finances of 
the state, and better the material condition of 
librarians which will mean extension and 
better service for the school children. It 
would seem that all librarians, their friends 
and supporters are ready to put their shoul- 
ders to the wheel and push the venture to a 
realization. 

"It will not be a difficult task if prop- 
erly organized, to rally to our support the 
many influential civic organizations through- 
out the state plus the thousands of soldiers 
who returned from the war who were shown 
what a value and comfort books were to 
them. 

"I trust your committee will derive from 



this compilation sufficient inspiration to 
launch the campaign for better libraries, in- 
creased salaries and closer co-operation with 
schools in every city and hamlet in the 
state." 

The returns from universities, colleges 
and normal schools are combined as follows : 
The normal school replies have been given 
to Willis H. Kerr, who is working on a 
"measuring stick for normal school libraries." 

Typical answers to the question : "Have 
members of your staff faculty. rank and sal- 
aries?" were: 

"No. Librarian has department head 
rank, staff classed as assistants in administra- 
tion." 

"Yes; one librarian only." 

"Only the librarian." 

"Yes; the librarian professor; assistant, 
assistant professor; others, instructors." 

"Yes." 

"Librarian and associate librarian only." 

The question : "Is there a member whose 
special work it is to teach all of the students 
the minimum essentials of the use of books 
and libraries in a regular credit course f" 
called forth the following: 

"We are praying for staff to enable us to 
do it." 

"Instruction without credit." 

"Elective course offered with credit." 

"Expect to give five lectures to seniors 
expecting to teach this year or next." 

"Not yet ; we have asked for one." 

"Yes." 

"No." 

"Course well established. Work is given 
by librarian, reference librarian and con- 
tinuations librarian. One credit. Required of 
freshmen of all schools except pharmacy and 
mines ; is elective in those schools." 

"Have been asking for two years for ap- 
pointment to our staff of some one to be 
assigned for work of instruction. This 
would include work with freshmen ; regular 
courses in the administration of high school 
libraries, special lectures to prospective 
teachers. This same person would at the 
outset also have supervision of university 
high school library. Have a person in mind 



28 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



but no appointment because of lack of funds." 

"Required course in library methods given 
to freshmen each semester by librarian and 
three trained assistants for regular college 
credit." 

"We do not give such instruction." 

Questions relating to the employment of 
librarians for colleges of education, and 
model schools and the training of teacher- 
librarians showed the following conditions : 

"Yes ; courses throughout year in regular 
university library school and in the summer. 
All normal schools giving courses." 

"We are hoping for a librarian." 

"We are hoping for staff to enable us to 
do it." 

"Have discussed with the dean the desir- 
ability of special instruction but so far have 
not succeeded. When funds are sufficient." 

The attitude of presidents is reported as : 
"Favorable," "Not antagonistic," "Unfavor- 
able." 

"How could State Library Association 
assist?" 

"By asking for such courses." 

"By urging universities to undertake such 
work." 

"Send recommendations to deans and pres- 
idents." 

"Start library training propaganda outside 
university for students to take course." 

The committee at its midwinter meeting 
decided to ask the North Central Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools to require 
trained school library service in their 
"Standards for Accrediting Secondary 
Schools." It also voted to ask the universities 
to put library subjects on their list of topics 
for these. 

It desires to thank the state presidents and 
chairmen and all who contributed to this sur- 
vey, and bespeaks their continued interest in 
school library work. 

In view of the conditions brought out in 
this report and because a sound school li- 
brary program is fundamental to the maxi- 
mum use of all kinds of libraries both now 
and in the future, your Committee submits 
the following School Library Objectives for 
consideration and adoption by the A. L. A. 



Council, the Association itself and the vari- 
ous sections concerned with young people. 
A. L. A. School Library Objectives 

I A conference of the A. L. A. and N. E. 

A. Executive Boards. 

II A Committee on Education in each State 

Library Association. 

A. To promote the state and local school 
library programs, through the co-opera- 
tion of library and educational associa- 
tions. 

B. To co-operate with the A. L. A. and 
the N. E. A. 

III School library adviser or supervisor. 

A. An adviser on school library work at 
A. L. A. Headquarters. 

1. Qualifications: 

a. Education : College degree. 

b. Professional training: At least a 
year at a recognized library 
school. 

c. Experience: Seven years in li- 
brary work partly general and 
partly as supervisor of school li- 
braries. "Successful teaching ex- 
perience is a valuable asset." 

2. Status and salary: At least as high 
as the supervisor or adviser of school 
library work in any state or city. 

B. A supervisor or adviser on school li- 
brary work in every state. 

1. Qualifications: 

a. Education : College degree. 

b. Professional training: At least a 
year in a recognized library 
school. 

c. Experience : Five years of library 
experience. "Successful teaching 
experience is a valuable asset." 

2. Status and salary: Equal to that of 

state educational supervisors of 
equal preparation and responsibility. 

C. A school librarian or supervisor to di- 
rect school library work for every 
school system : city, county, township or 
district. A school or school library sys- 
tem having an enrollment of at least 
1200 pupils of elementary and secondary 
grade should have a full time school- 
librarian. 



29 



1. Qualifications: 

a. Education: College degree or at 
least two years in college or nor- 
mal school, at least the equiva- 
lent of the requirement for teach- 
ers in the highest school main- 
tained by the community. 

b. Professional training: Standard 
is a year at library school. A six 
weeks' course is the minimum at 
present. 

c. Experience : Determined by stand- 
ards for teachers. 

2. Status and salary: Determined by 

local standards for teachers or su- 
pervisors of equal education and re- 
sponsibility in the community. 

Note : The question as to whether 
the school supervisor or librarian 
shall be employed by school or li- 
brary authorities separately or jointly 
is a matter to be determined by 
state or local conditions. 

The need of establishing the serv- 
ice is greater than the possibility of 
securing, in every case, a person with 
all of these qualifications. 

IV Training of school librarians. 
Adequate state or regional facilities in 
universities, colleges and teacher-training 
institutions, public and private, for the 
training of "school librarians," "teacher- 
librarians" or "community-school librari- 
ans" and for the establishment of their 
status by law (certification) just as for 
teachers. 

V Equipment. 

Equipment for school library work or for 
the public library doing school library 
work equal to that of other school labo- 
ratories. 

VI Appropriations. 

Appropriations in state and local budgets 
for funds commensurate with the funds 
for other educational work, if possible 
through state grants, based on state and 
local surveys. 

Finally 

VII Teaching the use of the library. 

Regular instruction for students from 



the elementary school through the uni- 
versity, in the use and appreciation of 
books and libraries. 

Committee on Education, 

HARRIET A. WOOD, Chairman. 

HARRIET K. AVERY, 

DUNCAN BURNETT, 

C. C. CERTAIN, 

ALICE I. HAZELTINE, 

ALFRED D. KEATOR, 

MARY LYTLE, 

MARTHA C. PRITCHARD, 

O. S. RICE, 

MARY E. ROBBINS, 

SHERMAN WILLIAMS, 

ADELINE B. ZACHERT. 

Appendix 
A Library Program 

1. The library is an educational institution 
made up of various agencies, the two most 
important being the school library and the 
public library. 

2. The school library should be the heart 
and center of the school work. 

3. It should be so used as to train pupils 
to use a public library intelligently. 

4. Pupils Should be so instructed as to 
want to read books that are worth while. 

5. There should be a collection of books 
in each schoolroom suitable to the age and 
purposes of the pupils. 

6. Teaching children \o read is of little 
value unless they are taught what to read, 
and are provided with the right kind of 
books. 

7. The public library should serve as a 
continuation school for those who have fin- 
ished their school life. 

8. Public libraries should be supported by 
public tax as are the public schools. 

9. Librarians should be as specially trained 
for their work as are teachers for theirs. 

10. All people should have easy access to 
libraries. 

The above unit be submitted to the Library 
Department of the National Education Asso- 
ciation at its Boston meeting for action. 

SHERMAN WILLIAMS, President, 
Library Department of the N. E. A. 



30 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



FEDERAL AND STATE RELATIONS 

In the report of the 1920-1921 Committee 
on Federal and State Relations, submitted at 
the Swampscott conference, it was noted that 
any official statements suggesting the con- 
stitutional functions of the Committee make 
no provision for outright decision and action, 
although in practice the Committee has ad- 
vocated or opposed legislation and taken a 
decided stand upon matters of federal ruling 
or practice. The question was therefore 
asked, "How far is a single committee au- 
thorized to put the Association on record or 
commit it to a policy or line of action" 
and it was urged that consideration be given 
to this point and some official statement be 
made in regard to it. When the Committee 
was reappointed to serve for 1921-1922 the 
Chairman again put this question and at the 
Chicago meeting, on December 31, the Execu- 
tive Board took the following action : 

Voted, That the Secretary be in- 
structed to inform the chairmen of com- 
mittees who are in doubt as to what 
action they ought to take when con- 
fronted by a change of situation that 
they should refer matters in question back 
to the President to be laid before the 
Executive Board for advice before tak- 
ing action. 

This vote of the Executive Board has giv- 
en a much desired definiteness to the powers 
and work of the Committee. 

The Committee has been very actively at 
work during the past year on various mat- 
ters relating to library interests in connection 
with the federal gbvernmenit. The most 
important of these are the following: 

Fordney tariff on books. Shortly after 
the Swampscott conference, the A. L. A. 
Committee on Book Buying, M. L. Raney, 
chairman, took a vigorous stand against the 
provisions of the Fordney tariff legislation 
in regard to the importation of books, and 
the Committee on Federal and State Rela- 
tions has actively co-operated with Dr. 
Raney's Committee, H. H. B. Meyer, having 
been assigned by the Chairman as its Wash- 
ington representative. 

The Fordney bill, briefly, provides that 
any library can import, free of duty, not 



over two copies of any book, as against two 
in any one invoice as at present allowed, and 
omits the present provision for the general 
free importation of books in foreign lan- 
guages, which would make it necessary for 
libraries to furnish affidavits for these books 
such as are required now for the free entry 
of books in the English language. It also 
raises the duty, for individual purchasers, 
from 15% to 20%. These restrictions con- 
stitute a tax on knowledge and are entirely 
unnecessary from a protectionist standpoint. 
Early in the year, therefore, the Executive 
Board of the Association approved a "State- 
ment as to Tariff on Books in the Fordney 
Bill," with suggested amendments to the bill, 
prepared by the chairmen of the two com- 
mittees. This was forwarded to Senator 
Boies Penrose, Chairman of the Senate Com- 
mittee on Finance, by the central office of 
the Association, and later was given wide 
publicity throughout congressional, educa- 
tional and library circles. It was published in 
the Library Journal of September 15, with 
a request that librarians all over the country 
write to their representatives and senators 
urging them to support the amendments to 
the bill, and later appeared in other library 
periodicals. One immediate result was the 
adopting by various influential library boards 
of strong resolutions against the proposed 
changes in the tariff on books. Similar reso- 
lutions were adopted by the conference of 
Eastern College Librarians held at Columbia 
University at Thanksgiving time, and, at the 
instance of our Committee, by such educa- 
tional bodies as the Regents of the University 
of the State of New York. Copies of the 
resolutions were in all cases placed before 
the Committee on Finance of the Senate, and 
were printed in library publications and in 
the daily press. Extended articles were pub- 
lished in leading journals, as the Educational 
Review, all with the suggestion that personal 
and institutional protests be sent to members 
of Congress. At the hearing on the tariff 
on December 21, Dr. Raney appeared as 
chief spokesman for the A. L. A., with Mr. 
Meyer in attendance also. Copies of the ar- 
gument presented at this hearing were pub- 



FEDERAL AND STATE RELATIONS 



31 



lished in the hearings themselves, in the Edu- 
cational Record, in the Library Journal, and, 
abridged, in Public Libraries. Reprints were 
sent broadcast wherever they could be of use. 

The gratifying result of all this endeavor 
was announced just as our report was ready 
to be submitted to the Association. On April 
10 Dr. Raney advised the members of his 
committee and the Committee on Federal 
and State Relations that the Senate Commit- 
tee on Finance has made radical revision in 
the tariff bill, to the effect that the duty has 
been restored to 15%, the limit in the num- 
ber of copies a library may import free en- 
tirely removed, and books in foreign lan- 
guages to continue to come in free. 

Copyright legislation. Our committee has 
also co-operated with the Committee on Book 
Buying in regard to impending copyright leg- 
islation detrimental to the interest of libraries, 
in that American publishers are seeking to 
amend the existing copyright law by cancell- 
ing the privilege, enjoyed by institutions and 
individuals, of importing the original editions 
of English books if for them copyright has 
also been secured. Through Dr. Raney's 
efforts the A. L. A. Council at the Chicago 
meeting gave unanimous rising vote in favor 
of a copyright resolution, in brief reaffirm- 
ing the Associati6n's disapproval of any meas- 
ure that would curtail or cancel the existing 
privileges of importation. The copyright bill 
was introduced into Congress on April 28. 
No hearings have been set, but both Dr. 
Raney's Committee and the Committee on 
Federal and State Relations are prepared to 
make strong opposing representation. 

War Department library budget. When 
it was learned that the current War De- 
partment estimates included not one dollar 
for welfare work or education, the Federal 
and State Relations Committee got into im- 
mediate touch with L. L. Dickerson, De- 
velopment Specialist for Army Libraries, and 
proceeded to take active measures looking 
toward restoration of such an item. The 
first step was a letter to the Secretary of 
War, advocating strong effort, through a 
supplemental budget, to have reasonably ade- 
quate provision arranged for Army library 



service. Subsequent information from both 
Mr. Dickerson and the Secretary of War ad- 
vised us that such a supplemental budget, 
carrying $60,000 for library books and per- 
sonnel, was sent to Congress, with the Sec- 
retary's endorsement. Mr. Dickerson ex- 
pressed his satisfaction with the amount pro- 
vided, which with $20,000 in the Military 
Post Exchange item for periodicals, made the 
library budget actually $80,000. The action 
next in order was preparation for the hear- 
ings on the budget before Congress, and an 
effort was made actively to interest every 
congressman on the Military Affairs Appro- 
priations Committee, both House and Senate, 
as well as other influential congressmen. 
Members of our Committee were advised by 
the chairman to see that letters were sent 
from as many libraries and individuals in 
their districts as possible, and the chairman 
himself addressed some fifty libraries in New 
York State and certain influential librarians 
not to be reached by other members of the 
Committee, urging them to write to their 
congressmen and the senators from New 
York State in behalf of the continuance of 
library work by the War Department. Re- 
sponse both from members of the Committee 
and the libraries addressed was very encour- 
aging and indicated a keen interest in and ap- 
preciation of this peace time service for our 
soldiers. In the face of all this representa- 
tion, however, the House Sub-Committee 
struck out the $60,000 item and even re- 
duced the Military Post Exchange item from 
$20,000 to $15,000, which would simply buy 
books without providing for any kind of li- 
brary service and put an end altogether to 
proper library administration. But the Com- 
mittee and friends of library work are now 
hard at work with the Senate Committee on 
Military Affairs in the hope that its mem- 
bers will replace in the bill the $60,000 asked 
for by the Secretary of War, and stand firm 
in conference for this provision. 

United States Patent Office specifications. 
The chairman has in hand letters from six 
or seven libraries complaining about service 
from the United States Patent Office in fur- 
nishing specifications and drawings on an- 



32 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



nual subscription at $50 each. A question- 
naire to members of the Committee brought 
out the fact that there are fewer than twenty 
libraries now subscribing at $50 per year, and 
that none of these is at all satisfied with 
present arrangements. This general dissatis- 
faction results from 

(1) discontinuance in 1912 of binding by 
the Patent Office and the consequent confu- 
sion introduced by shipment in pamphlet 
form ; 

(2) the fact that separate numbers are sent 
in packages at irregular intervals, the time 
of arrival bearing no discernible relation to 
the weekly date of issue and no invoice being 
sent with each package ; 

(3) the number of missing parts and the 
fact that even after advice of these missing 
parts has been sent to the Patent Office they 
are supplied slowly and often not at all, one 
library reporting that after careful checking 
5201 items were found missing in three and a 
half years and that of this total a very small 
portion has been supplied in answer to claims ; 

(4) discontinuance of the useful monthly 
index. 

The trouble seems to be with poor and in- 
sufficient help at the Patent Office. Mr. 
Meyer, our Washington member, feels that 
there is little to be gained by adding to the 
burdens of this office and that the most effect 
can be had through representing conditions to 
those committees of Congress which are con- 
cerned with appropriations for the Patent 
Office. Results from such procedure seem 
rather hopeless and your Committee leaves 
the matter with this statement of fact. 

In addition to the foregoing, several im- 
portant matters that formed part of the Com- 
mittee's work and report for 1920-1921 were 
carried over into the present year. These in- 
clude the following : 

The Sterling-Towner education bill. Af- 
ter submission of the 1920-1921 report, but 
before the Swampscott conference, the chair- 
man sent out a circular letter to the mem- 
bers urging them to strike hard and imme- 
diately for the furtherance of the Sterling- 
Towner bill, and especially for adequate li- 
brary representation therein. Each member 



of the Committee was made responsible for 
a certain section of the country and it was 
suggested that a strong letter or telegram go 
from every important library in the district 
to Senator Sterling or Judge Towner. This 
letter of the chairman was further enforced 
by a circular letter from Joy E. Morgan 
of the National Education Association, sug- 
gesting that letters be sent to members of 
the committees on education other than Judge 
Towner and Senator Sterling. Returns from 
seven members of the Committee indicate 
that over five hundred letters were sent to 
Washington. To these in most instances very 
encouraging replies were received from the 
congressmen addressed. At the National Ed- 
ucation Association conference in Washington 
in support of the bill, the Committee was 
represented by Claribel R. Barnett, and at 
the meeting of the legislative commission of 
the N. E. A. in Washington, on January 7, 
by Joy E. Morgan. 

Bureau of education statistical report on 
libraries. The chairman and members of 
the Committee have again addressed the 
United States Commissioner of Education in 
behalf of an early edition of the bulletin on 
library statistics but the chairman, at least, 
has had no reply to his communication. The 
Library Journal for February 15, however, 
carries the following notice: 

"The Library of the United States Bureau 
of Education has made preliminary plans for 
a new edition of Bulletin 1915, No. 25, Statis- 
tics of Public, Society and School Libraries, 
with the advice and co-operation of the Com- 
mittee on Federal and State Relations of the 
American Library Association." 

Federal salary classifications. This mat- 
ter has been on the docket of the Committee 
and the chairman has brought copies of the 
1921 reclassification bill and the report there- 
on informally to the attention of those who 
might be interested and influential in this 
connection. Dr. Bowerman continues in 
close touch with the Committee, which stands 
ready to meet his wishes in any respect. 

Cheaper library book post. The Com- 
mittee has been steadily co-operating with 
A. L, Spencer of Greenwood, New York, 



FOREIGN PERIODICALS OF THE WAR PERIOD 



33 



in an effort to bring about a reduction 
in the fourth class (parcel post) book rate 
on rural delivery routes for books sent to or 
from free public libraries. At the Chicago 
meeting the A. L. A. Council adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution in this connection: 

Resolved, That the American Li- 
brary Association again urge upon the 
Postmaster General the imperative need 
of such modification of the initial pound 
parcel post rate on books passing be- 
tween any properly defined public li- 
brary and its rural population adjacent, 
as is clearly possible within the limit of 
a desired self-paying character of the 
postal service. 

In furtherance of this resolution, the Sec- 
retary of the A. L. A. addressed the Post- 
master-General and was advised that the mat- 
ter is still under consideration. The chair- 
man and members of the Committee stand 
ready to take every opportunity to write a 
strong letter or put in a good word for a 
cheaper parcel post book rate. 

The activities thus set forth somewhat in 
detail have involved a large amount of cor- 
respondence, some conference, much thought 
and planning. They have kept the Commit- 
tee very fully occupied during the past year. 
Partly because of this, it has not been pos- 
sible to develop to any considerable, extent 
the conception of the function of the Com- 
mittee suggested over a year ago by Secre- 
tary Milam and stated in our last report, 
that the Committee "accept as its field the 
whole province of government service to li- 
braries." Moreover, the time has not seemed 
ripe for furtherance of the work involved in 
such a conception of the Committee's pur- 
pose. But the Committee has not lost sight 
of this ideal and stands ready to do all in 
its power to advance an enlarged program 
for library development in this country. 

The foregoing is respectfully submitted. 

J. I. WYER, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH H. WEST, JOHNSON BRIGHAM, 
EDITH GUERRIER, H. H. B. MEYER, 

CLARIBEL R. BARNETT, MARTHA WILSON, 
M. S. DUDGEON, C. S. THOMPSON. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

See Financial reports page 76. 



FOREIGN PERIODICALS OF THE 
WAR PERIOD 

The Committee on Completing the Files of 
German Periodicals offers the following re- 
port of its activities for the period of 1921- 
1922: 

In accordance with the recommendations 
submitted at the Swampscott Conference 
and through the courtesy of the Institute 
of International Education and the interest of 
its Director, Stephen P. Duggan, the Com- 
mittee succeeded in compiling a joint list 
of desiderata in German periodicals for the 
war period, which list was sent to the Not- 
gemeinschaft der Deutschen Wissenschaft for 
such assistance as the members of the organi- 
zation can supply. Our recommendation sug- 
gested that the lists be in the hands of the 
Institute of International Education not later 
than July 15, 1921 ; from the lists submitted 
on that date the Committee compiled a joint 
list indicating titles and the number of each 
copy or issue called for. After work began 
on the compilation of the joint list, other 
lists were submitted. These lists as submitted 
by individual libraries, together with the joint 
list as submitted by the Columbia University 
Library, the New York Public Library, the 
New York State Library, the Princeton Uni- 
versity Library, the Yale University Library, 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture Library 
and the Eastman Kodak Company, of Roches- 
ter, New York, were forwarded to the Not- 
gemeinschaft. 

As a result of this list we were informed 
by the Notgemeinschaft in letters dated 
March 3 and April 10, of this year, that 
four large packages are ready for ship- 
ment through the Smithsonian Institution 
Bureau of International Exchanges. At the 
date of submission of this report nothing fur- 
ther has been heard on this point. 

We received also from the Notgemein- 
schaft on December 19, 1921, and on Feb- 
ruary 4, 1922, lists of their desiderata in 
the field of American periodicals for this pe- 
riod. These lists were sent to various li- 
braries that had submitted lists of their dupli- 
cates in German periodicals for the war pe- 
riod. With the lists went a letter asking 



34 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



each institution to make speedy examination 
of its files of American periodicals for this 
period, noting on the list such as could be 
forwarded to the Notgemeinschaft through 
the Bureau of International Exchanges of the 
Smithsonian Institution and when this was 
done forward the list to the library next in 
order. The libraries so chosen were ar- 
ranged primarily with reference to the num- 
ber of duplicates of German periodicals for 
the war period reported by them as available 
for exchange. These lists have not completed 
their rounds. At the date of this report we 
have received returns from eight libraries 
showing that they have shipped 2,811 items 
for this purpose. 

As a result of our recommendation that 
libraries submit lists of German periodicals 
held by them in duplicate many of the copies 
in our files have been completed by sale or 
exchange among co-operating libraries. 

We now feel that once the duplicates from 
the Notgemeinschaft have been received, the 
opportunities for securing by gift or exchange 
the periodicals needed for completing our 
files are practically exhausted. We therefore 
recommend that at a date to be determined 
later and to be fixed within a reasonable time 
after receipt of the shipment from the Not- 
gemeinschaft, the libraries wishing to co-op- 
erate send to Otto Harrassowitz, 14 Quer- 
strasse, Leipzig, Germany, their revised list 
of desiderata. The Committee has written to 
Harrassowitz explaining the situation to him 
and has learned that he will be willing to act 
as our agent in buying these periodicals in 
the open market. We are convinced that 
they can be secured in no other way and, as 
set forth in our previous reports, we are like- 
wise convinced that the best interests of all 
will be served by co-operation. Experience 
shows us that little more can be hoped for 
from American agents. Our recommendation 
is that notice of the date on which reports 
should be submitted to Harrassowitz be 
given through the Library Journal and Pub* 
lie Libraries. 

It is probable that cases may arise where 
Harrassowitz cannot secure a sufficient num- 
ber of periodkals to supply the needs of all 



co-operating libraries. Our recommendation 
in such an event is that, if possible, he ar- 
range for reprinting a quantity large enough 
to supply all, pro-rating the cost among the 
institutions that need this particular title. Of 
course we must ask the agent in case of 
doubt to report to us for approval, and we 
must assure ourselves that the cost in such 
cases is to be reasonable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. M. LYDENBERG, Chairman. 

J. T. GEROULD, 

WILLARD AUSTEN. 

INSTITUTIONAL LIBRARIES 
The Committee on Institutional Libraries 
has been particularly interested this season 
in two movements: (1) The preparation of 
the new edition of A thousand books for 
the hospital library and (2) The appeal of 
the American Prison Association to the 
American Library Association in behalf of 
libraries in prisons. 

(1) It was early decided to rewrite entirely 
the original list and to add to it lists of books 
for children, for nurses' training-schools, and 
lists of periodicals ; a bibliography of litera- 
ture on hospital libraries; chapters on or- 
ganization, administration and book selection, 
and to change the title to The hospital li- 
brary. Because the members of the Com- 
mittee are so widely separated geographically 
it was extremely difficult to consult them upon 
the countless questions which were continually 
arising and therefore Miss Jones was made 
editor with full authority and responsibility. 

(2) At the meeting of the American Prison 
Association in Jacksonville, Florida, last fall, 
a resolution was adopted asking the A. L. A. 
to provide libraries in prisons throughout the 
United States. This resolution after being 
presented to the secretary of the A. L. A. was 
referred to the committee on institutional li- 
braries. From this a correspondence resulted 
which may develop into a discussion of the 
whole question of prison libraries at the next 
annual meeting of the American Prison Asso- 
ciation. The Committee hopes to have defi- 
nite information to present at the meeting of 
the A. L. A. in Detroit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MIRIAM E. CAREY, Chairman. 
CHARLOTTE TEMPLETON, LOUISE SINGLEY, 
EDITH KATHLEEN JONES, CAROLINE WEBSTER, 
HARRIET E. LEITCH, NELLIE WILLIAMS, 
JULIA A. ROBINSON, F. W. JENKINS. 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 



35 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

The Committee on International Relations 
has, during the past year, had to consider 
only two projects referred to it: one, the 
matter of the Book Fair at Florence, Italy, 
beginning in May, 1922; and the other, a sug- 
gestion as to representation of the A. L. A. 
in a Conference upon the International Cata- 
logue of Scientific Literature, to be held at 
Brussels later in the summer. 

There was also referred to it a prospectus 
of an international conference on education 
proposed for 1923, the project for which is 
still too inchoate to be dealt with practically. 

E. C. Richardson, a member of the Com- 
mittee, has been designated as represen- 
tative of the Association to attend the confer- 
ence at Brussels. 

An A. L. A. exhibit at Florence was, after 
inquiry and consideration, deemed quite im- 
practicable on account of the brief period 
available for preparation, the lack of material 
on hand, and the expense involved in the as- 
semblage, transmittal,- installation and admin- 
istration of an exhibit. The omission of an ex- 
hibit seemed to the Committee perhaps 
less to be regretted from the fact 
that while, according to the prospec- 
tus, the Book Fair would include exhibits by 
libraries and in exposition of their methods 
and appliances, it was to be primarily a 
Book Fair for the promotion of commercial 
interests. 

HERBERT PUTNAM, Chairman, 
For the Committee. 

May 11, 1922. 

INVESTIGATION OF MANNER IN 

WHICH MUNICIPALITIES ARE 

MEETING OBLIGATIONS 

TO DONORS 

Since the problem given this Committee 
to solve had been carefully outlined in its 
report of last year, the next step, that of 
beginning active work, seemed a simple one. 

Finding the Carnegie Corporation had no 
later statistics than were available last year, 
the following plan has been evolved: 

That there be submitted to the A. L. A. 
the recommendation that it approve and act 



on Sections 2 and 3 of last year's report 
through a form letter and a form newspaper 
story. 

(Suggestions referred to in sections 2 and 
3 of last year's report are as follows : 2, To 
appeal through state library commission di- 
rectly to delinquent libraries (a) to library 
boards, (b) to mayors ; 3,To send letters to 
state authorities, as commissions, governors). 
After this had been done and all possible 
effort been made to secure the present stand- 
ing of delinquent Carnegie Libraries and to 
bring them up to the required standards, 
that a list of all those still found delinquent 
be published as was suggested in Section 4 
of last year's report; but wholly upon the re- 
sponsibility of the A. L. A. or State De- 
partments and with no implication of the 
Carnegie Corporation in such publication. 

And to offset this list that an honor list 
of all libraries which had increased their 
appropriations more than 15% or 20% be 
also published. 

The latest statistics from the Carnegie 
Corporation have been secured and are being 
sent with this report. The Committee re- 
spectfully tenders this as their final report 
and asks to be released. 

ANNA A. MACDONALD, Chairman. 

JOSEPH L. WHEELER, 

LINDA A. EASTMAN, 

WM. J. HAMILTON. 

JOINT COMMITTEE OF SEVEN 

No matters for the consideration of the 
Joint Committee of Seven, representing the 
American Library Association and the Spe- 
cial Libraries Association, were referred to 
the Committee this past year, and for that 
reason the Committee has been inactive. 
Respectfully submitted, 
SAMUEL H. RANCK, Chairman. 

LEGISLATION 
Library Legislation in 1922 

Eleven states held legislative sessions this 
year. Library laws were passed in Kentucky, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New 
York and Virginia. No library legislation 
was enacted in Colorado (special session), 



36 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Rhode 
Island. 

This report includes also last year's spe- 
cial session in Missouri and the regular ses- 
sion of California, which ended too late for 
full inclusion in last year's report. 

Establishment and Tax 

New York state passed a number of minor 
amendments to the general education law 
relative to libraries. 

A New Jersey act permits a municipality 
to appropriate in the current budget for its 
library a sum equal to that paid into the 
general treasury by the library the proceeding 
year. Such sum shall be in addition to the 
regular appropriation. This refers to the 
fines and other money earned by the library, 
which had been taken away from libraries 
by the budget act. 

Missouri at the extra session last year 
amended the regular library law, providing 
that in case of an increase in valuation of 
the taxable property within an incorporated 
city the common council may reduce the levy 
provided by law for library maintenance to 
an amount which the council deems suffi- 
cient, but not over ten percent more than 
was levied the previous year. ''Similar amend- 
ments were adopted by the legislature with 
regard to practically all local expenditures on 
account of the great increase in property 
valuation in this state which has been taking 
place last year and this." 

In Virginia "a bill providing for the for- 
mation of local memorial libraries by means 
of funds raised by taxation, if the localities 
elected to tax themselves, and providing state 
aid, failed to pass." 

State Agencies 

California last year in the general amend- 
ment of the political code abolished the 
board of trustees of the state library and 
transferred their powers and duties to the 
state department of finance. "The statutes 
and laws under which they existed and all 
laws prescribing their duties, powers, pur- 
poses and responsibilities and jurisdiction to- 
gether with all lawful rules and regulations 



established thereunder are hereby expressly 
continued in force." "The division of li- 
braries" becomes one of the six divisions of 
the department of finance. While the logic 
of this arrangement is not clear to one at a 
distance, it is evidently much more tolerable 
to the state librarian than "the ghost of 
school control of the library," which he dis- 
cusses with decided force and fullness in the 
January 1921 number of News Notes of 
California Libraries. The change makes 
practically no difference in the operation of 
the state library. 

The Kentucky library commission law was 
amended by omitting four words limiting the 
secretary's salary, which is now properly at 
the discretion of the commission. 

Another state library commission has been 
absorbed by a state department of education. 
This time it happened in Maryland as a re- 
sult of the governor's "comprehensive plan 
of re-organization of the entire state govern- 
ment with a comparatively small number of 
departments. In that re-organization the 
library commission had to be placed some- 
where and obviously the department of edu- 
cation was the proper one in which to place 
it." The functions of the commission de- 
volve upon the state superintendent of 
schools. The governor is to appoint five per- 
sons, who with the state librarian and the 
librarian of the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
shall constitute the Maryland Public Library 
Advisory Commission, which shall advise and 
counsel with the superintendent with respect 
to his library duties. 

In Massachusetts a movement to abolish 
its work among aliens in libraries was fore- 
stalled by securing an amendment to the 
law defining the functions of the Board of 
Free Public Library Commissioners. 

County Libraries 

A 1921 California law amended the po- 
litical code relative to county officers by add- 
ing "a county librarian" to the list of sixteen 
enumerated county officers. The state li- 
brarian writes : "This is part of the move- 
ment to incorporate the county library as an 
integral part of the county government and 



LEGISLATION 



37 



to give to the county librarian a legal status 
equal to that of other county officers." One 
of the results is that "most of the county li- 
brary salaries were increased by amendment 
to the county government act rather than 
by amendment to the county library law." 
Hitherto these salaries were prescribed in 
the county library law ; now they come up 
for consideration in the general salary bill 
passed by the legislature for each county. 
The increases made last year affected the 
county librarians in 30 counties, increases 
ranging from $200 to $600 per person, so 
that present salaries range from $1000 to 
$3000, the largest number being between 
$1800 and $2400. 

A New Jersey amendment specifies the 
power of the county library commission to 
purchase supplies and equipment and limits 
such purchases to the amount appropriated. 
Another New Jersey law relating to county 
libraries is given under school district li- 
braries. 

The members of the Mississippi Library 
Association "have been trying for a number 
of years to get a liberal county library law 
passed but have failed thus far." They had 
their usual experience this year. Two years 
ago a law was passed permitting counties 
with an assessed valuation over eighteen mil- 
lion dollars to appropriate not over $3000 an- 
nually toward the support of one or more 
public libraries in the county. Only nine 
counties in the state could qualify under this 
law and of these only three are contributing 
to the support of libraries. In some of the 
other counties there are no public libraries, 
negroes outnumbering the whites by several 
hundred percent. The state library associa- 
tion will continue its efforts for library leg- 
islation. 

School District Libraries 

In California apportionment of the fund 
for school district libraries is to be "such 
sum as may be requested by the school trus- 
tees of such district," but not less than $25 
for each teacher ; if the trustees fail to file 
request the county superintendent shall 
make apportionment not exceeding $50 per 



teacher. Formerly this was on a percentage 
basis, five to ten percent of the school fund, 
but not to exceed $50 per district except in 
districts having five or more teachers, where 
it was to be not under $10 or over $15 per 
teacher. 

New Jersey amended her law authorizing 
state duplication of money raised by any 
school district for library purposes, $20 for 
establishment and $10 annually. The amend- 
ment provides for these amounts to be paid 
by the state through the county library com- 
mission of any county where a co-operative 
agreement has been made between the county 
library and the local school. 

Special Legislation 

Laws applying to special places are not 
generally included. Note is here made, how- 
ever, of a few in New York state on account 
of their possible suggestiveness to those in- 
terested. Of three laws passed for the bene- 
fit of law libraries in Catskill, Plattsburgh 
and Albany, the latter provides for consoli- 
dating the Albany county law library with 
the appellate division library, third depart- 
ment, and makes an appropriation for the li- 
brarian's salary at not exceeding $3500. 

An amendment to the Oneonta city charter 
changes the name of the Oneonta Public Li- 
brary to "The Huntington Memorial Li- 
brary" pursuant to the request of Mr. Henry 
E. Huntington, who has already made valu- 
able gifts to the city for library and park 
purposes and who proposes to endow the 
same in memory of his parents. 

An amendment to the greater New York 
charter permits the sale of corporate stock 
for the erection and equipment of the central 
library in the borough of Brooklyn. The 
next step will be for the board of estimate 
and apportionment to authorize the sale of 
the stock. 

A law which passed the legislature but 
was not approved by the mayor amended the 
greater New York charter giving public li- 
brary trustees power to select library sites 
subject to the approval of the board of esti- 
mate and apportionment, prepare plans, 
award contracts and supervise construction 



38 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



of new library buildings. In the acquisition 
of such sites the library board was to have 
all the powers of the board of education and 
contracts for the construction of new li- 
brary buildings were to be let in the same 
manner as contracts for new school build- 
ings. 

Appropriations 

Reports were not available from all of the 
states mentioned. Amounts given are for 
two years unless otherwise stated. 

Kentucky: State library commission $15,- 
000, state library $13,824, state historical so- 
ciety $10,000. 

Maryland: Public library commission 
$11,982, state library $11,600, legislative refer- 
ence bureau $3725 for 1923 and $7550 the 
next year. 

Massachusetts: Department of education, 
division of public libraries $24,100 for one 
year. 

Missouri : State library commission $1200 
in addition to previous $25,500 for two years, 
1921-22. 

New Jersey for one year : Public library 
commission $47,980; state library $19,900; 
record bureau, which takes place of histori- 
cal society, $10,500. The following amounts 
are appropriated to the departments named 
but spent under supervision of the public 
library commission : Agricultural extension 
department $3000, for books on agriculture 
for their farm demonstrators ; department 
of institutions and agencies $5000, for li- 
braries in institutions ; department of educa- 
tion $1000 for teachers' libraries. 

Virginia: State library $41,142.50 for year 
ending Feb., 1923, and $41,067.50 the next 
year; state law library $7250 each year; leg- 
islative reference' bureau $8851 and $9451; 
world war history commission $7500 each 
year; aid to local school libraries each year 
$3000. Work done by a library commission 
in other states "will be more thoroughly done 
hereafter because the general assembly made 
an appropriation sufficient to enable the state 
library board to secure the services of a li- 
brary organizer." 



Contemplated Legislation 

These contemplations vary in definiteness 
from vague hopes to formulated bills, some 
of which were drawn but not introduced, 
others were introduced but defeated, still 
others have been passed but are admittedly 
defective and should and will be improved. 

A report of the Michigan Library Associa- 
tion in October, 1921, says "So far as legisla- 
tion is concerned, the last session of the leg- 
islature made conditions for getting adequate 
library service to the largest half of the peo- 
ple of the state worse than they were be- 
fore." The Association has pledged its re- 
sources in a vigorous effort to "secure the 
library legislation which Michigan so sorely 
* needs." Among the items on the legislative 
program of the Association are (1) a general 
revision of the library legislation of the 
state, with a view to combine all general li- 
brary laws into one act under the education 
clause of the constitution; (2) a law making 
officials of libraries competent to certify to 
printed or manuscript material in their pos- 
session, so that such certified copies will be 
legal evidence in court; (3) provision for a 
retirement fund for librarians; (4) "adequate 
organization and means to carry out system- 
atic, centralized and state wide library 
work." 

The last legislature abolished the state li- 
brary commission and transferred its duties 
to the state library without adequate appro- 
priation. The association memorialized the 
governor and the administrative board of the 
state on this subject. It also passed a resolu- 
tion opposing the effort to repeal the law di- 
recting the use of penal fines for library pur- 
poses without concurrent adequate substitute 
for library support. 

Certification. In Minnesota, where the 
certification feature was partly responsible 
for the defeat last year of amendments to 
the county library law, the state education 
department, which has absorbed the state 
library commission, has as a part of its pro- 
gram "to bring library service to a higher 
degree of proficiency by setting up profes- 
sional standards for librarians to correspond 



LEGISLATION 



39 



with those set for teachers in the same com- 
munities and to provide for their attainment." 

At the October meeting of the Missouri 
Library Association a report on certification 
was presented which will probably be incor- 
porated in a bill to be introduced in the legis- 
lature next year. 

Township Libraries. "In Indiana town 
library boards and county library boards 
have the right to fix their own tax levy with- 
in a ten percent limit. About 150 of our 207 
tax supported libraries obtain in addition a 
tax from one or more townships, but our 
township support act does not give the library 
board the right to fix the township library 
levy, but this is fixed by the governing body 
of the civil township." At the next session 
of the legislature an effort will probably be 
made to give library boards in townships the 
same right in regard to the tax levy as they 
have in towns and cities. 

County Libraries. In Colorado, where 
the county library has been defeated in two 
different sessions, "The Colorado Library As- 
sociation is contemplating the wisdom of re- 
introducing next year the proposed county 
library bill." 

The Indiana county library law provides 
for a city library to extend its service to 
townships outside the city and for a tax to be 
levied on all such parts of the county. An 
amendment last year provided that "Said tax 
shall be continued so long as ten percent of 
the inhabitants of the districts [plural] so 
taxed outside the limits of said city or town 
are found to be users of said library." This 
year in one county enough card holders with- 
drew in one district to bring the number of 
users in that district below the ten percent 
requirement, and so the county commissioners 
dropped the tax. By changing the word 
'"districts" to "district," that is, by making it 
singular instead of plural, it will be impos- 
sible for a single district to cause a discon- 
tinuation of the tax in all of the townships 
so long as the combined use of several dis- 
tricts is up to the ten percent limit. 

In Minnesota the state commissioner of 
education says : "We hope for an amend- 
ment to our county library laws to facilitate 



the establishment of county libraries through- 
out the state." 

Missouri worked six years for a county li- 
brary law, which was passed on the last day 
of last year's session. "No such library has 
as yet been organized under this law ; in fact 
it seems nearly impossible at present on ac- 
count of the tax situation in general and 
because most counties have already reached 
the limit of taxation allowed under the con- 
stitution. In a month or two the constitu- 
tional convention will convene and it has been 
suggested that library interests try to secure 
an amendment which will allow a county li- 
brary tax to be levied in addition to the maxi- 
mum fixed for general purposes a provision 
which is already in force for school pur- 
poses." 

The state library commission of North 
Dakota is carrying on a campaign of public- 
ity in favor of a county library law which 
it is confident will be enacted at the next ses- 
sion of the legislature. 

In many cases in Pennsylvania where the 
county library proposition is considered, 
"there is a fear that the county seat or some 
other town will get the lion's share of the 
books and the work, and the rest of the 
county will be left out in the cold." For this 
reason the question has been raised "whether 
it would be advisable to provide that libraries 
already existing could come into the county 
system and retain control and title to what- 
ever property they may have gathered and 
that county library books should be distrib- 
uted in the different communities pro rata 
to the population." 

Washington will try again at the next ses- 
sion for a county library law, which failed 
last year. 

State Agencies. The Massachusetts board 
of free public library commissioners failed in 
an attempt to enlarge the scope of its work 
to include aid to libraries in state and county 
institutions. The bill "was referred to the 
next legislature because of the very strong 
feeling just at present throughout the state 
that the state is trying to assume too many 
responsibilities." 

"For several years the South Carolina Li- 



40 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



brary Association and the federation of wom- 
en's clubs have been conducting a campaign 
to secure a library commission. The bill has 
been killed twice owing to the appropriation 
asked. This year the financial situation was 
such that we determined not even to introduce 
a bill. Next year we hope to get favorable 
action." 

Tennessee "librarians have visions of a 
state library department on a par with the 
education department, but the time is not 
yet ripe for this." 

In Virginia, "Two years ago the general 
assembly made an appropriation for the erec- 
tion of a memorial library to commemorate 
the services of Virginia troops in the world 
war. The 1922 assembly finding that no prog- 
ress had been made on the work of erecting 
a building, not only refused a further appro- 
priation but also took away the amount ap- 
propriated two years ago. This leaves the 
library board and the war memorial com- 
mission, the two bodies designated by law to 
erect the building, without any funds, but 
with a site on which to erect the building. 
It is hoped that the legislature of 1924 will 
provide the funds." 

WILLIAM F. YUST, Chairman. 

LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION 

During the year 1920-21, the Committee on 
Library Administration at the request of the 
President made a tentative revision of the 
uniform form for library statistics originally 
adopted by the Association in 1914. There 
was insufficient time to make the revision 
as carefully as was desirable, but the tenta- 
tive revision was printed and distributed to 
several hundred libraries of the country by 
the Secretary of the Association. This form 
was designed for use by public libraries, not 
by college and reference libraries. As was 
hoped, the use of the form brought forth a 
number of criticisms and suggestions, which 
enabled the Committee during the year 1921- 
22 still further to revise it. This later re- 
vision has now been printed and distributed 
by the Secretary of the Association. 

At the Swampscott meeting, the chair- 
man of the Committee presented to the Col- 



lege and Reference Section the need for a 
similar form of statistics for use by the col- 
lege and reference libraries of the country. 
A special committee was appointed by the 
College and Reference Section with Mr. 
Gerould of Princeton as chairman, this com- 
mittee to co-operate with the Committee on 
Library Administration. The two commit- 
tees working together during the year 1921- 
22 have devised a form of report for college 
and reference libraries. This form is similar 
to the one in use by public libraries. Un- 
doubtedly, criticisms and suggestions will be 
made by the libraries using the form this 
first year and thus next year the form may be 
revised to advantage. 

Respectfully submitted, 
FRANKLIN F. HOPPER, Chairman. 

LIBRARY CO-OPERATION WITH 
OTHER COUNTRIES 

The Committee was not appointed until 
late in 1921. The Chairman was absent in 
Europe at the time he was appointed. There 
has been no opportunity to hold a meeting of 
the Committee during the year. 

Much, work has, however, been done by 
correspondence, and certain sub-committees 
have been very active in gathering material 
and in answering letters addressed to the 
Committee. The chief function of the Com- 
mittee has been that of answering inquiries 
received from abroad either directly by the 
Committee or by the Headquarters of the 
American Library Association, and referred 
tc the Committee by the Secretary or by the 
President. In many instances the Chairman 
has answered an inquiry without referring it 
directly to another member of the Commit- 
tee. Most of these requests have been for 
information which could be supplied from 
material easily accessible in print. They have 
involved letters frequently of some length. 
The replies appear to have been helpful in a 
number of instances where librarians abroad 
have inquired about American practice and 
have sought the addresses of specialists in 
various lines of library work in the United 
States, etc. 

The Chairman of the Committee visited the 



LIBRARY CO-OPERATION WITH OTHER COUNTRIES 



41 



Institut International de Bibliographic at 
Brussels in October, and received later from 
Monsieur Otlet, the Director of the Insti- 
tute, an extremely interesting plea and plan 
for co-operation between American libraries 
and the Institute. This communication is 
printed as an appendix to this report. 

The Committee has not had an opportunity 
to confer upon this matter and refrains from 
recommendation in consequence. Of course, 
this and other matters involving considerable 
outlays of money can be considered at pres- 
ent only as interesting and valuable problems 
whose consummation would unquestionably be 
of incalculable aid to the progress of knowl- 
edge. 

The Chairman, at the instance of the 
President of the American Library Associa- 
tion, visited the Army and Y. M. C. A. Li- 
braries in the "Occupied Area" in charge of 
the American Forces in Germany. He was 
given every opportunity to inspect the work 
which was begun by the American Library 
Association, and which has been so well car- 
ried on under the direction of Elizabeth B. 
Steere, by the Y. M. C. A. and the Army 
working in conjunction. As a result of this 
visit cables were sent to various libraries in 
America and individual contributions of books 
were made in large numbers, in addition to 
books purchased with the sum of $1000 voted 
by the Executive Board of the American Li- 
brary Association. 

One of the members of the Committee, 
Jessie M. Carson of the New York Pub- 
lic Library, has been resident in France for 
some years now in charge of the library work 
carried on by the American Committee for 
Devastated France. Miss Carson has served 
as a connecting link between the American 
Library Association and this Committee and 
libraries in France and Brussels. It has been 
possible to refer inquirers to her, thus saving 
much time, which because of the long distance 
between Europe and the United States, would 
have been wasted in the mails. Parentheti- 
cally, it may be observed that Miss Carson's 
effective presentation of the work of herself 
and her colleagues in the devastated region 



of France was one of the notable features 
of the Manchester meeting of the British Li- 
brary Association. 

The Committee has had much correspond- 
ence with the director of the American 
Library in Paris, W. Dawson Johnston, 
who is endeavoring with great success to 
serve as a medium of communication be- 
tween French and American libraries. Some 
of the matters inaugurated by Mr. Johnston 
are almost certain to have far-reaching results 
in the future. 

The Sub-Committee, headed by Cor- 
nelia Marvin, has continued its work in gath- 
ering information as to library activities in 
Eastern Asia, and as to collections of books 
in East Asiatic languages in the United 
States. A summary of the report of this 
committee is given as an appendix. 

One of the difficulties facing the Commit- 
tee was a definition of its functions. There 
was no wish on the part of any member of 
this Committee to trespass on the field of the 
Committee on International Relations. The 
distinction between the work of the two Com- 
mittees was so well defined by Herbert 
Putnam, of the Library of Congress, in a 
letter to the Chairman of the Committee, that 
it is printed herewith. 

December 27, 1921. 
Dear Mr. Bishop: 

. . . As to the two Committees : The 
reason for the creation of the one on Co- 
operation was that the one on International 
Relations deemed itself concerned only with 
matters of larger policy in which the A. L. 
A., as such, might have relations of an inter- 
national character. 

It did not, for instance, feel that it could 
deal with the projects for practical co-opera- 
tive work such as were involved in various 
appeals or suggestions that come from abroad 
as for children's libraries in Belgium, etc., 
etc., the most of which involve, if not actual 
supply of material, at least advice, sugges- 
tion and counsel from this side. 

Hence the establishment of the new Com- 
mittee. 

There need, I think, be no conflict of 
jurisdiction, as our Committee would have 
concern with matters dealt with by yours only 
in case they should reach a point where the 
Association is called upon, as an Association, 
to enter into a relation of international char- 
acter. In any such case our Committee 



42 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



might be drawn into consultation with yours 
as to questions of policy involved. . . 
Faithfully yours, 
HERBERT PUTNAM, 

Librarian. 

All the work of the year has been done 
in accordance with the spirit of the fore- 
going letter, which seems to mark off very 
definite fields for the work of the two com- 
mittees. 

The Committee believes that there is a 
reasonable amount of current work which 
can best be done through a committee of 
the American Library Association. It, there- 
fore, suggests that the Committee be made 
a standing committee and that its activities 
be restricted to matters which do not in- 
volve action by the Association as a whole 
in the field of international relations. 
Respectfully submitted, 
WM. W. BISHOP, Chairman. 

Appendix A 

Report of the Sub-Committee on the 
Far East 

The Sub-Committee on the Far East has 
been occupied during the year with answer- 
ing individual requests for aid and with 
gathering data on library activities in China, 
Japan, and the Philippines. This material 
is so extensive that it can only be summar- 
ized for purposes of this report. The chair- 
man of the Sub-Committee is engaged in 
compiling a more elaborate report which will 
doubtless appear in the library press in the 
course of a few months. 

The Committee calls the attention of the 
Association to the suggestion made in the 
New Republic of the fifteenth of March, 
1922. All the money comprising the Boxer 
Indemnity Fund has not been returned to 
China. The House of Representatives has 
passed a bill authorizing the return of the 
residue, the income of which will doubtless 
yield about $500,000 annually. The Senate 
has not up to this date acted on this bill. 
The New Republic suggests that the in- 
come be used for libraries and popular edu- 
cation in China, rather than in the form of 
fellowships for Chinese students, which is 
the purpose to which the original fund has 



been devoted by the Chinese Government. 
The suggestion is a notable one and the Com- 
mittee feels that the officers of the American 
Library Association should take cognizance 
of it, and should, if possible, bring influence 
to bear in Washington to see that the matter 
is fully considered by Congress and the De- 
partment of State. This matter comes with- 
in the province of the Committee on Inter- 
national Relations rather than in that of the 
Committee reporting. 

The Sub-Committee proposes further that 
it should be authorized and directed to make 
a list of students from the Orient who have 
attended library schools or other training 
agencies in the United States with the idea 
of keeping in touch with their work upon 
their return, to the possible mutual advantage 
of libraries in both countries. 

The Committee calls to the attention of 
the Association a recently published work 
entitled The Christian occupation of China; 
a report of the general missionary survey 
1919-21, published in Shanghai in the spring 
of this year. Portions of this report are de- 
voted to the education including libraries, and 
should be of extreme interest to American 
librarians in the way of information as to 
what has been done by missionary effort in 
China. 

The Committee has received appeals for 
help from Shanghai from the American 
School and from the American Women's 
Club, and has endeavored to meet these ap- 
peals to the best of its ability. 

A contribution to the discussion of the 
Asiatic collections in American libraries was 
an article by John L. Bramhall, East Asiatic 
works in the Newberry Library, which ap- 
peared in the Open Court for December, 1921. 

The Committee feels that a more complete 
report than the exceedingly fragmentary one 
published as an appendix to its report of 
last year should be made either by this Sub- 
Committee or by a special committee of the 
American Library Association. It recom- 
mends that the Council take the matter under 
consideration, and requests that if favorable 
action is taken on the suggestion a small ap- 
propriation be made from the treasury of the 



LIBRARY CO-OPERATION WITH OTHER COUNTRIES 



43 



Association to cover clerical expenses in- 
volved in the preparation of copy to be sub- 
mitted to the Editorial Committee of the As- 
sociation. Such a survey as the Committee 
has in mind should prove useful to reference 
librarians the country over and to certain 
students of Oriental languages scattered 
throughout the United States and Canada. 
It should facilitate interlibrary loan and the 
use of the photostat in copying important 
articles in a field which necessarily appeals 
to a very small number of persons. Such 
a survey in printed form cannot fail to be 
of great value and interest. 

One of the members of the Committee, 
Katharine H. Wead, has been spending a 
year at the University of Nanking and re- 
ports (Appendix B) her impressions of 
Chinese libraries. The Committee hopes to 
have her report reprinted in the library press. 
The Committee learns from Jessie Douglas, 
librarian of the Canton Christian College, 
that there is much interest in Canton in 
establishing a public library, and a commis- 
sion has been appointed to study the possi- 
bilities of such a library by visiting the li- 
braries in the Philippines and elsewhere. 

Very interesting reports have come to the 
Committee from Mary Polk, librarian of 
the Bureau of Science of the Philippine 
Islands. Miss Polk has sent us not only an 
extremely interesting letter giving details of 
the courses in Library Science being offered 
in the University of the Philippines, but also 
an important collection of material on the 
legal status of libraries in the Philippines. It 
is interesting to note that the Library of the 
Bureau of Science has already passed 40,000 
volumes, is cataloged and classified in ac- 
cordance with our best American standards, 
is aiding the University of the Philippines to 
give instruction in Library Science, and in 
general is serving as a means of furthering 
co-operation in library matters in Manila and 
elsewhere. Attention should be called to the 
possibilities of exchange between American 
and Philippine libraries offered by the or- 
ganization of the Library of the Philippine 
Bureau of Science. Librarians are urged to 
communicate directly with Mary Polk, li- 



brarian of the Bureau of Science, at Manila. 

This report would be incomplete did it 
fail to note the large number of Oriental 
students in American colleges and univer- 
sities, the greater part of them being Chi- 
nese. It is highly important that American 
libraries should not neglect the opportunity 
offered them by the presence in all our large 
cities and in our universities and colleges of 
great numbers of highly intelligent Oriental 
students. The impressions which they take 
back with them will influence greatly the re- 
lations of Eastern Asia with America in the 
next thirty years. Many of them are anxious 
to learn the administrative details of our 
libraries, and the Committee suggests that 
they be offered every facility, whenever they 
make inquiries, by public and university 
libraries. 

In conclusion, the Sub-Committee begs to 
report its willingness at all times to aid 
libraries in America desiring to secure in- 
formation about Oriental libraries, and libra- 
ries in Eastern Asia wishing information con- 
cerning conditions in America. When any 
member of the Committee is not possessed of 
the information desired, inquiries can gen- 
erally be referred to a competent person. 
Respectfully submitted, 
CORNELIA MARVIN, Chairman, 
Sub-Committee on the Far East. 

Appendix B 
Impressions of Chinese Libraries 

On actually writing a report on Chinese 
libraries I find that I have impressions rather 
than facts. For facts I would refer you to 
Mr. Tai's excellent report in the A. L. A. 
Annual Report 1920-1921, p. 58-63. But you 
may be interested in pen pictures of the li- 
braries which I have seen since they are fairly 
representative of the old and new types in 
northern China. 

Of the strictly Chinese libraries there are 
two kinds, the provincial libraries and the 
public libraries. The former are supported 
by provincial funds, are primarily for the 
use of the officials of the province and con- 
tain chiefly books relating to the particular 
province. These more nearly accord with 



44 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



the definition of libraries given in the Chinese 
name hiding places for books for admis- 
sion is only to the few privileged persons on 
payment of a small admission fee. The two 
libraries of this type which I have seen, at 
Nanking and at Hangchow, have many rare 
books and manuscripts, some dating back 
two thousand years. 

The Nanking library building was formerly 
a fine old residence and has only within a 
few years been occupied by the library. A 
visitor passes, in Chinese fashion, through a 
gateway in a high wall, into a courtyard and 
into a guest room where a servant offers tea 
while one awaits the arrival of the librarian. 
He is then conducted into a small room 
where the catalog is kept, then into a room 
where an attendant sits expectantly awaiting 
the request slips, across another court into 
the stack and reading room and upstairs 
where the more valuable books are stored. 
The curved tiled roof, the carved eaves, the 
latticed windows, the high thresholds, all add 
beauty to the building but the thought of fire 
and all the destruction that would ensue is 
ever in the mind of the westerner, used to 
fire-proof buildings. Even the more modern 
stucco buildings are not immune to fire and 
I have been in many places where there are 
priceless treasures insufficiently protected. In 
the Nanking library the books are arranged 
in wooden cases, some of them inside locked 
glass doors, each case bearing the name of 
the class. Each thin, paper bound book car- 
ries a tag with its name and the name of 
the class but there are no such minute subdivi- 
sions .as book numbers. At Hangchow inter- 
est is added to the provincial library, now 
housed in a modern two story white stucco 
building, by knowing that it was once the 
imperial library of Chien Lung who had his 
summer palace on the famously beautiful 
West Lake. 

The public library, as its name implies, 5s 
supported by the municipality and is open to 
all though in some cases a fee of a few cop- 
pers is required. At Peking the fee varies 
with the type of reader and what kind of 
books are wanted newspapers, modern books, 
ancient books. Books may not be taken from 



the building. To the foreigner, the cold, dark 
whitewashed reading rooms with the straight 
hard chairs seem very unattractive but the 
Chinese ideas of comfort differ from ours and 
the rooms are generally well patronized. Sep- 
arate reading rooms are provided for women. 
These public libraries are often connected 
with public recreation centers where mu- 
seums educational exhibits, lecture halls, play- 
ground, etc., may be enjoyed. Extension work 
is becoming more and more general and is 
carried on in the form of traveling libraries 
which go to educational centers in the dis- 
trict. The public library does not attempt to 
hoard old books but provides the modern 
popular books of which there are only too 
few, and translations of foreign books. There 
is much interest in children's books but the 
supply of these books is yet small and they 
are largely translations of foreign stories for 
children. 

In the public libraries which I have visited 
at Peking, Wusih and Nanking I have seen 
three distinct types of catalogs. The kind 
generally found in Chinese libraries is in book 
form. The old system of classification con- 
sists of four classes : classics, history, phi- 
losophy and belles lettres to which are some- 
times added collected works and gazetteers. 
Each of these classes is again sub-divided un- 
til there are some forty classes. In the book 
form catalog there is usually a volume for 
the four main classes and the titles are en- 
tered as received under the proper sub-class. 
Sometimes additional information such as au- 
thor, date, previous owner, or price is also 
given. Almost invariably the author is giv- 
en a secondary place. At Wusih, the li- 
brary has the distinction of being the only 
truly Chinese library using a card catalog. 
It is a subject catalog in two sections, one 
contains the titles of the old books arranged 
according to the method just described; the 
other contains new and foreign books and is 
divided into the following four groups 
political science, social science, natural science 
and literature. The entries are first by sub- 
ject and then by title but there is no accurate 
filing. The question of a systematic and 
accurate way of filing Chinese characters is 



LIBRARY CO-OPERATION WITH OTHER COUNTRIES 



45 



a difficult one and is only recently receiving 
the attention of students. The third system, 
seen in a Nanking library, is a curious one 
but has some points to recommend it. 
Around the walls of a small room are three 
tiers of wooden blocks, about 4 inches by 
1 inch and very thin, inserted into a moulding. 
Each peg bears the name of a book and its 
price probably to frighten prospective 
thieves and at intervals there is a red peg 
indicating the class. A reader runs his eye 
along the rows until he finds the title which 
he wants, fills out a request slip and gives it 
to an attendant who procures the book and 
turns the peg around to show that the book 
is in use. 

The Commercial Press has an excellent 
library in its offices at Shanghai, containing 
many rare old books as well as modern ones. 
Some volumes of the almost extinct 15th 
century encyclopedia, Yung Lo Ta Tien, may 
be found there. The old Chinese books are 
classified according to the old four class 
system. Modern ones, including foreign 
ones, are classified according to a system 
originated by the firm, and comprising four- 
teen classes : philosophy, education, litera- 
ture, history and geography, political science, 
natural science, mathematics, industry, medi- 
cine, military affairs, fine arts, domestic arts, 
reprints and collected works. The company 
is doing a great deal towards arousing an 
interest in reading, by reprinting in an in- 
expensive form the best of Chinese litera- 
ture much of which is now out of print. It 
has also translated and printed many of the 
foreign books on science since China has 
produced few of her own, and the majority 
of the children's books which have been 
printed are from that press. I quote from 
a letter from Fong F. Sec, the head of the 
editorial department : 

"Generally speaking, I think that the books 
most read by the Chinese now are along the 
lines of social science, such as history, edu- 
cation, philosophy, ethics, etc., but not much 
in the way of natural science. The new 
thought movement is influencing the reading 
of our people during the last two or three 
years and there seems to be a great deal of 



interest in books along the lines of social, 
industrial and economic improvements. How- 
ever, the leading Chinese educators are tak- 
ing to heart the findings and recommendations 
of Prof. Monroe regarding education in this 
country and are taking steps to strengthen the 
science teachings in the schools of China. . ." 

In this connection it is interesting to note 
the library of the Science Society of China 
which has its headquarters at Nanking. It 
has two or three thousand books chiefly in 
European languages, on scientific subjects and 
a card catalog. This society also publishes 
a magazine entitled Science. To quote Dr. 
Sec again : 

"Outside of the college libraries there are 
so few libraries in China we do not think 
that the libraries are meeting the demand for 
books in China. Therefore persons who de- 
sire to read are forced to buy their own 
books. We understand that in Peking and 
the provinces of Shanci some new libraries 
have been opened but are comparatively few 
and the library movement is altogether new 
in this country." 

Enough for the truly Chinese library. 
Picturesqueness is giving way to up-to-date 
efficiency with its steel stacks, foreignized 
catalogs, American trained librarians and 
the library movement is developing fast. 
There are now several men who have been 
in American library schools and others are 
studying in America or planning to go in 
the near future. Those who can not go to 
America are being trained well in the Boone 
University Library School under the guid- 
ance of Elizabeth Wood and her Chinese 
assistants who have been to American li- 
brary schools. The Peking National Uni- 
versity has a large library where they are 
doing good work in the indexing of books. 
They are the only depository library in China 
for the Library of Congress cards. This 
University inaugurated the movement for 
popularizing reading by issuing literature in 
what is known as "be hua," the spoken style 
rather than the complicated literary classical 
style. Southeastern University at Nanking 
has a large library of foreign and Chinese 
books under the supervision of an Albany 



46 



graduate and is erecting a new building for 
it. Probably the finest library building in 
China is at Tsing Hua College just outside 
of Peking where another Albany graduate 
administers a large staff and an excellent 
collection of books and is also one of the 
prime movers in the library movement. 

The various mission colleges have libraries 
where foreign methods are used. The Dewey 
classification is generally used for the for- 
eign books and in some cases for the Chinese 
books though the best treatment for Chinese 
books is yet to be decided upon. Some 
libraries put their Chinese classics in one 
class, modern Chinese books in another and 
foreign books in another, which is anything 
but convenient. The mission schools where 
much of the class work is done in English 
have an opportunity to put modern library 
methods in practice in a way that has not 
been done in the older Chinese libraries. 
Here at the University of Nanking for in- 
stance a guide to Chinese periodical litera- 
ture is being made. The title cards are filed 
according to the Chinese characters but the 
subject cards give the subjects in both Eng- 
lish and Chinese and are filed alphabetically 
by the English. A bi-lingual index to agri- 
cultural literature is also being made. As 
far as I know nothing of the sort is being 
done elsewhere except possibly in Chinese at 
Peking National University, although the 
need of making Chinese literature available 
is very great. The University of Nanking has 
a branch library in its Middle School where 
there are perhaps a hundred books especially 
for children, largely chosen from the pub- 
lications of the Commercial Press. 

The Boone University Library is the cen- 
ter of the library movement for the upper 
Yangtse Valley. It encourages the use of 
libraries by its library schools where nineteen 
students have received training; by travelling 
libraries to mission and government schools 
and other organizations ; by its branch li- 
braries in the city of Wuchang; by the clas- 
sification system which it has worked out 
and lately published, based on Dewey. In 
answer to the question "In what way can 
the A. L. A. co-operate with the libraries in 



China?" Miss Wood replied with three def- 
inite answers: 

"I. The A. L. A. can furnish literature 
in the lines of helps and aids of all kinds 
that can be translated into Chinese. Gifts 
of catalogs of large libraries would be most 
acceptable. 

II. Library films and lantern slides that 
would help to popularize the library move- 
ment in China. 

III. Scholarships in library schools in the 
U. S. Scholarships given to the Boone Uni- 
versity Library Training School in China." 

I have written to several libraries asking 
for information and suggestions but I must 
send this much of my report before I can 
hear from them. If anything of interest is 
reported I will forward it as soon as possible. 
Respectfully submitted, 

KATHARINE H. WEAD, 
University of Nanking, Nanking, China. 

LIBRARY CO-OPERATION WITH 
THE HISPANIC PEOPLES 

In the first report of the Committee, sub- 
mitted to the conference of the Association 
held at Swampscott in 1921 (report of Sub- 
Committee on Latin America of the Com- 
mittee on Library Co-operation with other 
Countries), it was proposed that the com- 
mittee serve: 

1. As a medium for the exchange of thought 
between the libraries and library organizations 
in the respective countries. 

2. To inform librarians of the United States 
and of the Hispanic countries of the develop- 
ment of publications in the other countries. 

3. To communicate the names of new pub- 
lishers and booksellers. 

4. To give advice to librarians of the United 
States and Canada regarding books and peri- 
odicals published in the Hispanic countries, 
and to those of the Hispanic countries regard- 
ing books or magazines published in the 
United States and Canada. 

5. To assist libraries to acquire by subscrip- 
tion reviews and magazines published in the 
American countries. 

6. As a link between the Association and 
other organizations with which it might co- 
operate in the same field. 

In furtherance of this purpose, the Com- 
mittee has secured the co-operation of the 
Inter-American Division of the American 



LIBRARY REVENUES 



47 



Association for International Conciliation and 
its magazine Inter-America. Arrangements 
have been made by which Inter-America may 
become a medium for disseminating informa- 
tion among the libraries of the United States, 
Canada and the Hispanic countries, and the 
following steps have already been taken : 

1. Eight pages of the English edition of 
Inter-America will be devoted to the listing 
of current magazines, newspapers and books 
(including the lowest rates and prices given 
by publishers to foreign institutions), to the 
analysis of magazines and to book criticism. 

2. Through English Inter- America, with- 
out any charge whatsoever for service, sub- 
scriptions may be taken by the libraries of 
the United States and Canada to Hispanic 
and Hispanic-American magazines and news- 
papers, and through it current books may be 
bought. 

3. At the same time eight pages of the 
Spanish edition of Inter-America will be de- 
voted to a similar announcement of current 
publications of the United States and Canada 
for the benefit of Hispanic and Hispanic- 
American libraries, to which Inter-America 
also offers its services. 

4. Attention is called to the following de- 
tails of the plan proposed by Inter-America, 
which is being communicated in a letter to 
many of the leading libraries and publishers 
of the United States, Canada and the Hispanic 
countries of America and Europe: 

a. Inter-America will give the names of 
current newspapers, magazines and books, 
frequency of issue and subscription rates; in 
the case of the first two; publishers and 
prices, in the case of the last; the titles and 
authors of leading magazine articles, and a 
brief notice of books and pamphlets. 

b. It offers to act as intermediary to se- 
cure for libraries and individuals, without 
commission, any of the publications listed, or 
any other publications solicited of it, provided 
such be obtainable, payment to be made in 
advance by individuals and libraries, except 
by special agreement, in cases in which such 
payment may be impracticable. 

The Committee reports that the collection 
of "material illustrative of Hispanic-Amer- 



ican periodicals," which was exhibited at the 
conference at Swampscott, has since been ex- 
hibited at the following places : Columbia 
University, during the summer school of 
1921 ; Honolulu, during the meeting of the 
World Press Congress, October 4-14, 1921. 

Library Conditions in Spain and Portu- 
gal. Conditions that were found to exist in the 
Hispanic countries of America and that were 
described in our annual report of 1921 seem 
to be a prolongation of similar conditions in 
the mother countries, Spain and Portugal. In 
these countries libraries serve as archives and 
deposits, rather than as vital, growing, re- 
sponsive centers of public interest and initia- 
tive. While there are priceless collections 
of books and manuscripts, such as those of 
the Real Academia Espanola, the Biblioteca 
Nacional and similar institutions in Madrid, 
the Archivo de Simancas and the Archivo de 
Indias in Sevilla, and the Universidade de 
Coimbra in Portugal, libraries, as living en- 
tities that send their arteries forth into their 
surroundings, that continue the process of 
disseminating knowledge, begun in the 
schools ; libraries, as we understand them in 
the United States, do not exist. If circulat- 
ing libraries are to be found, they are in- 
significant private enterprises of slight extent 
and value. 

The Committee will endeavor, if continued 
during the coming year, to acquaint itself in- 
timately with the publishing houses and sup- 
ply conditions in the library centers of the 
Hispanic countries of Europe, and it hopes 
to bring them into closer relation with the 
Association, for the reciprocal exchange of 
information, for the securing of books and 
periodicals and for co-operation in the fu- 
ture. 

PETER H. GOLDSMITH, Chairman, 

FREDERICK C. HICKS. 

LIBRARY REVENUES 

Your Committee on Library Revenues sub- 
mitted a report with reference to revenues for 
public libraries, in the form of a resolution 
which was adopted at the meeting of the 
Council in Chicago last December. At that 
time it was voted to enlarge the Committee 



48 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



with a view to its continuing the study, and 
reporting on revenues for college and univer- 
sity, normal school, high school, and elemen- 
tary school libraries. The Committee has had 
considerable correspondence on this subject, 
and has had the benefit of some recent data on 
certain phases of this subject from the United 
States Bureau of Education. 

The investigations of the Committee thus 
far have demonstrated that a great deal of 
work will be necessary to get the information 
to draft a report that will adequately meet the 
situation with reference to all kinds of librar- 
ies. The Committee is planning to hold meet- 
ings at Detroit to get this matter into shape. 
In the meantime we can simply report prog- 
ress. 

SAMUEL H. RANCK, Chairman. 

IVA M. BUTLIN, 

J. T. GEROULD, 

CLARA HOWARD, 

W. H. KERR, 

SARAH E. MCCARDLE, 

H. C. WELLMAN, 

MABEL WILLIAMS. 

LIBRARY SERVICE (COMMITTEE 
OF FIVE) 

This Committee has been and still is en- 
deavoring to do what may prove to be an 
impossibility under present conditions, namely, 
to collect a voluminous amount of information 
through voluntary workers. Complete in- 
formation in detail on the plant, customs, and 
methods of service of American public li- 
braries is much needed and is still no where 
available in one place and in usable form. 

To collect, assemble, and discuss complete 
data of this kind, two general methods pre- 
sent themselves. First, to employ a small 
number of experts, each of whom must 
necessarily do a large amount of work, and 
secondly, to use a very large number of co- 
operators, not one of whom will be called 
upon for more than a small amount of time, 
energy and thought. 

The first method evidently requires a sal- 
aried staff, since each one of the workers 
would have to give to the task his or her 
entire time for a considerable period. It is 



still not impossible that some way may be 
found to finance the survey on this basis. 
The tentative budget made out by this Com- 
mittee when it was first constituted called 
for an annual expenditure of $23,200 for two 
years, and although it is possible that the 
work might be done for less than this, it 
would probably not be safe to begin it on a 
paid basis without something like this amount 
in sight, but up to this time none of the 
bodies that have funds for financing scholarly 
enterprises has been able or willing to give 
us a grant even while acknowledging the 
necessity and value of the projected work. 

As there seemed therefore to be no imme- 
diate possibility of using the first method, the 
Committee at the outset proceeded with plans 
for employing the second, namely, to secure 
the consent of a large number of librarians to 
do each a small part of the work. The field 
cf inquiry was divided and distributed among 
members of the Committee as indicated in 
previous reports and we have now for three 
years devoted what time we could give to the 
work of securing the consent of others to co- 
operate, to securing results from those who 
have consented but whose lack of available 
time has necessitated delay, and to the neces- 
sary work of adjusting and assembling these 
results. At the present writing, May 1, the 
end of this work is in sight, although not yet 
attained. Three years may seem an uncon- 
scionable time to prepare a mere question- 
naire, but it must be remembered that this 
body of questions is intended to cover in de- 
tail the minutiae of everything done by libra- 
ries or connected in any way with their work, 
that the questions on each small division of 
the subject have been entrusted to some one 
having special knowledge of that division or 
interested in it, and that each person who has 
consented to co-operate is a busy librarian 
with barely enough time to give to his own 
duties for which he is responsible to his su- 
periors and to the public. 

So long as we are making any progress at 
all and so long as the Association sees fit to 
continue us in this work, we shall believe that 
the time given to it is not wasted and that 
it must ultimately produce worthy results. 



LIBRARY TRAINING 



49 



Of course, in case we should succeed in so 
financing the work as to justify the appoint- 
ment of a paid director with an office staff of 
experts and compilers, the work done volun- 
tarily up to the present time will by no means 
be wasted, but would save a definite propor- 
tion of the labor that would otherwise have 
to be paid for from our funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. BOSTWICK, Chairman. 

FLORENCE OVERTON, 

AZARIAH S. ROOT, 

HENRY N. SANBORN, 

BESSIE SARGEANT SMITH. 

LIBRARY TRAINING 

The Committee on Library Training did 
not hold a meeting during the year. The 
chairman was not present at the mid-winter 
meeting, and the three members who did at- 
tend were not able to arrange a conference. 

The Alumni Committee of the Drexel In- 
stitute Library School requested a statement 
from this committee on the question of re- 
establishing that school. After correspond- 
ence with members of the committee, the 
chairman formulated a statement and sub- 
mitted it to the Drexel Institute Alumni Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee expected to have ready a 
thorough study of training offered for 
teacher-librarian work with recommendations 
for the Association. The School Libraries 
Section has been giving attention to this sub- 
ject, working especially at the desirable con- 
tent of a course preparing for school library 
positions. The section made a survey of 
school library courses offered by the estab- 
lished library schools and to avoid duplica- 
tion, turned over to our Committee the in- 
formation thus gathered and the following 
conclusions based on this survey: 

1. School librarian should be 

an executive, 
an educator, 
an inspirer. 

2. Courses in library schools preparing for 
these functions may be divided into sim- 
ilar classes. 

Technical and administrative, pedagog- 



ical (history, methods, school library 
movement), books (selection, refer- 
ence) . 

3. While technical-administrative and book 
courses are adequate, most schools are 
lacking in satisfactory educational and 
pedagogical courses. 

With this information at hand, the purpose 
of our Committee is to give particular study 
to the courses offered outside of the estab- 
lished library schools. It has not been pos- 
sible to complete this investigation, however, 
and it will be carried over into the work of 
the coming year. The Committee presents 
the following preliminary statement, and sub- 
mits a thesis on this subject, listing the 
courses offered on school library work, and 
including a bibliography of the teacher-li- 
brarian movement : 

The rapid growth of school libraries in re- 
cent years, the stimulus given to trained su- 
pervision of these libraries by N. E. A. offi- 
cial reports and by legislation in various 
states, have created a real problem the sup- 
ply of persons adequately trained to take 
charge of these libraries. 

In the case of the large high schools, where 
trained librarians can be employed, the diffi- 
culty is not so great from the library train- 
ing point of view, as in the far more nu- 
merous smaller schools, where the library 
must be cared for by a teacher or school ex- 
ecutive devoting part time to it regularly. 
To meet the demand for giving some library 
training to these "teacher-librarians," courses 
on school library work have sprung up in 
all parts of the country. These courses range 
from a total of 15 lessons to a full year's 
work. Much of this training must be super- 
ficial and it is plain that this Committee 
should study carefully the character of the 
instruction covered by these courses should 
examine the requirements of a teacher-li- 
brarian's equipment and should formulate 
some standards for such training as a rec- 
ommendation. To quote from the prelim- 
inary report of the Sub-Committee. 

"One can build a pyramid of Library train- 
ing, putting at its foundation the thirteen 
schools that are in the Association of Amer- 



50 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



ican Library Schools, raising on this as a 
superstructure, 

(1) The recognized training classes in large 
public libraries. 

(2) The summer sessions conducted by the 
regular library schools. 

(3) Summer sessions conducted by Com- 
missions, state libraries and universities 
on a stable departmental background, 
and a continuity of organization that 
has extended over a number of years. 

(4) Courses offered in normal schools and 
other institutions conducting summer 
sessions. 

(5) The extra-courses that are offered in 
colleges, normal schools, and many other 
institutions for those expecting to do 
library work on part time such as 
teacher-librarians. 

Just now this is the apex of the pyramid, and 
very attenuated in many instances. As it has 
had less attention than the others, it seems 
the place where a special study should be 
made and recommendations offered to the 
Association." 

The Committee wishes to emphasize, for 
the purpose of securing further consideration 
or discussion, some points brought out in the 
report of last year. 

We included several recommendations, re- 
peated below, looking forward to the develop- 
ment of a more uniform system of library 
training by bringing the various agencies 
into a closer co-operation and correlation of 
work. 

1. That the regular library schools offer 
summer school courses in special subjects 
for which the same credit be given as for 
equivalent courses in the regular school. 

2. That there is a place in our system of 
library training for thorough, carefully 
prepared and properly supervised corre- 
spondence courses in certain branches of 
library work, especially if sponsored by 
our library schools and if regular school 
credit could be granted for such work. 
It would not be practicable for all schools 
to offer correspondence work, but certain 
schools could give such extension courses 
in subjects in which they are fitted 
through specialization or through skilled 
instructors to do successful work. These 
courses should be developed on the best 
methods of instruction with careful fol- 
low-up work and with practice. 



3. That the various library schools adopt a 
uniform system of evaluating the credit 
for courses. A unit of credit similar to 
the "semester hour" of the standard col- 
leges and universities, would allow a more 
accurate comparison of courses in the dif- 
ferent schools, and also provide a definite 
basis for granting credit by colleges and 
for interchange of credit between library 
schools. 

4. A comparison of instructional courses in 
library science given by training classes 
and by summer schools, with data to as- 
sist in evaluating and correlating these 
courses so that there may be a uniformity 
in standards to be used as a basis for 
learning the relative value of these agen- 
cies in library instruction. 

If these recommendations could be carried 
out the opportunity for securing library train- 
ing would be broadened. Students, who are 
unable to take an entire year off for a library 
school course, could take extension work by 
correspondence, standard courses in sum- 
mer schools possibly registering at two or 
more summer schools, and all of this work 
would be progressing regularly towards a 
library school degree. Of course a fixed 
amount of residence work and the regular 
personality requirements should still be en- 
forced. 

The need of more properly qualified libra- 
rians is unquestionable. Practically no 
library school has a capacity number of stu- 
dents. The A. L. A. recruiting campaign 
should have a beneficial effect. At the same 
time it must not be forgotten that librarian- 
ship, like other professions, needs more real 
leaders. The need is not so much more 
library workers as more good ones. Dis- 
couraging the unsuitable candidate is as much 
service to the library as encouraging those 
who are fitted for it to engage in library 
work. Minimizing the demands which the 
library makes upon its staff will tend to lower 
ideals of library service and to encourage 
unduly the unfit. 

The recommendations made last year by the 
Sub-Committee on cataloging created some 
discussion but no action. 



51 



The Catalog Section has been working along 
the same lines and it is understood will con- 
tinue the discussion at the Detroit conference. 
This Committee believes that cataloging is 
one of the subjects which could be satisfac- 
torily taught by correspondence. By the use 
of photo-prints and a traveling library of 
books the proper equipment could be easily 
accumulated. 

The situation as to the dearth of catalogers 
remains about the same and the Committee 
urges most earnestly that the proper emphasis 
be given to the importance of this subject in 
the hope of remedying this condition. 

The Association probably does not realize 
the amount of work embodied in many of the 
special sub-committee investigations submitted 
in the reports of this Committee during the 
past few years. Definite and specific recom- 
mendations based on the highest professional 
experience and thorough study are made to 
the Association to no apparent purpose. Un- 
der these conditions the chairman is loath 
to request members of the Committee to un- 
dertake work which will require a great deal 
of time. Careful and intelligent considera- 
tion should be given to committee reports so 
that recommendations made would be either 
rejected or acknowledged through some fa- 
vorable action. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MALCOLM G. WYER, Chairman, 

W. W. APPLETON, 

EMMA V. BALDWIN, 

MARY EMOGENE HAZELTINE, 

JOHN A. LOWE, 

MARGARET MANN, 

EFFIE L. POWER, 

CARRIE E. SCOTT, 

F. K. WALTER. 

LIBRARY WORKERS ASSOCIATION 
No report. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

The present Committee was appointed Sep- 
tember 23, 1921, and the first letter of the 
Chairman to the members, a charge of spe- 
cial responsibility for membership campaigns 
in states represented by Committeemen, was 



sent out October 6. The Committee has 
had but one change in membership, Alice L. 
Rose of New York City being unable to 
serve because of ill health. Donald K. Camp- 
bell of Haverhill was appointed in her place 

A special effort has been made to have the 
matter of. membership in our international 
organization taken up in every state and 
province of the United States and Canada. 
Where possible state association meetings 
were addressed, district meetings and insti- 
tutes also, and the state and provincial li- 
brary organizations were used where avail- 
able, as well as the special or local library 
club. The library schools were reached, 
groups of library workers in a specific field 
as children's workers, high school librarians, 
medical librarians, etc., the Public Library 
Commission and state library bulletins were 
used, and finally personal letters were sent 
to librarians already members asking help 
and to librarians not yet members urging 
consideration. 

Each of these methods has had results, 
and each member of the Committee has cov- 
ered his own community in the way which 
seemed wisest with varying results. In pre- 
vious campaigns the large libraries of the 
United States and Canada had been pretty 
well reached by membership appeals, so this 
year the Committee made a special effort to 
reach the smaller libraries and communities. 
The total results show 494 new members up 
to May 20. 

To the Association Headquarters the Com- 
mittee must give a large share of the credit 
for the successful year. They have sent out 
most of the form letter material, as well as 
circulars and bulletin material, and have been 
fertile with suggestions of value. On the 
recommendation of the Membership Com- 
mittee, Headquarters has installed an ad- 
ditional office list of members arranged by 
geographical location. This will be of great 
assistance to future committees, as the names 
of members in each state will be available, 
preventing either vexatious double-canvassing, 
or missing some one. 

Special mention must be made also of 
Miss Hunt's contribution of 550 letters 



52 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



to the children's librarians of the coun- 
try; the volunteer aid of Czarina Hall 
of Omaha, in writing to all Nebraska li- 
brarians, and of Mr. Kerr in Kansas; as 
well as a similar letter to all Alabama li- 
brarians sent by Miss Chapman. A double 
effort to reach a large number of Ontario 
and Middle West librarians was made be- 
cause of the interest which the Detroit con- 
ference might be expected to stimulate. In 
covering this field special material was pre- 
pared for state bulletins and the membership 
lists of state and provincial library associa- 
tions were checked for individual letters. 

In the course of the year's work various 
queries have arisen. 

From the Atlantic coast, from the south- 
ern States and from the Pacific Northwest 
has come the common plaint that the A. L. 
A. "lives and moves and has its 'being for 
other parts of the country but neglects mine. 
Sometimes we feel that all you care about us 
is our membership fee." 

Suggestion 1. It is not possible to plan 
for sectional meetings which will tie all dis- 
tricts together rather than cut them apart. 
The district meetings of state associations 
strengthen rather than disrupt the main or- 
ganization. Cannot a southeastern meeting, 
a southwestern, a central Atlantic and a 
north Pacific be so engineered, attended and 
managed by Association officers biennially 
that a loyalty to the general Association may 
be strengthened, instead of strengthening the 
separatist spirit towards which the present 
independent sectional movement tends? The 
membership committee feels that this can 
and should be done. Against the increased 
expense of such a proposal must be consid- 
ered the loss in dues which follows the de- 
velopment of local dissatisfaction. 

Our second problem is that connected with 
the payment of membership dues. The chair- 
man of the Committee admits having strong- 
ly favored the present plan of a $2.00 fee for 
those dispensing with the Proceedings and 
Handbook, and $4.00 for those desiring them. 
More than one-half of old and new mem- 
bers are paying dues on the $2.00 plan. This 
plan (which, we believe, was first broached by 



a Pacific Coast librarian) would, it was 
thought, result in a larger membership from 
assistants than a higher uniform fee. Most 
assistants it was stated have access to the 
library copy of the Handbook and Proceed- 
ings when they were needed. However, the 
plan has not given the general satisfaction 
that was anticipated. The bitterest criticism 
has come from the $4.00 members who say 
that their junior assistants and the librarians 
of tiny libraries, to whom the $2.00 fee might 
be expected to appeal, do not join now be- 
cause "they get nothing at all in return for 
their fee beyond having their names printed 
in a handbook which they do not see." Even 
the institutional membership no longer brings 
to the small library the Booklist which for- 
merly made such membership appeal. 

Suggestion 2. The Committee therefore 
recommends A. that the Executive Board 
obtain a general expression of opinion from 
all members as to whether the present plan 
should continue or whether the rates should 
be raised to permit every member receiving 
the Handbook and the Proceedings. The 
Committee feels that the Handbook should go 
to all members, regardless of rate. B. that 
a special rate on the Booklist be made to 
libraries which are institutional members of 
the Association. One committeeman suggests 
that this class of members be allowed to 
choose between receiving the Proceedings or 
the Booklist. 

The membership lists of a number of State 
Library Associations were this year checked 
for circularization in the interests of A. L. 
A. membership. It will be interesting to 
learn the proportion of A. L. A. members 
already on the state lists. 

Suggestion 3. Cannot such checking be 
done for all state library organizations which 
are chapters of the A. L. A.? The Commit- 
tee here raises the question for discussion : 
"Would a joint fee for chapter and national 
membership be desirable?" 

Suggestion 4. It is recommended that 
the incoming Membership Committee be ap- 
pointed early enough in the summer so that 
they can get in touch with earlier state meet- 
ings which the present Committee was un- 



NATIONAL CERTIFICATION AND TRAINING 



53 



able to reach Colorado, Pacific Northwest, 
New York, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, 
Utah and Wisconsin. There are a large num- 
ber of such meetings in September and early 
October. Especial attention is also called to 
the larger southeastern conference which will 
be held in Chattanooga about the middle of 
October, and to the projected south central 
Conference at Austin in October. A Canadi- 
an member should also be added to the Com- 
mittee. Respectfully submitted, 

WM. J. HAMILTON, Chairman. 
Approved 

TOMMIE DORA BARKER, 

ZAIDEE BROWN, 

LILA MAY CHAPMAN, 

ISABELLA M. COOPER, 

HAROLD T. DAUGHERTY, 

ALICE R. EATON, 

MRS. ALICE G. EVANS, 

CLARA W. HUNT, 

MRS. JOSEPH A. THOMPSON, 
No response to tentative report. 

DONALD K. CAMPBELL, 

HOWARD L. HUGHES, 

JULIA IDESON, 

SABRA L. NASON. 
May 15, 1922. 

NATIONAL CERTIFICATION AND 
TRAINING 

Owing to the resignation of the chairman 
no report has been prepared since the Mid- 
Winter meetings. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

The report of this committee has been pre- 
sented in the Bulletin and on the official 
ballot. 

PREPARATION OF A BIBLIOGRA- 
PHY OF HUMANISTIC 
LITERATURE 

The Committee is unable to report any 
progress during the year on the project for 
the publication of an international biblio- 
graphy of humanistic studies. The Commit- 
tee of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors appears to have made no 
progress either in the plans for the project 



or in finding the means for carrying it into 
effect. 

The Committee, therefore, recommends 
that it be discharged. 

The Committee begs to place on record its 
deep conviction of the usefulness and im- 
portance of such a bibliography as that pro- 
posed by Professor Teggart, of the Uni- 
versity of California, in his address before 
the Association at the Asbury Park confer- 
ence. The present chaotic state of numerous 
bibliographic enterprises seems to point to a 
need for some unifying and directing body. 
The Committee does not feel that the Amer- 
ican Library Association should necessarily 
be the agency for such direction and unifica- 
tion, but it does feel that the Association 
necessarily has a profound interest in any 
plans leading to the production of co-op- 
erative bibliographical work on a large scale. 
Further, it is the conviction of all the mem- 
bers of the Committee that the experience 
of librarians extending over a period of many 
years has prepared the Association to render 
effective aid in devising and carrying on any 
bibliographic scheme of wide extent and 
range. The Association should, therefore, 
stand ready to proffer its aid when it is re- 
quested, either through the Council or 
through a special committee appointed for 
that purpose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. W. BISHOP, Chairman. 

E. H. ANDERSON, 

ANDREW KEOGH, 

H. H. B. MEYER, 

PUBLIC DOCUMENTS 

It was hoped that this session of Congress 
would see enacted the Printing Bill which 
would embody as far as possible provisions 
desired by librarians concerning their distribu- 
tion, format, etc., but the very important 
measures which have been under considera- 
tion in this Congress have crowded the 
Printing Bill to one side and it is not likely 
that it will be reported from the Committee. 

On the other hand, Public Law No. 171, 
67th Congress, approved March 20, 1922, car- 
ries a provision on page 17 of the greatest in- 



54 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



terest to depository libraries. This provision 
reads : 

"for supplying books to depository libra- 
ries, $75,000; equipment, material, and sup- 
plies for distribution of public documents, 
$35,000; . . . Provided, That no part of 
this sum shall be used to supply to deposi- 
tory libraries any documents, books, or 
other printed matter not requested by such 
libraries." 

and really enacts the principle of selection. 
In plain English it prohibits sending any 
documents that have not been requested. 

The Superintendent of Documents will 
send to the librarians of depository libraries 
very shortly a circular bringing this mat- 
ter to their attention with lists from which 
selections are to be made. Probably these 
will be in the hands of depository librarians 
by the time this report is read. 

At the last meeting of the Documents 
Round Table at Swampscott a number of 
librarians who desired immediate delivery of 
documents gave their names to Miss Hart- 
well, one of the staff of the Superintendent 
of Documents. The Superintendent at once 
tried the experiment of making immediate 
shipments of documents to these libraries and 
after an interval directed a letter to them 
asking for an expression of opinion on im- 
mediate shipments. Every response received 
was favorable to its continuation, and the 
Superintendent of Documents then prepared 
to circularize all libraries concerning imme- 
diate deliveries. This plan however was 
interrupted by the hearings on, and the pass- 
age of the law mentioned above. Under this 
law immediate deliveries will be made, but li- 
brarians should note especially that selection 
is now mandatory, and no documents will 
be sent to any library unless they have been 
requested, and once requested, if publication 
is continuous, they will continue to be sent, 
until the law is changed, or the librarian re- 
quests their discontinuance. It was the ex- 
press wish of Congress, through its Com- 
mittee, that watseful distribution be absolutely 
discontinued. Libraries failing to make a 
selection after due notice will not receive 
any documents. Those that make a blanket 
request for all will have to satisfy the Su- 
perintendent of Documents that they can 



take care of them properly, so far as shelving, 
cataloging, and circulation are concerned. 

At present we can only report progress on 
the pamphlet which we hope to prepare on 
the handling and circulation of documents in 
public libraries. It is hoped that something 
more definite can be said at the Detroit con- 
ference. 

H. H. B. MEYER, Chairman. 

PUBLICITY 

The Publicity Committee reports progress 
as follows : 

1. An effort was made to obtain material 
for a new handbook, for general use in li- 
brary campaigns, on Why we need a public 
library. It is recommended that the A. L. A. 
headquarters office prepare and publish this 
handbook. 

2. A conference of state library commis- 
sion and state library association officers was 
held at Chicago during the mid-winter meet- 
ings, to consider methods of obtaining library 
publicity in the newspapers of the various 
states. The Chicago office of the Associated 
Press co-operated in this conference and sent 
to its state correspondents a circular urging 
co-operation with state library officials. 

3. The idea of a daily publicity breakfast 
at the Detroit Conference grew out of the 
discussion at the meeting mentioned above. 

4. A comprehensive outline with series of 
recommendations regarding A. L. A. confer- 
ence publicity was submitted to the head- 
quarters office and the president. 

5. The Committee held a special meeting 
at Chicago for the consideration of National 
Library Week, suggested by the success of 
Children's Book Week, National Thrift Week, 
and by the preparations made for the Mis- 
souri Book Week and the Indiana Library 
Week. The Committee recommends that Na- 
tional Library Week be celebrated in the 
spring of 1923; and the Committee will co- 
operate heartily with the Association and the 
headquarters office in preparing and execut- 
ing the plans. 

Respectfully submitted on behalf of the 
committee, 



May 20, 1922. 



W. H. KERR, Chairman. 



RECIPROCAL RELATIONS 



55 



RECIPROCAL RELATIONS WITH 
OTHER NATIONAL OR- 
GANIZATIONS 

The work of this committee has been car- 
ried out as far as possible bearing in mind 
the point of view of the Committee on 
Committees. The larger part of the work of 
the committee such as appointing A. L. A. 
representatives for various national meetings 
and arranging exhibits, etc., has therefore 
been handled through the Secretary's office. 

Among other meetings at which the A. L. 
A. has been represented are the following: 
Emily Van Dorn Miller represented the 
A. L. A. at the meeting of the Country Life 
Association at New Orleans ; Edna I. 
Allyn, of Honolulu (appointed by the Execu- 
tive Board of the A. L. A.) represented the 
A. L. A. at the Educational Conference held 
in Hawaii ; Margaret Dunlap represented 
the A. L. A. at the Southern Co-operative 
League meeting; Mr. Marron, the American 
Prison Association meeting; Claribel R. Bar- 
nett of Washington represented the A. L. 
A. at the conference in Washington for the 
discussion of the Towner-Sterling Education- 
al Bill ; the A. L. A. co-operated with the N. 
E. A. on American Education Week, De- 
cember 4-10; with the Booksellers, Publish- 
ers and Boy Scouts of America on Children's 
Book Week; with the President's Unemploy- 
ment Conference Committees by obtaining in- 
formation about library buildings in course 
of construction ; with National Thrift Week 
organization; Dr. Putnam, Mr. Wyer and 
others represented the A. L. A. at the burial 
of the unknown soldier at Washington on 
November llth. 

Your committee recommends to the Coun- 
cil : 

(1) That the A. L. A. co-operate to the 
fullest possible extent with the American 
Press Association, made up of representatives 
of weekly newspapers in the United States in 
order to further the county library move- 
ment. 

(2) That the A. L. A. seek reciprocal rela- 
tions with the American Farm Bureau Federa- 
tion and secure the active aid and support of 
this strong organization in the interest of fur- 
thering the movement of the county library. 

(3) That the A. L. A. establish close alli- 



ance with the Booksellers' Association and 
the National Association of Book Publishers 
and provide A. L. A. speakers for their pro- 
grams from time to time. 

(4) Believing that the importance of a 
public library as a function of municipal gov- 
ernment still needs to be impressed on mu- 
nicipal executives your committee suggests 
that a showing at conferences of mayors 
would be valuable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. W. SUMNER, Chairman. 
PAUL M. PAINE, 
WILLIAM TEAL. 

RECRUITING 

Your Committee on Recruiting for Li- 
brarianship, consisting of the twelve members 
whose names are given at the end of this 
report, was appointed in November 1920 by 
the Executive Board of the A. L. A. Our 
first report, submitted at the Swampscott 
meeting, may be found on pp. 92-96 of the 
American Library Association Annual Re- 
ports, 1920-21. 

The work of the committee this second 
year has been conducted on much the same 
lines as the work during the first year. Let- 
ters* have been sent to the librarians in 604 
colleges and universities asking their help 
again this year in persuading college men and 
women of suitable personality to consider 
librarianship as a desirable profession and 
suggesting that this help can be given : 

1. By attractively written articles in their 
student publications. 

2. Through talks by competent speakers at 
student assemblies. 

The speaker might well be the librarian 
of the college or an alumnus who is a 
librarian. 

3. By personal interviews with individual 
students. 

4. By the distribution of printed matter 
about library work. 

Write to A. L. A. Headquarters for 
samples of such printed matter. 

5. By sending personal letters to selected 
students, as was done last year by Wil- 



Copies of the circular letters, pamphlets, 
placards and other recruiting material men- 
tioned in this report are available at A. L.. A. 
Headquarters. 



56 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



liam E. Henry, librarian University of 
Washington, Seattle. A sample of this 
letter is enclosed. 

6. By securing the co-operation of your 
college vocational adviser, who should be 
supplied with printed matter concerning 
librarianship. 

Sample letters have also been supplied to 
these same librarians, to be sent by them to 
individual students, in which it is stated that 
the supply of trained librarians is limited 
and the demand for them is increasing and 
that library work offers : 

1. The chance for individual development. 

2. Congenial surroundings and social contact. 

3. A choice of work not limited geograph- 
ically. .. . 

4. Opportunity for advancement for proved 
ability. 

5. A range of subject interest as wide as 
human knowledge. 

Posters printed by the A. L. A. have been 
supplied to college librarians and others to 
be used as an aid in recruiting; letters were 
sent to supervisors, or leaders of high school 
library work in 25 different states, requesting 
them to bring before the high school librari- 
ans of the state the desirability of encour- 
aging "a selected few among their students 
who seem especially adapted to library work 
to shape their course in high school and 
college so that they will be well prepared to 
undertake it." 

Circular letters have been sent to the di- 
rectors of approximately 100 private schools 
for girls, enclosing copies of "Books and a 
vocation" and stating briefly the requirements 
and attractions of the profession. From 
A. L. A. Headquarters suggested articles for 
use in college magazines were sent to a se- 
lected list of 21 women's colleges and to 
164 co-educational colleges. A considerable 
correspondence on recruiting has been con- 
ducted by the Committee and by A. L. A. 
Headquarters. 

Recruiting material printed by the A. L. A., 
or supplied in the form of reprints from 
articles printed elsewhere, has been accumu- 
lated at A. L. A. Headquarters in consider- 
able quantities. This is being distributed to 



advantage, is bringing results and will con- 
tinue to bring results. Some of the more 
important of these articles are the following: 
Training for librarianship, by Mary W. 

Plummer. 
Library work, an opportunity for college 

women, by June R. Donnelly. 
Library work for young men, by J. C. Dana. 
Library as a detective agency, by F. K. W. 

Drury. 

Books and a vocation, by Ernest J. Reece. 

Recruiting for librarianship, by Mary E. 

Hazeltine, in the Wisconsin Library 

Bulletin for December 1921, reprinted in 

Standard Catalog Bi-monthly for March 

1922. 

Librarianship, by Charles H. Compton, in 

the Open Road, May 1922. 

Recruiting for librarianship, by J. A. Mc- 

Millen, in Library Messenger, Missouri 

Library Commission bulletin, April 1922. 

Article in Minnesota Library Notes and 

News, April 1922. 

The committee feels that a larger fund 
should be provided for the publication and 
distribution of recruiting material. Our most 
effective work is done through publicity, and 
appropriate printed matter in large quantities 
will be needed. In this connection the chair- 
man feels that a recruiting manual should 
be prepared and published for distribution to 
A. L. A. members, to members of all re- 
cruiting committees, to college librarians, 
high school librarians, and vocational ad- 
visers. Such a manual would give definite 
suggestions as to how to proceed in the 
actual work of recruiting and would list 
available material with its price and where 
it could be obtained. 

At the urgent request of the A. L. A. Re- 
cruiting Committee, local recruiting commit- 
tees have been appointed by various organi- 
zations. Twelve library schools have ap- 
pointed such committees from among their 
alumni. Ten state library associations have 
appointed recruiting committees and several 
more state associations have indicated that 
the appointment of such a committee will be 
considered. 

Members of these state committees have 



RESOURCES OF AMERICAN LIBRARIES 



57 



addressed college and high school students in 
Wisconsin, Michigan, Alabama, North Caro- 
lina and at Wellesley college. Similar work 
has doubtless been done in other states and 
in other colleges. 

Letters were sent to 25 supervisors of 
high school libraries requesting that they 
bring the subject of recruiting for librarian- 
ship to the attention of the high school li- 
brarians in their states. Replies from Cali- 
fornia, Kentucky, Indiana, Rhode Island, Con- 
necticut, New Jersey, Texas, New York, Illi- 
nois, Iowa and Oregon, indicate that such 
work has either been done or will be done. 

Your committee has promoted the idea 
that the subject of recruiting be included in 
programs for library meetings. This sug- 
gestion has been acted upon in many cases 
that have come to the attention of the Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee heartily appreciates the 
splendid help and support given it by the 
A. L. A. Headquarters. Miss Bogle and Mr. 
Milam have made many valuable suggestions 
and have taken care of the bulk of the work 
and correspondence. 

The committee would make four recom- 
mendations for the coming year: 

1. Provide and distribute printed material 
and posters in larger quantities. 

2. Prepare, publish and distribute a recruit- 
ing manual. 

3. Work out a plan for presenting the sub- 
ject to students in colleges, universities 
and high schools, with a selected list of 
speakers having definite assignments, for 
the more important institutions. 

4. Endeavor to interest college presidents in 
adding a course in library science to the 
college curriculum in sections where 
schools seem to be needed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. T. JENNINGS, Chairman. 
IRVING R. BUNDY, ERNEST J. REECE, 
F. K. W. DRURY, RENA REESE, 
FRANCES E. EARHART, FLORA B. ROBERTS, 
ALICE M. JORDAN, GRACE D. ROSE, 
FLORENCE OVERTON, CHARLES H. STONE, 
ANNIE A. POLLARD, ALTHEA WARREN. 



RESOURCES OF AMERICAN LI- 
BRARIES 

I beg to submit the following preliminary 
report of the Committee on Resources of 
American Libraries : 

The initial work of the Committee was in- 
augurated in consequence of a resolution 
passed at a meeting of the Conference of 
Eastern College Librarians in November, 1920. 
At that meeting a committee, consisting of 
the librarians of Harvard, Yale, Columbia, 
Cornell and Princeton, was appointed to in- 
itiate a movement looking toward a better dif- 
ferentiation in the field of purchase of the 
larger university libraries. 

The Committee met in New York in Jan- 
uary, 1921, and following the meeting letters 
were written to the following national scien- 
tific societies : 

The American Historical Association, 
The Modern Language Association, 
The American Philosophical Association, 
The American Psychological Association, 
The American Political Science Association, 
suggesting, first, that they should institute, 
each within its own field, a study of existing 
resources for investigation ; second, that they 
should attempt to work out a program of col- 
lection which would result in the purchase 
of material in lines not now covered and 
in the elimination of unwise duplication. 

The replies received from these societies in- 
dicated great interest in the plan but an inabil- 
ity to finance the study of library resources. 
In every case, however, committees have been 
appointed, and it is hoped that during the 
coming year and before the next annual meet- 
ings of the societies a definite plan can be 
worked out. 

The work done by this preliminary com- 
mittee was discussed at the meeting of the 
Western College Librarians at Chicago in 
December, 1921, and it was the judgment of 
that conference that the committee should be 
placed on a national basis and should have 
behind it the prestige of the American Li- 
brary Association. As a consequence the 



58 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Executive Board authorized the appointment 
of a committee consisting of the following: 
J. T. GEROULD, Chairman. 
WILLARD AUSTEN, 
W. W. BISHOP, 
F. C. HICKS, 
ANDREW KEOGH, 
W. C. LANE, 
A. H. SHEARER, 
P. L. WINDSOR. 

Negotiations will be undertaken immediate- 
ly with others of the major national societies, 
and within another year we shall hope to 
be able to make a more definite report. 

The above is submitted purely as a report 
of progress. 

Very truly yours, 
JAMES THAYER GEROULD, Chairman. 

REVISION OF ADAMS' MANUAL 
OF HISTORICAL LITERATURE 

The Committee on the Revision of Adams' 
Manual of Historical Literature has been in 
co-operation with the Committee of the Amer- 
ican History Association which is prepar- 
ing the work. It has ceased to be a Revision 
of Adams' and has become a new Manual. 
Publication arrangements have been made 
with the MacMillan Co. and editorial work 
has continued with interruptions. Of the 
thirty chapters, four are ready for the print- 
er, the others are in various stages of prog- 
ress. The hope of publishing in 1922 is, how- 
ever, not to be justified but the book may go 
to press before the end of the year. 

AUGUSTUS H. SHEARER, Chairman. 

SALARIES 

The Salaries Committee was not appointed 
until January, 1922. Accordingly, this report 
will largely be of work begun and recom- 
mendations for future work, rather than of 
things actually accomplished. The Committee 
early agreed upon the following as an initial 
program : 

1. That certain salary statistics should be 
printed annually such as : 

a. Salary statistics of 30 large public 
libraries. 

b. Salary statistics of 30 medium sized 
public libraries. 



c. Salary statistics of 30 selected college 
and university libraries. 

2. That State Library Commissions be re- 

quested to publish salary statistics along 
with other statistics of libraries in their 
respective states, general distribution to 
be made to libraries within each state. 

3. That a comparison of salaries paid to 

teachers and librarians in 10 cities be 
made. That the cities be selected by 
the Committee and the librarian of each 
be asked to report on librarians' and 
teachers' salaries, showing in the case 
of both librarians and teachers the train- 
ing and experience required. 
It is planned later to collect salary statistics 
also of state, federal and endowed libraries. 

Questionnaires have already been sent out 
from A. L. A. Headquarters covering the pub- 
lic and college libraries as recommended in 
No. 1. The schedule of positions in the A. 
L. A. Revised Form for Library Statistics has 
been used but grades have been so defined 
that it should be possible for librarians to 
make more exact comparisons of salaries paid 
in different libraries. The results of these 
questionnaires will be printed in the A. L. A. 
Bulletin and perhaps in separate form so 
that they may be available for use with li- 
brary trustees and tax levying bodies for it is 
with them that library salaries largely have 
to do, not with the public in general. The 
Committee believes that the first thing for the 
A. L. A. to do is to print annually such facts 
regarding library salaries. Librarians then 
can use these facts as they see fit. 

The printing of salary statistics by library 
commissions should be of special value to 
small libraries. At tfie suggestion of the 
Salaries Committee, the Library Extension 
Division of the New York State Department 
of Education has sent out a circular letter to 
all libraries within the state in an effort to 
secure comprehensive salary statistics in New 
York. If this Division can compile the data 
received from this questionnaire it may well 
prove very helpful to other state library 
commissions in gathering similar data within 
their states. 
The Committee will endeavor to have a 



SALARIES 



59 



resolution submitted to the League of Library 
Commissions at its meeting in Detroit with 
the purpose of having the League endorse the 
collecting and printing of salary statistics by 
library commissions. 

The Committee would especially recommend 
that every state library association have a 
standing committee on salaries. The value of 
such committees is well illustrated by the ex- 
ceedingly good reports on library salaries pub- 
lished by the Committee on Salaries of the 
California Library Association and the Pa- 
cific Northwest Library Association. 

Adequate library appropriations as a whole 
invariably result in better salaries and the Com- 
mittee is glad to know of the attention which 
the Trustees Section plans to give to this 
topic at Detroit. In this respect the Com- 
mittee would point to the fact brought out 
in the report of the Committee on Salaries of 
the Pacific Northwest Library Association 
that county libraries generally pay higher sal- 
aries than other libraries and accordingly an 
important aid in the solution of the salary 
problem would be the further extension of 
the county library system, 

In order to ascertain the present status 
of the salary situation, the Committee wrote 
to a number of representative libraries in dif- 
ferent parts of the country. The purpose of 
this letter was to find out whether appropria- 
tions were being decreased and whether sal- 
aries had been decreased. No library had 
decreased salaries but a number had been un- 
able to make their usual increases. This is in 
spite of the fact that some of the same cities 
have reduced the salaries of other city em- 
ployees. Half of the libraries had received 
larger appropriation for 1922 than 1921; the 
other half had received less. A number of li- 
braries had used other funds and special book 
funds in order to make salary increases. One 
of the methods of economy was the employing 
of more untrained assistants. The Committee 
thinks that it is rather remarkable considering 
the widespread present tendency to reduce 
taxes, that libraries have not been more seri- 
ously affected. In a number of cities, in spite 
of this tendency, increased appropriations had 
been secured but there is no doubt that libra- 



ries generally will be affected more or less by 
this demand for lower taxation. Much was 
done during the war toward increasing li- 
brary salaries, and the salaries proposed for 
librarians in the bill in Congress for reclas- 
sification of civil service employees is encour- 
aging. However, they are far from being at 
the level which they should be in most com- 
munities. It is the opinion of the Committee 
that comparatively little can ever be accom- 
plished toward the recruiting of high grade 
library school students or of making certifi- 
cation practical until library salaries are 
more generally and widely increased. 

The Committee recommends that A. L. A. 
Headquarters with the aid of the Salaries 
Committee should, as far as time will allow, 
be constantly making studies and printing 
them, of various phases of the library salary 
problem. For example, a study should be 
made of the practice of libraries regarding 
the giving of stated salary increases within 
grades ; on what basis they are made ; whether 
they are made annually on the recommenda- 
tion of the librarian with the approval of the 
Board or automatically ; what methods are 
used to prevent employees receiving increases 
without merit. 

Other subjects for special studies might 
be Budgets of individual librarians selected at 
random; Study of the effect on library sal- 
aries of employees living at home. The Com- 
mittee is certain that much can be learned 
from the fight for higher salaries which has 
been and is being made by teachers especially 
through the N. E. A. Every number of the 
Journal of the National Education Association 
includes data on teachers' salaries and the 
N. E. A. also is publishing compilations on 
teachers' salaries of which the January bulle- 
tin is an exceedingly good example. 

There is a difference of opinion on the 
part of the various members of the Commit- 
tee regarding the setting up of a standard 
by the A. L. A. for a minimum beginning 
salary for trained library assistants. Mr. 
Perry, formerly chairman of the A. L. A. 
Salaries Committee, and Mr. Jennings, chair- 
man of the Pacific-Northwest Library Asso- 
ciation Salaries Committee, are both of the 



60 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



opinion that this would be desirable, but there 
are, undoubtedly, others who would not agree 
with them. The Committee, however, would 
suggest that this would be an interesting ques- 
tion to be considered at a meeting of the 
A. L. A. .Council. 

There is no more important question before 
American libraries than library salaries and 
the best efforts of the Association officially and 
of librarians individually should be put forth 
to raise the standard of salaries. Publicity 
that can be obtained on library salaries in 
general magazines and elsewhere should be of 
benefit to all libraries but the raising of sal- 
aries will depend almost entirely upon the 
efforts of the individual librarian and his 
board. Evenden's comprehensive report on 
teachers' salaries demonstrates through con- 
vincing statistics that there is little if any 
connection between the wealth or prosperity 
of a city and the scale of salaries paid to 
teachers. It says, "The above study would 
conclusively indicate that this question of in- 
creases to teachers' salaries is largely a mat- 
ter of local progress, and depends more upon 
the development of a favorable community 
attitude or upon the aggressive work of a su- 
perintendent or teachers' organization than 
upon any economic development of the com- 
munity. Such a study is evidence of the oft 
repeated statement that a community will find 
the means of supporting schools when con- 
vinced that it is a desirable thing to do." 

The Salaries Committee's primary object 
should be to supply ammunition to the libra- 
rian in his fight for the development of a 
favorable community attitude toward better li- 
brary salaries. The Committee, it would seem, 
can best do this by making available such 
facts bearing on salaries as have been indi- 
cated in this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CHARLES H. COMPTON, Chairman. 
MARY E. DOWNEY, 
FRANKLIN F. HOPPER. 

May 6, 1922. 

SPONSORSHIP FOR KNOWLEDGE 

The members of the Committee on Sponsor- 
ship for Knowledge believe the time has ar- 



rived when the American Library Association 
should consider seriously the formal adoption 
of a system of "Sponsors for Knowledge." 
This belief is based chiefly on what seems the 
obvious need for making known sources of in- 
formation on many questions that are fre- 
quently asked but unsatisfactorily or provis- 
ionally answered particularly in the library 
field. Business houses are more and more 
establishing their special libraries, in connec- 
tion with which they ask "What is the best 
system of classification to adopt?" Therefore 
there is need of a sponsor, by appealing to 
whom this question will become more and 
more satisfactorily answered each time it is 
asked. There is much talk about "business 
English," and the American mind looks for 
authority on many questions that are not an- 
swered or not finally answered through the 
usual dictionaries or books on English, and 
would therefore appreciate a source of appeal. 
Hence the need of a sponsor for "business 
English," who will bring enthusiasm to the 
problem of giving satisfaction when the 
usual channels fail. The community center 
movement is active and meets with varying 
success in different places. Its literature is be- 
coming vast and there is need of an unbiased 
opinion on the many questions that according- 
ly arise in connection with this movement. 
Of course, there are many authorities on 
community centers in this country, but will 
not a single library or librarian accept re- 
sponsibility for "who's who and where-to- 
look" for information regarding community 
centers? Again, always a difficulty with li- 
braries and such business houses as have 
many yearly publications to send for is the 
method of follow-up, the reminder, or "tick- 
ler" that will prevent oversight and conse- 
quent failure to obtain some annual publica- 
tion that is much needed. There has been a 
committee of the Special Libraries Associa- 
tion of Boston looking into this subject, and 
its report will probably have been published 
by the time of the library conference at 
Detroit. Hence the chairman of the above 
committee would be a natural sponsor for the 
"method of follow-up." 

'The Committee might mention dozens of 



TRANSFER OF LIBRARY WAR SERVICE ACTIVITIES 



61 



subjects, but to do so would make this report 
too lengthy. Suffice to say that, with the 
courage of its convictions, the Committee of- 
fers the following local sponsorships, includ- 
ed in which are members of the Library Ex- 
tension Service Committee which meets at the 
Boston Public Library every Tuesday after- 
noon. 

Business English : Lee. 

Classification systems for business libraries : 
Hartzell. 

Community centers : Tripp. 

Convention specifications : Chamberlain. 

Educational extensions : Moyer. 

Factory libraries : Whitmore. 

Information bureaus: Gibbs. 

Reference desk methods : Chase. 

Stamps and coins : Wellman. 

Trusteeship of libraries: Belden. 

By way of bringing matters to a head the 
following resolution is offered : "That this 
report be considered final, the Committee dis- 
charged and the central office of the Ameri- 
can Library Association take measures neces- 
sary to officialize sponsorships to at least a 
hundred in number, during the year begin- 
ning July 1, 1922." 

The Committee would emphasize the need 
for publicity as a feature of prime importance, 
as it has proved easy to secure sponsors, but 
difficult to make the public know or librarians 
realize that the system exists. 

CHARLES F. D. BELDEN, 
GEORGE WINTHROP LEE, 
GEORGE H. TRIPP, 
HILLER C. WELLMAN, 
FRANK H. WHITMORE. 

May 1, 1922. 

STANDARDIZATION OF LIBRARIES 

No report. 



During the past year two branches of the 
former Library war service continued in ac- 
tive operation, and conditions arose that made 
it necessary for the A. L. A. to continue its 
interest in them, and in fact take an active 
part in their operation. These were the Li- 



brary service at Coblenz, and the Hospital Li- 
brary Service throughout the United States. 
Both of these activities had been transferred 
to the United States government, the Li- 
brary service at Coblenz on January 1st, 1921, 
and the Hospital Library Service, July 1st, 

1921. The transfer of the Library service at 
Coblenz occurred at a time when the War 
service funds were at a low ebb, and it seemed 
advisable to concentrate expenditures on the 
Hospital Library Service where the need was 
greater, and no government funds were avail- 
able. 

Immediately after the transfer of the Cob- 
lenz library it appeared that owing to many 
unusual demands there were no government 
funds available to carry on the library serv- 
ice, with the result that it was transferred to 
the Y. M. C. A. and that organization has 
carried it on up to the present time. But 
the Y. M. C. A. funds also proved inadequate, 
as was disclosed by the visit of Win. W. 
Bishop, in October, 1921, which resulted in 
the expenditure of $1000 of the Library War 
fund, which had been augmented since the be- 
ginning of the year. This money was ex- 
pended in New York under the direct super- 
vision of Mr. Hopper, of the New York 
Public Library staff, who looked after all 
details and sent the books in the most ex- 
peditious way possible, so that they reached 
Miss Steere at Coblenz in time to save the 
situation. 

A letter from the Acting Adjutant General, 
dated Washington, Apr. 27, 1922, referring 
to the work of the Y. M. C. A. states that "li- 
brary books amounting to $500.00 were pur- 
chased during the latter months of 1921 by 
that organization and additional provision 
was made for the purchase of books amount- 
ing to $100.00 per month during the year 

1922, such books to be placed in the library 
but to remain the property of the Young 
Men's Christian Association. 

"In view of the generous contribution 
made by the American Library Association 
during November, 1921, and the provisions 
made by the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, it would appear that a reasonable quan- 
tity of new books has been supplied to the 



62 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



American Forces in Germany during the 
recent months." 

At present the Committee has under advise- 
ment the re-transfer of the books sent by 
the A. L. A. to Coblenz. Their distribution 
will probably be in part to the American Li- 
brary in Paris, and in part to the Y. M. C. A. 
in Europe for their international welfare 
work. 

The Hospital Library Service has present- 
ed a far more difficult problem. On the 
first of July, 1921, the formal transfer of 
the whole service to the United States gov- 
ernment was completed, and both personnel 
and books were taken over. Funds were as- 
sured by the appropriation of $100,000 for 
the purchase of books, etc., in the Act mak- 
ing appropriations for the War Risk Insur- 
ance. This peculiar arrangement made it some- 
what difficult for the Public Health Service, 
under whose jurisdiction most of the hospitals 
for the ex-service men were being carried 
on, to conduct the library service. 

The first difficulty arose in connection with 
the position of the director of the service. 
It seemed to the government officials adminis- 
tering the fund of $100,000 that this salary 
could be saved, by turning the work over to 
some one already in the government service, 
and this was done about the end of Septem- 
ber. On the other hand to the Committee 
and to the Public Health Service authorities, 
it appeared best to have some expert librarian 
continue to act in connection with the service, 
and Miss Webster was retained in an advisory 
capacity, her salary being paid by the A. L. A. 
out of Library War Service funds. There 
can be no question that this arrangement 
worked for the great advantage of all con- 
cerned. 

On May 1st, 1922, a final transfer of the 
service to the newly created Veterans' Bu- 
reau was made in pursuance of an executive 
order of the President. This order placed the 
management and control of all the hospitals 
previously operated by the Public Health 
Service for veterans of the World War in 
the United States Veterans' Bureau and of 
course included the Hospital Library Service. 
What the status of the Director of the 



service will be under the new arrangement, it 
will be impossible to say, but the matter is 
under consideration. 

At this point it may not be amiss to quote 
from a letter sent by the Surgeon General, 
H. S. Gumming, under date of May 5th, 
1922, to Mr. Root concerning "the library 
service as now operated under the supervision 
of Miss Caroline Webster of the American 
Library Association." 

"This separation of the Public Health 
Service from a large share of this work gives 
appropriate occasion for me to express to 
you, as the head of the American Library 
Association, the very keen appreciation of 
the Public Health Service for the most ex- 
cellent co-operation of your organization in 
carrying on satisfactory work in the hos- 
pitals of this Service. 

"I wish to assure you that this work 
throughout, both before and after its transfer 
to the Public Health Service, has not only 
been satisfactorily done, but has shown itself 
to be a factor of essential importance in the 
operation of our hospitals. We have all been 
so much impressed with the value of this 
service as to consider it an essential part of 
the successful operation of our hospitals. 

"I also take this occasion to express my 
gratitude that the American Library Asso- 
ciation should have found it feasible to 
lend us the services of Caroline Webster, 
under whom this work has been developed, 
organized and managed. Miss Webster has 
shown a fine spirit of co-operation and with- 
out her services this organization would never 
have functioned with such satisfaction." 

A second difficulty in connection with the 
transfer of the Hospital Library Service 
arose from the slowness with which govern- 
ment funds became available and govern- 
ment purchases are made, and toward the 
end of 1921, it became necessary for the A. 
L. A. to purchase books and place subscrip- 
tions for magazines to be used in the library 
hospitals. 

While the original instructions to the Com- 
mittee were to wind up the Library War 
Service in all its branches as rapidly as pos- 
sible it has not been found advisable to do 



UNION LIST OF PERIODICALS 



63 



so in the case of the Hospital Library Serv- 
ice. There can be no question that if the A. 
L. A. had withdrawn absolutely, the men in 
the hospitals would have suffered greatly for 
lack of proper library service. It is the plain 
duty of the A. L. A. to use what funds of the 
War service remain, to supplement the work 
of the government, as far as its limited 
funds permit to secure the best possible li- 
brary service to the men in the hospitals. 
H. H. B. MEYER, Chairman. 

UNION LIST OF PERIODICALS 

The Committee on a Union List of Periodi- 
cals reports progress but has no definite re- 
sults to offer at present. Several conferences 
have been held between the Chairman and 
the President of the H. W. Wilson Com- 
pany. A tentative scheme has been worked 
out and at a later date it is hoped that this 
scheme will be brought forward for dis- 
cussion at the Detroit meeting. In the mean- 
time a preliminary examination will be af- 
forded at the meeting of the American Li- 
brary Institute in Atlantic City on the af- 
ternoon of Friday, April 28. 

Very respectfully, 

H. M. LYDENBERG, Chairman. 

J. T. GEROULD, 

WILLARD AUSTEN, 

C. W. ANDREWS, 

A. E. BOSTWICK. 

VENTILATION AND LIGHTING OF 
LIBRARY BUILDINGS 

Your Committee on Ventilation and Light- 
ing of Library Buildings had expected to sub- 
mit its final report at the meeting of the 
Council in Chicago last December. However, 
the work of the Committee on Library Rev- 
enues, of which the undersigned is also 
chairman, was deemed of such importance 
that all available time was given to that 
subject; in other words, the report was not 
drafted for that meeting. 

The scientific data which has been gathered 
by the Committee makes this report a volum- 
inous one, and a draft of this will be sub- 
mitted to the other members of the com- 



mittee at Detroit preliminary to handing in 
the final report. 

Respectfully submitted, 
SAMUEL H. RANCK, Chairman. 

WORK WITH THE BLIND 

From a total of about $12,200 given for 
books for the blind, there have been embossed 
83 titles, comprising 108 volumes of Revised 
Braille, and one title in five volumes of Moon 
Type. Fifty-five percent of these books are 
fiction. 

Selected papers on philosophy by William 
James, Caleb West master diver by F. Hop- 
kinson Smith, and Heyday of the blood by 
Dorothy Canfield Fisher have just been 
brailled. 

Florence Nightingale and The end of Gen- 
eral Gordon, from Eminent Victorians by Lyt- 
ton Strachey, and The age of innocence by 
Edith Wharton are in press. After this work 
has been paid for, the balance on hand will 
be sufficient to braille another book. 

Although for a year and a half no funds 
have been solicited, gifts totaling more than 
$2000 have been received, and two organiza- 
tions indicate their intention to make further 
gifts. 

Mention of the following authors and or- 
ganizations contributing to this work show 
wide-spread interest and co-operation: 
Henry Van Dyke, Ida M. Tarbell, Edith 
Wharton, Thomas Nelson Page, Mrs. Jack 
London, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Mary Ray- 
mond Shipman Andrews, Irvin S. Cobb, Ed- 
ward E. Peple, Montague Glass, Jack Lait, 
Frank Crane, Holworthy Hall, Anne Sedg- 
wick, Herbert Adams Gibbons, Ida M. Leupp, 
Grace S. Richmond, Albert Payson Terhune, 
Eleanor Porter, Helen Mackay, Stewart Ed- 
ward White, Will Payne, Booth Tarkington, 
The National W. C. T. U., Red Cross Insti- 
tute for the Blind, Drexel Library School, 
Daughters of Ohio in New York, Braille So- 
ciety of Pittsburgh, etc., etc. 

One donor desired a book put into Moon 
Type, which is not embossed in this coun- 
try. The work was done in England by the 
National Institute for the Blind which agreed 
to provide copies of the work to American 



64 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



purchasers at 3s 6d per volume. Contrary to 
expectation a number of libraries were re- 
quired to pay the general increased price of 
16s per volume charged all American purchas- 
ers of N. I. B. publications. 

This Committee, meeting at the Library of 
Congress on February 18, passed the follow- 
ing resolutions, "Our Committee expresses 
its thanks to Cornelia Rhoades who, rela- 
tive to the raising of a fund to be used by 
the English as a memorial to the late Sir Ar- 
thur Pearson, set forth in an able letter which 
appeared in the New York Times, The Trib- 
une and The Sun, the great need for embossed 
books here in America. The Committee heart- 
ily endorses the appeal made by Miss Rhoades 
that in view of the high prices which the 
American purchaser must pay for the em- 
bossed English publications, some of those 
in this country who intend contributing toward 
the fund may be willing to help the Ameri- 
can blind as well." 

The Committee also addressed the Ameri- 
can Foundation for the Blind, expressing a 
hope that that organization .would issue a 
statement of the need for funds for emboss- 
ing in America. 

It was the sense of Committee members 
that we should urge the Chicago and Cleve- 
land Public Libraries to serve grade one and 
a half braille books to readers throughout the 
Middle West. 

In response to a request from the Georgia 
Library Commission for aid in establishing a 
circulating library in Georgia, loans were of- 
fered by the Cincinnati Library Society for 
the Blind and the Library for the Blind, New 
York Public Library. A loan from the form- 
er source has been effected, and the Georgia 
Library Commission is prepared to circulate 
this small group of books which will be 
changed from time to time. The Commission 
hopes also to act as a clearing house of in- 
formation on library facilities (outside the 
state) available for the blind of Georgia; to 
compile a mailing list of the blind of the 
state with a notation of the types read by 
each ; and to send out circular letters of in- 
formation from time to time to all persons 
listed. 



Our definite interest follows the proposed 
publication by the A. L. A. of a list of 
books in 12 point or larger type. The real 
need for such a list is indicated by inquiries 
from readers needing to be relieved of eye 
strain, persons with defective vision whose 
eyes are likely to improve under favorable 
conditions, and old people no longer able to 
read ordinary print. 

The American Foundation for the Blind, 
incorporated and organized in the past year, 
is the possible realization of many ideals and 
efforts to unify the work for the blind. It is 
hoped and believed it will do great things for 
the blind of America, and that its reflex in- 
fluence will be helpful to the blind of other 
countries. The objects of the Foundation are 
briefly these: (1) To co-operate with exist- 
ing agencies or such agencies as may hereaf- 
ter be established in promoting all and every 
interest of the blind in America and to initiate 
movements for such purpose; (2) To en- 
deavor to secure local, state and federal legis- 
lation for the welfare of the blind and the 
partially blind; (3) To establish and maintain, 
with the necessary personnel and equipment, 
such bureaus and departments as may be re- 
quired for its work, such as (a) Bureau of 
information and publicity to assemble, sys- 
tematize and disseminate all available data in 
any way relating to work for the blind, (b) 
Bureau of research to ascertain, develop and 
standardize, by comparison, experimentation, 
and otherwise, the best methods 'of instruc- 
tion, kinds of apparatus and appliances, or- 
ganizations, procedures, etc., for the various 
lines of work for the blind and the partially 
blind, (c) Bureau of education to improve 
every facility for preparing the blind and the 
partially blind for the greatest possible par- 
ticipation in the activities and enjoyments of 
life. 

Again this year an extension half-course on 
The Education of the Blind was given by 
the Graduate School of Education of Harvard 
University. 

Thirty lectures were given by eight speak- 
ers on the following subjects : The education 
of the blind historically to date; The gen- 
eral situation of public work for the blind 



65 



in Massachusetts, i. e., provision for the 
adult, prevention, relief; Placement; What 
a teacher of sight-saving classes should 
know of the eye and its diseases; The atti- 
tude of the seeing toward the blind ; How 
to get up public demonstrations ; Home 
teaching; The story of the Royal Normal 
College for the Blind, London ; The psychol- 
ogy of blindness and the blind. 

Eleven students were registered, of whom 
five were blind. 

"Last year's summer course for teachers of 
the blind, given at Peabody College, Nashville, 
Tennessee, will be extended and repeated this 
summer. 

A course of instruction for home teachers 
of the blind was given at Columbia University 
the summer of 1921. 

The National American Red Cross is organ- 
izing and training groups of volunteer braille 
transcribers in Chapters throughout the 
country. A pamphlet giving self taught braille 
lessons has been published, and is distributed 
with other necessary information about the 
work. Braille books are copied primarily for 
the American war-blind, but they will ulti- 
mately go to the blind of the country. 

The Red Cross nurse is a well-known fig- 
ure the world over. The woman who sits 
at her braille writer or slate copying books 
for the blinded soldier to read is a new picture 
in Red Cross work, yet she has had a vital 
part in the rehabilitation of the war-blind. 
What the volunteer is now doing for the 
war-blind will be done also for the civilian 
blind. Many readers long for more popular 
and up-to-date books. Unless a vast endow- 
ment is forthcoming, their wants will never 
be met save by the volunteer copyist, as 
braille printing is not a commercial propo- 
sition. 

In England where braille printing is en- 
dowed by the Carnegie Trust Fund, hand- 
copying has long been in vogue. A hand- 
copied book will last for years if well done on 
suitable paper and properly shellacked. 

In the past three months 9506 pages of 
braille manuscript have been received, proof- 
read and bound into 109 volumes. Among the 
longer books are, Thomas Alva Edison by F. 



A. Jones, Seventeen by Booth Tarkington, Age 
of innocence by Edith Wharton, and Mary- 
'Gusta by Joseph Lincoln. 

"Up to April 1, 1922, 510 ex-service men 
have been referred to the United States Veter- 
ans' Bureau on account of blindness or seri- 
ously defective vision. Of this number 390 
have been given training to overcome their 
handicap, 260 of them having been at Ever- 
green School for the Blind ; 277 are in train- 
ing at the present time, 85 at Evergreen, 130 
in other institutions, and 62 in training on 
the job, or in project training on their own 
farm or in their own business. 

"The Red Cross Institute for the Blind, 
popularly known as 'Evergreen,' located at 
Baltimore, Maryland, was an outgrowth of 
U. S. General Hospital No. 7, which was 
established to care for the United States 
blinded soldiers and sailors upon their return 
from France. In May, 1919, the hospital was 
taken over by the American Red Cross as a 
school for the training of blind ex-service 
men under contract first with the Federal 
Board for Vocational Education and later 
with the U. S. Veterans' Bureau. On Jan- 
uary 1, 1922, the school was taken over by 
the U. S. Veterans' Bureau, the name being 
changed to Evergreen School for the Blind. 

"There exists in the United States no other 
institution for the training of the adult blind, 
other than a few workshops and industrial 
homes, which with one or two exceptions, are 
not equipped for the training of our ex-service 
men. Evergreen School for the Blind is to 
give the pre-vocational or fundamental train- 
ing necessary for the blind to all ex-service 
men blind or with seriously defective vision 
who are eligible for training under the law, 
and certain special courses of vocational train- 
ing particularly adapted for the blind. 

"The pre-vocational training consists of 
courses in the reading and writing of braille, 
touch typewriting, various kinds of hand 
training such as basketry, wood working, 
hammock making, etc., to teach the newly 
blinded adult to use his hands in place of his 
eyes. Music instruction is also given. 

"The vocational training consists of courses 
in massage, store keeping, dictaphone operat- 



66 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



provide instruction for blind people in the 
Birmingham District. 

Excerpt from the Bulletin of The Ala- 
bama Library Assn. 



California 



ing, poultry husbandry, commercial basketry, 
cigar making, music and vulcanizing. 

"To see a totally blind man go into the lay- 
ing pen, take a hen out of the trap-nest, feel 
the braille number on her leg-band and record 
on the braille slate he carries that number and 

his report, is a convincing demonstration of Sacramento State Library Statistical Report 

the value of applied braille." of Books for Blind Department. 

The optophone, an instrument to enable 1921 

blind persons to read ink print has been tried Total number of 'books 13,736 

out in England. Careful tests made by a read- A. B 2,960 

er who had studied the instrument for eight E. B 1,973 

months show a reading speed of from two to Line 192 

three words per minute. The instrument is Moon 3,281 

delicate, complicated, and expensive. It is N. Y 2299 

doubtful whether it could be kept in repair by Rev. B. 942 

the average reader. Those conducting the tests Standard Dot 16 

are unanimous in opinion that adult blind per- Ink . 297 

sons could not obtain a greater speed than Music 

thirty or thirty-five words per minute, the A. B 1 169 

speed which is reached by expert telegraphers E. B 146 

in reading the Morse code, and that even such Line 21 

a rate of reading would not become possible Moon 3 

unless a long period were devoted to the sub- N. Y. 184 

ject without interruption. The Federated En- Rev. B. . 94 

gineers Development Corporation of Jersey Appliances 81 

City is handling the machine in this country. Games 45 

It sells for $600. Maps _ ' _ ................ 33 

Respectfully submitted, Borrowers 1,664 

GERTRUDE T. RIDER, Chairman. Circulation 31,973 

ANNIE CARSON, HoME TEACHING 

MRS. EMMA N. DELFINO, Total number of lessons 2,032 

MABEL R. GILLIS, Home 1,304 

LUCILLE A. GOLDTHWAITE, Library 635 

N. D. C. HODGES, .. visits and calls 699 

LA.URA M. SAWYER, Addresses 8 

BERNARD C. STEINER, Hours of correspondence and prepara- 

S. C. SWIFT. t j on o f i essO ns 711 

The first sight-saving class in the West was 

Appendix started in San Francisco on the third of 

this month, largely through the efforts of 
Miss Foley, one of our Home Teachers. 

Birmingham Public Library Birmingham In Oakland there is a group of women 

has now 100 books in revised braille. The calling themselves the Women Volunteers of 

first aim of the Birmingham Association for Oakland, California, who have put into re- 

the Blind is to provide a splendid library of vised braille a large number of stories, ar- 

such books, as this will supply a definite need tides, etc. Their work is very well done. We 

and provide recreation for many people in with the help of one of our blind borrowers, 

many communities. proof read the sheets, then shellac and bind 

Another definite aim of the Association is to them. These books have proved a most val- 



WORK WITH THE BLIND 



67 



uable addition to our library. In addition to 
giving us these books, every week they put 
into braille several sheets of news, sending 
it to a number of our deaf-blind borrowers. 
The last one to receive these sheets of news 
each week is a deaf -blind man who has lost 
his sense of touch and reads with his upper 
lip. 

MILTON J. FERGUSON, State Librarian, 

District of Columbia 

Library of Congress, Library for the Blind, 
Washington The circulation of books March, 
1921, to March, 1922, was 24,789; 1402 bor- 
rowers were served; 94 are residents of the 
District of Columbia. 
Books 
Revised braille, grade one and a half. 924 

English braille 2424 

French, Spanish, Serbian and Rouman- 
ian braille 198 

Moon type 1354 

New York point 2060 

American braille 569 

Line type 442 

Miscellaneous types 65 

Magazines 54 

Music 286 

Pamphlets, maps, etc 560 

Total collection 8936 

921 volumes of revised braille, grade one 
and a half circulated 5740 times. 

For three years we have fostered the pro- 
duction of hand-copied books, primarily for 
blinded ex-service men. Several hundred vol- 
unteer workers have been instructed in braille 
transcribing. Five blind proof readers work 
under our direction. 

Six months ago the National American Red 
Cross became deeply interested in this work 
and has sponsored the spread of it. 

GERTRUDE T. RIDER, In Charge. 

Maryland 

Evergreen School for the Blind, Baltimore. 
> The Braille library at Evergreen School for 
the Blind, although small, contains more books 
in revised braille, grade one and a half, 
than any other library in the country. Its 



chief interest, however, lies in the fact that 
out of the 1395 volumes in the library, 822 
are hand^copied books, transcribed by volun- 
teer workers throughout the country, under 
the direction of Mrs. Gertrude T. Rider, of 
the Library of Congress. One can see from 
these figures the great value of the volunteer 
work since the press made volumes amount 
only to 573 in number and include many dupli- 
cates. 

The monthly circulation varies from 104 
to 178 volumes. One important feature of 
the library is the reading room, where the 
men go during their spare time to read and 
smoke in quiet. 

To those who have been engaged in this 
work from the beginning and remember the 
hard struggle these newly-blinded men had 
in acquiring braille, and how much they dis- 
liked it, it is a source of much gratification 
to see what happiness and comfort it is now 
bringing to many of them. Many instances 
could be cited showing the present popularity 
of the once much despised subject; if a book 
is read and liked by one reader, the news 
soon spreads, and in a short time we have 
a waiting list for the book. When at the 
hospital, the men send to us for braille books 
as soon as they are able to read. One man 
who had been having a book read aloud to 
him, was delighted to find that he could 
finish the story himself in braille. This 
serves to give a slight idea of the important 
place which braille is now filling in the lives 
of our students. 

JOSEPH E. VANCE, Director. 
ELISABETH DAVISON, Librarian. 

Massachusetts 

Library of the Perkins Institution, Water- 
town. The circulation of our embossed 
books among the blind is constantly increas- 
ing. There is more and more demand by our 
readers for the books embossed in the braille 
system, grade one and a half. We have now 
255 different books in this type, making 480 
volumes. The books in Line type and New 
York point are gradually being diminished 
through discarding worn out copies. The 
American braille we replenish for use in our 



68 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



class rooms and for many of our readers. 
We accessioned 995 volumes last year in the 
different types. 

Our total circulation was increased by 
1,996. We registered 958 active readers in the 
school and outside. We sent through the post 
office to different parts of the United States 
and to Canada 8.922 volumes. This with the 
5,981 volumes circulated in the school made 
a total circulation of 14,903. We are supply- 
ing reading matter to the blind of New Eng- 
land, but also send books anywhere if read- 
ers are not able to obtain them nearer home. 

We have standing orders for copies of each 
new publication in grade one and a half at 
the Howe Publishing House : the Clover- 
nook Printing House and for Moon books 
at the Moon Society, London, England. We 
also order two or more copies of all the 
books printed in grade one and a half by 
the American Printing House for the Blind. 
The American Brotherhood of Free Reading 
for the Blind presents us with two copies each 
of its publications. We hope to have at least 
one copy of everything printed in grade one 
and a half. 

Our special reference library on blindness 
and the blind for the use of all students of 
the subject has been increased by books in 
English, French and German. We have also 
purchased from Dr. Mell of Vienna many 
German war posters connected with the 
blinded soldiers. This collection of blindiana 
was much used from October to February by 
the students in the Graduate School of Edu- 
cation at Harvard University who were tak- 
ing the course on the education of the blind 
conducted by Mr. Allen. The lectures were 
given at Harvard and the Saturday morning 
talks and demonstrations were given in the 
Library at Perkins Institution. The students 
in this course were most enthusiastic and all 
who took the final examination passed with 
credit. 

As last year, two of our teachers will go 
again to the George Peabody Normal College, 
Tennessee, in June to teach classes for teach- 
ers of the blind. An additional teacher in 
manual training goes with them this year. 
One part of this course includes libraries for 



the blind, giving all information as to where 
libraries are and how they may be used. In 
this way many learn how the blind in out-of- 
the-way places may obtain reading matter. 
We are now referring readers to our newer 
centers in Alabama, St. Louis and Texas. 
LAURA M. SAWYER, Librarian. 

New York 

State Library for the Blind, Albany The 

collection of the New York State Library for 

the Blind on April 1, 1922, consisted of 

11,336 volumes printed in six different types. 

Literature Music Total 

American braille 1,579 82 1,661 

English braille, 

Grades 1, V/ 2 , 2, 3. .3,065 274 3,339 

Line 531 .... 531 

Moon 1,435 7 1,442 

New York point 2,700 1,660 4,360 

Standard dot.. 3 3 



11,336 

The circulation of books, music and maga- 
zines from April 1, 1921, to March 31, 1922, 
was 17,085. 

Because of the very high cost of the print- 
ing and of the binding of embossed type books 
and because of a decided reduction in the 
appropriation for buying and printing books 
for this Library, but one publication, and 
that the generous gift of Nina Rhoades, 
was printed this year. It was Mrs. Mary 
Raymond Shipman Andrews' story, His soul 
goes marching on, written for President 
Roosevelt's birthday. The Roman Catholic 
women of Albany and Troy have been much 
interested in copying books in Grade \ l /t 
and have given several titles to the Library 
which were printed by the Xavier Free Pub- 
lication Society for the Blind of New York 
City. 

MARY C. CHAMBERLAIN, Librarian. 

New York City 

New York Public Library, Library for the 
Blind The circulation for the year 1921 was 
36,817. The number of readers using the 
Library for the Blind during the year to- 
talled 1129. In a survey of the location of 



WORK WITH THE BLIND 



69 



borrowers of the library it was found that 20 
percent of the blind citizens of the city use 
the library in spite of the fact that oppor- 
tunities for spreading any book news to these 
readers is very limited. 
NUMBER OF VOLUMES ACCORDING TO TYPE 

American braille 2,062 

Revised braille, grade \ l / 2 1,081 

Revised braille, grade 2. 3,777 

Moon type 4,239 

New York point 2,396 

Line letter 323 

Miscellany (Standard dot, etc.) 54 

Music scores 5,970 



19,902 
LUCILLE GOLDTHWAITE, Librarian. 

Ohio 

Cincinnati Library Society for the Blind 

number of volumes 4,182 

Number of magazines 8 

Number of borrowers, active 414, in- 
active 800 1,214 

Circulation 1921 4,807 

Attendance at three weekly readings . . . 2,800 
Attendance at monthly entertainments . . 2,000 
Attendance at Friday morning class... 3,500 
Passes from Cincinnati Traction Com- 
pany 19,200 

Tickets to concerts 545 

The past two years of the Cincinnati Li- 
brary Society for the Blind have been busy 
and interesting ones. The four weekly meet- 
ings of the blind held at the Public Library 
are eagerly looked forward to, not only by 
the blind, but by the volunteer workers who 
conduct them. At three of these meetings 
the new books and current events are read. 
The fourth meeting is held for the purpose of 
teaching the embossed type, pencil writing, 
sewing, knitting, etc. 

New books are added in revised braille 
and New York point as rapidly as they are 
published. Mr. Charles Boldt very kindly 
gave five hundred corrugated boxes to be used 
in sending these books through the mail to 
blind readers in many states. The catalogs 
printed in New York point and revised 
braille have proved to be the greatest help 



to borrowers, as some are deaf as well as 
blind, and some live alone, it would be very 
hard to have an ink print catalog read to 
them. 

GEORGIA D. TRADER, Secretary. 

Pennsylvania 

Philadelphia Free Library, Department for 
the Blind During 1921 the names of 96 new 
borrowers were added; of these 34 reside in 
Philadelphia, 30 in Pennsylvania and 32 in 
other states. The 880 active borrowers dur- 
ing the year were divided as follows : 345 in 
Philadelphia, 300 in Pennsylvania, 235 in other 
states. 

The distribution of embossed books accord- 
ing to types and place was as follows : 

i u y. 

Cfi a dl v at 

Type 

American braille 1,916 

European braille 

Revised braille, grade li. 

Line letter 

Moon 12,777 

New York point 

Total 16,105 8,476 6.105 30,686 

On December 31, 1921, there were in ac- 
tual use 7,232 accessioned volumes, divided as 
follows : 

American braille 1,393 

European braille 183 

Revised braille, grade \ l / 2 243 

Line letter 271 

Moon 4,557 

New York point 585 



s 





Oco 


EH 


1,916 


1,482 


304 


3,702 


136 


28 


41 


205 


958 


267 


52 


1,277 


7 


36 


12 


55 


12,777 


6,452 


5,607 


24,836 


311 


211 


89 


611 



7,232 

Twenty new titles were added during the 
year, making the total number 1,354. 

EMMA R. N. DELFINO, Chief, 
Department for the Blind. 

Pittsburgh 

Carnegie Library We have for the use of 
the blind in western Pennsylvania, a collec- 
tion of 1295 books in American braille, 137 
in English braille, 190 in line, 1451 in Moon, 
755 in New York point and 259 in revised 
braille, making a total of 4087 embossed 
books. Of these 1144, chiefly Moon Type, are 
the property of the Penna. Home Teaching 



70 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Society, of Philadelphia ; 7302 books were cir- 
culated and 40 new readers were added dur- 
ing 1921. A standing order has been placed 
with the American Printing House, to cover 
all books except text-books, which are em- 
bossed in revised braille. This will insure 
prompt delivery of all the new books. Cat- 
alogues of our books for the blind, in ink 
print, are to be ready for distribution very 
soon. The Penna. Home Teaching Society 
employs a teacher who works within a radius 
of 25 miles of Pittsburgh and through her 
we are able to keep in personal touch with a 
great many of our readers. 

MARION P. WHITAKER, 
Librarian for the Blind. 

Canada 

National Institute for the Blind, Library 
Department, Toronto 

Books Titles in Volumes 

English braille 984 3,247 

New York point 689 3,048 

Moon type 192 803 

French braille 99 301 

Esperanto 27 29 

American braille 16 31 

Italian braille 10 19 

German braille 5 5 

2,022 7,483 

Bound Music Titles in Volumes 

English braille 37 64 

New York point 69 175 

106 239 

Sheet Music 

English braille 391 

New York point 1,150 

1,541 

Total books and music 9,263 

Though our braille sections were not 
opened till the Library had been in existence 
for several years, our English braille titles 
are approximately 300 greater than those in 
New York point. English braille volumes 
are only 200 odd in excess of New York point. 
The reason is that for convenience in mailing, 
as well as lasting quality, we had the majority 



of our New York point books bound in small 
volumes or pamphlets. We found that the bul- 
ky volumes usually supplied in the case of New 
York point soon became racked and broken- 
backed in traveling all over the country. The 
smaller volumes, however, seem to last almost 
indefinitely. 

New York point, even though it had not 
been formally voted out of existence would 
have been doomed in this country to gradual 
extinction, because braille books (I here have 
particular reference to British publications) 
contain more reading matter per volume, cov- 
er a greater range of subjects and offer a 
much greater choice of that class of some- 
what light fiction demanded by the majority 
of blind readers, just as is the case with 
sighted library patrons. Classics are all right 
and should be provided in proper doses, but 
the average readers ask for excitement, action, 
emotion, love, hate, and all the gamut of the 
vaudeville and melodramatic class of litera- 
ture. 

Until a year ago the British presses were 
running full time on light fiction and this 
library at least could not keep pace with 
the demand of its patrons for work of 
the kind referred to. For the past twelve 
months, the National Institute for the Blind 
has been paying more attention to text books 
for school purposes than to general library 
needs. We, therefore, are hard put to it, to 
get sufficient new stuff for our readers. The 
American Library Association could do no 
better in my estimation at least, than confine 
its assistance to American embossers, to the 
field of fiction, and fiction of a quick, thrill- 
ing, emotional type. 

Our total circulation for 1921 was 12,296, an 
increase of 800 odd over the circulation of the 
previous year. By far the greatest amount of 
this circulation must be accredited to braille. 
Our publishing department was concerned 
mostly with the production of text books for 
the Ontario School for the Blind, but we 
managed to print George H. Locke's splen- 
did little historical work When Canada was 
New France. We are now, by the way, about 
to braille Louis Hemon's Maria Chapdelaine, 
a delightful story of present day French-Can- 



WORK WITH THE FOREIGN BORN 



71 



adian life in the wilds of Northern Quebec. 
We, of course, also have published regularly, 
our Braille Courier, a magazine in grade one 
and a half braille. 

S. C. SWIFT, Chief Librarian. 

WORK WITH THE FOREIGN BORN 

The principal activities of the Committee 
this year have been in two lines : in corre- 
spondence with librarians seeking advice and 
information, particularly in problems of book- 
buying; and in the preparation of the series 
of articles on library relations with various 
immigrant groups, the first numbers of which 
have appeared in the Library Journal as fol- 
lows: 

Yiddish literature, in the number of De- 
cember 15, 1921 ; the Polish immigrant and 
the library, part 1, January 15, 1922; the 
Library and the Japanese, February 15, 1922. 
The Roumanian immigrant and the library, 
May 1, 1922. 

Part 2 of The Polish Immigrant and the 
library is in the hands of the editor. An ar- 
ticle on library work with Greek immigrants 
is about ready and other topics are in prep- 
aration. 

It has been the aim of these articles to fur- 
nish such practical information as will be of 
use to librarians generally. They have found 
much appreciation also on the part of the 
immigrant groups discussed. The Polish im- 
migrant and the library was reviewed editor- 
ially at considerable length in the Polish press 
and has produced real interest among the 
Polish public in the work of libraries. The 
chairman of the Committee has been asked 
to take charge of weekly library columns in 
two important Polish newspapers. This could 
be made a work of much value in the exten- 
sion of library interest and influence, and 
in the Americanization through the library 
of the Polish people. 

The chairman represented the Committee 
at the National Conference of Social Work 
in Milwaukee in June, 1921, and at the Con- 
ference of the Department of Work with 
Foreign Born Americans of the Episcopal 
church at the same time. From Milwaukee 
she went at her own expense to Stevens 



Point, Wisconsin, to the Mother House of 
the Polish Sisters of St. Joseph, where she 
addressed the Order on How the library 
can help the Sisters in their teaching. This 
was an important piece of work; not only be- 
cause the Sisters addressed teach 225,000 chil- 
dren in parochial schools in 7 states ; but also 
because it marked the beginning of great pos- 
sibilities in parochial school relations. People 
who regard the public school as the universal 
melting-pot are apparently not aware that 
hundreds of thousands of children of foreign 
parents attend parochial schools where they 
are segregated by race. The library is the 
only agency so situated as to be able to estab- 
lish helpful and effective contacts with these 
children and their teachers and the importance 
of so doing cannot be overestimated. 

The Committee are in a position to promote 
this work by visiting other teaching orders, 
having invitations to other Mother-Houses, 
but it is felt that the Association ought to 
meet the necessary expenses of travel; and 
it is perhaps not amiss to say that there should 
be assurance that the Sisters will be received 
at the libraries they find it convenient to use 
with the responsiveness and interest they have 
been promised. 

A round table on work with the foreign born 
is in preparation for the Detroit conference, 
and it is designed to make the program one 
of practical helpfulness. 

The following suggestions are made to 
the Association as the general conclusions of 
the year, and it is recommended that they be 
adopted by the Council as an A. L. A. plat- 
form on library work with the foreign born : 

1st. The public library should be absolutely 
democratic in regimen and administration, giv- 
ing equal service to the whole public regard- 
less of the place of nativity. Where funds 
are insufficient, preference should be given to 
those portions of the community having least 
opportunity at their own command. 

2nd In order to provide the service which 
is the just due of all taxpayers, and which 
is an essential part of the educational and 
recreational functions of the public library, the 
immigrant people should be provided with 
reading matter which they can use, both in 



72 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



easy English books and in books and periodi- 
cals in the native tongue. 

3rd. Assistants should be trained for work 
with immigrants as a special field of library 
work, and encouraged in the study of racial 
understanding and of immigrant literatures 
and of the characteristics of immigrant cul- 
tures. Library schools should incorporate 
work along this line into their regular courses. 

4th. In communities having considerable im- 
migrant population, the library should be 
given prominence as a social institution, and 
should be made in actual fact a community 
center. We recommend in this connection 
the free use of library rooms for clubs, public 
meetings and the like; formal invitations to 
organizations such as societies, lodges and 
study-classes for carefully planned visits ; and 
also that libraries take the initiative in the 
public introduction of official representatives 
of European countries, such as consuls and 
visiting members of legations, and of dis- 
tinguished European visitors of races locally 
represented. The public library is admirably 
situated as a place for informal public recep- 
tions which, in the entertainment of distin- 
guished guests, may naturally bring together 
native and foreign born elements of the 



population, to the great increase of mutual 
respect and appreciation. 

In conclusion, the Committee call the atten- 
tion of the Association to the fact that no 
work worth doing can be accomplished with- 
out an expenditure of money on the part 
of some one. We as individuals and the li- 
braries with which we are connected have 
met all the expenses of the work of the 
last two years, but our limit is about reached. 
For the editorial work which is open to us, 
and for the correspondence which comes to 
us, stenographic help is necessary, and we 
should have a fund with which to provide 
it. The Committee are willing to give their 
time for constructive thought and careful 
planning, and for the establishment of con- 
tacts and the accomplishment of work, but 
they feel that they should be relieved of the 
need for doing themselves those mechanical 
processes which might be taken care of at 
the expenditure of a small amount of money. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ELEANOR E. LEDBETTER, Chairman. 

HANNAH C. ELLIS, 

JOSEPHINE GRATIAA, 

MARION HORTON, 

MARGERY QUIGLEY, 

ADELAIDE C. ROOD. 



FINANCIAL REPORTS, 1921-22 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

In accordance with the provisions of Sec- 
tion 15 of the Constitution as adopted in 1921, 
your Finance Committee submits the follow- 
ing report: 

The probable income of the Association for 
1922 from its various funds has been estimated 
by the Committee and the Executive Board 
has made appropriations within these amounts. 
These budgets setting forth the incomes as 
estimated, have been printed in the Bulletin 
for January (pp. 20-21) and it is, therefore, 
unnecessary to report their details herewith. 

The Committee thought it desirable to con- 
tinue the practice instituted last year of having 
the various accounts of the Association audit- 
ed by a certified public accountant instead of 
by the members of the Committee, and again 
engaged for this work the firm of Marwick, 
Mitchell & Company. This firm has, under 
the Committee's instructions, audited the fol- 
lowing funds of the Association for the year 
1921: 

American Library Association General 
Funds. 

James L. Whitney Fund. 

American Library Association Publishing 
Funds. 

American Library Association War Funds. 

American Library Association Books for 
Everybody Fund. 

The disbursements made from these various 
funds were verified by reference to the sup- 
porting vouchers and cancelled checks, and 
the various cash balances and securities held 
by the Association, deposited in bank, or in 
the hands of the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund, were also found to agree with the bal- 
ances reported by the Treasurer of the Asso- 
ciation and by the Trustees. 

The afore-mentioned audits have been ex- 
amined and approved by the Finance Com- 
mittee and will be laid before the Executive 
Board at its next meeting with the recom- 
mendation that they be adopted by that body, 
according to the practice of recent years. 



The securities in the custody of the Trus- 
tees of the Endowment Funds have been ex- 
amined as hereinbefore intimated, and checked 
by the certified public accountant, and the 
Committee finds that this audit agrees with 
the annual report of the Trustees for the 
period of January 15 to December 31, 1921. 

The accounts of the James L. Whitney 
Fund, which are in the hands of the Treasur- 
er, have been examined and found to be as 
stated by him in his annual report. 
Respectfully submitted, 
GEORGE B. UTLEY, Chairman. 
HARRISON W. CRAVER, 
CARL B. RODEN. 
May 8, 1922, 

TRUSTEES OF THE ENDOWMENT 
FUND 

The Trustees of the Endowment Fund beg 
leave to submit the following statement of the 
account of their trust for the period from 
January 15, 1921, to December 31, 1921. The 
fiscal year heretofore adopted by the Trustees 
has been from January 15th to the following 
January 15th, but at the request of the Sec- 
retary of the American Library Association 
we have changed our fiscal year to the calen- 
dar year, which has been adopted to conform 
to the reports of the Association. 

In April, 1921, we suffered a great loss in 
the death of M. Taylor Pyne, who for 
several years had been associated with us. 
By election of the Association, J. Ran- 
dolph Coolidge, jr., of Boston, succeeded 
Mr. Pyne. 

During the past year we have received from 
the Treasurer of the Association the sum 
of $19,447.21 in cash, and Liberty Bonds to 
the amount of $1,000. The cash has been in- 
vested in Liberty Bonds of the second and 
fourth issues, which the Trustees felt was for 
the best interests of the trust fund. 

One bond of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration was paid May 1, 1921, and this 
amount, together with the premium of $100, 



73 



74 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



was invested in Liberty Bonds. All of the 

above investments were to the credit of the 
Endowment Fund. 

The Trustees have made no change in in- 
vestments during the past year. 

The usual audit of the investments and 

accounts of the fund was made by the 



Messrs. Marwick, Mitchell & Co., certified 

public accountants. Respectfully submitted, 
EDWARD W. SHELDON, 
WM. W. APPLETON, 
J. RANDOLPH COOLIDGE, JR., 

Trustees of the Carnegie and Endowment 
Funds of the American Library Association. 

Dated April 13, 1922. 



STATEMENT OF CARNEGIE AND ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

Carnegie Fund, Principal Account 

Cash donated by Andrew Carnegie $100,000 

Invested as follows : 

Date of Purchase Cost. Book Value. 

June 1, 1908 5,000 American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
4% Bonds due July 1, 1929, interest Jan- 
uary and July 96*/ 2 $ 4,825.00 

June 1, 1908 10,000 American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
4% Bonds due July 1, 1929, interest Jan- 
uary and July 94^ 9,437.50 

June 1, 1908 15,000 Cleveland Terminal and Valley Railroad Com- 
pany First Mortgage 4% Bonds due Nov. 1, 
1995, interest May and November 100 15,000.00 

June 1, 1908 10,000 Seaboard Air Line Railway (Atlanta-Bir- 
mingham Division) First Mortgage 4% 
Bonds due May 1, 1933, interest March and 
September 9fr/ 2 9,550.00 

June 1, 1908 15,000 Western Union Telegraph Company Collateral 
Trust 5% Bonds due January 1, 1938, in- 
terest January and July 108^ 15,000.00 

June 1, 1908 15,000 New York Central and Hudson River Railroad 
Company, Lake Shore Collateral Z l / 2 % Bonds 

were exchanged February 10, 1916, for 

15,000 New York Central Railroad Company Consoli- 
dated Mortgage Gold 4% Bonds, Series "A," 
due Feb. 1, 1998, interest February and Au- 
gust 90 13,500.00 

June 1, 1908 15,000 Missouri Pacific Railroad Company Collateral 

Trust 5% Bonds were exchanged for 

15,000 Missouri Pacific Railroad Company First and 
Refunding Mortgage Gold 5% Bonds due 1923, 
Series "B," interest February and August. 104^ 15,000.00 

Aug. 6, 1909 1,500 United States Steel Corporation Sinking Fund 
Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 1964, interest 
May and November 106^ 1,500.00 

July 27, 1909 1,000 United States Steel Corporation Sinking Fund 
Gold 5% Bonds due April 1, 1963, interest 
May and November l02 l / 2 1,000.00 

May 3, 1909 15,000 United States Steel Corporation Sinking Fund 

Gold 5% Bonds 104 15,000.00 

May 5,1921 200 United States Third Liberty Loan 4%%.... 90.64 18128 

Jan. 1, 1922 Cash on hand, United States Trust Company 6.22 



$100,000 

The Surplus Account was increased $100.00 during 1917 by Premium received on one 

United States Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 5% Bond called in at $110.00, making 

the Surplus Account $350.00, invested in Liberty Bonds May 7, 1918, Third Liberty 
Loan, 



TRUSTEES OF THE ENDOWMENT FUND 



75 



1921 



Endowment Fund, Income Account 



January IS Balance on hand $ 1646 

May 2 United States Steel 200.00 

May 16 United States 2nd 4% 262 45 

June 15 Int. U. S. 4ft 28.44 

Sept. 15 Int. U. S. VA 2.13 

Oct. 15 Int. U. S. 4J4 272.02 

Nov. 1 Int. U. S. Steel 175.00 

Nov. 15 Int. U. S. 4)4 262.42 

Dec. 15 Int. U. S. 4M 28.56 

$1,247.48 

Disbursements 

1921 

May 5 Accrued Int. on U. S. 2nd 4J4 $ 247.85 

May 5 Accrued Int. on U. S. 4th / 2 29.04 

June 8 Exchange on checks 5.06 

June 8 Cash to E. D. Tweedell, treasurer 196.% 

June 6 Exchange on check .10 

June 18 Exchange on check .10 

Aug. 19 Exchange on check .10 

Dec. 7 E. D. Tweedell, treasurer 739.71 

1922 

January 1 Cash on hand, United States Trust Co 28.56 

$1,247.48 

Endowment Fund, Principal Account 
1921 

January 1 On hand, bonds and cash $ 9,561.84 

February 3 Life Membership, M. Reynolds 25.00 

February 3 Life Membership, A. Strohm 25.00 

March 7 Life Membership, M. J. Booth 25.00 

March 7 Life Membership, P. Goulding 25.00 

March 7 Life Membership, H. M. Leach 25.00 

March 7 Life Membership, R. H. Schabacker 25.00 

April 6 Life Membership, A. M. Colt 25.00 

April 6 Life Membership, E. Tobitt 25.00 

April 6 Life Membership, G. Whittemore 25.00 

May 5 Life Membership, G. Wormer 25.00 

May 5 Am. Liby. Ass'n Treasurer 20,447.21 

May S Profit U. S. Steel Bond 8.75 

May 5 Premium U. S. Steel Bond 100.00 

June 4 Life Membership, A. J. McCarthy 25.00 

June 4 Life Membership, G. Kraunsnick 25.00 

June 4 Life Membership, A. V. Jennings 25.00 

June 16 Life Membership, W. F. Sanborn 25.00 

June 16 Life Membership, B. E. Davis 25.00 

August 18 Life Membership, L. E. Adams 25.00 

August 18 Life Membership, O. S. Davis 25.00 

August 18 Life Membership, W. H. Kerr 25.00 

August 18 Life Membership, Mrs. W. H. Kerr 25.00 

August 18 Life Membership, L. A. Shepard 25.00 

August 18 Life Membership, Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool Earl 50.00 

$30,667.80 

Invested as follows : 

Date of Purchase Cost 

1908 
June 12 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold S% 

Bonds 98H $ 1,970.00 

October 19 2 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 5% 

Bonds 102*6 2,000.00 

November 5 \ l / 2 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 5% 

Bonds 101 1,500.00 



76 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1910 
July 27 \ l / 2 U. S. Steel Corporation Sinking Fund Gold 5% 

Bonds 102^ 1,500.00 

1919 

May 7 U. S. Victory Loan 4H% 700.00 

1921 

May 5 12,000 U. S. 2nd 4% expires 1942 87.30 10,483.50 

May 5 350 U. S. 2nd 4% expires 1942 87.36 305.76 

May 5 12,000 U. S. 4th 4% expires 1938 87.42 10,497.90 

May 5 300 U. S. 4th 4*/ 4 expires 1938 87.50 262.50 

May 5 500 U. S. 4th 4*A expires 1938 (Amer. Liby. 

Assn.) 500.00 

May 5 500 U. S. 5th 4M expires 1923 (Amer. Liby. 

Assn.) 500.00 

May 5 100 U. S. 3rd 4% expires 1928 90.64 

1922 

January 1 Cash on hand, United States Trust Co 357.50 

$30,667.80 

Carnegie Fund, Income Account 

1921 

January 15 Balance $1,174.77 

February 1 Int. New York Central 300.00 

February 1 Int. Missouri Pacific 375.00 

March 1 Seaboard Air Line 200.00 

March 15 Int. U. S. Bond 7.42 

May 2 Cleveland Terminal 300.00 

May 1 Int. United States Steel 437.50 

July 1 Int. Western Union Telegraph 375.00 

July 1 Int. American Telephone and Telegraph 300.00 

August 1 Int. New York Central 300.00 

August 1 Int. Missouri Pacific 375.00 

September 1 Int. Seaboard Air Line 200.00 

September 15 Int. U. S. Government 4*4 11.71 

November 1 Int. Cleveland Terminal 300.00 

November 1 Int. United States Steel 437.50 

December 1 Int. on deposits 75.84 

$5,169.74 

Disbursements 

1921 

May 5 Accrued Int. on U. S. Bonds 1.18 

May 5i Accrued Int. on U. S. Bonds .59 

June 8 E. D. Tweedell, treasurer 2,000.00 

December 7 E. D. Tweedell, treasurer 2,000.00 

December 2 United States Trust Company Commission 75.00 

1922 

January 15 Cash on hand, United States Trust Company 1,092.97 



TREASURER'S REPORTS 



77 



TREASURER'S REPORTS 
January 1 to April 30, 1922 

The annual financial reports for the calen- 
dar year 1921 for all funds except Endow- 
ment Funds were printed in the January 
Bulletin. The annual report of the Trustees 
of the Endowment Fund and of the Finance 
Committee are printed here. 

The financial statements of the Treasurer 
for January 1 to April 30, 1922, are printed 
here for information. 



GENERAL FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance, January 1 

Membership Annual dues 

Life memberships 

War Funds (for year 1922) 

Interest, December to April (in- 
clusive) 



Expenditures 

Bulletin $ 1,815.21 

Conference 142.91 

Committee 129.00 

Salaries 5,480.08 

Additional service 485.34 

Supplies 752.67 

Postage, telephone and tele- 
graph 357.06 

Travel 56.77 

Miscellaneous 187.90 

President's Contingemt 

Fund 19.66 

Trustees' Endowment Fund 175.00 



$ 6,664.20 

11,026.90 

175.00 

1,000.00 

56.20 
$18,922.30 



Balance, April 30 9,070.70 

Permanent balance, Nat'l 
Bank of the Republic... 250.00 



PUBLISHING FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance, January 1 

Sale of publications 

Booklist subscriptions 

Sale of books (Review copies) 

Interest, Dec. to April (inclusive) . . 



Expenditures 

Salaries $ 2,656.36 

Printing Booklist 1,234.85 

Advertising 468.32 

Express and postage 631.79 

Supplies 883.69 

Incidentals 200.84 

Publications 2,377.94 

Travel 477.50 



Balance, April 30. 



9,601.60 



9,320.70 
$18,922.30 



$ 449.33 

4,408.44 

5,177.08 

900.00 

10.52 

$10,945.37 



8,931.29 
2,014.08 

$10,945.37 



JAMES L. WHITNEY FUND 

Principal and interest, January 1... $ 664.21 

Interest, January 1 1.78 

Eighteenth installment, January 21, 

1922 35.85 

April 15, Liberty Bond Coupons.... 12.74 



Fund accounted for as follows: 
U. S. 4th Liberty Loan 
4^4 Bonds, par value 

$600.00 $ 530.68 

Cash in Savings Account, 

Union Trust Company 183.90 



WAR FUNDS 
Receipts 

Balance, January 1 

United War Work Campaign 

Miscellaneous 

Interest on bank balance, Dec. to 
April (inclusive) 



Expenditures 

Headquarters expenses $ 1,000.00 

Hospitals 5,824.94 

Paris 250.00 

Preserving War Service 

Material k 299.73 

Miscellaneous 685.30 



Cash on hand, April 30. ..$21,862.70 

Liberty Bonds and Thrift 

Stamps (par value) 31,550.00 

U. S. Gov. Cert, of In- 
debtedness 25,263.74 

Librarians and Agents.... 525.00 



$ 714.58 



$ 714.58 



$77.071.84 

9,737.50 

162.10 

289.97 
$87,261.41 



$ 8,059.97 



79,201.44 
$87,261.41 
BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY FUND 

Receipts 

Balance, January 1 $16,834.00 

New cash contributions and 
payments on pledges 

Cash $ 3,888.63 

Liberty Bonds 1,000.00 

4,888.63 
21.22 



Interest, Liberty Bond coupons.... 
Interest, Dec. to April (Inclusive) . . 



Expenditures 

Books for the Blind $ 709.41 

Library Extension 300.14 

Booklist, Reading Courses 

and book publicity 1,080.04 

General library publicity. . 328.35 

Recruiting 130.22 

Trustees' Endowment Fund 2,765.67 



135.40 



$21,879.25 



Balance, April 30 $15,565.42 

Liberty Bonds 1,000.00 



$ 5,313.83 



16,565.42 

$21,879.25 
Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD D. TWEEDELL, 
May. 17th, 1922 Treasurer. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



\MERICANLlBRARYASSOCIATION 

OL. 16, No. 5 CHICAGO, ILL. SEPTEMBER, 1922 



A. L. A. 

HANDBOOK 

1922 




PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY. 



Entered as second-class matter December 27, 1909, at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CONTENTS 

Charter 484 

Purpose of the Association, membership and dues 485 

Constitution and' by-laws 486 

Memberships classified 491 

Past meetings and attendance 493 

Honor roll of attendance at conferences 494 

Past officers 495 

Officers, 1922-23 497 

Council 49 

Committees 501 

Endowment funds 50 

Publications 50 

Sections and section officers 51 

Affiliated national organizations 51 

Other national library organizations 51 

State aqd provincial library associations 51 

Library clubs 517 

State and provincial library commissions 51 

Library schools 52i 

Library periodicals 52 

List of members 52 

Necrology 64 



CHARTER 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Be it known, that whereas Justin Win- Now, therefore, I, Henry B. Peirce, Sec 
sor, C. A. Cutter, Samuel S. Green, James retary of the Commonwealth of Massa 
L. Whitney, Melvil Dui, Fred B. Perkins chusetts, do hereby certify that said Justin 
and Thomas W. Bicknell, have associated Winsor, C. A. Cutter, Samuel S. Green, 
themselves with the intention of forming James L. Whitney, Melvil Dui, Fred B 
a corporation under the name of the Amer- Perkins and Thomas W. Bicknell, their as- 
ican Library Association for the purpose sociates and successors, are legally organ 
of promoting the library interests of the ized and established as, and are herebj 
country by exchanging views, reaching made an existing corporation under th 
conclusions, and inducing co-operation in name of the American Library Association 
all departments of bibliothecal science with the powers, rights, and privileges 
and economy; by disposing the public and subject to the limitations, duties, am 
mind to the founding and improving of restrictions, which by law appertain there- 
libraries; and by cultivating good will to. 

among its own members, and have com- Witness my official signature hereunto 

plied with the provisions of the statutes subscribed, and the seal of the Common- 

of this Commonwealth in such case made wealth of Massachusetts hereunto affixed 

and provided, as appears from the certifi- this tenth day of December in the year of 

cate of the President, Treasurer and Ex- our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 

ecutive Board of said corporation, duly ap- seventy-nine. 

proved by the Commissioner of Corpora- HENRY B. PEIRCE, 

tions, and recorded in this office: Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

484 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Organized Oct. 6, 1876; Incorporated Dec. 10, 1879 

The American Library Association is an organization of librarians, library trustees 
and others interested in libraries. It was founded in 1876 as the immediate result of a 
three days' conference held in connection with the Centennial exhibition. 

Its Purpose 

To foster the development of libraries and promote the use of books. 

To give through its Headquarters and committees advisory assistance to all who 
are interested in library establishment, extension and development. 

To maintain an Employment Bureau which will serve librarians seeking positions, 
and libraries which need librarians and assistants. 

To attract promising young men and women who have the necessary personal and 
educational qualifications, to library work as a profession. 

To hold conferences for the discussion of library topics, and to publish the confer- 
ence Papers and proceedings for members of the Association. 

To publish books, periodicals and pamphlets which will aid in the establishment of 
libraries, and which will aid trustees and librarians in rendering library service. 

To raise the professional standards, dignify library service, and improve library 
salaries. i 

To assist in making books a vital, working, educational force in American life, and 
in making libraries easily accessible to all the people. 

Headquarters Office 

The executive and publishing offices of the Association are at 78 East Washington 
Street, Chicago, on the second floor of the Chicago Public Library building. Members 
visiting Chicago may have their mail sent to this address and are cordially invited to 
use the office as headquarters. 

Change of Address 

Any change of address or position should be reported promptly to the Headquarters 
Office. 

Membership and Dues 

Any person or institution interested in library work may become a member. The 
annual dues are two dollars for individuals who receive the Bulletin (not including the 
Handbook and Proceedings) and four dollars for those who receive the Bulletin complete, 
including the Handbook and Proceedings. An entrance fee of one dollar must be paid by 
individuals upon joining or rejoining if membership has lapsed. 

Institutional membership is five dollars per year. 

Contributing members are persons, institutions or organizations paying twenty-five 
dollars annually. 

Sustaining members are persons, institutions or organizations paying one hundred 
dollars or more annually. 

On payment of fifty dollars any individual member may become a life member. 

All applications for membership and remittances for dues should be sent to A. L. A. 
Headquarters. 

Benefits of Membership 

Every member of the A. L. A. helps with personal influence and financial support 
to promote the development of libraries and the improvement of library service, by 
helping to carry on the work of a great international library organization. 

All members have the privilege of voting at meetings, have the advantage of special 
travel and hotel rates at conferences and have their names and addresses printed in the 
Handbook. 

Members also receive copies of the A. L. A. Bulletin as noted in the paragraphs above. 
Institutional members receive 10 per cent discount on all orders amounting to one 
dollar or more, not including The Booklist. 

485 



CONSTITUTION OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 



Adopted 1921 



Name 



Sec. 1. The name of this body shall be 
the American Library Association. 

Object 

Sec. 2. The object of the American Li- 
brary Association shall be to promote 
library service and librarianship. 

Membership 

Sec. 3. Members. Any person or insti- 
tution interested in library work may be- 
come a mem'ber on paying- the annual dues. 

Sec. 4. Honorary Members. On nom- 
ination of the Council, honorary members 
may be elected by unanimous vote at any 
meeting of the Association. 

Sec. 5. Contributing and Sustaining 
Members. Any person or institution elig- 
ible for or elected to membership may be- 
come a contributing or a sustaining mem- 
ber on payment of the required annual 
sums. 

Sec. 6. Life Members. Any person 
eligible for or elected to membership may 
become a life member by paying the re- 
quired amounts. 

Meetings 

Sec. 7. Annual Meetings. There shall 
be an annual meeting of the Association 
at such place and time as may be deter- 
mined by the Executive Board. 

Sec. 8. Special Meetings. Special meet- 
ings of the Association may be called by 
the Executive Board, and shall be called 
by the president on request of fifty mem- 
bers of the Association. At least one 
month's notice shall be given, and only 
business specified in the call shall be 
transacted. 

Sec. 9. Votes by Institutional Members. 

The vote of an institutional member shall 
be cast by the duly designated representa- 
tive whose credentials are filed with the 
secretary. In the absence of such desig- 



nation or of such delegate, the vote may 
be cast only by the chief executive officer 
of the institution. 

Sec. 10. Quorum. Fifty members shall 
constitute a quorum. 

Management 

Sec. 11. Executive Board. The admin- 
istration of the affairs of the Association 
shall be vested in the Executive Board, 
which shall consist of the president, first 
vice-president, second vice-president, treas- 
urer and eight other members. The mem- 
bers of the Executive Board, other than 
the president, the vice-presidents and the 
treasurer, shall be elected as hereafter 
specified. At the annual meeting of 1921 
there shall be elected by ballot four per- 
sons to serve as new members of the Ex- 
ecutive Board. Immediately after their 
election they shall divide themselves by 
lot into two equal classes, of which the 
terms of the first class shall expire three 
years later, and of the second class four 
years later. At each annual meeting 
thereafter two members shall be elected 
to the Executive Board to serve for four 
years. 

Sec. 12. The Executive Board shall have 
power to fill all vacancies in office pro 
tempore, the person so elected by the Ex- 
ecutive Board to serve only until the next 
annual meeting of the Association, except 
that in the case of the death, resignation 
or inability to serve of the president of the 
Association, the ranking vice-president 
shall become president. The election of 
a member of the Executive Board to the 
office of president, vice-president or treas- 
urer shall create a vacancy in the Board. 

Sec. 13. Meetings of the Executive 
Board may be called by the President at 
such times and places as he may desig- 
nate, and shall be called upon request of 
a majority of the Board. 

Sec. 14. Quorum. A majority shall con- 
stitute a quorum of the Executive Board. 



486 



HANDBOOK 



487 



Sec. 15. Finance Committee. There 
shall be a finance committee of three, the 
chairman of which shall be chosen from 
the Executive Board. The finance com- 
mittee shall prepare annual and supple- 
mentary budgets, within which appropria- 
tions shall be made by the Executive 
Board, and no expense shall be incurred 
in behalf of the Association by any offi- 
cer or committee in excess of the author- 
ized appropriation. The finance commit- 
tee shall audit the accounts of the secre- 
tary, treasurer, trustees of the endowment 
fund, treasurer of the Publishing Board 
and all other accounts, and report to the 
Association at the annual meeting. 

Sec. 16. Policy. No question involving 
the policy of the Association as such shall 
be voted upon by the Association until 
said question has been referred to the 
Council, and a report thereon made by the 
Council to the Association; but the Council 
shall make a report upon every question 
so referred to it not later than at the next 
session of the Association held after such 
reference. 

Sec. 17. Votes by Correspondence. Ap- 
proval in writing by a majority of a board 
or committee shall have the force of a vote, 
if conducted under the conditions specified 
in the by-laws. 

Officers and Committees 

Sec. 18. The officers of the Association 
shall be a president, first and second vice- 
presidents, secretary, treasurer, and as- 
sistant treasurer. The president, vice- 
presidents and treasurer shall be elected 
at each annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion. The secretary and assistant treas- 
urer, who shall be a trust company, shall 
be chosen by the Executive Board, shall 
hold office at its pleasure, and receive 
such salaries as it shall fix. 

Sec. 19. Officers. The president, vice- 
presidents, secretary, treasurer, and as- 
sistant treasurer, shall perform the duties 
usually pertaining to their respective of- 
fices. 

Sec. 20. The Executive Board shall ap- 
point all other officers and standing com- 



mittees of the Association and shall fix the 
salaries of all paid officers and employees. 

Sec. 21. Terms of Office. All officers 
and all elected members of the Executive 
Board shall serve until the adjournment 
of the meeting at which their successors 
are chosen. 

Council 

Sec. 22. Membership. The Council 
shall consist of the Executive Board, all 
ex-presidents of the Association who con- 
tinue as members thereof, all presidents 
of affiliated societies, fifty members elected 
by the Association at large, and one mem- 
ber from each state, provincial, or regional 
library association or club which com- 
plies with the conditions for such rep- 
resentation set forth in the by-laws. The 
elected members shall be chosen, ten each 
year, by the Association, to hold office for 
five years. 

Sec. 23. Meetings. The Council shall 
hold at least two meetings a year, one of 
which shall be at the time and place of 
the annual meeting of the Association. 
Other meetings may be called by the 
President and shall be called upon request 
of twenty members. Twenty members 
shall constitute a quorum of the Council. 

Sec. 24. Duties. The Council shall con- 
sider and discuss library questions of pro- 
fessional and pu'blic interest, and shall 
from time to time issue reports thereon; 
and it may by a two-thirds vote adopt res- 
olutions on these or any other matters 
of library policy or practice; and no such 
resolutions other than votes of thanks 
shall be adopted without such reference. 

Endowment Funds 

Sec. 25. All receipts from life member- 
ships and all gifts for general endow- 
ment purposes, shall constitute an endow- 
ment fund, which shall be invested and 
the principal kept forever inviolate. Gifts 
for special purposes accepted by the As- 
sociation shall be kept in separate funds 
which shall be invested and kept invio- 
late. The interest shall be expended as 
the Executive Board may direct, in ac- 
cordance with any conditions made by the 



488 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



donors and in consonance with the ap- 
proved policy of the Association. The en- 
dowment fund shall he in the custody of 
three trustees, one of whom shall be elect- 
ed by ballot at each annual meeting, to 
hold office for three years from the date of 
his election and until his successor shall 
be elected. No money from the endow- 
ment fund shall be invested or expended 
except on check signed 'by a majority of 
the trustees. 

Affiliated Organizations 

Sec. 26. The Council may by vote affi- 
liate with the American Library Associa- 
tion any national society having purposes 
similar to those of the American Library 
Association. The dues of affiliated soci- 
eties shall be based upon the number of 
its members who are not also members of 
the American Library Association as spe- 
cified in the by-laws. 

By-Laws 

Sec. 27. By-laws may be adopted and 
amended by vote of the Association upon 
recommendation of the Executive Board 
or Council or of a special committee ap- 
pointed by the Association to report there- 
on. Any by-law may be suspended by a 
three-fourths vote of those present and 
voting at any meeting of the Association. 

Amendments 

Sec. 28. This Constitution may be 
amended by a three-fourths vote of those 
present and voting at two successive an- 
nual meetings of the Association, pro- 
vided that notice of the proposed amend- 
ments be sent to each member of the 
Association at least one month before 
final adoption. 

BY-LAWS 

Adopted 1921 

Dues 

Sec. 1. Annual Dues, (a) The annual 
membership dues of the Association for in- 
dividuals receiving the A. L. A. Bulletin, 
except the Handbook and the Proceedings, 
shall be two dollars; for libraries and 
other institutions, five dollars, including 



the Bulletin, the Handbook and the Pro- 
ceedings. For all new members of the 
Association and all who rejoin after a 
lapse in membership, there shall be an 
initiation fee of one dollar. For all mem- 
bers of the Association attending any reg- 
ular conference, except those members 
who have paid an initiation fee in the cur- 
rent year, there shall be a registration fee 
of one dollar. The Executive Board shall 
fix the annual dues of individual members 
receiving the Handbook and Proceedings. 

(b) On payment of twenty-five dollars 
annually, any person, institution or or- 
ganization eligible for or elected to mem- 
bership may become a contributing mem- 
ber; on payment of one hundred dollars 
or more annually, any such person, insti- 
tution or organization may become a sus- 
taining member. Such members shall re- 
ceive the Bulletin including the Handbook 
and the Proceedings. 

Sec. 2. Life Members. On payment of 
fifty dollars, any individual member may 
become a life member. Such members 
shall receive the Bulletin including the Hand- 
book and the Proceedings. 

Sec. 3. Affiliated Societies. The an- 
nual dues of affiliated societies shall be 
ten cents per capita for all members who 
are not members of the American Library 
Association. 

Sec. 4. Chapter Dues. Annual dues for 
each chapter shall be five dollars, and five 
cents for each member of the chapter in 
excess of fifty. 

Sec. 5. Unpaid Dues. Members whose 
dues are unpaid on July 1 of each year 
and who shall continue such delinquency 
for one month after notice of the same 
has been sent by the treasurer, shall be 
dropped from membership. 

Sec. 6. New Members. Each new mem- 
ber shall be assigned a consecutive num- 
ber in the order of joining and paying 
dues. A delinquent member rejoining and 
paying his arrears of annual dues shall re- 
ceive his original number. 

Sec. 7. Fiscal Year. The fiscal year of 
the Association shall be the calendar year. 



HANDBOOK 



489 



Nominations and Elections 

Sec. 8. (a) At least six months prior to 
the regular meeting of the Association the 
Executive Board shall appoint a commit- 
tee of five, no one of whom shall be a 
member of the Board, to nominate can- 
didates for elective positions to be filled. 
No person shall be nominated unless his 
consent to such nomination be previously 
obtained. The Board shall also appoint a 
committee on election which shall have 
charge of the counting and tabulation of 
all votes cast at the regular election. 

(b) The report of the nominating com- 
mittee shall be published in the Bulletin 
at least three months prior to the regular 
meeting of the Association, and shall place 
such nominations before the Association 
on a printed ballot which shall be known 
as the "Official Ballot." The nominating 
committee shall also include on such bal- 
lot other nominations filed with the secre- 
tary by any fifteen members of the Asso- 
ciation at least two months before the 
regular meeting, provided written consent 
of these nominees be filed with such nom- 
inations. 

(c) At least six weeks prior to the reg- 
ular meeting, the secretary shall mail a 
copy of the ballot to each of the mem- 
bers of the Association. Ballots shall be 
marked and returned to the secretary in 
sealed envelopes bearing on the outside 
the name and address of the member vot- 
ing, together with the words "Official Bal- 
lot." 

(d) The secretary shall check on a list 
of members the names of all members 
whose votes are received. The Committee 
on Election shall thereupon provide for 
the counting and tabulation of the mail 
votes but shall not make public the result 
thereof until the votes taken at the reg- 
ular meeting shall have been also counted. 
Election shall be held at the regular meet- 
ing, at which ballots (each enclosed in an 
envelope, sealed and bearing the name and 
address of the member voting), may be 
cast by any members in attendance whose 
ballots by mail have not already been 
received and checked. The candidate re- 
ceiving the largest number of votes shall 



be elected. In case of a tie vote the 
successful candidate shall be determined 
by lot. 

(e) The position and residence of each 
nominee shall be given on the Official Bal- 
lot. 

State Representation in Council 

Sec. 9. Each state, provincial, terri- 
torial association (or any association cov- 
ering two or more such geographical divi- 
sions not having separate associations) 
which shall, according to the provisions 
of the by-laws of the Association, become 
a chapter of the A. L. A. shall be entitled 
to one delegate in the A. L. A. Council. 

Delegates shall 'be elected at meetings 
of the chapters, by the members of the 
chapter, to -become members of the 'Coun- 
cil to serve until the next election of offi- 
cers of the Association. Terms of dele- 
gates shall be coextensive with the term 
of the president of the Association. 

Delegates before exercising the privi- 
leges of membership in the Council shall 
file with the secretary of the Association 
satisfactory credentials of qualification. 

Sec. 10. There shall be at least two 
meetings of the Council annually. 

Chapters 

Sec. 11. State, territorial or regional 
chapters of the American Library Associa- 
tion may be established by the Council at 
the written request of ten members of 
the A. L. A. residing in the territory 
within which the. chapter is desired. 

Chapters may adopt their own consti- 
tution and by-laws if they are harmoni- 
ous with the Constitution and By-Laws of 
the A. L. A. 

Chapters may admit members who are 
not members of the A. L. A. 

A member of the A. L. A. who is also 
a member of more than one state or ter- 
ritorial chapter shall be accredited only to 
the chapter in the state in which he re- 
sides. 

Local chapters may be authorized by the 
Council but such chapters shall not have 
representation in the Council. 

Chapters may be dissolved by the Coun- 
cil for good and sufficient reasons, and 



490 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



shall be dissolved if the chapter becomes 
inactive or the membership becomes less 
than the required minimum. 

Sections 

Sec. 12. Petitions for the establishment 
of sections shall be presented only by 
members actively engaged in the work of 
the proposed section and by not legs than 
twenty-five such members. Before such 
a petition be granted by the Council, it 
shall be referred to a special committee, 
to be appointed by the president, which 
shall investigate and report to the Coun- 
cil as to the desirability of such section. 
The Council shall have power to discon- 
tinue a section when in the opinion of the 
Council, the usefulness of that section has 
ceased. 

Sec. 13. Sections may, if they so elect, 
charge annual dues, limit their own mem- 
bership, issue publications, and in gen- 
eral carry on activities along the line of 
their own interest, accounting for their 
own funds solely to their own members. 

Sec. 14. No authority is granted any 
section to incur expense on behalf of 
the Association or to commit the Associa- 
tion as such by any declaration of policy. 

Sec. 15. Provision shall be made by the 
Executive Board for sessions of the vari- 
ous sections at regular meetings of the 
Association, and the programs for the 
same shall be prepared by the officers of 
sections in consultation with the program 
committee. Sessions of sections shall be 
open to any member of the Association 
but no person may vote in any section un- 
less registered as a member of the same. 
The registered members of each section 
shall, at the final session of each annual 
meeting, choose officers to serve until the 
close of the next annual meeting. 

Sec. 16. There shall be a standing com- 
mittee of the Council consisting of four 
members, the chairman of which shall be 
the president of the Association, one mem- 
ber to be appointed each year by the presi- 
dent of the Association to serve for three 
years. The committee shall prepare out- 
lines of matters for discussion at Council 



meetings, and shall mail them to the 
Council in advance of the meetings. 

Publications 

Sec. 17. The Executive Board shall 
administer all publishing activities of 
the Association. It shall appoint annually 
an editorial committee of five members of 
the Association, who are not employees 
thereof, to advise upon material for publi- 
cation. The members thereof shall serve 
until their successors are appointed. The 
Executive Board shall make an annual re- 
port to the Association on its publishing 
activities. 

"Committees 

Sec. 18. There shall be a committee on 
committees, which after conference with 
the president, shall recommend to the Ex- 
ecutive Board the appointment or discon- 
tinuance of such committees, other than 
those provided by the Constitution and 
By-Laws, as the needs of the Association 
may require. The Committee on Commit- 
tees shall define the duties of all com- 
mittees so to be appointed. All commit- 
tees shall be appointed annually and their 
members shall hold office until their suc- 
cessors are qualified or the committee is 
discontinued. 

Committees created by the Council or by 
its presiding officer upon the request of the 
Council are limited as to functions to con- 
sideration of or assistance in the business 
of the Council. 

Sec. 19. The Executive Board shall at 
each annual meeting of the Association 
appoint a committee of three on resolu- 
tions, which shall prepare and report to 
the Association suitable resolutions. 

Votes by Correspondence 

Sec. 20. Approval in writing by a ma- 
jority of a board or committee shall have 
the force of a vote, provided not more 
than one member expresses dissent. If 
one member dissents, the vote shall not 
be effective until such member has had 
opportunity to communicate his views to 
the other members, and a second vote has 
been taken. If two members on the sec- 



HANDBOOK 491 

ond mail vote dissent, the action shall bership in the Association or to members 
fail. of affiliated societies. 

Privileges of Membership Regional Meetings 

Sec. 21. The privileges and advantages Sec. 22. The Executive Board may ar- 

of the A. L. A. conferences shall be avail- range for regional meetings to include 

able only to those holding personal mem- such chapters or library associations as it 

bership or representing institutional mem- sees fit to group. 

MEMBERSHIPS CLASSIFIED 

MEMBERSHIP BY POSITION 

Institutional Members 625 

Affiliated State Associations 30 

Trustees 155 

Library Commissions 56 

Chief Librarians 1458 

Heads of Departments and Branch Librarians 1041 

Assistants 1703 

Library School Instructors 55 

Library School Students 39 

Editors 27 

Commercial Agents 98 

Others 397 

Total .... . 5684 



492 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



MEMBERSHIP BY STATES 





1920 


1921 


1922 




1920 


1921 


1922 


Alabama 


38 


48 


53 


\Vest Virginia . . 


7 


8 


12 


Arizona 


8 


10 


8 


\Visconsin 


124 


133 


160 


Arkansas 


10 


12 


11 


Wyoming 


11 


11 


12 


California 


208 


234 


263 


Canada 


46 


58 


80 


Colorado 


75 


69 


63 


Alberta 


5 


7 


7 


Connecticut 


112 


131 


125 


British Columbia. 


4 


6 


6 


Delaware 


13 


13 


11 


Manitoba 


3 


3 


3 


District of Columbia. 
Florida 


132 
15 


151 
17 


146 
23 


New Brunswick... 
Nova Scotia 


2 
3 


2 
1 


2 
1 


Georgia 


41 


34 


31 


Ontario 


21 


27 


49 


Idaho 


13 


11 


10 


Prince Edward 








Illinois 


378 


396 


452 


Island 


o 


1 


1 


Indiana 


182 


211 


238 


Quebec 


7 


11 


9 


Iowa 


93 


120 


118 


Saskatchewan 


1 


1 


2 




45 


58 


55 










Kentucky 


38 


38 


40 


Total . 


4397 


5228 


5609 


Louisiana 


11 


13 


15 


FOREIGN 








Maine 


29 


40 


36 


(Incl'd'g U S Depend'cies) 








Maryland 


43 


49 


43 


Australia 


3 


4 


3 


Massachusetts 


335 


518 


467 


Belgium 








1 


Michigan . . 


226 


263 


439 


Canal Zone 


3 


3 


2 


Minnesota . ... 


134 


191 


177 


China 


7 


11 


11 


Mississippi 


6 


6 


8 


Cuba 


2 


3 


1 


Missouri 


101 


173 


166 


Denmark 


1 


1 


1 


Montana 


19 


25 


20 


England 


7 


8 


9 


Nebraska 


42 


51 


51 


Finland 


1 


1 





Nevada 


1 


2 


2 


France 


6 


7 


6 


New Hampshire 


42 


51 


48 


Germany 


1 


2 


1 


New Jersey 


149 


165 


160 


Hawaii 


8 


10 


11 


New Mexico 


5 


4 


5 


Holland 


1 


1 


1 


New York 


678 


748 


770 


India 


5 


5 


6 


North Carolina 


23 


29 


33 


Japan 


3 


3 


2 


North Dakota 


24 


24 


24 


New Zealand 


2 


1 


1 


Ohio 


254 


333 


440 


Newfoundland 








1 


Oklahoma 


26 


39 


39 


Norway 





2 





Oregon 


78 


78 


74 


Philippine Islands... 


9 


5 


5 


Pennsylvania 


259 


269 


308 


Porto Rico 


1 


2 


2 


Rhode Island 


42 


73 


60 


Russia 


1 








South Carolina . 


13 


10 


14 


Scotland 


1 


1 


1 


South Dakota 


21 


22 


18 


South America 


2 


1 





Tennessee 


30 


31 


39 


Sweden .... 


1 


2 


1 


Texas 


62 


68 


62 


Turkey 





3 


1 


Utah 


13 


12 


11 


Switzerland 





1 


5 


Vermont 


22 


31 


27 


Union of So Africa. 


2 


2 


3 


Virginia 


20 


77 


32 










Washington 


100 


104 


110 


Grand Total 


4464 


5307 


5684 



MEMBERSHIP BY CLASSES 

1920 1921 1922 

Honorary Members 3 3 3 

Life Fellows 222 

Life Members 150 169 174 

Perpetual Members 3 3 3 

Institutional Members 580 573 625 

Affiliated State Associations 27 27 30 

Annual Members . . 3699 4530 4847 



Total . 4464 



5307 5684 



PAST MEETINGS AND ATTENDANCE 



Date 


Place 


Attend- 
ance 


Nos. in order 
Membership 
of joining 


Total 
Mem- 
ber- 
ship 


1876 Ort 4-fi 


Philadelphia 


103 


1- 69 




1R77 ^pnt 4-fi 


New York 


66 


70- 122 




1877 Oct 2-5 


London (international) 


21* 






1878* 


No meeting 




123- 196 




1R70 Tune "?fl-Tulv 2 


Boston 


162 


197- 385 




1880 


No meeting 




386- 397 




1881 Feb 9-12 


Washington 


70 


398- 413 




1882 May 24-27 


Cincinnati 


47 


414- 454 




1R8T Ann- 14-17 


Buffalo 


72 


455- 470 




1884 


No meeting 




471- 476 




1885 Sept 8-11 


Lake George, N Y 


87 


477- 513 




1886 Tulv 7-10 


Milwaukee 


133 


514- 594 




1887 Aug 30-Sept 2 


Thousand Islands, N. Y 


186 


595- 700 




1888* Scot 25-28 


Catskill Mts., N. Y 


32 


701- 725 




1889 Mav 8-11 


St. Louis 


106 


726- 771 




1890 Sept 9-13 


Fabyans (White Mts.) 


242 


772- 884 




1891 Oct 12-16 


San Francisco 


83 


885- 939 




1892 May 16-21 


Lakewood, Baltimore, Washington. 


260 


940- 1081 




1893 July 13-22 


Chicago 


311 


1082- 1230 




1894 Sept 17-22 


Lake Placid, N. Y 


205 


1231- 1315 




1895 Aug 13-21 


Denver and Colorado Springs... 


147 


1316- 1377 




1896 Sept 1-8 


Cleveland 


363 


1378- 1550 




1897 June 21-25 


Philadelphia 


315 


1551- 1684 




1897 July 13-16 


London (international) 


94 






1898 July 5-9 . 


Lakewood-on-Chautauqua 


494 


1685- 1825 




1899 May 9-13 


Atlanta, Ga 


215 


1826- 1908 




1900 June 6-12 


Montreal, Canada 


452 


1909- 2116 




1901* July 3-10 


Waukesha, Wis 


460 


2117- 2390 




1902 June 14-20 


Boston and Magnolia, Mass 


1018 


2391- 2735 




1903 June 22-27 


Niagara 


684 


2736- 2975 




1904* Oct 17-22 


St. Louis 


577 


2976- 3239 




1905 July 4-8 


Portland, Ore 


359 


3240- 3497 




1906 June 29-July 6 


Narragansett Pier, R. I 


891 


3498- 3979 




1907 May 23-29 


Asheville, N. C 


478 


3980- 4325 


1808 


1908 June 22-27 


Minnetonka, Minn 


658 


4326- 4557 


1907 


1909 June 28-July 3 


Bretton Woods, N. H 


620 


4558- 4704 


1835 


1910 June 30-Tuly 6 


Mackinac Island, Mich 


533 


4705- 5010 


2005 


1910 Aug 28-31 


Brussels (international) 


46* 






1911 May 18-24 


Pasadena, Calif 


582 


5011- 5217 


2046 


1912* June 26-Tuly 2 


Ottawa, Canada 


704 


5218- 5628 


2365 


1913 June 23-28 


Kaaterskill, N. Y 


892 


5629- 6018 


2563 


1914 Mav 25-29 


Washington, D. C 


1366 


6019- 6486 


2905 


1915 June 3-9 


Berkeley, Calif 


779 


6487- 6862 


3024 


1916 June 26-July 1 


Asbury Park N J 


1386 


6863- 7260 


3188 


1917 June 21-27 


Louisville, Ky 


824 


7261- 7622 


3346 


1918 July 1-6 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y 


620 


7623- 7927 


3380 


1919 June 23-27 


Asbury Park, N. J 


1168 


7928- 8843 


4178 


1920 June 2-7 


Colorado Springs 


553 


8844- 9394 


4464 


1921 June 20-25 


Swampscott, Mass 


1899 


9395-10431 


5307 


1922 June 26-July 1 


Detroit Mich 


1839 


10432-11347 


5684 













American attendance. 



493 



HONOR ROLL OF ATTENDANCE AT CONFERENCES 

COMPILED BY MRS. HENRY JAMES CARR 

For earlier honor rolls and other statistics, see Library Journal, 1892 conference, p. 24, vol. 23, 
pp. 238-9; and previous Handbooks. 

The following members have attended the number of conferences indicated: 

38 Henry James Carr. 

34 Mrs. Henry James Carr. 

32 Frank Pierce Hill. 

31 Mary Eileen Ahern. 

30 Clement W. Andrews, George E. Wire. 

29 Richard Rogers Bowker, Frederick Winthrop Faxon. 

27 Mrs. Alice G. Evans. 

26 Thomas Lynch Montgomery, Bernard C. Steiner. 

25 Melvil Dewey. 

24 John Cotton Dana, Tessa L. Kelso. 

23 Gardner M. Jones, Josephine A. Rathbone, Ernest C. Richardson, James I. Wyer. 

22 Johnson Brigham, Nina E Browne, Linda A. Eastman, George S. Godard, W. T. 
Peoples, Willis K. Stetson, Purd B. Wright. 

21 Arthur E. B^twick, George F. Bowerman, William E. Foster, Herbert Putnam. 

20 . H. Hastifgs, Alice S. Tyler. 

19 Walter S. *iscoe, Walter L. Brown, Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool Earl, Caroline M. 
Hewins, Franklin O. Poole, Samuel H. Ranck, Hiller C. Wellman. 

18 Edwin H. Anderson, Marilla W. Freeman, J. C. M. Hanson, Mary Emogene Hazel- 
tine, Washington T. Porter, Edith Tobitt, George B. Utley, Sula Wagner. 

17 Arthur L. Bailey, William Warner Bishop, Electra C. Doren, Mary E. Downey, Mrs. 
H. L. Elmendorf, Jane P. Hubbell, Carl B. Roden, A. J. Small, Caroline M. 
Underhill, Lizzie A. Williams, Halsey W. Wilson, F. Mabel Winchell, William 
F. Yust. 

16 Eliza G. Browning, Mrs. Emma R. Neisser Delfino, Mrs. Frederick W. Faxon, 
Alfred Hafner, N. D. C. Hodges, Judson T. Jennings, R. H. Johnson, William 
C. Lane, Frank C. Patten, Mary E. Robbins, Azariah S. Root, Bessie Sargeant 
Smith, Lutie E. Stearns, Adam Strohm, Mrs. Jessie Palmer Weber. 

15 John R. Anderson, William Beer, Edith E. Clarke, George Watson Cole, Anna R. 
Dougherty, Caroline H. Garland, Chalmers Hadley, Andrew Keogh, George 
Winthrop Lee, Effie L. Power, Abby L. Sargent, Willis F. Sewall, Rose G. 
Stewart, Mrs. George B. Utley, Beatrice Winser. 

14 Robert P. Bliss, Herbert O. Brigham, Harrison W. Craver, Gratia A. Countryman, 
. William R. Eastman, James T. Gerould, Irene A. Hackett, J. LeRoy Harrison, 
Adelaide R. Hasse, B. Pickman Mann, Margaret Mann, Harriet L. Matthews, 
Carl H. Milam, W. C. Rowell, Peter Wolter. 

13 Clara F. Baldwin, Mrs. Rena M. Barickman, Silas H. Berry, Charles H. Brown, 
Demarchus 'C. Brown, Cedric Chivers, Theodore L. Cole, Emma R. Engle, E. 
A. Feazel, Jennie D. Fellows, Frank B. Gay, Sarah E. Coding, Helen E. Haines, 
W. E. Henry, Theresa Hitchler, Jessie F. Hume, Willis Holmes Kerr, Theo- 
dore W. Koch, Charles Martel, May Massee, Charles Alexander Nelson, Glen 
Parker, John F. Phelan, Anna May Price, Charles E. Rush, Helen Sperry, Mary 
L. Titcomb, Adelaide Underhill, Elizabeth B. Wales, Mrs. W. R. Watterson. 

12 Claribel Ruth Barnett, Mrs. R. R. Bowker, June R. Donnelly, Miriam S. Draper, 
Frances E. Earhart, Mary P. Farr, Luther E. Hewitt, Franklin F. Hopper, 
Henry R. Huntting, W. Dawson Johnston, Isabel E. Lord, Andrew H. Mettee, 
Herman H. B. Meyer, Annie Carroll Moore, Katharine Patten, Nina K. Preston, 
Flora B. Roberts, Grace D. Rose, William F. Sanborn, Thorvald Solberg, Eliz- 
abeth P. Thurston, Malcolm G. Wyer. 

11 Sarah B. Askew, Willard Austen, Emma V. Baldwin, Sarah C. N. Bogle, Mrs. John- 
son Brigham, Edith H Cot>b, Georgia S. Davis, Matthew S. Dudgeon, Julia E. 
Elliott, Eva M. Ford, H. J. Gaylord, Frederick C. Hicks, Clara W. Hunt, Ada 
Alice Jones, Mrs. Gardner M. Jones, Mary L. Jones, A. G. S. Josephson, Minnie 
M. Kohler, Ethel F McCollough, Ella M. McLoney, Isadore G. Mudge, Lyman 
P. Osborn, Nellie E. Parham, Edith A. Phelps, Rev. L. M. Robinson, Mary S. 
Saxe, George Thomas Settle, Frances Simpson, Mrs. Laura Speck, William R. 
Watson, Frank H. Whitmore, Mrs. George E. Wire, Charles E. Wright. 

10 Charles H. Barr, Mary J. Booth, Fanny Borden, Edna D. Bullock, Mrs. D. P. 
Corey, Olin S. Davis, Asa Don Dickinson, Josephine E. Durham, Jennie M. 
Flexner, Elizabeth L. Foote, Charlotte H. Foye, Mary Francis, Laura R. Gibbs, 
Harriet B. Gooch, G. L. Hinckley, George lies, LeRoy Jeffers, Grace F. 
Leonard, Mary Medlicott, Florence Overton, John Parker, F. H. Price, M. L. 
Raney, Fannie C. Rawson, Henry N. Sanborn, Robert K. Shaw, Luella M. 
Stevenson, Frank K. Walter, Caroline Webster, P. L. Windsor, Adeline B. 
Zachert. 494 , 



PAST OFFICERS 

The following tabulation of officers of the American Library Association has been 
compiled by Mrs. Henry J. Carr. For additional particulars see Library Journal, vol. 23 : 
567-570, 614-615, 660-661. 

PRESIDENTS 

Presided at the following con- 
Year, ferences: 

Justin Winsor 1 1876-85 Philadelphia; New York; Bos- 
ton; Washington; Cincinnati; 
Buffalo; Lake George. 

William Frederick Poole 2 1885-87 Milwaukee; Thousand Islands. 

Charles Ammi Cutter* 1887-89 Catskill Mts.; St. Louis. 

Frederick Morgan Crunden 4 1889-90 Fabyans (White Mountains) 

Melvil Dewey 1890-July, 1891 

Samuel Swett Green 13 July-Nov., 1891 San Francisco. 

William Isaac Fletcher 10 1891-92 Lakewood, N. J.; Baltimore and 

Washington. 

Melvil Dewey 1892-93 Chicago. 

Josephus Nelson Lamed/ 1 1893-94 Lake Placid, N. Y. 

Henry Munson Utley* 1894-95 Denver. 

John Cotton Dana 1895-96 Cleveland. 

William Howard Brett 13 1896-97 Philadelphia. 

Justin Winsor 1 July-Oct., 1897 

Herbert Putnam Jan.-Aug., 1898 Lakewood (Chautauqua), N. Y. 

William Coolidge Lane 1898-99 Atlanta. 

Reuben Gold Thwaites 7 1899-1900 Montreal. 

Henry James Carr .- 1900-01 Waukesha, Wis. 

John Shaw Billings 8 1901-02 Boston and Magnolia, Mass. 

James Kendall Hosmer 1902-03 Niagara Falls. 

Herbert Putnam 1903-04 St. Louis. 

Ernest Gushing Richardson 1904-05 Portland, Ore. 

Frank Pierce Hill 1905-06 Narragansett Pier, R. I. 

Clement Walker Andrews 1906-07 Asheville, N. C 

Arthur Elmore Bostwick 1907-08 Lake Minnetonka, Minn. 

Charles Henry Gould" 1908-09 Bretton Woods. N. H. 

Nathaniel Dana Carlile Hodges 1909-10 Mackinac Island. Mich. 

James Ingersoll Wyer 1910-11 Pasadena, Calif.* 

Mrs. Theresa West Elmendorf 1911-12 Ottawa, Canada. 

Henry Eduard Legler 11 1912-13 Kaaterskill, N. Y. 

Edwin Hatfield Anderson 1913-14 Washington, D. C 

Hiller Crowell Wellman 1914-15 Berkeley, Calif. 

Mary Wright Plummer 8 1915-16 Asbury Park, N. J.** 

Walter Lewis Brown 1916-17 Louisville, Ky. 

Thomas Lynch Montgomery 1917-18 Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

William Warner Bishop 1918-19 Asbury Park, N. J. 

Chalmers Hadley 1919-20 Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Alice S. Tyler 1920-21 Swampscott, Mass. 

Azariah Smith Root 1921-22 Detroit, Mich. 

George Burwell Utley 1922- 



1 Died Oct. 22. 1897. 
*Died March 1, 1894. 
"Died Sept. 8, 1903. 
*Died Oct. 28, 1911. 
"Died Aug. 15, 1913. 
Died March 11. 1913. 
'Died Oct. 22, 1913. 
"Died Sept. 21, 1916. 
Died Feb. 16, 1917. 
"Died June 16, 1917. 
"Died Sept. 13, 1917. 
"Died Aug. 24, 1918. 
M Died Dec. 8, 1918. 
"Died July 30. 1919. 

President absent. General sessions presided over by ex-presidents Green, Hill, Carr, 
Andrews, Bostwick and ex-vice-president Alice S. Tyler. 

President absent. General sessions presided over by vice-presidents Brown and Hadley. 

495 



496 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



SECRETARIES 

Melvil Dewey, 1876-90. 

William E. Parker and Mary Salome Cut- 
ler, 1890-July 1891. 

Frank Pierce Hill, 1891-95. 

Henry Livingston Elmendorf, 1895-96. 

Rutherford Platt Hayes, 1896-97. 

Melvil Dewey, 1897-98. 

Henry James Carr, 1898-1900. 

Frederick Winthrop Faxon, 1900-02. 

James Ingersoll Wyer, 1902-09. 

(Edward Clarence Hovey, Executive 
Officer, 1905-07.) 

Chalmers Hadley, 1909-11. 

George Burwell Utley, 1911-April 15, 1920. 

Carl H. Milam, April 15, 1920- 

RECORDERS 

Ernest Gushing Richardson, 1887-89. 
George Thomas Little, 1889-92. 
Henry Munson Utley, 1892-93. 
Henry James Cafr, 1893-95. 
Charles Alexander Nelson, 1895-96. 
Gardner Maynard Jones, 1896-97. 
Helen Elizabeth Haines, 1897-1907. 
Lutie Eugenia Stearns, 1907-08. 
Mary Eileen Ahern, 1908. 
Alice Bertha Kroeger, 1908-09. 

REGISTRAR 

Nina E. Browne, 1889-1909. 



TREASURERS 

Melvil Dewey, Oct. 1876-April 1877. 
Charles Evans, April 1877-Sept. 1878. 
Melvil Dewey, 1897-98. 
Frederick Jackson, April 1879-July 1880. 
Melvil Dewey, July 1880-Dec. 1880; Chair- 
man Finance Committee, Dec. 1880- 

March 1881. 
Frederick Jackson, March 1881-May 1882; 

Chairman Finance Committee, May 1882- 

Sept. 1882. 
James Lyman Whitney, Sept. 1882-Oct. 

1886. 

Henry James Carr, Oct. 1886-Sept. 1893. 
George Watson Cole, Sept. 1893-Aug. 1895. 
Edwin Hatfield Anderson, Aug. 1895-Aug. 

1896. 

George Watson Cole, Sept.-Nov. 1896. 
Charles Knowles Bolton, Dec. 1896-June 

1897. 
Gardner Maynard Jones, June 1897-Sept. 

1906. 
George Franklin Bowerman, Sept. 1906- 

Aug. 1907. 
Anderson Hoyt Hopkins, Aug. 1907-July 

1908. 

Purd B. Wright, July 1908-Jan. 1910. 
Carl B. Roden, Jan. 1910-March 1920. 
Edward D. Tweedell, April 1920- 



OFFICERS, 1922-1923 

President 
George B. Utley, The Newberry Library, Chicago, 111. 

First Vice-President 

Josephine A. Rathbone, School of Library Science, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Second Vice-President 

Malcolm G. Wyer, University of Nebraska Library, Lincoln, Neb. 

Treasurer 
Edward D. Tweedell, The John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111. 

Executive Board 

The president, vice-presidents, treasurer and eight other members as follows: 

For term expiring 1923 

Chalmers Hadley, Public Library, Denver, Colo. 
Julia Ideson, Public Library, Houston, Tex. 
(Elected by Executive Board to fill vacancy.) 

For term expiring 1924 

Gratia A. Countryman, Public Library, Minneapolis, Minn. 
George S. Godard, Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Conn. 

For term expiring 1925 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
Carl B. Roden, Public Library, Chicago, I1L 

For term expiring 1926 

William W. Bishop, University of Michigan General Library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
James I. Wyer, New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 



Secretary 
Carl H. Milam, 78 East Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Trustees of Endowment Fund 

W. W. Appleton, New York. (Term expires 1923.) 
J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr., Boston, Mass. (Term expires 1924.) 
Washington T. Porter, Cincinnati, Ohio. (Term expires 1925.) 



497 



COUNCIL OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



1922-1923 



The Executive Board 



George B. Utley, The Newberry Library, 
Chicago, 111. 

Josephine A. Rathbone, School of Library 
Science, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Malcolm G. Wyer, University of Nebraska 
Library, Lincoln, Neb. 

Edward D. Tweedell, The John Crerar Li- 
brary, Chicago, 111. 

Chalmers Hadley, Public Library, Den- 
ver, Colo. 

Julia Ideson, Public Library, Houston, 
Texas. 

Gratia A. Countryman, Public Library 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

George S. Godard, Connecticut State Li- 
brary, Hartford, Conn. 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C. 

Carl B. Roden, Public Library, Chicago, 
111. 

William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan General Library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

James I. Wyer, New York State Library, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Ex-Presidents Now Members 

Melvil Dewey, Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 
J. C. Dana, Free Public Library, Newark, 

N. J. 
Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 
W. C. Lane, Harvard University Library, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
H. J. Carr, Public Library, Scranton, Pa. 

E. C. Richardson, Princeton University 
Library, Princeton, N. J. 

F. P. Hill, Public Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
C. W. Andrews, The John Crerar Library, 

Chicago, 111. 

A. E. Bostwick, Public Library, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

N. D. C. Hodges, Public Library, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

J. I. Wyer, State Library, Albany, N. Y. 

Mrs. H. L. Elmendorf, Public Library, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

E. H. Anderson, Public Library, New York 
City. 



H. C. Wellman, City Library Association, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Walter L. Brown, Public Library, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Thomas L. Montgomery, Historical So- 
ciety of Pennsylvania Library, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan General Library, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Chalmers Hadley, Public Library, Denver, 
Colo. 

Alice S. Tyler, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity Library School, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Azariah S. Root, Oberlin College Library, 
CVberlin, Ohio. 

Presidents of National Affiliated Organiza- 
tions 

Mrs. Jessie Palmer Weber, National Asso- 
ciation of State Libraries, Illinois State 
Historical Library, Springfield, 111. 

Andrew H. Mettee, American Association 
of Law Libraries, Library Company of 
the Baltimore Bar, Baltimore, Md. 

Rebecca B. Rankin, Special Libraries As- 
sociation, Municipal Reference Library, 
New York City. 

William R. Watson, League of Library 
Commissions, State Department of Edu- 
cation, Albany, N. Y. 

Elected by the Association at Large 
Term expires 1923 

W. Dawson Johnston, American Library 
in Paris, Inc., Paris, France. 

Joseph L. Wheeler, Public Library, 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

Mary G. Saxe, Public Library, Westmount, 
P. Q., Can. 

Jessie Fremont Hume, 2261 Loring Place, 
New York City. 

Henry N. Sanborn, Public Library, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Term expires 1924 
Miriam E. Carey, Minnesota State Board 

of Control, St. Paul, Minn. 
Bessie Sargeant Smith, Public Library, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



498 



HANDBOOK 



499 



P. L. Windsor, University of Illinois Li- 
brary, Urbana, 111. 

Lloyd W. Josselyn, Public Library, Birm- 
ingham, Ala. 

C. C. Williamson, Rockefeller Foundation, 
New York City. 

Term expires 1925 

Mary Eileen Ahern, Editor, Public Libraries, 
Chicago, 111. 

W. O. Carson, Inspector of Libraries, 
Province of Ontario, Toronto, Can. 

L. L. Dickerson, Adjutant General's Of- 
fice, Washington, D. C. 

C. F. D. Belden, Public Library, Boston, 
Mass. 

Julia Ideson, Public Library, Houston, 
Texas. 

Term expires 1926 
George H. Locke, Public Library, Toronto, 

Can. 
Cornelia Marvin, Oregon State Library, 

Salem, Oregon. 
Fannie C. Rawson, Kentucky Library 

Commission, Frankfort, Ky. 
Robert K. Shaw, Free Public Library, 

Worcester, Mass. 
Adam Strohm, Public Library, Detroit, 

Mich. 
W. E. Henry, University of Washington 

Library, Seattle, Wash. 
Margaret Mann, Engineering Societies 

Library, New York City. 
Laura Smith, Public Library, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 
Charles Martel, Library of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 

Julia A. Ro'binson, Iowa Library Commis- 
sion, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Term expires 1927 

Electra C. Doren, Public Library, Dayton, 
Ohio. 

Matthew S. Dudgeon, Public Library, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

James T. Gerould, Princeton University 
Library, Princeton, N. J. 

Edith Guerrier, Public Library, Boston, 
Mass. 

Alice I. Hazeltine, Public Library, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Herbert S. Hirshberg, Ohio State Library, 
Columbus, Ohio. 



Ernest J. Reece, Library School of the 
New York Public Library, New York 
City. 

Charles E. Rush, Public Library, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Caroline Webster, Library Sub-Section, 
Hospital Sub-Division, U. S. Veterans' 
Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

Harriet A. Wood, Minn. Department of 
Education, St. Paul, Minn. 

Elected by the Council 

Term expires 1923 

M. Llewellyn Raney, The Johns Hopkins 
University Library, Baltimore, Md. 

Pauline Mc-Cauley, Morganfield, Ky. 

Milton J. Ferguson, California State Li- 
brary, Sacramento, Calif. 

R. R. Bowker, Library Journal, 62 W. 45th 
St., New York City. 

Term expires 1924 

Clara F. Baldwin, Minnesota State Depart- 
ment of Education, Library Division, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

June R. Donnelly, Simmons College Li- 
brary, Boston, Mass. 

Everett R. Perry, Public Library, Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

Alice S. Tyler, Western Reserve Univer- 
city Library School, 'Cleveland, Ohio. 

Purd B. Wright, Public Library, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Term expires 1925 

Arthur L. Bailey, Wilmington Institute 
Free Library, Wilmington, Del. 

John H. Leete, Carnegie Library, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Henry O. Severance, University of Mis- 
souri Library, Columbia, Mo. 

Burton E. Stevenson, Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Charlotte Templeton, Public Library Com- 
mission, Atlanta, Ga. 

Representatives of the Affiliated State Li- 
brary Associations 

The library associations of the follow- 
ing states are now entitled to representa- 
tion in the Council because they have been 
affiliated with the A. L. A. in accordance 
with the By-Laws: Alabama, California, 
Colorado, Connecticut, District of Colum- 



500 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 






bia, Florida, Illinois, Indiana L. Assoc., 
Indiana L. Trustees Assoc., Iowa, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michi- 
gan, Minnesota, Missouri,* Montana, Ne- 
braska, New Hampshire, New York,* 



North Carolina, North Dakota,* Ohio, 
Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee,* 
Texas, Utah,* also the Pacific Northwest 
Library Association. (See pages 515-517 
for officers of these associations.) 



COMMITTEES, 1922-1923 



Bookbinding 

Mary E. Wheelock, Public Library, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, chairman. 
Sarah L. Munson. 
Franklin H. Price. 

Book Buying 

M. L. Raney, Johns Hopkins University 

Library, Baltimore, Md., chairman. 
Carl L. Cannon. 
Asa Don Dickinson. 
Hiller C. Wellman. 
Purd B. Wright. 

Cataloging 

W. W. Bishop, University of Michigan 
General Library, Ann Arbor, Mich., 
chairman. 

T. F. Currier. 

J. C. M. Hanson. 

Sophie K. Hiss. 

Theresa Hitchler. 

Harriet E. Howe. 

A. G. S. Josephson. 

Andrew Keogh. 

Charles Martel. 

Axel Moth. 

Civil Service Relations 

(Appointed by Council) 
George F. Bowerman, Public Library of 

the District of Columbia, Washington, 

D. C, chairman. 
C. F. D. Belden. 
M. J. Ferguson. 
J. T. Jennings. 
Carl B. Roden. 
P. L. Windsor. 

Committee on Committees 

(Appointed by Council) 
C. B. Lester, Wisconsin Free Library Com- 
mission, Madison, chairman. 



'Applications for affiliation received, to be acted 
upon Dec. 29, 1922. 



Jesse Cunningham. 
Anne M. Mulheron. 

Constitution and By-Laws 
Henry N. Sanborn, Public Library, Bridge- 
port, Conn., chairman. 
Matthew S. Dudgeon. 
Malcolm G. Wyer. 

Council Program 
George B. Utley, The Newberry Library, 

Chicago, 111., chairman. 
C. F. D. Belden. 
Fannie C. Rawson. 
Bessie Sargeant Smith. 

Decimal Classification Advisory Committee 

C. W. Andrews, The John Crerar Library, 
Chicago, 111., chairman. 

Mary E. Baker. 

W. S. Biscoe. 

Dorcas Fellows. 

Sophie K. Hiss. 

William S. Merrill. 

Adah Patton. 

C. W. Perley. 

Julia Pettee. 

Editorial 

Hiller C. Wellman, City Library Associa- 
tion, Springfield, Mass., chairman. 

Matthew S. Dudgeon. 

Josephine A. Rathbone. 

Carl B. Roden. 

Joseph L. Wheeler. 

Education 
Harriet A. Wood, Minnesota Department 

of Education, St. Paul, chairman. 
Harriet K. Avery. 
Elva L. Bascom. 
C. C. Certain. 
Annie S. Cutter. 
Anne T. Eaton. 
Alice I. Hazeltine. 
Marion Horton. 
May Ingles. 



HANDBOOK 



501 



Lucy M. Lewis. 
Martha Pritchard. 
O. S. Rice. 
Mary E. Robbins. 
Lillian H. Smith. 
Frank K. Walter. 
Sherman Williams. 
Adeline B. Zachert. 

Elections 
Helen A. Bagley, Public Library, Oak 

Park, 111., chairman. 
Ruth Hammond. 
Harriet E. Leitch. 
James A. McMillan. 
Charles H. Stone. 

Federal and State Relations 
J. I. Wyer, N. Y. State Library, Albany, 

N. Y., chairman. 
Claribel R. Barnett. 
Johnson Brigham. 
Matthew S. Dudgeon. 
Edith Guerrier. 
H. H. B. Meyer. 
C. Seymour Thompson. 
Elizabeth H. West. 
Edwin Wiley. 

Finance 

Carl B. Roden, Public Library, Chicago, 

111., chairman. 
H. W. Graver. 
Louise B. Krause. 

Foreign Periodicals of the War Period 
H. M. Lydenberg, Public Library, New 

York City, chairman. 
Willard Austen. 
J. T. Gerould. 

Hospital Libraries 

E. Kathleen Jones, Div. of Public Libraries, 
Mass. Dept. of Education, Boston, Mass., 
chairman. 

Miriam E. Carey. 

Caroline L. Jones. 

Perrie Jones. 

Harriet Leitch. 

Mrs. Grace W. Myers. 

Elizabeth Pomeroy. 

Grace Shellenberger. 

Institutional Libraries 
Miriam E. Carey, Minn. State Board of 
Control, St. Paul, Minn., chairman. 



W. S. Bassett, State Prison, Concord, N. H. 

Florence R. Curtis. 

E. Kathleen Jones. 

Lydia E. Kinsley. 

Mary B. Palmer. 

Julia A. Robinson. 

Charlotte Templeton. 

Nellie Williams. 

International Relations 
Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, 

Washington, D. C., chairman. 
E. H. Anderson. 
R. R. Bowker. 
John Cotton Dana. 
W. Dawson Johnston. 
T. W. Koch. 
George H. Locke. 
E. C. Richardson. 

Joint Committee of Seven 
(With Special Libraries Association.) 
Chairman to be selected by the Committee. 
Florence Bradley. 
Alta B. Claflin. 
Dorsey W. Hyde, Jr. 
Elwood H. McClelland. 
Samuel H. Ranck. 
Rebecca B. Rankin. 
Nancy W. Sydnor. 

Legislation 

(Appointed by Council.)' 
W. F. Yust, Public Library, Rochester, 

N. Y., chairman. 
W. O. Carson. 
Mary E. Downey. 
M. J. Ferguson. 
W. J. Hamilton. 
John B. Kaiser. 
C. B. Lester. 
S. H. Ranck. 
Fannie C. Rawson. 
Mary U. Rothrock. 
Carl Vitz. 
O. L. Wildermuth. 

Library Administration 
Franklin F. Hopper, Public Library, New 

York City, chairman. 
Jeannette M. Drake. 
J. T. Gerould. 
Ethel F. McCollough. 
William R. Watson. 



502 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Library Co-operation with Hispanic 
Countries 

Peter H. Goldsmith, 407 West 117th St., 

New York City, chairman. 
Frederick C. Hicks. 

Library Co-operation with Other Countries 

William W. Bishop, University of Michi- 
gan General Library, Ann Arbor, Mich., 
chairman. 
W. J. Sykes. 
Katharine H. Wead. 
Sub-committees 
Far East: 

Cornelia Marvin, Oregon State Li- 
brary, Salem, Oregon, chairman. 
Children's Work in Other Countries: 
Annie Carroll Moore, Public Library, 

New York City, chairman. 
Jessie Carson. 

Library Revenues 

(Appointed by Council) 
S. H. Ranck, Public Library, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., chairman. 
Iva M. Butlin. 
J. T. Gerould. 
Clara Howard. 
W. H. Kerr. 
Sarah E. McCardle. 
Killer C. Wellman. 
Mabel Williams. 

Library Service (Committee of Five) 

A. E. Bostwick, Public Library, St. Louis, 

Mo., chairman. 
John B. Kaiser. 
Florence Overton. 
A. S. Root. 
Bessie Sargeant Smith. 

Library Training 

Malcolm G. Wyer, University of Nebraska 

Library, Lincoln, Neb., chairman. 
W. W. Appleton. 
Mary Emogene Hazeltine. 
John A. Lowe. 
Margaret Mann. 
Effie L. Power. 
Martha C. Pritchard. 
Carrie E. Scott. 
Frank K. Walter. 



I 



Membership 

Julia Ideson, Public Library, Houston, 

Texas, chairman. 
Lila May Chapman. 
H. T. Dougherty. 
Howard L. Hughes. 
Esther Johnson. 
John Adams Lowe. 
Sarah E. McCardle. 
Anne M. Mulheron. 
Rena Reese. 
Octavia Rogan. 
Mrs. J. A. Thompson. 
Ida F. Wright. 

National Certification and Training 

Frank K. Walter, University of Minnesota 

Library, Minneapolis, chairman. 
C. C. Certain. 
Mary B. Day. 
Cornelia Marvin. 
Mary B. Palmer. 
Josephine A. Rathbone. 
Ernest J. Reece. 
Adam Strohm. 
Althea Warren. 

Nominating Committee 

Azariah S. Root, Oberlin College Library, 

Oberlin, Ohio, chairman. 
Walter L. Brown. 
Matthew S. Dudgeon. 
Faith E. Smith. 
Willis K. Stetson. 

Program 

George B. Utley, The New'berry Library, 

Chicago, 111., chairman. 
Carl H. Milam. 
Josephine A. Rathbone. 

Public Documents 

Jessie M. Woodford, Public Library, Chi- 
cago, 111., chairman. 
Sylvester J. Carter. 
Mabel Colcord. 
Edith Guerrier. 
Mary A. Hartwell. 
C. B. Lester. 
Charles Reeder. 
Elizabeth West. 
Lawrence C. Wroth. 



HANDBOOK 



503 



Publicity 

\V. II. Kerr, Kansas State Normal School 

Library, Emporia, Kan., chairman. 
Jasmine Britton. 
Earl W. Browning. 
Charles H. Compton. 
Mary Frank. 
Herbert S. Hirshberg. 
L. W. Josselyn. 
C. B. Lester. 
Marian C. Manley. 
Paul M. Paine. 
S. H. Ranck. 
Margaret Reynolds. 
Joseph L. Wheeler. 
Ida F. Wright. 

Reciprocal Relations with Other National 
Organizations 

C. W. Sumner, Public Library, Sioux City, 

Iowa, chairman. 
Paul M. Paine. 
William Teal. 

Recruiting for Library Service 

F. K. W. Drury, Brown University Li- 
brary, Providence, R. I., chairman. 
Gertrude E. Andrus. 
Elsie L. Baechtold. 
Irving R. Bundy. 
Charles H. Compton. 
Lucy T. Fuller. 
Mary Emogene Hazeltine. 
W. E. Henry. 
Louise B. Krause. 
Annie A. Pollard. 
Ernest J. Reece. 
Grace D. Rose. 
Charles H. Stone. 
Sabra W. Vought. 
Althea H. Warren. 

Resources of American Libraries 

J. T. Gerould, Princeton University Li- 
brary, Princeton, N. J., chairman. 
Willard Austen. 
William W. Bishop. 
Frederick C. Hicks. 
Andrew Keogh. 
W. C. Lane. 
A. H. Shearer. 
P. L. Windsor. 



Revision of Adams' Manual of Historical 
Literature 

A. H. Shearer, Grosvenor Library, Buffalo, 

N. Y., chairman. 
H. H. B. Meyer. 

Salaries 

Charles H. Compton, Public Library, St. 

Louis, Mo., chairman. 
Franklin F. Hopper. 
Mary R. Kobetich. 
Sydney B. Mitchell. 
Elizabeth M. Smith. 

Standardization of Libraries 

(Appointed by Council) 
Josephine A. Rathbone, School of Library 

Science, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

chairman. 

Charles H. Compton. 
Gratia A. Countryman. 
Franklin F. Hopper. 
J. T. Jennings. 
John Adams Lowe. 
Florence Overton. 
Grace D. Rose. 
Charles E. Rush. 
William R. Watson. 
Hiller C. Wellman. 
P. L. Windsor. 

Transfer of Library War Service Activities 

H. H. B. Meyer, Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C., chairman. 

Claribel R. Barnett. 

Carl H. Milam. 

J. I. Wyer. 

Travel 

F. W. Faxon, 83 Francis Street, Boston, 
Mass., chairman. 

Charles H. Brown. 

John F. Phelan. 

Franklin H. Price. 

Union List of Periodicals 

(Appointed by Council) 
H. M. Lydenberg, Public Library, New 

York City, chairman. 
C. W. Andrews. 
Willard Austen. 
A. E. Bostwick. 
J. T. Gerould. 



504 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Ventilation and Lighting of Public Library 
Buildings 

(Appointed by Council) 
S. H. Ranck, Public Library, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., chairman. 

C. W. Andrews. 
E. D. Burton. 

D. Ashley Hooker. 
H. M. Lydenberg. 

Ways and Means Committee 

C. W. Andrews, The John Crerar Library, 

Chicago, chairman. 
J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr. 
Harrison W. Craver. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Claypool Earl. 
J. T. Jennings. 

E. C. Richardson. 
Alice S. Tyler. 



Work with the Blind 

Mrs. Gertrude T. Rider, Library of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C., chairman. 
A. E. Bostwick. 
Mary C. Chamberlain. 
Mrs. Grace D. Davis. 
Mrs. Emma N. Delfino. 
Mabel Gillis. 
Lucille Goldthwaite. 
Laura M. Sawyer. 
S. C. Swift. 

Work with the Foreign Born 

Mrs. Eleanor E. Ledbetter, Broadway 
Branch Public Library, Cleveland, Ohio, 
chairman. 

Ida F. Farrar. 

Josephine Gratiaa. 

Dorothy Hurlbert. 

Esther Johnston. 

Margery Quigley. 

Marguerite Reed Wetmore. 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



Following the meeting of 1890 and 
through the efforts of the Trustees Section 
to collect a permanent fund "for publish- 
ing the proceedings of the association," 
the Endowment Fund (see sec. 25 of Con- 
stitution) was established. It amounted 
to $30,667.80 January 1, 1922. 

The Carnegie Endowment Fund was 
created in 1902 by a gift of $100,000 from 
Andrew Carnegie. The income is used 
"for the preparation and publication of 
reading lists, indexes and other biblio- 
graphical aids" which are thought to be 
"specially useful in the circulating li- 
braries." 

The James L. Whitney Fund amounted 
to $664.21 January 1, 1922. It is being 



increased slowly by the terms of the will 
and the interest is being added to the 
principal. It is hoped that the fund may 
increase so that it will eventually yield an 
income which will be of some slight as- 
sistance in the preparation of bibliographi- 
cal aids for research workers. 

Special mention should be made of the 
benefactions of George lies in financing 
several publications which the Association 
would not have been able to have pub- 
lished without such financial aid. 

Full information as to the investment 
and condition of these funds will be found 
in the reports of the Trustees as printed 
each year. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMERICAN 
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

78 East Washington St., Chicago, 111. 



The publishing business of the Ameri- 
can Library Association is conducted for 
libraries and in the interest of library 
progress. It is not conducted for profit. 
An endowment fund of $100,000 received 
from Mr. Andrew Carnegie in 1902 yields 
an income of $4,500 a year, which is ap- 
plied to the preparation and publication of 
useful library aids. 

The publications are listed here in the 
following groups: 

Book Selection and Bookbuying Aids in General 
Subject Lists, including Lists of Children's Books 
Reading Courses 
Reading Lists 

Lists of Books in Foreign Languages 
Indexes 

Library Economy in General 
Library Establishment 
Library Buildings and Equipment 
Library Training 
Cataloging 
Children's Libraries 
School Libraries 

Posters, Book Marks and Exhibits 
A. L. A. Bulletin and Proceedings 
Publications of the League of Library Commis- 
sions 
Publications of the American Library Institute 

All publications are unbound unless 
otherwise indicated. 

Publications of the current or coming year 
are marked with an asterisk. 

BOOK SELECTION AND BOOK- 
BUYING AIDS IN GENERAL 

A. L. A. catalog. Melvil Dewey, May 
Seymour and Mrs. H. L. Elmendorf, 
eds. 1904. Cloth, $2; can be obtained 
from the Superintendent of Documents, 
Washington, D. C, by sending a money 
order for $2 in advance. 

A catalog of 8,000 volumes useful in guiding 
readers in the choice of the best books on a given 
subject published before 1904. 

A. L. A. catalog, 1904-11. Elva L. Bas- 
com, ed. Cloth, $1.75. 

About 3,000 titles covering the years 1904-11. 
Contains a list of books in the A. L. A. Catalog 
of 1904 which were out of print in 1911, a list of 
new editions and a separate children's list. 

*Book selection. Elva L. Bascom. Re- 
vised 1922. (A. L. A. manual, ch. 16.) 
25c each; in lots of 25 or more, lOc each. 

The Booklist; 10 numbers a year. $2 a 
year; single copies, 25c. 

The A. L. A. official book selection magazine. 
Each number lists and annotates from 175 to 200 
current books, giving also classification number, 
subject headings, Library of Congress card num- 
ber, and an author and title index. 



Subject index to the A. L. A. Booklist, 
v. 1-6, 1905-10. 25c. v. 7, 1910-11. lOc. 

Really a subject guide to the best books 1905- 
1911. 

Booklist books (of 1921); a selection, 
25c. 10-50 copies, 10% discount; 50-100 
copies, 20% discount; 100 or more, 
33^5% discount. 

About 300 titles, chosen by library vote as best 
adapted to public library use. Each book is given 
a short descriptive note, usually taken from The 
Booklist. 

Booklist of Revised Braille, grade one and 
one-half, by the A.L.A. Committee on 
Work with the Blind. Free. 

Two numbers annually, listing the new books 
available in this type. 

Buying list of books for small libraries. 

Caroline Webster, comp. Reprinted 
with permission from Bibliography 
bulletin 65, New York State Library. 
1920. 35c; 20% discount in lots of 25 
or more. 

A list suggested for first purchase. 

*New guide to reference books. Isadore 
G. Mudge. 1922. Cloth, $3. 

A full index shows where to find in the various 
reference books many topics of general interest to 
which there is ordinarily no clue. Recommended 
for purchase by all libraries having five thousand 
volumes or more. Indispensable as a text book 
in reference study courses. 

Based on the third edition of Kroeger's Guide 
to the_ study and use of reference books, as revised 
by Miss Mudge. 

*Periodicals for the small library. Frank 
K. Walter. New edition ready early 
in 1923. 25c. 

SUBJECT LISTS INCLUDING LISTS 
OF CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

(See also Reading Courses, page 506, and Reading 
Lists, page 506.) 

Books for boys and girls. Caroline M. 
Hewins. 3d ed. 1915. 25c. 

A careful selection from ten years of children's 
literature and a re-weighing of the older books. 

Books on scientific management. C. 
Bertrand Thompson. Reprinted by 
courtesy of the Harvard University 
Press. 1915. lOc. 

A brief guide to the literature of Shakes- 
peare. H. H. B. Meyer. 1915. 50c. 

Very useful to student or teacher in selecting 
biographies and criticisms and describing editions 
of Shakespeare. 



505 



506 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



550 children's books; a purchase list for 
public libraries. Harriet H. Stanley. 
1910. 15c. 

*Graded list of books for children. Com- 
piled by the Elementary School Com- 
mittee of the Library Department of 
the National Education Association. 
1922. Cloth, $1.25. 

A list of children's books for every school and 
every library. It represents the best judgment of 
both teachers and librarians. The entry for each 
of the books listed (about 850) gives author, title, 
publisher, price, descriptive note and grades for 
which the book is suited. 

The titles are arranged in three groups: Sec- 
tion A, grades 1-3, Section B, grades 4-6, Section 
C, grades 7-9. A list of sixty reference books 
(grades 1-9) and a list of valuable books now out 
of print are also included. Complete title and 
subject indexes. 

This list will help in the selection of books, in 
using and grading books and in answering ques- 
tions about books. 

*Graded list of stories to tell or read 
aloud. Harriot E. Hassler and Carrie 
E. Scott. New ed. 1922. 35c. 10 or 
more, 20c each; 100 or more, 15c each. 

Useful to parents, teachers and librarians. In- 
cludes a list on children's literature, one for the 
story-teller, outlines for cycles of stories, and gives 
fifteen books for each grade with annotation, pub- 
lisher and price. The inexperienced will find this 
a helpful list. 

Plays for children; an annotated index. 
Alice I. Hazeltine, 1921. Cloth, $1.50. 

See note, page 507. 

Plays of today. 1921. Single copies, 15c 
(in stamps) ; 100 copies, $10. 

Lists 100 of the best modern dramas, grouped 
by subject. Notes give number of characters and 
settings. Useful as a buying list for libraries, for 
classes of English, and for the general reader. 
A 32-page leaflet, envelope-insert size. 

Selected list of music and books about 
music for public libraries. Louisa M. 
Hooper. 1909. 35c. 

*Technical books, 1921. Reprinted from 
Booklist Books of 1921. 1922. lOc. 

Viewpoints in biography. Katherine 
Tappert, 1921. Heavy paper cover. 60c. 

Groups biographies in a new way, according to 
essential interest. Annotated and indexed. 

""Viewpoints in essays. Marion Horton. 
1922. Heavy paper cover. 60c. 

Brief notes on essays old and new, grouped 
under such headings as Bed Books, Curry and 
Caviare, Masculine Attitudes, Youth and Age, 
Hobbies, Birds and Blossoming, The Footpath 
Way, Lands and Peoples, The American Mind 
and Manners, Eternal Verities, Everyday Ethics, 
Poetry. 

Viewpoints in travel. Josephine A. Rath- 
bone. 1919. Heavy paper cover. 60c. 

Travel literature grouped by the essential in- 
terests of adventure, folklore, character Interpreta- 
tions, hunting and over fifty other divisions other 
than the usual geographical unit. Annotated, and 
indexed by authors and regions. 



READING COURSES 

To enable even the least experienced assistant in 
library or book store to give good advice, we have 
begun the publication of a series of reading 
courses. Each is prepared by a specialist. The 
courses are short, limited usually to six or eight 
pages. They are attractively printed, each with 
its own cover design. 

*A. L. A. reading course on accounting. 

1922. Single copy, I5c (in stamps) ; 
8 for 25c (in stamps); 100 for $1.75; 
1,000 for $16. 

By a professor of accounting in a large uni- 
versity. Eight pages, convenient size for mailing 
in a number 10 envelope; recommends 8 books as 
essential. 

*A.L.A. reading course on business. Ethel 
Cleland. 1922. Single copy 15c (in 
stamps) ; 6 copies 25c (in stamps) ; 100, 
$2.50; 1,000, $20. 

Compiler is librarian of the Business Branch 
of the Indianapolis Public Library. The subjects 
and titles were chosen largely on the recommenda- 
tions of the departments of commerce and business 
administration of the leading universities. Will 
appeal to any man or woman who would be at- 
tracted by a correspondence course on business. 

*A. L. A. reading course on journalism. 

1922. Single copy, 15c (in stamps); 
12 for 25c (in stamps); 100 for $1; 
1,000 for $9. 

By the director of the school of journalism in 
a university. Four pages, uniform in size with 
accounting but on different colored paper; rec- 
ommends 10 books. 

READING LISTS 

Your own imprint on any of these lists in 
quantities of 1,000 or more, $1.50 extra. 

*Books and thrift. Rev. ed. 1922. 6 
copies 25c (in stamps); 100 copies, 
$2.50; 1,000 copies, $17. 

Lists 33 books and pamphlets under the head- 
ings: Thrift, Investments, Budgets, Life insur- 
ance, Owning a home, Making a will, Sharing 
with others. 

*Books for vacation. 1922. 8 copies 25c 
(in stamps); 100 copies, $2; 1,000, $18. 

Contains 129 titles of children's books for rec- 
reational reading, with a descriptive note about 
each book. A 16-page leaflet, envelope-insert size. 

*Boys' books. 1922. 100 copies, $1; 1,000 
copies, $5. 

Thirty-nine titles with descriptive notes that 
will make a boy want to read. A 4-page leaflet, 
envelope-insert size. 

*Business books for profit and pleasure. 
1922. 25 copies $1.00; 100, $3; 500, $12; 
1,000, $20. 

Forty titles, annotated, covering general phases 
of business. A 12-page leaflet, envelope-insert 
size; illustrated cover. 

*Children's books for Christmas presents. 

New ed. 1922. 100 copies $2.50; 1,000 
copies $17. Purchaser's imprint will 
appear on title page. 



HANDBOOK 



507 



A new buying list for parents and others who 
make gifts to children. One hundred titles with 
prices and brief descriptive notes. For distribution 
by libraries, schools and book stores. A 16-page 
leaflet, envelope-insert size. 

*Gifts for children's book shelves. Com- 
piled by a committee of the Children's 
Librarians Section of the A.L.A. 1922. 
100 copies, $2; 250, $4; 500, $7; 1,000, 
$12. 

Compiled at the request of the Library Com- 
mission of the Boy Scouts of America. A 16-page 
leaflet listing 85 titles, without annotations. Use- 
ful as a buying list for parents throughout the 
year. This list will form the basis of a list of 
100 titles to be issued in 1923. Suggestions of 
books to be added are invited. 

*Home planning. 1922. 30 copies for $1 ; 
1,000, $18. 

Describes 12 books which will be a help and a 
delight to any one about to build a home or mere- 
ly planning a castle in Spain. An 8-page leaflet, 
envelope-insert size, with a cover illustration by 
Irving K. Pond. 

Plays of today. 1921. Single copies, 15c 
(in stamps) ; 100 copies, $10. 

Lists 100 of the best modern dramas, grouped 
by subject. Notes give number of characters and 
settings. Useful as a buying list for libraries, for 
classes of Eniglish, and for the general reader. 
A 32-page leaflet, envelope-insert size. 

*A shelf of books for a one-room school. 

100 copies, $1; 1,000, $5. 

Attractively illustrated, annotated list of the 
25 books chosen by votes of librarians and teach- 
ers as the best 25 books for any one room school. 
This list has received much publicity in magazines 
and newspapers throughout the country and will 
be welcomed by the children as well as by teach- 
ers and parents. 

*The United States. 1921. Single copy, 
20c (in stamps); 10 copies, $1; 100 
copies, $6; 1,000 copies, $45. 

A reading list of 140 popular books on Amer- 
ican history, government, ideals and literature; 
American resources, opportunities and occupations; 
lives of some interesting Americans; some fifty 
titles of historic and characteristic fiction. A 20- 
page leaflet, 5}4x7$4 inches. 

"Useful books for the home. 1922. 30 
copies for $1; 1,000 for $18. 

A small, practical selection of the most useful 
books on cooking and food values, dressmaking, 
millinery, etiquette, house planning and decora- 
tion, household budgets, gardening, child care, 
hygiene and morals, suggested reading for chil- 
dren, etc. An 8-page leaflet, envelope-insert size. 
Lists 24 books. 

*Wanderlust book shelf. 1922. 200 copies 
for $1; 1,000 for $4. 

Brief notes on the ten books voted "the best 
travel books ever written" by visitors at the Inter- 
national Travel Exposition in New York, March, 
1922. A 2-page leaflet, envelope-insert size. 

LISTS OF BOOKS IN FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES 

Aids in library work with foreigners. 
Marguerite Reid and J. G. Moulton. 
1912. 15c. 



Lists of books for learning English, books on 
citizenship, foreign book selection and grammars 
and handbooks in foreign languages. 

Recent French literature. Mrs. Sarah G. 
Bowerman. 1916. 25c. 

Selected list of German books. Emma 
Gattiker. 1907. 50c. 

Selected list of Polish books. Mrs. Josefa 
Kudlicka. 1913. 25c. 

Selected list of Russian books. J. Maud 
Campbell. 1916. 50c. 

Selected list of Swedish books. Valfrid 

Palmgren. 1909. 25c. 



INDEXES 

The A. L. A. index; an index to general 
literature to January 1900. W. I. Fletch- 
er, ed. Cloth, $6. 

Indexes some 6,000 volumes of critical and gen- 
eral essays, books of travel, general history, edu- 
cation, labor, health reports and so forth. Very 
useful in any fairly large school or public library. 

A. L. A. index to general literature Sup- 
plement 1900-1910. Cloth, $4. 

Cumulates the Index to general literature sec- 
tions of the Annual library index 1900-1910 and 
indexes besides 125 books never before analyzed 
in print. 

A. L. A. portrait index. W. C. Lane and 
Nina E. Browne, ed's. 1906. Cloth, $3; 
order from the Superintendent of Doc- 
uments, Washington, D. C., sending in 
advance a money order for $3. 

Lists about 120,000 portraits to be found in 
printed books and periodicals to 1906. 

Index to kindergarten songs including 
singing games and folk songs. Margery 
C. Quigley. 1914. Cloth, $1.75. 

Very useful to children's librarians and to teach- 
ers as it indexes sixty-three song collections in one 
alphabet, giving composer, title, first line and, 
where important, the author. Includes a separate 
list of songs for special days. 

Index to library reports. Katharine T. 
Moody. 1913. Cloth, $1. 

Indexes reports of library commissions, state, 
university, and public libraries of the United 
States and Canada. A tool for the librarian's 
office. 

Plays for children; an annotated index. 
Alice I. Hazeltine, 1921. Cloth, $1.50. 

An index to plays, arranged alphabetically, with 
brief notes about each, giving number of charac- 
ters and time required. Lists the plays suitable 
for special days and special occasions. 

Special indexes in American libraries; a 
list of subjects separately cataloged or 
so arranged as to be really accessible. 
1917. lOc. 

Saves duplication of reference work and is an 
evidence of the trend toward inter-library work 
and inter-library loans. 



508 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



LIBRARY ECONOMY IN GEN- 
ERAL 

A. L. A. manual of library economy. 

Chapters published separately. 25c 
each; in lots of 25 or more of one title, 
lOc each. 

1. American library history. C. K. 

Bolton. 1911. 

2. Library of Congress. W. W. Bish- 

op. 1911. 

3. State library. J. I. Wyer. 1915. 

4. The College and university library. 

J. I. Wyer. Revised 1921. 

5. Proprietary and subscription li- 

braries. C. K. Bolton. 1917. 

6. The free public library. Isabel Ely 

Lord. 1914. 

7. The (high school library. G. O. 

Ward. 1915. 

8. Special libraries. R. H. Johnston. 

1915. 

9. Library legislation. William F. 

Yust. Revised 1921. 

10. The library building. W. R. East- 

man. Revised 1918. 

11. Furniture, fixtures and equipment, 

Linda A. Eastman. 1916. 

12. Administration of a public library. 

A. E. Bostwick. Revised 1920. 
*13. Training for librarianship. Mary 

W. Plummer. New ed. by F. K. 

Walter ready early in 1923. 
*15. Branch libraries. Linda A. Eastman. 

New ed. ready early in 1923. 
*16. Book selection. Elva L. Bascom. 

Revised 1922. 

17. Order and accession department. F. 

F. Hooper. Revised 1916. 

18. Classification. Corinne Bacon. 1916. 

19. The catalog. Harriet E. Howe. 

1921. 

20. Shelf department. Josephine A. 

Rathbone. Revised 1918. 

21. Loan work. Carl Vitz. Revised 

1919. 

*23. U.S. Government documents (fed- 
eral, state and city). J. I. Wyer. 
Revised 1922. 

24. Bibliography. Isadora G. Mudge. 

1915. 

25. Pamphlets and minor library ma- 

terial. J. I. Wyer and others. 1917. 
*27. Commissions, state aid and state 

agencies. Asa Wynkoop. New ed. 

ready early in 1923. 
30. Library work with the blind. Mary 

C. Chamberlain. 1915. 
*32. Library printing. F. K. Walter. 

New ed. ready early in 1923. 



The following chapters are out of print: 
14, Library service; 22, Reference depart- 
ment; 26, Bookbinding; 29, Library work 
with children. Chapters 28 and 31 have 
not yet been published. 

Binding for libraries. A. L. A. Commit- 
tee on Bookbinding. 2d ed. rev. 1915. 
(Library handbook no. 5) 15c. 

*Essentials in library administration. 
Lutie E. Stearns. Rev. by Ethel F. Mc- 
Collough. Cloth, 75c; paper, 50c. 

It is filled with practical help for the librarian 
and trustee of the small or medium sized library. 
It includes, for example, suggested by-laws for the 
board of trustees, suggested rules and regulations 
for a public library, addresses of library supply 
houses, a recipe for manufacturing library paste, 
a summary of the main divisions of the Decimal 
classification, and reproductions of accounting 
forms, circulation statistics blanks, and shelf list, 
and catalog cards. 

The collection of social survey material. 
Florence R. Curtis. 1915. 15c. 

Useful to women's clubs or others attempting 
a social diagnosis of a community. 

*Fundamentals of reference service. Mary 
Emogene Hazeltine. 1922. 25c. 

Reprinted from Wisconsin Library Bulletin. 
Especially useful for apprentices, members of train- 
ing classes, new assistants and inexperienced 
librarians. 

Lettering on library books. Bookbinding 
Committee. 1919. lOc. 

Library efficiency test. Julia A. Robin- 
son. 1920. 25c each; in lots of 25 or 
more 40% discount. 

A carefully arranged outline of questions on 
the library resources and use, designed to show 
whether adequate returns are made to the com- 
munity on the funds invested. Useful to all 
librarians, library trustees, and those interested in 
community affairs. 

Manual for institution libraries. Carrie 
E. Scott. 1916. (Library handbook 
no. 10) 25c. 

Very useful for hospitals, prisons, reformatories 
or any small library. 

Mending and repair of books. (Library 
handbook no. 6.) M. W. Brown. 4th 
ed. Rev. by Gertrude Stiles. 1921. 25c. 
In lots of 10 or more, 20c each. 

Notes from the art section of a library. 
C. A. Cutter. 1905. (Library tract no. 
5) lOc; 25 or more, 5c each. 

Some principles of business-like conduct 
in libraries. A. E. Bostwick. 1920. 
(Library handbook no. 11) 25c. 

LIBRARY ESTABLISHMENT 
A county library. 1921. 4-page leaflet. 
30 copies, $1; 100 copies, $3; 1,000 
copies, $20. 

For distribution where it is desired to create 
or stimulate interest in this subject. 



HANDBOOK 



509 



Book wagons; the county library with 
rural book delivery. 1921. 8-page 
pamphlet. Single copy, ISc (in stamps); 
10 copies, $1; 30 copies, $2.50; 100 
copies, $7. Special prices on larger 
quantities. 

Pamphlet has six pictures illustrating book 
wagons in counties, townships and cities. For dis- 
tribution to the general public. 

County library exhibit. 14 panels, $18 
a set; postage or express extra. (Only 
a few sets left.) 
See note, page 510. 

How to start a public library. G. E. 
Wire. 2d ed. 1913. (Library tract 
no. 2) lOc. 

*What is a reasonable income for your 
library? 150 copies, $1; 1,000 copies, $6. 

One-page statement of the dollar per capita 
resolution adopted by the A. L. A. Council. 

Why do we need a public library? Ma- 
terial for a library campaign. Chal- 
mers Hadley. 1910. (Library tract 
no. 10) lOc. 

Note. In lots of 25 or more of one kind the 
Library Tracts are sold at 5c each. 

Workshops for assembling business facts. 
Dorsey W. Hyde, Jr. 1921. 24 pages 
and cover, 20c: special prices in quan- 
tities. 

Written for the business man. 

LIBRARY BUILDINGS AND EQUIP- 
MENT 

Furniture, fixtures and equipment. Linda 
A. Eastman. 1916. (A. L. A. manual, 
ch. 11) 25c; 25 or more, lOc each. 

The library building. W. R. Eastman. 
2d ed. 1918. (A. L. A. manual, ch. 
10) 25c; 25 or more, lOc each. 

Library rooms and buildings. Charles 
C. Soule. 1902. (Library tract no. 4) 
lOc; 25 or more, 5c each. 

Some recent features in library architec- 
ture. Chalmers Hadley. 1915. 5c. 

LIBRARY TRAINING 

An apprentice course for small libraries. 

The faculty of the Library School of 
the University of Wisconsin. 1917. 
Cloth, $1. 

Outlines of lessons, with suggestions for prac- 
tice work, study and required reading. 

After college what? Free. 

A placard for use especially in colleges and 
universities as an aid in recruiting young men 
and women for library work. 

Books and a vocation. 4 p. Free in small 
quantities; 100 copies, $1. 

For use as an aid in recruiting young men 
and women for library work. 



*The child and the book. Christopher 
Morley. 1922. 4 p. Free in small 
quantities: 100 copies, $1.25; 1,000 
copies, $10. 

Published for the double purpose of attracting 
young w_omen to library work with children, and 
for use in library campaigns establishment, finan- 
cial or extension. Delightful illustration on front 
cover. 

Library work an opportunity for college 
women. June R. Donnelly. 1921. Re- 
printed from Careers for Women, ed. by 
Catherine Filene. Published by Houghton 
Mifflin Co. 8 p. Free. 

_A brief summary of the opportunities librarian- 
ship offers to college women who intend entering 
professional life. Includes a list of recognized 
library schools and a brief list of suggested read- 
ing. 



*Library work as a profession. 
See note, page 510. 



Free. 



"Library work for young men, an inter- 
view with John Cotton Dana. 1922. 
4 p. Free in small quantities; 100 
copies, $1. 

*Training for librarianship. Mary W. 
Plummer. New ed. by F. K. Walter 
ready early in 1923. (A. L. A. manual, 
ch. 13) 25c; 25 or more, lOc each. 

CATALOGING 

The catalog. Harriet E. Howe. 1921. 
(A. L. A. manual, ch. 19), 25c each; 
in lots of 25 or more, lOc each. 

Catalog rules; author and title entries. 
Compiled by committees of the Amer- 
ican Library Association and The 
(British) Librarv Association. Amer- 
ican ed. 1908. Cloth, $1. 

Cataloging for small libraries. Theresa 
Hitchler. Rev. ed. 1915. Cloth, $2. 
Designed for the small public, school, or pri- 
vate library or special collections. Clear and com- 
prehensive aid, practical for any library and very 
useful in teaching cataloging. 

List of subject headings for use in dic- 
tionary catalogs. 3d ed. rev. by Mary 
J. Briggs. 1911. Cloth, $4. 

Each heading is accompanied by its "see also" 
references and, in an opposite column by its "re- 
fer from" references. One side of each page is 
left blank for additional headings. For any li- 
brary. 

Subject headings for use in dictionary 
catalogs of juvenile books. Margaret 
Mann. 1916. Cloth, $1.75. 

The headings used are those of the Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburgh, and the arrangement is the 
same as that of the List of subject headings. 
Specially useful also to school libraries or any 
small public library. 



510 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



CHILDREN'S LIBRARIES 

(See also the book lists, pages 505-507.) 

*The child and the book. Christopher 
Morley. 1922. Free in small quanti- 
ties. 100 copies, $1.25; 1,000 copies, 
$10. 

See note, page 509. 

Exhibit on children's reading. 10 panels. 
$10 a set; postage or express extra. 

Printed on heavy gray cover stock, comprising 
14 photographs and appropriate wording. For use 
at state and county fairs, conventions, teachers' 
institutes and meetings, in the library and else- 
where. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES 

(See also the lists, pages 505-507.) 

Standard library organization and_ equip- 
ment for secondary schools of different 
sizes. C. C. Certain. 2d ed. 1920. 
40c. 

This report of the Committee on Library Or- 
ganization and Equipment of the National Educa- 
tion Association and of the North Central Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools embodies 
a constructive program of library development. It 
is useful alike to teachers and librarians. 

The high school library. G. O. Ward. 
1915. (A.L.A. manual, chap. 7) 25c. 
25 or more, lOc each. 

*Is your library organized for education? 

25 copies, 25c (in stamps); 100, 75c; 
500, $2.50; 1,000, $4; 5,000, $15. 

This is the resolution on school libraries adopted 
by the A.L.A. Council and approved by the Li- 
brary Department of the N.E.A. Attractively 
printed as a broadside for distribution by libraries, 
library commissions and school officials. 

POSTERS, BOOK MARKS AND EX- 
HIBITS 
After college what? Free. 

A placard for use especially in colleges and uni- 
versities as an aid in recruiting young men and 
women for library work. 

County library exhibit 14 panels. $18 
a set; postage or express extra. (Only 
a few sets left.) 

Panels 20x26 inches in size, printed on heavy 
gray cover stock. Thirty photographs are mounted 
on the panels. For use at state and county fairs, 
conferences of social workers, teachers, librarians, 
and church workers, and at farmers' institutes, 
agricultural colleges, etc. 

Exhibit on children's reading. 10 panels, 
$10 a set; postage or express extra. 

Printed on heavy gray cover stock, comprising 
14 photographs and appropriate wording. For use 
at state and county fairs, conventions, teachers' 



institutes and meetings, in the library and else- 
where. 

^Library work as a profession. Free. 

Poster, 21x26 inches, printed in black on 
white poster paper. For use in recruiting young 
people for the profession. 

McCutcheon cartoon book mark. Size 
3^x5^2 inches. One hundred for 50c; 
500 for $2; 1,000 for $3.50; 5,000 for 
$15. 

For distribution with local correspondence, at 
meetings, through high schools and colleges, and 
in books as they circulate. 

McCutcheon cartoon poster. Size 13^x 
2Q l / 2 inches. Five for 50c; 10 for 90c; 
25 for $1.75; 50 for $3; 100 for $5; 500 
for $20; 1,000 for $35. 

Used for book and library publicity. 

A. L. A. BULLETIN AND PROCEED- 
INGS 

Bulletin of the American Library Asso- 
ciation. Six numbers annually. 

Handbook. Annual. Issued as the Sep- 
tember number of the Bulletin. Extra 
copies, 75c. 

Includes complete list of members, with ad- 
dresses. 

Papers and proceedings. Annual. Issued 
as a number of the Bulletin. 

Papers and proceedings for 1894, 1896, 1897, 
1898, 1899, 1903, 1905, 1906, 1909, 1910, 1911, 
1916, 1919, 1920, 1921, $1 each. 

Papers and proceedings for 1900, 1901, 1902, 
1904, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1917, 1918, 35c each. 

Papers and proceedings for 1922. $2 each (to 
members $1.25). 

Papers and proceedings for years other than 
the above are out of print. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE LEAGUE 
OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 

Aids in library work with foreigners. 
Marguerite Reid and J. G. Moulton. 
1912. 15c. 

_Lists of books for learning English, books on 
citizenship, foreign book selection and grammars 
and handbooks in foreign languages. 

League of Library Commissions hand- 
book, 1922. 50c. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMER- 
ICAN LIBRARY INSTITUTE 

Proceedings for 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 
$2 each; 1920, 1921, $1 each. 



SECTIONS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



By means of a system of sections the 
practical usefulness of the A. L. A. meet- 
ings has been considerably enlarged. The 
section meetings, while open to all, pro- 
vide especially for the needs of each class 
of workers, and afford more opportunity 
for the discussion of details. The general, 
or undivided, sessions are thus left free 
for subjects of general interest and the 
consideration of routine matter concern- 
ing the entire association. 

Eight of these sections maintain a for- 
mal organization from year to year, and 
take under consideration questions relat- 
ing more particularly to their own prov- 
ince. They are as follows: 

COLLEGE AND REFERENCE 
SECTION 

which dates from a first meeting of the 
college librarians held in 1889. Since then, 
meetings have been held regularly. 

The members of the committee on ar- 
rangements are: Chairman, W. E. Henry, 
University of Washington Library, Seattle 
(term expires 1923); E. D. Tweedell, The 
John Crerar Library, Chicago, 111., (term 
expires 1924) ; Willard Austen, Cornell 
University Library, Ithaca, N. Y., (term 
expires 1925). 

TRUSTEES SECTION 

has had a permanent organization since 
the meeting of 1890. 

More boards of trustees are each year 
recognizing the practical value of having 
their librarians attend the meetings al- 
lowing them not only the time, but also 
necessary expenses in many cases. Equal- 
ly significant is the increasing number of 
trustees who find that it pays to attend 
the A. L. A. meetings each year. By com- 
paring views, and advising with each other 
on their peculiar duties, mutual aid is ren- 
dered toward the efficient discharge of the 
public trust committed to them. Some of 
the meetings of trustees are held jointly 
with the librarians interested in supervi- 
sory problems; others with trustees only 



present; thus favoring the joint and sep- 
arate discussion of salaries, laws, vaca- 
tions, rules for the staff, and other ques- 
tions in which librarians have a personal 
interest that modifies their judgment. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: President, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Claypool Earl, Muncie, Ind.; 
vice-president, W. L. Jenks, Port Huron, 
Mich.; secretary, Mrs. Dwight Peterson, 
14 The Lincoln Apartment, Toledo, Ohio. 

CATALOG SECTION 

was established by action of the Council 
in 1900 and has met at each conference 
since the Waukesha meeting in 1901, ex- 
cepting at St. Louis in 1904, when no sec- 
tion meetings were held. 

At the Mackinac Island conference 
(1910) the Catalog Section completed its 
organization by the adoption of a consti- 
tution and by-laws. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: Chairman, 
Helen B. Sutliff, Stanford University Li- 
brary, Stanford University, Calif.; secre- 
tary, Ruth Wallace, Public Library, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

CHILDREN'S LIBRARIANS SECTION 

At the Montreal conference in 1900 an 
informal meeting was held for the purpose 
of personal acquaintance and co-operation 
among those actively engaged in library 
work with children. As a result of this 
meeting the Club of Children's Librarians 
was formed, and, in recognition of this 
movement for closer organization and 
wider discussion in this field than was 
afforded at the general sessions of the A. 
L. A., the Executive Board, in November, 
1900, established this section, which held 
its first meeting at Waukesha in 1901. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: Chairman, Elva 
S. Smith, Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, 
Pa.; vice-chairman, Delia McGregor, Pub- 
lic Library, St. Paul, Minn.; secretary, 
Avis Meigs, Edison Junior High School 
Library, Long Beach, Calif.; treasurer, 
Grace L. Aldrich, Public Library, Madi- 
son, Wis. 



511 



512 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SEC- 
TION 

This section was established by vote 
of the Council of A. L. A. on June 26, 1909, 
upon petition signed by the members of 
the Committee on Library Training. Its 
first meeting was held at the Bretton 
Woods conference and its second meet- 
ing took place at the Mackinac Island con- 
ference, when constitution and by-laws 
were adopted. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: Chairman, Elva 
L. Bascom, School of Library Science, Uni- 
versity of Texas, Austin, Tex.; vice-chair- 
man, Marie Newberry, Public Library, 
Toledo, Ohio; secretary, Blanche Watts, 
475 West 7th, Spencer, Iowa. 

AGRICULTURAL LIBRARIES SEC- 
TION 

At the Mackinac Island conference a 
round table of librarians of agricultural 
libraries was held, at which it was voted 
to request the Council of the A. L. A. to 
create an agricultural libraries section. 
Conditions having been complied with, this 
was done at the Pasadena conference in 
1911. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: Chairman, H. 
O. Severance, University of Missouri Li- 
brary, Columbia; secretary, Mary G. Lacy, 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES SECTION 

At the 1914 conference the high and 
normal school librarians, then holding 
round table meetings, made a formal peti- 
tion to the Council that a section for 



school libraries be established. The Coun- 
cil in January, 1915, authorized the organi- 
zation of the section, and the first meet- 
ing was held at the Berkeley conference. 

The School Libraries Section seeks to 
serve as a clearing house for professional 
information regarding libraries in ele- 
mentary, secondary and normal schools, 
and to compile a directory of school li- 
brarians. Its purpose is to discuss meth- 
od's, formulate policies, establish stand- 
ards and maintain relations with the Li- 
brary Department of the N. E. A. and 
other educational organizations. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: Chairman, Har- 
riet A. Wood, Minn. Department of Edu- 
cation, St. Paul, Minn.; vice-chairman, 
Susie Lee Crumley, Library School, Car- 
negie Library, Atlanta, Ga. ; secretary- 
treasurer, Marion Lovis, Hutchins Inter- 
mediate School, Detroit, Mich.; normal 
school representative, Helen Ganser, State 
Normal School Library, Millersville, Pa.; 
high school representative, Mary Davis, 
Public Library, Brookline, Mass.; elemen- 
tary school representative, Janet Jerome, 
Public Library, Denver, Colo. 

LENDING SECTION 

This section held its first meeting as a 
section June 5, 1920. 

Officers for 1922-23 are: Chairman, Bess 
McCrea, Library of Hawaii, Honolulu, T. 
H. (Miss McCrea has taken a position in 
Hawaii and has asked to be excused from 
the chairmanship; the vice-chairman will 
act in her stead) ; vice-chairman, Marie L. 
Fisher, Lawrenceville Branch Carnegie 
Library, Pittsburgh, Pa.; secretary-treas- 
urer, Ruth M. Barker, Cossitt Library, 
Memphis, Tenn. 



AFFILIATED NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 



Acting under Section 16 of the Consti- 
tution and upon applications formally 
made by the proper officers, the Council 
has regularly affiliated with the American 
Library Association the following na- 
tional organizations of kindred purpose. 
These societies meet annually, usually at 
the time and place of meeting of the A. L. 
A. Their members enjoy all privileges of 
members of the larger body as to railroad 
and hotel rates and conference hospitali- 
ties. Their proceedings are included in the 
A. L. A. conference volume and they are 
often formally represented by designated 
delegates upon the program of the Asso- 
ciation. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES 

Officers for 1922-23 are: President, Mrs. 
Jessie Palmer Weber, Illinois State His- 
torical Library, Springfield, 111.; vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. Virginia G. Moody, South Caro- 
lina State Library, Columbia; second vice- 
president, Herbert S. Hirshberg, Ohio 
State Library, Columbus; secretary-treas- 
urer, Herbert O. Brigham, Rhode Island 
State Library, Providence. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS 

Officers for 1922 are as follows: Presi- 
dent, William R. Watson, State Dept. of 
Education, Library Extension Division, 
Albany, N. Y.; first vice-president, I. R. 
Bundy, Missouri Library Commission, 
Jefferson City; second vice-president, Eliza- 
beth H. West, Texas State Library, Aus- 
tin; secretary-treasurer, Anna May Price, 
Library Extension Division, State Library, 
Springfield, 111.; three members of the 
executive board for one, two and three 
year periods, respectively, Grace E. Kings- 
land, New Hampshire Public Library Com- 



mission, Concord; Elizabeth B. Wales, 
116 S. Karlov Ave., Chicago, 111.; Milton 
J. Ferguson, California State Library, 
Sacramento, Calif. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES 

Officers for 1922-23 are: President, An- 
drew H. Mettee, Library Company of the 
Baltimore Bar, Baltimore, Md.; first vice- 
president, Edwin Gholson, Cincinnati Law 
Library Association, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
second vice-president, Mrs. W. F. Marshall, 
Mississippi State Library, Jackson; secre- 
tary, Mary S. Foote, Law Library Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Urbana; treasurer, Anna 
M. Ryan, Law Library 8th Judicial Dis- 
trict, Buffalo, N. Y. Executive Committee, 
ex-officio, Gilson G. Glasier, Wisconsin 
State Library, Madison. Executive Com- 
mittee, by election, R. H. Wilkin, Illinois 
Supreme Court Library, Springfield; Fred- 
erick C. Hicks, Columbia University, New 
York City; E. A. Feazel, Cleveland Law 
Library Association, Cleveland, Ohio. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 

Officers for 1922-23 are: President, Re- 
becca B. Rankin, Municipal Reference Li- 
brary, New York City; first vice-president, 
Lewis A. Armistead, Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company Library, Boston; second 
vice-president, Alta B. Claflin, Federal Re- 
serve Bank Library, Cleveland, Ohio; sec- 
retary-treasurer, Alfred B. Lindsay, 
Bureau of Railway Economics Library, 
Washington, D. C.; assistant secretary- 
treasurer, Nelson W. McCombs, Federal 
Reserve Board Library, Washington, D. 
C.; executive board, the foregoing officers 
and Bertha V. Hartzell, Social Service Li- 
brary, Boston, Mass.; and Louise Keller, 
Independence Bureau Library, 137 South 
5th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 






513 



OTHER NATIONAL LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 

(Not affiliated with the A. L. A.) 
AMERICAN LIBRARY INSTITUTE LIBRARY WORKERS ASSOCIATION 



Officers for 1922-23: President, C. W. 
Andrews, The John Crerar Library, Chi- 
cago, 111.; secretary, Theodore W. Koch, 
Northwestern University Library, Evan- 
ston, 111. 

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LI- 
BRARY SCHOOLS 

Officers for 1922-23: President, Ernest 
J. Reece, Library School of the New York 
Public Library, New York City; secretary, 
Margaret S. Williams, New York State 
Library School, Albany. These officers, 
together with the retiring president, P. L. 
Windsor, and Alice S. Tyler and Nina C. 
Brotherton, constitute the executive com- 
mittee. (The library schools constituting 
the Association are listed on page 520.) 

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF 
AMERICA 

Officers for 1922-23: President, William 
W. Bishop, University of Michigan Gen- 
eral Library, Ann Arbor, Mich.; secretary, 
A. H. Shearer, Grosvenor Library, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 



Officers for 1922-23: President, Cath- 
erine Van Dyne, National Bureau of Cas- 
ualty and Surety Underwriters L., New 
York City; treasurer, Carl L. Cannon, Pub- 
lic Library, New York City; secretary, 
Marian C. Manley, Public Library, Sioux 
City, Iowa. 

MEDICAL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

Officers for 1922-23: President, Col. C. 
F. Wylde, Montreal, Canada; secretary- 
treasurer, John Ruhrah, HE. Chase St., 
Baltimore, Md.; manager of the Exchange, 
Miss M. C. Noyes, 1211 Cathedral St., 
Baltimore, Md, 

NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIA- 
TIONLIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Officers for 1922-23: President, Martha 
C. Pritchard, supervisor of Sch. Ls. City 
of Detroit, 508 Yost Bldg., Detroit, Mich.; 
vice-president, Mrs. Edward S. Carter, 
Gates Memorial Library, Port Arthur, 
Texas; secretary-treasurer, Delia F. 
Northey, Ind. Public Library Commission, 
Indianapolis. 



514 



STATE AND PROVINCIAL LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS 



The names of the Associations which 
are affiliated with the A. L. A. (1922) are 
printed in black face type. 

Alabama Library Association: President, 
J. R. Rutland, Ala. Polytechnic Institute, 
Auburn; secretary, Mary R. Mullen, 
State Dept. of Archives and History, 
Montgomery. 

Arkansas Library Association: President, 
George B. Rose, 514 W. Markham St., 
Little Rock; secretary, Beatrice Prall, 
Public Library, Little Rock. 

British Columbia Library Association: 
President, John Hosie, Provincial Li- 
brary, Victoria; secretary, Margaret 
Clay, Public Library, Victoria. 

California Library Association: President, 
Susan T. Smith, Free Public Library, 
Sacramento; secretary, Hazel G. Gibson, 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 

Colorado Library Association: President, 
Lucretia Vaile, Public Library, Denver; 
secretary, Mary Weaver, Public Library, 
Rocky Ford. 

Connecticut Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Belle Holcormb Johnson, 
Room 96, State Capitol, Hartford; sec- 
retary, Helen Coffin, State Library, 
Hartford. 

District of Columbia Library Association: 

President, Dorsey W. Hyde, Jr., U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce, Washington; 
secretary, Mary F. Carpenter, Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics Library, U. 
S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington. 

Florida Library Association: President, 
Louise E. Gamsby, Ocala; secretary, 
Mrs. S. Arthur Davies, Dunedin. 

Georgia Library Association: President, 
C. Seymour Thompson, Public Library, 
Savannah; secretary, Louise O. Bercaw, 
Public Library, Cordele. 

Hawaii Library Association: President, 
Clara F. Hemenway, University of 
Hawaii Library, Honolulu; secretary, 



Jessie Purdy, McKinley High School 
Library, Honolulu. 

Idaho Library Association: President, 
Jessie Fraser, Public Library, Twin 
Falls; secretary, Marion Orr, Public Li- 
brary, Idaho Falls. 

Illinois Library Association: President, Ida 
F. Wright, Public Library, Evanston; 
secretary, Nellie E. Parham, Withers 
Public Library, Bloomington. 

Indiana Library Association: President, 
Mrs. Sallie C. Hughes, Emeline Fair- 
banks Library, Terre Haute; secretary, 
William J. Hamilton, Public Library, 
Gary. 

Indiana Library Trustees Association: 
President, C. H. Oldfather, Wabash Col- 
lege, Crawfordsville; secretary, Mrs. J. 
M. Thistlewaite, Sheridan. 

Iowa Library Association: President, 
Grace Shellenberger, Public Library, 
Devenport; secretary, Ruth Gibbons, 
Public Library, Cherokee. 

Kansas Library Association: President, 
Mrs. Delia E. Brown, Public Library, 
Salina; secretary, Elsie Evans, Public 
Library, Leavenworth. 

Kentucky Library Association: President, 
Mrs. A. S. Gardner, Scottsville; secre- 
tary, Mary Robert Loyd, Kentucky 
Wesleyan College Library, Winchester. 

Maine Library Association: President, 
Elmar T. Boyd, Public Library, Bangor; 
secretary, Marion Brainerd, State Li- 
brary, Augusta. 

Maritime Library Association: Acting 
President, Miss E. M. A. Vaughan, St. 
John, N. B.; secretary, Mrs. M. K. In- 
graham, Acadia University, Wolfeville, 
Nova Scotia. 

Massachusetts Library Club: President, 
Harold T. Dougherty, Free Public Li- 
brary, Newton; secretary, O. C. Davis, 
Public Library, Waltham. 



515 



516 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Michigan Library Association: President, 
Constance Bement, Public Library, Port 
Huron; secretary, Charlotte M. Jackson, 
State Library, Lansing. 

Michigan (See Upper Peninsula Library 
Association) 

Minnesota Library Association: President, 
Frank K. Walter, University of Minne- 
sota Library, Minneapolis; secretary, 
Sophia J. Lammers, Public Library, 
Mankato. 

Mississippi Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Whitman Davis, Agricultural and 
Mechanical Coll. Library, Agricultural 
College; secretary, Bulah Culberson, 
Columbus. 

Missouri Library Association: President, 
James A. McMillen, Washington Univer- 
sity Library, St. Louis; secretary, Jane 
Morey, Missouri Library Commission, 
Jefferson City. 

Montana Library Association: President, 
Mrs. Laura Zook, Miles City; secretary, 
Clara Main, Lewistown. 

Nebraska Library Association: President, 
Lulu Home, City Library, Lincoln; sec- 
retary, Ethol M. Langdon, Wesleyan 
University Library, University Place. 

New Hampshire Library Association: 

President, Willard P. Lewis, New Hamp- 
shire State College Library, Durham; 
secretary, Winifred Tuttle, City Library, 
Manchester. 

New Jersey Library Association: Presi- 
dent, J. T. Gerould, Princeton Univer- 
sity Library, Princeton; secretary, Lynda 
Phillips, Free Public Library, Chatham. 

New York Library Association: Presi- 
dent, A. H. Shearer, Grosvenor Library, 
Buffalo; secretary, Margery Quigley, 
Free Library, Endicott. 

North Carolina Library Association: Pres- 
ident, Louis R. Wilson, University of 
North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill; 
secretary, Clara M. Crawford, Public Li- 
brary, Durham. 



North Dakota Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mary E. Downey, State Library 
Commission, Bismarck; secretary, Inga 
Rynning, Public Library, Fargo. 

Ohio Library Association: President, 
Elizabeth K. Steele, Public Library, Lo- 
rain; secretary, Lillie Wulfekoetter, Pub- 
lic Library, Cincinnati. 

Oklahoma Library Association: President, 
J. L. Rader, University of Oklahoma Li- 
brary, Norman; secretary, Eliza J. Rule, 
Oklahoma Coll. for Women Library, 
Chickasha. 

Ontario Library Association: President, 
W. H. Murch, Royal Bank Chambers, 
St. Thomas; secretary, E. A. Hardy, 81 
Collier St., Toronto. 

Pacific Northwest Library Association: 

President, Ethel Sawyer, Library Asso- 
ciation, Portland, Oregon; secretary, 
Ralph Munn, Public Library, Seattle. 

Pennsylvania Library Association: Presi- 
dent, George P. Donehoo, State Library, 
Harrisburg; secretary, Helen G. Better- 
ly, Osterhout Free Library, Wilkes- 
Barre. 

Rhode Island Library Association: Presi- 
dent, George L. Hinckley, Redwood Li- 
brary, Newport; secretary, Gertrude E. 
Robson, John Carter Brown Library, 
Providence. 

South Carolina Library Association: Pres- 
ident, Louise McMaster, Public Library, 
Darlington; secretary, Anne A. Porcher, 
Charleston Museum, Charleston. 

South Dakota Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Ethel C. Jacobsen, Carnegie 
Library, Pierre; secretary, Mrs. Maud 
Russell Carter, Normal School Library, 
Spearfish. 

Southeastern Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Mary U. Rothrock, Lawson-Mc- 
Ghee Library, Knoxville, Tenn.; secre- 
tary, Charlotte Templeton, Georgia Li- 
brary Commission, Atlanta. 

Southwestern Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Elizabeth H. West, Texas State 



HANDBOOK 



517 



Library, Austin; secretary, E. W. Wink- 
ler, University of Texas Library, Aus- 
tin. 

Tennessee Library Association: President, 
Nora Crimmins, Public Library, Chatta- 
nooga; secretary, Adelaide Rowell, Pub- 
lic Library, Chattanooga. 

Texas Library Association: President, 
Dorothy Amann, Southern Methodist 
University Library, Dallas; secretary, 
Mary Hill, West Texas State Normal 
Coll. Library, Canyon. 

Upper Peninsula Library Association: 
President, Helena LeFevre, Spies Public 
Library, Menominee; secretary, Gertrude 
Kelly, Public School Library, Hancock, 
Mich. 

Utah Library Association: President, 
Julia T. Lynch, Free Public Library, 



Salt Lake City; secretary, Minnie Mar- 
getts, Latter Day Saints High School 
Library, Salt Lake City. 

Vermont Library Association: President, 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Town Library, 
Springfield; secretary, Iva M. Young, 
Bellows Falls. 

Virginia Library Association: President, 
Mary D. Pretlow, Public Library, Nor- 
folk; secretary, Margaret V. Jones, State 
Library, Richmond. 

West Virginia Library Association: Presi- 
dent, Sally Scollay Page, Public Library, 
Clarksburg; secretary, Bessie J. Reed, 
High School Library, Fairmont. 

Wisconsin Library Association: President, 
Edith K. Van Eman, Public Library, 
Oshkosh; secretary, Leila Janes, Public 
Library, Fond du Lac. 



LIBRARY CLUBS 



Ann Arbor (Mich.) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Jean Sharpe, 548 Church St.; secre- 
tary, Nina K. Preston, 408 E. Jefferson. 

Bay Path Library Club: President, Emily 
Haynes, Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Worcester, Mass.; secretary, Helen 
P. Shackley, Merriam Public Library, 
West Brookfield, Mass. 

Berkshire Library Club: President, Edith 
O. Fitch, Lenox Library, Lenox, Mass. 

The Boston (Mass.) Special Libraries As- 
sociation: President, Harriet Howe, 
Simmons College, 300 The Fenway; sec- 
retary, Margaret Withington, Simmons 
College, 300 Th,e Fenway. 

Cape Cod Library Club: President, Galen 
W. Hill, Fairhaven, Mass.; secretary, 
Mrs. John Coleman, Marstons Mills, 
Mass. 

Chicago Library Club: President, Sarah 
C. N. Bogle, American Library Asso- 
ciation, Chicago; secretary, Theodore A. 
Mueller, Harper Memorial Library, Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Cleveland Club of Special Librarians: Pres- 
ident, Alta B. Claflin, Federal Reserve 



Bank Library; secretary, Mayme Hoi- 
linger, Federal Reserve Bank Library. 

Columbia (Mo.) Library Club: President, 
S. Blanche Hedrick, University of Mis- 
souri Library; secretary, Lois Barnes, 
University of Missouri Library. 

Des Moines (Iowa) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Jessie Swem, Public Library; sec- 
retary, Eva Fitch, Public Library. 

Iowa City (Iowa) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Gertrude Krausnick, State Univer- 
sity Library; secretary, Irma Molis, 
State Historical Society Library. 

Missouri Valley Library Club: President, 
Ward Edwards, State Teachers College, 
Warrensburg; secretary, Miss Frank 
Delehant, Swinney Branch Public Li- 
brary, 47th & West Prospect Place, 
Kansas City. 

New York High School Librarians' Asso- 
ciation: President, Katharine M. Chris- 
topher, Julia Richman High School Li- 
brary, New York City; secretary, Ruth 
Wilcox, Washington Irving High School 
Library, New York City. 

New York Library Clu'b: President, 



518 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Theresa Hitchler, Public Library, Brook- 
lyn; secretary, Marion F. Schwab, Pub- 
lic Library, Brooklyn. 

New York Special Libraries Association: 
President, Frances S. Cox, Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Company Library, New 
York City; secretary, Margaret Wells, 
American International Corporation Li- 
brary, New York City. 

Northern New York Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Eva G. Frederick, Carthage; sec- 
retary, Minnie A. Bodrnan, Philadel- 
phia, N. Y. 

Old Colony Library Club: President, Josh- 
ua E. Crane, Public Library, Taunton, 
Mass.; secretary, Helen A. Brown, 
Branch Library, Montello, Mass. 

Ottawa (Ont., Canada) Library Associa- 
tion: President, R. A. Inglis; secretary, 
Miss I. A. Campbell. 

Pasadena (Calif.) Library Club: Presi- 
dent, Elizabeth Connor, Mt. Wilson Ob- 
servatory Library; secretary, Ruth Ann 
Waring, Pasadena High School Library. 

Pennsylvania Library Club: President, A. 
S. W. Rosenbach, 1320 Walnut St., Phil- 
adelphia; secretary, Martha L. Coplin, 
Free Library, Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia (N. Y.) Library Association: 
President, Mrs. Mary B. Tucker; secre- 
tary, Allie Brooks. 

Puget Sound Library Club: President, 
Rebecca W. Wright, Pu'blic Library, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Rochester (N. Y.) District Library Club: 
President, Donald B. Gilchrist, Univer- 



sity of Rochester Library; secretary, 
Fern B. Wall, Exposition Park Branch, 
Public Library. 

St. Louis (Mo.) Chapter of the American 
Library Association: Secretary-treas- 
urer, James A. McMillen, Washington 
University Library. 

San Antonio Library Club: President, 
Mrs. Anna M. Robinson, Claremont, 
Calif.; secretary, Mrs. L. L. Martin, Pub- 
lic Library, Ontario, Calif. 

Southern Tier Library Club: President, 
Kate Strong Peck, Public Library, Bing- 
hamton, N. Y.; secretary, Ellen H. 
Chamberlayne, High School Library, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 

Southern Worcester Library Club: Presi- 
dent, May Murphy, Millville, Mass.; sec- 
retary, Rosalie E. Williams, East Doug- 
las, Mass. 

Southwest (Mo.) Library Club: President, 
Alice R. Gladden, Carthage; secretary, 
Blanche Trigg, Public Library, Joplin. 

Twin City Library Club: President, 
Elizabeth Robinson, Public Library, St. 
Paul; secretary, Elizabeth Clark, Minne- 
sota Historical Society Library, St. Paul. 

University of Illinois Library Club: Pres- 
ident, Adah Patton, 603 S. Busey Ave., 
Urbana; secretary, Elizabeth Bryan, 612 
W. Church St., Champaign. 

Western Massachusetts Library Club: 
President, Harold A. Wooster, Athen- 
aeum Free Public Library, Westfield; 
secretary, Meribah Keefe, City Library 
Association, Springfield. 



STATE AND PROVINCIAL LIBRARY COMMISSIONS 



Alabama Department of Archives and His- 
tory, Division of Library Extension: Di- 
rector, Mrs. Marie Bankhead Owen, 
Montgomery. 

British Columbia Public Library Commis- 
sion: Secretary, Herbert Killam, Parlia- 
ment Bldg., Victoria. 

California State Library: State Librarian, 
Milton J. Ferguson, Sacramento. 

Colorado State Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, Elfreda Stebbins, Fort Collins. 

Colorado Traveling Library Commission: 
President, Mrs. Fannie M. D. Galloway, 
Denver. 

Connecticut Public Library Committee: 
Secretary, Caroline M. Hewins, Public 
Library, Hartford. 

Delaware State Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, E. B. Louderbough, Delaware 
State Library, Dover. 

Georgia Library Commission: Secretary, 
Charlotte Templeton, Atlanta. 

Idaho State Traveling Library Commis- 
sion: Secretary, Ethel E. Redfield, Boise. 

Illinois State Library, Library Extension 
Division: Superintendent, Anna May 
Price, Springfield. 

Indiana Public Library Commission: Act- 
ing secretary, Delia F. Northey, State 
House, Indianapolis. 

Iowa Library Commission: Secretary, 
Julia A. Robinson, Historical, Memorial 
and Art Building, Des Moines. 

Kansas Traveling Libraries Commission: 
Secretary, Louise McNeal, Topeka. 

Kentucky Library Commission: Secretary, 
Fannie C. Rawson, Frankfort. 

Louisiana State Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, Mrs. Katherine M. Hill, 638 La- 
fayette Ave., Baton Rouge. 



Maryland Public Library Commission: 
Secretary, Mrs. M. A. Newell, State 
Normal School, Towson. 

Massachusetts Board of Free Public Li- 
brary Commissioners: General Secretary 
and Library Advisor, E. Kathleen Jones, 
State House, Boston. 

Michigan State Library: State Librarian, 
Mrs. M. C. Spencer, Lansing. 

Minnesota Department of Education, Li- 
brary Division: Library Director, Clara 
F. Baldwin, St. Paul. 

Missouri Library Commission: Secretary, 
Irving R. Bundy, Jefferson City. 

Nebraska Public Library Commission: 
Secretary, Nellie Williams, Lincoln. 

New Hampshire Public Library Commis- 
sion: Secretary, Grace Edith Kingsland, 
State Library Building, Concord. 

New Jersey Public Library Commission: 
Librarian, Sarah B. Askew, Trenton. 

New York, The University of the State of 
New York, Library Extension Division: 
Chief, William R. Watson, State Educa- 
tion Bldg., Albany. 

North Carolina Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, Mary B. Palmer, Raleigh. 

North Dakota Public Library Commission: 
Librarian and Director, Mary E. Dow- 
ney, Bismarck. 

Ohio State Library: State Librarian, 
Herbert S. Hirshberg, Columbus. 

Oklahoma Library Commission: Secre- 
tary, Mrs. J. R. Dale, Oklahoma City. 

Ontario Department of Education: Inspec- 
tor of Public Libraries, W. O. Carson, 
Toronto. 

Oregon State Library: State Librarian, 
Cornelia Marvin, Salem. 



Maine State Library, Bureau of Library Pennsylvania State Library, Library Ex- 
Exension: Director, Theresa C. Stuart, tension Division: Chief, Robert P. Bliss, 
State Library, Augusta. Harrisburg. 

519 



520 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Rhode Island State Board of Education, 
Library Division: Secretary, Walter E. 
Ranger, State House, Providence. 

South Dakota Free Library Commission: 
Secretary, Doane Robinson, Pierre. Ad- 
dress communications to Leora J. Lewis, 
Field, Ln., Pierre. 

Tennessee Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, Division of Library Extension: Di- 
rector, Emma Watts, Nashville. 

Texas State Library: Librarian, Elizabeth 
H. West, Austin. 

Utah Department of Public Instruction: 



Library secretary and organizer, A. C. 
Matheson, Salt Lake City. 

Vermont Free Public Library Commission: 
Secretary, Julia C. Carter, Montpelier. 

Virginia State Library: Librarian, H. R. 
Mcllwaine, Richmond. 

Washington State Library Commission: 
Secretary, J. M. Hitt, Olympia. 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission: Sec- 
retary, C. B. Lester, Madison. 

Wyoming State Library: Librarian, Gen- 
evra Brock, Cheyenne. 



LIBRARY SCHOOLS CONSTITUTING THE ASSOCIATION 
OF AMERICAN LIBRARY SCHOOLS 



Carnegie Library School, Carnegie Insti- 
tute, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Library School of the Carnegie Library of 
Atlanta, Atlanta, Ga. 

Library School of the Los Angeles Public 
Library, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Library School of The New York Public 
Library, New York City. 

Library School of the University of Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wis. 

Library School of Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, Cleveland, Ohio. 



New York State Library School, Albany, 
N. Y. 

Pratt Institute School of Library Science, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Simmons College School of Library Sci- 
ence, Boston, Mass. 

Syracuse University Library School, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 

University of Illinois Library School, Ur- 
bana, 111. 

University of Washington Library School, 
Seattle, Wash. 

St. Louis Library School, St. Louis, Mo. 



LIBRARY PERIODICALS 



The Booklist. An annotated buying list 
of current books suitable for small and 
larger public libraries. Published monthly, 
except in August and September, by the 
American Library Association, 78 East 
Washington St., Chicago. Price $2 a 
year, 2Sc a copy. 

Bulletin of the American Library Asso- 
ciation. The official organ of the Associa- 
tion, sent without charge to members only. 
Published bi-monthly, one issue being the 
Proceedings of the annual conference and 
another being the Handbook. 

The following periodicals are not offi- 
cially connected with the A. L. A.: 

Library Journal. A semi-monthly expo- 
nent of library progress whose volumes 
constitute a bibliothecal work now recog- 
nized as a necessity in every progressive 
library and as unexcelled in any language. 
It is published at 62 West Forty-fifth St., 
New York. The subscription price is $5 
per year. Special rate to small libraries on 
application. 



Public Libraries. A monthly journal 
dealing with every phase of library prog- 
ress. It aims to meet the needs of libra- 
rians in their every-day work by discus- 
sion of library methods, to further general 
ideas, and to give interesting news from 
the library field. Published by Library 
Bureau, 6 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
$3 per year. 

Special Libraries, the official organ of 
the Special Libraries Association, is pub- 
lished monthly, except July and August, 
and acts as a clearing house for news 
articles and comments on the progress of 
the special library movement and the best 
methods of organization and procedure. 
It is managed by an editor appointed by 
the Association with the assistance of an 
editorial advisory board. Subscription 
rate, including membership in the Associa- 
tion, is $4 per year. - Editor, Adelaide R. 
Hasse, Office of Asst. Secretary of War, 
Statistics Branch, Washington, D. C. 



521 



MEMBERS 



This list has been prepared at A. L. A. Headquarters, and is, so far as possible, cor- 
rect to December 20, 1922. The names of honorary members are printed separately, 
names of libraries and other institutional members in Antique type and of life members 
in capitals. 

The number following each name is the registration number in the order of joining. 



* died during the year 
Asst. assistant 
Br. branch 
Catlgr. -cataloger 
Child. children 
Circ. circulating or circula- 
tion 
Class. classifier 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Dir. director 
Ed. editor 
F. free 
Inst. institute 
Jr. junior 
L. library 
Ln. librarian 
Mem. memorial 



Mgr. manager 
P. public 
Ref. reference 
Sch. school 
Sr. senior 
Stud. student 
Treas. treasurer 
Trus. trustee 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Charles William Eliot, LL.D., Cambridge, Mass. 372. 

Ezekiel A. Harris, Jersey City, N. J. 2504. 

Frank A. Vanderlip, Scarborough-on-Hudson, N. Y. 8747. 



A. Herr Smith Memorial L. See Lancaster, 
Pa. 

A. K. Smiley P. L. See Redlands, Calif. 

Abbot, Etheldred, asst. In. P. L., Brookline, 
Mass. 9955. . 

Abbott, Jane H., 5466 Woodlawn Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 3175. 

Abbott, Katherine, catlgr. P. L., Omaha, 
Neb. 9598. 

Abbott, Mabel Louise, asst. in charge Mu- 
sic Dept. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 5692. 

Abbott, Theodora, asst. In. Nat'l City 
Financial L., N. Y. City. 10539. 

Abbott Laboratories L., Chicago, 111. 
(Lottie Nell Ingram, In.). 10525. 

Abel, A. Evelyn, In. Normal Sch. L., Pots- 
dam, N. Y. 9018. 

Abel, Clara L., 1st asst. In. Lincoln L., 
Springfield, 111. 9672. 

Abell, Martha Wynne, head Loan and Ref. 
Depts. Univ. of Rochester L., Rochester, 
N. Y. 10764. 

Abernethy, Clara L., ref. In. Iowa L. Com- 
mission, Des Moines, Iowa. 10004. 

Abraham, Erne Gale, class, and 2nd asst. 
Catalog Dept. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 
6776. 

Abrams, Dorothy A., general asst. Univ. 
of North Dakota L., Grand Forks, N. D. 
7760. 

Abrams, Eva, asst. Carnegie L. of Al- 
legheny, Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 9906. 

Academy of the New Church L., Bryn 



Athyn, Pa. (Reginald W. Brown, In.). 
11284. 

Ackerly, Mary Belle, catlgr. L. of 'Common 
Service Committee, N. Y. City. 5854. 

Ackley, Elizabeth, asst. In. Riverside Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 9525. 

Ackley, Gabriella, In. Aguilar Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 3533. 

Adams, Arthur, In. Trinity Coll. L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 7680. 

Adams, Benjamin, Wethersfield, Conn. 
2529. 

Adams, Edna C., asst. Wis. State Hist. 
Soc. L., Madison, Wis. 3357. 

*Adams, Edward B., In. Harvard Law L., 
Cambridge, Mass. 4760. 

Adams, Ellen Frances, chief Circ. Dept. 
Dartmouth Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. 6895. 

Adams, Florence A., child. In. Riverside Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 9795. 

Adams, Ida Elizabeth, In. West Seattle Br. 
P. L., Seattle, Wash. 9599. 

Adams, Jessie F., In. F. P. L., Atlantic 
City, N. J. 9796. 

ADAMS, LETA E., ord. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land Ohio. 4352. Life member. 

Adams, Maude B., In. Concord Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 10788. 

Adams, Mildred, stud. Univ. of 111. L. Sch., 
Urbana, 111. 11231. 

Adams, Minnie F., asst. P. L., Worcester, 
Mass. 10155. 



522 



HANDBOOK 



523 



Adamson, Ruth E., In. Garfield High Sch. 
L., Terre Haute, Ind. 7193. 

Adelbert Coll. L., Western Reserve Univ., 
Cleveland, Ohio. (George F. Strong, 
In.) 5631. 

Adler, Cyrus, pres. Dropsie Coll. for He- 
brew and Cognate Learning, Broad and 
York Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 1122. 

Adrian (Mich.) P. L. (Margaret F. Jewell, 
In.) 4763. 

Adriance Mem. L. See Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Agg, Rachel, ref. In. P. L., Evansville, 
Ind. 10432. 

AHERN, MARY EILEEN, ed. Public Li- 
braries, 6 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
111. 1676. Life member. 

Aiken, Gertrude E., In. P. L., Crawfords- 
ville, Ind. 7357. 

Aikenhead, Grace D., In. W. T. Grant Co. 
L., N. Y. City. 10156. 

Ainsworth, Elizabeth, In. Hyde Park Br. 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 10157. 

Ainsworth, Harry, purchasing dir. P. L., 
Moline, 111. 8049. 

Ainsworth, Marguerite, order In. P. L., 
Toledo, Ohio. 6419. 

Akers, Susan G., instructor Univ. of Wis. 
L. Sch., and field visitor Wis. F. L. Com- 
mission, Madison, Wis. 6028. 

Akron (Ohio) P. L. (Maude Herndon, 
In.) 4754. 

Alabama State Dept. of Archives and Hist. 
L., Montgomery, Ala. (Mrs. T. M. Owen, 
dir.) 4092. 

Alameda (Calif.) F. P. L. (Marcella H. 
Krauth, In.) 4275. 

Albert, Katherine, 1st asst. Roxbury Br. 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 9951. 

Alden, Bessie M., br. asst. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 9925. 

Alden, Jessica C., In. State Normal Sch. 
L., Oneonta, N. Y. 9257. 

Alderson, Altthea Todd, catlgr. District of 
Columbia P. L., Washington, D. C. 
11087. 

Aldrich, Grace L., head Child. Dept. F. L., 
Madison, Wis. 7932. 

Aldrich, Helen F., asst. Down Town An- 
nex P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9388. 

Alexander, Hon. Charles B., Regent Univ. 
of State of N. Y. and member of Com- 
mittee on State L. of that Board, 120 
Broadway, N. Y. City. 7650. 



Alexander, Lilla M., catlgr. Univ. of Chi- 
cago Harper Mem. L., Chicago, 111. 
10765. 

Alexander, Mabel, Marion, Ohio. 8471. 

Alexander, W. H., asst. In. Association of 
the Bar L., 42 W. 44th St., N. Y. City. 
3249. 

Alford, Eva, chief Technical Dept. P. L., 
Duluth, Minn. 9600. 

Alford, Helena B., ref. In. P. L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 8699. 

Allegheny Carnegie F. L. See Pittsburgh, 
N. S., Pa. 

Allen, Abbie L., catlgr. Redwood L., New- 
port, R. I. 10344. 

Allen, Alvoni R., trus. F. P. L., Jersey 
City, N. J. (Address, 55 Bentley Ave.) 
9210. 

Allen, Amy, catlgr. and instructor Univ. of 
Ky. L., Lexington, Ky. 5137. 

Allen, Anita M., In. St. George Br. and 
Staten Island Extension Div. P. L., N. 
Y. City. 8793. 

Allen, Annie P., ref. asst. P. L., Mason 
City, Iowa. 10928. 

Allen, Carrie S., In. P. L., Milton, Mass. 
4063. 

Allen, Faith, child. In. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 9673. 

Allen, Harriet Luella, catlgr. L. Assoc., 
Portland, Ore. 4930. 

Allen, Jessie M., asst. In. Western Reserve 
Historical Society L., Cleveland, Ohio. 
2355. 

Allen, Margaret S., child. In. P. L., Beloit, 
Wis. 11260. 

Allen, Margery, In. Baldwin P. L., Bir- 
mingham, Mich. 11088. 

Allen, Marina D., asst. supt. Circ. Dept. 
P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 3147. 

Allen, Mary S., In. The Provident Life 
and Trust Co. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8544. 

Allen, Mary T., asst. In. P. L., Asbury 
Park, N. J. 8193. 

Allen, Mary Warren, bibliographer Rocke- 
feller Foundation L., N. Y. City. 2430. 

Allen, Maude Eliza, In. Board of Educa- 
tion RefT L., Detroit, Mich. 6917. 

Allen, Mrs. Philip Loring, 211 W. Main St., 
Reedsburg, Wis. 5958. 

Alliance Franc.aise of Chicago L., 406-407 
Fine Arts Bldg., Chicago, 111. (Moise 
Dreyfus, In.) 9668. 



524 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Allison, Evie, In. Converse Coll. L., Spar- 

tanburg, S. C. 7949. 
Allison, Gladys, organizer 111. L. Extension 

Div. State L., Springfield, 111. 6247. 
Allsebrook, Anna, br. In. P. L., San Diego, 

Calif. 9080. 
Allyn, Edna I., In. L. of Hawaii, Honolulu, 

T. H. 8933. 
Alma Coll. L., Alma, Mich. (Annette P. 

Ward, In.) 9425. 
Alma (Mich.) P. L. (Mrs. M. Estella 

Moore, In.) 9635. 

Almond, Nina, In. Hoover War L., Stan- 
ford Univ., Stanford University, Calif. 

9036. 
Alseth, Hilda J., In. Engineering L. Univ. 

of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 10929. 
Althoff, Mary E., head Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Dayton, Ohio. 11089. 
Amann, Dorothy, In. Southern Methodist 

Univ. L., Dallas, Tex. 7341. 
Ambler, Sarah, In. P. Documents L. 

Office, Washington, D. C. 2796. 
AMBROSE, LODILLA, 1. research in 

medicine, Box 918, New Orleans, La. 

895. Life member. 

American Geographical Society L., Broad- 
way at 156th St., N. Y. City. (John K. 

Wright, In.) 9046. 
Ames, Georgiana, supervisor Child. Work 

P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 6444. 
Ames, Harriet Howe, ex-ln., Pepperell, 

Mass. 267. 

Ames, Lola A., 2624 Oxford St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 9258. 
Ames, Mary E., In. Norfolk House Centre 

Br. Fellowes Athenaeum L., Roxbury, 

Mass. 10158. 
Ames, Sara Jane, catlgr. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 10044. 
Amherst (Mass.) Coll. L. (Robert S. 

Fletcher, In.) 3514. 
Anaconda (Mont.) Hearst F. L. (Elizabeth 

L. Thomson, In.) 5790. 
Anders, Mae C., in charge Book Selection 

P. L., Des Moines, Iowa. 10045. 
Anderson, Amy M., In. P. L., Stevens 

Point, Wis. 9725. 
Anderson, Anna M., child. In. Columbia 

Br. P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6852. 
Anderson, Augusta, child. In. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 8748. 



Anderson, Edna E., asst. In. Polytechnic 

High Sch. L., Long Beach, Calif. 8396. 
Anderson, Edwin H., dir. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 1083. 
Anderson, Elizabeth J., In. South Side Br. 

P. L., Omaha, Neb. 9798. 
Anderson, Eunice G., state historian State 

Historical Dept., Cheyenne, Wyo. 9081. 
Anderson, Frank V., asst. In. Bureau of 

Industrial Research L., 289 4th Ave., 

N. Y. City. 7217. 

Anderson, Mrs. Frank V., dir. of Immi- 
grant Education, South Norwalk, Conn. 

5221. 
Anderson, Hannah P., asst. Silas Bronson 

L., Watertown, Conn. 

Anderson, Helen, catlgr. City L., Spring- 
field, Mass. 11090. 
Anderson, John R., bookseller, 31 W. 81st 

St., N. Y. City. 2944. 
Anderson, Mrs. Josephine, In. P. L., Bar- 

ron, Wis. 10345. 
Anderson, Mrs. Merlyn Abbott, In. F. P. 

L., Beatrice, Neb. 9000. 
Anderson (Ind.) Carnegie P. L. (Margaret 

A. Wade, In.) 10526. 
Anderson (S. C.) Library Association 

(Mrs. S. W. Geiger, In.) 4094. 
Andover, Mass. See Phillips Academy L. 
Andrew, Mrs. Kate Deane, In. Steele Mem. 

L., Elmira, N. Y. 2760. 
Andrew, Nell, In. Texas Christian Univ. 

L., Fort Worth, Tex. 7204. 
Andrews, Charles Lincoln, In. Denver Law 

Sch. L., Denver, Colo. 9082. 
ANDREWS, CLEMENT WALKER, In. 

The John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 796. 

Life member. 
Andrews, Elsie V., ref. In. Mich. State 

Normal Sch. L., Ypsilanti, Mich. 4119. 
Andrews, Evelyn R., In. Muhlenberg Br. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 6487. 
Andrews, Gertrude H., asst. In. 111. State 

Normal Univ. L., Normal, 111. 6001. 
Andrews, Gladys May, In. Stephenson P. 

L., Marinette, Wis. 6792. 
Andrews, Winnifred P., asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10046. 
Andrus, Gertrude E., mgr. Bookshop for 

Boys and Girls, Frederick and Nelson, 

Seattle, Wash. 5116. 
Angell, Mrs. Margaret, asst. East Tech. 

High Sch. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9956. 



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525 



Ann Arbor (Mich.) P. L. (S. W. McAllis- 
ter, In.) 4761. 
Annable, Dorothy, 1st asst. Extension 

Dept. P. L., Evansville, Ind. 8764. 
Annett, Sarah E., In. Washington Irving 

High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 5952. 
Annie Halenbake Ross L. see Lock Haven, 

Pa. 
Ansonia (Conn.) L. (Anne Richards, In.) 

4798. 
Anthony, Irene B., head catlgr. P. L., Fall 

River, Mass. 8124. 
Antrim, E. I., trus. Brumback L., Van 

Wert, Ohio. 10505. 
Applegate, O., Jr., L. Div. Library Bureau, 

43 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 10789. 
Appleton, William W., trus. P. L., N. Y. 

City (Address 35 W. 32nd St.) 4554. 
Appleton (Wis.) F. P. L. (Florence C. Day, 

In.) 6572. 

Archer, Frances Randolph, In. State Nor- 
mal Sch. Carnegie L., Athens, Ga. 4708. 
Arie, Janet, asst. In. Coe College L., Cedar 

Rapids, Iowa. 10390. 
Arizona State L., Phoenix, Ariz. (Con. P. 

Cronin, In.) 7947. 
Arizona Univ. L., Tucson, Ariz. (Estelle 

Lutrell, In.) 5015. 
Arkansas City (Kan.) P. L. (Mrs. A. B. 

Ranney, In.) 6130. 
Arkansas Univ. L., Fayetteville, Ark. (Julia 

Vaulx, In.) 10691. 

Armbruester, Rudolph A., geographical ex- 
pert Grosvenor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 11091. 
Arms, Jessie L., class. Univ. of Minn. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 5201. 
Armstrong, Agnes M., head catlgr. Case 

Mem. L., Hartford, Conn. 4621. 
Armstrong, Alice E., In. North Oakland 

Br. F. L., Oakland, Calif. 5436. 
Armstrong, Dorothy W., asst. Circ. Dept. 

P. L., Providence, R. I. 9800. 
Armstrong, Hazel E., documents and ref. 

In. Ind. State Normal L., Terre Haute, 

Ind. 9003. 
Arnett, Lonna D., In. Univ. of W. Va. L., 

Morgantown, W. Va. 4797. 
Arney, Mary, In. P. L., Raymond, Wash. 

8503. 
Arnold, Florence W., sr. asst. Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7233. 
Arnold, Gladys, class. P. L., Chicago, 111. 

7234. 



Arnold, Marion L., registrar P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. L 10005. 

Arnold, Mrs. Porter, 225 1st St., Weston, 
W. Va. 11261. 

Art Institute, Ryerson L. See Chicago, 
III 

Asbury Park (N. J.) P. L. (Josephine W. 
Porter, In.) 6131. 

Ashbaucher, Mrs. Ida, In. P. L., Bluffton, 
Ind. 11060. 

Asheville (N. C.) Pack Mem. P. L. (Ann 
Talbot Erwin, In.) 3656. 

Ashhurst, John, In. F. L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 1678. 

Ashley, Frederick W., supt. Reading Room 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6095. 

Ashley, Grace, sec'y to In. F. P. L., New- 
ark, N. J. 1992. 

Ashley, Mabel, In. P. L., Everett, Wash. 
8749. 

Ashley, May, In. P. L., Greenfield, Mass. 
2031. 

Askew, Sarah B., In. N. J. P. L. Commis- 
sion, Trenton, N. J. 3641. 

Atchinson, Frances, asst. Juvenile Dept. P. 
L., Flint, Mich. 11092. 

Atkins, Helen, gen. asst. Conely Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11093. 

Atkinson, Lena, asst. Loan Desk P. L., 
Des Moines, Iowa. 10047. 

Atlanta (Ga.) Carnegie L. (Tommie Dora 
Barker, In.) 4286. 

Atlanta (Ga.) Carnegie L. Training Sch. 
(Tommie Dora Barker, dir.) 3418. 

Atlantic City (N. J.) F. P. L. (Jessie 
Franch Adams, In.) 3317. 

Attleboro (Mass.) P. L. (Mrs. Lucinda 
Field Spofford, In.) 7326. 

Atwater, Claire Nelson, In. P. L., Lock- 
port, N. Y. 9047. 

Atwood, Alice C., bibliographical asst. 
Bureau of Plant Industry U. S. Dept. of 
Agric., Washington, D. C. 2641. 

Auburn (N. Y.) Seymour L. (Theodora 
Kellogg, In.) 5218. 

Aulls, Ina T., head Circ. Dept. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 7736. 

Aurora (111.) P. L. (James Shaw, In.) 
5415. 

Austen, Willard, In. Cornell Univ. L., 
Ithaca, N. Y. 1120. 

Avery, Anna Wentworth, Colchester, Conn. 
9869. 



526 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 






Avery, Emma L., in charge McPherson 
Sq. Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8251. 

Avery, Harriet K., In. Keystone State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Kutztown, Pa. 6773. 

Avery, Jessie R., In. Central State Normal 
Sch. L., Lock Haven, Pa. 5735. 

Avery, Matilda Leffingwell, Colchester, 
Conn. 9870. 

Avery, Maude E., catlgr. Carnegie L., 
State College, Pa. 11321. 

Avery, Maurice H., asst. chief Order Div. 
L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 5634. 

AVEY, E. GERTRUDE, chief child. In. 
P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 4896. Life mem- 
ber. 

Axtell, Frederic G., In. Macalester Coll. 
L., St. Paul, Minn. 4370. 

Ayer, Marion L., acting In. Wheaton Coll. 
L., Newton, Mass. 10611. 

Ayer, Winslow B., pres. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 2706. 

Ayers, Louise, asst. In. Reuben H. Don- 
nelley Corporation L., 652 S. State St., 
Chicago, 111. 7241. 

Ayres, Mary Armstrong, supervisor child, 
work P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 8546. 

Ayres, Samuel Gardiner, In. in charge Gar- 
rett Biblical Institute L., Evanston, 111. 
976. 

Babcock, Helen S., asst. In. Henry E. Leg- 
ler Regional Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 
5629. 

Babcock, Mrs. Julia G., In. Kern County 
F. L., Bakersfield, Calif. 2950. 

Baber, C. P., asst. In. Univ. of Okla L., 
Norman, Okla. 8875. 

Bacheller, J. H., trus. F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 6562. 

Backer, Mrs. J. W., 3729 North Road, Fair- 
mount, Baltimore, Md. 8794. 

Bacon, Corinne, lecturer L. Sch. of N. Y. 
P. L., and editor H. W. Wilson Co., 
N. Y. City. 2536. 

Bacon, Mary Randell, asst. Lewis and 
Clark High Sch. L., Spokane, Wash. 
10930. 

Bacon, Mrs. Virginia Cleaver, asst. dir. Jr. 
Div. U. S. Employment Service, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 10346. 

Baden, Anne L., bibliographical research- 
er L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
10092. 



Baechtold, Elsie L., In. Irving National 

Bank L., N. Y. City. 6396. 
Baensch, Emil, 610 North 7th St., Manito- 

woc, Wis. 8050. 

Baer, Harriet Irene, 3809 Gladys Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5526. 
Bagg, Rosanna C., child. In. Huntington 

Mem. L., Oneonta, N. Y. 10699. 
Bagger, Eleanor M., In. U. S. Veterans' 

Hospital No. 26 L., Greenville, S. C. 

9583. 
Bagley, Helen A., In. P. L., Oak Park, 111. 

6777. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, head Sch. Dept. Fresno 

Co. F. L., Fresno, Calif. 9674. 
Bailey, Arthur Low, In. Wilmington Inst. 

F. L., Wilmington, Del. 1999. 
Bailey, Beulah, ref. asst. N. Y. State L., 

Albany, N. Y. 7793. 
Bailey, Catherine, In. Haughville Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 9347. 
Bailey, Mrs. Elva B., sr. asst. Ref. Dept. 

P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9907. 
Bailey, Louis J., In. P. L., Flint, Mich. 

3642. 
Bailey, Sarah R., In. Crunden Br. P. L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 4880. 
Bailey, Serena C., In. P. L., Palatka, Fla. 

7667. 
Bailey, Thomas D., L. Dept. Library 

Bureau, N. Y. City. 5278. 
Baillet, May E., In. F. P. L., Irvington, 

N. J. 6149. 
Baillie, Herbert, In. P. L., Wellington, N. 

Z. 3409. 
Baillie, Joyce, stud Course in Work with 

Child. Western Reserve Univ. L. Sch., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 11094. 
Baker, Mrs. A. R., In. Andover F. L., An- 

dover, N. Y. 11325. 
Baker, Adaline Maitland, head Catalog 

Dept. Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 4396. 
Baker, Asa George, life member of Cor- 
poration City L., Springfield, Mass. (Ad- 
dress, 6 Cornell St.) 6295. 
Baker, Charles Melville, asst. In. Univ. of 

North Carolina L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 

7712. 
BAKER, CHARLOTTE A., In. Colo. 

State Agric. Coll. L., Fort Collins, Colo. 

1345. Life member. 
Baker, Clara M., desk asst. P. L., Decatur, 

111. 10160. 



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527 



Baker, Edith M., asst. In. Clark Univ. L., 
Worcester, Mass. 8536. 

Baker, Ethel G., asst. In. P. L., South Bend, 
Ind. 9260. 

Baker, Julia A., In. Austin Br. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 5443. 

Baker, Lucy W., In. P. L., Colorado 
Springs, Colo. 3198. 

Baker, Marion C, 1st asst. sub-branches 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 7218. 

Baker, Marion V., In. High Sch. L., 
Rochester, Minn. 10790. 

Baker, Mary Ellen, head Catalog Dept. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4731. 

Baker,, Mary Neikirk, supervisor of Lend- 
ing Dept. Ohio State L., Columbus, 
Ohio. 5351. 

Baker, Violet M., head of Desk P. L., Vir- 
ginia, Minn. 9934. 

Baker Univ. L., Baldwin, Kan. (Hattie 
Osborne, In.) 6044. 

Balch, Ruth, asst. Harper Mem. L. Univ. 
of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 5639. 

Baldwin, Bessie Russell, In. James Mem. 
L., Williston, N. D. 4389. 

Baldwin, Clara F., dir. L. Div. Minn. State 
Dept. of Education, St. Paul, Minn. 1872. 

Baldwin, Elizabeth G., In. Bryson L. 
Teachers Coll., N. Y. City. 828. 

Baldwin, Emma V., Denville, N. J. 2718. 

Baldwin, Rachel, In. Deerfield Shields 
High Sch. L., Highland Park, 111. 6496. 

Ball, Fanny D., In. Central High Sch. and 
Jr. Coll. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 4808. 

Ball, Rose, In. Albion Coll. L., Albion, 
Mich. 4034. 

Ballou, Isabel A., In. P. L., Bay City, Mich. 
9727. 

Baltimore (Md.) Dept. Legislative Refer- 
ence L., 219 City Hall (Horace E. Flack, 
executive.) 10371. 

Baltimore (Md.) See Enoch Pratt F. P. L., 
Maryland Medical and Chirurgical Fac- 
ulty L., and Peabody Inst. L. 

Balz, Leonard, Jr., chief of Stations Dept. 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 7740. 

Bamford, William B., pres. Board of Trus. 
F. P. L., Belmar, N. J. 8552. 

Bancroft, Anna M., trus. The Bancroft 
Mem. L., Hopedale, Mass. 3420. 

Bancroft, Edna H., In. Saratoga Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 3684. 



Bancroft, Priscilla, In. Deering High Sch. 

L., Portland, Me. 10161. 
Banes, Mary, In. Hughes High Sch. L., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 7407. 
Bangalore (India) P. L. (H. V. Krish- 

nayya, officer in charge; Y. V. Chan- 

drasekhariah, In.) 7717. 
Bangs, Mrs. Lena M., In. Denver Bar As- 

soc. L., Denver, Colo. 9084. 
Barber, Rose M., sr. asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 10612. 
Barden, Bertha, supervisor of Apprentice 

Class and 1st asst. Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 5804. 
Bargar, Frances A., asst. P. L., Columbus, 

Ohio. 7472. 
Barger, Laura, asst. In. Wylan Br. P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 9474. 
Barickman, Mrs. Rena M., In. P. L., Joliet, 

111. 4426. 
Barker, Alta M., In. F. P. L., Montclair, 

N. J. 6176. 
Barker, Beatrice J., head catlgr. Univ. of 

Ore. L., Eugene, Ore. 3029. 
Barker, Eleanor M., In. Rogers High Sch. 

L., Newport, R. I. 10001. 
Barker, Ruth McClintock, head Circ. Dept. 

Cossitt L., Memphis, Tenn. 6207. 
Barker, Tommie Dora, In. Carnegie L. and 

dir. L. Sch., Atlanta, Ga. 4575. 
Barkhurst, Marjorie, child. In. South Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9871. 
Barkley, Mrs. A. J., member Iowa L. Com. 

and pres. Board Ericson P. L., Boone, 

Iowa. 4427. 
Barksdale, Catherine, asst. Pacific Br. P. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9973. 
Barmby, Mary, In. Alameda County F. L., 

Oakland, Calif. 3160. 
Barmore, Nelle, asst. P. L., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 10791. 
Barnard, Elizabeth, asst. P. L., Kalama- 

zoo, Mich. 8904. 
Barnes, Charlotte, In. Greendale Br. F. P. 

L., Worcester, Mass. 8700. 
Barnes, Clara M., 710 E. Archer Ave., 

Monmouth, 111. 7868. 

Barnes, Elizabeth, supt. of Circ. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 7242. 

Bafnes, Grace, ref. In. Univ. of Mo. L., Co- 
lumbia, Mo. 6395. 
Barnes, Lois, asst. catlgr. Univ. of Mo. L., 

Columbia, Mo. 9787. 



528 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Barnes, Ruth, Hurlbut Br. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 10700. 

Barnett, Claribel Ruth, In. Dept. of Agri- 
culture L., Washington, D. C. 1434. 
Barnett, Helen, 940 Highland Ave., Pelham 

Manor, N. Y. 7877. 
Barney, Abby L., asst. Burton Historical 

Collection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11095. 
Barney, Mrs. Caroline Clark, 21 Baltimore 

St., Lynn, Mass. 9788. 
Barney, Edward M., trus. P. L., Medford, 

Mass. 10162. 
Barnum, Mabel F., In. Coll. of Liberal Arts 

L. Boston Univ., Boston, Mass. 10163. 
Barnum, Thomas Rossiter, editorial asst. 

to Sec'y of Yale Univ. and curator of 

Yale Memorabilia Yale Univ., New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 792. 
Baroda (India) Central L. Dept. (Newton 

M. Dutt, curator State Ls.) 10396. 
Barr, Annie Leonora, In. P. L., Rumford, 

Me. 4231. 
Barr, Charles J., asst. In. Yale Univ. L., 

New Haven, Conn. 2565. 
Barr, Elizabeth M., sec'y to In. State L., 

Providence, R. I. 9729. 
Barrett, Mrs. D., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 9945. 
Barrette, Lydia M., In. P. L., Mason City, 

Iowa. 4428. 
Barroll, Joseph R., member Board of Dir. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. (Address, 4603 

Pershing Ave.) 8876. 
Barrow, A. Mabel, asst. In. Williamsburgh 

Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9063. 
Barrow, Trotman Campbell, child. In. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 5439. 
Barry, Florence M., In. P. L., Forest Park, 

111. 10766. 
Barry, Kathleen E., vice-pres. Chivers 

Book Binding Co., 911-13 Atlantic Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 3913. 
Barry, Sarah Ford, cataloging asst. Yale 

Univ. L., New Haven, Conn. 10701. 
Barss, Margaret F., In. Charlotte Br. P. L., 

Rochester, N. Y. 10433. 
Barth, Gertrude, br. In. P. L., Fort Wayne, 

Ind. 9336. 
Bartholomew, P. A., In. N. J. Zinc Co. of 

Pa. L., Palmerton, Pa. 8505. 
Bartleson, Mabel, head Sch. Dept. P. 'L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 10048. 
Bartlett, Sarah R., In. F. P. L., Concord, 

Mass. 8554, 



Barton, Margaret S., 1st asst. Dorchester 

Br. P. L., Boston, Mass. 2501. 
Bartram, Mary S., trus. Bayard Taylor 

Mem. L., Kennett Square, Pa. 8840. 
Bascom, Elva Lucile, adjunct professor of 

L. Science Univ. of Texas, Austin, Tex. 

2477. 
Baskette, G. H., In. Carnegie L., Nashville, 

Tenn. 4190. 
Bastin, Dorothy, In. Riverview Br. P. L., 

St. Paul, Minn. 5946. 
Batchelder, Annie, In. Austin High Sch. 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7020. 
Batchelder, Marion F., field sec'y Md. P. 

L. Commission, Towson, Md. 1Q347. 
Bate, Gertrude, In. in charge Earlscourt Br. 

P. L., Toronto, Ont, Can. 11262. 
Bateman, Stella, 101 Morningside Drive, 

Apt. 52, N. Y. City. 9001. 
Bates, Flora J., In. Chicago Normal Coll. 

L., Chicago, 111. 2214. 
Bates, Mrs. Flora M., asst. in charge Peri- 
odicals State L., Lansing, Mich. 11061. 
Bates, Helen ., ref. In. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 1469. 
Bates, Mary R., asst. In. Univ. of Vermont 

L., Burlington, Vt. 5431. 
Batman, Marie, asst. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 7363. 
Batterson, Mary A., head Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Tacoma, Wash. 8506. 
Bauer, Isabelle, asst. catlgr. P. L., Kalama- 

zoo, Mich. 10541. 
Baum, Winifred E., asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 9935. 
Bauman, Eva M., 1st asst. McPherson Sq. 

Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8332. 
Baumer, Bertha A., ref. In. P. L., Omaha, 

Neb. 2888. 
Baumler, Jane I., head Intermediate Dept. 

P. L., Utica, N. Y. 8556. 
Baus, Esther L., asst. Univ. of Ky. L., 

Lexington, Ky. 8354. 
Baxter, Anne M., asst. In. Kan. State L., 

Topeka, Kan. 11344. 
BAXTER, CHARLES NEW'COMB, In. 

James Blackstone Mem. L., Branford, 

Conn. 2737. Life member. 
Bay City (Mich.) P. L. (Isabel A. Bal- 

lou, In.) 103. 
Bayer, Edna E., In. Jefferson Junior High 

Sch. L., Rochester, N. Y. 10049. 



HANDBOOK 



529 



Bayles, Ruth S., asst. Walker Br. P. L., 

cor. Mack and Montclair Ave., Detroit, 

Mich. 11096. 
Baylor University L., Waco, Tex. (John 

Strecker, In.) 6495. 
Beach, Bessie Baldwin, In. U. S. Indian 

Sch. L., Chilocco, Okla. 2239. 
Beach, Mrs. David N., 112 Broad St., Guil- 

ford, Conn. 2411. 
Beal, H. Marjorie, Stout Inst., Menomonie, 

Wis. 6519. 
Beale, Helen M., asst. In. Adelbert Coll. 

L., Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 3116. 
Bean, Mary Ramona, consulting In. Mc- 

Kee and Wentworth Distributors for the 

Library Bureau, Los Angeles, Calif. 

11210. 
Bean, Ruth A., In. West Side Br. P. L., 

Evansville, Ind. 10006. 
Beattie, Mabelle B., catlgr. Univ. of Neb. 

L., Lincoln, Neb. 7261. 
Beatty, Cora M., asst. Ref. Dept. F. P. L., 

Louisville, Ky. 7364. 
Beatty, M. Irene, ref. asst. P. L., East 

Cleveland, Ohio. 7431. 
Beatty, Mary B., In. Pershing County High 

Sch. L., Lovelock, Nev. 10767. 
Beaver Falls (Pa.) Carnegie F. L. (Elsie 

Rayle, In.) 5748. 
Bechtel, Elizabeth, In. Wooster -College L., 

Wooster, Ohio. 10931. 
Becker, Helen, head Open Shelf Dept. P. 

L., Buffalo, N. Y. 6609. 
Beckwith, Minerva G., asst. Dept. of Agric. 

Bureau of Chemistry L., Washington, D. 

C. 9526. 

Bedinger, Margery, In. U. S. Military 
Academy L., West Point, N. Y. 7743. 

Bedlow, Elinor, In. Natl. Bk. of Commerce 
L., N. Y. City. 11097. 

Beebe, Faye I., In. Southeastern High Sch. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 11098. 

Beebe, H. E., pres. Ipswich L., Ipswich, S. 

D. 9396. 

Beebe Town L. See Wakefield, Mass. 
Beecroft, Lillian J., chief Newspaper Dept. 

Wis. State Historical Society, Madison, 

Wis. 7021. 
Beeken, Dorothy, child. In. Chatham Sq. 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 9801. 
Beem, Vilda Prescott, In. Reddick's L., 

Ottawa, 111. 10768. 



BEER, WILLIAM, In. Howard Mem. L., 
New Orleans, La. 747. Life member. 

Beetle, Clara, subject header and class. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 9789. 

Beggs, Lutie, Ashland, 111. 9085. 

Behn, Naomi, catlgr. Univ. of Michigan L., 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 11099. 

Behr, Florence, In. High Sch. L., Long 
Beach, Calif. 10434. 

Behrens, Clara L., head Order Dept. F. P. 
L., Louisville, Ky. 7365. 

Belden, Charles F. D., In. Boston P. L. and 
dir. Div. of P. L's. State Board of Edu- 

cation, Boston, Mass. 4656. 

Bell, Bernice W., head Child. Dept. F. P. 
L., Louisville, Ky. 4874. 

Bell, Dorothy G., In. Jackson and More- 
land Engineers L., Boston, Mass. 10050. 

Bell, Harriette C., asst. City L., Manches- 
ter, N. H. 10165. 

Bell, Helen M., In. Roxbury Br. P. L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 1009. 

Bell, Katharine S., chief Circ. P. L., Hoi- 
yoke, Mass. 10166. 

Bell, Lillian E., In. F. P. L., Kaukauna, 
Wis. 5961. 

Bell, Mrs. Louise Parks, 4417 Second 
Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 9802. 

Bell, Lucy S., catlgr. Goucher Coll. L., 
Baltimore, Md. 9601. 

Bell, Minnie M., In. Tulane Univ. L., New 
Orleans, La. 3667. 

Belleville (111.) P. L. (Bella Steuernagel, 
In.) 7318. 

Bellows Falls (Vt) Rockingham F. P. L. 
(Iva M. Young, In.) 9669. 

Belser, Amanda M., In. in charge Orders 
and Accessions Univ. of Mich. General 
L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 7790. 

Bement, Constance, In. P. L., Port Huron, 
Mich. 6504. 

Bemis, Dorothy, In. Financial Ref. L. Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank, Philadelphia, Pa. 
7022. 

Bendorf, Rena M., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Chicago, 111. 11232. 

Benedict, Inez, In. P. L., McMinnville, Ore. 
8831. 

Benjamin, Anna, In. Butman-Fish Mem. L., 
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Bennett, Adelaide, Elyria Br. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 9086. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Bennett, Norma B., In. P. L., Madison, 

N. J. 2016. 

Bennett, Stella, sr. asst. Univ. of Califor- 
nia L., Berkeley, Calif. 4067. 
Bennett, Mrs. Theodore Van Brunt 

(Nathalie Adams Maurice), catlgr. 

Smithsonian Institution L., Washington, 

D. C. 3781. 
Benson, Frances M., In. Va. Agric. Exp. 

Station L., Blacksburg, Va. 8194. 
Benson, Rachel, 1. critic teacher Marr Sch. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 11211. 
Benson, Robert D., pres. trus. P. L., 

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N. Y. City.) 3455. 
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Y. 10613. 
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Ga. 6882. 

Beresford, Rose G., asst. In. P. L., Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 10932. 
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P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8507. 
Berry, Silas H., In. Bedford Br. Y. M. C. 

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10935. 



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Wis. 6837. 

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L., Hays, Kan. 9087. 

Bickel, Lucile Clark, 208 Sweitzer St., 
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Hatch, In.) 7319. 

Biddle, Marie H., stud. Univ. of Michigan, 
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ton, N. J. 8126. 

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Mich. 7981. 

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Society L., 109 University Place, N. Y. 
City. 1326. Life member. 

Bigelow, Mary C., asst. Loan Desk P. L., 
Rockford, 111. 4824. 

Bigley, Winifred H., In. Merced County 
F. L., Merced, Calif. 6677. 

Bilby, Mrs. Sarah H., 1294 N. 5th St., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 6926. 

Billingsley, Mary P., In. Federal Reserve 
Bank L., Kansas City, Mo. 4814. 

Binford, Mary, In. Central High Sch. Br. 
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lander, Wis. 5694. 

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In.) 4230. 

Birchard, L. See Fremont, Ohio. 

Bircholdt, Harriet N., acting editor Public 
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pital L., Cleveland, Ohio. 7026. 

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Bisbee, Joyce G., In. P. L., Lynn, Mass. 
10348. 

Bischof, Grace L. E., in charge Circ. Dept. 
P. L., St. Joseph, Mo. 10007. 



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Biscoe, Walter Stanley, sr. In. N. Y. State 

L., Albany, N. Y. 80. 
Biser, Ruth E., In. P. L., West Lebanon, 

Ind. 9730. 
Bishop, Ruth L., asst. P. L., Pomona, 

Calif. 8196. 
Bishop, William Warner, In. Univ. of Mich. 

General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 1435. 
Bishop, Mrs. William Warner, care Univ. 

of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 8558. 
Bixby, Alice Persis, catlgr. Ryerson L., 

Art Institute, Chicago, 111. 2472. 
Black, Helen M., in charge Documents P. 

L., Denver, Colo. 7027. 
Black, Miss M. J. L., In. P. L., Fort Wil- 
liam, Ont, Can. 4746. 
Black, Margaret, stud. N. Y. State L. Sch., 

Albany, N. Y. 9348. 
Black, Mary E., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 

10793. 
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Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 6977. 
Blackall, Mrs. Elizabeth W., In. The Hunt- 

ington Mem. L., Oneonta, N. Y. 6299. 
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coln L., Springfield, 111. 9974. 
Blackburn, R. T., member Okla. State L. 

Commission, Wagoner, Okla. 8782. 
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C. A. L., 610 Lexington Ave., N. Y. 

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North Carolina L., Chapel Hill, N. C 

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Urbana, 111. 9803. 
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L., Boston, Mass. 2499. 
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Women Salem Normal Sch. L., Salem, 

Mass. 9430. 

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chopathic Hospital L., Boston, Mass. 

5916. 
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L., Chicago, 111. 8454. 
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pelier, Vt. 3470. 
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H. 2438. 

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ton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 5053. 
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Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 5161. 
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Fla. 10702. 
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L., Newport, R. I. 6896. 
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ism, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

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L., Springfield, Mass. 8905. 
Bliss, Henry E., deputy In. Coll. of City 

of New York L., N. Y. City. 5194. 
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of Henry E. Huntington, San Gabriel, 

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City. 4422. 

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ence Simmons Coll. L. Sch., Boston, 

Mass. 2722. 
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Park Place, N. Y. City. 8560. 
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High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 6989. 
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Mich. 10936. 
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Mich. 11101. 
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Boston Univ. Coll. of Liberal Arts L., 
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Boswell, Jessie Partridge, In. Legislative 
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Bourne, F. A., architect, 70 Kilby St., Rm. 
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Bowen, Lila, head Extension Dept. P. L., 
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the District of Columbia, Washington, 
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field, Mass. 8129. 

Bowles, Verne, specal catlgr. Mo. Histori- 
cal Society L., St. Louis, Mo. 9089. 

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N. J. 10168. 

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Assoc., Portland, Ore. 3467. 

Bowne, Jacob T., In. International Y. M. 
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Bowton, Mrs. Anna M., In. and catlgr. 
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Boyd, Anne M., associate Univ. of 111. L. 
Sch., Urbana, 111. 8130. 

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Boyer, Emma M., dir. Standard Sch. of 
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Boyle, Gertrude, P. L., Toronto, Ont., Can. 
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Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 6978. 

Brackett, Marion W., In. Brighton Br. P. 
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L., Yreka, Calif. 9476. 

Bradbury, Mildred R., asst. to In. Sch. of 
Landscape Architecture L., Harvard 
Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 8877. 

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Lamb, In.) 5180. 

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Bradley, Florence, extension In. Common 
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City. 7982. 

Bradley, Mary, asst. In. State Normal Sch. 
L., River Falls, Wis. 10439. 

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(Charles N. Baxter, In.) 6645. 

Branham, Alice I., sr. asst. Ref. Dept. P. 
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Rredehoft, Nellie M., L. Exten. Div. 111. 
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Brewitt, Mrs. Theodora R., acting In. P. L., 
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Brewster, Mary B., head Order Section 
N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 8131. 

Brewster, William L., trus. L. Assoc., 
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Y. 1512. 

Briggs, Walter B., asst. In. Harvard Coll. 
L., Cambridge, Mass. 2597. 

Brigham, Clarence Saunders, In. American 
Antiquarian Soc. L., Worcester, Mass. 
2139. 

Brigham, Gwendolyn, asst. American Li- 
brary Assoc., Chicago, 111. 9199. 

Brigham, Harold F., asst. Rutgers Coll. L. 
and dir. F. P. L., New Brunswick, N. J. 
10440. 

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Providence, R. I. 2446. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



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lyn, N. Y. 9976. 

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tion L., Washington, D. C. 6031. 

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Brockton (Mass.) P. L. (Frank H. Whit- 
more, In.) 5852. 

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Pennie, Davis, Marvin and Edmonds, 
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dam, N. Y. 8052. 

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Brooker, Rosalie A., In. Miles Park Br. P. 
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Broomell, Ellyn Chapin, 5750 Midway 
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Brotherton, Jane W., Delphos, Ohio. 3570. 

Brotherton, Nina C., principal Carnegie 
L. Sch., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4994. 



Brough, Mary M., sr. asst. catlgr. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 10377. 

Brower, Kate W., In. Valley Br. F. L., 
Orange, N. J. 8566. 

Brown, Agnes Elizabeth, in charge L. Ex- 
ten, and asst. ref. In. State Coll. of Wash. 
L., Pullman, Wash. 7230. 

Brown, Alice E., child. In. in charge Teach- 
ers' Room P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8899. 

Brown, Alice Harris, Univ. of Rochester, 
Rochester, N. Y. 2611. 

BROWN, ARTHUR N., 30 Maryland 
Ave., Annapolis, Md. 206. Life mem- 
ber. 

Brown, Bertha L., In. P. L., Reading, Mass. 
3501. 

Brown, C. R., Carswell and Company, 
Ltd., Toronto, Ont., Can. 9091. 

Brown, Charles Harvey, In. Iowa State 
Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. 2409. 

Brown, Charlotte M., In. Univ. of South- 
ern Calif. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 9807. 

Brown, Delia E., In. P. L., Salina, Kan. 
6267. 

Brown, Demarchus C., In. Indiana State 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 4091. 

Brown, Dorothy, class, and annotator Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8272. 

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Minneapolis, Minn. 6821. 

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Evanston, 111. 1812. 

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P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5683. 

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Brown, Helen C., asst. Magnus Butzel Br. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9350. 

Brown, Helen D., In. U. S. Naval Training 
Station L., Hampton Roads, Va. 4963. 

Brown, Henry John, B. F. Stevens and 



HANDBOOK 



535 



Brown, 4 Trafalgar Square, London, W. 

C, England. 1758. 

Brown, Jane H., In. U. S. Naval Hospital 

L., Great Lakes, 111. 5280. 
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land Park, Mich. 11212. 
Brown, Mrs. Jennie Prentiss, ref. In. Michi- 
gan State L., Lansing, Mich. 10795. 
Brown, L. Lindsey, asst. In. F. P. L., New 

Haven, Conn. 8878. 
Brown, Lincoln Doty, 1527 Curso'n Ave., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 7869. 
BROWN, MARGARET W., 1207 West 

3rd St., Los Angeles, Calif. 4405. Life 

member. 
Brown, Marie T., In. Carnegie P. L., Con- 

neaut, Ohio. 7342. 
Brown, Mildred G., In. Camden County P. 

L., Haddenfield, N. J. 10441. 
Brown, Minnie K., 1st asst. Hood River 

County L., Hood River, Ore. 9092. 
Brown, Olive I., asst. Central High Sch. 

Br. P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 9478. 
Brown, Philip G., trus. P. L., Portland, Me. 

8134. 
Brown, Ruth L., 1st asst. Ref. Dept. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 7276. 
Brown, Ruth W., In. F. P. L., Bartlesville, 

Okla. 10796. 
BROWN, WALTER L., In. P. L., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 620. Life member. 
Brown, William L., asst. register of copy 

rights Library of Congress, Washington, 

D. C. 7614. 

Brown, Mrs. William R., trus. P. L., Gary, 

Ind. 9397. 
Brown, Zaidee, In. P. L., Long Beach, 

Calif. 2428. 
Brown Univ. L., Providence, R. I. (Harry 

L. Koopman, In,) 3598. 
Browne, D. B., bookseller Himebaugh and 

Browne, 471 Fifth Ave., N. Y. City. 

8567. 
BROWNE, NINA ELIZA, 44 Pinckney 

St., Boston, Mass. 716. Life member. 
Brownell, Lena V., head Catalog Dept. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6537. 
Browning, Earl W., In. P. L., Hamilton, 

Ont., Can. 6979. 
Browning, Eliza Gordon, asst. In. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 1081. 
Brownne, John Smart, In. N. Y. Academy 



of Medicine L., 17 W. 43rd St., N. Y. 

City. 588. 
Bruer, Mrs. Christine M., In. A. W. Shaw 

Pub. Co. L., Cass and Erie Sts., Chicago, 

111. 7763. 
Brumbaugh, Olive, In. P. L., Frankfort, 

Ind. 9093. 
Bruner, Helen M., asst. California State 

L., Sacramento, Calif. 10797. 
Brunot, Eugenia, child. In. Wylie Ave. Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6246. 
Bruns, Eleanor C., asst. Osius Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 11104. 
Brunson, Mary A., In. Madisonville Br. P. 

L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 10798. 
Bryan, Sarah Elizabeth, loan asst. Univ. 

of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 6865. 
Bryant, Marion E., In. P. L., Chippewa 

Falls, Wis. 7290. 
Bubb, M. Ethel, supervisor Work with 

Schools P. L. of the District of Colum- 
bia, Washington, D. C. 6114. 
Buchanan, Jessie, In.-teacher Balch Sch. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 10938. 
BUCHER, MRS. PAUL (ETHEL SHER- 
WOOD), Information Div. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 5253. Life member. 
Buck, Fred, trus. Hoyt P. L., Saginaw, 

Mich. 11343. 
Buckhous, M. Gertrude, In. Univ. of Mont. 

L., Missoula, Mont. 3132. 
Bucknam, Edith Phoebe, instructor Pratt 

Inst. Sch. of L. Science, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3850. 
Buder, G. A., dir. L. Board P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. (Address, Times Bldg.) 7916. 
Budlong, Mrs. Minna C, minister People's 

Church, Kalamazoo, Mich. 4433. 
Buell, Myra W., chief Br. Div. P. L., St. 

Paul, Minn. 8702. 
Buffalo (N. Y.) Grosvenor L. (Augustus 

H. Shearer, In.) 5185. 
Buffalo (N. Y.) P. L. (Walter L. Brown, 

In.) 1065. 
Bugbee, Mary F., asst. In. P. Documents 

Office, Washington, D. C. 6060. 
Buker, Lucy M., acting In. Marshall Coll. 

L., Huntington, W. Va. 8550. 
Bull, Mrs. Louise P., acting In. Mott Ha- 
ven Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 7914. 
Bulla, Mrs. Abbie L. S., In. Republic Iron 

and Steel Co. L., Youngstown, Ohio. 

10939. 



536 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Bullock, Edna Dean, dir. Neb. Legislative 

Reference Bureau, Lincoln, Neb. 1170. 
Bullock, Helen C, chief In. P. L., Lodi, 

Calif. 10907. 
Bullock, Waller Irene, head Adult Lending 

Dept. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 1694. 
Bulmer, Jeanie M., In. in charge Ref. L. 

Guaranty Trust Co., N. Y. City. 5433. 
Bumstead, Frank M., supt. of Circ. Univ. 

of Calif. L., Berkeley, Calif. 4348. 
Bundy, Irving R., sec'y Mo. L. Commis- 
sion, Jefferson City, Mo. 5398. 
Bunker, Beth C., In. Navarre Br. P. L., 

Toledo, Ohio. 10593. 
Bunker, May T., catlgr. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 3511. 
Bunn, Arralee, ref. In. Lawson McGhee L., 

Knoxville, Tenn. 7418. 
Bunnell, Fannie L., asst. Susquehanna Co. 

Historical Society and F. L. Assoc., 

Montrose, Pa. 9298. 
Bunting, Alice, supt. Inter-Branch Loan 

Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 8197. 
Burbank, Jane Lord, In. Dyer L., Saco, 

Me. 8273. 

Burck, Edna W., In. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital No. 61 L., Fox Hills, Staten Island, 

N. Y. 8796. 
Burd, Mrs. Priscilla P., In. Blue Valley L., 

12th & Ewing St., Kansas City, Mo. 

8844. 
Burdett, Helen Ripley, In. Macon Br. P. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10052. 
Burdick, Frances G., asst. High Sch. of 

Commerce L., N. Y. City. 9187. 
Burditt, Margery, head Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Waterloo, Iowa. 9977. 
Burgess, Alice P., child. In. City L., Wichi- 
ta, Kans. 7032. 
Burgess, Helen M., In. Brownell Jr. High 

Sch. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9808. 
Burgy, Florence, 1st asst. Hosmer Br. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 8288. 
Burk, Hazel, In. Woman's Board of Trade 

L., Santa Fe, N. Mex. 11342. 
Burke, Laurance Charles, asst. In. Univ. 

of Wis. L., Madison, Wis. 7687. 
Burkhardt, Esther H., asst. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Washington, D. C. 9529. 
Burlingame, Fanny M., In. Earl P. L., 

Earlville, 111. 9094. 
BURMEISTER, LAURA E., catlgr. Univ. 



of Southern Calif. L., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 8114. Life member. 

Burnet, Duncan, In. Univ. of Ga. L., Ath- 
ens, Ga. 2286. 

Burnet, Martha Alice, In. F. P. L., Dover, 
N. J. 2836. 

Burnet, Philip, trus. Wilmington Inst. 
F. L., Wilmington, Del. (Address, 182 
Du Pont Bldg.) 7917. 

Burnett, Edah Flower, in charge of Fine 
Arts Dept. P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 9095. 

Burney, Mary Vick, asst. In. Extension 
Loan L. Univ. of Tex., Austin, Tex. 
8984. 

Burnham, Alice E., head Circ. Dept. L. of 
Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 8041. 

Burnham, Mary, 810 E. Lime St., Lakeland, 
Fla. 6446. 

Burns, Esther Helen, In. Legislative Ref. 
Dept. Ohio State L., Columbus, Ohio. 
10940. 

Burnside, Elizabeth H., 1283 C Ave., East, 
Oskaloosa, Iowa. 9262. 

Burnside, Frances E., child. In. Campbell 
Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 10941. 

Burrage, Edith May, class, and subject 
header Preparation Div. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 3575. 

Burrage, Elizabeth, 70 Circuit Road, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass. 10002. 

Burroughs, Olive C., chief Readers' Dept. 
P. L., Berkeley, Calif. 5780. 

Burrows, Dorothy E., In. F. P. L., Ruth- 
erford, N. J. 2465. 

Burrows, Elizabeth D., In. P. L., Bethle- 
hem, Pa. 9297. 

Burrows, Marion, catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 2741. 

Burt, Lillian, In. Pacific Unitarian Sch. for 
The Ministry L., Berkeley, Calif. 3353. 

Burtch, Betty, gen. asst. P. L,, Detroit, 
Mich. 9351. 

Burton, Ernest D., dir. University of Chi- 
cago Libraries, Chicago, 111. 6421. 

Burton, Ruth Wood, acting In. P. L., Hot 
Springs, S. D. 11326. 

Burwash, Mary G., asst. Agric. L. Univ. 
of 111., Urbana, 111. 7591. 

Burwell, Ethel Irene, 2921 Hampshire 
Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 7034. 

Bush, Anges S., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 8906. 



HANDBOOK 



537 



Butler, Emma E., child. In. Cumminsville 
Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 6422. 

Butler, Harold L., In. The American Law 
L., N. Y. City. 8568. 

Butler, Helen L., In. Lindblom High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10770. 

Butler, Mrs. Louisa C, ref. asst. Burton 
Historical Collection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 
8289. 

Butler, Pierce, head Order Dept. The New- 
berry L., Chicago, 111. 7933. 

Butler, Mrs. W. W. S., Jr., chairman Board 
of Dir. P. L., Roanoke, Va. 9809. 

Butlin, Iva M., In. Beloit Coll. L., Beloit, 
Wis. 4435. 

Butterfield, Alice M., head Catalog Room 
P. L., Riverside, Calif. 10799. 

Butterfield, Mrs. Duane A., 220 Warren E., 
Apt. 403, Detroit, Mich. 8290. 

Butterworth, Jeanne, In. Elmwood P. L., 
Providence, R. I. 8750. 

Button, Mrs. Frances M., In. F. L., Neills- 
ville, Wis. 10771. 

Byers, Mrs. Frances, East Chicago, Ind. 
5764. 

Byrne, Mary Aloysia, ref. In. P. L., San 
Francisco, Calif. 4158. 

Byrne, Paul R., ref. In. Notre Dame Univ. 
L., Notre Dame, Ind. 7271. 

C. C. Mellor Mem. L. See Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Cadillac (Mich.) P. L. (William F. San- 
born, In.) 6067. 

Cain, Mary J., In. West Indianapolis Br. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8357. 

Cairo (111.) P. L. (Erne A. Lansden, In.) 
6233. 

Caldwell, Bessie, In. P. L., Martinsville, 
Ind. 5409. 

Caldwell, Hazel G., asst. In. P. L., Lake- 
wood, Ohio. 7479. 

Calfee, Margaret E., stud. Coll. for Wom- 
en, Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 8198. 

Calhoun, Alexander, In. P. L., Calgary, 
Alberta, Canada. 5279. 

Calhoun, Annie H., head Fine Arts Div. 
P. L., Seattle, Wash. 3372. 

Calhoun, Kathleen, asst. In. Univ. of Al- 
berta L., Edmonton, South, Alberta, Can- 
ada. 6628. 

Califano, Augustave, sec'y to asst. In. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8845. 



California State L., Sacramento, Calif. 
(Milton J. Ferguson, In.) 3512. 

California Univ. L., Berkeley, Calif. (Har- 
old L. Leupp, In.) 5033. 

CALKINS, RUTH HELEN, ref. In. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 8242. Life member. 

Calkins, Mrs. Sadie B., In. P. L., Dickin- 
son, N. D. 10908. 

Call, Harry, trus. P. L., Gary, Ind. 9398. 

Callaghan, Mary Ellen, asst. Circ. Dept. 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 10122. 

Callahan, E. B., In. The Macmillan Co. L., 
The Macmillan Co., N. Y. City. 10594. 

Callahan, Lilian, In. John A. Howe L., 
Albany, N. Y. 5025. 

Callahan, Margaret L., catlgr. Yale Univ. 
L., New Haven, Conn. 9676. 

Callan, Jessie, asst. In. and catlgr. Inter- 
state Commerce Commission L., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 6152. 

Callow, Harriet M., In. Quincy Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 1410. 

Cambria F. L. See Johnstown, Pa. 

Cambridge (Mass.) P. L. (Thomas Harri- 
son Cummings, In.) 3629. 

Camden (N. J.) F. P. L. (William H. Ket- 
ler, In.) 10692. 

Cameron, Jean E., In. P. L., Sedalia, Mo. 
10442. 

Camp, Mildred H., br. In. P. L., Water- 
town, Mass. 10095. 

Campbell, Catharine, revisor Univ. of 
Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 11105. 

Campbell, Clara Evelyn, sch. In. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 7036. 

Campbell, Donald K., In, P. L., Haverhill, 
Mass. 6963. 

Campbell, Eleanor H., In. Lothrop Br. P. 
L. f Detroit, Mich. 6652. . 

Campbell, Ella S., asst. In. Colo. Coll. L., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 7601. 

Campbell, I. Charlotte, chief Periodical 
Div. P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 10615. 

Campbell, Ida B., dir. Standard Sch. Filing 
and Indexing, Globe-Wernicke Co., 6 E. 
39th St., N. Y. City. 7449. 

Campbell, J. Maud, In. Jones Mem. L., 
Lynchburg, Va. 2606. 

Campbell, Juliette E., child. In. Central 
Child. Room Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 9399. 



538 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Campbell, Mrs. W. C., trus. Stephenson P. 
L., Marinette, Wis. 11106. 

Camper, Elta L., sr. asst. Univ. of Calif. 
L., Berkeley, Calif. 10909. 

Canfield, Adah C., chief Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 3191. 

Canniff, Edith L., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 11213. 

Cannon, Carl L., chief of Acquisition Div. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 6898. 

Cannon, Lucius H., In. Municipal Ref. Br. 
P. L., 211 City Hall, St. Louis, Mo. 6767. 

Cannons, Harry George Turner, In. Fins- 
bury P. L., London E. C., England. 
10349. 

Canon, Eva T., asst. Open Shelf Room P. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 7219. 

Cantner, Mrs. Frances C., In. Hardin Sq. 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10616. 

Canton, Ruby, In. Central State Teachers' 
Coll. L., Edmond, Okla. 6139. 

Canton Christian College L., Canton, 
China (Jessie Douglass, In.) 10372. 

Carabin, Maud A., In. The Detroit Edison 
Co. L., Detroit, Mich. 8570. 

Carbajal, J. B., In. Spring Hill Coll. L., 
Mobile, Ala. 11306. 

Carey, Alice V., In. Westwood Br. P. L., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 4738. 

Carey, Mary M., asst. P. L., St. Joseph, 
Mo. 9776. 

CAREY, MIRIAM E., supervisor of Insti- 
tution Ls. Minn. State Board of Control, 
St. Paul, Minn. 2141. Life member. 

Cargill, Joseph V., asst. In. P. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 3709. 

Carhart, Edith B., In. P. L., Bellingham, 
Wash. 3459. 

Carleton, Helen F., In. Sheppard and Enoch 
Pratt Hospital L., Towson, Md. 6490. 

Carlisle, Mrs. Geraldine V., In. Air Serv- 
ice Field Officers' Sch. L., Langley Field, 
Hampton, Va. 10399. 

Carlisle, Ruth H., asst. P. L., Woburn, 
Mass. 10053. 

Carlson, Ruth E., asst. John S. Gray Br. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11234. 

Carlton, W. N. C, In. Williams Coll. L., 
Williamstown, Mass. 3845. 

Carlton, Mrs. W. N. C., care of Williams 
Coll. L., Williamstown, Mass. 4059. 

Carmody, Helen M., supervisor Story- 



telling and Instructor in Storytelling 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10176. 
Carmody, Mrs. Mary, ref. In. Mechanics 

Mercantile L., San Francisco, Calif. 

10443. 
Carnahan, Lina W., Geological Survey L., 

Dept. of Interior, Washington, D. C. 

6306. 
Carnahan, Virginia C., head Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Fort Wayne, Ind. 8915. 
Carnation Milk Products Co. L., Chicago, 

111. (Ruth W. Colman, In.) 11078. 
Carnegie Endowment for International 

Peace L., Washington, D. C. (M. Alice 

Matthews, hi.) 9256. 
Carnegie-Lawther L. See Red Wing, 

Minn. 

Carnegie-Stout L. See Dubuque, Iowa. 
Carnes, Katharine P., child. In. P. L., Mor- 

ristown, N. J. 6077. 
Carney, Frank, supt. of Widener Mem. L. 

Bldg., Harvard Coll., Cambridge, Mass. 

2126. 
Carothers, Wilhelmina E., ref. In. James 

Jerome Hill Ref. L., St. Paul, Minn. 

3001. 
CARPENTER, GEORGE O., pres. Board 

of Dir. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. (Address, 

12 Portland Place.) 3430. Life fellow. 
CARPENTER, MRS. GEORGE O., 12 

Portland Place, St. Louis, Mo. 3431. 

Life member. 
Carpenter, J. Ruth, ed. of Publications, 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10942. 
Carpenter, Mrs. Leonore Crowell, In. Car- 
negie P. L., Iron Mountain, Mich. 10943. 
Carpenter, Mary F., asst. U. S. Dept. of 

Agric. L., Washington, D. C. 6013. 
Carpenter, Mary Frances, acting In. Mills 

College L., Oakland, Calif. 2143. 
Carr, Flora F., In. Wasco County L., The 

Dalles, Ore. 7283. 
CARR, HENRY J., In. P. L., Scranton, Pa. 

215. Life member. 
Carr, Mrs. Henry J. (Edith Wallbridge), 

ex-ln., 919 Vine St., Scranton, Pa. 448. 
Carr, John Foster, dir. Immigrant Publica- 
tion Society, 241 Fifth Ave., N. Y. City. 

6940. 
Carroll, Beatrice A., asst. Broadway Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10617. 
Carroll, Ethel, In. P. L., Oxnard, Calif. 

5159. 



HANDBOOK 



539 



Carson, Annie E., extension In. Rochester- 
Fulton County L., Rochester, Ind. 
9383. 

Carson, Helen K., 5047 15th Ave., N. E., 
Seattle, Wash. 8135. 

Carson, Jessie M., dir. L. Dept. American 
Committee for Devastated France, 15 
Blvd. Lannes, Paris, France. 2435. 

Carson, Josephine B., In. Pa. Compensa- 
tion Rating and Inspection Bureau L., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 10618. 

Carson, W. O., inspector of P. L's. of 
Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto, 
Ont., Canada. 7231. 

Carter, Albert F., In. Colo. State Teachers' 
Coll. L., Greeley, Colo. 7350. 

Carter, Bertha, In. Oak Park and River 
Forest Township High Sch. L., Oak 
Park, 111. 5384. 

Carter, Julia C., sec'y Vt. F. P. L. Com- 
mission, Montpelier, Vt. 9019. 

Carter, Julia F., child. In. Extension Div. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 3773. 

Carter, Lillian M., head catlgr. P. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 3307. 

Carter, Mrs. Maud Russell, In. State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Spearfish, S. D. 4445. 

Carter, Sylvester J., ref. In. P. L., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 5332. 

Cartoni, Pietro, U. S. general agent Alinari 
Bros, of Florence, Italy, Boston, Mass. 
11062. 

Gary Memorial L. See Lexington, Mass. 

Casamajor, Mary, sec'y to In. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 2099. 

Case, Flora M., P. L., Salem, Ore. 6014. 

Case, Mrs. Gladys S., prin. Juvenile Dept. 
P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 10444. 

Case, Louise W., trus. P. L., Weston, 
Mass. 10910. 

Casey, Phyllis A., child. In. Cabanne Br. 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 10542. 

Casford, E. Lenore, 1st asst. Sch. Dept. I- 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 10704. 

Cassidy, Charles E., trus. F. P. L., Jersev 
City, N. J. (Address, 542 Henderson 
St.) 9211. 

Cassidy, M. Louise, asst. Special Ls. Dept. 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 10179. 

Castle, Carolyn M., In. Exposition Park 
Br. P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 6308. 

Caswell, Caroline, asst. In. East Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 8825. 



Caswell, Edward S., asst. In. and sec'y- 
treas. P. L., Toronto, Ont., Canada. 5496. 

Catholic Univ. of America L., Washington, 
D. C. (Joseph Schneider, In.) 5347. 

Caton, Elizabeth S., In. The Filger L., 
Minonk, 111. 11288. 

Caton, Laura Sherrill, child. In. P. L., Ra- 
cine, Wis. 7983. 

Cavanaugh, Eleanor S., In. Standard Statis- 
tics Company, Inc. L., N. Y. City. 7795. 

Cawley, Reba S., reviser Catalog Dept. 
Princeton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 
6734. 

Cedar Rapids (Iowa) P. L. (Joanna 
Hagey, In.) 4245. 

Certain, C. C., asst. dir. Dept. of Lan- 
guages, Detroit P. Schs., Detroit, Mich. 
895S. 

Chaffin, Isabelle L., In. P. L., Dearborn, 
Mich. 10800. 

Chamberlain, Marguerite M., ref. In. P. L., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 8916. 

Chamberlain, Mary C., In. for the Blind 
N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 11289. 

Chamberlayne, Ellen F., In. Central High 
Sch. L., Binghamton, N. Y. 5781. 

Chamberlin, Fred W., mgr. L. Div. Library 
Bureau, Detroit, Mich. 11107. 

Chamberlin, Louise T., In. Eastern High 
Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 11108. 

Champaign (III) P. L. (Ethel G. Kratz, 
In.) 5076. 

Champlin, George G., asst. Ref. Dept. N. 
Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 1254. 

CHANDLER, ALICE GREENE, advis- 
ory In. and trus. Town L., Lancaster, 
Mass. 47. Life member. 

Chandler, Ellen M., head Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Buffalo, N. Y. 1099. 

Chapin, Artena M., In. P. L., Alhambra, 
Calif. 2378. 

Chapin, Ernest W., In. First National Bank 
L., Boston, Mass. 8571. 

Chapin, Esther S., catlgr. Princeton Univ. 
L., Princeton, N. J. 6990. 

Chapman, Atta, asst. Western State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., Kalamazoo, Mich. 10096. 

Chapman, Erne Louise, sec'y to In. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 5070. 

Chapman, Mrs. James H., trus. P. L., 
Rensselaer, Ind. 9098. 

Chapman, Lila May, vice-dir. P. L., Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 4243. 



540 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Chapman, Margaret C., In. Elmwood Place 

Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 10801. 
Chapman, Winnifred A., asst. catlgr. P. 

L., Lynn, Mass. 10181. 
Charleston (111.) See Eastern Illinois State 

Teachers' Coll. L. 
Charleston (S. C.) L. Assoc. (Ellen M. 

FitzSimons, In.) 5075. 
Charlson, Ellen O., jr. asst. Rogers Park 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10802. 
Chase, Arthur Horace, In. N. H. State L., 

Concord, N. H. 1319. 
Chase, Frank H., ref. In. P. L., Boston, 

Mass. 6447. 
Chase, George E., Ivanhoe Ave. and Loma 

Vista Place, Los Angeles, Calif. 7962. 
Chase, Jessie C., information asst. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 1468. 
Chase, L. Nell, 61 S. Professor St., Ober- 

lin, Ohio. 8136. 
Chase, Mary Alice, 303 County St., New 

Bedford, Mass. 3292. 
Chase, Mrs. Mildred H., 73 Elm Road, 

Newtonville, Mass. 5857. 
Chatfield, Marguerite, ref. In. P. L., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 9584. 
Chattanooga (Tenn.) P. L. (Margaret S. 

Dunlap, In.) 5760. 
Cheesman, Helen G., In. Public and Sch. 

L., Kane, Pa. 10365. 
Chelsea (Mass.) P. L. (Esther C. Johnson, 

In.) 3975. 
Chenery, Winthrop Holt, chief Dept. of 

Special Ls. P. L., Boston, Mass. 5622. 
Cheney, George N., In. Court of Appeals 

L., Syracuse, N. Y. 5545. 
Chevalier, Samuel A., chief of Catalog and 

Shelf Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 1979. 
Cheyenne (Wyo.) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. 

Luella G. Moore, In.) 6587. 
Chicago (111.) Art Institute. Ryerson L. 

(Sarah Louise Mitchell, In.) 4779. 
Chicago (111.) P. L. (Carl B. Roden, In.) 

4209. 
Chicago (111.) Univ. of Chicago Libraries 

(Ernest DeWitt Burton, dir., J. C. M. 

Hanson, associate dir.) 5188. 
Chicago University Press, Chicago, III 

3652. 
Chicago (111.) See also John Crerar L., 

Newberry L. and Pullman P. F. L. 
Chicopee (Mass.) P. L. (Anne A. Smith, 

In.) 7320. 



Chidester, Maud, child. In. P. L., Evans- 
ton, 111. 4437. 

Child, Ellen M., asst. Extension Dept. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10705. 

Child, Emily E., catlgr. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 4633. 

Child, Grace A., In. Phoenix Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. L., Hartford, Conn. 2528. 

CHILDS, JAMES BENNETT, asst. The 
John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 8846. Life 
member. 

Chilocco Indian Sch. L., Chilocco, Okla. 
(Bessie B. Beach, In.) 8048. 

Chipman, Frank E., pres. Chipman Law 
Pub. Co., 129 Washington St., Brook- 
line, Mass. 10445. 

Chipman, John H., treas. Chipman Law 
Pub. Co., 129 Washington St., Brook- 
line, Mass. 10445. 

Chippewa Falls (Wis.) P. L. (Marion E. 
Bryant, In.) 7288. 

Chisholm (Minn.) P. L. (Agnes V. John- 
son, In.) 9160. 

Chivers, Cedric, pres. and treas. Chivers 
Book Binding Co., Inc., 911-913 Atlantic 
Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 2862. 

Christey, Ella G., fiction catlgr. P. L., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 9435. 

Christman, Lois H., child. In. and general 
asst. P. L., Bradford, Pa. 9900. 

Christopher, Katharine M., In. Julia Rich- 
man High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 5840. 

Chutter, Mildred C., asst. Manuscript and 
History Div. State L., Albany, N. Y. 
10350. 

Cilley, Lillie, In. Neb. State Normal Sch. 
L., Chadron, Neb. 7737. 

Cincinnati (Ohio) P. L. (N. D. C. Hodges, 
In.) 1810. 

Claflin, Alta B., In. Federal Reserve Bank 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 4697. 

Claflin, Helen M., In. High Sch. L., Attle- 
boro, Mass. 10182. 

Claflin, Louise, 1st asst. Order Dept. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 2628. 

Clancey, Elena A., head Order Dept. P. 
L., Tacoma, Wash. 5147. 

Clanton, Cleora, head Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Dallas, Tex. 9810. 

Clark, A. Loretto, head of Visual Educ. 
Dept. City Sch. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 
8943. 



HANDBOOK 



541 



Clark, Annette L., In. P. L., New Albany, 

Ind. 4236. 
Clark, Clara A., asst. Norfolk Center L., 

Roxbury, Mass. 10446. 
Clark, Clara M., In. Biblical Seminary in 

N. Y. L., 541 Lexington Ave., N. Y. 

City. 4689. 
Clark, Elizabeth Kendall, head catlgr. 

Minn. Historical Society L., St. Paul, 

Minn. 4438. 

Clark, Mrs. Elizabeth Wallace, "The Con- 
necticut," Washington, D. C. 10772. 
Clark, Etta M., In. Howe L., Hanover, N. 

H. 3857. 
Clark, George Thomas, In. Stanford Univ. 

L., Stanford University, Calif. 629. 
Clark, Gertrude E., asst. Technical High 

Sch., Omaha, Neb. 11327. 
Clark, Harriet O., asst. P. L., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 9223. 
Clark, Hazel C., 1st asst. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 6823. 
Clark, Isabelle, In. Grinnell Coll. L., Grin- 

nell, Iowa. 7688. 

Clark, Janet M., In. Citizens' F. L., Wash- 
ington, Pa. 6125. 

Clark, Margaret M., ref. asst. P. L., Haver- 
hill, Mass. 10097. 
Clark, Mrs. Martha B., 33 S. Gore Ave., 

Webster Groves, Mo. 3045. 
Clark, Mary H., municipal ref. In. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 6779. 
Clark, May M., In. Carnegie-Stout P. L., 

Dubuque, Iowa. 8968. 
Clark, Minnie S., br. In. Hiram Kelly Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 6538. 
Clark, Norah M., In. East High Sch. Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 7781. 
Clark, Sarah E., asst. Selsby F. L., 

Charlestown, N. H. 10184. 
Clark, Theodora A., asst. catlgr. Graduate 

Sch. of Business Administration L. Har- 
vard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 9872. 
Clark, Viarda, catlgr. P. L., Superior, Wis. 

10428. 
Clark, William Edwin, chairman Board of 

Trus. P. L., Sharon, Mass. (Address, 75 

Newberry St., Boston.) 8055. 
Clark Univ. L., Worcester, Mass. (Louis 

N. Wilson, In.) 4030. 

Clarke, Edith E., Fayetteville, N. Y. 711. 
Clarke, Elizabeth Porter, organizer Iowa 

L. Commission, Qes Moines, Iowa. 1517. 



Clarke, Elva E., In. Employers' Assoc. of 

Detroit L., Detroit, Mich. 3074. 
Clarke, Jeannette A., In. F. P. L., Winona, 

Minn. 2200. 
Clarke, Mary E., asst. Epiphany Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 7706. 

Clarke, Sara B., trus. Millicent L., Fair- 
haven, Mass. 10185. 
Clatworthy, Linda M., In. Denver Univ. L., 

Denver, Colo. 2196. 
Clausen, Malvina C., In. State Normal 

Sch. L., Oshkosh, Wis. 6218. 
Clausen, Mrs. Maude Hiatt, In. P. L., 

Phoenix, Ariz, 7852. 
Clawson, Cortez R., In. Alfred Univ. L., 

Alfred, N. Y. 6959. 
Clay, Miriam E., head Circ. Dept. Kansas 

State Agric. Coll. L., Manhattan, Kan. 

10706. 
Clayton, Herbert Vincent, head Law and 

Legislative Dept. State L., Sacramento, 

Calif. 7798. 
Cleaveland, Dorothy K., In. Herring L. St. 

Lawrence Univ., Canton, N. Y. 10707. 
Cleaveland, Margaret, In. South High Sch. 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8707. 
Cleaves, Edith L., asst. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 8706. 
Cleavinger, John S., asst. professor Univ. 

of 111. L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 4829. 
Cleland, Ethel, In. Business Br. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 4883. 
Clement, Caroline B., asst. In. City L., 

Manchetser, N. H. 5275. 
CLEMENTS, W. L., Regent Univ. of 

Mich., Bay City, Mich. Sustaining mem- 
ber. 11287. 
demons, Harry, In. Univ. of Nanking L., 

Nanking, China. 4613. 
Cleveland (Ohio) P. L. (Linda A. East- 
man, In.) 3880. 
Cleveland Heights (Ohio) P. L. (Helen R. 

Keeler, In.) 10604. 
Clinton, Mabel, asst. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

8415. 
Clinton (Iowa) F. P. L. (Mary A. Egan, 

In.) 6530. 
Clonney, Mrs. Josephine W., ex-ln., 302 

W. 79th St., N. Y. City. 1590. 
Cloquet (Minn.) P. L. (Eda Tanke, In.) 

4440. 
Cloud, Josephine P., dir. Hennepin County 

F. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 2030. 



542 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Cloues, William Jacob, In. Hills L. Newton 
Theol. Inst, Newton Centre, Mass. 7627. 

Clyde, Mary E., asst. In. Iowa State Coll. 
of Agric. and Mechanic Arts L., Ames, 
Iowa. 8935. 

Coast Artillery School L., Fort Monroe, 
Va. (F. S. Clark, In.) 8776. 

Coats, Nellie Mae, R. R. 3, Lafayette, Ind. 
9299. 

Cobane, Lydia A., In. L. Assoc., Skan- 
eateles, N. Y. 6471. 

Cobb, Edith H., asst. F. P. L., New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 2636. 

Cobb, Lucille, asst. Catajog Dept. Car- 
negie L., Atlanta, Ga. 6079. 

Cobb, Mary Elizabeth, In. N. Y. State Coll. 
for Teachers L., Albany, N. Y. 7040. 

Cochran, Alice A., In. State Normal Sch. 
L., West Chester, Pa. 3498. 

Cochran, Jennie Owen, head of Stations 
and Extension Dept. F. P. L., Louisville, 
Ky. 6472. 

COCHRAN, MARY RUDD, Div. of Soci- 
ology P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 3509. Life 
member. 

Cochran, Ruth S., ref. In. P. L., Racine, 
Wis. 7984. 

Cochrane, Jennie M., catlgr. Maine State 
L., Augusta, Me. 5725. 

Cocker, Clara L, 1st asst. Tech. Dept. P. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 8291. 

Coddington, Hester, asst. In. Univ. of Wis- 
consin L., Madison, Wis. 1156. 

Coe, Mrs. Frances Rathbone, head Cata- 
log Dept. Mass. State L., Boston, Mass. 
1533. 

Coe College L., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Betty 
H. Pritchett, In.) 6866. 

Coffey, Maude Mara, child. In. 115th St. 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 10620. 

Coffin, Helen, legislative ref. In. Conn. 
State L., Hartford, Conn. 6199. 

Coit, Emily S., In. U. S. Veterans' Hosp. 
No. 27 L., Am. Red Cross, Alexandria, 
La. 2480. 

Colby, Adah Marie, In. Montague Br. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1301. 

COLBY, MRS. W. S. (INEZ F. SACHS), 
sr. asst. Catalog Dept. Univ. of Calif. L., 
Berkeley, Calif. 4571. Life member. 

Colcord, Mabel, In. Bureau of Entomology, 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture L., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 2517. 



Cole, Agnes M., sr. asst. Univ. of Calif. 

L., Berkeley, Calif. 3234. 
COLE, GEORGE WATSON, In. Henry 

E. Huntington L., San Gabriel, Calif. 

500. Life member. 
Cole, Lauretta C., head Sch. Div. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 10009. 
Cole, Theodore Lee, law bookseller, 715 

Colorado Bldg., Washington, D. C. 737. 
Colegrove, Mrs. Mabel E., head Periodical 

Dept. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 6312. 
Coleman, Sarah P., asst. child. In. P. L., 

Washington, D. C. 10447. 
Colerick, Margaret M., In. P. L., Fort 

Wayne, Ind. 2266. 
Coles, Virginia, asst. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

9604. 
Colgate Univ. L., Hamilton, N. Y. 

(Charles Worthen Spencer, In.) 6503. 
Collier, Amelia, asst. In. State Normal Sch. 

L., Millersville, Pa. 9678. 
Collier, Mary E., head Bindery Dept. Cos- 

sitt L., Memphis, Tenn. 8574. 
Collins, Anne Ross, In. Reynolds L., 

Rochester, N. Y. 5330. 
Collins, Elsie, In. North Br. P. L., New 

Bedford, Mass. 6449. 
Collins, Mary Ella, In. P. L., Fox Lake, 

Wis. 6140. . 

Collins, Mary F., Philadelphia, Pa. 11109. 
Collins, Will H., stud. N. Y. State L. Sch., 

Albany, N. Y. 9101. 
Collmann, Sophie Marie, chief Foreign 

Lit. Dept. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 3507. 
Colorado Springs (Colo.) P. L. (Lucy W. 

Baker, In.) 4843. 
Colorado State Agricultural ColL L., Fort 

Collins, Colo. (Charlotte A. Baker, In.) 

4379. 
Colorado University L., Boulder, Colo. (C. 

Henry Smith, In.) 7395. 
COLT, ALICE M., In. The Ferguson L., 

Stamford, Conn. 8343. Life member. 
Columbia (Mo.) P. L. (Lelia B. Willis, 

In.) 9252. 
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(Bertram French, In.) 9581. 
Columbia University L., N. Y. City. (Wil- 
liam H. Carpenter, In.) 8029. 
Columbus (Ohio) P. L. (John J. Pugh, In.) 

4942. 
Colvin, Mary P., In. P. L., Gilbertville, 

Mass. 10187. 



HANDBOOK 



543 



Colwell, Mrs. Mabel Emerson, In. Olney- 
ville F. L. Br. P. L., Providence, R. I. 
9811. 

Combs, Hilda A., In. Commercial High 
Sch. L., Providence, R. I. 11345. 

Comings, Marian E., asst. in charge Burn- 
ham L. of Architecture, Ryerson L. Art 
Inst., Chicago, 111. 5064. 

Compton, Charles H., asst. In. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 3728. 

Compton, Nellie Jane, asst. In. Univ. of 
Nebraska L., Lincoln, Neb. 3048. 

Compton Co., F. E., 538 S. Clark St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 11227. / 

Conat, Mabel L., 1st asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 6399. 

Cone, Jessica G., asst. In. Goodwyn Inst. 
L., Memphis, Tenn. 1302. 

Congdon, Feme L., chief catlgr. P. L., 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 8138. 

Congdon, Mrs. William M., 1. visitor and 
dir. of Traveling Ls. for L. Div. R. I. 
State Board of Education, 455 Cranston 
St., Providence, R. I. 5414. 

Conklin, Mae A., asst. child. In. F. P. L., 
New Haven, Conn. 9436. 

Conklin, V. Irene, asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 11110. 

Conkling, Portia M., In. Russell Sage Coll. 
L., Troy, N. Y. 8847. 

Conn, Mrs. Lucy, In. P. L., Superior, Neb. 
9102. 

Conneaut (Ohio) Carnegie P. L. (Marie 
T. Brown, In.) 7338. 

Connecticut State L., Hartford, Conn. 
(George S. Godard, In.) 4233. 

Conner, Martha, instructor L. Sch. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 2648. 

Connolly, Ethel, catlgr. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8936. 

Connolly, Katherine H., head Div. of Sta- 
tistics F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 9605. 

Connolly, Marguerite H., ref. In. and head 
of Apprentice Class F. L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 8937. 

Connor, Elizabeth, In. Mount Wilson Ob- 
servatory L., Pasadena, Calif. 8765. 

Conover, Mary, child. In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8292. 

Constant, Lillian J., In. F. P. L., Lawrence, 
Kans. 9585. 

Converse, M. Louise, In. Central State 



Normal Sch. L., Mount Pleasant, Mich. 

4403. 
Conway, Hester, child. In. Columbus Br. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 8336. 
Cook, Dorothy E., catlgr. P. L., East 

Cleveland, Ohio. 6867. 
Cook, Edith L., In. East Technical High 

Sch. Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5766. 
Cook, Lillian E., In. State Normal Sch. L., 

Minot, N. D. 5714. 

COOK, RUTH V., In. School of Archi- 
tecture L. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, 

Mass. 8243. Life member. 
Cook, Wilbur E., Grolier Society L., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 11111. 
Cooke, Adeline, stud. L. Sch. Univ. of Wis., 

Madison, Wis. 11346. 
Cooke, Jane E., reviser Catalog Div. L. 

of Congress, Washington, D. C. 3887. 
Cooke, Marion A., 1st asst. catlgr. P. L., 

Providence, R. I. 6964. 
Cooley, Genevieve S., catlgr. L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 4149. 
Coolidge, Elsie Winchester, catlgr. P. L., 

Boston, Mass. 3692. 
Coolidge, J. R'indolph, Jr., trus. Boston 

Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. (Address, 89 

State St.) 2520. 
Coolidge, Orrill P., In. P. L., Niles, Mich. 

10944. 
Coombs, Julia Marie, asst. In. Schenley 

High Sch. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10448. 
Coombs, Ruth Crawford, dir. Circ. P. L., 

Providence, R. I. 9812. 
Coons, Sallie, In. P. L., Fulton, Mo. 9238. 
Cooper, Ada, In. P. L., Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

10708. 
Cooper, Helen S., In. of Branches P. L., 

Flint, Mich. 9927. 
Cooper, Isabella M., In. in charge Central 

Circ. P. L., N. Y. City. 4381. 
Cooper, Louise B., chief Circ. Dept. F. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 1560. 
Cooper, Mildred B., asst. Catalog and Or- 
der Dept. Univ. of N. C. L., Chapel Hill, 

N. C. 9952. 
Copeland, Lora A., asst. P. L., Brockton, 

Mass. 3668. 
Coplin, Martha Lee, chief Dept. Pub. Doc. 

F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 7044. 
Corcum, Mrs. Mabel Roberts, child. In. 

Parlin Mem. L., Everett, Mass. 10188. 



544 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



COREY, MRS. DELORAINE PENDRE 
(Isabella Holden), 2 Berkeley St., Mai- 
den, Mass. 1925. Life member. 

Corfield, Marion, Adelbert Coll. L. West- 
ern Reserve Univ., Cleveland, Ohio. 
10543. 

Cornell, Helen, asst. F. L., Emporia, Kan. 
10010. 

Cornell Univ. L., Ithaca, N. Y. (Willard 
Austen, In.) 7387. 

Cornew, Elsie M., Dept. of Institutions and 
Agencies, State House, Trenton, N. J. 
5304. 

Corning, Grover T., mgr. Boston Library 
Div. Library Bureau, 43 Federal St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 9606. 

Corona (Calif.) P. L. (E. Leone Fink, In.) 
6663. 

Coronado, F. deP., sec'y of Academy of 
History and dir. of Havana National 
L., Havana, Cuba. 9401. 

Correy, Edna H., P. L., Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. 10506. 

Corson, Mary E., head In. P. L., Waukesha, 
Wis. 10945. 

Corwin, Belle, In. N. Y. Univ. L., N. Y. 
City. 4758. 

Corwin, Ella F., In. Carnegie L., Elkhart, 
Ind. 4444. 

Corwin, Euphemia Kipp, In. Berea Coll. L., 
Berea, Ky. 1723. 

Coshocton (Ohio) P. L. (Mrs. Clara B. 
Olney, In.) 7352. 

Cossitt, L. See Memphis, Tenn. 

Cottrell, Florence L., In. Madison Br. P. 
L., Lakewood, Ohio. 9263. 

Couillard, Ada S., ref. asst. Municipal Ref- 
erence L., 212 Municipal Bldg., N. Y. 
City. 6631. 

Coulter, Edith M., ref. In. Univ. of Calif. 
L., Berkeley, Calif. 3799. 

Council Bluffs (Iowa) F. P. L. (Grace E. 
Switzer, In.) 4248. 

Counsell, Mabel Louise, catlgr. P. L., 
Utica, N. Y. 9680. 

Countryman, Gratia A., In. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 1766. 

Courteau, Stella, catlgr. P. L., St. Paul, 
Minn. 8708. 

Courtright, Helen B., In. High Sch. L., 
Long Beach, Calif. 10449. 

Covington, Maud E., In. St. Johns Br. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8990. 



Cowan, Frances M., In. Wilson and Co. L., 

U. S. Yards, Chicago, 111. 10450. 
Cowgill, Ruth, 1415 Jewell Ave., Topcka, 

Kan. 9103. 
Cowing, Agnes, asst. In. F. P. L., East 

Orange, N. J. 3584. 
Cowing, Herbert L., head Catalog Dept. 

F. P. L., New Haven, Conn. 3866. 
Cox, Fannie, head Loan Dept. Carnegie L., 

Atlanta, Ga. 6518. 
Cox, Frances S., In. Metropolitan Life Ins. 

Co. L., N. Y. City. 8511. 
Cox, Mary Frances, child. In. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 9332* 
Cragin, Emma F., supt. Cataloging Dept. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 5000. 
Craig, Clara Louise, ref. In. Univ. of Neb. 

L., Lincoln, Neb. 3821. 
Craig, Florence M., catlgr. Stanford Univ. 

L., Stanford University, Calif. 7575. 
Craig, Helen M., asst. In. Engineering 

Dept. L., Western Electric Co., 463 West 

St., N. Y. City. 7047. 
Craig, Jane Adah, 613 W. Springfield Ave., 

Champaign, 111. 5348. 
Craig, Mayme, In. Dulany P. L., Paris, Mo. 

7841. 
Crain, Ena M., document catlgr. Wyoming 

State L., Cheyenne, Wyo. 10191. 
Craine, Mura M. H., asst. to Supervisor of 

Brs. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8751. 
CRAMPTON, SUSAN C., 1470 Beacon 

St., Brookline, Mass. 2710. Life mem- 
ber. 
Crandall, Annabel, catlgr. P. Documents 

L., Washington, D. C. 3306. 
Crandle, Inez, In. P. L., Du Bois, Pa. 5711. 
Crane, Helen M., 324 Hendrie Ave., De- 
troit, Mich. 6780. 
Crane, Joshua Eddy, In. P. L., Taunton, 

Mass. 504. 
Cranmer, Gladys R., Carnegie L., State 

College, Pa. 8512. 
Craven, Jessie T., asst. Interbranch Loan 

Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 10803. 
GRAVER, HARRISON WARWICK, dir. 

Engineering Societies L., 29 West 39th 

St, N. Y. City. 2229. Life member. 
Craver, Mrs. Harrison Warwick, In. Great 

Neck L., Great Neck, N. Y. 9188. 
Crawford, Clara M., head Catalog Dept. P. 

L., Durham, N. C. 7669. 



HANDBOOK 



545 



Crawford, Doris, In. P. L., Boise, Idaho. 
10365. 

Crawford, Mary Royce, In. Conn. Coll. for 
Women L., New London, Conn. 8139. 

Creagan, Isabel, catlgr. P. L., St. Louis, 
Mo. 9532. 

Creglow, Mrs. Harold C, Box 93, Lake 
Ann, Mich. 9140. 

Crenshaw, May V., In. Peoples L., New- 
port, R. I. 6154. 

Crevecoeur, Pierre B. de, In. Fraser Insti- 
tute F. P. L., Montreal, Canada. 1976. 

Cribbins, Mrs. Helen J., chief of Periodical 
Div. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9386. 

Crimmins, Nora, asst. In. P. L., Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 3438. 

Criswell, Lois, catlgr. High Sch. Ls. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 5135. 

Critzer, Helena M., asst. P. L., Berkeley, 
Calif. 5767. 

Crocker, Julia L., stud. Simmons Coll. L. 
Sch., Boston, Mass. 9595. 

Crocker, M. E., In. Annie Halenbake Ross 
L., Lock Haven, Pa. 9301. 

Crocker, Mary, chief Open Shelf Dept. P. 
L., St. Louis, Mo. 9480. 

Crocker, Ruth E., In. North Portland Br. 
L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6781. 

Crockett, Myrtle, catlgr. Carnegie L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 10946. 

Crofts, George D., In. Law L. Eighth Judi- 
cial District, Buffalo, N. Y. 7484. 

Crone, Albert R., Library Journal, 62 W. 
45th St., N. Y. City. 7485. 

Crooks, Muriel A., asst. In. Bay Ridge 
High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 8140. 

Crosman, Frances, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11112. 

Cross, Anne G., In. L. of the Dept. of 
Commerce, Washington, D. C. 7791. 

Cross, Laura M., In. East Boston Br. P. 
L., Boston, Mass. 10193. 

Cross, Leora M., In. West High Sch. Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5364. 

Cross, Mabel, asst. In. Campbell Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11113. 

Crossley, F. B., In. Northwestern Univ. 
Law L., Chicago, 111. 3987. 

Crowell, Edith H., In. P. L., Perth Amboy, 
N. J. 10544. 

Crowne, Helen S., chief Special Ref. Desk 
Univ. of Pennsylvania L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 7048. 



Crowther, Grace, asst. Lewis Institute Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 10947. 
Crowther, Mary J., In. West Gardner Br. 

Levi Heywood Mem. L., Gardner, Mass. 

10427. 
Cruice, Mary Z., organizer and catlgr. 

Sacred Heart Villa L., Danville, Pa. 

1598. 
Cruikshank, Catherine, asst. P. L., Fort 

Dodge, Iowa. 8496. 

Crumley, Susie Lee, principal L. Sch. Car- 
negie L., Atlanta, Ga. 5283. 
CRUNDEN, MRS. F. M., 145 E. 60th St., 

N. Y. City. 727. Life member. 
Cudworth, Warren H., 15 Beacon Ave., 

Norwood, Mass. 8142. 
Cufflin, M. Florence, In. South Boston Br. 

P. L., Boston, Mass. 10011. 
Cullen, Elizabeth Orlan, asst. catlgr. 

Bureau of Ry. Economics L., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 10545. 
Cullen, Lucy, asst. Card Section L. of 

Congress, Washington, D. C. 6053. 
Culver, Essae M., State L., Sacramento, 

Calif. 5485. 
Culver, Marjorie, jr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 10948. 

Cummer, W. E., trus. F. P. L., Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 5074. 
Cummings, Alice Twiss, asst. In. P. L., 

Hartford, Conn. 1927. 
Cummings, Mrs. R. B., In. Springwells 

Unit Schools L., Route 4, Dearborn, 

Mich. 11114. 

Cummings, T. Harrison, In. P. L. Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 7689. 
Cundiff, Ruby E., asst. In. Earlham Coll. 

L., Richmond, Ind. 9020. 
Cunningham, Edith, In.-teacher Moore 

Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 10949. 
Cunningham, Jesse, In. P. L., St. Joseph, 

Mo. 5265. 
Currie, Florence B., head catlgr. Univ. of 

Mo. L., Columbia, Mo. 5695. 
CURRIER, THOMAS FRANKLIN, asst. 

In. Harvard Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. 

1712. Life member. 
Currin, Althea M., In. P. Schools, Wal- 

tham, Mass. 10054. 
CURRY, ARTHUR R., ref. In. Univ. of 

Okla. L., Norman, Okla. 9335. Life 

member. 



546 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Curry, Mrs. Belle, In. P. L., Parsons, Kan. 

6555. 
Curry, Myrtle, asst. Hurlbut Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 11115. 
Curtice, Helen B., child. In. Henry B. 

Schoolcraft Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 
8879. 
Curtin, Mrs. Harry B., 624 Mulberry St., 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 10950. 
Curtis, Florence Rising, vice-dir. Drexel 

Inst. Sch. of L. Science, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 4364. 

Curtis, Gail, ref. In. Mich. State L., Lans- 
ing, Mich. 7677. 
Curtis, Helen R., asst. Armour Inst. of 

Tech. L., Chicago, 111. 10451. 
Curtis, Susan W., In. Town L., Framing- 
ham, Mass. 9813. 
Curtis, Mrs. W. L., trus. Carnegie P. L., 

Bradford, Pa. 6464. 
Curtis Memorial L. See Meriden, Conn, 
Curtiss, Clara Louise, child. In. Macon Br. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8575. 
Curtiss, Frances E., asst. In. Detroit News 

L., Detroit, Mich. 3220. 
Curtiss, Lucy M., sec'y L. Sch. Univ. of 

Wis., Madison, Wis. 10951. 
Gushing, Helen G., asst. Ord. Dept. P. L., 

Boston, Mass. 4626. 
Gushing, Helen Grant, catalog-In. N. H. 

Coll. L., Durham, N. H. 7744. 
Cushman, Esther C., asst. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 7787. 
Cushman, Josephine A., assoc. In. Bierce 

L. Municipal Univ., Akron, Ohio. 8848. 
Custead, Alma D., In. P. L., Patchogue, 

N. Y. 6155. 
Cutter, Annie Spencer, dir. Sch. Dept. P. 

L., Cleveland, Ohio. 4699. 
Cutter, Marian, Children's Bookshop, 5 W. 

47th St., N. Y. City. 6956. 
Cuyler, Linda C., child. In. P. L., Elyria, 

Ohio. 9596. 
Dabney, Elizabeth L., asst. Issue Desk 

Cossitt L., Memphis, Tenn. 10351. 
Dailey, Fern, asst. Loan Desk F. P. L., 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 11214. 
Daland, Stephanie, reviser Univ. of Wis. 

L. Sch., Madison, Wis. 9239. 
Daley, J. J., In. Osgood Law L., Toronto, 

Ont., Can. 6122. 
Dallas (Tex.) P. L. (Betsy T. Wiley, In.) 

4328. 



Dallas, Tex. See also Southern Methodist 

Univ. L. 
Dalton (Mass.) F. P. L. (Mrs. C. R Flick- 

inger, In.) 4028. 

Dame, Katharine, chief Ref. Div. P. L., St. 
Paul, Minn. 2391. 

Damon, Lalia May, head Catalog Dept. 
Nat'l City Financial L., N. Y. City. 2434. 

Dana, John Cotton, In. F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 773. 

Danbury (Conn.) L. (Mary P. Wiggin, In.) 
7251. 

Danforth, May Aphra, asst. Carnegie West 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8991. 

Daniel, Nora, In. F. P. L., Emporia, Kan. 
9104. 

Daniells, William N., asst. Univ. of Texas 
L., Austin, Tex. 5858. 

Darby, M. Claire, asst. Technology Div. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5599. 

Darling, Frances C., asst. Bookshop for 
Boys and Girls, Boston, Mass. 7628. 

Darlow, Gertrude E., head General Liter- 
ature Dept. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 
5412. 

Darrach, Marjorie J., ref. asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8293. 

Dartmouth Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. (Na- 
thaniel L. Goodrich, In.) 4244. 

Darwin, Gertrude, 517 E. 77th St., N. Y. 
City. 6924. 

Datz, Harry R., Library Bureau, 316 
Broadway, N. Y. City. 4589. 

Daughaday, C. Colton, publisher, 168 N. 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 9524. 

Davenport, Margaret E., In. High Sch. L., 
Freeport, 111. 9264. 

Davenport (Iowa) P. L. (Grace Shellen- 
berger, In.) 4373. 

Davidson, Adeline T., stud. L. Sch. of the 
N. Y. P. L., N. Y. City. 8576. 

Davidson, Arlie, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 10452. 

Davies, John F., 4159 Arcade Bldg., Seat- 
tle, Wash. 455. 

DAVIS, BERTHA E., ref. In. P. L., 
Brooklihe, Mass. 10114. Life member. 

Davis, Caroline H., asst. Ref. Dept. Co- 
lumbia Umiv. L., N. Y. City. 7051. 

Davis, Dorothy H., 1st asst. P. L., Dan- 
bury, Conn. 9903. 

Davis, Edna E., asst. Ohio State Univ. L., 
Columbus, Ohio. 4134. 



HANDBOOK 



547 



Davis, Eleanor, ret", asst. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 9049. 

Davis, Elizabeth H., ref. In. Kan. State 
Agric. Coll. L., Manhattan, Kan. 5302. 

Davis, Esther M., In. Brooklyn Training 
Sch. for Teachers L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
2674. 

Davis, Georgia Sylvia, asst. head of Order 
Dept. and Statistician P. L., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 4390. 

Davis, Gertrude Bryan, oatlgr. P. L., Hib- 
bing, Minn. 9777. 

Davis, Mrs. J. Hornor, Clarksburg, W. 
Va. 11322. 

Davis, Jennie Louise, asst. In. Cossitt L., 
Memphis, Tenn. 2977. 

Davis, Katharine N., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 11116. 

Davis, Letty Lucile, In. Condi Nast Press 
Co. L., Greenwich, Conn. 5667. 

Davis, Mary G., child. In. 135th St. Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 5917. 

Davis, Mary H., high sch. In. P. L., Brook- 
line, Mass. 4570. 

Davis, Mary L, In. Lorain Br. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 5232. 

Davis, Mary Louise, In. P. L., Troy, N. Y. 
1037. 

Davis, Mildred, ref. In. Hoover War L., 
Stanford Univ., Calif. 8475. 

DAVIS, OLIN SYLVESTER, In. P. L., 
Laconia, N. H. 493. Life member. 

Davis, Mrs. Olin Sylvester, Laconia, N. H. 
4676. 

Davis, Orlando C, In. P. L., East Chicago, 
Ind. 5013. 

Davis, Reba, In. Univ. of Wyoming L., 
Laramie, Wyo. 5203. 

Davis, Ruth A., catlgr. U. S. Dept. of 
Agric. L., Washington, D. C. 9607. 

Davis, S. Irene, asst. In. and supervisor of 
Work with Child. Ferguson L., Stam- 
ford, Conn. 6813. 

Davis, Sarah D., In. West High Sch. L., 
Columbus, Ohio. 8709. 

Davis, Whitman C., In. Miss. Agric. and 

IMech. Coll. L., Agricultural College, 
Miss. 3988, 
Davis, Mrs. Winifred L., instructor L. Sch. 

Univ. of Wis., Madison, Wis. 8842. 
Davison, Mrs. Hannah P., In. emerita P. 
L., San Diego, Calif. 3333. 



Dawley, Helen, asst. in charge Geology L. 

Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 10373. 
Dawson, Loleta I., county In. Wayne 

County Service, Scripps Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 7720. 
Day, Edward, In. S. A. A. I. D. L., Kelly 

Field, Tex. 7994. 
Day, Mrs. Gladys Judd, In. Hartford Bar 

L., Hartford, Conn. 7052. 
Day, Ida M., In. P. L., Hutchinson, Kan. 

9105. 
Day, Marian E., child. In. P. L., Lynn, 

Mass. 10055. 
Day, Mary Bostwick, In. National Safety 

Council L., Chicago, 111. 5803. 
Day, May E., In. J. V. Fletcher L., West- 
ford, Mass. 9860. 
Dayton, H. Irene, In. U. S. Naval Training 

Station L., Great Lakes, 111. 5715. 
Dayton (Ohio) P. L. and Museum (Elec- 

tra C. Doren, In.) 4314. 
De Angelis, Annina, head of Lending Dept. 

F. P. L., East Orange, N. J. 8577. 
de Carteret, Katherine, In.-teacher Marx- 

hausen Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 10952. 
DeGelder, Gertrude E., asst. Travel L. 

Dept. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 9533. 
deGogorza, Mrs. Flora, In. Brownsville Br. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9979. 
DeLaughter, Mrs. Nellie McCreary, class. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 1351. 
De Moss, Rose E., In. Collinwood Br. P. 

L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8578. 
De Puy, Almena Rebecca, catlgr. P. L., 

Jackson, Mich. 4785. 
De Rhodes, Hazel M., asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 10621. 
De Ridder, Gustave, notary, 4 Rue Per- 

rault, Paris, France. 3528. 
de Roulet, Marie Antoinette, child. In. 

Blackstone Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10953. 
DeVis, Sylvia, Penton Publishing Co., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 9437. 
De Waters, Lena, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 9107. 
de Yoe, Dorothy, asst. Child. Dept. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 9778. 
Deaderick, Mrs. Inez, asst. Lawson Mc- 

Ghee L., Knoxville, Tenn. 8579. 
Dean, Alice C., acting In. Rice Inst. L., 

Houston, Texas. 7574. 
Dean, Dorothy, stud. Simmons Coll. L. 

Sch., Boston, Mass. 10954. 



548 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Dear, Joseph A., trus. F. P. L., Jersey 

City, N. J. 9212. 
Dearborn, James M., chief Order Dept. 

Boston Athenaeum L., Boston, Mass. 

6801. 

Deatheraze, Mrs. Sallie Elaine, asst. Cen- 
tral High Sch. Br. P. L., Kansas City, 

Mo. 9896. 
Deborah Cook Sayles P. L. See Pawtucket, 

R. I. 
Decatur (111.) F. P. L. (Mrs. Alice G. 

Evans, In.) 172. 
Decker, Cora M., asst In. P. L., Scranton, 

Pa. 2311. 
Dedham (Mass.) P. L. (Anna P. Holland, 

In.) 5777. 
Deery, Delia Jean, asst. P. L., Boston, 

Mass. 2598. 
Deighton, Bina, In. P. L., Great Bend, Kan. 

8143. 

Dela Fosse, Frederick M., In. P. L., Peter- 
borough, Ont., Canada. 5703. 
Delehant, Frances, In. Swinney Br. P. L., 

Kansas City, Mo. 8710. 
DELFINO, MRS. LIBORIO (Emma R. 

Neisser). Traveling Libraries F. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 952. Life member. 
Democrat Printing Company, Madison, 

Wis. (Winifred F. Ticer, consulting In.) 

7282. 

Dempster, Lorene, asst. In. Omaha Tech- 
nical High Sch. L., Omaha, Neb. 10453. 
Dennis, Elizabeth G., 1st asst. Sch. Div. 

P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 8711. 
Dennison, Winifred, 1st asst. Carnegie 

Inst. of Technology L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

11290. 
Dennison Mfg. Co. L., Framingham. Mass. 

(F. A. Mooney, In.) 11257. 
Denny, Mrs. Winfield A., pres. L. Board 

Carnegie P. L., Anderson, Ind. 10507. 
Denton, Louise, In. P. L., Blue Island, 111. 

10955. 
Denver (Colo.) P. L. (Chalmers Hadley, 

In.) 1073. 
Denver Univ. L., Denver, Colo. (Linda M. 

Clatworthy, In.) 5121. 
DERBY, GRACE EMILY, assoc. In. Kan. 

State Agric. Coll. L., Manhattan, Kan. 

4069. Life member. 
Derby (Conn.) Harcourt Wood Mem. L. 

(Emma E. Lessey, In.) 5761. 



Derickson, Maud E., In. Pillsbury Br. P. 
L., Minneapolis, Minn. 32D6. 

Des Moines (Iowa) P. L. (Grace D. Rose, 
In.) 4303. 

Deshon, Corinne A., In. Curtis Mem. L., 
Meriden, Conn. 4020. 

Detroit (Mich.) P. L. (Adam Strohm, In.) 
4777. 

Detroit Publishing Co., Detroit, Mich. 
11228. 

DEVENEAU, GEORGE A., dir. of Re- 
search, R. H. Donnelley Corporation, 
. Chicago, 111. 6787. Life member. 

Devereux, Josephine, br. In. P. L., Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 7195. 

Dew, M. S., In. John Marshall High Sch. 
L., Richmond, Va. 8513. 

Dewees, Anna, asst. In. Bureau of Markets 
L., U. S. Dept. of Agric., Washington, 
D. C. 10804. 

Dewey, Gladys E., head of br. Barton Br. 
P. L., Hamilton, Ont., Can. 10956. 

DEWEY, MELVIL, Lake Placid Club, 
N. Y. 1. Life fellow. 

*DEWEY, MRS. MELVIL (Annie R. 
Godfrey), ex-ln., Lake Placid Club, N. 
Y. 29. Life member. 

Dexter, Lydia A., 2920 Calumet Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 782. 

Dice, J. Howard, In. Univ. of Pittsburgh 
L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 5359. 

Dick, Christian R., asst. In. Univ. of N. D. 
L., Grand Forks, N. D. 6994. 

Dick, Grace Isabella, catlgr. Mills Coll. L., 
Mills College, Calif. 6995. 

Dickerson, Luther L., development special- 
ist for Ls., Adjutant General's Office, 
Washington, D. C. 4588. 

Dickerson, Mrs. Mae H., ref. asst. Ryerson 
L. Art Institute, Chicago, 111. 9337. 

Dickey, Helene Louise, Windermere Hotel, 
Chicago, 111. 2152. 

Dickey, Viola S., 1st asst. Lorain Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 11117. 

Dickinson, Asa Don, In. Univ. of Pennsyl- 
vania L., Philadelphia, Pa. 2903. 

Dickinson, Sarah S., sr. asst. The John 
Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 1466. 

Dickson, Lillian L., In. Park College L., . 
Parkville, Mo. 9608. 

Dielman, Louis Henry, executive sec'y 
Peabody Institute of Baltimore, Balti- 
more, Md. 2426. 



HANDBOOK 



549 



Dieserud, Juul, reviser of cataloging L. 

of Congress, Washington, D. C. 2433. 
Dietrich, Mrs. Charles H., member Neb. 

P. L. Commission, Hastings, Neb. 11063. 
Dietz, C. N., pres. L. Board P. L., Omaha, 

Neb. (Address, 428 S. 38th St.) 8057. 
Dietz, Hifdegard, sch. In. P. L., Gladstone, 

Mich. 9814. 
Dill, Minnie A., asst. In. and catlgr. F. P. 

L., Decatur, 111. 1632. 
Dillard, Florence, In. P. L., Lexington, Ky. 

7300. 
Dills, Clara B., In. Solano County F. L., 

Fairneld, Calif. 6634. 
Dilts, Arlene, asst. In. Colo. Agric. Coll. L., 

Fort Collins, Colo. 9037. 
Dimmick Mem. L. See Mauch Chunk, Pa. 
Dimmitt, LeNoir, In. Extension Loan L. 

Univ. of Tex., Austin, Tex. 6802. 
Dinsmoor, Kate E., In. Teachers' Special 

L. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 3860. 
Dinsmore, Lucy C., In. Walker Br. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 3076. 
Dinwiddie, Edna Juliet, In. Davenport L., 

Bath, N. Y. 8446. 
Dion, Amanda L., asst. North Br. P. L., 

New Bedford, Mass. 9534. 
Dippel, Clara, sr. asst. P. L., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 2345. 
Diven, Lou Gertrude, supt. Wash. State 

Traveling L., Olympia, Wash. 5604. 
Dixon, Edna A., In. Kingsbridge Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 6231. 
Dixon, Vera M., supervisor Sch. Ls. Des 

Moines P. Schools, Des Moines, Iowa. 

5783. 
Dixon (111.) P. L. (Mary Frances Wynn, 

In.) 7327. 
Doane, Gilbert H., chief class. Univ. of 

Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

8969. 
Doane, Stella T., In. State Normal Sch. L., 

Mansfield, Pa. 7057. 
Dobell, Lila G., In. Trinity County F. L., 

Weaverville, Calif. 10146. 
Doblin, Mrs. Joseph W., 140 E. 19th St., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 8799. 
Dodd, Mary Lillian, In. Middletown Town- 
ship and Navesink Assoc. L., Navesink, 

N. J. 8581. 
Dodge, Cleveland H., trus. P. L., N. Y. 

City. (Address, 99 John St.) 3962. 



Dodge, Melvin Gilbert, printer-publisher, 

806 Union St., Utica, N. Y. 1263. 
Dodge, Vera L., Extension Div. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 9109. 
Dodgen, Lily M., In. State Normal Sch. L., 

Trenton, N. J. 5745. 
Doe, Janet, reviser L. Sch. of the N. Y. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 10454. 
Doggett, Marguerite V., In. High Sch. of 

Commerce L., Columbus, Ohio. 9004. 
Doherty, Cornelia Buel, ref. In. Silas Bron- 

son L., Waterbury, Conn. 10709. 
Doherty, Kathryn Frances, In. Silk Assoc. 

of America L., N. Y. City. 9535. 
Doherty, Pauline J., catlgr. P. L., Flint, 

Mich. 11118. 
Dolbee, Harriett C., In. Jennie D. Hayner 

L. Assoc., Alton, 111. 9735. 
Doll, Lena, l.-teacher Sampson Sch. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 10957. 
Donaghy, Grace L., br. In. P. L., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 3285. 
Donaldson, Florence A., asst. Medical 

Dept. Grosvenor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 

10958. 
Doncourt, Amy E., child. In. Mott Haven 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 7058. 
Donegan, Marie, asst. Catalog Dept. Gen- 
eral L. Univ. of Mich., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

9816. 

Donehoo, George P., In. State L., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 10455. 

Donnelly, J. W., Birmingham, Ala. 7918. 
DONNELLY, JUNE RICHARDSON, 

prof, of L. Science, dir. of Simmons Coll. 

L. Sch., and In. of Simmons Coll. L., 

Boston, Mass. 2427. Life member. 
Donovan, Katharine A., chief Registry 

Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7235. 
Doren, Electra C., In. P. L., Dayton, Ohio. 

1275. 
Doren, Elizabeth B., head Book Ord. Dept. 

P. L., Dayton, Ohio. 2933. 
Dorf, A. T., ref. In. Univ. of Chicago L., 

Chicago, 111. 8850. 
Dorrance, Frances, sec'y Wyoming Hist. 

and Geol. Society, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

7707. 
Dossing, Th., biblioteks dir. Statens Biblio- 

tekstilsyn, Copenhagen, Denmark. 9213. 
Doty, Beatrice Ingram, asst. Child. Dept. 

L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 9779. 



550 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Doty, Gladys, child. In. Barr Br. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 10456. 

Doty, Mabel E., 1st asst. P. Sch. L., Lans- 
ing, Mich. 10959. 

Doud, Margery, In. Buder Br. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 8851. 

Dougan, Alice M., asst. In. Purdue Univ. 
L., Lafayette, Ind. 5136. 

Dougherty, Anna R., chief Art and Music 
Dept. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 1563. 

Dougherty, Harold Taylor, In. F. L., New- 
ton, Mass. 3044. 

Douglas, Julia B., In. P. L., Evergreen, 
Colo. 8956. 

Douglass, Matthew Hale, In. Univ. of Ore- 
gon L., Eugene, Ore. 2133. 

Dousman, Mary E., child. In. P. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 1537. 

Dover (N. H.) P. L. (Caroline H. Garland, 
In.) 4264. 

Dow, Mary Edith, In. P. L., Saginaw E. 
S., Mich. 5243. 

Dowd, Helen M., asst. Northwestern Univ. 
L., Evanston, 111. 9483. 

Dowle, Gertrude E., sec'y to In. The New- 
berry L., Chicago, 111. 9536. 

DOWNEY, MARY ELIZABETH, In. and 
dir. N. D. P. L. Commission, Bismarck, 
N. D. 2294. Life member. 

Downing, Isabel N., St. Charles, Minn. 
9923. 

Downs, Verna, sr. asst. Osius Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11119. 

Dowse, George James, managing dir. Ed- 
ward G. Allen and Sons, Ltd., 14 Grape 
St., Shaftesbury Ave., London, Eng. 
5109. 

Doxsee, Roberta M., In. P. L., Bound 
Brook, N. J. 8447. 

Doyle, Katherine, periodical In. Univ. of 
111. L., Urbana, 111. 7489. 

Draddy, Mildred, In. Carnegie P. L., Wash- 
ington, Ind. 9681. 

Drake, Genevieve, general asst. Wooster 
Coll. L., Wooster, Ohio. 10960. 

Drake, Jeannette M.. In. P. L., Pasadena, 
Calif. 3732. 

Drake, Ruth B., In. Chazy Central Rural 
Sch. L., Chazy, N. Y. 5659. 

Drake Univ. L., Des Moines, Iowa. (Irene 
Engle, In.) 4594. 

Drane, Millie K., In. Prospect Br. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 8359. 



Draper, Aimee F., child. In. P. L., Milton, 
Mass. 10198. 

Draper, Miriam S., In. Children's Museum 
L., Brooklyn Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
1639. 

Dresel, Johanna E., child. In. L. Assoc., 
Portland, Ore. 10710. 

Drew, Nettie V., In. Franklin High Sch. 
Br. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8477. 

Drew Theological Seminary L., Madison, 
N. J. 9774. 

Drexel Inst L. Drexel Inst. of Art, Sci- 
ence and Industry. Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Mrs. Anne W. Rowland, In.) 4260. 

Drexel Inst. Sch. of L. Science, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. (Mrs. Anne W. Rowland, dir.) 
11079. 

Driscoll, Marjorie R., In. High Sch. L., 
Bangor, Me. 10711. 

Driver, Erline, In. Booker T. Washington 
Br. P. L., Birmingham, Ala. 10457. 

Drotning, Ananda, stations In. P. L., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 9957. 

Drum, Mrs. Adele H., In. Alexander Mit- 
chell L., Aberdeen, S. D. 6564. 

Drumm, Stella M., In. Mo. Historical So- 
ciety L., St. Louis, Mo. 9817. 

Drury, Francis K. W., asst. In. Brown 
Univ. L., Providence, R. I. 2781. 

Drury, Mrs. Gertrude G., instructor L. 
Sch. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 8779. 

DuBois, Isabel, asst. to Library Specialist 
Bureau of Navigation, Sixth Div., New 
Navy Bldg., Navy Dept., Washington, 
D. C. 5752. 

Du Bois (Pa.) P. L. (Inez Crandle, In.) 
9580. 

du Pont de Nemours and Co., E. L, Experi- 
mental Station L., Henry Clay, Del. 
(Elizabeth Vinsonhaler, In.) 10529. 

Dubuque (Iowa) Carnegie-Stout L. (May 
M. Clark, In.) 7321. 

DUDGEON, MATTHEW S., In. P. L., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4812. Life member. 

Dudley, Birdelle, sr. asst. West North Ave. 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10961. 

Dudley, Ruth C., In. City L., Manchester, 
N. H. 6540. 

Duff, Carmelita, In. Plumas Co. F. L., 
Quincy, Calif. 9924. 

Duffey, Katherine I., sr. asst. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 11291. 



HANDBOOK 



551 



Duffield, Mrs. Anna V., In. P. L., Loveland, 

Colo. 9484. 
Duggan, Eileen, asst. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 9333. 
Dullard, John P., sec'y to In. State L., 

Trenton, N. J. 6141. 

Dulles, Joseph Heatly, In. Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary L., Princeton, N. J. 
3432. 
Duluth (Minn.) P. L. (Alice M. Dunlap, 

In.) 4266. 
Dunbar, Isabelle, asst. In. State Normal 

Coll. L., Kent, Ohio. 10508. 
Dunbar, Margaret, head of Dept. of L. 
Science, Kent State Normal Coll. L., 
Kent, Ohio. 5448. 
Dunbar, Margaret E., supervisor Br. Ls. 

P. L., Berkeley, Calif. 11120. 
Dunbar, Ralph M., field In. Bureau of Nav- 
igation, Sixth Div., Navy Dept., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 6423. 

Duncan, Barbara, In. Sibley Musical L., 
Eastman Sch. of Music, Rochester, N. Y. 
6498. 

Duncan, Eleanor flolliott, managing editor 
Library Journal, 62 West 45th St., N. Y. 
City. 8059. 
Duncan, Mary C., stud. N. Y. State L. Sch., 

Albany, N. Y. 9402. 
Duncan (Okla.) P. L. (Mrs. L. A. Browder, 

In.) 9670. 
Dunham, B. Mabel, In. P. L., Kitchener, 

Ont., Can. 4964. 

Dunham, Mary, In. Smith Coll. L., North- 
ampton, Mass. 3031. 
Dunlap, Alice M., In. P. L., Duluth, Minn. 

8585. 

Dunlap, Fanny, ref. In. Univ. of 111. L. 
and lecturer in L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 6772. 
Dunmore, Delia, ref. asst. F. P. L., New- 
ark, N. J. 8586. 
Dunn, Abigail D., In. Young Men's Inst. 

L., New Haven, Conn. 5795. 
Dunn, Florence E., trus. P. L., Waterville, 

Me. 2541. 
Dunn, Isabel Lucile, catlgr. Ref. Catalog 

Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 9609. 
Dunn, Moira, asst. Locke Br. P. L., To- 
ledo, Ohio. 10546. 

Dunn, Roscoe Loring, Univ. of Mich. Gen- 
eral L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 10199. 
Dunne, Muriel, In. Englewood High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 9073. 



Dunsmore, Eugenia, In. Kalamazoo Coll. 

L., Kalamazoo, Mich. 9682. 
Dunton, Florence E., In. F. L., Belfast, Me. 

5255. 
Durango (Colo.) P. L. (Sadie K. Sullivan, 

In.) 6051. 

Duren, Fanny, Eldora, Iowa. 3190. 
Durfee, Helen Munger, registrar Syracuse 

Univ. L. Sch., Syracuse, N. Y. 10805. 
Durham, Josephine E., 423 S. Wisconsin 

St., Mitchell, S. D. 1103. 
Dutcher, Emma, In. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital No. 50 L., Whipple Barracks, Ariz. 

9818. 
Dutcher, Harriet S., ref. In. P. L., Duluth, 

Minn. 6803. 
Duvall, Louise, In. Bureau of Chemistry L., 

U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, 

D. C. 6101. 
Dwight, Franklin B., vice pres. Morristown 

L. and pres. Morristown L. and Lyceum, 

Morristown, N. J. 7062. 
Dye, Eleanor M., In. Detroit Teachers' 

Coll. L., Detroit, Mich. 5808. 
Eales, Laura A., asst. In. and head Tech. 

Dept. P. L., Bridgeport, Conn. 8223. 
Eaman, Mabel, order asst. The John 

Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 5258. 
Eames, Cora B., ref. In. P. L., Somerville, 

Mass. 9110. 
Earhart, Frances E., corps In. Seventh 

Corps Area, Ft. Crook, Neb. 2651. 
EARL, MRS. ELIZABETH CLAY- 
POOL, pres. Indiana P. L. Commission, 

Muncie, Ind. 1862. Life member. 
Earle, Clara, In. Coll. of the Ozarks L., 

Clarksville, Ark. 10391. 
Earle, Samuel L., trus. P. L., Birmingham, 

Ala. 9610. 
Earll, Irene, professor of L. Training R. 

I. Coll. of Education, Providence, R. I. 

11323. 
East Cleveland (Ohio) P. L. (Edith L. 

Eastman, In.) 8495. 
East Orange (N. J.) F. P. L. (Louise G. 

Hinsdale, In.) 4066. 

East St Louis (111.) P. L. (J. Lyon Wood- 
ruff, In.) 4176. 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers' Coll. L., 

Charleston, 111 (Mary J. Booth, In.) 4326. 
Eastman, Annie W., child. In. P. Sch. L., 

Lansing, Mich. 7652. 



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Eastman, Edith L., In. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 4673. 

Eastman, Jessie M., br. In. P. L., Seattle, 
Wash. 8587. 

EASTMAN, LINDA A., In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 1188. Life member. 

Eastman, Mary H., ref. In. Wilmington In- 
stitute F. L., Wilmington, Del. 8588. 

Eastman, William R., 6 Everit St., New 
Haven, Conn. 958. 

Easton, Valeria, In. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital No. 25 L., Houston, Tex. 6814. 

Easton (Pa.) P. L. (Henry F. Marx, In.) 
4270. 

Eastwood, Mary E., head Book Selection 
Sec. N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 3725. 

Eaton, Alice Rhea, In. P. L., Harrisburg, 
Pa. 4667. 

Eaton, Anne T., In. Lincoln Sch. L. Teach- 
ers' Coll., N. Y. City. 3638. 

Eaton, Charles C., In. Sch. of Business Ad- 
ministration L. Harvard Univ., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 10200. 

Eaton, Mabel, asst. In. Bates Coll. L., 
Lewiston, Me. 10098. 

Ebel, Chas. F., In. State L., St. Paul, Minn. 
10401. 

Eberlin, Laura M., In. Green Lake Br. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 9873. 

Eccles, Mary Willson, child. In. P. L., 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 7891. 

Echols, John Warnock, Vienna, Va. 8061. 

Echols, Mrs. Ula W., child. In. P. L., 
Omaha, Neb. 9980. 

Eckert, Edna L., jr. asst. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 10340. 

Eckman, Emma, chief Circ. Dept. Wil- 
mington Inst. F. L., Wilmington, Del. 
6187. 

Eddy, Mary A., In. South Shore Country 
Club L, Chicago, 111. 597. 

Eddy, Sarah S., In. Research Div. Aetna 
Life Ins. L., Hartford, Conn. 9064. 

Edgar, Martha J., asst. Circ. Dept. Oster- 
hout F. L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 10962. 

Edge, George A., chief Legislative Ref. 
Div. Ohio State L., Columbus, Ohio. 
11121. 

Edgerton, Frederick William, In. P. L., 
New London, Conn. 6877. 

Edmonds, Jean Lowrie, asst. Preparation 
Div. Ref. DepL P. L., N. Y. City. 9537. 



Edmonton (Alta., Canada) P. L. (E. L. 
Hill, In.) 5627. 

Educational Commission L. of Kwantung, 
Canton, China. (Dung U. Doo, 1. com- 
missioner) 10528. 

EDWARDS, ANNIE DEANE, catlgr. P. 
L., St. Paul, Minn. 8874. Life member. 

Edwards, Mrs. Edith, Ensley Br. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 11324. 

Edwards, Edith, 53 Hamilton Terrace, N. 
Y. City. 9538. 

Edwards, Gertrude M., In. Alfred Dickey 
F. L., Jamestown, N. D. 6654. 

Edwards, Nineveh Honour, In. Scripps Br. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8416. 

Edwards, Russell, head Circ. Dept. Univ. 
of Okla. L., Norman, Okla. 9846. 

Edwards, Mrs. Sarah Scott, ref. In. Univ. 
of Iowa L., Iowa City, Iowa. 11263. 

Edwards, Susie, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8144. 

Egan, Mary A., In. P. L., Clinton, Iowa. 
6286. 

Egbert, Mabel, Printz Dwellings, Frank- 
lin, Pa. 4642. 

Eggers, Edward E., In. Allegheny Carnegie 
F. L., Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 3143. 

Eggert, Elisabeth M., head Catalog Dept. 
P. L., Bridgeport, Conn. 3500. 

Eggmann, Hortense, part time asst. Univ. 
of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 9485. 

Egly, Mrs. Delia L., asst. in charge of 
Charging Desk. Univ. of Mich. L., Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 10712. 

Einstein, Alice F., chairman L. Board 
Emanuel Einstein Mem. L., Pompton 
Lakes, N. J. 7643. 

El Centro (Calif.) P. L. (Agnes F. Ferris, 
In.) 7355. 

El Paso (Tex.) P. L. (Mrs. Maud D. Sulli- 
van, In.) 6096. 

Elcock, Harriet, asst. State Normal Sch. 
L., Emporia, Kans. 9611. 

Elder, Martha, In. Central High Sch. Br. 
P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 9486. 

Eldridge, Bessie L., In. N. Y. State Normal 
Sch. L., Oswego, N. Y. 8590. 

Elgin, 111. Gail Borden P. L. (Katherine L. 
Abbott, In.) 9161. 

ELIOT, CHARLES WILLIAM, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 372. Honorary member. 

Elizabeth (N. J.) F. P. L. (C. A. George, 
In.) 4905. 



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553 



Elliott, Bonnie, child. In. P. L., Perth Am- 
boy, N. J. 10458. 

Elliott, Carrie L., ref. In. P. L., Chicago, 
111. 1175. 

Elliott, Julia E., dir. The Indexers, 5526 
So. Park Ave., Chicago, 111. 1667. 

Ellis, Hannah C, In. Hamilton Fish Park 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 6450. 

Ellis, Mrs. J. D., In. Avondale Br. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 8713. 

Elmendorf, Mrs. H. L. (Theresa West), 
vice-In. P. L., Buffalo, N. Y. 417. 

Elmore, Laura Martin, In. L. Assoc., Mont- 
gomery, Ala. 2425. 

Elsbree, Anna, acting In. Cornell L. Assoc., 
Ithaca, N. Y. 8514. 

Else, Ethel E., In. P. L., Watertown, S. D. 
7067. 

Elsworth, Mrs. Edward (Louise Arm- 
strong), Penn Yan, N. Y. 3250. 

Elwood (Ind.) P. L. (Helen Donaldson, 
In.) 4767. 

Ely, Margaret, principal asst. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 6825. 

Ely, Ruth, In. State Teachers' Coll. L., Du- 
luth, Minn. 9240. 

Elyria (Ohio) L. (Grace Mary Petersen, 
In.) 4035. 

Emeline Fairbanks Mem. L. See Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

Emerson, Mrs. H. L., 442 Main St., Stone- 
ham, Mass. 10336. 

Emerson, Martha F., in charge Cataloging 
Dartmouth Coll. L., Hanover, N. H. 
4331. 

Emerson, Ralf P., In. P. L., Jackson, Mich. 
7209. 

Emery, Cynthia M., child. In. P. L., Madi- 
son, N. J. 11235. 

Emery, Ethel E., asst. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 10806. 

Emmanuel Missionary College L., Berrien 
Springs, Mich. (Bertha E. Allen, In.) 
8835. 

Encking, Louise F., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 4456. 

Endicott, Edith, instructor L. Sch. Carne- 
gie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 9874. 

Endicott, Grace, head Child. Dept Carne- 
gie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6435. 

Endicott (N. Y.) F. L. (Margery C. Quig- 
ley, In.) 8285. 



England, Grace A., chief Civics Div. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 6400. 
Engle, Emma R., supervisor of Child. 

Work F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 2021. 
English, Gladys, asst. P. L., Mills Coll. L., 

Mills College P. O., Calif. 9487. 
English, Mary Goode, asst. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 7445. 
Engstfeld, Mrs. Caroline, catlgr. P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 6287. 
Engstrom, L. Frances, In. Bremer Br. P. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9736. 
Enid (Okla.) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. Cora 

Case Porter, In) 10115. 
Enoch Pratt F. L., Baltimore, Md. (Bern- 
ard C. Steiner, In.) 4214. 
Ensign, Mary E., chief of Binding P. L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 8852. 

Erb, Frank C., supervisor Shelf Dept. Co- 
lumbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 6188. 
Erb, Frederic W., asst. In. and supervisor 

Loan Div. Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. 

City. 3923. 
Erchinger, Hazel H., In. Ballard High Sch. 

L., Seattle, Wash. 10963. 
Erie (Pa.) P. L. (Mrs. Jean Ashley Hard, 

In.) 4277. 
Ernst, Gertrude E., asst. Technology Dept. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 4960. 
Errett, Mrs. A. W., Jr., trus. P. L., Ke- 

wanee, 111. 9403. 
Erskine, Edith, In. Blackstone Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 5493. 

Erskine, Mary Louise, In. Wilson Coll. L., 
- Chambersburg, Pa. 6494. 
Essery, Mrs. Carl V., 12842 Second Blvd., 

Detroit, Mich. 8309. 

Essex, Mary C., chief catlgr. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 2514. 
Estabrook, Lillian O., In. F. L., Newburgh, 

N. Y. 3290. 
Estey, Helen G., In. P. L., Athol, Mass. 

8591. 
Ethell, Emily, In. Northern Ariz. Normal 

Sch. L., Flagstaff, Ariz. 10459. 
Eustis, George H., trus. P. L., Winchester, 

Mass. 2800. 
Evans, Adelaide F., chief Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 2695. 
Evans, Mrs. Alice G., In. F. P. L., Decatur, 

111. 8062. 
Evans, Charles, ex-ln., 1413 Pratt Ave., 

Rogers Park, Chicago, 111. 2. 



554 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Evans, Charlotte E., asst. In. and catlgr. 

P. L., Erie, Pa. 3753. 
Evans, Elizabeth, In. Sprague House Br. 

P. L., Providence, R. I. 9666. 
Evans, Elsie, In. F. P. L., Leavenworth, 

Kan. 9005. 
Evans, George H., In. P. L., Somerville, 

Mass. 7804. 
Evans, Hazel, Circ. Dept. Iowa State 

Teachers Coll. L., Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

11317. 
Evans, Lillian M., In. Juniata Coll. L., 

Huntingdon, Pa. 6189. 
Evans, Margaret Hunt, head Child. Dept. 

P. L., Buffalo, N. Y. 5888. 
Evans, Orrena Louise, In. U. S. Bureau 

of Public Roads L., Willard Bldg., 

Washington, D. C., 7491. 
Evanston (111.) P. L. (Ida F. Wright, In.) 

4175. 
Evansville (Ind.) P. L. (Ethel F. McCol- 

lough, In.) 7328. 

Eveleth (Minn.) P. L. (Margaret Hick- 
man, In.) 7786. 
Everett, Violet B., head Stations Dept. P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8360. 
Everett, Mass. Frederick E. Parlin Mem. 

L. (Marian Price, In.) 4705. 
Ewald, Harriot R., general asst. P. L., 

Harrisburg, Pa. 9981. 
Ewell, Glenn B., In. Rochester Theol. Sem. 

L., Rochester, N. Y. 7806. 
Ewing, Constance R. S., head of Order 

Dept. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 10622. 
Ewing, Florence M., In. P. L., New 

Brighton, Pa. 10713. 
Ewing, Marian, child. In. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 10039. 
Exeter (N. H.) P. L. (Carrie W. Bying- 

ton, In.) 4753. 
Experimental Station L., E. I. du Pont 

de Nemours and Co. See du Pont de 

Nemours and Co. 

FAILING, MARY F., 201 Fifth St., Port- 
land, Ore. 3248. Life member. 
Fair, Ethel Marion, field visitor Wis. F. L. 

Commission and instructor Univ. of Wis. 

L. Sch., Madison, Wis. 7197: 
Fairbanks, Cornelia Taylor, In. St. Johns- 
bury Athenaeum, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

9613. 
Fairchild, C. B., Jr., executive asst. Rapid 

Transit Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 4873. 



Fairchild, Charlotte L., In. East 79th St. 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8714. 
Fairfax, Virginia, dir. Standard Sch. of 

Filing and Indexing Globe-Wernicke Co.. 

417 Camp St., New Orleans, La. 9224. 
Fairhaven, Mass. Millicent L. (Galen W. 

Hill, In.) 3542. 
Fairweather, Maurine, In. Jewish Inst. Br. 

P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 10807. 
Faison, Georgie H., In. Randolph-Macon 

Woman's Coll. L., Lynchburg, Va. 10374. 
Fall River (Mass.) P. L. (George W. Ran- 

kin, In.) 4250. 
Falley, Eleanor W., In. Goucher Coll. L., 

Baltimore, Md. 5642. 

Fanning, Clara E., asst. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 4367. 
Fanti, A., In. U. S. Bureau of Standards 

L., Washington, D. C. 6115. 
Fargo, Lucile F., In. North Central High 

Sch. L., Spokane, Wash. 4768. 
Fargo (N. D.) P. L. (Winnie Bucklin, In.) 

6598. 
Farnum, Mrs. Howard W., trus. Manton 

F. P. L., Chepachet, R. L 7807. 
Farnum, Jessica L., sec'y L. of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 6054. 
Farquhar, Alice M., asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 5729. 
Farr, Alice N., In. State Teachers Coll. L., 

Mankato, Minn. 4458. 
Farr, Helen E., In. State Teachers' Coll. 

L., Bemidji, Minn. 8145. 
Farr, Mabel, In. Adelphi Coll. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 2172. 
FARR, MARY PARRY, In. in charge 

Southwark Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1594. Life member. 
Farrand, Isabel D., In. P. L., Houghton, 

Mich. 10509. 
Farrar, Ida F., head Catalog Dept. City L. 

Assoc., Springfield, Mass. 1733. 
Farris, Cecile K., child. In. P. L., Salem, 

Mass. 10099. 

Fast, Louise K., In. P. L., Tiffin, O. 8594. 
Fatout, Nellie B., 2055 Park Ave., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 2156. 
Faulkner, Mrs. Mabel Frances, in charge 

County Dept. P. L., Riverside, Calif. 

9922. 
Faus, Laura I., In. High Sch. L., Atlantic 

City, N. J. 10623. 



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555 



Fauteux, Aegidius, chief In. Bibliotheque 
Saint Sulpice, Montreal, Canada. 5705. 

FAXON, FREDERICK WINTHROP, 
proprietor F. W. Faxon Company, 83 
Francis St., Boston, Mass. 1139. Life 
member. 

Faxon, Mrs. Frederick Winthrop, 41 Lor- 
raine St., Roslindale, Mass. 2069. 

Faxon, Mrs. Marcus, 86 Huntington Ave., 
Boston, Mass. 4385. 

Fay, Adra M., In. North Br. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 8767. 

Fay, Lucy E., In. Univ. of Tenn. L., Knox- 
ville, Tenn. 3990. 

Feddersen, Pearl E., In. Bessemer Park 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8449. 

Feder, William, trus. P. L., Gary, Ind. 9404. 

Federal Reserve Bank L., N. Y. City. (Mar- 
guerite Burnett, In.) 6646. 

Fegan, Ethel S., In. Girton Coll. L., Cam- 
bridge, England. 5829. 

Fehrenkamp, Winifred, In. Ricker L. of 
Architecture, and lecturer in Univ. of 
111. L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 5308. 

FEIPEL, LOUIS N., editor of publica- 
tions P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5329. Life 
member. 

Feldkamp, Cora L., ref. In. Mich. Agric. 
Coll. L., East Lansing, Mich. 6637. 

Fell, Emily J., In. Chemists' Club L., 52 
East 41st St., N. Y. City. 2805. 

Fellheimer, Jeannette, child. In. Hyde Park 
Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 10460. 

Fellows, Dorcas, general asst. in charge 
State L. Printing and ed. Decimal Classi- 
fication State L., Albany, N. Y. 1430. 

Felsenthal, Emma, associate Univ. of 111. 
L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 5307. 

FELT, ANNA E., financial sec'y P. L., 
Galena, 111. 2329. Life member. 

Fenneman, Lillian N., In. Nicholas Senn 
High Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10911. 

Fenton, Jane M., ref. In. F. P. L., Oakland, 
Calif. 11215. 

Fenton, Polly, instructor L. Sch. of New 
York P. L., N. Y. City. 4869. 

Ferguson, Andrea, Catalog Dept. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 10624. 

Ferguson, Dorothy, child. In. P. L., Tor- 
onto, Ont., Can. 10204. 

Ferguson, Jessie L., asst. ref. In. Ryerson 
L. Art Institute, Chicago, 111. 7433. 

Ferguson, John B., trus. Washington 



County F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 8806. 
Ferguson, K. Dorothy, In. Bank of Italy 

L., San Frandsco, Calif. 6782. 
Ferguson, Milton James, In. California 

State L., Sacramento, Calif. 2564. 
Ferguson L. See Stamford, Conn. 
FERNALD, LOUISE M., In. P. L., Great 

Falls, Mont. 3560. Life member. 
Ferris, Angela B., child. In. P. L., Salt 

Lake City, Utah. 7198. 
Ferris, Phoebe S., asst. catlgr. Syracuse 

Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 10964. 
Ferry, Genevieve, 1st asst. and catlgr. 

Cambria F. L., Johnstown, Pa. 7072. 
Few, Rosamond, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 10625. 
Field, Katherine W., In. R. C. Morse L. 

Silver Bay Sch., Silver Bay, N. Y. 6177. 
Field, Pauline, in charge of Extension 

Work, P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 4460. 
Field, Pearl I., In. Henry E. Legler Re- 
gional Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 4989. 
Fiery, Marion H., asst. to supervisor Work 

with Child. P. L., N. Y. City. 10626. 
Fifield, Alta Doty, asst. Tech. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 7390. 
Fihe, Pauline J., In. Walnut Hills Br. P. 

L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 5273. 
FI LONDON, MRS. S. T., Stow, Mass. 

4012. Life member. 
Findley, Rena B., In. Bierce L. Municipal 

Univ., Akron, Ohio. 8853. 
Findley, Sarah M., asst. In. State Teachers' 

Coll. L., Kearney, Neb. 9241. 
Fink, Julia M., In. P. L., Faribault, Minn. 

8466. 
Finkelstein, Leah, Box 49, Waluga, Ore. 

10627. 
Finley, Louise, In. Univ. of the South L., 

Sewanee/Tenn. 7208. 
Finn, Beatryce A., In. Hibbing Sch. L., 

Hibbing, Minn. 10965. 
Finney, Byron A., ref. In. emeritus Univ. 

of Michigan L., Ann Arbor, Mich. (Ad- 
dress, 849 Tappan Ave.) 1192. 
Finney, Mrs. Byron A., trus. Ladies' L. 

Assoc., Ann Arbor, Mich. (Address, 849 

Tappan Ave.) 1200. 
Finney, Florence G., In. F. P. L., Engle- 

wood, N. J. 8970. 
Finney, Grace B., chief Circ. Dept. P. L. 

of the District of Columbia, Washington, 

D. C. 2756. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Finster, Robert R., clerk Board of Trus- 
tees and sec'y to Dir., P. L., N. Y. City. 

5988. 
Firkins, Ina Ten Eyck, ref. In. Univ. of 

Minn. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 4461. 
Firmin, Kate M., head Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 5610. 
First Wisconsin NatT Bank L., Milwaukee, 

Wis. (Margaret Reynolds, In.) 9427. 
Fish, E. Mildred, child. In. Pratt Inst. F. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3015. 
Fishback, Mary, sr. asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9353. 
Fisher, Abigail E., 5466 Woodlawn Ave., 

Chicago, 111. 8854. 

Fisher, Edna, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8361. 
Fisher, Marie E., asst. Scientific L. U. S. 

Patent Office, Dept. of the Interior, 

Washington, D. C. 10205. 
Fisher, Marie L., In. Lawrenceville Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6320. 
Fisher, Nellie M., head Technical Dept. L. 

Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8044. 
Fiske, Wilbur A., In. Chaffey L., Ontario, 

Calif. 8325. 
Fison, Herbert W., In. P. L., Maiden, Mass. 

2448. 
Fisse, Irene, asst. Catalog Dept. P. L., St., 

Louis, Mo. 7495. 
Fitch, Ada Florence, In. Indiana Harbor 

Br. of E. Chicago P. L., Indiana Harbor, 

Ind. 10966. 
Fitch, Edith O., In. Lenox L., Lenox, Mass. 

7199. 
Fitch, Ethel H., Ellsworth Station, Ohio. 

5661. 
Fitch, Eva L., asst. catlgr. P. L., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 5769. 

Fitchburg (Mass.) P. L. (George E. Nut- 
ting, In.) 3976. 
Fitzgerald, Mrs. Alice F., asst. In. Nat'l 

Life Ins. Co. L., Montpelier, Vt. 10967. 
Fitzpatrick, John T., law In. N. Y. State 

L., Albany, N. Y. 7073. 
Fitzpatrick, Marian M., 1. critic teacher 

Wingert Sch. Detroit Teachers' Coll. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 10968. 
Fjeldstad, Nina, technology asst. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 6842. 

Flack, Charles R., Suite 9, Hull Blk., Ed- 
monton, Alta., Canada. 9226. 



Flagg, Burton S., trus. Mem. L., Andover, 

Mass. 8146. 
Flanagan, Beatrice M., In. Mt. Bowdoin 

Br. P. L., Boston, Mass. 10206. 
Flanagan, Gladys M., acting child. In. P. 

L., Washington, D. C. 10219. 
Fleischner, Otto, asst. In. P. L., Boston, 

Mass. 1710. 

Fleming, Edith E., asst. Order and Ac- 
cession Dept. Univ. of Mich. General L., 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 10547. 
Fleming, Ella M., asst. In. Carnegie P. L., 

Sault Sainte Marie, Mich. 11122. 
Fleming, Ruth, In. Humboldt State Teach- 
ers Coll. L., Arcata, Calif. 7007. 
Fleming, Winogene, asst. P. L., Denver, 

Colo. 9111. 
Fletcher, Robert Stillman, In. Amherst 

Coll. L., Amherst, Mass. 2149. 
Fletcher, Sheldon, asst. In. Commercial 

High Sch. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7602. 
Flexner, Jennie M., head Circ. Dept. F. 

P. L., Louisville, Ky. 4048. 
Flickinger, Mrs. Caroline R., In. F. P. L., 

Dalton, Mass. 3490. 
Flower, Gretchen, In. Tulare County F. L., 

Visalia, Calif. 10773. 
Flynn, Marcella, In. N. Goodman St. Br. 

P. L., Rochester, N. Y. 6321. 
Fogarty, Mrs. Kate H., general asst. Key- 
stone State Normal Sch. L., Kutztown, 

Pa. 10510. 
Foik, Paul J., In. Univ. of Notre Dame L., 

Notre Dame, Ind. 7343. 
Foley, Margaret Baker, In. Conn. Coll. for 

Women L., New London, Conn. 3721. 
Foote, Elizabeth Louisa, 910 Harrison St., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 957. 

Foote, Frances R., principal Dept. of Fic- 
tion P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 3958. 
Foote, Mary S., law In. Univ. of 111., Ur- 

bana, 111. 6322. 
Foote, William W., In. Wash. State Coll. 

L., Pullman, Wash. 6499. 
Forbes, Leila G., In. State Normal Sch. L., 

Montclair, N. J. 5395. 
Forbes L. See Northampton, Mass. 
Forbush, Rachel B., In. Philippine Dept. 

U. S. Army, League Island, P. I. 7683. 
Ford, Edith H., In. P. L., Minonk, 111. 5821. 
Ford, Eva M., asst. sec'y American Library 

Assoc., Chicago, 111. 7888. 



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557 



Ford, Mrs. Neva N., stud. Univ. of 111. L., 

Urbana, 111. 10461. 

Fordyce, George L., trus. P. L., Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 7292. 
Forest Park (111.) P. L. (Florence M. 

Barry, In.) 10785. 
Forgeus, Elizabeth, asst. In. Yale Law 

Sch. L., New Haven, Conn. 6970. 
Forman, Helen H., br. In. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 8326. 
Fornwalt, Ruth Mabon, asst. Lending Div. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10013. 
Forrest, Elizabeth, In. Coll. of Agric. and 

Mechanic Arts L., Bozeman, Mont. 3476. 
Forrester, Mrs. May K., In. Chapman Br. 

P. L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 7497. 
FORSTALL, GERTRUDE, asst. catlgr. 

The John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 2136. 

Life member. 
Forsyth, John, In. Provincial L., Victoria, 

B. C, Can. 6765. 

Forsyth, Susanna A., supt. Bind, and Re- 
pair Dept. Enoch Pratt F. L., Baltimore, 

Md. 9615. 
Fort Collins (Colo.) P. L. (Elfreda Steb- 

bins, In.) 6573. 
Fort Dodge (Iowa) F. P. L. (Isabella C. 

Hopper, In.) 4902. 

Fort Morgan Carnegie P. L., Fort Mor- 
gan, Colo. (Mrs. Estella McCutcheon, 

In.) 11229. 
Fort Wayne (Ind.) P. L. (Margaret M. 

Colerick, In.) 7428. 
Fort Worth (Texas) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. 

Charles Scheuber, In.) 5231. 
Forward, Mildred R., In. City Normal Sch. 

L., Rochester, N. Y. 6983. 
Foss, Calvin W., ref. In. P. L., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 4688. 
FOSSLER, ANNA, asst. In. Southern Br. 

Univ. of Calif. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 

1989. Life member. 
Foster, Mrs. Clara, In. Carnegie L., Mt. 

Carmel, 111. 10100. 
Foster, Elima A., head Philosophy and 

Religion Div. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 

9206. 
Foster, Helen W., general asst. F. P. L., 

Newark, N. J. 6544. 
Foster, Mrs. Jeanne B., In. Kuhn, Loeb 

and Co. L., N. Y. City. 10207. 
Foster, Jennie W., 1st asst. State L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 9540. 



Foster, Katharine, asst. P. L., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 5123. 
Foster, Mrs. Martha Attaway, In. East 

Lake Br. P. L., Birmingham, Ala. 9473. 
Foster, Mary Elizabeth, dir. Work with 

Child, and Schools P. L., Birmingham, 

Ala. 10774. 
Foster, Mary Stuart, chief Ref. Div. Wis. 

State Hist. Society, Madison, Wis. 1994. 
Foster, Mrs. Stanhope, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

9938. 

Foster, William Eaton, In. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 22. 
Foucher, L. C., acting In. P. L., Utica, N. 

Y. 3471. 
Fowler, Mrs. Everett, (Anna S.) chairman 

Board of Trustees King's Daughters P. 

L., Haverstraw, N. Y. 9858. 
Fowler, Helen A., reviser The Newberry 

L., Chicago, 111. 9875. 
Fowler, Julian S., In. Univ. of Cincinnati 

L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8938. 
Fowler, Mrs. Myrtle Elmedfc, 8121 Hough 

Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 4189. 
Fox, Catherine J., prin. asst. P. L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 10969. 
FOX, HANNAH, pres. Foxburg F. L., 

Assoc., Foxburg, Clarion County, Pa. 

1900. Life member. 
Fox, Helen J., In. P. L., Mansfield, Ohio. 

11123. 
Fox, Mrs. Marie Hammond, 1510 A. S. 

Brand Blvd., Glendale, Calif. 5954. 
Fox, Mary A., asst. In. Pontiac High Sch. 

L., Pontiac, Mich. 11124. 
Fox, Nelly, supervisor of Branches L. As- 
soc., Portland, Ore. 4128. 
Frame, E. Lura, In. Crane Co. L., Chicago, 

111. 10970. 
Framingham (Mass.) Town L. (Susan 

W. Curtis, In.) 5749. 
Francesville (Ind.) P. L. (Doris P. Petra, 

In.) 10530. 
Francis, Gertrude, sr. asst. F. P. L., East 

Orange, N. J. 10714. 
FRANCIS, MARY, 101 Elm St., Hartford, 

Conn. 1148. Life member. 
Frank, Ella, sr. asst. East Technical High 

Sch. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 11216. 
Frank, Esther E., child. In. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 8295. 
Frank, Mary, supt. Extension Div. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 6436. 



558 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Franklin, Irene, sr. asst. Catalog Dept. P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 10628. 
Franklin Institute L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Alfred Rigling, In.) 6599. 
Frantz, Cora M., In. Gilbert M. Simmons 

L., Kenosha, Wis. 5068. 
Fraser, Jessie, In. P. L., Twin Falls, Idaho. 

11064. 
Frazier, Mrs. Helen, P. L., Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 10548. 
Frazier, Margaret, asst. Girls High Sch. 

Br. F. P. L., Louisville, Ky. 10808. 
Frebault, Marcelle, asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 10014. 
Fredell, Anna M., asst, P. L., Edmonton, 

Alta., Can. 9616. 
Frederick, Frances, information asst. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8417. 
Frederick E. Parlin Mem. L. See Everett, 

Mass. 
Frederickson, Esther M., head Catalog 

Dept. P. L., St. Joseph, Mo. 7935. 
Frederickson, Marion E., asst. F. L., Madi- 
son, Wis. 10971. 
Freed, Kittie B., In. P. L., Ames, Iowa. 

9266. 
Freeman, Florence M., head Catalog and 

Ord. Dept. P. L., Long Beach, Calif. 

4465. 
Freeman, Marilla Waite, In. Main L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 1135. 
Freeman, Mrs. Winfield, In. State L., 

Topeka, Kan. 10775. 
Freeport (III) P. L. (Ruth P. Hughes, 

In.) 4849. 
Freidus, Abraham S., chief Jewish Div. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 5862. 

Fremont (Ohio) Birchard L. (Elsie Fran- 
ces Pack, In.) 595. 
French, Anna L., In. Western State Nor. 

Sch. L., Kalamazoo, Mich. 4974. 
French, L. Ruth, In. P. L., Albion, Mich. 

4891. 

Fresno County F. L. (Fresno, Calif.) Sar- 
ah E. McCradle, In.) 6531. 
Frick, Eleanor Hurley, care Amer. Soc. 

of Civil Engineers, 29 W. 39th St., N. Y. 

City. 4332. 
Friedberg, Sylvia, sr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 10972. 
Friedel, Esther, asst. Child. Dept. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 6793. 
Friedel, J. H., asst. to Managing Dir. Na- 



tional Industrial Conference Board, N. Y. 

City. 7809. 
Friedman, Mrs. Fannie, catlgr. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 9541. 
Frink, Ellen Beadle, 1st asst. Monterey 

County F. L., Salinas, Calif. 8917. 
Frisk, Mrs. Edna M., asst. Sarah Platt 

Decker Br. P. L., Denver, Colo. 10973. 
Froggatt, Lillian M., teacher-ln. High Sch. 

L., Burlington, Wis. 9542. 
Frost, Edith L., In. Linden Hills Br. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 6324. 
Frost, Jennie C, asst. Simmons Coll. L., 

Boston, Mass. 10056. 
Frost, Pattie, chief asst. Loan and Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Jacksonville, Fla. 6033. 
Frost, Sarah L., In. Phillips Academy L., 

Andover, Mass. 9617. 
Frost, Ula, In. City L., Fairview, Okla. 

11248. 
Frothingham, Mrs. L. A., trus. Ames F. 

L., North Easton, Mass. 8467. 
Frothingham, Theodore L., trus. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (Address, 32 Liberty 

St., N. Y. City.) 6142. 
Fuchs, Florence C., head Catalog Dept. 

Grosvenor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 7425. 
Fulham P. Libraries, London, S. W., Eng- 
land. (James E. Walker, In.) 5957. 
Fuller, Edith Davenport, In. Episcopal 

Theological School L., Cambridge, Mass. 

1303. 
Fuller, George W., In. P. L., Spokane, 

Wash. 5438. 
Fuller, Grace J., In. P. L., Bucyrus, Ohio. 

10776. 
Fuller, Lucy T., In. Harris County P. L., 

Houston, Tex. 10462. 
Fullerton, Caroline Q., ref. In. F. P. L., 

Louisville, Ky. 4834. 
Fullerton, Margaret, 1st asst. Coll. for 

Women L., Cleveland, Ohio. 4835. 
Fullerton, Robert S., book salesman, De 

Wolfe and Fiske Co., Boston 21, Mass. 

7995. 
Funnell, Helen L., In. Lafayette Sch. Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10057. 
Furbish, Alice C., In. P. L., Portland, Me. 

1523. 
Furnas, Marcia M., chief Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 7499. 
Furness, Margaret, asst. Catalog Dept. 

The John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 2166. 



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559 



Furniss, Mabel E., head Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 7270. 

Furst, Mrs. Elisabeth H., In. P. L., Adams, 
Mass. 5230. 

Gabbert, Mrs. B. F., 1938 Grand Ave., Dav- 
enport, Iowa. 7102. 

Gable, Helen M., asst. P. L., Harrisburg, 
Pa. 10058. 

Gaffin, Frances E., catlgr. P. L., Utica, 
N. Y. 2671. 

Gage, Laura Jane, catlgr. Federal Reserve 
Bank of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 6869. 

Gail Borden P. L. See Elgin, 111. 

Galbreath, Charles B., sec'y, ed. and In. 
Ohio State Archaeological and Historical 
Society L., Columbus, Ohio. 1510. 

Gale, Ellen, In. P. L., Rock Island, 111. 211. 

Gale, Mary Virginia, In. F. P. L., West- 
field, N. J. 11292. 

Galesburg (111.) F. P. L. (Anna F. Hoover, 
In.) 4764. 

Gallaway, Irene D., Fayetteville, Ark. 2704. 

Gallaway, Margaret, In. Arkansas Agric. 
Coll. and Experiment Station L., Fay- 
etteville, Ark. 7443. 

Galloway, Blanche, head Sch. Dept. Kern 
County F. L., Bakersfield, Calif. 7810. 

Galveston, Texas. Rosenberg L. (Frank 
C. Patten, In.) 2947. 

Gamble, William Burt, chief Science and 
Technology Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 
5276. 

Gammons, Abbie Frances, 1st asst. Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9785. 

Gamsby, Louise E., In. P. L., Ocala, Fla. 
11249. 

Gangstad, Ida Marie, instructor and 1. 
asst. Extension Div. Univ. of Wis., Mad- 
ison, Wis. 10629. 

Ganser, Helen A., In. State Nor. Sch. L., 
Millersville, Pa. 5266. 

Gantt, Edith, head Loan Dept. Stanislaus 
County P. L., Modesto, Calif. 7789. 

Garaghty, Louise M., asst. In. Lothrop Br. 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8296. 

Garb, Leah, jr. asst. Tremont Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 10809. 

Garb, Libby, Bernard Ginsburg Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 10549. 

Garber, Blanche A., 1st asst. Ref. Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9354. 

Gardner, Henry B., pres. Board of Trus. 
P. L., Providence, R. I. 7920. 



Gardner, Jane E., ref. In. F. P. L., New 
Bedford, Mass. 2819. 

Gardner, Julia M., asst. In. 58th St. Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 6392. 

Gardner, Mary Craig, 1st asst. Rosenberg 
L., Galveston, Tex. 3142. 

Gardner (Mass.) Levi Heywood Mem. L. 
(Barbara H. Smith, In.) 7682. 

Garfield, Mrs. James A., Mentor, Ohio. 
7076. 

Garland, Caroline Harwood, In. P. L., 
Dover, N. H. 619. 

Garneau, Hector, In. P. L., Montreal, P. Q., 
Canada. 6911. 

Garner, Margaret, asst. in charge West 
End Br. P. L., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 
7691. 

Garritt, Mary C., child. In. P. L., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 10210. 

Garst, Julia C., chief In. High Sch. L., 
Hamtramck, Mich. 10974. 

Garten, Bess, asst. Child. Room P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 8363. 

Garvai, Mildred, catlgr. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8944. 

Carver, Willia K., order In. Univ. of 111. 
L., Urbana, 111. 8715. 

Garvin, Ethel, custodian Special Libra- 
ries P. L., Providence, R. I. 1749. 

Gary (Ind.) P. L. (William J. Hamilton, 
In.) 4781. 

Gaskin, Elsie, In. P. L., Derry, N. H. 8598. 

Gates, Edith M., circ. In. F. P. L., Worces- 
ter, Mass. 4680. 

Gates, Frances E., 1st asst. Woodland Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8800. 

Gates, Lillian C., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8855. 

Gauger, Mrs. Alfred William, 2333 Chan- 
ning Way, Berkeley, Calif. 6307. 

GAULT, BERTHA HORTENSE, catlgr. 
Mount Holyoke Coll. L., South Hadley, 
Mass. 4316. Life member. 

Gavit, Joseph, head Shelf Section N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 7708. 

Gay, Alice M., asst. Conn. Hist. Soc., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 1964. 

Gay, Anna J., In. John S. Gray Br. P. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 8418. 

Gay, Frank Butler, In. Watkinson L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 789. 

Gaylord, Mrs. H. J., 504 Comstock Ave., 
Syracuse, N. Y. 5865. 



560 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Gaylord Brothers, Library Supplies, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 4799. 
Gebauer, Emma C., asst. Municipal Ref. 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8716. 
Geddes, Helen Corey, In. Second Nat'l 

Bank L., Boston, Mass. 5293. 
Geisler, Emma A., ref. In. P. L., Canton, 

Ohio. 9114. 
Gentles, Ruth, acting In. Washington 

Junior High Sch. L., Rochester, N. Y. 

9021. 
Gentry, Irene, sec'y to In. P. L., Kansas 

City, Mo. 6685. 
George, C. A., In. F. P. L., Elizabeth, N. J. 

4653. 
George, Lillian M., catlgr. State Normal 

Sch. L., Bellingham, Wash. 3003. 
George, Marilla Buckland, in charge Child. 

Room Kingsbridge Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 

9439. 
George Peabody Coll. for Teachers L., 

Nashville, Tenn. (Charles H. Stone, In.) 

7322. 
Gericke, Martha L., In. States Relations 

Service L. U. S. Dept. of Agric., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 9820. 
Germain, Clara L, asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 10811. 
German, Clara L., In. George Walker Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 8224. 
Gerould, James Thayer, In. Princeton 

Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 2008. 
Gerow, Irma, asst. Editorial Dept. Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers, N. Y. 

City. 8599. 
Getchell, Myron Warren, asst. catlgr. 

Univ. of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 9786. 
Gettys, Cora M., ref. In. Harper Reading 

Room Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 

6424. 
GIBBS, LAURA RUSSELL, in charge 

Research Dept. The Tel-U-Where Co. 

of America, 142 Berkeley St., Boston, 

Mass. 2644. Life member. 
Giblin, Mary, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10812. 
Gibson, Judith C., asst. In. The Handley 

L., Winchester, Va. 9618. 
Giele, Nora H., child. In. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 5753. 
Giesler, Edna, br. In. P. L., Des Moines, 

Iowa. 9936. 



Giffin, Etta Josselyn, dir. and In. National 
L. for the Blind, Washington, D. C. 2522. 

Gifford, Florence M., ref. asst. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 6326. 

Gifford, Odessa, asst. P. L., Greensboro, 
N. C. 10813. 

Gifford, William Logan Rodman, In. Mer- 
cantile L., St. Louis, Mo. 1690. 

*Gilbert, Lucy B., curator of Museum P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 4859. 

Gilbert M. Simmons L. See Kenosha, Wis. 

Gilchrist, Donald B., In. Univ. of Rochester 
L., Rochester, N. Y. 9543. 

Gilder, Millicent, 370 Walnut St., Winnet- 
ka, 111. 9982. 

Gilkey, Malina A., asst. Catalog Div. L. 
of Congress, Washington, D. C. 1727. 

Gill, Anna, In. South Br. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 5488. 

Gill, Julia, In.-teacher Carsten Sch. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10975. 

Gillette, Fredericka B., supt. of Stacks and 
Circ. Univ. of Michigan General L., Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 5003. 

Gillette, Helen, 1st asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Seattle, Wash. 3373. 

Gillis, Mabel R., asst. In. California State 
L., Sacramento, Calif. 7232. 

Gilmore, Alice F., asst. Ref. Dept. F. P. L., 
Louisville, Ky. 7277. 

Gilmore, Margaret B., asst. In. DePauw 
Univ. L., Greencastle, Ind. 10912. 

Gilmore, Sarah G., asst. In. Fiske F. L., 
Claremont, N. H. 9214. 

Gilpin, Margaret, In. P. L., Mountain Iron, 
Minn. 8515. 

Gilson, Luella, In. Mott Br. P. L., Toledo, 
Ohio. 8788. 

Gilson, William H., trus. P. L., Charles- 
town, N. H. 8064. 

Ginsburg, Helen Unger, catlgr. P. L., Mus- 
kogee, Okla. 9937. 

Girton, Ruth L., child. In. P. L., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 10814. 

Gjelsness, Rudolph H., chief bibliographer 
Univ. of Calif. L., Berkeley, Calif. 9215. 

Glasgow, Ellen, 1 West Main St., Rich- 
mond, Va. 5556. 

Glasgow, Stella R., 6756 Glenwood Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 6950. 

Glasier, Gilson G., In. Wisconsin State L., 
Madison, Wis. 7502. 



HANDBOOK 



561 



Glass, Jessie J., In. Lincoln High Sch. L., 

Lincoln, Neb. 7873. 
Gleason, Celia, In. Los Angeles County F. 

L., Los Angeles, Calif. 1846. 
Gleason, Eleanor, IS Portsmouth Terrace, 

Rochester, N. Y. 3018. 
GLENDENING, ELIZABETH, class. 

and 1st asst. catlgr. P. L., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 8364. Life member. 
Glenn, Eugenia W., sen. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 11236. 
GLENN, WILLIAM L., Emmorton, Har- 

ford Co., Md. 1224. Life member. 
Glennon, Gertrude, In. P. L., Stillwater, 

Minn. 9242. 

Clock, Louise Shaffer, asst. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 11125. 
Gloucester, Mass. Sawyer F. L. (Rachel 

Sawyer Webber, In.) 6070. 
Godard, George Seymour, In. Connecticut 

State L., Hartford, Conn. 2142. 
Godard, Mrs. George Seymour, 350 Blue 

Hills Ave., Hartford, Conn. 2622. 
Goddard, Alice; 2728 Euclid Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 8856. 
Goddard, William Dean, In. Deborah Cook 

Sayles P. L., Pawtucket, R. I. 1983. 
Goding, Sarah E., 1st asst. F. L., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 1464. 
Goeppinger, Eva C., asst. In. and catlgr. 

P. L., South Norwalk, Conn. 5920. 
Goff, Ethel L., In. L. of Wayne County 

Medical Society, Detroit, Mich. 11126. 
Gold, Louise E., In. U. S. Naval Hospital 

L., Portsmouth, Va. 7077. 
Goldberg, Bessie, chief of Catalog Div. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 4733. 
Goldberger, Herman, magazine subn. 

agent, 44 Bromfield St., Boston 9, Mass. 

3891. 
Goldman, Alvin D., member Bd. of Dir. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 8880. 
Goldman, Jane Elizabeth, asst. Army L. 

A. F. G., Coblenz, Germany. 9928. 
Goldsmith, Beatrice, asst. Williamsburgh 

Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9684. 
Goldsmith, Peter H., dir. Inter-American 

Div. American Assoc. for International 

Conciliation, N. Y. City. 9204. 
Goldstein, Bella, 1st asst. South Side Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 9074. 
Goldstein, Fanny, In. Tyler St. Br. P. L., 

Boston, Mass. 9619. 



Goldthwaite, Lucille A., In. L. for Blind, 

P. L., N. Y. City. 5941. 
Goman, Lillian M., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 

10815. 

Gooch, Harriet Bell, 56 Brattle St., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 1993. 
Goode, Velma, In. P. L., Burlington, N. C. 

9620. 
Goode, Verna, asst. P. L., Greenville, S. C. 

10816. 
Goodell, Frederick, 3772 Montgomery Ave., 

Detroit, Mich. 5866. 
Goodfellow, Mary E., P. L., Seattle, Wash. 

9622. 
Gooding, Lydia M., In. Dickinson 'Coll. L., 

Carlisle, Pa. 8881. 
Goodman L. See Napa, Calif. 
Goodnow, Mildred F., asst. in chge. Circ. 

and Information Nat'l Bk. of Commerce 

L., N. Y. City. 8516. 
Goodrich, Dorothy Allen, sec'y to chief of 

Circ. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 5805. 
Goodrich, Edna, In.-teacher Pattengill Sch. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 10976. 
GOODRICH, FRANCIS L. D., asst. In. 

in charge of Ref. Dept. Univ. of Mich. 

General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 3729. Life 

member. 
Goodrich, Nathaniel L., In. Dartmouth Coll. 

L., Hanover, N. H. 4686. 
Goodwin, John Edward, In. Univ. of Tex- 
as L., Austin, Tex. 3535. 
Gordon, Elsie, stud. Simmons Coll. L. Sch., 

Boston, Mass. 10715. 
Gordon, Ernestine, asst. Child. Dept. P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 10463. 
Goree, Edwin Sue, In. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital No. 79 L., Dawson Springs, Ky. 

7996. 
Gorgas, Mary V., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 10550. 
Gorham, Eva A., chief Catalog Dept. 

Queens Borough P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 

5034. 
Gorman, Catherine, child. In. Mott Br. P. 

L., Toledo, Ohio. 10551. 
Gorton, Helen D., county normal instruc- 
tor in L. Methods State L., Lansing, 

Mich. 10464. 
Goss, Edna Lucy, head Catalog Dept. 

Univ. of Minn. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 

3043. 
Goss, Harriet, order asst. Adelbert Coll. 



562 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



L., Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 2094. 
Gottlieb, Mildred, extension In. P. L., 

Gary, Ind. 6260. 

Goucher College L., Baltimore, Md. (Elea- 
nor W. Falley, In.) 6973. 
Gould, Emma C, ref. In. P. L., Portland, 

Me. 3561. 
GOULDING, PHILIP SANFORD, head 

catlgr. Henry E. Huntington L., San 

Gabriel, Calif. 2167. Life member. 
Gouwens, Mrs. Gladys Rush, asst. In. Iowa 

State Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. 7154. 
Grabow Co., Inc., E. R. (E. R. Grabow, 

pres.) Swampscott, Mass. 9470. 
Grace, Louise C., In. Wm. N. Albee Corp. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 4946. 
GraceviUe (Minn.) P. L. (Mrs. R. T. 

Crowe, In.) 9235. 
Grady, Emma Alberta, in charge Lending 

Dept. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 6474. 
Graffen, Jean E., chief Periodical Dept. F. 

L., Philadelphia, Pa. 1564. 
Graham, Alice Clark, In. Carnegie F. L., 

Ottawa, Kan. 8717. 
Graham, Audiene, In. Price, Waterhouse 

and Co. L., 56 Pine St., N. Y. City. 8602. 
Graham, Emma, In. P. L., Sidney, Ohio. 

2020. 
Graham, Mary B., asst. In. Walter Reed 

Army Hospital L., Takoma Park, D. C. 

8065. 
Graham, Maude E., In. University Br. P. 

L., Des Moines, Iowa. 10059. 
Gramesly, Margaret Amidon, asst. Iowa 

L. Commission, Des Moines, Iowa. 9267. 
Grand Island (Neb.) P. L. (Daisy Houck, 

In.) 9379. 
Grand Rapids (Mich.) P. L. (Samuel H. 

Ranck, In.) 3817. 

Grant, Esther M., asst. James V. Camp- 
bell Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 10060. 
Grant, Louise E., asst. P. L., Akron, Ohio. 

9685. 
Grant, Mary, In. State Teachers' Coll. L., 

Winona, Minn. 4469. 
Grant, Sophia J., In. P. L., Geneseo, 111. 

9268. 
Grant, Thirza E., head instructor Western 

Reserve Univ. L. Sch., Cleveland, Ohio. 

5519. 
Gratiaa, Josephine, In. Soulard Br. *P. L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 2996. 



Grauman, Edna, In. Male High Sch. Br. 

F. P. L., Louisville, Ky. 7372. 
Graves, C. Edward, Route 3, Hood River, 

Ore. 5326. 
Graves, Eva W., head Periodical Div. P. 

L., Seattle, Wash. 6036. 
Graves, Francis Barnum, In. Mechanics 

Mercantile L., San Francisco, Calif. 1916. 
Graves, Mildred L., asst. Sub-Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 9338. 
Gravett, Mrs. Nettie K., acting In. U. S. 

Veterans' Hospital L., Palo Alto, and 

Marine Hospital L., San Francisco. (Ad- 
dress, Red Cross Home, U. S. Veterans' 

Hospital, Palo Alto, Calif.) 6522. 
Gravez, Clara, asst. In. Technical L., N. J. 

Zinc Co., Palmerton, Pa. 7080. 
Gray, Alexander C., In. Eureka Coll. L., 

Eureka, 111. 10402. 

Gray, Blanche, In. P. L., Mattoon, 111. 7301. 
Gray, Elizabeth P., supt. of Binding Dept. 

P. L., Washington, D. C. 5948. 
Gray, Myra, asst. Loan and Documents 

Div. P. L., Jacksonville, Fla. 8066. 
Gray, Norman D., deputy state In. and dir. 

of Museum State L., Harrisburg, Pa. 

3149. 
Gray, Violet Gordon, In. Starr Centre As- 

soc., Philadelphia, Pa. 9544. 
Grear, Helen Louise, head catlgr. General 

L. Div. 111. State L., Springfield, 111. 

10977. 
Great Bend (Kan.) P. L. (Bina Deighton, 

In.) 8119. 
Great Falls (Mont) P. L. (Louise M. Fer- 

nald, In.) 4796. 
Green, Anna M., Order Dept. Syracuse 

Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 7081. 
Green, Carrie P., Ref. Dept. L. of Hawaii, 

Honolulu, T. H. 5770. 
Green, Charles R., In. Jones L. Inc., Am- 

herst, Mass. 4645. 
Green, Edna Sue, In. Divie B. Duffield Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 6794. 
Green, Ethel Averil, asst. Mass. Agric. 

Coll. L., Amherst, Mass. 7082. 
Green, Henry S., In. Mass. Agric. Coll. L., 

Amherst, Mass. 7504. 
Green, Janet M., In. The Hospital L. and 

Service Bureau, 22 E. Ontario St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 2330. 
Green, Lola M. B., catlgr. Legal Dept. 



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American Telephone and Telegraph Co., 
195 Broadway, N. Y. City. 4334. 

Green, Margaret S., chief of Book Order 
Dept. Queens Borough P. L., Jamaica, 
N. Y. 7083. 

Green, Mrs. Ora Williams, 909 East 9th 
St., Flint, Mich. 4916. 

Green, Samuel S., sec'y L. Board and act- 
ing In. P. L., Bartow, Fla. 8149. 

Green Bay (Wis.) Kellogg P. L. (Deborah 
B. Martin, In.) 5722. 

Greene, Charles S., In. F. L., Oakland, 
Calif. 1903. 

Greene, Doris, asst. Univ. of Wyoming 
L., Laramie, Wyo. 5613. 

Greene, Gladys C., 1st asst. P. L., Ply- 
mouth, Mass. 10214. 

Greene, Grace, jr. asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 11237. 

Greene, Helen Holcombe, directrice Ameri- 
can Committee for Devastated France, 
Blerancourt, Aisne, France. 7084. 

Greene, Margaret, head Deposit Station 
Div. P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6045. 

Greene, Marian P., 1129 W. 27th St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 6961. 

Greene, Sara E., asst. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital L., Fort Bayard, N. Mex. 7692. 

Greenlee, Mrs. C. M., trus. P. L., Gary, 
Ind. 9405. 

Greenman, Edward D., asst. dir. and In. N. 
Y. State Bureau Municipal Information, 
Albany, N. Y. 4357. 

Greensboro Coll. L., Greensboro, N. C. 
(Mrs. R. R. Alley, In.) 10414. 

Greensboro (N. C.) P. L. (Nellie M. Rowe, 
In.) 4142. 

Greenwald, Merry G., sr. asst. Lyndale Br. 
P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9912. 

Greer, Agnes F. P., teacher-ln. P. L., Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 5382. 

Greer, Margaret R., In. Central High Sch. 
L., Minneapolis, Minn. 7880. 

Gregory, Lillian, In. Southern Coll. L., Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 10101. 

Gregory, Winifred, asst. Tech. Dept. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6804. 

Grey, Florence Baker, sr. asst. F. P. L., 
East Orange, N. J. 10817. 

Griebel, Helena, sr. asst. Sherman Park 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10818. 

Grierson, Mrs. E. S., In. P. L. of Calumet 



and Hecla Mining Co., Calumet, Mich. 

1787. 
Griffin, Georgia S., asst. P. L., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 5229. 
Griffin, Jeanne, asst. In. P. L., Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 4847. 
Griffith, Alice, sr. asst. Teachers' Special 

L. Dept. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9355. 
Griffith, Frank C., In. Poland Springs L., 

South Poland, Me. 1820. 
Griffith, Margaret L., sr. asst. Order Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9303. 
GRIFFITH, ROBERTA A., dir. Exten- 
sion Education for the Blind Mich. State 

Dept. of Public Instruction, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 8972. Life member. 
Griffith, Rose Louise, asst. Child. Dept. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10716. 
Griffiths, Sarah Helen, asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 7220. 
Griggs, Mrs. A. F., In. P. L., Durham, N. 

C. 5049. 
Grill, Maude, child. In. P. Sch. L., Battle 

Creek, Mich. 10465. 
Grimes, Mrs. Sarah Mahool, chief Dept. 

of Natural Science and Industrial Arts 

Enoch Pratt F. L., Baltimore, Md. 9066. 
Grimm, Minerva E., In. Morrisania Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 5962. 
Grinnell ColL L., Grinnell, Iowa. (Isabelle 

Clark, In.) 458. 
Griswold, Helen S., sr. asst. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Milwaukee, Wis. 9051. 
Grolier Club, New York City (Ruth S. 

Grannis, In.) 4315. 
Grosh, Miriam, catlgr. Oberlin Coll. L., 

Oberlin, Ohio. 9687. 
Grosh, Myra S., child. In. P. L., Tulsa, 

Okla. 8225. 

Grosvenor L. See Buffalo, N. Y. 
Grout, Dorothy K., child. In. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 10466. 
Grover, Arlene, asst. In. Univ. of Wis. L., 

Madison, Wis. 7693. 

Grubb, Rosalie Joyce, clerk P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 9441. 
Grube, Theresa A., head filer General L. 

Univ. of Mich., Ann Arbor, Mich. 9824. 
Gruener, Henry R., asst. Yale Univ. L., 

New Haven, Conn. 8497. 
Guerber, Louise, asst. St. Agnes Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 9442. 



564 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Guerrier, Edith, supervisor of Circ. P. L., 
Boston, Mass. 2576. 

Gugle, Katherine L., asst. In. P. L., Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 6004. 

Guilinger, Lillian, head Child. Dept. War- 
ren County P. L., Monmouth, 111. 10467. 

Guinn, Lillian M., In. Bradley Polytechnic 
Inst. L., Peoria, 111. 5199. 

Guiraud, Louise, child. In. Homewood Br. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 9586. 

Gulledge, J. R., asst. Univ. of Texas L., 
Austin, Texas. 9983. 

Culler, Alice Adelaide, loan In. Colgate 
Univ. L., Hamilton, N. Y. 7730. 

Gunter, Lillian, In. P. L., Gainesville, Tex. 
5921. 

Guntermann, Bertha L., L. Dept. Long- 
mans Green and Co., N. Y. City. 4881. 

Gunthrop, Pauline, head catlgr. Univ. of 
California L., Berkeley, Calif. 2135. 

Guthrie (Okla.) Carnegie L. (Mary Eliza- 
beth Wilson, In.) 4889. 

Guyer, Margaret G., In. Carnegie L., Lew- 
iston, Idaho. 3316. 

Gymer, Rosina C., head Periodical Div. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 3790. 

Haagen, Cordelia L., asst. in charge Ex- 
changes and Duplicates Univ. of Mich. 
L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 8151. 

Hackett, Irene A., In. and teacher Scudder 
Sch., N. Y. City. 1774. 

Hackley P. L. See Muskegon, Mich. 

Hadden, Anne, In. Monterey County F. L., 
Salinas, Calif. 3366. 

Hadden, Elizabeth, chief of Order Dept. 
Stanford Univ. L., Stanford University, 
Calif. 6582. 

Hadley, Chalmers, In. P. L., Denver, Colo. 
3797. 

Hadley, Mrs. Chalmers, care Public Li- 
brary, Denver, Colo. 7811. 

Hadley, Clara J., head In. High Sch. L., 
Decatur, 111. 10511. 

Hadley, Marian M., head In. Negro P. L., 
Nashville, Tenn. 11328. 

Hadley, William B., care of Funk and 
Wagnalls Co., 354 4th Ave., N. Y. City. 
10913. 

Haferkorn, Henry E., In. Engineer Sch. 
L. Washington Barracks, Washington, 
D. C. 6236. 

HAFNER, ALFRED (G. E. Stechert and 



Co.), Bookseller, 151-155 W. 25th St., 

N. Y. City. 1860. Life member. 
Haft, Delia M., In. State Sch. of Mines L., 

Rapid City, S. D. 11238. 
Hagey, E. Joanna, In. P. L., Cedar Rapids, 

Iowa. 2931. 
Hague, Edith, ref. asst. Oregon Agric. Coll. 

L., Corvallis, Ore. 6016. 
Hahn, Esther D., jr. asst. Univ. of Calif. 

L., Berkeley, Calif. 9960. 
Hahn, Ora, In.-teacher Thirkell Sch. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 10978. 
Haigh, Elsie L., head Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Utica, N. Y. 10216. 
Hails, Frances M., extension In. Ala. Dept. 

of Archives and History, Montgomery, 

Ala. 7263. 
Haines, Alice J., head Documents Dept. 

Calif. State L., Sacramento, Calif. 3332. 
Haines, Charles H., 8 Carrera St., St. Au- 
gustine, Fla. 11250. 
Haines, Helen E., 1175 N. Mentor Ave., 

Pasadena, Calif. 1265. 
Hale, Emma E., In. F. P. L., Middletown, 

Ohio. 10630. 
Hale, Ralph Tracy, treas. and managing 

dir. The Medici Society of America, 755 

Bolyston St., Boston, Mass. 10217. 
Haley, Lucia, head Continuations Dept. 

Ore. Agric. Coll. L., Corvallis, Ore. 3623. 
Hall, Agnes Skidmore, head Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Denver, Colo. 5789. 
Hall, Albert H., publisher and bookseller 

Hall's Book Shop, 361 Boylston St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 10123. 

Hall, Mrs. Albert H., 20 Gray St., Cam- 
bridge 38, Mass. 10124. 
Hall, Anna Gertrude, consulting In. H. R. 

Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 5172. 
Hall, Czarina M., stud. Pratt Inst. Sch. 

of L. Science, Brooklyn, N. Y. 9623. 
Hall, Eva S. W., child. In. Hayes St. Br. 

F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 7842. 
Hall, Gertrude E., supervisor Child. Work 

P. L., Youngstown, Ohio. 9022. 
Hall, Josephine, asst. P. L., Kansas City, 

Mo. 9895. 

Hall, Mrs. L. M., Towanda, Pa. 9406. 
Hall, Mary E., In. Girls' High Sch. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 4569. 
Hall, Mary Lee, 1st asst. P. L., Everett, 

Wash. 10819. 
Hall, Ruth L., In. High Sch. of Commerce 



HANDBOOK 



565 



Br. Library Assoc., Portland, Ore. 9781. 

Hall, Sophia, asst. and In. Municipal In- 
formation Bureau Univ. of Wis., Madi- 
son, Wis. 7285. 

Hall, Wilmer L., asst. In. State L., Rich- 
mond, Va. 10422. 

Hallahan, Amy V., child. In. Columbia Br. 
P. L., Seattle, Wash. 9861. 

Haller, Christine H., In. Board of Com- 
merce Business Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 
7086. 

Hallett, Annie O., In. Massey L. Ont. 
Agric. Coll., Guelph, Ont., Can. 11251. 

Halliday, Sara L., In. Public Health Div. 
Municipal Ref. L., N. Y. City. 8605. 

Hallock, Anna, child. In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 10979. 

Halpert, Freda, child. In. Carnegie F. L., 
Duquesne, Pa. 5843. 

Ham, Mrs. Wm. T., 20 Prescott St., Suite 
23, Cambridge, Mass. 7655. 

Hamann, Clara W. M., asst. Child. Room 
Pratt Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10717. 

Hamilton, Louise, child. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 7087. 

Hamilton, May, In. Natrona County High 
Sch. L., Casper, Wyo. 11217. 

Hamilton, Theodosia, Indianola, Iowa. 
8366. 

Hamilton, William, In. Mechanics Inst. of 
Montreal L., Westmount, P. Q., Can. 
10914. 

Hamilton, William J., In. P. L., Gary, Ind. 
6250. 

Hamilton, Mrs. William J., care of P. L. 
Gary, Ind. 11127. 

Hamilton (Ont, Can.) P. L. (Earl W. 
Browning, In.) 10116. 

Hamilton (Ohio) Lane P. L. (Mrs. Hattie 
S. James, In.) 7578. 

Hamm, Mrs. A. K., In. P. L., Meridian, 
Miss. 7507. 

Hammi, Lucille Edith, general ref. asst. 
Broadway Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 
9939. 

Hammond, Blanche, 'head Book Order 
Dept. P. L., Omaha, Neb. 4471. 

Hammond, Evelyn A., 1st asst. In. P. L., 
Traverse City, Mich. 10820. 

Hammond, Laura, In. Ga. Sch. of Technol- 
ogy L., Atlanta, Ga. 2044. 

Hammond, Otis G., supt. N. H. Hist. So- 
ciety L., Concord, N. H. 5675. 



Hammond, Ruth E., In. P. L., Muskogee, 
Okla. 7694. 

Hammond, Sarah S., In. P. L., Glencoe, 111. 
5523. 

Hance, Emma, dir. of Ref. Work P. L. of 
the District of Columbia, Washington, 
D. C. 4624. 

Hand, Thomas W., In. P. L., Leeds, Eng- 
land. 6029. 

Handerson, Juliet A., 1st asst. Publication 
Dept. Russell Sage Foundation, N. Y. 
City. 6143. 

Handley L. See Winchester, Va. 

Handy, D. N., In. clerk and treas. The 
Insurance L. Assn. of Boston, 141 Milk 
St., Boston, Mass. 5771. 

Hannaford, Janet L., In. West Br. Car- 
negie P. L., Dayton, Ohio. 10821. 

Hannan, William E., legislative ref. In. 
N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 7902. 

Hannigan, Francis J., custodian Periodi- 
cal Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 8720. 

Hannum, Frances A., In. P. L., Racine, 
Wis. 7329. 

Hansell, Mary, In. P. L., Thomasville, Ga. 
9961. 

Hansen, Agnes, head Foreign Div. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 6329. 

Hansen, Alta I., asst. Business and Muni- 
cipal Br. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9738. 

Hanson, James Christian Meinich, asso- 
ciate dir. Univ. of Chicago Ls., Chicago, 
111. 1136. 

Hanson, Marie Alice, asst. Interloan P. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 8480. 

Hanvey, Lily C., In. S^. Louis Medical So- 
ciety L., St. Louis, Mo. 9688. 

Harader, Mrs. Sadie Lindsay, In. Pierce 
County / Medical Society L., Tacoma, 
Wash. 8030. 

Harcourt, Alfred, Harcourt, Brace and Co., 
1 West 47th St., N. Y. City. 7812. 

Harcourt Wood Mem. L. See Derby, Conn. 

Hard, Mrs. Jean A., In. P. L., Erie, Pa. 
9667. 

Harden, Walter L., Houghton Mifflin and 
Company, N. Y. City. 7088. 

Harden, William, In. Georgia Historical 
Society L., Savannah, Ga. 55. 

Harding, Elizabeth Boyd, In. Rayen High 
Sch. L., Youngstown, Ohio. 8518. 

Harding, Henrietta H., In. asst. Bay Ridge 
Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7089. 



566 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Hardy, E. A., sec'y Ontario L. Assoc., 81 

Collier St., Toronto, Ont., Can. 1834. 
Hardy, Mary T., In. Brumback L., Van 

Wert, Ohio. 5394. 
Hargrave, Josephine R., In. Ripon Coll. L., 

Ripon, Wis. 10631. 
Hargrave, Kathleen, In. Nat'l Geographic 

Society L., Washington, D. C. 9739. 
Hargrave, Margaret D., 1st asst. Br. Head- 
quarters P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6583. 
Harper, Wilhelmina, county child. In. Kern 

County F. L., Bakersfield, Calif. 7881. 
Harper, Zetta, asst. P. L., Toronto, Ont., 

Can. 11128. 
Harris, A. M., In. P. L., Guelp'h, Ont., Can. 

5500. 
HARRIS, EZEKIEL A., ex-ln., Jersey 

City, N. J. 2504. Honorary member. 

(Member of Librarians Convention of 

1853.) 
Harris, Helen Margaret, 1. supervisor U. 

S. Veterans' Hospital No. 60 L., Oteen, 

N. C. 
Harris, Laura, art teacher Lincoln Schools, 

Lincoln, Neb. 10822. 
Harris, Mrs. Lewis W., In. P. L., Mobile, 

Ala. 9791. 
Harris, Mabel, In. Teachers' Coll. L. Univ. 

of Neb., Lincoln, Neb. 9116. 
Harris, Mary B., Andrew Carnegie F. L., 

Carnegie, Pa. 6826. 
Harris, Mary Walton, chief of Br. Dept. 

Fresno County F. L., Fresno, Calif. 

9488. 
Harris, Mildred A., catlgr. P. Documents 

Office, Washington, D. C. 6261. 
*Harris, Rachel Agnes, catlgr. Univ. of 

North Carolina L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 

6900. 
Harris, Rachel D., in charge Schools and 

Stations Colored Dept. F. P. L., Louis- 
ville, Ky. 7508. 

Harris Institute L. See Woonsocket, R. I. 
Harrisburg (Pa.) P. L. (Alice Rhea Eaton, 

In.) 5824. 
Harrison, Joseph Le Roy, In. Forbes L., 

Northampton, Mass. 1011. 
Harrison, Marion V., asst. Preparation Div. 

Ref. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 7090. 
Harron, Mrs. Julia S., 1. ed. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 4878. 
Harroun, Blanche E., Law L. Univ. of 

Mich., Ann Arbor, Mich. 9587. 



Hart, Veva, principal Lincoln Heights Br. 
P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 8908. 

Harter, Miss Lyle, In. Technical High Sch. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 10512. 

Hartford (Conn.) P. L. (Caroline M. Hew- 
ins, In.) 9512. 

Hartmann, Bertha U., sec'y to In. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 8368. 

Hartmann, Charlotte E., In. John Marshall 
High Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8399. 

Hartog, Alfred, mgr. Columbia Univ. Press 
Bookstore, 2960 Broadway, N. Y. City. 
8826. 

Hartwell, Edith, executive sec'y Univ. of 
Penn. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 8940. 

Hartwell, Mary A., catlgr. P. Documents 
Office L., Washington, D. C. 1606. 

Hartzell, Mrs. Bertha V., In. Social Ser- 
vice L., Boston, Mass. 9691. 

Harvard Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. (Wil- 
liam C. Lane, In.) 4100. 

Harvey, Bess Brunton, In. Globeville Br. 
P. L., Denver, Colo. 9117. 

Harvey, Mrs. C. K., 2112 Plainview Ave., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 7896. 

Harvey, Mrs. Esther Finlay, In. and in- 
structor Newcomb Coll. L., New Or- 
leans, La. 5421. 

HARVEY, LE ROY, mgr. and treas. 
Wilmington Institute F. L., Wilmington, 
Del. 8780. Life member. 

Harvey, M. Florence, asst. In. P. L., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. 9079. 

Harvey, Martha A., catlgr. Victoria Coll. 
L., Toronto, Ont., Can. 10980. 

Harwoodi, Anne E., special catlgr. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 11129. 

Hasbrouck, Dudley C., sec'y Board of 
Trus.' Field L., Peekskill, N. Y. 1238. 

Haskell, Emma E., child. In. P. L., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. 8783. 

Haskell, H. S., pres. Haskell F. L., Derbr 
Line, Vt. 3685. 

Haskin, Gladys R., asst. Fine Arts Dept. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9443. 

Haskin, Grace, 1st asst. Quincy Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 10017. 

Haskins, Inez Clara, child. In. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 10718. 

HASSE, ADELAIDE R., dir. Washing- 
ton Sch. for Secretaries, Washington, D. 
C. (Address, Office of the Asst. Sec'y 



HANDBOOK 



567 



of War Statistics Br., Washington, D. C.) 
779. Life member. 

Hassell, Cora M., In. High Sch. L., Con- 
cord, N. H. 9792. 

Hassler, Harriot E., In. U. S. Veterans' 
Hospital L., Perryville, Md. 3392. 

Hastings, Charles Harris, chief of Card 
Div. L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
1644. 

Hatch, Alice K., child. In. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 7091. 

Hatch, Bertha, In. -teacher Cleveland Sch. 
of Education, Cleveland, Ohio. 10468. 

Hatch, Elsie M., In. P. L., Melrose, Mass. 
10220. 

Hatch, Grace E., catlgr. Goucher Coll. L., 
Baltimore, Md. 9023. 

Hatch, Grace Linn, asst. P. L., Haverhill, 
Mass. 3894. 

Hatch, Mildred Anne, In. in charge Den- 
tal L. Univ. of Mich., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
10823. 

Hatfield, Thomas F., In. F. P. L., Hoboken, 
N. J. 5730. 

Hathaway, C. Eveleen, asst. N. Y. State L., 
Albany. N. Y. 8226. 

Hathaway, Mrs. E. Louise, West Bridge- 
water, Mass. 8857. 

Hatton, W. H., New London, Wis. 5370. 

Hauenstein, Genevieve, asst. Lincoln 
Heights Br. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 
9624. 

Haugh, Mary Teresa, child. In. Woodstock 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 10981. 

Hauke, Rilla M., In. U. S. Shipping Board 
L, Washington, D. C. 6998. 

Haupt, Lura L., P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 
5869. 

Haverhill (Mass.) P. L. (Donald K. Camp- 
bell, In.) 3518. 

Hawaii L., Honolulu, T. H. (Edna I. Allyn, 
In.) 5825. 

HAWES, CLARA SIKES, 425 N. Apple 
Ave., Freeport, 111. 1171. Life member. 

Hawkes, Caira D., ref. In. P. L., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 9547. 

Hawkins, Alice M., P. L., Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 10982. 

Hawkins, Dorothy Lawson, asst. In. Univ. 
of Delaware L., Newark, Del. 7745. 

Hawkins, Eleanor E., ed. Cumulative Book 
Index, H. W. Wilson Co., 958 Univ. 
Ave., N. Y. City. 3296. 



Hawkins, Enid May, In. Stevens Inst. of 
Technology L., Hoboken, N. J. 3779. 

Hawks, Blanche L., In. Southwest Tex. 
State Normal Coll. L., San Marcos, Tex. 
5365. 

Hawks, Emma Beatrice, asst. In. U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture L., Washington, D. 
C. 1847. 

Hawley, E. J. Roswell, 147 Sigourney St., 
Hartford, Conn. 6159. 

Hawley, Emma A., documentary In. Wis- 
consin State L., Madison, Wis. 1463. 

Hawley, Helen F., In. East Bridgeport Br. 
P. L., Bridgeport, Conn. 5844. 

Hawley, Louise A., In. Milan Township 
L., Milan, Ohio. 10719. 

Hawley, Marjory L., executive asst. Silas 
Bronson L., Waterbury, Conn. 7766. 

Haxby, Mrs. Anne C., In. Hood River Co. 
L., Hood River, Ore. 9339. 

Hay, Flora Naylor, ref. In. P. L., Evans- 
ton, 111. 3133. 

Hayes, Dorothy C., In. P. L., Hinsdale, 
111. 11130. 

Hayes, Edith Bancroft, asst. In. Town L., 
Framingham, Mass. 3715. 

Hayes, Ethel Munroe, In. Tufts Coll. L., 
Tufts College, Mass. 3810. 

Hayes, John Russell, In. Swarthmore Coll. 
L., Swarthmore, Pa. 3843. 

Hayes, Mrs. Louise C., child, traveling In. 
Mich. State L., Lansing, Mich. 10720. 

HAYES, MARGARET A., In. F. L., Gen- 
eva, N. Y. 8338. Life member. 

Hayes, Mary, head Ref. Div. Nat'l City 
Financial L., 60 Wall St., N. Y. City. 
3617. 

Haynes, Alice, asst. Extension Div. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 10221. 

Haynes, Emily M., In. Worcester Poly- 
technic Inst. L., Worcester, Mass. 2652. 

HAYNES, FRANCES E., asst. In. Mount 
Holyoke Coll. L., South Hadley, Mass. 
1689. Life member. 

Haynes, Marguerite B., br. In. P. L., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 9168. 

Hays, Alice N., ref. In. Stanford Univ. L., 
Stanford University, Calif. 4661. 

Hayward, Celia A., asst. In. and catlgr. P. 
L., Berkeley, Calif. 6686. 

Hayward, Mabel, sr. asst. The John Crerar 
L., Chicago, 111. 4474. 

Hayward, Ruth P., asst. catlgr. Wis. State 



568 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Historical Society L., Madison, Wis. 

5662. 

Haywoo'd, Alarshall DeLancey, In. Su- 
preme Court L., Raleigh, N. C. 10469. 
Hazelrigg, Ella, asst. In. Riverside Park 

Br. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9356. 
Hazeltine, Alice I., supervisor child, work 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 3694. 
Hazeltine, Lelia, North Portland Br. L. 

xAssociation, Portland, Ore. 10421. 
HAZELTINE, MARY EMOGENE, pre- 
ceptor Univ. of Wis. L. Sch., Madison, 

Wis. 1235. Life member. 
Hazleton (Pa.) P. L. (Alice Willigerod, 

In.) 7399. 

Head, Jessie Louise, asst. P. L., Green- 
ville, S. C. 10824. 
Healy, Alice M., chief catlgr. P. L., San 

Francisco, Calif. 6687. 
Healy, Eileen Augusta, asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., San Francisco, Calif. 6688. 
Hean, Clarence S., In. Coll. of Agriculture 

L. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

4369. 
Heap, Elinor, general asst. Butzel Br. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 11131. 
Hearn, Mrs. Clara, head Business Div. Ref. 

Dept. P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 10825. 
Hearst F. L. See Anaconda, Mont. 
Heath, Ethel J., In. Sheppard L. Mass. 

Coll. of Pharmacy, Boston 17, Mass. 

3664. 
Hedden, Ruth G., catlgr. and ref. asst. State 

L., Boston, Mass. 10061. 
Hedenbergh, Ethel A., In. High Sch. L., 

Sioux City, Iowa. 10777. 
Hedges, Annette Jane, asst. Reading Room 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8369. 
Hedrick, Ellen A., ref. In. U. S. Dept. of 

Agric. L., Washington, D. C. 4126. 
Hedrick, S. Blanche, head Dept. of Acqui- 
sitions Univ. of Mo. L., Columbia, Mo. 

4961. 
Hefron, Josephine M., ref. In. Reference 

L. Guaranty Trust Co., N. Y. City. 8607. 
Hein, 'Caroline, In. Cincinnati Traction Co. 

L., 901 Traction Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

10983. 
Heins, Dorothea, In. Traveling L. Iowa L. 

Commission, Des Moines, Iowa. 5754. 
Hellings, Emma L., In. in charge Passy- 

unk Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 5263. 



Hellman, Florence S., chief asst. Div. of 

Bibliography L. of Congress, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 9208. 
Helm, Margie M., acting asst. In. Western 

Ky. State Normal Sch. L., Bowling 

Green, Ky. 10721. 
Heltzen, Frances V., asst. Industrial L. P. 

L., Providence, R. I. 10018. 
Hemphill, Helen E., In. Engineering Dept. 

L. Western Electric Co., 463 West St., 

N. Y. City. 8519. 
Hendee, Cora, R. F. D. No. 3, Arkport, 

N. Y. 8067. 
Henderson, Fanchon Isabel, In. Douglas 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7713. 
Henderson, Mrs. John, In. P. L., Edgerton, 

Wis. 8254. 
Henderson, Lucia Tiffany, In. James Pren- 

dergast F. L., Jamestown, N. Y. 1625. 
Henderson, Robert William, in charge 

of Stacks P. L., N. Y. City. 5217. 
Hendricks, Emily B., searcher Univ. of 

Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

10552. 
Hendry, Donald, head of Applied Science 

Dept. Pratt Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

6183. 
Henkel, Margaret M., sr. asst. Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11132. 
Henley, Eunice D., 243 E. Hill St., Wa- 

bash, Ind. 3213. 

Hennig, Ruth M. E., asst. In. State Teach- 
ers' Coll. L., Moorhead, Minn. 9827. 
Henry, Atta L., P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 

8371. 
Henry, Catherine, P. L., Akron, Ohio. 

10826. 
Henry, Edward A., head of Readers' Dept. 

Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 8819. 
Henry, Elizabeth, head Catalog Dept. 

Univ. of Okla L., Norman, Okla. 6689. 
Henry, Elizabeth Gillette, ref. asst. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 9119. 
Henry, Leah E., head Binding Dept. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 9357. 
Henry, W. E., In. Univ. of Wash. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 2533. 
Henry, William T., trus. P. L., Dallas, 

Texas. 9693. 

Henshall, Mrs. May D., county 1. organ- 
izer Calif. State L., Sacramento, Calif. 

6783. 



HANDBOOK 



569 



Hensley, Olive, 1st asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Denver, Colo. 9120. 
Henthorne, Mary C, br. In. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 7813. 
Hepburn, William M., In. Purdue Univ. L., 

Lafayette, Ind. 2732. 

Herbert, Clara W., asst. In. P. L. of Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Washington, D. C. 

2668. 
Herbert, Helen, stud. Training Class P. 

L., Toledo, Ohio. 10827. 
Herbert, Mrs. Mary B., In. Mark Twain 

Br. P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 9548. 
Herd, Mary I., statistician P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 9389. 
Hering, Hollis W., In. Missionary Research 

L., N. Y. City. 8045. 

Hermann, Mrs. J. P., Genesee, Idaho. 8034. 
Hermanson, Helen, sr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 

111. 10722. 
Herndon, Maude, acting In. P. L., Akron, 

Ohio. 9690. 
Herold, Verna, In. Union High Sch. Br. 

P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 10392. 
Herr, Hardin H., Inter-Southern Life 

Bldg., Louisville, Ky. 6475. 
Herr, Mary E., In. Brearley Sch. L., 60 E. 

61st St., N. Y. City. 6103. 
Herr, Norma, 1st asst. Jefferson Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 9444. 
Herrick, Grace Emma, In. Western Coll. 

for Women L., Oxford, Ohio. 5198. 
Herrington. Elizabeth, In. U. S. Veterans' 

Hospital No 59 L., Tacoma, Wash. 

6477. 
Herrman, Jennie, 130 Barson St., Santa 

Cruz, Calif. 3861. 
Hertzberg, Edward C. J., Monastery Hill 

Bindery, 1751 E. Belmont Ave., Chicago, 

111. 5953. 

Herzog, Alfred C., ex-ln., 13 Troy St., Jer- 
sey City, N. J. 1246. 
Hess, Mrs. Gertrude Fox, 822 Grand Ave., 

Oakland, Calif. 3141. 

Hewett, Jane A., In. Morrill Mem. L., Nor- 
wood, Mass. 2450. 
HEWINS, CAROLINE M., In. P. L., 

Hartford, Conn. 263. Life member. 
HEWITT, C. TEFFT, chief Order Dept. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 5343. Life 

member. 
Hewitt, Luther E., In. Law Assoc. of Phila. 



L., Room 600, City Hall, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 1079. 
Hewitt, Mrs. Luther E., Ill E. Durham. St., 

Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 10224. 
Hibbard, George, asst. In. Grosvenor L., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 9913. 
Hibbard, Margaret E., asst. Catalog Dept. 

McGill Univ. L., Montreal, P. Q., Can. 

11133. 

Hibbard, Mrs. Rosa M., In. Jackson Coun- 
ty Medical Society L., Kansas City, Mo. 

7440. 
Hibbing (Minn.) P. L. (Dorothy Hurlbcrt, 

In.) 8120. 
Hickey, Mrs. Herbert, Hurley, N. Mex. 

10008. 
Hickin, Eleanor Maude, In. Kenyon Coll. 

L., Gambier, Ohio. 3666. 
Hickman, Miss C., In. The Fair L., Chi- 
cago, 111. 10513. 
Hickman, Margaret, In. P. L., Eveleth, 

Minn. 7779. 
Hicks, Blanche E., In. P. L., Ashland, Ore. 

9190. 
Hicks, Frederick C., law In. Columbia 

Univ. L., N. Y. City. 3416. 
Hicks, Mrs. Frederick C., 530 West 123rd 

St., N. Y. City. 8612. 

Hicks, Mary Lydia, educational dir. Pub- 
lic Health Federation, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

5709. 
Hier, Stella, In. Woodward High Sch. L., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 7313. 
Hifton-King, Harriette J., asst. Copyright 

Office L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

3087. 
Higgins, Alice G., instructor L. Sch. of the 

N. Y. P. L., N. Y. City. 4419. 
Higgins, Dorothy I., catlgr. Ohio State 

Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 10378. 
Higgins, Elizabeth B., In. and ed. Ber- 

nice P. Bishop Museum L., Honolulu, T. 

H. 10062. 
Hile, Edith Elizabeth, In. Queen Anne Br. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 8613. 
Hileman, Janet E., In. State Normal Sch. 

L., Clarion, Pa. 10828. 
Hill, Caroline E., asst. Grosvenor L., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 10829. 
Hill, Dorothy A., 1st asst. East 79th St. Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8993. 
Hill, E. L., In. P. L., Edmonton, Alta., 

Can. 5069. 



570 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Hill, Edith M., In. Central High Sch. Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 4919. 

Hill, Eleanor N., asst. Burton Historical 
Collection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8297. 

Hill, Frank Pierce, chief In. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 459. 

Hill, Galen W., In. Millicent L., Fairhaven, 
Mass. 5215. 

Hill, Grace, head catlgr. P. L., Kansas City, 
Mo. 5574. 

Hill, Mrs. Norman C, 5042 Kensington 
Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 7037. 

Hillebrand, Ruth C., asst. Down Town An- 
nex P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8614. 

Himmelwright, Susan M., In. F. L., Wood- 
lawn, Pa. 7095. 

Hincher, Madge E., child. In. Brownsville 
Children's Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
10063. 

HINCKLEY, GEORGE LYMAN, In. 
Redwood L., Newport, R. I. 2432. Life 
member. 

Hinesley, Pearl, acting In. P. L., Roanoke, 
Va. 7513. 

Hinman, Katharine D., asst. Preparation 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 9445. 

Hinsdale, Louise G., In. F. P. L., East 
Orange, N. J. 4871. 

Hinsdale (111.) P. L. (Dorothy C. Hayes, 
In.) 7298. 

Hirshberg, Herbert S., In. State L., Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 3583. 

Hirst, Mary J., head Civics Dept. P. L., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 3508. 

Hirth, Mrs. Madelene, staff sec'y P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 7514. 

Hiss, Mary, In. P. L., Nashwauk, Minn. 
9024. 

Hiss, Sophie K., head catlgr. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 3255. 

Hitchcock, Jeannette M., 1st asst. catlgr. 

P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 8017. 
Hitchler, Theresa, supt. Catalog Dept. P. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 989. 
Hitt, Eleanor, In. San Diego County F. 

L., San Diego, Calif. 6541. 
Hitt, J. M., In. State L. Olympia, Wash. 

4475. 
Hitt, Katherine, In. High Sch., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 8068. 
Hoadley, Clara, In. P. L., Streator, 111. 

9269. 
Hobart, Frances, Cambridge, Vt. 3245. 



Hobart Coll. L., Geneva, N. Y. (Milton 

Haight Turk, In.) 4773. 
Hobbs, Marabeth, In. Dunwoody Br. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 9170. 
Hoboken (N. J.) F. P. L. (Thomas F. Hat- 
field, In.) 5182. 
Hochstein, Irma, asst. In. Legislative Ref. 

L., Madison, Wis. 10984. 
Hodapp, Mary Louise, sr. asst. Order 

Dept. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9390. 
Hodge, Cordelia B., head of Traveling L., 

Div. of L. Extension State L., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 5573. 
Hodge, Flora Annis, ref. asst. Univ. of N. 

D. L., Grand Forks, N. D. 10470. 
Hodge, Lillian, asst. In. Northeastern High 

Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 11134. 
Hodges, Bernice E., sec'y to In. P. L., 

Rochester, N. Y. 10830. 
Hodges, Clara D., trus. P. L., Petersham, 

Mass. 8155. 
HODGES, NATHANIEL DANA CAR- 

LILE, In. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 1941. 

Life member. 
Hodges, Mrs. Nathaniel Dana Carlile, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 4172. 
Hodges, Theresa D., general asst. Circ. 

Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9626. 
Hodges, Virginia, trus. P. L., Petersham, 

Mass. 8228. 
Hodgson, James, asst. In. Univ. of Ariz. 

L., Tucson, Ariz. 6901. 
Hoek, Mrs. Esther Orcutt, br. In. P. L., 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 9694. 
Hoffman, Carrie R., asst. Child. Dept. P. 

L., Hamilton, Ont., Can. 10985. 
Hoffman, Ellen, asst. Legislative Ref. L., 

Madison, Wis. 7330. 
Hoffman, Ruth, child. In. P. L., Sioux 

City, Iowa. 7767. 
Hogan, Marie, Br. Service P. L., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 9270. 
Hogan, Percy A., In. Univ. of Mo. Law L., 

Columbia, Mo. 9962. 
Hoit, Doris L., 1st asst. Carnegie West 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8722. 
Holbrook, Mrs. Clara L., child. In. P. L.. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 10393. 
Holcombe, Josephine, asst. catlgr. Univ. 

of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 10723. 
HOLDEN, FREDRIKA G., trus. F. L., 

Proctor, Vt. 8775. Life member. 



HANDBOOK 



571 



Holden, Octavia D., asst. In. U. S. Vet- 
erans' Hospital L., Palo Alto, Calif. 
11347. 

Holding, Anna L., 505 E. Lancaster Ave., 
St. Davids, Pa. 6190. 

Holdridge, Anna P., asst. U. S. Civil Serv- 
ice Commission L., Washington, D. C. 
6928. 

Holland, Mary E., in charge Periodical 
Room City L., Manchester, N. H. 
7295. 

Holland (Mich.) P. L. (Dora Schermer, 
In.) 7636. 

Hollingsworth, Josephine B., asst. In. U. 
S. Shipping Board L., Washington, D. 
C. 6611. 

Hollingsworth, Virginia, head Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Dayton, Ohio. 3227. 

Hollins College. Cocke Mem. L., Rollins, 
Va. (Marian S. Bayne, In.) 4740. 

Hollowell, Emily, asst. in charge of Loan 
Desk Sch. of Education L. Univ. of Chi- 
cago, Chicago, 111. 11282. 

Holly, Catherine E., catlgr. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 9549. 

Holmes, Dagmar O., asst. Frick Art Ref. 
L., N. Y. City. 4710. 

Holmes, Florence Isabel, head Catalog 
Dept. F. P. L., East Orange, N. J. 
9627. 

Holmes, Raymond D., In. Seattle Post- 
Intelligencer, Seattle, Wash. 10366. 

Holmes, Thomas J., asst. In. John G. 
White Collection P. L. and In. William 
Gwinn Mather L., Cleveland, Ohio. 
9446. 

Holyoke (Mass.) P. L. (Frank G. Willcox, 
In.) 6774. 

Holzaepfel, Edna A., Supervisor of 
Branches P. L., Buffalo, N. Y. 8919. 

Homan, Mrs. Harold, asst. P. L., Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 9489. 

Homes, Nellie M., head of Desk Jefferson 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9271. 

Homestead (Pa.) Carnegie L. (William F. 
Stevens, In.) 4375. 

Honeyman, J. R. C., In. and sec'y-treas. 
P. L., Regina, Sask., Can. 5466. 

Hood, Ida Richardson, asst. In. American 
Museum Natural Hist. L., N. Y. City. 
5676. 

Hooker, D. Ashley, technology In. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 3993. 



Hooper, Blanche H., asst. In. Tufts Coll. 
L., Tufts College, Mass. 4735. 

Hooper, Lillie M., supt. Young People's 
Dept. Carnegie L., Nashville, Tenn. 
8882. 

HOOPER, LOUISA M., In. P. L., Brook- 
line, Mass. 1952. Life member. 

Hoopes, Edna M., child. In. F. P. L., At- 
lantic City, N. J. 10632. 

Hoover, Anna F., In. P. L., Galesburg, 111. 
2297. 

Hoover, Mrs. Jessie A., In. Akron Law L., 
Akron, Ohio. 11135. 

Hoover, Mary E., In. Superior Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 8401. 

Hopkins, Alice L., asst. In. Simmons Coll. 
L. and asst. prof., Boston, Mass. 6764. 

Hopkins, Doris F., asst. P. L., Seattle, 
Wash. 9695. 

Hopkins, Florence May, In. Central High 
Sch. and Junior Coll. L., Detroit, Mich. 
1691. 

Hopkins,- James J., pres. of Trust. F. P. 
L., Jersey City, N. J. 9216. 

Hopkins, Jessica, asst. In. Carnegie L., 
Atlanta, Ga. 4477. 

Hopkins, Julia Anna, supervisor Staff In- 
struction P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 2098. 

Hopkins, Ruth G., child. In. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 8768. 

Hopper, Franklin F., chief of Circ. Dept. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 2798. 

Koran, Ella M., In. Warren Br. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 9901. 

Horine, Harriet M., In. P. L., Springfield, 
Mo. 9244. 

Horix, Helen, asst. Schools Div. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11136. 

Home, Grace, sr. asst. School Ls. Div. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 7517. 

Home, Lulu, In. Lincoln City L., Lincoln, 
Neb. 2354. 

Hornor, Martha Jane, in charge of Fine 
Arts Dept. P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 
10831. 

Horton, B. Flora, asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
10832. 

Horton, Byron B., Sheffield, Pa. 11318. 

Horton, Eleanor, catlgr. of Music P. L. f 
Detroit, Mich. 10227. 

Horton, Marion, principal L. Sch. P. L., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 6763. 



572 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Horwitz, Frances M., desk asst. Sterling 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8620. 

Hosie, Clara M., sec'y to In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8421. 

Hoskins, Clarissa H., asst. Circ. Dept. P. 
L., Sioux City, Iowa. 11330. 

Hospital Library and Service Bureau, 
22 E. Ontario St, Chicago, 111. (Janet 
M. Green, In.) 9671. 

Hostetter, Anita M., research sec'y Kan- 
sas State Normal Sch. L., Emporia, 
Kans. 9696. 

Hostetter, Marie M., class. Univ. of Kan. 
L., Lawrence, Kan. 9628. 

Hotchkiss, Richard, trus. P. L., Gary, Ind. 
6209. 

Hoth, Louis H., 3862 Lincoln Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 11239. 

Hottes, Flora Emily, asst. Child. Dept. 
Ginsburg Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9325. 

Houchens, Josie Batcheller, binding In. 
Univ. of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 4070. 

Hough, Helen Yale, asst. In. Goodwyn 
Inst. L., Memphis, Tenn. 9929. 

Hougham, Sarah Chase, In. State Teach- 
ers' Coll. L., Moorhead, Minn. 9305. 

Houghton, Carlos C., asst. sec'y Poor's 
Publishing Co., 33 Broadway, N. Y. 
City. 6216. 

Houghton, Cecile F., In. Quinsigamond 
Br. F. P. L., Worcester, Mass. 8432. 

Houghton, Mifflin Co., Publishers, 4 Park 
St., Boston, Mass. 115. 

Houston, Marie, child. In. Lincoln 
Heights Br. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 
8723. 

Houston (Tex.) P. L. (Julia Ideson, In.) 
3983. 

Hout, Miss Frank H., In. Polk County L., 
Dallas, Ore. 10375. 

H O V E Y, EDWARD CLARENCE, 
Greenville, S. C. 832. Life member. 

Howard, Anna, scientific asst. in L. Sci- 
ence States Relations Service L., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 7769. 

Howard, Clara E., teacher-ln. Schenley 
High Sch. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 2274. 

Howard Mem. L. See New Orleans, La. 

Howard Whittemore Mem. L. See Naug- 
atuck, Conn. 

Howe, Ellen Ford, asst. ref. In. and in- 
structor in L. Economy, Univ. of Wash- 
ington, Seattle, Wash. 7618. 



Howe, Fanny C., catlgr. Adelbert Coll. L. 
Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, O. 
9588. 

Howe, Harriet E., asst. professor L. Sci- 
ence Simmons Coll. L. Sch., Boston, 
Mass. 3355. 

Howe, Mrs. Henry J., member Iowa L. 
Commission, Marshalltown, Iowa. 2983. 

Howe, Mabel A., Short Hills, N. J. 7937. 

Howell, Isabel McD., chief Order Dept. 
F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 3735. 

Howes, Mrs. Alma B., Shanghai Coll. 
L., Shanghai, China. 9374. 

Howes, Frank H., trus. P. L., Newton, 
Mass. (Address, 4 Liberty Sq., Bos- 
ton, Mass.) 8069. 

Howes, Jessie M., sr. asst. Austin Br. P. 
L., Chicago, 111. 10724. 

Howland, Mrs. Anne W., In. Drexel Inst. 
of Art, Science and Industry, and dir. 
Drexel Inst. Sch. of L. Science, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 1479. 

Howson, Roger, asst. In. Columbia Univ. 
L., N. Y. City. 8070. 

Hoxie, Louise M., asst. In. Marshall Coll. 
L., Huntington, West Va. 8298. 

Hoxie, Mrs. Lucy B., asst. In. Hunting- 
ton Mem. L., Oneonta, N. Y. 10471. 

Hoysradt, Grace Hudson, asst. In. P. L., 
Madison, N. J. 11307. 

Hrdlicka, Anna, sr. asst. Harrison High 
Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10633. 

HU, THOMAS CHIN SEN, associate In. 
Boone Univ. L., Wuchang, Hupeh Prov- 
ince, China. 7573. Life member. 

Hubbard, Eva M., asst. Miles Park Br. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10634. 

Hubbard, Mary, in charge of Classifica- 
tion P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 6017. 

Hubbell, Jane P., In. P. L., Rockford, 111. 
1760. 

Hubbert, Frances, 1st asst. Yorkville Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 8621. 

Hudson, Alice O., reviser Univ. of Wis. L. 
Sch., Madison, Wis. 10833. 

Hudson, Grace F., chief of Staff P. L., 
Kansas City, Mo. 10403. 

Hughes, Howard L., In. F. P. L., Trenton, 
N. J. 5254. 

Hughes, Mary, dir. Child. Work P. L., 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 6856. 

Hughes, Ruth, head Child. Dept. P. L., 
Davenport, Iowa. 7279. 



HANDBOOK 



573 



Hughes, Ruth P., In. P. L., Freeport, 111. 
8752. 

Huhn, Natalie T., asst. Ref. Dept. State 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9877. 

Hulburd, Anna A., head catlgr. Syracuse 
Univ. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 3994. 

Hulce, Jennie A., In. P. L., Janesville, Wis. 
4186. 

Huling, Caroline Alden, ed. Social Prog- 
ress, Chicago, 111. 7654. 

Hulings, Florence, In. McClymonds L., 
Massillon, Ohio. 6331. 

Hull, Carl W., In. P. L., Millinocket, Me. 



Hull, Edna M., In. East Jr. High Sch. L., 

Warren, Ohio. 9697. 
Hull, Mabel C, 1st asst. Catalog Dept. 

F. P. L., St. Joseph, Mo. 9829. 
Hull, Ruth S., In. Dept. of P. Instruction, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 9039. 
Humble, Marion, executive sec'y Year- 

Round Bookselling Plan, 334 Fifth Ave., 

N. Y. City. 6414. 
Hume, Jessie Fremont, 2261 Loring Place, 

N. Y. City. 2612. 
Humiston, Alice M., head catlgr. State 

Univ. L., Missoula, Mont. 10635. 
Humphrey, Erin, In. Federal Reserve 

Bank L., Dallas, Tex. 7402. 
Humphrey, Frances R., In. Carnegie L., 

San Antonio, Tex. 11137. 
Humphrey, Mary B., ref. and periodical 

In. Univ. of Ore. L., Eugene, Ore. 4065. 
Humphreys, Florence G., Corn Exchange 

National Bank L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1879. 
Humrichouse, J. W., trus. Washington 

County F. L., Hagerstown, Md. 8230. 
Hung, Yu-Feng, In. Nat. Southeastern 

Univ. L., Nanking, China. 9025. 
Huning, Annalil, asst. L. Sch. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 9550. 
Hunt, Clara Whitehill, supt. Child. Dept. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1782. 
Hunt, M. Louise, 74 Broad St., Newark, 

N. J. 3698. 
Hunt, Mabel L., sr. asst. Child. Room P. 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8372. 
Hunt, May, In. Penn Coll. L., Oskaloosa, 

Iowa. 6690. 

Hunter, Edith M., asst. American Medi- 
cal Association L., Chicago, 111. 9017. 
Huntington, Cornelia E., supervisor of 



Home Ls., Boston Children's Aid Soci- 
ety, Boston, Mass. 10228. 

Huntington, Mary E., In. P. L., New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y. 2791. 

Huntington, Stella, In. Santa Clara Co. F. 
L., San Jose, Calif. 3364. 

Huntington (Ind.) City F. L. (Priscilla 
MacArthur, In.) 4806. 

Huntington F. L. and Reading Room, N. 
Y. City. (Emma K. Volz, In.) 5181. 

H uniting, rfenry R., bookseller, Spring- 
field, Mass. 4152. 

Hurlbert, Dorothy, In. P. L., Hibbing, 
Minn. 6771. 

Hurlbut, Anna, child. In. Bushwick Br. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9698. 

Hurty, Mrs. Jane A., asst. in charge En- 
gineering Dept. L. Univ. of Mo., Co- 
lumbia, Mo. 9306. 

Huse, Mary B., child. In. P. L., St. Louis, 
Mo. 7096. 

Husenetter, Gertrude L., In. Rogers Park 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 8157. 

Husted, Harriet F., head catlgr. Pratt 
Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1709. 

Hutchins, Ethel Lavinia, catlgr. and ref. 
.In. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 9793. 

Hutchins, Margaret, ref. In. and lecturer 
in L. Sch. Univ. of Illinois L., Urbana, 
111. 4830. 

Hutchinson, Helen, In. Am. Medical Assn. 
L., 535 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
4478. 

Hutchinson, Ida, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Muscatine, Iowa. 9941. 

Hutchinson, Lillian L., In. Union High 
Sch. L., Anaheim, Calif. 9272. 

Hutchinson, Lura C., ref. In. P. L., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 7519. 

Hutchinson, Susan A., In. and curator of 
prints Brooklyn Museum L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 2122. 

Hutchinson, Miss Wil, School of L. Sci- 
ence Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8481. 

Hutton, Natalie, In. Walker Br. P. L., cor. 
Mack and Montclair Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
6332. 

Huxley, Florence A., 114 Grand Ave., 
Englewood, N. J. 6333. 

Hyatt, Aeola L., asst. Catalog Dept. P. L., 
St. Louis, Mo. 9551. 

Hyde, Dorsey W., Jr., asst. manager Civic 
Development Dept. U. S. Chamber of 



574 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Commerce, Mills Bldg., Washington, D. 

C. 7901. 
Hyde, Mary Elisabeth, Amherst Coll. L., 

Amherst, Mass. 10681. 
Hyde, Mary Elizabeth, 334 Lincoln Ave., 

Palo Alto, Calif. 2902. 
Hygen, Dorthea H., reviser Catalog Dept. 

Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 6425. 
Hymans, Ella M., sr. catlgr. Univ. of 

Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 9552. 
Ibbotson, Joseph D., In. Hamilton Coll. 

L., Clinton, N. Y. 5830. 
Ide, Mrs. Mary S., In. P. L. Fiske Foun- 
dation, Claremont, N. H. 9830. 
Ideson, Julia, In. P. L., Houston, Texas. 

3492. 
ILES, GEORGE, journalist, Park Ave. 

Hotel, N. Y. City. 946. Life member. 
Ilion (N. Y.) F. P. L. 7577. 
Illinois Legislative Reference Bureau L., 

Springfield, 111. (E. J. Verlie, sec'y) 

7600. 
Illinois L. Extension Division State L., 

Springfield, I1L (Anna M. Price, supt.) 

8116. 
Illinois State Library, General L. Div., 

Springfield, 111. (Hattie M. Skogh, supt.) 

7404. 
Illinois Univ. L., Urbana, 111. (Phineas L. 

Windsor, In.) 4117. 
IMHOFF, MRS. HOWARD, North 

Bend, Ore. 4840. Life member. 
Imperial County F. L., El Centre, Calif. 

(Mrs. Thomas B. Beeman, In.) 10605. 
Indiana Public Library Commission, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. (Delia Frances Northey, 

acting sec'y) 3660. 
Indiana State L., Indianapolis, Ind. (De- 

marchus C. Brown, In.) 1086. 
Indiana State Normal Sch. L., Terre 

Haute, Ind. (Arthur Cunningham, In.) 

4317. 
Indiana Univ. L., Bloomington, Ind. (W. 

A. Alexander, In.) 4299. 
Indianapolis (Ind.) P. L. (Charles E. 

Rush, In.) 5065. 

Ingersoll, Alma H., In. James V. Camp- 
bell Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 7904. 
Ingersoll, Helen F., supervisor of Br's. and 

Child. Work P. L., Denver, Colo. 3148. 
Ingersoll, Mrs. J. W., Circ. Dept. Yale 

Univ. L., New Haven, Conn. 11138. 



Ingersoll, Mary, In. Elyria High Sch. L., 

Elyria, Ohio. 11139. 
Ingersoll, Sarah B., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Denver, Colo. 10404. 
Ingerson, Martha, asst. Central Ave. Br. 

P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9741. 
Ingham, Roena A., In. .P. L., Lakewood, 

Ohio. 1795. 
Inghram, Florence, stud. Western Reserve 

Univ. L. Sch., Cleveland, Ohio. 10366. 
Ingles, May, In. Tech. High Sch. L., 

Omaha, Neb. 8909. 
Ingraham, Joanna, asst. E. Washington 

St. Br. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9742. 
Ingram, Lottie Nell, In. The Abbott Labo- 
ratories L., 4753 Ravenswood Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 6827. 
Inness, Mabel, In. Bureau of Municipal 

Research L., Philadelphia, Pa. 10472. 
Innes, Myra Ethel, In. Winton PI. Br. P. 

L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 9878. 
International Labour Office L., Geneva, 

Switzerland. (Hilda A. Lake, In.) 10430. 
Iowa State Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. (Charles 

H. Brown, In.) 5187. 
Iowa State L., Des Moines, Iowa. (John- 
son Brigham, In.) 4285. 
Iowa State L. Commission, Des Moines, 

Iowa. (Julia A. Robinson, sec'y) 5826. 
Iowa State Teachers' ColL L., Cedar Falls, 

Iowa (Anne S. Duncan, In.) 6123. 
Iowa State Univ. L., Iowa City, Iowa. 

(Grace Wormer, acting In.) 4392. 
Irvin, Gertrude L., In. Schmidlapp F. Sch. 

L., Piqua, Ohio. 10986. 
Isaacs, Minnie, catlgr. Missouri L. Com- 
mission, Jefferson City, Mo. 11264. 
Isbister, Jennie E., asst. Public Square 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 1413. 
Ishpeming (Mich.) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. 

Nellie E. Brayton, In.) 4900. 
Isphording, Alice Louise, asst. In. Walnut 

Hills Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 8073. 
Ives, Mary, In. J. C. Fremont High Sch. 

L., Oakland, Calif. 5965. 
Jackes, Lillian M., Riverdale Br. P. L., 

Toronto, Ont., Can. 11265. 
Jackson, Annie, child. In. P. L., Toronto, 

Ont., Can. 11266. 
Jackson, Annie Brown, chairman Bd. of 

Trus. P. L., North Adams, Mass. 787. 
Jackson, Charlotte M., head catlgr. Mich. 

State L., Lansing, Mich. 10636. 



HANDBOOK 



575 



Jackson, Fanny R., In. Western 111. State 

Teachers' Coll. L., Macomb, 111. 2777. 
Jackson, Helen, head Circ. Desk Kern 

County F. L., Bakersfield, Calif. 10834. 
Jackson, Henrietta E., asst. In. Carnegie 

L., Winnipeg, Man., Can. 2799. 
Jackson, Margaret, In. P. L., Hempstead, 

N. Y. 6227. 
Jackson (Mich.) P. L. (Ralf P. Emerson, 

In.) 4702. 
Jacksonville (Fla.) F. P. L. (Joseph F. 

Matron, In.) 5038. 
Jacob, William F., In. Main L. General 

Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 7770. 
Jacobsen, Anna, head catlgr. Iowa State 

Coll. L., Ames, Iowa. 8074. 
Jacobsen, Ethel C., In. Carnegie L., 

Pierre, S. D. 8018. 
Jacobsen, Karl Theodor, In. Luther Coll. 

L., Decorah, Iowa. 5641. 
Jacobus, Alma B., In. Milwaukee Leader 

L., Milwaukee, Wis. 6845. 
Jacobus, Sarah M., In. P. L., Pomona, 

Calif. 7741. 
Jaeger, Anna C., 1st asst. Auditor's Office 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 9490. 
Jakway, Ellen Hope, asst. In. Grinnell Coll. 

L., Grinnell, Iowa. 10778. 
James, Lucile, P. L., Yakima, Wash. 10368. 
James, Margaret, In. Townsend Harris 

Hall High Sch. L., N. Y. City. 10229. 
James, Susan H., In. High Sch. L., Man- 
chester, N. H. 9553. 
JAMES. WILLIAM JOHN, In. Wesley- 

an Univ. L., Middletown, Conn. 892. 

Life member. 
James Jerome Hill Reference L., St. Paul, 

Minn. (J. G. Pyle, In.) 8520. 
James Mem. L. See Williston, N. D. 
James Millikin Univ. L., Decatur, 111. (Eu- 
genia Allin, In.) 5517. 
James V. Brown P. L. See Williamsport, 

Pa. 
Jameson, Mary Ethel, In. Nat'l Industrial 

Conference Board L., 127 E. 76th St., 

N. Y. City. 5893. 
Jamieson, Emily B., asst. In. Provincial L., 

Edmonton, Alta., Can. 10553. 
Jamieson, Sophia A., asst. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 10835. 
Jamison, Anna Ruth, 222 Woodward Ave., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 7857. 



Jandell, Josephine M., In. Northern 111. 

Normal Sch. L., DeKalb, 111. 9629. 
Janes, Leila A., In. P. L., Fond du Lac, 

Wis. 7462. 
Janesville (Wis.) P. L. (Jennie A. Hulce, 

In.) 9292. 
Janvrin, Charles E., In. Natural Hist. L., 

Univ. of 111., Urbana, 111. 2734. 
Janzow, Laura M., dept. mgr. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 9699. 
Japan Imperial L., Tokio, Japan (I. Tan- 

aka, In.) 4272. 
Japan Paper Co., 109 E. 31st St., N. Y. 

City. (George A. Nelson, In.) 10606. 
Jaques, Mildred Noyes, ref. asst. Mt. Hoi- 
yoke Coll. L., South Hadley, Mass. 

10019. 
Jardine, Katherine, sr. asst. West North 

Ave. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 9052. 
Jast, L. Stanley, chief In. Public Libraries, 

Manchester, England. 11140. 
Jefferis, Laura C., asst. Order Dept. F. P. 

L., Louisville, Ky. 10836. 
Jeffers, Le Roy, mgr. Book Order Office 

P. L., N. Y. City. 4911. 
Jeffers, Samuel A., asst. in charge of Circ. 

Univ. of Mo. L., Columbia, Mo. 9328. 
Jeffrey, Maud D., ref. In. Ohio State Univ. 

L., Columbus, Ohio. 2232. 
Jemison, Margaret Malone, In. Emory 

Univ. L., Emory University, Ga. 6083. 
Jenkins, Frederick W., In. Russell Sage 

Foundation L., N. Y. City. 3930. 
Jenkins, Gertrude I., In. Shedd Park Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 10473. 
Jenkins, Marjorie, asst. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 7754. 

Jenkins, William E., prof. English Liter- 
ature, Univ. of Ind., Bloomington, Ind. 

3661. 
Jenkinson, R. C., vice-pres. Board of 

Trus. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 3971. 
Jenks, Lorette, catlgr. P. L., N. Y. City. 

6037. 
Jenks, W. L., trus. P. L., Port Huron, 

Mich. 11218. 
JENNINGS, ANNA V., In. Neb. State 

Teachers Coll. L., Kearney, Neb. 3060. 

Life member. 
Jennings, Mrs. Jennie Thornburg, asst. In. 

P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 1830. 
Jennings, Judson Toll, In. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 1012. 



576 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Jennings, Mrs. Marion Sheldon, asst. 

catlgr. Syracuse Univ. L., Syracuse, N. 

Y. 8733. 
Jermain, Sylvanus P., trus. John Jermain 

Mem. L., Sag Harbor, N. Y. (Address, 

P. O. Box 362, Toledo, Ohio.) 8075. 
Jerome, Janet, acting head Schools Div. 

P. L., Denver, Colo. 4730. 
Jersey City (N. J.) F. P. L. (Edmund W. 

Miller, In, and sec'y) 1061. 
Jessup, Mrs. Jennie B., In. P. L., La Porte, 

Ind. 1431. 
Jessup, Luella N., P. L., Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 4200. 
Jessup, Maud M., stenographer in charge 

Periodical Records P. L., Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 5838. 
Jewell, Agnes H., asst. In. P. L., Adrian, 

Mich. 10637. 

Jewell, G. A., In. Private L., North War- 
ren, Pa. 11141. 
Jewell, Osie H., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 11142. 
Jewett, Alice L., Rockefeller Foundation, 

61 Broadway, N. Y. City. 6558. 
Jewett, Mary B., chairman L. Com. P. L., 

Winter Haven, Fla. 7645. 
Jillson, Althea, clerical asst. Walker Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11143. 
Jirak, Helen A., In. Morris F. Fox and Co. 

L., 437 E. Water St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

11144. 
Jobin, Louis J., pres. Schoenhof Book Co., 

15 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 10126. 
Joeckel, Carleton B., In. P. L., Berkeley, 

Calif. 4962. 
Johannesburg (South Africa) P. L. (S. 

B. Asher, In.) 6647. 
John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. (Clement W. 

Andrews, In.) 2702. 
John Jermain Mem. L. See Sag Harbor, 

N. Y. 
Johns, Helen, In. Deschutes County L., 

Bend, Ore. 9985. 
Johns Hopkins Univ. L., Baltimore, Md. 

(M. Llewellyn Raney, In.) 7339. 
Johnson, Agnes V., In. P. L., Chisholm, 

Minn. 6659. 
Johnson, Alice Sarah, ref. In. Univ. of 111. 

L., and lecturer L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 

4407. 
Johnson, Mrs. Belle H., visitor and inspec- 



tor of libraries Conn. P. L. Committee, 

Hartford, Conn. 2895. 
Johnson, Bessie M., asst. catlgr. la. State 

Teachers' Coll. L., Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

9831. 

Johnson, Edith, Matawan, N. J. 3648. 
Johnson, Edith M., child. In. John S. Gray 

Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 10987. 
Johnson, Edna B., sr. asst. Child. Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 10638. 
Johnson, Ellen A., R. D. 11, Knoxville, 

Tenn. 9026. 
Johnson, Ernest L., In. Logan Park Br. 

P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 10639. 
Johnson, Esther C., In. P. L., Chelsea, 

Mass. 9192. 
Johnson, Esther C., In. Temple Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 9274. 
*Johnson, Dr. Frank S., chairman of Book 

Committee The John Crerar L., Chicago, 

111. 4226. 
Johnson, Hannah, 1st asst. Locke Br. P. 

L., Toledo, Ohio. 10554. 
Johnson, Jeanne F., head Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 5949. 
Johnson, M. Josephine, asst. Sheridan Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 5471. 
Johnson, Mary Augusta, asst. In. New 

Britain Inst. L., New Britain, Conn. 

10369. 
JOHNSON, MILDRED NOfi, 1 W. 34th 

St., N. Y. City. 7210. Life member. 
Johnson, Pearl, 1st asst. Mott Br. P. L., 

Toledo, Ohio. 10555. 
Johnson, Roxana G., 2613 Durant Ave., 

Berkeley, Calif. 4483. 
Johnson, Wilbur S., trus. P. L., East 

Orange, N. J. 8201. 

Johnston, Charles D., In. Cossitt L., Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 1849. 
Johnston, Mrs. Charles D., Memphis, 

Tenn. 6208. 
Johnston, Esther, In. Seward Park Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 4415. 
Johnston, Peter N., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 

6084. 

Johnston, Richard H., In. Bureau of Rail- 
way Economics L., Washington, D. C. 

1191. 
Johnston, Stella G., asst. 96th St. Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 4040. 
Johnston, W. Dawson, In. American L. in 



HANDBOOK 



577 



Paris, Inc., 10 Rue de 1'Elysee, Paris, 
France. 2969. 

Johnstone, Ursula K., National City Fi- 
nancial Co., 60 Wall St., N. Y. City. 
3711. 

Johnstown, Pa. Cambria F. L. (L. Helen 
Berkey, In.) 8284. 

Jolliffe, Mrs. Elsie Eddy, Plymouth, Mich. 
10988. 

Jonas, Frieda, child. In. P. L., N. Y. City. 
4728. 

Jones, A. Marshall, book publisher, 212 
Summer St., Boston, Mass. 7345. 

JONES, ADA ALICE, head catlgr. N. Y. 
State L., Albany, N. Y. 770. Life 
member. 

Jones, Alice L., supervisor of Business 
House Ls. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 
9743. 

Jones, C. Olive, In. P. L., Plattsmouth, 
Neb. 8344. 

Jones, Caroline Louise, In. P. L., Walling- 
ford, Conn. 7771. 

Jones, Carrie M., head catlgr. Univ. of 
Idaho L., Moscow, Idaho. 9172. 

Jones, Cecil Knight, classifier L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 3424. 

Jones, Clara B., In. P. L., Osgood, Ind. 
7521. 

Jones, Clara T., In. P. L., Brainerd, Minn. 
9879. 

Jones, E. Kathleen, gen. sec'y Div. of 
Public Ls. Mass. Dept. of Education, 212 
State House, Boston, Mass. 2755. 

Jones, E. Louise, field sec'y Div. of Public 
Ls. Mass. Dept. of Education, Boston, 
Mass. 2479. 

Jones, Mrs. Edward, In. P. L., Newburgh, 
Ind. 9448. 

Jones, Ethel, asst. Music and Drama 
Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11145. 

Jones, Florence L., chief Ref. Dept. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 4888. 

JONES, GARDNER MAYNARD, In. P. 
L., Salem, Mass. 605. Life member. 

JONES, MRS. GARDNER MAYNARD 
(Kate Emery Sanborn), ex-ln., 119 Fed- 
eral St., Salem, Mass. 781. Life mem- 
ber. 

Jones, George Miller, trus. P. L., Read- 
ing, Pa. 10915. 

Jones-Williams, Gladys E., asst. P. L., 
Evansville, Ind. 10725. 



Jones, Hannah M., In. Friends' F. L., Ger- 
mantown, Pa. 2171. 

Jones, Linn, child. In. P. L., Des Moines, 
Iowa. 8328. 

Jones, Lizzie E. Boice, asst. In. State His- 
torical Dept. of Iowa L., Des Moines, 
Iowa. 10989. 

Jones, Louise E., In. Tremont Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 7099. 

Jones, Mary Letitia, 1407 Garfield Ave., 
South Pasadena, Calif. 962. 

Jones, Olive, In. Ohio State Univ. L., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 1104. 

Jones, Thomas D., 1st vice-pres. and dir. 
The John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 4222. 

Jones Mem. L. See Lynchburg, Va. 

Jord'an, Alice M., supervisor Work with 
Child. P. L., Boston, Mass. 2550. 

JORDAN, FREDERICK P., assoc. In. 
Univ. of Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 593. Life member. 

Jordan, Horace M., asst. Library of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 3425. 

Jordan, Lois M., chief Order Dept P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 4380. 

Jordan, Margaret Hall, catlgr. and ref. In. 
P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 10640. 

Jordan, May E., In. Community High 
Sch. L., St. Charles, 111. 10556. 

Josenhans, M. Alma, asst. Utley Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 5798. 

Josephson, Aksel G. S., catlgr. The John 
Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 1708. 

Josephson, Mrs. Aksel G. S., care The 
John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 7101. 

Joslyn, Rosamond, In. Jamaica High Sch. 
L., N. Y. City. 3995. 

Josselyn, Clara B., child. In. F. P. L., Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 9053. 

Josselyn, Lloyd W., dir. P. L., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 5055. 

Jubal Howe Mem. L. See Shrewsbury, 
Mass. 

Judd, Lewis S., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
2041. 

Judkins, Agnes F., child. In. P. L., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 10231. 

Judson, Ruth E., Sandusky, Ohio. 8994. 

Jutton, Emma Reed, loan In. Univ. of 111. 
L., and lecturer in L. Sch., Urbana, 111. 
2320. 

Kahan, Rose, catlgr. Mont. State Coll. L., 
Bozeman, Mont. 6161. 



578 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Kaiser, John Boynton, In. P. L., Tacoma, 
Wash. 5142. 

Kaiser, Zelma G., American Red Cross, 
Lake Div., Cleveland, Ohio. 9943. 

Kalamazoo (Mich.) P. L. (Flora B. Rob- 
erts, In.) 8952, 

Kalispell (Mont.) P. L. (Anne G. Donovan, 
In.) 6244. 

Kamenetzky, Elizabeth L., asst. In. Wood- 
stock Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 6162. 

Kammerer, Florinne C., asst. Ref. Dept. F. 
P. L., Louisville, Ky. 10837. 

Kammerling, Edith, head asst. Civics 
Room P. L:, Chicago, 111. 5851. 

Kampf, Louise F., catlgr. Coburn L. Colo. 
Coll., Colorado Springs, Colo. 9701. 

Kanaly, Margaret, asst. Traveling L. Dept. 
Vt. F. P. L. Commission, Montpelier, 
Vt. 9630. 

Kane, Annise Boyd, catlgr. and ref. In. 
Jones L., Inc., Amherst, Mass. 8076. 

Kansas City (Kansas) P. L. (Sarah Judd 
Greenman, In.) 4216. 

Kansas City (Mo.) P. L. (Purd B. Wright, 
In.) 1087. 

Kansas State Hist. Soc. L. Topeka, Kan. 
(William E. Connelley, sec'y.) 4166. 

Kansas State Manual Training Sch. L., 
Pittsburg, Kan. (Odella Nation, In.) 
7334. 

Kansas State Nor. Sch. L., Emporia, Kan. 
(Willis H. Kerr, In.) 5379. 

Kansas Univ. L., Lawrence, Kan. (Earl 
N. Manchester, In.) 5791. 

Kappes, Sallie B., sec'y to In. Drexel In- 
stitute of Art, Science and Industry and 
sec'y to dir. Drexel Inst. Sch. of L. 
Science, Philadelphia, Pa. 10020. 

Karlson, Judith E., child. In. Washington 
Heights Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 6202. 

Kato, Hana, stud. Sch. of L. Science Pratt 

Inst., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10726. 
Keane, Mary G., asst. In. P. L., East St. 

Louis, 111. 5427. 

Kearns, Alice M. V., 1st asst. Lending 
Dept. Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10727. 
Keating, Kathleen M., asst. P. L. Berke- 
ley, Calif. 5716. 
Keator, Alfred D., In., Univ. of N. D. L., 

Grand Forks, N. D. 5271. 
Kedler, Florence E., sr. 1. asst. Woodlawn 
Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10728. 



Keefer, Jessie G., asst. In. P. L., Scranton, 
Pa. 2011. 

Keeler, Helen R., In. P. L., Cleveland 
Heights, Ohio. 9275. 

Keen, Gregory Bernard, curator Penn. 
Hist. Soc., Philadelphia, Pa. 622. 

Keep, Chauncey, trus. The John Crerar 
L., Chicago, 111. (Address, 112 W. Adams 
St.) 4205. 

Keffer, Charles A., dir. Div. of Agric. Ex- 
tension Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, 
Tenn. 10990. 

Keiser, Mrs. George M., 1504 Mahantongo 
St., Pottsville, Pa. 6160. 

Keith, Bettie, Carnegie L., Selma, Ala. 
10557. 

Keith, Effie A., asst. In. Northwestern 
Univ. L., Evanston, 111. 5755. 

Keith, Mrs. Nellie E., In. P. L., South Pas- 
adena, Calif. 6693. 

Keith, Mrs. Ruth, 1. teacher, Columbian 
Elementary Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 10991. 

Kellar, Ethel B., In. Carnegie City L., Fort 
Smith, Ark. 11329. 

Keller, Louise, In. Independence Bureau 
L., 137 S. 5th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 6193. 

Kelley, Florence Josephine, In. North High 
Sch. L., Columbus, Ohio. 10992. 

Kelley, Grace Osgood, chief class. The 
John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 5114. 

Kellicott, Gertrude, accession In. Ohio 
State Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 2918. 

Kelliher, Beatrice E., In. Indian Orchard 
Br. City L., Springfield, Mass. 10234. 

Kelling, Lucile, acting head Periodical 
Dept. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 7746. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Abbie S., In. F. P. L., San 
Luis Obispo, Calif. 11252. 

Kellogg, Ida B., In. P. L., Neenah, Wis. 
9963. 

Kellogg, Theodora, In. Seymour L., Au- 
burn, N. Y. 10641. 

Kellogg-Hubbard L. See Montpelier, Vt 

Kellogg P. L. See Green Bay, Wis. 

Kellow, Ethel, child. In. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 5062. 

Kelly, Elizabeth Hooks, child. In. P. L., 
El Paso, Texas. 9986. 

Kelly, Frances Hamerton, head Dept. of 
Work with Schools Carnegie L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 6451. 

Kelly, Gertrude, In. Public Sch. L., Han- 
cock, Mich. 11146. 



HANDBOOK 



579 



Kelly, Margaret E., child. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 10474. 

Kelsey, Bessie H., asst. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 10729. 

Kelso, Tessa L., In. Baker and Taylor Co., 
354 Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 562. 

Kelsoe, Stephen H., asst. Del. Stations 
Dept. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 8537. 

Kemp P. L. See Wichita Falls, Texas. 

Kendall, Alice W., asst. F. P. L., Newark, 
N. J. 6466. 

Kennedy, Helen Theresa, 2nd asst. In. P. 
L., Los Angeles, Calif. 3092. 

Kennedy, Kathleen A., In. P. L., Welles- 
ley, Mass. 8521. 

Kennedy, Mrs. R. E., catalog asst. Univ. 
of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 6405. 

Kennedy, Robert McMillan, In. South Car- 
olina Univ. L., Columbia, S. C. 5637. 

Kenney, Josephine E., In. Jamaica Train- 
ing Sch. for Teachers L., Jamaica, N. Y. 
6426. 

Kenosha, Wis. Gilbert M. Simmons L. 
(Cora M. Frantz, In.) 3865. 

Kent, Lillian, In. V. Warner P. L., Clinton, 
111. 8858. 

Kent, Sadie T., In. Mo. State Teachers' 
Coll. L., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 7103. 

Kentucky L. Commission, Frankfort, Ky. 
(Fannie C. Rawson, sec'y) 5028. 

KEOGH, ANDREW, In. Yale Univ. L., 
New Haven, Conn. 1822. Life member. 

Keokuk (Iowa) P. L. (Nannie Peaks Ful- 
ton, In.) 5736. 

Kern, Mrs. Muriel, In. F. P. L., Ridgefield 
Park, N. J. 9492. 

Kern County F. L., Bakersfield, Calif. 
(Mrs. Julia G. Babcock, In.) 11080. 

Kerns, Frances, child. In. Brooklyn Br. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10040. 

Kerns, Mrs. Sara Jordan, principal asst. 
P. L., Chicago, 111. 9631. 

Kerr, Grace, head Order Dept. P. L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 9359. 

Kerr, Lilian Calhoun, In. P. L., Plymouth, 
Mass. 3174. 

KERR, WILLIS H., In. Kansas State 
Normal Sch. L., Emporia, Kan. 2312. 
Life member. 

KERR, MRS. WILLIS H., dean of women 
Kansas State Normal Sch., Emporia, 
Kan. 2265. Life member. 



Kerschner, Constance, head catlgr. Army 

War Coll. L., Washington, D. C. 3955. 
Kersey, Juanita, asst. In. Hawthorne Br. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 11331. 
Kessel, George, pres. L. Board P. L., Cres- 

co, Iowa. 8078. 
Ketcham, Ethel B., Bellport, L. I., N. Y. 

3032. 
Ketler, William H., In. F. P. L., Camden, 

N. J. 3417. 
Kewanee (III) P. L. (Harriet P. Turner, 

In.) 5827. 
Keys, V. Isabelle, asst. In. Wells Coll. L., 

Aurora, N. Y. 10558. 
Kidder, Harriet L., ref. In. Iowa State 

Teachers' Coll. L., Cedar. Falls, la. 9744. 
KIDDER, NATHANIEL T., chairman 

Board Trus. P. L., Milton, Mass. 3969. 

Life member. 
Kiemle, Katherine, In. Benson Polytechnic 

Sch. L., Portland, Ore. 6812. 
Kil Gour, M. Belle, In. F. P. L., Kearny, 

N. J. 3052. 
Kilbourn, Katharine, catlgr. Mechanics 

Inst. L., San Francisco, Calif. 8255. 
Kilburn, Mrs. Marie Fechet, In. Carnegie 

P. L., Winston-Salem, N. C. 7413. 
Kilian, Laura C., In. Arlington Br. P. L., 

St. Paul, Minn. 9862. 
Killam, Herbert, sec'y of British Columbia 

P. L, Commission, Victoria, B. C., Can. 

4704. 

Kimball, Arthur R., asst. in charge Bind- 
ing Div. L. of Congress, Washington, 

D. C. 862. 
Kimball, Ethel E., In. State Normal Sch. 

L., Lowell, Mass. 10236. 
Kimball, Florence B., catlgr. P. L., Marble- 
head, Mass. 3996. 
KIMBALL, MARTHA S., trus. P. L., 

Portsmouth, N. H. 8743. Life mem- 
ber. 
Kimball, Mary B., In. P. Schools, South St. 

Paul, Minn. 7302. 
Kimble, Mrs. Martha B., In. P. L., Brook- 

ville, Ind. 9702. 
Kindt, Alice J., asst. Circ. Dept. Pratt Inst. 

F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9987. 
King, Agnes, instructor Sch. of L. Science 

Univ. of Texas, Austin, Tex. 9632. 
King, Edith A., In. for all Jackson City 

Schs. (Address, High Sch. L.), Jackson, 

Mich. 10682. 



580 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



King, Effalene Holden, art In. City L., 

Springfield, Mass. 5294. 
King, Elizabeth McBride, catlgr. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 5668. 
King, Florence, 14 E. 60th St., N. Y. City. 

8624. 
King, Hazel F., asst. catlgr. P. L., Salem, 

Mass. 10102. 

King, Hazel Hastings, child. In. West Seat- 
tle Br. P. L., Seattle, Wash. 9863. 
King, Margaret I., In. Univ. of Ky. L., 

Lexington, Ky. 6222. 
King, Ora Frances, asst. P. L., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 10779. 
Kingman, Marion C., 28 Downer Ave., 

Dorchester, Mass. 10103. 
Kingsbury, Mrs. Phoebe P., In. Chester C. 

Corbin P. L., Webster, Mass. 9633. 
Kingsbury, Ruth, asst. In. Univ. of Utah 

L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 9634. 
Kingsland, Grace Edith, sec'y N. H. P. L. 

Commission, Concord, N. H. 7816. 
Kjngsley, Mrs. Florence K., stud. L. Sch. 

P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 9554. 
Kinkeldey, Otto, chief Music Div. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 6655. 

Kinne, Emma E., asst. In. Univ. of Pitts- 
burgh L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10423. 
Kinney, Sarah D., In. Forest Products 

Laboratory L., Madison, Wis. 9409. 
Kinsley, Lydia Esther, chief of the Down 

Town Annex P. L., Detroit, Mich. 4154. 
Kinsman, Annis Louise, In. U. S. Naval 

Hospital L., Chelsea, Mass. 8079. 
Kinsman, Carrie H., head asst. and catlgr. 

P. L., Salem, Mass. 2557. 
Kirk, Marguerite, asst. 'Coll. of Agric. and 

Mechanic Arts L., Univ. of Mont., Boze- 

man, Mont. 11240. 
Kirkland, Marian P., In. Gary Mem. L., 

Lexington, Mass. 1977. 
Kistler, Ellen D., 1st asst. P. L., Peru, Ind. 

9493. 
Kite, Anna A. W., asst. H. Josephine 

Widener Br. F. L.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

7008. 

Kittell, Ruth, asst. Franklin Br. P. L., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 9745. 
Kittelson, Corina Louise, head Catalog. 

Dept. Los Angeles County F. L., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 9010. 
Kleiber, Anna M., desk asst. Crunden Br. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 9516. 



Kline, Mrs. W. P., In. Carnegie L., Yuma, 

Ariz. 9334. 
Klinge, Norma, child. In. P. L., St. Louis, 

Mo. 9494. 
Klingensmith, Annie, trus. P. L., Gary, 

Ind. 9410. 
Klingholz, Johanna, In. Coll. L., Evans- 

ville, Ind. 8821. 
Klinkenberg, Florence, 1028 Columbia 

Ave., Fort Wayne, Ind. 10993. 
Kluge, Clara M., asst. Shelf Div. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 10994. 
Knapp, Alice Louise, asst. In. Hobart Coll. 

L., Geneva, N. Y. 6996. 
Knapp, Elisabeth, chief Child. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 5423. 
Knapp, Ethel Marjorie, 1. instructor State 

Normal Sch., Bridgewater, Mass. 7534. 
Knapp, M. Winifred, catlgr. Ind. Univ. L., 

Bloomington, Ind. 6008. 
Knapp, Ruth, child. In. Reddick's L., Ot- 
tawa, 111. 9125. 
Kneeland, Jessie, 136 E. 67th St., N. Y. 

City. 5366. 
Knevels, Madge V., ref. In. P. Sch. L., 

Lansing, Mich. 10839. 
Knight, Marion A., ed. Book Review Di- 
gest, H. W. Wilson Company, N. Y. 

City. 2661. 
*Knightly, Loretta A., 13 Gray St., Am- 

herst, Mass. 9703. 
Knoblauch, Louise, asst. Pillsbury Br. P. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9174. 
Knodel, Emma, In. Guiteau L., Irvington- 

on-Hudson, N. Y. 7818. 
Knowles, Leah M., sec'y to In. F. P. L., 

Trenton, N. J. 5872. 
Knowlton, Jessie L., catlgr. and ref. asst. 

State L., Boston, Mass. 10065. 
Knox, Ida V., In. Jermain Br. P. L., To- 
ledo, Ohio. 10595. 
Knox, Rozella F., asst. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 8483. 
Kobetich, Mary R., In. Stadium High Sch. 

Br. P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 7843. 
KOCH, THEODORE W., In. Northwest- 
ern Univ. L., Evanston, 111. 1752. Life 

member. 
Kohler, Minnie M., In. P. L., Moline, 111. 

2386. 
Kohn, Lydia E., attributor and class, of 

Photographs Art Institute Ryerson L., 

Chicago, 111. 7638. 



HANDBOOK 



581 



Kolker, Katherine, asst. P. L., Quincy, 111. 

11147. 

Konert, Paul M., In. F. P. L., West Hobo- 
ken, N. J. 6656. 
Koopman, Harry Lyman, In. Brown Univ. 

L., Providence, R. I. 482. 
Kornhauser, Henrietta M., 815 Hastings 

St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8160. 
Korpman, Edith L., asst. Goucher Coll. L., 

Baltimore, Md. 10995. 
Kosek, Anna A., head catlgr. Univ. of 

Notre Dame L., Notre Dame, Ind. 6795. 
Kosmoski, Gertrude D., 1st asst. In. F. P. 

L., Owatonna, Minn. 10730. 
Kostomlatsky, Zulema, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Box 3H, Orange, Calif. 5894. 
Krape, Katharine, In. and trus. P. L., Lena, 

111. 8859. 
Kratz, Ethel G., In. P. L., Champaign, 111. 

6788. 
Krause, Louise B., In. H. M. Byllesby and 

Co., Engineers, Chicago, 111. 3041. 
KRAUSNICK, GERTRUDE, In. Minn. 

Historical Society L., St. Paul, Minn. 

5138. Life member. 
Krauss, Bertha Katherine, chief catlgr. 

Allegheny 'Carnegie F. L., Pittsburgh, 

N. S., Pa. 7466. 
Kraybill, Mrs. A. E., 779 N. Charlotte St., 

Pottstown, Pa. 8910 
Krieg, Amelia, asst. in Modern Language 

Seminar Univ. of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 

9308. 
Krochman, Gertrude M., 1st asst. Barr Br. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 9517. 
Krocker, Leonie G., sr. ref. asst. P. L., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 11148. 
Krouse, Edna L., In. F. P. L., Scottdale, 

Pa. 5608. 
Krug, Julia, chief of Traveling L. Dept. P. 

L., St. Louis, Mo. 1349. 
Krull, Dorothea, In. Illinois Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8374. 
Krum, Gracie B., In. Burton Historical 

Collection P. L., Detroit, Mich. 2880. 
Kruse, Elizabeth D., In. Chemical Dept. 

Technical L., E. I. Du Pont de Nemours 

and Co., Wilmington, Del. 10475. 
Kuhns, Jane L, 1st asst. P. L., Walla Wal- 
la, Wash. 7588. 

Kull, Julia, asst. Lewis Inst. Br. P. L., 
Chicago, 111. 10996. 



Kuriyagawa, Tadiashi, head In. P. L., 
Yamaguchi, Japan. 10426. 

Kurth, Edith A., sch. In. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 9880. 

Kyle, Eleanor, In. Kings Co. F. L., Han- 
ford, Calif. 10129. 

La Berge, Helene M., In. Lake View High 
Sch. Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7523. 

La Franier, Edna, 1148 Bates St., S. E., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 10997. 

La Grange (111.) F. P. L. (Louise E. De- 
witt, In.) 5220. 

La Monte, George M., member P. L. Com- 
mission, Bound Brook, N. J. 10514. 

La Porte (Ind.) P. L. (Mrs. Jennie B. Jes- 
sup, In.) 6580. 

Lacy, Ethel A. L., asst. States Relations 
Service L. U. S. Dept. of Agric., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 9834. 

Lacy, Mary G., In. Bureau of Agric. Eco- 
nomics L. U. S. Dept. of Agric., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 3556. 

Ladd, Louise H., asst. in charge Photostat 
Section P. L., N. Y. City. 9589. 

Ladd, Mary B., catlgr. Bureau Ry. Eco- 
nomics L., 429 Homer Bldg., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 10998. 

Lagro, Greta Celia, In. High Sch. L., 
Fargo, N. D. 11319. 

Laing, Hazel D., catlgr. National Safety 
Council L., Chicago, 111. 7731. 

Laird, Edith M., asst. Circ. Dept. Pratt 
Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10731. 

Lake, Hilda A., In. Internat'l Labor Office 
L., Geneva, Switzerland. 10407. 

Lake Forest Coll. L., Lake Forest, I1L 
(Mable Powell, In.) 6026. 

Lake Forest (III) P. L. (Frances E. Kemp, 
In.) 6575. 

Lakewood (Ohio) P. L. (Roena A. Ing- 
ham, In.) 10786. 

Lamb, Eliza, head catlgr. Univ. of Chicago 
L. ( Chicago, 111. 2548. 

Lamb, George H., In. Carnegie F. L., Brad- 
' dock, Pa. 2750. 
Lamb, Lucy I., asst. Ref. Dept. City L., 

Springfield, Mass. 5321. 
Lamb, Sarah Doris, asst. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 9915. 
Lammers, Sophia J., In. F. P. L., Mankato, 

Minn. 5832. 

Lamprey, Mary Lavinia, In. Ames F. L., 
North Easton, Mass. 2452. 



582 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Lancaster (Pa.) A. Herr Smith Mem. L. 

(Helen B. Umble, acting In.) 5014. 
Lancefield, Hilda M., In. Washington High 

School Br. L. Association, Portland, Ore. 

8625. 

Landon, Mrs. Linda E., In. Mich. Agricul- 
tural Coll. L., East Lansing, Mich. 5204. 
Lane, Harriet, station In. U. S. Veterans' 

Bureau No. 80 L., Fort Lyon, Colo. 

2264. 
Lane, Mary E., In. Talladega Coll. L., 

Talladega, Ala. 4933. 
Lane, Mrs. Ruth M., In. Vail L. Mass. 

Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. 

11308. 
Lane, William Coolidge, In. Harvard Coll. 

L., Cambridge, Mass. 472. 
Lane P. L. See Hamilton, Ohio. 
Langdon, Amelia E., catlgr. Circ. Dept. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 8626. 
Langdon, Ethol M., In. Neb. Wesleyan 

Univ. L., University Place, Neb. 5967. 
Langfitt, Bernice Louise, asst. Iowa State 

L., Des Moines, Iowa. 10732. 
Lanning, Catharine M., child. In. Univer- 
sity Br. P. L., Seattle, Wash. 10559. 
Lanquist, Ada M., In. Humboldt Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 8256. 
Lansden, Erne A., In. P. L., Cairo, 111. 

7589. 
Lansing, Cora L, In. P. L., Wausau, Wis. 

5392. 
Lansing, Pauline D., head Order Dept. P. 

L., Buffalo, N. Y. 5687. 
Lapp, John A., ed. Modern Medicine, 

22 E. Ontario St., Chicago, 111. 7820. 
Larimer, Ruth, acting sec'y Kansas Trav- 
eling L. Commission, Topeka, Kan. 

11309. 
Larson, Clara, asst. Catalog Dept. Univ. 

of Minn. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 10840. 
Larson, Mrs. Emily T., head asst. Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 6184. 
Latch, Elsie Margaret, asst. Carondelet Br. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 10733. 
Latham, Mrs. Vera W., asst. catlgr. P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 9495. 
Lathrop, Helen, head Circ. and Ref. Depts. 

American L. in Paris, Inc., 10 Rue de 

1'Elysee, Paris, France. 3719. 
Lathrop, Mary E., asst. Walker Br. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 4491. 



Lathrop, Olive C., In. Detroit Bar Assoc. 

L., 648 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

4860. 

Lathrop, Ruth M., In. High Sch. L., Rock- 
ford, 111. 8834. 
Lathrope, Eunice, asst. catlgr. Wellesley 

Coll. L., Wellesley, Mass. 7772. 
Latimer, Louisa P., dir. Work with Chil- 
dren P. L. of the District of Columbia, 

Washington, D. C. 5235. 
Lauman, Caroline, head Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Youngstown, Ohio. 5145. 
Lauren, Anna E., 1312 E. 54th St., Chicago, 

111. 10353. 
Laurson, Edla, In. Carnegie L., Mitchell, 

S. D. 4393. 
Law, Marie Hamilton, instructor Drexel 

Inst. Sch. of L. Science, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 5532. 
Lawrence, Edith C., care of Mr. Perry 

Dryden, 5039 Dorchester Ave., Chicago, 

111. 7453. 
Lawrence, Ella B., In. Washington Univ. 

Sch. of Medicine L., Euclid and Kings- 
highway, St. Louis, Mo. 10999. 
Lawrence, Juliet, asst. Univ. of Neb. L., 

Lincoln, Neb. 8301. 
Lawrence, Mary S., dir. Child. Work L. of 

Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 7304. 
Lawrence (Kan.) F. P. L. (Lillian J. Con- 
stant, In.) 4318. 
Lawrence (Mass.) P. L. (William A. 

Walsh, In.) 4148. 
Laws, Anna C., asst. in charge of Shelf 

Listing L. of Congress, Washington, D. 

C. 4042. 
Laws, Helen Moore, catlgr. Wellesley Coll. 

L., Wellesley, Mass. 7722. 
Lawson, Mrs. Algeline M., head of Order 

Dept. P. L., San Diego, Calif. 10841. 
Lawson, Mildred H., In. High Sch. L., 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 6941. 
Lawson, Sarah, In. Carnegie L., Madison, 

S. D. 10734. 
Layman, Joseph D., In. Univ. of Nevada 

L., Reno, Nev. 924. 
LeCrone, Anna L., catlgr. State Normal 

Sch. L., Oshkosh, Wis. 1642. 
LeCrone, Sarah E., asst. In. P. L., Fari- 

bault, Minn. 2175. 
LeFevre, Alice Louise, asst. child. In. 

Hackley P. L., Muskegon, Mich. 11000. 



HANDBOOK 



583 



Le Fevre, Helena S., In. Spies P. L., Me- 

nominee, Mich. 8628. 
Lea, Jessie, catlgr. Contra Costa Co. F. 

L., Martinez, Calif. 6696. 
LEACH, HAZEL M., head catlgr. Colgate 

Univ. L., Hamilton, N. Y. 7747. Life 

member. 
Leach, Howard Seavoy, ref. In. Princeton 

Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 5874. 
Leach, Robbie Mai, sec'y and In. Memphis 

Bar and Law L. Association, Memphis, 

Tenn. 7420. 

Leaf, Grace M., Ellensburg, Wash. 5605. 
Leaf, Harriet W., child In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 9309. 
League of Nations, Societe des Nations. 

See International Labour Office, Geneva, 

Switzerland. 
Learned, Marjorie, 2280 Santa Clara Ave., 

Pasadena, Calif. 9496. 
Learned, Mrs. Walter, 145 East 49th St., 

N. Y. City. 1653. 
Lease, Evelyn S., In. Kellogg-Hubbard L., 

Montpelier, Vt. 2656. 
LEATHERMAN, MARIAN, In. State 

Teachers' Coll. L., Kirksville, Mo. 6010. 

Life member. 
Leavitt, Maria V., in charge Gifts P. L., 

N. Y. City. 5814. 
Ledbetter, Mrs. Eleanor E., In. Broadway 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 1751. 
Ledyard, Winifred E., 335 N. Madison 

Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 6452. 
Lee, George Winthrop, In. Stone and Web- 
ster Inc. L., Boston, Mass. 2440. 
Lee, Hazel B., sch. In. Bishop Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 11150. 
Lee, Mary Cornelia, In. Carnegie F. P. L., 

Manhattan, Kan. 2759. 
Leech, Charlotte C., chief Circ. Dept. F. 

P. L., Atlantic City, N. J. 10642. 
Leet, Clara B., In. West High Sch. L., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 9175. 
Leetch, Dorothy L., child. In. South East 

Br. P. L., Washington, D. C. 11332. 
Leete, John H., dir. Carnegie L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 8231. 
Lefler, Grace, asst. In. City Sch. L., 419 

So. Olive St., Los Angeles, Calif. 3063. 
Lehigh Univ. L., South Bethlehem, Pa. 

(John Lammey Stewart, dir.) 4306. 
Lehmann, Elsie M., asst. South Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 8629. 



Leidigh, Donald, accession asst. Ohio State 

Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 11149. 
Leighton, Edna M., ref. In. P. L., Long 

Beach, Calif. 8402. 
Leighton, Mrs. Flora H., child. In. Milli- 

cent L., Fairhaven, Mass. 3597. 
Leipziger, Pauline, 55 W. 95th St., N. Y. 

City. 2244. 
Leiser, Esther, ref. In. P. L., Missoula, 

Mont. 9746. 

Leitch, Harriet E., asst. Ref. Dept. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4833. 
Lemcke, Hildegarde, Columbia Univ. Press 

Bookstore, 2960 Broadway, N. Y. City. 

2842. 
Lemon, Mary Dyer, asst. Editorial Staff 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8376. 
Lenox (Mass.) L. Assoc. (Edith O. Fitch, 

In.) 3957. 
Leonard, Grace Fisher, In. Providence 

Athenaeum L., Providence, R. I. 1368. 
Leonard, Mary A., In. Hudson Park Br. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 4052. 
Lerch, Alice Hollister, "Reserve" Room 

Am. Hist. Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 6965. 
Lesch, Rudolf, art publisher, 13 W. 42nd 

St., N. Y. City. 7107. 
Leslie, Eva G., child. In. Broadway Br. P. 

L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5451. 
Lessey, Emma E., In. P. L., Derby, Conn. 

8406. 
Lester, Clarence B., sec'y Wis. F. L. Com., 

Madison, Wis. 4492. 
Letherman, Dorothy, order In. P. L., Gary, 

Ind. 7526. 

I.etson, Helen F., In. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital No. 68 L., Minneapolis, Minn. 

6698. 

LEUPP, HAROLD L., In. Univ. of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley, Calif. 3033. Life 

member. 

Levi Heywood Mem. L. See Gardner, Mass. 
* Levin, Emma, In. Logan Sq. Br. P. L., 

Chicago, 111. 7858. 
Levin, Nathan R., supervisor Deposits P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 7236. 
Levy, Martha, In. Dickinson Br. P. L., Den- 
ver, Colo. 6934. 
Lewinson, Leah, In. 115th St. Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 5697. 
Lewis, Eleanor Frances, ref. In. and head 

of Circ. Dept. Northwestern Univ. L., 

Evanston, 111. 5546. 



584 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Lewis, Florence K., head In. P. L., Living- 
ston, Mont. 10476. 

Lewis, Frank G., In. Bucknell L. Crozer 
Theol. Sem. and American Baptist Hist. 
Soc., Chester, Pa. 5129. 

Lewis, George Lothrop, In. Northland Coll. 
L., Ashland, Wis. 3997. 

Lewis, Helen B., In. Glenville High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10237. 

Lewis, Katharine, 1st asst. P. L., Battle 
Creek, Mich. 10842. 

Lewis, Katherine, 1161 llth Ave., S. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 6401. 

Lewis, Leora J., field In. S. D. F. L. Com- 
mission, Pierre, S. D. 8861. 

Lewis, Lucy M., In. Ore. Agric. Coll. L., 
Corvallis, Ore. 3730. 

Lewis, Marion B., Norwich, Vt. 8334. 

Lewis, Mary Elizabeth, child. In. North- 
east Br. P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 9449. 

Lewis, Sarah L., In. Lincoln High Sch. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 11151. 

Lewis, Sarah Virginia, supt. Circ. Dept. 
P. L., Seattle, Wash. 5362. 

Lewis, Willard P., In. N. H. State Coll. L., 
Durham, N. H. 5669. 

Lewis, William F., asst. Economics Div. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 10515. 

Lewis, Winifred, sch. In. P. L., Chisholm, 
Minn. 9127. 

Lexington (Ky.) P. L. (Florence Dillard, 
In.) 3980. 

Lexington (Mass.) Gary Mem. L. (Marian 
P. Kirkland, In.) 4056. 

L'Hommedieu, Alma J., In. Dayton St. Br. 
P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 7331. 

Lhotka, Charles, div. supt. P. L., Chicago, 
111. 6226. 

Libbie, Frederick J., book auctioneer, 3 
Hamilton, PI., Boston, Mass. 2534. 

Library Book House, 21 Besse Place, 
Springfield, Mass. 8897. 

Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
(Herbert Putnam, In.) 3239. 

Lichtenberger, Cleo, catlgr. Univ. of 111. 
L., Urbana, 111. 9310. 

Liebergeld, Emily Z., In. N. Y. State Nor- 
mal Sch. L., New Paltz, N. Y. 8630. 

Liebmann, Estelle L., Index and L. Service 
Editorial Assistance, 280 Broadway, 
N. Y. City. 6087. 

Light, Matilda M., catlgr. Engineering So- 



cieties L., 29 West 39th St., N. Y. City. 

3578. 
Lilienthal, Flora, asst. In. Insurance L. 

Assoc., Boston, Mass. 10238. 
Lilley, Mrs. Adelaide, In. P. L., Eugene, 

Ore. 3389. 
Lilliequist, Lillie C., In. Library Bureau, 

6 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 7303. 
Lincoln, Leontine, pres. Bd. of Trus. P. 

L., Fall River, Mass. 1424. 
Lincoln City L. See Medicine Lodge, Kan. 
Lincoln County L., Libby, Mont. (Vera J. 

Snook, In.) 11255. 
Lind, Alberta, asst. Henry M. Utley Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 10735. 
Lindale, Grace, class. Univ. of Pa. L., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 8809. 
Lin'dberg, Thure H., Snead and Company 

Iron Works, Jersey City, N. J. 7761. 
Lindgren, Elin J., asst. ref. In. Pratt Inst. 

F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 5876. 
Lindo, Jessie L., asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 10843. 
Lindsay, Alfred B., asst. In. Bureau of 

Railway Economics L., Washington, D. 

C. 8947. 
Lindsey, Eliza, ref. In. P. L., Fall River, 

Mass. 2820. 
Lindstedt, Hilda S., In. Royal Technical 

Univ. L., Stockholm, Sweden. 10066. 
Line, Sarah Ruth, sr. asst. in charge Juven- 
ile Cataloging P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 

8538. 

Lingenfelter, Mary Rebecca, In. U. S. Vet- 
erans' Hospital No. 49 L., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 7108. 
Linn, Mrs. Frances B., In. F. P. L., Santa 

Barbara, Calif. 4256. 
Linn, June, head Extension Dept. P. L., 

Denver, Colo. 3037. 
Linnemann, A., In. St. Joseph's Coll. L., 

Collegeville, Ind. 7434. 
Linton, Mrs. Ellen A., In. Cass Technical 

High Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 10736. 
Lippincott Co., J. B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

5792. 
Lippold, Helen, In. -teacher Maybee Sch. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 11001. 
Lipschutz, Emma Marian, In. Hebrew Inst. 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10477. 
Lipschutz, Rose S., jr. asst. Logan Sq. 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10737. 



HANDBOOK 



585 



Little, Edna M., 1st asst. Broadway Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8753. 
Little, Elizabeth Wart, asst. Ref. Dept. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8302. 
Little, Vivian Gray, In. Northeast Br. P. L., 

Kansas City, Mo. 7258. 
Little Rock (Ark.) P. L. (Beatrice Prall, 

In.) 6132. 
Liu, Kwoh Chuin, stud. Univ. of Wis. L. 

Sch., Madison, Wis. 11310. 
Liveright, Ada F., In. Pedagogical L., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 10844. 
Livingston, Martha E., In. Hearst F. L., 

Lead, S. D. 7844. 
Livingston, Neita, 1st asst. Child. Room 

P. L., Toledo, Ohio. 10560. 
Livingston, Mrs. Robert, 150 Haven Ave., 

N. Y. City. 10540. 

Lochbihler, Florence A., asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8303. 
Lock Haven (Pa.) Annie Halenbake Ross 

L. (Mary E. Crocker, In.) 10088. 
Locke, Mrs. Alice Smith, In. F. L., Edmes- 

ton, N. Y. 10067. 
Locke, George H., chief In. P. L., Toronto, 

Ont., Can. 4605. 
Locke, Margaret S., In. Boston Univ. Coll. 

of Business Administration L., Boston, 

Mass. 7630. 
Lockwood, Julia, asst. Univ. of Michigan 

L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 11152. 
Lodwick, Rowena N., asst. In. P. L., Vir- 
ginia, Minn. 11267. 
Loeber, L. Elsa, In. Chamber of Commerce 

of the State of N. Y. L., N. Y. City. 

11153. 
Loewenberg, Zerlina, In. South Portland 

Br. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8484. 
Logan, Jessie E., br. In. P. L., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 10643. 
Logansport (Ind.) P. L. (Alice D. Stevens, 

In.) 4251. 
Logasa, Hannah, In. Univ. High Sch. L., 

Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 6204. 
Lomer, Gerhard R., In. McGill University 

L., Montreal, P. Q., Can. 8836. 
London, Eng. See Fulham Ls. 
London (Ont., Can.) P. L. (Fred Landon, 

In.) 4904. 
Long, Alice B., 93 Monroe St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 8911. 
Long, Elizabeth V., chief Classification and 

Ref. Dept. P. L., Jacksonville, Fla. 6034. 



LONG, MRS. F. A., trus. P. L., Madison, 

Neb. 8785. Life member. 
Long, Harriet C., chief Traveling L. Dept. 

Wis. F. L. Commission, Madison, Wis. 

4599. 
Long Beach (Calif.) P. L. (Zaidee Brown, 

In.) 4805. 
Longdon, Mrs. Mary E., In. Hawkes F. 

Children's L., Griffin, Ga. 7939. 
Longley, Edna J., child. In. P. L., South 

Bend, Ind. 11002. 
Loomis, Frances, ref. asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 10068. 
Loomis, Metta M., In. Coll. of Medicine L., 

Univ. of 111., Chicago, 111. 9311. 
Loomis, Nellie A., In. F. P. L., Columbus, 

Wis. 4494. 
Lord, F. Mildred, child. In. Alliance Br. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9450. 
LORD, ISABEL ELY, 176 Emerson Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 1429. Life member. 
LORING, KATHARINE P., trus. P. L., 

Beverly, Mass. (Address, Prides Cross- 
ing, Mass.) 3071. Life member. 
Loring, Percy A., Sales Dept. The Medici 

Society of America, 755 Boylston St., 

Boston, Mass. 10242. 
Los Angeles County F. L., Los Angeles, 

Calif. (Celia Gleason, In.) 7335. 
Los Angeles (Calif.) P. L. (Everett R. Per- 
ry, In.) 2085. 
Loud, Abbie L., In. Tufts L., Weymouth, 

Mass. 5301. 
Louder, Mrs. Esther, Bernard Ginsburg 

Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 10845. 
Louisiana State L., New Orleans, La. 

(Alice M. Magee, In.) 11081. 
Louisville (Ky.) F. P. L. (George T. Set- 
tle, In.) 4274. 
Louson, Mrs. Mau'd A. Wait, 31 Ambrose 

St., Charlottetown, P. E. L, Can. 4032. 
Love, Cornelia S., order In. Univ. of North 

Carolina L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 6972. 
Love, Florence D., ref. In. P. L., Decatur, 

111. 6846. 
Love, Gladys E., br. In. P. L., Rochester, 

N. Y. 6262. 
Lovell, Eleanor, asst. Tech. Dept. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 9748. 
Lovell, Mildred Gould, In. Arroyo Sana- 
torium L., Livermore, Calif. 8522. 
Lovis, Marion, In. Hutchins Intermediate 

Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 7109. 



586 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 






Low, E. Janet, ref. In. N. Y. State Coll. of 
Forestry L., Syracuse, N. Y. 9882. 

Lowe, John Adams, asst. In. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 3765. 

Lowell, Mrs. Albert Fay, trus. Levi Hey- 
wood Mem. L., Gardner, Mass. 8162. 

Lowell, Mary Ann, general asst. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 9381. 

Lowell (Mass.) City L. Frederick A. 
Chase, In.) 491. 

Lowes, Fanny E., In. Washington and Jef- 
ferson Coll. L., Washington, Pa. 8081. 

Lowry, Bess, asst. In. State Teachers' Coll. 
L., Valley City, N. D. 9883. 

Lowry, Reba, asst. Utley Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10644. 

Loyola Univ. L., Chicago, 111. (Wnx T. 
Kane, In.) 11256. 

Luard, Lucy D., In. P. L., Belmont, Mass. 
3472. 

Lucas, Mary R., Colonial Place, Waynes- 
burg, Pa. 9518. 

Lucero, Isaac, asst. Government L., 
Manila, P. I. 7942. 

Lucht, Ida C, In. Clark Br. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 7571. 

Lucht, Julius, In. City L., Wichita, Kan. 
4732. 

Ludden, Mrs. Edith S., sr. asst. Ogden 
Park Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10645. 

Ludey, Mrs. Metta R., In. Jarvie Mem. L., 
Bloomfield, N. J. 2742. 

Ludington, Flora Belle, ref. In. Mills Coll. 
L., Mills College P. O., Calif. 10846. 

Ludlam, Bertha S., In. P. F. L., Pullman, 
Chicago, 111. 10847. 

Ludwig, Hazel, In. Research Div. L., 
D'Arcy Advertising Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
9835. 

Luehrs, Nellie M., acting head Literature 
Div. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5399. 

Luitwieler, Helen, catlgr. Coll. of Liberal 
Arts L. Boston Univ., Boston, Mass. 
9638. 

Lunt, Georgiana, In. P. L., Auburn, Me. 
7892. 

Lupfer, Mrs. C. M., Balboa Heights, Canal 
Zone. 5058. 

Lupton, Adele Wiley, asst. Newark Mu- 
seum Assn., Newark, N. J. 8725. 

Lusk, Amy, In. P. L., Petoskey, Mich. 
4956. 



Luther, Mrs. Jessie W., ref. In. Kan. State 
Nor. Sch. L., Emporia, Kan. 8218. 

Luttrell, Laura Elizabeth, In. College of 
Medicine L. Univ. of Tennessee, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 6857. 

Lydenberg, Harry Miller, chief ref. In. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 2181. 

Lyman, Bertha H., ref. In. P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 2447. 

Lyman, Frank, trus. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Address, 14 Wall St., N. Y. City.) 6144. 

Lyman, Grace F., In. Utica F. Academy L., 
Utica, N. Y. 10561. 

Lynch, Julia T., asst. In. and catlgr. F. P. 
L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 7529. 

Lynchburg, Va. George M. Jones Mem. L. 
(J. Maud Campbell, In.) 10607. 

Lynn, Ida May, readers' asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 9011. 

Lynn (Mass.) P. L. (Joyce G. Bisbee, 
In.) 160. 

Lyon, Eveline Crandall, In. Medical Sch. 
L., Univ. of Minn., Minneapolis, Minn. 
1703. 

Lyon, Lois M., In. Georgetown Br. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 9639. 

Lyons, Alice, child. In. P. L., Eveleth, 
Minn. 10069. 

Lyons, John F., In. McCormick Theologi- 
cal Seminary L., Chicago, 111. 8941. 

Lyons, Mabel J., representing Nat'l L. 
Bindery Co., Springfield, Mass. 10415. 

Lyser, Alice Irene, sr. asst. Univ. of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley, Calif. 11003. 

Lytle, Josephine, In. P. L., Warren, Ohio. 
8726. 

Lytle, Mary, head In. Seattle High Schools, 
Seattle, Wash. 4750. 

Mabbett, Leora Esther, head catlgr. Rosen- 
berg L., Galveston, Tex. 3938. 

McAfee, Georgia G., chief Extension Dept. 
P. L., Evansville, Ind. 7530. 

McAllister, J. A., pres. Evangelical Semi- 
nary of P. R., Rio Piedras, P. R. 9411. 

McAllister, S. W., In. P. L., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 11154. 

McArt, Edith May, asst. Broadway Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10646. 

McArthur L. See Biddeford, Me. 

McCabe, Olivia, In. Highland Park Br. P. 
L., Des Moines, Iowa. 7821. 

McCague, Anna C., asst. Tech. High Sch. 
L., Omaha, Neb. 10647. 



HANDBOOK 



587 



McCaleb, Florence, asst. in charge Loan 
Desk Vassar Coll. L., Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y. 9640. 

McCardle, Sarah E., In. Fresno Co. F. L., 
Fresno, Calif. 5173. 

McCarnes, Mabel F., In. Longstreet L. of 
Peddie Inst., Hightstown, N. J. 6340. 

MCCARTHY, ADA J., Richland Center, 
Wis. 4496. Life member. 

McCarthy, Bernice, asst. Auditor's Office 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 9497. 

McCarthy, Mary A., 129 Kenoza Ave., 
Haverhill, Mass. 10117. 

MacCarthy, Mary M., 6387 Sherwood 
Road, Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pa. 7264. 

McCarty, Harriet D., In. Homewood Br. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10916. 

McCauley, Pauline, Morganfield, Ky. 6829. 

McChesney, Rosalie, 1st asst. Inter Br. 
Loan Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 8632. 

McClelland, Ellwood H., technology In. 
Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 4567. 

McClelland, Maud, asst. Wadleigh High 
Sch. L., N. Y. City. 7110. 

McClung, Quantrille D., In. Park Hill Br. 
P. L., Denver, Colo. 7742. 

McClure, Anne Borodell, clerk Govern- 
ment Employment Service, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 8163. 

McClure, Mrs. Donald C., 951 Corona St., 
Denver, Colo. 6610. 

McClure, Mabel B., chief Periodical Dept. 
P. L., Kansas City, Mo. 10848. 

McClure, Mary N., asst. City L., Manches- 
ter, N. H. 7709. 

McCollough, Ethel F., In. P. L., Evans- 
ville, Ind. 2929. 

McCollough, Ruth Dorothy, chief catlgr. 
P. L., Evansville, Ind. 6237. 

McCombs, Charles F., supt. of Main Read- 
ing Rm. P. L., N. Y. City. 5640. 

McCombs, Nelson W., In. Washington 
Square L. N. Y. Univ., N. Y. City. 8634. 

McConnell, Elizabeth N., In. P. L., New 
London, Ohio. 11219. 

McConnell, Ruth I., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8424. 

MacCormick, Emily C., sec'y Seaboard Air- 
Line F. Travel. L. System, Middleton, 
Ga. 8801. 

McCoy, Helen R., 509 S. 15th St., San 
Jose, 'Calif. 7905. 



McCoy, Raymond J., In. Creighton Univ. 

L., Omaha, Neb. 8258. 
McCracken, Helen E., In. South Side Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 7639. 
McCrea, Bess, in charge of Islands Dept. 

L. of Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 6442. 
McCrickett, Ethel A., Periodicals Dept. 

Mich. State Nor. Coll. L., Ypsilanti, 

Mich. 11155. 
McCright, Edith C, asst. In. P. L., El Paso, 

Texas. 11241. 
McCulloch, Frances S., In. Henry M. Utley 

Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8305. 
McCulloch, R. W., asst. prof, of English 

Univ. of Maine, Orono, Me. 8232. 
McCullough, Emma K., asst. Br. Dept. P. 

L., Seattle, Wash. 6456. 
McCullough, Miss Everett, reviser The 

Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 9750. 
McCullough, Julia, In. Commercial High 

Sch. L., Atlanta, Ga. 10849. 
McCurdy, Robert M., 60 Bartlett St., An- 

dover, Mass. 2787. 
McCutcheon, Leona, asst. Extension Div. 

Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

10648. 
McDaniel, Arthur S., asst. In. Assoc. of 

the Bar L., 42 W. 44th St., N. Y. City. 

1961. 
Macdonald, Mrs. A. C, In. P. L., St. 

Thomas, Ont., Can. 5506. 
MacDonald, Alice Jane, principal Boyle 

Heights Br. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 

11268. 

MacDonald, Anna A., consulting In. L. Ex- 
tension Div. State L. and Museum, Har- 

risburg, Pa. 1793. 
MacDonald, Anne C., 1st asst. Oakman 

Blvd. Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8306. 
MacDonald, Irene K., In. High Sch. L., 

Brockton, Mass. 11269. 
MacDonald, Margaret L., In. -teacher 

George Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 11004. 
Macdonald, Mary C., chief In. St. Francis 

Xavier's Coll. L., Antigonish, N. S., Can. 

9864. 
MacDonald, Sarah, In. -teacher Grossman 

Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 11005. 
MacDonough, Ann, asst. to supervisor of 

Branches Queens Borough P. L., 

Jamaica, N. Y. 10248. 
McDonough, M. F., 34 S. 16th St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 3615. 



588 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



McDowell, Ella R., municipal ref. In. P. L., 

Seattle, Wash. 7238. 
MacDowell, Ethel J., In. P. L., Ashtabula, 

Ohio. 8523. 

McDowell, Grace E., br. In. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 2669. 
McDowell, Mrs. J. R., 603 W. Hill St., 

Knoxville, Tenn. 11006. 
McDuff, Gertrude Thiebaud, In. U. S. Vet- 
erans' Hospital No. 56 L., Fort Mc- 

Henry, M'd. 5609. 

McEldowney, Fred K., member commis- 
sion McGregor P. L., Highland Park, 

Mich. 10596. 
McFadden, Jeannette E., In. P. L., Santa 

Ana, Calif. 5158. 
McFarland, Helen M., catlgr. Kansas State 

Historical Society L., Topeka, Kan. 

10249. 
McGahen, Mrs. Rebecca B., 50 Linden 

Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7113. 
McGill, Mrs. Kate P., In. and pres. L. Bd. 

P. L., Marlette, Mich. 11007. 
McGirr, Alice T., asst. ref. In. Carnegie 

L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 3998. 
McGlenn, Alma Reid, In. P. L., Tulsa, 

Okla. 5970. 
McGovern, Frances, In. Technical L. B. F. 

Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio. 8636. 
McGrath, E. Gertrude, P. L., Regina, Sask., 

Can. 11008. 
McGregor, Bessie E., In. Port Richmond 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8884. 
McGregor, Delia, chief Juvenile Div. P. L., 

St. Paul, Minn. 7114. 
McGregor, Mary, P. L., Toronto, Ont., 

Can. 11270. 
McGrew, Marian B., sr. attendant Boyle 

Heights Br. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 

11293. 
McGriff, Fannie, In. West End Br. P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 10478. 
McGuffey, Margaret, executive sec'y Ex- 
tension Dept. Girls' Friendly Society in 

America, Rm. 1005, 15 E. 40th St., N. Y. 

City. 1084. 
McGuire, Hannah A., asst. Loan Desk P. 

L., Cleveland, Ohio. 11156. 
McGuire, Letha Pearl, In. Palmer Coll. L., 

Albany, Mo. 10562. 
Mcllwaine, Henry R., In. Virginia State L., 

Richmond, Va. 4295. 



Mclntire, Elizabeth H., in charge Delivery 

Desk P. L., Salem, Mass. 2558. 
Mclntire, Ella, In. Huron Coll. L., Huron, 

S. D. 5018. 

Mclntosh, Margaret B., chief Book Selec- 
tion and Order Dept. P. L., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 5367. 
Mcjunkin, Clara Bell, asst. Osterhout F. 

L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 8996. 
Mack, Abby C, asst. Circ. Dept. Wilming- 
ton Inst. F. L., Wilmington, Del. 10416. 
McKay, Elsie, asst. In. P. L., Evansville, 

Ind. 7447. 
Mackay, Margaret S., asst. sec'y Internat'l 

Catalog of Scientific Literature, McGill 

Univ. L., Montreal, P. Q., Can. 1543. 
McKay, Mary Nell, Travel. Ls. D'ept. Mich. 

State L., Lansing, Mich. 6919. 
McKee, Alice D., ref. asst. Ohio State 

Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 6272. 
McKee, R. H., trus. P. L., Wheeling, W. 

Va. 11220. 
Mackenzie, Annie, head Circ. Dept. Pratt 

Institute F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 8901. 
McKenzie, Jessica, asst. Magnus Butzel 

Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9360. 
McKesson, Rebecca, In. Seward Park Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 10649. 
McKillop, Samuel A., dir. of Extensions P. 

L., Milwaukee, Wis. 4603. 
Mackin, Clare, In. South High Sch. L., 

Omaha, Neb. 10683. 
McKinley, Ruth, asst. James E. Scripps 

Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 9361. 
McKinstry, Laura L., trus. P. L., San 

Francisco, Calif. (Address, 2988 Pacific 

Ave.) 8165. 
McKinstry, Ruth Everard, asst. In. N. J. 

P. L. Commission, Trenton, N. J. 8525. 
McKnight, Elizabeth B., In. Bay Ridge 

High Sch. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 4399. 
McKown, Blanche E., principal Periodical 

Dept. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 9340. 
MacLachlan, Margaret, head Circ. Dept. 

L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 3397. 
MacLachlan, May A., P. L., Toronto, Ont., 

Can. 11271. 
Maclachlan, Nancy Caldwell, In. F. L., 

Conshohocken, Pa. 5504. 
McLaughlin, Alice E., asst. Scripps Br. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 9705. 
McLaughlin, Bernadine, In. Ogden Park 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10650. 



HANDBOOK 



589 



McLaughlin, Maud, asst. In. Research L. 
Nat'l Aniline and Chemical Co., Inc., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 10516. 

MacLean, Alberta S., Osterhout F. L., 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 10251. 

McLean, Ruth B., head catlgr. Conn. State 
L., Hartford, Conn. 8457. 

McLeish, Margaret, In. Central High Sch. 
L., Evansville, Ind. 11157. 

McLeod, Edith A., In. Wyoming Br. of 
Cincinnati P. L., Wyoming, Ohio. 10850. 

McLoney, Ella M., asst. In. Washington 
State Normal Sch. L., Ellensburg, Wash. 
1181. 

McLouth, Mabel F., asst. in charge Chem- 
istry L. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 10563. 

McMahon, Eva I., asst. In. Northern 111. 
State Teachers' Coll. L., DeKalb, 111. 
6847. 

McMahon, Grace, asst. In. Lewis Inst. L., 
Chicago, 111. 9498. 

McMahon, Lillian J., In. Carroll Park Br. 
P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3853. 

McMahon, Mattie L., In. P. L., Lady- 
smith, Wis. 10851. 

McManis, Rumana, The Hidden Bookshop, 
74 Broadway, N. Y. City. 6912. 

McMaster, Louise M., In. P. L., Darling- 
ton, S. C. 10479. 

McMillen, James A., In. Washington Univ. 
L., St. Louis, Mo. 6254. 

McMullen, Elizabeth, asst. Ref. Dept. P. 
L., Des Moines, Iowa. 6903. 

MacNair, Mary W., asst. Catalog Div. L. 
of Congress, Washington, D. C. 2744. 

MacNair, Rebecca S., head of Branches 
Los Angeles County F. L., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 6568. 

McNamara, H. Katherine, Bradford Acad- 
emy L., Bradford, Mass. 8637. 

McNeal, Mrs. E. Jennie, In. P. Sch. L., 
Lansing, Mich. 10852. 

McNEIL, LAILA ADELAIDE, Middle- 
bury Coll. L., Middlebury, Vt. 3635. Life 
member. 

McNeill, Norah, In. P. L., Richmond, Calif. 
7940. 

McNiece, Mrs. Jessie Sargent, chief Circ. 
Dept. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 5372. 

Macon (Mo.) P. L. (Mrs. Richard Holtz- 
claw, In.) 11259. 



MacPherson, Harriet D., reviser Catalog 
Dept. Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 
8638. 

Macpherson, Maud R., In. State Normal 
Sch. L., Monmouth, Ore. 4498. 

MacPhie, Norma, asst. Locke Br. P. L., 
Toledo, Ohio. 10564. 

McPike, Eugene F., 135 E. llth Place, Chi- 
cago, 111. 11065. 

McQuaid, Mary C., In. P. L., Fairbury, 
Neb. 9902. 

McQuigg, Mrs. Kate Meade, Lord and 
Thomas, Chicago, 111. 7617. 

McRae, Isabella, In. Tau Beta Community 
House L., Hamtramck, Mich. 11221. 

McRaith, Helen, In. East Portland Br. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6770. 

McRoberts, Blanche, apprentice Temple 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 11158. 

Macrum, Adeline, In. Tuberculosis League 
L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 6273. 

McShane, Elizabeth H., 2nd asst. Codman 
Sq. Br. P. L., Boston, Mass. 10388. 

McShane, L. L., gen. mgr. Dodd Mead 
and Co., Inc., New International Ency- 
clopaedia, 56 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 
111. 7255. 

MacTarnaghan, Mrs. Mary Wallace, asst. 
Economics Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 4696. 

Macurdy, Theodosia Endicott, chief Order 
Dept. P. L., Boston, Mass. 1707. 

McVittie, Mrs. James A., 1808 Roosevelt 
Ave., Richmond, Calif. 5913. 

McWethy, Helen, asst. Alta Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 9193. 

McWhorter, Ruby, In. Worth Elliott-Car- 
negie L., Hickory, N. C. 10853. 

Madden, Eulalia M., In. The American 
Brass Co. L., Waterbury, Conn. 10854. 

Madden, Pauline, asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
8042. 

Madigan, Katherine, asst. Catalog. Dept. 
P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 11159. 

Madison (N. J.) P. L. (Norman B. Ben- 
nett, In.) 3609. 

Magee, Anna Mary, 2400 Second Ave., Al- 
toona, Pa. 9642. 

Maginn, Gertrude, sec'y to In. Univ. of 
Michigan L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 8167. 

Maguire, Beatrice C., In. Warren St. Br. 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 10250. 

Mahony, Bertha E., dir. The Bookshop 



590 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



for Boys and Girls, Women's Educa- 
tional and Indus. Union, 264 Boylston 
St., Boston, Mass. 7533. 

Maiden, Grace, In. North End Br. P. L., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 8233. 

Maine State L., Augusta, Me. (H. E. Dun- 
nack, In.) 5996. 

Maine University L., Orono, Me. (R. L. 
Walkley, In.) 4289. 

Major, Antoinette V., 1st asst. Lending 
Dept. P. L., New Rochelle, N. Y. 8168. 

Makepeace, Mary E., In. R. I. Coll. of Edu- 
cation L., Providence, R. I. 7117. 

Malone, Eva E., asst. In. and head catlgr. 
Trinity Coll. L., Durham, N. C. 5971. 

Malone, Tennessee, In. West Tex. State 
Normal Coll. L., Canyon, Texas. 5387. 

Maltby, Ruth E., principal San Pedro Br. 
of Los Angeles P. L., San Pedro, Calif. 
8973. 

Man, Mary Louise, 1st asst. Catalog 
Dept. L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 6701. 

Manche, Hellene, head Loan Div. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 5477. 

Manchester, Earl N., dir. of Ls. Univ. of 
Kansas, Lawrence, Kans. 3896. 

Manchester (England) P. F. Libraries. 
(Charles W. Sutton, In.) 4388. 

Manchester (N. H.) City Library. (F. Ma- 
bel Winchell, In.) 4167. 

Mankato (Minn.) F. P. L. (Sophia J. Lam- 
mers, In.) 5132. 

Manley, Marian C., head Circ. and Ref. 
Depts. P. L., Sioux City, Iowa. 7118. 

Manly, W. H., vice-pres. L. Board P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. (Address, Birming- 
ham Trust and Savings Co.) 8169. 

Mann, Annie L, reviser Catalog Dept. Co- 
lumbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 4629. 

MANN, BENJAMIN PICKMAN, bibliog- 
rapher, 1918 Sunderland Place, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 200. Life member. 

Mann, Elizabeth E., head catlgr. Smith 
Coll. L., Northampton, Mass. 4630. 

Mann, Gertrude E., In. F. P. L., DeLand, 
Fla. 8811. 

Mann, Laura N., In. Central High Sch. L., 
Washington, D. C. 5928. 

Mann, Leonora C., asst. Dept. of Fine 
Arts P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 8204. 

Mann, Margaret, catlgr. Engineering So- 
cieties L., 29 W. 39th St., N. Y. City. 
1527. 



Mann, Murza V., asst. Univ. of Michigan 
General L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 11242. 

Manning, Anna L., asst. In. P. L., Boston, 
Mass. 8769. 

Manning, Ethelwyn, head catlgr. Amherst 
Coll. L., Amherst, Mass. 8526. 

Manning, Harriet, In. Riverside Br. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 8378. 

MANRY, JAMES CAMPBELL, represen- 
tative in America Ewing Christian Col- 
lege, Allahabad City, U. P., British 
India. (Address, P. O. Box 521, Iowa 
City, Iowa.) 11086. Life member. 

Manson, Hazel B., asst. In. Fresno Co. F. 
L., Fresno, Calif. 9499. 

Mantel, Frances, Educ. Dept. George H. 
Doran Co., N. Y. City. 9885. 

Manville, Hazel E., sch. In. P. Sch. L., 
Ithaca, N. Y. 10480. 

Manypenny, Sara, asst. in charge of Serial 
Record L. of Congress, Washington, D. 
C. 10565. 

Maphis, Omer B., In. Bethany Bible Sch. 
L., 3435 West Van Buren St., Chicago, 
111. 8863. 

Maplewood (N. J.) See South Orange 
Township F. P. L. 

Margrave, Anne, In. Inyo Co. F. L., Inde- 
pendence, Calif. 9964. 

Marion, Guy E., asst. In. P. L., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 4846. 

Marion (Ohio) P. L. (Helen L. Kramer, 
In.) 4343. 

Markowitz, Augusta, In. Woodstock Br. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 5846. 

Markowitz, Margaret, stud. L. Sch. of the 
N. Y. P. L., N. Y. City. 10566. 

Marks, A. Ola, asst. South Side Br. P. L., 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 8922. 

Marks, Jessie W., sr. asst. Deposit Dept. 
P. L., Chicago, 111. 9313. 

Marks, Mary E., asst. Univ. of Wyoming 
L., Laramie, Wyo. 6263. 

Marks, Vivin, 3653 Michigan Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. 10855. 

Marlboro (Mass.) P. L. (John P. McGee, 
hi.) 6930. 

Marple, Alice, In. Historical Dept. of Iowa 
L., Des Moines, Iowa. 3368. 

Marquand, Fanny E., Preparation Div. 
Ref. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 3999. 

Marquette (Mich.) Peter White P. L. 
(Alma A. Olson, In.) 4793. 



HANDBOOK 



591 



Marriott, Victor E., In. Pomona Coll. L., 
Claremont, Calif. 11009. 

Marron, Joseph R, In. F. P. L., Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 7426. 

Marsh, Eugenia L., acting child. In. Divoll 
Br. P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 10481. 

Marsh, Gertrude E., child. In. P. L., Dan- 
bury, Conn. 10738. 

Marshall, Mabel E., State Teachers' Coll. 
L., Peru, Neb. 6789. 

Marshall, Mary K., classifier P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10856. 

Marshall, Mary L., asst. in charge Orleans 
Parish Medical Society L., New Orleans, 
La. 6524. 

Marshalltown (Iowa) P. L. (Gallic Wieder, 
In.) 4305. 

Martel, Charles, chief Catalog Div. L. of 
Congress, Washington, D. C. 1685. 

Martin, Arabel, supt. of Circ. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 4501. 

Martin, Bertha E., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 9370. 

Martin, Deborah Beaumont, In. Kellogg P. 
L., Green Bay, Wis. 2328. 

Martin, Helen, child. In. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 7651. 

Martin, Lena, In. P. L., Gadsden, Ala. 
3979. 

Martin, Lenala A., In. Lassen Co. F. L., 
Susanville, Calif. 10024. 

Martin, Marjorie H., In. U. S. Veterans' 
Hospital No. 44 L., West Roxbury, 
Mass. 8335. 

Martin, Mary E., In. Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute L., Auburn, Ala. 8885. 

Martin, Mary E., Harlem Br. P. L., 9 W. 
124th St., N. Y. City. 9706. 

Martin, Mary P., In. P. L. Assoc., Canton, 
Ohio. 1739. 

Martin, May Louise, asst. Sch. Dept. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 3039. 

Martin, Nella Jane, sr. asst. Ref. Dept. 
Univ. of Calif. L., Berkeley, Calif. 6594. 

Marvin, Cornelia, In. Oregon State L., Sa- 
lem, Ore. 1514. 

Marvin, Hattie E., P. L., Long Beach, 
Calif. 4502. 

Marvin, Helen D., In. Alliance Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 9131. 
Marx, Henry F., In. P. L., Easton, Pa. 
3643. 



Maryland Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
L., 1211 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 
(Marcia C. Noyes, In.) 5131. 

Maryland P. L. Commission (office) State 
Normal Sch., Towson, Md. (Mrs. M. A. 
Newell, sec'y.) 10089. 

Maryland Univ. L., College Park, Md. 
(Miltanna Rowe, In.) 9582. 

Mason, Alby, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 9500. 

Mason, Mrs. Anna P., In. Carondelet Br. 
P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 5543. 

Mason, Julia A., In. P. L., Franklin, Ind. 
5405. 

Mason, Pearl L., assoc. In. State Normal 
Sch. L., Bloomsburg, Pa. 10025. 

Mason, Rose E., ref. In. Woodstock Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 10254. 

Mason City (Iowa) P. L. (Lydia M. Bar- 
rette, In.) 6621. 

Mass. Dept. of Education Div. of P. Ls., 
Boston, Mass. (E. Kathleen Jones, gen- 
eral sec'y) 11085. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology L., 
Cambridge, Mass. (Robert P. Bigelow, 
In.) 5691. 

Massachusetts State L., Boston, Mass. (Ed- 
ward H. Redstone, In.) 6413. 

Massee, May, in charge of Children's Book 
Publishing, Doubleday, Page and Co., 
Garden City, N. Y. 3695. 

Mast, Clara, in charge South High Sch. 
Br. P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 7536. 

Masterson, F. Adele, In. Prospect Br. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 6749. 

Mather, Rose M., asst. Lincoln L., Spring- 
field, 111. 6668. 

Mathes, Florence, ref. asst. in charge So- 
cial Science Div. P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 
10070. 

Mathews, Helen S., In. P. L., De Pere, Wis. 
9751. 

Mathews, Jeanette, 1st asst. Circ. Dept. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8379. 

Mathews, Lydia, asst. Carnegie L., Atlan- 
ta, Ga. 10857. 

Mathews, Mary E., In. Bedford Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2100. 

Mathewson, Helen G., asst. Georgia State 
L. Commission, Atlanta, Ga. 9341. 

Mathewson, Hope S., asst. In. Sprague 
House Br. P. L., Providence, R. I. 10253. 

Mathiews, Franklin K., chief scout In. Boy 



592 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Scouts of America, 200 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

City. 6343. 
Matson, Charlotte, In. Board of Education 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 7537. 
Matthews, Charles Grant, In. Ohio Univ. 

Carnegie L., Athens, Ohio. 3260. 
Matthews, Etta L., In. High Sch. L., Knox- 

ville, Tenn. 5742. 
Matthews, Harriet Louise, Lynn, Mass. 

807. 
Matthews, Irene Estella, In. High Sch. L., 

Dubuque, Iowa. 6657. 
Matthews, Vesta S., asst. P. L., Columbus, 

Ohio. 11010. 
Mattoon (111.) P. L. (Blanche Gray, In.) 

6614. 
Mauch Chunk (Pa.) Dimmick Mem. L. 

7324. 
Mauser, Marian, In. P. L., Bloomsburg, Pa. 

10147. 
Mawson, C. O. S., Central Ave., Needham, 

Mass. 7823. 
Maxwell, Louise, asst. In. Indiana Univ. 

L., Bloomington, Ind. 1816. 
Maxwell, Sadie Alison, asst. Coll. of Busi- 
ness Administration L. Boston Univ., 

Boston, Mass. 10104. 
May, Edwin C., May Building, Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 10482. 
May, Elsie, sr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 111. 

11294. 
May, Gertrude D., 1st asst. Cabanne Br. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 10567. 
Mayberry, Carrie C., head catlgr. P. L., 

Bangor, Me. 10568. 
Mayberry, Elizabeth, child. In. F. P. L., 

Newcastle, Pa. 9452. 

Mayes, Alice, In. Univ. of Miss. L., Univer- 
sity, Miss. 10739. 

Mayes, Olive, In. Goodwyn Inst. L., Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 6228. 
Mayhew, Esther M., In. West Somerville 

Br. P. L., Somerville, Mass. 3714. 
Maynard, George S., tech. In. P. L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 8469. 
Maynard, Clyde, prin. attendant Sch. and 

Teachers' Dept. P. L., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 8275. 
Maynard, Mildred, child. In. F. P. L., East 

Orange, N. J. 8433. 
Maynard, Theodore, district sales manager 

Educational Books, "The World Book," 

Chehalis, Wash. 10651. 



Maze, Mrs. Adele Henry, br. In. P. L., Oak 
Park, 111. 11011. 

Mead, Elizabeth Lyon, catlgr. Engineer- 
ing Societies L., N. Y. City. 9556. 

Mead, Herman Ralph, catlgr. Henry E. 
Huntington L., San Gabriel, Calif. 2749. 

Meade, Charlotte H., In. St. Agnes Br. P. 
L., N. Y. City. 10255. 

Meadville Theological Sch. L., Meadville, 
Pa. (Walter C. Green, In.) 5256. 

Mears, Marian, asst. P. L., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 8923. 

Mecutchen, Mary, In. Girard Coll. L., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 9412. 

Medford (Mass.) P. L. (Abby L. Sargent, 
In.) 3604. 

Medicine Lodge (Kan.) Lincoln City L. 
(Mrs. M. B. Kathrens, In.) 7867. 

Medlicott, Mary, ref. In. City L., Spring- 
field, Mass. 780. 

Meehan, Lina, 1st asst. P. L., Cleveland 
Heights, Ohio. 8039. 

Meigs, Avis F., In. Edison Jr. High Sch. 
L., Long Beach, Calif. 10569. 

Meisel, Max, 1593 President St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 6893. 

Mel, Clara F., asst. catlgr. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 5149. 

Melbourne, Australia, P. L. of Victoria. 
See Victoria. 

Melcher, Frederic G., vice-president R. R. 
Bowker Co., 62 W. 45th St., N. Y. City. 
7893. 

Melcher, Mary M., head classifier Harper 
Mem. L. Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
3767. 

Melgaard, Irene M., asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9752. 

Mellor Mem. L. See C. C. Mellor and 
Pittsburgh. 

Melvill, Jessie D., asst. L. Assoc., Port- 
land, Ore. 2262. 

Memphis, Tenn. Cossitt L. (Charles D. 
Johnston, In.) 4210. 

Mendenhall, Marjorie, asst. Bowen Br. P. 
P., Detroit, Mich. 11160. 

Merced County F. L., Merced, Calif. (Win- 
ifred H. Bigley, In.) 6757. 

Merchant, Jean, In. Provincial Normal 
Sch. L., Toronto, Ont., Can. 9965. 

Meredith, Roberta, head Circ. Dept. Fresno 
County F. L., Fresno, Calif. 8031. 



HANDBOOK 



593 



Meriden (Conn.) Curtis Mem. L. (Corinne 

A. Deshon, In.) 5719. 
Merrill, Mrs. Adaline C., In. Heights High 

Sch. L., Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 10858. 
Merrill, Bertha H., 23 Oak Ave., Belmont, 

Mass. 1786. 
Merrill, E. Carolyn, catlgr. P. L., Boston, 

Mass. 10026. 
Merrill, Julia Wright, chief Organization 

Dept. Ohio State L., Columbus, Ohio. 

2350. 

Merrill, William Stetson, head Public Serv- 
ice Dept. The Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 

1166. 
Merryman, Florence E., 1st asst. East Side 

Br. P. L., Evansville, Ind. 10130. 
Merville, Florence E., 1st asst. Sch. and 

Child. Dept. F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 

10570. 
Merwin, Mrs. N. H., Jr., In. Youngstown 

Telegram L., Youngstown, Ohio. 7912. 
Messer, Angie, In. P. and Sch. L., Manis- 

tee, Mich. 4932. 
Metcalf, Helen G., ref. In. P. L., Waterloo, 

Iowa. 9990. 
Metcalf, Keyes D., executive asst. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 5670. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art L., N. Y. 

City. (William Clifford, In.) 6819. 
Mettee, Andrew H., In. L. Company of 

Baltimore Bar, 329 Court House, Balti- 
more, Md. 4103. 
Mettler, Florence E., 1st asst. Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9178. 
Metz, Corinne A., county In. The P. L. of 

Fort Wayne and Allen County, Fort 

Wayne, Ind. 3828. 
Mexico (Mo.) P. L. (Tine C. Houston, In.) 

10531. 
Meyer, Amy L., 150 E. 34th St., N. Y. City. 

8308. 

Meyer, Mrs. Edith Patterson, 6339 Kim- 
bark Ave., Chicago, 111. 7137. 
Meyer, Emma, head Bind. Dept. P. L., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 2332. 

MEYER, HERMAN H. B., chief bibliog- 
rapher L. of Congress, Washington, D. 

C. 715. Life member. 
Meyer, Mrs. Herman H. B., care Library 

of Congress, Washington, D. C. 10257. 
Michael, Mrs. Elias, dir. of Board P. L., 

St. Louis, Mo. 10684. 



Michigan State L., Lansing, Mich. (Mrs. 

Mary C. Spencer, In.) 4144. 
Michigan State Normal Coll. L., Ypsilanti, 

Mich. (G. M. Walton, In.) 4815. 
Michigan Univ. General L., Ann Arbor, 

Mich. (W. W. Bishop, In. ) 4341. 
Middleton, Jean Y., catlgr. Forbes L., 

Northampton, Mass. 941. 
Middleton, Katharine Jean, recatlgr. Chazy 

Central Rural Sch. L., Chazy, N. Y. 

11311. 
Middletown (Conn.) Russell L. (Edna H. 

Wilder, In.) 182. 
Mikes, Mrs. Irene Zack, asst. Broadway 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10652. 
Milam, Carl H., sec'y American Library 

Association, Chicago, 111. 4023. 
Milam, Mrs. Carl H., 906 Hinman Ave., 

Evanston, 111. 9132. 

Millar, Annie, In. Western Br. P. L., To- 
ronto, Ont., Can. 11272. 
Millar, Ethel Key, stud. Univ. of 111. L. 

Sch., Urbana, 111. 8170. 
Millard, Mrs. Cora Poor, In. F. P. L., Bur- 
lington, Iowa. 8902. 
Millard, Jessie Hodge, head Child. Dept. 

L. Association, Portland, Ore. 3373. 
Millener, Mrs. Jessie Scott, In. P. L., 

Pocatello, Idaho. 7121. 
Miller, Edmund W., In. F. P. L., Jersey 

City, N. J. 6974. 

Miller, Edyth L., In. Rockefeller Founda- 
tion L., N. Y. City. 4695. 
Miller, Elizabeth, asst. In. Union High Sch. 

Br. P. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 11012. 
Miller, Emily Van Dorn, 1536 Calhoun St., 

New Orleans, La. 6241. 
Miller, Frederica, asst. P. L., Toronto, 

Ont., Can. 11273. 
Miller, Grace, In. D. A. Wells Econ. L., 

City L., Springfield, Mass. 2455. 
Miller, J. Fay, In. P. L., Darlington. Ind. 

9837. 
Miller, Louise V., In. F. L., Dobbs Ferry, 

N. Y. 8084. 

Miller, Mabel V., asst. Schools' and Teach- 
ers' Dept. Los Angeles County F. L., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 7773. 
Miller, Mrs. Minnie D., U. S. Veterans' 

Hospital No. 78 L., Fort Roots, Nth., 

Ark. 7377. 
Miller, Noma G., classifier Enoch Pratt F. 

L., Baltimore, Md. 9230. 






594 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Miller, Ruth B., child. In. P. L., St. Joseph, 
Mo. 8206. 

Miller, Ruth Tillotson, In. Sch. of Educa- 
tion L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5897. 

Miller, Sarah E., 1st asst. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 8085. 

Miller, Wharton, In. Union Coll. L., Schen- 
ectady, N. Y. 6055. 

Miller, Zana K., In. Library Bureau, 316 
Broadway, N. Y. City. 2752. 

Millerd, Alice J., In. F. L., Marshfield, Wis. 
10653. 

Millicent L. See Fairhaven, Mass. 

Mills, Alice E., subject reader Ref. Dept. 
P. L., N. Y. City. 6904. 

Mills, M. Eleanor, 1st asst. P. L., N. Y. 
City. 2206. 

Milner, Ange V., In. Illinois State Normal 
Univ. L., Normal, 111. 1185. 

Miltimore, Cora, In. Univ. of Fla. L., 
Gainesville, Fla. 10685. 

Miltimore, Louise S., In. L. and Bureau of 
Information of the American Inst. of Ac- 
countants, 135 Cedar St., N. Y. City. 
10417. 

Milton (Mass.) P. L. (Carrie S. Allen, 
In.) 3984. 

Milwaukee (Wis.) P. L. (Matthew S. Dud- 
geon, In.) 1509. 

Milwaukee, Wis. See also First Wis. Nat'l 
Bank. 

Mineau, Georgiana, In. Perkins Br. P. L., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 10654. 

Miner, Helen E., In. Shaker Heights Sch. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 11013. 

Miner, Helen E., In. Yankton Coll. L., 
Yankton, S. D. 5393. 

Minneapolis (Minn.) P. L. (Gratia A. 
Countryman, In.) 4363. 

Minnesota Department of Education, L. 
Division, St. Paul, Minn. (Clara F. 
Baldwin, library dir.) 4739. 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, 
Minn. (Gertrude Krausnick, In.) 6532. 

Minnesota State Teachers' Coll. L., Moor- 
head, Minn. (Sarah Hougham, In.) 4995. 

Minnesota Univ. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 
(F. K. Walter, In.) 5727. 

Minot (N. D.) P. L. (Margaret Greene, In.) 
5747. 

Mirick, Lilian, In. State Sch. of Science L., 
Wahpeton, N. D. 2916. 

Missionary Research L., 25 Madison Ave., 



N. Y. City. (Hollis W. Hering, In.) 4344. 
Mississippi State L., Jackson, Miss. (Mrs. 

W. F. Marshall, In.) 6391. 
Mississippi University L., University, Miss. 

(Alice Mayes, In.) 8873. 
Missouri Univ. L., Columbia, Mo. (Henry 

O. Severance, In.) 5019. 
Missouri University School of Mines and 

Metallurgy L., Rolla, Mo. (Edith C. 

Jones, In.) 5811. 
Mitchell, Blanche, In. F. P. Sch. L., Troy, 

Ohio. 11066. 
Mitchell, Emily Burns, asst. Manuscripts 

Div. L. of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

5338. 
Mitchell, Marguerite, In. Wilmington Coll. 

L., Wilmington, Ohio. 6784. 
Mitchell, Mary, In. F. P. L., Webb City, 

Mo. 9247. 
Mitchell, Sarah Louise, In. Ryerson L., Art 

Inst., Chicago, 111. 6462. 
Mitchell, Sydney B., assoc. In. Univ. of 

Calif. L., Berkeley, Calif. 2646. 
Mix, Lucy M., asst. P. L., Fort Wayne, 

Ind. 10859. 
Moderwell, Mabel C., In. Butler House Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 8234. 
Moe, Gudrun, ref. In. Bankers Trust Co.,j 

N. Y. City. 9027. 

Moehlman, Grace, In. -teacher Barbour In- 
termediate Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 11014. 
Moehlman, Lillian, catlgr. F. L., Madison, 

Wis. 7697. 
Moenck, Hertha, In.-teacher Gruesel Sch. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 11015. 
Moeser, Emily, asst. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 10740. 
Moffatt, Mary L., child. In. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 11161. 

Mohun, Anna R., stenographer L. of Con- 
gress, Washington, D. C. 9838. 
Moir, Elizabeth, associate head Ref. Div. 

P. L., Toronto, Ont., Can. 5462. 
Moller, Gertrude, In. P. L., Mt. Vernon, 111. 

9839. 
Alolleson, Susan Moore, 1st asst. P. L., N. 

Y. City. 6966. 
Molnar, Mrs. Ida B. L., In. Melrose Br. P. 

L., N. Y. City. 7124. 

Monchow, Carlina Mavis, In. F. L., Dun- 
kirk, N. Y. 3757. 
Monrad, Anna M., head catlgr. Yale Univ. 

L., New Haven, Conn. 5525. 



HANDBOOK 



595 



Monro, Isabel Stevenson, subject header 
Ref. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 5741. 

Montana State Hist, and Miscellaneous L., 
Helena, Mont (Florence Fortune, In.) 
4262. 

Montclair (N. J.) F. P. L. (Alta M. Barker, 
In.) 4775. 

Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas, Calif. (Anne 
Hadden, In.) 9868. 

Montgomery, Edna Lois, asst. Cent. Circ. 
Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8259. 

Montgomery, Maude, In. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture L. Iowa State Coll., Ames, Iowa. 
9991. 

Montgomery, Ruth, sub. In. Leg. Ref. Sec- 
tion N. Y. State L., Albany, N. Y. 7748. 

MONTGOMERY, THOMAS L., In. His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania L., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 853. Life member. 

Montgomery L. Assoc., Montgomery, Ala. 
(Laura M. Elmore, In.) 4628. 

Montpelier, Vt. Kellogg-Hubbard L. (Eve- 
lyn S. Lease, In.) 4776. 

Montross, S. Elizabeth, sr. asst. The John 
Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 2366. 

Moody, Grace A., loan desk asst. Univ. 
of Minnesota L., Minneapolis, Minn. 
8837. 

Moody, Katharine T., ref. In. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 1686. 

Moody, Mrs. Virginia G., In. State L., Co- 
lumbia, S. C. 11243. 

Moon, Amy C., chief Catalog Div. P. L., 
St. Paul, Minn. 3056. 

Moon, Edith C., extension In. P. L., Evans- 
ton, 111. 6348. 

Moon, Mrs. Jessie C., chief Circ. Dept. 
Hackley P. L., Muskegon, Mich. 11016. 

Moore, Alice K., ref. asst. City L., Spring- 
field, Mass. 10259. 

Moore, Annie Carroll, supervisor of Work 
with Child. P. L., N. Y. City. 1428. 

Moore, Dora, catlgr. Ohio Wesleyan Univ. 

L., Delaware, Ohio. 4000. 
Moore, Edna G., chief Publicity Div. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 7845. 

Moore, Mabel B., child. In. Traveling Ls. 
Dept. Ohio State L., Columbus, Ohio. 
6705. 
Moore, Mabel L., In. F. L., Adams, Mass. 

7126. 

Moore, May L., asst. Order Dept. P. L., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 9414. 



Moorhead, Mary R., In. Allegheny High 

Sch. L., Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 10355. 
Mooresville (Ind.) P. L. (Mrs. Morris 

Talley, In.) 10532. 
-Moquin, Belle, asst. Child. Dept. Utley Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11162. 
Moran, Nina M. K., acting head in charge 

Stations Div. P. L., Tacoma, Wash. 6545. 
Morden, Cornelia F., child. In. Woodlawn 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 11017. 
More, Helen Gould, stud.-catlgr. Univ. of 

111. L., Urbana, 111. 11018. 
Morey, Jane, mgr. Traveling Ls. Mo. 

P. L. Commission, Jefferson City, Mo. 

9133. 
MORGAN, ANNE, 219 Madison Ave., N. 

Y. City. 10924. Sustaining member. 
Morgan, Blanche J., In. Galva Township 

P. L., Galva, 111. 11295. 
Morgan, Ella S., In. Lincoln High Sch. L., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 6706. 
Morgan, Helen H., asst. 67th St. Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 7127. 
MORGAN, JOY E., ed. The Journal of 

the National Education Association, 1201 

16th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

7632. Life member. 
Morgan, Leone, general asst. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 10356. 
Morgan, Lucy L., instructor apprentices P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 5990. 
Morgan, Mamie M., catlgr. Gail Borden P. 

L., Elgin, 111. 10860. 
Morgan, Vera, asst. Illinois St. Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 9646. 
Moriette, Mrs. C. C., asst. Ord. Dept. P. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9179. 
Moriette, Gladys, sr. asst. Music Dept. P. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9753. 
Morison, Avis Mathews, br. In. City L., 

Springfield, Mass. 10655. 
Morley, Linda H., In. Business Br. F. P. 

L., Newark, N. J. 4590. 
Morris, Alice L., In. East High Sch. L., 

Columbus, Ohio. 8540. 
Morris, Deborah, architectural In.. Univ. 

of Pennsylvania L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

8642. 
Morris, Emily B., In. Thornton Mem. L., 

Saco, Me. 10597. 
Morris, F. .M., bookseller, 24 N. Wabask 

Ave., Chicago, 111. 2212. 



596 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Morris, Lida F., schools asst. P. L., To- 
ledo, Ohio. 11163. 
MORRIS, LOUISE R., 17 West 12th St., 

N. Y. City. 3484. Life member. 
Morris, Marie, ref. asst. P. L., Toledo, 

Ohio. 10598. 
Morrison, Eleanor, head Thiel Coll. L., 

Greenville, Pa. 9754. 
Morrison, Mrs. H. D., Stamford, N. Y. 

7968. 

Morrison, Mary, high sch. In., East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 9314. 
Morrison, Mary B., asst. Child. Room 

Lothrop Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11164. 
Morrison, Noah Farnham, bookseller, 314- 

318 West Jersey St., Elizabeth, N. J. 

3453. 
Morsch, Mabel L., asst. catlgr. Univ. of 

Iowa L., Iowa City, Iowa. 9992. 
Morse, Alice W., In. William H. Hall F. 

L., Edgewood, R. I. 30%. 
Morse, Bianca M., child. In. Alta Br. P. L., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 10656. 
Morse, Gertrude W., br. child. In. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 10483. 
Morse, Stella M., asst. In. Schenley High 

Sch. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 9472. 
Morton, Gabrielle, In. P. L., Coronado, 

Calif. 10861. 

Morton, Nellie, In. Brandywine Br. Wil- 
mington Inst. F. L., Wilmington, Del. 

6454. 
Mosher, Lovila M., In. State Normal Sch. 

L., River Falls, Wis. 4401. 
Mosher, Marion Dix, In. Genesee Br. P. L., 

Rochester, N. Y. 5352. 
Moshier, L. Marion, asst. In. Skidmore 

Coll. L., Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 9557. 
Moth, Axel, chief catlgr. P. L., N. Y. City. 

5088. 
Motter, Murray Gait, dir. L. Service U. S. 

Veterans' Bureau, 2314 19th St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 10261. 
Motz, Ruth M., asst. In. Whipple Barracks 

Hospital, Prescott, Ariz. 9944. 
Moulton, Mrs. Frank, 1908 Hutching St., 

Portsmouth, Ohio. 10675. 
MUDGE, ISADORE GILBERT, ref. In. 

Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 2219. 

Life member. 
Muench, Alice F., H. W. Wilson Co., N. 

Y. City. 9453. 
Mueser, Emilie, class. Engineering So- 



cieties L., 29 West 39th St., N. Y. City. 
7130. 

Muldoon, Katherine F., In. Allston Br. P. 
L., Boston, Mass. 10027. 

Mulford, Fanny A., pres. Hempstead L., 
Hempstead, N. Y. 6525. 

Mulheron, Anne Morton, In. L. Associa- 
tion, Portland, Ore. 6905. 

Mullen, Mary R., In. Ala. Dept. of Archives 
and History L., Montgomery, Ala. 4713. 

Mullet, Elinor, catlgr. Columbia Univ. L., 
N. Y. City. 9840. 

Mullett, Mrs. Clara, in charge Graduate 
Reading Room Univ. of Mich. General 
L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 10917. 

Mumford, Rosalie, chief Order Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 2785. 

Mumm, Beulah, ref. In. State L., Sacramen- 
to, Calif. 9707. 

Muncie (Ind.) P. L. (Mary Torrance, In.) 
4802. 

Munn, Ralph, ref. In. P. L., Seattle, Wash. 
9028. 

Munro, Miss M. E., In. Normal Sch. L., 
Peterborough, Ont., Can. 10918. 

Munson, Ida Gertrude, chief Catalog Dept. 
Calif. State L., Sacramento, Calif. 10862. 

Munson, Sarah L., supervisor of Binding 
P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8310. 

Murch, William H., trus. P. L., St. Thomas, 
Ont., Can. 10863. 

Murdoch, John, 1st asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Boston, Mass. 6641. 

Murdoch, Mrs. John, care P. L., Boston, 
Mass. 6759. 

Murray, Annie May, Hilltop, Tenafly, N. J. 
5704. 

Murray, Grace M., asst. in Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 9277. 

Murray, Katherine M., sch. In. F. P. L., 
Worcester, Mass. 3628. 

Murray, Margaret E., In. Filene Ref. L., 
Boston, Mass. 5562. 

Muscatine (Iowa) P. M. Musser P. L. (El- 
len G. Stocker, In.) 4217. 

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L. Wheeler, In.) 4097. 

Muskogee (Okla.) P. L. (Ruth E. Ham- 
mond, In.) 5850. 

Muzzy, A. Florence, asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
5806. 

Myers, Mrs. Grace W., In. Treadwell L. 



HANDBOOK 



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Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

11339. 
Myers, Helen E., In. Lebanon Valley Coll. 

L., Annville, Pa. 5027. 
Myers, Lulah J., asst. P. L., Omaha, Neb. 

9708. 
Mysore Univ. L., Mysore, India. (N. 

Narasimha Moorty, In.) 7861. 
Nachman, Selma, reviser Univ. of Chicago 

L., Chicago, 111. 4508. 
Nairn, Isabel, Campbell Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10741. 
Napa (Calif.) Goodman L. (Minnie C. 

Shreve, In.) 6620. 
Nash, Allene F., 1st asst. P. L., Tacoma, 

Wash. 7724. 
Nashua (N. H.) P. L. (Alice T. Rowe, 

In.) 7356. 
Nashville (Term.) Carnegie L. (G. H. 

Baskette, In.) 4219. 
Nason, Sabra L., In. Umatilla Co. P. L., 

Pendleton, Ore. 2867. 
National Aniline and Chemical Co., Inc., 

Research L., Buffalo, N. Y. (Julian F. 

Smith, In.) 8841. 
National Aniline and Chemical Company 

L., 40 Rector St, N. Y. City. (Grace 

Carstensen, In.) 9071. 
National Bank of Commerce L., N. Y. City. 

(Elinor Bedlow, In.) 10342. 
National Child Welfare Assoc., 70 Fifth 

Ave., N. Y. City. (Charles F. Powlison, 

general sec'y) 9163. 
National Library Bindery Company, 

Springfield, Mass. 7948. 
National Library for the Blind, 1800 D 

Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. (Etta 

Josselyn Griffin, dir.) 7593. 
Naugatuck, Conn. Howard Whittemore 

Mem. L. (E. M. Goodyear, In.) 4903, 
Neale, Minnie, chief Circ. Dept. P. L., Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 6710. 

Nebraska Univ. L., Lincoln, Neb. (Mal- 
colm G. Wyer, In.) 5001. 
Needham, Elsa A., correspondence clerk 

U. S. Dept. of Agric. L., Washington, 

D. C. 11165. 

Nelson, Ada M., In. Knox Coll. L., Gales- 
burg, 111. 7586. 
Nelson, Bessie E., official catlgr. Yale Law 

Sch. L. Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn. 

10263. 



Nelson, Charles Alexander, 218 Tecumseh 
Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 83. 

Nelson, Dorothea, Marshfield Hills, Mass. 
3809. 

Nelson, Esther, In. Univ. of Utah L., Salt 
Lake City, Utah. 3262. 

Nelson, Peter, head of Manuscripts and 
History Section N. Y. State L., Albany, 
N. Y. 2663. 

Nesbit, Maude E., sr. asst. Reading Rm. 
P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8381. 

Nethercut, Mary Bell, In. Coll. of Emporia 
L., Emporia, Kan. 6025. 

Netter, Miriam, In. P. L. of Warsaw and 
Wayne Township, Warsaw, Ind. 11067. 

New Bedford (Mass.) P. L. (George H. 
Tripp, In.) 3274. 

New Brunswick (N. J.) F. P. L. (Harold 
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Pa. See Academy. 

New Hampshire Coll. L., Durham, N. H. 
(Willard P. Lewis, In.) 10090. 

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(Arthur H. Chase, In.) 6761. 

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Stetson, In.) 4319. 

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of, Technical L., Newark, N. J. (Alma C. 
Mitchell, In.) 6863. 

New Jersey State L., Trenton, N. J. (F. E. 
Croasdale, In.) 10787. 

New Orleans, La., Howard Mem. L. (Wil- 
liam Beer, In.) 6039. 

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In.) 4084. 

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Huntington, In.) 5206. 

New South Wales P. L., Sydney, Australia. 
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tion L., Geneva, N. Y. (J. D. Luckett, 
hi.) 9045. 

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ander J. Wall, In.) 4786. 

New York Library Club (Pres., Theresa 
Hitchler, P. L., 26 Brevoort Place, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. Sec'y, Marion F. Schwab, P. 
L., 26 Brevoort Place, Brooklyn, N. Y.) 
3513. 

New York Mercantile L., Astor Place, N. 
Y. City. (Charles H. Cox, hi.) 4029. 



598 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



New York (N. Y.) P. L. (Edwin H. Ander- 
son, dir.) 2733. 

New York (N. Y.) P. L., Library School 
of. (Ernest J. Reece, principal.) 7895. 

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N. Y. City. (Frank B. Bigelow, In.) 4278. 

New York. See also Brooklyn P. L., Gro- 
lier Club, Huntington F. L. and Reading 
Room, Queens Borough P. L., and Y. M. 
C. A. L. 

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New York State L., Albany, N. Y. (James 
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Newark (N. J.) F. P. L. (John Cotton 
Dana, In.) 1078. 

NEWBERRY, MARIE AMNA, super- 
visor of Training P. L., Toledo, Ohio. 
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well Utley, In.) 1075. 

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sons, In.) 5380. 

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Newell, Bessie, Sch. Stations P. L., Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 10571. 

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City, N. J. 9841. 

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son, In.) 10693. 

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H. 8729. 

Newport, R. I. Redwood L. and Athenae- 
um. (George Lyman Hinckley, In.) 7213. 

Newton, Elizabeth J., In. Robbins L., Ar- 
lington, Mass. 2788. 

Newton, Lesley, child. In. P. L., Lakewood, 
Ohio. 6351. 

Newton, Marjorie, catlgr. Northwestern 
Univ. L., Evanston, 111. 9513. 

Newton, Mary Irene, In. Girls' High Sch. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10517. 

Newton, Nathaly E., 1st asst. Russell L., 
Middletown, Conn. 9455. 

Newton (Mass.) F. L. (Harold T. Dough- 
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Mich. 5195. 
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P. Porter, In.) 7635. 
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Providence, R. I. 4647. 
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10408. 
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Detroit, Mich. 6806. 
Nichols, Ruth G., In. Federal Reserve Bank 

L., Chicago, 111. 3299. 
Nicholson, Delia Wheelock, asst. catlgr. P. 

L., Kansas City, Mo. 8329. 
Nickerson, Mrs. Essie C., In. Tainter Mem. 

F. L., Menomonie, Wis. 5299. 
Nie,mi, Signa, asst. P. L., Eveleth, Minn. 

10072. 
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hout 9, The Hague, Holland. 7890. 
Nilsson, Emma B., asst. in charge Foreign 

Books Franklin Br. P. L., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 9181. 

Nisbet, Lillian F., In. Winchester Repeat- 
ing Arms Co. L., New Haven, Conn. 

7314. 
Noble, Sarah A., asst. Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Tulsa, Okla. 8026. 
Noel, Jacqueline, ref. In. P. L., Tacoma, 

Wash. 6595. 
Nolan, Isabel, child. In. Hazelwood Br. 

Carnegie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 8434. 
Noll, Amy Wentworth, asst. chief Ord. 

Dept. and asst. ref. In. James Jerome 

Hill Ref. L., St. Paul, Minn. 6943. 
Nolte, Claire, stud. Course in 1. work with 

Child. Western Reserve Univ. L. Sch., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 10657. 
Nolte, Mrs. Louise, In. West Intermediate 

Sch. L., Davenport, Iowa. 11222. 
Nordyke, Lucile, In. Irvington Br. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8382. 
Norlie, O. M., In. Reference L. of Lutheran 

Bureau. N. Y. City. 10264. 
Norman, Carl, representative American 

Scandinavian Foundation, 25 West 45th 

St., N. Y. City. 4975. 
Norman, Mollie, In. Union Springs L., 

Union Springs, Ala. 6352. 
Norman, Oscar E., In. Peoples Gas Light 

and Coke Co. L., Chicago, 111. 4024. 
Norman William P. L. See Woodstock, 

Vt 



HANDBOOK 



599 



Norris, Helen, In. Commonwealth Edison 

Company L., Chicago, 111. 7132. 
Norris, Helen H., catlgr. Univ. of Minn. 

L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9029. 
North Adams (Mass.) P. L. (Mabel Tem- 
ple, In.) 3525. 
North Attleborough, Mass., Richard Mem. 

L. (Ada M. Perry,. In.) 4296. 
North Carolina Legislative Reference L., 

Raleigh, N. C. (H. M. London, In.) 8121. 
North Carolina L. Commission, Raleigh, 

N. C. (Mary B. Palmer, sec'y and dir.) 

11084. 
North Carolina State L., Raleigh, N. C. 

(Carrie L. Broughton, In.) 6110. 
North Carolina Univ. L., Chapel Hill, N. 

C. (Louis R. Wilson, In.) 10694. 
North Dakota Agricultural Coll. L., Fargo, 

N. D. (Mrs. Ethel McVeety, In.) 8954. 
North Dakota State Normal Sch. L., Valley 

City, N. D. (Helen M. Crane, In.) 4509. 
North Dakota University L., Grand Forks, 

N. D. (Alfred D. Keator, In.) 5257. 
Northern Illinois State Normal School, 

Haish L., De Kalb, 111. (Josephine M. 

Jandell, hi.) 7240. 
Northey, Delia F., acting sec'y Ind. P. L. 

Commission, Indianapolis, Ind. 5197. 
Northwestern University L., Evanston, 111. 

(Theodore W. Koch, In.) 4321. 
Norton, Edith M., asst. In. Federal Re- 
serve Bank L., Cleveland, Ohio. 7825. 
Norton, Margaret, In. Constantinople Coll. 

L., Constantinople, Turkey. 6894. 
Norton, Margaret Cross, Archives Div. 

State L., Springfield, 111. 6526. 
Norton, Ruth, In. Washington Jr. High 

Sch. L., Rochester, N. Y. 6952. 
Norval, Florence C., general asst. L. As- 

soc., Portland, Ore. 8487. 
Norville, Mrs. Marguerite I., Rolla, Mo. 

10424. 
Norwich, Conn., Otis L. (Imogene A. Cash, 

hi.) 100. 
Noyes, Fanny A., 1428 Peoples Gas Bldg., 

122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 5976. 
Noyes, Sara E., asst. Mass. State L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 9560. 
Nunns, Annie A., asst. supt. Wis. State 

Hist. Soc., Madison, Wis. 2289. 
Nute, Ethel M., asst. P. L., Waltham, 

Mass. 10265. 



Nuttall, Frank Emmett, In. University L., 
Kennedy St., Winnipeg, Man., Canada. 
11223. 

Nutting, George E., In. P. L., Fitchburg, 
Mass. 1721. 

Nye, Anna M., asst. In. Washington Town- 
ship L., Lynn, Ind. 11337. 

Nye, Lucie C., chief Br. Dept. F. L., Oak- 
land, Calif. 6478. 

Oahu College L. See Punahou Sch., Hono- 
lulu, T. H. 

Oak Park (111.) P. L. (Helen A. Bagley, 
In.) 4832. 

Oakland (Calif.) F. L. (Charles S. Greene, 
In.) 3758. 

Oakley, Sylvia, high sch. In. P. L., South 
Bend, Ind. 8797. 

Oaks, Catharine S., asst. In. Wells Coll. 
L., Aurora, N. Y. 5315. 

Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohio. (Azariah 
S. Root, In.) 4765. 

O'Brien, Richard, chairman Board of 
Commissioners F. P. L., St. John, N. B., 
Canada. 2002. 

O'Connell, Frances, In. P. High School L., 
Little Rock, Ark. 4724. 

O'Connor, Alice Keats, child. In. Seward 
Park Br. .P. L., N. Y. City. 5817. 

O'Connor, Mary -T., head Child. Dept. 
Price Hill Br. P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
7396. 

O'Connor, Rose A., hospital In. P. L., Sioux 
City, Iowa. 10266. 

O'Connor, Teresa G., P. L., Toronto, Ont., 
Can. 11274. 

O'Donoghue, Marie E., sr. asst. Jackson 
Sq. Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 10028. 

Oertli, Ena, asst. catlgr. James Jerome Hill 
Ref. L., St. Paul, Minn. 7859. 

Oftedal, Gunhild, In. Seven Corners Br. 
P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9917. 

Ogden, Alice Elizabeth, stud. L. Sch. of 
the New York P. L., N. Y. City. 10484. 

Ogden, E. Jane, 1st asst. Art and Music 
Dept. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 5773. 

Ogden, E. Lucy, asst. in charge Law L. 
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 
1745. 

Ogle, Rachel, In. Franklin Coll. L., Frank- 
lin, Ind. 6906. 



600 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 






Ohio State Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 

(Olive Jones, In.) 4346. 
Ohio Wesleyan University L., Delaware, 

Ohio. (Russell B. Miller, In.) 4565. 
Ohr, Cerene, supervisor of Branches P. L., 
, Indianapolis, Ind. 7541. 
Ohr, Elizabeth, head Sch. Ls. Div. P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 7542. 
Oklahoma City (Okla.) Carnegie L. (Mrs. 

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Oklahoma College for Women L., Chick- 

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City, Okla. (Mrs. J. R. Dale, sec'y.) 8818. 
Oklahoma Univ. L., Norman, Okla. (Jesse 

Lee Rader, In.) 5077. 
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Ground, In.) 10608. 
Oko, Adolph S., In. Hebrew Union Coll. L., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 4890. 
Olcott, Emma McElroy, In. Prospect Br. 

P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7755. 
Olcott, Florence, head Science Dept. P. L., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 5800. 
Olcott, Frances Jenkins, 1270 Ocean Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 1839. 
Olcott, Margaret T., asst. U. S. Dept. of 

Agriculture L., Washington, D. C. 8812. 
Oldeg, Helen, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 10133. 
Oldham, Annie Josephine, asst. General 

Ref. Dept. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9456. 
Oliphant, Anne Fox, child In. E. 79th St. 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10572. 
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5900. 
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Lincoln Sch., Teachers' Coll. L., 646 

Park Ave., N. Y. City. 7133. 
Olney, Eleanor, In. Carnegie F. L., Con- 

nellsville, Pa. 8346. 

Olschewsky, Johanna L., In. Inst. for Crip- 
pled and Disabled Men L., 245 E. 23rd 

St., N. Y. City. 7134. 
Olsen, Laura M., In. P. L., Eau Claire, 

Wis. 6658. 
Olson, Charlotte L., In. Stanton Park Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 10485. 
Olson, Nelle A., In. P. L., Buhl, Minn. 

4511. 
Olympia (Wash.) P. L. (Elizabeth Satter- 

thwaite, In.) 10397. 



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Rockford, 111. 9457. 

Open Court Publishing Company, 122 S. 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. (Catherine 
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Ophiils, Louise, medical In. Lane Medical 
L. of Stanford Univ., San Francisco, 
Calif. 5385. 

Orange County F. L., Santa Ana, Calif. 
(Margaret E. Livingston, In.) 11286. 

Oregon Agric. ColL L., Corvallis, Ore. 
(Lucy M. Lewis, In.) 6502. 

Oregon Univ. L., Eugene, Ore. (M. H. 
Douglass, In.) 6417. 

Ormes, Manly D., In. N. P. Coburn L. 
Colorado Coll., Colorado Springs, Colo. 
4564. 

Ormond, Margaret, 1st asst. East Liberty 
Br. P. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10658. 

Orr, Edna Dearth, In. F. P. L., Water- 
town, Wis. 7975. 

Orr, Mrs. L. B., Chicago, 111. 9407. 

Orr, Marion C., In. P. L., Idaho Falls, Ida- 
ho. 8174. 

Orwig, Florence, asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Toledo, Ohio. 10518. 

Osborn, George A., In. Rutgers Coll. L., 
New Brunswick, N. J. 1901. 

Osborn, Lyman P., trus. Peabody Inst. L., 
Peabody, Mass. 1731. 

Osborn, Mrs. Lyman P., member L. Com- 
mittee Peabody Institute L., Peabody, 
Mass. 9164. 

Osborn, Mary Louisa, In. State Normal 
Sch. L., Towson, Md. 6166. 

Osborne, Florence L., In. North Side Br. 
P. L., Omaha, Neb. 9135. 

Osborne, Florence M., head Catalog Dept. 
P. L., Lynn, Mass. 8529. 

Osborne, Frances S., chief Order Depart- 
ment P. L., Washington, D. C. 8175. 

Osborne, Lucy Eugenia, custodian of 
Chapin L., Williams Coll., Williams- 
town, Mass. 6948. 

Osborne, Ruth Blagge, head catlgr. P. L., 
Pasadena, Calif. 5432. 

Osgood, Mrs. Edward L., 221 Beacon St., 
Boston, Mass. 5699. 



HANDBOOK 



601 



Osgood, Mary A., In. Westport Br. P. L., 

Kansas City, Mo. 3534. 
Osgood, Mary M., In. P. L., Mt. Pleasant, 

Mich. 10134. 
O'Shaughnessy, Margaret C., prin. asst. P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 5447. 
Oshkosh (Wis.) P. L. (Edith K. Van 

Eman, In.) 4757. 
Osmotherly, Sue, In. F. P. L., Wilmette, 

111. 9415. 

Osterhout, F. L. See Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Osterloh, Selma, Adelbert Coll. L., West- 
ern Reserve Univ., Cleveland, Ohio. 

10573. 

O'Sullivan, Mary Isabelle, fellow in Eng- 
lish Bryn Mawr Coll., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

8235. 
Otis, Mabel L., supervisor of Branches 

Queens Borough P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 

5950. 

Otis L. See Norwich, Conn. 
Ottawa, 111., Reddick's L. (Vilda Prescott 

Beem, In.) 4844. 
Overfield, Mrs. C. P., trus. P. L., Salt 

Lake City, Utah. 8207. 
Overman, Ruth Anne, child. In. P. L., St. 

Louis, Mo. 9520. 
Overton, Clara L., In. High Sch. L., White 

Plains, N. Y. 8761. 
Overton, Florence, supervisor of Branches 

P. L., N. Y. City. 3605. 
Overton, Jacqueline M., child. In. 58th St. 

Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 8087. 
Ovitz, Delia G., In. State Normal Sch. L., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 4512. 
Owen, Esther B., 41 Willard St., Hartford, 

Conn. 2516. 
Owen, Ethel, principal 1. asst. Municipal 

Ref. L., Chicago, 111. 6217. 
OWEN, ETHEL, catlgr. P. Documents 

Office, Washington, D. C. 3115. Life 

member. 
Owens, Belle M., principal asst. in charge 

information Desk P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 

8260. 
Oxley, Mary, child. In. P. L., Pasadena, 

Calif. 6828. 

P. M. Musser P. L. See Muscatine, Iowa. 
Pack, Elsie Frances, In. Birchard L., Fre- 
mont, Ohio. 9279. 

Pack Mem. P. L. See Asheville, N. C. 
Packard, Virginia Morse, asst. In. F. P. 

L., Atlantic City, N. J. 9842. 



Paddock, Alice M., asst. L. of Hawaii, 
Honolulu, T. H. 4001. 

Paducah (Ky.) Carnegie P. L. (Harriet 
Boswell, In.) 4157. 

Page, Sally Scollay, In. P. L., Clarksburg, 
W. Va. 10864. 

Paine, Fantine C., asst. Ord. Dept. P. L., 
Providence, R. I. 8279. 

Paine, Paul M., In. P. L., Syracuse, N. Y. 
5731. 

Pajanovitch, Cecile, asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., St. Louis, Mo. 10135. 

Palen, Ruth, head shelf lister Univ. of Pa. 
L., Philadelphia, Pa. 1581. 

Palm, Elizabeth, In. charge Circ. Dept. 
Ore. State Agric. Coll. L., Corvallis, Ore. 
8019. 

Palmer, Alice W., trus. P. L., Holliston, 
Mass. 10267. 

Palmer, E. Lucile, ref. asst. Adelbert Coll. 
L., Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 10268. 

Palmer, Grace, In. Mo. State Teachers' 
Coll. L., Springfield, Mo. 9280. 

Palmer, Mrs. Harriet L., asst. In. and 
catlgr. James Blackstone 'Mem. L., Bran- 
ford, Conn. 2406. 

Palmer, Margaret, 7718 Imperial St., Edi- 
son Park, Chicago, 111. 3300. 

Palmer, Mary B., sec'y and dir. N. C. 
L. Commission, Raleigh, N. C. 4582. 

Palmer, Sarah, In. P. L., Red Oak, Iowa. 
9865. 

Palmer, Vera, Bernard Ginsburg Br. P. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 10866. 

Palmer, W. Millard, 310 Assoc. of Com- 
merce Bldg., Grand Rapids, Mich. 1525. 

Palmerlee, Dessa, apprentice P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 10865. 

Palo Alto (Calif.) P. L. (Frances D. Pat- 
terson, In.) 5750. 

Paltsits, Victor Hugo, chief American His- 
tory Div., keeper of Manuscripts, cura- 
tor of Spencer Collection, in charge of 
General Exhibitions, P. L., N. Y. City. 
4202. 

Panama Canal L., Balboa Heights, Canal 
Zone. 6592. 

Panjab University L., Lahore, India. (A. 
C. Woolner, In.) 7013. 

Paoli, Mrs. Minnie B., In. Public Square 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 1498. 



602 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 






Parham, Nellie E., In. Withers P. L., 
Bloomington, 111. 2221. 

Park, Charles V., asst. In. Stanford Univ. 
L., Stanford University, Calif. 7774. 

Parke, Thomas D., member L. Board P. 
L., Birmingham, Ala. 9647. 

Parker, Mrs. Blanche, In.-teacher A. L. 
Holmes Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 11019. 

Parker, Cora, In. High Sch. L., Anaheim, 
Calif. 7714. 

Parker, Elizabeth Leete, asst. In. Hudson 
Park Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 4333. 

Parker, Glen, mgr. L. Dept. Baker and 
Taylor Co., 354 Fourth Ave., N. Y. City. 
3908. 

Parker, Herbert C, Library Bureau, New 
Orleans, La. 10867. 

Parker, John, In. Peabody Inst. L., Balti- 
more, Md. 5472. 

PARKER, PHEBE, catlgr. Brown Univ. 
L., Providence, R. I. 2050. Life mem- 
ber. 

Parker, Ruth H., catlgr. State L., Mont- 
pelier, Vt. 9886. 

Parkinson, Herman O., In. Stockton F. P. 
L. and San Joaquin County L., Stock- 
ton, Calif. 8646. 

Parma, Rosamond, In. Law L. Univ. of 
Calif., Berkeley, Calif. 9137. 

Parmenter, James Parker, trus. Robbins 
L., Arlington, Mass. (Address, Court 
House, Boston, Mass.) 859. 

Parsons, Francis Henry, asst. in charge of 
Smithsonian Div. L. of Congress, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 903. 

Parsons, Harrison M., chief Dept. of Fi- 
nance and Equipment Queens Borough 
P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 8647. 

Parsons, Harry N., supt. of Circ. P. L., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 5357. 

Parsons, Mary Prescott, In. Morristown L., 
Morristown, N. J. 7002. 

Parsons (Kans.) High Sch. L. (Helen S. 
Bartlett, In.) 10533. 

Partch, Isa L., In. Osius Br. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 2882. 

Parthesius, Mrs. L. E., Soulard Br. P. L., 
St. Louis, Mo. 10574. 

Partlow, Fanny, 1st asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 8962. 

Partridge, Mira R., In. Morse Inst. L., 
Natick, Mass. 10029. 



Parvin, Newton R., In. Iowa Masonic L., 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 4377. 

Pasadena (Calif.) P. L. (Jeannette M. 
Drake, In.) 3568. 

Passaic (N. J.) P. L. (Maud I. Stull, In.) 
5738. 

Paterson (N. J.) F. P. L. (George F. Win- 
chester, In.) 514. 

Patten, Eunice Farnsworth, sr. asst. Macon 
Br. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 9993. 

Patten, Frank Chauncy, In. Rosenberg L., 
Galveston, Tex. 543. 

Patten, Katharine, In. Minneapolis Athe- 
naeum L., Minneapolis, Minn. 1871. 

Patterson, Edith, In. F. P. L., Pottsville, 
Pa. 5881. 

Patterson, J. Ritchie, chief Binderies Dept. 
P. L., Chicago, 111. 5590. 

Patterson, Lillian M., ref. In. Mt. Union 
Coll. L., Alliance, Ohio. 9710. 

Patterson L. See Westfield, N. Y. 

Patton, Adah, catalog In. Univ. of Illi- 
nois L., Urbana, 111. 2321. 

Patton, John S., In. Univ. of Va. L., Uni- 
versity, Va. 3663. 

Patton, Mollie M., catlgr. Yale University 
L., New Haven, Conn. 8838. 

Pauli, Adolph F., Hanover, Vt. 8246. 

Pawtucket, R. I., Deborah Cook Sayles P. 
L. (William Dean Goddard, In.) 403. 
Perpetual member. 

Paxson, Ruth M., head Sch. Dept. L. As- 
soc., Portland, Ore. 7139. 

Payne, Elon, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 10486. 

Payne, Mrs. Emma S., head Circ. Dept. 
P. L., Fort Wayne, Ind. 8924. 

Payne, Maud, asst. Periodical Div. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 9382. 

Peabody, Josephine, asst. Child Dept. Car- 
negie L., Atlanta, Ga. 8985. 

Peabody F. L. See Columbia City, Indiana. 

Peabody Institute L., Baltimore, Md. 
(John Parker, In.) 164. 

Pearce, Lillian E., asst. chief Travel. L. 
Dept. Queens Borough P. L., Jamaica, 
N. Y. 9194. 

Pearson, Harriet Angeline, asst In. N. D. 
Agric. Coll. L., Fargo, N. D. 6021. 

Pearson, Mary Keeling, In. Sterling Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5882. 



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603 



Peaslee, Mildred J., asst. In. P. L., Frank- 
lin, N. H. 8450. 

PECK, AMY E., jr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 
111. 9070. Life member. 

Peck, Edith M., In. P. L., Rockville, Conn. 
5986. 

Peck, Eunice E., In. Service Dept. U. S. 
Rubber Co. L., New Haven, Conn. 8648. 

Peck, Eva R-., in charge Business and Mu- 
nicipal Dept. P. L., Fort Wayne, Ind. 



Peck, George M., curator Special Collec- 
tions Princeton Univ. L., Princeton, N. 
J. 8649. 

PECK, HARRIET R., In. Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Inst. L., Troy, N. Y. 3657. 
Life member. 

Peck, Kate Strong, catlgr. P. L., Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. 2442. 

Peck, Norma Lee, In. Gresham Br. L. As- 
soc., Portland, Ore. 6830. 

Peek, Zona, In. Sul Ross State Normal 
Coll. L., Alpine, Tex. 6890. 

Peeples, Annalee, asst. Loan Desk Univ. 
of Missouri L., Columbia, Mo. 10659. 

Peeples, Ella L, hospital In. Wm. Beau- 
mont General Hospital L., El Paso, 
Tex. 10487. 

Peers, Esther, In. Manual Training High 
Sch. L., Kansas City, Mo. 8459. 

Peets, Margaret A., asst. Butzel Br. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11166. 

Peffer, Lillian, asst. P. L., Denver, Colo. 
8460. 

Pegan, Patience, In. North Side High Sch. 
L., Denver, Colo. 7140. 

Pehotsky, J. Lois B., asst. Miles Park Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10575. 

Peirce, Evangeline C., catlgr. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8949. 

Peking Teachers Coll. L., Peking, China. 
(T. Y. Chen, asst. In.) 9205. 

Penfield, Clara M., asst. catlgr. Minn. His- 
torical Society L., St. Paul, Minn. 11167. 

Penfield, Harriet Evelyn, sr. asst. The 
John Crerar L., Chicago, 111. 9322. 

Penfold, Florence, sr. asst. P. L., Chicago, 
111. 11296. 

Penley, Mrs. J. C., asst. in charge Order 
Dept. P. L., Pomona, Calif. 11020. 

Penniman, Jennie C., In. L. Assoc., Wind- 
sor, Vt. 8176. 



Pennock, Mrs. Elizabeth E., In. P. L., Car- 
thage, 111. 8089. 

Pennock, Maude M., In. P. L., Weston, 
Mass. 2978. 

Pennsylvania College for Women L., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. (Georgia Proctor, In.) 7886. 

Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruc- 
tion of the Blind, Philadelphia, Pa. (Sara 
K. Sterling, In.) (O. H. Burritt, prin- 
cipal) 6389. 

Pennsylvania Library Club (Pres,, A. S. 
W. Rosenbach, 1320 Walnut St., Phila- 
delphia; sec'y Martha Lee Coplin F. L., 
Philadelphia, Pa.) 3537. 

Pennsylvania R. W. Grand Lodge F. and 
A. M. L., Philadelphia, Pa. (J. E. Bur- 
nett Buckenham, In.) 10695. 

Pennsylvania State Coll. L., State College, 
Pa. (Erwin W. Runkle, In.) 6024. 

Pennsylvania State L. and Museum, Har- 
risburg, Pa. (George P. Donehoo, In.) 
3504. 

Pennsylvania University L., Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Asa Don Dickinson, In.) 3520. 

Penrose, Alma, In. Univ. High Sch. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 6403. 

Penrose, Kate A., Bloomingdale Br. P. L., 
N. Y. City. 8650. 

Peoples, William Thaddeus, In. emeritus 
Mercantile L., N. Y. City. 3. 

Peoria (111.) P. L. (Edwin Wiley, In.) 
6552. 

Ferine, Katherine Sayrs, In. High Sch. L., 
Watertown, N. Y. 10599. 

Perkins, Caroline B., In. in charge Chest- 
nut Hill Br. F. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
3153. 

Perkins Institution for the Blind L., Wa- 
tertown, Mass. (Laura M. Sawyer, In.) 
5110. 

Perley, Clarence Warner, chief Classifica- 
tion Div. L. of Congress, Washington, 
D. C. 2259. 

Perley, Edward E., asst. P. L., N. Y. City. 
8261. 

Perrin, John W., In. Case L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 11168. 

Perrin, Ruth H., Child. Dept. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 11169. 

Perrine, Cora Belle, head Purchasing Div. 
Acquisition Dept. Univ. of Chicago L., 
Chicago, 111. 1155. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Perry, Everett Robbins, In. P. L., Los An- 
geles, Calif. 2474. 

Perry, Leta, In. High Sch. L., Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 10030. 

Pert, Minnie W., asst. Cataloging and Ref- 
erence Dept. State L., Boston, Mass. 
10073. 

Perth Amboy (N. J.) F. P. L. (Edith Hall 
Crowell, In.) 7216. 

Peru (111.) P. L. (Fannie Snyder, In.) 
10925. 

Peru (Ind.) P. L. (Mrs. Eva May Fowler, 
In.) 5828. 

Peter White P. L. See Marquette, Mich. 

Peterkin, Gertrude D., In. Legal Dept. Am. 
Telephone and Telegraph Co. L., 15 Dey 
St., N. Y. City, 6088. 

Peters, Florence D., asst. in charge Science 
L. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
7142. 

Peters, Louise M., catlgr. Irving Nat'l Bank 
L., N. Y. City. 7143. 

Peters, Marie, sr. asst. Catalog Dept. P. 
L., Indianapolis, Ind. 10660. 

Peters, Orpha Maud, asst. In. P. L., Gary, 
Ind. 2926. 

Petersen, Agnes J., In. Milwaukee Jour- 
nal L., Milwaukee, Wis. 5992. 

Petersen, Grace Mary, In. Elyria L., 
Elyria, Ohio. 7853. 

Peterson, Mrs. Dwight, State L. Board 
Ohio State L., Toledo, Ohio. (Address: 
14 The Lincoln Apartment) 11253. 

Peterson, Ethel O., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 10661. 

Pettee, Julia, head catlgr. Union Theo- 
logical Seminary L., N. Y. City. 2511. 

Petterson, Esther L., sr. asst. P. L., De- 
troit, Mich. 8312. 

Pettigrew, Mrs. Anna W. E., In. Br. Agric. 

Coll. of Utah L., Cedar City, Utah. 11068. 

Pettingell, Frank Hervey, 1st vice-pres. 

Board of Dir. P. L., Los Angeles, Calif. 

9648. 

Pettit, Dorothy B., asst. Circ. Desk Univ. 

of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 10742. 

Petty, Annie F., asst. sec'y and dir. North 

Carolina L. Com., Raleigh, N. C. 3230. 

Peugh, Mrs. J. Winfield, member Board 

of Dir. P. L., Waltham, Mass. 10271. 

Phelan, John F., chief of Branches P. L., 

Chicago. 111. 4681. 



Phelps, Edith Allen, In. P. L., Paso Robles, 

Calif. 3058. 
Phelps, Edith M., sec'y H. W. Wilson Co., 

N. Y. City. 7145. 
Phelps, Narcissa, asst. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 

10868. 
Phelps, Rose B., 629 Forest Ave., Ann 

Arbor, Mich. 11244. 

Phelps, Veva Deal, In. High Sch. L., Pel- 
ham, N. Y. 10488. 
Philadelphia (Pa.) Commercial Museum L. 

(John J. Macfarlane, In.) 5125. 
Philadelphia (Pa.) F. L. (John Ashhurst, 

In.) 1837. Perpetual member. 
Philadelphia (Pa.) See also Drexel Insti- 
tute L. and Drexel Institute L. Sch. 
Philbrick, Hazel, 1st asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Birmingham, Ala. 7955. 
Philippine Library and Museum, Manila, 

P. I. (Jose Zurbito, acting dir.) 5039. 
Philips, Ida, 1st asst. P. L., East Chicago, 

Ind. 5353. 
Phillips, Dorothy L., asst. Loan Desk P. L., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 10869. 
Phillips, Edna, In. Franklin Br. F. P. L., 

East Orange, N. J. 10489. 
Phillips, Florence L., asst. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 10870. 
Phillips Academy L., Andover, Mass. 

(Sarah L. Frost, In.) 5290. 
Phinney, H. K., asst. In. Univ. of Roches- 
ter L., Rochester, N. Y. 607. 
Phoenix (Ariz.) Carnegie P. L. (Mrs. 

Maude Hiatt Clausen, In.) 6111. 
Pickering, Rose C., asst. Carnegie L., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 11021. 
Pickett, Amelia T., In. P. L., Pottstown, 

Pa. 8090. 
Pickett, Frances, In. Judson Coll. Carnegie 

L., Marion, Ala. 4716. 
Pieplow, William L., mem. Board of Trus. 

P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. (Address: 926 

23rd Ave.) 11069. 
Pierce, Anne, In. Carnegie L., Charlotte, 

N. C. 5287. 
Pierce, Frances M., asst. In. Forest Park 

Br. City. L., Springfield, Mass. 2873. 
Pierce, Mrs. Ruth, In. Lents Br. L. Assoc., 

Portland, Ore. 8992. 
Pierson, Esther, asst. Ref. Dept. P. L., 

Kansas City, Mo. 9561. 
Pierson, Harriet Wheeler, asst. Catalog 



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605 



Div. Society Publications Section L. of 

Congress, Washington, D. C. 2743. 
P1ERSON, STELLA H., In. Teacher 

Training L., Kansas City, Mo. 9953. 

Life member. 
Pike, Mildred H., asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Sioux City, Iowa. 11333. 
Pilcher, Margaret L., 1st asst. Ref. Dept. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 7252. 
Pillow, Mrs. M. Y., 65 S. llth St., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 7265. 
Pillsbury, Avis Miller, catlgr. Univ. of 

North Dakota L., Grand Forks, N. D. 

10148. 
Pillsbury, Mary B., catlgr. Vassar Coll. L., 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 7459. 
Pillsbury, Mary M., In. General Theolog- 
ical L., Boston, Mass. 7012. 
Pillsbury, Olive E., In. Lewis Institute Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 3792. 
Pine, Mrs. Elsie Howard, ref. asst. State 

Manual Training Nor. Sch. L., Pittsburg, 

Kan. 10919. 
Pine Island, Minn., Van Horn P. L. (Mrs. 

Claude C. Perkins, In.) 9255. 
Pinneo, Dorothy, F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 

7756. 
Pinneo, Dotha Stone, In. P. L., Norwalk, 

Conn. 1670. 
Pipestone (Minn.) P. L. (Mrs. May C. 

Funk, In.) 9294. 
Pirritte, Lida M., sr. asst. Ogden Park 

Br. P. L., Chicago, 111. 10662. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. C. C. Mellor Memorial 

L. 11258. 
Pittsburgh (Pa.) Carnegie L. (John H. 

Leete, dir.) 1458. 
Pittsburgh (Pa.) Carnegie L. Sch., a dept. 

of the Carnegie Inst. (John H. Leete, 

dir.; Nina C. Brotherton, principal.) 

3217. 
Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. Allegheny Carnegie 

F. L. (E. E. Eggers, In.) 5812. 
Pittsburgh Univ. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. (J. 

Howard Dice, In.) 6134. 
Place, Frank, Jr., asst. N. Y. Academy of 

Medicine L., 17-21 West 43d St., N. Y. 

City. 5638. 
Place, Lois T., In. P. L., Mt. Clemens, 

Mich. 11170. 

Plainfield (N. J.) P. L. (Florence M. Bow- 
man, In.) 4263, 



Plasman, Helen Louise, head Shelf Div. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9459. 
Plass, Joseph, G. E. Stechert and Co., 151 

W. 25th St., N. Y. City. 6357. 
Platte County P. L., Wheatland, Wyo. 

(Beatrice Lucas, In.) 7909. 
Plumb, Margaret Grant, asst. In. Hunter 

Coll. L., N. Y. City. 9460. 
Plumb, Ruth W., general asst. Hackley P. 

L., Muskegon, Mich. 10576. 
Plumb Memorial L. See Shelton, Conn. 
Plummer, Alice R., br. In. P. L., Salem, 

Mass. 10106. 
Pockman, Eleanor A., sr. asst. Tompkins 

Sq. Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 10149. 
Podlasky, Martha, sr. catlgr. P. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 10380. 
Poland, Myra, In. Osterhout F. L., Wilkes- 

Barre, Pa. 2026. 
POLK, MARY, In. Bureau of Science L., 

Manila, P. I. 4249. Life member. 
Pollard, Annie Archer, 2nd asst. In. P. 

L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 2190. 
Pollock, Eleanor, jr. asst. P. L., Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 9363. 
Pollock, Mary H., ref. In. P. L., Salem, 

Mass. 2561. 
Pomeroy, Edith Mary, head Order Dept. 

Pratt Inst. F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 973. 
Pomeroy, Elizabeth, 1. supervisor U. S. 

Veterans' Bureau, 4649 Drexel Blvd., 

Chicago, 111. 7665. 
Pomeroy, Phebe G., teacher-ln. Lakewood 

High Sch., Lakewood, Ohio. 7360. . 
Pomona (Calif.) P. L. (Sarah M. Jacobus, 

In.) 4309. 
Ponca City (Okla.) High Sch. L, (Mrs. 

C. H. Wady, In.) 10534. 
Ponca City (Okla.) Carnegie L. (Leah 

Buchheimer, In.) 10535. 
Pond, Elizabeth Maltby, In. Stevens Mem. 

L., North Andover, Mass. 1968. 
Pond, Martha E., In. P. L., Manitowoc, 

Wis. 6796. 

Pond, Martha T., In South Br. P. L., Sa- 
lem, Mass. 10107. 
Ponder, Wilma E., In. Proviso Township 

High Sch. L., Maywood, 111. 10600. 
Ponton, Mrs. Maude S., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Alexandria, Va. 9649. 
Pool, E. Millicent, asst. In. Internat'l La- 
bour Office L., Geneva, Switzerland. 

10686. 



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AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Poole, Franklin Osborne, In. Assoc. of the 

Bar L., N. Y. City. 1761. 
Poole, Gladys, In. Ensley High Sch. Br. P. 

L., Birmingham, Ala. 10490. 
Pooley, Mary Helen, In. East High Sch. 

L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 5663. 
Pope, Ethel M., asst. F. L., Newton, Mass. 

10074. 

Pope, Mildred H., state organizer L. Ex- 
tension Div. State Educ. Dept., Albany, 

N. Y. 6907. 
Poray, Aniela, In. Northeastern High Sch. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 2893. 
Port Huron (Mich.) P. L. (Constance Be- 

ment, In.) 4780. 
Porter, Annabel, head Child. Dept. P. L., 

Tacoma, Wash. 2942. 
Porter, Annie S., In. Greenville P. L., 

Greenville, S. C. 8530. 
Porter, Mrs. Cora Case, In. Carnegie P. L., 

Enid, Okla. 6005. 
Porter, Josephine W., In. P. L., Asbury 

Park, N. J. 8208. 
Porter, Washington T., pres. trus. P. L., 

Cincinnati, 'Ohio. (Address, 708 Fourth 

National Bank Bldg.) 2307. 
Portland (Ore.) L. Assoc. (Anne M. Mul- 

heron, In.) 3954. 
Porto Rico Carnegie L., San Juan, Porto 

Rico. (Manuel Fernandez Juncos, In.) 

5211. 
Post, Orpha L., child. In. Carnegie West 

Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5363. 
Potter, Alfred Claghorn, asst. In. Harvard 

Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. 1600. 
Potter, Alice Elizabeth, Periodical Record 

Harper Mem. L. Univ. of Chicago, Chi- 
cago, 111. 5708. 
Potter, Mrs. Elizabeth Gray, asst. In. 

American L. in Paris, Inc., 10 rue de 1'E- 

lysee, Paris, France. 5349. 
Potter, Hope L., In. High Sch. L., Red- 
lands, Calif. 10491. 
Potter, Mildred B., In. Butzel Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8313. 
Potts, Marian E., corps In. Third Corps 

Area, Baltimore, Md. 7545. 
Pottsville (Pa.) P. L. (Edith Patterson, 

In.) 9859. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Adriance Mem. L. 

(Marion F. Dutcher, In.) 9007. 
Powell, Elizabeth B., In. P. L., Missoula, 

Mont. 5688. 



Powell, Mrs. F. W., 3705 McKinley St., 
Chevy Chase, Washington, D. C. 8771. 

*Powell, Mrs. L. L., In. P. L., Cairo, 111. 
8262. 

Powell, Lillian J., asst. catlgr. P. L., Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 8963. 

Powell, Lucia F., In. Kemp P. L., Wichita 
Falls, Texas. 9966. 

Powell, Lucy Lee, asst. Order Dept. P. L., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 7546. 

Powell, Mable, In. Lake Forest Coll. L., 
Lake Forest, 111. 8865. 

Powell, Margaret, jr. asst. P. L., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 10871. 

Powell, Mary, chief Art Dept. P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 8609. 

Power, Erne L., dir. Work with Child. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 1453. 

Power, Leonore St. John, In. in charge 
Central Children's Rm. P. L., N. Y. City. 
6358. 

Power, Ralph L., care of Univ. of Southern 
Calif., Los Angeles, Calif. 6944. 

Powner Co., The Charles T., 177 W. Mad- 
ison St., Chicago, 111. 11082. 

Prall, Beatrice, In. P. L., Little Rock, Ark. 
8236. 

Pratt, Adelene J., In. Burlington County 
L., Mt. Holly, N. J. 5577. 

Pratt, Anne Stokely, asst. ref. In. Yale 
Univ. L., New Haven, Conn. 5333. 

Pratt, Gladys F., asst. Univ. of 111. L., Ur- 
bana, 111. 8977. 

Pratt Institute F. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. (Ed- 
ward F. Stevens, In.) 4362. 

Prescott, Harriet Beardslee, supervisor 
Catalog Dept. Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. 
City. 733. 

Pressey, Julia C., asst. Central Missouri 
State Teachers' Coll. L., Warrensburg, 
Mo. 11283. 

Prest, Marion, sec'y to In. P. L., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 9757. 

Preston, Mrs. Nellie Andrus, In. Douglas 
L., Canaan, Conn. 9843. 

Preston, Nina Kate, reviser Catalog Dept. 
Univ. of Mich. General L., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 3897. 

Pretlow, Mary Denson, In. P. L., Nor- 
folk, Va. 7633. 

Prevost, Marie Louise, head catlgr. F. P. 
L., Newark, N. J. 5214. 



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607 



Price, Anna M., supt. L. Extension Div. 
State L., Springfield, 111. 2288. 

Price, Christine, sr. asst. Catalog Dept. 
Univ. of Calif L., Berkeley, Calif. 10492. 

Price, Franklin H., business agent F. L., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 4867. 

Price, Helen L., In. Univ. High Sch. L., 
Oakland, Calif. 2300. 

Price, Marian, In. Parlin Mem. L., Eve- 
rett, Mass. 5250. 

Price, Miles O., In. U. S. Patent Office L., 
Washington, D. C. 9058. 

Princeton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. (James 
Thayer Gerould, In.) 1077. 

Pritchard, Martha Caroline, supervisor 
of Sch. Ls. City of Detroit, Detroit, Mich. 
(Address: 508 Yost Bldg.) 6120. 

Pritchett, Betty H., In. Coe Coll. L., Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 6238. 

Proctor, Frederick T., trus. P. L., Utica, 
N. Y. 2201. 

Proctor, Lucy B., In. Gilbert Sch. L., Win- 
sted, Conn. 10273. 

Prout, Vera, asst. Sch. Div. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 8426. 

Prouty, Edythe A., supervisor L. Stations 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 7149. 

Prouty, Gratia L., in charge Engineering 
Dept. L. Western Electric Co., 463 West 
St., N. Y. City. 11022. 

Prouty, Helen G., asst. Federal Reserve 
Bank L., Cleveland, Ohio. 7150. 

Prouty, Louise, vice-In. P. L., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 3705. 

Providence Athenaeum, Providence, R. I. 
(Grace F. Leonard, In.) 4238. 

Providence (R. I.) P. L. (William E. Fos- 
ter, In.) 4283. 

Public Service Corporation of N. J. Tech- 
nical L. See N. J. Public Service Cor- 
poration Technical L. 

Pugsley, Maud Mary, Business Women's 
Club, 144 Bowdoin St., Boston, Mass. 
2445. 

Pullman P. F. L., Pullman, Chicago, 111. 
(Bertha S. Ludlam, In.) 8746. 

Pulsifer, Pauline F., catlgr. P. L., Haver- 
hill, Mass. 10274. 

Punahou School L., Oahu Coll., Honolulu, 
T. H. (Mabel M. Hawthorne, In.) 4221. 



Purdue Univ. L., Lafayette, Ind. (W. M. 

Hepburn, In.) 5020. 
Purer, William A., supt. Delivery Station 

Dept. P. L., Chicago, 111. 7441. 
Purinton, Mrs. R. B., 1443 Cuyler Ave., 

Chicago, 111. 9822. 
Putnam, Bernice F., asst. P. L., Waltham, 

Mass. 10275. 
Putnam, Elizabeth G., child. In. Walker Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich., 8772. 
Putnam, Herbert, In. L. of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 558. 
Putnam, Sarah M., high sch. asst. Cass 

Tech. High Sch., Detroit, Mich. 11171. 
Queens Borough P. L., Jamaica, N. Y. 

(John C. Atwater, dir.) 3947. 
Quigley, Margery C., In. F. L., Endicott, 

N. Y. 8092. 
Quigley, May G., chief Child. Dept. P. L., 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 5339. 
Quimby, Cora A., In. P. L., Winchester, 

Mass. 1735. 
Quinby, M. Gladys, child. In. F. L., Orange, 

N. J. 8652. 

Quincy, Mass. Thomas Crane P. L. (Tru- 
man R. Temple, In.) 5823. 
Quinlan, Margaret A., child, asst. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 11172. 
Quinn, Antoinette, In. Layton Park Br. P. 

L., Milwaukee, Wis. 9995. 
Quinn, Marietta, asst. Ginsburg Br. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 8314. 

Quire, Joseph H., law In. State L., Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 7840. 
Racine (Wis.) P. L. (Frances A. Hannum, 

In.) 5944. 
Radcliffe, Alice B., In. Lisbon Ave. Br. P. 

L., Milwaukee, Wis. 10381. 
Radcliffe Coll. L., Cambridge, Mass. (Rose 

Sherman, In.) 10536. 

Rademaekers, William H. and Son, L. Bin- 
ders, Newark, N. J. 7979. 
Rader, Jesse Lee, In. Univ. of Okla. L., 

Norman, Okla. 7306. 
Radford, Jane R., stud. L. Sch. Univ. of 

Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 11334. 
Radford, Mary R., catlgr. State Normal 

Sch. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 5774. 
Rae, Robina, III. American Red Cross L., 

Washington, D. C. 5815. 
Rains, Mary D., child In. P. L., Hibbing, 

Minn. 6815. 



608 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



Raisler, Viola, In. P. L., Shawano, Wis. 

10382. 
Ralston, Lucile, attendant P. L., Omaha, 

Neb. 9711. 
RANCK, SAMUEL H., In. P. L., Grand 

Rapids, Mich. 949. Life member. 
Ranck, Mrs. Samuel H., Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 11173. 
Rand, Eva E., headi of Classification P. L., 

Bang-or, Me. 10577. 

Randall, Bertha T., 25 Adrian Court, Seat- 
tle, Wash. 2938. 
Randall, Elinor Edna, In. Malheur County 

L., Ontario, Ore. 7725. 
Raney, M. L., In. Johns Hopkins Univ. L., 

Baltimore, Mel. 4558. 
Rank, Zelia, catlgr. Colo. Agric. Coll. L., 

Fort Collins, Colo. 6480. 
Rankin, George W., In. P. L., Fall River, 

Mass. 1423. 
Rankin, Helen G., asst. In. Haughville Br. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8383. 
Rankin, Helen M., Municipal Ref. Div. F. 

L., Philadelphia, Pa. 9887. 
Rankin, Hilda, catlgr. Detroit Teachers 

Coll. L., Detroit, Mich. 10578. 
Rankin, Ina, asst. In. Cass Technical High 

Sch. L., Detroit, Mich. 5566. 
Rankin, Rebecca B., In. Municipal Ref. L., 

N. Y. City. 8653. 

Ranney, Helen L., asst. P. L., East Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 9946. 
Rapp, Ruth, asst. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 

11174. 
Rathbone, Georgia W., In. Y. W. C. A. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 2768. 
Rathbone, Josephine A., vice-dir. Sch. of 

L. Science, Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

961. 
Rawlins, Mary Starr, asst. In. Riverside Br. 

P. L., 190 Amsterdam Ave., N. Y. City. 

9844. 
Rawson, Fannie C., sec'y and dar. Kentucky 

L. Commission, Frankfort, Ky. 5021. 
Ray, Elizabeth C., 1st asst. P. L., Holyoke, 

Mass. 2490. 
Ray, Ella G., asst. Butzel Br. P. L., Detroit, 

Mich. 8315. 
Ray, Richard, Jr., In. Boston Y. M. C. 

Union L., 48 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

2138. 
Rayle, Maurine, asst. Br. Dept. and Offi- 



cial Poster Maker P. L., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 8384. 

Raymond, Dorothy S., Gowanda, N. Y. 
10108. 

Read, Albert C., prin. Order Dept. P. L., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 2858. 

Read, Carrie E., In. Barre Town L., Barre, 
Mass. 10031. 

Read, Helen S., chief Order Dept. P. L., 
Kansas City, Mo. 6716. 

Read, Jennie M., child. In. Jones L., Inc., 
Amherst, Mass. 7699. 

Reading (Mass.) Woman's Club. 10537. 

Reardon, John H., Information Office P. 
L., Boston, Mass. 9918. 

Reavis, W. Elmo, mgr. Pacific L. Bind- 
ing Co., 210 E. Washington St., Los An- 
geles, Calif. 6035. 

Rebenklan, F. Margaret, sr. asst. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 9759. 

Rechcygl, Edith A., In. P. L., Antigo, Wis. 
10493. 

Reddick's L. See Ottawa, 111. 

Redfield, Jennie L., asst. P. L., Bay City, 
Mich. 11175. 

Redlands, Calif. A. K. Smiley P. L. (Gwen- 
dolyn M. Tinker, acting In.) 5186. 

Redstone, Edward H., In. State L., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 7151. 

Redwood L. and Athenaeum. See New- 
port, R. I. 

Reece, Ernest J., principal L. Sch. of the 
New York P. L., N. Y. City. 5530. 

Reed, Bessie J., In. High Sch. L., Fairmont, 
W. Va. 7152. 

Reed, Doris Mary, asst. Ref. Dept. Colum- 
bia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 10033. 

Reed, Mrs. Elizabeth T., In. Dorchester 
Br. P. L., Boston, Mass. 10032. 

Reed, Ethel, In. P. L., Brook, Ind. 11023. 

Reed, Jessie E., In. Sheridan Br. P. L., 
Chicago, 111. 7249. 

Reed, Katherine, In. Lombard Coll. L., 
Galesburg, 111. 6493. 

Reed, Laurabell, Sch. Brs. P. Sch. L., Bat- 
tle Creek, Mich. 11024. 

Reed, Lois A., In. Bryn Mawr Coll. L., 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 3034. 

Reed, Lulu Ruth, head catlgr. Univ. of 
Kansas L., Lawrence, Kan. 7750. 

Reed, Susan H., Muhlenberg Br. P. L., 
209 W. 23 St., N. Y. City. 2782. 



HANDBOOK 



609 



Reader, Charles W., ref. In. Ohio State 
Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 4863. 

Reely, M. Grace, In. High Sch. L., Boise, 
Idaho. 8887. 

Reely, Mary Katharine, in charge Book 
Selection Wis. F. L. Commission, Madi- 
son, Wis. 10429. 

Reese, Rena, 1st asst. P. L., Denver, Colo. 
4968. 

Reeve, Miriam Disbrow, catlgr. P. L. v 
N. Y. City. 10743. 

Reeve, Wilma E., asst. Sch. Ls. Div. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 9365. 

Regnart, Mrs. Ora Marie, In. San Benito 
County L., Hollister, Calif. 8541. 

Rehnquist, Mamie Elizabeth, head ref. asst. 
P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 10383. 

Reich, Pauline, In. Carnegie West Br. P. 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 5902. 

Reichert, Mary L., ref. In. P. L., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo. 6671. 

Reid, Adelia, South Weare, N. H. 4931. 

Reid, Jeanie M., In. West End Br. Car- 
negie L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 9416. 

Reider, Joseph, asst. In. Dropsie Coll. L., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 6931. 

Reinecke, Clara M., sr. asst. P. L., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 3731. 

Reinke, Caroline E., ref. In. P. L., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 5665. 

Reins, Alice W., teacher In. Baltimore City 
Coll. L., Baltimore, Md. 5611. 

Reisland, Mrs. Anna M., In. Woodland Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 8038. 

Reissman, Gertrude, In. Research L. East- 
man Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y. 10150. 

Reiter, Miriam B., trus. P. L., Miamisburg, 
Ohio. 10277. 

Remfry, Elizabeth, High Sch. L., Proctor, 
Minn. 11312. 

Remick, Grace M., 130 Gladstone Ave., De- 
troit, Mich. 11176. 

Remley, Elsie Jeannette, asst. Ref. Dept. 
Iowa Univ. L., Iowa City, Iowa. 7584. 

Remsberg, Helen, asst. Univ. Br. P. L., 
Seattle, Wash. 9761. 

Reque, Anna C., In. American Scandinav- 
ian Foundation L., 25 West 45th St., N. 
Y. City. 5467. 

Resor, Marguerite Burnet, head catlgr. 
Univ. of Cincinnati L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
7548. 



Reutter, Mary E., In. Memorial P. L., 

Alexandria, Pa. 9316. 
Rex, Frederick, In. Municipal Ref. L., 1005 

City Hall, Chicago, 111. 6463. 
Rey, Florence M., child. In. Pacific Br. P. 

L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10579. 
Reynolds, Mabel Marie, In. State Normal 

Sch. L., Cheney, Wash. 3344. 
REYNOLDS, MARGARET, In. First 

Wisconsin Nat'l Bank L., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 4135. Life member. 
Reynolds, Marian E., br. In. P. L., Kalama- 

zoo, Mich. 10278. 
Rhode Island State L., Providence, R. I. 

(Herbert O. Brigham, In.) 4257. 
Rhodes, Gertrude, In. High Sch. L., Stam- 
ford, Conn. 8532. 
Rhodes, Isabella K., instructor N. Y. State 

L. Sch., Albany, N. Y. 4355. 
Ribenack, Dorothy M., asst. Catalog Dept. 

L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 10663. 
Rice, Edith, In. Hunter Coll. High Sch. 

L., N. Y. City. 2236. 
Rice, Frances V., In. Lincoln Centre Br. 

P. L., Chicago, 111. 6933. 
Rice, Mrs. J. Merritt, Lakewood, White 

Bear Lake, Minn. 5765. 
Rice, John W., class. Princeton Univ. L., 

Princeton, N. J. 9954. 
Rice, O. S., state supervisor of Sch. Ls. 

State Dept. of Education, Madison, Wis. 

6864. 
Rice, Paul North, chief Preparation Div. 

P. L., N. Y. City. 5331. 
Rich, Thelma, asst. Lindenwood Coll. L., 

St. Charles, Mo. 10519. 
Richards, Clara Alida, In. Masonic Grand 

Lodge L., Fargo, N. D. 6360. 
Richards, Elizabeth M., asst. L. of W. A. 

Gilchrist, 122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 

111. 5274. 
Richards, Mrs. Helen M., head Travel. L. 

Dept. F. P. L. Commission, Montpelier, 

Vt. 9231. 
Richards, John S., In. Washington State 

Normal Sch. L., Ellensburg, Wash. 

9030. 
Richards Mem. L. See North Attleborough, 

Mass. 
Richardson, Carrie L., sec'y Board of 

Trus. P. L., Ilion, N. Y. 8094. 
Richardson, Ernest Gushing, dir. Prince- 
ton Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 395. 



610 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 






Richardson, Helen K., asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 8385. 
Richard'son, Louise, In. Florida State Coll. 

for Women L., Tallahassee, Fla. 8435. 
Richardson, (Miss) M. M., asst. Technol- 
ogy Div. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10872. 
Richardson, Mary C, head L. Dept. State 

Normal Sch., Geneseo, N. Y. 6243. 
Richardson Mem. L. See Sugar Hill, N. 

H. 
Richmond, Lucy C., head Delivery Dept. 

City L. Assoc., Springfield, Mass. 2451. 
Rider, Gertrude T., in charge of Work and 

Books for the Blind L. of Congress, 

Washington, D. C. 6089. 
Ridgway, Amy, In. Spring Garden Br. F. 

L., Philadelphia, Pa. 6752. 
Rieley, Mabel, 5524 Kenwood Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 9315. 
Ries, Donna L, catlgr. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 9650. 
Riggs, Henrietta S., catlgr. Card Div. L. 

of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6056. 
Riggs, Winifred, catalog In. P. L., Toledo, 

Ohio. 3035. 
Rigling, Alfred, In. Franklin Inst. L., 15 

So. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 771. 
Ringier, Fanny, 1259 Vermont St., Quincy, 

111. 11177. 
Ringier, Margaret, In. F. P. L., Quincy, 

111. 2278. 
Ringier, Nada Dover, 642 Ohio St., Quincy, 

111. 11025. 
Rinta, Mary E., 1st asst. West Technical 

High Sch. Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 

8997. 
Ripley, Mrs. E. Bradford, 431 Prospect 

Ave., Hartford, Conn, 8107. 
Aippey, Mrs. Mary Stephens, asst. Army 

War Coll. L., Washington, D. C. 9712. 
Rippier, Maude, In. Operations L. Federal 

Power Commission, Interior Bldg., 

Washington, D. C. 10151. 
Ritchie, Ada M., In. Scott High Sch. L., 

Toledo, Ohio. 11224. 
Ritchie, Elizabeth P., head catlgr. State 

Agric. Coll. L., Corvallis, Ore. 7640. 
RITCHIE, JOHN, Washington Place, 

Maiden, Mass. 2694. Life member. 
Ritter, Clement V., bookseller, 345 Old 

Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 6501. 
Ritter, Jessie L., asst. P. L., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 1411. 



Riverside (Calif.) P. L. (Charles F. Woods, 

In.) 4253. 
Roanoke (Va.) P. L. (Pearl Hinesley, 

acting In.) 10091. 
Robb, Mary G., 4160 Lewis Ave., Toledo, 

Ohio. 8790. 

Robbins, Caira, trus. Robbins P. L., Ar- 
lington, Mass. 10359. 
Robbins, Jessie A., jr. asst. Catalog Dept. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9651. 
Robbins, Mary Esther, asst. In. Syracuse 

Univ. L. and professor of L. Science 

Syracuse Univ. L. Sch., Syracuse, N. Y. 

963. 

Robbins, Pamelia F., In. P. L., Southing- 
ton, Conn. 10279. 
Robert, Grace Louise, revjser Catalog 

Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 8348. 
Roberts, Blanche C., vice and child. In. P. 

L., Columbus, Ohio. 4966. 
Roberts, Mrs. Blanche W., In. Bates Coll. 

L., Lewiston, Me. 4683. 
Roberts, Erne I., In. Carnegie L., Wabash, 

Ind. 5834. 
Roberts, Ethel Dane, In. Wellesley Coll. 

L., Wellesley, Mass. 4003. 
Roberts, Etta M., In. P. L., Wheeling, W. 

Va. 8655. 
Roberts, Flora B., In. P. L., Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 2115. 

Roberts, Georgia E., asst. to In. The Rocke- 
feller Foundation L., N. Y. City. 9713. 
Roberts, Jane E., chief Accessions Div. 

Ohio State L., Columbus, Ohio. 4391. 
Roberts, Katharine Olcott, child. In. P. L.,j 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 7315. 
Roberts, Louise, In. Woodlawn High Sch. 

L., Birmingham, Ala. 6514. 
Roberts, Martin A., asst. chief clerk L. of 

Congress, Washington, D. C. 3451. 
Roberts, Mary Hilda, asst. ref. In. State 

L., Indianapolis, Ind. 5323. 
Robertson, Anne Martin, head East Side 

Br. P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 11070. 
Robertson, Blanche, 1st asst. Tech. Dept. 

P. L., Seattle, Wash. 6406. 
Robertson, Eleanor M., catalog reviser 

Univ. of 111. L., Urbana, 111. 5822. 
Robertson, Florence R., In. of Branches 

P. L., Hartford, Conn. 8451. 
Robertson, Gertrude M., asst. Ref. Div. 

P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 9201. 
Robertson, Josephine Chester, head card 



HANDBOOK 



611 



Dept. Univ. of Chicago L., Chicago, 111. 

1619. 
Robeson, Julia G., In. Richmond Hill High 

Sch. L., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 3020. 
Robie, Amelia H., child In. Butzel Br. 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 6491. 
Robinson, Agnes M., In. Matson P. L., 

Princeton, 111. 9281. 
Robinson, Caroline E., child. In. P. L., 

Gary, Ind. 9462. 
Robinson, Edith E., In. P. L., Wellington, 

Ohio. 11178. 
Robinson, Elizabeth, chief Sch. Div. P. L., 

St. Paul, Minn. 6719. 
Robinson, Gertrude H., 5 Lincoln Hall, 

Trinity Ct., Boston, Mass. 7854. 
Robinson, Julia A., executive sec'y Iowa 

L. Commission, Des Moines, Iowa. 5026. 
Robinson, L. M., dir. Philadelphia Divinity 

Sch. L., 42nd and Locust Sts., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 3314. 
Robinson, Lydia G., ed. of Publications P. 

L., Chicago, 111. 2316. 
Robinson, Mabel Frances, asst. catlgr. Os- 

terhout F. L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 2053. 
Robinson, Marguerite, In. State Normal 

Sch. L., Cortland, N. Y. 10276. 
ROBINSON, MORGAN P., state archivist 

Va. State L., Richmond, Va. 7775. Life 

member. 
Robinson, Sarita, head Catalog Dept. P. 

L., Sioux City, Iowa. 9077. 
Robinson, Sylvia, expert catlgr. P. L., 26 

Brevoort Place., Brooklyn, N. Y. 3852. 
Robison, Emily, 304 West 3rd St., Blooms- 
burg, Pa. 5951. 
Robson, Gertrude E., asst. In. John Carter 

Brown L., Providence, R. I. 10281. 
Robson, Norma, asst. Mott Br. P. L., To- 
ledo, Ohio. 10580. 
Rochester (N. Y.) P. L. (William F. Yust, 

In.) 5618. 
Rochester University L., Rochester, N. Y. 

(Donald B. Gilchrist, In.) 4267. 
Rock, Katharine H., In. P. L., Greenville, 

Pa. 8781. 
Rock Island (111.) P. L. (Ellen Gale, In.) 

6577. 
Rockford (III) P. L. (Jane P. Hubbell, 

In.) 7394. 
Rockingham F. P. L. See Bellows Falls, 

Vt 



Rockport (Mass.) P. L. (Mabel L. Wood- 
fall, In.) 6112. 

Rockwell, Anna G., asst. Pamphlet Dept. 
F. P. L., Newark, N. J. 809. 

Rockwell, Elizabeth L., In. P. L., Goshen, 
Ind. 6063. 

Rockwell, Helen E., organizer L. Exten- 
sion Div. State L. and Museum, Harris- 
burg, Pa. 6427. 

Rockwood, Eleanor Ruth, head Ref. Dept. 
L. Assoc., Portland, Ore. 3393. 

Roden, Carl B., In. P. L., Chicago, 111. 
2283. 

Roden, Mrs. Carl B., care of P. L., Chicago, 
111. 6264. 

Rodier, Ruth E., In. U. S. Veterans' Hos- 
pital No. 32L., Washington, D. C. 8814. 

Roeder, Alice E., In. P. L., Wyomissing, 
Pa. 8657. 

Roehrig, Ruth K., stud. Drexel Inst. Sch. 
of L. Science, Philadelphia, Pa. 10873. 

Rogan, Alice B., In. P. L., Freeport, N. Y. 
7280. 

Rogan, Katherine S., In. Charlestown Br. 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 9897. 

ROGAN, OCTAVIA FRY, legislative ref. 
In. Texas State L., Austin, Tex. 5251. 
Life member. 

Rogers, Mrs. E. C., In. Natrona County P. 
L., Casper, Wyo. 9141. 

Rogers, Esther, ref. In. Carnegie L., Okla- 
homa City, Okla. 10136. 

ROGERS, MRS. FORD H., member 
Board of Dir., chairman Book Com. 
and asst. In. Carnegie P. L., Ocala, Fla. 
8115. Life member. 

Rogers, Jane Grey, In. Sch. of Medicine L. 
Tulane Univ., New Orleans, La. 5400. 

Rogers, Katharine B., ref. In. N. J. State 
L., Trenton, N. J. 5932. 

Rogers, Mrs. Violet J., substitute In. P. L., 
Detroit, Mich. 11179. 

Roghe, Hedwig, br. In. P. L., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 8659. 

Rolland, Anna P., In. P. L., Dedham, Mass. 
3620. 

Rollston, Lila G., In. P. L., Fayetteville, 
Ark. 9232. 

Romig, Lida, In. F. P. L., Abilene, Kan. 
3188. 

Ronan, Elizabeth C., chief Circ. and Ref. 
Dept. P. L., Flint, Mich. 7550. 



612 



Roop, Frederica, acting child. In. Stix Br. 

P. L., St. Louis, Mo. 10744. 
Roos, Jean Carolyn, sch. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 9967. 
ROOT, AZARIAH SMITH, In. Oberlin 

Coll. L., Oberlin, Ohio. 736. Life mem- 
ber. 
Root, Mrs. Azariah S., care of Oberlin 

Coll. L., Oberlin, Ohio. 11180. 
Root, Harriet T., 448 Lincoln St., York, 

Pa. 7641. 
Root, Marion Metcalf, subject header and 

class. Ref. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 8661. 
Root, Mrs. Mary E. S., child. In. P. L., 

Providence, R. I. 2080. 
Roper, Eleanor, 114 W. 12th St., N. Y. 

City. 1486. 
Ropes, Bessie P., In. Peabody Institute L., 

Danvers, Mass. 7992. 

Rorke, Jessie E., Beaches Br. P. L., Toron- 
to, Ont, Can. 11275. 
Rose, Alice L., In. National City. Financial 

L., 60 Wall St., N. Y. City. 2403. 
Rose, Beulah, Washington, D. C. 11338. 
Rose, Ernestine, In. 135th St. Br. P. L., 

N. Y. City. 4691. 
Rose, Grace Delphine, In. P. L., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 1720. 
Rose, (Miss) L. D., In. Elizabethtown Coll. 

L., Elizabethtown, Pa. 10664. 
ROSE, SISTER M. FLORENCE, In. Coll. 

of St. Teresa L., Winona, Minn. 6415. 

Life member. 
Rosen, Mrs. Katherine N., asst. P. L., N. 

Y. City. 9968. 
Rosenbaum, Etta H., ref. asst. P. L., N. Y. 

City. 10494. 

Rosenberg L. See Galveston, Tex. 
Rosholt, Dorothy, 1925 Penn Ave. S., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 10874. 
Rosholt, Ruth, head Catalog Dept. P. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 4520. 
ROSS, CECIL A., Apopka, Fla. 7863. 

Life member. 
Ross, Elizabeth P., In. Codman Sq. Br. P. 

L., Boston, Mass. 10152. 
Ross, Marjorie, In. Western Univ. L., Lon- 
don, Ont., Can. 10283. 
Ross, Mildred E., asst Ref. Dept. Gros- 

venor L., Buffalo, N. Y. 10075. 
Ross, Mrs. Ora Thompson, trus. P. L., 

Rensselaer, Ind. 4090. 



Rosselit, Marie L., In. P. L., Delphos, Ohio. 

10425. 
Rossell, Mary E., child. In. P. L., Roanoke, 

Va. 5672. 
Roth, Mrs. Phyllis S., In. L. Extension 

Div. 111. State L., Springfield, 111. 10665. 
Rothrock, Mary U., In. Dawson McGhee 

L., Knoxville, Tenn. 6927. 
Rowe, Alice T., In. P. L., Nashua, N. H. 

8267. 

Rowe, Miltanna, head In. Univ. of Mary- 
land L., College Park, Md. 8662. 
Rowell, Warren C., vice-pres. The H. W. 

Wilson Co., N. Y. City. 3901. 
Rowland, Dunbar, dir. Miss. Dept. of Ar- 
chives and History, Jackson, Miss. 7928. 
Rowley, Edith, In. Allegheny Coll. L., 

Meadville, Pa. 3722. 
Rowley, Jessie, chief Ref. Dept. F. P. L., 

Atlantic City, N. J. 9845. 
Royall, Rebecca, In. Carnegie L., Cleburne, 

Tex. 3489. 
Royce, Mrs. C. S., trus. F. P. L., New 

Castle, Pa. 11071. 

Royce, Mrs. Caroline H., Vermont Histor- 
ical Society L., Montpelier, Vt. 6206. 
Roys, Leah O., P. L., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

9143. 

Roys, Margaret, serial and documents re- 
viser Columbia Univ. L., N. Y. City. 

10581. 
Ruckteshler, N. Louise, In. Guernsey Mem. 

L. and David N. Follett Mem. Law L., 

Norwich, N. Y. 4212. 
Ruddock, Edith L., In. Manitowoc High 

Sch. L., Manitowoc, Wis. 10875. 
Rudy, Mary E., sec'y P. L., Harrisburg, 

Pa. 10076. 
Rugg, Harold 'Goddard, asst. In. Dartmouth 

Coll. L., Hanover, N H. 6968. 
Rugg, Helen, ref. asst. in charge Industrial 

Arts Dept. P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 8731. 
Rulon, Elva E., asst. catlgf. Univ. of Iowa 

L., Iowa City, Iowa. 3067. 
Runcie, J. E., University Club, Cleveland, 

Ohio. 6363. 
Runkle, Erwin W., In. Pennsylvania State 

Coll. Carnegie L., State College, Pa. 

8178. 
Runner, Emma A., Supervisor Catalog 

Div. Cornell Univ. L., Ithaca, N. Y., 

1477. 



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613 



Runner, Mrs. Mabelle M., asst. Carnegie 
L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 10745. 

Rupp, Julia, In. La Salle Extension Univ. 
L., Chicago, 111. 3047. 

RUPPENTHAL, JACOB C, pres. Board 
of Directors, Carnegie P. L., Russell, 
Kan. 4156. Life member. 

RUSH, CHARLES E., In. P. L., Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 4005. Life member. 

Russell, Abi, In. Normal Sch. L., Farm- 
ville, Va. 9664. 

Russell, Etta Lois, asst. In. P. L., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 3599. 

Russell, Florence, head Loan Dept. F. P. 
L., New Haven, Conn. 3760. 

Russell, Frances B., In. L. Assoc., Strat- 
ford, Conn. 8237. 

Russell, Harold G., head Order Dept. Univ. 
of Minn. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 10876. 

Russell, Helen A., asst In. N. Y. State 
Normal Sch. L., Geneseo, N. Y. 7155. 

Russell, Isabel Margaret, asst. Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 9763. 

Russell, Mary Ethelyn, child. In. City L., 
Manchester, N. H. 9183. 

Russell Library. Sec Middletown, Conn. 

Rust, Marion Stamwood, catlgr. Coll. of 
the City of N. Y. L., N. Y. City. 9847. 

Rutcher, Elizabeth, catlgr. Wesleyan Univ. 
L., Middletown, Conn. 11181. 

Rutherford, Drusilla D., catlgr. P. L., 
Denver, Colo. 8210. 

Rutherford, Nettie E., asst. P. L., Detroit, 
Mich. 6720. 

Rutland, James Richard, Auburn, Ala. 
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Rutzen, A. Ruth, In. T. B. Scott P. L., 
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Ruzicka, Joseph, bookbinder, 606 N. Eutaw 
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Ryan, Mrs. Ella B., P. L., Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 11026. 

Ryan, Gertrude, In. East Washington St. 
Br. P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 7229. 

Ryan, Irene, asst. Univ. of Indiana L., 
Bloomington, Ind. 10582. 



Ryan, M. Lillian, asst. Branches Dept. 
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Ryder, Godfrey, pres. Trus. P. L., Mai- 
den, Mass. 10284. 

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mons L., Kenosha, Wis. 8867. 

Ryerson L., Art Inst. See Chicago. 

Ryland, Rosamay, in charge Story Hours 
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Rymer, Mrs. Anne J., charge Adult Dept. 
Seward Park Br. P. L., N. Y. City. 10109. 

Sabin, Daisy B., In. Evander Childs High 
Sch. L., N. Y. City. 3036. 

Sabin, Lilian, asst. Univ. of Wyo. L., 
Laramie, Wyo. 7777. 

Sacks, Ida, catlgr. of Music P. L., St. 
Louis, Mo. 10583. 

Sacramento (Calif.) City F. L. (Susan 
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Sadlier, Louise C., asst. In. High Sch. L., 
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Sag Harbor, N. Y. John Jermain Mem. L. 
(C. E. Hoster, In.) 11285. 

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8778. 

St. John, Winifred K., asst. ref. In. State 
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Sampson, E. Elizabeth, asst. In. N. C. Coll. 
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Sampson, Harold R., Library Bureau, 6 
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Sams, Mrs. Alice Miller, asst. Fresno Co. 
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San Anselmo (Calif.) P. L. (Belle Meagor, 
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San Antonio (Tex.) Carnegie L. (Mrs. 
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San Bernardino County F. L., San Bernar- 
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San Francisco (Calif.) Mechanics'-Mercan- 
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L., Aurora, N. Y. 2424. 

Sanborn, Henry Nichols, In. P. L., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 5502. 

SANBORN, WILLIAM F., In. P. L., Cad- 
illac, Mich. 3837. Life member. 

Sanders, Dora L., In., Vanderbilt Univ. L., 
Nashville, Tenn. 7576. 

Sanders, Nannie Gillespie, asst. Univ. of 
Texas L., Austin, Tex. 9888. 

Sanderson, Edna M., vice dir. N. Y. State 
L. Sch., Albany, N. Y. 3724. 

Sandifer, Pearl, In. Woodlawn Br. P. L., 
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Sandoe, Mildred W., child. In. P. L., Sa- 
vannah, Ga. 11276. 

Sandusky (Ohio) L. Assoc. (Dorothy 
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Sanford, Delia C., classifier Univ. of Wis- 
consin L., Madison, Wis. 3051. 

Saniel, Isidoro, asst. Bureau of Science L., 
Manila, P. I. (Address, N. Y. State L. 
Sch. Albany, N. Y.) 7944. 

Sankee, Ruth, In. Univ. of 111. High Sch. 
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SANTES, MARIE, catlgr. Univ. of Minn. 
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614. 

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troit, Mich. 10666. 

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Saunders, Janet F., asst. Catalog Dept. 
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Sawyer, Ethel R., dir. Training Class L. 
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Hospital No. 35 L., St. Louis, Mo. 8096. 

SAWYER, MRS. HARRIET P., princi- 
pal St. Louis L. Sch. P. L., St. Louis, 
Mo. 3021. Life member. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Jeanie L., In. P. L., Ham- 
mond, Ind. 6064. 

Sawyer, Kate E., stud. Univ. of Mich., 714 
E. University Ave., Ann Art>or, Mich. 
8248. 

Sawyer, Rollin A., Jr., chief Economics 
Div. P. L., N. Y. City. 10035. 

Sawyer F. L. See Gloucester, Mass. 

Saxton, Mary Lucina, In. P. L., Keene, 
N. H. 7829. 

Sayers, Alfred H. P., treas. Silbermann, 
Sayers Book and Art Shop, 118 E. On- 
tario St., Chicago, 111. 8784. 

Sayler, Marion, asst Binding Dept. P. L., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 9764. 

Sayre, Ethel F., asst. In. Rochester, Theo- 
logical Sem. L., Rochester, N. Y. 3022. 

Scanlan, Madaline M., asst. Circ. Dept. L. 
Assoc., Portland, Ore. 8815. 

Scarth, Helen M., In. Farmington L., Farm- 
ington, Conn. 8211. 

Schabacker, Muriel J., catlgr. Princeton 
Univ. L., Princeton, N. J. 7860. 



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SCHABACKER, RUTH KATHERINE, 
P. L., Erie, Pa. 8890. Life member. 

Schafer, Joseph, supt. Wis. State Histori- 
cal Society, Madison, Wis. 9042. 

Schaperkotter, Dorothy, asst. Divoll Br. P. 
L., St. Louis, Mo. 10138. 

Schapiro, Israel, in charge Semitic Div. L. 
of Congress, Washington, D. C. 6146. 

Schaub, Emma, In. P. Sch. L., Columbus, 
Ohio. 6283. 

SCHENK, FREDERICK WILLIAM, In. 
Univ. of Chicago Law L., Chicago, 111. 
3804. Life member. 

Scheuber, Mrs. Charles, In. Carnegie P. L., 
Fort Worth, Tex. 2498. 

Schiedt, Madeleine J., asst. In. Financial L. 
Federal Reserve Bank, Philadelphia, Pa. 
9040. 

Schilling, Julia Anita, asst. In. Carnegie 
L., Charlotte, N. C. 6516. 

Schlichter, Louise, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 
Birmingham, Ala. 9503. 

Schmidt, Alfred F. W., chief asst. classifier 
L. of Congress, and In. George Wash- 
ington Univ. L., Washington, D. C. 
2209. 

Schmidt, Dorothea C., in charge Sch. of 
Commerce and Administration L. Univ. 
of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 3061. 

Schmidt, Elizabeth, head Sch. Dept. P. L., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 11028. 

Schmidt, John J., catlgr. Univ. of Chicago 
Ls., Chicago, 111. 9326. 

Schneider, Bertha M., head catlgr. Ohio 
State Univ. L., Columbus, Ohio. 4826. 

Schneider, Mrs. Jules E., dir. P. L., Dal- 
las, Tex. 9714. 

Schnitzer, Martha, asst. In. P. L., Hous- 
ton, Texas. 7726. 

Schoenleber, Louise A., In. Third St. Br. 
P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 10520. 

Schoepf, Barbara M., Library Bureau, N. 
Y. City. 10879. 

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N. Y. 10881. 

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Washington, D. C. 8238. 

Schott, Vera Winifred, child. In. P. L., 
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Schrage, Jennie T., 513 Washington Court, 
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Schroeder, Edith E., asst. Miles Park Br. 
P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10667. 

Schueren, Leah M., 1st asst. Schoolcraft 
Br. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 11182. 

Schuette, Sybil, 1st asst. Kellogg P. L., 
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land, Ohio. 11030. 

Schultz, Katherine E., asst. catlgr. Vassar 
Coll. L., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 9905. 

Schulze, Alma E., child. In. P. L., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 8461. 

Schulze, Edith M., In. Redondo Union 
High Sch, L., Redondo Beach, Calif. 
11072. 

Schwab, Gertrude A., In. P. L., Superior, 
Wis. 8501. 

Schwab, Marion F., asst. to supt. Child. 
Dept. P. L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 7159. 

Schwamb, Amy E., catlgr. Simmons Coll. 
L., Boston, Mass. 10287. 

Schwartz, Fenimore, asst. Economics Div. 
Ref. Dept. P. L., N. Y. City. 9144. 

Schwedes, Henry A., trus. P. L., Irving- 
ton, N. J. (Address, 191 Nesbit Ter- 
race.) 8179. 

Schwegler, Edith E., In. Winthrop Br. P. 
L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 10882. 

Schwind, Dorothea, ref. In. F. P. L., Jersey 
City, N. J. 6871. 

Scott, Mrs. A. J., 834 Calumet St., Detroit, 
Mich. 9400. 

Scott, Almere L., sec'y Univ. Exten. Div. 
Dept. of Debating and Public Discus- 
sion Univ. of Wis., Madison, Wis. 9041. 

Scott, Carrie Emma, supervisor Child. 
Work P. L., Indianapolis, Ind. 3727. 

Scott, Edna Lyman, 817 Green Bldg., Seat- 
tle, Wash. 2263. 

Scott, Mrs. Frances Hanna, In. Mich. Coll. 
of Mines L., Houghton, Mich. 2117. 

Scott, Jennie F., head catlgr. State L., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 4887. 

Scott, Lillian C., 1st asst. Cambridge Field 
Br. P. L., Cambridge, Mass. 10288. 

Scott, W. J., Edmonston, 5212 Florence 
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Scranton, Henriette, asst. Ref. Dept. Univ. 
of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 5943. 



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Scribner, Mrs. Nathalie H., In. P. L., 

Merrill, Wis. 9343. 
Scripture, Elizabeth, In. East High Sch. L., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 10883. 
Sears, Gertrude, teacher-ln. High Sch. L., 

Centralia, Wash. 11314. 
Sears, Minnie E., 420 W. 118th St., N. Y. 

City. 2227. 
Sears, Rose Roberts, catlgr. Virginia L. 

McCormick Theol. Sem., Chicago, 111. 

5391. 

Seattle (Wash.) P. L. (Judson Toll Jen- 
nings, In.) 4047. 
Seaver, William N., In. P. L., Woburn, 

Mass. 6366. 
Secombe, Annabell C, In. F. L., Milford, 

N. H. 4649. 
Sedalia (Mo.) P. L. (Jean E. Cameron, In.) 

4168. 
Sedeyn, Rachel, In. Univ. of Brussels L., 

Brussels, Belgium. 10780. 
Seed, Lucille B., chief Dept. Fine Arts P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 8316. 
Seely, Blanche M., supt. Branches and Sta- 
tions P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 2287. 
Seim, Gertrude, asst. Circ. Dept. P. L., 

Detroit, Mich. 11183. 
Seiwell, Sara Belle, In. P. L., Danville, 

111. 9565. 
Selden, Elisabeth C., In. East Br. P. L., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 6429. 
Selkregg, Laura A., 1st asst. P. L., Osh- 

kosh, Wis. 10747. 
Selleck, Elizabeth F., circ. In. Univ. of 

Colo. L., Boulder, Colo. 9145. 
SENG, SAMUEL TSU-YUNG, assoc. In. 

Boone Univ. L., Wuchang, China. 5106. 

Life member. 
Senter, J. Herbert, ex-ln., 44 Avon St., 

Portland, Me. 492. 
Service, Marion R., acting chief Circ. 

Dept. P. L., Detroit, Mich. 784?. 
Sestak, Bessie, asst. P. L., Great Falls, 

Mont. 9715. 

Settle, George Thomas, In. F. P. L., Louis- 
ville, Ky. 3844. 
Settle, Mrs. George Thomas, care F. P. L., 

Louisville, Ky. 5883. 
Severance, Henry Ormal, In. Univ. of Mo. 

L., Columbia, Mo. 2911. 
Severs, Florence H., br. In. P. L., Seattle, 

Wash. 8330. 



Sewickley (Pa.) P. L. (Cornelia E. Stroh, 

In.) 4281. 
Sexauer, Emilie, asst. Down Town Annex 

P. L., Detroit, Mich. 7333. 
Sexton, Eunice R., child. In. Duffield Br. P. 

L., Detroit, Mich. 8667. 
Sexton, Jean M., organizer Ind. P. L. 

Commission, Indianapolis, Ind. 10495. 
Sexton, Pliny T., regent Univ. of State 

of N. Y., Palmyra, N. Y. 816. 
Seymour, Elizabeth P., ref. In. Engineer- 
ing Societies L., 29 W. 39th St., N. Y. 

City. 10521. 
Seymour, Mrs. H. W. (F. Florelle), In. 

Mary E. Seymour Mem. F. L., Stockton, 

N. Y. 5390. 
Seymour, Helen, publicity and editorial 

asst. American Library Association, Chi- 
cago, 111. 11031. 
Seymour L. See Auburn, N. Y. 
Shackelford, Emma N., In. Cottey Coll. 

L., Nevada, Mo. 9417. 
Shadall, Claire E., br. In. P. L., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 7281. 
Shakeshaft, Gwendolen, asst. Kansas State 

Historical Society L., Topeka, Kan. 

10496. 
Shapiro, Ruth, head of Jr. Br. Detroit St. 

Br. P. L., Milwaukee, Wis. 10748. 
Sharp, Mary Kathryn, 116 S. Third St., 

New Philadelphia, Ohio. 6542. 
Sharpe, Jean MacNeill, in charge Grad- 
uates Reading Rm. Univ. of Mich. L., 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 9146. 
Sharpless, Helen, asst. In. Haverford Coll. 

L., Haverford, Pa. 2245. 
Shattuck, Helen B., In. Univ. of Vermont 

L., Burlington, Vt. 2806. 
Shattuck, Ruth, asst. In. Beebe Town L., 

Wakefield, Mass. 6613. 
Shaver, Mary M., catlgr. Vassar Coll. L., 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 4006. 
Shaw, Caroline C., asst. to chief Sch. Dept. 

P. L., St. Paul, Minn. 7274. 
Shaw, Charles B., In. N. C. Coll. for 

Women L., Greensboro, N. C. 9031. 
Shaw, Laurence M., auditor P. L., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 2389. 
Shaw, Marian, ref. In. Univ. of Idaho L., 

Moscow, Idaho. 7757. 
Shaw, May E., child. In. Dayton St. Br. 

P. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 10884. 



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Shaw, Robert K., In. F. P. L., Worcester, 

Mass. 1623. 
Shaw, Sarah Herron, br. In. Carnegie L., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 9418. 
Shawnee (Okla.) Carnegie L. (Mrs. R. W. 

Funk, In.) 7203. 
Sheaf, Edith M., In. F. L., Herkimer, N. 

Y. 3978. 
Shearer, Augustus H., In. Grosvenor L., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 5756. 
Shearer, Edith L., In. Western Union Tel- 

Pegraph Co. L., Rm. 2208, 195 Broadway, 
N. Y. City. 3023. 

Shearer, Mabel B., child. In. Central Ave. 
Br. P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9766. 

Shebanek, Matilda Marie, asst. Broadway 
Br. P. L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10668. 

Sheffield, Pyrrha B., In. Portland Cement 
Assoc. L., Ill W. Washington St., Chi- 
cago, 111. 7226. 

SHEFFIELD, WILLIAM PAINE, pres. 
People's L., Newport, R. I. 8118. Life 
member. 

Sheldon, Edward W., trus. and treas. P. 
L., N. Y. City. (Address, 45 Wall St.) 
6181. 

Sheldon, Fanny A., In. Irving Br. P. L., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 5422. 

Sheldon, Louise E., asst. In. P. L., Mel- 
rose, Mass. 10290. 

Sheldon, Sara P., head Newspaper Rm. 
P. L., Buffalo, N. Y. 9463. 

Shellenberger, Grace, In. P. L., Davenport, 
Iowa. 7585. 

Shelly, Adah, In. P. L., Whiting, Ind. 
10497. 

Shelton, Wilma Loy, In. Univ. of N. Mex. 
L., Albuquerque, N. Mex. 7207. 

Shelton, Conn., Plumb Mem. L. (Jessa- 
mine Ward, In.) 7765. 

Shepard, Alice, asst. In. City L., Spring- 
field, Mass. 1699. 

Shepard, Bessie H., ref. In. P. L., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 3678. 

SHEPARD, LOLA A., 343 Franklin St., 
Waukegan, 111. 8097. Life member. 

Sheridan, Margaret A., In. South End Br. 
P. L., Boston, Mass. 2699. 

Sherman, Clarence Edgar, asst. In. P. L., 
Providence, R. I. 5644. 

Sherman, Grace D., asst. Circ. Dept. F. P. 
L., New Bedford, Mass. 6265. 



Sherman, Rose, In. Radcliffe Coll. L., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 3543. 

Sherman, Susan H., asst. Vassar Coll. L., 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 10291. 

Sherman, Susan L., In. P. L., Butler, Pa. 
3608. 

Sherman (Texas) P. L. (Mrs. Nora Key 
Weems, In.) 5726. 

Sherrard, Mary C, 517 Philadelphia Ave., 
Chambersburg, Pa. 6256. 

Sherwood, Elizabeth J., editor Reader's 
Guide, H. W. Wilson Co., N. Y. City. 
8240. 

Sherwood, Grace M., legislative ref. dir. 
State L., Providence, R. I. 5907. 

Shields, Zora, In. Central High Sch. L., 
Omaha, Neb. 7162. 

Shier, Mrs. Ada B., asst. In. State L., Lan- 
sing, Mich. 11032. 

Shinover, Clara L., asst. Order Dept. Univ. 
of Mich. L., Ann Arbor, Mich. 10749. 

Shivers, Marion B., In. Woman's Coll. of 
Ala. L., Montgomery, Ala. 9284. 

Shoemaker, Charles C., manager Penn 
Publishing Co., 925 Filbert St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 10292. 

Shoemaker, Katharine H., In. William B. 
Stephens Mem. L. of Manayunk, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 5908. 

Shore, Maud E., head Circ. Dept. Kan. 
State Nor. Sch. L., Emporia, Kan. 7663. 

Short, Mrs. F. G. (Elizabeth M.), In. 
Dwight Foster P. L., Fort Atkinson, 
Wis. 5057. 

Shortess, Lois F., asst. In. Eastern 111. 
State Teachers' Coll. L., Charleston, 
111. 9285. 

Shouse, Harriett, Belton, Mo. 10669. 

Shreve, Minnie C., In. Goodman L., Napa, 
Calif. 7607. 

Shrewsbury, Mass. F. P. L. (Mabel E. 
Knowlton, In.) 6135. 

Shroyer, Ethel M., asst. sch. In. P. L., Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 8926. 

Shryock, Mabel, R. F. D. No. 1, Cumber- 
land, Md. 2418. 

Shuler, Clara, In. P. L., Miamisburg, Ohio. 
8827. 

Shuler, Evlyn, In. P. L., Raton, N. Mex. 
7681. 

Shulze, Margaret M., In. South Side High 
Sch. L., Fort Wayne, Ind. 8925. 



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Sias, Louise, In. Henry Ford Hospital L., 
Detroit, Mich. 8318. 

Sibley, May V., asst. In. and catlgr. Hack- 
ley P. L., Muskegon, Mich. 10498. 

Signet L., Edinburgh, Scotland, (John 
Minto, In.) 4218. 

Signer, Nelle M., In. History and Political 
Science L. Univ. of 111., Urbana, 111. 
6809. 

Silas Bronson Library. See Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Silk, Agnes, asst. in charge of Clippings 
P. L., Minneapolis, Minn. 9767. 

Silk, Florence, In-teacher Pattengill Sch. 
L., Detroit, Mich. 11033. 

Sill, Nell G., In. Cleveland Museum of Art 
L., Cleveland, Ohio. 10293. 

Silliman, Helen C., catlgr. in charge P. 
Documents Office L., Washington, D. C. 
4062. 

Silliman, Sue Imogene, In. P. L., Three 
Rivers, Mich. 3442. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., In. Stanislaus Coun- 
ty F. L., Modesto, Calif. 4013. 

Simmons, Ethel, In. P. L., Waco, Texas. 
11034. 

Simmons College L., Boston, Mass. (June 
R. Donnelly, In.) 6