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Full text of "Bulletin of Elon College, the, 1940-1946"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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http://www.archive.org/details/bulletinofelon371401elon 




STATELY COLONNADES CONNECT THE BUILDINGS 






Vol. XXXVII X- February, 194r^"''^^^^^-^'^*' No. 1 



THE BULLETIN 

OF 

ELON COLLEGE 

FIFTY-SECOND 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 

1941-1942 

AND 

CATALOGUE OF 1940-41 




ELON COLLEGE 

Elon College, N. C. 

Bulletin Issued Quarterly 



Entered as second-class mail at the postoffice of Elon College, N. C, under the 
act of July 16, 1894. 



a. (^^-^ 



Member of 

THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES 

and of the 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE CONFERENCE 



Contents 



Page 

College Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

The Faculty 7 

Officers of Administration 10 

Faculty Committees 10 

Educational Philosophy 11 

Administration 12 

The Physical Environment 14 

Buildings and Equipment 15 

Historical Sketch 18 

Annual Events 21 

Student Organizations 23 

Student Expenses 27 

Boarding Department 28 

Academic Regulations 2)2i 

Scholarships 43 

Loan Funds 45 

Endowment and Somxes of Income 46 

Outline of Courses of Study 50 

Departments of Instruction of the College : 

Biology 57 

Business Administration 58 

Chemistry 64 

Education 65 

English 71 

Geography and Geology 73 

Greek 74 

History 74 

Mathematics 76 

Modern Languages 78 

Philosophy and Religion 80 

Physics 82 

Psychology 84 

Sociology 85 

Special Departments of the College : 

Art 86 

Home Economics 87 

Music 89 

Physical Education 93 

Roster of Students in the College 94 

Schedule of Recitations Ill 



1941 1 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER | 


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S |M|T |W|T IF 1 S 


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FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


OCTOBER 1 












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NOVEMBER | 














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. . 1. . 


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1942 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER 1 










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• ■ 








FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


OCTOBER 1 


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MARCH 


JULY 


NOVEMBER 1 


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.. ..|.. 


1 


APRIL 


AUGUST 


DECEMBER 1 




1 2 


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. . 










1 


. 1 


2 


3 


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S 6 7 


8 9 


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15 116 


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I.. I.. I.. 




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College Calendar 

SESSION OF 1941-1942 



September 2-^1 — Freshman Period. Fall Semester begins. 

September 3-4 — Freshman Registration. 

September 5 — Registration for Upperclassmen, and Freshman Classes begin. 

September 6 — Upperclassmen Classes begin. 

September 6 — Annual Faculty Reception. 

September 7 — Opening Addresses of the President. 

October 11 — Sophomore- Freshman Reception. 

October 15 — Subjects for Senior Essay due. 

November 3 — Mid-Semester Grade Reports due. 

November 20 — Thanksgiving Day. 

December 1 — First Draft of Senior Essay, or Comprehensive Examinations due. 

December 6 — Senior-Junior Dinner. 

December 7 — Elon Singers present Christmas Program. 

December 13 - January 1 — Christmas Holidays. 

January 2 — Classes resume, 8 : 00 A. M. 

January 14-17 — Registrtation Afternoons for Second Semester. 

January 19 — Classes for Spring Semester begin. 

January 31 — Freshman-Sophomore Reception. 

February 7 — Mid- Year Alumni ISIeeting. 

February 10 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

March 13 — Senior Banquet given by President and Mrs. L. E. Smith. 

March 14 — Mid-Semester Grade Reports due. 

March 16-23 — Spring Holidays. 

March 24 — Classes resume, 8 : 00 A. M. 

April 1 — Senior Essay or Comprehensive Examinations completed. 

April 5 — Easter Sunday. 

May 2 — May Day Exercises. 

May 8 — Junior-Senior Dinner. 

May 19-23 — Second Semester Examinations. 

May 23-26 — Commencement Exercises. 

May 26 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 9 : 30 A. M. 

Jxme 3 — Summer School opens. 



Board of Trustees 



Leon Edgar Smith, D. D, President, ex officio Elon College, N. C. 

Dr. W. H. Boone, Chairman Durham, N. C. 

Alton West, Business Manager Elon College, N. C. 

Stanley C. Harrell, Secretary Durham, N. C. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1942 

H. Shelton Smith, D. D Durham, N. C. 

Harry K. Eversull, D. D Marietta, Ohio 

Mrs. Russell T. Bradford R. 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Hon. Kemp B. Johnson Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Miss Susie Holland Suffolk, Va. 

D. R. Fonville, Esq Burlington, N. C. 

J. H. McEwen Burlington, N. C. 

E. C. Gillette, D.D Jacksonville, Fla. 

John L. Farmer Wilson, N. C. 

V. R. Holt Burlington, N. C. 

Miles H. Krumbine, D. D • • Shaker Heights, Columbus, Ohio 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1944 

Col. J. E. West Suffolk, Va. 

Prof. L. L. Vaughan Raleigh, N. C. 

S. C. Harrell, D. D Durham, N. C. 

Chas. D. Jolinston Elon College, N. C. 

E. L. Moffitt, LL.D Burlington, N. C. 

Luther E. Carlton Paces, Va. 

F. L. Fagley, D.D New York City 

W. J. Ballentine • • Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

O. F. Smith Norfolk, Va. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1946 

Col. E. E. Holland Suffolk, Va. 

W. H. Boone, M. D Durham, N. C. 

J. A. Kimball Manson, N. C. 

W. Horace Day, D. D Bridgeport, Conn. 

Russell J. Clinchy Hartford, Conn. 

Richard H. Clapp New Haven, Conn. 

C. W. McPherson, M. D Burlington, N. C. 

W. B. Truitt Greensboro, N. C. 

J. H. Lightbourne, D.D Burlington, N. C. 

B. D. Jones, Jr., M. D Norfolk, Va. 

J. A. Vaughan New York City 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

L. E. Smith, C. W. McPherson, W. H. Boone, S. C. Harrell, L. L. Vaughan, 
J. L. Farmer and J. H. McEwen. 



The Faculty 



LEON EDGAR SMITH 

President 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Princeton University; D.D., Elon College; 

LL.D., Marietta College 

JOHN DECATUR MESSICK 

Dean, Head of the Department of Education 

Ph.B., Elon College; University of North Carolina; Ph.D., New York 

University 

JULIE MAE OXFORD 

Dean of Women, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A. B., Bessie Tift College; M. A., University of Georgia; 

Graduate Work, Duke University 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK 

Registrar, Professor of Physics 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M.S., Cornell University, Additional 

Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins University, University of 

Chicago, Duke University 

JOHN WILLIS BARNEY 

Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University, University of 

Virginia, University of North Carolina 

GEORGE BEECHER 

Associ-ate Professor of Education and Science 
A. B., Yale University; Graduate Work, Yale University, 

D. J .BOWDEN 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 

B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; B. D., Ph.D., Yale University 

NED FAUCETTE BRANNOCK 

Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., M.A., Elon College; M.S., Columbia University; Litt.D., 

Defiance College; Additional Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins 

University, University of North Carolina 

JOE BRUNANSKY 

Assistant Coach and Director of Intramural Sports 
A. B., Duke University 

WILSIE FLORENCE BUSSELL 

Instructor of French and Spanish 

A. B., M. A., Duke University; Graduate Work, Duke University, 

Pennsylvania State College, Alliance Francaise in Paris 



S ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

GEORGE L. CARRINGTON 

Chief Surgeon, Alamance General Hospital 

Iristructor in Health and Hygiene 

A. B., University of North Carolina; M. A., Duke University; 

M. D., Johns Hopkins University 

JOHN A. CLARKE 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A. B., Hampden-Sydiiey College; M. A., University of Virginia; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

(On Leave) 

FLETCHER COLLINS, Jr. 

Professor of English 
Ph. B., Ph.D., Yale University 

LEONORA DAVIS 

Instructor in Conuuercial Department 
B. S., Tennessee College; Graduate Work, Bowling Green Business University 

LESTER COOLIDGE DICKINSON 

Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., M. A., George Washington University; Residence Requirements 

Completed for Ph. D. at Columbia University 

JULIAN GARDINER 

Instructor of Voice 

B. A. Honors, Oxford University, England; Graduate of Royal College of 

Music, London, England 

JNIRS. JULIAN GARDINER 

Instructor of Voice 

L. R. A. M., Royal Academy of ^Slusic, London, England 

MERTON FRENCH 

Associate Professor of Religion and Greek 

A. B., Washburn College; M. A., Ph.D., Brown University 

HOWARD S. GRAVETT 

Associate Professor of Biology 
A. B., James MiUikin University; M. A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

HORACE HENDRICKSON 

Head Coach and Director of Physical Education 

A. B., Duke University 

MRS. HORACE HENDRICKSON 

Director of Physical Education for Girls 

B. S., University of Pittsbiirg 

HANS HIRSCH 

Instructor of Modern Languages and History 

Hoehere Reifepruefung Realgymnasium Mannheim, University of 

Frankfort-on-the-Main, University of Heidelbuerg, University 

of Vienna, Ph. D., University of Mvmich 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 

WAITUS W. HOWELL 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

MRS. SUE CRAFT HOWELL 

Instructor of Commercial Department 

A. B., La Grange College; M. S., North Carolina State College 

MRS. OMA U. JOHNSON 

Librarian 

Ph. B., A. B., Elon College; B. S., Columbia University 

FLETCHER MOORE 

Instructor of Piano and Organ 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Columbia University; Julliard School of Music; 

Piano Student of Sascha Gorodnitzki and Guy Maier 

LIDA MUSE 

Instructor of Home Economics 
B. S., University of Tennessee; M. A., Columbia University 

JOHN URQUART NEWMAN 

Professor Emeritus of Biblical Language and Literature 

A. B., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Chicago University; 

Litt. D., La Grange; D. D., Union College 

LILA CLARE NEWMAN 

Instructor of Art 

Ph. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University and 

Harvard University 

STUART G. PRATT 

Associate Professor of Music 

A. B., Hartwick College; Mus. B., Philadelphia Musical Academy; 

Mus. M., Syracuse University. Two years' study in Berlin, 

Germany, under Marta Siebold (piano), Hugo Kaun 

(theory and composition), and Walter Scharwenka 

(organ) ; Colleague of the American Guild 

Organists 

AUSTIN DEVER SPRAGUE 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A. B., Miami University; M. Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

JAMES H. STEWART 

Instructor of Business Administration 
A. B., Transylvania College ; M. A., University of Kentucky 

WILLIAM B. TERRELL 

Principal, Tteacher Training School 
A. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, University of North Carolina 

HOWARD BROWN 

Student Director of College Band 



10 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

LEON EDGAR SMITH, A. B., INI. A., A. D., LL.D., President. 
J. D. MESSICK, Ph. B., Ph.D., Dean. 
JULIA MAE OXFORD, A. B., M. A., Dean of Women. 
ALONZO LOHR HOOK, A. B., M. A., M. S., Registrar. 
ALTON WEST, A. B., .Accountant and Business Manager. 

GEORGE D. COLCLOUGPI, A. B., Director of Public Relations and Alumni 
Secretary. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Administrative — Dean Messick, Dean Oxford, Mr. West, Dr. Bowden, Prof 

Hook. 
Alumni Cooperation — Mr. Howell, Dr. Clark, Mr. Colclough. 
Athletic — Prof. Barney, Prof. Hook, Dean Messick, Mr. West, Coach Hendrick- 

son. 
Chapel — Dr. French, Prof. Pratt, Miss Muse, Prof. Edwards. 
Deates — Dr. French, Prof. Dickinson, Dr. Collins, Mrs. Johnson, Dr. Brannock. 
Dramatics — Dr. Collins, Miss Muse, Dr. Gravett, Mr. Moore, Mrs. Hendrickson. 
Admission and Credits — Prof. Hook, Dean Messick, Dean Oxford. 
Library — Mrs. Johnson, Dr. French, Dr. Gravett, Mrs. Howell, Dr. Hirsch. 
Music Organizations — Prof. Pratt, Prof. Moore, Prof. Edwards. 
Practice School — Dean Messick, Mr. Beecher, Dean Oxford, Mrs. Hendrickson. 
Religious Organizations — Dr. Bowden, Dr. French, Dr. Newman, Aliss Davis, 

Miss INIuse. 
Public Entertainment — Prof. Pratt, Dean Oxford, Prof. Hook, Miss Newman, 

Dr. Collins, Mrs. Edwards. 
Social Clubs — Dean Oxford, Prof. Hook, Prof. Stewart, Prof. Dickinson. 
Student Loans and Scholarship — Mr. West, Mr. Colclough, Dr. Bowden, Mr. 

Howell, Mrs. Johnson. 

Student Publication — Dr. Collins, Mr. Colclough, Prof. Hook, Mr. Beecher. 
Honors — Prof. Hook, Dr. Collins, Prof. Dickinson. 

Curriculum — Dean ]\Iessick, Prof. Hook, Dr. Collins, Dr. French, Dr. Bowden, 
Dr. Sprague. 

Student Employment — Mr. Howell, Mr. Colclough, Mr. West, Mrs. Johnson, 
Mrs. Smith. 



Catalogue of Elon College 

The purpose of this Catalogue is to set forth concisely the 
principles involved in progressive education, as contained in 
the curriculum of Elon College. Parents and students will 
find these principles both interesting and stimulating, and are 
invited to examine the same carefully. 

The Church College. — Elon College is a church institu- 
tion, supported by the Congregational-Christian Church for 
the specific purpose of training young men and young w^omen 
under moral and religious influences. It is not the purpose of 
the College to change or uproot honest faith in any heart, but 
to afford to every individual opportunities for moral develop- 
ment and spiritual advancement. The Church under whose 
auspices Elon College was founded and has been maintained 
has always believed in Christianity as the way of life, not as 
a system of theology or a body of doctrine. The College feels 
that Christianity is the basis for the student's way of life at 
Elon and in the years to come. The College seeks through 
education and example to preserve and develop religious values 
as a means of developing Christian character and safeguarding 
civilization. 

The Progressive College. — As a progressive college, Elon 
believes that education is a process of learning through exper- 
iences, and that these experiences should be not only intellec- 
tual, but also emotional, religious and social. Directed oppor- 
tunities are therefore given for students to gain a human 
understanding of books, themselves and other people, and 
their God. 

The Small College. — Elon College feels strongly that there 
are distinct advantages to the student in the small college en- 
vironment. There is a solidarity of interests among faculty 
and students, a group unity, which would not be as possible 



12 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

with larger numbers. Everyone knows everyone else, and a 
friendly, democratic spirit is made possible. Individualized 
instruction, personal interest and understanding on the part 
of teachers and students, and a genuine spirit of Christian 
cooperation characterize life at Elon College. 

College life at Elon is wholesome and invigorating. The 
students are not extravagant in their living, and the cost of 
education is reasonable. There are opportunities for self-help, 
affording students with limited means jobs that will pay part 
of their expenses. However, these grants are limited in 
number. 

ADMINISTRATION 

To carry out the educational philosophy of the College, 
there is an administrative organization. 

Board of Trustees. — The Board of Trustees is the final 
authority in the disposition of all matters of government and 
administration. 

President — The President is the resident agent of the 
Board and is responsible for administrative policies and plans 
for the advancement of the College. He is assisted by the 
Faculty of which body he is chairman, and, in monthly meet- 
ings with the Faculty, discusses and acts upon the manifold 
problems of administration. 

The Faculty. — The Faculty is a democratic body, and in 
meetings acts upon legislative measures pertaining to the cur- 
riculum. It also passes upon the reports and recommendations 
of Faculty committees, through which groups much of the 
detail of educational research and planning is done. These 
committees also act administratively for the Faculty in the 
interim between its sessions, but have no legislative authority. 

Dean. — The Dean of the College is responsible for the 
administration of the curriculum, regulates attendance for 
men students at classes, chapel and other religious services, and 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 13 

is in charge of the character-building and guidance programs 
for the men of the College. He is the adviser of the Student 
Senate. He also represents the President when the latter is 
out of town. 

Dean of Women. — The Dean of Women regulates, for the 
women, attendance at classes, chapel and other religious ser- 
vices, and gives permissions to leave the campus. She resides 
on the campus and is in charge of the character-building pro- 
gram for the women of the College. She is adviser of the 
women's Council. 

The two Deans, in cooperation with the President, have 
jurisdiction over the social functions of the College, and the 
officers of Student Government confer with these officials for 
advice regarding these functions. 

Business Manager. — The Business Manager carries out the 
business and financial policies of the College as directed by 
the Board of Trustees. All business contracts must have his 
endorsement before they are binding on the College. He is 
the purchasing agent for all branches of the College, and is 
custodian of all its assets and properties. He is also general 
manager of all student self-help work done on the campus, 
and of all college service departments. 

Student Government. — This important branch of college 
government was granted its first constitution by the Faculty 
in 1919, and has since that time successfully operated through 
the men's Senate and later also through the women's Council. 
These constitutions, together with the by-laws of the two or- 
ganizations, are printed in the Elon Handbook. 

Registrar. — The Registrar of the College receives all ap- 
plications for entrance, and keeps the academic records of all 
students. He has charge of admissions, transcripts of records, 
grades, and other statistical data. 



14 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 

The Location. — Elon College is located sixty-four miles 
west of Raleigh, seventeen miles east of Greensboro, and four 
miles west of Burlington, on the North Carolina division of 
the Southern Railway. The railroad is the southern boundary 
of the campus, and it commands a view of the college build- 
ings. State Highway No. 100 is the northern boundary. 

Eight mail and passenger trains pass the College daily. 
The short line of the Carolina Coach Company passes the 
College and affords bus accomodations to the students to all 
parts of the country. 

The Campus. — The College Campus presents a most 
beautiful and attractive appearance. It is spacious and, for 
the most part, is covered by stalwart native oak and hickory. 
Shrubbery has been placed on the campus where such ad- 
ditions would add to the beauty and attractiveness of the 
grounds. The concrete walks and driveways add to its native 
beauty and charm. Its very atmosphere is a contribution to 
the development of manhood and womanhood. The massive 
brick wall surrounding the campus lends dignity as well as 
protection and quietude. 

The Climate. — Climatic conditions are unusually favorable 
to the mental and physical development of the Elon student. 
At all seasons of the year the temperature is moderate, with 
an annual average of about 60 degrees. The winter season is 
usually short and the fall and spring seasons long and pleas- 
ant. The health of the student is thus naturally safeguarded, 
and there is abundant opportunity for the beneficial effects of 
much time spent out of doors in an atmosphere neither ener- 
vating nor forbidding. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 15 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Elon College has been accurately described by an official 
of the Association of American Colleges as "the best equipped 
small college in the country." Ten buildings, thoroughly 
equipped for living and study, are on the campus; five of them 
have only recently been completed and are modern in every 
detail. 

The Greater Elon Group 

These five, three-story, fire-proof structures are constructed 
of brick and reinforced concrete, and all are identical in their 
architectural design. 

Alamance Building. — This is the administration building, 
and houses classrooms; administrative offices; the laboratories 
of the Business, Home Economics, Mechanical Drawing, and 
Art Departments; and the College Bookstore. The citizens 
of Alamance County undertook to raise an amount necessary 
to erect and equip this building. 

Carlton Library. — This building, the gift of Trustees P. J., 
H. A., and L. E. Carlton, and their sister, Mrs. T. S. Parrott, 
has a stack-room capacity for 187,500 volumes. The reading 
room has seating capacity for one hundred readers. Besides 
offices and work room for the library force, the building con- 
tains fourteen professors' research and office rooms and seven 
students' seminar rooms. 

Whitley Memorial Auditorium. — In memory of his father- 
in-law, Mr. L. H. Whitley, Mr. J. M. Darden lent $50,000 to 
assist in the erection of this building. This building houses 
the large college auditorium, designed to seat 1,000 persons, 
and is used for chapel and church services, community gath- 
erings, lyceum performances, motion pictures and concerts. 
The Music Department is completely contained in the build- 
ing, with five studios, twenty-two practice rooms with upright 



16 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

pianos, a four-manual Skinner organ, an Estey practice organ, 
and several grand pianos. The auditorium is equipped with 
a professional motion picture projection apparatus, and on the 
stage is a projection screen and adequate lighting. The equip- 
ment of the building is outstanding. 

Mooney Christian Education Building. — In memory of 
Rev. Isaac Mooney, his father-in-law, Mr. M. Orban, Jr., gave 
this building to the college. The building is devoted to the 
religious and social activities of the college. At opposite ends 
of the building on the first floor are the Y. M. C. A. and Y. 
W. C. A. recreation rooms. The second floor provides as- 
sembly hall, classrooms, and offices for the Department of 
Philosophy and Religion. The assembly hall has a seating 
capacity of 400 and is adequately equipped for student dra- 
matic performances. On the third floor is a unique feature, a 
completely graded Sunday School plant used by the entire 
community. In the basement is a woodworking shop, which 
is equipped with power tools. 

Duke Science Building. — In memory of their mother, Mrs. 
Artelia Roney Duke, a native of Alamance County, Messrs. 
J. B. and B. N. Duke donated $60,000 toward the erection of 
this modern, fire-proof building. The first floor of the build- 
ing is used by the Department of Physics and the Elon Press, 
the second by the Departments of Biology and Geology, and 
the third by the Department of Chemistry. Each floor is 
fully equipped with modern scientific furniture and labora- 
tory apparatus. 

Dormitories 

East Dormitory. — This is the only original building left 
on the campus. It is used as a dormitory for men, and is a 
three-story brick structure, completely overhauled and fitted 
up with all modern conveniences. 




ELON'S BUILDINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL AND WELL EQUIPPED 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 17 

Alumni Building. — This building, erected in 1912, is the 
gift of the alumni to Alma Mater. It is a three-story, brick 
structure, and is used as a dormitory for men, with a men's 
gymnasium on the first floor. 

West Dormitory. — This is a three-story brick building next 
to the Library, and measures 158 by 46 feet. On the second 
and third floors are modern accommodations for 120 women 
students. The first floor contains a large reception hall, guest 
rooms and parlors, the infirmary, and living quarters for Fac- 
ulty women. The building has an annex which houses the 
two dining halls, the kitchen, and the women's gymnasium. 

Ladies' Hall. — This is a two-story brick edifice, with ac- 
commodations for 64 women. The interior has recently been 
renovated and modernized. 

South Dormitory. — Traditionally known as Publishing 
House, this building has been renovated, and is used as a 
dormitory for fifty men. 

Club House. — This is a one story building, with accom- 
modations for eighteen men, 

Carlton House. — This is a nine room dormitory which is 
used for eighteen men. 

Other Buildings 

West End Hall. — This is a fourteen-room dwelling, and 
is used as an apartment house for faculty members. 

Power Plant. — ^The power plant is the central station for 
heat, light, water and other service functions for the college 
buildings. Adjacent to the plant is a 50,000-gallon steel water 
tank with a deep well of pure water. 

Special Equipment 

Athletic Field. — The Athletic field contains thirty-four 
acres located near the campus, and has adequate space for all 
sports, A new stadium is being erected. 

Visual Education Aids. — The projection booth of the Aud- 
itorium is equipped with two 35-millimeter sound-on-film 



18 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

projectors. These projectors have low intensity arc lamps and 
RCA sound-heads. This equipment is used weekly for edu- 
cational and entertainment purposes. Projection facilities are 
provided for film strips, glass slides, opaque projectors, and 
16-millimeter films. 

Elon Press. — Housed in the Science Building is the Elon 
Press, composed of an electrically-driven printing press, four- 
teen complete fonts of Century and Cloister types, a composing 
table, and adequate apparatus for the printing of student pub- 
lications. 

Dramatic Stage. — The student stage in the Mooney Chris- 
tian Education Building has a proscenium opening of twenty- 
two feet and a depth of fifteen feet. Equipment includes a 
cyclorama, four mobile spot-lights, and other lighting appara- 
tus of modern design. Dressing rooms and a costume ward- 
robe are off the wings of the stage. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of Elon College is a constituent part of the 
history of the Christian Church in the Southeast. In 1794 the 
Reverend James O'Kelly and a group of dissenters from Wes- 
leyan Methodism, then spreading through the nation, met at 
Lebanon Church in Surry County, Virginia. This group 
agreed to found what was the first democratically governed 
church to arise on American soil. They named the church 
"Christian, to the exclusion of all party and sectarian names." 
They were interested in Christianity, not as a system of the- 
ology or a body of doctrines, but as a way of life. It was on 
this basis that the Christian and Congregational Churches 
merged in 1929. 

It was on this basis, also, that Elon College in 1889 was 
founded and has been developed. Many church colleges were 
established in the Nineteenth Century; nearly every denom- 
ination had and still has a church college for the training of 
its own leadership and as its contribution to civilization. From 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 19 

the early beginning in North Carolina and Virginia there had 
been a demand on the part of the Christian Church that there 
be established a college for the denomination. The demand 
grew with the church, and in September, 1888, the Southern 
Convention met in extraordinary session in Old Providence 
Church, Graham, North Carolina, to hear the reports and 
recommendations of the Committee on Schools and Colleges. 
The Convention appointed a provisional Board for the 
proposed college, authorizing the Board to choose a site for 
the college and to make the necessary legal and financial trans- 
actions. The Board was composed of Dr. W. S. Long, Dr. J. 
Pressley Barrett, Hon. F. O. Moring, Col. J. H. Harden, and 
Dr. G. S. Watson. Dr. W. S. Long, a pioneer in higher edu- 
cation, opened a school in Graham in 1865, which developed 
into Graham Normal College, a forerunner of Elon College. 
Led by Dr. Long, the Board finally chose a site at a village 
then known as Mill Point, six miles from Graham. A tract 
of twenty-five acres of land at Mill Point was given by the 
Hon. W. H. TroUinger of Haw River. The citizens of Mill 
Point donated twenty-three acres additional, and four thou- 
sand dollars in cash. In consideration of these donations the 
college was located at Mill Point. 

The Provisional Board preferred other names, but owing 
to the predominance of stalwart oaks on the site, selected the 
name "Elon," the Hebrew word meaning oak. 

On March 11, 1889, Elon College was chartered and in- 
corporated by the General Assembly of the State of North 
Carolina. (Private Laws of North Carolina for 1889, chapter 
216, sections 1-12.) 

In keeping with the charter provisions, the original Board 
of Trustees numbered fifteen: W. S. Long, J. W. Wellons, W. 
W. Staley, G. S. Watson, M. L. Hurley, E. T. Pierce, W. J. 
Lee, P. J. Kernodle, J. F. West, E. E. Holland, E. A. Moffitt, 
J. M. Smith, J. H. Harden, F. O. Moring, and S. P. Read. 






20 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

According to this charter, the "said institution" of Elon 
College was to "remain at the place where the site is now locat- 
ed, in Alamance County, Boone Station Township, at the place 
now called Mill Point." The purpose of the college was to 
"afford instruction in the liberal arts and sciences." 

Dr. Long was elected president of the college, and six ad- 
ditional members of the faculty were elected. Two buildings 
were erected on the site at Mill Point: the Administrative 
Building, a large three-story, brick building that housed the 
library, laboratories, the administrative offices, society halls, and 
classrooms for all departments; the other a dormitory for girls. 
The latter still stands on the campus. 

After four years. Dr. Long was succeeded as president in 
1893 by Dr. W. W. Staley, then pastor of the Suffolk (Virginia) 
Christian Church, who served as non-resident president without 
salary. 

Upon Dr. Staley 's resignation in 1905, Dr. E. L. Moffitt was 
elected to succeed him. Dr. Moffitt served six years, during 
which time two additional buildings were erected on the cam- 
pus. A larger dormitory for women West Dormitory, was 
built, and East Dormitory was given over to boys. In addition, 
the power house was erected, providing electric light and 
steam heat for the college buildings. 

In 1911, Dr. E. L. Moffitt resigned as president, and Dr. 
W. A. Harper, then a member of the faculty, was elected and 
began the longest term of office in the history of the college. 
In 1912, a larger boys' dormitory and gymnasium combined 
was built and financed through the generosity of Elon Alumni. 
It is properly known as Alumni Building. 

In 1913, Ladies' Hall was erected to take care of an in- 
creased enrollment of girls. 

During the period of America's participation in the World 
War, regular enrollment at Elon declined. However, a con- 
tingent of the R. O. T. C. was stationed at Elon which tempora- 
rily greatly increased the student population. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 21 

In January, 1923, the Administration Building was de- 
stroyed by fire, and students and faculty carried on as best they 
could with improvised classrooms and equipment. Out of the 
ashes of the old building rose a great rebuilding program, to 
be undertaken in terms of the growth and development of the 
college. Facilities had for several years been inadequate, and 
the destruction of the central building made this program of 
reconstruction imperative. 

With the onset of the depression of 1929-33, the heavy 
mortgages and a decreased enrollment combined to bring hard 
times upon Elon. Following Dr. Harper's resignation in June, 
1931, the College was without a president until October of 
that year, and there was grave doubt as to whether Elon would 
be able to open its doors to students in the fall of 1931. At 
this desperate moment the Board of Trustees elected as presi- 
dent Dr. L. E. Smith, then pastor of the Christian Temple of 
Norfolk, Virginia. 

Dr. Smith succeeded in bringing Elon through the stormy 
years of the depression, and not only recouped the losses in 
personnel and students, but by 1941 had greatly reduced the 
indebtedness of the institution and increased the student en- 
rollment to a total of 689. Financial problems still confront 
the College; however, the future is decidedly hopeful. Modest- 
ly, but with determination, the college is working towards a 
modern curriculum for education at the college level, a curri- 
culum which will best serve youth in our complex world. 

ANNUAL EVENTS 

Certain annual events at the College have become Elon 
traditions, and are anticipated with great pleasure by the stu- 
dents and faculty. Some of these events are broadcast directly 
from the College through Station WBIG of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System. 

Banquets. — The President and his wife are accustomed to 
giving an annual banquet to the Senior class. 



22 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Faculty Reception. — ^The Faculty gives a formal reception 
to the students on Saturday evening after the College opens in 
September. 

Lyceum Entertainments. — The Faculty committee on Pub- 
lic Entertainments each year schedules a series of concerts, re- 
citals, plays or lectures by distinguished artists of national 
reputation. These performances are scheduled throughout the 
year and are open to all Elon students upon payment of their 
Activity Fee. These programs are also available to the general 
public upon subscriptions to the series. Such artists as Nino 
Martini and Helen Jepson appear in concerts here. 

Players' Evenings. — At least three times during the year, 
public performances of full-length plays are given by the Elon 
Players. 

College Recitals. — Members of the Faculty of the Music 
Department and advanced students in Music each year give a 
series of recitals in Whitley Memorial Auditorium. 

"The Messiah." — Shortly before the beginning of the 
Christmas holidays, the Elon Singers present Handel's classic 
oratorio, "The Messiah." It is presented in Whitley Memorial 
Auditorium by candlelight. 

Garden Party. — The President and his wiic give a Garden 
Party to the Senior class. Faculty members, alumni and visitors 
on the afternoon of Monday of Commencement w^eek. 

Art Exhibit. — The Art Department gives an annual exhibit 
of student vv^ork. 

Commencement. — This final event of the year begins on 
Saturday before the fourth Sunday in May. Commencement 
exercises include the Baccalaureate Sermon, the aw^arding of 
academic and honorary degrees and distinctions, and a com- 
mencement address by some noted person. Immediately after 
the close of commencement exercises, the Board of Trustees 
meets in final session. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 23 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Community Church. — The Community Church is 
made up of students, faculty members and residents of the 
town. Church services are held each Sunday in the Whitley 
Memorial Auditorium. The pastor of the church is Dr. L. E. 
Smith, President of the college. Ministers from other churches 
and denominations are frequently invited to occupy the college 
pulpit. 

The Church School. — The Community Church, together 
with the college, maintains a church school. 

Student Christian Association. — The Student Christian As- 
sociation is responsible for student religious activities on the 
campus. Among these activities are included the Sunday even- 
ing Vesper Services in which students and outside speakers par- 
ticipate, Student Sunday School in which International Sunday 
school lesson, current social problems, and other subjects are 
considered, morning prayer service, social service in the com- 
munity, occasional socials on the campus. The association 
functions primarily through committees, but includes within 
its membership more than half of the student body, students 
pledging themselves to foster Christian principles in the cam- 
pus life. 

Ministerial Association. — The Ministerial Association com- 
prises the members of the student body who intend to enter the 
Christian Ministry, directors of Religious Education, social ser- 
vice, or medical missionaries. Meetings of this group are held 
weekly, in which discussion and practice-preaching are utilized 
to help prepare the prospective minister for his profession. 

The Elon Singers. — This is a mixed chorus of students, or- 
ganized for two purposes: as the College Choir it regularly 
furnishes the music for the weekday chapel services and Sunday 
morning services of the Community Church ; as the Elon Sing- 
ers it presents concerts of sacred and secular music at the 
College and in various communities in North Carolina 



24 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and adjoining states. Its membership is open to the entire 
student body. 

Elon Band. — This colorful organization, equipped with 
band instruments and uniforms in the college colors, supplies 
music for intercollegiate athletic contests and for various 
other functions at the college. Training is given to all students 
who own or can play band instruments. 

Elon Orchestra. — This is an orchestra which provides en- 
tertainment for college activities. 

Elon Players. — Several groups of students, interested in 
active participation in the writing and production of plays, 
combine to form the larger group called Elon Players. The 
class in Shakespeare each year produces a Shakespeare play. 
The class in Dramatic Literature writes its own plays and 
produces them for invited audiences as well as producing for 
the public plays by modern dramatists. Other groups, not 
members of these classes, produce plays from time to time. 
The Players constitute a chapter of the National Dramatic 
Fraternity, Delta Psi Omega. They are also members of the 
North Carolina Dramatic Association, and take part in its 
activities. 

Social Science Honorary Society. — This is the Alpha Chap- 
ter in North Carolina of Pi Gamma Mu, the National Social 
Science Honor Society. The purpose of the organization is to 
give recognition to those students and faculty members who 
have attained distinction in the fields of Social Sciences. Elec- 
tions are held in the fall and spring, at which time Seniors and 
others who are eligible are received into membership in the 
society. 

The Elon Debaters. — This organization is a member of 
the North Carolina Inter-Collegiate Debating Association, and 
makes a number of trips each year to debate at tournaments 
with other college teams. Current economic and social prob- 
lems are subjects of their debates. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 25 

Social Clubs. — Under supervision of their faculty advisers 
and with regulations as provided in the Elon Handbook, the 
social clubs are recognized as foUov^s: 

For men: Alpha Pi Delta; Iota Tau Kappa; Kappa Psi 
Nu; Sigma Phi Beta. 

For women: Beta Omicron Beta; Delta Upsilon Kappa; 
Tau Zeta Phi; Pi Kappa Tau. 

Each of these organizations has a club room on the first 
floor of the Christian Education Building. 

Maroon and Gold. — The publication of the college news- 
paper, "Maroon and Gold," is undertaken by the college class 
in Journalism. This group serves as the editorial staff and also 
sees the paper through the Elon Press. The headquarters of 
the Elon journalists is in the Printing Room of the Duke 
Science Building. The newspaper appears at least once every 
two weeks during the college year. This publication is a 
member of the North Carolina Collegiate Press Association 
and of the Associated Collegiate Press. Students who are not 
members of the course in Journalism may write for the paper 
as an extra-curricular activity. 

Elon Colonnades. — This is the college literary magazine. 
It is written and printed at least twice each year by students 
interested in creative expression, both verse and prose. The 
magazine, in being completely the literary production and 
press work of students, is unique among college magazines 
in North Carolina. 

Phipsicii. — Phipsicli is the college annual, edited by mem- 
bers of the Senior class. The name commemorates the three 
erstwhile "literary societies" of the college. First published 
in 1913, this annual now ranks high in the college field. 

Elon Handbook. — The Handbook is a manual for Student 
Government and contains the constitutions and by-laws of the 
Senate and the Women's Council, as well as information need- 
ed by entering students. A copy of the Handbook is furnished 



26 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

to each student upon registration and is the basis for the learn- 
ing process during the Orientation Period. 

Class Organizations. — Each of the four classes has its own 
organization, and each year elects its officers and representa- 
tives to the student government. The Freshman class organ- 
izes on the first Tuesday in October. Each class selects some 
member of the faculty other than the President or Deans as 
its adviser. 

Inter-Collegiate Athletics. — There are varsity teams at 
Elon in the following sports: football, basketball, baseball, 
and tennis. These teams represent the college in inter- 
collegiate contests and are under the supervision of the Di- 
rector of Athletics and his assistants. Any student is eligi- 
ble for these teams who meets the regulations governing Inter- 
Collegiate Athletics as printed in the Handbook. Elon Col- 
lege is a member of the North State Inter-Collegiate Athletic 
Association. 

The "E" Men's Club. — This is the varsity athletic organi- 
zation and is composed of all students who have been awarded 
an "E" for participation in inter-collegiate athletics. 

Intramural Athletics. — In addition to the varsity squads, 
there is ample provision for intramural contests in touch-ball, 
basketball, baseball, tennis and other sports. These games are 
open to all students who are not participating on a varsity team 
in the same sport. Teams are formed from the Men's Dormi- 
tories from Men's Social Clubs, and from the Faculty, and in 
group sports a season of league games is played. 

Business Administrators. — Business majors of Sophomore 
level and above are eligible for membership in the Business 
Administrators Club. It is the purpose of the Club to make 
the students' business training as practical as possible by spon- 
soring talks by business men and by arranging visits to indus- 
trial plants and business offices. Through these contacts the 
students receive helpful vocational guidance, and their under- 
standing of business and industrial activity is deepened. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 27 

Commercial Club. — The Commercial Club functions for 
the benefit of Secretarial students taking a one- and two-year 
Secretarial course. The purpose of the club is twofold. First, 
it assists in creating a business atmosphere in the classroom by 
sponsoring demonstrations of up-to-date office equipment and 
by making contacts with outside business organizations for 
the privilege of inspection trips and lectures from members of 
those organizations. Second, the club provides a means for 
social contacts among the students within the department. 

The Education Club. — The primary object of this club is 
to promote a professional attitude on the part of student 
teachers; to bring outstanding educators to the campus; and 
to visit schools to see the actual operation of educational pro- 
cedures. 

French Club. — The French Club is composed of a group 
of interested students who meet twice a month to enjoy con- 
versation, group singing, games, short plays, and informal dis- 
cussions in French. 

German Club. — A voluntary and informal organization of 
advanced students in German. At the meetings the time is 
spent in German conversation on different subjects, in playing 
games (with view of developing and building up the vocabu- 
lary) and in singing German songs, thus stimulating and pro- 
moting a deeper and more thorough understanding of the 
cultural and human background of German civilization. 

Literary Societies. — The Dr. Johnson Literary Society for 
young men and the Panvio Literary Society for young women 
provide opportunity for the training and guidance in thinking, 
speaking, and in parliamentary proceedings. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

The detailed expenses of the College year of nine months 

are as follows: 

Registration Fee $ 60.00 

Tuition 80.00 



28 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Student Activities Fee 15.00 

Library Fee 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 

Total for Day Students $ 165.00 

Room Rent $ 50.00 to 75.00 

Board 144.00 to 180.00 



Total for Boarding Students . . .$359.00 to $ 420.00 
Room Rent — The price of room rent per student in the 
College dormitories is as follows: 

Alumni Building $ 50.00 

Carlton House T 50.00 

Club House - 60.00 

West Dormitory (front rooms) 60.00 

West Dormitory (other rooms) 50.00 

East Dormitory 75.00 

Ladies' Hall 60.00 

Men's Hall 60.00 

Note: Students occupying corner rooms pay $2.50 per semester 
extra in all buildings. 

Two students occupy one room together. Single beds are 
furnished in all dormitories. The room rental includes current 
for one 60-watt lamp for each student. If additional lights are 
desired the charge will be 75 cents per light per semester. A 
charge of $1.25 per semester is made to cover extra current 
used when a radio is operated in a dormitory room. The 
College reserves the right to change rooms or a room-mate of 
any student at any time, but no student is allowed to change 
rooms without permission from the business office. To do so 
will cost the student $1.00, or more. Students are expected to 
furnish pillows, bed linen, towels, etc. 

BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

Only a limited number of students can be accommodated 
in the Club Dining Hall, and placement of students there is 
made only on reservation. No deductions are made in board 
charges for absence from meals for less than a full consecutive 
week. The price of board is subject to change without notice. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 29 

In order to facilitate figuring of expenses for any combin- 
ation of dining hall and dormitory, the following tables are 
given: 

Regular College Expenses 

East Dormitory: College ciub 

Dining Hall Dining Hall 

Board $ 180.00 $ 144.00 

Room 75.00 75.00 

Tuition 80.00 80.00 

Registration Fee 60.00 60.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 15.00 

Library Fee 3.00 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 7.00 

Total for Year $ 420.00 $ 384.00 

Per Semester 210.00 192.00 

Per Half-Semester 105.00 96.00 

South Dormitory, Ladies' Hall, West Dormitory (Front), 

Club House: College Club 

Dining Hall Dining Hall 

Board $ 180.00 $ 144.00 

Room 60.00 60.00 

Tuition 80.00 80.00 

Registration Fee 60.00 60.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 15.00 

Library Fee 3.00 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 7.00 

Total for Year $ 405.00 $ 369.00 

Per Semester 202.50 184.50 

Per Half-Semester 101.25 92.25 

North Dormitory, West Dormitory (other than front), 
Carlton House: College ciub 

Dining Hall Dining Hall 

Board $ 180.00 $ 144.00 

Room 50.00 50.00 

Tuition 80.00 80.00 

Registration Fee 60.00 60.00 

Student Activitv Fee 15.00 15.00 



30 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Library Fee 3.00 3.00 

Atiiletic Fee 7.00 7.00 



Total for Year $ 395.00 $ 359.00 

Per Semester 197.50 179.50 

Per Half-Semester 98.75 89.75 

Note: These estimates do not include any laboratory fees, radio, 
etc. Corner rooms in all dormitories cost $2.50 per semester more than 
other rooms in the same dormitory. 

Special Courses and Fees. — The following tuition and fees 
for special courses apply only to students taking these items, 
and are not included in above figures: 

Liberal Arts Course (up to three), each $ 30.00 

Extra Liberal Arts Course (above five), each .... 25.00 
Laboratory Fee (for Chemistry, Physics, Biology, 
Home Economics, Accounting, Secretarial Prac- 
tice, Alechanical Drawing, Botany, Geology and 

Surveying), each 10.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin (2 half-hour lessons 

weekly) 75.00 

Practice Fee, Pipe Organ (one hour daily) 32.00 

Fine Arts '. 80.00 

Typewriting 30.00 

Practice Teaching Fee (per semester) 15.00 

Graduation Fee (Seniors) 10.00 

Commercial and Secretarial Courses. — When the full Sec- 
retarial or Commercial Course is taken, which includes Book- 
keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, Business Arithmetic, Pen- 
manship, Filing, Office Methods, and Business English, the 
cost is the same as the regular course as outlined above. 

Music Courses. — Piano, Organ, and Voice fees are $75.00 
each for tuition per year. However, the courses in Music 
Theory, such as Harmony, Public School Music, History of 
Music, are included in the regular tuition if they are taken as a 
part of the five subjects regularly carried. 

Dates of Payments. — The college year is divided into two 
semesters, the first beginning in September and the second in 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 31 

January. Two plans of payment of the college expenses are 
offered to students and parents. 

1. Payment of 50% of total expenses at the beginning of 
each semester. 

2. The total expenses for the year may be divided equally 
into nine installments to be paid promptly and without offset 
on first of each month. 

Each parent or student is requested to notify the Business 
Office concerning the plan selected in order that all concerned 
may know definitely the plan of payment to be followed 
through the year. 

Incidental and Miscellaneous Expenses. — Books are esti- 
mated to cost from $20.00 to $25.00 per year, about $15.00 of 
which will be needed at the fall term opening. Books are 
sold at the Bookstore and for cash only. 

An acceptance fee of $5.00 is paid by all boarding students 
when they place their applications for admission to the college. 
This fee is credited to the student's expenses when he or she 
registers. The payment of this fee also reserves a room and 
boarding place for those living on the campus. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for any special test or examin- 
ation taken to make up a deficiency or remove a condition, 
or test or examination on a current course taken other than 
at the regular time. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for changing a course of study 
after the regular dates set for such changes. 

A fee of $1.00 per day up to five days, is charged for the 
late registration. 

After the first transcript of credits, a fee of $1.00 will be 
charged for each additional transcript requested. 

Work and Scholarship Credits. — Credit for work done, or 
other student aid, applies toward tuition and room rent, and 
not toward board and fees. 



32 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Students who have regular jobs with the College take 
their meals at the College Dining Hall. Students who have 
either work or scholarship aid from the college are required 
to keep the remainder of their expenses paid up promptly in 
order to continue such aid. 

Refunds. — To those leaving college for any reason during 
the term, refunds are allowed on all items in proportion to the 
time spent in college, provided the students remain less than 
twelve of the eighteen weeks in any semester. After that time 
all fees are due in full, and only board, room and tuition are 
refundable on a time basis for the complete semester. 

Students leaving during the term are expected to check 
out through the business office and to secure a final and cor- 
rected statement of their account. 

Financial Requirements. — Payments must be promptly 
made. This is a fixed rule of the Board of Trustees, and the 
college officers are not permitted to make exceptions in favor 
of any person. 

No student will be allowed to take examinations who has 
not made satisfactory settlement of his account prior to the 
beginning of examinations. 

No degrees, certificates, or diplomas will be granted to 
those whose accounts to the College are not paid in full. 

In any case if the student desires credit on any course the 
full tuition charge must be paid. 

Transfer of credit to another institution will not be made 
until the student's account is paid in full. 

No annual will be delivered to a student until his account 
is paid in full for the entire college year. 

Credit may be denied a student who has failed to take 
physical education according to regulations. 

What to Bring with You. — All students should bring pil- 
low, pillow slips, bed clothing, towels, bureau and table scarfs, 
one knife, fork, and spoon for use in the room when necessary. 




A WEALTH OF BEAUTIFUL TREES ADORNS THE CAMPUS 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 33 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Collegiate Degrees. — The College confers the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts upon those who complete the requirements 
for the degree. 

Requirements for Admission. — Students may be admitted 
to freshman standing as candidates for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree in Elon College, without examination, on certificate of 
graduation from an accredited four-year high school course, 
with a total of at least fifteen units from the list of subjects ac- 
cepted for admission as given below. A record of the high 
school work should be furnished to the college by the high 
school principal. 

Students who have been graduated from non-accredited 
high schools, or who have attended an accredited high school 
for four years, and have fifteen units of credit, may be admitted 
upon successfully passing the college entrance examinations. 
These examinations will be given at the beginning of each 
semester. 

A limited number of students may be accepted for special 
work or departmental courses, not to exceed fifteen percent of 
the college enrollment and not as candidates for a degree. 

Subjects acceptable for admission are as follows: 

Units 

Bible 2 

Economics or Social Science 1 

English 4 

French 2 

German 2 

History 4 

Latin 4 

Mathematics 4 

Music 1 

Science 4 

Spanish 2 

Vocational Subjects 3 

No credit in foreign language may be had until the student 
has completed a minimum of two years in at least one foreign 
language. 



34 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Of the fifteen units required for admission, nine are pre- 
scribed as follows: 

Units 

English 3 

Foreign Language 2 

History 1 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

Students having been graduated from high school but not 
meeting the prescribed requirements may be admitted on con- 
dition, such condition to be worked off before the beginning 
of the sophomore year. Not more than two conditions can 
be allowed. 

Applicants for advanced standing must present to the 
Registrar of Elon College an official transcript of their work 
in other colleges. Full credit will be given for work in ac- 
credited institutions in so far as it parallels the work at Elon. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree must com- 
plete at least one full college year of residence work at Elon 
College. Students admitted to advanced standing are subject 
to all the entrance and graduation requirements of the college. 

Health Certificate. — Every student must present a health 
certificate of a satisfactory physical examination taken within 
the immediate past or pay an examination fee of $1.00 upon 
entrance to the college. 

Classification. — For admission to the sophomore class, a 
student must have removed all entrance conditions and have 
completed not fewer than eighteen semester hours of fresh- 
man work toward a degree. 

For admission to the junior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than forty-eight semester hours of work 
for credit toward a degree. 

For admission to the senior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than eighty-four semester hours of work 
toward a degree. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 35 

Classifications are made at the beginning of the school 
year in September, and no new classifications are made during 
the year. 

Registration. — Each student goes to the Dean of the Col- 
lege for a conference and for assignment to a faculty adviser 
who aids the student in arranging his course of study. Before 
entering any department, the student pays the registration fee 
of $30.00 and his other expenses, and receives from the Busi- 
ness Manager a registration card admitting him to the depart- 
ment of the college. The registration fee of $30.00 is payable 
at the beginning of the Fall and Spring Semesters, and no 
student is allowed any privilege of the college until these fees 
are paid. 

Every student is required to register within twenty-four 
hours after his arrival, and not later than 5:30 p. m. of the 
registration days in September and January. The penalty for 
late registration is one dollar for each day after the date set 
for registration, the maximum penalty being five dollars. 

No new course may be entered after September 25 in the 
Fall Semester, or February 1 in the Spring Semester. 

Freshman Orientation Period. — The Freshman Orienta- 
tion Period is for the purpose of introducing the student to 
his environment. It is an endeavor to acquaint the student 
with the policies and ideals of the college. Receptions, assem- 
blies, lectures and open forums help to establish a close fel- 
lowship, and the student is enabled to begin his college life 
more efficiently. Professors are assigned as advisers for a min- 
imum number of freshmen and are, throughout the year, at 
the service of these students. 

Schedule of Studies. — All students are expected to carry 
fifteen hours of college work per week, this amount being 
considered the normal student-load. No student may carry 
less than twelve hours or more than sixteen hours, without 
special permission from the Dean, and in accordance with the 



36 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Handbook regulations for extra work. In making up the 
number of hours required, no course in the Fine Arts, includ- 
ing applied music, can count for more than two semester-hours, 
and no credit is given for physical training in making up the 
120 semester-hours required for graduation. 

Change of Course. — Registration is for an entire course, 
and a course once begun must be continued except in unusual 
circumstances. Continuous elementary subjects must be pur- 
sued for a year in order to be credited toward a degree. Chang- 
ing a course after registration is discouraged, and such change 
may be made only with the permission of the Dean. A charge 
of $1,00 is made for changing a course after six days. No new 
course may be entered after September 25 in the Fall Semester, 
or February 1, in the Spring Semester, Any course dropped 
after those dates automatically draws a grade of "F." 

Nine Hour Rule. — Students failing to pass nine hours of 
the work pursued, may not return for the next semester. This 
rule does not apply to foreign students in the first year of res- 
idence, or to specially admitted students if recommended by 
the Faculty Committee on Admission and Credits; and in the 
case of freshmen students, three hours of the nine may be a 
conditional grade. 

Class Absences. — Absences are counted from the first 
meeting of the class in the semester. Those who enter late are 
to be reported as absent from the previous meetings of the class. 
Not more than three unexcused absences from a class during a 
semester are permitted, without the loss of quality points. 
Necessarily additional absences without penalty are allowed 
students who must be absent in order to represent the College 
as members of athletic teams or other recognized organizations, 
provided that the total absences must be made up as early as 
practicable each semester, by the permission of the Dean and 
at the convenience of the Faculty member concerned. For 
each two additional absenes or any fractional part of two 
additional absences not allowed as specified above, one quality 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 37 

point will be deducted from the quality points earned during 
the semester. 

Any work missed by a student is to be made up at a con- 
venient time appointed by the professor in charge. 

A student who fails to get permission to drop a course 
receives F on the course. No student will be permitted a re- 
examination who has received an F on the course. 

Chapel and Church Absences. — (1) All students are re- 
quired to attend the regular Chapel exercises. Seniors are not 
allowed more than ten absences from Chapel during a semester. 
All other students are not allowed more than six absences. 
(2) All dormitory students are required to attend Sunday 
morning church services. Permission must be secured from 
the proper Dean to attend church off the campus. Seniors are 
allowed four absences during a semester without the loss of 
credit; upperclassmen are allowed three absences during a 
semester without the loss of credit. (3) A student who is ab- 
sent from Chapel or Church over the above limit during a 
semester will be subject to discipline. Absences from Chapel or 
Church over the limit mentioned above, unless excused by the 
proper Dean, will reduce the student's semester hour credits 
one hour for each four Chapel absences or portion thereof, and 
one hour for each two additional Church absences or portion 
thereof. (4) Freshmen are required to attend Sunday school, 
and the same rules shall apply as those concerning attendance 
at Church. 

Semester Examinations. — Semester examinations are given 
in January and May. An average of "D" on each subject in- 
cluding term standing and examination, is required for credit. 
All students making a grade of "E" on a continuous subject 
may be conditioned if this condition occurs at the end of the 
Fall Semester. A grade of "C" is required during the follow- 
ing semester to remove the condition without a re-examination. 



38 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Students who fail to attend regular tests or examinations, 
or who fail to hand in papers, are regarded as handing in 
blank papers, unless they have been previously excused from 
the examination. Excuses from tests and examinations are 
granted only in case of absolute necessity. 

Special Examinations. — A student wishing a special ex- 
amination must obtain a permit from the Dean before the 
date of the examination. A student who has been excused 
from an examination or who has made an "E" in a subject 
for the Fall Semester, may have opportunity to make good his 
deficiency without taking the subject over, provided the de- 
ficiency be removed within one college year from the time it 
was incurred. 

A charge of $1.00 for each test or examination taken out 
of the regular time will be made, except in cases where stu- 
dents have been excused from taking the regular test or ex- 
amination at the regular examination period. 

Senior Deficiencies. — Senior deficiencies may be made up 
either at a special examination arranged by the Dean and the 
instructor, or at the regular examination at the close of the 
Fall Semester. All senior conditions must be made up not 
later than April 1st, in order for the student to become a 
candidate for a degree at the following commencement. 

Graduation Requirements. — At the beginning of the Jun- 
ior year, each candidate for the Bachelor of Arts Degree must 
elect a major from the department listed below in which 
majors are offered. More than one major may be elected. 

One hundred and twenty semester-credit hours must be 
completed as a minimum for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
forty-eight hours of which must be taken on the Junior-Senior 
level. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 39 

Majors. — The College offers majors, four courses only re- 
quired, except as specified, as follows: 

Biology. History. 

Business Administration, Mathematics. 

30 semester-hours.* Music, 34-44 semester-hours. 

Chemistry. Physics. 

English. Religion, t 

French. Science, 6 courses. | 

A major course will not be formed for fewer than three 

students, a minor for fewer than five. 

Minors. — Any field in which a major is offered, if pursued 
for the first two years, as prescribed in the department of in- 
struction below, may constitute a minor, in addition to the 
following fields : 

Applied Mathematics. Geology. Greek. 

Education. German. Home Economics. § 

In addition to the requirement of one major, as specified 
above, two minors totaling twenty-four semester hours, relat- 
ing to the elected major, must be completed. 

(1) 12 semester-hours in English. 

(2) 12 semester-hours in Foreign language. 

(3) One of the following: 

(a) 12 semester-hours in Mathematics. 

(b) 2 coiirses in a Natural Science. 

(c) 6 semester-hours in Mathematics and one course in 

Natural Science. 

(d) 1 course in each of two Natural Sciences. 

(e) 6 semester hours of Home Economics may be substi- 

tuted for one course in Mathematics or Natural 
Science. 

(4) 6 semester hours in Religion. 

*Students majoring in Business Administration are advised to minor in 
Social Science. 

fStudents majoring in Religion have at least two years in each of the 
following subjects: History, Sociology, Philosophy, and Greek. 

JThis must include Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Geography. 

§Home Economics may be rated as a major, provided both Biology and 
Chemistry are pursued as minors. 



40 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Students must have an average grade of "C" in the major 
field in order to be graduated. 

Six semester-hours in American History and six semester- 
hours in European History are advised. 

Students v^^ho plan to pursue graduate work leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy should take both French 
and German. 

Electives. — Any course not chosen as a major or a minor 
may be elected toward the degree. Additional electives are 
provided in Art and in Applied Music. 

Courses in Art and Applied Music receive four semester- 
hours credit per year. Under no circumstances can more than 
twelve semester-hours credit toward the A. B. degree be al- 
lowed iQ Art and Applied Music. 

QuaUty Points. — 120 quality points are required for grad- 
uation in addition to the 120 semester-hours of Liberal Arts 
credits as heretofore required. The quality-point values of 
grades are: 

A — 3 quality-points for each semester hour. 
B — 2 quality-points for each semester hour. 
C — 1 quality-point for each semester hour. 

Comprehensive Examination and Senior Essay. — Each 
senior is required to take a comprehensive examination in his 
major field, or at the discretion of his major professor to write 
an essay. 

1. The comprehensive examination, according to the 
judgment of his major professor, may be either written or oral 
or a combination of the two. The examination is prepared 
and administered by the membership of the department or by 
the membership of the department and a related department 
if the membership of the department consists of less than two. 
The head of the department will act as chairman. The com- 
prehensive examination is to be held prior to December 1 of 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 41 

the student's senior year, and is not to exceed two hours if oral 
or three hours if written. 

2. Each major professor is permitted, at his discretion, 
to require of the student an essay in Heu of the comprehensive 
examination. In case of this essay, the subject is to be sub- 
mitted to the major professor who in turn notifies the dean's 
office not later than October 15 of the senior year. The first 
draft of the essay is to be submitted to the sponsoring pro- 
fessor not later than December 1. Three typewritten copies 
of this paper shall be submitted to the reading committee, and 
an oral examination on the essay held by the committee which 
reads his work, not later than March 1 of the senior year. This 
examination is not to exceed one hour. 

Certificates. — Departmental Certificates will be given those 
who have completed the course in Music and Art, provided that 
each student shall have completed fifteen units of high school 
work as required for entrance to the college, and have com- 
pleted the requirements for a major in some one of the College 
departments, with an average of at least C for the work done 
both in the special department and in the liberal arts depart- 
ments. In lieu of a major, the candidate may offer thirty 
semester-hours of Freshman liberal arts work. A certificate 
may be secured in the Commercial Department upon the com- 
pletion of a one year's course as outlined by that department. 
No certificate is given in the liberal arts departments of the 
College. 

Diplomas. — Departmental diplomas are granted to those 
who in a single department complete four years of work with 
an average of C, and in addition two majors in the liberal 
arts departments, or sixty semester-hours of Freshman and 
Sophomore work. 

Reading for Honors. — The purpose of the plan of Reading 
for Honors is to encourage those students who have the ability 
and ambition to study independently in going beyond the 



^ ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

minimum standards of the regular courses. The plan provides 
for the best students a program of training which, alike by its 
freedom and severity, w^ill develop them to the utmost. 

To this end, prospective candidates should apply to the 
Chairman of the Honors Committee not later than May 1st of 
their Junior year. A limited number of applicants is then 
admitted by the committee, after faculty approval. 

The admitted candidate is, at the discretion of his advisory 
committee either permitted great freedom in class atten- 
dance of regular courses during his senior year or is excused 
from attendance of regular courses altogether. If the latter 
alternate is pursued, an Honors course which adequately paral- 
lels the requirements and subject matter of regular courses is 
followed at the Senior level. 

The Honors course is based upon work already done by 
the candidate in his major and minor fields and is guided 
by a committee composed of one member from each of these 
departments, the professor in the major field acting as coordi- 
nating chairman. Conferences with the chairman occur at 
least once each fortnight, while additional consultations are 
held with the professors in the minor fields. Near the end of 
the second semester of the senior year an oral comprehensive 
examination in the planned reading is held by the Honors 
Committee and some professor invited from the faculty of 
another college or university. 

If any member of the committee is dissatisfied with the 
progress of the candidate, he may request a consideration by 
the committee of the student's pursuing regular class work 
in any given parallel field. No student may expect to continue 
in the Reading for Honors course who does not satisfy the 
committee that he is progressing satisfactorily. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 43 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Tuition Scholarships and Self-Helf Positions. — The Presi- 
dent and the Scholarship Committee of the Faculty award all 
scholarships and self-help positions. No scholarship will be 
awarded to a high school graduate whose average has been less 
than "C" and all scholarships are awarded on the condition that 
the student will average not less than "C" on his college work» 
Self-help positions are awarded on the same basis, with oc- 
casional exceptions. Applications for awards should be in the 
hands of the Scholarship Committee before July 1. The atten- 
tion of the applicant is called to the section on "Work and 
Scholarship Credits," contained on page 31 of this catalogue. 

Alumni Scholarship. — The Alumni Association, in session 
on June 1, 1909, established a scholarship in Elon College. This 
scholarship is awarded in the literary department, and is of 

value of 180.00 a year. 

Elon High School Scholarships. — The Board of Trustees 
offer scholarships to one graduate of any high school of which 
an Elon graduate is principal or superintendent, or a teacher in 
high school work. Said scholarship is good for one year, and 
covers tuition in any liberal arts course. The candidate is to be 
satisfactorily recommended by the principal or superintendent 
and approved by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships. The 
number of such scholarships is limited to ten. 

Public High School Scholarships. — The Board of Trus- 
tees offers ten free tuition scholarships upon the recommenda- 
tion of the principal or superintendent of approved high 
schools, subject to the approval of the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships. 

Ministerial Students and Minor Children of Ministers. — • 

Ministerial students and minor children of ministers who live 
at the college are granted scholarships to cover their regular 
tuition ($80.00). Day students taking the ministerial course, 



44 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and minor children of ministers who are day students will pay 
one-half of the regular tuition charge. 

The J. J. Summerbell Scholarship. — In consideration of a 
bequest of $1,000.00 for that purpose, left the college by the late 
Dr. J. J. Summerbell, the President of the College each year 
will award a $60.00 tuition scholarship, in either the College or 
one of the special departments, good for the succeeding year, 
to that member of either the Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior 
class, who shall write the best thesis on "The First Command- 
ment." The same is to be adjudged by a committee of the 
Faculty. Theses in this competition are to be typewritten and 
in the President's hands, the name of the writer accompanying 
in a sealed envelope, not later than May 1. 

The Barrett Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. J. Pressley 
Barrett, an original trustee of the College, a free tuition scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to some worthy member of the 
Freshman class. 

The Long Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. S. Long, 

founder and first president, a free tuition scholarship is award- 
ed annually to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

The Staley Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. W. Staley, 
second president, a free tuition scholarship is awarded annually 
to some member of the Freshman class. 

The Moffitt Scholarship. — In honor of Dr. E. L. Moffitt, 
third president, a free tuition scholarship is awarded annually 
to some member of the Freshman class. 

The Martyn Summerbell Scholarship. — Dr. Martyn Sum- 
merbell of Lakemont, N. Y., each year awards free tuition 
scholarship to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

The Parkerson Scholarship. — In memory of her mother, 
Mrs. L. S. Parkerson, Mrs. L. M. Cannon awards annually a 
free tuition scholarship to some member of the Commercial 
Department. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 45 

LOAN FUNDS 

The Bowling Fund. — Dr. E. H. Bowling, Durham, N. C, 
has created a fund to be used in the education of deserving 
students, preferably candidates for the ministry. Those who 
are accepted as beneficiaries of this fund will receive $60.00 per 
year to be applied to their account with the College. They will 
give an interest-bearing note at 6 per cent for the same, with 
acceptable security, and will begin to pay the money back, at 
least one note a year, immediately after graduation. The title 
of this fund will remain in the College, but it is to be perpet- 
ually used for the purpose indicated. Awards of funds are 
made by the President. 

The Amick Fund. — Dr. T. C. Amick, formerly of the 
College Faculty, has created a fund to be loaned to deserving 
students at 6 per cent interest. The President lends this fund 
on proper security. 

The Clarke Fund. — Dr. J. A. Clarke of the College 
Faculty has created a loan fund for deserving students. The 
Business Manager lends this at 6 per cent interest on proper 
security. 

Ministerial Loan Fund. — The treasurer of the College is 
the custodian for the loan fund of $13,031.49 of the Southern 
Convention of Congregational-Christian Churches. It is loaned 
to ministerial students upon the recommendation of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Convention. 

The Eastern Virginia Conference Ministerial Fund. — By an 
agreement with the authorities of the College, whereby the 
Eastern Virginia Conference relinquished certain bonds owned 
by it, there is provided a special fund for ministerial students 
from that conference. The value of this fund is $180 per year, 
but it is provided that no one student shall receive over $100.00 
in any one year. If there are two or more ministerial students 
from that conference, the $180.00 is to be equally divided. It is 
further provided that if there are no students who qualify, the 
fund is not cumulative. 



46 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

The Masonic Fund. — The Grand Lodge of North Carolina 
has given the College $2,500.00 to be loaned to seniors in Col- 
lege, on acceptable security. 

The Knights Templar Educational Loan Fund. — Under 
the rules of the Grand Commandary, students in Elon College 
may secure loans from this fund. 

The McLeod Fund. — The family of the late Prof. M. A. 
McLeod have established a fund of $2,000.00, the interest on 
which is to be loaned to v^^orthy students on proper security. 

The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund. — Mr. John M. W. 
Hicks, of Raleigh, N. C, and of Nev^^ York City, has estab- 
Hshed this fund to assist members of the Junior and Senior 
classes. The initial amount of the fund w^as $1,000.00, v^hich 
the donor hopes may be materially increased. 

ENDOWMENT AND SOURCES OF INCOME 

Tuition and Fees. — The income from tuition in the literary 
and special departments constitutes a chief and growing source 
of revenue for the support of the College. The income from 
fees, matriculation and departmental, is used to pay the inci- 
dental expenses of the College and of the departments. Besides 
these sources of income and gifts from time to time on current 
expenses, the College has the following sources of revenue : 

The O. J. Wait Fund. — This fund was a bequest from Rev. 
O. J. Wait, D. D., of Fall River, Massachusetts. The amount, 
$1,000.00, was the first bequest that came to the College. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Fund. — Of this fund $20,- 
000.00 was given by Mr. Francis Asbury Palmer, of New York, 
before his death. The remaining ten thousand dollars having 
been provided for in his will, became available soon after his 
been provided for in his will, became available after his death. 

The J. J. Summerbell Fund. — Dr. J. J. Summerbell, Day- 
ton, Ohio, from its foundation a staunch friend and loyal sup- 
porter of the College, departed life February 28, 1913, and left 
a bequest of $1,500.00 to Elon. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 47 

The Patrick Henry Lee Fund.— This fund of $1,000.00 is 
a bequest from Capt. P. H. Lee, of Holland, Va. 

The Jesse Winbourne Fund. — This fund, a bequest from 
Deacon Jesse Winbourne, of Elon College, N. C, amounting 
to $5,000.00 became available in January, 1923. It is a part of 
the permanent endowment funds of the College. 

The Southern Convention Fund. — The Southern Conven- 
tion of Congregational Christian Churches asks the Confer- 
ences composing the Convention for $12,500.00 annually for 
the support of the College. This is called the Elon College 
Fund, and is the equivalent of an invested endowment of 
$250,000.00 at 5 per cent. By vote of the Convention in May, 
1918, a note was given the College for $112,500.00, and later, 
$100,000.00 in 6 per cent bonds, as evidence of this obligation. 

The Carlton Fund. — The family of the late J. W. Carlton, 
of Richmond, Va., P. J. Carlton, H. A. Carlton, Luther Carlton 
and Mrs. T. S. Parrott, gave the College for its permanent 
funds, certain R. F. and P. Railway stocks, to found a Profes- 
sorship in Christian Literature and Methods in memory of Mrs. 
J. W. Carlton. Upon his death, in May, 1935, Mr. P. J. Carlton 
left a bequest adding $25,000.00 to the College endowment. 

The Corwith Fund. — W. F. Corwith, a former trustee, has 
given the College for its permanent funds $35,000.00 to found 
a Professorship in Biblical Languages and Literature, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. W. F. Corwith. 

The J. W. Wellons Fund. — Dr. J. W. Wellons, several 
years before his death, bought two annuity bonds of the Col- 
lege in the sum of $1,500.00. By the terms of the bonds, at his 
decease they were cancelled and the principal became a part 
of the general endowment of the College. Dr. Wellons desired 
that the Church supplement his gift, providing an endowment 
of $300,000.00 for the School of Christian Education. 

Other Invested Funds. — Other gifts to the permanent En- 
dowment Fund are: One of $25.00 from the late Rev. J. J. 



48 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Summerbell, D. D., of Dayton, Ohio; one of $28335 from the 
estate of the late Jos. A. Foster of Semora, N. C; one of $50.00 
by Miss Mamie Tate, as a student loan fund; and one of $100.00 
to be kept at interest for a term of years, left by the late Rev. 
S. B. Klapp. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Board Donations. — The late 
Francis Asbury Palmer, who endowed the College, left his 
estate to a Board to administer it in furthering education. This 
Board at one time made a considerable donation in cash for 
current expenses. 

The Standardization Fund. — During the spring of 1919, 
a campaign was put on to raise additional endowment. This 
was known as the Standardization Fund. There was raised 
$381,600.00 in cash and subscriptions. 

Forms of Bequest. — A number of friends have made pro- 
vision for the College in the disposition of their property after 
their decease. We appreciate this generous action on their part 
and commend it to the liberal-hearted of our friends, for whose 
convenience we append herewith three forms of bequests: 

FIRST FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 

sum of Dollars, to be applied at 

their discretion, for the general purposes of the College. 

SECOND FORM 

I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely in- 
vested by them and called the Scholarship 

Fund. The interest of this fund shall be applied at their discretion 
to aid deserving students. 

THIRD FORM 

I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely invest- 
ed by them as an endowment for the support of the College. 

Annuity Bonds. — Those desiring a stable income on funds 
that they intend to leave the College in their wills, can secure 












PATHS OF OPPORTUNITY ABOUND AT ELON 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 49 

the same by placing such funds with the College treasurer and 
receiving an annuity bond as follows : 

ANNUITY BOND 

The Board of Trustees of Eton College. 

Elon College., 19... 

Whereas, of has donated 

and paid to the Board of Trustees of Elon College, a corporation 
established under a charter from the State of North Carolina, its 
principal office being located at Elon College, in said State, the sum 

of Dollars, said sum becoming by said gift the 

absolute property of said Board of Trustees of Elon College, the whole 
ainount to go direct to said College and ever be administered for its 
advancement by said Board of Trustees: Now, therefore, in consider- 
ation thereof, the said Board of Trustees agree to pay the 

said the interest on the same at 6 per 

cent, payable semi-annually, during natiiral 

life. 

As the above interest provision is made for the sole benefit of the 

said during natural life, it is declared 

to be the intention of the parties subscribed hereto that no obligation 
whatever is, or shall be considered hereby to have been assumed by the 
said Board of Trustees, to the heirs, executors, administrators, or as- 
signs of said for any interest a:fter 

life shall have terminated. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF ELON COLLEGE, 

By President ( Seal) 

Witness : Treasurer of Elon College. 

So far five annuity bonds have been taken: two by the 
late Dr. }. W. Wellons, in the sum of $1,500.00; one by Trustee 
A. B. Farmer, in the sum of $1,000.00; one by Mrs. J. P. Avent, 
also in the amount of $1,000.00; and a fifth by Mrs. Esther 
Jenkins, in the sum of $3,000.00. Generous-hearted friends, 
desiring a safe investment of their funds and a sure means of 
perpetuating their memory to generations yet unborn, may 
avail themselves of this inviting privilege. 

Insurance Policies. — Friends may make the College their 
beneficiary in one or more insurance policies. Details of this 
plan will be gladly furnished. 



Outline of Courses of Study 



This section outlines proposed courses of study in specific 
fields. Courses numbered 11 through 19 are on the Freshman 
level, 21 through 29 are on the Sophomore level, and 31 and 
above are on ':he Junior-Senior level. 

FOUR-YEAR COURSES OF STUDY LEADING TO 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

V Bus. Adm. 15-16 6 

History 11-12 6 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 6 

30 

JUNIOR 
r Bus. Adm. 31-32-33-34 or 35-36... 6 

y Social Science 6 

Math, or Science 6 

Electives 12 



Business Administration 

SOPHOMORE 

Hours 
:^us. _Adm^21r22 6 



English 21-22 6 

French or German 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Math, or Science 6 or 8 

30 or 32 
SENIOR 
Bus. Adm. 41-42, 43-48 or 37-44. . .12 

History 48 3 

Electives 15 



30 30 

English with North Carolina Public School Certificate 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Math, or Science 6 or 8 

30 or 32 
JUNIOR 

English 38-39 or 31-32 6 

Education 47-48 6 

History 6 

Sociology 6 

Electives 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

History 6 

French or German 6 

Psychology 21 and 31 6 

Math, or Science 6 or 8 

30 or 32 
SENIOR 

English 45 and 49 6 

English 33-34 6 

Education 32-42 6 

Directed Teachings 3 

Electives 9 



30 



30 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBE'R 



51 



History and Pre-Law 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Language 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

30 or ^2 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

History 13-14 6 

Psychology 22 3 

Language 6 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

Elective 3 



30 



JUNIOR 

English 35-36 6 

History 31-32 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

Bus. Adm. 33-34 6 

Sociology 6 



SENIOR 
History 48 3 

English-History 21-22 6 

English 33-34 6 

Philosophy 35-36 6 

Electives 9 



30 or 32 



30 



Home Economics with Certificate 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Biology 11-12 8 

Home Economics 11-12 6 

French 11-12 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

Home Economics 13-14 6 

Psychology 21 and 31 6 

Chemistry 31-32 8 

French 21-22 6 



34 



32 



JUNIOR 

Education 47 and 48 6 

Physics 16 4 

Home Economics 23-34 6 

Home Economics 31-32 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

Psychology 32 3 



31 



SENIOR 

Biology 32 4 

Biology 42 4 

Education 52 3 

Education (elective) 3 

Home Economics 41 3 

Home Economics 42 3 

Home Economics 45 3 

Home Economics 44 3 

Home Economics 43 3 



29 



52 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Journalism 



/ 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

Language 6 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

30 or 32 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

Language 6 

History 6 

Psychology 21 3 

Science 21-22 or Math. 21-22 6 or 8 
Electives 3 

30 or 32 



JUNIOR 

English 33-34 or 38-39 6 

English 31-32 6 

Electives 6 

History 6 

Sociology 31-42 6 

30 



SENIOR 

English 41-42 6 

English 49 3 

Philosophy 31-32 6 

Electives 15 



30 



Bachelor of Arts Degree and Diploma in Piano, Organ, 
Violin, or Voice* 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Music 13-14 4 

Music 17-18 4 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 27-28 4 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 21-22 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 



26 or 28 



28 or 30 



JUNIOR 

Music 21-22 6 

Music 23-24 6 

Music 37-38 4 

Religion 33-34 6 

General Electives 12 



34 



SENIOR 

Music 47-48 4 

Music Elective 6 

General Electives 22 

Recital Q 



32 



*Total hours for degree and diploma 120-124. 
Total hours of music required for diploma 44. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



53 



Bachelor of Arts Degree and Diploma in Music Theory* 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 13-14 4 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

Music 21-22 6 

Music 23-24 6 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 21-22 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 



28 or 30 
JUNIOR 

Music 31-32 6 

Music 17-18 (Piano) 4 

Religion 33-34 6 

General Electives 16 



32 



30 or 32 



SENIOR 

Music 41-42 

Music Elective 

General Electives 



. 6 
. 6 
.20 

32 



*Total hours for degree and diploma 122-126. 
Total hours of music required for diplom 44. 



Bachelor of Arts Degree and Certificate in Music* 



FRESHMAN 

:\Iusic 13-14 4 

Music 17-18 (Voice) 4 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 



SOPHOMORE 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 23-24 6 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 21-22 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 



26 or 28 
JUNIOR 

Music 21-22 6 

Religion 33-34 , . 6 

General Electives .20 



30 or 32 

SENIOR 

Music 45-46 6 

Music 34 ? 

General Electives 24 



32 



32 



*Total hours for degree and certificate 120-124. 
Total hours of music required for certificate 34. 



Pre-Engineering — Chemical 



FRESHMAN 

Math. 11-12 6 

English 11-12 6 

Language 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Math. 13-14 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Math. 21-22 6 

English 21-22 6 

Language 6 

Chemistry 21-22 8 

Religion 11-12 6 



32 



32 



54 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



JUNIOR 

Hours 

Math. 31-32 6 

Economics 11-12 6 

Chemistry 31-32 8 

Electives 12 



SENIOR 

Hours 

Math. 41-42 6 

Business Organization 

Chemistry 41-42 8 

Electives 12 



32 



32 



Pre-Engineering — Civil 



FRESHMAN 

English 11-12 6 

Math. 11-12 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Math. 13-14 6 

Language 6 



SOPHOMORE 

English 21-22 6 

Math. 21-22 6 

Physics 13-14 8 

Math. 23-24 or Bus. Adm. 11-12. . . 6 

Language 6 



32 

JUNIOR 

Math. 31-32 6 

Physics 21-22 8 

Math. 51-52 6 

Elective 6 

Religion 13-14 or 33-34 6 



32 



32 

SENIOR 

Geology 11-12 8 

Math. 41-42 6 

Physics 41-42 8 

Electives 6 



28 



Pre-Engineering — Electrical or Mechanical 



FRESHMAN 

English 11-12 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Math. 11-12 6 

Engineering Drawing 13-14 6 

Language 6 

32 
JUNIOR 

Physics 41-42 8 

Calculus, Math. 31-32 6 

Physics 21-22 8 

History 11-12 6 

Sociology 31-32 or Philosophy 31-32 6 



SOPHOMORE 

English 21-22 6 

Physics 13-14 8 

Math. 21-22 6 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

Language 6 

32 

SENIOR 

Physics 31-32 8 

Math. 41-42 6 

Bus Adm. 33-34 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

Elective 6 



34 



32 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



55 



Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental 

The following courses are suggested to the student con- 
templating a Medical or Dental profession. The courses listed 
for the Freshman and Sophomore years include all of the 
required courses for entrance to Medical School, and fulfill 
the minimum requirements of the Council on Education of 
the American Medical Association. For the student wishing 
to spend more than two years, courses have been suggested 
which will meet the requirements of Elon College for grad- 
uation, and will also give him a better preparation. 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Biology 11-12 8 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

English 11-12 6 

French 11-12 or German 11-12.... 6 

Math. 11-12 6 

34 

JUNIOR 

Biology 31-32 8 

Chemistry 31-32 . 8 

Physics 21 4 

Health and Hygiene 31-32, 33-34.. 6 

Religion 33-34 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Houn 

Biology 21-22 8 

Chemistry 21-22 8 

English 21-22 5 

French 21-22 or German 21-22.... 6 

Physics 13-14 8 

36 

SENIOR 

Biology 41-42 8 

Chemistry 41-42 8 

Psychology 21 3 

Sociology 31-32 or Philosophy 6 

Economics 11-12 ,... 6 



32 

Religion 



31 



FRESHMAN 

English 11-12 6 

Science Survey 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Greek 11-12 6 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

30 

JUNIOR 

Religion 23 3 

Religion 31-32 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

Philosophy 31-32 6 

Philosophy 36 3 

History 31-32 6 



SOPHOMORE 

English 21-22 6 

Biology 11-12 8 

Religion 21-22 6 

Greek 21-22 6 

Psychology 21 3 

Geography 22 3 

32 
SENIOR 

Religion 37-38 6 

Philosophy 35 3 

Philosophy 41-42 6 

History 33-34 6 

Sociology 31-42 6 

Church Music 33 2 



30 



29 



56 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Two-Year Courses of Study 

Students desiring two-year courses may make their selec- 
tion from the courses indicated below: 

Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Course: 

Biology 11-12, 21-22; Chemistry 11-12, 21-22; Physics 11-12; 
English 11-12, 21-22; Religion 11-12, and two elective subjects for 
the year. 

Pre-Law Course: 

English 11-12, 21-22, 35-36; History 11-12, 21-22; Religion 
11-12. Other subjects elective. 

Pre-Engineering Course: 

Physics 11-12, 21-22; Mathematics 11-12, 13-14, 21-22; Eng- 
lish 11-12, 21-22; French Spanish or German 11-12, 21-22; Chemis- 
try 11-12. 

One- Year Secretarial Course 

Fall Semester: 

Shorthand, Typewriting, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
and Penmanship. 

Spring Semester: 

Advanced Shorthand (Dictation), Advanced Typewriting, Sec- 
retarial Practice, Bookkeeping. 

Two- Year Secretarial Course 

First Year same as above. 

Second Year: 

English 11-12, 6 semester hours; Business Administration 11 
and 12, 6 semester hours; Business Administration 32 and 34, 6 se- 
mester hours; Advanced Dictation, 3 semester hours; Business Ad- 
ministration 21-22, 6 semester hours. Total, 27 semester hours. 

NOTE — Satisfactory completion (ability to meet office standards) of the 
One- Year Secretarial course entitles one to a Secretarial Certificate. 



Departments of Instruction 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

MR. GRAVETT 
MR. BEECHER 

Biology is the science of life, and therefore includes the 
study of both plants and animals. The courses are arranged 
to teach the fundamental facts of biology, including the laws 
of development, heredity, and variation, together with studies 
of the habits and distribution of the members of the plant 
and animal kingdoms. The courses are planned for those 
who seek a general culture, or professional training. 

11-12 General Biology. The fundamental principles of the 
biological sciences; correlation of laboratory data with the underlying 
principles discussed in class. Origin and development, structures, 
functions, and interrelations of animal and plant life. 3 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

21-22 Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. The 
morphology, histology, physiology, development, and environmental 
adaptations of the vertebrates. Dissections for the purpose of dis- 
covering homologies and analogies. 2 hours class work, 4 hours lab- 
ratory. 8 s. h. 

24 Botany. A study of the scientific basis for identification 
and classification of the higher forms of plant life, chiefly the flower- 
ing plants. Observation of plants in the Southern Piedmont region 
during the spring. Collection, preservation, and notebook descrip- 
tions of families. Genera and species are made the process by which 
the student may develop independently an ability to recognize and 
name plants, and to use scientifically constructed guides to the plant 
kingdom. 2 hours class work, 2 hours laboratorv. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

31 Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology, and 
chemistry of bacteria, and introductory studies of disease and immun- 
ity. Laboratory work in the common bacteriological techniques: 
staining of bacteria, cultural methods, and the analysis of milk and 
water. Offered in alternate years; 2 hours class work, 4 hours labo- 
ratory work. 4 s. h. 



58 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

32 Physiology. Circulation, respiration, digestion, internal 

secretion, muscle physiology, reproduction, and other physiological 

processes of animals. Offered in alternate years; 2 hours class work, 
4 hours laboratory work. 4 s. h. 

41 Genetics. A general introductory course in studies in hered- 
ity, evolution, and eugenics. Presented as a cultural and preparatory 
course for those wishing to pursue teaching, home making, practice of 
medicine and other related vocations. 3 hours class work, 2 hours 
laboratory work. 4 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

42 Embryology. The development of the tissues and organs 
of the frog and chick and some work with mammals. Offered in al- 
ternate years; 2 hours class work, 4 hours laboratory work. 4 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. This course 
is designed to stress nature study, cultures, preserving materials for 
class-work, arranging courses, and organized laboratory work. 4 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

MR. HOWELL 
MRS. HOWELL 
MR. STEWART 

MISS DAVIS 

The courses in Business Administration offer help to four 
kinds of students: 

First, to those who plan to be business men or women, 
the theory and practice of business are taught, so that grad- 
uates may be prepared for positions of responsibility, and for 
greater service to society. 

Second, to those who plan to teach, the courses specified 
by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction are 
offered to supply the requirements for the certification of 
commercial teachers. 

Third, to those who have not the time or the money for 
a four-year course, either a one-year or a two-year Secretarial 
course is available. Secretarial students must meet the same 
entrance requirements as other students. A Secretarial Cer- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 59 

tificate is awarded to those who meet certain proficiency 
standards. Only superior students are able to meet those re- 
quirements. Therefore, the two-year course is recommended 
for students of average ability. 

Fourth, to other students who wish to explore the eco- 
nomic structure of society. Business Administration courses 
are offered as electives. 

A business Administration major consists of thirty se- 
mester hours, six hours of which may be taken from the sec- 
retarial courses carrying degree credit. Those preparing for 
a commercial teacher's certificate must have thirty-six hours 
of business, nine hours of which may be taken from secretar- 
ial courses carrying degree credit. 

11-12 Pffinciples of Economics."^ An introductory course to ac- 
quaint the stu3eTi1r-with: the fundamental principles which underlie 
economic relations and activities. An analysis is made of production, 
consumption, exchange, and distribution. A brief survey of money, 
banking, and credit, the business cycle, business organization, monop- 
oly and trusts, labor problems, insurance, public finance, and econom- 
ic reforms. A combination of the lecture and case method will be 
used to relate practical situations to theory. 6 s. h. 

15 Economic Resources and Industry, f This course presents 
an elementary survey of geographic and economic factors — soil, 
climate, power resources, raw materials, available markets, distribu- 
tion of population, etc. — which are essential to production and human 
welfare. Particular emphasis is placed upon the relation of these 
factors to industrial development, distribution and occupations. Fall 
Semester. 3 s. h. 

16 Business Organization and Practiced The purpose of this 
course is to inffoduce the student to certain fundamental information 
regarding the characteristics, organization, operations, relative ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and 
corporations. Business transactions are studied with respect to their 
elementary legal and economic significance. Valuable information 



*'Required of all students majoring in Business Administration. 

jThis course may not be counted as part of the 30 semester hours required 
for a major in Business Administration ; it is, however, recommended for those 
anticipating further work in this department. 



60 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

regarding the use of checks, notes, drafts, etc., in business transactions 
is obtained through business practice assignments. Spring Semester. 
3 s. h. 

21-22 Principles of Accounting* This course does not require 
a knowledge of bookkeeping. It deals with the proprietorship equa- 
tion, financial statements, the ledger and the trial balance, posting, 
adjusting and closing entries, columnar records, controlling accounts, 
business forms and papers, notes and drafts, partnership accounting, 
classification of accounts, accrued and deferred items, corporation 
statements, elements of manufacturing accounts. Problems, practice 
sets, and lectures. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per semester. Not o|)en 
to Freshmen. 3 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory, 6 s. h. 

25 Salesmanship. This course is a consideration of the broad 
field of personal selling. The steps in a sale, the psychology of the 
selling process, knowledge of goods and of the market, selling to 
wholesalers and to retailers, are some of the problems considered. 
Attention is given to sales methods, the relation of personal selling to 
advertising, sales management, the house policies, the selection, train- 
ing, cooperation with, and supervision of salesmen, and the various 
methods of compensating salesmen. Prerequisite or corequisite: Psy- 
chology 21. 3 s. h. 

28 Credits and Collections. This is a consideration of the place 
of credit in the marketing structure. The economic basis of credit 
extension, the relation of credit to selling, methods of collecting and 
using credit information, credit bureaus, the use of trade acceptances, 
commercial paper, and collection letters, are investigated. Prerequi- 
site: Bus. Adm. 11-12 or 21-22. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

31 Marketing. A study of the fundamental processes of the 
system of marketing. Nature and scope of marketing, marketing 
functions, types of middlemen, retail distribution and marketing 
agencies, wholesale marketing of manufactured goods, marketing con- 
veniences, shopping and speciality goods, marketing industrial goods, 
direct selling. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Merchandising. This course sets forth the different mer- 
chandising policies, methods and principles, with a discussion of 
terms and phraseology in general use. Various methods of computing 
gross and net profits and turnover, effect of turnover on price, profits 
and merchandise investment, use and importance of budgetary control. 



*Required of all students majoring in Business Administration. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 61 

control of inventories, monthly estimated net profit, and inventory 
statements are considered. Prerequsite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Spring 
Semester. 3 s. h. 

33-34 Business Law. This course is designed to give the 
student an understanding of the main principles of law governing 
the daily conduct of business. A consideration of contracts, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, sales, 
bailments, personal and real property relations. Prerequisite: Bus. 
Adm. 11-12 or Junior standing. 6 s. h. 

35-36 Advanced Accounting. Profits, analysis of statements, ad- 
vanced work in partnerships and corporations, agencies and branches, 
statements of affairs, realization and liquidation, good will, reserves, 
funds, consolidations, mergers, partnerships, liquidations, consolidat- 
ed balance sheets and profit and loss statements, reorganizations, 
foreign exchange, and insurance. Prerequisite: Business Adminis- 
tration 13-14. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per semester. 3 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

3 T^ Cost Accounting. An introduction to cost accounting pro- 
cedure which includes basic cost terms; accounting for materials, 
labor, and burden; job-lot and process systems. A brief study is 
made of standard costs. Students visit industrial plants in order to 
gain practical information as to the problems involved. Prerequisite: 
Bus. Adm. 11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. 
Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

41 Corporation Finance. Development of corporate forms of 
business; its advantages and disadvantages; promotion; sources of 
capital; stock classifications and rights of stockholders; internal 
financial management; legal positions, receivership and reorganiza- 
tion. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12 or 21-22. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors only. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

42 Mjoney and Banking. A general survey of the modem 
financial system, including the principles and history of money and 
monetary standards; the principles and functions of banks and bank 
credit, commercial banks, investment banks, trust companies, the 
Federal Reserve System; a brief survey of the commercial banking 
systems of other countries. The relation of the business man and 
the banker. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors only. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

43 Life^Insumn£&. . The purpose of this course is primarily to 
acquaint the general business student with the subject of life insurance, 



62 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and, secondarily, to provide a foundation course for those intending 
to enter the insurance business. The topics include: the use of life 
insurance for protection and investment; the selection and treatment 
of risks; the policies and options offered, life insurance programs; 
rate-making; mutual, stock, legal requirements; and company organi- 
zation. Prerequisite: Business Adra. 11-12. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

44 Auditing. This course deals with the duties of the auditor; 
the problems involved in detailed and balance sheet audits, special 
investigation, and preparation of reports. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 
11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Spring 
Semester. 3 s. h. 

45 Materials and Methods. This course is to assist students 
who desire Grade "A" Teaching Certificates in the commercial field. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

48 Labor Problems. Causes of industrial unrest and other 
labor problems, the reactions of various groups to these conditions, 
and recent labor tendencies, are discussed. Special emphasis is given 
to the American labor movements, their objects, tactics, and accom- 
plishments. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Spring Semester. 
3 s. h. 

Secretarial Courses 

5 Penmanship. This course is optional, but is recommended 
for those students who have never had a course in penmanship, and 
also for those who write with a laborious and cramped style. It is 
designed to teach the fundamentals of correct posture and to develop 
a fluent, rapid, and legible handwriting. Fall Semester. 3 hours per 
week. 

7 Commercial Arithmetic. This is a brief elementary course in 
business arithmetic, which reveals short-cuts and helpful suggestions 
for speed in computations. JMajor emphasis is placed upon develop- 
ing proficiency in those problems frequently met by secretaries and 
office workers; such as problems in billing and pay rolls, interest, 
trade discounts, bank discounts, profit and loss, and price marking. 
Fall Semester. 3 hours per week. 

8 Secretarial Practice. This course acquaints the student, 
through actual laboratory experience, with the major and minor 
activities and duties of the secretary. It is designed to bring into the 
classroom, as much as possible, the office atmosphere. Filing, index- 
ing, mailing procedures, transcription methods, and financial duties 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 63 

are emphasized. Spring Semester. 6 hours per week, with 3 ad- 
ditional laboratory hours. 3 s. h. 

9 Personal Typewriting. A short course in touch typewriting 
offered to students who wish to learn the use of the machine for per- 
sonal convenience, and not for marketable skill. Fall Semester. 
3 hours a week. 

11 Business English. The purpose of this course is to give 
the basic elements and principles of good practical English, as adapted 
to the usages of modem business. The topics discussed, besides a 
thorough review of grammar, are letter planning and organization; 
effective letter layout; credits, collections, and adjustments; selling 
by mail; job-hunting by mail; fact writing — reports and memoran- 
dums; basic advertising. Fall Semester. 3 hours per week. 

12 Bookkeeping and Accounting. This elementary course ac- 
quaints students with present day methods of keeping and interpreting 
business records and reports. In addition to the regula.r bookkeeping 
cycle, special journals, notes, interest, discount, deferred charges, 
reserves, and columnar records, are studied. 

13-14 Shorthand."^ Fundamental principles of Gregg Short- 
hand with special emphasis on accuracy and speed. Practice work 
in dictation and transcription. In the spring semester intensive work 
is done in dictation and transcription. 6 hours per week throughout 
the year. 6 s. h. 

15-16 Secretarial Typewriting."^ The course in touch type- 
writing includes a speed-building program, which develops a high 
degree of skill. Five hours of class instruction, and six hours of 
laboratory work, each week throughout the year. 

17-18 Advanced Typewriting. Emphasis is placed on applied 
typewriting. The course is open only to students who have had one 
or more years of typewriting. 

31-32 Advanced Dictation. A second-year course in shorthand, 
consisting of rapid dictation and rapid transcription. Training in the 
editing duty of the private secretary is a part of this course. Effective 
English is stressed, as well as the art of completing transcripts with 
dispatch. 3 hours per week. 3 s. h. 

3d) Office Management. This course offers advanced prepara- 
tion for the teacher of commercial subjects. In addition, it trains for 



*Degree credit allowed only to students with Business Administration major. 



64 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

the positions of office manager, private secretary, and head stenogra- 
pher. A study of office organization, which includes an analysis of 
equipment, of lay-out, of personnel, of standards, of paying methods, 
and of departmental routine, constitutes the subject matter of this 
course. Actual office work is required of each student. Spring Se- 
mester, 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

MR. BRANNOCK 

Since matter is one of the two fundamental entities of the 
universe, chemistry is one of the fundamental sciences. Hence 
it is advantageous for those working in any field of science to 
study chemistry. 

The field of chemistry is broad and practical. There is 
no great industry which does not make use of some chemical 
principles. Chemistry is recommended to those who plan to 
enter the special fields of astronomy, geology, biology, med- 
icine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, home economics, agri- 
culture, or engineering. Aside from its vocational values, 
chemistry is also recognized as an important part of a general 
education. 

11-12 General Chemistry. Fundamental principles of inor- 
ganic, physical, and experimental chemistry. Each student is required 
to keep a note book in which he must record his experimental work. 
3 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

21-22 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 
The kinetic-molecular hypothesis, solutions, electrolysis, the chemical 
behavior of ionic substances, chemical equilibrium, and electro-motive 
chemistry. 3 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory work. 8 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

31-32 Organic Chemistry. Organic compounds, including the 
aliphatic and the aromatic series: hydrocarbons of the methane series, 
alcohols, organic acids, ethers, anhydrides, esters, aldehydes, ketones, 
amines, amides, halogen compounds, cyanogen, carbonhydrates, cylic 
hydrocarbons, dyes, and proteins. The laboratory work consists not 
only in the methods of preparation and purification of compounds, 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 65 

but also in methods of arriving at their structures. 3 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

41-42 Quantitative Analysis. Chiefly laboratory work in sim- 
ple introductory determinations in gravimetric and volumetric methods 
of analysis. Pure salts of known composition are first analyzed, fol- 
lowed by unknown specimens consiting of pure salts or mixtures of 
pure salts. 1 hour class work, 6 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

45-46 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Chem- 
istry. The main purpose of this course is to present the modern 
theory and methods of teaching chemistry in secondary schools. 
6 s. h. 

48 Physical Chemistry. Problems in the gaseous, liquid and 
solid states; solutions; the phrase rule, thermo-chemistry ; chemical 
change; and electro-chemistry. 3 hours class work. 3 s. h. 

53 Industrial Chemistry. Water, fuels, destructive distilla- 
tion, alkalies and hydrochloric acid, iron and steel, packing house 
industries, cottonseed oil products, leather, soap, cement, paper, paints, 
and clay products. 3 hours class work. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MR. MESSICK 
MR. BEECHER 
MR. TERRELL 

The functions of the Department of Education are: 
First, to guide students in acquiring a background in the 
history and philosophy of education, so that they may under- 
stand the basis upon which modern progressive trends in 
education are built. 

Second, to inspire students with the ideal that the purpose 
of all education is that one may learn to live a better life, 
that school is life, and that the proper methods of teaching 
are those which begin with the life situations of the child 
and are built upon them. 

Third, to instruct students in the principles and tech- 
niques of teaching so that they may know and understand the 
proper procedures of instruction. 



66 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Professional Requirements for North Carolina Teaching 
Certificates 
High School. — High School Teachers' Certificates, Class 
A, represent graduation from standard four-year colleges. 
These certificates are issued on the basis of transcripts of col- 
lege records which show the professional credit and specialized 
work hereinafter described for each certificate. Each appli- 
cant should meet the requirements in two or more teaching 
fields. The subjects for which certificate is granted will ap- 
pear on the face of the certificate. 

First. The professional requirements common to all cer- 
tificates are: 

1. Educational Psychology, 2 s. h. 

2. Principles of High School Teaching, or 
Problems in Secondary Education, 2 s. h. 

3. Materials and Methods (required in one subject only), 2 s. h. 
*4. Directed Teaching (one or both fields), 3 s. h. 

5. Electives, 9 s. h. 

Note: In Directed Teaching one should have not fewer than 
forty hours of actual class teaching or should teach not fewer than 
forty full class exercises. Thirty hours of observation must precede 
teaching. 

Second. Subject-matter requirements for the teaching of 
any subject are: 

1. For English, at least 24 s. h., including Grammar, Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric, and American Literature. 

2. For French, at least 18 s. h. This is based on two units of 
entrance credit. If no entrance credit is presented, the applicant must 
have 24 semester hours. The requirements for any other modem 
foreign language will be the same. 

3. For History, at least 24 s. h., including Ancient and Medieval, 
Modem European, United States, to total at least 12 s. h. ; Political 



*If all requirements except Directed Teaching are met, the Class A Cer- 
tificate will be issued after the applicant shall have had one year of successful 
teaching experience. It is understood that this teaching will be done vmder the 
joint supervision of the Head of the Education Department of the institution 
from which the student has been graduated and the superintendent of the school 
in which the applicant is teaching. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 67 

Science or Government, at least 3 s. h. ; elective from Economics, So- 
ciology, N. C. History, or the above, 9 s. h. 

4. For Mathematics, at least 15 s. h. 

5. For Science, at least 30 s. h., including Biology, Chemistry, 
Physics, and Geography or Geology. A certificate to teach any one 
science, e. g., Biology, may be secured by presenting credit for a mini- 
mum of 30 s. h. in Science, including a major in the particular 
science in which the certificate is desired. 

6. For Commerce, at least 36 s. h., including Stenography, Type- 
writing, Bookkeeping, and Office Management. 

7. For Public School Music, at least 30 s. h., including 3 s. h. 
in Voice. 

8. For Physical Education, at least 30 s. h. 

9. For Home Economics, at least 45 s. h., including 6 s. h. of 
Chemistry, 6 of Physiology and Bacteriology, 2 of Physics, 3 of Art, 
8 of Foods, 8 of Clothing, 6 of Management (Home Management, 
Home Management Residence, Economics of the Home), 6 of Family 
(Child Development, Family and Social Relationships, Health and 
Home Nursing). 

A certificate to teach Foods only will be issued if appli- 
cant has credit for 18 semester-hours in Food and has met all 
requirements for the Home Economics Certificate except in 
Art and Design and Clothing. A certificate to teach Clothing 
only will be issued if applicant has credit for 15 semester- 
hours in Clothing and has met all requirements for the Home 
Economics Certificate except that in Foods. 

Grammar Grade. — Grammar Grade Teachers' Certifi- 
cates, Class A, represent graduation from a standard four-year 
college, or the equivalent, embracing not less than 120 semes- 
ter-hours. As a part of the work, or in addition to it, the 
applicant shall have the following: 

1. English, 12 s. h,, including six semester hours of Composition, 
two of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 6 s. h. 

3. Geography, including nature study, 6 s. h. 



68 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 9 s. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and Music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 6 s. h., including two semester 
hours each of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Education. 

6. Education, 21 s. h., including Grammar Grade Methods 
(Reading, Language, Arithmetic, Social Science), Classroom Manage- 
ment, Child Study, Educational Psycholog)', Educational Measure- 
ments, and Directed Teaching. 

Primary. — Primary Teachers' Certificates, Class A, repre- 
sent graduation from a standard four-year college, or the 
equivalent, embracing not less than 120 semester-hours. As 
a part of the work, or in addition to it, the applicant shall 
have the following: 

1. English, 12 s. h., including six semester hours of composition, 
two of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 6 s. h. 

3. Geography, including Nature Study, 6 s. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 9 s. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and Music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 6 s. h. including 2 s. h. each 
of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Education. 

6. Education, 21 s. h., including Primary Methods (Reading, 
Language, Numbers), Classroom Management, Child Study, Educa- 
tional Psychology, and Directed Teaching. 

Before any certificate will be issued for teaching in the 
elementary schools, the records from the institution in which 
the applicant received his training must show that he has 
reached a satisfactory stage of proficiency in Spelling and 
Penmanship. This certification will be made by the institu- 
tion and will appear on the record. 

General Education Courses 

33 Elementary Methods. This course works on problems 
involved in planning and carrying out learning programs in each 
grade of the elementary school. A review of experimental practice 
and recent educational trends is made the basis for building programs 
to meet the needs and to develop the curriculum of the modem Pri- 
mary and Grammar grade school. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ^ 

42 Classroom Management. To acquaint the student teacher 
with methods of organization and procedure in the guidance of stu- 
dent activity. Principles of directed conduct, integrated unit pro- 
grams, and other essential features. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Educational Measurements. Philosophy of the testing pro- 
gram through acquaintance with objective tests, their formulation, 
giving, and interpretation. Actual testing programs are set up and 
a knowledge of statistical procedures is acquired, from the mode 
through correlation so that test results may provide a basis for student 
guidance. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

36 Curriculum. This course is designed to acquaint students 
with a comprehensive view of the basic considerations involved in 
determining the content and organization of curricula for elementary 
and secondary schools. A survey of modem practices in curriculum 
offerings, trends and construction, and emphasis on pertinent en- 
vironmental possibilities will be stressed. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

43 History of Education. Special emphasis is placed upon edu- 
cation in the United States, with particular attention to educational 
leaders and progressive programs. The progress of elementary, secon- 
dary, higher, and adult education is studied in detail, with European 
and later American influences as backgrounds. 3 s. h. 

44 The Philosophy of Education. This course acquaints stu- 
dents with the underlying principles of educational theories; the 
solution of educational problems; the development of democratic con- 
ceptions underlying an educational program; and the social, moral; 
and cultural implications of the development of personality. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

45 Materials and Methods for High School Teachers. See 
specific departments for description. 

47 Principles of High School Teaching. To guide the prospec- 
tive teacher in the principles of learning ; to acquaint him with modem 
procedures of school programs; and to give him an underlying phi- 
losophy of student attitudes and needs so that he may know how to 
guide the pupil properly in his activities. 3 s. h. 

48 Character Education. This course shows how the home, the 
school, the church, the community, and other agencies function as 
units, and as cooperative agencies in a combined effort to guide boys 
and girls in ways of wholesome and happy living. 3 s. h. 



70 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

51, 52, 53, 54, 55 or 56 Observation and Directed Teaching. 
Both observation and directed-teaching are done under close coopera^ 
tion with the public school teachers and principal. The student 
teacher must observe and teach at least 80 hours in the subject of his 
major field. He is required to analyze teaching problems in written 
reports of his observations, and to make careful teaching plans in 
frequent conferences with the supervising classroom teacher and with 
the College supervisor of directed-teaching. Fall or Spring 3 s. h. 

57-58 Directed Methods in Teaching. This course gives all 
who are doing directed teaching an opportunity to work together on 
teaching problems as they occur in the real situations of the Elon 
College Public School. The course is in the nature of a workshop for 
directing attention to tools, equipment, books, and materials needed in 
carrying out a teaching program at the school, and to enable the 
student teacher to gain first-hand experience in supplementing class- 
room routines with facilities for active learning. Through group 
discussions student teachers piece together the teaching problems of 
the whole school and see their own individual classroom problems in 
relation to those of other teachers. Fall or Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

Directed Teaching. — It is the philosophy of the College 
to offer the student opportunities in all departments for self- 
development in thinking and in character. The Department 
of Education uses the local public schools as a place where 
educational problems may be seen as realities. Close cooper- 
ation between the public school and the Department of Edu- 
cation makes possible the opportunity for student teachers to 
study Education through a real school situation. The public 
school teachers and principal help supervise directed-teaching, 
and the student teachers enter actively into the life of the 
school, contributing their efforts under College guidance to 
further the development of the school, as well as to use the 
school classrooms as a training ground. 

The College looks upon directed-teaching as a serious 
responsibility in training for a profession, and requires careful 
preparation in subject-matter and theory of education along 
with high standards in directed-teaching. All the facilities 
of the college library, laboratories, studios, workshop, special 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 71 

classes and seminars dealing with the methods, materials and 
planning of school programs are available to make directed- 
teaching an experience in the application of the modern pro- 
gressive philosophy of education to a teaching situation. Those 
w^ho expect to enter educational w^ork should consult the head 
of the Department of Education before taking any course. 

Summer Sessions. — Tv^^o six-weeks terms are conducted 
for students who wish to earn credit toward a B. A. degree, 
and for teachers in service. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

MR. COLLINS 
MR. BARNEY 

The function of courses in the field of English is three- 
fold: 

First, to give ample opportunities for oral expression of 
ideas and feelings. To this end the Freshman and Sophomore 
courses employ group discussion as the chief method of ap- 
proaching subject-matter. Advanced courses in Dramatic 
Literature, American Literature, Shakespeare, Argumentation 
and Debate, and Modern Literature, offer abundant oppor- 
tunity for oral expression and interpretation. 

Second, to give directed opportunities for development in 
the universally necessary craft of writing. Expression in writ- 
ten language should be both practical and creative. The 
Freshman and Sophomore courses contain opportunities for 
both kinds of expression, while on the Junior-Senior level the 
course in Journalism specializes in direct writing, and the 
courses in Dramatic Literature and Modern Literature em- 
phasize a more purely creative approach. Grammar and 
"Correct English" are treated as a means to a more complete 
expression rather than as an end in themselves. Through the 
required courses for Freshmen and Sophomores an attempt is 
made, moreover, to produce a uniform excellence in the use 
of written English as a tool for all other studies. 



72 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Third, to give to students, through their extensive reading 
and discussion, a firm grasp of the aesthetic and social im- 
pHcations of Hterature and language. The Freshman course 
is primarily an introduction to American culture, the Soph- 
omore course discovers English culture, and the advanced 
courses deal with other phases of culture in relation to groups 
of mankind, past and present. 

11-12 Freshman English. This course includes a review of 
grammar and punctuation together with the study of the forms of 
composition. During the second semester the Reader's Digest, and 
other periodicals, are used as a basis for class discussion and themes 
on current topics. 

21-22 Sophomore English. During this year there is carried on 
an extensive, individualized reading program, with group discussions 
of literary and social phenomena common to the works read. The class 
not only reads, studies, and discusses works in English Literature, 
but also attempts to produce in some literary form, in which leads 
from some of the courses in Freshman English are followed. 

24 Children's Literature. The study of children's language 
as a basis for the selection and production of reading or story ma- 
terials for children in the primary and elementary schools. With a 
knowledge of children's uses of language in mind, the student writes 
stories or study materials which will be suited in style and content to 
the demands of the modem school for programs related directly to 
the child's experiences in living. Examination is made of the field 
of children's literature and folk literature to discover reading matter 
which satisfies modem educational requirements and to find sources 
for the production of new materials. No credit on major. 3 s. h. 

31-32 Journalism. This course demands the cultivation of 
curiosity and resourcefulness, the formation of direct style of writing, 
an understanding of public opinion and newspaper policy, and a 
working knowledge of modem printing. These assets are acquired 
through the writing, editing, and printing of the college newspaper, 
"Maroon and Gold." 6 s. h. 

33-34 Shakespeare. Workshop productions on an Elizabethan 

stage of at least fifteen complete plays by Shakespeare and his fellow 

\ dramatists, and the public production of one of these plays. The 

student's experience of Shakespeare is direct and active rather than 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 73 

merely receptive through lectures and silent readings. The production 
of each play is preceded by study of the essential facts about the play 
and its production, and is followed by a critical discussion of the 
characters and of the dramatic values of Shakespeare's work. 6 s. h. 

35-36 Argumentation and Debate. Classroom practice and 
training in various branches of speech. Formal and informal debate 
and argumentation, formulating group opinion, after-dinner speaking,, 
oratory, and discussion leadership. 6 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

37-38 Dramatic Literature. Readings in the drama from 
Ibsen to contemporary dramatists, with the parallel composition of 
original plays by the class. All plays studied, whether professional 
or original, are given workshop production in the Little Theatre, and 
several of these plays are produced for the public during the year. 
The course thus covers many phases of the modern theatre: play- 
writing, acting, directing, staging, costuming, and make-up. 6 s. h. 

41-42 American Literature. For students who wish an ad- 
vanced understanding of American culture, for students who plan 
to teach, and for those above the sophomore level who have trans- 
ferred from other colleges. 6 s. h. 

45-46 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Eng- 
lish. Materials for teaching literature and language are explored 
and evaluated, and problems of teaching English are discussed in 
relation to the student's experience of directed teaching. 6 s. h. 

49 Modern Literature. Readings in contemporary English and 
American literature, with parallel work in creative writing. The best 
of these compositions are printed in the Spring number of "Elon 
Colonnades." The writing and readings are accompanied by discus- 
sion of modern social and psychological theories and practices with.- 
an attempt to help the student to find his place in the modem world, 
of ideas and feelings. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 



MISS OXFORD 
MR. BEECHER 



21 Principles of Geography. A study of the principles and the- 
major geographical factors in determining the distribution of popula- 
tion, occupations, and modes of life. The effects of climatic and 
economic conditions on the peoples of the world will be stressed. 



74 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Practical work in the study of maps and reports will be included in 
the course. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

22 Geography of North America. A study of the geographical 
regions of the continent, climate, industries, natural resources, and 
the human responses to the geographic conditions; the growth of 
cities, development of trade and the geographical influences in the 
development of the United States. Spring Semester. 3 &. h. 

32 Geology. This course deals with Physical and Dynamical 
Geology. Laboratory work consists of frequent field excursions and 
a study of the common minerals and rocks, map interpretations, and 
geological folios. Lectures and recitations three hours a week, two 
hours devoted to laboratory work. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

MR. FRENCH 

Ancient Greek is a cultural language. It supplies a depth 
of background for the modern cultural languages. Students 
majoring in Religion are expected to take New Testament 
Greek. 

11-12 Elementary Greek. Mastery of declensions and conju- 
gations, synopsis of verbs, word analysis, derivation and composition, 
and simpler principles. Drill in pronunciation by reading Greek 
aloud. Xenophon, Book I. 6 s. h. 

21-22 Greek New Testament. The study of the grammar of 
New Testament Greek. Readings in the New Testament. Problems 
and methods of exegesis. Textual problems. 6 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

MR. DICKINSON 
MR. HIRSCH 

In the Department of History, raw historical material is 
not memorized aimlessly, but is evaluated, criticized and or- 
ganized in such fashion as to illuminate the minds of students 
with respect to the nature of the past and the manner in 
which the past has produced the present. One of the chief 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ^ 

contributions which history may make is the working toward 
a better understanding of the modern age. 

11-12 The Establishment and Development of the American 
Nation. A survey of the European background of American history; 
the English settlements, their developments and their experiences with 
the colonial system seeking to protect and control them; the revolt, 
union, and organization of the United States; the struggle for Ameri- 
can Neutrality; the development of national parties; the problems of 
territorial expansion; the War between the States; Reconstruction,, 
North and South; the agrarian movement; financial questions; re- 
form; relations of government and business; and expansion overseas. 
Special emphasis upon bibliography. 6 s. h. 

21-22 Tite Establishment and Development of the English 
Nation. 400 A. D. to the present. Primitive beginnings in Britain, the 
Germanic invasions, the Norman conquest, the development of Parlia- 
ment, the Hundred Years' War, the foundation of the Tudor Mon- 
archy, James and the divine right of kings, revolt, the Republican 
experiment in England, Restoration, revolution of 1688, the rise of the 
cabinet, constitutional development and loss of first colonial empire, 
foundation of Modem Empire, the World War, and Simpson crisis, 
George VI. Emphasis is placed upon legal and constitutional de- 
velopment, and hence the course is recommended for students planning 
to study law. 

31-32 Ancient and Medieval History. A brief survey of an- 
cient history from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia to 
the close of the second century, A. D. Emphasis is placed upon the 
history of Greece and Rome, the evolution of government, and the 
progress of art, science, and philosophy. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 
A survey of European history from the disintegration of the Roman 
Empire to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on the causes of 
Rome's decline, the origin and growth of the church, feudal and 
manorial society, intellectual interest, the place of the Empire and 
the rise of national monarchy in France and England. Spring 
Semester. 3 s. h. 

33-34 Modern European History. 1500 A. D. to the Present. 
The Renaissance, the Reformation, the "Commercial Revolution," the 
rise of the national state, dynastic and colonial rivalries, the "Intel- 
lectual Revolution," the progress of nationalism, the "Industrial Rev- 
olution," and the diplomatic background of the World War. 6 s. h. 



^6 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

45 Methods and Materials in Teaching High School History. 
lilodem trends in the teaching of history and its place in education; 
the construction of courses and methods of integrating history with 
other fields; teaching procedures, materials, and aids for study; pro- 
lems of evaluating, organizing, and using such materials as maps, 
pictures, textbooks, reference books, biographical materials, radio, 
and motion pictures. 3 s. h. 

47 The Evolution of the Commonwealth of North Carolina. 
A survey of the state from its origins to the present; its place in the 
history of the United States as a whole, in colonial times, during the 
Revolution, Federalism, Democracy, contributions to the Western 
Movement, attitude toward nullification and secession, the Civil War, 
reconstruction, big business and the New Deal. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

48 American Government and Politics. A general survey of 
national, state, and local governments. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

49 The Historical Development of Democratic Ideas and In- 
stitutions. A survey of Democracy from the earliest times to the 
present; the variety of definitions and origins of Democracy, its 
progress from early beginnings in the Ancient Near East, Greece, 
Rome and the Christian world through Medieval Europe, modern 
France and England. Democracy in the United States; its historical 
evolution in the American system of religion, education and politics; 
comparison with rival systems of government and its prospects. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

MR. SPRAGUE 

The Department of Mathematics offers in Freshman and 
Sophomore years, work which introduces the student to prin- 
ciples of mathematical reasoning. In advanced courses, in- 
tended primarily for those going into the engineering or 
teaching professions, a solid groundwork is offered in the 
fields of Calculus and Applied Mathematics. Emphasis is 
constantly placed upon the value of scientific reasoning in ap- 
proaching any problem. 

11 College Algebra. A rapid review of the fundamentals of 
algebra, followed by a thorough study of quadratic equations, ratio 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 77 

and proportion, variation, series, binomial formula, logarithms, de- 
terminants, and the theory of equations. 3 s. h. 

12 Trigonometry. The solution of right and oblique triangles 
both with and without logarithms ; trigonometric identities and trigono- 
metric equations; line functions and graphic representations. 3 hours 
class work. 3 s. h. 

21-22 An Introductory to Calculus. Treatment of the straight 
line, the circle and other conic sections, special plane curves and 
transformation of coordinates. A study of differential calculus, dif- 
ferentiation of functions with simple applications to the derivative of 
rates, length of tangents, normals, and similar topics. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 11-12. 6 s. h. 

31 Differential Calculus. A study of differentiation of func- 
tions, with applications of the derivatives to rates, length of tangents, 
normals, and other topics; the subjects of maxima and minima, 
curvature, rates and envelopes; drill on curve tracing. 3 s. h. 

32 Integral Calculus. Integration: The constant of integra- 
tion, the delinite integral; drill on the methods of integration. The 
object is to enable the student to investigate without having to rely 
on any tables or set rules, and after having learned the principles of 
integration, to apply them to such subjects as areas, lengths of curves, 
volumes of solids or revolution, and areas of surfaces of revolution. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21-22. 3 s. h. 

41 Differential Equations. Ordinary and the partial differen- 
tial equations, the theory of integration of such equations as admit 
of a known transformation group, and the classic methods of integra- 
tion compared with those which flow from the theory of continuous 
group. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1940-1941. 

42 Applied Calculus. Differential equations continued, and 
calculus applied to mechanics and to engineering problems. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1940-1941. 

45 Materials and Methods in the Teaching of Mathematics. 
Methods of presenting the different branches of mathematics to the 
pupil in secondary schools. Offered in alternate years. 3 s. h. 

Applied Mathematics 

MR. BOWDEN. 
13-14 Engineering Drawing. This course provides a basic 
treatment of modem conventions, theory and practice of Engineering 



78 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Drawing. Instruction is given in the care and use of instruments, 
drawing materials and scales, methods of procedure in drawing, free- 
hand lettering, geometric drawing, orthographic projection, working 
drawings, tracing, and blue printing. Prerequisite : Plane Geometry. 
No credit on major. 6 s. h. 

23-24 Engineering Drawing. Engineering lettering with copy 
books, detail of machine parts, assembly drawings; systems of dimen- 
sioning, bills of material, conventions, titles, pipes, piping systems; 
elements of machine design, gears, worms, screws, nuts and bolts. No 
credit on major. 6 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

MR. HIRSCH 
MISS BUSSELL 

The work in French, German and Spanish is designed to 
give to the students an appreciation of the manners and cus- 
toms of these peoples, their background and language, to 
provide suitable material for those who desire to teach these 
languages in secondary schools, and to provide tools for 
research. 

I — French 

MISS BUSSELL 
7-8 Elemenetary French. An introduction to the essentials of 
French grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and civili- 
zation with major emphasis on the reading approach. No credit. 

11-12 Intermediate French. A thorough review of French 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury short stories, novels and plays. 6 s. h. Prerequisite: French 
7-8 or two years of high school French. 

21-22 A Survey of French Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces of the classical, romantic, realistic, and natural- 
istic periods with a consideration of the necessary historical back- 
ground and literary criticism. 6 s. h. 

31-32 The Modern French Theater. A study of the develop- 
ment of the modern French drama from the seventeenth century to 
the present day. Extensive reading and discussions of plays as well 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 79 

as lectures and reports on critical and historical material. 6 s. h. 
Offered in alternate years. 

41-42 The Modern French Novel. A study of the development 

of the modern French novel from its beginnings in the seventeenth 

century to the twentieth century. Rapid reading and discussions of 

the most significant novels as well as lectures and reports on critical 

and historical material. 6 s. h. Offered in alternate years. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

II — German 

MR. HIRSCH 
11-12 Elementary German. An introductory course including 
thorough study of the fundamentals of the German grammar and the 
common vocabulary, of pronunciation, elementary composition, read- 
ing and translation. 

21-22 Intermediate German. The work of this course includes 
the reading and translating (partly at sight) of German prose and 
poetry, exercises in composition and free reproduction, oral and writ- 
ten, with considerable colloquial practice and a rapid review of 
grammar. 

31-32 Advanced German. This course is intended for those 
who have had two years of German in College. It stresses practical 
use of the German language. It includes class reading and transla- 
tion of selected German authors as well as the history of German 
literature, investigations in German language and civilization (partly 
in German) with special emphasis upon the ideals and influence of 
German Literature and thought of the 18th and 19th century. 

Ill — Spanish 

MISS BUSSELL 
11-12 Elementary Spanish. An introduction to the essentials 
of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and 
civilization of Spanish-speaking countries with early readings in easy 
Spanish prose. 6 s. h. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish. A thorough review of Spanish 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth century 
short stories, novels and plays. 6 s. h. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 
or two years of high school Spanish. 



80 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

MR. BOWDEN 
MR. FRENCH 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion seeks to 
communicate to the students the heritage of the past, and to 
equip them with the stimulus to achieve an intelligent inter- 
pretation of that heritage for present and future ends. Students 
achieve a vital and constructive attitude toward life through 
historical and critical study of philosophical and religious lit- 
erature. 

The fundamental doctrines of Christianity, as found in 
the teachings of Jesus, are interpreted as having real meaning 
for the present age of scientific progress and discovery. 

In addition to preparing students for effective participa- 
tion in general Christian service and in wholesome living, the 
function of this department is to prepare a select group of 
young men and young women for graduate training, that they 
may become intelligent teachers and Christian ministers. 

Philosophy 

31-32 Introduction to Philosophy. An introductory study of 
the basic philosophical problems: What is reality? What is the 
basis for values? What is consciousness? Is knowledge possible? 
How distinguish truth from error? Is the world a machine? Has 
the world a purpose? What are the relations of religion and science 
to life? 6 s. h. 

35 Logic. The conditions under which thinking proceeds; the 
elements of formal logic, induction, and scientific method. Offered in 
alternate years. 3 s. h. Fall Semester. 

36 Ethics. A study of the early beginnings and growth of 
morality, the development of customs and social organization, the 
psychological aspects of morality, some modem systems of ethics, and 
the application of ethical theory to some modern world-problems. 
Offered in alternate years. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 

38 The Philosophy of Science. A comparatively new field of 
study, covering the basic philosophical principles upon which the 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 81 

sciences are based. Dealing with the foundations rather than the 
facts of science, the course does not require a background of advanced 
scientific knowledge. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

41-42 The History of Philosophy. The history of philosophy 
from early Greek to nineteenth-century German philosophy, including 
the pre-Socratic philosophers, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Early 
Christian and Scholastic philosophies, seventeenth-century Rational- 
ism, English Empiricism, Kant, Hegel, and subsequent German Ideal- 
ism. Students read from original sources and from modem commen- 
tators. Offered in alternate years. 6 s. h. 

Religion 

11-12 Survey of the Bible. A historical account of the rise of 
Hebrew and Jewish religious literature, the Christian Church and its 
literature, and the situations which produced the various documents 
and books of the Bible. 6 s. h. 

21-22 New Testament History and Literature. A brief survey 
of the religious experiences of the Hebrew prophets; the social, re- 
ligious, and political situation in Palestine; the historical bases for 
our knowledge of the religious experience, character, teaching, and 
dynamic faith of Jesus; the impact of his life and teaching; the de- 
velopment of the Christian Church in Palestine, and its spread from 
Jerusalem to Rome. 6 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

23 Leadership in Christian Education. Administration of the 
Sunday Church School, materials and methods for work with chil- 
dren, young people, and adults, and plans for a local church program 
of leadership training. 3 s. h. Fall semester, alternate years. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

31-32 Old Testament History and Literature. The historical 
development of the literature of the Old Testament; the early poems, 
narratives, and laws, the growth of the Hebrew monarchy; and the 
ethical, political, and religious contributions of the literary prophets. 
Further extensive reading in the Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and 
Apocalyptic material. 6 s. h. 

33-34 Philosophy of Religion."^ The origin and development 
of religious belief from primitive times to the present day, including a 



*NOTE — Students wishing a major in Philosophy are given full credit 
for this course under the head of Philosophy, 



ffi ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

survey of the classical religions — Hinduism, Buddhism, Confuciali- 
ism, Mohammedanism, Judaism — and a detailed history of Chris- 
tianity. The influence of scientific inquiry, Biblical criticism and 
modem psychology upon religious belief; the development of a con- 
structive philosophy of religion and of life; and the problems of 
religious belief in a scientific age. 6 s. h, 

37-38 Seminar: Christianity and Other Religions. Individual 
assignments, papers and reports on various phases of Christian His- 
tory and Doctrine, including its Jewish background. Research in 
other classical and modern religions. 6 s. h. 

Two hours, one afternoon each week. 

41-42 Bible Seminar. Special research in some fields of Old 
and New Testament study, such as archaeology, hexateuchal synopsis, 
the law codes of the Old Testament, Hellenic Judaism, St. Paul and 
the jSIessianic consciousness of Jesus. Offered in alternate years. 
6 s. h. 

Not oft'ered in 1941-1942. 

43-44 Seminar in Religion and Modern Social Problems, The 
basic social problems viewed in the light of their religious, ethical, and 
social implications. Each student pursues one or more projects of 
research into some particular social situation. Brief reports on the 
social implications of outstanding current events. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

MR. HOOK 

Physics is one of the important divisions of human knowl- 
edge. Its purpose is to describe as accurately and clearly as 
possible the physical processes which go on in the universe 
around us. Wherever a transfer of energy is involved, the 
principles of physics are used. This may occur in the spin 
of the atom or in the movement of a giant liner; the flight 
of an alpha particle or the creation of a galaxy. Physics is a 
tool course for other sciences. The fundamental phenomena 
of physics are approached from a combination of two points 
of view: the purely physical, in which the mind paints a 
picture of what is happening; and second, the mathematical 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 83 

and analytical, in which a mental picture is expressed by 
means of mathematical symbols. 

In the first courses of the physical sciences special empha- 
sis is placed on the development of the scientific attitude. 

11-12 Survey of Physical Sciences. General subjects of astron- 
omy, geography, geology, physics, and chemistry. Demonstrations 
with various physical apparatus and illustrations with slides, film 
strips, movie films, and field trips. No credit on major. 6 s. h. 

13-14 General Physics. Mechanics, heat, sound, light, and 
electricity. Examples and experiments given throughout the entire 
course with a view of rendering it practical. Training in the manipu- 
lation of instruments employed in physical investigation, accurate 
measurements and practice in properly recording and reducing ex- 
perimental data. Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 8 s. h. 

21-22 Modern Physics. Atomic nature of matter and elec- 
tricity, corpuscular nature of radiant energy, spectroscopy, planetary 
model of the atom. X-rays, molecular structure, radio activity, neu- 
trons, positrons, theory of relativity, and astrophysics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 13-14. 8 s. h. 

31-32 Electricity and Magnetism. Ohm's law, electrical power 
and energy, concerning wire, resistance, magnets and magnetism, 
magnetic circuit, generator, motor, batteries and electrochemical action, 
inductance, capacitance, alternating currents, vacuum tubes and 
gaseous conduction, and the electrostatic circuit. Prerequisite: Phy- 
sics 13-14. 8 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

33-34 Light and Sound. Reflection, refraction, dispersion, 
chromatic, spherical, aberration, optical constants of mirrors and 
lenses, velocity, radiation, absorption, interference, diffraction, polari- 
zation, colors of crystaline plates and oil films, and photography. The 
nature of sound velocity, frequency, resonance, forced oscillations, 
tranverse and longitudinal vibrations, vibrations in various media, 
and acoustics of buildings. Prerequisite: Physics 13-14. 8 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

35 Aeronautics. This course is offered for the Civilian Pilot 
Training Program sponsored by the Civil Aeronautics Authority. 
The following subjects are studied in detail: history of aviation, civil 
air regulations, navigation, meteorology, parachutes, aircraft and the 



M ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

theory of flight, engines, instruments, radio uses and forms. Flying 
instruction 35 to 50 hours. Special fee. 3 s. h. 

Successful completion of the above course entitles the student to 
a Private Pilot Certificate. 

36 Household Physics. A one-semester course designed espe- 
cially for women students and to meet the requirements of the public 
school certificate in Home Economics. 4 s. h. 

41 Mechanics. Forces: their composition and resolution, forces 
acting on a rigid body, balanced forces, v^^ork and energy, first and 
second degree moments, dynamics of translatory motion, dynamics of 
rotary motion. 

42 Heat. The course presents the essential fundamentals of 
heating, ventilating, and air conditioning. The emphasis is placed 
on domestic uses. Factors affecting human comfort, heat transmission 
and air infiltration, calculation and estimation of building heat losses 
and heat gains, fuels, combustion, draft, chimneys, boilers, insulation, 
heating with steam, hot water, and warm-air systems; air conveying 
and air cleaning, humidification and dehumidification, control of air 
temperature and summer cooling of buildings. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

MISS OXFORD 
MR. MESSICK 

Psychology teaches students to understand human nature 
and its ramifications, helps them to interpret their own mental 
reactions, and points out possible ways of building and ad- 
justing personality. 

21 General Psychology. An introductor}' course, emphasizing 
fundamental processes of human behavior, responses to various 
stimuli, building of personality, and mind in its relationship to the 
modem world. A prequisite to all other courses in Psychology. 
Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

31 Educational Psychology. Inherited tendencies; laws of 
learning; laws of teaching; habit formation; individual differences; 
formation of correct ideals and attitudes. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Psychology of Childhood. A study of the mental, physical, 
and emotional developments of the child in relation to personality and 
social adjustments. 3 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 85 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

MR. BOWDEN 

Sociology is that branch of the social sciences which deals 
with the individual in relation to his human environment. 
Students discover their places of responsibility in society only 
through a knowledge of the culture, mores and institutions 
of that society. It is the function of sociology, therefore, to 
trace the development of culture, to point out the chief char- 
acteristics and danger zones in the contemporary social scene, 
and to inspire student interest in solving the problems of 
modern life. 

31 Introductory Sociology. The origins and development of 
culture, the nature of personality and its relation to society^ forms of 
collective behavior, community and social organization, and the 
basic social problems: the family, international relations, political 
and economic organization, and social development. 3 s. h. Fall 
Semester. 

42 Rufal Sociology. Conditions of life in the country and 
constructive organization for improvement, social technology of rural 
communities, importance of agriculture, rural institutions, cooperative 
marketing, good roads, consolidated scliools, social surveys of the 
country and the rural church, organization of the rural community, 
and social control. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 



Special Departments of the College 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

MISS NEWMAN 

A thorough course of instruction in Art is oflfered to those 
who desire to devote themselves to its study and practice. 
Students in this department are required to spend tv^elve 
hours a w^eek at v\^ork in the studio. An annual exhibition 
is held during Commencement. 

11-12 Freehand drawing in charcoal from still-life, geometrical 
solids and casts, linear and angular perspective structure, study of 
light and shade, flat washes in water color and monochrome painting, 
color sketches from still-life, pastel painting, letters and designing, 
clay modeling and pottery. 

21-22 Drawing in charcoal from still-life, heads, hands, features, 
and casts; painting in oils, pastels and water colors, from still-life, 
illustration, wash drawings in water color; principles of color; pen 
and ink drawings, designing and structure. 

23 Elementary Drawing. Working knowledge of the principles 
of drawing necessary in the primary and elementary school. Color 
design, drawing and painting from life or geometric forms, illustra- 
tions, posters and printing. Picture study art activities for the child 
in the home, school, and community; and the development of creative 
abilities. Offered in alternate years. 3 s. h. 

24 Industrial Arts for Elementoj^y Grades. Methods and 
materials used in the study of industrial arts for primary and gram- 
mar grades. Color theory, weaving, modeling, construction work, 
posters, book-binding, block-printing, and projects for history and 
geography classes. The subject matter is creative and illustrated, and 
is centered about the interests and needs of the child. Offered in 
alternate years. 3 s. h. 

Sketch Class. Pencil-drawing, with or without model out-of- 
door work. 

China Painting. Tinting : La Croix colors, matt colors, powder 
colors. Flower Painting: Designs of Edward Reeves and Marshall 
Fray; Dresden colors, Herr Lamm. Figure Painting: La Croix 
Dresden, Herr Till. Ornamental Work: Raised paste and gold; 
enamels; jewels, etc., on hard china, satsuma, Beleek, and Sedji. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 87 

History of Art. Architecture and sculpture : Egjptian, Assyrian, 
Greek and Roman, Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Renais- 
sance. Modem sculpture, painting, ceramics. Appreciation of Art. 
Required of certificate and diploma pupils. 

Note: Offered only in summer. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

MISS MUSE 

The work in Home Economics is designed to prepare 
young women for home-making, to provide adequate training 
to meet the requirements for teacher's certificate in Home 
Economics, and to offer foundation courses for those wishing 
to enter other fields of Home Economics. 

" 11-12 Food Preparation and Service. The general principles 
of cookery applied to the preparation of different t}^es of foods. 
A study of the composition, selection, care, and preparation of foods 
is coordinated with a study of their nutritive value and digestion. 
Planning of menus, cooking and serving of breakfast, luncheon, and 
dinner. 1 hour class work ; 4 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

13-14 Clothing and Textiles. Study of textiles and problems, 
selection and construction of clothing, including the use and alteration 
of commercial patterns, the drafting of patterns, and the appropriate 
use of fabrics. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

> 31 Home Nursing and Child Cat^e. Home care of the sick, 
first aid, and practical experience in the care of pre-school children. 
3 hours class work with laboratory. 3 s. h. 
Not offered in 1941-1942. 

32 House Planning and Furnishing. This course deals with 
matters pertaining to the house and its environs. A study of art 
structure, good spacing, tone relations, and color arrangements, as 
applied to planning, decorating and furnishing a home. Includes a 
survey of architectural elements, period furniture, decorative treat- 
ments and materials. Students desiring practical information on the 
subject will find this course helpful. 3 s. h. 

a Child Development. The development of the infant and 
pre-school child with emphasis on physical, social, emotional and 
mental erowth. 



88 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

33 Nutrition. The fundamental scientific principles of human 
nutrition and their application to the feeding of the family. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 11-12 and Chemistry 11-12. 3 hours 
class work. 3 s. h. 

Not oft'ered in 1941-1942. 

34 Dietetics. Normal diets for children and adults and diets 
for the sick. Diets in relation to income scale. Prerequisite : Home 
Economics 33. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

41 Economics of the Home. The science and art of planned 
family living. General policies for the use of time, energy, money, 
and property. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

42 Home Management. The adjustment of the home to 
changed social and economic conditions, civic responsibilities of the 
home, the organization and ef&cient handling of home industries, 
household accounts, and the family budget. Each student is required 
to live in the practice house for at least six weeks. 2 hours class 
work, and laboratory work in the practice house. 3 s. h. 

43 Costume and Design. Art principles and color harmonies 
applied to the original designing of costumes in pencil-drawing and 
crayons. A survey of historic costumes from ancient to modem 
times, thus giving a background of knowledge from which to draw 
and create new designs. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 3 s. h. 

44 Advanced Clothing. The construction of garments from 
different materials; accessories to complete the costume; economics of 
textile purchasing. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 13-14 and 43. 3 s. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Home Economics. A 
study of the development of Home Economics; organization and con- 
tent of course of study; leaders in the work of Home Economics in 
relation of Home Economics to other subjects in high school curricula; 
planning and presentation of lessons ; texts, reference books, and maga- 
zines; and the place of Home Economics teachers in the community. 
3 s. h. 

48-49 Home-Makers' Course. A survey course to acquaint 
students who are not majoring in Home Economics with the principles 
of architectural designs, home planning and furnishing, cooking, 
serving, sewing, color harmony, dress designing, and other pertinent 
information for the home-maker. No credit on major. 6 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 89 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

MR. PRATT, Piano, Organ, and Theory 
MR. GARDINER, Voice and Public School Music 

MR. MOORE, Piano, Organ, and Theory 

MRS. GARDINER, Voice ajid Public School Music 

MR. BROWN, Band 

The Department of Music has a four-fold purpose: First, 
to offer courses in the theory of music and to the general 
student body. Second, to afford opportunities for musical 
growth through student participation in the concerted per- 
formance of music. Third, to provide a comprehensive foun- 
dation for those wishing to make music their profession. 
Fourth, to offer lessons in applied music to special students, 
either children or adults. 

Diploma in Music. — The sequence leading to a Diploma 
in Music is intended for the student who wishes to make the 
profession of music his life work. The diploma qualifies a 
student to apply for a certificate to teach music in the public 
schools of North Carolina, provided the student takes the ad- 
vanced course in Public School Methods (Music 45-46). How- 
ever, the candidate for the diploma need not prepare for public 
school teaching. Diplomas are given in Theory, Piano, Or- 
gan, Violin, and Voice. The requirements for the Diploma 
in Music will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

Certificate in Music. — The sequence leading to a Certifi- 
cate in Music is intended for those students who desire to 
teach music in public schools. This certificate qualifies the 
student to apply for the North Carolina Public School Music 
Certificate. The requirements for the Certificate in Music 
will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

11-12 Harmony. Intervals, scales, triads, seventh- and ninth- 
chords, inversions, figured bass and harmonization of melodies, dia- 
tonic modulation, elementary form. 6 s. h. 

13-14 Ear Training and Sight-Singing. The course presents 
the rudiments of music, develops sight-singing ability, and musical 
dictation. 4 s. h. 



90 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

15-16 Introduction to Music. An introductory survey course, 
open to all students of the College. The fundamentals of music, 
musical instruments, forms of musical composition. The development 
of an appreciative understanding and enjoyment of music from the 
listener's point of view. No credit on major. 4 s. h. 

17-18 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons, see 
below. 2-4 s. h. 

21-22 Advanced Harmony. Altered chords, non- harmonic 
tones, chromatic and enharmonic modulation, form and analysis. Pre- 
requisite: Music 11-12. 6 s. h. 

23-24 History and Appreciation of Music. The development 
of musical art from ancient times to the present. The relationship 
between the evolution of music and social conditions, and between 
music and the other arts. The study of music as literature, through 
analysis of masterworks. 6 s. h. 

25-26 Public School Music. Choice of materials for elemen- 
tary grades, rote-songs, part-songs, folk-songs. The child's voice, 
correction of the monotone. Intended primarily for students seeking 
primary or grammar grade Certificate. No credit on major. 3 s. h. 

27-28 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons: see 
below. 2-4 s. h. 

31-32 Counterpoint. Sixteenth-century and modem counter- 
point in two, three, and four parts. Counterpoint applied to various 
types of vocal and instrumental composition. Prerequisite: Music 
11-12. 6 s. h. 

2)i Church Music and Hymnology. The history of music in 
the Church. Detailed hyronological studies. The sacred as contrasted 
with the secular style. The ideals of church music and the means for 
their realization. The development of discriminating taste in the 
selection of vocal and instrumental music for use in the Church, 
2 s. h. 

34 Conducting. Technique of conducting. Score reading, 
resonance, and combination of tone qualities in orchestral choirs, the 
conducting of symphonies and choral works. 2 s. h. 

37-38 Private Lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. 
2-4 s. h. 

41-42 Composition. Creative work in music, advanced form 
and analysis, modem harmonic and contrapuntal theories. 6 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 91 

43-44 Advanced Form and Analysis. A study of musical form 
through the Sonata-Allegro forms. Students working toward a Di- 
ploma in Music Theory must take Music 41-42 rather than this 
course. 4 s. h. 

45-46 Advanced Public School Music. The study of materials 
and methods for primary and intermediate grades, junior and senior 
high school; choice of materials and methods in appreciation; the 
child's voice and the changing voice. This course is intended pri- 
marily for music majors seeking a teacher's Certificate in Music. 
6 s. h. 

47-48 Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. Private lessons; see 
below. 2-4 s. h. 

Applied Music 

Private lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice, may 
be taken in the Department of Music for credit on degrees 
up to 12 semester hours. (See note under Electives.) A max- 
imum of two hours credit per semester is granted for two 
thirty-minute lessons and twelve hours of practice a week. 
Credit is determined, however, on the basis of actual accom- 
plishment, and is granted only after examination before the 
members of the faculty of the Department of Music. 

Piano. — Preparatory and Intermediate Courses. — These 
courses cover the work in piano from the beginning through 
such compositions as the Little Preludes by Bach, Sonatinas by 
Kuhlau and Beethoven, Studies by Heller. 

Advanced Courses. — The freshman course begins with 
the Two-Part Inventions of Bach; Studies, Opus 299 of Czer- 
ny, the easier sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven, pieces of 
Grieg, Chopin, Schumann and others. The sophomore and 
junior courses cover more difficult compositions. The best 
compositions of the classic, romantic, and modern schools are 
studied. The senior course covers such compositions as the 
Transcriptions by Bach-Liszt, the more difficult preludes of 
Debussy, Concertos. 



92 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Organ. — The freshman course in Piano must be complet- 
ed before beginning the study of Organ. The material used 
in the organ course includes the Organ School by Ritter, pre- 
ludes and fuges of Bach, sonatas of Mendelssohn, Rheinberger, 
and Guilmant, and standard compositions of the modern 
school. The students will have thorough drill in sight-reading 
and the different styles of hymn playing, together with the 
study of accompaniment for solo, quartet, and chorus. 

Violin. — A thorough foundation is given in playing scales 
and arpeggios in any form. An extensive repertory is devel- 
oped from Bruck, Mendelssohn, and others. 

Voice. — The first two years of vocal study are devoted 
especially to the correct development of the voice. English, 
Italian, and German songs are added, as well as the study of 
operatic and oratorio arias. 

Note. — ]MonthIy recitals are given, and each student in Applied Music is 
expected to perform at least twice during the year. Every candidate for the 
Diploma in Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice must give a complete recital. 

General Courses in Applied Music 

The Elon Singers. — A choir of mixed voices. Member- 
ship is based on examination by the Director of Music. This 
organization furnishes the music at the Sunday morning ser- 
vices of the Elon College Community Church, and presents 
concerts, both sacred and secular, in North Carolina and 
nearby states. Three rehearsals weekly. 

The Elon Festival Chorus. — This chorus is open to all 
students, faculty members, and singers from Elon College and 
surrounding communities. The purpose of the organization 
is to present standard oratorios and other choral works. 

The Elon Band. — Training is oflered to students who can 
play band instruments. The band furnishes music for athletic 
activities and other college functions. Four rehearsals weekly. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 93 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

MR. HENDRICKSON 

DR. CARRINGTON 

MR. BRUNANSKY 

MRS. HENDRICKSON 

This department emphasizes the care and building of the 
body and the development of the mind. The further aim is 
to stimulate the growth of such character traits as honesty, 
cleanliness, and cooperation, thus enhancing the student's per- 
sonality and value to society. 

31-32 Physical Education. Designed for students who expect 
to teach. Background in the teaching of health and hygiene; history 
of physical education, planning of programs, supervision of play- 
ground activities; study of games, method of teaching games and 
dances; first aid information. Two hours per week. Open to 
women. 4 s. h. 

33-34 Physical Education. Principles and history of physical 
education, organization and supervision of intra-mural programs, 
teaching and direction of games, coaching, first aid information. Two 
hours a week. Open to men. 4 s. h. 

35-36 Physical Education. Physical education, skills, applied 
techniques. Two hours a week. Open to men. 4 s. h. 

41-42 Lay Medicine and Hygiene. Practical knowledge about 
the functions of the body in health and disease. Dissection of dog, 
with study of anatomy and physiology, and of diseases and accidents 
with a general resume of their prevention and treatment; study of the 
normal and abnormal functioning of the mind. One hour a week. 
2 s. h. 

43-44 Health Education. The teaching of health and school 
health problems. One hour a week. 2 s. h. 

The Physical Training program is planned to give to the 
young women and men varied activities in intra-mural sports, 
including archery, basketball, volley ball, tennis, touch-football, 
horseshoe pitching, and soccer, rhythmic dancing, hiking, and 
calisthenic exercises. 

All students are expected to participate regularly in some 
activity, and are required to have physical training for two 
years. Credit may be withheld from students failing to com- 
ply with this regulation. 



Nj "W 



^^^ Roster of Students 

SESSION OF 1940-1941 



SENIORS— Class of 1941. 

Aldridge, Gladys Burlington, N. C. 

Barney, Winifred Elon College, N. C. 

Biggerstaff, (Mrs.) Carrie Guinn, 708 S. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Blanks, Joe Younger Roxboro, N. C. 

Boone, Helen Kesler 206 Everette St., Burlington, N. C. 

Born, Donald G W. Main St., Everett, Pa. 

Brickhouse, Ernest 1811 Claiborne Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Brown, Howard Grier 2338 Greenway St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Burgess, Stanley Clyde R. F. D. No. 2, Courtland, Va. 

Caruso, Slivio Wilson 329 Kossuth St., Riverside, N. J. 

Causey, William Garland 611 Wise St., High Point, N. C. 

Clarke, Ellis Nusome Swepsonville, N. C. 

Claytor, Mary B Hillsboro, N. C. 

Coble, Albert Vernon Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Cochrane, Mary Frances Ether, N. C. 

Cooper, Nathan J Route 1, Valdese, N. C. 

Cox, James Stanley Box 142, Burlington, N. C. 

Cross, Edrie B Ruffin, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Moses 330 W. Lee St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Dameron, Mary Lee R. 1, Yanceyville, N. C. 

Eaves, Christine D Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Edwards, Dorothy Elizabeth 200 Dinwiddle St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Fitzgerald, Fern Sigmon Troy, N. C. 

Foushee, Frederick Watson Elon College, N. C. 

FVeeland, Estelle Efland, N. C. 

Fulcher, Clayton, Jr Atlantic, N. C. 

Gentry, Dwight L Route 3, Roxoboro, N. C. 

Gilliam, Bess Florence Elon College, N. C. 

Gregg, Bessie Burlington, N. C. 

Hall, Joseph William Mt. Ulla, N. C. 

Hamrick, James Young Boiling Springs, N. C. 

Holmes, Evelyn Creedmoor, N. C. 

Hook, Cephas Garvin Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Hook, Jessie Irene Elon College, N. C. 

Hunt, Edward Albert R. 5, Oxford, N. C. 

Inman, Roger Winfree N. Main St., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Inman, Thomas Grayson Route 5, Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Iseley, Allen Alfred Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Kernodle, George Wallace Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Kivette, Camille Gibsonville, N. C. 

Krukin, Sidney Alexander 108 W. 17th St., Norfolk, Va. 

Lawrence, Claude Haynes Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Lindley, Andrew Hoyt Route 1, Snow Camp, N. C. 

Longest, Walter Roland 211 Orange St., Beaufort, N. C. 

Lowe, Early Fred Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 95 

Martin, Roberta Pearle Eagle Rock, N. C. 

Maxwell, Harold E Falcon, N. C. 

McDade, Jimmie Pass Route 2, Hillsboro, N. C. 

McDuffie, Albert Glenn West End, N. C. 

Mitchell, John W New Bern, N. C. 

Moore, Oscar Daulton 116 Carolina Ave., Biirlington, N. C. 

Nash, Margaret Bryant Elon College, N. C. 

Newton, Elizabeth Lyon R. 3, Luray, Va. 

Pace, Helen Elizabeth Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Parker, Charles Wesley 1530 Barron St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Pearce, John Henry 214 Morgan St., Suffolk, Va. 

Penn, Horace Richland, Ga. 

Pennington, Margaret Teague New London, N. C. 

Potter, Edward 197 Marsh St. Beaufort, N. C. 

Powell, Harold Lloyd Morganton, N. C. 

Powell, Shirley Madeline 329 S. Main St., Norfolk, Va. 

Pritchett, Mary Elizabeth Altamahaw, N. C. 

Quackenbush, Joy Elizabeth Graham, N. C. 

Rankin, Samuel Murray 44 W. Webster Ave, Roselle Park, N. J. 

Ray, Evan R Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Register, Kenneth Route 1, Sanford, N. C. 

Rigney, Viney Sue Fancy Gap, Va. 

Rumley, James Dewey Elon College, N. C. 

Secrest, Paul James Drexel, N. C. 

Sexton, W. Marvin Denton, N. C. 

Screen, Robbie Marine Gibsonville, N. C. 

Smith, Ross Lea Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Somers, Lucille Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Taylor, Earl C Route 1, Harrisburg, N. C. 

Thompson, Azariah Graves R. 1, Reidsville, N. C. 

Truitt, Robert Wesley 309 Elom Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Walker, John B., Jr 605 Fountain St., Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Mary Lewis Brown Summit, N. C. 

Walker, Nannie Virginia 204 Peele St., Burlington, N. C. 

Westmoreland, John Somers Box 37, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Wright, Gladys Ree Star, N. C. 

JUNIORS— Class of 1942. / Q S 

Abernathy, Talmage Lafayette Mebane, N. C. 

Abner, Mebel Tennala 902 E. Morehead St. Burlington, N. C. 

Adair, Louis Benjamin 310 Court St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Allison, Melvin Leslie Route 1, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Apple, Rifton Dixon, Jr 1635 Spring Garden St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Archer, John William 1153 Battleground Ave., Greensborg, N. C. 

Armfield, Elizabeth Grace Irving Ave., Leaksville, N. C. 

Austin, Henry Marshall Route 2, Albemarle, N. C. 

Bagley, Joe Henry 125 N. Main St., Suffolk, Va. 

Barney, John Willis Box 318 Elon College, N. C. 

Barrier, Edna Alene 601 Third St., Spencer, N. C. 

Bell, Earl Edward 159 Chantauqua Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Bean, Clifton Talmadge 803 Third St., Spencer, N. C. 

Boone, Robert Lee 107 Gilmeston Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 



96 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Byran, Curry Edward, Jr 1149 King St., Charleston, S. C. 

- Cameron, Sara Margaret Olvia, N. C. 

Carroll, IMargaret Juanita 61 Barnes St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Casey, John Stuart 221 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Clapp, John Boyd Route 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Clarke, John Vernon Snow Camp, N. C. 

Claytor, John William Hillsboro, N. C. 

Claytor, Julius Lee Route 1, Ruffin, N. C 

Coble, Charles Emory Haw River, N. C. 

Coble, Joseph Holliday Snow Camp, N. C. 

Coble, Worth Dewey ,505 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cole, Dorothy Frances 615 Treland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Corbitt, Sara Margaret Svmbury, N. C. 

Cox, Robert Eugene 2212 Eye St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Craft, Maurice Montague 2901 18th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Crawford, Virginia Hazelene Haw River, N. C. 

Daher, Bernard George 127 W. 5th St., Bridgeport, Pa. 

Dixon, Margaret Dedie Marshall, St., Graham, N. C. 

Dobbs, Hazel White 421 Fourth St., Shenandoah, Va. 

Donate, Charles 335 Bishop St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Fagan, Ivan Hugo 110 S. Broadway, Forest City, N. C. 

Felton, Margaret Edith 249 Lincoln Place, Irvington, N. J. 

Fowlkes, John Wesley Yanceyville, N. C. 

Frazier, Frances Margaret 210 Elm St., Asheboro, N. C 

Friedman, Sanford 1716 Elm Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Garber, Harold H 321 Third St., Clifton Forge, Va 

Gardner, Jack 3126 Walnut St., Portsmouth, Ohio 

Gilliam, Frederick Kenne Route 1, Elon College, N. C 

Goode, Grace Wilkins Virgilina, Va. 

Grissom, Martin Luther R. 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Hayes, Frank Alfred Elon College, N. C. 

Henry, Angle 815 Linden Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Hilliard, William N Box 138, Gary, N. C. 

Hobson, W. L., Jr Ramseur, N C. 

Holoman, Judith M Rich Square, N. C. 

Hopkins, Joseph Howard. . 2116 N. Monroe St., Arlington, Va. 

Hoyt, Elizabeth Mabel 520 East St., Walpole, Mass. 

Huffstetler, William Harvey Box 133, Haw River, N. C. 

Hunter, Margorie Rose Box 334, Elon College, N. C. 

Jones, Charles L 1014 Willard St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Kerns, Jewel Ether, N. C. 

Kravitz, Isidore 709 9th Ave., Belmont, N. J. 

Laws, Hubbard Frederick Route 3, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Lightbourne, James Horn 401 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Looney, John Joseph Williams, Jr., 521 Falls Rd., Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Malloy, Cormac Joseph 1001 Frankford Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mansfield, Roy Hampton Route 2, Sanford, N. C. 

- Martin, Ruth Fairchild Brookfield Center, Conn. 

May, John Allen 1801 W. Market St., Greensboro, N. C. 

McDade, Millard Banks 212 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

McGougan, Dorothy Lunber Bridge, N. C. 

Mclntyre, Hazel Anne R. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

McLean, Malcolm Ralph Autryville, N. C. 

■)% 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 97 

-^Miller, Pansy Route 6, Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Morgan, Ogbum Lee Elon College, N. C. 

Morgan, Voight Fritz Gibsonville, N. C. 

Moss, Douglas Richfield, N. C. 

Murphy, June Paige 118 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

O'Connor, William Joseph 4330 43rd St., Washington, D. C. 

Palantonio, Wm. Joseph 249 Highland Ave., Wayne, Pa. 

Pamplin, Douglas Roberts 304 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Phillips, Marvin Worth 700 S. Fayetteville St., Asheboro, N. C. 

Piberg, Millard Hugo 23 Elmwood Place, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Pittman, Paul W Brookwood Extension, Burlington, N. C. 

Pollard, John Francis 603 Fifth Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Pritchett, James Garrison Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Progar, Albert Joseph 318 Rosalyn Ave., Springdale, Pa. 

Reid, William Joseph 7 Dean St. Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Saecker, Wellington IMills 403 Chautauqua Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Schlitter, Donald John 6 Fifth St., Ansonia, Conn. 

- Schwob, Helen Elizabeth 138 E. Livingston Ave., Orlando, Fla. 

Shaw, Edward Francis Box 3, Rosemont, Pa. 

Somers, Lester Irvin R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Spence, Royall Herman 636 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

- Stanley, Mary Frances Polknille, N. C. 

- Stephens, Lila Budd 66 Market St., Hertford, N. C. 

Stewart, David Carlton Summerville, N. C. 

Stratford, Kent Robbins Haw River, N. C. 

Tingen, Nell Frances Brookwood St., Burlington, N. C. 

Terrell, William Isaac 511 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Towns, Preston Eugene 716 Fifth St., Augusta, Ga. 

Triplett, Inez Purlear, N. C. 

Utt, Claude Kenneth Route 3, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Walker, William Thomas Brown Summit, N. C. 

Walters, Charles Manly 220 Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Weldon, Richard Thomas R. 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Wilkinson, Jack Broadus 1511 Charleston Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Williams, Elmer Christine 313 Lancaster Road, Richmond, Va. 

Wise, Henry Butler 1021 22nd St., Newport News, Va., 

Wolfe, Tom B 112 Harris Ave., Johnson City, Tenn. 

Woodson, Samuel Thomas Burlington, N. C. 

SOPHOMORES— Class of 1943. 

Anderson, James Burlington, N. C. 

ix^skin, Bernard 627 Allison St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Bass, Thomas Leon 115 W. Graham St., Shelby, N. C. 

- Black, Rena Gilmer College Corner, Ohio 

' Boone, Sarah Isabelle Gibsonville, N. C. 

Bowden, Zolly 207 Maryland Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

" Browne, Mary Deane Route 1, Ramseur, N. C. 

*^Bullard, George Minson Roseboro, N. C. 

*/Casey, Richard Matthew 221 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Castura, Stephen 1021 Peace St., Hazelton, Pa. 

Cessna, Ray Bowers 105 S. Findley St., Punksutawney, Pa, 

^ Clapp, William Keith R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

V Clayton, John Elvis Route 1, Durham, N. C. 



98 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Clodfelter, Helen Louise Route 2, New London, N. C. 

rXobb, Albert Dotson 605 S. Spring, Burlington, N. C. 

Collier, Robert Morris Dyke, Va. 

Comminake, Siverin Petterson 1614 Morris Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

'. Comer, Claude Reidsville, N. C. 

' Cooke, Garrett Hansel Box 838, Grayson, Ky. 

"" Copeland, Marjorie Zelma R. 2, Smithfield, Va. 

• Culbreth, Howard New Bern, N. C. 

D' Antonio, Rinaldo Raymond 501 Maplewood Road, Wayne, Pa. 

Darden, James Fenton Hall and Fork Sts., Suffolk, Va, 

Bellinger, James Lyle 909 Commercial Ave., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Dennan, Kent Irwin 136 Albemarle Road, White Plains, N. Y. 

Dofflemyer, Milton Amos Box 68, Elkton, Va. 

Elder, James Wytche Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va. 

Ferris, James Vincent 89 Forest St., Kearney, N. J. 

Forlines, Julian Howell Virgilina, Va. 

- Frye, Minnie Belle Carthage, N. C. 

Gallardo, Ignacio Lorenzo. . . .Ave. Ferhandez Juncos, Stop 26% Santurce, P. R. 

- Galloway, Dorothy 614 Spring St., Hamlet, N. C. 

Gilmer, John Roscoe Elkton, Va. 

Goldblum, Seymour 90 Independence Ave., Freeport, N. Y. 

Goslen, Harold Henry Route 2, Kernersville, N. C. 

'; Griffin, Johnson Lenwood Route 2, Box 149, Windsor, Va. 

'' Hall, Forrest Chalmers 128 Lakeside Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Hall, John Lovell Kenley, N. C. 

Harris, Erwin Guthrie Thomasville, N. C. 

Hatchell, Edward Gordan 1910 Camden Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Hauser, Margaret Louise Justall Court No. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Herbert, Kenneth 1000 Virginia Ave., S. W., Washington, D. C. 

Holmes, Luvene Route 1, Franklinton, N. C. 

Holt, Jolea E. Harden St., Graham, N. C. 

Holton, James Wallace 218 Spencer Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

. Howard, Lennings M Hallison, N. C. 

"^ Isley, Donald Clyde Burlington, N. C. 

Jesson, William Edward New Preston, Conn. 

Johnson, Lonnie Alfred 508 Harris St., Burlington, N. C. 

Johnson, Sherman Vistal Glen Raven, N. C. 

Johnston, James William Elon College, N. C. 

Larsen, Malcolm 207 Albright Ave., Graham, N. C. 

Lee, Robert Edward Maxton, N. C. 

Loftis, Charles Braxton Mebane, N. C. 

Long, Jessie Paul Sunbury, N C. 

Lowe, Wade Ferrier 313 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Luter, Raleigh Owen Route 3, Box 22, Suffolk, Va. 

Madren, Weldon Thomas Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Magnotta, Joseph Robert 44 William St., Englewood, N. J. 

/ Martin, Carl R. 4, Elon College, N. C. 

^ Masse, Charles Napoleon 74 Main St., Gonic, N. H. 

Matlock, Gary Rufus Elon College, N. C. 

Mc Adams, William Eugene West Elm St., Graham, N. C. 

McClenny, Celestial Louise 903 Monmouth Ave., Durham, N. C 

McDade, Edith Leigh 212 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 99 

~ McPherson, Ruth Lea Box 195, Burlington, N. C. 

Mebane, Alexander Murphy 711 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Meena, George Hercules 1503 Wilmore Drive, Charlotte, N. C. 

- Mendenhall, Mary Louise 822 Mt. Vernon Ave., Orlando, Fla. 

Messick, Turner Paul 119 Carolina Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

i^iller, Donald David Elon College, N. C. 

sNash, William Parrish Elon College, N. C. 

Nichols, Amerith Lettie Route 4, Durham, N. C. 

Old, Lloyd Herman 416 Armstrong St., Portsmouth, Va. 

^CDllis, Ivan Lenore Frank, N. C. 

Perry, Harrell Boone 516 McManner St., Durham, N. C. 

Peterson, Henry DeWitt Roseboro, N. C. 

j^hillips, Amos Matthew 1508 Elm Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Phillips, Sarah Lucretia Bennett, N. C. 

Powers, Frank Douglas R. 1, Whitetop, Va. 

Rawls, Marcella Lee 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Roberts, James Francis 4641 Queen St., Portsmouth, Va. 

{/Robertson, Edward DeRoy 418 Hillcrest Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Rogers, John Beverly Box 34, Creedmoor, N. C. 

Ross, Ottis Holt Route 4, Biu-Iington, N. C. 

Russell, Susan Elizabeth Ill Marsh St., Beaufort, N. C. 

«^Sellers, Emory Roberson 2309 Almont St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Senter, James Pearce Kipling, N. C. 

J^Scott, Archie Joel Northport, Mich. 

Shoffner, Fred T Liberty, N. C. 

Shook, Ada Mildred Banner Elk, N. C. 

Showfety, Emil Thomas 668 Chestnut St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Smith, Max Dayton Kipling, N. C. 

V Smythe, Thomas James Campbell 1913 S. State St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Stephens, Elsie Louise 708 W. Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Sullivan, William Jay Maple Ave., Greenlawn, N. Y. 

- Summey, Nora Belle Lakey St., Black Mountains, N. C. 

Taylor, Charles Leonard 625 Woodward St., Detroit, Mich. 

^Thomanchek, Joseph James 1039 New Jersey Ave., Hilbertown, Pa. 

^ Thompson, Finley McFarland Snow Camp, N. C. 

Thompson, John Frank Eiland, N. C. 

Thornton, Mae Graham, N. C. 

Toole, Clarke Walter 10 W. Orange St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

- Triplett, Velma Purlear, N. C. 

Tripp, Bryant Bethel, N. C. 

Troxler, Mildred Frances Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

/.^Troxler, Irwen Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Tulchinsky, Bernard 100 Kerr Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Utsey, Pierce Tillman 198-B Calhoun St., Charleston, S. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth 605 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Florence Keron Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Washburn, James Cummings Box 243, Elon College, N. C. 

Watts, Blanchard King Peachland, N. C. 

l^Watts, Edwin Route 2, Peachland, N. C. 

^ Weatherly, Richard Miller Route 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Whitaker, Joe Fairy 129 Jordon St., Bennettsville, S. C. 

White, Billy Siler City, N. C. 










100 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

White, Lillian Frances Ellerbe, N. C. 

White, Atlas Thomas Ellerbe, N. C. 

Whitesell, Bernice Dave Elon College, N. C. 

Wilkins, Billy Poole 703 Graydon Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Wilkins, Robert Oscar, Jr 613 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Williams, Junius Briant Hemp, N. C. 

Wilson, Waher R. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Wingard, Robert Neel 1356 "D" St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 

Yonkoski, Stanley Joseph 103 Virginia Ave., Johnson City, N. Y. 

Zyvith, Max Stanley R. 4, Greensburg, Pa. 

FRESHMEN— Class of 1944. 



^ Adomaitis, Walter Antony 56 Alder St., Waterbury, Conn. 

(J ^ Agresto, Louis Thomas 921 N. Pcust St., Hazleton, Pa. 

Antone, Joseph Ferris, Jr R. 2, Raleigh, N. C. 

~ Armstrong, Katherine Matilda 1055 Leckie St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Atkins, Vernon Doub R. 2, Kernersville, N. C. 

Avery, Leslie Eugene 1610 Pamell St., Augusta, Ga. 

Avery, Sally Caroline Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Baker, Oma Sprice Pine, N. C. 

Barfield, Gloria Jane Mebane, N. C. 

Barker, Dan Taylor R. 5, Oxford, N. C. 

Bartkus, Edward Charles 18 Popular St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Basnight, Miller C 33 Avenue A, New Bern, N. C. 

Bell, Betty Lee 10 Vannoy St., Greenville, N. C. 

Beamen, Kenneth Portsmouth, Ohio 

Blalock, Lucille Breeze R. 1, Durham, N. C. 

Bohenshy, Francis Jerome 125 Thorn St., Clarkesburg, W. Va. 

Bowden, Carlyle Miller 321 Park Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

Bradshaw, Grace Lee 523 W. Washington St., Suffolk, Va. 

Breeze, Nelle Gentry Roxboro, N. C. 

Britt, Leslie Henderson R. 1, Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Bullock, George Pleasant R. 5, Durham, N. C. 

Burgess, Hubert Harding R. 2, Courtland, Va. 

Burns, Warren Theodore 339 Mary St., Englewood, N. J. 

Cable, Harold Gordon R. 1, Brown Summit, N. C. 

Cannon, Jeanne Wilson Biu-lington, N. C 

Carroll, Adi-ian Meredith 310 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Carver, Bobby Exie R. 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Chapman, Dorothy Louise 33 N. Main St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Cleinman, Victor Lawrence 29 Carrington Ave., Providence, R. I. 

Coble, Ruth Burdetta Parkersburg, N. C. 

Cole, Howard Biscoe, N .C. 

Coleman, William C./ Johnson City, Tenn. 

Coone, Virginia Marshall Marion, N. C. 

Copley, Nancy Caroline R. 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Covington, Charles Dewey R. 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Creef, Frances Juanita 1101 Jackson St., S. Norfolk, Va. 

Cronin, George Francis 209 Bridgeport St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Crowell, Rachael Gertrude 806 Salisbury Ave., Spencer, N. C. 

Cubell, Richard Luis 29 Lancaster Terrace, Brookline, Mass. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 101 

David, Richard Colclough Vanceboro, N. C. 

Davis, George Henry R. 1, Blanch, N. C. 

Davis, Earnest Merritt R. 3, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Dawson, John Philip 61 Glenw^ood Ave., E. Orange, N. J. 

Day, Edward Ray 909 Fauquier St., Norfolk, Va. 

Day, James Robert 23 Wales St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Decker, Robert Hugh 83 Hawley Ave., Woodmont, Conn. 

DeLoache, Sarah Rebecca 805 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dillard, Walter Haynes 515 Central Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Dillingham, Novel H 1304 Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dixon, Jennings, Jr R. 4, Charlotte, N. C. 

Dunlap, Dinkle Walnut Cove, N. C. 

Dyer, Lillian Grace R. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Dyer, Ruth Elizabeth R. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Earp, Rachel Lee Paces, Va. 

Edwards, Ralph R. 3, Henderson, N. C. 

Fallin, Ollie Louise Gibsonville, N. C. 

Faust, George Henry, Jr Main St., Scalp Level, Pa. 

Festa, Salvatore Antonio 817 Quince St., Vineland, N. J. 

Filby, Dearborn Richmond Hills, N. Y. 

Foster, Hiram Basley Yanceyville, N. C. 

Fowler, Dorothy Perkins 813 Central Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Fowlkes, Nancey Williamson Yanceyville, N. C. 

Gearing, Philip James 202 Queen St., Bristol, Conn. 

Gertz, Irving 56 Doyle Ave., Providence, R. I. 

Glenn, Robert Lorane 314 Gorrell St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Green, Lura Mae R. 1, Clyde, N. C. 

Hall, Wilhelmina Whitsell 702 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hallama, Francis John 7315 12th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Harrell, Brown Vivian R. 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Harris, W. Keith Eliot, Me. 

Hayes, Beverly DeShazo Elon College, N. C. 

Henderson, James Cecil W. Davis St., Smithville, N. C. 

Hicklin, Edward Millard 118 Lakeside Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Hill, Elizabeth Driver, Va. 

Hisey, Henry Clyde Shenandoah, Va. 

Hisey, Bobby Lee Shenandoah, Va. 

Hood, Garth Edwin 512 53rd St., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Hook, Brevitt Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Hooper, Elroy Jones, Jr 505 Cypress St., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Huffman, Louis G Burlington, N. C. 

Hughes, Joseph 121 Cooledge St., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Hughes, Sarah Catherine Graham, N. C. 

Hunt, Alfred Penn R. 5, Oxford, N. C. 

Hussey, Tracy Eldon R. 2, Hemp, N. C. 

Husted, Charlotte Elaine 118 Ackerly St., Riverhead, N. Y. 

Jay, Mary Nelle 2026 Academy St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Johnson, Vallie 506y2 W. Front St. Burlington, N. C. 

Johnston, Robert Elington Elon College, N. C. 

Jones, Clyde Howard Elon College, N. C. 

Jones, Joe Simion Bramville, W. Va. 



102 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Kastner, George William Ill E. Main St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Kelley, Frances Geraldine Tobar City, N. C. 

Kernodle, William H R. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Kerns, Louvinia Ether, N. C. 

Kidwell, Cyril Randolph 1640 Massachusetts Ave., S. E., Washington, N. C. 

Kirkman, Dorothy Mae 606 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Koontz, Ruth Edith 306 Mangum Ave., High Point, N. C. 

Lambeth, Hosea Deewood, Jr Elon College, N. C. 

Langston, James Marvin R. 3, Lillington, N. C. 

Liglitbourne, Peg Carrol 401 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Lentz, Charles Meri 119 Hitchman St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Little, Mary Louise 1215 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Lupton, Graham West Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 

Lynch, Betty Lillian R. 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Mann, Charles O'Hara Cypress Chapel, Va. 

Marshall, Nettie Bell Hillsville, Va. 

May, Katlierine Youell 510 Robertson St., Burlington, N. C. 

McCarn, Harold Bernice Elon College, N. C. 

McCartt, Sherman Lee 505 W. Maple St., Johnson City, Tenn. 

McClenny, Nettie Carolyn 903 Monmouth Ave., Durham, N. C. 

McGee, William Hardin Germantown, N. C. 

McKenzie, Edward Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

McLeod, Charles Vernon Troy, N. C. 

McPherson, Sidney Lawrence Snow Camp, N, C. 

Meredith, Jessie H Fancy Gap, Va. 

Messick, Helen Margaret Elon College, N. C. 

Monroe, Eula Mae Hemp, N. C. 

Morgan, Colby Shannon Eagle Springs, N. C. 

Morris Goldie Marie Jackson, N. C. 

Moss, Joseph R. 1, Pineville, N. C. 

Muir, Dora Elizabeth 2410 Ballentine Blvd., Norfolk, Va. 

Muleucis, Peter Joseph 301 Mary St., Englewood, N. J. 

Myrick, Robert A 506 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Nance, Albert Daniel Byrd St., Troy, N. C. 

Nance, Allen Clarkson Byrd St., Troy, N. C. 

Nance, Lewis Alexander 1208 E. 10th Charlotte, N. C. 

Newlon, Ralph Burl 328 S. 22nd St., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Nicholson, JNIarion Pike, Jr West Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Norman, John Roy, Jr Redd St., Reidsville, N. C. 

O'Boyle, Nancy Brothers York St., Cassopolis, Mich. 

Omahundra, Robert Leland 103 College Ave., Salem, Va. 

Peebles, Murice Jerome R. 4, Oxford, N. C. 

Perkins, Charles Arnold, Jr 105 Haven Ave., Woodmbnt, Conn. 

Pittman, Gladys Frank, N. C. 

Pittman, Ruth Lea Frank, N. C 

Pitts, Robert INIcPherson 1733 Amherst Place, Charlotte, N. C. 

Pollard, Gayle Henry 603 Fifth Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Porter, Mary Jewell Grimesland, N. C. 

Randolph, Charles Wesley Gibsonville, N. C. 

Rath, Mary Helen R. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Reese, John Charles 81 Pershing St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 103 

Richnafaky, Albert George R. 1, Grindstone, Pa. 

■ Rice, Sarah Florence R. 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Ridge, Paul Harold Gibsonville, N. C. 

Rippy, William Denner Gibsonville, N. C. 

• Rountree, Magenta Agnes Sunbury, N. C. 

Ruggiero, Paul Walter 31 Bonsileve St., Woodmont, Conn. 

Russell, Dorothy Elizabeth Sophia, N. C. 

Russell, Jack Faughnan 2207 Fourth St., Altoona, Pa. 

Sanders, John Arthvir Asheboro, N. C. 

Seat, Arthur Russell, Jr Virgilina, Va. 

Senter, Jack Averett Kipling, N. C. 

Schmidt, Elliott Tourret 145 Fourth St., Pelham N. Y. 

-Sharpe, Margaret 900 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Shelton, Jessie Fleet Gibsonville, N. C. 

Sherrill, Clarence Neill 2500 East Fifth St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Shomaker, Edward Gilmer Elon College, N. C. 

Shumar, George Martin 205 Bridgeport St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Siddell, William Henry 309 Forest Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

Simpson, Davis Lee R. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

"Simpson, Mary Frances R. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

"Sizemore, Lucille Gibsonville, N. C. 

Smith, J. C R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Spivey, Herbert Clyde 331 Mt. Vernon Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Staten, Richard 1929 Robinson Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio 

Stolte, Harry Allen South View Ave., Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Sumner Ruth E Elon College, N. C. 

Swindell, Daniel Hemp, N. C. 

Tate, Annie Laura Efland, N. C. 

Templeton, Clayton Peaco 3501 Jordon St., Norfolk, Va. 

Trollinger, Betsy 911 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Edna Mae R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Hazel Irene R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Helen Goff R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Underwood, Nannie Bet Yancey ville, N. C. 

Walker, Lillian Celestia Milton, N. C. 

Walker, Margaret Sue R. 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Walker, Marvin Edwin 901 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Warren, Sara Lou Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Whitfield, Rose Beatrice Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Whisnont, Denny C Polkville, N. C. 

Wigington, John Craig 144 "F" St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, Hobert Claude Staley, N. C. 

Wilson, James Loftin 217 Adams St., Burlington, N. C. 

Winbon, Eunice Elizabeth Fremont, N. C. 

Winters, Harold Bell Elk Park, N. C. 

Wood, James A Elk Park, N. C. 

Woody, Claude Lee Bassett, Va. 

Wooten, Bert Hugheston Webb Ave. Ext., Burlington, N. C. 

Worsley, Cora Elizabeth Aberdeen, N. C. 

Wrenn, Joseph Earl R. 1, Blanch, N. C. 

Zurlis, John Peter 48 Chambers St., Waterbury, Conn. 



104 ELON COLLEGE BULLETII^ 

Zipperer, William Paul 300 Bvirtner St., Greensboro, N, C. 

Yarborough, Helen Deanne 1110 Lafayette St., Shelby, N. C. 

Yobe, Cecil 309 Ash Ave., Clarksburg, W. Va, 

Yount, William Hester Lawsonville Ave., Reidsville, N. C. 

ART. 

Armfield, Elizabeth Leaksville, N. C 

Allred, Helen Burlington, N. C. 

Avery, Sally Rjomebeck, N. C. 

Biggerstaff , Mrs. F. M Biirlington, N. C. 

Boone, Sara Gibsonville, N. C. 

Gates, Mrs. Melba Warren Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Gates, Mrs. Eloise W Mebane, N. G. 

Gheek, Mrs. Ethel Graham, N. G. 

Dameron, Mary Lee Reidsville, N. G. 

Davis, Ernest Burlington, N. C. 

Eaves, Christine Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Edwards, Dorothy 200 Dinwiddle St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Fogleman, Mrs. Margaret Alamance, N. G. 

Fogleman, Margaret Alamance, N. G. 

Frazier, Frances 210 Elm St., Asheboro, N. G. 

Freeland, Estelle Efland, N. G. 

Garrett, Mrs. Vance S Mebane, N. G. 

Harden, Margaret Graham, N. G. 

Holoman, Judith Rich Square, N. G. 

Holmes, Evelyn Creedmoor, N. C. 

Holt, Mrs. Elsie C Graham, N. G. 

Holt, Jolea Burlington, N. G. 

Holt, Mrs. Iris Alrbight Elon College, N. G. 

Kemodle, Mrs. Lecay R. 1, Elon College, N. G. 

Kivette, Camille Gibsonville, N. G. 

Klingenschmitt, Mrs. Sally McPherson Club, Burlington, N. G. 

Luter, Raleigh O Route 3, Box 22, Suffolk, Va. 

Mabe, Coy E Roxboro, N. G. 

Martin, Roberta Eagle Rock, N. G. 

McClenny, Carolyn Durham, N. G. 

McLongan, Dorothy Burlington, N. G. 

Oldham, Jessamine 106 Guthrie St., Burlington, N. C. 

Pace, Helen Elizabeth Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Paul, Evelyn Burlington, N. G. 

Pichett, Mattie Lucille Elon College, N. G. 

Screen, Mrs. Robbie Gibsonville, N. G. 

Smith, Gladys Elon College, N. C. 

Somers, Emma Elon College, N. C. 

Somers, Lucille Gibsonville, N. G. 

Tingen, Nell Brookwood Burlington, N. G. 

Troxler, Mildred Route 2, Elon College, N. G. 

Taylor, Earl Cochrane Harrisburg, N. G. 

Thomas, Mrs. Mary Foimtain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Mary Lewis Brown Summit, N. C. 

Walker, Karen Burlington, N. G. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 105 

Walker, Margaret Route 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Walker, Nannie Virginia Biirlington, N. C. 

Watts, Mrs. Thelma Haw River, N. C. 

Whitsell, O. M R. 2, Graham, N. C. 

White, Alice Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Woodson, Julia Burlington, N. C. 

COMMERCIAL. 

Aldridge, Nellie R. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Allred, Helen R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Anderson, Mildred Delane B. 192, Haw River, N. C. 

Armfield, Lib Irving Ave., Leaksville, N. C. 

Ayscue, Harriet L R. 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Bangle, Bernice 411% N. Tryon St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Barney Elva Grace Elon College N. C. 

Bassett, Lorraine Elon College, N. C. 

Beck, Clyde Sanford, N. C. 

Brittain, Millicent Asheoro, N. C. 

Buckner, Sarah Winter Elon College, N. C. 

Butler, Edward Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Campbell, Russell Luray, Va. 

Chase, Thelma Fremont, N. C. 

Cobb, Russell Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Daniels, Verone Beaufort, N. C. 

Deese, Virginia Newton, N. C. 

Dill, Hazel 112 Live Oak St., Beaufort, N. C. 

Duke, Eloise R. 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Ellis, Kermit Weldon Henderson, N. C. 

Evans, Jean Barbara 608 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Fitch, Virginia R. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Goldston, Welford Turner Siler City, N. C. 

Grant, Harriet Spivey Rich Square, N. C. 

Gurley, Mavia Lee 218 Grayson St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Gywnn, Marie R. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Hamrick, Roberta R. 2, Shelby, N. C. 

Hawkins, Eunice Corbett Mebane, N. C. 

Hoffman, Doris Virginia Gibsonville, N. C. 

Holt, Sidney Ben Graham, N. C. 

Jeffreys, Virginia R. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Kennedy, Van Rocky Moimt, N. C. 

King, Helen Elizabeth R. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Lashley, Helen M 304 Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Loy, Milton Cook (Jr.) R. 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Mangum, Alice Blue 606 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Mansfield, Donna 206 Graves St., Burlington, N. C. 

Mattos, Marie R. 4, B\irlington, N. C. 

Messer, Rubie 316 Circle Drive, Burlington, N. C. 

Morgan, Margaret C Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Murphy, Mildred R. 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Overton, Hazel Virginia Aurora, N. C. 

Owens, Shirley 220 Melville St., Graham, N. C. 



106 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Paige, Lawrence Elon College, N. C. 

Phillips, Ilene Fancy Gap, Va. 

Rimer, Katliryn Foile 354 Ann St., Concord, N. C. 

Rook, Kitty Gibsonville, N. C. 

Roney, Frances 405 Ireland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Scott, Elizabeth Lawrenceville, N. C. 

Shaw, Marion R. F. D. No. 1, Reidsville, N. C. 

Shoffner, Helen B. 152, Alamance, N. C. 

Stem, Lillie Mae Oxford, N. C. 

Taylor, Maude Williamston, N. C. 

Walker, Flora Hazel R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Weldon, Doris D Henderson, N. C. 

West, Ruth 202 Adams Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Whitesell, Bernice Elon College, N. C. 

Whitesell, Naomi R. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Wilson, Jane R. 3, Louisburg, N. C. 

Winfree, Mildred Augusta Summerfield, N. C. 

Wyrick, James Gibsonville, N. C. 

SECOND YEAR COMMERCIAL. 

Carroll, Margaret 61 Barnes St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Chapman, Dorothy North Main St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Creef, Frances 1101 Jackson St., South Norfolk, Va. 

Jay, Mary Nelle 2026 Academy St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Kelley, Esther Ruth Route 1, Jonesboro, N. C. 

Kimrey, Elizabeth Mary Elon College, N. C. 

McDade, Mary Ruth Hillsboro, N. C. 

Oakley, Margarette Virginia B. 324, Elon College, N. C. 

O'Boyle, Nancy York Street, Cassopolis, Mich. 

Newman, Ann O'Berry Route 1, Cary N. C. 

Pittman, Gladys Frank, N. C. 

Pittman, Ruth Frank, N. C. 

Rountree, Magenta Sunbury, N. C. 

Seymour, Juanita Grace Alamance, N. C. 

Thomason, Jessie Edith Ill Plymouth St., Kannapolis, N. C. 

Trollinger, Betsy 911 North Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Worsley, Cora Elizabeth Aberdeen, N. C. 

MUSIC. 

Allen, Joe 304 Hillcrest Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Allred, Faye R. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Apple, Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Baine, Katherine W. Front St., Biu-lington, N. C. 

Barfield, Gloria Graham St., Mebane, N. C. 

Barney, Winifred Elon College, N. C. 

Basnight, Miller 33 Ave. "A", New Bern, N. C. 

Bell, Betty 10 Vannay St., Greenville, S. C. 

Boone, Helen 602 Everette St., Burlington, N. C. 

Brittle, Dorothy Elon College, N. C. 

Brown, Howard 2338 Greenway St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Buckles, Isabelle Burlington, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 107 

Bussell, Wilsie Durham, N. C. 

Cameron, Margaret Olivia, N. C. 

Cannon, Jeanne Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Carr, Betty Jane 708 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Claytor, Mary Hillsboro, N. C. 

Colclough, Mary Sue Elon College, N. C. 

Creef, Frances 1101 Jackson St., So. Norfolk, Va. 

Dameron, Mary Lee Route 1, Yanceyville, N. C. 

Darden, James Hall and York Sts., Suffolk, Va. 

David, Richard Vanceboro, N. C. 

Davidson, Eleanor Gibsonville, N. C. 

Dixon, Deedie Marshall St., Graham, N. C. 

Earp, Rachel .Paces, Va. 

Edwards, Dorothy 200 Dinwiddle St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Faulconer, Catherine 608 Webb Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Felton, Margaret 249 Lincoln Place, Irvington, N. J. 

Fitzgerald, Fern Troy, N. C. 

Foster, C. T 612 Cameron St., Burlington, N. C. 

Foster, Dolly Ree 403 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Gearing, P. J 202 Queen St., Bristol, Conn. 

Gill, Sarah M Mebane, N. C. 

Goode, Grace Virgilina, Va. 

Hargrove, Irma Dell Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hauser, Louise Justall Court No. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Hill, Elizabeth Driver, Va. 

Holmes, Evelyn Creedmoor, N. C. 

Holt, Jolea East Harden St., Graham, N. C. 

Holton, James New Bern, N. C. 

Hook, Irene Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, Jeanne Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, Doris Patricia Elon College, N. C. 

Johnson, Vallie 5O6I/2 W. Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Jorosy, Joseph Graham, N. C. 

Jorosy, Myra Graham, N. C. 

Jay, Mary Nell Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Jordan, Rose Ann Saxapahaw, N. C 

King, Ann 711 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Kirkman, Dorothy 606 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C 

Kivett, Florence Greensboro, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Koljeski, Teddy Graham, N. C. 

Lambeth, H. D., Jr B. 7, Elon College, N. C. 

Lightbourne, James Burlington, N. C. 

Lindley, Mary Elizabeth Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 

MacKenzie, Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Maxwell, Harold Falcon, N. C. 

McDade, Mildred 212 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

McGougan, Dorothy Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth B. 195, Burlington, N. C. 

Messick, Helen Elon College, N. C. 

Messick, Rose Mary Elon College, N. C. 

Morgan, Miriam Gibsonville, N. C. 



108 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Moser, Betty Jean 305 Whitsett St., Burlington, N. C. 

Murray, Jane Lea Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Nichols, Amerith R. 4, Durham, N. C. 

Omahundra, Robert 103 College Ave., Salem, Va. 

Paschall, Emma 603 Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Pitts, Robert 1733 Amherst Place, Charlotte, N. C. 

Rader, Jeanne B. 145, Burlington, N. C. 

Rawls, Marcella 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Ruggiero, Paul Woodmont ,Conn. 

Russell, Betsy Ill Marsh St., Beaufort, N. C. 

Screen, Robbie M Gibsonville, N. C. 

Siddell, William 309 Forest Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

Somers, Katherine 605 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Somers, Lucille R. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Stephens, Elsie Louise Burlington, N. C. 

Taylor, Earl Harrisburg, N. C. 

Thornton, Mrs. R. S Fourth St., Burlington, N. C. 

Triplett, Velma Purlear, N. C 

Tingen, Nell Brookwood, Burlington, N. C. 

Westmoreland, John B. 37, Gibsonville, N. C. 

White, Billy Siler City, N. C. 

Whitten, Katherine Elon College, N. C. 

Whitten, Martha Lee Elon College, N. C. 

Wilkins, Lacola Edgewood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Woodson, Julia 106 Brooks St., Bttrlington, N. C. 

Woodson, Samuel Burlington, N. C. 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC. 

Bragg, Frank Brenard Burlington, N. C. 

Cauthen, Robert Bruce Burlington, N. C. 

Dollar, Gwendolyn (Mrs.) R. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Fonville, DeRoy B Burlington, N. C. 

Goodin, LeRoy Eugene R- 4„ Burlington, N. C. 

Hoffman, Louis Burlington, N. C. 

Huffines, Kenneth Gibsonville, N. C. 

Koury, Ernest 513 N. Park Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Isley, Mary Elon College, N. C. 

Liverman, Neva Mae Plymouth, N. C. 

McCloud, Charles Burlington, N. C- 

Smidt, E. T Burlington, N. C. 

Wood, Everett V R. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION 

Barney, Winifred Elon College, N. C. 

Barnwell, Frances Ray Burlington, N. C. 

Boone, Helen 206 Everette St., Burlington, N. C. 

Caddell, Nancy Elon College, N. C. 

Cameron, Geneva Harrington R. 1, Broadway, N. C. 

Cannon, Jeanne Burlington, N. C. 

Claytor, Mary Hillsboro, N. C. 

Cochrane, Frances Ether, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 109 

Coleman, Anne Route 2, Reidsville, N. C. 

Craft, Maurice Washington, D. C. 

Cross, Edrie Belle Burlington, N. C. 

Culbreth, Howard New Bern, N. C. 

Dahl, Mrs. Ernest Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dameron, Mary Lee Route 1, Yanceyville, N. C. 

Dixon, Margaret Deedie Graham, N. C. 

Dollar, Mrs. G Buiiington, N. C. 

Dye, Lelia Cobb Route 1, Reidsville, N. C. 

Edwards, John Lee Stantonburg, N. C. 

Elam, Mrs. W. P B. 191, Burlington, N. C. 

Elder, Fannie Glen Alamance, N. C. 

Fitzgerald, Sigmon Fern Troy, N. C. 

Foster, Mrs. Myrtle White Elon College, N. C. 

Foust, Bobby Burlington, N. C. 

Foust, Lizabel Graham, N. C. 

Fritts, James P Lexington, N. C. 

Goode, Grace Virgilina, Va. 

Gordon, Eugene Alamance, N. C. 

Griffin, Wilma Lois Snow Camp, N. C. 

Hall, Mary B Wilington, N. C. 

Holloman, Judith Rich Square, N. C. 

Holt, Mrs. Elsie Coble Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Holt, Jolea Burlington, N. C. 

Holt, Nellie Mae Burlington, N. C. 

Hook, Cephas G Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Hook, Jessie Irene Elon College, N. C. 

Hoover, Nell Blain Crause, N. C. 

Hunt, E. A Oxford, N. C. 

Kernodle, Mrs. Lecy M R. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

King, Raleigh Gates, N. C. 

Lameth, Wilma Elon College, N. C. 

Martz, Edward E., Buchanan Blvd., Durham, N. C. 

Maxwell, Harold Falcon, N. C. 

McPherson, Grace Burlington, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Burlington, N. C. 

Merritt, Lena Burlington, N. C. 

Miller, Margaret Ridgeway, S. C. 

Mitchell, John Beaufort, N. C. 

Moore, O. D Haw River, N. C. 

Morgan, Miriam Elizabeth Burlington, N. C. 

Muirray, Beulah :Snow Camp, N. C. 

Nash, Margaret Bryant Elon College, N. C. 

Nash, William Elon College, N. C. 

Phillips, Illene Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Phillips, Marvin W Asheboro, N. C. 

Pickard, Mrs. Charles B. 167, Burlington, N. C. 

Pritchett, Mary Elizabeth Route 1, Elon College, N. C- 

Rankin Samuel Roselle Park, N. J. 

Ray, Evan R Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Riddick, Mrs. M. A Suffolk, Va. 



no ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Rigney, Viney Sue Elon College, N. C. 

Schlitter, Donald John Ansonia, Conn. 

Schwob, Helen Elizabeth 138 E. Livinigston Ave., Orlando, Fla. 

Sexton, Warfore Denton, N. C. 

Smith, Gladys Vestal Burlington, N. C. 

Stewart, Emma Brannock Burlington, N. C. 

Steele, Lodosca Burlington, N. C. 

Stolte, H. A Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Summey, Nora Black Motmtain, N. C 

Tingen, Nell Frances Brookwood, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, John B Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Margaret Sue Graham, N. C. 

Walker, Virginia Burlington, N. C. 

Wood, Everett V R. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

AERONAUTICS— Summer, 1940. 

Boone, Thomas Burlington, N. C. 

Durham, Lynn Burlington, N. C. 

Edward, John Lee Stantonburg, N. C. 

Fowler, Robert Hughes Burlington, N. C. 

George, Judson Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Gillespie, James Woodrow Haw River, N. C. 

Hall, Forrest Chalmers Burlington, N. C. 

Holt, John Blaine Graham, N. C. 

Huffines, Lloyd Sloan , Burlington, N. C. 

Hughes, Leroy Sloan Elon College, N. C. 

AlciSIahan, John Louis Burlington, N. C. 

Morgan, Ogburn Lee Elon College, N. C. 

Pearce, Elwood Newton Burlington, N. C. 

Webster, George Daniel Elon College, N. C. 

White, James William Glen Raven, N. C. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 81 

Juniors 105 

Sophomores 127 

Freshmen 196 

Art 48 

Commercial 78 

Music 87 

Special Literary 13 

735 

Less those coimted twice 76 

Total regular session 659 

Summer session 88 

Grand total 747 



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Vol. XXXVIII 



January, 1941 



Number 1 



THE BULLETIN 

OF 

ELON COLLEGE 

FIFTY-THIRD 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 

1942-1943 

AND 

CATALOGUE OF 1941-42 




ELON COLLEGE 

Elon College, N. C. 

Bulletin Issued Quarterly 



Entered as second-class mail at the postoffice of Elon College, N. C, under the 
act of July 16, 1894. 



Member of 

THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES 

and of the 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE CONFERENCE 



Contents 



Page 

College Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

The Faculty 7 

Officers of Administration 10 

Faculty Committees 10 

Educational Philosophy 11 

Administration 12 

The Physical Environment 14 

Buildings and Equipment 15 

Historical Sketch 18 

Annual Events 21 

Student Organizations 23 

Student Expenses 27 

Boarding Department 28 

Academic Regulations 33 

Scholarships 43 

Loan Funds 45 

Endowment and Sources of Income 46 

Outline of Courses of Study 50 

Departments of Instruction of the College: 

Biology 57 

Business Administration 58 

Chemistry 64 

Education 65 

English 71 

Geography and Geology 73 

Greek 74 

History 74 

Mathematics 76 

Modern Languages 78 

Philosophy and Religion 80 

Physics 82 

Psychology 84 

Sociology 85 

Special Departments of the College : 

Art 86 

Home Economics 87 

Music 89 

Physical Education 93 

Roster of Students in the College 94 

Schedule of Recitations HI 



1942 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER 1 


S |M 


T 


W 


T 


F S 


S M 


T W 


T IF 1 S 


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M|T |W 


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6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


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7 


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6 


7 


8 


9 


16 


11 


12 


11 


12 


13 


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IS 


16 


17 


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11 


12 13 


14 


16 


16 


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18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


17 


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21 


22 


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26 


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26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


24 
31 


26 


26 27 


28 


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39 


27 28 

.... 


29 


80 








FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


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1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


6 7 




1 


2 


8 


4 


6 


6 












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8 


9 


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11 


12 


13 14 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


6 


6 


7 




9 


19 


IS 


16 


17 


18 


19 


29 21 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


IS 


14 


16 


16 


17 


22 


23 


24 


2S 


26 


27 28 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


27 


16 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 






.. .. 


.. .. I. . 


28 


29 


SO 










26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


31 


MARCH 


JULY 


NOVEMBER 1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


SI 6 


7 








1 


2 


8 


4 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


8 


9 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


IS 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2S 


26 27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


22 


28 


24 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


SO 31 








26 


27 


28 


29 


SO 


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29 


80 


.. 


■• 




..!.. 1 


APRIL 


AUGUST 


DECEMBER I 








1 2 


3 


4 














1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


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6 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


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6 


7 


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7 


8 





10 


11 


12 


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15 16 


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11 


12 


13 


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16 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


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17 


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23 


24 


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24 


26 


26 


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29 


27 


28 


20 30 


31 


















36 


31 














. .j..|.. 






1943 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER 1 












1 


2 














1 








1 


2 


8 


4 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


8 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12 


IS 


14 


16 


12 


IS 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


24 


2S 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


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26 


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39 






81 1 . . 1 . . 1 . . 








39 


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. 














.1.. 1 


FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


OCTOBER 1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


6 












1 


2 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


8 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


27 


29 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


17 


18 


19 


29 


21 


22 


23 


28 


'.'. 












27 


28 


29 


30 








24 
81 


28 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


MARCH 


JULY 


NOVEMBER | 




1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 










1 


2 


8 




1 


2 


S 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


7 


8 


9 


19 


11 


12 


18 


14 


IS 


IS 


17 


18 


19 


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11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


32 


23 


24 


26 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


28 


24 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


39 


31 








26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


81 


28 


29 


30 










APRIL 


AUGUST 


DECEMBER | 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 








1 


2 


S 


4 


4 


S 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


IS 


14 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


11 


12 


13 


14 


IB 


16 


17 


16 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


IS 


16 


17 


18 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


39 


81 


^M_ 



College Calendar 

SESSION OF 1942-1943 



September 1-3 — Freshman Period: Fall Semester begins. 

September 2-3 — Freshman Registration. 

September 4 — ^Registration for Upperclassmen, and Freshman Classes begin. 

vSeptember 5 — Upperclassmen Classes begin. 

September 5 — Annual Faculty Reception. 

September 6 — Opening Address of the President. 

October 10 — Sophomore-Freshman Reception. 

October 15 — Subjects for Senior Essay due. 

November 2 — Mid-Semester Grade Reports due. 

November 26 — Thanksgiving Day. 

December 1 — First Draft of Senior Essay, or Comprehensive Examinations due. 

December 5 — Senior-Junior Dinner. 

December 7 — Elon Singers present Christmas Program. 

December 12-January 3 — Christmas Holidays. 

January 4 — Classes resume, 8 :00 A. M. 

January 13-16 — Registration Afternoons for Second Semester. 

January 18 — Classes for Spring Semester begin. 

January 30 — Freshman-Sophomore Reception. 

February 6 — Mid- Year Alumni Meeting. 

February 9 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

March 12 — Senior Banquet given by President and Mrs. L. E, Smith. 

March 13 — Mid-Semester Grade Reports due. 

March 15-22 — Spring Holidays. 

March 23 — Classes resume, 8:00 A. M. 

April 26 — Senior Essays. Examinations completed. 

April 25 — Easter Sunday. 

May 1 — May Day Exercises. 

May 7 — Junior-Senior Dinner. 

May 18-22 — Second Semester Examinations. 

May 22-25 — Commencement Exercises. 

May 25 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 9:30 A. M. 

June 2 — Summer School opens. 



Board of Trustees 



!Leon Edgar Smiih, D. D., President, pa: officio Elon College, N. C. 

Dr. W. H. Boone, Chairman Durham, N. C. 

Alton West, Business Manager Elon College, N. C. 

Stanley C. Harrell, Secretary Durham, N. C. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1942 

H. Shelton Smith, D. D Durham, N. C. 

Harry K. Eversull, D. D Marietta, Ohio 

Mrs. Russell T. Bradford R. 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Hon. Kemp B. Johnson Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Miss Susie Holland Suffolk, Va. 

D. R. Fonville, Esq Burlington, N. C. 

J. H. McEwen Burlington, N. C. 

E. C. Gillette, D. D Jacksonville, Fla. 

John L. Farmer Wilson, N. C. 

V. R. Holt Burlington, N. C 

Miles H. Krimibine, D. D. . . . . • • Shaker Heights, Columbus, Ohio 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1944 

Col. J. E. West Suffolk, Va 

Prof. L. L. Vaughan Raleigh, N. C. 

S. C. Harrell, D. D Durham, N. C. 

Chas. D. Johnston Elon College, N. C. 

E. L. Moffitt, LL.D Burlington, N. C. 

Luther E. Carlton Paces, Va. 

F. L. Fagley, D. D New York City 

W. J. Ballentine • ■ Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

O. F. Smith Norfolk, Va. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1946 

W. H. Boone, M. D Durham, N. C. 

J. A. Kimball Manson, N. C. 

W. Horace Day, D. D Bridgeport, Conn. 

Russell J. Clinchy Hartford, Conn. 

Richard H. Clapp New Haven, Conn. 

C. W. McPherson, M. D Burlington, N. C. 

W. B. Truitt Greensboro, N. C. 

J. H. Lightboume, D. D Burlington, N. C. 

B. D. Jones, Jr., M. D Norfolk, Va. 

J. A. Vaughan New York City 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

L. E. Smith, C. W. McPherson, W. H. Boone, S. C. Harrell, L. L. Vaughan, 
J. L. Farmer and J. H. McEwen. 



The Faculty 



LEON EDGAR SMITH 

President 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Princeton University; D.D., Elon College; 

LL.D., Marietta College 

JOHN DECATUR MESSICK 

Dean, Head of the Department of Education 

Ph.B., Elon College; University of North Carolina; Ph.D., New York 

University 

JULIE MAE OXFORD 

Dean of Women, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A. B., Bessie Tift College; M. A., University of Georgia; 

Graduate Work, Duke University 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK 

Registrar, Professor of Physics 

A. B., M. A., Elon College ; M. S., Cornell University, Additional 

Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins University, University of 

Chicago, Duke University 

JOHN WILLIS BARNEY 

Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University, University of 

Virginia, University of North Carolina 

GEORGE BEECHER 

Associate Professor of Education and Science 

A. B., Yale University ; Graduate Work, Yale University, 

D. J. BOWDEN 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 
B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University 

NED FAUCETTE BRANNOCK 

Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M.S., Columbia University; Litt.D., 

Defiance College; Additional Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins 

University, University of North Carolina 

JOE BRUNANSKY 

Assistant Coach and Director of Intramural Sports 

A. B., Duke University 

WILSIE FLORENCE BUSSELL 

Instructor of French and Spanish 

A. B., M. A., Duke University; Graduate Work, Duke University, 

Pennsylvania State College, Alliance Francaise in Paris, 

Middleburg College 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

GEORGE L. CARRINGTON 

Chief Surgeon, Alamance General Hospital 

Instructor in Health and Hygiene 

A. B., University of North Carolina; M. A., Duke University; 

M. D., Johns Hopkins University 

JOHN A. CLARKE 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A. B., Hampden-Sydney College; M. A., University of Virginia; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

(On Leave) 

FLETCHER COLLINS, Jr. 

Professor of English 
Ph. B., Ph. D., Yale University 

MERTON FRENCH 

Associate Professor of Religion and Greek 
^ A. B., Washburn College; M. A., Ph.D., Brown University 

HOWARD S. GRAVETT 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A. B., James Millikin University; M. A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

HORACE HENDRICKSON 

Head Coach and Director of Physical Education 

A. B., Duke University 

MRS. HORACE HENDRICKSON 

Director of Physical Education for Girls 

B. S., University of Pittsburg 

ELEANOR HENRY 

Instructor of Violin 

Graduate, New England Conservatory of Music; Mus. B., American 

Conservatory of Music, Chicago 

HANSE HIRSCH 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and History 

Hoehere Reifepruefung Realgymnasium Mannheim, Uni\ersity of 

Frankfort-on-the-Main, University of Heidelberg, University 

of Vienna, Ph. D., University of Munich 

WAITUS W. HOWELL 

Associate Professor of Business Admini:t*ation 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., University of North Carc'.ina 

MRS. SUE CRAFT HOWELL 

Instructor of Commercial Department 

A. B., La Grange College; M.S., North Carolina State College 

E. B. JEFFREYS 

Instructor in Journalism- 

B. S., University of North Carolina 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ' 

MRS. OMA U. JOHNSON 

Librarian 

Ph. B., A. B., Elon College; B. S., Columbia University 

LILA LE VAN 

Instructor in Public School Music and Piano 

Mus. B., Mus. M., Kansas University; Graduate Work, Julliard 

School of Music 

FREDERICK LOADWICK 

Instructor of Voice 
Mus. B., Syracuse University ; Graduate Work, Julliard School of Music;. 

FLETCHER MOORE 

Instructor of Piano and Organ 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Columbia University; Julliard School of Music ;' 

Piano Student of Sascha Gorodnitzki and Guy Maier 

MARY REED MOORE 

Instructor of Education 

A. B., Winthrop College; M. A., Furman University; Graduate Work, 

University of California, Columbia University, College of 

William and Mary 

LIDA MUSE 

Instructor of Home EconoDiics 

B. S., University of Tennessee; M. A., Columbia University 

JOHN URQUART NEWMAN 

Professor Emeritus of Biblical Language and Literature 

A. B., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Chicago University; 

Litt. D., La Grange; D. D., Union College 

LILA CLARE NEWMAN 

Instructor of Art 

Ph. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University and 

Harvard University 

STUART G. PRATT 

Head of the Department of Music 

A. B., Hartwick College; Mus. B., Philadelphia Musical Academy; 

Mus. M., Syracuse University. Two years' study in Berlin, 

Germany, under Marta Siebold (pi^no), Hugo Kaun 

(theory and composition), and Walter Scharwenka 

(organ) 

E. F. RHODES 

Director of College Band 

Shenandoah College; A. B., Elon College 

HAROLD SCHULTZ 

Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Columbia University; M. A. Duke University; Candidate for 

Ph. D., Duke University, 1942 



10 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

JAMES H. STEWART 

Instructor of Business Administration 

A. B., Transylvania College; M. A., University of Kentucky 

ROBERT L. WESTHAFER 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B. A., College of Wooster; A. M., Harvard University; 

Ph. D., Ohio State University 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

LEON EDGAR SMITH, A. B, M. A., A. D., LL.D., President. 

J. D. MESSICK, Ph. B., Ph.D., Dean. 

JULIA MAE OXFORD, A. B., M. A., Dean of Women. 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK, A. B., M. A., M. S., Registrar. 

C. E. LOVITT, A. B., Accountant and Business Manager. 

GEORGE D. COLCLOUGH, A. B., Director of Public Relations and Alumni 

Secretary. 
GRACE McGUIRE, A. B., Dietitian. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Administrative — Dean Messick, Dean Oxford, Mr. Lovitt, Dr. Bowden, Prof. 

Hook. 
Alumni Cooperation — Mr. Howell, Dr. Bowden, Mr. Colclough. 
Athletic — Dean Messick, Prof. Hook, Coach Hendrickson, Mr. Lovitt. 
Chapel — Dr. French, Prof. Pratt, Miss Muse, Prof. Edwards. 
Debates — Dr. French, Prof. Schultz, Dr. Collins, Mrs. Johnson, Dr. Brannock. 
Dramatics — Dr. Collins, Miss Muse, Dr. Gravett, 'Mr. Moore, Mrs. Hendrickson. 
Admission and Credits — Prof. Hook, Dean Messick, Dean Oxford. 
Library — Mrs. Johnson, Dr. French, Dr. Gravett, Mrs. Howell, Dr. Hirsch. 
Music Organizations — Prof. Pratt, Prof. Moore, Prof. Loadwick. 
Practice School — Dean Messick, Miss Moore, Dean Oxford, Mrs. Hendrickson. 
Religious Organizations — Dr. Bowden, Dr. French, Prof. Barney, Miss Muse. 
Public Entertainment — Prof. Pratt, Dean Oxford, Prof. Hook, Miss Newman, 

Dr. Collins. 
Social Clubs — Dean Oxford, Prof. Hook, Prof. Stewart, Dean Messick. 
Student Loans and Scholarships — Mr. Lovitt, Mr. Colclough, Dr. Bowden, Mr. 

Howell, Mrs. Johnson. 
Student Publications — Dr. Collins, Miss Moore, Prof. Hook, Mr. Jeffreys. 
Honors — Prof. Hook, Dr. Collins, Prof. Schultz. 
Curriculum — Dean Messick, Prof. Hook, Dr. Collins, Dr. French, Dr. Bowden, 

Dr. Westhafer. 
Student Employment — Mr. Howell, Mr. Colclough, Mr. Lovitt, Mrs. Johnson, 

Mrs. Smith. 



Catalogue of Elon College 

The purpose of this Catalogue is to set forth concisely the 
principles involved in progressive education, as contained ini 
the curriculum of Elon College. Parents and students w^ill = 
find these principles both interesting and stimulating, and are- 
invited to examine the same carefully. 

The Church College. — Elon College is a church institu- 
tion, supported by the Congregational-Christian Church for 
the specific purpose of training young men and young vv^omen 
under moral and religious influences. It is not the purpose of 
the College to change or uproot honest faith in any heart, but 
to afford to every individual opportunities for moral develop- 
ment and spiritual advancement. The Church under w^hosc 
auspices Elon College was founded and has been maintained 
has always believed in Christianity as the way of life, not as 
a system of theology or a body of doctrine. The College feels 
that Christianity is the basis for the student's way of life at 
Elon and in the years to come. The College seeks through 
education and example to preserve and develop religious values 
as a means of developing Christian character and safeguarding 
civilization. 

The Progressive College, — As a progressive college, Elorsi 
believes that education is a process of learning through exper- 
iences, and that these experiences should be not only intellec- 
tual, but also emotional, religious and social. Directed oppor- 
tunities are therefore given for students to gain a human 
understanding of books, themselves and other people, and 
their God. 

The Small College. — Elon College feels strongly that there 
are distinct advantages to the student in the small college en- 
vironment. There is a solidarity of interests among faculty 
and students, a group unity, which would not be as possible 



12 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

with larger numbers. Everyone knows everyone else, and a 
friendly, democratic spirit is made possible. Individualized 
instruction, personal interest and understanding on the part 
of teachers and students, and a genuine spirit of Christian 
cooperation characterize life at Elon College. 

College life at Elon is wholesome and invigorating. The 
students are not extravagant in their living, and the cost of 
education is reasonable. There are opportunities for self-help, 
affording students with limited means jobs that will pay part 
of their expenses. However, these grants are limited in 
number. 

ADMINISTRATION 

To carry out the educational philosophy of the College, 
there is an administrative organization. 

Board of Trustees. — The Board of Trustees is the final 
authority in the disposition of all matters of government and 
administration. 

President — The President is the resident agent of the 
Board and is responsible for administrative policies and plans 
for the advancement of the College. He is assisted by the 
Faculty of which body he is chairman, and, in monthly meet- 
ings with the Faculty, discusses and acts upon the manifold 
problems of administration. 

The Faculty. — The Faculty is a democratic body, and in 
meetings acts upon legislative measures pertaining to the cur- 
riculum. It also passes upon the reports and recommendations 
of Faculty committees, through which groups much of the 
detail of educational research and planning is done. These 
committee^ also act administratively for the Faculty in the 
interim between its sessions, but have no legislative authority. 

Dean.- -The Dean of the College is responsible for the 
administration of the curriculum, regulates attendance for 
men students at classes, chapel and other religious services, and 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 13 

is in charge of the character-building and guidance programs 
for the men of the College. He is the adviser of the Student 
Senate. He also represents the President when the latter is 
out of town. 

Dean of Women. — The Dean of Women regulates, for the 
women, attendance at classes, chapel and other religious ser- 
vices, and gives permissions to leave the campus. She resides 
on the campus and is in charge of the character-building pro- 
gram for the women of the College. She is adviser of the 
women's Council. 

The two Deans, in cooperation with the President, have 
jurisdiction over the social functions of the College, and the 
officers of Student Government confer with these officials for 
advice regarding these functions. 



^& 



Business Manager. — The Business Manager carries out the 
business and financial policies of the College as directed by 
the Board of Trustees. All business contracts must have his 
endorsement before they are binding on the College. He is 
the purchasing agent for all branches of the College, and is 
custodian of all its assets and properties. He is also general 
manager of all student self-help work done on the campus, 
and of all college service departments. 

Student Government. — This important branch of college 
government was granted its first constitution by the Faculty 
in 1919, and has since that time successfully operated through 
the men's Senate and later also through the women's Council. 
These constitutions, together with the by-laws of the two or- 
ganizations, are printed in the Elon Handbook. 

Registrar. — The Registrar of the College receives all ap- 
plications for entrance, and keeps the academic records of all 
students. He has charge of admissions, transcripts of records, 
grades, and other statistical data. 



14 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 

The Location. — Elon College is located sixty-four miles 
west of Raleigh, seventeen miles east of Greensboro, and four 
miles west of BurHngton, on the North Carolina division of 
the Southern Railway. The railroad is the southern boundary 
of the campus, and it commands a view of the college build- 
ings. State Highway No. 100 is the northern boundary. 

Eight mail and passenger trains pass the College daily. 
The short line of the Carolina Coach Company passes the 
College and aflords bus accomodations to the students to all 
parts of the country. 

The Campus. — The College Campus presents a most 
beautiful and attractive appearance. It is spacious and, for 
the most part, is covered by stalwart native oak and hickory. 
Shrubbery has been placed on the campus where such ad- 
ditions would add to the beauty and attractiveness of the 
grounds. The concrete walks and driveways add to its native 
beauty and charm. Its very atmosphere is a contribution to 
the development of manhood and womanhood. The massive 
brick wall surrounding the campus lends dignity as well as 
protection and quietude. 

The Climate. — Climatic conditions are unusually favorable 
to the mental and physical development of the Elon student. 
At all seasons of the year the temperature is moderate, with 
an annual average of about 60 degrees. The winter season is 
usually short and the fall and spring seasons long and pleas- 
ant. The health of the student is thus naturally safeguarded, 
and there is abundant opportunity for the beneficial effects of 
much time spent out of doors in an atmosphere neither ener- 
vating nor forbidding. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 15 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Elon College has been accurately described by an official 
of the Association of American Colleges as "the best equipped 
small college in the country." Ten buildings, thoroughly 
equipped for living and study, are on the campus; five of them 
have only recently been completed and are modern in every 
detail. 

The Greater Elon Group 

These five, three-story, fire-proof structures are constructed 
of brick and reinforced concrete, and all are identical in their 
architectural design. 

Alamance Building. — This is the administration building, 
and houses classrooms; administrative offices; the laboratories 
of the Business, Home Economics, Mechanical Drawing, and 
Art Departments; and the College Bookstore. The citizens 
of Alamance County undertook to raise an amount necessary 
to erect and equip this building. 

Carlton Library. — This building, the gift of Trustees P. }., 
H. A., and L. E. Carlton, and their sister, Mrs. T. S. Parrott, 
has a stack-room capacity for 187,500 volumes. The reading 
room has seating capacity for one hundred readers. Besides 
offices and w^ork room for the library force, the building con- 
tains fourteen professors' research and office rooms and seven 
students' seminar rooms. 

Whitley Memorial Auditorium. — In memory of his father- 
in-lavir, Mr. L. H. Whitley, Mr. J. M. Darden lent $50,000 to 
assist in the erection of this building. This building houses 
the large college auditorium, designed to seat 1,000 persons, 
and is used for chapel and church services, community gath- 
erings, lyceum performances, motion pictures and concerts. 
The Music Department is completely contained in the build- 
ing, vi^ith five studios, tvi^enty-two practice rooms with upright 
pianos, a four-manual Skinner organ, an Estey practice organ, 



16 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and several grand pianos. The most modern recording equip- 
ment is lioused in the music department for the use of both 
students and faculty. The auditorium is also equipped with 
a professional motion picture projection apparatus, and on the 
stage is a projection screen and adequate lighting. The equip- 
ment of the building is outstanding. 

Mooney Christian Education Building. — In memory of 
Rev. Isaac Mooney, his father-in-law^, Mr. M. Orban, Jr., gave 
this building to the college. The building is devoted to the 
religious and social activities of the college. At opposite ends 
of the building on the first floor are the Y. M. C. A. and Y. 
W. C. A. recreation rooms. The second floor provides as- 
sembly hall, classrooms, and offices for the Department of 
Philosophy and Religion. The assembly hall has a seating 
capacity of 400 and is adequately equipped for student dra- 
matic performances. On the third floor is a unique feature, a 
completely graded Sunday School plant used by the entire 
community. In the basement is a w^oodv^orking shop, which 
is equipped with power tools. 

Duke Science Building. — In memory of their mother, Mrs. 
Artelia Roney Duke, a native of Alamance County, Messrs. 
J. B. and B. N. Duke donated $60,000 toward the erection of 
this modern, fire-proof building. The first floor of the build- 
ing is used by the Department of Physics and the Elon Press, 
the second by the Departments of Biology and Geology, and 
the third by the Department of Chemistry. Each floor is 
fully equipped with modern scientific furniture and labora- 
tory apparatus. 

Dormitories 

East Dormitory. — This is the only original building left 
on the campus. It is used as a dormitory for men, and is a 
three-story brick structure, completely overhauled and fitted 
up with all modern conveniences. 




ELOJST'S BUILDINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL AND WELL EQUIPPED 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 17 

Alumni Building. — This building, erected in 1912, is the 
gift of the alumni to Alma Mater. It is a three-story, brick 
structure, and is used as a dormitory for men, with a men's 
gymnasium on the first floor. 

West Dormitory. — This is a three-story brick building next 
to the Library, and measures 158 by 46 feet. On the second 
and third floors are modern accommodations for 120 women 
students. The first floor contains a large reception hall, guest 
rooms and parlors, the infirmary, and living quarters for Fac- 
ulty women. The building has an annex which houses the 
two dining halls, the kitchen, and the women's gymnasium. 

Ladies' Hall. — This is a two-story brick edifice, with ac- 
commodations for 64 women. The interior has recently been 
renovated and modernized. 

South Dormitory. — Traditionally known as Publishing 
House, this building has been renovated, and is used as a 
dormitory for fifty men. 

Club House. — This is a one story building, with accom- 
modations for eighteen men. 

Carlton House. — This is a nine room dormitory which is 
used for eighteen men. 

Other Buildings 

West End Hall. — This is a fourteen-room dwelling, and 
is used as an apartment house for faculty members. 

Power Plant. — The power plant is the central station for 
heat, light, water and other service functions for the college 
buildings. Adjacent to the plant is a 50,000-gallon steel water 
tank with a deep well of pure water. 

Special Equipment 

Athletic Field. — The Athletic field contains thirty-four 
acres located near the campus, and has adequate space for all 
sports. A new stadium is being erected. 

Visual Education Aids. — The projection booth of the Aud- 
itorium is equipped with two 35-millimeter sound-on-film 



18 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

projectors. These projectors have low intensity arc lamps and 
RCA sound-heads. This equipment is used weekly for edu- 
cational and entertainment purposes. Projection facilities are 
provided for film strips, glass slides, opaque projectors, and 
16-millimeter films. 

Elon Press. — Housed in the Science Building is the Elon 

Press, composed of an electrically-driven printing press, four- 
teen complete fonts of Century and Cloister types, a composing 
table, and adequate apparatus for the printing of student pub- 
lications. 

Dramatic Stage. — The student stage in the Mooney Chris- 
tian Education Building has a proscenium opening of twenty- 
two feet and a depth of fifteen feet. Equipment includes a 
cyclorama, four mobile spot-lights, and other lighting appara- 
tus of modern design. Dressing rooms and a costume ward- 
robe are off the wings of the stage. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of Elon College is a constituent part of the 
history of the Christian Church in the Southeast. In 1794 the 
Reverend James O'Kelly and a group of dissenters from Wes- 
leyan Methodism, then spreading through the nation, met at 
Lebanon Church in Surry County, Virginia. This group 
agreed to found what was the first democratically governed 
church to arise on American soil. They named the church 
"Christian, to the exclusion of all party and sectarian names." 
They were interested in Christianity, not as a system of the- 
ology or a body of doctrines, but as a way of life. It was on 
this basis that the Christian and Congregational Churches 
merged in 1929. 

It was on this basis, also, that Elon College in 1889 was 
founded and has been developed. Many church colleges were 
established in the Nineteenth Century; nearly every denom- 
ination had and still has a church college for the training of 
its own leadership and as its contribution to civilization. From 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 19 

the early beginning in North Carolina and Virginia there had 
been a demand on the part of the Christian Church that there 
be established a college for the denomination. The demand 
grew with the church, and in September, 1888, the Southern 
Convention met in extraordinary session in Old Providence 
Church, Graham, North Carolina, to hear the reports and 
recommendations of the Committee on Schools and Colleges. 
The Convention appointed a provisional Board for the 
proposed college, authorizing the Board to choose a site for 
the college and to make the necessary legal and financial trans- 
actions. The Board was composed of Dr. W. S. Long, Dr. J. 
Pressley Barrett, Hon. F. O. Moring, Col. J. H. Harden, and 
Dr. G. S. Watson. Dr. W. S. Long, a pioneer in higher edu- 
cation, opened a school in Graham in 1865, which developed 
into Graham Normal College, a forerunner of Elon College. 
Led by Dr. Long, the Board finally chose a site at a village 
then known as Mill Point, six miles from Graham. A tract 
of twenty-five acres of land at Mill Point was given by the 
Hon. W. H. Trollinger of Haw River. The citizens of Mill 
Point donated twenty-three acres additional, and four thou- 
sand dollars in cash. In consideration of these donations the 
college was located at Mill Point. 

The Provisional Board preferred other names, but owing 
to the predominance of stalwart oaks on the site, selected the 
name "Elon," the Hebrew word meaning oak. 

On March 11, 1889, Elon College was chartered and in- 
corporated by the General Assembly of the State of North 
Carolina. (Private Laws of North Carolina for 1889, chapter 
216, sections 1-12.) 

In keeping with the charter provisions, the original Board 
of Trustees numbered fifteen: W. S. Long, J. W. Wellons, W. 
W. Staley, G. S. Watson, M. L. Hurley, E. T. Pierce, W. J. 
Lee, P. J. Kernodle, J. F. West, E. E. Holland, E. A. Moffitt, 
J. M. Smith, J. H. Harden, F. O. Moring, and S. P. Read. 



20 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

According to this charter, the "said institution" of Elon 
College was to "remain at the place where the site is now locat- 
ed, in Alamance County, Boone Station Township, at the place 
now called Mill Point." The purpose of the college was to 
"afford instruction in the liberal arts and sciences." 

Dr. Long was elected president of the college, and six ad- 
ditional members of the faculty were elected. Two buildings 
were erected on the site at Mill Point: the Administrative 
Building, a large three-story, brick building that housed the 
library, laboratories, the administrative offices, society halls, and 
classrooms for all departments ; the other a dormitory for girls. 
The latter still stands on the campus. 

After four years. Dr. Long was succeeded as president in 
1893 by Dr. W. W. Staley, then pastor of the Suffolk (Virginia) 
Christian Church, who served as non-resident president without 
salary. 

Upon Dr. Staley's resignation in 1905, Dr. E. L. Moffitt was 
elected to succeed him. Dr. Moffitt served six years, during 
which time two additional buildings were erected on the cam- 
pus. A larger dormitory for women West Dormitory, was 
built, and East Dormitory was given over to boys. In addition, 
the power house was erected, providing electric light and 
steam heat for the college buildings. 

In 1911, Dr. E. L. Moffitt resigned as president, and Dr. 
W. A. Harper, then a member of the faculty, was elected and 
began the longest term of office in the history of the college. 
In 1912, a larger boys' dormitory and gymnasium combined 
was built and financed through the generosity of Elon Alumni. 
It is properly known as Alumni Building. 

In 1913, Ladies' Hall was erected to take care of an in- 
creased enrollment of girls. 

During the period of America's participation in the World 
War, regular enrollment at Elon declined. However, a con- 
tingent of the R. O. T. C. was stationed at Elon which tempora- 
rily greatly increased the student population. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 21 

In January, 1923, the Administration Building was de- 
stroyed by fire, and students and faculty carried on as best they 
could with improvised classrooms and equipment. Out of the 
ashes of the old building rose a great rebuilding program, to 
be undertaken in terms of the growth and development of the 
college. Facilities had for several years been inadequate, and 
the destruction of the central building made this program of 
reconstruction imperative. 

With the onset of the depression of 1929-33, the heavy 
mortgages and a decreased enrollment combined to bring hard 
times upon Elon. Following Dr. Harper's resignation in June, 
1931, the College was without a president until October of 
that year, and there was grave doubt as to whether Elon would 
be able to open its doors to students in the fall of 1931. At 
this desperate moment the Board of Trustees elected as presi- 
dent Dr. L. E. Smith, then pastor of the Christian Temple of 
Norfolk, Virginia. 

Dr. Smith succeeded in bringing Elon through the stormy 
years of the depression, and not only recouped the losses in 
personnel and students, but by 1941 had greatly reduced the 
indebtedness of the institution and increased the student en- 
rollment to a total of 689. Financial problems still confront 
the College ; however, the future is decidedly hopeful. Modest- 
ly, but with determination, the college is working towards a 
modern curriculum for education at the college level, a curri- 
culum which will best serve youth in our complex world. 

ANNUAL EVENTS 

Certain annual events at the College have become Elon 
traditions, and are anticipated with great pleasure by the stu- 
dents and faculty. Some of these events are broadcast directly 
from the College through Station WBIG of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System. 

Banquets. — The President and his wife are accustomed to 
giving an annual banquet to the Senior class. 



22 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Faculty Reception. — The Faculty gives a formal reception 
to the students on Saturday evening after the College opens in 
September. 

Lyceum Entertainments. — The Faculty committee on Pub- 
lic Entertainments each year schedules a series of concerts, re- 
citals, plays or lectures by distinguished artists of national 
reputation. These performances are scheduled throughout the 
year and are open to all Elon students upon payment of their 
Activity Fee. These programs are also available to the general 
public upon subscriptions to the series. Such artists as Nino 
Martini, Helen Jepson and Albert Spaulding appear in con- 
certs here. 

Players' Evenings. — At least three times during the year, 
public performances of full-length plays are given by the Elon 
Players. 

College Recitals. — Members of the Faculty of the Music 
Department and advanced students in Music each year give a 
series of recitals in Whitley Memorial Auditorium. 

"The Messiah." — Shortly before the beginning of the 
Christmas holidays, the Elon Festival Chorus presents Handel's 
oratorio, "The Messiah." It is presented in Whitley Memorial 
Auditorium by candlelight. 

Garden Party. — The President and his wife give a Garden 
Party to the Senior class. Faculty members, alumni and visitors 
on the afternoon of Monday of Commencement week. 

Art Exhibit — The Art Department gives an annual exhibit 
of student work. 

Commencement — This final event of the year begins on 
Saturday before the fourth Sunday in May. Commencement 
exercises include the Baccalaureate Sermon, the awarding of 
academic and honorary degrees and distinctions, and a com- 
mencement address by some noted person. Immediately after 
the close of commencement exercises, the Board of Trustees 
meets in final session. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 23 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Community Chm-ch. — The Community Church is 
made up of students, facuky members and residents of the 
town. Church services are held each Sunday in the Whitley 
Memorial Auditorium. The pastor of the church is Dr. L. E. 
Smith, President of the college. Ministers from other churches 
and denominations are frequently invited to occupy the college 
pulpit. 

The Church School. — The Community Church, together 
with the college, maintains a church school. 

Student Christian Association. — The Student Christian As- 
sociation is responsible for student religious activities on the 
campus. Among these activities are included the Sunday even- 
ing Vesper Services in which students and outside speakers par- 
ticipate, Student Sunday School in which International Sunday 
school lesson, current social problems, and other subjects are 
considered, morning prayer service, social service in the com- 
munity, occasional socials on the campus. The association 
functions primarily through committees, but includes within 
its membership more than half of the student body, students 
pledging themselves to foster Christian principles in the cam- 
pus life. 

Ministerial Association. — The Ministerial Association com- 
prises the members of the student body who intend to enter the 
Christian Ministry, directors of Religious Education, social ser- 
vice, or medical missionaries. Meetings of this group are held 
weekly, in which discussion and practice-preaching are utilized 
to help prepare the prospective minister for his profession. 

The Elon Singers. — This is a mixed chorus of students, or- 
ganized for two purposes: as the College Choir it regularly 
furnishes the music for the weekday chapel services and Sunday 
morning services of the Community Church; as the Elon Sing- 
ers it presents concerts of sacred and secular music at the 



24 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

College and in various communities in North Carolina 
and adjoining states. 

Elon Band. — This colorful organization, equipped with 
uniforms in the college colors, supplies music for intercolle- 
giate athletic contests and for various other functions at the 
college. Training is given to all students who own or can 
play band instruments. 

Elon Players. — Several groups of students, interested in 
active participation in the writing and production of plays, 
combine to form the larger group called Elon Players. The 
class in Shakespeare each year produces a Shakespeare play. 
The class in Dramatic Literature writes its own plays and 
produces them for invited audiences as well as producing for 
the public plays by modern dramatists. Other groups, not 
members of these classes, produce plays from time to time. 
The Players constitute a chapter of the National Dramatic 
Fraternity, Delta Psi Omega. They are also members of the 
North Carolina Dramatic Association, and take part in its 
activities. 

Social Science Honorary Society. — This is the Alpha Chap- 
ter in North Carolina of Pi Gamma Mu, the National Social 
Science Honor Society. The purpose of the organization is to 
give recognition to those students and faculty members who 
have attained distinction in the fields of Social Sciences. Elec- 
tions are held in the fall and spring, at which time Seniors and 
others who are eligible are received into membership in the 
society. 

The Elon Debaters, — This organization is a member of 
the North Carolina Inter-Collegiate Debating Association, and 
makes a number of trips each year to debate at tournaments 
with other college teams. Current economic and social prob- 
lems are subjects of their debates. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 25 

Social Clubs. — Under supervision of their faculty advisers 
and with regulations as provided in the Elon Handbook, the 
social clubs are recognized as follows: 

For men: Alpha Pi Delta; Iota Tau Kappa; Kappa Psi 
Nu; Sigma Phi Beta. 

For women: Beta Omicron Beta; Delta Upsilon Kappa; 
Tau Zeta Phi; Pi Kappa Tau. 

Each of these organizations has a club room on the first 
floor of the Christian Education Building. 

Maroon and Gold. — The publication of the college news- 
paper, "Maroon and Gold," is undertaken by the college class 
in Journalism. This group serves as the editorial staff and also 
sees the paper through the Elon Press. The headquarters of 
the Elon journalists is in the Printing Room of the Duke 
Science Building. The newspaper appears at least once every 
two weeks during the college year. This publication is a 
member of the North Carolina Collegiate Press Association 
and of the Associated Collegiate Press. Students who are not 
members of the course in Journalism may write for the paper 
as an extra-curricular activity. 

Elon Colonnades. — This is the college literary magazine. 
It is written and printed at least twice each year by students 
interested in creative expression, both verse and prose. The 
magazine, in being completely the literary production and 
press work of students, is unique among college magazines 
in North Carolina. 

Phipsicli. — Phipsicli is the college annual, edited by mem- 
bers of the Senior class. The name commemorates the three 
erstwhile "literary societies" of the college. First published 
in 1913, this annual now ranks high in the college field. 

Elon Handbook. — The Handbook is a manual for Student 
Government and contains the constitutions and by-laws of the 
Senate and the Women's Council, as well as information need- 
ed by entering students. A copy of the Handbook is furnished 



26 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

to each student upon registration and is the basis for the learn- 
ing process during the Orientation Period. 

Class Organizations. — Each of the four classes has its own 
organization, and each year elects its officers and representa- 
tives to the student government. The Freshman class organ- 
izes on the first Tuesday in October. Each class selects some 
member of the faculty other than the President or Deans as 
its adviser. 

Inter-Collegiate Athletics. — There are varsity teams at 
Elon in the follovi^ing sports: football, basketball, baseball, 
and tennis. These teams represent the college in inter- 
collegiate contests and are under the supervision of the Di- 
rector of Athletics and his assistants. Any student is eligi- 
ble for these teams v^^ho meets the regulations governing Inter- 
Collegiate Athletics as printed in the Handbook. Elon Col- 
lege is a member of the North State Inter-Collegiate Athletic 
Association. 

The "E" Men's Club. — This is the varsity athletic organi- 
zation and is composed of all students v^^ho have been awarded 
an "E" for participation in inter-collegiate athletics. 

Intramural Athletics. — In addition to the varsity squads, 
there is ample provision for intramural contests in touch-ball, 
basketball, baseball, tennis and other sports. These games are 
open to all students who are not participating on a varsity team 
in the same sport. Teams are formed from the Men's Dormi- 
tories from Men's Social Clubs, and from the Faculty, and in 
group sports a season of league games is played. 

Business Administrators. — Business majors of Sophomore 
level and above are eligible for membership in the Business 
Administrators Club. It is the purpose of the Club to make 
the students' business training as practical as possible by spon- 
soring talks by business men and by arranging visits to indus- 
trial plants and business offices. Through these contacts the 
students receive helpful vocational guidance, and their under- 
standing of business and industrial activity is deepened. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 27 

Commercial Club. — The Commercial Club functions for 
the benefit of Secretarial students taking a one- and two-year 
Secretarial course. The purpose of the club is twofold. First, 
it assists in creating a business atmosphere in the classroom by 
sponsoring demonstrations of up-to-date office equipment and 
by making contacts with outside business organizations for 
the privilege of inspection trips and lectures from members of 
those organizations. Second, the club provides a means for 
social contacts among the students within the department. 

The Education Club. — The primary object of this club is 
to promote a professional attitude on the part of student 
teachers; to bring outstanding educators to the campus; and 
to visit schools to see the actual operation of educational pro- 
cedures. 

French Club. — The French Club is composed of a group 
of interested students who meet twice a month to enjoy con- 
versation, group singing, games, short plays, and informal dis- 
cussions in French. 

German Club. — A voluntary and informal organization of 
advanced students in German. At the meetings the time is 
spent in German conversation on different subjects, in playing 
games (with view of developing and building up the vocabu- 
lary) and in singing German songs, thus stimulating and pro- 
moting a deeper and more thorough understanding of the 
cultural and human background of German civilization. 

Literary Societies. — The Dr. Johnson Literary Society for 
young men and the Panvio Literary Society for young women 
provide opportunity for the training and guidance in thinking, 
speaking, and in parliamentary proceedings. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

The detailed expenses of the College year of nine months 

are as follows: 

Registration Fee $ 60.00 

Tuition 80.00 



28 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Student Activities Fee 15.00 

Library Fee 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 

Total for Day Students $ 165.00 

Room Rent $ 50.00 to 75.00 

Board 144.00 to 180.00 



Total for Boarding Students . ..$ 359.00 to $ 420.00 
Room Rent — The price of room rent per student in the 
College dormitories is as follows: 

Alumni Building $ 50.00 

Carlton House 50.00 

Club House - 60.00 

West Dormitory (front rooms) 60.00 

West Dormitory (other rooms) 50.00 

East Dormitory 75.00 

Ladies' Hall 60.00 

Men's Hall 60.00 

Note: Students occupying comer rooms pay $2.50 per semester 
extra in all buildings. 

Two students occupy one room together. Single beds arc 
furnished in all dormitories. The room rental includes current 
for one 60-watt lamp for each student. If additional lights are 
desired the charge will be 75 cents per light per semester. A 
charge of $125 per semester is made to cover extra current 
used when a radio is operated in a dormitory room. Thr 
College reserves the right to change rooms or a room-mate of 
any student at any time, but no student is allowed to change 
rooms without permission from the business office. To do so 
will cost the student $1.00, or more. Students are expected to 
furnish pillows, bed linen, towels, etc. 

BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

Only a limited number of students can be accommodated 
in the Club Dining Hall, and placement of students there is 
made only on reservation. No deductions are made in board 
charges for absence from meals for less than a full consecutive 
week. The price of board is subject to change without notice. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 29 

In order to facilitate figuring of expenses for any combin- 
ation of dining hall and dormitory, the following tables arc 
given: 

Regular College Expenses 

East Dormitory: College 

Dtmng Hall 

Board $ 180.00 

Room 75.00 

Tuition 80.00 

Registration Fee 60.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 

Library Fee 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 

Total for Year $ 420.00 

Per Semester 210.00 

Per Half-Semester 105.00 

South Dormitory, Ladies' Hall, West Dormitory (Front), 
Club House: college 

Dining Hall 

Board $ 180.00 

Room 60.00 

Tuition 80.00 

Registration Fee 60.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 

Library Fee 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 

Total for Year $ 405.00 

Per Semester 202.50 

Per Half-Semester 101.25 

North Dormitory, West Dormitory (other than front), 
Carlton House: College 

Dining Hall 

Board $ 180.00 

Room 50.00 

Tuition 80.00 

Registration Fee 60.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 



30 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Library Fee 3.00 

Athletic Fee 7.00 

Total for Year $ 395.00 

Per Semester 197.50 

Per Half-Semester 98.75 

Note: These estimates do not include any laboratory fees, radio, 
etc. Comer rooms in all dormitories cost $2.50 per semester more than 
other rooms in the same dormitory. 

Special Courses and Fees. — The following tuition and fees 

for special courses apply only to students taking these items, 

and are not included in above figures: 

Liberal Arts Course (up to three), each $ 30.00 

Extra Liberal Arts Course (above five), each .... 25.00 
Laboratory Fee (for Chemistry^ Physics, Biology, 
Home Economics, Accounting, Secretarial Prac- 
tice, Mechanical Drawing, Botany, Geology and 

Surveying), each 10.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin (2 half-hour lessons 

weekly) 75.00 

Practice Fee, Pipe Organ (one hour daily) 32.00 

Fine Arts 80.00 

Typewriting 30.00 

Practice Teaching Fee (per semester) 20.00 

Graduation Fee (Seniors) . 10.00 

Use of Recording Equipment (per year) 1.00 

Commercial and Secretarial Courses. — When the full Sec- 
retarial or Commercial Course is taken, which includes Book- 
keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, Business Arithmetic, Pen- 
manship, Filing, Office Methods, and Business English, the 
cost is the same as the regular course as outlined above. 

Music Courses. — The music courses which cost extra fees 
are Organ, Piano, Voice and Violin, the cost for each being 
$75.00 per year for two lessons a week. 

Payment of College Charges. — College charges for tuition, 
fees, room and board, are payable in advance by the semester. 
Tuition and fees are not refunded in case of withdrawal from 
the college except in cases of protracted illness and on com- 
petent medical advice. Charges for room and board will be 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 31 

made for the time spent in college. No deviation from this 
plan is permissible unless approved by the Business Office. 

Dates of Payments. — The college year is divided into two 
semesters, the first beginning in September and the second in 
January. Tw^o plans of payment of the college expenses arc 
offered to students and parents. 

1. Payment of 50% of total expenses at the beginning of 
each semester. 

2. The total expenses for the year may be divided equally 
into nine installments to be paid promptly and without offset 
on first of each month. 

Each parent or student is requested to notify the Business 
Office concerning the plan selected in order that all concerned 
may know definitely the plan of payment to be followed 
through the year. 

Room Registration and Breakage Fee. — A deposit of $5.0Q 
is paid by all boarding students when they place their appli- 
cations for admission to the college. This deposit is refunded 
at the close of the college year, less charges for breakage and 
damage, if any, other than ordinary wear from reasonable use, 
to the dormitory in which he is located and its furnishings. 
The costs of all repairs for unnecessary damage are prorated 
among all students occupying dormitory in which damage 
occurss. 

Students leaving during the term are expected to check 
out through the business office and to secure a final and cor- 
rected statement of their account. 

Incidental and Miscellaneous Expenses. — Books are esti- 
mated to cost from $20.00 to $25.00 per year, about $15.00 of 
which will be needed at the fall term opening. Books are 
sold at the Bookstore and for cash only. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for any special test or examin- 
ation taken to make up a deficiency or remove a condition,, 
or test or examination on a current course taken other than 
at the regular time. 



32 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

A fee of $L00 is charged for changing a course of study 
after the regular dates set for such changes. 

A fee of $L00 per day up to live days, is charged for the 
late registration. 

After the first transcript of credits, a fee of $L00 will be 
charged for each additional transcript requested. 

Work and Scholarship Credits. — Credit for work done, or 
other student aid, applies toward tuition and room rent, and 
not toward board and fees. 

Students who have regular jobs with the College take 
their meals at the College Dining Hall. Students who have 
either work or scholarship aid from the college are require^ 
to keep the remainder of their expenses paid up promptly ir 
order to continue such aid. 

Financial Requirements. — ^Payments must be promptly 
made. This is a fixed rule of the Board of Trustees, and tl. 
college officers arc not permitted to make exceptions in favoi 
of any person. 

No student will be allowed to take examinations who has 
not made satisfactory settlement of his account prior to the 
beginning of examinations. 

No degrees, certificates, or diplomas will be granted to 
those whose accounts to the College arc not paid in full. 

In any case if the student desires credit on any course the 
full tuition charge must be paid. 

Transfer of credit to another institution will not be made 
until the student's account is paid in full. 

No annual will be delivered to a student until his account 
is paid in full for the entire college year. 

Credit may be denied a student who has failed to take 
physical education according to regulations. 

What to Bring with You. — All students should bring pil- 
low, pillow slips, bed clothing, towels, bureau and table scarfs, 
one knife, fork, and spoon for use in the room when necessary. 




PATHS OF OPPORTUNITY ABOUND AT ELON 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 33 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Collegiate Degrees. — The College confers the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts upon those who complete the requirements 
for the degree. 

Requirements for Admission. — Students may be admitted 
to freshman standing as candidates for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree in Elon College, without examination, on certificate of 
graduation from an accredited four-year high school course, 
with a total of at least fifteen units from the list of subjects ac- 
cepted for admission as given below. A record of the high 
school work should be furnished to the college by the high 
school principal. 

Students who have been graduated from non-accredited 
high schools, or who have attended an accredited high school 
for four years, and have fifteen units of credit, may be admitted 
upon successfully passing the college entrance examinations. 
These examinations will be given at the beginning of each 
semester. 

A limited number of students may be accepted for special 
work or departmental courses, not to exceed fifteen percent of 
the college enrollment and not as candidates for a degree. 

Subjects acceptable for admission are as follows: 

Units 

Bible 2 

Economics or Social Science 1 

English 4 

French 2 

German 2 

History 4 

Latin ; 4 

Mathematics 4 

Music 1 

Science 4 

Spanish 2 

Vocational Subjects 3 

No credit in foreign language may be had until the student 
has completed a minimum of two years in at least one foreign 
language. 



34 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Of the fifteen units required for admission, nine are pre- 
scribed as follows: 

Units 

English 3 

Foreign Language 2 

History 1 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

Students having been graduated from high school but not 
meeting the prescribed requirements may be admitted on con- 
dition, such condition to be worked off before the beginning 
of the sophomore year. Not more than two conditions can 
be allowed. 

Applicants for advanced standing must present to the 
Registrar of Elon College an official transcript of their work 
in other colleges. Full credit will be given for work in ac- 
credited institutions in so far as it parallels the work at Elon. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree must com- 
plete at least one full college year of residence work at Elon 
College. Students admitted to advanced standing are subject 
to all the entrance and graduation requirements of the college. 

Health Certificate. — Every student must present a health 
certificate of a satisfactory physical examination taken within 
the immediate past or pay an examination fee of $L00 upon 
entrance to the college. 

Classification. — For admission to the sophomore class, a 
student must have removed all entrance conditions and have 
completed not fewer than eighteen semester hours of fresh- 
man work toward a degree. 

For admission to the junior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than forty-eight semester hours of work 
for credit toward a degree. 

For admission to the senior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than eighty-four semester hours of work 
toward a degree. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 35 

Classifications are made at the beginning of the school 
year in September, and no new classifications are made during 
the year. 

Registration. — Each student goes to the Dean of the Col- 
lege for a conference and for assignment to a faculty adviser 
who aids the student in arranging his course of study. Before 
entering any department, the student pays the registration fee 
of $30.00 and his other expenses, and receives from the Busi- 
ness Manager a registration card admitting him to the depart- 
ment of the college. The registration fee of $30.00 is payable 
at the beginning of the Fall and Spring Semesters, and no 
student is allowed any privilege of the college until these fees 
are paid. 

Every student is required to register within twenty-four 
hours after his arrival, and not later than 5:30 p. m. of the 
registration days in September and January. The penalty for 
late registration is one dollar for each day after the date set 
for registration, the maximum penalty being five dollars. 

No new course may be entered after September 25 in the 
Fall Semester, or February 1 in the Spring Semester. 

Freshman Orientation Period. — The Freshman Orienta- 
tion Period is for the purpose of introducing the student to 
his environment. It is an endeavor to acquaint the student 
with the policies and ideals of the college. Receptions, assem- 
blies, lectures and open forums help to establish a close fel- 
lowship, and the student is enabled to begin his college life 
more efficiently. Professors are assigned as advisers for a min- 
imum number of freshmen and are, throughout the year, at 
the service of these students. 

Schedule of Studies. — All students are expected to carry 
fifteen hours of college work per week, this amount being 
considered the normal student-load. No student may carry 
less than twelve hours or more than sixteen hours, without 
special permission from the Dean, and in accordance with the 



36 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Handbook regulations for extra work. In making up the 
number of hours required, no course in the Fine Arts, includ- 
ing applied music, can count for more than two semester-hours, 
and no credit is given for physical training in making up the 
120 semester-hours required for graduation. 

Change of Course. — Registration is for an entire course, 
and a course once begun must be continued except in unusual 
circumstances. Continuous elementary subjects must be pur- 
sued for a year in order to be credited toward a degree. Chang- 
ing a course after registration is discouraged, and such change 
may be made only with the permission of the Dean. A charge 
of $1.00 is made for changing a course after six days. No new 
course may be entered after September 25 in the Fall Semester, 
or February 1, in the Spring Semester. Any course dropped 
after those dates automatically draws a grade of "F." 

Nine Hour Rule. — Students failing to pass nine hours of 
the work pursued, may not return for the next semester. This 
rule does not apply to foreign students in the first year of res- 
idence, or to specially admitted students if recommended by 
the Faculty Committee on Admission and Credits; and in the 
case of freshmen students, three hours of the nine may be a 
conditional grade. 

Class Absences. — Absences are counted from the first 
meeting of the class in the semester. Those who enter late are 
to be reported as absent from the previous meetings of the class. 
Not more than three unexcused absences from a class during a 
semester are permitted, without the loss of quality points. 
Necessarily additional absences without penalty are allowed 
students who must be absent in order to represent the College 
as members of athletic teams or other recognized organizations, 
provided that the total absences must be made up as early as 
practicable each semester, by the permission of the Dean and 
at the convenience of the Faculty member concerned. For 
each two additional absenes or any fractional part of two 
additional absences not allowed as specified above, one quality 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 37 

point will be deducted from the quality points earned during 
the semester. 

Any work missed by a student is to be made up at a con- 
venient time appointed by the professor in charge. 

A student who fails to get permission to drop a course 
receives F on the course. No student will be permitted a re- 
examination who has received an F on the course. 

Chapel and Church Absences. — (1) All students are re- 
quired to attend the regular Chapel exercises. Seniors are not 
allowed more than ten absences from Chapel during a semester. 
All other students are not allowed more than six absences. 
(2) All dormitory students are required to attend Sunday 
morning church services. Permission must be secured from 
the proper Dean to attend church off the campus. Seniors are 
allowed four absences during a semester without the loss of 
credit; upperclassmen are allowed three absences during a 
semester without the loss of credit. (3) A student who is ab- 
sent from Chapel or Church over the above limit during a 
semester will be subject to discipline. Absences from Chapel or 
Church over the limit mentioned above, unless excused by the 
proper Dean, will reduce the student's semester hour credits 
one hour for each four Chapel absences or portion thereof, and 
one hour for each two additional Church absences or portion 
thereof. (4) Freshmen are required to attend Sunday school, 
and the same rules shall apply as those concerning attendance 
at Church. 

Semester Examinations. — Semester examinations are given 
in January and May. An average of "D" on each subject in- 
cluding term standing and examination, is required for credit. 
All students making a grade of "E" on a continuous subject 
may be conditioned if this condition occurs at the end of the 
Fall Semester. A grade of "C" is required during the follow- 
. iig semester to remove the condition without a re-examination. 



38 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Students who fail to attend regular tests or examinations, 
-or who fail to hand in papers, are regarded as handing in 
blank papers, unless they have been previously excused from 
the examination. Excuses from tests and examinations are 
granted only in case of absolute necessity. 

Special Examinations. — A student wishing a special ex- 
amination must obtain a permit from the Dean before the 
date of the examination. A student who has been excused 
from an examination or who has made an "E" in a subject 
for the Fall Semester, may have opportunity to make good his 
deficiency without taking the subject over, provided the de- 
ficiency be removed within one college year from the time it 
was incurred. 

A charge of $1.00 for each test or examination taken out 
of the regular time will be made, except in cases where stu- 
dents have been excused from taking the regular test or ex- 
amination at the regular examination period. 

Senior Deficiencies. — Senior deficiencies may be made up 
either at a special examination arranged by the Dean and the 
instructor, or at the regular examination at the close of the 
Fall Semester. All senior conditions must be made up not 
later than April 1st, in order for the student to become a 
candidate for a degree at the following commencement. 

Graduation Requirements. — At the beginning of the Jun- 
ior year, each candidate for the Bachelor of Arts Degree must 
elect a major from the department listed below in which 
majors are offered. More than one major may be elected. 

One hundred and twenty semester-credit hours must be 
completed as a minimum for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
forty-eight hours of which must be taken on the Junior-Senior 
level. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 39 

Majors. — The College oilers majors, four courses only re- 
quired, except as specified, as follows: 

Biology. History. 

Business Administration, Mathematics. 

30 semester-hours.* Music, 34-44 semester-hours. 

Chemistry, Physics. 

English. Religion, t 

French. Science, 6 courses.:]: 
German. 

A major course will not be formed for fewer than three 

students, a minor for fewer than five. 

Minors. — Any field in which a major is offered, if pursued 
for the first two years, as prescribed in the department of in- 
struction below, may constitute a minor, in addition to the 
following fields : 

Applied Mathematics. Greek. Home Economics. § 

Education. Geology. Spanish. 

In addition to the requirement of one major, as specified 
above, two minors totaling twenty-four semester hours, relat- 
ing to the elected major, must be completed. 

(1) 12 semester-hours in English. 

(2) 12 semester-hours in Foreign language. 

(3) One of the following: 

(a) 12 semester-hours in Mathematics. 

(b) 2 courses in a Natural Science. 

(c) 6 semester-hours in Mathematics and one course in 

Natural Science. 

(d) 1 course in each of two Natural Sciences. 

(e) 6 semester hours of Home Economics may be substi- 

tuted for one course in Mathematics or Natural 
Science. 

(4) 6 semester hours in Religion. 

♦Students majoring in Business Administration are advised to minor in 
Social Science. 

fStudents majoring in Religion have at least two years in each of the 
following subjects: History, Sociology, Philosophy, and Greek. 

{This must include Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Geography. 

§Home Economics may be rated as a major, provided both Biology and 
Chemistry are pursued as minors. 



jO ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Students must have an average grade of "C" in the major 
field in order to be graduated. 

Six semester-hours in American History and six semester- 
Jiours in European History are advised. 

Students w^ho plan to pursue graduate w^ork leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy should take both French 
and German. 

Electives. — Any course not chosen as a major or a minor 
may be elected tov^^ard the degree. Additional electives are 
provided in Art and in Applied Music. 

Courses in Art and Applied Music receive four semester- 
hours credit per year. Under no circumstances can more than 
twelve semester-hours credit toward the A. B. degree be al- 
lowed in Art and Applied Music. 

Quality Points. — 120 quality points are required for grad- 
uation in addition to the 120 semester-hours of Liberal Arts 
credits as heretofore required. The quality-point values of 
grades are: 

A — 3 quality-points for each semester hour. 
B — 2 quality-points for each semester hour. 
C — 1 quality-point for each semester hour. 

Comprehensive Examination and Senior Essay. — Each 
senior is required to take a comprehensive examination in his 
major field, or at the discretion of his major professor to write 
an essay. 

1. The comprehensive examination, according to the 
judgment of his major professor, may be either written or oral 
or a combination of the two. The examination is prepared 
and administered by the membership of the department or by 
the membership of the department and a related department 
if the membership of the department consists of less than two. 
The head of the department will act as chairman. The com- 
prehensive examination is to be held prior to December 1 of 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 41 

the student's senior year, and is not to exceed two hours if oral 
or three hours if written. 

2. Each major professor is permitted, at his discretion, 
to require of the student an essay in heu of the comprehensive- 
examination. In case of this essay, the subject is to be sub- 
mitted to the major professor who in turn notifies the deanV- 
office not later than October 15 of the senior year. The first: 
draft of the essay is to be submitted to the sponsoring pro- 
fessor not later than December 1. Three typewritten copies^, 
of this paper shall be submitted to the reading committee, and 
an oral examination on the essay held by the committee which 
reads his work, not later than March 1 of the senior year. This, 
examination is not to exceed one hour. 

Certificates. — Departmental Certificates will be given those 
who have completed the course in Music and Art, provided that 
each student shall have completed fifteen units of high school 
work as required for entrance to the college, and have com- 
pleted the requirements for a major in some one of the College 
departments, with an average of at least C for the work done 
both in the special department and in the liberal arts depart- 
ments. In lieu of a major, the candidate may offer thirty 
semester-hours of Freshman liberal arts work. A certificate 
may be secured in the Commercial Department upon the com^ 
pletion of a one year's course as outlined by that department. 
No certificate is given in the liberal arts departments of the 
College. 

Diplomas. — Departmental diplomas are granted to thosr 
who in a single department complete four years of work with 
an average of C, and in addition two majors in the liberal 
arts departments, or sixty semester-hours of Freshman and 
Sophomore work. 

Reading for Honors. — The purpose of the plan of Reading 
for Honors is to encourage those students who have the ability 
and ambition to study independently in going beyond the 



42 ELQN COLLEGE BULLETIN 

minimum standards of the regular courses. The plan provides 
for the best students a program of training which, alike by its 
-freedom and severity, will develop them to the utmost. 

To this end, prospective candidates should apply to the 
^Chairman of the Honors Committee not later than May 1st of 
their Junior year. A limited number of applicants is then 
admitted by the committee, after faculty approval. 

The admitted candidate is, at the discretion of his advisory 
committee either permitted great freedom in class atten- 
dance of regular courses during his senior year or is excused 
from attendance of regular courses altogether. If the latter 
alternate is pursued, an Honors course which adequately paral- 
lels the requirements and subject matter of regular courses is 
followed at the Senior level. 

The Honors course is based upon work already done by 
the candidate in his major and minor fields and is guided 
by a committee composed of one member from each of these 
departments the professor in the major field acting as coordi- 
nating chairman. Conferences with the chairman occur at 
least once each fortnight, while additional consultations are 
held with the professors in the minor fields. Near the end of 
the second semester of the senior year an oral comprehensive 
examination in the planned reading is held by the Honors 
Committee and some professor invited from the faculty of 
another college or university. 

If any member of the committee is dissatisfied with the 
progress of the candidate, he may request a consideration by 
the committee of the student's pursuing regular class work 
in any given parallel field. No student may expect to continue 
in the Reading for Honors course who does not satisfy the 
committee that he is progressing satisfactorily. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 43 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Tuition Scholarships and Self-Helf Positions. — The Presi- 
dent and the Scholarship Committee of the Faculty award all 
scholarships and self-help positions. No scholarship will be 
awarded to a high school graduate whose average has been less 
than "C" and all scholarships are awarded on the condition that 
the student will average not less than "C" on his college work. 
Self-help positions are awarded on the same basis, with oc- 
casional exceptions. Applications for awards should be in the- 
hands of the Scholarship Committee before July L The atten- 
tion of the applicant is called to the section on "Work and; 
Scholarship Credits," contained on page 31 of this catalogue. 

Alumni Scholarship. — The Alumni Association, in session 
on June 1, 1909, established a scholarship in Elon College. This 
scholarship is awarded in the literary department, and is of 
value of $80.00 a year. 

Elon High School Scholarships. — The Board of Trustees 
offer scholarships to one graduate of any high school of which 
an Elon graduate is principal or superintendent, or a teacher in 
high school work. Said scholarship is good for one year, and 
covers tuition in any liberal arts course. The candidate is to be 
satisfactorily recommended by the principal or superintendent 
and approved by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships. The 
number of such scholarships is limited to ten. 

Public High School Scholarships. — The Board of Trus- 
tees offers ten free tuition scholarships upon the recommenda- 
tion of the principal or superintendent of approved high 
schools, subject to the approval of the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships. 

Ministerial Students and Minor Children of Ministers. — 

Ministerial students and minor children of ministers who live 
at the college are granted scholarships to cover their regular 
tuition ($80.00). Day students taking the ministerial course^ 



-44 ELON COLLEGE BULLETUST 

and minor children of ministers who are day students will pay 
' one-half of the regular tuition charge. 

The J. J. Summerbell Scholarship. — In consideration of a 
tbequest of $1,000.00 for that purpose, left the college by the late 
Dr. J. J. Summerbell, the President of the College each year 
will award a $60.00 tuition scholarship, in either the College or 
one of the special departments, good for the succeeding year, 
to that member of either the Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior 
class, who shall write the best thesis on "The First Command- 
ment." The same is to be adjudged by a committee of the 
Faculty. Theses in this competition are to be typewritten and 
in the President's hands, the name of the writer accompanying 
in a sealed envelope, not later than May 1. 

The Barrett Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. J. Pressley 
Barrett, an original trustee of the College, a free tuition scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to some worthy member of the 
Freshman class. 

The Long Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. S. Long, 
founder and first president, a free tuition scholarship is award- 
ed annually to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

The Staley Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. W. Staley, 
second president, a free tuition scholarship is awarded annually 
to some member of the Freshman class. 

The Moffitt Scholarship. — In honor of Dr. E. L. Moffitt, 
third president, a free tuition scholarship is awarded annually 
to some member of the Freshman class. 

The Martyn Summerbell Scholarship. — Dr. Martyn Sum- 
merbell of Lakemont, N. Y., each year awards free tuition 
scholarship to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

The Parkerson Scholarship. — In memory of her mother, 
^ Mrs. L. S. Parkerson, Mrs. L. M. Cannon awards annually a 
free tuition scholarship to some member of the Commercial 
. Department. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 45 

LOAN FUNDS 

The Bowling Fund. — Dr. E. H. Bowling, Durham, N. C, 
has created a fund to be used in the education of deserving 
students, preferably candidates for the ministry. Those who 
are accepted as beneficiaries of this fund will receive $60.00 per 
year to be applied to their account with the College. They will 
give an interest-bearing note at 6 per cent for the same, with 
acceptable security, and will begin to pay the money back, at 
least one note a year, immediately after graduation. The title 
of this fund will remain in the College, but it is to be perpet- 
ually used for the purpose indicated. Awards of funds are 
made by the President. 

The Amick Fund. — Dr. T. C. Amick, formerly of the 
College Faculty, has created a fund to be loaned to deserving 
students at 6 per cent interest. The President lends this fund 
on proper security. 

The Clarke Fund.— Dr. J. A. Clarke of the College 
Faculty has created a loan fund for deserving students. The 
Business Manager lends this at 6 per cent interest on proper 
security. 

Ministerial Loan Fund. — The treasurer of the College is 
the custodian for the loan fund of $13,031.49 of the Southern 
Convention of Congregational-Christian Churches. It is loaned 
to ministerial students upon the recommendation of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Convention. 

The Eastern Virginia Conference Ministerial Fund. — By an 

agreement with the authorities of the College, whereby the 
Eastern Virginia Conference relinquished certain bonds owned 
by it, there is provided a special fund for ministerial students 
from that conference. The value of this fund is $180 per year, 
but it is provided that no one student shall receive over $100.00 
in any one year. If there are two or more ministerial students 
from that conference, the $180.00 is to be equally divided. It is 
further provided that if there are no students who qualify, the 
fund is not cumulative. 



46 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

The Masonic Fund. — The Grand Lodge of North Carolina 
has given the College $2,500.00 to be loaned to seniors in Col- 
lege, on acceptable security. 

The Knights Templar Educational Loan Fund. — Under 
the rules of the Grand Commandary, students in Elon College 
may secure loans from this fund. 

The McLeod Fund. — The family of the late Prof. M. A. 
McLeod have established a fund of $2,000.00, the interest on 
which is to be loaned to worthy students on proper security. 

The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund.— Mr. John M. W. 
Hicks, of Raleigh, N. C, and of New York City, has estab- 
lished this fund to assist members of the Junior and Senior 
classes. The initial amount of the fund was $1,000.00, which 
the donor hopes may be materially increased. 

ENDOWMENT AND SOURCES OF INCOME 

Tuition and Fees. — The income from tuition in the literary 
and special departments constitutes a chief and growing source 
of revenue for the support of the College. The income from 
fees, matriculation and departmental, is used to pay the inci- 
dental expenses of the College and of the departments. Besides 
these sources of income and gifts from time to time on current 
expenses, the College has the following sources of revenue: 

The O. J. Wait Fund. — This fund was a bequest from Rev. 
O. J. Wait, D. D., of Fall River, Massachusetts. The amount, 
$1,000.00, was the first bequest that came to the College. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Fund. — Of this fund $20,- 
000.00 was given by Mr. Francis Asbury Palmer, of New York, 
before his death. The remaining ten thousand dollars having 
been provided for in his will, became available soon after his 
been provided for in his will, became available after his death. 

The J. J. Summerbell Fund. — Dr. J. J. Summerbell, Day- 
ton, Ohio, from its foundation a staunch friend and loyal sup- 
porter of the College, departed life February 28, 1913, and left 
a bequest of $1,500.00 to Elon. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 47 

The Patrick Henry Lee Fund.— This fund of $1,000.00 is 
a bequest from Capt. P. H. Lee, of Holland, Va. 

The Jesse Winbourne Fund. — This fund, a bequest from 
Deacon Jesse Winbourne, of Elon College, N. C, amounting 
to $5,000.00 became available in January, 1923. It is a part of 
the permanent endowment funds of the College. 

The Southern Convention Fund. — The Southern Conven- 
tion of Congregational Christian Churches asks the Confer- 
ences composing the Convention for $12,500.00 annually for 
the support of the College. This is called the Elon College 
Fund, and is the equivalent of an invested endowment of 
$250,000.00 at 5 per cent. By vote of the Convention in May, 
1918, a note was given the College for $112,500.00, and later, 
$100,000.00 in 6 per cent bonds, as evidence of this obligation. 

The Carlton Fund. — The family of the late J. W. Carlton, 
of Richmond, Va., P. J. Carlton, H. A. Carlton, Luther Carlton 
and Mrs. T. S. Parrott, gave the College for its permanent 
funds, certain R. F. and P. Railway stocks, to found a Profes- 
sorship in Christian Literature and Methods in memory of Mrs. 
J. W. Carlton. Upon his death, in May, 1935, Mr. P. J. Carlton 
left a bequest adding $25,000.00 to the College endowment. 

The Corwith Fund. — W. F. Corwith, a former trustee, has 
given the College for its permanent funds $35,000.00 to found 
a Professorship in Biblical Languages and Literature, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. W. F. Corwith. 

The J. W. Wellons Fund. — Dr. J. W. Wellons, several 
years before his death, bought two annuity bonds of the Col- 
lege in the sum of $1,500.00. By the terms of the bonds, at his 
decease they were cancelled and the principal became a part 
of the general endowment of the College. Dr. Wellons desired 
that the Church supplement his gift, providing an endowment 
of $300,000.00 for the School of Christian Education. 

Other Invested Funds. — Other gifts to the permanent En- 
dowment Fund are: One of $25.00 from the late Rev. J. J. 



48 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Summerbell, D. D., of Dayton, Ohio; one of $283.35 from the 
estate of the late Jos. A. Foster of Semora, N. C; one of $50.00 
by Miss Mamie Tate, as a student loan fund; and one of $100.00 
to be kept at interest for a term of years, left by the late Rev. 
S. B. Klapp. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Board Donations. — The late 

Francis Asbury Palmer, who endowed the College, left his 
estate to a Board to administer it in furthering education. This 
Board at one time made a considerable donation in cash for 
current expenses. 

The Standardization Fund. — During the spring of 1919, 
a campaign was put on to raise additional endowment. This 
was known as the Standardization Fund. There was raised 
$381,600.00 in cash and subscriptions. 

Forms of Bequest. — A number of friends have made pro- 
vision for the College in the disposition of their property after 
their decease. We appreciate this generous action on their part 
and commend it to the liberal-hearted of our friends, for whose 
convenience we append herewith three^ forms of bequests: 

FIRST FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 

sum of Dollars, to be applied at 

their discretion, for the general purposes of the College. 

SECOND FORM 
I give eind bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely in- 
vested by them and called the Scholarship 

Fund. The interest of this fund shall be applied at their discretion 
to aid deserving students. 

THIRD FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely invest- 
ed by them as an endowment for the support of the College. 

Annuity Bonds. — ^Those desiring a stable income on funds 
that they intend to leave the College in their wills, can secure 




STATELY COLONNADES CONNECT THE BUILDINGS 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 49 

the same by placing such funds with the College treasurer and 
receiving an annuity bond as follows: 

ANNUITY BOND 
The Board of Trustees of Eton College. 

Elon College., 19... 

Whereas, of has donated 

and paid to the Board of Trustees of Elon College, a corporation 
established under a charter from the State of North Carolina, its 
principal office being located at Elon College, in said State, the sum 

of Dollars, said sum becoming by said gift the 

absolute property of said Board of Trustees of Elon College, the whole 
amount to go direct to said College and ever be administered for its 
advancement by said Board of Trustees : Now, therefore, in consider- 
ation thereof, the said Board of Trustees agree to pay the 

said the interest on the same at 6 per 

cent, payable semi-annually, during natural 

life. 

As the above interest provision is made for the sole benefit of the 

said during natural life, it is declared 

to be the intention of the parties subscribed hereto that no obligation 
whatever is, or shall be considered herteby to have been assumed by the 
said Board of Trustees, to the heirs, executors, administrators, or as- 
signs of said for any interest after 

life shall have terminated. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF ELON COLLEGE, 

By President ( Seal) 

Witness : Treasurer of Elon College. 

So far five annuity bonds have been taken: two by the 
late Dr. J. W. Wellons, in the sum of 1|1,500.00; one by Trustee 
A. B. Farmer, in the sum of $1,000.00; one by Mrs. J. P. Avent, 
also in the amount of $1,000.00; and a fifth by Mrs. Esther 
Jenkins, in the sum of $3,000.00. Generous-hearted friends, 
desiring a safe investment of their funds and a sure means of 
perpetuating their memory to generations yet unborn, may 
avail themselves of this inviting privilege. 

Insurance Policies. — Friends may make the College their 
beneficiary in one or more insurance policies. Details of this 
plan will be gladly furnished. 



Outline of Courses of Study 



This section outlines proposed courses of study in specific 
fields. Courses numbered 11 through 19 are on the Freshman 
level, 21 through 29 are on the Sophomore level, and 31 and 
above are on the Junior-Senior level. 

FOUR-YEAR COURSES OF STUDY LEADING TO 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

Bus. Adm. 15-16 6 

History 11-12 6 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 6 



Business Administration 

SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

Bus. Adm. 21-22 6 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Math, or Science 6 or 8 



30 
JUNIOR 
Bus. Adm. 31-32-33-34 or 35-36... 6 

Social Science 6 

Math, or Science 6 

Electives 12 



30 



30 or 32 
SENIOR 
Bus. Adm. 41-42, 43-48 or 37-44... 12 

History 48 3 

Electives 15 



30 



English with North Carolina Public School Certificate 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Math, or Science 6 or 8 

30 or 32 
JUNIOR 

English 33-34 or 31-32 6 

Education 47-48 6 

History 6 

Sociology 6 

Electives 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

History 6 

French or German 6 

Psychology 21 and 31 6 

Math, or Science 6 or 8 

30 or 32 
SENIOR 

English 45 6 

English 41-42 6 

Education 32-42 6 

Directed Teachings 3 

Electives 9 



30 



30 



THE CATLOGUE NUMBER 



51 



History and Pre-Law 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Language 6 



Mathematics or Science 



6 or 8 



30 or 32 



JUNIOR 

English 35-36 6 

History 31-32 6 

Mathematics or Science .... 6 or 8 

Business Adm. 33-34 6 

Sociology 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

History 13-14 6 

Psychology 22 3 

Language 6 

Business Adm. 11-12 6 

Electives 3 

30 
SENIOR 

History 48 3 

English-History 21-22 6 

English 33-34 6 

Philosophy 35-36 6 

Electives 9 



30 or 32 



30 



Home Economics with Certificate 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Biology 11-12 8 

Home Economics 11-12 6 

French 11-12 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

Home Economics 13-14 6 

Psychology 21 and 31 6 

Chemistry 31-32 8 

French 21-22 6 



34 

JUNIOR 

Education 47 and 48 6 

Physics 16 4 

Home Economics 23-24 6 

Home Economics 31-32 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

Psychology 32 3 



31 



32 

SENIOR 

Biology 32 4 

Biology 42 4 

Education 52 3 

Education (elective) 3 

Home Economics 41 3 

Home Economics 42 3 

Home Economics 43 3 

Home Economics 44 3 

Home Economics 45 3 



29 



52 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Journalism 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

English 11-12 6 

Language 6 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

30 or 32 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

English 21-22 6 

Language 6 

History 6 

Psychology 21 3 

Science 21-22 or Math. 21-22 6 or 8 
Electives 3 

30 or 32 



JUNIOR 

English 33-34 or 38-39 6 

English 31-32 6 

Electives 6 

History 6 

Sociology 31-42 6 

30 



SENIOR 

English 41-42 6 

English 49 3 

Philosophy 31-32 6 

Electives IS 



30 



Bachelor of Arts Degree and Diploma in Piano, Organ, 
Violin, or Voice 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Music 13-14 4 

Music 17-18 4 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

26 or 28 



SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 23-24 4 

Music 27-28 4 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 21-22 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

32 or 34 



JUNIOR 

Music 21-22 6 

Music 35-36 6 

Music 37-38 4 

Religion 33-34 6 

General Electives 8 



30 



SENIOR 

Music 47-48 4 

Music Elective 6 

General Electives 20 

Recital 



30 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



53 



Bachelor of Arts Degree and 

FRESHMAN 

Hours 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 13-14 4 

Music 17-18 (Piano) 4 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

32 or 34 
JUNIOR 

Music 31-32 6 

Music 35-36 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

General Electives 14 



Diploma in Music Theory 

SOPHOMORE 

Hours 

Music 21-22 6 

Music 23-24 4 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 21-22 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

28 or 30 
SENIOR 
Music 41-42 6 

Music Elective 2 

General Electives 22 



30 



32 



Bachelor of Arts Degree and Certificate in Music 



FRESHMAN 

Music 13-14 4 

Music 17-18 (Voice) 4 

English 11-12 6 

French or German 11-12 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

26 or 28 

JUNIOR 

Music 21-22 6 

!Music 35-36 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

General Electives 14 



SOPHOMORE 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 23-24 4 

Music 34 2 

English 21-22 6 

French or German 21-22 6 

Science or Math 6 or 8 

30 or 32 
SENIOR 

Music 45-46 6 

General Electives 26 



32 



32 



Pre-Engineering — Chemical 



FRESHMAN 

Math. 11-12 6 

English 11-12 6 

Language 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Math. 13-14 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Math. 21-22 6 

English 21-22 6 

Language 6 

Chemistry 2 1 -22 8 

Religion 11-12 6 



32 



32 



54 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



JUNIOR 

Hours 

Math. 31-32 6 

Economics 11-12 6 

Chemistry 31-32 8 

Electives 12 



SENIOR 

Hours 

Math. 41-42 6 

Business Organization o 

Chemistry 41-42 8 

Electives 12 



32 



32 



Pre-Engineering — Civil 



FRESHMAN 

English 11-12 6 

Math. 11-12 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Math. 13-14 6 

Language 6 

32 

JUNIOR 

Math. 31-32 6 

Physics 21-22 8 

Math. 51-52 6 

Elective 6 

Religion 13-14 or 33-34 6 



32 



SOPHOMORE 

English 21-22 6 

Math. 21-22 6 

Physics 13-14 8 

Math. 23-24 or Bus. Adm. 11-12... 6 

Language 6 

32 
SENIOR 

Geology 11-12 8 

Math. 41-42 6 

Physics 41-42 8 

Electives 6 



28 



Pre-Engineering — Electrical or Mechanical 



FRESHMAN 

English 11-12 6 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

Math. 11-12 6 

Engineering Drawing 13-14 6 

Language 6 

32 

JUNIOR 

Physics 41-42 8 

Calculus, Math. 31-32 6 

Physics 21-22 8 

History 11-12 6 

Sociology 31-32 or Philosophy 31-32 6 



SOPHOMORE 

English 21-22 6 

Physics 13-14 8 

Math. 21-22 , 6 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

Language 6 

32 

SENIOR 

Physics 31-32 8 

Math. 41-42 6 

Bus Adm. 33-34 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

Elective 6 



34 



32 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



55 



Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental 

The following courses are suggested to the student con- 
templating a Medical or Dental profession. The courses listed 
for the Freshman and Sophomore years include all of the 
required courses for entrance to Medical School, and fulfill 
the American Medical Association. For the student wishing 
the minimum requirements of the Council on Education of 
to spend more than two years, courses have been suggested 
which will meet the requirements of Elon College for grad- 
uation, and will also give him a better preparation. 



FRESHMAN 

Hours 

BioloRy 11-12 8 

Chemistry 11-12 8 

English 11-12 6 

French 11-12 or German 11-12.... 6 

Math. 11-12 6 

34 

JUNIOR 

Biologj- 31-32 8 

Chemistry 31-32 8 

Physics 21 4 

Health and Hygiene 31-32, 33-34.. 6 



SOPHOMORE 

Houn 

Biology 21-22 8 

Ch<-mistry 21-22 8 

English 21-22 6 

French 21-22 or German 21-22.... 6 

Physics 13-14 8 

36 

SENIOR 

Biology 41-42 8 

Chemistry 41-42 8 

Psychology 21 3 

Sociology 31-32 or Philosophy 6 



Religion 33-34 6 Economics 11-12 6 



32 

Religion 



31 



FRESHMAN 

English 11-12 6 

Science Survey 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Greek 11-12 6 

Bus. Adm. 11-12 6 

30 

JUNIOR 

Religion 23 3 

Religion 31-32 6 

Religion 33-34 6 

Philosophy 31-32 6 

Philosophy 36 3 

History 31-32 6 



SOPHOMORE 

English 21-22 6 

Biology 11-12 8 

Religion 21-22 6 

Greek 21-22 6 

Psychology 21 3 

Geography 22 3 

32 
SENIOR 

Religion 37-38. 6 

Philosophy 35 3 

Philosophy 41-42 6 

History 33-34 6 

Sociology 31-42 6 

Church Music 33 2 



30 



29 



56 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Two- Year Courses of Study 

Students desiring two-year courses may make their selec- 
tion from the courses indicated below: 

Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Course: 

Biology 11-12, 21-22; Chemistry 11-12, 21-22; Physics 11-12; 
English 11-12, 21-22; Religion 11-12, and two elective subjects for 
the year. 

Pre-Law Course: 

English 11-12, 21-22, 35-36; History 11-12, 21-22; Religion 
11-12. Other subjects elective. 

Pre-Engineering Course: 

Physics 11-12, 21-22; Mathematics 11-12, 13-14, 21-22; Eng- 
lish 11-12, 21-22; French Spanish or German 11-12, 21-22; Chemis- 
try 11-12. 

One- Year Secretarial Course 

Fall Semester: 

Shorthand, Typewriting, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
and Penmanship. 

Spring Semester: 

Advanced Shorthand (Dictation), Advanced Typewriting, Sec- 
retarial Practice, Bookkeeping. 

Two- Year Secretarial Course 

First Year same as above. 

Second Year: 

English 11-12, 6 semester hours; Business Administration 11 
and 12, 6 semester hours; Business Administration 33 and 34, 6 se- 
mester hours; Advanced Dictation, 3 semester hours; Business Ad- 
ministration 21-22, 6 semester hours. Total, 27 semester hours. 

NOTE — Satisfactory completion (ability to meet office standards) of the 
One- Year Secretarial course entitles one to a Secretarial Certificate. 



Departments of Instruction 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

MR. GRAVETT 

Biology is the science of life, and therefore includes the 
study of both plants and animals. The courses are arranged 
to teach the fundamental facts of biology, including the laws 
of development, heredity, and variation, together with studies 
of the habits and distribution of the members of the plant 
and animal kingdoms. The courses are planned for those 
who seek a general culture, or professional training. 

11-12 General Biology. The fundamental principles of the 
biological sciences; correlation of laboratory data with the underlying 
principles discussed in class. Origin and development, structures, 
functions, and interrelations of animal and plant life. 3 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

21-22 Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. The 
morphology, histology, physiology, development, and environmental 
adaptations of the vertebrates. Dissections for the purpose of dis- 
covering homologies and analogies. 2 hours class work, 4 hours lab- 
ratory. 8 s. h. 

24 Botany. A study of the scientific basis for identification 
and classification of the higher forms of plant life, chiefly the flower- 
ing plants. Observation of plants in the Southern Piedmont region 
during the spring. Collection, preservation, and notebook descrip- 
tions of families. Genera and sp>ecies are made the process by which 
the student may develop independently an ability to recognize and 
name plants, and to use scientifically constructed guides to the plant 
kingdom. 2 hours class work, 2 hours laboratorv. 3 s. h. 

31 Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology, and 
chemistry of bacteria, and introductory studies of disease and immun- 
ity. Laboratory work in the common bacteriological techniques: 
staining of bacteria, cultural methods, and the analysis of milk and 
water. Offered in alternate years; 2 hours class work, 4 hours labo- 
ratory work. 4 s. h. Prerequisite: Biology 11-12. 

Not offered in 1942-1943. 

32 Physiology. Circulation, respiration, digestion, internal 
secretion, muscle physiology, reproduction, and other physiological 



58 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

processes of animals. Offered in alternate years; 2 hours class work, 
4 hours laboratory work. Prerequisite: Geology 11-12. 
Not offered in 1942-1943. 

41 Genetics. A general introductory course in studies in hered- 
ity, evolution, and eugenics. Presented as a cultural and preparatory 
course for those wishing to pursue teaching, home making, practice of 
medicine and other related vocations. 3 hours class work, 2 hours 
laboratory work. 4 s. h. Prerequisite: Biology 11-12, or Junior 
status. 

42 Embryology. The development of the tissues and organs 
of the frog and chick and some work with mammals. Offered in al- 
ternate years; 2 hours class work, 4 hours laboratory work. 4 s. h. 

Not offered in 1942-1943. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teacliing Biology. This course 
is designed to stress nature study, cultures, preserving materials for 
class-work, arranging courses, and organized laboratory work. 4 s. h„. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

MR. HOWELL 
MRS. HOWELL 
MR. STEWART 

The courses in Business Administration offer help to four 
kinds of students: 

First, to those who plan to be business men or women, 
the theory and practice of business are taught, so that grad- 
uates may be prepared for positions of responsibility, and for 
greater service to society. 

Second, to those who plan to teach, the courses specified 
by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction are 
offered to supply the requirements for the certification of 
commercial teachers. 

Third, to those who have not the time or the money for 
a four-year course, either a one-year or a two-year Secretarial 
course is available. Secretarial students must meet the same 
entrance requirements as other students. A Secretarial Cer- 
tificate is awarded to those who meet certain proficiency 
standards. Only superior students are able to meet those re- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 59 

quirements. Therefore, the two-year course is recommended 
for students of average abihty. 

Fourth, to other students who wish to explore the eco- 
nomic structure of society, Business Administration courses 
are offered as electives. 

A business Administration major consists of thirty se- 
mester hours, six hours of which may be taken from the sec- 
retarial courses carrying degree credit. Those preparing for 
a commercial teacher's certificate must have thirty-six hours 
of business, nine hours of which may be taken from secretar- 
ial courses carrying degree credit. 

11-12 Principles of Economics.'^ An introductory course to ac- 
quaint the student with the fundamental principles which underlie 
economic relations and activities. An analysis is made of production, 
consumption, exchange, and distribution. A brief survey of money, 
banking, and credit, the business cycle, business organization, monop- 
oly and trusts, labor problems, insurance, public finance, and econom- 
ic reforms. A combination of the lecture and case method will be 
used to relate practical situations to theory. 6 s. h. 

15 Economic Resources and Industry, f This course presents 
an elementary survey of the principal world resources, the regions of 
their production, and contribution to world trade. This is followed 
by a study of the major industries, with particular emphasis upon 
the United States. Each industry is studied with respect to raw 
materials consumed, processes and methods used, finished products, 
and the industry's relation and contribution to other institutions 
and economic activities. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

16 Business Organization and Practiced The purpose of this 
course is to introduce the student to certain fundamental information 
regarding the characteristics, organization, operations, relative ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and 
corporations. Business transactions are studied with respect to their 
elementary legal and economic significance. Valuable information 
regarding the use of checks, notes, drafts, etc., in business transactions 
is obtained through business practice assignments. Spring Semester. 
3 s. h. 



^Required of all students majoring in Business Administration. 

fThis course may not be counted as part of the 30 semester hours required 
for a major in Business Administration ; it is, however, recommended for those 
anticipating further work in this department. 



60 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

21-22 Principles of Accounting* This course does not require 
a knowledge of bookkeeping. It deals with the proprietorship equa- 
tion, financial statements, the ledger and the trial balance, posting, 
adjusting and closing entries, columnar records, controlling accounts, 
business forms and papers, notes and drafts, partnership accounting, 
classification of accounts, accrued and deferred items, corporation 
statements, elements of manufacturing accounts. Problems, practice 
sets, and lectures. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per semester. Not open 
to Freshmen. 3 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

25 Salesmanship. This course is a consideration of the broad, 
field of personal selling. The steps in a sale, the psychology of the 
selling process, knowledge of goods and of the market, selling to 
wholesalers and to retailers, are some of the problems considered. 
Attention is given to sales methods, the relation of personal selling to 
advertising, sales management, the house policies, the selection, train- 
ing, cooperation with, and supervision of salesmen, and the various- 
methods of compensating salesmen. Prerequisite or corequisite: Psy- 
chology 21. 3 s. h. 

28 Credits and Collections. This is a consideration of the place 
of credit in the marketing structure. The economic basis of credit 
extension, the relation of credit to selling, methods of collecting and 
using credit information, credit bureaus, the use of trade acceptances^ 
commercial paper, and collection letters, are investigated. Prerequi- 
site: Bus. Adm. 11-12 or 21-22. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

31 Marketing. A study of the fundamental processes of the 
system of marketing. Nature and scope of marketing, marketing 
functions, types of middlemen, retail distribution and marketing 
agencies, wholesale marketing of manufactured goods, marketing con- 
veniences, shopping and speciality goods, marketing industrial goods, 
direct selling. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Retailing. This course offers the student an opportunity 
to become familiar with those principles which have been found 
generally successful in the field of retailing. Types of retail es- 
tablishments, store location and arrangement, buying, inventory 
control, display and selling, are illustrative of the topics studied. 
Part-time work in retail establishments on the part of the students 
enrolled is encouraged. This plus visits to some of the outstanding 
stores in the section and discussion periods from time to time led 

"'Required of all students majoring in Business Administratio:*. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 61 

by persons of recognized standing in the field, give the course more 
than theoretical value. Prerequisite: Bus. Admin. 11-12. 
Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

33-34 Business Law. This course is designed to give the 
student an understanding of the main principles of law governing 
the daily conduct of business. A consideration of contracts, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, sales, 
bailments, personal and real property relations. Prerequisite: Bus. 
Adm. 11-12 or Junior standing. 6 s. h. 

35-36 Advanced Accounting. Profits, analysis of statements, ad- 
vanced work in partnerships and corporations, agencies and branches, 
statements of affairs, realization and liquidation, good will, reserves, 
funds, consolidations, mergers, partnerships, liquidations, consolidat- 
ed balance sheets and profit and loss statements, reorganizations, 
foreign exchange, and insurance. Prerequisite: Business Adminis- 
tration 13-14. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per semester. 3 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

37 Cost Accounting. An introduction to cost accounting pro- 
cedure which includes basic cost terms; accounting for materials, 
labor, and butden; job-lot and process systems. A brief study is 
made of standard costs. Students visit industrial plants in order to 
gain practical information as to the problems involved. Prerequisite : 
Bus. Adm. 11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. 
Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

38 Income Taxation. This course is a study of federal in- 
come tax regulations as they relate to individuals, partnerships, and 
corporations. A complete, authoratative tax manual is used for 
study and analysis of the law. This is supplemented by problem 
material which asquaints the student with procedures and forms. 
The course may be scheduled either in the fall or spring semester 
in lieu of Cost Accounting or Auditing, when there is sufficient de- 
mand to justify substitution. 3 s. h. 

42 Money and Banking, A general survey of the modem 
financial system, including the principles and history of money and 
monetary standards; the principles and functions of banks and bank 
credit, commercial banks, investment banks, trust companies, the 
Federal Reserve System; a brief survey of the commercial banking 
systems of other countries. The relation of the business man and 
the banker. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors only. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 



62 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

43 Life Insurance. The purpose of this course is primarily to 
acquaint the general business student with the subject of life insurance, 
and, secondarily, to provide a foundation course for those intending 
to enter the insurance business. The topics include: the use of life 
insurance for protection and investment; the selection and treatment 
of risks; the policies and options offered, life insurance programs; 
rate-making; mutual, stock, legal requirements; and company organi- 
zation. Prerequisite: Business Adm. 11-12. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

44 Auditing. This course deals with the duties of the auditor; 
the problems involved in detailed and balance sheet audits, special 
investigation, and preparation of reports. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 
11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Spring 
Semester, 3 s. h. 

45 Materials and Methods. This course is to assist students 
who desire Grade "A" Teaching Certificates in the commercial field. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

47 Elements of Statistics. A course designed for students in- 
terested in the application of the statistical method to various fields, 
especially the social sciences. Such topics as the collection, presen- 
tation and analysis of data, measure of central tendency, and cor- 
relation are discussed. 3 s. h. 

48 Labor Problems. Causes of industrial unrest and other 
labor problems, the reactions of various groups to these conditions, 
and recent labor tendencies, are discussed. Special emphasis is given 
to the American labor movements, their objects, tactics, and accom- 
plishments. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Spring Semester. 
3 s. h. 

Secretarial Courses 

5 Penmanship. This course is optional, but is recommended 
for those students who have never had a course in penmanship, and 
also for tliose who write with a laborious and cramped style. It is 
designed to teach the fundamentals of correct posture and to develop 
a fluent, rapid, and legible handwriting. Fall Semester. 3 hours per 
week. 

7 Commercial Arithmetic. This is a brief elementary course in 
business arithmetic, which reveals short-cuts and helpful suggestions 
for speed in computations. Major emphasis is placed upon develop- 
ing proficiency in those problems frequently met by secretaries and 
office workers; such as problems in billing and pay rolls, interest, 
trade discounts, bank discounts, profit and loss, and price marking. 
Fall Semester. 3 hours per week. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 63 

8 Secretarial Practice. This course acquaints the student, 
through actual laboratory experience, with the major and minor 
activities and duties of the secretary. It is designed to bring into the 
classroom, as much as possible, the office atmosphere. Filing, index- 
ing, mailing procedures, transcription methods, and financial duties 
are emphasized. Spring Semester. 6 hours per week, with 3 ad- 
ditional laboratory hours. 3 s. h. 

9 Personal Typewriting. A short course in touch typewriting 
offered to students who wish to learn the use of the machine for per- 
sonal convenience, and not for marketable skill. Fall Semester. 
3 hours a week. 

11 Business English. The purpose of this course is to give 
the basic elements and principles of good practical English, as adapted 
to the usages of modem business. The topics discussed, besides a 
thorough review of grammar, are letter planning and organization; 
effective letter layout; credits, collections, and adjustments; selling 
by mail; job-hunting by mail; fact writing — reports and memoran- 
dums; basic advertising. Fall Semester. 3 hours per week, 

12 Bookkeeping and Accounting. This elementary course ac- 
quaints students with present day methods of keeping and interpreting 
business records and reports. In addition to the regular bookkeeping 
cycle, special journals, notes, interest, discount, deferred charges, 
reserves, and columnar records, are studied. 

13-14 Shorthand.* Fundamental principles of Gregg Short- 
hand with special emphasis on accuracy and speed. Practice work 
in dictation and transcription. In the spring semester intensive work 
is done in dictation and transcription. 6 hours per week throughout 
the year. 6 s. h. 

15-16 Secretarial Typewriting * The course in touch t>TDe- 
writing includes a speed-building program, which develops a high 
degree of skill. Five hours of class instruction, and six hours of 
laboratory work, each week throughout the year. 

17-18 Advanced Typewriting. Emphasis is placed on applied 
typewriting. The course is open only to students who have had one 
or more years of typewriting. 

31-32 Advanced Dictation. A second-year course in shorthand, 
consisting of rapid dictation and rapid transcription. Training in the 
editing duty of the private secretary is a part of this course. Effective 
English is stressed, as well as the art of completing transcripts with 
dispatch. 3 hours per week. 3 s. h. 

*Degree credit allowed only to students with Business Administration major. 



64 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

38 Office Management. This course offers advanced prepara- 
tion for the teacher of commercial subjects. In addition, it trains for 
the positions of office manager, private secretary, and head stenogra- 
pher. A study of office organization, which includes an analysis of 
equipment, of lay-out, of personnel, of standards, of paying methods, 
and of departmental routine, constitutes the subject matter of this 
course. Actual office work is required of each student. Spring Se- 
mester. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

/ , MR. BRANNOCK .5. 

Since matter is one of the two fundamental entities of the 
universe, chemistry is one of the fundamental sciences. Hence 
it is advantageous for those working in any field of science to 
study chemistry. .-, . 

The field of chemistry is broad and practical. There is 
no great industry which does not make use of some chemical 
principles. Chemistry is recommended to those who plan to 
enter the special fields of astronomy, geology, biology, med- 
icine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, home economics, agri- 
culture, or engineering. Aside from its vocational values, 
chemistry is also recognized as an important part of a general 
education. 

11-12 General Chemistry. Fundamental principles of inor- 
ganic, physical, and experimental chemistry. Each student is required 
to keep a note book in which he must record his experimental work. 
3 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

21-22 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 
The kinetic-molecular hypothesis, solutions, electrolysis, the chemical 
behavior of ionic substances, chemical equilibrium, and electro-motive 
chemistry. 3 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory work. 8 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

31-32 Organic Chemistry. Organic compounds, including the 
aliphatic and the aromatic series: hydrocarbons of the methane series, 
alcohols, organic acids, ethers, anhydrides, esters, aldehydes, ketones, 
amines, amides, halogen compounds, cyanogen, carbonhydrates, cylic 
hydrocarbons, dyes, and proteins. The laboratory work consists not 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 65 

only in the methods of preparation and purification of compounds, 
but also in methods of arriving at their structures. 3 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

41-42 Quantitative Analysis. Chiefly laboratory work in simr 
ple introductory determinations in gravimetric and volumetric methods 
of analysis. Pure salts of known composition are first analyzed, fol- 
lowed by unknown specimens consiting of pure salts or mixtures of 
pure salts. 1 hour class work, 6 hours laboratory. 8 s. h. 

45-46 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Chem- 
istry. The main purpose of this course is to present the modern 
theory and methods of teaching chemistry in secondary schools. 
6 s. h. 

48 Physical Chemistry. Problems in the gaseous, liquid and 
solid states; solutions; the phrase rule, thermo-chemistry ; chemical 
change; and electro-chemistry. 3 hours class work. 3 s. h. 

53 Industrial Chemistry. Water, fuels, destructive distilla- 
tion, alkalies and hydrochloric acid, iron and steel, packing house 
industries, cottonseed oil products, leather, soap, cement, paper, paints, 
and clay products. 3 hours class work. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MR. MESSTCK 
MISS MOORE 

The functions of the Department of Education are: 
First, to guide students in acquiring a background in the 
history and philosophy of education, so that they may under- 
stand the basis upon which modern progressive trends in 
education are built. 

Second, to inspire students with the ideal that the purpose 
of all education is that one may learn to live a better life, 
that school is life, and that the proper methods of teaching 
are those which begin with the life situations of the child 
and are built upon them. 

Third, to instruct students in the principles and tech- 
niques of teaching so that they may know and understand the 
proper procedures of instruction. 



66 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Professional Requirements for North Carolina Teaching 
Certificates 

High School. — High School Teachers' Certificates, Class 
A, represent graduation from standard four-year colleges. 
These certificates are issued on the basis of transcripts of col- 
lege records which show the professional credit and specialized 
work hereinafter described for each certificate. Each appli- 
cant should meet the requirements in two or more teaching 
fields. The subjects for which certificate is granted will ap- 
pear on the face of the certificate. 

First. The professional requirements common to all cer- 
tificates are: 

1. Educational Psychology, 2 s. h. 

2. Principles of High School Teaching, or 
Problems in Secondary Education, 2 s. h. 

3. Materials and Methods (required in one subject only), 2 s. h. 
*4. Directed Teaching (one or both fields), 3 s. h. 

5. Electives, 9 s. h. 

Note: In Directed Teaching one should have not fewer than 
forty hours of actual class teaching or should teach not fewer than 
forty full class exercises. Thirty hours of observation must precede 
teaching. 

Second. Subject-matter requirements for the teaching of 
any subject are: 

1. For English, at least 24 s. h., including Grammar, Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric, and American Literature. 

2. For French, at least 18 s. h. This is based on two units of 
entrance credit. If no entrance credit is presented, the applicant must 
have 24 semester hours. The requirements for any other modem 
foreign language will be the same. 



*If all requirements except Directed Teaching are met, the Class A Cer- 
tificate will be issued after the applicant shall have had one year of successful 
teaching experience. It is imderstood that this teaching will be done under the 
joint supervision of the Head of the Education Department of the institution 
from which the student has been graduated and the superintendent of the school 
in which the applicant is teacliing. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 67 

3. For Social Studies, 30 s. h., including 6 s. h. in American 
History, 6 s. h. in European History, 9 s. h. in Government, Geo- 
graphy, Economics or Sociology, and 9 s. h. Electives from the above. 

4. For Mathematics, at least 15 s. h. 

5. For Science, at least 30 s. h., including 6 s. h. in Biology, 6 s. 
h. in Physics, 6 s. h. in Chemistry, 3 s. h. in Geography or Geology, 
and 9 s. h. from above subjects as electives. Individual certification 
will be granted in any of the above fields in which 12 or more s. h. 
credit is presented. Certification for General Science will require 18 
s. h. from three of the four areas given above. 

6. For Commerce, at least 36 s. h., including Stenography, Type- 
writing, Bookkeeping, and Office ISIanagement. 

7. For Public School Music, at least 30 s. h., including 3 s. h. 
in Voice. 

8. For Physical Education, at least 30 s. h. 

9. For Home Economics, at least 45 s. h., including 6 s. h. of 
Chemistry, 6 s. h. of Biology, 2 s. h. of Physics, 3 s. h. of Art, 8 s. h. 
of Foods, 8 s. h. of Clothing, 6 s. h. of Management (Home Manage- 
ment, Home Management Residence, Economics of the Home), 6 s. h. 
of Family (Child Development, Family and Social Relationships, 
Health and Home Nursing), and 6 s. h. of Social Science. 

10. For Fine Art, 30 s. h. 

11. For Bible, 15 s. h. 

Grammar Grade. — Grammar Grade Teachers' Certifi- 
cates, Class A, represent graduation from a standard four-year 
college, or the equivalent, embracing not less than 120 semes- 
ter-hours. As a part of the work, or in addition to it, the 
applicant shall have the following: 

1. English, 12 s. h., including six semester hours of Composition, 
two of Children's Literature. 

2. American History- and Citizenship, 6 s. h. 

3. Geography, including nature study, 6 s. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 9 s. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and Music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 6 s. h., including two semester 
hours each of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Education. 



^ ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

6. Education, 21 s. h., including Grammar Grade Methods 
(Reading, Language, Arithmetic, Social Science), Classroom Manage- 
ment, Child Study, Educational Psychology, Educational Measure- 
ments, and Directed Teaching. 

Primary. — Primary Teachers' Certificates, Class A, repre- 
sent graduation from a standard four-year college, or the 
equivalent, embracing not less than 120 semester-hours. As 
a part of the work, or in addition to it, the applicant shall 
have the following: 

1. English, 12 s. h., including six semester hours of composition, 
two of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 6 s. h. 

3. Geography, including Nature Study, 6 s. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 9 s. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and Music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 6 s. h. including 2 s. h. each 
of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Education. 

6. Education, 21 s. h., including Primary Methods (Reading, 
Language, Numbers), Classroom Management, Child Study, Educa- 
tional Psychology, and Directed Teaching. 

Before any certificate will be issued for teaching in the 
elementary schools, the records from the institution in which 
the applicant received his training must show that he has 
reached a satisfactory stage of proficiency in Spelling and 
Penmanship. This certification will be made by the institu- 
tion and will appear on the record. 

General Education Courses 

33-34 Elementary Methods. This course works on problems 
involved in plaiming and carrying out learning programs in each 
grade of the elementary school. A review of experimental practice 
and recent educational trends is made the basis for building programs 
to meet the needs and to develop the curriculum of the modem Pri- 
mary and Grammar grade school. Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

42 Classroom Management. To acquaint the student teacher 
with methods of organization and procedure in the guidance of stu- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 69 

dent activity. Principles of directed conduct, integrated unit pro- 
grams, and other essential features. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Educational Measurements. Philosophy of the testing pro- 
gram through acquaintance with objective tests, their formulation, 
giving, and interpretation. Actual testing programs are set up and 
a knowledge of statistical procedures is acquired, from the mode 
through correlation so that test results may provide a basis for student 
guidance. Fall Semester. 3 s. h, 

36 Curriculum. This course is designed to acquaint students 
with a comprehensive view of the basic considerations involved in 
determining the content and organization of curricula for elementary 
and secondary schools. A survey of modem practices in curriculum 
offerings, trends and construction, and emphasis on pertinent en- 
vironmental possibilities will be stressed. 3 s. h. 

43 History of Education. Special emphasis is placed upon edu- 
cation in the United States, with particular attention to educational 
leaders and progressive programs. The progress of elementary, secon- 
dary, higher, and adult education is studied in detail, with European 
and later American influences as backgrounds. 3 s. h. 

44 The Philosophy of Education. This course acquaints stu- 
dents with the underlying principles of educational theories; the 
solution of educational problems; the development of democratic con- 
ceptions underlying an educational program; and the social, moral; 
and cultural implications of the development of personality. 3 s. h. 

45 Materials and Methods for High School Teachers. See 
specific departments for description. 

47 Principles of High School Teaching. To guide the prospec- 
tive teacher in the principles of learning; to acquaint him with modem 
procedures of school programs; and to give him an underlying phi- 
losophy of student attitudes and needs so that he may know how to 
guide the pupil properly in his activities. 3 s. h. 

48 Character Education. This course shows how the home, the 
school, the church, the community, and other agencies function as 
units, and as cooperative agencies in a combined effort to guide boys 
and girls in ways of wholesome and happy living. 3 s. h. 

51, 52, 53, 54, 55 or 56 Observation and Directed Teaching. 
Both observation and directed-teaching are done under close coopera^ 
tion with the public school teachers and principal. The student 



70 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

teacher must observe and teach at least 80 hours in the subject of his 
major field. He is required to analyze teaching problems in written 
reports of his observations, and to make careful teaching plans in 
freq' ent conferences with the supervising classroom teacher and with 
the College supervisor of directed-teaching. Fall or Spring 3 s. h. 

57-58 Directed Methods in Teaching. This course gives all 
who are doing directed teaching an opportunity to work together on 
leaching problems as they occur in the real situations of the Elon 
College Public School. The course is in the nature of a workshop for 
directing attention to tools, equipment, books, and materials needed in 
carry^ing out a teaching program at the school, and to enable the 
student teacher to gain first-hand experience in supplementing class- 
room routines with facilities for active learning. Through group 
discussions student teachers piece together the teaching problems o/ 
the whole school and see their own individual classroom problems in 
relation ro those of other teachers. Fall or Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

Directed Teaching. — It is the philosophy of the College 
to offer the student opportunities in all departments for self- 
development in thinking and in character. The Department 
of Education uses the local public schools as a place where 
educational problems may be seen as realities. Close cooper- 
ation between the public school and the Department of Edu- 
cation makes possible the opportunity for student teachers to 
study Education through a real school situation. The public 
school teachers and principal help supervise directed-teaching, 
and the student teachers enter actively into the life of the 
school, contributing their efforts under College guidance to 
further the development of the school, as well as to use the 
school classrooms as a training ground. 

The College looks upon directed-teaching as a serious 
responsibility in training for a profession, and requires careful 
preparation in subject-matter and theory of education along 
with high standards in directed-teaching. All the facilities 
of the college library, laboratories, studios, workshop, special 
classes and seminars dealing with the methods, materials and 
planning of school programs are available to make directed- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 71 

teaching an experience in the appUcation of the modern pro- 
gressive philosophy of education to a teaching situation. Those 
who expect to enter educational work 5hould consult the head 
of the Department of Education before taking any course. 

Slimmer Sessions. — Two six-weeks terms are conducted 
for students who wish to earn credit toward a B. A. degree, 
and for teachers in service. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

MR. COLLINS 
MR. BARNEY 

The function of courses in the field of English is three- 
fold: 

First, to give ample opportunities for oral expression of 
ideas and feelings. To this end the Freshman and Sophomore 
courses employ group discussion as the chief method of ap- 
proaching subject-matter. Advanced courses in Dramatic 
Literature, American Literature, Shakespeare, Argumentation 
and Debate, and Modern Literature, offer abundant oppor- 
tunity for oral expression and interpretation. 

Second, to give directed opportunities for development in 
the universally necessary craft of writing. Expression in writ- 
ten language should be both practical and creative. The 
Freshman and Sophomore courses contain opportunities for 
both kinds of expression, while on the Junior-Senior level the 
course in Journalism specializes in direct writing, and the 
courses in Dramatic Literature and Modern Literature em- 
phasize a more purely creative approach. Grammar and 
"Correct English" are treated as a means to a more complete 
expression rather than as an end in themselves. Through the 
required courses for Freshmen and Sophomores an attempt is 
made, moreover, to produce a uniform excellence in the use 
of written English as a tool for all other studies. 



72 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Third, to give to students, through their extensive reading 
and discussion, a firm grasp of the aesthetic and social im- 
pHcations of Hterature and language. The Freshman course 
is primarily an introduction to American culture, the Soph- 
omore course discovers English culture, and the advanced 
courses deal with other phases of culture in relation to groups 
of mankind, past and present. 

11-12 Freshman English. This course includes a review of 
grammar and punctuation together with the study of the forms of 
composition. During the second semester the Reader's Digest, and 
other periodicals, are used as a basis for class discussion and themes 
on current topics. 

21-22 Sophomore English. During this year there is carried on 
an extensive, individualized reading program, with group discussions 
of literary and social phenomena common to the works read. The class 
not only reads, studies, and discusses works in English Literature, 
but also attempts to produce in some literary form, in which leads 
from some of the courses in Freshman English are followed. 

24 Children's Literature. The study of children's language 
as a basis for the selection and production of reading or story ma- 
terials for children in the primary and elementary schools. With a 
knowledge of children's uses of language in mind, the student writes 
stories or study materials which will be suited in style and content to 
the demands of the modem school for programs related directly to 
the child's experiences in living. Examination is made of the field 
of children's literature and folk literature to discover reading matter 
which satisfies modem educational requirements and to find sources 
for the production of new materials. No credit on major. 3 s. h. 

31-32 Journalism. This course demands the cultivation of 
curiosity and resourcefulness, the formation of direct style of writing, 
an understanding of public opinion and newspaper policy, and a 
working knowledge of modem printing. These assets are acquired 
through the writing, editing, and printing of the college newspaper, 
"Maroon and Gold." 6 s. h. 

33-34 Shakespeare. Workshop productions on an Elizabethan 
stage of at least fifteen complete plays by Shakespeare and his fellow 
dramatists, and the public production of one of these plays. The 
student's experience of Shakespeare is direct and active rather than 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 73 

merely receptive through lectures and silent readings. The production 
of each play is preceded by study of the essential facts about the play 
and its production, and is followed by a critical discussion of the 
characters and of the dramatic values of Shakespeare's work. 6 s. h. 

35-36 Argumentation and Debate. Classroom practice and 
training in various branches of speech. Formal and informal debate 
and argumentation, formulating group opinion, after-dinner speaking, 
oratory, and discussion leadership. 6 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

37-38 Dramatic Literature. Readings in the drama from^ 
Ibsen to contemporary dramatists, with the parallel composition of 
original plays by the class. All plays studied, whether professional 
or original, are given workshop production in the Little Theatre, and 
several of these plays are produced for the public during the year. 
The course thus covers many phases of the modern theatre: play- 
writing, acting, directing, staging, costuming, and make-up. 6 s. h. 

41-42 American Literature. For students who wish an ad- 
vanced understanding of American culture, for students who plan 
to teach, and for those above the sophomore level who have trans- 
ferred from other colleges. 6 s. h. 

45-46 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Eng- 
lish. Materials for teaching literature and language are explored 
and evaluated, and problems of teaching English are discussed in 
relation to the student's experience of directed teaching. 6 s. h. 

49 Modern Literature. Readings in contemporary English and 
American literature, with parallel work in creative writing. The best 
of these compositions are printed in the Spring number of "Elon 
Colomiades." The writing and readings are accompanied by discus- 
sion of modem social and psychological theories and practices with 
an attempt to help the student to find his place in the modem world 
of ideas and feelings. 3 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

MISS OXFORD 

21 Principles of Geography. A study of the principles and the 
major geographical factors in determining the distribution of popula- 
tion, occupations, and modes of life. The effects of climatic and 
economic conditions on the peoples of the world will be stressed.. 



74 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN" 

Practical work in the study of maps and reports will be included in 
the course. Fall Semester, 3 s. h. 

22 Geography of North America. A study of the geographical 
regions of the continent, climate, industries, natural resources, and 
the human responses to the geographic conditions; the growth i>f 
cities, development of trade and the geographical influences in th-r 
development of the United States. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Geology. This course deals with Physical and Dynamical 
Geology. Laboratorj^ work consists of frequent field excursions and 
a study of the common minerals and rocks, map interpretations, and 
geological folios. Lectures and recitations three hours a week, two 
hours devoted to laboratory work. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1942-43. ' 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

MR. FRENCH 

Ancient Greek is a cultural language. It supplies a depth 
of background for the modern cultural languages. Students 
majoring in Religion are expected to take New Testament 
Greek. 

11-12 Elementary Greek. Mastery of declensions and conju- 
gations, s}'nopsis of verbs, word analysis, derivation and composition, 
and simpler principles. Drill in pronunciation by reading Greek 
aloud. Xenophon, Book I. 6 s. h. 

21-22 Greek New Testament. The study of the grammar of 
New Testament Greek. Readings in the New Testament. Problems 
and methods of exegesis. Textual problems. 6 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

MR. SCHULTZ 
MR. HIRSCH 

In the Department of History, raw historical material is 
not memorized aimlessly, but is evaluated, criticized and or- 
ganized in such fashion as to illuminate the minds of students 
with respect to the nature of the past and the manner in 
which the past has produced the present. One of the chief 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 75 

contributions which history may make is the working toward 
a better understanding of the modern age. 

11-12 The Establishment and Development of the American 
Nation. A survey of the European background of American history; 
the English settlements, their developments and their experiences with 
the colonial system seeking to protect and control them; the revolt,, 
union, and organization of the United States; the struggle for Ameri- 
can Neutrality; the development of national parties; the problems of 
territorial expansion; the War between the States; Reconstruction, 
North and South; the agrarian movement; financial questions; re- 
form; relations of government and business; and expansion overseas. 
Special emphasis upon bibliography. 6 s. h. 

21-22 The Establishment and Development of the English 
Nation. 400 A. D. to the present. Primitive beginnings in Britain, the 
Germanic invasions, the Norman conquest, the development of Parlia- 
ment, the Hundred Years' War, the foundation of the Tudor Mon- 
archy, James and the divine right of kings, revolt, the Republican 
experiment in England, Restoration, revolution of 1688, the rise of the 
cabinet, constitutional development and loss of first colonial empire, 
foundation of Modem Empire, the World War, and Simpson crisis, 
George VI. Emphasis is placed upon legal and constitutional de- 
velopment, and hence the course is recommended for students planning 
to study law. 

31-32 Ancient and Medieval History. A brief survey of an- 
cient history from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia to 
the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed upon the evolution of cultures 
and civilizations, and upon the development of art, science, litera- 
ture and philosophy. A survey-course of European history. 6 s. h. 

33-34 Modern European History. The evolution and develop- 
ment of modern history, from the breaking down of the medieval 
world, through Renaissance and Reformation to the rise of the na- 
tional states of Europe. The dynastic and colonial rivalries, the 
intellectual and industrial "revolutions" of recent centuries are taken 
in together with the growth of art, literature, science and philosophy. 
6 s. h. 

45 Methods and Materials in T'eaching High School History. 
Modem trends in the teaching of history and its place in education; 
the construction of courses and methods of integrating history with 
other fields; teaching procedures, materials, and aids for study; pro- 



76 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

lems of evaluating, organizing, and using such materials as maps, 
pictures, textbooks, reference books, biographical materials, radio, 
■and motion pictures. 3 s. h. 

46 llie Evolution of the Commonwealth of North Carolina. 
A survey of the state from its origins to the present; its place in the 
histor}' of the United States as a whole, in colonial times, during the 
Revolution, Federalism, Democracy, contributions to the Western 
Movement, attitude toward nullification and secession, the Civil War, 
reconstruction, big business and the New Deal. 3 s. h. 

47 American Government and Politics. A general survey of 
national, state, and local governments. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

48 History of American Democratic Ideas and Institutions. Af- 
ter a survey of the European origins of democracy, a study is made 
of American democratic thought and institutions from the colonial 
period to the present day. 3 s. h. 

Offered spring semester in alternate years. Not offered 1942. • 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

MR. SPRAGUE 

The Department of Mathematics ofifers in Freshman and 
Sophomore years, work which introduces the student to prin- 
ciples of mathematical reasoning. In advanced courses, in- 
tended primarily for those going into the engineering or 
teaching professions, a solid groundwork is offered in the 
fields of Calculus and Applied Mathematics. Emphasis is 
constantly placed upon the value of scientific reasoning in ap- 
proaching any problem. 

11 College Algebra. A rapid review of the fundamentals of 
algebra, followed by a thorough study of quadratic equations, ratio 
and proportion, variation, series, binomial formula, logarithms, de- 
terminants, and the theory of equations. 3 s. h. 

12 Trigonometry. The solution of right and oblique triangles 
both with and without logarithms; trigonometric identities and trigono- 
metric equations; line functions and graphic representations. 3 hours 
class work. 3 s. h. 

21-22 An Introduction to Calculus. Treatment of the straight 
line, the circle and other conic sections, special plane curves and 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 77 

transformation of coordinates. A study of differential calculus, dif- 
ferentiation of functions with simple applications to the derivative of 
rates, length of tangents, normals, and similar topics. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 11-12. 6 s. h. 

31 Differential Calculus. A study of differentiation of func- 
tions, with applications of the derivatives to rates, length of tangents, 
normals, and other topics; the subjects of maxima and minima, 
curvature, rates and envelopes; drill on curve tracing. 3 s. h. 

32 Integral Calculus. Integration: The constant of integra- 
tion, the definite integral; drill on the methods of integration. The 
object is to enable the student to investigate without having to rely 
on any tables or set rules, and after having learned the principles of 
integration, to apply them to such subjects as areas, lengths of curves, 
volumes of solids or revolution, and areas of surfaces of revolution. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21-22, 3 s. h. 

41 Differential Equations. Ordinary and the partial differen- 
tial equations, the theory of integration of such equations as admit 
of a known transformation group, and the classic methods of integra- 
tion compared with those which flow from the theory of continuous 
group. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1940-1941. 

42 Applied Calculus. Differential equations continued, and 
calculus applied to mechanics and to engineering problems. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1940-1941. 

45 Materials and Methods in the Teaching of Mathematics. 
Methods of presenting the different branches of mathematics to the 
pupil in secondary schools. Offered in alternate years. 3 s. h. 

Applied Mathematics 

MR. BOWDEN. 
13-14 Engineering Drawing. This course provides a basic 
treatment of modem conventions, theory and practice of Engineering 
Drawing. Instruction is given in the care and use of instruments, 
drawing materials and scales, methods of procedure in drawing, free- 
hand lettering, geometric drawing, orthographic projection, working 
drawings, tracing, and blue printing. Prerequisite : Plane Geometry. 
No credit on major. 6 s. h. 



78 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

MR. HIRSCH 
MISS BUSSELL 

The work in French, German and Spanish is designed to 
give to the students an appreciation of the manners and cus- 
toms of these peoples, their background and language, to 
provide suitable material for those v^^ho desire to teach these 
languages in secondary schools, and to provide tools for 
research. Students who have not had two years of foreign 
language in high school will be required to make up this 
deficiency by taking the first year of a language without 
credit. 

I — French 

7-8 Elemenetary French. An introduction to the essentials of 
French grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and civili- 
zation with major emphasis on the reading approach. 6 s. h. 

11-12 Intermediate French. A thorough review of French 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury short stories, novels and plays. 6 s. h. Prerequisite: French 
7-8 or two years of high school French. 

21-22 A Survey of French Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces of the classical, romantic, realistic, and natural- 
istic periods with a consideration of the necessary historical back- 
ground and literary criticism. 6 s. h. 

31 Advanced Grammar and Composition. This course provides 
a systematic review of the fundamental principles of grammar and 
trains the student in the use of idiomatic French. The work is es- 
sentially practical and provides abundant oral and written practice. 
3 s. h. Offered first semester, alternate years. Not offered, 1942-43. 

32 The Modern French Theatre. Extensive reading and dis- 
cussions of nineteenth and twentieth century plays as well as lectures 
and reports on critical and historical material. 3 s. h. 

Offered second semester in alternate years. Not offered 1942-43. 

41 Phonetics and Oral Practice. A practical approach to cor- 
rect pronunciation through the study of the formation of French 
sounds, oral exercises and ear training. Major emphasis will be 
given to individual problems of pronunciation. Phonographs and 
discs will be used. 3 s. h. Offered first semester, alternate years. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ^ 

42 The Modern French Novel. Rapid reading and discus- 
sions of significant nineteenth and twentieth century novels, as well 
as lectures and reports on critical and historical material. 3 s. h. 

II — German 

11-12 Elementary German. An introductory course including 
thorough study of the fundamentals of the German grammar and the 
common vocabulary, of pronunciation, elementary composition, read- 
ing and translation. 6 s. h. 

21-22 Intermediate German. The work of this course includes 
the reading and translating (partly at sight) of German prose and 
poetry, exercises in composition and free reproduction, oral and writ- 
ten, with considerable colloquial practice and a rapid review of 
grammar. 6 s. h. 

31-32 Advanced German. This course is intended for those 
who have had two years of German in College. It stresses practical 
use of the German language. It includes class reading and transla- 
tion of selected German authors as well as the history of German 
literature, investigations in German language and civilization (partly 
in German) with special emphasis upon the ideals and influence of 
German Literature and thought of the 18th and 19th centuries. 6 s. h. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 

41-42 A Survey of German Literature. This course is design- 
ed to introduce the student to the outstanding literary masterpieces 
and the greatest figures and personalities in German literature of 
different periods. It aims to give an idea of the relation of literature 
to social, political and religious history. 6 s. h. 

Ill — Spanish 

11-12 Elementary Spanish. An introduction to the essentials 
of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and 
civilization of Spanish-speaking countries with early readings in easy 
Spanish prose. 6 s. h. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish. A thorough review of Spanish 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth century 
short stories, novels and plays. 6 s. h. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 
or two years of high school Spanish. 

31-32 A Survey of Spanish Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces from the Golden Age to the present day, with a 
consideration of the necessary historical background and literary 
criticism. 6 s. h. 



80 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

MR. BOWDEN 
MR. FRENCH 

The Department of Philosophy and ReUgion seeks to 
communicate to the students the heritage of the past, and to 
equip them with the stimulus to achieve an intelligent inter- 
pretation of that heritage for present and future ends. Students 
achieve a vital and constructive attitude toward life through 
historical and critical study of philosophical and religious lit- 
erature. 

The fundamental doctrines of Christianity, as found in 
the teachings of Jesus, are interpreted as having real meaning 
for the present age of scientific progress and discovery. 

In addition to preparing students for effective participa- 
tion in general Christian service and in wholesome living, the 
function of this department is to prepare a select group of 
young men and young women for graduate training, that they 
may become intelligent teachers and Christian ministers. 

Philosophy 

31-32 Introduction to Philosophy. An introductory study of 
the basic philosophical problems: What is reality? What is the 
basis for values? What is consciousness? Is knowledge possible? 
How distinguish truth from error? Is the world a machine? Has 
the world a purpose? What are the relations of religion and science 
to life? 6 s. h. 

Offered in alternate years. 

35 Logic. The conditions under which thinking proceeds; the 
elements of formal logic, induction, and scientific method. Offered in 
alternate years. 3 s. h. Fall Semester. 

36 Ethics. A study of the early beginnings and growth of 
morality, the development of customs and social organization, the 
psychological aspects of morality, some modem systems of ethics, and 
the application of ethical theory to some modem world-problems. 
Offered in alternate years. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 

38 The Philosophy of Science. A comparatively new field of 
study, covering the basic philosophical principles upon which the 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 81 

sciences are based. Dealing with the foundations rather than the 
facts of science, the course does not require a background of advanced 
scientific knowledge. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 

41-42 The History of Philosophy. The history of philosophy 
from early Greek to nineteenth-century German philosophy, including 
the pre-Socratic philosophers, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Early 
Christian and Scholastic philosophies, seventeenth-century Rational- 
ism, English Empiricism, Kant, Hegel, and subsequent German Ideal- 
ism. Students read from original sources and from modern commen- 
tators. Offered in alternate years. 6 s. h. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 

Religion 

11-12 Survey of the Bible. A historical account of the rise of 
Hebrew and Jewish religious literature, the Christian Church and its 
literature, and the situations which produced the various documents 
and books of the Bible. 6 s. h. 

21-22 New Testament History and Literature. A brief survey 
of the religious experiences of the Hebrew prophets; the social, re- 
ligious, and political situation in Palestine; the historical bases for 
our knowledge of the religious experience, character, teaching, and 
dynamic faith of Jesus; the impact of his life and teaching; the de- 
velopment of the Christian Church in Palestine, and its spread from 
Jerusalem to Rome. 6 s. h. 

23 Leadership in Christian Education. Administration of the 
Sunday Church School, materials and methods for work with chil- 
dren, young people, and adults, and plans for a local church program 
of leadership training. 3 s. h. Fall semester, alternate years. 

31-32 Old Testament History and Literature. The historical 
development of the literature of the Old Testament; the early poems, 
narratives, and laws, the growth of the Hebrew monarchy; and the 
ethical, political, and religious contributions of the literary prophets. 
Further extensive reading in the Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and 
Apocalyptic material. 6 s. h. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 

33-34 Philosophy of Religion.* The origin and development 
of religious belief from primitive times to the present day, including a 



*NOTE — Students wishing a major in Philosophy are given full credit 
for this course under the head of Philosophy. 



82 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

survey of the classical religions — Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucian- 
ism, Mohammedanism, Judaism — and a detailed history of Chris- 
tianity. The influence of scientific inquiry, Biblical criticism and 
modem psychology upon religious belief; the development of a con- 
structive philosophy of religion and of life; and the problems of 
religious belief in a scientific age, 6 s. h. 

37-38 Seminar: Christianity and Other Religions. Individual 
assignments, papers and reports on various phases of Christian His- 
tory and Doctrine, including its Jewish background. Research in 
other classical and modern religions. 6 s. h. 

Two hours, one afternoon each week. 

41-42 Bible Seminar. Special research in some fields of Old 
and New Testament study, such as archaeology, hexateuchal synopsis, 
the law codes of the Old Testament, Hellenic Judaism, St. Paul and 
the Messianic consciousness of Jesus. Offered in alternate years. 
6 s. h. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 

43-44 Seminar in Religion and Modern Social Problems. The 
basic social problems viewed in the light of their religious, ethical, and 
social implications. Each student pursues one or more projects of 
research into some particular social situation. Brief reports on the 
social implications of outstanding current events. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

MR. HOOK 

Physics is one of tlie important divisions of human knowl- 
edge. Its purpose is to describe as accurately and clearly as 
possible the physical processes which go on in the universe 
around us. Wherever a transfer of energy is involved, the 
principles of physics are used. This may occur in the spin 
of the atom or in the movement of a giant liner; the flight 
of an alpha particle or the creation of a galaxy. Physics is a 
tool course for other sciences. The fundamental phenomena 
of physics are approached from a combination of two points 
of view: the purely physical, in which the mind paints a 
picture of what is happening; and second, the mathematical 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 83 

and analytical, in which a mental picture is expressed by 
means of mathematical symbols. 

In the first courses of the physical sciences special empha- 
sis is placed on the development of the scientific attitude. 

11-12 Survey of Physical Sciences. General subjects of astron- 
omy, geography, geology, physics, and chemistry. Demonstrations 
with various physical apparatus and illustrations with slides, film 
strips, movie films, and field trips. No credit on major. 6 s. h. 

13-14 General Physics. Mechanics, heat, sound, light, and 
electricity. Examples and experiments given throughout the entire 
course with a view of rendering it practical. Training in the manipu- 
lation of instruments employed in physical investigation, accurate 
measurements and practice in properly recording and reducing ex- 
perimental data. Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 8 s. h. 

21-22 Modern Physics. Atomic nature of matter and elec- 
tricity, corpuscular nature of radiant energy, spectroscopy, planetary 
model of the atom. X-rays, molecular structure, radio activity, neu- 
trons, positrons, theory of relativity, and astrophysics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 13-14. 8 s. h. 

31-32 Electricity and Magnetism. Ohm's law, electrical power 
and energy, concerning wire, resistance, magnets and magnetism, 
magnetic circuit, generator, motor, batteries and electrochemical action, 
inductance, capacitance, alternating currents, vacuum tubes and 
gaseous conduction, and the electrostatic circuit. Prerequisite: Phy- 
sics 13-14. 8 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

33-34 Light and Sound. Reflection, refraction, dispersion, 
chromatic, spherical, aberration, optical constants of mirrors and 
lenses, velocity, radiation, absorption, interference, diffraction, polari- 
zation, colors of crystaline plates and oil films, and photography. The 
nature of sound velocity, frequency, resonance, forced oscillations, 
tranverse and longitudinal vibrations, vibrations in various media, 
and acoustics of buildings. Prerequisite: Physics 13-14. 8 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

35 Aeronautics. This course is offered for the Civilian Pilot 
Training Program sponsored by the Civil Aeronautics Authority. 
The following subjects are studied in detail: history of aviation, civil 
air regulations, navigation, meteorology, parachutes, aircraft and the 



84 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

theory of flight, engines, instruments, radio uses and forms. Flying 
instruction 35 to 50 hours. Special fee. 3 s. h. 

Successful completion of the above course entitles the student to 
a Private Pilot Certificate. 

36 Household Physics. A one-semester course designed espe- 
cially for women students and to meet the requirements of the public 
school certificate in Home Economics. 4 s. h. 

41 Mechanics. Forces: their composition and resolution, forces 
acting on a rigid body, balanced forces, work and energy, first and 
second degree moments, dynamics of translatory motion, dynamics of 
rotary motion. 

42 Heat. The course presents the essential fundamentals of 
heating, ventilating, and air conditioning. The emphasis is placed 
on domestic uses. Factors affecting human comfort, heat transmission 
and air infiltration, calculation and estimation of building heat losses 
and heat gains, fuels, combustion, draft, chimneys, boilers, insulation, 
heating with steam, hot water, and warm-air systems; air conveying 
and air cleaning, humidification and dehumidification, control of air 
temperature and summer cooling of buildings. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

MISS OXFORD 
MR. MESSICK 

Psychology teaches students to understand human nature 
and its ramifications, helps them to interpret their own mental 
reactions, and points out possible ways of building and ad- 
justing personality. 

21 General Psychology. An introductory course, emphasizing 
fundamental processes of human behavior, responses to various 
stimuli, building of personality, and mind in its relationship to the 
modem world. A prequisite to all other courses in Psychology. 
Fall Semester. 3 s. h. 

31 Educational Psychology. Inherited tendencies; laws of 
learning; laws of teaching; habit formation; individual differences; 
formation of correct ideals and attitudes. Spring Semester. 3 s. h. 

32 Psychology of Childhood. A study of the mental, physical, 
and emotional developments of the child in relation to personality and 
social adjustments. 3 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 85 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

AIR. BOWDEN 

Sociology is that branch of the social sciences which deals 
with the individual in relation to his human environment. 
Students discover their places of responsibility in society only 
through a knov^^ledge of the culture, mores and institutions 
of that society. It is the function of sociology, therefore, to 
trace the development of culture, to point out the chief char- 
acteristics and danger zones in the contemporary social scene, 
and to inspire student interest in solving the problems of 
modern life. 

31 Intro duct my Sociology. The origins and development of 
culture, the nature of personality and its relation to society, forms of 
collective behavior, community and social organization, and the 
basic social problems: the family, international relations, political 
and economic organization, and social development. 3 s. h. Fall 
Semester. 

41 Current Social Problems. Analysis of origin and nature of 
social problems in the realm of public health, crime, race relations, 
immigration, distribution of wealth and income, population, city and 
rural conditions, and social change. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon problems in the South. Lectures, discussion, projects, and re- 
ports. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 

42 Rural Sociology. Conditions of life in the country and 
constructive organization for improvement, social technology of rural 
communities, importance of agriculture, rural institutions, cooperative 
marketing, good roads, consolidated schools, social surveys of the 
country and the rural church, organization of the rural community, 
and social control. 3 s. h. Spring Semester. 

Offered in alternate years. 



Special Departments of the College 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

MISS NEWMAN 
MR. HIRSCH 

A thorough course of instruction in Art is offered to those 
who desire to devote themselves to its study and practice. 
Students in this department are required to spend twelve 
hours a week at work in the studio. An annual exhibition 
is held during Commencement. 

11-12 Freehand drawing in charcoal from still-life, geometrical 
solids and casts, linear and angular perspective structure, study of 
light and shade, flat washes in water color and monochrome paintings 
color sketches from still-life, pastel painting, letters and designing,, 
clay modeling and pottery. 

21-22 Drawing in charcoal from still-life, heads, hands, features, 
and casts; painting in oils, pastels and water colors, from still-life, 
illustration, wash drawings in water color; principles of color; pen 
and ink drawings, designing and structure. 

23 Elementary Drawing. Working knowledge of the principles 
of drawing necessary in the primary and elementary school. Color 
design, drawing and painting from life or geometric forms, illustra- 
tions, posters and printing. Picture study art activities for the child 
in the home, school, and community; and the development of creative 
abilities. Offered in alternate years. 3 s. h. 

24 Industrial Arts for Elementary Grades. Methods and 
materials used in the study of industrial arts for primary and gram- 
mar grades. Color theory, weaving, modeling, construction work, 
posters, book-binding, block-printing, and projects for history and 
geography classes. The subject matter is creative and illustrated, and 
is centered about the interests and needs of the child. Offered in 
alternate years. 3 s. h. 

Sketch Class. Pencil-drawing, with or without model out-of- 
door work. 

China Painting. Tinting: La Croix colors, matt colors, powder 
colors. Flower Painting: Designs of Edward Reeves and Marshall 
Fray; Dresden colors, Herr Lamm. Figure Painting: La Croix 
Dresden, Herr Till. Ornamental Work: Raised paste and gold; 
enamels; jewels, etc., on hard china, satsuma, Beleek, and Sedji. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 87 

33 History of Christian Art. A course that traces the develop- 
ment of Christian Art from its earliest beginnings, through Byzan- 
tine, Irish and Carolingian days to its highest bloom in the Roman- 
esque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles. Architecture is 
treated as well as sculpture and painting. Slides contribute greatly 
to the understanding of the subject. 2 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

MISS MUSE 

The work in Home Economics is designed to prepare 
young women for home-making, to provide adequate training 
to meet the requirements for teacher's certificate in Home 
Economics, and to offer foundation courses for those wishing 
to enter other fields of Home Economics. 

11-12 Food Preparation and Service. The general principles 
of cookery applied to the preparation of different types of foods. 
A study of the composition, selection, care, and preparation of foods 
is coordinated with a study of their nutritive value and digestion. 
Planning of menus, cooking and serving of breakfast, luncheon, and 
dinner, 1 hour class work; 4 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

13-14 Clothing and Textiles. Study of textiles and problems, 
selection and construction of clothing, including the use and alteration 
of commercial patterns, the drafting of patterns, and the appropriate 
use of fabrics. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 6 s. h. 

31 Home Nursing and Child Care. Home care of the sick, 
first aid, and practical experience in the care of pre-school children. 
3 hours class work with laboratory. 3 s. h. 

32 House Planning and Furnishing. This course deals with 
matters pertaining to the house and its environs. A study of art 
structure, good spacing, tone relations, and color arrangements, as 
applied to planning, decorating and furnishing a home. Includes a 
survey of architectural elements, period furniture, decorative treat- 
ments and materials. Students desiring practical information on the 
subject will find this course helpful. 3 s. h. 

33 Child Development. The development of the infant and 
pre-school child with emphasis on physical, social, emotional and 
mental OTOwth. 



88 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

33 Nutrition. The fundamental scientific principles of human 
nutrition and their application to the feeding of the family. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 11-12 and Chemistry 11-12. 3 hours 
class work. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

34 Dietetics. Normal diets for children and adults and diets 
for the sick. Diets in relation to income scale. Prerequisite : Home 
Economics 33. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

41 Economics of the Home. The science and art of planned' 
family living. General policies for the use of time, energy, money, 
and property. 3 s. h. 

Not offered in 1941-1942. 

42 Home Management. The adjustment of the home to 
changed social and economic conditions, civic responsibilities of the 
home, the organization and efficient handling of home industries, 
household accounts, and the family budget. Each student is required 
to live in the practice house for at least six weeks. 2 hours class 
work, and laboratory work in the practice house. 3 s. h. 

43 Costume and Design. Art principles and color harmonies 
applied to the original designing of costumes in pencil-drawing and 
crayons. A survey of historic costumes from ancient to modem, 
times, thus giving a background of knowledge from which to draw 
and create new designs. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 3 s. h. 

44 Advanced Clothing. The construction of garments from 
different materials; accessories to complete the costume; economics of 
textile purchasing. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 13-14 and 43. 3 s. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Home Economics. A 
study of the development of Home Economics; organization and con- 
tent of course of study; leaders in the work of Home Economics in 
relation of Home Economics to other subjects in high school curricula; 
planning and presentation of lessons ; texts, reference books, and maga;- 
zines; and the place of Home Economics teachers in the commimity. 
3 s. h. 

48-49 Home-Maker^ Course. A survey course to acquaint; 
students who are not majoring in Home Economics with the principles 
of architectural designs, home planning and furnishing, cooking* 
serving, sewing, color harmony, dress designing, and other pertinent, 
information for the home-maker. No credit on major. 6 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 89 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

MR. PRATT, Piano and Theory 

MR. LOADWICK, Voice 

MR. MOORE, Piano, Organ, and Theory 

MISS LE VAN, Public School Mtisic and Piano 
MRS. HENRY, Violin 
MR. RHODES, Band 

The Department of Music has a four-fold purpose: First, 
to offer courses in the theory of music and to the general 
student body. Second, to afford opportunities for musical 
growth through student participation in the concerted per- 
formance of music. Third, to provide a comprehensive foun- 
dation for those wishing to make music their profession. 
Fourth, to offer lessons in applied music to special students, 
either children or adults. 

Diploma in Music. — The sequence leading to a Diploma 
in Music is intended for the student who wishes to make the 
profession of music his life work. The diploma qualifies a 
student to apply for a certificate to teach music in the public 
schools of North Carolina, provided the student takes the ad- 
vanced course in Public School Methods (Music 45-46). How- 
ever, the candidate for the diploma need not prepare for public 
school teaching. Diplomas are given in Theory, Piano, Or- 
gan, Violin, and Voice. The requirements for the Diploma 
in Music will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

Certificate in Music. — The sequence leading to a Certifi- 
cate in Music is intended for those students who desire to 
teach music in public schools. This certificate qualifies the 
student to apply for the North Carolina Public School Music 
Certificate. The requirements for the Certificate in Music 
will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

11-12 Harmony. Intervals, scales, triads, seventh- and ninth- 
chords, inversions, figured bass and harmonization of melodies, dia- 
tonic modulation, elementary form. 6 s. h. 

13-14 Ear Training and Sight-Singing. The course presents 
the rudiments of music, develops sight-singing ability, and musical 
dictation. 4 s. h. 



90 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

15-16 Introduction to Music. An introductory survey course, 
open to all students of the College. The fundamentals of music, 
musical instruments, forms of musical composition. The development 
of an appreciative understanding and enjoyment of music from the 
listener's point of view. No credit on major. 4 s. h. 

17-18 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons, see 
below. 2-4 s. h. 

21-22 Advanced Harmony. Altered chords, non - harmonic 
tones, chromatic and enharmonic modulation, form and analysis. Pre- 
requisite: Music 11-12. 6 s. h. 

23-24 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing. Continua- 
tion of ear training and sight singing and musical dictation. 4 s. h. 

25-26 Public School Music. Choice of materials for elemen- 
tary grades, rote-songs, part-songs, folk-songs. The child's voice, 
correction of the monotone. Intended primarily for students seeking 
primary or grammar grade Certificate. No credit on major. 3 s. h. 

27-28 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons: see 
below. 2-4 s. h. 

31-32 Counterpoint. Sixteenth-century and modem counter- 
point in two, three, and four parts. Counterpoint applied to various 
types of vocal and instrumental composition. Prerequisite: Music 
11-12. 6 s. h. 

d>2) Church Music and Hymnology. The history of music in 
the Church. Detailed hymnological studies. The sacred as contrasted 
with the secular style. The ideals of church music and the means for 
their realization. The development of discriminating taste in the 
selection of vocal and instrumental music for use in the Church. 
2 s. h. 

Prerequisite: Music 13-14. 

34 Conducting. Technique of conducting. Score reading, 
resonance, and combination of tone qualities in orchestral choirs, the 
conducting of symphonies and choral works. 2 s. h. 

Not offered, 1942-43. 

35-36 History and Appreciation of Music. The development 
of musical art from ancient times to the present. The relationship 
between the evolution of music and social conditions, and between 
music and the other arts. The study of music as literature, through 
analysis of masterworks. 6 s. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 91 

37-38 Private Lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. 
2-4 s. h. 

41-42 Composition. Creative work in music, advanced form 
and analysis, modem harmonic and contrapuntal theories. 6 s. h. 

43-44 Advanced Form and Analysis. A study of musical form 
through the Sonata-Allegro forms. Students working toward a Di- 
ploma in Music Theory must take Music 41-42 rather than this 
course. 4 s. h. 

45-46 Advanced Public School Music. The study of materials 
and methods for primary and intermediate grades, junior and senior 
high school; choice of materials and methods in appreciation; the 
child's voice and the changing voice. This course is intended pri- 
marily for music majors seeking a teacher's Certificate in Music. 
6 s. h. 

47-48 Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. Private lessons; see 
below. 2-4 s. h. 

Applied Music 

Private lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice, may 
be taken in the Department of Music for credit on degrees 
up to 12 semester hours. (See note under Electives.) A max- 
imum of two hours credit per semester is granted for two 
thirty-minute lessons and twelve hours of practice a week. 
Credit is determined, however, on the basis of actual accom- 
plishment, and is granted only after examination before the 
members of the faculty of the Department of Music. 

Piano. — Preparatory and Intermediate Courses. — These 
courses cover the work in piano from the beginning through 
such compositions as the Little Preludes by Bach, Sonatinas by 
Kuhlau and Beethoven, Studies by Heller. 

Advanced Courses. — The freshman course begins with 
the Two-Part Inventions of Bach; Studies, Opus 299 of Czer- 
ny, the easier sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven, pieces of 
Grieg, Chopin, Schumann and others. The sophomore and 
junior courses cover more difficult compositions. The best 
compositions of the classic, romantic, and modern schools are 
studied. The senior course covers such compositions as the 



92 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Transcriptions by Bach-Liszt, the more difficult preludes of 
Debussy, Concertos. 

Organ. — The freshman course in Piano must be complet- 
ed before beginning the study of Organ. The material used 
in the organ course includes the Organ School by Ritter, pre- 
ludes and fuges of Bach, sonatas of Mendelssohn, Rheinberger, 
school. The students will have thorough drill in sight-reading 
and Guilmant, and standard compositions of the modern 
and the different styles of hymn playing, together with the 
study of accompaniment for solo, quartet, and chorus. 

Violin. — A thorough foundation is given in playing scales 
and arpeggios in any form. An extensive repertory is devel- 
oped from Bruck, Mendelssohn, and others. 

Voice. — The first two years of vocal study are devoted 
especially to the correct development of the voice. English, 
Italian, and German songs are added, as well as the study of 
operatic and oratorio arias. 

Note. — Monthly recitals are given, and each student in Applied Music is 
expected to perform at least twice during the year. Every candidate for the 
Diploma in Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice must give a complete recital. 

General Courses in Applied Music 

The Elon Singers. — A choir of mixed voices. Member- 
ship is based on examination by the Director of Music. Three 
rehearsals weekly. Two semester hours yearly. However, 
not more than four semester hours credit may be applied 
toward the A. B. degree. 

The Elon Festival Chorus. — This chorus is open to all 
students, faculty members, and singers from Elon College and 
surrounding communities. The purpose of the organization 
is to present standard oratorios and other choral works. 

The Elon Band. — Training is offered to students who can 
play band instruments. The band furnishes music for athletic 
activities and other college functions. Four rehearsals weekly. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 93 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

MR. HENDRICKSON 

DR. CARRINGTON 

MR. BRUNANSKY 

MRS. HENDRICKSON 

This department emphasizes the care and building of the 
body and the development of the mind. The further aim is 
to stimulate the growth of such character traits as honesty, 
cleanliness, and cooperation, thus enhancing the student's per- 
sonality and value to society. 

31-32 Physical Education. Designed for students who expect 
to teach. Background in the teaching of health and hygiene; history 
of physical education, planning of programs, supervision of play- 
ground activities; study of games, method of teaching games and 
dances; first aid information. Two hours per week. Open to 
women. 4 s. h. 

33-34 Physical Education. Principles and history of physical 
education, organization and supervision of intra-mural programs, 
teaching and direction of games, coaching, first aid information. Two 
hours a week. Open to men. 4 s. h. 

35-36 Physical Education. Physical education, skills, applied 
techniques. Two hours a week. Open to men. 4 s. h. 

41-42 Lay Medicine and Hygiene. Practical knowledge about 
the functions of the body in health and disease. Dissection of dog, 
with study of anatomy and physiology, and of diseases and accidents 
with a general resume of their prevention and treatment; study of the 
normal and abnormal functioning of the mind. One hour a week. 
2 s. h. 

43-44 Health Education. The teaching of health and school 
health problems. One hour a week. 2 s. h. 

The Physical Training program is planned to give to the 
young vi^omen and men varied activities in intra-mural sports, 
including archery, basketball, volley ball, tennis, touch-football, 
horseshoe pitching, and soccer, rhythmic dancing, hiking, and 
calisthenic exercises. 

All students are expected to participate regularly in some 
activity, and are required to have physical training for two 
years. Credit may be withheld from students failing to com- 
ply with this regulation. 



Roster of Students 



SENIORS— 1941-42. 

Abner, Mabel Tennalla 810 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Adair, Louis Benjamin 310 Court St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Atwater, Lucy Steelman 502 West Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Austin, Henry Marshall Rt. 2, Albemarle, N. C. 

Barney, John Willis Box 318, Elon College, N. C. 

Barrier, Edna Alene 601 Third St., Spencer, N. C. 

Bean, Clifton Talmadge 803 Third St., Spencer, N. C. 

Bell, Allen Duncan, Sr Parksley, Va. 

Bell, Earl Edward 159 Chautauqua, Portsmouth, Va. 

Boone, Robert Edward 2102 Elm Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Bryan, Curry Edward, Jr 1149 King St., Charleston, S. C. 

Carroll, Margaret Juanita 61 Barnes St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Clapp, Boyd Rt. 6, Greensboro, N. C. 

Clarke, John Vernon Snow Camp, N. C. 

Ciaytor, John Wm Box 188, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Clayton, Julius Lee Rt. 1, Ruffin, N. C. 

Coble, Worth Dewey, Jr 505 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cole, Dorothy Frances 615 Ireland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Corbitt, Sarah Margaret Sunbury, N. C. 

Cox, Robert Eugene E. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Craft, Maurice 1445 Ogden St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Culbreth, Howard Crawford Box 27, Siler City, N. C. 

Daher, Bernard George 520 DeKalb St., Bridgeport, Conn 

Dameron, Mary Lee Rt. 1, Yanveyville, N. C. 

Dobbs, Hazel White 421 Fom-th St., Shenandoah, Va. 

Donato, Charles 335 Bishop St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Dye, Delia Cobb Rt. 1, Reidsville, N. C. 

Ellingsworth, Margaret Penniwell London Bridge, Va. 

Felton, INIargaret Edith Irvington, N. J, 

Frazier, Frances Margaret Asheboro, N. C. 

Garber, Harold, Jr 321 Third St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Gilliam, Bessie Florence Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Gilliam, Frederick Keene Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Goode, Grace Wilkins Virgilina, Va. 

Griffin, Wilma Lois Snow Camp, N. C. 

Grissom, Martin Luther Graham, N. C. 

Henry, Angie 815 Linden Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Floyt, Elizabeth Mabel 520 East St., Walpole, Mass. 

Huffstetler, Wm. Harvey Box 133, Haw River, N. C. 

Hunter, Marjorie Rose Elon College, N. C. 

Jones, Charles Lawrence 1014 Willard St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Kerns, Jewell Ether, N. C. 

Kravitz, Isidore 1225 Tenth Ave., Belmar, N. J. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 95 

Lightboume, James Horn, Jr 401 Church St., Burhngton, N. C. 

Mansfield, Roy H Rt. 2, Sanford, N. C. 

Martin, Carl Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Martin, Ruth Fairchild Erooktield Center, Conn. 

Malloy, Carmoc Joseph 1001 Krankford Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

May, John Allen, Jr 1801 W. Market St., Greensboro, N. C. 

McDade, James Pass Hillsboro, N. C. 

McDuffie, Albert Mills Box 95, West End, N. C. 

McGougan, Dorothy Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

Mclntyre, Hazel Anne Rt. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Merritt, Lena Evelyn Box 463, Burlington, N. C. 

Miller, Pansy Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Morgan, Ogsburn Lee Box 315 Elon College, N. C. 

Murphy, June Paige 118 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Nash, William Parish Elon College, N. C. 

O'Conner, William Joseph 4330 42nd St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Phillips, Marvin Worth 214 Elm St., Ashebo;o, N. C. 

Pritchett, James G Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Rawls, Marcella Lee 204 S. Broad St., Suffalk, Va. 

Saecker, Wellington Mills Portsmouth, Va. 

Schwob, Helen Elizabeth 138 E. Livingston St., Orlando, Fla. 

Shaw, Edward Francis Box 3, Wentworth Farm, Roscmoiit, Penna. 

Somers, Lester Irvin Rt. 4, Bbrlington, N. C. 

Stamey, Mary Frances Polkville, N. C. 

Stephens, Lila Budd 110 Church St., Hertford, N. C. 

Triplett, Inez Purlear, N. C. 

Triplett, Velma Purlear, N. C. 

Utt, Claude Kenneth Rt. 7, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Walker, William Thomas Brown Summitt, N. C. 

Walters, Charles Manley, Jr 220 Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Weldon, Richard Thomas, Rt. 1, Handerson, N. C. 

Williams, Elmer Christine 313 Lancaster Rr., Richmond, Va. 

JUNIORS— 1941-42. 

Abernathy, Talmadge Lafaj-ette 2nd St., Islebane, N. C. 

Askin, Bernard 627 Allison St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Beeman, Kenneth 2138 Gallia St., Portsmouth, Ohio 

Black, Rena Gilmer College Corner, Ohio 

Brown, Mary Deane Rt. 1, Ramscur, N. C. 

Bullard, George Minson Box 185, Roseboro, N. C. 

Casey, John Stuart 121 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Casey, Richard Matthews 121 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Cobb, Albert Dotson 605 Spring St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cooke, Garrett Box 277, Elen College, N. C. 

Copeland, Marjorie Selma Rt. 1, Smithfield, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Mary Christine Rt. 1, Graham, N. C. 

D'Antonia, Rinald Raymond 501 Maplewood Rd., Wayne, Penna. 

Darden, James Fenton York Street, Suffolk, Va. 



96 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Davis, Earnest IMerritt Rt. 3, Mt. Pleasant, Penna. 

Bellinger, James Lyle 909 Commercial Ave., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Elder, James Wytche Navy Pier, Chicago, 111. 

Ferris, James Vincent 89 Forest St., Kearny, N. C. 

Frj'e, Minnie Bell Carthage, N. C. 

Galloway, Dorothy 614 Spring Street, Hamlet, N. C. 

Griffin, Johnson Linwood Rt. 2, Box 149, Windsor, Va. 

Gardner, Jack 3126 Walnut St., Portsmouth, Ohio 

Goldblum, Seymour 90 Independence Ave., Freeport, N. Y. 

Hall, Forrest Chalmers Alamance Rd., Burlington, N. C. 

Hauser, Margaret Louise Greensboro, N. C. 

Hayes, Frank Alfred Elon College, N. C. 

Hobson, W. L., Jr Remseur, N. C. 

Holmes, Luvene Rt. 1, Franklinton, N. C. 

Holoman, Judith Rich Square, N. C. 

Holt, Jolea Graham, N. C. 

Howard, Lennings M Hallison, N. C. 

Isley, Donald Clyde Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Johnston, James William Elon College, N. C. 

Lowe, Wade Ferris 313 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Madren, Weldon Thomas Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

McDade, Edith Leigh 212 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Lea Box 195, Burlington, N. C. 

Mendenhall, Mary Louise 822 Mt. Vernon Ave., Orlando, Fla. 

Moore, Rachel Harriet 410 Circle Drive, Burlington, N. C. 

Morgan, \'oigt Gibsonville, N. C. 

Nichols, Amerith Lettie Wake Forest Rd., Durham, N. C. 

Oakley, Margarette Virginia Box 324, Elon College, N. C. 

Ollis, Ivan L Frank, N. C. 

Oslund, Margarette Bothilda 1230 Allison Ave., Washington, Penna. 

Palantonio, William Joseph 249 Highland Ave., Wayne, Penna. 

Phillips, Amos 1508 Elm Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Phillips, Sarah Lucretia Bennett, N. C. 

Pollard, John Francis 603 Fifth Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Reid, Reuben Benjamin Box 60, Campbell, S. C. 

Robertson, Edward Deroy 418 Hillcrest Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Ross, Otis Hilt, Jr Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Sellars, Emory Robinson, Jr 2309 Almont St., Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Scott, Archie Joel Southport, Mich. 

Shook, Ada Mildred Banner, N. C. 

Smythe, Thomas James Campbell 1913 S. State St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Smith, Maxine Marie 503 Riddley Ave., Lt Grange, Ga. 

Spence, Royal 636 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Stephens, Elsie Louise Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Stevens, Joe Tom 728 N. Highland Ave., Roanoke, Ala. 

Stolte, Harry Allen Southview Ave., Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Summey, Nora Black Mountain, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 97 

Terrell, William Isaac Swepsonville, N. C. 

Thompson, Finley McFarland Snow Camp, N. C. 

Thornton, Mae Philips Burlington, N. C. 

Tomancheck, Joseph James 1113 3rd Ave., Herrertown, Penna. 

Tripp, Bryant Bethel, N. C. 

Troxler, Irvin Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Troxler, Mildred Frances Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Truitt, Helen Goff Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth 605 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Florence Keron Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Watts, Edwin Peachland, N. C. 

Wells, Ruby Jane Bastic, N. C. 

Whitaker, Joe 109 Townsend St., Bennettsville, S. C. 

White, Lillian Frances Ellerbe, N. C. 

Woodson, Samuel Thomas 106 Brooks St., Burlington, N. C. 

SOPHOMORES— 1941-42. 

Agresta, Louis Tom 921 N. Focuet St., Hazleton, Penna. 

Atkins, Vernon Doub Rt. 2, Kemersville, N. C. 

Barnwell, Eleanor Smith Brookwood, Burlington, N. C. 

Barker, Dan Taylor Rt. 5, Oxford, N. C. 

Basnight, Miller C 33 Ave. A, New Bern, N. C. 

Bell, Betty Lee 10 Vannoy St., Greenville, S. C. 

Elalock, Lucille Breeze Rt. 1, Durham, N. C. 

Bowden, Carlyne Box 504, New Bern, N. C. 

Breeze, Nellie Gentry Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Bullock, George Pleasant Rt. 5, Durham, N. C. 

Burgess, Hubert Harding Rt. 2, Courtland, Va. 

Burns, Warren Theodore 330 Mary St., Englewood, N. J. 

Cannon, Jeanne Wilson 109 Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Carroll, Adrain Meredith 600 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Clayton, John Elvis Rt. 1, Durham, N. C. 

Coble, Mildred 628 Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Coble, Ruth Bursetta Rt. 1, Bladen, N. C. 

Comer, Claude Valentine Rt. 4, Reidsville, N. C. 

Copley, Nancy Carolina Box 234, Elon College, N. C. 

Cox, Margaret Lucille 700 Sellars St., Burlington, N. C. 

Crowell, Rachel Gertrude 806 Salisbury Ave., Spencer, N. C. 

Cubell, Dick L 29 Lancaster Terrace, Brooklin, Mass 

Damron, Robert Sutton 424 Commercial St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Day, Edward Ray 909 Fauguier St., Norfolk, Va. 

DeLoache, Sarah Rebecca 805 West Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dillard, Walter Haynes 515 Central Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Dixon, Jennings Bryan, Jr Rt. 4, Charlotte, N. C. 

Duncan, William Henry 19 Keat, 4th St., New York, N. Y. 

Dyer, Lillian Grace Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Dyer, Ruth Elizabeth Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Earp, Rachel Lee 703 Efrid St., Albemarle, N. C. 

F^dwards, Ralph Plvmimer Rt. 2, Henderson, N. C. 



98 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Elder, Elizabeth Ann Elon College, N. C. 

Evans, Josephine Inez Rt. 1, Franklinton, N. C. 

Fallin, Ollie Louise 812 Bellevue St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Farmer, Roy Lee Rt. 3, Nathalie, W. Va. 

Festa, Salvatono Antonio 81 Quince St., Vineland, N. J. 

Fowlkes, Nancy Williamson Yancey ville, N. C. 

Gearing, Phillip James 202 Quenne St., Bristol, Conn. 

Glenn, Robert L 314 Gorrell St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Greene, Lura Mae Rt. 1, Clyde, N. C. 

Harrell, Vivian Brown, Jr Rt. 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Harris, Erwin Guthrie 505 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Harris, W. Kaith Eliot, Me. 

Hicklin, Edward 118 Lakeside Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Hill, Mary Elizabeth Driver, Va. 

Hisey, Henry Clyde, Jr 4th St., Shenandoah, Va. 

Hisey, Robert S 4th St., Shenandoah, Va. 

Hook, Brevitt Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Hooper, Elroy James, Jr 505 Cypress St., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Huffman, Louis Gordon Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Hughes, Sarah Catherine Graham, N. C. 

Hunt, Alfred Penn Rt. 5, Oxford, N. C. 

Hussey, Tracy Eldon Rt. 2, Hemp, N. C. 

Husted, Charlotte Elaine 200 Water St., Warren, Penna. 

Johnston, Robert Ellington Elon College, N. C. 

Kelly, Frances Geraldine Box 201, Tabor City, N. C. 

Kern, Raymond Head 2814 Bellevue Terrace, Washington, D. C. 

Kirkman, Dorothy Mae 606 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Koelbel, Christian Garland 135 Downing St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Koontz, Ruth Edith 306 Mangum Ave., High Point, N. C. 

Langston, James Mai'vin Rt. 3, Lillington, N. C. 

Lee, Robert Edward Clayton, N. C. 

Lentz, Charles M 119 Hetchman St., Mt. Pleasant, Penna. 

Lightbourne, Peg Carroll 401 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Little, Mary Louise 1215 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Lynch, Betty Lillian Rt. 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Mann, Charles O'Hara Cypress Chapel, N. C. 

Masse, Charles Napoleon 74 Main St., Conic, N. H. 

Matlock, Gary Rufus Elon College, N. C. 

McClenny, Nettie Carolyn 903 Monmouth Ave., Durham, N. C. 

McKenzie, Edward Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Meredith, Jesse H Fancy Gap, Va. 

Messick, Helen Margaret Elon College, N. C. 

Miller, Donald David 618 Smithfield St., Mt. Pleasant, Penna. 

Miller, Leonard Arthur 203 E. Fifth St., Burlington, N. C. 

Morgan, Colby Shannon Eagle Springs, N. C. 

Nance, Lewis Alexander 1208 E. 10th St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Neal, Vivian Frances Lawrenceville, Va. 

Nicholson, Marion Pike, Jr Box 302, Burlington, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 99 

Norman, John Roy, Jr Bedd St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Perkins, Charles 108 New Haven Ave., Woodmont, Conn. 

Pitts, Robert McPerson 1733 Amherst Place, Charlotte, N. C 

Plybon, Marion Carthage, N. C. 

Pollard, Gayle Henry 603 Fifth Ave., Greensboro, N. C 

Randolph, Charles Wesley Gibsonville, N. C. 

Rath, Mary Rt. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Rice, Sarah Florence Rt. 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Ridge, Paul Harold Gibsonville, N. C. 

Rippy, William Dennis Gibsonville, N. C. 

Roberts, James Francis 4614 Queen St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Russell, Jack Faughnan 2207 4th St., Altoona, Penna. 

Schmidt, Elliot Tourret 145 4th St., Pelham, N. Y. 

Sherrill, Clarence Neil 2500 East 5th St., Charlotte, N.'C. 

Shoffner, Fred Tull Liberty, N. C. 

Shomaker, Edward Gilmer Box 314, Elon College, N. C. 

Siddell, William 307 Forest Rd., Raleigh, N; C. 

Simpson, Davis Lee Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Stephenson, Robert Hugh Severn, N. C. 

Tate, Annie Laura Efland, N. C. 

Templeton, Clayton Peace 3501 Jordon Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Truitt, Edna Mae Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Hazel Irene Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Underwood, Nannie Yanceyville, N. C 

Walker, Flora Hazel Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Lillian Celestia Milton, N. C. 

Walker, Malcolm Forest 441 N. Scales St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Walker, Marvin Edwin 901 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Warren, Sarah Lou Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Whisnant, Dennis Polksville, N. C. 

Wigington, John Craig. .. .2933 Avacostia Rd., S. E., Apt. 3, Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, James Loftin 217 Adam St., Burlington, N. C. 

Wood, Everett Vaughn Rt. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Worsham, James J Ruffin, N. C. 

Worsley, Cora Elizabeth Box 275, Aberdeen, N. C. 

Yates, Marily Jane 814 Watts St., Durham, N. C. 

Zipperer, William Paul 6230 Artesian, Chicago, 111.. 

FRESHMAN CLASS— 1941-42. 

Albright, Fred Walter 1014 Wiscrassett St., Albemarle, N. C- 

Almond, Irvis Hurl, Jr South Morrow Ave., Albemarle, N. C. 

Baker, Irene Alfrieda Main St., Carthage, N. C, 

Barber, John William, Jr 814 Central Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Barone, Roland 35th Tudor St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Batten, Person Alex, Jr 2211 High St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Bcauduy, Henry Louis, Jr 76 James St., Englewood, N. J. 

Bell, Allan Duncan, Jr Elon College, N. C. 

Berry, Allen Kendrick Rt. 4, Elizabeth City, N. C 



™ ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Blazek, Edwin Louis 3164 Lyndale Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Boehm, William Paul 1654 Cliftview Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Boone, Elsie Spivey Jackson, N. C. 

Bower, Albert Ellsworth Front Royal, Va. 

Boyd, Eliza Myrtle 238 Young St., Henderson, N. C. 

'Boyles, Burrell Clarence Box 135, Gibsonville, N. C. 

'Bradsher, Hugh Tate Rt. 1, Old Fort, N. C. 

J?rinsOn, John Frank 416 Spencer Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

Brown, Gordon Oscar 20 East Elm St., Huntington, N. Y. 

Brown, Richard Austin Rt. 2, Trinity, N. C. 

Brown, Walter Henry, Jr Box 415, Kannapolis, N. C. 

Browning, Melba Coleen Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Calhoun, Walter Stillman Andrews, N. C. 

Carter, Mary Jaan Clifton Forge, Va. 

Cecil, James Douglas 604 Fifth Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Cheli, Marco Joseph Brewster and Whest Rds., Vineland, N. J. 

Coble, Rachel Louise Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Colenda, Allen Graham Morehead City, N. C. 

Copeland, Alvard B Rt. 1, Lynhave, N. C. 

Coplin, John Frederick 607 Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Coyner, Carlisle Eraldean Burlington, N. C. 

Crandell, Ervin Simmons Rt. 1, Stokes, N. C. 

Creef, Frances Juanita Norfolk, Va 

Crenshaw, Nell Brookwood, Burlington, N. C. 

Currie, James Leroy Rt. 1, Raeford, N. C. 

Dalton, Glenn Edward Hillsville, Va. 

Danieley, James Earl Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Daughtry, Julian Kelly B-1 Harbor View Apts, Portsmouth, Va. 

Davis, William McKeithan Raeford, N. C. 

Denczi, Joseph Andrew 1061 DeKolb St., Bridgeport, Penna. 

Dickson, Arthur William 24 Dow Ave., Mineola, N. Y. 

Doyle, Gordon Bennett 24 Arlington St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Earp Sam James Rt. 1, Milton, N. C. 

Edwards, George Thurston Box 487, Henderson, N. C. 

Ellington, Warren Leacester Rt. 3, Reidsville, N. C. 

Evans, John Galloway Rt. 4, Danville, Va. 

Evans, Richard Wesley 1905 20th St., Portsmouth, Ohio 

Evans, Roy Nathaniel 603 Summitt Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Fairy, William Arthur Woodland Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Farrell, Earl Thompson Rt. 1, Pittsboro, N. C. 

Fearing, Zenas Elbert 409 Cedar St., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Festa, Anthony Joseph 817 Quince St., Vineland, N. J. 

Foushee, Carolyn Parks 912 Spring Garden St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Foushee, L. Merritt 617 Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Frazier, Hilda Alice Rt. 2, Virgilina, Va. 

Fulcher, Murry Thomas 33 George St., New Bern, N. C. 

Gardner, Mack Williams Angier, N. C. 

Garrett, John Max Rt. 1, Julian, N. C. 

Georgeo, Johnnie Louis 59 Coming St., Charleston, S. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 101 

Gilliam, John Jacob Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C, 

Gilliam, R. L., Jr Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Gold, Marcus Clifford Rt. 5, Shelby, N. C. 

Grissom, George Ayscue Graham, N. C. 

Hagood, Lacy Edward Burington, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Elizabeth Rt. 1, Woodleaf, N. C. 

Hall, Wilhelmena W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hamm, Omeaga C 529 Rowland St., Henderson, N. C. 

Harden, Ann 207 E. Fifth St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hayes, Frances Viola Norlina, N. C. 

Helms, Ula Boyce, Jr 1833 North Pegram St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Hipps, James Tennyson Rt. 3, Morganton, N. C. 

Hoffman, Adi-ian Wendell Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Hoffman, Fred John 167 Sypress Ave., Bogota, N. J. 

Holt, Artie Glenn, Jr 114 Ladie Astor St., Danville, Va. 

Holyfield, Robert Harden Rockford, N. C. 

Hook, Harvey Oliver Box 262, Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, Jeanne Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, John William Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Home, James Maxwell 410 Bowman Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Huffman, Wade Herbert 305 Hoke St., Burlington, N. C. 

Huntley, Frank L Rt. 3, Wadesboro, N. C. 

Jennings, Norma Whitman Flying Point, Water Mill, Long Island, N. Y. 

Johns, Ernie Robert Rt. 4, Greensburg, Penna. 

Johnson, William Lee Stokesdale, N. C. 

Jones, Charles Needham 1101 Hunnicutt Ave., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Kernodle, Dwight Talmadge Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Knight, James William Hillsboro Ave., Hillsboro, N. C. 

Kozakewich, Michael 245 S. Dean St., Englewood, N. J. 

Lancaster, Claude Wilaxe 316 Spencer Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

Lancaster, Rodman Lyon Vanceboro, N. C. 

Latta, William Caleb 503 Georgia Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Lea, Fred Allen Gibsonville, N . C. 

Leath, Sarah Jane 505 South Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Levison, Arnold Irving 39 Arlington Rd., Brookline, Mass. 

Lilly, James David LaCross, Va. 

Lisman, Maurice Onis Ennis, Texas. 

Malone, Frank Jabez Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Manchester, Elizabeth 6 Judd St., Bristol, Conn. 

Maynard, Ella Gladys Monroe, N. C. 

McCants, Mary Ellen 928 Powers St., Anderson, S.C. 

McClenny, David Frank Goldsboro, N. C. 

McLennan, Margaret Louise 121 Lakeside Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

McNull, Edwin Lentz Raeford, N. C. 

Meachum, William Frank Rt. 3, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Michael, John Donald 101 Alamance Rd., Burlington, N. C. 

Murray, Joseph Henry Hillsboro, N. C. 

Oakley, Mary Frances Elon College, N. C. 

Offman, David William Julian, N. C. 



102 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Parker, James Sunbury, N. C. 

Parker, Margaret Vivian South Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Perdue, Mary Juanita Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Perry, Isaac Peyton 611 Maple St., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Phillips, James Wyatt 1508 Elm Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Phillips, Jesse Ray Elon College, N. C. 

Pierce, Robert Lee Jonesboro, N. C. 

Pittman, Jessie Grey Rt. 1, Kenly, N. C. 

Pohl, Charles Samuel 188 McKinley Ave., Kennmore, N. Y. 

Pohl, John Emerson 188 McKinley Ave., Kenmore, N. Y. 

Quails, Everette Charles 510 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Ransom, Matt Whitaker Weldon Rd., Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Reidt, Marjory E 28 Wellington St., Waltham, Mass 

Reitzel, Edna Louise Hillsboro, N. C. 

Riddle, Betty Louise Graham, N. C. 

Robbins, Charles Thomas 526 Uwharrie St., Asheboro, N. C. 

Routh, Sylvan Rascoe Rt. 1, Franklinville, N. C. 

Rumley, Edan Virginia Elon College, N. C. 

Sanders, Carolyn Iris Anderson, S. C. 

Sarrow, Arnold Gilbert 13 E. Thirteenth St., Huntington, N. Y. 

Sarvis, Samuel Thomas 117 Tarpley St., Burlington, N. C. 

Simons, Charles Campbell 113 E. Front St., New Bern, N. C. 

Simpson, Margaret Stokesdale, N. C. 

Simpson, Margie Louise Elon College, N. C. 

Smith, Dorothy Lynn Ireland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Smith, L. T., Jr Liberty, N. C. 

Snyder, John Nelson 317 W. Park Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Snyder, Walstein Welch Rt. 2, Box 141, Elkton, Va. 

Spivey, Herbert Clyde 331 Mt. Vernon Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Spruill, Hal Box A, Pinetow^n, N. C. 

Stephens, Ira Vance Tryon Rd., New Bern, N. C. 

Stevens, Kenneth Earl 516 Bryant St., Stroudsburg, Penna. 

Storey, Walter Edwin 301 Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Story, George Thomas Holland, Va. 

Thomas, Emogene 608 High St., Burlington, N. C. 

Thomas, Faye Rt. 1, Greensboro, N. C. 

Thomas, James Nelson Rt. 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Thompson, Ferris Clifton Rt. 2, Mebane, N. C. 

Thompson, Mary Catherine Graham, N. C. 

Tucker, Doug Paschal 512 Cleveland St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Vernon, John Owen Milton, N. C. 

Viola, Joseph A 303 S. Eighth St., Vineland, N. J. 

Walker, William Pinkney, Jr 204 Peele St., Burlington, N. C. 

Ward, Howard Earl Rt. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Warren, Folrence Harding Rt. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Warren, Mary Maggie Staley, N. C. 

Watson, Rebecca Elizabeth Morven, N. C. 

Webster, Margarette Ruth Elon College, N. C. 

White, Betty Evelyn Bynum, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 103 

Williamson, Jesse Waren Haw River, N. C. 

Withers, Jennings Waller 1006 Union St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Wright, Ruby Carolyn Narrow Gauge Rd., Reidsville, N. C. 

Zeissner, John William 4 Collins Va., Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Zodda, Victor Alfred 25 Johnson St., Spring Valley, N. Y. 

FIRST YEAR COMMERCIAL— 1941-42. 

Allen, Nancy Louise Enfield, N. C. 

Allen, Violet Haw River, N. C. 

Allen, S. Carl Box 4, Bunnlevel, N. C. 

Bailey, Margaret Clarke Rt. 4, Henderson, N. C. 

Barfield, Gloria Graham St., Mebane, N. C. 

Barrett, Agnes Mae 501 Spring St., Burlington, N. C. 

Baynes, Doris Marie 407 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Brady, Clyde Elon College, N. C. 

Bridges, Mary Elizabeth Lawndale, N. C. 

Britt, Lelia Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Brooks, Edna Inez Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Bryan, Aetna Smith Elon Rd., Burlington, N. C. 

Bunn, Sarah Elsie. Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Burkhead, Grace Evelyn Candor, N. C. 

Byrd, Mary Hill 400 .^rd Ave., Franklin, Va. 

Caddell, Ruby Lee Carthage, N. C. 

Chandler, Doris Mae Rt. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Chase, Marion Butler Freemont, N. C. 

Cobb, Hilda Lee 6$5 Spring St., Burlington, N. C. 

Coble, Nellie Mae Rt. 1, Julian, N. C. 

Cordell, Frances Rollins 600 Grover St., Shelby, N. C. 

Councilman, Virginia Lee 509 Robertson St., Burlington, N. C. 

Davis, Nellie Frances Box 448, Burlington, N. C. 

Dodds, Mary Agnes Bardenville, Penna. 

Dowd, Maude Hughes Rt. 1, Carthage, N. C. 

Dunn, Florence Hort St., Mebane, N. C. 

Earp, Barbara Elizabeth Milton, N. C. 

Edwards, Arnold Liberty, N. C. 

Edwards, Neliene Rt. 1, Kittrell, N. C. 

Edwards, Thurston Box 481, Henderson, N. C. 

Faucette, Louis Henry. Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

P'oster, Edna Carnel 314 Fisher St., Burlington, N. C. 

Fowler, Dorothy Perkins 813 Central Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Fox, Elford Vernon Candor, N. C. 

Gladden, Jackie Rt. 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Gordon, Ottis Lee Brown Summitt, N. C. 

Griffin, Rebecca Hall 430 N. 4th St., Albemarle, N. C. 

Greene, Jo Fleet Snow Camp, N. C. 

Hardison, Sarah Elizabeth Whitaker St., Enfield, N. C. 

Flarrell, Emily Leone Burgaw, N. C. 

Harrell, Evelyn Louise Burgaw, N. C. 



104 ELON COLLEGE BULLETII^ 

Hawkins, Beth Lollins Dover Mill, Shelby, N. C. 

Hill, Ruth Evelyn 407 N. Fifth St., Albemarle, N. C. 

Hix, Carlyne Candor, N. C. 

Hobby, Robert Gordon 708 S. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Holland, Elizabeth Alice Box 590, Shelby, N. C. 

Holland, Winston Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Homewood, Ada Harden Mapel Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Holt, Sidney Ben 210 S. Main St., Graham, N. C. 

Hunter, Helen Bernice 1005 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Holt, Artie Glenn Box 1067, Burlington, N. C. 

Jeffreys, Mildred Gray Rt. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Johnson, Henry Shepard 317 Young St., Franklin, Va. 

Johnson, Roger Lee Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Johnston, Clyde 702 Sellars St., Burlington, N. C. 

Jones, Myrtle Elams, N. C. 

Kirkman, Hilda Mae Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Kirkman, Dorothy Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Kittner, Lucille Weldon, N. C. 

Lamberth, Flossie Adelaide 507 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Lassiter, Virginia 414 Rowland St., Henderson, N. C. 

Leath, Catherine Tapscott 303 Raubert St., Burlington, N. C. 

Lloyd, Gladys 228 N. Yadkin Ave., Spencer, N. C. 

Long, Agnes Lee Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Lynch, Dorothy Eunice Elon College, N. C. 

Mangum, Gladys Louise 606 Maple St., Burlington, N. C. 

Martin, Harry Horton 820 N. Main St., Graham, N. C. 

Martin, Mary Lou Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Matthews, Julia Anne Rt. 1, Portsmouth, Va. 

McAdams, Virginia Christine Hillsboro, N. C. 

Moore, Addie Rawls Chuckatuck, Va. 

Muse, Sarah Star Route, Carthage, N, C 

Neal, Vivian Frances Lawrenceville, N. C. 

Perry, Jacqueline Elmira Glen Raven, N. C 

Pope, Louise Rebecca Enfield, N. C. 

Poythress, Eileen 1214 Guerriere St., S. Norfolk, Va. 

Rice, Gloria Hillsboro, N. C. 

Rice, Medra Rt. 1, Graham,] N. C. 

Robinson, Charles Deway Providence St., Graham, N. C 

Savage, Janet Williamson Rt. 2, Suffolk, Va. 

Shomaker, Samuel Ryan Box 314, Elon College, N. C. 

Smith, Margaret Grey 611 N. Main St., Graham, N. C 

Summey, Elsie Mae South Academy, Lincolnton, N. C. 

Wagner, Ruth Love 509 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Elsie Leigh Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Ward, Madge Isabel Suffolk, Va. 

Watkins, Katherine Rebecca Rt. 2, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Watson, Evelyn Noreen Stonewall, N. C. 

Whitley, Sadie Elizabeth 832 S. Main St., High Point, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 1^ 

Wood, Jeanne Durham 5th St., Mebane, N. C. 

Wrightenberry, Irma Lee 302 Rollings Rd., Burlington, N. C. 

Yelverton, Grace Marion Eureka, N. C. 

SECOND YEAR COMMERCIAL— 1941-42. 

Aldridge, Nellie Margaret Rt. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Ayscue, Harriet Louise Rt. 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Barney, Elva Grace Elon College, N. C. 

Brittain, Millicent Isabel 415 S. Fayetteville St., Asheboro, N. C. 

Butler, Edward East Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Fonville, Doris Lee 805 Peele St., Burlington, N. C. 

Grant, Harriet Rich Square, N. C. 

Hayes, Beverly DeShazo Elon College, N. C. 

Jeffreys, Virginia Dare Rt. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Kernodle, William H Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

King, Helen Elizabeth Rt. 3, Burlington, N, C. 

Mangum, Alice Blue 606 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Paige, Lawrence Elon College, N. C. 

Scott, Viola Elizabeth Lawrenceville, Va. 

Yarborough, Helen Deanne 1110 S. Lafayette St., Shelby, N. C. 

MUSIC— 1941-42. 

Agresta, Louis 921 N. Locust St., Hazleton, Pa. 

Allen, Joe Hillcrest Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Allen, Louis Hillcrest Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Allred, Faye Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Barfield, Gloria Mebane, N. C. 

Bassnight, Miller New Bern, N. C. 

Bell, Betty 10 Vannoy St., Greenville, S. C. 

Boone, Elsie Jackson, N. C. 

Brown, Mary Rt. 1, Ramseur, N. C. 

Carr, Betty Jane 708 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Coble, Mildred 628 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Colchough, Mary Sue Elon College, N. C. 

Cowan, James Burlington, N. C. 

Cox, Margaret 700 Sellers St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cook, Mac Graham, N. C. 

Darden, James York St., Suffolk, Va. 

Day, Ray Norfolk, Va. 

Davidson, Eleanor Gibsonville, N. C. 

Dillard, Helen Portsmouth, Va. 

Dunn, Florence Mebane, N. C. 

Evans, Josephine Franklinton, N. C. 

Eaton, Sylvia Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Felton, Margaret 249 Lincoln Place, Irvington, N. J. 

Faulconer, Katherine Webb, Ave., Burlington, N. C. 



106 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Foster, C. T 612 Cameron Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Foster, Dolly Ree 403 Maple Ave., Burlingt on, N. C. 

Frazier, Frances 210 Elm St., Asheboro, N. C. 

Hargrove, Irma Dell 1030 Welch St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Woodleaf, N. C. 

Goode, Grace Virgilina, Va. 

Grant, Harriet Rich Square, N. C. 

Grissom, George Graham, N. C. 

Hauser, Louise Justall Ct., Greensboro, N. C. 

Hill, Elizabeth Sunbury, N. C. 

Holyfield, Robert Rockford, N. C. 

Hook, Doris Patricia Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, Jeane Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, John William Box 225, Elon College, N. C. 

Jarosz, Joseph Eugene Box 430, Graham, N. C. 

Jarosz, Myra Edna Box 430, Graham, N. C. 

Johnson, Shepard Franklin, Va. 

Jordan, Rose Ann Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Kirkman, Jean Burlington, N. C. 

Land, Frances Burlington, N. C. 

Lee, Robert Edward Clayton, N. C. 

Lindley, Mary Elizabeth Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 

Maynard, Ella Monroe, N. C. 

Martin, Mary Elon College, N. C. 

Melton, Leora Rt. 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Messick, Helen Margaret Elon College, N. C. 

Morgan, Miriam Elizabeth Gibsonville, N. C. 

Moser, Betty Jane Burlington, N. C. 

Moser, Nancy Graham, N. C. 

McCants, Mary 928 Power St., Anderson, S. C. 

McKenzie, Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Box 195, Burlington, N. C. 

Owen, Wallace Gibsonville, N. C. 

Paschal, Emma Elizabeth 603 E. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Petrea, Elizabeth Tarpley St., Burlington, N. C. 

Pitts, Robert Amherst Place, Charlotte, N. C. 

Ploybon, Marian Box 171, Carthage, N. C. 

Rader, Jeanne Graham, N. C. 

Rath, Carroll 106 Chisholm St., Sanford, N. C. 

Robinson, Nancy 308 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Siddell, William 309 Forest Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 

Steele, Ladosca Gibsonville, N. C. 

Stephens, Louise 708 W. Front St., Bxirlington, N. C. 

Stevens, Joe Thomas 728 N. Highland Ave., Roanoke, Ala. 

Thornton, Mae Fourth St., Burlington, N. C. 

Triplett, Velma Purlear, N. C. 

Truitt, Helen Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 107 

Utt, Kenneth Rt. 7, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Warren, Mary Staley, N. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth 605 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Geron Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Whitten, Katherine Elon College Orphanage, Elon College, N. C. 

Wilkins, Lacola Edgewood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Wood, Jean Mebane, N. C. 

Woodson, Samuel Thomas 106 Brook St., Burlington, N. C. 

Zimmerman, Jeanette Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

ART— 1941-42. 

Allred, Helen Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Brown, Mary Deane Rt. 1, Ramseur, N. C. 

Cates, Mrs. Eloise Woosley Rt. 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Coble, Ruth Parkersburg, N. C. 

Corbitt, Sara Sunbury, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Christine Rt. 1, Graham, N. C. 

Clemmer, Lelia Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Crowell, Carolyn Rt. 2, Graham, N. C. 

Dyer, Lillian Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Frye, Minnie Belle Carthage, N. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Vance Rt. Graham, N. C. 

Griffin, Wilma Snow Camp, N. C. 

Green, Mrs. W. B Graham, N. C. 

Harden, Margaret Graham, N. C. 

Hall, Wilhelmena W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Home, Lillie Burlington, N. C. 

Holmes, Luvene Rt. 1, Franklinton, N. C. 

Holoman, Judy Rich Square, N. C. 

Holt, Mrs. Iris Albright Mebane, N. C. 

Holt, Mrs. Elsie Coble Rt. 1, Graham, N. C. 

Kerns, Jewel Ether, N. C. 

Lively, Lois Burlington, N. C. 

Long, Mrs. George 408 Trollinger St., Burlington, N. C. 

Messick, Rose Elon College, N. C. 

Miller, Pansy Mount Airy, N. C. 

McClenny, Carolyn Durham, N. C. 

McGogan, Dorothy Rt. 1, Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

Mclntyre, Hazel Rt. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Nichols, Amerity Durham, N. C. 

Oldham, Jessamine Guthrie St., Burlington, N. C. 

Paul, Evelyn Burlington, N. C. 

Sharpe, Boyd Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Sommers, Emma V Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Stafford, Mrs. George Box 327, Graham, N. C. 

Stephens, Lila Budd Church St., Hertford, N. C. 

Shooks, Mildred Banner Elk, N. C. 



108 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Summey, Nora Black Moiintain, N. C. 

Sutton, Dorothy Elon College, N. C. 

Tingen, Nell Burlington, N. C. 

Troxler, Mildred Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Truitt, Helen Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Turner, Mrs. Josephine Rt. 2, Graham, N. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth Fotmtain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Keron Rt. 4, Biu-lington, N. C. 

Walker, Margaret Sue Rt. 3, Mebane, N. C. 

Watts, Mrs. Thelma Thompson Haw River, N. C. 

Wells, Ruby Jane Bostic, N. C. 

White, Lillian Ellerbe, N. C. 

White, Mrs. Alice Rt. 1, Graham, N. C. 

SPECIAL LITERARY STUDENTS— 1941-42. 

Caldwell, Paul 910 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dennis, Emma Edith Whitsett St., Gibsonville, N. C. 

Gattis, Martha LaMonna 112 Guthrie St., Burlington, N. C. 

Kivette, Florena Olga Gibsonville, N. C. 

Southern, Clarence Oliver 709 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

LIST OF SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS— 1941. 

Askew, Gorell Jiles 709 Eskew St., Burlington, N. C. 

Atwater, Annie Mae 617 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Atwater, Frank Garrison 809 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Bell, Earl Edward 59 Chautaugua Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Carroll, Adrian Meredith 600 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Clarke, John Vernon Snow Camp, N. C. 

Claytor, Bill Hillsboro, N. C. 

Clayton, Julius Lee Rt. 1, Ruffin, N. C. 

Cole, Dorothy Frances 615 Ireland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Coleman, Anne Rt. 2, Reidsville, N. C. 

Comninaki, Siverin Petterson 1614 Morris Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Cooper, Mary Ash burn 410 E. Davis St., Burlington, . . . C. 

Copeland, Marjorie Zelma Rt. 2, Smithfield, Va. 

Copley, Nancy Caroline Rt. 2, Durham, N. C. 

Corbitt, Sara Margaret Sunbury, N. C. 

Cox, Mrs. Byrd Dailey 107 Hoke St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cox, Robert Eugene E. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Crawford, Virginia Hazeline Haw River, N. C. 

Culbreth, Howard Ceranford Box 27, Siler City, N. C. 

Dameron, Alary Lee Rt. 1, Yanceyville, N. C. 

Davis, Earnest Merritt Rt. 3, Mt. Pleasant, Penna. 

Dellinger, James Lyle 090 Commercial Ave., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Dixon, Margaret Deedie Marshall St., Graham, N. C. 

Donato, Charles 335 Bishop St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Dye, Lelia Cobb 227 Washington St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Dyer, Lillian Grace Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 109 

Dyer, Ruth Elizabeth Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Farmer, Annie Josephine Elon College, N. C. 

Ferris, James Vincent, Jr 89 Forest St., Kearney, N. J. 

Festa, Salvatone Antonio 817 Quince St., Vineland, N. J. 

Foster, Mrs. J. L Elon College, N. C. 

Foushee, Carolyn Parks Box 234, Elon College, N. C. 

Fulcher, Fannie Pearl 504 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Gilliam, Bess F Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Glenn, Mrs. Datie Brown Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Green, Mary Lena Graham, N. C. 

Green, Mrs. W. B 236 Main St., Graham, N. C. 

Griffin, Wilma Snow Camp, N. C. 

Grissom, Martin Luther Rt. 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Harden, Margaret Box 363, Graham, N. C. 

Hayes, Frank Alfred Elon College, N. C. 

Hiklin, Edward Milland 118 Lakeside Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Holt, Elsie Coble Rt. 1, Graham, N. C. 

Hook, Brevitt Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Hoyt, Elizabeth Mabel 250 East St., Walpole, Mass. 

Jones, Charles L., Jr 1014 Willard St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Johnston, James William Elon College, N. C. 

Jordan, Grace Virginia Gibsonville, N. C. 

Kernodle, Mrs. Lecy Martin Elon College, N. C. 

Knight, Talmadge R. F. D., Graham, N. C. 

Looney, Bill 521 Falls Rd.,Rocky Mount, N. C, 

McDade, Edith Leigh 212 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

McDuffin, Albert Glenn West End, N. C. 

Mclntyre, Hazel Anne Rt. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Merritt, Lena Evelyn 203 Trail Eleven, Brookwood, Burlington, N. C. 

McCarn, Bernice Hobert Elon College, N. C. 

Miller, Pansy Rt. 5, Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Murphy, June Baige 118 South Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Nash, William Parrish Elon College, N. C. 

Pickard, Maurice Glenn 200 Beaimiont Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Rath, M. C Rt. 3, Apex, N. C. 

Rawls, Marcella Lee 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Rippy, Villiam Dennis Lewis St., Gibsonville, N. C. 

Saecher, Wellington Mills 16 Alden Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Schwob, Helen Elizabeth 138 E. Livingston Ave., Orlando, Fla. 

Scott, Archie Joel Northport, Mich. 

Shaw, Edward Francis Wentworth Farm, Rosemont, Penna. 

Somers, Lester Irvin Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Spivey, Herbert 331 Mt. Vernon Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Stephens, Elsie Louise 708 W. Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Sullivan, Wm. Jay Maple Ave., Greenlawn, N. Y. 

Thomas, Mary Burlington, N. C. 

Thompson, Annie Sydnie Graham, N. C. 



no ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Thompson, Finley McFarland Snow Camp, N. C> 

Thompson, Henrietta Elizabeth 216 Maple Ave., Graham, N. C. 

Toole, Clark Walter 10 W. Orange St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Tripplett, Inez Purlear, N. C. 

Tripplett, Velma Purlear, N. C. 

Turner, Mrs. Josephine Graham R. F. D. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Utsey, Preice Tillman 198-B Calhoun St., Charleston, S. C. 

Walker, Margaret O'Kelly Brown Summit, N. C. 

Walters, Charles Manly, Jr 220 Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Wegington, John Craig 2922 Anacostia Rd., S. E., Washington, D. C. 

Wilkins, R. O., Jr 613 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Williams, Mrs. Lallah Adler Morehead City, N. C. 

Wilson, Mrs. Bessie H Graham, N. C. 

Wilson, Walter Arvey Rt. 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Wood, Everett Vaughan Rt. 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Zipperer, Wm. Paul 6230 Artesion Ave., Chicago, 111. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 75 

Juniors 76 

Sophomores 117 

Freshmen 161 

Commercial 107 

Music 80 

Art 49 

Special Literary 5 

670 
Less Those Counted Twice 70 

Total Regular Session 600 

Summer Session 1941 89 

Grand Total 689 



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Vol. XXXIX January, 1943 Number 1 

THE BULLETIN 

OF 

ELON COLLEGE 

FIFTY-FOURTH 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 

1943-1944 

AND 

CATALOGUE OF 1942-43 




ELON COLLEGE 
Elon College, N. C. 

Bulletin Issued Quarterly 



Entered as second-class mail at the postoffice of Elon College, N. C, under the 
act of July 16, 1894. 



Member of 

THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES 

and of the 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE CONFERENCE 



Contents 



Pag» 

College Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

The Faculty 7 

Officers of Administration 10 

Faculty Committees 10 

Educational Philosophy 11 

Administration 12 

The Physical Environment 14 

Buildings and Equipment 15 

Historical Sketch 18 

Annual Events 21 

Student Organizations 23 

Student Expenses 27 

Boarding Department 28 

Academic Regulations 33 

Scholarships 43 

Loan Funds 45 

Endowment and Sources of Income 46 

Outline of Courses of Study 49 

Departments of Instruction of the College: 

Biology 63 

Business Administration 64 

Chemistry 70 

Education ,.. . 71 

English 77 

Geography and Geology 79 

Greek 80 

History 80 

Mathematics 82 

Modern Languages 84 

Philosophy and Religion 86 

Physics 89 

Psychology 91 

Sociology 91 

Special Departments of the College ; 

Art 93 

Home Economics 94 

Music 96 

Physical Education 100 

Roster of Students in the College 104 



1943 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER 


S M 


T 


W 


T 


F 1 S 


S |M|T |W|T IF 1 S 


S |M 


T |W 


T 1 F 1 S 












1 


2 














1 


. . 


. 


. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


3 


4 


S 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


S 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






31 












30 


31 














., |.. 




. . 1 . . 1 . . 


FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


OCTOBER 


. 1 


2 3 


4 


5 6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


6 




.. 1.. 






1 2 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


27 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


28 






'■'■ 


, 


■ • 


27 


28 


29 30 


'■'■ 


'■'■ 


•• 


24 
31 


26 


26 


27 

• ■ 


28 


29 30 


MARCH 


JULY 


NOVEMBER 




12 3 4 


6 


6 










t 


2 3 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 124 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 30 131 . . 






25 26 


27 


28 


29 


30131 


28 


29 


30 . . . . 






APRIL 


AUGUST 


DECEMBER 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


11 


12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 18 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


1R 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2S 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




29 


30 


31 . . 


., I.. 




26 


27128 


29 


30131 




1944 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER 














1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




.... |. - 1 


2 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 


9 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


10 11 


12 13 14 16 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 


23 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


SI 








24 25 


26 27 28 129 


30 


30 


31 












.. .. 










.. 


.. ..j.. |.. |.. i.. 




FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


OCTOSER 






12 3 


4 


5 






.12 


3 


1 


21 3 


4 


5 6 7 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


4 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


11 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


20 


21 22|23 24 


26 


26 


18 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 28 


27 


28 29 1 . . . . 






2S 


26 27 


28 29 30 




29 30|31 






MARCH 


JULY 


NOVEMBER 






1 


2 


3 


4 












1 






1 


2 3 


4 


6 


6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


12 13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


19 20 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


27 28 


29 


30131 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 . . 






20 


•tt 


















.. .. 1.. 1.. 






1 


AUGUST 






.. . . 1.. 


1 


2 


2 


3 415 


6 


7 


8 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


3 


4 


5 


61 7 


8 


9 


9 


10 11|12 


13 


14 


15 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


16 


17 18 119 


20 


21 


22 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


17 


18 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 


23 


24 25 126 


27 


28 


29 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


24 


25 


26 


27128 


29 


30 


30 


•• 


..|.. 








27 


28 29 30 


31 






31 






.. |.. 





College Calendar 

SESSION OF 1943-1944 



September 7-8 — Freshman Period: Fall quarter begins. 

September 8 — Freshman Registration. 

September 9 — Registration for Upperclassmen, and Freshman Classes begin. 

September 10 — Upperclassmen Classes begin. 

September 11 — Annual Faculty Reception. 

September 12 — Opening Address of the President. 

October 26 — Sophomore-Freshman Reception. 

October 15 — Subjects for Senior Essay due. 

November 24 — Fall Quarter closes. 

November 25 — Holiday. 

November 26 — Winter Quarter Opens. 

December 1 — First Draft of Senior Essay, or Comprehensive Examination 

completed. 
December 4 — Senior- Jimior Party. 

December 5 — Elon College Singers present Christmas Program. 
December 16- January 3 — Christmas Holidays. 
January 4 — Classes resume, 8 :30 A. M. 
January 29 — Freshman-Sophomore Party. 
February 5 — Mid- Year Alumni Meeting. 
February 8 — ^Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
February 15 — Thesis completed. ' 

March 1 — Thesis Examination completed. 
March 3 — Winter Quarter ends. 
March 3 — Noon-March 6 — Spring Holidays. 
March 7 — Spring Quarter begins. 

March 11 — Senior Party given by President and Mrs. L. E. Smith. 
April 9 — Easter Svmday. 

April 26 — Senior Essays. Examinations completed. 
May 7 — Easter Simday. 
May 6 — Junior-Senior Dinner. 
May 7 — May Day Exercises. 
May 17-21 — Examinations. 
May 21-24 — Commencement Exercises. 
May 24 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 9 :30 A. M. 
June 1 — Summer School begins. 



Board of Trustees 



Leon Edgar Smith, D. D., President, ex officio Elon College, N. C. 

Dr. W. H. Boone, Chairman Durham, N. C. 

Stanley C. Harrell, Secretary Durham, N. C. 

G. E. Lovett, Business Manager Elon College, N. C. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1942 

H. Shelton Smith, D. D Durham, N. C. 

Harry K. Eversull, D. D Marietta, Ohio 

Mrs. Russell T. Bradford R. 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Hon. Kemp B. Johnson Fuquay Springs, N. C, 

Miss Susie Holland Suffolk, Va. 

D. R. Fonville, Esq Burlington, N. C. 

J. H. McEwen Burlington, N. C. 

John L. Farmer Wilson, N. C. 

V. R. Holt Burlington, N. C. 

Miles H. Krumbine, D. D • ■ Shaker Heights, Columbus, Ohio 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1944 

Col. J. E. West Suffolk, Va. 

Dean L. L. Vaughan Raleigh, N. C. 

S. C. Harrell, D. D Durham, N. C. 

Chas. D. Johnston Elon College, N. C. 

Luther E. Carlton Paces, Va. 

F. L. Fagley, D. D New York City 

W. J. Ballentine • • Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

O. F. Smith Norfolk, Va. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1946 

W. H. Boone, M. D Durham, N. C, 

J. A. Kimball Manson, N. C, 

Thad Eure Raleigh, N. C. 

Russell J. Clinchy Hartford, Conn. 

Clyde R. Gordon Burlington, N. G. 

C. W. McPherson, M. D Burlington, N. C. 

W. B. Truitt Greensboro, N. G. 

J. H. Lightboume, D. D Burlington, N. C. 

B. D. Jones, Jr., M. D Norfolk, Va. 

J. A. Vaughan New York City 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

L. E. Smith, C. W. McPherson, W. H. Boone, S. C. Harrell, L. L Vaughan, 
J. L. Farmer and J. tj. l^JicEwen. <J /{ . , \ ^ ■ 











The Faculty 



LEON EDGAR SMITH 

President 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Princeton University; D.D., Elon College; 

LL.D., Marietta College 

JOHN DECATUR MESSICK 

Dean, Head of the Department of Education 

Ph.B., Elon College; University of North Carolina; Ph.D., New York 

University 

•■ HELEN BOYD 
Dean of Women, Associate Professor of Religious Education 
A. B., University of Washington; M. A., Columbia University 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK 

Registrar, Professor of Physics 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M.S., Cornell University, Additional 

Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins University, University of 

Chicago, Duke University 

JOHN WILLIS BARNEY 

Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University, University of 

Virginia, University of North Carolina 

MRS. CLARA H. BARTLEY 

Instructor in Biology 

B. S., Miami University ; M. A., University of Michigan ; Ph.D., University 

of Kansas 

IRVING D. BARTLEY 

Head of the Department of Music 

B. Mus., Syracuse University; M. Mus., Syracuse University; New England 

Conservatory, Diploma in Piano; New England Conservatory, 

Diploma in Organ 

D. J. BOWDEN 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 
B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; B. D., Ph.D., Yale University 

NED FAUCETTE BRANNOCK 

Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M.S., Columbia University; Litt.D., 

Defiance College; Additional Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins 

University, University of North Carolina 

WILSIE FLORENCE BUSSELL 

Instructor of French and Spanish 

A. B., M. A., Duke University; Graduate Work, Duke University, 

Pennsylvania State College, Alliance Francaise in Paris, 

Middleburg College 



8 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

GEORGE L. CARRINGTON 

Chief Surgeon, Alamance General Hospital 

Instructor in Health and Hygiene 

A. B., University of North Carolina; M. A., Duke University; 

M. D., Johns Hopkins University 

JOHN A. CLARKE 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A. B., Hampden-Sydney College; M. A., University of Virginia; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

(On Leave) 

RACHEL CROWELL 
Assistant in Physical Education for Girls 

HERBERT F. DONALDSON 

Instructor in Piano and History of Music 
B. Mus., Piano, Chicago Conservatory ; M. Mus., Piano, Chicago Conservatory 

MERTON FRENCH 

Associate Professor of Religion and Greek 

A. B., Washburn College; M. A., Ph.D., Brown University 

HOWARD S. GRAVETT 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A. B., James Millikin University; M. A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

(On Leave) 

HANSE HIRSCH 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and History 

Hoehere Reifepruefung Realgymnasium Mannheim, University of 

Frankfort-on-the-Main, University of Heidelberg, University 

of Vienna, Ph. D., University of Munich 

MARION L. HOCKBRIDGE 
Instructor in French and Spanish 

B. A., Smith College ; M. A., Middleburg French School 

VIOLET HOFFMAN 

Instructor in Cotmnercial Department 

A.B., Elon College 

WAITUS W. HOWELL 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

A. B., Elon College; M.S., North Carolina State College 

(Part Time) 

MRS. SUr CRAFT HOWELL 

Instructor of Commercial Department 

A. B , La Grange College; M S., North Carolina State College 

MRS. OMA U. JOHNSON 

Librarian 

Ph. B., A. B., Elon College; B. S., Columbia University 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 9 

LILA LE VAN 

Instructor in Public School Music and Piano 

B. Mus., M. Mus., Kansas University; Graduate Work, Julliard School 

of Music 

'FREDERICK LOADWICK 

Instructor in Voice 

B. Mus., Syracuse University; Graduate Work, Julliard School of Music 

CHARLES L. McCLURE 

Associate Professor of English 

B. A., Maryville College; M. A., Ohio State University; Indiana University 

FLETCHER MOORE 

Instructor in Piano and Organ 

A. B., Elon College; M. A. Columbia University; Julliard School of JMusir; 

Piano Student of Sascha Gorodnitzki and Guy Maier 

(On Leave) 

MARY REED MOORE 

Instructor in Education 

A. B., Winthrop College; M. A., Furman University; Graduate Work, 

University of California, Columbia University, College of 

William and Mary 

LIDA MUSE 

Instructor in Home Economics 

B. S., University of Tennessee; M. A., Columbia University 

LILA CLARE NEWMAN 

Instructor in Art 

Ph. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University and 

Harvard University 

MRS. MARGARET C. PHILLIPS 
Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics 
B. A., Marshall College ; M. A., Duke University 

J. L. PIERCE 

Director of Physical Education 
A. B., High Point College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

E. F. RHODES 

Director of College Band 

Shenandoah College; A. B., Elon College 

■ - ELIZABETH ROUTT 

Assistant Professor in Commercial Department 

A. B., Bowling Green Business University; Liberal Arts Degree, 

Georgetown University 

-^-HA-Refc©— SCHUETZ 

Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Columbia University; M. A. Duke University; Candidate for 

"Ph.D., Duks University, 1943 



10 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ARTHUR F. SMULLYAN 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Psychology 

A. B., College of the City of New York; M. A., Harvard University; 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

JAMES H. STEWART 

Instructor of Business Administration 

A. B., Transylvania College; M. A., University of Kentucky 

(On Leave) 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

LEON EDGAR SMITH, A.B., M. A., D.D., LL. D., President. 

JOHN DECATUR MESSICK, Ph. B., Ph. D., Dean. 

HELEN BOYD, A. B., M. A., Dean of Women. 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK, A. B., M. A., M. S., Registrar. 

C. E. LOVETT, A. B., Accountant and Business Manager. 

GEORGE D. COLCLOUGH, A. B., Director of Public Relations and Alumni 

Secretary. 
MRS. ISABELLA CHINN OLSEN^ Dietitian. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Administrative — Dean Messick, Dean Boyd, Mr. Lovitt, Dr. Bowden, Prof. 
Hook. 

Alumni Cooperation — Mr. Howell, Dr. Bowden, Mr. Colclough. 

Athletic — Dean Messick, Prof. Hook, Mr. Pierce, Mr. Lovett. 

Chapel — Dr. French, Prof. Prof. Bartley, Miss Muse, Prof. Loadwick. 

Debates — Dr. French, Prof. Schultz, Dr. McClure, Mrs. Johnson, Dr. Brannock. 

Dramatics — Dr. McClure, Miss Muse, Mrs. Bartley, Mr. Donaldson, Mrs. 
Phillips. 

Admission and Credits — Prof. Hook, Dean Messick, Dean Boyd. 

Library — Mrs. Johnson, Dr. French, Mrs. Bartley, Mrs. Howell, Dr. Hirsch. 

Music Organizations — Prof. Bartley Prof. Donaldson, Prof. Loadwick. 

Practice School — Dean Messick, Miss Moore, Dean Boyd, Mrs. Phillips. 

Religious Organizations — Dr. Bowden, Dr. French, Prof. Barney, Miss Muse. 

Public Entertainment — Dr. McClure, Dean Boyd, Prof. Hook, Miss Newman 
Mrs. Leadwick. 

Social Clubs — Dean Boyd, Prof. Hook, Mr. Pierce, Dean Messick. 

Student Loans and Scholarships — Mr. Lovett, Mr. Colclough, Dr. Bowden, Mr. 
Howell, Mrs. Johnson. 

Student Publications — Dr. McClure, Miss Moore, Prof. Hook, Miss Routt 

Honors — Prof. Hook, Dr. McClure, Prof. Schultz. 

Curriculum — Dean Messick, Prof. Hook, Dr. McClxire, Dr. French, Dr. Bow- 
den, Dr. Smullyan. 

Student Employment — Mr. Howell, Mr. Colclough, Mr. Lovett, Mrs. Johnson, 
Mrs. Smith. 



Catalogue of Elon College 

The purpose of this Catalogue is to set forth concisely the 
principles involved in progressive education, as contained in 
the curriculum of Elon College. Parents and students will 
find these principles both interesting and stimulating, and are 
invited to examine the same carefully. 

The Church College. — Elon College is a church institu- 
tion, supported by the Congregational-Christian Church for 
the specific purpose of training young men and young women 
under moral and religious influences. It is not the purpose of 
the College to change or uproot honest faith in any heart, but 
to afford to every individual opportunities for moral develop- 
ment and spiritual advancement. The Church under whose 
auspices Elon College was founded and has been maintained 
has always believed in Christianity as the way of life, not as 
a system of theology or a body of doctrine. The College feels 
that Christianity is the basis for the student's way of life at 
Elon and in the years to come. The College seeks through 
education and example to preserve and develop religious values 
as a means of developing Christian character and safeguarding 
civilization. 

The Progressive College. — As a progressive college, Elon 
believes that education is a process of learning through exper- 
iences, and that these experiences should be not only intellec- 
tual, but also emotional, religious and social. Directed oppor- 
tunities are therefore given for students to gain a human 
understanding of books, themselves and other people, and 
their God. 

The Small College. — Elon College feels strongly that there 
are distinct advantages to the student in the small college en- 
vironment. There is a solidarity of interests among faculty 
and students, a group unity, which would not be as possible 



12 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

with larger numbers. Everyone knows everyone else, and a 
friendly, democratic spirit is made possible. Individualized 
instruction, personal interest and understanding on the part 
of teachers and students, and a genuine spirit of Christian 
cooperation characterize life at Elon College. 

College life at Elon is wholesome and invigorating. The 
students are not extravagant in their living, and the cost of 
education is reasonable. There are opportunities for self-help, 
affording students with limited means jobs that will pay part 
of their expenses. However, these grants are limited in 
number. 

ADMINISTRATION 

To carry out the educational philosophy of the College, 
there is an administrative organization. 

Board of Trustees. — The Board of Trustees is the final 
authority in the disposition of all matters of government and 
administration. 

President — The President is the resident agent of the 
Board and is responsible for administrative policies and plans 
for the advancement of the College. He is assisted by the 
Faculty of which body he is chairman, and, in monthly meet- 
ings with the Faculty, discusses and acts upon the manifold 
problems of administration. 

The Faculty.— The Faculty is a democratic body, and in 
meetings acts upon legislative measures pertaining to the cur- 
riculum. It also passes upon the reports and recommendations 
of Faculty committees, through which groups much of the 
detail of educational research and planning is done. These 
committees also act administratively for the Faculty in the 
interim between its sessions, but have no legislative authority. 

Dean. — The Dean of the College is responsible for the 
administration of the curriculum, regulates attendance for 
men students at classes, chapel and other religious services, and 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 13 

is in charge of the character-building and guidance programs 
for the men of the College. He is the adviser of the Student 
Senate. He also represents the President when the latter is 
out of town. 

Dean of Women. — The Dean of Women regulates, for the 
women, attendance at classes, chapel and other religious ser- 
vices, and gives permissions to leave the campus. She resides 
on the campus and is in charge of the character-building pro- 
gram for the women of the College. She is adviser of the 
women's Council. 

The two Deans, in cooperation with the President, have 
jurisdiction over the social functions of the College, and the 
officers of Student Government confer with these officials for 
advice regarding these functions. 

Business Manager. — The Business Manager carries out the 
business and financial policies of the College as directed by 
the Board of Trustees. All business contracts must have his 
endorsement before they are binding on the College. He is 
the purchasing agent for all branches of the College, and is 
custodian of all its assets and properties. He is also general 
manager of all student self-help work done on the campus, 
and of all college service departments. 

Student Government. — This important branch of college 
government was granted its first constitution by the Faculty 
in 1919, and has since that time successfully operated through 
the men's Senate and later also through the women's Council. 
These constitutions, together with the by-laws of the two or- 
ganizations, are printed in the Elon Handbook. 

Registrar. — The Registrar of the College receives all ap- 
plications for entrance, and keeps the academic records of all 
students. He has charge of admissions, transcripts of records, 
grades, and other statistical data. 



14 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 

The Location. — Elon College is located sixty-four miles 
west of Raleigh, seventeen miles east of Greensboro, and four 
miles west of Burlington, on the North Carolina division of 
the Southern Railway. The railroad is the southern boundary 
of the campus, and it commands a view of the college build- 
ings. State Highway No. 100 is the northern boundary. 

Six mail and passenger trains pass the College daily. 
The short line of the Carolina Coach Company passes the 
College and affords bus accommodations to the students to all 
parts of the country. 

The Campus. — The College Campus presents a most 
beautiful and attractive appearance. It is spacious and, for 
the most part, is covered by stalwart native oak and hickory. 
Shrubbery has been placed on the campus where such ad- 
ditions would add to the beauty and attractiveness of the 
grounds. The concrete walks and driveways add to its native 
beauty and charm. Its very atmosphere is a contribution to 
the development of manhood and womanhood. The massive 
brick wall surrounding the campus lends dignity as well as 
protection and quietude. 

The Climate. — Climatic conditions are unusually favorable 
to the mental and physical development of the Elon student. 
At all seasons of the year the temperature is moderate, with 
an annual average of about 60 degrees. The winter season is 
usually short and the fall and spring seasons long and pleas- 
ant. The health of the student is thus naturally safeguarded, 
and there is abundant opportunity for the beneficial effects of 
much time spent out of doors in an atmosphere neither ener- 
vating nor forbidding. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 15 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Elon College has been accurately described by an official 
of the Association of American Colleges as "the best equipped 
small college in the country." Ten buildings, thoroughly 
equipped forgiving and study, are on the campus; five of them 
have only recently been completed and are modern in every 
detail. 

The Greater Elon Group 

These five, three-story, fire-proof structures are constructed 
of brick and reinforced concrete, and all are identical in their 
architectural design. 

Alamance Building. — This is the administration building, 
and houses classrooms; administrative offices; the laboratories 
of the Business, Home Economics, Mechanical Drav^ing, and 
Art Departments; and the College Bookstore. The citizens 
of Alamance County undertook to raise an amount necessary 
to erect and equip this building. 

Carlton Library. — This building, the gift of Trustees P. J., 
H. A., and L. E. Carlton, and their sister, Mrs. T. S. Parrott, 
has a stack-room capacity for 187,500 volumes. The reading 
room has seating capacity for one hundred readers. Besides 
offices and v^ork room for the library force, the building con- 
tains fourteen professors' research and office rooms and seven 
students' seminar rooms. 

Whitley Memorial Auditorium, — In memory of his father- 
in-law, Mr. L. H. Whitley, Mr. J. M. Darden lent $50,000 to 
assist in the erection of this building. This building houses 
the large college auditorium, designed to seat 1,000 persons, 
and is used for chapel and church services, community gath- 
erings, lyceum performances, motion pictures and concerts. 
The Music Department is completely contained in the build- 
ing, with five studios, twenty-two practice rooms with upright 
pianos, a four-manual Skinner organ, an Estey practice organ, 



16 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and several grand pianos. The most modern recording equip- 
ment is housed in the music department for the use of both 
students and faculty. The auditorium is also equipped with 
a professional motion picture projection apparatus, and on the 
stage is a projection screen and adequate lighting. The equip- 
ment of the building is outstanding. 

Mooney Christian Education Building. — In memory of 
his father-in-law, Rev. Isaac Mooney, Mr. M. Orban, Jr., gave 
this building to the college. The building is devoted to the 
religious and social activities of the college. At opposite ends 
of the building on the first floor are the Y. M. C. A. and Y. 
W. C. A. recreation rooms, which are used at present for din- 
ing halls. The second floor provides assembly hall, classrooms, 
and offices for the Department of Philosophy and Religion. 
The assembly hall has a seating capacity of 400 and is ade- 
quately equipped for student dramatic performances. On 
the third floor is a unique feature, a completely graded Sun- 
day School plant used by the entire community. In the base- 
ment is a woodworking shop, which is equipped with power 
tools. 

Duke Science Building. — In memory of their mother, Mrs. 
Artelia Roney Duke, a native of Alamance County, Messrs. 
J. B. and B. N. Duke donated $60,000 toward the erection of 
this modern, fire-proof building. The first floor of the build- 
ing is used by the Department of Physics and the Elon Press, 
the second by the Departments of Biology and Geology, and 
the third by the Department of Chemistry. Each floor is 
fully equipped with modern scientific furniture and labora- 
tory apparatus. 

Dormitories 
East Dormitory, — This is the only original building left 
on the campus. It is used as a dormitory for men, and is a 
three-story brick structure, completely overhauled and fitted 
up with all modern conveniences. 




ELON'S BUILDINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL AND WELL EQUIPPED 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 17 

Alumni Building. — This building, erected in 1912, is the 
gift of the alumni to Alma Mater. It is a three-story, brick 
structure, and is used as a dormitory for men, with a men's 
gymnasium on the first floor. 

West Dormitory. — This is a three-story brick building next 
to the Library, and measures 158 by 46 feet. On the second 
and third floors are modern accommodations for 120 women 
students. The first floor contains a large reception hall, guest 
rooms and parlors, the infirmary, and living quarters for Fac- 
ulty women. 

Ladies' Hall. — This is a two-story brick edifice, with ac- 
commodations for 64 women. The interior has recently been 
renovated and modernized. 

South Dormitory. — Traditionally known as Publishing 
House, this building has been renovated, and is used as a 
dormitory for fifty men. 

Club House. — This is a one story building, with accom- 
modations for eighteen men. 

Other Buildings 

West End Hall. — This is a fourteen-room dwelling, and 
is used as an apartment house for faculty members. 

Carlton House. — This is a nine room house which is used 
for faculty apartments. 

Power Plant. — The power plant is the central station for 
heat, light, water and other service functions for the college 
buildings. Adjacent to the plant is a 50,000-gallon steel water 
tank with a deep well of pure water. 

Special Equipment 

Athletic Field. — The Athletic field contains thirty-four 
acres located near the campus, and has adequate space for all 
sports. A new stadium is being erected. 

Visual Education Aids. — The projection booth of the Aud- 
itorium is equipped with two 35-millimeter sound-on-film 



18 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

projectors. These projectors have low intensity arc lamps and 
RCA sound-heads. This equipment is used weekly for edu- 
cational and entertainment purposes. Projection facilities are 
provided for film strips, glass slides, opaque projectors, and 
16-millimeter films. 

Elon Press. — Housed in the Science Building is the Elon 
Press, composed of an electrically-driven printing press, four- 
teen complete fonts of Century and Cloister types, a composing 
table, and adequate apparatus for the printing of student pub- 
hcations. 

Dramatic Stage. — The student stage in the Mooney Chris- 
tian Education Building has a proscenium opening of twenty- 
two feet and a depth of fifteen feet. Equipment includes a 
cyclorama, four mobile spot-lights, and other lighting appara- 
tus of modern design. Dressing rooms and a costume ward- 
robe are off the wings of the stage. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of Elon College is a constituent part of the 
history of the Christian Church in the Southeast. In 1794 the 
Reverend James O'Kelly and a group of dissenters from Wes- 
leyan Methodism, then spreading through the nation, met at 
Lebanon Church in Surry County, Virginia. This group 
agreed to found what was the first democratically governed 
church to arise on American soil. They named the church 
"Christian, to the exclusion of all party and sectarian names." 
They were interested in Christianity, not as a system of the- 
ology or a body of doctrines, but as a way of life. It was on 
this basis that the Christian and Congregational Churches 
merged in 1929. 

It was on this basis, also, that Elon College in 1889 was 
founded and has been developed. Many church colleges were 
established in the Nineteenth Century; nearly every denom- 
ination had and still has a church college for the training of 
its own leadership and as its contribution to civilization. From 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 19 

the early beginning in North Carolina and Virginia there had 
been a demand on the part of the Christian Church that there 
be established a college for the denomination. The demand 
grew with the church, and in September, 1888, the Southern 
Convention met in extraordinary session in Old Providence 
Church, Graham, North Carolina, to hear the reports and 
recommendations of the Committee on Schools and Colleges. 
The Convention appointed a provisional Board for the 
proposed college, authorizing the Board to choose a site for 
the college and to make the necessary legal and financial trans- 
actions. The Board was composed of Dr. W. S. Long, Dr. }. 
Pressley Barrett, Hon. F. O. Moring, Col. J. H. Harden, and 
Dr. G. S. Watson. Dr. W. S. Long, a pioneer in higher edu- 
cation, opened a school in Graham in 1865, which developed 
into Graham Normal College, a forerunner of Elon College. 
Led by Dr. Long, the Board finally chose a site at a village 
then known as Mill Point, six miles from Graham. A tract 
of twenty-five acres of land at Mill Point was given by the 
Hon. W. H. Trollinger of Haw River. The citizens of Mill 
Point donated twenty-three acres additional, and four thou- 
sand dollars in cash. In consideration of these donations the 
college was located at Mill Point. 

The Provisional Board preferred other names, but owing 
to the predominance of stalwart oaks on the site, selected the 
name "Elon," the Hebrew word meaning oak. 

On March 11, 1889, Elon College was chartered and in- 
corporated by the General Assembly of the State of North 
Carolina. (Private Laws of North Carolina for 1889, chapter 
216, sections 1-12.) 

In keeping with the charter provisions, the original Board 
of Trustees numbered fifteen: W. S. Long, }. W. Wellons, W. 
W. Staley, G. S. Watson, M. L. Hurley, E. T. Pierce, W. J. 
Lee, P. J. Kernodle, J. F. West, E. E. Holland, E. A. Moffitt, 
J. M. Smith, J. H. Harden, F. O. Moring, and S. P. Read. 



20 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

According to this charter, the "said institution" of Elon 
College was to "remain at the place where the site is now locat- 
ed, in Alamance County, Boone Station Township, at the place 
now called Mill Point." The purpose of the college was to 
"afford instruction in the liberal arts and sciences." 

Dr. Long was elected president of the college, and six ad- 
ditional members of the faculty were elected. Two buildings 
were erected on the site at Mill Point: the Administrative 
Building, a large three-story, brick building that housed the 
library, laboratories, the administrative offices, society halls, and 
classrooms for all departments; the other a dormitory for girls. 
The latter still stands on the campus. 

After four years. Dr. Long was succeeded as president in 
1893 by Dr. W. W. Staley, then pastor of the Suffolk (Virginia) 
Christian Church, who served as non-resident president without 
salary. 

Upon Dr. Staley 's resignation in 1905, Dr. E. L. Moffitt was 
elected to succeed him. Dr. Moffitt served six years, during 
which time two additional buildings were erected on the cam- 
pus. A larger dormitory for women, West Dormitory, was 
built, and East Dormitory was given over to boys. In addition, 
the power house was erected, providing electric light and 
steam heat for the college buildings. 

In 1911, Dr. E. L. Moffitt resigned as president, and Dr. 
W. A. Harper, then a member of the faculty, was elected and 
began the longest term of office lq the history of the college. 
In 1912, a larger boys' dormitory and gymnasium combined 
was built and financed through the generosity of Elon Alumni. 
It is properly known as Alumni Building. 

In 1913, Ladies' Hall was erected to take care of an in- 
creased enrollment of girls. 

During the period of America's participation in the World 
War, regular enrollment at Elon declined. However, a con- 
tingent of the R. O. T. C. was stationed at Elon, which tempo- 
rarily greatly increased the student population. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 21 

In January, 1923, the Administration Building was de- 
stroyed by fire, and students and faculty carried on as best they 
could with improvised classrooms and equipment. Out of the 
ashes of the old building rose a great rebuilding program, to 
be undertaken in terms of the growth and development of the 
college. Facilities had for several years been inadequate, and 
the destruction of the central building made this program of 
reconstruction imperative. 

With the onset of the depression of 1929-33, the heavy 
mortgages and a decreased enrollment combined to bring hard 
times upon Elon. Following Dr. Harper's resignation in June, 
1931, the College was without a president until October of 
that year, and there was grave doubt as to whether Elon would 
be able to open its doors to students in the fall of 1931. At 
this desperate moment the Board of Trustees elected as presi- 
dent Dr. L. E. Smith, then pastor of the Christian Temple of 
Norfolk, Virginia. 

Dr. Smith succeeded in bringing Elon through the stormy 
years of the depression, and not only recouped the losses in 
personnel and students, but by 1941 had greatly reduced the 
indebtedness of the institution and increased the student en- 
rollment to a total of 689. Financial problems still confront 
the College; however, the future is decidedly hopeful. Modest- 
ly, but with determination, the college is working towards a 
modern curriculum for education at the college level, a curri- 
culum which will best serve youth in our complex world. 

ANNUAL EVENTS 

Certain annual events at the College have become Elon 
traditions, and are anticipated with great pleasure by the stu- 
dents and faculty. 

Faculty Reception. — The Faculty gives a formal reception 
to the students on Saturday evening after the College opens in 
September. 



22 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Senior Party. — The President and his wife are accustomed 
to giving an annual party for the Senior class. 

Lyceum Entertainments. — The Faculty committee on Pub- 
lic Entertainments each year schedules a series of concerts, re- 
citals, plays or lectures by distinguished artists of national 
reputation. These performances are scheduled throughout the 
year and are open to all Elon students upon payment of their 
Activity Fee. These programs are also available to the general 
public upon subscriptions to the series. Such artists as Nino 
Martini, Helen Jepson and Albert Spaulding appear in con- 
certs here. 

Players' Evenings. — At least three times during the year, 
public performances of full-length plays are given by the Elon 
Players. 

College Recitals. — Members of the Faculty of the Music 
Department and advanced students in Music each year give a 
series of recitals in Whitley Memorial Auditorium. 

"The Messiah." — Shortly before the beginning of the 
Christmas holidays, the Elon Festival Chorus presents Handel's 
oratorio, "The Messiah." It is presented in Whidey Memorial 
Auditorium by candlelight. 

Garden Party. — The President and his wiic give a Garden 
Party to the Senior class. Faculty members, alumni and visitors 
on the afternoon of Monday of Commencement week. 

Art Exhibit — The Art Department gives an annual exhibit 
of student work. 

Commencement — This final event of the year begins on 
Saturday before the fourth Sunday in May. Commencement 
exercises include the Baccalaureate Sermon, the awarding of 
academic and honorary degrees and distinctions, and a com- 
mencement address by some noted person. Immediately after 
the close of commencement exercises, the Board of Trustees 
meets in final session. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 23 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Commimity Church. — The Community Church is 
made up of students, faculty members and residents of the 
town. Church services are held each Sunday in the Whidey 
Memorial Auditorium. The pastor of the church is Dr. L. E. 
Smith, President of the college. Ministers from other churches 
and denominations are frequently invited to occupy the college 
pulpit. 

The Church School, — The Community Church, together 
with the college, maintains a church school. 

Student Christian Association. — The Student Christian As- 
sociation is responsible for student religious activities on the 
campus. Among these activities are included the Sunday even- 
ing Vesper Services in which students and outside speakers par- 
ticipate. Student Sunday School in which International Sunday 
school lesson, current social problems, and other subjects are 
considered, morning prayer service, social service in the com- 
munity, occasional socials on the campus. The association 
functions primarily through committees, but includes within 
its membership more than half of the student body, students 
pledging themselves to foster Christian principles in the cam- 
pus life. 

Ministerial Association. — The Ministerial Association com- 
prises the members of the student body who intend to enter the 
Christian Ministry, directors of Religious Education, social ser- 
vice, or medical missionaries. Meetings of this group are held 
weekly, in which discussion and practice-preaching are utilized 
to help prepare the prospective minister for his profession. 

The Elon Singers. — This is a mixed chorus of students, or- 
ganized for two purposes: as the College Choir it regularly 
furnishes the music for the weekday chapel services and Sunday 
morning services of the Community Church; as the Elon Sing- 
ers it presents concerts of sacred and secular music at the 



24 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

College and in various communities in North Carolina 
and adjoining states. 

Elon Band. — This colorful organization, equipped with 
uniforms in the college colors, supplies music for various func- 
tions at the college. Training is given to all students who own 
or can play band instruments. 

Elon Players. — Several groups of students, interested in 
active participation in the writing and production of plays, 
combine to form the larger group called Elon Players. The 
class in Shakespeare each year produces a Shakespeare play. 
The class in Dramatic Literature writes its own plays and 
produces them for iavited audiences as well as producing for 
the public plays by modern dramatists. Other groups, not 
members of these classes, produce plays from time to time. 
The Players constitute a chapter of the National Dramatic 
Fraternity, Delta Psi Omega. They are also members of the 
North Carolina Dramatic Association, and take part in its 
activities. 

Social Science Honorary Society. — This is the Alpha Chap- 
ter in North Carolina of Pi Gamma Mu, the National Social 
Science Honor Society. The purpose of the organization is to 
give recognition to those students and faculty members who 
have attained distinction in the fields of Social Sciences. Elec- 
tions are held in the fall and spring, at which time Seniors and 
others who are eligible are received into membership in the 
society. 

Social Clubs. — Under supervision of their faculty advisers 
and with regulations as provided in the Elon Handbook, the 
social clubs are recognized as follows: 

For men: Alpha Pi Delta; Iota Tau Kappa; Kappa Psi 
Nu; Sigma Phi Beta. 

For women: Beta Omicron Beta; Delta Upsilon Kappa; 
Tau Zeta Phi; Pi Kappa Tau. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 25 

The Elon Debaters. — This organization is a member of 
the North CaroUna Inter-Collegiate Debating Association, and 
makes a number of trips each year to debate at tournaments 
with other college teams. Current economic and social prob- 
lems are subjects of their debates. 

Maroon and Gold. — The publication of the college news- 
paper, "Maroon and Gold," is undertaken by the college class 
in Journalism. This group serves as the editorial staff and also 
sees the paper through the Elon Press. The headquarters of 
the Elon journalists is in the Printing Room of the Duke 
Science Building. The newspaper appears at least once every 
two weeks during the college year. This publication is a 
member of the North Carolina Collegiate Press Association 
and of the Associated Collegiate Press. Students who are not 
members of the course in Journalism may write for the paper 
as an extra-curricular activity. 

Elon Colonnades. — This is the college literary magazine. 
It is written and printed at least twice each year by students 
interested in creative expression, both verse and prose. The 
magazine, in being completely the literary production and 
press work of students, is unique among college magazines 
in North Carolina. 

Phipsicli. — Phipsicli is the college annual, edited by mem- 
bers of the Senior class. The name commemorates the three 
erstwhile "literary societies" of the college. First published 
in 1913, this annual now ranks high in the college field. 

Elon Handbook. — The Handbook is a manual for Student 
Government and contains the constitutions and by-laws of the 
Senate and the Women's Council, as well as information need- 
ed by entering students. A copy of the Handbook is furnished 
to each student upon registration and is the basis for the learn- 
ing process during the Orientation Period. 

Class Organizations. — Each of the four classes has its own 
organization, and each year elects its officers and representa- 



26 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

tives to the student government. The Freshman class organ- 
izes on the first Tuesday in October. Each class selects some 
member of the faculty other than the President or Deans as 
its adviser. 

The "E" Men's Club. — This is the varsity athletic organi- 
zation and is composed of all students vi^ho have been av^arded 
an "E" for participation in inter-collegiate athletics. 

Business Administrators. — Business majors of Sophomore 
level and above are eligible for membership in the Business 
Administrators Club. It is the purpose of the Club to make 
the students' business training as practical as possible by spon- 
soring talks by business men and by arranging visits to indus- 
trial plants and business offices. Through these contacts the 
students receive helpful vocational guidance, and their under- 
standing of business and industrial activity is deepened. 

Commercial Club. — The Commercial Club functions for 
the benefit of Secretarial students taking a one- and two-year 
Secretarial course. The purpose of the club is twofold. First, 
it assists in creating a business atmosphere in the classroom by 
sponsoring demonstrations of up-to-date office equipment and 
by making contacts with outside business organizations for 
the privilege of inspection trips and lectures from members of 
those organizations. Second, the club provides a means for 
social contacts among the students within the department. 

The Education Club. — The primary object of this club is 
to promote a professional attitude on the part of student 
teachers; to bring outstanding educators to the campus; and 
to visit schools to see the actual operation of educational pro- 
cedures. 

French Club. — The French Club is composed of a group 
of interested students who meet twice a month to enjoy con- 
versation, group singing, games, short plays, and informal dis- 
cussions in French. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 27 

German Club. — A voluntary and informal organization of 
advanced students in German. At the meetings the time is 
spent in German conversation on different subjects, in playing 
games (with view of developing and building up the vocabu- 
lary) and in singing German songs, thus stimulating and pro- 
moting a deeper and more thorough understanding of the 
cultural and human background of German civilization. 

Literary Societies. — The Dr. Johnson Literary Society for 
young men and the Panvio Literary Society for young women 
provide opportunity for the training and guidance in thinking, 
speaking, and in parliamentary proceedings. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

Itemized expenses per College Quarter (a Quarter is one 
third of the regular college session) are as follows: 

Minimum Average Maximum 

Charges Charges Charges 

Tuition $ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00 

Matriculation Fee 21.50 21.50 21.50 

Library Fee 1.50 1.50 1.50 

Athletic Fee 2.00 2.00 2.00 

Student Activities Fee. 5.00 5.00 5.00 

Room Rent 17.00 20.00 25.00 

Meals 75.00 75.00 75.00 



$147.00 $150.00 $155.00 

(Expenses for the regular college session can be obtained by 
multiplying the totals above by three.) 

Day student charges are $55.00 per quarter plus charges 
for any laboratory fees or courses taken above a normal course, 
a normal course being from ten to fifteen quarter hours. 

Room Rent. — Room rent per student in the college dor- 
mitories is as follows: 

Alumni Building $ 51.00 

Club House 60.00 



28 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

East Dormitory 75.00 

Ladies Hall 60.00 

South Dormitory 60.00 

West Dormitory (front rooms) 60.00 

West Dormitory (other rooms) 51.00 

Note: Students occupying corner rooms pay $2.00 each per 
quarter extra. 

Room Registration and Breakage Fee. — A deposit of $5.00 
is paid by all boarding students when they place their applica- 
tions for admission to the college. This deposit is refunded at 
the close of the college year, less charges for breakage and 
damage, if any, other than ordinary wear from reasonable 
use, to the dormitory in which he is located and its furnish- 
ings. The costs of all repairs for unnecessary damage are pro- 
rated among all students occupying dormitory in which dam- 
age occurs. 

Two students occupy one room. Single beds are furnished 
in all dormitories. The room rental includes current for one 
60 watt lamp for each student. If additional lights are desired 
there will be a change of fl.OO per light per quarter. A charge 
of $1.00 per quarter is made when a radio or any other elec- 
trical appliance is operated in a dormitory room. The college 
reserves the right to change rooms or a room mate of any stu- 
dent at any time, but no student in allowed to change rooms 
without permission from the business office. Violation of this 
rule will cost the student $L00 or more. 

Students leaving college during the quarter forfeit re- 
funds due on room reservation and other deposit fees and 
room and board unless they check out through the business 
office. 

All students are required to room in the dormitories 
unless they come directly from the home of their parents or 
unless they are living with relatives. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 29 

Boarding Department — All dormitory students are re- 
quired to take their meals in the Central Dining Hall. No 
reductions are made in board charges for absences for less 
than one full consecutive week. The price of board is subject 
to change without notice. 

Special Courses and Fees. — The following tuition and 
fees for special courses apply only to students taking these 
items, and are not included in above figures : 

Liberal Arts Course (up to three), each per quarter. $ 15.00 

Extra Liberal Arts Course (above three), each. . . . 12.00 
Laboratory Fee (for Chemistry, Physics, Biology, 
Home Economics, Accounting, Secretarial Prac- 
tice, Mechanical Drawing, Botany, Geology and 

Surveying,) each per quarter 5.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin (2 half-hour lessons 

weekly) , per quarter 25.00 

Practice Fee, Pipe Organ (one hour daily), per 

quarter 11 .00 

Fine Arts, per quarter 27.00 

Typewriting, per quarter 15.00 

Practice Teaching Fee, per quarter 20.00 

Graduation Fee (Seniors) 10.00 

Use of Recording Equipment, per quarter 1.00 

Commercial and Secretarial Courses. — When the full Sec- 
retarial or Commercial Course is taken, which includes Book- 
keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, Business Arithmetic, Pen- 
manship, Filing, Office Methods, and Business English, the 
cost is the same as the regular course as outlined above. 

Music Courses. — The music courses which cost extra fees 
are Organ, Piano, Voice and Violin, the cost for each being 
$25.00 per quarter for two lessons a week. In the case of ap- 
plied music courses refunds will be made only when the stu- 
dent withdraws from college and on a pro-rata basis. Under 
no other conditions will music tuition for private lessons be 
refunded. 



30 ELQN COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Payment of College Charges. — College charges for tuition, 
fees, room and board, are payable in advance by the quarter. 
Tuition and fees are not refunded in case of withdrawal from 
the college except in cases of protracted illness and on compe- 
tent medical advice. Charges for room and board will be 
made for the time spent in college. No deviation from this 
plan is permissible unless approved by the Business Office. 

Dates of Payments. — The college session is divided into 
three quarters, the Fall Quarter beginning in September, the 
Winter Quarter beginning in late November, and the Spring 
Quarter beginning in early March. Charges are payable in 
advance by the quarter at the time of registration. 

Incidental and Miscellaneous Expenses. — Books are esti- 
mated to cost from $30.00 to $35.00 per year, about $15.00 of 
which will be needed at the fall term opening. Books are sold 
at the Bookstore for cash only. 

A fee of $1,00 is charged for any special test or examina- 
tion on a current course taken other than at the regular time. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for changing a course of study 
after the regular dates set for such changes. 

A fee of $1.00 per day up to five days, is charged for the 
late registration. 

After the first transcript of credits, a fee of $1.00 will be 
charged for each additional transcript requested. 

Work and Scholarship Credits. — Credit for work done, or 
other student aid, applies only on college charges. 

What to Bring With You. — All students should bring pil- 
low, pillow cases, bed clothing, towels, bureau and table scarfs, 
and toilet articles. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 31 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Collegiate Degrees. — The College confers the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

Requirements for Admission. — Students may be admitted 
to freshman standing as candidates for the Bachelor's degree 
in Elon College, without examination, and on certification of 
graduation from an accredited four-year high school course, 
with at least fifteen units from the list of subjects as given 
below. 

In accordance with a recent ruling of the North Carolina 
State Department of Education, a student in the upper third 
of his class who is recommended by the principal, and who has 
at least twelve units of credit, may be admitted upon success- 
fully passing the required examination. 

A limited number of students may be accepted for special 
work or departmental courses, not to exceed fifteen percent of 
the college enrollment and not as candidates for a degree. 

Subjects acceptable for admission are as follows: 

Units 

Bible 2 

Economics or Social Science 1 

English 4 

French 2 

German 2 

History 4 

Latin 4 

Mathematics 4 

Music 1 

Science 4 

Spanish 2 

Vocational Subjects 3 

No credit in foreign language may be had until the student 
has completed a minimum of two years in at least one foreign 
language. 



32 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Of the fifteen units required for admission, upon gradu- 
ation from a secondary school, nine are prescribed as follows: 

Units 

English 3 

Foreign Language 2 

History 1 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

Students having been graduated from high school but not 
meeting the prescribed requirements may be admitted on con- 
dition, such condition to be worked off before the beginning 
of the sophomore year. Not more than two conditions can 
be allowed. 

Applicants for advanced standing must present to the 
Registrar of Elon College an official transcript of their work 
in other colleges. Full credit will be given for work in ac- 
credited institutions in so far as it parallels the work at Elon. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree must com- 
plete at least one full college year of residence work at Elon 
College. Students admitted to advanced standing are subject 
to all the entrance and graduation requirements of the college. 

Health Certificate. — Every student must present a health 
certificate of a satisfactory physical examination taken within 
the immediate past or pay an examination fee of $1.00 upon 
entrance to the college. 

Classification. — For admission to the sophomore class, a 
student must have removed all entrance conditions and have 
completed not fewer than eighteen semester hours of fresh- 
man work toward a degree. 

For admission to the junior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than forty-eight semester hours of work 
for credit toward a degree. 

For admission to the senior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than eighty-four semester hours of work 
toward a degree. 




PATHS OF OPPORTUNITY ABOUND AT ELON 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 33 

Classifications are made at the beginning of tiie school 
year in September, and no new classifications are made during 
the year. 

Registration. — Each student goes to the Dean of the Col- 
lege for a conference and for assignment to a faculty adviser 
who aids the student in arranging his course of study. Before 
entering any department, the student pays the registration fee 
of $30.00 and his other expenses, and receives from the Busi- 
ness Manager a registration card admitting him to the depart- 
ment of the college. The registration fee of $30.00 is payable 
at the beginning of the Fall and Spring Semesters, and no 
student is allowed any privilege of the college until these fees 
are paid. 

Every student is required to register within twenty-four 
hours after his arrival, and not later than 5:30 p. m. of the 
registration days in September, November and March. The 
penalty for late registration is one dollar for each day after the 
date set for registration, the maximum penalty being five 
dollars. 

No new course may be entered after September 20 in the 
Fall Quarter, December 8 in the Winter Quarter, or March 15 
in the Spring Quarter. 

Freshman Orientation Period. — The Freshman Orienta- 
tion Period is for the purpose of introducing the student to 
his environment. It is an endeavor to acquaint the student 
with the policies and ideals of the college. Receptions, assem- 
blies, lectures and open forums help to establish a close fel- 
lowship, and the student is enabled to begin his college life 
more efficiently. Professors are assigned as advisers for a min- 
imum number of freshmen and are, throughout the year, at 
the service of these students. 

Schedule of Studies. — All students are expected to carry 
fifteen hours of college work per week, this amount being 
considered the normal student-load. No student may carry 



34 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

less than twelve hours or more than sixteen hours, without 
special permission from the Dean, and in accordance with the 
Handbook regulations for extra work. In making up the 
number of hours required, no course in the Fine Arts, includ- 
ing applied music, can count for more than three quarter- 
hours, and no credit is given for physical training in making 
up the 180 quarter-hours required for graduation, but four 
quarter-hours in physical education are required in addition to 
the 180 quarters for graduation. 

Change of Course. — Registration is for an entire course, 

and a course once begun must be continued, except in unusual 
circumstances. Continuous elementary subjects must be pur- 
sued for a year in order to be credited toward a degree. Chang- 
ing a course after registration is discouraged, and such change 
may be made only with the permission of the Dean. A charge 
of $1.00 is made for changing a course after six days. No new 
course may be entered after September 20 in the Fall Quarter, 
December 8 in the Winter Quarter, or March 15 in the Spring 
Quarter. Any course dropped after those dates automatically 
draws a grade of "F." 

Ten Hour Rule. — Students failing to pass ten hours of 
the work pursued, may not return for the next quarter. This 
rule does not apply to foreign students in the first year of res- 
idence, or to specially admitted students if recommended by 
the Faculty Committee on Admission and Credits; and in the 
case of freshmen students, five hours of the ten may be a con- 
ditional grade for the first quarter. 

Class Absences. — Absences are counted from the first 
meeting of the class in the quarter. Those who enter a course 
after the first meeting of a class are reported as absent from 
the prevous mieetings of the class. Necessarily additional ab- 
sences without penalty are allowed students who must be ab- 
sent in order to represent the College as members of athletic 
teams or other recognized organizations, provided that the to- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 35 

tal absences must be made up as early as practicable each 
quarter, by the permission of the Dean and at the convenience 
of the Faculty member concerned. For each two additional 
absences or any fractional part of two additional absences not 
allowed as specified above, one quality point will be deducted 
from the quality points earned during the quarter. 

Cuts. — (1) No Freshman is allowed any class cuts his first 
quarter in school. (2) No student securing an "F" on a course 
may be permitted cuts in any class the following quarter. 
(3) A student making an average of "D" in all work regis- 
tered for in a given quarter may be allowed two cuts in each 
subject the following quarter. (4) A student making an 
average of "C" on all courses registered for in a given quarter 
may be allowed three cuts in the following quarter. (5) A 
student making an average of "B" on all courses registered for 
in a given quarter may be allowed five cuts in each subject 
the following quarter. (6) A student making all grades 'A" 
in a given quarter may be allowed unlimited cuts the follow- 
ing quarter. (7) Incomplete and Conditional grades are con- 
sidered as grades of "F" in regard to cuts for the following 
quarter. 

Any work missed by a student is to be made up at a con- 
venient time appointed by the professor in charge. 

A student who fails to get permission to drop a course 
receives F on the course. No student will be permitted a re- 
examination who has received an F on the course. 

Chapel and Church Absences. — (1) All students are re- 
quired to attend the regular Chapel exercises. Seniors are not 
allowed more than seven absences from Chapel during a quar- 
ter. All other students are allowed not more than four absen- 
ces. (2) All dormitory students are required to attend Sunday 
morning church services. Permission must be secured from 
the proper Dean to attend church off the campus. Seniors are 
allowed three absences during a quarter without the loss of 



56 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

credit; all other students are allowed three absences during a 
quarter without the loss of credit. (3) A student who is ab- 
sent from Chapel or Church over the above limit during a 
quarter will be subject to discipline. Absences from Chapel or 
Church over the limit mentioned above, unless excused by the 
proper Dean, will reduce the student's quarter hour credits 
one hour for each three Chapel absences or portion thereof, 
and one hour for each two additional Church absences or por- 
tion thereof. (4) Freshmen are required to attend Sunday 
school, and the same rules shall apply as those concerning at- 
tendance at Church. 

Quarter Examinations. — Quarter examinations are given 
in November, in March, and in May. An average of "D" on 
each subject including term standing and examination, is re- 
quired for credit. All students making a grade of "E" on a 
continuous subject may be conditioned if this condition oc- 
curs at the end of the first quarter of the course. A grade of 
"C" is required during the following quarter to remove the 
condition without a re-examination. 

Students who fail to attend regular tests or examinations, 
or who fail to hand in papers, are regarded as handing in 
blank papers, unless they have been previously excused from 
the examination. Excuses from tests and examinations are 
granted only in case of absolute necessity. 

Special Examinations. — A student wishing a special ex- 
amination must obtain a permit from the Dean before the 
date of the examination. A student who has been excused 
from an examination or who has made an "E" in a subject 
may have opportunity to make good his deficiency without 
taking the subject over, provided the deficiency be removed 
within one college year from the time it was incurred. 

A charge of $L00 for each test or examination taken out 
of the regular time will be made, except in cases where stu- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBE R 37 

dents have been excused from taking the regular test or ex- 
amination at the regular examination period. 

Senior Deficiencies. — Senior deficiencies may be made up 
either at a special examination arranged by the Dean and the 
instructor, or at the regular examination at the close of the 
Fall Quarter. All senior conditions must be made up not 
later than April 1st, in order for the student to become a 
candidate for a degree at the following commencement. 

Graduation Requirements. — At the beginning of the Jun- 
ior year, each candidate for a Bachelor's Degree must elect a 
major from the department listed below in which majors are 
offered. More than one major may be elected. 

One hundred and eighty quarter-credit hours must be 
completed as a minimum for a Bachelor's Degree, seventy-two 
hours of which must be taken on the Junior-Senior level. 

Majors. — The College offers the following majors, with 
required quarter hours as specified : 

Biology, 45 quarter hrs. Home Economics, 77 quarter 
Business Administration, 45 hrs.§ 

quarter hrs.* Mathematics, 36 quarter hrs. 

Chemistry, 45 quarter hrs. Music, 51-66 quarter hrs. 

English, 36 quarter hrs. Phj^sics, 45 quarter hrs. 

French, 36 quarter hrs. Religion, 36 quarter hrs.| 

German, 36 quarter hrs. Science, 45 quarter hrs.f 

History, 36 quarter hrs. Spanish, 36 quarter hrs. 

A major course may not be formed for fewer than three 
students, a minor for fewer than five. 



*Students majoring in Business Administration are advised to minor in 
Social Sciences. 

fStudents majoring in Religion should have at least two years in each 
of the followng subjeicts: History, Science, Philosophy, Greek. 

JThis must include Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geography or Geology. 

§Requirements for the Home Economics major must include Chemistry, 
Biology, Physics and 9 quarter hours of Social Science. 



38 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Minors. — Any iield above in wiiich one obtains twenty 
quarter hours may constitute a minor, in addition to the fol- 
lowing fields: 

Education 
Philosophy- 
Greek 

In addition to the requirements of one major as stated 
above, two minors totaling thirty-six quarter hours, relating 
to the elected major, must be completed. Other requirements 
for graduation include: 

(1) 18 quarter hours in Composition, Grammar and English 

Literature. 

(2) 18 quarter hours in a foreign language. 

(3) One of the following: 

(a) 18 quarter hours in Mathematics. 

(b) 18 quarter hours in a natural science. 

(c) 9 quarter hours in Mathematics and 9 quarter 

hours in Natural Science. 

(d) 9 quarter hours in each of two Natural Sciences. 
9 quarter hours in Home Economics may be sub- 
stituted for a atural Science of Mathematics. 

(4) 9 quarter hours in Religion. 

Students must have an average grade of "C" in the major 
field in order to be graduated. 

Ten quarter-hours in American History and nine quarter- 
hours in European History are advised for all students. 

Students who plan to pursue graduate work leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy should take both French 
and German. 

Electives, — Any course not chosen as a major or a minor 
may be elected toward the degree. Additional electives are 
provided in Art and in Applied Music. 

Courses in Art and Applied Music receive six quarter- 
hours credit per year. Under no circumstances can more than 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 39 

eighteen quarter-hours credit toward the A. B. degree be al- 
lowed in Art and Applied Music. 

Quality Points. — 180 quality points are required for grad- 
uation in addition to the 180 quarter-hours of Liberal Arts 
credits as heretofore required. The quality-point values of 
grades are: 

A — 3 quality-points for each quarter hour. 

B — 2 quality-points for each quarter hour. 

C — 1 quality-point for each quarter hour. 

Comprehensive Examination and Senior Essay. — Each 
senior is required to take a comprehensive examination in his 
major field, or at the discretion of his major professor to write 
an essay. 

1. The comprehensive examination, according to the 
judgment of his major professor, may be either written or oral 
or a combination of the two. The examination is prepared 
and administered by the membership of the department or by 
the membership of the department and a related department 
if the membership of the department consists of less than two. 
The head of the department will act as chairman. The com- 
prehensive examination is to be held prior to December 1 of 
the student's senior year, and is not to exceed two hours if oral 
or three hours if written. 

2. Each major professor is permitted, at his discretion, 
to require of the student an essay in lieu of the comprehensive 
examination. In case of this essay, the subject is to be sub- 
mitted to the major professor who in turn notifies the dean's 
office not later than October 15 of the senior year. The first 
draft of the essay is to be submitted to the sponsoring pro- 
fessor not later than December 1. Three typewritten copies 
of this paper shall be submitted to the reading committee, on 
or before February 15, and an oral examination on the essay 
held by the committee which reads his work, not later than 
March 1 of the senior year. This examination is not to exceed 
one hour. 



40 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Certificates. — Departmental Certificates will be given those 
who have completed the course in Music and Art, provided that 
each student shall have completed fifteen units of high school 
work as required for entrance to the college, and have com- 
pleted the requirements for a major in some one of the College 
departments, with an average of at least C for the work done 
both in the special department and in the liberal arts depart- 
ments. In lieu of a major, the candidate may offer forty-five 
quarter- hours of Freshman liberal arts work. A certificate 
may be secured in the Commercial Department upon the com- 
pletion of a one year's course as outlined by that department. 
No certificate is given in the liberal arts departments of the 
College. 

Diplomas. — Departmental diplomas are granted to those 
who in a single department complete four years of work with 
an average of C, and in addition two majors in the liberal 
arts departments, or ninety quarter-hours of Freshman and 
Sophomore work. 

Reading for Honors. — The purpose of the plan of Reading 
for Honors is to encourage those students who have the abiUty 
and ambition to study independendy in going beyond the 
minimum standards of the regular courses. The plan provides 
for the best students a program of training which, alike by its 
freedom and severity, will develop them to the utmost. 

To this end, prospective candidates should apply to the 
Chairman of the Honors Committee not later than May 1st of 
their Junior year. A limited number of applicants is then 
admitted by the committee, after faculty approval. 

The admitted candidate is, at the discretion of his advisory 
committee either permitted great freedom in class atten- 
dance of regular courses during his senior year or is excused 
from attendance of regular courses altogether. If the latter 
alternate is pursued, an Honors course which adequately paral- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 41 

lels the requirements and subject matter of regular courses is 
followed at the Senior level. 

The Honors course is based upon work already done by 
the candidate in his major and minor fields and is guided 
by a committee composed of one member from each of these 
departments the professor in the major field acting as coordi- 
nating chairman. Conferences with the chairman occur at 
least once each fortnight, while additional consultations are 
held with the professors in the minor fields. Near the end of 
the second quarter of the Senior year an oral comprehensive 
examination in the planned reading is held by the Honors 
Committee and some professor invited from the faculty of 
another college or university. 

If any member of the committee is dissatisfied with the 
progress of the candidate, he may request a consideration by 
the committee of the student's pursuing regular class work 
in any given parallel field. No student may expect to continue 
in the Reading for Honors course who does not satisfy the 
committee that he is progressing satisfactorily. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Tuition Scholarships and Self-Help Positions. — The Presi- 
dent and the Scholarship Committee of the Faculty award all 
scholarships and self-help positions. No scholarship will be 
awarded to a high school graduate whose average has been less 
than "C" and all scholarships are awarded on the condition that 
the student will average not less than "C" on his college work. 
Self-help positions are awarded on the same basis, with oc- 
casional exceptions. Applications for awards should be in the 
hands of the Scholarship Committee before July L The atten- 
tion of the applicant is called to the section on "Work and 
Scholarship Credits," contained on page 31 of this catalogue. 

Alumni Scholarship. — The Alumni Association, in session 
on June 1, 1909, established a scholarship in Elon College. This 



42 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

scholarship is awarded in the literary department, and is o£ 
value of $80.00 a year. 

Elon High School Scholarships. — The Board of Trustees 
ofTer scholarships to one graduate of any high school of which 
an Elon graduate is principal or superintendent, or a teacher in 
high school work. Said scholarship is good for one year, and 
covers tuition in any liberal arts course. The candidate is to be 
satisfactorily recommended by the principal or superintendent 
and approved by the Faculty Committee on Scholarships. The 
number of such scholarships is limited to ten. 

Public High School Scholarships. — The Board of Trus- 
tees offers ten free tuition scholarships upon the recommenda- 
tion of the principal or superintendent of approved high 
schools, subject to the approval of the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships. 

Ministerial Students and Minor Children of Ministers. — 

Ministerial students and minor children of ministers who live 
at the college are granted scholarships to cover their regular 
tuition ($80.00). Day students taking the ministerial course, 
and minor children of ministers who are day students will pay 
one-half of the regular tuition charge. 

The J. J. Summerbell Scholarship. — In consideration of a 
bequest of $1,000.00 for that purpose, left the college by the late 
Dr. J. J. Summerbell, the President of the College each year 
will award a $60.00 tuition scholarship, in either the College or 
one of the special departments, good for the succeeding year, 
to that member of either the Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior 
class, who shall write the best thesis on "The First Command- 
ment." The same is to be adjudged by a committee of the 
Faculty. Theses in this competition are to be typewritten and 
in the President's hands, the name of the writer accompanying 
in a sealed envelope, not later than May L 

The Barrett Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. J. Pressley 
Barrett, an original trustee of the College, a free tuition scholar- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 43 

ship is awarded annually to some worthy member of the 
Freshman class. 

The Long Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. S. Long, 
founder and first president, a free tuition scholarship is award- 
ed annually to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

The Staley Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. W. Staley, 
second president, a free tuition scholarship is awarded annually 
to some member of the Freshman class. 

The Moffitt Scholarship. — In honor of Dr. E. L. Moffitt, 
third president, a free tuition scholarship is awarded annually 
to some member of the Freshman class. 

The Martyn Summerbell Scholarship. — Dr. Martyn Sum- 
merbell of Lakemont, N. Y., each year awards free tuition 
scholarship to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

LOAN FUNDS 

The Bowling Fund. — Dr. E. H. Bowling, Durham, N. C, 
has created a fund to be used in the education of deserving 
students, preferably candidates for the ministry. Those who 
are accepted as beneficiaries of this fund will receive $60.00 per 
year to be applied to their account with the College. They will 
give an interest-bearing note at 6 per cent for the same, with 
acceptable security, and will begin to pay the money back, at 
least one note a year, immediately after graduation. The title 
of this fund will remain in the College, but it is to be perpet- 
ually used for the purpose indicated. Awards of funds are 
made by the President. 

The Amick Fund. — Dr. T. C. Amick, formerly of the 
College Faculty, has created a fund to be loaned to deserving 
students at 6 per cent interest. The President lends this fund 
on proper security. 

The Clarke Fund.— Dr. J. A. Clarke of the College 
Faculty has created a loan fund for deserving students. The 



44 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Business Manager lends this at 6 per cent interest on proper 
security. 

Ministerial Loan Fund. — The treasurer of the College is 
the custodian for the loan fund of $13,031.49 of the Southern 
Convention of Congregational-Christian Churches. It is loaned 
to ministerial students upon the recommendation of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Convention. 

The Eastern Virginia Conference Ministerial Fund. — By an 

agreement with the authorities of the College, whereby the 
Eastern Virginia Conference relinquished certain bonds owned 
by it, there is provided a special fund for ministerial students 
from that conference. The value of this fund is $180 per year, 
but it is provided that no one student shall receive over $100.00 
in any one year. If there are two or more ministerial students 
from that conference, the $180.00 is to be equally divided. It is 
further provided that if there are no students who qualify, the 
fund is not cumulative. 

The Masonic Fund. — ^The Grand Lodge of North Carolina 
has given the College $2,500.00 to be loaned to seniors in Col- 
lege, on acceptable security. 

The Knights Templar Educational Loan Fund. — Under 
the rules of the Grand Commandary, students in Elon College 
may secure loans from this fund. 

The McLeod Fund. — The family of the late Prof. M. A. 
McLeod have established a fund of $2,000.00, the interest on 
which is to be loaned to worthy students on proper security. 

The Helen Martin Parkerson Loan Fund. — Mrs. Helen 
Cannon has established at Elon College a memorial for her 
mother, Mrs. Helen Martin Parkerson. The memorial con- 
sists of a loan fund for deserving students of the Business De- 
partment. From this fund a loan of $75 is obtainable annually. 

The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund.— Mr. John M. W. 
Hicks, of Raleigh, N. C, and of New York City, has estab- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 45 

lished this fund to assist members of the Junior and Senior 
classes. The initial amount of the fund was $1,000.00, which 
the donor hopes may be materially increased. 

ENDOWMENT AND SOURCES OF INCOME 

Tuition and Fees. — The income from tuition in the literary 
and special departments constitutes a chief and growing source 
of revenue for the support of the College. The income from 
fees, matriculation and departmental, is used to pay the inci- 
dental expenses of the College and of the departments. Besides 
these sources of income and gifts from time to time on current 
expenses, the College has the following sources of revenue : 

The O. J. Wait Fund, — This fund was a bequest from Rev. 
O. J. Wait, D. D., of Fall River, Massachusetts. The amount, 
$1,000.00, was the first bequest that came to the College. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Fund. — Of this fund $20,- 
000.00 was given by Mr. Francis Asbury Palmer, of New York, 
before his death. The remaining ten thousand dollars having 
been provided for in his will, became available soon after his 
been provided for in his will, became available after his death. 

The J. J. Summerbell Fund — Dr. J. J. Summerbell, Day- 
ton, Ohio, from its foundation a staunch friend and loyal sup- 
porter of the College, departed life February 28, 1913, and left 
a bequest of $1,500.00 to Elon. 

The Patrick Henry Lee Fund.— This fund of $1,000.00 is 
a bequest from Capt. P. H. Lee, of Holland, Va. 

The Jesse Winbourne Fund. — This fund, a bequest from 
Deacon Jesse Winbourne, of Elon College, N. C, amounting 
to $5,000.00 became available in January, 1923. It is a part of 
the permanent endowment funds of the College. 

The Southern Convention Fund. — The Southern Conven- 
tion of Congregational Christian Churches asks the Confer- 



46 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ences composing the Convention for $12,500.00 annually for 
the support of the College. This is called the Elon College 
Fund, and is the equivalent of an invested endowment of 
$250,000.00 at 5 per cent. By vote of the Convention in May, 
1918, a note v^as given the College for $112,500.00, and later, 
$100,000.00 in 6 per cent bonds, as evidence of this obligation. 

The Carlton Fund.— The family of the late J. W. Carlton, 
of Richmond, Va., P. J. Carlton, H. A. Carlton, Luther Carlton 
and Mrs. T. S. Parrott, gave the College for its permanent 
funds, certain R. F. and P. RaiWay stocks, to found a Profes- 
sorship in Christian Literature and Methods in memory of Mrs. 
J. W. Carlton. Upon his death, in May, 1935, Mr. P. J. Carlton 
left a bequest adding $25,000.00 to the College endowment. 

The Corwith Fund. — W. F. Corwith, a former trustee, has 
given the College for its permanent funds $35,000.00 to foimd 
a Professorship in Biblical Languages and Literature, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. W. F. Corwith. 

The J. W. Wellons Fund— Dr. J. W. Wellons, several 
years before his death, bought two annuity bonds of the Col- 
lege in the sum of $1,500.00. By the terms of the bonds, at his 
decease they were cancelled and the principal became a part 
of the general endowment of the College. Dr. Wellons desired 
that the Church supplement his gift, providing an endowment 
of $300,000.00 for the School of Christian Education. 

Other Invested Funds. — Other gifts to the permanent En- 
dowment Fund are: One of $25.00 from the late Rev. J. J. 
Summerbell, D. D., of Dayton, Ohio; one of $283.35 from the 
estate of the late Jos. A. Foster of Semora, N. C; one of $50.00 
by Miss Mamie Tate, as a student loan fund; and one of $100.00 
to be kept at interest for a term of years, left by the late Rev. 
S. B. Klapp. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Board Donations. — ^The late 
Francis Asbury Palmer, who endowed the College, left his 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 47 

estate to a Board to administer it in furthering education. This 
Board at one time made a considerable donation in cash for 
current expenses. 

The Standardization Fund. — During the spring of 1919, 
a campaign was put on to raise additional endowment. This 
was known as the Standardization Fund. There was raised 
$381,600.00 in cash and subscriptions. 

Forms of Bequest — A number of friends have made pro- 
vision for the College in the disposition of their property after 
their decease. We appreciate this generous action on their part 
and commend it to the liberal-hearted of our friends, for whose 
convenience we append herewith three forms of bequests: 

FIRST FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 

sum of Dollars, to be applied at 

their discretion, for the general purposes of the College. 

SECOND FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely in- 
vested by them and called the Scholarship 

Fund. The interest of this fund shall be applied at their discretion 
to aid deserving students. 

THIRD FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely invest- 
ed by them as an endowment for the support of the College. 

Annuity Bonds. — Those desiring a stable income on funds 
that they intend to leave the College in their wills, can secure 
the same by placing such funds with the College treasurer and 
receiving an annuity bond as follows: 

ANNUITY BOND 
The Board of Trustees of Elon College. 

Elon College., 19... 

Whereas, of has donated 

and paid to the Board of Trustees of Elon College, a corporation 
established under a charter from the State of North Carolina, its 



48 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

principal office being located at Elon College, in said State, the sum 

of Dollars, said sum becoming by said gift tlie 

absolute property of said Board of Trustees of Elon College, the whole 
amount to go direct to said College and ever be administered for its 
advancement by said Board of Trustees: Now, therefore, in consider- 
ation thereof, the said Board of Trustees agree to pay the 

said the interest on the same at 6 per 

cent, payable semi-annually, during natural 

life. 

As the above interest provision is made for the sole benefit of the 

said during natural life, it is declared 

to be the intention of the parties subscribed hereto that no obligation 
whatever is, or shall be considered hereby to have been assumed by the 
said Board of Trustees, to the heirs, executors, administrators, or as^ 

signs of said for any interest after 

life shall have terminated. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF ELON COLLEGE, 

By President (Seal) 

Witness : Treasurer of Elon College. 

So far five annuity bonds have been taken: two by the 
late Dr. J. W. Wellons, in the sum of $1,500.00; one by Trustee 
A. B. Farmer, in the sum of $1,000.00; one by Mrs. J. P. Avent, 
also in the amount of $1,000.00; and a fifth by Mrs. Esther 
Jenkins, in the sum of $3,000.00. Generous-hearted friends, 
desiring a safe investment of their funds and a sure means of 
perpetuating their memory to generations yet unborn, may 
avail themselves of this inviting privilege. 

Insurance Policies. — Friends may make the College their 
beneficiary in one or more insurance policies. Details of this 
plan will be gladly furnished. 




STATELY COLONNADES CONNECT THE BUILDINGS 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



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in in in Im 



to m CO uo I vo 



CO in 00 1^ 



tq 



o 



u 



W tJ c)^ 



w 
p^ 

O g 
o u 



o 

l-H -r: 



• S "cS 



in" M fH 

CO g O 



G rt u 
W hJ P^ 



c y S .^ 

w w H-i M 



w w 



ffi Ph w 



<o m in i/i m 



in in in |in 



CO CO CO in l'^ 



m CO m CO ho 



^ a 
< d 
§o 

W § 
P^ . 

a 

o 
U 



Pil 

o 
o .-• 

Ph >-< 

c/2 :^. « ri 



P^ 
O d 






.2 -a 



G o 



<; (n 



O Ph "^ 



. 60 a 

G fd rj 

W 1-1 w 



CM K^ 


^ CO 5? 1, 


^-00 60 .y 


■ 2 c 


Tf CO g > 

. . 60 '-!^ 


•M ^ ^ g 


60 M _aJ 


^^^M 


^g'l'S 


W M C/2 


W W 1-1 M 


Ph W cAi W 



50 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



<-5 1/3 lo m 



po lo lo oq 



q3 



U 

o 
o 

OS 
u 
C/3 

.3 



u 

-5 

O 

:z; 



Pi 
w 

H 

■< 

C 

O 

I— I 
P< 

Ph 
CO 



&3 



CO ctf 



w 
Pi 
o 

o 

O -5 

C/2 nJ 



60 



m 



5:^ W 



2 c - 
ffi c/^ W 



P ^ -" 



P4 






w 



2 > 



. M bO ->-; 

C n! I) -ii 
W h-j P^ W 



&C BO 3 

WWW 



W t-1 rt a; 

^ g ^.s 

|-fw 

o tic .y 
^ ^ ^ 

. O (J 

60-" :=t 
C o '^ 
Www 



P^ 
W 
H 

Pi 

< 

pil 

w 

H 

;? 



J^ lO lO lO 



lO lO 1/^ 



PO 1/3 rO lO 



tq 



O 



CO T3 

W c 



U 



W 
Pi 
O „ 

O 5 
o o 



p^ 
o ^• 



1/3 m PO lO 






WWW 



6 W S^ 
< ^ ^ 

of .9 M 



W 



• ' 3 .^ 

60 C -^ 

C CTJ a-' 

W W Pi 



6C O 



w w w K 



•s o :5 



Ph 



Ph K W Ph 



Pi 

w 
h 

Pi 

< 

a 

w 
w 

< 

w 



<-o 1/3 1/3 1/3 



ro ro fO lO 



lO ro 1/3 lO 



< i 

rr! O 



-s 



W 
P^ 
O 

O.ti 

Ph 



P^ 

o . 

I— I ,-^ 

Z W 



o 



60 < 

c 

w ^- 



< CO 



^ w 

(U g 

so o 



P^ 




fi^ 


s 


u 




.y ^ 




1— 1 




i§ 


Tl 


w 




-9 -o 


O 


C/J 


eral 
Y Pro 

t. an 


c 

1— 1 




H rt "* 

O P^ "^ 


c^ 




^ 


>. 




^ 


~ 00 lO 


60 



w w c52 



w K 



60 60 C 3 
C C rJ ta 

w w w w 



ff c c S 

Ph W W CO 



THE CATLOGUE NUMBER 



51 



<o lO lO lO 



CM ro lO vo 






S^- 



> 1) 



CO 



W 



-a 
•S w 

> rt „ 

■■t^ H-l 5 



o 

I— I 



a 



&0 -c! — 

u: t; M 

<u =3 a 

C^ § W 



W 






t/5 »H C/l 

•^ o o 

w M p^ 



.< 



C/i ffi S 



I i2 



fi \r, \ri \n 



O^i rri \r) m 



lO lO lO 



&: 





s 


H 


s 


P^ 


^ s 


<: 


< o 


P 


s^ 


u 


K c 


w 


CO t^ 

Si 



. c 

O 'o 
'Si CO 



Pi! 
O 
I-" b. 



P^ 2 
O P-i 

I— I 



^-g" 
'^P- 



W h-1 K 



Y> '-'00 



■4- O ^ CaO 
^ -^ ^ § 
W ffi IS K-I 



C O ^ 



'" 13 

--* en 

U ft 

__ CO 

"^ 10" 

60 _, (O 
^ "S > 

III 

CO W W 



CO 



in 10 10 10 



eg f<^ 10 10 



13 
S 



< 



o 



CO ri 

W . 
P^ o. 

^ I 

u 



w 
p^ 
o 

o 
M 

o 



§ W2 ,^ 



■^ 



<U ,-1 
60 

60 O 

w 1-; lx| 



OT ;:j 



w 



05 (^ 



y CTJ rt (L> 

t3 g . c 

CM T-, 

>> < 00" 
60 ^ 

O CO 

-s.s 

^ ^K 
Ph w ffi 



0i S 

^ ■ 

CO i! 



XJ 



ro — 

W 

60 r< (U 

o C — i 

CO W W 



52 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



<\J CM UO lO 



f\a OJ rO lO lO 



CM lO lO VO 



g O 



^ y S S 

_M O T3 O 
cJi r> < _ 



^^ 



O .tn 






w -^ 



< < 



o u o :3 .22 



S !^ J w 






;^ w o w 



d 

a ■ 
< 



S O f^ 



<o lo <M og lo 



rg CM ro lo lo 



r<i IT) TT) m 



,IS 



^ < ^ 



o u o 3 



S § ^ H^l 



o g 



2 P 



i-'^ trj t3 C 

< < K 



rr 00 MD 1) Csl 
(M r-J ro bC 

o u o :3 .2 



S S J w 



2 .y -ii' 

00 O 



^^^ 



2 " 

CO 1^ 



- S — 5 
^ w ^ o 



•^ in csi CM LO 



lO CM CM <r) vo 



CM LO VO lO 



c^ 






^ 


r^ 


< 


< 


^ 


;=) 


w 


r-y 


CO 




w 


H-l 


p^ 


hJ 


fe 



(tJ bJ) o 

M ■c;5 > :::3 



< < 



w 
o 
o 

Ph W 

o . . 



a 

a 13 
< S 



a-2^ u 



rg CM CM t^ ^ 

u o o u 3 

■| ■§ •§ 'I I 

S S ^ ^ w 



p^ 


o 


o 


p 


z 


^ 


^ 


•n 


1— , 










a 




a 




< 



■p -3 

Pi <ri 



■3; CD C . 
klj ■" o •" 



CM 10 10 vO 



P^ 

2 o 

^ i 

CO !==< 



a -t^ 

< y o 
-W ^ 

o .52 cj 

If "i 
;^ w s 



•5^ 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



53 



5^ eg fsj lo vo 



&5 



H .5 



eg lo IT) >o 

o 



O 



.B 



S ^ 



w Pi _ 1^ 



3 S'^.S 



I 2 
o 



PO r^ i-H 00 



I ^ 



6C 

W =2 



t-( TO M (J 

!^ >-i w OT 



Pi! d ^ 

I— I ^ o 



jS o c 

W CJ .j2 S 

< < - 1; 

\o oj o C 

ro ro CM — 

a u a ^ 

I 1 1 £ 



u -^ 



i5 '" 





^ 


ir 


CM 


c\ 


ly- 


1 "^ 


<\ 


LO l/- 


ir 


1 f^ 




r*- 


I/- 


r^ 


,_ 


1 "^ 


r<- 


rg 1 \n 














1 '-I 










1 ^ 












1 T-l 






1 -H 




t^ 








































P^ 






C/2 




































w 






c/i 




































P^ 


^ 










P!j 






























< 


< 




nJ 






o 




>< 




^ 


c 


1< 








P^ 








!3 


g 




bC 






i>r! 


bi 


c 




o 


c 


li -tJ 


> 


^ 




o 








a 




> 

c 








1^ 
O 


'5 


j5 




1-H 


< 


C 

'c 

c 


C 


L, 




1—1 


C 
.C 






w 


fa 








Ph 


c? 


ffi 




H-» 


rt 


I 


c 






w 


c 






H 


E 


c 




O 


^_ 










c 


Ic 




c 




a • 


g 
S 


;r 








CO 


1 








% 

s 


c 


Ph 


C 
- _> 






i 








(N] 


' ^" 


cc 


a. 




^ 


" fM" 2r 


CO 




>C 


" <N 


I, 
0. 


OC 




fNJ 


"1 










■" 


b 


D 


(N 









r^ 


r^ 


C 

c 


K 


^ 




^ 


H 






_C 


_o 


_(, 






_t- 


u 13 


y 




_o 


_t. 






_c 




_(_ 








'3 


3 


'7 


bi 

C 


D 


'3- 


■§1 




) 


'5 


3 


'I 




I. 
C 


'Tr 




'2 


5 
o 






1 


§^ 


Jd 




1 


s^ 




§ 


^ 


(S 


1 




1 



ji li^ CM eg u^ 



tl5 



<; 



*^ ^ bO 
CO >i c 

P^ S ^ O 






^ ^ ^ U) 



CD c/] w 



:^ss>3 



CM in lo \0 



fa 

o 

y-4 ou K 

i§ .g o 
O 'bo B 

M.S S 
Pi w ffi 

CO T-l '^ O 
CM CM -^ 

O O .JQ <-' 

'I 'I M £ 



re ro lO \0 



Pi^ D. 

O a 



o a 



0^ 
I—" 5 
W -55 






•§ 1 ;^ g 
gS;2c5^ 



U > 

.y 



54 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



^ eg cvi lo vo 



CM UO lO m 



lO fO lO f«0 






u 

y3 






Vh 

bit) 






u 



w 

H 

o 

Ph 



!:; 



C/2 .S 

W CO 



m > 



6 ■£ 



^ J 



<; cvT 



w 






^«1 



U 



ro ro .S ^ 



;i ;i w 



1^ c rt ■" 
r^ W h-1 O 



^S 






w 



o 



J1 lO CVl Ol lO 



te 






CO -^ 00 D 



o o o P 

1 ■§ 1 1 



lO CQ lO lO 



w 
Pi 
o 

o 

p^ W c/D '"' 

C/2 r^ ^ C 

Csf •^" CM <V 
CM CM _ M 

o (J EG 3 

1 1 '?> c 



ro to PO VO 



I ^ 



CO 



O to >> 
I— I • -2 -q 

t3 - 









— 3 <u 
W CO 



3 := 



«v ^ "^ 

O o .2 

?; '13 y o 

W w ^ -^ 

■^ ^ -Js 

.y ^ a 

M o a 

;^ ph w 



i-s lO CM CM VT) 



< 

an a 



ro lO rO VO 



O 

c3 M O 



M c^ 



^ r^ ,^ 00 

d 

o o o S 



ss:^»3 




I iS 



O O _ 60 

(5 ^ S 



13 



rr _o .2 

"to o y 

^ Ph W 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



55 



•o lO >o lO 



< 
Pi 



C<1 lO fO -^ 



w ,^: 

CN] O 

-^ 'Si 

oO <u ^ 

G t-i 1) 

w o « 



o 

►^ s* i>, ^ 

o tn M 

•2 ^^ 

W fL, Pi! 



O 



^ W 



E S 






?^ ^ 



O 

I— I 

w 

CO 









•^ '-5 -2 ^ 
ffi p4 K w 



^ .2 S 

O M O 

w M Ph 



"o 1/5 lO lO 





s 










o 










!3^ 








C^ 










w 




u 






^ 


s 
s 




<: 


< 




ID 


^ 


1-t 




a 


K 


^1 


■> c 


(1^ 


UJ 


ni 




f^ 

fe 


c 

£ 

c 


t. 

a. 


s 
< 



1 15 



lo lo rn eg 



I i2 



lO in lO 



^: & 



WOK 



O "o -o b 

N ^ ^ 

m ^ ^ 

O 00 tn 

pq p^ Pw 



c c 



o 


6 


.2 

(.J 


t-H 




=) 


t3 


o 



' fe C o 
l5 c\f W 



C 1=^ 



^ •" to S 
Pi Ph W w 



2 ^ >. 

_ o 2 

<-> ~ ffi 

w £ ^- 

- . ^ 

^ .2 g 

O M O 

M p^; pm 



•^ lO lO lO 



< i 

e^ =^ S fe 

^ d S S 

p ii < 

3 W „ 

u ^-^ 

z^ "^ >^ 

w o ffi 



lO w-> lO 



ro in lo cq 






Pi 

o 

o 

m ■ ^ rn 

f= !z; - 

- ^" _ 

<M (M C! 

CM O 

DO OJ ^ 

G >H t) 

W O Pi 



Pi 
o 

tj ^ -3 G 
t^ -i G ■" 






O 

I— ( 



"S 1g M 

Pi PM Ph 



■" p-i 2 

'"3 ^G 

. G M S 

£? .2 -2 ^ 

o 'So o '-I^ 

•I ^ ■§ ^ 

M Pi w H 



56 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



w 

Pi 
< 

a 

o 



O J^ 



G '.S 00 

y Pi - 






h-1 P^ 



1 12 



Pi ^ 'rt 

O ft ■£ 

^ W 00 



Km w 



Pi 






P5 ffi W 



^ m \r> \r> 



P< d 
Q i3 



O 3 



.s 



e4 
w 
H 

Pi 

< 

a 

Pi 
w 

H 

:2i 



w 

Pi 

< 

< 




BO lO lO 



H 

Pi ^ 

o.s 



p (U o 



ffi B y 



P-i < <u ^3 
OO oj-CO Pi 



.s 

P ro 



. o 

S ^ 

< 

■ "S 



m ;^ ►-! 



< 


bo 

p 


in 

> 




hfl 




3 




«u 


m h4 w 



H 00 S "rt 



< "-1 ^ .> 



m 




I ^ 



I 12 



Pi 

O n 



pq ffi w 



o 


^ - 


^ 


M 


Hh^ 


OJ 


0-1 


o 


C 


o 


< ^ 

U3 


_<u 


Cfi 


^" "ci 


CO 




CM c 






^- w 


o 






fM 




<; (M 


-a 




o5 M 






P C 


§ 



1-5 s 



-g o 60 

<;§ s 

P uj rt 
W Ph hJ 



^ ^ g 

I— ' § " 

W Eo o 

CO C i! 



"^^ — .> 

PP w w 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



57 



<^ 1/5 VO 1/1 



lO lO PCi ro 



ttj 



o 



-^ i4 



W CQ W 



Cu o - 



in u 



o .y 



u Q 



O 



'^ r*^ kS 






Ti- w 



(DUO 






rt 


g> s a 


3 


c3 ^ ^ 


T5 


J in ffi 


W 



■ ■ (XJ 

U o 

W W 
1) 

H „ 

o o 






w 



W PL, 



<o lo lO VO 



tq 



5 w 



17 <t) 

< O 



'^ o 

^ (nT <^^ 

<^" • ^ 

43 "^ to 

W W '- 



w 



IT) 10 10 ro 



g bO 



(L> — tn 

Q P^ JiJ 

Q. 

T; to o 

43 O •? 



u 



CM '"' 

-S .2 



C lu rt 
W P^ H-1 



(Vj PO ro Tl- 

u u (J 13 
M H (jj .2 



C O O T3 

t-1 W K W 



10 10 10 



60 

^ s 

O S o 

U <; ^ 
2' 3-'^ 



u u 00 

o 



O O tn 

W W CM 



3 ■" 

E 



O 



VO vo 10 IT) 



CM r<2 vo 10 



Pi fi 



a o 

a -° 



fiH 



o 



u 



o 

M 

o 

CO ^ 



60 !3 C 

w M u 



8^- 

d (u 

"• a ^ 

p; K h-i 







M) 






.3 






43 













ni 






•u 


P^ 




H 







"^ 


HH 




t3 


^, 


c 


rt 


w 


4- 


0) 



o 



43 >, ,-1 
> 00 o ,0 

W W Ps P< 



UO CM H 



u' C C 

W .2.2 



ffi w w 



58 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



■-5 lO lO lO 



I i2 



I ^ 



(4 
w 

H 

< 

a 
o 

Pi 



&5 



ISO 



o 



in 



^ c 



.-H l-H ^ 



^^^ 



J^ w S3 



6 -g 60 
"-' rt c 

u li ^3 



S 

en O 

'a . 



■u 



^ c '^ 















w 

H 

P^ 
< 

a 



<o lO lO VO 



tC! 



S 
S 

< O 
^^ S 

CO " 






W C O r5 



U 






A en 

en . -3 

•^ ^ s 

w S u 



vO lO ro lO 



O g> 9 60 
O < to . 

CO C bo 



r^: ^ 60 

(U 60 -j^ c 
U W !^ J 



I '-I '-' I »-• 



CO 



>1 



o 

I— I -^ 

M-; . Ph 
V^ ^ 
Q -^ ^- 

- ^ "^ 

.22 o 
■5 S ■§) 

^ U « 



CO W 



Pi 
H 
< 

< 



10 lO 1/5 V3 



1 :2 



o 



o 



<1 T-( 



o 



2 c 



tn 



tn 



— 4:i S 

60^ S 

'^ ;? u 



w ^ 



^J ^ W 



P^ 
O 2! 

►^ ^ .y 

^^ ao 

fi ^ r<r 
^- >>"" 

.S3 O 
-rj g 'So 

k^ -^ <" 

f^ U pii 



CO 



XI 


3 . 


.il 


a • 


a 




o. 


CNl 


< 


'^ • 


_ 


>i 




iH 0] 




.2 ^ 


43 


f^ -J^ 











THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



59 



^ IT) in ^n 



tq 



O 



U 



t-i ^ 



^q)^^ 



O 60 

o . 



"^" So ^ 

aj CO 

-g M S 

rt c ij 

;^ hj u 



s ^ 

l-y- "^ '^ -l-i 

^ o bo 

. Ji C 

^ W H 

P ^. ^- 

^ rn oi 

. O 00 

•S 't« '-S, 

Is Ph W 






<M Si 

^ o 
in "> 

o „ > 

Ph W w 




Cm w W 



<^ lO lO vO 




hH 3 



O „ § rt 



"^ 






•3 li ^ 



rS HM *ti 

n -^ 

^ eg 

• .2 <-> 

3 ^ ^ 
^ P^ S 



ft W W 
< 

_ eg" oj 
(%1 oo (M 

^ y> ^ 

. o en 

■3 '=« -B, 
■^ >i '"^ 

!^ ph w 



60 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



u 

*a 

O 



^ 



bfl 



a 

a 



Pi 
w 
h 

< 

a 
o 

Pi 

Ah 
C/3 



•o lo lO >/5 



to poincMiolvo lovoioivo ^oioliovo 



15^ 



^ l-H < 



hJ S 



O 60 1^ 

Ph fi -^ 
CO 5P . 

C M 

W 



'U 






<N1 <U IT 



W W hJ 



_o .> 



Ph W 






Pm CO 



W 



H 
< 

a 

Pi 

w 
h 



fl lO lO VO 



tq 



go 

CO -TD b 

W c -is ^ 
c^ '^ § 2 

ft 2 c 

C G flJ 

§ ao 

[_, CM 

W ^ U 



rO ^ lO lO 



w 
o 

O . C M 

C/3 W) "U C 

c, O W ^ 

W „ „CVJ 



3 

(J (-1 ^ 
"* h O 



X) 



P^ 
O „ 

C/3 J5 



u _m 3 



^ 'S — 
*^ •=! Bf 



W H-1 



• '-> .2 

.fl 'tn 60 

§ £ p^ 



1—1 u 





1^ 


•j3 




u 
o 


■u 


^ 


CO 


w 


m 


VO 


\n 



Pi 
w 

p^ 

< 

a 

< 



•o 1/5 ir> VO 



I S 



go 

Pi "* ?; 



ri fd 



O < 



Pi 

o 



. -c a 

c iS -G 

pa S u 



CJ 



^o 









•:^s 



S .2 

•B '^ -^ 

liS j:3 "iJ 

S P. Pi 



Pi 

o 

<; U C 

W ^ '^ 

< - a 

• <-> _ 

.^ 'K _ni 

S P-l CO 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



61 



\0 vO lO t-~ 



b c c 



pq T) X) 

< < 



o a s 

m u u 



o 



O < rt 

M . S 

O S H-1 

M W .JJ 

CO o 

^ ^ « 

PP W CO 






o . 



a <u >, 

H-1 U Ph 



W 5i ^ 

'^ o* ^ 

TT M ^ 

? a § 
:2^3 

M U (X, 



•o lO so lO 



I ^ 



U1 vO lO 



.2? c 
i^ 'if 



.rU 



^' a -^ 

^ U W 



N O 



• 2 -£3 rt 
FP ClH 1-1 






O 

I— ( 






hJ H P^ 



c 



W CJ w 



^ to MS UO 



'O lo 'O r-» 



O 
P^ _S S3 t^ 

M g ft 

<o I 



O 

Pi ° 
o § 



O 



O "cS 5d 

I— I Ih o 

^pqM_ 

- - CO 

ca r? ro 



o 



rlll 


60 


^ >> g 


_: ri "> 


m 60 .5 


■a a '^ 


O ui 60 


1^ O 0£ 


■^ U W 


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62 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Two-Year Courses of Study 

Students desiring two-year courses may make their selec- 
tion from the courses indicated below: 

Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Course: 

Biology 11-12, 21-22; Chemistry 11-12, 21-22; Physics 11-12; 
English 11-12, 21-22; Religion 11-12, and two elective subjects for 
the year. 

Pre-Law Course: 

English 11-12, 21-22, 35-36; History 11-12, 21-22; Religion 
11-12. Other subjects elective. 

Pre-Engincering Course: 

Physics 11-12, 21-22; Mathematics 11-12, 13-14, 21-22; Eng- 
lish 11-12, 21-22; French, Spanish or German 11-12, 21-22; Chemis- 
try 11-12. 

One- Year Secretarial Course 

Fall and Winter Quarters: 

Shorthand, Typewriting, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
and Penmanship. 

Spring Quarter: 

Advanced Shorthand (Dictation), Advanced Typewriting, Sec- 
retarial Practice, Bookkeeping. 

Two-Year Secretarial Course 

First Year same as above. 

Second Year: 

English 11-12, 10 quarter hours; Business Administration 11 
and 12, 10 quarter hours; Business Administration 33 and 34, 10 
quarter hours; Advanced Dictation, 5 quarter hours; Business Ad- 
ministration 21-22, 10 quarter hours. Total 45 quarter hours. 

NOTE — Satisfactory completion (ability to meet office standards) of the 
One- Year Secretarial course entitles one to a Secretarial Certificate. 



Departments of Instruction 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

MRS. BARTLEY 

Biology is the science of life, and therefore includes the 
study of both plants and animals. The courses are arranged 
to teach the fundamental facts of biology, including the laws 
of development, heredity and variation, together with studies 
of the structure, habits and distribution of the members of the 
plant and animal kingdoms. The courses are planned for 
those who seek a general culture or professional training. 

11 General Zoology. The fundamental principles of animal 
biology. The origin, development, structure, functions, distribution 
and relationships of animals. 5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 
6 q. h. 

12 General Botany. The fundamental principles of plant 
biology. The origin, development, structure, functions, distribution 
and relationships of plants. 5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 
6 q. h. 

21-22 Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. The mor- 
phology, histology, physiology, development and environmental adap- 
tations of the veterbrates. Dissections for the purpose of discovering 
homologies and analogies. 4 hours class work, 4 hours laboratory. 
6 q. h. Prerequisite Biol. 11. 

31 Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
chemistry of bacteria, and introductory studies of diseases and im- 
munity. Laboratory work in the common bacteriological techniques: 
staining bacteria, cultural methods, and the analysis of milk and 
water. 4 hours class work, 4 hours lecture work. 6 q. h. Prerequi- 
sites: Biology 11 or 12 or Chemistry 11, 12. Not given 1943-1944. 

32 Physiology. Circulation, respiration, digestion, internal se- 
cretion, muscle physiology, reproduction, and other physiological 
processes of animals. 4 hours class work, 4 hours laboratory. 6 q. h. 
Prerequisites: Biology 11. 

41 Genetics. A general introductory course in studies of hered- 
ity, evolution, and eugenics. Presented as a cultural and preparatory 



64 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

course for those wishing to pursue teaching, home making, practice 
of medicine and other related vocations. 5 hours class work. 5 q. h. 
Prerequisites: Biology 11 or 12 or junior status. 

42 Embroyology. The development of the tissues and organs 
of the frog and chick and some work with animals. 4 hours class 
work, 4 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. This course 
is designed to stress nature study, cultures, preserving materials for 
class-work, arranging courses and organized laboratory work. 5 hours 
class work. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

MR. HOWELL 

MISS ROUTT 

MISS HOFFMAN 

MRS. HOWELL 

The courses in Business Administration ofler help to four 
kinds of students: 

First, to those who plan to be business men or women, 
the theory and practice of business are taught, so that grad- 
uates may be prepared for positions of responsibility, and for 
greater service to society. 

Second, to those who plan to teach, the courses specified 
by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction are 
offered to supply the requirements for the certification of 
commercial teachers. 

Third, to those who have not the time or the money for 
a four-year course, either a one-year or a two-year Secretarial 
course is available. Secretarial students must meet the same 
entrance requirements as other students. A Secretarial Cer- 
tificate is awarded to those who meet certain proficiency 
standards. Only superior students are able to meet those re- 
quirements. Therefore, the two-year course is recommended 
for students of average ability. 

Fourth, to other students who wish to explore the eco- 
nomic structure of society, Business Administration courses 
are offered as electives. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ^ 

A Business Administration major consists of 45 quarter 
hours, 10 hours of which may be taken from the secretarial 
courses carrying degree credit. Those preparing for a commer- 
cial teacher's certificate must have 54 hours of business, 15 
hours of which may be taken from secretarial courses carrying 
degree credit. 

11-12 Principles of Economics.^ An introductory course to ac- 
quaint the student with the fundamental principles which underlie 
economic relations and activities. An analysis is made of production, 
consumption, exchange, and distribution. A brief survey of money, 
banking, and credit, the business cycle, business organization, monop- 
oly and trusts, labor problems, insurance, public finance, and econom- 
ic reforms. A combination of the lecture and case method will be 
used to relate practical situations to theory. 10 q. h. 

16 Business Organization and Practice.] The purpose of this 
course is to introduce the student to certain fundamental infonnat-ion 
regarding the characteristics, organization, operations, relative ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and 
corporations. Business transactions are studied with respect to their 
elementary, legal and economic significance. Valuable information 
regarding the use of checks, notes, drafts, etc., in business transactions 
is obtained through business practice assignments. Spring quarter. 
5 q. h. 

21-22 Principles of Accounting.'^ This course does not require 
a knowledge of bookkeeping. It deals with the proprietorship equa- 
tion, financial statements, the ledger and the trial balance, posting, 
adjusting and closing entries, columnar records, controlling accounts, 
business forms and papers, notes and drafts, partnership accounting, 
classification of accounts, accrued and deferred items, corporation 
statements, elements of manufacturing accounts. Problems, practice 
sets, and lectures. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per quarter. Not open 
to Freshmen. 5 hours class work, 5 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 

25 Salesmanship. This course is a consideration of the broad 
field of personal selling. The steps in a sale, the psychology of the 
selling process, knowledge of goods and of the market, selling to 
wholesalers and to retailers, are some of the problems considered. 



*Required of all students majoring in Business Administration. 

tThis course may not be counted as part of the 45 quarter hours required 
for a major in Business Administration; it is, however, recommended for those 
anticipating further work in this department. 



66 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Attention is given to sales methods, the relation of personal selling to 
advertising, sales management, the house policies, the selection, train- 
ing, cooperation with, and supervision of salesmen, and the various 
methods of compensating salesmen. Prerequisite or corequisite: Psy- 
chology 21. 5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

28 Credits and Collections. This is a consideration of the place 
of credit in the marketing structure. The economic basis of credit 
extension, the relation of credit to selling, methods of collecting and 
using credit information, credit bureaus, the use of trade acceptances, 
commercial paper, and collection letters, are investigated. Prerequi- 
site: Bus. Adm. 11-12 or 21-22. Spring quarter. 5 q. h. Not offered 
1943-1944. 

31 Marketing. A study of the fundamental processes of the 
system of marketing. Nature and scope of marketing, marketing 
functions, types of middlemen, retail distribution and marketing 
agencies, wholesale marketing of manufactured goods, marketing con- 
veniences, shopping and speciality goods, marketing industrial goods, 
direct selling. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Fall Quarter. 5 q. h. 

32 Retailing. This course offers the student an opportunity 
to become familiar with those principles which have been found 
generally successful in the field of retailing. Types of retail es- 
tablishments, store location and arrangement, buying, inventory 
control, display and selling, are illustrative of the topics studied. 
Part-time work in retail establishments on the part of the students 
enrolled is encouraged. This plus visits to some of the outstanding 
stores in the section and discussion periods from time to time led 
by persons of recognized standing in the field, give the course more 
than theoretical value. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. 5 q. h. 

33-34 Business Law. This course is designed to give the 
student an understanding of the main principles of law governing 
the daily conduct of business. A consideration of contracts, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, sales, 
bailments, personal and real property relations. Prerequisite: Bus. 
Adm. 11-12 or Junior standing. 10 q. h. 

35-36 Advanced Accounting. Profits, analysis of statements, ad- 
vanced work in partnerships and corporations, agencies and branches, 
statements of affairs, realization and liquidation, good will, reserves, 
funds, consolidations, mergers, partnerships, liquidations, consolidat- 
ed balance sheets and profit and loss statements, reorganizations, 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 67 

foreign exchange, and insurance. Prerequisite: Business Adminis- 
tration 13-14. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per quarter. 5 hours class 
work, 5 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 

37 Cost Accounting. An introduction to cost accounting pro- 
cedure which includes basic cost terms; accounting for materials^ 
labor, and burden; job-lot and process systems. A brief study is 
made of standard costs. Students visit industrial plants in order to 
gain practical information as to the problems involved. Prerequisite: 
Bus. Adm. 11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. 
5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

38 Income Taxation. This course is a study of federal in- 
come tax regulations as they relate to individuals, partnerships, and 
corporations. A complete, authoritative tax manual is used for 
study and analysis of the law. This is supplemented by problem 
material which acquaints the student with procedures and forms. 
5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

42 Money and Banking. A general survey of the modem 
financial system, including the principles and history of money and 
monetary standards; the principles and functions of banks and bank 
credit, commercial banks, investment banks, trust companies, the 
Federal Reserve System; a brief survey of the commercial banking 
systems of other countries. The relation of the business man and 
the banker. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors only. Spring quarter. 5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

43 Life Insurance. The purpose of this course is primarily to 
acquaint the general business student with the subject of life insurance, 
and, secondarily, to provide a foundation course for those intending 
to enter the insurance business. The topics include: the use of life 
insurance for protection and investment; the selection and treatment 
of risks; the policies and options offered, life insurance programs; 
rate-making; mutual, stock, legal requirements; and company organi- 
zation. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. 5 q. h. Not offered 1943- 
1944. 

44 Auditing. This course deals with the duties of the auditor; 
the problems involved in detailed and balance sheet audits, special 
investigation, and preparation of reports. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm> 
11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. 

5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 



68 ELQN COLLEGE BULLETIN 

45 Materials and Methods. This course is to assist students 
who desire Grade "A" Teaching Certificates in the commercial field. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 5 q. h. 

47 Elements of Statistics. A course designed for students in- 
terested in the application of the statistical method to various fields, 
especially the social sciences. Such topics as the collection, presen- 
tation and analysis of data, measure of central tendency, and cor- 
relation are discussed. 5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

48 Labor Problems. Causes of industrial unrest and other 
labor problems, the reactions of various groups to these conditions, 
and recent labor tendencies, are discussed. Special emphasis is given 
to the American labor movements, their objects, tactics, and accom- 
plishments. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Spring quarter. 
5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

Secretarial Courses 

7 Commercial Arithmetic. This is a brief elementary course in 
business arithmetic, which reveals short-cuts and helpful suggestions 
for speed in computations. Major emphasis is placed upon develop- 
ing proficiency in those problems frequently met by secretaries and 
office workers; such as problems in billing and pay rolls, interest, 
trade discounts, bank discounts, profit and loss, and price marking. 
3 hours per week. 

8 Secretarial Practice. This course acquaints the student, 
through actual laboratory experience, with the major and minor 
activities and duties of the secretary. It is designed to bring into the 
classroom, as much as possible, the office atmosphere. Filing, index- 
ing, mailing procedures, transcription methods, and financial duties 
are emphasized. 6 hours per week, with 3 additional laboratory 
hours. 5 q h. 

9 Personal Typewriting. A short course in touch typewriting 
offered to students who wish to learn the use of the machine for per- 
sonal convenience, and not for marketable skill. 5 hours a week. 

11 Business English. The purpose of this course is to give 
the basic elements and principles of good practical English, as adapted 
to the usages of modem business. The topics discussed, besides a 
thorough review of grammar, are letter planning and organization; 
effective letter layout; credits, collections, and adjustments; selling 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 69 

by mail; job-hunting by mail; fact writing — reports and memoran- 
dums; basic advertising. 3 hours per week. 

12 Bookkeeping and Accounting. This elementary course ac- 
quaints students with present day methods of keeping and interpreting 
business records and reports. In addition to the regular bookkeeping 
cycle, special journals, notes, interest, discount, deferred charges, 
reserves, and columnar records, are studied. 

13-14 Shorthand* Fundamental principles of Gregg Short- 
hand with special emphasis on accuracy and speed. Practice work 
in dictation and transcription. In the spring quarter intensive work 
is done in dictation and transcription. 10 q. h. per week throughout 
the year. 10 q. h. 

15-16 Secretarial Typewriting.* The course in touch type- 
writing includes a speed-building program, which develops a high 
degree of skill. Five hours of class instruction, and five hours of 
laboratory work, each week throughout the year. 

17-18 Advanced Typewriting. Emphasis is placed on applied 
typewriting. The course is open only to students who have had one 
or more years of typewriting. 

31-32 Advanced Dictation. A second-year course in shorthand, 
consisting of rapid dictation and rapid transcription. Training in the 
editing duty of the private secretar)' is a part of this course. Effective 
English is stressed, as well as the art of completing transcripts with 
dispatch. 5 hours per week. 5 q. h. 

38 Office Management. This course offers advanced prepara- 
tion for the teacher of commercial subjects. In addition, it trains for 
the positions of office manager, private secretary, and head stenogra- 
pher. A study of office organization, which includes an analysis of 
equipment, of lay-out, of personnel, of standards, of paying methods, 
and of departmental routine, constitutes the subject matter of this 
course. Actual office work is required of each student. 5 q. h. 



*Degree credit allowed only to students with Biisiness Administration major. 



70 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

MR. BRANNOCK 

Since matter is one of the two fundamental entities of the 
universe, chemistry is one of the fundamental sciences. Hence 
it is advantageous for those working in any field of science to 
study chemistry. 

The field of chemistry is broad and practical. There is 
no great industry which does not make use of some chemical 
principles. Chemistry is recommended to those who plan to 
enter the special fields of astronomy, geology, biology, med- 
icine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, home economics, agri- 
culture, or engineering. Aside from its vocational values, 
chemistry is also recognized as an important part of a general 
education. 

11-12 Gefieral Chemistry. Fundamental principles of inor- 
ganic, physical, and experimental chemistry. Each student is required 
to keep a note book in which he must record his experimental work. 
5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 12 q. h. 

21-22 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 
The kinetic-molecular hypothesis, solutions, electrolysis, the chemical 
behavior of ionic substances, chemical equilibrium, and electro-motive 
chemistry. 5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory work. 12 q. h. 

31-32 Organic Chemistry. Organic compounds, including the 
aliphatic and the aromatic series: hydrocarbons of the methane series, 
alcohols, organic acids, ethers, anhydrides, esters, aldehydes, ketones, 
amines, amides, halogen compounls, cyanogen, carbohydrates, cyclic 
hydrocarbons, dyes, and proteins. The laboratory work consists not 
only in the methods of preparation and purification of compounds, 
but also in methods of arriving at their structures. 5 hours class 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 12 q. h. 

41-42 Quantitative Analysis. Chiefly laboratory work in sim- 
ple introductory determinations in gravimetric and volumetric methods 
of analysis. Pure salts of known composition are first analyzed, fol- 
lowed by unknown specimens consisting of pure salts or mixtures of 
pure salts. 1 hour class work, 10 hours laboratory. 12 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Chem- 
istry. The main purpose of this course is to present the modem 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 71 

theory and methods of teaching chemistry in secondary schools. 
5 q.h. 

48 Physical Chemistry. Problems in the gaseous, liquid and 
solid states; solutions; the phrase rule, thermo-chemistry ; chemical 
change; and electro-chemistry. 5 hours class work. 5 q. h. 

53 Industrial Chemistry. Water, fuels, destructive distilla- 
tion, alkalies and hydrochloric acid, iron and steel, packing house 
industries, cottonseed oil products, leather, soap, cement, paper, paints, 
and clay products. 5 hours class work. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MR. MESSICK 
MISS MOORE 

The functions of the Department of Education are: 
. First, to guide students in acquiring a background in the 
history and philosophy of education, so that they may under- 
stand the basis upon which modern progressive trends in 
education are built. 

Second, to inspire students with the ideal that the purpose 
of all education is that one may learn to live a better life, 
that school is life, and that the proper methods of teaching 
are those which begin with the life situations of the child 
and are built upon them. 

Third, to instruct students in the principles and tech- 
niques of teaching so that they may know and understand the 
proper procedures of instruction. 

Professional Requirements for North Carolina Teaching 

Certificates 

High School. — High School Teachers' Certificates, Class 
A, represent graduation from standard four-year colleges. 
These certificates are issued on the basis of transcripts of col- 
lege records which show the professional credit and specialized 
work hereinafter described for each certificate. Each appli- 
cant should meet the requirements in two or more teaching 



72 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

fields. The subjects for which certificate is granted will ap- 
pear on the face of the certificate. 

First. The professional requirements common to all cer- 
tificates are: 

1. Educational Psychology, 3 q. h. 

2. Principles of High School Teaching, or 
Problems in Secondary Education, 3 q. h. 

3. Materials and Methods (required in one subject only), 3 q. h. 
*4. Directed Teaching (one or both fields), 5 q. h. 

5. Electives, 10 q. h. 

Note: In Directed Teaching one should have not fewer than 
thirty-five hours of actual class teaching. Thirty-five hours of obser- 
vation must precede teaching. 

Second. Subject-matter requirements for the teaching of 
any subject are: 

1. For English, at least 36 q. h., including Grammar, Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric, and American Literature. 

2. For French and Spanish, at least 27 q. h. This is based on 
two units of entrance credit. If no entrance credit is presented, the 
applicant must have 36 q. h. 

3. For Social Studies, 45 q. h., including 9 q. h. in American 
History, 9 q. h. in European History, 14 q. h. in Government, Geog- 
raphy, Economics or Sociology, and 13 q. h. Electives from the above. 

4. For Mathematics, at least 23 q. h. 

5. For Science, at least 45 q. h., including 9 q. h. in Biology, 
9 q. h. in Physics, 9 q. h. in Chemistry, 9 q. h. in Geography or 
Geology, and 14 q. h. from above subjects as electives. Individual 
certification will be granted in any of the above fields in which 18 
or more q. h. credits are presented. Certification for General Science 
will reqquire 27 q. h. from three of the four areas given above. 



*If all requirements except Directed Teaching are met, the Class A Cer- 
tificate will be issued after the applicant shall have had one year of successful 
teaching experience. It is understood that this teaching will be done under the 
joint supervision of the Head of the Education Department of the institution 
from which the student has been graduated and the superintendent of the school 
in which the applicant is teaching. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 73 

6. For Commerce, at least 45 q. h., including Stenography, 
Typewriting, Bookkeeping, and Office Management. 

7. For Public School Music, at least 40 q. h., including 5 q. h. 
in voice. Courses requiring singing may be substituted for voice. 

8. For Physical Education, at least 45 q. h. 

9. For Home Economics, at least 68 q. h., including 9 q. h. of 
Chemistry, 9 q. h. of Clothing, 9 q.- h. of Management (Home Man- 
agement, Home Management Residence,^Economics of the Home), 
9 q. h. of Family (Child Development, Family- and Social Relation- 
ships, Health and Home Nursing), and 9 q. h. of Social Science. 

10. For Fine Art, 45 q. h. 

11. For Bible, 25 q. h. 

Grammar Grade. — Grammar Grade Teachers' Certifi- 
cates, Class A, represent graduation from a standard four-year 
college, or the equivalent, embracing not less than 180 quarter- 
hours. As a part of the work, or in addition to it, the applicant 
shall have the follov^ing: 

1. English, 18 q. h., including 10 quarter hours of Composi- 
tion and Grammar, three hours of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 10 q. h. 

3. Geography, including nature study, 10 q. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 14 q. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 9 q h., including three quar- 
ter hours each of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Educa- 
tion. 

6. Education, 32 q. h., including Grammar Grade Methods 
(Reading, Language, Arithmetic, Social Science), Classroom Manage- 
ment, Child Study, Educational Psychology, Educational Measure- 
ments, and Directed Teaching. 

Primary. — Primary Teachers' Certificates, Class A, repre- 
sent graduation from a standard four-year college, or the 
equivalent, embracing not less than 180 quarter hours. As 
a part of the w^ork, or in addition to it, the applicant shall 
have the follov^^ing: 



74 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

1. English, 18 qh., including 10 quarter hours of Composition, 
three of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 10 q. h. 

3. Geography, including Nature Study, 10 q. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 14 q. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and Music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 9 q. h., including 3 q. h. each 
of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Education. 

6. Education, 32 q. h., including Primary Methods (Reading, 
Language, Numbers), Classroom Management, Child Study, Educa- 
tional Psychology, and Directed Teaching. 

Before any certificate will be issued for teaching in the 
elementary schools, the records from the institution in which 
the applicant received his training must show that he has 
reached a satisfactory stage of proficiency in Spelling and 
Penmanship. This certification will be made by the institu- 
tion and will appear on the record. 

General Education Courses 

33-34 Elementary Methods. This course works on problems 
involved in planning and carrying out learning programs in each 
grade of the elementary school. A review of experimental practice 
and recent educational trends is made the basis for building programs 
to meet the needs and to develop the curriculum of the modem Pri- 
mary and Grammar grade school. 5 q. h. 

42 Classroom Management. To acquaint the student teacher 
with methods of organization and procedure in the guidance of stu- 
dent activity. Principles of directed conduct, integrated unit pro- 
grams, and other essential features. 5 q. h. 

32 Educational Measurements. Philosophy of the testing pro- 
gram through acquaintance with objective tests, their formulation, 
giving, and interpretation. Actual testing programs are set up and 
a knowledge of statistical procedures is acquired, from the mrode 
through correlation so that test results may provide a basis for student 
guidance. 5 q. h. 

36 Curriculum. This course is designed to acquaint students 
with a comprehensive view of the basic considerations involved in 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ^ 

deteiTQining the content and organization of curricula for elementary 
and secondary schools. A survey of modern practices in curriculum 
offerings, trends and construction, and emphasis on pertinent en- 
vironmental possibilities will be stressed. 3 q. h. 

43 History of Education. Special emphasis is placed upon edu- 
cation in the United States, with particular attention to educational 
leaders and progressive programs. The progress of elementary, secon- 
dary, higher, and adult education is studied in detail, with European 
and later American influences as backgrounds. 3 q. h. 

44 The Philosophy of Education. This course acquaints stu- 
dents with the underlying principles of educational theories; the 
solution of educational problems; the development of democratic con- 
ceptions underlying an educational program; and the social, moral 
and cultural implications of the development of personality. 3 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods for High School Teachers. See 
specific departments for description. 

47 Principles of High School Teaching. To guide the prospec- 
tive teacher in the principles of learning; to acquaint him with modem 
procedures of school programs; and to give him an underlying phi- 
losophy of student attitudes and needs so that he may know how to 
guide the pupil properly in his activities. 3 q. h. 

48 Character Education. This course shows how the home, the 
school, the church, the community, and other agencies function as 
units, and as cooperative agencies in a combined effort to guide boys 
and girls in ways of wholesome and happy living. 3 q. h. 

51, 52, 53, 54, 55 or 56 Observation and Directed Teaching. 
Both observation and directed-teaching are done under close coopera- 
tion with the public school teachers and principal. The student 
teacher must observe and teach at least 80 hours in the subject of his 
major field. He is required to analyze teaching problems in written 
reports of his observations, and to make careful teaching plans in 
frequent conferences with the supervising classroom teacher and with 
the College supervisor of directed-teaching. 9 or 18 q. h. 

57-58 Directed Methods in Teaching. This course gives all 
who are doing directed teaching an opportunity to work together on 
teaching problems as they occur in the real situations of the Elon 
College Public School. The course is in the nature of a workshop for 
directing attention to tools, equipment, books, and materials needed in 



76 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

carr}'ing out a teaching program at the school, and to enable the 
student teacher to gain first-hand experience in supplementing class- 
room routines with facilities for active learning. Through group 
discussions student teachers piece together the teaching problems of 
the whole school and see their own individual classroom problems in 
relation to those of otiier teachers. 3 q. h. 

Directed Teaching. — It is the philosophy of the College 
to offer the student opportunities in all departments for self- 
development in thinking and in character. The Department 
of Education uses the local public schools as a place where 
educational problems may be seen as realities. Close cooper- 
ation between the public school and the Department of Edu- 
cation makes possible the opportunity for student teachers to 
study Education through a real school situation. The public 
school teachers and principal help supervise directed-teaching, 
and the student teachers enter actively into the life of the 
school, contributing their efforts under College guidance to 
further the development of the school, as well as to use the 
school classrooms as a training ground. 

The College looks upon directed-teaching as a serious 
responsibility in training for a profession, and requires careful 
preparation in subject-matter and theory of education along 
with high standards in directed-teaching. All the facilities 
of the college library, laboratories, studios, workshop, special 
classes and seminars dealing with the methods, materials and 
planning of school programs are available to make directed- 
teaching an experience in the application of the modern pro- 
gressive philosophy of education to a teaching situation. Those 
who expect to enter educational work should consult the head 
of the Department of Education before taking any course. 

Summer Sessions. — Two six-weeks terms are conducted 
for students who wish to earn credit toward a Bachelor's de- 
gree, and for teachers in service. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 77 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

-MR. McCLURE 
MR. BARNEY 

The function of courses in the field of English is three- 
fold: 

First, to give ample opportunities for oral expression of 
ideas and feelings. To this end the Freshman and Sophomore 
courses employ group discussion as the chief method of ap- 
proaching subject-matter. Advanced courses in Dramatic 
Literature, American Literature, Shakespeare, Argumentation 
and Debate, and Modern Literature, offer abundant oppor- 
tunity for oral expression and interpretation. 

Second, to give directed opportunities for development in 
the universally necessary craft of writing. Expression in writ- 
ten language should be both practical and creative. The 
Freshman and Sophomore courses contain opportunities for 
both kinds of expression, while on the Junior-Senior level the 
course in Journalism specializes in direct writing, and the 
courses in Dramatic Literature and Modern Literature em- 
phasize a more purely creative approach. Grammar and 
"Correct English" are treated as a means to a more complete 
expression rather than as an end in themselves. Through the 
required courses for Freshmen and Sophomores an attempt is 
made, moreover, to produce a uniform excellence in the use 
of written English as a tool for all other studies. 

Third, to give to students, through their extensive reading 
and discussion, a firm grasp of the aesthetic and social im- 
plications of literature and language. The Freshman course 
is primarily an introduction to American culture, the Soph- 
omore course discovers English culture, and the advanced 
courses deal with other phases of culture in relation to groups 
of mankind, past and present. 

11-12 Freshman English. This course includes a review of 
grammar and punctuation together with the study of the forms of 



78 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

composition. During the second quarter the Reader's Digest, and 
other periodicals, are used as a basis for class discussion and themes 
on current topics. 10 q. h. 

21-22 Sophomare English. During this year there is carried on 
an extensive, individualized reading program, with group discussions 
of literary and social phenomena common to the works read. The class 
reads, studies, and discusses works in English Literature. 10 qh. 

24 Children's Literature. The study of children's language 
as a basis for the selection and production of reading or story ma- 
terials for children in the primary and elementary schools. With a 
knowledge of children's uses of language in mind, the student writes 
stories or study materials which will be suited in style and content to 
the demands of the modem school for programs related directly to 
the child's experiences in living. Examination is made of the field 
of children's literature and folk literature to discover reading matter 
which satisfies modem educational requirements and to find sources 
for the production of new materials. No credit on major. 5 q. h. 

31-32 Journalism. This course demands the cultivation of 
curiosity and resourcefulness, the formation of direct style of writing, 
an understanding of public opinion and newspaper policy, and a 
working knowledge of modem printing. These assets are acquired 
through the writing, editing, and printing of the college newspaper, 
"Maroon and Gold." 9 q. h. 

33 Shakespeare. The academic study of a selected group of 
the best of his chronicle history plays, comedies and tragedies. 3 q. h. 

34 Shakespeare in the Theatre. Study and production of his 
plays in the Little Theatre. Public presentation of one play. 3 q. h. 

35 Public Speaking. A basic course in oral English and the 
art of speaking, including the psychological background, the technique 
of gesture and body action, study in interpretation and the art of 
the orator, tempo, crescendos, and essential elements of effective de- 
livery. Platform practice emphasized. 5 q. h. 

36 Argumentation and Debate. Classroom practice and train- 
ing in various branches of speech. Formal and informal debate and 
argumentation, formulating group opinion, after-dinner speaking, 
oratory, and discussion leadership. 3 q. h. 



I 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 79 

37 Modern Drama. The academic study of a selected group 
of modern dramas, including Ibsen, Rostand, Shaw, plays from the 
Celtic Renaissance, and the American theatre. 5 q. h. 

38 Modern Drama in the Theatre. The art of play produc- 
tion studied through practice with modern plays. Little Theatre pro- 
ductions. One public presentation of a full length play, and other 
presentations of one-act plays. 5 q. h. 

41-43 American Literature. For students who wish an ad- 
vanced understanding of American culture, for students who plan 
to teach, and for those above the sophomore level who have trans- 
ferred from other colleges. 9 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Eng- 
lish. Materials for teaching literature and language are explored 
and evaluated, and problems of teaching English are discussed in 
relation to the student's experience of directed teaching. 5 q. h. 

49 Modern Literature. Readings in contemporary English and 
American literature, with parallel work in creative writing. The best 
of these compositions are printed in the Spring number of "Elon 
Colonnades." The writing and readings are accompanied by discus^ 
sion of modem social and psychological theories and practices with 
an attempt to help the student to find his place in the modem world 
of ideas and feelings. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

MRS. SCHULTZ 

21 Principles of Geography. A study of the principles and the 
major geographical factors in determining the distribution of popula- 
tion, occupations, and modes of life. The effects of climatic and 
economic conditions on the peoples of the world will be stressed. 
Practical work in the study of maps and reports will be included in 
the course. Fall quarter. 5 q. h. 

22 Geography of North America. A study of the geographical 
regions of the continent, climate, industries, natural resources, and 
the human responses to the geographic conditions; the growth of 
cities, development of trade and the geographical influences in the 
development of the United States. 5 q. h. 



80 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

32 Geology. This course deals with Physical and Dynamical 
Geology. Laboratory work consists of frequent field excursions and 
a study of the common minerals and rocks, map interpretations, and 
geological folios. Lectures and recitations four hours a week, two 
hours devoted to laboratory work. 5 q. h. 

Not offered in 1943-1944. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

MR. FRENCH 

Ancient Greek is a cultural language. It supplies a depth 
of background for the modern cultural languages. Students 
majoring in Religion are expected to take New Testament 
Greek. 

11-12 Elementary Greek. Mastery of declensions and conju- 
gations, synopsis of verbs, word analysis, derivation and composition, 
and simpler principles. Drill in pronunciation by reading Greek 
aloud. Xenophon, Book I. 10 q. h. 

21-22 Greek New Testament. The study of the grammar of 
New Testament Greek. Readings in the New Testament. Problems 
and methods of exegesis. Textual problems. 10 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

MR. SCHULTZ 

MRS. SCHULTZ 

MR. HIRSCH 

In the Department of History, raw historical material is 
not memorized aimlessly, but is evaluated, criticized and or- 
ganized in such fashion as to illuminate the minds of students 
with respect to the nature of the past and the manner in 
which the past has produced the present. One of the chief 
contributions which history may make is the working toward 
a better understanding of the modern age. 

11-12 The Establishment and Development of the American 
Nation. A survey of the European background of American history; 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 81 

the English settlements, their developments and their experiences with 
the colonial system seeking to protect and control them; the revolt, 
union, and organization of the United States; the struggle for Ameri- 
can Neutrality; the development of national parties; the problems of 
territorial expansion; the War between the States; Reconstruction, 
North and South; the agrarian movement; financial questions; re- 
form; relations of government and business; and expansion overseas. 
Special emphasis upon bibliography. 10 q. h. 

21-22 The Establishment and Development of the English 
Nation. 400 A. D. to the present. Primitive beginnings in Britain, the 
Germanic invasions, the Norman conquest, the development of Parlia- 
ment, the Hundred Years' War, the foundation of the Tudor Mon- 
archy, James and the divine right of kings, revolt, the Republican 
experiment in England, Restoration, revolution of 1688, the rise of the 
cabinet, constitutional development and loss of first colonial empire, 
foundation of Modem Empire, the World War, and Simpson crisis, 
George VI. Emphasis is placed upon legal and constitutional de- 
velopment, and hence the course is recommended for students planning 
to study law. 10 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

23-24 History. The Contemporary World: War and Peace. 
A study of contemporary world history and the problems of post- 
war reconstruction. 10 q. h. 

31-32-32a Ancient and Medieval History. A brief survey of 
ancient history from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia 
to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed upon the evolution of cul- 
tures and civilizations, and upon the development of art, science, 
lirerature and philosophy. A survey-course of European history. 
9 q. h. 

33-34-35 Modern European History. The evolution and devel- 
opment of modern history, from the breaking down of the medieval 
world, through Renaissance and Reformation to the rise of the na- 
tional states of Europe. The dynastic and colonial rivalries, the 
intellectual and industrial "revolutions" of recent centuries are taken 
in together with the growth of art, literature, science and philosophy. 
9 q. h. 

41 Latin American History. A survey of Latin American 
History from the first Spanish explorations until the present day. 

45 Methods and Materials in Teaching High School History. 
Modem trends in the teaching of history and its place in education; 



82 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

the construction of courses and methods of integrating history with 
other fields; teaching procedures, materials, and aids for study; pro- 
lems of evaluating, organizing, and using such materials as maps, 
pictures, textbooks, reference books, biographical materials, radio, 
and motion pictures. 5 q. h. 

47 The Evolution of the Commonwealth of North Carolina. 
A survey of the state from its origins to the present; its place in the 
history of the United States as a v/hole, in colonial times, during the 
Revolution, Federalism, Democracy, contributions to the Western 
Movement, attitude toward nullification and secession, the Civil War, 
reconstruction, big business and the New Deal. 5 q. h. Not offered 
in 1943-1944. 

48 American Government and Politics. A general survey of 
national, state, and local governments. Spring Semester. 5 q. h. 

49 History of Democratic Ideas and Institutions. An historical 
survey of the origins of the elements which make up the modern 
conception of democracy. The study begins with the ancient Creeks 
and comes up to the present day. Some of the important subjects 
dealt with are: republicanism, monarchy, oligarchy, dictatorship, 
tyranny, absolutism, popular assemblies, representation, political 
parties, aristocracy, plutocracy, popular sovereignty, divine right, 
social contract, natural rights, equality, liberty, justice, liberalism, 
individualism, socialism, nationalism and fascism. 5 q. h. 

49a History of American Democratic Ideas and Institutions. 
After a survey of the European origins of democracy, a study is made 
of American democratic thought and institutions from the colonial 
period to the present day. 5 q. h. 

Not offered 1943. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

MR. SPRAGUE 

The Department of Mathematics offers in Freshman and 
Sophomore years, work which introduces the student to prin- 
ciples of mathematical reasoning. In advanced courses, in- 
tended primarily for those going into the engineering or 
teaching professions, a solid groundwork is offered in the 
fields of Calculus and Applied Mathematics. Emphasis is 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 83 

constantly placed upon the value of scientific reasoning in ap- 
proaching any problem. 

11 College Algebra. A rapid review of the fundamentals of 
algebra, followed by a thorough study of quadratic equations, ratio 
and proportion, variation, series, binomial formula, logarithms, de- 
terminants, and the theory of equations. 5 q. h. 

12 Trigonometry. The solution of right and oblique triangles 
both with and without logarithms; trigonometric identities and trigono- 
metric equations; line functions and graphic representations. 3 hours 
class work. 5 q. h. 

13 Analytical Geometry. Loci of equations, the straight 
line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, the general ecjuation of the 
second degree, polar coordinates, transcendental curves, parametric 
equations, coordinates in space, planes and surfaces. 5 q. h. 

21-22 An Introduction to Calculus. Treatment of the straight 
line, the circle and other conic sections, special plane curves and 
transformation of coordinates. A study of differential calculus, dif- 
ferentiation of functions with simple applications to the derivative of 
rates, length of tangents, normals, and similar topics. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 11-12. 10 q. h. 

31 Differential Calculus. A study of differentiation of func- 
tions, with applications of the derivatives to rates, length of tangents, 
normals, and other topics; the subjects of maxima and minima, 
curvature, rates and envelopes; drill on curve tracing. 3 q. h. 

32-33. Integral Calculus. Integration: The constant of inte- 
gration, the definite integral; drill on the methods of integration. The 
object is to enable the student to investigate without having to rely 
on any tables or set rules, and after having learned the principles of 
integration, to apply them to such subjects as areas, lengths of curves, 
volumes of solids or revolution, and areas of surfaces of revolution. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21-22. 6 q. h. 

41 Differential Equations. Ordinary and the partial differen- 
tial equations, the theory of integration of such equations as admit 
of a known transformation group, and the classic methods of integra- 
tion compared with those which flow from the theory of continuous 
group. 3 q. h. 

42-43 Applied Calculus. Differential equations continued, 
and calculus applied to mechanics and to engineering problems. 6 q. h. 



84 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

45 Materials and Methods in the Teaching of Mathematics. 
Methods of presenting the different branches of mathematics to the 
pupil in secondary schools. Offered in alternate years. 5 q. h. 

Applied Mathematics 

MR. BOWDEN. 
14-15 Engineering Drawing. This course provides a basic 
treatment of modern conventions, theory and practice of Engineering 
Drawing. Instruction is given in the care and use of instruments, 
drawing materials and scales, methods of procedure in drawing, free- 
hand lettering, geometric drawing, orthographic projection, working 
drawings, tracing, and blue printing. Prerequisite : Plane Geometry, 
No credit on major. 6 s. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

MR. HIRSCH 
MISS HOCKRIDGE 

The work in French, German and Spanish is designed to 
give to the students an appreciation of the manners and cus- 
toms of these peoples, their background and language, to 
provide suitable material for those who desire to teach these 
languages in secondary schools, and to provide tools for 
research. Students who have not had two years of foreign 
language in high school will be required to make up this 
deficiency by taking the first year of a language without 
credit. 

I — French 

7-8 Elementary French. An introduction to the essentials of 
French grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and civili- 
zation with major emphasis on the reading approach. 9 q. h. 

11-12 Intermediate French. A thorough review of French 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury short stories, novels and plays. 10 q. h. Prerequisite: French 
7-8 or two years of high school French. 

21-22 A Survey of French Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces of the classical, romantic, realistic, and natural- 
istic periods with a consideration of the necessary historical back- 
ground and literary criticism. 10 q. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 85 

31-32-33 Advanced Composition and Practice in Speaking 
French. This course provides a systematic review of the fundamental 
principles of French grammar and aims to give the student specitil 
competence in the control of French as an instrument of expression. 
The work is essentially practical. Throughout the entire course, it 
provides abundant oral and written practice. It consists of idiomatic 
translations and discussions (partly in French) on outside readings. 
The material used includes nineteenth and twentieth century plays 
as well as French novels and literature in general. 9 q. h. 

41-42-43 Phonetics and Oral Practice, of Modern French. A 
practical approach to correct pronunciation through progressive exer- 
cises and the thorough study of the formation of French sounds, 
intonation and rhythm. Major emphasis will be given to individual 
problems of pronunciation. Phonographs and discs will be used. 
The course includes rapid reading and discussions of significant 
nineteenth and twentieth century literature of France, as well as 
lectures and reports on critical and historical material. A survey of 
the more significant dramatists, novelists, poets, critics and their 
groups. The ideals and work of the different groups will be com- 
pared with those of other periods. 9 q. h. 

II — German 

11-12 Elementary German. An introductory course including 
thorough study of the fundamentals of the German grammar and the 
common vocabulary, of pronunciation, elementary composition, read- 
ing and translation. 10 q. h. 

21-22 Intermediate German. The work of this course includes 
the reading and translating (partly at sight) of German prose and 
jXDetry, exercises in composition and free reproduction, oral and writ- 
ten, with considerable colloquial practice and a rapid review of 
grammar. 10 q. h. 

31-32 Advanced German. This course is intended for those 
who have had two years of German in College. It stresses practical 
use of the German language. It includes class reading and transla- 
tion of selected German authors as well as the history of German 
literature, investigations in German language and civilization (partly 
in German) with special emphasis upon the ideals and influence of 
German Literature and thought of the 18th and 19th centuries. 10 q.h. 

41-42 A Survey of German Literature. This course is de- 
signed to introduce the student to the outstanding literary master- 



86 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

pieces and the greatest figures and personalities in German literature 
of different periods. It aims to give an idea of the relation of litera- 
ture to social, political and religious history. 10 q. h. 

Ill — Spanish 

11-12 Elementary Spanish. An introduction to the essentials 
of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and 
civilization of Spanish-speaking countries with early readings in easy 
Spanish prose. 9 q. h. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish. A thorough review of Spanish 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth century 
short stories, novels and plays. 9 q. h. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 
or two years of high school Spanish. 

31-33 A Survey of Spanish Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces from the Golden Age to the present day, with a 
consideration of the necessary historical background and literary 
criticism. 9 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

MR. BOWDEN 
MR. FRENCH 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion seeks to 
communicate to the students the heritage of the past, and to 
equip them with the stimulus to achieve an intelligent inter- 
pretation of that heritage for present and future ends. Students 
achieve a vital and constructive attitude toward life through 
historical and critical study of philosophical and religious lit- 
erature. 

The fundamental doctrines of Christianity, as found in 
the teachings of Jesus, are interpreted as having real meaning 
for the present age of scientific progress and discovery. 

In addition to preparing students for effective participa- 
tion in general Christian service and in wholesome living, the 
function of this department is to prepare a select group of 
young men and young women for graduate training, that they 
may become intelligent teachers and Christian ministers. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 87 

Philosophy 

31-32 Introduction to Philosophy. An introductory study of 
the basic philosophical problems: What is reality? What is the 
basis for values? What is consciousness? Is knowledge possible? 
How distinguish truth from error? Is the world a machine? Has 
the world a purpose? What are the relations of religion and science 
to life? 10 q. h. Not offered in 1943-1944. 

35 Logic. The conditions under which thinking proceeds; the 
elements of formal logic, induction, and scientific method. Offered in 
alternate years. 5 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

36 Ethics. A study of the early beginnings and growth of 
morality, the development of customs and social organization, the 
psychological aspects of morality, some modem systems of ethics, and 
the application of ethical theory to some modem world-problems. 
Offered in alternate years. 5 q. h. 

38 The Philosophy of Science. A comparatively new field of 
study, covering the basic philosophi'^al principles upon which the 
sciences are based. Dealing with the foundations rather than the 
facts of science, the course does not require a background of advanced 
scientific knowledge. 5 s. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

41-42 The History of Philosophy. The history of philosophy 
from early Greek to nineteenth-century German philosophy, including 
the pre-Socratic philosophers, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Early 
Christian and Scholastic philosophies, seventeenth-century Rational- 
ism, English Empiricism, Kant, Hegel, and subsequent German Ideal- 
ism. Students read from original sources and from modem commen- 
tators. Offered in alternate years. 10 q. h. Not offered in 1943-1944. 

Religion 

11-12 Survey of the Bible. A historical account of the rise of 
Hebrew and Jewish religious literature, the Christian Church and its 
literature, and the situations which produced the various documents 
and books of the Bible. 10 q. h. 

21-22 New Testament History and Literature. A brief survey 
of the religious experiences of the Hebrew prophets; the social, re- 
ligious, and political situation in Palestine; the historical bases for 
cur knowledge of the religious experience, character, teaching, and 
dynamic faith of Jesus; the impact of his life and teaching; the de- 
velopment of the Christian Church in Palestine, and its spread from 
Jerusalem to Rome. 10 q. h. 



88 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

23 An Introduction to Christian Education. A survey of the 
objectives of Christian Education, methods of administration, re- 
cruiting, and training of leaders; of techniques for securing home 
cooperation; of plans for developing a week-day program in the 
public schools. Three hours of class work and four hours' of labora- 
tory and field work each week. 5 q. h. 

24 The Children of the Church. A study of the laws of 
learning as applied to the children's program in the Church; Chil- 
dren's curriculum; equipment; worship materials. Three hours of 
class work and four hours of laboratory and field work each week. 
5 q. h. 

25 The Youth and Adidt Program of the Church. A survey 
of programs of action for young people and adults in the fields of 
worship, social action, literature, recreation, churchmanship, and 
missions. Methods of organizing youth and adult groups will be 
considered. Three hours of class work and four hours of laboratory 
and field work each week. 5 q. h. 

31-32 Old Testament History and Literature. The historical 
development of the literature of the Old Testament; the early poems, 
narratives, and la:ws, the growth of the Hebrew monarchy; and the 
ethical, political, and religious contributions of the literary prophets. 
Further extensive reading in the Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and 
Apocalyptic material. 10 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

33-34 Philosophy of Religion.* The origin and development 
of religious belief from primitive times to the present day, including a 
survey of the classical religions — Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucian- 
ism, Mohammedanism, Judaism — and a detailed history of Chris- 
tianity. The influence of scientific inquiry. Biblical criticism and 
modem psychology upon religious belief; the development of a con- 
structive philosophy of religion and of life; and the problems of 
religious belief in a scientific age. 10 q. h. 

37-38 Seminar: Christianity and Other Religions. Individual 
assignments, papers and reports on various phases of Christian His- 
tory and Doctrine, including its Jewish background. Research in 
other classical and modern religions. 9 q.h. Two hours, one after- 
noon each week for three quarters. Not offered 1943-1944. 



*NOTE — Students wishing a major in Philosophy are given full credit 
for this course tinder the head of Philosophy. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 89 

41-42 Bible Seminar. Special research in some iields of Old 
and New Testament study, such as archaeology, hexateuchal synopsis, 
the law codes of the Old Testament, Hellenic Judaism, St. Paul and 
the Messianic consciousness of Jesus. Offered in alternate years. 
9 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

43-44 Seminar in Religion and Modern Social Problems. The 
basic social problems viewed in the light of their religious, ethical, and 
social implications. Each student pursues one or more projects of 
research into some particular social situation. Brief reports on the 
social implications of outstanding current events. 9 q. h. Not offered 
1943-1944. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

MR. HOOK 

Physics is one of the important divisions of human knowl- 
edge. Its purpose is to describe as accurately and clearly as 
possible the physical processes which go on in the universe 
around us. Wherever a transfer of energy is involved, the 
principles of physics are used. This may occur in the spin 
of the atom or in the movement of a giant liner; the flight 
of an alpha particle or the creation of a galaxy. Physics is a 
tool course for other sciences. The fundamental phenomena 
of physics are approached from a combination of two points 
of view: the purely physical, in which the mind paints a 
picture of what is happening; and second, the mathematical 
and analytical, in which a mental picture is expressed by 
means of mathematical symbols. 

In the first courses of the physical sciences special empha- 
sis is placed on the development of the scientific attitude. 

11-12 Survey of Physical Sciences. General subjects of astron- 
omy, geography, geology, physics, and chemistry. Demonstrations 
with various physical apparatus and illustrations with slides, film 
strips, movie films, and field trips. No credit on major. 10 q. h. 

13-14 General Physics. Mechanics, heat, sound, light, and 
electricity. Examples and experiments given throughout the entire 



90 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

course with a view to rendering it practical. Training in the manipu- 
lation of instruments employed in physical investigation, accurate 
measurements and practice in properly recording and reducing ex- 
perimental data. Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 12 q. h. 

21-22 Modern Physics. Atomic nature of matter and elec- 
tricity, corpuscular nature of radiant energy, spectroscopy, planetary 
model of the atom, X-rays, molecular structure, radio activity, neu- 
trons, positrons, theory of relativity, and astrophysics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 13-14 12 q.h. 

31-32 Electricity and Magnetism. Ohm's law, electrical power 
and energy, concerning wire, resistance, magnets and magnetism, 
magnetic circuit, generator, motor, batteries and electrochemical action, 
inductance, capacitance, alternating currents, vacuum tubes and 
gaseous conduction, and the electrostatic circuit. Prerequisite: Phy- 
sics 13-14. 12 q.h. 

33-34 Light and Sound. Reflection, refraction, dispersion, 
chromatic, spherical, aberration, optical constants of mirrors and 
lenses, velocity, radiation, absorption, interference, diffraction, polari- 
zation, colors of crystaline plates and oil films, and photography. The 
nature of sound velocity, frequency, resonance, forced oscillations, 
tran verse and longitudinal vibrations, vibrations in various media, 
and acoustics of buildings. Prerequisite: Physics 13-14. 12 q.h. 

35 Aeronattics. This course is offered as a part of the train- 
ing for the war effort. It is sponsored by the Civil Aeronautics Ad- 
ministration and is known as CAA War Training Service. All of the 
student's time is consumed in this course which consists of 240 hours 
of ground work and a minimum of 35 hours flight training. The 
course is normally completed in eight weeks. All expenses are paid 
by the government. Only enlisted men are accepted for the course. 
The subjects covered in the ground work are: Mathematics, Physics, 
Civil Air Regulations, Navigation, General Servicing and Operation 
of Aircraft, Code, Military and Physical Training, Aircraft Identi- 
fication, Military Science and Discipline, and Meteorology. 12 q. h. 

36 Household Physics. A one-semester course designed espe- 
cially for women students and to meet the requirements of the public 
school certificate in Home Economics. 5 q. h. 

41 Mechanics. Forces: their composition and resolution, forces 
acting on a rigid body, balanced forces, work and energy, first and 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 91 

second degree moments, dynamics of translatory motion, dynamics of 
rotary motion. 6 q. h. 

42 Heat. The course presents the essential fundamentals of 
heating, ventilating, and air conditioning. The emphasis is placed 
on domestic uses. Factors affecting human comfort, heat transmission 
and air infiltration, calculation and estimation of building heat losses 
and heat gains, fuels, combustion, draft, chimneys, boilers, insulation, 
heating with steam, hot water, and warm-air systems; air conveying 
and air cleaning, humidification and dehumidification, control of air 
temperature and summer cooling of buildings. 6 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

MR. SMULLYANN 
MR. MESSICK 

Psychology teaches students to understand human nature 
and its ramifications, helps them to interpret their own mental 
reactions, and points out possible ways of building and ad- 
justing personality. 

21 General Psychology. An introductory course, emphasizing 
fundamental processes of human behavior, responses to various 
stimuli, building of personality, and mind in its relationship to the 
modem world. A prequisite to all other courses in Psychology. 
5 q. h. 

31 Educational Psychology. Inherited tendencies; laws of 
learning; laws of teaching; habit formation; individual differences; 
formation of correct ideals and attitudes. 5 q. h. 

32 Psychology of Childhood. A study of the mental, physical, 
and emotional developments of the child in relation to personality and 
social adjustments. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

MR. BOWDEN 

Sociology is that branch of the social sciences which deals 
with the individual in relation to his human environment. 
Students discover their places of responsibility in society only 
through a knowledge of the culture, mores and institutions 



92 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

of that society. It is the function of sociology, therefore, to 
trace the development of culture, to point out the chief char- 
acteristics and danger zones in the contemporary social scene, 
and to inspire student interest in solving the problems of 
modern life. 

31 Introductory Sociology. The origins and development of 
culture, the nature of personality and its relation to society, forms of 
collective behavior, community and social organization, and the 
basic social problems: the family, international relations, political 
and economic organization, and social development. 5 q. h. 

41 Current Social Problems. Analysis of origin and nature of 
social problems in the realm of public health, crime, race relations, 
immigration, distribution of wealth and income, population, city and 
rural conditions, and social change. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon problems in the South. Lectures, discussion, projects, and re- 
ports. 5 q. h. 

42 Rural Sociology. Conditions of life in the country and 
constructive organization for improvement, social technology of rural 
communities, importance of agriculture, rural institutions, cooperative 
marketing, good roads, consolidated schools, social surveys of the 
countr}^ and the rural church, organization of the rural community, 
and social control. 5 q. h. 



Special Departments of the College 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

MISS NEWMAN 
MR. HIRSCH 

A thorough course of instruction in Art is oflered to those 
who desire to devote themselves to its study and practice. 
Students in this department are required to spend twelve 
hours a week at work in the studio. An annual exhibition 
is held during Commencement. 

11-12 Freehand drawing in charcoal from still-life, geometrical 
solids and casts, linear and angular perspective structure, study of 
light and shade, flat washes in water color and monochrome painting, 
color sketches from still-life, pastel painting, letters and designing, 
clay modeling and pottery. 

21-22 Drawing in charcoal from still-life, heads, hands, features, 
and casts; painting in oils, pastels and water colors, from still-life, 
illustration, wash drawings in water color; principles of color; pen 
and ink drawings, designing and structure. 

23 Elementary Drawing. Working knowledge of the principles 
of drawing necessary in the primar}^ and elementary school. Color 
design, drawing and painting from life or geometric forms, illustra- 
tions, posters and printing. Picture study art activities for the child 
in the home, school, and community; and the development of creative 
abilities. Offered in alternate years. 5 q. h. 

24 Industrial Arts for Elementally Grades. Methods and 
materials used in the study of industrial arts for primary and gram- 
mar grades. Color theory, weaving, modeling, construction work, 
posters, book-binding, block-printing, and projects for history and 
geography classes. The subject matter is creative and illustrated, and 
is centered about the interests and needs of the child. Offered in 
alternate years. 5 q. h. 

Sketch Class. Pencil-drawing, with or without model out-of- 
door work. 

China Painting. Tinting : La Croix colors, matt colors, powder 
colors. Flower Painting: Designs of Edward Reeves and Marshall 
Fray; Dresden colors, Herr Lamm. Figure Painting: La Croix 
Dresden, Herr Till. Ornamental Work: Raised paste and gold; 
enamels; jewels, etc., on hard china, satsuma, Beleek, and Sedji. 



94 ELQN COLLEGE BULLETIN 

33 History of Christian Art. A course that traces the develop- 
ment of Christian Art from its earliest beginnings, through Byzan- 
tine, Irish and Carolingian days to its highest bloom in the Roman- 
esque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles. Architecture is 
treated as well as sculpture and painting. Slides contribute greatly 
to the understanding of the subject. 3 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

MISS MUSE 

The work in Home Economics is designed to prepare 
young women for home-making, to provide adequate training 
to meet the requirements for teacher's certificate in Home 
Economics, and to offer foundation courses for those wishing 
to enter other fields of Home Economics. 

11-12 Food Preparation and Service. The general principles 
of cookery applied to the preparation of different types of foods. 
A study of the composition, selection, care, and preparation of foods 
is coordinated with a study of their nutritive value and digestion. 
Planning of menus, cooking and serving of breakfast, luncheon, and 
dinner. 1 hour class work; 4 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 

13-14 Clothing and Textiles. Study of textiles and problems, 
selection and construction of clothing, including the use and alteration 
of commercial patterns, the drafting of patterns, and the appropriate 
use of fabrics. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 

31 Home Nursing and Child Cafe. Home care of the sick, 
first aid, and practical experience in the care of pre-school children. 
5 hours class work with laboratory. 5 q. h. 

32 House Planning and Furnishing. This course deals with 
matters pertaining to the house and its environs. A study of art 
structure, good spacing, tone relations, and color arrangements, as 
applied to planning, decorating and furnishing a home. Includes a 
survey of architectural elements, period furniture, decorative treat- 
ments and materials. Students desiring practical information on the 
subject will find this course helpful. 

33 Child Development. The development of the infant and 
pre-school child with emphasis on physical, social, emotional and 
mental growth. 5 hours class work. 5 q. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER _95 

33 Nutrition. The fundamental scientific principles of human 
nutrition and their application to the feeding of the family. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 11-12 and Chemistry 11-12. 3 hours 
class work. 5 q. h. 

34 Dietetics. Normal diets for children and adults and diets 
for the sick. Diets in relation to income scale. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 33. 5 q. h. 

41 Economics of the Home. The science and art of planned 
family living. General policies for the use of time, energy, money, 
and property. 5 hours class work and 6 hours laboratory. 5 q. h. 
Not offered in summer. 

42 Home Management. The adjustment of the home to 
changed social and economic conditions, civic responsibilities of the 
home, the organization and ef&cient handling of home industries, 
household accounts, and the family budget. Each student is required 
to live in the practice house for at least six weeks. 2 hours class 
work, and laboratory work in the practice house. 5 q. h. 

43 Costume and Design. Art principles and color harmonies 
applied to the original designing of costumes in pencil-drawing and 
crayons. A survey of historic costumes from ancient to modem 
times, thus giving a background of knowledge from which to draw 
and create new designs. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 5 q. h. 

44 Advanced Clothing. The construction of garments from 
different materials; accessories to complete the costume; economics of 
textile purchasing. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 13-14 and 43. 5 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Home Economics. A 
study of the development of Home Economics; organization and con- 
tent of course of study; leaders in the work of Home Economics in 
relation of Home Economics to other subjects in high school curricula; 
planning and presentation of lessons; texts, reference books, and magai- 
zines; and the place of Home Economics teachers in the community. 
5 q. h. 

48-49 Home-Makers' Course. A survey course to acquaint 
students who are not majoring in Home Economics with the principles 
of architectural designs, home planning and furnishing, cooking, 
serving, sewing, color harmony, dress designing, and other pertinent 
information for the home-maker. No credit on major. 10 q. h. Not 
offered 1943-1944. 



96 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

MR. BARTLEY, Piano and Theory 

MR. LOADWICK, Yoke 

MR. DONALDSON, Pianv, Organ, and Theory 

MISS LE VAN, Public School Micsic and Piano 

The Department of Music has a four-fold purpose: First, 
to ofler courses in the theory of music and to the general 
student body. Second, to afford opportunities for musical 
growth through student participation in the concerted per- 
formance of music. Third, to provide a comprehensive foun- 
dation for those w^ishing to make music their profession. 
Fourth, to offer lessons in applied music to special students, 
either children or adults. 

Diploma in Music. — The sequence leading to a Diploma 
in Music is intended for the student w^ho wishes to make the 
profession of music his life work. The diploma qualifies a 
student to apply for a certificate to teach music in the public 
schools of North Carolina, provided the student takes the ad- 
vanced course in Public School Methods (Music 45-46). How- 
ever, the candidate for the diploma need not prepare for public 
school teaching. Diplomas are given in Theory, Piano, Or- 
gan, Violin, and Voice. The requirements for the Diploma 
in Music will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

Certificate in Music. — The sequence leading to a Certifi- 
cate in Music is intended for those students who desire to 
teach music in public schools. This certificate qualifies the 
student to apply for the North Carolina Public School Music 
Certificate. The requirements for the Certificate in Music 
will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

11-12 Harmony. Intervals, scales, triads, seventh- and ninth- 
chords, inversions, figured bass and harmonization of melodies, dia- 
tonic modulation, elementary forms 10 q. h. Not offered 1943-1944. 

13-14 Ear Training and Sight-singing. The course presents 
the rudiments of music, develops sight-singing ability, and musical 
dictation. 6 q. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 97 

16 Introduction to Music. An introductory survey course open 
to all students of the College. The fundamentals of music, musical 
instruments, forms of musical composition. The development of an 
appreciative understanding and enjoyment of music from the listen- 
er's point of view. No credit on major. 2 q. h. 

17-18-19 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons, see 
below. 3-6 q. h. 

21-22 Advanced Harmony. Altered chords, non - harmonic 
tones, chromatic and enharmonic modulation, form and analysis. 
Prerequisite: Music 11-12. 9 q. h. 

23-24-24a Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing. Con- 
tinuation of ear training and sight singing and musical dictation. 
6 q. h. 

25 Public School Music. Fundamentals of music theory and 
sight reading necessary for primary and grammar grade teachers. 
Study of the child voice, rote songs, problems, and materials of 
music in the elementary grades. Intended for students seeking pri- 
mary or grammar grade certificate. No credit on major. 5 q. h. 

27-28 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons: see 
below. 3 q. h. 

31-32-32a Counterpoint. Sixteenth-century and modern coun- 
terpoint in two, three, and four parts. Counterpoint applied to va- 
rious types of vocal and instrumental composition. Prerequisite: 
Music 11-12. 9 q. h. 

2)2) Church Music and Hymnology. The history of music in 
the Church. Detailed hymnological studies. The sacred as contrasted 
with the secular style. The ideals of church music and the means for 
their realization. The development of discriminating taste in the 
selection of vocal and instrumental music for use in the Churchi. 
3 q. h. Prerequisite: Music 13-14. 

34 Conducting. Technique of conducting. Score reading, 
resonance, and combination of tone qualities in orchestral choirs, the 
conducting of symphonies and choral work. 3 q. h. 

35-36 History and Appreciation of Music. The development 
of musical art from ancient times to the present. The relationship 
between the evolution of music and social conditions, and between 
music and the other arts. The study of music as literature, through 
analysis of masterworks. 9 q. h. 



98 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

38-39 Private Lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. 
3-6 q. h. 

41-42-42a Composition. Creative work in music, advanced 
form and analysis, modern harmonic and contrapuntal theories. 9 q. h. 

43-44 Advanced Form and Analysis. A study of musical form 
through the Sonata-Allegro forms. Students working toward a Di- 
ploma in Music Theory must take Music 41-42 rather than this 
course. 6 q. h. 

45 Advanced Public School Music. A survey of the prob- 
lems of music in the elementary school. Study of the best methods 
and materials, model lessons, and teaching of the class by its mem- 
bers. This course is required for music majors seeking a high school 
teacher's Certificate in Music. 5 q. h. 

46 Advanced Public School Music. A study of music in the 
junior and senior high school, including methods and materials for 
the various musical organizations of the school, and classes in theory 
and music appreciation. Prerequisite: Music 45. Required for music 
majors seeking the high school teacher's Certificate in Music. 5 q. h. 

47-48-49 Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. Private lessons; 
see below. 6 q. h. 

Applied Music 

Private lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice, may 
be taken in the Department of Music for credit on degrees 
up to 12 quarter hours. (See note under Electives.) A max- 
imum of two hours credit per semester is granted for two 
thirty-minute lessons and twelve hours of practice a week. 
Credit is determined, however, on the basis of actual accom- 
plishment, and is granted only after examination before the 
members of the faculty of the Department of Music. 

Piano. — Preparatory and Intermediate Courses. — These 
courses cover the work in piano from the beginning through 
such compositions as the Little Preludes by Bach, Sonatinas by 
Clement, Kuhlau and Beethoven, Studies by Heller. 

Advanced Courses, — The freshman course begins with 
the Two-Part Inventions of Bach; Studies, Opus 299 of Czer- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER ^ 

ny, the easier sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven, pieces of 
Grieg, Chopin, Schumann and others. The sophomore and 
junior courses cover more difficult compositions. The best 
compositions of the classic, romantic, and modern schools are 
studied. The senior course covers such compositions as the 
Transcriptions by Bach-Liszt, the more difficult preludes of 
Debussy, Concertos. 

Organ — The Freshman course in Piano must be com- 
pleted before beginning the study of Organ unless special per- 
mission be granted by the Head of the Music Department. 
The material used in the organ course includes Graded Ma- 
terials for the Organ by Rogers, preludes and fugues by Bach, 
sonatas by Mendelssohn as well as compositions by contempo- 
rary American composers. Since the aim of the course is pri- 
marily to prepare students for playing in church services, em- 
phasis will be laid on hymn playing and also on providing 
suitable organ accompaniments for solo, quartette and cho- 
rus. During the junior and senior years the larger composi- 
tions by Franck, Widor and Guilmant will be studied. 

Violin. — A thorough foundation is given in playing scales 
and arpeggios in any form. An extensive repertory is devel- 
oped from Bruck, Mendelssohn, and others. 

Voice. — The first two years of vocal study are devoted 
especially to the correct development of the voice. English, 
Italian, and German songs are added, as well as the study of 
operatic and oratorio arias. 

Note. — Monthly recitals are given, and each student in Applied Music is 
expected to perform at least twice during the year. Every candidate for the 
Diploma in Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice must give a complete recital. 

General Courses in Applied Music 
The Elon Singers. — A choir of mixed voices. Member- 
ship is based on examination by the Director of Music. Three 
rehearsals weekly. Two semester hours yearly. However, 
not more than four semester hours credit may be applied 
toward the A. B. degree. 



100 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

The Elon Festival Chorus. — This chorus is open to all 
students, faculty members, and singers from Elon College and 
surrounding communities. The purpose of the organization 
is to present standard oratorios and other choral works. 

The Elon Band. — Training is offered to students who can 
play band instruments. The band furnishes music for intra- 
mural activities and other college functions. Two rehearsals 
weekly. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

MR. PIERCE 
STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Intercollegiate Athletics have been discontinued at Elon 
for the duration of the war. Until this action was taken the 
college was an active member of the North State Inter-Colle- 
giate Athletic Association and had representative teams in 
football, basketball, baseball, and tennis. 

At present a broad program of intramural athletics is 
conducted with the objective of providing one or more activ- 
ities in which each student is interested. Similar programs are 
conducted for both boys and girls. For boys the program in- 
cludes touch-football, soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, 
tennis, shuffleboard, softball, track and field, and horseshoes. 
The girls program includes volleyball, tennis, table tennis, 
Softball, archery, track, shuffleboard, foul shooting, badmin- 
ton, etc. 

The Intramural Councils serve as advisory groups for the 
director and his staff and are composed of representatives from 
all classes, dormitories and the day student group. The pur- 
pose of these groups is to make the program as much as pos- 
sible the program of the students. The councils have formed 
competitive groups around the dormitories and the social 
clubs, eight groups for boys and six for girls. 

The program aims to provide healthful physical activity 
and recreation for the entire student body. The names of win- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 101 

ning teams and individuals are inscribed on permanent troph- 
ies which are to be placed in a modern trophy case in Ala- 
mance Hall. Individual aw^ards are given the winners in such 
activities as track and tennis. 

The entire program and all contests are carefully super- 
vised by the Director of Physical Education and Athletics and 
his assistants. 

Physical Education, which is required of all dormitory 
students, during their first and second years, carries 3 quarter 
hours credit for the two years, but must be in addition to the 
120 hours otherwise required. If the student does not pass 
satisfactorily any of this work during the first and second 
years it must be repeated until two years credit is secured. 

The department through the three phases of its program 
aims to carry out the following objectives: 

1. Provide training in the theory and practice of health 
and physical education for those who are planning to teach. 

2. Contribute to the general education of each student 
through the various health and physical activities; developing 
habits, attitudes, character, etc. 

3. Provide an opportunity for each student to develop 
physically through a progressive program of physical activi- 
ties; stressing the value of physical activity and the proper care 
of the body. 

4. Provide an opportunity for each student to learn and 
participate in wholesome physical activities which have recre- 
ational values both during and after college. 

The three phases of the program are : 

1. Intramural athletics. 

2. Service course — These courses are planned so that each 
student will not only receive the physical and educational bene- 
fits but will also learn and develop skills in activities of a phys- 
ical nature which may be of recreational value after college. 



102 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

These courses may be taken during the entire four years 
but are required during the first two years. Credit is given on 
the basis of IV2 quarter hours per year. Each student is as- 
signed to the class on the basis of the health examination and 
the physical capacity tests which are given at the beginning of 
the year. After developing a high degree of physical skill a 
student is permitted to select the desired course. 

1 Physical Education. Touch Football. Includes the study 
of the rules, skills, strategy, history, terminology, etc,, of playing the 
game of football. Approximately one-third of the time is spent on 
the above, with one-third on practice of skills, and one-third of the 
time spent in actual playing the game of touch football. 

2 Physical Education. Soccer — Same as above except that the 
activity is soccer. 

3 Physical Education. Basketball — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activity is basketball. 

4 Physical Education. Volleyball — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activity is volleyball. 

Physical Education. Softball — Same as Physical Edcuation 1 
except the activity is softball. 

6 Physical Education. Tennis — Same as Physical Education 
1 except the activity is tennis. 

7 Physical Education. Badminton — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activitities are badminton, table tennis, etc. 

8 Physical Education. Archery — Same as Physical Education 
1 except the activity is archery. 

9 Physical Education. Rhythms and folk dancing — the teach- 
ing of coordination and posture through the use of rhythms and folk 
dances. 

All classes include periods of physical conditioning and 
drill depending upon the condition of the group. However, 
the emphasis is placed on learning through the play situation. 

3. Teacher training. 

31 Physical Education. Introduction to Health and Physical 
Education. Designed for students who expect to teach. Includes 
history of health and physical education; philosophical, psychologi- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 103 

cal, and physiological background for the teaching of health and 
physical education; basis for program, and selection and organization 
of activities. 3 q. h. 

32 Physical Education. Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of Low-organization. Designed for elementary and teachers 
of health and physical education. Includes study and classification 
of games of low-organization with investigation and practice in meth- 
ods of teaching them. 3 q. h. 

i3 Physical Education. Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of High-organization. Designed for teachers in Junior and 
Senior high schools. Includes the study of football, soccer, baseball, 
Softball, basketball, tennis, and track as activities for the physical 
education program. 3 q. h. 

34 Physical Education. Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of High-organization. (Coaching.) Designed for high school 
coaches with emphasis on methods and techniques in developing and 
caring for teams in football, baseball, basketball, tennis, and track. 
3 q. h. 

35 Physical Education. Organization and Administration of 
Health and Physical Education. Designed for teachers of health 
and physical education and coaches. Includes the study of facilities 
and equipment, scheduling, organization of classes, content of course 
of study. 3 q h. 

41 Health Education. Personal Hygiene. The purposes of 
course are to develop habits, attitudes and knowledge concerning 
health and to provide professional preparation of teachers for teach- 
ing health. 3 q h. 

42 Health Education. Materials and Methods in Teaching 
Health. Designed for elementary teachers and teachers of health and 
physical education. Investigation of materials for teaching health and 
methods of presentation and the development of lesson plans for 
teaching health. 3 q. h. 



Roster of Students 

SENIORS— 1942-43. 

Askin, Bernard 627 Allison St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Black, Rena Gilmer College Corner, Ohio 

Browne, Mary Deane Route 1, Ramseur, N. C. 

Eullard, George Minson Box 185, Roseboro, N. C. 

Casey, Richard Matthew 221 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Crutchfield, Mary Christine Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

D' Antonio, Rinaldo Raymond 501 Maplewood Rd., Wayne, Penna. 

Darden, James Fenton Hall and York Sts., Suffolk, Va. 

Dennan, Irwin Kent Benjamin Franklin Apt., White Plains, N. Y. 

Earp, Rachel Lee 301 Concord Rd., Albemarle, N. C. 

Elder, James Wytche Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla. 

Evans, Josephine Inez Route 1, Franklinton, N. C. 

Festa, Salvatore Antonio 817 Quince St., Vineland, N. J. 

Fowlkes, Nancy Williamson Yanceyville, N. C. 

Galloway, Dorothy 614 Spring St., Hamlet, N. C. 

Greene, Lura Mae Route 1, Clyde, N. C. 

Griffin, Johnson Linwood Route 2, Windsor, Va. 

Grissom, Martin Luther Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Hall, Forrest Chalmers Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Hauser, Margaret Louise Justall Ct., Apt. R, Greensboro, N. C. 

Holmes, Luvene Route 1, Franklinton, N. C. 

Howard, Lennings Star Route, Hemp, N. C. 

Iseley, Donald Clyde Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Johnston, James William Trollinger Ave., Elon College, N. C. 

Kern, Raymond Head 2814 Bellevue Terr., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Lynch, Betty Lillian Elon College, N. C. 

Madren, Weldon Thomas Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Meredith, Jesse H Fancy Gap, Va. 

Messick, Helen Margaret Elon College, N. C. 

McDade, Edith Leigh 212 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Lea Box 195, Burlington, N. C. 

Miller, Donald David 120 Shupe St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Nichols, Amerith Lettie Route 5, Durham, N. C, 

Oakley, Margarette Virginia Box 324, Elon College, N. C. 

Ollis, Ivan Lenore Frank, N. C. 

Pollard, John Francis 603 Fifth Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Reid, Reuben Benjamin Campobello, S. C. 

Rice, Sarah Florence Route 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Rippy, William Dennis Gibsonville, N. C. 

Shook, Ada Mildred Banner Elk, N. C. 

Smith, Marie Maxine 503 Ridley Ave., LaGrange, Ga. 

Stevens, Joe Tom Roanoke, Ala. 

Stolte, Harry Allen 24 South View Ave., Pleasantville, N. Y, 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 105 

Tate, Annie Luara Route 1, Efland, N. C. 

Tripp, Bryant Bethel, N. C. 

Troxler, Mildred Frances Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Truitt, Helen Goff Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth 605 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Florence Keron Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Watts, Edwin Peachland, N. C. 

Whitaker, Joseph Fairey 109 Townsend St., Bennettsville, S. C. 

Wigington, John Craig 6257 N. St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

JUNIOR CLASS— 1942-43. 

Agresta, Louis Thomas Messapequa, N. Y. 

Andes, Mark Winston Route 4, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Barnwell, Eleanor Smith 1200 Brookwood, Burlington, N. C. 

Basnight, Miller C 42 Nat. Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

Blalock, Lucille Breeze Route 1, Durham, N. C. 

Boone, Elsie Spivey Jackson, N. C. 

Bowden, Carlyle Miller Box 514, New Bern, N. C. 

Breeze, Nelle Gentry Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Bums, Warren Theodore Box 395, Creshill, N. J. 

Butler, Edward East Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Carroll, Adrian Meredith 600 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Coble, Mildred 628 South Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Comer, Claude Valentine Route 4, Reidsville, N. C. 

Coplin, John Frederick 607 Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Cox, Margaret Lucille 700 Sellars St., Burlington, N. C. 

Crowell, Rachel Gertrude 806 Salisbury Ave., Spencer, N. C. 

Day, Edward Ray 909 Fauquier St., Norfolk, Va. 

Duncan, William Henry 530th E. 90th St., New York, N. Y. 

Harrell, Vivian Brown, Jr Route 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Hill, Mary Elizabeth 408 West Bute St., Norfolk, Va. 

Hisey, Henry Clyde 414 Fourth St., Shenandoah, Va. 

Hook, Brevitt Capon Bridge, W. Va. 

Hooper, Elrov Jones, Jr 505 Sypress St., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Huff, Henry 'Taylor Route 1, Oxford, N. C. 

Huffman, Louis Gordon Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Hussey, Tracy Eldon Route 2, Hemp, N. C. 

Husted, Charlotte Elaine 500 Locust St., Indiana, Pa. 

Jeffreys, Virginia Dare Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Johnston, Robert Ellington Elon College, N. C. 

Kerns, Louvina Ether, N. C. 

Kidd, Joseph Howard Route 1, Hemp, N. C. 

Koontz, Ruth Edith 306 Mangum Ave., High Point, N. C. 

Lightbourne, Peg Carroll 401 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Little, Mary Louise 1215 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Mann, Charles O'Hara Cypress Chapel, Va. 

Mebane, Alexander Murphy 711 N. Main St., Bui-lington, N. C. 

McKenzie, Edward Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Morgan, Colby Shannon Route 1, Eagle Springs, N. C. 

Morris, Goldie Marie Jackson, N. C. 

Nance, Lewis Alexander 1208 E. 10th St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Norman, John Roy Redd St., Reidsville, N. C. 



106 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Rath, M. Carroll 9 M. Lake Village, Wilmington, N. C. 

Ridge, Paul Harold Gibsonville, N. C. 

Roberts, James Rimmer Route 3, Jonesboro, N. C. 

Schmidt, Elliott 145 P^ourth St., Pelham, N. Y. 

Senter, James Pearce Kipling, N. C. 

Terrell, Fannie Myrtle 603 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Edna Mae Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Hazel Irene Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Flora Hazel Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Whisnant, Denny Cordell Polkville, N. C. 

Wood, Everett Vaughn Route 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Yates, Marilyn Jane 819 Watts St., Durham, N. C. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS— 1942-43. 

Albright, Fred Walter 1014 Wiscassett St., Albemarle, N. C. 

Allen, Lemuel Carl, Jr Bunnlevel, N. C. 

Baker, Irene Alfreida Main St., Carthage, N. C. 

Barber, John William, Jr 814 Central Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Bostwick, William Morley Washington Ave., Vineland, N. J. 

Boyd, Eliza 238 Young St., Henderson, N. C. 

Bradsher, Hugh Tate Route 1, Old Fort., N. C. 

Brinson, John Frank 416 Spencer Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

Brown, Richard Austin Route 2, Trinity, N. C. 

Brown, Walter Henry, Jr Route 3, Kannapolis, N. C. 

Browning, Melba Coleen Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Cates, Jesse Howard 717 N. Main St., Burlington, .N C. 

Cheli, Marco Joseph Brewster Rd., Vineland, N. J. 

Coble, Rachel Louise 505 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Colenda, Allen Gorham 513 Arendell St., Morehead City, N. C. 

Coplin, James Elbert 607 Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Crenshaw, Nell Box 308, Burlington, N. C. 

Danieley, James Earl Route 4, Biirlington, N. C. 

Dickson, Arthur William 24 Dow Ave., Mineola, N. Y. 

Dodds, Mary Agnes Bradenville, Penna. 

Ellington, Warren Leacester Route 3, Reidsville, N. C. 

Evans, Roy Nathaniel 603 Summitt Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Farrell, Earl Thompson Route 1, Pittsboro, N. C. 

Festa, Anthony Joseph 817 Quince St., Vineland, N. J. 

Frazier, Hilda Alice Route 2, Virgilina, Va. 

Garrett, John Max Route 1, Julian, N. C: 

Gilliam, John Jacob Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Hagood, Lacy Edmimds 208 Elmira St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Elizabeth Route 1, Woodleaf, N. C. 

Hayes, Frances Viola Norlina, N. C. 

Hiatt, Mary Elizabeth 4 Baily Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Hipps, James Tennyson Box 132, Elon College, N. C. 

Hoffman, Adrian Wendell Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Hook, Harvey Oliver Box 262, Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, John William Baltimore, Md. 

Huffman, Wade Herbert 514 W. Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Huntley, Frank Little Morven, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 107 

Kernodle, Dwight Talmadge Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Latta, William C 503 Georgia Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Lisman, Maurice Onis Ennis, Texas 

Malone, Frank Jabez Prospect Hill, S. C. 

McCants, Mary Ellen 928 Power St., Anderson, S. C. 

Meacham, William Franklin Route 3, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Messick, Rita Shirley 215 East 13th St., Washington, N. C. 

Oakley, Mary Frances Box 324, Elon College, N. C. 

Paige, Lawrence Earl Elon College, N. C. 

Parker, James Hallette, Jr Sunbury, N. C. 

Parker, Margaret Vivian 712 S. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Perdue, Mary Juanita Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Perry, Isaac Peyton 611 Maple Ave., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Perry, Jacqueline Elmira Box 1222, Burlington, N. C. 

Pohl, Charles 188 McKinley Ave., Kenmore, N. Y. 

Quails, Everett Charles 510 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Reidt, Marjorie Eleanor 28 Wellington St., Waltham, Mass. 

Reitzel, Edna Louise Hillsboro, N. C. 

Routh, Sylvan Roscoe Franklinville, N. C. 

Rumley, Edna Virginia Elon College, N. C. 

Simpson, Margie Louise Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Snyder, Walstein Welch Route 2, Elkton, Va. 

Snyder, John Nelson 317 W. Park Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Spivey, Herbert Clyde 331 Mt. Vernon Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 

Thomas, Faye Route 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Thompson, Mary Catherine 938 Oakley St., Graham, N. C. 

Walker, Woodrow Wilson Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Warren, Mary Maggie Staley, N. C. 

Watson, Rebecca Elizabeth Morven, N. C. 

Webster, Margarette Ruth Elon College, N. C. 

Westbrook, Iris Grey Route 5, Dunn, N. C. 

Wilson, James Loftin 217 Adams St., Burlington, N. C. 

Wright, Ruby Carolyn Narrow Gauge Rr., Reidsville, N. C. 

Zodda, Victor Alfred 25 Johnson St., Spring Valley, N. Y. 

FRESHMAN CLASS— 1942-43. 

Allred, Benjamin Ernest, Jr Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Apple, Annie Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Ayscue, Melvin Washington, Jr Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Batten, Person Alex 2211 High St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Biddix, Clarence Route 4, Marion, N. C. 

Boland, Iris Celestia Box 242, Elon College, N. C. 

Boone, James Wood Jackson, N. C. 

Bowland, Loy Samuel 302 Union Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Braddy, Elizabeth Alston 1105 N. Mebane St., Burlington, N. C. 

Braddy, James Clyde Elon College, N. C. 

Bridgers, Ralph Francis Route 2, Princeton, N. C. 

Brower, Mary Jean Liberty, N. C. 

Cannon, Doris Lucille Highland Park, Canton, N. C. 

Cannon, Mary Louise Highland Park, Canton, N. C. 



108 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Chandler, Claude Edwin Broadway, N. C. 

Clapp, John William Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Clendenin, Kenneth Thomas Haw River, N. C. 

Coble, Thomas Worthy Mill St., Graham, N. C. 

Coley, Richard Opie 700 Rainey St., Burlington, N. C. 

Copeland, William V 1419 Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cooper, Elsie Jeanne Falcon, N. C. 

Cummings, Pattie Mae Route 2, Madison, N. C. 

Daniel, Edwin Lewis Virgilina, Va. 

Denson, Mary Kathryn 5270 103rd St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Durham, Alton Thomas 314 Logan St., Burlington, N. C. 

Eaves, Josie Burt Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Flinchum, Nell Reid Carthage, N. .C 

Floyd, J. Lynv/ood, Jr 1098 Rosedale Rd., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Foltz, Dorothy Nell Luray, Va. 

Forbes, Charles Alfred Route 5, Greenville, N. C. 

Foushee, L. Merritt 617 Lexington Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Frazier, Forrest Livingston Route 1, Shenandoah, Va, 

Fuller, Fletcher B., Jr Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Gibbs, Clayton Leon Route 4, Reidsville, N. C. 

Gill, Robert Trumbull 101 Pollock St., New Bern, N. C. 

Gray, Allen Thurman Route 2, LaGrange, N. C. 

Gray, Fred Earle 1514 Park Drive, Charlotte, N. C. 

Graves, Margaret Elizabeth 402 Sidney St., Burlington, N. C. 

Griffin, Ethalinda Route 1, Summerfield, N. C. 

Grimes, Rethel Route 3, Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Gunter, Francess Cattishall 516 Mclver St., Sanford, N. C. 

Harrell, D. B., Jr Route 4, Mount Olive, N. C. 

Harrelson, Evelyn Sue Tabor City, N. C. 

Hill, John Rankin Box 401, Elon College, N. C. 

Hilliard, Charles Albert Macon, N. C. 

Holt, Lena Dare Route 2, Reidsville, N. C. 

Hook, Gerald Edge Box 262, Elon College, N. C. 

Hooks, Hugh Becton Freemont, N. C. 

Ingram, Raymond Woodland Route 2, Princeton, N. C. 

Kemodle, John Franklin, Jr Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Liverman, Henry Joe Route 1, Colombia, N. C. 

Malone, Hilda Lee Prospect Hill, N. C. 

McCauley, Joseph Franklin Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

McDaniel, Martha Anne 311 Crayton St., Anderson, S. C. 

Merrow, Harry Franklin 88 Kenny St., Bristol, Conn. 

Mize, Carrie Rowland 205 Rolling Rd., Burlington, N. C. 

Moody, John Date, Jr Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Moore, Richard Joseph 419 Hall Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Moore, Robert Samuel 419 Hall Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Morton, Erma Elizabeth 205 Ruffin St., Burlington, N. C. 

Muckenfuss, Charles Thomas 314 Centennial Ave., High Point, N. C. 

Muckenfuss, Augustus 307 Trollinger St., Burlington, N. C. 

Newsom, Mary Helen Lucama, N. C. 

Nichols, Phyllis Haliburton Route 4, Durham, N. C. 

Parker, Elizabeth Holland Sunbury, N. C. 

Parnell, Wallace Aaron 304 Winston St., Florence, S. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 109 



Patterson, Fred Hartwell 1431 Myrtle Ave., Danville, Va. 

Peedin, Junius Hugh Glendon, N. C. 

Pennington, Betty Zone 101 W. Hall St., Burlington, N. C. 

Poe, Gene 604 Fayetteville Rd., Rockingham, N. C. 

Pohl, John Emerson 188 McKinley Ave., Kenmore, N. Y. 

Porterfield, Erwin Lee Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Price, Cleo Hampton Summerfield, N. C. 

Pritchard, William White 516 Young St., Henderson, N. C. 

Pruett, Andrew William Casar, N. C. 

Rawls, Margaret Elizabeth 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Reynolds, Hal Leach Troy, N. C. 

Rossi, John Albert 529 Wood St., Vineland, N. J. 

Ross, Vernon Lee Altamahaw, N. C. 

Russell, Betty Jane 264 Pine St., Graham, N. C. 

Self, Norman Faucette 901 S. Park Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Shoemaker, Samuel Ryan Box 314, Elon College, N. C. 

Simmons, Wayne Nichols White Plains, N. C. 

Smith, James Claude Route 4, Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Smith, David Anthony 103 Trollinger St., Burlington, N. C. 

Smith, Mary Lillian 911 Green St., Durham, N. C. 

Snead, Mary Elizabeth Route 5, Henderson, N. C. 

Sprinkle, Alma Rose Route 1, Pfafftown, N. C. 

Stone, Betty Bob Siler City, N. C. 

Strader, Victor Lawrence Kernersville, N. C. 

Summey, Warren Spencer Box 306, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Sutton, Thomas Daniel Gibsonville, N. C. 

Tapscott, William Eugene Burlington, N. C. 

Towery, Grace Nell Route 1, Asheboro, N. C. 

Troxler, Willis Reid Brown Summit, N. C. 

Walker, Stephen Edward Milton, N. C. 

Walker, William Pinkney, Jr 204 Peele St., Burlington, N. C. 

Webster, Betty Joe Bonlee, N. C 

Wheeler, Virginia Roberta 171 Homestead Blvd., Longmeadow, Mass. 

Wheless, Perry Louisburg, N. C. 

White, Franklin Roll Star Route, Siler City, N. C. 

Wood, Elmer Virgil Route 1, Stokesdale, N. C. 

Woody, Zella Dew Henderson, N. C. 

Zeissner, John William 4 Collins Ave., Spring Valley, N. Y. 

COMMERCIAL STUDENTS— 1942-1943. 

Albright, Mary Carolyn Route 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Armfield, Carey Hahn 1210 Fourteenth St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Ayscue, Helen Bums Route 1, Warrenton, N. C. 

Barrier, Ellen Stewart 601 Third St., Spencer, N. C. 

Beauford, Mattie Lee Box 224, Haw River, N. C. 

Bennett, Mary Emily US E. Webster St., Whiteville, N. C. 

Blalock, Helen Roscoe Meadow St., Gibsonville, N. C. 

Blue, Geraldine Stewart Route 2, Elon College, N. C 

Bounds, Ann Holland Holland, Va. 

Boyles, Ruth Cobb Railroad St., Gibsonville, N. C. 

Braxton, Esther Florine P. O. Box 507, Whiteville, N. C. 

P.iooks, Ruby Gray Route 4, Oxford, N. C. 

Bryan, Mary Alice 201 Broadway St., Durham, N. C, 



no 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Busick, Margaret Louise Brown Summit, N. C. 

Cahoon, Jean Powell 120 Commercial Ave., Clifton Forge, Va. 

Callahan, Edmond Falcon, N. C. 

Carden, Dorothy Elaine Haw River. 

Colclough, Nita Dare 2155 Guess Road, Durham 

Comer, Carolyn Frances Brown Summit 

Crawford, Grace Pearl Chadbourne. 

Critcher, Mary Alice Route 1, Oxford 

Darden, Mary Louise Box 431, Siler City 

Davis, Bonnie Grace Eureka 

Day, INIaude Evelyn 601 Ireland St., Burlington, 

Dickens, Janey Roberts Box 285, Weldon 

Dickey, Geraldine Route 1, Elon Sollege 

Dixon, Rachel Brown Summit 

Egerton, Leola Mae Norlina 

Ellington, Winifred Powell Route 3, Reidsville 

Fisher, Stacey Alice Route 1, Bryson City 

Fitch, Edna Muriel Burlington, 

Foster, Dorothy Lee Altamahaw 

Foster, Mary Jane Route 1, Yanceyville 

Fowlkes, Frances Anne Yanceyville 

Haley, Frances Estelle Route 2, Hillsboro. 

Harris, Coke Charles 622 Foimtain Place, Burlington 

Harris, Betty Jeanne 622 Fountain Place, Burlington 

Hendry, Betty Jeanne Haw River, 

Holt, Eunice Elizabeth S. Main St., Graham 

Huey, Joyce Route 4, Burlington 

Hundley, Maggie Mae Norlina 

Hughes, Evelyn Pearl Lewis St., Gibsonville 

Jennings, Norma Whitman Flying Point, Water Mill, 

Jernigan, Norma Blonde Elon College, 

Jones, Senora Virginia Milton 

Kimbro, David Vernon Route 1, Prospect Hill 

Kingsland, Elsie Louise 107 Stmimit Ave., Burlington 

Loy, Janice Madge Route 2, Elon College 

Martin, Mary Lou Route 2, Elon College 

May, Katherine Youell 570 Robertson St., Burlington 

May, Virginia Lee Route 4, Burlington, 

Mc Adams, Jahu Cornelius Route 3, Mebane 

McClenny, Dorothy Josephine Box 185, Chadbourne 

McVey, Hilda Christine Route 1, Graham 

Miller, Alice Rollin Box 6, Chadbourne 

Neese, Eleanor Beatrice Haw River 

Newton, Margaret Louise Route 3, Luray 



Oakes, Elizabeth Floyd Route 1, Oxford 

Perry, Worth Edwards Route 3, Jonesboro 

Rader, Betty Maude Box 127, Burlington 

Rader, Jeanne Box 127, Burlington 

Read, Willie Catherine Norlina, 

Rice, Vivian Blanche 415 W. Front St., Burlington 

Riggs, Elizabeth Musette Prospect Hill 



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THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 111 

Riggs, Frank Coleman Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Roberts, Hazel Earl Jonesboro, N. C. 

Rook, Carrie Hattie Gibsonville, N. C. 

Simpson, Margaret Stokesdale, N. C. 

Simpson, Margie Louise Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Smith, Helen Frances Kipling, N. C. 

Smith, Virginia Caroline Route 2, Rockingham, N. C. 

Smith, Walena Route 1, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Spitzer, Oletha Route 3, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Sumner, Arnold Clifford Shorts Creek, Va. 

Sutton, Alene Alta Brown Summit, N. C. 

Svvink, Ethel Lovenia Box 143, Haw River, N. C. 

Thompson, Mary Alice Route 1, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Thurecht, Jessie Dale 1105 Hunnicutt Ave., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Turner, Mary Elizabeth Route 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Walker, Lillian Celestia Milton, N. C. 

Welch, Sarah Elizabeth Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

White, Kate Rawling Scottsville, Va. 

White, Virginia Lee Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Wrenn, Harriette Emily Route S, Diu-ham, N. C. 

Yancey, Mildred Lyon Route 3, Oxford, N. C. 

SECOND YEAR COMMERCIAL— 1942-43. 

Baynes, Doris Marie 407 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Byrd, Mary Hill 400 Third Ave., Franklin, V.a 

Chandler, Doris Mae Route 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Holland, Elizabeth Alice Box 590, Shelby, N. C. 

Matthews, Julia Anne Route 1, Portsmouth, Va. 

MUSIC— 1942-43. 

Allen, Joseph Hillcrest Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Basnight, Miller New Bern, N. C. 

Barney, Mrs. J. W Elon College, N. C. 

Boone, Elsie Jackson, N. C. 

Braxton, Florine Whiteville, N. C. 

Bullard, George Minson Roseboro, N. C. 

Carr, Betty Jane 708 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cheek, Eloise 910 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Colclough, Mary Sue Elon College, N. C. 

Cook, Max Graham, N. C. 

Cox, Margaret 700 Sellars St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cowan, James Burlington, N. C. 

Darden, James Fenton Hall and York Sts., Suffolk, Va. 

Day, Ray Norfolk, Va. 

Day, Mocile 601 Ireland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Davidson, Eleanor Gibsonville, N. C. 

Dias, Elaine Burlington, N. C. 

Eaton, Sylvia Burlington, N. C. 

Earp, Rachel Lee 300 Concord Rd., Albemarle, N. C. 

Evans, Josephine Franklinton, N. C. 



112 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Foster, Dolly Rae 403 Maple Ave, Biirlington, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Route 1, Woodleaf, N. C. 

Harrelson, Evelyn Tabor City, N. C. 

Hauser, Louise Greensboro, N. C. 

Hill, Elizabeth Sunbury, N. C. 

Hook, Mary Jeanne Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, Doris Patricia Elon College, N. C. 

Jarosz, Mimi Graham, N. C. 

Land, Frances Burlington, N. C. 

Little, Mary Louise Burlington, N. C. 

Lynch, Alma Estelle Box 231, Elon College, N. C. 

Martin, Karon Elon College, N. C. 

Matthews, Julia Anne Portsmouth, Va. 

McCants, Mary Ellen 928 Powers St., Anderson, S. C. 

McCauley, J. Franklin Henderson, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Burlington, N. C. 

McKenzie, Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Messick, Helen Margaret Elon College, . .. C. 

Mize, Carrie Burlington, N. C. 

Moore, Wayne Burlington, N. C. 

Morgan, Miriam Gibsonville, N. C. 

Nevi^some, Mary Helen Lucama, N. C. 

Paris, Oliver Burlington, N. C. 

Patterson, Fred Danville, Va. 

Petrea, Raymond Burlington, N. C. 

Pritchett, Nancy Burlington, N. C. 

Rath, Carroll 106 Chisholm St., Sanford, N. C. 

Steele, Lodosca Gibsonville, N. C. 

Steele, Nancy Gibsonville, N. C. 

Stephens, Louise 708 W. Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Stevens, Joe Tom Roanoke, Ala. 

Warren, Mary Maggie Staley, N. C. 

Wilkins, Lacala Edgewood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

ART— 1942-43. 

Allred, Helen Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Apple, Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Browne, Mary Deane Ramseur, N. C. 

Breeze, Nell Gentry Roxboro, N. C. 

Blalock, Lucille Route 1, Durham, N. C. 

Browning, Coleen Elon College, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Christine Route 1, Graham, N. C, 

Coplin, James Burlington, N. C. 

Fitch, Edna Muriel Burlington, N. C. 

Galloway, Dorothy Hamlet, N. C. 

Home, Lillian Burlington, N. C. 

Husted, Charlotte Elaine Indiana, Penna. 

Jemigan, Norma Elon College, N. C. 

Kern, Louvina Ether, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 113 

Merritt, Lena Burlington, N. C. 

Newman, Anne O'Berry Burlington, N. C. 

Nichols, Ameritli Durham, N. C. 

Oldham, Jessamine Burlington, N. C. 

Paul, Evelyn Burlington, N. C. 

Rath, Carroll Sanford, N. C. 

Smith, Mrs. Gladys Elon College, N. C. 

Smith, Mrs. Beatrice Haw River, N. C, 

Somers, Miss Emma V Rt. 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Thompson, Mary Catherine Burlington, N. C. 

Troxler, Mildred Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Keron Rt. 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Watson, Rebecca Morven, N. C. 

Wheeler, Virginia Longmeadow, Mass. 

WiUdns, Ida Haw River, N. C. 

SPECIAL LITERARY STUDENTS— 1942-43. 

Greenberg, Mrs. Sydney Elon College, N. C. 

Mansfield, Roy Hamilton Rt. 2, Sanford, N. C. 

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS— 1942. 

Allred, Helen Rose Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Apple, Annie Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Atwater, Annie Mae Bm-lington, N. C. 

Atwater, Lucy Steelman Burlington, N. C. 

Barrett, Regina Olgyn Hickory, N. C. 

Barrett, Eva Reid Hickory, N. C. 

Bell, Betty Lee 10 Vannoy St., Greenville, S. C. 

Black, Rena Gilmer College Corner, Ohio 

Blue, Geraldine Stewart Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Boland, Iris Celeste Elon College, N. C. 

Boone, Elsie Spivey Jackson, N. C. 

Bradshaw, Mrs. Luella Muson Burlington, N. C. 

Breeze, Nelle Gentry Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Brooks, Edna Inez Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Brown, Walter Henry, Jr Route 3, Kannapolis, N. C. 

Brower, Armstead Jackson, Jr Liberty, N. C. 

Bullard, George Minson Roseboro, N. C. 

Burns, Theodore Warren Creshill, N. J. 

Busick, Margaret Louise Brown Summit, N. C. 

Butler, Edward Burlington, N. C. 

Carroll, Margaret Juanita Reidsville, N. C. 

Casey, John Stuart Clifton Forge, Va. 

Cooke, Garrett H Elon College, N. C. 

Copeland, Marjorie Selma Rt. 1, Smithfield, N. C. 

Cox, Margaret Lucille Burlington, N. C. 

Cox, Newman Casuewell Burlington, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Chi-istine Graham, N. C. 

Darden, James Fenton Hall and York Sts., Suffolk, Va. 



114 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Bellinger, James Lyle Clifton Forge, Va. 

Dennan, Kent White Plains, N. Y. 

Duncan, William New York, N. Y. 

Dyer, Lillian Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Dyer, Ruth Rt. 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Elder, Elizabeth Pensacola, Fla. 

Elder, James Pensacola, Fla. 

Ellis, Hazel Marguerette Siler City, N. C. 

Farrell, Earl Pittsboro, N. C. 

Festa, Salvatore Vineland, N. J. 

Fitch, Edna Burlington, N. C. 

Floyd, James Lynwood Charlotte, N. C. 

Foster, Mrs. J. L Elon College, N. C. 

Frye, Minnie Bell Carthage, N. C. 

Galloway, Dorothy Hamlet, N. C. 

Greene, Lura Mae Clyde, N. C. 

Griffin, Johnson Windsor, Va. 

Hall, Wilhelmina Burlington, N. C. 

Harden, Elizabeth Graham, N. C. 

Hauser, Louise Greensboro, N. C. 

Hayes, Frances Norlina, N. C. 

Hayes, Frank. Elon College, N. C. 

Helms, Boyce Charlotte, N. C. 

Hicklin, Edward Burlington, N. C. 

Holmes, Luvene Franklinton, N. C. 

Holt, Nellie May Burlington, N. C. 

Hook, Brevitt , Capon Bridge, West Va. 

Hook, Patricia Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, John Baltimore, Md. 

Hook Jesse Irene Elon College, N. C. 

Hook, Jeanne Elon College, N. C. 

Huffman, Wade Burlington, N. C. 

Husted, Charlotte Elaine Indiana, Penna. 

Jeffreys, Virginia Dare Rt. 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Jernigan, Norma Blonde Elon College, N. C. 

Jones, Mabel Barrett Hickory, N. C. 

Jordan, Grace Virginia Gibsonville, N. C. 

Kern, Raymond Head Washington, N. C. 

Kivette, Florence Olga Gibsonville, N. C. 

Looney, June Miirphy Suffolk, Va. 

Love, Frank S Burlington, N. C. 

Lynch, Alma Estelle Elon College, N. C. 

Lynch, Betty Elon College, N. C. 

Lynch, Dorothy Elon College, N. C. 

Mansfield, Roy Hamilton Sanford, N. C. 

Martin, Carl Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Martin, Mary F Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Martin, Mary Lou Elon College, N. C. 

Meacham, William F Rt. 3, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Meredith, Jesse Fancy Gap, Va. 

Messick, Helen Margaret Elon College, N. C. 

Messick, Rose Elon College, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Lea Graham, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 115 

McKenzie, Clyde Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Miller, Leonard Arthur Burlington, N. C. 

Morgan, Miriam Gibsonville, N. C. 

Morris, Goldie Jackson, N. C. 

Oakley, Virginia Elon College, N. C. 

Perdue, Juanita Rt. 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Perry, Mrs. Mary Lou Burlington, N. C, 

Phillips, Amos Portsmouth, Va. 

Pollard, John Francis Greensboro, N. C. 

Porterfield, La Verne Haw River, N. C. 

Rankin, Helen Clodf elter Asheboro, N. C. 

Reid, Reuben Campobello, S. C. 

Rice, Sarah Florence Rt. 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Rippy, William D Gibsonville, N. C. 

Rumley, James D Elon College, N. C. 

Schwob, Helen Orlando, Fla. 

Shaw, Edward Rosemont, Pa. 

Shook, Mildred Banner Elk, N. C. 

Smyth, Thomas J. C Syracuse, N. Y. 

Spence, Royall Herman Burlington, N. C. 

Spivey, Herbert Portsmouth, Va. 

Steele, Catherine Gibsonville, N. C. 

Steele, Lodosca Gibsonville, N. C. 

Stephens, Elsie Louise Burlington, N. C. 

Stevens, Joe Tom Roanoke, Ala. 

Stolte, Harry Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Sumnerj Clifford Shorts Creek, Va. 

Tate, Annie Laura Rt. 1, Efland, N. C. 

Templeton, Clayton Norfolk, Va. 

Thomas, Faye Rt. 4, Greensboro, N. C. 

Thompson, Mary Mackenzie Burlington, N. C. 

Thompson, Mary Catherine Graham, N. C. 

Thornton, Mae Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Agnes Ruth Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Lillian Milton, N. C. 

Walker, Lucille Burlington, N. C. 

Walker, Margaret E Brown Summit, N. C. 

Walker, Margaret Sue Gibsonville, N. C. 

Watkins, Emma Louise Burlington, N. C. 

Watson, Rebecca Morven, N. C. 

Watts, Edwin Peachland, N. C. 

Webster, Margarette Elon College, N. C. 

Wells, Ruby Jane Bostic, N. C. 

Whitaker, Joseph Bennettsville, S. C. 

Whitlock, Dorothy Carthage, N. C. 

Wigington, John Craig Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wright, Buby Reidsville, N. C. 



116 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



SUMMARY. 

Seniors 52 

Juniors 53 

Sophomores 72 

Freshmen 104 

Commercial 90 

Music 54 

Art 30 

Special Literary 2 

457 

Less Counted Twice 48 

Total Regular Session 409 

Simimer Session 1942 129 

Grand Total 538 



i 




ELON'S ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



Vol xxxx 



January, 1944 



Number I 



THE BULLETIN^ 

OF 

ELON COLLEGE 

FIFTY-FIFTH 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 

1944-1945 

CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 
FOR 1943 




;':.'A 



ELON COLLEGE 

Elon College, N. C. 

Bulletin Issued Quarterly 



Entered as second-class mail at the postofiice of Elon College, N. C, under the 
act of July 16, 1894. 




PATHS OF OPPORTUNITY ABOUND AT ELON 



Foreword 



This bulletin is issued as a supplement to the Elon College 
Catalogue and it should be used in connection with the cat- 
alogus. All the changes that have been made for the 1944- 
1945 sesion are given in this supplementary bulletin. Except 
where changes are noted in this bulletin, expenses, courses 
offered and other information will be as published in the 
catalogue of 1943. 

The scarcity of paper prohibits the publishing of the 
general catalogue for 1944. Prospective students will find a 
copy of the general catalogue in the office of their high 
school principal or in the high school library. We have on 
hand a few copies of the 1943 catalogue and shall be glad 
to send one if you are unable to find one in your high school 
library. 



College Calendar 

SESSION OF 1944-1945 



September 4 — Faculty ^Meeting, 6:00 P. ]M. 
September 5-6 — Freshman Period : Fall quarter begins. 
SeptemlDer 6 — Freshman Registration. 
September 7 — Registration of Upperclassraen. 
September S — Classes begin. 
September 9 — Annual Faculty Reception. 
September 10 — Opening Address of the President. 
Octoljer 15 — Subjects for Senior Essays due. 
October 20 — Sophomore-Freshman Reception. 
November 22 — Fall Quarter closes. 
Nov. 22, Noon-Nov. 26— Fall Holidays. 
November 27 — Winter Quarter opens. : 

December 1 — First Draft of Senior Essay, or 

Comprehensive Examination completed. 
December 2 — Senior- Junior Party. 

December 10 — Elon College Singers present Christmas Program. 
December 16, Noon-January 1 — Christmas Holidays. 
January 2 — Classes Resume, 8 : A. M. 
January 27 — Freshman-Sophomore Party. 
February 10 — ^Mid-Year Alumni Meeting. 
February 13 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
February 15 — Thesis completed. 
]\Iarch 1 — Thesis Examination completed. 
jNIarch 1 — Winter Quarter ends. 
March 1, Noon-March 5 — Spring Holidays. 
March 6 — Spring Quarter begins. 
April 1 — Easter Sunday. 

April 26 — Senior Essays, Examinations completed. 
May 5 — May Day Exercises. 
May 15-18 — Examinations. 
May 19-21 — Commencement Exercises. 
May 21 — Meeting of Board of Trustees, 9:30 A. M. 
June 4 — Summer School begins. 



The Faculty 



LEON EDGAR SMITH 

President 

A. B., Elon College; M. A,, Princeton University; D.D., Elon College; 

LL.D., Marietta College 

JOHN DECATUR MESSICK 

Dean, Head of the Department of Education 
Ph.B., Elon College; University of North Carolina; Ph.D., New York 

University 

EDNA REND ALL KRAFT 
Dean of Women 

B. A., Rockford College; University of Iowa; M. A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK 

Registrar, Professor of Physics 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M.S., Cornell University, Additional 

Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins University, University of 

Chicago, Duke University 

■ L. B. ADCOX 

Assistant Director of Physical Education 
A. B., Davidson College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

JOHN WILLIS BARNEY 

Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University, University of 

Virginia, University of North Carolina 

MRS. CLARA H. B.^RTLEY 

Instructor in Biolopy 

B. S., Miami University; M. A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University 

of Kansas 

IRVING D. BARTLEY 

Head of the Department of Music 

. Mus., Syracuse University; M. Mus., Syracuse University; New England 

Conservatory, Diploma in Piano ; New England Conservatory, 

Diploma in Organ 

ROBERT BOOTH 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Duke University; LL.D., University of North Carolina; 

Graduate Work, Duke University 

D. J. BOWDEN 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 

B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; B. D., Ph.D., Yale University 



8 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

NED FAUCETTE BRANNOCK 

Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M.S., Columbia University; Litt.D., 

Defiance College; Additional Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins 

University, University of North Carolina 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN BURTON, Jr. 

Assistant Professor in Physics 
A. B., Elon College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

WILSIE FLORENCE BUSSELL 

Instructor of French and Spanish 

A. B., M. A., Duke University; Graduate Work, Duke University, 

Pennsylvania State College, Alliance Francaise in Paris, 

Middleburg College 

ALBERT COBLE 

Assistant Professor in Physics 

A. B., Elon College 

A. L. EGGERS 

Associate Professor in Geography 

B. A., Carson-Newman College; M. A., Peabody College 

MERTON FRENCH 

Associate Professor of Religion and Greek 
A. B., Washburn College; M. A., Ph.D., Brown University 

HOWARD S. GRAVETT 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A. B., James Millikin University; M. A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

(On Leave) 

COLON CLIFTON HANCOCK 

Assistant Professor in Physics 
B. S., Appalachian State Teachers' College 

HANSE HIRSCH 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and History 

Hoehere Reifepruefung Realgymnasium Mannheim, University of 

Frankfort-on-the-Main, University of Heidelberg, University 

of Vienna, Ph. D . University of Munich 

(On Leave) 

MRS. VERA C. HIRSCH 

Instructor in French and German 

L'Ecole Francaise Girard, St. Petersburg (Russia), (B.A.) Godda Gymnasium, 

St. Petersburg (Russia), Alliance Francaise in Paris, Studies at 

University of Paris (Sorbonne), Paris (France), University 

of Munich, Certificate of The German Academy,Munich 

(Equivalent to A. B., M. A. in United States) 

VIOLET HOFFMAN 

Instructor in Conunercial Department 

A. B., Elon College 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 

MARSHALL W. HOOK 

Associate Professor in Mathematics 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., University of North Carolina; Graduate Work 

at Yale University, Duke University, University of North Carolina 

WAITUS W. HOWELL 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

A. B., Elon College; M.S., University of North Carolina 

MRS. SUl^ CRAFT HOWELL 

Instructor of Commercial Department 

A. B , La Grange College: M S., North Carolina State College 

MRS. OMA U. JOHNSON 

Librarian 

Ph. B., A. B., Elon College; B. S., Columbia University 

LILA LE VAN 

Instructor in Public School Music and Piano 

B. Mus., M. Mus., Kansas University; Graduate Work, Julliard School 

of Music 

KENNETH VERNE LOTTICK 

Associate Professor of History and Geography 

A. B., Hanover College; M. A., Ohio State University; Graduate Work, 

University of Louisville 

CHARLES L. McCLURE 
Associate Professor of English 

B. A., Maryville College; M. A., Ohio Stete University; Graduate Work 

Indiana University 

FLETCHER MOORE 

Instructor in Piano and Organ 

A. B., Elon College; M. A.. Columbia University; Julliard School of Music; 

Piano Student of Sascha Gorodnitzki and Guy Maier 

(On Leave) 

MARY REED MOORE 

Instructor in Education 

A. B., Winthrop College; M. A., Fiu-man University; Graduate Work, 

University of California, Columbia University, College of 

William and Mary 

LIDA MUSE 

Instructor in Hoine Economics 

B. S., University of Tennessee; M. A., Columbia University 

LILA CLARE NEWMAN 

Instructor in Art 

Ph. B., Elon College; Graduate Work, Columbia University and 

Harvard University 



10 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

-' J. L. PIERCE 
Director of Physical Education 
A. B., High Point College ; M. A., University of North Carolina 

E. F RHODES 

Director of College Band 

Shenandoah College; A. B., Elon College 

HAROLD SCHULTZ 

Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Columbia University; M. A., Ph.D., Duke University 

(On Leave) 

MRS. HAROLD SCHULTZ 

Ijistriictor in History 

A.B., Macalaster College; A.M., University off Minnesota; 

Graduate Work, Duke University 

n-:,"l ■ JAMES H. STEWART ^ "'' 

* •■■ Instructor of Business Administration ' ^ 

A. B., Transylvania College; M. A., University of Kentucky 

(On Leave) 

MRS. HAZEL VICKREY 

■;.;;,',:' ■ Director of Physical Education for Girls ■ ; .''.... 

A. B., Troy State Teachers' College (Alabama) 

JOHN WESTMORELAND 

Instructor in Piano 

' i "' -:■ A. B., Elon College; INI. A., Columbia University • / ,' 

Graduate Work Julliard School of ISIusic 

^NIARG.'VRET H. WHITTINGTON 

Instructor in Voice 

Chowan College; Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

University of North Carolina; B. S. in ]Music, ^Meredith College; 

University of Michigan 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

LEON EDGAR S:\nTH, A. B., :\I. .\., D.D., LL. D., President. 

JOHN DECATUR MESSICK, Ph. B., Ph.D., Dean. 

EDNA REND ALL KRAFT, B. A., M. A., Dean of Women. 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK, .-\. B., Isl. A., M. S., Registrar. 

CHARLES E. APEL, A. B., B. S., M. S., Business Manaser. 

GEORGE D. COLCLOUGH, A. B, Director of Public Relations and Alumni 

Secretary. 
SARA BOYD PICKETT, B. S., Dietitian. 



General 1 nformation 



Location. — Elon College is located in the heart of the 
Piedmont section of North Carolina, a section of the State 
that is progressive, has a pleasant and healthful climate, and 
is an ideal location for a college such as Elon. It is seventeen 
miles east of Greensboro, on the Southern Railway, and on 
N. C. highway No. 100, easily accessible from any direction. 

The town of Elon College is strictly a college commun- 
ity and is suited to the development of scholarship and 
character. The twenty-five-acre campus is beautifully land- 
scaped and is an ideal setting for the college buildings. 

History, Purpose, Etc. — Elon College was chartered in 
1889 for the purpose of furnishing young men and young 
women, on equal terms, with thorough instruction under 
positive moral and religious influences. While it is the de- 
nominational college of the Congregational Christian Church 
in this section, its teachings are non-sectarian, and students 
from all denominations attend. The student body of Elon 
College is large enough to require a comprehensive curricu- 
lum and small enough for each professor and administrative 
officer to give individual attention to each student. 

The college has a well-trained faculty who are Christian 
men and women and who take a personal interest in the 
students who come under their instruction. The college is 
a standard four-year, A-grade college, a member of the Amer- 
ican Association of Colleges, and is accredited by the various 
State Boards of Education, State Universities, and other ac- 
crediting agencies. Work done at Elon will be fully recog- 
nized for entrance to graduate schools, for teachers' certifi- 
cates in North Carolina, Virginia, New York and other states, 
or for transfer to other educational institutions. 

College Buildings. — There are ten buildings on the cam- 
pus devoted to the work of the college. Five of these are 



12 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

practically new, only recently completed in an enlarged re- 
building program. These include the Alamance Building, 
which houses the offices, classrooms, and special departments 
of the college, such as Fine Arts, Home Economics, and 
Business Administration; the Carlton Library Building; the 
Auditorium and Music Building; the Duke Science Hall; 
and the Mooney Memorial Building, which houses the school 
of Religion and all student activities. These buildings are 
modern and efficient in every detail and offer to the student 
here the very best advantages to be found in any small college 
in the South. In addition to these there are four dormitories 
on the campus and four just off the main campus. The East, 
South, North Dormitories and Club House are used for boys. 
The West Dormitory, Ladies Hall, Oak Lodge, and Cedar 
Lodge are used for girls. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

A certificate of graduation from an accredited four-year 
high school, with at least fifteen units, will admit a student 
to freshman standing as a candidate for a Bachelor of Arts 
degree in Elon College. 

Students who have been graduated from non-accredited 
high schools may be admitted upon successfully passing the 
college entrance examinations. These examinations will be 
given at the beginning of the school term in the fall by the 
Dean. A limited number of students may be accepted for 
special departmental courses but not as candidates for a 
degree. 

The following are prescribed units: 

English 3 

Modern Language 2 

History 2 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

Applicants for advanced standing must present an of- 
ficial transcript of their work in other colleges or universities 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 13 

before any credit will be allowed. Full credit for work in 
accredited institutions in so far as it parallels the work at 
Elon College. Every candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree 
must have at least one full year in residence at Elon College. 
Students admitted to advanced standing are subject to all the 
entrance and graduation requirements of the College. 

SPECIAL TO NEW STUDENTS. 

Beginning with the academic year of 1944-45, a quali- 
fying examination in any subject offered in the regular cur- 
riculum may be given to any entering student who receives 
permission from the head of the department in which the 
course is given. 

Although no degree credit will be allowed for passing 
the examination, the student may take the second year course 
in the field in which he passed the examination, or some 
other more challenging course during his first year in college. 

If the student fails to qualify, he or any other student 
recommended by the department may be given a qualifying 
test at the end of the first quarter in the specified subject, 
which, if passed, will permit him to go on into advanced 
work. The qualifying examination will not affect the number 
of courses to be taken in class to qualify for a major. 

Students wishing to take such examinations should in- 
terview the proper Department Head on the day preceding 
registration. 

The examination questions are to be selected by the de- 
partment in which a student wishes an examination, but will 
be surveyed by the curriculum committee for approval. 

The examination fee is $5.00. 

THE QUARTER SYSTEM. 

Elon College has recently changed from the Semester 
System to the Quarter System. This change necessitates an 
explanation of the difference in hours of work completed. 

A semester's work in a course that has been held three 



14 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 




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CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 15 

times a week has been giving ttiree semester hours credit. In 
the quarter system now being used, a class being conducted 
for one quarter with class periods being held five times weekly 
will carry five quarter hours credit, or the equivalent to three 
and one third semester hours. In the quarter system, one 
would complete in two quarters ten quarter hours, two-thirds 
semester hours more than is possible to obtain in the present 
system of two semesters. The quarter system will operate 
five days weekly, leaving Saturday open for one to prepare 
college work or to pursue work off the campus. The classes 
will come every day for five days instead of on alternating 
days, except in a few cases when classes will be offered three 
times a week to make it possible for the student who needs 
to pursue more than the normal load of three classes a day 
to take four classes one day and three the following day. 
Such a load as this would be equivalent to eighteen semester 
hours a semester, which is the maximum load one may take 
now. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES. 

Elon College encourages its students to take part in extra- 
curricular activities. There are eight social clubs or fratern- 
ities and sororities, four for boys and four for girls; two 
literary societies; dramatic, music and glee clubs; two national 
honorary fraternities; commercial club; Student Christian 
Association; and other organizations on the campus. 

Intercollegiate athletics have been abandoned for the 
duration. The college will participate in athletics again as 
soon as conditions permit We do maintain a Department of 
Physical Education which provides intramural sports for 
both boys and girls. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS. 

Elon College owns its own printing press which is lo- 
cated on the first floor of the Duke Science Building. The 
students publish the college paper, "Maroon and Gold," as 



16 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

well as the "Elon Colonnades," a literary magazine. The 
students edit the college year book, "PhiPsiCli." 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS. 

Elon College grants the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science degrees on the satisfactory completion of 180 quar- 
ter hours of work. Seventy-two quarter hours must be on the 
Junior-Senior level. A student must have at least one major, 
and two minors, totaling thirty-six quarter hours, related to 
the major must be completed to meet the requirements for 
a degree. Prescribed minors are Mathematics, Science, English 
and a Modern Language. 

Quality Points. — One hundred and eighty points are re- 
quired for graduation. Quality points may be earned by 
making the following grades per quarter: 

Grades Per Quarter Hour 

Quality Points 

D 

C 2/3 

B \y2 

A 2 

ABSENCES AND CUTS. 

Class Absences. — Absences are counted from the first 
meeting of the class in the quarter. Those who enter a course 
after the first meeting are reported as absent from the pre- 
vious meetings of the class. 

Cuts. — (1) No freshman is allowed any class cuts his first 
quarter in school. (2) Any student securing an "F" on a 
course may not be permitted any class cuts the following 
quarter. (3) A student making an average of "D" in all 
work registered for in a given quarter may be allowed two 
cuts in each subject the following quarter. (4) A student 
making an average of "C" on all courses registered for in a 
given quarter may be allowed three cuts in each subject the 
following quarter. (5) A student making an average of "B" 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 17 

on all courses registered for in a given quarter may be al- 
lowed five cuts in each subject the foUov^ang quarter, (6) A 
student making all grades of "A" in a given quarter may be 
allowed unlimited cuts the following quarter. (7) Incom- 
plete and conditional grades are considered as grades of "F" 
in regard to cuts for the following quarter. 

COLLEGE EXPENSES. 

The detailed student expenses per quarter for the regular 
College session are as follows: 

Mininmm Average Maximum 

Charges Charges Charges 

Tuition $ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00 

Matriculation Fee 21.50 21.50 21.50 

Library Fee 1.50 1.50 1.50 

Board 75.00 75.00 75.00 

Athletic Fee 2.00 2.00 2.00 

Student Activities Fee . 5.00 5.00 5.00 

Room Rent 17.00 20.00 25.00 



$ 147.00 $ 150.00 $ 155.00 

Note. — These totals should be multiplied b}' three for the total 
expenses for the school year. 

Laboratory fees in the department of Biology will be 
$7.50 for each quarter and for Comparative Anatomy SIO. 
These changes are necessary because of the increase in the 
prices of materials used in this department. 

DORMITORIES. 

All dormitory rooms are equipped with two single beds. 
Room rent for the different dormitories per quarter is as 
follows : 

For Girls — 

West Dormitory, front, per quarter $ 20.00 

West Dormitory, other than front, per quarter .... 17.00 

Ladies Hall, per quarter 20.00 

Cedar Lodge, per quarter 20.00 



18 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

For Boys — 

South Dormitory, per quarter $ 20.00 

Club House, per quarter 20.00 

East Dormitory, per quarter 25.00 

North Dormitory, per quarter 20.00 

Note. — Students occupying corner rooms will pay an additiontl 
$2.00 per quarter for this privilege. 

All dormitory students are required to bring or provide 
a matress cover for a single matress. 

All charges are due and payable on the day of registra- 
tion. 

Day Students. — Day students pay $55.00 per quarter plus 
any laboratory fees or extra courses at regular rates. 

AVIATION. 

The United States Government has lifted the restrictions 
on civil aeronautics and from now on individuals wishing to 
learn to fly will be allowed to do so. Elon College, in co- 
operation with the Burlington Flying Service and the Burl- 
ington Municipal Airport, will offer aviation for its students 
beginning with the fall quarter, 1944. 

The ground school work for the fall and winter quar- 
ters is required for the private pilot certificate, and the ground 
school work for all three quarters is required for the com- 
mercial pilot certificate. 

The following courses will be offered on the campus 
and will give credit towards graduation: 

Curriculum for Pilots' Certificates. 

Ground School Work — 

Fall quarter 1. Civil Air Regulations. 

2. General Service of Aircraft. 3 q. h. 
Winter quarter 1. Navigation. 

2. Meteorology. 5 q. h. 
Spring quarter 1. Internal Combustion Engines. 

2. Theory of Flight. 

3. Aerodynamics. 5 q. h. 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 



19 




20 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Flying Time — 

Private Pilot S hours dual. 

35 hours solo. 
Commercial Pilot S hours dual. 
200 hours solo. 

The fee for the first 8 hours of dual flight instruction 
with a certified pilot is $75.00. Solo hours may be obtained 
at $6.50 per hour. Transportation to and from the airport is 
to be furnished by the student. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS. 

Friends of higher education have established several 
free tuition scholarships at Elon College that are to be given 
each year to deserving freshmen. Students interested in this 
financial aid should apply early. All free tuition scholarships 
are usually awarded before July 1. Loan funds are available 
for deserving students who have attended Elon College for as 
much as two years. 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 21 



Courses of Study 



The following Courses of Study will be offered at Elon 
College during the school year 1944-45. A more complete 
description of these courses will be found in the 1943-44 cat- 
alogue. 

Course Qlr. Hrs. 

No. Name and Description of Course. Credit. 

ART: 

11-12 Freehand drawing, color sketches, pastels, pottery .... 10 

21-22 Oils, principles of color, pen and ink drawings 10 

23 Color design, illustrations, posters, printing 5 

24 Color theory, weaving, book-binding, drawing and in- 

dustrial art for teachers 5 

Sketch Class — Pencil drawing, out-of-door work 5 

China Painting — Tinting, ornamental work, figure .... 5 

a Tracing development of Christian Art and Architecture . 3 

BIBLE: 

1 1-1 2 Survey of the Bible 10 

21-22 Life of Christ and his teachings 10 

23 Objectives of Christian Education; training leaders ... 5 

24 Children's curriculum; equipment; worship materials . 5 

25 Youth and Adult program of the Church 5 

31-32 Literature of the Old Testament, History 10 

33-34 Origin and development of religious belief 10 

37-38 Seminar: Christian and other religions 10 

41-42 Special research in Old and New Testament study ... 10 

43-44 Basic social problems reviewed 10 

BIOLOGY: 

11 General Zoology: Fundamental principles of animal bi- 

ology 6 

12 General Botany: Principles of plant biolog)- 6 

21-22 Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy 12 

31 Bacteriolog}^' 6 

32 Physiological processes of animals 6 

41 Study of heredity, evolution, and eugenics 5 



22 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Course Qtr. Hrs. 

No. Name and Description of Course. Credit. 

42 Embryology 6 

]Materials and Methods of teaching Biolog\' 5 

BUSINESS: 

7 Commercial Arithmetic — reveals short-cuts and speed . 

8 Secretarial Practice — actual activities and duties 5 

9 Personal T}-pewriting — short course in touch typing . . 

1 1 Business English — basic elements and principles 

12 Bookkeeping and Accounting 

13-14 Shorthand — fundamental principles of Gregg shorthand 10 

15-16 Secretarial Typewriting — speed building, accuracy .... 

17-18 Advanced Typewriting — one or more years required . . 

31-32 Advanced Dictation — second-year course in shorthand 5 

38 Office ]Management — preparation for teachers 5 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: 

11-12 Principles of Economics 10 

16 Business Organization and Practice 5 

21-22 Principles of Accounting 10 

2S Salesmanship 5 

28 Credits and Collections 5 

31 Alarketing 5 

32 Retailing 5 

33-34 Business Law 10 

35-36 Advanced Accounting 10 

37 Cost Accounting 5 

38 Income Taxation 5 

42 ?\Ioney and Banking 5 

43 Life Insurance 5 

44 Auditing 5 

45 ^Materials and ^Methods of Teaching Business Admin- 

istration 5 

47 Elements of Statistics 5 

48 Labor Problems 5 

CHEMISTRY: 

11-12 General Chemistry — fundamental principles 12 

21-22 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Qualitative Analysis . . 12 

31-32 Organic Chemistry 12 

41-42 Quantitative Analvsis 12 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 



23 




24 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Course Qtr. Hrs. 

No. Name and Description of Course. Credit. 

45 Materials and ^Methods of teaching High School Chem- 
istry 5 

48 Physical Chemistr\- S 

53 Industrial Chemistry 5 

EDUCATION: 

33-34 Elementary ISIethods 10 

42 Classroom Management 5 

32 Educational ^Measurements 5 

36 Curriculum 3 

43 History of Education 3 

44 The Philosophy of Education 3 

45 Materials and Methods of High School Teachers 5 

(See specific departments for descriptions.) 

47 Principles of High School Teaching 3 

48 Character Education 3 

51, to 56 Observation and Directed Teaching 9 or 18 

57-58 Directed Methods in Teaching 3 

ENGLISH : 

11-12 Freshman English 10 

21-22 Sophomore English 10 

24 Children's Literature 5 

31-32 Journalism 9 

33 Shakespeare 3 

34 Shakespeare in the Theatre 3 

35 Public Speaking 5 

36 Argumentation and Debate 3 

37 Modern Drama 5 

38 IModern Drama in the Theatre 5 

41-43 American Literature 9 

45 Materials and Methods of teaching H. S. English .... 5 

49 Modern Literature 5 

FRENCH: 

7- 8 Elementary French 10 

1 1-12 Intermediate French 10 

21-22 A Survey of French Literature 10 

31-32-33 Advanced Composition and Practice in Speaking ... 10 

41-42-43 Phonetics and Oral practice of Modern French .... 10 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 25 

Course Qtr. Hrs. 

No. Name and Description of Course. Credit. 

GERMAN : 

1 1-1 2 Elementary German 10 

21-22 Intermediate German 10 

31-32 Advanced German . 10 

41-42 A Survey of German Literature 10 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY: 

21 Principles of Geography 5 

22 Geography of North America 5 

32 Geology 5 

GREEK: 

1 1-22 Elementary Greek 10 

21-22 Greek New Testament 10 

HISTORY: 

11-12 Establishment and Development of America 10 

21-22 Establishment and Development of English Nation . . 10 

23-24 History 10 

3 1-3 2-3 2a Ancient and Medieval History 9 

33-34-35 Modern European History 9 

41 Latin American History 9 

45 Methods and Materials in teaching H. S. History .... 5 

47 Evolution of the State of North Carolina 5 

48 American Government and Politics 5 

49 History of Democratic Ideas and Institutions 5 

49a History of American Democratic Ideas and Institutions 5 

HOME ECONOMICS: 

11-12 Food Preparation and Service 10 

13-14 Clothing and Textiles 10 

3 1 Home Nursing and Child Care 5 

32 House Planning and Furnishing 5 

33 Child Development 5 

33 Nutrition 5 

34 Dietetics 5 

41 Economics of the Home 5 

42 Home Management 5 

43 Costume and Design 5 

44 Advanced Clothins; 5 



26 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Course Qtr. Hrs. 

No. Name and Description of Course. Credit. 

45 Materials and ^Methods of teaching Home Economics . . 5 

48-49 Home-Maker's Course 10 

MATHEMATICS: 

1 1 College Algebra 5 

1 2 Trigonometry 5 

13 Analytical Geometry 5 

21-22 An Introduction to Calculus 10 

31 Differential Calculus 3 

32-33 Integral Calculus 6 

41 Differential Equations 3 

42-43 Applied Calculus 6 

45 jSIaterials and Methods in the teaching of Mathematics 5 

MATHEMATICS (APPLIED): 

14-15 Engineering Drawing 10 

MUSIC: 

1 1-12 Harmony 10 

13-14 Ear Training and Sight-singing 6 

16 Introduction to ]Music 2 

17-18-19 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice 3-6 

21-22 Advanced Harmony 9 

23-24-24a Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing 6 

2S Public School Music 5 

27-28 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice 3 

3 1-3 2-3 2a Counterpoint 9 

c>3 Church ^Nlusic and Hymnologv 3 

34 Conducting 3 

35-36 Histor}- and Appreciation of ]Music 9 

38-39 Private Lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice .... 3-6 

41-42-42a Composition 9 

43-44 Advanced Form and Analysis 6 

45 Advanced Public School ]Music 5 

46 Advanced PuIdHc School ^Nlusic 5 

47-48-49 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice 6 

PHILOSOPHY: 

31-32 Introduction to Philosophy 10 

35 Locic 5 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 



27 




28 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Course Qtr. Hrs. 

Xo. Name and Description of Course. Credit. 

36 Ethics 5 

38 The Philosophy of Science 5 

41-42 The History of Philosophy 10 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 

31 Introduction to Health and Physical Education 3 

32 Methods and ^Materials in Teaching Games of Low- 

organization 3 

33 Methods and Materials in Teaching Games of High- 

organization 3 

34 Methods and Materials in Teaching Games of High- 

organization (Coaching) 3 

35 Organization and Administration of Health and Physi- 

cal Education 3 

41 Personal Hygiene 3 

42 Health Education — Materials and Methods in Teaching 

Health 3 

PHYSICS: 

1 1-12 Survey of Physical Sciences 10 

13-14 General Physics 12 

21-22 Modern Physics 12 

31-32 Electricity and Magnetism 12 

33-34 Light and Sound 12 

36 Household Physics 5 

41 Mechanics 6 

42 Heat 6 

PSYCHOLOGY: 

21 General Psychology 5 

3 1 Educational Psychology 5 

32 Psycholog}' of Childhood 5 

SOCIOLOGY: 

3 1 Introductory Sociology 5 

41 Current Social Problems 5 

42 Rural Sociology 5 

SPANISH: 

1 1-12 Elementary Spanish 10 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish 10 

31-33 A Survey of Spanish Literature 10 



CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 29 

Summer School - 1944 

First Term: June 5 — July 14. 
Second Term: July 14 — August 18. 

PURPOSE OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

Elon College conducts a summer school for the benefit 
of teachers in service who may wish to improve or renew 
their certificates as well as for students who desire under- 
graduate credit. The summer school affords unusual op- 
portunities for students who have conditions or failures in 
undergraduate work and wish them removed. Students 
wishing to graduate in less time than four years are urged 
to attend summer school. By doing this, a student may be 
able to complete the requirements for graduation within a 
three year period. 

Courses to be Offered. 

ART : China Painting, Drawing. 

AVIATION : Civil Air Regulations, Flight, General Course of Air- 
craft, Meterology, Navigation. 

EDUCATION : Character Education, Phylosophy of Education, 
Visual Education. 

ENGLISH: American Literature, English Literature, Freshman 
English. 

FRENCH: Intermediate French, A Survey of French Literature. 

HOME ECONOMICS: Clothing, Dietetics, Practice House. 

IML'SIC: Conducting, Organ, Piano, Public School Music. 

RELIGION : Survey of the Bible. 

SCIENCE: Bacteriology, Genetics, Physics, Zoology. 

At least six students are to register for a course before 
it will be justified. 

Pre-Nursing. — Trained nurses are in great demand. Elon 
College offers the regular pre-nursing course required for 
entrance to leading hospitals. This course may be started 
in June or September. 



30 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Other Courses. — Other courses will be offered if as many 
as six students desire a course that is not set up for the sum- 
mer school. If you are interested in a special course, find 
five others and notify the Director of the Summer School, 
and arrangements will be made for the course. 

Room and Board. — The college will have adequate room 
for both boys and girls who desire to live in the dormitories. 
The boys will occupy the South Dormitory and the Club 
House. Girls will occupy the West Dormitory and Ladies 
Hall. Meals will be served in the central dining hall. All 
dormitory students are required to take their meals in the 
college dining hall. 

How and When to Register. — Summer school students 
will register on the morning of June 5, in the office of the 
Director of the Summer School. If it is convenient for you 
to see the director before the first day and arrange your course, 
it is perfectly all right to do so. Students should register as 
near the first day as possible in order to get full credit. 

Expenses for the Summer Session. 

First term of six weeks, June 5 to July 14: 

^Matriculation Fee $ 5.00 

Tuition, S2.00 per quarter hour 18.00 

Room and board 45.00 

$68.00 

Second term of five weeks, July 14 to August 18: 

Matriculation Fee $ 5.00 

Tuition, $2.00 per quarter hour 18.00 

Room and Ijoard 37.50 



$60.50 



NOTE. — All expenses are due and payable at the Business Of- 
fice on the first dav of resristration. 



.»s. 






m 



Volume XLI 



January, 1945 



Number 1 



THE BULLETIN 

OF 

ELON COLLEGE 

FIFTY-SIXTH 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 

1945-1946 

AND 

CATALOGUE OF 1944-45 




ELON COLLEGE 

Elon College, N. C. 

Bulletin Issued Quarterly 



Entered as second-class mail at the postoffice of Elon College, N. C, under the 
act of July 16, 1894. 



Member of 

THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES 

and of the 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE CONFERENCE 



Contents 



College Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

The Faculty 7 

Officers of Administration 10 

Faculty Committees 10 

Educational Philosophy 11 

Administration 12 

The Physical Environment 13 

Buildings and Equipment 14 

Historical Sketch 18 

Endowment and Sources of Income 21 

Annual Events 24 

Student Organizations 25 

Student Expenses 29 

Scholarships 33 

Loan Fimds 34 

Academic Regulations 37 

Outline of Courses of Study 48 

Departments of Instruction of the College : 

Biology 61 

Business Administration 62 

Chemistry 67 

Education 69 

English 74 

Geography and Geology 76 

Greek 77 

History 77 

Mathematics 79 

Modern Langiiages 81 

Philosophy and Religion 83 

Physics 86 

Psychology 88 

Sociology 88 

Special Departments of the College: 

Art 90 

Home Economics 91 

Music 93 

Physical Education 97 

Roster of Students in the College 101 



1945 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER | 


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6 


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APRIL 


AUGUST 


DECEMBER \ 


1 


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61 6 


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1946 1 


JANUARY 


MAY 


SEPTEMBER 1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


S 








1 


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FEBRUARY 


JUNE 


OCTOBER 1 












1 


2 














1 


. 




1 


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4 


6 


3 


4 


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« 


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23 
30 


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27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






MARCH 


JULY 


NOVEMBER 1 






. . 1. . 




1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


6 


. 










1 


a 


3 


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IS 


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31 


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29 


SO 


28 


29 


30 


31 








24 


26 


28 


27 


28 


29 


SO 


APRIL 


AUGUST 


DECEMBER 1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


6 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


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8 


9 


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SO 










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29 


30 


31 











College Calendar 

SESSION OF 1945-46 



September 4-6 — Freshman Period: Fall Quarter begins. 

September 5 — Freshman Registration. 

September 6 — Registration of Upperclassmen. 

September 7 — Classes begin. 

September 8 — Annual Faculty Reception. 

September 9 — Opening Address of the President. 

October 15 — Subject for Senior Essay due. 

October 20 — Sophomore-Freshman Reception. 

November 21 — Fall Quarter ends. 

Nov 21, noon-Nov. 25 — Fail Holidays. 

November 26 — Winter Quarter opens. 

December 1 — Comprehensive Examination or First Draft of Senior Essay Com- 
pleted. 

December 1 — Senior- Junior Party. 

December 9 — Elon College Singers present Christmas Program. 

Dec. 14, noon- Jan. 1 — Christmas Holidays. 

January 2 — Classes resume, 8 :00 A. M. . 

January 26 — Freshman-Sophomore Party. 

February 9 — ^Mid-Year Alumni Meeting. 

February 12 — ^Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Febriiary 15 — Senior Essay Completed. 

March 1 — Senior Essay Examination Completed. 

March 1 — Winter Quarter ends. 

Mar.l, noon-Mar. 10 — ^Spring Holidays. 

March 11 — Spring Quarter begins. 

March 16 — Senior Party given by President and Mrs. L. E. Smith. 

April 26 — Deadline for Comprehensive or Senior Essay Examination. 

April 26 — Junior-Senior Dinner. 

May 4 — May Day Exercises. 

May 22-24 — Examinations. 

May 25-28 — Commencement Exercises. 

May 28 — ^Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Jxme 3 — Summer School begins. 



Board of Trustees 



Leon Edgar Smith, D. D., President, ex officio Elon College, N. C. 

Dr. W. H. Boone, Chairman Durham, N. C 

Stanley C. Harrell, Secretary Durham, N. C. 

Charles Apel, Business Manager Elon College, N. C. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1946 

W. H. Boone, M. D Durham, N. C. 

J. A. Kimball Manson, N. C. 

Thad Eure Raleigh, N. C. 

Russell J. Clinchy, D. D Hartford, Conn. 

Clyde R. Gordon Birrlington, N. C. 

C. W. McPherson, M. D Burlington, N. C. 

W. B. Truitt Greensboro, N. C. 

J. H. Lightbourne, D. D Providence, R. I. 

B. D. Jones, Jr., M. D Norfolk, Va. 

J. A. Vaughan New York, N. Y. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1948 

H. Shelton Smith, Ph. D Durham, N. C. 

Harry K. Eversull, D. D Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mrs. Russell T. Bradford Suffolk, Va. 

Miss Susie Holland Suffolk, Va. 

D. R. Fonville Burlington, N. C. 

J, H. McEwen Burlington, N. C. 

John L. Farmer Wilson, N. C. 

V. R. Holt Burlington, N. C. 

Miles H. Krumbine, D. D Cleveland, Ohio 

R. A. Maynard Burlington, N. C. 

W. W. Sellars Burlington, N. C. 

Philip Suffern New York, N. Y. 

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1950 

J. E. West Suffolk, Va. 

L. L. Vaughan Raleigh, N. C. 

S. C. Harrell, D. D Durham, N. C. 

C. D. Johnston Elon College, N. C. 

L. E. Carlton Paces, Va. 

F. L. Fagley, D. D New York, N. Y. 

W. J. Ballentine Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

O. F. Smith Norfolk, Va. 

W. C. Elder Burlington, N. C. 

Harold Johnson Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Mrs. W. V. Leathers Suffolk, Va. 

J. F. English, D. D Hartford, Conn. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

L. E. Smith, C. W. McPherson, W. H. Boone, S. C. Harrell, L. L. Vaughan, 

Clyde R. Gordon and J. H. McEwen. 



The Faculty 



LEON EDGAR SMITH 

President 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Princeton University; D. D., Elon College; 

LL. D., Marietta College 

DANIEL J. BOWDEN 

Dean, Head of the Department of Philosophy and Religion 

B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; B. D., Ph. D., Yale University 

MARY L PHARES 

Dean of Women, Head of the Department of Education 

B. A., Iowa State Teachers College; M. A., Ph. D., State University of Iowa 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK 

Registrar, Professor of Physics 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M. S., Cornell University; Additional 

Graduate Work: Johns Hopkins University, University of 

Chicago, Duke University 

L. B. AD COX 

Assistant Director of Physical Education 

B. S., Davidson College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

JOHN WILLIS BARNEY 

Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Elon College; Graduate Work: Columbia University, University of 

Virginia, University of North Carolina 

INIRS. CLARA H. BARTLEY 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B. S., Miami University; M. A. University of INIichigan; 

Ph. D., University of Kansas 

IRVING D. BARTLEY - ' 

Head of the Department of Music 

B. Mus., M. Mus., Syracuse University; Diploma in Piano, Diploma 

in Organ, New England Conservatory 

NINA ALICE BOWMER 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B. S., M. A., University of Kentucky 

NED FAUCETTE BRANNOCK 

Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., M. A., Elon College; M. S., Columbia University; Litt. D., Defiance 

College; Additional Graduate Work: Jolins Hopkins 

University, University of North Carolina 



8 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

WILSIE FLORENCE BUSSELL 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

A. B., M. A., Duke University; Graduate Work, Duke University, 

Pennsylvania State College, Alliance Francaise in Paris, 

Middleburg College 

(On Leave) 

JOHN A. CLARKE 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A. B., Hampden-Sydney College; M. A., University of Virginia; 

Ph. D., Columbia University 

(On Leave) 

PATTIE LEE COGHILL 

Instructor in Christian Education 

A. B., Elon College; Grad\iate Work 

THEO DALTON 

Associate Professor of Education 

Diploma, Troy Teachers College; B. S., University of Alabama; M. Ed., 

Duke University; Ph. D. (to be conferred June, 1945), 

George Peabody College for Teachers 

MERTON B. FRENCH 

Associate Professor of Religion and Greek 

A. B., Washburn College; M. A., Ph. D., Brown University 

MRS. JAMES GEROW 

Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., Meredith College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

HOWARD S. GRAVETT 

Professor of Biology 

A. B., James Millikin University; M. A., Ph. D., University of Illinois 

(On Leave) 

HANS E. HTRSCH 

Associate Professor of History 

Hoehere Reifepruefimg Realgymnasium Mannheim, University of 

Frankfort-on-the-Main, University of Heidelberg, University 

of Vienna, Ph. D., University of Munich 

MRS. VERA C. HIRSCH 

Assistant Professor of French and Gerrtian 

L'Ecole Francaise Girard, St. Petersburg (Russia), (B. A.) Gedda Gymnasium, 

St. Petersburg (Russia), Alliance Francaise in Paris, Studies at 

University of Paris (Sorbonne), Paris (France), University 

of Munich, Certificate of The German Academy, Munich 

VIOLET HOFFMAN 

Instructor in Commercial Department 

A.B., Elon College 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER \ 

MRS. OMA U. JOHNSON 

Librarian 

Ph. B., A. B., Elon College; B. S., Columbia University 

ANNE McCLENNY 

Instructor in Music 
A. B., Hollins College 

CHARLES R. McCLURE 

Associate Professor of English 

B. A., Maryville College; M. A., Ohio State University; Graduate 

Work: Indiana University 

FLETCHER MOORE 

Instructor in Piano and Organ 

A. B., Elon College ; M. A., Columbia University ; JuUiard School of Music 

Piano Student of Sascha Gorodnitzki and Guy Maier 

(On Leave) 

LIDA MUSE 

Instructor in Home Economics 

B. S., University of Tennessee; M. A., Columbia University 

LILA CLARE NEWMAN 

Instructor in Art 

Ph. B., Elon College; Graduate Work: Columbia University and 

Harvard University 

J. L. PIERCE 

Director of Physical Education 

A. B., High Point College; M. A., University of North Carolina 

(On Leave) 

E. F. RHODES 

Director of College Band 

Shenandoah College; A. B., Elon College 

HAROLD SCHULTZ 

Associate Professor of History 

A. B., Columbia University; M. A., Ph. D., Duke University 

(On Leave) 

MRS. L. E. SMITH, Jr. 

Instructor in Dratnatics 

(Part Time) 

Irvine Studio for the Theatre, New York City. 

AUSTIN DEAVER SPRAGUE 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Miami University; M. Sc, Ph. D., Ohio State University 



10 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



JAMES H. STEWART 
Instructor in Business Administration ^ 
A. B., Transylvania College; M. A., University of Kentucky 
(On Leave) 

JOHN WESTMORELAND 

Instructor in Piano 

(Part Time) 

A. B., Elon College; M. A., Columbia University; Graduate Work: 

Julliard School of Music 

MARGARET H. WHITTINGTON 

Instructor in Voice 

B. S. in Music, Meredith College; M. A. in Music, University of Michigan; 

Graduate Work: Julliard School of Music 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

LEON EDGAR SMITH, A. B., M. A., D. D., LL. D., President. j 

DANIEL J. BOWDEN. B. S., B. D., Ph. D., Dean of the College, Dean of Men, i 

MARY L. PHARES, B. A., M. A., Ph. D., Dean of Women. * 

ALONZO LOHR HOOK, A. B., B. S., M. A., M. S., Registrar. 

CHARLES E. APEL, A. B., B. S., M.S., Business Manager. 

GEORGE D. COLCLOUGH, A. B., Director of Public Relations and Alumni 

Secretary. 
EFFIE KENDRICK, Dietitian. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Administrative — Bowden, Phares, Apel, French, Hook. 

Alumni Cooperation — Hook, Brannock, Colclough. 

Athletics — McClure, Adcox, Hook, Apel. 

Admissio7i and Credits — Hook, Bowden, Phares. 

Chapel — French, Mr. Bartley, Muse, Whittington. 

Curriculum — Bowden, Hook, McClure, French, Phares. 

Debate — French, Mrs. Hirsch, McClure, Johnson, Barney. 

Dramatics — McClure, Muse, Mrs. Bartley, Mrs. Smith, Jr., Westmoreland. 

Honors — Hook, McClure, Bowden, Brannock. 

Library — Johnson, French, Mr. Hirsch, Mrs. Bartley, Hoffman. 

Music Organizations — Mr. Bartley, Whittington, ]\Ir. Hirsch, McClenny, West- 
moreland. 

Practice School — Bowden, Dalton, Phares, Mrs. Bartley. 

Public Entertainment — McClure, Phares, Hook, Newman. 

Religious Organizations — Bowden, French, Barney, Whittington, Bowmer. 

Social Clubs — Phares, Hook, Adcox, Bowden, McClenny. 

Student Employment — Colclough, Apel, Mrs. Smith, Sr., Johnson, Mr. Hirsch. 

Student Loans and Scholarships — Colclough, Apel, Johnson, Bowden. 

Student Publications — McClure, McClenny, Hook, Hoffman, Bowmer. 

Joint Student and Faculty Committee — Bowden, Phares, French, Hook, Mrs. 
Bartley. 



Catalogue of Elon College 

The purpose of this Catalogue is to set forth concisely the 
principles involved in progressive education, as contained in 
the curriculum of Elon College. Parents and students v^ill 
find these principles both interesting and stimulating, and are 
invited to examine the same carefully. 

The Church College. — Elon College is a church institu- 
tion, supported by the Congregational Christian Church for 
the specific purpose of training young men and young women 
under moral and religious influences. It is not the purpose 
of the College to change or uproot honest faith in any heart, 
but to afford to every individual opportunities for moral de- 
velopment and spiritual advancement. The Church under 
v\^hose auspices Elon College w^as founded and has been 
maintained has always believed in Christianity as the way 
of life, not as a system of theology or a body of doctrine. 
The College feels that Christianity is the basis for the student's 
way of life at Elon and in the years to come. The College 
seeks through education and example to preserve and develop 
religious values as a means of developing Christian character 
and safeguarding civilization. 

The Progressive College. — As a progressive college, Elon 
believes that education is a process of learning through ex- 
periences, and that these experiences should be not only intel- 
lectual, but emotional, religious and social. Directed oppor- 
tunities are therefore given students to gain a human under- 
standing of books, themselves, other people, and their God. 

The Small College. — Elon College feels strongly that there 
are distinct advantages to the student in the small college 
environment. There is a solidarity of interests among faculty 
and students, a group unity, which would not be as possible 
with large numbers. Everyone knows everyone else, and a 
friendly, democratic spirit is made possible. Individualized 



12 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

instruction, personal interest and understanding on the part 
of teachers and students, and a genuine spirit of Christian 
cooperation characterize Hfe at Elon College. 

College life at Elon is wholesome and invigorating. The 
students are not extravagant in their living, and the cost of 
education is reasonable. There are opportunities for self- 
help, affording students with limited means jobs that will pay 
part of their expenses. These grants are limited in number. 

ADMINISTRATION 

To carry out the educational philosophy of the College, 
there is an administrative organization. 

Board of Trustees. — The Board of Trustees is the final 
authority in the disposition of all matters of government and 
administration. , 

President — The President is the resident agent of the 
Board and is responsible for administrative policies and plans 
for the advancement of the College. He is assisted by the 
Faculty of which body he is chairman, and, in monthly meet- 
ings with the Faculty, discusses and acts upon the manifold 
problems of administration. 

The Faculty. — The Faculty is a democratic body, and in 
meetings acts upon legislative measures pertaining to the cur- 
riculum. It also passes upon the reports and recommendations 
of Faculty committees, through which groups much of the 
detail of educational research and planning is done. These 
committees also act administratively for the Faculty in the 
interim between its sessions, but have no legislative authority. 

Dean. — The Dean of the College is responsible for the 
administration of the curriculum, regulates attendance at 
classes, chapel and other religious services, and is in charge of 
the character-building and guidance programs for the men 
of the College. He is the adviser of the Student Senate. He 
also represents the President when the latter is out of town. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER J3 

Dean of Women. — The Dean of Women is responsible 
for the supervision of the women's dormitories, and must be 
consulted for permissions to leave the campus. She resides 
on the campus and is in charge of the character-building pro- 
gram for the women of the College. She is adviser of the 
Women's Council. 

The two Deans, in cooperation with the President, have 
jurisdiction over the social functions of the College, and the 
officers of Student Government confer with these officials for 
advice regarding these functions. 

Business Manager. — The Business Manager carries out the 
business and financial policies of the College as directed by 
the Board of Trustees. All business contracts must have his 
endorsement before they are bindiag on the College. He is 
the purchasing agent for all branches of the College, and is 
custodian of all its assets and properties. He is also general 
manager of all student self-help work done on the campus, 
and of all college service departments. 

Student Government. — This important branch of college 
government was granted its first constitution by the Faculty 
in 1919, and has since that time successfully operated through 
the men's Senate and later also through the women's Council. 
These constitutions, together with the by-laws of the two or- 
ganizations, are printed in the Elon Student Handbook. 

Registrar. — The Registrar of the College receives all ap- 
plications for entrance, and keeps the academic records of all 
students. He has charge of admissions, transcripts of records, 
grades, and other statistical data. 

THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 

The Location. — Elon College is located sixty-four miles 
west of Raleigh, seventeen miles east of Greensboro, and four 
miles west of Burlington, on the North Carolina division of 
the Southern Railway. The railroad is the southern boundary 



14 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

of the campus, and it commands a view of die college build- 
ings. State Highway No. 100 is the northern boundary. 

Six mail and passenger trains pass the College daily. 
The short line of the Carolina Coach Company passes the 
College and affords bus accommodations to the students to 
all parts of the country. 

The Campus. — The College Campus presents a most 
beautiful and attractive appearance. It is spacious and, for 
the most part, is covered by stalwart native oak and hickory. 
Shrubbery has been placed on the campus where such ad- 
ditions would add to the beauty and attractiveness of the 
grounds. The concrete walks and driveways add to its native 
beauty and charm. Its very atmosphere is a contribution to 
the development of manhood and womanhood. The massive 
brick wall surrounding the campus lends dignity as well as 
protection and quietude. 

The Climate. — Climatic conditions are unusually favorable 
to the mental and physical development of the Elon student. 
At all seasons of the year the temperature is moderate, with 
an annual average of about 60 degrees. The winter season is 
usually short and the fall and spring seasons long and pleas- 
ant. The health of the student is thus naturally safeguarded, 
and there is abundant opportunity for the beneficial effects of 
much time spent out of doors in an atmosphere neither ener- 
vating nor forbidding. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Elon College has been accurately described by an official 
of the American Association of Colleges as "the best equip- 
ped small college in the country." Ten buildings thoroughly 
equipped for living and study, are on the campus; five, of 
comparatively recent construction, are modern in every detail. 
The Greater Elon Group 

These five, three story, fire-proof structures are construct- 
ed of brick and reinforced concrete, and all are identical in 
their colonial architectural design. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 15 

Alamance Building. — This is the administration building, 
and houses classrooms; administrative offices; the laboratories 
of the Business, Home Economics, mechanical Drawing, and 
Art Departments; and the College Bookstore. The citizens 
of Alamance County undertook to raise an amount necessary 
to erect and equip this building. 

Carlton Library. — This building, gift of Trustees P. J., 
H. A., and L. E. Carlton, and their sister, Mrs. T. S. Parrott, 
has a stack-room capacity for 187,500 volumes. The reading 
room has seating capacity for one hundred readers. Besides 
offices and w^ork room for the library force, the building 
contains fourteen professors' research and office rooms and 
seven students' seminar rooms. 

Whitley Memorial Auditorium. — In memory of his father- 
in-law, Mr. L. H. Whitley, Mr. J. M. Darden lent $50,000 to 
assist in the erection of this building. This money was repaid 
to Mr. Darden in full with interest. This building houses 
the large college auditorium, designed to seat 1,000 persons, 
and is used for chapel and church services, community gath- 
erings, lyceum performances, motion pictures and concerts. 
The Music Department is completely contained in the build- 
ing, with five studios, twenty-two practice rooms with upright 
pianos, a four-manual Skinner organ, an Estey practice organ, 
and several grand pianos. The most modern recording equip- 
ment is housed in the music department for the use of both 
students and faculty. The auditorium is also equipped with 
a professional motion picture projection apparatus, and on the 
stage is a projection screen and adequate lighting. The equip- 
ment of the building is outstanding. 

Mooney Christian Education Building. — In memory of 
his father-in-law. Rev. Isaac Mooney, Mr. M. Orban, Jr., gave 
this building to the college. The building is devoted to the 
religious and social activities of the college. At opposite ends 
of the building on the first floor are the Y. M. C. A. and Y. 
W. C. A. recreation rooms, which are used at present for din- 



16 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ing halls. The second floor provides assembly hall, classrooms, 
and oflEices for the Department of Philosophy and Religion. 
The assembly hall has a seating capacity of 400 and is ade- 
quately equipped for student dramatic performances. On 
the third floor is a unique feature, a completely graded Sun- 
day School plant used by the entire community. In the base- 
ment is a woodworking shop equipped with power tools. 

Duke Science Building. — In memory of their mother, 
Mrs. Artelia Roney Duke, a native of Alamance County, 
Messrs. }. B. and B. N. Duke donated $65,000.00 toward the 
erection of this modern, fire-proof building. The first floor 
is used by the Department of Physics and the Elon Press, the 
second by the Departments of Biology and Geology, the third 
by the Department of Chemistry. Each floor is fully equipped 
with modern scientific furniture and laboratory apparatus. 

Dormitories 

East Dormitory. — This is the only original building left 
on the campus. It is used as a dormitory for women, and is a 
three-story brick structure, completely overhauled and fitted 
up with all modern conveniences. 

Alumni Building. — This building, erected in 1912, is the 
gift of the alumni to Alma Mater. It is a three-story, brick 
structure, and is used as a dormitory for men, with a men's 
gymnasium on the first floor. 

West Dormitory. — This is a three-story brick building 
next to the Library, and measures 158 by 46 feet. On the 
second and third floors are modern accommodations for 120 
women students. The first floor contains a large reception 
hall, guest rooms and parlors, the infirmary, and living quar- 
ters for Faculty women. 

Ladies' Hall. — This is a two-story brick edifice, with ac- 
commodations for 64 women. The interior has recendy been 
renovated and modernized. 

Club House. — This is a one-story building, with accom- 
modations for eighteen men. 




ELON'S BUILDINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL AND WELL EQUIPPED 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 17 

South Dormitory. — Traditionally known as Publishing 
House, this building has been renovated, and is used as a 
dormitory for fifty men. 

Other Buildings 

West End Hall. — This is a fourteen-room dwelling, and 
is used as an apartment house for faculty members. 

Carlton House. — This is a nine-room house which is used 
for faculty apartments. 

Power Plant. — The power plant is the central station for 
heat, light, water and other service functions for the college 
buildings. Adjacent to the plant is a 50,000-gallon steel water 
tank with two deep wells of pure water. 

Special Equipment 

Athletic Field. — The Athletic field contains thirty-four 
acres located near the campus, and has adequate space for all 
sports. A new stadium is being erected. 

Visual Education Aids. — The projection booth of the Aud- 
itorium is equipped with two 35-millimeter sound-on-film 
projectors. These projectors have low intensity arc lamps and 
RCA sound-heads. This equipment is used weekly for edu- 
cational and entertainment purposes. Projection facilities are 
provided for film strips, glass slides, opaque projectors, and 
16-millimeter films. 

Elon Press. — Housed in the Science Building is the Elon 
Press, composed of an electrically-driven printing press, a 
linotype machine, fourteen complete fonts of Century and 
Cloister types, composing table, and adequate apparatus for 
the printing of student publications. 

Dramatic Stage. — The student stage in the Mooney Chris- 
tian Education Building has a proscenium opening of twenty- 
two feet and a depth of fifteen feet. Equipment includes a 
cyclorama, four mobile spot-Ughts, and other lighting appara- 
tus of modern design. Dressing rooms and a costume ward- 
robe are off the wings of the stage. 



18 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of Elon College is a constituent part of the 
history of the Christian Church in the Southeast. In 1794 
the Reverend James O'Kelly and a group of dissenters from 
Wesleyan Methodism, then spreading through the nation, met 
at Lebanon Church in Surry County, Virginia. This group 
agreed to found what was the first democratically governed 
church to arise on American soil. They named the church 
"Christian, to the exclusion of all party and sectarian names." 
They were interested in Christianity, not as a system of the- 
ology or a body of doctrines, but as a way of life. On this basis 
the Christian and Congregational Churches merged in 1929. 

It was on this basis, also, that Elon College in 1889 was 
founded and has been developed. Many church colleges were 
established in the nineteenth century; nearly every denom- 
ination had and still has a church college for the training of 
its own leadership and as its contribution to civilization. From 
the early beginning in North Carolina and Virginia there had 
been a demand on the part of the Christian Church that there 
be established a college for the denomination. The demand 
grew with the church, and in September, 1888, the Southern 
Convention met in extraordinary session in Old Providence 
Church, Graham, North Carolina, to hear the reports and 
recommendations of the Committee on Schools and Colleges. 

The Convention appointed a provisional Board for the 
proposed college, authorizing the Board to choose a site for 
the college and to make the necessary legal and financial trans- 
actions. The Board was composed of Dr. W. S. Long, Dr. }. 
Pressley Barrett, Hon. F. O. Moring, Col. J. H. Harden, and 
Dr. G. S. Watson. Dr. W. S. Long, a pioneer in higher edu- 
cation, opened a school in Graham in 1865, which developed 
into Graham Normal College, a forerunner of Elon College. 
Led by Dr. Long, the Board finally chose a site at a village 
then known as Mill Point, six miles from Graham. A tract 
of twenty-five acres of land at Mill Point was given by the 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 19 

Hon. W. H. Trolinger of Haw River. The citizens of Mill 
Point donated twenty-three acres additional, and four thou- 
sand dollars in cash. In consideration of these donations the 
college was located at Mill Point. 

The Provisional Board preferred other names, but owing 
to the predominance of stalwart oaks on the site, selected the 
name "Elon," the Hebrew word meaning oak. 

On March 11, 1889, Elon College was chartered and in- 
corporated by the General Assembly of the State of North 
Carolina. (Private Laws of North Carolina for 1889, chapter 
216, sections 1-12.) 

In keeping with the charter provisions, the original Board 
of Trustees numbered fifteen: W. S. Long, J. W. Wellons, W. 
W. Staley, G. S. Watson, M. L. Hurley, E. T. Pierce, W. J. 
Lee, P. J. Kernodle, J. F. West, E. E. Holland, E. A. Moffitt, 
J. M. Smith, J. H. Harden, F. O. Moring, and S. P. Read. 

According to this charter, the "said institution" of Elon 
College was to "remain at the place where the site is now 
located, in Alamance County, Boone Station Township, at 
the place now called Mill Point" The purpose of the college 
was to "afford instruction in the liberal arts and sciences." 

Dr. Long was elected president of the college, and six ad- 
ditional members of the faculty were elected. Two buildings 
were erected on the site at Mill Point: the Administration 
Building, a large three-story, brick building that housed the 
library, laboratories, the administrative offices, society halls, 
and classrooms for all departments; and a dormitory for girls, 
still standing on the campus, and known as East Dormitory. 

After four years, Dr. Long was succeeded as president 
in 1893 by Dr. W. W. Staley, then the pastor of the Suffolk 
(Virginia) Christian Church, who served as non-resident pres- 
ident without salary. 

Upon Dr. Staley's resignation in 1905, Dr. E. L. Moffitt 
was elected to succeed him. Dr. Moffitt served six years, dur- 
ing which time two additional buildings were erected on the 
campus. A larger dormitory for women. West Dormitory, was 



20 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

built, and East Dormitory was given over to boys. In addition, 
the power house was erected, providing electric light and 
steam heat for the college buildings. 

In 1911, Dr. E. L. Moffitt resigned as president, and Dr. 
W. A. Harper, then a member of the faculty, was elected and 
began the longest term of office in the history of the college. 
In 1912, a larger boys' dormitory and gymnasium combined 
was built and financed through the generosity of Elon Alumni. 
It is properly known as the Alumni Building. 

In 1913, Ladies' Hall was erected to take care of an in- 
creased enrollment of girls. 

During the period of America's participation in the World 
War, regular enrollment at Elon showed no decline. More- 
over, a contingent of the S. A. T. C. was stationed at Elon, 
which temporarily greatly increased the student population. 

In January, 1923, the Administration Building was de- 
stroyed by fire, and students and faculty carried on as best they 
could with improvised classrooms and equipment. Out of 
the ashes of the old building rose a great rebuilding program, 
to be undertaken in terms of the growth and development of 
the college. Facilities had for several years been inadequate, 
and the destruction of the central building made this program 
of reconstruction imperative. 

With the onset of the depression of 1929-33, the heavy 
mortgages and a decreased enrollment combined to bring hard 
times upon Elon. Following Dr. Harper's resignation in June, 
1931, the College was without a president until October o£ 
that year, and there was grave doubt as to whether Elon would 
be able to open its doors to students in the fall of 1931. At 
this desperate moment, the Board of Trustees elected as pres- 
ident Dr. L. E. Smith, then pastor of the Christian Temple 
of Norfolk, Virginia. 

Dr. Smith has been successful in raising funds to pay the 
debts of Elon College and to increase the number of students 
in attendance. Elon College has a bright future, and with 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 21 

the interest manifested by its Alumni, members of the Chris- 
tian Church, and friends, it will continue to grow and to 
render a greater service. 

ENDOWMENT AND SOURCES OF INCOME 

Tuition and Fees. — The income from tuition in the lit- 
erary and special departments and from fees, matriculation 
and departmental, constitutes a chief and growing source of 
revenue to pay the incidental expenses of the College and of 
the departments. Besides these sources of income and gifts 
from time to time on current expenses, the College has the 
following sources of revenue: 

The O. J. Wait Fund. — This fund was a bequest from Rev. 
O. J. Wait, D. D., of Fall River, Massachusetts. The amount, 
$1,000.00, was the first bequest that came to the College. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Fund. — Of this fund $20,- 
000.00 was given by Mr. Francis Asbury Palmer of New York, 
before his death. The remaining ten thousand dollars, having 
been provided for in his will, became available after his death. 

The J. J. Summerbell Fund. — Dr. J. J. Summerbell, Day- 
ton, Ohio, from its foundation a staunch friend and loyal 
supporter of the College, departed life February 28, 1913, and 
left a bequest of $1,500.00 to Elon. 

The Patrick Henry Lee Fund.— This fund of $1,000.00 is 
a bequest from Capt. P. H. Lee, of Holland, Va. ' 

The Jesse Winbourne Fund. — This fund, a bequest from 
Deacon Jesse Winbourne, of Elon College, N. C, amounting 
to $5,000.00, became available in January, 1923. It is a part 
of the permanent endowment funds of the College. 

The Southern Convention Fund. — The Southern Conven- 
tion of Congregational Christian Churches asks the confer- 
ences composing the Convention for $12,500.00 annually for 
the support of the College. This is called the Elon College 
Fund, and is the equivalent of an invested endowment of 



22 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

$250,000.00 at 5 per cent. By vote of the Convention in May, 
1918, a note was given the College for $112,500.00, and later, 
$100,000.00 in 6 per cent bonds, as evidence of this obligation. 

The Carlton Fund —The family of the late J. W. Carlton, 
of Richmond, Va., P. J. Carlton, H. A. Carlton, L. E. Carlton 
and Mrs. T. S. Parrott, gave the College for its permanent 
funds, certain R. F. and P. Railvv^ay stocks, to found a profes- 
sorship in Christian Literature and Methods in memory of 
Mrs. J. W. Carlton. Upon his death, in May, 1935, Mr. P. J. 
Carlton left a bequest adding $25,000.00 to the College en- 
dowment. 

The Corwith Fund. — W. F. Corwith, a former trustee, 
has given the College for its permanent funds $35,000.00 to 
found a Professorship in Biblical Languages and Literature, 
in memory of Mrs. W. F. Corwith. 

The J. W. Wellons Fund— Dr. J. W. Wellons, several 
years before his death, bought two annuity bonds of the Col- 
lege in the sum of $1,500.00. By terms of the bonds, at his 
decease they were cancelled and the principal became a part 
of the general endowment of the College. Dr. Wellons desired 
that the Church supplement his gift, providing an endowment 
of $300,000.00 for the School of Christian Education. 

Other Invested Funds. — Other gifts to the permanent 
Endowment Fund are: One of $25.00 from the late Rev. J. J. 
Summerbell, D. D., of Dayton, Ohio; one of $283.35 from 
the estate of the late Jos. A. Foster of Semora, N. C; one of 
$50.00 by Miss Mamie Tate, as a student loan fund; and one 
of $100.00 to be kept at interest for a term of years, left by the 
late Rev. S. B. Klapp. 

The Francis Asbury Palmer Board Donations. — The late 
Francis Asbury Palmer, who endowed the College, left his 
estate to a Board to be administered in furthering education. 
This Board at one time made a considerable donation in cash 
for current expenses. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 23 

The Elon College Foundation, Inc., with offices at Elon 
College, has been created for the purpose of providing finan- 
cial assistance for the entire program of education at Elon 
College. J. H. McEwen, Julian Price, Thad Eure, O. F. Smith, 
Garland Gray, William E. Wisseman, Darden Jones, S. T. 
Holland, J. Dolph Long, W. C. Elder, W. H. Boone, Leslie 
R. Rounds, W. H. Scott, R. S. Dickson and L. E. Smith have 
been elected as directors of the Foundation. J. H. McEwen is 
president; Julian Price, vice-president, and Thad Eure, secre- 
tary-treasurer. O. F. Smith, S. T. Holland, W. C. Elder and 
J. Dolph Long together with the officers constitute the execu- 
tive committee. The directors will expend all funds received 
in interest of Elon College. Contributions should be forward- 
ed to Thad Eure, secretary-treasurer, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Forms of Bequest. — A number of friends have made pro- 
vision for the College in the disposition of their property after 
their decease. We appreciate this generous action on their part 
and commend it to the liberal-hearted of our friends, for whose 
convenience we append herewith three forms of bequests: 

FIRST FORM 
I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 

sum of Dollars, to be applied at 

their discretion, for the general purposes of the College. 

SECOND FORM 

I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely in- 
vested by them and called the Scholarship 

Fund. The interest of this fund shall be applied at their discretion 
to aid deserving students. 

THIRD FORM 

I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of Elon College the 
sum of Dollars to be safely invest- 
ed by them as an endowment for the support of the College. 

Annuity Bonds. — Those desiring a stable income on funds 
they intend to leave the College in their wills, can secure the 
same by placing such funds with the College treasurer and 
receiving an annuity bond. Generous-hearted friends, desir- 



24 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ing a safe investment of their funds and a sure means of per- 
petuating their memory to generations yet unborn, may avail 
themselves of this privilege. Full particulars may be obtained 
by writing the president of the College. So far five annuity 
bonds have been taken: tvs^o by the late Dr. J. W. Wellons, in 
the sum of $1,500; one by Trustee A. B. Farmer, in the sum 
of $1,000; one by Mrs J. P. Avent, also for $1,000; and a fifth 
by Mrs. Esther Jenkins, in the sum of $3,000. 

Insurance Policies. — Friends may make the College their 
beneficiary in one or more insurance policies. Details of this 
plan will also be gladly furnished, upon request 

ANNUAL EVENTS 

• 

Certain annual events at the College have become Elon 
traditions, and are anticipated with great pleasure by the stu- 
dents and faculty. 

Faculty Reception. — The Faculty gives a formal reception 
to the students on the first Saturday evening after the College 
opens in September. 

Senior Party. — The President and his wife are accustomed 
to giving an annual party for the Senior class. 

Lyceum Entertainments. — The Faculty committee on Pub- 
lic Entertainments each year schedules a series of concerts, re- 
citals, plays or lectures by distinguished artists of national 
reputation. These performances are scheduled throughout the 
year and are open to all Elon students upon payment of their 
Activity Fee. These programs are also available to the general 
public upon subscription to the series. Such artists as Nino 
Martini, Helen Jepson and Albert Spaulding have appeared. 

Players' Evenings. — At least three times during the year, 
public performances of full-length plays are given by the Elon 
Players. 

"The Messiah." — Shortly before the beginning of the 
Christmas holidays, the Elon Festival Chorus presents Handel's 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 25 

oratorio, "The Messiah." It is presented in Whitley Memorial 
Auditorium by candlelight. 

College Recitals. — Members of the Faculty of the Music 
Department and advanced students in Music each year give a 
series of recitals in Whitley Memorial Auditorium. 

Art Exhibit — The Art Department gives an annual exhibit 
of student work. 

Commencement — This final event of the year begins on 
Saturday before the fourth Sunday in May. Commencement 
exercises include the Baccalaureate Sermon, the av^arding of 
academic and honorary degrees and distinctions, and a com- 
mencement address by some noted person. Immediately after 
the close of commencement exercises, the Board of Trustees 
meets in final session. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Community Church.~The Community Church is 
made up of students, faculty members and residents of the 
tov^'n. Church services are held each Sunday in the Whidcy 
Memorial Auditorium. The pastor of the church is Dr. L. E. 
Smith, President of the college. Ministers from other churches 
and denominations are frequently invited to occupy the college 
pulpit. 

The Church School. — ^The Community Church, together 
with the College, maintains a church school. 

Student Christian Association. — The Student Christian As- 
sociation is responsible for student religious activities on the 
campus. Among these activities are included the Sunday even- 
ing Vesper Services in which students and outside speakers par- 
ticipate. Student Sunday School in which International Sunday 
school lesson, current social problems, and other subjects are 
considered, morning prayer service, social service in the com- 
munity and occasional socials on the campus. The association 
functions primarily through committees, but includes within 
its membership more than half of the student body, students 



26 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

pledging themselves to foster Christian principles in the cam- 
pus life. 

Ministerial Association. — The Ministerial Association com- 
prises the members of the student body who intend to enter the 
Christian ministry, religious education, social service, or med- 
ical missions. Meetings of this group are held w^eekly, in 
which discussion and practice-preaching are utilized to help 
prepare the prospective minister for his profession. 

The Elon Singers. — ^This is a mixed chorus of students, or- 
ganized for two purposes: as the College Choir it regularly 
furnishes the music for the weekday chapel services and Sunday 
morning services of the Community Church; as the Elon Sing- 
ers it presents concerts of sacred and secular music at the 
College and in various communities in North Carolina 
and adjoining states. 

Elon Band. — ^This colorful organization, equipped with 
uniforms in the college colors, supplies music for various func- 
tions at the college. Training is given to all students who own 
or can play band instruments. 

Elon Players. — Several groups of students, interested in 
active participation in the writing and production of plays, 
combine to form the larger group called Elon Players. The 
class in Shakespeare each year produces a Shakespeare play. 
The class in Dramatic Literature writes its own plays and 
produces them for invited audiences as well as producing for 
the public plays by modern dramatists. Other groups, not 
members of these classes, produce plays from time to time. 
The Players constitute a chapter of the National Dramatic 
Fraternity, Delta Psi Omega. They are also members of the 
North Carolina Dramatic Association, and take part in its 
activities. 

Social Science Honorary Society. — This is the Alpha Chap- 
ter in North Carolina of Pi Gamma Mu, the National Social 
Science Honor Society. The purpose of the organization is to 
give recognition to those students and faculty members who 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 27 

have attained distinction in the fields of Social Sciences. Elec- 
tions are held in the fall and spring, at which time Seniors and 
others who are eligible are received into membership in the 
society. 

Social Clubs. — Under supervision of their faculty advisers 
and with regulations as provided in the Elon Student Hand- 
book, the social clubs are recognized as follows: 

For men: Alpha Pi Delta; Iota Tau Kappa; Kappa Psi 
Nu; Sigma Phi Beta. 

For women: Beta Omicron Beta; Delta Upsilon Kappa; 
Tau Zeta Phi; Pi Kappa Tau. 

The Elon Debaters. — This organization is a member of 
the North Carolina Inter-Collegiate Debating Association, and 
makes a number of trips each year to debate at tournaments 
with other college teams. Current economic and social prob- 
lems are subjects of their debates. 

Maroon and Gold. — ^The publication of the college news- 
paper, "Maroon and Gold," is undertaken by the college class 
in Journalism. This group serves as the editorial staff and also 
sees the paper through the Elon Press. The headquarters of 
the Elon journalists is in the Printing Room of the Duke 
Science Building. The newspaper appears at least once every 
two weeks during the college year. This publication is a 
member of the North Carolina Collegiate Press Association 
and of the Associated Collegiate Press. Students who are not 
members of the course in Journalism may write for the paper 
as an extra-curricular activity. 

Elon Colonnades. — This is the college literary magazine. 
It is written and printed at least twice each year by students 
interested in creative expression, both verse and prose. The 
magazine, in being completely the literary production and 
press work of students, is unique among college magazines 
in North Carolina. 

PhiPsiCli. — PhiPsiCli is the college annual, edited by 
members of the Senior class. The name commemorates the 



28 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

three erstwhile "literary societies" of the college. First pub- 
lished in 1913, this annual now ranks high in the college field. 

Elon Student Handbook. — The Handbook is a manual 
for Student Government and contains the constitutions and 
by-laws of the Senate and the Women's Council, as well as 
information needed by entering students. A copy of the 
Handbook is furnished to each student upon registration and 
is the basis for the learning process during the Orientation 
Period. 

Class Organizations. — Each of the four classes has its own 
organization, and each year elects its officers and representa- 
tives to the student government. The Freshman class organ- 
izes on the first Tuesday in October. Each class selects some 
member of the faculty other than the President or Deans as 
its adviser. 

The "E" Men's Club. — This is the varsity athletic organ- 
ization and includes every student who has been awarded an 
"E" for participation in inter-collegiate athletics. 

Business Administrators. — Business majors of Sophomore 
level and above are eligible for membership in the Business 
Administrators Club. It is the purpose of the Club to make 
the students' business training as practical as possible by spon- 
soring talks by business men and by arranging visits to in- 
dustrial plants and business offices. Through these contacts 
the students receive helpful vocational guidance, and their 
understanding of business and industrial activity is deepened. 

Commercial Club. — The Commercial Club functions for 
the benefit of Secretarial students taking one- or two-year 
Secretarial courses. The purpose of the club is twofold. First, 
it assists in creating a business atmosphere in the classroom by 
sponsoring demonstrations of up-to-date office equipment and 
by making contacts with outside business organizations for 
the privilege of inspection trips and lectures from members of 
those organizations. Second, the club provides a means for 
social contacts among the students within the department. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 29 

French Club. — The French Club is composed of a group 
of interested students who meet twice a month to enjoy con- 
versation, group singing, games, short plays, and informal dis- 
cussions in French. 

German Club. — A voluntary and informal organization of 
advanced students in German. At the meetings the time is 
spent in German conversation on different subjects, in playing 
games (with view of developing and building up the vocabu- 
lary) and in singing German songs, thus stimulating and pro- 
moting a deeper and more thorough understanding of the 
cultural and human background of German civilization. 

The Education Club. — The primary object of this club is 
to promote a professional attitude on the part of student 
teachers, to bring outstanding educators to the campus, and 
to visit schools to see the actual operation of educational pro- 
cedures. 

Literary Societies. — The Dr. Johnson Literary Society for 
young men and the Panvio Literary Society for young women 
provide opportunity for the training and guidance in thinking 
and speaking, and in parliamentary proceedings. 

BUSINESS OFFICE INFORMATION 

Student Expenses 

The college session is divided into three quarters, the Fall 
Quarter beginning in September, the Winter Quarter begin- 
ning in late November, and the Spring Quarter beginning in 
early March. Charges are payable in advance by the quarter 
at the time of registration. Tuition and fees are not refunded 
in case of withdrawal from the college except in cases of 
protracted illness and on competent medical advice. Charges 
for room and board will be made for the quarter enrolled 
and refunds made on a pro-rata basis for room and board 
provided the student checks out through the business office. 
No reductions are made in board charges for absences of less 
than two full consecutive weeks. 



30 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Itemized expenses per College Quarter are as follows: 

Tuition $ 25.00 

Matriculation Fee 26.50 

Library Fee 1.50 

Athletic Fee 2.00 

Student Activities Fee 5.00 

*Room Rent 20.00 

tMeals 75.00 

ITotal $ 155.00 

Day student charges are $60.00 per quarter plus charges 
for any laboratory fees or special courses. 

The College Dining HalL — All dormitory students are 
required to take their meals in the College Dining Hall. The 
Dining Hall opens with the evening meal before the first 
day of freshman orientation and closes with the evening meal 
on Commencement Day. During vacation periods it closes 
with the evening meal of the last day of classes and opens 
with the evening meal on the day before classes are resumed 
after the vacation period. Ration books must be submitted at 
time of first registration. ' 

Room Accommodations. — All students are required to 
room in the dormitories unless they reside in the homes of 
their parents or of relatives. 

Two students occupy one room. Single beds are fur- 
nished in all dormitories. The college reserves the right to 
change rooms or a roommate of any student at any time, 
but no student is allowed to change rooms without permis- 
sion from the proper dean and the business office. 



*Room rent will vary from $20.00 to $27.00 per quarter depend- 
ing upon the room selected. 

t Subject to change without notice. 

^Laboratory fees and charges for special courses in Voice, Piano, 
Organ, Art, etc., are not included in this total. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 31 

Room rent per student per quarter in the college dorm- 
itories is as follows: 

For men: 

North Dormitory $ 20.00 

Club House 20.00 

South Dormitory 20.00 

For Women: 

East Dormitory $ 25.00 

West Dormitory 20.00 

Ladies Hall 20.00 

Note: Students occupying corner rooms pay $2.00 each per 
quarter extra. 

Room Registration and Breakage Fee. — A deposit of $5.00 
is paid by each boarding student when he places his applica- 
tion for admission to the college. This deposit is refunded at 
the close of the college year, less charges for any breakage and 
damage (other than ordinary wear from reasonable use) to 
the dormitory in which he is located or its furnishings. The 
costs of repairs for unnecessary damages are charged to the 
responsible individual if possible. If not, they are pro-rated 
among all students occupying the dormitory in which damage 
occurs. 

Commercial and Secretarial Courses. — When the full Sec- 
retarial or Commercial Course is taken, which includes Book- 
keeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, Business Arithmetic, Pen- 
manship, Filing, Office Methods, and Business English, the 
cost is the same as for any other regular course, with fees for 
Secretarial Courses 8 and 12 added. 

Music Courses. — The music courses for which extra fees 
are charged are Piano, Organ, Voice and Violin. All private 
lessons are an half-hour in length. In the case of these ap- 
plied music courses, refunds will be made on a pro-rata basis 
only when the student withdraws from college on account of 
illness. Under no other conditions will music tuition for 
private lessons be refunded. Fees are as follows: 



32 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Per Quarter. 

Piano, Organ, Voice (2 lessons a week) $ 30.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice (1 lesson a week) 18.00 

Practice Fee, Pipe Organ (6 hours a week) 11.00 

Practice Fee, Reed Pedal Organ (6 hours aweek) . 7.00 
Piano to Public School students (2 lessons a week). 18.00 
Piano to Public School students (1 lesson a week) . 10.00 
Piano to out-of-town Public School students (2 les- 
sons per week) 25.00 

Piano to out-of-town Public School students (1 les- 
son per week) 15.00 

Special Course and Laboratory Fees. — The following tu- 
ition and laboratory fees are for special courses, apply only to 
students taking these items, and are not included in the list of 
itemized expenses. In each instance the charge is per quarter: 

Per Quarter. 

Special Liberal Arts Courses (up to three), each. ...$ 15.00 
Additional Liberal Arts Courses (above regular 15 

hours), each 12.00 

Art— 

Fine Arts, full course 27.00 

Fine Arts, half course 15,00 

Industrial Art, if not taken fall quarter 15.00 

Lai) oratory Fees — 

Biology 11, 12, 31, 32, 42, 43, each 7.50 

Biology 21, 22, each 10.00 

Business Administration 21, 22, each 5.00 

Chemistry 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, each 5.00 

Home Economics 31, 32, 43, each 1.50 

Home Economics 11, 12, 13, 14, 34, each 5.00 

Home Economics 42 25.00 

Mathematics 14, 15, each 5.00 

Physics 11, 12, each 50 

Physics 13, 14, 21, 22, 31, 32, 3i, 34, each 5.00 

Practice Teaching fee 20.00 

Secretarial course 8 5.00 

Secretarial course 12 2.50 

Typewriting to non-commercial students 15.00 




PATHS OF OPPORTUNITY ABOUND AT ELON 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 33 

Electrical Appliance Fee. — The room rental includes cur- 
rent for one 60 watt lamp for each student. If additional 
lights are desired there will be a charge of $1.00 per light per 
quarter. A charge of |1.00 per quarter is made when a radio 
or any other electrical appliance is operated in a dormitory 
room provided the student voluntarily reports the use of same 
to the business office within ten days after entering. Failing 
to report to the business office within ten days means a pen- 
alty will be assessed for late reporting. No hot plates are 
allowed in dormitory rooms. 

Incidental and Miscellaneous Expenses. — Books are esti- 
mated to cost from $30.00 to $35.00 per year, about $15.00 
of which will be needed at the fall term opening. Books are 
sold at the Bookstore for cash only. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for any special test or examina- 
tion on a current course taken other than at the regular time. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for changing a course of study 
after the regular dates set for such changes. 

A fee of $1.00 per day, up to five days, is charged for late 
registration. After five days a straight fee of $5.00 is charged. 

After the first transcript of credits, a fee of $1.00 will be 
charged for each additional transcript requested. 

Work and Scholarship Credits. — Credit for scholarships, 
loans, or for work done, applies only on college expenses. 

What to Bring With You. — All students should bring pil- 
low, pillow cases, sheets, blankets, bed spreads, towels, bureau 
and table scarfs, toilet articles, and ration books. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Tuition Scholarships and Self-Help Positions. — The Pres- 
ident and the Scholarship Committee of the Faculty award 
all scholarships and self-help positions. No scholarship will be 
awarded to a high school graduate whose average has been less 
than "C," and all scholarships are awarded on the condition 



34 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

that the student will average not less than "C" in his college 
work. Self-help positions are awarded on the same basis, with 
occasional exceptions. Applications for awards should be in 
the hands of the Scholarship Committee before July L The at- 
tention of the applicant is called to the section on "Work and 
Scholarship Credits," on page 33 of this catalogue. 

Alumni Scholarship. — The Alumni Association, in session 
on June 1, 1909, established a scholarship in Elon College. 
This scholarship is awarded in the literary department, and is 
of value of $80.00 a year. 

High School Scholarships, Special. — The Board of Trus- 
tees offers a scholarship to one graduate of each high school 
of which an Elon graduate is principal or superintendent, or 
a teacher in high school work. Said scholarship is good for 
one year, and covers tuition in any liberal arts course. The 
condidate is to be satisfactorily recommended by the principal 
or superintendent and approved by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships. The number of such scholarships is limited to 
ten. 

High School Scholarships, General. — The Board of Trus- 
tees offers ten free tuition scholarships upon the recommenda- 
tion of the principals or superintendents of approved high 
schools, subject to the approval of the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships. 

Ministerial Students and Minor Children of Ministers. — 

Ministerial students and minor children of ministers, if said 
students live at the college, are granted scholarships to cover 
their regular tuition ($75.00). Day students taking the minis- 
terial course and minor children of ministers who are day 
students will pay one-half of the regular tuition charge. 

The Barrett Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. J. Pressley 
Barrett, an original trustee of the College, a free tuition schol- 
arship is awarded annually to some worthy member of the 
Freshman class. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 35 

The Long Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. S. Long, 
founder and first president of the College, a free tuition schol- 
arship is awarded annually to some worthy member of the 
Freshman class. 

The Staley Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. W. Staley, 
second president of the College, a free tuition scholarship is 
awarded annually to some worthy member of the Freshman 
class. 

The Moffitt Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. E. L. Moffitt, 
third president of the College, a free tuition scholarship is 
awarded annually to some worthy member of the Freshman 
class. 

The Harper Scholarship. — In memory of Dr. W. A. Har- 
per, fourth president of the College, a free tuition scholarship is 
awarded annually to some worthy member of the Freshman 
class. 

The Martyn Summerbell Scholarship. — Dr. Martyn Sum- 
merbell of Lakemont, N. Y,, each year awards a free tuition 
scholarship to some worthy member of the Freshman class. 

LOAN FUNDS 

The Trolinger Memorial Foundation. — The William H. 
Trolinger and John A. Trolinger Memorial Foundation has 
been established at Elon College by Mrs. Isla Stratford May, 
William H. Stratford, John B. Stratford, Park C. Stratford, 
and Robert E. Stratford, children of the late William O. and 
Bessie Trolinger Stratford, in memory of their grandfather 
and uncle, for the benefit of the College and worthy students 
of Alamance County who may attend Elon College. D. R. 
Fonville, John B. Stratford and L. E. Smith constitute the 
committee in charge. Income from the fund to be used at 
the discretion of the committee in interest of applicants. 

The Bowling Fund. — Dr. E. H. Bowling, Durham, N. C, 
has created a fund to be used in the education of deserving 



36 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

students, preferably candidates for the ministry. Those who 
are accepted as beneficiaries of this fund will receive $60.00 per 
year to be applied to their account with the College. They will 
give an interest-bearing note at 6 per cent for the same, with 
acceptable security, and will begin to pay the money back, 
at least one note a year, immediately after graduation. The 
title of this fund will remain in the College, but it is to be 
perpetually used for the purpose indicated. Awards of funds 
are made by the President. 

The Amick Fund. — Dr. T. C. Amick, formerly of the 
College Faculty, has created a fund to be loaned to deserving 
students at 6 per cent interest. The President lends this fund 
on proper security. 

The Clarke Fund.— Dr. J. A. Clarke, formerly of the Col- 
lege Faculty, has created a loan fund for deserving students. 
The Business Manager lends this at 6 per cent interest on 
proper security. 

The Helen Martin Parkerson Loan Fund. — Mrs. Helen 
Cannon has established at Elon College a memorial for her 
mother, Mrs. Helen Martin Parkerson. The memorial con- 
sists of a loan fund for deserving students of the Business De- 
partment. From this fund a loan of $75.00 is obtainable an- 
nually. 

The Ministerial Loan Fund. — The treasurer of the College 
is the custodian for the loan fund of $13,031.49 of the Southern 
Convention of Congregational Christian Churches. It is loaned 
to ministerial students upon the recommendation of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Convention. 

The Eastern Virginia Conference Ministerial Fund. — By 

an agreement with the authorities of the College, whereby the 
Eastern Virginia Conference relinquished certain bonds owned 
by it, there is provided a special fund for ministerial students 
from that conference. The value of the fund is $180.00 per year, 
but it is provided that no one student shall receive over $100.00 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 37 

in any one year. If there are two or more ministerial students 
from that conference, the $180.00 is to be equally divided. It 
is further provided that if there are no students w^ho qualify, 
the fund is not cumulative. 

The Masonic Fund. — The Grand Lodge of North Carolina 
has given the College $2,500.00 to be loaned to seniors in Col- 
lege, on acceptable security. 

The Knights Templer Educational Loan Fund. — Under 
the rules of the Grand Commandery, students in Elon Col- 
lege may secure loans from this fund. 

The McLeod Fund. — The family of the late Prof. M. A. 
McLeod has established a fund of $2,000.00, the interest on 
which is to be loaned to worthy students on proper security. 

The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund. — Mr. John M. W. 
Hicks, of Raleigh, N. C, and of New York City, has estab- 
lished this fund to assist members of the Junior and Senior 
classes. The initial amount of the fund was $1,000.00, which 
the donor hopes may be materially increased. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Collegiate Degrees. — The College confers the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

Requirements for Admission. — Students may be admitted 
to freshman standing as candidates for the Bachelor's degree 
in Elon College, without examination, and on certification of 
graduation from an accredited four-year high school course, 
with at least fifteen units from the list of subjects as given 
below. 

In accordance with a recent ruling of the North Carolina 
State Department of Education, a student in the upper third 
of his class who is recommended by the principal, and who has 
at least twelve units of credit, may be admitted upon success- 
fully passing the required examination. 



38 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

A limited number of students may be accepted for special 
work or departmental courses, not to exceed fifteen percent of 
the college enrollment and not as candidates for a degree. 
Subjects acceptable for admission are as follows: 

Units 

Bible 2 

Economics or Social Science 1 

English 4 

French 2 

German 2 

History 4 

Latin 4 

Mathematics 4 

Music 1 

Science 4 

Spanish 2 

Vocational Subjects 3 

No credit in foreign language may be had until the student 
has completed a minimum of two years in at least one foreign 
language. 

Of the fifteen units required for admission, upon gradu- 
ation from a secondary school, nine are prescribed as follows: 

Units 

English 3 

Foreign Language 2 

History 1 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

Students having been graduated from high school but not 
meeting the prescribed requirements may be admitted on con- 
dition, such condition to be worked off before the beginning 
of the sophomore year. Not more than two conditions can 
be allowed. 

Applicants for advanced standing must present to the 
Registrar of Elon College official transcripts of their work 
in other colleges. Full credit will be given for work in ac- 
credited institutions in so far as it parallels the work at Elon. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree must com- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 39 

plete at least one full college year of residence work at Elon 
College. Students admitted to advanced standing are subject 
to all the entrance and graduation requirements of the college. 

Health Certificate. — Every student must present a health 
certificate of a satisfactory physical examination taken within 
the immediate past. 

Classification. — For admission to the sophomore class, a 
student must have removed all entrance conditions and have 
completed not fewer than 36 quarter hours of freshman work 
toward a degree. 

For admission to die junior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than 81 quarter hours of work for credit 
toward a degree. 

For admission to the senior class, a student must have 
completed not fewer than 126 quarter hours of work toward 
a degree. 

Classifications are made at the beginning of the school 
year in September, and no nevv^ classifications are made during 
the year. 

Summer Quarter. — The College operates on the basis of 
four quarters during the year, the summer quarter of which 
is divided into two terms of six weeks each. 

Registration. — Each student goes to the Dean of the Col- 
lege for a conference and for assignment to a faculty adviser 
who aids the student in arranging his course of study. Before 
entering any department, the student pays the registration fee 
and other expenses, and receives from, the Business Manager 
a registration card admitting him to the departments of the 
college. The registration fee is payable at the beginning of 
each quarter, and no student is allowed any privilege of the 
college until this fee is paid. 

Every student is required to register within twenty-four 
hours after his arrival, and not later than 5:30 p.m. of the 
registration days in September, November and March. The 



40 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

penalty for late registration is one dollar for each day after the 
date set for registration, the maximum penalty being five 
dollars. 

No new course may be entered after the tenth day of 
classes in any quarter. 

Freshman Orientation Period. — The Freshman Orienta- 
tion Period is for the purpose of introducing the student to 
his environment. It is an endeavor to acquaint the student 
w^ith the policies and ideals of the college. Receptions, assem- 
blies, lectures and open forums help to establish a close fel- 
lowship, and the student is enabled to begin his college life 
more efficiently. Professors are assigned as advisers for a 
minimum number of freshmen and are, throughout the year, 
at the service of these students. 

Schedule of Studies. — All students are expected to carry 
fifteen hours of college work per week, this amount being 
considered the normal student-load. No student may carry 
less than twelve hours or more than sixteen hours, without 
special permission from the Dean, and in accordance with the 
Handbook regulations for extra work. In making up the 
number of hours required, no course in Fine Arts, includ- 
ing applied music, can count for more than three quarter- 
hours, and no credit is given for physical training in making 
up the 180 quarter-hours required for graduation, but four 
quarter-hours in physical education are required in addition to 
the 180 quarter hours for graduation. 

Change of Course. — Registration is for an entire course, 
and a course once begun must be continued, except in unusual 
circumstances. Continuous elementary subjects must be pur- 
sued for a year in order to be credited toward a degree. 
Changing a course after registration is discouraged, and such 
change may be made only with the permission of the Regis- 
trar. A charge of $1.00 is made for changing a course after 
six days. No new course may be entered after the tenth day 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 41 

of classes. Any course dropped after this date automatically 
draws a grade of "F." 

Ten Hour Rule. — Students failing to pass ten hours of 
the work pursued, may not return for the next quarter. This 
rule does not apply to foreign students in the first year of res- 
idence, or to specially admitted students if recommended by 
the Faculty Committee on Admission and Credits; and in the 
case of freshman students, five hours of the ten may be con- 
ditional grade for the first quarter. 

Class Absences. — Absences are counted from the first 
meeting of the class in the quarter. Those who enter a course 
after the first meeting of a class are reported as absent from 
the previous meetings of the class. Necessarily additional ab- 
sences without penalty are allowed students who must be ab- 
sent in order to represent the College as members of athletic 
teams or other organizations. These absences must be made 
up as soon as practicable and at the convenience of the Fac- 
ulty member concerned. 

Cuts. — (1) No Freshman is allowed any class cuts his first 
quarter in school. (2) No student securing an "F" on a course 
may be permitted cuts in any class the following quarter. 
(3) A student making an average of "D" in all courses regis- 
tered for in a given quarter may be allowed two cuts in each 
subject the following quarter. (4) A student making an 
average of "C" in all courses registered for a given quarter 
may be allowed three cuts in the following quarter. (5) A 
student making an average of "B" in all courses registered for 
in a given quarter may be allowed five cuts in each subject 
the following quarter. (6) A student making all grades "A" 
in a given quarter may be allowed unlimited cuts the follow- 
ing quarter. (7) Incomplete and Conditional grades are con- 
sidered as grades of "F" in regard to cuts for the following 
quarter. 

For each two additional absences or any fractional part 
of two additional absences not allowed as specified above, one 



42 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

quality point will be deducted from the quality points earned 
during the quarter. 

Any work missed by a student is to be made up at a con- 
venient time appointed by the instructor in charge. 

A student who fails to get permission to drop a course 
receives F on the course. No student will be permitted a re- 
examination who has received an F on the course. 

Chapel and Church Absences. — (1) All students are re- 
quired to attend the regular Chapel exercises. Seniors are al- 
lowed not more than seven absences from Chapel during a 
quarter. All other students are allowed not more than four 
absences. (2) All dormitory students are required to attend 
Sunday School and Sunday morning church services. At- 
tendance at Sunday School or church off the campus must be 
reported in writing the next day to the Dean of the College. 
Seniors are allowed three absences from each during a quarter 
without the loss of credit; all other students are allowed two 
absences during a quarter without loss of credit. (3) A stu- 
dent who is absent from Chapel, Sunday School, or Church, 
over the above limit during a quarter will be subject to dis- 
cipline. Absences over the limit mentioned above, unless ex- 
cused by the proper Dean, will reduce the student's quarter 
hour credits one hour for each three Chapel absences or por- 
tion thereof, and one hour for each two additional Church 
or Sunday School absences or portions thereof. 

Quarter Examinations. — Quarter examinations are given 
in November, in March, and in May. An average of "D" on 
a subject including term standing and examination, is re- 
quired for credit. All students making a grade of "E" on a 
continuous subject may be conditioned. If this condition 
occurs at the end of the first quarter of the course, a grade of 
"C" is required during the following quarter to remove the 
condition without a re-examination. 

Students who fail to attend regular tests or examinations, 
or who fail to hand in papers, are regarded as handing in 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 43 

blank papers, unless they have been previously excused. Ex- 
cuses from tests and examinations are granted only in cases 
of absolute necessity. A charge of $1.00 w^ill be made for 
each test or examination taken out of the regular time, except 
in cases v^here students have been excused from taking the 
test or examination at the designated period. 

Special Examinations. — A student w^ishing a special ex- 
amination must obtain a permit from the Dean before the 
date of the examination. A student who has been excused 
from an examination or who has made an "E" in a subject 
may have opportunity to make good his deficiency without 
taking the subject over, provided the deficiency be removed 
within one college year from the time it was incurred. 

Senior Deficiencies. — Senior deficiencies may be made up 
either at a special examination arranged by the Dean and 
the instructor, or at the regular examination at the close of 
the Fall Quarter. All senior conditions must be made up not 
later than April 1st, in order for the student to become a 
candidate for a degree at the following commencement. 

Requirements for Graduation. — One hundred and eighty 
quarter-credit hours must be completed as a minimum for a 
Bachelor's Degree, seventy-two hours of which must be taken 
on the Junior-Senior level. Classes meet daily, with few ex- 
ceptions, five days each week, and each such class earns a credit 
of five quarter hours per quarter. 

Also required for graduation are 180 quality-points. The 
quality-point values of grades are: 

A — 3 quality-points for each quarter hour. 
B — 2 quality-points for each quarter hour. 
C — 1 quality-point for each quarter hour. 

Specific requirements for graduation include: 

(1) One major subject. (See detailed description below.) 

(2) Two minor subjects related to the major. (See detailed de- 

scription below.) 



44 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

(3) Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination on 

major and minor fields in the senior year. (See de- 
tailed description below.) 

(4) 20 quarter hours in Composition, Grammar and English 

Literature. 

(5) 20 quarter hours in a foreign language. 

(6) 10 quarter hours in Religion. 

(7) One of the following: 

(a) 20 quarter hours in Mathematics. 

(b) 20 quarter hours in a Natural Science. 

(c) 10 quarter hours in each of two Natural Sciences. 

(d) 10 quarter hours in Mathematics and 10 quarter 

hours in a Natural Science. 
(10 quarter hours in Home Economics may be sub- 
stituted for a Natural Science or Mathematics.) 

(8) Two years of Physical Training. 

Majors. — At the beginning of the Junior year, each can- 
didate for a Bachelor's Degree must elect a major from the 
departments listed below in which majors are oflfered. More 
than one major may be elected. The College offers the follow- 
ing majors, with required quarter hours as specified: 

Biology, 45 quarter hrs. Home Economics, 77 quarter 
Business Administration, 45 hrs.§ 

quarter hrs.* Mathematics, 36 quarter hrs. 

Chemistry, 45 quarter hrs. Music, 51-66 quarter hrs. 

English, 36 quarter hrs. Physics, 45 quarter hrs. 

French, 36 quarter hrs. Religion, 36 quarter hrs.f 

German, 36 quarter hrs. Science 45 quarter hrs.| 

History, 36 quarter hrs. Spanish, 36 quarter hrs. 



♦Students majoring in Business Administration are advised to minor in 
Social Sciences. 

§Requirements for the Home Economics major must include Chemistry, 
Biology, Physics and 9 quarter hours of Social Science. 

tStudents majoring in Religion should have at least two years in each 
of the following subjects: History, Science, Philosophy, Greek. 

$This must include Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Geography or Ge- 
ology. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 45 

Minors. — ^Any field above in which one obtains twenty 
quarter hours may constitute a minor, in addition to the fol- 
lowing fields: 

Art 

Education 

Philosophy 

Greek 

A major course may not be formed for fewer than three 
students, a minor for fewer than five. 

Students must have an average grade of "C" in the major 
field in order to be graduated. 

Ten quarter hours in American History and ten quarter 
hours in European History are advised for all students. 

Students who plan to pursue graduate work leading to 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy should take both French 
and German. 

Electives. — Any course not chosen as a major or a minor 
may be elected toward the degree. Additional electives are 
provided in Art and in Applied Music. 

Courses in Art and Applied Music receive six quarter- 
hours credit per year. Under no circumstances can more than 
eighteen quarter-hours credit toward the A. B. degree be al- 
lowed in Art and Applied Music. 

Comprehensive Examination and Senior Essay. — Each 
senior is required to take a comprehensive examination in his 
major field, or at the discretion of his major professor to write 
an essay. 

1. The comprehensive examination, according to the 
judgment of his major professor, may be either written or oral 
or a combination of the two. The examination is prepared 
and administered by the membership of the department or by 
the membership of the department and a related department 
if the membership of the department consists of less than two. 
The head of the department will act as chairman. The com- 
prehensive examination is to be held prior to December 1 of 



46 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

the student's senior year, and is not to exceed two hours if oral 
or three hours if written. 

2. Each major professor is permitted, at his discretion, 
to require of the student an essay in Heu of the comprehensive 
examination. In case of this essay, the subject is to be sub- 
mitted to the major professor who in turn notifies the dean's 
office not later than October 15 of the senior year. The first 
draft of the essay is to be submitted to the sponsoring pro- 
fessor not later than December 1. Three typewritten copies 
of this paper shall be submitted to the reading committee, on 
or before February 15, and an oral examination on the essay 
held by the committee which reads his work, not later than 
March 1 of the senior year. This examination is not to exceed 
one hour. 

Certificates. — Departmental Certificates will be given those 
who have completed the course in Music or Art, provided that 
each student shall have completed fifteen units of high school 
work as required for entrance to the College, and have com- 
pleted the requirements for a major in some one of the College 
departments, with an average of at least C for the work done 
both in the special department and in the liberal arts depart- 
ment. In lieu of a major, the candidate may offer forty-five 
quarter-hours of Freshman liberal arts work. A certificate 
may be secured in the Commercial Department upon the 
completion of a one-year course as outlined by that depart- 
ment. No certificate is given in the liberal arts departments 
of the College. 

Diplomas, — Departmental diplomas are granted to those 
who in a single department complete four years of work with 
an average of C, and in addition two majors in the liberal arts 
departments, or ninety quarter-hours of Freshman and Soph- 
omore work. 

Reading for Honors. — The purpose of the plan of Read- 
ing for Honors is to encourage those students who have the 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 47 

ability and ambition to study independently in going beyond 
the minimum standards of the regular courses. The plan, pro- 
vides for the best students a program of training which, alike 
by its freedom and severity, will develop them to the utmost. 

To this end, prospective candidates should apply to the 
Chairman of the Honors Committee not later than May 1st of 
their Junior year. A limited number of applicants is then 
admitted by the committee, after faculty approval. 

The admitted candidate is, at the discretion of his advis- 
ory committee, either permitted great freedom in class atten- 
dance of regular courses during his senior year or excused 
from attendance of regular courses altogether. If the latter 
alternative is pursued, an Honors course which adequately 
parallels the requirements and subject matter of regular courses 
is followed at the Senior level. 

The Honors course is based upon work already done by 
the candidate in his major and minor fields and is guided 
by a committee composed of one member from each of these 
departments, the professor in the major field acting as co- 
ordinating chairman. Conferences with the chairman occur 
at least once each fortnight, while additional consultations are 
held with the professors in the minor fields. Near the end 
of the second quarter of the Senior year an oral comprehensive 
examination in the planned reading is held by the Honors 
Committee with some professor invited from the faculty of 
another college or university. 

If any member of the committee is dissatisfied with the 
progress of the candidate, he may request a consideration by 
the committee of the student's pursuing regular class work 
in any given parallel field. No student may expect to continue 
in the Reading for Honors course who does not satisfy the 
committee that he is progressing satisfactorily. 



48 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



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50 



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THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



51 



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52 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



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THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



53 



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54 



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THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



55 




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56 



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THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 



57 



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58 



ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 



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59 




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60 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Two- Year Courses of Study 

Students desiring two-year courses may make their selec- 
tion from the courses indicated below: 

Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Course: 

Biology 11-12, 21-22; Chemistry 11-12, 21-22; Physics 11-12; 
English 11-12, 21-22; Religion 11-12, and two elective subjects for 
the year. 

Pre-Law Course: 

English 11-12, 21-22, 35-36; History 11-12, 21-22; Religion 
11-12. Other subjects elective. 

Pre-Engineering Course: 

Physics 11-12, 21-22; Mathematics 11-12, 13-14, 21-22; Eng- 
lish 11-12, 21-22; French, Spanish or German 11-12,21-22; Chemis- 
try 11-12. 

One-Year Secretarial Course 

Fall and Winter Quarters: 

Shorthand, Typewriting, Business English, Business Arithmetic, 
and Penmanship. 

Spring Quarter: 

Advanced Shorthand (Dictation), Advanced Typewriting, Sec- 
retarial Practice, Bookkeeping. 

Two-Year Secretarial Course 

First Year same as above. . 

Second Year: 

English 11-12, 10 quarter hours; Business Administration 11 
and 12, 10 quarter hours; Business Administration 33 and 34, 10 
quarter hours; Advanced Dictation, 5 quarter hours; Business Ad- 
ministration 21-22, 10 quarter hours. Total 45 quarter hours. 

NOTE — Satisfactory completion (ability to meet office standards) of the 
One- Year Secretarial course entitles one to a Secretarial Certificate. 



Departments of Instruction 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

MRS. HARTLEY 

Biology is the science of life, and therefore includes the 
study of both plants and animals. The courses are arranged 
to teach the fundamental facts of biology, including the laws 
of development, heredity and variation, together with studies 
of the structure, habits and distribution of the members of the 
plant and animal kingdoms. The courses are planned for 
those who seek a general culture or professional training. 

11 General Zoology. The fundamental principles of animal 
biology. The origin, development, structure, functions, distribution 
and relationships of animals. 5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 
6 q. h. 

12 General Botany. The fundamental principles of plant 
biology. The origin, development, structure, functions, distribution 
and relationships of plants. 5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 
6 q. h. 

21-22 Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. The mor- 
phology, histology, physiology, development and environmental adap>- 
tations of the vertebrates. Dissections for the purpose of discovering 
homologies and analogies. 3 hours class work, 6 hours laboratory. 
12 q. h. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

31 Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
chemistry of bacteria, and introductory studies of diseases and im- 
munity. Laboratory work in the common bacteriological techniques: 
staining bacteria, cultural methods, and the analysis of milk and 
water. 4 hours class work, 4 hours lecture work. 6 q. h. Prerequi- 
sites: Biology 11 or 12 or Chemistry 11, 12. 

32 Physiology. Circulation, respiration, digestion, internal se- 
cretion, muscle physiology, reproduction, and other physiological 
processes of animals. 4 hours class work, 4 hours laboratory. 6 q. h. 
Prerequisites: Biology 11. 

33 Parasitology. The structure, life history, and distribution 
of the protozoan, worm and anthropod parasites and their relation- 



62 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ship to mankind. 3 hours class work, 6 hours laboratory. 6 q. h. 
Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

41 Genetics. A general introductory course in studies of hered- 
ity, evolution, and eugenics. Presented as a cultural and preparatory 
course for those wishing to pursue teaching, home making, practice 
of medicine and other related vocations. 5 hours class work. 5 q. h. 
Prerequisites: Biology 11 or 12 or junior status. 

42 Embryology. The development of the tissues and organs of 
the frog and chick and some work with animals. 3 hours class work, 
6 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. This course 
is designed to stress nature study, cultures, preserving materials for 
class- work, arranging courses and organized laboratory work. 5 hours 
dass work. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

MISS BOWMER 
MISS HOFFMAN 

The courses in Business Administration offer help to four 
kinds of students: 

First, to those who plan to be business men or women, 
the theory and practice of business are taught, so that grad- 
uates may be prepared for positions of responsibility and for 
greater service to society. 

Second, to those who plan to teach, the courses specified 
by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction are 
offered to supply the requirements for the certification of 
commercial teachers. 

Third, to those who lack the time or the money for a 
four-year course, either a one-year or a two-year Secretarial 
course is available. Secretarial students must meet the same 
entrance requirements as other students. Secretarial certifi- 
cates are awarded to those who meet certain proficiency stand- 
ards* Only superior students are able to meet those require- 



*13.5 q. h. credit toward a college degree are allowed to those 
who receive the Secretarial Certificate. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 63 

merits in one year. Therefore, the two- year course is recom- 
mended for students of average abiHty. 

Fourth, to other students who wish to explore the eco- 
nomic structure of society, Business Administration courses 
are offered as electives. 

A Business Administration major consists of 45 quarter 
hours, 10 hours of which may be taken from the secretarial 
courses carrying degree credit. Those preparing for a commer- 
cial teacher's certificate must have 54 quarter hours of busi- 
ness, 15 hours of which may be taken from secretarial courses. 

11-12 Principles of Economics* An introductory course to ac- 
quaint the student with the fundamental principles which underlie 
economic relations and activities. An analysis is made of production, 
consumption, exchange, and distribution. A brief survey of money, 
banking, and credit, the business cycle, business organization, monop- 
oly and trusts, labor problems, insurance, public finance, and econom- 
ic reforms. A combination of the lecture and case method will be 
used to relate practical situations to theory. 10 q. h. 

16 Business Organization and Practice, j The purpose of this 
course is to introduce the student to certain fundamental information 
regarding the characteristics, organization, operations, relative ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and 
corporations. Business transactions are studied with respect to their 
elementary, legal and economic significance. Valuable information 
regarding the use of checks, notes, drafts, etc., in business transactions 
is obtained through business practice assignments. 5 q. h. 

21-22 Principles of Accounting* This course does not require 
a; knowledge of bookkeeping. It deals with the proprietorship equa- 
tion, financial statements, the ledger and the trial balance, posting, 
adjusting and closing entries, columnar records, controlling accounts, 
business forms and papers, notes and drafts, partnership accounting, 
classification of accounts, accrued and deferred items, corporation 
statements, elements of manufacturing accounts. Problems, practice 
sets, and lectures. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per quarter. Not open 
to Freshmen. 5 hours class work, 5 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 



^Required of all students majoring in Business Administration. 

fThis course may not be coimted as part of the 45 quarter hours required 
for a major in Business Administration; it is, however, recommended for those 
anticipating further work in this department. 



64 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

25 Salesmanship. This course is a consideration of the broad 
field of personal selling. The steps in a sale, the psychology of the 
selling process, knowledge of goods and of the market, selling to 
wholesalers and to retailers, are some of the problems considered. 
Attention is given to sales methods, the relation of personal selling to 
advertising, sales management, the house policies, the selection, train- 
ing, cooperation with, and supervision of salesmen, and the various 
methods of compensating salesmen. Prerequisite or corequisite: Psy- 
chology 21. 5 q. h. 

28 Credits and Collections. This is a consideration of the place- 
of credit in the marketing structure. The economic basis of credit 
extension, the relation of credit to selling, methods of collecting and 
using credit information, credit bureaus, the use of trade acceptances, 
commercial paper, and collection letters, are investigated. Prerequi- 
site: Bus. Adm. 11-12 or 21-22. 5 q. h. Not offered 1945-1946. 

31 Marketing. A study of the fundamental processes of the 
system of marketing. Nature and scope of marketing, marketing 
functions, types of middlemen, retail distribution and marketing 
agencies, wholesale marketing of manufactured goods, marketing con- 
veniences, shopping and speciality goods, marketing industrial goods, 
direct selling. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. 5 q. h. 

32 Retailing. This course offers the student an opportunity 
to become familiar with those principles which have been found 
generally successful in the field of retailing. Types of retail es- 
tablishments, store location and arrangement, buying, inventory 
control, display and selling, are illustrative of the topics studied. 
Part-time work in retail establishments on the part of the students 
enrolled is encouraged. This plus visits to some of the outstanding 
stores in the section and discussion periods from time to time led 
by persons of recognized standing in the field, give the course more 
than theoretical value. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. 5 q. h. 

33-34 Business Law. This course is designed to give the 
student an understanding of the main principles of law governing 
the daily conduct of business, A consideration of contracts, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, negotiable instruments, bankruptq% sales, 
bailments, personal and real property relations. Prerequisite: Bus. 
Adm. 11-12 or Junior standing. 10 q, h. 

35-36 Advanced Accounting. Profits, analysis of statements, ad- 
vanced work in partnerships and corporations, agencies and branches, 
statements of affairs, realization and liquidation, good will, reserves, 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 65 

funds, consolidations, mergers, partnerships, liquidations, consolidat- 
ed balance sheets and profit and loss statements, reorganizations,, 
foreign exchange, and insurance. Prerequisite: Business Adminis- 
tration 13-14. Laboratory fee of $5.00 per quarter. 5 hours class 
work, 5 hours laboratory, 10 q. h. 

37 Cost Accounting. An introduction to cost accounting pro* 
cedure which includes basic cost terms; accounting for materials, 
labor, and burden; job-lot and process systems. A brief study is 
made of standard costs. Students visit industrial plants in order to 
gain practical information as to the problems involved. Prerequisites: 
Bus. Adm. 11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. 
5 q. h. 

38 Income Taxation. This course is a study of federal in- 
come tax regulations as they relate to individuals, partnerships, and 
corporations. A complete, authoritative tax manual is used for 
study and analysis of the law. This is supplemented by problem 
material which acquaints the student with procedures and forms. 
5 q.h. 

42 Money and Banking. A general survey of the modem 
financial system, including the principles and history of money and 
monetary standards; the principles and functions of banks and bank 
credit, commercial banks, investment banks, trust companies, the 
Federal Reserve System; a brief survey of the commercial banking 
systems of other countries. The relation of the business man and 
the banker. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors only. 5 q. h. 

43 Life Insut^nce. The purpose of this course is primarily to 
acquaint the general business student with the subject of life insurance, 
and, secondarily, to provide a foundation course for those intending 
to enter the insurance business. The topics include: the use of life 
insurance for protection and investment; the selection and treatment 
of risks; the policies and options offered, life insurance programs; 
rate-making; mutual, stock, legal requirements; and company organi- 
zation. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 11-12. 5 q.h. 

44 Auditing. This course deals with the duties of the auditor;, 
the problems involved in detailed and balance sheet audits, special 
investigation, and preparation of reports. Prerequisites: Bus. Adm. 
11-12 and 21-22. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. 5 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods. This course is to assist students 
who desire Grade "A" Teaching Certificates in the commercial field. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 5 q. h. 



66 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

47 Elements of Statistics. A course designed for students in- 
terested in the application of the statistical method to various fields, 
especially the social sciences. Such topics as the collection, presen- 
tation and analysis of data, measure of central tendency, and cor- 
relation are discussed. 5 q. h, 

48 Labor Problems. Causes of industrial unrest and other 
labor problems, the reactions of various groups to these conditions, 
and recent labor tendencies, are discussed. Special emphasis is given 
to the American labor movements, their objects, tactics, and accom- 
plishments. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. 5 q. h. 

Secretarial Courses 

7 Commercial Arithmetic. This is a brief elementary course in 
business arithmetic, which reveals short-cuts and helpful suggestions 
for speed in computations. Major emphasis is placed upon develoj>- 
ing proficiency in those problems frequently met by secretaries and 
office workers; such as problems in billing and pay rolls, interest, 
trade discounts, bank disccunts, profit and loss, and price marking. 
3 hours per week. 

8 Secretarial Practice. This course acquaints the student, 
through actual laboratory experience, with the major and minor 
activities and duties of the secretary. It is designed to bring into the 
classroom, as much as possible of the office atmosphere. Instruction 
and practice in the use of such office machines as the mimeograph, 
jelatin duplicator, dictaphone, adding machine, calculator, etc. Fil- 
ing, indexing, mailing procedures, transcription methods, and finan- 
cial duties are emphasized. 5 hours per week, with 3 additional lab- 
oratory hours. 

9 Personal Typewriting. A short course in touch typewriting 
offered to students who wish to learn the use of the machine for per- 
sonal convenience, and not for marketable skill. 5 hours a week. 

11 Business English. The purpose of this course is to give 
the basic elements and principles of good practical English, as adapted 
to the usages of modem business. The topics discussed, besides a 
thorough review of grammar, are letter planning and organization; 
effective letter layout; credits, collections, and adjustments; selling 
by mail; job-hunting by mail; fact writing — reports and memoran- 
da; basic advertising. 5 hours per week. 

12 Bookkeeping and Accounting. This elementary course ac- 
quaints students with present day methods of keeping and interpreting 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER q^ 

business records and reports. In addition to the regulai- bookkeeping 
cycle, special journals, notes, interest, discount, deferred charges, 
reserves, and colunmar records, are studied. 5 hours per week, with 
3 additional laboratory hours. 

13-14 Shorthand.* Fundamental principles of Gregg Short- 
hand with special emphasis on accuracy and speed. Practice work 
in dictation and transcription. In the spring quarter intensive work 
is done in dictation and transcription. 5 hours per week throughout 
the year. 

15-16 Secretarial Typewriting."^ The course in touch type- 
writing includes a speed-building program, which develops a high 
degree of skill. Five hours of class instruction, and five hours of 
laboratory work, each week throughout tlie year. 

17-18 Advanced Typewriting. Emphasis is placed on applied 
typewriting. The course is open only to students who have had one 
or more years of typewriting. 

31-32 Advanced Dictation. A second-year course in shorthand, 
consisting of rapid dictation and rapid transcription. Training in the 
editing duty of the private secretary is a part of this course. Effective 
English is stressed, as well as the art of completing transcripts with 
dispatch. 5 hours per week. 5 q. h. 

38 Office Management. This course offers advanced prepara- 
tion for the teacher of commercial subjects. In addition, it trains for 
the positions of office manager, private secretary, and head stenogra- 
pher. A study of office organization, which includes an analysis of 
equipment, lay-out, personnel, standards, paying methods, and depart- 
mental routine, constitutes the subject matter of this course. Actual 
office work is required of each student. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

MR. BRANNOCK 

Since matter is one of the two fundamental entities of the 
universe, chemistry is one of the fundamental sciences. Hence 
it is advantageous for those working in any field of science to 
study chemistry. 

The field of chemistry is broad and practical. There is 
no great industry which does not make use of some chemical 

*Degree credit allowed only to students with Bxisiness Administration major. 



68 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

principles. Chemistry is recommended to those who plan to 
enter the special fields of astronomy, geology, biology, med- 
icine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, home economics, agri- 
culture, or engineering. Aside from its vocational values, 
chemistry is also recognized as an important part of a general 
education. 

11-12 General Chemistfy. Fundamental principles of inor- 
ganic, physical, and experimental chemistry. Each student is required 
to keep a note book in which he must record his experimental work. 
5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory. 12 q. h. 

21-22 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 
The kinetic-molecular hypothesis, solutions, electrolysis, the chemical 
behavior of ionic substances, chemical equilibrium, and electro-motive 
chemistry. 5 hours class work, 3 hours laboratory work. 12 q. h. 

31-32 Organic Chemistry. Organic compounds, including tiie 
aliphatic and the aromatic series: hydrocarbons of the methane series, 
alcohols, organic acids, ethers, anhydrides, esters, aldehydes, ketones, 
amines, amides, halogen compounds, cyanogen, carbohydrates, cyclic 
hydrocarbons, dyes, and proteins. The laboratory work consists not 
only in the methods of preparation and purification of compounds, 
but also in methods of arriving at their structures. 5 hours dass 
work, 3 hours laboratory. 12 q. h. 

41-42 Quantitative Analysis. Chiefly laboratory work in sim- 
ple introductory determinations in gravimetric and volumetric methods 
of analysis. Pure salts of known composition are first analyzed, fol- 
lowed by unknown specimens consisting of pure salts or mixtures of 
pure salts. 1 hour class work, 10 hours laboratory. 12 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Chem- 
istry. The main purpose of this course is to present the modem 
theory and methods of teaching chemistry in secondary schools. 
5 q.h. 

48 Physical Chemistry. Problems in the gaseous, liquid and 
solid states; solutions; the phase rule, thermo-chemistry; chemical 
change; and electro-chemistry. 5 hours class work, 5 q. h. 

53 Industrial Chemistry. Water, fuels, destructive distilla- 
tion, alkalies and hydrochloric acid, iron and steel, packing house 
industries, cottonseed oil products, leather, soap, cement, paper, paints, 
and clay products. 5 hours class work. S q. h. 

Not offered in 1945-46. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 69 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MISS PHARES 
MR. DALTON 

The functions of the Department of Education are: 

First, to guide students in acquiring a background in the 
history and philosophy of education, so that they may under- 
stand the basis upon which modern progressive trends in 
education are built. 

Second, to inspire students with the ideal that the purpose 
of all education is that one may learn to live a better life, 
that school is life, and that the proper methods of teaching 
arc those which begin with the life situations of the child 
and are built upon them. 

Third, to instruct students in the principles and tech- 
niques of teaching so that they may know and understand the 
proper procedures of instruction. 

Professional Requirements for North Carolina Teaching 

Certificates 

High School. — High School Teachers* Certificates, Class 
A, represent graduation from standard four-year colleges. 
These certificates are issued on the basis of transcripts of col- 
lege records which show the professional credit and specialized 
work hereinafter described for each certificate. Each appli- 
cant should meet the requirements in two or more teaching 
fields. The subjects for which certificate is granted will ap- 
pear on the face of the certificate. 

First. The professional requirements common to all cer- 
tificates are: 

1. Educational Psychology, 3 q. h. 

2. Principles of High School Teaching, or 
Problems in Secondary Education, 3 q. h. 

3. Materials and Methods (required in one subject only), 3 q. h. 



70 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

*4. Directed Teaching (one or both fields), 5 q. h. 

5. Electives, 10 q. h. 

Note: In Directed Teaching one should have not fewer than 
thirty-five hours of actual class teaching. Thirty-five hours of obser- 
vation must precede teaching. 

Second. Subject-matter requirements for the teaching of 
any subject are: 

1. For English, at least 36 q. h., including Grammar, Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric, and American Literature. 

2. For French and Spanish, at least 27 q. h. This is based on 
two units of entrance credit. If no entrance credit is presented, the 
applicant must have 36 q. h. 

3. For Social Studies, 45 q. h., including 9 q. h. in American 
History, 9 q. h. in European History, 14 q. h. in Government, Geog- 
raphy, Economics or Sociology, and 13 q. h. Electives from the above. 

4. For Mathematics, at least 23 q. h. 

5. For Science, at least 45 q. h., including 9 q. h. in Biology, 
9 q. h. in Physics, 9 q. h. in Chemistry, 9 q. h. in Geography or 
Geology, and 14 q. h. from above subjects as electives. Individual 
certification will be granted in any of the above fields in which 18 
or more q. h. credits are presented. Certification for General Science 
will require 27 q. h. from three of the four areas given above. 

6. For Commerce, at least 45 q. h., including Stenography, 
Typewriting, Bookkeeping, and Office Management. 

7. For Public School Music, at least 40 q. h., including 5 q. h. 
in voice. Courses requiring singing may be substituted for voice. 

8. For Physical Education, at least 45 q. h. 

9. For Home Economics, at least 68 q. h., including 9 q. h. of 
Chemistry, 9 q. h. of Clothing, 9 q. h. of Management (Home Man- 
agement, Home Management Residence, Economics of the Home), 
9 q. h. of Family (Child Development, Family and Social Relation- 
ships, Health and Home Nursing), and 9 q. h. of Social Science. 

10. For Fine Arts, 45 q. h. 

11. For Bible, 25 q. h. 

*If all requirements except Directed Teaching are met, the Class A Cer- 
tificate will be issued after the applicant shall have had one year of successful 
teaching experience. It is understood that this teaching will be done under the 
joint supervision of the Head of the Education Department of the institution 
from which the student has been graduated and the superintendent of the school 
in which the applicant is teaching. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 71 

Grammar Grade. — Grammar Grade Teachers' Certifi- 
cates, Class A, represent graduation from a standard four-year 
college, or the equivalent, embracing not less than 180 quarter- 
hours. As a part of the work, or in addition to it, the applicant 
shall have the following: 

1. English, 18 q. h., including 10 quarter hours of Composi- 
tion and Grammar, three q. h. of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 10 q. h. 

3. Geography, including nature study, 10 q. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 14 q. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 9 q h., including three quar- 
ter hours each of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Educa- 
tion. 

6. Education, 32 q, h., including Grammar Grade Methods 
(Reading, Language, Arithmetic, Social Science), Classroom Manage- 
ment, Child Study, Educational Psychology, Educational Measure- 
ments, and Directed Teaching. 

Primary. — Primary Teachers' Certificates, Class A, repre- 
sent graduation from a standard four-year college, or the 
equivalent, embracing not less than 180 quarter hours. As 
a part of the work, or in addition to it, the applicant shall 
have the following: 

1. English, 18 qh., including 10 quarter hours of Composition, 
three of Children's Literature. 

2. American History and Citizenship, 10 q. h. 

3. Geography, including Nature Study, 10 q. h. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts, 14 q. h., including Drawing, Indus- 
trial Arts, and Music. 

5. Physical and Health Education, 9 q. h., including 3 q. h. each 
of Physical Education, Hygiene, and Health Education. 

6. Education, 32 q. h., including Primary Methods (Reading, 
Language, Numbers), Classroom Management, Child Study, Educa- 
tional Psychology, and Directed Teaching. 

Before any certificate will be issued for teaching in the 
elementary schools, the records from the institution in which 



72 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

the applicant received his training must show that he has 
reached a satisfactory stage of proficiency in Spelling and 
Penmanship. This certification will be made by the institu- 
tion and will appear on the record. 

General Education Courses 

32 Educational Measurements. Philosophy of the testing pro- 
gram through acquaintance with objective tests, their formulation, ad- 
ministration, and interpretation. Actual testing programs are set up 
and a knowledge of statistical procedures is acquired, from the mode 
through correlation so that test results may provide a basis for student 
guidance. 5 q. h. 

33-34 Elementary Methods. This course works on problems 
involved in planning and carrying out learning programs in each 
grade of the elementary school. A review of experimental practice 
and recent educational trends is made the basis for building programs 
to meet the needs and to develop the curriculum of the modem Pri- 
mary and Grammar grade school. 5 q. h. each. 

35 Child Development. The development of the infant and 
pre-school child with emphasis on physical, social, emotional and 
mental growth. 5 q. h. 

36 Curriculum. This course is designed to acquaint students 
with a comprehensive view of the basic considerations involved in 
determining the content and organization of curricula for elementary 
and secondary schools. A survey of modem practices in curriculum 
offerings, trends and construction, and emphasis on pertinent en- 
vironmental possibilities will be stressed. 5 q. h. 

42 Classroom Management. To acquaint the student teacher 
with methods of organization and procedure in the guidance of stu- 
dent activity. Principles of directed conduct, integrated unit pro- 
grams, and other essential features. 5 q. h. 

43 History of Education. Special emphasis is placed upon edu- 
cation in the United States, with particular attention to educational 
leaders and progressive programs. The progress of elementary, secon- 
dary, higher, and adult education is studied in detail, with European 
and later American influences as background. 5 q. h. 

44 The Philosophy of Education. This course acquaints stu- 
dents with the underlying principles of educational theories; the 
solution of educational problems; the development of democratic con- 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER _73 

ceptions underlying an educational program; and the social, moral 
and cultural implications of the development of personality. 5 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods for High School Teachers. See 
specific departments for description, 

47 Principles of High School Teaching. To guide the prospec- 
tive teacher in the principles of learning; to acquaint him with modem 
procedures of school programs; and to give him an underlying phi- 
losophy of student attitudes and needs so that he ma:y know how to 
guide the pupil properly in his activities. 5 q. h. 

51, 52, 53, 54, 55 or 56 Observation and Directed Teaching. 
Both observation and directed-teaching are done under dose coopera- 
tion with the public school teachers and principal. The student 
teacher must observe and teach at least 70 hours in the subject of his 
major field. He is required to analyze teaching problems in written 
reports of his observations, and to make careful teaching plans in 
frequent conferences with the supervising classroom teacher and with 
the College supervisor of directed-teaching. 5 q. h. per quarter. 

57-58 Directed Methods in Teaching. This course gives all 
who are doing directed teaching an opportunity to work together on 
teaching problems as they occur in the real situations of the Elon 
College Public School. The course is in the nature of a workshop for 
directing attention to tools, equipment, books, and materials needed in 
carrying out a teaching program at the school, and to enable the 
student teacher to gain first-hand experience in supplementing class- 
room routines with facilities for active learning. Through group 
discussions student teachers piece together the teaching problems of 
the whole school and see their own individual classroom problems in 
relation to those of other teachers. 5 q. h. 

Directed Teaching. — It is the philosophy of the College 
to oiler the student opportunities in all departments for self- 
development in thinking and in character. The Department 
of Education uses the local public schools as a place where 
educational problems may be seen as realities. Close cooper- 
ation between the public school and the Department of Edu- 
cation makes possible the opportunity for student teachers to 
study Education through a real school situation. The public 
school teachers and principal help supervise directed-teaching, 
and the student teachers enter actively into the life of the 



74 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

school, contributing their efforts under College guidance to 
further the development of the school, as well as to use the 
school classrooms as a training ground. 

The College looks upon directed-teaching as a serious 
responsibility in training for a profession, and requires careful 
preparation in subject-matter and theory of education along 
with high standards in directed-teaching. All the facilities 
of the college library, laboratories, studios, workshop, special 
classes and seminars dealing with the methods, materials and 
planning of school programs are available to make directed- 
teaching an experience in the application of the modern pro- 
gressive philosophy of education to a teaching situation. Those 
who expect to enter educational work should consult the head 
of the Department of Education before taking any course. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

MR. McCLURE 
MR. BARNEY 
MRS. SMITH 

All courses in English are arranged to promote a precise 
and practical knowledge of both written and oral usage. 
Fundamental methods of teaching, at once time-tested and 
progressive, are used. 

Opportunities for development in the arts of writing, 
public speaking, and the drama are provided. Cultural and 
aesthetic training in the classics is emphasized. The social 
implications of language and literature in the history of man- 
kind, the best thought of the best minds in the most able 
forms of expression, the techniques of poetry, the history of 
language and literary art in relation to the rise of democracy: 
all these are goals we strive to attain in the study of the Eng- 
lish language and its literature. 

11-12 Freshman English. A study of the forms of composi- 
tion: grammar, punctuation, and the technical skills of writing. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 75 

Prose models read. Accuracy in writing and preciseness in reading 
comprehension demanded. 10 q. h. 

21-22 A Survey History of English Literature. Includes study 
of one Shakespearean drama. Lecture and recitation combined. Some 
socialized recitation. Primarily a literary history and an interpreta- 
tion of English classics. 10 q. h. 

24 Children's Literature. The study of children's language 
as a basis for the selection and production of reading or story ma- 
terials for children in the primary and elementary schools. With a 
knowledge of children's uses of language in mind, the student writes 
stories or study materials which will be suited in style and content to 
the demands of the modem school for programs related directly to 
the child's experiences in living. Examination is made of the field 
of children's literature and folk literature to discover reading matter 
which satisfies modem educational requirements and to find sources 
for the production of new materials. No credit on major. 5 q. h. 

31-32 Journalism. This course demands the cultivation of 
curiosity and resourcefulness, the formation of direct style of writing, 
an understanding of public opinion and newspaper policy, and a 
working knowledge of modem printing. These assets are acquired 
through the writing, editing, and printing of the college newspaper, 
"Maroon and Gold." 10 q. h. 

33 Shakespeare. The academic study of a selected group of 
the best of his chronicle history plays, comedies and tragedies. 5 q. h. 

34 Shakespeare in the Theatre. Study and production of his 
plays in the Little Theatre. Public presentation of one play. 5 q. h. 

35 Public Speaking. A basic course in oral English and the 
art of speaking, including the psychological background, the technique 
of gesture and body action, study in interpretation and the art of 
the orator, tempo, crescendo, and essential elements of effective de- 
livery. Platformi practice emphasized. 5 q. h. 

36 Argumentation and Debate. Classroom practice and train- 
ing in various branches of speech. Formal and informal debate and 
argumentation, formulating group opinion, after-dinner speaking, 
oratory, and discussion of leadership. 5 q. h. 

37 Modern Drama. The academic study of a selected group 
of modern dramas, including Ibsen, Rostand, Shaw, plays from the 
Celtic Renaissance, and the American theatre. 5 q. h. 



76 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

38 Modern Drama in the Theatre. The art of play produc- 
tion studied through practice with modern plays. Little Theatre pro- 
ductions. One public presentation of a full length play, and other 
presentations of one-act plays. 5 q. h, 

39 Creative Writing. Advanced work in the writing of poetry 
and prose of all kinds. For Juniors and Seniors only. Admission 
dependent upon good scholastic rating and the approval of the in- 
structor. Best work published in the spring number of "Elon Colon- 
nades." Writing of scenarios and one-act plays encouraged. 5 q. h. 

41-42 American Literature. For students who wish an ad- 
vanced understanding of An^rican culture, for students who plan 
to teach, and for those above the sophomore level who have trans- 
ferred from other colleges. Required for high school teacher's cer- 
tificate in North Carolina. 10 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Eng- 
lish. Materials for teaching literature and language are explored 
and evaluated, and problems of teaching English are discussed in 
relation to the student's experience of directed teaching. 5 q. h. 

49 Modern Literature. Readings in contemporary English and 
American literature, with parallel work in creative writing. The best 
of these compositions are printed in the Spring number of "Elon 
Colonnades." The writing and readings are accompanied by discus- 
sion of modem social and psychological theories and practices with 
an attempt to help the student to find his place in the modem world 
of ideas and feelings. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

MR. FRENCH 

21 Principles of Geography. A study of the principles and the 
major geographical factors determining the distribution of population, 
occupations, and modes of life. The effects of climatic and economic 
conditions on the peoples of the world. Practical work in the study 
of maps and reports. 5 q. h. 

22 Geography of North America.. A study of the geographical 
regions of the continent, climate, industries, natural resources and the 
human responses to the geographic conditions; the growth of cities, 
development of trade, and geographical influences in the development 
of the United States. 5 q. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 77 

32 Geology. This course deals with Physical and Dynamical 
Geology. Laboratory work consists of frequent field excursions and 
a study of the common minerals and rocks, map interpretations, and 
geological folios. Lectures and recitations four hours a week, two 
hours devoted to laboratory work. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

MR. FRENCH 

Ancient Greek is a cultural language. It supplies a depth 
of background for the modern cultural languages. Students 
majoring in Religion are expected to take New Testament 
Greek. 

11-12 Elementary Greek. Mastery of declensions and conju- 
gations, s)aiopsis of verbs, word analysis, derivation and composition, 
and simpler principles. Drill in pronunciation by reading Greek 
aloud. 10 q. h. 

21-22 Greek New Testament. The study of the grammar of 
New Testament Greek. Reading in the New Testament. Problems 
and methods of exegesis. Textual problems. 10 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

MR. HIRSCH 

In the Department of History, raw historical material is 
not memorized aimlessly, but is evaluated, criticized and or- 
ganized in such fashion as to illuminate the minds of students 
with respect to the nature of the past and the manner in 
which the past has produced the present. One of the chief 
contributions which history may make is the working toward 
a better understanding of the modern age. 

11-12 The Establishment and Development of the American 
Nation. A survey of the European background of American history; 
the English settlements, their developments and their experiences with 
the colonial system seeking to protect and control them; the revolt, 
union, and organization of the United States; the struggle for Ameri- 



78 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

can Neutrality; the development of national parties; the problems of 
territorial expansion; the War between the States; Reconstruction, 
North and South; the agrarian movement; financial questions; re- 
form; relations of government and business; and expansion overseas. 
Special emphasis upon bibliography. 10 q. h. 

21-22 The Establishment and Development of the English 
Nation. 400 A. D. to the present. Primitive beginnings in Britain, 
the Germanic invasions, the Norman conquest, the development of 
Parliament, the Hundred Years' War, the foundation of the Tudor 
Monarchy, the "divine rights" of kings, the revolt, the Republican 
experiment in England, Restoration, revolution of 1688, the rise of 
the cabinet, constitutional development and loss of first colonial em- 
pire, foundation of modern empire, the World Wars and their influ- 
ence upon the British Empire. 10 q. h. Not offered 1945-1946. 

23-24 Ancient and Medieval History. A brief survey of an- 
cient history from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia 
to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed upon the evolution of cul- 
tures and civilizations, and upon the development of art, science, 
literature and philosophy. A survey-course of European history. 
10 q. h. 

33-34 Modern European History. The evolution and devel- 
opment of modem history, from the breaking down of the medieval 
world, through Renaissance and Reformation to the rise of the na- 
tional states of Europe. The dynastic and colonial rivalries, the 
intellectual and industrial "revolutions" of recent centuries are dis- 
cussed, together with the growth of art, literature, science and philos- 
ophy. 10 q. h. 

41 Latin American History. A survey of Latin American 
History from the first Spanish explorations until the present day 
5 q. h. 

41-42 The Contemporary World. War and Peace. A study of 
world history between the two World Wars and the problems of post- 
war reconstruction. 10 q. h. 

45 Methods and Materials in Teaching High School History. 
Modem trends in the teaching of history and its place in education; 
the construction of courses and methods of integrating history with 
other fields; teaching procedures, materials, and aids for study; 
problems of evaluating, organizing, and using such materials as maps, 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 79 

pictures, textbooks, reference books, biographical materials, radio, 
and motion pictures. 5 q. h. 

47 The Evolution of the Commonwealth of North Carolina. 
A survey of the state from its origins to the present; its place in the 
history of the United States as a whole, in colonial times, during the 
Revolution, Federalism, Democracy, contributions to the Western 
Movement, attitude toward nullification and secession, the Civil War, 
reconstruction, big business and the New Deal. 5 q. h. 

48 American Government and Politics. A general survey of 
national, state, and local governments. 5 q. h. 

49 History of Democratic Ideas and Institutions. An historical 
survey of the origins of the elements which make up the modern 
conception of democracy. The study begins with the ancient Greeks 
and comes up to the present day. Some of the important subjects 
dealt with are: republicanism, monarchy, oligarchy, dictatorship, 
tyranny, absolutism, popular assemblies, representation, political 
parties, aristocracy, plutocracy, popular sovereignty, "divine rights," 
social contract, natural rights, equality, liberty, justice, liberalism, 
individualism, socialism, nationalism and fascism. 5 q. h. 

49a History of American Democratic Ideas and Institutions. 
After a survey of the European origins of democracy, a study is made 
of American democratic thought and institutions from the colonial 
period to the present day. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

MR. HOOK 
MR. BOWDEN 

The Department of Mathematics offers in Freshman and 
Sophomore years, work which introduces the student to prin- 
ciples of mathematical reasoning. In advanced courses, in- 
tended primarily for those going into the engineering or 
teaching professions, a solid groundwork is offered in the 
fields of Calculus and Applied Mathematics. Emphasis is 
constantly placed upon the value of scientific reasoning in ap- 
proaching any problem. 

11 College Algebra. A rapid review of the fundamentals of 
algebra, followed by a thorough study of quadratic equations, ratio 



80 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

and proportion, variation, series, binomial formula, logarithms, de- 
terminants, and the theory of equations. 5 q. h. 

12 Trigonometry. The solution of right and oblique triangles 
both withi and without logarithms; trigonometric identities and trigono- 
metric equations; line functions and graphic representations. 5 q. h. 

13 Analytical Geometry. Loci of equations, the straight 
line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, the general equation of the 
second degree, polar coordinates, transcendental curves, parametric 
equations, coordinates in space, planes and surfaces. 5 q. h. 

21-22 An Introduction to Calculus. Treatment of the straight 
line, the circle and other conic sections, special plane curves and 
transformation of coordinates. A study of differential calculus, dif- 
ferentiation of functions with simple applications to the derivative of 
rates, length of tangents, normals, and similar topics. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 11-12. 10 q. h. 

31 Differential Calculus. A study of differentiation of func- 
tions, with applications of the derivatives to rates, length of tangents, 
normals, and other topics; the subjects of maxima and minima, 
airvature, rates and envelopes; drill on curve tracing. 5 q. h. 

32 Integral Calculus. Integration: The constant of integra- 
tion, the definite integral; drill on the methods of integration. The 
object is to enable the student to investigate without having to rely 
on any tables or set rules, and after having learned the principles of 
integration, to apply them to such subjects as areas, lengths of curves, 
volumes of solids or revolution, and ai'eas of surfaces of revolution. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21-22. 5 q. h. 

41 Differential Equations, Ordinary and the partial differen- 
tial equations, the theory of integration of such equations as admit 
of a known transformation group, and the classic methods of integra- 
tion compared with those which flow from the theory of continuous 
group. 5 q. h. 

42 Applied Calculus. Differential equations continued, and 
calculus applied to mechanics and to engineering problems. 5 q. h. 

45 Materials and Methods in the Teaching of Mathematics. 
Methods of presenting the different branches of mathematics to the 
pupil in secondary schools. Offered in alternate years. 5 q. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 81 

Applied Mathematics 

MR. BOWDEN. 
14-15 Engineering Drawing. This course provides a basic 
treatment of modem conventions, theory and practice of Engineering 
Drawing. Instruction is given in the care and use of instruments, 
drawing materials and scales, methods of procedure in drawing, free- 
hand lettering, geometric drawing, orthographic projection, working 
drawings, tracing, and blue printing. Prerequisite : Plane Geometry. 
No credit on major. 10 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

MRS. HIRSCH 
MISS CHEGWIN 

The work in French, German and Spanish is designed to 
give to the students an appreciation of the manners and cus- 
toms of these peoples, their background and language, to 
provide suitable material for those who desire to teach these 
languages in secondary schools, and to provide tools for 
research. Students who have not had two years of foreign 
language in high school will be required to make up this 
deficiency by taking the first year of a language without 
credit. 

I — French 

7-8 Elementary French. An introduction to the essentials of 
French grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and civili- 
zation with major emphasis on the reading approach, 10 q. h. 

11-12 Intermediate French. A thorough review of French 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury short stories, novels and plays. 10 q. h. Prerequisite: French 
7-8 or two years of high school French. 

21-22 A Survey of French Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces of the classical, romantic, realistic, and natural- 
istic periods with a consideration of the necessary historical back- 
ground and literary criticism. 10 q. h. 

31-32 Advanced Composition and Practice in Speaking French. 
This course provides a systematic review of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of French grammar and aims to give the student special 



82 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

competence in the control of French as an instrument of expression. 
The work is essentially practical. Throughout the entire course, it 
provides abundant oral and written practice. It consists of idiomatic 
translations and discussions (partly in French) on outside readings. 
The material used includes nineteenth and twentieth century plays 
as well as French novels and literature in general. 10 q. h. 

41-42-43 Phonetics and Oral Practice, of Modern French. A 
practical approach to correct pronunciation through progressive exer- 
cises and the thorough study of the formation of French sounds, 
intonation and rhythm. Major emphasis will be given to individual 
problems of pronunciation. Phonographs and discs will be used. 
The course includes rapid reading and discussions of significant 
nineteenth and twentieth century literature of France, as well as 
lectures and reports on critical and historical material. A survey of 
the more significant dramatists, novelists, poets, critics and their 
groups. The ideals and work of the different groups will be com- 
pared with those of other periods. 9 q. h. 

II — German 

11-12 Elementary German. An introductory course including 
thorough study of the fundamentals of the German grarmnar and the 
common vocabulary, of pronunciation, elementary composition, read- 
ing and translation. 10 q. h. 

21-22 Intermediate German. The work of this course includes 
the reading and translating (partly at sight) of German prose and 
poetry, exercises in composition and free reproduction, oral and writ- 
ten, with considerable colloquial practice and a rapid review of 
grammar. 10 q. h. 

31-32 Advanced German. This course is intended for those 
who have had two years of German in College. It stresses practical 
use of the German language. It includes class reading and transla- 
tion of selected German authors as well as the history of German 
literature, investigations in German language and civilization (partly 
in German) with special emphasis upon the ideals and influence of 
German literature and thought of the 18th and 19th centuries. 10 q. h. 

41-42 A Survey of German Literature. This course is de- 
signed to introduce the student to the outstanding literary master- 
pieces and the greatest figures and personalities in German literature 
of different periods. It aims to give an idea of the relation of litera- 
ture to social, political and religious history. 10 q. h. 

Not offered in 1945-1946. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 83 

III — Spanish 

11-12 Elementary Spanish. An introduction to the essentials 
of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, composition, conversation, and 
civilization of Spanish-sp)eaking countries with early readings in easy 
Spanish prose. 10 q. h. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish. A thorough review of Spanish 
grammar with selected readings from nineteenth and twentieth century 
short stories, novels and plays. 10 q. h. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 
or two years of high school Spanish. 

31-32-33 A Survey of Spanish Literature. A study of outstanding 
literary masterpieces from the Golden Age to the present day, with a 
consideration of the necessary historical background and literary 
criticism. 9 q, h. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

MR. BOWDEN 
MR. FRENCH 
MISS COGHILL 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion seeks to 
communicate to students the heritage of the past, and to 
equip them with the stimulus to achieve an intelligent inter- 
pretation of that heritage for present and future ends. Students 
achieve a vital and constructive attitude toward life through 
historical and critical study of philosophical and religious lit- 
erature. 

The fundamental doctrines of Christianity, as found in 
the teachings of Jesus, are interpreted as having real meaning 
for the present age of scientific progress and discovery. 

In addition to preparing students for effective participa- 
tion in general Christian service and in wholesome living, the 
function of this department is to prepare a select group of 
young men and young women for graduate training, that they 
may become intelligent Christian ministers and teachers. 

Religion 

11-12 Survey of the Bible. An historical account of the rise of 
Hebrew and Jewish religious literature, the Christian Church and its 



84 ELQN COLLEGE BULLETIN 

literature, and the situations which produced the various documents 
and books of the Bible. 10 q. h. 

21-22 New Testament History and Literature. A brief survey 
of the religious experiences of the Hebrew prophets; the social, re- 
ligious, and p)olitical situation in Palestine; the historical bases for 
our knowledge of the religious experience, character, teaching, and 
dynamic faith of Jesus; the impact of his life and teaiching; the de- 
velopment of the Christian Church in Palestine, and its spread from 
Jerusalem to Rome. 10 q. h, 

23 An Introduction to Christian Education. A survey of the 
objectives of Christian Education, methods of administration, re- 
cruiting, and training of leaders; of techniques for securing home 
cooperation; of plans for developing a week-day program in the 
public schools, 5. q. h. 

24 The Children of the Church. A study of the laws of 
learning as applied to the children's program in the Church; Chil- 
dren's curriculum; equipment; worship materials. Three hours of 
class work and four hours of laboratory and field work each week. 
5 q. h. 

25 The Youth and Adult Programs of the Church. A survey 
of programs of action for young people and adults in the fields of 
worship, social action, literature, recreation, churchmanship, and 
missions. Methods of organizing youth and adult groups will be 
considered. Three hours of class work and four hours of laboratory 
and field work each week. 5 q. h. 

26 The Mission of the Church. The general functioning of 
the local church in education, evangelism, and social action, and the 
work of home and foreign mission boards. 5 q. h. 

31-32 Old Testament History and Literature. The historical 
development of the literature of the Old Testament; the early poems, 
narratives, and laws, the growth of the Hebrew monarchy; and tbe 
ethical, political, and religious contributions of the literary prophets. 
Further extensive reading in the Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and 
Apocalyptic material. 10 q. h. 

33-34 Philosophy of Religion.* The origin and development 
of religious belief from primitive times to the present day, including a 
survey of the classical religions — Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucian- 



*NOTE — Students desiring a major in Philosophy are given credit for this 
coiirse \mder the head of Philosophy. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 85 

ism, Mohammedanism, Judaisms — and a detailed history of Chris- 
tianity. The influence of scientific inquiry. Biblical criticism and 
modem psychology upon religious belief; the development of a con- 
structive philosophy of religion and of life; and the problems of 
religious belief in a scientific age. 10 q. h. 

37-38 Seminar: Christianity and Other Religions. Individual 
assignments, papers and reports on various phases of Christian His- 
tory and Doctrine, including its Jewish background. Research in 
other classical and modern religions. 9 q. h. Two hours, one after- 
noon each week for three quarters. Not offered 1945-1946. 

41-42 Bible Seminar. Special research in some fields of Old 
and New Testament study, such as archaeology, hexateuchal synopsis, 
the law codes of the Old Testament, Hellenic Judaism, St. Paul and 
the Messianic consciousness of Jesus. Offered in alternate years. 
9 q. h. Not offered 1945-1946. 

43-44 Seminar in Religion and Modern Social Problems. The 
basic social problems viewed in the light of their religious, ethical, and 
social implications. Each student pursues one or more projects of 
research into some particular social situation. Brief reports on the 
social implications of outstanding current events. 9 q. h. Not offered 
1945-1946. 

Philosophy 

31-32 Introduction to Philosophy. An introductory study of 
the basic philosophical problems: What is reality? What is the 
basis for values? What is consciousness? Is knowledge possible? 
How distinguish truth from error? Is the world a machine? Has 
the world a purpose? What are the relations of religion and science 
to life? 10 q. h. 

35 Logic. The conditions under which thinking proceeds; the 
elements of formal logic, induction, and scientific method. Offered in 
alternate years. 5 q. h. 

36 Ethics. A study of the early beginnings and growth of 
morality, the development of customs and social organization, the 
psychological aspects of morality, some modem systems of ethics, and 
the application of ethical theory to some modem world-problems. 
Offered in alternate years. 5 q. h. 

38 The Philosophy of Science. A comparatively new field of 
study, covering the basic philosophi'^al principles upon which the 
sciences are based. Dealing with the foundations rather than the 



86 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

facts of science, the course does not require 2i background of advanced 
scientific knowledge. 5 q. h. Not offered 1945-1946. 

41-42 The History of Philosophy. The history of philosophy 
from early Greek to nineteenth-century German philosophy, including 
the pre-Socratic philosophers, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Early 
Christian and Scholastic philosophies, seventeenth-century Rational- 
ism, English Empiricism, Kant, Hegel, and subsequent German Ideal- 
ism. Students read from original sources and from modem commen- 
tators. Offered in alternate years. 10 q. h. Not offered 1945-1946. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

MR. HOOK 

Physics is one of the important divisions of human knowl- 
edge. Its purpose is to describe as accurately and clearly as 
possible the physical processes which go on in the universe 
around us. Wherever a transfer of energy is involved, the 
principles of physics are used. This may occur in the spin 
of the atom or in the movement of a giant liner; the flight 
of an alpha particle or the creation of a galaxy. Physics is a 
tool course for other sciences. The fundamental phenomena 
of physics are approached from a combination of two points 
of view: the purely physical, in which the mind paints a 
picture of what is happening; and second, the mathematical 
and analytical, in which a mental picture is expressed by 
means of mathematical symbols. 

In the first courses of the physical sciences special empha- 
sis is placed on the development of the scientific attitude. 

11-12 Survey of Physical Sciences. General subjects of astron- 
omy, geography, geology, physics, and chemistry. Demonstrations 
with various physical apparatus and illustrations with slides, film 
strips, movie films, and field trips. No credit on major. 10 q. h. 

13-14 General Physics. Mechanics, heat, sound, light, and 
electricity. Examples and experiments given throughout the entire 
course with a view to rendering it practical. Training in the manipu- 
lation of instruments employed in physical investigation, accurate 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 87 

measurements and practice in properly recording and reducing ex- 
perimental data. Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 12 q. h. 

21-22 Modern Physics. Atomic nature of matter and elec- 
tricity, corpuscular nature of radiant energy, spectroscopy, planetary 
model of the atom, X-rays, molecular structure, radio activity, neu- 
trons, positrons, theory of relativity, and astrophysics. Prerequisite: 
Physics 13-14 12 q.h. 

31-32 Electricity and Magnetism. Ohm's law, electrical power 
and energy, concerning wire, resistance, magnets and magnetism, 
magnetic circuit, generator, motor, batteries and electrochemical action, 
inductance, capacitance, alternating currents, vacuum tubes and 
gaseous conduction, and the electrostatic circuit. Prerequisite: Phy- 
sics 13-14. 12 q.h. 

33-34 Light and Sound. Reflection, refraction, dispersion, 
chromatic, spherical, aberration, optical constants of mirrors and 
lenses, velocity, radiation, absorption, interference, diffraction, polari- 
zation, colors of crystalline plates and oil films, and photography. 
The nature of sound velocity, frequency, resonance, forced oscilla- 
tions, transverse and longitudinal vibrations, vibrations in various 
media, and acoustics of buildings. Prerequisite: Physics 13-14 
12 q. h. 

35 Aviation. Elon College in conjunction vnth Burlington Fly- 
ing Service holds Air Agency Certificate No. 577, issued by the Civil 
Aeronautics Administration. A complete course, whereby an appli- 
cant may earn a private pilot's certificate, is offered under the above 
agency certification. 

Ground work consists of: (a) Civil ^ir Regulations; (b) Gen- 
eral Service and Operation of Aircraft; (c) Navigation; (d) Meteor- 
ology. Credit 5 q. h. Flying time: Minimum 8 hours dual, 35^ 
hours solo. 

The fee for the first 8 hours of dual flight instruction with a 
certified pilot is $75.00. Solo hours may be obtained at $6.50 per 
hour. Transportation to and from the airport is to be furnished by 
the student. The flight work may be completed anytime within a 
year from the time the ground work has been passed. 

36 Household Physics. A one-quarter course designed espe- 
cially for women students and to meet the requirements for the public 
school certificate in Home Economics. S q. h. 



88 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

41 Mechanics. Forces : their composition and resolution, forces 
acting on a rigid body, balanced forces, work and energy, first and 
second degree moments, dynamics of translatory motion, dynamics of 
rotary motion. 6 q. h. 

42 Heat. The course presents the essential fundamentals of 
heating, ventilating, and air conditioning. The emphasis is placed 
on domestic uses. Factors affecting human comfort, heat transmission 
and air infiltration, calculation and estimation of building heat losses 
and heat gains, fuels, combustion, draft, chimneys, boilers, insulation, 
heating with steam, hot water, and warm-air systems; air conveying 
and air cleaning, humidification and dehumidification, control of air 
temperature and summer cooling of buildings. 6 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

MISS PHARES 

Psychology teaches students to understand human nature 
and its ramifications, helps them to interpret their own mental 
reactions, and points out possible ways of building and ad- 
justing personality. 

21 General Psychology. An introductory course, emphasizing 
fundamental processes of human behavior, responses to various 
stimuli, building of personality, and mind in its relationship to the 
modern world. A prerequisite to all other courses in Psychology. 
5 q. h. 

31 Educational Psychology. Inherited tendencies; laws of 
learning; laws of teaching; habit formation; individual differences; 
formation of correct ideals and attitudes. 5 q. h. 

32 Psychology of Childhood. A study of the mental, physical, 
and emotional developments of the child in relation to personality and 
social adjustments. 5 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

MR. BOWDEN 

Sociology is that branch of the social sciences which deals 
with the individual in relation to his human environment. 
Students discover their places of responsibility in society only 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 89 

through a knowledge of the culture, mores and institutions 
of that society. It is the function of sociology, therefore, to 
trace the development of culture, to point out the chief char- 
acteristics and danger zones in the contemporary social scene, 
and to inspire student interest in solving the problems of 
modern life. 

31 Introductory Sociology. The origins and development of 
culture, the nature of personality and its relation to society, forms of 
collective behavior, community and social organization, and the 
basic social problems: the family, international relations, political 
and economic organization, and social development. 5 q. h. 

41 Current Social Problems. Analysis of origin and nature of 
social problems in the realm of public health, crime, race relations, 
immigration, distribution of wealth and income, population, city and 
rural conditions, and social change. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon problems in the South. Lectures, discussion, projects, and re- 
ports. 5 q. h. 

42 Rural Sociology. Conditions of life in rural areas and 
constructive organization for improvement, social technology of rural 
communities, importance of agriculture, rural institutions, cooperative 
marketing, good roads, consolidated schools, social surveys of the 
country and the rural church, organization of the rural community, 
and social control. 5 q. h. 



Special Departments of the College 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

MISS NEWMAN 
MR. HIRSCH 

A thorough course of instruction in Art is offered to those 
who desire to devote themselves to its study and practice. 
Students working for a certificate or diploma in this depart- 
ment are required to spend twelve hours a week at work in 
the studio. Courses are also offered to give students in other 
departments the opportunity to study Art for its broadening 
value in the liberal arts program. 

11-12 Freehand drawing in charcoal from still-life, geometrical 
solids and casts, linear and angular perspective structure, study of 
light and shade, flat washes in water color and monochrome painting, 
color sketches from still-life, pastel painting. 5 q. h. 

21-22 Drawing in charcoal from still-life, heads, hands, features, 
and casts; painting in oils, pastels and water colors, from still-life, 
illustration, wash drawings in water color; principles of color; pen 
and ink drawings, designing and structure. 5 q. h. 

23 Elementary Drawing. Working knowledge of the principles 
of drawing necessary in the primary and elementary school. Color 
design, drawing and painting from life or geometric forms, illustra- 
tions, posters and printing. Picture study, art activities for the child 
in the home, school, and community; and the development of creative 
abilities. Required for Grammar Grade and Primary Teacher's Cer- 
tificates. Offered in alternate years. 5 q. h. 

24 Industrial Arts for Elementaty Grades. Methods and 
materials used in the study of industrial arts for primary and gram- 
mar grades. Color theory, weaving, modeling, construction work, 
posters, book-binding, block-printing, and projects for history and 
geography classes. The subject matter is creative and illustrated, and 
is centered about the interests and needs of the child. Required for 
Grammar Grade and Primary Teacher's Certificates. Offered in al- 
ternate years. 5 q. h. 

Sketch Class. Pencil-drawing, with or without model, out-of- 
door work. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 91 

China Painting. Tinting: La Croix colors, matt colors, powder 
colors. Flower Painting: Designs of Edward Reeves and Marshall 
Fray; Dresden colors, Herr Lamm. Figure Painting: La Croix 
Dresden, Herr Till. Ornamental Work: Raised paste and gold; 
enamels; jewels, etc., on hard china, satsuma, Beleek, and Sedji. 

26 Commercial Art. Open to all students. Lettering, creative 
work in commercial advertising, principles of design, art structures. 
A study of color theory. Free expression, geometries and abstract. 
5 q. h. 

33 History of Christian Art. A course that traces the develop- 
ment of Christian Art from its earliest beginnings, through Byzan- 
tine, Irish and Carolingian days to its highest bloom in the Roman- 
esque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles. Architecture is 
treated as well as sculpture and painting. Slides contribute greatly 
to the understanding of the subject. 3 q. h. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

MISS MUSE 

The work in Home Economics is designed to prepare 
young women for home-making, to provide adequate training 
to meet the requirements for teacher's certiificate in Home 
Economics, and to oflfer foundation courses for those wishing 
to enter other fields of Home Economics. 

11-12 Food Preparation and Service. The general principles 
of cookery applied to the preparation of different types of foods. 
A study of the composition, selection, care, and preparation of foods 
is coordinated with a study of their nutritive value and digestion. 
Planning of menus, cooking and serving of breakfast, luncheon, and 
dinner. 1 hour class work; 4 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 

13-14 Clothing and Textiles. Study of textiles and problems, 
selection and construction of clothing, including the use and alteration 
of commercial patterns, the drafting of patterns, and the appropriate 
use of fabrics. 1 hour class work, 4 hours laboratory. 10 q. h. 

31 Home Nursing and Child Care. Home care of the sick, 
first aid, and practical experience in the care of pre-school children. 
5 hours class work with laboratory. 5 q. h. 

Not offered in 1945-46. 



92 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

32 House Planning and Furnishing. This course deals with 
matters pertaining to the house and its environs. A study of art 
structure, good spacing, tone relations, and color arrangements, as 
applied to planning, decorating and furnishing a home. Includes a 
survey of architectural elements, period furniture, decorative treat- 
ments and materials. Students desiring practical information on the 
subject will find this course helpful. 

ZZ Nutrition. The fundamental scientific principles of human 
nutrition and their application to the feeding of the family. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 11-12 and Chemistry 11-12. 5 hours 
class work. 5 q. h. 

34 Dietetics. Normal diets for children and adults and diets 
for the sick. Diets in relation to income scale. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 3Z. 5 q. h. 

41 Economics of the Home. The science and art of planned 
family living. General policies for the use of time, energy, money, 
and property. 5 hours class work and 6 hours laboratory. 5 q. h. 
Not offered in summer. 

42 Home Management. The adjustment of the home to 
changed social and economic conditions, civic responsibilities of the 
home, the organization and efficient handling of home industries, 
household accounts, and the family budget. Each student is required 
to live in the practice house for at least six weeks. 2 hours class 
work, and laboratory work in the practice house. 5 q. h. 

43 Costume and Design. Art principles and color harmonies 
applied to the original designing of costumes in pencil-drawing and 
crayons. A survey of historic costumes from ancient to modem 

times, thus giving a background of knowledge from which to draw and 
create new designs. 2 hours class work, 6 hours laboratory. 5 q. h. 

44 Advanced Clothing. The construction of garments from 
different materials; accessories to complete the costume; economics of 
textile purchasing. 2 hours class work. 6 hours laboratory. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 13-14 and 43. 5 q. h. 

Not offered in 1945-46. 

45 Materials and Methods of Teaching Home Economics. A 
study of the development of Home Economics; organization and con- 
tent of course of study; leaders in the work of Home Economics, 
relation of Home Economics to other subjects in high school curricula; 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 93 

planning and presentation of lessons; texts, reference books, and maga:- 
zines; and the place of Home Economics teachers in the community. 
5 q. h. 

Not offered in 1945-46. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

MR. BARTLEY, Piano, Organ, and Theory 

MISS McCLENNY, Piano and Theory 

MR. WESTMORELAND, Public School Music and Piano 

MISS WHITTINGTON, Voice 

The Department of Music has a four-fold purpose : First, 
to offer courses in the theory of music and to the general 
student body. Second, to afford opportunities for musical 
growth through student participation in the concerted per- 
formance of music. Third, to provide a comprehensive foun- 
dation for those wishing to make music their profession. 
Fourth, to offer lessons in applied music to special students, 
either children or adults. 

Diploma in Music. — The sequence leading to a Diploma 
in Music is intended for the student who wishes to make the 
profession of music his life work. The diploma qualifies a 
student to apply for a certificate to teach music in the public 
schools of North Carolina, provided the student takes the ad- 
vanced course in Public School Methods (Music 45-46). How- 
ever, the candidate for the diploma need not prepare for public 
school teaching. Diplomas are given in Theory, Piano, Or- 
gan, Violin, and Voice. The requirements for the Diploma 
in Music will be found under the Outline of Courses of Study. 

Certificate in Music. — ^The sequence leading to a Certifi- 
cate in Music is intended for those students who desire to 
teach music in public schools. This certificate qualifies the 
student to apply for the North Carolina Public School Music 
Certificate. The requirements for the Certificate in Music 
will be found under the Oudine of Courses of Study. 



94 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

11-12 Harmony. Intervals, scales, triads, seventh- and ninth- 
chords, inversions, figured bass and harmonization of melodies, dia- 
tonic modulation, elementary form. 10 q. h. 

13-14 Ear Training and Sight-singing. The course presents 
the rudiments of music, develops sight-singing ability, and musical 
dictation. 6 q. h. 

16 Rudiments of Music. An introductory course open to all 
students of the College. The fundamentals of music, musical in- 
struments, forms of musical composition. The development of an 
appreciative understanding and enjoyment of music from the listen- 
er's point of vievi^. Offered in fall quarter. 3 q. h. 

17-18-19 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons, see 
below. 3-9 q. h. 

21-22 Advanced Harmony. Altered chords, non - harmonic 
tones, chromatic and enharmonic modulation, form and analysis. 
Prerequisite: Music 11-12, 9 q. h. 

Not offered in 1945-46. 

23-24-24a Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing. Con- 
tinuation of ear training and sight singing and musical dictation. 
6 q.h. 

25-26 Public School Music. Fundamentals of music theory and 
sight reading necessary for primary and grammar grade teachers. 
Study of the child voice, rote songs, problems, and materials of 
music in the elementary grades. Intended for students seeking pri- 
mary or grammar grade certificate. Students are advised to take 
Music 13 and 16 before taking this course. No credit on major. 
6 q. h. 

27-28-29 Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Private lessons: see 
belovv^. 3-9 q. h. 

3 1-3 2-3 2a, Counterpoint. Sixteenth-century and modern coun- 
terpoint in two, three, and four parts. Counterpoint applied to va- 
rious types of vocal and instrumental composition. Prerequisite: 
Music 11-12. 9 q, h, 

33 Church Music and H}Tnnology. The history of music in 
the Church, Detailed hymnological studies. The sacred as con- 
trasted with the secular style. The ideals of church music and the 
means for their realization. The development of discriminating 
taste in the selection of vocal and instrumental music for use in the 
Church. 3 q. h. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 95 

34 Conducting. Technique of conducting. Score reading, res- 
onance, and combination of tone qualities in orchestral choirs, the 
conducting of symphonies and choral work. 3 q. h, 

3 5-3 6-3 6a History of Music. The development of musical art 
from ancient times to the present. The relationship between the 
evolution of music and social conditions, and between music and the 
other arts. The study of music as literature, through analysis of 
masterworks. 9 q. h. 

37-38-39 Private Lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. 
3-9 q. h. 

41-42-42a Composition. Creative work in music, advanced 
form and analysis, modern harmonic and contrapuntal theories. 9 q. h, 

43-44 Advanced Form and Analysis. A study of musical form 
through the Sonata-Allegro forms. Students working toward a Di- 
ploma in Music Theory must take Music 41-42 rather than this 
course. 6 q. h. 

4S-46-46a Advanced Puhlic School Music. This course is re- 
quired of all music majors seeking a high school teacher's Certificate 
in Music. A survey of problems in the elementary school is made 
in the first part of the course. The second part deals with the ado- 
lescent student and his music in the junior high school, and the 
third part treats the work of the senior high school and the special 
organizations of the school, theory and music appreciation. Best 
materials and methods are presented to the student and observations 
in the demonstration school. 9 q. h. 

47-48-49 Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice. Private lessons; 
see below. 3-9 q. h. 

Applied Music 

Private lessons in Piano, Organ, Violin, and Voice, may 
be taken in the Department of Music for credit on degrees 
up to 12 quarter hours. (See note under Electives.) A max- 
imum of two hours credit per semester is granted for two 
thirty-minute lessons and twelve hours of practice a week. 
Credit is determined, however, on the basis of actual accom- 
plishment, and is granted only after examination before the 
members of the faculty of the Department of Music. 



96 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Piano. — Preparatory and Intermediate Courses. — These 
courses cover the work in piano from the beginning through 
such compositions as the Little Preludes by Bach, Sonatinas by 
Clement, Kuhlau and Beethoven, Studies by Heller. 

Advanced Courses. — The freshman course begins v^^ith 
the Tvi^o-Part Inventions of Bach; Studies, Opus 299 of Czer- 
ny, the easier sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven, pieces of 
Grieg, Chopin, Schumann and others. The sophomore and 
junior courses cover more difficult compositions. The best 
compositions of the classic, romantic, and modern schools are 
studied. The senior course covers such compositions as the 
Transcriptions by Bach-Liszt, the more difficult preludes of 
Debussy, Concertos. 

Organ — The Freshman course in Piano must be com- 
pleted before beginning the study of Organ unless special per- 
mission be granted by the Head of the Music Department. 
The material used in the organ course includes Graded Ma- 
terials for the Organ by Rogers, preludes and fugues by Bach, 
sonatas by Mendelssohn as well as compositions by contempo- 
rary American composers. Since the aim of the course is pri- 
marily to prepare students for playing in church services, em- 
phasis will be laid on hymn playing and also on providing 
suitable organ accompaniments for solo, quartette and cho- 
rus. During the junior and senior years the larger composi- 
tions by Franck, Widor and Guilmant will be studied. 

Violin. — A thorough foundation is given in playing scales 
and arpeggios in any form. An extensive repertory is devel- 
oped from Bruck, Mendelssohn, and others. 

Voice. — The first two years of vocal study are devoted 
especially to the correct development of the voice. English, 
Italian, and German songs are added, as well as the study of 
operatic and oratorio arias. 

Note. — Monthly recitals are given, and each student in Applied Music is 
expected to perform at least twice during the year. Every candidate for the 
Diploma in Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice must give a complete recital. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 97 

General Courses in Applied Music 
The Elon Singers. — A choir of mixed voices. Member- 
ship is based on examination by die Director of Music. Three 
rehearsals weekly. Three quarter hours yearly. However, 
not more than six quarter hours credit may be applied toward 
the A. B. degree. 

The Elon Festival Chorus. — This chorus is open to all 
students, faculty members, and singers from Elon College and 
surrounding communities. The purpose of the organization 
is to present standard oratorios and other choral works. 

The Elon Band. — Training is oflfered to students who can 
play band instruments. The band furnishes music for inter- 
collegiate activities and other college functions. Two re- 
hearsals weekly, 

DEPARTMENT OF PFIYSICAL EDUCATION 

MR. ADCOX 
STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Intercolleo-iate Athletics have been discontinued at Elon 

o 

for the duration of the war. Until this action was taken the 
college was an active member of the North State Inter-Colle- 
giate Athletic Association and had representative teams in 
football, basketball, baseball, and tennis. 

A broad program of intramural athletics is conducted 
with the objective of providing one or more activities in 
which each student is interested. Similar programs are con- 
ducted for both men and women. For men the program 
includes touch-football, soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, 
table tennis, shuffleboard, softball, track and field, horseshoes, 
bowling and badminton. The women's program includes 
volleyball, tennis, table tennis, softball, archery, track, shuffle- 
board, foul shooting, badminton, bowling, gymnastics, and 
military drill. 

The Intramural Councils serve as advisory groups for the 
director and his staff and are composed of representatives from 



98 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

all classes, dormitories and the day student group. The pur- 
pose of these groups is to make the program as much as pos- 
sible the program of the students. The councils have formed 
competitive groups around the dormitories and the day stu- 
dents, three groups for men and five for w^omen. 

The program aims to provide healthful physical activity 
and recreation for the entire student body. The names of win- 
ning teams and individuals are inscribed on permanent troph- 
ies which are to be placed in a modern trophy case in Ala- 
mance Hall. Individual awards are given the winners in such 
activities as track and tennis. 

The entire program and all contests are carefully super- 
vised by the Director of Physical Education and Athletics and 
his assistants. 

Physical Education, which is required of all dormitory 
students, during their first and second years, carries 3 quarter 
hours credit for the two years, but must be in addition to the 
120 hours otherwise required. If the student does not pass 
satisfactorily any of this work during the first and second 
years it must be repeated until two years credit is secured. 

The department through the three phases of its program 
aims to carry out the following objectives: 

1. Provide training in the theory and practice of health 
and physical education for those who are planning to teach. 

2. Contribute to the general education of each student 
through the various health and physical activities; developing 
habits, attitudes, character, etc. 

3. Provide an opportunity for each student to develop 
physically through a progressive program of physical activi- 
ties; stressing the value of physical activity and the proper care 
of the body. 

4. Provide an opportunity for each student to learn and 
participate in wholesome physical activities which have recre- 
ational values both during and after college. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 99 

The three phases of the program are: 

1. Intramural athletics. 

2. Service course — These courses are planned so that each 
student will not only receive the physical and educational bene- 
fits but will also learn and develop skills in activities of a phys- 
ical nature which may be of recreational value after he leaves 
college. 

These courses may be taken during the entire four years 
but are required during the first two years. Credit is given on 
the basis of P/z quarter hours per year. Each student is as- 
signed to the class on the basis of the health examination and 
the physical capacity tests which are given at the beginning of 
the year. After developing a high degree of physical skill a 
student is permitted to select the desired course. 

1 Physical Education. Touch Football. Includes the study 
of the rules, skills, strategy, history, terminology, etc,, of playing the 
game of football. Approximately one-third of the time is spent on 
the above, with one-third on practice of skills, and one-third of the 
time spent in actual playing the game of touch football. 

2 Physical Education. Soccer — Same as above except that the 
activity is soccer. 

3 Physical Education. Basketball — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activity is basketball. 

4 Physical Education. Volleyball — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activity is volleyball. 

5. Physical Education. Softball — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activity is softball. 

6 Physical Education. Tennis — Same as Physical Education 
1 except the activity is tennis. 

7 Physical Education. Badminton — Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activities are badminton, table tennis, etc. 

8 Physical Education. Archery — Same as Physical Education 
1 except the activity is archery. 

9 Physical Education. Rhythms and folk dancing — the teach- 
ing of coordination and posture through the use of rhythms and folk 
dances. 

10 Physical Education. Bowling. Same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1 except the activity is bowling. 



100 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

All classes include periods of physical conditioning and 
drill depending upon the condition of the group. However, 
the emphasis is placed on learning through the play situation. 

3. Teacher training. 

31 Physical Education. Introduction to Health and Physical 
Education. Designed for students who expect to teach. Includes 
history of healtli and physical education; philosophical, psychologi- 
cal, and physiological background for the teaching of health and 
physical education; basis for program, and selection and organization 
of activities. 3 q. h, 

32 Physical Education. Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of Low-organization. Designed for elementary and teachers 
of health and physical education. Includes study and classification 
of games of low-organization with investigation and practice in meth- 
ods of teaching them. 3 q. h. 

33 Physical Education. Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of High-organization. Designed for teachers in Junior and 
Senior high schools. Includes the study of football, soccer, baseball, 
Softball, basketball, tennis, and track as activities for the physical 
education program. 3 q. h. 

34 Physical Education. Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of High-organization. (Coaching.) Designed for high school 
coaches with emphasis on methods and techniques in developing and 
caring for teams in football, baseball, basketball, tennis, and track. 
3 q.h. 

35 Physical Education. Organization and Administration of 
Health and Physical Education. Designed for teachers of health 
and physical education and coaches. Includes the study of facilities 
and equipment, scheduling, organization of classes, content of course 
of study. 3 q. h. 

41 Health Education. Personal Hygiene. The purposes of 
course are to develop habits, attitudes and knowledge concerning 
health and to provide professional preparation of teachers for teach- 
ing health. 3 q, h. 

42 Health Education. Materials and Methods in Teaching 
Health. Designed for elementary teachers and teachers of health and 
physical education. Investigation of materials for teaching health and 
methods of presentation and the development of lesson plans for 
teaching health. 3 q. h. 



Roster of Students 



SENIOR CLASS— 1944-45. 

Boland, Iris Celeste Elon College, N. C. 

Boone, Elsie Spivey Jackson, N. C. 

Boyd, Eliza Myrtle 238 Young St., Henderson, N. C. 

Browne, Lula Pernica West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Chandler, Doris Mae Route 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Cates, Jesse Howard Burlington, N. C. 

Coble, Rachel Louise 505 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Crenshaw, Nell Box 308, Burlington, N. C. 

Dyer, Ruth Elizabeth Ruffin, N. C. 

Farrell, Earl Thompson Route 1, Pittsboro, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Elizabeth Box 32, Route 1, Woodleaf, N. C. 

Harrell, Vivian Brown, Jr Route 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Hayes, Frances Viola Norlina, N. C. 

Hook, Mary Jeanne Elon College, N. C. 

Kerns, Louvinia Ether, N. C. 

McCants, Mary Ellen 928 Power St., Anderson, S. C. 

Miller, Donald David 933 W. Main St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Morris, Goldie Marie Jackson, N. C. 

Oakley, Mary Frances Elon College, N. C. 

Perdue, Mary Juanita Elon College, N. C. 

Pollard, John Francis Greensboro, N. C, 

Reitzel, Edna Louise Hillsboro, N. C. 

Rumley, Edna Virginia Elon College, N. C. 

Snyder, Walstein Welch Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Stnma, Orphia Theo Leasburg Road, Roxboro, N. C. 

Warren, Mary Maggie Staley, N. C. 

Watson, Rebecca Elizabeth Morven, N. C. 

Westbrook, Iris Grey Route 5, Dimn, N. C. 

Whistnant, Polly Anna Hollis, N. C. 

JUNIOR CLASS— 1944-45. 

Apple, Anne Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Braddy, Elizabeth Alston 1105 N. Mebane St., Burlington, N. C. 

Brower, Mary Jean Box 306, Liberty, N. C. 

Clapp, John William, Jr Elon College, N. C. 

Danieley, James Earl Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Diu-ham, Alton Thomas 314 Logan St., Burlington, N. C. 

Foltz, Dorothy Nell Route 3, L\iray, Va. 

Gibbs, Clayton Leon Route 4, Box 3, Reidsville, N. C. 

Griffin, Ethalinda .Route 1, Siunmerfield, N. C. 



1|^ ELQN COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Gunter, Frances Pat 516 Mclver St., Sanford, N. C. 

Hall, William Walter Route 1, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Harrelson, Evelyn Sue Tabor City, N. C. 

Hayden, Florence Gertrude 11 Fruit St., Northampton, Mass. 

Holland, Elizabeth Alice Box 590, Shelby, N. C. 

Malone, Hilda Lee Prospect Hill, N. C. 

McCrimmon, Pauline Box 375, Pittsboro, N. C. 

McDaniel, Martha Anne 311 Crayton St., Anderson, N. C. 

Moize, Sarah May 630 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Neal, Carl Ray Route 1, Belew Creek, N. C. 

Newsom, Mary Helen Box 7, Lucama, N. C. 

Parker, Elizabeth, Holland Svmbury, N. C. 

Parker, Ida Marie Eure, N. C. 

Parnell, Wallace Aaron 304 Winston St., Florence, S. C. 

Peedin, Junius Hugh 49 Bryden Circle, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Poe, Gene Preston Franklin Ave., Rockingham, N. C. 

Rawls, Margaret Elizabeth 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Rossi, John Albert 529 Wood St., Vineland, N. J. 

Simpson, Mary Elizabeth 207 Tarpley St., Burlington, N. C. 

Stone, Betty Bob Siler City, N. C. 

Sutton, Thomas Daniel Gibsonville, N. C. 

Thurecht, Jessie Dale Elizabeth City, N. C. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS— 1944-45. 

Asbell, Marion Jean Sunbury, N. C. 

Bangle, Bernice lona 406 W. Ninth St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Boon, Mary Johnston Church St., Gibsonville, N. C. 

Boyd, Virginia Mae 24 Maple St., Graham, N. C. 

Braxton, Esther Florine Box 507, Whiteville, N. C. 

Braxton, Ruby Elizabeth Box 507, Whiteville, N. C. 

Brewer, Sarah Louise Box 162, Pittsboro, N. C. 

Clayton, Annie Louise Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Cole, Dorothy Hazel Route 1, Biscoe, N. C. 

Coxe, Mary Baxley Wagram, N. C. 

Dean, Lois Marie 410 Long St., Amherst, Ohio 

Ezell, Ida Virginia 7 Beuthall Apts., Howard St., Phoebus, Va. 

Faulconer, Catherine Elizabeth 606 Webb Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Franks, Joseph Daniel, Jr Big Oak Farm, Elon College, N. C. 

Franks, Martha Lee Route 4, Raleigh, N. C. 

Graham, Robert Jenkins Route 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Griffin, Marian Geraldine .Route 1, Summerfield, N. C. 

Hancock, Eugene Glen Maple St., Graham, N. C. 

Haney, Mildred 312 Hawkins St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hensley, Ruby Dale Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Hoffman, Thomas Ervin Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Holland, Dorothy Virginia Box 590, Shelby, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 103 

Hook, Doris Patricia Elon College, N. ,C. 

Horner, Thomas Mar land 131 Craven St., New Bern, N. C.- 
Johnson, Inez Eva Box 265, Belmont, N. C. 

Kernodle, Verna Lee Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

King, Doris Adell Route 3, Burlington, N. C, 

Lamm, Dorothy Elizabeth 200 Gilmer St., Burlington, N. C, 

Leonard, James Olin Route 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Lloyd, Bettie Sue Efland, N. C. 

Marlette, Willard Grimes Route 2, Graham, N. C. 

McPherson, Elnor Dare Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Morgan, Lucille Irene Route 1, Box 461 -A, Hampton, Va. 

Moore, Willard Glenn 115 Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 

Neese, Hilda Grey Route 2, Graham, N. C. 

Norris, Verdalee Route 2, Box 18, Jonesboro, N. C. 

Register, Fred Page Route 1, Sanford, N. C. 

Reid, Harold Alfred 1202 Redgate Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Rice, Margaret Winslow Route 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Riley, Leslie Walter 702 Washington St., Burlington, N. C. 

Rogers, Luther Frank Route 1, Magnolia, N. C. 

Shoffner, Kathleen Smith Box 213, Liberty, N. C. 

Showe (Mrs.), Dorothy Mae Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Smith, Betsy Maude Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Smith, (Mrs.), Elizabeth Riddick Elon College, N. C. 

Smith, Joyce Adelle Ill College, Whiteville, N. C. 

Stanford, Jr., Richard A Route 2, Graham, N. C. 

Stout, Opal Mae 609 Walker Ave, Greensboro, N. C. 

Strader, Anne Ruth Box 232, Carthage, N. C. 

Sunbury, John Harvey 159 Vance St., New Britain, Conn.. 

Waugh, Agnes Lorraine Box 127, Elon College, N. C. 

Webster, Margarette Ruth 214 W. Kime St., Burlington, N. C. 

Welch, Malchus Victor Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Whatley, Ralph Emerson, Jr Ulah, N. C. 

Yarbrough, Fred Wilson Route 1, Roxboro, N. C. 

FRESHMAN CLASS— 1944-45. 

Allen, George Lemuel, Jr 117 Weatherspoon St., Sanford, N. C. 

Argenbright, Elinor Jean 103 Enola Drive, Enola, Pa.. 

Bain, Frank McDowell, Jr Box 294, Haw River, N. Cl 

Banks. Daniel Everett Route 1, New Bern, N. Cl 

Barham, Howard Lee . . . . ^ Box 54, Reidsville, N. C^ 

Barrett, Jo Nell 127 Wellons St., Suffolk, Va. 

Benton, Elizabeth Curtis 232 Lucille Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Berry, Roy Henderson Efland, N. C. 

Blue, Betty Louise Box 263, Aberdeen, N. C." 

Blacknall, Louise Foster 11 Lawsonville Ave., Reidsville, N. C." 

Braxton, Archie Ira, Jr Route 1, Snow Camp, N. C. 

Bryan, Viola Marie Elon Road, Burlington,. N; Gl. 



104 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Burch, Jack Melvin Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Chandler, Florine JNIargaret Route 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Chandler, Fred jNIalloy Semora, N. C. 

Clapp, Edna ISIae Route 6, Box 126, Greensboro, N. C. 

Cole, Maxine Stuart Jackson Springs, N. C. 

Collins, Helen Hinton 209 Thomas St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Copeland, William Carlton Route 1, Sunbury, N. C. 

Coslon, Thelma Marie Route 1, Box 84, Maysville, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Willie Smith Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Dameron, Naomi Corinne 115 E. Peyton, Kinston, N. C. 

Daniels, Herman Burton, Jr Route 1, Beaufort, N. C. 

Davis, Rutli Ermine Route 5, Box 255, Durham, N. C. 

Detrick, Alice Frances Route 1, De Graff, Ohio 

Dunn, Charlie Joseph 1104 Waterman Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Earp, Jo Mauree 338 Concord Road, Albemarle, N. C. 

Eason, Agnes Barber Macclesfield, N. C. 

Eaves, Sydney Paige Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Felton, Marcus Delman Route 1, Whaleyville, Va. 

Foster, Edith Daniel Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

Foster, Hal D., Jr 107 E. Ruffin St., Burlington, N. C. 

Foster, Truella Uldine Route 2, Henderson, N. C. 

Foust, Robert Arrington Long Ave., Graham, N. C. 

Freeman, Arwilda Carter 706 Chiorch St., Burlington, N. C. 

Gilliam, Emery Keith Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Graham, Irma Ruth Route 1, Cameron, N. C. 

Gray, Alise Virginia 418 N. Elm St., Asheboro, N. C. 

Griffin, Arie Anne Route 1, Summerfield, N. C. 

Grinstead, Ronald Bryan Route 1, Blanche, N. C. 

Gunter, Helen Wrenn Box 32, Trinity, N. C. 

Hall, Thomas Roy 609 Ireland St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hardy, Eurath Ann 22 Wade Ave., Catonsville, Md. 

Hedrick, Margie Ella Route 2, Greensboro, N. C. 

Hinton, Leon Carrington 606 Kivet St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hudson, Marguerite Wayne Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Hurdle, Allen Lafayette 402 Apple St., Burlington, N. C. 

Inman, Paul Kermit Freeland, N. C. 

Johnson, Hazel Vernell Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Johnson, Jack Edward Route 3, Siler City, N. C. 

Johnson, Rachael Louise Route 3, Siler City, N. C. 

Johnson, Susie Elizabeth Route 1, Box 281, Suffolk, Va. 

LeVine, Eleanor Jean 1 Bayfront Place, Baldwin, N. Y. 

Lewis, Jane Mary Graham, N. C. 

Little, William Dvmcan Route 2, St. Pauls, N. C. 

Long, Ralph Clinton Prospect Hill, N. C. 

Lyon, James Wallace Gilmer St., Burlington, N. C. 

Maness, SaraJi Martha Raeford, N. C. 

Martin, Thomas Harry Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 105 

McBane, Helen Gray Route 2, Graham, N. C. 

McCauley, Jane Utley Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

McEntire, William Harrison Spindale, N. C. 

Menager, Florence Patricia 3531 Bevis Ave., Cincinnati 7, Ohio 

Miles, Doris Kathleen 300 Rauhut St., Burlington, N. C. 

Moore, Elizabeth Irene Route 4, Reidsville, N. C. 

Morgan, Ella Mae Route 1, Box 461-A, Hampton, Va. 

Nail, Jack Augustus 301 Williamson Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Neighbors, Carl Ralph 210 Hawkins St., Burlington, N. C. 

Nelson, Virginia Dana Winchester, Va. 

Owen, Wallace Hufman Gibsonville, N. C. 

Parks, Ellen Eugenia Ramseiir, N. C. 

Pass, John Wiley Roxboro, N. C. 

Patterson, Joseph Route 5, Burlington, N. C. 

Peeler, James David Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Pegram, Frances Carol 209 Carolina Ave., Henderson, N. C. 

Pender, Alma Doering Box 478, Leaksville, N. C. 

Petrea, Raymond 1531 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Pollard, Dewey Lee Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Rakestraw, Gladys Route 1, Stoneville, N. C. 

Rawls, Harvey Pretlow 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Reid, Philip Dean 1240 Woodland Drive, Charlotte, N. C. 

Reitzel, Lynna Grey 303 Everett St., Burlington, N. C. 

Rickard, Faye Route 1, Burlington, N. .C 

St. Clair, Frances Elizabeth Eggleston, Va. 

Scott, Helen Arnold High St., Lawrenceville, Va. 

Setzer, Fred Lee Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Simpson, Marjory Frances Box 235, Route 2, Jonesboro, N. C. 

Smith, Leo Malcolm 321 W. Morgan St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Snyder (Mrs.), Nellie Gray Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Stanford, Carrie Elizabeth Route 2, Graham, N. C. 

Stone, Henry Jackson, Jr Siler City, N. C. 

Storey, Bobby Jack 342 Albright Ave., Graham, N. C. 

Summers, Lester Roland Route 1, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Sutton, John Theophilus Route 3, Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Truitt, Carrie Louise Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Turner, Harry Greer, Jr 606 Elam Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Walker, Bonnie Faye Barnes St. Ext., Reidsville, N. C. 

Walker, Vivian Allen Route 1, Asheboro, N. C. 

Wall, Jean Craig 202 Gilmer St., Burlington, N. C. 

Ward, Gertrude Route 1, Clarendon, N. C. 

Webster, Ruth Route 1, Haw River, N. C. 

White, Edward Carl, Jr Route 2, Waverly, Va. 

Whitlock, Jane Box 233, Carthage, N. C. 

Wilson, Kathryn Charlotte 502 Cameron St., Burlington, N. C. 

Wolfe, Thomas Arthur 1012 Park Ave. Ext., Burlington, N. C. 

Wrenn, Patsy Ruth Route 2, Box 80, Durham, N. C. 



106 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Yarbrough, Sara Louise Yanceyville, N. C. 

Young, Alma Kathleen Vernon, Ala. 

COMMERCIAL CLASS— 1944-45. 

Beckom, Thelma Irene Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Boone, Helen Colene Cedar Grove, N. C. 

Breedlove, Erma Ruth Route 5, Box 416, Durham, N. C. 

Brewer, Cora Alice Route 1, Peachland, N. C. 

Brown, Elsie Amaryllis Route 1, Brown Summit, N. C. 

Brown, Mildred Inez Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Burkhead, Omri Dell Box 66, Candor, N. C. 

Canady, Erma Dixon Route 2, Parkton, N. C. 

Carter, Erna Nell 63 Montgomery St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Carter, June Ann Route 1, Thomasville, N. C. 

Chappell, Cornelia Kathleen Candor, N. C. 

Clapp, Edna Doris Route 6, Box 126, Greensboro, N. C. 

Coble, Vivian Irene Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Cochrane, Pattie Elizabeth Ether, N. C. 

Cole, Oneida Wyona Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Cook, Edward Lee 345 Mill St., Graham, N. C. 

Crumpton, Frances Louise Altamahaw, N. C. 

Daugherty, Hilda Grace 1303 N. Heritage St., Kinston, N. C. 

Faircloth, Louise 314 Walnut St., Reidsville, N. C. 

Flinchum, Dora Leigh Box 237, Carthage, N. C. 

Gamer, Norris Marie Aberdeen, N. C. 

Gibson, Sarah Nell 3506 Bainbridge Blvd., Norfolk, Va. 

Gomer, Rachel Hunter Route 2, Holland, Va. 

Gowens, Mabel Juanita 209 Marshall St., Graham, N. C. 

Harris, Sarah Lenora 505 Church St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hedrick, Jacqueline Ray Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Hill, Katherine Jaunita Box 401, Elon College, N. C. 

Hudson, Bertha Pauline Route 1, Box 102, Connellys Springs, N. C. 

Jenkins, George Anderson, Jr Route 1, Liberty, N. C. 

Jones, Mary Ella Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Joseph, Sylvia Marie 415 Spencer Ave., New Bern, N. C. 

Lamb, Vera Etta 530 S. Park St., Asheboro, N. C. 

Lindley, James Thomas 207 Highland Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Liverman, Eva Louise 4109 Bernard St.. Norfolk 6, Va. 

Long, Colien Daniel Route 1, Roxboro, N. C. 

Longest, Faye Earleen 1345 Marshall St., Graham, N. C. 

Mabe, Marcelene 415 Chestnut St., Asheboro, N. C. 

McCrimmon, Bemice Pittsboro, N. C. 

Moore, Elizabeth Irene Route 4, Reidsville, N. C. 

Moore, Evelyn Levonia Ill Melville St., Graham, N. C. 

Morris, Peggy Jill 301 Banks St., Graham, N. C. 

Neese, John Thomas 211 N. Main St., Graham, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 107 

O'Briant, Margaret Dare Leasburg Ave., Roxboro, N. C. 

Paige, Vallie Victoris Elon College, N. C. 

Pierce, Dorothy Sunbury, N. C. 

Pittman, Mildred Sadie Route 2, Selma, N. C. 

Porter, Virginia Celeste Tabor City, N. C. 

Powell, Ruth Virginia Route 1, Simbury, N. C. 

Robinson, Faye Meriel Atlantic, N. C. 

Rosser, Mary Eunice Route 1, Broadway, N. C. 

Russ, Sarah Artelia Box 123, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Schadel, Mildred Irene Route 2, Suffolk, Va. 

Scoggin, Mary Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Shaw, Carleen Alta Route 1, Mebane, N. C. 

Simmons, Naomi Jane Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Simpson, Irene Willie Elon College, N. C. 

Sinclair, Shirley Jane Aberdeen, N. C. 

Taylor, Vera Marie Route 1, Elizabethtown, N. C. 

Todd, Prudence Eve Route 1, Whiteville, N. C. 

Turner, Mary Elizabeth 522 Sideview Ave., Graham, N. C. 

Vickers, Attelia Alda 1821 Oak Ave., Brunswick, Ga. 

Ward, Grace Evelyn Route 1, Staley, N. C. 

Ward, Janet Alevia Whaleyville, Va. 

Warren, Nancy Grey Cedar Grove, N. C. 

Young, Dorothy Raj'e Box 75, Roxboro, N. C. 

SECOND YEAR COMMERCIAL CLASS— 1944-45. 

Allison, Lucy Holden 717 Central Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Barnham, Jennie Lee 112 Carolina Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Bogue, Verble Marie Freemont, N. C. 

Brewer, Harriet Miuriel Route 1, Roxboro, N. C. 

Brooks, Barbara Lou Box 502, Siler City, N. C. 

Coffin, Theressa Lea Box 433, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Cooper, Catherine W 214 W. Ruf&n St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dickinson, Marjorie Helene Route 1, Smithfield, N. C. 

Harris, Edna Frances N. Main St., Roxboro, N. C. 

Hester, Anne Elizabeth . , Route 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

McCotter, Robert Francis Vandemere, N. C. 

McLean, Bette Doreene Star Route, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Morgan, William Jackson Carthage, N. C. 

Morris, Helen lona Jackson, N. C. 

Rader, Beverly Ann Box 127, Burlington, N. C. 

Roberts, Hilda Mae Route 1, Cameron, N. C. 

Shepard, Myrtle Marie Box 257, Route 2, Liberty, N. C. 

Taylor, David Wayne Route 1, Efland, N. C. 

Walker, Florence 921 S. Park Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Williams, Dorothy Alene 310 S. Main St., Suffolk, Va. 

Wrenn, Sarah Lou Route 1, Roxboro, N. C. 



108 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

MUSIC— 1944-45. 

Barboiir, Jon Carr Parkview Drive, Burlington, N. C. 

Barbour, Joseph Parker .Parkview Drive, Burlington, N. C. 

Barette, Dorothy 

Beard, Mildred 809 Tucker St., Burlington, N. C. 

Boland, Margaret Anne Elon College, N. C. 

Brackett, Jewell Rae Elon College, N. C. 

Bradshaw, Lois 613 S. Broad St., Burlington, N. C. 

Braxton, Archie Ira, Jr Route 1, Snow Camp, N. C. 

Braxton, Esther Florine Box 507, Whiteville, N. C. 

Browning, Mary Elizabeth 328 N. Maple St., Graham, N. C. 

Colclough, Mary Sue Elon College, N. C. 

Council, Annabell Durham, N. C. 

Dabbs, Dorothy Mae Elon College, N. C. 

Danieley, James Earl Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Davidson, Eleanor Gibsonville, N. C. 

Dellinger, George, Jr Burlington, N. C. 

Edwards, Norma Jean Gibsonville, N. C. 

Flanigan, Pat Faye 536 Banks St., Graham, N. C. 

Foster, C. T., Jr 612 Cameron St., Burlington, N. C. 

Foster, Dolly Ree Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Hall, Edith Elizabeth Box 32, Route 1, Woodleaf, N. C. 

Hardy, Eurath Ann 22 Wade Ave., Catonsville, Md. 

Harrell, Vivian Brown Route 1, Suffolk, Va. 

Harrelson, Evelyn Sue Tabor City, N. C. 

Hill, Barbara 123 Pine St., Graham, N. C. 

Hoffman, Elizabeth Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Holland, Elizabeth Alice Box 590, Shelby, N. C. 

Hudson, Marguerite Wayne Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Huffine, Mary Louise Box 325, Elon College, N. C. 

Isley, Ted 301 Everette St., Burlington, N. C. 

Jarosz, Myra Graham, N. C. 

Johnson, Fj-ank Wilson Graham, N. C. 

Johnson, Hazel Yemen Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Johnson, Susie Elizabeth Route 1, Box 281, Suffolk, Va. 

Jones, Restie Shirley Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Kernodle, Sara Rebecca Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Knight, Marie Essie 601 Cameron St., Burlington, N. C. 

Lewis, Jane Mary Graham, N. C. 

Lindsey, Merle Burlington, N. C. 

Lynch, Alma Estelle Box 231, Elon College. N. C. 

Martin, Karen Elon College, N. C. 

McCauley, Jane Utley Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

McCrimmon, Pauline Pittsboro, N. C. 

McPherson, Ruth Lea Box 195, Burlington, N. C. 

Moore, Wayne 115 Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER 109 

Morgan, Lucille Irene Route 1, Box 461-A, Hampton, Va. 

Neighbors, Carl Ralph 210 Hawkins St., Burlington, N. C. 

Newman, Joann 1707 Woodland Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Petrea, Raymond 1531 W. Davis St., Burlington, N. C. 

Pritchett, Mary Elizabeth Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Rader, Bettie Maude Box 127, Burlington, N. C. 

Rader, Jeanne Box 127, Burlington, N. C. 

Randolph, Fletcher Harmon Gibsonville, N. C. 

Rice, Lida Etta Box 34, Elon College, N. C. 

Simmons, Jean Barbara Elon College, N. C. 

Slate, Betty Jane 400 Circle Drive, Burlington, N. C. 

Stanford, Carrie Elizabeth Route 2, Graham, N. C. 

Steele, Hilda Grey 401 N. Mebane St., Burlington, N. C. 

Steele, Ladosca Gibsonville, N. C. 

Strader, Anne Ruth Box 232, Carthage, N. C. 

Suggs, Wanda 119 Anthony St., Burlington, N. C. 

Sykes, John Howard 812 Maple Ave., B'jrlington, N. C. 

Truitt, Carrie Louise Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Westmoreland, Dolly Gibsonville, N. C. 

Wiles, Betty 715 Maple Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Wilkins, Lacola Edgewood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

ART— 1944-45. 

Allison, Lucy Holden 717 Central Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Apple, Ann Elizabeth Box 304, Elon College, N. C. 

Barham, Jennie Lee 112 Carolina Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Boyd, Eliza Myrtle 238 Young St., Henderson, N. C. 

Braxton, Ruby Elizabeth Box 507, V/hiteville, N. C. 

Bryan, Viola Marie Elon Road, Burlington, N. C. 

Crutchfield, Willie Smith Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Florence, Mrs. W. R Burlington, N. C. 

Hensley, Ruby Dale Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Kernodle, Verna Lee Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Kerns, Louvinia Ether, N. C. 

McCants, Mary Ellen 928 Power St., Anderson, S. C. 

Miller, Donald Davis 933 W. Main St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Oldham, Jessamine Guthrie St., Burlington, N. C. 

Paul, Evelyn Btirlington, N. C. 

Reitzel, Edna Louise Hillsboro, N. C. 

Shepard, Myrtle Marie Box 257, Route 2, Liberty, N. C. 

Showe (Mrs.), Dorothy Mae Route 4, Burlington, N. C. 

Snyder, Nellie Gray Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Snyder, Walstein Welch Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Southerland, John Rodney Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Stafford, Mrs. George Graham, N. C. 

Yarbrough, Sara Louise Yanceyville, N. C. 



no ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

SPECIAL STUDENTS— 1944-45. 

Bishop, Raymond Lendo 608 Chestnut St., Burlington, N. C. 

Bellinger, Rev. George Burlington, N. C. 

Hobbs, Otis Oliver 608 Chestnut St., Biu-lington, N. C. 

Holder, James Franklin 108 Tucker St., Burlington, N. C. 

McCuiston, Coy Crawford 600 Glenwood Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Simmons, Dr. A. W 410 Webb Ave., Burlington, N. C. 

Southerland, John Rodney Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Walker, William Thomas Brown Summit, N. C. 

Westmoreland, James Phillip Box 37, Gibsonville, N. C. 

Whitesell, Hurley Elmo, Jr Elon College, N. C. 

SUMMER SCHOOL— 1944— BOTH SESSIONS. 

Andrews, Ralph Brantley P. O. Box 284, Elon College, N. C. 

Apple, Annie Elizabeth Elon College, N. C. 

Bangle, Bernice lona 406 W. Ninth St., Charlotte, N. C. 

Barney, Winifred Elon College, N. C. 

Biddix, Clarence Finley Route 4, Marion, N. C. 

Boland, Iris Celeste Box 242, Elon College, N. C. 

Boland, Margaret Anne Box 242, Elon College, N. C. 

Bowman, Reeda Ararat, Va. 

Boyd, Eliza Myrtle 238 Young St., Henderson, N. C. 

Bradshaw, Lois Burlington, N. C. 

Braxton, Esther Florine Box 507, Whiteville, N. C. 

Breedlove, Ruth Erma Route 5. Box 608, Durham, N. C. 

Brewer, Cora Alice Route 1, Peachland, N. C. 

Brewer, Harriet Muriel Route 1, Roxboro, N. C. 

Brower, Mary Jean Box 306, Liberty, N. C. 

Browne, Lula Pemica 213 Lakewood Road, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Browning, Mary Elizabeth 328 Maple St., Graham, N. C. 

Buckner, Catherine Athaleen Pittsboro Road, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Callahan, Virginia Junken 202 Atwater St., Burlington, N. C. 

Gates, Jesse Howard 717 N. Main St., Burlington, N. C. 

Cobb, Helen Henderson 400 W. Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Chase, Katherine Joyce Route 1, Fremont, N. C. 

Colclough, Mary Sue Elon College, N. C. 

Coxe, Mary Baxley Wagram, N. C. 

Daniels, Herman Burton, Jr Route 1, Beaufort, N. C. 

Davis, Bonnie Grace Eureka, N. C. 

Davis, John P Center St., Statesville, N. C. 

Dean, Lois Marie 410 Long St., Amherst, Ohio 

Detrick, Alice Frances Route 1, De Graff, Ohio 

Durham, Alton Thomas 314 Logan St., Burlington, N. C. 

Dyer, Ruth Elizabeth Route 2, Ruffin, N. C. 

Farrell, Earl Route 1, Pittsboro, N. C. 

Foltz, Dorothy Nell Luray, Va. 



THE CATALOGUE NUMBER m 

'Franks, Joseph Daniel Route 1, Elon College, N. C. 

Gunter, Frances Patishall 516 Mclver St., Sanford, N. C. 

Harrington, Irene Burrxis Taylorsville, N. C. 

Harrington, Walter Wilson .Taylorsville, N. C. 

Henderson, Alma Ruth 90S Askew St., Burlington, N. C. 

Hensley, Ruby Dale Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Hill, Barbara Anne 123 Pine St., Graham, N. C. 

Holt, Lena Dare Route 2, Reidsville, N. C. 

Holland, Elizabeth Alice Box 590, Shelby, N. C. 

Hook, Doris Patricia Elon College. N. C. 

Hook, INIary Jeanne . _ Elon College, N. C. 

Homer, Thomas Marland 131 Craven St., New Bern, N. C. 

Hudson, Bertha Pauline Route 1, Box 102, Connellys Springs, N. C. 

Kernodle, Margaret Jean Elon College, N. C. 

King, Doris Adell Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Lamm, Dorothy Elizabeth 200 Gihner St., Burlington, N. C. 

Leete, Patricia Holden Macon, N. C. 

Lloyd, Bettie Sue Efland, N. C. 

Martin Karen Elon College, N. C. 

Malone, Hilda Lee Prospect Hill, N. C. 

McCauley, Jane Utley Route 1, Henderson, N. C. 

McClure, Jane L Elon College, N. C. 

Messick, Mary Rosalyn Box 307, Elon College, N. C. 

Moore, Elizabeth Irene Box B, Elon College, N. C. 

Morgan, Virginia Dare Corapeake, N. C. 

Morris, Helen lona Jackson, N. C. 

Neal, Carl Ray Route 1, Belew Creek, N. C. 

Nielson, Betty Lynn Route 3, Liberty, N. C. 

Norris, Verdalee Box 331, Sanford, N. C. 

Oakley, Mary Frances Box 324, Elon College, N. C. 

Parker, Elizabeth Holland Sunbury, N. C. 

Patterson, Joseph Gladstone, Jr Route 6, Burlington, N. C. 

Perdue, Mary Juanita Route 2, Elon College, N. C. 

Pierce, Ruth Hazel Sunbury, N. C. 

Poe, Gene Preston Rockingham, N. C. 

Powell, Sophia M Elon College, N. C. 

Rawls, Harvey Pretlow 204 S. Broad St., Suffolk, Va. 

Reid, Harold Alfred 1202 Redgate Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Reitzel, Edna Louise Hillsboro, N. C. 

Rice, Margaret Winslow Route 2, Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Ross, Julia Frances 620 Fountain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Rossi, John 529 Wood St., Vineland, N. J. 

Rumley, Edna Virginia Elon College, N. C. 

Rumley, James Dewey Box 292 Elon College, N. C. 

Scott, Martha Jean 635 Fovmtain Place, Burlington, N. C. 

Simpson, Mary Elizabeth 207 Tarpley St., Burlington, N. C. 

Smith, Joyce Adelle HI College, Whiteville, N. C. 



112 ELON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Smith, Leo Malcolm 327 W. Morgan St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Somers, Frances Mae Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Somers, T\Iabel Lee Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Snyder, Nellie Gray Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Snyder, Walstein Welch Route 3, Burlington, N. C. 

Stone, Betty Bob Siler City, N. C. 

Stout, Opal Mae 609 Walker Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 

Strum, Ophelia Theo Leasburg Road, Roxboro, N. C. 

Swinton, Lillian Rountree Warsaw, N. C. 

Sunburn, Jack Harvey 159 Vance St., New Britain, Conn. 

Sutton, John Theophilus Route 3, Mt. Olive, N. C. 

Sutton, Thomas Daniel Gibsonville, N. C. 

Sykes, Mary Ellen Route 1, Graham, N. C. 

Tapscott, Claudia Jane Route 2, Burlington, N. C. 

Thurecht, Jessie Dale 1105 Hunnicutt Ave., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Underwood, Nannie Bet 721 Temple Ave., Danville, Va. 

Walker, Florence Keren Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 

Warren, Mary Maggie Staley, N. C. 

Westbrook, Iris Grey Route 5, Dunn, N. C. 

Whatley, Ralph Emerson Box 34, Ulah, N. C. 

Whitfield, Mrs. Claude C Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Winstead, Jane McKinnon Route 1, Roxboro, N. C. 

Wolfe, Thomas Arthur 1012 Park Ave. Ext., Burlington, N. C. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 29 

Juniors 31 

Sophomores 55 

Freshmen 108 

Commercial 65 

Second Year Commercial 21 

]Music 66 

Art 23 

Special Literary 10 

Total 408 

Less Those Counted Twice 37 

Total Regular Session 371 

Summer Session 103 

Grand Total 474 



'^1 



Date Due 








































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f) 









37B.05 

St68b 



1945 



37206 
Elon College. Department 

5f~lHe~Adiniriistratiori . 
Bulletins ,_^ia:^1945__ 



378.05 
3t68b 

19a- 

1945 



37206 



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