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Full text of "The bulletin of the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina [serial]"

Vol.X 



OCTOBER, 1962 



No. 1 



RE"'' 

DIVISION ^ ' 
HEALTH AFFAIRS UBRAK^ 



THE BULLETIN 



School of Medjcine 
University of North Carolina 



THE 

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ESTABLISHED THIS PLAN OF GROUP ACCIDENT AND 

HEALTH PROTECTION FOR ITS MEMBERS IN 1940 




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OPTIONAL HOSPITAL COVERAGE 



Available only to members who can 
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123 NORTH 
COLUMBIA STREI T 



A WORD OF THANKS 



Dr. Ernest Craige is an outstanding citizen of the University of North 
Carohna School of Medicine, and is well-known throughout the state and 
beyond as a clinician, teacher, and investigator of high character. His personal 
attributes match his professional capabilities, and he is clearly one of our most 
respected and popular people. Among the many tasks on behalf of the school 
which he has encumbered during the past decade, has been the editorial direc- 
tion of the Bulletin. Its steady growth as a friendly and informative com- 
munication between the school, its student body, house staff, and faculty and 
its alumni and friends has been due in great part to the efforts of Dr. Craige 
and the members of his committees since 19 5 3. The present editorial com- 
mittee acknowledges with gratitude Dr. Craige's many contributions to the 
Bulletin during his years as its Editor. 




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The Bulletin 

of the School of Medicine 
of the University of North CaroHna 

Pubhshed in cooperation with the Whitehead Medical Society 
and the Medical Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. 

Vol. X October, 1962 No. 1 

IN THIS ISSUE 

A Word of Thanks 6 

The University Medical Center 9 

The Very First Patient 1 5 

Reflections on Problems of A Medical Center 16 

The Whitehead Lecture 24 

The Class of 1966 32 

Presenting the Alumni 34 

Presenting the Faculty 3 5 

Presenting the House Staff 36 

Alumnus Honored 3 6 

Alumni News Items 37 

Parents' Club Affairs 38 

THE NEW COVER was designed by Mrs. Adele Speigler of the Depart- 
ment of Medical Illustrations, UNC School of Medicine 



Editorial Committee 

C. C. FoRDHAM, M.D. ('49) Hugh A. McAllister, M.D. ('35) 

Chairman j. t. Monroe, M.D. ('55) 

W. Reece Berryhill. M.D. ('25) George D. Penick, M.D. ('44) 

E. Ted Chandler. M.D. ('55) H. L. Stephenson, M.D. 

Ira Fowler, Ph.D ^- ^idra, Ph.D. 

Emory S. Hunt 

W. P. Jacocks, M.D. ('09) Quincey Ayscue ('63) 



Address all inquiries and communications to Eir.ory S. Hunt, 117 Medical 
Science Building— or Box 957, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Published four times a year — October. December, February and April — 
Entered as third-class matter at the Post Office at Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Working 
and Growing 
with the 

University Community 
Since 1899 



TODAY! 

A $13,000,000 institution ojjerijtg 
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President 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 
Chairman of the Board 

J. TEMPLE GOBBEL 

Executive Vice President 

and Cashier 



W. E. THOIVIPSON 
Vice President 



E. L. GRAY 
Ass't. Cashier 



OFFICERS 



W. R. CHERRY 
Comptrollei 

JOHN T. WETTACH 
Assistant Cashier 

JACK P. JURIMEY 

Ass't Cashier, Manager 

Carrboro Branch 

THELMA HARRIS 

Manager, 
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MRS. T. ADGER WILSON, JR. 
Manager, Eastgate Branch 



DIRECTORS 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

CLYDE EUBANKS 

RAYMOND L. ANORZWS 

D. D. CARROLL 

E. B. CRAWFORD 

R. B. FITCH 

DR. E. McG. HEDGPETH 

CROWELL LITTLE 

ROLAND McCLAMROCH 

C. W. STANFORD 

F. E. STROWD 

J. TEMPLE GOBBEL 

W. E. THOMPSON 



The Ban 




apel Hill 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 
GLEN LENNOX CARRBORO CHAPEL HILL 



EASTGATE 



The University Medical Center 
1952-1962 

by W. Reece Berryhill, M.D., '25, Dean 



In September, the second decade of operation of the expanded School of 
Medicine and the North CaroHna Memorial Hospital — the University Medical 
Center — began. The achievements of the first ten years have been significant — 
in many areas, exciting. There has been continued growth in quahty, in quantity 
and progress in education and training at all levels relating to medicine, in 
research, and in patient care. These developments and contributions are mak- 
ing an impact upon the quaUty of medicine in the State and have gained 
national recognition for the University in the field of medicine. 

The problems of the earlier years — those inherent in the expansion or de- 
velopment of all new four year medical schools — are now largely behind us. 
All in all, these have been fewer, within the Medical Center itself, than in most 
of the medical schools which have expanded or have been developed entirely 
from "scratch" in this and earlier decades. 

The understanding and support of the University administration, trustees, 
alumni, friends, faculty, students, house staff, leaders in the General Assembly, 
and of the State's Chief Executive during these years have been of very great 
value, and to all of these, we are grateful. 

The following seem to me to be contributions and developments of which 
the alumni and friends and indeed the entire State can be proud and which 
justify optimism and hope for the next decade. 

I. EDUCATION 

(A) Undergraduate Medical Students 

Beginning with those admitted in the first graduating class of 
1954 and including the current freshman class, 871 students have 
been admitted. Of these, 96 per cent were residents of North 
Carolina and have come from 87 counties. This represents almost 
5 per cent of all State residents who have entered all medical 
schools in the United States during this period and more than 5 
per cent of those who have attended medical schools in North 
Carolina. 

Five hundred and forty-one have graduated and of those who 
have completed both their graduate medical training in hospitals 
and military obligations, approximately 90 per cent have entered 
practice in North Carolina in 63 counties and are located from 
Burnsville in the West to Sea Level on the Coast. Approximately 
3 1 per cent of these are in Family Practice. There is still a large 
backlog of graduates in residency training or in military service. 



(B) Graduate Education 

Several of the basic science departments had been approved 
by the University Graduate School for the Masters and Ph.D. De- 
grees for many years before the School's expansion, but in the pr.st 
ten years, both the number and the quality of graduate students 
studying for advanced degrees in the Departments of Biological 
Chemistry, Bacteriology, Physiology, Pathology, and just recently 
in Genetics, have increased and improved. For this session they 
number 5 5. 

Graduate education (residency programs) has been developed 
and approved by the appropriate Boards in all clinical specialties. 
In addition, during this period, the hospital has provided an intern- 
ship and residency designed especially for those interested in Family 
Practice. During the last few years, here as elsewhere, there has 
been an increasing number of fellows and trainees in the clinical 
and basic science departments made possible by funds from the 
National Institutes of Health. This year this latter group numbers 40. 

In the development of the residency programs, the resources of 
several affiliated hospitals have been utilized. For example, in both 
the surgical and psychiatry residences, experience in the State mental 
hospitals of Umstead and Dix Fiill are included. There are joint 
residency programs in ( 1 j opthalmology involving the North 
Carolina Memorial Hospital, the McPherson Hospital in Durham, 
and the State mental hospitals; (2) in urology. Watts Hospital — 
North Carolina Memorial; and (3) in obstetrics. North Carolina 
Memorial — Southeastern General and the Wake County Memorial. 
The joint residency in psychiatry involving our own service and 
the State mental hospitals is generally well known and with the 
continued efforts of the institutions involved has played an im- 
portant part in the improved standards of patient care currently- 
prevailing in our mental institutions. 

(C) Continuation Education 

There has been a considerable expansion and diversification of the 
long established continuation education program for practicing 
physicians, including within the past year the initiation of the 
weekly two-way radio programs involving the staff of some ten 
community hospitals with their county medical societies. The reg- 
istration of physicians in these postgraduate courses for the decade, 
since 1951, totals over 5,000. Finally, opportunities have been pro- 
vided for undergraduate degrees in Medical Technology and in 
Physical Therapy, as well as a certificate program in X-Ray 
Technology. 

II. THE FACULTY 

The University has been fortunate over this period in attracting an able 
faculty in all departments, and although there have been some regrettable 
losses, it is really amazing and, at the same time, reassuring that so very 
many of the ablest remain and continue their efforts to build a better 

10 



School of Medicine. More and more their accompUshments are being 
recognized throughout the country and even internationally. In numbers, 
the full-time faculty has grown from 92 in 195 2 to 189 in 1962, while 
the very valuable part-time group has increased from 55 in 1952 to 163 
in 1962. 

The following are cited as at least a few indications of the quality of 
the faculty. During this period, eight faculty members have been selected 
as Markle Scholars in the Medical Sciences: 

Dr. John B. Graham — Professor of Pathology 

Dr. George D. Penick — Associate Professor of Pathology 

Dr. Isaac M. Taylor — Associate Professor of Medicine 

Dr. Judson J. Van Wyk — Professor of Pediatrics 

Dr. Franklin Williams — Associate Professor of Medicine and Preven- 
tive Medicine 

Dr. Walter Hollander, Jr. — Associate Professor of Medicine and 
Director, Clinical Research Unit 

Dr. Robert Zeppa — Assistant Professor of Surgery and Associate 
Director, Clinical Research Unit 

Dr. William D. Huffines — Assistant Professor of Pathology 

The following have been awarded Research Career Development 
Awards, USPHS (Formerly USPHS Research Fellows): 

Dr. Isaac M. Taylor — Associate Professor of Medicine 

Dr. Robert D. Langdell — Associate Professor of Pathology 

Dr. Edward Glassman — Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Dr. John K. Spitznagel — Associate Professor of Bacteriology and 

Assistant Professor of Medicine 
Dr. Charles L. Johnston — Assistant Professor of Physiology 
Dr. Robert H. Wagner — Associate Professor of Pathology and Bio- 
chemistry 
Dr. Martin H. Keeler — Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 
Dr. Billy Baggett — Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Bio- 
chemistry 
Dr. Ira Fowler — Associate Professor of Anatomy 
Dr. Arthur J. Prange, Jr. — Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Two members of the faculty have been selected for the USPFIS 
Career Research Awards: 

Dr. Judson J. Van Wyk — Professor of Pediatrics 

Dr. Morris A. Lipton — Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Dr. Carl W. Gottschalk has been awarded an American Heart Asso- 
ciation Career Investigatorship, which, by its terms, is equivalent to an 
endowed professorship. There have been only eleven such awards to date 
in the United States and Canada. 

With these and many others of high ability, the potential of the 
School and its future would appear bright indeed and its place secure, 
provided opportunity to continue to work under reasonably adequate 
conditions can be assured. At the moment, the adequate conditions very 
largely mean SPACE! 

11 



III. THE HOSPITAL SERVICES— PATIENT CARE 

Since September 1952 when the North Carolina Memorial Hospital 
opened with 7(> beds activated, there have been added Gravely Sanatorium 
with 100 beds for care and study of tuberculosis and chronic chest dis- 
eases and the psychiatric pavilion with 54 beds for inpatients and an 
out patient department. One floor of this building now houses temporarily 
the 12-bed general Clinical Research Unit. 

Special mention should be made of the important role played by the 
Gravely Sanatorium in the Medical Center. While administratively 
separate, it is functionally an internal part of the teaching — for under- 
graduates and house officers — and patient care responsibility of the School 
of Medicine and especially of the Departments of Medicine and Surgery. 

The number of activated beds in Memorial Hospital has increased 
from 7() to 385 — this does not include the 100 in Gravely. The annual 
occupancy rate is over 80 per cent and for the greater portion of the year, 
near 90 per cent. The current addition of a ten-bed isolation ward (7th 
floor porch enclosure) in pediatrics and the full activation of the special 
care ward — dependent on adequate nursing coverage — will bring the bed 
capacity to 413 or all the beds which can be provided until a major 
expansion has been completed. 

From the standpoint of both medical care and teaching, the ambula- 
tory clinic is assuming increasing and major importance. At the end of 
the first year of operation, there were approximately 2 5,000 patient visits. 
Ten years later, the number had increased to 10 5,000 visits. Here again, 
inadequate space causes delays in appointments for patients and otherwise 
handicaps the value and effectiveness of this service. This is the reason 
that an enlarged new ambulatory clinic for staff and private patients 
has been determined as the first priority in the proposed new addition to 
the hospital. 

In the developments in the area of patient care, special mention should 
be made of the initial development of the Acute Care Unit, its well 
proven value to patients, and its subsequent extension and broadening to 
a Special Care Ward to include special facilities for the treatment of 
severely burned patients, paraplegics, and other diseases or conditions 
requiring care that can best be given in such a facility. This represents 
one important step in implementing the important concept of graded 
patient care which the faculty and the administration of the Hospital 
and School have determined to effect throughout the hospital as soon 
as adequate space can be provided. 

There has been a continuing interest in various aspects of rehabilita- 
tion. Valuable assistance in implementing these concepts in both teaching 
and patient care has been made by financial support from the National 
Foundation and the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. Mention should 
be made of the work of Dr. Peacock in plastic surgery, especially of the 
hands and in speech therapy with children who have had cleft palate 
operations, the development of the Hearing and Speech Center under the 
direction of Dr. Newton Fischer, and the broad medical interests of Dr. 
Donald D. Weir. 

12 



Perh::ps one of the most important moves of this period was to 
combine — functionally and administratively — the Hospital and Medical 
School, effected in 1956, so that the Hospital became a department or a 
division within the Medical School. 

IV. RESEARCH 

The contributions of the faculty in investigation in many and varied 
fields of the basic medical sciences and in the clinical departments are 
widely known and respected and have done much to establish and further 
the reputation of the University Medical Center. Although in the past 
five to six years the availability of funds from the National Institutes of 
Health for investigation and special training has increased enormously, 
at the same time, it is significant that for the year 19 5 2-5 3 the total 
funds from sources outside the State appropriated budget for the support 
of research and special teaching and training projects totalled $3 80,000, 
while for the year 1961-62 such funds were of the order of $3,330,000. 

Another development of very real significance which provides addi- 
tional evidence of the high quality of the faculty is the award during the 
past two years of funds in the amount of approximately $3,500,000 over 
a seven year period to support (a) a general clinical research unit for 
the careful study of various disease processes in humans and (b) a cate- 
gorical clinical research unit for the study of hemorrhage and thrombosis 
in humans. 

V. FINANCES 

The financial support for a university medical center, whether in a 
state or privately controlled university, must come from many and varied 
sources and presents many complex problems. For years prior to 1947 and 
even later, it was argued by many that the State of North Carolina not 
only didn't need an expanded University Medical School but that it could 
not and would not provide adequate financial support. Experience thus 
far has shown that perhaps the State could not provide adequate financial 
support in toto for the adequate and complete operation of all the 
activities of this or comparable medical institutions at this period in 
the explosive developments in medicine. At the same time, with all its 
increasing obligations, the State of North Carolina has been reasonably 
generous in the support it has provided for the Medical School and the 
hospital services although such funds provide support for only a portion 
of the total needs. 

In 195 2-5 3, the State appropriation for the Medical School was 
$646,642, in 1962-63, $1,480,091; for the North Carolina Memorial 
Hospital in 1952-53 the State appropriation was $1,067,176 (prior to 
opening the psychiatric pavilion), and for 1962-63, the State appropria- 
tion for the entire Hospital, including the psychiatric service, which 
has always enjoyed a higher appropriation than the remainder of the 
Medical Center is $2,448,000. 

This report — already too long — is a summary of some of the develop- 
ments and accomplishments during the first decade of the expanded School. 
Obviously, all of us can rightly have a feeling of pride and some degree of 

13 



satisfaction, as well as great hope for the future. At the same time, the medical 
faculty is keenly aware of the gaps which must be filled and the shortcomings 
that prevail. 

There is a healthy dissatisfaction which continually motivates us all 
toward higher goals for the second decade. We are convinced that the future 
of the School is in large measure dependent upon how quickly more adequate 
physical facihties can be provided. In the attainment of these, you, as alumni, 
have a very key role to play, and we are confident you will do your utmost 
as the alumni, many of them your seniors, did in the period 1945-19 52. 



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14 




The Very 
First Patient 

By THOMAS B. BARNETT, M.D. 



While the first patient admitted to the North Carolina Memorial Hospital, 
the patient bearing Unit Number 1, is well-known as a result of considerable 
publicity at the time, the very first patient officially seen after opening the doors 
of this institution on September 2, 19 52, was an out-patient seen in the General 
Clinic quite early on the morning of that first day. 

Having been much involved in the planning for the opening of the 
hospital and particularly for the beginning of activities in the Out-Patient 
Department General Chnic, I was here quite early on the morning of Septem- 
ber 2, 19 52. The very first patient was here early on that morning for a 
somewhat different reason. She was an 18 year old Negro female, the mother 
of 2 children, aged 2 years and 1 year respectively. She was expecting her 
third almost any day. Since the plan had been to open the North Carolina 
Memorial Hospital on or about July 1, 1952, this patient had not consulted 
a physician during this pregnancy but had planned to come here as soon as 
the hospital opened. Because of unavoidable delays, the opening of the hospital 
came distressingly close to her expected date of confinement. As I have said, 
she was here quite early in the morning for good reason. 

The patient was examined and a diagnostic impression of pregnancy, 
uterine, near term, was made. An obstetrician was called into consultation and 
the diagnosis was confirmed by him. Within a few days, the patient appeared 
in the Emergency Room in active labor, but since the section of our new 
hospital designated for obstetrical patients and the associated nursery were not 
ready for occupation, it was necessary to refer the very first patient to a 
near-by institution where she was dehvered of a normal, healthy infant. This 
patient has continued to be followed in our clinic and was last seen May 2 1 
1962. 

This statement is being published as a matter of record and to illustrate 
how it was in the early days when the General Clinic was really a general chnic. 



Dr. Barnett is Associate Professor of Medicine, U.N.C. School of Mecficine. 

15 



Reflections on Problems of A 
Medical Center 

by Chester Keeper, M.D. 



The folloiuing article cotjccrns cur- 
rent problems of medical education, 
practice and research. It reflects some 
of the views of Dr. Chester Reefer, 
who delivered these remarks to mem- 
bers of the Departments of Medicine 
and Pediatrics of the University of 
North Carolina School of Medicine 
during an interdepartmental confer- 
ence held at Sedgefield, North Caro- 
lina, February, 1962. Dr. Reefer, 
formerly Wade Professor of Medicine, 
Boston University School of Medicine 
and Physician-in-Chief, Massachusetts 
Memorial Hospitals, is now University 
Professor, Boston University. 



Training programs are of several sorts. Resident training programs are 
usually designed to train generalists in medicine or pediatrics. Research training 
programs are designed for the training of men who plan to follow an academic 
career as teacher-investigators, or as investigators without teaching responsibiU- 
ties. In general, it can be said that these programs are quite different in content 
and emphasis, but in the clinical services they usually start after an internship. 

It should be recalled that resident and research training programs in the 
United States have multiplied at an astonishing rate since World War II. 

Also, resident training programs were designed, for the most part, during 
the early part of this century for the training of teacher-consultants, and not 
for teacher-investigators. The internship was designed for the better prepara- 
tion of the practitioner, the safe practitioner, but not for the specialist. 

Gradually, the resident training programs were changed to train teacher- 
investigators, who would devote their full time to this activity. The young 
man would spend half of his time in the care of general medical patients, and 
the other half working with an older man, under supervision and as a partner, 
doing clinical investigation. This was the system and it developed at a rapid 
pace. The type of training changed rapidly and was further divided into resi- 
dent training and research training. This was due, in part, to the establishment 
of certifying boards, accrediting agencies for hospitals and training programs. 
It was also conditioned by the growth of specialization, the increase in the 
number of special services provided for patients, and the growth of resources 
to support such programs of research-fellowships. 

Most resident training programs today are designed to train practitioners. 
Some will be part-time teachers in medical schools, others will not. They are 

16 



educational, training and service programs combined. In design, they aim to 
provide postgraduate training that makes a good physician out of an M.D. 

Chnical research training programs, in contrast to resident training pro- 
grams, are relatively new and the hne separating them may be rather thin. 
The division of the two is often artificial and has an economic determinant. 

Fellowship-traineeships which carried with them an honorarium were very 
few indeed prior to 1946. There were a few fellowships in medicine in our large 
universities. The foundations offered fellowships either directly or throuo^h 
institutions or agencies such as the National Research Council but, by and 
large, they were few. About the only way that a young man could obtain 
traming as a clinical investigator was to win a spot in a resident training 
program as they existed in a few university hospitals or in institutes like the 
Rockefeller Hospital. 

The situation today is in a state of flux and it has been changing rapidly 
for many reasons. But, we must not overlook the central objective of all 
traming programs. This is: to train better doctors, whether the primary 
objective of the doctor with respect to function is the practice of medicine, 
or to become a teacher-investigator or just an investigator. It is our job as 
academicians to provide opportunities for young men and women to develop 
along the paths of their greatest skill and aptitude. Programs should be de- 
veloped that have freedom and flexibility. 

If we agree that our duty as university people is to produce more and 
better doctors, more and better teachers and investigators, then it is both our 
responsibility and duty to provide the best opportunities for self-development 
in the care of patients and in advancing knowledge. 



Orange Savings & Loan Association 




CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 
A Thrift Institution 

Current Dividends 4% 

Compounded Semi-Annually 



17 



The Training of the System Specialist 

A system specialist is a person who concentrates his attention, his research 
or investigation, in a narrow rather than a broad area, although the system 
itself may be very broad indeed. Let me illustrate what I mean. Professor 
Michelson, Nobel Prize Laureate for his work in the physics of hght, told me 
one time that this had been his life-long interest and that he did not know 
what other physicists in his department were working on except in a general 
way. He used his knowledge of Hght, gained by experiment, to study its speed 
as well as measure such phenomena as land tides in contrast to sea tides. This 
is the extreme of system specialists in physics. 

There are some men who have a passion and an intense desire to learn 
as much as they can about a system or a region, such as the heart and blood 
vessels, allergy, etc. This has led to the creation of specialty boards, some- 
times called sub-specialty boards. 

The trend today is that some men want to quaHfy and be identified with 
a specialty or a system specialty and they want to concentrate upon a specific 
subject early in their medical careers. For those who choose this path of train- 
ing, opportunities and encouragement should be stimulated. The training of such 
a person should encompass a period of generalization, perhaps not more than a 
year or two after graduation from medical school, and then be followed by 
specific training. This is best carried out within speciahzed sections of research 
training. 

Here, opportunities should be available for men to study the basic sciences 
of mathematics, physics, biology, etc., as a part of research training and I 
might add, the history of science as well as science in history. The latter adds 
to our understanding and certainly helps the system specialist in his work and 
assists him in becoming not only a skilled technician but a scholar. 

Interdepartmental Relations 

The next topic I propose to discuss is interdepartmental relations. This 
subject applies not only to relations between departments of pediatrics and 
medicine but to all departments within a university medical school or center. 
In the recent past, I have made some general observations upon the importance 
of the practice of interdepartmental relations (interdisciplinary) and profes- 
sional collaboration in medicine is both necessary and essential for several rea- 
sons. It is necessary for the advancement of science, the improvement of health, 
and the education and training of the doctor. By professional collaboration, I 
mean a closer intellectual contact among the members of departments and 
specialties and the substitution of group objectives, voluntarily accepted, for 
the individual objectives of the members. 

As specialism increases, the need for improved professional collaboration 
between departments becomes necessary because the exchange of ideas and 
better communication between groups aids in the definition of problems, and 
opens up and stimulates new paths of investigation. The need for further 
improvement of interdepartmental relations in our medical centers is important 
for both doctors and patients. It accelerates the advancement of knowledge 
and its application. Let me give you a striking example of professional 
collaboration between specialists. 

The Alfred Hess-Adolph Windhaus Story 

When dermal tissues are radiated with ultraviolet rays in vitro, they have 
antirachitic power. Alfred Hess and Weinstock proved this by feeding human 

18 



or calf skin to rats on a rachitogenic diet; while non-radiated skin had httle 
or no healing effect. Thus, sunlight activates a provitamin in the skin. Hess 
was tormented by this observation and his own chemistry was inadequate to 
solve the problem. He invoked in vain the aid of several American chemists. 
He knew that the skin contained ergosterol and cholesterol but he was unable to 
determine what substance developed following exposure to ultraviolet light. 

Finally, he communicated his problem, his findings, and his hypotheses, 
to Professor Adolph Windhaus, the great biochemist at Gottingen, Germany, 
the world's expert steroid chemist of that time. It is reported he said to 
Windhaus, "What substance develops following ultraviolet light exposure of 
ergosterol or cholesterol?" Windhaus said 7-dihydrocholesterol or "viosterol." 
He went ahead and solved the problem and was awarded the Nobel Prize for 
his work on cholesterol and vitamin D. As a fitting appreciation of the part 
which Hess had played, he divided the honorarium with Hess, who used it, as 
he had long been using his own private resources, in the further prosecution 
of his studies. 

Here, then, is an example of true collaborative research, by foremost in- 
vestigators working together and searching for new facts which have practical 
importance in safeguarding or improving health. 

The means of developing and improving interdepartmental collaboration 
always presents problems and calls for thorough self-examination on a con- 
tinuing basis because it is a dynamic process and calls for maintaining strong 
interpersonal relationships. We need to recognize the advantages and work 
hard to overcome the difficulties. 

A fair question is, how can interdepartmental relationships be improved? 
First of all, I submit that there must be appreciation of the need and the idea, 
and the joining together of groups as true partners for progress. This requires 
acceptance of the doctrine of equality of respect among all participating groups, 
which is one of the basic premises of any such relationship. 

Second, an element of potential success is the development of what might 
be called, in the common jargon of the day, a positive program, that is, a plan 
based upon objectives and goals and an expression of the results you hope to 
achieve, agreed to by the participants, based upon local needs and available 
facilities and evolved by the staff or personnel of the combined departments. 
It requires planning and organization for the flow of work, and adequate 
financing with proportionate contributions of resources. 

Third, in the development of any program, one must build and lead from 
strength. One must capitalize upon the skills, imagination and intellectual 
experience of the members of the group and their voluntary acceptance of 
a group objective. 

Fourth, the program should avoid conformity to a rigid and regimented 
pattern as determined by an outside approving authority. It should allow for 
freedom and flexibility for maximum development. 

In short, then, improved interdepartmental relationships with respect to 
teaching, research and patient care in our medical centers are essential if we are 
to advance knowledge, transmit it and apply it for the benefit of the patient. 

Now, it must be recognized that some scientists, like Einstein, work best 
as individuals and do not work well in tandem. Insofar as such individuals are 
concerned, their talents must be respected but insofar as professional collabora- 
tion is concerned, they can be forgotten because there are too few of them, and 

19 



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YESTERDAY AND TODAY 

Pictured here are scenes photographed more than ten years ago at the 
beginning and during construction of the UNC School of Medicine and 
Memorial Hospital. The bottom right photo shows the center as it appears today. 
Within a few niotitlis, n wooded area containing two small buildings (the 
infirmary and old medical school) was transformed into the complex structure 
shown as it note exists. Will changes during the next ten years be as great? 




they do their best work and make their greatest contributions in an environ- 
ment such as an institute for advanced study where they have no duties but 
only opportunities of individual achievement. 

The interdependence among various medical disciplines is great and is 
increasing because of the accumulation and advancement of knowledge and the 
growth of specialization. 

The need to improve communications between departments by working 
together with a set of goals should be a major objective. 

I turn attention now to the third topic; namely, the merits and defects of 
the present divisions of family medical care by general practitioners, pediatricians 
and internists. 

Patterns of family medical care and their quaUty vary from one com- 
munity to another, depending upon many factors — the number of physicians 
and their age, background, education and training, the accessibility and avail- 
ability of health resources (hospitals, public health stations or centers, labora- 
tory facihties, nurses and social agencies), the socio-economic status of the 
community (per capita income) and finally, the kind of medical care the 
family will select, accept and pay for. This is related to pubhc attitudes toward 
medicine and health, local customs and education. 

To discuss division of medical care properly, I submit that it is necessary 
to define a doctor by what he does. (We must admit at once that the doctor 
changes with society and it is what he does and how he does it that counts. 
The doctor today lives in a different world and while what he does changes, 
his basic function is to manage patients for their welfare and benefit.) 

A personal physician is the doctor who assumes responsibihty for the care 
of an individual patient. A family physician is a doctor who assumes respon- 
sibihty for the medical care of a family. A general practitioner may be a per- 
sonal physician or a family physician. A pediatrician is a physican who accepts 
responsibility for child care, and the internist is usually a physician who accepts 
responsibility for the medical care of the adults of a family. Sometimes, the 
pediatrician or the internist acts as a consultant and accepts patients only upon 
referral, and then he shares the responsibility for the total care of the patient 
through his advice. 

In my opinion, every person should have a personal physician who should 
be responsible for the medical care of the patient. If he feels that he needs 
outside help or advice, he should guide the patient to the proper facilities or 
doctor for help but he should continue to accept responsibility for the total 
care of the patient unless he discharges the patient to the care of another 
doctor. In many instances, this is desirable because the way the doctor manages 
the relationship with patients is a crucial factor in practice, and it is important 
for both the doctor and the patient. 

When a patient has more than one doctor and there is no communication 
between them, then difficult situations arise and medical care of poor quality 
may follow as a result of conflicting information. This sort of situation should 
be avoided and discouraged. When it exists, it is a defect. 

The merits of the division of family medical care are that if a person 
has a personal physician, who is competent and well trained, and knows his 
limitations, and a good relationship is established, the patient is likely to 
receive the best care. 

22 



My own opinion is that the adults of the family should have a personal 
physician; one who supervises and guides the patient in medical care, and one 
who refers the patient to another doctor for special services when they are 
needed, be it pediatrician, surgeon or obstetrician. 

In practice, family medical care, whether it is divided or individualized 
with respect to specialists or family physicians, will have to be assessed upon 
the basis of the human relations the doctor establishes with the family or the 
individual patient. 

I do want to emphasize that, as academic educators, we have a respon- 
sibility to the public and community for providing exemplary medical care 
of the sick; for improving medical care through advancing knowledge, and 
transmitting it for the benefit of the public. Adaptation, growth and repro- 
duction are three phases of the living organism if it survives. So with a depart- 
ment, we adapt or adjust to meet a local need. We grow in order to fulfill our 
purpose and we reproduce personnel for continuity and succession of medical 
care of high standards. 

Training programs for internists, pediatricians and categorical specialists 
should be sufficiently flexible to allow for freedom to develop specific interests 
without undiscriminating discipline. 

The organization of medical practice must be worked out at the local 
community level and will depend upon what the pubHc will accept. The local 
profession must set their own high standards that will be acceptable to outside 
professional and public opinion, and insist upon medical practice of high and 
ethical standards. 

Improved interdepartmental relations are important and should be repre- 
sented by real collaboration, as determined by working together for a common 
objective. This should be done to train better doctors and improve patient care. 

Finally, I want to say that there is a great and urgent need for all depart- 
ments in a university to relate their total programs to costs and budget. There 
is a great deal of education needed here — education of administrators, educa- 
tion of participants, and education of the public. The public is being called 
upon to provide more money for medical care, medical research and medical 
education. We need to keep the public informed about these matters so that 
they will continue to give us their support. 



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23 




THE WHITEHEAD LECTURE 

by Erle E. Peacock, Jr., M.D. 



The Whitehead Society, named for Richard 
H. Whitehead, first dean of the School of 
Medicine, is the student government organiza- 
tion of the UNC School of Medicine. All stu- 
dents in the Medical School are members of the 
Whitehead Society. The executive body of the 
Society, the Whitehead Council, is composed 
of class presidents, an elected representative of 
each class, and Officers of the Society. The 
President of the Whitehead Society for 1962- 
1963 is Mr. Neil Bender. 

An important part of the orientation pro- 
gram conducted by the Society for the first 
year class each fall is the Whitehead Lecture 
which was given this year by Dr. Erie E. 
Peacock, Jr., Associate Professor of Surgery. 



24 



Mr. Bender, members and guests of the Whitehead Society, and distinguished 
members of the Class of 1966: 

You have been surfeited by words and deeds of welcome during the last 
few days which surely must have left no doubt in your minds as to the eager- 
ness and pleasure with which we have anticipated your arrival in Chapel Hill. 
You are a select group, chosen from one of the largest and most capable groups 
of applicants ever to apply for admission to one of the best medical schools in 
the United States. That you are here is evidence that you are good, and the 
confidence that you are good will undoubtedly serve as a tremendous stimulus 
to you to keep faith with parents, teachers, selection committees and others 
who have aided you in attaining admission to the University of North Carolina 
School of Medicine. 

I cannot hide from you the pleasure which I feel in being asked to speak 
to you on the eve of this beginning of your medical studies. My only qualifica- 
tions for taking your time are that I sincerely believe the next four years will 
be among the happiest of your life, and that if I were faced with the same 
opportunity you have now, there are a few things which I would do differently 
than I did some years ago. It is the purpose of my talk to outline a few of 
these things as simply and as directly as possible. 

My first objective is to point out to you the enormity of the bulk of 
knowledge which is to be set before you and the importance which any 
fragment of this knowledge may have in terms of health and happiness for 
those whom you will ultimately serve. In most pre-medical courses, a finite 
amount of knowledge is put in front of a student, and he is required to absorb 
and give back enough of this knowledge either to be rid of the subject entirely, 
or to pass on to a more advanced course. Practical use of some pre-medical 
knowledge is obvious in developing a well-rounded individual, but much of 
it has no immediate practical importance and, at best, can only be justified on 
the basis of being required for admission to preparation for one's life work. 
When you go into your first class tomorrow, however, there will be a differ- 
ence. The body of knowledge confronting you is not finite. What is known 
is considerably more than you can master in many years of intensive study, 
yet a good deal of what you will need to know in the practice of medicine 
is not known. You are faced, therefore, with a problem of infinite proportions 
and with the sharp realization that there will never again be a point at which 
you can close your book and say, "I have mastered that subject." There will 
never be a time when you can feel completely confident to manage a patient 
because of the mastery of a subject. 

The reaUzation that the bulk of the known is too great for complete 
mastery and that the limits of things which are not known is infinite can 
be paralytic to the uninitiated as he starts the study of medicine. Perhaps 
many teachers contribute to the paralysis of unprepared students, for they 
frequently appear to act as if their aim was to cram the brain rather than 
to educate the person. It is not too early to emphasize to you that no one 
realizes more than the faculty of the Medical School that it is completely 
impossible to prepare you for your life's work by cramming your brain with 
enough useful facts to serve even one patient after you have left the confines 
of Alma Mater. This faculty is dedicated to one purpose — fo teach you to 

25 



educate yourself. We do not presume to tell you how to treat abdominal pain. 
We will do all that we can to teach you how to study abdominal pain, how- 
ever, and tomorrow morning you will begin to learn how to study anatomy 
as part of that preparation. You will probably find that certain anatomical 
facts will have to be relearned at least three different times — on your cadaver, 
at the autopsy table next year, and at the operating table or in the hospital 
ward at a still later period. 

Recently I showed a group of students in surgery a microscopic slide 
of diseased tissue to which I was quite certain they had never been exposed 
either in practice or in theory. I asked them to study the slide and to write 
a short critique on the prognosis of the patient. Although most of the students 
seemed to enjoy the exercise, a few were obviously quite disgruntled. After 
the session was over, I questioned some of these students a little more in- 
tensively. One of them was quite outspoken, and finally blurted out, "We pay 
you to teach us these things." The obvious answer, even to you at this stage, 
is that you don't pay your faculty to teach you anything. You pay them to 
teach you how to teach yourselves. The facts are available for you in books, 
laboratories, and in patients. The best that your faculty can do is to try to 
help you learn to assimilate these facts, call them up when needed, and try 
to understand the problems of disease and injury on the basis of sound 
scientific fact. 

I think you will find that you will be exposed to knowledge of four 
types. The first type I will call hearsay knowledge, because it is the type 
picked up during dormitory bull sessions, at lunch, or in the halls where 
formal education has not been planned. Such knowledge is valuable only in so 
far as it stimulates curiosity to verify or discredit. It can be extremely 
dangerous if it is blindly accepted because it is reported to have come from, 
an authoritative source. This type of knowledge is extremely abundant 
around periods of examinations, when some students will try to build up 
their own confidence by speaking loosely and using words which do not hold 
true meaning for them. The syndrome memorizer is a good example of this 
practitioner, because, as you enter the study of cUnical medicine, you will 
find that eponyms have been used to categorize various groups of symptoms 
to give the impression that the entire pathology, physiology, and treatment 
for the disease is understood. I have a favorite such syndrome I used to upset 
the syndrome memorizers in my own class. It is the syndrome known as 
Coast's disease, a term which can be discreetly dropped as if everyone should 
know its full meaning. Only by persistent delving into abstract Hterature can 
one find the disease which is due to cobalt deficiency in a specialized breed 
of cattle. 

A second type of knowledge which is also, in my opinion, a rather vague 
experience is knowledge which I will call empirical knowledge — in a derogatory 
sense. It has been the basis for a great deal of treatment which is given not 
because of scientific formulation or experimental tests but by the "general 
impression" that it "usually" works. The history of medicine is filled with 
ridiculous ends to which such knowledge has led us. Not many years ago 
pulmonary congestion was nearly always treated by bleeding the patient. There 
was no evidence that the patient had a problem of increased blood volume, 
yet the fact that this treatment sometimes worked was given as a reason for 
doing it routinely. Actually, bleeding did improve some patients. It was not 

26 



until some years later, however, when methods of diagnosis and understandmg 
of the pathologic physiology made it possible for us to determine the difference 
between pulmonary congestion due to failure of the heart and pulmonary 
congestion due to infection with pneumococcal bacteria, that venotomy was 
put on a rational therapeutic basis. Bleeding is still occasionally used with good 
results in the emergency treatment of heart failure due to high blood pressure, 
but it now appears to be ridiculous beyond measure to treat pulmonary con- 
gestion from other sources by opening a vein and relieving the patient of some 
of his blood volume. 

A third type of knowledge is that obtained by immediate deduction, or 
knowledge reached by reasoning. This kind of knowledge is superior to the 
other two but is precariously subject to sudden refutation by direct ex- 
perience or measurement. Some years ago, the Washington Red Skin profes- 
sional football team was training in Chapel Hill for an exhibition game with 
the Green Bay Packers. On the afternoon before the game, the trainer ap- 
peared at the hospital and offered several tickets to the game if someone from 
the surgical staff would sit on the bench and act as the team doctor. I was 
the chief surgical resident, and being well primed with knowledge of all three 
types, I accepted the invitation. Midway during the second quarter, a mammoth 
Redskin tackle was laid prostrate on the field, and the officials and trainers 
began calling for the "Doc". I suddenly reaUzed that 40,000 people were 
waiting for me to examine the man, and I must admit I felt somewhat of a 
sense of panic. I was quickly reassured, however, for when I turned back his 
eyeUds and found one pupil much larger than the other and completely non- 
reactive, I knew precisely what the situation was and what had to be done. 
Any third year medical student should recognize the extremely dangerous 
sign of rapidly increasing intracranial pressure, and knows that the patient 
must be placed under experienced neurosurgical attention and possibly oper- 
ated upon as an acute emergency. I explained this with great authority to the 
officials, and during the ten minutes it seemed to take before an ambulance 
could be gotten to the field and preparations made to move him, I felt very 
confident of my deductive reasoning. Before the patient could be loaded 
in the ambulance, however, in front of 40,000 people, including my own 
chief, the patient began to struggle violently. In a few seconds he was on his 
feet demanding to be put in the game. The pupil was still dilated and fixed, 
and it was only a few moments later I learned that, of the 100 eyes on the 
Washington Redskin football team I had rolled back the lid over the one glass 
eye in the whole outfit. 

It follows, therefore, that the highest kind of knowledge is the form 
which comes by direct perception. It is upon this type of knowledge that 
the soundest part of your medical education will be based. This type of 
knowledge will make it possible for you to practice medicine as the highest 
type of measurable science. There can be no doubt that medicine, like other 
sciences, is becoming a science of measurement, and that only by accurate 
and precise scientific measurements will we be able to arrive at truth. We 
have to know what is there. It is so easy to lie to one's self, but, even at the 
crudest level, observations must not be faked. We often take truth for 
granted; yet it is truth which differentiates science — in its widest sense — from 
all other intellectual activities. 

27 



If these, then, are the types of knowledge, and the enormity and 
infiniteness of the amount of knowledge are such that we cannot hope to 
encompass it all, what is the plan by which a first year medical student 
may learn to educate himself? 

It seems to me that the first thing to do is to reahze the importance 
of a plan. Let me hasten to caution that a plan stubbornly followed without 
flexibility or recourse to change can in itself be disastrous. I am convinced, 
however, that, when faced with as formidable a task as that of acquiring a 
medical education in 1962, some type of flexible plan is essential for doing 
the best with the time allotted. Mercifully, during the first two years, the 
plan for your activities dviring the day has already been made for you. For 
the next two years you will be told, for the most part, where to go and when 
to be there, and given some idea what you will be expected to cover. During 
the final years, however, there will be a good deal of the day when you will 
not be told to do anything. There will be a tremendous number of educational 
experiences going on around you in the wards and operating rooms of the 
hospital, and it will be up to you to decide how you will spend your time to 
best advantage. 

Above everything else, the plan must have an objective. I strongly feel 
that there should only be one objective — quality. As was pointed out by 
Dr. Louis Welt in a previous address to the Whitehead Society, there is very 
little mathematical probability that you are going to fail the medical course. 
The big question you have to decide is how good you are going to be. I am 
realistic enough to be aware that everyone cannot be on the top rung of the 
ladder. But I also know that everyone can raise himself a Httle higher, to 
relieve the terrible congestion on the bottom rung. Your objective is not to 
pass the work in this medical school. You have got to have a plan that has 
as its objective to be a superior student. Your objective must not be merely 
to have an internship — your objective has got to be to have the best intern- 
ship. You cannot have as an objective to pass the specialty boards in a clinical 
practice. You have got to have, as your objective, the goal of being a leading 
or top man in your chosen field. The failure to have an objective is so often 
the failure to excel. Nothing is more certain to assure you of a mediocre 
record in this medical school and a mediocre post-graduate training program 
and a mediocre service in the field of medicine than to plan for nothing more 
than mediocrity at the very beginning. You are the elite of several hundred 
candidates to this medical school — see that your objective is to be the elite 
of the graduating students in medicine in this country. In no other way can 
you keep faith with those who have bet on you. We did not admit a single 
student to this medical school with the idea that he would be in the lower 
third of his class. Those who end up in the lower third of their class are, for 
the most part, those who had no other plan of their own. 

The most important part of a plan for your four years in medical school, 
other than the objective, is a plan for organized study. Let it be said right 
now that there is nothing easy about attaining a medical degree. Physically, 
mentally, and morally, you will find it easier to attain doctorate status in 
any other field than medicine. You would not want it any other way. Already 
there are many examples around you which make you know that anything 
which is worth having must be sacrificed for. Only those things which re- 

28 



quire great sacrifice are worthy of being a final objective; in choosing the 
objective of admittance to the medical profession, you have also chosen sacri- 
fice and hard work. 

It IS quite possible that many of you have never learned to concentrate 
for two or three hours at one time, because you never had to do so. By 
determination and self discipline, you are going to have to learn to do just 
that: To set aside a time for concentrated study and to hold that time more 
sacred than anything else you do. The old joke about the freshman medical 
student who dropped his pencil during the first lecture and was six weeks 
behind before he picked it up is more fact than fiction. You cannot afford to 
miss a night. Before long it will become habit, and much easier than in the 
beginning. If, however, you fail in the beginning to discipline yourself to set 
aside a time in the evening or early morning hours in which you can have 
uninterrupted concentrated study, you will never fulfill your potential in 
this medical school. 

By now you know how many hours sleep it is necessary for you to have 
to perform effectively. Your plan must include this period of time, and 
discipline will often be required to be assured that it is fulfilled. It is stupid 
to sleep in class. To sleep in class is to make a public demonstration of the 
fact you lack an adequate plan or to demonstrate that you are either bored 
or completely overwhelmed with the subject matter at hand. 

As a medical student you will be exposed to certain diseases, and par- 
ticipate in physical exertion which will require that you be in top physical 
condition. To this end, it is extremely important that you eat three good 
meals a day. Tuberculosis, peptic ulcer, and certain stress conditions most 
often appear in medical students who have a history of missing meals or 
substituting a cigarette for a meal— generally the result of poor planning or 
the complete lack of a plan. I see no point in taking up your time with a plan 
for recreation. Carolina students have seemed to solve this problem over the 
years, and I have no doubt that you will also. 

Although I have no intention of advising or interfering in one's personal 
rehgious Kfe, I cannot help but advise that a plan include attendance at 
church on Sunday. At the very least, this assures you of at least one hour 
during the week when you can sit relatively undisturbed and reflect about 
whatever comes to mind. 

You will note that I have been very careful not to try to set up a 
specific plan for any of you. My purpose instead has been to emphasize to 
you the importance of a plan. You will have to decide whether you study 
best in the early evening, the late evening, or the early morning hours. All 
I want to do is to coerce you to spend some time during the next few hours 
deciding upon a plan with the highest objective— and finding within yourself 
the grit and guts to adhere to the plan as long as it appears to be the best 
one for you. 

Much has been written and much research has been done on the subject 
of success. After a long study of the problem, a graduate student once wrote 
to his father, "I have not yet found the key to success, but I am getting 
very much afraid that it is hard work." Medical school will be the most 
gratifying hard work you have ever done because for the first time, perhaps, 
it will be hard work with a purpose, which I might add is recognized through- 

29 



out the world as the most unselfish of all professions. From the first lecture 
on the first day, a direct application of what you are learning to the needs 
of people in trouble will be obvious; this applicability should give you a 
lightness of heart and springiness of step that will make it possible for you 
to sacrifice as you have never sacrificed before. 

The greatest threat to any plan which you may devise tonight is the 
threat of disappointment and temporary failure. Such disappointment or 
realization of failure usually takes the form of an examination or oral quiz. 
Not One of you will escape this type of disappointment. This faculty knows 
that the weakest point in our educational system is the ability of a faculty 
to examine and evaluate its students. No matter how hard you work, how 
much you learn, how noble your ambition — you are going to get caught. You 
are going to get caught short on an examination, and you are going to get 
caught short on a patient. A student whom I had personally coached in 
preparation for an examination, and who did not do as well on the examina- 
tion as he felt he should have, came into my office recently to apologize and 
bemoan the result of the examination. The tragedy, in my opinion, was not 
that the student did poorly on the examination. That was over and done 
with, and too many important examinations are ahead. The tragedy was the 
failure to realize that even when he had done his best and felt prepared, he 
could fail so badly. The most intriguing facet of the study of medicine is 
that you can never master it completely. So often when one just begins to 
feel that he is understanding or getting on top of a medical problem, it will 
rise up and smite him down, whether in the form of an examination or a 
tragic complication in a seemingly properly handled patient. Know that this 
is going to happen to you; be prepared to take it when it comes, and somehow, 
develop as early as possible the attitude expressed at the upper left hand corner 
of an envelope I saw recently which said, "if not delivered in five days, try 
like hell the sixth." 

You are going to hear that class standing and grades are unimportant, 
that one should not worry about such things in medical school. I think that 
this is an insult to your intelligence. Of course, you did not come here for 
the sole purpose of making a grade or passing an examination. You came here 
to learn the art and science of medicine. But you know without being told 
that you have to be evaluated and that the opportunities which will be open 
to you are going to be dependent upon the type of grades which you attain. 
Grades are tremendously important, and unfortunately, because of the limita- 
tions in methods of testing, it is inevitable that you are going to be unfairly 
and inadequately tested at some time during the next four years. Discourage- 
ment, when this happens, can be dangerous. Somehow, as soon as possible, you 
have got to develop the philosophy and shrugging motions of the old horse 
that accidentally fell in the well. The well was not too deep, and it had been 
dry for many years. The horse was not too good, and so the farmer decided 
the best way to settle the situation was to throw dirt in the well until he 
buried the horse and covered the well at the same time. With each shovel full 
of dirt, the horse developed a shrugging motion, shaking the dirt to the ground 
and stamping on it. With each shovel of dirt which was shrugged off and 
stamped under foot, the horse raised himself higher and higher in the well. 
Before long the horse was standing on dry land, because he refused to be 
buried. Learn the shrugging, stamping motion, and refuse to be buried. 

30 



The lessons from the worst failures are the most important ones that we 
have. Every experience will be valuable in the learning process. I do not know 
if anyone ever considered me as a likely candidate for a pediatrician, but I 
never considered being a pediatrician, and I know the reason why. The first 
pediatric patient I was asked to examine was a tiny colored infant lying in 
the arms of a 3 50 pound Negro mother. She said, "This baby squalls and 
squalls and the only way I can get him to stop squalling is when I feeds it. 
I don't mind feeding it except that it squalls so much I's almost run dry." 
Then the baby started to scream its head off, and being unable to examine it 
in that condition, I instructed the mother to feed it until it stopped crying. 
She exposed a tremendous left breast and began to try to feed the child, who 
paid no attention and only intensified its screaming. With a note of despara- 
tion, she finally began to spank the baby on top of the head and said, "Hesh 
up you little nob head, hesh up afore I gives your dinner to the doctor man." 
Believe me, failures make a great impression and much can be learned from 
even the most frustrating experience. 

The one great cause for human failure is an alibi. An alibi will be your 
personal enemy number one. It is not merely an excuse for failure, but is 
often a rationalization, which means a ready excuse. How often the crse has 
been, however, that success has not been in spite of a handicap; it has been 
because of a handicap. 

Because it seems so pertinent at this time, I would like to close with one 
illustration which perhaps many of you know in detail. I believe that this 
account is accurate as it involves the life of William Ernest Henley. As a 
small boy living in Edinburgh, he had a chronic condition in his leg which 
led his doctor to say he could not help him and that the only doctor who 
could help him lived in London. As you know, it was before the days of 
hitch hiking, and apparently, it was with great difficulty that this lad made 
his way by train, cart, and walking to the outskirts of London. If the facts 
which we are given are accurate, conditions were so bad, and the legs were in 
such condition by the time the boy reached London, that he actually made the 
last few miles on his stomach, crawling to the address of the bone specialist 
who was to help him. Apparently it was necessary to amputate one of the 
legs immediately in order to save the boy's life. Over the course of the next 
three months, a great deal of work was done in an attempt to save the other 
leg. As it appeared the other leg might have to be amputated also, the surgeon 
arranged for a consultation with several other reknown specialists who were 
meeting in London at the time. During the course of their consultation in 
an adjacent room, William Henley wrote on the back of the nurse's temperature 
sheet the immortal poem liivictus, which included this determination: 

It matters not how straight the gate, 

How charged with punishment the scroll; 

I am the master of my fate; 

I am the captain of my soul. 

Invictus — unconquerable, insuperable, indomitable — the only answer I 
know for those who would advise you to shun the call to perfection. It is the 
challenge we put before you on the eve of this, your most exciting adventure. 
Your accomplishments in the past leave great hope that this challenge will 
be met in full. 

31 



The Class of 1966 



Nanie 

James Curtis Abell 
James David Alford 
Willis Arthur Archer 
Frank Walton Avery 
Rudy Watkins Barker 
Robert Phillips Barringer 
Joseph O. Bell, III 
Garry P. Bergeron, Jr. 
Robert Hodges Bilbro 
William Hampton Bowers 

Paul Leach Burroughs 

Daniel Malloy Calhoun, Jr. 

Timothy Earl Cloninger 

Earnest Swindell Collins 

George Wheeler Cox 

John Robert Crawford, III 

Joseph Bernard Credle 

William Monroe Crutchfield 

Nelson Park Davis, II 

Philip Carl Deaton 

Wesley Caswell Fowler, Jr. 

Thomas Nash French 

Edgar Cornelius Garrabrant 

Robert Clayton Gibson, III 

Carroll Lee Gray 

Cyrus Leighton Gray, III 

George Talmadge Grigsby, Jr. 

Carol Anne Hedden 

Ronald Jay Hickes 

Lewis Patterson Hicks 

Howard Thomas Hinshaw 

Nelson Neil Howell 

William Colvin Hubbard 

Theodore Hyde Kiesselbach 

Thomas Jeffrey Koontz 

Sidney Carl Kress 

Arthur Eldridge Leake, Jr. 

Hugh Talmage Lefler, Jr. 

Jacob Andrew Lohr 

Wyndell Hunt Merritt 

Peter Lorenz Morris 

Duncan Morton, Jr. 

Larry Mumford 

George Marion Paddison 

Roy Kenneth Pons 

James Allen Pressly 



U nJcrgraihiate College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
The Citadel 

(UNC Graduate School) 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Davidson College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Duke University 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Duke University 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Duke University 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Guilford College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Duke University 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Notre Dame University 
Davidson College 
East Carolina College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 



Residence 

Yanceyville 

Zebulon 

Salisbury 

Winston-Salem 

Carrboro 

Newton 

Tuxedo 

Farmville 

Greenville 

Melvin Hill 

Raleigh 

Elizabethtown 

Newton 

Nashville 

Charlotte 

Salisbury 

Ahoskie 

Pittsboro 

Jamestown 

Greensboro 

Dunn 

Reidsville 

Wilmington 

Winchester, Va. 

Franklinville 

High Point 

Holly Springs 

Lenoir 

Charlotte 

Wise 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Raleigh 

Media, Pa. 

Lexington 

Wadesboro 

Marshall 

Chapel Hill 

Lexington 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte 

Charlotte 

Pikeville 

Smithfield 

Valdese 

Kings Mountain 



32 



Name 

Don Warren Printz 
William Cleaton Rawls 
Karl Arthur Ray 
Alvis Marvin Rich, Jr. 
William Barker Riley, Jr. 
William Earl Roberson 
Surry Parker Roberts 
Charles Kimrey Scott 
Robert English Sevier 
James Lewis Sigmon, Jr. 
Robert George Simmons 
Herbert Lee Smyre 
John Wilder Southard 
Elizabeth Harrison Splvey 
Verner Eugene Stanley, Jr. 
Walter Franklin Steele 

Elliott Walker Stevens, Jr. 
Harold Lewis Tarleton 
Donald Anton Thomas 
Henry Fuller Thomas, Jr. 
William Beverly Tucker, III 
William Hunter Vaughan 
James Hubert Whicker 
James Alvin Yount 



Undergraduate College 
Duke University 
Davidson College 
Duke University 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Duke University 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Davidson College 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 
Univ. of North Carolina 



Residence 

Asheville 

Rocky Mount 

Greensboro 

Burlington 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Greenville, S. C. 

Durham 

Haw River 

Asheville 

Newton 

Roseboro 

Newton 

Bethesda 14, Md. 

Williamston 

Charlotte 

Hickory 

Warsaw 

Monroe 

Roanoke Rapids 

Spindale 

Hertford 

Tryon 

North Wilkesboro 

Claremont 



LIFE INSURANCE ESTATE PLANNERS 





W. H. Branch 



Frank G. Umstead 



Special Services 
To t-he Medical Profession 

Representing 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
OF GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Local Offices: 136 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, Telephone 942-4263 



33 



presenting . . . The Alumni 




DR. ARTHUR HILL LONDON, JR. 

Dr. Arthur Hill London Jr., clinical professor of pediatrics, is a native 

of Pittsboro. He received his B.S. in Medicine from the University of North 

Carolina in 192 5 and his M.D. in 1927 from the University of Pennsylvania. 

Dr. London began his teaching career at the University of Pennsylvania, 

where he was an instructor in pediatrics, in both the medical school and the 

postgraduate program, from 1929 to 1930. He left 

the university in 1930 to engage in private practice 

and he joined the UNC medical faculty in 1937. 

He has served as chairman of the North Carolina 
Medical Society Pediatrics Section as well as sec- 
retary of the Durham County Board of Health. He 
is a former president of the Durham-Orange County 
Medical Society and a former district chairman of the 
American Academy of Pediatrics. 

From 1948 to 1951 he was a Southern Medical 
Councillor and in 1949 was district chairman and 
an executive committee member of the state Medi- 
cal Society. He has also been a member of the 
American Academy of Pediatrics' National Executive Committee. 

(Continued on Page .3 8j 

DR. CHARLES A. SPEAS PHILLIPS 

Dr. Phillips is a native North Carolinian. A Phi Beta Kappa here, he re- 
ceived his B.S. in Physics in 1942. After two years in the UNC School of 
Medicine, he attended Northwestern University where the M.D. degree was 
awarded in 1947. Following an internship at Cook 
County Hospital in Chicago and residencies in General 
Surgery and Urology at the Veterans Administration 
Hospital, Hines, UUnois, he served three years in the 
U. S. Navy as a Flight Surgeon. 

In 19 54, Dr. Phillips joined and has remained in 
the staffs of Moore Memorial Hospital, Pinehurst, and 
St. Joseph's of the Pines Hospital, Southern Pines, as 
attending surgeon. At present, he is Chief of Staff of 
Moore Memorial Hospital. He is a member of many 
professional societies including the American College of 
Surgeons, American Geriatrics Society, and New York 
Academy of Sciences. 

Dr. Phillips' chief hobby is flying, and he is a quaUfied commercial pilot 
with instrument rating. This enables him to make a quick trip to Chapel Hill 

(Continued on Page 3 8 ) 

34 




presenting . . . The Faculty 



DR. GORDON SHELDON DUGGER 

Dr. Gordon Sheldon Dugger joined the faculty of the School of Medi- 
cine in 1954. He is an associate professor of surgery specializing in Neuro- 
surgery. 

A native of Vilas, N. C, Dr. Dugger received his A.B. degree from 
the University of North Carolina in 1941. His M.D. degree was awarded 
by Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1945, and he served his internship 
in surgery at North CaroUna Baptist Hospital. He 
was trained in Neurosurgery at the Montreal Neuro- 
logical Institute of Montreal, Canada. 

From 1946 to 1948 he served in the Army 
Medical Corps with the rank of captain. After the 
war he became a staff physician with the Oregon 
State Hospital in Salem. From there he went into 
private practice for a year at St. Helen's, Oregon. 
He was assistant resident in neurology at the 
Montreal Neurological Institute during 195 1. At the 
institute he held consecutively the posts of Senior 
Fellow in Neuropathology, Neurosurgical Assistant 
Resident and Neurosurgical Resident. 

In 1957. while an assistant professor of surgery 
at UNC, he was awarded a three-year grant from the 
Public Health Service for study of the effects of pituitary gland operations 

(Continued on Page }8) 




DR. GEORGE R. HOLCOMB 

Dr. Holcomb is a native of lUinois and completed his educational training 
at the University of Wisconsin, receiving his Ph.D. in anthropology in 1956. 
After three years as an instructor in anatomy at Creighton University Medical 
School, he joined this faculty in 1957 as an Assistant 
Professor in the Department of Anatomy. 

In addition to his teaching duties in the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy, Dr. Holcomb also teaches in the 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology. He has 
recently been appointed Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School for Research Administration. 

Dr. Holcomb is a member of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science (Fellow, 1956), 
American Anthropological Association, (Fellow), 
American Association of Physical Anthropologists and 
American Association of Anatomists. 

He is married to the former Miss Ellen Jean Jacob- 
sen of Racine, Wisconsin, and they have three daughters. 

35 




Presenting the House Staff 

DR. WILLIAM M. CLARKE 

Dr. William M. Clarke received his AB (1954) and M.A. (1957) degrees 
from Duke University where he was a research associate in the Department 
of Zoology (195 6-57). His medical degree was awarded by the University 
of North CaroHna in 1961. In 1961-62 he was an intern 
in pediatrics at North Carolina Memorial Hospital, and 
at the present time is a first year pediatric resident at 
this institution. He is the recipient of a 2-year Wyeth 
Pediatric Fellowship. 

Dr. Clarke won the Deborah Leary Award for the 
outstanding thesis of his graduating class for his work 
upon lens development and has contributed a number 
of articles in this field. As a member of the house 
staft, he has maintained an active interest in research 
while continuing his development as an outstanding 
clinician. 

He is the son of Mrs. M. J. Clarke of Fayetteville 
and is married to the former Miss Dorcas Gaines. They are the parents of 
two boys. 




ALUMNUS HONORED . . . 

At the invitation of the Swedish National Association Against Heart 
and Chest Disease and the Swedish Medical Society, Dr. H. McLeod Riggins, 
'22, gave a lecture entitled "Primary Bronchogenic Carcinoma" in Stockholm 
on September 4, 1962. On this occasion. Dr. Riggins was awarded the 150th 
Anniversary Medal of the Swedish Medical Society in recognition of his work 
in the field of respiratory disease. 

He also gave a paper on this subject on September 6 in Munich, Germany, 
at a meeting of the International Congress on Internal Medicine. 

Dr. Riggins has lived and practiced mainly in the New York area, living 
in the city during the winter and in Greenwich, Connecticut, during the 
summer months. He is Visiting Physician (Chest Service), Bellvue Hospital 
and Associate Clinical Professor at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University. 

A past president of the American Trudeau Society and National Tuber- 
culosis Association, Dr. Riggins was for several years out of state counsellor 
for the U. N. C. Medical Alumni Association. 



Peg board 
• Shelves 



Tools 

• Hardware 



Paints 

• Millwork 



FITCH LUMBER COMPANY 

CARRBORO. NORTH CAROLINA 



36 




ALUMNI 
NEWS ITEMS 



CLASS OF 1923 

Dr. Roy W. Upchurch, 506 Haw- 
thorne Drive, Danville, Virginia. Does 
genito-urinary surgery; had his post- 
graduate training at Columbia Uni- 
versity. Certified by the American 
Board of Urology, Dr. Upchurch is a 
Fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons and is a member of the 
American Urological Association. He 
and his wife, Mae MacDaniel, have 
two daughters, Susie and Peggy, and 
a son. Roy, Jr. Susie married Dr. 
Don Keller and lives in California. 
Peggy married Dr. Art David and 
they live in Jacksonville, Floi'ida. 
Roy, Jr. (UNC '57) married the former 
Miss Nina Skinner and they live in 
Durham where Roy, Jr. is employed 
with Liggett and Meyei's Tobacco 
Company. 

Clyde Reitzel Hedrick, P. O. Box 
619, Lenoir, North Carolina. Does 
general practice and cardiology; had 
postgraduate training at Stuart Circle 
Hospital, Richmond, Virginia, and 



Cook County Graduate School, 
Chicago, Illinois. An elder and chair- 
man of Consistory, Zion Evangelical 
and Reformed Church, member of 
Kiwanis, Pythian, and Moose Clubs, 
Dr. Hedrick enjoys fishing for recrea- 
tion. He and his wife, Stella, have 
three married daughters, Theresa 
Sherman, Marlene Neisler, and Phyl- 
lis Miller. 

CLASS OF 1924 

John William Ormand, Sr., P. O. 
Box 397, Monroe, N. C. Does general 
practice and E.E.N.T.; had his post- 
graduate training at University of 
Cincinnati, Washington University at 
St. Louis, Chicago E.E.N.T. Hospital 
and University of Rochester. An elder 
in the First Presbyterian Church, Dr. 
Ormand has served both as councilor 
and President of District 7 Medical 
Society. He married the former 
Louise Alida Thoman and they have 
two sons, John W., Jr. and Thoman 
Lane, both physicians. 



Crowell Little Motor Company 

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Telephone 942-3143 Durham Road 



In Chapel Hill — 

For Fine Gifts 
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157 E. Franklin St. 



37 



PARENTS' CLUB AFFAIRS 



Region V of the University of North Carohna Medical Parents Club held 
a meeting Saturday, September 22, at the D. R. Printz residence in Asheville. 

Region V includes Burke, Caldwell, McDowell, Mitchell, Cleveland, Gas- 
ton, Lincoln, Rutherford, Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Transylvania, 
Cherokee, and Jackson Counties. 

Welcoming and opening remarks were made by C. G. Pickard of Ashe- 
ville, Regional Chairman. Mrs. Zebulon Weaver of Asheville, chairman and 
fund trustee of the Student Emergency Loan Fund, gave a report on the fund. 

The Medical Parents Club consists of the parents of all students of the 
UNC School of Medicine, past, present, and future. 

Its purpose is to keep all parents of medical students informed about 
the total program of the School of Medicine, and to foster a close and en- 
thusiastic Medical School-Parent relationship. 

Dr. Carl Anderson, assistant dean for student affairs, and Emory S. Hunt, 
assistant director. The Medical Foundation of North Carolina, Inc., attended 
the meeting as representatives of the School of Medicine, and made brief talks 
on recent developments at the School and plans for the future. 



Good Future? 




Wonderful fuiure! — If you use the 
Equitable plan for young career 
people. It gives you the right to 
obtain more Living Insurance 
protection in the future — every 
three years from 25 to 40 — with- 
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SHELDON WHITE 
Phone 942-3094. Chapel Hill 



— DR. LONDON — 

{Continned from Page 54) 
Dr. London, in addition to his 
teaching activity at UNC, is an assist- 
ant professor of pediatrics at Duke 
University and chief of pediatrics at 
Watts Hospital in Durham. 



— DR. PHILLIPS — 

(Continued from Page 54) 
once a week, which he has been do- 
ing since 19 57. As clinical assistant 
professor. Dr. Phillips may be found 
each Wednesday morning in the gross 
lab teaching anatomy to first year 
medical students. 



— DR. DUGGER — 

(Continued from Page 3 5 ; 

on patients with cancer. 

Dr. Dugger, whose hobby is the 
study of history, is a member of the 
Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the 
Harvey Cushing Society, and South- 
ern Neurological Society. 




This new model Elec- 
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one of the many fine 
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display in our show- 
rooms. 

We invite you to 
pay us a visit and see 
this equipment. 



Buraick EK-111 iiiiectrocardiograpn 

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706 Tucker St. 
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Frank D. Bozarth 

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39 



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40 



Compl iments of 

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LABORATORIES 



Clemmons, North Carolina 



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VISITORS 
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Vol. X DECEMBER. 1962 No. 2 



JAN ^Q '63 

Dl VISIOi^ ^f 
*iE«UH AFFAIRS UBRARB- 



THE BULLETIN 



School of Medicine 
University of North Carolina 



THE 

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ESTABLISHED THIS PLAN OF GROUP ACCIDENT AND 

HEALTH PROTECTION FOR ITS MEMBERS IN 1940 



NEW AND MORE EXTENSIVE 
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HOME 

SAVINGS 

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SMITH BUILDING 
23 NORTH 
:OLUMBIA STREIT 



LIFE INSURANCE ESTATE PLANNERS 





W. H. Branch 



Frank G. Umstead 



Special Services 
To the Medical Profession 

Representing 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
OF GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Local Offices: 136 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, Telephone 942-4263 




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NEAR MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, RESTAURANT 
AND GOLF COURSE 

PHONE 968-4446 CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

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CLYDE EUBANKS 

RAYMOND L. ANDREWS 

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8 



The Bulletin 

of the School of Medicine 
of the University of North CaroUna 

PubUshed in cooperation with the Whitehead Medical Society 
and the Medical Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. 



Vol. X December, 1962 No. 2 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Ruth Faison Shaw — Creator of Fingerpainting 10 

The New Department of Hospital Administration 15 

Ob-Gyn Fund Established 1 8 

The Rehabilitation Team 19 

Presenting the Alumni 26 

Presenting the Faculty 27 

Presenting the House Staff 28 

Alumni News Items 29 



Editorial Committee 



C. C. FoRDHAM, M.D. ('49) Hugh A. McAllister, M.D. ('35) 

Chairman j. T. Monroe, M.D. ('55) 

W. Reece Berryhill, M.D. ('25) George D. Penick, M.D. ('44) 

E. Ted Chandler, M.D. ('55) H. L. Stephenson, M.D. ('55) 

T T7 ou -n A.. WiDRA, Ph.D. 

Ira Fowler, Ph.D Emory S. Hunt 

W. P. Jacocks, M.D. ('09) Quincey Ayscue ('63) 



Address all inquiries and communications to £:r-ory S. Hunt, 117 Medical 
Science Building— or Box 957, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Published four times a year — October. December. February and Ayril — 
Entered as third-class matter at the Post Office at Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Ruth 

Faison 

Shaw 

Creator of 
Fingerpainting 

By Ellouise Schoettler 




"UNLESS YOU CAN give some measure of pleasure to someone — you 
haven't done a worthwhile thing," Ruth Faison Shaw told me as we sat sipping 
coffee in her work-room in the Psychiatric Unit. Certainly she has achieved 
her goal through her creation, fingerpainting, by bringing recreation and 
pleasure to countless thousands as well as the release of tensions and conflicts 
afforded others through skilled application of the art and chnical interpretation 
of their paintings. 

Our conversation ran a real gamut of subjects. She even took time out to 
give me some advice on child-raising. Harried mother of four, I leaned forward 
eagerly on the edge of my chair. "Relax and enjoy them," she laughed. "There's 
nothing like an old maid for giving advice about children." After all her years 
as a gifted teacher there wouldn't seem to be a better qualified authority. 

Being with Ruth Shaw is an experience. She is completely charming — 
radiating warmth mingled with flashes of humor. Quick to laugh, she is even 
quicker to deny her own importance. She is an artist — although she jokingly 
says fingerpainting was derived for her pleasure as she never could paint — but 
the most striking facet of her artistry is her facility with people. A friend of 
hers remarked, "Everywhere you go with Ruth Shaw is a picnic." 

* Mrs. Schoettler is the wife of a Resident in Psychiatry here. Combining writing with her 
duties as a housewife, she has had articles in Resident Physician and elsewhere. 



10 



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Miss Shaw's whole face betrays the sincere affection she feels for her pa- 
tients as she relates their problems and accomplishments. It is no wonder 
that the affection is reciprocal. A patient recently wrote of her: 

"I was excited over the prospect of something new in my life to 
break the monotony of passive daily living. Having met Miss Shaw I 
was almost overwhelmed by her magnificent personality. Just to be 
with her was an inspiration in itself. I felt compelled to attempt con- 
structive response." 

Ruth Faison Shaw originated hngerpainting in the mid-twenties. At the 
time she was teaching in her own school in Rome. The idea sprang from the 
need of one of her pupils to "smear." The child smeared the bathroom walls 
with iodine and it seemed so much fun that the other children wanted a turn 
too. This set Miss Shaw on the trail of the formula that would be fingerpaints. 
The aim was to perfect a color substance children could use with their bare 
hands; safe to the skin and harmless if eaten. 

Miss Shaw says that her school wasn't planned as "progressive." The ques- 
tion seemed logical after the iodine anecdote. Her explanation of her school was 
simple and straight to the point as well as delightfully honest. "It was mine. 
I did what I wanted to and I had a wonderful time." The children did too. At 
a tea, a child in Miss Shaw's hearing was asked, "Do you go to Miss Shaw's 
school?" "No," came the emphatic reply. "But," the inquirer persisted, "your 



11 



mother told me you did." "No, you say I go to Miss Shaws school — / go to Miss 
Shaw's parties." 

Once the formula was perfected and she began using fingerpaints with her 
pupils it didn't take Miss Shaw long to recognize the overwhelming potential 
of the media. In what she had thought to be an intriguing new play technique 
lay untold possibilities for creative education. 

The innovation first came to the foreground at the International Congress 
of New Education in Nice. An exhibit of fingerpaintings by Miss Shaw's pupils 
was an instant sensation. Fingerpainting became the center of attention and 
object of speculation. Almost overnight Miss Shaw and her work were trans- 
ferred from relative obscurity to prominent acclaim. They were subjected to 
careful scrutiny by educators as well as medical personnel. The curiosity of 
"medicine" was aroused when stutterers and bedwetters were greatly helped 
when allowed and encouraged to express themselves freely on paper. Conflicts 
otherwise undetected were revealed and subsequently resolved. "Fingerpainting 
gives color and form to thoughts for which children often know no words," is 
one explanation given by Miss Shaw. 

The initial flurry has since subsided. Today fingerpainting is accepted in 
educational circles as a valuable means of allowing the young child to express 
himself creatively. It took some time to re-educate teachers to the idea that 
fingerpainting was not just a time filler to while away frustrating rainy days. 
Children all have a deepseated need to create but this potential won't flourish 
without encouragement. Here fingerpainting comes in, and this is why Miss 
Shaw feels that this remains the most important use for the media. 

Memorial Hospital claims a full slice of Miss Shaw's time these days. 
Fingerpainting has proved itself to be a useful adjunct to psychiatric diagnosis 
and therapy, so her heaviest load is with psychiatric patients although she does 
have some medical cases. In addition to working with patients, she teaches 
classes in fingerpainting to residents and other psychiatric personnel so that 
they can extend fingerpainting into their own work. 

The patients in Gravely, the tuberculosis sanatorium, have plenty of time 
on their hands. Miss Shaw crosses the street from neighboring South Wing 
carrying with her paint and paper. Getting some paint on those idle hands re- 
lieves their boredom and gives a lift to their hum-drum hours. 

"Fingerpainting is rehabilitation made easy through fun. Further, it ful- 
fills that intrinsic need so inherent in all of us — self-expression through crea- 
tivity. We, the debilitated, yearn for such an outlet and are fortunate indeed 
that we can be exposed to fingerpainting . . . for when Miss Shaw told me 
that cerebral palsied children can and do fingerpaint, I saw it as challenge to 
most all the debilities." 

The woman who wrote these sentiments has myasthenia gravis and is a 
patient Miss Shaw has now. Until the onslaught of her illness, she led a happy 
and extremely busy life. A widowed mother of three, her fruitful career as a 
public health nurse was their sole support. Miss Shaw beams with pride and 
pleasure over her progress, not only for the artistic skills she is developing, but 
for the way she is utilizing fingerpainting in both her emotional and muscular 
readjustment. 

"Fingerpainting is life because it is movement. Anytime there is movement 
there is life." This axiom is Miss Shaw's own. No background of extensive 
training is necessary to fingerpaint. It is simphcity itself because there are no 

12 




hampering tools of the trade to restrict the beginner. Miss Shaw says most people 
take readily to fingerpainting and most times through it relive a pleasurable 
experience. The elements of the media themselves — water and soft squishy 
paint — are reminiscent of the mud pies most children revel in. Another attribute 
is its "quickness." It takes little time to complete a picture and then the artist 
h-is his or her creation. 

I was intrigued by one observation Miss Shaw mentioned. It concerned the 
difference in men and women — in their approach to painting. A man plows in 
and goes to work with a great deal of vim and vigor. He does not stop until his 
idea is completed on the paper. A woman, on the other hand, will paint vigor- 
ously for a time, then pause as though interrupted. She waits a moment and 
then returns to her work. Miss Shaw feels this is analogous to differences in 
their routine daily lives. Women, usually in the home, are continually inter- 
rupted by children, the phone, door-bell, while men "at the office" are permitted 
by circumstances to finish their work relatively free of interruption. Miss Shaw's 

13 



own astuteness in observing people is exemplified in this but also there is il- 
lustrated the way in which personality patterns may be revealed through 
fingerpainting. 

Fingerpainting, properly utiUzed, is also a bridge of communication with 
the mentally retarded. A retarded child often cannot wield a brush with the 
dexterity to paint acceptably in the usual way. Using fingerpaints, however, 
and their ordinary body movements, they can create a thing of beauty which 
can be praised quite honestly as an artistic creation. Through this recognition 
the retarded can gain a feeling of adequacy not otherwise available to them. 
Relaxed, they can then begin to release some of their pent-up frustrations onto 
the paper and perhaps for the first time communicate with someone. 

Three years ago Miss Shaw returned to her native North Carolina and 
Chapel Hill ostensibly to retire. Obviously, she is anything but. In addition to 
her work at Memorial, she teaches classes in the art, exhibits her own and her 
pupils' work, as well as being a gracious and willing guest speaker in and around 
this area. 

Her white frame bungalow on Estes Drive declares itself SUMMER HILL 
by a sign at the walkway. The bitter October afternoon of her latest backyard 
exhibit, this sign expressed a popular "wish." The fences were almost obscured 
by numerous vari-shaped paintings on display. One glance at these brought 
home the fact that fingerpainting certainly should not be disregarded as an art 
form in its own right. It takes a second thought to comprehend that the lovely 
paintings were done in the same paints and similar manner as that used by 
small children. The techniques were infinitely more sophisticated and the sub- 
jects anything but childish. They ranged from still life's to modern abstracts to 
nudes — a far cry from the kindergarten work-table. 

BustHng happily through the mingling crowd was a white-haired figure 
bundled warmly against the cold. A blue wool beret was perched on the back of 
her head. Ruth Shaw chatted gaily with everyone showing real pride in the 
handiwork of her pupils. A smattering of paintings from her own permanent 
personal collection was tucked away in a back corner of the garden. The only 
other things in sight signed RFS were some souvenirs of the showing. In these 
small squares which predominately were pairs of fawns done in black on white 
was the touch of the master. 

After being with Ruth Shaw and talking about fingerpainting, it is easy 
to think of the two synonymously and speculate that perhaps the Magic of 
Fingerpainting IS Ruth Faison Shaw. This assumption doesn't hold though be- 
cause over the years fingerpainting has proved itself on its own merit. The 
media has been used educationally and medically as well as artistically all over 
the world with success, and will continue to be. 

Sentimentally though . . . once you've met Miss Shaw and seen finger- 
painting "it gives a measure of pleasure" to irrevocably connect the two. 



MEDICAL TEXTS AND BOOKS FOR 
FAMILY PLEASURE 

BIG STOCK — FAST ORDER SERVICE 

The Intimate Bookshop 

119 East Franklin Streel — Chapel Hill 

14 



The New Department of Hospital 
Administration 



THE RESPONSIBILITY OF Schools of Medicine for a wide variety of 
extension services directed to physicians in private practice has been accepted 
for many years. The responsibility of Schools of Medicine for extension services 
to hospitals and to their personnel, however, is a new concept to be pioneered 
by U.N.C. Actually, this concept is in keeping with the announced responsi- 
bilities of the University which considers the entire state to be its campus and 
service to its citizens of equal importance with the education of its student 
body. Furthermore, it is in keeping with the spirit of the 1946 Sanger Report 
which served as the template for the organization and construction of our 
present expanded School of Medicine. 

It is with this thought in mind along with the widely recognized needs 
for further education and research in hospital administration that led to the 
creation last July of a new Department of Hospital Administration. Dr. Robert 
R. Cadmus, a graduate of Columbia University's College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, has been named Chairman of this new section. Dr. Cadmus came to 
Chipel Hill in 19 50 as Director of the North CaroUna Memorial Hospital and 
as Professor of Hospital Administration following administrative assignments 
at the University Hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio, and at the Columbia-Presby- 
terian Medical Center in New York. When he arrived the hospital was nothing 
more than a huge mud hole from which a few tentacles of steel were beginning 
to inch skyward. Following the hospital's activation in 195 2, he remained as 
its Director through its first critical decade of service to North Carolina. He 
continues to be close to hospital affairs and serves as its Consulting Director. 

The Department of Hospital Administration, as do all academic programs, 
has three broad responsibilities — education, research and service. Through the 
years. Dr. Cadmus has participated, usually on a limited one or two session basis, 
in the educational programs of most of the schools within the Division of 
Health Affairs as well as in such programs as Physical Therapy and Recrea- 
tional Therapy. These interdisciplinary contacts will hopefully continue and 
perhaps expand. 

Of special interest to the department is the educational impact it might 
make on medical students. Actually there is no intention to, develop a new 
course and try to squeeze it into the already tight curriculum. Rather, it is 
hoped that the necessary understanding of how physicians relate to today's 
modern hospital and the development of healthy attitudes towards this relation- 
ship may come from other educational approaches, primarily in cooperation 
with clinical teaching. 

No special school of hospital administration, similar to those already widely 
established throughout the country, is contemplated. Rather, a cooperative pro- 
gram is being developed with the School of Businses Administration whereby 
administrative students wishing careers in hospital administration may take 

15 



certain special courses offered by the Department of Hospital Administration 
probably with assistance from other departments or health affairs schnols. much 
as students wishing to specialize in insurance, marketing or personnel concen- 
trate in these fields. The basic educational core, consequently, will be in busi- 
ness administration for which he would receive an unqualified M.B.A. degree. 
All but two of the present hospital administration programs offer a master's 
degree in hospital administration, pubHc health or in some similar field, a 
degree which has Umited acceptrbility should the student wish to shift to 
commercial career at a later date. As one member of the business faculty put 
it the other day, "Hospitals are a growth industry, and consequently, we want 
to have a part in it." As one would expect, opinions vary widely as to the best 
method of selecting and preparing hospital administrators. Of the five new 
programs, either under way or in the planning stage, within the southeast, all 
have different academic foundations. Dr. Cadmus, having served for some 
years as the Chairman of the Educitional Policies Board of the American Col- 
lege of Hospital Administrators, is familiar with these various educational ap- 
proaches. The U.N.C. plan, which will attempt to preserve that which is sound 
and reject that which appears undesinble, will be an experiment in graduate 
hospital administration education worthy of watching. At present, no starting 
date for this program has been determined. 

In respect to research, the Department is currently involved in an N.T.H. 
financed project entitled "Improving Hospital-Physician Relations Through 
Education." This is a study of the understanding of hospital-physician relations 
of students in three schools of medicine — Columbia, Iowa and U.NC. Certain 
educational efforts have been directed to the third year U.N.C. students and 
follow-up studies will reveal if better understanding in this small, but vital 
phase of a student's education can actually be accomplished. 

The most unique and promising function of this new department will be 
its service to the many community hospitals in North Carolina. In a modest 
way it would hope to serve hospitals much the same way as the Institute of 
Government serves government. In general, the department will concentrate on 
those broad facets of hospital operation concerned with patient care rather than 
on the pure business or fiscal functions for which there are already available 
ample recourses should help be needed. Primarily, this will involve the prepara- 
tion of long range planning surveys, the conducting of hospital care or medical 
audits, assistance with hospital accreditation, trustee orientation and attention 
to a wide variety of other operational problems. The services of the depart- 
ment, within the availability of time and staff, will be provided only upon 
invitation. Most services will be without charge although in those projects 
requiring a considerable amount of travel and the production of a complex 
report, minimal charges will be made to cover out-of-pocket expenses for which 
there are no departmental funds. Already hospitals in such places as Fayette- 
ville. Mount Airy, Thomasville, Mooresville, Siler City, Sparta and Wilson have 
requested assistance in one form or another from this department. It is also 
assisting the North Carolina Medical Care Commission in revising the North 
Carolina hospital licensing regulations. 

The department, of course, is still small and is financed from a patchwork 
of state, grant and trust fund monies. Assisting Dr. Cadmus is Col. Harvey E. 

16 




Departmental Conference— Left to right: Kachael Long; Dr. Robert L Glass; 
Dr. Robert R. Cadmus, Chairman; Harvey E. Archer; Rachel Forbes. 

Archer, who has not only a degree in education from George Washington, but 
also a masters degree in hospital administration from Baylor University. He 
recently retired from military service after twenty-seven years with the Army 
Medical Service. He formerly served as Executive officer at Womack General 
Hospital at Fort Bragg and most recently was assigned to the Surgeon General's 
office as Chief of the Hospital Engineering Management Section which is con- 
cerned with research and development in all phases of hospital operation. In 
addition to his military experience, he has maintained a continuing association 
vAth civilian health services. 

Dr. Robert Lee Glass, a retired neurosurgeon, formerly Chief of Neuro- 
surgery at Indiana University and more recently in private practice in Indian- 
apolis, serves half-time, particularly involved with the research program and 
with review of medical records. Miss Rachael Long, associated with the North 
Carolina Memorial Hospital since its very beginning in areas of Personnel and 
more recently with long range planning, serves as a Research Associate. Miss 
Rachel Forbes serves as secretary completing the staff of five housed within the 
new department. In addition, Mr. Crawford, the Director of the North Carolina 
Memorial Hospital and Messrs. Warden and Lane, the two assistants, hold ap- 
pointments in this department. Various hospital department heads will assist in 
special projects and, therefore, become actively engaged in the department's 
activities. Mr. Arthur Tuttle, the University Planning Officer, also assists the 
group as its architectural staff member. 

The department is currently housed in converted space in the sub-basement 
of the Interns building. But don't be misled— a quick visit will reveal a Ught, 
airy, above ground suite, attractively decorated and well equipped— but like 
the rest of the School of Medicine, already overcrowded. 



17 



OB-GYN Fund Established 

Dr. Samuel L. Parker ('40), Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, has recently made a note- 
worthy contribution to the Medical Foundation with funds 
designated for use by the Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. Additional contributions by his professional as- 
sociate. Dr. Fleming Fuller, Clinical Associate Professor, and 
members of the full-time staff of obstetrics and gynecology, 
have assured a healthy beginning for a developmental fund 
for this department. 

Dr. Parker received his M.D. degree from George Wash- 
ington University and his residency training at Watts Hos- 
pital and Duke University Hospital. He married Frances Carr 
of Durham and practices his specialty in Kinston, North 
Carolina, being associated with Doctors Fuller and Tom 
Vestal (H.S. '54-'58). It is hoped that this will afford an 
opportunity to persons desiring to contribute to the Ob-Gyn 
Development Fund. 

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18 



The Rehabilitation Team 

by Donald D. Weir, M.D.=' 

REHABILITATION IS A TERM applied with increasing frequency. It 
has come to have many definitions and shades of meaning. Usually implied is 
some sort of restorative process through which an afflicted individual achieves a 
better state. Rehabilitation of prisoners, alcohoUcs, mentally ill, cardiacs, and 
hemiplegics evokes rather dissimilar associations. The term has become some- 
what overworked. Like the flag and motherhood, it is "good," and nearly every- 
one is in favor of it. 

In a medical context, there is, of course, nothing new in the concept of 
restoring people. This is a major objective in much that physicians traditionally 
do. There are, however, many chronically ill and disabled people who are not 
restored to normality by medical and surgical care and who may be subject to 
further deterioration and increasing disability. 

Problems associated with severe physical disability are frequently complex 
and multifaceted. To deal effectively with these problems, the skills of many 
different professional specialists may be required. In this context, the concept 
of team care becomes important. In a medical setting, medical specialists, nurses, 
social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, 
chaplains, brace and limb makers, vocational counselors, psychologists and 
sundry others may all have contributions to make to the care of the same 
patients. For a patient, much diversified activity may be involved. If this 
activity is divergently directed, an effect Uke Brownian movement may result, 
with much moving about but little forward progress. Adequate communications 
between all concerned and coordination of this variegated activity is crucial if 
the patient is really to benefit. 

Chronic illness and physical disability present problems of long duration. 
Frequently, many aspects of hving are aflfected for the individual, his family, 
and the community, especially the collective pocketbook. The problems are not 
medical alone and not all the problems are currently soluble. However, many 
are not as insoluble and hopeless as is commonly thought. 

There are increasing numbers of chronically ill and disabled people, espe- 
cially in older age groups. Pressures increase to find improved ways of caring 
for such people in a reasonably comprehensive and efficient manner and as 
economically as possible. 

It has been demonstrated that rehabilitative programs for physically dis- 
abled people often justify their cost through the reduction of long-term 
dependency and the costs of custodial care at home or in institutions. A com- 
prehensive program, involving intensive services of a multiprofessional team, 
frequently can achieve much in helping restore disabled people. As applied in 
specialized centers, intensive rehabilitative care may be expensive rnd utilize 
much professional time. Economic considerations and shortages of specially 
trained nurses, therapists, social workers, etc., make some other approach neces- 
sary if larger numbers of physically disabled people are to be benefited. 



'■■ Dr. Weir is Assistant Professor of Medicine and Preventive Medicine .ind Reliabilitation 
Coordinator, U.N.C. School of Medicine. 

19 



The Program at Carolina 

At the U.N.C. School of Medicine, the rehabilitation program has been 
formulated as one which is applicable to numbers of patients, does not unduly 
prolong hospitalization and carries over to the homes and communities of the 
patients. 

The Rehabilitation Team includes in addition to the author, many other 
specialized personnel. Miss Ruth Holmes, Rehabilitation Nurse, has had several 
years' experience in public health nursing prior to her current activities. Miss 
Elinor Dorries, Home Health Supervisor, serves as liaison between the hospital 
and the local county and district health departments and public health nurses. 
She is a well-trained public health nurse. Miss Virginia Rigsbee, Chief Re- 
habilitation Social Worker, has had extensive experience in public welfare as 
well as medical social work. Other social workers in the department under the 
direction of Miss Euzelia Smart, work closely with the Rehabilitation Team in 
their work with specific patients. Mrs. Betty Cogswell serves with the group 
rs a sociologist and is also a trained vocational counselor. Mrs. Sara Weaver 
functions as a physical therapist with the Rehabilitation Team in the Out- 
patient Department. The entire staff in Physical Therapy under Miss Margaret 
Moore and Miss Sue Flowers function closely with the group in the care of 
patients. Miss Florence Bearden, Mrs. Ann Smith, and other Occupational 
Therapy staff members also work extensively with the rehabilitation group. 
Mr. Joe Ferguson and his staff in the Brace Shop, the staff in Speech Therapy, 
and in Psychology also frequently work with the group. 

The Rehabilitation Team functions in a coordinating and consultative 
capacity in the care of appropriate patients. Inpatients are not transferred to a 
separate rehabilitation service but remain with the clinical service to which 
their disease or injury assigns them. Approximately 1 5 '/f of patients in medi- 
cine, surgery, and pediatrics have complex problems related to physical dis- 
ability and are known to the rehabilitation group. 

Patients are evaluated not only in terms of disease or Injury but also in 
terms of specific disability and residual function or ability. Associated psycho- 
logical and social problems are also assessed. Patients are both private and staff, 
and of diverse ages, social backgrounds and vocational categories. They present 
a variety of physical disabilities. Arthritic disorders and collagen diseases are 
commonly represented because of the author's special interests. Hemiplegia, 
spinal cord disorders, peripheral neuritis, and other chronic disabling conditions 
are commonly included. 

Rounds by the rehabilitation group are conducted as team conferences. The 
social worker, physical therapist, and occupational therapist treating the specific 
patient under discussion attend together with other rehabilitation personnel, 
house officers, ward nurses, and assorted students. Goals for achievement during 
hospitalization and plans for long-term care after discharge are reviewed. 

Functions of the Team 

Rehabilitation is conceived by the team as a process which a disabled indi- 
vidual himself must accomplish. Emotional adjustment and motivation to im- 
prove are of great import;mce. Rehabilitation is not accomplished within in- 
stitutions, especially general hospitals, except in a limited sense. It must be 
translated into living at home and in a community. The role of the family is 

20 





The Rehabilitation group evaluating an arthritic patient. From the left 
are Dr. Weir; Florence Bearden, O.T.; Virginia Rigsbee, Social Service; Ruth 
Holmes,, Rehabilitation Nurse; Ann Smith, O.T.; Sara Weaver, P.T.; Sandra 
Allen, Secretary; and Sue Harper, P.T. 



of great importance. In most cases, relatives will be involved in long-term 
care at home. If family members consider the patient a hopeless invalid, he 
likely will tend to become this, even if he had potential to accomplish much 
more. Positive family, as well as patient, attitudes are most helpful. An addi- 
tional factor is duration of disability. If the educational, counseUng and thera- 
peutic activities designed to promote rehabilitation are begun early, the results 
are much more favorable. If the patient and his family have become accustomed 
to invalidism, often nothing will be accompUshed. 

One of the objectives in rehabilitative patient care is the reduction of de- 
pendency. This includes both physical dependency so that the disabled indi- 
vidual cares for himself as completely as possible, and socioeconomic dependency, 
so that the family can remain as self-sufficient, economically and otherwise, as 
possible. 

Toward the objective of reducing physical dependency, nursing, physical 
therapy, and occupational therapy are of major help. In rehabilitation, the 
emphasis in nursing shifts from doing things for the patient to encouraging and 
teaching the patient to do for himself. Thus, the hemiplegic stroke victim can 
quickly learn to feed, bathe and dress himself using his good arm. 

Physical therapy employs various physical modalities therapeutically such 
as heat, diathermy or ultrasound. More important, however, are therapeutic 
exercises to improve motion, strength, and coordination. Training in the use 



21 



of aids such as braces, crutches, and wheel chairs independently is also given 
by the physical therapists. 

Occupational therapy employs various manual creative activities for thera- 
peutic purposes. A craft project may thus be set up in a specific way to achieve 
repetitive exercise of a disabled part to improve strength or motion. The occu- 
pational therapists also assist in traming disabled people in various aspects of 
self care. This frequently includes use of assistive devices. A sharp rounded 
"rocking" knife may enable a one-handed person to cut his meat independently. 
Various holding devices may make activities such as cleaning glasses or cutting 
fingernails, one-handed operations. Long or thick-handled utensils may enable 
specific patients to perform various activities independently. Occupational 
therapists often can help retrain disabled homemakers in simplified methods for 
performing various household tasks. They frequently can also help explore pos- 
sible future vocational objectives for disabled people. 

In many instances patients and relatives also need assistance with an enor- 
mous array of psychological and social problems related to physical disabiUty. 
Often resolution or at least palliation of such problems is crucial to the suc- 
cessful implementation of a long-term home program and any real rehabilita- 
tion. Psychiatric care is occasionally required. Frequently, social case work is 
especially helpful in successfully dealing with such problems. The social workers 
also are of considerable help through their knowledge of various community 
resources which may be of assistance to the patient. 

Home Care 

Despite improved physical function and self-care observed in the hospital, 
for most patients, the program must be continued at home to be really suc- 
cessful. Families frequently do an excellent job in caring for even the most 
severely disabled, if they are carefully instructed in the techniques and proce- 
dures involved and are periodically supervised. Considerable time and effort is 
spent by the rehabilitation group in expediting the transfer of programs of 
care from hospital to home. Teaching the details of diet, medication, appro- 
priate nursing care, self-care activities, use of assistive devices and special 
equipment, home physical therapy, and occupational therapy programs is time 
consuming. 

Communications to various local personnel are of considerable importance. 
Patients and families may need further supervision and assistance. Often in- 
formation and instructions, which seemed perfectly clear in the hospital, become 
a sea of confusion at home, even with written instructions for reference. The 
local personal physician, obviously, has a key role in the continued care at home 
and needs to be informed and involved in all facets of the program. 

Public health nurses in the local health department are frequently re- 
quested, as part of this program, to make home visits on patients discharged 
from the hospital. The nurses are supplied with specific details of the program 
and instructions given the patient and family. The public health nurse, after 
clearing with the personal physician, visits the patient and family periodically. 
The home nursing care, diet, medications, home physical and occupational 
therapy programs are reviewed and reinforced. The nurse often spots problems 
which need further attention. The written reports from the public health nurses 
are of considerable help to hospital personnel. Home evaluations prior to dis- 
charge from the hospital enable more realistic plans for home care to be de- 

22 



veloped. The foUowup reports after discharge indicate areas of progress and 
sources of difficulty. 

A home program must be realistic. It accomplishes little to prescribe daily 
hot packs for an arthritic patient who must chop wood to build a fire and 
carry water from the well to prepare the hot packs. It profits Uttle to instruct 
the brother of a hemiplegic patient how to assist with exercises, when the 
brother absents himself frequently for days or weeks on alcoholic sprees. Anti- 
cipating and planning for such problems is facilitated by the pubUc health 
nurse's reports, supplementing data gathered at the hospital. 

The public health nurses are not able to render bedside nursing care. 
However, the limited supervision of the care given by the family is most 
valuable. This service has, in this program, been well received by private as 
well as staff patients. Usually, physicians, who understand the nature and pur- 
pose of this activity, find the information and observations the nurses can pro- 
vide of considerable help in their continued care of chronically ill and disabled 
patients. 

The N.C. State Board of Health employs several physical therapists for 
the various crippled children's clinics and as part of the chronic disease pro- 
gram. These therapists cooperate with our program by visiting at home selected 
patients discharged from the hospital, at approximately monthly intervals. 
Usually, the therapist is accompanied by the local public health nurse. The 
home physical therapy program is reviewed and, with permission of the phy- 
sician, can be upgraded as the patient improves. The nurse can then review 
this with the patient between visits by the therapist. In some communities 
physical therapists are available in local hospitals, private practice, or employed 
by the health department or other groups. In these areas more intensive physical 
therapy supervision can be obtained in the home programs of certain patients. 

The local welfare department often is of help, not only with financial 
problems, but also with at least limited case work services. Public financial 
assistance is obviously not a goal in itself. It may be of value temporarily, until 
more adequate rehabilitation can be achieved to thereby reduce the problem of 
long-term social disability. Homemaker services, offered in some counties, are 
of immense aid in some difficult family situations. Certain patients are already 
known to the local welfare department. In these cases, information from the 
case workers can be of great help in planning for long-term care. 

Various other local organizations may be of assistance in individual cases. 
Church groups, civic clubs, the Society for Crippled Children and Adults, and 
other groups may be called upon. For patients with potential for return to 
gainful employment, the State Vocational Rehabilitation program offers diverse 
forms of assistance to help disabled people return to work. 

The most common limiting factor in restoration vocationally is not physi- 
cal disability but lack of education and skills which can be used productively 
despite disability. There are few employment opportunities for the functionally 
illiterate and unskilled with disability. More adult educational opportunities and 
sheltered workshops would certainly help reduce the number of disabled people 
who currently remain "on the welfare." 

Outpatient Program 

A number of chronically ill and disabled patients are followed periodically 
as outpatients in the Chronic Disease and Rehabilitation Clinic. Patients are ad- 

23 



mitted to this clinic primarily on the basis of need for continued, coordinated, 
multiprofessional or team care. Most patients can be adequately cared for by 
their own physician and are returned to him. Some patients with more complex 
problems have continued needs for special nursing care, physical therapy, occu- 
pational therapy, case work, and other services if further improvement is to hz 
obtained. 

In the Chronic Disease and Rehabilitation CUnic attention is given pri- 
marily to long-range home care. Periodic assessment of disability and asso- 
ciated psychosocial problems and the implementation of a comprehensive but 
realistic home program are emphasized. With outpatients, the home care pro- 
gram, if complex, may be developed gradually over several clinic visits. Psy- 
chological and social problems also are resolved or ])alliated only gradually. 

For patients and their families learning what to do in home care may not 
be too difficult. Actually, carrying out programs, repetitively and consistently 
for prolonged periods of time, is a quite different matter. Periodic reinforcement 
and encouragement are of great importance. The personal physician, local public 
health nurses, visiting therapists, and other community resources are important 
m long-range care of outpatients in a manner quite analogous with the in- 
patient program. 

There is much about care of severely disabled people which is not as 
scientifically based as in other branches of therapeutics. Many complex variables 
are involved especially human variables which defy ready quantification and 
measurement. "Tincture of enthusiasm" and the "art of medicine" clearly are 
of importance and may be more so than specific forms of therapy. The dif- 
ference between a rehabiUtated paraplegic and one who is a complete invaUd 
lies in a httle "know how," consistently applied, and a favorable state of mind. 
Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease for which only more or less paUiative therapy 
is available. Control and limitation of potential disabiUty is a long-term goal 
viewed over decades. To accept and live with the disease with equanimity, 
while carrying out, over and over, a routine program of exercises, splints and 
medications is difficult. These items do make considerable difference in Umiting 
the eventual degree of disabihty and the degree to which the afflicted person 
regresses to a whining, complaining invalid. The care of a hemiplegic individual 
is not as great a problem if the person learns to walk and independently care 
for himself. By contrast, many hemiplegics, without some rehabilitative efforts, 
undoubtedly would remain in bed, incontinent, and completely helpless, letting 
others care for them. 

With many physically disabled patients, goals are Umited and are attained 
only slowly. The alternative to a program aimed at some degree of rehabiUtation 
is, for many patients, further physical deterioration and psychological in- 
vaUdism with very difficult problems of long-term care for the families in- 
volved. 

For some patients, one criterion of limited success in rehabilitation is 
merely avoiding rehospitalization with various complicating problems. Many 
patients are able to achieve much more. In some cases other family members 
may be freed from caring for the patient, who has learned to care for himself, 
and can seek outside employment. Certain patients, unfortunately, too few at 
present, are able to seek employment themselves and resume a productive role 
in family and community affairs. 

24 



presenting . . . The Alumni 




DR. HARRY L. BROCKMANN 

Dr. Harry L. Brockmann of High Point, president of the UNC Medical 
Alumni Association, is currently beginning the forty-first year of his surgical 
practice and the seventy-second year of a fruitful varied life that has brought 
him the honor of his peers. 

A two-year man at the UNC medical school. Dr. Brockmann received his 
M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania. From 1917 to 1920 he was a lieu- 
tenant in the Medical Corps of the U. S. Navy, en- 
gaged with "ten or twelve" other officers in establish- 
ing medical care for inhabitants of the Virgin Islands, 
purchased by the U. S. from Denmark in 1916. His 
work involved surgery and tropical medicine and he 
had personal responsibility for a leper colony, an in- 
sane asylum and a hospital for, as he says, "the lame, 
the halt, and the blind." Working on St. Croix, he was 
also an associate in surgery and medical treatment to 
a general hospital. 

After the war service, he returned to do graduate 
work at the Hospital of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and then began his surgical practice in High 
Point. 

One of Dr. Brockmann's main concerns has been the encouragement of 
mutually cooperative practice among the M.D.s of his home city. He was for 
years a member of the Burrus CUnic Group and later was actively involved in 
developing the present High Point Medical Center. 

He has also worked to increase coordination of effort between hospital 
administrators and the nursing and medical professions. For twenty-five years 
he has taught anatomy and physiology to students in nursing school. 

Dr. Brockmann is former president of the North Carolina Hospital Asso- 
ciation, has been a member and chairman of the Committee on Nursing of the 
state Medical Society and has served on a joint committee to have laws enacted 
for licensing practical nurses in North Carolina. These activities, and his mem- 
bership on the board of directors of the North Carolina Hospital Saving Asso- 
ciation, express his efforts for improved patient care. 

A former president of the Guilford County Medical Society and of the 
Eighth District (N.C.) Medical Society, Dr. Brockmann has also served as 
councilor to both the Southeastern Surgical Congress and the Southern Medical 
Association. 

(Continued on page 27) 



25 



presenting . . The Facility 



DR. EDWARD GLASSMAN 

Dr. Edward Glassman was appointed to the faculty of the School of Medi- 
cine in July 1960 as Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, and in September 
1961 he was awarded a Senior Research Fellowship"'" by the Public Health 
Service for a five-year period. 

Dr. Glassman received B.A. and M.S. degrees from New York University 
and the Ph.D. degree from The Johns Hopkins University in 19 5 5. He was 
Postdoctoral Fellow of the American Cancer Society 
at California Institute of Technology from 195 5 to 
1957; Research Associate at City of Hope Medical 
Center, 1957-1958; and Postdoctoral Fellow of the 
Public Health Service at the University of Edinburgh 
from 1958 to 195 9. Thereafter, he returned to City 
of Hope Medical Center for one year before joining the 
faculty of our School of Medicine. 
^ — -•#^/ Dr. Glassman has broad research interests in bio- 

flf& "V Ji^^ chemical genetics, but his research is directed prin- 

^■Hl ^|||||||^H||^|^ cipally toward a study of the genetic control of xan- 

^^^B A**!^^^! thine dehydrogenase in Drosophila. This research has 

led to the important discovery of an in vitro com- 
plementation between nonallelic mutants deficient in the enzyme, xanthine 
dehydrogenase. This significant observation provides an important "break- 
through" in the study of genetic control of enzyme synthesis, and it has broad 
implications for a more detailed study of so-called "inborn errors" of meta- 
bolism in human beings. 

The Public Health Service has redesignated these fellowships as Career Development Awards. 




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16 



Presenting the Home Staff 

DR. CARL BLACKBURN LYLE, JR. 

Dr. Lyle, a native of Tennessee, is Chief Resident in Medicine. He re- 
ceived his undergraduate education at Princeton University and was awarded 
his medical degree by the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
1957. He served his internship at the University of 

P California Hospitals in San Francisco, CaUfornia and 

then returned to the South to take his junior residency 
at Duke University Hospital. In 19 5 9 he entered the 
United States Air Force and was for two years an 
instructor in Aviation Medicine and was engaged in 
Aerospace-medical research at the Aerospace Medical 
i -Ni** Center at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, 

Texas. He came to Chapel Hill as a senior resident in 
1961 and took over his present assignment in July of 
this year. His research interests have included studies 
in neurogenic aspects of pulmonary edema, cerebral 
embolic phenomenon, fat embolization, decompression 
sickness, syncope and sickle cell anemia. 
He is married to the former Ishbel McGill Keefer of Boston and they have 
one son. Dr. Lyle is interested in group practice and plans to remain in North 
Carolina. 

T>Y. Brockmanii — (continued) 

He is a life elder in the Presbyterian Church and plays the piano "to the 
extent of being assistant pianist for the men's Bible class." He is currently, and 
has for years been, a member of the High Point Chamber of Commerce's 
Congressional Action Committee, and has 39 years of activity in the local 
Civitan Club. He is a former member of the Guilford County Board of Health 
and the Board of Welfare, a former director of the local and state Tuberculosis 
Association, and a member of Emerywood Country Club. 

His recreational activities have gone from tennis to golf to gardening and 
fishing, and he has a great reader's interest in economics and political science. 

He and Mrs. Brockmann have two sons, both teachers: one a surgeon and 
the other a Christian minister. 




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17 




ALUMNI 
NEWS ITEMS 



CLASS OF 1924 

Ed. Note: In the brief biographical 
sketch of Dr. John W. Ormand, Sr., 
'24, P. O. Box 397, Monroe, North 
Carolina, which appeared in Alumni 
News Items, October, 1962, mention 
was inadvertently omitted of the fact 
that Dr. Ormand's two sons, John W., 
Jr. and Thomas Lane, are both grad- 
uates of the U.N.C. School of Medi- 
cine. John W., Jr. was a member of 
the class of 1956 and Thomas Lane of 
the class of 1958. 

CLASS OF 1945 
GEORGE WALKER BLAIR, JR., 
328 West Davis Street, Burlington, 
N. C. Associated with another intern- 
ist, he practices internal medicine. 
Had his last two years of Medical 
School at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania (AOA) and internship and resi- 
dency at the hospital of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. He served as 
Chief of Staff at Alamance General 
Hospital, Burlington, N. C, from 
January, '56, until the hospital was 
transferred to its new building and 
became Memorial Hospital of Ala- 
mance County in December, 1961. He 
served as Chief of Staff of Memorial 
Hospital of Alamance County from 
December, 1961 until October, 1962. 
He married the former Sara Jo Bar- 
nett and they have three children: 
George Walker, III, 10, Barnett Lips- 
comb, 7, and Sara Wilhite, 3. 



KIRBY T. HART, JR., 109 S. Mar- 
ket St., Petersburg, Virginia. Does 
Pediatrics in partnership with two 
other pediatricians. Had his postgradu- 
ate training at Boston City Hospital, 
University Hospital, Cleveland, and 
MCVA— Richmond Hospital. He holds 
membership in the American Acad- 
emy of Pediatrics and is a diplomate 
of the American Board of Pediatrics. 
He and his wife, George Anne, have 
one son, Kirby, III, 11. A deacon in 
the Second Presbyterian Church and 
a member of Rotary, golf and travel 
are his principal recreational inter- 
ests. 

RICHARD E. HOOKS, 123 N. 2nd 
Street, St. Pauls, N. C. Does general 
practice. Postgraduate training was 
done at James Walker Memorial Hos- 
pital in Wilmington, N. C. He and his 
wife, Anne, have one son, age 15. He 
is Assistant Chief of Staff, Robeson 
County Memorial Hospital, a member 
of the Town Board of Commissioners, 
and a deacon of the First Baptist 
Church in St. Pauls. For recreation, 
he fishes and water skis at White 
Lake. 

JOE H. MONROE, 415 N. Spring 
Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. Practices 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. A diplo- 
mate in Ob-Gyn, he had postgraduate 
training at University of Cincinnati 
and Yale Medical Centers. He and his 
wife, the former Elizabeth Breeden, 



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28 



have three children: Elizabeth Cloud, 
12, Joe, Jr., 10, and Thomas Guy III, 
4. His recreational activities include 
cabinet making and fishing (rarely). 

CLASS OF 1946 

DAVID Y. COOPER, 424 Colebrook 
Lane, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Does research 
surgery. Postgraduate training was 
obtained at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. He and his wife, Cynthia, 
have two children: Lucy and Allison. 

LUTHER W. KELLY, JR., Nalle 
Clinic, 1350 S. Kings Drive, Charlotte 
7, N. C. Does internal medicine (en- 
docrinology). A fellow of the Amei-i- 
can College of Physicians, he did 
postgraduate work at Harvard and at 
University Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio. 
He is married to the former Susan 
Bowman and they have two children: 
Abbott Bowman, 5, and Mary Luther, 
4. A past president of the Unitarian 
Church, of the Family and Children's 
Service, and the Council on Human 
Relations, he is a member of the So- 
cial Planning Council and has been 
honored with the W.S.O.C. Public 
Service Achievement Award. He is a 
member of the Charlotte Country Club 
and the Charlotte Badminton Club and 
enjoys playing golf. 

WILLIAM E. SHEELY, 509 Cathe- 
dral Drive, Alexandria, Va. Does 
radiology in partnership with two 
other radiologists. Postgraduate train- 
ing was received at Philadelphia Gen- 
eral Hospital. Now Chairman-elect of 
the Section on Radiology of the D. C. 
Medical Society, he served as secre- 
tary for the last three years. He and 
his wife, Amelia, have three children, 
Mary Ellen, 11, Elizabeth Ann, 6, and 
Susan Virginia, 4. Favorite recrea- 
tional activity: golf (for the exer- 
cise!!). Of trips taken, he reports that 
only short trips have been taken so 
far to meetings in the U.S. "till the 
kids get older." 

EDWIN L. WEBB, 634 East Patton 
Ave., Montgomery 5, Alabama. Has 
practice in pediatrics and pediatric 
allergy. Did his postgraduate work at 
Louisville Children's Hospital and 
University of Louisville, Louisville, 
Kentucky. A fellow of the American 
Academy of Pediatrics, he is a diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Pedia- 
trics. He married the former Francis 



Brice (U.N.C. '45) and they have three 
children: Elise, 13, Lee, 10, and Janet, 
7. An elder in the Westminster Pres- 
byterian Church, he received the Boy 
Scout Award for Distinguished and 
Outstanding Service for 1982. Chief 
recreational interests are numismatics, 
golf, and photography. Interesting 
trips taken: Eastern Canada — '59; 
Mexico — '60; Western Canada — '61; 
International Congress of Pediatrics — 
Lisbon and Western Europe — '62 (for 
one month). 

CLASS OF 1947 

WILLIAM H. BLAND, Cary, N. C. 
Does private general practice, solo. 
Postgraduate training was received at 
Rex Hospital in Raleigh. He married 
the former Jane Hobgood and they 
are the parents of three children: 
William Herbert, Jr., 12; Frank Hob- 
good, 11; and James Robert, 10. A 
member of Cary Methodist Church, 
he teaches the Young Adult Class. 
Among his recreational activities are 
golf and Softball and he had an in- 
teresting trip to Hawaii in '61. 



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29 



W. ERNEST POWELL, JR., Moun- 
tainview Rd., Mars Hill, N. C. Does 
general practice in partnership with 
two other physicians. A member of 
AOA, he did his postgraduate work at 
Duke. He and his wife, Frances, have 
three children: Billy, 9; Carol, 7; and 
Allen, 1. For recreation he enjoys 
fishing. 

HEWITT ROSE, 2009 Clark Ave., 
Raleigh. A surgeon, with boards in 
general and thoracic surgery, his 
postgraduate training was received at 
the Medical College of Virginia, Uni- 
versity of Alabama Medical School 
Hospital, and Washington University 
in St. Louis. Married to the former 
Dudley Hill, he and Dudley have two 
sons: Hewitt HI, 11, and Dudley, 9. A 
Presbyterian, he is a member of the 
White Memorial Presbyterian Church. 

EMILY TUFTS, 660 S. W. Broad 
Street, Southern Pines, N. C. Does a 
solo pediatric practice. Now on the 
clinical staff at N. C. Memorial Hospi- 
tal, Chapel Hill, she did her postgrad- 
uate work at St. Christopher's Hospi- 
tal for Children in Philadelphia. She 
is active in work with the Red Cross 
and with retarded and crippled chil- 



dren. She had an interesting trip to 
Europe in 1960. Was in the earth- 
quake in Yellowstone in 1959. 

SHERROD NEWBERRY WOOD, 
Enfield, N. C. Does general practice, 
solo. His internship was done at U.S. 
Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, Va. 
(1950-51). He married the former 
Hulda Turner and they have three 
children: Amy Lou, 5; Turner, 4; and 
Valerie, 2. He is secretary-treasurer 
of the Enfield Recreation Commission 
and a member of the Enfield Educa- 
tional Foundation. Hunting and fish- 
ing are chief among his recreational 
activities. 

GEORGE ROBERT SMITH, JR., '51, 
Shawsville, Va. Mildred and Bob just 
had their fourth child — now have 
three girls and a boy. Bob continues 
in general practice in Shawsville, Va., 
in association with Dr. Clarence Tay- 
lor, '58. 

CLARENCE TAYLOR, '58, Shaws- 
ville, Va. Clarence and Ora now have 
two boys and a girl. Clarence con- 
tinues in general practice in Shaws- 
ville, Va., in association with Dr. Bob 
Smith, '51. 



Orange Savings & Loan Association 




CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

A Thrift Institution 

Current Dividends 4% 

Compounded Semi-Annually 



30 




This new model Elec- 
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31 



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32 



CompI iments of 

HART 
LABORATORIES 



Clemmons, North Carolina 



(Nine miles west of Winston-Salem on Interstate 40) 




VISITORS 
WELCOME 



DO NOT READ THIS 

if you don't want to learn three facts 
of which you may already be aware: 
Hospital Saying Association — Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield of Chapel 
Hill — leads all other companies 
operating in North Carolina in: 1. 
Total persons protected; 2. Benefits 
paid, and 3. Growth. 

Put these three facts together and 
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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 
PERMIT NO. 24 



BOX 957 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



Vol.X 



FEBRUARY, 1963 



No. 3 




MAfill'ft, 

OmsiON OF 



THE BULLETIN 



US 

lij 

CO 

< • 

C u. > 

U. O (E 

• C < 

< CL c: 

-J • — 

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>• V> iTi 

2 < »^ 



School of Medicine 
University of North Carolina 



THE 

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ESTABLISHED THIS PLAN OF GROUP ACCIDENT AND 

HEALTH PROTECTION FOR ITS MEMBERS IN 1940 



NEW AND MORE EXTENSIVE 
BENEFITS 

We are proud to announce the most exten- 
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*Amount payable depends upon the nature of the loss as set forth in the policy. 

OPTIONAL HOSPITAL COVERAGE 



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Refnember. . . 

FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1963 

IS 
MEDICAL ALUMNI DAY 



The following classes have been invited to plan 
reunions in connection with Alumni Day: 1913, 
'17, '18, '19, '28, '33, '38, '43M, '43D, '58. 



MEDICAL PARENTS' DAY 

IS 
SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1963 

Plan Now to Attend 



The Bulletin 

of the School of Medicine 
of the University of North CaroHna 

Published in cooperation with the Whitehead Medical Society 
and the Medical Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. 



Vol. X February, 1963 No. 3 

IN THIS ISSUE 

Continuation Education: An Editorial 11 

The Personal Physician 12 

In Memoriam 1 7 

The Intensive Care Unit — N. C. Memorial Hospital 1 8 

Glimpses of Medical Europe, 1961-1963 (Part I) 22 

Presenting the Alumni 29 

Presenting the Faculty 30 

Presenting the House Staff 3I 

Alumni News Items 32 

Departmental News 3 g 

Class Notes 3 7 



Editorial Committee 

C. C. FoRDHAM, M.D. ('49) J. T. Monroe, M.D. ('55) 

Chairman George D. Penick, M.D. ('44) 

W. Reece Berryhill, M.D. ('25) H. L. Stephenson, M.D. ('55) 

E. Ted Chandler, M.D. ('55) A. Widra, Ph.D. 

Ira Fowler, Ph.D Emory S. Hunt 

W. P. Jacocks, M.D. ('09) Quincey Ayscue ('63) 

Hugh A. McAllister, M.D. ('35) Karl Ray '66 



Address all inquiries and communications to Emory S. Hunt, 117 Medical 
Science Building— or Box 957, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Published four times a year — October, December. February and April 

Entered as third-class matter at the Post Office at Chapel Hill, N. C. 



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and Growing 
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Since 1899 



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10 



Continuation Education: An Editorial 

In this time, when "the dehvery of medical care" is considered primarily 
in economic terms, it should be recalled that one of the most important con- 
siderations concerning this endeavor is the ability of physicians to become and 
stay educated in medical science. Many of the troublesome aspects of post- 
graduate medical education were recently examined in a thoughtful and 
provocative report by a Joint Study Committee."' This group proposed the 
long range development of a "University without Walls" for postgraduate 
medical education. 

It may be useful to examine briefly some of the measures currently used 
by physicians in efforts to keep up with advancing medical knowledge. First, 
there are the problems associated with reading the medical Uterature: time in 
which to do so and a measure of selectivity which will best accomplish the 
purpose. These are really major problems, no doubt of it. It is a difficult task 
to keep even current journals from simply piling up. Furthermore, the com- 
plex character of the literature lends itself in but a limited way to productive 
perusal. Some physicians try to set aside specific hours of the week for this 
purpose, but these intentions too often fall victim to the exigencies of the day. 
The plan to set aside time for this purpose, however, is well worth a most 
earnest effort. The subject matter can logically be divided into two major 
categories: general and special. From the systematic reading of several general 
medical periodicals and one or two special interest journals, one may surprising- 
ly cull much of contemporary interest. The editorials in particular tend to 
emphasize recent and noteworthy developments. Special reading concerns 
problems actually encountered and is a particularly vital part of the overall 
effort. It is in this regard that the hospital or the community medical library 
can make an important contribution by the provision of up-to-date textbooks, 
as well as a selection of current periodicals; and here too it is that habits of 
study and pursuit developed during medical school and residency days assert 
themselves. It is probably reasonable to consider that earnest, critical and 
selective reading is the most important form of continuing medical education. 
The doctor who does not read is not likely to stay educated in his profession 
very long. 

Participation in hospital or community medical rounds, with recourse to 
the literature or consulting colleagues, is a widely used technique by which 
the physician shares his experiences with his fellows. Many physicians now take 
blocks of time away from their practice for study. This time may be well 
spent in individual efforts or, increasingly, by attendance at organized post- 
graduate courses. The latter are widely available, are genuine working sessions 
and often provide a useful didactic stimulus. The scientific sections of organi- 
zational meetings vary greatly in quality and usefulness. Too often, however, 
these meetings combine work with play, the latter all but precluding the 
former. Such meetings may have very significant value to the physician, both 
as a pleasant experience and in support of his professional organization; but 
this often does not constitute a serious educational effort on the part of the 
attendee. A variety of other techniques are receiving attention, such as two- 
way radio conferences, tape recorded panels, and correspondence courses. We 
badly need effective means of evaluating the benefits of each of these ap- 
proaches. 

C.C.F. 

* Dryer, B. V., Lifetime Learning for Physicians, J. Med. Educ. — 37:1962 — part 2, 

ai 



The 

Personal 

Physician 

Key Man 

In Medical Care 





By William J. Cromartie, M.D. 



The chief problem in our medical program today is that of supplying 3 
sufficient number of personal physicians: well-trained practitioners capable of 
bringing the latest developments in medical science into the area of patient 
care. A personal physician is one who assumes comprehensive and continuing 
responsibility for the medical care of the individual. In most cases, he will 
himself handle the medical problems involved, referring the patient to the 
appropriate specialist for the remainder. The major difficulty we now face is 
that of providing each of our citizens with such a qualified personal physician. 

Much of our resources going into medical programs is given to attempts 
to compensate for the shortage of personal physicians. Clinics are set up for the 
diagnosis of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and tuberculosis; immunizations are 
given on a community-wide scale. Necessary as they may be at this time, such 
programs are poor substitutes for periodic health reviews; i.e., history, physical 
examination, and indicated laboratory and x-ray studies, and planned preventive 
medicine on an individual basis. No program, or series of programs, which 
deals with only one aspect of medical care can take the place of the personal 
physician. He is the key figure in any approach to obtaining the benefits of our 
medical knowledge for every citizen. 

"" Dr. Cromartie is Professor of Bacteriology and Medicine, the University of North Caro- 
lina School of Medicine. 



12 



Included in the designation of personal physician are three kinds of practi- 
tioners: the pediatrician who takes responsibility for the care of children; the 
internist who is concerned with the care of adults; and the family physician 
whose practice encompasses all age groups. It should be noted that some 
pediatricians and internists limit their practice to consultation work, accepting 
patients only on referral; however, the majority are in practice as personal 
physicians even though they function partially as consultants in a subspecialty. 
There is general agreement as to the functions and training of the internist 
and the pediatrician. It is in defining the scope of the family doctor that wc 
hnd a great divergence ot views among both medical educators and practicing 
physicians. 

Fifty years ago, the family doctor was internist, pediatrician, surgeon, 
obstetrician, and psychiatrist. Specialists were out of reach, geographically and 
financially, in most cases. That the life expectancy of the patient was only half 
of what it is today is no reflection on the abilities and training of the family 
doctor but only an indication of the progress medical science has made in the 
oast half century. 

This increasing body of knowledge which the medical graduate must 
naster makes necessary a reevaluation of the training programs designed to 
produce personal physicians. It seems obvious that in the future it will be 
necessary for the personal physician to refer to the specialist certain areas of 
patient care which have been, and to some extent are still, the province of 
the family physician. To say that changes are necessary in training personal 
physicians of the future, however, should not be taken as criticism of different 
patterns which were appropriate in the past. 

Despite many opinions to the contrary, the trend seems to be increasingly 
away from the practice of surgery by the personal physician. Where formerly 
it was necessary in many localities that the general practitioner should be 
trained in surgery, there are few places in the country today which are not 
within easy reach of competent surgical specialists. With knowledge in every 
field of medicine multiplying rapidly, it would seem impossible for one practi- 
tioner to keep sufficiently abreast of all fields to offer the best possible care to 
his patients. Minor surgery and the emergency and primary management of 
trauma will in all probability be a part of the practice of any personal 
physician, but the time required for surgical training beyond these would better 
be spent in other fields, leaving surgical problems to the surgical specialist. 

What has just been said in reference to surgery applies, in my opinion, 
to obstetrics and gynecology also, though there is even less agreement among 
medical practitioners on this subject. The personal physician will need to be 
well-versed in obstetrical and gynecological diagnosis and in the medical man- 
agement of problems related to these fields, but beyond this, the personal 
physician of the future will, when it is possible, refer patients 'in this area to 
the well-trained obstetrician and gynecologist. 

The medical disciplines most to be emphasized in the training of the 
family practitioner of the future, then, will be those of internal medicine and 
pediatrics. '•■ There are medical educators who question the wisdom of trying to 
educate an individual who will function as both pediatrician and internist. 
Since it is not possible at this time to determine whether the family of the 

'■ I wish to make it clear that I consider basic training in psychiatry and preventive 
medicine an integral part of training in internal medicine and pediatrics, and I therefore make 
no separate mention of these fields. 

13 



future will be better off with two personal physicians — an internist and a 
pediatrician — or with one family physician, most would agree that until this 
question is answered a concerted effort should be made to increase the numbers 
of all three types of personal physicians. It should be emphasized that the 
family physician who treats patients of all ages will need to be as well trained 
in pediatrics and internal medicine as the personal physician who functions in 
only one of these fields. 

In addition to the question of what type of training the personal physi- 
cian will need, about which much controversy arises, there is the question of 
where and how the necessary training will be given. Those who still hold to 
a concept of general practice in which the personal physician takes responsi- 
bility in all fields of medical care tend to feel that rotating internships of one 
or two years' duration provide the best training for general practice. Others 
who view the personal physician of the future as a specialist taking responsi- 
bility for continuing and comprehensive medical care of the individual feel 
that he must be as thoroughly trained as any other specialist and that this is 
not possible in our present rotating internships. 

A variety of programs are now being offered whose purpose is to train 
the family physician as a specialist.''" In the North CaroUna Memorial Hospital, 
the mixed internship is divided between duty in the Departments of Medicine 
and Pediatrics, in which there is active participation by the Department of 
Psychiatry, and a period of one and a half months in the Emergency Room. 
This is followed by two years of residency, one each in medicine and pediatrics. 
An optional third year of residency provides rotation through the subspecial- 
ties of medicine and pediatrics or training in obstetrics may be obtained for 
6-12 months. There are 184 officially approved residency programs for general 
practice throughout the country. Their content and duration vary greatly, 
reflecting the divergent opinions as to the proper training for practice as a 
personal physician. 

Of the general practice residencies mentioned above, 27 are in hospitals 
affiliated with medical schools, the remaining 156 in a variety of public and 
private hospitals. In assessing the value of these programs from the point of 
view of training a medical graduate as a specialist in personal care of the patient, 
we need to consider how well the hospital can operate as an educational institu- 

* Training of the two other types of personal physicians (pediatricians and internists) 
is not considered in this essay. 



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14 



tion. A hospital may offer excellent patient care and facilities and still be 
unable to give the kind of training necessary to produce personal physicians 
of the quality needed. Such training is expensive. It requires in addition to a 
staff capable of giving the time needed to teaching interns and residents, the 
services of a full-time director of education to supervise their training. It re- 
quires a patient load large and varied enough so that trainees have a wide 
experience of different types of medical problems in the course of the training 
period. It is obvious that a share of the burden of training beyond medical 
school will be borne by non-affiliated hospitals and there is no reason why this 
training cannot be of excellent quality provided it is kept in mind that the 
primary purpose of an internship-residency program is the education of the 
future practitioner and not the services which are rendered to the hospital by 
the trainee. 

In addition to residencies in general practice, two experimental programs 
designed to train the graduate for practice as a personal physician have been 
approved by the AMA House of Delegates. The Family Practice Program con- 
sists of two years' training: eighteen months divided between medicine and 
pediatrics, an optional four months' training in obstetrics and gynecology, 
and service in the emergency room and outpatient departments. The two-year 
Program for General Practice is divided into a year of medicine and pediatrics 
and one of surgery, obstetrics and gynecology. 

The first of these was the result of a Report on Preparation for Family 
Practice made by a committee composed of representatives of the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals, The Association of American Medical 
Colleges, and the American Academy of General Practice. It was emphasized 
that the report was concerned entirely with the preparation of physicians in 
the future for family practice, and was not to be interpreted as having im- 
port for the training or privileges of general practitioners now in practice. 
Nevertheless, there was some alarm that the philosophy expressed in the com- 
mittee report might be used as an excuse to restrict the hospital privileges of 
general practitioners and resolutions were passed by the House of Delegates 
asking the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals to consider for approval 
other two-year programs which would incorporate experience in obstetrics and 
surgery. The programs now designated as General Practice Programs are the 
result of this action. 

One of the great difficulties in establishing new programs to fit changing 
patterns of medical practice is that too often a new approach is taken as 
criticism of programs of the past. The resistance of many general practitioners 
to the views expressed in the report of the Committee on Preparation for 
Family Practice and to General Practice Residency programs VAat the one at 
North Carolina Memorial Hospital increases the difficulty of attracting medi- 
cal students into training as personal physicians. The acrimonious debate and 
conflicting advice tend to keep medical graduates out of those programs where 
they are most needed. Until greater agreement can be reached as to the future 
role of the personal physician and the training therefor, there can be little hope 
of attracting the necessary personnel into these programs. 

Several years ago, a British physician,''" concerned with some of the same 
problems discussed here, stated: "Whereas until recently our tendency on 
graduation day was to select the future specialists and let everybody else go 
into general practice, we might do better in the future to select the future 

1) 



personal doctors and let everybody else be a specialist." If this could be done, 
I believe it would help greatly in solving the problem of recruiting medical 
graduates into practice as personal physicians. For the first-rate student is not 
looking for a program that is quick or easy, but for one which will offer .: 
challenge to his abilities. The sooner it can be recognized, among medical 
educators and others in the profession and by the public, that to be a truly 
excellent personal physician requires as much, if not more, ability than to be 
a first-rate specialist, the sooner we will begin to encourage our best scholars 
to choose this branch of medicine. 

At the same time, we must realize that a longer time is needed for train- 
ing in this field, and a way must be found to provide adequate compensation 
during the residency period. If, in addition to a real challenge and adequate 
compensation, we are able to offer recognition to those choosing such careers, 
preferably through existing specialty boards or by a less favorable alternative, 
establishing a specialty board of family practice, we would be a long way 
toward solving the problem of securing a sufficient number of students for 
family practice programs. 

One further point needs to bs mentioned briefly. Even if agreement 
can be reached on methods of training, and problems of recruitment solved, 
we will still have to educate the pubUc. Our citizenry should be taught to 
recognize sound programs of medical care, to use them intelligently, and to 
provide the community atmosphere necessary to their establishment an J 
growth. 

No problem in medical care is more important than securing adequate 
numbers of highly trained personal physicians, and none so beset with difficulties 
We must begin with the recognition that the area of personal physician is an 
important specialty and that it will differ in the future from the general 
practice of the past. We must formulate programs which take this into account 
and establish methods of training as challenging and demanding as are now 
offered in recognized specialties. By showing the medical graduate the difficulty 
and importance of such training and giving recognition to those who choose 
this field, we must attract more of our finest students into it. Only then can 
we bring to the individual patient the benefits of the great advancements in 
medical knowledge. 

'•Fox, T. F., The Personal Doctor: Lancet, April 2, 1960, pp. 743-760. 



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16 



IN MEMORIAM 

During the summer, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Porter of Burlington, 
N. C. were notified officially by 
telegram from the Navy Depart- 
ment of the loss of their son, Lt. 
Richard A. Porter, '59, who was 
a Naval Medical officer based at 
Macon, Georgia. Lt. Porter and 
Air Force Captain Frank Schill- 
ing of Phoenix, Arizona, lost 
their lives while skin-diving at 
Blue Springs Caverns near Mad- 
ison, Florida. 

Following his graduation from 
the Medical School in 1959, Lt. 
Porter served an internship at 
the General Rose Memorial 
Hospital in Denver, Colorado. 
He was nearing the completion 
of two years of active duty with 
the Navy and had accepted a 
position with a clinic in Ban- 
ning, California. 

Surviving in addition to his 
parents are his wife, Mrs. Nillah 
Gilbert Porter, two daughters, 
Deborah Lynn and Christine 
Rose; one sister, Barbara Joan 
Porter, and his grandfather, O. 
M. Ingebretson. 



17 



The Intensive Care Unit 



N. C Memorial 
Hospital 



By Miss Ethel F. Harrison''' 




The concept of an Intensive Care Unit for the care of the acutely ill 
patient is not new to the North Carolina Memorial Hospital. As early as the 
summer of 19 5 3, representatives of the medical staff, administration, and the 
nursing staff of the hospital recognized the need to locate the acutely and 
seriously ill in one area in order to provide closer observation and a greater 
concentration of nursing care than was possible in the usual patient unit. 
Accordingly, two adjoining four bed wards were modified for this purpose 
and were opened as a "Special Care" unit. While maintaining the essential ele- 
ments of an Intensive Care unit and thus serving a very useful purpose for a 
number of years, this area was limited by its size and lack of facilities for 
isolation or quiet. 

Dreams of a bigger and better unit, tailored to fit the needs of the patients 
of the North CaroHna Memorial Hospital, were finally realized when funds 
were donated by the University, the Hospital Women's AuxiUary, and the 
federal Hill-Burton program through the North Carolina Medical Care Com- 
mission. This made it possible to design, construct, and equip an area in the 
east wing of the hospital for this purpose. 

* Miss Harrison is a graduate of Duke University (B.S.N.) and Columbia University 
(M.A. 1951). She has been Supervisor and Assistant Director of the Nursing Service at N. C. 
Memorial Hospital since 1952 and has been a key person in the organization and development 
of the Intensive Care Unit. 



18 



The new Intensive Care Unit was activated in April of 1962 and can 
currently care for 16 to 18 patients. Patients are admitted to this unit in 
accordance with their medical and nursing needs regardless of their age, sex, 
race, or the nature of their illness. 

There is a nurses' station with routine and emergency suppUes, equipment, 
and drugs for each six beds. Although seemingly costly in the beginning, the 
provision of these items at each station pays large dividends in patient care by 
saving vital seconds in emergencies and countless time and steps in daily care. 

Each bed space is equipped with oxygen, suction, vacuum control manom- 
eter, wall mounted sphygmomanometer, intravenous standard, special over- 
head and wall mounted lighting, and additional electrical outlets. 

Glazed partitions and doors have been effectively used to provide the 
maximum possible observation of patients while permitting flexibility in ar- 
rangement of patients regardless of diagnosis or condition. Privacy and quiet 
may be achieved by the simple act of pulling shades installed at eich glazed 
partition and closing the cubicle door. An additional advantage of this con- 
struction is the security given patients by their ability to see their doctor 
and/or nurse from their bed. 

An intercom at each nurses' station provides means of immediate com- 
munication with personnel in all stations in the event of an emergency as 
well as saving time in routine transactions. 

One of the three patient areas in the unit is especially designed and fitted 
for isolation, having foot controlled sinks in each room and a ventilating 
system which provides exhaust under positive pressure. This area is chosen for 
the care and treatment of acute burns but may be used for any other acutely 
or seriously ill patient when not occupied by the former. Special equipment 
has been added to the basic treatment room facilities on the unit to aid in 
the treatment and care of severe burns. 

Many adjuncts to care as well as vital necessities are incorporated in 
monitoring devices, hypo-hyperthemia equipment, an electrocardiograph ma- 
chine, a pacemaker-defibrillator, respirators and respiratory assistors available 
as standard equipment for the unit. These are only a few of the resources 
which enable the physician to institute immediate and detailed therapy when 
indicated. 

The complexity of care and the required closed observation of patients 
in this unit necessitate a proportionately higher ratio of nursing personnel than 
is the case in other units of the hospital. To date, personnel have been selected 
on the basis of expressed interest in this type of nursing care. Many have had 
experience in this area of nursing before; new nurses receive orientation to the 
hospital and to the unit. Every effort is made to assure the new nurse assistance 
and supervision until skill and experience are gained. 

For all, this is an area in which the opportunities for new ex- 
periences and learning are constant; an area where the cooperative efforts of 
physician, nurse, and allied personnel are paramount in the provision of in- 
tensive care. Due credit must be given to all hospital departments and services 
who have contributed to the operation of this unit by willing and prompt 
extension of their services to this area. 

Believing that no program can progress without periodic evaluation, an 
Intensive Care Committee representative of all clinical services, hospital 
administration, and nursing meets periodically to review progress and discuss 
and recommend improvements and procedures designed to maintain treatment 
and care on a level consistent with advances in medical practice. 

Sec pictures pertaining to this article on the folloiiing two pages. 



H 


INTENSIVE CARE 
UNIT 


'-;•■<■_- 


UK i«£»sin or 

ii!>RT« CJROLIN* 

1. e, H£0!C»L C»RC 

COKMlSSiOll 

*flMtS'S KOSPU*!. »t!«ll(JIRV 




WILLIAM W. MCLENDON, M.D., '5 6, a pre- 
vious member of the Department of Pathology of 
the University of North Carolina, is currently a 
Captain in the Army Medical Corps. 




Glimpses of Medical Europe 
1961-1%3 



(Parti) 



The title for this paper is borrowed from that of a book by another 
pathologist — Dr. Ralph L. Thompson, late Professor of Pathology at the St. 
Louis University School of Medicine — who wrote a book with the title Glimpses 
of Medical Europe in 1908 following a tour of medical centers in Europe. 

My opportunity to have a series of glimpses of medical Europe was 
provided by the U. S. Army when I went on active duty in July of 1961 
after having completed my residency training in pathology at Chapel Hill 
under the Army's Berry Plan (by which physicians with military obHgation 
are deferred from active duty until they complete their residency) . After a 
brief period of orientation to the Army Medical Service at Fort Sam Houston, 
San Antonio, Texas, I was sent to Germany in August 1961 to be stationed 
at the 2nd General Hospital. 

My family arrived in September of 1961 and we are living in a comfortable 
German apartment in the town of Landstuhl within walking distance of the 
U. S. Army Hospital. Landstuhl is a small town in the Land (state) of the 
Rhineland-Pfalz and is located near the French border, about one hour west of 
Heidelberg (figure 1). 

22 



U. S. Army Medical Service in Europe 

In peacetime the Army Medical Service in Europe comes under two gen- 
eral administrative channels, which would be consolidated in time of war. 
Most of the larger hospitals and some of the other medical faciUties are under 
the control of the U. S. Army in Europe (USAREUR) with headquarters in 
Heidelberg, while the field hospitals and many of the troop dispensaries are 
directly under the 7th Army. In practice, the entire medical service works 
together to provide medical care for the troops and their dependents in Europe. 

In order to better coordinate medical care in time of peace or war, the 
Army Medical Service in Germany and France has been organized into Hospi- 
tal Centers for administrative purposes. Formerly there were two hospital 
centers in Europe with the 9th Hospital Center here in Landstuhl coordinating 
the medical activities for all of France and northern Germany. The 9th 
Hospital Center has recently moved to Heidelberg and now covers all of 
Germany while a new center is being activated in France for that area. Within 
the hospital centers there are medical service areas with coordinated groups of 




Figure 1. Map of Europe with some of the [principal medical centers. 



23 



'^"^^MJ^- 




Figure 2. Aerial view of Landstuhl Army Medical Center, Germany. 

The 2nd General Hospital is in tke center and the town of Landstuhl 

is in the backgrojind. 



dispensaries and small hospitals under a larger general hospital. This plan 
allows for better coordination of medical care in an area and promotes coopera- 
tion among the physicians at the various levels. The latter is a two-way affair 
with the specialists in the general hospital making periodical consultation visits 
to the smaller units and the dispensary physicians (when they can find the 
time) coming to the hospitals for conferences and rounds. 

The 2nd General Hospital is located at the Landstuhl Army Medical 
Center (which is a geographic designation and is not to be confused with the 
hospital centers, which are purely administrative entities). This post is com- 
posed entirely of medical units, the largest being the hospital (figure 2). Other 
units stationed here include two 7th Army field hospital units; ambulance, 
ambulance train and helicopter units; a medical illustration unit; a nuclear 
medical research unit; and the USAREUR Medical Laboratory, which furnishes 
consultant services in tissue pathology and specialized laboratory facilities (such 
as toxicology and virology) for the entire European theater. My position is in 
the pathology service of the hospital, although we work clcsely with the pathol- 



24 



ogists in the USAREUR Medical Laboratory, which is located just across the 
street. 

Physically, the 2nd General Hospital is like many other U. S. Army hospitals 
built in the early 1950's across Germany and France. Unlike many of the 
other hospitals, which are on a standby basis with none or only a few patients, 
the 2nd General Hospital has an average census of about 5 00 patients. The 
hospital can actually accomodate up to 1000 patients, but the remainder of the 
space is taken up by the many specialized chnics and facilities. 

The 2nd General Hospital serves as the main referral center for the Armv 
in Europe and has Board certified or quahfied men in all of the major surgical 
and medical specialties. It also serves as a cardiovascular-renal center and has 
an artificial kidney and facihties for cardiac catheterization. Because of the fact 
that there is an intern and residency program for German physicians (the 
only one in an American hospital in Germany) there are numerous conferences, 
rounds and visiting consultants. Among the latter there have been visits by Dr. 
Zolhnger of Ohio State in surgery and Dr. Edward Smith of Indiana Univer- 
sity in pathology. Monthly meetings of the Western Germany Armed Forces 
Medical Society are also held in this area; these are attended by U. S. Army and 
Air Force physicians, RCAF physicians, and civilian German physicians from 
this area and the nearby medical school. The yearly Medical and Surgical Train- 
ing Conference for the U. S. Army, Europe, is generally held in Garmisch, 
Germany, in May. 

Germany 

Germany has had a socialized system of medical care since the end of the 
last century and most of the workers are insured under the various Kranken- 
kassen (health insurance plans). Those who can afford it also can go to the 
medical centers as private patients. Although it is difficult to make general 
statements regarding the relative quahty of medical care, one does get the 
impression that on the local level many of the things which we now take for 
granted (such as intravenous fluids and blood transfusions) are seldom used 
and that the convalescence from even minor operative procedures is inordinate- 
ly prolonged. On the other hand, the type of medical care given in the larger 
centers appears to be of high quaUty. The physical facilities of both the local 
hospitals and the medical schools in Germany are undergoing a period of great 
expansion. Although much progress has been made in this direction in recovering 
from the war damage and in modernization of the remaining facilities, the 
greater problem of replacing the medical men lost by war and forced emigra- 
tion will take much longer to solve. 

The Federal Republic of Western Germany now has 19 medical schools; 
17 of these are schools associated with universities while the two medical 
academies at Dusseldorf and Giessen provide only the cHnical part of the cur- 
riculum. The pre-medical education in Germany generally consists of four 
years of primary school (average age, 6 to 10 years) and nine years of sec- 
ondary school (average age, 11 to 19 years). A certificate, based on oral and 
written examinations, attesting to the completion of a course of secondary 
education and some knowledge of Latin is generally all that is required for 
medical school admission. The academic year in the medical schools is divided 
into two semesters, the Winter Semester running from November to February, 
and the Spring Semester running from May to July. During the remaining 
five months of the year the student is expected to study for his examinations 
or to spend a period of clinical clerkship in a hospital. The medical curriculum 

25 



itself is divided into a pre-clinical period of two-and-a-half years (hve semes- 
ters) followed by the pre-clinical examination known as the Physiktim, and 
the clinical period of three years (six semesters), which is followed by the 
clinical or qualifying examinations. Most of the examinations are oral and 
practical in nature rather than written. Successful completion of the medical 
course gives the title of Medizinalassistcnt but does not lead to a university 
degree; the university degree of Doctor medicinae (Dr. Med.) may be subse- 
quently obtained by submitting a thesis containing the results of original 
research or observation. Following the completion of the required two years of 
internship, the physician is issued a license to practice by the health department 
of the Land (state) in which the final qualifying examination in medicine was 
passed. This license entitles the holder to practice in any of the states of the 
Federal Republic. 

The nearest medical school to Landstuhl is the Medical Faculty of the 
University of the Saar. The coal-rich Saar has been somewhat of an interna- 
tional football for years. In 193 5 it returned to German rule, but following 
the war it was again under French rule. As a result of a plebiscite it reverted 
to Western Germany on 1 January 19 57 and became one of the German Lander. 
Shortly after the Second World War the University of the Saar was founded 
by the French at Saarbrucken (the capital of the Saar) with the Medical 
Faculty at Homburg at the site of an old mental hospital (figure 3). Hom- 
burg (which should not be confused with Hamburg in northern Germany) is 
located in the Saar about 20 miles west of Landstuhl. Because of the proximity 



Figure j. Aerial view of the Medical School of the University of the 
Saar, Homburg, Germany. 


















to the Army hospital here there have been a number of close contacts between 
members of the various specialties at the American hospital here and their 
counterparts in the University. I have been fortunate to be able to visit the 
Pathology Institute there several times and to attend some of the weekly 
lectures given on Friday evenings for the entire Medical Faculty. I was par- 
ticularly pleased to hear a lecture by the son of the famous German pathologist 
Karl Aschoff (1866-1942); the younger Aschoflf is a physiologist working in 
Bavaria and gave an enthusiastic presentation of his researches on cycHc 
biological phenomenon. 

The German university best known to Americans is the University of 
Heidelberg. The city itself is picturesquely located in a valley along the Neckar 
River and is dominated by the famous Fieidelberg Castle which overlooks the 
old city. The Medical Faculty, Hke the other faculties, is located in the old city, 
in an area of several blocks overlooking the river. The University does have 
long-range plans to move many of its functions across the river to a large 
plot of previously undeveloped land. Several of the medical facilities have 
already moved to the new campus while others are to follow in the next few 
years. The present Pathology Institute is located in a spacious old building 
which contains among other things a well-equipped laboratory for electron 
microscopy. Plans for the new building for the Pathology Institute are being 
made and the building should be completed in a few years. The present chief 
of the Pathology Institute is Professor Lennert, who has just published a monu- 
mental work on diseases of lymph nodes in the new revision of the Henke- 
Lubarsch Handbucb der spcziellen pathologischen Anatomic unci Histologic. 



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During a recent trip to Nurnberg, I had the opportunity to stop brietl\ 
at the University of Wurzburg. It was here that Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, 
then Professor of Physics at the University, discovered the X-ray in November 
1895. As might be expected, one of the most impressive buildings at the Uni- 
versity is the Roentgen Institute, which is located on one of the main streets 
known as Roentgenring. The Institute building, which is in the process of a 
further expansion at the moment, has a large plaque on the outer wall com- 
memorating Roentgen's discovery. Inside the newer wing of the building is a 
display case containing many items relating to Roentgen's personal and 
scientific life. While at the University we stopped briefly at the Institute of 
Medical History which is located in a small two-story building behind the 
Roentgen Institute. The Professor of Medical History had recently left Wurz- 
burg to accept the professorship of medical history at the University of Kiel 
(in northern Germany) , which I am told has a large and active medical 
history institute with many resources in ancient and medieval medical 
history. His assistant. Dr. KudUen, who will also go to Kiel in the next year, 
was present and gave us a brief tour of the Institute's library. Dr. Kudlien was 
delighted to learn that I had studied at Chapel Hill for he had recently met 
Professor MacKinney of the U.N.C. History Department and had corresponded 
with him. Because of limitation of time I did not have the chance to searcli 
out the Pathology Institute at Wurzburg, where Rudolf Virchow had b.en 
Professor of Pathology from 1849 until his return to Berlin in 18 56. 

In visiting and observing the medical schools in Germany, one is struck 
with several obvious differences between the German and American systems. 
From the physical standpoint, one of the first impressions one gains is the 
presence of the many separate institutes, as contrasted to our system of medical 
school departments located within a single building or several connectinii 
buildings. Although the German system has the obvious advantage of havin.; 
smaller, more compact units where there is less distraction, it would appear 
to foster a narrowness of viewpoint. From the standpoint of the students, 
the German system of medical education is much more flexible than the 
American system. For one thing, it is possible for the student to shift freely 
from one medical school to another. At least in the past this was used as a 
method of taking advantage of the best teachers and strongest departments ni 
several medical schools. Also, unlike our rather rigid system of classes of stu- 
dents which proceed together through the curriculum in a lock step fashion, 
the German student can more or less set his own pace within the limits of the 
requirements for the examinations. This has obvious advantages for the good 
students, but on the other hand appears to result in much wasted effort and 
a large drop-out rate. The third major difference which I have noted is the 
apparent retention in many areas of the Prussian approach to education as 
characterized by the aloof and dogmatic professor whose word is never ques- 
tioned. For one who attended a medical school such as that of Chapel Hill whe"e 
there is a friendly student-faculty relationship and an emphasis on development 
of the student's intellectual inquisitiveness, the German attitude comes as some- 
what of a shock. In fairness, it should be said that there is evidence of many 
changes for the good in the last few years, but it does appear that the 
Prussian approach is slow to die. 

(Dr. McLendon will conclude this article in a future edition ot 
The Bulletin with an account of his experiences in Austria, France, 
England and Scotland.) 

28 



DR. W. E. CORNATZER 

Dr. W. E. Cornatzer, professor and head of the Department of Biochem- 
istry and Director of the Ireland Research Laboratory at the University of 
North Dakota School of Medicine, is a native of Mocksville and a three-way 
alumnus of UNC. 

He received his M.S. in Biological Chemistry here 
in 1941, his Ph.D., in that field in 1944 and attended 
the School of Medicine from 1944 to December 1945. 
From 1941 to 194 5 he was a Pels Research Fellow 
at UNC. 

Dr. Cornatzer received his M.D. from Bowman 
Gray in 1951. He served there as assistant professor 
of biochemistry from 1946-51, with a year off for 
work at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies in 
1948. He assumed his present position at North Da- 
kota in 1951. 

Dr. Cornatzer has won the American Medical 
Association's Frank Billing Award for Original In- 
vestigation and a silver medal for an exhibition on "The Role of Lipotropic 
Agents in Liver Disease," 1951; a National Science Travel Award to the 
Second International Congress of Biochemistry, Paris, France, 19 52; an Ameri- 
can Association for Cancer Research Travel Award to the Seventh Interna- 
tional Cancer Congress, London, 195 8; and an International Union of Physio- 
logical Science Travel Award to the First International Pharmacological Meet- 
ing in Stockholm, 1961. 

Currently a member of the Biochemistry Test Committee of the National 
Board of Medical Examiners and a consultant to the Medical Division of the 
Oak Ridge Nuclear Institute, Dr. Cornatzer is a widely-known medical scholar 
responsible for a sizable number of publications in various fields of medicine. 




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V 



DR. MARGARET C. SWANTON 

Dr. Swanton has been a member of the Pathology Staff since 1947, al- 
though she had worked as a research Assistant to Dr. Russell Holman in the 
Pathology Department during her years as a medical student at UNC. She 
received her medical degree from Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity in 1946, where she was a member of AOA, and 
served in a rotating internship at State University of 
Iowa Hospitals. She returned to Chapel Hill for a 
fellowship in Pathology as a background for the prac- 
tice of internal medicine, but found the field of 
pathology more to her liking and entered the academic 
ranks as an Instructor in the department that then 
consisted of only Drs. Brinkhous and Graham. In 1949, 
"just in case this new exfoliative cytology might be- 
come important," she spent time receiving special 
training in cytology at McGill University and in Dr. 
Papanicolaou's Laboratory at Cornell. She now directs 
the Cytology Program in the department which serves 
NCMH and many physicians throughout the state. She also directs a cytology 
training program sponsored by a USPHS Cancer Control Grant. Dr. Swanton's 
other special interest is neuropathology, a field in which she received special 
training in the Neuropathology Laboratory at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in N. Y. In addition to a number of articles on neuropathologic sub- 
jects, she has published accounts of her rather extensive studies of hemo- 
philic arthropathy. 

DR. CHARLES ELLIOT MORRIS 

Dr. Morris, a native of Denver, Colorado, joined the faculty as Assistant 
Professor of Neurology in 1961. As an undergraduate he attended Stanford 
University and subsequently received an M.A. in chemistry from the Univer- 
sity of Denver. He attended the University of Colorado 
School of Medicine from 1951 to 1955, where he was 
president of the Alpha Omega Alpha Chapter and 
recipient of several awards for scholarship. After an 
internship at Los Angeles County General Hospital, 
Dr. Morris chose the field of clinical Neurology, left 
the West and came East to complete the training pro- 
gram at the Harvard Neurological Unit of Boston 
City Hospital. He was certified in Neurology in 1962. 

While in the Navy, Dr. Morris was in charge of 
Neurology at the U.S.N. Hospital, Portsmouth, Vir- 
ginia. 

His research interests particularly concern auto- 
immune diseases of skeletal muscle and he has entered 
upon a course of investigation using the tool of tissue culture. 

Dr. Morris' wife, Naomi, also a physician, is affiliated with the School of 
Public Health. They have two sons: Jonathan, 6, and David, 4. 

30 




DR. HUGH M. SHINGLETON 

Dr. Shingleton, a native of Wilson, North Carolina, is an American Cancer 
Society Fellow serving in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He 
received his baccalaureate in 19 54 and the M.D. degree in 1957, both at Duke 
University. After a rotating internship served at 
Jefferson Medical College Hospital he went into the 
Medical Corp of the Air Force. At Webb Air Force 
Base in Texas he had duty as Chief, Aviation Medicine, 
and Chief of Professional Services. In July, 1961, he 
was appointed first year assistant resident in obstetrics 
and gynecology. He was an exchange resident at The 
Margaret Hague Maternity Hospital and has served six 
months in the Department of Pathology. At present he 
is resident in charge of the gynecology tumor clinic, 
coordinating the care of and organizing the data for 
such patients. In July, 1963 he will become Chief 
Resident and Instructor in the department. 

He is married to the former Lucy Koesy, of Miami, 
Florida and they have one son. 




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CLASS OF 1945 

DAVID G. BUNN, 107 N. Thompson 
St., Whiteville, N. C. Does general 
practice, solo. Postgraduate training 
was done at Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. He and his wife, Mozelle, have 
two children: David, age 12, and 
Candace, age 6. A member of the 
Baptist Church, golf is his favorite 
recreational activity. 

A. ROBERT CORDELL, Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Is Assistant Professor of 
Surgery at Bowman Gray. Postgrad- 
uate training was done at Johns 
Hopkins, Yale, and Bowman Gray 
Schools of Medicine. Among profes- 
sional honors are: Participant, special 
project in Medical education, Univer- 
sity of Buffalo, 1956-'57, (Common- 
wealth Fund), and visiting instructor 
in Surgery, University of Buffalo 
School of Medicine, 1956-'57. He 
married the former Dewitt Cromer 
and they have two sons: Alfred Rob- 
ert, 5, and Franklin Cromer, 3. He 
holds membership in the Winston- 
Salem Chamber of Commer-ce, Twin 
City Kiwanis and City Clubs and Old 
Town Club and is a member of the 
official board of the Centenary 
Methodist Church. He plays tennis 
occasionally. 

WELDON H. JORDAN, 114 Broad- 
foot Ave., Fayetteville, N. C. An in- 
ternist, he did postgraduate work at 
G. F. Geisinger Memorial Hospital; 
Dept. of Pathology, U.N.C. School of 
Medicine; and Medical College of 
Virginia Hospital in Richmond. He 
married the former Mary Lynn 
Haigler and they have four sons: 
Weldon, Jr., 7; Dick, 6; Stuart, 41/2; 
and Peter, SVz. He is a member of 
the Vestry of Holy Trinity Episcopal 
Church in Fayetteville. 

CHARLES ROBERT THOMPSON, 
112 N. Boundary St., Lenoir, N. C. Is 



half owner of Dula Hospital, Inc., 
Lenoir, N. C. (A 50-bed private gen- 
eral hospital). Does general practice. 
Postgraduate training was received 
at Watts Hospital, Durham, and 
Spartanburg General Hospital in 
Spartanburg, S. C. He married the 
former Elizabeth Dula and they have 
two children: Charles, Jr., 9, and 
Jennie, 7. A Presbyterian and a* 
Mason, he is a past president of the 
Community Chest. Bowling and golf 
are his chief recreational activities. 
He spent two years abroad in 
Germany. 

CLASS OF 1946 

JULES AMER, 1575 Vine St., Den- 
ver 6, Colorado. Does pediatrics in 
association with two other pediatri- 
cians. A member of the American 
Association of Pediatrics, he had his 
postgraduate training at the Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati, Queens General 
Hospital (N.Y.), U. S. Public Health 
Service and University of Colorado 
Medical School. He and his wife, 
Marilyn, have three children: Lyle, 
9; Manette, 7; and Janette, 8 months. 
He advises that he plays handball and 
"lost a recent tournament!" He re- 
ports interesting trips abroad to Italy 
in 1980 and Mexico in 1962. 

WALTER C. BARNES, JR., South- 
ern Clinic, 401 E. Fifth Street, Tex- 
arkana, Ark-Texas. Does general 
surgery in a twelve man group of 
diversified specialists. Following in- 
ternship at Watts Hospital, Durham, 
N. C, he did a residency in surgery 
at Baroness Erlanger in Chattanooga, 
Tenn., followed by a one year fellow- 
ship with Dr. Guy Horsley in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. Certified by the 
American Board of Surgery, he holds 
membership in numerous surgical and 
medical associations; is a former 
president of the Bowie County Medi- 



32 



cal Society; former chief of the 
Surgical Staff. St. Michael's Hospital, 
Texarkana, Ark. (1959); Chief of Staff, 
Wadley Hospital, Texarkana, Texas 
(1960); and Chairman of the Surgical 
Service at Wadley (1958). He and 
Pauline have two children: W. C, IH 
(Tad), age 8 and Abbiegail Ruth 
'Abbie), age 6. He is a member of the 
Official Board, Methodist Church, 
Texarkana, Arkansas, where he 
teaches a Sunday School Class and he 
is a member of the Board of Directors 
of the Four States Freedom Founda- 
tion and a member of the Board of 
the American Cancer Society for the 
Four States Area. Hunting, some fish- 
ing, and bowling are his recreational 
interests and he has had an interest- 
ing trip to the South Pacific under 
Army Sponsorship. 

EDGAR T. BEDDINGFIELD, JR., 
Stantonsburg, N. C. Does general 
practice in partnership with Jack W. 
Wilkerson, '51 and P. Milton Moore, 
Jr., '59. He received his M.D. CUM 
LAUDE from Harvard Medical School, 
followed by postgraduate training at 
Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, 



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D. C. Married to the former Lorraine 
Moore on Aug. 22, 1947, he and Lor- 
raine have three children: Ed III, 12; 
Alice, 11; and Gladys, 6. A member 
of AOA (Alpha of Massachusetts), 
Joseph Waron Lodge No. 92 AFOAM, 
Elks Club, he is a deacon in the 
Stantonsburg Baptist Church and a 
past president of the Kiwanis Club 
and of the Wilson County Hunt Asso- 
ciation. A recipient of the NEWS 
AND OBSERVER'S "Tar Heel of the 
Week" award, he plays golf on Thurs- 
day afternoons. He hopes for interest- 
ing trips abroad, but reports that 
there is too little time or money and 
that there is too much to do in North 
Carolina. 

GEORGE WILLIAM FARRIS, 412 
Medical Arts Building, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. Does anesthesiology in partner- 
ship with eight physicians. After an 
internship at Jefferson-Hillman Hos- 
pital, his first year of residency was 
done at Baroness Erlanger Hospital, 
Chattanooga, and his second year at 
Duke University Hospital. He is a 
diplomate of the American Board of 
Anesthesiology and chief of the De- 
partment of Anesthesiology of Baro- 
ness Erlanger Hospital. He and his 
wife. Sue, have two children: William 
Charles, 21/2, and James Lee, 1. A 
deacon and choir member (bass) in 
the Lutheran Church of the Ascen- 
sion (Chattanooga), his recreational 
activities include sailing, swimming, 
and photography. He had an interest- 
ing trip to Nassau some SVz years ago. 

VIRGINIA SUHRIE RONK, 100 N. 
Wycome Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. Pro- 
fessional activities are listed as: Aca- 
demic — Consultating — Research — 
Teaching at the Hospital of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania in Philadel- 
phia where she had her postgraduate 
training. She married W. L. Ronk 
and they have one son, Neil, age 5. 

PETER SOMERS SCOTT, Route 2. 
Burlington, N. C. Classifies himself 
as a Rural G.P. who does general 
practice at Union Ridge, N. C. in 
association with his father, S. Floyd 
Scott, '16, and Dr. C. C. Shoemaker. 
Did postgraduate training at Duval 
County Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida 
(1947-48) and at Watts Hospital, 
Durham, N. C. (1948-49). He married 
the former Pamela Thompson and 
they have five children: Susan, 14; 
Valerie, 13; Jonathan, 11; Cynthia, 10; 



33 



and Michael, 7. He designates himself 
as an inactive member of the Union 
Ridge Congregational Church. He lays 
claim to no professional or commun- 
ity awards and honors "except hard 
and steady work." Among "occa- 
sional" recreational activities, he lists: 
"Rockhound," collector of Indian 
Artefacts, sports car enthusiast, 
sports car race fan (spectator only), 
and he plays tennis regularly on his 
own lighted court at home at night. 

CLASS OF 1947 

EDWARD P. KINGSBURY. 704 
Todd, Union City, Tenn. Does pedi- 
atrics (partnership) in Union City 
Clinic which also includes 2 surgeons, 
2 OB-GYN, 1 G.P., 1 internist, and 
1 EENT. Postgraduate training was 
done at Duke and Watts Hospitals, 
Durham, N. C. He and his wife, Mary, 
have one son, Warren Hai^ris, age 8. 
A deacon in the First Christian 
Church and a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce and Union City Country 
Club, his principal recreational inter- 
ests are hunting, fishing, and golf. 

THOMAS R. NEWITT, 3003 Deluna 
Drive, Rolling Hills, California. Does 
Anesthesiology. A diplomate of the 
American Board of Anesthesiology, 
he had his postgraduate training at 
the V.A. Hospital, West Los Angeles, 
California. He and his wife, Nina, 
have two children: Chris, 4, and 
Lance, 2. A ham radio operator, he 
reports contacts with North Carolina 
when ionosphere permits. 

J. LLOYD PATE, 208 lona St., 
Fairmont, N. C. A general practitioner 
in partnership with Chas E. Inman, 
he did his postgraduate training at 
Roper Hospital, Charleston, S. C. He 
married the former Bernice Russ and 
they have one son, James Lloyd, Jr. 
(Jim), 8. A member of the First Bap- 
tist Church, he is President of the 
Fairmont Rotary Club. 

ROBERT R. ROSEN, 260 95th 
Street, Miami Beach 54, Florida. Has 
general practice. Served internship at 
Michael Reese Hospital and residency 
at Mount Sinai, Cleveland. He and 
his wife, Beatrice, have one son, Seth 
David, age 4. 

HARRY GORDON WALKER, 310 
Davie Ave., Statesville, N. C. Does 
general practice in partnership with 
John T. Stegall, '42. Postgraduate 



training was done at U. S. P. H. S. 
Hospitals at New Orleans and Savan- 
nah. He and his wife, Peggy, have 
three children: Gilda Anne, 14; 
Cheryl Jean, 11; and Harry G., Jr. 9. 
A deacon in the Wake Forest Presby- 
terian Church, he enjoys golf, gar- 
dening, and hunting. 

CLASS OF 1948 

JAMES H. GALLOWAY, 223 Bryan 
Bldg., Raleigh, N. C. Does general 
nractice. Had his internshin and PpdJ- 
atric residency (1 year) at Rex Hos- 
pital, Raleigh, N. C. He and his wife, 
Eleanor, have one son, James H., Ill, 
age 9. A member of the West Raleigh 
Rotary Club, he reports an interesting 
trip to Grand Bahama Island in June 
1962 and suggests that it might be 
a good place for a meeting sometime. 

HENRY JOSEPH LIVERMAN,^ 
Engelhard, N. C. Does general prac- 
tice (solo). Had one year internship 
at U. S. Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, 
Va. He and his wife, Kathryn, have 
three children: H. J., Jr., 10; Kathy, 
8; and Walter, 21/2. He is a lay leader 
in the Episcopal Church. A flying 
physician, he is a member of the 
Experimental Aircraft Association. 
He serves two offices by airplane, one 
at Engelhard and one at Fairfield, 
N. C; plans to open third office at 
Ocracoke in Spring, 1963, on com- 
pletion of airstrip there. He practices 
at Fairfield two half days a week and 
will be at Ocracoke one day a week 
(Wednesday). System operating one 
year now and very successful. 

ANDREW A. MANNING, JR., 763 
Plume Street, Spartanburg, S. C. Is 
not engaged in practice at present but 
hopes shortly to be doing general 
practice. Did postgraduate work at 
Charity, Grady, and Columbia Hos- 
pitals. A member of the Spartanburg 
Episcopal Church, his chief recrea- 
tional activities are fishing and hunt- 
ing. 

EUGENE V. MAYNARD, Elm City, 
N. C. Does general practice in part- 
nership with Dr. R. H. Putney, Jr. 
A member of A.M.A. and A.A.G.P., 
he reports that he did his postgrad- 
uate training "in the country with 
people." He and his wife, Eleanor, 
have two children: Katie, 10, and 
Jonathan, 8. A Baptist and member of 
the School Board, the practice of 
medicine apparently takes up any 



H 



time that might be used for recrea- 
tional activities. Trips to Nash County 
and Wilson are reported as "interest- 
ing trips abroad." 

EARLE SPAUGH, 126 Cottage 
Place, Charlotte, N. C. A pediatrician 
who had his postgraduate training at 
M.C.V. and U.N.C., he is a diplomate 
of the American Board of Pediatrics 
and has applied for membership in 
the American Academy of Pediatrics. 
He and Beckie have two children: 
Sue and Earle, Jr. 



TOM A. VESTAL, 1958 member of 
the House Staff, recently announced 
the removal of his office from the 
Kinston Clinic to 1220 North Fant 
Street, Anderson, South Carolina. A 
diplomate in the American Boards of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology, he is in 
partnership with Dr. Rudolph H. 
Hand. He is married to the former 
Janis Ballentine and they have four 
daughters: Lyndon, 8; Collins, 6; Jan, 
3; and Ansley, 1. Their home address 
is 2810 Echo Trail, Anderson, South 
Carolina. Both Tom and Janis are 
U.N.C. graduates, 1949 and 1951 re- 
spectively. 



Peg board 
• Shelves 



Tools • Paints 

• Hardware • Millwork 



FITCH LUMBER COMPANY 



CARRBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



In Chapel Hill — 

For Fine Gifts 
and Stationery 




157 E. Franklin St. 



35 




DEPARTMENTAL 
NEWS 



BACTERIOLOGY 

Dr. George Philip Manire, professor 
of bacteriology, will take a year's 
leave of absence from UNC to con- 
duct research at the Institute for Virus 
Research of Kyoto University in Ja- 
pan, beginning July 1. He has been 
awarded the Alan Gregg Travel Fel- 
lowship in Medical Education from the 
China Medical Board of New York for 
the year of study. 

Dr. Manire's work will be in the 
Institute's Department of Biophysics 
with Dr. Noboru Higashi, a distin- 
guished scientist whose work is in Dr. 
Manire's field of interest. Dr. Higashi 
has been especially recognized for his 
studies during the last few years on 
the utilization of new techniques in 
thin sectioning and electron micros- 
copy to study the comparative struc- 
ture and mode of reproduction of 
certain disease-causing viruses. 

While in Kyoto, an old city near 
Tokyo, Dr. Manire plans to continue 
his own virus studies begun at UNC 
and to work for proficiency in the 
new techniques developed by Dr. 
Higashi and his associates. 



MEDICINE 

Dr. William G. Wysor, assistant 
professor of medicine in the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina School of 
Medicine, left Chapel Hill recently to 
begin a six-month teaching term at 
the Escola Paolista de Medicine in Sao 
Paulo, Brazil, under a program set up 



by the Rockefeller Foundation with 
the UNC Department of Medicine. 

The program allows the Depart- 
ment of Medicine to extend its educa- 
tional services through cooperation 
with foreign medical centers, particu- 
larly those of South American coun- 
tries. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

Dr. Panayotis G. latridis, is now 
associated with Dr. John H. Ferguson's 
Blood Coagulation Research Program 
as a Research Associate. Dr. latridis 
was assistant director of the Pathology 
Clinic at Greek Hospital, "Theochari 
Cozzica," Alexandria, Egypt prior to 
coming to Chapel Hill where he joined 
his brother. Dr. Sotirios G. latridis, 
who has been here several years in the 
capacity of Research Associate with 
Dr. Ferguson, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department. Dr. latridis re- 
ceived the M.D. degree in 1951 at the 
University of Athens and then spe- 
cialized in internal medicine. 


PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

Dr. William L. Fleming, Chairman, 
Department of Preventive Medicine 
and Assistant Dean, resumed his duties, 
January 1, 1963 after a six months' 
leave of absence. Dr. Fleming served 
during this period as Consultant and 
Visiting Professor of Preventive Medi- 
cine in the Escola Paulista de Medicina, 
Sao Paulo, Brazil. This was arranged 
through a Rockefeller Foundation 



36 



grant to the Department of Medicine 
calling for staff assistance to the Escola 
Paulista de Medicina. Dr. James Woods 
served this institution as Visiting Pro- 
fessor during the last six months of 
1961 and Dr. W. G. Wysor will serve 
in the same capacity during the first 
six months of 1963. 



PSYCHIATRY 

Dr. Harvey L. Smith, director of 
the Social Research Section of the Uni- 
versity of North Carohna Division of 
Health Affairs, was recently appointed 
Chairman of the newly constituted 
subcommittee on Pilot and Special 
Projects and Pubhc Health of the Na- 
tional Institute of Mental Health's 
Training Branch. 

Dr. Smith, who joined the UNC 
faculty in 19 57, is professor of sociol- 
ogy in the Departments of Psychiatry 
and Sociology and Anthropology and 



a research professor in the Institute for 
Research in Social Science. 

OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY 

Dr. Charles E. Flowers, Jr., profes- 
sor of Obstetrics and Gynecology was 
one of the three guest faculty at a 
postgraduate course in Obstetrics and 
Gynecology at the University of Ne- 
braska College of Medicine, January 
17 and 18. 

Under the topic of "Comphcations 
of Late Pregnancy," Dr. Flowers pre- 
sented a talk on the treatment of 
toxemia and participated in a panel on 
problem cases. He also spoke on "Dila- 
tation and Curettage," "Premature 
Rupture of the Membranes" and "How 
We Suppress Lactation." The two-day 
meeting was held with the co-sponsor- 
ship of the Division of Maternal and 
Child Health, Nebraska State Health 
Department. 




Class of 196} 

As one of the more optimistic mem- 
bers of our class said to me today, 
"Only 141 more days," meaning, I 
believe, that the closer we come to 
graduation, the closer we come to the 
partial fulfillment of something we 
all set out to accomplish at least eight 
or more years ago. There still is much 
to be done: senior papers to be written, 
national board exams to be endured, 
and student-faculty day to be plotted. 
But, even here in the gloom of Janu- 
.xry, the prospects look cheerful. 



A good representation from our 
class was able to take advantage of 
the Christmas trip to New York City, 
co-sponsored by the Lederle and Squibb 
drug companies. In spite of the severe 
cold, everyone had the opportunity to 
see a few Broadway shows of his 
choice, as well as to participate in the 
planned activities, bacchanalian and 
otherwise. Following the narrow escape 
of one of our members whom we near- 
ly lost over the balcony rail at Radio 
City Music Hall, we returned to cele- 
brate the advent of the New Year in 
North Carolina. 



37 



On the nativity scene, Richard and 
Patsy Pressley are the proud parents 
of a new son. Also, Everette and 
Jeanette James are the parents of a 
new daughter, whom we acknowledge, 
even though her father will graduate 
this year from a neighboring institu- 
tion in Durham, N. C. Rumor also 
has it that one of the last of the 
bachelors in our midst, Larry Taylor, 
will soon join the ranks of the connu- 
bial confirmants. 

Quincy Ayscue, 1963??? 

Class of 1966 

The officers of the class of 1966 are: 
Bob Bilbro, President; Jake Lohr, Vice- 
president; Beth Spivey, Secretary; Bev 
Tucker, Treasurer; Bob Sevier, White- 
head representative; Bill Rawls and 
Bill Riley, Honor Council representa- 
tives; and Bill Hubbard, intramural 
manager. 

In order to ease the pain of resum- 
ing classes after Christmas vacation, 
the class took time out January 12 
for a therapeutic evening together. 
The party, held at the American 
Legion Annex, was enjoyed by all. It 
helped some members of the class to 
gain an appreciation for the "Carolina 
way of life." 

Some members of the class are 



initiating a series of evening discus- 
sions with faculty and staff personnel. 
The hope is that these meetings will 
prove to be valuable in acquainting us 
better with our faculty and with some 
important extracurricular aspects of 
medical practice. 

The class has had good participation 
in intramural sports. The football 
team finished the season as runners-up 
in the graduate division play-off 
against the lawyers. Two basketball 
teams are putting their free after- 
noons to good use this quarter. They 
are acquiring invaluable experience in 
the treatment of blisters. 

Elliott Walker Stevens, Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Walker Stevens of 
Warsaw, has been named as the first 
recipient of the recently established 
Pfizer Laboratories Scholarship at the 
University of North Carolina School 
of Medicine. 

This is the first time that UNC has 
participated in the Pfizer Scholarship 
program. The Pfizer Laboratories Di- 
vision of Charles Pfizer & Co., Inc., 
awarded UNC one thousand dollars for 
the initial scholarship, to be given in 
the interest of furthering medical edu- 
cation through financial assistance to 
a particularly deserving student. The 
Scholarship is to apply toward the 
academic .... 



Remember . , . 

Medical Alumni Day — March 22 
Medical Parents Day — April 6 

— Plan Now To Attend — 



38 




This new model Elec- 
trocardiograph is just 
one of the many fine 
types of equipment on 
display in our show- 
rooms. 

We invite you to 
pay us a visit and see 
this equipment. 



Burdick EK-111 Electrocardiograph 



Carolina Surgical Supply Company 



706 Tucker Si. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Phone TE 38631 







Chapel Hill's 

Complete 

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MAIN OFFICE: 
West Franklin Slteet 

BRANCH OFFICE: 
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BANK&TRUST 
COMPANY 


MEMBER 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 









39 






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40 



CompI iments of 

HART 
LABORATORIES 



Clemmons, North Carolina 



(Nine miles west of Winston-Salem on Interstate 40;) 




VISITORS 
WELCOME 



HO HUM 



another year has gone by. For Hos- 
pifal SAVING Association of Chapel 
Hill, it was a record-breaker. Enroll- 
ment is at an all-time high. So are 
Blue Cross and Blue Shield payments 
to doctors and hospitals! 
Thank YOU for helping to make it 
all possible! 



NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
PERMIT NO. 24 



BOX 957 



\PEL HILL. PiORTH'CAROLINA 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



Vol. X APRIL, 1963 No. 4 



>p^. 



\ 



THE BULLETIN 



School of Medicine 
University of North Carolina 



THE 

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ESTABLISHED THIS PLAN OF GROUP ACCIDENT AND 

HEALTH PROTECTION FOR ITS MEMBERS IN 1940 



NEW AND MORE EXTENSIVE 
BENEFITS 

We are proud to announce the most exten- 
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offered your Society. 



(A) NOW 
Seven 
years 
for 
Sickness 

(B) Lifelime 
for 
Accident 

(C) Larger 
Weekly 
Indemnity 



We are as close as your phone . . . Call us Colled — Phone 682-5497 — Durham 
BENEFITS AND RATES AVAILABLE UNDER NEW PLAN 




Accidental 

Death 

Coverage 

5,000 

5.000 

5,000 

5,000 

5.000 



♦Dismemberment 

Loss of Sight, 

Speech or 

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5,000 to 10,000 

7,500 to 15,000 

10,000 to 20,000 

12,500 to 25,000 

15,000 to 30,000 



COST UNTIL AGE 35 



Accident and 

Sickness 

Benefits 

50.00 Weekhr 

75.00 Weekly 

100.00 Weekly 

125.00 Weekly 

150.00 Weekly 



Annual 
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Semi-Annual 
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COST FOR AGES 35 TO 70 
Annual Semi-Annual 



? 78.00 


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114.00 


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150.00 


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"Amount payable depends upon the nature of the loss as set forth in the policy. 

OPTIONAL HOSPITAL COVERAGE 



Available only to members who can 
furnish satisfactory evidence of insur- 
ability and are under 60 years of age. 
Renewable to age 70. 



$20.00 
Daily Hospital 

Up to 90 days each confinement 
Annual Semi-Annual 



Premium 
$40.00 



Premium 
$20.00 



For Application or Further Information Write or Call 

J. L. Crumpton, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 
BOX 147. DURHAM, N. C. 

REPRESENTING COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEWARK. N. J. 



DOCTORS' OF INSURANCE 



It's a comforting feeling to know that there is 
always a doctor on hand to help us out in any kind of 
an emergency. Whether it's an automobile wreck or a 
common cold we know that we can rely on our doctor 
to take care of us. 

We like to think of ourselves as your "doctor" for 
your insurance needs. First, we make certain that your 
policy will take care of all your needs should a loss 
occur. Then we pledge to you our immediate service 
should that need arise. 

The true worth of your doctor is really appreciated 
when he answers that call for the accident or the com- 
mon cold. 

The true worth of your insurance agent can be 
evaluated when you discover a theft, have a serious 
accident or fire. 



COLLIER CCBB & ASSOCIATES, Inc. 

(Vonucrly Seri/ce Insurance ^ Realty Company) 

INSURANCE AND SURETY BONDS 
Collier Cobb, Jr., President 

1407 E. Franklin Slreet Telephone 968-4472 

Chapel Hill. Norlh Carolina 



GLEN LENNOX 

Truly a Good Place to Live 

And a Good Place to Shop 



LENNOX DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 

Glen Lennox Raleigh Road — U.S. 54 

Rental Office Phone 967-7081 



Silverware 



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Watches 



Orange Blossom 



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Diamond Rings 
Distinctive Styling 



• Hamilton 

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T 



WENTWORTH & SLOAN 

JEWELERS 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 




A Pleasant Inn 

Of A Great University 

In A Good Town 

A good place to stay, to dine, to entertain or just to visit and 
enjoy the congenial homelike atmosphere. For your convenience 
and pleasure we offer clean and comfortable guest rooms, appe- 
tizing and wholesome food in our main dining room— The Hill 
Room— and in our cafeteria. Private dining rooms are available 
for parties, banquets, meetings and dances. 

You Are Invited To Hospitable . . . 

Carolina Inn 

Owned and Operated by the University of North Carolina 



"Edge on fashion 



n Chapel Hill 




The House of Fashion 
For the Carolinas 

COMPLETE WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT STORE 
(We Specialize in Nurses' Uniforms) 



SLOAN 
DRUG CO. 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

Free 
Delivery 



Phone 968-4455 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



DON'T BE 
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Be sure your 
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SEE US 

FOISTER'S CAMERA 
STORE 

Chapel HilL North Carolina 



it Paying FOUR Per Cent Per Year 
Dividends on Savings 

iV All Accounts Insured 

^ Free Parking at Merchants Parking Lot 
Across Columbia Street when 
Transacting Business 



HOME 
SAVINGS 

AND LOAN 




oM; 



SMITH BUILDING 
123 NORTH 

LUMBIA STREI T 







We at Thalhimers Ellis Stone ex- 
tend a sincere welcome to you and 
hope to be of service during your 
visits with us. 

By way of introduction, may 
we conduct a thumbnail tour of 
our down-town Durham store, lo- 
cated on the corner of Main and 
Corcoran Streets? 



The Parking Level . . . facing on Durham's spacious parking 
lot . . . offers gifts for the home, an excellent Linen department, home 
furnishings and decorating needs, and our own decorating services. 

Our Main Floor . . . here is our Shoe Salon, speciaHzing in duty 
shoes and shoes for casual or fashion wear . . . complete accessory lines 
for fashion or casual wear, a Men's Furnishings department, and a 
Stationery department that covers every need from impressive pens 
to fine personalized stationery. 

Fashion Floor, Second, a grand array of better sportswear, suits, 
coats, dresses and millinery . . . and in particular the Bridal Salon and 
the After Five Salon . . . here also on this floor is our Sewing Center 
Annex carrying a full Hne of home sewing needs and notions. 

A Young World, our Third Floor, covering the necessities of the 
Young from infancy to teenage ... of note on the Third Floor is our 
Beauty Salon, staffed by excellent and up-to-date Stylists. 

The Colony Shops comprise our Fourth Floor . . . popularly 
priced sportswear, shces, and featuring Nurses' Uniforms . . . not to 
be forgotten is the complete selection of luggage, everything from 
attache cases to carry-alls. The Fourth Floor also contains our execu- 
tive, cashier's, credit and service offices. 



The Bulletin 

of the School of Medicine 
of the University of North Carolina 

Published in cooperation with the Whitehead Medical Society 
and the Medical Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. 



Vol. X April, 1963 No. 4 

IN THIS ISSUE 

Medical Parents Meet 9 

The Class of 1963 11 

Glimpses of Medical Europe, 1961-63 (Part II) 19 

Highlights of Alumni Day 33 

Lassiter Named Markle Scholar 3 J 

Presenting the Faculty 36 

Presenting the House Staff 37 



Editorial Committee 

C. C. FoRDHAM, M.D. ('49) J. T. Monroe, M.D. ('55) 

Chairman George D. Penick, M.D. ('44) 

W. Reece Berryhill, M.D. ('25) H. L. Stephenson, M.D. ("55) 

E. Ted Chandler, M.D. ('55) A. Widra, Ph.D. 

Ira Fowler, Ph.D Emory S. Hunt 

W. P. Jacocks, M.D. ('09) Quincey Ayscue ('63) 

Hugh A. McAllister, M.D. ('35) Karl Ray '66 



Address all inquiries and communications to E.r.ory S. Hunt, 117 Medical 
Science Building— or Box 957, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Published jour times a year — October. December. February and April — 
Entered as third-class matter at the Post Office at Chapel Hill. N. C 



Working 
and Growing 
with the 

University Community 
Since 1899 

TODAY! 

A $14fiOOfiOO institution offering 
complete banking service and 
modern facilities. Four offices and 
three drive-up locations. 



CLYDE EUBANKS 
President 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 
Chairman of the Board 

J. TEMPLE GOBBEL 

Executive Vice President 

and Cashier 



W. E. THOIVIPSON 
Vice President 



E. L. GRAY 
Ass't. Cashier 



OFFICERS 



W. R. CHERRY 
Comptroller 

JOHN T. WETTACH 
Assistant Cashier 

JACK P. JURNEY 

Ass't Cashier, IVlanager 

Carrboro Branch 

THELIVIA HARRIS 

IVlanager, 
Glen Lennox Branch 

MRS. T. ADGER WILSON, JR. 
IVlanager, Eastgate Branch 



DIRECTORS 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

CI YDE EUBANk-S 

RAYMOND L. ANDREWS 

D. D. CARROLL 

E. B. CRAWFORD 

R. B. FITCH 

DR. E. McG. HEDGPETH 

CROWELL LITTLE 

ROLAND McCLAMROCH 

C. W. STANFORD 

F. E. STROWD 

J. TEMPLE GOBBEL 

W. E. THOMPSON 



The Ban 




apeimU 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 
GLEN LENNOX CARRBORO CHAPEL HILL 

8 



EASTGATE 




Charles C. Dudley of Hiintersville, left, is the new president of the 
Medical Parents' Club. Here he talks ivith Dean BerryhAl and three of the 
Club's other new officers: J. C. Cowan of Greensboro, first vice-president; 
Carl G. Pickard of Asheiille, secretary; and Howard Holderness of Greens- 
boro, second vice-president. 

Medical Parents Meet 



The Medical Parents' Club, in their seventh annual meeting here at the 
Medical School on April 6, had a fine day despite the rain. Three different 
special tours gave all the parents — new and old to the School — a chance to 
see facilities, and the barbecue lunch made just as good a picnic indoors as out. 

Elected to guide the club through the coming year were Charles C. Dudley 
of Huntersville, president; J. C. Cowan of Greensboro, first vice-president; 
Howard Holderness of Greensboro, second vice-president; and Carl G. Pickard 
of Asheville, secretary. 

Regional officers were elected as follows: 

Region I: Chairman, J. L. Phillips of Kinston; Vice-chairman, W. S. Bost 
of Greenville. 

Region II: Chairman, Frank Cella of Raleigh; Vice-chairman, Dr. Robert 
D. Croom of Maxton. 

Reeion III: Chairman, H. H. Aderhold of Greensboro; Vice-chairman, 
L. O. Branch of Durham. 

Region IV: Chairman, W. T. Harris of Charlotte; Vice-chairman, Dr. 
K. L. Cloninger of Newton. 

Region V: Chairman, William F. Algary of Asheville; Vice-chairman, Dr. 
Donald R. Printz of Asheville. 

New Fund Trustee is Donald S. Menzies, Sr., of Hickory. 

A report on the Parents' Club Student Loan Fund was given by Mrs. Carl 
Pickard of Asheville, in the absence of Fund Trustee, Mrs. Zebulon Weaver. 

Mrs. Pickard reported that the Fund had received from parents and friends 
a total of $7,671 as of March 31. The Fund has loaned out almost $15,000 
since its founding, she said. Mrs. Pickard urged the parents' support in building 
the fund total to $10,000 as soon as possible. 



LIFE INSURANCE ESTATE PLANNERS 





W. H. Branch 



Frank G. Umstead 



Special Services 
To the Medical Profession 

Representing 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
OF GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Local Offices: 136 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, Telephone 942-4263 




STOP 

FOR 

REAL ESTATE 

AT 

KUTZ REALTY 

MODERN PHOTOGRAPHIC LISTING SERVICE 



1408 East Franklin Street 



CALL 
942-5136 



TO 

INVEST 

OR 

RENT 





THE CLASS OF 1963 




' """'B^'^^i^ 




WILLIAM PAGE ALGARY: Bill is 25 
and from Asheville, N. 
C. He was graduated 
from Duke in 1959 with 
an A.B. degree in 
Chemistry. He and his 
wife, Ruth, along with 
their daughter, Kitty, 
will remain in Chapsl 
Hill where Bill will do 
a straight medicine in- 
ternship at N. C. Memorial Hospital. 
His future plans include more tra.ning 
ing in internal medicine. Phi Chi. Sen- 
ior Class Secretary. 

QUINCY ADAMS AYSCUE: Qunicy is 
28 and from Monroe, 
N. C. He received his 
A.B. degree in history 
from U.N.C. in 1957. He 
and his wife, Margaret, 
will be moving to Dan- 
ville, Pennsylvania, 
where Quincy will do a 
rotating internship at 
the George F. Gei- 
singer Medical Center. He plans a 
residency in Anesthesiology. Phi Chi. 

HARRIS HARTWELL BASS: "Bunky" 
is 25 and from Hender- 
son, N. C. He was grad- 
uated from U.N.C. with 
an A.B. in English. 
Bunky and his wife, 
Rae, will move to Seat- 
tle, Washington, where 
he will do a rotating 
internship at the Vir- 
ginia Mason Hospital. 

Phi Chi. He plans for the future a 

family practice. 

NEIL CARMICHAEL BENDER: Neil 
is from Pollocksville, 
N. C. and is 25. He is a 
graduate of U.N.C. with 
an A.B. degree in His- 
tory. His wife is Mary 
Dale. They will move 
to Seattle where he will 
do a straight medicine 
internship at the Uni- 
versity of Washington. 
Plans a residency in internal medicine. 
Student body president. 







WILLIAM PAUL BIGGERS: Paul is 
25 and from Charlotte, 
N. C. He received his 
B.S. degree in Chemis- 
try - Biology in 1959 
from Davidson. H i s 
wife is Joyce. They 
have a daughter, Sarah 
Machelle. They will re- 
main in Chapel Hill 
where Paul will do a 
straight surgery internship at N. C. 
Memorial Hospital. He plans more 
training in surgery. Will possibly re- 
main in academic medicine. Phi Chi. 

KARL F. BITTER: Karl is 27 and from 
Asheville, N. C. He was 
graduated from David- 
son with a B.S. degree 
in Biology and Chemis- 
try. His wife is Mary 
Gladys and they have 
two daughters, Diana 
and Allison. Karl will 
stay at N. C. Memorial 
Hospital and do an in- 
ternship in straight Pathology. He plans 
to do a surgical residency. Phi Chi. 

WILLIAM RICHARD BURKE, JR. Bill 
is 26 and from Wilson, 
N. C. He received his 
B.S. degree from U.N.C. 
Single. He will have a 
rotating internsh p at 
St. Mary's Hospital in 
West Palm Beach, Flor- 
ida. He plans a resi- 
dency in Psychiatry and 
a private practice in 

the South. Phi Chi. 

JESSE ANDREW BURNAM: Andy is 
26 and from Cordele, 
Georgia. He was gradu- 
ated in 1958 from U.N.C. 
with an A.B. in Chem- 
istry. He and his wife, 
Gloria, will remain in 
this area while Andy 
does a surgery intern- 
ship at Duke Hospital 
in Durham. He plans a 
surgical practice. Phi Chi. 





* Edited by Mrs. Robert J. Cownn. 




FRANKLIN DANFORD BURROUGHS: 

^^^ Dan is 29 and from 

^^""Bllk^ Charlotte, N. C. He was 
w \ graduated in 1956 from 

i iju, ^^ Georgia Tech. with a 
• ^^ ^*^ B.S. in Chemistry. His 
wife is Melissa. They 
i ^J"-**^ have a daughter, Shan- 

^flLjI^Vjjkfeji non. Dan will do a ro- 
^^^k <y^^| tating internship at 
^^^ a^^ Norfolk G-neral Hos- 
pital, Norfolk, Virginia. He plans a 
General Practice residency. 



BRUCE FRANCIS CALDWELL: Bruce 
is 29 and from Clyde, 
N. C. He received his 
B.S. degree from U.N.C. 
His wife is Janice and 
they have two boys, 
Brian and Jeff. Bruce 
will do a mixed Sur- 
gery internship at the 
Eugene Talmadge Me- 
morial Hospital, Augus- 
ta, Georgia. He plans a surgical resi- 
dency and practice in Western N. C. 
Bruce is president of the Senior Class. 



IRWIN KELMAN COHEN: Kel is 28 
and from Charlotte, N. 
C. He is a graduate of 
Columbia University, 
receiving his degree in 
English in 1959. He and 
his wife, Judie, have 
two children, David and 
Nancy Beth. They will 
move to Hanover, New 
Hampshire, where Kel 

will do a rotating internship at the 

Mary Hitchcock Clinic. 



CHARLES LEE COOKE: Charley is 25 
and from Davidson, N. 
C. He graduated from 
Davidson with a B.S. 
degree in 1959. His wife 
is Jane. They will move 
to Richmond where 
Charley will -"'o a rotat- 
ing internship at the 
Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. 






DONALD L. COPELAND: Don is 29 
and from Davidson, N. 
C. He received his B.S. 
degree in Biology- 
Chemistry from David- 
son in 1958. Carolyn, 
his wife, and their two 
daughters, Ann and 
Jan, will be in Augus- 
ta, Georgia, where Don 
will do a straight pa- 
dia+r'c internship at the E''g<^ne Tal- 
madge Memorial Hospital. Plans fam- 
ily practice residency program. 







«r^ 



ROBERT JENKINS COWAN: Bob is 
26 and from Greens- 
boro, N. C. He received 
his A.B. degree in 
chemistry from U.N.C. 
in 1959. Phi Chi. Presi- ^ »Mw t »f *«' " > ■> 
dent of AOA. His wife 
is Caroline. They will 
move to New York City 
where Bob will do a 
straight medicine in- 
ternship at Presbyterian Hospital. He 
plans a residency in internal medicine 
and will probably practice in N. C. 
Recipient of the William deB. Mac- 
Nider Award. 

JOHN W. D ALTON, JR.: John is 25 
and from Forest City, 
N. C. He is a graduate 
i of U.N.C. where he re- 
ceived an A.B. degree 
in Chemistry in 1959. 
Single. He will intern 
at the Cleveland Metro- 
politan General Hospital 
in straight medicine. He 
plans a residency in in- 
ternal medicine. 

DAVE McALISTER DAVIS: Dave is 
26 and from Roanoke, 
Virginia. He did his 
undergraduate work at 
Goettingen University, 
Germany, and at U. N. 
C. He has an A.B. de- 
gree in German. His 
wife is Joan. He will do 
a straight medicine in- 
ternshp at the Univer- 
sity of Florida Teaching Hospital and 
Clinics in Gainesville, Fla. Phi Chi. 





12 



WILLIAM BROWN DEAL: "Willie" is 
a native of Forest City, 
N. C. and is 26. He re- 
ceived his A.B. degree 
in Chemistry at U.N.C. 
in 1958. His wife is 
Bibby. They will be in 
Florida at the Univer- 
sity of Florida Teaching 
Hospital and Clinics in 
Gainesville. He has a 

straight medicine internship and plans 

to practice internal medicine in N. C. 

Phi Chi. 




Ben 




BENJAMIN EMERSON DUNLAP: 
is 26 and from Wag- 
ram, N. C. He graduat- 
ed from U.N.C. in 1959 
with a B.S. degree. His 
wife is Suzanne. They 
have a son Benjie. He 
will do a rotating in- 
ternship at the George 
F. Geisinger Hospital 
in Danville, Penn. He 
plans one year of general practice 
dency. 



CLARENCE A. DUNN, JR.: Clarence 
is 30 and from New 
York City. He is a grad- 
uate of Hamilton Col- 
lege with an A.B. de- 
gree in Biology. Single. 
Phi Chi. He will do a 
mixed Medicine - Sur- 
g e r y internship at 
Roosevelt Hospital in 
New York City. Clar- 
ence plans a surgery residency and a 
practice in the southwest. 





HENRY WALTER GEROCK, JR.: 
Henry is from Mays- 
ville, N. C. and is 28. 
He is a graduate of 
Duke with a B.S. de- 
gree in Zoology. Single. 
He will intern in 
straight medicine at the 
Eugene Talmadge Me- 
morial Hospital, Augus- 
ta, Georgia. He plans a 

residency in medicine. 



ROWLAND DALEY GOFF. JR.: Daley 

is 27 and from Dunn, 

N. C. He graduated 

from U.N.C. with an 

A.B. degree in History. 

Daley and his wife, 

Mott, together with 

their son, Chris, will be 

in Gainesville where 

Daley will do a straight 

surgery internship at the University 

of Florida Teaching Hospital and 

Clinics. He plans to complete boards 

in surgery. Phi Chi. Chairman Honor 

Council. 



BENJAMIN MITCHELL GOODMAN, 
JR.: Ben is from Gates, 
N. C. and is 25. He re- 
ceived his B.S. degree 
from U.N.C. in 1980. 
Single. He will do a ro- 
tating internship at 
Norfolk General Hospi- 
tal, Norfolk, Virginia. 
He plans a general prac- 
tice residency. 





JOHN MICHAEL GALLAGHER: Mike 
is 27 and a native of 
Chapel Hill. His A.B. 
degree in philosophy is 
from U.N.C. His wife is «• . 

Ann and they have a ^mtj^^^riMlT 
son, Walter. They will ' y ^^ 
move to Madison, Wis- 
consin, where he has a V 
mixed internship at the ^^[|[| '•^ Mj 
University of Wiscon- •^^* *^ 
sin. Mike plans a residency in internal 
medicine. Phi Chi. 



JOHN PHILLIP GOODSON: Phil is 
from Mt. Olive, N. C. 
and is 25. He is a U.N.C. 
graduate with a B.S. de- 
gree in Medicine. His 
wife is Barbara and 
tiiey have a son, John 
Phillip, Jr. They will 
stay in Chapel Hill 
while Phil does a 
straight surgery intern- 
ship at N. C. Memorial Hospital. He 
plans to specialize in surgery. 




13 



IRA M. HARDY: Ira is 28 and from 
Raleigh, N. C. He re- 
ceived his A.B. degree 
in English from U.N.C. 
in 1959. His wife is 
Mary Ruth. Their chil- 
dren are: Skipper: 
Sandy, and Ann Rob- 
bins. Ira will stay in 
Chapel Hill at N. C. 
Memorial Hospital do- 
ing a straight surgery internship. He 
plans a surgery practice. Phi Chi. 




WALTER BRYAN LATHAM: Bryan it 
24 and comes from 
Bethel, N. C. He re- 
ceived his B.S. degree 
from U.N.C. in 1960. 
Single. Phi Chi. Bryan 
will do a mixed sur- 
gery internship at the 
Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. He plans a prac- 
tice in General Surgery. 





GEORGE CAPERS HEMINGWAY, 
JR.: George is a na- 
tive of Winston-Salem 
and is 27. He received 
his A.B. degree in Bi- 
ology - Chemistry from 
Davidson. His wife is 
Lynn and they have 
a daughter, Susan. 
George will do a mixed 
medicine-pediatrics in- 
ternship at N. C. Memorial Hospital. 
He plans a Medicine and Pediatrics 
residency. Phi Chi. 



LARRY KENT JACKSON: Larry is 
from Durham, N. C. and 
is 25. He received his 
B.S. degree from U.N.C. 
His wife is Sandra and 
their children are 
Gregory Kent and Lori 
Ann. He will do a 
mixed Pathology-Medi- 
cine internship at the 
Medxal College of 
South Carolina in Charleston. He will 
specialize in internal medicine. 



LEWIS: Ray- 





RAYMOND HAROLD 
mond comes from Win- 
ston-Salem and is 26. 
He graduated from 
Furman in 1959 with a 
B.S. degree in zoology. 
Single. Phi Chi. He will 
do a straight med'cal 
internship at Duval 
Medical Center, Jack- 
sonville, Florida. 



CHARLES IVEY LOFTIN III: Charles 
is 25 and from Gas- 
tonia, N. C. He re- 
ceived his B.S. degree 
in Chemistry - Biology 
from Davidson in 1959. 
He and his w!f3, Alice, 
v/ill move to Augusta, 
Ga. where Charles will 
do a straight medicine 
internship at the Eu- 
gene Talmadge Memorial Hospital. He 
plans more training in Medicine. Phi 
Chi. 




WILLIAM OSCAR JOLLY III: Bill 
comes from Ay -'en, N. 
C. and is 26. His A.B. 
degree in History is 
from U.N.C. Nancy is 
his wife and their son 
is Will. Bill will do a 
rotating internship at 
Norfolk General Hos- 
pital, Norfolk, Virginia. 
After his residency he 
plans a general practice. Phi Chi. 




JOHN MARSHALL McLEAN: "Ma?" 
is from Ayer, Mass. H- 
received his A.B. de 
gree in Biology from 
Amherst. His wife is 
Cindy. They will move 
to Chicago, Illino's 
where he will do a 
straight medicine in- 
ternship at Presbyter- 
ian-St. Luke's Hospital. 
Alpha Kappa Kappa. 




14 





CARROLL L. MANN IH: Carroll is 29 
and from Raleigh, N. C. 
He is a graduate of N. 
C. State College with a 
B.S. degree in Zoology. 
He and his wife, Mar- 
ion, will remain in 
Chapel Hill while Car- 
roll does a surgery in- 
ternship at N. C. Memo- 
rial Hospital. His fu- 
ture interests are in Neurological 
Surgery. 



WALTER FORD MAUNEY: Walt is 24 
and comes from Mur- 
phy, N. C. He received 
his B.S. degree in Medi- 
cine from U.N.C. in 
1930. Single. He will do 
his rotating internship 
at the University Hos- 
pital and Hillman Clinic 
in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama. His plans for the 
future may include general practice 
after residency or a residency in Ob- 
Gyn. 



JAMES LEE PARKER: Jim is 24 and 
comes from Enfield, N. 
C. He received his B.S. 
degree in Medicine 
from U.N.C. in 1980. 
A.O.A. He will take a 
straight pathology in- 
ternship at the Eugene 
Talmadge Memorial 
Hospital. He plans a 
pathology residence and 
a practice in eastern N. C. He will 
marry Miss Martha Bowman of Hick- 
ory in June. 



EUGENE W. PATE, JR.: Gene is from 
Kinston and is 27. He 
received a B.S. degree 
from The Cita el in 
1938. Single. He will in- 
tern at the University 
Hospital, Birmingham, 
Alabama. Phi Chi. 







RICHARD LaMARR PRESSLEY: Dick 
is 25 and from Gastonia, 
N. C. He is a graduate 
of U.N.C. with a B.S. 
degree in Medicine. His 
wife is Patricia and 
their son is Richard, Jr. 
He will do a straight 
surgery internship at N. 
C. Memorial Hospital. 
He plans a residency in 
Neurosurgery. 



TOM SLADE RAND: Tom is 26 and 
comes from Fremont, 
N. C. He received his 
A.B. degree in English 
from U.N.C. His wife is 
Mary Margaret. They 
have two sons, Slade 
and Walter. They will 
stay in Chapel Hill 
where Tom will do a 
straight surgery in- 
ternship at N. C. Memorial Hospital. 
He plans a Surgical Residency. 



DOUGLAS LAMAR RITCH: Doug is 
30 and from Belmont, 
N. C. He receive 1 his 
B.S. degree in medicine 
from U. N. C. in 1930. 
His wife is Helen. They 
will move to Norfolk, 
Virginia, where Doug 
will do a rotating in- 
ternship at Norfolk 
General Hospital. He 
plans a family practice resi ency and 
practice in piedmont North Carolina. 

CHARLES JUDSON SAWYER III: 
Charlie is 30 and a na- 
tive of Windsor, N. C 
He holds an A.B. degree 
in Chemistry from 
U.N.C. His wife is Lois 
and they have a daugh- 
ter, Kathy. They will 
be in Charleston where 
Charlie will do a rotat- 
ing internship at the 
Medical College of South Carolina. He 
plans a general practice residency. Phi 
Chi. 





15 




HORACE KIMBRELL SAWYER, JR.: 
"Buzz" is 32 and is 
from Atlanta, Georgia. 
He received a B.S. de- 
gree in Chemistry in 
1954 at the University 
of Miami in Florida and 
a M.S. degree in Physi- 
ology in 1959 at Florida 
State University. His 
wife is Mary Frances 
and their son is "Kim." He will do a 
rotating internship at the Georgia Bap- 
tist Hospital in Atlanta. He plans fu- 
ture training and practice in Ob-Gyn 
in Georgia. 

SAMUEL E. SCOTT: Sam is 25 and 

from Burlington, N. C. 

He received his A.B. jMHi|k> 
degree in History from jF ^^^^k 
U.N.C. in 1959. His wife J ^ 

is Connie and they will \ "^ •* 
move to Little Rock, 
Arkansas, where he 
will do a mixed intern- 
ship at the University 
Hospital. He plans a 
general practice residency. Phi Chi. 



kiAi 




STEPHEN ROGER SHAFFER: "Step" 
is 25 and a native of 
Tryon, N. C. His under- 
graduate work was 
done at Duke Univer- 
sity. His fiancee is 
Margaret Calhoun from 
Tryon. He will do a ro- 
tating internship at St. 
Luke's Hospital in 
Cleveland, Ohio. In the 
future he plans general and orthopeaic 
surgical residencies. Phi Chi. 

RICHARD W. SHERMER: Dick is 27 
and is from Winston- 
Salem, N. C. He receiv- 
ed an A.B. degree in 
Che^istrv from U.N.C. 
in 1957. Single. He will 
do a straight pathology 
internship at N. C. Me- 
morial Hospital. He 
p^a^s to continue in 
straight Pathology. Phi 
Chi. 






DAVID WILDE SILLMON: Dave is 
from Greensboro, N. C. 
and is 26. He did his 
undergraduate work at 
High Point College and 
U.N.C. in Chemistry. 
His wife is Gertrude. 
They will move to Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania, 
where Dave will do a 
rotating internship at 
Harrisburg Hospital. He plans a gen- 
eral practice. 

JERRY ALLEN SMITH: Jerry is 27 
and from Salisbury, N. 
C. He is a graduate of 
U.N.C. where he re- 
ceived his B.S. degree 
in Medicine. Single. 
A.O.A. He will do a 
straight Pediatrics in- 
ternship at the Univer- 
sity Hospital, Western 
Reserve, Cleveland, 
Ohio. He plans a residency in pedia- 
trics. 

EDDIE PHILLIPS STILES: Eddie is 32 
and from Newton, N. 
C. He is a 1957 gradu- 
ate of Lenoir-Rhyne 
with a B.S. degree, and 
a M.S. degree in Bio- 
chemistry from U.N.C. 
His wife is Loretta and 
their son is Phillip. He 
will do a rotating in- 
ternship at Roanoke 

Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, Virginia. 

He plans additional training for family 

practice. 

FRED DAVIDSON SUMMERS, JR.: 
Fred is from States- 
ville, N. C. and is 30. He 
received his A.B. de- 
gree in English from 
Davidson. Marie is his 
wife and their two 
daughters are Anita 
and Adele. They will be 
in Danville, Pa., where 
Fred will do a rotating 
internship at the George F. Geisinger 
Hospital. He is interested in a gen- 
eral practice. 





16 



CHESTER WINFIELD TAYLOR, JR.: 
"Chet" is 25 and a na- 
tive of Castle Hayne, 
N. C. His B.S. degree 
in Medicine is ±rom 
U.N.C. Single. Phi Chi. 
He will do a rotating 
internship at St. Mary's 
Hospital in West Palm 
Beach, Florida. 




TAYLOR: 




LAWRENCE ARTHUR 
Larry is from Reids- 
ville, N. C. and is 26. 
He received his A.B. 
degree in History from 
U.N.C. in 1959. He will 
do a pathology intern- 
ship at Duke Hospital 
in Durham. He is in- 
terested in a career in 
academic medicine. He 
plans to be married in June 



WILLIAM HOWARD TAYLOR: Bill 
is 25 and from Aber- 
deen, N. C. He received 
his A.B. degree from 
U.N.C. in 1959. His wife 
is Anita and their 
daughter is Kathryn. 
They will go to Gaines- 
ville where Bill v/ill do 
a straight medicine in- 
trrnship at the Univer- 
sity of Florida Teachng Hospital and 
Clinics. He plans an internal medicine 
residency. 





WARD LANDIS VOIGT: Lannv is 
from Greensboro, N. C. 
and is 26. He is a 1959 
graduate of Davidson 
with a B.S. degree. His 
wife is Peggy and they 
have a son, Jim. Lanny 
will do a straight sur- 
gery internship at the 
University of Florida 
Teaching Hospital and 
Clinics in Gainesville. He plans a sur- 
gical residency. Phi Chi. 

KELLEY WALLACE, JR.: Kelley is 27 
and from Chicod, N. C. 
He received his A.B. 
degree in Zoology from 
U.N.C. His wife is Calla 
Ann. They will move to 
Syracuse, N. Y., where 
Kelley will do a 
straight surgery intern- 
ship at the Syracuse 
Medical Center. He 
plans a general surgery residency and 
a practice in N. C. Phi Chi. 

ROY ALBERT WEAVER: Roy is a na- 
tive of Newton Grove, 
N. C. and is 25. He re- 
ceived his B.S. degree 
in Medicine from U.N.C. 
His wife is Anita and 
their daughter is Gail 
Veron'ca. Roy will do 
a straight pathology in- 
ternship at N. C. Memo- 
rial Hospital. He plans 

a residency in pathology. Phi Chi. 





WILLIAM E. THORNTON: Bill is 33 
and from Faison, N. C. 
He received a B.S. de- 
g"ee in Physics from 
U.N.C. in 1952. His wife 
is Jennifer and their 
two sons are Simon and 
James. Bill will have 
a fellowship in Anes- 
thesiology at N. C. Me- 
morial Hospital next 
year. 




JACK H. WELCH: Jack is from Wil- 
liamston, N. C, an V is 
31. He is a graduate of 
U.N.C. with a B.S. de- 
gree in Business Ad- 
ministration. His wife 
is Jean and thev have 
three children: Jacque- 
line, Kathryn, and Rob- 
ert. Phi Chi. Jack will 
do a mixed internship 
at the University of Kentucky Medical 
Center in Lexington. His future inter- 
ests are in anesthesiology. 




17 



JAMES GRADY WHITE: Jim is from 
Charlotte and is 29. He 
eceived his A.B. de- 
cree in chemistry from 
U.N.C. Phi Chi. His wife 
is Wes and their son is 
Jamie. Jim will do a 
;traight pediatrics in- 
ernship at the Univer- 
; ty of Florida teaching 
Hospital and Clinics in 
Gainesville. He plans a pediatric resi- 
dency and a private practice in Char- 
lotte. 




THEODORE CLARK WHITSON: Ted 
is 25 and is from Re- 
lief, N. C. He is a grad- 
uate of Berea College 
n Kentucky with a 
B.S. degree in Chemis- 
try. His wife is Shelby. 
They will stay in 
Chapel Hill where Ted 
will do a straight sur- 
gery internship at N. C. 
Memorial Hospital. He plans a resi- 
dency in general surgery and a sur- 
gery practice in Western N. C. Phi Chi. 




DAVID ROBERT WILLIAMS: David is 
25 and from Biscoe, N. 
C. He has an A.B. de- 
gree in History from 
U.N.C. His wife is Jane 
and they will remain 
in Chapel Hill while 
David does a straight 
psd'atric internship at 
N. C. Memorial Hospi- 
tal. He plans a pe ia- 
tric practice in North Carolina. Phi Chi. 




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n 



Glimpses of Medical Europe 
1961-1963 

(Part II) 

by William W. McLendon, M.D., '56 



Berlin 



Berlin, the former capital of Germany, is now the one remaining occupa- 
tion zone in Europe. Although surrounded by Russian-occupied territory since 
World War II and divided into four occupation sectors, it was not until after 
13 August 1961 when the infamous Wall was begun by the Communist regime 
that Berlin became the divided city it is today. There are now about 2,200,000 
persons in the Western Zone of the City and 1,100,000 persons in the Eastern 
Zone. 

By supplying inexpensive transportation and lodgings, the Army indi- 
rectly encourages visits to Berlin by servicemen in order for as many as pos- 
sible to see first hand the nature of the Communist threat. In addition to those 
who go on their own, the Army regularly takes groups of enlisted men and 
noncommissioned officers to Berlin as part of "Operation Look-See" for the 
same reasons. The overnight ride from Frankfurt to Berlin on the duty train is 
rather exciting in its implications but went without incident for us. The cars 
for the train are supplied by the U. S. Army but the engine for the portion of 



The Bulletin presents hereivitb the second and 
final installment of Dr. McLendon's paper en- 
titled "Medical Glimpses of Europe." 

Though somewhat longer than our usual 
article, it is presented in but slightly abridged 
form because we consider it to be an excellent 
personal view of many aspects of contemporary 
European I'fe in general and medicine in particu- 
lar. That it is also a "refresher course" in medical 
history is attributable to the author's zeal for h's 
avocation. 




the trip through the Communist-held territory is furnished by the East Ger- 
mans. When the train stops in Marienborn and Potsdam for the engine changes, 
it is on an enclosed track and is closely guarded by Russian guards to assure 
that no one gets on it. The train itself is guarded only by the U. S. Military 
Police and no Communist guards are allowed aboard. In order to go on the 
train, one must have his passport or Army ID card as well as travel orders with 
Russian translations. These are processed by the train commander, who then 
shows them to the Russian officer at the checkpoint at Marienborn, so that the 
passengers actually have no contact with the Russians or East Germans. 

Our first effort after arriving in Berlin in the early morning and checking 
into the Army hotel was to take a bus tour of the city. Since my wife was 
ineligible to take the Army tour we chose to go together on the commercial 
tour. The East Zone still allows some tours through East Berlin, but these are 
limited in number and a Communist guide is furnished for the East Berlin 
portion of the trip. As members of the occupation forces, American servicemen 
in uniform can freely pass over the border into East Berlin and are under 




Figure 4. Map of Europe ii'itb some of the principal medical centers 



20 



orders not to show identification papers to the East Germans. Since most of 
those on our tour bus were civilians, however, the bus was delayed some 30 
minutes as we entered and left East Berlin at Checkpoint Charlie while the 
East German bolder guards carefully checked each of their passports. While 
this was being done other guards scrutinized the exterior of the bus to assure 
that no one or nothing was being brought into or out of East Berlin. Because 
of the presence of the East Berlin guide the tour in East Berlin stressed the 
reconstructed buildings, the new apartment buildings and the large Russian 
War Memorial Park. Upon returning to West Berlin and again getting our 
West Berlin guide, we obtained a more realistic impression of the Communists' 
intentions as we drove along the Wall and saw the bricked-in windows of the 
buildings, the searchlights, the Communist guards in their perchss along the 
wall, and the many memorials to those who were killed in attempts to escape. 
If there were any doubts in one's mind about the real meaning of the Cold 
War and its seriousness, such a tour quickly dispels them. 

University education in Berlin is relatively young by European standards, 
the University of BerUn having been founded in 1808 through the efforts of 
Wilhelm von Humboldt, then Minister of Education in the Prussian govern- 
ment of Frederick Wilhelm III. The University was housed in the former 
palace of Prince Henry on the street known as Uiitcr den Linden. The Royal 
Charite Hospital, which dates from an outbreak of the plague in 1710, became 
the main teaching hospital for the Berlin University. It was here that Rudolph 
Virchow founded his Pathological Institute in 18 56 and promulgated his theory 
of "cellular pathology," one of the foundations for modern scientific medicine. 
Professor Thompson, in his book of 1908 about medical travels in Europe 
(cited at the beginning of Part I of this article) enthusiastically described the 
numerous post-graduate courses available to the physicians who visited Berlin. 
At that time Berlin had an Anglo-American Medical Association which had 
been organized in 1903 to assist visiting physicians with ther arrangements for 
post-graduate courses. Unlike the similar society in Vienna, the Berlin medical 
association apparently did not survive the World Wars. Following the Second 
World War both the Berlin University proper and the Charite Hospital were 
located in the Russian Zone and it was soon apparent that the old Berlin Uni- 
versity (renamed the Hum bold f JJniversitat) was under Communist domina- 
tion. Thus in 1948 the Freie Uniirrs/taf Berlin (Free University of Berlin) 
was founded in West Berlin with the main campus bsing in the American 
occupation zone in the district of Dahlem. The Sfadfiscben Krankenhaiis Wat- 
end (Westend City Hospital) in the Charlottenburg district of West Berlin 
became the main teaching hospital for the new Free University, while the pre- 
clinical institutes (departments) have been located on the Dahlem campus of 
the University. 

The University Pathological Institute is located at the Westend Hospital 
and its director is Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Masshoff. I was anxious to meet him be- 
cause we have had one case of a peculiar type of mesenteric adenitis (clinically 
simulating acute appendicitis) which he had first described in 195 3 when he 
was still at Tubingen and which he later found to be due to Pasfenirclla pseu- 
dotuberculosis (this condition is known in Germany as "Masshoff 's lymphadeni- 
tis"). 

I was fortunate to be able to spend a day at the Pathological Institute of 
the St^dtiscben Krankeiihaus Moadbif, the City Hospital for the district of 
Moabit, where a former civilian pathologist at the U. S. Army Hospital at 

21 



Landstuhl is now working. The hospital itself was founded in 1873 and has 
some 1000 beds with an additional 200 beds now being added. Most of the 
work appears to be in general medicine and surgery with only a small obstetrical 
and pediatric unit. The hospital does have a Roentgen Institute with facilities 
for radiotherapy. The Pathological Institute for the Hospital is housed in a 
separate three-story brick building, which is old but in a very good state of 
repair and which is well equipped for gross and histopathology studies. At 
present the building is being temporarily shared with the Berlin police medical 
examiner whose building was located in East BerUn and had to be abandoned 
after the Wall was erected. The chief of the Pathological Institute is Prof. Dr. 
Karlferdinand Kloos, who holds a teaching appointment with the Medical 
Faculty of the Free University. He is assisted by one assistant pathologist and 
some five or six interns and residents in pathology. The main work-load for 
the Institute consists of some 1000 autopsies per year. As seems to be the cus- 
tom in European hospitals, the autopsies are done between eight and ten o'clock 
in the morning (7 were done the morning I was there). Following this the 
Professor reviews the gross material from each case and dictates his gross diagno- 
ses. With the exception of an occasional frozen section, very little histological 
study is done; the prosector dictates a more detailed description the same day 
and the case is usually completed by the following day. The pathologists have 
available practically no clinical information prior to starting their examina- 
tions, but the clinicians do come between ten o'clock and noon to review the 
findings with the pathologists. In the afternoons the surgical pathology speci- 
mens are examined grossly and microscopically by the Professor and his As- 
sistant. A very well-equipped histopathology laboratory is available and the 
surgical specimens are processed in much the same way as in most American 
pathology laboratories. As is true in most of the Pathology Departments which 
I have visited in Europe, the clinical laboratories are run by the various clinical 
services. In addition to the routine work, Prof. Kloos is actively engaged in 
some interesting studies of the placenta from the standpoint of gross and 
microscopic pathology, fibinolysin activity and gas transport. 

I learned from a former associate that someone in the Physiology Institute 
of the Free University had formerly worked in Chapel Hill, so arrangements 
were made for me to visit Prof. Ullrich at the Institute the following morning. 
I arrived at the appointed time to find a new building with many workmen 
still around and no obvious signs of habitation. Fortunately I stepped across 
the street to the Dahlem Museum and telephoned Prof. Ullrich, who said that 
he was in the new building and would come right over to meet me. I had 
somewhat expected an elderly professor and was pleasantly surprised when a 
young, friendly man in a white coat walked up and introduced himself as 
"Karl Ullrich." He told me that he had worked for nine months in Durham 
and in Chapel Hill with Dr. Carl Gottschalk's group and that Dr. WiUiam 
Lassiter from Chapel Hill was coming to Berlin in August to work with him 
for a year. He further explained that the Physiology Institute is somewh::t 
unique for Germany in having two chairs of physiology. Dr. Ullrich holds one 
of the professorships while the other chair is held by Prof. Dr. Otto Gauer, 
whose main research interest is in blood volume studies. Followin-^ our introduc- 
tion, he took me on a tour of the new buildings. The new building is across 
from the Dahlem Museum and adjacent to a large new building for the Insti- 
tute for Inorganic Chemistry. The building is almost a block long and some 
four stories high. The Physiology Institute is at one end and the Physiological 

22 



Chemistry Institute is at the other; these are separated in the middle by several 
auditoriums for joint use. The first floor of the Physiology Institute has mul- 
tiple small teaching laboratories where small groups of students meet one day 
a week with three instructors for a full day of experimentation. Since the 
medical school classes have about 200 students this allows for more individual 
contact b:tween the students and instructors. The upper floors of the building 
are taken up with offices and research laboratories. The latter are well-designed 
and included small animal operating rooms and X-ray facilities. One some- 
what unique feature is a suite of rooms with bathroom and kitchen facilities 
to be used for experimental studies with human subjects as well as for lodging 
for visiting scientists. When we arrived on the top floor, Prof. Ullrich showed 
me through his laboratories, which are the only ones yet occupied. He has 
several spacious and well-equipped rooms where he is carrying on some fascinat- 
ing work in renal physiology using micropuncture techniques to study tubular 
function in experimental animals. 

While in Berlin we enjoyed spending an evening with Ruth and Leonard 
Woodall (class of 1956, UNC Medical School). Leonard has had a busy two 
years as chief of the obstetrical and gynecological service of the U. S. Army 
Hospital in Berlin. They will also be returning to North Carolina in June ol 
this year. 

Austria 

Austria, which before the First World War was an empire of some 70 
million persons, is now a small nation of some 9 million persons situated be- 
tween East and West in the current Cold War struggle. Although neutral in 
the current struggle (and one of the countries where leaves of American 
servicemen are stamped "civilian clothing is mandatory"), the Austrians are 
quite friendly to Americans and one quickly senses the relief that the Austrian 
people feel that they did not get caught in the grip of the closing Iron Curtain. 
Although Austria is poor by the standards of the Hapsburg days, its pride in 
its past and its faith in the future is demonstrated by the reconstruction of 
the many famous landmarks in Vienna which suffered so much damage during 
the closing days of the war in Europe. Perhaps no single monument demon- 
strates this better than the Vienna State Opera House, which was originally 
opened in 1869 and which burned on the night of March 12, 1945, during the 
Nazis' retreat from Vienna. The rebuilt opera house was opened with a per- 
formance of Beethoven's 'Tidelio" on November 5, 195 5, less than two weeks 
after the final occupation troops had left Austrian soil. We were delighted to 
have the opportunity to attend the opera while in Vienna and were thrilled 
with the magnificent opera house, the enthusiastic audience and the marvelous 
music and production. Even more than the fabled Danube, tKe Opera now 
seems to be the symbol of Vienna's past and future. 

The medical schools in Austria are organized similarly to those in Ger- 
many. There are three Austrian medical schools, the youngest being those at 
Graz (founded in 1863) and at Innsbruck (founded in 1669). The University 
of Vienna was founded in 136 5 and now claims to be the oldest German uni- 
versity (since the University of Prague, founded in 1348, is no longer con- 
sidered a German university). Records of the Medical Faculty at the University 
of Vienna extend back to prior to 1400 so that there has been medical teaching 
at the University for almost 600 years. The large and well-known Allgcmcines 
Krankenhaus (General Hospital), founded at the end of the 18th century by 

23 



Emperor Joseph II, serves as the main teaching hospital for the Medical Faculty 
Medical sightseeing and study by English-speaking physicians in Vienna 
is facilitated by a rather unique and extremely valuable organization known as 
the American Medical Society of Vienna. The society had its origin in 1879 
when a group of American physicians attending post-graduate courses in oph- 
thalmology founded the "Austro-American Medical Society." This was ex- 
panded during the years to provide numerous post-graduate courses in English 
by members of the Medical Faculty of the University of Vienna. With the 
exception of a lapse during the First World War, it is estimated that over 
32,000 English-speaking physicians attended the University of Vienna courses 
sponsored by the American Medical Society during the years from 1879 until 
1939. The medical association was closed in 1939 by the Nazi government 
which had annexed Austria. With the help of alumni of the society and the 
U. S. Embassy in Vienna, the American Medical Society of Vienna was re- 




Fig. 5. Frail Etigel in front of the entrance to the American 
Medical Society of Vienna. 



24 



opened in June of 195 3 and in the past several years has registered more than 
1000 physicians a year for post-graduate courses in Vienna. Many of th:se 
physicians, Hke myself, are stationed in Europe with one of the military services 
and come for short courses, while others are EngHsh-speaking physicians from 
the United States and other countries who come for longer courses. Although 
specific seminars and courses are listed in the Registry of Pest-Graduate Courses 
published by the Society, this is only a guide and all the courses are practical 
and are tailor-made for the individual physician on the basis of his interests 
and the time available. The two persons who are primarily responsible for the 
success of the Society in providing services to the visiting physicians are Dr. 
M. Arthur Kline, who is Executive Secretary of the Society (and also serves 
as physician to the American Embassy in Vienna), and his able secretary, Frau 
Engel (Fig. 5). Having hved in Vienna most of her Hfe and having worked 
with the Society since the 1920's, Frau Engel has the solution for all of the 
many problems of the visiting doctors and has come to be known as the 
"Angel of the American Doctors in Vienna" (Engel is the German for 
"angel"). She had maternal concern for all of our needs during our visit but 
seemed disappointed that we didn't bring our children so she could be a 
"grandmother" for them. 

Because of my interest in both medical history and pathology, I had re- 
quested courses in both of these subjects during our brief visit to Vienna in 
January of 1963. Our first visit was with Frau Professor Erna Lesky at the 
Institute for Medical History of the University. The Institute (along with the 
Institute of Pharmacology) is housed in a building known as the Josephinum. 
It was so named for Emperor Joseph II who had the building erected in the 
late 18 th century to house the Academy for Mihtary Medicine and Surgery 
which he had founded. Although the building is beautiful and spacious, it 
suffers from lack of support for the heavy book collections and museums and 
is now in the process of renovation. Frau Prof. Lesky, who is quiet-spoken but 
very enthusiastic about the Institute, took delight in our interest in Viennesi 
medical history and in the Institute. Following a brief review of some of the 
highlights of medical history in Vienna, she took us on a tour of the buildin<^. 
The Institute has an excellent hbrary, which I understand had its origin m 
that of the Academy (which no longer exists) and in the Hbrary of Prof. Max 
Neuberger, the former Professor of Medical History. The other collection of 
interest in the Institute is the museum of wax models of anatomical dissections. 
These were made in Italy over a hundred years ago and are truly works of art. 

I had requested several hours of review of gynecological histopathology 
and was fortunate to be assigned to Dr. J. H. Holzner, a relatively youn^ 
pathologist who was trained in Vienna and had spent a year at Mt. Sinii Hos- 
pital in New York in Dr. Hans Popper's department. Dr. Holzner is now 
in charge of the pathology laboratory for the Fraiicn Kliuik (the two univer- 
sity obstetrical and gynecological hospitals). I spent several hours with Dr. 
Holzner in reviewing some of his current cases of interest and several sehcted 
topics in gynecological histopathology. Later he took me on a tour of the 
University Pathological Institute, which is in a separate building in the same 
block as the main portion of the Allgewe'nics Krankciihaiis. I was interested in 
seeing that the large museum of gross pathology in the Institute still contained 
many of the specimens of Karl Rokitansky (1804-1878), who was the most 
famous of the \'ienncse pathologists. The present Chief of the Institute 
Prof. Chiari, who is an active, grey-haired gentleman who kindly received 



IS 

mc 



25 



and insisted that I stand beside him during the gross demonstrations held each 
morning in order that I might see as much as possible. As in Berlin, the em- 
phasis is on gross pathology as far as the autopsies are concerned, but the 
surgical pathology is performed much as it is in America. While at the In- 
stitute I also enjoyed seeing some of the work being done by Dr. Holzner in 
his histochemistry laboratory where he is following in the footsteps of Ep- 
pinger of Vienna and of Hans Popper in studying liver disease. 

One afternoon I visited with Dr. Deutsch, who is well known for his 
studies in blood coagulation. His laboratories are located on the top floor of 
the 1st University Medical Clinic building. In addition to his work as a hema- 
tologist, he is in charge of the clinical laboratories for the Medical Clinic. Be- 
cause of my previous work with Dr. Brinkhous' group I was most interested 
in Dr. Deutsch's new assay for anti-hemophiUc factor. 

The final afternoon we were fortunate to be able to take the bus tour 
through the old wine-growing villages north of Vienna, along the Danube and 
up to the top of the Kahlenberg where one can get a magnificent view of 
the city and the Danube below. Following this we had a delightful Viennese 
dinner and then had time for another visit to the art museum before catching " 
our train for Frankfurt. 

France 

Because of limited time in Paris and in France and because of my relative 
ignorance of French, my impressions of medical France were rather limited and 
were confined to external glimpses of buildings and landmarks of medical 
interest. 

France has 24 medical schools, the best known to most Americans being 
those at the Universities of Strasbourg and Paris. Even older than the Uni- 
versity of Paris is the University of Montpellier; both of these have been well- 
known medical schools from the early Middle-Ages to the present time. The 
only French medical school which I have had the opportunity to visit is that 
in Paris, which is now housed in a modern building in the center of the uni- 
versity area on the "Left Bank" of the Seine. 

During a walking tour of the university section of Paris it was a thrill to 
pass the Neckar Hospital where Laennec (1781-1826) had discovered the 
stethoscope and had made his many contributions to the clinical-pathological 
knowledge of diseases of the chest. It was also of interest to see the Pasteur 
Institute, which is composed of a number of old, but well-kept buildings in a 
two-block area (Fig. 6). My immediate reaction in seeing the Pasteur Institute 
was much the same as I had experienced when I first saw the Rockefeller In- 
stitute in New York some ten years ago — one of disappointment that the 
buildings weren't more massive and impressive. Yet a few minutes reflection 
made me realize once again that it is not the buildings or equipment — necessary 
as they are for modern research — that make an institution or university famous, 
but the men and the work they do. 

England and Scotland 

Because of the friendly reception we received and the lack of any language 
barrier, it was possible to obtain a better view of English and Scottish medicine 
than of any other. The British Medical Association, through its International 
Medical Advisory Bureau in London, offers all types of assistance to visiting 
physicians. The Medical Director of the Bureau, Dr. R. A. Pallister, and his 

26 




Fig. 6. Bust of Louis Pasteur in front of the Pasteur Institute, Paris. 

staff can assist not only in arranging visits to hospitals, clinics, and labora- 
tories, but as well can assist with problems of travel, lodging, and so forth. 
Much of what I was able to do in London and Edinburgh was arrant^ed through 
Dr. Pallister. 

The other persons who were most hospitable during our visit were Dr. and 
Mrs. Isley Ingram. They had spent the year 1960-1961 in Chapel Hill and have 



27 



now returned to London where Dr. Ingram is a hematologist working in the 
Louis Jenner Laboratory of St. Thomas' Hospital. We spent our first weekend 
in England with the Ingrams in their beautiful home at Esher, a suburb of 
London. During our visit with them we had a personal experience with Brit- 
ain's socialized medical system when our 6-year-old daughter fell from a bicycle 
and suffered a deep laceration of her forehead. Mrs. Ingram drove us in to St. 
Thomas' where Kathy had X-rays and sutures while her mother was given a 
shot of brandy and then tea by the nurses who quickly sensed that the mother 
was paler than the injured child! Kathy had her stitches removed prior to our 
departure from England and had an uneventful recovery. Even though we 
were foreigners our medical care for this accident was completely free (yet the 
more than two English pounds "embarkation tax" which was collected at the 
airport upon our departure somewhat balanced the account). 

London itself has twelve medical schools, which together constitute the 
Faculty of Medicine of the University of London. The oldest medical school is 
at the St. Thomas' Hospital and was founded in the thirteenth century. The 
hospital is located directly across the Thames River from the Houses of 
Parliament and "Big Ben." One wing of the hospital was destroyed by a 
bomb near the end of the war and the present buildings are soon to be torn 
down in stages and replaced by a new and modern plant. St. Thomas' is known 
not only for its medical school but as well for its nursing school, which was 
founded by Florence Nightingale. 

The St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London claims to be the oldest hospital 
in the world. According to legend, the hospital and the adjacent Church of 
St. Bartholomew the Great were founded in 1123 by Rohere, a cleric in the 
court of King Henry I, following a vision of St. Bartholomew during a pil- 
grimage to Rome. The church and hospital are situated at what was then the 
gates of the city on the great plain of Smithfield, where all the pubHc spectacles 
were held in these times. A beautiful, but simple and rustic church now stands 
across the street from the present hospital at the site of the original church 
founded by Rohere. Although there have been many later additions to the 
church, portions of it date back to the thirteenth century. By contrast, the 
St. Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College, founded in 1662, is now located 
some two blocks from the hospital in modern post-war buildings in a campus- 
like setting. 

The Guy's Hospital, which was founded in 172 5 and whose medical school 
was opened in 1769, is located adjacent to the London Bridge and just across 
the Thames River from the Tower of London. In addition to the older por- 
tions, the hospital now has a large modern surgical wing which resembles many 
of the new VA Hospitals in the United States (Fig. 7). While at Guy's Hos- 
pital I had an interesting visit with Dr. G. Payling Wright, the Professor of 
Pathology, and had the opportunity to visit the pathology museum where are 
preserved the specimens described by Richard Bright (1789-18 5 8) and Thomas 
Hodgkin (1798-1866) in their classic descriptions of the diseases which bear 
their names. 

Through the assistance of Dr. Pallister, I was able to visit both the Royal 
College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 
The former is located in an old building just off Trafalgar Square, but is 
moving in a year or two to new and larger facilities in Regent's Park. The 
most interesting part of the Royal College of Physicians is the library which 
now contains over 40,000 books on medical and related subjects. The collec- 

28 




Fig. 7. New surgical wing of Gny's Hospital, London. 

tion was originally based on the library of Thomas Linacre, who founded the 
College in 1518, and included the library of WilHam Harvey. Many books from 
these two collections were destroyed in the London Fire of 1666, but many 
other notable collections and individual volumes have been added in subse- 
quent years to make up the present collection, which is of great historical value. 

In contrast to the rather sedate Royal College of Physicians, the Royal 
College of Surgeons is a beehive of activity since it serves as a center of post- 
graduate instruction for physicians from all over the Commonwealth who are 
studying for their qualifying examinations in surgery. It has an active pathology 
department which appears to have both a teaching and service function. Dr. 
Proger of the Pathology Department gave me a tour of the department and 
the pathological museum. Although designed primarily for practical study pur- 
poses, the museum contains items of historical interest such as the skull from 
which Sir James Paget (1814-1899) described osteitis deformans^ in 1877. The 
other famous collection which the College has is the museum of the surgeon 
and anatomist John Hunter (1728-1793). The College building and the 
Hunterian Museum suffered direct bomb damage during the war, but much 
of the museum was saved. A new wing of the College building specifically 
designed for the Museum has just been completed and moving of the collection 
to it was in progress during my visit. Through the kindness of Miss Dobson, 
the Curator of the Hunterian Museum, I was able to view some of the beau- 
tiful and well-preserved specimens illustrating the nervous system and embry- 
ology which Hunter had painstakingly prepared some 200 years ago. 

Another building of medical interest in London is the Wellcome Build- 
ing, which houses the offices of the Burroughs Wellcome & Company. The 
entire profits from this pharmaceutical company now go to the Wellcome 

29 



Foundation for advancement of research in medical and allied sciences. In addi- 
tion to the company offices the building contains the Wellcome Museum of 
Medical Science, the Wellcome Museum of Medical History, and the Wellcome 
Library of Medical History. The former is open to the public but is so well 
done that it is used by many physicians studying for their advanced degrees or 
certificates. The British seem to have a great talent in the field of medic.il 
museums and this was one of the best examples I have seen. The primary sub- 
ject covered by the museum was that of tropical diseases with an alcove devoted 
to each of the diseases. It was so designed that one could have a quick review 
or spend a good deal of time using the reference materials in each alcove. The 
Wellcome Library of Medical History was in the process of renovation and re- 
painting during my visit, but I was able to walk through and get some idea of 
the extensive collection of works on medical history. The Medical History 
Museum has a number of interesting exhibits relating to medical history. The 
current exhibit at the time of my visit was on the development of diagnostic 
instruments in medicine and was extremely well done. 

In addition to visiting London, I was able to visit three of the other 
university and medical centers in England and Scotland — Oxford, Cambridge,, 
and Edinburgh. Oxford is a relatively large city and has the main factories of 
the Morris Motor Company located on the outskirts. The center of town, how- 
ever, is dominated by the numerous university buildings. Dr. Ingram drove me 
up to Oxford, where our first visit was to the Sir William Dunn School of 
Pathology, which is located at the edge of the University campus in a rela- 
tively new brick building. Although we did not have the opportunity to meet 
Sir Howard Florey, the Professor of Pathology, we had an interesting visit 
with Dr. J. L. Gowans, who is doing some fascinating work on lymphocytes. 
Later we walked through the Radcliffe Infirmary, where Dr. Robb-Smith is 
chief of pathology and where Drs. Biggs and MacFarlane have done most of 
their well-known work in blood coagulation. 

The following day I took the train from London to Cambridge to spend 
the day there. Cambridge is in a rather isolated area about 5 5 miles north of 
London. It is a much smaller town than Oxford and reminded me a great deal 
of Chapel Hill in that the town and the University are so thoroughly amalga- 
mated. Because I was considering spending a year in England, I had an ap- 
pointment to see Dr. R. R. A. Coombs in the Pathology Department. Dr. 
Coombs, who is a physician working in the field of immunology, is best known 
for the anti-globulin test (the so-called "Coombs test") which he described 
along with Mourant and Race in 1945 and which is now used in blood banks 
throughout the world. I was pleasantly surprised to find him to be very young 
in appearance and extremely friendly. His laboratory is located on the top 
floor of the University Pathology Department building. In order to get up to 
his laboratories one has to go up a circular iron staircase similar to those found 
in a ship or lighthouse. Dr. Coombs states that he prefers this location since 
it gives a quiet atmosphere with a minimum of interruptions. Much of his 
work now is in the field of the immunological identification of cells in tissue 
cultures. In view of a number of cases of sudden unexplained death in infancy 
(the so-called "crib deaths") which we had been seeing, I was very inter'^sted 
in other recent work in which he had collaborated suggesting the possibility 
that at least some of these cases may be due to hypersensitivity to cow's milk 
in infancy. Although this hypothesis is by no means proven, it is an attractive 
explanation for some of these baffling deaths. 

30 



My final side trip from London was to Edinburgh. I left the London train 
station just before midnight on the "Night Scotsman," an express sleeper train, 
and arrived in Edinburgh at 7:30 the next morning. I had the entire day in 
Edinburgh for sightseeing and visiting, leaving that evening on a similar 
sleeper for London. I found Edinburgh to be one of the most fascinating and 
striking cities I have seen in Europe. It is divided in two halves by Princes 
Street, which runs from east to west. On the north side of Princes Street is the 
"new town" with its business, shopping and residential areas; while on the 
south side is the "old town" which contains the University and is dominated 
by the imposing Edinburgh Castle. As a result of prior arrangements by Dr. 
Pallister at the BMA office in London, I first met Prof. Eric C. Mekie, who is 
Curator of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Director of Post- 
Graduate Medical Studies at the University of Edinburgh. I had a fascinating 
two hours with Prof. Mekie discussing the history of medicine in Edinburgh 
and in touring Surgeons' Hall, the home of the Royal College of Surgeons of 
Edinburgh. Afterwards, I walked a few blocks to the University, which like 
many European universities has no real campus but has buildings intermixed 
with those of the surrounding area. The University Faculty of Medicine (found- 
ed in 1725) uses the 1000-bed Royal Infirmary as the main teaching hospital. 
It covers the equivalent of a large city block and is composed of numerous 
connecting buildings of varying ages. The medical school buildings are located 
across the street in an area crowded with many university buildings. A new 
7-story wing for the medical school had been completed just prior to my visit. 
Although I had no previous engagement with anyone at the Pathology De- 
partment, I was given a friendly reception and was given a tour of the depart- 
mental facilities in the new building. Prof. Montgomery, the head of the de- 
partment, was out-of-town, but I enjoyed meeting Dr. D. L. Gardner, who 
had recently returned from a year of research in the United States and who is 
doing work in experimental hypertension. Following my visit to the Medical 
School and lunch with Dr. Gardner, I had several hours remaining before my 
train for some sightseeing at the Castle, the Palace of Holyrood (the palace of 
Mary Queen of Scots and now the official residence of the Queen when she 
visits Edinburgh), and in the city itself. 
Epilogue 

Although it may seem from the above comments that I have spent two 
years only in travel, most of these visits and observations have been made 
during brief periods of leave from my work at the hospital. Because of the 
various Cold War crises during my stay in Europe Army personnel have been 
subject to a curfew and many restrictions on passes and leaves, all of which 
limit the opportunity to travel at any distance from one's base. Never-the-less, 
I have been very grateful for the opportunity to make these visits and feel that 
it has been a valuable educational experience in many ways. To medical students 
and physicians having the chance to go abroad — whether in one of the military 
services or on their own — I would strongly recommend taking full advantage 
of the opportunities to meet and observe their medical colleagues in other lands. 
As Sir William Osier, the first Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, so aptly stated in his essay on "The Student Life": 

". . . it is not only book knowledge and journal knowledge, but a 
knowledge of men that is needed. The student will, if possible, see 
the men in other lands. Travel not only widens the vision and gives 
certainties in place of vague surmises, but the personal contact with 

31 



foreign workers enables him to appreciate better the faiHngs or suc- 
cesses in his own Hne of work, perhaps to look with more charitable 
eyes on the work of some brother whose limitations and opportunities 
have been more restricted than his own. Or, in contact with a 
mastermind, he may take fire, and the glow of enthusiasm may be 
the inspiration of his life." 

At a time when America is the acknowledged leader in the medical world 
and when it is often popular to assume therefore that medicine in other lands 
has little to offer, these further words of Osier (from his address entitled 
"Chauvinism in Medicine") are also worth consideration: 

"There is room, plenty of room, for proper pride of land and birth. 
What I inveigh against is a cursed spirit of intolerance, conceived in 
distrust and bred in ignorance, that makes the mental attitude 
perennially antagonistic, even bitterly antagonistic to everything 
foreign, that subordinates everywhere the race to the nation, forget- 
ting the higher claims of human brotherhood . . . Personal, first-hand 
intercourse with men of different lands, when the mind is young and 
plastic, is the best vaccination against the disease [of nationalism in 
medicine] . . . Let our young men, particularly those who aspire to 
teaching positions, go abroad. They can find at home laboratories and 
hospitals as well equipped as any in the world, but they may find 
abroad more than they knew they sought — widened sympathies, 
heightened ideals and something perhaps of a Weltknltur which will 
remain through life as the best protection against the vice of na- 
tionalism." 

Acknowledgments: To Fraulein Johanna Rojan, medical artist, and PFC 
Larry Schroeck, medical photographer, both of the Medical Illustration Sec- 
tion, Pathology Service, U. S. Army Hospital, Landstuhl, Germany, I would 
like to express my appreciation for their assistance with the illustrations for 
this paper. 

I am also grateful to Dr. Charlotte Pommer, formerly civilian pathologist 
at the U. S. Army Hospital, Landstuhl, for the benefit of her advice and as- 
sistance in making possible many of my medical travels in Europe. 



North Caroitnds Number 1 Family 
Of Fine Dairy Foods 

LONG MEADOW FARMS 



32 



Highlights Of Alumni Day 

Major L. P. McLendon, Sadie MacBrayer McCain of Woman's College, 
and four distinguished physicians received Distinguished Service Awards from 
the U.N.C. School of Medicine on March 22. 

Physicians tapped for the awards were: Dr. Andrew Jackson Warren, a 
pioneer pubhc health worker and long-time member of the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation, who attended U.N.C. from 1908-1912; Dr. John Sloan Rhodes of Ra- 
leigh, "honored physician and citizen of his community," and president-elect 
of the N. C. Medical Society; Dr. Hugh A. McAllister of Lumberton, former 
U.N.C. Medical Alumni Association President whose services to the School 
"have been marked by a dedication and enthusiasm which have earned the 
gratitude of her students, alumni, faculty, and friends;" and Dr. Paul F. 
Whitaker of Kinston, former president of the Medical Foundation, vice-presi- 
dent of the American College of Physicians, and one "who has contributed 
immeasurably to the development of the Good Health Program of the State of 
North Carolina." 




Shoxvn above arc (L to R): Dr. Hugh McAllister, '3 5, Alumni Futicl 
Chairman; Dr. R. L. Pittman, '08, incom'ng Alumni President; Dr. Harry 
Brockmann, '7 5, outgoing Alumni President; Mr. Paul W. Schenck, Jr., 
President of the Medical Foundation of N. C, Inc.; and Dr. Tom Thurston, 
'39, Alumni President-elect. 

33 




Shown talking with Dr. W. Reece BerryhiU, Dean, are the Distinguished 
Service Award recipients: (L to R) Mrs. McCain, Major McLendon, Dr. Mc- 
Allister, Dr. Whitaker, and Dr. Rhodes. Dr. Warren was unable to be present 
for the presentation. 



Major McLendon was cited for his work as a "lawyer, humanitarian and 
statesmen." He was recognized as chairman of the first Board of Trustees 
Committee on the Medical School and as an ardent champion of the state's 
Good Health Program. 

Mrs. McCain, dean of students at Woman's College, was praised for her 
contributions, with her husband, the late Dr. Paul McCain, to the School of 
Medicine and to the development of Gravely Sanatorium as a part of the U.N.C. 
Medical Center. 

Principal speaker at the Alumni Annual Dinner was Holt McPherson, 
Editor of the High Point Enterprise, who spoke on "The Challenge and Con- 
tributions of the School of Medicine and N. C. Memorial Hospital from the 
Point of View of the Public." 

In elections also held here on Alumni Day, Dr. Tom Thurston of Salisbury 
was named new president-elect of the U.N.C. Medical Alumni Association. 
Dr. R. L. Pittman of Fayetteville took office as the Association's new president, 
succeeding Dr. Harry L. Brockmann of High Point. 

Also chosen to posts were: Dr. Isaac Manly of Raleigh, vice-president of 
the Association; Dr. H. Haynes Baird of Charlotte and Dr. David A. Cooper 
of Bryn Mawr, Pa., Councillors. 

Paul W. Shenck, Jr., of Greensboro was re-elected president of the Medical 
Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. and Howard Holderness of Greensboro 
was named vice-president. 

34 



Lassiter Named 
Markle Scholar 



-^w^ ,dS% 



^^^p 



Dr. William E. Lassiter, assistant professor of medicine in 
the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, recently 
was named a Markle Scholar in Academic Medicine, one of the 
most outstanding honors that can be given to a young medical 
scientist. 

Dr. Lassiter is one of 2 5 scientists in this coun'rrv and 
Canada to bs so honored. He is the ninth member of the U.N.C. 
medical faculty to receive this coveted award. 

The appointment from the John and Mary R. Markle Foun- 
dation of New York provides a $30,000 grant to the Medical School here 
where Dr. Lassiter teaches and engages in research. The sum is given over a 
five-year period to supplement salary, aid research, and assist in the scientist's 
development as a teacher and investigator. 

Dr. Lassiter, a native of Wilmington, joined the U.N.C. medical faculty 
in 195 8 as a research fellow in medicine. He received his A.B., magna cum 
laude, with highest honors in physics, from Harvard University, and his M.D., 
cum laude, from the Harvard Medical School. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
L. R. Lassiter of Wilmington. 




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Since 1962, Dr. Lassiter 
an assistant professor of 
here, specializing 



has been 
medicine 
in internal medi- 
cine. In 1962, he was named an Es- 
tablished Investigator by the Ameri- 
can Heart Association. 

The eight faculty members who 
have been selected as Markle Scholars 
previously are Dr. John B. Graham, 
professor of pathology; Dr. George 
D. Penick, associate professor of 
pathology; Dr. Isaac M. Taylor, asso- 
ciate professor of medicine; Dr. Jud- 
son J. Van Wyk, professor of pedia- 
trics; Dr. Frankhn WiUiams, associate 
professor of medicine and' preventive 
medicine; Dr. Walter Hollander, Jr., 
associate professor of medicine and 
director. Clinical Research Unit; Dr. 
Robert Zeppa, assistant professor of 
surgery and associate director. Clinical 
Research Unit; and Dr. William D. 
Huftines, assistant professor of path- 
ology. 



35 



Presenting the Faculty 



DR. MORRIS A. LIPTON 

Dr. Lipton became an Associate Professor in the Department of Psy- 
chiatry in 1959, bringing with him an unusual background of training and 
experience. He is a native of New York City, where he obtained his under- 
graduate training at City College. He obtained his 
Master's and Ph.D. degrees in biochemistry at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin in 1937 and 1939. Subsequent to 
this, he held a research and teaching position in physi- 
ology at the University of Chicago. In 1948 he gradu- 
ated from that university with honors in medicine. 
After obtaining his M.D. degree, he completed his 
training in psychiatry, following which he combined a 
faculty position with training in internal medicine. In 
195 5 he was certified by the American Board of Psy- 
^^^i / chiatry and Neurology (psychiatry) and in 1957 was 

^^^^^^dkmt^mil^ certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine. 

^^Hk ^^^^^»_ ^^ *^ presently an advanced candidate in the Wash- 

^^^^^^ JkVUI ington Institute for Psychoanalysis. 

Just prior to coming to Chapel Hill, he was director of research at the 
Veteran's Administration Research Hospital in Chicago. He is author of many 
papers in the areas of biochemistry, physiology, psychiatry, and internal medi- 
cine. He holds a five year Research Career Award from the N.I.H. 




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CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 



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H. D. Bennett 
D. D. Carroll 
Miles M. Fitch 



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Presenting the House Staff 




DR. CHARLES F. GILBERT 

Dr. Gilbert, a native of Benson, North Carolina, is Chief Resident and 
Instructor in the Department of Pathology. As an undergraduate, he attended 
Campbell College and the University of North Carolina where he received an 
A.B. degree in 195 5, majoring in Zoology. He attended 
the University of North Carolina School of Medicine 
and received his medical degree in 1959. 

During his medical training, he did research in 
endocrinology with Dr. Charles W. Hooker of the De- 
partment of Anatomy. His internship and previous 
years of residency have been in Pathology at the North 
Carolina Memorial Hospital. He has engaged in re- 
search during his residency and has published and pre- 
sented several scientific studies on generaUzed salivary 
gland virus disease, Pneumocystis pneumonia and vascu- 
lar invasion in lung tumors. 

Dr. Gilbert will remain in the medical school dur- 
ing the next year and will have a joint appointment in the Departments of 
Bacteriology and Pathology. He will enter the Army in July, 1964, and his 
post-service plans are indefinite. He is married to the former Myra Lee Benson 
of Benson, N. C, and they have one son and a daughter. 

DR. SAMUEL G. JENKINS, JR. 

Dr. Jenkins, chief resident in surgery at North Carolina Memorial 
Hospital, was in the tobacco industry for over a year before he came back 
to UNC for his pre-medical and medical education. 

A native of Tarboro, Dr. Jenkins attended Staunton Military Academy 
and the University of North Carolina, from which he received the B.S. in 
Commerce in 1948. 

He returned to UNC in 1949 to complete pre- 
medical requirements and entered the School of Medi- 
cine in 1951, receiving his degree in 195 5. He was a 
member of Phi Chi and AOA. 

Serving his internship at Memorial Hospital from 
195 5 to 195 6, Dr. Jenkins then left UNC for a two- 
year tour in the U. S. Navy, where he was in the sub- 
marine service. 

He took up his residency in surgery in July of 
195 8 and will complete it this June. Married in 1954 
to the former Jaquelin Nash, the Jenkins have four 
children: Jaquelin, 7; Martha, 6; Samuel III, 4; and 
Pembroke, 1. 




37 



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38 




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40 



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