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Full text of "Bulletin of Durham Technical Institute: Catalog Announcements 1972-73"

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Member of 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
American Association of Junior Colleges 
Southern Association of Junior Colleges 
American Technical Education Association 

Approved by 

North Carolina State Board of Education 

North Carolina State Department of Community Colleges 

North Carolina Board of Nursing 

North Carolina State Board of Opticians 

Accredited by 

Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association 



Cover compliments of Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc. 



DURHAM TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



H. K. Collins, M.Ed., President 

Randall S. Cain, B.S., Administrative Assistant 

Robert D. Holloman, LL.B., Institute Attorney 

ACADEMIC 

William A. Martin, M.Ed., Dean of Instruction 

Clyde P. Richman, M.Ed., Director of Curriculum Programs 

Lowell A. Speight, M.A., Director of Continuing Education 

Larry W. Fuqua, M.Ed., Associate Director of Continuing Education 

Robert L. Barham, M.Ed., Associate Director of Continuing Education 

STUDENT SERVICES z 

o 

Kyle S. Jones, M.A., Director of Student Services < 

Edward L. Adams, M.M., Registrar h 

Ann W. Jones, M.A., Counselor E 

Aaron M. Conn, M.A., Admissions Director ^ 

Q 

Jerry S. McDaniel, M.Ed., Director of Guidance and Student Activities, < 

Counselor P - 9 

LEARNING RESOURCES £ 

John M. Johnson, M.S.L.S., Director of Learning Resources Center 

RUSINESS AFFAIRS 

Thomas E. Glass, Jr., M.Ed., Business Manager 

L. A. Veasey, Accountant 

Douglas Council, A.A.S., Assistant Accountant 



THE FACULTY (>T) 



Noel L. Allen, Multimedia Center Specialist 
A.B., Elon College. 

Nancy D. Avery, Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Ernest L. Badgett, Division Chairman of General Education 
B.A., St. Andrews College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

George E. Bock, Instructor in Design b- Drafting 

A.B., M.E., Columbia University, Professor Emeritus, Purdue University. 
Registered Professional Engineer. 

Alexander J. Bott, Instructor in General Education 
B.A., St. Peters College; M.A., J.D., Fordam University. 

Eugene E. Bray, Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Carolyn G. Brown, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
B.S., Winston-Salem State University. 

Margaret L. Cheek, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
R.N., Watts Hospital School of Nursing; B.S., Limestone College. 

Thelma B. Cheek, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
R.N., Watts Hospital School of Nursing. 

- n John Christopher, Instructor in Mathematics 

iU B.A., M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Leona A. Crockett, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
B.S., North Carolina Central University. 

Ruby A. Dasher, Multimedia Center Specialist 
Undergraduate Study at Fisk University. 

Anton L. DeBruyne, Instructor in Electronics Engineering Technology 
B.S.E.E., Duke University. 

Frank K. de Torony, Instructor in Design ir Drafting 

M.S., Ludovika Technical Academy; M.E.E., Polytechnical University; Ph.D., 
General Staff Academy; Licensed Professional Engineer. 

Joyce M. Dunagin, Instructor in Business Education 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., Appalachian State 
University. 

Corrine J. Durham, Instructor in WIN Program. 
B.S., East Carolina University. 

Thomas A. Eaves, Instructor in Physical Science 
B.S., M.A., North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Barbara S. Ferrell, Librarian and Instructor in Library Technology 
A.B., M.L.S., North Carolina Central University. 

Geraldine E. Gentry, Instructor in WIN Program 
A.B., Washington University 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, Counselor-Co-ordinator 
B.S., North Carolina Central University. 



John E. Gilmore, Jr., Instructor in Automotive Technology 
B.S., North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Louise J. Gooche, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
B.S., A. & T. State University. 

John D. Goodwyn, Instructor in Dental Laboratory Technology 
A.A.S., Durham Technical Institute; Certified Dental Technician. 

Euel G. Goss, Program Chairman of Business Administration 

B.S., Atlantic Christian College; M.Ed., North Carolina State University at 
Raleigh. 

Robert H. Gunter, Instructor in Dental Laboratory Technology 
B.S., Old Dominion University; Certified Dental Technician. 

Amelia H. Harrison, Instructor in WIN Program 

A. A., Peace College; A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Ronald H. Hilbert, Instructor in Business Education 
B.A., University of Virginia. 

Esther W. Hodges, Program Chairman of Secretarial Science 

B.S., George reabody College; M.Ed., North Carolina State University at 
Raleigh. 

Bobby R. Holman, Program Chairman of Accounting and Data Pro- 
cessing 

B.S., Jacksonville State University. 

Albert D. Jernigan, Division Chairman of Business Education 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Ed., North Carolina 
State University at Raleigh. 

Georgia A. Tones, Program Chairman of Practical Nurse Education 

B.S., Meharry Medical College; M.Ed., North Carolina State University at 
Raleigh. 

Otis S. Jordon, Instructor in Business Education 
B.S., North Carolina Central University. 

John T. Kilby, Instructor in Business Education 

A. A., Lees McRae Junior College; B.S., Appalachian State University. 

Hyland R. McDaniel, Instructor in Mechanical Laboratory 

Master Tool and Die Maker, Apprentice, Edward G. Budd Manufacturing 
Company and Laurel Machine Works. 

Howard L. Major, Division Chairman of Engineering and Industrial 
Education 
B.S.E.E., Duke University. 

Guy F. Miller, Instructor in English 

A.B., Atlantic Christian College; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Douglas V. Morr, Instructor in Dental Laboratory Technology 

A.T., B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois University; Certified Dental Technician. 

Thomas R. Morris, Instructor in Inhalation Therapy 

B.S., University of Alabama; Registered Inhalation Therapist. 

Evelyn S. Nicholoson, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education. 
R.N., Rowan Memorial Hospital. 



Barbara B. Page, Co-ordinator of Fundamentals Learning Laboratory 
Undergraduate Study at Radford College. 

John E. Page, Specialist- Adult Education 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

James T. Patrick, Instructor in Architectural Drafting 

B.S., North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Stacy L. Peck, Instructor in Business Education 

A.B., Bates College; M.B.A., Harvard Graduate School of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Ranova S. Pendergraft, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
B.S., A. & T. State University. 

Robert E. Perkins, Instructor in Business Education 
A.A.S., Durham Technical Institute. 

Bonnie R. Piacentino, Instructor in English 

B.A., Lander College; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

Howard S. Proctor, Instructor in Opticianry 
Undergraduate Study at Springfield College. 

W. Carl Riddle, Jr., Instructor in Automotive Technology 

Undergraduate Study at North Carolina State University at Raleigh; Certified 
Master Mechanic. 

Elizabeth Robinson, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
R.N., Crouse Irving Hospital School of Nursing. 

William L. Rodgers, Program Chairman of Dental Laboratory Tech- 
nology 

U.S. Navy Instructors Training School. 

Joy K. Roy, Instructor in English. 
B.A., M.A., University of Washington. 

Sharon Sawyer, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
R.N., St. Lukes Hospital. 

William J. Sewell, Instructor in English 

A.B., La Grange College; M.A., University of Alabama. 

Yvonne Simmons, Instructor in Business Education 
B.S., North Carolina Central University. 

Patricia A. Smith, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 

R.N., Wilson School of Nursing; B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

Rosemary Snead, Instructor in Practical Nurse Education 
R.N., St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing. 

Cora S. Stackelberg, Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S.E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A.T., Duke University. 

Joseph D. Wade, Chairman of Police Science Technology 

B.A., B.S., High Point College; Federal Bureau of Investigation, National 
Police Academy; Federal Bureau of Narcotics School; Northwestern University 
Traffic Institute. 

Jerome R. Worsley, Instructor in Business Education 
B.A., M.A., East Carolina University. 




POM 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

The origin of Durham Technical Institute is both interesting and 
involved. In the original sense the history of the Institute may be traced 
back to June 1948, when a program of Practical Nursing was established 
under the Vocational and Adult Education Department of the Durham 
City Schools. Numerous terminal adult education programs were 
developed in the years that followed. Such programs included Mechani- 
cal Drafting, Architectural Drafting, and Electronics Technology. 
Courses, which in most cases were operated at night, were conducted 
in the classrooms and laboratories at Durham High School and at 
Hillside High School. Admission requests to these programs and 
tuition rates were essentially the same then as they are today. 

By 1957, when the North Carolina General Assembly authorized a 
small appropriation to establish a limited number of area schools to be 
known as Industrial Education Centers, Durham already had a 
vigorous program in adult education underway. Along with various 
adult education programs, many short courses were offered in ele- 
mentary education for adults. Courses to upgrade the skills of workers 
in a variety of trades were also offered. 

As a result of the Assembly's appropriation, a challenge went out to 
the various county school administrative units in the state to provide a 
separate educational facility that would provide for the educational 
needs of a whole area's population. A new comprehensive curriculum 
was to be devised for citizens in need of education and technical 
skills required to advance satisfactorily in the world of work. 

Durham was among the first counties in the state to meet this 
challenge to the satisfaction of the state officials. In June 1958, the 
residents of the county made $500,000.00 available to purchase the 
site and to erect the initial building of the Institute. Durham Industrial 
Education Center officially opened its doors on September 5, 1961, 
with thirty-four full time students enrolled in the programs of Auto- 
motive, Mechanical, or Electronics Technology. The institution con- 
tinued to operate as an industrial education center until February 4, 
1965, when the State Board of Education officially designated that 
hence forth it be properly identified as a technical institute. On March 
30, 1965, the Board of Trustees authorized that the name of the institu- 
tion be changed to Durham Technical Institute. 

Durham Technical Institute, in keeping with the three-county area 
it serves, is ever expanding. The Institute operates both day and night 
classes; these being offered both on and off campus. The curriculum 
now contains fifteen major programs with twelve of these leading 



to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. The day enrollment has 
grown from thirty-four full time students to over one thousand students 
representing twenty -three states and eight foreign countries. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Realizing that the future of American democracy depends upon an 
educated and responsible citizenry, Durham Technical Institute con- 
ceives as its purpose the development of the individual toward the 
attainment of his maximum potential in life. The Institute was 
established to make more readily available a higher educational 
opportunity distinct from traditional academic education as well as 
to inspire an active desire for continuing personal development. 
Financially and geographically, the Institute is available to all youth 
and adults who would not otherwise have this educational oppor- g 

tunity. < 

The Institute is an instrument of service for the community as a ^ 

whole. It takes advantage of its relationship to the community in order £ 

that students and faculty may use the community as their workshop — 

for learning. Students at the Institute are given the opportunity to p i r 

learn the art of living in group relationships as well as the art of earning 
a living. 

The Institute strives to be highly flexible in its offerings so as to 
provide as many educational opportunities as possible for specialized 
training by means of the "open door placement" policy. More specific- 
ally, the Institute attempts to accept the individual where he is and 
strives to provide him an opportunity to pursue an educational pro- 
gram toward the attainment of his career goal. 

PURPOSE 

Within the scope and meaning of the North Carolina General 
Statute 115a creating and supporting the Institute and the guidelines 
established by the North Carolina Department of Community Col- 
leges, it is the purpose of this institution through its facilities and 
services, to offer educational opportunities meaningful to the needs of 
the individual and related to his future in the world of work. The 
Institute, being comprehensive in its purpose, endeavors to meet those 
objectives by providing: 

1. Post Secondary education at the technical and vocational- 
technical levels for the development of skills and knowledge of 
its students for initial employment as qualified technicians and 
skilled craftsmen. 



2. A wide array of technical and vocational programs which are 
designed to improve and upgrade employed workers in their 
present job situations. Special attention is given to the training 
and educational needs of new and existing industry. 

3. Numerous programs and courses which afford adults an oppor- 
tunity to continue their education through the elementary and 
secondary levels as well as courses for avocational interest and 
personal growth. 

ACCREDITATION 

Durham Technical Institute is fully accredited by the Southern 

Association of Colleges and Schools. Also, Durham Technical Institute 

is approved by the North Carolina State Department of Community 

Colleges and the State Board of Education as specified in Chapter 

o 115A of the General Statutes of North Carolina. In addition, the 

b curriculum in Dental Laboratory Technology is accredited by the 

^ Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association. 

£ V, A. APPROVAL 

z 

The Institute is approved for the training of Veterans, war orphans 

P - 16 and children of totally disabled veterans. Veterans education is ap- 

proved under the provisions of Public Law 89-358 (Veterans Readjust- 
< ment Benefits of 1966), Public Laws 894 and 87-815 (Veterans 

w Vocational Rehabilitation Program ). War orphans may obtain benefits 

}£} under Public Law 634 (War Orphans Educational Assistance Act of 

1956 and children of totally disabled veterans under Public Law 
88-361. Veterans seeking such benefits should contact their local 
Veterans Service Office. 

NORTH CAROLINA DIVISION OF 
REHABILITATION APPROVAL 

The Institute is approved for the training and education of personnel 
who qualify under the provisions of the North Carolina Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Public Instruction. Disabled 
persons desiring such benefits should contact their local office of the 
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

NOTICE OF INSTITUTE REGULATIONS 

The Institute has a genuine interest and concern for the integrity of 
all students; therefore, the regulations found below and contained in 
other official statements are binding on all students. The Institute 
reserves the right to change any of these regulations, as well as any 
others, at any time without prior notice. 



Information 

A Weekly Bulletin is published to publicize important announce- 
ments for students. Each student is responsible for information pub- 
lished in the bulletin, bulletin board notices, and announcements made 
through the public address system. 

Food and Drink 

The Institute maintains lounge areas and a snack bar for the con- 
venience of the student and for the consumption of food and drink. 
The consumption of food and drink is prohibited in all other areas. 

Parking 

The Institute includes a paved and well-lighted parking area. Stu- 
dents may use any of these areas with the exception of those marked 
"NO PARKING", "RESERVED" or "VISITORS". At all times speed 
within the parking area shall not exceed fifteen (15) miles per hour. 
Students are required to register their vehicles with the Registrar's £ 

Office and obtain a parking permit to be displayed on the vehicle. ? 

Parking and towing regulations are enforced. p 1 -, 

Smoking _i 

Smoking is permitted in all areas with the exception of all class- uj 

rooms, laboratories, shops, and the library. All lounge areas are uj 

equipped with receptacles for smoking. 

Student Conduct 

It is expected that at all times the student will conduct himself as 
a responsible adult in a public place. Therefore, destruction of 
school property, such acts as stealing, gambling, use of profane lan- 
guage, engaging in personal combat, the possession of dangerous 
weapons, and the possession or use of alcoholic beverages or narcotics 
in or on school property cannot be tolerated. Any violation of the 
regulation concerning alcohol and/or narcotics will result in expulsion 
from the Institute for the first offense. 

Student Dress 

Students are expected to dress neatly and appropriately for all 
classes and other school functions. Students are urged to study the 
dress of professional workers in their area of study and dress in like 
manner while attending school. As the student will soon enter pro- 
fessional status, he should become accustomed to like dress while 



enrolled for a training period. 

Due to the complex nature and variety of programs offered at 
Durham Technical Institute, special dress will be required in some 
shops and laboratories. It is mandatory that certain rules governing 
dress and grooming be observed. These requirements will be enforced. 

ATTENDANCE 

The curricula of the Institute consists of highly condensed courses 
designed to impart the maximum of "know how'and "know why" to 
the student in his preparation for the world of work. Each session of 
each class or laboratory is designed to build upon the information 
learned in the previous sessions. Prompt attendance to all scheduled 
classes, laboratory periods and examinations, therefore, is expected of 
all students or continuity will be lost. Absences and tardies are classi- 
fied in one of the two categories, excused or unexcused. Excused 
absences are usually honored for one of the following reasons. 

1. Death or severe illness in the immediate family. 

2. Personal illness or accidents. 

3. Excuses for other reasons. 

The instructor of any particular class or laboratory has the authority 
to judge whether absences or tardies incurred by the student are 
excusable or have interfered with satisfactory learning of the course. 
The instructor may require extra work and evidence that the student 
has caught up with the required work in special cases or may at his 
discretion drop a student from a course, if he feels that the time lost 
cannot be made up. 

DISMISSAL AND DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURE 

A student may be dismissed from the Institute for violation of the 
established standards of conduct. Any violation should be reported 
to the Director of Student Services and arrangements will be made 
for the student to have a fair and impartial hearing before the Judicial 
Review Committee. The student will have the right to appeal a 
decision of the Judicial Review Committee to the President and Board 
of Trustees of the Institute. The decision of the Board of Trustees will 
be final. 



ADMISSIONS 

General Admissions Information 

Durham Technical Institute operates under the "open door" ad- 
missions policy as established by the North Carolina Department of 
Community Colleges. Admission to the Institute is open to virtually 
all persons eighteen years of age or older. Programs of study are offered 
in Basic Adult Education (Grades 1-8), high school courses leading to 
a high school diploma, non-credit preparatory courses, General Adult 
Education courses, and curriculum programs in Occupational Educa- 
tion. 

Vocational-Technical Education programs are offered in the areas 
of engineering, business, health related, public service and special 
technologies, and the vocational trades. Vocational-technical curricu- 
lum programs are available to high school graduates or to those who 
possess a high school equivalency certificate issued by the North 
Carolina Department of Public Instruction or other State Departments 
of Public Instruction. 

The admissions process includes the initial application, transcripts 
of all secondary and post secondary work, aptitude placement tests, a 
counseling conference, and in certain instances a health examination. 
All applicants should be in reasonably good health with no physical 
or mental defects which would preclude successful completion of a 
proposed program of study. 

Applicants are encouraged to complete the admissions process as 
soon as possible. High school students should apply early during their 
senior year. Other persons may apply at any time; however, admission 
will depend upon the individual situation. All data should be on file at 
least one month prior to the beginning of the quarter in which the 
student plans to enroll. 

Placement in various programs of instruction is selective and par- 
ticular emphasis is placed on vocational and occupational guidance. 
Through counseling conferences, prior to admission, the individual is 
given assistance in establishing realistic goals. Aptitude placement 
tests and counseling conferences, which are part of the admissions 
process, are used to determine the applicant's potential for success 
in a given program of instruction. 

When an evaluation of an applicant's aptitudes, previous educa- 
tional records, previous experiences, and interests reveals a lack of 
readiness to enroll in a specific curriculum, he may be advised to 
enroll in preparatory studies, the Multimedia Center, or the Con- 
tinuing Education Department high school credit courses, or he may 
be advised to reevaluate his occupational and educational goals. When 
an applicant has sufficiently prepared himself through preparatory 
studies, he may be admitted into a specific curriculum. 



The Institute reserves the right to refuse admission to an applicant 
if it appears that such action is in the best interest of the Institute 
and/or the applicant. 

Application forms and detailed information on instructional pro- 
grams may be obtained by writing: 

Admissions Director 

Durham Technical Institute 

Drawer 11307 

1637 Lawson Street 

Durham, North Carolina 27703 

SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

1. Application 

The applicant should submit a properly completed application 
form to the Admissions Office for the quarter in which he desires 
to enroll. All admission requirements should be completed one 
month prior to anticipated enrollment. Early application is o 

recommended to allow adequate time for processing and to 
increase the opportunity for entry into programs of limited en- 
rollment capacity. 



-z. 



P-21 



2. Transcripts 

Official transcripts are required from the high school and all 
post-secondary institutions attended. Applicants who have earned o 

equivalency certificates should write: Chief Examiner GED § 

Program, Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, North Caro- § 

lina, and request that a letter certifying high school equivalency < 

be forwarded to the Admissions Office. NOTE: Applicants for 
Practical Nurse Education must submit two (2 ) official transcripts 
or letters certifying high school equivalency. Individuals who 
have neither a high school diploma or an equivalency certificate 
should contact the local Superintendent of Schools for permis- 
sion to take the General Educational Development Test (GED ). 
Applicants may prepare for the examination by using materials 
available in the Multimedia Center of the Institute. (Inquiries 
should be directed to the Multimedia Center. ) 

3. Aptitude Testing 

Each applicant is required to take a series of aptitude examina- 
tions appropriate to the curriculum area in which he plans to 
enroll. The test results are used in helping the prospective 
student to assess his various aptitudes and abilities in relation 
to his interests and desires. This information provides an addi- 
tional basis for placement of the individual in an appropriate 
curriculum program. In exceptional cases, where an applicant 



o 

h- 
< 

<r 
o 



resides out of North Carolina, the individual may be permitted 
to take the aptitude tests (at his expense) at a nearby testing 
agency. (Applicants must make their own arrangements for such 
testing). Applicants who are unable to keep an appointment 
should immediately notify the Admissions Office to arrange 
another appointment. 

4. Counseling Conference 

After initial admissions requirements and aptitude testing are 
completed, a counseling conference is scheduled. The conference 
will involve a discussion and analysis of the applicant's proposed 
choice of curriculum in relation to his educational preparation, 
health factors, work experience, interests, motivation, and career 
objectives. Applicants who are unable to keep a conference 
appointment should immediately notify the Admissions Office 
to arrange another appointment. 

5. Acceptance 

Each applicant is notified verbally and in writing of his ad- 
mittance to a program of study. 

6. Orientation and Registration 

p. 22 Fal1 orientation and registration dates and registration dates 

for each quarter are specified in the School Calendar. Orienta- 
o tion provides information concerning Institute policy and regula- 

rs tions, members of staff and student council, and the appropriate 

g instructional department. Students are assisted in completing 

g registration by their curriculum advisors, essential information 

is inspected and collected by the Registrar's Office, and tuition 
and fees are paid to the Business Office. Students who register 
after the announced registration date(s) will be charged a $5.00 
late registration fee. Late registration is not permitted after the 
date listed in the School Calendar. 

OUTLINE OF ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

1. Obtain catalogue and application. 

2. Read catalogue thoroughly. 

3. Complete application and send to Institute. 

4. Ask high school counselor to send Institute a copy of your trans- 

script. If you have had any education after high school gradua- 
tion, have transcript of such work sent to the Institute. 

5. Receive acknowledgement from Institute that your application has 

been received. 

6. Letter from Institute scheduling admission placement testing. 

7. Admission placement testing. 



8. Admission placement conference. 

9. Acceptance to program of study. 

Curriculum Admission Requirements 

The basic admission requirements to any curriculum are a high 
school diploma or equivalency education preferably above average 
high school background, potential aptitude, and good physical and 
mental health. Some curricula require additional prerequisites: 

Applicants for Electronic Data Processing, Opticianry, Inhalation 
Therapy, Electronics Engineering Technology, and Automotive Tech- 
nology should have two units of higher mathematics preparation. One 
unit of physical science with laboratory is also recommended. 

Architectural Drafting applicants should have one unit of higher 
mathematics preparation. One physical science unit with laboratory 
is also recommended. 

Dental Laboratory Technology requires substantive aptitude for 
finger and hand dexterity. 

Inhalation Therapy applicants are required to have a complete 
physical examination. 

Practical Nurse Education applicants are required to submit a com- 
plete physical examination, dental examination, and a schedule of 
disease immunizations. 

Applicants who do not have the essential educational background P - 23 

to enroll in a particular program may obtain the necessary preparation 
by enrolling in preparatory courses or the Multimedia Center. 

o 
Admission Requirements for Part-time Evening Curriculum Students o 

and Special Students. 

Applicants for admission to evening curriculum programs and as 
special students may not be required to complete all admission re- 
quirements. However, each applicant must complete an application 
form, present evidence of high school completion and when he earns 
20 credit hours in a degree or diploma program, he must complete all 
admission requirements to be officially admitted to such program. 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT TO FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS 



UNC-Charlotte 

Electronics Engineering Technology graduates who meet the other 
admission requirements may enter the University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte as a junior in Computer-Electronics Technology or Mechani- 
cal Technology. After satisfactory completion of the prescribed two- 



o 



year curriculum the student will receive a Bachelor of Engineering 
Technology Degree. 

DTI Police Science graduates are eligible to enter the Bachelor 
of Science Degree Program in Law Enforcement and Administration at 
the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. 

Appalachian State University 

Business and Engineering Technology graduates may transfer to the 
Bachelor of Technology Degree Program at Appalachian State Uni- 
versity in Boone. This program is designed primarily to train vocational 
and technical instructors for technical institutes or community colleges 
and technicians with a broad educational background for industry 
and business. 

Mars Hill College 

Graduates of Dental Laboratory Technology, Inhalation Therapy, 
and Opticianry may enter the Bachelor of Science Degree Program in 
Allied Health at Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, North Carolina. 

< North Carolina Central University 

£5 Electronics Engineering Technology graduates may transfer to 

2 North Carolina Central University to pursue a Bachelor of Science 

Degree in Physics. 



o 



P-24 

o 



< 



Old Dominion University 

Graduates of Electronics Engineering Technology may enter the 
a Bachelor of Science Degree Program in Engineering Technology at 

o Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Virginia Commonwealth University 

Police Science graduates are eligible to transfer to the Bachelor of 
Science Degree Program at Virginia Commonwealth University, Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Durham Technical Institute offers an Associate in Applied Science 
Degree in those two-year technical curriculums approved by the North 
Carolina State Board of Education and the Department of Community 
Colleges. Associate degree programs vary from six to seven quarters 
in length. 

DIPLOMA PROGRAMS 

Durham Technical Institute will grant diplomas when a student 
successfully completes any of the occupational trade level curriculums 



offered by the Institute. These programs are four quarters (12 months ) 
in length and require approximately 69 quarter hours credit. 

CERTIFICATES 

Any student enrolled in a curriculum of less than 12 months dura- 
tion will receive a certificate certifying completion and attendance. 
Students enrolled in a non-credit course through the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education will receive a certificate of completion. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Special students are those who are enrolled for course credit but who 
do not plan to pursue a diploma or the Associate Degree. Students so 
enrolled will normally be required to meet the prerequisites for the 
course work or to demonstrate a necessary level of competence by 
appropriate tests. Enrollment in dental laboratory technical courses is § 

not permitted until all related course work is completed. 



COURSE AUDIT 



< 



Students who desire to audit a course (s ) must secure approval from p ^c 

their faculty advisor. Those persons interested in auditing a course (s ) 
that are not enrolled at the Institute must secure the approval of the o 

Registrar. Auditors receive no credit and are not required to attend 



^ 



Q 



classes or take examinations. Participation in class discussion or < 



o 



laboratory exercises is at the discretion of the instructor. A student who < 

has previously audited a course is ineligible for credit by examina- 
tion. The fee for auditing is identical to the regular cost of the course. 

PROVISIONAL STATUS 

Any student who has not completed the admission procedures and 
requirements is identified as a provisional student. Those students so 
identified must complete all admission requirements immediately fol- 
lowing actual enrollment. 

Students transferring from other technical institutes, community 
colleges, or college are also considered provisional students until they 
have demonstrated their competence at the Institute. 

Those students assigned to non-credit preparatory courses prior to 
regular enrollment are provisional students until such assignment con- 
dition is completed. 



ADVANCED STANDING 

Transfer Credit 

The Institute permits admission with advanced standing for trans- 
fer students from member institutions of the North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges. Credit will be approved for all required 
courses which the student satisfactorily completed at the member 
institution. 

The Institute will accept transfer credit from other recognized and 
approved institutions only on those courses with a grade of "C" or 
above. The content of such courses must closely parallel those for 
which credit is sought at the Institute. An official transcript of the 
student's previous post secondary work must be submitted well in 
advance of the proposed date of enrollment. The Registrar's Office 
must approve all transfer credits and each application for advanced 
standing will be evaluated according to the individual situation. 

Credit By Examination 

Advanced standing may be approved by examination. This examina- 
tion will be administered by the division or department concerned. 
This examination may be based on high achievement in secondary 
26 schools, private commercial schools, military service, or work experi- 

ences. Students seeking advanced standing through "Credit by 
Examination" should contact the Student Services Division for initiation 
of action. 

To receive grade points for a course, a student must register for 
a course and be examined by the department concerned. Upon success- 
fully completing the examination, the examination grade will be 
recorded as the official grade for that course; and grade points will be 
recorded on the student's permanent record in the normal manner. 

Prior to registration a course may be waived through evaluation of 
the student's experiences and/or written examination by the depart- 
ment concerned. Grade points will not be accumulated for a waived 
course. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The Institute is authorized under Federal law to enroll non- 
immigrant alien students. Students enrolling under this classification 
will be treated as nonresident with respect to tuition and fees. An 
immigrant alien is subject to the same considerations as a citizen and 
may establish North Carolina residence in the same manner as any 
other nonresident. 

All foreign applicants must submit evidence of adequate financial 



resources to support them throughout their educational program. The 
Institute cannot provide financial aid for foreign students. 

All foreign applicants must also present evidence of adequate pro- 
ficiency in the English language as well as sufficient aptitude 1 and 
previous educational preparation to succeed in a specific educational 
program. 

WITHDRAWAL REGULATIONS 

Any student who wishes to withdraw from the Institute or from a 
specific course must officially withdraw through the Student Services 
Division. 

Any student planning to withdraw must first discuss it with his 
faculty advisor. The student must then discuss withdrawal with a 
counselor in the Student Services Office. An official withdrawal form 
must be obtained from the counselor. The form must be signed by 
the student's instructors and advisor, his grades entered, then returned z 

to the Student Services Division for final approval. A student must p 

present evidence that he has cleared with the Library and the Business ^ 

Office before approval can be given. § 

Students who officially withdraw prior to the end of the first three 2 

full weeks of a quarter will receive grades of "W". Students who offi- 
cially withdraw after the first three full weeks of a quarter will receive P - 27 
grades of "WP" or "WF" depending upon whether the student is 
passing or failing. ^ 

Students who withdraw unoffically will receive a failing grade 
for all courses and must obtain special permission from the Admissions o 

Office to be readmitted. 



GRADING SYSTEM 

Grade reports showing the student's progress will be issued at the 
end of each quarter. Each course a student completed successfully 
earns for him both quarter hour credits and grade points. 

The cumulative grade point average is determined by dividing the 
total grade points earned in all courses by the total number of quarter 
hours credit attempted. 

Grade Point Equivalent 



Letter 


Numerical 




Grade 


Grade 


Explanation 


A 


93-100 


Superior 


B 


86- 92 


Above Average 


C 


76- 85 


Average 


D 


70- 75 


Below Average 


F 


0- 69 


Failure 



4 grade points per quarter hour 
3 grade points per quarter hour 
2 grade points per quarter hour 
1 grade point per quarter hour 
grade points per quarter hour 



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I — Incomplete. This temporary grade is assigned at the discretion of 
instructor for incomplete course work. Hours are not counted for 
the quarter to which assigned. An "I" can be removed or replaced 
with an "F" only at the discretion of the instructor. 
W — Withdrew. Official permission to withdraw from a course within 
the first three full weeks of the quarter. No grade point penalty is 
incurred. 
WP — Withdrew Passing. Official permission to withdraw from a course 
with a passing grade within the fourth through the eighth week 
of the quarter. No grade point penalty is incurred. 
WF — Withdrew Failing. Official permission to withdraw from a course 
with a failing grade within the fourth through the eighth week of 
the quarter. Failure penalty is incurred in the same manner as 
for the grade of "F". 

Withdrawal from courses is not permitted from the ninth 
week until the end of the quarter. An unofficial withdrawal dur- 
ing this time period will receive a "WF". Failure penalty is in- 
O curred in the same manner as for the grade of "F". 

< AU — Audit. Enrollment as a non-credit student. 

o: Academic credit may be withheld when a student has not cleared 

u- his obligation with the Business Office or Library. 

Because of the complexity of some of the aspects of Practical Nurse 

P - 28 Education, and because human lives and health are involved, a grade 

lower than "C" on theory or clinical experience will not be acceptable 

— in the Practical Nurse Education Program. Any grade below "C" will 

uj constitute a failure and that quarter must be repeated with a grade of 

< "C" or higher as a prerequisite for the next quarter's work. 
< 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The annual graduation exercise is held at the close of the spring 
quarter. An overall grade point average of 2.0 (c ) is required to gradu- 
ate. All outstanding obligations to the Business Office and Library must 
be cleared to be eligible for graduation. 

Each student must apply to the Student Services Division for his 
degree or diploma at the beginning of the quarter preceding the com- 
pletion of his program. Students who complete their programs at the 
close of the spring quarter are required to participate in the graduation 
exercise. Those who cannot participate due to unusual circumstances 
must present justifiable reasons in writing to the Student Services 
Division. Students who complete their work at the close of the summer, 
fall, and winter quarters may elect to participate in the spring gradu- 
ation exercise. 

All candidates for graduation must pay a $5.00 graduation fee to 
cover the cost of the diploma and cover. Students who participate in 



the spring graduation exercise must pay a $10.00 graduation fee to 
cover the cost of diploma, cover, and cap and gown apparel rental. 
Graduation fees are collected at registration for the quarter in which a 
student expects to complete his program requirements. No refunds can 
be made. 

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS 

Students transferring from other technical institutes, community 
colleges, colleges, or universities must complete at least one-fourth of 
the total quarter hours required by Durham Technical Institute, in 
residence, to be eligible to receive a degree or diploma from Durham 
Technical Institute. 

HONORS 

Outstanding students will be honored by placement on the Presi- o 

dent's List, published after each quarter. To qualify for the President's ^ 

List, a student must achieve a cumulative 3.0 (B ) grade point average. ^ 

Graduating students with the highest overall grade point average in 2 

both the Associate Degree program and the diploma program will be — 
given special recognition at the graduation exercises. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES 2 



A student must first confer with his faculty advisor about schedule 
changes. The student must then obtain a drop-add form from the 
Student Services Division. With the approval of the faculty advisor and 
the Student Services Division a student may drop or add courses 
within the limits outlined below: 

Adding of courses: 

Students will not be permitted to add courses after the first five 

days of classes in a regular quarter or after the first three days of 

classes in a six weeks summer term. 

Dropping Courses: 

Courses dropped prior to the end of the first three full weeks of a 

regular quarter or the first two full weeks during a summer term will 

receive a grade of "W". Courses officially dropped within the fourth 

through the eighth week will receive a grade of "WP" or "WF" 

depending upon whether the student is passing or failing. 

Withdrawal from courses is not permitted from the ninth week 

until the end of the quarter. An official withdrawal during this 

time period will receive a grade of "WF". 

Class schedules will not be rearranged to permit early dismissal 

nor will social activities be scheduled during class hours. 



COURSE LOAD 

Students enrolled for 13 or more quarter hours are identified as full- 
time students. A student may enroll for up to 20 quarter hours de- 
pending upon his capability as evaluated by his faculty advisor. No 
student will be permitted to enroll for more than 20 quarter hours. 
Students who encounter serious academic difficulty are advised to 
attempt only a part-time course load. Students who work on a job in 
excess of 3 hours per school day are strongly advised to enroll for 
less than a full-time course load. Students carrying less than a full- 
time course load should not expect to graduate within the normal 
time limit. 

ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

The following cumulative grade point averages are the minimums 

which must be attained in order for a student to make reasonable 

2 progress toward graduation. A student must pass all prerequisite 

9 courses before enrolling in a course in which a prerequisite is required. 

< A 2.0 grade point average is required for graduation. 

9 TWO YEAR ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 



P-30 

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Cumulative Quarter 


Hours 


Quarters 


Minimum 


Grade Point Average 


0- 25 




1 




1.00 


26- 45 




2 




1.25 


46- 65 




3 




1.50 


66- 85 




4 




1.75 


86-105 




5 




1.75 


106-or more 


6, 7 




2.00 



0- 25 


1 


26- 45 


2 


46- 65 


3 


66- or more 


4 



ONE YEAR DIPLOMA PROGRAMS 
Cumulative Quarter Hours Quarters Minimum Grade Point Average 

1.00 

1.50 
1.75 
2.00 

Any student whose academic average falls below the minimums in- 
dicated or who works on a job in excess of 3 hours per school day is 
recommended to register for less than a fulltime course load. Students 
who continually encounter serious academic difficulty should contact 
their faculty advisor and the Student Services Division to consider 
change to a more appropriate curriculum, preparatory studies, or 
use of the basic learning materials available in the Multimedia Center. 



TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts of scholastic records (pertaining to your attend- 
ance at this institution only) are issued on request. One transcript is 
furnished free of charge. Additional copies are issued for one dollar 
($1.00) each. Payment is to be made with the request and the request 
is to be directed to the Registrar's Office. 

FAILURE REGULATIONS 

A student who fails any required course in his major curriculum 
must repeat the course until a passing grade is attained to be eligible 
to graduate with the Associate Degree or the diploma. 

Course Repeat Rule 

When a course failure is repeated, the first attempt will be omitted 
from the computation of the cumulative grade point average and only o 

the second grade, whether "F" or higher, will count. If a course is 
repeated a third time, both the second and third grades will be used in 
the computation. All "F's" remain on the permanent record. 



z 



RE ADMISSION P - 31 

Any student who voluntarily and officially withdraws from the - 

Institute and later wishes readmittance must contact the Student w 

Services Division. Readmission conditions will depend upon the indi- g 

vidual circumstances, but generally a student is eligible to return at such < 

time as he can work out an appropriate course schedule. 

A former student will not be readmitted until he has met all former 
and current expense obligations to any program or activity under the 
administrative jurisdiction of the Institute. 

Any student who is financially indebted to the Institute by failure 
to completely meet any outstanding debt such as the following: Bad 
check, tuition, bookstore, library, activity, uniform, graduation, park- 
ing fines, promissory note, equipment or supplies debt, or any required 
payment to the Institute will not be eligible for re-entrance nor acquire 
any transcript until such indebtedness is completely cleared. Any 
indebtedness to this institution will make one ineligible to enter 
any other institution of the Community College System of North 
Carolina. 




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COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE 

Effective counseling is an ongoing process that begins with the 
placement interview and continues throughout the student's enroll- 
ment. It is not confined to the narrow role of helping serious "problem" 
cases, although every effort is made to help students who have 
academic or personal problems; rather, it is directed toward helping 
all students develop their individual capabilities to the fullest extent. 
The Institute recognizes that the student can develop personal initia- 
tive and responsibility for planning his future only to the extent that 
he has knowledge about himself and the goals he has set. 

ORIENTATION 

Orientation is a continuing process which begins at the time of the 

student's initial contact with the Institute and continues through the 

first quarter of enrollment. 

Each student receives pre-admissions information and counseling 

co during the admissions process to enable him to enter a study program 

o which is appropriate to his interests and abilities. Group orientation 

5 sessions are conducted during the fall registration to introduce 

{/) representatives of the administration, student government, and faculty. 

_ . Group sessions also are utilized to explain and clarify Institute policies, 

regulations, facilities, and services. 

i- 
z 

Q FACULTY ADVISORS 

\- 

At the time of initial enrollment, each student is assigned a faculty 
advisor in his major curriculum area. The advisor assists the student 
in planning his program and in selecting appropriate courses. He is 
available throughout the student's enrollment to offer advice and 
assistance. 

Each student has full responsibility for keeping account of his 
progress in his curriculum program. This includes being aware of his 
cumulative grade point average, course failures, courses repeated, 
and graduation requirements. 

STUDENT HOUSING 

Durham Technical Institute has no dormitories or other boarding 
facilities. Students who live too far away to commute daily must secure 
living quarters in the Durham area. Although the Institute assumes no 
responsibility for housing, the Student Services Division will assist 
students in locating suitable accommodations. New students are invited 
to utilize this service. 



SELECTIVE SERVICE DEFERMENT 

Undergraduate students are no longer eligible for draft deferment 
by authority of the 1971 amendment to the Military Selective Service 
Act of 1967. 



STUDENT CENTER 

The Student Center, centrally located in the original building, is 
the refreshment and social area for students. The snack bar offers a 
variety of soft drinks, sandwiches, candy, and coffee. Tables and 
chairs are provided so that students may relax and eat, chat, or watch 
television. A limited number of lockers are provided on a first come- 
first served basis which may be used to store books, supplies, and 
other items. The center is open from 7:30 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. daily, 
Monday through Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Friday. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

(/) 

Ixl 

The Student Association was organized in the 1965-66 academic o 

year. The organization and function of an effective Student Association S 

is dependent entirely upon student interest and initiative. The Student co 

Association shall have the following purposes: p _ 35 

1. coordinating student activities. 

2. providing procedural guides for creating new organizations for H 
students, g 

3. providing an opportunity for student participation in making ^ 
policies concerning student activities, ^ 

4. providing a framework within which students may work to improve 
the school, and 

5. serving as an agency to stimulate civic responsibility, profitable 
use of leisure time and a spirit of fellowship among students. 

The Representative Council is composed of elected representatives 
from each curriculum. Officers of the council are elected by the student 
body at large. 

The Bylaws of the Student Government Association are printed in 
the Student Handbook. Each student should be thoroughly familiar 
with the Bylaws of the Constitution and the Student Handbook. 

ATHLETICS 

The Institute offers the opportunity for student athletes to partici- 
pate in an interscholastic basketball program with members of the 
Piedmont Athletic Conference of Technical Institutes (PACTI). Intra- 
mural volleyball and football games are played between student teams 
from various departments. Sports equipment for informal recreation 



such as footballs, volleyballs, softballs, bats, horseshoes, and basket- 
balls may be checked out at the Student Center. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Publications of the Student Government Association include a year- 
book and newspaper. The yearbook project offers an opportunity to 
obtain valuable experience in editing, art, layout, photography, and 
business management. The newspaper project provides an opportunity 
for self expression and creativity through the functions of news gather- 
ing, writing, reporting, editing, layout, art, photography, and business 
management. These activities operate as divisions of the student 
government. All students who are interested in working on the year- 
book or newspaper staff should contact the Director of Student 
Activities. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Tau Eta Sigma, a fraternity established to promote excellence in 
the dental laboratory field, is open to Dental Laboratory Technology 
students, faculty, and an alumni. 

Students who are interested in organizing departmental clubs, 
organizations, or fraternities should seek a faculty sponsor and express 
such interest to the Student Council. Such organizations must be 
formed as divisional members of the Student Government Association. 

PLACEMENT 

The Institute offers assistance to graduates seeking employment. 
The Student Services Division maintains a file on job opportunities 
which is available to all students. Personnel representatives of area 
business and industrial firms are encouraged to visit the Institute and 
discuss employment opportunities with students. Public notice is made 
of such recruiting visits. Employment openings are posted in the 
Student Center. 

Students are also encouraged to utilize the services of the Employ- 
ment Security Commission which is active in job placement through- 
out the nation. 





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GENERAL STATEMENT 

The legal organization and operation of institutions of the Com- 
munity College System provides that the distribution of operating 
costs are shared approximately as follows: 

State 65% 

Local 15% 

Student 20% 

The state provides administrative and instructional equipment, sup- 
plies, materials, salaries, travel costs, clerical expenses, library books, 
and part of other costs such as postage, printing, and institutional 
dues. There are certain federal acts providing funds or matching funds 
to qualifying institutions and such funds are procured as supplemental 
to the total State allocations. 

The local board of county commissioners provide funds from Durham 
County's general tax levies to acquire land, erect buildings, and to 
maintain and operate the buildings and sites. 

The student assumes approximately twenty percent of the cost of 
operation through the payment of tuition and fees. The non-resident 
student pays slightly more than four times the tuition rate of a North 
Carolina resident student. 

RESIDENT STATUS FOR TUITION PAYMENT 

General: The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is 

less than for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resi- 

uj dent must have maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least 

^ z the twelve months next preceding the date of first enrollment or re- 

°l enrollment in an institution of higher education in this state. Student 

1x1 status in an institution of higher education in this state shall not 

constitute eligibility for residence to qualify said student for in-state 

tuition. 

Minors: A minor is any person who has not reached the age of 
eighteen years. The legal residence of a person under eighteen years 
of age at the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher 
education in this state is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal 
guardian. In cases where parents are divorced or legally separated, 
the legal residence of the father will control unless custody of the 
minor has been awarded by court to the mother or to a legal guardian 
other than a parent. No claim of residence in North Carolina based 
upon residence of a guardian in North Carolina will be considered if 
either parent is living unless the action of the court appointing the 
guardian antedates the student's first enrollment in a North Carolina 
institution of higher education by at least twelve months. 

Adults: An adult is any person who has reached the age of eighteen 
years. Persons, eighteen or more years of age at the time of first enroll- 



ment in an institution of higher education, are responsible for estab- 
lishing their own domicile. Persons reaching the age of eighteen, whose 
parents are and have been domiciled in North Carolina for at least 
the preceding twelve months, retain North Carolina residence for 
tuition payment purposes until domicile in North Carolina is aban- 
doned. If North Carolina residence is abandoned by an adult, main- 
tenance of North Carolima domicile for twelve months as a non-student 
is required to regain in-state status for tuition payment purposes. 

Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that of her 
husband, except that a woman currently enrolled as an in-state student 
in an institution of higher education may continue as a resident even 
though she marries a nonresident. If the husband is a nonresident and 
separation or divorce occurs, the woman may qualify for in-state tuition 
after establishing her domicile in North Carolina for at least twelve 
months as a nonstudent. 

Military Personnel: No person shall lose his in-state resident status 
by serving in the Armed Forces outside of the State of North Carolina. q 

A member of the Armed Forces may obtain in-state residence status < 

for himself, his spouse, or his children after maintaining his domicile < 

in North Carolina for at least the twelve months next preceding his z 

or their enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher educa- z 

tion in this state. u - 

Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent P - 39 

residence may establish North Carolina residence in the same manner 
as any other nonresident. § 

Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of taxes 
to the State of North Carolina apart from legal residence will not w 

qualify one for the in-state tuition rate. gj 

Change of Status: The residence status of any student is determined x 

as of the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher educa- 
tion in North Carolina except: 

(a ) in the case of a nonresident student at the time of first enrollment 
who has subsequently maintained domicile as a non-student for at least 
twelve consecutive months and 

(b ) in the case of a resident who abandons his legal residence in North 
Carolina. 

In either case, the appropriate tuition rate will become effective at the 
beginning of the first subsequent term enrolled. 

Responsibility of Students: Any student or prospective student in 
doubt concerning his residence status must bear the responsibility for 
securing a ruling by stating his case in writing to the Registrar. The 
student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change 
in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, 
has the responsibility of immediately informing the Registrar of his 
circumstance in writing. Failure to give complete and correct infor- 
mation regarding residence constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. 



TUITION AND FEES 

All tuition and fees are due and payable at the Business Office on 
the official day(s) of registration. Payments are to be by cash or check. 
Partial payments or credits are not accepted unless previous arrange- 
ments have been made and approved by the Business Manager. You 
are to initiate such needs with the Student Services Division prior to 
any attempt to register. 

There is no required payment nor any tuition deposit necessary prior 
to the official day (s ) of registration. However, students desiring to pay 
in advance may do so providing arrangements are made with both 
the Student Services and Business Offices. 

All checks and money orders should be made payable to Durham 

Technical Institute. A check given in payment of expenses which is 

returned by the bank creates an indebtedness to the Institute and 

jeopardizes the student's enrollment. Due to the problems involved in 

D our receiving a "bad" check, a fee of $3.00 will be charged in addition 

< to the indebtedness. 

5! The Institute reserves the right to adjust charges to current costs. 

o Such necessary adjustments with respect to certain charges may be 

< made without prior written notice. 

\t Tuition charges and some of the other fees are created and set by 

P AH ^ e North Carolina Department of Community Colleges. 

The student should arrange well in advance of enrolling to pay all 

q necessary expenses (including such items as kits, tools, and uniform 

< deposits ) on the day (s ) of registration. Registration will not be complete 
[3 nor can a student be officially enrolled until all required tuition and 
z fees are paid. A late registration fee will be charged in addition to the 
q_ regular required fees for all those not paying upon registering on the 
w day (s ) according to the official school calendar. 

TUITION— NORTH CAROLINA RESIDENT 

The formula for equating credit-hour equivalency with credit hours 
for the purpose of assessing tuition charges is as follows: 

1 class hour = 1 credit hour 

2 laboratory hours = 1 credit hour 

3 shop hours = 1 credit hour 
Number of Weeks X Credit Hour 

in course Equivalency X $2.50= 

11 
tuition per quarter with a maximum of $32.00 for all technical, voca- 
tional curriculum, and audit students. 



FULL-TIME STUDENTS 

All vocational, technical, and audit students who are enrolled for 
thirteen (13) or more credit hours are charged a maximum of $32.00 
per quarter. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

The tuition charge for curriculum credit students (and audit stu- 
dents ) is $2.50 times the number of credit hours for which the student 
is enrolled. Example: 9 credit hours X $2.50 = $22.50. 

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION (Non-Resident ) 

Any student whose legal residence is outside of North Carolina will 
pay tuition fees approximately four times the in-state resident rate. 
Students living with relatives in this state whose parents or guardians 
live outside North Carolina will pay tuition fees at the non-resident 
rate. 



FULL-TIME NON-RESIDENT E 

Non-resident students taking thirteen (13) or more credit hours of P - 41 

work will be charged a maximum of $137.50 per quarter tuition for Q 

vocational and technical curriculum programs. ^ 

CO 
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PART-TIME NON-RESIDENT z 

ui 

Q. 

Those taking twelve (12) or less credit hours of work per quarter 25 

will be charged $12.50 times the number of credit hours enrolled. 

AUDIT AND SPECIAL STUDENTS, who are non-residents, will 
be charged at the same rate as the non-resident curriculum student. 

ACTIVITY FEE 

An Activity Fee of $4.00 per quarter, with the exception of summer 
session, is required of all curriculum students enrolled for nine (9 ) or 
more credit hours. The fee is payable by both resident and non-resident 
students. This fee is for the purpose of providing athletic and intra- 
mural equipment and supplies, student government activities, and a 
yearbook for each student. This fee is not refundable and is a required 
payment upon registration in the fall, winter, and spring quarters. 



LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

To prevent or reduce the problems incident to late registration, 
registration schedules are set for specific days and certain definite 
procedures are required. 

A student has not completed registration until all of the required 
steps are taken. It is the student's responsibility to seek and then to 
follow the necessary procedures. 

Any student who fails to complete registration for all classes and 
to make the required payment of expenses and fees on the prescribed 
registration day (s ) according to the official school calendar will be 
charged a late registration fee of $5.00. This applies to all students with 
no exceptions— day, evening, full-time, part-time, special, and audit 
enrollees. 

Those with anticipated financial difficulties should contact the Stu- 
dent Services Division, in person, well in advance of the registration 
deadline. Only the Business Office will approve any special arrange- 
ments, payments and credits concerning any late payments. The Busi- 
er 5- ness Manager will approve or disapprove any request for exemption 
< o of the late registration fee. 



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GRADUATION FEE 

A graduation fee of $10.00 will be due and payable to the Business 
Office once a curriculum student applies for a degree or diploma and 
is so notified by the Student Services Division that he is eligible for 
graduation. This fee covers the cost of the diploma, the rental of a 
cap and gown, and any other graduation expense for which the Insti- 
tute nor the State are eligible to pay. The fee is usually payable at 
registration during the Spring Quarter. The fee is required prior to 
graduation but the student should know that he is eligible to graduate 
before paying. It is not refundable. Those graduating other than at the 
Spring Graduation Exercises and who will not wear caps and gowns 
are required to pay only a $5.00 Graduation Fee. 

REFUND POLICY 

Tuition refund for students shall not be made unless the student is, 
in the judgment of the institution, compelled to withdraw for un- 
avoidable reasons. In such cases, two-thirds (%) of the student's 
tuition may be refunded if the student withdraws within ten (10) 
calendar days after the first day of classes as published in the school 
calendar. Tuition refunds will not be considered after that time. 
Tuition refunds will not be considered for tuitions of five dollars 
($5.00) or less, unless a course or curriculum fails to materialize due to 
no fault of the student. 



There is no refund on such yearly payments as activity fee, insurance 
premium fee, graduation fee for cap, gown, and diploma once it is 
ordered, and special fees such as for late registration. 

In all refund cases, the student must initiate his withdrawal through 
the Student Services Division. The Business Office will make the 
allowable refund only after written request is received from the Student 
Services Division. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Most of the student's necessary textbooks, supplies, and materials 
can be acquired from the Institute's book and supply store. Special 
tools and instruments such as drawing supplies, slide rules, nursing 
caps, etc., are also available. 

The store is operated on a cash basis, and there is no refund on 
books and supplies. 

Some textbooks cost as low as $1.25 and as high as $15.00, but the 9 

average cost of each book is approximately $7.00. Most student should _, 

anticipate spending an average of approximately $45.00 per quarter for ^ 

books, supplies, and materials. The total cost varies according to the z 

particular program. It would be to the student's advantage to meet E 

each class at least once before attempting to purchase texts and 
materials. The Dental, Nursing, Drafting, and Automotive programs P - 43 

require special items and/or instructional kits which may vary from 
quarter to quarter. z 

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UNIFORM DEPOSIT 

Ld 
Q. 

Nursing Students 23 

Nursing students enrolling for their first quarter (or re-enrolling) 
are required to make a $20.00 uniform deposit. This deposit is payable, 
along with the other required fees and tuition, at the Business Office 
during the day (s ) of registration. 

The uniform deposit entitles each Nursing student to use four (4) 
sets of uniforms. Nursing caps are not included, but can be acquired 
from the Institute's book and supply store. 

Should the student complete the requirements for graduation and 
return all uniforms in satisfactory condition, the $20.00 will be paid to 
the State to cover the required cost of taking the State Nursing Board 
Examination. In this case there is no refund. However, the deposit is 
refundable to those who leave school and are not eligible to take the 
State Examinations and who return all uniforms in satisfactory condi- 
tion. 



44 



Automotive Students 

Students enrolling in Automotive programs are required to pay 
$20.00 upon registration each quarter for uniform rental and laundry. 
This fee entitles the student to the use of five (5) sets of uniforms. The 
fee is non-refundable. 



INSURANCE 

A student may become covered for expenses incurred for accidents 
associated with school activities for $2.00 per year. This group in- 
surance coverage is for the entire school year. It is highly recom- 
mended that students take advantage of this coverage especially those 
students in Automotive Engineering, Dental, Electronics, Opticianry, 
and those taking laboratory work in Chemistry, Physics, and Metal- 
lurgy. The insurance charge is optional and students desiring this 
insurance may make payment to the Business Office upon registering 
for Fall Quarter. It is not refundable. 

Neither the Institute nor the State of North Carolina carries insur- 
ance to cover any student for accidents or otherwise. 

TYPICAL FALL QUARTER EXPENSES 





N. C. Resident 


Non-Resident 


Tuition 


$32.00 


$137.50 


Activity Fee 


4.00 


4.00 


Insurance (Optional) 


2.00 


2.00 


Books and Supplies Estimate 


45.00 


45.00 


TOTAL 


$83.00 


$188.50 



N. C. Resident 


Non-Resident 


$32.00 


$137.50 


4.00 


4.00 


40.00 


40.00 


10.00 


10.00 



TYPICAL SPRING QUARTER EXPENSES 

Tuition 
Activity Fee 
Books and Supplies 
Graduation Fee 

TOTAL $81.00 $191.50 

Students in the curriculums or programs listed below will have addi- 
tional expenses as indicated: 

Practical Nursing— $20.00 (Uniform Deposit)— 1st Quarter 
Dental Laboratory Technology— $180.00 (Instructional Kits) — 
($90.00 1st Quarter; $50.00 2nd Quarter; $40.00 6th Quarter ). 



Auto Mechanics— $150.00 (Tools — 2nd Quarter; Uniform $20.00 each 

quarter. 
Automotive Technology— $150.00 (Tools )*— 2nd Quarter; Uniform 

$20.00 each quarter. 
Drafting— $25.00; Instructional Kit; 1st quarter. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Dental Laboratory Technology students may compete for scholar- 
ships available through the American Fund for Dental Education. 
These scholarships range from $500 to $650 per year. First and second 
year students are eligible to apply. Scholarship selections are made by 
the Scholarship Award Committee of the American Fund for Dental 
Education. Applications may be obtained from the Director of Finan- 
cial aid or by writing to the American Fund for Dental Education, 
211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, 60611. Deadline for filing 
is July 1. Annual awards are announced in August. Q 

Competitive scholarships are available for Opticianry students _, 

through the Ladies Auxiliary Guild of Prescription Opticians of America ^ 

and for Architectural Drafting students through Women in Construe- z 

tion of Durham. Interested applicants who have demonstrated high z 

achievement or aptitude should apply to the Director of Financial 
Aid. P - 45 

The Ford Motor Company Fund annually awards competitive schol- 
arships for children of employees of Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury 
dealerships of Ford Motor Company. The scholarship program is 
available only for students who enroll in Automotive Technology. Jjj 

Eligible applicants may obtain information at their local Ford Motor 5 

Company dealership or from the Director of Financial Aid. >< 

Two national organizations sponsor scholarship programs for Practi- 
cal Nurse Education students. A limited number of $250 scholarships 
are available from the National Licensed Practical Nurse Education 
Foundation. Applicants should apply to the Director of Financial Aid. 
A scholarship program is also sponsored by the National Association 
for Practical Nurse Education and Service. Applicants should apply 
to the Director of Practical Nurse Education. 

Scholarships are periodically available through Durham area service 
club, notably the Pilot Club and Altrusa Club. Interested students 
should contact the Director of Financial Aid. 

Long-Term Loans 

Long-term loans are generally awarded upon the basis of need or 
scholarship. Information may be obtained at the Student Services 
Division. 



CO 



P-46 



Insured Student Loans 

Financial assistance is available under the Higher Education Act, 
1965 administered by the College Foundation, Inc. Legal residents 
of North Carolina who have been accepted for enrollment or those who 
expect to enroll for the second year may apply. Students may borrow 
up to $1,500 per year or up to an aggregate of $3,000 for a total of 
two years. Repayment of principal and interest at the rate of 7% begins 
nine months after the student ceases to carry a full time course load. 
Minimum repayment period may not exceed ten years. 

James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation 

The Bryan Foundation, administered by the College Foundation, 
Inc., provides limited funds for loans up to $1,500 per year, with an 
aggregate of $3,000. Interest is 1% while in school and 6% during the 
repayment period. Repayment begins four months after the student 
leaves school. Minimum repayment period may not exceed eight years. 

Vocational Student Loan Fund 

The Vocational Student Loan Fund was established by the State 
Board of Education for deserving North Carolina residents. Students 
who can establish their need for finances may borrow up to $300 
annually. The interest rate is 3/2% and repayment begins one year 
following graduation. The loan must be repaid in five years. 

Short-Term Loans 

Durham Technical Institute Loan Fund 

Small loans are available from an institutional loan fund, made 
possible by donations from local business and industry. The maximum 
loan may not exceed the cost of tuition and fees. This fund is primarily 
available to those students whose shortage of funds is a temporary 
emergency condition. No interest is charged. 

The Kathryn Judd Gray Hardship Fund for Worthy Practical Nurse 
Students 

This small loan fund is available only to students who have suc- 
cessfully completed Practical Nurse Education I. The loan shall not 
exceed the tuition fee. Repayment in full with 4% interest must be 
made within 60 days after completion of the program. Worthy appli- 
cants will be recommended by Mrs. Georgia Alston Jones, Practical 
Nurse Education chairman. 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Law Enforcement Assistance Administration was created under 



the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to provide 
financial aid to individuals enrolled or accepted for enrollment in law 
enforcement degree programs. Students and in-service law enforce- 
ment officers who are enrolled or accepted for enrollment in Police 
Science Technology are eligible to apply to the Director of Financial 
Aid for assistance under the Law Enforcement Education Program. 
Two types of financial aid are available: 

1. Loans for students who are enrolled or accepted for enrollment 
on a full-time basis in preparation for employment in law enforcement. 
Such loans are cancelled at the rate of 25 percent per year for each 
year of employment with a law enforcement agency following gradua- 
tion. 

2. Grants for tuition and fees are available only to students who 
are officers of publicly-funded law enforcement agencies enrolled in 
or accepted for enrollment on a full-time or part-time basis and who 
agree to remain in service of the law enforcement agency employing 
them for a two year period following completion of their educational 
program. 



Work-Study Program 

z 
A limited number of eligible full-time students may be employed u- 

up to a maximum average of 15 hours per week by the Institute under _ 

the Work-Study Program. Work-Study students may be employed 

up to a maximum of 40 hours per week during the summer if they are Q 

not enrolled during such period and plan to resume full-time studies < 

the following quarter. uj 

Interested students should apply to the Student Services Division for z 

the Work-Study Program. Work-Study funds are made available cl 

through the College Work-Study Program under the Higher Educa- w 

tion Act of 1963, as amended. 

Educational Opportunity Grant Program 

A limited number of Educational Opportunity Grants are available 
for eligible full-time students of exceptional financial need who, for the 
lack of financial means of their own or of their family, would be unable 
to enter or remain in an institution of higher education without such 
assistance. Grant recipients must earn the required matching share 
through employment in the Work-Study Program. The Educational 
Opportunity Grant Program is authorized by the Higher Education 
Act of 1965, as amended. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Assistance 

Certain handicapped students are eligible for aid administered 
through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, N. C. Department 



of Public Instruction. Those who seek such aid should make applica- 
tion to the local Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Social Security Benefits 

Some students may qualify for financial assistance through their 
parent's Social Security benefits. Those seeking such aid should first 
contact their local Social Security office. 

Veterans Education Benefits 

Durham Technical Institute has been approved for students who 
wish to attend under the new "Cold War G.I. Bill." 

Veterans who plan to attend under any of the various veterans' 

training laws, and dependents of deceased or disabled veterans who 

expect to enroll under the War Orphans Educational Assistance Act 

should contact their Veterans Service officer in advance of registration. 

q A person claiming benefits and eligibility to receive a monthly 

< subsistence check should be prepared to finance in full his expences 

< for the first two to three months. When full eligibility is established, 
z a subsistence check should be expected about the 20th of each month. 
z The contact hours shown in the catalog are minimal. It is a policy of 
^ this institution to permit students to enroll in additional subjects and 
p . 48 laboratory work beyond those shown in the catalog. 

When in any quarter the total weekly contact hours listed are fewer 
z than twenty-five hours in a technical curriculum and fewer than thirty 

^ hours in a vocational trade curriculum, a student may enroll on re- 

SJ) quest for additional instructional hours deemed by the institution to 

5 be consistent with the program and appropriate to the student to 

x make up twenty-five hours per week in a technical curriculum or 

sufficient hours of attendance to make up thirty hours per week in a 

vocational trade curriculum. 

Other Financial Aid Sources 

The City of Durham sponsors a scholarship program for members 
of the Durham Police Department who are selected to enroll in Police 
Science. Prospective applicants may obtain information at the City 
of Durham Personnel Office. 

Duke University Medical Center provides an educational advance- 
ment program for their employees who may enroll in Durham Techni- 
cal Institute programs. The Paths for Employee Progress Program 
(PEP) offers medical center employees an opportunity to advance 
educationally and to qualify for higher level positions and promotions. 
Inquiries should be directed to the PEP office at Duke Medical Center. 

Persons who are severely disadvantaged may be eligible for assist- 
ance under the Work Incentive Program (WIN ) administered by the 



Employment Security Commission and the Department of Social 
Services. Inquiries should be directed to the Employment Security 
Commission. 

Individuals who are disadvantaged, unemployed or underemployed 
may qualify for assistance under the Manpower Development and 
Training Act of 1962 (M.D.T.A. ) administered by the Employment 
Security Commission and the Department of Community Colleges. 
Inquiries should be directed to the Employment Security Commission. 



P-49 




*gf\ 






PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



Associate in Applied Science Degree Programs 



Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Data Processing Technology 

Dental Laboratory Technology 

Electronics Engineering Technology 

General Office Technology 

Inhalation Therapy 

Library Technology 

Opticianry 

Police Science 
Secretarial Science 



Diploma Programs 

Architectural Drafting 
Automotive Mechanics 
Practical Nurse Education 




®(Mfe 
000 ^pffld 



mmm mm 



o 



ACCOUNTING 



Accounting is one of the fastest growing employment fields in 
America today, and the job outlook for good accountants seems bright 
for many years to come. These opportunities are the result of the 
tremendous business and industrial expansion in all parts of the 
country. Because of this emphasis, there is a growing need for trained 
people in the area of accounting to help managers keep track of a 
firm's operation. The Accounting Curriculum is designed to fill this 
need by offering students the necessary accounting theories and skills 
for entry into the accounting profession. 

The specific objectives of the Accounting Curriculum are to develop 
the following competencies: 

1. Understanding of the principles of organization and manage- 
ment in business operations. 

2. Understanding of the fundamentals of accounting and analysis 
of financial statements. 

3. Understanding and skill in effective communications for 
business. 

The duties and responsibilities of an accountant vary somewhat in 
different firms. Some of the things an accountant might do are: record 
transactions, render periodic reports, maintain cost records, make 
special reports, complete tax returns, audit the books, and advise 
management in areas of financial affairs. 

The graduate of the Accounting Curriculum may qualify for various 
jobs in business and industry leading to any of the following account- 
ing positions: accounting clerk, payroll clerk, accounting machine 
operator, auditor, and cost accountant. This training plus further 
experience should prepare them to become office managers, accounting 
supervisors, and to fill other responsible positions in a business firm. 



Suggested Accounting Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


101 


BUS 


101 


BUS 


102 


BUS 


110 


MAT 


110 



Grammar 

Introduction to Business 
Typewriting (or elective) 
Office Machines 
Business Mathematics 



Hours per 


week 


Quarter 
Hours 


Class 


Lab. 


Credit 


3 





3 


5 





5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


5 





5 



WINTER QUARTER 



ECO 
ENG 
BUS 
BUS 



102 
102 
115 
120 



Elective 
Economics 
Composition 
Business Law 
Accounting 



17 



19 

5 

3 
3 
3 

6 



SPRING QUARTER 



ECO 


104 


Elective 
Economics 


BUS 


116 


Business Law 


BUS 


121 


Accounting 


ENG 


204 


Oral Communication 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


103 


EDP 


104 


BUS 


123 


BUS 


222 


BUS 


225 



Report Writing 

Introduction to Data Processing 

Business Finance 

Accounting 

Cost Accounting 



19 

3 
3 
3 
5 
3 

17 



20 

3 
3 
3 
6 

3 

18 



P-55 



WINTER QUARTER 



BUS 


124 


ENG 


206 


BUS 


223 


BUS 


227 


BUS 


235 



Business Finance 
Business Communication 
Accounting 
Accounting Theory 
Business Management 



18 



20 



3 





3 


3 





3 


5 


2 


6 


3 


2 


4 


3 





3 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

BUS 226 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 229 Taxes 

BUS 269 Auditing 



17 



19 



16 



19 



Accounting Course Descriptions 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the course 
title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is the 
number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture and 
laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hoar each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. 
Regular laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two 
laboratory hours. 



Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 (5-0) 

A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure 
of the various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal 
organization, and management. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 102 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct tech- 
niques, mastery of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and 
manuscripts. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 110 Office Machines 3 (2-2) 

A general survey of business and office machines. Student will receive training 
techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, 
full keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, 
commission, taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 
Prerequisite: None. 



WINTER QUARTER 

ECO 102 Economics 3 (3-0) 

The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices 
by which people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and 
demand and the principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, 
and consumption both in relation to the individual enterprise and to society at 
large. 
Prerequisite: None. 



s 



ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

BUS 115 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals 
and principles of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and 
agencies. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 120 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the me- 
chanics of accounting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting informa- 
tion about service and mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of 
the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: MAT 110. 



SPRING QUARTER 

ECO 104 Economics 3 (3-0) 

Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the com- 
position and pricing of national output, distribution of income, international trade < 
and finance, and current economic problems. ^ 
Prerequisite: ECO 102. O 

Q_ 
BUS 116 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk -bearing, partnership- P - 57 

corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 
Prerequisite: BUS 115. O 

BUS 121 Accounting 6 (5-2) £ 

A study of partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, 3 

federal and state taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and § 

interpreting data for management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Ac- O 

counting services are shown as they contribute to the recognition and solution 
of management problems. 
Prerequisite: BUS 120. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 



< 



58 



EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 4 (3-2) 

Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an 
aid in developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study 
of particular computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming 
courses. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 123 Business Finance 3 (3-0) 

Includes a study of the financing of business units, as individuals, partnerships, 
corporations, and trusts. A detailed study is made of short-term, long-term, and 
consumer financing. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 222 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Thorough treatment of the field of general accounting, providing the necessary 
foundation for specialized studies that follow. The course includes among other 
aspects, the balance sheet, income and surplus statements, fundamental processes 
of recording, cash and temporary investments, and analysis of working capital. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

BUS 225 Cost Accounting , 4 (3-2) 

Nature and purposes of cost accounting; accounting for direct labor, materials, 
and factory burden; job cost, and standard cost principles and procedures; selling 
and distribution cost; budgets, and executive use of cost figures are studied. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

WINTER QUARTER 

BUS 124 Business Finance 3 (3-0) 

Includes a study of the financing, federal, state, and local government and the 
ensuing effects upon the economy. Factors affecting supply of funds, monetary 
and credit policies are studied. 
Prerequisite: BUS 123. 

ENG 206 Business Communication 3 (3-0) 

Develops skills and techniques needed in writing business communications. Em- 
phasis is placed on writing action — getting sales letters and business reports. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

BUS 223 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Additional study of intermediate accounting with emphasis on investments, plant 
and equipment, intangible assets and deferred charges, long-term liabilities, paid- 
in capital, retained earnings, and special analytical processes. 
Prerequisite: BUS 222. 

BUS 227 Accounting Theory 4 (3-2) 

Accounting Theory is designed to provide a frame of reference in the theory of 
income, in asset valuation, in the history of accounting thought, and as a general 
survey in the field of financial accounting. It is also designed to enable the 
student through the processes of inductive and deductive reasoning to obtain a 
better understanding of the many controversial topics in the area of accounting 
theory and to evaluate critically these abstract points of view. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

BUS 235 Busint ,s Management 3 (3-0) 

Principles of business management including overview of major functions of 
management, such as planning, staffing, controlling, directing, and financing. 
Clarification of the decision-making function versus the operating function. Role 
of management in business — qualifications and requirements are studied. 
Prerequisite: None. 



SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 269 Auditing 4 (3-2) 

Application of federal and state taxes to various businesses and business condi- 
tions. A study of the following taxes: income, payroll, intangible, capital gain, 
sales and use, excise, and inheritance. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

BUS 226 Managerial Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Principles of conducting audits and investigations setting up accounts based upon 
audits; collecting data on working papers; arranging and systemizing the audit, and 
writing the audit report is studied. Emphasis placed on detailed audits, internal 
auditing, and internal control. 
Prerequisite: BUS 223. 

BUS 226 Managerial Accounting 6 (5-2) 

The course consists of the presentation, analysis, and interpretation of financial 
data, accounting and managerial control and planning. The objective is to explain 
how accounting data can be interpreted and used by management in planning 
and controlling business activities and to show how accounting can help to solve 
the problems that confront those who are directly responsible for the management 
of the enterprise. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 



< 
cr 
O 
O 

tr 

Q_ 

P-59 



3 

8 
2 



Automotive Technology 



There is a growing need for transportation maintenance technicians 
to rebuild, test and service automotive units including diesel engines. 
The Service Managers Committee of the American Motors Association 
estimates that 45 to 50 thousand mechanics and technicians are needed 
each year to keep service shops properly manned. However, fewer 
than 10,000 recruits are entering the profession annually. 

North Carolina, in its tremendous industrial growth, feels the need 
for more highly trained and skilled personnel in the automotive and 
transportation field. Industry is dependent upon transportation for 
movement of raw materials and finished products. Automotive units 
and diesel engines are prime movers, and require technicians to service 
and maintain them for proper operation. This curriculum has been 
developed to train technicians for the transportation maintenance field. 

The Automotive Technology Curriculum is designed for students 
who are interested in work on or related to motor vehicles. This cur- 
riculum provides for entrance into technician level employment areas. 
Principles of design and operation provide for an exact appreciation 
of the functions of automotive units. Correlated laboratory work 
develops ability to execute or supervise diagnostic tests and repairs. 

The automotive machinist and maintenance technician has a knowl- 
edge of laboratory procedures in automotive and associated areas. He is 
capable of operating laboratory equipment and instruments to perform 
a variety of tests on materials and equipment. Included also may be 
performance testing of new materials and equipment. As a diagnosti- 
cian, he may, with the use of instruments, locate automotive or electri- 
cal defects and arrange for repair. He is often required to record data, 
write reports and make recommendations. 



Suggested Automotive Technology Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



Hours per week 



FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 

MEC 101 Machine Processes 

PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 

AUT 111 Internal Combustion Engines 

DFT 111 Blueprint Reading and Sketching 



Class 

3 
5 

3 
4 




Lab. 



6 

2 
3 
3 



Quarter 
Hours 
Credit 

3 
5 
2 
4 
5 
1 



15 



14 



20 



WINTER QUARTER 



ENG 
MAT 
MEC 
PHY 
AUT 


102 Composition 

102 Technical Mathematics 

102 Machine Processes 

103 Physics: Electricity 

112 Internal Combustion Engines 


SPRING QUARTER 

PHY 102 Physics: Work, Energy, Power 
AUT 121 Automotive Electrical Systems 
AUT 125 Chassis Systems 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 
PHY 209 Thermodynamics 


FALL QUARTER 

CHM 101 Chemistry 

ENG 103 Report Writing 

AUT 213 Diesel Engines 

AUT 221 Power Trains 

MEC 235 Hydraulics and Pneumatics 


WINTER QUARTER 

H 1 r*r**'f'i \rt± 




AUT 
AUT 
AUT 


201 Engine Rebuilding 

226 Braking Systems 

231 Diagnosis and Testing 


SPRING QUARTER 


Ejlective 


AUT 
AUT 

AUT 


202 Engine Rebuilding 
232 Diagnosis and Testing 
240 Motor Vehicle Laws 
and Regulations 



3 





3 


5 





5 





6 


2 


3 


2 


4 


4 


6 


6 



15 

3 
3 
2 
3 
3 

14 



4 
3 
2 
3 
3 

15 



12 



14 

2 
3 
6 



11 



2 


3 

6 
3 

14 



15 



20 



5 
3 
3 
5 
4 

20 



3 





3 


3 





3 


2 


6 


4 


2 


3 


3 


2 


6 


4 



17 



3 





3 


3 





3 


1 


6 


3 


2 


6 


4 



P-61 



12 



12 



16 



Automotive Technology Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is the 
number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credits earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. Number 
systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic operations, the 
rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental trigonometric concepts and 
operations are introduced. The application of these principles to practical problems 
is stressed. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MEC 101 Machine Processes 2 (0-6) 

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with basic hand tools, 
safety procedures and machine processes of our modern industry. It will include a 
study of measuring instruments, characteristics of metals and cutting tools. The 
student will become familiar with the lathe family of machine tools by performing 
selected operations such as turning, facing, threading, drilling, boring, and 
reaming. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 4 (3-2) 

A fundamental course covering several basic principles of physics. The divisions 
included are solids and their characteristics, liquids at rest and in motion, gas 
laws and applications. Laboratory experiments and specialized problems dealing 
with these topics are part of this course. 
Corequisite: MAT 101. 

AUT 111 Internal Combustion Engines 5 (4-3) 

A basic study of the internal combustion engine, theoretical cycles, physical 
principles of fueling, lubricating and cooling, and the nature and relationship of 
all components in the functioning engine. The laboratory correlates with the 
classroom work. 
Prerequisites: None. 

DFT 111 Blueprint Reading and Sketching 1 (0-3) 

Reading and interpretation of blueprints, drawings, charts, wiring diagrams, 
service manuals and associated information are studied. Practice in free-hand 
sketching of wiring diagrams and parts using basic principles of lines, wires, and 
dimensions is included. 
Prerequisite: None. 



WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
teehnieal composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

A continuation of MAT 101. Advanced algebraic and trigonometric topics in- 
cluding quadratics, logarithms, determinants, progressions, and binomial expansion, 
complex numbers, solution of oblique triangles and graphs of the trigonometric 
functions are studied in depth. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

MEC 102 Machine Processes 2 (0-6) 

Advanced operations on lathe, drilling, boring and reaming machines. Milling 
machine theory and practice. Thorough study of the types of milling machines, 
cutters, jigs and fixture devices, and the accessories used in a modern industrial 
plant. Safety in the operational shop is stressed. 
Prerequisite: MEC 101. 

PHY 103 Physics: Electricity 4 (3-2) >_ 

Basic theories of electricity, types of electricity, methods of production, and trans- O 

mission and transforming of electricity are studied. Electron theory, electricity by _J 

chemical action, electricity by friction, electricity by magnetism, induction voltage, ^ 

amperage, resistance, horsepower, wattage, and transformers are major parts of X 

the course. yj r 

Prerequisites: MAT 101, PHY 101. H r 

AUT 112 Internal Combustion Engines 4 (4-6) P - 63 ■ 

Emphasis upon proper fits, clearances, exact requirements of engines in common i 

use, interpretation of manufacturers' specifications as related to engine principles, > 

functional and design relationships. The laboratory correlates with the classroom P 

work. O t 

Prerequisite: AUT 111. O I 

SPRING QUARTER < { 

PHY 102 Physics: Work, Energy, Power 4 (3-2) : ' 

Major areas covered in this course are work, energy, and power. Instruction 

includes such topics as statics, forces, center of gravity and dynamics. Units of 

measurement and their applications are a vital part of this course. A practical 

approach is used in teaching students the use of essential mathematical formulas. 

Prerequisites: MAT 101, PHY 101. 

AUT 121 Automotive Electrical System 4 (3-3) 

A study of electrical principles specifically related to the motor vehicle industry. 
Stress is placed on the construction, operation, and service of the following 
items: battery, generator, alternator, ignition system, wiring circuits, voltage and 
current control devices, including transistor units. The student will receive in- 
struction in the use of testing equipment and special tools used on electrical 
components. Laboratory correlates theory and practice in the actual use of equip- 
ment for testing and adjusting. 
Corequisite: PHY 103. 

AUT 125 Chassis Systems 4 {2-6) 

The principles of wheel and chassis alignment suspension systems, static and 
dynamic wheel balancing, and steering geometry are studied. The laboratory will 
include power steering units and other chassis units for investigation of theory 
practice and design. 
Prerequisite: None. 



ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

PHY 209 Thermodymanics 3 (3-0) 

A basic course to familiarize the student with the principles of thermodynamics. 
Topics include heat, temperature, work and the first and second laws of thermo- 
dynamics, with basic applications. Gases, vapor cycles, combustion and the internal 
combustion engine are studied. 
Corequisites: PHY 102, MAT 102. 



Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

CHM 101 Chemistry 5 (4-2) 

Study of the physical and chemical properties of substances, chemical changes; 
elements, compounds, gases, chemical combinations; weights and measurements; 
theory of metals; acids, bases, salts, solvents, solutions, and emulsions. In addition, 
study of carbohydrates; electrochemistry, electrolytes, and electrolysis in their 
application of chemistry to industry. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

AUT 213 Diesel Engines 3 (2-3) 

Fuel analysis, air induction, fuel systems with emphasis on pumps and injectors — 
their calibration and adjustments, combustion and precombustion chambers, and 
exhaust systems are studied. 
Prerequisites: AUT 112, PHY 209. 

AUT 221 Power Trains 5 (3-6) 

The study of vevel, spiral, worm, hypoid, and planetary gearing; rear axle de- 
sign including positive traction units, driveshafts, universal joints; fluid couplings, 
torque converters, servos, and control units as applied to the automatic trans- 
mission. The laboratory correlates theory and practice using various manufacturers 
units. 
Prerequisite: PHY 102. 

MEC 235 Hydraulics and Pneumatics 4 (3-3) 

The basic theories of hydraulic and pneumatic systems are studied including com- 
binations of systems in various circuits. Basic designs and functions of circuits 
and motors, controls, electrohydraulic servomechanisms, plumbing, filtration, ac- 
cumulators and reservoirs are included. 
Prerequisite: PHY 102. 

WINTER QUARTER 

AUT 201 Engine Rebuilding 4 (2-6) 

A thorough study of the maintenance of the internal combustion engine. An in- 



vestigation of factors affecting engine performance, testing methods and equip- 
ment, and calculations relative to performance comparisons. Laboratory work 
stresses the operation and maintenance of equipment required in the engine 
rebuilding process, correct methods of disassembly, cleaning, inspection of parts 
and reassembly. 
Prerequisites: AUT 112 & 121. 

AUT 226 Braking Systems 3 (2-3) 

The application of hydraulic and pneumatic principles to motor vehicle brake 
systems. Modes of braking and control systems including heavy duty brakes, 
vacuum assist, and air brakes. 
Prerequisite: MEC 235. 

AUT 231 Diagnosis and Testing 4 (2-6) 

A comprehensive study of the principles of modern automotive test equipment 
including the dynamometer, engine analyzers, oscilloscopes, dwell meters, fuel 
and exhaust analyzers. The laboratory involves test runs to obtain engine power 
output and mechanical efficiency. 
Prerequisites: AUT 112, AUT 121, AUT 125. 

SPRING QUARTER 

AUT 202 Engine Rebuilding 3 (1-6) 

Emphasis is given to the fits and tolerances of reworked parts and components. £3 

Laboratory experience is given on the more complex equipment to enable the — I 

student to complete the engine rebuilding process. 21 

Prerequisite: AUT 201. X 

AUT 232 Diagnosis and Testing 4 (2-6) •" 

Diagnostic testing procedures are emphasized in determining the nature of 
troubles that develop in various component systems found in motor transportation 
units. A thorough study and application of testing methods, equipment use, and 
the interpretation of test results. Outside reading concerning the latest test pro- > 

cedures and research performed by major companies will be assigned and dis- P 

cussed. Related laboratory studies will involve test runs, analysis of data and Q 

corrective maintenance. Includes a study of various power units in general use O 

on motor vehicles. Instruction in various power operated convenience and safety ^ 

devices including tops, windows, seats, and speed control units. Also, power < 

brake units, power steering units, and comfort control devices. Course will also 
include a general introduction to the principles of refrigeration. A study of the 
assembly components and connections necessary in the unit as applied to auto- 
mobiles and trucks. The methods of operation and control. Safety precautions 
in the handling of refrigerants. Laboratory instruction includes installation and 
service of the air conditioning unit. 
Prerequisite: AUT 231. 

AUT 240 Motor Vehicle Laws and Regulations 3 (3-0) 

A basic study of motor vehicle laws and regulations of North Carolina including 
the state inspection requirements. An overview of interstate and intrastate I.C.C. 
and liability insurance requirements pertaining to motor carriers. 
Prerequisite: None. 



> 



P-65 



Business Administration 



In North Carolina the opportunities in business are increasing. 
With the increasing population and industrial development in this 
State, business has become more competitive and automated. Better 
opportunities in business will be filled by students with specialized 
education beyond the high school level. The Business Administration 
Curriculum is designed to prepare the student for employment in one 
of many occupations common to business. Training is aimed at pre- 
paring the student in many phases of administrative work that might 
be encountered in the average business. 

The specific objectives of the Business Administration Curriculum 
are to develop the following competencies: 

1. Understanding of the principles of organization and management 
in business operations. 

2. Understanding our economy through study and analysis of the 
role of production and marketing. 

3. Knowledge in specific elements of accounting, finance, and 
business law. 

4. Understanding and skill in effective communication for business. 

5. Knowledge of human relations as they apply to successful busi- 
ness operations in a rapidly expanding economy. 

The graduate of the Business Administration Curriculum may enter 
a variety of career opportunities from beginning sales person or office 
clerk to manager trainee. The duties and responsibilities of this grad- 
uate vary in different firms. These encompassments might include: 
making up and filing reports, tabulating and posting data in various 
books, sending out bills, checking calculations, adjusting complaints, 
operating various office machines, and assisting managers in super- 
vising. Positions are available in businesses such as advertising; bank- 
ing; credit; finance; retailing; wholesaling; hotel, tourist, and travel 
industry; insurance; transportation; and communications. 



Suggested Business Administration Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 

BUS 102 Typewriting (or elective) 

BUS 110 Office Machines 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 



ours per week 


Quarter 




Hours 


Class Lab. 


Credit 


3 


3 


5 


5 


2 3 


3 


2 2 


3 


5 


5 



17 



19 



WINTER QUARTER 



ECO 
ENG 
BUS 
BUS 
BUS 



102 
102 
115 
120 
239 



Economics 
Composition 
Business Law 
Accounting 
Marketing 



19 



20 



SPRING QUARTER 



ECO 


104 


Economics 


BUS 


116 


Business Law 


BUS 


121 


Accounting 


ENG 


204 


Oral Communications 


BUS 


232 


Sales Development 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 












ENG 


103 


Report Writing 




EDP 


104 


Introduction to Data 


Processing 


BUS 


123 


Business Finance 




BUS 


243 


Advertising 





3 





3 


£- 


3 





3 


2 
Q 


5 


2 


6 


< 


3 





3 




3 





3 


P-67 


.7 


2 


18 


LlI 

z 

C/) 
CO 


3 





3 




3 





3 




3 


2 


4 




3 





3 




3 


2 


4 





WINTER QUARTER 







Elective 
Elective 
Business Finance 


BUS 


124 


ENG 


206 


Business Communication 


BUS 


235 


Business Management 



15 



17 



3 





3 


3 





3 


3 





3 


3 . 





3 


3 





3 



SPRING QUARTER 



Elective 

Elective 

BUS 229 Taxes 

BUS 271 Office Management 

BUS 272 Principles of Supervision 



15 



15 



3 





3 


3 





3 


3 


2 


4 


3 





3 


3 





3 



15 



16 



Business Administration Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and ''manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 (5-0) 

A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure 
of the various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal 
organization, and management. 
68 Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 102 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct tech- 
niques, mastery of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and 
manuscripts. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 110 Office Machines 3 (2-2) 

A general survey of business and office machines. Students will receive training 
techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, 
full keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, 
commission, taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ECO 102 Economics 3 (3-0) 

The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices 
by which people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and 
demand and the principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, 
and consumption both in relation to the individual enterprise and to society at 
large. 
Prerequisite: None. 



ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

BUS 115 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals 
and principles of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and 
agencies. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 120 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the me- 
chanics of accounting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting informa- 
tion about service and mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of 
the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: MAT 110. 

BUS 239 Marketing 5 (5-0) 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of functions, z 

policies, and institutions involved in the marketing process. O 

Prerequisite: None. ^ 

Od 
SPRING QUARTER £ 

E 

ECO 104 Economics 3 (3-0) § 

Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the com- Q 

position and pricing of national output, distribution of income, international trade 
and finance, and current economic problems. p cq 

Prerequisite: ECO 102. 

BUS 116 Business Law 3 (3-0) $ 

Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- ^ 

corporation, mortgages, and property rights. ^j 

Prerequisite: BUS 115. Z> 

CD 

BUS 121 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

A study of partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, 
federal and state taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and 
interpreting data for management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Ac- 
counting services are shown as they contribute to the recognition and solution 
of management problems. 
Prerequisite: BUS 120. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

BUS 232 Sales Development 3 (3-0) 

A study of retail, wholesale and specialty selling. Emphasis is placed upon 
mastering and applying the fundamentals of selling. Preparation for and execution 
of sales demonstrations required. 
Prerequisite: None. 



Sophomore Year 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 4 (3-2) 

Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an 
aid in developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study 
of particular computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming 
courses. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 123 Business Finance 3 (3-0) 

Includes a study of the financing of business units, as individuals, partnerships, 

z corporations, and trusts. A detailed study is made of short-term, long-term, and 

O consumer financing. 

h- Prerequisite: None. 

:r 

£ BUS 243 Advertising 4 (3-2) 

2 The role of advertising in a free economy and its place in the media of mass 

;= communications. A study of advertising appeals; product and market research; 

□ selection of media; means of testing effectiveness of advertising. Theory and practice 

^ of writing advertising copy for various media. 

p -jp. Prerequisite: None. 

fJ) WINTER QUARTER 

\n 

2 BUS 124 Business Finance 3 (3-0) 

7) Includes a study of the financing, federal, state, and local government and the 

^ ensuing effects upon the economy. Factors affecting supply of funds, monetary and 

credit policies are studied. 

Prerequisite: BUS 123. 

ENG 206 Business Communication 3 (3-0) 

Develops skills and techniques needed in writing business communications. Em- 
phasis is placed on writing action — getting sales letters and business reports. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

BUS 235 Business Management 3 (3-0) 

Principles of business management including overview of major functions of 
management, such as planning, staffing, controlling, directing, and financing. 
Clarification of the decision -making function versus the operating function. Role 
of management in business — qualifications and requirements are studied. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 229 Taxes 4 (3-2) 

Application of federal and state taxes to various businesses and business condi- 
tions. A study of the following taxes; income, payroll, intangible, capital gain, 
sales and use, excise and inheritance. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 



BUS 271 Office Management 3 (3-0) 

Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role 
of office management including its functions, office automation, planning, con- 
trolling, organizing and actuating office problems. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 272 Principles of Supervision 3 (3-0) 

Introduces the basic responsibilities and duties of the supervisor and his rela- 
tionship to superiors, subordinates, and associates. Emphasis on securing and 
effective work force and the role of the supervisor. Methods of supervision are 
stressed. 



P-71 



3 ! 

I 

C 



Data Processing 



The processing of data by electronic equipment has created vast 
changes in business and industry. Nowhere are these changes more 
apparent than in the occupations associated with the handling of 
business information. Much of the routine and time-consuming work 
of obtaining, compiling and reporting the information necessary for a 
business to operate can now be adapted to machine processing. 

This curriculum is designed to give the student (1 ) an understanding 
of the principles of business operation, (2 ) experience with techniques 
and handling business data, and (3 ) functional competence in the 
application of data processing systems, and experience in computer 
programming of business records and accounts, inventory, sales, and 
income and expenditures essential to business and to management 
decisions. 

Emphasis is upon business data processing and use of machines in 
solving business problems. 

The business data processing specialist applies currently available 
programming techniques to a defined problem with minimum super- 
vision. He analyzes and defines systems requirements to develop a 
program for electronic data processing; conducts detailed analyses 
of systems requirements, and develops all levels of block diagrams 
and logical flow charts. Translates program details into coded instruc- 
tions; establishes test data; tests, refines, and revises program and 
documents and procedures. Ascertains if other combinations of instruc- 
tion would achieve greater flexibility, better machine utilization, or 
more dependable results. He may prepare a complete set of operation 
instructions for use by a console operator; on occasion, operates the 
console in processing program. 



Suggested Data Processing Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



Hours per week 



FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 

EDP 125 Data Processing Fundamentals 

EDP 140 Introduction to Computer Concepts 

EDP 141 Compiler Language I 



Class 

3 
5 

2 
3 
2 



Lab. 



2 

2 



Quarter 
Hours 
Credit 

3 
5 
3 

3 
3 



WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 

ECO 102 Economics 

BUS 120 Accounting 

EDP 143 Assembly Language 



13 

3 
3 
5 
2 



15 

3 
3 
6 
4 



SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 121 Accounting 

EDP 142 Compiler Language II 

ENG 204 Oral Communications 

PSY 206 Applied Psychology 



13 



16 



5 


2 


6 


2 


4 


4 


3 





3 


3 





3 



13 



16 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 

Elective 

EDP 202 Data Processing Applications I 

MAT 214 Statistics I 

EDP 214 Computer Systems I 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

EDP 203 Data Processing Applications II 

EDP 215 Computer Systems II 

EDP 219 Systems and Procedures 

EDP 228 User Programs 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

ENG 103 Report Writing 

EDP 216 Data Processing Project 

EDP 220 Applied Business Systems 

EDP 226 Computer Language Survey 









6 


2 


4 


4 


5 





5 


2 


2 


3 


9 


6 


18 








6 


2 


4 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 





3 


2 


2 


3 


9 


8 


16 








6 


3 





3 


1 


8 


5 


3 





3 


2 


2 


3 



10 



17 



Data Processing Course Descriptions 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 

^ Prerequisite: None. 

c/> 

O MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

^ The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. Number 

Q- systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic operations, the 

. rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental trigonometric concepts and 

' " '^ operations are introduced. The application of these principles to practical problems 

is stressed. 

< Prerequisite: None. 



CD 



EDP 125 Data Processing Fundamentals 3 (2-2) 

A basic introductory course in the fundamental principles of collection, recording, 
interpreting, and processing data. Emphasis is placed on input-output devices 
and the utilization of unit record equipment. Manual, mechanical and electronic 
methods of processing data are used in experiments for the purpose of emphasiz- 
ing the three methods. 
Prerequisites: None. 

EDP 140 Introduction to Computer Concepts 3 (3-0) 

An introductory course in computers for the student who plans to pursue data 
processing as a career and for the student who desires a general non-technical 
knowledge of terminology and concepts. No previous knowledge or experience in 
data processing is required. 
Prerequisite: None. 

EDP 141 Compiler Language I 3 (2-2) 

A fundamental course in computer programming. A compiler language structure, 
statements, and programming methods and techniques are studied. The student 
will develop program logic and write computer programs for solving problems. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 



ECO 102 Economics 3 (3-0) 

The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices 
by which people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and 
demand and the principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, 
and consumption both in relation to the individual enterprise and to society at 
large. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 120 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the me- 
chanics of accounting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting informa- 
tion about service and mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of 
the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: None. 

EDP 143 Assembly Language 4 (2-4) 

A study of symbolic computer languages with emphasis on a particular example of 
such a language. The student will develop program logic and write programs 
using assembly language for solving problems. 
Prerequisite: EDP 140. 

SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 121 Accounting 6 (5-2) Z 

A study of partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, </) 

federal and state taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and LJ 

interpreting data for management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Ac- ^ 

counting services are shown as they contribute to the recognition and solution CE 
of management problems. 
Prerequisite: BUS 120. P - 75 

EDP 142 Compiler Language II 4 (2-4) 

This course is designed to provide extensive training in programming using a I— 

compiler language. The language structure, statements, and programming ^ 

methods and techniques are studied. The students will develop program logic and 
write programs for solving problems. 
Prerequisites: EDP 141, MAT 101. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, 
improving diction, voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory 
to correct speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 (3-0) 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understand- 
ing of inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions, are 
considered with particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics inves- 
tigated are: employee selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. 
Attention is also given to personal and group dynamics so that the student may 
learn to apply the principles of mental hygiene to his adjustment problems as a 
worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 



Sophomore Year 
FALL QUARTER 

EDP 202 Data Processing Applications I 4 (2-4) 

This course is designed to provide the student with sufficient knowledge in 
computer methodology to permit the use of computers in business. Emphasis will 
center around the computer environment with an in-depth study of the integra- 
tion of the computer within business applications. 
Prerequisite: EDP 142. 

MAT 214 Statistics I 5 (5-0) 

A study of the theory and application of statistics. Experience is given in the 
association and use of statistical techniques in the prediction and estimation of 
the outcome of experiments related to practical problems in business data process- 
ing. Practical experience is gained in the utilization of computers in the statistical 
solution of problems. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

EDP 214 Computer Systems I 3 (2-2) 

A study of computer systems involving such concepts of architecture and/or 
programming as file devices, file organization, job control language, channels, 
interruptions, and operating systems. 
Prerequisite: EDP 143. 

WINTER QUARTER 

EDP 203 Data Processing Applications II 4 (2-4) 

This course emphasizes the preparation and utilization of operations data used in a 
typical business, case problems involving systems established for collecting the 
data, and generating information for organizational units are studied. Audit 
trails enabling the tracing of transactions back to the original source or forward 
to the final report are analyzed. Simulated data is used to demonstrate program- 
ming techniques required in processing management information. Statistical 
analysis programming using scientific language is studied as an aid to business 
decisions. 
Prerequisite: EDP 202, EDP 214. 

EDP 215 Computer Systems II 3 (2-2) 

A study of computer systems involving such concepts of architecture and/or 
programming for resident packs, multiprogramming job scheduling, teleprocess- 
ing, and utility programs. 
Prerequisite: EDP 214. 

EDP 219 Systems and Procedures 3 (3-0) 

An introductory course in the principles of management systems applied to infor- 
mation flows. Particular attention is given to forms flow -charting, forms analysis, 
and systems analysis. 
Corequisite: EDP 215. 



EDP 228 User Programs 3 (2-2) 

A study of the documentation, application, and use of various user supplied pro- 
grams, as related to business data processing. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SPRING QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 



application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

EDP 216 Data Processing Project 5 (1-8) 

Individual assignments of a carefully selected project will be the work of the 
student during this course. It will give the student an opportunity to initiate and 
carry out a project from outside the school. This course places the responsibility 
upon the student to solve a significant problem with a minimum of assistance 
from the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Sixth quarter standing and approval of the instructor. 

EDR220 Applied Business Systems 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of management systems applied to information data flow. Practical 
work in systems flow-charting and analysis is implemented. The condition of 
feasibility studies, the preparation and maintenance of standard practice, policies 
and organization manuals, and computer application are stressed. 
Prerequisites: EDP 214, MAT 214. 

EDP 226 Computer Language Survey 3 (2-2) 

A study of various computer languages. Students will write and execute basic 

programs in the computer language being studied. <j 

Prerequisites: EDP 142, EDP 143. 2 

C/) 

in 

LU 

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P-77 



Dental Laboratory Technology 



The dental laboratory technician is a member of the dental health 
team. With the increased population growth throughout the country, 
there has been increased demand for dental treatment placed upon 
the dental profession. Although only a few years ago, it was possible 
for the practicing dentist to perform all the work required to meet the 
needs of the patient, today he must rely on technically trained 
subsidiary assistants such as the dental laboratory technician, dental 
hygienist, and dental assistant. With his talent and technical skill 
the dental laboratory technician is able to provide an essential 
auxiliary service to the profession of dentistry. 

The dental laboratory technician fabricates prosthetic appliances, 
as authorized by the dentist only, through written prescriptions, im- 
pressions, and casts. He works with various specialized hand instru- 
ments and equipment using materials such as gypsum products, waxes, 
plastics, ceramic materials, precious and semi-precious metals. 

The work of the dental laboratory technician, as a member of the 
dental health team, is confined to the dental laboratory. He is the 
only member of the team that does not come in contact with the 
patient; however, through his work, he is able to contribute much 
to the dental health of the patient. 






Suggested Dental Laboratory Technology Curriculum 





Freshman Year 












Hours per 


week 


Quarter 
Hours 


FALL 


QUARTER 


Class 


Lab. 


Credit 


ENG 


101 Grammar 


3 





3 


ZT^DEN 
^T DEN 


101 Dental Anatomy and Physiology 


2 


12 


'6 ' 


104 Dental Materials 


1 


6 


3 


DEN 


106 Complete Denture Techniques 


1 


3 


2 


MAT 


110 Business Mathematics 


5 





5 



12 



21 



19 



WINTER QUARTER 



ENG 


102 


DEN 


107 


DEN 


111 


DEN 


113 



Composition 

Complete Denture Techniques 

Dental Metallurgy 

Cast Metallic Inlay and 

Crown Techniques 



SPRING QUARTER 

GUM 101 Chemistry W 
DEN 108 Partial Denture Techniques 

DEN 115 Crown and Bridge Techniques 

ENG 204 Oral Communications 



SUMMER QUARTER 

ffiY 101 " Physies^r 

DEN 109 Partial Denture Techniques 

DEN 116 Crown and Bridge Techniques 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


103 


Report Writing 


DEN 


201 


Advanced Dentures with Cast 
Base Techniques 


DEN 


204 


Partial Denture Techniques 


DEN 


207 


Advanced Crown and Bridge 
Techniques 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

DEN 205 Partial Denture Techniques 

DEN 211 Ceramic Techniques 

DEN 213 Dental Laboratory Practice 



3 





3 




1 


9 


4 




3 





3 




2 


12 


6 




9 


21 


16 


>- 
o 
o 

_J 

o 

z 

X 

o 

UJ 

h- 


4 

2 
1 
3 


2 
9 
9 



5 
5 
4 
3 





20 


17 


P-79 


3 
1 
1 


2 

9 

12 


4 
4 
5 


>- 
tr 

P 

< 
o 

DO 

3 


5 


23 


9 








_l 

2 
UJ 
Q 


3 





3 




2 


9 


5 




1 


6 


3 




1 


6 


3 




7 


21 


14 




3 





3 




1 


12 


5 




2 


9 


5 




1 


3 


2 





24 



15 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

DEN 209 Jurisprudence and Ethics Seminar 

DEN 212 Advanced Ceramic Techniques 

DEN 214 Advanced Dental Laboratory 

Practices 



3 





3 


3 





3 


2 


12 


6 



18 15 



Dental Laboratory Technology Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is the 
number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture and 
laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of credits 
earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the quarter with 
the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". A "manipu- 
lative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency and earns 
credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular laboratory 
hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DEN 101 Dental Anatomy and Physiology 6 (2-12) 

An introduction to anatomy of the head and neck, and physiology of occlusion 
with special emphasis on anatomy of the individual teeth and surrounding 
tissues. The laboratory portion includes drawings of each tooth, from central 
incisor through the second molar on one side of the upper and lower arches. 
Fourteen teeth are carved in wax, with special emphasis on reproducing natural 
anatomy. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DEN 104 Dental Materials 3 (1-6) 

A study of the composition, properties, and uses of nonmetallic dental materials 
such as gypsum products, impression materials, plastics, waxes and duplicating 
materials. The laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate the properties and 
uses of the materials studied and the results of proper and improper manipulation. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DEN 106 Complete Denture Techniques 2 (1-3) 

A study of the fabrication of complete dentures. Laboratory work includes con- 
struction of shellac base plates and occlusion rims; mounting casts, using both 
the face -bow and arbitrary method; arrangement of teeth for complete maxillary 
and mandibular dentures on an adjustable articulator, and simple denture repair. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, 
commission, taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 
Prerequisite: None. 



WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

DEN 107 Complete Denture Techniques 4 (1-9) 

A continuing study of the fabrication of complete dentures. Laboratory work 
includes construction of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures using 
various posterior tooth forms on an adjustable articulator; and procedures for 
relining and rebasing complete dentures. 
Prerequisite: DEN 106. 

DEN 111 Dental Metallurgy 3 (3-0) 

A study of precious metals, alloys, and chrome alloys; and their application to 
dental procedures, including the physical and mechanical properties, crystalline 
structure, investments, methods of casting, soldering, heat treatment, and polishi 
Prerequisite: DEN 104. 



usnim 



DEN 113 Cast Metallic Inlay and Crown Techniques 6 (2-12) 

A study of techniques for fabrication cast restorations and an introduction to 
terminology and techniques specific to inlays, crowns, and bridges. In the £3 

laboratory, casts and dies are prepared from impressions. Waxing, carving, invest- 
ing, casting, and polishing of simple and complex inlays, full crowns, and three- 
quarter crowns are preformed. A total of no less than eight castings are fabricated. X 
Prerequisites: DEN 101, DEN 104, DEN 106. 



SPRING QUARTER 



> 



o 



P-81 



CHM 101 Chemistry 5 (4-2) 

Study of the physical and chemical properties of substances; chemical changes; ^ 

elements, compounds, gases, chemical combinations; weights and measurements; O 

theory of metals; acids, bases, salts, solvents, solutions, and emulsions. In addition, < 

study of carbohydrates; electrochemistry, electrolytes, and electrolysis in their 9r 

application of chemistry to industry. CD 

Prerequisite: MAT 101, (MAT 110— Dental only). 3 

DEN 108 Partial Denture Techniques 5 (2-9) 

A study of basic techniques used in fabrication of cast removable partial dentures. 
Laboratory phases include fundamentals of survey and design, constructing 
refractory casts, and casting removable partial denture frameworks utilizing chrome - 
nickel alloy. 
Prerequisites: DEN 111, DEN 113, DEN 107. 

DEN 115 Crown and Bridge Techniques 4 (1-9) 

A study of techniques for the construction of fixed bridges, with a review of 
dental anatomy and terminology are related to crown and bridge techniques. The 
laboratory portion includes construction of bridges of various designs utilizing 
metal with veneer facings in all phases, from the fabrication of the cast through 
the polishing of the completed bridge. A mandibular posterior three unit bridge, 
a maxillary posterior three unit bridge and a maxillary anterior three unit bridge 
are constructed. 
Prerequisite: DEN 113. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 



SUMMER QUARTER 

PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 4 (3-2) 

A fundamental course covering several basic principles of physics. The divisions 
included are solids and their characteristics, liquids at rest and in motion, gas 
laws and applications. Laboratory experiments and specialized problems dealing 
with these topics are part of this course. 
Corequisite: MAT 101. 

DEN 109 Partial Denture Techniques 4 (1-9) 

A study of the fabrication of various types of temporary removable appliances 
including wrought-metal. Laboratory procedures including bending and assembling 
wrought clasps, and the fabrication of combination wrought and cast metal frame- 
works. 
Prerequisite: DEN 108. 

DEN 116 Crown and Bridge Techniques 5 (1-12) 

A study of the physical properties and manipulation of veneering materials; 
including techniques for construction of bridges in the anterior and posterior 
region. Minimum requirements are one six-tooth maxillary anterior bridge, and 
one three -tooth mandibular posterior bridge. 
Prerequisite: DEN 115. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

DEN 201 Advanced Denture with Cast Base Techniques 5 (2-9) 

A study of the fabrication of cast metal bases in complete denture Construction, 
complete dentures, with and without cost metal bases. 
Prerequisite: DEN 107. 

DEN 204 Partial Denture Techniques 3 (1-6) 

A study of advanced techniques in removable partial denture design. Laboratory 
exercises include construction of all-metal removable partial dentures using tube 
teeth and flatback facings, and the repair and reconstruction of removable 
partial dentures. 
Prerequisite: DEN 109. 

DEN 207 Advanced Crown and Bridge Techniques 3 (1-6) 

A study of techniques for the construction of bridges combining resin material 
and gold framework. Minimum requirements are construction of one three-tooth 
maxillary and one three-tooth mandibular bridge, using the plastic build-up 
veneering material. 
Prerequisite: DEN 116. 

WINTER QUARTER 

DEN 205 Partial Denture Techniques 5 (1-12) 

A continuing study of advanced techniques in removable partial denture design. 
Laboratory exercises include the use of internal attachments, precision attachments, 
and advanced clasping techniques. 
Prerequisite: DEN 204. 



DEN 211 Ceramic Techniques 5 (2-9) 

A study of the physical properties and manipulation of porcelain, including staining 
and personalization crowns. The fabrication of porcelain units "includes the 
preparation of dies, adaptation of platinum matrix, firing, and glazing. Minimum 
requirements are three porcelain jackets and three stained or personalized units. 
Prerequisites: DEN 101, DEN 104, DEN 106. 

DEN 213 Dental Laboratory Practice 

2 (1-3) 
The fabrication of appliances from casts and a prescription supplied by the 
School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina. The dentist-laboratory relations 
are followed and the technician-student witnesses insertion of the appliances 
fabricated in the school laboratory. 
Prerequisites: DEN 107, DEN 113, DEN 201, DEN 205. 

SPRING QUARTER 

DEN 209 Jurisprudence and Ethics Seminar 3 (3-0) 

A study of the legal and ethical aspects of dental laboratory practice, dentist- 
laboratory relationship, and business aspects of operation and managing a dental 
laboratory. Guest speakers and field trips are utilized. 
Prerequisite: None. 

>- 

DEN 212 Advanced Ceramic Techniques 6 (2-12) g 

The' advanced study of various techniques for bonding porcelain to metal and _J 

methods of personalizing porcelain used in bridge construction. Laboratory experi- 2 

ence include fabrication of eight crown and bridge units, including two single I 

crowns. LU 

Prerequisite: E>EN 211. *- 

DEN 214 Advanced Dental Laboratory Practice 3 (1-6) P - 83 
Further practice in fabrication of advanced appliances from casts and prescriptions 

supplied by the School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina; continued > 

emphasis on ethical dentist-laboratory relations. O 

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Prerequisite: DEN 213. 



Electronics Engineering Technology 

The field of electronics has developed at a rapid pace since the 
turn of the century. For many years the major concern of electronics 
was in the area of communications. Developments during World War 
II and in the period since have revolutionized production techniques. 
New industries have been established to supplement the need and 
demand for electronics equipment. 

Many opportunities exist for men and women with a technical 
education in electronics. This curriculum provides a basic background 
in electronic related theory with practical applications of electronics 
for business and industry. Courses are designed to develop competent 
electronics technicians who may take their place as an assistant to an 
engineer, or as a liaison between the engineer and the skilled crafts- 
man. 

The electronics technician may start in one or more of the following 
areas: research, product development, production, maintenance or as 
a customer engineer in sales. The technician may be called upon to 
analyze and solve various technological problems, prepare reports 
on experiments and tests, or perform such functions as drafting, mak- 
ing surveys or investigating customer equipment problems. 

As a graduate technician he can extend his education either in 
company training schools or at one of several colleges and universities 
that offer full credit for his work at Durham Technical Institute towards 
a bachelors degree in engineering technology. 



Suggested 
Electronics Engineering Technology Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



FALL QUARTER 



DFT 


101 


ELC 


101 


ENG 


101 


MAT 


101 


PHY 


101 



Technical Drafting 

Fundamentals of Electricity 

Grammar 

Technical Mathematics 

Physics: Properties of Matter 



Hours per 


week 


Quarter 
Hours 


Class 


Lab. 


Credit 





6 


2 


4 


4 


6 


3 





3 


5 





5 


3 


2 


4 



WINTER QUARTER 



DFT 


102 


ELC 


102 


ENG 


102 


MAT 


102 


PHY 


102 



Technical Drafting 
Fundamentals of Electricity 
Composition 
Technical Mathematics 
Physics: Work, Energy, Power 



SPRING QUARTER 



ELN 



101 



MAT 


103 


ELN 


105 


ENG 


204 



Electronic Instruments 
and Measurements 
Technical Mathematics 
Control Devices 
Oral Communications 



15 


4 
3 
5 
3 

15 



12 

6 
4 



2 

12 



20 

2 
6 
3 
5 
4 

20 



P-85 



15 



19 



CD 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


103 


PHY 


104 


MAT 


201 


ELN 


205 



Report Writing 
Physics: Light and Sound 
Technical Mathematics 
Applications of Electronic 
Control Devices 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

ELN 210 Semiconductor Circuit Analysis 

ELN 214 Wave Shaping and Pulse Circuits 

ELN 235 Industrial Instrumentation 



3 
3 
5 

5 

L6 

3 
4 
2 
3 






3 


2 


4 





5 


4 


7 


6 


19 





3 


4 


6 


4 


4 


2 


4 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

Technical Specialty Elective 

ELN 215 Wave Shaping and Pulse Circuits 

ELN 220 Electronic Systems 



12 



10 


2 
4 
4 



13 



10 



18 



Electronics Engineering Technology Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. 
Regular laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two 
laboratory hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

DFT 101 Technical Drafting 2 (0-6) 

The field of drafting is introduced as the student begins study of drawing principles 
and practices for print reading and describing objects in the graphic language. 
Basic skills and techniques of drafting included are: use of drafting equipment, 
lettering, freehand orthographic and pictorial sketching, geometric construction, 
orthographic instrument drawing of principal views, and standards and practices 
of dimensioning. The principles of isometric, oblique, and perspective are intro- 
duced. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ELC 101 Fundamentals of Electricity 6 (4-4) 

36 Elementary principles of electricity including: basic electric units, Ohms law, 

Kirchhoffs law, network theorems, magnetics, basic electrical measuring instru- 
ments, inductance, capacitance, sine wave analysis, and non -resonant resistive, 
inductive and capacitive networks. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. Number 
systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic operations, the 
rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental trigonometric concepts and 
operations are introduced. The application of these principles to practical problems 
is stressed. 
Prerequisite: MAT 010. 

PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 4 (3-2) 

A fundamental course covering several basic principles of physics. The divisions 
included are solids and their characteristics, liquids at rest and in motion, gas 
laws and applications. Laboratory experiments and specialized problems dealing 
with these topics are part of this course. 
Corequisite: MAT 101. 



> 



WINTER QUARTER 

DFT 102 Technical Drafting 2 (0-6) 

The application of orthographic projection principles to the more complex drafting 
problems, primary and secondary auxiliary views, simple and successive revolutions, 
and sections and conventions will be studied. Most important is the introduction of 
the graphical analysis of space problems. Problems of practical design elements 
involving points, lines, planes, and a combination of these elements shall be 
studied. Dimensioning practices for "details" and "working drawings," approved by 
the American Standards Association will also be included. Introduction is given 
to intersections and developments of various types of geometrical objects. 
Prerequisite: DFT 101. 

ELC 102 Fundamentals of Electricity 6 (4-4) 

Series and parallel resonant-circuit analysis, resonant and non-resonant trans- 
former analysis, basic diode power supply analysis, introduction to non-linear 
resistive control devices, and introduction to electro-mechanical devices. 
Prerequisite: ELC 101. 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expressiqn in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position, g 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. O 

O 

MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) Z 

A continuation of MAT 101. Advanced algebraic and trigonometric topics in- <j 

eluding quadratics, logarithms, determinants, progressions, the binomial expansion, W 
complex numbers, solution of oblique triangles and graphs of the trigonometric 

functions are studied in depth. p _ oy 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

O 
PHY 102 Physics: Work, Energy, Power 4 (3-2) Z 

Major areas covered in this course are work, energy, and power. Instruction CE 

includes such topics as statics, forces, center of gravity and dynamics. Units of l±j 

measurement and their applications are a vital part of the course. A practical Z 

approach is used in teaching students the use of essential mathematical formulas. ^ 

Prerequisites: MAT 101, PHY 101. 5 

c/) 
SPRING QUARTER ^ 

z 

ELN 101 Electronic Instruments and Measurements 4 (2-4) cc 

A study of basic electronic instruments, their theory of operation, function, q 

tolerances, and calibration. Both service and laboratory instruments will be studied. ^ 

Laboratory experience will provide application of each type instrument studied. Ld 
Prerequisite: ELC 102. 

MAT 103 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

The fundamental concepts of analytical geometry, differential and integral calculus 
are introduced. Topics included are graphing techniques, geometric and algebraic- 
interpretation of the derivative, differentials, rate of change, the integral and basic 
integration techniques. Applications of these concepts to practical situations are 
stressed. 
Prerequisite: MAT 102. 

ELN 105 Control Devices 7 (5-4) 

A study in depth of the electrical characteristics of vacuum tubes and transistors. 
Basic parameters and applications of each type device to the three configurations 
of a three terminal two port system will be included. 
Prerequisite: ELC 102. 



ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, 
using writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. 
Practical application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each 
student at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in 
the student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

PHY 104 Physics: Light and Sound 4 (3-2) 

>_ A survey of the concepts involving wave motion leads to a study of sound, its 

S3 generation, transmission and detection. The principles of wave motion also serve 

—i as an introduction to a study of light, illumination and the principles involved in 

§ optical instruments. Application is stressed throughout. 

X Prerequisites: MAT 101, PHY 101. 

UJ 

*~ MAT 201 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

A continuation of MAT 103. More advanced concepts of differentiation and in- 
P - 88 tegration are considered. Included are graphs and derivatives of the trigonometric 

functions, exponential and logarithmic differentiation and integration, advanced 
^ integration techniques, polar equations, parametric equations, and Fourier series. 

£ Prerequisite: MAT 103. 

UJ 

UJ 

z 

§ WINTER QUARTER 

ui 

(f) ELN 210 Semiconductor Circuit Analysis 6 (4-4) 

— A study in some depth of the analysis and design of transistor circuits. Network 

O theorems and equivalent circuits are used extensively in evaluating total circuit 

j£ performance. Device peculiarities and limitations pertinent to reliable operations 

O are considered. H. Y. Z. and T. parameters are employed as well as signal-flow 

_j graphs. 

W Prerequisite: ELN 105. 

ELN 214 Wave Shaping and Pulse Circuits 4 (2-4) 

Broadband amplifiers, magnetic amplifiers, multivibrators, wave shaping tech- 
niques, chopper amplifiers, clipper and clampter circuits are subjects of study. 
Prerequisites: ELN 105, MAT 103. 

ELN 235 Industrial Instrumentation 4 (3-2) 

Broad introduction to use of industrial electro-mechanical and electronic circuits 
and equipment. Provides an understanding of the methods, techniques, and skills 
required for installation, service and operation of a variety of industrial control 
systems. Analysis of sensing devices for detecting changes in pressure, temperature, 
humidity, sound, light, electricity, the associated circuitry and indicating and 
recording devices. 
Prerequisites: ELN 205, PHY 104. 



SPRING QUARTER 

ELN 215 Wave Shaping and Pulse Circuits 4 (2-4) 

Pulse techniques, diode switches, gates, step-counters, restorers and other spe- 
cific circuits which function as switches are studied. 
Prerequisite: ELN 214. 

ELN 220 Electronic Systems 7 (5-6) 

A block diagram course investigating numerous electronic systems. Modules or 
blocks of various circuits already studied are arranged in various manners to pro- 
duce complex electronic systems. Systems will be explained and reduced to func- 
tions and then to block diagrams. AM, FM, and Single Sideband transmitters and 
receivers, multiplexing, TV transmitters and receivers, pulse-modulated systems, 
computers, telemetry, navigational systems, sonar and radar will be considered. 
Corequisite: ELN 215. 



P-89 



o 



o 



o 



General Office Technology 



More people are now employed in clerical occupations than in any 
other single category. Automation and increased production mean that 
these people will need more technical skills and a greater adaptability 
for diversified types of jobs. 

The General Office Technology curriculum is designed to develop 
the necessary variety of skills for employment in the business world. 
The curriculum offers a clerical program coupled with basic business 
courses so necessary to the successful office manager. Specialized 
training in skill areas is supplemented by related courses in mathe- 
matics, accounting, business law, and applied psychology. 

The graduate of the General Office Technology curriculum is trained 
to perform most of the office duties necessary to an efficient assistant, 
accounting clerk, assistant office manager, bookkeeper, file clerk, 
machine transcriptionist, or a variety of other clerical related jobs. 
Positions are available in almost every type of business, large or small. 



Suggested 
General Office Technology Curriculum 

Freshman Year 



FALL QUARTER 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 

ENG 101 Grammar 

BUS 102 Typewriting (or elective) 

BUS 110 Office Machines * 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 



ours per week 


Quarter 




Hours 


Class Lab. 


Credit 


5 


5 


3 


3 


2 3 


3 


2 2 


3 


5 


5 



WINTER QUARTER 



ECO 


102 


Economics 


ENG 


102 


Composition 


BUS 


103 


Typewriting (or elective) 


BUS 


115 


Business Law 


BUS 


120 


Accounting 



SPRING QUARTER 



104 


Typewriting 


112 


Filing 


116 


Business Law 


121 


Accounting 


204 


Oral Communications 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 



Elective 

ENG 103 Report Writing 

EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 

BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 

BUS 211 Office Machines 

BUS 232 Sales Development 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

Elective 

206 Business Communication 

212 Machine Transcription — Executive 

213 Office Procedures 



ENG 

BUS 
BUS 



SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 209 Advanced Production 

and Speed Building 
BUS 229 Taxes 

BUS 271 Office Management 

— . Elective 

Elective 



17 

3 
3 
2 
3 
5 

16 



16 



14 



19 



3 





3 


3 





3 


3 





3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 



16 



2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 


3 





3 


3 





3 


6 





6 



2 


3 


3 


I 

o 


3 





3 


L±J 


3 





3 


h- 


5 

3 


2 



6 

3 


P-91 


16 


5 


18 


Ld 
O 

Li. 
U. 

o 

_l 
< 


3 





3 


LJ 


3 





3 




3 


2 


4 


O 


2 


3 


3 




2 


2 


3 




3 





3 





14 



19 



General Office Technology Course Descriptions 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is the 
number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture and 
laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credits earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 
FALL QUARTER 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 (5-0) 

A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure 
of the various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal 
organization, and management. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 102 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct tech- 
niques, mastery of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, 
and manuscripts. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 110 Office Machines 3 (2-2) 

A general survey of business and office machines. Students will receive training 
techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten -key adding machines, 
full keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, 
commission, taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ECO 102 Economics 3 (3-0) 

The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices 
by which people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and 
demand and the principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, 
and consumption both in relation to the individual enterprise and to society at 
large. 
Prerequisite: None. 



ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

BUS 103 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further 
mastery of correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied 
in tabulation, manuscript correspondence, and business forms. 

Prerequisite: BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per minute 
for five minutes. 

BUS 115 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals 
and principles of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and 
agencies. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 120 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Principles, techniques and tools of accounting for understanding of the me- 
chanics of accounting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting informa- 
tion about service and mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of >. 
the principles learned. £2 
Prerequisite: , MAT 110. — ' 

SPRING QUARTER X 

L±J 

BUS 104 Typewriting 3 (2-3) •" 
Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the 
development of the student's ability to function as an expert typist, producing • " "«J 
mailable copies. The production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, 

and business forms. q 

Prerequisite: BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 40 words per minute [Z 

for five minutes. q 

BUS 112 Filing 3 (3-0) < 

Fundamentals of indexing and filing, combining theory and practices by the use ui 

of miniature letters, filing boxes and guides. Alphabetic, Triple Check, Auto- ^j 

matic, Geographic, Subject, Soundex, and Dewey Decimal filing are reviewed. O 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 116 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 
Prerequisite: BUS 115. 

BUS 121 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

A study of partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, 
federal and state taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and 
interpreting data for management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Ac- 
counting services are shown as they contribute to the recognition and solution 
of management problems. 
Prerequisite: BUS 120. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 



Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 10?. 

EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 4 (3-2) 

Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an 
aid in developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study 
of particular computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming 
courses. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The stu- 
dent learns the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that closely 
approximate the work appropriate to the field of study. These projects include 
review of letter forms, methods of duplication, statistical tabulation, and the 
typing of reports, manuscripts and legal documents. 
Prerequisite: BUS 104. Speed requirement, 50 words per minute for five minutes. 

BUS 211 Office Machines 3 (2-2) 

Instructions in the operation of the bookkeeping-accounting machines, duplicating 
equipment, and the dictation and transcribing machines. 
Prerequisite: BUS 110. 

BUS 232 Sales Development 3 (3-0) 

A study of retail, wholesale and specialty selling. Emphasis is placed upon 
mastering and applying the fundamentals of selling. Preparation for and execution 
of sales demonstrations required. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 206 Business Communication 3 (3-0) 

Develops skills and techniques needed in writing business communications. Em- 
phasis is placed on writing action — getting sales letters and business reports. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

BUS 212 Machine Transcription — Executive 3 (2-3) 

A study and practice course in the use of transcribing machines in business dicta- 
tion. Proficiency in word usage, correct grammar, and letter styles will be em- 
phasized. 
Prerequisite: BUS 104. 

BUS 213 Office Procedures 4 (3-2) 

Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a 
general office worker during the work day. These include the following: recep- 
tionist duties, handling the mail, telephone techniques, travel information, tele- 
grams, office records, purchasing of supplies, office organization, and insurance 
claims. 
Prerequisite: None. 



SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 209 Advanced Production and Speed Building 3 (2-3) 

A course designed to bridge the gap between classroom and office for the typist. 
Emphasizes speed building on straight copy and increased skill in production, 
utilizing material closely related to the actual office situation. 
Prerequisite: BUS 205. 

BUS 229 Taxes 4 (3-2) 

Application of federal and state taxes to various businesses and business conditions. 
A study of the following taxes is included: income, payroll, intangible, capital 
gain, sales and use, excise, and inheritance. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

BUS 271 Office Management 3 (3-0) 

Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role 
of office management including its functions, office automation, planning, con- 
trolling, organizing and actuating office problems. 
Prerequisite: None. 



3 

o 

z 

X 

o 



P-95 



o 



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Inhalation Therapy 



Inhalation Therapy is one of the newest and fastest growing allied 
health specialties in the United States today. This fact can be directly 
attributed to the increasing incidence of respiratory diseases in our 
society and the increasing complexity of the various modalities used 
in the treatment and diagnosis of the diseases. Today, the practicing 
physician relies heavily upon the technical skills of all members of 
the medical team to assure his patients a safer and faster recovery. 
The inhalation therapist that is well trained in the procedures and 
techniques employed in the treatment and diagnosis of all type of 
cardio pulmonary disorders is not only an asset to his hospital but a 
valuable adjunct to the physician. 

The inhalation therapist must be an expert in the therapeutic uses 
of such aids to the breathing process as medical gases, oxygen admin- 
istering apparatus, humidity and aerosol devices, positive pressure 
ventilation, mechanical airways, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

Therapeutic and diagnostic procedures are applied to outpatients 
as well as inpatients, to the elderly as well as to infants, to the 
chronically ill as well as to the acutely ill, and in fact, to patients from 
every specialty area of the hospital. 

The successful completion of this program will academically qualify 
the student to participate in the National Registry Examination. 



Suggested 
Inhalation Therapy Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



Hours per week 



FALL QUARTER 

BIO 101 General Biology 

CHM 101 Chemistry 

ENG 101 Grammar 

INT 101 Introduction to Inhalation Therapy 

MAT 101 Mathematics 

DFT 111 Blueprint Reading and Sketching 



Class 

3 
4 
3 
2 
5 




Lab. 

2 
2 



3 



Quarter 
Hours 
Credit 

4 
5 
3 
2 
5 
1 



WINTER QUARTER 



NUR 


101 


Nursing Arts 


PHY 


101 


Properties of Matter 


BIO 


102 


Anatomy and Physiology 


ENG 


102 


Composition 


INT 


102 


Inhalation Therapy Procedures 


SPRING QUARTER 


BIO 


103 


Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & 
Physiology 






IHT 


103 


Inhalation Therapy Procedures 


MED 


150 


Pharmacology 


ENG 


204 


Oral Communication 



SUMMER QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 

PHY 103 Physics: Electricity 

BIO 201 Microbiology & Pathology 

IHT 201 Inhalation Therapy Procedures 



17 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 

16 



14 





2 
2 


7 

11 



14 





2 

2 

12 



20 

3 
4 

4 
3 
6 

20 



3 


2 


4 


5 


12 


9 


3 





3 


3 





3 



19 

3 
4 

4 



P-97 



14 



16 



20 



Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

Elective 

IHT 202 Inhalation Therapy Procedures 

PSY 206 Applied Psychology 



3 





3 


5 


16 


10 


3 





3 



11 



16 



20 



WINTER QUARTER 

IHT 203 Inhalation Therapy Procedures 

& Practice 



SPRING QUARTER 

IHT 204 Clinical Application 



8 


24 


16 


8 


24 


16 


5 


30 


15 


5 


30 


15 



Inhalation Therapy Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is the 
number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture and 
laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regxdar laboratories and "manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regidar 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

BIO 101 General Biology 4 (3-2) 

An introduction to biology: Man and his place in the biological world; human 
anatomy and physiology, with consideration of representative major plant and 
animal groups and dissection of a vertebrate. 
Prerequisite: None. 

CHM 101 Chemistry 5 (4-2) 

Study of the physical and chemical properties of substances; chemical changes; 
elements, compounds, gases, chemical combinations; weights and measurements; 
theory of metals; acids, bases, salts, solvents, solutions, and emulsions. In addition, 
study of carbohydrates; electrochemistry, electrolytes and electrolysis in, their 
application of chemistry to industry. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

IHT 101 Introduction to Inhalation Therapy 2 (2-0) 

Introduction to Inhalation Therapy, including history and development, func- 
tions and responsibilities. Ethics will be covered, emphasizing professional expec- 
tations and attitudes. Also, medical-legal considerations related to the paramedical 
profession will be covered. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. Number 
systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic operations, the 
rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental trigonometric concepts and 
operations are introduced. The application of these principles to practical problems 
is stressed. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DFT 111 Blueprint Reading and Sketching 1 (0-3) 

Reading and interpretation of blueprints, drawings, charts, wiring diagrams, 
service manuals and associated information are studied. Practice in free-hand 
sketching of wiring diagrams and parts using basic principles of lines, wires, and 
dimensions is included. 
Prerequisite: None. 



WINTER QUARTER 

NUR 101 Nursing Arts 3 (3-0) 

Classroom activities are planned to assist students in development of knowledge, 
understanding, appreciation, and attitudes basic to effective nursing of patients of 
all ages and backgrounds with nursing needs arising both from the individuality 
of the patient and from inability for self-care as a result of a health deviation. 
The student is encouraged to develop beginning skills in analysis of patient 
needs, both through classroom study of hypothetical patient situations and through 
planned patient experiences in the clinical environment. Beginning skills in 
nursing methods are developed through planned laboratory experiences, followed 
by related practice in actual patient care. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 4 (3-2) 

A fundamental course covering several basic principles of physics. The divisions 
included are solids and their characteristics, liquids at rest and in motion, gas 
laws and applications. Laboratory experiments and specialized problems dealing 
with these topics are part of this course. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

BIO 102 Anatomy and Physiology 4 (3-2) 

A study of the functional and structural components of the human body, and 

their relationships and integrations as organ systems. 

Prerequisite: BIO 101. > 

< 
ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) g 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business X 

and technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole •"" 

composition. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 



P-99 



x 



IHT 102 Inhalation Therapy 6 (4-7) g 

The student will be introduced to the safety requirements which must be observed p 

in the practice of Inhalation Therapy. Methods of manufacturing gases will be < 

covered and will include the transportation and storage of liquid oxygen and < 

compressed gases; standards for piping systems and cylinders; systems used in 
identifying gases such as pin-indix, diameter-index, labeling, and color coding. 
These topics will be covered in accordance to the recommendations made by the 
National Fire Protection Association and controlling agencies such as the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission and Compressed Gas Association. Mechanics of 
pressure and flow regulating devices utilized in controlling gases supplied from 
both high and low pressure systems will be covered. As an introduction to tech- 
niques and procedures, the theory and mechanics of gas driven types of equipment 
used to administer oxygen and aerosols will be included. 
Prerequisite: IHT 101. 

SPRING QUARTER 

BIO 103 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiology 4 (3-2) 

A detailed study of the structural and functional integration of the respiratory 
system in conjunction with the circulatory system. Factors involved in respiration, 
mechanics of respiration, ventilation, pulmonary circulation, tissue metabolism, 
oxygen transport, and carbon dioxide elimination will be included. 
Prerequisite: BIO 102. 

IHT 103 Inhalation Therapy Procedures 9 (5-12) 

This course will be a continuation of IHT 102. Emphasis will be placed on the 
techniques and procedures to be observed in the application of the devices 
utilized in oxygen and aerosol therapy. In addition, this course will provide the 
student with detailed instructions on the mechanics of ventilators, resuscitators, 



P-100 



spirometers, pressure manometers, analyzers, etc. The student will be taught to 
disassemble and reassemble all types of ventilators, identifying each part and its 
function. Areas such as preventive maintenance, bacteriological control and sterili- 
zation requirements will be included. 
Prerequisite: IHT 102. 

MED 150 Pharmacology 3 (3-0) 

The course will provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of medica- 
tions used in Inhalation Therapy. Emphasis will be placed on the techniques to 
be observed that will assure safe administration of all therapeutic drugs. 
Prerequisite: BIO 102. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communication to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 
voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

SUMMER QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in the 
student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

PHY 103 Physics: Electricity 4 (3-2) 

Basic theories of electricity, types of electricity, methods of production, and trans- 
mission and transforming of electricity are studied. Electron theory, electricity by 
chemical action, electricity by friction, electricity by magnetism, induction voltage, 
amperage, resistance, horsepower, wattage, and transformers are major parts of 
the course. 
Prerequisites: MAT 101, PHY 101. 

BIO 201 Microbiology & Pathology 4 (3-2) 

This course combines both microbiology and pathology with particular emphasis 
on the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease, including microbiology, environ- 
mental, chemical, functional, and hereditary etiologies. Further emphasis will be 
placed on bacteriological control of equipment and effective methods of sterili- 
zation. 
Prerequisite: BIO 103. 

IHT 201 Inhalation Therapy Procedures 9 (5-12) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the theory and concepts of 
Respiratory Care. Subjects included in this course are: airway management, 
Resuscitation, Oxygen Administration, Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing, 
Prolonged Artificial Ventilation, Monitoring, to include Blood Gas Determina- 
tions and Spirometry. Student will observe the treating of patient in the hospital. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

IHT 202 Inhalation Therapy Procedures 10 (5-16) 

Under close supervision, the student will clinicially apply the techniques and 
procedures covered in IHT 201. Emphasis will be placed on patient chart reading 



and comprehension of physician's orders; psychological disposition of patients; 
professional attitude and conduct. Through close supervision the student will 
develop a keen sense of observation in terms of safety and precision required in 
the application of all modes of therapy. 
Prerequisite: IHT 201. 

PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 (3-0) 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understand- 
ing of inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are 
considered with particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investi- 
gated are: employee selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. 
Attention is also given to personal and group dynamics so that the student may 
learn to apply the principles of mental hygiene to his adjustment problems as a 
worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

IHT 203 Inhalation Therapy Procedures & Practice 16 (8-24) 

This course will provide the student with the therapy and clinical application of 
Inhalation Therapy as related to specific specialties such as emergency, medical 
obstetrics, and gynecology, pediatrics, general and thoracic surgery, neuro- 
surgery, pulmonary function, and physical therapy (chest physiotherapy). Within 
the realm of his responsibility, the student will be required to explain and justify 
his every action involved in the practice of Inhalation Therapy. Through this >- 

instruction, the student will be taught the types of responsibilities and decisions < 

which will be required of him as an Inhalation Therapy Technician. [*j 

Prerequisite: IHT 202. I 



SPRING QUARTER 



P-101 



IHT 204 Clinical Application 15 (5-30) 

In this course the student will develop his proficiency in the practice of Inhalation q 

Therapy through clinical application. He will be required to demonstrate knowl- P 

edge of Inhalation Therapy in making decisions within the realm of his respon- ^j 

sibility. During this course, he will become less dependent upon his instructor, < 

which will enable him to develop the sense of responsibility, the sense of security, z 

the professional attitude and the independence necessary to competently perform 
the arts and skills of Inhalation Therapy. 
Prerequisite: IHT 203. 



Library Technology 



The Library Technology program is designed to prepare persons for 
employment in various types of libraries— public, school, hospital, 
government, and industry. The curriculum provides a background of 
general education and basic library skills to prepare interested stu- 
dents to enter library work above the minimum clerk status. It also 
introduces a variety of library experiences into which a trained 
person may enter, suiting abilities to the particular job. The library 
content courses are not designed to transfer as library science courses 
in the full professional degree program at an accredited library school; 
however, the library courses would be helpful as background for 
students desiring to enter the professional library field and the 
business courses could provide a good background for further busi- 
ness training. Thus the graudate of the Library Technology program 
may enter a variety of career opportunities. 

There is a growing need for men and women to assist Librarians by 
assuming the many technical and clerical responsibilities essential to 
the operation of the modern library. The Library Technician is a 
library worker who has graduated from a program in Library Tech- 
nology with an Associate in Applied Science degree with a defined 
major in courses in Library Technology. He is capable of work in 
support of professional librarians. Library Technicians will generally 
follow established procedures which have been developed by librari- 
ans. Under the librarian's supervision, he can be expected to have 
sufficient knowledge and skills to perform the assigned or routine 
duties in the library, and in some cases to be capable of supervision of 
untrained library clerk personnel. In a closely coordinated library 
system, a Library Technician may be responsible for a service unit. 



Suggested 

Library Technology Curriculum 

Freshman Year 



FALL QUARTER 

Elective 

EdM 101 Introduction to Library Services 

ENG 101 Grammar 

BUS 102 Typewriting 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 



Hours per 


week 


Quarter 
Hours 


Class 


Lab. 


Credit 


3 





3 


3 


2 


4 


3 





3 


2 


3 


3 


5 





5 



16 



18 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

ENG 102 Composition 
EdM 103 Library Media Resources 

EdM 104 Audiovisual Equipment 

BUS 103 Typewriting 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

EdM 102 Library Processes I 

PSY 102 General Psychology 

ENG 103 Report Writing 

EdM 105 Introduction to Production 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 

Elective 

SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 

EdM 201 Library Processes II 

EdM 203 Practicum 

BUS 213 Office Procedures 



3 
3 
3 

2 
2 

13 



3 
3 
5 

3 
2 

16 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



3 
4 
5 
3 
3 

18 



3 

i 

o 

i'5 



p-ioag 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

HUM 101 Humanities 

EdM 202 Library Media Procedures 

EdM 204 Practicum 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 



14 



10 



19 



3 





3 


4 





4 


3 





3 





6 


3 


3 





3 



13 



16 



SPRING QUARTER 



POL 


103 


Elective 

Government — State and Local 


3 
3 






3 

3 


GEO 


201 


Geography (Political) 


3 


2 


4 


EdM 


205 


Practicum 





6 


3 


EdM 


206 


Maintenance of Materials and 












Equipment 


3 


2 


4 



12 



10 



17 



Library Technology Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given the course. 1 tie number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 

£lj English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 

O Prerequisite: None. 

§ EdM 101 Introduction to Library Services 4 (3-2) 

X General background and philosophy of information service, including a brief 

uj history of libraries and information centers and their recent developments. Intro- 

duction to classification systems and organization of materials, functions and uses 
of information centers, and terminology. A study of the duties and qualifications 
of the personnel who staff these centers. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 102 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct tech- 
niques, mastery of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and 
manuscripts. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, 
commission, taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

EdM 103 Library-Media Resources 3 (3-0) 

Study of general and special reference works and other basic sources of information. 
This course also includes practice in preparation of simple bibliographies (em- 
phasizing correct form) of all kinds of media. 
Prerequisite: None. 



P-104 



BUS 103 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further 
mastery of correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied 
in tabulation, manuscript correspondence, and business forms. 
Prerequisite: BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per 

minute for five minutes. 
EdM 104 Audiovisual Equipment 3 (2-2) 

An introduction to the nature and use of audio-visual materials. Emphasis is on 
the operation of equipment and the communication characteristics of the various 
non print media. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SPRING QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in his chosen 
curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

EdM 102 Library Processes I 4 (3-2) 

Policies and practices of acquisition of various kinds of materials, information 

relative to their sources, and the techniques of ordering. Includes borrowing 2 

films and film rentals, interlibrary loan materials, microfilm, etc. 

Prerequisite: None. 



O 



PSY 102 General Psychology 5 (5-0) p 

A study of the various fields of psychology; the developmental process; motivation; " *"3 

emotion; frustration and adjustment; mental health; attention and perception; 
problems of group living. Attention is given to applications of these topics to (K 

problems of study, self-understanding and adjustment to the demands of society. ^ 

Prerequisite: None. CD 

_J 
EdM 105 Introduction to Production 3 (2-3) 

An intensive study for the necessary laboratory work so that the students will be 
capable of producing materials such as 2" x 2" slides, transparencies, audio 
tapes, and dry mount materials suitable for use in the learning environments. 
The student will also be able to operate the various components of video tape 
recording systems to assist in the production of video taped programs. 
Prerequisite: None. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 5 (5_0) 

An introductory course in the principles of sociology. An attempt to provide an 
understanding of culture, collective behavior, community life, social institutions 
and social change. Presents the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to 
other men, the general laws affecting the organization of such relationships and 
the effects of social life on human personality and behavior. 
Prerequisite: None. 

EdM 201 Library Processes II 4 (3-2) 

Routine aspects of simple cataloging. Includes study of the organization of media 
collections, bibliographic searching for cataloging information, practice in descrip- 
tive cataloging, production and filing of catalog cards, and physical preparation 
of materials for use. 
Prerequisite: None. 



EdM 203 Practicum 3 (0-6) 

Student will be placed in an approved location for six hours per week of supervised 
learning experiences under a professional librarian or media specialist, putting 
into practice the various skills learned. 
Prerequisite: None. 



BUS 213 Office Procedures 4 (3-2) 

Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a 
general office worker during the work day. These include the following: recep- 
tionist duties, handling the mail, telephone techniques, travel information, tele- 
grams, office records, purchasing of supplies, office organization, and insurance 
claims. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

HUM 101 Humanities 4 (4-0) 

A broad, chronological survey of ten representative world-views that shaped the 
western world as they are manifested in philosophy, art, music, and literature. 
The survey begins with "The Mythological Level" and culminates in the final 
unit, "The Year 2,000." Principal methods of instruction are recordings, art 
slides, selected readings, and lecture-discussions. Grades are determined on the 
basis of individual progress toward measurable, specified objectives. 
Prerequisite: None. 

EdM 202 Library Media Procedures 3 (3-0) 

Study of the principles of various circulation systems and their attendant pro- 
cedures. Supervised performance of routines that are common to information 
centers, such as scheduling, record keeping, inventory, shelving, filing, processing 
and mending materials, and handling equipment. 
Prerequisite: None. 

EdM 204 Practicum 3 (0-6) 

Continuation of supervised practice. Six hours per week of practice work in an 
approved location. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, 
improving diction, voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory 
to correct speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, arid interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

SPRING QUARTER 

POL 103 Government — State and Local 5 (5-0) 

A study of state and local government, state-federal interrelationships, the functions 
and prerogatives of the branches. Problems of administration, legal procedures, 
law enforcement, police power, taxation, revenues and appropriations. Special 
attention will be given to North Carolina Government. 
Prerequisite: None. 

GEO 201 Geography 4 (3-2) 

A study of the major geographical regions of the world — their climates, natural 
resources, industries, and the human response to environment. 
Prerequisite: None. 



EdM 205 Practicum 3 (0-6) 

Continuation of supervised practice. Six hours per week of practice work in an 
approved location. 
Prerequisite: EdM 204. 

EdM 206 Maintenance of Materials and Equipment 3 (2-4) 

A course designed to provide the skills and competencies essential to the insti- 
tutional level preventive maintenance of all elements of the media collection. 
Emphasis is to be placed on the septimatic organization of the maintenance 
program. 
Prerequisite: None. 



>- 
O 
O 



X 



P-107 



>- 

< 
a: 

CO 



Opticianry 

Opticianry is the art of applying the science of optics to the making 
and fitting of lenses and devices to aid in providing comfortable and 
efficient vision. The science of optics is a branch of physics which is 
concerned with the study of light; the nature and properties of light, 
the role of light in vision, and with the geometry of reflection and 
refraction of light by lenses. Your job as an optician or opthalmic 
dispensor will be to measure, adapt and fit eye glasses or contact 
lenses to the human face as well as aiding or correcting visual (which 
pertains to the eye ) peculiarities. You will be a specialist in the science 
of opthalmic optics and will apply your knowledge, both technical 
and mechanical, to the production of lenses according to prescriptions 
written by the opthalmologist or optometrist. You will be a member 
of the "eye health team" and will deal directly with the patient who 
is in need of your professional services. 

After graduation from this two year program of study, many em- 
ployment opportunities are open. In North Carolina, after working 
with a licensed optician for one year, the graduate is eligible to take 
the North Carolina Opticians Examination and become a licensed 
optician. In those states not at present requiring a license, a graduate 
may immediately open his own business if he or she so desires. Also, 
without having a license, the graduate is qualified to perform as a 
branch manager of a wholesale laboratory, a technician in a whole- 
sale laboratory, or an optical goods salesman. All of these opportunities 
are open to the graduate and each carries a good financial return. 



Suggested Opticianry Curriculum 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


101 


MAT 


101 


OPT 


101 


ECO 


102 


OPT 


111 



Freshman Year 










Hours per 


week 


Quarter 
Hours 


ER 


Class 


Lab. 


Credit 


Grammar 


3 





3 


Technical Mathematics 


5 





5 


Mechanical Optics 


2 


3 


3 


Economics 


3 





3 


Lens Design and Sketching 


2 


2 


3 



WINTER QUARTER 

PHY 101 Properties of Matter 

ENG 102 Composition 

MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 

OPT 102 Mechanical Optics 



15 



17 



\*-S 



13 



15 



SPRING QUARTER 


OPT 103 


Mechanical Optics 


PHY 108 


Geometric Optics 


CHM 111 


General Chemistry 


ENG 204 


Oral Communications 


PSY 206 


Applied Psychology 



SUMMER QUARTER 



2 
3 
4 
3 
3 

15 



3 
4 
3 




10 



3 
5 
5 
3 
3 

19 



BUS 




Business Elective if 


3 





3 


OPT 


104 


Mechanical Optics 


2 


6 


4 


OPT 


105 


Equipment Repair and Maintenance 


2 


6 


4 


PHY 


109 


Geometric Optics 


3 


4 


5 


OPT 


199 


Plastic Lens 


1 


2 


2 



P-109 

> 
a: 

z 
< 
o 

o 



11 



18 



18 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 



103 Report Writing 

204 Mechanical Optics 

211 Lens Design and Sketching 

231 Ophthalmic Dispensing 

24 1 Anatomy of the Eye 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective ■" 
OPT 205 Mechanical Optics 

OPT 232 Ophthalmic Dispensing 

OPT 242 Physiology of the Eye 



13 



10 



12 



12 



18 



? 





3 


1 


6 


3 


4 


6 


6 


2 





2 



14 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

OPT 206 Mechanical Optics 

OPT 233 Ophthalmic Dispensing 

OPT 261 Contact Lens 

OPT 273 Seminar 



Opticianry Course Descriptions 



V 



1 


6" 


3 


4 


6 


6 


3 





3 


1 





1 



12 12 16 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credits earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regidar laboratories and "manipulative laboratories" . 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

< Freshman Year 

O FALL QUARTER 

£L 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

P- 110 Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. 

The approach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence struc- 

>- ture, punctuation, and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the 

z basic principles of English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry 

< and social life. 

S^ Prerequisite: None. 

O MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. Number 
systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic operations, the 
rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental trigonometric concepts and 
operations are introduced. The application of these principles to practical prob- 
lems is stressed. 
Prerequisite: None. 

OPT 101 Mechanical Optics 3 (2-3) 

The history, development, and manufacture of glass and lens, as well as require- 
ments of ophthalmic glass are studied. Computation of specifications for grinding 
spherical surfaces on single vision and multifocal lens blanks. Grinding and polish- 
ing of spherical surfaces using regular hand spindle machines and by using 
diamond lap automatic lens generators and automatic polishing machines. Funda- 
mental aspects of cylindrical lenses will be studied. The use and care of grinding 
tools and materials will be stressed. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ECO 102 Economics 3 (3-0) 

A study of the fundamental principles of economics including the institutions 
and practices by which people gain a livelihood. Included in a study of the laws 
of supply and demand and the principles bearing upon production, exchange, 
distribution, and comsumption both in relation to the individual enterprise and 
to society at large. 
Prerequisite: None. 



OPT 111 Lens Design and Sketching 3 (2-2) 

Basic instruction includes study in the Dioptric system, spheres, cylinders, 
surface curvatures, prisms, and corrected curves. The history and development of 
single vision lenses and bifocals is studied. An introduction to modern lens con- 
struction and basis for designs of same is included. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 4 (3-2) 

A fundamental course covering several basic principles of physics. The divisions 
included are: solids and their characteristics, liquids at rest and in motion, gas 
laws and applications. Laboratory experiments and specialized problems dealing 
with these topics are part of this course. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business 
and technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole 
composition. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

A continuation of MAT 101. Advanced algebraic and trigonometric topics in- 
cluding quadratics, logarithms, determinants, progressions, and binomial expansion, 5 
complex numbers, solution of oblique triangles and graphs of the trigonometric J 
functions are studied in depth. tn 

PrprPnnisi'tp. MAT 101 V> 



Prerequisite: MAT 101 



OPT 103 Mechanical Optics 3 (2-3) 

A continuation of Mechanical Optics 102. Topics studied include computation 
of specifications for grinding and polishing special type lenses for high refractive 
errors, cataract lens grinding, verification of lens specifications and tolerances by 
use of vertex measuring instrument, marking lenses for the cutting and beveling 
process, rimless edging, hand beveling, and lens sizing operations. 
Prerequisite: OPT 102. 

PHY 108 Geometric Optics 5 (3-4) 

A basic study of the nature and theory of light. Instruction will include but will 
not be limited to the following: luminous sources and propagation of light, concept 
of rays, pencils, and beams, Huygens construction of a wave -front, principles of 
photometry, reflection at plane and spherical mirror surfaces, also refraction at 
plane surfaces and refraction of a single ray through a prism, minimum deviation, 
effects and measurements of grazing incident and emergent rays. Demonstration 
and discussion of Youngs interference experiments to be performed by students 
to correlate theory. 
Prerequisite: PHY 101. 

CHM 111 General Chemistry 5 (4-3) 

An introductory chemistry course involving chemical terminology, atomic struc- 
ture, properties of some elements, and the function of the periodic table. Properties 
of compounds and mixtures are studied as are types of chemical reactions. Labora- 



I 



OPT 102 Mechanical Optics 3 (2-3) p - - - 

A continuation of Mechanical Optics 101. Topics to be studied include the r- 111 
computation of specifications for cylindrical surfaces, the use and care of automatic 

cylindrical lap truing machines, cylindrical surfaces by hand method, and the ^ 

grinding and polishing of prism elements into single vision and multifocal lenses. Z 

Prerequisite: OPT 101. § 

SPRING QUARTER t 



tory work consists of various inorganic reactions and preparations. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, 
improving diction, voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to 
correct speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 (3-0) 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the under- 
standing of inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings, and emotions, 
are considered with particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics in- 
vestigated are: employee selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial 
conflicts. Attention is also given to personal and group dynamics so that the 
student may learn to apply the principles of mental hygiene to his adjustment 
problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SUMMER QUARTER 

OPT 104 Mechanical Optics 4 (2-6) 

2 A continuation of Mechanical Optics 103. More emphasis is placed on accuracy 

tE and speed, 

g Prerequisite: OPT 103. 

0C 

°" OPT 105 Equipment Repair and Maintenance 4 (2-6) 

_ -i -I o This course is designed to provide the student with skill and knowledge relative 

' " ^ to maintenance and simple repair to equipment found in the optical laboratory 

and the Optician's office. Text material will include equipment service manuals. 
> Manufacturer's representatives will be used as consultants and guest lecturers. 

Z Prerequisite: OPT 103. 

< 

^ PHY 109 Geometric Optics 5 (3-4) 

^ A continuation of Geometric Optics 108. Topics to be covered but not limited 

O to the following will include: Refraction through thin lenses, refraction power, 

object-image relationship, lens gauge constant, refraction through thick lenses, 
cardinal points of thick lenses, power of cylinder lenses, effect of sphero-cylindrical 
lens combinations, optical instruments, defects of lenses, lens coating and polariza- 
tion of light, optical system of the eye, magnification of optical systems, and retinal 
magnification. Selected experiments are to be performed by the students to 
correlate theory. 
Prerequisite: PHY 108. 

OPT 199 Plastic Lens 2 (1-2) 

Plastic lens techniques with computation, surfacing, inspection, cutting, and 
edging are covered in this course. 
Prerequisite: None. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization 
and techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, 
using writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. 
Practical application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each 



student at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in 
the student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

OPT 204 Mechanical Optics 3 (1-6) 

A continuation of basic finishing operations. Topics covered include checking, 
marking, cutting, edging, and beveling of lenses, insertion of lenses into zylonite 
frames, and instrument and machine maintenance. 
Prerequisite: OPT 104. 

OPT 211 Lens Design and Sketching 3 (2-2) 

Lens Design 211 is basically a continuation of Lens Design 111. Instruction in 
this course will cover, but will not be limited to, the development specifications, 
and applications of many of the available ■ multifocals, both glass and plastic; 
cataract lenses, both clinical and lenticular forms; double segments and quadri- 
focal lenses. Spectral transmission and absorption characterisitcs of modern oph- 
thalmic glass and plastic will be discussed and their applications reviewed. 
Effects of thickness on spectral transmission and the use of nomographs to aid 
in selection of proper choice of lens density will be covered. Repeated emphasis 
on proper use of base curve selection charts and -various lens availability charts. 
Prerequisite: OPT 111. 

OPT 231 Ophthalmic Dispensing 7 (5-4) 

Introduction, history, and evolution of the present day professional optician. 
Topics included are: development of spectacles, measuring devices, dispensing 2S 

procedures, the use of lenses neutralizing instruments, prescription interpretation [E 

and analysis, determination of facial and spectacle measurements and require- £P 

ments, methods and use of devices in determining pupillary distances, and the q: 

criteria of comfortable and optically well-fitted glasses. Practice fitting and dis- 
pensing the plastic-type spectacles is included. 
Prerequisite: Completion of First Year. 

OPT 241 Anatomy of the Eye 2 (2-0) £ 

A detailed study of the composition of the eye and its associated structures such ^ 

as orbit lids, lacrimal apparatus, and muscles. q 

Prerequisite: None. P 



WINTER QUARTER 

OPT 205 Mechanical Optics 3 (1-6) 

A continuation of OPT 204 with the addition of the layout and finishing of 
multifocal lenses, lens insertion into all available styles zylonite, metal, and 
combination frames. Basic instruction in mounting lenses on rimless and semi- 
rimless mounting, soldering and trimming of frames and mountings is given. 
Prerequisite: OPT 204. 

OPT 232 Ophthalmic Dispensing 6 (4-6) 

Clinical practice and individual instruction in fitting, adjusting, and general 
dispensing of spectacles. The use of all ophthalmic pliers and the related 
dispensing devices required in fitting each specific style of eye-wear, single 
vision, multifocal, prism, and anisometropic prescription analysis. Professional 
ethics of opticianry and office procedures are studied. 
Prerequisite: OPT 231. 

OPT 242 Physiology of the Eye 2 (2-0) 

A detailed study of the function of the eye and its associated structures. Also 
included is a study of accommodation and presbyopia, refractive errors and their 
correction, binocular vision, eye muscle imbalance, and common eye diseases. 



8 

tr 

Q. 

P-113 



SPRING QUARTER 

OPT 206 Mechanical Optics 3 (1-6) 

Intensified work in all phases of finishing operations including automatic beveling 
with special emphasis on rimless and semi-rimless work. Safety lenses and heat- 
treating procedures are studied. 
Prerequisite: OPT 205. 

OPT 233 Ophthalmic Dispensing 6 (4-6) 

A continuation of instruction and clinical practice in dispensing all types of 
spectacles. Analysis of complex and unusual prescriptions and the dispensing 
procedures in these cases. Instruction in fitting special types of spectacles in- 
cluding: cataract, telescopic, bi-centric, monocular, microscopic, vocational, avo- 
cational, sports, safety, stenopaic, ptosis crutch, subnormal visison and others. 
Frame analysis for the patients needs, dependent upon intended use and present 
day vogue, vertex, distance measurements and prescription compensation. Office 
management and credit sales with field trips to several ophthalmic product 
manufacturing plants are also included. 
Prerequisite: OPT 232. 

OPT 261 Contact Lenses 3 (3-0) 

History, development and manufacture of contact lenses, anatomical data of the 
eye with emphasis on the cornea, study of appropriate application of contact 
lenses when they are indicated and contraindicated, introduction to the instru- 

2 ments used followed by the theory of contact lenses and optics of contact lenses. 

^ Prerequisite: None. 

(3 

§, OPT 273 Seminar 1 (1-0) 

°- Ethics of the profession; job opportunities; State Board Examinations of the 

various states; variations in state laws; review of first -year technical courses in 

■ " 1 14 preparation for North Carolina State Board Examination are covered in this 

course. 

^ Prerequisite: None. 



Police Science Technology 



Law enforcement techniques have evolved from rather simple jobs, 
requiring simple qualifications, to more complex activities requiring a 
large capacity for highly specialized knowledge. 

Traditional policies and entrance requirements, coupled with edu- 
cation and training standards have led to a shortage of trained law 
enforcement technicians and administrators. 

Today, as police agencies move toward a professional status, educa- 
tional institutions are becoming the training centers for tomorrow's 
policemen. The North Carolina Department of Community Colleges' 
Law Enforcement Training program is dedicated to the purpose of 
developing proficiency in leadership in these people. Its development 
is based on present and future educational and training needs rather 
than those of the past. 

The program is designed to provide occupational training for the 
individual who has a definite interest in and adaptability to a law 
enforcement career. It offers practical, technical, and general instruc- 
tion to meet the requirements of various law enforcement agencies and 
provides the student with the skills, knowledges, and attitudes, neces- 
sary for employment at the operational or management level. 

There is an increasing demand for properly trained law enforcement 
officers in industry, municipal, county, state, and federal agencies; 
and there is every reason to believe that the highly trained law en- 
forcement officer will find challenging opportunities with putlic and 
private law enforcement services. 

Law enforcement is that important division of government which 
is assigned the power and responsibility to maintain order and enforce 
law. Its basic functions may be classified as prevention of crime, 
suppression of criminal activity, apprehension of offenders, preserva- 
tion of the peace, regulation of noncriminal conduct, and the protec- 
tion of life and property. 

To the original and primary police functions of preserving the peace 
and maintaining law and order, the ever widening scope of govern- 
ment activity has added a host of other duties to the various law en- 
forcement agencies, ranging from the regulation of traffic and the 
suppression of vice to the enforcement of minor laws and ordinances 
that regulate the minutiae of business and private life in a modern 
society. 



Suggested 
Police Science Technology Curriculum 



Freshman Year 








FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 

PSC 101 Introduction to Law Enforcement 

PSY 102 General Psychology 


Hours per 

Class 
3 
5 
5 
5 


week 

Lab. 







Quarter 
Hours 
Credit 

3 
5 
5 
5 




18 





18 


WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 

SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 

POL 102 Government— National 

PSC 220 Police Organization & Administra- 


3 
5 
5 







3 
5 
5 



tion I 



SPRING QUARTER 



Elective 

POL 103 Government — State and Local 

PSC 110 Police Role in Crime and 

Delinquency 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 



5 

18 



5 

18 

5 
5 

5 
3 



>• 
CD 

3 

O 

z 

X 

o 



P- 117 



18 



18 



Sophomore Year 



FALL QUARTER 

CHM 101 Chemistry 4 2 5 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 3 

PSC 115 Criminal Law 5 5 

PSC 201 Traffic Planning and Management 4 2 5 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

PSC 205 Criminal Evidence 

PSC 210 Criminal Investigation 

PSC 215 Fingerprints & Photography 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

PSY 103 Adolescent Psychology 

PSC 211 Introduction to Criminalistics 

PSC 225 Criminal Procedure 



16 



17 



18 



3 





3 


5 





5 


5 





5 


4 


2 


5 



18 



3 





3 


5 





5 


4 


3 


5 


5 





5 



17 



18 



Police Science Technology Course Descriptions 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach 
is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. Number 
systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic operations, the 
rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental trigonometric concepts and 
operations are introduced. The application of these principles to practical problems 
is stressed. 
Prerequisite: MAT 010. 

PSC 101 Introduction to Law Enforcement 5 (5-0) 

A general course designed to familiarize the student with a philosophy and history 
of law enforcement, including its legal limitations in a democratic republic, a 
survey of the primary duties and responsibilities of the various law enforcement 
agencies, delineation of the basic processes of justice, an evaluation of law enforce- 
ment's current position, and an orientation relative to law enforcement as a 
vocation. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PSY 102 General Psychology 5 (5-0) 

A study of the various fields of psychology; the developmental process; motivation; 
emotion; frustration and adjustment; mental health; attention and perception; 
problems of group living. Attention is given to applications of these topics to 
problems of study, self-understanding and adjustment to the demands of society. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 5 (5-0) 

An introductory course in the principles of sociology. An attempt to provide an 



understanding of culture, collective behavior, community life, social institutions 
and social change. Presents the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to other 
men, the general laws affecting the organization of such relationships and the 
effects of social life on human personality and behavior. 
Prerequisite: None. 

POL 102 Government — National 5 (5-0) 

English and colonial background, the articles of confederation and the framing of 
the articles of confederation and the framing of the federal constitution. The 
nature of the federal union, state rights, federal powers, political parties. The 
general organization and functioning of the national government. 
Prerequisite: PSC 101. 

PSC 220 Police Organization and Administration I 5 (5-0) 

Introduction to principles of organization and administration, discussion of the 
service functions; e.g., personnel management, police management, training, com- 
munications, records, property maintenance and miscellaneous services. 
Prerequisite: PSC 101. 

SPRING QUARTER 

POL 103 Government — State and Local 5 (5-0) 

A study of state and local government, state -federal interrelationships, the functions >- 

and prerogatives of the branches. Problems of administration, legal procedures, $5 

law enforcement, police power, taxation, revenues and appropriations are re- -J j 

viewed. Special attention will be given to North Carolina Government. 2 

Prerequisites: POL 102, PSC 101. X 

UJ 

PSC 110 Police Role in Crime and Delinquency 5 (5-0) *~ j 

The study primarily concerned with scientific efforts to understand crime and to _ 

understand man in relation to crime phenomena. It deals with those definitions r - liy 

and formulations of crime and criminals upon which an adaptation system of 

criminology must be based. It examines the law as the basic framework within q ! 

which social deviations of a peculiar character assume their functions as criminal Z 

acts and those broad principles upon which a science of criminology must rest. — | 

Prerequisite: None. c/5 | 



Q_ 



ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the O 

student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, 

voice, and speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 

attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 

Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

CHM 101 Chemistry 5 (4-2) 

Study of the physical and chemical properties of substances; chemical changes; 
elements, compounds, gases, chemical combinations; weights and measurements; 
theory of metals; acids, bases, salts, solvents, solutions, and emulsions. In addition, 
study of carbohydrates; electrochemistry, electrolytes, and electrolysis in their 
application of chemistry to industry. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization 
and techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, 



using writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. 
Practical application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each 
student at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in 
the student's curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

PSC 115 Criminal Law 5 (5-0) 

Designed to present a basic concept of criminal law and create an appreciation 
of the rules under which one lives in our system of government. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PSC 201 Traffic Planning and Management 5 (4-2) 

A study which covers the history of the traffic enforcement problem and gives 
an over-view of the problem as it exists today. Attention will be given to the 3 E's 
and legislation, the organization of the traffic unit, the responsibilities to the 
traffic function of the various units within the law enforcement agency, enforce- 
ment tactics, evaluation of the traffic program effectiveness, and the allocation 
of men and materials. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

>. PSC 205 Criminal Evidence 5 (5-0) 

£P Instruction covers the kinds and degrees of evidence and the rules governing the 

-J admissibility of evidence in court. 

Z 
X 

o 



o 



Prerequisite: PSC 115. 



PSC 210 Criminal Investigation 5 (5-0) 

•~ This course introduces the student to fundamentals of investigation, crime scene 

P 1 on search, recording, collection and preservation of evidence, sources of information, 

" -l^U interview and interrogation, case preparation and court presentation, and the 

investigation of specific offenses such as arson, narcotics, sex, larceny, burglary, 

q robbery and homicide. 

Z Prerequisite: PSC 115. 

{/) PSC 215 Science of Fingerprints and Crime Scene Photography 5 (4-2) 

This is a general course consisting of specialized study of fingerprints as a means 
of positive identification in law enforcement work. The course involves the history 
O of fingerprints, basic patterns, and the Henry system for classification. Training in 

°- classification and filing with practical problems and the taking of fingerprints 

and handling simple latent fingerprint patterns receive major emphasis. 
Also included is a general course in the utilization of crime scene photography 
techniques and equipment. These are tailored toward the introduction of the stu- 
dent to 4 x 5 crown and speedgrafic cameras, the fingerprint camera, the 35 mm. 
camera, the lens setting, proper film and the basic developing process. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SPRING QUARTER 

PSY 103 Adolescent Psychology 5 (5-0) 

A study of the nature and source of the problems of adolescents in western 
culture, physical, emotional, social, interllectual and personality development of 
adolescents. 
Prerequisite: PSY 102. 

PSC 211 Introduction to Criminalistics 5 (4-3) 

Continuation of the study of criminal investigation including a general survey of 
the methods and techniques used in modern scientific investigation of crime, 
with emphasis upon the practical use of these methods by the students. Laboratory 
techniques will be demonstrated and the student will participate in actual use of 
the scientific equipment. 
Prerequisite: PSC 210. 



PSC 225 Criminal Procedure 5 (5-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with a review of court systems, 
procedures from incident to final disposition; principles of constitutional, federal, 
state and civil laws as they apply to and affect law enforcement. 
Prerequisites: PSC 205, PSC 210. 



P- 121 



9 



O ) 

UJ ] 



Secretarial Science 



The demand for better qualified secretaries in our ever-expanding 
business, industry, government, and professional world is becoming 
more acute. The purpose of this curriculum is to outline a training 
program that will provide training in the accepted procedures required 
by the business, industrial, legal, and professional areas, and to enable 
persons to become proficient soon after employment in their particular 
fields. 

The secretarial science curriculum is designed to offer students the 
necessary secretarial skills in typing, dictation, transcription, and 
terminology for employment in business, medical, legal, and technical 
areas. The special training in secretarial subjects is supplemented by 
related courses in mathematics, accounting, business law, and per- 
sonality development. 

The graduates of these programs should have a knowledge of the 
terminology peculiar to the major area, skill in diction and accurate 
transcription of all correspondence, memoranda, and reports. The 
graduate may be employed as a stenographer or a secretary. Oppor- 
tunities for employment of the graduate of this program exist in a 
variety of secretarial positions in legal, medical, engineering, govern- 
ment, and many technical areas. 






Suggested Secretarial Science Curriculum 



Freshman Year 



FALL QUARTER 



BUS 


101 


ENG 


101 


BUS 


102 


BUS 


106 


MAT 


110 



Introduction to Business 
Grammar 

Typewriting (or elective) 
Shorthand (or elective) 
Business Mathematics 



Hours per week Quarter 
Hours 

Class Lab. Credit 

5 5 

3 3 

2 3 3 

3 2 4 
5 5 



WINTER QUARTER 



ENG 


102 


Composition 


BUS 


103 


Typewriting (or elective) 


BUS 


107 


Shorthand 


BUS 


115 


Business Law 


BUS 


120 


Accounting 


SPRING QUARTER 


BUS 


104 


Typewriting 


BUS 


108 


Shorthand 


BUS 


110 


Office Machines 


BUS 


112 


Filing 


ENG 


204 


Oral Communications 



18 

3 
2 
3 
3 
5 

16 

2 
3 
2 
3 
3 



20 

3 
3 
4 
3 
6 

19 



P-123 



13 



16 



Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 

EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 

Systems 
BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 

BUS 206E Dictation and Transcription 

BUS 211 Office Machines 



WINTER QUARTER 

Elective 

Elective (Technical Specialty) 

ENG 206 Business Communication 



BUS 
BUS 



207E Dictation and Transcription 
213 Office Procedures 



13 



17 



SPRING QUARTER 

Elective 

Elective (Technical Specialty) 

BUS 208E Dictation and Transcription 

BUS 209 Advanced Production and Speed 

Building 
BUS 271 Office Management 



15 



17 



3 





3 


6 





6 


3 


2 


4 


2 


3 


3 


3 





3 



17 



19 



Secretarial Science Course Descriptions 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is the 
number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regidar 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

Freshman Year 
FALL QUARTER 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 (5-0) 

A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure 
of the various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal 
organization, and management. 
Prerequisite: None. 

g ENG 101 Grammar 3 (3-0) 

Z Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The 

— approach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, 

(/) punctuation, and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic 

principles of English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social 

P - 124 life. 

Prerequisite: None. 
_j 

^ BUS 102 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

< Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, 

[^j mastery of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and manu- 

0C scripts. 

uj Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 106 Shorthand 4 (3-2) 

A beginning course in the theory and practice of reading and writing shorthand. 
Emphasis is on phonetics, penmanship, word families, brief forms, and phrases. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, 
commission, taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 102 Composition 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and 
technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole com- 
position. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

BUS 103 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further 
mastery of correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied 



in tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 
Prerequisite: BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per 
minute for five minutes. 

BUS 107 Shorthand 4 (3-2) 

Continued study of theory with greater emphasis on dictation and elementary 

transcription. 

Prerequisite: BUS 106 or the equivalent. 

BUS 115 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals 
and principles of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and 
agencies. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 120 Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the me- 
chanics of accounting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting informa- 
tion about service and mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of 
the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: MAT 110. 

SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 104 Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the 

development of the student's ability to function as an expert typist, producing 

mailable copies. The production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, w 

and business forms. O 

Prerequisite: BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 40 words per minute 

for five minutes. p _ 125 



O 



BUS 108 Shorthand 4 (3-2) _, 

Theory and speed building. Introduction to office style dictation. Emphasis on < 

development of speed in dictation and accuracy in transcription. QC 

Prerequisite: BUS 107. H 

BUS 110 Office Machines 3 (2-2) O 

A general survey of business and office machines. Students will receive training c/) 

techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, 
full keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 112 Filing 3 (3-0) 

Fundamentals of indexing and filing, combining theory and practices by the use 
of miniature letters, filing boxes and guides. Alphabetic, Triple Check, Auto- 
matic, Geographic, Subject, Soundex, and Dewey Decimal filing are reviewed. 
Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 (3-0) 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, 
improving diction, voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory 
to correct speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular 
attention given to conducting meetings, conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

Sophomore Year 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 



techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using 
writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical 
application in the preparation of a full-length report is required of each student 
at the end of the term. This report must have to do with something in his chosen 
curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 4 (3-2) 

Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an 
aid in developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study 
of particular computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming 
courses. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 3 (2-3) 

Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The stu- 
dent learns the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that closely 
approximate the work appropriate to the field of study. These projects include 
review of letter forms, methods of duplication, statistical tabulation, and the 
typing of reports, manuscripts and legal documents. 
Prerequisite: BUS 104. Speed requirement, 50 words per minute for five minutes. 

BUS 206E Dictation and Transcription 4 (3-2) 

Designed to develop skill in taking dictation and transcribing at the typewriter 
materials of a legal nature. The course includes a review of the theory and the 

bj dictation of familiar and unfamiliar material at varying rates of speed. A minimum 

Z dictation rate of 100 words per minute for five minutes on new material is re- 

— quired. 

co Prerequisite: BUS 108. 

P - 126 BUS 211 Office Machines 3 (2-2) 

Instructions in the operation of the bookkeeping-accounting machines, duplicating 

-J equipment, and the dictation and transcribing machines. 

Prerequisite: BUS 110. 



WINTER QUARTER 



en 

uj ENG 206 Business Communication 3 (3-0) 

*" Develops skills and techniques needed in writing business communications. Em- 

phasis is placed on writing action — getting sales letters and business reports. 
Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

BUS 207E Dictation and Transcription 4 (3-2) 

Covering material appropriate to the course of study, the student develops the 
accuracy, speed, and technical vocabulary that will enable the student to meet the 
stenographic requirements necessary for an executive secretary. A minimum dicta- 
tion rate of 110 words per minute for five minutes on new material is required. 
Prerequisite: BUS 206E. 

BUS 213 Office Procedures 4 (3-2) 

Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a 
general office worker during the work day. These include the following: recep- 
tionist duties, handling the mail, telephone techniques, travel information, tele- 
grams, office records, purchasing of supplies, office organization, and insurance 
claims. 
Prerequisite: BUS 205. 

SPRING QUARTER 

BUS 208E Dictation and Transcription 4 (3-2) 

This is primarily a speed building course which also emphasizes accuracy. 



Terminology consists mainly of business terms and a minimum dictation rate of 
120 words per minute for five minutes on new material is required. 
Prerequisite: BUS 207E. 

BUS 209 Speed Building and Advanced Production 3 (2-3) 

A course designed to bridge the gap between classroom and office for the typist. 
Emphasizes speed building on straight copy and increased skill in production, 
utilizing material closely related to the actual office situation. 
Prerequisite: BUS 205. 

BUS 271 Office Management 3 (3-0) 

Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role 
of office management including its functions, office automation, planning, con- 
trolling, organizing and actuating office problems. 
Prerequisite: None. 



P- 127 



Associate Degree Elective Course Descriptions 

The following list of courses is comprised of those courses not re- 
quired in any other two year curriculum. Not all elective courses are 
offered each quarter and consultation with your advisor should pre- 
cede the selection of any elective. 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed 
by the course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first 
number listed is the number of quarter hours of credit given for the 
course. The number of lecture and laboratory hours for the course are 
listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of credit is earned for a class 
meeting one hour each week for the duration of the quarter with the 
exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job 
proficiency and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three 
laboratory hours. Regular laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of 
one quarter hour per each two laboratory hours. 

Accounting 

BUS 271 Advanced Accounting 6 (5-2) 

Advanced accounting theory and principles as applied to special accounting 
problems, bankruptcy proceedings, estates and trusts, consolidation of statements, 
parent and subsidiary accounting are studied. 
Prerequisite: BUS 223. 

Business 

Bus 183E Terminology and Vocabulary 3 (3-0) 

Technical terminology and vocabulary as it is used in business offices is intro- 
duced in this course. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 215E Office Application 6 (6-0) 

In this course students are assigned to work in a business, technical, or professional 
office for six hours per week. The objective is to provide actual work experience 
for students and an opportunity for the practical application of the skills and 
knowledge previously learned. 
Prerequisites: BUS 213, BUS 205, BUS 207E, BUS 211. 



BUS 217 Business Law 3 (3-0) 

A study of the powers, policies, methods, and procedures used by the various 
federal, state and local administrative agencies in promoting and regulating 
business enterprises. It includes a consideration of the constitutional and statutory 
limitations on these bodies and judicial review of administrative action. 
Prerequisite: BUS 116. 

BUS 219 Credit Procedures and Problems 3 (3-0) 

Principles and practices in the extension of credit collection procedures; laws 
pertaining to credit extension and collection are included. 
Prerequisite: BUS 120. 

BUS 233 Personnel Management 3 (3-0) 

Principles of organization and management of personnel, procurement, placement, 
training, performance checking, supervision, remuneration, labor relations, fringe 
benefits and security. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 237 Wholesaling 3 (3-0) 

The development of wholesaling; present day trends in the United States. A 
study of the functions of wholesaling. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 239 Marketing 5 (5-0) 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of the functions, 
policies, and institutions involved in the marketing process. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 245 Retailing 3 (3-0) 

A study of the role of retailing in the economy including development of present 
retail structure, functions performed, principles governing effective operation and 
managerial problems resulting from current economic and social trends. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 247 Business Insurance 3 (3-0) 

A presentation of the basic principles of risk insurance and their application. A 
survey of the various types of insurance is included. 
Prerequisite: None. 

BUS 255 Interpreting Accounting Records 3 (3-0) 

Designed to aid the student in developing a "use understanding" of accounting 
records, reports and financial statements. Interpretation, analysis, and utilization 
of accounting statements. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

BUS 266 Budget and Record Keeping 3 (3-0) 

The basic principles, methods, and procedures or preparation and operation of 
budgets. Special attention is given to the involvement of individual departments 
and the role they play. Emphasis on the necessity for accurate record keeping in 
order to evaluate the effectiveness of budget planning. 
Prerequisite: BUS 121. 

fDTI 210 Investment Analysis 2 (2-0) 

A basic study of the securities market with emphasis on stock, bonds, mutual 
funds, and investment management. 
Prerequisite: None. 

f Institutional credit only. 



Drafting 

DFT 204 Descriptive Geometry 4 (2-4) 

Graphic analysis of space problems involving points, lines, planes, connectors, and 
a combination of these. Practical design problems will be stressed with ana- 
lytical verification where applicable. Visualization shall be stressed on every 
problem. 
Prerequisites: DFT 102, MAT 102. 

DFT 212 Jig and Fixture Design 4 (2-6) 

Commercial standards, principles, practices and tools of jig and fixture design. 
Individual project and design work to acquaint students with the types of jigs 
and fixtures and their design. 
Prerequisites: DFT 205, DFT 211. 

Economics 

ECO 104 Economics 3 (3-0) 

Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the com- 
position and pricing of national output, distribution of income, international trade 
and finance, and current economic problems. 
Prerequisite: ECO 102. 

ECO 108 Consumer Economics 3 (3-0) 

Designed to help the student use his resources of time, energy, and money to get 
the most out of life. It gives the student an opportunity to build useful skills in 
buying, managing his finances, increasing his resources, and to understand better 
the economy in which he lives. 
Prerequisite: None. 

Electronics 

ELN 240 Digital Computers 3 (3-0) 

An exploration into the methodology of counting and computing. Various com- 
puter techniques will be investigated including: non-sinusoidal waveforms, binary, 
and decade" counters, industrial counters, readout devices, logic circuits, arith- 
metic circuits, storage devices, input-output devices, computer control, analog 
and digital converters. 
Prerequisite: ELN 214. 

ELN 245 Electronic Design Project 2 (0-4) 

Students are required to design and construct a project approved by the instructor. 
Includes selection of project, design, construction, and testing of completed 
project. Projects may include: AM or FM transmitters or receivers, amplifiers, test 
equipment, control devices, simple counters, lasers, masers, etc. 

ELN 307 Industrial Electronics 5 (3-4) 

A study of electronic measurement and control devices as used by industry. 
Application and design, including limitations of controlled rectifiers, transistors, 
integrated circuitry and other solid state devices. Types of regulators, counters, 
numerical control and basic computer systems are major topics of study. 
Prerequisite: ELN 205. 

Industrial Science 

ISC 201 Industrial Organization and Management 3 (3-0) 

Organizational structure for industrial management; operational and financial 
activities, including accounting, budgeting, banking, credit and industrial risk, 
forecasting of markets, selection and layout of physical facilities; selection training 



and supervision of personnel as found in typical industrial organizations. 
Prerequisite: None. 

Mathematics 

MAT 104 Mathematics of Finance 

The course consists of applied business mathematics with emphasis on topics 
which can be implemented on a computer. The course will include interest, 
equivalence, annuities, sinking funds, perpetuities, bonds, and depreciation. 
Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

Mechanical 

MEC 110 Fundamental Mechanisms 4 (2-4) 

A study of the purpose and actions of cams, cables, gear trains, differentials, 
screws, belts, pulleys, shafts, levers, and other mechanical devices used to transmit 
or control signals. 
Prerequisite: PHY 102. 

MEC 120 Welding Techniques 1 (0-3) 

Principles of oxyacetylene welding and cutting, and brazing. Basic principles, pro- 
cedures, safety, and experience in using arc welding equipment. 
Prerequisite: None. 



MEC 237 Control Systems 4 (2-4) > 

Hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, electrical and electronic control systems and q 

components. Basic description, analysis and explanation of operation. Typical w 

performance characteristics, limitations on performance, accuracy, applications UJ 
and their utilization in industrial processes. 

Prerequisites: PHY 103, PHY 205. P - 131 

Political Science ^ 

UJ 

POL 102 Government — National 5 (5-0) O 

English and colonial background, the articles of confederation and the framing of q 

the articles of confederation and the framing of the federal constitution. The ^ 

nature of the federal union, state rights, federal powers, political parties. The H 

general organization and functioning of the national government. — 

Prerequisite: PSC 101. O 

^ CO 

CO 

POL 103 Government— State and Local 5 (5-0) < 

A study of state and local government, state -federal interrelationships, the functions 

and prerogatives of the branches. Problems of administration, legal procedures, 

law enforcement, police power, taxation, revenues and appropriations. Special 

attention will be given to North Carolina Government. 

Prerequisites: POL 102, PSC 101. 

POL 201 United States Government 3 (3-0) 

A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, pro- 
cedures and problems. 
Prerequisite: None. 

Psychology 

PSY 102 General Psychology 5 (5-0) 

A study of the various fields of psychology; the developmental process; motivation; 
emotion; frustration and adjustment; mental health; attention and perception; 
problems of group living. Attention is given to applications of these topics to 
problems of study, self-understanding and adjustment to the demands of society. 
Prerequisite: None. 



PSY 103 Adolescent Psychology 5 (5-0) 

A study of the nature and source of the problems of adolescents in western culture, 
physical, emotional, social, intellectual and personality development of adolescents. 
Prerequisite: PSY 102. 

PSY 112 Personality Development 3 (3-0) 

Designed to help the student recognize the importance of the physical, intellectual, 
social, and emotional dimensions of personality. Emphasis is placed on grooming 
and methods of personality improvement. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 (3-0) 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understand- 
ing of inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are 
considered with particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics in- 
vestigated are: employee selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial 
conflicts. Attention is also given to personal and group dynamics so that the 
student may learn to apply the principles of mental hygiene to the adjustment 
problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 

Social Science 

[3 SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 5 (5-0) 

> An introductory course in the principles of sociology. An attempt to provide an 

£t understanding of culture, collective behavior, community life, social institutions 

LlI and social change. Presents the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to 

w other men, the general laws affecting the organization of such relationships and 

the effects of social life on human personality and behavior. 

P - 132 Prerequisite: None. 

UJ SSC 201 Social Science 3 (3-0) 

£ An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropol- 

uj °gy> psychology, history, and sociology. 

q Prerequisite: None. 

UJ 

£ SSC 202 Social Science 3 (3-0) 

O A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, 

O and social problems as they relate to the individual. 

c/> Prerequisite: SSC 201. 

SSC 205 American Institutions 3 (3-0) 

A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon 
the individual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, 
national, and global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic 
heritage. 
Prerequisite: None. 



Architectural Drafting 



This curriculum is designed to prepare students to enter the field 
of architectural drafting. The first quarter contains courses basic to all 
fields of drafting. The second, third, and fourth quarters contain 
specialization and related courses that prepare one to enter architec- 
tural drafting occupations. 

Each course is designed to enable an individual to advance rapidly 
in drafting proficiency upon entering the field of work. Courses are 
arranged in sequence to develop drafting skills and proficiency in 
mathematics and science. The draftsman associates with many levels 
of personnel— administrators, architects, engineers, skilled workmen— 
and must be able to communicate effectively with them. Courses to 
develop knowledge and skills in communication, human relations, 
economics, and business organization are provided to assist the student 
in developing understandings and confidence in his relations with 
other persons. 

A draftsman prepares clear, complete, and accurate working plans 
and detail drawings from rough or detailed sketches or notes for con- 
struction purposes. According to the specified dimensions, he makes 
final sketches of the proposed drawing, checking the dimensions of 
parts, materials to be used, the relation of one part to another, and the 
relation of the various parts to the whole structure. The draftsman, 
proficient in the use of triangle, T-square, and other drawing tools; 
makes any adjustments or changes necessary or desired. Also within 
the realm of a draftsman come these skills: The preparation of charts 
for statistical data, furnishing finished designs from architect's sketches, 
and utilization of knowledge of construction practices, mathematics, 
building materials, and physical sciences to complete the drawings. 

An Architectural Draftsman performs the general duties of a 
draftsman and also specializes in organizing and drawing of working 
drawings from final preliminary sketches from the architect to include 
the mechanical equipment and structural drawings. 



Suggested Architectural Drafting Curriculum 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


1101 


Reading Improvement 
Applied Science 
Algebra 


PHY 


1101 


MAT 


1102 


DFT 


1121 


Drafting 



Hours per Week Quarter 
Hours 
Class Lab. Credit 





2 



12 



13 



14 



18 



WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 1102 Communication Skills 

PHY 1102 Applied Science 

MAT 1103 Geometry 

DFT 1122A Architectural Drafting 

DFT 1125 Descriptive Geometry 



3 
3 
3 
3 

2 

14 




2 

6 
3 

11 



3 
4 
3 
5 

3 

18 



o 



SPRING QUARTER 



PSY 


1101 


MAT 


1104 


DFT 


1141 


DFT 


1143 


DFT 


1144 



Human Relations 

Trigonometry 

Architectural Drafting 

Building Mechanical Equipment 

Building Materials and Methods 











< 


3 





3 


P- 


135 


3 





3 






3 
3 


12 



7 
3 




< 


3 





3 




ID 
1- 



15 



12 



19 



SUMMER QUARTER 

CIV 1101 Surveying 

BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 

DFT 1142 Architectural Drafting 

DFT 1145 Specifications and Contacts 



2 


3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


12 


7 


3 





3 



11 



15 



16 



Architectural Drafting Course Descriptions 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given for the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credits earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 1101 Reading Improvement 2 (2-0) 

Designed to improve the student's ability to read rapidly and accurately. Special 
machines are used for class drill to broaden the span of recognition, to increase eye 
span and to train for comprehension. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PHY 1101 Applied Science 4 (3-2) 

An introduction to physical principles and their application in industry. Topics in 

cj this course include measurements; properties of solids, liquids, and gases; basic 

fj[ electrical principles. 

£ Prerequisite: None. 

< 

g MAT 1102 Algebra 5 (5-0) 

Basic concepts and operations of algebra: historical background of our base-10 

p . 135 number system; algebraic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and 

division; fractions, letter representation, grouping, factoring, ratio and proportions, 

_i variations; graphical and algebraic solution of first degree equations; solution of 

^ simultaneous equations by: addition and subtraction, substitution, graphing; 

ID exponents, logarithms, tables and interpolation. 

q Prerequisite: None. 

LU 

tj DFT 1121 Drafting 7 (3-12) 

O An introduction to drafting and the study of drafting practices. Instruction is given 

^ in the selection, use and care of instruments, singlestroke lettering, applied 

geometry, freehand sketching consisting of orthographic and pictorial drawings. 
Orthographic projection, reading and instrument drawing of principal views, 
single auxiliary views (primary), and double (oblique) auxiliary views will be 
emphasized. Dimensioning and note practices will be studied with reference to the 
American Standards Association practices. Methods of reproducing drawings will 
be included at the appropriate time. 
Prerequisite: None. 

WINTER QUARTER 

ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 (3-0) 

Designed to promote effective communication through correct language usage in 
speaking and writing. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1101. 

PHY 1102 Applied Science 4 (3-2) 

The second in a series of two courses of applied physical principles. Topics intro- 
duced in this course are heat and thermometry, and principles of force, motion, 
work, energy, and power. 
Prerequisite: PHY 1101. 



MAT 1103 Geometry 3 (3-0) 

Fundamental properties and definitions; plane and solid geometric figures, selected 
general theorems, geometric construction of lines, angles and plane figures. 
Dihedral angles, areas of plane figures, volumes of solids. Geometric principles 
are applied to shop operations. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DFT 11 22 A Architectural Drafting 5 (3-6) 

An introduction to architectural drafting. Intersections and developments will be 
studied by relating the drawings to the sheet metal trades. Models will be made 
from cardboard as a proof of the solutions to the assigned problems. Instrument 
drawings will be made of isometric, cabinet, and perspective pictorial problems 
with emphasis on shading, shadows, and landscaping. A study will be made of 
residential planning, including basic floor plans, room sizes, and location of 
windows and doors. 
Prerequisite: DFT 1121. 

DFT 1125 Descriptive Geometry 3 (2-3) 

Graphical analysis of space problems. The problems deal with practical design 
elements involving points, lines, planes, connectors, and a combination of these. 
Included are problems dealing with solid geometry theorems. Where applicable, 
each graphical solution shall be accompanied by the analytical solution. 
Prerequisite: DFT 1121. 

SPRING QUARTER O 



PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 (3-0) tl 

A study of basic principles of human behavior. The problems of the individual ^ 

are studied in relation to society, group membership, and relationships within Q 
the work situation. 

Prerequisite: None. P - 137 



MAT 1104 Trigonometry 3 (3-0) -i 

Trigonometric ratios; solving problems with right triangles, using tables, and en 

interpolating; solution of oblique triangles using law of sines and law of cosines; £3 

graphs of the trigonometric functions; inverse functions, trigonometric equations. O 

All topics are applied to practical problems. I— 

Prerequisites: MAT 1102, MAT 1103. X 

O 

DFT 1141 Architectural Drafting 7 (3-12) < 

Further development of techniques in lettering, dimensioning, freehand sketching 

and instrument drawing. Drawings of construction details, using appropriate 

material symbols and conventions. Working drawings, including plans, elevations, 

sections, scale details and full-size details will be prepared from preliminary 

sketches for a residence designed by the student. 

Prerequisite: DFT 1122A. 

DFT 1143 Building Mechanical Equipment 3 (3-0) 

General study of heating, air conditioning, plumbing and electrical equipment, 
materials and symbols. Building code requirements pertaining to residential and 
commercial structures. Beading and interpretation of working drawings by me- 
chanical engineers. 
Prerequisites: DFT 1122 A. 

DFT 1144 Building Materials and Methods 3 (3-0) 

Materials used in the construction of architectural structures will be studied. 
Their economic values and limitations affected by locality, budget and codes. 
Field trips to construction sites and study of manufacturer's specifications for 
materials. Standard sizes of structural materials and modular construction tech- 
niques. 
Prerequisite: None. 



SUMMER QUARTER 

CIV 1101 Surveying 3 (2-3) 

Basic instrumentation and topography will be studied together with field trips 
and drafting room application of site surveying. 
Prerequisite: MAT 1104. 

BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 (3-0) 

An introduction to the business world, problems of small business operation, 
basic business law, business forms and records, financial problems, ordering and 
inventorying, layout of equipment and offices, methods of improving business, 
and employer-employee relations. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DFT 1142 Architectural Drafting 7 (3-12) 

Individual and group participation in the preparation of complete working draw- 
ings for a complex architectural structure. Study of drafting room organization 
and relationships of personnel within the architectural office. 
Prerequisites: DFT 1141, DFT 1143, DFT 1144. 

DFT 1145 Specifications and Contracts 3 (3-0) 

The purpose and writings of specifications will be studied along with their legal 
and practical application to working drawings. Contract documents will be 
analyzed and studied for the purpose of client-architect-contractor responsibilities, 

O duties and mutual protection. 

? Prerequisites: DFT 1141, DFT 1143, DFT 1144. 

Ll_ 
< 
DC 
Q 

P-138 

< 

h- 
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Ld 

X 
O 

< 



Automotive Mechanics 



This curriculum provides a training program for developing the 
basic knowledge and skills needed to inspect, diagnose, repair or 
adjust automotive vehicles. Manual skills are developed in practical 
shop work. Thorough understanding of the operating principles in- 
volved in the modern automobile comes in class assignments, dis- 
cussion, and shop practice. 

Complexity in automotive vehicles increases each year because of 
scientific discovery and new engineering. These changes are reflected 
not only in passenger vehicles, but also in trucks, buses and a variety 
of gasoline-powered equipment. This curriculum provides a basis for 
the student to compare and adapt to new techniques for servicing 
and repair as vehicles are changed year by year. 

Automobile mechanics maintain and repair mechanical, electrical, 
and body parts of passenger cars, trucks, and buses. In some communi- 
ties and rural areas they also may service tractors or marine engines 
and other gasoline-powered equipment. Mechanics inspect and test 
to determine the cause of faulty operation. They repair or replace 
defective parts to restore the vehicle or machine to proper operating 
condition. They become acquainted with shop manuals and other tech- 
nical publications. 

Automotive mechanics in smaller shops usually are general me- 
chanics qualified to perform a variety of repair jobs. A large number 
of automobile mechanics specialize in particular types of repair work. 
For example, some may specialize in repairing only power steering 
and power brakes, or automatic transmissions. Usually such specialists 
have an all-round knowledge of automotive repair and may occasion- 
ally be called upon to do other types of work. 



Suggested Automotive Mechanics Curriculum 



FALL QUARTER 



ENG 


1101 


MAT 


1101 


MEC 


1101 


PHY 


1101 


PME 


1101 



Reading Improvement 
Fundamentals of Mathematics 
Tools and Measurements 
Applied Science, Auto Related 
Internal Combustion Engines 



Hours 


per 


Week 


Quarter 
Hours 


Class 




Lab. 


Credit 


2 







2 


5 







5 







3 


1 


3 




4 


2 


3 




12 


7 



13 



17 



19 



WINTER QUARTER 

DFT 1101 Schematics & Diagrams 

ENG 1102 Communication Skills 

PME 1102 Engine Electrical & Fuel Systems 

ECO 1114 Basic Economics 



1 


3 


2 


3 





3 


5 


15 


10 


3 





3 



12 



18 



18 



SPRING QUARTER 



P- 140 



PSY 

PME 

PME 

WLD 

PME 



1101 
1103 
1123 
1129 
1227 



Human Relations 

Principles of Auto Air Conditioning 

Brakes, Chassis & Suspension 

Basic Welding (Related) 

Power Accessories 



3 
2 
3 
2 
3 

13 





2 

12 

3 



17 



3 
4 
7 
3 
3 

20 



SUMMER QUARTER 



BUS 


1103 


PME 


1124 


PME 


1125 



Small Business Operations 
Power Trains 
Auto Servicing 



3 





3 


3 


12 


7 


3 


9 


6 



21 



16 



Automotive Mechanics Course Descriptions 



In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first number listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency 
and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per three laboratory hours. Regular 
laboratory hours earn credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory 
hours. 

FALL QUARTER 

ENG 1101 Reading Improvement 2 (2-0) 

Designed to improve the student's ability to read rapidly and accurately. Special 
machines are used for class drill to broaden the span of recognition, to increase 
eye span and to train for comprehension. 
Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 5 (5-0) 

Practical number theory. Analysis of basic operations: addition, subtraction, ^ 

multiplication and division. Fractions, decimals, powers and roots, percentages, O 

ratio and proportion. Plane and solid geometric figures used in industry; measure- 2 

ment of surfaces and volumes. Introduction to algebra used in trades. Practice X 

in depth. Q 

Prerequisite: None. 2 

MEC 1101 Tools and Measurements 1 (0-3) p _ 141 

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with basic hand tools, 
safety procedures and machine processes of our modern industry. It will include 
a study of measuring instruments, characteristics of metals and cutting tools. The 
student will become familiar with the lathe family of machine tools by performing O 

selected operations such as turning, facing, threading, drilling, boring, and ream- 
ing. 
Prerequisite: None. 



PHY 1101 Applied Science 4 (3-2) 

An introduction to physical principles and their application in industry. Topics in 
this course include measurements; properties of solids, liquids, and gases; basic 
electrical principles. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PME 1101 Internal Combustion Engines 7 (3-12) 

Development of a thorough knowledge and ability in using, maintaining, and 
storing the various hand tools and measuring devices needed in engine repair 
work. Study of the construction and operation of components of internal com- 
bustion engines. Testing of engine performance; servicing and maintenance of 
pistons, valves, cams and camshafts, fuel and exhaust systems, cooling systems; 
proper lubrication; and methods of testing, diagnosing and repairing. 
Prerequisite: None. 

DFT 1101 Schematics & Diagrams Power Mechanics 2 (1-3) 

Interpretation and reading of blueprints. Development of ability to read and 
interpret blueprints, charts, instruction and service manuals, and wiring diagrams. 
Information on the basic principles of lines, views, dimensioning procedures, 
and notes. 
Prerequisite: None. 



> 



O 



ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 (3-0) 

Designed to promote effective communication through correct language usage in 
speaking and writing. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1101. 

PME 1102 Engine Electrical and Fuel Systems 10 (5-15) 

A thorough study of the electrical and fuel systems of the automobile. Units 
involved will include cranking mechanisms, generators, standard ignition, tran- 
sitrized and transistor ignitions, transistor control units, plus accessories and 
wiring. The characteristics of fuels, types of fuel systems, special tools, and testing 
equipment for fuel and electrical systems are given close study. 
Prerequisite: PME 1101. 

ECO 1114 Industrial Economics (Basic) 3 (3-0) 

The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices 
by which people gain a livelihood in our industrial society. Topics include pro- 
duction, consumption, exchange and distribution of materials and resources, 
money and credit, business fluctuations, labor and management. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SPRING QUARTER 

PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 (3-0) 

Q A study of basic principles of human behavior. The problems of the individual 

2 are studied in relation to society, group membership, and relationships within 

< the work situation. 

q Prerequisite: None. 

UJ 

s PME 1103 Principles of Auto Air Conditioning 4 (2-2) 

A general introduction to the principles of refrigeration. A study of the assembly 
' ' 14*- components and connections necessary in the unit as applied to automobiles 

and trucks. The methods of operation and control, including safety precautions 
> in the handling of refrigerants, are studied. Laboratory instruction include 

H stallation and services of the air conditioning unit. 

2 Prerequisite: None. 



ies 



H PME 1123 Brakes, Chassis and Suspension 7 (3-12) 

< A complete study of various braking systems employed on automobiles and light 

weight trucks. Emphasis is placed on how they operate, proper adjustment, and 
repair. Course will also include the study of the principles and functions of the 
components of an automotive chassis. Practical joo instruction in adjusting and 
repairing of suspension and steering systems. Units to be studied will include 
shock absorbers, springs, steering systems, steering linkage, and front end align- 
ment. 
Prerequisite: PME 1101, PME 1102. 

WLD 1129 Basic Welding 3 (2-3) 

Welding demonstrations by the instructor and practice by students in the welding 
shop. Safe and correct methods of assembling and operating the welding equip- 
ment. Practice will be given for surface welding; bronze welding, silver-soldering, 
and flamecutting methods applicable to mechanical repair work. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PME 1227 Power Accessories 3 (3-0) 

A study of various power units in general use on motor vehicles. Instruction in 
various power operated convenience and safety devices including tops, window, 
seats, and speed control units. Also, power brake units, power steering units, and 
comfort control devices. Prerequisites: PHY 1101, PME 1102. 



SUMMER QUARTER 

BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 (3-0) 

An introduction to the business world, problems of small business operation, 
basic business law, business forms and records, financial problems, ordering and 
inventorying, layout of equipment and offices, methods of improving business, and 
employer-employee relations. 
Prerequisite: None. 

PME 1124 Power Trains 7 (3-12) 

A study of the principles and functions of automotive power train systems including 
clutches, transmission gears, torque converters, drive shaft assemblies, rear axles, 
and differentials. The course also involves the identification of power train troubles, 
servicing, and repair. 
Prerequisites: PHY 1101, PME 1123. 

PME 1125 Automotive Servicing 6 (3-9) 

Emphasis is on the shop procedures necessary in determining the nature of 
troubles developed in the various components systems of the automobile. Trouble- 
shooting of automotive systems thus providing a full range of experiences in 
testing, adjusting, repairing, and replacing various parts. 
Prerequisites: PME 1103, PME 1123, PME 1124. 



P- 143 



Practical Nurse Education 



The accelerated growth of population in North Carolina and rapid 
advancement in medical technology demand an increased number 
of well-trained personnel for health services. Realizing this need, the 
North Carolina Department of Community Colleges, in conjunction 
with local hospitals, administers programs of practical nurse education 
throughout the state. 

The aim of the Practical Nurse Education Program is to prepare 
qualified persons for participation in care of patients of all ages, in 
various states of dependency, and with a variety of illness conditions. 

Students are selected on the basis of demonstrated aptitude for 
nursing, as determined by pre-entrance tests, interviews with faculty 
members, high school record, character references, and reports of 
medical and dental examinations. 

There are four classes operating simultaneously, i.e., a new class 
enters each quarter and a class graduates each quarter. An individual 
accepted into the program of Practical Nurse Education may enter in 
September, December, March, or June (see calendar for exact dates ). 

Throughout the one-year program the student is expected to con- 
tinuously acquire knowledge and understandings related to nursing 
and the biological and social sciences and to develop skills related to 
nursing practice, communications, inter-personal relations, and use of 
good judgment. Evaluation of student performance consists of tests on 
all phases of course content, evaluation of clinical performance, and 
evaluation of adjustment to the responsibilities of nursing. A passing 
score is required on all graded work, plus demonstrated progress in 
application of nursing skills to actual patient care. 

Graduates of accredited programs of practical nurse education are 
eligible to take the licensing examinations given by the North Carolina 
Board of Nursing. This examination is given twice each year, usually 
in April and September. A passing score entitles the individual to 
receive a license and to the legal title "Licensed Practical Nurse." 
The license must be renewed annually. The Licensed Practical Nurse 
can apply for licensure in other states on the basis of a satisfactory 
examination score, without repeating the examination. 



Suggested 
Practical Nurse Education Curriculum 



Hours per Week 



Class 


Lab, 


28 


2 


18 


16 


12 


24 


12 


24 



NUR 1001 Practical Nursing I 

NUR 1002 Practical Nursing II 

NUR 1003 Practical Nursing III 

NUR 1004 Practical Nursing IV 



Practical Nurse Education Course Description 

In each course description there is listed the course number followed by the 
course title. Afterwards, a series of numbers appears. The first nuinber listed is 
the number of quarter hours of credit given the course. The number of lecture 
and laboratory hours for the course are listed in parenthesis. One quarter hour of 
credit is earned for a class meeting one hour each week for the duration of the 
quarter with the exception of regular laboratories and "manipulative laboratories". 
A "manipulative laboratory" involves development of skills and job proficiency q 

and earns credit at the rate of one quarter hour per each two laboratory hours. p 

< 
NUR 1001 Practical Nursing I (28-2) 3 

Designed to assist students in acquiring the knowledge, understanding, apprecia- Q 

tions, and attitudes basic to effective nursing of patients of all ages and back- 
grounds. Emphasis is on nursing needs arising both from the individuality of the P - 1 AR 
patient and from inability for self-care as a result of a health deviation. Patient- 
centered studies include analysis of patient needs, both through classroom study ^ 
of hypothetical patient situations and through planned experiences in the clinical </) 
environment. Beginning skills in nursing methods are developed through planned 3 
laboratory practice and supervised patient care. 2 

_i 
NUR 1002 Practical Nursing II (18-16) < 

Designed to introduce the student to deviation from normal, to nursing methods fZ 

and therapeutic procedures, and to the clinical specialties. Continued patient- ££ 

centered study, with introduction of the illness condition as an additional source CC 

of nursing needs. Increased emphasis on clinical activities and selected patient 
care. 

NUR 1003 Practical Nursing III (12-24) 

Designed to acquaint the student with common illness conditions, related nursing 
needs and therapeutic methods, and role of the practical nurse in care of patients 
with specific conditions. Learning situations are selected to illustrate commonalities 
with a wide variety of similar conditions and to promote student awareness of 
similarities and differences. Clinical practice emphasizes student experience in 
care of subacutely ill patients with a wide variety of illnesses, correlated with 
classroom studies insofar as possible. 

NUR 1004 Practical Nursing IV (12-24) 

Designed to introduce the student to care of patients with complex nursing needs 
and to the assisting role of the practical nurse in situations requiring judgments 
based on depth of knowledge. Clinical practice includes supervised care of labor 
patients and seriously ill adults and children. 



CL 



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MM 






LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 

In keeping with the philosophy of Durham Technical Institute, the 
Learning Resources Center has as its role the following objectives: 

(1) To provide an organized and readily accessible collection of 
media needed to meet the institutional, instructional, and individual 
needs of students and faculty. 

(2 ) To provide a staff that is qualified, concerned, and involved in 
serving the needs of students, faculty, and community. 

(3 ) To encourage innovation in learning and instruction by provid- 
ing facilities and resources which will make these objectives possible. 

In creating this role for the Center the Institute is moving away from 
the traditional library as a collection of books, to a Center where 
learning occurs, rather than one in which print and non-print media 
are stored. Stress is placed on moving information to the individual, not 
on collecting information. In the Learning Resources Center the 
individual student is able to explore fields of knowledge which will 
enhance his potential and at the same time be relevant specifically to 
him 

The means of exploration are through active participation in 
classroom, as well as through self-directed study and the use of individ- 
ualized instructional resources. Trained specialists are available to 
direct him in finding and interpreting the print and non-print media 
which relate to his individual needs and which are adapted to his 
level of skills and abilities. Instructional materials and programed 
materials in the Center are designed for multi levels of instruction. 
Initially the student is assisted by a specialist in the selection of 
materials and or the program of study which best meets his needs and 
abilities. Thereafter, assistance is afforded the student throughout his 
program as deemed necessary. Thus a student is free to proceed at his 
own rate until he has successfully completed his program objectives. 
The Learning Resources Center is open from 8 AM to 10 PM on 
Monday thru Thursday and 8 AM to 5 PM on Friday. 

One of the many special features of the Center is the Adult High 
School Diploma Program. This is a unique program of self-teaching 
materials in English, social studies, science, mathematics, and litera- 
ture. Special arrangements exist between the Institute and the public 
school system for the purpose of awarding high school diplomas to 
students who meet requirements for graduation. The course work is 
completed in the Center; the diploma is awarded by the school system 
of the county or city in which the student lives. Applicants for the 
Adult High School Diploma Program must be eighteen (18) years of 
age or older and not enrolled in a public school. The Center also 
offers through programed instruction materials a variety of other 
programs either for credit in the Curriculum Program or for personal 
improvement through the General Interest Program. Through the 



College-Preparatory Program of self-instruction high school graduates 
can better prepare themselves for entrance into institutions of higher 
learning. 

The Center offers a program for those students whose level of 
achievement indicates that an individualized program approach to 
helping him reach the attainment of his goals is desirable. Students 
whose high school record, test scores, and information gained through 
interviews indicate the likelihood of difficulty with the regular cur- 
riculum are encouraged to enroll in this program. This is a program 
usually divided equally in the three subject areas— Mathematics, Eng- 
lish, and Reading Improvement— these are the areas where most stu- 
dents encounter problems in post-secondary education. The mathema- 
tics program includes a review of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and 
trigonometry. The English program includes a review of basic English 
mechanics, sentence and paragraph structure, composition, vocabulary. 
The Reading Improvement Program is constructed to encompass the 
areas of vocabulary development, comprehension and speech. Students 
are placed in one or more of these programs on a level consistent with 
his ability. Upon successful completion of this program students may 
then pursue other courses in his choice of curriculum consistent with 
his interest, aptitude, and ability. 

In the area of audiovisual equipment to be used with records, ° 

transparencies, tapes, slides, films, filmstrips, and other non-print soft- P - 149 
ware, this equipment is centrally administered through the Learning 
Resources Center. uj 

Where materials are not readily available to meet the instructional cr 

objectives, the center is charged with the responsibility of reproducing O 

the materials needed to meet these objectives. It also reproduces all £ 

materials necessary for the administrative staff to carry out their o 

assigned duties. = 



z 




MOMGD 



PHILOSOPHY 

Education is a process that continues throughout an individual's 
life. The recent rapid developments in technology have made it 
imperative that individuals make purposeful plans in order that they 
might keep abreast of these developments both in the societal and 
physical changes that have taken place. It is the Institute's aim to 
afford the individual the opportunity to develop to his fullest potential 
in whatever areas of vocational and cultural levels that he desires. 
In this way the Institute helps to build a more functional person which 
our rapidly changing democratic society demands if our society is to 
preserve those things important and change those things that need 
changing. 

The Institute offers to any adult the opportunity to continue his 
education regardless of his background, be he an illiterate or a Ph.D. 
One individual might like to take a course in Conversational German, 
Creative Thinking, or Modern Math; another individual might wish to 

2 learn to read and write the English language; and still another might 

p wish to improve his job skills in electronics, auto mechanics, or nursing. 

o The Department of Continuing Education stands ready to help you 

o pursue all of these things. 



p - 152 GENERAL INFORMATION 



2 
O 

o 



ADMISSION 

Any adult who has reached the age of eighteen (18) and is not 
enrolled in public school is eligible to enroll. 

CLASS LOCATIONS 

A number of adult classes are held on the Institute campus. Classes 
are also conducted in any community of the following counties when- 
ever a sufficient number of students have indicated an interest: Dur- 
ham County, Granville County, Orange County. 

COURSE SCHEDULING 

Classes are scheduled when there is a sufficient demand for a par- 
ticular course or courses and when facilities and a qualified instructor 
can be found. The Department of Continuing Education maintains a 
"Record of Inquiry" in which a list is kept of the names and addresses 
of people who express interest in a course or courses. This "Record 
of Inquiry" is one of the tools used in determining the schedule of 
the Continuing Education Department; however, other survey meth- 



ods will be used in determining the educational needs and interests of 
the public, and the results of these surveys will also influence class 
scheduling. 

The Institute will publish and distribute a schedule of courses to be 
offered. Additional courses may be scheduled upon request. Persons 
wishing to take certain courses should call the Department of Con- 
tinuing Education at Durham Technical Institute (Phone: 596-8293) 
for personal interest or occupational educational classes, or call 
596-8294 for Adult Basic Education or Adult High School Diploma 
Program classes. 

FEES 

A small fee is charged for certain Continuing Education classes. 
Such fees, when charged, are due and payable at the first class session. 
Books and supplies are available through the Institute bookstore. 
When classes meet at community centers the Institute's bookstore 
makes it possible for books to be purchased at the community center. 

ATTENDANCE 

Adults are expected to attend class regularly. Attendance records 
are maintained by class teachers. 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS 

Certificates are awarded students meeting requirements for any of 
the classes and programs for adults. 



AREAS OF STUDY 

PERSONAL INTEREST 

In this area the Institute offers the individual an opportunity to 
attain skills for personal use and general education to broaden the 
individual culturally. Classes are begun at any time we have twelve 
(12) or more individuals registered for a course. Some of the courses 
available are listed below. Remember, this is only a partial listing. 
The Department of Continuing Education will offer any course, 
except social entertainment, provided there is sufficient registration. 

Conversational German, French, Personal Income Tax 

and Spanish Flower Arranging 

Sewing Physical Fitness 

Interior Decorating Knitting 



P-154 



Speed Reading Millinery 

Great Decisions Modern Math 

Great Books Small Gasoline Engine Repair 

Art Powder Puff Mechanics 

Decoupage Ceramics 

Real Estate Investments 

ADULT EDUCATION 

(basic and high school completion) 

Adult Education may be defined as a major component toward 
raising the social level of adults in our society. To do this "change" 
must occur— a change in behavior. 

Some desirable changes in behavior are as follows: (1) changes in 
behavior that will bring about increased understanding; (2) changes 
in behavior that will further appreciation (3) changes in behavior 
that will provide for an increase in skills. 

OBJECTIVES 



1. To teach the basic skills of communication and computation to 
the undereducated individuals age eighteen (18) and over. 

2. To increase the social and political competence of the under- 
educated adults in our service area by teaching the basic concepts 

eg of home management, hygiene, political thought, social concern 

5 and individual responsibility with a democratic society. 

— 3. To co-ordinate the adult basic education with the high school 

g diploma program and ultimately with the other curriculum and 

° extension offerings of the Institute in an effort to increase the 

employability of many undereducated adults. 

4. To teach courses and gear curricula with the individual student's 
needs in mind. 

5. To educate the people to the concept of continuing education as 
a way of life. 

Adult Basic Education 

Adult Basic education is offered to any adult who has reached the 
age of eighteen (18 ) and is not enrolled in the public school who desires 
to acquire the basic skills of reading, writing, and arithmetic. 

Teaching the skills of communication to any undereducated indi- 
vidual eighteen (18) and over is the major purpose of Adult Basic 
Education. These skills are not meaningful in isolation, so that 
materials used in these classes are designed especially for adults 
in terms of subject matter that has the adult interests in mind. For 



example, family budgeting is used to teach addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, division, computation with fractions, and reading. 

Instruction is individualized. The teacher and the student determine 
where the student is and where he wants to go. Instruction proceeds 
on that basis in Level I classes or in Level II classes. 
Level I (Adult Basic Education) is intended for the individual who 
has difficulty in reading, writing, and arithmetic. 
Level II (Adult Basic Education) is intended for the more advanced 
individual who has not achieved an eighth grade level of reading 
ability. At this level much emphasis is placed on arithmetic and the 
social living skills. 

High School Diploma Program 

The Department of Community Colleges in cooperation with the 
Department of Public Instruction has established procedures for 
adults to be issued their high school diploma by the local school board 
upon the recommendation from the Institute that a student has com- 
pleted the prescribed course of study. 

The time required to complete this course of study is determined 
by several factors such as: (1) The innate ability of the individual; 
(2) Individual initiative; (3) Course units earned in the public high 
schools as shown on an official high school transcript. The courses 
required for the completion of the high school diploma program are: 

English (four levels) 
Mathematics 
General Science 
American History 
Government or Civics 
Biology 



High School Equivalency Program 

The equivalency preparation classes are offered to those individuals 
nineteen (19 ) and older who are not enrolled in the public schools who 
would like to prepare for passing the high school equivalency exam. 
This program is not as comprehensive as the high school diploma 
program, but it does fulfill employment requirements comparable to 
a high school diploma. Four major areas of academic pursuit are 
stressed here. They are: Mathematics, Science, English, Social Studies. 

After one has satisfactorily completed his studies in these four areas 
arrangements must be made with the University of North Carolina 



at Chapel Hill to, take the final exams. For this service a fee of ten 
dollars ($10) is payable to the University. A favorable score will 
result in the University awarding the student with a High School 
Equivalency Certificate. 

Adult Basic Education and Adult High School Diploma programs 
are offered in the Multi-Media Center on campus, in the Orange 
County Adult Education Center in Hillsborough or in the classes held 
at various locations throughout the service area. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

There is no tuition fee or book fees for educational opportunities 
that are conducted under the heading of Adult Education (basic and 
high school completion). 

Once a class is in progress additional students may be enrolled at 
any time. 

Classes usually meet two nights per week. Class periods will vary 
from two to three per night depending on the individual class organi- 



g zation. 



p - 156 OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION EXTENSION 

o An occupational extension course is a part-time course which does 

5 not count toward a diploma or degree, but for which a certificate of 

? completion may be given. Occupational extension classes are designed 

2 to meet the general or specific occupational needs of employees in 

o business, industry, governmental agencies, and other public institu- 

tions. The training provided is of an upgrading or updating nature. 
Any adult 18 years old or older who needs training or re-training, or 
who can otherwise profit from the proposed course, may be enrolled. 
Classes vary in length; are held whenever instructor, space, and 
funds are available; and are conducted both day and night; and are 
taught by part-time instructors selected by the Institute. 
Major areas of emphasis are as follows: 
Distribution and Marketing Extension 
Health Occupations Extension 
Occupational Home Economics Extension 
Occupational Office Extension 
Technical Extension 
Trades and Industry Extension 
Apprenticeship Programs 
New and Expanding Industry Training 
Course offerings in the major areas listed above fall into one of two 
categories: Individual Occupational Classes and Special Occupational 
Programs . 



Individual Occupational Classes 

Most occupational extension offerings are flexible in that course 
content is tailored to meet specific group needs. Classes are initiated 
as the need is indicated by surveys, interviews, requests, and sufficient 
enrollment in existing or proposed programs and classes. Individual 
Occupational Extension classes offered in the past are as follows: 

Certified Life Underwriter, Part I 

Certified Life Underwriter, Part II 

Commercial Law (American Institute of Banking) 

Accounting I (American Institute of Banking) 

Effective Speaking (American Institute of Banking ) 

Money and Banking (American Institute of Banking ) 

Introduction to Economics 

Oral Communications (American Institute of Banking ) 

Principles of Bank Operations (American Institute of Banking ) 

Effective Business Correspondence 

Home Nursing 

Human Relations and Communications for Head Nurses O 

Nurse Assistant ^ 

Pharmacology Theory for the Licensed Practical Nurse 3 

Pharmacology Math for the LPN 8 

Porcelain Fused to Gold p - „ 

Pre-Pharmacology for the LPN 

Pre-Pharmacology Math for the LPN o 

Creative Activities and Safety for Young Children — 

Health, Safety, and Creative Activities for Young Children EH 

Nature and Scope of Day Care z 

Pre-School Guidance Activities o 

Sewing— Alterations and Tailoring 

Use of Audio- Visual Aids to Better Understand Children 

College Accounting 

Library Science for Aides (New Careers ) 

Typing — Library Aides (New Careers ) 

Typing for Unit Secretary (New Careers ) 

Gregg Shorthand Refresher 

Fundamentals of Computing Systems 

Bookkeeping 

Engineering and Business Writing 

Surveying, Basic 

VASCAR 

Auto Electric Tune-Up 

Automatic Transmissions 

Bluepring Reading 

Bluepring Reading for Construction Trades 

Blueprint Reading for the Parachute Industry 



Blueprint Reading and Math for Masons 

Brick Masonry 

Caulking 

D C Electricity 

Drafting, Basic 

Drafting, Advanced 

Electricity, Basic 

Electricity and Electronics, Basic 

Electronics, Basic 

Machine Shop 

National Electric Code 

Oil Burner Service 

Plumbing Theory and Code 

Radio and T V Service and Repair 

Small Gasoline Engines 

Statistics and Trend Forecasting, Basic 

Welding 
z Public Speaking 

p Research Machining and Design 

g Production Reporting 

q Techniques of Merchandising 

Fundamentals of Real Estate 
p . 158 Ambulance Attendant Training 

Quantity Food Production Management 
| First Aid 

^ Introduction to PL/I Programming 

jz Introduction to System/360 

o Business English 

Medical Terminology 

Beginning Typing 

Refresher Typing 

Advanced Typing 

Chemical Test for Alcohol (Retraining) 

Installment Credit (American Institute of Banking ) 

Bank Public Relations and Marketing (American Institute of 
Banking ) 

Analyzing Financial Statements (American Institute of Banking) 

Overview of Pharmacology 

Equipment Use and Care (School Food Service ) 

Organization and Personnel Management (School Food Service ) 

Pre-Portioned and Pre-Costed Cycle Menus (School Food Service ) 

Nutrition and Menu Planning (School Food Service ) 

Sanitation for Hospital Food Service 

Minor Auto Repair and Tune Up 

Front End Alignment 

Teacher Aide 



o 



< 



Effective Writing 
Food Service Selling 

The list above could be endless. Almost any occupational subject 
can be taught at any achievement level if the following sequence 
takes place: 

(1 ) Fifteen to twenty individuals indicate a desire to take a specific 
course. 

(2 ) The Institute finds a qualified part-time instructor to teach the 
proposed class and secures adequate classroom facilities. 

(3) At least twelve individuals register to begin the course. 

(4 ) An active attendance of seven or more for each meeting. 

SPECIAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAMS 

In an attempt to meet the more specialized needs of various organi- 
zations the Department offers the following Special Occupational 
Programs : 

Supervisory Development Training 

Hospitality Training ^ 

Law Enforcement Training g 

Fire Service Training 

Apprenticeship Training P - 159 

New and Expanding Industry Training 

z 

Supervisory Development Training z 

i- 
z 

Supervisory Development Training is an educational program de- 3 

signed to upgrade the competency of Supervisory and Mid-manage- 
ment level personnel. 

The North Carolina Department of Community Colleges is aware 
of the need for training supervisors in industry, business, institutions, 
and other types of organizations. Because of this awareness, Super- 
visory Development Training Programs have been made available to 
supervisors through a wide variety of courses. Some courses are short 
while others range up to forty-eight hours in length. Some are basic 
for all supervision, while others offer instruction for certain special 
interests . 

The current SDT Program consists of twenty-one well prepared 
courses which, in many instances, can be taught almost verbatim. 
Each course of training described herein serves one or more of the 
following purposes: to help develop potential supervisors to assume 
full supervisory responsibilities; to prepare present supervisors for 
advancement to greater responsibilities; to improve abilities of super- 
visors at all levels; and most importantly, to make supervisors and 
potential supervisors more proficient in their present assignments. A 



supervisor may pursue as many of the courses as he desires and 
thereby afford himself an opportunity for extensive training. Emphasis 
has been placed on group dynamics and creative problem-solving 
techniques. 

Course Descriptions: 

a. SDT-1 : Principles of Supervision 44-46 hours 

This course is divided into seven distinct parts, each representing six 
(6) to eight (8) clock hours in length. The participant may take the total 
course consecutively or any part(s) he selects. The parts to be covered are: 

• Fundamentals of Supervision 

• Relationships on the Job 

• Communications 

• How to Train Employees 

• Performance and Job Evaluation 

• Job Management 

• Work Improvement 



2 
O 

§ 

Q 



P-160 



SDT-2: Job Relations Training 10 hours 

This course is concerned with the fundamentals of human relations. The 
course, though updated several times, is one of three original courses offered 
to supervisors. It is, perhaps, the most popular and meaningful of all SDT 
courses. Like the Articles of War are to the military this course is repeated 
to industrial supervisors as often as every two years in many organizations. 
It is highly recommended for all levels of management. 

The course content is divided into five distinct sections. They are: 

• The foundation for good human relations 

• Basis for decisions 

• The 4-Step problem -solving methods 

• Taking preventive action 

• Importance of getting the facts 

SDT-3: Science of Human Relations 18-20 hours 

This course is designed to relate the development of the science of 
humanics. Emphasis is given to the following topics: Machines and the 
Human Element, the Personal Needs that Stimulate Behavior, Leadership 
and Supervision, Factors Influencing Attitudes, The Foundation of Business. 

SDT-4: Art of Motivating People 22 hours 

This course is designed to show the importance of production. Emphasis 
is placed on specific problems in the area of motivation. A further value 
derived from this course would be to provide self-evaluation for those 
attempting to stimulate others. It is recommended for all managers who 
supervise hourly or incentive employees. 

SDT-5: Economics in Business and Industry 22 hours 

Training in economics gives the supervisor a better understanding of the 
AMERICAN FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM and how it operates. In- 
cluded in this course are: the five basic principles of capitalism, the function 
of government and its responsibility to the people, the laws of supply and 
demand, wages and productivity, and most important, the profit motive. 
Excellent charts accompany this course and a considerable amount of 
time is devoted to group discussion. 

SDT-6: Effective Communication 22 hours 

Emphasis in this course is placed on clear and forceful oral, written, and 
implied communication. It will provide supervisors with an opportunity to 
improve their effectiveness in day-to-day communications with employees 



through face-to-face contacts. The course will be conducted on an informal 
discussion basis and a limited enrollment is advised for effective group par- 
ticipation. Since communications represent the most vital link in manage- 
ment efficiency, this course is recommended for all levels of supervision. 

». SDT-7: Effective Writing 22 hours 

This course is designed to help foremen and supervisors improve their 
writing skills in reports, letters, and memoranda which are so necessary in 
daily operation. Fundamentals of sentence structure will be reviewed; 
elements of clear, forceful writing will be emphasized. Attention will be 
given to the individual needs of participants. Participation is the hallmark 
of this course; therefore, enrollment should be limited for best results: 
mid-management and line supervisors should greatly benefit from this 
course. 

h. SDT-8: Effective Speaking 15 hours 

This course encompasses the theory and practice in the art of self- 
expression. A step-by-step guide is provided for supervisors to follow in 
helping them to overcome fear and self-consciousness when addressing 
a group. Sentence structure and vocabulary are explained as a basis for 
effective speech. Each participant is given opportunities to address the 
group after which he is constructively criticized much in the same manner 
used in the Toastmaster's Club. 

z 

L SDT-9: Speed Reading 20 hours 2 

This course is composed of a series of sessions in which the tachistoscopic ^ 

method of flashing forms on a screen— digits, words, phrases, and sentences — O 

is used. Objectives of the course will broaden the span of perception and q 

recognition, and increase speed and comprehension in reading for those in w 
business and industry whose jobs require much reading. The course is 

originally designed to run twenty (20) clock hours; however, it can be P - 161 
extended for those desiring advanced training. 

j. SDT-10: Work Measurement 22 hours | 

The work measurement course is designed to acquaint the supervisor z 

with the purposes and uses of time and motion studies. It is especially P 

helpful in supplying the supervisor with the information needed to deal g 

with the problems and questions with which he is constantly faced in O 

time and motion practices. Areas of discussion include: production standards, 
wage rates, job standards, incentives, base rates, and various employee 
ratings. 

k. SDT-11: Job Methods 10 hours 

This course consists of five two-hour sessions. Emphasis is placed on the 
importance of finding more efficient ways of completing daily tasks. Com- 
petence in improving methods of accomplishing work is one of the basic 
skills needed by every supervisor. This skill can be acquired and is neces- 
sary in our industrial society which demands efficiency with high pro- 
ductivity. Each participant is given an opportunity to study and submit 
a proposed method improvement project. 

1. SDT-12: Conference Leadership Training 10 hours 

Conference Leadership Training is designed to aid the supervisor when 
presiding over groups^-large or small — through sessions in group dynamics. 
Each participant is given several opportunities to serve in the role of a 
conference leader. Because much attention is given to individual participa- 
tion by members, a limited enrollment is encouraged for this course. 

m. SDT-13: Instructor Training 15 hours 

This course consists of twelve units of instruction to be covered in 



approximately fifteen (15) clock hours. It has two basic objectives. First, 
this course provides the future supervisor instructor with an approved 
method of instruction based on the basic principles of learning, which will 
enable him to teach others the related technology or manipulative skills 
of his trade. 

Secondly, this course is offered to build a corps of qualified, trained 
instructors for trade, public service, and industrial occupations in the adult 
education field. 

n. SDT-14: Creative Thinking 22 hours 

The aim of this course is to improve attitudes and thinking abilities of 
supervisors, to develop a strong motivation to utilize one's creative po- 
tential, to develop a greater curiosity in problem solving, and to gain 
openmindedness toward ideas of others. 

Special emphasis is placed on individual and group brainstorming 
through the creative problem solving process. This course is recommended 
for all levels of management. 

o. SDT-15: Industrial Safety and Accident Prevention 22 hours 

This course offers the supervisor a systematic approach to a better 

understanding and scope of safety and accident prevention problems. 

Attention is given to preventive safety measures, and understanding the 

causes of accidents and injuries. 
q A portion of this course will be devoted to proper maintenance and 

p housekeeping that contribute greatly to proper safety conditions and well- 

< being of employees. 

Z) 

g p. SDT-16: Industrial First Aid 10 hours 

Panic, indecision, and ignorance of sound first aid principles have resulted 

p _ 152 m death or permanent disability to injured people. A primary responsibility 

of the supervisor is to safeguard the health and wellbeing of his employees. 
(j This course is designed to give the basics of first-aid treatment techniques 

2 to supervisors who will be confronted with injuries from accidents likely 

3 to occur in the work area. Also covered is factual information for the 
? temporary treatment of sudden illnesses, attacks, and seizures on the job. 
2 This course is recommended for all levels of management, sub-supervisors, 
O and other key personnel. 

q. SDT-17: The Supervisor in North Carolina 10 hours 

This course was prepared in response to numerous requests from new 
industries, which bring out-of-state key personnel to state operations in 
North Carolina. "The Supervisor in North Carolina" is a course specifically 
designed for management personnel to increase their knowledge and 
understanding of the people of North Carolina, their heritage, mores, 
values, and customs. Generally speaking, basic supervisory skills are the 
same throughout the United States; however, certain techniques differ 
in the various sections of our country. This course will prove beneficial 
to newcomers to our State or for supervisors transferring from one section 
to another within the State. 

r. SDT-18: Job Analysis Training 12 hours 

Job Analysis Training involves a careful study of jobs to determine just 
what work is included, such as what the job holder does, how he does it, 
under what conditions the job is performed and what special qualifications 
the job holder should have. The course is designed to familiarize the super- 
visor with techniques necessary to gather facts about the specific operations 
and responsibilities of the job, what it entails, such as mental ability, 
skills and physical requirements. Job analysis is recommended for line 
supervisors. 



SDT-19: Management Primer 44 hours 

The Management Primer series is designed primarily for supervisors in 
mid -management positions. It is meant as an introduction to managerial 
thinking. It will make a contribution toward better performance by helping 
participants see their problems, more clearly in terms of accepted manage- 
ment practices. It will, consequently, motivate continued analysis, study, 
and managerial self-improvement. This course is not recommended for 
non-supervisor personnel. 

The total series runs approximately forty -four (44) hours. The participant 
may enroll for all or any part of this series. The ten parts covered in 
Management Primer are: 

Management and Productivity 

Enterprise Organization 

Human Relations in Management 

Personnel Administration 

Controls and Supervision 

Production Management 

Procurement and Inventory 

Financial Management 

Distribution and Sales 

Research and Public Relations 
This course is highly recommended as a management orientation program. 

SDT-20: Cost Accounting for Supervisors 14 hours 5 

This course is designed to help the production supervisor become ac- p 

quainted with costs in operating his department. It provides basic training < 

in the application of an accurate methoa of cost accounting which is simple 3 

to use and inexpensive. Some of the areas to be covered include: general Q 
cost accounting, direct manufacturing costs, direct sales costs, direct and 
indirect labor costs, manufacturing overhead, cost of sales, cost of opera- P - 163 
tions, ratios of costs to sales, and profit and loss statements. 

SDT-21: Supervision in Hospitals 40 hours Z 

Hospitals represent the fourth largest industry in North Carolina. A Z) 

training course, similar to SDT-1, has been developed specifically for f= 

hospital supervisors. This series covers supervisory areas of human relations, j^ 

leadership, job methods, housekeeping, and training subordinates. The O 
course may be taken as a block or in units, depending on the needs of 
the participants. 



Hospitality Training 

The Hospitality Education Program is one answer to North Caro- 
lina's need for more trained personnel in the area of food, lodging, 
recreation, and travel information. This program has three primary 
objectives: 

1. To provide employers with well-trained personnel to operate 
their business. 

2. To develop within individuals skills that will qualify them for 
better employment opportunities. 

3. To provide better hospitality services to the citizens of North 
Carolina and visitors to the State. 

Hospitality Education courses are arranged and scheduled in accord- 
ance with the needs of the industry. 



a. Food Service Courses 

(1) Commercial Food Preparation and Service 

(a) Food Service Selling 20 hours 

A course dealing with the responsibilities of a waiter or waitress 
from the time he walks on the job until his day's work is done. 
Much emphasis is placed on the fact that the good waitress is 
a dignified sales person rather than a "hash slinger." Every 
good sales person needs certain essential job knowledge and 
this course is designed to help the waitress develop the knowl- 
edge and attitudes necessary to do an effective job. 

(b) Basic Quantity Cooking 150 hours 

A course dealing with principles of interpreting menus, menu 
terms, recipes, measurements and other data relative to the 
cooking profession. Skill in selection, preparation, and serving 
foods, also purchasing food, and keeping records of supplies 
and expenses. To capitalize on native food handling talent 
to insure a profitable profession. 

(c) Food and Beverage Purchasing* 20 hours 

A summary of knowledge and principles of quantity food buy- 
ing that would take years to learn by experience. Tells the 
importance of purchase specifications and how to write them. 

p (d) Food and Beverage Management and Service* 20 hours 

< This course is designed for those who have a sincere desire to 

3 prepare themselves for entry or advancement in a very complex 

Q field requiring a balanced blending of knowledge and skills in 

food, its preparation, its merchandising and service, buttressed 
P - 164 kv a good and sound knowledge of financial and business 

practices. 

2 (e) Food and Beverage Controls* 20 hours 

3 This course deals with each step in the production and mer- 
? chandising of food with special emphasis on calculating costs, 
^ establishing standards and production planning. 

O 

(f) Food Service Supervision for Hospital Personnel 90 hours 

This course consists of classroom instruction and 6 months of 
supervised experience in a hospital kitchen. It is designed to 
provide a standardized educational program for food service 
supervisors which will qualify them to assume the responsi- 
bilities delegated to them by the dietitian and prepare them 
to meet the performance level of the current concept of super- 
visory leadership in their respective areas. Successful comple- 
tion of this course the food service supervisor eligible for 
membership in the Hospital, Institution, and Education Food 
Service Society. 

(2) School Food Service Training Courses 

(a) Overview of School Food Services 60 hours 

The pre-requisite course for all school food service personnel. 
A basic orientation course presenting the history of school 
feeding, characteristics of a good program, personnel and 
human relations, nutrition and menu planning, organization 
and management; purchasing, storing, preparation and serving 
of food; sanitation and safety. 

"This course offered in co-operation with the American Hotel-Motel Asso- 
ciation. 



(b) Nutrition and Menu Planning (Pre-requisite Course I) 60 hours 

A course for all school food service personnel in depth of the 
role in nutrition of protein, fats, carbohydrates, minerals, and 
vitamins; factors in developing good food habits; dietary needs 
of children and youth; advanced work in planning and evalu- 
ating menus. 

Course outline available for classroom use or in combination 
with ETV and classroom. 

(c) Use and Care of Equipment (Pre-requisite courses 

I and II) 60 hours 

A course for all school food service personnel in general care 
and safety in the use of equipment; specific use and care of 
large ana small pieces of food service equipment; inventory 
and maintenance records. 

(d) Quantity Food Preparation (Pre-requisite courses 

I, II, & HI) 60 hours 

A course for all school food service personnel with experience 
in methods of quantity food preparation which retain nutritive 
values; use of standardized recipes; use of weights and meas- 
ures; use and care of equipment; timing, selection, preparation 
and service of foods for the school lunch. 

Z 

o 
b. Hotel-Motel Management p 

(1) Introduction to Hotel Management 20 hours 5 
Tkis course is an introduction to the hotel business, its depart- Z) 
ments, its responsibilities and the opportunities for creative em- w 
ployment it offers. 

P 1 cc 

(2) Motel- Motor Hotel Management* 20 hours 

This course is designed to make the student more aware of the ^ 

scope of managerial responsibility in the motel industry. Effort is Z 

made to develop within the student a familiarity with various technical Z) 

requirements, a basic knowledge of the working problems of inn- — 

keeping, and a better understanding of the total effort and work Z 

experience required to successfully operate today's motel. O 

(3) Front Office Procedures* 20 hours 

This is a course dealing with front office management, routines and 
accounting plus crucial material on human relations and public re- 
lations. 

(4) Hotel-Motel Accounting* 20 hours 

This course deals with basic accounting terms, practices and state- 
ments in common use in hotels, and the use of accounting informa- 
tion in making management decisions. 

(5) Hotel-Motel Law* 20 hours 

The purpose of this course is 

(a) To illustrate the consequences of lack of foresight in the inn- 
keeper's managerial functions. 

(b) To supply sufficient information to understand the attitudes 
of the courts when an innkeeper is involved in a litigation. 

(c) To create an awareness of the many responsibilities which the 
law imposes upon the innkeeper. 



"This course offered in co-operation with the American Motel-Hotel Association. 



I- 



(6) Human Relations 20 hours 

This is a course illustrating the principles of Business psychology and 
the many ways in which employees and guests react to each other. 
Improved employee cooperation and guest relations are stressed. 

(7) Supervisory Development 34 hours 
This course deals with how to train and how to supervise. Emphasis 
is placed on the department heads' responsibility in communicating 
with people, training employees, controlling costs and improving 
methods. 

(8) Communications 20 hours 
This course has been designed as an overview of the uses and tech- 
niques of communication with particular reference to the innkeeping 
industry. It can be beneficial to employees at any level of the organi- 
zation, but should be especially helpful to those having managerial 
responsibilities. Special emphasis and attention is given to: 

(a) The theory of communication 

(b) Application of communication principles to basic management 
functions 

(c) Effective listening 

(d) Improving reading ability 

(e) Developing speaking skills 

(f) Communicating on the job 

(g) Writing better letters 
< (h) Audio-visual communication techniques 

Z> 

Q (9) Supervisory Housekeeping 20 hours 

This course deals with the housekeeper's executive responsibilities, 
with emphasis on employee training and record keeping, 
r - 166 Produced in cooperation with the National Executive Housekeepers 

^ Association, this course carries toward NEHA's own program for 

Z accreditation. 

Z) 

f= (10) Maintenance and Engineering 24 hours 

2 This course deals with essential technical information on electronics, 

O air conditioning, plumbing, heating, electricity, acoustics, elevators 

and other equipment necessary to establish preventative maintenance 
routines and to make necessary operating decisions. 

(11) Maid Training 20 hours 

This course stresses the importance of the maid to the overall opera- 
tion of a hotel or motel. Much emphasis is placed on techniques 
for doing the job more quickly, more effectively and with less effort. 

(12) How to Organize Your Work 10 hours 
c. Travel Service 

(1) Travel Information 4-10 hours 

These courses are set up to fit the local situation and may vary in 
length. Great stress is placed on the importance of travel service to 
the overall economy of the area. Visual aids are used to illustrate what 
there is to see ana do in the area. Often these courses are used to 
motivate the community to develop its travel potential and to point 
out the need for trained personnel in the Hospitality Industry. 



O 



"This course offered in co-operation with the American Motel-Hotel Association. 



(2) Service Station Selling 15-20 hours 
This course is designed to assist gasoline service station attendants 
to improve their selling techniques and thereby render better customer 
service. Much emphasis is given to the importance of knowing the 
area in order to answer customer questions and give good travel 
directions. 

(3) Personality Development 10 hours 

(4) Customer Relations 10 hours 

d. Hospital Training 

(1) Hospital Human Relations 20 hours 

This course is designed to train personnel who are responsible for 
keeping the hospital clean and sanitary. All of the basic problems of 
hospital housekeeping are covered with a good breakdown of what 
should be done daily and what can be done only periodically. There 
is much information on techniques for doing the job more effectively 
and with maximum efficiency. 

(2) Hospital House Keeping 40 hours 

z 

(3) Custodial Training 40-400 hours O 

(4) Modified Diets 20 hours O 

z> 

Q 

Law Enforcement Training 

The goal of the law enforcement training program of the Depart- " D/ 

ment of Community Colleges is to promote and provide adequate o 

training and education courses in the legal and technological fields 
that will keep law enforcement officers abreast of these advancements 
and, at the same time, aid them in moving toward professionalization. z 

More specifically, the objectives are: o 

(1 ) To provide an adequate, well-rounded program in law relative 
police subjects and human relations with emphasis on practical 
application. This affords the new officer the necessary job 
knowledge and skills to carry out his task of protecting lives 
and property and maintaining peace and tranquility; and at 
the same time, providing a foundation for future specialized 
training. 

(2 ) To coordinate and provide series of specialized training pro- 
grams for law enforcement officers such as supervisor's training, 
technical training, and comprehensive seminar presentations. 

Course Descriptions 



"Introduction of Police Science" 120 hours 

A program in law, applied police subjects, special courses, communicative 
skills, and human relations. The program may be offered on a basis of 6 
hours per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks; or 5 hours per day, 5 days 
per week, for 5 weeks. It may also be offered one course at a time on an 
updating, upgrading basis; whereby, the class meets one or two nights a 



=> 



week over a designated period of time. 

Each of the 15 divisions of the Introduction to Police Science is a 
separate and distinct course within itself and requires differential instruc- 
tional knowledge and ability. Therefore, a course description is submitted 
for each of them. Introduction to Police Science (120 hours) is transferable 
for credit to the Police Science degree program. 

(1) Courts and Law 6 hours 

Course covers: History of law enforcement, constitutional law, state 
and local government, and evolution of the law. 

(2) Elements of Offenses 24 hours 

Course covers: Use of legal and research materials, general prin- 
ciples of criminal law, crimes against the person, crimes against 
property, crimes against public morality and decency; against the 
state and public justice; against the public peace and safety; general 
police regulations. 

(3) Laws of Arrest 9 hours 

Course covers: Introduction, arrest with a warrant, arrest without 
a warrant, use of force, escape and rearrest, rights and duties after 
arrest, and jurisdiction of officers. 

O (4) Search and Seizure s 3 hours 

\- Course covers: Constitutional bases, search with a search warrant, 

O search without a warrant, and illegally obtained evidence. 

uj (5) Evidence 6 hours 

Course covers: Evidence in general, legislative power to prescribe 

P - 168 rules and fix weight of evidence, jurisdiction and venue, kinds of 

evidence, hearsay rule, evidence distinguished from proof, the burden 

(3 of proof, opinion evidence, rules of admissibility, judicial notice, 

privileges, and collection and preservation of evidence. 



z 



p (6) General Criminal Investigation 12 hours 

Z Course covers: Original complaint, crime scene searches— identifi- 

q cation and preservation, interrogation and interview, scientific aids, 

and descriptions of persons. 

(7) Special Courses 6 hours 

Course covers: Report Writing, note taking, records systems, records 
completion, concise report writing, and first aid. 

(8) Motor Vehicle Law 18 hours 

Course covers: Motor vehicle law in general, driver license law, 
rules of the road, traffic direction and control, enforcement tech- 
niques, accident investigation, emergency vehicle operation, Finan- 
cial Responsibility Act of 1957, size, weight and equipment regula- 
tions. 

(9) Liquor Laws 3 hours 

Course covers Liquor laws in general, manufacture of intoxicating 
liquor, possession of intoxicating liquor, use of intoxicating liquor, 
transportation, jurisdiction and general powers of the Alcoholic Board 
of Control, drunkenness and other liquor offenses. 

(10) State Parole Board 3 hours 

Course covers: parole systems and parole laws. 

(11) Court Structure and Procedure 6 hours 



Course covers history and development of courts, officers of the 
court — courtroom demeanor and testifying in court. 

(12) Juveniles 6 hours 

Course covers: types of juvenile cases most frequently encountered, 
cause of juvenile misbehavior, effects of gangs, and neighborhood 
conditions on juveniles, legal restrictions upon treatment of juveniles, 
juvenile probation laws, the juvenile and his parents, police procedure 
in juvenile cases, disposition and follow-up of juvenile cases, juvenile 
traffic offenders, juvenile sex offenders, adults contributing to delin- 
quency of juveniles, the functions of local facilities and agencies, and 
prevention of juvenile delinquency. 

(13) Law Enforcement Procedures 6 hours 

Course covers pursuit driving; raids and roadblocks; patrol pro- 
cedures; riots, unlawful assemblies and crowd control; defensive 
tactics and weapons and firearms safety. 

(14) Police Administration 6 hours 

Course covers: fundamentals of supervision and administration. 

(15) Human and Public Relations 6 hours 

Course includes: development of the speaking voice, pronunciation 
and enunciation, kinds of oral communication, diction and delivery, ^ 

group discussion, taking part in group discussion and conference r; 

meetings and interviews. < 

Supervision for Law Enforcement Personnel 120 hours 

Officers will cover such subjects as principles of police administration, 
the police supervisor, development of a police supervisor, decision making, p _ 1 go 

human relations, leadership, role of the supervisor in training, evaluation, 
performance rating, personnel complaints, discipline and control of per- ( _ 

sonnel, planning, report writing, and public relations. Supervision for Law z 

Enforcement Personnel (120 hours) is transferable for credit to the Police 5 

Science degree program. £■: 

Chemical Tests for Alcohol Operator s Training Course 68 hours o 

Studies covered in this course are mathematics and metric system; scientific 
concepts; pharmacology and physiological effects of alcohol; background 
and history of chemical testing; theory of breath test instruments; main- 
tenance of breath test instruments; simulated courtroom situation; intro- 
duction to supervision of chemical test programs. 

Chemical Tests for Alcohol Operator's Retraining Course 28 hours 

Studies covered in this course are: mathematics and metric system; scien- 
tific concepts; pharmacology and physiological effects of alcohol; background 
and history of chemical testing; theory of breath test instruments; main- 
tenance of breath test instruments; simulate courtroom situation; introduc- 
tion to supervision of chemical test programs. 

Coping With the Drinking Driver 8 hours 

A course to aid every law enforcement officer in North Carolina to recog- 
nize, arrest and prosecute the persons who drive upon the highways while 
they are under the influence of alcohol and drugs. 

Chemical Tests for Alcohol Supervisor's Training Course 

Studies covered in this course are: mathematics and metric system; scientific 
concepts; pharmacology and physiological effects of alcohol, background 
and history of chemical testing; theory of breath test instruments; main- 
tenance of breath test instruments; simulated courtroom situation; intro- 
duction to supervision of chemical test programs. 



g. Traffic Accident Investigation 30 hours 

Course covers: The various laws of physics as they apply to traffic accidents, 
determining speed from brake marks, making collision diagrams, witness 
interrogation and hit-and-run investigations. 

h. Fingerprint Identification 30 hours 

Course covers: Search, classifying and filing of fingerprints; developing 
latent fingerprints and presenting fingerprints evidence in court. 

i. Firearms Training 30 hours 

Course covers: Firearms safety and firearms proficiency with the revolver, 
shotgun, rifle and gas gun, with some emphasis placed on gas gernades 
and projectiles. 

j. Riot and Crowd Control 30 hours 

Course covers: Philosophy of crowds, laws pertaining to riots and un- 
lawful assemblies, riot control formulations and use of special weapons. 

Curriculum credit may be allowed on an individual analysis basis in 
the Law Enforcement courses above (items c-j ). 

Fire Service Training 

z 

p Firefighting is becoming more complex. With the demands of tech- 

5 nological and economic changes, the fireman's problems increase— 

q ranging from the technical to the psychological, from the area of 

mechanical equipment to the area of human relations. Confronting 
P - 170 him are situations virtually non-existent a few years ago, and his re- 

sponsibilities demand a continuous program of training and education, 
z The following objectives have been established for the Fire Service 

^ Training Program: 

p (1 ) To teach the firemen safe habits and the correct techniques for 

o using tools and equipment on the fire ground. 

(2 ) To develop the firemen's initiative and judgment. 

(3) To train firemen to accept individual responsibility. 

(4) To teach the firemen the technical information and the skills 
necessary to perform selected operations on the fire ground. 

(5) To teach the firemen the importance of planning jobs and opera- 
tions for greater accuracy and efficiency of operation. 

(6) To develop in the firemen self-reliance and confidence in his 
ability. 

(7 ) To present to the firemen a variety of experiences and problems 
which will develop his ability to master the practical problems 
that he will encounter in the service. 

Course Descriptions 

a. Ambulance Attendant Training 22 hours 

Designed to develop understanding of and appreciation for the role of 
the ambulance attendant in the care and transportation of the sick and 
injured. Classroom discussions include principles related to administering 
emergency aid to victims in selected situations, to safe transportation of 
the sick or injured, and to safe operation of the ambulance. Student ex- 



periences include supervised practice in applying splints, in using resuscita- 
tion techniques, in applying dressings, and in positioning and transporting 
victims with a variety of conditions. 

b. Hospital Fire Training 

The reason for a fire drill, fire protection and drill for hospital, chemistry 
of fire, classification and types of firefighting appliances, rescue and evacua- 
tion techniques. 

c Fire Science Technology 

A 108 quarter-hour curriculum consisting of English, math, science, and 
fire technologies. 

d. Home Fire Safety 

Suggestions for protecting a house from fire, the fire triangle, definition 
and control of fires by classification, fire extinguishers, rescue practices and 
techniques, and home safety check list. 

e. Arson and Unlawful Burning 

Firemen's responsibility in unlawful burnings, finding the point of origin, 
determining the cause of fire, identification of incendiary fires, searching 
fire scene, types of fire setters and modes of operation, techniques for 
collecting, protecting and preserving evidence, questioning witnesses, and 
appearing in court. 

f. The Company Officer 

Introduction to fire service organization, the fire department, officership, 
the company officer, training fire company personnel, human relations, 
public relations, the fireman's responsibility in arson detection, and codes. 

g. Introduction To Firefighting 42 hours 

Introduction to the fire service, forcible entry practices, portable fire 
extinguisher practices, fire service rope practices, fire apparatus practices, 
fire stream practices, fire hose practices, ventilation practices, ladder prac- 
tices, salvage and overhaul practices, rescue practices, protective breathing 
equipment, firefighting procedures, and course postmortem. 

h. Fire Service Training 120 hours 

Major titles of the course are: forcible entry, rope practices, portable fire 
extinguishers, ladder practices, hose practices, salvage and overhaul prac- 
tices, fire stream practices, fire apparatus practices, ventilation, rescue 
practices, protective breathing equipment, and firefighting procedures. 

APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING 

Under General Statute 115 A, enacted in 1963, the institutions 
under the Department of Community Colleges have been given the 
responsibility for conducting the related training for apprentices in 
North Carolina. The major objective for related instruction for ap- 
prentices is to teach the apprentice that part of the technical related 
information pertaining to his trade which can best be taught in the 
classroom. Other objectives include the development of abilitv to apply 
technical related information, the evolvement of proper attitudes and 
human relations, and the adjustment to social problems encountered 
in the world of work. 



< 



The following apprentice classes have been offered: 

a. Electrical Apprentice d. Carpentry Apprentice 

b. Mould-Maker Apprentice e. Bricklayer Apprentice 

c. Sheet metal Apprentice 

NEW AND EXPANDING INDUSTRY TRAINING 

Durham Technical Institute in cooperation with the Industrial 
Services Division of the North Carolina Department of Community 
Colleges may provide state-sponsored industrial training and related 
service for: 

1. New Industry. Industry locating in North Carolina from another 
state. 

2. Expanding Industry. Local industry expanding its North Caro- 
lina facilities, either building another plant or expending addi- 
tional capital for expanding present capacity, that is, additional 
equipment, manpower, and/or space. This training applies only 
to new jobs created through expansion. 

One of the basic objectives of Durham Technical Institute is to 
stimulate the creation of more challenging and rewarding jobs for the 
o people of our area by providing a customized training service to new 

Q and expanding industries. Subject to only minimal limitations, this 

institution, in cooperation with the Industrial Services Division of 
" " * the State Department of Community Colleges, will design and admin- 

ister a special program for training and production manpower required 

E by any new or expanding industry creating new job opportunities in 

z North Carolina. 

£ This program includes the following services: 

g 1. Consultation in determining job descriptions; defining areas of 

training; and in prescribing appropriate course outlines, train- 
ing schedules, and materials. 

2. Selecting and training of instructors. These instructors may be 
recruited from the company and from outside sources. 

3. Payment of instructors' wages for the duration of the training 
program. 

4. Provision of suitable space for a temporary training facility 
prior to the completion of the new plant, should such temporary 
space be required. This may be space with Durham Technical 
Institute or leased space in the community. 

5. Assumption of installation costs of equipment in the temporary 
training facility. 

6. Payment for one-half the cost of nonsalvageable materials 
expended in the training program. 

The purpose of this service is to help a new or expanding industry 
meet its immediate manpower needs and to encourage each industry 
to develop a long-range training program of its own to satisfy its con- 
tinuing replacement and retraining needs. 




Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Progress 30 

Acceptance 22 

Accounting 54 

Accreditation 16 

Activity Fee 41 

Administration 9 

Admissions 

General 20 

Specific 21 

Procedure 22 

Continuing Education 152 

Part Time Evening Students .... 23 

Special Students 25 

Adult Basic Education 154 

Adult Education 154 

Advanced Standing 26 

Application 21 

Application Form 176 

Apprenticeship Training 171 

Electrical Apprentice 172 

Mould Maker Apprentice 172 

Sheetmetal Apprentice 172 

Bricklayer Apprentice 172 

Aptitude Testing 21 

Architectural Drafting 134 

Associate Degree Electives 128 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 
Programs 

Accounting 54 

Automotive Technology 60 

Business Administration 66 

Data Processing Technology .... 72 
Dental Laboratory Technology . . 78 
Electronics Engineering 

Technology 84 

General Office Technology 90 

Inhalation Therapy 96 

Library Technology 102 

Athletics 35 

Attendance 18 

Automotive Mechanics 139 

Automotive Technology 60 

Board of Trustees 8 

Books 43 

Business Administration 66 

Calendar 5 

Certificates 25 

Continuing Education 152 

Admission 152 

Class Locations 152 

Course Scheduling 152 

Fees 153 

Attendance 153 

Certificates and Diplomas 153 

Correspondence Directory 2 



Counseling 34 

Counseling Conference 22 

Course Audit 25 

Course Descriptions 

Accounting 56 

Automotive Technology 62 

Business Administration 68 

Data Processing Technology ... 74 
Dental Laboratory Technology . . 80 
Electronics Engineering 

Technology 86 

General Office Technology 92 

Inhalation Therapy 98 

Library Technology 104 

Opticianry 110 

Police Science Technology 118 

Secretarial Science 124 

Architectural Drafting 136 

Automotive Mechanics 140 

Practical Nurse Education 145 

Course Load 30 

Credit By Examination 26 

Curriculum Admission 

Requirements 23 

Data Processing Technology 72 

Degree Programs 24 

Dental Laboratory Technology ... 78 
Diploma Programs 

Architectural Drafting 134 

Automotive Mechanics 139 

Practical Nurse Education 144 

Disciplinary Procedure 18 

Dismissal 18 

Educational Opportunity 47 

Electronics Engineering 

Technology 84 

Expenses and Financial Aid 38 

Faculty 10 

Faculty Advisors 34 

Failure Regulations 31 

Fees 153 

Fire Service Training 170 

Course Descriptions 170 

Food Drink 17 

Food Service Courses 164 

Course Descriptions 164 

Foreign Students 26 

General Information 14, 152 

General Office Technology 90 

Grading System 27 

Graduation Fee 42 

Graduation Requirements 28 

Guidance 34 

High School Diploma Program .... 155 
High School Equivalency 

Program 155 



History and Organization 14 

Honors 29 

Hospital Training 167 

Course Descriptions 167 

Hospitality Training 163 

Food Service Courses 164 

Hotel-Motel Management 165 

Hospitality Training 163 

Travel Service 166 

Information 17 

Inhalation Therapy 96 

Institute Regulations 16 

Insurance 44 

Late Registration Fee 42 

Law Enforcement Education 

Program 46 

Law Enforcement Training 167 

Course Description 167 

Learning Resources Center 148 

Library Technology 102 

Loans 

Long-Term 45 

Insured 46 

Short-Term 46 

Map Inside Back Cover 

New and Expanding Industry 

Training 172 

North Carolina Division of 

Rehabilitation Approval 16 

Occupational Education 

Extension 156 

Opticianry 108 

Orientation 22, 34 

Parking 17 

Personal Interest Courses 153 



General Information 15 

Continuing Education 152 

Placement 36 

Police Science Technology 116 

Practical Nurse Education 144 

Programs of Study 52 

Provisional Status 25 

Purpose, Institute 15 

Readmission 31 

Refund Policy 42 

Registration 22 

Residency Requirements 29 

Resident Status for Tuition 

General 38 

Minors . 38 

Adults 38 

Married Students 39 

Military Personnel . 39 

Aliens 39 

Property and Taxes 39 

Change of Status 39 

Responsibility of Students 39 

Schedule Changes 29 

Scholarships 45 



Secretarial Science 122 

Selective Service Deferment 35 

Smoking 17 

Social Security Benefits 48 

Special Occupational Programs 

Supervisory Development 159 

Hospitality Training 163 

Law Enforcement Training 167 

Fire Service Training 170 

Apprenticeship Training 171 

New and Expanding Industry 

Training 172 

Special Students 25 

Student Center 35 

Student Conduct 17 

Student Dress 17 

Student Government 35 

Student Housing 34 

Student Organizations 36 

Student Publications 36 

Supervisory Development 

Training 159 

Course Descriptions 160 

Supplies 43 

Transcripts 21, 31 

Transfer of Credit 23 

Travel Service 166 

Course Descriptions 166 

Tuition 

North Carolina Resident 40 

Full-time Students 41 

Part-time Students 41 

Non-Resident 41 

Full-time Non-Resident ........ 41 

Part-time Non-Resident 41 

Uniform Deposit 43 

V. A. Approval 16 

Veterans Education Benefits 48 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Assistance 47 

Withdrawal Regulations 27 

Work Study 47 



FOR SCHOOL USE ONLY 














DATE APPLICATION RECEIVED 


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 
DURHAM TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


ATTACH A RECENT 
PHOTOGRAPH 




RETURN TO: 




STUDENT PERSONNEL OFFICE 
DURHAM TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 
POST OFFICE BOX 1 1307 
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 27703 








PLEASE PRINT LEGIBLY 








1 Name of Curriculum you are interested 


in 


Which quarter do you wish to enter? 

Fall Wintpr Spring 
19 nay Nirjht 


Summer 


2, Name LAST FIRST 
Mr 
Mrs, 


MAIDEN 


Home Phone 


Dote of Birth 





oHdress: number 



ZIP CODE COUNTY 



4. 


Age 


Roce 

Caucasian Indian 


Negr 


US CITIZEN 
) Mongoloid yes no 


Socio 


Security Number 




5, 


Father 


Nome 




Living 
No 


Address, City and State 




Education: Highest grade completed 


Occupation and Employer 


6, 


Mother 


Name 




Living 
Yes 

No 


Address, City and State 




Education: Highest grade completed 


Occupation and Employer 






7 


Guardian 


f not living with parents: Name 






Address, City and State 


8. 


Your mar 


tol stotus 

simle married sepa 


ated 


divorced 


widowed 


Number 


of Children 





Name of husbor 



Address, City and St. 



10, Height Weight 

Feet Inches Pounds 

1 1. Do you hove any physical defects or disobil 



General heolth cond 



ies? If so, describe 



had to discontinue study 



rk because of physical or 



Have you registered for selective 
Local board and location 



Selective Service Number 



ave you hod any military service? 



dote entered 



special interests or hobbii 



16. Whot person(s) 
Principal . 



nfluenced you most 
DTI Student 



choosing DURHAM TECHNICAL INSTITUTE? 
_ DTI Graduate Speoker Radio 



Counselor Teacher 

Newspaper Visit 



Friend 
_ Other 



17. 


Name of Local Newspaper 






Addres 


5, City and State 






18. 


Financial Assistance Needed? 


YES_^ 


NO 






Type 


Monthly Amount 

Needed 



Education: Are you a student? 



NO List the grade you are 



give highest grade completed 



List below all high schools, colleges, trade schools, technical institute 
at each school attended is required You are expected to contoc 
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE. Two transcripts ore required of Practical 



i attended Note: as part of your application, a transcript of your record 
the school(s) and request that your transcript be sent to DURHAM 



NAME OF SCHOOL 


ADDRESS 


DATES OF ATTENDANCE 


MAJOR FIELD OF STUDY 


































20. Employment: Are you now employed? 

Storting with your present job, list all job 


YFS ND PART TIMF Fll 


_L TIME HOURS 
nces that you have hod. 


in the past five years or give any other skilled work experie 


EMPLOYER 


DATES 
From— To 


ADDRESS 


TYPE OF WORK 


REASON FOR LEAVING 











































21. Exp'ain your reasons for applying for a program of study at DURHAM TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



in case of emergency 



RELATIONSHIP 



This information is complete and correct to the best of my knowledge. If accepted for odmission, I agree to obide by all rules and 
regulations of the school 



SIGNATURE 
DATE 



Restore 




Chapel Hill 



Fuquay Springs 



78.302(1960) 



"warn