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Full text of "Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine 1956"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bulletinofuniver4141 



Bulletin 



OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Vol. 41 

1956 



k 



r,Al TlMDRE 



31 I ■ "■ 

BALTIMORE 



y^3-3T9^ 



INDEX TO VOLUME 41—1956 



Abortions, therapeutic, 93 
Acute hydronephrosis in man, 39 
Admissions, medical school, 73 
Agents, therapeutic; investigation of, 118 
Agnew Clinic 

painting of, 14 

reaction by public and critics, 16 
Allen, John M., M.D., 79 
Anderson, Donald L., 39 
Anajihylaxis, occurrence of in antibiotic 

therapy, 5 
Anatomic lesions 

distribution of in phlebothrombosis, 103 

table of, 103 
Aneurysms, saccular, repair of, 79 
Angiomas, discussion of, 67 
Angioma, venous, cause of cerebellar apoplexy, 

64 
Antagonism, antibiotic, incidence of, 5 
Anti-bacterial activity of sulfonamides, 118 
Antibiotic 

antagonism, 5 

development of, 4 

drugs, toxic effects of, 5 

resistant strains in micro-organisms, 4 

resistant strains of staphylococci, 1 

treatment of appendicitis, 38 
Apoplexy, cerebellar, as caused by venous 

angioma, 64 
Appendicitis 

diagnosis of, 38 

is still dangerous, 38 

l^rogress in treatment, 38 

treatment of with antibiotics, 38 

Births, according to weight and condition at dis- 
charge, 88 
Blood clotting, as effected In' tryjisin, 76 
Blood clots, as effected by ])lasmin, 75 
Bradley, Stanley E., 39 
Breast, fibroadenoma of, 58 
Browne, James S., M.D., 95 

Carcinoma, case history 

of colon, 51 

of esophagus, 47 

of pancreas, 50 

of stomach, 49 
Carcinomas, trijjle primar\ , 23 
Case history 

cerebral phk-bolhrombosis, 95 

nialenial deaths, 94 



Case report 

fibroadenoma of breast, 60 

multiple primary malignancy, 23 

obstetric, 30, 121 

placenta accreta, 70 

use of new vascular instrument for saccular 
aneurysms repair, 79 

venous angioma, 64 
Cerebellar apoplexy, venous angioma resulting 

from, 64 
Cerebellar hemorrhages 

clinical aspects, 64 

signs and symptons, 64 
Cerebral phlebothrombosis, analysis of 22 cases, 

95 
Cesarean section, indications for, 92 
Chemistry 

organic, the rise of, 117 

phenomenal rise in, 117 
Circulation, intracranial venous, scheme of, 54 
Clashing of trends in European art, 7 
Clots, blood 

plasmin as effected by, 75 

trypsin as effected by, 76 
Colon 

carcinoma of, case history, 51 

physiologic study of the, 115 
Colonic function, a major anxiety, 115 
Comments of obstetric case report, 30 
Complications 

arising from treatment with Thorozine, 21 

obstetric, 90 

pregnancy of, placenta accreta, 70 
Constipation, studies of, 115 
Control measures for sta])h>-|ococci cross-in- 
fection, 3 
Cowley, R. Adams, M.D., 79 
Cross infection with staphylococci, 1 
Cross-resistant therapy, 4 
Cytology^ gastrointestinal exfoliative, 46 

Deaths, maternal, 93 

case histories, 94 
de Choudens, Jose Alvarez, M.D., 95 
Deliveries 

with previous episiotomy, 87 

forcep, 86 

with hemorrhage, 91 

medical complications, 90 

operations for and number by jircsentation, 86 

according to jiuerpcral morbidity, 92 

Rh negative, 90 



-423 



^4 



BULLET IX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



summary of totals and prenatal examinations, 

85 
with toxemia, 90 
Depolymerizing enzymes, streptodornase, 75 
Development of antibiotic resistant strains of 

micro-organisms, 4 
Diagnosis of appendicitis, 38 
Discussion 

fibroadenoma of, 60 

occurrences of multiple ])rimary carcinomas, 
27 
Distention of urinary bladder under pressure, 

40 
Distribution of staphylococci, 1 
Drugs, sulfonamides, antibacterial activity', 118 

Eakins and Sargent, medical portraits by, 7 
Eakins, Thomas; early training in Philadelphia, 
10 

European training, 10 

painting of "The Gross Clinic", 12 
EfTect 

of distention of urinary bladder under pressure, 
40 

of staphylocci cross infection in hospital 
nurseries, 1 
Electro-shock vs Thorozine, 19 
Enzymes, depolymerizing, streptodornase, 75 
Enzymes, proteolytic, the use of in surgery, 75 
Episiotomy, 87 
Esophagus, carcinoma, 47 
Ether, first use of, 117 
European art, its efTect on early America, 7 
Exchange of staphylococci between patient and 

hospital personnel, 2 
Exfoliative cytology, not new science, 46 

Factors involved in staphylococci cross-in- 
fection, 3 
Factors involved in superinfections, 4 
Fibroadenomas 

discussion of, 60 

(giant) of breast, 58 

history of, 58 
Forcep, deliveries, 86 
"Four Doctors," painting of by Sargent, 8 

Gareis, Louis C, M.D., 70 
Gastrointestinal 

exfoliative cytology, 46 

neoplasms as diagnosed through gastro- 
intestinal cytology, 46 
Giant fibroadenoma of the breast, 58 
GifTard, George E., Jr., 7 



Gross Clinic 

painting of by Eakins, 12 

reactions to by public and critics, 12 

Hematoma, [puerperal, obstetric case report, 109 
Hemorrhage 

cerebellar, signs and symptoms, 64 

primary intracerebellar, reported with some 
frequency, 64 

with deliveries, 91 
History 

fibroadenomas, 58 

phlebothrombosis, 103 
Holbrook, William A., M.D., 58 
Hospitals 

cross infection staphylococci, 3 

source of resistant strains staphylococci, 2 
Humoral activator, streptokinase, 75 
Hydronephrosis, acute, 39 

Immaturity, causes of, 89 
Incidence of 

criteria for multiple primary malignancies, 23 
hospital resistant strains in infected wounds, 

2 
staphylococci infection in hospital person 
nel, 2 
Inflammation, as healed by streptokinase, 75 
Instrument, for repair of saccular aneurysms, 79 
Intestines, the problem of, 115 
Intracerebellar, primary hemorrhages, 64 
Intracranial venous circulation, 54 
Intrapelvic pressure, effect of, 40 
Investigation of therapeutic agents, 118 

Krantz, John C, Jr., Ph.D., 4, 73, 117 

Labor 

premature active, obstetric case report, 30 

jirolonged, 91 
Lesions, anatomic, distribution of in phlebo- 
thrombosis, 103 

Maternal deaths, 93 

case histories, 94 
Medical complications in deliveries, 90 
Medical school, admission to, 73 
Medical students, basis for admission of, 73 
Megacolon, studies of, 115 
Mental illness, the search for drugs, 118 
Methods of studies of renal function in hydro- 
nephrosis, 39 
Miller, Joseph M., M.D., 75 
Mortality 

appendicitis, relative to perforation, 38 

perinatal, etiology of, 89 



INDEX 



1^ 



Morbidity, puerperal, in deliveries, 92 
Multiple primary carcinoma, case report, 23 

summary of case reports, 28 
Mutant and naturally resistant strains in bac- 
teria] population a definite problem, 4 

Nagel, Lester R., 64 

Neonatal deaths and still births, according to 
weight, 88 

Neoplasms, gastrointestinal as diagnosed 
through gastrointestinal exfoliative cy- 
tology, 46 

New medication, Thorozine, 19 

New vascular instrument for repair of saccular 
aneurysms, 79 

Nichols, Pomeroy, Jr., M.D., 95 

Obstetric complications, 90 
Obstetrics and gynecology, summary of admis- 
sions and prenatal mortality, 84 
Obstetric 

case report, 121 

case report, comments, 30 

puerperal hematoma, 109 

study placenta accreta, 70 
Obstipation, the study of four types, 115 
Operations, total number of in deliveries, 86 
Organic chemistry, the rise of, 117 
Origin of staphylococci resistant strains, 2 

Pancreas, carcinoma of, case history, 50 
Pelvis 

deliveries by, 91 

effect of elevation in intrapelvic pressure, 40 

renal, distention of and effects, 42 
Perinatal mortality, etiology of, 89 

yearly report from Dept. of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology, 84 
Pharmacologic horizons, 117 
Phlebothrombosis 

age distribution and underhing causes, 100 

blood or xanthochromia, table of, 102 

cerebral, the f)roblem of and a summary of 22 
cases, 95 

discussion of history, 103 

distribution of anatomic lesions, table of, 103 

signs and symptoms, 102 

spinal fluid pressure, 102 

survey of recorded data, 100 

survival time after onset, 103 
Physiologic study of the colon, 115 
Placenta accreta, obstetric case study, 70 
Plasmin, effect of on blood clots, 75 
Pregnane)', a com])licati()n, placenta accreta, 70 



Premature active labor, case report, 30 
Prematurity, causes of, 89 
Prenatal examinations, total number of, 85 
Pressure, intrapelvic, effect of, 40 
Problem of 

cerebral jihlebothrombosis, a case history, 
95 

intestines the, 115 
Problems encountered in antibiotic therapy, 4 
Prolonged labor, 91 
Propulsive waves in constij^ation, 115 
Proteolytic enzymes in surgery, the use of, 75 
Psychosis, neurosis, treatment with Thorozine, 

20 
Puerperal 

hematoma, obstetric case report, 109 

morbidity, in deliveries, 92 

Ramsey, James H., M.D., 58 
Raskin, Howard F., M.D., 46 
Renal function in man during acute hydro- 
nephrosis, 39 
Report 

obstetric, case history, 30 

primary carcinoma, multiple, 23 
Respiratory system and staph^dococci, 1 
Results of 

treatment with Thorozine, 20 

Thorozine therapy in psychosis and neurosis, 
20 
Review of literature on multiple jirimary car- 
cinomas, 27 
Rh negative, deliveries, 90 

Sargent, John Singer, growth of and early 

training, 8 
Sargent, his career in portrait painting, 8 
Sargent and Eakins, two portrait painters, 7 
Scheme for intracranial venous circulation, 54 
School, medical, admission to, 73 
Secondary infections, result of antibiotic 

therapy, 4 
Shipley, E. Roderic, M.D., F.A.C.S., 115 
Side effects of treatment with Thorozine, 21 
Signs and symptoms of cerebellar hemorrhages, 

64 
Spinal fluid pressure, phlcljolhrombosis, table of 

cases, 102 
Stafford, Edward S., M.D., 38 
Staphylococci 
distribution of, 1 
hospital strain, domestic strains, exchange 

of, 2 
resistant strains in hospitals, origin of, 2 



"t?fj 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Staphylococci, cross infection, 1 

control of, 3 

factors involved in, 3 

hospital nurseries in, 2 
Sterilization, and indication for, 93 
Still Hirths, according to weight, 88 
Stomach, carcinoma of, case history, 49 
Streptodornase, depol\'merizing enzymes, 75 
Streptokinase 

eflect of in the healing of intlammation, 75 

humoral activator, 75 

streptodornase, where used, 75 
Students, evaluation of, 73 
Studies 

obstipation four types of, 115 

of constipation, 115 

of megacolon, 115 

renal function during acute hydronephrosis, 39 
Sulfonamides, antibacterial activity, 118 
Summary, Thorozine in psychiatric treatment, 

22 
Superinfection 

factors involved, 4 

in antibiotic therapy, 4 
Surgery, the use of proteolytic enzymes, 75 
Survival time, phlebothrombosis, 103 
Symjitomatic control in behavior problems, 
result, with Thorozine, 20 

Taylor, Irving J., M.D., 19 

Therapeutic abortions, 93 

Therapeutic agents, investigation of, 118 



Thorozine 

complications arising from treatment with, 
21 

dosage of, 20 

electro-shock, compared with, 19 

indications for usage, 19 

new medication, 19 

ps_\chiatric treatment in, experience with, 19 

summary of treatment with, 22 
Toxemia, deliveries with, 90 
Toxic efTects, antibiotic drugs, 5 
Treatment of appendicitis, progress of, 38 
Triple primary carcinomas, 23 
Tryi)sin, how obtained and the effect of in blood 
clotting, 76 

Ureters, hydronephrotic, 42 

Urinary bladder, effect of distention under 

pressure, 40 
Urushizaki, Ichiro, M.D., 23 
Use of proteolytic enzymes in surgery, 75 

Venous angioma, case report, 64 

cause of cerebellar apoplexy, 64 
Venous circulation, intracranial, scheme of, 54 

Wagner, John A., M.D., 54, 64, 95 
Waves, propulsive, in constipation, 115 
Wisseman, Charles L., Jr., M.D., 3 

Xanthochromia, table of in phlebothrombosis, 
102 



Bulletin of 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

VOLUME 41 January J 1956 number i 

EDITORIAL 

HOSPITAL CROSS-INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCI 

Cross infection has long constituted a serious problem in institutions. Hospitals 
have not been exempt. Indeed, in recent years, hospital cross-infection with staph- 
ylococci has attracted considerable attention the world over, especially in relation to 
the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. 

However, cross-infection with staphylococci is not a new problem. Over the years 
it has been recognized that wounds of long duration almost inevitably come to harbor 
staphylococci. Indeed, prior to Lister, the formation of laudable pus in surgical 
wounds was accepted almost as a normal stage of wound healing. Today, of course, we 
regard such occurrences as serious complications and are dismayed when the anti- 
biotics do not entirely eliminate the problem. Furthermore, the very use of the anti- 
biotics has introduced new problems of cross-infection and superinfection. 

There are many published accounts available on the incidence of antibiotic re- 
sistant strains of staphylococci, the changing pattern of resistance with widespread 
usage of newer antibiotics and the problem of treatmg infections with these adaptable 
organisms. Hence, these aspects will not be discussed here. It may be rather more 
profitable to consider the problem of staphylococcal cross-infection from a broader 
epidemiologic point of view, attempting to distill from the massive literature on 
the subject pertinent observations on the biology and ecology of the staphylococcus 
in our social structure, and to search for clues to the genesis of the problem and to 
means for effective control. 

Viewing the community as a whole, we find that staphylococci are widely dis- 
seminated in, on and about man. Outside of specific lesions, the varieties regularly 
j)athogenic for man are most commonly and consistently found in his respiratory 
tract, particularly in the anterior nares, from which they are readily sjiread to his 
hands, skin, clothing, air and to his fellow man. Surveys by diff'erenl investigators 
over the years have shown that from 30 to 60 per cent of the normal population carry 
potentially pathogenic staphylococci in their anterior nares. It is a particularly 
significant but poorly understood observation that some persons may remain nasal 
carriers for years; others may be carriers only intermittently; and still others seem 
to rid themselves of these organisms fairly promi)tly. The staphylococci found in the 
general population seem to vary widely in many of their characteristics, belong to 

1 



2 HI l.lJ'VnX or THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XE, C. 01- Ml). 

\ari()us different j^hage grou|)s and are, in a large proportion of instances, sensitive 
to the usual arra_\' of antibiotics. However, there are some indications of slight 
increase in the incidence of resistant strains in the general population. 

Turning now to the people who staff our hospitals, we find that here, as in the 
general population, are carriers of staphylococci. Reports indicate that the inci- 
dence of carriers among these persons may be even higher (up to 80%). Furthermore, 
a high {proportion of the staphylococci isolated from hospital personnel today are 
resistant in different degrees to the antibiotics in common use. Most of these re- 
sistant strains seem to fall within a single ])hage group (Group III). Hence, in con- 
trast to conditions existing in the general population, the hospital not only seems 
to provide a selective environment which favors survival of antibiotic resistant 
organisms but also seems to provide a reservoir within its personnel for maintaining 
them. 

Patients entering the hospital einironment tend to acquire the hospital strains 
rather quickly. Thus, the total incidence of positive nose and throat cultures tends 
to increase after admission finally to approach that which obtains among the person- 
nel. Upon discharge the incidence tends to decrease over a period of a few weeks 
until it is again about the same exhibited by the population of the home environ- 
ment. Meanwhile, there may be some, but not particularly marked, exchange of 
strains between the patient and his family contacts, with some members of the family 
acquiring the resistant strains from the hospital and, in turn, some patients ac- 
quiring staphylococci from their associates. Thus, to a small degree at least, the 
select strains from the hospital environment find their way into the community. 

Cross-infection of serious nature appears to be more frequent than one would like 
to admit. Indeed, after a careful study in one hospital, evidence was found to indicate 
the occurrence of at least 2vS0 instances of cross-infection with "hospital" strains of 
staphylococci in one twelve month period. Infected wounds all too frequently 
acquire the resistant strains and these strains often turn up in post-operative wound 
infections. Indeed, it is highly probable that the prophylactic use of antibiotics in 
the latter situation favors the selection of such resistant organisms. 

Cross-infection is commonly found in newborn nurseries. It is common experi- 
ence for the newborn infant to acquire the "hospital" strains of staphylococci carried 
by the nursery attendants within the first few days of life and to become a heavy 
nasal carrier. On occasion, because of the operation of factors which remain largely 
unknown, the relatively silent dissemination of these organisms erupts into a clinically 
apparent institutional outbreak which may take the form of pemphigus neonatorum 
or staphylococcal pneumonia in the infant, of acute mastitis in the nursing mothers 
or infection of both mother and child. 

The origin of the resistant strains in hospitals is easy to understand. The remark- 
able caj)acity of staj)hylococci to give rise to antibiotic-resistant mutants is well 
known both as a clinical and as a laboratory phenomenon. The extensive therapy 
with antibiotics practiced within a hospital apparently exerts a very strong selective 
inlluence favoring the resistant strains. This selective influence is not restricted to 
patients who are being treated for overt staphylococcal infections but also oi)erales 
in any person who harbors staphylococci in his respiratory tract regardless of the 
reason for which he receives chemotherapy. The attending personnel quickly acquire 



EDITORIAL 3 

these strains through their contacts with such patients and serve as a reservoir for 
their perpetuation within the hosjjital and their dissemination to new patients. 

In summary, it seems rather clear that the present problem with staphylococci 
arises at least in part through operation of the following factors: 1) the high inci- 
dence of carriers, both within the hospital and in the community, 2) the great ease 
with which stajihylococci pass from one person to another, ?i) the remarkable capacity 
of staphylococci to develop antibiotic resistant mutants and 4) the selective in- 
lluence of the hospital environment favoring the perpetuation of the resistant 
strains. 

Examining these factors for points at which control measures might be instituted, 
one linds that only the tirst two ofTer some limited opportunity. 

Complete elimination of carriers among the hospital personnel by treatment 
with antibiotics has not proved {practical or even possible. It is difficult to eradicate 
completely staphylococci from the respiratory tract by systemic antibiotic therapy. 
Some limited success has been reported with the local application of antibiotic 
containing ointment to the nose. However, in either case diminution of carrier rate 
appears only temporary. On the other hand, the observation that certain persons tend 
to be chronic carriers and others seem to be able to rid themselves rather quickly 
of acquired organisms, if substantiated, might provide an approach to control that 
is biologically sound. While it is obviously totally impractical to replace all of the 
chronic carriers in the hospital organization with persons who are not, it is certainly 
within the realm of practicability to do so in certain selected areas of the hospital 
in which cross-infection is a problem. Since the bacteriologic techniques are fairly 
well developed, execution of such a program becomes primarily an administrative 
problem. 

The passage of staphylococci from one person to another is another obvious 
point of attack. Attempts to reduce cross-infection by controlling airborne or- 
ganisms through ultraviolet irradiation, chemical disinfection and oiling of the bed 
clothes have not, generally speaking, proved very effective. However, it has been 
clearly shown that strict adherence to aseptic technique when examining and dress- 
ing surgical wounds or burns reduces the incidence of post-operative wound infec- 
tions. It is a simple but often overlooked fact that it is just as likely for the attend- 
ing physician or house staff members to be carriers of pathogenic sta-)hylococci as 
it is for the nursing personnel and ward attendants. It would be reasonable to ex- 
pect physicians above all to exercise exceptional care to prevent the OLCurreme of 
cross-infection. 

Obviously, these measures are rather feeble attempts at control in the face of 
pressure from such a large reservoir of staphylococci in the general population, 
ever ready to re-invade the hospital and to adjust so effectively to the drugs we 
administer. Much, indeed, remains to be learned about the factors which influence 
the carrier state and about control of the spread of infection by the respiratory route 
in general. 

Charles I.. W'isseniaii, Jr., M ./). 
Professor of Microbiologv 
School of Medicine 
L'liiversity of Maryland 



SOME PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED L\ ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY 
JOHN C. KRANTZ, JR. I'h.I). 

One of the most perplexinj^ (lilTicuUies that arises in antibiotic therapy is the devel- 
opment of resistant strains of micro-organisms. The appearance of resistant strains of 
micro-organisms is a definite epidemiologic problem posed by the use of penicillin. 
For example, bacterial strains of staphylococci collected from random patients in 
1043 showed a greater sensitivity to penicillin than those collected from random 
patients in 1949. A continuation of these sensitivity studies at various medical 
centers throughout the world has shown that penicillin-resistant staphylococcal 
infections are continuing to increase. It is indeed fortunate that the resistance phe- 
nomenon has not occurred with hemolytic streptococci, Treponema pallidum, gono- 
cocci, meningococci, and the pneumococci. Most enterococci, especially the producers 
of penicillinase, have shown resistance development to penicillin. 

Striking indeed is the fact that bacteria which have become sensitive to strepto- 
mycin may require this agent as an essential part of their substrate for continued 
growth. Thus it becomes apparent that mutant and naturally resistant strains of 
bacteria have become a large factor in our bacterial populations. 

Clinically, resistance development to the broad-spectrum antibiotics has begun to 
pose a definite problem. Experimentally, resistance to these antibiotics can be clearly 
demonstrated. Finland et al. (1953) and other investigators have reported the oc- 
currence of staphylococci which are no longer sensitive to the broad-spectrum anti- 
biotics. Finland (1954) observed that staphylococci which are resistant to penicillin 
and the tetracyclines have shown little resistance to chloramphenicol. 

One of the interesting investigations of Finland and his associates (1954) demon- 
strated the cross-resistance phenomenon among the three tetracyclines. They showed 
that bacteria which had become resistant to tetracycline (Achromycin), or oxytetra- 
cycline (Terramycin), or chlortetracyline (aureomycin), were resistant to the other 
two tetracyclines. The cross-resistance, however, did not prevail for other unrelated 
antibiotic agents. 

Another frequent complication in antibiotic therapy is the appearance of a second 
injection in patients under treatment for a primary infection. These superinfections 
are more likely to occur when very young, very old, or debilitated patients are being 
treated. For example, staphylococcic glossitis and pharyngitis may occur during 
streptomycin therapy. When aureomycin, chloramphenicol, or Terramycin are being 
given, monilial infections of the mouth, tongue and vagina may occur. The black 
tongue which may occur during penicillin therapy is probably caused by a secondary 
invader. Pneumonias caused by gram-positive rods sometimes make their appearance 
while penicillin is being administered. It is possible that Proteus may displace other 
organisms in urinary tract infections which are being treated with aureomycin, Terra- 
mycin, and occasionally chloramphenicol. 

Tillett (1953) made an exhaustive study of the problem of superinfections. As a 
rule the organism is not commonly considered primarily a pathogen. The offending 
bacteria are usually present in large numbers in areas of the body which are not their 

4 



KRAXrZ -PROBLEMS IX ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY 5 

common habitat. They are permitted to multiply and spread by the destruction of 
the pathogen. Superinfections are considered to be caused by one of three different 
mechanisms: (1) the introduction of new bacteria from outside sources or from con- 
tact with other infections, or incident to the parenteral administration of the anti- 
biotic; (2) resistant organisms which may be jiresent in small numbers flourish and 
spread after the destruction of the susceptible bacteria; (3) the prompt development 
of resistance to the antibiotic, permitting the offending organism to spread and cause 
other infectious areas. As suggested, the problem of suf)erinfection is encountered 
mainly in elderly debilitated patients. 

A third problem is the toxic effects of the antibiotic drugs, which in the main are 
few. It is well established that vertigo and deafness may result from injury of the 
eighth cranial nerve during streptomycin therapy. This has been greatly obviated 
by dosage reduction and the use of dihydrostreptomycin-streptomycin mixtures. 
Supplemental therapy with para-aminosalicylic acid and isoniazid has been also help- 
ful in reducing the incidence of this untoward effect of the streptomycin. Chlor- 
amphenicol is reported to have produced leukopenia, granulopenia, and anemia in a 
few patients. Instances, however, are extraordinarily rare. Penicillin, but notably 
aureomycin, Terramycin, and to a lesser extent chloramphenicol, produce gastro- 
intestinal symptoms when administered by mouth. The use of tetracycline (Achromy- 
cin) has reduced the incidence of gastrointestinal distress from approximately 25 
per cent to 5 per cent. In many patients these symptoms are disconcerting and 
extend over considerable periods of time. In some patients these effects are very 
serious. Polymyxin, neomycin, and bacitracin have been known to produce definite 
kidney damage. 

With the increasing use of penicillin the occurrence of penicillin anaphylaxis is 
steadily climbing. Of 61 cases studied by various observers (1952-53), 23 were fatal. 
The syndrome occurs suddenly, often in a matter of minutes after the antibiotic is 
given. Shock, cyanosis, labored and slow breathing, are common signs. Convulsive 
seizures and unconsciousness may rapidly follow. Most of these tragic reactions oc- 
cur in patients who have been sensitized to penicillin by previous treatment. A 
histor\' of allergy and asthma appears very commonly among these patients. It is to 
be hoped that some modification of the penicillin molecule might alter this facet of 
its action without affecting its antibacterial action. 

A fourth difficulty encountered is antibiotic antagonism. It was shown by Jawetz 
(1952) that the three broad-spectrum antibiotics, aureomycin, Terramycin, and 
chloramphenicol, can impede the action of penicillin, streptomycin, and bacitracin 
on certain bacteria in vitro and in vivo. The conditions required for the demonstra- 
tion of this antagonism are most exciting. Tillet (1953) in a review of the subject 
holds the view that the possibility of this condition prevailing in clinical practice is 
rare. Nevertheless, Lepper and Dowling (1952) observed a higher mortality in a 
series of pneumonia patients treated with aureomycin and penicillin than in a similar 
series treated with penicillin alone. It is quite clear that promiscuous multiple anti- 
biotic therapy is to be discouraged. However, as pointed out by Long (1953), resistant 
cases of bacterial endocarditis still require combined penicillin-streptomycin therapy. 

The problem of antibiotic therapy requires judgment and skill if the best results 



6 HILI.ETIX or THE SCHOOL 01' MEDKIXE, U. OE MI). 

are to be achieved lor the iiulixidual i)alicnl and uliimai(.'l\- for llie general popula- 
tion, for this form of tlierapy is but one segmenl of ihe timeless conflict which con- 
tinues unceasingly between the animal and plant kingdoms. We the animal contest- 
ants are armed now with new weapons, formidable and effective, but what about our 
foe the bacteria — will they take it lying down? (iarrod, a Hritish investigator, very 
cogently commented: "Bacteria are displaying some versatility in their response to 
chemotherapeutic drugs. They are not taking the present widespread attack on them 
lying down; some are defending themselves very effectively, and some are even turn- 
ing our weapons to their own advantage. So far the supply of new antibiotics has 
more than matched the capacity of bacteria to resist them, but if this supply should 
cease — -and presumably the number yet to be discovered is limited the time may 
come when a few of the more enterj)rising species will flourish more or less unhin- 
dered." 

Bibliography to be supplied upon request. 



THE :\IEDICAL PORTRAITS OF EAKIXS AXD SARGENT 
GEORGE E. GIFFORD. JR., B.S., M.D. 

Two great American portrait painters were John Sargent and Thomas Eakins. 
Each man represented one of the two trends of reahstic art in America after the Civil 
War; Eakins, the "native" painter who received inspiration from American themes 
and Sargent, the "cosmopoHte" who still looked to Europe for inspiration. Both 
painters did great medical portraits which are used as a common denominator in 
illustrating these two schools of painting. 

The "Gilded Age" insisted on European art and its scorn of American products 
had made "European" synonymous with "artistic". American artists therefore 
went to Europe to supply the demand, but in vain, for the patrons purchased names 
(European) rather than paintings. The young artists gained a sound routine train- 
ing and became able technicians. Imbued with European salon ideas and confronted 
with the Europeanizing of the United States, they found themselves at one point of 
an unfortunate triangle: a lusty new republic deep in the 19th century ferment; a 
patronage w-ith untrained artificial taste, and quite blind to any role that the artist 
might play in the American commonwealth; and the artist. In view of this situa- 
tion some of the painters remained in Europe, others came home to practice what 
was largely "art for art's sake" rather than art that grew out of a function in a 
culture which produced them. Some assimilated their European ideas better than 
others. Some displayed more virility and independence. Of the painters who re- 
mained abroad, Whistler and Sargent are examples. In contrast to the European 
painters were the "solitaries", such as Eakins, who absorbed whatever European 
training and travel they had had and pursued their profession frequently in ob- 
scurity or isolation without regard to popular taste and fashion of the day (1, 2, 3). 

Since most American artists, including Sargent and Eakins, went to Europe and 
were influenced by existing trends, it is important to note the various schools. The 
situation in Paris about 1850 was a triangle of three antagonistic groups. One con- 
sisted of the academician, chiefly followers of the classical and romantic traditions, 
who controlled the salons and formulated strict rules as to subject matter, which had 
to be religious or legendary. It was called "high art" or the "grand manner". Gerome, 
Garolus-Duran, and Bonnat were leaders of this tradition. The second was the Bar- 
bizon school which had affected American landscape painting. Its most famous 
members were Corot, and Jean Francois Millet. The third group consisted of the 
individuals of independence, such as Daumier and Courbet. Courbet had passed ofif 
stage before the later generation of American artists, Eakins and Sargent, had reached 
Paris, but his turbulent personality had given an impulse to the realistic movement, 
that was carried forward by others, even in The Academy. Gerome, for example, 
varied subjects of classical motives with the rendering of actual incidents; while 
Bonnat easily imbibed the naturalistic tendencies of the old Spanish school and 
became a conspicuous instance of fact and analytical study. His portraits of men, by 
reason of their intense objective rendering of the external characteristics and an 
indication of what is below the surface, gave a realistic representation of human 



8 HI I.LETIX ()/■ I III: SCHOOL ()/■ MKDICIXE, C. OF MI). 

personality. Kakins was a sludcnl, of bolh (ieromc and Honnal, and slands out as 
keenly analylical in his observation. He is the mosl representative of the realistic 
movement upon the academic training, (ierome and Carolus-Duran had studied 
\'elasquez and the influence of this artist on Sargent greatly affected his use of con- 
trasting colors; Sargent has been called a "virtuoso in pigment". 

John Singer Sargent was born in Florence of American ])arenls. His father, Dr. 
Fitzwilliam Sargent, received his medical training in Philadelphia; here also he 
married Mary Singer, of an old Philadelphia family. The parents were abroad in 
1856 when Sargent was born. He was educated in France, (iermany, and Italy, 
taking drawing lessons of the desultory kind. His early works were carefully and 
painstakingly done. In 1876, he paid a visit to the United States, but Sargent lived 
abroad all his life and never s|)ent more than a year in the country of his parents. 
To be fair we must say he was an American only by citizenship. 

Sargent began to study art seriously at the studio of Carolus-Duran in Paris at 
the age of eighteen. Duran was a member of the academic group which was the 
carrier of romantic and classical traditions. The scientific precision of the method 
taught by C'arolus-Duran was based on a close study of Leonardo de \'inci, Franz 
Hals and \'elasquez. This influenced Sargent who made the technique his own and 
gave him the assured mastery of his material. Duran chose Sargent as an assistant 
in the execution of important medical commissions. As a painter, Sargent's manner 
was French in brilliant versatility but his treatment was superior to the efforts of 
Duran and his school. Eventually he adopted a method and style which were purely 
his own (4). 

From the outset commissions came to him easily; he did not have to knock at 
any doors. It was not vmtil the Salon of 1884 w'hen he showed a portrait of Madam 
(iautreau that the painter found himself famous, or infamous. Madam Gautreau 
w'as a friend of Geanbutta, acclaimed by the Republican party and Sargent was 
accused as having purposely done a caricature. The journals raged on in a furious 
and ])rolonged manner. Sargent left Paris and moved to London. In 1897 after having 
done most of the nobility of London, he was elected to the Royal Academy. It 
became a high distinction to be painted by him and many clamoured for the distinc- 
tion, in vain. 

In 1906, Miss Mary Garrett, inheriter of a large fortune from a former president 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, commissioned Sargent to paint The Four 
Doctors, portraits of the physicians who founded the Johns Hopkins medical school; 
Welch, Osier, Halstead and Kelly. Miss Ciarrett was one of the female crusaders of 
the 180()'s who took advantage of the low financial status of the School at that time. 
She made a deal. If the authorities would admit women to its student body, she would 
give them a new building; the deal was made (5). 

The four famous physicians became "The Four Saints" really, and the story of 
early Hopkins is chiefly their story. They weave in and out of it constantly and their 
very lives were closely associated. These men were of superior talents and unique 
personalities. They made the medical side of the Johns Hopkins University great 
and created an aura of glamour and excellence that has |)ersisted ever since (6). 

W'illiam \\'elch, born in 1850, was of New England origin; \\'i!liam Halstead, born 



GIFFORD—MEDICAL PORTRAITS OF EAKIXS AND SARGEXT 




I'JG. 1. Tlie Foiiy Doctors by John S. Sargent 
Photograph by Chester Reather of Johns Hop'^ins University 

in 1852 was from New York City; William Osier, born in 1849, was a Canadian, 
and Howard Kelly, born in 1858, was from New Jersey. Welch and Halstead were 
both educated at Yale and Columbia Universities, Osier at ]\IcGill in .Montreal, 
and Kelly at Pennsylvania. It was by fortunate circumstances that they came to the 
Hopkins, all ai the same time. Any one of them would have brought renown, but 
together they brought fame. They were more than doctors; they were teachers, 
executives, organizers, lecturers, research workers, writers and advisers. They were 
even actors and pro[)agandists for a great cause. Sargent and only Sargent with liis 
brilliant tc(hnif|uc, his world wide re[)utati()n and his gra|)hit' rejircsentations. could 



10 BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XK, C. OF MD. 

puiiu these men. He was like ihem; he loo, had studied in Europe. .\rt and medicine 
then were dominated by European standards. 

The painting of Tlic Four Doctors by Sargent done in 1906, revealed the painter 
in the maturity of his i)owers. Its dignity and character presents as perfect an ex- 
ample of an institution [licture as is found in America. M the time Sargent was very 
tired of portrait jxainting, and was refusing perfunctory work, but the personalities 
of these four great specialists, inspired him to seriousness and sobriety. Composition- 
ally, the picture is very interesting in that the widely scattered and apparently 
casually arranged figures fill their big space admirably and the space itself seems to 
share the meditative process of the great scientists who occupy it. To the left is 
Welch, sitting on the opposite side of the table is Osier, holding a pen in his hand. 
Standing in front of the globe is Kelly, and to the extreme right is Halstead. They 
are dressed in the academic regalia of black, which accents their faces. This painting, 
now one of the most valued possessions of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 
reposes in the great hall of the \\'elch Memorial Library (7). 

Another great American portrait painter of medical subjects was Thomas Eakins, 
born in Philadelphia in 1844. His ancestry was Scotch-Irish, English and Dutch. 
As a boy he was intelligent and early an agnostic and freethinker. He was filled with 
the scientific enthusiasm of the time; his interest was divided between art and science. 
An indefatigable student, he pursued studies outside of school, borrowed scientific 
books from the library, constructed a small steam engine and studied language by 
himself, particularly French and Italian. He was graduated from Central High 
School wdth a B.A. degree in 1861. 

His regular art training began at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Soon 
after entering the academy he began attending anatomy courses at Jeflferson Medical 
College under the famous surgeon Joseph Pancoast. Here, this was no amateurish 
teaching of anatomy out of a book, but the regular training of a medical student, 
witnessing dissections and operations by great physicians. Eakins dissected human 
and animal subjects; he became so absorbed at one time, he thought of becoming a 
surgeon. After a few years of this kind of education, half artistic and half scientific, 
he possessed a thorough knowledge of perspective and anatomy and was able to do a 
strong drawing. However, he had little experience of working from the nude and 
practically none of painting in general, which is so necessary to the finished artist. 
Eakins realized that it was necessary to go abroad and completed his artistic educa- 
tion in France. He was in a sense a pioneer. The English influence on American art 
had waned, and that of France was making itself felt. Paris was not yet the universal 
goal of art students. Relatively few Americans had studied there in comparison to 
the horde who would flock to this city to make it the capital of the art world in the 
next decade. 

French art in these years was dominated by the Conservative Academy of Beaux- 
Arts, which controlled the Ecole des Beaux Arts, the Ecole de Rome, and the Salons. 
It distributed prizes and scholarships and regulated museum purchases and the awards 
of public commissions. Eakins entered this school and choose as his instructor, Jean 
Leon Gerome, foremost of the academic teachers and the dominating spirit of the 
Beaux- Arts. Later Eakins visited Spain and saw the works of \'elasquez. After the 



GIFIVKD^MEDICAL PORTRAITS OF EARIXS AM) SARGEXT 



11 




I'lG. 2. Tlie Gross Clinic Ijv Thomas Eakiiii 
Photograph by courtesy of Jefferson Medical Collefie 



Salons, Spain must have seemed very real with its naturalism, its concern with the 
facts of every day life, its love of character more than ideal beauty, and its scientific 
objectivity. Compared to the microscopic literalness of Gerome, Velasquez's breadth 
of vision belonged to an ampler world. The austere simplicity of this Spanish j^ainter 
had a great influence on Kakins. 

Eakins left Spain and came to I'hiladel])hia where he planted his feet in America 
and Ijegan his great work. In the course of his anatomic study at Jefferson >redical 



12 BVLLKTIX Of THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

College, Eakins became acquainted with many of the leading physicians of the city. 
At this time one of the dominating influences in the college was the great surgeon 
Dr. Samuel D. Gross (1805-1884). Dr. Gross, professorof surgery at Jefferson Medical 
College, was also a great teacher, and author of the monumental System of Surgery, 
which had been translated into many languages. Eakins had seen Dr. (iross many 
times operating in his clinic before students. From this experience Eakins conceived 
the most ambitious painting of his early years — the Gross Clinic. 

The scene is a somber amphitheater into which daylight falls from above, bringing 
the principal actors into dramatic relief. Dr. Gross has paused during the surgery, 
scalpel in hand, and stands talking to the students. The operation is on a young man 
from whose thigh a piece of dead bone is being removed. Dr. James M. Barton on the 
other side of the table is probing in the incision, which is being held open with a 
tentaculum by Dr. Samuel Apple, who is seated at his left. Dr. Charles S. Briggs, 
seated directly in front of Dr. Gross, is holding the patient's legs. The anaesthetist 
is Dr. W. Joseph Hern, later Professor of Clinical Surgery at Jefferson. The patient's 
mother, seated behind Dr. Gross, is hiding her eyes in anguish. Behind the doctor 
is the clinic clerk, Dr. Franklin West, who is recording Dr. Gross's remarks. The 
latter's son, Dr. Samuel W. Gross, who later occupied his father's chair of surgery, is 
leaning against the wall of the entrance to the ampitheater; behind him appears 
"Hughie", the janitor, in his shirt sleeves. Instead of the immaculate white of present 
day surgery, the doctors wear dark everyday' clothes, characteristic of the day before 
modern antisepsis. Dr. Gross is frock coated and gloveless in accordance with the 
medical methods of those days. Further back rises tier after tier of seats filled with 
dimly seen students absorbed in the great undertaking. 

While this picture represents a composite of many people, it is at the same time 
the portrait of one man. Dr. Gross dominates it, with his silvery hair, fine brow, and 
string-like features, he catches the full force of the light — an imposing figure, with 
the rugged aspect of a pioneer in his profession. Every detail in the picture contributes 
to the dramatic value of his figure and the subordinate drama of the group of assist- 
ants clustered around the patient, yet, every person is a individual, whose character is 
depicted with a sure grasp, and each is doing his work with absorbed intentness. 
The viewpoint is absolutely objective; the hand that guided the brush was as steady 
as the hand that guided the scalpel. There is no lack of humanity, nor sentimentality 
that hides its eyes or shrinks from the less pleasant aspects of life. There is the under- 
standing of the scientist who can look on disease and pain and record them truthfully. 
This work has the impersonality of science, its humanity, and humility. It represents a 
drama of contemporary medical life, a phase of man's search for knowledge. In its 
truth of characterization, its formal strength and balance of design, it shows a power 
and com{)leteness of realism. 

This picture of Eakins' early manhood was finished in 1875 when he was M years 
old. He had worked diligently over it, persuading friends and fellow students to pose. 
The leading characters and famous surgeon himself posed. Soon after the picture was 
comi)leted, it was exhibited at the Haselline Cialleries in Philadelphia, probably the 
artist's first public exhibition of an oil in this country. 

It created a sensation, crowds visited the galleries, and long accounts of it appeared 
in the news papers. One critic wrote: 



GIFFOKD MEDICAL PORTRAITS OF EAKINS AND SARGENT 13 

''The public of Philadelphia now have for the first time an opportunity to form 
something like an accurate judgement with regard to the qualities of an artist, who 
in many particulars is far in advance of any of his Romerian rivals. We know of no 
artist in this country who can at all compare with Mr. Eakins as a draftsman, or 
who has the same thorough mastery of certain essential artistic principles today. . . . 
We know of nothing in the line of portraiture that in any way approaches it". 

While a few other writers echoed these sentiments, the bulk of the criticism was 
unfavorable. Complaints were made about the puzzle presented by the patient's body, 
the darkness of the color, the strong lighting and the realistic style, diagnosed as 
"The modern French manner". 

The subject, however, was what condemned the picture in the eyes of most writers, 
especially the fact that the artist had dared to show blood on the hands of the surgeon. 
One critic, after praising the principal figure, remarked regretfully: 

"If we could cut the figure out of the canvas and wipe the blood from the hand, 
what an admirable portrait it would be!" 

Another, on the occasion of its exhibition in New York a few years later wrote: 

"The more one praises it, the more one must condemn its admission to a gallery 
where men and women of weak nerves must be compelled to look at it. For not to 
look is impossible". 

Still another wrote: 

"The more we study it, the more our wonder grows that it was ever painted, in 
the first place, and that it was ever exhibited in the second. This is a picture of heroic 
size — that a society thinks it proper to hang in a room where ladies, young and old, 
young girls and boys and little children, are expected to be visitors. It is a picture 
that even strong men find difficult to look at long, if they can look at it at all; and as 
for people with nerves and stomach, the scene is so real that they might as well go 
to a dissecting room and have done with it. No purpose is gained by this morbid 
exhibition, no lesson taught." 

One of the country's leading critics, S. G. W. Benjamin, author of Art in America, 
said: 

"As to the propriety of introducing into our art a class of subjects hitherto confined 
to a few of the more brutal artists and races of the old world, the question may well 
be left to the decision of the public. If they demand such pictures, they will be painted, 
but if the innate delicacy of our people continues to assert itself there is no fear that 
it can be injured by an occasional display of the horrible in art, or that our painters 
will create many such works." 

One remarkable fact about all the criticism however was the amount of space 
the critics gave the i)icture. The writer who saw no reason "that it was ever painted, 
in the first place, and that it was ever exhibited in the second," S[)oke of it before 
any other work in the large collection. He devoted more than half of his review to 
this picture alone. 

When painting it, Eakins had in mind the Centennial Exhibition of 1876 soon to 
open in Philadelphia. Hut the art jury of the Centennial, while accepting five other 
works by him, rejected the Gross Clinic. He finally succeeded in getting it hung in 
the medical section. Commenting on this, a friendly critic remarked: 

"It is rumored that the blood on Dr. Gross' fingers made some of the members 



14 BLLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

of the committee sick, but judging from the quality of the works exhibited by them 
we fear that it was not the blood alone that made them sick. Artists have before now 
been known to sicken at the sight of pictures by younger men which they in their 
souls were compelled to acknowledge were beyond their emulations." 

Eakins had pinned high hopes on the picture but they were not realized. There 
had been no order for it, and not until three years after it was painted did the Jef- 
ferson Medical College buy it for S2()0.()(). Then it was hung in the college where the 
art public seldom saw it. A few times during the year, Eakins borrowed the picture 
for important exhibitions, but only in 1904 did it receive an award. The reception of 
the Gross Clinic must have been a blow to Eakins^the first of many. But he showed 
no sign of any attempt to compromise with the public taste. The picture is now 
insured for S75,00() by the JefTerson Medical College. 

The best known work of Eakins' middle life, and the most important commission 
he ever received was the Agnew Clinic. Dr. P. D. Hayes Agnew (1818-1892), a sur- 
geon and anatomist, who for twenty-six years taught at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and idolized by his students, was about to retire in the spring of 1889. In 
accordance with custom, the students arranged to have his portrait painted for 
presentation to the University. They gave the commission to Thomas Eakins. It 
was assured that the picture would be a single figure of the conventional type, but 
Eakins admired Dr. Agnew so much that he started on his largest composition, show- 
ing the great surgeon at work. He told the students, however, that the price first 
agreed on, $750, would remain the same, all he asked was that they should come 
and pose for the figures in the background. It was completed in three months, and 
was presented to the University by the undergraduate class of the ^Medical School 
at the annual commencement, May 1st, 1889. 

In this picture. Dr. Agnew is dressed in a white surgical gown, as are his assist- 
ants. He is holding a scalpel in his left hand (he was ambidextrous), while talking 
to the class about the operation for cancer of the breast which he has just per- 
formed. His assistant, Dr. J. William White, also a famous surgeon, applies a dress- 
ing to the wound. It was through Dr. W^hite that Eakins met Sargent. Dr. Joseph 
Leidy II holds a sponge to wipe away the blood. The anaesthetist, Dr. Elwood R. 
Kirby, stands at the patient's head. In the entrance to the amphitheater at the ex- 
treme right Dr. Fred H. Millikin is whispering to the artist himself. This portrait 
was painted by Mrs. Eakins. The students are dressed in dark street clothes; and 
their identity w^as published in the Old Penn Review of October 30th, 1915 (8). 

The conception of the picture is similar to that of the Gross Clinic. But in many 
ways the two pictures belong to different ages. In the 14 years since Dr. Gross posed 
in his brown frock coat, surgical costumes changed to antiseptic white. There is less 
blood in evidence, none of the family are present, and a woman nurse appears in the 
background. The whole spirit is that of immaculateness and tense skill of modern 
surgery. The grouping is less formal than in the Gross picture, with a seemingly 
casual naturalism which conceals a careful balance of the various elements. Agnew 
stands to one side, away from the group of assistants around the patient, and leans 
against the rail of the pit, scalpel in hand. Although far from the geometric center of 
the picture, he is still the center of interest. His figure in its white garments, with the 



GirrORD -MEDICAL PORTRAITS OF EAKIXS AXD SARGENT 



15 




16 BiLLKTf.y or THE SCHOOL or MEDICI XE, r. or .\{D. 

strong cold light full on it, stands out in startling relief against the dark, background. 
This portrait has a reality and power that makes it oneof Eakins finest achievements. 
Dr. Agnew's striking likeness shows in its frown and firm lines the marks of a life 
lived at high pressure. There is a calm, steely steadiness quite different from the 
placid countenance of Dr. Gross — -a face of a more high-strung modern age. 

This large composition had to be iinished in three months. During part of this 
time the artist was ill with grippe, but did not interrupt his work. Some of the most 
important sections being in the foreground and the canvas being too large to put on 
an easel, he would lie back and sleep for an hour or so, and then continue to paint. 
One of his pupils recalls coming into the studio late at night and found 
Eakins stretched out in front of the picture, asleep from exhaustion. 

Dr. Agnew's biographer tells us that the doctor, noticing that he was being pic- 
tured with blood on his hands, ''at once objected most strenuously, and despite the 
artists protest for tidelity to nature, ordered all the blood to be removed." Eakins 
painted the blood on afterwards or else Dr. Agnew changed his mind, for the blood 
is there today, although less prominently than in the Gross Clinic. 

The public reception of the picture was much like that of its predecessor. For several 
years after it was painted, this picture aroused no such widespread comment as the 
Gross Clinic, and little written criticism, but in the polite art aisles of Philadelphia 
it created a scandal. The favorite phrase that went around was "Eakins is a butcher" 
— an attack which seemed to have affected the artist more than most, for he repeated 
it to a friend. 

The Agnew Clinic was exhibited only once in the Haseltine Galleries, soon after 
it was completed, but it was rejected by the Society of American Artists. It was 
solicited by the Artist's jury of the Pennsylvania Academy in 1891, but was not 
allowed to be hung by the oiiicials. It was later put on exhibition at the Chicago's 
World Fair in 1893. 

One critic wrote: 

"If the Gross Clinic is one of his (Eakin's) successes, the Agnew Clinic must rank 
among his failures. The light may actually have fallen with the same brilliance on 
the group of white coated surgeons and the white draperies and the white flesh of the 
patient in the foreground, though I doubt it. But if it did, the students seated behind, 
in tier above tier, could not have been seen at all, here they hit you in the face and 
each looks as if he were posing in the studio, as he very likely was. The painting is 
subordinated to a record of greater importance to the University of Pennsylvania 
than to art." 

However, things had changed since the first exhibition of the Gross Clinic. The 
same critic continued: 

"Eakins had not the vision, the power, the sense of beauty of the unusually great. 
At his best he did things like the Gross Clinic, a large dignilied group skillfully man- 
aged, the interest centered upon the principal figure without any sacrifice of the 
composition as a whole. The portraits of the operating doctors rendered carefully 
yet in relation to the students suggested, in the background a difficult problem suc- 
cessfully solved, and undoubtedly the finest picture of the sort ever done in America." 

In the wider art world of America, the comparative fame of Eakins' early years 
was succeeded in the late eighties by increasing obscurity. The leading tendencies of 



Gil' FORD— MEDICAL PORTRAITS OF EAKINS AXD SARGENT 17 

American paintings were away from almost everything that he stood for. Impres- 
sionism, the brilhant naturalism of Sargent, and the aestheticism of Whistler, light, 
atmosphere, pure color and technique were becoming the chief issues. P'orm and 
constitution were of less importance than an eye for appearances, a clever brush, a 
gift for pattern, a gay sense, or pleasing sentiment. The world of art was pursuing 
evanescent visions of moonlight and shade and pretty faces — ideals which contrasted 
with Eakin's mature realism. To liis contemporaries his art seemed increasingly 
severe, somber, lacking "beauty" or poetry. Much of his subject matter lay outside 
the charmed circle of "Art" — ungraceful portraits of doctors, professors and other 
"Philistines"; commonplace themes like surgical operations. His draughtmanship 
and knowledge of anatomy and perspective brought respect, but seemed dull and 
old-fashioned. Sargent had an international re{)Utation and a waiting list of fash- 
ionable and wealthy patrons; Eakins was an obscure artist painting portraits of his 
friends — mostly physicians (10). 

Sargent visited Philadelphia in 1906 after having done the Four Doctors, and was 
lavishly entertained. He was asked by his hostess what Philadelphia artists he would 
like to have to dinner, and he said, "There's Eakins, for instance," to which her reply 
was, "And who is Eakins?" 

Dr. White was a close friend of John Singer Sargent, who visited him in Phila- 
delphia and painted his portrait. Eakins became a friend of Sargent, and the two 
were to paint each other's portraits, a plan interrupted by Sargent's having to return 
to England. In 1906, Eakins presented his portrait of Dr. White to Sargent, and 
received the following letter in acknowledgment: 

"My dear Eakins, I don't know how long it is since your portrait of Dr. White has 
been here, nor how long my thanks have been overdue. Please accept them now that 
I have returned from a six months' absence and found the picture, which gives me 
pleasure. It is a capital likeness of a great friend and a specimen of your work which 
I am delighted to possess. I also bear in mind your kindness in wishing to offer it 
to me." 

The picture has since disappeared. 

Eakins, not Sargent is the biographer of his times. Sargent's subject is only social 
position — Eakins' is social environment. Concentrating upon the characteristics which 
made each sitter like no other in the world, Eakins recorded with remorseless truth 
the world which pressed in upon them all. The strong realistic portraits of Thomas 
Eakins corresponded to the men he portrayed; when you look at the portrait of 
Dr. Gross, you see the soul of Thomas Eakins, the character of Dr. Gross, and the 
state of American medicine at the time. Eakins used his brush with direct decision as 
a scalpel was used in the hands of the men he painted. Sargent used his brush with 
brilliant technique to show the personalities of the men who became "Saints" of 
American medicine. 

In iversily Ilospiliil 
Baltimore I, Md. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. Gardner, Helen: Art Tlirouiili the At;fs: ^r^\ Edition; T'p. 685-696; Harcdurl Brace & ("ompanw 
New York; 194S. 



18 BLI.LETIX 01' THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. 01' Ml). 

1. liKARU, CiiAKLKs AM) Makv: 77/c Risc of American Civiliztilion; Pp. 386-387; Macmillan, New- 
York; 1927. 

3. Caffin, Charles: Amiricnn Masters of Painting; Pp. 55-67, 103; D<)ul)le(lay Page and Company, 

New York; 1902. 

4. Encyclopedia Britaxnica: Volume 19; Pp. 999; 1954. 

5. Flexner, Simon and Flexxer, J.\mes Thomas: Welch and the Heroic Age of American Medicine; 

Pp. 230, 420; Viking Press, New York; 1941. 

6. Berxheim, Bertram Moses: The Story of Johns Hopkins; V. 7; Whilllesey House, New York; 

1948. 

7. M.\ther, F. J., Morey, C. R. Henderson, \V. J.: The American Spirit in Art; Volume 12; P. 

142; Yale Press, New Haven; 1927. 

8. Old Penn Weekly Review: October 30, 1915. 

9. Goodrich, Lloyd: Thomas Eakins, His Life and Work; P. 320; Whitney Museum of American 

Art, New York; 1933. 
10. Wheelwright, John: Eakins, the Fainter at Work; New Republic; Vol. 75; P. 50; May 24, 1933. 



EXPERIENCES WITH THORAZINE IN PSYCHIATRIC TREATMENT' 

IRVING J. TAYLOR, M.D. 

A year ago it would have been difficull to believe that half of the patients in our 
psychiatric hospital would be taking a new medication, Thorazine.- Today, fifteen 
months later, with the experience of having over three hundred patients on this medi- 
cation, we feel most enthusiastic about the added therapeutic agent we have at our 
disposal. A i)rivate hospital would not ordinarily use a new drug so quickly, but there 
was the distinct advantage of knowing that Thorazine had been used e.xtensively in 
Europe for several years, without serious complications. This has been the first im- 
portant somato-therapy added to the field of psychiatr}' since the advent of electric- 
shock treatment in 1938. Its full impact can only be realized when one finds there 
are 40 patients at the present time in our psychiatric hospital receiving this medica- 
tion. Other medications, especially the barbiturates for day and night sedation, are 
at an all time minimum. We do not feel, as yet, that phenobarbital has been sup- 
planted as the most valuable and widely used psychiatric medicine, but, time may 
find it losing first place. 

INDICATION'S 

For the average physician who treats psychiatric problems in his practice, 
Thorazine must be used only in those cases in which it is known to have a beneficial 
effect. Like all new treatments, as was the case with electro-shock therapy, a thera- 
peutic aid can fall into disrepute when it is used because 'T don't know what else to 
do". Thorazine is no more a last resort in psychiatry than is electro-shock. It has a 
specific indication in controlling anxiety, restlessness, agitation and the reaction to 
thought content in the following: (1) Neuroses (anxiety reaction, obsessive com- 
pulsive, hypochondria), (2) Psychoses (acute and chronic schizophrenia, the manic 
phase of manic-depressive psychosis, agitated depression, senile and arteriosclerotic 
psychosis), (3) In personality character disorders (including alcohol and narcotic 
addiction). 

Centra-indications are few and include depression without agitation (which is 
aggravated by Thorazine), and coma from sedatives, alcohol or narcotics. 

In only a minority of cases is Thorazine alone depended upon for achievement of 
the therapeutic goal. Rather, it should be considered as an adjunct to other methods 
of psychiatric treatment. We have found it excellent as a supplement to psycho- 
therapy. It can control the patient's tension symptoms making him comfortable 
enough to participate in discussions of his problems. 

Thorazine does not replace electric shock. True, there are some chronic psychiatric 
patients who are on a maintenance electric shock every few weeks, and, in such cases, 
Thorazine has resulted in the stabilization without need for electro-shock. In acute 
cases of depression, with or without agitation, or in manic-depressive or schizophrenic 
psychosis, electric shock remains the best treatment. It is difficult however, to make 

' Study of in-palicnls and oul palieiUs of Taylor Manor Hospital. KllicoU C'ily, .Md. 
-Thorazine supi)lic'd through ihe courtesy of Smith, Kline and French i.ahoratories. Philadelphia. 

19 



20 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

the above blank, slalemcnt about schizojjhrenia, since acute schizophrenic psychosis 
may take many different forms. There have been occasions when we have used 
Thorazine alone as the only treatment. Although we do not use Thorazine routinely 
in conjunction with electro-shock, we have found it an invaluable aid in the handlinc; 
of these patients who have become management }3roblems, or who have shown a 
tendency to relapse when an attempt is made to taper off on electrotherapy. 

Symptomatic control of behavior problems in both in- and out-patients has been 
most gratifying with Thorazine. 

DOSAGE 

The range of Thorazine daily has been from 40 to 2,(K)() mg. with the average 
in- or out-patient receiving somewhere between 150 to 400 mg. daily. We feel that 
most of the medication can and should be given orally except when a patient either 
cannot or refuses to take medication by mouth, or when an observation of the im- 
mediate effect is desired. We almost never use 10 mg. doses, except to start medica- 
tion on elderly senile or sclerotic patients. Usually neurotic patients are started on 
25 mg. t.i.d., and if this is tolerated well for two or three days without the desired 
effect being reached, the dose is doubled. If there is trouble sleeping, 50 or 100 mg. 
are added at bedtime. Psychotic patients are started on 50 or 100 mg. t.i.d., and in 
difficult cases this is doubled in 24 to 48 hrs. If intramuscular administration is 
desired, we start with one or two cc. (25 mg. per cc.) and repeat in two to four hours. 

Adequate dosage in both intensity and duration is of the utmost importance. We 
believe that those who are not enthusiastic about Thorazine have erred in either of 
these respects. Each case is different and no hard and fast rule can be stated. The 
diagnosis itself is not the indication of dosage. The individual's reaction to Thorazine 
should indicate the amount he takes or the frequency with which this amount should 
be changed. Experience has proved that a trial of less than one month is inadequate, 
and that in a good many cases it takes two months to achieve the desired effect and 
hence treatment should not be discontinued prior to this period of time. 

The question as to maintenance dosage is still unsettled, and here again we believe 
it is a very individual matter that must be decided separately for each patient. We 
have been able to discontinue Thorazine with beneficial results in some patients after 
only two to four weeks of medication. Most patients stay on the medication from one 
to four months. If medication has been started in the hospital a good many are sent 
home on a maintenance daily dose which amounts to ^ -j or J-^ of their peak daily 
dose. Some of these individuals will be gradually tapered off of the medication over 
the next few weeks at home, while others may remain on it for a year or indefinitely, 
just as a diabetic maintains his insulin therapy. 

RESULTS 

In a later more detailed paper we will j)ublish a statistical analysis of the results 
of our cases. We will simply state here that in ^)1 ])er cent of {)atients treated (both 
neurotic and psychotic individuals) there was a definite improvement in behavior. As 
far as the basic neurotic or psychotic illness was concerned, we felt that in 86 per 
cent of the cases there was a change for the better. It should be emphasized that all 



TAYLOR—THORAZIXE IN PSYCHIATRIC TREATMEXT 21 

of these were selected cases which makes our results even better than at first glance, 
since the majority of patients treated were special problems where a definite aid was 
needed to supplement other therapies being given, or where other therapies had 
failed. As time goes on and with more experience, we no longer wait to start Thor- 
azine until we see that other therapies are inadequate, but we know a good deal now 
about specific indications and may start using it as soon as the admission examination 
and diagnosis are made. The percentages speak for themselves and to say that we are 
highly pleased is an understatement. 

COMPLICATIONS 

Undesirable side reactions are not difficult to handle and serious complications are 
rare. A most frequent side reaction, drowsiness, is actually the eff"ect which is most 
desired in psychiatric patients. In the hospital this is no problem but may be danger- 
ous on an ambulatory basis where the patient drives a car or operates machinery. 
Dexedrine can be given to counteract this effect. 

Other reactions are given below in the order of their decreasing frequency: 

Dryness of the mouth and stuffiness of the nose are very frequent especially after 
the initiation of Thorazine. These gradually subside after several weeks of adjust- 
ment to the medication. Occasionally a flare-up of a chronic sinusitis, because of 
blockage of drainage, occurs. 

Symptoms of Parkinsonism such as tremor and rigidity are frequently encountered 
in daily dosages above 300 mg., especially after these have been given for more than 
several w-eeks. These always disappear on reduction of dosage and if it is desired not 
to reduce the Thorazine an anti-Parkinson medication (e.g. Cogentin 2.0 mg. hs.), 
can be used. 

Dermatitis, especially photosensitivity occurs in the summer time where patients 
expose themselves to the sun. They quickly get an exaggerated erythema and should 
be warned in such cases to remain in the shade. The itching can be controlled by 
calamine lotion. We have observed several cases of a roseola type of rash which 
apparently is allergic in origin and will disappear with or without discontinuing the 
medication and can best be treated with an oral antihistamine. 

jNIild constipation is frequently observed following initiation of therapy. If so 
laxatives are advised or if there has been no movement for a few days an enema is 
given after manual examination for a fecal impaction. The latter is rare. Diarrhea is 
also untommon but has been noticed where large dosages of one to two thousand mg. 
daily are used. It immediately subsides on lowering the dosage or stopping medication. 

Mild fever, tachycardia, and excessive perspiration have been observed in a small 
number of patients where the dosage is rapidly raised, e.g. from 200 to 600 mg. 
daily in the first week of medication. These subside spontaneously on decreasing 
the medication. 

Hypotension was not observed on oral medication nor did we find it as frequently 
on intramuscular Thorazine as has been indicated in the literature. We routinely how- 
ever, tried to get patients to lie down following i.m. Thorazine and checked their 
blood pressure every half hour for two hours. We ha\'c never had occasion to place a 
ymtient in the shock position. 



22 BILLETIX 01' THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Jaundice has been observed in only one ]>aiieni so thai our percentage is ' -j of 1 
per cent. There was a spontaneous clearing within a week. In this case jaundice 
appeared within three weeks after the initial dose of Thorazine. 

There have been a few patients who have failed to show the desired resi)onse one 
would expect on Thorazine. Such refractory cases are rare and should be tried on 
one of the other ataractic drugs. 

In only one case, a child, live years old, did we hnd a sufVicient tolerance dexeloped 
to Thorazine so that the required sedative effect was no longer obtained. 

There appears to be a dehnite hormonal-like response on the part of the boily, as 
evidenced by weight-gain in most patients and lactation in some females. 

Relapses occur, but we feel this results from a failure to continue Thorazine for the 
desired length of time in the proper dosage, or to the cessation of adjunctive treat- 
ment (psychotherapy, electric shock or hospitalization), at the wrong moment. 

SUMMARY 

Thorazine used in over 200 cases at a private psychiatric hospital on both in- and 
out-patients has resulted in this newly found aid being received most enthusiastically 
as an adjunct to other treatment in psychiatric problems. After 15 months of ex- 
perience we are convinced that in this short period of time Thorazine has established 
a place for itself along with other recognized therapies and that the test of time will 
prove it will stand in spite of ihe misuse and abuse that all new treatments untlergo. 
Thorazine can be safely used by a general practitioner in otiice and home treatment. 
Dosage is usually begun at 1^ to 50 mg. t.i.d., and the average maintenance dosage 
is 150 to 400 mg. daily. Indications are specific and results are frequently dramatic 
especially with regard to improvement in symptomatology and behavior. Compli- 
cations are not serious and many of the minor side reactions disappear after a thera- 
peutic level of the drug is established. It is emphasized that an adequate dosage in 
both intensity and duration is essential for results. 

Taylor Manor Hospital 
ElUcott CV/v. Marxhiud 



TRIPLE PRIMARY CARCINOMAS 

ICHIRO URUSHIZAKI, M.D.* 

Many reports of multiple primary malignant lesions in the same person have 
appeared in the literature since Billroth (1) published the first case in 1879. 

The incidence of multiple primary malignancies occurring in the same individual 
is reported variously from 0.5 to 4 per cent of all malignancies. The association of 
malignant and benign tumors is much more common. Watson (2) in 1953 reported 
that in a series of 16,626 patients with carcinoma, 1171 suffered from two distinct 
types of malignant tumors and in eleven cases there were three separate malignancies. 

The criteria set up by Billroth for the diagnosis of multiple primary malignancies 
are that each must arise in a different location, each must be histologically different 
and each must produce its own metastases. 

Relative to the last criterion, a malignant tumor may ordinarily be recognized by 
its clinical behavior and its pathologic characteristics even in the absence of metastases. 

Recently, an elderly white male with squamous carcinoma of the lung, adenocar- 
cinoma of the prostate and papillary carcinoma of the urinary bladder was observed 
at the University Hospital. 

CASE REPORT 

This sixty-four year old white stevedore was admitted to the University Hospital on 
December 4, 1948 with the complaints of indigestion and nervousness. In 1913 he 
had had a surgical drainage of his gallbladder. During the last three or four years 
he has suffered from fullness in the abdomen, and pain in the epigastrium which 
occasionally radiated to the right shoulder. During the past year he lost approxi- 
mately six pounds in his weight. Because of the persistence of the above symptoms, 
he entered the hospital for further investigation. 

Physical examination on this, the first admission to the hospital revealed a fairly 
well developed, well nourished elderly white male. Except for adentia and a slightly 
enlarged non-tender prostate with moderate fixation of the right lobe, the physical 
examination was negative. 

Roentgenologic studies revealed a non-functioning gallbladder. A gastrointestinal 
series including a barium enema was negative. In the roentgenographs of the chest a 
rounded homogeneous mass measuring 3 cm. in diameter was found in the posterior 
segment of the upper lobe of the left lung. A bronchoscopic examination was negative. 
An intravenous pyelogram showed a moderate hydronef)hrosis on the right. The 
tuberculin skin reaction was negative. 

Laborator\' data revealed hemoglobin of 92 {)er cent; white cell count, 12,300 per 
cu. mm.; differential cell count was within normal limits. Blood urea nitrogen was 21 
mgm. per 100 ml.; serum acid phosphatase, 0.41; serum alkaline phosphatase, 2.1; 

* Assistant Resident in Medicine, assigned to Pathology. 

From the Departments of Medicine and Pathology, University of Maryland, School of Medi- 
cine, Haltimore. Md. .\ided 1)\ a t;ranl from the Sy(lne>' M. Cone Research Fund. 

25 



24 KILLETIX 01- THE SCHOOL 01' MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

serum cakiuni '•).?> mEq. and serum phosphorus, 2.7 mEq.; serum albumin 4.4; 
serum globuHn 2.09. A serologic test for syphilis was negative. An examination of 
sputum and gastric washings was negative for tubercle bacilli. 

On the basis of the roentgen ray findings, a left pneumonectomy was performed on 
December 20, 1948. .\ firm infiltrating tumor mass measuring 3.2 cm. was found in 
the posterior portion of the upper lobe of the left lung. 

Histologic sections showed a carcinoma composed of nests and strands of clearly 
recognizable squamous epithelial cells. Areas of necrosis were observed in the tumor, 
the stroma was scant. The diagnosis was squamous carcinoma, upper lobe, left lung 
(Fig. 1). 

Following surgery the patient had an uneventful convalescence; he was discharged 
from the hospital on January- 8, 1949. 

The patient was next admitted to the University Hospital on December 26, 1953 
because of painless hematuria. At this time, a roentgenologic examination of the 
chest showed opacity of the entire left hemithorax with elevation of the left hemi- 
diaphragm and retraction of the mediastinal structures to the left. The parenchyma 
of the right lung appeared clear; however, a round area of soft tissue density was 
observed in the region of the hilus. The existence of a mild right hydronephrosis was 
confirmed by retrograde pyelogram and radiolucent defects were seen along the left 
inferior lateral wall of the bladder. A cystoscopic examination showed a papillar}' 
tumor mass on the left inferior lateral wall of the bladder. On rectal examination a 
firm moderately enlarged prostate was found. In view of these latter findings, a 
suprapubic prostatectomy was done and an electro-surgical excision of the bladder 
tumor was carried out. 

Sections from the prostate showed an invasive tumor composed of glandular 
elements lined by small irregular pleomorphic epithelial cells. Histologically, the 
bladder tumor was composed of fibrovascular stalks covered by multiple layers of 
transitional epithelial cells. The diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of the prostate ( Fig. 2) 
papillary carcinoma of the bladder (Fig. 3). 

The patient was again admitted to the University Hospital on July 20, 1954, 
because of severe dyspnea. His respirator}- difficulties began in April, 1954. At this 
time the mass in the hilus of the right lung previously seen on the roentgenograph had 
increased in size. The patient was given a series of roentgen ray treatments; these 
were completed two weeks prior to the present admission. 

When the patient entered the hospital, he was in extreme respirator}- distress; he 
was cyanotic; the respirations were fifty per minute. The percussion note in the back 
beneath the angle of the scapula was impaired and the breath sounds in this area 
were markedly suppressed. The liver was enlarged. A fluoroscopic examination sug- 
gested an obstruction of the right main stem bronchus. 

The patient was placed in an o.xygen tent, sedated and given intravenous alimenta- 
tion. He expired on the third hospital day. 

At autopsy, the right lung was enlarged and the mediastinum was shifted to the 
left. An examination of the right lung showed a yellow-white tumor mass measuring 
4 cm. in diameter involving the hilus. On section, the tumor was globular in shape; it 
had infiltrated into the surrounding pulmonary parenchyma. The lumen of the 



VRUSHIZAKI— TRIPLE PRIMARY CARCINOMAS 



25 



Fig. 1 



Kic, 2 




Fig. 1. Squamous carcinoma, left lung 
Fig. 2. Adenocarcinoma, jiroslate 



26 



BL LLETIX 01- THE SCHOOL Of MEDICI XE, U. OF MI). 




Fig. 3 



Fig. 4 



Fig. 3. Papillary carcinoma, urinary bladder 
Fig. 4. Metastatic carcinoma, right lung 



URUSHIZAKI— TRIPLE PRIMARY CARCINOMAS 27 

bronchus to the lower lobe was compressed. The bronchial tree in the lower lobe was 
dilated and the lumens of the subdivisions contained mucopurulent material. 

Three small papillomatous tumor masses were found on the mucosa of the left 
lateral wall of the bladder. 

Sections from the tumor in the right lung hilus showed a papillary lesion, composed 
of fibrovascular stalks covered by multiple layers of transitional cells (Fig. 4). 

The tumor from the bladder presented the same histologic appearance as that seen 
in the original bladder biopsy. The lesions were papillary in character and the in- 
volved epithelium was transitional in type. There was invasion of the bladder wall. 

The autopsy diagnosis was: Absence of left lung; papillary carcinoma, bladder, 
with metastasis to hilus, right lung; emphysema, right lung; bronchiectasis and con- 
fluent lobular pneumonia, lower lobe, right lung. 

DISCUSSION 

A review of the literature on the subject of multiple cancer reveals that this status is 
rare. Warren and Ehrenreich (3) (1944) found 194 instances of multiple primary 
malignant growths in 2829 autopsies, an incidence of 6.8 per cent. They felt that a 
patient with one carcinoma was more likely to develop a second cancer than would be 
expected normally. Bugher(4) (1934) stated that the probability of the patient having 
three primary carcinomas was 0.34%. In 1946 Black and Howe (5) reported a case 
in which four carcinomas were found at different times (both breasts, uterus and 
colon). They stated that these were primary malignancies with no real evidence of 
recurrence and although the malignant lesions were of different grade, all were adeno- 
carcinomas. Ettinger (6) (1949) reported a fifty-three year old Caucasian male who 
had six primary carcinomas, involving respectively the jejunum, the transverse colon, 
the sigmoid colon, the retrosigmoid colon, the urinary bladder and the skin. In 1952 
Forber (7) reported the case in which four neoplasms which might have been pri- 
mary, were found at post mortem. Marrangoni and McKenna (8), in 618 cases of 
carcinoma of the female genitals, found fifteen cases of multiple primary cancer; of 
these fifteen, two were triple primaries (breast, sigmoid and uterus; uterus, ovary and 
colon). Lacey (9) (1953) reported the development of three primary carcinomas 
during a period of nineteen years. He stated that all three carcinomas adhered to the 
criteria laid down by Warren and Gates (12). This case was a forty-one year old 
white woman who had adenocarcinoma of the right breast, papillary intracystic 
adenoma, medullary carcinoma of the left breast and papillary carcinoma of the 
ovary. During the past fifty years most pathologists (13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20) 
have become more cognizant of the fact that more than one {)rimary germ center 
might occur in a given system or organ. Such occurrences were recognized as primary 
multiplicity of malignant lesions. These multiple lesions have been known to group 
themselves in organs that are part of an anatomic or physiologic system, but they are 
frequently found in sites that have no particular relationships. There are many 
tumors which characteristically develop from multiple foci of origin; some of these 
lesions are considered totally benign, others as tumors which occasionally undergo 
malignant transformation, and some are considered as precancerous lesions. The 
most common of these are polyi)s of the stomach and tolon, papillomas of the urinary 



28 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

bladder, and libromyomas of the uterus. All of these benign lesions which oc^cur as 
multiple independent neoplasms, are a potential source of multiple malignant tumor. 
Low grade papillary carcinomas of I he urinary bladder constitute another example of 
the more common epithelial tumors which tend to occur as a multiple disease in one 
organ. It suggests that the etiologic factor, whatever it may be, acts on all the tissues 
of one type, and may produce multiple anaplastic lesions of the mucosa of the colon, 
for example; or the e[)ithelial lining of the urinary bladder. On the other hand, the 
multiple tumors that occur in different organs suggest a tumor diathesis in the indi- 
vidual, certainly a greater degree of susceptibility than can be explained away as 
mere coincidence or accident. Heredity may play a part in occurrence of multiple 
tumors. In the series of cases reported by Hurt and Broders (10) there was a signill- 
cant family history of cancer in 28.6 per cent. Ettinger (6) said actually the occur- 
rence of one or more additional primary neoplasms in a j)atient already afflicted with 
one such lesion is sk or seven times as likely as the lirst occurrence of a malignancy 
in an unafflicted individual. Bugher (4) in a thorough mathematical study of the 
problem, has proved that the reported incidence exceeds the expected rate of occur- 
rence based on chance. He further states that if one considers that a certain unknown 
portion of the population is not subjected to the cancer risk, because of lack of in- 
herent susceptibility, the difference between the actual and the expected rate would 
be even more striking. Lombard and Warren (11) concluded that the presence of one 
cancer does not confer immunity, but on the contrary, that patients with one cancer 
are more susceptible to the disease than are individuals who have never had one. 
Watson (2) said in 1953 that in 16,626 patients, the incidence of true multiple cancers 
(that is, two or more primary malignant tumors in the different organs or systems) 
did not differ from the ordinary rate of cancer in a normal population. There was no 
constitutional predisposition to multiple cancers of different systems, and no immu- 
nity was conferred by a first cancer. It is undoubtedly true that some people have a 
marked predisposition to multiple cancers of the same organ. They are not considered 
to display a constitutional tendency of all systems to the disease. It represents a pre- 
disposition of a certain tissue to malignant tumor development or the same response 
by different parts of similar tissue to the same stimulus and thus could not be con- 
sidered as an indication of a generalized predisposition to the cancer. Whatever the 
etiologic background of multiple tumors may be, it seems definitely established that 
they occur more frequently than could be expected on the basis of chance alone. Such 
tumors will probably increase in frequency in the future as more and more cancer 
patients are cured and survive long enough to develop another tumor. 

CONCLUSION 

This patient entered the hospital because of the symptoms resulting essentially 
from chronic indigestion; otherwise he might not have sought medical assistance. The 
bronchogenic carcinoma of the left upper lobe was apparently asymptomatic and was 
detected only by chance in the course of an unrelated roentgenologic examination. 
Five years after jjneumonectomy, the patient was readmitted because of hematuria 
and was found to have an enlarged prostate and a tumor of the urinary bladder. At 
that lime a small round shadow in the right hilum was detected by roentgen ray 



URUSHIZAKI—TRIPLE PRIMARY CARCINOMAS 29 

examination. The next year the patient was admitted again because of severe respira- 
tory distress and at last expired. 

All three tumors were separate primary growths, earh with distinctive histologic 
aspects, namely, squamous cell carcinoma of the bronchus, adenocarcinoma of the 
prostate gland and papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, with 
metastases to the right lung. 

REFERENCES 

1. Billroth, C. A. T. : Chirurgishe Klinik, Wien, Berlin, p. 258, 1879. 

2. Watson, T. A.: Incidence of multiple cancer. Cancer, 6: 365, 1953. 

3. VVafren, S. and Ehrenreich, T. : Multiple ])rimary tumors and susceptibility. Cancer Re- 

search, 4: 554, 1944. 

4. BuGHER, J. C: The probability of the chance occurrence of multiple malignant tumors. Am. 

J. of Cancer, 21: 809, 1934. 

5. Black, B. H. and Howe, R. F. : Multiple primary carcinomas of the breasts, uterus and colon. 

Proc. Staff Meetings Mayo Clinic, 21: 484, 1946. 

6. Ettinger, J. and Massel, T. B.: Si.x primary carcinomas in one patient. Am. J. of Surg., 78: 

894, 1949. 

7. Forbes, J. .\.: A case of multiple primary neoplasms. .\ust. & New Zeal. J. of Surg., 21 236, 

1952. 

8. Marrangoni, a. G. and McKenna, R.: Multiple cancer, primary in the female genitals. Am. 

J. of Ob. & Gyn., 63: 660, 1952. 

9. Lacey, J. T. : Triple primary malignant lesions. Post graduate Med., 14: 1953. 

10. Hurt, H. H. and Broders, .\. C: Multiple primary malignant neoplasms. J. Lab. & Clin. 

Med., 18: 765, 1933. 

11. Lombard, H. I^. and W.arren, S.: Association of the malignant tumor with cancer of the skin. 

Am. J. Pub. Health, 33: 533, 1943. 

12. W.arren, S. .-\nd G.\tes, O. : Multiple primary malignant tumors. Am. J. of Cancer, 16: 1358, 

1932. 

13. Schreiner, B. F. .and Wehr, W. H.: Multiple primary cancer as observed at the State In- 

stitute for the Study of Malignant Diseases. Am. J. of Cancer, 20: 418, 1934. 

14. Stalker, L. K. .\nd Philips, R. S.: Multiple primary malignant lesions. S. G. & O., 68: 600, 

1939. 

15. Tullis, L. J.: Multiple primary malignant lesions. J. Lab. & CHn. Med., 27: 588, 1942. 

16. Sl.\ugiiter, D. p.: The multiplicity of origin of malignant tumors. International .\bst. of Surg., 

79: 93, 1944. 

17. Hanson, K. B. and Crone, J. T. : Simultaneous occurrence of multii)le primary carcinoma 

within the abdominal cavity. Am. J. of Surg., 74: 896, 1947. 

18. Andrew, C. J.: Coexisting cancer of the ovary and fundus. .\m. J. of Ob. & Gyn., 53: 75, 1947. 

19. Barrett, W. D. and Miller, K. T.: Multiple primary cancer, S. G. & O., 89: 768, 1949. 

20. Wklcii, J. W.: Multiple primar\' malignant lesions. J. of Kansas Med. Soc, LV: 314, 1954. 



OBSTETRK^ (WSE RETORT* 

This patient is a 24 year old, jiara 2002, who is admitted to the hospital in early, 
active labor, with membranes intact about four weeks from her expected date of 
confinement. 

Her past obstetric history is essentially negative, revealing the birth of two normal, 
full-term infants weighing 2600 grams and 3000 grams in 1949 and 1952. The history 
of her present pregnancy is likewise negative, revealing a normal prenatal course up 
until the onset of s{)ontaneous premature labor about 4 hours prior to admission. 

On admission to the hospital the blood pressure is 120 systalic over 80 diastolic; 
heart and lungs are negative. The position of the fetus by palpation is thought to be 
LOP, with the presenting part dipping. The fetal heart is in the midline at about 140 
per minute. The estimated size is about 2400 grams. Rectal e.xamination on admission 
reveals the cervix to be 3 to 4 cms. dilated with bulging membranes. 

Under light DemeroF and scopolamine analgesia the patient progressed rapidly, 
until approximately 90 minutes after admission a rectal examination revealed the 
cervix to be fully dilated with tensely bulging membranes. Using a hook the mem- 
branes were ruptured in bed. Following this a second rectal e.xamination revealed 
that a single footling breech had been presenting, and that a foot and part of the 
breech and the cord had prolapsed through a cervix that was now found to be onl\- 
6 to 7 cms. dilated. The patient was moved to the delivery room; and by the time 
she was put up in stirrups, the infant had been born up to the level of the umbilicus. 
The cervix was tightly applied around the neck and umbilical cord of the infant. 
Pulsations in the cord were weak. 

Hurried attempts to deliver the head through the partially dilated cervix were to 
no avail; and finally the cervix was incised with ditficulty at "10 and 2 o'clock." A 
premature dead fetus weighing 2360 grams was easily delivered. .\t tempts at resusci- 
tation were not successful. .\ pelvic examination revealed extension of the cervical 
incision almost to the vaginal vault, bilaterally, with a deep lateral sulcus tear in 
the vagina. The lacerations were repaired and the patient was returned to her room 
in good condition. 

COMMENT 

In going back over the conduct of this case it is obvious that certain errors were 
made that resulted in a poor outcome. 

The first error was in not making a correct diagnosis as to the position of the fetus 
on admission to the hospital. The second mistake was the rupturing of the membranes 
on a patient in which the presenting part was not completely engaged in the pelvis, 
without being prepared to do an immediate delivery, if necessary. The next error was 
the rupture of the membranes without first doing a pelvic examination to be sure of 
the position, the presenting part and the cervix. Another error was in attempting to 
deliver the head through an incompletely dilated cervix without first doing Duhrssen's 
incisions. 

* From The Deparlmenl of Ohslclrics, School of .Mediciiu-, Inivt-rsily of Maryland, Baltimore 

30 



OBSTETRIC CASE REPORT 31 

This case demonstrates the importance of correctly determining the position of 
the fetus, by roentgenology if necessary, before operative interference of any type is 
undertaken. This patient could just as easily have had a transverse lie as well as a 
breech, as far as the operator knew; and the results could have been even more dis- 
astrous. It is well known that a premature breech not infrequently will descend 
through an incompletely dilated cervix; and must therefore be watched closely for 
rupture of the membranes and subsequent cord compression. Under no circumstances 
should the membranes be ruptured artificially with a breech presentation unless the 
cervix is completely dilated and retracted, and only then with the patient up sterile 
and the operator ready to deliver. When the membranes are intact late in labor with 
a breech, especially with a premature fetus, it is wise to conduct the latter part of 
labor on the delivery table so as to be prepared for a rapid delivery, should the mem- 
branes rupture and the body prolapse through an incompletely dilated cervix. If 
this accident occurs and the baby is viable and the cervix is more than 5 to 6 cms. 
dilated, thenDuhrssen's incisions at 10, 2 and 6 o'clock should be made in the cervix 
without delay. 



BOOK REVIEWS 

Histology. Arthur Worth Ham, M.B., F.R.C.S., Professor of Anatomy in Charge of Histology, in 
Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Second edition, 1953, 
J. B. Lippincott, Co., pp. 866. Price $10.00 

In this second edition which has come out 3 years after the first, the author has incorporated a 
number of new facts keeping apace with the recent researches and knowledge accjuired. This has 
resulted in adding 100 new images of subject matter. 

Like the previous edition, this one too has been divided into 4 parts. I. Introduction to Histology: 
In this the author has added brief descriptions of Quartz rod illumination and trans{)arenl chamber 
techniques for examining living tissue. II. Cytology and Intercellular Substances and Fluids. The 
chapter on cell has been complete!)' recast; new facts on the localization of nucleoproteins and mor- 
phology as revealed by electron microscopy have been dealth with in detail. References are also made 
to segregation of functions in cytoplasmic components as studied by centrifugation and biochemical 
studies. Morphology- of intercellular substances as described by electron microscopy is added in detail. 
III. Primary Tissues; Nervous tissue is described in great detail and is profusely aided by photo- 
micrographs and drawings. A l)rief description of development of the central nervous system is also 
added to make clear the relation of peripheral and autonomic nervous systems to the brain and spinal 
cord. Morphology of muscle fiber is described in great detail, with 2 full-page size electron photomicro- 
graphs. The chapter on bone is modified to a fair degree and newer concepts on osteoclast have been 
added. IV. Histology of Organs: Structure of lung alveoli has been described in great detail to piesent 
a newer concept. Role of hypothalamus and importance of "hypophyseal portal circulation" has 
been presented in detail in the chapter on endocrines. Adrenal cortex, renal glomeruli and liver lobule 
have been described in more detail. A section on histology of conducting mechanism in the heart has 
been added and it deals with it in some detail. Other chapters are also rearranged and in them newei 
photomicrographs have been added, some of which replace the older ones. 

The author, as mentioned in the preface of the book, has continued the goal of presenting histolog>' 
in its correlative aspect with other branches of medical sciences, e.g. gross anatomy, biochemistry 
and physiology. The subject matter has been presented in a very intelligent and stiaighl-forward 
manner. He also tried to attract the mind of the reader to the understanding of the concepts of his- 
tology and their relation to current medical problems. 

The book, although it contains over 540 photomicrographs and drawings, of which 73 are new, 
yet one notices the colored plates are meager, being only 7. It is desirable to add a few, especially 
when describing hypophysis and other secreting cells, etc., even though the cost of the book might 
have to be increased a little. 

The book is highly recommended to medical and dental students for its lucid description and easy 
reading. It is also very useful to post-graduate students in various fields, who wish to increase their 
background knowledge. 

Applied Pathology: As In Introduction to Disease and its Control, Charles G. Darlington, 
M.D., F.C.A.P. and Charlotte F. Davenport, R.N., B.S. J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia, 2nd ed.„ 
1954; 500 pp., with 154 illustrations, 4 plates and 30 charts, price $4.75. 

This is a book which is primarily meant for nurses. The authors have tried to jiresent a large 
amount of up to date information in a ver_v concise manner and have laid particular emphasis on the 
role of nurse towards ajipreciating vaiious diseases and also of her responsiliility towards the handling 
of various sf)ecimens meant for pathologic and bacteriologic investigations. The book is written in a 
very simj)le language which even a layman can understand. 

The material has been divided into three main parts. Part one deals with an introduction to Med- 
ical Science. In this part etiolog}', pathogenesis and manifestations of various common disease proc- 
esses have been dealt with. Authors have also stiessed the role of various agencies and organizations, 
national as well as international in checking disease. In a chapter entitled, "How diseases is treated: 
Therapies", where various forms of therapies, such as surgical, medical, i)hysical, and chemotherap\- 
are discussed, rather little consideration is give to sera, vaccines and bacteriophages. 

32 



BOOK REVIEWS 33 

In part two, "Pathology of Disease According to Systems of the Body," the authors have briefly 
and concisely dealt with important features of individual diseases. A number of illustrations are 
diagrammatic. Some of the illustrations are not too clear and need replacement by better ones. 

In part three, "Clinical Laboratory Tests and Procedures — Microbiology — Tissue Examinations — 
Autopsies — Records", the authors have specially emphasized the duties and responsibilities of the 
nurse towards collection of the specimen, its proper labelling and dispatching it to the laboratory and 
properly filing of the report when it comes. They have also discussed in few words the importance of 
each test. 

At the end of each chapter, the authors have given review exercises which are ver>' useful in that 
if the reader can answer those quiz questions, she will feel that she has completely understood the 
subject matter. 

This is a book which should be recomended to nurses and also to the medical technologists. Il 
gives a large amount of up to date information in a very concise manner. 

K. M. Wahal, M.D. 




> 



m 



Bulletin of 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

VOLUME 41 Aprilj 1956 number 2 



To HUGH R. SPENCER, Professor 



THE CONTRIBUTION OF ONE WHO SOUGHT FOR THE NE\\- 



WAS OF NO GREATER VALUE THAN THAT OF THE COMPETENT 



TEACHER— WHO MADE KNOWN AND INTERPRETED THE OLD. 



Harper — 

University of Chicago 



35 



36 



BILLET I \ or THE SCHOOL OT MEDIC I XE, U. OF MD. 




Hugh R. Spencer, ]\I.D. 



o^ Tribute 



High button shoes and celluloid collars were in vogue when Dr. 
Spencer came to the Medical School; carbon filament electric lights 
had not completely replaced gas; and pathology was practiced with 
one eye, pots and pans, and simply constructed microtomes. 

In the fifty years that since have passed, pathology has taken an 
increasing role in medical education and practice and the depart- 
ment in this school has grown twenty times. 

In these years, the attitude of pathology has extended beyond 
structural considerations of disease and embraced concepts that 
depend upon physical sciences, microbiology and a varied array 
of chemical specialties. 

In this changing scene, Dr. Spencer has personified attributes that 
are changeless requirements of the good Doctor: excellence of 
character and the honesty, humility, and kindness which necessarily 
are implied; diligence and devotion to Medicine, the school, the 
students, and colleagues, which carry not only the possessor of these 
characteristics ahead but also those that share his friendship; and 
wisdom that permits sight of untouched talents in others and 
promised growth unfulfilled. 

This writer is young enough to walk in one direction and look 
another when a pretty girl passes and old enough to know that 
recollection and sentiment can be painful on occasions such as this. 

For this reason our fondness for our honored teacher and friend, 
though great in fact, is briefly stated. 

Honor, happiness, and satisfaction in accomplishment are his 
just reward. These things in full measure are wished for him. 



EDITORIAL 
APPENDICITIS IS STILL DANGEROUS 

EDWARD S. STAFFORD, M.D. 

Seventy years have elapsed since the appearance of the paper by Reginald H. 
Fitz entitled 'Terforating Inflammation of the \'ermiform Appendix". During this 
period there has been truly amazing progress in the treatment of acute appendicitis 
until it can be recorded with pride that the mortality rate from the surgical treat- 
ment of appendicitis is approaching the low rate associated with the simple adminis- 
tration of almost an}- type of anesthetic agent. The modern conquest of this hitherto 
dangerous malady has resulted from many things, including improved recognition of 
the disease, standardized operative techniques, improved safety in anesthesia, better 
recognition and treatment of the complications of appendiceal perforation, the fre- 
quent employment of antibiotics, intestinal intubation and drainage, and better 
understanding and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte requirements. 

A recent study from a large L'niversity clinic points out, however, that deaths are 
still occurring from appendicitis. It is discouraging to note that perforation of the 
appendix, as found at the operating table, is of about the same relative frequency 
toda}- as it was twenty years ago. The mortalit}' is directly related to perforation of 
the appendLx, which, in turn, is directly related to the interval between the onset of 
the disease and its proper recognition and treatment. The study referred to indicates 
that the blame for delay in treatment, and thus for a fatal outcome, is to be shared 
by both patients (or parents) and physicians. A continual program of education is 
necessary to warn the lay public of the danger inherent in home remedies when a 
person complains of spontaneous abdominal pain. Physicians must guard against 
the temptation to prescribe for such a patient after listening to a recital of symptoms 
over the telephone. 

It is of interest that several recent studies point out that the widespread use of 
antibiotic agents has not had a profound effect in either reducing the incidence of 
this disease or in reducing the occurrence of complications following it. There is no 
doubt, however, as to the value of antibiotic agents in reducing the mortality from 
the peritonitis which follows appendiceal perforation. Nevertheless, there is no 
method of treating appendicitis as successful as prompt recognition of the disease 
followed by immediate appendectomy. 

Recognition of the disease is not always easy, particularly in infants and in the 
aged. Furthermore, the general use of antibiotics and, more recently, of cortisone and 
related steroids has added to the difiiculty of diagnosis for these agents may mask or 
suppress local and general evidences of inflammation. The physicians and surgeons 
who wish to prevent deaths from appendicitis must be prepared, also, to accept 
philosophically the fact that a certain number of diagnoses will be in error, and a few 
normal appendices removed. Even in this day of frowning tissue committees, and 
harassed admitting officers, persistent, spontaneous, abdominal pain together with 
real tenderness at or near INIcBurney's point constitute, in the absence of another 
positive diagnosis, presumj)tive evidence of appendicitis and indication for aj)i)en- 
dectomy. 

38 



RENAL FUNCTION IN .MAN DURING ACUTE HYDRONEPHROSIS* 

STANLEY E. BRADLEY .\xd DONALD L. ANDERSON 

For reasons that are not entirely clear, complete or partial interference with the 
outflow of the urine from the renal pelvis results in hydronephrosis, prox-ided renal 
insufficiency does not terminate life too quickly. When life is prolonged or obstruction 
is unilateral, the dilatation of the pelvis and destruction of the renal parenchyma 
may be remarkable. The changes in renal function have not been followed during this 
process and the forces concerned in causing structural changes in the affected kidney 
have not been defined. The present study was undertaken with the purpose of eluci- 
dating the possible course of events by the measurement of glomerular filtration, 
renal blood flow and tubular acti\'ity in man during distention of the renal pelvis 
with isotonic saline solution under pressure. 

METHODS 

Large caUber ureteral catheters were placed in the ureters and inserted to the level 
of the pelves in a group of fifteen healthy, normal human subjects, premedicated 
with Nembutal® and Demerol®. Every effort was made to place the catheter tips 
within the renal pelves. The catheters were connected with a reservoir of isotonic 
saline solution which was allowed to flow into the pelves under a gra\'ity head of 
pressure sufficiently high to produce an intrapelvic pressure of 17 to 35 mm. Hg. The 
intrapelvic pressure was calculated on the basis of the measured resistance of the 
apparatus, the rate of inflow of saline solution, and the head of pressure in the reser- 
voir. Determination of the ratio between pressure gradient and flow for the system 
used in each study permitted calculation of the intrapelvic pressure since, by 
Poiseuille's law, 

Pr - Pp ^ Pr 

Fi Fo 

where Pr is the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the fluid in the reservoir, F\, the rate 
of outflow against the pressure in the pelves; Fo, rate of free outflow against atmos- 
pheric pressure alone; and Pp, the pressure within the pelves at the tip of 
the catheters. 

Effective renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular activity were 
measured with the clearance and saturation techniques devised by Homer Smith and 
his co-workers (1-3). ]\Iannitol clearance was used to measure filtration rate, sodium 
p-aminohippurate (PAH) clearance to measure effective renal plasma flow, and the 
maximal tubular reabsorption of glucose (Tmc) and excretion of Diodrast® (Tnio) to 
evaluate the functional tubular mass. 

Urine was collected at 10 to 15-minute intervals for three periods before intrapehnc 
pressure was increased, and for two or three periods during and after pressurization. 

* From the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
New York City and the Departments of Medicine and Urolog)% Boston University School of Medicine 
and the Evans Memorial Hospital, Boston, ^L1Ssachusetts. 

39 



40 BULLET IS OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The urine draining from the ureteral catheters and from the l)ladder (by indwelling 
urethral catheter) was pooled and the volume corrected for the (|uantity of saline 
solution added during the procedure and for the amount introduced to "wash-out" 
the bladder. Throughout the procedure a constant intravenous infusion of mannitol 
and PAH or mannitol,* glucose and diodrast was maintained to adjust the plasma 
concentrations of these substances at appropriate levels. Sam[)les of blood were ob- 
tained at intervals through the course of the study. V'enous or arterial plasma filtrates, 
prepared by the method of Fujita and Iwatake (4) and alif|uots of diluted urine 
samples were analyzed for mannitol, PAH, Diodrast and glucose by methods set out 
in detail by Goldring and Chasis (2). 

RESULTS 

Effect of distention of the urinary bladder under pressure: Tn four subjects the bladder 
was distended with saline solution under pressures ranging from 35 to 50 mm. Hg. 
Although all complained of lower abdominal pain, there was no significant change in 
renal function in three. In the fourth, glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow 
decreased by 19 per cent. All values returned to the control levels following return 
of the intracystic pressure to normal. In view of the striking effects of elevated intra- 
pelvic pressure, failure to induce a change in urine flow and in renal clearances may 
be ascribed to an effective resistance to the retrograde transmission of pressure from 
the bladder to the renal pelves. It seems likely that urine tlow was maintained in the 
face of the elevated intracystic pressure by efficient ureteral peristalsis and that 
regurgitation was prevented under these circumstances by sphincter action at the 
ureterocystic junction. 

Effect of an elevation in intrapelvic pressure: When ureteral catheters were passed 
to the level of the renal pelves and saline administered at external pressures suflficient 
to maintain intrapelvic pressure at 20 mm. Hg on the average, urine formation de- 
creased markedly in four studies. The mannitol and PAH clearances fell sharj)!}- in 
all during elevation of pressure and returned promptly to control values during re- 
covery. In three subjects PAH clearance fell more than mannitol clearance and the 
filtration fraction increased; in one the fall in mannitol clearance was more marked 
(Fig. 1). The former complained of severe pain in the lower abdomen and costoverte- 
bral angles whereas the latter experienced little discomfort, suggesting the possibility 
that pain may have played a role in producing the difference in response. 

Diodrast® Tm and glucose T,„ were measured as a means of evaluating changes in 
tubular function. The maximal rate of Diodrast excretion by the tubules (Diodrast 
T,a) decreased significantly in four subjects in association with oliguria and increased 
urinary concentration of mannitol (Fig. 2). Glucose Tm fell in five of eight patients 
(Fig. 3) and remained unchanged or increased slightly in three. The method em- 
ployed for the distention of the pelves resulted in a great dilution of the urine as a 
consequence of the introduction of a large volume of isotonic saline solution. Under- 
estimation of the diluting volume would yield a falsely high value for urine flow and 
would minimize the decrement in glucose T,,, while exaggerating that in Diodrast Tm . 

* We are indebted toSharpe and Dohme, Inc., of Glen Olden, Pennsjdvania, for a generous supply 
of sterile solutions of mannitol (25%) and sodium p-aminohipjjurate (20' o). 



BRADLEY AND ANDERSON— RENAL FUNCTION 



41 



3,0- 
25- 



ML/MIN, eo 

600 

60 



nTrrrrrrnTTrnrrrT 



INTRA- PELVIC 
PRESSURE 

3!> MU MO 



10 20 30 MINUTES 50 60 70 

Fig. 1. Effective renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate during increased intrapelvic 
pressure. Subject D. N. Effective renal plasma flow (p-aminohippurate clearance, Cpah) and glo- 
merular filtration rate (mannitol clearance, Cm) decreased significantly during the elevation of intra- 
pelvic pressure during the time between the two arrows. The filtration fraction (Cm/Cpah, F. F.) 
also fell in this subject, liut in three other subjects it rose, apparently as a result of pain. The urine 
flow (V) was strikingly diminished under pressure and remained depressed after pressure release. The 
values charted are averages of the urine collection periods obtained during the time indicated. 



120- 
10,0- 



80- 
70- 



25- 
20- 



Tmq 



iiiifnniinnnr '^^^^^^'^'^"^'^^^' 



iirtf TTirrr. 



INTRA-PELVIC 
PRESSURE 



20 MINUTES 40 



Fig. 2. Maximal tubular diodrast excretory rate (Tmn) during increased intrapelvic pressure. 
Suljject F. M. Maximal diodrast excretory rate (Tmn) fell markedly under j)ressure. The glomerular 
filtration rate (Cm) was not appreciably reduced in this individual, though urine flow (Vj fell mark- 
edly. 



Such an error was much more Hkely than overestimation of dilution under the condi- 
tions of these studies. It is presumably for this reason that Diodrast T„i fell more than 
glucose T,u measured at the same time. Since the possibility of error cannot be elim- 
inated, the relationship between the change in glucose T,„ and Diodrast Tm cannot be 
evaluated with certainly. It may be concluded, however, that an elevation in intra- 
pelvic pressure tended to depress both values. 



42 



BULLET IX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



I rO 
90- 



60- 
50- 



30|- 
PERIODS 



iiiiiiiimuuuii 



nmrmimrrrrni 



INTRA -PELVIC 
PRESSURE 



20 MINUTES 40 



Fig. 3. Maximal tubular glucose reabsorption rate (Tmc) during increased intrapelvic pressure. 
Subject M. K. Maximal tubular glucose reabsorption (Tmo) and glomerular filtration rate (Cm) were 
decreased by intrapelvic pressure. Urine flow (V) was also greatly reduced. All values returned to the 
control levels during the recovery phase. 



DISCUSSION 

Distention of the renal pelves under pressure appeared to elicit a variety of renal 
functional changes in the subjects of the study reported in this paper. The reductions 
observed in PAH and mannitol clearances appear to be referable to diminished renal 
blood flow and glomerular filtration, possibly as a result of intra-renal vasoconstric- 
tion arising from pain, stretching of the pelvic wall, or both. The fall in both diodrast 
Tm and glucose T,u suggests that cessation of activity in a portion of the nephron 
population may also play a role in reducing filtration and urine flow. A similar re- 
sponse, observed during abdominal compression in human subjects, (5) has been 
ascribed to an effective obstruction to outflow of urine from some of the nephrons as 
a result of elevation in intrapelvic pressure per se. It is possible that ballooning of the 
pelvis or transmission of pressure into the renal parenchyma in the region of the 
hilum may also interfere with blood flow directly. Urine flow persisted even in the 
face of a significant rise in intrapelvic pressure. It may be inferred that transmission 
of pressure from the glomeruli is sufficient to distend the renal pelves and produce 
acute hydronephrosis during partial or complete obstruction of the urinary tract. 

Intrapelvic pressure was increased in our subjects by a method that permitted 
approximate estimation of the degree of pelvic distention. Ureteral catheters were 
inserted to the level of the pelves and allowed to drain freely during the control 
periods. Pressure was applied by perfusion of the catheters with isotonic saline solu- 
tion under a pressure head determined by the height of the infusion flask above the 
table. The fluid flowed in rapidly at first but after 15 to 30 milliliters had entered the 
pelves, inflow fell sharply to a slow regular rate (usually less than 2 ml. per 
min.). It may be presumed that the initial phase of rapid inflow was attributable to 
initial rapid filling (and distention) of each pelvis with 7 to 15 milliliters of tluid with 
a rapid rise in pressure, once the "elastic limit" was reached, to levels sufficient to 
overcome the resistance resulting from partial obstruction of the ureters by the in- 
dwelUng catheters. When the tip of the catheters did not reach to the level of the 



BRADLEY AXD AiXDERSOX—REXAL FUXCTIOX 43 

pelves, very little fluid flowed in at the usual pressures, and it seemed to be diflicult 
to afi^ect urine flow or clearance values by raising the intra-ureteral pressures. This 
observation was not pursued because elevation of ureteral pressure proved to be 
quite painful. However, the phenomenon suggests that ureteral peristaltic activity 
may be efficient in presenting the transmission of pressure to the pelves. The fact 
that maintenance of a very high distending pressure in the bladder did not diminish 
urine flow or clearances, is further evidence of ureteral competence in the transport 
of urine from the pelves to the bladder. 

^Nlost subjects complained of pain which may have played a role in exciting hemo- 
dynamic adjustments. Painful stimuli and apprehension have been shown (1, 6) to 
produce intra-renal vasoconstriction which is characterized by a rise in filtration 
fraction without much if any change in filtration. This response may account, in 
part at least, for some of the changes observed; but it seems an inadequate explana- 
tion for the reductions in filtration rate and in the maximal rates of tubular trans- 
port. In one subject who was relatively comfortable throughout the procedure the 
filtration fraction actually decreased. Moreover, equally severe discomfort resulting 
from distention of the bladder under the same pressure did not usually aflFect the 
clearance values significantly. 

It is not certain whether stretching of the pelvic wall may have played a role in 
setting off local antidromic reflex changes in the renal circulation. Experimental work 
with animals (7, 8) bearing upon this point suggests that neurogenic responses are 
minimal or absent at pressure levels apparently comparable to those achieved in the 
study reported here. In the animal studies the ureters were isolated and cannulated 
with plastic tubing. Urine was collected from one ureter held at body level and from 
the other under an elevated pressure produced either by a pressurized collection 
tube (7) or by raising the orifice of the tubing 36 and 52 centimeters above the body 
(8). The behavior of the kidney excreting urine against pressure could be compared 
with the behavior of the unaffected kidne}' on the opposite side. Since little e\idence 
of reflex vasoconstrictive activity was noted in the control kidney during unilateral 
elevation of ureteral pressure, the fall in blood flow in the affected kidney was at- 
tributed chiefly to local physical effects or to compression of the hilar vessels. In 
view of the ability of the ureter to maintain urine flow against a high pressure, it is 
possible that the ureteral pressures recorded did not accurately reflect intrapelvic 
pressure and were, therefore, perhaps not strictly comparable to the pressures at- 
tained in man. Nonetheless, these findings strongly suggest that in man, too, the 
reduction in renal blood flow should not be attributed solely to vasoconstriction. 

Since both diodrast T„i and glucose T,n decreased appreciably, it seems likely that 
the elevated pressure removed a portion of the tubular mass from active participa- 
tion in urine formation. Sufficiently high plasma concentrations of diodrast and 
glucose were maintained throughout to assure adequate loading of the tubular cells 
and no other technical difficulties were encountered that could account for this 
change. Failure to observe an "overshoot"; i. e., a temporary increase in the excre- 
tion of diodrast or glucose, indicates that the fall in Tm cannot be attributed to in- 
complete collection of urine during the period of elevated pressure. 

The pressure gradient along the tubules is a complex function (1) of the head of 
pressure in the glomeruli, (2) the resistance to urine flow imposed by the tubules, 



44 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 

{3) the rate of tubular water reabsorption and {4) the pressure in the pelvis. The fall 
in pressure from glomerulus to pelvis may be greater in some nephrons than in others, 
and the terminal pressure under which urine issues from the papillary ducts may not 
be the same throughout the kidney. Anatomic studies (9) have demonstrated a wide 
range in tubular dimensions and investigation (10, 11) of the time required for filtrate 
to move from the glomerulus to the bladder has revealed a corresponding functional 
heterogeneity. It seems likely, therefore, that emptying pressures are similarly diverse 
and that an intrapelvic pressure of 20 mm. Hg may exceed the terminal pressures of 
"low pressure" units. The immediate return of values to control levels on reduction 
of intrapelvic pressure is in harmony with this view and consistent with the changes 
observed during abdominal compression (5). 

The rise in pressures within the residual active nephrons apparently affected 
tubular reabsorption of water. Urine flow always decreased more than the filtration 
rate, and it may be presumed on the basis of the work with experimental animals and 
abdominal compression in man that sodium reabsorption also increased relative to 
filtration. The cause for this response is obscure, but it does not seem to be attribut- 
able to release of diuretic hormone (12). Diminished filtration by the active glomeruli 
may possibly result in a glomerulotubular imbalance that predisposes to more efficient 
water and electrolyte reabsorption even in the presence of excessive amounts of an 
osmotically active solute such as mannitol (8), or a change in the character of the 
nephron population may be involved (12). In any case, urine flow persists and it may 
be assumed that intrapelvic pressures as high as the filtration pressure (from 77 to 
96 mm. Hg in the dog (13)) may be attained before urine flow ceases as a result of 
complete urinary obstruction. 

With prolonged obstruction a very large volume of dilute urine may accumulate 
within the hydronephrotic kidney in association with a remarkable dilatation of the 
pelvis and destruction of renal tissue. It seems unlikely that the levels to which the 
intrapelvic pressure may rise as the result of transmission from the glomerular 
capillaries could be sufficient to account for these changes. The anatomic evidence 
(14) suggests rather that dilatation results from forces applied primarily at the level 
of the pelvis since the collecting ducts and lower tubular segments are dilated in the 
absence of any distention of the proximal convoluted tubules or glomeruli. Eleva- 
tions of intra-abdominal pressure are immediately reflected in equal increases in 
intrapelvic pressure (5), and it may be surmised that excessive intrapelvic pressure 
develops frequently in daily life with coughing, straining or work involving contrac- 
tion of the abdominal musculature during inspiration. In one subject the intra- 
abdominal pressure rose to 125 mm. Hg during a Valsalva maneuver (5), and even 
higher pressures may be observed transiently during a violent cough. The compres- 
sion of the obstructed and dilated pelvis under these circumstances is not uniform 
because of its position within the substance of the kidney. Hence, the elevation of 
pressure may tend to force fluid up into the calyces with flattening of the papillae 
and dilatation of the terminal urinary ducts. Since the lower outflow tract is blocked, 
it seems likely that the pelvis may also undergo momentary stretching and llattening. 
Repetition of this process on many occasions might be expected ultimately to pro- 
duce a persistent change in pelvic capacity that would result in a lowered intrapelvic 



BRADLEY AND ANDERSON—RENAL FUNCTION 45 

pressure and temporary restoration of urine formation. The rapid rise in urine flow 
after temporary obstruction observed in the studies reported here or after more 
prolonged blockage in dogs (15) gives some substance to this speculation. Such a 
mechanism operating over a long period of time could have a severely damaging 
effect upon the renal parenchyma adjacent to the pelvis and provide a reasonable 
basis for the development of massive hydronephrosis. 

SUMMARY 

In normal human subjects, distention of the renal pelves with isotonic saline solu- 
tion under a pressure of about 20 mm. Hg was associated with a reduction in renal 
blood tlow (PAH clearance), glomerular filtration rate (mannitol clearance), urine 
flow, and functioning renal tubular mass (Diodrast Tm and glucose T,n). AH values 
tended to return promptly to control levels on return of intrapelvic pressure to 
normal. These changes may be explained in part by obstruction to outflow of urine 
from a portion of the nephron population having low "terminal emptying pressures" 
and in part by intrarenal vasoconstriction in response to pain, stretching of the renal 
pelvic wall or both. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

We wish to express our appreciation to Misses Elizabeth Xoland and Constance Qua for technical 
assistance. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. Smith, H. W. The Kidnej^-Structure and Function in Health and Disease. Oxford Universitj'^ 

Press, New York, 1951. 

2. GoLDRiNG, W., AND Chasis, H. Hypertension and Hypertensive Disease. The Commonwealth 

Fund, New York, 1944. 

3. Br.\dlev, S. E., Bradley, G. P., Tyson, C. J., Curry, J. J., and Blake, W. D. Renal function 

in renal diseases. Am. J. Med., 9: 766, 1950. 

4. Fujita, a., and Iwatake, D. Bestimmung des echten Blutzuckers ohne Hefe. Biochem. Zeit- 

schrift, 242: 43, 1941. 

5. Bradley, S. E., and Br.-vdley, G. P. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on renal 

function in man. J. Clin. Investigation, 26: 1010, 1947. 

6. Wolf, G. A., Jr. Mechanism of reflex anuria. Ann. Int. Med., 23: 99, 1945. 

7. Sh.\re, L. Effect of increased ureteral pressure on renal function. Am. J. Physiol., 168: 97, 1952. 

8. Selkurt, E. E., Brandfonbrener, M., akd Geller, H. M. Effects of ureteral pressure increase 

on renal hemodynamics and the handling of electrolytes and water. Am. J. Physiol., 170: 61, 
1952. 

9. Peter, K. Untcrsuchungcn liber Ban und Entwicklung der Niere. Gustav Fischer, Jena, 1927. 

10. Bradley', S. E., Nickel, J. P., and Leifer, E. The distribution of nephron function in man. 

Trans. Assoc. Am. Phys., 65: 147, 1952. 

11. Childs, a. VV., Wheeler, H. O., Cominskv, B., Leifer, E., W.\de, O. L., and Bradley, S. E. 

The distribution of "nephron delay time" in normal man. J. Clin. Investigation, 34: 926, 1955. 

12. Br.vdley, S. E., Mudge, G. H., Bl.\ke, W. D., and Alphonse, P. The etYect of increased intra- 

abdominal pressure on the renal excretion of water and electroljtes in normal human sul)jects 
and in patients with diabetes insipidus. Acta Clin. Bclg., 10: 209, 1955. 

13. McDonald, J. R., Mann, F. C, and Priestley, J. T. The maximal intrapelvic pressure (secre- 

tion pressure) of the kidne)' of the dog. J. Urol., 37: 326, 1937. 

14. HiNMAN, F. Hydronephrosis I. The structural changes. Surgery, 17: 816, 1945. 

15. Kerr, W. S., Jr. Effect of complete ureteral obstruction for one week on kidney function. J. 

.\l)plied Physiol., 6: 762, 1954. 



GASTROIXTESTIN\\L EXFOLIATIVE CYTOLOGY*! 

Its Coxtributiox to the Diagnosis of Gastrolvtestinal Neoplasms 

HOWARD F. IL\SKIN, M.D.t 

This paper describes four selected cases of carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract 
in which exfoliative cytologic studies were crucial in establishing the correct diagnosis. 

Exfoliative cytology is not a new science. As a matter of record, this diagnostic 
procedure is presently in its third and most successful wave of popularity. Reimann 
(1) has reviewed the early history of cellular study. Body ejecta were examined for 
exfoliative cell t}'pes as far back as the 1860s. For that era, the difficulties and prob- 
lems involved in collecting, staining and interpreting the exfoliate were insurmount- 
able. 

Exfoliative cytology today has many fields of usefulness. Its most popular appli- 
cation is in the early detection of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Grade I carcinoma 
of the cervLx is more accurately identified by cytologic scrapings than by simple 
examination with the speculum. In the difi"erential diagnosis of pulmonary disease, 
examination of bronchial secretions and aspirates frequently demonstrates the 
malignant cells of bronchogenic tumors. Peritoneal and pleural effusions of malignant 
origin often contain the characteristic exfoliated cell representative of the primary 
lesion. 

In the 14 years since Papanicolaou rekindled interest in the procedure, clinicians 
have realized its advantages in the diagnosis of diseases of the pulmonary tree, re- 
productive tract, and urinary system. Exfoliative cytology now is an accepted science; 
whether it should be considered separate and unassociated with pathology or whether 
it will eventually fall squarely within the pathologist's domain remains for the future. 

In one particular field the cytologist probably will remain autonomous. I refer to 
the detection of gastrointestinal cancers by exfoliative cellular study. It is some- 
what paradoxical that less work has been done in developing cytologic techniques 
for the gastrointestinal tract with its high incidence of carcinoma than in any other 
area. Numerous suggestions for this relatively slow rate of development have been 
advanced. Tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, regardless of site of origin, are 
among the most inaccesible of all neoplasms to the roentgenologist, endoscopist, and 
accordingly, to the cytologist. A determined effort plus meticulous care is required 
to reach the site of the suspected lesion, to produce exfoliation, and to collect the 
material properly. The lumen of the viscus examined must be free of retained food, 
fecal material, or barium, as any detritus will destroy the exfoliated cells during 
centrifugation. The prolonged contact of gastric cells with hydrochloric acid will 
partially digest the material and render the specimen unsatisfactory for interpreta- 
tion. Special techniques and procedures, some of which require the services of the 

* This work was facilitated by a grant from the Stewart Fund to the University of Chicago. 

t From the Frank Billings Medical Clinic, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

X Public Health Service Research Fellow of the National Cancer Institute. Department of Med- 
icine, University of Chicago. 

46 



RASKIN— GASTROINTESTINAL EXFOLIATIVE CYTOLOGY 47 

physician, have been devised to obtain suitable specimens in the gastrointestinal 
tract. A knowledge and understanding of the conditions of the test are important in 
the final analysis. Not infrequently esophagitis, gastric ulcer, or ulcerative colitis 
will yield an exfoliated cell closely resembling cells derived from cancerous tissue. 
The differentiation is most important and is possible only with experience and careful 
study. 

CARCINOMA OF THE ESOPHAGUS 

Case j^ I, A. P. (Unit ;^62 39 44) a fifty-eight year old white male construction worker, first seen 
in April 1955, complained of increasing difficulty in swallowing and a dull burning sensation in the 
upper epigastrium of four month's duration. The patient was an avid consumer of alcoholic beverages 
for many years; his present consumption was two quarts of beer and three glasses of wine daily. 

The present history was essentially one of dysphagia with a sensation of food sticking in the 
middle third of the chest followed by a vague burning sensation located under the xiphoid process. 
The symptoms had subsided during the twenty-one days preceding admission. Ironically, there had 
been a weight gain of six pounds in the last six months without change in diet in spite of the digestive 
disturbance. Occasionally there had been some regurgitation of food. Physical examination disclosed 
no evidence of loss of weight or anemia. The firm liver extended eight centimeters below the right 
costal margin; 

The pertinent laboratory studies were: hemoglobin 14.5 grams; 7,600 leukocytes with a normal 
differential; albumin 3.9 grams per cent; globulin 3.3 grams per cent; cephaHn and thymol floccula- 
tions negative; serum alkaline phosphatase and serum bilirubin within the normal range. Roentgen 
examination of the esophagus demonstrated a narrowing of the lower portion of the esophagus for a 
distance of seven centimeters (Fig I). The films were difficult to interpret; the cause of the narrowed 
lumen could not be determined roentgenologically. On April 15, 1955, an esophageal cytologic exam- 
ination revealed maUgnant epithelial cells (Fig. II). 

At esophagoscopy, a gradual narrowing of the esophagus was noted at 28 cm. from the gingival 
margin. The lesion was described as a diffuse, friable leukoplakia. The esophagoscopist was unable to 
identify the lesion as carcinoma. Further passage of the esophagoscope was prevented by stiffness of 
the neck and lack of cooperation. A biopsy of the area confirmed the cytologic diagnosis of carcinoma. 

At thoracotomy, a tumor mass 3-4 centimeters in size was found eight centimeters above the eso- 
phageal-cardiac junction. The tumor seemed to be more para-esophageal in location than intra- 
luminal. A plastic funnel-ended Mackler tube was inserted above the tumorous portion of the esoph- 
agus. The patient developed a pleuro-esophageal fistula and expired nine days postoperatively. 

At autopsy the cause of death was found to have been an erosion and perforation of the esophageal 
wall by the plastic tube. Numerous leukoplakic plaques were noted but no mucosal involvement by 
tumor could be demonstrated. The wall of the esophagus was infiltrated with tumor which caused a 
mild stenosis. The cardia of the stomach was not involved. At no point, on microscopic examination, 
could carcinoma be seen arising from the squamous epthelium (Fig. III). The tumor was extensive in 
the lymphatic channels of the esophageal wall. The histology was most unusual; the tumor seemed to 
be an adenocarcinoma with marked squamous metaplasia. No keratin pearls were seen nor was there 
any lymph node involvement. 

COMMENT 

This was a most unusual case of esophageal carcinoma from both clinical and 
pathologic aspects. The patient was an alcoholic with mild dysphagia and no weight 
loss. Since the narrowing of the esophagus as seen by roentgen study was gradual 
rather than abrupt, the correct diagnosis of carcinoma could not be made. Esopha- 
goscopy contributed the additional information of a leukoplakia but only cytology 
and the esophageal biopsy were definitive. If the esophagoscopist had not fortuitously 
biopsed an area of submucosal tumor, as sometimes happens, then disposition of this 



1 






> 



# 



«^ 



« 







ILiSKIN— GASTROINTESTINAL EXFOLIATIVE CYTOLOGY 49 

case would have been based solely on the cytologic findings. The fact that the pa- 
thologist could not demonstrate the actual site of tumor penetration to the surface 
from which the malignant cells exfoliated, illustrates and emphasizes the sensitivity 
of the technique. 

CARCINOMA or THE STOMACH 

F. B. (Unit ^59 92 37), a sixty-three year old salesman, was first admitted in April, 1954, for 
general evaluation and control of diabetes mellitus of eighteen months' duration. During routine 
interrogation the patient stated that he had lost 18 pounds in 4 months, attributed to a lack of appe- 
tite. He had no abdominal distress or pain and had noticed no change in bowel habits. An upper 
gastrointestinal roentgenograph revealed coarseness of rugal folds in the cardia and proximal greater 
curvature. 

At gastroscopy the mucosa of the greater curvature was rejjorted to be characteristic of patchy 
hypertrophic gastritis. The remainder of the gastrointestinal investigation including barium enema, 
proctoscopy, and a search for occult blood in the stools, were negative. 

In June 1955, he was readmitted for control of the diabetes symptoms which included: morning 
nausea, loss of appetite, dull intermittent epigastric pain made worse by particular bodily positions, 
and a weight loss of 4 pounds in 3 weeks. A physical examination revealed no abnormalities. On a 
regulated bland diet the glycosuria was controlled, the patient improved and he gained weight. 
Before discharge a second roentgen-ray examination of the stomach was reported as normal. 

From June 1955 to September 1955, the patient again experienced periodic episodes of the pre- 
viously described abdominal distress. He was able to maintain his weight and had no glycosuria. 
However, his astute physician requested gastric exfoliative cytologic studies in spite of previous 
negative roentgenologic examination and gastroscopy. Adenocarcinoma cells were found (Fig. IVj. 
In view of these findings a third roentgen examination of the stomach was requested (4 months after 
the second); a polypoid ulcerating neoplasm was outlined in the body of the stomach projecting into 
the lesser curvature (Fig. V). 

On October 18, 1955, an eighty per cent gastric resection was performed. The tumor was not poly- 
poid but flat and infiltrative and measured 2.5 cm. by 3.5 cm. by 2 cm.; it was situated on the lesser 
curvature at the angulus. A seven millimeter shallow ulcer crater lay on its surface (Fig. VI). The 
tumor histologically was a well differentiated adenocarcinoma. Four of the 39 lymph nodes examined 
contained metastatic tumor. The patient has done well since the operation. 

COMMENT 

Had exfoliative cytology not made the definitive diagnosis of carcinoma of the 
stomach, it is most likely that a considerable additional period of time would have 
elapsed before some untoward event such as hemorrhage would have necessitated a 
complete re-evaluation of the status of the stomach. In the light of the numerous 
negative studies, the patient's complaints were assumed to be entirely functional and 
complicated by a diabetic slate in a none-too-cooperative patient. The large rugal 
fold pattern in the fundal portion of the stomach excited the suspicion of neoplasm 
in April 1954. The original concern of a diffuse carcinoma in the cardia was pre- 
mature. A flat ulcerating carcinoma of the lesser curvature unfortunately was 
discovered in October 1955. 

Fig. 1. Narrowing of lower one/third of esophagus 

Fig. 2. Malignant epithelial cell from the esophagus 

Fig. 3. Carcinoma invading the esophageal wail 

Fig. 4. Adenocarcinoma ceils from the stomach 

Fig. 5. Filling defect, lesser curvature of the stomach 



so 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF ^lEDICINE, U. OF MD. 




Fig. 6. Resected stomach showing maUgnant infiltrative tumor with ulceration 

Fig. 7. Malignant cells recovered following pancreatic stimulation 

Fig. 8. Carcinoma involving wall of common bile duct, autopsy specimen 

Fig. 9. Adenocarcinoma cells from colonic wash 



CARCINOMA OF THE PANCREAS 

E. A. (Unit ^63 60 95), an 80 year old female, was admitted on October 10, 1955, because of loss 
of appetite and energj' for seven months, and a two week period of jaundice. The patient had always 
been robust and active. For the last 6 months she had been troublefl by occasional ill-defined colicky 
pain in the right upper quadrant. There had been a gradual weight loss from 158 to 132 pounds. Ex- 
cessive belching and occasional loose stools were the only other complaints elicited. 

Physical examination revealed an elderly woman in no acute distress with evidence of substantial 
weight loss, marked jaundice, and numerous pruritic scratch marks. The hver was palpable 3 cm. 
below the costal margin. A 1 centimeter in diameter, slightly tender mass contiguous with the liver 
edge was easily palpated. 

Laboratory studies revealed 13.2 grams of hemogloliin with a normal leukocyte count. Total 
serum l)ilirubin was 29.9 mg per cent of which 23.1 mg. was of the "direct" reacting type. The alkaline 
phosphatase was 11.5 Bodansky units. Scrum albumin and glolnilin fractions were 3.2 and i.2> grams 
percent respectively. A 24 hour urinary urobilinogen estimation was 0.84 mg. One of several stool 
examinations was positive for occult blood. 



RASKIN— GASTROINTESTINAL EXFOLIATIVE CYTOLOGY 51 

Roentgen studies of the stomach and duodenum were normal. There was no widening of the duo- 
denal loop. A large, three centimeter, partially calcified gall stone was noted during the gastrointes- 
tinal roentgen-ray studies. There was a suggestion of smaller stones within the gall bladder, but be- 
cause of the intense jaundice no attempt was made to visualize the gall bladder with radio-opaque 
material. 

A pancreatic drainage test was done by inserting the long arm of a double lumen (Diamond) tube 
into the duodenum. One hundred units of secretin* were injected intravenouslj'. There was a poor 
pancreatic response to the hormone stimulator; the total volume and bicarbonate levels were ex- 
tremely low and suggestive of diffuse disease or pancreatic duct blockage. The material collected 
contained malignant cells, some of which formed abortive ducts or tubules (Fig. VII) ; a presumptive 
diagnosis of carcinoma of the pancreas was made. 

At operation, the liver was dark green and slightly enlarged. The gall bladder contained a large 
solitary stone. The common duct was enormously dilated and could admit a finger. No stones were 
palpated or irrigated from the duct. There were several indurated firm areas throughout the entire 
pancreas, consistent with focal chronic pancreatitis. The duodenum was opened revealing a normal 
ampulla of Vater. A frozen section liiopsy from the head of the pancreas demonstrated a dilated pan- 
creatic duct with a small papilloma growing into the lumen. There was considerable periductal 
fibrosis and atrophy of accinar tissue. A choledochojejunostomy and a cholecystectomy^ were done. 

The patient's condition deteriorated post-operatively and a pancreatic fistula developed. Acute 
congestive heart failure ended fatally on the tenth post-operative day. At autopsy, digestion of the 
skin around the pancreatic fistulous opening was noted. The surgical anastomoses were intact. The 
pancreas was of normal size; the previously described areas of nodularity proved to be surviving 
islands of pancreatic tissue surrounded by more atrophic fibrotic gland. The common bile duct and 
pancreatic duct emptied independently into the duodenum. However, both ducts were pinched at the 
same level, about one centimeter above the ampulla of Vater. No obvious tumor was present grossly, 
either by appearance or palpation. The duct walls were smooth and unbroken. The pathologist was 
uncertain of the diagnosis from the gross specimen. 

Histologic examination of the section from the head of the pancreas demonstrated a diffuse scatter- 
ing of a glandular carcinoma of ductal origin. The walls of both ducts as well as the surrounding 
pancreatic tissue were involved (Fig. VIII). 

COMMENT 

The clinical aspects strongly suggested obstructive jaundice. The weight loss sug- 
gested the presence of a carcinoma but a palpable gall stone had strengthened the 
possibility of other stones impacted within the common bile duct. The exfoliative 
cytologic study was the only tangible evidence of malignancy. Laparotomy (and 
biopsy) failed to verify the presence of tumor. Even at autopsy the gross specimen 
was difficult to analyze. The carcinoma had infiltrated the head of the pancreas and 
produced no definite mass. At autopsy, impression smears of tissue from the head of 
the pancreas were made on glass slides and stained by the Papanicolaou technique. 
Malignant cells similar to those obtained during duodenal intubation were recognized. 

CARCINOMA OF THE COLON 

M. McI. (Unit #63 59 93), a fifty-five year old pharmacist, was first seen in October, 1955. For 
eleven months the patient had been troubled with intermittent constipation and left lumbar pain. 
The constipation required a laxative every seven to fourteen da\'S. Occasionally he noticed bloody 
mucus when straining excessively at stool. A barium enema elsewhere was reported to have shown a 
lesion in the left colon. The patient stated that he had not taken either castor oil or enemas prior to 
roentgenography; the films were unavailable. A physical examination revealed tenderness to palpa- 
tion in the left flank and costovertebral angle; no masses or organs were palpated. 

* Kindly supplied by Dr. J. B. Hammond of the Eli Lilly Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 



52 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 




Fig. 10. Filling defect, superior border of splenic fie.xure 

Laboratory studies revealed a mild anemia of 1 1.9 grams. The cardiolipin test was 3+, the Kahn 
serologic test was doubtful. Urinalysis was within normal limits. 

Proctoscopic examination to 24 centimeters revealed only pseudo-melanosis coli secondary to the 
chronic laxative habit. The barium enema roentgen-ray study was reported as normal. Exfoliative 
cytologic studies were done and cells typical of a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma were found (Fig. 
IX). On the basis of these iindings, the colon roentgen-ray study was repeated, demonstrating a small 
polypoid tumor on the superior wall of the splenic flexure. 

During surgery a thirty centimeter section of splenic flexure and its adjacent colon were resected. 
A hard, reddish-white, sessile polypoid lesion protruded into the lumen to a height of 1.3 cm. The 
base involved one half the circumference of the lumen. Histologic sections revealed well differentiated 
adenocarcinoma. There was extensive invasion deep into the muscle coat, but extension into the 
subserous fatty tissue was noted. The patient made an uneventful recovery and has returned to full- 
time employment. 



COMMENT 



Had it not been for the positive cytology report, the patient probably would have 
been allowed to proceed for several more months before his symptoms became more 
urgent and necessitated further roentgen studies. The tumor had penetrated the 



RASKIN— GASTROINTESTINAL EXFOLIATIVE CYTOLOGY 53 

serosa in only one area; none of the 13 lymph nodes examined contained tumor. This 
patient may have better than the normal prospects for permanent cure. 

SUMMARY 

Four selected cases of carcinoma of various regions of the gastrointestinal tract 
are reported. In each instance exfoliative cytologic studies contributed decisive and, 
occasionally the only evidence of the neoplasm. In two cases the positive cytologic 
findings resulted in earlier and perhaps curative surgery, 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

Grateful acknowledgment is clue Miss Sylvia Pleticka, Mrs. Harold Ford, Mr. Lawrence Gottlieb, 
a senior medical student, for their invaluable assistance, and to Dr. Walter L. Palmer and Dr. Joseph 
B. Kirsner for their support. The photography was done by Mr. Jean Crunelle. 

REFERENCE 

1. Reimann, D. L. Some 19th Century Contributions to Cancer Detection. Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Survey. Vol. 9, No. 4, .\ugust, 1954. 



SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES PUBLISHED BY TITLE 

The following articles have been received for the Hugh R. Spencer number and 
will be published in a subsequent edition. 

L Goldstein, A. E., Weinberg, T., and W.\rner, C. G.: Polypoid Rhabdomyoma 
(Sarcoma Botryoides) of the Urinary Bladder in Children; Review of the Litera- 
ture 

2. Fisher, Donald E.: Pathologists and Empiricism 



A SCHEIME FOR INTRACRANIAL VENOUS CIRCULATION*! § 
JAMES S. BROWNE, M.D.J and JOHN A. WAGNER, M.D. 

With the interest in cerebral venous circulation in its present state of activity, the 
publication of a new scheme of the intracranial venous circulation seems indicated, 
especially because of the neurologic problems of intracranial phlebothrombosis and 
thrombophlebitis which affect individuals of all ages. jNIore recently the roentgenol- 
ogist and neurosurgeon have shown a newer, practical aspect of the application 
of knowledge of the diagnosis of mass venous system lesions by cerebral angiogra- 
phy(3,4). 

The scheme presented herewith is a composite of information gained from two 
injected specimens, standard anatomy textbooks (1, 2), and several publications 
(3, 5). It does not purport to show the smaller venous channels, anatomic variations, 
or even a specific circulation, but merely to present a generalization of the venous 
circulation such as is here described. For the sake of clarity the circulations of the 
brain stem and cerebellum, as such, are not included; the right hemisphere is repre- 
sented as a phantom. For better orientation the outline of the ventricles is included. 

The intracranial venous circulation can be divided into deep and superficial sys- 
tems, the former including the central veins (septal, choroid, thalamostriate, internal 
cerebral, basal, and the great cerebral) as well as deep dural sinuses (i.e. the inferior 
sagittal and straight sinuses). The remaining major venous channels are considered 
part of the superficial system. 

The paired internal cerebral veins commence at the interventricular foramina, 
traverse the third ventricle in the tela choroidea, and inferior to the splenium of the 
corpus callosum join to form the great cerebral vein. These veins drain the choroid 
plexus of the third ventricle and portions of the basal ganglia and deep white matter. 
The chief tributaries are the septal, choroid and thalamostriate veins. 

The septal veins (veins of the septum pellucidum) begin near the anterior poles 
of the lateral ventricles, pass posteriorly along the septum pellucidum draining por- 
tions of the caudate nucleus and corpus callosum and terminate by opening into the 
most anterior portion of the internal cerebral veins. 

Conmiencing in the choroid plexus of the inferior horn of the lateral ventricle, each 
of the two choroid veins spirals along the choroid plexus and either shortly before 
reaching the interventricular foramen empties into the thalamostriate vein, or at the 
foramen joins this vein in forming the internal cerebral vein. The choroid vein drains 
the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle, the hippocampus, the fornix and part of 
the corpus callosum. 

* From The Department of Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, School of Medicine, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

t Aided by a Grant From The Sidney M. Cone Research Fund. 

JFormer Resident in Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. 

§ The diagram in this text is a slight modification of one used in an exhibit "Phlebothrombosis 
and the Pathologj* of the Venous Circulation" presented at the 1951 scientific exhibit of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association Convention at Atlantic City. A paper on this subject will appear in the Bul- 
letin of The School of Medicine, University of Maryland. The art work was done by Mr. Thomas 
Stevenson, Department of Art as Applied to Medicine. University of Maryland School of Merlicine. 

54 



BROWNE AND WAGNER— INTRACRANIAL VENOUS CIRCULATION 



55 



SUPERIOR 
CeR£BB(=iL 
VEINS 



SUPER I OR 
ftNASTOnOTIC 

V£iN (of trolard) 



SUPERIOR 
SAG ITTAU 
SINUS 



INFERIOR 
SAGITTAL 
SINUS 




TRANSVeRSE 
SINUS 



SUPERIOR 

CeRSBCLLAR 

VE.IKIS 



INFERIOR 
ANASTOnOTiq 
VEIN (of LABBEJ 



INTeRNAL 
JO&ULAR 

veiN 



INTERNAL 
CEREBRAL 
VEINS 



niDDLE 

CEREBRAL 

VEIN 



SUPERIOR 

OPHTHALniC 

VeiM 



INFERIOR 

OPHTHALniC 

VEIN 



ANTERIOR 
FACIAL 

veiN 



Schematic flrawing of cereljral venous system. For explanation, see text. 



The paired thalamostriate veins He in the groove between the thalamus and the 
caudate nucleus and terminate by passing through the interventricular foramina to 
form the internal cerebral veins. The change in direction which this vein makes as it 
passes through the foramen gives a characteristic representation on angiography 
which enables one to identify the foramen and pathologic displacement of the vessel 
(4). The thalamostriate veins drain the thalamus, the corpus striatum, and the 
internal capsule. 

There are in addition small tributaries from the corpus callosum, the choroid ple.xus 
of the third ventricle, the thalamus and the posterior horns of the lateral ventricles. 

The single great cerebral vein (vein of Galen) is formed by the junction of the 
internal cerebral veins inferior or posterior to the splenium of the corpus callosum, 
is joined by the basal veins and then passes posterosuperiorly in the midline to join 
the straight sinus which begins at the posterior end of the free edge of the fal.x cerebri. 

The junction of the anterior cerebral, the deep middle cerebral, and the anterior 
striate veins at the anterior perforated substance is the commencement of each of the 
two basal veins (veins of Rosenthal), which then proceed posteriorly, passing in the 
vicinity of the cerebral peduncles, and finally turning medially and superiorly to join 
the great cerebral vein. The areas drained include portions of the frontal lobes, the 
corpus callosum, the anterior perforated substance, the interpeduncular regions of 



56 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

the midbrain, the insular cortex and portions of the brain stem, temporal and occipital 
lobes. 

Lying in the proximity of the anterior cerebral artery and receiving blood from 
the medial cerebral hemispheres, the anterior cerebral veins terminate at the anterior 
perforated substance by joining other tributaries to form the basal veins. 

The operculum and insula are drained by the deep middle cerebral vein which 
passes in either lateral fissure to the anterior perforated substance. It also communi- 
cates with the superficial system via the superficial middle cerebral vein. 

After receiving blood from the corpus striatum each striate vein passes through 
the anterior perforated substance to help form the basal vein. 

Passing posteriorly in the free edge of the falx cerebri the inferior sagittal sinus 
receives blood from this structure and from the medial surfaces of the cerebral 
hemispheres and terminates by joining the great cerebral vein (at the posterior end 
of the free edge of the falx cerebri) to form the straight sinus. In the junction of the 
falx cerebri and tentorium cerebelli is located the straight sinus which having re- 
ceived tributaries from the superior surface of the cerebellum, terminates in the 
region of the internal occipital protuberance by turning to the left to form the left 
transverse sinus. Generally a channel connects it in this region with the confluence 
of the sinuses but variations are frequent and there may be no communication, the 
straight sinus may join the confluens directly, or the right transverse sinus may be 
formed from the straight sinus. 

SUPERFICLA.L SYSTEM OF THE INTRACRANIAL VENOUS CIRCULATION 

As the name implies, this system drains the superficial portions of the brain. 

The superior cerebral veins, usually from eight to twelve pairs, drain the supero- 
lateral surfaces of the cerebral hemispheres, progress superiorly and medially, re- 
ceive tributaries from the medial surfaces of the cerebral hemispheres, and terminate 
in the superior sagittal sinus. 

Large portions of the lateral surfaces of the cerebral hemispheres are drained by 
the superficial middle cerebral veins which pass in the lateral sulcus to terminate in 
either the sphenopalatine or cavernous sinuses. These veins have several important 
anastomoses. The superior anastomotic veins (of Trolard)* join them with the 
superior sagittal sinus, and the inferior anastomotic veins (of Labbe) t connect them 
with the transv^erse sinuses. Lastly, anastomotic channels communicate between the 
deep and superficial middle cerebral veins. 

The inferior surfaces of the cerebral hemispheres are drained by the inferior cerebral 
veins which terminate in the superior cerebral, the middle cerebral or basal veins and 
in the cavernous, superior petrosal, or transverse sinuses. 

The superior sagittal sinus, located in the attached margin of the falx cerebri, 
receives blood from the superior cerebral veins, the venous lacunae, and via the 

* These veins sometimes cannot be easily distinguished anatomically in the normal specimen but 
in pathologic conditions in which they arc of significance (as thrombosis) they may become quite 
prominent. 

t O'Connell has pointed out that these anastomotic channels may be multiple rather than single 
vessels. 



BROWNE AND WAGNER— INTRACRANIAL VENOUS CIRCULATION 57 

parietal foramina from the pericranium. It terminates in the vicinity of the internal 
occipital protuberance in the confluence of the sinuses (where also received is the 
occipital sinus from the posterior fossa). '^•!'li' 

Usually the right transverse sinus commences at the confluence of the sinuses but 
as previously mentioned variations are frecjuent. The paired transverse sinuses are 
found in the lateral attachments of the tentorium cerebelli. They are joined by the 
inferior cerebral veins, the inferior anastomotic vein, some diploic and emissary veins, 
and the superficial petrosal sinus and end in the sigmoid sinuses which connect them 
to the internal jugular veins. 

Each cavernous sinus, on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone, communi- 
cates via the intercavernous sinuses with the other, receives blood from the orbit 
and face via the opthalmic veins, drains the sphenoparietal sinus, the superficial 
middle cerebral veins, communicates via emmisary veins with the pterygoid venous 
plexus, and empties via the superior petrosal sinus into the transverse sinus and via 
the inferior petrosal sinus into the internal jugular vein. 

Although for descriptive purposes the venous channels were divided into a deep 
and superficial system, it was seen that the two systems are in communication as 
are the intracranial and extracranial systems. This is of the utmost importance in 
understanding thrombotic and infectious processes involving the brain. 

SUMMARY 

A scheme for the demonstration of the intracranial venous circulation and a re- 
view of this circulation has been presented. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. Cunningham, D. J., Textbook of Anatomy, J. C. Brash, Eel., London: Oxforrl University Press, 

9th ed., 1604 pp., 1951. 

2. Gray, H., Anatomy of the Human Body, C. M. Gross, Ed., Philadelphia: Lea and Febigcr, 26th 

ed., 1480 pp., 1954. 

3. JoHANSON, C, The central veins and deep dural sinuses of the brain. An anatomical and angio- 

graphic study. Acta radiol., Stockholm, 1954, supplement 107, 184 pp. 

4. LiN, P. M., MOKROHISKY, J. F., Stauffer, H., AND ScoTT, M., The importance of the deep cere- 

bral veins in cerebral angiography with special emphasis on the orientation of the foramen of 
Monro through the visualization of the "venous angle" of the brain. J. Neurosurg. 12: 256-277, 
1955. 

5. O'CoNNELL, J. E. A., Some observations on the cerebral veins. Brain 57: 484-503, 1934, 



GIANT FIBROADENOMA OF THE BREASTf 

WILLIAM A. HOLBROOK, .AI.D., and JAMES H. RAMSEY, M.D.* 

In the present era of a medically well informed public giant fibroadenomas are a 
rarity as breast lumps are generally not allowed to attain giant size. Owens and 
Adams in 1941, reviewing the literature, collected 121 cases. The earliest report they 
found was by Chelius in 1828 who used the diagnostic term "cystic hydatid of the 
breast". Since then many other authors have applied descriptive names to this 
tumor, such as Brodie's serocystic disease, cystosarcoma pliyllodes, intracystic mammary 
sarcoma, adenoma pseiidosarcomatodes, adenomyxofibroma inlracanaliculare papillare, 
and giant intracanalicular myxoma, to mention only a few.* Owens and Adams sug- 
gested that giant intracanalicidar fibroadenoma would be an inclusive or fitting appel- 
lation for the varied forms of this tumor. A review of the nomenclature as it has ap- 
peared through the years suggests the variety of clinical and pathologic features of 
the tumor, and at the same time denotes a changing trend in the tumor itself as 
relatively younger tumors are being diagnosed and treated. 

The earlier descriptive terms of hydatid, serocystic, intracystic, etc. reflect late 
stages of the tumor with marked cystic degenerative changes. Pliyllodes refers to 
giant myxomatous papillary formations. The fact that some of these tumors (ap- 
proximately 10 per cent),^ turn out to be cUnically malignant and many others show 
areas histologically appearing to be malignant is reflected in the smattering of 
"sarcoma" and "pseudosarcoma" through the long list of names. All of these de- 
scriptive terms used in inconstant combinations well illustrate the multiple potentials 
of such a tumor. 

In recent years diagnostic terms have placed less emphasis on the cystic appear- 
ance of giant fibroadenomas as today the advanced cystic tumors rarely are seen. 
The separation of sarcoma from the benign tumors results in part from more accurate 
pathologic study, but at the same time the separation is being aided by public aware- 
ness of breast lumps and the resulting earlier treatment. Even the grossly myxoma- 
tous changes are denoted less frequently in nomenclature. The description intra- 
canalicidar is not necessarily applicable, as illustrated in the case reported here as 
well as in other cases notably in the recent literature. The simplified term giant 
fibroadenoma of the breast is perhaps the simplest and most accurate term for present 
day usage, regardless of the variance which age and growth potential produces in 
the different tumors of this category. McDonald and Harrington suggest this name 
for any benign fibroadenoma large enough to occupy the major portion of the breast, 
generally weighing more than 500 grams and replacing at least four fifths of the 
breast. 

During ihe past year a 14 year old colored girl was treated at the University Hos- 
pital for a giant fibroadenoma of her breast. This tumor had grown quite rapidly and 
presented such unusual clinical aspects that sarcoma could not be excluded in the 

t From the Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 
Baltimore. 

* Department of Pathology-Washington County Hospital, Hagerstovvn, Md. 

58 



HOLBROOK AND RAMSEY—FIBKOADEXOMA OF BREAST 



59 




---^J 



Fig. 1. Clinical appearance of 14 
year old colored female with a giant 
fibroadenoma of the left breast and a 
small fibroadenoma of the right breast 
associated with virginal hypertrophy. 



Fig. 2. Bisectioned specimen show- 
ing the size and gross characteristics 
of the tumor. 



Fig. 3. Representative microscopic 
picture of the reported tumor. 




m.^'TA 










60 BULLETIN 01- THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

differential diagnosis. Therefore, the conventional surgical treatment for a benign 
fibroadenoma was felt inadequate. Her case summary is presented and discussed here 
in order to emphasize salient features of breast fibroadenomas as well as to point out 
the interesting problem provoked by this particular case. 

CASE PRESENTATION 

D. D., U. H. 038-6-39, a 14 year old colored female, was admitted on September 20, 1954, because 
of enlargement of her left breast of 4 months duration. She initially felt a "lump" in her left breast 
in May 1954. Following this she noticed rapid growth of the mass but delayed seeking medical atten- 
tion until Sei^tember when she was admitted to the hospital. There were no associated sj'mptoms, no 
local pain or tenderness, and no nipple discharge. Her past and family histories were negative. System 
review revealed a normal menstrual history with menarche at age 11. 

Positive physical lindings were limited entirely to the breasts (Figure 1 .). The left breast was about 
three times the size of the right breast and was deformed in configuration. The breast substance was 
replaced by a lirm, nodular mass which was not fixed to the chest wall. The overlying skin and areola 
were stretched and the nipple was flattened. Anteriorly the skin seemed adherent to the mass. The 
skin of this breast was significantly warmer than other body skin. The right breast, even though one 
third the size of the left breast, appeared to have undergone a moderate degree of virginal hyper- 
trophy. A rounded, non-tender, freely movable discoid mass, l}/^ cm. in diameter (previously un- 
known to the patient) was present at 11 o'clock. 

The initial impression was bilateral fibroadenomas; however, because of the rapid growth and size 
of the tumor in the left breast with increased skin temperature and apparent skin adherence, it was 
felt that sarcoma in the left breast could not be excluded with certainty. Much deliberation was 
made in choosing the operative procedure for this patient. Left simple mastectomy and excision of the 
underlying fascia was carried out on September 23, 1954, at which time also the small lump in the 
right breast was excised. 

The diagnosis of bilateral fibroadenomas was made from frozen sections and study of the fixed 
specimens was confirmatory. The pathologist's report is as follows: — 

S. P. 87258-Gross (Figure 2) : The breast specimen contains a firm movable tumor which measures 
15 x 12 X 10 cms. and weighs 1410 grams. It has almost replaced the breast which now is represented 
by a rim of compressed fibrofatty tissue. The overljang skin and nipple are normal in appearance. A 
clevage plane surrounding the tumor is easily developed. The outer aspect of the lesion is moderately 
bosselated. The cut surface is ghstening, light red brown, and streaked by fine trabeculae of fibrous 
tissue. There is no hemorrhage or evidence of necrosis. There are no cysts or crevices apparent on cut 
section. 

Microscopic (Figure 3): Sections of the right breast lesion show h3'perplasia of the glandular 
elements. The ducts are dilated, elongated and distorted by overgrowth of the cellular fibrous stroma. 
The acini are increased in number and lined with dark staining, tall columnar cells. Sections of the 
lesion from the left breast show a thickened fibrous tissue capsule limiting the lesion. There is a very 
marked hj'perplasia of the glandular elements, with many lobules. The ducts are distorted, elongated 
and compressed. There is pronounced h\-perplasia of the intralobular and interlobular connective 
tissue. 

Diagnosis: Fibroadenoma, right and left breasts. 

The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Examination a year later found her in good 
condition without recurrent tumor. She has had no apparent psychologic disturbance from her 
mastectomy. 

DISCUSSION 

The most frequently occurring breast lumps in adolescent and young adult females 
are benign fibroadenomas. Usually these tumors present little difiiculty in their 
clinical handling and the decision for excisional biopsy is universally made. The 
clinical characteristics of fibroadenomas such as their mobility, lack of skin fixation 



HOLE ROOK AND RAMSEY—FIBROADENOMA OF BREAST 61 

and nipple retraction, smooth or lobulated contour resulting from encapsulation, and 
firm or slightly elastic, solid feel to palpation aid in the diagnosis. This is especially 
true in the young breast which is more commonly free of the changes resultant from 
cyclic breast disease. Tenderness, nipple discharge and skin changes are fortunately 
rare though occasionally are seen. 

The average duration of fibroadenomas in reported series is as long as 3 years, 
indicating generally a slow rate of growth. ]\Iost frequently fibroadenomas are 2-5 
cm. in diameter. Many reach a size of 2-3 cm. and then remain stationary. They 
rarely e.xceed 6-8 cm. in diameter. Large fibroadenomas are usually the result of 
accelerated growth in pre-existing tumors and, therefore, are seen mainly in the fifth 
and sixth decades. The tumor herein reported is unusual in that it grew rapidly to 
such a large size. 

There is a generally accepted concept that fibroadenomas are the result of hyper- 
estrinism or a hypersensitivity of breast tissue to estrin. No hormone studies were 
done in the presently reported case; however, it is significant that the tumor oc- 
curred during the period of adolescent development, (when 10-20% of reported 
series have begun) and in the presence of virginal hypertrophy. The periods when the 
highest titer of ovarian hormone is found are in adolescence, during pregnancy, and 
immediately preceding the onset of menopause. Occasionally secreting ovarian 
tumors cause a period of high estrin titer. During these times pre-existing fibro- 
adenomas show accelerated growth and new tumors make their first appearance. For 
these reasons the majority of fibroadenomas occur before the age of 35, and after 
that age the incidence sharply declines. The highest incidence is seen between the 
ages of 21 and 25. Oliver and Major stated that the occurrence in colored women is 
about 5 years earlier. This corresponds probably to earlier pregnancies in the colored 
race as the incidence of fibroadenomas is also highest in women who have borne 
children. 

Geshicter has pointed out that in the development of fibroadenomas, although the 
fibrous tissue and epithelial structures both respond to the same endocrine stimulus, 
the connective tissue is the main neoplastic component. The pronounced regenerative 
capacity of the poorly differentiated supporting stroma of the mammary gland ac- 
counts for the frequency of fibroadenomas of the breast as well as for the myxoma- 
tous character usually seen in those tumors having undergone rapid growth. Likewise 
it follows that sarcomatous change should be and is the most frequent form of 
malignancy developing in pre-existing fibroadenomas. Warren and others have 
pointed out, however, that the breast from which a benign fibroadenoma was excised 
is twice as susceptible to the development of carcinoma as is a normal breast. 

The microscoi)ic aspects of the tumor being presented (Figure 3) shows consider- 
able epithelial neoplasia and the fibrous stroma does not show the loose myxomatous 
substance as would be expected from its rapid rate of growth. The balanced epithelial 
and connective tissue proliferation accounts for the pericanalicular pattern of its 
histologic appearance. 

A fetal type of fibroadenoma occurs in the younger age group, is rapid growing and 
may reach considerable size. The tumor consists of highly cellular connective tissue 
stroma with imperfect differentiation between ducts and acini. The outstanding 



62 Hi I. LET I. \ or THE SCHOOL or MEDICINE, U. OE MD. 

feature is several layers of cuboidal cells liiiiii}^ the ducts. The case presented here 
shows no characteristics typical of fetal fibroadenoma. 

The small tumor in the right breast of this case conformed to the observation that 
fibroadenomas as most other neoplastic forms develop more often in the upper and 
outer portions of the breast. Although considerably smaller, it was entirely similar 
in its microscopic appearance to the large fibroadenoma of the left breast. This is 
usually true in multiple lesions. It is also true in recurrent fibroadenomas, which 
actually are multiple tumors with staged or delayed appearance. Fibroadenomas are 
most frequently solitary lesions, but may be multiple (18 per cent) and may be 
bilateral (5 per cent)^ Bilateral giant fibroadenomas have been reported with rela- 
tively high incidence in adolescent and young females. The incidence of bilaterality 
in ]\IcDonald and Harrington's report was 30 per cent with two cases age 13 and one 
case age 15. Although in the case reported here only one tumor was giant sized, it 
probably reflects the same pathogenic factors. 

The dififerential diagnosis in the case presented here required the stern considera- 
tion of sarcoma. Sarcoma of the breast comprises about 1 per cent of all malignant 
mammary tumors^. Although sarcoma is generally known to have a poor prognosis, 
there is variance in the malignant potential of the forms of sarcoma occurring in the 
breast. The only form of sarcoma peculiar to the breast itself is fibro-spindle cell 
sarcoma, which is derived from the supporting stroma of the mammary gland. The 
surgical treatment of this type of sarcoma offers an opportunity for considerable 
success. The usual clinical condition is that of a bulky tumor which is locally invasive, 
usually growing slowly with no axillary metastasis. It rarely involves the skin. Fre- 
quently there is a history of a precursory breast lump. It has a tendency for local 
recurrence with invasion of the chest wall and shoulder region, and late hemotogenous 
spread. Many factors enhance its rate of growth such as pregnancy, hormone therapy, 
increased estrin titer preceding menopause, and trauma which often is in the form 
of biopsy, incision, or incomplete removal. According to Ewing rapid growth when 
once established is maintained. For these reasons adequate surgical removal at the 
time of initial surgery is necessary. Geshicter advocates simple mastectomy with 
excision of the underlying pectoral fascia. Bloodgood advocated removal of the 
pectoralis major muscle with simple mastectomy; and Grimes, Fenston, and Bell 
have recently advised radical mastectomy in order to widely excise the tumor and 
its local avenues of spread. McLoren of INIelbourne, Australia, in referring to sarcoma 
developing in giant fibroadenomas recommends local excision in all cases, even 
though recurrences occasionally appear in the scar. It seems that wider initial excision 
would be in the best interest of the patient. 

Fibroadenomas resemble breast sarcoma much less frequently than early carcinoma 
of the breast. All fibroadenomas, therefore, must be regarded with suspicion, and 
adequate excision carried out as early as possible. 

SUMMARY 

1. This is a discussion of the varied clinical and pathologic features of giant fibro- 
adenomas. It considers this tumor's changing trend resulting from earlier treatment, 
as reflected in the nomenclature from the literature. 



HOLBROOK AND RAMSEY— FIBROADENOMA OF BREAST 63 

2. The case report of a 14 year old colored female with bilateral breast fibroadeno- 
mas, one a giant tumor, is presented. 

3. The reported case is discussed to point out salient clinical and pathologic 
features of fibroadenomas of the breast. 

4. The problems in differential diagnosis and surgical considerations posed by the 
unusual clinical features of the reported tumor are discussed, including a brief resume 
of breast sarcoma. 

REFERENCES 

1. Bloodgood, J. D.: Lesions of the Female Breast. In Binnie; A Treatise on Regional Surgery. 

Sect. 23, Vol. 1, Philadelphia, 1917, P. Blakiston's Son and Co. 

2. EwiNG, J.: Neoplastic Diseases, ed. 4, Philadelphia, 1940, W. B. Saunders Co. 

3. Geshicter, C. F.: Diseases of the Breast, Second Edition, Philadelphia, 1947, J. B. Lippin- 

cott Co. 

4. Geshicter, C. F., Lewis, D. D., and Hartman, C. G. : Tumors of thebreast related to the oestrin 

hormone— Am. J. Cancer, 21: 828-859, 1934. 

5. Grimes, O. F., E. B. Fenston, and H. G. Bell: Sarcomas of the breast, Surg., Gynec. and 

Obstet., 96: 693-695, 1953. 

6. Haran, a. M.: Tumoration (fibroadenoma and Reclus' disease) due to hyperfolUculinemia in 

patient hysterectomized with ovary conserved, .\rch. Urug. Med., 40: 87-100, 1952. 

7. Hertzler, a. E.: Surgical Pathology of the Mammary Gland, Philadelphia, 1933, J. B. Lippin- 

cott Co. 

8. McDonald, J. R. and S. W. Harrington: Giant Fibroadenoma of thebreast- — "cystosarcoma 

phyllodes". Annals of Surgery. 131: 243-251, 1950. 

9. McLaren, D. M.: Giant fibroadenoma, Australian and New Zealand J. Surg., 22: 136-145, 1952. 

10. Oliver, R. L., and R. C. Major: Cyclomastopathy; A physio-pathological conception of some 

benign breast tumors, with an analysis of four hundred cases. Am. J. Cancer, 21: 1-86, 1934. 

11. Shellito and Bartlett: Giant Intracanalicular Fibroadenoma, J. Kansas M. Soc. 53: 509- 

510, 1952. 

12. Warren, S.: The relation of "chronic mastitis" to carcinoma of the breast, Surg., Gynec, and 

Obst., 71: 257, 1940. 



VENOUS ANGIOINIA AS THE CAUSE OF CEREBELLAR APOPLEXY: 

REPORT OF A CASE* 

LESTER R. XAGEL, M.D. and JOHN A. WAGNER, M.D. 

While being far from common, primary intracerebellar hemorrhages have been 
reported with some frequency. It is stated that the tirst such case was reported by 
Sedillot of Paris in 1813, and the second, by Huss in Sweden, 29 years later. In 
1932, ^lichael (1) recorded but 10 cases from 17,257 autopsies, including 1,112 
cases of cerebral hemorrhage. Ten years later, Mitchell and Angrist (2) reviewed 
109 cases found in the literature and added 15 cases of their own. In the same year, 
Friedman and Nielsen (3) added 4 cases. Since that time, several additional cases 
have been reported: one by Siris and Seller (4) in 1948, and one by Werden (5) in 
1951. ^lichael's series represented less than one per cent of intracranial hemorrhage, 
while that of ]\Iitchell and Angrist was 15 per cent. This disparity may be explained 
by the fact that cerebellar hemorrhage is one cause of sudden death, and the latter 
series included JMedical Examiner's material. 

ISIichael suggested that the rarity of cerebellar hemorrhage be ascribed to the literal 
anastomosis of blood vessels on both sides of the vermis. Mitchell and Angrist how- 
ever, made the interesting observation that the ratio of cerebellar to cerebral hemor- 
rhage is very similar to the ratio of the weight of the cerebellum to the cerebrum, 
thus contradicting the general impression that cerebellar hemorrhage is a rare lesion 
in contrast to its cerebral counterpart. These writers also concluded that the factor 
responsible for cerebellar hemorrhage differ in no major degree from those causing 
cerebral apoplexy. 

The clinical aspects of cerebellar hemorrhage varies with the degree of tissue 
destruction and the extension of the hemorrhage, which is more likely to be ventricu- 
lar rather than into the subarachnoid space (2). The signs and symptoms then de- 
pend upon meningeal irritation, increased pressure within the fourth ventricle and 
destruction of the cerebellum itself. So headache, stiffness of the neck, vomiting, 
irregularities of the pulse and respiratory rates, localizing neurologic signs and coma 
may be seen. When the area of hemorrhage is small, and the pressure within the 
fourth ventricle is little altered, a clinical diagnosis may be made. However, coma is 
the overshadowing symptom, often being present at the onset, appearing as though 
the patient were struck down by a blow (2, 3). Death, as a result of rupture into the 
fourth ventricle and compression of the medullary centers, occurs shortly, usually 
within a few hours, rarely more than 24 hours after the onset (2, 4). 

CASE REPORT 

The patient, a 63 year old white woman, was admitted to University Hospital with the history 
of having become stuporous shortly after arising on the day of admission. Past history contributed by 

* From the Pathology Service, U. S. Public Health Service Hospital and the Department of 
Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland. Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Received for publication April 12, 1955. 

64 



NAGEL AND W AG NER— VENOUS ANGIOMA 



65 





'-^ 



X_ 



-^ 



i m iii,i.ii> - ..,jiiii > iiiii | ii ji i i | i i i |iii|iiy m iiii|iii4uy 

s.s. 51^3 



Fig. 1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage about the circus arlcrii)sus ami over llie lateral surface of the 

left cerebellar hemisphere 
Fig. 2. Section through the cerebellum showing the extensive midline hemorrhage 



66 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 




4 5 

Fig. 3. Venous angioma; note the abnormal vessels immediately adjacent to the zone of hemorrhage 
Fig. 4. Venous angioma; note the tortuosity of the vessels together with the irregularity of size and 

vessel wall thickness 
Fig. 5. Venous angioma; note the variation in vessel wall thickness within the circumference of a 

single vessel 



NAG EL AND W AGNER— VENOUS ANGIOMA 67 

the family physician added a -^ to 4 \ear iiislory ui aitlirilis, willi 2 courses of gold therapy, each of 
which produced a remission of tlie arthritic symptoms. 

Pliysical Examination: 1 he i)atieiit was cnmalose on admission. Her hlood ])ressure was 150 nnn. 
of mercury .systolic, and SO mm. of men ury diastolic. '1 he pulse rale was 70 per minute, the resjjira- 
tory rate, 16 |)er minute, and the temperature was 98.6 F. She was thin and well devcloiJcd. The 
eyes were fixed anleriorl}, the pupils hcin;^ constricted and immobile. 'J'here was no nystagmus, and 
the corneal rellexts were not ])resent. Fun(lusco])ic examination was unsalisfactor)'. There was slight 
llattening of the face on the left. The gag rellex was present bilaterally, and the tongue deviated to 
the right. 'I here was no iuk hal rigidity. The extremities were in extension, with muscle tone e(|ual 
on both sides. Stimulation of both arms and legs elicited mild extensor responses. 

Moist rales were heard i)osteriorl\- over the right chest, and expiratory wheezes were heard over 
both bases. The heart did not a])pear to be enlarged, and its rate and rhythm were normal. A grade 
I mitral murmur was heard. The liver was palpable -t to 5 linger breadths below the right costal 
margin, and the spleen was felt two to three linger breadths below the left costal margin. The hands 
and feet showed deformity typical of rheumatoid arthritis. 

Tour hours after admission, a routine lumbar puncture was performed. The initial pressure was 
140 mm. of water. ,\bout 8 cubic centimeters of grossl}' bloody spinal fluid were obtained. The fluid 
d\namics ajjpeared normal, and the closing pressure was 80 mm. of water. Upon centrifuging the 
s|jinal fluid aj^peared xanthochromic. Eight hours after admission, the patient died. 

Autopsy Findings: The principal findings were limited to the brain. This showed edema and flatten- 
ing of the convolutions, .\reas of hemorrhage were noted in the subarachnoid space about the vessels 
at the base of the brain and over the left cerebellar hemisphere (Fig. 1). On section, a massive mid- 
line hemorrhage was found in the cerebellum (Fig. 2). At the region of the vermis, there was rupture 
into the fourth ventricle, with the entire ventricular system being distended with freshly clotted 
blood. In the left hemisphere of the cerebellum, the area of hemorrhage extended to the surface and 
into the subarachnoid space. 

Microscopic Examination: .\djacent to the extensive area of fresh hemorrhage were clusters of 
anomalous vessels. These extended a short distance into the cerebellar parenchyma and reached the 
surface in the midline where similar abnormal vessels were noted in the subarachnoid space. In some 
areas, the vessels were large, tortuous and bizarre (Figs. 3, 4), while in other areas, there were 
congeries of small vessels rather closely packed together. The vessel walls consisted of a flat endo- 
thelial lining resting upon dense connective tissue, the latter forming the principal mural element. 
Occasionally, there was endolhehal proliferation with focal heaping up of the cells. .\n clastic lamina 
was, on occasion, associated with the endothelium, but was more often absent. The structure of the 
vessels was often not constant, the wall being thin and delicate at one point, and at another being 
greatly thickened by abundant connective tissue and occasional rare smooth muscle fibers (Fig. 5). 
Some vessels remained thin-walled in their entire circumference, while others showed marked mural 
thickening by connective tissue. About some such vessels, strands of connective tissue extended into 
the neighboring nervous tissue. Associated with this were irregular foci of gliosis and clusters of sider- 
ophages. This pattern was suggestive of minor hemorrhages, both recent and remote, prior to the 
final catastrophe. In addition, there were scattered foci of necrosis of the granular layer of the cere- 
bellar cortex, and there was a light, dilTuse gliosis of the tissue separating the bizarre grou])S of 
vessels. 

DISCUSSION 

riic role of vascular anomalies in intracranial hemorrhage has been stressed by 
many writers (6, 7, 8, 9), and a careful search for angiomatous malformations or 
tumors should be made when an otherwise unexplained intracranial hemorrhage 
occurs. These are, on occasion, not easy to dcnionstralc, and the legion itself nia\' be 
lost in the area of hemorrhage. 

Because of the conflicting viewpoints concerning the structure of venous angioma, 
a redundant and confusing nomenclature has arisen. The widely used classification 



68 BILLETIX 01- HIE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE, U. 01- M D. 

of Cusliing and Bailey (10) rctognized this lesion as "angioma venosum." Turner and 
Kernohan (11) employed the same term, but regarded the lesion as a hamarloma 
rather than an angioma. Kergstrand, Oliveerone and Tonnis (12) termed the lesion 
"angioma racemosum \'enosum." Russel {\?>) applied the term ''cirsoid aneurysm"; 
RienholT (14), ''venous aneurNsm"; and Dandy (15), "venous anomaly" or "plexi- 
form angioma." In his classification, Noran (16) preferred the term "venous angioma" 
as the most descriptive, but accepted "venous racemous angioma" as well, because 
of its widespread use. 

The classic venous angioma is a cone-shaped lesion, the base in contact with the 
leptomeninges, and the ape.x e.xtending toward the ventricle. Witliin the brain there 
is a tangled mass of large vessels resembling veins, separated by thin layers of nervous 
tissue; less often, the vessels are more sparsely distributed through the invoKed 
area. ^lost of the vessels structurally resemble veins. The vessels are usually irregular 
and bizarre in shape. The walls are relatively thin, but may show j^rominent \aria- 
tion. Scattered vessels may present thick walls, and others may reveal marked ir- 
regularity within the circumference of a single vessel. The vessels themselves consist 
of a single layer of endothelium occasionally associated with a delicate elastic mem- 
brane, resting on connective tissue which forms the principal mural element. A few 
muscle fibers may appear, btit a prominent muscular layer does not occur in vessels 
regarded as venous in nature. The criteria for distinguishing between arteries and 
veins are not easy to apply; indeed, within a single vessel, the wall may look like thai 
of a vein in one area, and resemble that of an artery in another (17). Bertstrand et al. 
point out in their opinion, it may be impossible, on occasion to ascertain whether the 
vessels arc veins or arteries. 

STJMMARY 

A case of primar\- intracerebellar hemorrhage having its origin in a venous angioma 
(venous racemous angioma) is rej)orled. The literature is briefly reviewed. 

REFERENCES 

1. .Michael, J. C: Cerebellar apoplexy, Am. J. Med. Sci.. 183: 687-695, 1932. 

2. Mitchell, X., axd Axgrist, A.: Spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage. Am. J. Path.. 18: 9.^5- 

954, 1942. 

3. Friedm.\n, a. p.. and Xn:LSKN. J. M.: Cerebellar hemorrhage. Bull, l.os .\ngelcs Xcurol. Soc, 

6: 135-138, 1941. 

4. SiKis. J. H., .\ND Beller, a. J.: Spontaneous intracerebellar hemorrhage, Surg. Clin. X'. Amer- 

ica. 28: 412-415, 1948. 

5. W K.RUEX. D. H.: Spontaneous intracerebral and cerebellar hematoma. Bull. 1-os .\ngeles Xeurol. 

Soc, 16: 174-183, 1951. 

6. Bagley, C: Spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage. Arch. Xeurol. I'sxchiat., 27: 1133-1178, 1932. 

7. Hawkin, C. F., .\nd Rewell, R. E.: Unheralded, fatal hemorrhages in haemangiomata of the 

l)rain, Guys Hosp. Rep., 95: 88-91, 1946. 

8. Olivecroxe, H., AND RuvES, J.: Arteriovenous aneurysms of the brain. .\rch. Xeurol. Psychiat., 

59: 567-602, 1948. 

9. Margolis. G., Odom, G. L., Woodiiall, B., .-\xd Bloor, B. M.: The role of small angiomatous 

malformations in the production of intracerebral hematomas, J. X'eurosurg., 8: 564-575, 1951. 
10. CcsiiiNG, H., AND Bailey, P.: Tumors Arising from the Blood- Vessels of the Brain, Springfield 
and Baltimore, Charles C. Thomas, 1928. 



NAGEL AND WAGNER— VENOUS ANGIOMA 69 

11. Turner, A. O., and Kernoiian, J. \V.: Vascular iiiall'ornnilions and vascular luiiiors involving 

the spinal cord, Arch. Neurol. Psychiat., 46: 444-463, 1941. 

12. Hkkgstrand, H., Olivecrone, H., and Tonnis, W.: Gcfassmisshildungcn uiid Ciefassgesch- 

wulste des Gehirns, Leipzig, Georg Thieme, 1936. 
Iv^. Russell, D.: In discussion on vascular tumors of the hrain and spinal cord, I'roc. Roy. Soc. 
Med., 24: 263-288, 1931. 

14. Rienhokf, W. F., Jr.: Congenital arteriovenous tistula, Hull. Johns Hoi)kins Hosp., 35: 271-280, 

1924. 

15. Dandy, VV. E.: Venous abnormalities and angiomas of the brain, Arch. Surg., 17: 715 793, 1928. 

16. NoRAN, H. H.: Intracranial vascular tumors and malformations, Arch. I'alh., 39: 393-416, 

1945. 

17. Wolf, .\., .vnd Brock, S.: The pathology of cerebral angiomas, Bull. Neurol. Inst. New York, 

4: 144-176, 1935. 



OBSTETRICAL CASE STUDY1 

I'l.ACKNTA AcCKR;TA 

LOUIS C. (iARLIS, M.D. 

I'laccnta accreta is an unusual comiilicalion of pregnancy in whit h the j^Iacenta 
becomes adherent to the uterine wall so that manual removal is impossible. 

The following is the history and pathologic iindings in a recent case of placenta 
accreta. 

The patient is a 30 year old para 0-1-1-1, whose family and past history are non 
contributory. Her obstetric history is poor. In 1948, a 10 week pregnancy aborted, 
a D & C was done. In 1950 a laparotrachelotomy was done for placenta previa, the 
baby was premature but survived. 

The present pregnancy was marked by repeated episodes of bleeding all during 
her pregnancy. At 30 weeks the membranes ruptured, and after 6 days the patient 
delivered spontaneously a premature baby weighing 2 pounds. 

Following delivery the placenta could not be expressed. After 10 minutes the 
uterus was explored, the placenta was found to be in the left lower segment and 
adherent. The patient was bleeding actively. It is estimated that one-half of the 
surface was adherent. Complete placental removal was attempted, but this pro- 
cedure left a defect in the uterine wall in which a sulcus or crater was formed. Active 
bleeding continued and a total hysterectomy was done immediately. Blood loss was 
about 800 cc, the patient was at all times in good condition. 

The gross pathologic specimen shows a post partum uterus with a crater in the 
left lateral wall at the junction of the lower segment and the cervi.x. The crater was 
6 cm in diameter. Over a 3 cm area there was no uterine muscle at all, only serosa 
being present. 

The placental fragments were hard and friable many infarcts were present, its 
consistency was cartilaginous. 

INIicroscopally the muscle has been replaced by placental elements in many areas. 
The muscle is hemorrhagic and partially destroyed in many areas. 

DISCUSSION 

Placenta accreta is the diagnostic term used when there is a pathologic adherence 
to and/or invasion of the uterine wall by the placenta. There are three types: 1) 
placenta accreta in which the placenta is adherent only superficially; 2) placenta 
increla, in which the ])lacenta invades the muscle wall deeply; and 3) placenta per- 
crcla, in which the uterine wall is invaded to the serosal layer. The condition may be 
complete or partial, depending on the amount of placenta involved. 

Incidence 1 : 10,000 deliveries 

Etiology: It is seen more in multiparas; following intrauterine infections; cur- 
rettage; and in the presence of tumors such as fibroids or any condition in which the 
normal histolf)gy of the endometrium is disturbed. A previous histor}' of adherent 
placenta is common. 

t From llir r)oi);irlnHnt of ( )l>stcliics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. 

70 




Fig. 1 ANu 2. Microscopic sections showing Irophoblaslic invasion of ihe uterine muscle 

71 



I 



72 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Pathology: Usually the spongiosum layer of the decidua basalis is absent or dis- 
torted. Nitabuch's Layer is also missing (this is a layer of hyaline found at the base 
of the spongiosum layer). 

Treatment: A hysterectomy should be done as soon as the condition is disclosed. 
Adcciuate use of blood transfusions is imperative. 

The above case history illustrates the value of early diagnosis and treatment 
before blood loss becomes excessive and shock ensues. 

BlUlAnVAi.WVW 

1. Clxnccology and ()l)stetrics I'alhology, Novak, 1053. 

2. Greenhill Olistetrics, 1^53. 

3. Placenta Accreta — Kaltreider— Bulletin of Univ. of Md. .School of .Medicine 1<M5 \'ol. 30. 



Bulletin of 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

VOLUME 41 J^^hj ^^^^ NUMBER 3 

EDITORIAL 

ADMISSION TO YOUR MEDICAL SCHOOL 

JOHN C. KRANTZ, JR.* 

Sir William Osier very cogently asserted: "Only a good man can be a great physi- 
cian." Osier exemplified in his own life that this virtue of goodness must be buttressed 
by culture, sound medical knowledge, critical thinking and Osier's magic word 
"work." 

To maintain this high standard of integrity and scholarship among physicians, 
most medical schools of the United States have appointed committees on admission 
to select carefully those who apply to study medicine. This is essential if the doctor 
is to maintain his position of professional and social prestige in a highly competitive 
society. 

Of the 14,538 who applied to study medicine in 1955 in the United States, 7,549 
were admitted. One must willingly admit that perhaps among those young men 
rejected there are some who might have become successful physicians had they been 
given the chance. 

Human judgment is seldom infallible, but the admission committees must judge 
the physician potential in the young man or woman at the time application is made. 
And these are formative years in the students' life. Those admitted to the Schools 
of Medicine are, in the judgment of these committees, the young people with the 
greatest physician potential. 

But what is the basis for the selection of medical students? Not all admission 
committees function in exactly the same manner. In the Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland the procedure for selection of the 96 Freshmen students each 
year should be of interest to our Alumni, for these are the men who will join your 
ranks in the j)ractice of medicine. 

It is clear that since over 800 students usually api)ly for entrance and only 96 are 
accepted, admission is on a competitive basis. A good college record is necessary. 
It need not be that of a genius. Four years of college is more desirable than three 
years. The additional year is a maturing process. In addition, an aptitude for medi- 
cine is essential. This is measured by the Medical Student's Aptitude Test. Su( cess 
in this test correlates well with success in the course in the medical school. 

* Member of the Committee on .\fimissions. 

73 



74 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XE, V. OF MD. 

The professors who leach these students for several years in their respective 
colleges generally formulate an opinion of the student which is dependable. The 
Committee lays great stress on the recommendations which the student brings from 
his college teachers. 

A personal interview is often a revealing experience. Our applicants are seen by 
members of the Admissions Committee in a friendly personal interview. The appli- 
cant is always put at ease. Interviews consume from 10 to 30 minutes. Basic science 
teachers and clinicians are members of the Admissions Committee. Their separate 
evaluations of the applicants are brought before the Committee and discussed at 
length. Agreement of evaluation of the student by individual interviewers is usual. 
Occasionally a divergence of opinions arise. If this is the case, additional interviews 
may be recjuired with other Committee members in order to achieve a consensus. 
Once the decision to admit or reject a student is decided, the individual is promptly 
notified. 

The School of ^ledicine receives 67 per cent of its support from State tax funds. 
It is therefore incumbent upon the School to give first choice to the applicants who 
are citizens of ^laryland. 

We strive to select from suitable ^Maryland applicants about two-thirds of the class. 
The remaining one-third is selected from the best qualified non-residents of the 
State. 

The Committee is eager always to have as students in the University of Maryland, 
School of ^Medicine, the sons and daughters of its Alumni. Every consideration is 
given to these applicants. However, it is clear that the admission to a medical school 
is dependent upon a number of factors, as have been enumerated. We therefore urge 
}'ou, if you have children in high school or college who are contemplating studying 
medicine, to see to it that they acquire good study habits. Furthermore, we suggest 
that you endeavor to have them apply themselves to their scholastic duties so that 
they may make application, if they desire, to this School with a creditable scholastic 
record. 

We are endeavoring to maintain a standard of admission so that our graduates, 
your fellow Alimini, will meet the high calling of the physician so magnificently 
exemplified by Sir William Osier. 



{Special Arlicle) 

THE USE OF THE PROTEOLYTIC ENZYMES IX SURGERY 

JOSEPH M. MILLER, M.D.* 

Clotted human blood in vitro may dissolve spontaneously upon standing. This 
effect is produced by plasmin. Its inactive precursor, plasminogen, which is present 
in the euglobulin fraction of human plasma, is converted to plasmin by a humoral 
activator or by one of a number of other substances. 

Streptokinase, secreted by streptococci into their culture medium, is such an 
activator. Although other organisms elaborate a similar principle, streptokinase is 
unique in the speciticity and the rapidity with which it transforms plasminogen into 
plasmin. The exact mechanism of action remains to be determined. There is con- 
flicting evidence as to whether streptokinase activates plasminogen directly or in- 
directly. 

Partially purified preparations of streptococcal filtrates also contain streptodornase, 
which actually is a group of depolymerizing enzymes, activated by magnesium or 
manganese ions. These enzymes digest desoxyribonucleoprotein and desoxyribo- 
nucleic acid, the major constituents of viscous exudates, to phosphoric acid, desoxy- 
ribose, purines and pyrimidines. The depolymerized products are not as viscid as 
their parent substances and are easily removed from the wound. The viscid desoxy- 
ribonucleic acid clumps polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes and prevents 
their movement. Since such leukocytes function as phagocytes only when they are 
in an amoeboic state, streptodornase, by degrading this complex nucleic acid, en- 
hances phagocytosis. 

Streptokinase and streptodornase do not digest collagen. The removal of this 
substance poses a problem in certain infections but aid cannot be expected from the 
use of these digestants. 

Streptokinase and streptodornase do not affect living cells. Damage of tissues has 
not been seen from the use of the compounds. 

Streptokinase is used locally wherever fibrin is a deterrent to healing as in collec- 
tions of clotted blood or pus. The plasminogen-plasmin system must be present to 
be activated to obtain lysis of fibrin. The use of streptodornase is indicated wherever 
purulent material is present. The methods of application of streptokinase and strepto- 
dornase vary with the anatomic site of the lesion. For collections of clotted blood 
and/or pus, the quantity of the substances instilled should be proportionate to the 
size of the cavity. Debridement of surface lesions can be effected by application of 
the substances in carboxymethylcellulose jelly or in lubafax, or on a surgical gauze 
or nylon dressing kept moist with the solution. To obtain good results, streptokinase 
and streptodornase must make adecjuate contact with their respective substrates 
in the lesion. 

Streptokinase, when administered intramuscularly, has a specific and ameliorating 
effect upon the healing of inflammation. The edema fluid in such lesions contains a 

* Surgical Service, Veterans .Administration Hosjntal. Fort Howard, ^L^r^•iand. 

75 



I 



76 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

larj^c amount of fibrin. Coagulation of this substance in the affected tissues and the 
formation of small thrombi in the arteries, capillaries, veins and lymphatics of the 
region help to localize the damaged area. This walling-oflf process becomes what 
many surgeons term a limiting membrane. 

Traditionally this defense curtain has been correctly regarded as a beneficial 
structure inasmuch as it inhibits the spread of infection. The preservation of the 
continuity of this membrane has been considered a basic surgical necessity. 

The advent of streptokinase has produced a change in thought about this barrier. 
The antibacterial drugs are of little value in the treatment of abscesses, walled-off 
cellulitis and similar infections. Being borne by the blood, the antibacterial drugs 
cannot pass through the membrane from without any more than can pathogenic 
bacteria from within. 

Streptokinase, given intramuscularly, acts upon the plasminogen-plasmin system. 
Plasmin changes the chemical barrier about the area of inflammation apparently 
by a lysis of fibrin and a resultant decrease in viscosity of the edema fluid. This per- 
mits resorption of fluid. The circulation to the part is improved and so the amount 
of antibacterial drugs reaching the bacteria is larger, resulting in an accelerated 
resolution of the inflammation present. 

Streptokinase, 5,000 units in 0.5 physiologic saline, is given intramuscularly in 
the gluteal region, twice a day for a minimum of 6 doses. Treatment may be given 
longer if it is necessary. One of the antibacterial drugs must be given either orally 
or parenterally to attack the bacteria and prevent a spreading infection. About 60 
per cent of patients complain of pain and tenderness at the site of injection, but 
these disappear about 24 hours after the cessation of treatment. About 10 per cent 
of the patients will have a rise in temperature of about 2 to 3 degrees F. The slight 
prolongation of the prothrombin time observed is not clinically significant. Strepto- 
kinase and streptodornase should not be used in patients with defects in the clotting 
mechanism because of the fear of bleeding. 

Streptokinase and streptodornase are antigenic substances capable of stimulating 
the production of antibodies. The presence of high titers of these substances do not 
affect the therapeutic actions of streptokinase and streptodornase when sufficient 
amounts of the drugs are used. Allergic reactions to these substances have not been 
observed. 

Solutions of streptokinase and streptodornase in physiologic saline should not be 
stored for more than 24 hours to insure the presence of maximum potency of the 
substances. When suspended in lubafax or in carboxymethylcellulose jelly for local 
use, the drugs can be used for about 3 days. Solutions and suspensions of streptokinase 
and streptodornase must be kept in a refrigerator when they are not being used. 

Trypsin, extracted from mammalian pancreatic glands, attacks fibrin deposited 
in a wound in two ways. By direct proteolyzing effect, the enzyme hydrolyzes fibrin 
into soluble polypeptides. Trypsin also effects activation of plasminogen to plasmin 
which then lyses fibrin. Prothrombin, thrombin, albumins and globulins are also 
attacked by the enzyme. The physicochemical nature of the substrates in the wound 
is important when considering their digestion by enzymes. Denaturation of proteins, 
which occurs in infected wounds, produces an unfolding of closely packed peptide 



MILLER- P ROT EOLVriC EXZYMES IX SURGERY 77 

chains. This action increases the susceptibility of the protein to enzymatic action 
by making specific chemical groups more accessible to tryptic action. The phagocytic 
action of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes is enhanced by trypsin. 

Some of the polypeptides produced by the proteolytic action of trypsin may e.xert 
a biochemical action of their own. The digestion of casein by trypsin produces poly- 
peptides capable of affecting capillary permeability. The action of trypsin at the 
site of infection could give rise to polypeptides which may produce chills and fever. 
Since the antihistaminic drugs decrease capillary permeability, routine premedica- 
tion with one of these drugs should accompany the local use of trypsin in the treat- 
ment of hemothoraces or deeply placed infected wounds. 

Trypsin will attack collagen slowly. Repeated applications of the enzyme are 
necessary, however, before lysis is obtained. 

Trypsin is not active on and does not harm living tissues since it has been shown 
that trypsin does not penetrate the viable cell membrane. In addition, each cell 
contains a specific trypsin inhibitor which protects it from the proteolytic action 
of the enzyme. Blood serum also contains specific and nonspecific inhibitors of 
trypsin which counteract the effects of trypsin. Certain minimal amounts of trypsin 
must be given to overcome this retarding action before any proteolysis will be noted 
clinically. 

Trypsin has not produced signs of sensitization. The enzyme may be used with 
safety over long periods of time or recurrently after prolonged intervals. 

For local use, trypsin can be applied to the affected part in a number of ways. 
The powder may be blown on with a De Vilbiss powder blower or sprinkled directly 
upon the wound from the vial. Trypsin dissolved in Sorenson's phosphate buffer 
solution can be used as a wet dressing, by irrigation or by instillation. The enzyme 
dissolved in Sorenson's phosphate buffer solution may be added to lubafax to form 
an ointment. 

Trypsin, given intramuscularly, apparently acting through the plasminogen- 
plasmin mechanism, has the ability to produce the regression of inflammation and 
edema. It is suspected that the mechanism of activation of the lytic system by 
streptokinase and trypsin differ but the details of the reactions are not known. 

Trypsin, 0.005 grams in 1.0 cc. of physiologic saline, is given intramuscularly, 
twice a day for a minimum of 3 days. Treatment may be given longer if necessary. 
An antibacterial drug must be given orally or parenterally when treatment with 
trypsin is given. Varying degrees of pain and tenderness occur at the site of injection. 
In many patients, they were minimal and not greater than would be expected from 
the intramuscular injection of any drug. In others, the pain and tenderness were 
more severe. A rise in temperature attributable to the administration of trypsin 
was not noted in any of the patients. A significant prolongation of the clotting time 
was not observed. Trypsin should not be given intramuscularly to patients with 
defects in the clotting mechanism due to the possibilites of hemorrhage. 

Since solutions of trypsin lose about 50 per cent of their proteolytic activity within 
4 hours, they should be used immediately. When suspended in lubafax, the enzyme 
can be used for about 2 days. Suspensions of trypsin must be stored in a refrigerator 
when they are not being used. 



78 BLLLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The proteolytic enzj'mes offer the surgeon a new biologic approach to the treat- 
ment of clotted hemothorax and infections. The results of local treatment of infected 
wounds with the enzymes are uniformly good so that if healing is not obtained, some 
factor deterrent to the effective use of the enzymes must exist and must be removed. 
The enzymes, used systemically, by changing the chemical barrier about inflamma- 
tion and edema, permit the antibacterial drugs to reach the bacteria in a larger 
amount and cause regression of the infection and swelling. The local and/or the 
systemic uses of the enzymes must be considered adjuncts to and not substitutes for 
thoughtful and competent surgical management. 



A NEW VASCULAR INSTRUMENT FOR REPAIR OF 
SACCULAR ANEURYSMS*! 

JOHN M. ALLEN, M.D. and K. ADAMS COWLEY, I\LD. 

The surgical repair of vascular aneurysms recjuires instruments which can be 
relied upon to prevent exsanguinating hemorrhage and yet not weaken or damage 
the arterial wall by their application. Such an instrument, to secure maximum safety, 
should jiermit the continuous flow of blood thru a portion of the customary vascular 
channel. It should be simj)le in design, fit snugly, hold without slipping, and yet 
be easy to apply and remove. It must be compact, without extensions or handles, 
so that it may be j^laced in remote areas with little dil^culty. Such a clamp has 
been devised to meet the above criteria and has been used successful!}' to repair 
an aneurysm of the a.scending aorta. 

The clamp consists of two parallel, curved, stainless steel blades which are adjust- 
able at either end. To promote stability, one end of the clamp is partially fixed and 
adjustable while the other end can be opened completely. The blades are smooth, 
flat, and thin. The inner surface of the blades are serrated longitudinally with the 
grooves matched to prevent slipping (Fig. 1). A curved Rochester Pean forcep can 
be used at either end of the clamp to facilitate approximation of the blades on the 
blood vessel wall. The nuts are then adjusted on the clamp to the desired tension 
on the blood vessel wall. After the curved forceps were removed the operating field 
is left unobstructed and free of cumbersome handles which are found on many other 
vascular instruments. Such advantages are obvious when the surgeon must consider 
obstructing the neck of an aneurysm in some seemingly inaccessible area. 

C. T. H. (No. 073-1-88) A 53 year old white man was admitted to University 
Hospital, May 16, 1955, with a complaint of constant aching pain under the right 
pectoral muscle which, on exertion, radiated to the right scapula and down the 
medial aspect of the left arm. These symptoms began 6 weeks prior to admission at 
which time he was treated unsuccessfully for pleurisy with antibiotics and narcotics. 
Twenty years ago the patient was treated for gonorrhea and at the time refused 
treatment for syphilis. On examination, the peripheral pulses were found to be equal 
and full, B.P. right arm 120/60 mm. of Hg, left arm 110/70 mm. Hg. The trachea 
was in the midline; there was no tug. On the anterior chest wall, immediately below 
the right clavicle, a thrust was palpable which was synchronous with the heart beat. 
A soft blowing systolic murmur was heard in the second and third right intercostal 
spaces near the sternum. His general physical e.xamination was otherwise normal. 

The serologic test for syphilis was positive on two occasions (Reagin titer 64 and 
128). Other laboratory findings, including the electrocardiograms were normal. 
Roentgenograms and aortograms showed a large saccular aneurysm of the ascending 
aorta. The heart and lungs appeared normal (Fig. 2, A and B). 

* P'rom the Dc])arlnieiU of Surf^cr\-, l'iiiversit>' of Maryland, School of Medicine. 
t Received for j)ul)lication Eehruary 20, 1956. 

The first clamp was fabricated b>- Murray-Baumgartner Surgical Instrument Company, Inc., 5 
West Chase Street, liaitimore, .M<1., under the supervision of Drs. Co\vle\' anrl Allen. 

79 




Fig. 1. Aortic clamp open. The serrations are grooved longitudinally and matched. The above 
nuts may be replaced with "wing" nuts. 




I"i(.. 2 i'A and Bi. A Postern anterior view of the right [)leural cavity. B — Same view during 
retrograde aortography. Xote part of aneurysmal sac not filled because of clot formation. 

80 



ALLEN AND COWLEY— NEW VASCULAR INSTRUMENT 



81 



Mm^>:^.- 







82 



BlLLEriX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XE, l\ OF MD. 



With these t'lndings a diagnosis of cardiovascular syphilis witli an aneurysm of the 
ascending aorta was made and the patient received 12,(JU(),()0() units of penicillin 
I.M. during the next ten days. 

On June lOth, the patient developed sudden severe pain and blanching of the 
right leg and foot. A diagnosis of popliteal obstruction because of embolization was 
made. Shortly thereafter he underwent a right popliteal embolectomy with good 
results. It was felt the embolus had dislodged from the aneurysm. Repair of the 
aneurysm was advised and accepted. 

On June 22, 1955, under endotracheal nitrous oxide, o.xygen, and ether anesthesia, 
the chest was entered anteriorally through a transverse incision. Both pleural cavities 
were free of adhesions except where the aneurysm was tixed to the right anterior 
chest wall beneath the sternum. The aneurysm measured approximately 7.5 centi- 
meters in length and protruded anlerioralh- and laterally approximately the same 
distance. The aneurysmal sac was freed from the anterior chest wall, the mediastinal 
pleura, superior vena cava, and the trachea, by careful sharp and blunt dissection. 
The neck of the sac was wide and extended almost the length of the ascending aorta. 
The aorta above the coronary arteries was momentarily occluded by linger compres- 
sion and the specially devised clamp quickly applied to the base of the aneurysmal 
sac. It was then closed in position with a Rochester Pean forcep at each end. After 
noting adequate room for aortic blood flow past the clamp, the aorta was released 
from finger compression and the nuts properly adjusted to i)ermit removal of the 
Rochester Pean forceps. The sac was then excised leaving a one centimeter cuff 




Fig. 4. Postero anterior chest roentgenogram live months after excision of aneurysm. 



ALLEN AND COWLEY^NEW VASCULAR INSTRUMENT M 

distal to the clamp. The cuff was closed with interrui)ed mattress sutures of 3-0 
silk. This row was then reinforced with "end-on" sutures of the same material. 
The clamp was slowly released without leakage of l)lood from the suture line and the 
clamp was then completely removed (Fig. 3). 

The suture line extended along the antero-lateral aspect of the ascending aorta 
from about 1 centimeter above the coronary oritice to the innominate artery. The 
mediastinal pleura was reappro.ximated and the chest wall closed in the routine 
manner after draining both pleural cavities with underwater trap drainage. Dur- 
ing the operation the patient received 1000 cc. of whole citrated blood. 

The post operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged July 
6, 1055. He has been followed at frequent intervals with serial roentgenograms of 
the chest; the last of these was taken November 20, 1955 (Fig. 4). He is now em- 
ployed at his previous occupation as a truck driver. He is without symptoms. 

SUMMARY 

A new vascular clamp for the surgical treatment of aneurysms is presented. A 
case report of resection of an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, in which this instru- 
ment was used successfully, is given. 



I 



DEPARTMENT 

OF 

OBSTETRICS ^S: GYNECOLOGY 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Summary of Admissions 

and 

Perinatal Mortality 



July I, 1954 through June 30, 1955 



84 



DEPT. OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY— ANNUAL REPORT 



85 



I. SUMMARY 



1 . Number of patients discharged . . 

2. Number of patients delivered 
and discharged (twins 48 sets) . . . 

A. Patients delivered of viable 
infants 

B. Patients aborting 

3. Maternal Mortality 

A. Rate per 1000 live births 

4. Number of viable babies born . . . 

A. Term 

B. Premature* 

C. Immature! 

5. Number born alive 

A. Term 

B. Premature 

C. Immature 

6. Number stillborn 

A. Term 

B. Premature 

C. Immature 

7. Number of neonatal deaths 

A. Term 

B. Premature 

C. Immature 

8. Total perinatal mortality 

A. Rate per 1000 live births 

Rate deducting immature de- 
liveries 



9. 



White Ward 



347 
3 

0.0 

294 

54 

4 

291 

51 
1 

3 
3 
3 

6 
5 
1 

59.6 

48.3 



395 
350 



352 

343 



Colored 



12 



21 



1785 

1539 

1522 

19 (twins 3) 
4 
2.6 

1278 

234 

38 

1268 

220 

21 

10 
14 
17 

4 
16 
19 

53.1 

29.3 



1550 



1509 



41 



39 



80 



Private 



1334 

1201 

1152 

51 (twins 3) 



1086 
67 
10 

1079 
60 

5 

7 

7 



1163 



1144 



19 



3 

4 
4 

27.8 

19.8 



13 



32 



Total 



3021 
73 

1.3 

2658 

355 

52 

2638 

331 

27 

20 
24 
25 

15 

25 
24 

43.5 

27.4 



3514 
3090 



3065 



2996 



69 



64 



133 



* A premature baby is one which weighs between 1001 grams and 2500 grams. 
t An immature baby is one which weighs between 401 grams and 1000 grams. 



II. TOTAL DELIVERIES BY NUMBER OF PRENATAL EXAMINATIONS 













FeUl Loss 




White Ward 


Xegro 


Private 


Total 






No. 


Per cent 





107 


183 


1 


291 


39 


13.4 


1-3 


20 


72 


25 


117 


21 


17.9 


4^7 


53 


207 


114 


374 


29 


7.8 


8 or more 


148 


1049 


982 


2179 


37 1.7 


Elsewhere 


16 


8 


10 


34 


2 5.9 


Unknown 


8 


31 


31 


70 


5 7.1 








Total 


352 


1550 


1163 


3065 


133 


4.34 



I 



86 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MFIDICINE, U. OF AID. 



III. TOTAL DELIVERIES BY PRESENTATION 



Presentation 


White Ward 


Neero 


Private 


Total 


Fetal Loss 






No. 


Per cent 


Vertex 

Breech 

Face 

Brow 

Compound 

Transverse 

Unknown 


319 
28 
2 

1 
2 



1463 
63 
6 
1 
7 
9 
1 


1115 

42 

2 



1 
3 



2897 

133 

10 

1 

9 

14 

1 


90 

33 
2 


5 
2 

1 


3.1 

24.8 
20.0 
0.0 
55.0 
14.3 
100.0 






Total 


352 


1550 


1163 


3065 


133 


4.34 


Twins and other mul- 
tiple births 


10 


57 


23 


90 


10 


11.1 



IV. TOTAL OPERATIONS FOR DELIVERY 
A. Forceps and Cesarean Section and Other Operations 





White 
Ward, 
No. 


Negro, 

No. 


Private , 
No. 


Total 


Fetal Loss 




No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% 


Low forceps, elective 

Low forceps, indicated* 

Mid forceps, elective 


206 

16 

2 




824 

100 

8 

5 


863 

61 

32 




1893 

177 
42 

5 


61.8 
5.8 
1.4 
0.1 


21 

7 




1.1 
4.0 
0.0 


Mid forceps, indicated* 


0.0 


Total Forceps 


224 


937 


956 


2117 


69.0 


28 


1.3 


Cesarean section 


.5t 


86 


24 


125 


4.1 


9 


7.2 






Breech, spontaneous 

Breech, extraction 

Breech, decomposition 

Breech, forceps to after-coming 
head 


4 
19 

4 

15 


13 

42 

3 

34 


7 

32 



23 


24 
93 

7 

72 


0.8 
3.0 
0.2 

2.3 


15 

13 



7 


62.5 

14.0 

0.0 

9.7 


Total Breech 


27 


58 


39 


124 


4.1 


28 


22.6 






Craniotomy and other destructive 

operations 

Version and extraction (single) 

Version and extraction (multiple) . . . 
Spontaneous . 






85 




4 

1 

464 




2 



142 




6 

1 

691 


0.0 
0.2 

22.5 








68 


0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
9.9 









* Indicated forceps refer to delivery after 2 hours of second stage labor, 
t 1 set twins. 



DEPT. OF OBSTETRICS AND GYX ECOLOGY —ANNUAL REPORT 



B. Episiotomy 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


ToUl 


Median 

3° laceration 


255 
9 
3.5 

10 
3.9 



0.0 


0.0 


1041 
50 
4.8 

31 
3.0 



0.0 


0.0 


1020 

13 
1.3 

20 
2.0 

8 

0.0 


0.0 


2316 

72 


Per cent 

4° laceration 

Per cent 

Mediolateral 

3° laceration 

Per cent 


3.1 

61 
2.6 

8 

0.0 


4° laceration 





Per cent 


0.0 






Total 


255 


1041 


1028 


2324 



C. Other Operations 



Hysterostomatomy 

External version 

Induction of lalior liy rupture of mem- 
branes 

Pitocin induction 

Induction of labor, other 

Pitocin stimulation 

Manual removal of placenta 

Repair of cervical laceration 

Repair of vaginal laceration 

Prolajise of cord 

Willet forceps 

Single transfusion 

Multiple transfusion 

Shoulder dystocia 



White 

Ward, 

No. 



1 




11 

2 

9 

15 

13 

17 

3 



12 

17 





Negro, 
No. 



3 
3 

3 
18 

5 
22 
33 
78 
61 

6 

1 
84 
66 

5 



Private, 
No. 



3 
11 

5 
44 

5 
46 
41 
19 
19 

3 


23 



Total 



No. 



7 
14 



73 
12 
77 
89 

110 

97 

12 

1 

119 

91 

6 



% Del. 



0.2 
0.4 

0.3 
2.4 
0.4 
2.5 
2.9 
3.6 
3.2 
0.3 

3.9 
3.0 
0.2 



Fetal Loss 



No. 



% 



14.3 
0.0 

0.0 

10.9 

8.3 

9.1 



33.3 
0.0 



33.3 



D. Total Number 


of Deliveries 


with Previous Cesarean Section 








White 

Ward, 

No. 


Negro. 
No. 


Private, 
No. 


Total 


Fetal Loss 




No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% 


Vaginal delivery 


2 

9 


9 
23 


5 
14 


16 
46 


0.5 
1.5 


2 



12.5 


Repeat cesarean section 


0.0 


Total 


11 


32 


19 


62 


2.0 


2 


3.2 



88 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



V. TOTAL NUMBER OF LIVE BIRTHS ACCORDING TO WEIGHT AND CONDITION 

AT DISCHARGE 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 


Hirth Weik'ht, (Irams 


Total 

live 

births 


Died 


% 
Deaths 


Total 

live 

births 


Died 


Deaths 


Total 

live 

births 


Died 


% 
Deaths 


Total 

live 

births 


Died 


% 
Deaths 


401-1000 

1001-1500 

1501-2000 

2001-2500 

2501 &over 


1 

4 

18 

29 

291 


1 
3 
2 

6 


100.0 

75.0 

11.1 

0.0 

2.1 


21 

31 

45 

144 

1268 


19 

11 

3 
2 
4 


90.6 

35.5 

6.7 

1.4 

0.3 


5 

11 

6 

43 

1079 


4 
2 
2 


5 


80.0 

18.2 

33.3 

0.0 

0.5 


27 

46 

69 

216 

2638 


24 

16 

7 

2 

15 


88.8 

34.8 

10.1 

0.9 

0.6 


Total 


343 


12 


3.5 


1509 


39 


2.6 


1144 


13 


1.1 


2996 


64 


2.1 



VI. TOTAL NUMBER OF STILLBIRTHS ACCORDING TO WEIGHT 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 


Birth Weight, Grams 


3-^ 




6§ 


1^ 






•5 




6? 


J3 


55 


65 


401-1000 

1001-1500 

1501-2000 

2001-2500 

2501 & over 


34 

5 

20 

29 

294 


3 
1 
2 

3 


75.0 

20.0 

10.0 

0.0 

1.0 


38 

36 

49 

149 

1278 


17 
5 
4 
5 

10 


44.8 

13.9 

8.2 

3.4 

0.8 


10 
15 

44 
1086 


5 
4 
2 
1 
7 


50.0 

26.6 

25.0 

2.3 

0.6 


52 

56 

77 

222 

2658 


25 

10 

8 

6 

20 


48.1 

17.8 

10.4 

2.7 

0.8 


Total 


352 


9 


2.6 


1550 


41 


2.6 


1163 


19 


1.6 


3065 


69 


2.2 



VII. TOTAL NUMBER OF STILLBIRTHS AND NEONATAL DEATHS 
ACCORDING TO WEIGHT 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 






A 






X 






A 








































d 






ta 






<a 










Weight, Grams 




^•S 






«3-0 






(ftJ-O 




.a 


<3-S 






'T. 


1- 




13 


^5 




13 


■a .2 




13 


H 
































"3.1: 


■9 o 




ni 


■S. o 




& 


£ o 




S 


£0 






r 


IXI 


6§ 


^ 


CA) 


^ 


fS 


(/3 


feS 


^ 


49 


6? 


401-1000 


4 


4 


100.0 


38 


36 


94.7 


10 


9 


90.0 


52 


94.3 


1001-1500 


5 


4 


80.0 


36 


16 


44.4 


15 


6 


40.0 


56 


26 


46.5 


1501-2000 


20 


4 


20.0 


49 


7 


14.2 


8 


4 


50.0 


77 


15 


19.5 


2001-2500 


29 





0.0 


149 


7 


4.8 


44 


1 


2.3 


222 


8 


3.6 


2501 &over 


294 


9 


3.1 


1278 


14 


1.1 


1068 


12 


1.1 


2658 


35 


1.3 


Total 


352 


21 


6.0 


1550 


80 


5.2 


1163 


32 


2.8 


3065 


133 


4.34 



DEFT. OF OBSTETRICS AND GYXECOLOGY—AXXUAL REPORT 



89 



VIII. ETIOLOGY OF PERINATAL MORTALITY 



Hemorrhage, intracranial 

Precipitate lahor 

Breech 

Anoxia 

Placenta — premature se])aration of 

Placenta ]irevia 

Toxemia 

Cord — umbilical compression of . . . 

Complications — medical 

Shoulder dystocia 

Development — anomalies of 

Infections 

Immaturity 

Atelectasis 

Erythroblastosis 

Cndetermined 





Premature 








Full Term 






w.w. 


Negro 


Private 


W.W. 


Negro 


Private 





1 










1 




1 
















1 










1 













1 




6 


27 




6 


2 


11 




3 


5 


22 


4 




2 


2 










1 


1 















1 


2 


1 







2 










1 










1 


2 


















6 


1 







1 





















2 




1 













2 







1 













1 


20 




6 













1 


5 




1 


2 


2 




2 










1 


2 







3 


2 


11 




4 


3 







3 



Total 



1 
2 

35 
2 
6 

4 
7 
1 



3 
3 

27 

13 

6 

23 



IX. CAUSES OF PREMATURITY AND IMMATURITY 



Toxemia 

Hemorrhage 

Premature rupture of 
membranes 

Multiple i)regnancy 

Maternal diseases 

Cervical pathology 

Fetal abnormalities 

Fetal death in utero 

Undetermined 

Total 



White Ward 



4 

10 






4 

3 

18 



Negro 



44 
35 

38 
45 
5 
6 
7 
6 
86 



Private 



10 

6 

12 



2 

2 
5 

n 



Total 



56 



:>3 

65 

5 

8 

13 

14 

136 



Fetal Loss 



No. 



10 

32 

7 

10 

2 

1 

4 

14 

18 



Per cent 



17.8 
58.3 

12.7 
15.4 
40.0 
12.5 
30.7 
100.0 
13.2 



58 



272 



77 



407 



98 



24.1 



) 



90 



BULLETIX 01' THE SCHOOL OE MEDICLXE, U. OF MD. 



X, COMPLICATIONS 
A. Total Number of Deliveries with Toxemia 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 


Fetal Loss 




No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% 


Acute toxemia . . . 
Pre-eclampsia . . 

Eclampsia 

Chronic hyper- 
tension 

With toxemia. . 
Without tox- 
emia 


14 
14 


17 
3 

14 


4.0 

4.0 
0.0 

4.8 
0.8 

4.0 


109 
106 
3 

163 
18 

145 


7.1 
6.9 
0.2 

10.5 
1.2 

9.3 


35 

34 
1 

43 
4 

39 


3.0 

3.0 
0.0 

3.7 
0.4 

3.3 


158 

154 
4 

223 

25 

198 


5.2 
5.1 
0.1 

7.3 
0.8 

6.5 


5 
5 


22 
8 

14 


3.2 
3.2 
0.0 

9.9 
32.0 

7.1 


Total 31 


8.8 


272 


17.6 


78 


6.7 


381 


12.5 27 7.1 



B. Total Number of Deliveries — Rh Negative 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 


Fetal Loss 




No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% 


Rh Xeg., sensitized 

Rh Xeg., not sensitized. . . . 
Other isoimmunization 


7 

42 

2 


2.0 

11.9 

0.1 


10 

84 

3 


0.6 
5.4 
0.2 


22 

180 

3 


7.0 

15.5 


39 

306 

8 


1.3 

10.0 

0.2 


7 
8 



17.9 
2.6 
0.0 


Total 


51 


14.0 


97 


6.2 


205 


17.5 


353 


11.5 


15 


4.9 



C. Total Number of Deliveries with Medical C 


omplications 






White 
Ward. 

No. 


Negro, 
No. 


Private, 
No. 


Total 


Fetal Loss 




No 


% Del. 


No. 


% 


Heart disease 

No failure 

Failure 

Tuberculosis 

Pulmonary, active 

Pulmonary, inactive 

Elsewhere 

Diai)etes 

Sickle cell anemia 

Syphilis 


3 

2 

1 
2 



2 




4 


11 
9 
2 

16 
1 
13 
2 

8 

3 

52 


11 
11 


8 


7 

1 


3 


25 
22 
3 

26 
1 
22 
3 
12 
3 
59 


0.8 
0.7 
0.1 

0.8 

0.7 

0.1 

0.4 
0.1 
1.9 


1 
1 


1 


1 


3 

3 


4.0 

4.5 

0.0 

3.8 

0.0 

4.5 

0.0 

25.0 
0.0 
5.1 



DEPT. OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY—ANNUAL REPORT 



91 



D. Prolonged Labor 



Pitocin stimulation . . 
Spontaneous delivery 

Elective forceps 

Indicated forceps. . . . 
Cesarean section . . . . 
Breech 

Total 



White Ward 



Negro 



Private 



Total 



13 

3 
11 
7 
6 
1 



Fetal Loss 



No. 



Per cent 



0.0 

9.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



28 



41 



4.9 



E. Total Number of Deliveries by Pelvis 



Type of Pelvis 



Normal 

Contracted inlet 

Midplane contraction .... 

Outlet contraction 

Inlet and outlet 

Inlet and midplane 

Midi)lane and outlet 

Inlet, midplane and outlet 

Asymmetrical 

Unknown 

Total 



Cases 



W.W. 



245 
3 

10 
23 
1 

3 


67 



Negro 



1099 

27 

64 

137 

14 

8 

51 

23 

1 

126 



Private 



1107 

5 

17 

11 

1 

1 

7 

1 



13 



By X-ray 



W.W. 



49 
3 
6 
1 


3 


2 



Negro 



183 

15 

57 

21 

6 

5 

39 

19 

1 

2 



Pri- 
vate 



107 

3 

17 

5 


6 






Fetal Loss 
(Cases) 



No. 



70 
1 
1 
9 
3 

1 
3 


45 



% 



4.4 
2.9 
1.1 
5.3 

18.7 
0.0 
1.6 

12.5 
0.0 

21.8 



Fetal Loss 
(X-ray) 



No. 



% 

1.2 
0.0 
1.2 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 

15.8 
0.0 

50.0 



352 



1550 



1163 



64 



348 



138 



133 



4.34 



10 



1.8 



F. Total Number of Deliveries with Hemorrhage 



White 
Ward 



Negro 



Private 



Total 



No. 



% Del. 



Fetal Loss 



No. 



Antepartum Hemorrhage 



Placenta previa. . . 
Aljruptio placenta . 
Marginal sinus. . . . 
Ruptured uterus. . 
Other causes 

Total 



1 


8 


3 


12 


15 


30 


13 


58 


3 


4 


2 


9 


1 





2 


3 


5 


38 


15 


58 


25 


80 


35 


140 




Postpartum Hemorrhage* 



Total postpartum hemor- 
rhage 



10 



60 



18 



88 



2.9 



Postjiartum hemorrhage is defined as blood loss of 500 cc. or more. 



92 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF .\f EDI CINE, U. OF MD. 



G. Total Number of Deliveries According to Puerperal Morbidity 



Puerperal Morbidity 


White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


ToUl 




No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 


No. 


% Del. 

2.1 
1.3 
0.8 


No. 


% Del. 


One day fever 

Puerperal infection 

Other causes 


8 
15 
10 


2.3 
4.3 
2.8 


52 

123 

78 


3.4 
7.9 
5.0 


25 

15 

9 


85 

153 

97 


2.8 
5.0 
3.2 


Total 


2>i 


9.4 


253 


16.3 


49 


4.2 


335 


11.0 



XI. CESAREAN 


SECTIONS 








Type of Operation 


White 
Ward 


Negro 


Private 


ToUl 


Fetal Loss 




No. 


% 


Low cervical 


11 
1 

1 

2 



64 

1 
4 
8 
3 
6 


18 
1 

4 
1 



93 
3 
5 

12 
6 
6 


6 


1 
1 
1 



6.5 


Classical 

Classical with tubal sterilization 


0.0 
20.0 


Low cervical with tubal sterilization 

Classical and hysterectomy . . . 


8.3 
16.7 


Extraperitoneal 


0.0 


Total 


15 


86 


24 


125 


9 


7.2 



Indications for Cesarean Section 



1. Pelvic contractions and mechanical 
dystocia 

A. Contracted pelvis 

B. Uterine inertia 

C. Malpresentation 

D. Large fetus — normal pelvis 

2. Previous cesarean section 

3. Hemorrhagic complications 

A. Abruptio placentae 

B. Placenta previa 

C. Ruptured uterus 

4. Toxemia 

5. Diabetes 

6. Miscellaneous 

A. Elderly primigravida 

B. Prolapse of cord 

C. Bad obstetrical history 

D. Other 



White 
Ward 


Negro 


6 


49 


2 


31 


2 


13 


1 


2 


1 


3 


6 


16 


2 


12 





4 


1 


8 


1 








2 





2 


1 


5 








1 


4 











1 



Private 



12 
4 



Total 



a 

18 
3 
6 



5 

11 

2 



60 



34 
18 



Fetal Loss 



No. 



6.1 

11.1 

0.0 

0.0 



60.0 
9.1 
0.0 



0.0 

16.7 

0.0 

0.0 



6.7 



0.0 
22.2 



0.0 

0.0 

14.3 



DEPT. OF OBSTETRICS AXD GYN ECOLOGY—ANN UAL REPORT 



93 





XII. THERAPEUTIC ABORTIONS 




White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 















XIII. STERILIZATIONS 



Type of Operation 



A. Tubal, puerperium 

K. Tubal, not i:)regnant 

C. Accompanying cesarean sect. — tubal ligation. 

D. Accompanying therapeutic abortion — hysler 
otomy and tubal ligation 

E. Accomi)anying cesarean sect. — hysterectomj-. . 

F. Hysterectomy, not pregnant 

Total 



White Ward 



10 



Negro 



30 



11 


3 

7 



51 



Private 



Total 



35 



16 



3 

13 

67 



Indications for Sterilization 





White Ward 


Negro 


Private 


Total 


Diabetes 

Previous section 




1 

9 






7 
2 
33 

9 



4 



2 



12 


Hypertensive disease 

Multiparity 

Heart disease 


2 

42 




Other .... 


11 






Total 


10 


51 


6 


67 







XIV. MATERNAL DEATHS 



Total live births 

Total maternal deaths. . . . 
Total maternal death rate . 



2996 

4 

1.33 



Registered Inrths 

Maternal deaths in registered patients. . . . 
Maternal death rate in registered i)atients. 



2799 

1 

0.39 



Non-registered births , 

Maternal death in non-registered patients. . . . , 
Maternal death rate in non-registered patients. 



291 

3 

10.6 



94 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

L. \V. U.H. 055-6-62. This is a 23 year old, colored, unregistered female, para 2-0-2-0, admitted 
7/22/54 in labor. The patient began to bleed before admission and was bleeding actively after admis- 
sion and throughout labor. Admission blood pressure was 160/100 with 1 jilus proteinuria in the 
urine. She was treated for toxemia, put uj) under double set-up and found to be almost full)- dilated. 
Membranes ruptured and after a labor of 3 hours and 13 minutes, she delivered a premature living 
female weighing 2i2i grams. On the first day, postpartum, the patient had a temperature of 102.6. 
She was thought to have endometritis. At the same time there was mild and indefinite tenderness in 
the sole of the right foot and some tenderness elicited on squeezing the right calf. The following daj- 
the temperature was normal and these complaints were no longer present. She was afebrile for one 
week following deliverj- and was discharged on July 29, 1954 without an}' complaints. The following 
day the family called and stated that the patient was foaming at the mouth and was disoriented. 
She was brought to the hospital by ambulance and was dead on arrival. The medical examiner did 
an autopsy which revealed pulmonary embohsm secondary to thrombophlebitis of the right leg. 
Cause of death: Thromboj3hlel)itis of the right leg with secondary f)ulmonar\- embolism. 

N. D. U.H. 070-7-78. This is a 29 year old, unregistered, colored female, para 6-0-5-5, who was 
admitted to the hospital on 2/13/55 because of a duration of pregnancy of 4 months and vaginal 
bleeding. Briefly, this patient was in shock on admission and had a complete abruptio; and because 
of a very strong reUgious beUef, refused blood. An abdominal hysterotomy was done and the patient 
delivered of a stillborn, immature fetus. Shock was severe and became worse. The patient developed 
afibrinogenemia and was oozing constantly, postoperativeh-. This could not be controlled without 
transfusion, in spite of fibrinogen being given and other methods of support. The patient died 27 hours 
after admission because of abruption of the placenta in mid pregnancy with afibrinogenemia and 
refusal of blood transfusions. 

L. J. U.H. 070-9-24. This is a 17 year old, colored, unregistered female, primigravida, admitted to 
the hospital at 7:40 pm on February 15th. At that time the patient was complaining of vaginal bleed- 
ing. The duration of pregnancy on admission was 4 to 5 months, although it was impossible to get a 
history of the last menstrual period. Soon after admission she dehvered a 482 gram infant with the 
placenta intact. The patient had previously confessed to one of the nursing help that this was a self 
induced abortion with the use of a tooth brush and a rubber tube with a wire inside. The following 
course was one of sepsis, shock and marked oliguria, followed by anuria; and later, uremia. The 
patient succumbed in the early afternoon of February 17th, two days after admission. Autopsy was 
obtained; and in addition to evidence of severe local and generalized infection, there was an acute 
cortical necrosis of the kidney and terminal pulmonary edema. 

M. G. U.H. 047-7-84. This is a 20 year old, colored, registered primigravida who was admitted 
6/5/55 at 5:30 AM in the 24th to 26th week of gestation with a blood pressure of 210/120 and 4 plus 
proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively throughout that early morning; but at 2:00 
PM that afternoon she had a generalized convulsion with the blood i)ressure at 240/140 at that time. 
The patient was still treated conservatively with the routine toxemic regime, and 5^ 2 hours later she 
showed some evidence of shock with the l)lood pressure dropping abruptly to the levels of 150 to 160 
over 120. From here on until the following morning, when she expired, the [latient's condition was 
generallj' poor, that of being unconscious all the time and periods of shock with blood pressures as 
low as 110/96. Just prior to the patient's exodus, the blood pressure again cUmbed to 210/140. The 
patient died at 11:00 .\m the day after admission. Autopsj' was obtained and showed a massive 
cerebral hemorrhage in the right parietal lobe. There was also subarachnoid hemorrhage over the 
right parietal lobe. Cause of death: Eclampsia; cerebral hemorrhage. 



THE PROBLEM OF CEREBRAL PHLEBOTHROMBOSIS; AN ANALYSIS 

OF 22 CASES* 

JOHN A. WAGNER, M.D., POMEROY NICHOLS, JR., M.D., JOSE ALVAREZ 
DE CHOUDENS, M.D., and JAMES S. BROWNE, M.D. 

CASE mSTORY 

On September 1, 1950, a parturient woman of 31 was admitted to the hospital, 
following a convulsive seizure. In a rural hospital on August 24, she had been de- 
livered of a full-term normal child. Prenatal or intrapartum complications were not 
recorded. She had been entirely well until the sixth postpartum day when she noticed 
beginning numbness of the left side of her body. Early in the morning of the next 
day, she suffered a convulsion which was followed by weakness of the left side, in 
turn shortly followed by a second grand mal seizure. She was then admitted to the 
same local hospital where she had been previously delivered. A spinal puncture at 
this time showed a pressure of 180 mm. of water, the fluid containing 160 leukocytes 
per cubic millimeter, 72 per cent being lymphocytes and 28 per cent being poly- 
morphonuclear neutrophils. The Pandy test for protein was positive. 

Her past and family history was non-contributory. Her blood pressure had been 
reported normal during her pregnancy and in the immediate postpartum period. 
Because of the bizarre neurologic syndrome and the onset of unconsciousness, she 
was admitted to the University Hospital. 

Physical examination showed a well developed female and in an early parturient 
state. There was no evidence of trauma. The skin was normal in texture. There was 
no cyanosis or jaundice. Temperature (rectal) was 99° F; the pulse was 82 per minute; 
respirations were 20; and the blood pressure was 120 mm. of mercury systolic and 
70 mm. of mercury diastolic. The remainder of the physical examination was gener- 
ally normal except for the neurologic findings. She was completely comatose. The 
pupils were round and equal and reacted sluggishly to light. Dissociated eye move- 
ments were prominent. The fundi showed some venous engorgement bilaterally. 
The optic discs were pale but were well outlined. There was no nuchal rigidity. 
Attempts to get the patient to open her mouth failed. There was a facial palsy on 
the left side and a partial left hemiparesis. The left arm when elevated dropped and 
fell faster than the right. All deep reflexes on the left side of the body were exag- 
gerated, and there was a sustained ankle clonus on the left side. The Babinski sign 
was negative bilaterally. 

Laboratory studies showed a blood hemoglobin of 61 per cent (Sahli), a blood 
volume of 27 mm. Red blood cells numbered 3.3 million per cubic millimeter, and 
the blood leukocyte count was 14,900 per cubic millimeter, the differential being 93 
per cent polymorphonuclears and 7 per cent lymphocytes. Blood platelet count was 
normal. Blood urea nitrogen was 19 mgm. per cent and blood sugar was 98 mgm. per 
cent. The urinalysis was reported as negative. 

* From the Division of Neuropathology, Department of Pathology and the Department of Neu- 
rosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. 
Aided by a grant from the Sidney M. Cone Research Fund. 

95 



96 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF .UEDICIXE, V. OF MD. 

On Sepleniber 1 (ihc second day after admission), a lumbar puncture was per- 
formed. Initial pressure was 240 mm. of water. The fluid was cloudy-pink and con- 
tained >v()()() erythrocytes j)er cubic millimeter, 60 leukocytes, of which 95 per cent 
were polymorphonuclears, and 5 per cent were lymphocytes. The Pandy test was 
positive (1 + ). Her course in the hospital was progressively unsatisfactory. It was 
believed that she sutTered either an intracerebral hemorrhage or a subdural hema- 
toma, or that a leaking intracranial aneurysm was the responsible lesion. She failed 
to respond; her stupor deepened, and she died on September ?> without regaining 
consciousness. .An autopsy was performed. 

P.VTHOLOGIC FIXDINGS 

The gross and microscopic findings were those of a normal postpartum state with 
no e.xternal evidence of trauma or specific debilitating disease. The scalp and skull 
were normal throughout, and upon removal of the dura, there was found an accumu- 
lation of cerebrospinal fluid over the parieto-occipital areas of this brain. However, 
the frontal, parietal, and temporal convolutions were flattened, and the sulci were 
narrowed. Extending from the beginning of the lateral fissure, a dark reddish black 
clot was found, covering most of the right frontal lobe, extending over the anterior 
portion of the right parietal lobe (Fig. 1, 2, 3, 4) beneath the arachnoid. There was 
considerable vascular prominence throughout the right parietal lobe which appeared 
slightly displaced toward the left. Anastomotic veins were present, and palpation 
suggested the presence of thrombi within them (Fig. 5). Antemortem clots were found 
in the superior sagittal, left transverse, and sigmoid sinuses. The base of the brain 
and hypoph3'sis were normal. After fixation, coronal sectioning revealed numerous 
areas of brownish red hemorrhagic discoloration, seen principally in the parasagittal 
regions, averaging from 2.5 to 4 cms. in size. These areas of hemorrhagic discolora- 
tion were quite soft and extended from the frontal to the posterior parietal and 
occipital areas, involving principally the superficial and the medial aspects of both 
hemispheres. The ventricular system was compressed as though by edema. The 
superficial cortical veins were prominent and were filled with clotted blood. Careful 
examination of the arteries showed no evidence of aneurysm or other primary patho 
logic change. 

Microscoj)ic studies confirmed the occlusion of numerous cortical veins, including 
bilateral anastomotic veins of Trolard. Acute passive congestion of the cerebral 
cortex was seen with innumerable fresh interstitial hemorrhages of the petechial, 
"ring", and "ball" type, these being associated with grossly dilated veins, the walls 
of which were hardly distinguishable, and which in many instances had apparently 
become necrotic with subsequent rupture (Fig. 5A). Inflammatory changes were 
not present. No abnormality of the blood in the cerebral vessels was noted. \'ery 
little reactive vascular or glial changes in the cortex were present, suggesting a very 
recent process. The hypophysis was enlarged, and on microscopic examination, 
showed diffuse hyper[)lasia. Final diagnosis was: Hyperplasia, hypophysis (post- 
partum state); thrombosis, superior sagittal sinus, superficial cortical veins, and 
anastomotic veins of Trolard; passive congestion, acute, frontal, parietal and occipital 
lobes; hemorrhage, intracerebral and subarachnoid, diffuse, secondary. 





Fig. 1, lop; Fig. 2, bottom. 

Fig. 1. \'ic\\ of (HTchral lu'iiiisphcres, showing intense congestion and the promiiifncc of oc- 
cluded veins over both fronto-i)arielal areas. The large anastomotic vein is occluded. 

Fig 2. Right lateral view of brain, showing dilated veins, extensive hemorrhage, and the anas- 
loinolic vein now ixcluded. The superior sagittal sinus is also occluded. 

97 




i:,6. S968 



' hIililiiiiilihliliMili! 

Fig. 3, top; Fig. 4, bottom. 

Fig. 3. Coronal section of brain, showing l)ilateral massive hyperemia with confluent inter- 
stitial hemorrhage into both jjarietal lobes (red softening). 

Fig. 4. View of occipital lobe, giving close-uj) details of the punctate hemorrhages and the con- 
fluent nature of them. Note the occlufied cortical veins in the meninges. 

98 










'*f 









' 









^ 












Fig. .S, top; Fig. 5A, bottom. 
Fig. 5. Lateral view of brain, showing presence of anastomotic vein of Trolarcl. 
Fig. 5A. Photomicrograph showing subarachnoid space containing fresh blood. The artery is 
patent and is encircled by an occluded vein. Ball and interstitial hemorrhages are seen in the cortex. 
Venules and cajnllaries are necrotic. 

99 



100 



BLLLETIS or THE SCHOOL 01- MEDK ISE, U. OF MI). 



SURVEY OF Ki:('()kl)i:i) DATA 

Tlie aljsciHc of oilier tontribulory factors in ilic uiuimcly demise of lliis younj,' 
woman stimulated a search of our records for further evident e (onierning sponta- 
neous venous clotting. In this study, we attempted to rule out all occlusive venous 
changes which followed operation, thermal or electro-coagulation, tumor, trauma, 
or where there was a hint of an inllammalory j)rocess. It was therefore postulated 
that some systemic mechanism other than the above was responsible for the spon- 
taneous intravenous clotting. In slightly under 4, ()()() neurologic specimens, we were 
able to locate 22 autopsy cases which seemed to fulfill the criteria of i)hlel)othrombosis 
in the absence of previously mentioned factors. Eliminated from this series were 
thromboses of the superior sagittal sinus or of the other intracranial dural sinuses 
only and without propagation. Eliminated also were the vascular lesions associated 
with diseases such as lupus erythematosus. The group presented herewith, therefore, 
represents as near as possible a "pure" intravenous cortical occlusive phenomenon 
based entirely upon perhaps a physiologic basis. An analysis of this material reveals 
some very interesting features. 

The group was divided as follows: under 1 year, 7 cases; 1 to 6 years, 5 cases; and 
6 to 20 years, no cases; with two other groui)s 20 to 40 years and 40 to 60 years, 
comprising the remainder of the series (Table 1). 

The underlying disease processes which were recorded along with the phlebo- 
thrombolic ]irocesses are listed as follows: In the children, an analysis of Table 2 

TABLE 1 

Age Distribution 

Under 1 year 7 

1-6 years 5 

6-20 years 

20-40 years 6 

40-60 years 4 



TABLE 2 

Underlying Causes 



Children 


Lesion 


10 months 


Vomiting — hemoconcen t ration 


9 


Head injury 


Newliorn 


p 


4 


Pneumonia 


10 months 


i'neumonia mongolism 


5 


Leucemia 


1 month 


Diarrhea and malnutrition 


10 davs 


Diarrhea and furunculosis 


1 dav 


Diarrhea and pneumonia 


6 


Cerebral jialsy and pneumonia 


22 davs 


Diarrhea 


10 months 


Scurvy and vomiting -hemoconccntralion 



WAGNER ET A L.— CEREBRAL PHLEBOTHROMBOSIS 



101 



TABLE 3 

Underlying Causes 





Young Adults 


Lesion 




23 


Pregnancy 




33 


Food poisoning 




32 


Subacute nephritis 




20 


Sicklemia 




31 


Pregnancy (posti)artum) 




38 


Sicklemia 



TABLE 4 
Underlying Causes 



Older Adulte 


Lesion 


51 

54 
44 
54 


Atherosclerosis — heart disease 
Atherosclerosis, generalized 
Pulmonary tuberculosis and cachexia 
After electroshock 



Sex: Female, 7; Male, 14; Not given, 1. 

shows the predominant cause to be diarrhea, malnutrition, vomiting, and pneumonia. 
In analyzing this group, one might assume the association of hemoconcentration and 
a certain degree of toxemia, both contributing toward the possibility of spontaneous 
clotting. 

In the second group, (Table 3j, or young adults, there is a diversit}' of causes; 
however, none of them appear with frequency enough to be statistically significant. 
Two cases of sicklemia appear, one of which has been reported previously as a case 
appearing without anemia (18). In the older group, (Table 4) atherosclerotic cardio- 
vascular disease with various phases of decompensation and vascular collapse seemed 
to have played an important role. 

The distribution as to sex appears to be significant. There happen to be 14 males 
and 7 females. The principal systemic, underlying or predisposing causes are sum- 
marized in Table 5. 

The signs and symptoms demonstrated by these patienlsfell into the general pattern 
exhibited by most previous reports (Table 6). In general, the syndrome may be sum- 
marized as a neurologic disorder resulting from venous occlusion, passive congestion, 

TABLE 5 
Principal Underlying Causes 



Under 1 jear 


Diarrhea, vomiting 




1-6 years 


Pneumonia, head injury, blood dyscrasias 




6-20 years 






20-40 years 


Varies, but includes blood dyscrasias and pregnancy. 




40-60 years 


Arteriosclerosis with and without heart failure; 


any 




cachectic state. 





102 BLLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XE, U. OF MD. 

TABL1-; 6 
Signs and SyDiptonis 



Coma 13 

Stupor 5 

Delirium 5 

Rigidity or flacciditj' 4 

Convulsions 4 

Hyperjiyrcxia (over 103) 5 

Rapid pulse (over 120) 5 

Rapid respiratory rale (over 40) 4 

Shock 2 



TAIU.I'; 7 
Spinal Fluid Pressure 



Significantly increased (to 400) 6 

Moderately elevated 6 

Not given 10 



hemorrhage, and red softening, appearing upon a base line physiologic disturbance 
because of sliock, heart failure, hemoconcentration or other mechanisms which may 
enhance clotting tendencies with propagation of thrombi into the smaller radicals 
of the cerebral venous system. Coma is a prominent feature; stupor, various states 
of altered consciousness, and various states of motor activity with convulsions and 
abnormal movements are also found. 

In about 50 per cent of patients, there are abnormal spinal fluid findings. In this 
series, the spinal fluid pressure was significantly increased in 6 cases, moderately 
elevated in 6, and was not reported in 10 instances (Table 7). We may assume that 
there is a moderate rise in spinal fluid pressure. Xanthochromia was present in 9 
cases, was absent in 4 cases, and not recorded in 9 cases (Table 8). This might in- 
dicate a percentage occurrence of about 50 per cent as corrections and allowances 
are made. Protein was almost a universal finding. Table 9 shows the survival time 
of these patients after the onset of their illness. 

All patients in this series succumed to their illnesses. However, it is to be noted 
that only a few were considered to have died of cerebral phlebothrombosis; others 
having succumbed to the disease processes ostensibly responsible for the phlebo- 
thrombosis, which actually represented a complication. Two patients survived less 
than 1 day. Si.x lived less than 5 days. Six lived from 5 to 10 days, and 4 patients 
from 10 to 20 days. Four patients lived over 20 days (30, 85, 41, and 4 years). 

TABLE 8 

Blood or Xanthocliromia 

Present 9 cases 

Absent 4 cases 

Not recorded 9 cases 



WAGNER ET AL~CEREBRAL PHLEBOTHROMBOSIS 103 

TABLE 9 
Survival Time after Onset 



Less than 1 day 
1-5 days 
5-10 days 
10-20 days 
Over 20 days 



2 
6 
6 

4 

4 (30, 85, 41, and 4 yrs.) 



TABLE 10 

Distribution, Anatomic Lesions 



Sagittal sinus 

Occluded 14 

Patent 8 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 15 

Tntracortical hemorrhages 
Parietal 

Left 11 

Right : 13 

Frontal 

Left 3 

Right 2 

Occipital 

Left 5 

Right 2 

Insula 1 

Choroid 1 

Temporal 3 

Paraventricular 1 



ANALYSIS 

The distribution of anatomic lesions in this series is interesting (Table 10). It 
has been stated that very few cases of cerebral phlebothrombosis are present without 
some involvement of the dural sinuses. This series confirms that fact. Fourteen cases 
showed an occluded sagittal sinus with 8 showing patency of the sinus. Fifteen cases 
showed subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracortical hemorrhages of the parietal 
areas were most prominent in the series. Elsewhere, hemorrhages were present in 
scattered areas. In all cases, occlusion of various cortical veins was a feature of the 
disease process. 

DISCUSSION 

There is nothing new about phlebothrombosis. As early as 1861, Dusch (1) re- 
ported ecchymoses in the gray matter on the surface of the brain along with throm- 
bosis of the superior longitudinal sinus in a woman who had previously developed 
focal cerebral signs. In 1888, Gowers (2) postulated thrombosis of the cerebral veins 
as a cause of hemiplegia and described the clinical syndrome of convulsions which he 
felt was caused by the extension of the thrombus from the sagittal sinus into the 
cortex. He also raised the question of thrombosis occurring in the veins without 



104 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MFIDICINE, U. OF MD. 

involvement of the sinuses, a C|uestion which today has been arf^ued both ways. 
Subsequent to Gowers' dissertation, a number of interestinj; contributions have 
appeared, which include Bagley's (3) description of the vein of (ialen syndrome in 
which he outlined the clinical manifestations of occlusion of the internal venous 
systems of the brain. Byers and Haas (4) in 1^)33 discussed this condition in children 
and developed the clinical syndrome as we know it today. They concluded that in 
children cerebral phlebothrombosis is a process i)receded by acute nutritional dis- 
turbances, diarrhea, and vomiting, the thrombus being formed as the result of hemo- 
concentration and failing lirculation. Marburg and Rezek (9), while studying cases 
of porence])haly in children, believed that one of the causes of this condition was the 
thrombosis of the great cerebral vein producing necrosis and cyst formation. Ellers 
and Courville (13) have also presented a large series in children, coming to just about 
the same conclusions as Byers and Haas. 

The association of cerebral phlebothrombosis and pregnancy has been emphasized 
by Cairns and Melton (6), Joseph (7), ^NIcNairn (10), Martin (16), and .Martin and 
Sheehan (17). Recently, King (11) in his dissertation concerning neurologic coiKlitions 
occurring as complications of pregnancy, has also discussed this problem. From the 
literature presently available, it would appear that the majority of reported cases thus 
far have fallen into 2 groups: those occurring in early childhood, and those occurring 
in the puerperium. In the latter group, one would infer that 2 possible processes 
are responsible for the lesion: namely, propagation of thrombi from the pelvic veins 
into the cerebrospinal system according to Batson's (15) ideas, and a theory resting 
on the proven hypercoagulability of the blood as reported by Stansfield (8) and Bram- 
ble, Hunter, and Fitzpatrick (12). Undoubtedly, stasis and hypercoagulability 
together play a role to the extent that one might suggest that the phlebothrombosis 
("milk leg") of the puerperium and cerebral phlebothrombosis have a common 
background. 

Theories as to the distribution of lesions is interesting. It would appear that there 
is a consensus to the effect that the majority of cases involve the dural sinuses; that 
occlusion of the dural sinuses alone need not necessarily produce cortical symptoms, 
but that propagation from the dural sinuses into the cortical veins (or the reverse) 
may and does result in passiv^e cerebral venous congestion and intracortical hemor- 
rhages as described. 

There is a relative paucity of the literature and a relative lack of discussion of 
collateral venous drainage within the calvarium. It is also interesting to note that 
in this a relatively large series of neurologic specimens, only 22 cases have appeared. 
In all probability, therefore, phlebothrombosis of cortical veins is a fairly common 
syndrome. However, it apparently does not end fatally or at least the degree of 
venous occlusion coupled with the intensity of the process j)roducing it does not 
result in the death of the patient. 

The reason for the infrecjuency of a lesion which should be much more common is 
possibly explained on the basis of certain peculiarities of the venous drainage systems 
of the brain. A brief e.xplanation might be in order. 

The venous return from the brain is collected by four |)rincipal systems (Fig. 6, 7, 
8, 9) whi( h ultimately empty into the dural sinuses. The first of these great systems 



WAGNER ET AL.— CEREBRAL FIJLEBOTHROMBOSIS 



105 




OCCLUS/Oh/ OF 



OCCLUS/0/\l OF 
D£EF= Cer<£e>F<FiL SySTFCt 




OCCLUSIOr^ OF 

PF^Hfiv^hfTR/cui-Fip. sy^Tcn 



OCCLt/S/Ofy OF 
CHOF<0/D SYSTem 



Fig. 6. Diagram showing general distribution of superficial cerebral system. 

Fig. 7. Diagram showing distribution of deep cerebral system. 

Fig. 8. Diagram showing drainage area of paraventricular system. 

Fig. 9. Diagram showing drainage area of choroid sj^stem. 



is the superficial cerebral system which drains the superficial cerebral cortex and 
empties into the superior longitudinal sinus. The second great system is the deep 
cerebral system including the middle cerebral vein, which drains the inferior frontal 
and temporal areas and which empties principally into the cavernous sinus. The para- 
ventricular or terminal system, draining the basal nuclei and the callosal areas 
includes the deep cerebral pellucidal branches. These ultimately join with the 
choroid system from the ventricular cavities. These two main systems receive the 
basal vein of Rosenthal, and form the great cerebral vein, (Vein of Galen) which 
drains into the straight sinus. These 2 main systems drain the inferior surface of 
the brain, including the temporal lobes, the paraventricular and choroid systems 
draining the remainder.* 

When an occlusion is present in any one of the systems, anastomotic channels 
are usually set up (P'ig. 5). In the instance of the superficial and deep cerebral systems, 
an anastomosis is present between the systems by way of the anastomotic vein of 

* The conce[)t suggested above has been recently e.x]>anded with an appropriate diagram b>- Dr. 
James S. Browne, the article being found in the April, 1956 issue of the Bulletin, School of Medi- 
cine, Universitv of Marvlanrl. 



106 BULLETLX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE, U. OF MD. 

Trolard and also by way oi the anastomotic vein of Labbe which can divert the 
blood into the transverse sinus. Similarly, occlusions of the deep cerebral system 
can reverse the flow from the temporal lobes through the anastomotic veins into the 
transverse sinus or into the superficial cerebral circulation. In a similar fashion, the 
vein of Rosenthal may theoretically drain the deep systems in the presence of occlu- 
sion of the great cerebral vein. There occurs a free anastomosis between the para- 
ventricular and the choroid systems. 

Since this collateral drainage is so potentially active, it may be hypothecated that 
if occlusion occurs in any of the major venous systems, it may end locally in terminal 
twigs, causing small areas of focal red softening with subsequent atrophy (giving 
rise to sharply localized signs) or that collateral drainage will rapidly open and after 
a period of preliminary- embarrassment, drainage will be resumed by another route. 

It is presumably in the relatively small group of cases in which the anastomotic 
veins and the collateral cross connections have become occluded by propagation 
that the continuing and often fatal syndromes are found. This situation certainly 
obtained in the initial case mentioned and most certainly has been a part of at least 
2 others. 

An example of what has probably been an instance of developing collateral circula- 
tion is illustrated by the following history. This patient was a 25 year old parturient 
who was delivered of a normal child on March 29. Her immediate postpartum course 
was uneventful. However, on the 6th and 8th postpartum days, she became stuporous 
and suffered grand mal con\nilsions. She was admitted to the hospital where physical 
examination showed a spinal fluid pressure of 270 mm. of water with 36,000 erythro- 
cytes per cubic millimeter, including 145 leukocytes. She suffered a right homonomous 
hemianopsia. There was minimal papilledema and minimal right hemiparesis. An 
electroencephalograph was interpreted as showing a destructive process in the left 
parieto-occipital region. On the 10th postpartum day, she suffered a transient attack 
interpreted as motor aphasia and on the 15th postpartum day, she suffered another 
generalized conxnilsion. At this time, her spinal fluid pressure was normal. There were 
52 er>'throcytes per cubic millimeter and 3 leukocytes. The fluid was xanthochromic. 
By the 20th postpartum day, she had shown continuing improvement with diminish- 
ing hemiparesis and hemianopsia along with complete return of speech. She is now 
essentially well and suffers only a residual hemianopsia. Phlebograms have not been 
attempted. 

The congruity of all of the antecedent and successive clinical syndromes in these 
two patients are very striking. However, the results are vastly different. It is quite 
logical, therefore, that in the second patient collateral circulation of a sufficient type 
developed, following initial venous occlusion and furthermore that the collateral 
remained patent along with the subsidence of the base line factors initially responsi- 
ble for the condition, without much irreversible cerebral damage. 

The therapy of this condition seems to rest upon 2 premises. The lirst is its pre- 
vention. Fatal phlebothrombosis seems to have occurred most commonly in debili- 
tated children and infants, suffering a combination of toxemia, hemoconcentration 
and circulator^' failure, the other large group occurring with pregnancy or with 
sicklemia. In this latter group, alterations in the coagulability of the blood seems 



WAGNER ET A L.- CEREBRAL PII LEBOTHROMBOSIS 107 

to be the predisposing factor (8 and 12). The most logical approach to the problem is 
first the maintenance of normal coagulability in those patients showing a tendency 
toward hypercoagulability. This can be accomplished by the use of heparin (8) and 
Dicumerol® (12). Where toxemia is present, thetreatmentmusttirstbedirected against 
the primary disease and next against the physiologic secondary effects; hemoconcen- 
tration and the anoxias. 

As far as is now known, there are no measures which have been used successfully 
once i)rogressive thrombosis has developed. The removal of thrombi from dural 
sinuses is surgically feasil)le. However, once })ropagation has occurred into the 
cerebral veins, the only recourse is the prevention of further propagation and a hope 
for collateral drainage. 

SUMMARY 

As we see the problem of cerebral phlebothrombosis, it is represented as an infre- 
(juent condition, but on the other hand it is {probably much more common in its 
transient forms than is presently recorded. The syndrome is stupor with convulsions 
associated with a vacillating, mixed, irregular, superficial, focal, cortical syndrome 
in the presence of moderately increased intracranial pressure, xanthochromic spinal 
liuid, and with gradual recovery. In patients showing this syndrome and possessing 
an appropriate pre-existing base line physiologic picture of hypercoagulability, this 
seems to offer an answer to at least some of the vague neurologic syndromes so often 
associated with heart failure, shock, dysentery, vomiting in children, the toxemias, 
and pregnancy, and which are so difficult to explain on an etiologic basis. Phle- 
bography might be of value in further investigating these cases. Certainly, the 
prophylactic use of anticoagulants; the use of hydration measures, the maintenance 
of adequate circulation, and other vigorous methods to avoid phlebothrombosis are 
in order. Once this syndrome has begun, the therapeutic use of anticoagulants might 
be helpful, but this has not as yet been studied. Additional information concerning 
the development of collateral venous drainage after sinus occlusion, lobular or 
regional venous occlusion, might also contribute additional valuable information. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. DusCH, T. ; On Thrombosis of the Cerebral Sinuses. Selected Monographs, The New Syndenham 

Society, London, 186L 

2. GowERS, W. R.; Diseases of the Nervous System (Am. edit.); Blakiston, Phila., 1885, i). 834. 

3. Bagley, Charles, Jr.; Extensive Hemorrhagic Extravasation from the Venous System of 

Galen with a Clinical Syndrome; Arch. Surg. 7: 237, 1923. 

4. BvERS, R. K. AND Haas, G. M.; Thrombosis of Dural and Venous Sinuses in Infanc> and Child- 

hood; Am. J. Dis. Child., 45: 1161-1183, June 1933. 
.X Meriwarth, H. R.; Hemijilegia of Cortical or Venous Origin (Occlusion of Roiandic Vein); 
Brooklyn Hosp. J. 2: 193-212, October 1940. 

6. Cairns, D. R. and Melton, G.; Primary Thrombosis of the Cerebral Veins in the Puerperium; 

Brit. M. J. 1: 4-39, April 1942. 

7. Joseph, J.; Puerperal Venous Throml)osis; Brit. M. J. 1: 438-439, Ai)ril 4, 1942. 

8. Stansfield, F. R.; Puerperal Cerebral Thromi)hIel)itis Treated by Hcjiarin; Brit. M. J. 1: 436, 

1942. 

9. .Marburg, ()., Rezek, P. K., .\1arka, N. 15.; Studies in Phiel)olhn)mb()sis and I'hiebostasis; J. 

of Neuropath. & Ex])er. Neurol. 4: 43 .S8, Januar\- 194.S. 



108 lULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL 01- MEDICI SE, C. OE MI). 

10. McNairx. J.; W-nous Tliromliosis in l'rc'<;n:uuy; J. Olisl. & (Inikicc. Urit. Mni])., 55: bM) 6.^4, 

()ct()i)er 194cS. 

1 1. King, A. B.; Xcurologic Ci>ii(iilii)iis Occurring; ;is C'oniplicalions of lVt'giianc\'; Arch. Neurol. & 

Psychiat. 63:471-499, 1950. 

12. Br.xmbel, C. E., Hunter, R. E.. and Eitzi'atuick, V. !'.; I'ro])hylactic Use of AnlicoaKulants 

in the Puerperal Period (Dicumcrol, Heparin and Link ('oni|)()iuid 6,^); Hidl. Scli. Med. I'niv. 
of Md.,35:91 103, 1950. 
Kv Miii.KRS, H. AND ("ouRVii.i.K, C". B.; Thromliosis of IiUeriiai Cereiiral Veins in Infancy and 
Childhood; Review of Literature and Report of 5 Cases; J. Pediat. 8: 023, May 1936. 

14. Irish, C. W.; Cerebral Thrombosis of Superior Cerel)ral Vein; .\nn. Otol. Rhin., and Ear\-ny., 

47: 775-791, September 1938. 

15. Batson, O. v.; Function of Vertebral Veins; Their Role in the S])rea(l of Metastasis; Annals 

Surg. 112: 138, 1940. 

16. Martin, J. P.; Thrombosis in the Sujjcrior Longitudinal Sinus Following Childbirth; Brit. M. J. 

1: 349, 1941. 

17. ALartin, J. P. AND Sheehan, H. L.; Primary Thrombosis of the Cerebral Veins Following 

Childbirth; Brit. M. J. 1: 349, 1941. 

18. Thompson, R. K., Wagner, J. A. and M.\cLeod, C. M.; Sickle Cell Disease: Re])ort of a Case 

with Cerebral Manifestations in the Absence of Anemia; Ann. Int. Med. 29: 922 (Nov.) 1948. 

19. BotJMAN, C. E.; Thrombosis of the Rolandic Vein; Report of a Case; Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 

15: 110, 1926. 



OBSTETRICAL CASE REPORT* 

The patient was a i)rimigravida, 22 years of age, who was admitted to the hospital 
on December 12 in early labor. Her past medical history was not significant and 
her prenatal course had been uncomplicated. The estimated date of confinement was 
December 4. She was Rh positive, type O, STS negative, and her hemoglobin in 
June had been 12.5 grams. On admission she was found to be in good general condi- 
tion. The fetus was in the ROA position, heart tones present at 140 per minute, and 
the estimated fetal weight was 3600 grams. Her blood pressure was 120/65, urinalysis 
negative, and hemoglobin 12 grams. The cervix was four centimeters dilated, 90 
per cent efifaced, membranes intact, and the station one centimeter above the spines. 
She was given an enema after which she received 100 mg. Demerol and 0.6 mg. 
scopolamine intramuscularly. Four hours later the presenting part crowned and a 
saddle block anaesthesia using 2.5 mg. hyperbaric Xupercaine was given. Delivery 
was effected with outlet forceps after a midline episiotomy. The baby weighed 3425 
grams and was in good condition. Third stage was normal and the episiotomy was 
repaired. Her labor had totaled twelve hours. The estimated blood loss was 150 cc. 
Her postpartum period was normal until three hours after delivery. At this time the 
patient complained of some perineal pain. An anaesthetic ointment was applied to 
the episiotomy suture line and anus believing the symptoms were caused by the wound 
and/or hemorrhoids. There was an increase in the perineal pain so that morphine 
was given. Seven hours after delivery, the patient was found in shock with a blood 
pressure of 80/40 and pulse 140, even though the amount of external bleeding had 
been considered reasonable. She again complained of perineal pain and a constant 
desire to defecate. Her uterus was round, hard, slightly to the right of the midline 
with its upper Umits three centimeters above the umbilicus. Perineal inspection 
revealed some ecchymoses to the left of the midline. Rectal examination revealed a 
large, tense, mass bulging into the vagina and making pressure against the rectal 
wall. A diagnosis of vaginal hematoma was made. 

Whole citrated blood was made available and under general anesthesia, an incision 
was made through the vaginal mucous membrane over the center of the mass and 
about 500 cc of clotted blood evacuated from the hematoma cavity. The cavity was 
inspected but no bleeding point could be located. Consequently a snug vaginal pack 
was placed which produced firm pressure against the area of the hematoma. She 
was given 1000 cc of citrated blood during and after the o])eration and placed on a 
broad-spectrum antibiotic. The pack was removed in 12 hours and recovery was 
uneventful. 

Puerperal hematomas arc a rather fre(|ucnt cause of excessive postpartum blood 
loss. These extravasations of blood occur as a result of a laceration or rupture of a 
blood vessel in the i)aravaginal tissues. The collection of blood may be confined to the 
tissues just beneath the skin of the vulva or, more seriously, it may extend along the 
vaginal wall and under or into the broad ligament. In most cases there appears to 
be no definite etiologic factor but among the possible causes may be mentioned 

* From The Department of ()l)sU'trics & (ivnecology, l'iiiversit\- of Mar\lan(l School of Medicine. 

109 



no BULLET IX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDIC/. \E, C. OF .\TD. 

pressure necrosis of vessels as in {)rolonged labors, varicose veins, large babies, 
inadecjuate hemostasis in an episiotomy wound, traumatic forceps deliveries, precipi- 
tate deliveries, and breech presentations. The symptoms usually presented are 
perineal pain much like severe episiotomy pain or the pain of hemorrhoids, rectal 
discomfort because of pressure from the mass and, in the same manner, inability to 
void. Later the manifestations of shock develop and these may be the first symptoms 
to aj)pear in the most serious type of hematoma — that which dissects its way upwards 
towards the broad ligament through the loose, areolar tissue. The diagnosis is usually 
made as a result of a digital examination, either rectal or vaginal, which reveals the 
mass. In addition to the symptoms, occasionally an observed perineal swelling and 
some ecchymoses over the skin may direct attention to the possibility of a hematoma. 
Most of these collections could be recognized early if a routine rectal examination 
were made prior to sending the patient from the delivery room. Conservative man- 
agement may be employed for small hematomas — ice cap, external pressure, and 
observation. Larger ones should be treated by blood replacement, incision and evacu- 
ation of the collection of blood. Following removal of the blood, hemostasis should 
be achieved by suture-ligature of any bleeding points or, if these cannot be located, 
the cavity may be packed, perhaps using a substance such as Gelfoam and/or mechan- 
ical hemostasis from a firm vaginal pack. 

J. H. .Morrison-, M.D. 



BOOK REVIEWS 

Fluid and Electrolyte Therapy. Franklin L. Ashley, B.S., M.D. and Horace G. Love, B.S.. M.D. 

The J . B. Lippincotl Company, Philadelphia, London, Montreal, 1954. 72 pages. 

It is regrettable that the authors of this tiny text should have confined themselves within the 
narrow limits of 58 pages. To utilize to the utmost the information therein, one must have already 
a firm and comprehensive background in fluid and electrohte pathophysiology. This, then, appears 
to be a "primer" for the advanced student, not for the beginner. 

Most commendable indeed is the attempt to list the signs and symi)toms of the various states 
of fluid and electrolyte aberration. Here, the student looking for increased knowledge, would have 
been well served indeed by a discussion of the mechanisms of i)roduction of these defects and by 
attempts to offer some helpful e.xplanations for the uniformity of signs and symptoms seen in the 
various deviations. 

Perhaps this book could best be utilized by the young house officer, with some knowledge and 
considerable interest in fluid and electrolyte disorders, as a practical reference to which he may 
refer in the course of his busy hospital day. 

R. B. 

Hypotension -Shock and Cardiocirculatory Failure. Paul G. Weil, M.D., Ph.D., Director of 

Transfusion Service. Royal Victoria Hospital, ifontreal, Canada. J. B. Lippincott Co. PJiiladel- 

phia and Montreal; 1955. Price $2.25. 

Dr. Weil has set for himself an impossible task in writing a small 78 page book on the voluminous 
topic of hypotension. The text is well organized and serves well to outline our present knowledge 
of the subject. The physiopathology of shock is given one and one half pages and is a nice review 
of the salient features of the problem, but the reader must be well versed in the subject to obtain 
maximum Ijenefit. It is more complete in the sections on blood replacement, blood substitute, 
plasma loss etc. 

The book j^erhajjs is valuable to the busy instructor or to the overworked house officer who 
need a quick and accurate review of the topic to help organize their thoughts. 

The size (7^2 x 4^:^ x '2 inch) is f[uite handy and is easily carried in the coat pocket. The print 
and paper are well chosen. 

E. Roderick Shipley, M.D. 

Regional Enteritis, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Considerations. Frederick F. Boyce, M.D. 

J. B. Lippincott Company. Publishers. Philadelphia and Montreal, Copyright 1955, 73 pages. 19 

illustrations. 

In this volume, of some 69 pages of text, is summarized in a stark and succinct fashion aliout 
all we know of the disease of regional enteritis. From the 71 references and the wide clinical ex- 
perience of the author, it could have been anticipated that a greater tome might t)e forthcoming. 
This is not so and future medical authors should take note. 

The amount of precise information contained in this small volume is amazing. A short historical 
background leads one to the unqualified conclusion that the incidence of this disease entity is in- 
creasing sharply. And yet, we are as wholly ignorant of its precise etiology, as were Crohn, Ginzburg 
and Oppenheimer in 1932. Particularly well done are the seven or eight paragraphs on the neurotic 
and psychiatric manifestations of the disease. Here is a clear, reasonalilc disjilay of much that wc 
arc aware of in the psychogenic backgrounds of these patients, and the author's most reasonable 
response, and a short case report, to one such individual. 

It is particularly gratifying for the author to record the outstanding and most important sources 
for his clear-cut impressions. It may be of considerable interest and of importance to some to be 
able to refer readily to a i)aper limited to the histopathologic manifestations, for example, of a 
disease, the observations quoted being based on a "pathologic study of 377 specimens" and "more 
than 3,000 slides". Here, too, arc recorded the reported instances of gastric involvement, duodenal 
involvement and others. 

Ill 



112 BVLLEriX OF THE SCHOOL OF AfEDICI.XE, C. OF MD. 

Boyce has dolinealcd (|iiitf nicely liis ajjproacli lo llu' ircalnu'iit ol iIiusl- paliuiUs. Ik- is par 
licuiarly heli)ful in suniniariziii<; where coiiservalive ihera])},' is niosl surel_\' iiidicatecl; he sicle-sleps 
adroit l\' many of the fiuestions the reader ma\' have in minrl as to when surgical interference is 
deemed the wisest course. Perhaps there is no answer. Some good may come of laying to rest the 
use of radiation therapy and vagal neurectomy as im])ortant measures of therajiy in this disease; 
and also from the words of caution and advice in the use of ACTII. Perhajjs the last sentence should 
he repeated here for the benefit of the unwary or overly enthusiastic: "Surgery olTers the best re- 
sults at this time and resection, it is believed, is more satisfactory than a short-circuiting operation, 
but recurrence has run lo a third or more in the most cxjicrt hands." 

Robert \V . Buxton, M.I). 

Fifth Annual Report on Stress, 1Q55 56: Edited by Hans Srlyc mid Guuuar Hciiscr. .\l I) Publi- 
cations, Inc., Neii.< York. pp. SI5. 

The Fiftli Annual Report on Stress represents a continued attempt to elal)orate on Selye's con- 
cept and at the same time serves as a reference for those publications which the proponents of the 
"general adaptation syndrome" consider relevant to their field. The volume extends over 816 
pages and contains 5,698 references, which the authors take as evidence for the increasing accept- 
ance and interest of their views by the researchers in all fields of medical investigation. They propose 
a universal methodology of "fact-finding, clinical examination of one's own and all other ])ertinent 
data, elimination of the true and unimportant and correlation of newly required facts with integra- 
tion into an existing body of classical knowledge." Moreover, they emphasize that they have selected 
in their section of "special articles" not only investigative reports of the adherents, but also paj)ers 
by authors who do not wholh' subscribe to Selye's unitarian approach. 

In an attempt to avoid semantic confusion the volume has as its first chapter a discussion on 
definitions and terminology used in connection with the general adaptation s\'ndrome. This seems 
to be of particular usefulness to the neophyte as many of their terms deviate considerably from the 
meanings which a reader with conventional medical education might have attributed to them pre- 
viously. The chapter ends with a glossary of abbreviations and symbols and in reading through 
the various original articles and references one is almost continuously coerced to return to those 
pages. 

Hans Selve, himself, oft'ers a synopsis of the stress concept as it appears in 1955. He paj'S lril)ute 
to precursors like Ricker, Speransky, Reilly and Hoff, and also mentions the role of VV. Cannon 
in helping to understand the ]mrt played by the sympathetic nervous system and its humoral elYector 
substances. He emphasizes as motivation for the eventual formulation of the Stress concept a desire 
for unification by which it could be shown that various non-specific responses of individual target 
organs are not onh' closely integrated, but represent part of a single biologic response, namely the 
general adaptation syndrome. From here on, he discusses the nature of "non-specific stress", re- 
formulates his concejJt of the general adaptation syndrome, its fundamental mechanisms, kidnej' 
l)ehavior, the conditioning of hormone actions and describes the more recenth" introduced concept 
of a "local adaptation syndrome" which is thought to be interrelated with the general one. Reference 
to a focal syndrome leads to an elaboration on diseases of adaptation and consideration of future 
problems in stress research. The chai)ter then broadens out into a general, physiologic discussion 
of stress, as well as anti-stress drugs (with mention of salic^dates, phenylbutazone. 1 arbiturates, 
morphine and chloropromazine) and their potentiation through the hypophyseal-adrenocortical 
axis. An analysis of pathways and mediation describes in detail hyj)ophyseal function, adrenal 
medulla and cortex and ends with enumeration of the special characteristics of corticoids and re- 
lated steroids. A discussion of individual organ res])onses is detailed as to kidne\- function, the 
nervous system, thyroid gland, ovaries and liver. Also mentioned is an anahsis of the "chronology" 
within the sequence of the general adajitation s\ndrome. The chapter ends with an analysis of 
experimental diseases of adaptation, considering the mechanisms of inflammation and anaphylactic 
phenomena as well as diseases of adaptation, with a wide range from h\])ertension to even ruptured 
intervertebral discs and tendon contractures. The author also refers to neoplastic diseases like 
leukemia in which cortical secretory activity is definilely deranged and makes reference to similari- 
ties between the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the general adaptation syndrome with 



BOOK REllEUS 113 

forniulatioii of a theor\- according to which schizophrenia can Ijc considered a "regressive ada|)ta' 
lion s\nchome". Amongst eighl additional S])eciai articles, one by Conn and Louis descriliing a new 
clinical entity of primary aldosteronism, another one \)y Ernst Scharrer and oliscrvation on ])sychi- 
atric stress in infancy by Si)itz seem of particular interest. Also a paper by Gray, et al. of adrenal 
influences upon the stomach and the gastric responses to stress appears imj)ortant to those con- 
cerned with psycho-physiological concepts of chronic medical illness. 

While at times one cannot help sensing a certain degree of artificiality in their attempt to unify 
and to conceptualize, one still remains cajitivated by the comprehensiveness of this yearly reference 
volume wiiich should offer incentive for thought to ])ractitioners and researchers alike. 

Claus If. Berblinfier. M.I). 

Physiology and Anatomy with Practical Considerations. E.sllirr M. Grcislicimcr, B.S.. M ..\.. 

Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Physiology, Temple U)iiversity School of Medicine. Philadelphia. Serenlh 

Edition, 1V55, J. B. Lippincolt Co., pp 868. Price $5.00 

This book, originally copyrighted in 1932, was written with attention to its applicability to the 
student nurse, and the present edition has utilized the author's man\- years' teaching exi)erience 
with these students. 

There are 805 pages of actual text beautifully arranged, ])rintcd and bound, — and as one would 
expect of a book originally written nearly twenty-four years ago, there are verj- few technical or 
tyjjographical errors. The amount and the detail of the material included seems rather more than 
we have lieen al)lc to persuade most of our own students to assimilate in an average-length nurses' 
course, and we can well appreciate the author's resigned comment, "surely there are some students 
who do not need to study the skeletal system in detail". 

Physiology of the circulatory system is quite comprehensive. Physiologj- of the digestive system 
is generally excellent though in a book of this scope it seems regrettable that obesity as a physio- 
logic variant is not further emphasized. It received 5' 2 lines as opposed to diarrhea (20), and con- 
slii)ation (1*2'- 

Statements concerning the ]ihysiology of the endocrines are delightfully succinct, and the de- 
scri])tion of the thyroid hormone and its functions are as clear as we have seen. The adrenal hor- 
mones are deftly described and the information is up to date. 

The illustrations are man\- and well chosen. There are 430 of these, instructive and interesting, 
including a few unusual highlights such as "Appearance of a cat in an emotional crisis", and the 
apparent male homologue of the Monroe calendar picture entitled "Fig. 100. Male figure as seen 
from the left side." 

This is an excellent text, — interesting, authoritative, easy to read and understand, — and written 
1)\- an obviousl\' highly cf)mpetent author. .\ny student may consult it with confidence. 

II'w. B. .Settle, M.D. 

The House l*h\sician's Haiuibook. C. .Mian Birch. Williams & W'ilkins Co., Baltimore. Price S3.00 

This handbook is written on a senior student and intern level. Its size precludes its use as a pocket 
companion. 

.\ portion of the handbook is irrelevant to the American house ])hysician i:)ecause it concerns the 
administrative details of Hnglish governmental medicine. .\lso, emphasis has been placed upon some 
clinical entities rarely seen in this country and clinicopathologic methods not the routines of choice. 

A few simple diagnostic procedures and practical clinical suggestions, rarely adec|uatcly explained 
to the young physician, are here clearly outlined. 

Throughout, the author has maintained the importance of patient-physician relationship, a 
humanitarian approach, which is essential to the successful practice of medicine that too often is lost 
in a strict academic atmosphere. 

.\II medical students would i)rosper by reading this volume, and it would complement the hand- 
books usuall>' issued to the internes by their hospitals. 

John O. Sii.akrf.tt, M.D. 




OF 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

VOLUME 41 OctobeVj 1956 number 5 



EDITORIAL 

THE PROBLEM OF THE INTESTINES 

E. RODERIC SHIPLEY, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Colonic function is a major anxiety of the average American, a constant worry to 
the new mother, of increasing importance to the advertising industry, a major source 
of income to drug firms and a constant clinical problem to the medical practitioner. 
In spite of these facts, present knowledge of the physiology of the colon is all too 
vague and incomplete. There are many reasons for this. One of the major ditlficulties in 
the physiologic investigation of intestinal function is the inability to isolate a piece of 
colon from its nerve or vascular supply so that the influence of the intrinsic nerve 
supply, or the hormonal effect on the smooth muscle can be studied separately. To 
date this is impossible, so most studies reveal not speciiic activities and influences on 
the colon but represent the influence of many, often dissimilar, factors. The treatment 
of the constipated patient is accordingly dilftcult and varied. Frequently, therapy is 
guided by folklore and quite often is unsatisfactory. 

Recent studies of patients with a megacolon and of individuals with severe consti- 
pation reveal at least four different patterns of colonic malfunction. Such studies, 
based on the recording of the intracolonic pressure by means of balloons placed in 
predetermined positions, measure the end result of many varied and distinct influ- 
ences on the colon. A study of each type of colonic malfunction may aid in more 
efiicient therapy of obstipation. 

In the first type, propulsive waves are present but are of such a weak nature that 
forward movement of the fecal matter is impossible. To combat such a situation 
either the propulsive waves must be increased in force by the use of a parasympatho- 
mimetic drug or the bowel contents must be made into a mass that can be more 
easily moved along by the careful administration of some hydrophilic colloid. Both 
methods can be used together with great success. 

A second pattern of obstipation is that of a marked increase in bowel tone. Such a 
spastic bowel will not adecjuately empty itself and the obvious remedy is to overcome 
such spasticity by the judicious use of anti-spasmodics. 

\ pattern exactly opposite from the spastic bowel is fref|uently seen. Such an 

ILS 



116 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

atonic bowel will have no peristaltic pattern and no forward propulsion in the large 
intestine. The fecal material, forced into the colon by higher intestinal activity, lies 
unmoving in the large and atonic bowel until it will empty by a simple overflow 
mechanism. Therapy of this third type is directed at increase in the bowel activity 
by the use of proper low residue diet and drugs with an acetylcholine-like action. 

More rarely there will be an absence of the myenteric plexus from various segments 
of the colon. In such cases, there is a marked increase in tone and the involved seg- 
ment, most commonly the rectum or sigmoid, will act as a functional obstruction. 
Medical and surgical therapy in these patients with Hirschsprung's disease must be 
carefully evaluated by the physician. 

Study of these four possible types of obstipation explains why drugs and therapy 
with exactly opposite effects may give good results in the treatment of the same 
disease. In the future, when each influencing factor on the normal physiologic function 
of the colon can be studied separately, we will be more able to help the obstipated 
patient. 



PHARMACOLOGIC HORIZONS 

JOHN C. KRANTZ, JR. PH.D. 

One hundred years ago death claimed almost simuUaneously two great men. 
They were vanguards of progress. Independently they were hewing stones where the 
unseen spires of the future were to stand. One of these, an American, Dr. John C. 
Warren, founder of the Massachusetts General Hospital, was the first surgeon to 
have ether used on one of his patients, on October 17, 1846. His voice has echoed 
through the corridors of time as he addressed the skeptical spectators in the balcony, 
declaring, "Gentlemen, this is no humbug, Mr. Abbott is fast asleep." The other 
was the Italian chemist and physicist, Amadeo Avogadro, whose fundamental 
studies in chemistry, the great handmaiden of medicine, were to give to that science 
an unprecedented impetus. One can hear him now postulating that far-reaching 
basic hypothesis which bears his name, "Equal volumes of different gases under the 
same conditions of temperature and pressure contain the same number of molecules." 
It was the utilization of those basic principles of chemistry illustrated by the con- 
tribution of Avogadro by such men of vision as John C. Warren which gave medicine 
a sejise of destiny in the afifairs of man. 

Progress over the century was not rapid at first. The physician's armamentarium 
was static. Folklore, mysticism and empiricism were characteristics of most of the 
drugs in use. This is e.xemplified by the statement of the great physician, Sir William 
Osier, shortly after the turn of the century. The advocate of therapeutic nihilism 
speaks, referring to cardamon tincture compound: "Here, gentlemen, is a very useful 
drug. It has a beautiful color, pleasant odor, delectable taste, and although we are 
convinced that it will do the patient no good we are equally certain that it will do 
no harm." Osier could not anticipate the phenomenal strides which were just over 
the horizon. The rise of carbon chemistry, fundamental researches in the hormones 
and vitamin fields, the new anti-infective drugs, were to give the physician a formid- 
able list of effective drugs that were destined to revolutionize medical practice. To 
use words of Shakespeare as e.xpressed by Decius in Julius Caesar, it was a vision fair 
and fortunate. 

Today it seems trite to assert that the only permanent characteristic of our materia 
medica is change. During the past decade these changes have occurred with a rapidity 
that is overwhelming. The magnitude of the mutation is evinced by the statement 
that 80 per cent of the pharmacologic agents available in the armamentarium of the 
physician in 1956 were not known a decade ago. Indeed the promise for the future 
appears equally fruitful. No chemical structure seems to be able to thwart the enter- 
prising synthetic efforts of the organic chemist. From his assembly line new organic 
chemicals roll ofif at the prodigious rate of about 10,000 a year. With the indefati- 
gable efforts of the pharmacologist and bacteriologist in screening compounds for 
therapeutic value, one anticipates the demonstration of the usefulness of many of 
these agents annually in the treatment of disease. The search is exciting, the struggle 
intriguing, and the stakes are high. 

Let us e.xamine some of the basic principles underlying these important and rapid 

117 



118 BILLETIX or THE SCHOOL OF MKDICIXE. V. OE MD. 

changes in modern therapy. John J. Aljel, the father of pharmacology in America, 
asserted a generation ago that the source of the newer drugs of the future will be the 
animal body. Professor Abel's statement was prophetic. It was also fitting and proper 
that he should have made it. It grew out of his pioneer work on the isolation of 
epinephrine and his association with the subsequent isolation of acetylcholine by 
Reid Hunt which occurred in Abel's laboratory. A half-century later one views in 
retrospect the large list of important sympathomimetic amines embracing such 
important therapeutic agents as norepinephrine and neosynephrine. Stemming also 
from this fundamental idea has evolved the basic concept of adrenergic block. This 
field has been enriched by the synthesis of such drugs as Priscoline*, Dibenzyline® 
and Ilidar®, useful in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease; and Regitine 
valuable for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. 

The far-reaching possibilities of therapeutic agents which either emulate or block 
the action of the ubiquitous acetylcholine are constantly being explored. These 
investigations have greatly enriched materia medica. For example, the use of Mecho- 
lyl® and Urecholine®, which provide cholinergic activity for the smooth muscle 
viscera; and prostigmine and ]Mysuran®which inactivate cholinesterase, providing 
greater acetylcholine action in myasthenia gravis. The number of new anticholiner- 
gic drugs is legion. After the provisional hypothesis of the atropine cholinergic 
blockade, the chemist was not slow to meet the challenge for better spasmolytic 
agents. To mention only a few, Trasentin®, Pro-Banthine®, Monodral® and others 
have made therapy in the treatment of peptic ulcers, so fittingly described by the 
late Dr. George Crile as the ''wound stripe of civilization," more effective and more 
dependable. It is also a matter of great therapeutic significance that these newer 
anticholinergic agents are playing an important role in the management of Parkin- 
son's disease. One thinks immediately of Artane®, Cogentin® and Parsidol®. Indeed 
it does not appear to be extending the prophecy of Abel too far to concede that 
directly or indirectly these new drugs have emanated from this concept. 

An extension of the prophecy of Abel was realized in 1940 through the classical 
researches of Woods and Fildes, who showed that the antibacterial activity of the 
sulfonamide drugs was dependent upon their capacity to compete with the essential 
bacterial metabolite para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). This concept has permeated 
the entire fabric of pharmacologic research. It has been responsible for some of our 
greatest advances in therapy. No longer is the organic chemist, interested in drug 
therapy, synthesizing compounds at random. On the other hand, he now has a 
pattern of natural metabolites to emulate and modify in order to interrupt enzyme 
systems in invading parasites or the uncontrolled growth of neoplasm. For example, 
the use of Daraprim* in malaria and 6-mercaptopurine in leukemia stems from this 
fundamental approach to use of drugs in the treatment of disease. 

The introduction of cortisone and its modifications into medicine are a further 
extension of the statement of Professor Abel. Curiously enough, the use of reserpine 
in mental illness appears to be associated with its capacity to replace serotonin in 
neuronal cells. The two molecular structures contain in common the indole nucleus. 
This has opened an entirely new field of therapy, namely, the systematic search for 
new drugs in the treatment of the mentally ill. 



KRANTZ, JR.—PHARMACOLOGIC HORIZONS 119 

Xo discussion of this kind would be complete without reference to another im- 
portant facet of modern medical medicine, namely, large scale medical research 
programs. Research may be likened to a bevy of quail soaring high among the en- 
veloping clouds. An occasional isolated shot might infrequently bring down a bird. 
This is the analogy to medical research prior to World \A'ar II. Now many guns with 
new sights are aimed with rapid firing devices at the illusive target. More hits will 
be made and in more rapid succession, with a geometric progression. This is the 
modern approach which by virtue of its repetitious impact of men and funds will 
achieve greater goals than the random shooting of the past. 

The outlook on the pharmacologic horizon of the future is bright. The goal has 
been set. The die is cast and the direction of progress with concerted effort is estab- 
lished. One is reminded of this timeless comment of Sir Frederick Hopkins, which is 
fitting to this era of pharmacologic progress: "In a country rich in gold observant 
wayfarers may tind nuggets on their path, but only systematic mining may provide 
the currency of nations." 



BOOK REVIEWS 

Psychiatry and Religion (.1 Syinposiuni, cd. by Felix Marli-Ihiu'icz), M . D. J'lihliculions, Inc., 

Xeic York, 1956. 

In this nation, uninhibited discussions of religious principles and traditions in contrast with 
psychiatric opinion is an unusual phenomenon. This symposium, a collection of 13 essays on variouii 
aspects of religious evidence, ritual and dogma is an attempt to present just such a convergent 
anal>-sis, and to afford the student a basis for comparative thought. While some of the statements 
and beliefs of individual members of the symposium might be even offensive or at least at odds with 
orthodo.x religious concepts, one cannot but admire the attitude of frankness and the point of view 
even if unorthodox. The authors have placed considerable thought into the jireparation of this sym- 
posium and their ideas are not to be taken lightly. Such presentations, be they few, are informative 
and provocative, whether they be acceptable or not. If one can approach this type of discussion 
with a relaxed attitude and without too much fear for his stress mechanisms, it can be recommended 
as an interesting antithesis to an established flow of traditional thought. 

John A. Wagner, M.D. 

Veterinary Dermatology. Frank Krai, D.V.M. and Banjamin J. Novak, Ed.D., 317 Pages, 162 

Black and White Illustrations, Published by J. B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia, Pa., Price 

$10.00. 

In this first complete text on Veterinary Dermatology in English, the authors stress the fact 
that many eruptions on the skin have an internal origin which ma>' be associated with local or gen- 
eral infections. It is interesting to note that the veterinarian, like the practicing physician, stresses 
the necessity for an examination of the entire body. 

Much of the terminology used by the veterinarian is similar to that used by the physician. The 
word "mange" is loosely used and some adjustment in nomenclature should be made so that it 
could be eliminated. Many conditions described as mange are probably eczematous and in no way 
related to animal parasites. 

The chapter on the examination of the skin would be an excellent guide to the medical student 
as well as to the dermatologist in training. The text is adequately illustrated. This text is authori- 
tative, and well written. 

It is an unusual privilege for a physician to be allowed to review a text which has been written 
primarily for those engaged in the practice of veterinary medicine. Physicians interested in derma- 
tology should be familiar with cutaneous lesions in animals as well as humans. This applies espe- 
cially to those engaged in animal research. 

//. R. 



120 



OBSTETRICAL CASE STUDY* 

This 29 year old woman was admitted to the hospital on 7-13-55 at 2:00 P.M. 
with spontaneous rupture of her membranes at 11:30 A.M. on the day of admission. 
She also complained of abdominal and low back discomfort. Her past history and 
family history were non-contributory. She has had five full term pregnancies all 
terminated by the vaginal route. The largest infant weighed 7 lb. 11 oz. Her L.M.P. 
was 10-7-54 and E.D.C. 7-14-55. Her prenatal course was entirely uneventful with 
a total weight gain of 4 lb. while under observation. 

Physical Examination: A colored female, age 29, well nourished, B.P. 110/65. 
Heart and lungs were negative; breasts gravid, and no masses. The abdomen was 
gravid, height of fundus 27 cms., estimated weight of the fetus 3200 grams, lying 
as an ROA, fetal heart 142 in right lower quadrant, with the head dipping at the 
inlet. A rectal examination revealed the cervix to be finger tip dilated and approxi- 
mately 80 per cent effaced. The nitrozene test vvas positive. Hemoglobin was 10.8 
grams, catheterized specimen of urine was negative for albumin, sugar trace and 
acetone negative; microscopic-numerous WBC per high power field. 

The patient was given a soap suds enema which was effectual. At 6:00 P.M. she 
had failed to go into labor and was sent to the ward. At about 3:00 A.M., on 7-14-55, 
the patient was returned to the delivery floor, having gone into labor. At 4:30 A.M., 
pains were occurring every 2-3 minutes and lasting 40-50 seconds. Labor progressed 
satisfactorily, and at 10:30 A.M. she was fully dilated, but the head failed to engage. 
A roentgenograph was then taken and revealed the OC to be 10.5 cms., AP of mid 
plane 13.1 cms., TI 10 cms., and IS 9.8 cms., with INIengert's index at inlet of 105 
and mid pelvis 128. The fetus was lying as an LOP. Pains were occurring ever 2 
minutes and of good quality. The fetal heart beat was 140 per minute. 

In view of the evident disproportion, a decision to deliver this patient by caesarean 
section was made. Under spinal anesthesia, a low mid line incision was made. The 
lower uterine segment was found to be about 15 cms. in length and edematous. A 
transverse incision was made in the lower uterine segment and a full term, living 
female child, weighing 3374 grams was delivered from LOP with some difficulty. 
Following this, the uterus was delivered through the abdominal incision. It was then 
discovered that the incision had extended to the left, involving the left uterine artery 
which was bleeding briskly. The bleeding was controlled by clamps and an attempt 
was then made to close the lower uterine incision, but the tissue was so friable that 
the sutures tore through the muscular tissue. Accordingly, it was necessary to perform 
a total hysterectomy in order to control the bleeding. During this operative procedure, 
the patient received 1500 cc of whole blood and 1100 cc of 5 per cent glucose in water. 
She withstood the operative procedure and left the operating room in apparent good 
condition. 

The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient received intravenous fluids, 
1 gram of streptomycin and 6000 units of S R penicillin daily. She was out of bed on 

* From the Department of 01)stetrics and Gynecology, University' of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine, Baltimore. 

121 



122 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

the first post-operative day; but ran a low grade temperature for 4 days for which no 
cause was found. She was discharged on ihe 8th post-operative day. 

DISCUSSION 

This case is of interest from several aspects. First: The fact that a patient may 
have had several vaginal deliveries without any difficulty and yet, under a set of 
circumstances, may require a caesarean section in a subsequent pregnancy. In this 
case, this patient had a dystocia evidently caused by a mal-presentation; i.e. LOP in a 
borderline pelvis. 

Secondly: A transverse incision in the lower uterine segment can be dangerous, 
especially when one is dealing with a large baby and where delivery of the head may 
be difficult. A longitudinal incision in the lower uterine segment could only have 
extended longitudinally and, therefore, would not have involved the uterine artery. 

Thirdly: The importance of having blood available for such an emergency, which is 
life saving. 

Fourthly: The prompt decision to perform a hysterectomy. One may cjuestion the 
performance of a total hysterectomy instead of a sub-total hysterectomy in this case. 
However, in our clinic the resident has had previous experience in performing total 
hysterectomy at time of caesarean section, and he had learned that once the bleeding 
is controlled, and with technical experience, a total hysterectomy carries no increased 
risk. 

Finally: Patients with total hysterectomy usually have as good a postoperative 
course as those following a ceaserean section, especially after membranes have been 
ruptured for many hours. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

DEAN'S LETTER 

Dear Members of the Alumni and Friends: 

During the past two years I am sure some of you have been troubled by rumors, 
statements and counter statements concerning the standing of the ^Medical School. 
On November 14th the School was revisited by the joint committee of the American 
Medical Association Council on Medical Education and Hospitals and the Association 
of American Medical Colleges. We are proud to say that the committee reported that 
they are transmitting to their parent associations praise for the educational program 
of the School of Medicine. This is fine recognition, not only for the current program 
of the School, but a proper tribute to the quality of work done in the past and a real 
promise for an illustrious future. 

The Medical School is not unmindful of the many improvements that are taking 
place in the State. Through the understanding and support of the Governor, the State 
Legislature, the Board of Regents and the University administration much progress 
is being made in adapting the Medical School and University Hospital to meet educa- 
tional and service needs. Improvements previously cited as being requested have 
been granted and are now under way or accomplished. 

P^oUowing a study of the needs of the Baltimore campus a Master Planning Com- 
mittee of the professional schools recommended that a request be made that the 
campus area be designated for redevelopment. The Board of Regents has made such 
a request of the Planning Commission of Baltimore and the first concept of what the 
Baltimore campus may develop to in the future has been submitted to the Board of 
Regents for their consideration in planning. While this is just a dream for the future, 
it is submitted as being possibly of interest to you. 

Sincerely, 

William S. Stone, M.D., Dean 

DEAN NAMES SESQUICENTENNIAL COIMMITTEE 

Dean William S. Stone has recently announced the appointment of a committee 
to organize the Sesquicentennial Celebration of the School of Medicine which will 
occur in 1957. The committee, shortly to begin work, will receive suggestions and 
coordinate plans for a year-long celebration in observance of the 150th anniversary 
of the founding of the School of Medicine. Members of the committee include Drs. 
Maurice C. Pincoflfs, C. Reid Edwards, J. Morris Reese, William H. Triplett, Eduard 
Uhlenhuth. Dr. John A. Wagner is Chairman of the committee. All communications 
and suggestions should be sent to the School of Medicine directed to the Chairman of 
the Sesquicentennial Committee. 



ii BILI.ETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, C. OF Ml). 

POST GRADUATE COMMITTEE AKAES TO NEW QUARTERS IN OLD 

MEDICAL BUILDING 

Dean Stone Assigns Commillee and Alumni Association to New Quarters, Once hacultv 

Board Room 

For a number of years il has been apparent ihal interest in postgraduate medical 
education in the State of Maryhmd has kept pace with that of the rest of the country. 
It is obvious though that there still remains quite a good bit of fertile territory and 
undiscovered needs. Recognition of these facts resulted in a greater emphasis on this 
type of continuing education by the Legislature, the President of the University as 
well as the Dean and the Faculty of the School of ]\Iedicine. A first step in this direc- 
tion was taken early last October and resulted in the establishment of the Post- 
graduate Committee of the School of Medicine in a new home, with a greatly in- 
creased staflf. The Committee changed its address from the sixth floor of the Bressler 
Building to the second floor of the old Medical Building. Many of you will recall that 
the rooms now occupied by the Committee were formerly used for Faculty Board 
meetings. Still older alumni and friends will remember the area as the Anatomy 
Department. The new quarters provide space for the greatly expanded activities of 
the Committee as well as the needs of the additional personnel. 

The several rooms which now constitute the office of the Committee are shared 
jointly with the Medical Alumni Association, thus bringing into close contact the two 
important services of the Medical School to its graduates and to other physicians 
in the state. Some redecoration — in line with the long range plan to restore the Medi- 
cal Building to its original architecture — has been carried out. Major consideration 
in the redecoration was given to the preservation of the basic architecture of the 
"Federal Period" and its graceful furnishings. Of great importance too in redecorating 
was the plan to make the offices of the Committee and the Alumni Association a 
"living room away from home" for graduates, faculty members and friends of the 
School of ^Medicine. Besides lounging facilities, the new rooms include a small library 
for those who wish to relax and read while waiting for friends, a telephone and several 
desks for that short note you should have written before you left home. It is hoped 
that all friends of the jNIedical School will take advantage of this new "living room" 
and feel free to utilize the facilities for your comfort and convenience while on the 
campus attending meetings or simply dropping in on your way through town to 
say "hello." 

As postgraduate medical education in Maryland takes some "giant steps," the 
need for adequate meeting rooms becomes essential. Therefore, space has also been 
provided for group meetings and approximately fifteen people can be easily ac- 
commodated. The Postgraduate Committee and the ^Medical Alumni Association and 
their various subcommittees are now able to arrange meetings more conveniently. 

WITH SOMK NEW PEOPLE 

Dr. Louis H. Douglass, Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics, and one of the best known 
and respected members of the Faculty of the School of Medicine for over forty years, 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 




New Quari(,rs oi the Medical Alumni Association 

is the most recent and important addition to the stafif of the Postgraduate Com- 
mittee. His association with the Committee will enable the members to make use of 
his knowledge as well as his experience with the needs of the physicians in postgraduate 
education. Though he is serving in the capacity of "counselor" to the Committee, 
his activities will be felt throughout the state. We are very grateful to Dr. Douglass 
for sharing with us his e.xperiences and thinking in furthering the development of 
postgraduate education in Maryland. 

On October 1, 1955 Mr. Thomas J. .\ylward assumed the position of Assistant 
Director of the Postgraduate Committee. His areas of responsibility are explained 









iP.UT\W\ 



oRt- 



iv BILLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI. \E, C. OF M D. 

elsewhere in this issue. In general, Mr. Aylward will coordinale the present activities 
of the Committee and investigate further needs and programs in postgraduate 
education. 

Dr. D. C Smith, who has been a member of the Committee for a number of years 
and more recently its assistant director, has relinquished that title because of the 
additional responsibilities he has recently assumed. His new duties as Associate 
Dean and Chairman of the Committee on Admissions, as well as being generally in 
charge of student activity and curriculum, will occupy a large share of his time and 
efforts. However, he continues to serve on the Committee as Vice-Chairman. 

BUT STILL DOING BUSINESS 

Since the beginning of October the Postgraduate Committee has been producing 
the weekly television program TV-MD. This is the fifth year this program has been 
telecast in the Baltimore area. It is seen locally on Sunday afternoon at 2:30 P. INI., 
Channel 11, Station WBAL. This season the programs are centered around the theme: 
"Dr. What does it mean . . . ?" and each w-eek a question of general interest to the 
lay audience is considered. The success of this interesting and informative program 
has made the effort and time of the faculty members who have participated very 
worthwhile. A variety of subjects were covered during the fall. Dr. Vernon E. Krahl 
opened the series with a discussion of the human lung w'ith some new anatomic 
findings. Remedial education, with emphasis on reading rate training, was the subject 
presented by Dr. George Weigand on the second program. Professor Richard Hendrik 
and Mrs. Dorothy Craven of the Speech Clinic demonstrated with children articula- 
tion therapy and research. This was followed by Dr. R. x^dams Cowdey, who pre- 
sented a ver}' interesting program on myocardial infarction — a very timely subject. 
Proctology was the general theme of Dr. Monte Edwards. Diabetes mellitus was 
investigated for the lay audience by Dr. T. Nelson Carey. The last program in 1955 
was "Pains in the leg" by Dr. Louis A. M. Krause. TV-MD will continue each week 
until the first of June. 

On December 8, 1955 the Postgraduate Committee sponsored a one day meeting 
for general practitioners in cooperation with the Maryland Academy of General 
Practice. Several other sessions of this type are scheduled for February and April. 
Announcements of these meetings are mailed to physicians in the state. The success 
of this program indicates that it is the type of program which fits the needs of many 
of the general practitioners. 

Plans are being made to reorganize the Basic Science course, which has been most 
popular during the past few years. It is expected that this course will be offered again 
during the school year 1956-57. The Surgical Anatomy course will begin on January 
30th and continue through June 9, 1956. Announcement of other postgraduate 
courses was made in the September issue of the Bulletin and further information can 
l)e obtained from the Postgraduate Committee oflice. 

WITH SOME NEW IDEAS 

It is hoped that with the recent enlargement of the staff of the Postgraduate Com- 
mittee that new offerings in postgraduate education can be made. During this year 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION v 

information is being compiled concerning the extent of such courses being ofiferecl in 
the state, with an eye toward avoiding duplication and also to satisfy the needs in 
areas not being covered adequately. At the same time an efifort is being made to 
gather some personal observations and thinking by physicians concerning their 
needs in postgraduate education. It is hoped that by these means the postgraduate 
courses may be made more realistic and practical for the physicians. 

Since it is manifestly impossible to visit and talk with each physician in the state, 
it is suggested that those who are interested communicate their ideas to the Com- 
mittee office and make their wishes known. In that way it is possible to plan course 
offerings that are truly designed to meet a need. So let us hear from you. 

DELAY OF DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS ANNUAL REPORT 

The summary of admissions and perinatal mortality of the Department of Ob- 
stetrics of the University of Maryland usually published in the January number of 
the Bulletin will be delayed this year. Publication will be forthcoming in either the 
April or the July, 1956 number. 

DR. STONE ANNOUNCES FORMATION OF GEORGE H. SMITH 
IMEMORIAL FUND 

Committee Formed to Receive Funds in Honor of Late Resident 

A Memorial Fund has been established in honor of the late Dr. George H. Smith, 
U. S. Public Health Service Fellow in Psychiatry whose untimely death occurred on 
November 7, 1955, the result of an acute coronary occlusion. 

A committee, headed by Dean Stone who is serving as Honorary Chairman, has 
been organized to accept contributions to the Fund. The committee includes Dr. 
Jacob E. Finesinger, Chairman, Dean Florence M. Gipe, Dr. Theodore E. Woodward, 
Dr. Clifford E. Blitch, and Dr. James G. Arnold. Dr. John O. Sharrett is serving as 
secretary and Dr. Virginia Huffer, Treasurer. 

Contributions may be sent to Dr. Virginia Huffer, Treasurer, the George H. Smith 
Memorial Fund Committee, University Hospital, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

OPENING EXERCISES .MARK BEGINNING OF 148TH ACADEMIC YEAR 

Opening exercises at the School of Medicine, an informal convocation were held 
on September 21, the first day of the new academic year. The program reproduced 
herewith introduced to the students the principle academic officers of the University 
and of the School of ^Medicine. Following the exercises tea was served in the Assemby 
Hall of Westminster Church under the auspices of the Woman's Board of the Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

These opening exercises will become an annual function in the School of Medicine. 



BL'LLETIX 01- THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE, T. 01 Ml). 

Opening Exercises 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

School of Medicine 

WF.STMINSTER PRESBVTERI.\N CHURCH 

BaLTUMORE 1, M \RYL.\XD 

SEPTEMBER TWENTY-FIRST 

Nineteen Hitndred Fifty-Fu-e 

3:1X1 r.M. 

ORGAN MUSIC 

Mrs. Bruce H. McDonald 

Westminster Presbyterian Church Organist 

INVOCATION 

Dr. Bruck H. McDonald 

Minister, Westminster Presbyterian Church 

WELCOME 

Dr. Willl\m S. Stc^xe 
Dean, School of Medicine 

GREETINGS 

Jltk;e William P. Cole, Jr. 
Chairman, Board of Regents 

THE STUDENT NURSES' GLEE CLUB 

Mr. Charles A. Haslup, Director 

"Praise Ye the Father" Gounod 

"Alma Mater" 

"WHAT THE PUBLIC EXPECTS 
OF THE PHYSICIAN" 

Dr. Wilsox H. Elkins 
President, University of Maryland 

"^LARYLAND, MY MARYLAND" 
Audience 

BENEDICTION 

Dr. Bruce H. McDonald 

TEA 

Women's Board of the University Hospital 
(Assembly Hall) 



MEDICA L SCHOOL SECTION vii 

POST GRADUATE ACTIVITIES EXPANDED THROUGH APPOIXTMEXT 

OF NEW COORDINATOR 

Mr. Thomas J. Aylward Named lo Newly Created Post 

Through the efforts of the Post Graduate Committee and in cooperation with 
Dean Stone and the Board of Regents, a modest increase in funds for the Post Gradu- 
ate Committee was granted in the current budget. 

Mr. Thomas J. Aylward, formerly a member of the Speech Department of the 
University of Maryland was recently named to this position. Mr. Aylward will be 
the [)ersonal representative of the School of Medicine relative to post graduate affairs 
and will bring first hand to the practitioners of the state knowledge of current pro- 




Mr. Thomas J. Aylward, Jr. 

grams in post graduate education as planned and as in progress. He will also provide 
a close liaison between the views of alumni and practitioners of the State of Maryland 
relative to the needs of post graduate education. Mr. Aylward will also ser\-e as an 
Associate Editor of the Bulletin of the Sc hool of Medicine. 

He is a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin and the son of Dr. Thomas J. A\-lward. He 
received his preliminary education in the {)ublic schools of Milwaukee and is a gradu- 
ate of the University of Wisconsin in the class of 1947 receiving his Master of Science 
degree in 1949. He later studied law at Georgetown University Law School and 
during the summers at the University of Wisconsin. 

-Mr. .\ylward, a former Ford Foundation Fellow, is a member of the American 
Association of University Professors, the Speech Association of America and the 
Adult Education Association. He has had e.xtensive teaching e.xperience, public 
relations activities and has studied television [jroduction in connection with his 
graduate work. 

In announcing his ap{)ointment Dr. Howard .M. Bubert, Chairman and Director 
of the Post Graduate Committee called attention to the importance of Mr. Aylward's 



viii BVLLEriX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE, V. OF MD. 

work in bringing the post graduate services of the University closer to the practitioner, 
an administrative problem which heretofore has been extremely diHicult to solve. 
Physicians throughout the State of Maryland and alumni of the School of Medicine 
will have more news of ^Ir. Aylward's activities as the programs, on which he is 
working, broaden and are further developed. 

DR. SHIPLEY DIES 

Dr. Arthur M. Shipley, Emeritus J'rofessor of Surgery and long a member of 
the Faculty of the School of Medicine, prominent surgeon and member of the class 
of 1902, died at his home on October 16, 1955. Dr. Shipley's obituary will afjpear in a 
forthcoming edition of the Bulletin. 

DR. SCHULTZ DIES 

Former Head of Pharmacology Department Succumbs in Xeiv York City 

Dr. William H. Schultz, formerly Professor of Pharmacology in the University 
of Maryland School of IMedicine and later Research Professor, died of coronary 
thrombosis at his home in New York on July 23, 1955. 




Dr. William H. Schultz 

Originally an ot'ticial of the United States Public Health service from 1908 to 1913, 
Dr. Schultz did extraordinary work on the mechanism of anaphylactic shock. He 
was also a pioneer in the early studies on adrenaline. Dr. Schultz was Professor of 
Pharmacology at the School of Medicine from 1920 to 1931. 

Born in Akron, Ohio, he studied under the late Dr. William Howell at the Johns 
Hopkins University. Prior to his appointment to the professorship at the University 
of Maryland Dr. Schultz held important teaching j^ositions in the University of 
W^est Virginia and in the George Washington University. After his retirement in 1931 
he was appointed research professor at the Medical School and served in this capacity 
for a period of 5 years. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION ix 

Dr. Schultz was noted for his fundamenlal studies on anaphylaxis. The Schultz- 
Dale reaction is the outgrowth of some of his fundamental work. 

In a resolution memorializing Dr. Schultz, Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr., Professor of 
Pharmacology, introduced to the faculty the following resolution. "Be it therefore 
resolved that we, the present faculty of the School of Medicine of the University of 
Maryland, express our deep sense of loss at the passing of our former faculty colleague, 
and further, be it resolved that this action be spread upon the minutes of the Faculty 
Board, and that copies be sent to his widow, Mrs. William H. Schultz, and his two 
daughters, Mrs. Alexander Moss and Mrs. Edward Minor. 

FACULTY MEMBERS PRESENT PAPER AT HEART ASSOCIATION 

MEETING 

At the Twenty-eighth Annual Scientific Session of the American Heart Association 
held in New Orleans, October 22-24, 1955, Drs. Sidney Scherlis and R. Adams Cowley 
of the School of Medicine presented a paper entitled "Neurogenic Factors in Coronary 
Disease — Findings and Clinical Results of Selective Vagotomy." 

DR. THOMAS P. SPRUNT DIES 

Was Acting Professor of Medicine During World War II 

Dr. Thomas P. Sprunt, formerly Professor of Medicine in the School of Medicine' 
died on April 26, 1955 at his home in Baltimore after a long illness. He was 
71 years old. 

A native of Fort Defiance, V^irginia, Dr. Sprunt was a graduate of the 
School of Medicine of Johns Hopkins University in the class of 1909. He held academic 
positions in both the Johns Hopkins University and the Baltimore City Hospitals 
from 19()9 to 1917 entering private practice in 1919. He was later visiting physician at 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Professor of Clinical ^ledicine at the University of 
Maryland. Dr. Sprunt was President of the Baltimore City Medical Society in 1944. 
In World War I he served as captain and major in the Army and during World War 
II served as acting Professor of ^ledicine at the University of Maryland in the ab- 
sence of Dr. Maurice C. Pincofifs. 

He was a member of the Association of American Physicians, the American College 
of Physicians, the American ^Medical Association and the Clinical and Climatological 
Society. 

NEW APPOINTIMENT TO UNIVERSITY HOSPIT.AU STAFF 

Mr. Michael J. Spoknik, Jr. has been appointed Assistant Director of the Uni- 
versity Hospital and Director of the University's Outpatient Department. A graduate 
of St. Francis College at Loretta, Pennsylvania, Mr. Spodnik also attended Pennsyl- 
vania State College and served 18 months in the United States Army Finance Corps. 
He has rei)laced Mr. .-Vlbert Wnuk who has accepted a position with the Nassau Hos- 
pital in Mineola, New York. 

IMPROX'EMENTS SL.VIED FOR UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Preliminary approval has been given by the United States Public Health Service, 
Department of Health, Education and \\'elfare for a contribution to a fund totalling 



x BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

nearly 0-j million dollars for the purpose of improving certain facilities within the 
University Hospital. 

Dean Stone recently reported that the impro\-ement projects will be started within 
the next v^ to 4 months and will include a new Xurses' Residence, a relocation of the 
ramp entrance to the Emergency Room and enlargement of several hospital areas 
including operating rooms, delivery rooms and facilities for improved radiologic 
services. 

Particularly will attention be devoted to relocation of delivery rooms, increase in 
operating room facilities and the development of a recovery room for post-operative 
patients. In addition to improvements in the department of roentgenology, facilities 
will be provided for the first time for advancing work in ophthalmology. 

DR. DOUGLASS CONTINUES FACULTY ACTIVITIES 

Dr. Louis H. Douglass, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics in the School of Medicine, 
has been recently named Counselor and .\dvisor to the Post Graduate Committee of 
the School of ^ledicine. Dr. Douglass will assist Dr. Howard Bubert in his activities 
directed toward the development of post graduate teaching throughout Maryland. 

DR. W. HOUSTON TOULSON RETIRES 

Professor of Urology Retires from Active Teaching Role 

Dr. William Houston Toulson, Professor of L^rology at the School of ^ledicine, 
has recently tendered his resignation effective July 1, 1955. 

Long active in the practice of his specialty, Dr. Toulson has served the School of 
Medicine in the capacity of Professor of Urology since 1935. 

.\ native of Chestertown in Kent County, ^Maryland, Dr. Toulson received his 
preliminary education in the public schools of Kent County, later graduating from 
Washington College in the class of 1908. In 1911 he received from Washington College 
the degree of blaster of Science and his degree of Doctor of ^ledicine from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in the class of 1913. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY 



Edward Steers, President 

School of Medicine 
Baltimore, Md. 



Donald E. Shay, Treasurer 

School of Pharmacy 

Baltimore, Md. 



Frank A. Dolle, Secretary 

School of Pharmacy 

Baltimore, Md. 

COUNCILORS 
G. P. Hager R. M. Burgison 

E. J. Herbst F. P. Ferguson 

EDITORIAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BULLETIN 
Vernon E. Krahl 



PROCEEDINGS 

of the 
University of Maryland Biological Society 

February 16, 1955. Bressler Library. 

"The Relation of the Krebs Cycle to Clinical Disease" by Samuel P. Bessman, 
M.D., Dej)artment of Pediatrics, School of Medicine. (See Abstract) 
March 16, 1955. Bressler Library. 

"The Structure of Substances which Affect the Autonomic Nervous System 
(Aminovinyl ketones)" by Jacob S. Hanker, Department of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, Pharmacy School. (See Abstract) 
April 20, 1955. Bressler Library. 

"Plasma Proteins in Leukemia and Lymphoma" by ^larie A. Andersch, Ph.D. 
and Milton S. Sacks, ]\LD., Division of Clinical Pathology, School of ]\fedicine. 
May 18, 1955. Dinner Meeting, Park Plaza Hotel. 

'■Recent Studies on Coli-bacteriophage T2" by Roger M Herriott, Department 
of Biochemistry, The Johns Hopkins L^niversity, School of Hygiene and Public 
Health. (See Abstract) 

ABSTRACTS 

The Relation of the Krebs Cycle to Clinical Disease.* By Samuel P. Bessman, 

]\LD., Department of Pediatrics. 

The Krebs cycle is the major oxidative energy source in all tissues. There is 
considerable variability in the manner in which various tissues can replace losses 
which occur. The hepatic coma syndrome results in a loss of alphaketoglutaric acid 

* Presented Feliruary 16, 1955. 



xii BVLl.ETiy 01' THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXR. l\ OF .\fD. 

beiause the increased ammonia levels in the tissues cause a reversal of the glutamic 
dehydrogenase reaction, using up this intermediate. Since the brain possesses no 
source of supply for Krebs cycle members other than the glutamic dehydrogenase 
reaction the symptomatology of increased ammonia concentration is chiefly cerebral. 
It is pro{)osed that the normal functioning of the Krebs cycle requires an acceptor 
for the high energy phosphate formed by oxidation and that this acceptor is either 
the hexokinase or creatine kinase reaction. In the diabetic the hexokinase reaction 
is inhibited in all tissues except brain, because of insulin lack. This results in a 
deficiency of acceptor and a consequent diminution in Krebs cycle oxidation. The 
normal oxidative capacity of the muscle in diabetes is occasioned by its creatine 
kinase activity, which has no requirement for insulin. This explains the adequate 
utilization of ketones in the peripheral tissues of the diabetic at the same time that 
liver cannot oxidize them. 

The Structure of Substances Which Affect the Autonomic Nervous Sys- 
tem (Aminovinyl Ketones). t By Jacob S. Hanker, Department of Pharmaceu- 
tical Chemistry. 

In a continuing investigation of the role of interaction between amino groups 
and adjacently-oriented groups in determination of pharmacodynamic properties, 
a series of aminovinyl ketones (vinylogous amides) has been prepared. The rela- 
tionship of these compounds to known pharmacodynamically-active types was 
discussed, and the hypothetical basis for preparing and testing them, elaborated. 

Recent Studies on Coli-B.\cteriophage T2.J By Roger M. Herriott, Ph.D. 

Department of Biochemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene 

and Public Health. 

The mechanism of infection of coli bacteriophage T2 is probably belter under- 
stood than for any other viral agent. The attachment of this phage or virus to the 
host cell, followed by injection of its deoxyribosenucleic acid into the host which 
then ceases forming host components and produces new phage particles was dis- 
cussed in some detail. Particular attention was focused on Dr. Herriott's observa- 
tion that many of the biologic properties of this bacterial virus are also found in 
its i^roteinous coat after the nucleic acid has been removed. 11ius, the phage coats, 
or "ghosts," carry the viral host range specificity, the property of "killing" and 
lysing the host, of interference or exclusion of super-infecting phages, specific in- 
hibition of synthesis of ribosenucleic acid, the antigenicity, and inhibition of adap- 
tive enzyme formation. Since these proteinous coats fail to replicate or to induce 
in the host the formation of viral nucleic acid or protein it is presumed that this 
function requires the injected viral nucleic acid, a conclusion reached by Hershey 
and Chase through more direct experimentation. 

The speaker also discussed some recent experiments designed to reveal the mech- 
anism by which the virus injects its nucleic acid. 

Following an internship at the University Hospital he became resident in surgery 

t Presented March 16, 1955. 
t Presented May 18, 1955. 



MEDIC A L SCHOOL SECT I OX xiii 

at the Baltimore City Hospitals and later al the University Hospital during the 
years 1916 and 1917. During World War I he was a lieutenant in the Medical Corps 
of the United States Army serving with the British Exj)editionary Forces in France 
and later with an Evacuation Hospital (No. 8) with the American Forces in France. 

Following his separation from the service he returned to Baltimore and began a 
career in surgery which culminated in a succession of appointments as Instructor, 
Assistant Professor and tinally Professor and Chairman of the Department of Urology 
at the School of Medicine. 

Dr. Toulson has been widely active in the urological tield, being a member of the 
American Urological Association and Past President of the Middle Atlantic Section. 
He is also a member of the American Association of Genito-Urinary Surgeons and is 
a Past President of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of ^laryland (1949). During 
World War II he was a member of the Advisory Board of Medical Defense and a 
member of the Disaster Preparedness Committee, Chairman of the Medical Division 
of the American Red Cross Campaign and a member of the Board of Directors of the 
Baltimore Chapter of the American Red Cross. Dr. Toulson has been active on the 
staffs of several Baltimore Hospitals and has been a consistent contributor to the 
urological literature. Dr. Toulson was succeeded in office by Dr. John D. Young, Jr. 

PATHOLOGY DEPART:\IENT REPRESENTED AT SOUTHERN IMEDICAL 

ASSOCIATION .MEETING 

A paper entitled Ischemic Hypophyseal Necrosis ami other Pituitary Lesions was 
recently presented at the Southern Medical Association meeting at Houston, Texas 
by Dr. John O. Sharrett of the Department of Neurosurgery and Dr. John A. Wagner 
of the Department of Pathology. 



ALUiMNl ASSOCIAIION SECTION 



OFFICERS* 
I. Morris Reese, M.D., President 



ROV GUYTHER, M.D. 



Vice-Presidents 

NoRMAX E. Sartorius, M.D. 



Ber.n'ard Thomas, M.D. 



Edwin H. Stewart, M.D., Secretary 

J. Emmf.tt Queen, M.D., Assistant Secretary 

William H. Triplett, M.D. 



Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., Treasurer 
Mi.nette E. Scott, Executive Secretary 
Director 



Board of Directors 

Frank J. Geraghtv, M.D., 

Chairman 
J. Morris Reese, M.D. 
Edwin H. Stewart, Jr., M.D. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., M.D. 
J. Emmett Queen, M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 
J. Sheldon Eastland, M.D. 
H. Bo\-D Wylie, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 



Nominating Committee 

Ginso.N J. Wells, ^I.D., 

Chairman 
Emanuel Schimunek, M.D. 
Dexter L. Reimann, M.D. 
Edwin S. Muller, M.D. 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

Library Committee 
Milton S. Sacks, M.D. 

* July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956 



Representatives to General 
Alumni Board 

Thurston R. .\dams, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Representatives, Editorial 
Board. Bulletin 

Harry C. Hull, M.D. 
.\lbert E. Goldstein, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 



Dear Fellow Alumnus: 



May I report the activities of the Medical Alumni Association since my last letter. 

The new Alumni office, of which I spoke before, has become a reality and at the 
present time the ^Medical Alumni Association and the Post Graduate Committee 
occupy the large room on the second floor of the old Medical Building. This room 
has been completely renovated and furnished in accordance with the character of 
the room, and furnishes a most excellent meeting place for returning Alumni. While 
not overly large or sumptuous, it is with all, still very much in keeping with the 
building and is a most decided improvement over our old quarters. 

Your Board of Directors met on October thirteenth. At that meeting, several 
innovations were proposed and passed by the Board. 

First, it was suggested that a Special Membership Committee be set up in each 
State. This idea being to promote closer contact between this Committee and the 
Alumni Association and through the Committee to the individual alumnus scattered 
throughout the State. More will be heard about this later. 

It was further decided to circularize all ^ledical Alumni relative to the meeting of 
the Southern Medical Association in Houston and the American Medical Association 
Clinical meeting in Boston. General chairman for the Houston University of Maryland 
cocktail parly is Dr. John Roberts Phillips, and to date some one hundred fifty accept- 
ances have been received. The General chairman for the University of Maryland 
meeting in Boston is Dr. Norman J. Wilson, Class of 1935. The University of Mary- 
land Alumni gathering will be held Wednesday, November thirtieth at the University 



A LI. MX I ASSOCIATION SECTION xv 

Club and the Houston meeting on the fourteenth of November. The acceptances 
for the Houston party have been most satisfactory and evinces renewed interest in 
the Alumni Association. 

The Board of Directors further decided to bring before the Annual meeting the 
proposal to designate a President-Elect who would automatically succeed to the 
Presidency. The reason for this being to familiarize the President-Elect with the 
affairs of the Alumni Association prior to taking office as President. This i)roposal, of 
course, necessitates a change in the Constitution and this will be voted on at the 
Annual meeting. 

The increase in membership has been slow but steady and the financial affairs of 
the Association are in excellent condition. 

Won't each and everyone of you who receives this letter attempt to bring in a 
minimum of one new member to the Alumni Association? 

Sincerely, 
J. Morris Reese, j\1.D., President 

WEST VIRGINIA ALUAINI HOLD RECEPTION AT ANNUAL 
MEDICAL MEETING 

More than 40 alumni of the School of Medicine and their wives participated in 
a reception and cocktail party held on Thursday, August 18 at the Greenbrier Hotel 
in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. This reception, held in connection with 
the annual meeting of the West Virginia State Medical Association is one of a series 
planned by the ^Medical Alumni Association for various medical meetings for Uni- 
versity of Maryland alumni who are present in sufficient number. Dr. William H. 
Triplett, Director of the Medical Alumni Association, represented the Associa- 
tion. It was originally planned that Dr. William S. Stone, Dean, would represent 
the School of ^Medicine. However, unforeseen difficulties prevented his attendance. 
Dr. Stone conveyed his compliments to the group by way of a telegram which will 
be published in the West Virginia Medical Journal. Dr. J. Frank Williams, class of 
1935, was Chairman of the reception which was considered most successful. 

NOTICE OF ALUMNI REUNION— JUNE, 1956 

Plans are now in progress for the alumni gathering and clinical session to be held 
in 1956 on June 7. 

Aside from an interesting clinical session there will be the usual alumni luncheon, 
election of officers and presentation of the Alumni Honor Award and gold key given 
each year to a distinguished alumnus of the School of Medicine. 

This year the Medical Alumni Association will honor the class of 1906, the known 
and living alumni (including all three schools) number over 80. President Reese 
of the Alumni Association will present the 50 year membership certificates to those 
members of the golden jubilee classes in attendance at the alumni banquet. 

Alumni are urged to return to the School of Medicine for an inspection tour of the 
new facilities and to meet the many new faculty members who have been introduced 
in these pages during the past year. 

Events of the day will be climaxed by the usual alumni banquet and individual 



BULLET IX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



class reunions. As usual hotel reservations can be made in advance through the otTice 
of the alumni secretary. 

Those members of the classes of 19U6 who will receive their fifty year certilicates 
include the following. 



Henry Blank 
Earl H. Brannon 
W . L. Brent 
William D. Campbell 
Harry A. Cantwell 
Romulus L. Carlton 
Thomas M. Chaney 
Earle S. Coster 
Ralph E. Dees 



Samuel M. Allerton 
David E. Baird 
Leo V. Becker 
Frederick V. Beitler 
Harry J. Bennett 
Russell E. Blaisdell 
Edw^ard F. Briggs 
George R. Curry 
Wm. Paul Dailey 
Jacob M. Gershberg 
Henry J. Giamarino 
Edward F. Healv 



David Beveridge 
\\'illiam P. Bonar 
French S. Gary 
Orel N. Chaffee 
:\I. Tolbert Dalton 
William F. Deutsch 
Walter A. Glines 
Patrick J. Heston 
George F. Johnson 



University of Maryland 

Joseph A. Devlin 
J. Sterling Geatty 
W. Lee Hart 
James C. Hill 
Oliver A. Howard 
Lafayette Lake 
Louis Limauro 
Samuel H. Lynch 
Joseph McElhattan 

Baltimore Medical College 

Homer S. C. Hetrick 
Leon P. Jankiewicz 
Manuel Katzoff 
Lloyd A. Kefauver 
Harvey A. Kelly 
Absalom A. Lawton 
Otto E. Longacre 
Patrick J. McLaughlin 
Angus D. ]\IacLennan 
Michael J. O'Connor 
Thomas M. Pascall 
George H. Pflueger 



Louis ^L Pastor 
Edwin L. Scott 
J. G. Fowble Smith 
Paul B. H. Smith 
Washington W. Stonestreet 
Bernard O. Thomas 
Fitzrandolph Winslow 



James E. Poulton 
John F. Quinn 
Jacob Roemer 
George A. Schneider 
Seth B. Sprague 
Alfred Stahl 
Philip Sussman 
Henry J. Walton 
Samuel B. Westlake 
Clinton M. Young 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 



Frederick E. Knowles 
Arminus B. Lyon 
James H. McCoey 
Burtis W. McLean 
Lewis C. McNeer 
J. Ward Mankin 
Thatcher Miller 
Solomon G. ]\Ioore 
Hodge A. Newell 



Arthur C. Palmateer 
George L. Pence 
Cecil V. Smith 
Ziba L. Smith 
Robert T. Temple 
Parker M. Wentz 
Walter D. Wise 



UBe President 

and 

l^oard of 'Directors 

of the 

Medical Alumni Association of the University of Maryland 



extend to the graduates of the School of Medicine 
and other friends of the University a cordial invi- 
tation to visit new quarters located on the second 
floor of the old building affectionately known as 
Chemical Hall, and now occupied jointly by the 
Medical Alumni Association and Post Graduate 
Committee. 

A lounge equipped to provide comfort and 
convenience will be found open daily Monday 
through Friday during the hours nine to four. A 
warm welcome awaits those who will take ad- 
vantage of these facilities. 



xviii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

HOUSTON ALUMNI REUNION A SUCCESS 

More than 50 alumni of ihe School of Medicine were present at the Houston Club 
on Tuesday evening, November 15 on the occasion of the annual meeting of the 
Southern Medical Association held in Houston, Texas. The reunion, sponsored by 
the Medical Alumni Association, was under the Chairmanship of Dr. and Mrs. John 
Roberts Phillips, class of 1927, who acted as hosts. A most delightful buffet and 
reception mixed with interesting informalities characterized the evening. A more 
detailed account including some photographs will appear in a subsequent number of 
the Bulletin. 



Alumni and others present at the meeting included: 



Dr. John Roberts Phillips 

^Irs. Rebecca Hall Phillips 

Dr. J. Morris Reese 

Dr. Harold Newell Taylor 

Mrs. Doris Wahle Taylor 

Dr. Harry ]M. Robinson, Sr. 

]\Irs. ^Margaret Lois Reynolds 

Mr. Robert P. ^Slencees, Jr. 

Dr. Howard Stackhouse 

Mrs. Howard Stackhouse 

Mrs. W. A. :Mathews 

Dr. W. A. Mathews 

Dr. Alex Brodsky 

]\Irs. Alex Brodsky 

Mrs. Dana Thomas 

Mrs. Rebecca Turner 

Dr. W. Raymond ^NIcKenzie 

Dr. R. C. M. Robinson 

]\Irs. R. C. M. Robinson 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr. 

]Mrs. Harry M. Robinson, Jr. 

Dr. Augustus H. Frye, Jr. 

]\Irs. Eleanor Frye 

Dr. F. A. Holden 

Mrs. F. A. Holden 

Mrs. John Echols 

Dr. J. E. Echols 

Mrs. E. Paul Knotts 

Dr. E. Paul Knotts 

Dr. J. B. Anderson 

Mrs. J. B. Anderson 



Dr. Zack N. Owens 
Mrs. Zack N. Owens 
Dr. Ross Pierpont 
Mrs. Ross Pierpont 
Dr. Gilbert Artijani 
Dr. C. A. Davenport 
Mrs. C. A. Davenport 
Miss Ruth Schnaeder 
Dr. R. G. Martin 
Mrs. R. G. Martin 
Dr. John Shell 
Mrs. John Shell 
Robert L. Swink 
Dr. John A. Wagner 
John O. Sharrett 
Dr. L. jM. Draper 
Dr. Henry Lee Claude 
Dr. John James Bunting 
Mrs. John James Bunting 
Dr. Charlie Gill 
Dr. T. N. Carpening 
Mrs. T. N. Carpening 
Dr. I. A. Siegel 
Mrs. I. A. Siegel 
Dr. A. Greer 
Mrs. A. Greer 
Dr. David Strider 
Mrs. Fred Gibbons 
Mr. Vernon Slagle 
Davis V. Strider 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 




BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 




Legend on page xxi 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION xxi 

DR. SHAWKEY HONORED AT POST GRADUATE FORUM 

Dr. Arthur A. Shawkey of Charleston, West Virginia was honor guest at the first 
in a series of forums in post graduate education for physicians sponsored by the 
Charleston General Hospital, the meeting having dealt in pediatrics. Dr. Shawkey, a 
graduate of the class of 1900, College of Physicians and Surgeons, has been a prac- 
ticing pediatrician for 39 years. He is responsible for the purified water system and 
the tubercular testing of daily cattle in Kanawha County and is active in a number 
of civic organizations. 

Dr. Shawkey was selected as honoree of the opening session because of his "con- 
tribution to health and welfare of the community." 

MARYLAND ALUIMNI ATTEND REUNION AT AM A. CLINICAL SESSION 

Under the leadership of Dr. Norman J. Wilson of the class of 1935, alumni of the 
School of Medicine attended a reunion which was held on Wednesday, November 30, 
1955 at the University Club in Boston. 

This assembly, held under the auspices of the Medical Alumni Association and 
organized by Dr. Wilson featured a fellowship hour and cocktails. The reunion was a 
part of a continuing program of the Medical Alumni Association to organize informal 
gatherings of alumni of the School of Medicine at the larger medical meetings. A re- 
union sponsored by the ^Medical Alumni Association is planned for the annual meeting 
of the American ]\Iedical Association to be held in Chicago in June, 1956 due notice 
of which will be given. 

MARYLAND ACADEMY OF GENERAL PRACTICE NEWS 

Alumni of School of Medicine Named to Important Maryland Academy of General 

Practice Posts 

At the recent annual meeting of the Maryland Academy of General Practice 
Dr. Nathan E. Needle, class of 1930, was named president of the Society. Dr. Robert 
W. Farr, class of 1934 and of Chestertown, ^Maryland, was named president-elect. 
Vice-presidents elected included Dr. Philibert Artigiani, class of 1920 and Dr. Archie 
R. Cohen, class of 1930. Members named to the Board of Directors include Dr. 

Candid snapshots during Houston reunion 

a. A Toast to the old school. 1. to r. Mrs. Robert L. Swink, Dr. John J. Bunting, '38, Mrs. Margaret 
Reynolds Mencees, nursing, '41, Dr. Robert L. Swink, Dr. John A. Wagner. Dr. .\. E. Brodsky. 

b. Banquet table in black and gold. (1. to r.) Dr. John Robert Phillips, Dr. Raymond McKenzie, 
Mrs. Rebecca Hall Phillips and Dr. J. Morris Reese, Alumni President. 

c. Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr. greets Dr. and Mrs. Phillips at their table where lhe\' entertain 
Dr. F. .\. Holden, Southern Medical Councillor, (in Texas hat). 

d. Small group (I. to r. ) Dr. and Mrs. Harold N. Taylor; Dr. and .Mrs. T. X. Cori)ening. 

e. Informal grou]). 1. to r. Dr. J. Morris Reese, .\lumni President, Mrs. l\el)ecca Hall Phillijjs, 
Dr. Hcnr_\' Lee Claude and Dr. E. Paul Knotts. 

f. Three .Mumnae of Nursing School, (1. to r.) Mrs. Doris Wahle Taylor, .Mrs. l\ei)ecca Hall 
Phillips and Mrs. Margaret Reynolds Mencees. 

g. .\ good time is had by all. 

h. Presidents in conference. Dr. Raymond McKenzie, (1.), President, Southern Medical .\ssocia- 
tion, chats with Dr. J. Morris Reese, President, Medical .Munini Association and Chairman Board 
of Directors, Southern Medical .Association. 



xxii BILLRTIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Walter A. Anderson, class of 1929, Dr. C. Rodney La5rton, class of 1935, Dr. Hugh 
Ward, class of 1929, Dr. J. Roy Guyther, class of 1943 and Dr. William T. Layman, 
class of 1939. Mr. William W. Wiscott is Executive Secretary of the Society. 

ITEMS 

Dr. G. Donald Niswander, class of 1948, has recently been appointed Director of 
Psychiatric Research and Education at the New Hampshire State Hos])ital at Con- 
cord. 

Dr. Harold L. Daly, Jr. and Dr. Miriam S. Daly, class of 1950, have announced 
the opening of ofTices at 318^^ South Superior, Albion, Michigan, with practices 
limited to general surgery and pediatrics respectively. 

Dr. Olin C. Moulton, class of 1934, is currently Secretary-Treasurer of the Washoe 
County ^Medical Society, Reno, Nevada. 

Captain Gordon B. Tayloe, ]\Iedical Corps, United States Navy, of the class of 
1927, has been assigned by the Nav^^ Department as the Assistant District Medical 
Officer of the 5th Naval District with Headquarters in Norfolk, Virginia. Dr. Tayloe 
entered the naval service on June 29, 1927. Prior to assuming his new duties, he 
served as the Commanding Officer of the United States Naval Hospital, Bethesda, 
]\Iaryland. 

Dr. R. Kennedy Skipton, class of 1951, has announced the opening of his office at 
7220 Forest Road, Kent \'illage, Landover, Maryland for the practice of obstetrics 
and gynecology. Dr. Skipton received his training at the University Hospital and at 
the ^laryland General Hospital in Baltimore. 

Dr. Irving J. Taylor, class of 1943, has recently announced that Dr. Leonard 
Rothstein has joined him as a full-time associate at the Taylor Manor Hospital in 
Ellicott City, ^laryland. 

Dr. John Rosser, class of 1947, is currently engaged in the practice of general sur- 
gery at the Davis General Hospital, Statesville, North Carolina. 

Dr. T. Edgie Russell, Jr. has announced the association of Dr. James Lee Eavey, 
class of 1946, with him in the practice of obstetrics and gynecology with offices al 
3901 North Charles Street in Baltimore. 

Dr. John T. Scully, class of 1951, has announced the opening of his office for the 
practice of internal medicine at Room 1007, 504 Broadway, Gary, Indiana. 

Dr. Matthew J. Sullivan of Haverstraw, New York was recently honored at a 
testimonial dinner. Dr. J. Henry Orff of Shillington, Pennsylvania and Dr. Howard 
G. Stevens of New ^lilford, Connecticut also members of Dr. Sullivan's class (1904) 
were among those present. 

The testimonial dinner which was held in the dining room of the Bear ^fountain 
Inn was well attended. 

Dr. Irvin H. Cohen, class of 1947, has announced the opening of his office for the 
practice of psychiatry at 14 East Biddle Street in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. Victor F. King, class of 1951, has become an associate of Dr. James G. Howell 
in the practice of medicine with offices located at 715 Frederick Road, Catonsville, 
Maryland. 

Dr. Andrew J. Devlin, class of 1952, is currently serving as resident in obstetrics 
and gynecology at the St. Luke's Hospital in Spokane, Washington. Dr. Devlin 



A Li' M XI ASSOCIAriOX SECTIOX xxiii 

recently completed a residency in gynecology and obstetrics at St. Agnes Hospital 
in Baltimore. 

Dr. Norman Levin, class of 1947, was the recent author of a paper entitled "Non- 
puerperal Inversion of the Uterus" which appeared in the June, 1955 number of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Dr. Eugene S. Bereston, class of 1937, and Assistant Professor of Dermatology 
has been awarded the degree of Doctor of Medical Science by the University of 
Pennsylvania (Graduate School of Medicine for graduate work in Dermatology. 

Dr. I. Phillips Frohman, class of 1937, of 2924 Nichols Avenue, S.E., Washington, 
D. C, has been recently elected Chairman of the Section on (jeneral Practice of the 
American Medical Association for the year 1955-56. 

Dr. Mark B. Hollander, class of 1931, has announced the removal of his olTices 
to the Medical Arts Building in Baltimore for the practice of dermatology. 

Dr. Bowie Grant, class of 1948, has entered the United States Air Force and until 
recently has been a student at the USAF School of Aviation Medicine. Dr. Grant 
is currently stationed at the Wheeler Air Force Base in Tripoli. 

Dr. Earle M. Wilder, class of 1934, was the recent author of a paper entitled 
"The Use of Local Anesthesia in Minor Gynecological Surgery", published in the 
International Journal of Anesthesia, September, 1954. 

Dr. J. Sherman Garrison, class of 1953, has recently graduated from the United 
States Naval Submarine School at New London, Connecticut and has become a 
member of the regular Navy Medical Corps. He will be stationed at Pearl Harbor, 
T. H. as Squadron Medical Officer. 

Drs. Harold and Miriam Daly, class of 1950, are now residents of Albion, Michigan. 
Dr. Harold Daly finished his residency in surgery at the Lutheran Hospital July 1, 
1955. He intends to practice surgery in Albion. At present they are living at 313 
South Zona. 

Dr. Daniel O. Hammond, class of 1945, has been recently certified by the Ameri- 
can Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Hammond is in practice at 350 N.E. 
15th Street, \'enetian Causeway, ^Nliami, Florida. 

Dr. Richard W. Corbitt, class of 1939, is practicing urology in Parkersburg, W. \'a. 

Dr. Leslie D. Simmons, class of 1951, has recently returned to Parkersburg, West 
\'irginia from duty in the United States Air Force. Dr. Simmons is in general practice. 

Dr. John Brannen, class of 1951, is in general practice at Bridgeport, West \'irginia. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

June 29, 1955 
Dr. Frank J. (ieraghty, M.D., President 
University of ^laryland Alumni Association 
% University of Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 

My dear Doctor Geraghly: 

May I apologize for my delay in writing and e.xpressing my sincere thanks to j-ou 
for the wonderful experience and entertainment during the week (Alumni Day, 
June 2, 1955) and especially the day of the meeting and banquet tendered the 50- 



xxiv BII.I.ETIX or THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI \E, C. 01' MD. 

year classes of the Baltimore Medical College, the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons and the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 

I am personally very happy to have our local paper and the L'nited Press recog- 
nize the event and give it the publicity as you will note by the clippings enclosed. 

So many friends have called me and extended good wishes and congratulations 
on my good luck in having the opportunity to be able to attend. The events of the 
week and the day will not soon be forgotten, especially the kindness of the com- 
mittees and the warm welcome extended to each one who attended. 

Also, may I hope that some day I may have the pleasure of meeting }-ou (Dr. 
Geraghty) again if I am in Baltimore, or if you should come to Florida and West 
Palm Heach. 

Very sincerely yours, 
ir. E. VanLandiugham, M.D. 
431 First Street 
West Palm Beach Florida, 

Dr. Waller E. Meanwell, Class of 1909 Dies 

July 19, 1955 
Mrs. Walter E. Meanwell 
3202 Lake Mendota Drive 
Shorewood Hills 
Madison 5 Wise. 

My dear Mrs. Meanwell: 

Your letter of 15th inst. has come to my attention and I regret exceedingly that 
appropriate notice of the passing of Walter Meanwell was not taken by the Alumni 
Association and condolences sent you. 

I personally feel the sting because I knew him so well. I was in college with him 
although two years behind him in graduation. We were fraternity brothers and 
had kindred interests in young people, athletics and such. I remember well his suc- 
cessful approach to the Public Athletic League problem in Baltimore. I occasionally 
communicated with him after he went to Wisconsin. During the late war it was my 
good fortune to see Dr. William S. ^Nliddleton in England frequently and we seldom 
failed to mention Walter ^leanwell during our conversations. 

I shall refer your letter to the Editor of our Bulletin for appropriate attention. I 
oflfer you the apology of the Alumni Association for failure to note the passing of a 
distinguished alumnus. 

^lay the (ireat Giver of All Good be your Comforter and your Strength. 

Sincerely, 

William H. Triplett, M.D., Director 

Ed. Note: Dr. Meanwell was a prominent student at the Eallimore Medical College and was a 
member of the class of 1909. He excelled especially in Athletics and was an early contributor to the 
old Public Athletic League activity which for many j'cars was successfully operated in the City of 
Baltimore. After he left Baltimore he went to the University of Wisconsin where he became a dis- 
tinguished coach of baskell)all being an inventor of suction sole shoes and other ])asketball equipment 
now standard with all basketball teams. He was also a successful practitioner of medicine in his 
home town. 



OBITUARIES 

Br. (gcorge ^. ^mittj 

Dr. (ieorge H. Smith, class of 1952, and a I'. S. Public Health Service Fellow in 
Psychiatry at the School of Medicine, died suddenly on November 7, 1955 while on 
duty. Dr. Smith's death was caused by coronary thrombosis. 

A native of Brewer, Massachusetts and a veteran of World War II, he c()mi)leted 
his pre-medical education at Clark University receiving the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in 1948 and the Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Maryland in 1952. 

Following his graduation he served a rotating internship at the Univ^ersity Hos- 
pital, after which he si)enl two years as assistant resident in psychiatry. On July 1, 
1955, Dr. Smith was appointed U. S. Public Health Service Fellow, the position he 
held at the time of his death. 

He is survived by his wife and one son. Members of the faculty and friends of Dr. 
Smith have organized the George H. Smith ^Memorial Fund notice of which is carried 
in the "Medical School Section" of this number. 

Br. Hennett) M- l@opl> 

Dr. Kenneth B. Boyd, gynecologist and obstetrician and a member of the class 
of 1924, died at his home in Baltimore on October 23, 1955 after an illness of almost 
a year. Dr. Boyd had been an active member on the staffs of a number of Baltimore 
Hospitals specializing in gynecology and obstetrics. 

Following his graduation from the School of Medicine he served his rotating intern- 
ship at the Hosf)ital for Women of Maryland and later his residency in gynecology 
and obstetrics at the University Hospital. 

He was a memberof the American ^Medical Association, the Baltimore City Medical 
Society and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He was also a Diplomate of 
the .American Board of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Br. ^rtt)ur €. llanbcrs 

Dr. Arthur E. Landers, class of 1907 and for nearly M) years a prominent physician 
of Reno, Nevada, died on October 11, 1955. 

Born in West port, Ireland, April 5, 1878, he immigrated to the United States at 
the age of 17. He completed his medical studies at the University of ^Maryland, 
following which he practiced in Snow Hill, .Maryland prior to his moving to Reno, 
.\evada. 

Dr. Landers was a trustee for the Washoe Medical Center and was at one time as- 
sistant superintendent of the .Nevada State Hospital. He was a member of the Washoe 
Medical Society, the Nevada State Medical Association and the American Medical 
.\ssociation. 

Alexander, James Ramsey, Charlotte, N. C; classof 1894; aged 85; died, July 22, 
1955, of coronary occlusion. 

Cavanaugh, Leo Martin, Takoma Park, Md.; classof 191.^; aged 67; served during 
WOrld Wars I and 11; died, July 16, 1955. of cancer. 



xxvi BILLKTIX 0/ 77//-: SCIIiX)/. 0/ MEDICI SK, I . 01 MI). 

Champion. William Leon, Atlanta, C.a.; P & S, classof 1891; aged 86; died, July 2 
1955. 

Chowning, William C, Xew Smyrna Beach, Fla.; class of 1904; aged 72; died, 
June 24. 1955, of congestive heart disease. 

Edmimds, Fred Andrew, Bethel, Vt., B.M.C., classof 1903; aged 77; died, July 17, 
1955, of coronary infarction. 

Longsdorf, Harold E., .Mt. Holly, X. J.; P & S, classof 1910; aged 69; died, August 
24, 1955, of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. 

©r. eipbc ^(bin Clapp 

Dr. Clyde A. Clapp, B.M.C., class of 1902, and Professor Emeritus of Opthal- 
mology at the School of Medicine, died at his home 300 East Cold Spring Lane in 
Baltimore after a long illness, on April 9, 1955. Dr. Clapp who was 74 was a native 
of Chatham, Ohio. 

Following his graduation from the Baltimore ^ledical College he entered practice 
with Dr. Erank Crouch, ultimately specializing in ophthalmology. Eor a number 
of years he was active on the facult}' of the School of ^Medicine ultimately as Pro- 
fessor of Ophthalmology, being preceded by the late Dr. Crouch. Dr. Clapp was 
active on the staff of the Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, and was a prom- 
inent member of his specialty. 

Adams, James Frederick, Catonsville, Md.; class of 1894; aged 85; died, June 10, 
1955, of carcinoma of the prostate. 

Armstrong, Fred Francis, Wilmington, Del.; class of 1917; aged 62; served during 
World War I; died. May 3, 1955, of coronary occlusion. 

Austraw, Harrison Henry, Houston, Texas; class of 1934; aged 49; served during 
World War II; died, A[)ril 6, 1955, of coronary thrombosis. 

Blodgett, John Moody, Lancaster, X. H.; class of 1910; aged 74; died, March 24, 
1955. of cerebral hemorrhage. 

Brinker, Samuel Peter, Uniontown, Pa.; P & S, class of 1905; aged 78; died, March 
17, 1955. 

Carpenter, Paul Tracy, Cortland, X. Y.; B.:\I.C., class of 1894; aged 85; died, 
April 13, 1955, of acute pyelonephritis. 

Casto, Parley Carper, St. Joseph, III.; B.M.C., class of 1900; aged 81; died, May 
13, 1955, of cerebrovascular accident and chronic hypertensive arteriosclerosis. 

Clapp, Clyde Alvin, Baltimore, Md.; B.M.C., classof 1902; aged 74; died, April 9, 
1955, of carcinoma of the stomach. 

Cole, Arthur Judson, Holbrook, Mass.; class of 1909; aged 82; died, March 9, 
1955, of diabetes mellitus and pneumonia. 

Compton, Alfred Fillmore, Warren, O.; class of 1916; aged 63; served during 
World War I; died, .May 6, 1955, of coronary thrombosis, arteriosclerosis and diabetes 
mellitus. 

Costner, George Henry, Lincolnton, X. C.; class of 1901; aged 76; died, April 17, 
1955, of carcinoma of the urinary bladder. 

Grossblatt, Philip, Xewark, X'. J.; class of 1924; aged 53; served during World 
War II: died, Mav 26. 1955, of acute mvocardial infarction. 



OBITUARIES xxvii 

Haines, Franklin Gregg, Warren, Pa.; B.M.C., class of 1895; aged 83; died, 
May 19. 1955, of chronic cholecystitis and peritonitis. 
Halsey, Levi Wright, Montclair, X. J.; P & S, class of 1883; aged 94; died, March 

10. 1955. of carcinoma of the prostate and arteriosclerotic heart disease. 

Howe, WiUiam R., Voungstown, O.; P & S, class of 1899; aged 91; died, June 20, 
1955. of cerebrovascular accident and arteriosclerosis. 
Matthei, Edward, Jersey City, X. J.; B.M.C., class of 1896; aged 86; died, April 

11. 1955. of annular carcinoma of the ileocecal junction and peritonitis. 
Palmer, Robert Vickery, Avenue. Md.; class of 1895; aged 83; died, February- 19, 

1955. of pneumonia. 

Pratt, Frank L., Bentley Creek, Pa.; P & S, class of 1899; aged 83; died, April 12, 
1955. of myocarditis. 

Rooney, James Francis, Plainx-ille, Conn.; B.M.C., class of 1903; aged 75; served 
during World War I; died, March 27, 1955, of carcinoma of the lung with metastases 
to right shoulder. 

SuUivan, William F., Providence, R. I.; P & S, class of 1909; aged 68; died, March 
1?>. 1955, of arteriosclerosis. 

Willard, Laurence Edward, Saco, Me.; B.M.C., class of 1898; aged 80; died, April 
2^. 1955. of carcinoma of the esophagus. 

McGlennon, William J., Harrison. X. J.. B.M.C., class of 1905; aged 71; died, 
October 11. 1954. 

Nelson, William Alexander, Williamstown, Mass.; B.M.C., class of 19f>4; aged 76; 
died. .September 10, 1954, of coronar}- occlusion. 

Nowlin, J. Burton, Charlotte, X. C; P & S, class of 1896; aged 81: died, Februan,- 
17. 1955. of bronchopneumonia. 

Opfermann, John Laird, Highlands, X. J.; P & S, class of 1904; aged 79; died, 
March l.'^. 1955, of chronic glomerular nephritis with uremia. 

Patrick, Thomas Alexander, Fayettexille, Tenn.; class of 1909; aged 71: died, 
December 17, 1954. 

Ritter, John Joseph, Adams, ^Nlass. ; B.M.C., class of 1901; aged d>i\ died, October 
27, 1954, of bronchopneumonia and cardiac decompensation. 

Schall, Reuben Elmer, Camden, X. J.: P & S, class of 1904; aged 78; died, October 
14, 1954. of carcinoma of the stomach. 

Storrs, Berton W., Portsmouth, R. I.: class of 1902; aged 80; died, September 30, 
1954. of coronary embolism. 

Vaughn, George Washington, Wilmington, Del.; class of 1917; aged 62; died, 
Februar}- 11. 1955. of myocardial insufficiency and coronan,' arteriosclerosis. 

West, Edward Talmage, Johnson City, Tenn.; P & S, class of 1901; aged 78; 
ser\ed during World War I; died, March 2, 1955, of coronan,' thrombosis. 

Br. i^cnrp KlalbschmiDt 

Dr. Henry Waldschmidt, class of 1904, died on December 14, 1954. The son of 
the late George and Elizabeth Waldschmidt he was a graduate of both the Mar\Mand 
College of Pharmacy and the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. 
Waldschmidt had practiced in Baltimore since 1910. 



xxviu BLLLtTIX 01' THE SCHOOL OF MEDICfNE, U. OF MI). 

Br. ILcbi 13a. lijalscp 

Dr. Levi W. Halsey, P & S, class of 1883, died at his home in I'pper Moiiulair, 
New Jersey on .March 10, 1^55 after an iUness of about 5 months. He was 94. 

Born in Bridgeliamplon, New York, Dr. Halsey was graduated from Oberlin 
College in 1880 and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1883. For 8 
years he practiced in his home town where he was coroner of SufTolk County, New 
York. In 1892 he went to Montclair, New Jersey and joined the stafT of the Mountain- 
side Hosi)ital. He served as a member of the Montclair Board of Health from 1902 
to 1916 and was i)resident of the hosj)ital stafif in 1923 and 1924. 

Br. Milliam (£. Curtin 

Dr. William E. Curtin, of Plymouth, Massachusetts, and a practicing physician 
for over 40 years died on February 3, 1955, at the age of 66. Dr. Curtin was a former 
town health officer and had been medical examiner in Plymouth (Massachusetts) for 
22 years. His death culminated an active career including voluntary work with the 
local police and fire departments, the Plymouth County Health Association and 
many local scientific organizations. In World War I he was examining physician 
for the town of Plymouth and in World War II served as a Lieutenant Colonel in 
the 25th Infantry Massachusetts State Guard. 

2Sr. Mailfreb 3a. aaonlggfaerg 

Dr. Wilfred K. Konigsberg, class of 1933, died at the Sinai Hospital in Baltimore 
on February 21, 1955. Dr. Konigsberg who was an active practitioner of obstetrics 
was a member of the staiTs of both Lutheran Hospital of Maryland and the Sinai 
Hospital of Baltimore. Among his many achievements was his membership in the 
American Academy of Obstetricians and (iynecologists. 




Equipment and Suppliei tor: 

PnysicianB ana Surgeons * Hospitalf 

LaDoratoriea * Industrial Clinics 



R 



URRAY-JDAUMGARTNER 
SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 

5 West Ckase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



HUGH R. SPENCER SECTION 



A TRIBUTE 

Dr. Hugh Spencer will retire as Head of the Department of i'atliology in the School 
of Medicine on 30 June 1956. This will terminate a phase of Dr. Spencer's life in 
which he devoted himself to medical education and service in bringing health to 
many individuals. Words are inadec|uate to portray the sincerity of purpose, the 
unselfish assumption of tasks, the devotion to improving professional knowledge and 
capabilities that mark the works of Dr. Spencer. With minimal and often inadequate 
resources and support. Dr. Spencer has built and maintained a superior deixirtment 
of pathology. This has been done largely through his own great ability and many 
personal sacrifices. 

During trying periods in the School of Medicine when the teaching staff was 
largely in service during World War II, Dr. Spencer provided the leadership and 
judgment, not only for his own department, but much of that needed for the Medi- 
cal School as a whole to adapt to the needs of an accelerated medical educational 
program with far from adequate faculty and staff for such an undertaking. 

A soft spoken, modest man whose brilliant career known principally to his students 
and contemporaries, leaves the University as an active Department Head. He was 
never one to sacrifice his daily work to attend national meetings where his accom- 
plishments would have received greater recognition. The mark of his inlluence and 
the wisdom of his teachings rests in the esteem that all who have known him hold 
for him. 

We wish Dr. Spencer ha])j)iness in his retirement and express the desire that he 
will continue to be with us whenever his health and time permit. 

William S. Stone, M.D., Dea>i 



ABOUT OUR PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY 

". . . a feii' pages of print, nor many for l/ial mailer, caii nol possibly express Zi'lial lie 
has meant to so many, both as a liKman being and as a teacher. /lis aeromplishmenls in 
the field of medical training are immense." 

A Pathologist 
Chatcaurotix, France 

"His department has always been one of the highlights in the leaching program of the 

medical school." 

A Surgeon 

Charleston, West X'irginia 
i 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 




Dr. Hugh R. Spencer 
I'rom Mitk to Mic.iiT. Vplycr /(//—Hugh and Sister, Mary; upper r/^///— Dandy, isn't he?; 
hncer lefl—\s the French saw him; hn.'cr ;-ii'///— Malignant????. 



CUNNl .V67/. I .\I~I>. 1 T no LOG 1 ' IN SURGICA L TRA INING iii. 

'7/ is only fair lo ackiinicledgc deep and sincere appreciation to our Professor of Pa- 
thology who thruoiit the years has constantly stimulated not only the trainees in pathology 
hut also the clinicians alikeT 

An Internist 
Columbus, Georgia 

"77/c one year I spent as an assistant in pathology was the most important one in my 

professional career." 

A Gynecologist 

Falls Church, Virginia 

'7//.S- inspiration has been shared by many and will continue to live in our hearts for 

many years to comr." 

A Surgeon 
Brunswick, Georgia 



ROLE OF PATHOLOGY I\ THE TRAINING OF A SURGEON 
RAVMOXD .M. CUNNINGHAM, M.D.* 

The late Dr. Frank Lynn in his surgical lectures to us made it tjuite clear that 
the most important [)arl of good surgical practice is surgical diagnosis and judgment. 
The late Dr. Artiuir .M. Shipley impressed upon us that although surgical judgment 
cannot easily be taught or grasped — rather it is a gift or a quality to be developed — 
nevertheless surgical diagnosis can be learned by hard work, clear thinking and 
deductive reasoning, gleaned from bedside observation, aided and abetted by ex- 
perience, the foremost of all our teachers. 

Surgical diagnosis is the pinpointing of underlying surgical pathology — it is ob- 
viously the explaining of a patient's symptoms because of altered function and 
deranged anatomy. 

It was "Tom Culleii of Baltimore" wlio, in describing his years in pathology at 
the Hopkins in 18<A^, wrote: "Technical skill in surgery is an important thing but 
it is not the most important. Pathology teaches a man that and makes him humble. 
That is one reason why it is so necessary to make men jiathologists before you let 
them become surgeons." 

As Boyd so aj)tly puts it in his text of Surgical Pathology, "the surgery of to-day 
is based on pathology. Unless he builds on that solid foundation, the surgeon is no 
better than a hewer of tlesh and a drawer of blood." To further (|Uote from this 
master of {)rose and teacher of pathology: "the history of surgery may without ex- 
aggeration be dividcfl into two periods before John Hunter and after him. Before 
him it was tonteiit lo he an art founded on empiricism; after him it aspired to be a 
science founded on pathology. He was the hrst and greatest surgical pathologist — a 
first-hand knowledge of j)athology is the only safe guide for the hands of the surgeon, 
however skilled those hands may l)e." 

* Instructor in Siirf;fr\' and Pathology. 



BULLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XE. C. Of MD. 




Familiar Scenes 
Upper left — Trainees at autopsy; upper rif^lil— Lester Kiefer finding out things; cenler 
Jager, James E. Smith, Margaret Mary Sellmaycr, Marian Loose; lon'tr left — Robert 
lower right— L. A. Jager at \vorl<. 



— ^Louis A. 
Weinacht ; 



CUNNINGHAM— PATHOLOGY IN SURGICAL TRAINING v 

The surgeon must be something of a morbid anatomist. He should be absolutely 
familiar with the gross appearance of diseased tissue. When he operates on a lump 
in the breast he should be able to say whether the cut surface is benign or malignant, 
even before the frozen section is made. The abdominal surgeon is time and again 
called upon to make a gross pathologic diagnosis on his own observations. 

The story of surgery throughout the world is woven with the works and teachings 
of pathologists. No less is this true in American surgery which came into mature 
age from 1850 to 1900. Listerian teaching had enormously extended the scope of 
operative surgery and the specialties became established. American surgeons sought 
post graduate training in Germany and Austria where Billroth demonstrated surgical 
technic and \'irchow taught cellular pathology. Dr. Samuel Gross of Philadelphia 
was perhai)s the foremost American figure in the surgery of this period. It was he 
who helped establish surgical pathology on a tirm footing in America. His pathologic 
anatomy was the lirst book in English on that subject. He was founder of the Pa,th- 
ological Society of Philadelphia and in 1880 of the American Surgical Association. 

Space does not permit more than the mentioning of a few pioneer surgeons and 
renowned teachers whose interests constantly included pathologic anatomy and 
surgery alike. Henry Jacob Bigelow^ (1818-1890) brilliant pioneer of Boston; Reginald 
Heber Fitz (1843-1913) of Boston, a pathologist and surgeon, immortalized by the 
appendix; William Stewart Halsted (1852-1922) whose first post at the newly formed 
Johns Hopkins in 1889 was in surgical pathology. In more recent years, we have 
time and again read the papers and heard the talks of Frank Lahey, Fred Rankin and 
our own Emil Novak to mention but a few, echoing and re-echoing the gross and the 
microscopic aspects. 

It is to men such as Hugh Raymond Spencer, who, having dedicated their lives to 
teaching, are responsible in no small way for the adequate training of a present day 
surgeon. He, as his many fellow pathologists throughout the country, was happiest 
and his enthusiasm was highest in the teaching of young men at the Department's 
Pathology Conference, or at the senior, clinico pathologic conference. This spirit was 
continued even when bending over a microscope with a struggling assistant resident 
in surgery who came away from the operating rooms so as to have a more compre- 
hensive view of the complex aspects of disease. Six months with Dr. Spencer and his 
pleasant department personnel went all too quickly. If you are in doubt, ask any of 
the forty or so surgical residents whose good fortune it was to be a part of the resi- 
dency training program since 1942 when, despite opposition from some quarters, Dr. 
Spencer finally got his way and budding surgeons once again became his most in- 
terested students. 

Since 1919, when he was appointed Professor of Pathology at the University of 
^Maryland, he has been a respected teacher and has held top ratings in student popu- 
larity. It is indeed difficult to express our sincere appreciation to Hugh Spencer — • 
words are miserably inadequate; it is even more difficult to say good bye. 



vi BULLET IX OF THE SCHOOL OF MRDICIXE. l\ OF MD. 

THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAININ(i L\ PEDIATRIC PATHOLOGY 

D. J. (IRKIXER, MD. 

Ill the course of stud}' of any broad subjeci there exists the possibiHl)- of relative 
neglect of some particular phase of that subject. From personal experience, and 
observation of the attitude and experience of other pathologists, it is my opinion 
that in many institutions pediatric pathology has not been given sufficient emphasis 
in the training of students and residents. With no desire to lessen the instruction in 
any phase of pathology, nor to increase the load of an already heavy training period 
schedule, I would suggest that increased emphasis on this facet of pathology would 
result in a specialist better able to serve all departments of a general hospital Staff. 

There is some tendency for the pathologist to treat the post-mortem examination 
of the newborn or very young infant as a necessary but burdensome task in order to 
maintain a fairly good autopsy percentage rating for his hospital. Too often this type 
of examination is not approached with the same investigative attitude which accom- 
panies the adult autopsy examination. Could it be that a part of this reaction results 
from a basic lack of interest in pediatric pathology? If this be true then a part of the 
fault may lie with the training of the individual. If the instructors are but slightly 
interested in pediatric pathology it is difficult to instill an interest in the student. 

One can easily learn that the average size general hospital usually has an active 
pediatric service. In many of these hospitals infant and neonatal deaths constitute a 
sizeable percentage of the total hospital death rate and therefore post-mortem ex- 
aminations on these patients are essential to maintain an acceptable over all percent- 
age rate. There may be many very interesting cases in this pediatric group for use as 
teaching material for the entire Staff of a general hospital. It is important then that 
the pathologist realize this opportunity and utilize the material for the benefit of 
the Staff. 

There is probably no other examination in pathology where the results may be so 
important to the patient's family as the post-mortem examination of the infant. This 
examination can supply the clinician with the data necessary not only to explain the 
course of events in a given patient, but in many instances he can also allay the fears 
of the parents with respect to other children in the family or, conversely, be instru- 
mental in the proper protection of all other contacts within the family. Of utmost 
importance is the opportunity in many cases to supply the information necessary to 
explain to the parents that future pregnancies may be planned. The cases of congeni- 
tal abnormality which will be encountered periodically are of scientific interest par- 
ticularly if of an unusual type. But they are more important than that: The pedia- 
trician, alone or with the pathologist, can discuss the case with the parents and 
backed by the autopsy findings can explain why the chance for recurrence in future 
offspring is remote. 

The work of the pathologist is most important in hemolytic disease of the newborn. 
Here he has an oy^portunity to materially aid the y^ediatrician. The autopsy may 
substantiate an obvious clinical diagnosis or it may diagnose the unsuspected case. 
Where a hosy^ital has a relatively large obstetric service, drawing from rural y:)opula- 
tions, a fair percentage of y^atients are admitted for delivery who have not had the 



GREINER—TRAINING IN PEDIATRIC PATHOLOGY 




Ttf/)— Spencer's Corner; a meeting place for coon hunUrs, praclical jokers, fishermen, and palholo 
gists; bottom — Conference Room, the scene of many happ}- and informative hours. 



viii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF .\f KD/Cf .\E, C. OF MD. 

benefit of adequate pre-nalal study or care. (Kxasional eases of erythroblastosis are 
seen in this group. Otliers are seen in the rarer .AHO group incomjiatibiHties. It may 
take considerable efTort on the part of the obstetrician, the pediatrician and the 
j)athologist, backed by the autopsy lindings, to get the necessary members of the 
family to submit to proper blood e.xaminations. The imjxjrtance to the j)arents who 
plan future pregnancies cannot be too strongly presented, and a very real service is 
supplied to the family and the clinicians involved. 

Over a period of time post-mortem examinations on the premature infant may 
supply data which can be of importance in modification of the handling of this type 
of patient. If enough trained pathologists are interested in examining these cases in 
which the lindings are those of intra-alveolar hemorrhage, or resorption atelectasis 
with or without "hyalin membrane", or intrauterine pneumonia, the accumulated 
findings and interpretations will eventually lead to a better understanding of these 
conditions and perhaps to methods to combat their occurrence in future ])atients. 
The excellent work done in retrolental fibroplasia was done largely by physicians who 
were not pathologists. The pathologist should be the leader in this type of investi- 
gation. 

There are a number of conditions in the newborn infant which may give essen- 
tially the same physical findings and the pediatrician has a very trying diagnostic 
enigma on his hands. Then, too, there are numerous cases which may be encountered 
on any active pediatric service in which the newborn infant has signs and symptoms 
relating to one diagnosis and the autopsy may demonstrate the basic pathology to 
be some other condition. The best qualified pediatrician may err in the clinical diag- 
nosis under these conditions. The interested pathologist plays a very important part 
in establishing the correct sequence of events in these individuals and a definite 
diagnosis can be submitted to the Department of \'ital Statistics rather than what 
may amount to no more than an "educated guess". The pathologist should be able 
to bring as much knowledge and experience to the investigation of the pediatric 
problem as he would offer to the aid of the internist or general surgeon in the study 
of an adult patient. The pediatrician has the right to expect this service. 

It is my opinion that the medical student and most certainly the resident in pa- 
thology should be stimulated more in the field of pediatric pathology. Our general 
texts have a minimum of material available for the student. The few special texts 
available are excellent but deal chiefiy with the neonatal period. There is a consider- 
able volume of information relative to infant and childhood pathology which is 
scattered through the periodicals in a number of specialty branches. The instructor 
of students should make some effort to consolidate this material and those responsible 
for the training of residents in {)athology should particularly stimulate an interest in 
a search for this knowledge. We are all too prone to become involved in the flaily 
volume of adult cases and most investigative work will concern some i)articularly 
interesting or unusual adult case or series of cases. Our residents should be encouraged 
to explore unsolved jjroblems in pediatric pathology. 

In the training of students there is, all too often, no si)ecial section for the demon- 
stration of pediatric pathology, or in lieu of a separate section, no particular attempt 
to supply examples from infant material in the [presentation of pathologic conditions. 



BIEREN~PA THOLOG Y AS AN A] OCA TION ix 

Admittedly there are many lesions showing little or no variation between infant 
and adult. Hut where dififerences do exist these should be emphasized. The gross lung 
of the newborn infant with pneumonia has certain differences from the typical adult 
pneumonic lung and there are numerous other differences which should be demon- 
strated. 

All pathologists know that the too often used expression "the pathologist has the 
last word" can at times leave much to be desired. We have all had the experience of 
doing complete autopsies which result in findings that are inadequate to account for 
the symptoms and course of disease in a given patient. Any relative neglect of train- 
ing in pediatric pathology will only tend to increase the number of unsatisfactory 
autopsies in this field; unsatisfying to both the clinician and the conscientious pa- 
thologist. We all draw upon our experiences in evaluating any given case. The indi- 
vidual who through direct training and interested study has made himself familiar 
with some of the less common diseases of the infant and young child will be best 
equipped to perform an adequate examination of these individuals. 

The goal of the teacher is not so much to impart knowledge to the student, but is 
rather to stimulate interest and a desire to learn in all phases of a given subject. A 
little added emphasis on the subject of pediatric pathology should result in more 
adequately trained residents who in turn will be better prepared to give valuable 
assistance to the patient, llie obstetrician and the pediatrician. 



PATHOLOGY AS AN AVOCATION 
ROLAND BIEREN, M.D.* 

The imminence of Dr. Spencer's retirement from the Professorship of Pathology 
is the stimulus for this report. Students and young physicians might be interested 
in reading what a major influence pathology has been in the medical career of this 
surgical specialist. In 1939, at a troublesome personal crossroad in my surgical train- 
ing, I followed the time honored advice to spend a year in pathology. That year in 
Dr. Spencer's department set the pattern for the remainder of my professional life. 
It guided me into gynecologic pathology as an avocation and into writing as a hobby. 
The purpose of this article is twofold. It will demonstrate the part pathology has 
played in the development of a good relationship in the medical community. It will 
also illustrate its importance to me in one yxarticular phase of clinical practice, the 
early diagnosis of uterine cancer. 

All physicians should speak a universal language, but only i)athologists do. At 
one time I spent several weeks of observation at a medical center famous the world 
over for its work in neoplastic diseases. When I first arrived there I had a j)ersonal 
introduction to the medical director. His attitude towards me was lukewarm, at best, 
and he failed to introduce me to the various persons I needed to meet. Discouraged, 
I looked up the department of pathology and found that only one pathologist was 
at work on that day. 1 introduced myself to him and we sat and chatted in a friendly 

* Gynecologist, (Iroup Hculth Association, W'ashinfjton, I). C. 



BVI.I.RTIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MRDICIXE. U. OF MD. 




Secretarial Staff 
Upper /e//^Mary Joan Ennis Vilo; mid-lefl — Elayiie Faye Cohen; loit'er left — Barbara Talbott 
Fisher; center — Loretto Ann Hogan; loioer center — Betty M. Zimmerman; upper rigid — Betty Birch 
Leonarfi; mid-right — -W. Joan Hodnick; lower right — Mar\- Ruth Meyers Bollinger. 



way about the things I was interested in. I mentioned, incidentally, thai I had 
brought my own microscope along. 

"Well now," he said, getting up, "I'll just get you a key for a locker to put il in 
and show you where the slides are. Then we'll go around and meet all the depart nienl 
heads." 



BIEREN— PA TJIOLOG I ' .1 S A N A I 'OCA TION xi 

Frontal assault on the main gate had been futile. Entrance via the side door of the 
laboratory was open sesame. Two weeks later my friend had his secretary take me 
over and introduce me to the secretary of one of the big shots at another famous 
medical center in the same city. "You might as well see it all while you are up here," 
he commented. Thanks to him, I did. 

A clinician who has mastered some phase of laboratory medicine rarely fails to 
command the respect of his fellow physicians who usually feel uncomfortable in the 
smelly and somewhat messy atmosphere of the laboratory. Sometimes professional 
recognition comes from a totally unexpected source. During a period in the second 
world war, I was the surgeon for a naval air base located in a small southern com- 
munity. We had a few unexpected fatalities during the year and, naturally, I per- 
formed the autopsies. On my first such case I gathered together a few makeshift 
instruments and made my way to the funeral home of the only local undertaker where 
the body was. The mortician received me in a distinctly cool and disapproving fashion. 
Notwithstanding, I went to work under his disproving eye. After struggling along in 
my own quiet way for awhile I was amazed to hear him say in a friendly fashion, 
"Say, doc, wait a minute. You can't do a decent job on the skull cap with that hack 
saw. Let me get some decent tools and I'll give you a hand." We soon became fast 
friends. My predecessor, it seemed, had badly mangled several corpses for him. 

Shortly after I entered practice in Washington, D. C, the yearning to smell the 
stink of zylene and formaldehyde became unbearable and I meandered into the 
pathology laboratory of the medical school with which I am now associated. The 
department head was a distinguished gentleman of the old school of pathologists and 
he gave me free access to his laboratory and the slide files. In a few weeks I had a 
regular seminar established for the resident staff. A little later I was invited to join 
the teaching staff". Since then I have held weekly conferences on a regular schedule. 
T have also tutored many of the younger specialists for their American Board exami- 
nation in obstetrics and gynecology. It has been gratifying to see almost two score of 
them pass their examination with little difticulty. My interest in pathology has given 
me a wide and interesting accjuaintanceship with my fellow specialists in the area. 
Teaching young physicians is a rewarding experience. I doubt if the boys realize 
that they teach me as much and probably more than I teach them. 

The practice of gynecology becomes dull and boring to me over a long period of 
lime and I set uj) little projects to run within my practice to keep me interested. From 
time to time I conclude one of these with a paper on the subject published in a jour- 
nal. Some I continue indefinitely and one of these is that pertaining to the early 
diagnosis of uterine ( anc er. While a resident in gynecology I concluded that we were 
not making the diagnosis of early cancer of the cervix because we did not know what 
to look for. I decided that if we had such cases in our files, they would be under the 
heading of, "biopsy suspicious — suggest repeat." I went over the entire cervix 
cancer file and found seventeen such cases. I can best describe each case by saying 
that in each the e.xamining physician reached for a biopsy forceps instead of the 
cautery. The gross descriptions indicated that some lesion could be seen which led to 
biopsy. Follow u{) revealed that some of these patients later developed frankly inva- 
sive carcinoma. During my service in the navy I removed a similar lesion completely 



xii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

by biopsy. The pathologist reported an unequivocal carcinoma but follow up studies 
failed to reveal any residual growth. 

The idea of a precancerous lesion or a preinvasive one is not original with our gen- 
eration. The demonstration thai cancer of the cervi.x is detectable in its earliest stages 
by simple measures has received its greatest imi)ctus during the past decade. The 
excellent work of Dr. Richard TeLinde of Johns Hopkins has probably done more to 
establish this fact than that of any other single individual. Undoubtedly my asso- 
ciation with his ideas and with men who worked closely with him during my most 
formative years had great influence upon my own ideas on the subject. 

I also made a review of the effect of irradiation upon cancer of the corpus uteri 
prior to surgery. In studying a considerable series of cases at the University Hospital 
I was impressed by the apparent fact that women who had intermenstrual or post- 
menopausal bleeding for a relatively short time prior to curettage invariably had a 
small, localized tumor. 

I rationalized that if I could put a given group of women under observation for an 
indeterminate period of time and subject to biopsy every cervix lesion and perform a 
curettage in all instances of postmenopausal bleeding and every instance of inter- 
menstrual bleeding beyond two or three cycles, that the degree of cancer when dis- 
covered should be limited. In 1947 I was offered my present position as gynecologist 
for a cooperative medical group which provides comprehensive medical care pro- 
grams for its patient members. Here was a captive group for study, so to speak. My 
primary job is to serve as gynecologist for the adult women members. However, 
the position has provided an unusual opportunity to put to test many ideas I pre- 
viously have entertained but had never been able to demonstrate to my own satis- 
faction. It has been without question the most interesting thing I have ever under- 
taken. I am well into my ninth year on the project and I present my figures sim{)ly 
for what they are worth. The total number of cancer cases is small — fifteen and 
they tend to show what I believe is true: periodic examinations with biopsy and 
curettage will find them in an early stage. Nonetheless, it is easy to err about cancer 
facts and figures. Perhaps after a period of twenty years of observation I may be rash 
enough to draw some conclusions. 

In the total group of over twenty thousand participants there are about four 
thousand w^omen who have regular physical examinations. This group is not constant, 
like everything in the Washington area, it fluctuates and there is a twenty per cent 
turnover each year. The majority of those who leave will return within a period of 
three years and resurne membership. The average in number of examinations is 
slightly more than one examination by a j^hysician per adult woman each year. 
Some women, usually with a strong family history of cancer or an obsessive can- 
cerophobia, are examined every three months. Not all members completely utilize 
our services. Some go to physicians in private practice for personal reasons. Whenever 
the outside physician discovers something of interest he usually notifies us about it. 

No one can ever completely control a group of human patients in a democratic 
nation such as ours, but I mention these things to point out that insofar as I am able 
to determine; every instance of uterine cancer in this group diagnosed primarily 
during this particular nine year period is included in this study. In addition a group 



BIEREN— PATHOLOGY AS AN AVOCATION 




Robert Powell and William Kelley 

of nine women, five cervix and four corpus, were found to have a history of treatment 
for cancer prior to entering membership in the group. That is all. 

By independent pathologists' classification the total of fifteen cases are as follows: 

Corpus: Six cancers with but superficial invasion of myometrium. 

Cervix: Seven preinvasive cancers. 
One stage i cancer* 
One early stage iii cancer* 

What was responsible for these early diagnoses? In effect, it was the group. Our 
members are circularized several times a year with medical newsletters. Notices are 
printed in this along with admonitions from the medical staff that a physical exami- 
nation once a year is good medical practice and that, for women, regular examination 
of the breasts, pelvis and rectum by a physician every six months is even better. All 
members are warned that intermenstrual bleeding, prolongation of menses, change 
in cycle and any degree of i)ost menopausal bleeding indicated the need to be ex- 
amined by a physician. Especially emphasized is periodic palpation of the breasts 
and uterus and inspection of the cervix by a physician. Women have a natural dislike 
of being examined and most married women volunteer the information that their 
husband is the member of the family who insisted they make the appointment. Most 
unmarried women need a male physician's advice periodically and they can be edu- 
cated into expecting periodic examination as part of the consultation. 

Self examination of the breast is not encouraged because in actual practice few 



Classified after careful pelvic dissection. 



xiv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 

women seem able lo do so. Moreover, the ones who i)raclice self examination are in- 
clined to place false oplimisni on the results of their own examinations. X'aginal 
smears are performed only on request. None of the fifteen cases was found by smear. 

Every corpus cancer was discovered by a routine curettage in all women with more 
than a minimal deviation from normal cycle. The younger the woman, the greater 
the deviation may be. All six were past iS. Five had intermenstrual bleeding for two 
or three successive cycles. Three had postmenopausal bleeding for less than two 
weeks. Ironically, all three w'omen past the menopause had sufficient senile vaginitis 
to account for some spotty vaginal bleeding. 

Every cervix cancer was discovered for the first time by a general practitioner on 
our staff in the department of adult medicine during a routine physical e.xamination. 
When referred promptly to a gynecologic consultant a biopsy resulted in the diagno- 
sis. The first year I worked for the association I encouraged the medical staflf to call 
me any time they were not certain of the a{)pearance of the cervix when viewed 
through a speculum. This has paid good dividends. If every woman could have her 
cervix inspected once a year by a doctor so trained most cancers would be discovered 
in an early and curable stage. 

What better demonstration can I give than this in showing the importance of 
pathology in clinical practice? My training and experience in gynecologic pathology 
has been in part passed on to all the physicians on our staff' in the department of adult 
medicine to say nothing of the scores of residents and younger specialists who have 
rubbed against it in the course of their training and study programs. 

It is always saddening to learn of a favorite teacher's retirement. This sadness is 
counterbalanced by the overwhelming realization that a great teacher does not ev^er 
retire. His students and their students carry into successive generations the knowledge 
and skill transmitted. Association with one of the greatest teachers of my generation, 
Hugh R. Spencer, counselor, guide and friend has helped gain for me any claim I may 
ever have to a niche in the hall of fame. In retirement he may rest assured that he 
has laid the pattern well for future generations to follow. Every time I sit down with 
a group of young doctors to try to impart to them some of my skill in the art and 
technic of medical practice I always feel the presence of his spirit sitting beside me. 



DR. HUGH SPENCER'S PROFESSORIAL 
ASSOCIATES IN PATHOLOGY 




Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S. Professor of General 
and Oral Pathology, and Dean, Dental School, 
University of Maryland. 



Sidney M. Cone, M.D. Deceased 1939; Associ- 
ate Professor of Pathology. "Sidney M. Cone Re- 
search Fund in Pathology" established in his mem- 
ory by his son, Maxwell Cone. 



Charles P. Harnett, M.D. In the Department 
1949 to 1952; .Vssociatc in Pathology. Pathologist, 
Mar}' Washington Hosi)ital, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Photogra])h unavai]al>lc 




Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. In the Department 
1921 to 1956; Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Member of American Urological Association; 
American College of Surgeons and American Medi- 
cal Association. Past-President of the Baltimore 
City Medical Society and the Mid-Atlantic Uro- 
logical Association. Diplomate of the American 
Board of Urology; Director of the Urological 
Laboratory, Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 



D. James Greincr, M.D. In the Department 
1938 to 1946; Associate Professor. 

Member of College of American Pathologists; 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists and 
American Medical Association. Diplomate of the 
American Board of Pathology. Pathologist, The 
McLeod Infirmary, Florence, S. C. 




Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. Deceased 
1949; Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Mcmlier of Medical Chirurgical Fac- 
ulty; Founding Fellow College of Ameri- 
can Pathologists and First Chief Medical 
Ivxaminer for Mar\UuKl. 




Walter C. Merkel, M.D. Associate Professor, 
Pathologist, Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, 
Md. 





C. Gardner Warner, M.D. In the Department 
15 3'ears; Associate Professor. 

Member of American College of Pathologists; 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists and 
Medical Chirurgical Faculty. Chief Pathologist, 
Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 



Standish McCleary, M.D. Deceased 1934; Pro- 
fessor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine, College 
of Physicians and Surgeons and later Professor of 
Pathology, University of Maryland, also Post- 
mortem Physician for Baltimore Citj'. 




James H. Ramsey, M.D. In the Department 4 
years; Assistant Professor. 

Member of Medical Chirurgical Faculty; Ameri- 
can Medical Association and College of American 
Pathologists. 

Pathologist, Washington County Hospital, 
Hagcrstown, .Md. 




Roy Byron Turner Jr., M.D. In the Department 
4} 2 years; .\ssistant Professor. Associate Patholo- 
gist, Washington County Hospital, Hagerstown, 
Md. 



Dexter L. Reimann, M.D. Member of Depart- 
ment of Pathology 1942 to 1956; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Pathology; nieniher American Medical 
Association and Count_\' Societ}-; American Associa- 
tion of Pathology and Bacteriology; Maryland 
Societ)' of Patholog\-. I)i])lomateof .Vmerican lioard 
of Pathology. 



Tobias Weinberg, M.D. In the Dej)artment 1 
year; Associate Professor 1956. 

Member of American Association of Pathology 
and Bacteriology; American Society of Clinical 
Pathology and College of American Pathologists. 

Pathologist-in-Chief and Director of Lab- 
oratories, Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 




John A. Wagner, M.D. Member of Department 
of Pathologj' 1940 to 1956; Associate Professor of 
Pathology; Chief of Division of Neuropathologj'. 

Member of American Academy of Neurology and 
-Vmerican Medical Writers Association. Certified 
by the American Board of Pathology. 




Robert B. Wright, M.D. In the Department 
1924 to 1956; Associate Professor. Member of 
Medical Chirurgical Faculty; American Medical 
Association; American College of Ph\sicians and 
College of American Pathologists. 



DR. SPENCER'S RESIDENTS IN PATHOLOGY 



Richard J. Colfer, M.D. In the Department 2 
years; Instructor. Member of Delaware Pathological 
Society. Assistant Pathologist, Delaware Hos- 
pital. Wilmington, Del. 

Photograph unavailable 




Emil Duskes, M.D. Deceased 1927; .Associate in Pathology 





Helen A. Horn, M.D. In the Department 1945 
to 1947; Instructor. 

Member of American Medical Association; 
College of American Pathologists; American 
Society of Clinical Pathology and International 
Academ\- of Pathology. 

Pathologist, High Point Memorial Hospital, 
High Point, N. C. Adjunct Assistant Professor of 
Pathology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 



Charles J. Farinacci, M.U. In the Department 
1933 to 1934; Instructor. 

Member of American Medical Association; 
.\merican Society of Clinical Pathologists; College 
of American Pathologists and International Acad- 
emy of Pathology. 

Commanding Officer, Fourth Army Area Medi- 
cal Laboratory, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 




William H. Leitch, M.D. In the Department 6 
months; Resident in Pathology. 

Member of American Medical Association; 
College of American Pathologists and American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

Pathologist, St. Joseph's Hospital, Denver, Col. 




Gcranlo H. I'olanco, M.l). In tho Dopartnifiit 
1951 to 1954; Instructor and National Cancer 
Institute Trainee. 

Pathologist, 737 3r(l. U. S. A. F. Hospital, 
C'hatcauroux, France. 





Ursula T. Slager, M.D. In the Department 2 

Benedict Skilarelic, M.D. In the De])arlment 14 years; Instructor, 
years; Associate in Pathology. Assistant Resident in Pathology, Sinai Hos- 

Member of American Society of Clinical Patholo- pital, Baltimore, Md. 
gists; College of American Pathologists and Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 

Pathologist, Memorial & Sacred Heart Hos- 
pitals, Cumberland, Md. 



RESIDENTS IN TRAINING 




Charles Fisher Carroll 





Lester Kiefer 



Josi.i'11 Patrick Gillotte 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

DEAN'S LETTER 

Dear Friends: 

The development of the Medical School is bringing aboul a number of changes. 
These can be attributed to new appointments and the inevitable changes that take 
place with new leadership. However, if one views the iNIedical School from a broad 
viewpoint the clianges are mainly due to progress that is taking place in medicine in 
general. 

The ever increasing amount of technical knowledge and c linical assessments and 
skills that must be taught in a medical curricula make it imperative that a number 
of full-time clinical faculty be available to organize, supervise and coordinate the 
clinical teaching. In addition, a considerable amount of the actual teaching hours 
must be carried by the full-time faculty. These trends raise doubts in the minds of 
some as to the responsibilities of the part-time and volunteer clinical faculty. 

All medical schools depend upon part-time and volunteer faculty to present much 
of the arts and sciences of medicine in their teaching programs. The clinician in prac- 
tice has much to contribute to medical education. The University of INIaryland 
School of Medicine desires the teamwork of a faculty made up of full-time, part-time 
and volunteer faculty in presenting to the undergraduate and graduate in medicine 
an outstanding program of medical education. 

In the past, the School of Medicine has not received financial support that would 
allow it to develop in the front rank of medical education. During the past two years, 
much understanding and assistance has been received. While every effort is being 
made to utilize the resources available in improving medical education at Maryland, 
we are trying in many instances to catch up as well as to progress. 

The University of Maryland School of INIedicine does not receive as much State 
support for its students as other southern regional state institutions do. In addition, 
the students' share (tuition) of the ^Medical School budget is higher at ^Maryland 
than at similar schools in the south. 



State University 



Maryland 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

Georgia 

Louisiana 

North Carolina 
South Carolina. 

Texas 

Virginia 

Mississippi 



Percent of teaching budget 
received from tax sources 



Percent of teacning budget 
provided by tuition 



67% 


25% 


85% 


13% 


76% 


7% 


77% 


16% 


99% 


1% 


78% 


12% 


88% 


12% 


91% 


2% 


73% 


14% 


86% 


10% 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xxv 

In general, medical graduates locate and enter practice in or near their home town. 
55 % of all medical students in the United States are enrolled in medical schools that 
receive 50% or more of their teaching budget from tax sources. Approximately 111 
residents of Maryland enter medical schools each year. During 1954-55 forty entered 
medical schools in other states. Of the 71 resident students entering medical schools 
in ^Maryland, 60 were in the freshman class at the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine. Approximately 60% of the physicians in practice in Maryland are gradu- 
ates of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 

Schools such as Harvard, Hopkins, Yale, Duke have from $600.00 to S1500.00 
more per student per year to conduct their teaching program in medicine than the 
University of Maryland School of Medicine. If the comparison is made on a national 
basis, the University of Maryland School of Medicine has $722.00 less money in its 
teaching budget per student, per year than the average provided by the budgets of 
all medical schools in the United States. 

The teaching hospital of the University of Maryland School of Medicine is only 
40% supported through tax sources. This is spent on charity patients in its clinics 
and wards. 60% of the cost of operating the University Hospital must be earned 
through services to patients for which the patients pay. In essence there is very little 
difference in the financing of the University Hospital and so called voluntary hos- 
pitals. The University Hospital in Baltimore is trying in every way possible to render 
high class medical care to its patients and to provide a learning opportunity for the 
majority of the future physicians of Maryland. 

The Liaison Survey Committee of the American ]\Iedical Association and the 
Association of American Medical Colleges in its recent survey of the University of 
Maryland affirmed the school's class A standing and further stated, "Very real prog- 
ress has been made in a relatively short time toward resolution of the many difficult 
problems facing this institution. x\lthough there remain unresolved problems, all are 
matters receiving considerable study and thought. The Liaison Survey Committee 
is confident that the administration and faculty of this institution will find a means 
of resolving these remaining problems at an early date." 

Sincerely, 

William S. Stone, M.D., Dean 

WEEKLY CALENDAR ANNOUNCED 

Dr. William S. Stone, Dean, has announced the anticipated publication of a 
weekly University Calendar. This publication will be sent by the School of Medicine 
to the various county medical societies, hospitals in the vicinity and to various 
scientific societies and will be prepared by the Postgraduate Committee to be dis- 
tributed in the interest of public information concerning the scientific programs, 
meetings and clinics held regularly in the School of Medicine and University Hos- 
j)ital. It is believed that such a publication will more effectively assist in the devel- 
opment of the postgraduate medical educational program of the School of Medicine. 



BVLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MI). 




Projected Student Union Building for Baltimore Schools 



STUDENT UXIOX BUILDING AUTHORIZED 

Dr. William S. Stone, Dean, has recently announced that plans have been approved 
for the further growth and expansion of the professional schools (Medicine, Dentistry, 
Pharmacy, Law and Nursing) through the development of student union facilities. 

Costing approximately 1 million dollars and financed through the sale of revenue 
bonds, the project is anticipated to be self liquidating. The structure which is planned 
in 2 separate stages will be approximately 6 stories high and will include cafeteria 
facilities, meeting rooms, a faculty lounge, a terrace and dormitory rooms. The build- 
ing will be located west of the old University Hospital (dispensary) building adjacent 
to the Crane Company warehouse and will replace the laundry building of the old 
University Hospital. 

DR. PARKER NOMINATED ASSOC I A IE DEAN 

Dr. Robert T. Parker, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the School of Medicine, 
has been nominated Associate Dean of the School of .Medicine effective November 
1 1955. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xxvii 

Dr. Parker is a native of Baltimore and a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University 
in 1941 receiving his degree of doctor of medicine at the same institution in 1944. He 
then served a rotating internship at the Lincoln Hospital in New York City and later 
served in the out-patient department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He attended 
the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania and then became 
resident in medicine at the United States Veterans Administration Hospital at 
Fort Howard, Maryland. 

In 1949 he became a Fellow in Medicine at the School of Medicine, University of 
Maryland and an assistant resident in medicine from 1950 to 1951. He then served 
as an instructor in medicine and assistant director of the section on infectious diseases, 
being appointed Assistant Professor of Medicine in 1953. 

Dr. Parker's military service included the Medical Field Service School, Carlisle 
Barracks, Pennsylvania and service with the Finneu General Hospital in Thomas- 
ville, Georgia. He was also Chief of ^Medicine at the Station Hospital, Fort Eustis, 
Virginia. 

Dr. Parker is the author of a number of papers dealing with the therapy of typhoid 
fever and the rickettsial diseases. 

POSTGRADUATE DAY DECEMBER 8, 1955 A SUCCESS 

In collaboration with the Maryland Academy of General Practice the Post- 
graduate Committee of the School of Medicine presented a series of clinics and 
lectures for more than 50 members of the Academy and other invited guests. Papers 
included studies on obesity, the treatment of thyroid disease in children and a paper 
on cytology. Following a luncheon, the afternoon session was devoted to a paper on 
endometriosis and studies on the action of antibiotics. A clinical demonstration of 
neurologic examination techniques concluded the program. 

TOBACCO RESEARCH GRANT 

Dr. Russell S. Fisher, Professor of Legal jNIedicine, has been a participant in a cross 
country, coordinated lung study sponsored by the Tobacco Industry Research Com- 
mittee. Total research grants in the United States now exceed 8800,000. 

DR. DODD RESIGNS ANESTHESIA POST 

Dr. Robert A. Dodd, Professor of Anesthesia, has resigned from the Faculty of 
the School of Medicine to take a similar appointment. 

DR. K.\LTREIDER ON AMERICAN ACADEMY OF GENERAL 
PRACTICE PROGRAM 

Dr. D. Frank Kallreider, Associate Professor of Obstetrics at the School of Medi- 
cine, was a recent participant in the annual meeting of the American Academy of 

General Practice held in Washington, D. C. 

SESQUICEXTENNIAL COMMITTEE REPORTS 

.\s a result of several meetings of the Sesquicentennial Committee of the School 
of Medicine the following program for the sesquicentennial year, 1957, has begun 
to take form. 



xxviii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

It is suggested ihat department heads have the appropriate sesquicentennial over- 
print executed on departmental stationery. These facilities are available at College 
Park. The committee has also begun plans on a sesquicentennial convocation to be 
held on the evening of January 18, 1957 in the Lyric Theatre. 

Dr. John K. Savage, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, has been nominated His- 
torian on the occasion of the Sesquicentennial Year. Dr. Savage is proceeding with 
with the research necessary to produce an historical sketch of the School of Medicine, 
which will include a review of the Cordell volume up to 1890 and a more detailed 
historic sketch of the School of Medicine subsequent to that date. Dr. Savage has 
directed his efforts toward the production of this volume in time for the sesquicen- 
tennial convocation. 

The Founder's Day Banquet will be held on the evening of January 19, 1957 at 
the Lord Baltimore Hotel. This affair, a jointly sponsored celebration, is under the 
chairmanship of Dr. Thomas R. O'Rourk. 

The committee will also study a number of additional suggestions for other appro- 
priate ceremonies during the centennial year. Members of the faculty, alumni and 
friends are urged to submit suggestions for the sesquicentennial programs. As addi- 
tional information becomes available, it will appear in these pages. 

MEET THE EMERITI 
Henry Janney Walton, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Roentgenology 

Dr. Walton was born in Nebraska, but only because his parents were temporarily 
developing a stock Ranch in the West at the time. His father, William E. and his 
mother, Ellen Janney were both Marylanders, being born, reared and educated in 
Harford County. Both were descended from a long line of Quaker Ancestors. Al- 
though Dr. Walton in later life affiliated himself with the Presbyterian denomination, 
he still exemplities many of the laudable characteristics of our Quaker brethren. 

In 1893 the Walton family moved back to Maryland. Young Henry received his 
elementary education in the public and private schools of Harford County and 
Baltimore, attending both Friends School and Baltimore City College. He sought 
a medical education at a time when there were many schools in Baltimore, graduating 
from the school of Homeopathy in 1902. Dr. Walton associated himself with his 
uncle. Dr. Edward Janney in the practice of Homeopathy for a time, but finding this 
not too satisfying went abroad for a year's study in Berlin and Vienna. He is a Char- 
ter Member of the Anglo-American Medical Association of Berlin. 

Returning to Baltimore, the Doctor matriculated at the Baltimore Medical College 
(which later consolidated with the University of Maryland Medical School), gradu- 
ating in the Class of 1906. He is looking forward to his (lolden Anniversary in June, 
1956. Dr. \\'alton interned at Mercy Hospital, and then started the practice of both 
Medicine and Surgery. His interest was develojjing in the new diagnostic procedure, 
x-ray. I'Vom about 1909 much of his time and energy was spent in this new specialty, 
although he continued part lime in the ])ractice of Medicine and Surgery. His train- 
ing and experience was under Dr. Baetjer at Hopkins. 

In 1911 Dr. Henry Chandlee, a pioneer roentgenologist in Baltimore was appointed 
head of the department at the University and Dr. Walton was taken on as his assist- 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 




Dr. Henry J. Walton seen al work in his shop 



ant. This connection with the University was continued for about .^5 years. Part-time 
jNIedical and Surgical Practice was continued for several years, but the increasing use 
of the diagnostic and therapeutic x-ray in hospitals finally forced Dr. Walton to 
devote his full time to this specialty. 

In 1916 Dr. Chandlee died and Henry J. Walton was made Professor and Chief of 
the department. In 1918 Dr. Walton enlisted for service in \\'orld War I and was 
sent to Officers Training Camp at Chattanooga, Tenn., being attached to the Depart- 
ment of Roentgenology, U. S. Medical Corps. From there he was transferred to the 
Base Hospital at Camp Upton, New York, as Chief of the X-Ray Department where 
he served with the rank of Captain until .May, 1919. 

Returning to the University HosjMtal, he served until World War II. Contemplat- 
ing retirement in 1941, he was persuaded to stay on until after the war, serving with 
untiring energy during this {)eriod of medical acceleration and depleted hospital 
staff. He was Professor for about M) years. During this period he participated in the 
development of a specialty from its infancy to one of the chief hospital departments. 
About 25 residents came under his training and guidance during this time. All hold 
him in high respect and esteem. Two of his i)ast residents and assistants remain 
associated in his private practice. 

Dr. Walton retired to an emeritus status, as far as the medical school was concerned 
in 1945 but he remained active in the private practice of roentgenology until January 
1st of 1955. He still stops in occasionally at his office of many years in the Medical 
Arts Building. His younger associates are carrying on in the established tradition. 



XXX BILLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Dr. Walton's newest hobby is wood working. He has an elaborate, well equipped 
shop in his basement at 3806 Greenway, and spends many enjoyable hours in this 
satisfying recreation. He is even attending night school in an adult vocational guid- 
ance course in manual training, much to his enjoyment. 

Dr. Walton spends some time in travel, visitation of children and grandchildren in 
New England and a part of the winters in Florida. He enjoys excellent health, and 
we wish him continued enjoyment of his well earned retirement years. 

MEDICAL LIBRARY NOTES 

Gifts of books and journals were presented to the library by the following donors 
in the period from November tirst to February first: 

Mr. C. W. L. Briscoe Mr. John E. Manuals 

Dr. J. J. Burne Dr. Howard B. Mays 

Dr. Reid Edwards Dr. I. C. Rubin 

Dr. Herbert E. Gakenheimer Dr. John E. Savage 

Dr. George E. Gifford, Jr. Dr. Sylvan Isl. Shane 

Dr. Frank W. Hachtel Dr. R. Eloise Smith 

Mr. Lee Hoffman Dr. William S. Stone 

Hynson, Westcott & Dunning Dr. Masiuchi Takino 

Dr. J. J. Izquierdo Dr. John Wagner 

J\lr. H. M. Jones Dr. Edwin C. W^ard 

Dr. Frank J. Kirby Mrs. John E. Weeks 

Col. Sherman L. Kiser Dr. Huntington W^illiams 

Dr. A. M. Kraut Dr. Robert B. Wright 

Dr. Helen I. Maginnis Dr. H. Boyd W'ylie 

The University of Maryland Medical Alumni Association has generously provided 
money this year for additional subscriptions to twenty-six medical journals needed 
in the library. These added copies will help greatly in the use of current periodicals. 
The library received a Christmas greeting from the United States Military Ad- 
visors to the First Republic of Korea Army, with a note added by University of 
Maryland graduate Dr. Luis F. Gonzalez (School of Aledicine, 1952). Dr. Gonzalez, 
as Medical Advisor of the II R O K Corps Medical Section, expressed appreciation 
for the medical books and journals sent from the library's excess duplicates, to aid in 
medical training in Korea. 

MERCY HOSPITAL NEWS 
NEW :\IE.MBERS OF THE VISITING STAFF OF MERCY 

Dr. James Bisanar has been appointed to the teaching and Pediatric Visiting Staff 
of Mercy Hospital. Dr. Frederick Heldrich who recently transferred his practice to 
Frederick, Maryland, was formerly in charge of arranging the teaching program. 
Dr. Bisanar is now in charge of this program. 

Dr. William B. Rever, Jr. and Dr. Leonard G. Hamberry, former Co-Residents in 
surgery and Dr. Edward M. Barczak, former Resident in gynecology have recently 
joined the Mercy Hospital X'isiting Staff. 

Dr. John T. Everett has recently been appointed to the Surgical \'isiting Staff, 
and Dr. Irving Kramer to the Pediatric \'isiting Staff. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xxxi 

DIRECTOR OF THE BIOCHEMICAL LABORATORY LEAVES MERCY 
Dr. Charles E. Brambel, Ph.D., Director of the Biochemical Laboratory of ^lercy 
Hospital for the past 20 years, has been appointed as Professor and Head of the 
University of Notre Dame's Department of Biology. He is one of several interna- 
tionally known scholars appointed to the Xotre Dame Faculty under the University's 
distinguished ])rofessors program. 

ASSOCIATE RADIOLOGIST NAMED 

Dr. Albert B. Shackman was recently appointed to the Mercy Hospital Staff as 
Associate Radiologist, part time. He assists Dr. Edward R. Dana with the increased 
volume of work in the Radiology Department four days each week. 

Dr. Shackman is a diplomate of the American Board of Radiology. He was gradu- 
ated from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1948. After two years of 
internship, he came to Baltimore for four years of radiologic training at the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital and was senior resident in 1953. He is now instructor in radiology 
at the Hopkins Hospital and University and attending radiologist to the \'eterans 
Administration Hospital, Loch Raven Boulevard. He is also engaged in the private 
practice of radiology. 

CHIEFS OF TWO DEPARTMENTS NAMED 

After two years as acting chiefs, Dr. Henry J. L. ^Marriott and Dr. Theodore 
Schwartz have been named Chief of Electrocardiography and Chief of Otolaryngol- 
ogy, respectively. 

The Joint Convention of the College of American Pathologists and the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists was held at the Drake Hotel in Chicago from October 
9th to 15th. 

Mercy's representative was Dr. C. Gardiner Warner, who attended meetings on 
medical care plans, joint commissions on accreditation of hospitals, and the patholo- 
gist's role in preventing the practice of socialized medicine in the hospital. Highlight- 
ing the program was a discussion of the pathologist's responsibility to control the use 
of radioactive isotopes for diagnosis and treatment. 

CLINICAL LABORATORY NEWS 

Sister Paula Marie, M.T. and Connie Chapman, M.T., after having successfully 
completed an e.xamination in Blood Bank Techniques, have become certified mem- 
bers of the .American Association of Blood Banks. 

ARMED FORCES SECTION 

Dr. John R. Davis of the \'isiting Staff of Mercy Hospital began his military serv- 
ice with the Navy on May 23, 1955. Lieutenant Commander Davis is stationed at 
Bethesda Naval Hospital. 

Commander William C. Dunnigan, I'.S.X.R., reported for duly aboard the U.S.S. 
Wyandot at Norfork, X'irginia, on October 23, 1955. 

Dr. Dunnigan who interned and served his residencies at Mercy from 1935 to 1940 
has been ordered to the South Pole for a six-month tour of duty. The e.xpedition, 
otTuially called "Operation Deepfreeze", is a preliminary operation for the 1957 
International (ieophysical Expedition of .Admiral Richard Hyrd. Dr. Dunnigan, who 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



entered the Navy in March, 1955, was selected on the basis of his work in traumatic 
and general surgery. 

ITEM 

Dr. Charles Van Buskirk, Professor of Neurology has been invited to become a 
member of the Neurology Graduate ^ledical Training Grant Committee of the 
National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness to serve as a consultant to 
the Surgeon General for this training program. 

NEW JOURNAL 

The Pergamon Press of London and New York has recently announced the publi- 
cation of a new journal entitled "Journal of Psychosomatic Research". 

DR. BRANTIGAN NAMED CHURCH HO.ME HEAD 
Dr. Otto C. Brantigan, Professor of Surgical Anatomy and Professor of Clinical 
Surgery in the School of Medicine, has been recently named Chief of Surgery at the 
Church Home and Hospital in Baltimore. 

OBITUARY 
^rtljur jHarriott ^fjiplcp 

Dr. Arthur Marriott Shipley was born at Harmans, Anne Arundel County, ]\Iary- 
land on January 8, 1878. He was a son of Roderick O. and Wilhelmina Clark Shipley. 
His father was a successful and resourceful farmer whose ancestors were among the 
early settlers of ^Maryland, and the name "Shipley", through its many branches, 
numbers hundreds in the State of Maryland. Dr. Shipley received his early education 

in the county schools and high school, at the 
Friends School, Baltimore, and was graduated 
in Medicine from the University of ^Maryland 
in 1902. He was awarded a degree of Doctor 
of Science from St. John's College, Annapolis, 
Maryland. x-Xfter graduation he entered the 
University Hospital as an intern and was ad- 
vanced through the various grades to Resi- 
dency in Surgery and Superintendent of the 
Hospital, completing his training in 1908. Dr. 
Shipley was always a good student. He was an 
attentive listener and throughout his entire 
life was able to concentrate on what a speaker 
said and how he said it and was able, years 
later, to Cjuote a lecturer as accurately as if 
he had just recently heard him. In the latter 
part of the previous century, when most medical 
teaching was didactic, there were many brilliant 
lecturers. Dr. Shipley was exposed to many 
Dr. Arthur .Marridti Shipley of them and hc disciplined himself to attend 




MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xxxiii 

medical and surgical meetings in order to hear doctors whose teaching he appreciated 
and admired. It was only natural, therefore, that he decided to be a teacher and he 
elected Clinical Surgery as a field in which he wished to serve. He devoted his life to 
this phase of surgical teaching. He had an unusual ability to classify signs, symptoms, 
and pathologic conditions and he also possessed a remarkable memory. He could 
pigeonhole facts and bring them out when the occasion demanded in such a manner 
that students soon learned that the clarity of his method of teaching was greatly to 
their benefit. He was a constant exponent of the Socratic method of teaching and was 
always at his best when conducting a clinic where students and visitors would be 
afforded the opportunity to ask questions, and then he would be able to so properly 
classify and state signs and symptoms that they would never forget them. He re- 
garded written examinations in surgery as useless and almost a waste of time, and 
while no teacher could have been busier he always made time to orally examine each 
student, and in the more than five thousand students whom he taught in his pro- 
fessional career, no one ever passed through the School without having been exam- 
ined by him on two or three occasions. 

He was made an Associate Professor of Surgery in 1906, Professor of Clinical 
Surgery in 1914, and Professor of Surgery and Head of the Department in 1920, 
retaining this position until his retirement on July 1, 1948. In 1911 he was appointed 
as Chief of the Surgical Service at The Baltimore City Hospitals, a position he filled 
with great distinction and accomplishments until May 4, 1939, when he resigned to 
devote all of his time to the University of j\Iaryland and the University Hospital. 
The volume of Clinical Surgery material at these two hospitals was tremendous and 
provided him with a variety of cases admirably suited for broad training in General 
Surgery. In both institutions he was able to gather about him a number of loyal and 
competent surgeons who were happy to share the teaching load for both medical 
students and house-officers. 

Dr. Shipley served as President of The iNIedical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land in 1936 and 1937, was a member of The American Surgical Association of which 
he was Vice-president in 1943, The Southern Surgical Association, The Research 
Society, The American Thoracic Society, The Eclat Club, The Clinical Surgical 
Society, and was a very active member of The American College of Surgeons, serving 
as a regent from 1935 to 1945, and a governor for several years thereafter. 

Dr. Shipley was a prodigious reader, being very familiar with history. Probably 
no civilian was more, or better acquainted with military history than was he. His 
reading was wide spread. He was fond of the classics, but he preferred literature which 
had a historic background. He was also very fond of flowers and had one of the most 
beautiful gardens to be found in surburban Baltimore. It was terraced back of his 
house, leading up to the foot of a dense woods, the moisture and drainage from which 
constantly provided nourishment to the garden. His familiarity with flowers con- 
stantly amazed his many friends who frequently visited him in the garden. 

Following his retirement in 1948, Dr. Shipley lived quietly at home with Mrs. 
Shipley, his books, and his flowers. ]\Irs. Shipley's invalidism saddened his latter 
years, but his devotion to her led him to assume a protectorate over her, and this 
was softened by the proximity to his books and garden, and the knowledge of the 



xxxiv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

great esteem in which he was held by the thousands of students whom lie liad taught, 
and the service he had been through his profession to the City and State. 

There were many facets to Dr. Shipley's character. Among them were integrity, 
courage, honor, and determination. If I had to emphasize one of them it would 
probably be the latter. Early in his career he determined to be a good clinical surgeon 
and a good teacher of clinical surgery. He never j)ermitted anything to interfere with 
the desire to carry on the responsibilities of each. The only break in his long period of 
service came during the First World War. Almost as soon as war was declared he 
offered his services. A short time thereafter he was called to duty and was sent to 
Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, for a brief period of training and indoctrination, and to 
help organize an evacuation hospital for service in Europe. This hospital, Evacuation 
Hospital Number 8, had an extensive service in the late summer and fall of 1918 on 
the Western Front. He was Chief of the Surgical Service there and upon retirement 
as a lieutenant colonel in the Medical Corps, he resumed his teaching activities 
He was cited by Surgeon General Ireland for the distinguished service medal. Deter- 
mination of the kind that he possessed is the same type that forced Columbus to 
sail westward across unexplored oceans, that encouraged Lindbergh to fly eastward 
across the Atlantic, that drove Pasteur to seek the knowledge that he later made 
available to the world. He realized that if he were to be a good teacher, he must be 
constant and consistent, that he must never miss classes, and in all of his teaching 
career, although he was extremely busy, and during the earlier years of his practice 
he was in great demand in many parts of the State for consultation, he never per- 
mitted a class to be without a teacher. If he could not be present, he telephoned or 
otherwise made arrangements for someone to take the class for him. He instilled 
this attitude in the minds of the men who were associated with him in teaching, so 
that the Surgical Department, under his direction, had a record for many years of 
never permitting a class to be unattended. His devotion to his duties and to the 
University of ^Maryland School of Medicine has certainly not been outdone by any 
other member of the faculty in the nearly a century and a half of its existence. His 
long tenure of office and association with the School of ^Medicine stands out as an 
unimpeachable record. 

He served the Medical School in many different ways. For a short time he was 
Superintendent of Nurses. Likewise, for a short period, he taught materia medica and 
then therapeutics, and he acted as Dean after the death of Dr. Dorsey Coale, until 
someone could be found to fill that position. But, probably in no other place did he 
serve the University so well as in helping to organize the forces which led to the State 
University which now exists. Truly it may be said that Dr. Shipley is the pivot about 
whom the history of the University of Maryland School of Medicine revolved, during 
the forty-five years that he was of service to it. There was considerable opposition in 
certain quarters against the University of Maryland School of Medicine being a part 
of a state institution and it recjuired very considerable maneuvering on the part of 
many of the Alumni and friends of the Medical School to accomplish this desired 
end. In it all Dr. Shipley played a very important part. How important cannot be 
measured, excei)t by the end results. Governor Ritchie, who was in office at that time, 
was very much opposed to it, and he did many things and made c|uite a few offers to 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xxxv 

try to neutralize the activities and the friends of the University of Maryland, but 
politicians, many of them in high positions in the State, knew Dr. Shipley, many of 
them had been his patients, and they would usually ask, "What does Dr. Shipley 
think about this? What does he desire?" And when his statements were made to 
them, they no longer opposed the development of a State Institution. 

Upon his retirement he severed all connections with the responsibility for the care 
of patients. Likewise, he discontinued teaching. Dr. Shipley came into Medicine 
when teaching was still largely didactic and by the demonstration of disease and 
conditions on the living patient. Laboratory investigations came later, and he could 
never agree that laboratory methods should be totally substituted for clinical ap- 
praisal. His ideals prevailed with him to the very end of his career. 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

ABSTRACTS OF CURRENT RESEARCH BY THE FACULTY 
OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment of Granuloma Inguinale* 

Granuloma inguinale is endemic among southern negroes of the lower economic 
level. It is an infectious disease of questionable venereal origin which apparently 
holds little interest for the average practitioner because of the rarity of such patients 
in private practice. Although the etiologic agent was determined 60 years ago, the 
mode of transmission is still a mystery. Investigation of contacts has been fruitless, 
as the sexual partners of patients with extensive lesions have been proved to be 
clinically free of the disease. Insect vectors have been incriminated as carriers but 
the pediculus pubis has not been discovered in any of the patients in this series and 
evidence of cimex lectularius has also been absent. 

* Harry M. Robinson, Jr., Raymond C. V. Robinson, and Morris M. Cohen. 

From the Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland. 

The study was supported by a grant-in-aid from the Charles Pfizer Company of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clues to Better Understanding of the Nature and Treatment of Certain 

Infectious Diseases! 

Problems related to understanding basic tissue alterations in infectious diseases 
are broad and complex dependent upon various factors, i.e., host reaction, character 
of the invading parasite and numerous intermediate considerations. Various microbial 
diseases are now amenable to control as a result of drug action which denies the 
causative germ of an essential metabolite necessary for its survival and growth. So 
little is known of the metabolic alterations which pathogenic organisms effect in the 
tissues. \'ital mysteries are concerned with the metabolic substrates which determine 
whether a micro-organism may invade and cause disease, reside latently in a host 

t Woodward, Theodore E. From the Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University 
of Maryland. 

This study was su])[>()rted iiy a grant in aid by the Parke, Davis and Company, Detroit, Mich- 
igan. 

Presented at the annual meeting of the American Clinical and Climatological Association, 1955, 
and sutimittefl to the .\merican Journal of the Medical Sciences. In press. 



xxwi BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

cell, or die. Models chosen for discussion in this paper are the rickettsioses, epidemic 
hemorrhagic fever, meningococcal infections, and important diseases of the gram 
negative group. 

Certain trends pertinent to these fundamental considerations are discussed such as 
1) the relationship of the vascular system, particularly the capillaries, upon the 
pathologic and physiologic tissue alterations in infectious diseases; 2) the role of 
to.xins and other vaso-reactor substances upon the vascular system; 3) the problem 
of persistence of certain microorganisms in the human host and the relapse problem 
with particular reaction to therapy and the natural development and the immune 
state. 



I 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



Roy Guyther, M.D. 



OFFICERS* 

J. Morris Reese, M.D., President 

Vice-Presidents 
Norman E. Sartorius, M.D. 



Bernard Thomas, M.D. 



Edwin H. Stewart, M.D., Secretary Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., Treasurer 

J. Emmett Queen, M.D., Assistant Secretary Minette E. Scott, Executive Secretary 

William H. Triplett, M.D., Director 



Board of Directors 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., 

Chairman 
J. Morris Reese, M.D. 
Edwin H. Stewart, Jr., M.D. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., M.D. 
J. Emmett Queen, M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 
J. Sheldon Eastland, M.D. 
H. Boyd VVylie, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 



Nominating Committee 

Gibson J. Wells, M.D., 

Chairman 
Emanuel Schimunek, M.D. 
De.xter L. Reimann, M.D. 
Edwin S. Muller, M.D. 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

Library Committee 

Milton S. Sacks, M.D. 

* July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956 



Representatives to General 
Alumni Board 

Thurston R. Adams, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Representatives, Editorial 
Board, Bulletin 

Harry C. Hull, M.D. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 



YOU ARE REQUESTED 

Your Medical School Asks That You Contribute to the National Fund for 

Medical Education 

Since the inauguration of the National Fund for Medical Education and the A.^I.A. 
sponsored American ]\Iedical Education Foundation the School of Aledicine has 
been a continued recipient of valuable funds which are received without restriction 
and which may be used at the discretion of the faculty for the improvement of medical 
education. 

Since the cost of educating a student is many times the tuition paid, it is highly 
important that donors sympathetic with the medical education movement con- 
tribute adequately, that proper standards of medical education can be maintained. 

Alumni of the School of Medicine are cordially invited to contribute to this most 
useful fund and to earmark specifically their contributions for the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine. 

Last year the following Maryland alumni made donations to the fund. The School 
respectfully acknowledges these contributions and desires to give them public ac- 
knowledgement and appreciation. 



William P. Dailey 
Dorcas C. Harley 
August C. Pavlatos 
Lester L. Burtnick 
Hamilton P. Dorman 



Horatio N. Dorman 
Abraham Karger 
Samuel Marton 
Orel Chafifee 
William B. Cooper, Jr. 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Joseph Katz 

Michael Skovron 

Felix Shubert 

Samuel E. Ganz 

David N. Ingram 

Samuel Jackson 

Michael Krosnoflf 

Clarence Latimer, Jr. 

Sidney Safifran 

George Schmieler 

Frank Theuerkauf 

James Wilson 

Walter L. Bailey 

Richard C. Hayden 

James Miniszek 

Allen J. O'Neill 

Frederick Pokrass 

Elizabeth B, Sherman 

Irving Terman 

William Yudkofif 

William R. Amberson 

Charles W, Gardner 

Lawrence J. Knox 

Maurice C. Pincofifs 

William H. Pomeroy 

Russell A. Stevens 

Fred Fernald 

Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 

Womans' Auxiliary 
Houston L. Bell 
Charles A. Hefner 
William C. Humphries 
Donald W. Mintzer 
Paul R. Myers 
Henry Rothkopf 
Bruce Barnes 
C. L. Beaven 
Robert J. Peters 
William Speicher 
James G. Stegmaier 
Richard AUsopp 
Edwin O. Daue, Jr. 
David Imbrie 



Frederick Mayer 
W. Raymond McKenzie 
Arthur E. Pollock 
Robert A. Bier 
Bernard Botsch 
Francis Bowen 
Jesse C. Coggins 
H. Elias Diamond 
John M, Edmonds 
Wylie M, Faw, Jr. 
Joseph M. George, Jr. 
Donald B. Grove 
Frank S. Hassler 
Rowland S. Heisley 
Nathan Janney 
Martin F. Kocevar 
Frank F. Lusby 
A. J. Maysels 
Dudley Phillips 
James A. Roberts 
Fred C. Sabin 
Maurice H. Schneiman 
Alexander A. Weinstock 
Walter D. Blankenship 
Hamilton Dorman 
H. N. Dorman 
Parker S. Dorman 
Robert H. Dreher 
Louis Friedman 
Samuel S. Glick 
Raymond B. Goldberg 
David B. Gray 
William L. Gu3rton 
Richard C. Hayden 
Samuel M. Jacobson 
C. Henry Jones 
Jack A. Kaplan 
Abraham Kremen 
Karl F. Mech 
Karl J. Myers 
James J. Range 
Benjamin M. Stein 



DR. JOSEPH NATARO NOMINATED FOR ALUMNI HONOR AWARD 
Dr. Joseph Nataro of 172 Littleton Avenue, Newark 3, New Jersey, and a member 
of the class of 1925 has been nominated recipient of the 1956 Alumni Honor Award 
and gold key. Dr. Nataro will receive his honor at the Alumni Day celebration on 
June 7, 1956. 



\ 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 




Dr. Nataro 



A native of a small town in Sicily, Dr. Xataro was born on March 12, 1898, the 
son of Thomas and Lillian Nataro. Coming to this country at the age of 5 he settled 
in Newark, New Jersey where he still resides. His education was received in the 
grammar and high schools of Newark, the young man often working after school and 
during his summer vacations to help augment the family income. 

Following 2 years at New York University accomplished largely by his own efforts, 
he entered the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1921. During his second 
year his father passed away leaving the family bereft of funds. The Hitchcock Scholar- 
ship, then valued at S125.(K), found him deserving and made it possible for him to be 
graduated in 1925. 

Following his graduation, he worked for 6 months with the late Dr. Harrison 
Martland, noted pathologist. A subsecjuent 2 year rotating internship at Newark 
City Hospital completed his training and he entered general practice in 1927 in a 
financially poor section of Newark. 

During the depression most of his jiatients met with adversity and necessitated 



xl BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF AID. 

much of his time, given wilUngly and without recompense. In this situation Dr. 
Nataro continued to thrive for he gave not only of his time but also of his finances 
and often bought both medicines and food for the poor people he served as a physi- 
cian. In addition to caring for his patients, at the same time he assumed the responsi- 
bility of his brother's education both at the New York University and later through 
medical school. As a result of these efforts he was doubly rewarded. After graduating 
from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1937, his brother became an 
Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Louisville Medical School and 
Director of Atomic Medicine at the Nichols General Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky. 

At the age of 45 in 1942, Dr. Joseph Nataro voluntarily enlisted in the United 
States Army. When asked by a reporter from a Newark paper why he had done so in 
spite of his age, Dr. Nataro replied, "To say thanks to the United States for all the 
wonderful opportunities it has afforded me and my family." 

His meager Army pay, however, did not prevent him from placing his oldest son, 
Jerome, through college and medical school. Today, Jerome is a practicing physician 
in Levittown, Long Island and is a graduate of the class of 1946 of the University of 
]Vf aryland School of Medicine. 

His second son, Frank, has also followed him at the University of Maryland, being 
a graduate of the class of 1955. Frank plans to enter active practice of medicine with 
his brother Jerome upon completion of his internship. 

Joseph Nataro, Jr., his third son, is currently a student at the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine and is about ready to complete his first year. 

Noted for his complete devotion to medicine, his unselfish charity to his patients 
and fellow men, for his propagation of the medical profession through 3 sons and a 
brother. Dr. Nataro exemplifies the physician who, in spite of formidable hardships, 
gave not for personal gain but for the gain of society. He is truly a physician to be 
noted for "outstanding contribution to medicine and distinguished service to man- 
kind" — the essential requirements considered by the Alumni Association for nomi- 
nation for this most honored award. 

PLANS NOW COMPLETE FOR ALUMNI DAY, JUNE 7, 1956 

The Board of Directors of the Medical Alumni Association have announced plans 
for the annual Alumni Day which will be held at the University Hospital and the 
School of ^Medicine on June 7, 1956. The recipient of the annual Alumni Honor 
Award and gold key will be Dr. Joseph Nataro of the class of 1925. 

Following the customary registration, the morning program will be devoted to 
clinical subjects and will be under the auspices of the Postgraduate Committee of 
the School of Medicine. Interesting accounts of research now in progress at the Uni- 
versity and broad discussions on current medical problems as well, will feature the 
morning program. This will be followed by the customary alumni luncheon and busi- 
ness meeting. On this occasion. Dr. Nataro will be presented with the Honor Award 
and gold key. 

Following the business meeting Alumni are urged to inspect the new and growing 
facilities of the School of Medicine and particularly are invited to visit the new 
offices jointly occupied by the IMedical Alumni Association and the Postgraduate 
Committee, a greatly refurbished and elegantly furnished quarters in the old Medical 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION! SECTION xli 

Building on the second floor. Alumni reunions are being planned, one in particular 
being that of the class of 1931 which is under the chairmanship of Dr. Arthur Si- 
winski. 

The evening's activities will be climaxed by the annual alumni banc|uet held in 
honor of the class of 1956. On this occasion, President J. Morris Reese of the Medical 
Alumni Association will award the fifty year certificates to those members of the 
Alumni Association who have been in active practice for fifty years. 

Mrs. Minette E. Scott, Executive Secretary of the Medical Alumni Association 
recjuests early banc|uet reservations and should alumni from out of the city desire 
hotel reservations, these requests should also be sent directly to Mrs. Scott who will 
complete the necessary arrangements. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PLANS REUNION ON OCCASION Ol" NORTH 
CAROLINA STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY MEETING 

Dr. John H. Anderson of the class of 1935 and a resident of Asheville, North 
Carolina, has announced the organization of a luncheon for ^ledical School Alumni 
on the occasion of the annual meeting of the North Carolina State ^Medical Society 
at Pinehurst, North Carolina, April 29 May 2, 1956. 

This program is in line with the policy established several years ago by the ]\IedicaI 
Alumni Association in c^rganizing alumni reunions at the various slate regional and 
national medical meetings. 

The next alumni reunion is planned for the American .Medical Association .\nnual 
IMeeting in Chicago, June 11-15, 1956. Further details will be forthcoming. 

ALUMNI REUNION AT A.M.A. MEETING LIKELY 

Dr. \A'illiam H. Triplett, Director of the ^ledical Alumni Association, has an- 
nounced that plans are in progress for a Medical School smoker, luncheon or some 
other appropriate function on the occasion of the American Medical Association 
Annual ^Meeting in Chicago, June 11 15, 1956. Alumni attending the American 
Medical Association fleeting are recjuested to inquire at the registration desk relative 
to this function. In addition, Dr. Triplett states that the Medical Alumni Association 
will inform all alumni individualh', should such a reunion or other function take place. 

ADVANCE NOTICE OF ALUMNI REUNION ON OCCASION OF 
SOUTHERN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION .MEETING 

The Medical Alumni Association plans to organize a reunion on the occasion of 
the Southern Medical Association's Annual Meeting which will be held in Washing- 
ton, D. C. during the month of November, 1956. Further details will appear in 
forthcoming numbers of the Bulletin. 

MARYLAND'S PERSONABLE AND FIRST WOMAN PHYSICIAN 
Dr. Theresa 0. Sxaith, Class of 1923, enjoys active west virgIxXia practice 

One of the most active physicians in the .\lumni .\ssociation of the School of Medi- 
cine, one of its most personable alumnae and the lirst woman graduate of the School 



xlii BULLET I. \ OF THE SCHOOL OE MEDIC LYE, i\ OF MD. 




Dr. Theresa O. Snaith 

of Medicine is Dr. Theresa O. Snaith of 450 Center Avenue, ^^'eston. West 
Virginia. 

A pediatrician, Dr. Snaith served her rotating internship and a residency in pediat- 
rics at the University Hospital foUowing her graduation. She then served for 4 years 
on the medical staff of the Rosewood Training School and in 1930 was actively 
engaged in postgraduate work in child study at the Washington University and 
Children's Hospital in St. Louis. She then returned to Weston, West Virginia, limiting 
her practice to pediatrics. 

A diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics, Dr. Snaith is an active member 
of the Central West Virginia Medical Society, the West Virginia State JNIedical 
Association, the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics 
and is a member of the Child Welfare Committee of the State of West ^'irginia, 
serving as its Chairman in 1951 and again in 1956. She is a member of the Committee 
on Rural Health of the State Medical Association and is a member of the Medical 
Advisory Committee for the West Virginia Society for Crippled Children. From 
1935 until 1938 she held the ofi&ce of secretary of the Lewis County ]\Iedical Society 
and is presently secretary of the Central West Virginia Medical Society serving in 
this capacity since 1948. She has been past president and secretary of the Pediatric 
Section of the West Virginia State Medical Association. She was a member of the 
Council of the State Medical Association of West Virginia for the years 1952-53-54- 
55. Incidently, Dr. Snaith was the first woman member of the Council. 

DR. L. F. BOLAND ACCEPTS NEW POSITION 

Dr. L. F. Boland, prominent surgeon of Williamson, West Virginia and a member 
of the class of 1911, HaUimore Medical College, has recently accepted the position 
of Medical Director for the Kentucky Training Home, an institution for the case 
of mentally retarded children and adults at Frankfort, Kentucky. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION xliii 




Dr. Ayd 

DR. AYD RECEIVES J.A.C. AWARD 

Dr. Frank J. Ayd, Jr., a member of the class of 1945, a practicing psychiatrist, was 
recently named as Baltimore's "outstanding young man of the year" by vote of the 
Junior Association of Commerce of Baltimore. At ceremonies at the Stafford Hotel, 
Dr. Ayd was presented the award by Governor McKeldin. 

CLASS OF 1956 TO RECEIVE COMPLIMENTARY BULLETIN 

SUBSCRIPTION 

]\Iedical Alumni Association to Continue Annual Tradition 
Members of the graduating class of 1956 will, as customary, receive a year's free 
subscription to the Bulletin of the School of Medicine, copies to be sent to the hospital 
where the graduate will serve his rotating internship. ^lembers of the class of 1956 
are encouraged to continue contact with the School of ^ledicine through continued 
subscription to the Bulletin and active membership in the Medical Alumni Associa- 
tion. Inciuiries should be directed to Mrs. Minette Scott, ^Medical Alumni Association, 
University of Maryland. 

AMERICAN :\IEDICAL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION OFFERS MANUSCRIPT 

EDITIXO SERVICE 

A manuscript editing service sponsored by the American ^ledical Writers' Asso- 
ciation is available to physicians preparing scientific manuscripts. Each manuscript 
as submitted is returned promptly with a written rej)ort giving a running commentary 
which, line by line, paragraph by paragraph, calls the author's attention to certain 
errors and suggests alternate phrasing. It is a non-commercial service obtained 
through the American Medical Writers' Association, \\' C U Building, Quincy, 
Illinois. 



xliv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

MARYLAND ALl.MXI HEAD SOUTHERX MEDIC\L ASSOCIATION 

At the -i^)th Annual Meeting of the Southern Medical Association held on Novem- 
ber 14. 1955 in Houston, Texas, Dr. W. Raymond McKenzie of the class of 1915, 
was elected President. Dr. J. Morris Reese, class of 1920, was elected Chairman of 
the Council. The next Annual Meeting of the Southern Medical Association will be 
held on November 12-15, 1956 in Washington, D. C. 

ITEMS 

Dr. Howard F. Raskin, class of 1949, and formerly resident in medicine at the 
University Hospital, has been appointed Assistant Professor of ^Medicine at the 
University of Chicago Department of Medicine. 

Dr. Howard B. Mays, class of 1935, has announced the removal of his office for the 
practice of urology to 3301 North Charles Street in Baltimore. 

Dr. Edward E. Rose, P & S class of 1907, was recently nominated superintendent 
of the Stale of West Virginia's Andrew S. Rowan ^Memorial Home at Sweet Springs, 
West Mrginia. A native of Hinton, West Virginia and long a practitioner in Hunting- 
ton, Dr. Rose succeeds Dr. J. U. Rohr who has retired. Dr. Rohr is also an alumnus 
of the University of ^Maryland School of ^Medicine. 

Dr. John F. Hogan, class of 1911, P & S and Dr. John F. Hogan, Jr., class of 1947, 
have announced the removal of their offices to 11 East Chase Street, Baltimore 2, 
Mar^'land for the practice of urology. 

Dr. Robert Trace, class of 1952, is currently associated with the department of 
obstetrics and gynecology at Louisiana State University. 

Dr. William P. Keefe, class of 1955, has been recently nominated a Fellow in 
Neurologic Surgery at the Maj'o Clinic. 

Dr. I. William Nachlas and Dr. Jesse N. Borden have announced the association 
of Dr. George H. Greenstein, class of 1950, for the practice of orthopedic surgery at 
819 Park Avenue in Baltimore. 

Dr. Daniel Lewis Stone, class of 1948, has announced the removal of his beach 
office to 420 Lincoln Road, ]\Iiami Beach, Florida and the opening of an additional 
office at 2700 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami, Florida. Dr. Stone limits his practice to 
gynecology and obstetrics. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION HOLDS CHRIST.MAS STUDENT-FACULTY 

RECEPTION 

On December 16, 1955, the Medical Alumni Association sponsored an informal 
Student-Faculty reception which was held at the Church House of Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, Fayette and Greene Streets. 

Started several years ago was one of a continuing series sponsored by the ^ledical 
Alumni Association to foster a closer union between faculty and students. 



POST GRADUATE COMMITTEE SECTION 

POST GRADUATE COMMITTEE, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



HOWARD M. BUBERT, M.D., Chairman and Director 
Elizabeth Carroll, Executive Secretary 

Post Graduate Office : Room 600 

29 South Greene Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

In an effort to keep the physicians of the state apprised of activities at the Univer- 
sity Hospital and School of Medicine, the Postgraduate Committee is in the process 
of compiling a semi annual calendar of events to include the date, time, names of 
speakers and subject. The Committee plans to mail the Calendar to the secretaries 
of the county medical societies and others upon request. Perhaps in the not too distant 
future, this information could be sent direct to all physicians of the state if sufficient 
demand develops. All departments of the school and hospital are urged to assist in 
this efifort by notifying the Postgraduate Committee office of all activities well in 
advance, so that the Calendar might be a complete one. 

We mentioned above that the Calendar was to serve the physicians of the state 
away from the University, but we feel that it will be no less valuable to all on the 
campus who are interested in knowing what is happening where and when. 

A dinner meeting was arranged by Dr. Louis H. Douglass, Counselor of the Post- 
graduate Committee and held at the Wicomico Hotel in Salisbury on January 26. 
The meeting was for the purpose of endeavoring to determine the needs and desires 
of the physicians of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Dr. Stone attended the meeting 
as Dean and Director of Medical Education and Research, and Dr. Howard M. 
Bubert and ^Irs. Elizabeth Carroll represented the Postgraduate Committee. The 
meeting was well attended by an enthusiastic group from the 'shore. 

The Postgraduate Committee has been asked by the Northern Virginia Clinical 
Assembly to present a day-long scientific session on Sunday, April eighth at Alexan- 
dria, Virginia. Those from the University who will participate and their subjects are: 

Dr. Arthur L. Haskins, Pelvic Endometriosis 

Dr. Robert W. Buxton, Portal Hypertension 

Dr. Ephraim T. Lisansky ]„ , -t^. ,^r riri 

r» rv, 1 \' "R 1 • 1- I Comprehensive Diagnosis and Management oi .Med- 

j_jr, V nsrics \ 3.11 i>iiSK.irK r . i t-* i i /-r* i\ 

T^^ ,- . . _ '1 ical Problems (Panel) 

Dr. Benjamin Pope J 

Dr. Samuel Bessman, Significance of the Blood .Ammonia in Liver Disease and 

Other Clinical Conditions 

Dr. Jacob Unesinger, A Psychiatric Problem 

Dr. ]\Iilton R. Stein of Alexandria is Chairman of the meeting. 

The Postgraduate Committee is hopeful of taking, in the very near future, a giant 

step forward by installing a closed circuit television unit. It is hoped that the equip- 

.xlv 



xlvi 



BULLET IX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI XE, U. OF MD. 



menl will be received in lime to be used initially by Dr. Brantigan in leaching Sur- 
gical Anatomy to both undergraduate and postgraduate students. The secretary 
of the Carroll County ^Medical Society asked the Committee to have someone speak 
to the members of the society at their monthly meeting at Westminster in March. 
In accordance with this request, Dr. Howard M. Bubert will speak on Bronchial 
Asthma. In this regard, the Committee is endeavoring to arrange a panel of speakers 
who will make themselves available for county medical society meetings on request. 
The television program "T\'-MD", now in its fifth year over WBAL-TV on Sun- 
day afternoons from 2:30 to 3:00 P.]\I. continues to enjoy wide and enthusiastic 
acclaim from the viewing public. The Committee wishes to thank sincerely all who 
cooperated to make this presentation the success that it is. 




THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

AND 

HOSPITAL PLATES 

Plates of the School of Medicine; the old Hospital and the new Hospital; University of 
Maryland, are available. These white plates are 10 inches in diameter with the design 
printed in black. 

The price is $2.50 each, plus fifty cents insurance and postage in the U. S. A. 
Insurance and postage for foreign mail is one dollar. Please send your order, with check, 
stating the plates desired to Mrs. Bessie M. .\rnurius. Box 123, University Hospital, Bal- 
timore 1, Maryland. 

Checks should be made payable to the Nurses' Ali'mx.\e Associ.a.tion of the Univer- 
sity OF M.^R-iX.\ND. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



Edwakd Steers, President 

School of Medicine 

Baltimore, Md. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY 

Frank A. Dolle Secretary 

School of Pharmacy 

Baltimore, Md. 



F. P. Ferguson 

G. P. Hager 



COUNCILORS 



DoN.\LD E. Shay. Treasurer 

School of Pharmacy 

Baltimore, Md. 



E. J. Herbst 

R. M. BURGISON 



PROCEEDINGS 

of the 
University of Maryland Biological Society 

November 16, 1955. Annual Business ^^leeting. Bressler Library, School of ^Medicine. 
Officers elected for the year 1955-1966 are as follows: 
President— Robert M. N. Crosby, M.D. 
Secretary — Frank A. Dolle, Ph.D. 
Treasurer — Donald E. Shay, Ph.D. 
Councilor- Edward Steers, Ph.D. 
Nominees elected to membership in the Society are as follows: 

1. Ordinary ]\Iembers 

Benjamin Sweet, Ph.D. ^Margaret Hines Sickels, Ph.D. 

Vincent Provenza, Ph.D. Frank D. Vasington, Ph.D. 

Charles W. Foreman, Ph.D. Walle J. H. Nauta, M.B., Ph.D. 
Theodore F. Leveque, Ph.D. 

2. Associate ^Members 

Donald L. Keister, B.S. Henricus G. J. M. Kypers, Ph.D., ^NI.D. 

Elizabeth Heinz, B.A. Roger H. Davidheiser, B.S., ^NI.S. 

Zenas A. McDonald, B.A. 
Following the business meeting Doctor Walle J. H. Nauta, Professor of Anatomy. 
University of Marj^land School of [Medicine, spoke on "An Anatomic Analysis of 
the Fornix System in the Rat Brain". An abstract of the paper is presented herewith. 

An Anatomic Analysis of the Fornix System in the Rat Brain. By Walle J. H. 

Nauta, IM.D., Ph.D., of the Department of Anatomy, University of [Maryland 

School of Medicine and the Department of Neurophysiology, Walter Reed Army 

Institute of Research, Washington, D. C. 

By the aid of a modified Bielschowsky technique suitable for the demonstration 
of degenerating axons, the distribution of efferent hippocampal connections in the 
fornix system was studied in the rat. From all parts of Ammon's horn, fornix libers 

xlvii 



xlviii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

could be followed to the entire extent of the septal nuclei. Precommissural fornix 
fibers extend through the septal region and distribute to the nucleus of the diagonal 
band and the lateral preoptic nucleus. The postcommissural fornix terminates only 
in part in the mammillary body. Immediately behind jMonro's foramen a massive 
fiber group separates itself from the fornix bundle and runs dorsally toward the 
thalamus. This fiber system, already described by Gudden (1880) and 0. Vogt 
(1898) in the rabbit, distributes to the anterior nucleus and to the entire extent of 
the ventral reuniens complex of the thalamus. No hippocampal fibers are contained 
in the stria meduUaris which does, howev^er, receive an important contribution from 
the septal region. A few hippocampal eflferents bypass the mammillary body and end 
in the central grey substance of the midbrain surrounding the anterior orifice of the 
aqueduct. 

The "medial cortico-hypothalamic tract" (Gurdjian) arises in the caudal third of 
the hippocampus and distributes to the rostral half of the periventricular zone of the 
hypothalamus (exclusive of the paraventricular nucleus), including the arcuate 
nucleus, which has been claimed to be involved in the neural mechanism controlling 
ACTH production by the hypophysis. 



Single Copies of 
Bulletin are Available 



Back numbers of many volumes of the Bulletin of the 
School of Medicine are available. 

An inquiry will be promptly acknowledged. Copies in 
stock can be purchased at S2.00 per volume (single 
copies 3-5o) as long as thev last. All issues postpaid. 

Address 

Bulletin of the School of Medicine 
University of Maryland 
Lombard 6c Greene Sts. 
Baltimore i, Maryland 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

THE MEDICAL LIBRARY— PAST Ax\D FUTURE 

IDA MARIAN ROBINSON 

In 1813, the library of the University of Maryland could be found on the book 
shelves of the "Green Room" (then the provost's office, now the dean's office) of the 
medical school building at Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. The library 
consisted of about four hundred volumes bought that year from the estate of Dr. 
John Crawford, former faculty member of the institution. Although the number of 
volumes and their purchase price of five hundred dollars seem a modest beginning, 
this collection was to grow in fame and value per se and to form the basis not only of 
a medical library but in fact of a whole university library system. It is with the medi- 
cal library- — the oldest medical college library in the United States to remain con- 
tinuously in existence — that we are here concerned, and with its surroundings, from 
the 15 by 24 foot Green Room of 1813 to the 97 by 170 foot three-story library 
building of 1958. 

From lack of funds and other problems, the growth of the medical library was 
slow in the first century of its existence. It continued to be housed in various parts 
of the original building until 1913, when a 75 year old church building directly across 
the street became available because it was considered no longer structurally adequate 
for the congregation. The University of ^Maryland bought the building, placed a 
desk on the pulpit rostrum and book cases around the room; converted the choir 
loft to a balcony, eventually added side balconies, heavy wooden bookstacks and 
some discarded laboratory tables. Voila — a library building! 

In this building, under the direction of a single librarian, were placed the assorted 
book collections of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, law, and commerce. Law and 
commerce soon found their way out, as too disparate from the medical sciences. 
Later when the dentistry and pharmacy schools went into buildings of their own, 
each drew out its book collection, leaving only medicine in the building labelled 
"Davidge Hall, University of Maryland Library." The medical book collection gradu- 
ally grew large enough to recjuire the entire building (in the earlier years the balcony 
rooms had been used for faculty offices, the ground floor for activities varying from 
an R.O.T.C. mess-hall to a pediatrics clinic). The book collection, in fact, eventually 
grew to proportions large enough to need two buildings of the size at hand, but con- 
tinued to be contained to the bursting point in one. Such expedients as sending 
several thousand volumes to storage to gain shelf space for another year or two 
were necessary. 

While the medical collection was growing in Davidge Hall, the libraries of den- 
tistry and pharmacy were increasing independently in their new quarters across the 
corner of Lombard and Greene. A library was organized for the School of Nursing, 
in its building, and joined the growth of the other medical sciences. Because, in- 
creasingly with modern developments, each of the health sciences overlaps and reaches 
over into the others, it gradually became evident that coordination was desirable. 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 




RfCL-nl \i(.-\\ 1)1 Davidge Hall soon to be demolished for new Lihran' Building 



The library collections of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing were placed 
under one administration more than a dozen years ago, though continuing in separate 
quarters, perforce. The growth of the book collection and increased services in each 
unit soon made unanimous the need for more space, a need which had grown from 
acute to desperate in the past decade. Now the changes come full circle: medicine, 
dentistry, pharmacy, combined in 1913, separated later, will once more be united 
(with nursing added) in a new library building to be completed in 1958. 

In March of 1956 the legislature appropriated SI, 126, 840 for constructing a library 
of medical sciences. Since the only feasible site is the southeast corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, two buildings adjoining the present medical library on Lombard 
Street and one on Greene have been purchased; the four buildings will be razed to 
provide the needed space for the library. With allowance for a tive-foot "lawn" on 
the north and west sides, the new building itself will cover 97 feet on Lombard and 
170 feet on Greene Street, rising three stories in height in addition to underground 
space for utilities. Its structure will permit addition of another floor of book stacks 
in the future, although the original stacks will have a capacity estimated to be ade- 
quate for many years. 

The building has been planned from the inside out, as library buildings should be, 
with maximum attention to interior function and flexibility from the library's point 
of view, not merely from the architect's. The card catalog area will be at the center 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION iii 

of the first tloor, with circulation desk, reading rooms, technical services, and ad- 
ministrative offices near this center of activity. Book stacks will occupy part of each 
floor, though not in ec|ual proportions. 

Surrounding each floor of stacks will be individual study carrels (accent on the first 
syllable of carrels, please I) and group study rooms, providing about half the total 
seating of the library. The other half will be in two large reading rooms on the tirst 
floor (reference room and periodicals room) and in other special rooms of varying 
size. For example, just inside the entrance, a comfortable room with easy chairs and 
lounge furniture will provide newspapers, popular magazines, and books for non- 
technical and recreational reading. The archives room and the expansive historical 
room on the second floor will contain the library's Maryland source material and its 
historical and special collections, with comfortable seating areas throughout. 

So that students may study together in small groups, the group study rooms 
already referred to will be available on the second floor. Each of these rooms will 
have a study table, four or five chairs, and a blackboard on the wall (for those ana- 
tomic drawings and chemical formulas I). 

Faculty members have not been forgotten in the planning of studies. On the ground 
floor, there will be a series of research studies to be assigned to individual faculty 
members or departments. A separate entrance to these rooms will permit them to be 
occupied (with a system of keys, of course) during hours when the library is closed. 
Library material checked out to the studies should greatly facilitate bibliographic 
research extending over indefinite periods. It is regrettable that the original number 
of these rooms had to be reduced by more than half when the administration decided 
to lake over the north end of the ground floor as an auditorium for the temporary 
use of the schools (during the years until an auditorium is built elsewhere on the 
Baltimore campus). If there prove to be too few studies to meet the demand, please 
remember, faculty members, that the library tried to provide adequately for you. 

Also on the ground floor, accessible from the outside entrance, will be a reading 
room for the School of Special and Continuation Studies, where books from the 
university library will be deposited for local use. This arrangement also is to be 
considered not permanent, and is recognized, at present, as a needed library service. 
It will be maintained entirely separately from the librar}- services of the medical 
sciences. 

On the same floor, within the main library area, will be a series of rooms to provide 
services which have never been possible in the present library's inadeciuate building. 
This grouj) will offer a place for the development of a medical motion picture collec- 
tion, a room for medical recordings, ecjuipment for various forms of photoduplication, 
and other audio-visual services needed in the modern library. 

Present day library furnishings and ecjuipment are pleasantly changed from the 
(lark, heavy fittings so long associated with libraries. Light, even gay, colors will be 
used in decoration of the new building, with furniture which combines proper func- 
tion, comfort, and attracti\-eness. In reading rooms, easy chairs and lounge furniture 
will be interspersed with the more traditional study tables. Air conditioning through- 
out the building, smoking areas on each floor, automatic elevators, and other con- 
veniences will make library patrons wonder how the\' managed in old I^avidge Hall. 



iv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The new buiklinj,' will be one probably not conceivable lo the imagination of Dr. 
Cordell, our distinguished medical librarian and historian al the end of the nineteenth 
century when the library was in Chemical Hall. It would hardly have been believable, 
either, to Mrs. Briscoe during the earlier part of her thirty-two years as medical 
librarian in Davidge Hall, though she lived long enough to share the dream of the 
new building. She enjoyed, in fact, comparing the years when she maintained the 
entire library on one Hoot of Davidge Hall, with the assistance of one student, to the 
future years which would see a tine new library with a staff of fifteen or more and 
many specialized services. 

Davidge Hall will have to make way for a much needed evidence of progress.* 
But at the same time we welcome the new, we shall feel a pang for the old building, 
its intangible appeal, its memories. To alumni who may be remembering nostal- 
gically, we should like to say, however, that it will be the same library in the new 
building, for library is basically spirit and service. We hope to carry the same spirit 
to more adequate surroundings, and to receive from our alumni the same evidences 
of interest and regard for the library which they have shown for Davidge Hall. 

FACULTY AND ALUMNI HONOR DR. SPENCER 

Hugh R. Spencer Day Held Saturday, April 28, 1956 

Under the auspices of a special Faculty-Alumni Committee, Dr. Hugh R. Spencer, 
retiring Professor of Pathology in the School of Medicine, was honored on April 28, 
as more than 200 students and faculty gathered for scientitic sessions and a testi- 
monial dinner in his honor. 

After a brief reception in Dr. Spencer's ofiice. Dr. Stanley E. Bradley, a member of 
the class of 1938 and currently Associate Professor of ^ledicine at Columbia Uni- 
versity, spoke as a guest of the faculty at the interdepartmental seminar in Gordon 
Wilson Hall. A special article was contributed by Dr. Bradley which is published in 
the April, 1956 Bulletin. 

This Scientific session was followed by an informal luncheon at the University 
Hospital and by a formal testimonial dinner at the Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel that 
evening. A portrait of Dr. Spencer painted by ]\Ir. Stanislav Rembski was presented 
to the School of Medicine and was accepted for the School by Dr. William S. Stone, 
Dean. 

Dr. Charles Reid Edwards served as Toastmaster and Dr. Walter D. Wise was 
the principal speaker. The portrait was unveiled by ^liss Kathryn Elliott Bailey, 
daughter of Dr. and ^Irs. Carl E. Bailey and a niece of Dr. Spencer. 

Funds contributed by friends and former students were used to defray the cost of 
the portrait, the additional money is being used for the purpose of creating a "Hugh 
R. Spencer Student Loan Fund". Dr. Spencer will retire officially from his post July 
1, 1956. 

FIFTH ANNUAL PEDIATRIC SEMINAR 

The Department of Pediatrics of the School of Medicine presents its Fifth Annual 
Pediatric Seminar on Sunday, April 8, 1956. Dr. J. Edmund Bradley, Professor of 

* A future issue of the Bulletin will show pictures of the new library building plans, and will dis- 
cuss the temj)orary quarters to be occupied during the construction period. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 




Miss Kathr\n Bailey unveils jjortrait of Dr. Hugh R. Spencer 
1. to r. — Dr. Spencer, Miss Bailey and Mr. Stanislav Remhski 
01(1 Grads present Dr. Spencer with commemorative tray. Members of former baskell)all team 
honor former manager and coach. Dr. Spencer receives testimonial silver tray from Dr. Austin H. 
Wood. 



vi BVLLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI \E, C. OF MI). 

Pediatrics presided and Dr. Samuel S. (llirk, Assislanl Professor of Pediatrics served 
as moderator. The program included Dr. Edward B. I). Xeuhauser who spoke on 
Pediatric-Roentgenologic Problems; Dr. Horace L. Hodes who spoke on Recent De- 
velopments in Treatment of Infectious Diseases and Dr. Irving J. Wolman who spoke 
on The Practitioner and Hematologic Diseases of Infants and Children. Dr. Meredith 
F. Campbell spoke on Urologic Problems Frequently Encountered in Children. Dr. 
Harold E. Harrison, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Hospital 
served as moderator for the second portion of the program. 

The Committee on Arrangements included Drs. Frederick J. Heldrich, Jr., William 
.M. Seabold and Samuel S. Glick, Chairman. 

DR. KIPNIS APPOINTED JOHN AND MARY R. MARKLE FELLOW 

To Conduct Endocrine Research 

Dr. David W. Kipnis, a member of the class of 1951 and recently appointed Markle 
scholar in medical science at the University of Maryland, was one of 23 members of 
the medical school faculties in the United States and Canada to receive Markle 
I'\)undation appointments. 

The fund, providing for a total of 830,000 toward the support of the scholar will 
be granted at the rate of 86,000 annually for 5 years. Scholars were selected from 49 
candidates nominated by deans of medical schools. In his letter of nomination, Dr. 
William S. Stone of the School of Medicine outlined the L^niversity's plans for Dr. 
Kifinis. He said "Following his return from W'ashington University, Dr. Kipnis will 
assume the rank of associate in medicine and director of the Metabolic Research 
Laboratory. In addition to his laboratory responsibilies he will teach medical stu- 
dents, house ofHicers and fellows in problems of endocrinology." Dr. Kipnis will also 
render consultative service to the department of medicine, will partipate in post- 
graduate programs and will conduct his personal research. Current plans also include 
a relocation of laboratory space in the Bressler Building to enable Dr. Kipnis to 
carry out researches on chemical, enzymatic and hormone determinations. 

A former resident in medicine at the University Hospital, Dr. Kipnis is currently 
-American College of Physicians Research Fellow under Dr. Carl Cori in the Washing- 
ton University School of Medicine Department of Biochemistry. 

DR. HELLIER SPEAKS AT DERMATOLOGY SE.MINAR 

Dr. Francis F. Hellier, senior lecturer in dermatology at Leeds L^niversity 
visited the School of Medicine on May 29, 1956. 

SESQUICENTENNIAL PR0(;RESS 

Preliminary j)lans as announced in a previous edition of the Bulletin have received 
faculty approval and during the remainder of 1956 faculty committees will be at 
work developing in realistic form the program for the Ses(|uicentennial Year, 1957. 
l'"urther details will be published in forthcoming Bulletins. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION vii 

FACULTY ME.MBERS ACTRE IX SOUTHEASTERX 
SURGIC.\L COXGRESS 

At the Richmond Assembly of the Southeastern Surgical Congress held from 
March 12-15, 1956, Dr. William L. Garlick, Dr. George H. Yeager, Dr. Daniel 
J. Pessagno each presented papers. 

CATALOGUE XO\V A PART OF BULLETLX 

Since July. 1^>55. the Catalogue of the School of Medicine has been listed as a 
part of the Bulletin. However, the pagination is quite different and the folio for 
binding the Bulletin still consists of a sequence beginning with the January* number 
and ending with the October number excluding the September number which is the 
Catalogue and which carries different pagination. 

Attention is called to this change in order that the binding of the Bulletin which 
still consists of 4 scientific issues, will not be subject to confusion through the in- 
clusion of the Catalogue of the School of Medicine as an integral part of the publica- 
tion. The Catalogue has no direct representation in the folio. 

CORRECTIOX 

On page 10. Bulletin of the School of Medicine, \'olume 41, number 1, the sentence 
"standing in front of the globe is Kelly, and to the extreme right is Halstead" is 
incorrect. This should read "standing in front of the globe is Halstead and to the 
e.xtreme right is Kelly". 

On page 12, the word "tenaculum" is misspelled. The Bulletin regrets the error. 

MEDICAL LIBRARY NOTES 

The following personal donors presented gifts of books and journals to the library 
between Februar}- 1 and May 1: 

Mr. John D. Adams Dr. ^laurice C. Pincoffs 

Dr. RajTTiond ^NI. Burgison ^Ir. Louis M. Rabinowitz 
Dr. Wylie M. Faw, Jr. in memor\- of Dr. Howard F. Raskin 

Dr. E. J. C. Hildenbrand Dr. Milton S. Sacks 

Dr. Kurt Glaser Dr. John E. Savage 

Dr. Samuel S. Glick INIiss Grace Shaw 

Dr. Frank W. Hachtel Dr. \Villiam S. Stone 

Dr. Robert J. Hunter Dr. William H. Triplett 

Dr. Arthur M. Kraut Dr. John A. Wagner 

Dr. Hideo Moriyama Dr. Charles H. Williams 

Dr. Robert T. Parker Dr. H. Boyd Wylie 

Dr. .Arthur M. Kraut of the class of 1923 and Dr. .\. Frank Thompson, Jr. of 
the class of 1940 each contributed generous checks to the library', to be used for 
additions to the book collection or other library needs. This seems to have become 
a habit with these two alumni, for their gifts are a repetition from past years. Such 
checks are deposited in the Ruth Lee Briscoe Library I'uml for use as indicated. 



viii BLLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXK. f. OF MD. 

MERCY HOSPITAL SECTION 

Ai the Quarterly Staff Meeting held December \?>, 1955, officers of the Mercy 
Hospital Medical Staff were appointed for the coming year. They are: Dr. Howard 
L. Zupnik. President; Dr. J. Emmet t Queen, \'ice-President ; Dr. Harold P. Biehl, 
Secretary. 

The Annual Convention of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology 
was held December 12 13-14 at the Conrad Hilton Hotel in Chicago. ^lercy was 
represented by Dr. Henry ^IcB. Beck, Dr. William J. Rysanek, Jr., and Dr. Vincent 
de Paul Fitzpatrick, who led a round table discussion on "Anticoagulant Therapy" 
in Obstetrics. 

The monthly meeting of the Pathology Section of the Baltimore City Medical 
Society was held at IMercy Hospital on ^Monday, February 20th. Mercy's Pathology 
Staff prepared the following scientific program: "Extra-adrenal Pheochromocytoma" 
— A Case Report, presented by George H. Beck, M.D., Sr. Assistant Resident in 
Mercy; Statistical Survey — "D & C's and Cervical Biopsies for one year" — C. G. 
Warner, M.D., Chief of Pathology at Mercy; "Porphyuria-Hepatica and Peri- 
arteritis" — Jacingo Gochoco, M.D., Resident in Pathology at Mercy. 

Dr. Frank K. Morris, Chief of Gynecology, and Dr. William L. Garlick, Chief of 
Thoracic Surgery, attended the 52nd Annual Congress on ^Medical Education and 
Licensure, held at the Palmer House, Chicago, Illinois, from February 11-14, 1956. 
Dr. ]\Iorris is a member of the ^laryland State Board of Medical Examiners, and 
Dr. Garlick is Chairman of the Graduate Training Committee of Mercy Hospital. 

Dr. John S. Haines, active member of the Urological Visiting Staff was recently 
appointed to succeed Dr. Legge as Chief of Urology. (Dr. Legge's Obituary- appears 
elsewhere in the Bulletin — Ed.) 

NEW HOSPITAL BUILDIXG PLANNED 

Sister Mary Thomas, R.S.^L, Administrator, has announced initiation of measures 
directed toward erection of a new hospital building. The new structure will occupy a 
site, purchased recently from the City, facing Preston Gardens on St. Paul Place, 
inmiediately in back of the present building. 

The new unit will be designed to provide more modern ancillary facilities and to 
increase total bed capacity. "We know that Doctors and Students will welcome the 
greater efficiency and convenience to be afforded by the new building, "Sister Mary 
Thomas commented. "It will incorporate every advancement of modern medical 
science, architecture, and engineering, and will be a valuable addition to the health 
needs of the Baltimore area." 

NEWS IN ARTHRITIS 

Doctor Henry J. L. Marriott, Chief of the Department of Electrocardiography 
at Mercy, was recently appointed Head of the newl}- organized Division of Arthritis 
at the University Hospital. 

An Arthritis Out-Patient Clinic under the direction of Dr. Joseph E. Furnari has 
recently been started at Mercy. Dr. Furnari is Assistant Director of the Medical 
Out-Patient Department at the University Hospital, and is also a member of the 
Division of Arthritis at the University. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION ix 

May 1st at Mercy Hospital, Dr. Leon A. Kochman was guest speaker at the weekly 
medical seminar. A movie on "Office Alanagement and Diagnosis of Arthritis" was 
followed by a discussion on Arthritis. 

Drs. Kochman, Furnari and ]\Iarriott together attended the annual meeting of 
the New York Rheumatism Association at the New York Hospital, Cornell Medical 
Center, in April. 

MERCY HOSPITAL DOCTOR GUEST SPEAKER 

In Minneapolis, May 7-12, the University of Minnesota offered a postgraduate 
course in Electrocardiography and invited Dr. Henry J. L. Marriott to join their 
Faculty for the occasion. On Tuesday May 8 Dr. Marriott spoke on "The Incidence 
of the \'arious Heart Blocks with Special Reference to Conduction Disturbances 
within the Atria," and on May 9 he lectured on "Interactions between Atria and 
\'entricles during Complete A-\' Block or Dissociation." Dr. Marriott also con- 
ducted afternoon seminar discussions on those days. 

ABSTRACTS OF CURRENT RESEARCH BY THE 
FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Hydroxyzine Diiiydrochloride (At.vr.ax®) in Derm.\tologic Therapy* 

Hydroxyzine dihydrochloride is an ataractic drug which produces a state of re- 
laxation and relief from tension. The authors used this compound in the treatment of 
159 patients with various dermatoses in which emotional stress is thought to be a 
factor. Three types of evaluation were used: 1 — subjective, using the patients state- 
ments; 2 — objective, in which the investigators attempted to evaluate the physical 
improvement and 3 — comparative study with other sedative and sedative stimulant 
mixtures. Subjective evaluation led to the conclusion that the ataractic effect was 
satisfactory in 132 patients. The adverse reactions were mild and consisted of sleep- 
iness and slight headache in several patients. Objective evaluation led to the con- 
clusion that the use of Hydroxyzine dihydrochloride was valuable adjunctive therapy 
in the treatment of patients with dermatoses in which emotional tension is a factor. 
Comparative studies led to the conclusion that Hydro.xyzine dihydrochloride pro- 
duces as satisfactory an ataractic effect as other tranquilizers presently available. 

Selenium Sulfide in the Tre.atment of Tine.\ Versicolor t 

Tinea versicolor is a benign, non-contagious superficial fungus infection of the skin 
caused by microsporum furfur. Prior to this study there was no specific treatment 
for this condition. During the course of clinical and laboratory investigation of fungi- 
cides, the authors treated 32 i)atients with tinea versicolor using one per cent selenium 
sulfide in a water miscible ointment base. Involution of the lesions occurred promptly 
in twenty-eight patients and no recurrence of the eruption was noted after one year 
of observation. The other four patients did not return for post-treatment examina- 

* Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D.; Raymond C". V. Robinson, M.D. and John V. Slrahan, .M.D. 

This project was sponsored by a grant-in-aid from the Charles Pfizer comj^any. 

t Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D. and Stanley N. Yaffe, M.D. 

This study was sponsored In- a grant-in-aid from the Abbott Laboratories. 



X BVLLETIX OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICI AE, U. OF MD 

tions. Xo adverse reactions were encountered in this study. One per cent selenium 
sulfide ointment proved an efficacious method for the treatment of tinea versicolor 

Physiology and Treatment of Myxedema* 

Deficiency of the thyroid hormone in man results in a retardation of many bodily 
functions and metabolic processes. Despite e.xtensive studies, both in man and in 
animals, which have delineated and defined some of the metabolic aberrations oc- 
curring in myxedema, the exact nature and mechanisms of action of the thyroid 
hormone remain unidentified. 

The diagnosis of myxedema is established by recognition of the symptoms and 
physical manifestations which result from lack of thyroid hormone as well as by 
several ancillary laboratory procedures. Myxedema most often results from ablation 
or spontaneous idiopathic atrophy of the thyroid, although other specific mecha- 
nisms may lead to failure of production of thyroid hormone. 

The treatment of thyroid deficiency consists of hormonal replacement theraj)y witii 
desiccated thyroid, thyroxine or triiodothyronine. Administration of one of these 
preparations daily in adequate dosage restores the patient to an apparently normal 
metabolic status. These medications are effective when administered orally. The 
results of therapy are gratifying. 

Atrioventricular Synchronization and AccRocHAc.E.f (Circulation (in press). 

Complete heart block implies an absolute independence between atria and ven- 
tricles which does not in fact always exist. Segers showed that, after complete block 
was artificially produced in the frog's heart, atria and ventricles would sometimes 
begin to beat exactly in phase, most commonly in a two to one ratio. He subsequently 
reported one clinical example of two to one A-V synchronization in a patient with 
complete heart block. Two further cases which may illustrate different varieties of 
synchronization are here presented. 

* Samuel P. Asper, Jr., M.D. and John G. Wiswell, M.D. From the De])artment of Medicine, 
the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Ho])kins Hospital and the Depart- 
ment of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Baltimore City Hosjiitals. 

This work was supported in part by the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases 
of the National Institutes of Health, U. S. Public Health Service, and in jiart by the Maryland 
Division of the American Cancer Society. 

t Marriott, Henry J. L., Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Maryland School of 
Medicine; Chief of Electrocardiograph Dejiartment, Mercy Hospital. Haltimore, Maryland. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY 

Cdvvard Steers, President Frank A. Dolle Secretary Donald K. S:iay. Trmsiirrr 

School of Medicine School of Pharmacy School of Pharmacy 

Baltimore, Md. Baltimore, Md. Baltimore, Md. 

COUNCILORS 

F. P. Ferguson E. J. Herbst 

G. P. Hager R. M. Burgison 



PKOCEEDINCJS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
lUOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

January 11, 1056. Rressler Library 

"Applicalion of Physiologic Principles to Cardiac Surgery" by R. Adams Cowley, 
M.D., Director, Cardio-Pulmonary Physiology Laboratory, School of Medicine. 

(See abstract) 

March 7, 1056. Hressler Library 

"Vitamin ]ii> Blood Levels in Leukaemia" by Ciovanni Raccuglia, Division of 
Hematology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine. 

April 11, 1056. Bressler Library 

"Clinical and Laboratory Studies on Vagal Activity in Cardiac Disease" by Sidney 
Schcrlis, ALD., Department of Medicine, and R. Adams Cowley, M.I)., Cardio- 
pulmonary Physiology Laboratory, School of Medicine. (See abstract) 

May 17, 1056. Dinner Meeting in the Private Dining Room of the Friendship Inter- 
national Airport. Members of the Baltimore Branch of the Society of the Sigma 
Xi were special guests of the Biological Society at this meeting. 

"Studies of a .Minimum Orbital Unmanned Satellite of the Earth (MOUSE)", 
by S. F. Singer, I*h.D. .'Xssociate Professor, Department of Physics, Universit}' 
of Maryland, College Park, .Md. (See abstract) 

ABSTRACTS 

Ai'Pi.icATio.x OF Piivsioioc.u' PKi xcii'i.ics TO Cakdiac Sukc.ivR V. * bv R. .Adams 
Cowley, ALD., Director, Cardio-Pulmonary Physiology Laboralorw School of 
Medicine, I'niversity of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 
A motion picture lilmf was presented on intra-cardiac- surger>- whii h dest ribed ilie 

* I'resenlid Jaiiu;ir\- 11. 1M,S6. 

t This film was produced by Dr. R. .Vdams Co\vle>- and Dr. Leonard Scherlis with the technical 
assistance of the Dei)arlmenl of .\rl, School of Medicine. 



xii BVLLETiy OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICiyR. i'. OF .VD. 

diagnostic instruments available and showed how these instruments are used in pre- 
paring a patient for surgery. Two patients were presented; one with mitral stenosis, 
an acquired heart lesion; the other with pulmonic stenosis, a congenital heart lesion. 
The patients are taken through the various diagnostic procedures and then operated 
upon. During the sequence showing the operations, diagrams and drawings are inter- 
jected to demonstrate the operative technique and the instruments used. Following 
the film, the techniques and uses of hypothermia in cases now undergoing open 
cardiac surgery at University Hospital were described. 

Clinical .\nd L.abor.a.tory Studies ox \'ag.\l Activity ix Cardiac Disease.* 
by Sidney Scherlis, >\I.D., Department of ^ledicine, and R. Adams Cowley, M.D.. 
Cardio-Pulmonary Physiology Laboratory, School of Medicine. 

Certain clinical observations suggest the importance of dynamic factors in addi- 
tion to atherosclerosis in angina pectoris and coronary occlusion: the easier pre- 
cipitation of angina by exercise in cold weather, after eating, by a large meal alone; 
the apparent relationship between gallbladder disease, coronary occlusion and angina; 
the precipitation of angina by excitement alone; the background of increased emo- 
tional tension in a patient with coronary occlusion; the variability in ease of pre- 
cipitation of angina; the ''premonitory symptoms" in the majority of patients with 
coronary occlusion, etc. Neurogenic factors were investigated in anesthetized open- 
chest dogs. Stimulation of the left main vagus and its branches produced various 
arrhythmias. However, stimulation of the cardiac branch of the left vagus produced 
striking electrocardiographic changes strongly resembling those of acute coronary 
occlusion in humans. This effect was localized to stimulation of the distal portions 
of these nerves. Stimulation of the stellate ganglion produced changes strongly re- 
sembling coronary insufficiency in humans. The changes produced by cardiovagal 
stimulation were reproduced several weeks after stellate ganglionectomy; but could 
not be produced by similar stimulation several weeks after the left main vagus nerve 
was severed. These studies would indicate that vagal stimulation is responsible for 
the results obtained experimentally. Clinically it suggests that vagal factors may be 
noxious for patients with pre-existing atherosclerosis, perhaps by inducing coronary 
artery spasm. Studies on coronary circulation in these animals under the conditions 
of the experiment are under way, and metabolic studies are planned. 

Studies of a Minimum Orbital Unmanned Satellite of the Earth (MOUSE). f 
By S. F. Singer, Ph.D., Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Md. 

A ]\IOUSE would provide a far-reaching extension of present high altitude rockets 
in the study of the upper atmosphere and extra terrestrial radiations. Lifetimes of 
even a few days and payloads as low as 50 pounds would be adequate to allow con- 
tinuous obser\'ations of the solar ultraviolet and X-radiations which have a profound 
influence on the ionosphere and therefore on radio communications. The cause of 
magnetic storms and aurorae could be established with more certainty. Observations 
of cosmic rays would help clear up the c|uestion of their origin. Warious other astro- 

* Presented b\- Dr. Sidney Scherlis. Aj)ril 11, 1956. 
t Presented May 17, 1956. 



BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY xui 

physical phenomena, such as micrometeorites, could be brought under direct ob- 
servation. Measurement of the earth's albedo (reflected sunlight) would give a 
measure of total world cloud coverage which could be used to predict long term 
climatic changes. Radio transmissions from MOUSE would send back all data and 
allow at the same time a study of the ionosphere. The change in the orbit and the 
lifetime would give information on drag and therefore upper atmosphere densities, 
while observation of a luminous trail of sodium emitted from the satellite would 
allow studies of winds, temperature, and turbulence in the outermost layers of the 
earth's atmosphere. 



POST GRADUATE COMMITTEE SECTION 

POST GRADUATE COMMITTEE, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

HOWARD M. BUBERT, M.D., Cltairman and Director 
Elizabeth Carroll, Executive Secretary 

Post Graduate Office: Room 201 

Old ]\Iedical Building, Lombard and Greene Streets 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION 

An innovation in teaching methods at the medical school was inaugurated with 
the installation by the Postgraduate Committee of a closed circuit television unit. 
Dr. Otto Brantigan was the first to use the new equipment in his surgical anatomy 
class in which he teaches both undergraduate and postgraduate students. The tele- 
vision unit has a two-way speaker system which immeasurably enhances the teaching 
potentialities. This new teaching medium affords the instructor a means for pre- 
senting to large groups of students demonstrations and instruction on minute speci- 
mens which demonstrations heretofore had to be repeated many times to small 
groups. Unquestionably this new acquisition is a boon to both instructor and student. 

NORTHERN VIRGINIA CLINICAL ASSEMBLY 

The Postgraduate Committee presented a scientific program at the Seventh Annual 
Northern \"irginia Clinical Assembly in Arlington, Virginia under the sponsorship 
of the Alexandria, Arlington and Fairfax County Medical Societies on Sunday, 
April 8, 1956. Dr. INIilton R. Stein of Alexandria was chairman of the aflfair, and the 
session was approved for Category I credit by the American Academy of General 
Practice. Those who attended were most lavish in their praise of the whole program 
and Dr. Stein added that the "rvfedical School and Alumni can well be proud of their 
faculty members." 

BASIC SCIENCES AS THEY APPLY TO THE PRACTICE OF 

IVIEDICINE 

The Postgraduate Committee is planning to repeat the course, Basic Sciences as 
as they Apply to the Practice of Medicine in September, 1956 if there is sufficient de- 
mand. It is expected that the course will be given on Wednesday afternoons from 
four to six P.M. and the tuition will be S50.00 as heretofore. Anyone interested in 
taking the course may obtain further information from the Postgraduate Com- 
mittee office. 

TV~:\ID 

On April 29, 1956 the University's weekly telecast T\' — MD ended its fifth year 
on the air. .Mr. .\rnold Wilkes and Mr. Soterios Pappas of WBAL are producer and 



POST GRADIATE SECTION xv 

director respectively, and Dr. E. Roderick Shipley, Chairman of the Audiovisual 
Subcommiltee of the Postgraduate Committee, is professional advisor. The program 
has enjoyed wide popularity with the viewing public and will be resumed in the fall 
at which time appropriate recognition will be given to the celebration of the 150th 

Anniversary of the .Medical School. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

In the last issue of the Bulletin it was stated that the Postgraduate Committee 
was in the process of compiling a semi annual calendar of events. Because Calendar 
material is not available far enough in advance for a semi annual publication, it was 
decided to publish weekly. The Calendar was discontinued after seven issues because 
it was too great a burden on the Postgraduate office staff. It is hoped that it will be 
possible to resume weekly publications of the Calendar in the fall. 

Because the Calendar represents a rather large investment in time and money, 
the Committee would like to know the reaction of those who hav^e seen this publica- 
tion. If, in the opinion of those who have received it, it has value, we would like to 
have that comment so that our future course in this regard can be determined. 
Your help would be very much appreciated. 

FACILITIES FOR RETURNING GRADUATES 

Graduates who have had occasion to return to the campus have, in the past, ex- 
perienced dissatisfaction at the lack of facilities for their convenience. In an effort to 
overcome this verj^ real deficiency, the Postgraduate Committee has arranged a room 
for their use in the Postgraduate Office. There is a public telephone available 
and some current popular magazines. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



ROV GUVTHER, M.D. 



OFFICERS* 
J. Morris Reese, M.D., President 

Vice-I*residents 

Norman E. Sartorius, M.D. 



Bernard Thomas, M.D. 



Edwin H. Stewart, M.D., Secretary Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., Treasurer 

J. Emmett Queen, M.D., Assistant Secretary Minette E. Scott, Executive Secretary 

William H. Tkiplett, M.D., Director 



Board of Directors 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., 

Chairman 
J. Morris Reese, M.D. 
Edwin H. Stewart, Jr., M.D. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., M.D. 
J. Emmett Queen, M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 
J. Sheldon Eastland, M.D 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 



Nominating Committee 

Gibson J. Wells, M.D., 

Chairman 

Emanuel Schimunek, M.D. 
Dexter L. Reimann, M.D. 
Edwin S. Muller, M.D. 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 

Library Committee 

Milton S. Sacks, M.D. 



July 1, 1955 to June 30. 1956 



Representatives to General 
Alumni Board 

Thurston R. Adams, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Representatives, Editorial 
Board. Bulletin 

Harry C. Hull, M.D. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 



DEAN'S LETTER 

Dear ^Members of the Alumni and Friends: 

Another school year has been completed and it is time to make a resume of the 
work accomplished and discuss some of the problems remaining to be solved. 

The major problem in the minds of all at the beginning of the school year was that 
of accreditation. We are happy to say that all questions in this regard have been 
erased, and we are happily involved in progressive work that speaks well for the 
future of the School. 

The educational program has undergone considerable moditication towards the 
block system of clinical teaching. Revisions in the curriculum are continuing to be 
made to decrease didactic teaching in favor of small group instruction with student 
participation. 

The Faculty has been reinforced by the addition of new positions and the increase 
in full-time members in key positions. This has allowed more and better planning of 
teaching sessions and more direct student instructor contact. 

Clinical and laboratory teaching areas have been improved and considerable new 
equipment provided. A number of improvements in University Hospital previously 
discussed with you are being accomplished. Construction and renovation projects 
move at a snail's pace due to many channels of approval involved, the slowness of 
architects and the leisure attitude of contractors. Patience and perseverance will 
see us through and University Hospital should then be a much improved teaching 
area. 

We are much encouraged by both the amount and (|uality of research underway. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION xvii 

All departments are now participating and we are pleased to see the increases in 
both clinical investigation and basic research. 

In accordance with general changes taking place in the University, faculty and 
student government has been revised along more democratic lines. The administra- 
tion has been reinforced by the appointments of Dr. Dietrich C. Smith as Associate 
Dean for student affairs, and Dr. Robert T. Parker as Associate Dean primarily in 
charge of curriculum planning and administration. The faculty, under the new By- 
Laws, will have a greater responsibility for educational policy and content of the 
curriculum. 

The School of Medicine is in need of better and more extensive clinical teaching 
areas without requiring students and faculty to spend so much time traveling to and 
from the various affiliated hospitals. In addition, we must plan on an increased en- 
rollment to meet population needs for M.D.'s anticipated by 1970. If the present 
ratio of M.D.'s to numbers of population is to be maintained, medical school classes 
should be increased by one-third by 1960. If this is done, a new basic science build- 
ing, a new out-patient dispensary and a 600 bed addition to the hospital or access to 
such clinical areas in our immediate vicinity must be provided. These anticipated 
needs will require your understanding and support if they are to be obtained in time 
to meet the demands for increasing the enrollment of the University of Maryland, 
School of Medicine. 

Sincerely, 

WiLLi.\M S. Stone, M.D. 

Dean 

ALUMNI DIRECTORY TO APPEAR IN OCTOBER BULLETIN 

The Editorial Staff of the Bulletin in collaboration with the Medical Alumni 
Association will publish in the October or January number of the Bulletin of the 
School of ]\Iedicine a Directory of all active members of the Medical Alumni x\ssocia- 
tion. It is understood that reprints of this Directory will be available for students, 
alumni friends and faculty. The Directory will be designed to include all who are on 
the active rolls as of August 1, 1956. It is anticipated that frequent revisions will 
appear from time to time in order that the list may be kept current. 

OLD PHOTOGRAPHS WANTED 

As the Sesquicentennial Year approaches, the Bulletin of the School of Medicine, 
the general Alumni publications and the student Terra Mariae Medicus will be in a 
position to use a rather large number of important photographs relating to the history 
of the School of Medicine. 

These photographs come from old albums, from testimonial dinners and from 
other events which have formed a living ])art of the complexity of the School of 
]\Iedicine during the past 150 years. Particularly interesting are photographs of 
events and persons taken during the past 50 years. Many of these jihotographs are 
in the hatids of living alumni or their immediate families. 



xviii BVLLETIX OF TIIK SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MI). 

The Hullcliii and olhcr publications of the Tniversity earnestly recjuest the loan 
(or gift ) of such photographs to enrich forthcoming issues during the sesciuicenlennial 
year. Credit will be given and photographs so marked will be promptly returned and 
undamaged. 

All pictures should be mailed to Dr. John A. Wagner, Medical Editor, Bulletin of 
the School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Lombard and Cireene Streets, 
Baltimore 1 Maryland. 

DRRK FOR NEW MEMBERS CONTINUES UNDER LEADERSHIP OF 

DR. TRIPLETT 

The annual campaign to enlist an ever growing and enthusiastic group of alumni 
has again been launched by Dr. William H. Triplet t, Director of the Medical Alumni 
Association. In addressing alumni who have not been active in the Association Dr. 
Triplett called attention to the increasing need for united effort of alumni which, in 
cooperation with the faculty can materially assist in the development of a program 
for a better School of Medicine. The letter sent to the inactive alumni is printed 
herewith. 

'Tt is e.xceedingly regretted to iind that your name does not appear on the rosier 
of membership in this Association. 

It is sincerely hoped the reason is merely one of neglect. It would be distressing 
if found that other factors have influenced your decision to stand aloof. 

If such should prove to be the case it is hoped you will let your grievance be known. 
If the fault lies with us, we want to correct it at once because we are trying to conduct 
Association alTairs in a manner that will merit the interest and support of every 
graduate of our School of Medicine. 

You will no doubt be interested in keeping abreast of what is taking place in the 
counsels and conduct of your Alma Mater. As a member of the Alumni Association 
you would receive the bulletin which is published four times a year and includes in 
its pages a section devoted to progress noted on and about the campus. In addition, 
there will be found scientific articles and reports, many of them original, and dealing 
with work currently in progress here. 

We take the liberty of enclosing a bill for dues which, when signed and returned 
with check in the amount of $6.00, will cause your name to be added to our member- 
ship roster and the Bulletin subscription list. It is hoped your interest will prompt 
your immediate attention. 

We extend you a cordial invitation and shall welcome the opportunity of ac- 
knowledging your affiliation. 

Sincerely, 

William H. Triplett, M.D. 

Director" 



ALU MM ASSOCIATION SECTION 



COST OF BULLETIN RISES 



Because of increased production costs it has been necessary to increase the sub- 
scription price of the Bulletin from $2.00 to $3.00 annually. Coupled with the in- 
creased number of subscriptions and income from advertising, this modest increase 
should provide both for the increased costs of production and for further improve- 
ments in the journal. 

ALUIMNI ASSOCIATION TO HOLD RECEPTION AT SOUTHERN MEDICAL 
ASSOCIATION MEETING IN WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Members of the Medical Alumni Association are informed that the customary 
reception and alumni function will be held in connection with the annual meeting 
of the Southern Medical Association which will be held from November 12-15, 
1956 in Washington, D.C. 

Due notice will be received through the Alumni Offtce. 

ALUMNI DOINGS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

An encouraging experience was enjoyed by a group of our Alumni in North Caro- 
lina when they got together for luncheon during the 102nd Annua! Session of the 
Medical Society of the State of North Carolina. The Stag Room in the Carolina 
Hotel in Pinehurst was the scene of the assembly and it should be noted that the 
space proved to be inadequate to accommodate the entire group. Every seat was 
taken and several persons were turned away. 

Dr. J. B. Anderson, class of 1935, now a surgeon located in Asheville, rendered 
yeoman service as Chairman of the Committee working with the Alumni Office in 
arranging the affair. 

Dean Stone accepted the invitation of the Committee and together with Dr. 
Triplett, Director of the Medical Alumni Association, attended the luncheon and 
shared in the program. There follows a letter received from Dr. Anderson which 
should be of genera! interest. 

May 11, 1956 

Dear Dr. Triplett: 

It was indeed a pleasure to have the privilege of seeing you and Dean Stone at our 
first North Carolina Maryland ]\Iedical x-Mumni .Association at the Stale -Medical 
meetint: at Pinehurst last week, and we are extremely grateful to you for your push 
and guidance in directing us to organize this group. All of the .-Mumni who I talked 
to were very enthusiastic about a future meeting and sincerely ap{)recialed what you 
and Dean Stone had to say. I talked to otliers who said they would be liaj)py to be 
with us ne.xt year. At the {present time we do not know whether our next meeting 
will be in Asheville or at Pinehurst, but in the event that we do not meet in Pine- 
hurst it will be in Asheville, N.C. and we will look forward to having an exiellent 
attendance at our next meeting. 



BULLET IX or THE SCHOOL OF MEDICIXE. C. OF \fD. 
The following alumni were present: 





Name 


Class 


Address 




Hunter Moricle 


1939 


Reidsville, N. C. 




George Silverton 


1932 


Lumbcrton, N. C. 




Loulen R. Hedg])cth 


1935 


I.umberton, N. C. 




R. G. Sowers 


1923 


Sanford, N. C. 




(". W. Barnetl 


1899 


Greensboro, N. C. 




Hen H. Kendall 


1929 


Shelby, N. C. 




James S. Phelps, Jr. 


1952 


Troy, N. C. 




Isaac C. Wright 


1944 


Raleigh, N. C. 




Walter L. Crouch 


1946 


Wilmington, N. C". 




William F. Martiu 


1920 


Charlotte, N. C. 




Edwin L. Seigman 


1941 


Rocky Mount, N. C. 




Roscoe McMillan 


1910 


Red Springs, N. C. 




C. F. Strosnider 


1909 


Goldsboro, N. C. 




D. Allen Tate, Jr. 


1948 


Graham, N. C. 




Everett A. Livingston 


1912 


Gibson, N. C. 




Robert L. Murray 


1923 


Raeford, N. C. 




M. V. Jackson 


1930 


Princeton, N. C. 




Hal J. Wentz 


1946 


Salisbury, N. C. 




G. C. Shinn 


1933 


China Grove, N. C. 




J. F. McGowan 


1929 


Asheville, N. C. 




J. B. Anderson 


1935 


Asheville, N. C. 



Several members of the Alumni Association had to be turned away, some of those 
were Drs. Whittington, Owens, Bonner, Ruth Dodd, Patterson and Baggett. I am 
sure that several others were turned away but we were unable to get their names 
as we did not have adequate space for the meeting. 

Sincerely, 

J. B. Anderson, jM.D. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The distribution to alumni of the University of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine annual Catalogue has been discontinued. Any alumnus desiring a copy 
of the Catalogue may obtain one by making application direct to the Dean's 
Office, 522 West Lombard Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 



ITEMS 

Dr. Raymond C. V. Robinson, class of 1940, has announced tlic removal of his 
downtown offices to 1004 North Calvert Street for the practice of dermatology and 
syphilology. 



OBITUARIES TOO. 

Dr. David Bacharach, class of 1942, has announced the removal of his office to 
the ^Jedical Arts Building, Baltimore 1, Marj-land for the practice of dermatology. 

Dr. Joseph Robert Cowen, class of 1950, currently a member of the staff of the 
Spring (irove State Hospital, is the author of a recently published paper entitled 
"Administrative Economy on a State Hospital Ward", published in the Psychiatric 
Quarterly, October, 1955. 

Dr. Edward Siegel, class of 1938, who is currently engaged in the practice of 
Diseases of the Eye, Xose and Throat in Plattsburg, Xew York, was recently elected 
President of the Clinton County (Xew Yorkj Medical Society. 

Dr. Jacob H. Conn, class of 1929, addressed the York County Medical Society in 
York, Pennsylvania, on "The Histor\' and Practice of Hypnosis" on April 19, 1956. 
He also spoke to the Chicago Society for Clinical Hypnosis on ^lay 2, 1956 and 
discussed "The Use of Light Trance" at the Round Table on Hypnosis during the 
American Psychiatric Association meeting in Chicago on May 3. Dr. Conn was 
speaker at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Dentistr}' for Children in Baltimore 
on May 7. 

Dr. Philip Galitz, class of 1935, has announced the removal of his offices from 
Brooklyn, Xew York to 5794 Bird Road, Miami, Florida where he will be engaged 
in the practice of pediatrics. 

Dr. Henry L. Rigdon, class of 1937, who practices in Florence, South Carolina, 
recently gave a paper entitled "Successful Embryonic Parathyroid Tissues Trans- 
plant for the Treatment of Intractable Post Operative Parathyroid Tetany." 

(J^faituarieg 

Dr. James Bordley, Jr. 

Dr. James Bordley, Jr., class of 1896 and for many years a practicing ophthalmol- 
ogist in Baltimore, died at his home on Januar}' 7, 1956. 

Long active in historical work as well as in the practice of ophthalmology-, Dr. 
Bordley had been granted a national citation by the American Association for State 
and Local Histor>' in recognition of his contributions toward the preservation of 
Mar>-]and antiquities. 

Dr. Charles H. Conley 

Dr. Charles H. Conley, prominent Frederick County practitioner, died at his 
home near I-"rederick on March 21, 1956, aged 80. 

Dr. Conley, long active in social and political affairs of the State of Maryland, was 
a native of Montgomery County. He was educated at the Episcopal High School 
in Ale.xandria and at the University of \'irginia; later taking his medical degree from 
the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1898. 

Dr. Michael J. Griffin 

Dr. Michael J. Griffin, a member of the class of 1907, P & S, died at his home in 
Fall River, Massachusetts on Xovember 13, 1955. 



xxii BILLETIX 01' THE SCIIOOr. OF MEDICIXE, C. Ol- Ml). 

Dr. R. Sumter Griffith 

Dr. R. Sumter (Irinilh, of the class of V & S, 1886, one of the oldest li\-ing aUinini 
of the School of Medicine and one of the oldest physicians in the State of \'irj;inia, 
died in the Waynesboro Community Hospital, Waynesboro, \'irginia on I)ecemi)er 14, 
1955. He was 94. 

Dr. Griffith pacliced medicine in Waynesboro, X'irginia for over 56 years before 
retirin*:; in 1947. For many years Dr. (Iritlith will be remembered as one of the active 
alumni, returning each year for the June week atii\'ities. 

Dr. Emil J. C. Hildenbrand 

Dr. Kniil J. C. Hildenbrand, jirominent Washington surgeon and a mcnibcr of 
the tlass of 1930, died on April 16, 1956 of brain tumor. 

A native of Clay Center, Kansas, Dr. Hildenbrand spent most of his xouih on 
the Eastern Shore of Maryland. A graduate of Washington College, and later of 
the School of Medicine, he served first as an intern at the Marine Hospital in Balti- 
more in 19,^0 and later became assistant resident and subsequently resident at the 
Universit}' Hospital during the years 1933 and 1934. He then entered practice in 
Washington, D. C. becoming active in the fields of industrial, traumatic and vascular 
surgery. Dr. Hildenbrand was among the first physicians to employ ice anesthesia in 
amputation for vascular disease in extremely debilitated persons. In 1949 he was 
honored for meritorious contributions to medical science by the Washington Medical 
and Surgical Society. 

A member of the stafif of Garfield Hospital in Washington, he was also Medical 
Director of the Potomac Electric Power Company and Associate Professor of Clinical 
Surgery at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. He was also physician in 
charge of the tumor and neuro-circulatory clinic at the Georgetown Cniversity 
Hospital. 

Active in civic and philanthropic atTairs, Dr. Hildenbrand for a number of years 
served as a member of the Board of \'isitors and (iovernors of Washington College in 
Chestertown, Maryland. 

Dr. Kenneth D. Legge 

Dr. Kenneth D. Legge, a member of the class of 1917, and Chief of the Department 
of Urology at Mercy Hospital, died suddenly on January 22, 1956 at Palm Beach, 
Florida. A native of Shepherdstown, West Virginia and a graduate of Randolph- 
]Macon ]\lilitary Academy, Dr. Legge was active in the practice of urology until his 
retirement from private practice in 1954. 

.•\ veteran of World War I, he saw service in China and was later a Commander in 
the Naval Reserve in Baltimore. He was a member of the American and Mid-Atlantic 
Urological Societies, the Baltimore City Medical Society and the V\\\ Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. 

Abbitt, John Willis, Portsmouth, \'a.; class of 1910; aged 69; died, Se|)tember 2(), 
1955, of acute coronarN- thrombosis. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION xxiii 

Bordley, James Jr., Haltimore, Md.; class of 18%; aged SI; died, January 7, 
1956. 

Bossyns, Albert Joseph, Baltimore, Md.; class of 189S; aged 81 ; dierl, 0( lober 20, 
1955, of epithelioma and coronary thrombosis. 

Brabham, Vance Wells, Orangeburg, S. ('.; class of 1905; aged 74; died, August 28, 
1955, of porlal c irrhosis. 

Browning, Arthur Wolfe, Klloree, S. ('.; H.M.C., class of 1897; aged 77; died, 
September 28, 1955, of cerebral thrombosis. 

Bryson, Daniel Rice, Hryson ("ity, \. C; class of 1900; aged 79; died, December 
22, 1956, of Parkinsonism. 

Burt, Samuel Perry, Louisburg, .\. ('.; P & S, class of 1896; aged 84; died, October 
14, 1955; of hyjKJStatic j)neumonia and diabetes mellitus. 

Camper, Harry Greene, Welch, W. \'a.; B.M.C.'., class of 1912; aged 69; died, 
I-ebruary 17, 1956, of coronary occlusion. 

Carmine, Walter Mills, Dundalk, Afd.; class of 1907; aged 74; .served during 
World War II; died, October 13, 1955, of coronary occlusion. 

Chesson, Andrew Long, Raleigh, N. C; class of 1936; aged 41; served during 
World War II; drowned in Chesapeake Bay, North Beach, Md., August 12, 1955. 

Collins, Martin Slaughter, Si)ringlie]d, O.; B.]\I.C., class of 1908; aged 75; died, 
January 18, 1956, of acute coronary occlusion. 

Garland, Robert B., Hartford, Conn.; P. & S, class of 1913; aged 72; died, De- 
cember 11, 1955, of coronary thrombosis and hypertension. 

Garner, John Elmo, Thomaston, Ga.; B.M.C., class of 1903; aged 75; died, Jan- 
uary 2?), 1956, of jmlmonary emboli and coronary insullficiency. 

Gwynn, George Humphrey, Tallahassee, Fla.; class of 191 6; aged 63; served during 
World War II; died, January 28, 1956, of cancer of the lungs. 

Hartt, Percy Perley, Baltimore, Md.; P & S, class of 1913; aged 67; died, October 
24, 1955, of myocarditis. 

Harvey, Edward Regis, Seymour, Conn.; B.M.C., class of 1909; aged 70; died, 
November 5, 1955, of coronary occlusion and myocardial infarction. 

Holmes, Colin McLean, Springfield, Mass.; P & S, class of 1915; aged 68; died, 
August 10, 1955, of adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid. 

Hood, William Andrew, Hickory (irove, S. C.; P & S, class of 1889, aged 86; died, 
October 4, 1955, of arteriosclerosis. 

Keim, William W., Davidsviile, Pa.; B.M.C., class of 1905; aged 76; died, .\ugust 
7, 1955, of chronic fibrous pancreatitis. 

Kennedy, George Walter, Sharon, Pa.; B.M.C., class of 1897; aged 86; died, 
September 10, 1955, of arteriosclerosis. 

Kerr, James Purdy, Pittsburgh, Pa.; class of 1888; aged 91; died, September 9, 
1955, of arteriosclerotic heart disease. 

LaBarre, Louis Charles, .\llento\vn, Pa.; class of 1908; aged 72; died, N'cnember 19, 
19.S5. 

Landers, Arthur E., Reno, Nev.; class of 1907; aged 77; died, Octol>er 11, 1955, of 
cardiac decompensation and arteriosclerotic heart disease. 

Lewis, Morley Brown, Sag Harbor, N. Y.; B.M.C., class of 1896; aged 86; died, 
December 3, 1955, of lymi)hatic leukemia. 



xxiv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OT MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 

MacMillan, Hugh Allan, Long Beach, Calif.; P & S, class of 1910; aged 1^; served 
during World War II; died December 10, 1955, of heart block. 

Mason, Frank Ebaugh, East on, Md.; class of 1917; aged 62; served during World 
\\'ar I; died, X()veml)er 20, 1955. 

McBee, Thomas Judson, Morgantown, W. Va.; P & S, class of 1905; aged 75; 
served during \\ Orld War I; died, October 28, 1955, of chronic nephritis. 

Moore, Loyal Hamilton, McAlien, Texas; P & S, class of 1910; aged 72; died, July 
8, 1955, of coronary thrombosis. 

Morrissey, Michael Joseph, Hartford, Conn.; P & S, class of 1897; aged 79; died, 
December 14, 1955, of coronary sclerosis, lobular pneumonitis, nephrosclerosis and 
carcinoma of the prostate. 

Neistadt, Charles Simon, Baltimore, Md.; class of 1913; aged 64; died, January 11, 
1956, of myocardial infarction and arteriosclerotic heart disease. 

Osburn, John Nelson Neill, Balboa, Calif.; class of 1909; aged 69; died, October 
11, 1955, of cerebrovascular accident. 

Pearlstein, Phillip, Peekskill, N. Y.; class of 1912; aged 75; died, October 4, 1955, 
of acute coronary occlusion. 

Rogers, Oscar Leslie, Sandersville, Ga.; class of 1897; aged 81; died, January 9, 
1956, of congestive heart disease and pneumonia. 

Van Kirk, Asher W., Seattle, Wash.; P & S, class of 1907; aged 73; served during 
World War I; died, October 19, 1955. 

Zepp, Herbert Elmo, Baltimore, Md.; class of 1904; aged 76; died, December 2, 
1955, of cerebral hemorrhage and arteriosclerosis. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION 

THE COLLECTION OF CLASSICS OF THE ANATOMICAL 

LITERATURE IN THE LIBRARY OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY* 

By EDUARD UHLENHUTH, Ph.D. 

Since our Universities are the centers and the source of our cultural and intellectual 
life, they should also be the keepers of the documents in which are deposited the 
thoughts and ideas from which sprang the movements which have shaped our present 
standards of culture and civilization. I believe these were the thoughts which moti- 
vated in the first place my plan to collect for our Department of Anatomy a library 
not only of modern anatomical works but also of such works which would give the 
students an insight into the gradual development of our present anatomical knowl- 
edge. 

When I first came to our School in 1925, the only precious books which we pos- 
sessed were those of the Crawford Collection of our general Medical Library. These 
were, however, not suitable and not sufficient to teach the history of anatomy to the 
students. The Department of Anatomy possessed no library. As the department had 
no funds from which to buy books, I had at my disposal only the books which I 
brought with me and the complimentary copies which I received from the publishers. 

The First Book of the Collection 

One exception, however, deserves to be recorded; there was a very valuable and 
precious book in the department; I found it under the most peculiar circumstances. 
In those days my abode was the second floor of the old medical building, right above 
the office of Dr. Rowland, who was then our Dean. However, when I took over this 
place, the space where my office was to be was not yet accessible, as it was filled with 
old rubbish, furniture and boxes, the latter having served for old discarded skeletal 
material. One of the boxes, a very large one, was placed way in the back against a 
wall in which was hidden the water-conduit. One of these pipes was leaking and when 
we finally got to the box we found that the water had been leaking into it. After we 
had removed all the bones, we found lying on the bottom of the box a folio volume 
partly soaked with water. L'pon closer inspection this volume proved to be Johannis 
Gottlieb Walter^s "Tabulae Nervorum Thoracis et Abdominis", 1783, containing the 
most beautiful folio illustrations of the autonomic nerves of the thoracic and ab- 
dominal viscera; a thorough restoration resurrected its original beauty making it a 
permanent part of our collection. I treasure it particularly highly as it was the first 
item of our library of "anatomic classics". 

The Medical Freshmen, First Donators of Medical Books 

Since in those days there were no funds either in the medical library or in the 
Department of Anatomy for buying books on anatomy, I devised a scheme, as the 

* A Report to the Dean, Dr. William S. Stone; to my successor Dr. Frank H. J. Figge, to the 
Faculty, to our Alumni and to the Students. 



ii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

students of the second class I taught at the University will remember, from which I 
expected some help. I entered into an agreement with the students that we should 
buy wholesale directly from the publishers the books needed in the course and use 
the discount which the publishers allowed us, to buy books. The class appointed a 
committee to handle the finances and we made enough money to buy two works, 
Mollier's "Plastische Anatomic, 1924", containing the most instructive illustrations 
of muscle mechanics, and Friedrich MerkeVs "Anatomic des jNIuschen, 1913/27", 
which was to inform me about the method of teaching anatomy in Germany, but was 
of relatively little use because of the style of its illustrations. Both books have still a 
slip of paper mounted on the inside of the front cover bearing the following dedicatory 
note written by the hand of the class president: "The class of 1930 presents these 
books to the Department of Anatomy as an expression of cooperation and recognition 
of the interest shown by the members of the Department in furthering and developing 
anatomical research at the University of INIaryland. ]\farch 17, 1927." The text of 
this dedication is very beautiful, and it was written in beautiful handwriting, but 
unfortunately the signature of the class president is missing.^ The books, altogether 
eight volumes, were officially donated to the Department in a little celebration 
staged for this purpose. 

Unfortunately, this plan did not prove successful; in the first place, even if this 
procedure could have been continued, the money yielded by it would not have been 
enough to build up a sizable library; in the second place, soon afterwards we opened 
up a University Bookshop on the campus, whose major income was to be derived from 
the sale of books to the students. 

The J. M. H. Rowland Gift 

The real start of the library came in the year 1932. Before starting on my vacation 
journey to Europe, I went to see Dr. Rowland, then Dean of our medical school, and 
suggested to him to give me some money to buy anatomical classics at the source. 
Dr. Rowland was a very far seeing gentleman and historically-minded. However, he 
said that there were no funds in the coffers of the medical school for that sort of 
enterprise, but he added "I shall be glad to give you $200 out of my own pocket". 
He kept his promise and I brought back some veritable treasures worth today ten 
times the price I paid for them. Among them were such works as Vesalius' "Opera 
Omnia", 1725, bound in two large leather folios and containing the famous title page 
which shows Vesalius dissecting and demonstrating the human cadaver in his ana- 
tomical "theater", as well as the portrait of Vesalius and the well-known woodcuts 
of the drawings by Kalkar; also a small volume by the teacher of Vesalius, Jacob 
Sylvius, 1555, and another small volume by Gabriel Fallopius, the pupil of Vesalius 
(1562): for each of the small books I paid S3; several months ago I saw one of them 
advertised for the price of $30. Also a part of the $200 purchase were two folios of 
the famous anatomical atlas by the French artist Jacob-Fabian Gantier d'Agoty, con- 
taining the first colored copper engravings (mezzotints), in life-size, some of them 

' The class president was Mr. (now Dr.) Kenneth L. Benfer; it would be nice if he would see me 
some day and sign this historical "document". 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION iii 

very spectacular and of great artistic beauty; also the textbook of pathology in three 
volumes by the famous Viennese pathologist Rokitanski, and several other lesser 
works. 

There is one incident which happened in connection with this venture and which 
has ever since haunted my conscience. Before I left, Dr. Rowland asked me urgently 
to be sure and bring him Baas' History of Medicine. I spent a good deal of time to 
find a copy of this book, but came back with empty hands. I did not cease, however, 
to search in dealers' catalogues for this book; it took twenty years to find a copy of 
Baas on sale. We bought it, but it came too late. 

Celsus Pitches His Tent in our Anatomical Laboratory 

The arrival of so many precious books raised high hopes for future developments. 
Yet there still came no money for buying books, old or new. Though I was browsing 
through all kinds of catalogues advertising the most precious morsels of anatomical 
literature, I still had to discuss in my lectures to the students the past of the subject 
with the aid of the very few books at my command. One day I saw oflfered one of 
the original editions (1497) of AureUiis Cornelius Celsus' "De Medicina", a source- 
book for much prechristian anatomical history; true, the book was offered for the 
now unbelievably low price of $55, but there was no %SS in my budget. The idea came 
to me, that if each of the department heads would give only $5, we could have this 
book. Hence I went "begging" and found my colleagues in a very generous mood, 
giving me what I asked for. 

I waited with great anxiety for the arrival of the book, fearing all the time that some 
mishap may befall it on its way to the United States. When it finally came, it proved 
to be a most beautiful copy; not a page was missing and it was bound in perfectly well 
preserved leather cover (probably not the original cover, but very old). I took it home 
with me and feasted on it, glancing through its pages, elated by the thought that I 
was holding in my hands a book which had been made 450 years ago, five years after 
the discovery of America. I celebrated this unique event by designing and painting a 
decorated memorial page on durable Italian paper, which was to receive the signatures 
of all the donators; this memorial leaf was mounted into the book and is still with it. 
On it will be found the signatures of the following members of the faculty: J. M. H. 
Rowland, professor of obstetrics and Dean of the Medical Faculty; Arthur ]\I. 
Shipley, professor of surgery; Charles Bagley, Jr., professor of neurosurgery; J. 
Mason Hundley, professor of gynecology; W. Houston Toulson, professor of urology; 
Harry M. Robinson, professor of dermatology; Maurice C. Pincoflfs, professor of 
medicine; C. A. Clapp, professor of ophthalmology; Carl L. Davis, professor of 
anatomy; William S. Love, Jr.; Harvey Beck; Henry Walton, professor of roentgenol- 
ogy; Frank S. Lynn; John E. Legge; Edward A. Looper, professor of otolaryngology, 
and my own signature. It will be noticed, that even after so short a time — not twenty 
years have passed — this memorial leaf has already become a document of the history^ 
of our own School; some of those who signed are today emeriti professors and others 
are no longer among the living. Most recently we have acquired also a Oerman 
translation of Celsus by Eduard Scheller, 2nd ed., 1906. 



iv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Size of thk ("ollection 

It is necessary, in order to determine which books should be counted, to settle on 
the concept of what should be considered a classic. In this report it is not only the 
antiquity and rareness of a book, which makes it to be a classic, but also the im- 
portance of the contribution which it represents, and its position in the progressive 
stages of the development of the subject. Counting only such books which fit into 
this category and were published before 1900, the collection consists of 246 authors in 
455 volumes. However, there are many books published after 1900, yet extremely 
rare today and already classic publications. The dates at which these 246 books were 
printed are as follows: 

1 before 1500 (only incunabula in the collection) 
7 between 1500 and 1600 
19 between 1600 and 1700 
56 between 1700 and 1800 
64 between 1800 and 1850 
99 between 1850 and 1900 
246 Total 

Cataloguing 

It is, of course, not possible to mention all the books in this report. They have 
been indexed in the Department of Anatomy according to authors and cross-indexed 
according to subject; in addition for the work of each author, as soon as it comes in, a 
card is sent to the general IMedical Library. Each card bears a note giving the date 
of its arrival in the department, the dealer from whom it was bought, and the pur- 
chase price. 

Dollar Value of the Collection 

In dollars actually paid for each book, the entire collection is worth $12,000; but 
many books were obtained under especially favorable conditions which could not 
easily be duplicated and, moreover, in the last twenty years the prices for books of 
this kind have increased ten times. Appraised in the light of this situation, the col- 
lection is worth now not less than $25,000. 

Donations 

As time went on, I received the cooperation and support of the ISIedical School, of 
the alumni and of the students, both in finding a desired book on the market and in 
paying for it. Among the many donations — too many to mention all of them, but 
nevertheless remembered with a sense of gratitude — are such treasures as these: 

Berengarius, Commentaria, 1521, bound in beautiful wooden covers with lock, 
purchased at the price of $1551, presented in cash by Dr. Joseph Scott of Florida, 
an alumnus, by his class mates and most generously by Dr. Scott's father. In 
addition. Dr. Scott gave us the splendid work of Hourgery, Traite Complete de 
I'Anatomie, 1832-1854, in 8 folio volumes illustrated by thousands of hand- 
painted lithographs, worth S1600, and a copy of Lizars' System of Anatomical 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION v 

Plates, probably 1st ecL, 1825, worth S300, (and several more valuable books). 
Berengarius, Isagogae Breves, 1523, purchased at the price of $913, which we re- 
ceived in cash through the generosity of Dr. Nathan Snyder. 

A gift of S1300 from Dr. Goldstein, known as the "Albert E. Goldstein Book Fund of 
the Department of Anatomy of the School of Medicine of the University of ^Maryland". 
From this fund we bought 35 books of which only a few shall be mentioned here: 

Bauhinius, Theatrum Anatomicum, 1605 (1st ed. 1592) 
Casserius, De vocis auditusque etc., 1st ed. 1600 
Cowper, Myotomia reformata, 1724 
Darwin, Origin of Species, 1st ed., 1859 
Higlimore, Corporis Humani etc., 1st ed., 1651 
Hunter, Treatise on the Blood, etc., 1st ed., 1794 
Malpighi, Opera Omnia, 1st ed., 1687 
Pecquet, Experimenta Nova, 1st ed., 1651 
Wolff, Theoria Generationis, 1st ed., 1759 

Principles Guiding the Selection of Books 

Books were not bought in a haphazard manner, but in accordance with certain 
guiding principles and needs. But in a general way it may be said that most of us 
would experience a feeling of awe when we hold in our hands and read books that 
have come upon us from ancient times, communicating as it were with the spirit of 
men who were thinking and living hundreds of years ago. It has been my experience 
that the instructor can easily transfer upon the student and recreate in him this in- 
spiration, if he himself feels it, and that the acquaintance with the thoughts and works 
of men who lived several hundred years before us has a distinctly edifying and refining 
effect upon the students. 

Not a few of my students became interested in books and began to build up li- 
braries for themselves. Some of them helped me build up our departmental library. 
I remember especially two cases. We had in our general Medical Library an English 
translation of the classical work by Peham and Amreicli "Operative Gynecology", 
(1934), which contains a detailed description of the hysterectomy operation as 
practiced by the two famous \'iennese gynecologists Wertheim and Schauta, accom- 
panied by serial full-page colored illustrations. Often in my lectures on the anatomy of 
the pelvis I expressed regret over the lack in our library of the original German 
edition of this work. One day in 1946 Dr. Alaxwell Ibsen, then a freshman, came to me 
with the news that he had seen in some out-of-town book shop a large volume which 
looked to him as if it might be a German copy of Peham and Amreich; but when he 
told me that its price was only S5, I doubted that he could be correct. At any rate I 
asked him to inspect the book, gave him the authors' names and the title of the book 
and instructed him to buy it in case it was the book we wanted. It was an occasion of 
great enjoyment when ]\Ir. Ibsen one day walked into my office with the book in his 
hands. 

Another case is especially noteworthy as it concerns a book for which I had searched 
15 vears in vain. In mv lectures on the anatomv of the autonomic ner\'ous svstem I 



vi BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

often bemoaned the fact that I could not show to the students a copy of the classic 
book by Laugley on the autonomous nervous system. Although this little volume was 
published as recently as 1921, it was not only out of print, but entirely absent from the 
book market. Especially distressing it was to me, that repeatedly book dealers in dif- 
ferent cities and also in England, the place of i)ublication, had not only promised to 
get the book for me, but had assured me solemnly that they could procure it, only to 
the end of disappointing me sorely. One year, it was 1949/50, we had in the freshmen 
class, a Mr. (now Dr.) Leonhard Harold Flax who became very much interested in this 
problem and offered his help. I had little hope that he could tind a copy of Langley 
but he said he would try. And lo and behold, July 24, 1950, he entered my office, suc- 
cess radiating in his eyes and handing me a copy of Langley. It was procured for him 
by a book dealer in Detroit, Michigan. 

In building up the collection efforts were directed toward certain subjects only, 
partly for the purpose of teaching, partly for research purposes. The following are the 
major subjects: 

1. Texts on general (systematic, topographical, surgical) anatomy. 

2. Nervous System 

3. Lymphatics 

4. The "cell" 

5. Embryology and reproduction 

6. Pelvis and pelvic organs 

7. Comparative anatomy 

8. Authors whose names were attached (for some time) as eponyms to the names of 
certain structures 

9. Viennese School 

10. Americana 

11. Complete collections of the works of prominent authors and of successive 
editions of texts used in the freshmen course. 

Only a few of these subdivisions can be discussed here to give the reader an idea of 
the potentialities of the collection. 

1. General Texts 

One of the ideas uppermost in my mind was to show the students the gradual 
development of a modern text book of anatomy and to impress them that it took sev- 
eral hundred years to consolidate all we know about the anatomy of the human body 
into a rigid system of organs and structures described with the aid of an international 
anatomical nomenclature. Our collection of anatomical texts consists now of 69 items 
in which are included a number of modern texts. A few of them shall be mentioned 
here. 

Berengarius, Commentaria, 1521, and Isagogae, 1523, the only prevesalian works in 
our collection, showing the primitive and very inaccurate line drawings and 
sketchy and incorrect descriptions of organs, lacking in details. 

Vesalius, 1543, but not present in our collection in its original; instead we have a 
very excellent copy of the Opera Omnia, 1725, edited by Boerhave and S. B. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION vii 

Albinus, showing the complete transformation from the primitive state of 
Berengarius in the unbelievably short time of only 20 years. Notice that in the 
picture of the "anatomical theater" of the title page there are still seen various 
animals awaiting to be dissected. Also, Jacobus Sylvius, the teacher of Vesalius, 
and Gabriel Fallopius, a pupil of Vesal, both in the original copies. 

Realdus Columbo, 1559, Felix Plater, 1583, Caspar Bauhinius, 1605 (1st ed. 1592), 
loannis Veslingius, 1647, and Theodor Kerkring, 1670, postvesalian authors 
showing the influence which Vesalius had on anatomy. Notice the illustration of 
the "anatomical theater" on the tite page of Columbo; it shows only the human 
cadaver, but no animals. 

Malpighi, 1687, Caspar Barlholiuus, 1686, beginning of specialization along certain 
lines (glands of Bartholinus, kidney, lungs, etc.). 

Morgagni's Adversaria, 1719, and De Sedibus, 1779, (1st ed. 1761), well known by 
the rectal columns of Morgagni; first one to check symptoms of disease against 
pathological anatomy. 

Cowper, William, Anatomy of Humane Bodies, 1737, (1st ed. 1698) the copy which 
contains the most beautiful plates stolen from Bidloo. And Cowper, William,^ 
jNIyotomia reformata, 1724, Cowper's glands. 

Duverney-Gautier, 1745 and 1748, first life-size colored copper plates. 

Douglas, James, Description of the Peritoneum, 1730. 

Heister's Compendium of Anatomy, 1771, (German translation from 5th Latin); 
first description of Heister's valves of the gall-bladder. 

Haller, 1746-1752, introduction of physiology into anatomical studies, dominates 
the anatomy and physiology of the 18th century. 

Bichat's Anatomie Generale, 1801, transition from 18th to 19th century, introduction 
of the anatomy and physiology of tissues. 

Soemmering's many books on anatomy and physiology. (See under Nervous system.) 

Wistar, Caspar. System of Anatomy, 1817, first American anatomical text. 

Bell, Charles (and his brother John), wrote a text on "Anatomy and Physiology" of 
which we have the 6th ed., 1826, was anatomist and physiologist at the same 
time, made many contributions especially to the anatomy of the nervous system; 
13 of his most outstanding works in our collection (See Nervous System). 

Lizar, 1825, another member of the Edinburgh School (this School produced Alex- 
ander Monro whom see under "Nervous System", John Hunter, Charles Bell, 
and finally Cunningham, whose text and dissecting manual our students used 
in the course of anatomy). 

Cloquet, 1825-1831, in 5 volumes. 

Bourgery, 1832-1854, in 8 folios; these representing the period of the magnificent 

^ This is easily the most magnificently executed volume in our whole collection. The leather back 
and covers are richly embossed in gold with decorative designs. The edges of the leaves are gold- 
tipped, and the didactic illustrations on copper plates picturing the musclemen in the most varied 
postures have been designed by a great artist. But in addition, in the text the cajntals are adorned 
with decorative figures (one f. i. picturing a man who holds in his hand his inflated bladder), and a 
large number of decorative, highly artistic pieces mark the beginning and end of each chapter. The 
whole volume which could hardly have been printed in this sumptuous manner anjTvhere else but 
England, bespeaks the rich funds available in the country of its birth. 



viii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

French colored lithographs; both illustrate the pains-taking dissections of their 
time as well as the surgical procedures made possible by increased knowledge of 
anatomical detail. 

Cruveilhier, 1851/52, Luschka, 1862/67, Ilenle, 1866/71, Henke, 1878/84, and Sappey, 
4th ed., 1888/89. Texts in three and four volumes, written in argumentative 
manner. 

Gray, 1st English ed., 1858, 1st American ed. 1859; in England anatomical texts are 
condensed into one single volume, written in the style of an anatomical diction- 
ary. (Collection of successive editions consists of about 25 volumes.) Note: 1859 
marks the publication of two other important works: Darwin, Origin of Species, 
and \"irchow. Cellular Pathology (of the latter we have only the 4th ed., 1871). 
In France and Germany anatomical texts continue to be written in three and more 

volumes: 

Poirier, in 5 volumes bound in 7, 1898/1904 

Testut, 5 volumes bound in 8, 8th ed., 1928/31 

Rouvier, 3 volumes, 6th ed., 1948 

Tandler, 3 volumes, 1923/26 

Periikopf, 4 volumes, bound in 7, 1937/56 

The 20th century is characterized by the large German "Handbooks of Anatomy". 

Bardeleboi, 8 volumes bound in 27, 1896/1915. 
Peter, ]]'elzel and H eider icli, Anatomie des Kindes, 1928/1956. 
Okajama, 1933, the Japanese are entering the writing of anatomical texts. 
Brans, 1924, and Grant, 1937, the former in 3, the latter in 1 volume, wrote the first 
modern anatomical texts in the "functional" manner. 

XervoHs System 

The history of the anatomy of the nervous system is represented in our collection 
by 52 items. These may be discussed in two subdivisions. 

A. Gross Anatomy 

VesaVms, 1543, (in our collection Opera Omnia, 1725), classifies the cranial nerves 

into 7 pairs (probably has seen all twelve), his 7th pair being the N. intercostalis, 

our sympathetic trunk. 
Willis, Cerebri Anatome, 1664, (Opera Omnia, 1720, in our collection). First to 

describe the accessory (accessorius ad par vagum) as a special ner^^e. 
Winslou<, Exposition Anatomique, 1st ed., 1732, first to separate the sympathetic 

trunk from the cranial nerves, replacing the name "intercostalis" by "s}Tnpa- 

thicus", but counts the hypoglossal as 1st spinal nerve. 
Soemmering, De Basi Encephali, 1778, (also "Organ der Seele" 1796), first to classify 

the cranial nerves into 12 pairs. 
Prochaska, De Structure Nerv'orum, 1st ed., 1779, first to recognize and illustrate 

the complete independence of the spinal ganglia from the ventral spinal roots. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION ix 

Vicq d'Azyr, large beautifully illustrated folio, 1786, first to describe the "bundle of 

Vicq d'Azyr". 
Bell, Charles, Anatomy of Brain, 1802, and Engravings explaining the course of the 

nerves, 1803, first attempt at dissecting details, with functional explanation in 

mind. 
Bell, Charles, Nervous system of the human body, 1st ed., 1830, in which he falsified 

the text of his original articles to make it appear that he and not Magendie 

discovered the dififerential function of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots. 

Waller, (German) 1783 Represent the era of minute dissection and of accu- 

Swan, (English) 1834 rate and detailed illustrations of the peripheral 

Ilirschfeld, (French) 1866 nerves. 

B. Microscopic A natoniy 

Leeuwenhoeck, Physiological Epistles, 1st Dutch ed., 1702, 1st Latin ed. 1719, first to 

see and illustrate the nerve fibers. 
Fontana, On the venom of the viper, 1st ed., 1781, famous microscopical studies of 

nerves, first to see the sheaths of nerve fibers. 
Monro, Alexander II., Folio on the Nervous System, 1st ed., 1783; because of using 

direct sun-light on the mirror of the microscope, he is deceived in claiming that 

the nerve substance consists of worm like particles; his failure discouraged the 

use of the microscope until it was revived in Germany. Describes as the first the 

interventricular foramen (of ]\lonro). 
Treviranus, 1803, first to see the striations of nerve fibers, recognized later as caused 

by the neurofibrillae. 
Ebrenberg, "Beabachtungen", 1st ed., 1836, first one to see the nerv^e cells. 
Schwann, "^likroskopische Untersuchungen", 1st ed., 1839, advances the cell theory. 

First to see the cells of the "Schwann's Sheath" and was led to erroneous idea of 

the so-called "cell chain theory". 
Gerber, "Elements", 1842, representative of the claim of the existence of "terminal 

loops" of the nerve fibers. 
Midler, Johannes, Handbuch der Physiologic, 1840/44, rejects the "terminals loops"; 

also introduces the concept of the "specific nerve energies". 
Bethe, 1903, one of the most fervent exponents of Schwann's "Cell-Chain Theory". 

Lymphatics 

The lymphatic system is represented in our collection by 14 items, but only 9 of 
them were published before 1900. The following works are worth mentioning. 

Asellius, Caspar, De Lactibus, first i)ublication on the lymphatics (lacteals of the 
mesentery), contains also on several plates the first colored illustrations in the 
anatomical literature. We are most fortunate to possess this extremely rare work 
(only a few copies being present on the Western Hemisphere) which we owe to 
the efiforts of Dr. H. Boyd Wylie, then Dean of the Medical School, who pro- 



X BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

cured the money (S450). The copy which came from the library of a French 
nobleman is in most perfect condition, bound in red velvet leather. 

Pecquet, loannis, Experimenta Nova, 1651, marks the next step, the discovery of the 
thoracic duct. But the next stage in the history of the lymphatics, Olof Rudbeck 
and Thomas Bartholinus, have so far evaded all our efforts to obtain them. 

Mascagni, Vasorum lymphaticorum, etc., 1787, a beautifully preserved folio, richly 
illustrated, is one of the Hrst publications on mercury injection of the lymph 
vessels; with an illustration of the instrument which the author invented for 
this purpose. 

Burns, Allan, Observations on the Surgical Anatomy of the head and neck, 1824. 
The reader may wonder why this work is enumerated under Lymphatics. Burns 
was the outstanding authority on mercury injections in England. To this par- 
ticular edition is appended a "life of the author" by his pupil Granville Sharp 
Pattison, who in the capacity of a surgeon came to our Medical School in the 
early years of its existence and through whom the School bought a part of the 
collection of specimens from Burns. This collection has vanished, no catalogue 
and historical notes having come upon us, whh one exception, two jars contain- 
ing in alcohol the inguinal lymphatics injected with mercury and still to be seen 
in our anatomical collection of specimens. 

Teichmann, Das Saugadersystem, 1861 — and 

Sappey, Traite d'Anatomie, 1888/1889— 

Representing the period of detailed dissection and illustration of mercury- 
injected lymphatics, these leading finally to the study of physiology of the 
lymphatic system as represented by Rouvier in France, 1937, and Drinker, 
1933-'41-'42, in the U. S. A. 

Regrets and Suggestions 

Only a small number of all the items in our possession have been mentioned here. 
But even had I enumerated all of them, the reader experienced in medical history 
would not have failed to notice that there exist serious and often wide gaps in every 
one of the subdivisions. jMoreover, frecjuently the first edition of important authors is 
missing. This has the disadvantage that the student is not impressed by the year 
which marks the actual date of the contribution: f.i., Virchow's "Cellularpathologie" 
is represented only by the fourth edition published 1871, but it happens so that 1859, 
the date of the first edition of this work, is an especially memorable year, since in this 
year two other important works appeared in print, the first American edition of 
Gray's Text-Book of Anatomy, and Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species", both of 
them in our possession. Another serious deficiency is the complete lack, both in the 
Department of Anatomy and in the General ^ledical Library of foreign language 
periodicals of anatomy. There is no prospect that our collection of anatomical classics 
could become, in the near future, a suitable storehouse of historical research, but if the 
deficiencies referred to above can be eliminated, this collection could become a very 
excellent means of inspiring our students and familiarizing them with the past founda- 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xi 

tions of anatomical knowledge as well as of serving those of our anatomical inves- 
tigators who need to know the ancient background of special aspects of anatomy. 

In order to accomplish this goal and fill in all the gaps, a fund of approximately 
$20,000 would be required, to be spent as the desired items appear on the market, and 
also for subscription to foreign language (especially French and German) anatomical 
journals. 

I would not want to conclude this report without wishing the present keepers of 
this collection of anatomical classics success in continuing this work started 25 years 
ago, and without extending my gratitude to all those who have given me their support, 
moral and material, in advancing the collection to its present status. 

ABSTRACTS 

LEPTOSPIROSIS AS A MAJOR CAUSE OF SHORT TERM 
PYREXIA IN A TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT* 

Fred R. McCrumb, Joe L. Stockard and Theodore E. W oodward^ 

During 1954-1955, collaborative studies with investigators of the Royal Army 
Medical Corps, Malaya Command and the Institute for Medical Research, Kuala 
Lumpur were directed toward a more precise identification of short-term expatriated 
military personnel and 238 indigenous civilians were investigated by clinical and 
laboratory methods. 

Leptospirosis was found to be the cause of illness in 213 or 35 per cent of the mili- 
tary patients and 31 or 13 per cent of the civilian patients. Twelve of the 20 leptospiral 
serogroups, as classified by Wolflf and Broom, were represented in this series of 244 
cases of leptospirosis. The duration of fever was variable, ranging from 4 to 13 days 
with an average of 8 days. There appeared to be no correlation between the infecting 
type and the clinical syndrome produced. The clinical features of the diseases are 
described and the laboratory methods found most useful as confirmatory tests are 
discussed. 

In those patients with illnesses other than leptospirosis, the etiology varied. A 
virus or viruses related to the dengue group of agents accounted for 7 per cent of 
the illnesses among military personnel and 24 per cent of those in civilians. Scrub 
typhus, while rare in urban-dwelling civilians (3 per cent), was the cause of 11 per 
cent of the fevers in the military patients. Typhoid fever, murine typhus and infec- 
tious mononucleosis were infrecjuently causes of febrile disease in both groups during 
this course of study. Approximately 30 per cent of all illnesses studied remain undiag- 
nosed and further studies of this group are in progress. 

* Presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Physicians, May 1956, in 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

t From the United States Army Medical Research Unit, Kuala Lumpur, Malaya, the Walter 
Reed Army Institute for Research and the Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. 

This stud\- is one of a group sponsored by the Commission of Immunization of the Armed Forces 
Epidemiological Board. 



xii BLLLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

STUDIES FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
1954-1955 

The following list of publications by the Faculty of the School of Medicine was 
compiled by ^Irs. Florence R. Kirk, Reference Librarian, Medical Library. 

1. Andersch, Marie A. and Barbusca, Frances. 

A graphic method for the conversion of transmission curves to a corrected 
density curve for the calculation of proteins separated by paper electro- 
phoresis. J. Lab. & Clin. Med. 45: 958-%2, 1955. 

2. Barnes, Thomas G., Ganey, Joseph B. and Yeager, George H. 

Restoration of arterial continuity following sudden interruption: autogenous 
grafts; direct anastomosis; case reports. Am. Surgeon. 21: 17-24, 1955. 

3. Berblinger, Klaus W. and Greenhill, Maurice H. 

Levels of communication in ulcerative colitis. Psychosom. Med. 16: 156-162, 
1954. 

4. Bereston, Eugene S. 

Vitamins in dermatology. J. Clin. Nutrition 2: 133-139, 1954. 

5. Bessman, Samuel P. 

Ammonia metabolism is animals. Inorganic Nitrogen Metabolism, edited by 
William D. McElroy and Bentley Glass. Johns Hopkins Press, Balto. 1956. 
p. 408-437. 

6. Bessman, Samuel P. and Bessman, Alice N. 

The cerebral and peripheral uptake of ammonia in liver disease with an 
hypothesis for the mechanism of hepatic coma. J. Clin. Invest. 34: 622-628, 
1955. 

7. Bessman, Samuel P. and Bradley, J. Edmund. 

Uptake of ammonia by muscle, its implications in ammoniagenic coma. New 
England J. Med. 253: 1143-1147, 1955. 

8. Bessman, Samuel P. and Layne, Ennis C, Jr. 

A rapid procedure for the determination of lead in blood or urine in the 
presence of organic chelating agents. J. Lab. & Clin. ]\Ied. 45: 159-166, 1955. 

9. Bradley, J. Edmund and Powell, Albert M. 

Oral calcium EDTA in lead intoxication of children. J. Pediat. 45: 297-301, 
1954. 

10. Brahen, Leonard S. and Krantz, John C, Jr. 

Respiration of coronary arteries and nitrites. Arch, internal, pharmacodyn. 
104: 29-32, 1955. 

11. Brantigan, Otto C, Hadidian, Calvin Y. and Schimert, G. 

INIediaslinal tumors. ]\L Ann. District of Columbia. 23: 71-84, 1954. 

12. Burgison, Raymond M., O'Malley, W. Edward, Heisse, Claire K., Forrest, 

Jane W. and Krantz, John C, Jr. 
Anesthesia XLVI. Flourinated ethylenes and cardiac arrhythmias induced 
by epinephrine. J. Pharmacol. & Exper. Therap. 114: 470-472, 1955. 

13. Carr, C. Jelleff, Bell, Frederick K. and Krantz, John C, Jr. 

Anesthesia. XL VII. Brain phosphokinase and anesthetics. Anesthesiology. 
16: 738 741, 1955. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xiii 

14. Carr, C. Jeli.eff, Bell, Frederick K., Rehak, M. Joseph and Krantz, John 

C, Jr. 
Effect of drugs on myokinase activity of coronary arteries. Proc. Soc. Exper. 
Biol. & Med. 89: 184-186, 1955. 

15. Carr, C. Jelleff, Bell, Frederick K., Hurst, J, Neil and Krantz, John C, 

]^- 
Myokinase activity of coronary arteries. Circulation Res. 2: 516 519, 1954. 

16. Cohen, Morris M. 

Preliminary and short reports: A simple procedure for staining tinea versi- 
color (M. Furfur) with fountain pen ink. J. Invest. Dermat. 22: 9-10, 1954. 

17. Davidheiser, Roger H. and Figge, Frank H. J. 

Enzymatic porphyrin synthesis in Harderian glands and other organs and 
tissues of mice. Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & ]Med. 90: 461-62, 1955. 

18. De Carlo, John and Startzman, Henry H., Jr. 

The roentgen study of the chest in measles. Radiology. 63: 849-52, 1954. 

19. De Hoff, John B. and Ozazewski, John. 

Alpha tocopherol to treat diabetic retinopathy. Am. J. Ophth. 37: 581-82, 
1954. 

20. DoDD, Robert B. 

Anesthesia for the elderly. Am. Surgeon 21: 262-267, 1955. 

21. Edwards, C. Reh) and Jennings, Erwin R. 

Pancreatoduodenectomy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Bull. 
School Med. Univ. IMaryland. 39: 65-70, 1954. 

22. Edwards, C. R., McGrady, C. W., Jr. and Funk, Audrey M. 

The effects of air conditioning on operating room air contamination. Am. 
Surgeon. 21: 189-194, 1955. 

23. Edwards, ]\Ionte. 

Borderline epithelial lesions of the rectum and colon. ^Maryland M. J. 4: 
150-155, 1955. 

24. Edwards, ^Ionte and Rosin, John D. 

Essentials and nonessentials of colonic surgery. Am. Surgeon. 21: 201-206, 
1955. 

25. Figge, Frank H. J. 

Appearance of lymphatic leukemia in a colony of C3H mice. Am. Assoc, for 
Cancer Res. Proc. 1: 13, 1954. 

26. Figge, Frank H. J. and Peck, George C. 

Cortisone-like effect of hematophorphyrin and sunlight on anaphylaxis in 
mice. Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & ]\Ied. 87: 592-595, 1954. 

27. Figge, Frank H. J., ]Mack, H. Patterson, Peck, George C. and Holbrook, 

William. 
Use of red-fiourescent porphyrins to delineate normal and abnormal anatom- 
ical structures and neoplastic tissues in human subjects. Anat. Rec. 121: 
292, 1955. 

28. Figge, Frank H. J. and Wichterman, R.\lph. 

Effect of hematoporphyrin on x-radiation sensitivity in ])arame(ium. 
Science. 122: 468-469, 1955. 



xiv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

29. FiNESiNGER, Jacob E. with Barrabee, Paul and Barrabee, Edna L. 

A normative social adjustment scale. Am. J. Psychiat. 112: 252-259, 1955. 

30. Fisher, Russell S. 

Automobile injuries. Current Medical Digest. 22: 59 63, 1955. 

31. (ioRTEN, Martin K. and Hidey, Robert. 

Acute monocytic leukemia in childhood. Bull. School Med. Univ. Maryland. 

39: 59-64, 1954. 
2>2. (iRENELL, R. G., Mendelson, J. AND McElroy, W. D. 

ATP mapping in brain. Fed. Proc. 14: 63-64, 1955. 
2>i. Grenell, R. G., Mendelson, J. and McElroy, W. D. 

Effects of chlorpromazine on metabolism in central nervous system. Arch. 

Neurol. & Psychiat. 73: 347-351, 1955. 

34. Grenell, R. G., Mendelson, J. and McElroy, W. D. 

Neuronal metabolism and ATP synthesis in narcosis. J. Cell. & Comp. 
Physiol. 46: 143-161, 1955. 

35. Hadidian, Calvin Y. and Brantigan, Otto C. 

Regeneration of sympathetic nerves — an experimental study. Bull. School 
]\Ied. Univ. Maryland. 39: 51-53, 1954. 

36. Hankins, John R. and Yeager, George H. 

Use of a new long-acting penicillin compound in surgical infections. A. M. 
A. J. 155: 1306-1307, 1954. 

37. Herbst, Edward J. and Glinos, Eleanor Bartlett. 

An analysis of the putrescine requirement of hemophilus paraintluenzae. J. 
Biol. Chem. 214: 175-184, 1955. 

38. Hulme, Norman A. and Krantz, John C, Jr. 

Anesthesia. XLV: Effect of ethyl ether on oxidative-phosphorylation in the 
brain. Anesthesiology. 16: 627-631, 1955. 

39. Jennings, Erw in R. and Yeager, George H. 

Barbwire tendon suture. Arch. Surg. 70: 566-569, 1955. 

40. Kessler, Gerald, Vanderlinde, R. E. and Schmidt, E. G. 

Effect of 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid on growth of rats. Anti- 
biotics & Chemother. 4: 511-513, 1954. 

41. KiPNis, David M. and Sacks, Milton S. 

Observations on an agglutinin in human serum for periodate-treated 
erythrocytes. J. Lab. & Clin. Med. 45: 632-640, 1955. 

42. Krahl, Vernon E. 

The respiratory portions of the lung. Bull. School Med. Univ. Maryland. 
40: 101-127, 1955. 

43. Krahl, Vernon E. 

Symposium on respiratory diseases. Current concept of the finer structure of 
the lung. Arch. Int. Med. 96: 342-356, 1955. 

44. Krantz, John C, Jr. 

Cholinergic blocking agents on the gastrointestinal tract. Am. J. Gastro- 
enter. 24: 31-35, 1955. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xv 

45. Krantz, John C, Jr. 

On medical writing. GP 11 : 132-134, 1955. 

46. Krantz, John C, Jr. 

The principles of analysis for alcohol in the blood, the urine, and the breath. 
Maryland M. J. 3: 297-299, 1954. 

47. Krantz, John C, Jr. 

Recent advances in therapy. Bull. School ]\Ied. Univ. jNIaryland. 39: 94-101, 
1954. 

48. Krantz, John C, Jr. 

The use and abuse of the antibiotics. Pennsylvania M. J. 58: 383-386, 1955. 

49. Krantz, John C, Jr., Forrest, Jane W. and Heisse, Claire K. 

Contribution to the pharmacology of apoatropine and its methyl bromide. 
Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med. 86: 511-512, 1954. 

50. Krantz, John C, Jr., Lu, Go and O'JMalley, W. Edward. 

Anesthesia. XLI\\ The local anesthetic action of hydroxylidocaine hydro- 
chloride. J. Pharmacol. & Exper. Therap. Ill: 224-228, 1954. 

51. Lindenberg, Richard. 

Compression of brain arteries as pathogenetic factor for tissue necroses and 
their areas of predilection. J. Neuropath. & Exper. Neurol. 14: 223-243, 
1955. 

52. Liu, Ray S. J., Adams, Charles B., Snyder, INIerrill J., Gauld, John and 

Parker, Robert T. 
Clinical observ^ations with tetracycline in certain rickettsial and bacterial 
infections. Antibiotics Annual. 556-562, 1954-55. 

53. LoviTT, William V., Jr. and Lutz, Stanley. 

Embryological aneurysm of the myocardial vessels. Arch. Path. 57: 163-167, 
1954. 

54. ]\Iendelson, J., jSIendelson, J. H., Fax, B. J. and Grenell, R. G. 

Stability and absorption spectrum of malononitrile. Science. 120: 266-269, 
1954. 

55. jNIenon, p. G., Raskin, H. F. and Woodward, T. E. 

Further experience with chloramphenicol in the treatment of meningococcal 
meningitis. Antibiotics & Chemother. 4: 1113-1116, 1954. 

56. Morrison, J. Huff. 

Primary torsion of the omentum complicating term pregnancy. Obst. & 
Gynec. 2: 190-192, 1955. 

57. Morrison, Samuel. 

Diseases of the pancreas. Am. J. Gastroenter. 24: 403-412, 1955. 

58. ^Morrison, Samuel. 

^Magnesium aluminum hydroxide gel in the antacid therapy of peptic ulcer. 
Am. J. Gastroenter. 22: 301-308, 1954. 

59. ^loRRisoN, Samuel and Cope, Clyde B. 

Constipation. Cyclopedia of Medicine. 4: 193-218B, 1955. F. A. Davis, 
Phila., Pa. 



xvi BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

60. MoRRisox, Samuel and Cope, Clyde B. 

Enemas. Cyclopedia of Medicine. 5: 191 19,^, 1955. F. A. Davis, Phila., Pa. 
01. Morrison, Samuel and Cope, Clyde B. 

Fecal impaction. Cyclopedia of Medicine. 5: 501 502, 1955. F. A. Davis, 

Phila., Pa. 

62. Parker, Robert T., >Menon, P. Govinda, Merideth, Ann M., Snyder, 

Merrill J. and Woodward, Theodore E. 
Persistence of rickettsia rickettsii in a patient recovered from rocky moun- 
tain spotted fever. J. of Immunol. 73: 383-386, 1954. 

63. Parker, Robert T., Snyder, Merrill J., Liu, Ray S. J., Looper, John W., 

Jr. and Woodward, Theodore E. 
Therapeutic range of chloramphenicol in purulent meningitis. Antibiotic 
Med. 1: 192-200, 1955. 

64. Peck, George C, Mack, H. Patterson, Holbrook, William A. .and Figge, 

Frank H. J. 
Use of hematoporphyrin fluorescence in biliary and cancer surgery. Am. 
Surgeon. 21: 181-188, 1955. 

65. Peterson, William F., Prevost, Edward C, Edmunds, Frederick T., 

Hundley, J. Mason, Jr. and Morris, Frank K. 
Benign cystic teratomas of the ovary. Am. J. Obst. & Gynec. 70: 368-382, 
1955. 

66. Peterson, William F. and Robinson, Harry JNI., Jr. 

Intraepithelial epithelioma (Bowen's disease) of the vulva. Arch. Dermat. 
& Syph. 71: 615-617, 1955. 

67. PoLANCO, Gerardo B. and Powell, Albert M. 

Unusual combination of cardiac anomalies in a case of isolated dextrocardia. 
Am. Heart J. 49: 102-107, 1955. 

68. Pratt, Alfred J., Smith, Dietrich C. and Ferguson, Frederick P. 

Role of the adrenal gland in the response of plasma potassium of the rat to 
moderate and severe hypoxia. Endocrinology. 57: 450-455, 1955. 

69. Ramsey, James H. 

Bronchial granular-cell myoblastoma. Arch. Otolaryng. 62: 81-83, 1955. 

70. Rassmussen-Taxd.al, D. S., Ward, Grant E. and Figge, Frank H. J. 

Fluorescence of human lymphatic and cancer tissues following high doses of 
intravenous hematoporphyrin. Cancer. 1: 78-81, 1955. 

71. Reimann, D. L. 

Some nineteenth century contributions to cancer detection. Obst. & Gynec. 
Surv. 9: 495 500, 1954. 

72. Reimann, D. L., Clemmens, R. L. and Pillsbury, W. A. 

Congenital acute leukemia: Skin nodules, a first sign. J. of Pediat. 46: 415- 
418, 1955. 

73. Reimann, D. L. and Reeves, H. G. 

Concomitance of acute appendicitis and acute cholecystitis. Am. Surgeon. 
21: 220-222, 1955. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xvii 

74. Robinson, H. M., Jr. 

Antibiotika und steroide in der dermatologischen praxis. Therapiewoche. 
5: 630-653, 1955. 

75. Robinson, Harry M., Jr. 

Cutaneous manifestations of systemic diseases. J. Nat. M. A. 47: 13-17, 
1955. 

76. Robinson, Harry ]M., Jr. 

Moniliasis complicating antibiotic therapy. Arch. Dermal. & Syi)h. 70: 640- 
652, 1954. 

77. Robinson, Harry M., Jr. 

Oxytetracycline in dermatology and syphilology. Internat. Rec. ]Med. 168: 
207-212, 1955. 

78. Robinson, Harry ]M., Jr. 

Prednisone and prednisolone in the treatment of dermatoses. First Internat. 
Conf. on the CUnical and ^Metabolic Effects of ]\Ieticortenand]\Ieticortelone, 
New York City. May 31-June 1, 1955. 

79. Robinson, Harry M., Jr. 

Prednisone in treatment of selected dermatoses: preliminary report. A. M. A. 
J. 158: 473-475, 1955. 

80. Robinson, Harry j\I., Jr. 

Role of antibiotics in therapy of acne. Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 69: 414 417, 
1954. 

81. Robinson, Harry M., Jr. 

Uses and abuses of antibiotics in the treatment of dermatoses. U. S. Armed 
Forces M. J. 5: 953-967, 1954. 

82. Robinson, Harry M., Jr., Bacharach, David and Strahan, John. 

Magnamycin ointment in the treatment of the pyodermas. Preliminary re- 
port. Bull School Med. Univ. Maryland. 39: 54-55, 1954. 

83. Robinson, H.arry ]\I., Jr. and Cohen, Morris M. 

Preliminary and short report. jNIagnamycin in the granuloma inguinale. J. 
Invest. Dermat. 22: 263-264, 1954. 

84. Robinson, Harry M., Jr., Robinson, Raymond C. V. and Strahan, John F. 

Indications for local hydrocortisone therapy. Medical Times. 83: 227-237, 
1955. 

85. Robinson, Harry M., Jr., Robinson, Raytmond C. V. and Strahan, John F. 

Topical use of tetracycline. South. M. J. 48: 516-519, 1955. 

86. Robinson, Harry M., Jr., Robinson, Raymond C. V. and Strahan, John F. 

Topical steroid-antibiotic therapy of dermatoses. Antibiotics .\nnual. 62- 
67, 1954-55. 

87. Robinson, Harry M., Jr. and Robinson, Raymond C. \. 

Treatment of dermatoses with local application of hydrocortisone acetate. 
A. M. A. J. 155: 1213-1216, 1954. 

88. Robinson, Harry M., Robinson, Raymond C. \ . and Cohen, Morris M. 

The use of 9-alpha-l1uorohydrocortisone in the therapy of dermatoses. Bull. 
School ]\red. Univ. Maryland. 40: 72 75, 1955. 



xvui BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

89. Robinson, Harry M., Jr., Zeligman, Israel, Robinson, R. C. V., Cohen, 

Morris M. and Shapiro, Albert. 
Er}'thromycin in treatment of dermatoses. Report on 1,695 patients. Arch. 
Dermat. & Syph. 70: 325-330, 1954. 

90. S.\CKS, Milton S. 

Fibrinogen deficiency. (Editorial) Ann. Int. Med. 43: 1139 1146, 1955. 

91. Sacks, Milton S. .and Raccuglla, Giovanni. 

Hereditary deficiency of proaccelerin (parahemophilia): a family study. J. 
Lab. & ciin. Med. 46: 98-110, 1955. 

92. S.AVAGE, John E. 

Management of the fetal arms in breech extraction. A method to facilitate 
application of Piper forceps. Obst. & Gynec. 3: 55-57, 1954. 

93. Slager, Ursula T. 

Intracerebral vascular deposits in the basal ganglia. J. Xer\^ & Ment. Dis. 
121: 410-419, 1955. 

94. Slager, Ursula T., Wagner, John A. and Basham, Louise. 

A roentgen technique for demonstrating radio-opaque deposits in brain 
tissue slices. J. Neuropath. & Exper. Neurol. 13: 209-211, 1954. 

95. Smith, Dietrich C. and Ferguson, Frederick P. 

Efifects of acute decompression stress upon plasma electrolytes and renal 
function in anesthetized dogs. Bull. School Med. Univ. ^Maryland. 39: 39-50, 
1954. 

96. Vanderlinde, Raymond E., \\\sington, Frank D. and Westerfeld, W. W. 

The oxidation of stilbestrol in alkali. Am. Chem. Soc. J. 77: 4176-4178, 1955. 

97. Wagner, John A. 

Neuropathology of neoplastic metastasis to the brain. South. M. J. 48: 302- 
305, 1955. 

98. Wagner, John A., Douglass, Louis H. and Slager, Ursula T. 

Dystocia caused by fetal intracranial teratoma. Obst. & Gynec. 4: 647-652, 
1954. 

99. Wagner, John A. and Menon, P. Govinda. 

Encephalomalacia in children. Resulting from tuberculosis meningitis and 
arteritis. The Antiseptic (Madras). 50: 1-7, 1954. 

100. Wagner, John A., Slager, Ursula T., Dennis, John ^I. and Barnes, 

Elroy \\ 
The incidence and composition of radiopaque deposits in the basal ganglia of 
the brain. Am. J. Roentgenol. 74: 232-234, 1955. 

101. Wagner, John A., Slager, Ursula T. and Tucker, Leon.ard. 

Hypoparathyroidism with cerebral calcification. I. Report of a case. Bull. 
School Med. Univ. :\Iar>'land. 39: 102 109, 1954. 

102. Wahal, K. M. and Wagner, John A. 

Diffuse meningeal carcinomatosis. J. Indian M. Assoc. 25: 390-395, 1955. 

103. Wichterm.an, Ralph and Figge, Frank, H. J. 

Lethality and the biological effects of x-rays in paramecium: radiation 
resistance and its variability. Biol. Bull. 106: 253-263, 1954. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xix 

104. Woodward, Theodore E. 

Weil's disease (Leptospirosis). Method of Theodore E. Woodward, M.D. 
Current Therapy. 81 83, 1954. 

105. \\'oodward, Theodore E., Smadel, Joseph E. and Parker, Robert T. 

The therapy of typhoid fever. M. CHn. North America. 38: 577-59C), 1954. 

106. Yeager, George H. 

The educational role of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. ^Maryland M. 
J. 4: 448-450, 1955. 

107. Yeager, George H. 

Presidential editorial. Maryland M. J. 4: 14, 1955. 

108. Yeager, Gf.orge H. 

Reconstructive vascular surgery. Bull. School Med. Univ. Mar^dand. 40: 
1-4, 1955. 

109. Yeager, George H. 

Surgery of hypertension. South. M. J. 48: 635-639, 1955. 

110. Yeager, George H., Cowley, R. Adams and Curtis, Hugh P. 

Lumbar sympathectomy in organic peripheral vascular disease. Am. Sur- 
geon. 21: 233-237, 1955. 

111. Zeligman, I. AND Robinson, H. M., Jr. 

Licjuid nitrogen therapy in dermatology. Bull. School ]Med. fniv. ]\Iar}dand. 
40: 132-134, 1955. 

NEW APPOINTMENTS TO FACULTY-PROMOTIONS 
AND RESIGNATIONS* 

Promotions 

Dr. D. Frank Kaltreider — From Associate Professor of Obstetrics to Professor of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Dr. John J. Tansey — From Assistant in Orthopedic Surger}- to Associate in Ortho- 
pedic Surgery 

Dr. Marvin Jaffee — From Instructor in Psychiatry to Assistant Professor in Psy- 
chiatry 

Dr. Charles E. Shaw, Jr. — From Instructor in ^Medicine to Associate in Medicine 

Dr. Charles Bagley, III — From Instructor in Psychiatry to Associate in Psychiatry 

Dr. Walter S. Esterling — From Instructor in Psychiatry to Associate in Psychiatry 

Dr. H. Patterson Mack — From Assistant Professor of Anatomy to Associate Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy 

Dr. Frederick M. Zersavy — From Assistant in Obstetrics and (gynecology to In- 
structor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Dr. Sheldon Greisman From Instructor in Experimental Medicine to Associate 
in Medicine 

Dr. George H. Davis — From Associate in Obstetrics to Assistant Professor of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology 

* Corrected to July 31, 1956. 



XX BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Dr. J. Huff Morrison From Associale in Obstetrics to Assistant Professor of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology 
Dr. D. McClelland Dixon — From Associate in Obstetrics to Assistant Professor of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Dr. Sarah V. Huffer From Instructor in Psychiatry to Associate in Psychiatry 
Dr. Joe L. Stockard — From Instructor in Preventive Medicine to Associate in Pre- 
ventive Medicine and Associate Director Medical Care Clinic 
Dr. Leon Kochman -From Instructor in Medicine to Associate in ]\Iedicine 
Dr. Joseph S. Bierman — From Assistant in Psychiatry to Instructor in Psychiatry 
Dr. C. Parke Scarborough — From Associate in Plastic Surgery to Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Surgery 
Miss Ethel M. Ebersberger — From Research Assistant in Anatomy to Assistant in 

Anatomy 
Dr. Francis J. Borges — From Instructor in iNIedicine to Associate in Medicine 

Xnv Appointments 

Mrs. Imogene S. Young — Associate Professor of Psychiatric Social Work 

Dr. Robert T. Parker — Associate Dean in the School of Medicine and Assistant 

Professor of iNIedicine 
Dr. Armand J. Gold — Assistant Professor in Physiological Research 
Dr. Howard B. Bensusan — Assistant Professor of Physiological Research 
Dr. John E. Legge — Assistant Professor of ^ledicine 
Dr. Benjamin H. Sweet — Assistant Professor of Research — Microbiology 
Dr. Robert E. Farber — Assistant Professor of Preventive ^ledicine 
Dr. Alexander S. Dowling — Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine 
Dr. Paul E. Molumphy — Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Dr. Patrick B. Storey — Assistant Professor of ^Medicine 
Dr. Ross McLean- Assistant Professor of Medicine 
Dr. James A. Lyon, Jr. — Associate in Radiology 
Dr. Frederick R. McCrumb — Associate in ^Medicine 
Dr. Moritz Michaelis — Research Associale in Surgery 
Dr. William B. Rever, Jr. — Associate in Surgery 
Dr. David M. Kipnis — Associate in Surgery 
Dr. Stephen Krop — Lecturer in Pharmacology 
Dr. William A. Holbrook — Instructor in Anatomy 
Dr. Alice M. Band -Instructor in Medicine 
Dr. Albert B. Shackman Instructor in Radiology 
Dr. Leslie L. Mould Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Dr. Charles R. Green, Jr. — Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Dr. Julian W. Reed Instructor in Medicine 
Dr. Margaret H. Sickels Instructor in Physiology 
Dr. Dorothy C. Holzworth- Instructor in Anesthesiology 
Dr. George H. Longley — Inst rue tor in Psychiatry 
Dr. Elwyn A. Saunders Instructor in Anatomy 
Dr. Douglas H. Smith —Instructor in Anesthesiology 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION xxi 

Dr. Thomas D. Graff Instructor in Anesthesiology 

Dr. Thomas J. Burkart — Instructor in Pathology 

Dr. Leonard Lister — Instructor in Medicine 

Dr. Ennis C. Layne — Instructor in Pediatrics 

Dr. Aubrey D. Richardson Instructor in Preventive Medicine and Medicine 

Dr. Louis R. Lombardo Instructor in Neurology 

Dr. Harry B. Scott — Instructor in Medicine 

Dr. Francis F. Chang Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology 

Dr. William Speed, III — Instructor in Medicine 

Dr. Manuel Levin — Instructor in Medicine 

Dr. Dennis T. Jones — Instructor in Psychiatry 

Dr. Louis A. Fritz — Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology 

Miss Dorothea W. Barthel — Instructor in Rehabilitation 

Dr. Arnold L. Vance — Assistant in Pediatrics 

Dr. William H. Shea — Assistant in Dermatology and Assistant in ]\Iedicine 

Mr. Roman E. Magorka — Assistant in Occupational Therapy in the Department 

of Psychiatry 
Mrs. Jeanette D. Gambrill — Assistant in Anatomy 
Dr. Robert J. Lyden — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Michael K. Quinn — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Margaret L. Sherrard — Assistant in Medicine 
Mrs. Mary M. Brumfield — Assistant in Preventive Medicine 
Mr. Frederick E. Fadt — Assistant in Art as Applied to Medicine 
Dr. Joseph P. Gillottee — Assistant in Pathology 
Dr. Samuel Segall — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Herman Schaerf — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Mutlu Atagun — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Adabert F. Schubert — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Joseph Shear — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Arnold L. Vance — Assistant in Pediatrics 
Miss Margaret R. Hawkins — Assistant in Preventive ^Medicine 
Dr. Norma H. Keigler — Assistant in Clinical Bacteriology in Medicine 
Dr. William G. Esmond — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Abraham A. Silver — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Seymour H. Rubin — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. John B. MacGibbon — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. Leon E. Kassel — Assistant in ]\Iedicine 
Dr. Joseph B. Bronushas — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. George H. Beck — Assistant in Medicine 
Dr. George H. Friskey Assistant in Pathology 
Dr. George K. Baer —Assistant in Pathology 
Dr. Erwin Hecker Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Dr. Edward M. Barczak -Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Mr. Curtis B. Pfeiffer Research Assistant in Anatomy 
Miss Alice M. Conlan Research Assistant in Pharmacology 



xxii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Mr. Charles J. McBeth — Research Assistant in Legal ^Medicine 

Mrs. Julia J. Fich Research Assistant in Pharmacology 

Mr. Elmar Einberg— Research Assistant in Psychiatry 

Miss Ann M. Morgan — Research Assistant in Pharmacology 

Miss Janet E. Estes — Research Assistant in Radioisotopes 

Miss Marie T. Garcia — Research Assistant in Biochemistry 

Mr. John D. Alexander, Jr. — Research Assistant in Psychiatry 

Mr. Daniel S. Sax Research Assistant in Psychiatry 

Miss Joanne R. Delp — Research Assistant in Obstetrics and (gynecology 

Mr. Alfred S. C. Ling — Research Assistant in Pharmacology 

Miss Marguerite M. Lewis — Research Assistant in Pharmacology 

Dr. Robert S. Mosser — Research Assistant in Pediatrics 

Mr. Myron L. Wolbarscht — Research Assistant in Psychiatry 

Dr. Motoji Miyazaki — Research Assistant in Psychiatry 

Miss Shirley L. Bendall — Research Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Mrs. Frieda G. Rudo — Technical Consultant in Biochemistry 

Dr. Gerard D. Klee — Research Associate in Psychiatry 

Mr. Walter M. Shaw — Medical Student Research Fellow in Division of Thoracic 

Surgery 
Mr. Frank K. Kris Summer Fellow in Surgery 
Mr. Leonard L. Kogan — Summer Fellow in Neurology 
Mr. Emidio A. Bianco — Fellow in Hypertension 

Dr. Peter W. Rieckert — Research Fellow in Division of Legal [Medicine 
Dr. Chung S. Park ^Fellow in Pharmacology 
Dr. Ennis C. Layne, Jr. — Fellow in Pediatric Research 
Mr. Paul D. EUner — Fellow in Bacteriology 
Miss Brigitte E. Blankenhorn — Research Fellow in Physiology 
Dr. Jack Raher — U. S. Public Health Fellow in Psychiatry 
Mr. Richard L. Glassner — Weaver Fellow in Physiology 

Retirements 
Dr. Hugh R. Spencer — Professor of Pathology and Head of the Department 

Resignations 

Dr. W. Houston Toulson — Professor of Urology and Head of the Department 

Dr. Dexter L. Reimann — Associate Professor of Pathology 

Dr. Edwin Steers Associate Professor of Microbiology 

Dr. George W, Watson — Associate in Public Health 

Dr. G. V. Rama Row Assistant in Pediatrics 

Miss Frances C. McGrath Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work 

Miss Emily A. May- Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work 

Dr. Janet B. Hardy Lecturer in Pediatrics 



MEDICA L SCHOOL SECTION xxiii 

DR. ELWYN A. SAUNDERS APPOINTED ANATO.MY INSTRUCTOR 

The Department of Anatomy has recently announced the appointment of Dr. 
Elwyn A. Saunders as Instructor in Anatomy. Dr. Saunders, a native of Charleston, 
South Carolina is a graduate of the Citadel and of the Medical College of South 
Carolina. He obtained his undergraduate degree in 1949 and was awarded the Master 
of Science in anatomy at the Medical College of South Carolina in 1952. In 1955 he 
completed his studies for the degree of Doctor of Medicine and later interned at 
the E. J. Meyer Hospital in Buffalo, New York. 

Dr. Saunders' principal interest is in the field of peripheral vascular anatomy. 




Dr. Elwyn A. Saunders 

NEW BULLETIN APPEARS 

The Benjamin Eranklin Clinic of the Pennsylvania Hospital has recently begun 
publication of a periodic Bulletin containing reports and clinical observations and 
scientific data which tend to broaden the understanding of diagnosis and treatment. 
The new journal edited by Dr. John B. Alexander of the Pennsylvania Hospital 
Staff has offices at 330 South Ninth Street in Philadelphia. Publication began with 
the July, 1956 number. 

DR. BALDWIN PARTICIPATES IN SEIZURE PANEL 

Dr. Ruth Baldwin of the Department of Pediatrics was recently one of a j)anel of 
5 physicians who conducted a workshop on epilepsy held at Syracuse University. 
Dr. Baldwin is Director of the Seizure Unit of the School of Medicine and also serves 
as Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. She is consultant in epilei)sy for the Maryland 
State Health Department, the Rosewood State Training School and the Silver Ooss 
Home for Epileptic Females. 



xxiv BULLETIX 01' THE SCHOOL OF .\fEDICr.\E, ['. OF MD. 

T\-MD AdAIX OX TELEVISIOX 

The University of Maryland's Public Service Medical Program, T\'-MD, spon- 
sored jointly by the School of ^Medicine and \VBAL-T\' will again be presented 
during the Fall, Winter and Spring seasons of the Sesquicentennial Year, 1956 57. 
The programs will be under the medical direction of Dr. E. Roderick Shipley and 
the technical direction of the staff of \VBAL-T\'. Mr. Arnold Wilkes will be the 
producer. A more detailed account of the program will appear at a future date. 

DR. STONE REVE.ALS SIGXIEICAXT STATISTICAL FIGURES 

CONCERNING THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN 

MARYLAND 

In a recent announcement carried by "MARYLAND" Dr. William S. Stone has 
announced that 1247 of the 2500 physicians in active practice in the State of Mary- 
land are graduates of the L'niversity of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Stone 
stated that "although residents of Maryland are given preference, the school must 
be very selective in choosing students because the tuition charged students covers 
only about one lifth of the cost of medical education. 

DR. BRADLEY PUBLISHES IMPORTANT ARTICLE IN LAY PRESS 

The July 8 number of the prominent Sunday Supplement of "Parade" has carried 
an important article entitled "Don't Let Your Child Get Lead Poisoning This 
Summer", an article written particularly for the lay press by Dr. J. Edmund Brad- 
ley, Professor of Pediatrics in the School of ^ledicine. 

DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY NOTES 

Dr. Raymond C. \'ail Robinson, class of 1940, recently spoke at the Pee Dee 
Medical Society of South Carolina on the subject of "The Cutaneous Manifestation 
of Internal Diseases". 

The Division of Dermatology presented an exhibit at the American Medical As- 
sociation meeting in Chicago in June, 1956. 

Dr. Francis A. Ellis and Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr. of the department attended 
the meeting of the American Dermatologic Association in Santa Barbara, California. 

MARYLAND SOCIETY FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH CONTINUES ACTR'E 

Dr. Dietrich C. Smith, secretary of the Maryland Society for ^Medical Research 
announces a continued activity on the part of the local and national groups to in- 
form citizens of needs and aims of research for medical education. 

The program as described includes the distribution of free-loan films on medical 
research and education particularly to elementary and high schools. 

The society also arranges conducted tours through medical research centers 
locally and for classes and clubs in the various public and private schools. 

The society also supplies small animals to classrooms for controlled and super- 
vised experiments in nutrition and physiology. It assists also in the recruitment 
I)rograms for nurses and medical technologists. 

-Maryland Society for Medical Research also supplies general information to 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECTION ' xxv 

interested groups and individuals regarding the importance of experimentation in 
medical research and education. 

In a recent article to physicians and members of the Faculty of the School of 
Medicine, Dr. Smith urged continued support through active membership in the 
society. 

MEDICAL LIBRARY NOTES 

Between May lirst and August first 1956, the following donors presented books 
and journals to the library: 

Dr. Charles Bagley, Jr. Hynson, Wescott and Dunning 

Dr. Louis V. Blum Mrs. E. B. Jarrett 

Emerson Drug Company Dr. John C. Krantz 

Dr. Frank H. J. Figge Dr. John E. Savage 

Dr. G. E. Gififord, Jr. Dr. E. R. Shipley 

Dr. Herman Goodman Dr. William ^I. Sweeney 

Dr. Frank W. Hachtel Mr. Jack H. Yesner 

Dr. Leo Hoffman Dr. Jacob Zimmerman 

Mr. C. Whitridge L. Briscoe made a generous contribution to the Ruth Lee Briscoe 
Librar}' Fund established in honor of his mother, the late Ruth Lee Briscoe, Li- 
brarian Emeritus of the Medical Library. 

Temporary Quarters for the Medical Library 

To clear the site for the new million-dollar medical sciences library building, the 
medical library collection has been moved from Davidge Hall to temporary quarters 
at 6 South Green Street. One and one half floors of the business building at that 
address will be the overcrowded and inadequate home of the medical library for 
probably the next two years. ^Months of searching resulted in finding no other 
feasible location near enough to the university to be practicable. 

Many thousands more books have perforce been sent to storage. That part of the 
collection placed in the temporary library fills most of the space, leaving little for 
reading areas. The library staff is hampered by lack of work space for needed services. 
Staff and library patrons alike will face difficulties that cannot be resolved at the 
temporary location. With the reward of a fine new building in view, however, it seems 
certain that a philoso[)hical attitude can be maintained during the trying interval. 

MEET THE EMERITI 
Dr. Ch.arles B.aglev, Jr. 

Dr. Charles Bagley, Jr. was born at Sunnybrook, Baltimore County, in 1882. 
His father was a highly respected and busy country practitioner of the old school. 
Young Charlie, at age four, moved to Harford County to the vicinity of his father's 
birth. At the time of death of a brother, in 1902, he acquired the farm on which 
he was born. This homestead is still maintained and care of its stock has been a 
pleasure and a hobby of Dr. Bagley 's through the years. 

Charles Bagle}', Jr. received his elementary and secondary education in a two- 



BLLLETIX 01- THE SCHOOL 01- MEDICIXE, C. OF MD. 




Dr. Charles Bagley, Jr. 



room country school in Harford County, being tutored for his high school studies. 
His mind was made up early as to what his career would be. It could hardly have 
been otherwise, with daily exposure to his father's extensive practice. 

So, in 1900, he sought admission to the University of Maryland. Dr. Dorsey Cole 
was then Dean of the Medical School and advised some courses at Deichman's, a 
college preparatory school, before matriculation. However, young Charlie obtained 
permission to take these courses concurrently. The medical curriculum had only 
recently been made a four year course. The young student graduated in due course 
of time in 1904 and then spent two years of internship at the University. In those 
days, it was a straight rather than a rotating internshij). One year was spent in 
medicine, under Dr. Charles Mitchell, and one year in general surgery, under Dr. 
Randolph Winslow. In 1906 Dr. Bagley sought further training at Sinai Hospital. 
He passed four years at this institution in Xose and Throat, and in General Surgery. 
In 1911 he received his A.B. degree from Loyola College, Baltimore. 

During his Sinai training. Dr. Bagley frequently visited across the street at the 
Hopkins and attended many of Dr. Harvey Cushing's neuro-surgical operative 
clinics. His interest in this direction was considerably aroused and in 1912 the op- 
portunity came to go to Boston with Dr. (\ishing when he was called to the I'ro- 



MEDICAL SCHOOL SECT 10 X xxvii 

fessorship of Surgery at Harvard. The new Peter Bent Brigham Hospital was com- 
pleted in that year and Dr. Bagley had a busy and profitable year at this hospital 
with Dr. Cushing as the first resident in Neurosurgery. Returning to Baltimore, 
Dr. Bagley worked at the Phipps Clinic daily, on a fellowship, and rapidly estab- 
lished a practice in neurosurgery. 

At the onset of World War I, the young physician was appointed a member of the 
sub-committee on Ophthalmology of the General ^Medical Board of the Council of 
National Defense. The committee was early taken into the Surgeon-General's 
Office and Dr. Bagley, in July 1917, went on active duty in Washington. The section 
on Head Surgery was organized and after this work was completed, Dr. Bagley was 
sent abroad as a consultant in neurosurgery. Much of his time was spent in base 
hospitals in France, gaining abundant and invaluable experience in his chosen field. 

At the close of the war. Dr. Bagley was assigned to Fort McHenry, which had 
become a neuropsychiatric center. He maintained this connection on a part-time basis 
for some time after the war. 

In 1919 the surgeon, then 37 years old, gave up his bacheloric liberty in favor of 
Judge Harlan's daughter of Bel Air. They established a residence and office in the 
Latrobe on Read Street, but later moved around the corner to 17 East Eager Street, 
where they still reside. 

Dr. Bagley taught and practiced at the University from the early twenties, but 
the Professorship of Neurosurgery was not established until 1931. He was instru- 
mental in founding and organizing this important department in the Medical School. 
His residency training program included a full year in neuropathology and was inte- 
grated with Baltimore City and ]\Iercy Hospitals for clinical material and experi- 
ence. Several of his past Residents are now professors at medical schools. One, Dr. 
James G. Arnold, succeeded Dr. Bagley in the Chair of Neurosurgery at the Uni- 
versity upon his retirement in 1954. The eminent brain surgeon was also a professor 
for twenty-three years and took the occasion of his fiftieth anniversary of graduation 
in medicine for his retirement. After retirement to emeritus status, he still actively 
continued his private consultant practice. He gradually cut down his professional 
activity, but maintained his office of thirty-five years in the Latrobe until July 1st 
of this year. 

Dr. Bagley was a Methodist by birth and upbringing, but changed his religious 
affiliation to Episcopalian at the time of his marriage. His church connection is at 
Emmanuel Protestant-Episcopal, at Cathedral and Read Streets. 

The Bagley children — Elizabeth and Charles HI — are now grown and have 
families of their own. Charles HI has followed in his father's footsteps and is still 
around the University after graduation and residency training in neuropsychiatry. 

Dr. Bagley never developed any absorbing hobbies during his active years and 
therefore finds his retirement somewhat burdensome. His interest in his grand- 
children, his farm in Harford County, and periodic travel occupy most of his time. 
He and Mrs. Bagley spent four months in Florida this past winter and spring. 

Since Dr. Bagley was too busy to do much writing during his active career, we 
trust a textbook on neurosurgery based on his wealth of experience will now be 
forthcoming. 

C. G.ARDXER Warner, M.D. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



OFFICERS* 

J. Sheldon Eastland, M.D., President 
William B. Lono, M.D., President-elect 

Vice-Presidents 

A. Harry Kinkelstein, M.D. Arthur Siwinski, M.D. Martin Strobel, M.D. 

Edwin H. Stewart, Jr., M.D., Secretary Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., M.D., Treasurer 

J. Emmett Queen, M.D., Assistant Secretary Minette E. Scott, Executive Secretary 

William H. Triplett, M.D., Director 



Board of Directors 

J. Morris Reese, M.D., 

Chairman 
J. Sheldon Eastland. M.D. 
Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., M.D. 
Edwin H. Stewart, Jr., M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 
J. Emmett Queen, M.D. 
Gibson J. Wells, M.D. 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 
William B. Long, M.D. 



Nominating Committee 

Emanuel Schiminek, M.D., 
Chairman 
Dexter L. Reimann, M.D. 
Edwin S. Muller, M.D. 
J. Howard Franz, M.D. 
Howard B. Mays, M.D. 



Representatives to General 
Alumni Board 
William H. Triplett, M.D. 
Thurston R. Adams, M.D. 
Daniel J. Pessagno, M.D. 



Library Committee 

Milton S. Sacks, M.D. 

Representatives, Editorial Board, 

Bulletin 

Harry C. Hull, M.D. 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. 

J. Sheldon Eastland, M.D. 

(ex-officio) 

Representatives, Advisory Board, 
Faculty 

William H. Triplett, M.D. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. 
Edwin H. Stewart, M.D. 



DEAN'S LETTER 

Dear Members of the Alumni, Faculty and Students: 

One of the major roles of a medical school is the encouragement of students to 
enter academic careers in medicine. It is perhaps unnecessary to state that the 
quality of the educational program offered by a medical school is totally dependent 
upon the quality of the teachers responsible for that program. However, unless 
medical schools are mindful of the constant need to renew and maintain the faculty 
and an interest in scholarly teaching, able teachers will become scarce and the 
profession itself will deteriorate. 

The encouragement for entering academic careers is not the responsibility of a 
few medical schools, but of all such schools. The academic environment is intimately 
associated with creative efforts in improving medicine and without such an environ- 
ment, undergraduates and graduates would lack the inspiring leadership that has 
marked the great progress made during the last 100 years. 

To encourage our students to consider academic careers every effort is being 
made to raise the dignity and recognition of academic life in medicine, to improve 
the facilities and opportunities for research, to provide for study and evaluation of 
teaching programs and teachers and afford opportunities for advanced study and 
exchange of work and ideas with other institutions. 

The very term doctor had its origin from the early recognition that mastery of 
medicine required higher education at an advanced level and the original doctorate 
degrees were only awarded in medicine, law and divinity. 



ALU MM ASSOCIATION SECTION xxix 

The young aspirant to becoming a physician gains much of his tirst contacts with 
the formal side of medical education through the medical school catalogues or bul- 
letins. Study of these formal statements and descriptions gives the student his first 
insight as to the nature and extent of the education program in medicine. It aids 
the scholar in deciding whether or not medicine is a worthy challenge for a career. 

The Bulletin of the School of ^ledicine is being studied and revised in an attempt 
to convey additional information on the opportunities for advanced study in the 
medical school. 

It is hoped that this information plus additional opportunities and support will 
encourage students to undertake graduate work, and that all the departments of the 
medical school will utilize extensively, graduate programs in the development and 
presentation of their portions of the medical curriculum. 

Sincerely, 

WiLLi.\M S. Stoxe, M.D. 

Dean 



ALUMXI ASSOCIATION TO STRIKE CO.^niEMORATR'E :\IEDAL OX 
OCCASIOX OF SESQUICEXTEXXIAL 

A silver and bronze medal commemorating the 150th anniversary of the School 
of ^ledicine will be struck on the occasion of Founders Day, January- 20, 1957. 

This interesting souvenir of the School of Medicine's Sesquicentennial year was 
designed by the L. G. Balfour Company. On the obverse side is an engraving of the 
School of r^Iedicine surrounded by the words "'150 years of medical education — 1907- 
1957". The reverse side is the seal of the University of Mar\-land. 

The medal will be offered in both brilliant sterling and in bronze. A limited edition 
of the silver coins will be offered on a "first come, first ser\-e basis." It is anticipated 
that the cost of the silver medal will be approximately S6.00 and that of the bronze 
S3.00. 

Advance subscriptions and resers-ations for the limited silver edition should be 
made to ^^ledical Alumni Association, University of Mar>-land School of Medicine, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, Mar}-land. 

-]—' 





Drawing of Sesquicentennial Medal 



XXX BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ADVANX^E NOTICE 

The A. M. A. meets in New York City in 1957 and it is our misfortune to have 
the dates conflict with our Spring Activities. The scheduled dates of the A. M. A. 
meeting are: June 3-7, 1957 and our big day on the BaUimore campus is scheduled 
for June 6. We are already at work on plans for a social event for Maryland Alumni 
during the A. M. A. meeting. Dr. Joseph Nataro of Newark, N. J., has graciously 
accepted the Chairmanship of an Arrangements Committee and correspondence be- 
tween him and this headquarters indicates he is already at work on plans for next 
June. The A. M. A. has also been addressed with respect to the co-ordination of time, 
place, etc. and request tiled for publicity through the Journal at the appropriate 
time. This for your information. 

\V. H. Triplett, jNI.D. 
Director 

ALUMNI ELECT OFFICERS FOR 1956-57 

At the annual meeting of the jMedical Alumni Association the following were 
elected officers for the year 1956-57. It is to be noted that this year for the tirst 
time a President-Elect has been included in the list of otiicers coming up for elec- 
tion. Dr. William B. Long, Jr. of Salisbury, Maryland will succeed to the Presidency 
for the 1957-58 term. The following will serve for the ensuing year. 

President — J. Sheldon Eastland, ISI.D. 
President-Elect — William B. Long, Jr., ]\I.D. 
Vice-Presidents — A. Harry Finkelstein, M.D. 

Arthur Siwinski, ]\I.D. 

:\Iartin Strobel, :M.D. 
Board of Directors — Gibson J. Wells, ]\I.D. 

Representative to General Alumni Board — Thurston R. Adams, ^I.D. 
^Member to Nominating Committee — Howard B. Mays, M.D. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION HONORS CLASS OF 1906 
Alumni Day at School of Medicine a Success 

The annual Medical Alumni Day at the School of Medicine was held on June 
7, 1956. 

Beginning at 9:00 A.M. the visiting alumni were guests of the Postgraduate 
Committee in the new quarters in the Old ^ledical School Building. These have now 
been completely air-conditioned and coffee and light refreshments were served. 

At 10:00 A.M. a series of papers presented by the faculty of the School of ^ledi- 
cine were read. Included in the scientilic session was a demonstration of the applica- 
tion of classroom television in the teaching of clinical and pathologic subjects. This 
new television equipment, owned and operated by the Postgraduate Committee 
promises to be a valuable visual aid in the demonstration of small items to a large 
audience. 

The scientific session was followed by the annual luncheon held in the gymnasium 
of the Psychiatric Institute. On this occasion Dr. Joseph Nataro of the class of 1925 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION xxxi 

was presented the Alumni Honor Award and gold key. Dr. Nataro's remarks are 
printed elsewhere in the Bulletin of the School of ^Medicine. Election of officers for 
the ensuing year followed. 

In the evening the annual banquet attended by more than 350 alumni and friends 
was climaxed by the presentation of the 50 year certificates to the members of the 
class of 1906. 

The following alumni of the School of Medicine registered on Alumni Day. 



1895 
Nicholas G. Wilson 

Harry J. Bennett 
Harry A. Cantwell 
M. Tolbert Dalton 
Leon P. Jankiewicz 



1897 1903 

Lucius N. Glenn C. B. Ensor 

1906 

Harvey A. Kelly Bernard O. Thomas, Sr. 

Louis H. Limauro Henry J. Walton 

Solomon G. Moore Parker N. Wentz 
J. G. Fowble Smith 



George C. Coulbourn 
Frank P. Firey 
Herbert ]\I. Foster 
Norman T. Kirk 



H. R. Seelinger 
jNIaurice E. Shamer 
J. A. Thompson 
Ralph P. Truitt 



J. B. Kilbourn 
Stack Kelly 

H. Boyd Wylie 
1914 
Austin H. Wood 



1909 
Harry j\L Robinson, Sr 
1910 
Erasmus H. Kloman 
V. H. McKnight 
Roscoe D. McMillan 
J. Runkel 

1911 
John F. Hogan, Sr. 
F. C. Hutchinson 

1912 
Everett A. Livingston 

1913 
W. Houston Toulson 

1915 
Charles A. Cahn Ralph Cohen William R. Johnson 

1916 

Henry F. Buettner Harold M. Stein 

1917 

Charles H. Audet, Sr. Marvin H. Porterfield E. C. Reitzel 

1918 

John M. Nicklas 

1920 

Louis C. Dobihal J. ^^lorris Reese 

1921 
J. W. Schilling Felix S. Shubert 

1923 1925 

William S. Love Joseph Xataro 

1926 

Margaret B. Ballard Henry DeVincenlis Jacob R. Jensen 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

1927 
T. Nelson Carey E. Eugene (^ovington 

Bernard Cohen A. H. Finkelstein 

Frank K. ^Morris 

1928 
Joseph Laukaitis 
1929 
Walter A. Anderson Jacob H. Conn Henry J. Ullrich 

1930 
Samuel Fisher Kenneth Benfer 

1931 
Beatrice Bamberger Abraham Karger Richard L. Murphy 

E. I. Baumgartner Walter J. Keefe Emanuel Schimunek 

Roy Cashwell Jerome L. Krieger Arthur Siwinski 

Kenneth L. Cloninger , • , • i i r^i 

^r , TT n J D. G. Mankovich Michael Skovron 

Mark Hollander 

K. M. Hornbrook Thomas A. JMartin jMarvin L. Slate 

Samuel Jacobson John Masterson Milford Sprecher 

1932 

Louis F. Klines Aaron C. Sollod 

1933 

Lauriston L. Keown Leon Kochman Sidney Novenstein 

1934 
Thurston R. Adams Louis V. Blum Milton S. Sacks 

1935 
Josiah A. Hunt Karl Mech 

Howard B. Mays Harry AL Robinson, Jr. 

1936 
Harry C. Bowie W'alter Karfgin 

William Greifinger Joseph R. Myerowitz 

Gibson J. Wells 
1937 
Isadore Kaplan ^Maurice Nataro 

Joseph E. Muse, Jr. Nathan E. Needle 

1938 
Robert C. Sheppard John A. Wagner 

Bernard O. Thomas, Jr. Theodore E. Woodward 

1939 
Arnold Lavenstein Dexter L. Reimann 

1940 

Edmund G. Beacham James R. Karns 

1941 

Joseph J. Bowen Walter J. Revel! John D. Young, Jr. 

1942 
E. Roderick Shipley 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 
1943 



John ^1. Dennis 

Charles H. Audet, Jr. 
Jean AmUcke Audet 
Robert J. Audet 
Vincent O. Eareckson 



James H. Shell 

Edwin O. Hendrickson 
August Kiel 
Raymond L. Markley 
Edward P. Smith, Jr. 



Robert ]\I. N. Crosby Stephen Van Lill 

1945 
M. Dorcas Harley 
1946 
William D. Gentry 
William Gray 
Leland J. Hansen 
John B. Harley 
Herbert Swindell 

1947 

Jose G. Valderas 

1948 

Katherine V. Kemp Kyle Y. Swisher 

1951 

John R. Buell, Jr. Roger D. Scott Melvin ]\1. Udel 

Charles K. Ferguson Roy K. Skipton Charles P. W'atson 

1954 1955 

Robert B. Goldstein Joseph C. Eshelman 

ADDRESS BY DOCTOR JOSEPH NATARO 

At Annual Alumni Luncheon, Baltimore, ]\1aryland, June 7, 1956 

Dr. Reese . . . Dean Stone . . . Dr. Triplett . . . Fellow Alumni . . . Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

Receiving the Alumni Honor Award and the Gold Key is indeed a wonderful 
feeling. I accept this honor with a great deal of humility. I would like to offer my 
profound thanks to the Board of Directors and the Nominating Committee for 
making this day one that I will long remember. 

But this presentation, I feel, goes deeper than just making a doctor happy. It 
gives him the keen appreciation of having his name placed with such men as Dr. 
Wayne Babcock, Dr. Emil Novak, the late General Rankin, and many other out- 
standing and illustrious graduates of Maryland, and in addition makes him feel 
'hat in his own small way he has made a lasting contribution to the tield of medicine. 

But no contribution, whether in the field of medicine or in any other field, can be 
acknowledged without paying tribute to the people behind the scenes, the family 
whose sacrifices and encouragement make all this possible. 

I would like to say "Thanks" to my brother Maurice, who is now Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Medicine at the University of Louisville in Kentucky, and Director of 
Radioisotopes at the Nichol's Veteran's Hospital. My son Jerome, who is a general 
practitioner at Levittown in Long Island. My son Frank, who will complete his 
internshij) in a few weeks and will start the practice of medicine and surgery to- 
gether with his older brother, and my son Joseph Jr., the embryo M.D., who has 
just completed his first year of medicine here at ^Maryland. 



xxxiv BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

And, most of all, to the woman who is behind all these men, my wife Julia, the 
gracious and understanding woman to whom we all owe a great deal. . . . Julia, will 
you please stand up and take a bow. To you Julia we would all like to say "Thanks" 
for your patience, inspirations and understanding. Whatever measure of success we 
have today we owe to you. I might add that Mrs. Nataro has suffered through so 
many medical examinations with her family that if she were to take a Neuroanatomy 
or Gross Anatomy quiz today, she would most certainly get a sympathetic A. 

I am told that it is customary for one to make an address on some subject or 
other at this time. But I am going to relinquish that opportunity and instead make 
a plea. It is simply this. Let's bring back the family doctor, the generalist, the per- 
sonal physician, the general practitioner. 

The reasons for the need of the return of the general practitioner were best phrased 
some forty years ago by Sir William Osier when he wrote these words. 

'Tt will be a very sorry day for humanity, if the general practicioner, the family 

guide, philosopher, and friend become extinct. The world and society in general 

will be the losers. He may not know so much medicine, he may not be able to 

recognize and call by name many of the rare and more modern differentiation of 

disease conditions, but he has something that the individual needs . . . hope, 

coxFiDEN'CE, AXD GOOD CHEER, and that no one else can supply in equal manner." 

I sincerely hope that these words, which Dr. Osier meant only as a warning never 

become a reality. It is up to us, the members of the medical profession to prevent 

this from happening. ]\Iay I suggest that if each one of us could encourage a young 

graduate to enter the field of the generalist. Dr. Osier's words will not have been 

written in vain. 

In taking my leave, I would like to again express my gratitude to the University 
of Maryland Medical School for conferring this great honor upon me. . . . Thank you. 

DIRECTORY PUBLISHED IN THIS ISSUE 

For the first time, the Medical Alumni Association in collaboration with the 
Faculty of the School of Medicine is publishing a Directory of active members of 
the Medical Alumni Association. This organization boasts a very high percentage of 
activity among the known living graduates of the Baltimore Medical College, the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons and the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine. 

The Alumni Directory marks a progressive move in the direction of further uniting 
the alumni of the School of Medicine in concerted activity and effort for the im- 
provement of the School. It is now possible to locate accurately classmates and other 
graduates of the School who may be located in the region in which an alumnus 
finds himself. 

Reprints will be available through the Alumni Oflfice and requests for them should, 
be directed to Dr. William H. Triplett, Director, Medical Alumni Association 
University of Maryland, Baltimore 1 Maryland. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION xxxv 

COMMEMORATIVE ITEMS ON SALE TO MARK 
SESQUICENTENNIAL YEAR 

University Hospital Gift Shop to Offer Special Items 
During Period of Celebration 

The Woman's Auxiliary Board of the University Hospital has co-operated with 
the Sesquicentennial Committee in arranging for the sale of appropriately marked 
items commemorating the Sesquicentennial Year. Ceramic ashtrays, a small cup 
and saucer, and a cigarette box will be offered, appropriately embossed with the seal 
of the University of Maryland and the sesquicentennial dates 1807-1957. It is ex- 
pected that these items will be on sale in the University Hospital Gift Shop soon 
after the official exercises opening the Sesquicentennial Year in January. As yet 
prices are not available but application for the limited supply of these special items 
should be made directly to the Gift Shop, University Hospital, Baltimore 1 Mary- 
land. It is anticipated that a catalogue with prices will be promptly forwarded to 
any interested person inquiring. 

B. M. C. ALUMNUS HONORED 

Dr. Remo Fabbri, B. M. C. class of 1909, was honored at a celebration attended 
by some 3,612 individuals whom Dr. Fabbri had delivered during his nearly 40 
years of active practice in Norristown, Pennsylvania. 

In an article published in the Times Herald of that city, tribute was paid to the 
doctor who claims that approximately 2,500 of the youngsters whom he attended 
at birth are still living in the vicinity of their home town. 

ITEMS 

Dr. Philip H. Lerman, class of 1944, is currently engaged in the practice of urology 
with oflfices at 459 South Oyster Bay Road, Hicksville, New York. 

Dr. Leonard M. Lister, class of 1951, has announced the opening of his offices for 
the practice of internal medicine and clinical endocrinology at 2500 Eutaw Place 
in Baltimore. 

Dr. John Roberts Phillips, class of 1927, a member of the International College 
of Surgeons and his wife Airs. Rebecca Hall Phillips participated in the dedication 
of a Florence Nightingale nursing cap presented by Mrs. Phillips, this having taken 
place at the time of the Twenty-tirst Assembly of the United States and Canadian 
Sections of the International College in September, 1956. Mrs. Phillips is a member 
of the class of 1927, University of Maryland School of Nursing. Dr. and ]\Irs. Phil- 
lips were hosts to the Medical Alumni Association in Houston, Texas on the occasion 
of the meeting of the Southern Medical Association in 1955. 

Dr. Donald J. Silberman, class of 1938, has been appointed Associate Professor of 
Pediatrics in the ^Medical College of the University of Alabama. Dr. Silberman has 
also been promoted to the rank of Colonel in the ^iledical Corps of the United States 
Army Reserve. 

Dr. Stanley W. Hanson, Jr., class of 1950 and Dr. John A. Spittel, Jr., class of 



XXX vi BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

1949, received advanced degrees from the University of ^Minnesota. Dr. Henson 
received the degree of Master of Science in Surgery and Dr. Spittel received the 
degree of Master of Science in Medicine. 

Dr. Daniel R. Robinson, class of 1933, is currently Manager of the \'eterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital at Fort Howard, Maryland. 

Dr. James T. Welborn, class of 1944, and a Captain in the Medical Corps of the 
United States Army was recently graduated from the Army ^ledical Service School 
at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

Dr. Andrew J, Devlin, class of 1952, has announced the opening of his office for 
the practice of obstetrics and gynecology at 4110 North Division Street, Spokane, 
Washington. 

Captain Clarence F. Morrison, MC, USX, and a member of the class of 1931 has 
been assigned as Executive Officer of the U. S. Xaval Hospital, Pensacola, Florida. 
Entering the naval service in June, 1931, Dr. Morrison was formerly attached to 
the U. S. X'aval Hospital at Pensacola where he served as Chief of the Orthopedic 
service. 

Dr. John D. Sturgeon, class of 1880 P & S, and one of the oldest living practitioners 
in America recently celebrated his 102nd birthday on July 12, 1956. In 1954 the 
Bulletin carried a rather extensive account of Dr. Sturgeon's achievements (vol. 9, 
p. xxiii) October, 1954. 

Dr. Charles Reid Edwards, class of 1913, was recently elected President of the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. 

Dr. H. Ellas Diamond, class of 1926, was recently elected a Fellow of the Royal 
Society of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Academy of ^Medicine. Dr. 
Diamond has also been a Fellow of the American College of Allergists since 1944.^ 




Equipment and Supplies for: 

Pnysicians ana Surgeons * Hospital* 

Laboratories * Industrial Clinics 

Murray- jBaumgartner 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 

5 West Ckase Street • SArato^a 7-7333 
Baltimore L Maryland 



POSTGRADUATE COMMITTEE SECTION 

POSTGRADUATE COMMITTEE, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

HOWARD M. BUBERT, M.D., Chairman and Director 

Elizabeth B . Carroll , Executive Secretary 

Post Graduate Office: Room 201 

Old Medical Building, Lombard and Greene Streets 

Baltimore 1 , Maryland 

LECTURE SERIES FOR DELAWARE A.G.P 

A series of ten postgraduate lectures has been arranged by the Postgraduate 
Committee for the Delaware Academy of General Practice to be given at the Wil- 
mington General Hospital Nurses Home, Chestnut and Broom Streets, Wilmington, 
Delaware. The program is as follows: 

Sept. 26 Cardiov.ascular 

(a) Common Cardiac Conditions: Occlusion, Rheumatic Carditis; Diag- 
nosis and Treatment Dr. Leonard Scherlis 

(b) Surgery for the Cardiac Patient Dr. R. Adams Cowley 

Oct. 3 Respiratory 

(a) Chemotherapy Dr. Lawrence Serra 

(b) Surgical Management Dr. Otto C. Brantigan 

Oct. 10 Endocrinology 

(a) Diabetes Mellitus: Pathogenesis and Management of the Coma Case 

Dr. Charles Shaw 

(b) Thyroid Disorders: Diagnosis and Management 

Dr. Joseph Workman 
Oct. 17 Diseases of the Blood 

(a) Common Blood Discrasias Dr. Milton S. Sacks 

Oct. 24 Hypertension 

(a) Clinical Aspects: Diagnosis and Management 

Dr. Samuel T. R. Revell, Jr. 
Dr. Francis J. Borges 
Oct. 31 Neurology 

Neurological Problems in General Practice: Diagnosis and Management 

Dr. Charles \"an Buskirk 

Nov. 7 CiERIATRICS 

Geriatrics for the Generalist Dr. Louis A. M. Krause 

Nov. 14 I.VDUSTRIAL INIeDICINE 

Industrial Medicine for the (ieneralist Dr. E. Roderick Shipley 

Nov. 21 Infectious Diseases 

Infectious Diseases: Modern Diagnosis and Treatment 

Dr. Charles Wisseman 
xxxvii 



xxxviii BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Nov. 28 Psychosomatic ?^Ikdicixe 

Psychosomatic ^Manifestations as Seen by the Generalist 

Dr. Ephraim T. Lisansky 

The lectures will be on Wednesday afternoons from one o'clock until four o'clock 
and each lecture will begin with Basic Physiology as Applied to Clinical Medi- 
cine as relates to the subject. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

A weekly calendar of events is being compiled and published by the Postgraduate 
Committee. Deadline for material is noon on Monday preceding the week of the 
activity. Please send your items to the Postgraduate Committee office. 

BASIC SCIENCES AS APPLIED TO :MEDICINE 

As this publication goes to press, definite information is not available regarding 
the postgraduate course in Basic Sciences as They Apply to the Practice or 
Medicint;. The Committee hopes, however, to be able to offer this part-time course 
again and is endeavoring to set it up to begin very early in the fall. For further 
information please contact the Postgraduate Committee ofBce. 



Single Copies of 
Bulletin are Available 



Back numbers of many volumes of the Bulletin of the 
School of Medicine are available. 

An inquiry will be promptly acknowledged. Copies in 
stock can be purchased at $2.00 per volume (single 
copies $.50) as long as they last. All issues postpaid. 

Address 

Bulletin of the School of Medicine 
University of Maryland 
Lombard & Greene Sts. 
Baltimore i, Maryland 



0hitnaxit^ 

Conley, Charles H., Frederick, Md.; B. M. C, class of 1899; aged 79; served 
during World War I; died, March 20, 1956, of coronary artery disease. 

Day, Joseph Edward, Salt Lake City, Utah; P & S, class of 1913; aged 75; served 
during World War I; died, April 10, 1956, of cerebral hemorrhage. 

Greven, Harry John, Proctorsville, Vt.; B. M. C, class of 1907; aged 70; died, 
March 9, 1956, of coronary disease. 

Guthrie, Joseph Arthur, Huntington, W. Va.; P & S, class of 1903; aged 77; died, 
February 26, 1956, of coronary occlusion. 

Howard, Lewis Hoagland, Tucson, Ariz.; class of 1916; aged 62; served during 
World War I; died, April 6, 1956, of cerebral hemorrhage and hypertension. 

Jones, Latimer Porter, Pennsboro, W. Va.; P & S, class of 1908; aged 71; died, 
March 13, 1956, of lymphatic leukemia. 

Meade, James William, Ushing Creek, Md.; class of 1909; aged 67; died, March 
18, 1956, of adenocarcinoma of the stomach with metastasis. 

Seal, Gratta Earle, New Castle, Pa.; class of 1918; aged 66; died, March 27, 1956, 
of cerebral hemorrhage. 

Silver, E. Drew, Hightstown, N. J.; P & S, class of 1913; aged 66; served during 
World War I; died, March 27, 1956, of myocardial insufficiency. 

Solomon, Milton L., Baltimore, Md.; class of 1929; aged 52; died, February 14, 
1956, of coronary thrombosis. 

Symington, John, Carthage, N. C; B. M. C, class of 1902; aged 85; died, Janu- 
ary 22 1956, of cerebral hemorrhage and arteriosclerosis 

Taylor, Ralph Leland, Davisboro, Ga.; class of 1911; aged 68; died, January 22 
1956, of uremia. 

Voss, Norwood Warner, Wilmington, Del.; class of 1916; aged 70; died, February 
17, 1956. 

Westlake, Samuel B., St. Louis, ]\lo.; B. M. C, class of 1906; aged 77; died 
March 27, 1956, of coronary occlusion and myocardial infarction. 

Wilson, Harry C, Warriors ]\lark. Pa.; P & S, class of 1908; aged 76; died, Febru- 
ary 1, 1956, of benign prostatic hypertrophy with urinary obstruction and diabetes 
mellitus. 

Dr. Fred M. DuckwaU 

Dr. Fred M. Duckwall, class of 1928, died on September 27, 1955 in Kingsport, 
Tennessee of coronary thrombosis. A native of Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, 
received his surgical training at Baltimore City Hospitals following his graduation 
and then returned to Kingsport, Tennessee where he was a member of the surgical 
department of the Holston \'alley Community Hospital. 

A leader in civic affairs. Dr. Duckwall was a director of the Kingsport National 
Bank, was president of the Medical Arts Building, Incorporated and was a member 
of the Army Medical Reserve Corps. 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Dear Members of the Alumni: 

Your contriljulions to the National l-'und for Medical Education are of 
great assistance in bringing about improvement in the Medical School. 
Contributions made this year (1956) are particularly signiticant because: 
1. They are matched by the Ford F'oundation in the amount of 70 per cent 
if the contribution is the same as last year, and 100 per cent if they exceed 
last year's gifts. 2. In the process of reorganizing the Medical School there 
are many urgent needs that cannot be obtained under the State appropria- 
tions allowed for the medical school. This must not be construed to mean 
we are not getting State support for our requests. We have received very 
reasonable consideration, but our needs are many and great and we must 
try to progress more rapidly than can be depended upon by State appro- 
priations alone. 

We urge you to support the National Fund for Medical Education by 
gifts to them earmarked for the University of Maryland, School of Medicine. 

Gifts from Alumni to the National Fund for Medical Education are par- 
ticularly significant in that industry uses them as a criteria of the significance 
doctors attribute to the needs for increased support of medical education 
and gage their contributions to medical education accordingly. 

Sincerely, 
William S, Stone, M.D.,Dean 




string on your finger! 

Have you made your 1955 con- 
tribution to Medical Education? 

Whether you make your gift 

through your Alumni Committee 
or through the American 
Medical Education Foundation — NOW is the time to 
support Medical Education. 

Mail your check TODAY. 

american medical educatioo foundation 

535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago 10, III. 
• This space contributed by the publisher 



THE MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 






irectory 



1956 



Fellow Alumni: 

I am pleased to have a part in the development and publication of this, the first 
roster of known living active graduates ever attempted. 

It is offered as a helpful gesture in bringing our alumni closer together, to stimu- 
late interest in alumni affairs and to promote good will toward the great University 
we have the honor to represent. 

A report of errors and omissions noted is solicited and comments regarding im- 
provement of alumni services welcomed. 

Sincerely, 

J. Sheldon Eastland, M.D. 

President 



ALUMNI DIRECTORY 



AARONSON, Meyer W., 9441 Wilshire Blvd., 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 
ABBOTT, Thomas G., 4509 Liberty Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 7, Md. 
ABESHOUSE, George A., Sinai Hospital, 

Baltimore 5, Md. 
ABRAHAM, Robert A., 1511 N. York Road, 

Towson 4, Md. 
ABRAMS, Samuel J., 5801 Greenspring Ave., 

Baltimore 9, Md. 
ABRAMSON, Daniel J., 900 17th St., N. VV., 

Washington 6, D. C. 
ABRASKIN, Mortimer D., 1 Lincoln Road 

Bldg., Miami Beach 39, Fla. 
ACKLEY, David Bartine, 21 N. Clinton Ave., 

Trenton, N. J. 
ACTON, Elizabeth, 700 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 
ADALMAN, Philip, 87-lG 37th Ave., Jackson 

Heights 72, N. Y. 
ADAMS, John E., L'nion Memorial Hospital, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
ADAMS, Thurston R., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
ADKINS, Robert T., Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
ADZIMA, Joseph, 409 Noble Ave., Bridge- 

[lort. Conn. 
AGNELLI, Saverio, 281 E. 151st St., New 

York 51, N. Y. 
AGNEW, John R., 888 Worthington St., 

Springfield 9, Mass. 
AHLQUIST, Richard E., Jr., University of 

California, School of Medicine, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
AHROON, Carl K., Jr., 1511 E. Grove St., 

Bloomington, 111. 
AHROON, William .V., Clifton Springs Sana- 
torium and Clinic, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 
AKEHURST, James, 4012 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
ALAGIA, Damian Paul, Frederick Avenue, 

Catonsville, Md. 
ALBERTI, Aurora F., 5516 Uppingham St., 

Somerset, Chevy Chase, Md. 
ALESSI, Edward J., 6217 Harford Road, 

Baltimore 14, Md. 
ALGIRE, Glen H., National Cancer Institute, 

Bethesda, Md. 



509 Sjjring Ave., 
A., 706 Franklin 



ALLSOPP, Richard C, 246 Van Buren St., 
Evans Cit>', Pa. 

ALONSO, Miguel, P. O. Box 82K6, Fernandez 
Juncos Station, Santurce, P. R. 

AMOS, Hugh, 15701 Detroit Ave., Lakewood 
7, Ohio 

ANDERSON, Albert L., 44 Southgate Ave., 
Annapolis, Md. 

ANDERSON, Daniel G., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

ANDERSON, George H., 176 4th Ave., N. E., 
St. Petersburg 4, Fla. 

ANDERSON, John B., 294 Vanderbilt Road, 
Asheville, N. C. 

ANDERSON, Lang VV., P.O. Box 432, Willis- 
ton, S. C. 

ANDERSON, Walter Anders, 3001 Shannon 
Drive, Baltimore 18, Md. 

ANDERSEN, William A., 
Luthervillc, Md. 

ANDREWS, Chadbourne 
St., Tamj)a, Fla. 

ANDREWS, Stephen R., Jr., Elkton, Md. 

ANTONIUS, Nicholas V., 143 S. Center St., 
South Orange, N. J. 

APPLEFELD, Willard, 5901 Park Heights 
Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 

ARTHUR, Robert K., Jr., 34 W. Market St., 
Tiffin, Ohio 

ARTIGIANA, Philbert, 2942 E. Fayette St., 
Baltimore, Md. 

ASHMAN, Harry, 3700 Garrison Blvd., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

ASHMAN, Leon, 2510 Taney Road, Balti- 
more 9, Md. 

ASKIN, John A., 1406 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

AUDET, Charles H., Sr., 3 Second Ave., 
Waterbury 10, Conn. 

AUDET, Charles H., Jr., 3 2nd Ave., Water- 
bury 10, Conn. 

AUDET, Jeanne A. 
Waterbury, Conn. 

AUDET, Robert J. 
Waterbury, Conn. 

AUNGST, Melvin R., Fort Kent, Maine 

A YD, Frank John, 2005 E. Monument St., 
Baltimore 5, Md. 

AYD, Frank J., Jr., 6231 York Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 



132 E. Mountain Road, 



132 E. Mountain Road, 



xliii 



xliv 



DIRECTORY 



B 

BACHMAN, Leonard, i2f> Highland Lane, 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
BACON, A. Maynard, Jr., 819 Forrest Drive, 

Hagerstown. Md. 
BAER. Adolph. 3S.S1 Fialiands Ave., Brooklyn, 

X. V. 
BAER, Henry .K., L'niversity of Virginia Hos- 

l)ilal, Charlottesville, Va. 
BAGGETT, Joseph \V., Oil Hay St., Fayette- 

villc, X. C. 
BAGGOTT, BARTUS T., 3812 Greenmount 

.\ve., Baltimore 18, Md. 
BAGLEY, Charles, Jr., The Latrobe Apts., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
BAGLEY, Charles, III, Post Office, Kings- 

ville, Md. 
BAIER, John C, 815 Eastern Ave., Baltimore 

21, Md. 
BAILEY, Hugh A., 1031 Quarrier St., Charles- 
ton, \V. Va. 
BAILEY, Walter L.. 501 Delaware Ave., 

Wilmington 10, Del. 
BAKAL, Daniel, Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
BAKER, Frank W., Jr., 6001 The Alameda, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
BAKER, George S., 200 2nd Ave., S. W. 

Rochester, Minn. 
BALCERZAK, S. P., 101 E. Main St., Car- 
negie, Pa. 
BALCERZAK, Stanley P., Jr., Swallow Hill 

Rd., Carnegie, Pa. 
BALDWIN, Ruth, Seizure Clinic, University 

Hos[)ital, Baltimore 1, Md. 
BALLARD, Margaret B., Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
BAMBERGER, Beatrice, Benjamin Franklin 

Hospital, Columbus 7, Ohio 
BANK, R. Stanley, 1510 State St., Harrisburg, 

Pa. 
BANNEN, Wm. J., P.O. Box 248, Simpson- 

ville, S. C. 
BANVARD, F. X., 1216 McCurley Ave., 

Catonsvilie 28, Md. 
BARCHET, Stephen, U. S. Naval Hospital, 

Chelsea, ]\Iass. 
BARDFELD, Benjamin, 1080 E. Landis Ave., 

Vincland, X. J. 
BARISHAW, Samuel B., 25 Bentley Ave., 

Jersey City, X'. J. 
BARKER, Daniel C, 104 Rowland Road, 

Fairfield, Conn. 
BARKER, David H., 7220 Gratiot Ave., 

Detroit 13, Mich. 



BARKER, J. W.. Harbor Hills, Box 677, 
Hebron, Ohio 

BARNARDO, .Xnthony A., Mercy Hospital, 
Balliniore 2, Md. 

BARNES, Bruce, Seaford, Del. 

BARNES, John David, 34 Court St., Xew 
Bedford, Mass. 

BARNES, Thomas G., 344 Arnold Ave., 
Greenville, Miss. 

BARNETT, Charles P., Mary Washington 
Hosjiital, Fredericksburg, Va. 

BARROW. Bernard, Blackstone, Va. 

BARSTOW, Mar\- V. Medairy, Bradshaw, Md. 

BARTHEL, John P., 115 3rd St., S. E., Cedar 
RajHcis, Iowa. 

BARTHEL, Robert A., Jr., Forest Hill, Md. 

BATES, James Herbert, 230 E. Main St., 
Elkton, Md. 

BAUER, Robert E., 6012 Northwood Drive, 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

BAUM, Max, 1501 X. Milton Ave., Balti- 
more 13, Md. 

BAUMANN, Wilbur X., Travers St.. Cam- 
bridge, Md. 

BAUMGARTNER, Eugene Irving, Oakland, 
Md. 

BAWDEN, George A., :Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

BAYLUS, H. H., 1600 Wilkens Ave., Balti- 
more 23, Md. 

BEACHAM, Edmund G., 710 Thornwood 
Court, Baltimore 4, Md. 

BEARD, Grover Cleveland, Atkinson, N. C. 

BEARDSLEY, Earl M., 207 Maryland Ave., 
Salisbur_\', Md. 

BEAULIEU, Elmer Jos., Whitman, Mass. 

BEAVEN, Col. C. L., 916 Bolivia St., El Paso. 
Texas 

BECK, Harry M., 700 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

BECKER, Martin, 94 S. Munn Ave., East 
Orange, X^. J. 

BECKNER, William F., 713 West Virginia 
Bldg., Huntington, W. Va. 

BEERS, Reid L., 1625 Irving Ave., Glendale, 
Calif. 

BEITLER, Frederick V., 1014 Francis Ave., 
Baltimore 27, Md. 

BELGRAD, Richard, Universitj- Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

BELINKIN, William, 495 E. 178th St., Xew 
York 57, N. V. 

BELL, Arthur K., 1170 Sylvania Ave., Toledo 
12, Ohio 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



xlv 



BELL, David F., Jr., Bluefield Sanatorium, 

Biucfieid, \V. Va. 
BELL, Houston L., 711 S. JeiTerson St., Koa- 

n()l<c, Va. 
BELLIN, David E., 37-37 75th St., Jackson 

Heights 72, N. Y. 
BELLOMO, Frank R., The Mountainside Hos- 

l)ilal, Montclair, N. J. 
BENFER, Kenneth, 258 E. Market St., York, 

Pa. 
BENJAMIN, William P., Winter Veterans Adm. 

Hospital, Topeka, Kansas 
BENNET, D. F., 4 Main St., Lubec, Maine 
BENNETT, George E., 4 E. Madison St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
BENNETT, Harry J., 121 N. Julian St., Ebens- 

burg, Pa. 
BENNION, Jerald H., W. H. Groves Latter 

Day Saints Hosp., Salt Lake City, Utah 
BENSON, Carl Fisher, 5111 York Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 
BENSON, Clarence Irving, Port Deposit, Md. 
BENSON, Edward H., Manor Road, Glen 

Arm, Md. 
BERCOVITZ, Nathan, 675 E. 140th St., 

Bronx, N. Y., N. Y. 
BERDANN, Benjamin, 5010A Ritchie High- 

\va\', Baltimore 25, Md. 
BERESTON, Eugene, 2406 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 
BERGER, Herbert, 7440 Amboy Rd., Totten- 

ville, Staten Island, N. Y. 
BERGER, William A., 346 Roseville Ave., 

Newark, N. J. 
BERNARDO, John R., 348 High St., Bristol, 

R. I. 
BERNHARD, Robert, 2625 Grand Concourse, 

Bronx 68, N. Y. 
BERNS, S. Harry, 120 E. 89th St., New York, 

N. Y. 
BERRIOS, Osvaldo, 7526 Holabird Ave., Dun- 

dalk 22, Md. 
BESS, T. F. E., Keyser, W^ Va. 
BESSON, Edwin H. T., St. Agnes Hospital, 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
BEST, D. E., 139 W. Walnut St., Goldsboro, 

N. C. 
BEVERIDGE, David, 646 Allison Ave., Wash- 
ington, Pa. 
BIALEK, Stanley M., D. V. General Hospital, 

V\'ashington, D. C. 
BILDER, Joseph, Jr., 112 X. Huriull .\vr.. 

Denison, Texas 



BILLINGSLEA, C. L., 124 Willis St., West- 
minster, Md. 
BIRD, Jacob Wheeler, Sandy Springs, Md. 
BIRD, Joseph G., 2 Elm wood Drive, East 

Greenbush, N. Y. 
BIRELY, Morris F., Church St., Thurmont, 

Md. 
BISANAR, James, 930 Dulaney Valley Road, 

Towson 4, Md. 
BLAISDELL, Russell E., Pearl River, N. ^". 
BLEECKER, Harry H., Jr., 1100 Daveric 

Drive, Pasadena 8, Calif. 
BLEVINS, Joseph W., 40 Federal St., West 

Lynn, Mass. 
BLITZMAN, Louis, 264 E. Broadway, New 

York City 
BLUDELL, Albert E., 13902 232nd St., Laurel- 
ton, L. I., N. Y. 
BLUE, Morris L., Sinai Hospital, Baltimore 5, 

Md. 
BLUM, Joseph S., 1115 N. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
BLUM, Louis V., 2310 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 

17, Md. 
BLUM, S. Daniel, 670 West End Ave., New 

York 25, N. Y. 
BOBBITT, O. H., 1513 Jackson St., Charleston, 

W. Va. 
BOGGS, Ernest J., Drake Clinic, Williamson, 

W. Va. 
BOGORAD, Daniel E., 1905 W. Baltimore St., 

Baltimore, Md. 
BONFIGLIA, Vincent, 1903 S. Harvard St., 

Los Angeles 7, Calif. 
BONGARDT, Henry F., Jr., Mercy Hospital, 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
BONGIORNO, Henry D.. 516 River St., 

Paterson, N. J. 
BONNER, John Bryan, Aurora, N. C. 
BONNER, Robert A., Sr., 51 W. Main St., 

Waterbury, Conn. 
BORDEN, Melvin N., 5000 Old Frederick 

Road, Baltimore 29, Md. 
BORGES, Frank, 1321 Hcatherhill Road, 

Glendale. Baltimore 12, Md. 
BOTCH, Bernarfl, 424 W. W(X)drul^" St., Toledo 

2, Ohio 
BOWEN, Joseph J., Ill W . Main St., Walcr- 

bury 2, Conn. 
BOWERS, John Z., University of Wisconsin 

School of Medicine, Madison, Wise. 
BOWERS. Thaddeus R.. Jr.. Doctors' Bldg., 

Bristol, Tenn. 



xlvi 



DIRFX'TORY 



BOWIE, Harry (\, 1011 N. Calvert St., Balti- 

nioro 2, McI. 
BOWMAN, Harry T).. 318 N. Potomac St., 

Hufierstown. Md. 
BRADFORD, Kdward, 37 Plant St., Winter 

(larden, Fla. 
BRADY, Charles E., Robbins, N. C. 
BRAGER. Simon. 3501 St. Paul St., Baltimore 

IS. Md. 
BRAHMS, Max, 19 Clarkson Ave., Brooklyn, 

X. V. 
BRANDT, Frederick B., 1726 Eye St., N. W., 

Washington 6, D. C. 
BRANNEN. Joseph H., 1306 N. Patterson St., 

Vaidosta, Ga. 
BRAUER, Sehg, 2012 Hudson Blvd., Jersey 

City, X. J. 
BRAWNER, James N., 2800 Peachtree Rd., 

X. E., Atlanta, Ga. 
BREEDING, Earle Griffith, 1801 Eye St., 

X. W., Washington, D. C. 
BRENDLE, William K., 608 S. Union Ave., 

Havre de Grace, Md. 
BREZINSKI, Edward J., 308 Washington St., 

Perth .\mboy, X\ J. 
BRICE, Arthur Talbott, Jefferson, Md. 
BRICKNER, John G., 1120 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
BRIDGERS, Harvey Clifton, Blue Ridge 

Summit, Pa. 
BRIDGES, William A., 10 Othoridge Road, 

Towson 4, Md. 
BRIELE, Henry A., Medical Center, Salis- 

bur>-, Md. 
BRIGLIA, Xicholas N., 2116 \V. Passyunk 

Ave., Philadeli)hia, Pa. 
BRILL, Warren D., 9007 Garland Ave., Silver 

Spring, Md. 
BRINSFIELD, Carlton, 232 Baltimore Ave., 

Cumberland, Md. 
BROBST, Henry T., 1603 Franklin Rd., S. W., 

Roanoke 16, Va. 
BRODSKY, Alexander E., 4817 Montrose 

Blvd., Houston 6, Texas 
BRONSTEIN, Eugene L., USPHS National 

Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md. 
BRONSTEN, Irvin C, 39 Cumberland Drive, 

Vonkers 5, X^. V. 
BRONUSHAS, Ipolitas B., 3037 O'Donnell St., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
BRONUSHAS, Josei)h B., 3037 O'Donnell St., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
BROOKS, J. Culpepper, Jr., 702 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Chattanooga 3, Tenn. 



BROOKS, Wilbur S., 2114 South Ave., Syra- 
cuse 7, X. \'. 

BROSCHART, Frank J., 8 Russell Ave., 
Gaithcrsburg, Md. 

BROTMAN, Morton M., 90 Avon Ave., New- 
ark, X. J. 

BROWN, Archie E., 300 S. Main St., Green- 
ville, S. C. 

BROWN, Eli M., 13123 La Salle, Huntington 
Woods, Mich. 

BROWN, Ernest O., Cambridge City Hospital, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

BROWN, Eugene S., Summersville, W. Va. 

BROWN, Lucien Jos., 314 Turrentine Ave., 
Gadsden, Ala. 

BROWN, Leo T., 1621 New Hampshire Ave., 
X. W ., Washington, D. C. 

BROWN, Manuel, 1619 E. 15th St., Tulsa, 
Okla. 

BROWN, Robert R., Romney, W. Va. 

BROWN, Lt. Stuart M., MC, USA, U.S.A. 
Dispensary, Detachment 6,6006, S.U., Fort 
Lewis, Wash. 

BROWN, William E., 810 S. Mariposa Ave., 
Los Angeles 5, Calif. 

BRUMBACK, Joseph Edward, Medical Arts 
Building, Baltimore 1, Md. 

BRUMBACK, Lynn Hamilton, Hagerstown, 
Md. 

BUBERT, Howard M., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

BUBERT, John D., Wyman Park Apts., Balti- 
more 11, Md. 

BUCHNESS, Anthony V., 110 E. Lombard 
St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

BUCHNESS, John A., 1651 Ceddox St., Balti- 
more 26, Md. 

BUCHNESS, John M., 5429 The Alameda, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

BUCKNER, Louise, R.D. 2, Altamont, N. Y. 

BUELL, John R., Jr., 923 Carroll Ave., Laurel, 
Md. 

BUETTNER, Henry F., 5005 Edmondson Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

BULLOCK, Allen Culpeper, St. Mary's Memo- 
rial Hospital, Knoxville, Tenn. 

BUNCH, Littleton, 200 Crestone Ave., Ala- 
mosa, Colo. 

BUNDICK, William, 840 Park Ave., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

BUNTING, John J., 4705 Montrose Blvd., 
Houston 6, Texas 

BURKA, Irving, 3701 Connecticut Ave., N. W., 
Washington 8, D. C. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



xlvii 



BURKART, Thomas J., 3835 Loch Raven 
Blvd., Baltimore 18, Md. 

BURKEY, Fred J., 782 Washington Road, 
Pittsburgh 28, Pa. 

BURLESON, VVm. Brown, Plumtree, N. C. 

BURNE, John J., 17 Gould Ave., Newark, 
N.J. 

BURNER, Allen Eugene, Durbin, W. Va. 

BURNINGHAM, Richard A., U. S. Naval Hos- 
pitals, Charleston, S. C. 

BURNS, Harold H., 115 E. Eager St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

BURNS, Ira, 117 Magnolia Drive, Ormond 
Beach, Fla. 

BURROWS, Ernest A., 116 Waterman St., 
Providence, R. I. 

BURTNICK, Lester I., 3000 Connecticut Ave., 
N. W., Washington 8, D. C. 

BURTON, Jerome K., 209 Main, Boise, Idaho 

BURWELL, James A., White Cross Hospital, 
Columbus, Ohio 

BUSH, Joseph E., Hampstead, Md. 

BYERLY, M. Paul, 6415 Murray Hill Rd., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

BYERLY, William L., Jr., Hartsville, S. C. 

BYRNE, Robert J., Greenwich Hospital, Green- 
wich, Conn. 

BYRNES, Harry F., 160 Maple St., Springfield 
5, Mass. 



CADLE, W. R., Emmittsburg, Md. 

CAFRITZ, Edward A., 1835 I St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

CAHILL, Lawrence A., 361 Lafayette St., 
Newark, N. J. 

CAHN, Morriss L., 551 N. 11th St., Reading, 
Pa. 

CALLAGHAN, Adlai E., 1159 Gilman Drive, 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

CALLAHAN, John Wm., 308 Main St., Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

CALLENDER, George R., Jr., Charleston Gen- 
eral Hospital, Charleston, W. Va. 

CALVIN, Warren E., 1215 4th Ave., Seattle, 
Wash. 

CAMP, Leah, 3321 Sequoia Ave., Baltimore 
15, Md. 

CAMP, Oscar B., 3321 Sequoia Ave., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

CANO, Harold V., 391 Main St., Box 436, 
Sjiotswood, N. J. 

CANTWELL, Harrv Arthur, North East, Md. 



CAPLAN, Lester H., 4208 Colonial Road, Balti- 
more 8, Md. 

CAPLES, Delmas, 6 Hanover Rd., Reisters- 
town, Md. 

CARDINALE, Pasquale, 1405 North Ave., 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

CAREY, T. Nelson, 4300 Wendover Rd., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

CARLINER, Paul E., 2217 South Rd., Balti- 
more 9, Md. 

CARLSON, Carl E., 26 Wightman Road, New 
Britain, Conn. 

CARR, Charles E., Jr., 6201 Old York Road, 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

CARSKI, Theodore R., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

CASHWELL, Roy Lee, 300 S. Main St., Green- 
ville, S. C. 

CASILLI, Arther Raymond, 618 Newark Ave., 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

CASTELLANO, James, Jr., St. Agnes Hospital, 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

CHAMBERS, Earl Le Roy, 4108 Liberty 
Heights Ave., Baltimore 7, Md. 

CHAMOVITZ, Robert, 5804 Beacon St., 
Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

CHANCE, Lester T., 11 E. Chase St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

CHANEY, Thomas M., Bristol, Md. 

CHAPUT, Lucien Romeo, 3 Washington 
Square, Haverhill, Mass. 

CHARGIN, Louis, 1 W. 85th St., New York 
City 

CHASE, Harry V., 4 E. Church St., Frederick, 
Md. 

CHASE, James McA., Jr., Delaware Hospital, 
Wilmington, Del. 

CHASE, William W., Suite 902, 915 19th St., 
N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

CHECKET, Pierson M., 4024 Essex Road, 
Baltimore 7, Md. 

CHIMACOFF, Hyman, 548 Hamdton Rd., 
South Orange, N. J. 

CHISHOLM, Julian F., Sr., 201 Gaston St., 
Savannah, Ga. 

CHRISTOPHER, Russell L., Taylor St., 
Hinsdale, Mass. 

CHRISTOPHER, Thomas W., 46 Church St., 
Dedham, Mass. 

CIANOS, James N., 112 Tai)low Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

CLARK, Francis A., 212 Morris St., Charles- 
ton, W. Va. 



xlviii 



DIRECTORY 



CLAUTICE, Chas. Peter, 3013 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 18. Md. 

CLAYMAN, D. S., 6311 Baltimore .\ve.. River- 
dale. Md. 

CLIFT, John \'.. 5912 The Alameda, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

CLEMSON, Earle P., 701 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

CLINE. James A.. Ill, Rapid City Medical 
Center, Rapid Cit\', S. D. 

CLONINGER, Charles E.. Box U^, Conover, 
N. C. 

CLONINGER, Kenneth L., Catawba Hospital, 
Inc.. Xewton, N. C. 

CLONINGER, Rowell C. Box 1198. Shelby, 
N. C. 

COAXES. Stephen P., Main St., Suffield, Conn. 

COCIMANO, Joseph M., 1835 Eye St., N. W., 
Washington 6, D. C. 

CODD, Francis I., Box 289, Severna Park, Md. 

COFFMAN, K. M., Montoursville, Pa. 

COFFMAN, Robert T., Potomac Valley Hos- 
pital. Keyser, W. Va. 

COHEN, Archie R.. Clear Spring, Md. 

COHEN, Bernard J.. The Marylander, Apt. 2, 
3501 St. Paul St., Baltimore 18, Md. 

COHEN, Bernard S., 7306 Liberty Road, Balti- 
more 7. Md. 

COHEN, Harry, 3319 Clarks Lane, Baltimore 
15. Md. 

COHEN, Herman. 1301 Hamilton Ave., Tren- 
ton, N. J. 

COHEN, Jerome, Apt. 17, 240 Victor Ave., 
Dayton. Ohio 

COHEN, Marvin M.. 582 E. 25th St., Pater- 
son. X. J. 

COHEN, Morris D., 1534 E. Speedway, Tuc- 
son. Ariz. 

COHEN, William. Sinai Hospital, Baltimore 
5, Md. 

COLE, Frank S., 3300 E. Monument St., 
Baltimore 5. Md. 

COLEMAN, William J., 2810 Chelsea Terr., 
Baltmiore 16, Md. 

COLLAWN, Thomas H., AUentown Hospital, 
.\llentown. Pa. 

CONCILUS, Frank. 470 Summit Drive, Pitts- 
burgh 34. Pa. 

CONLEN, Richard A., 429 Cooper St., Cam- 
den, N. J. 

CONN, Jacob H., 2325 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

CONNER, Eugene H., 1015 Stoney Brook 
Drive, Springfield, Pa. 



CONNOR. Thomas B., 7 Osborne Ave., Catons- 

viile l>i. Md. 
CONWAY, Wm. Stanislaus. 646 Carew St., 

Springfield, Mass. 
COOK, Everett L., 4125 Arkansas Ave., X. W., 

Washington 11, D. C. 
COOK, Sarah. 3103 10th St., N., Arlington 

1. Va. 
COON, C. Melvin. Milan. Pa. 
COONEY, Robert F.. 512 Lackawanna Ave., 

Mayfield. Pa. 
COOPER, Jules, 723 Washington Ave.. Wood 

bine, X". J. 
COPE, Arthur Alexander. 17 S. 4th St.. Ham 

burg. Pa. 
COPLIN, George J.. 528 E. Jersey St., Eliza- 
beth 1, X. J. 
COPPOLA, Matthew J.. 555 Van Xess Ave., 

Xew York, X. Y. 
CORNBROOKS, Ernest I., Jr., Medical Arts 

Bldg.. Baltimore 1, Md. 
CORPENING, William X., Box 167, Granite 

Falls, X. C. 
CORRELL, Paul H., 26286 Cook Road. Olm- 
sted Falls, Ohio 
CORZINE, William J., Jr., 51 E. 2nd St., 

Chillicothe. Ohio 
COSTA-MANDRY, Oscar. Box 10048 San- 

turce. P. R. 
COSTER, Earle Somerville, Solomons, Md. 
COTTER, Edward F., 6 E. Read St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
COUGHLAN, Stuart G., 112 X. Augusta St., 

Staunton, Va. 
COUGHLIN, John B., 612 X. Wilbur Ave., 

Sa>Te. Pa. 
COULBOURNE, George C, Marion, Md. 
COVINGTON, E. E., 828 Park Ave., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 
COWEN, Joseph R., 44 Maple Drive, Catons- 

ville 28, Md. 
CRANE, Warren. 974 Broad St., Trenton 10, 

X.J. 
CRASTNOPOL, Philip. 1102 Phillip Court, 

Valley Stream, X. Y. 
CRECCA, Anthony D., 376 Roseville Ave., 

Xewark, X. J. 
CROCE, Gene A., 132 Glen Ridge Road, 

Cranston, R. I. 
CROSBY, Robert M. X., 11 E. Chase St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
CROSS, Earl W., Box 3C9 J. R.D. 1. Taren- 

tum. Pa. 



MEDICAL A/JW/Xf 



xlix 



CROSS, RichartI J., 104 W. Madison St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

CROUCH, Waiter L., 10th and Grace Sts., 
Wilmington, N. C. 

CTIBOR, V. F., Califon, N. J. 

CULPEPPER, Stuart P., P.O. 475, Cassel- 
i)err\', FJa. 

CUNNINGHAM, Raymond M., 11 E. Chase 
St., Haitimore 2, Md. 

CURANZY, Raymond, 39 E. Maple St., Pal- 
myra, Pa. 

CURRY, Geo. Ray, 415 Walnut St., Reading, 
Pa. 

D 

DAILEY, Gilbert L., 618 X. 3rd St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

DAILEY, William P. 901 X. 2nd St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

DAILEY, Wm. Paul, 19 Wahiut St., Steelton, 
Pa. 

DAILY, Louis E., 5 Xewton Ave., Xorwich, 
X. V. 

D'ALESSIO, Charles M., 523 Yale Ave., Xew 
Haven, Conn. 

DALTON, James B., Jr., 401 Medical Arts 
Bldg., Richmond 19, Va. 

DALTON, M. Tolbert, 6811 50th Ave., X. E., 
Seattle 15, Washmgton 

DALTON, Wm. B., 118 S. Greene St.. Greens- 
boro, X. C. 

DALY, Mary Viola, Lutheran Ho.spital of Mar\-- 
land. Inc., Baltimore 16, Md. 

D'AMICO, Thomas V., 368 Ridgewood Ave., 
Glen Ridge, X. J. 

DANIEL, Louie S., Oxford, X. C. 

DANIELS, Willard F., 3603 Piedmont Rd., 
Huntington, W. Va. 

DARBY, Wm. Arthur, Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

DAUE, Edwin O., Jr., 1113 X. Second St., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

DAVENPORT, Carlton A., Hertford, X. C. 

DAVIDOV, Nathan J., 3218 Eastern Ave., 
liallimorc 24. Md. 

DAVIDSON, David L., Baltimore City Hos- 
l)itals, Baltimore 24, Md. 

DAVIES, John Oliver, 3508 Dennlyn Road, 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

DAVIS, George H., 404 Hollen Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

DAVIS, Henry Vincent, Chesapeake City, Md. 

DAVIS, John B.. Frostburg, Md. 



DAVIS, John R., Jr., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

DAVIS, Melvin B., Dunrlalk, Md. 

DAVIS, William J. G., 1632 K St., X. W., 
Washington 6, D. C. 

DEAN, Hugh E., Burley, Idaho 

DeBARBIERI, Fred L., 4723 Park Heights 
.\ve., Baltimore 15, Md. 

DeCORMIS, Jos. L., Accomac, Va. 

DEEHL, Seymour R., 1026 E. Jersey St., 
Elizabeth, X. J. 

DE LA VEGA, Evelyn Anna, Bon Secours Hos- 
jiilal, Baltimore 23, Md. 

DE LUCA, Joseph, 158 Governor St., Provi- 
dence 8, R. I. 

DEMARCO, V. J., 1642 Poplar Ave., Memphis, 
Tenn. 

DEMMY, Xicholas, San Francisco V.A. Hos- 
pital, 42nd & Clement Sts., San Francisco 
21, Calif. 

DENT, Charles F., 244 Pleasant St., Morgan- 
town. W. Va. 

DeSANE, Josejjh, W. Seneca Place, Xassau 
Shores, Massapequa, X. Y. 

DETTBARN, Ernest A., 620 Trail Ave., 
Frederick, Md. 

DEUTSCHMAN, David, 1750 Grand Con- 
course, Xe\s- York City, X^. Y. 

DE VINCENTIS, Henry, 285 Henr>- St., 
Orange. X. J. 

DEVINCENTIS, M. L., Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

DIAMOND, H. E., 1749 Grand Concourse, 
Xew ^'ork City 

DIAMOND, J. George. 1125 Park Ave., Plain- 
t'leld, X. J. 

DICKEY, Francis G., Veterans Administra- 
tion, Hf^spital, Fort Howard, Md. 

DIEHL, Harold C. Frostburg. Md. 

DIEHL, William K., 2027 Skyline Rd., Balti- 
more 4. Md. 

DIENER, Louis, Cylburne Court Apts., Balti- 
more 1 7, Md. 

DIENER, Samuel, 2808 Ordway St., X. W.. 
Washington, D. C. 

DIEZ-GUTIERREZ, Emilio, P.O. Box 56, 
Orocovis. P. R. 

DIGGS, Everett S., 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

DILLINGER, Karl .\., 319 GofI Bldg., Clarks- 
burg. W. Va. 

DILLON, Wm. J., 162 Maple St., Springfield, 
Mass. 



DIRECTORY 



DI PAULA, Anthony. 1226 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

DITTMAR, Stuart \V., 473 Lincoln Way East, 
Chamt)crsl)urg, Pa. 

DIXON, D. McClelland. 5504 Normandy Place, 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

DOBIHAL, Louis C, 447 X. Kenwood Ave., 
Bailimore 6, Md. 

DODD, William A., 6308 Mossway, Baltimore 
12, Md. 

DODGE, Douglas R.. 2900 Blanche St., Pasa- 
dena 10. Calif. 

DODGE, Eva F., 12th & McAlamont Sts., 
Little Rock. Ark. 

DOERNER, Alexander A.. U. S. Public Health 
Service Hosp., San Francisco 18, Calif. 

DONCHI, Sol ^L, 118 Oakview Ave., Maple- 
wood, X. J. 

DORAN, William F.. 45 E. Columbus St., 
X'elsonville, Ohio 

DORF, Herman J., 7404 Liberty Road. Balti- 
more 7, Md. 

DORMAN, George E., Emporium, Pa. 

DORSE Y, Benj. H., Rear Admiral, 3500 Xew- 
ark St.. Washington 16, D. C. 

DORSEY, George H., Maj., 6990 W. 38th Ave., 
Wheat Ridge, Colo. 

DORSEY, James Thomas, .\llentown Hospital, 
Allentown, Pa. 

DOUGLASS, Louis H.. :Mount Custis, Acco- 
mac. Va. 

DOUGLASS, Robert C, Wayne County Gen- 
eral Hos]jital, Eloise, Mich. 

DOUKAS, James A., 101 E. Preston St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

DOWNING, John D., Jr., Tampa Municipal 
Hospital, Tampa, Fla. 

DREHER, Robert H., Wind Gap, Pa. 

DRESKIN, J. L., 34 Lyons Ave., Xewark 8, 
X.J. 

DRUCKER, \'ictor, 6 Kendall Ave., Bingham- 
ton. X. V. 

DUBOIS, Robert L., 29 Central Ave., Water- 
bury 11, Conn. 

DUFFY, William C, 1120 St. Paul St.. Balti- 
more 2. Md. 

DUMLER, John C, Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

DUMLER, John D., 1245 Greystone Road, 
Baltimore 27, Md. 

DUNBAR, John C, 807 Empire Bldg., Pitts- 
burgh 22, Pa. 

DUNN, George M., Princess Anne, Md. 



DUNNAGAN, W illiam C, Box 45, North Caro- 
lina Memorial Hos|)ital, Chapel Hill, X. C. 

DUNNIGAN, Comdr. William C, MC, USXR. 
C S S W\andot, FPO, New York, N. V. 

DUTROW, Howard V., 426 Kramer, Dayton 9 
Ohio 

DWYER, Frank P., Jr., The Latrobe Bldg., 
Charles & Read Sts., Baltimore 1, Md. 

DWYER, James R., 245 N. Potomac St., 
Hagerstown Md. 

DYAR, Edna G., 3824 Harrison St., N.W., Wash- 
ington 15, D.C. 



EAGLE, A. Bruce, 321 W. Burke St.. Martins- 
burg, W. Va. 

EANET, Paul, 6727 16th St., X\ W., Washing- 
ton 12, D. C. 

EASTLAND, John Sheldon, Medical Arts 
Bldg., Baltimore 1, Md. 

EATON, Wm. Robert, 5033 Castlemen St., 
Pittsburgh 32, Pa. 

EBELING, W. Carl, University Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

ECHOLS, John E., 4 School St., Richwood, 
W. \'a. 

ECHOLS, W. E., Richwood, W. Va. 

ECKERT, Herbert L., Navy No. 127 Box 2, 
% FPM Seattle, Wash. 

EDEL, John Wesley, Jr., 3403 Garrison Blvd., 
Baltimore 16, Md. 

EDMONDS, Charles W., 614 Hastings Rd., 
Wiltondale, Towson 4, Md. 

EDWARDS, Arthur George, Jr., Mercy Hos- 
pital. Baltimore 2, Md. 

EDWARDS, Charles Reid, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

EDWARDS, William H., Sheppard-Pratt Hos- 
pital, Towson 4, Md. 

EGAN, Michael Joseph, Jr., 210 East Liberty 
St.. Savannah, Ga. 

EGLSEDER, Ludwig J., Mound Park Hospital, 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

EHRLICH, Daniel. 6619 Chelwood Rd., Balti- 
more 9, Md. 

EICHERT, Arnold H., 2847 Lincoln St., Holly- 
wixjd. Ha. 

EINHORN, Samuel E., 241 16th Ave., Xewark, 
X.J. 

EISNER, Maurice S., 769 Xorth St., Pitts- 
tield. Mass. 

EISNER, William M., 6303 Pontiac St., Ber- 
wyn Heights, Md. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



ELEDER, Franklin ('., 2201 Echodale, Ave. 
Baltimore 14, Md. 

ELGIN, Lee W., 905 Huntington Bldg., Miami 
32, Fla. 

ELIASON, Harold W., P.O. Box 157, Cumber- 
land, Md. 

ELLIOTT, Julian C, Oxford, N. C. 

EMRICH, Wm., Hebron, Md. 

ENSOR, Charles B., 7201 York Kd., Baltimore, 
12, Md. 

ENSOR, Robert E., 7 Brackenridge Ct., Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

EPPERSON, John VV. \V., 1921 Griffith Place, 
W ., Owensboro, Ky. 

ERWIN, John J., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

ESHELMAN, Joseph C, Loyall, Ky. 

ESNARD, John, 10513 Santa Monica Blvd., 
West Los Angeles, Calif. 

ESTES, James T., Universit}' Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

ETKIND, Meyer, 1546 Chapel St., New Haven, 
Conn. 

EVANS, John, Medical Arts Bldg., Cathedral & 
Richmond Sts., Baltimore 1, Md. 

EVANS, Joseph G., 1388 Amar St., San Pedro, 
Calif. 

EVANS, Otis D., Jr., 247 Charlotte St., Ashe- 
ville, N. C. 

EVANS, Theodore E., 45 Ft. Benning Rd., 
Columbus, Ga. 

EVERETT, Franklin R., Dover, Del. 

EVERETT, John T., 10 E. Biddle St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

EWALD, August, 36 York Court, Baltimore 
18, Md. 

EYESTONE, Fred L., 4151 Brookside Road, 
Toledo 6, Ohio 



FABBRI, Remo, 1731 Markley St., Norris- 
town. Pa. 

FADER, Ferdinand, 365 Park Ave., East 
Orange, N. J. 

FARAINO, Frank A., 230 Fairchild St., Lack- 
land Village, San Antonio, Texas 

FARBER, Dawson L., Sparrows Point 19, Md. 

FARBER, Raphael, 1063 St. Paul St., Rochester 
21, X. Y. 

FARGO, L. K., 1800 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

FARKAS, Robert \V., 305 S. George St., York, 
Pa. 



FARMER, Richard G., Milwaukee County 
Hosjjital, Milwaukee, Wise. 

FARR, Robert W., Chestertown, Md. 

FAW, Wylie M., Jr., 531 Washington St., 
Cumberland, Md. 

FEARING, William L., 3025 Belair Road, 
Baltimore 13, Md. 

FEASTER, James H., Jr., 58 2nd St., Oak- 
land, Md. 

FEDER, Aaron, 40-42 75th St., Jackson Heights, 
N. Y. 

FEINGLOS, Israel J., 2002 E. Pratt St., Balti- 
more 31, Md. 

FELDMAN, Jerome, 20094 E. 14th St., Hay- 
ward, Calif. 

FELDMAN, Leon H., Flat Iron Bldg., Ashe- 
ville, N. C. 

FERGUSON, Charles E., 1740 Lincoln Ave., 
Cincinnati 12, Ohio 

FERRI, Henry G., 931 Washington Trust Bldg., 
Washington, Pa. 

FEUER, Arthur S., 3099 Brighton 6th St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FINE, Jack, 3331 Clark's Lane, Baltimore 9, 
Md. 

FINEGOLD, Aaron, 1341 Beechwood Blvd., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FINEGOLD, Joseph, 5800 5th Ave., Apt. 20, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FINEGOLD, Richard A., Montefiore Hospital, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

FINEMAN, Jerome, 4004 Liberty Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 7, Md. 

FINKELSTEIN, A. H., 11 E. Chase St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

FINN, John H., Refugio, Texas. 

FINNERTY, Chas. W., 440 Broadway, Somer- 
ville, Mass. 

FIOCCO, Vincent J., 231 W. 4th St., New York 
City, N. Y. 

FISCHER, Joseph S., 2705 Liberty Heights 
Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 

FISCHMAN, Harold H., 326 Avon Ave., New- 
ark, N. J. 

FISHBEIN, Elliott, 115 Church St., Boonton, 
N.J. 

FISHER, Charles Frederick, 508-509 GofT 
Bldg., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

FISHER, Charles T., 200 N. Division St., 
Salisbury, Md. 

FISHER, Donald E., 101 Columbia Road, 
l-"llic()it City, Md. 

FISHER, Harry R., 465 West End Ave., New 
York Citv 



Hi 



DIRECTORY 



FISHER, Joseph O., 2720 Grand (\)ncourse, 
Xew \\n\i City, N. Y. 

FISHER, Joseph P., Monongalelia Ave., Glass- 
port, Pa. 

FISHER, Samuel, 808 Madison Ave., Paterson, 
X. J. 

FITCH, Charles Thomas, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, ^Md. 

FITZPATRICK, Vincent, 1120 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

FLAX, Leonard H., 113 7th Ave., Br<xjklyn 
Park, Brooklyn 25, Md. 

FLIPPIN, James M., Pilot Mountain, N. C. 

FLOM, Charles, 3123 Eastern Ave., Baltimore 
24, Md. 

FLORA, Ernest P., Boones Mill, Va. 

FOARD, Fred T., State Department of Health, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

FOARD, Wilbur H., Manchester, Md. 

FOLEY, Chas. J., Havre de Grace, Md. 

FORD, John L., 840 S. Webster Ave., Green 
Bay. Wise. 

FORREST, O. Norman, Jr., Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

FORT, Wetherbee, 1118 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

FOSTER, Giraud V., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

FOSTER, H. M., 2824 St. Paul St., Baltimore, 
18, Md. 

FOSTER, William L., Murphy, N. C. 

FOWLER, Richard L., 125 Main St., Spencer, 
Mass. 

FOX, Haskell Wright, Greenville Sanatorium & 
Hospital, Greenville, Tenn. 

FOX, James S., 1017 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, 
Fla. 

FOX, Samuel L., 1205 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

FRANCE, Andrew Menaris, Parkton, Md. 

FRANCO, Jorge A., Bellevue Hospital, New 
N"ork, N. Y. 

FRANK, William H., 521 Cypress Ave., Johns- 
town, Pa. 

FRANKLIN, Frank A., 256 S. Centre St., 
Orange, N. J. 

FRANKLIN, Marshall, Duke Hospital, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 

FRANZ, J. Howard, 1127 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

FREEDMAN, Harold, 63 W. Main St., Free- 
hold, N. J. 

FREEMAN, Sylvan, 2916 Ridgewood Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 



FRENKIL, James, 338 W. Pratt St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

FREY, Edward L., Jr., 519 Overdale Rd., 
Baltimore 29, xMd. 

FREY, Ernest Wm., 1928 Penna Ave., Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

FRIEDENWALD, Edgar B., Marlborough 
Apts. IB, 1701 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17, 
Md. 

FRIEDMAN, Bernard, 617 Ocean Pkwy., 
Brooklyn 18, N. Y. 

FRIEDMAN, Joseph, 2800 Oakley Ave., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

FRISKEY, George H., 4201 Flowerton Rd., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

FRITZ, Julius Dudley, 8622 Bay Parkway, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ' 

FRITZ, Louis A., 3529 Glenmore Ave., Balti- 
more 6, Md. 

FROHLICH, Edward D., D. C. General Hos- 
pital, Washington, D. C. 

FROHMAN, I. Phillips, 2925 Nichols Ave., 
S. K., Washington, D. C. 

FRUCHTBAUM, Robert P., 431 Franklin 
Ave., Nutley 10, N. J. 

FRYE, Augustus H., Jr., llOf^ North Hill St., 
Griffin, Ga. 

FRYE, James C, Williamsburg, Pa. 

FRYE, Paul E., 1244 Sunset view Dr., Akron 3, 
Ohio 

FULTON, William J., 28536 Wildwood Trail, 
Farmington, Mich. 

FUNKHOUSER, George R., Geisinger Memo- 
rial Hospital, Danville, Pa. 

FUTTERMAN, Perry, Becklev Memorial Hos- 
pital, Beckley, W. Va. 



GABLE, Walter D., School of Aviation Medi- 
cine — USN, Pensacola, Fla. 
GALITZ, Philip J., 5794 Bird Road, Miami, 

Fla. 
GALLAGHER, James L., 181 Beard Ave., 

Buffalo 4, N. Y. 
GALLAGHER, William E., 564 Greenwood 

Ave,, Akron 20, Ohio 
GALLOWAY, Charles B., Harper Hospital, 

Detroit, Mich. 
GAMBLE, John R., Box 165, Lincolnton, N. C. 
GANEY, Joseph B., Bradenton, Fla. 
GANZ, S. Evans, 155 E. 72nd St., New York 

21, N. Y. 
GARBER, J. Savin, 8924 146th St., Jamaica. 

N. Y. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



GARDNER, Charles Wesley, 144 Golden Hill 
St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

GARDNER, Francis S., Jr., University Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 1, Md. 

GAREIS, Louis C, Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GAREY, James L., 27 E. Belair Ave., Aber- 
deen, Md. 

GARFINKEL, Abraham, 1801 Greenwood Ave., 
Trenton, N. J. 

GARLOCK, Frederick A., 106 N. 12th St., 
Edinburg, Texas 

GARNER, Wafe H., 308 Park Ave., Sanford, 
Fla. 

GARRETT, Richard M., 349 S. Ripley St., 
Montgomery, Ala. 

GARRISON, Lt. J. S., Mc USN, Sub Ron 7. 
% FPO, San Francisco, Calif. 

GARRISON, Ralph B., Hamlet, N. C. 

GASSAWAY, William F., Main St., Ellicott 
City, Md. 

GAULD, John R., University Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GAVER, Leo J., 1 Mallow Hill Ave., Baltimore 
29, Md. 

GEEN, James S., Utica, 111. 

GELLER, Samuel, 686 High Street, Newark, 
N.J. 

GELMAN, Sidney, 600 E. 27th St., Paterson, 
N.J. 

GEMMILL, W. F., 135 E. Market St., York, 
Pa. 

GEORGE, Joseph M., Jr., 402 Carson Ave., 
Las Vegas, Nev. 

GERAGHTY, Frank J., 3047 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 18, Md., 

GERSHENSON, D. A., 309 S. E. 4th St., 
Fairfield, 111. 

GERWIG, John Monroe, Jr., St. Agnes Hos- 
j)ital, Baltimore 29, Md. 

GERWIG, Walter H., Jr., 1805 Kenyon St., 
N. W., Washington 10, D. C. 

GESSNER, John E., 851 Middlesex Rd., Balti- 
more 21, Md. 

GIBEL, Harry, 1171 Eastern Pkwy., Brooklyn, 
N. V. 

GIESEN, John Jacob, Radford, Va. 

GILBERT, Jacques S., 337 S. Beverly Drive, 
Beverly Hills, CaHf. 

GILL, Charles E., State Park. S. C. 

GILLESPIE, J. L., 26 Midland Ave., Kearny, 
N.J. 

GILLIAM, Charles F., Thomasville, N. C. 



GILLIS, Andrew C, 1033 N. Calvert St., Bal- 
timore 2, Md. 

GILLIS, Marion H., Jr., 206 Walnut St., 
Salisbury, Md. 

GILMORE, George T., 216 Stanmore Rd., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

GIMBEL, Harry S., 4605 Edmondson Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

GINSBERG, William. 704 Empire Ave., Far 
Rockaway 91, N. Y. 

GINSBURG. Leon, 529 N. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GISIASON, Paul H., 7233 Pillsbury St., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

GLASSMAN, Edward L., 4037 Falls Road, 
Baltimore 11, Md. 

GLICK, Bernard, Lyndhurst, N. J. 

GLICK, Samuel S., 3914 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

GLOVER, Victor L.. 420 W. King St., Martins- 
burg, W. Va. 

GOLD, Benjamin M., 410 Peachtree St., Rocky 
.Mount, N. C. 

GOLDBERG, Benjamin M., 1156 E. State St., 
Trenton, N. J. 

GOLDBERG, Isadore, 303 N. Washington 
Ave., Dunellen, N. J. 

GOLDBERG, Raymond, 803 Cathedral St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

GOLDBERG, Sigmund, 12 E. Pratt St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

GOLDMAN, Alex. B., Ill Van Buren St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GOLDMAN, Lester M., 53 Leslie St., Newark 
8, N. J. 

GOLDMAN, Meyer L., 1320 Cornaga Ave., 
Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

GOLDMANN, Harry, 2326 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

GOLDSBOROUGH, Charles R., 2923 St. Paul 
St., Baltimore 18, Md. 

GOLDSMITH, Jewett, Duke Hospital, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 

GOLDSTEIN, A. E., 3505 N. Charles St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

GOLDSTEIN, Milton, 707 N. Webster Ave., 
Scranton 10, Pa. 

GOLDSTEIN, Robert Bruce, Universit\- Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 1, Md. 

GOLDSTONE, Herbert, 1810 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

GOLOMBEK, Leonard H.. 7013 Liberty Roa<i, 
Baltimore 7. Md. 



DIRECTORY 



GOODMAN, Howard, 1513 N. Milton Ave., 
IJaltimore 13, Md. 

GOODMAN, Jerome E., 809 Cathedral St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

GOODMAN, Julius H., 3400 K. Baltimore St., 
Baltimt)re 24. Md. 

GOODMAN, William, 1334 Sulphur Spring Kd., 
Baltimore 27, Md. 

GOODWIN, Perry B., John C. Proctor Hos- 
l^ital, Peoria, 111. 

GORDON, Attie Thompson, Spencer, W. Va. 

GORDON, Joseph, 106 Girard Blvd., S. E., 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

GORDY, L. L., 5106 Harford Rd., Baltimore 
14, Md. 

GORTEN, Martin, University Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GOULD, Arthur Richard, 291 Geary St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

GOULD, Don U., Sherburne, N. Y. 

GOULD, Nathaniel Jay, 940 Grand Concourse, 
Xew York City 

GOVATOS, George, Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GOVONS, Sidney R., 408 N. Capitol, Lansing 
ii, Mich. 

GRAHAM, David E., Spruce Pine, N. C. 

GRAMSE, Arthur E., 78 Maple St., Spring- 
field 5, ^L^ss. 

GRANOFF, Jerome P., 40 Cedar Drive, Great 
Xeck, L. I., N. Y. 

GRAY, David B., 205 Bradford St., Charleston 
1 , \V. Va. 

GRAY, H. William, 2017 Massachusetts Ave., 
X. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

GRAZIANO, Theodore, 2802 Harford Rd., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

GREEN, James W., High Spire, Pa. 

GREENGOLD, David B., 67 Commonwealth 
Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 

GREENGRASS, Jacob J., 146 Broadway, 
Paterson, N. J. 

GREENLEAF, Helen E., 30 Vista Drive, Little 
Silver, N. J. 

GREENSTEIN, George H., 819 Park Ave., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

GREER, Creed Collins, Goff Bldg., Clarks- 
burg, W. Va. 

GREGORY, Philip O., Boothbay Harbor, Me. 

GREIFINGER, Marcus H., 31 Lincoln Park, 
Newark, N. J. 

GREIFINGER, Wm., 31 Lincoln Park, New- 
ark, N. J. 



GRENZER, William H., 1520 E. 33rd St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

GRIGOLEIT, Alfred W., Winchester Memorial 
Hospital, Winchester, Va. 

GROLIMAN, A. I., 19 Garfield Place, Cincin- 
nati 2, Ohio 

GROSH, Josei)h Walter, Lititz, Pa. 

GROSS, Joseph B., 6911 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 8, Ohio 

GROSSMAN, Isadore K., 1212 Patterson Park 
Ave., Baltimore 13, Md. 

GROVE, Donald B., Medical Bldg., Cumber- 
land, Md. 

GROWT, Bower Hewitt, Addison, Mich. 

GRUBB. Robert A., Berlin, Md. 

GRUMBINE, Francis, 4508 Edmondson Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

GUBNITSKY, Albert, 5415 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

GUIDO, Angelino, 115 E. Eager St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

GUNDRY, Lewis P., 1014 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

GUNDRY, Rachel Krebs, 5002 Frederick Road, 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

GUNNING, Jean-Jacques, 216 Kendall Road, 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

GUTHRIE, William, 523 11th Ave., W., Hunt- 
ington, W. Va. 

GUTMAN, Isaac, 817 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

GUTOWSKI, Jos. ^L, 433 Brace Ave., Perth 
Amboy, N. J. 

GUYTON, William L., 130 W. Main St., 
W^aynesboro, Pa. 

H 

HAASE, F. Robert, 804 Latrobe Bldg., Charles 

& Read Sts., Baltimore 2, Md. 
HAASE, J. Henry, 2926 E. Cold Spring Lane, 

Baltimore 14, Md. 
HAGAN, William B., 3303 Perry St., Mt. 

Rainier, Md. 
HAHN, Albert G., 1335 12th St., Hickory, N. C. 
HAHN, Charles S., 781 Hicks St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
HALGRIMSON, Kenneth Wayne, Luther 

Hospital, Eau Claire, Wise. 
HALL, Arthur T., Jr., 2 E. Read St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
HALL, Howard E., Sykesville, Maryland 
HALPERIN, David, 590 Bergen Ave., Jersey 

City 4, N.J. 



MEDICAL ALU MM 



Iv 



HAMILL. James P., 2301 Proctor St., Port 

Arthur, Texas 
HAMMILL, Gerard P., Woodville, Pa. 
HAMMOND, Daniel O., 350 N. E. 15th St., 

Miami M. Fla. 
HAMMOND, Morton \... 350 N. E. 15th St., 

W-nctian Causc\va_\', Miami, Fla. 
HAMRICK. John ('., 809 N. Lafayette St., 

Shelby, N. C. 
HANELLIN, Nathan S., 41<> 80th St., Brook- 

l>-n 9, N. \. 
HANEY, John J., 850 Hamilton Ave., Trenton, 

N.J. 
HANIGSBERG, Murray J., 92-15 63rcl Drive, 

Kego Park 74, Queens, N. V. 
HANNUM, Marvin Ray, Milan, Mich. 
HANSEN, Leland J., 3760 12th St., Riverside, 

("alif. 
HARDEN, .Vibert Scott. 510 VV. Market St., 

Newark, N. J. 
HARLEY, John, Terre Alta, \V. Va. 
HARLEY, M. Dorcas, Terre Alta, W. Va. 
HARMAN, Howard E., 159 E. Water St., 

('hillicothe, O. 
HARRIS, Aaron, 6506 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 8, Md. 
HARRIS, Doris M., 619 Dearborn, Iowa City, 

Iowa 
HARSHA, Gene M., Sistersville, W. Va. 
HARTMAN, George O., 1608 N. Norton Ave., 

Tucson, Ariz. 
HARTMAN, Ira F., Buckhannon, W. Va. 
HARTMAN, John F., 4 N. Lakewood Ave., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
HASSLER, F. Stanley, 4602 Bedford Blvd., 

Forest Hills Park, Wilmington, Dcla. 
HATEM, Frederick J., 17 N. Philadelphia 

Blvd., Aberdeen, Md. 
HAUGHT, John, 3303 Perr\- St., Mt. Rainier, 

Md. 
HAWKINS, Charles W., 206 Professional BIdg., 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
HAWKINS, Josias H., Jr., Medical College of 

X'irginia Hf)si). Div., Richmond, Va. 
HAYDEN, Richard C., 228 Oakwood Road, 

Fairfax, Wilmington, Del. 
HAYES, James W., R.I). *1. Rock Hall. Md. 
HAYLECK, Mary \... 4401 Cnderwood Rd., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
HAYS, Leonard, 5201 Baltimore .\ve., Hyatts- 

ville, Md. 
HEADLEY, Robert N., Cnivcrsity of X'irginia 

Hospital, Charlottesville. Va. 



HEALY, Robert F., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

HEARN, Wm. Oswald, Minn. Soldiers Home 
Hf)spital. Minneapolis, Minn. 

HEATH, J. Mott, Greenport, N. Y. 

HECK, Leroy S., 8 N. Moger Ave., Mt. Kisco, 
N. V. 

HEDRICK, Grover (\, Jr.. Ill Locust St., 
Beckley, VV. Va. 

HEDRICK, John A., 206 Beckley Ave., Beck- 
ley, W. Va. 

HEGHINIAN, Jeannette R., 2212 South Road, 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

HEISLEY, Rowland S., Honesdale, Pa. 

HEISSE, John W., Jr., 7801 Ruxwood Road, 
Baltimore 4, Md. 

HELFOND, David M., 8127 88th St., Glendale, 
N. v. 

HELFRICH, Wm. G., 5006 Roland Ave., 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

HEMPHILL, Clyde H., 1401 N. 21st Place, 
.\pt. 2, Phoenix, Ariz. 

HENDERSON, Clair Grouse, Mt. Olive, N. C. 

HENDERSON, Neil C, Methodist Hospital, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HENDLER, H. B., Amityville Medical Center, 
.\mityville, N. Y. 

HENDRICKSON, Edwin O., HI, Medical and 
Dental Bldg., 4224 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Culver 
City, Calif. 

HENDRIX, Nevins B., 231 W. King St., Mar- 
tinsburg, W. Va. 

HENNESSY, John F., 15 S. Irving St., Ridge- 
woofl, N. J. 

HENSON, Kenneth C. 208 Broad St., Middle- 
town, Md. 

HEROLD, Lewis J., 801 Ocean Pkwy., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

HERRMAN, Frederick H., 1710 E. 33rd St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

HERROLD, Lewis C, Dover, Pa. 

HERSHNER, Newton W., Jr., 211 W. Main 
St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

HERSPERGER, Webb S., George F. Geisinger 
Memorial Hospital, Danville, Pa. 

HERTZOG, Francis C, 103 E. 8th St., Long 
Beach, Calif. 

HESS, Charles F., Smithburg. Md. 

HIMELFARB, Albert J., 3.501 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

HIMMELWRIGHT, George O.. 133 Virginia 
Ave., Cumberland, Md. 

HINNANT. Milford, Micro, N. C. 



niKFXTORY 



HIRSCHMAN, Isaiiore I.. Guaranl> Hunk & 
Trust Hldfi;., Huntington, W. \'a. 

HOCHFFLD. l.eo. 1240 Walton Ave. Bronx, 
Xc'w \'ork ("it\' 

HOFFMAN. Kdward S., 7 Brooksidc Drive, 
Rochester 18, X. V. 

HOFFMAN, Lee, Buffalo General Hospital, 
Buffalo. X. V. 

HOFSTETER. Grace, 1320 Market Ave., Can 
Ion 4. Ohio 

HOGAN, John F., 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

HOGAN, John F., Jr., 11 E. Chase St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

HOGG, Gory, Lewisburg, W. Va. 

HOLBROOK, William A., Jr., University Hos- 
pital. Baltimore 1, Md. 

HOLDEN, F. A., Medical Arts Bldg., Baltimore 
1, Md. 

HOLLOWAY, Howard Steele, Ferryman, Md. 

HOLMES, James, 796 Sumner Ave., Spring- 
field 8, Mass. 

HOLROYD, Frank, J., Princeton, W. Va. 

HONIGMAN, Alvin H., 704 Jackson St., 
.Klexandria, La. 

HOOKER, Charles B., 934 2nd St., Beaver, Pa. 

HOOPER, Virgil R., University Hospital, Ann 
.\rhor. Mich. 

HOOPER, Z. Vance, 3534 Ellerslie Ave., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

HOOPES, Lorman L., 17 S. Main St., Minot, 
N. D. 

HOOVER, \Vm. A., Murphy, N. C. 

HOPE, Daniel, Jr., Braewood, S. Rolling Road, 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

HOPE, Edward W., 6010 Eastern Ave., Balti- 
more 24, Md. 

HOPKINS, Robert C, St. Vincent's Hospital, 
Erie, Pa. 

HORKY, John R., Churchville, Md. 

HORNBRAKER, John H., 154 W. Washington 
St., Hagerstown, Md. 

HORNBROOK, Kent Maidlow, New Martins- 
ville, W. Va. 

HORNSTEIN, Abraham L., 204 E. Biddle St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

HOUCK, Henry C, 1929 W. North Ave., 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

HOUPT, William P., 3235 Wakefield Rd., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

HOUSKA Henry J.. 3214 MontebeUo Terrace, 
Baltimore 14, Md. 

HOUSTON, Robert E., 411 E. Washington St.. 
(jreenville, S. C. 



HOWARD, William 1... 107 High St., Salis- 
bury. Md. 

HOWELL, Clewell, 102 .\lleghany Ave., Tow- 
son 4, Md. 

HOWELL, James (;., 715 Frederick Rd., Ca- 
tonsville 28, Md. 

HOYT, Irvin G., Queenstown, Md. 

HUBBARD. J. Edward Chesapeake, Ohio 

HUDGEL, Charles R.. 510 Warm Springs Ave., 
Boise, Idaho 

HUFF, Wheeler O., 4529 Maple Ave., Bethesda 

14, Md. 

BUFFER, Sarah V., University Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

HUGG, John H.. 301 Clay Ave., Jeannette, Pa. 

HULL, Harry C, 521 Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

HULLA, Jaroslav. 2214 E. Fayette St., Balti- 
more 31, Md. 

HUMMEL, Ralph T., Wayne County General 
Hospital, Eloise, Mich. 

HUMMELL, Ernest G., 414 Cooper St., Cam- 
den, xX. J. 

HUMMELL, Ira Lee C, Salem, N. J. 

HUMPHREY, Wade R., 125 N. Main St.. 
Stillwater, Minn. 

HUMPHREYS, Charles W., Jr., 6607 Hillan- 
dale Rd., Chevy Chase, Md. 

HUNT, J. A., Delta, Pa. 

HUNTER, James S., Jr., 1603 6th St., S. W., 
Rochester, Minn. 

HUNTER, Robert C, 2636 Oak Park Blvd., 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

HURWITZ, Gilbert E., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

HUTCHINS, Harry, Buford, Ga. 

HUTCHINSON, Francis H., 2856 Observatory 
Road. .\pt. 4, Cincinnati 8, Ohio 

HYATT, Irvin, 6107 Hopeton Ave., Baltimore 

15, Md. 

HYLE, John C, 7527 Belair Road, Baltimore 
6, Md. 



IMBRIE, David E., 327 N. Main St., Butler, 
Pa. 

INGENITO, Gabriel A., 181 Edward St., New 
Haven 11, Conn. 

INGRAM, Charles H., 1116 Rotary Drive, 
High Point, N. C. 

INGRAM, David N., Houston, Pa. 

INLOES, Benjamin H., Jr., 851 11th St., New- 
port News, Va. 



MEDICAL ALL' MM 



Ivii 



ISAACS, Benjamin H., 2600 K. Baltimore St., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

IVENS, Betty I., University Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 



JACKSON, Andrew. Ill \V. Main St.. Water- 

l>ur\' 32, Conn. 
JACKSON. Marshall V., Princeton, X. f. 
JACKSON, Samuel, 233 Hendrickson Ave., 

X'alley Stream, N. V. 
JACKVONY, Albert H.. M^) Klmwood .\ve.. 

Providence, R. I. 
JACOBSON, Meyer W., 2310 Eutaw Place, 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
JACOBSON, Philip. IS Liberty St., Peters- 

burj;, Va. 
JACOBSON, Samuel M., 50 Pershing St., 

Cumberland, Md. 
JAMISON, William P., Voughiogheny Forest, 

Route »2, Oakland. Md. 
JANDORF, R. Donald. 640,S Western Run Dr., 

IJaltimore 15, Md. 
JANER, Manuel R., 685 West End Ave., New 

York 2?>. X. V, 
JANKIEWICZ, Leon Peter, 914 State St., 

Utica, N. Y. 
JANNEY, Nathan, 7101 Harford Road. Balti- 
more 14, Md. 
JAWORSKI, Melvin, 2711 Eastern Ave., Bal- 
timore 24, Md. 
JENNINGS, Erwin, 502' 2 G St., Brunswick, 

Ga. 
JENSEN, Carl D. F., .509 Olive Way, Seattle 1, 

Wash. 
JENSEN, Jacob R., 1514 E. Cold Spring Lane, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
JERARDI, Joseph V., 1800 X. Charles St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
JERNIGAN, Lane M.. 1101 W, Berry St., Fort 

Worth 10, Texas 
JETT, Page Covington, Prince F"rederick, Md. 
JOHNSON. Frederick ^L, La Plata, Maryland 
JOHNSON. H. Fred, 2.308 W. 8th St., Amarillo, 

Te.xas 
JOHNSON, Harlev .M.. West Columbia, S. C. 
JOHNSON, Jesse R.. 3C, E. 3rd St., Lewis- 
town. Pa. 
JOHNSON. Lucian Dale, Second Xational 

Bank Bldg., Connellsvilic, Pa. 
JOHNSON, Thorwald, 980 W. Olive St., Por- 

terville, Calif. 
JOHNSON, William R,, Medical .\rts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



JOHNSTON, Daniel F., Los Angeles County 
Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. 

JOHNSTON, E. H., 51 W. Main St., Water- 
bury 2, Conn. 

JONES, Bobby Lee, Box 12K, Route 1, Severna 
Park, Md. 

JONES, C. Henry. 707 X. Rebecca Ave., 
Scranton, Pa. 

JONES, Charles \Y., Argonne .\pts., 1629 Co- 
lumbia Road, Washington 9, D. C. 

JONES, Ezra Albert, 795 Elm St., Manchester, 
X. H. 

JONES, H. Alvan, 1107 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

JONES. James P., Pennsboro, W. Va. 

JONES, Richard Arvin, Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

JONES, Rosella E., 7138 Carrol Ave., Takoma 
Park 12, Md. 

JONES. Thomas L., Snow Hill, Md. 

JORGENSEN, Louis C, 3418 Fillmore Ave., 
Ogden, L'tah 

JOSLIN, C. L., 105 Woodlawn Road, Balti- 
more 10, Md. 

JUMPER, C. E.. 1511 X. Virginia St., El Paso, 
Tex. 



KADAN, J. Earl. 823 19th St., X. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

KAESE, Werner E., 12 Sellers Rd., .\nnapolis, 
Md. 

KAGEN, Gordon, 224 X. Fifth St., Reading.. 
Pa. 

KALTREIDER, D. Frank, 1526 Xorthwick 
Road, Baltimore 18, Md. 

KAMMER, William H., Jr., 612 W. 40th St., 
Baltimore 11, Md. 

KANE, Harry F., 2607 E. Preston St., Balti- 
more 13, Md. 

KANNER, .\lberl V., University of Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wise. 

KAPLAN, Irvin B., U. S. Public Health Service 
Hospital, Detroit. Mich. 

KAPLAN, Isadore, 3314 Marnat Road, Balti- 
more 8. Md. 

KAPLAN, Robert ^L, Boston City Hospital, 
Boston. Mass. 

KARDASH, Theodore. 114 Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1. Md. 

KARFGIN, Arthur, 1,532 Havenwood Road, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

KARGER, Abraham, 70 Fayette Rd., Scars- 
dale, X. Y. 



Iviii 



DIRECTORY 



KARNS, James K.. 700 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

KARPEL, Saul, 1^0 Montauk Ave., New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

KATZ, Abraham, 1775 Seward Ave., New York 
61, X. V. 

KATZ. Milton A., 1868 Pacific .\ve.. Long 
Beach 6, Calif. 

KATZENBERGER. James \V., Paradise Ave., 
Catonsville 2S, Md. 

KATZENSTEIN, Lawrence, 501 Delaware 
.Vve., Wilmington 1, Del. 

KAUFMAN, Israel, 3608 Bedford Ave., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

KAUFMAN, Ma.x, 21-51 75th St., Jackson 
Heights, N. Y. 

KAYSER, Fayner A., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KEARNEY, John H., 147 Prichard St., Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 

KEEFE, Raymond Bernard, St. Francs Hos- 
pital, Hartford, Conn. 

KEEFE, Walter J., 114 Ridgewood Road, West 
Hartford, Conn. 

KEEFE, William P., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, 
Minn. 

KEEGAN, Daniel F., 144 Golden Hill St., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

KEELEY, J. Francis, Jr., 1190 N. E. 100th St., 
Miami Shores, Fla. 

KEISTER, Stephen, 2701 Lafayette Rd., R. D. 
«2, Erie, Pa. 

KEITH, Marion Y., 369 N. Elm St., Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

KELLAM, Sheppard G., Bellevue Hospital, 4th 
Med. NYU, New York, N. Y. 

KELLER, Michael L., 673 E. 27th St., Pater- 
son, N. J. 

KELLY, Harvey A., 2CC Pleasant St., Win- 
throp, Mass. 

KELLY, John E., Jr., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KELMENSON, Harry, 1300 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

KEMICK, Irvin B., City Hospital, 3395 Scran- 
Ion Road, Cleveland 9, Ohio 

KEMP, Howard M., 42 Franklin St., Green- 
t'leld, Mass. 

KEMP, Katherine V., 722 Stamford Road, 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

KENLER, Myron L., 60-3C 79lh St., Elm- 
hurst, N. Y. 

KENNEDY, Carl H., 405 Warden Drive, East 
Falls, Philadelphia 29, Pa. 



KENWORTHY, Richard A., HI, Hyde, Md- 
KEOWN, Lauriston L., 1938 Linden Ave., 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
KERR, James P., Jr., Damascus, Montgomery 

Co., Md. 
KETZ, Wesley J., 377 E. Main St., Batesville, 

Ark. 
KIEFER, Robert A., Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 
KIEFFER, George S. M., 1010 Leeds Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
KIEL, August, Jr., 2 W. Read St., Baltimore 1, 

Md. 
KINCAID, Herbert C, 3635 Vacation Lane. 

Arlington 7, Va. 
KINDT, Willard F., Allentown Hospital, .\llen- 

town, Pa. 
KING, Charles H., University Hospital, .\nn 

.\rbor, Mich. 
KING, Samuel James, 800 CarletoB Blvd., St. 



Louis, Mo. 



KINGSBURY, Robert C, Federalsburg, Md. 
KINNAMON, Howard F., Jr., Waverly, 

Easton, Md. 
KIRBY, William H., Jr., 1515 Ramblewood 

Rd., Baltimore 12, Md. 
KIRK, Maj. Gen. Norman T., Montauk, L. I., 

N. Y. 
KLATT, Kenneth M., University Hospitals, 

Madison, Wise. 
KLAWANS, Maurice F., 46 Southgate Ave., 

Annapolis, Md. 
KLEIMAN, Norman, 3816 Chatham Road, 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
KLEIN, Harold H., 430 Wyoming Ave., 

Scranton, Pa. 
KLEIN, Henriette R., 131 E. 92nd St., New 

York 28, N. Y. 
KLEINMAN, Abraham ^L, 680 Montgomery 

St., Brooklyn 13, N. Y. 
KLEMKOWSKI, Irvin P., 213 Upnor Road, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
KLOMAN, Erasmus H., 44 W. Biddle St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
KLOMPUS, Irving, 301 E. High St., Bound 

Brook, N. J. 
KLUGMAN, Yale L., Roosevelt Hospital, 428 

W. 59lh St., New York 19, N. Y. 
KNABE, George W., Jr., Chief, Laboratory 

Service, Veterans Administration Center, 

4100 W. Third St., Dayton 7, Ohio 
KNIGHT, Arthur C, Jr., R. F. D. #1, Deer 

Lodge, Mont. 
KNIGHT, Walter P., 1745 N. Washington 

St., Scranton 9, Pa. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



lix 



KNIPP, George A., 4116 Edmondson Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
KNIPP, Harry L., 4116 Edmondson Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
KNOBLOCH, Howard T., 1102 Columbus 

.\ve.. Bay City, Mich. 
KNOLL, William, Veterans Administration 

Hospital, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
KNOTTS, Earl Paul, Denton, Md. 
KNOWLES, Paul \V., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
KOCEVAR, Martin Francis, 403 S. 2nd St., 

Steelton. Pa. 
KOCHMAN, Leon, 1037 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
KOHL, Schuyler, 31 Whig Road, Scarsdale, 

X. V. 
KOHN, Louis Winfield, 239 Central Park 

West, New York City 
KOHN, Walter, 102 E. Fort Ave., Baltimore 

30, Md. 
KOLB, Lawrence B., 6645 32nd St., N. W., 

Washington 15, D. C. 
KOLLER, Elmer C, Jr., Union Memorial 

Hospital, Baltimore 18, Md. 
KOLMAN, Lester N., 3700 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
KOLODNER, Louis J., 2502 Eutaw Place, 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
KORNS, Chas. Byron, Sipesville, Pa. 
KRAEMER, Samuel H., 126 Gifford Ave., 

Jersex' Cit\', X. J. 
KRAMER. Bernard, Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5. Md. 
KRAMER, Harold C, University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
KRAUT, Arthur .M., 2729 Boulevard, Jersey 

Citv 6, X. J, 
KREMEN, Abraham, 2355 Eutaw Place, 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
KREPP, Martin W., Jr., 4202 Kolb Ave., 

Baltimore 6, Md. 
KRESS, Scheldon, D. C. (ieneral Hospital, 

W ashington, D. C. 
KRIEG, Edward L. J., 510 X. Chai:.elgate 

Lane, Baltimore 29, Md. 
KRIEGER, Alexander A., 500 Pcnn Ave., 

I'ltlsburgh 22, Pa. 
KRIEGER, Jerome L., 4024 6th Ave., Brook- 
lyn n. X. V. 

KRIEGER, Morton M., Lutheran Hospital of 

.Mar\land, Baltimore 16, Md. 
KROLL, John G., X-Kay Dept., University of 

\'irginia Hos])ital, Charlottesville, Va. 



KRONE, William F., Jr., 3400 Taney Rd., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

KRULEVITZ, K. K., 400 X. Hilton St., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

KUMP, Albert, 39 Lake St., Bridgeton, N. J. 

KUNKOWSKI, Andrew, 2529 Eastern Ave., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

KUNKOWSKI, Mitchell, 1016 S. East Ave., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

KURLAND, Albert, 6207 Winner Ave., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

KUTNER, Charles, 211 N. 5th St., Camden, 
N.J. 



LACK, Frank E., 181 Edwards St., New 

Haven 11, Conn. 
LAMPLEY, William A., 433 N. Church St., 

Hendersonville, N. C. 
LANCASTER, Alston H., 50 Orange St. 

Worcester 8, Mass. 
LANCASTER, Louis J., Virginia Mason 

Hospital. Seattle 1, Wash. 
LANDERS, Arthur E., Medico-Dental Bldg., 

Reno, Nevada 
LANE, Edwin C, Hebron, Ohio 
LANG, M. C, 306 Tunbridge Rd., Baltimore 

12, Md. 
LANGELUTTIG, H. Vernon, 715 N. Charles 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
LANGFITT, Frank, L'nion X'^ational Bank 

Bldg., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
LANGRALL, Harrison M., Jr., Mayo Clinic, 

Rochester, Minn. 
LANHAM, Alston Gordon, Ronceverte, W. Va. 
LANZI, Joseph G., Mercy Hospital. Baltimore 

2, Md. 
LAPINSKY, Herbert, 470 Ocean Ave., Brook- 
lyn 26, N. Y. 
LAPP, Herbert W., 4804 Frederick Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
LARTZ, Robert E., 165 Euclid Ave.. Sharon, 

Pa. 
LASHER, Lemuel Abraham. 132 W. 26th St., 

Erie, Pa. 
LASS, Louis, 2314 Broad Ave., .\ltoona, Pa. 
LATIMER, Clarence V., Jr.. 20 Elm St.. 

Hudson Falls, N. Y. 
LATIMER, John H., 2160 S. 20th East St., 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
LAUGHLIN, Karl P., University Hospital, 

Cleveland. Ohio 
LAUGIER, Augustin R., Box 298, San Juan. 

P. R. 



Ix 



DIRECTORY 



LAUKAITIS, Joseph G., 679 Washington 

Blvd., Baltimore 30, Ud. 
LAVY, Louis T., 1844 \V. North Ave., Balli- 

niore 17, Md. 
LAYMAN, J. Walter, 5 Public Scjuare. Hagers- 

lowii, M(l. 
LAYTON. Cak-l. K., renlcrville, iVId. 
LAZOW. Sol M., 199 Main St., Matawan, N. J. 
LECHNER, Sidney I., 1777 Grand Concourse, 

Bronx 53, N. Y. 
LEE, Mathew Hung Mun, University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
LEFFERT, Jacob, 86 Arg\le Road, Brooklyn 

18. N. Y. 
LEGO. Thos. Henry, Union Bridge, Md. 
LEIBENSPERGER, Geo. P., 24 E. Main St., 

Kutztown, Pa. 
LEIGHTON, Capt. Herbert H., 2164-1 U. S. 

Army Hospital 1, Fort Eustis, Va. 
LEITH, Leroy R., Exeter, Mo. 
LEMMERT, William A., St. Agnes Hospital, 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
LENKER, Luther A., 232 State St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 
LENNON, Wm. Earl, Federalsburg, Md. 
LENSON-LAMBROS, Ruth, 213 Mallow 

Hill Road, Baltimore 29, Md. 
LENTZ, George E., 756 W. Market St., York, 

Pa. 
LERMAN, Philip H., 459 S. Oyster Bay Rd., 

Hicksville, N. Y. 
LERNER, Philip, 1111 St. Paul St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
LEUNG, Bernard, Wood Ridge, N. J. 
LEVICKAS, Herbert J., 5305 East Drive, 

Baltimore 27, Md. 
LEVIN, Harbert J., Walter Reed Army Hos- 

jiital, Washington, D. C. 
LEVIN, I. Leonard, 606 Broadway, Lorain, Ohio 
LEVIN, Isadore, Veterans Administration, 216 

Sui)erior Ave., Cleveland 4, Ohio 
LEVIN, Joseph, 831 S. 13th St., Newark, N. J. 
LEVIN, Manuel, 4818 Reisterstown Rd., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
LEVIN, Morris B., 218 E. University Pkwy., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
LEVIN, Morton L., State Department of 

Health, Albany, N. Y. 
LEVIN, Norman, 114 Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
LEVINE, David R., 488 E. 18th St., Brooklyn 

26, N. Y. 
LEVINE, Hilbert Merrill, Mercy Hospital, 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



LEVY, David .Vlfred, University Hospital, 

Baltimore, Md. 
LEWIS, Frank R., Willards, Md. 
LEWIS, Thomas E., 4047 Mitchell Drive, 

Flint 6, Mich. 
LICHTENBERG, Walter, 309 Kindcrkamack 

Road, Westwood, N. J. 
LIEB, Saul, 90 Treacy Ave., Newark, N. J. 
LIGGETT, B. Lee, Mill Creek, W. Va. 
LIMAURO, Louis Herbert, West Lynn, Mass. 
LING, William S. M., 34 E. 72nd St., New 

York 21, N. Y. 
LINHARDT, Elmer G., 3 Chesapeake Ave., 

Eastport, Annapolis, Md. 
LINK, Etta C, 600 Eleven Mile Rd., Berkley, 

Mich. 
LINTHICUM, Charles Mdton, Linthicum 

Heights, Md. 
LI PIRA, Joseph F., 8400 Loch Raven Blvd., 

Baltimore 4, Md. 
LIPKIN, Harry, 1749 Grand Concourse, New 

York City, N. Y. 
LIPSKEY, Joseph, Odenton P. O., A. A. Co., 

Md. 
LISANSKY, Ephraim T., 3210 Liberty Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 
LITTLE, Luther E., 10 W. Madison St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
LITTLETON, John B., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
LIVINGOOD, Comdr. Wm. C, MC USN., 

Quarters F-12, U. S. Naval Hospital, Phila- 
delphia 45, Pa. 
LIVINGSTON, Everett A., Gibson, N. C. 
LLEWELYN, Helen E., 408 N. Main St., 

Lancaster, S. C. 
LLOYD, OHver S., 701 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 
LLOYD, Thos. Peterson, 1006 Highland Ave., 

Shreveport, La. 
LLOYD, William T., Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
LOKER, Ford, 1120 St. Paul St., Baltimore 1, 

Md. 
LONG, Samuel Herman, 903-4 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
LONG, William B., Jr., Medical Center, 

Sahsbury, Md. 
LONGLEY, George H., 1609 Bolton St., 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
LOONEY, Edward M., 345 Essex St., Salem, 

Mass. 
LOUFT, Reuben K., 109 Capitol St., Charles- 
ton 1, W. Va. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixi 



LOVE, Rotjert G., 528 Bay Roatl, Hamilton, 

.Mass. 
LOVE, Thomas A., Mercy Hospital, Baltimore 

2, Md. 
LOVE, William S., 1214 X. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 2, M(l. 
LOWITZ, Irving R., 6()21 Highgate Drive, 

Baltimore \S, Md. 
LOWMAN, Mihon E., 6.S02 Dcancroft Road, 

Baltimore 9, Md. 
LUBAN, Benjamin, 7.50 High St., Newark, N. J. 
LUEDERS, Wm., Jr., Frederick St., Staunton, 

\'a. 
LUKATS, Paul G., .S24 Park Ave.. \V., Bar- 

herton, Ohio 
LUMPKIN, Lloyd U., 918 E. Las Olas Blvrl., 

I'l. Lauderdale, Ela. 
LUMPKIN, William R., 618 Valley Lane, 

Towsfjn 4, Md. 
LUND, Grant, 3(XJ1 Ashby Ave., Las Vegas, Xev. 
LURTING, Clarence \V., 516 Federal St., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
LUSBY, Frank F., 230 X. Potomac St., Hagers- 

town, Md. 
LUTZ, John F., % M-Sgt. C. G. Morgan, 8th 

Field Maintenance Squadron, APO 244, San 

P'rancisco, Calif. 
LYNN, Irving, 2760 Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J. 
LYON, A. B., Ulster, Pa. 

M 

MACCUBBIN, H. Pearce, 110 Lee St., Win- 
chester, \'a. 

MacDONALD, James M., Jr., 4918 Santa 
.Monica Ave., San Diego 7, Calif, 

MACHATA, Francis K., 2813 St. Paul Blvd., 
Rochester 17, X. V. 

MACK, Harry P., 3829 Arbutus Ave., Balti- 
mcjre 7, Md. 

MACKOWIAK, Stephen C, 6714 Holabird 
Ave., Baltimore 22, Md. 

MacLAUGHLIN, Donald, 4508 Edmondson 
Village, Baltimore 29, Md. 

MADDI, Vincent M., 3 Campbell Rrjad Court, 
BinKhamton, N. Y. 

MAGED, Allan J., SufTern, X. V. 

MAGGID, Gerald X., Sinai HosjHtal, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

MAGINNIS. Helen I., Xew Cut Road, Ellicott 
City, Md. 

MAGOVERN, Thomas F., 228 South Orange 
.\vc., .South Orange, X. J. 

MAGUIRE, Henry F., 233 A St.. San Diego 1, 
Calif. 



MAKER, John E., 90 Third St., I.cjng Branch, 

X. J. 
MAHOLICK, Leonard, 1027 2nd Ave., Crjlum- 

bus. Ga. 
MAHON, Robert J., Mercy Hospital, Baltimore 

2, .Md. 
MAHONEY, Vernon L., 614 X. 4th Ave., 

Tucson, Ariz, 
MAINS, Marchall P., Mercer Hospital, Trenton 

8, X. J. 
MALOUF, Raymond X. 52 X. 1st E., Ixjgan, 

Utah 
MAMULA, Peter, 15305 S. Atlantic Blvd., 

Compton, Calif. 
MANDEL, Jacfjb B., 479 Jersey Ave., Jersey 

City, X. J. 
MANGANIELLO, Ujuis O. G., Medical Arts 

fildg., 1467 Harper St., Augusta, Ga. 
MANGUS, Samuel J., Valley Forge General 

Hfjs[jital, Phfjenixvllle, Pa. 
MANKOVICH, D. G., 210 W. Mahoning St., 

Punxsuta\vne\% Pa. 
MANSDORFER, G. Bowers, 2937 X. Charles 

St., Baltimore 18, Md. 
MANSFIELD, Wm. Kenneth, 44 W. Biddle 

St., Baltimore 1, .Md. 
MAREK, Charles B., 33fXJ The Alameda, Balti- 
more 18, .Md. 
MARINO, Frank C, 1129 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md, 
MARINO, Frank S., 26 Coolidge St., Hart- 

ffjrd 10, Conn. 
MARKLEY, Raymond Jr., Medical Arts BIdg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
MARKMAN, H. David, 2396 Morris Ave., 

fircjn.x, X'ew Vcjrk Cit\' 
MARSH, James T., Westminster, Md. 
MARTIN, Clarence W., Route 5, Wrights 

Mill Road, Baltimore 7, Md. 
MARTIN, Thomas A., 2811 Hillsboro St.. 

Raleigh, .\. C. 
MARTIN, Wm. E., Randallstcjwn. Md. 
MARTON, Herbert M,. Bronx Municipal 

Hosjjital, Xew York, X^. Y. 
MARTON, Samuel. Hi West End Ave., Xew 

^■ork City 
MARYANOV, Alfred R.. 136 Race St., Cam- 
bridge, .Md. 
MASSENBURG, George \. Jr., 763 Pine St., 

.Macon, Ga. 
MASTERSON, John F., 98 Myrtle Ave., 

Irvinglon. .\. J. 
MATHEKE, George A.. 555 William St., Pkst 

Orange. X. J. 



Ixii 



DIRECTORY 



MATHEKE, OUo C, Jr., 328 Sussex Ave., 

Xewark, X. J. 
MATHERS, Daniel H., 212 N. Park Ave., 

Sanford, Fla. 
MATHESHEIMFR, Jacob L., 280 Old Bergen 

Road, Jersey City, N. J. 
MATTAX, Harry M., 711 Camden Ave., 

Salisbury, Md. 
MATTERN, Carl F. T., Micro Biol. Inst. 

Bldg. 7, National Institute of Health, 

Bethesda, Md. 
MATTERN, E. Anne Den try, 13518 Grenoble 

Drive, Rockville, Md. 
MATTHEWS, James Green, 421 Riverside 

Ave., Si)okane, Wash. 
MATTHEWS, Otto, Warsaw, N. C. 
MATTHEWS, Stanley W., State Sanatorium 

;^1, South Mountain, Pa. 
MAY, William T., 2519 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 

17, Md. 
MAYER, Erwin E., 2519 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 
MAYER, Frederick W. A., 1830 James Ave., 

St. Paul 5, Minn. 
MAYS, Howard B., 3301 N. Charlss St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 
MAXSON, Charles W., 817 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
McCANN, Harold F., 1401 Columbia Rd., N. 

W., Washington, D. C. 
McCARTY, Harry Downman, 37 W. Preston 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
McCLAFFERTY, WilHam J., 315 St. Dunstans 

Rd., Baltimore 12, Md. 
McCLUNG, Jas. A., Richwood, W. Va. 
McCLUNG, James E., McClung Hospital, 

Richwood, W. Va. 
McCLUNG, Wm. D., McClung Hospital, 

Richwood, W. Va. 
McCOSH, James N., 1014 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
McCOY, C. Glenn, 2270 National Rd., Elm 

Grove, W. Va. 
McCUTCHEON, Merle D., Little Bldg., 

F]ast Liverpool, Ohio 
McELVAIN, W. H., 3415 USAF Hospital, 

Lowry AFB, Colo. 
McELWAIN, Howard B., 31 E. North Ave., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
McFADDEN, John W., Hartville, Ohio 
McFADDEN, Robert B., The Latrobe, Charles 

& Read Sts., Baltimore 2, Md. 
McGOOGAN, Malcolm T., 513 Elizabeth St., 

Waycross, Ga. 



McGOWAN, Joseph F., 29 N. Market St., 

Asheville, N. C. 
McGRADY, Charles W., Jr., Jackson Memorial 

H(js|)ital, Miami, F'la. 
McGRADY, Kathleen, Jackson Memorial 

Hospital, Miami, F"la. 
McGregor, Alpine W., St. George, Utah 
McHENRY, D. J., 940 S. Queen St., York, Pa. 
McKAY, John N., 6014 F^dmondson Ave., 

Catonsville 28, Md. 
McKENZIE, W. Raymond, Medical Arts 

Building, Baltimore 1, Md. 
McKINNON, William J., Anson Sanatorium, 

Wadesboro, N. C. 
McKNEW, Hector C, Jr., 20 E. Locust St., 

Newark, Ohio 
McLANE, Wm. Oliver, Jr., Frostburg, Md. 
Mclaughlin, Francis J., 2 E. Read St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
McLaughlin, Joseph S., University Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 1, Md. 
McLEAN, Geo., Medical Arts Bldg., Baltimore 

1, Md. 

McMillan, WilHam O., 5010 Kanawha Ave., 
Charleston, W. Va. 

McMURRAY, J. B., 6 S. Main St., Washing- 
ton, Pa. 

McNALLY, Hugh B., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

McNINCH, Eugene R., 126 Walker Rd., 
Dover, Del. 

McPHERSON, C. W., 305 W. Front St., 
Burlington, N. C. 

MEADE, Forest C, 27 E. Center St., Lexing- 
ton, N. C. 

MECH, Karl, 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

MEDIARY, George Curtis, Rosewood Training 
School, Owings Mills, Md. 

MEISTER, Aaron H., 148-1 1 89th Ave., Jamaica 

2, N. Y. 

MENDELOFF, Morris I., 217.1^ Capitol St., 

Charleston, W. Va. 
MERANSKI, Israel P., 3354 Dolfield Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
MERKSAMER, David, 105 Lincoln Road, 

Brooklyn, N. V. 
MERLINO, Frank A., 225 Greenville Ave., 

Johnston, R. I. 
MESSMORE, Harry B., Addison, Pa. 
MESSMORE, John Lindsey, Masontown, Pa. 
METCALF, John S., Jr., 9422 Theodosia, 

Overland 14, Mo. 
METCALF, John W., E. IJaniel St., Toronto, 

(Jhio 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixiii 



MEYER, Alvin, % J. Schneider, 1109 Clay 

Ave., Bronx 56, N. Y. 
MICELI, Joseph, 423 Eastern Ave., Baltimore 

21, Md. 
MICHAELSON, Ernest, 341 Mineola Blvd., 

Mineola, L. 1., X. V. 
MICHEL, William, 1015 Poplar Grove St., 

Baltimore 16, Md. 
MILES, Leslie R., Jr., 27 Main St., Lonaconing, 

Md. 
MILHOLLAND Arthur V., Grace Line Medical 

Dept., Pier 57 N. R., New York 11, N. Y. 
MILLER, B. H. K , 2415 Bryn Mawr Ave., 

Philadelphia 31, Pa. 
MILLER, Carl F., 5354 Delmar Blvd., St. 

Louis, Mo. 
MILLER, Clarence L., 1465 Rhode Island 

Ave., X. \V., Washington 5, D. C. 
MILLER, Clarence S., 1515 Sloat Blvd., San 

Francisco 27, Calif. 
MILLER, Edgar A., Jr., Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital, Parma 29, Ohio 
MILLER, Edgar R., P.O. Box 1414 Wilming- 
ton, Del. 
MILLER, Irving, 650 Main St., New Rochelle, 

X. Y. 
MILLER, Isaac, 1228 S. Charles St., Baltimore 

30, Md., 
MILLER, J. G., 107 W. Saratoga St., Baltimore 

1, Md. 
MILLER, James .\., 1331 Reisterstown Road, 

Pikesville 8, Md. 
MILLER, James D., 2218 Market St., Youngs- 
town, Ohio 
MILLER, Royston, 1141 Delaney St., Orlando, 

Fla. 
MILLER, Samuel, 159 S. Main St., Akron, Ohio 
MILLETT, Joseph, 501 Fulton Ave., Hemp- 
stead, X. Y. 
MILLOFF, Bernard, 800 S. Federal Highway, 

Hollywood, Fla. 
MILLS, Lawrence H., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
MINERVINI, Robert V., 330 Park Hill Ave., 

Yonkcrs 5, N. Y. 
MINISZEK, James H., 13 Oak St., Bratlle- 

boro, \'t. 
MINNEFOR, C. A., 1K>4 South Orange Ave., 

South Orange, X. J. 
MIROW, Richard R., 1080 North Shore Drive, 

Miami Beach, Fla. 
MITCHELL, Wallace H., 611 Caroline St., 

Key West, Fla. 
MITCHELL, William A., 201 Hemenway 

Bid}'., l.ufkin, Texas 



MOHLER, Donald I., Jr., 362 E. Taylor St., 
Reno, X"ev. 

MOLZ, Edward L., 7425 Harford Rd., Balti- 
more 14, Md. 

MONNINGER, Arthur Cecil, 800 E. North 
Ave., Hallimore 2. Md. 

MONTALVO-GUENARD, Andres, P.O. Box 
9601, Santurce, P. R. 

MONTILLE, Victor J., 1111 Magdalena Ave., 
Santurce, P. R. 

MOONEY, Albert L., 1701 Hartsdale Rd., 
Baltimore 4, Md. 

MOORE, Alfred N., Oakland, 111. 

MOORE, S. G., Box 86, Stephens City, Va. 

MOORES, J. D., 3105 Belair Rd., Baltimore 
13„ Md., 

MORAN, John A., 215 W. Washington St., 
Hagerstown, Md. 

MORAN, John E., 31 Federal St., Greenfield, 
Mass. 

MORDECAI, Alfred, 806 S. Hawthorne Rd., 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

MORGAN, Irving J., 4075 Jenkins Arcade, 
Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

MORGAN, Zack R., 10 E. Eager St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

MORICLE, Charles H., Reidsville, N. C. 

MORRIS, Felix R., 953 E. Main St., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

MORRIS, Frank K., 11 E. Chase St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

MORRIS, Richard Holt, 35 Corey St., Everett, 
Mass. 

MORRISON, John E., Box 508, Norwich, 
Conn. 

MORRISON. Theodore, 11 E. Chase St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

MORROW, J. G., Box 206, Hahira, Ga. 

MORROW, Thomas L., Jr., Chester, S. C. 

MORSE, Leonard J.. 29 Moreland St., 
Worcester, Mass. 

MOSES, C. H., 919 Linden Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

MOSES, Robert A., Washington University, 
Medical School Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

MOSTWILL, Ralph, 1801 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

MOTTA, Peter G., Carnegie, Pa. 

MOULTON. OUn C, 130 N. Virginia St., 
Reno, Nev. 

MOYERS, Waldo B., 6901 Pineway, Hyatts- 
ville. Md. 

MUELLER, Eugene A.. 1653 B Waverl\- Way. 
Loch Raven .Vjjts., Baltimore 12, Md. 



Ixiv 



DIRECTORY 



MULLER, Stephen F., 2 W". Read Si., Balti- 
more 1, M(l. 
MUSE, Joseph E., 6212 Mossway, Baltimore 

12, Md. 
MUSE, William T., 125 Osliornc Ave., Catons- 

ville IS. Md. 
MUSSER. Leo P., Rt. 3, .SOO Vine Hill Way, 

Martinez, Calif. 
MUTCHLER. H. Raymond 3 Sanford St., 

Dover, X. J. 
MUTH, Robert G., U. S. Naval Hospital, 

Chelsea, Mass. 
MYER, Edw. H., Mahwah, N. J. 
MYERS, Donald J., 608 Main St., Steuben- 

ville, Ohio 
MYERS, G. Roger, 205 Prescott St., El Cajou, 

Calif. 
MYERS, Karl Johnson, Phillippi, \V. Va. 
MYERS, Paul R., Ridgway, Pa. 
MYERS, Philip, 2425 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 

17, Md. 
MYERS, Richard L, V. S. Public Health 

Service Hospital, Baltimore 11, Md. 

N 

NACHLAS, N. Edward, 2301 Farrington Road, 
Baltimore 9, Md. 

NAFZINGER, M. L., 43 Tripoli Heights, 
Route 1, Box 82A, Dumfries, Va. 

NAIMAN, Benjamin L., 1736 Columbia Road, 
Washington 9, D. C. 

NATARO, Jerome, 92 Wolcott Road, Levit- 
town, X. Y. 

NATARO, Joseph, 172 Littleton Ave., Newark, 
X.J. 

NEAFIE, Charles A., 493 Orchard Lake Ave., 
Pontiac, Mich. 

NEAL, Hunter S., Lankenau Hospital, Phila- 
delphia 30, Pa. 

NEEDLEMAN, Max, 132 E. 73rd St., New 
Vork21,N. Y. 

NEFF, Charles A., Street, Md. 

NEISTADT, Isadore I., 114 Dubois Ave., 
\'alley Stream, N. Y. 

NELLER, Walter Irving, 121 Wickham Ave., 
Middletown, N. V. 

NESTOR, Thomas A., 337 Main St., Wake- 
field, R. L 

NEWMAN, Saul, 365 Broadway, Amityville, 
N. Y. 

NIBLETT, Walter Saulsbury, 2220 Garrison 
.\ve., Baltimore 16, Md. 

NICKLAS, John M., 5701 Rusk Ave., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 



NICKMAN, Emanuel H., 1616 Pacific Ave., 

.\tlarilic Cit\-, X. J. 
NISWANDER, Ci. Donald, New Hampshire 

Slate Hosi)ital, Concord, N. H. 
NOLAN, F'rancis Fabian, New Monroe Bldg., 

Xorfolk, Va. 
NOLAN, James J., 416 Kensington Road, 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
NOLL, Louis, 1383 Clinton Ave., Irvington, 

X. J. 
NOON, Milton A., Xew Stanton, Pa. 
NORTH, Ellsworth H., Jr., 1502 Carolina Ave., 

Elizal)eth City, N. C. 
NORTON, Alfred S., 4711 Highland Ave., 

Bethesda 14, Md. 
NOVAK, Emil, 26 E. Preston St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
NOVENSTEIN, Sidney, Eunkstown, Md. 
NOVEY, Rita, Union Memorial Hospital, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
NOVEY, Samuel, 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
NOWELL, John F., U. S. Naval Hospital, 

Charleston, S. C. 

O 

O'CONNOR, James Jos., Olyphant, Pa. 
O'CONNOR, Raymon F., Punxsutawney, Pa. 
O'DONNELL, Charles F., 7301 York Road, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
OGDEN, Frank N., 2701 X. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
O'HANLON, George, R. D. 1, Elmira, N. Y. 
O'HARE, James S., 104 W. Madison St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
O'NEILL, Allen J., 7940 Old Georgetown Rd., 

Bethesda, Md. 
ORANS, Alfred, 225 Ellison Ave., West bury, 

N. Y. 
ORFF, John Henry, 229 East Lancaster Ave., 

S})eedway Park, Shillington, Pa. 
OROFINO, Caesar F., 1428 N. Spadra Road, 

Fulleton, Calif. 
O'ROURK, Thomas Ruller, 104 W. Madison 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
ORR, William J. B., 4801 Connecticut Ave.. 

X. W., Washington, D. C. 
ORRISON, Wm. W., Box X, Plains, Kan. 
OSHRIN, Henry, 7500 Bergenline Ave., North 

Bergen, X. J. 
OSSERMAN. Kermit E., 4 E. 89th St., New 

York 2<S, X. V. 
OSTEEN, Clark L., St. Agnes Hosjntal, Balti- 
more 29, Md. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixv 



OTT, K(n- H., Jr., 3700 S. Colorado Blvd., 

Knglewood, Colo. 
OURSLER, David A., University of Virginia 

Hos])ital, Charlottesville, Va. 
OWENS, David, 914 D. St., Sparrows Point 

19, Md. 
OWENS, Richard S., 920 S. Jefferson St., 

Roanoke 16, Va. 
OZAZEWSKI, John C, 1540 Oakridge Road, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



PACHTMAN, Isadore, 1080 Jenkins Arcade, 

Pittslmrgh, Pa. 
PACKARD, Albert G., Jr., N. Y. Orthopaedic 

Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Med. 

Center, New York 32, N. Y. 
PADUSSIS, Stephen K., 213 S. Elwood Ave., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
PALMER, M. Virginia, Easton, Md. 
PALMER, William M., Highland Alameda 

County Hospital, Alameda, Calif. 
PALMER, William N., Easton, Md. 
PALMISANO, Joseph P., 6014 Loch Raven 

Blvd., Baltimore 12, Md. 
PANEBIANCO, Richard R., 73-11 34th Ave., 

Jackson Heights 72, N. Y. 
PANZARELLA, John H., 137-33 241st St., 

Roscdale 22, N. Y. 
PARKS, Seigle W., 102 Adams St., Fairmont, 

W. Va. 
PARRAMORE, James B., 523 Whitehead St., 

P. O. Box 326, Key West, Fla. 
PASS, Isadore, 4001 Wilkens Ave., Baltimore 

29, Md., 
PATTEN, David H., 117 N. Beechwood Ave., 

Catonsville 28, Md. 
PATTERSON, Carl N., 3930 Plymouth Road, 

Hope Valley, Durham, N. C. 
PATTERSON, Frank, 809 Washington Ave., 

Tyrone, Pa. 
PEAKE, Clarence W., 4508 Harford Roa.l, 

lialtimore 14, Md. 
PEARCY, Thompson, 1109 Lee St. E., Charles- 
ton, W. Va. 
PECK, R. DeWilt, ()06 3rd Ave., Montgomery, 

W . Va. 
PENCHANSKY, Samuel Josei)h, 847 Ave. C, 

Hayonne, N. J. 
PENTECOSTE, Salvador, 14 Claremont Ave., 

Mapk'wood, N. J. 
PFRLMAN, Lawrence, 104 S. Michigan .\ve., 

("hicago 3, III. 



PERRAS, Louis A., 171 Butler St., New Bed- 

f(;rd, Mass. 
PERRY, Clayton Charles, Hanna BIdg., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 
PERRY, Ernest M., 125 Sunset Ave., Rocky 

Mount, N. C. 
PERRY, Henry B., Jr., 100 E. Brentwood 

Greensboro, N. C. 
PERRY, Henry D., Jr., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
PERTZ, Elden H., Weston, W. Va. 
PESSAGNO, Daniel J., Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
PETERS, H. Raymond, 1127 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
PETERSON, Preston, Curphey Clinic, 1045 N. 

California St., Stockton, Calif. 
PFEIL, E. Thornton, Lois Grunow Clinic, 

Phoenix, Ariz. 
PFLUEGER, Charles J., 460 S. Ardmore St., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
PHELAN, Patrick C, Jr., 201 W. Madison St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
PHILLIPS, David L., 605 E. 38th St., 

Indianajiolis, Ind. 
PHILLIPS, John Roberts, 407 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Houston, Texas 
PHILLIPS, Lawrence D., Marshallton R. D. 

^A, Wilmington 8, Del. 
PHILLIPS, Malcolm Dudley, Darlington, Md. 
PHILLIPS, Otto C, 2225 Lake Ave., Baltimore 

13, Md. 
PHRYDAS, Irene A., 878 Barton Woods Road, 

X. E., .\tlanta, Ga. 
PICCOLO, Pasquale H., 41 Trumbull St., New 

Haven 10, Conn. 
PICKETT, Wilbur Crafts, Jr., Duke Hospital, 

Durham, N. C. 
PICO, Jose T., Box 9924, Santurce, P. R. 
PIERPONT, Edwin L., 8204 Liberty Road, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
PIERPONT, Ross Z. 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
PIERSON, John W., 

more 2, Md. 
PIGGOTT, J. Burr, 3040 Idaho .\ve., X. W., 

Washington, I). C. 
PIGMAN, Carl, Whitesburg, Ky. 
PIKE, Warren IL, Jr., Ainsworth Rd., Hobart, 

Ind. 
PINESS, George, 240 S. LaCienga Blvd., 

Hcverly Hills, Calif. 
PINK. .Solomon H., Butler, N. J. 
PITTMAN, Robert R., Marhnton, W. Va. 



.5408 I'urlington Way, 
107 St. Paul St., Balli- 



Ixvi 



DIRECTORY 



PLATT, Marvin S., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1. Md. 

PLUMB, Richard L., Parkland Hospital. 
Dallas, Texas 

POINT, Walter \V., Jr., Box 2563, Charleston, 
\V. \'a, 

POKORNY. Jos.. 2200 E. Madison St., Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

POKRASS, Fred P., 1621 Union St., Reading, 
Pa. 

POLING, Evangeline M., 210 X. Walnut St., 
Philippi, W. Va. 

POLIS, George X.. 6138 5th St., X. W., Wash- 
ington. D. C. 

POLIZZOTTI, Joseph L., 34 17th Ave., East 
Patterson. X'^. J. 

POLLACK. Irvin P., Sinai Hospital. Baltimore 
5. Md. 

POLLOCK. Arthur E.. 1217 14th Ave.. Al- 
tiHina. Pa. 

POMEROY, William H.. Poquonock. Conn. 

PONTE, Joseph P., Jr., 202 Orchard Street, 
Xew Bedford, Mass. 

POOL, Marjorie K., 3603 Schoolhouse Lane, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



RAFFEL, William, 803 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

RAMIREZ-MARINI. Arquelio, Dr. Vene St., 
IS. Box 3^)7, .^an German, P. R. 

RANDOLPH. ¥.. Hurl, 102 Carpenter St., 
Clarksburg, W. \"a. 

RANGLE, Raymond V., 642 Washington Blvd., 
Baltimore 30, Md. 

RANKIN, Watson S., 2049 Briarwood Rd., 
Charlotte 7, X'. C. 

RASCOFF, Henry, 895 Eastern Pkwy., Brook- 
lyn. X. Y. 

RASKIN, Howard F., 950 E. 59th St., Chicago 
37. 111. 

RASKIN, Moses, 6221 Greenspring .\vt., 
Baltimore 9. Md. 

RATTENNI, Arthur, 1011 Smith St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

REAHL, George E., Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2. Md. 

REAM. Xorman B., Tyrone, Pa. 

RECKSON, M. M., Suite 346, 420 Lincoln Rd., 
Miami Beach 39, Fla. 



T.^T.^x,T.T,TT.xT. ,. . , REE D . R a Iph G . , Ccn t ral IsUp , X. Y. 

PORTERFIELD. Maurice Coleman, Hamp- uiMM-.r'Tj n i \ r .^ r) -n /-wl- 

, , , ' REEDER, Paul Arungton, Barnesvme, Ohio 



Jteau. Md 
POSEY, Dale M., Hunsecker Road, R. D. ,^5, 

Lancaster. Pa. 
POSNER. Leonard, 20 Plaza St., Brooklyn, 

X. Y. 
POST, William R.. 2120 E. Main St.. Spring- 

tield. Ore. 
POUND, John C, 104 X. RolHng Rd., Catons- 

ville 2^. Md. 
POVALSKI, Alexander Wm. T., 1925 Hudson 

Blvd.. Jersey City, X. J. 
POWELL, Albert M.. Jr.. 220 X. Market St., 

Frederick. Md. 
PRATHER, F. G.. 5 Fair\va\- Drive, Ashe- 

ville. X. C. 
PRATT, Louis J., 8402 Greenway Road, Towson 

4, Md. 
PRUITT, Charles E., 14 A St., Brunswick, Md. 



REESE. J. G. M., Lutherville. Md. 

REHMEYER, Walter, Monahans. Ward Co., 
Texas 

REIER, Charles H.. 6701 York Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

REIFSCHNEIDER, Chas. A., 104 W. Madison 
St., Baltimore l,Md. 

REIFSCHNEIDER, Herbert, 104 \\'. Madison 
St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

REIMANN, Dexter L., Bon Secours Hospital, 
Baltimore 23, Md. 

RELLINGER-STAFFORD. H., 15858 
Hesperian Blvd., San Lorenzo, Calif. 

RENNA, Francis S., 20 Morris Ave., Morris- 
town. X. J. 

RESNICK, Elton. 400 Rockwood Road, 
Brandywine Hills. Wilmington, Dela. 

REVELL, Samuel T. R., L'niversity Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 
^ REVELL, Walter J.. Louisville, Ga. 

QUEEN. J. Emmett, 4418 Xorwood Road, REYNOLDS, Georgia M., 12337 Cedar Road, 



Baltimore 18, Md. 



Cleveland 6, Ohio 



QUINN, John F., 81 Arcadia Ave., Bridgeport, REYT^OLDS, Roy R., Ohio Merchants Bank 



Conn. 



Bldg., Massillon, Ohio 



QUINN, Raymond J., 730 Baldwin St., Water- RHODE, C. Martin, Veterans Administration 



bur^-. Conn. 



Hospital. Augusta, Ga. 



MEDICAL ALUMXI 



Ixvii 



RHODES, Bricey M., 201 S. Monroe St., 
Tallahassee, Fla. 

RICH, Benjamin S., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

RICHARDS, Granville H., Jr., Port Deposit, 
M(l. 

RICHARDS, Walter I., Route 4, Charlottes- 
ville, \'a. 

RICHARDSON, Aubrey D.. 325 Overbook 
Road. Baltimore 12, Md. 

RICHARDSON, Paul F., U. S. Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hosp., Fort Howard, Md. 

RICHMOND, Lewis C. 1181 Main St., Milton, 
\V. \a. 

RICHMOND, Lewis C, Jr.. 1181 Main St., 
Milton. \V. Va. 

RICHTER, Christian. 11 W. Biddle St., Balti- 
m()re 1. Md. 

RICHTER, Conrad L., 226 St. Dunstan's Rd., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

RIDDICK, Willard J.. 7426 Dominican St., 
New Orleans, La. 

RIDGELY, Irwin Oliver, 201 \V. Madison Ave., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

RIGDON, Henr>- L., McLeod Intirmary, 
Florence, S. C. 

RILEY, Eugene J., 840 Park Ave.. Baltimore 
1. Md. 

RILEY, Robert A., Waggaman Circle, Wildrose 
Shores, .\nnapolis, Md. 

RINEBERG, Irving E., 137 Livingston Ave., 
Xew Brunswick, X. J. 

RINEHART, Arthur M., 1532 Havenwood 
Road, Baltimore 18, Md. 

ROBBINS, Martin A., Esplanade Apts., Balti- 
more 17. Md. 

ROBBINS, Morris A., Columbus, X. J. 

ROBERTS, Bryan Xazer, Tyron St., Hills- 
boro. X. C. 

ROBERTS, James A., 8907 Georgia Ave., 
Sih'er Si)ring, Md. 

ROBERTSON, Fdwin ^L, 212 \V. Main St., 
Durham. X'. C. 

ROBERTSON, Merritt E., New Windsor, Md. 

ROBINS, Isadore M.. 109 S. Franklin St., 
W'ilkcs-Barre, Pa. 

ROBINSON, Daniel R., Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital, Fort Howard 19, Md. 

ROBINSON. Harry M.. 106 E. Chase St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

ROBINSON, Harry M., Jr., 1024 X. Calvert 
St.. Baltimore 2, Md. 

ROBINSON. John D.. Wallace, X. C. 



ROBINSON, Raymond C. V., 1004 X. Calvert 

St., Baltimore 2, Md, 
ROBINSON, Wm. Herbert, Roaring Spring, 

Pa. 
RODMAN, Harold I., Baltimore City Hospitals, 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
ROEHRIG, Charles B., 27 Kirkland Circle, 

Wellesley Hills 82, Mass. 
ROEMER, Jacob, 591 E. 27th St., Paterson, 

X.J, 
ROETLING, Carl P., 1326 W. Lombard St., 

Baltimore 23, Md. 
ROGERS, Harry L., 101 E. Preston St., Balti- 
more 2, Md, 
ROGERS. Josei)h M., Hamilton, Va. 
ROGERS, Wm. B., 1935 Second St., Cuyahoga 

Falls, Ohio 
ROHM, Jack Seth, 217 E. Main St., Carnegie, 

Pa. 
ROHM, Robert F., 509 Liberty Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 
ROLFES, Harry F.. 2325 Covina Way S,, St. 

Petersburg, Fla. 
ROLLINS, Clarence D., 1402 Miami Road, 

South Jacksonville 7, Fla. 
ROMANO, Xicholas M,, Bangor, Pa, 
ROOP, Donald J., 1112 Hampton Garth, 

Towson 4, Md. 
ROSEN, Morris, 744 Ritner St., Philadelphia, 

Pa, 
ROSENBAUM, Geo,. 1521 Spruce St,, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 
ROSENBERG, Albert A., 422 Shaw Ave., 

McKecsport, Pa. 
ROSENBERG, Benjamin. 21 E. 91st St,, 

BrtK)klyn 12, X, V, 
ROSENBERG, Jonas S., 5330 Thrill Place, 

Denver 6, Colo. 
ROSENSTEIN, Jacob L., 568 Bergen Ave,, 

Jersey City. X*. J, 
ROSENTHAL, John L., 135 W, Belvedere 

Road, X'orfolk, Va, 
ROSENTHAL, Victor, Merrick, X. Y. 
ROSIN, John D„ 1010 St. Paul St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
ROSS, George Perry, 120 Genesee St., Auburn, 

N.Y. 
ROSS, Harry P., Union Memorial Hospital. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
ROSSBERG, Clyde A., 2436 Washington Blvd., 

Baltimore 30, Md. 
ROSSTON, X. Conwell, Casebeer Clinic Bldg., 

10 S. Idaho St.. Butte, Mont. 



Ixviii 



DIRECTORY 



ROTHBERG, Al)raliam Simon, 110 E. 90lh 

St., New \'ork C'ity. 
ROTHFUSS, I'aul A.. 1(U2 Rural Ave, 

\\ illiamsiMjrl, Pa. 
ROTHKOPF, Henry, 6231 Old York Kd., 

l'hila.kli)hia. Pa 
ROTTENBERG, Joscj)!!, 58 W. Adams Ave., 

Detroit 20, Mich. 
ROYER, Earl P., 407 Camden Ave., Salis- 

liury. Md. 
ROZUM. Jt)hn K.. 4420 Palmarito St., Coral 

Gal.U's 46. Eia. 
RUBENSTEIN, Robert, 2758 Hudson Blvd., 

Jersey City, N. J. 
RUBIN, Morris, 2021 Grand Concourse, 

Bron.x. X. V. 
RUBIN, Seymour, 1331 E. North Ave., Balti- 
more 13, Md. 
RUBINSTEIN, H\man, 2349 Eutaw Place, 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
RUDE, Richard S., R. D. Hi, Mt. Holly, N. J. 
RUNKEL, John G., 715 Charing Cross Road, 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
RUSSELL, T. Edgie, 3901 N. Charles St., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
RUTTER, Joseph H., 224 S. Palmetto Ave., 

Daytona Beach, Fla. 
RUZICKA, Edwin R., 10 Lancaster Rd., Need- 
ham 92, Mass. 
RUZICKA, Francis Fred, 800 N. Patterson 

Pk. Ave., Baltimore 5, Md. 



SABIN, Fredk. Collins, 23 N. Ann St., Little 

Falls, X. V. 
SABISTON, Frank, 115 E. Gordon St., Kinston, 

X, C. 
SACKS, Milton S., 3500 Shelburne Road, 

Baltimore 8, Md. 
SACHS, Sidney H., 10300 Carnegie Ave., 

Cleveland 6, Ohio 
SADLER, Henry H., Jr., 594 Rivard Blvd., 

Grosse Pointe 30, Mich. 
SADOWSKY, Wallace, Perry ville, Md. 
SAFFELL, Jas. Glenn, Reisterslown, Md. 
SAFFRON, Morris Harold, 292 Paulison Ave., 

Passaic. X'. J. 
SAGER, Harold, 800 Avenue C, Bayonne, N. J. 
SAKOWSKI, John Paul, 20 VV. 22nd St., 

Bayonne, X. J. 
SALVATI, Leo H., 1250 Prospect St., West- 
field, X. J. 
SANCHEZ, Hilarion, Jr., 652 McKinley, 

Santurce, P. R. 



SANDERS, Lucius C., P & S Bldg., 899 

Madison, Memphis, Tenn. 
SANISLOW, Charles A., Jr., University Hos- 

jiilal, .\nn .\rl)or, Mich. 
SAPARETO, R. Louis, 38 Saltonstall Road, 

Ha\crhill, Mass. 
SAREWITZ, Albert B., 102 Connelt Place, 

South Orange, X". J. 
SARGEANT, Geo. F., .Aigburth Manor, Tow- 
son 4. -Md. 
SARNOFF, Jack, 31-11 31st Ave., Ix)ng Island 

City, X. V. 
SASHIN, David, 25 W. 81st St., New York 

24, X. V. 
SASSCER, James Ghiselin, Upper Marlboro, 

Md. 
SAUNDERS, Thomas S., 727 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Portland, Oregon 
SAVAGE, John E., 811 Boyce Ave., Towson 

4, Md. 
SAWYER, George J., Jr., 4808 Harford Rd.. 

Baltimore 14, Md. 
SAX, Albert M., Strong Memorial Municipal 

Hospital, Rochester, N. Y. 
SBOROFSKY, Isadore, 4734 Park Heights 

.\ve., Baltimore 15, Md. 
SCAGNETTI, Albert, 3741 Lochearn Drive, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
SCANLAN, Thomas, 100 High Service Ave., 

X'orlh Providence, R. I. 
SCARBOROUGH, Asa M., 105 E. Avondale 

Drive. Greenville, S. C. 
SCHAEFER, John F., 401 Random Road, 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
SCHAPIRO, Sidney H., 334 Union Ave., 

Irvington 11, X'. J. 
SCHENTHAL, Joseph, 1328 Aline St., New 

Orleans 15, La. 
SCHERLIS, Irving, The Latrobe, Baltimore 

2, Md. 
SCHERLIS, Sidney, 1214 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
SCHILLING, J. W., 4031 Cochran St., Erie, Pa. 
SCHINDLER, Blane M., 41 Greene St., Cum- 
berland, Md. 
SCHLACHMAN, Milton 80-25 Elmhurst Ave., 

Elmhurst 73, N. Y. 
SCHMITT, George F., Jr., 30 S. E. 8th St., 

Miami 36, I'la. 
SCHMUCKLER, Jacob, 543 Hartford Ct., 

South Orange, X'^. J. 
SCHNAPER, Xalhan, 1214 X. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixix 



SCHNEIDER, David, 1101 N. Milton Ave., 

Ballimore 13, Md. 
SCHNEIMAN, Maurice Harris, 1220 Cottman 

Ave., Phiiaciel[)hia, Pa. 
SCHNITZKER, William F., 7220 Forest Kd., 

Hyattsville, Md. 
SCHOENRICH, Herbert, 111 E. Preston St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
SCHOOLMAN, Louis K., Professional Hldg., 

Frederick, Md. 
SCHULTZ, Louis A., 1177 Grant Ave., New 

\ork 56, X. V. 
SCHUSTER, Gerald D.. Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 
SCHWARTZ, Aaron D., 3-5 Madison Ave., 

Spring \'alley, N. Y. 
SCHWARTZ, Alec R., 5801 Beacon St., Pitts- 

hurth 17, Pa. 
SCHWARTZ, Paul M., 38 S. Clinton St., 

PouRhkec[)sie, N. Y. 
SCHWARTZ, Stanley E., 420 Lincoln Road, 

Miami Beach, L^la. 
SCHWARTZBACH, Saul, 1726 Eye St., N. \V., 

V\'ashington, D. C. 
SCOTT, John M., 8 Longwood Rd., Baltimore 

10, Md. 
SCOTT, Joseph VV., 701 DuPont Bldg., Miami 

n, Fla. 
SCULLY, John T., 1005 \V. 35th Ave., Apt. 

101, Gary, Ind. 
SEABOLD, \Vm. M., 5402 Edmondson Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
SEABRIGHT, Howard L., 233 A St., San 

Diego 1, Calif. 
SEEGAR, J. King, Jr., 2 W. Read St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 
SEIDEL, Herman, 2404 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more, Md. 
SEIDMAN, Herman Harold, 760 Hunts Point 

.\ve.. Xew York City, N. Y. 
SEIGMAN, Edwin L., 722 Falls Road, Rocky 

Mount, X. C. 
SELL, Roger K., Torrington, \V>'o. 
SEMOFF, Milton, 522 N. Tucson Blvd., 

Tucson, Ariz. 
SEWALL, Sidney, 64 Garden St., Hartford, 

Conn, 
SEWELL, James A., 430 Xew Haven Ave., 

.Melhourne, Fla. 
SEWELL, Stephen, Springlake, X. J. 
SEXTON, Thomas S., Ferry Hill Road, Granby, 

Mass. 
SEYMOUR, Geo. Alfred, 253 Orchard St., 

Elizabeth, N. J. 



SHAFFER, Charles I., Box 165, Somerset, Pa. 

SHAMER, .Maurice E., 3300 West Xorth Ave., 
Baltimore 16, Md. 

SHANNON, George E., 1421 Glendale Road, 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

SHAPIRO, Albert, 3701 Fords Lane, Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

SHAPIRO, Jerome E., 4003 Hilton St., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

SHAUB, Roy O., University- of Michigan Hos- 
pital, .•\nn Arbor, Mich. 

SHAW, Charles E., 5801 Loch Raven Blvd., 
Baltimore 1?, Md. 

SHAW, John J., m Beech Spring Rd., South 
Orange, X. J. 

SHEEHAN, Joseph C, 602 Parkwood Ave., 
R.F.D. 3, Annapolis, Md. 

SHELL, James H., Jr., 6510 Kriel St., Balti- 
more 7, Md. 

SHELLEY, Harry S., 3725 Estes Rd., Xash- 
ville 5, Tenn. 

SHEPPARD, Robert C, 311 Montrose Ave., 
Baltimore 28, Md. 

SHERMAN, Solomon, 2424 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 1 7, Md. 

SHERRILL, Elizabeth B., Cockeysville, Md. 

SHIPLEY, E. Roderick, Box 80A, Ridge Road, 
R.F.D. , Hanover, Md. 

SHIRKEY, Ivy G., Veterans Admm. Facility, 
Arlington Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

SHOCHET, Bernard R., Kiowa Indian Hos- 
pital, Lawton, Okla. 

SHUBERT, Felix S., 3926 State St., Erie, Pa. 

SHUMAN, Joseph E., 2702 S. 9th St., ArUng- 
ton, Va. 

SHUMAN, Louis, 1635 Massachusetts Ave., 
X"'. W., Washington, D. C. 

SIEGEL, Benjamin I., 15 Greenwood Rd., 
Baltimore 8, Md. 

SIEGEL, Edward, 81 BrinkerhotT St., Platts- 
burg, X. Y. 

SIEGEL, Maurice B., 119 S. Alta Vista Blvd., 
Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

SIEGEL, Samuel R.. 15335 Waterkx) Rd., 
Cleveland, O. 

SIEGEL, Sidney L., 227 X. 2nd St., Millville, 
X. J. 

SILBERMAN, Donald H., 1815 11th Ave., 
South Birmingham 5, Ala. 

SILLS, David X., Jr., 11 S. E. Front St.. Mil- 
ford, Del. 

SILVER, A. A., Temple Garden Apts., Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

SILVER, H. Fletcher, CK)ldsl)oro, Md. 



Ixx 



DIRECTORY 



SILVERSTEIN, J. M., 73 Main St., MiUburn, 
X. J. 

SIMON. Joseph R., 3400 F()rt)es St., Pitts- 
Inir-h 13, I'a. 

SIMONS, George, 615 Memorial Ave, Cumber- 
land, Md. 

SIMPSON, Henry H., Elon College, N. C. 

SIMPSON, Marshall A.. Tulare County Hos- 
pital, Tulare, Calif. 

SINDLER, Joseph, 929 Brooks Lane, Balti- 
more 1 7, Mtl. 

SINDLER, Richard A., Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 5, Md. 

SINTON, William A., Jr , Union Memorial 
Hospital, Baltimore 18, Md. 

SIRES, William O., 1787 Massachusetts Ave., 
Le.xington, Mass. 

SISCOVICK, Milton, 3411 Edgewood Road, 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

SIWINSKI, Arthur G., 15 E. Biddle St.. Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

SKAGGS, James W., Jr., Union Memorial 
Hospital, Baltimore 18, Md. 

SKAGGS, James Wm., Nitro, W. Va. 

SKIPTON, Roy K., 7220 Forest Road, Kent 
Village, Landover, Md. 

SKITARELIC, Benedict, Flintstone, Md. 

SKLAR, Allen L., Kings Beach, Calif. 

SKOVRON, Michael J., 439 Arlington Road, 
Erie, Pa. 

SLATE, Marvin L., 203 E. Green St., High 
Point, N. C. 

SLATER, Paul V., Milwukee County Hos- 
pital, Milwaukee, Wise. 

SLAVCOFF, Alexander, 3231 N. 2nd St., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

SLOANE, Henry Oscar, 1717 Pine St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

SLUSHER, Hamilton J., 7 E. Church St., 
Frederick, Md. 

SMINK, A. Clarence, 4509 Lilierty Hts. Ave., 
Baltimore 7, Md. 

SMITH, E. P., 920 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2. Md. 

SMITH, Edward P., Jr., Maj., USAF, MC, 
223 Fairchild, Lackland Village, San Antonio, 
Texas 

SMITH, Fred B., 2 W. University Pkwy., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

SMITH, George T., Royal Victoria Hospital, 
Montreal, Canada 

SMITH, J. G. Fowble, Brunswick, Md. 

SMITH, John P., 1100 E. Belvedere Ave., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 



SMITH, Joseph J., 800 Stratfield Rd., Bridge- 
port 4, Conn. 

SMITH, Leroy Henry, Winterport, Me. 

SMITH, Ruby A., 513 N. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

SMITH, Solomon, 2426 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

SMITH, Solomon, 2500 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

SMITH, W. H., 3429 Chestnut Ave., Balti- 
more 11, Md. 

SMITH, Ziba L., West Nanticoke, Pa. 

SMYTH, J. Walter, Lt. (j.g.), MC, USNR, 
U. S. Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Fla. 

SNAITH, Theresa Ora, Weston, W. Va. 

SNYDER, Fredk. 44 Clinton Ave., Kingston, 
N. V. 

SNYDER, Nathan, 1200 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

SOLLOD, Aaron C, 707 E. Fort Ave., Balti- 
more 30, Md. 

SOLLOD, Bernard W., 8 Liberty Pkwy., 
Dundalk 22, Md. 

SOLTZ, William B, 1171 Elder Ave, New 
York 72, N. Y. 

SOSNOWSKI, Andrew, 4016 Ritchie Highway. 
Baltimore 25, Md. 

SOWELL, George A., Roper Hospital. Charles- 
ton, S. C. 

SPARTA, Anthony J., 42 N. 2nd St., Easton, 
Pa. 

SPEAKE, Thomas C, B & O Central Bldg., 
2 N. Charles St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

SPEAR, Irving J., 928 N. Charles St., Balti- 
more, Md. 1 

SPEICHER, W. Glenn, Westminster, Md. 

SPELSBERG, Walter W., 415 Goff Building. 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 

SPENCER, Tracy N., Jr., 805 Montrose Drive, 
South Charleston, W. Va. 

SPIEGEL, Herbert, 161 King Point Road. 
Great Neck, L. I., N. Y. 

SPIELMAN, Morton M., 140 Riverside Drive. 
New York, N. Y. 

SPIER A. Allan, 4408 Loch Raven Blvd., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

SPOCK, Alexander, 826 Pine St., Kulpmont, 
Pa. 

SPRAGUE, Edward Wharton, 86 Washington 
St., Newark, N. J. 

SPRECHER, Milford H., Elkton, Md. 

SPREI, Emanuel, 85-04 168th St., Jamaica 3, 
N. Y. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



SPRINGER, James Earl, Peoples Bank Bldg., 

Akron, Ohio 
SPROUL, Dorothy G., 1416 Oxford St., 

Berkeky 9. Calif. 
SQUIRES. Millard F., Jr., 507 S. Maryland 

.Vve., Richardson Park, Wilmington, Del. 
STAHL, William J., 343 Main St., Danbury, 

Conn. 
STALLWORTH, Clarke Jackson, Thomaston, 

Ala. 
STANFIELD, Ehvin E., Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital, Fayetteville, N. C. 
STATMAN, Arthur J., 361 Warwick Ave., 

South Orange, X. J. 
STECHER, J. L., Angebilt Hotel, Orlando, Fla. 
STECKLER, Robert J., 1400 Cass Ave., Evans- 

ville 14, Ind. 
STEDEM, Anthony F. A., 11 E. Chase St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
STEELE, Byron Wm., Mullens, W. Va. 
STEELE, Guy, Cambridge, Md. 
STEELE, Paul Beadle, 500 Penn Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 
STEIN, Aaron, 31 Hen Hawk Road, Great 

Xeck, L. I., N. V. 
STEIN, Benjamin Maxwell, 465 Fulton Ave., 

Hempstead, X. V. 
STEIN, Harold M., 227 W. Broadway, Pater- 
son, X. J. 
STEIN, Milton R., 2700 S. June St., ArUngton, 

\'a, 
STEINBERG, Morris W., 410 X. Hilton St., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
STEINBERG, Stanley H., 5223 S. Dakota Ave., 

X. E., Washington 11, D. C. 
STERLING, Harold, 1352 University Lane, 

Hyattsville, Md. 
STERLING, William 1339 Fort Stevens Dr., 

X. W., Washington 11, D. C. 
STERN, Morris, 471 Clifton Ave., CUfton, X. J. 
STERNBERG, Harry Melmuth, 461 Bedford 

.\ve. Sta. W., Brooklyn, X. Y. 
STEVENS, Russell A., 148 S. Franklin St., 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
STEVENSON, Charles C, 411 Thirtieth St., 

Oakland 9, Calif. 
STEWART, C. Wilbur, 6 E. Read St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
STEWART, Edwin H., Jr., Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
STICHEL, Frederick L., Jr., 4580 Edmondson 

Ave.. Baltimore 29, Md. 
STONE, Daniel L.. 420 Lincoln Road, Miami 

Beach, Fla. 



STONE, WilUam L., 473 75th St., Brooklyn 
9, X. Y. 

STONER, James E., Jr., Walkersville, Md. 

STOVIN, James J., Lenox Hill Hospital, Xew 
York, X. Y. 

STRAHAN, John F., 1365 Kitmore Rd., Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

STRAYER, Helen, 404 Wildwood, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 

STROTHER, Walton L., Salem, W. Va. 

STUCK, Robert G., Union Memorial Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 18, Md. 

STURGEON, Howard E., Xorfolk General 
Hospital, Xorfolk, Va. 

SUGAR, S. Jack, 5802 Baltimore Blvd., Hyatts- 
ville, Md. 

SULLIVAN, Matthew J., 2 E. Main St., Stony 
Point, X. Y. 

SULMAN, Wm. R., 2 E. Broad St., Hazleton, 
Pa. 

SUMMA, Andrew J., 141 Paddock St., Water- 
town, X. Y. 

SUMMERLIN, Glenn O., 209 X. E. 2nd Ave., 
Gainesville, Fla. 

SUNDAY, Stuart D., 201 E. 33rd St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

SUSSMAN, A. A., 3101 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

SWANK, James L., 205 S. 4th St., Las Vegas, 
Xev. 

SWISHER, Kyle Y., Ligon Rd., Ellicott City, 
Md. 

SWISS, Adam G., Kingsville, Md. 



TANKIN, Louis H., 1701 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

TANNENBAUM, Morris, 1750 Grand Con- 
course, Xew York City 

TARR, Xorman, Morris St., Oxford, Md. 

TARTIKOFF, George, 2020 Cortelyou Rd., 
BrfX)klyn 26, N. Y. 

TAYLOR, Francis X., 34 Franklin St., Peters- 
burg, Va. 

TEETER, James Herring, Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

TEITELBAUM, Harry A., 1801 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

TEITELBAUM, Maurice L., 863 Eastern 
Pkwy., Bnxjklyn, X. Y. 

TEMPLE, Robert T., 4279 Lander Road, 
Route 4, Chagrin Falls, Ohio 

TERMAN, Irving, 4761 Broadwa>-, Xew 
York 34, X. Y. 



DIRECTORY 



THEUERKAUF, Frank J.. Jr.. 158 \V. 8th 

-St., Krif. Pa. 
THIBADEAU, Roherl T., 10623 Connecti- 
cut .Vve., Kensington, Md. 
THOMAS, -Anthony J., 4600 York Rd., Balti- 
more. Md. 12 
THOMAS, Bernard O., Jr., Professional Bidg., 

Frederick. Md. 
THOMAS, Chas. Rolierts. 503 Medical Arts 

Building. Chattanooga, Tenn. 
THOMAS, Edward P., 4 E. Church St., 

IVederick. Md. 
THOMAS, Ramsey B., 4123 Frederick Ave., 

Bakimore 29, Md. 
THOMASON, James A., P. O. Box 337, Foun- 
tain Inn, S. C. 
THOMPSON, A. F., Ardsley Road, Concord, 

X. C. 
THOMPSON, Carl F., 401 Spruce St., Morgan- 
town, \V. \'a. 
THOMPSON, Lewis B.. 14 Beverly Rd., East 

Xatick, Mass. 
THOMPSON, Raymond K., 11 E. Chase St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
THOMPSON, Winfield L., 809 Simmons St., 

(ioldshoro. X. C. 
THORUP, John M.. 4927 X. E. 30th Ave.. 

Portland, Oregon 
THUMIN, Mark, 57 S. Main St., Middletown, 

Conn. 
TILLEY, Russell M., Jr., 4325 49th St., N. \V., 

Washington 16, D. C. 
TOBIAS, Richard B., 1615 Riverside Drive, 

South VVilliamsport, Pa. 
TOLLIN, Louis X., 6908 North Point Rd., 

Sparrows Point, Md. 
TOLSON, Howard Lee, 122 S. Centre St., 

Cumberland, Md. 
TOMAIUOLI, Michele, 19 17th St., North 

Bergen. X. J. 
TOMPAKOV, Samuel, 3913 Labyrinth Rd., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
TOUHEY, T. Joseph, 441 S. Ellwood Ave., 

Baltimore, Md. 
TOULSON, W. Houston, Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1. Md. 
TOWNSHEND, Grafton D., 1141 Roscomore 

Rd.. Los Angeles 24, Calif. 
TOWNSHEND, W. H., Jr., 6 St. George Rd., 

Baltimore 10, Md. 
TRABAND, Millard T., Jr., St. John's Lane, 

Ellicott City, Md. 
TRACY, Harold William, Jr., U. S. Naval 

Hospital, Portsmouth, Va. 



TRAINOR, William J., 326 Virginia Circle, 
Wilmington, O. 

TRAMER, Arnold, 6506 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

TRAPNELL, Henry Rogers, U. S. Naval Hos- 
pital, Portsmouth, Va. 

TRENCH, James M., 725 Asylum .\ve., Hart- 
ford 5, Conn. 

TRIPLETT, William H.. 5209 Edmondson Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

TROXEL. James R., 1624 Valley Ave., Win- 
chester. Va. 

TRUCKER, Albert L., Jr., University of Cali- 
fornia Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 

TRUITT, Virginia H., AUentown General 
Hospital, .\llentown. Pa. 

TUBY, Josei)h, 1310 Beverlv Rd., Brooklyn, 
X. V. 

TUERK, Isadore, Spring Grove State Hospital, 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

TUNNEY, Robert B.. 115 E. Eager St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

TURANO, Leonard F., 194 18 117th Road, 
St. Albans 12, N. Y. 

TYRRELL, George W., 380 State St., Perth 
.\mbo\', N. J. 

TYSON, William A., Kingsville, Md. 



UDEL, Melvin M., U. S. Public Health, Wash- 
ington 25, D. C. 

ULLMAN, Alfred, 1712 Eutaw Place, Balti 
more 17, Md. 

ULLRICH, Henry F., 804 Cathedral St. 
Baltimore 1. Md. 

ULLSPERGER, John F., 5915 Loch Raven 
Blvd., Baltimore 12, Md. 

ULRICH, George J., 1286 E. Coast Highway. 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 

UPTON, Albert L., 7739 Meadowbrook Ave., 
Havward, Calif. 



VANDERBEEK, .Vndrew B., 683 E. 27th St.. 
Paterson, X. J. 

VAN GOOR, Kornelius, 26 Sheldon Ave., S. E., 
Grand Rapids 2, Mich. 

VAN KIRK, Wm., Eagle Lake, Me. 

VAN LILL, Stephen J., Ill, 3601 Greenway, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

VAN METRE, John Lee, 311 E. Washington 
Street, Charles Town, W. Va. 

VANN, Homer King, 410 Cedar St., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixxiii 



VAN ORMER, VV. Alfred, Medical Bldg., 122 

S. Centre St., Cumberland, Md. 
VARGAS, Dharma L., Box 825, Rio Piedras, P. R. 
VARHOL, Joseph G., 1122 Van Houten Ave., 

Clifton, N. J. 
VARNEY, William H., 120 Kelvidcre Ave., 

Washington, N. J. 
VAUGHN, James A., Jr., P. (). Box 1018, 

South Miami 43, FJa. 
VAZQUEZ, Rafael Santiago, Manati, P. R. 
VENROSE, Robert J., Milan, Mich. 
VICENS, Carlos N., Insular Tuberculosis 

Sanatorium, Rio Piedras, P. R. 
VICENS, Knrique A., 26 Hosto Ave., Ponce, P. R. 
VIEWEG, George L., Jr., ii Pleasant Drive, 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
VILAR-ISERN, Rafael A., 1861 Fernandez 

Juncos .Ave., Santurce, San Juan, P. R. 
VINCIGUERRA, Michael, 604 Westminster 

Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 
VINICOMBE, Harry W., 439 State St., 

Brcx)klyn, N. Y. 
VINSON; Porter P., Medical College of Va. 

Hospital, Richmond, Va. 
VINUP, Frederick H., 110 E. Lombard St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
VIRUSKY, Edmund J., Baxley, Ga. 
VOLENICK, Lee Joseph, 4710 Liberty Heights 

.Vve., Baltimore 7, Md. 
VOLLMER, Frederick J., 311 E. Gittings 

Ave., Baltimore 12, Md. 
VOSHELL, Allen F., 821 Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

W 

WACHSMAN, Irvin L., 407 S. Union Ave., 

Havre de Grace, Md. 
WAGNER, John A., 3419 Guilford Terr., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
WAGNER, Victor, 9 Kensington Ave., Jersey 

City 4. N. J. 
WAITE, Merton T., 56 Southgate Ave., 

.\nnapolis, Md. 
WALKER, James H., 1112 Virginia St., Charles- 
ton 1, W. V'a. 
WALKER, William Wallace, Medical Arts 

HIdg., Baltimore 1, Md. 
WALKUP, Adam Clark, St. Augustine, Fla. 
WALL, George H., 4405 Fairview Ave., Apt. D, 

Baltimore 16, Md. 
WALL, Lester A., Jr., 4407 Underwood Road, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
WALLACK, Charles A., 23 Treacy Ave., 

Newark, \. J. 



WALLENSTEIN, Leonard, 848 W. 36th St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

WALLER, VV. Kennedy, 512 Cathedral St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

WALTON, Henry J., 3806 Green way, Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

WANNER, Jesse R., Jr., 228 N. Division St., 
Salisbury, Md. 

WARD, Hugh W., Owings, Md. 

WARFIELD, John Ogle, 1726 Eye Street, 
Washington, D. C. 

WARNER, Carroll Gardner, Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

WARREN, Bryan Pope, Laurel, Md. 

WARREN, John McC, Laurel, Md. 

WARRES, Herbert L., 2337 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

WASSERWEIG, Martin M., 1059 N. 10th St., 
Reading, Pa. 

WATKINS, Dayton O., 4322 Van Buren St., 
University Park, Md. 

WATERMAN, Roger, 1022 N. Calvert St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

WATERS, Charles Alexander, 1100 N. Charles 
St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

WATERS, Zack J., 410 S. Division St., Salis- 
bury, Md. 

WATSON, Charles P., Jr., New Martinsville, 
W. Va. 

WAY, Samuel E., 1100 Hammond St., Rocky 
Mount, N. C. 

WEBSTER, Thomas C, 4336 N. Charles St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

WEEKLEY, Robert D., 5500 Ridge Rd., 
Cleveland 29, Ohio 

WEEKS, Harry S., Jr., 1203 Penn St., Clarks- 
burg, VV. Va. 

WEEKS, Howard N., 100 N. Potomac St., 
Hagerstown, Md. 

WEEKS, W. Earl, 5839 York Road, Baltimore 
12, Md. 

WEHLING, Benjamin B., 618 Orchard Ave., 
Barberton, Ohio 

WEINER, Lt. Israel H., (53A) AO 3041727, 
212 I'airchild St., Lackland AFB, San An- 
tonio, Texas 

WEINERT, Henry, 128 Market St., Passaic, 
N.J. 

WEINKAUF, William Ferdinand, Corunna, 
Mich. 

WEINSTEIN, Jack, 118-02 107th Ave., Rich- 
mond Hill, N. Y. 

WEINSTOCK, A. A., 4f)()3 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 



lxxi\- 



DIRECTORY 



WEISS, Maurice R., 124 S. Lasky Drive, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

WELBORN, James T., 15 E. 2m\ Ave., Lexing- 
ton, X. C. 

WELCH, Robert S. G., 46 State Circle, An- 
nai>olis, Md. 

WELFELD, Alvan, 1801 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 1 7. M(l. 

WELLIVER, Daniel, 6811 Eairfax Road, 
Bethesda. Md. 

WELLS, Gibson J., 309 E. 33rd St., Baltimore 
18, Md. 

WELLS, Samuel Robert, 115 X. Potomac St., 
Hagerstown, Md. 

WENTZ, Irl J., 420 Roberts St., Salisbury, 
X. C. 

WENTZ, Parker M., 701 \V. Princess St., York, 
Pa. 

WERNER, A. Seth, 205 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn 
l':'. X. V. 

WHEELER, H. Lawrence, 9 Paradise Ave., 
Baltimore 28, Md. 

WHEELWRIGHT, Harvey P., 2955 Harrison 
Blvd.. Ogden, Utah 

WHELCHEL, C. D., Gainesville, Ga. 

WHIPPLE, Ernest E., 196 Hamilton Circle, 
Painted Post, N. Y. 

WHITE, John P.. Ill, 224 Market St., Seaford, 
Del. 

WHITE, Kenneth H., Jr., 36 W. Avondale Ave., 
Youngstown 7, Ohio 

WHITE, \Vm. Kelso, 3005 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 18, :Md. 

WHITEFORD. Edwin \V., Jr., U. S. Air Force 
Hosi)ital, \'allcv Forge, Pa. 

WHITTAKER, Arthur V., 329 Fourth St., 
ElhvfKjd City, Pa. 

WHITTINGTON, Claude T., 600 Country 
Club Drive, Greensboro, N. C. 

WHITWORTH, F. Dixon, Box 439, 320 N. 
Royal Ave., Front Royal, Va. 

WHITWORTH, Fuller B., 123 Bedford St., 
Cumberland, Md. 

WIDMEYER, R. S., 1009 Market St., Parkers- 
burg, W. Va. 

WILD, Albert, 759 Parkway Blvd., Alliance, 
Ohio 

WILD, William O., 759 Parkway Blvd., Alliance, 
Ohio 

WILDER, Earle M., 1719 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

WILDER, Milton J., 1719 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 



WILDER, Thomas C, W. 112 24th Ave., 

Spokane, Wash. 
WILFSON, Daniel, Jr., 5721 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
WILKERSON, Albert R., 1200 St. Paul St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
WILKINSON, Arthur (i.. Ill Sherman Ave., 

X'ew Ha\cn, Conn. 
WILL, David R., 3619 Lochcarn Drive, Balti- 
more 7, Md. 
WILLIAMS, Charles H., 1632 Reistcrstown 

Road, Pikesville 8, Md. 
WILLIAMS, Herman J., 238 X. 10th St., 

Reading, Pa. 
WILLIAMS, J. Frank, Jr., 321 \V. Main St., 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
WILLIAMS, John E., 435 N. Roxbury Dr., 

Beverly Hill, Calif. 
WILLIAMS, John Z., Harrisburg Hospital, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
WILLIAMS, Louis V., R.D. 7, York, Pa. 
WILLIAMS, Mayes B., 6 Bae Mar Place, 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
WILLIAMS, :\Iortimer H., 711 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Roanoke, Va. 
WILLIAMS, Palmer Francis, Pikesville, Md. 
WILLIAMS, Richard Lloyd, Houtzdale, Pa. 
WILLIAMS, Richard T., 38 Park St., Warsaw, 

X. Y. 
WILLIAMS, Robert R., 6603 Eastern Parkway, 

Baltimore 14, Md. 
WILNER, Joseph, 1248 White Plains Road, 

Bronx, N. Y. 
WILNER, Sol., Medical Arts Bldg., 108 W. 6th 

St., Tulsa, Okla. 
WILSON, Edwin F., 55 E. 2nd St., Riverhead, 

L. I., X. Y. 
WILSON, Harry D., Jr., Union Memorial 

Hospital, Baltimore 18, Md. 
WILSON, Harry T., 1100 Hampton Garth, 

Towson 4, Md. 
WILSON, Nicholas G., 142 W. York St., 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
WILSON, Norman J., 135 Francis St., Boston 

15, Mass. 
WILSON, Paul R., Piedmont, W. Va. 
WILSON, Thomas N., 617 W. 40th St., Balti- 
more 11, Md. 
WINSLOW, Oliver P., Jr., 169 E. Flagler St., 

Miami ?t2, Fla. 
WINSTEAD, John Lindsay, Greenville, N. C. 
WIRTS, Carl, 812 Cedar Ave., Pittsburgh 12. 

Penna. 



MEDICAL ALU MM 



Ixxv 



WISE, Francis Roman, 136 E. Market St., 
\ork, Pa. 

WISE, Walter D., 1120 St. Paul St., Baltimore 2, 
Md. 

WISEMAN, John I., K.D. 1, Conneaut Lake, 
Pa. 

WOLFE, Samuel B.. 1331 E. North Ave., 
Baltimore 13, Md. 

WOLFF, Eldridge H., 15 Locust St., Cambridge, 
Md. 

WOLFF, William I., 16 Ridge Road, Tenafly, 
X.J. 

WOMACK, William S., 706 Camden Ave., 
Salisburj', Md. 

WOOD, Austin H., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

WOOD, Everet H., 2318 Hollister Ave., Madison 
5. Wise. 

WOODDY, Arthur O.,jar\vood Clinic, La Plata, 
Md. 

WOODEN, Allen G., 204 School House Lane, 
Wilmington 3, Del. 

WOODLAND, John C. 524 Valley Lane, Falls 
Church, Va. 

WOODROW, Jack H., 27 Ludlow St., Yonkers 
5, X. V. 

WOODS, T. Butler, 1301 Ohio St., South Nor- 
folk 6, Va. 

WOODWARD, Lewis K., Jr., Box 112, Wood- 
stock, Va. 

WOODWARD, Theodore E., 1 Merrymount 
Rd., Baltimore 10, Md. 

WORKMAN, Joseph B., Ligon Road, R.F.D. 
* 1, McAIpine, Howard Co., Md. 

WRIGHT, J. Leroy, 2539 Pickwick Rd., Balti- 
more 7, Md. 

WRIGHT, Robert Lee, Akron General Hospital, 
Akrcjn, Ohio 

WULWICK, Michael, 434 E. 23rd St., Brooklyn 
26, X. V. 

WYLIE, H. Boyd. 3119 X. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 



YAFFE, Stanley X., 2 East Read St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
YANAGISAWA, Kazuo, 50 E. 52nd St., New 

\<)rk 12, X. V. 
YAVELOW, Charles S.. 117 S. 2nd Ave., Mt. 

\'ernon, X. V. 
YEAGER, George Herschel, 314 Medical Arts 

Building, Baltimore 1 . Md. 
YEAGER, William H., Jr., 1800 Connecticut 

Ave., X. W., Washington 9, D. C. 



YORK, Thomas L., U. S. Marine Hospital, 

Galveston, Texas 
YOUNG, Charles A., 409 Medical Arts Bldg., 

Roanoke, Va. 
YOUNG, John D., Jr., 3709 Cedar Drive, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
YOUNG, Ralph F., WilUamsport, Md. 
YOUNG, Richard A., 302 X. Potomac St., 

Hagerstown, Md. 
YOUSEM, Herbert L., Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 
YUDKOFF, William, 770 Ave. A, Bavonne, 

N. J. 
YURKO, Leonard E., 3441 West St., Weirton, 

W. Va. 



ZACK, Frank A., 2639 Wilshire Ave., S. W., 

Roanoke, Va. 
ZAGER, Saul, 299 Clinton Ave., Newark 8, 

N.J. 
ZALIS, Daniel L., 3004 N. Hilton St., Baltimore 

29, Md. 
ZASLOW, John, 3304 Glenwood Rd., Brookl>-n 

10, X. Y. 
ZEIGER, Samuel, 3045 Ocean Pkwy., Brooklyn, 

X. Y. 
ZEIGLER, John B., Brookville. Montgomery 

County, Md. 
ZELIGMAN, Israel, 1109 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
ZIMMERMAN, Charles C, 105 S. Centre St., 

Cumberland, Md. 
ZIMMERMAN, Frederick T., 11 E. 68th St., 

New York 21, N. Y. 
ZIMMERMAN, Loy M., 3202 Harford Road, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
ZIMRING, Joseph G., 222 Riverside Blvd., 

Long Beach, N. Y. 
ZINBERG, Israel, 2320 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 

17, Md. 
ZINN, W. F., Medical Arts Bldg., Cathedral & 

Richmond Sts., Baltimore, Md. 
ZUPNIK, Howard L., 427 Hopkins Rd., Balti- 
more 12 Md. 
ZURAWSKI, Charles, 535 Broadway, Provi- 
dence 9, R. I. 

FACULTY 

NON-GRADUATES 

ACTON, Conrad, 1208 St. Paul St., Baltimore 2, 

Md. 
ARNOLD, James G., Jr., 11 E. Chase St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



D I RECTOR V 



BONGARDT, H. F., 201 \V. Madison St., 
Baltimore, Md. 

BRADLEY, J. Edmund, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

6RANTIGAN. Otto C, 104 W. Madison St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

COBLENTZ, Richard G., 5102 Roland Ave., 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

COMPTON, Beverley C, 1014 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

DAVIDSON, Charles N., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

DIEHL, William K., 2027 Skyline Rd., Balti- 
more 4. Md. 

EDWARDS, Monte, 404 Marlowe Rd., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

FERGUSON, Frederick P., Department of 
Physiolog}-, University of Md. School of 
Medicine, Ixjmbard & Greene Sts., Baltimore 
l,Md. 

FINESINGER, Jacob E., University of Mary- 
land Schcx^l of Medicine, Baltimore 1, Md. 

FULLER, Harvey L., 5718 Ridgedale Rd.. 
Baltimore 9, Md. 

GARLICK, William, 700 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GOVATOS, George, Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

HACHTEL, F. W., 122 W. Lafayette Ave., 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

HAHN, William E.. Univ. of Md. School of 
Dentistry, Baltimore 1, Md. 

HUNDLEY, J. Mason, Jr., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KADAN, Ferd E.. 701 Cathedral St., Baltimore 
1, Md. 

KILBY, Walter, 115 Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

KITLOWSKI, Edward A., 3301 N. Charles St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

KRANTZ, John C, Jr., School of Medicine, 
Universitj- of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Md. 

KRUMREIN, Louis Frederick, 722 N. Ken- 
wood Ave., Baltimore 5, Md. 

MILLAN, L. J., 516 Cathedral St., Baltimore 

1, Md. 

MOHR, Dwight, 301 S. Ellwmd Ave., Balti- 
more 24, Md. 

MORRISON, J. Huff, 707 Chumleigh Road, 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

MYERS, John A., 104 E. Biddle St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 

PINCOFFS, Maurice C, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



ROBBEN, John O., 7930 Georgia Ave., Silver 

Spring, Md. 
SETTLE, William B., Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
SIEGEL, I. A., r)4(X) Park Heights Ave., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 
SMITH, D. C, University of Maryland, Sch(x)l 

of Medicine, Baltimore 1, Md. 
SONNENFELDT, Gertrude, Springfield State 

Hospital, Sykesville, Md. 
UHLENHUTH, Eduard, 4115 Westview Road, 

Northwtxxl, Baltimore 18, Md. 
VOSHELL, Allen F., 821 Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
WARD, Grant, 15 E. Biddle St., Baltimore 2, 

Md. 
WRIGHT, Robert B., 31 S. Green St., Baltimore 

1, Md. 

CLASS OF 

1956 

ABESHOUSE, George A., Sinai Hospital, 
Baltimore 5, Md. 

ADAMS, John E., Union Memorial Hospital, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

ADKINS, Robert T., Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

ANDERSON, Daniel G.. University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

BAER, Henr\- A., University" of Virginia Hos- 
pital, Charlottesville, Va. 

BARCHET, Stephen, U. S. Naval Hosjiital, 
Chelsea, Mass. 

BELGRAD, Richard. University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

BELLOMO, Frank R., The Mountainside Hos- 
pital, Montclair, N. J. 

BENNION, Jerald H., W. H. Groves Latter Day 
Saints Hosp., Salt Lake City, Utah 

BIALEK, Stanley M., D. C. General HosjHtal, 
Washington, D. C. 

BLUE, Morris L., Sinai Hospital, Baltimore 5, 
Md. 

BONGARDT, Henry F., Jr., Mercy HosfHtal, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

BROWN, Ernest O., Cambridge City Hospital, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

BURNINGHAM, Richard A., U. S. Naval Hos- 
l)itals, Charleston, S. C. 

BURWELL, James A., While Cross Hospital, 
Columbus, Ohio 

BYRNE, Robert J., Greenwich Hospital, 
Greenwich, Conn. 



MEDICAL ALU MM 



Ixxvii 



CARSKI, Theodore R., University Hospital. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

CASTELLANO, James. Jr., St. Agnes Hospital, 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

CHASE, James McA., Jr., Delaware Hospital. 
\\ ilmington, Del. 

COHEN, William. Sinai Hospital, Baltimore 5. 
Md, 

COLL AWN, Thomas H.. Allentown Hosj)ital. 
Allentown. Pa. 

DAVIDSON, David L.. Baltimore City Hospi- 
tals, Baltimore 24, Md. 

DELAVEGA, Evelyn Anna, Bon Secours Hos- 
pital. Baltimore 23, Md. 

DORSE Y, James Thomas. Allentown Hospital, 
Allentown. Pa. 

DOWNING, John D.. Jr.. Tampa Municipal 
Hos[)ital. Tam])a. Fla. 

EGLSEDER, Ludwig J.. Mound Park Hospital, 
St. Petersburg, Ela. 

ESTES, James T., L^niversity Hospital, Balti- 
more 1. Md. 

FARMER, Richard G.. Milwaukee County 
Hospital. Milwaukee, Wise. 

FINEGOLD, Richard A., Montefiore Hospital, 
Philadeljjhia, Pa. 

FOSTER, Giraud V.. University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

FRANCO, Jorge A.. Bellevue Hospital. New 
York, N. Y. 

FRANKLIN, Marshall, Duke Hospital. Dur- 
ham, X. C. 

FROHLICH, Edward D.. D. C. General Hos- 
pital. Washington. D. C. 

GRIGOLEIT, Alfred W., Winchester Memorial 
Hospital. Winchester. Va. 

HAWKINS, Josias H.. Jr.. Medical College of 
Virginia Hosp, Div., Richmond, Va. 

HEADLEY, Robert N., University of Virginia 
Hospital. Charlottesville, Va. 

HENDERSON, Neil C, Methodist Hospital, 
BnK)klyn, X. Y. 

HERSPERGER, Webb S.. George F. Geisinger 
Memorial Hospital, Danville, Pa. 

HOFFMAN, Lee. ButTalo General Hospital, 
Buffalo. X. \'. 

HOOPER, X'irgil R.. Universit\- Hospital, Ann 
.Vrbor. Mich. 

HUMMEL, Ralph T.. Wayne County General 
Hospital. I'.loise, Mich. 

HURWITZ. Gilbert E., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1. .Md. 

IVENS, Betty I., University Hosi)ital, Balti- 
more 1. Md. 



JOHNSTON, Daniel F., Los Angeles County 
Hospital. Los Angeles, Calif. 

KANNER, Albert V., University of Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wise. 

KAPLAN, Robert M., Boston Cit\- Hosi)ital, 
Boston, Mass. 

KELLAM, Sheppard G., Bellevue Hospital, 
4th Med. NYU, New York, N. Y. 

KELLY, John E., Jr., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KING, Charles H.. University Hospital, Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 

KLATT, Kenneth M., University Hosjntals, 
Madison, Wise. 

KNOWLES, Paul W., University HosjHlal, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KOLLER, Elmer C, Jr., Union Memorial Hos- 
pital. Baltimore 18, Md. 

KRAMER, Bernard. Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

KRAMER, Harold C, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KRESS, Scheldon, D. C. General Hospital, 
Washington, D. C. 

LANCASTER, Louis J.. Virginia Mason Hos- 
pital, Seattle 1, Wash. 

LANZI, Josejih G., Merc>- Hospital, Baltimore 
2. Md. 

LAUGHLIN, Karl P., University Hospital, 
Cleveland, Ohio 

LEE, Mathew Hung Mun, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1. Md. 

LEMMERT, William A., St. Agnes Hospital, 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

LITTLETON, John B., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

LLOYD, William T., Mercy HosjHtal, Balti- 
more 2. Md. 

LOVE, Thomas A.. Mercy Hospital. Baltimore 
2. Md. 

MAGGID, (ierald N., Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

MAHON, Robert J., Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2. Md. 

MANGUS, Samuel J.. X'alley Forge General 
Hospital, Phoenixville, Pa. 

MARTON, Herbert M., Bronx Municipal Hos- 
pital, New York, N. Y. 

McLaughlin, Joseph S.. University Hos- 
pital. Baltimore 1, Md. 

MUTH, Robert G.. U. S. Naval Hosintal. 
Chelsea. Mass. 

MYERS, Richard I., U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice Hosi)ital, Baltimore 11, Md. 



Ixxviii 



DIRECTORY 



NOWELL, John F., U. S. Naval Hospital, 
Charleston, S. C. 

OSTEEN, (^lark L., St. Agnes HosjHta!, Balti- 
more 29, M(l. 

OURSLER, David A., University of Virginia 
Hospital. Charlottesville, Va. 

PALMER, William M., Highland Alameda 
County Hospital, .Alameda, Calif. 

PICKETT, Wilbur Crafts, Jr., Duke Hospital, 
Durham, N. C. 

PLATT, Marvin S., University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

PLUMB, Richard L., Parkland Hospital, Dallas' 
Texas 

POLLACK, Irvin P., Sinai Hospital, Baltimore 
5, Md. 

REAHL, George E., Mercy Hospital, Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

RODMAN, Harold I., Baltimore City Hosjii- 
tals, Baltimore 24, Md. 

ROSS, Harry P., Union Memorial Hospital, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

SANISLOW, Charles A., Jr., University Hos- 
pital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

SCHUSTER, Gerald D., Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

SHAUB, Roy O., University of Michigan Hos- 
pital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

SINTON, William A., Jr., Union Memorial Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 18, Md. 

SKAGGS, James W., Union Memorial Hospital, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

SLATER, Paul V., Milwaukee County Hospital, 
Milwaukee, Wise. 

SMITH, George T., Roj'al Victoria Hospital, 
Montreal, Canada 

SO WELL, George A., Roper Hosi)ital, Charles- 
ton, S. C. 

STOVIN, James J., Lenox Hill Hospital, New 
York, N. V. 

STUCK, Robert G., Union Memorial Hospital, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

STURGEON, Howard E., Norfolk General Hos- 
jiital, Norfolk, Va. 

TRUCKER, Albert L., Jr., University of Cali- 
fornia H(jsf)ital, San Francisco, Calif. 

TRUITT, Virginia H., Allentown General Hos- 
j)ital, Allentown, Pa. 

WHITEFORD, Edwin W., Jr., U. S. Air Force 
Hospital, Valley Forge, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, John Z., Harrisburg Hospital, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

WILSON, Harry D., Jr., Union Memorial Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 18, Md. 



WRIGHT, Robert Lee, Akron General Hospital, 
Akron, Ohio 

CLASS OF 

1955 

BALCERZAK, Stanley P., Jr., Swallow Hill 
Rd., Carnegie, Pa. 

CALLOWAY, Charles B., Harper Hospital, 
Detroit, Mich. 

DALY, Mary Viola, Lutheran Hospital of 
Maryland, Inc., Baltimore 16, Md. 

ESHELMAN, Joseph C, Loyall, Ky. 

FADER, Ferdinand, 365 Park Ave., East 
Orange, N. J. 

FRISKEY, George H., 4201 Flowerton Rd., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

GAULD, John R., University HosjMtal, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GILMORE, George T., 216 Stanmore Rd., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

KIRB Y, William H., Jr., 1515 Ramblewood Rd., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

KLUGMAN, Yale L., Roosevelt Hospital, 428 
W. 59th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

KRONE, William F., Jr., 3400 Taney Rd., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

MOONEY, Albert L., 1701 Hartsdale Rd., 
Baltimore 4, Md. 

MORSE, Leonard J., 29 Moreland St., Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

POLIS, George N., 6438 5th St., N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

SAX, Albert M., Strong Memorial Muncipial 
Hospital, Rochester, N. Y. 

SPOCK, Alexander, 826 Pine St., Kulpmont, Pa. 

STERLING, William, 1339 Fort Stevens Dr., 
N. W., Washington 11, D. C. 

YOUSEM, Herbert L., Sinai Hospital, Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1954 

ABRAMS, Samuel J., 5801 Greenspring Ave., 
Baltimore 9, Md. 

BLUMENFELD, Herbert Lee, Sinai HosjHtal, 
Baltimore 5, Md. 

BROWN, Lt. Stuart M., MC, USA, U.S.A. Dis- 
pensary, Detachment 6,6006, S. U., Fort 
Lewis, Wash. 

BULLOCK, Allen Culpeper, St. Mary's Me- 
morial Hospital, Knoxville, Tenn. 

COHEN, Earl, San Diego Count\' General 
Hospital, San Diego Calif. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixxix 



DORAN, William F., 45 E. Columbus St., 
Nclsonvilie, Ohio 

EVANS, Theodore E., 45 Ft. Bcnning Rd., 
("oiumhus, Ga. 

FUNKHOUSER, George K., Geisinger Me- 
riK^rial Hospital, Danville, Pa. 

GABLE, Walter D., School of Aviation Medi- 
cine, USN, Pensacola, Fla. 

GERWIG, John Monroe, Jr., St. Agnes Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 29, Md. 

GESSNER, John E., 851 Middlesex Road, Bal- 
timore 21, Md. 

GUNNING, Jean-Jacques, 216 Kendall Road, 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

HARTMAN, John F., 4 N. Lakewood Ave., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

HAYES, James W., R.D. #1, Rock Hall, Md. 

HOPF, Edward W., 6010 Eastern Ave., Balti- 
more 24, Md. 

HOUPT, William P., 3235 Wakefield Rd., Har- 
rishurg, Pa. 

HUNT, Thomas Edward, Jr., University Hos- 
jiital, Baltimore 1, Md. 

JONES, Rosella E., 7138 Carrol Ave., Takoma 
Park 12, Md. 

KAPIAN, Irvin Bernard, U. S. Public Health 
Service Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

LEVIN, Herbert J., Walter Reed Army Hospi- 
tal, Washington, D. C. 

MUELLER, Eugene A., 1653 B Waverly Way, 
Loch Raven Apts., Baltimore 12, Md. 

NAFZINGER, M. L., 43 Tripoli Heights, Route 
1, Box82A. Dumfries, Va. 

OWENS, David, 914 D St., Sparrows Point 19, 
Md. 

PACKARD, Albert G., Jr., N. Y. Orthopaedic 
Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Med. Cen- 
ter, New York 32, N. Y. 

PATTEN, David H., 117 N. Beechwood Ave., 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

SHAPIRO, Jerome E., 4003 Hilton St., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

SHOCKET, Bernard R., Kiowa Indian Hosjh- 
tal, Lawton, Okla. 

SIMPSON, Marshall A., Tulare County Hos- 
[)ilal, Tulare, Calif. 

SMYTH, Lt. (j.g.) J. Walter, MC, USNR, U. S. 
Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Fla. 

WALL, George H., 4405 Fairview .\ve., Apt. 
D, Baltimore 16, Md. 

WELLIVER, Daniel, 6811 Fairfax Road, Be- 
Ihesda, Md. 

WHITE, Kenneth H., Jr., 36 W. Avondale Ave., 
\'oungstcwn 7, Ohio 



WHITTAKER, Arthur V., 329 Fourth St , 
EIIw(kk1 City, Pa. 

WILD, William O., 759 Parkway Blvd., Al- 
liance, Ohio 

CLASS OF 
1953 

ABRAMSON, Daniel J., 900 17th St., N. W., 

Washington 6, D. C. 
BOGGS, Ernest J., Drake Clinic, Williamson, 

W. Va. 
BURKART, Thomas J., 3835 Loch Raven 

Baltimore 18, Md. Blvd., 
CLIFT, John V., 5912 The Alameda, Baltimore 

12, Md. 
DUMLER, John D., 1245 Greystone Road, 

Baltimore 27, Md. 
FLAX, Leonard H., 113 7th Ave., Brooklyn 

Park, Baltimore 25, Md. 
FREEMAN, Sylvan, 2916 Ridgewood Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
GARLOCK, Frederick A., 106 N. 12th St., 

Ed in burg, Texas 
GARRISON, Lt. J. S., MC, USN, Sub Ron 7, 

% FPO, San Francisco, Calif. 
HEISSE, John W., Jr., 7801 Ruxwood Road, 

Baltimore 4, Md. 
HENSON, Kenneth C, 208 Broad St., Middle- 
town, Md. 
HESS, C^harlcs F., Smithsburg, Md. 
HIMMELWRIGHT, George O., 133 Virginia 

Ave., Cumberland, Md. 
JONES, Thomas L., Snow Hill, Md. 
KAESE, Werner E., 12 Sellers Rd., Annapolis, 

Md. 
KINGSBURY, Robert C, Federalsburg, Md. 
KNIGHT, Arthur C., Jr., R.F.D. #1, Deer 

Lodge, Mont. 
LANGRALL, Harrison M., Jr., Mayo Clinic, 

Rochester, Minn. 
LEIGHTON, Herbert H., 2164-1 U. S. Army 

Hospital 1, Fort Eustis, Va. 
MILES, Leslie R., Jr., 27 Main St., l.onacon- 

ing, Md. 
PALMISANO, Joseph F., 6014 Loch Raven 

Blvd., Baltimore 12, Md. 
RICHMOND, Lewis C, Jr., 1181 Main St., 

Mi Hon, W. Va. 
SHUMAN, J()sei)h E., 2702 S. 9th St., Arling- 
ton, \'a. 
TROXEL, James R., 1624 Valley Ave., Winches- 
ter, Va. 
TYSON, William A., Kingsville, Md. 



Ixxx 



Df RECTORY 



WEEKS. Harry S., Jr., 1203 Penn St., Clarks- 

l)ur^', \V. Va. 
WEINER, Lt. Israel H., 212 Fairchild St., Lack- 

laiul AFB, San .\ntonio, Texas 

CLASS OF 
1952 

AHLQUIST, Richard E., Jr., University of 
California, School of Medicine, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

BERRIOS, Osvaldo, 7526 Holabird Ave., 
Dundalk 22, Md. 

CULPEPPER, Stuart P., P. O. 475, Cassei- 
t)err>-, Fla. 

DOUGLASS, Robert C, Wayne County 
General Hospital, Eloise, Mich. 

ECKERT, Herbert L., Navy No. 127 Box 2, 
% F P M Seattle, Wash. 

FINE, Jack, 3331 Clark's Lane, Baltimore 9, 
Md. 

FISHER, Josejih P., Monongalelia Ave., Glass- 
port, Pa. 

FRITZ, Louis A., 3529 Glenmore Ave., Balti- 
more 6, Md. 

GILLIAM, Charles F., Thomasville, N. C. 

GISLASON, Paul H., 7233 Pillsbury St., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

GRAHAM, David E., Spruce Pine, N. C. 

GRUBB, Robert A., Berlin, Md. 

HARRIS, Doris M., 619 Dearborn, Iowa City, 
Iowa 

HYATT, Irvin, 6107 Hopeton Ave., Baltimore 
15, Md. 

KRIEGER, Morton M., Lutheran Hospital 
of Maryland, Baltimore 16, Md. 

LAPP, Herbert W., 4804 Frederick Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

LOVE, Robert G., 528 Bay Road, Hamilton, 
Mass. 

McKAY, John N., 6014 Edmondson Ave., 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

SINDLER, Richard A., Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 5, Md. 

VICENS, Carlos N., Insular Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium, Rio Piedras, P. R. 

WEEKS, Howard N., 100 N. Potomac St., 
Hagerstown, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1951 

ARTHUR, Kol)crt K., Jr., 34 W. Market St., 
Tiffin, Ohio 



BARTHEL, John P., 115 3rd St., S. E., Cedar 

Rapids, Iowa 
BEARDSLEY, Earl M., 207 Maryland Ave., 

Salisbury, Md. 
BELL, Arthur K., 1170 Sylvania Ave., Toledo 

12, Ohio 
BILDER, Joseph, Jr , 112 N. Burnett Ave., 

Denison, Texas 
BUELL, John R., Jr., 923 Carroll Ave., Laurel. 

Md. 
CHRISTOPHER, Russell L., Taylor St. 

Hinsdale, Mass. 
COFFMAN, K. M., Montoursville, Pa. 
CURANZY, Raymond, 39 E. Maple St. 

PalniNTa, Pa. 
DETTBARN, Ernest A., 620 Trail Ave., 

Frederick, Md. 
DUNNAGAN, William C, Box 45, North 

Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill, 

N. C. 
EDWARDS, William H., Sheppard-Pratt 

Hosi)ital, Towson 4, Md. 
EVANS, Otis D., Jr., 247 Charlotte St., Ashe- 

ville, N. C. 
FERGUSON, Charles E., 1740 Lincoln Ave., 

Cincinnati 12, Ohio 
GARDNER, Francis S., Jr., University Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 1, Md. 
HATEM, Frederick J., 17 N. Philadelphia 

Blvd., Aberdeen, Md. 
HOPKINS, Robert C, St. Vincent's Hospital, 

Erie, Pa. 
JOHNSON, Frederick M., La Plata, Maryland 
KINDT, Willard F., Allentown Hospital, 

Allenlown, Pa. 
KNIPP, Harry L., 4116 Edmondson Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
MacDONALD, James M., Jr., 4918 Santa 

Monica Ave., San Diego 7, Calif. 
McFADDEN, John W., Hartville, Ohio 
McGRADY, Charles W., Jr., Jackson Mem- 
orial Hospital, Miami, Fla. 
McGRADY, Kathleen, Jackson Memorial 

Hospital, Miami, Via.. 
METCALF, John S., Jr., 9422 Theodosia, 

Overland 14, Mo. 
MYERS, Donald J., 608 Main St., Steuben- 

ville, Ohio 
PERRY, Henry D., Jr., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
REYNOLDS, Georgia M., 12337 Cedar Road, 

Cleveland 6, Ohio 
RICHARDSON, Aubrey D., 325 Overlirook 
Road, Baltimore 12, Md. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixxxi 



SCULLY, John T., 1005 VV. 35th Ave., Apt. 101, 

Gar)-, Ind. 
SKIPTON, Roy K., 7220 Forest Road, Kent 

Village, Landover, Md. 
TOBIAS, Richard B., 1615 Riverside Drive, 

South \Villiams{)ort, Pa. 
UDEL, Melvin AL, U. S. Public Health, Wash- 
ington 25, D. C. 
VENROSE, Robert J., Milan, Mich. 
WATSON, Charles P., Jr., New Martinsville, 

\V. Va. 
WEEKLEY, Robert D., 5500 Ridge Rd., 

Cleveland 29, Ohio 
WHEELWRIGHT, Harvey P., 2955 Harrison 

Blvd., Ogden, Utah 
YORK, Thomas L., U. S. Marine Hospital, 

Galveston, Texas 

CLASS OF 
1950 

ANDERSEN, William A., 509 Spring Ave., 
Lutherville, Md. 

BAGLEY, Charles, IH, Post Office, Kingsville, 
Md. 

BARSTOW, Mary V. Medairy, Bradshaw, 
Md. 

BAUMANN, Wilbur N., Travers St., Cam- 
bridge, Md. 

BLEECKER, Harry H., Jr., 1100 Daveric 
Drive, Pasadena 8, Calif. 

BORGES, Frank, 1321 Heatherhill Road, 
Glendale, Baltimore 12, Md. 

BRONUSHAS, Joseph B., 3037 O'Donnell 
St., Baltimore 24, Md. 

BURKE Y, Fred J., 782 Washington Road, 
Pittsburgh 28, Pa. 

COWEN, Joseph R., 44 Maple Drive, Catons- 
ville 28, Md. 

DEMMY, Nicholas, San Francisco V. A. Hos- 
pital, 42nd & Clement Sts., San Francisco 21, 
(\ilif. 

DUNN, George M., Princess Anne, Md. 

GREENSTEIN, George H., 819 Park Ave., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

HOFSTETER, Grace, 1320 Market Ave., Can- 
ton 4, Ohio 

HOYT, Irvin G., Queenstown, Md. 

HUFFER, Sarah V.. University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

HYLE, John C, 7527 Belair Road, Baltimore 6, 
Md. 

McELVAIN, W. H., 3415 U S A F Hosi)ital, 
I.owry .\ F B, Colo. 



NEAL, Hunter S., Lankenau Hospital, Phila- 
delphia 30, Pa. 

POLING, Evangeline M., 210 N. Walnut St., 
Philii)pi, W. Va. 

RICHARDSON, Paul F., U. S. Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hosj)., Fort Howard, Md. 

RUBIN, Seymour, 1331 E. North Ave., Balti- 
more 13, Md. 

SIRES, William 0., 1787 Massachusetts Ave., 
Lexington, Mass. 

SKLAR, Allen L., Kings Beach, Calif. 

SOSNOWSKI, Andrew, 4016 Ritchie High- 
wa\-, Baltimore 25, Md. 

THIBADEAU, Robert T., 10623 Connecticut 
Ave., Kensington, Md. 

UPTON, Albert L., 7739 Meadowbnjok Ave., 
Ha_\\vard, Calif. 

VAN GOOR, Kornelius, 26 Sheldon Ave., 
S. F., Grand Rapids 2, Mich. 

VICENS, Enrique A., 26 Hosto Ave., Ponce, 
P. K. 

YEAGER, William H., Jr., 1800 Connecticut 
Ave., N. W., Washington 9, D. C. 

CLASS OF 
1949 

ABRAHAM, Robert A., 1511 N. York Road, 
Towson 4, Md. 

BACHMAN, Leonard, 325 Highland Lane, 
Br_\n Mawr, Pa. 

BENJAMIN, William P., Winter Veterans Adm. 
Hospital, Topeka, Kansas 

BLUDELL, Albert E., 13902 232nd St., Laurel- 
ton, L. I., N. Y. 

BRADFORD, Edward, 37 Plant St., Winter 
Garden, Fla. 

CLINE, James A., Ill, Rapid City Medical 
Center, Rapid City, S. D. 

GORTEN, Martin, University Hospital, Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GUIDO, Angelino, 115 E. Eager St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

HUMPHREYS, Charles W., Jr., 6f)07 Hillan- 
dale Rd., Chevy Chase, Md. 

KNABE, George W., Jr., Chief, Laboratory 
Service, Veterans Administration Center, 
4100 W. Third St., Dayton 7, Ohio 

LEWIS, Thomas E.. 4047 Mitchell Drive, 
Flint 6, Mich. 

LONGLEY, George H., 1609 Bolton St., Bal- 
timore 17, Md. 

MATTAX, Harry M., 711 Camden Ave., 
Salisbury, Md. 



Ixxxii 



DIRECTORY 



PANZARELLA, John H., 137-33 241sl St., 
Kosedale 12, N. V. 

PITTMAN, Robert R., Marlinton, W. Va. 

RASKIN, Howard F., 950 E. 59th St., Chicago 
37, 111. 

ROEHRIG, Charles B., 27 Kirk land Circle, 
Wellesley Hills 82, Mass. 

SAREWITZ, Albert B., 102 Connett Place, 
South Orange, N. J. 

STANFIELD, Ehvin E., Veterans Administra- 
tion Hosi)ital, Fayetteville, N. C. 

STECKLER, Robert J., 1400 Cass Ave., Evans- 
ville 14, Ind. 

STRAHAN, John F., 1365 Kitmore Rd., Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

TILLEY, Russell M., Jr., 4325 49th St., N.VV., 
Washington 16, D. C. 

TRAMER, Arnold, 6506 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

ZEIGLER, John B., Brookville, Montgomery 
County, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1948 

BAKER, Frank \V., Jr., 6001 The Alameda, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
BISANAR, James, 930 Dulaney Valley Road, 

Towson 4, Md. 
BRONSTEIN, Eugene L., U S P H S, National 

Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md. 
BUCHNESS, John M., 5429 The Alameda, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
CHAMOVITZ, Robert, 5804 Beacon St., 

Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
DALTON, James B., Jr., 401 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Richmond 19, Va. 
DWYER, Frank P., Jr., The Latrobe Bldg., 

Charles & Read Sts., Baltimore 1, Md. 
ENSOR, Robert E., 7 Brackenridge Ct., Bal- 
timore 12, Md. 
GOLOMBEK, Leonard H., 7013 Liberty Road, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
GREEN, James W., High Spire, Pa. 
KEMP, Katherine V., 722 Stamford Road, 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
KENNEDY, Carl H., 3405 Warden Drive, 

East Falls, Philadelphia 29, Pa. 
MACK, Harry P., 3829 Arbutus Ave., Balti- 
more 7, Md. 
MOHLER, Donald L, Jr., 362 E. Taylor St., 

Reno, Nev. 
NISWANDER, G. Donald, New Hampshire 

State Hospital, Concord, N. H. 



PADUSSIS, Stephen K., 213 S. Elwood Ave., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
POWELL, Albert M., Jr., 220 N. Market St., 

Frederick, Md. 
STONE, Daniel L., 420 Lincoln Road, Miami 

Beach, Fla. 
SWISHER, Kyle Y., Ligon Rd., Ellicott City, 

Md. 
TARR, Norman, Morris St., Oxford, Md. 
THEUERKAUF, Frank J., Jr., 158 W. 8th 

St.. Erie, Pa. 
WATERMAN, Roger, 1022 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
WELBORN, James T., 15 E. 2nd Ave., Lexing- 
ton, N. C. 
WOMACK, William S., 706 Camden Ave., 

Salisbury, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1947 

BLEVINS, Joseph W., 40 Federal St., West 

Lynn, Mass. 
BRICKNER, John G., 1120 St. Paul St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
BUNCH, Littleton, 200 Crestone Ave., Ala- 
mosa, Colo. 
CHASE, Harry V.,4 E. Church St.,Frederick, Md. 
COHEN, Bernard S., 7306 Liberty Road, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
CORZINE, William J., Jr., 51 E. 2nd St., 

Chillicothe, Ohio 
FARAINO, Frank A., 230 Fairchild St., 

Lackland Village, San Antonio, Texas 
FISHER, Donald E., 101 Columbia Road, 

Ellicott City, Md. 
GOLD, Benjamin M., 410 Peachtree St., 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
HAASE, F. Robert, 804 Latrobe Bldg., Charles 

& Read Sts., Baltimore 2, Md. 
HALL, Howard E., Sykesville, Maryland 
HOGAN, John F., Jr., 11 E. Chase St., Balti 

more 2, Md. 
HUNTER, Robert C, 2636 Oak Park Blvd., 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 
IMBRIE, David E., 327 N. Main St., Butler, Pa. 
JERNIGAN, Lane M., 1101 W. Berry St., 

Fort Worth 10, Texas 
LEUNG, Bernard, Wood Ridge, N. J 
LEVIN, Norman, 114 Medical Arts Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
LI PIRA, Joseph F., 8400 Loch Raven Blvd., 

Baltimore 4, Md. 
MACHATA, Francis K., 2813 St. Paul Blvd., 

Rochester 17, N. Y. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixxxiii 



MATTERN, Carl F. T., Micro Biol. Inst. 
BIdg. 7, National Institute of Health, Beth- 
esda, Md. 

MATTERN, E. Anne Dentry, 13518 Grenoble 
Drive, Rockville, Md. 

MITCHELL, Wallace H., 611 Caroline St., 
Key West, Fla. 

MORROW, J. G., Box 206, Hahira, Ga. 

NACHLAS, N. Edward, 2301 Farrington Road, 
Baltimore 9, M. 

PERTZ, Elden H., Weston, W. Va. 

PHILLIPS, David L., 605 E. 38th St., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

POST, William R., 2120 E. Main St., Spring- 
field, Ore. 

ROGERS, Joseph M., Hamilton, Va. 

SACHS, Sidney H., 10300 Carnegie Ave., 
Cleveland 6, Ohio 

SCHNITZKER, William F., 7220 Forest Rd., 
Hyattsville, Md. 

TRENCH, James M., 725 Asylum Ave., Hart- 
ford 5, Conn. 

WHITE, John P., Ill, 224 Market St., Sea- 
ford, Del. 

WILLIAMS, John E., 435 N. Roxbury Dr., 
Beverly Hill, Calif. 

CLASS OF 
1946 

AUDET, Charles H., Jr., 3 2nd Ave., Water- 
bury 10, Conn. 
AUDET, Jeanne A., 132 E. Mountain Road, 

Waterbury, Conn. 
AUDET, Robert J., 132 E. Mountain Road, 

Waterbury, Conn. 
BANNEN, Wm. J., P. O. Box 248, Simpson- 

ville, S. C. 
BAUER, Robert E., 6012 Northwood Drive, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
BROWN, Eli M., 13123 La Salle, Huntington 

Woods, Mich. 
BROWN, Robert R., Romney, W. Va. 
BUCKNER, Louise, R. D. 2, Altamont, N. Y. 
CANO, Harold V., 391 Main St. Box 436, 

Spotswood, N. J. 
CHRISTOPHER, Thomas W., 46 Church St., 

Dedham, Mass. 
CODD, Francis I., Box 289, Severna Park, Md. 
COHEN, Jerome, \\A. 17, 240 Victor Ave., 

I)a\t()n, Ohio 
CONNOR. Thomas B., 7 Osborne Ave., Catons- 

villc 28, Md. 
CROSS, Richard J., 104 W. Madison St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



CROUCH, Walter L., 10th and Grace Sts., 

Wilmington, N. C. 
FISCHER, Joseph S., 2705 Liberty Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 
FRYE, Paul E., 1244 Sunsetview Dr., Akron 3, 

Ohio 
GAMBLE, John R., Box 165, Lincolnton, N. C. 
GRAY, H. William, 2017 Massachusetts Ave., 

N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 
HANSEN, Leiand J., 3760 12th St., Riverside, 

Calif. 
HARLEY, John, Terre Alta, W. Va. 
HAWKINS, Charles W., 206 Professional 

Bldg., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
HENDRICKSON, Edwin O., Ill, Medical 

and Dental Bldg., 4224 S. Sepulveda Blvd., 

Culver City, Calif. 
JENNINGS, Erwin, 5021-^ G St., Brunswick, Ga. 
KIEL, August, Jr., 2 W. Read St., Baltimore 

1, Md. 
LATIMER, John H., 2160 S. 20th East St., 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
LEVICKAS, Herbert J., 5305 East Drive, 

Baltimore 27, Md. 
MAHOLICK, Leonard T., 1027 2nd Ave., 

Columbus, Ga. 
MARKLEY, Raymond, Jr., Medical Arts 

Bldg., Baltimore 1, Md. 
MASSENBURG, George Y., Jr., 763 Pine 

St., Macon, Ga. 
MATTHEWS, Otto, Warsaw, N. C. 
MORRISON, John E., Box 508, Norwich, 

Conn. 
NATARO, Jerome, 92 Wolcott Road, Levit- 

town, N. Y. 
NORTH, Ellsworth H., Jr., 1502 Carolina 

Ave., Elizabeth City, N. C. 
O'HARE, James S., 104 W. Madison St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
ORRISON, Wm. W., Box X, Plains, Kan. 
RILEY, Robert A., Waggaman Circle, Wild- 
rose Shores, Annapolis, Md. 
ROBERTS, James A., 8907 Georgia Ave., 

Silver Spring, Md. 
SEWELL, James A., 430 New Haven Ave., 

Melbourne, Fla. 
SILLS, David N., Jr.. 11 S. E. Front St., Mil- 
ford, Del. 
SMITH, Maj. Edward P., Jr., USAF, MC, 223 

Fairchild, Lackland Village, San .Antonio, 

Texas 
VAUGHN, James A., Jr., P. O. Box 1018, 

South Miami 43, Fla. 
WENTZ, Iri J.. 420 Roberts St., Salisbury, N. C. 



Ixxxiv 



DIRECTORY 



WORKMAN, Joseph B., Ligon Road, R. F. D. 

*1, McAIpine, Howard Co., Md. 
YOUNG, Richard A., 302 N. Potomac St., 

Hagerstown, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1945 

ANDERSON, George H., 176 4th Ave., N. E., 
St. Petersburg 4, Fla. 

A YD, I'>ank J., Jr., 6231 York Road, Baltimore 
12, Md. 

BAGGETT, Joseph W., 911 Hay St., Fayette- 
villc, N. C. 

BARKER, David H., 7220 Gratiot Ave., De- 
troit 13, Mich. 

BARNES, Thomas G., 344 Arnold Ave., Green- 
ville, Miss. 

BELL, David F., Jr., Bluefield Sanatorium, 
Bluefield, W. Va. 

BERDANN, Benjamin, 5010A Ritchie Highway, 
Baltimore 25, Md. 

BRANNEN, Joseph H., 1306 N. Patterson St., 
Valdosla, Ga. 

BRENDLE, William K., 608 S. Union Ave., 
Havre de Grace, Md. 

CALLENDER, George R., Jr., Charleston 
General Hospital, Charleston, W. Va. 

CAMP, Leah, 3321 Sequoia Ave., Baltimore 15, 
Md. 

CAMP, Oscar B., 3321 Sequoia Ave., Baltimore 
15, Md. 

CONNER, Eugene H., 1015 Stoney Brook 
Drive, Springfield, Pa. 

COOK, Sarah, 3103 10th St. N., Arlington 1, 
Va. 

DAVIS, John B., Frostburg, Md. 

FITZPATRICK, Vincent, 1120 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

FOSTER, William L., Murphy, N. C. 

FRANK, William H., 521 Cypress Ave., 
Johnstown, Pa. 

GANEY, Joseph B., Bradenton, Fla. 

GREENLEAF, Helen E., 30 Vista Drive, 
Little Silver, N. J. 

HALL, Arthur T., Jr.. 2 E. Read St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

HAMMOND, Daniel O., 350 N. E. 15th St., 
Miami 32, Fla. 

HARLEY, M. Dorcas, Terre Alta, W. Va. 

HEDRICK, John A., 206 Beckley Ave., Beck- 
lex-, W. Va. 

HENNESSY, John F., 15 S. Irving St., Ridge- 
wood, X. J. 



HOLBROOK, William A., Jr., University 

Hosi)ital, Baltimore 1, Md. 
HUTCHINS, Harry, Buford, Ga. 
KEISTER, Stephen, 2701 Lafayette Rd., R. D. 

#2, Erie, Pa. 
KENWORTHY, Richard A., Ill, Hyde, Md. 
LINTHICUM, Charles Milton, Linthicum 

Heights, Md. 
MAGUIRE, Henry F., 233 A St., San Diego 1, 

Calif. 
MILLER, Clarence S., 1515 Sloat Blvd., San 

Francisco 27, Calif. 
MYERS, Paul R., Ridgway, Pa. 
NORTON, Alfred S., 4711 Highland Ave., 

Bethesda 14, Md. 
O'NEILL, Allen J., 7940 Old Georgetown Rd., 

Bethesda, Md. 
OTT, Roy H., Jr., 3700 S. Colorado Blvd., 

Englewood, Colo. 
PECK, R. DeWitt, 606 3rd Ave., Montgomery, 

W. Va. 
PHILLIPS, Malcolm Dudley, Darlington, Md. 
PIKE, Warren H., Jr., Ainsworth Rd., Hobart, 

Ind. 
ROSENTHAL, John L., 135 W. Belvedere 

Road, Norfolk, Va. 
SANCHEZ, Hilarion, Jr., 652 McKinley, San- 

turce, P. R. 
SHELL, James H., Jr., 6510 Kriel St., Balti- 
more 7, Md. 
STEDEM, Anthony F. A., 11 E. Chase St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
WAGNER, Victor, 9 Kensington Ave., Jer- 
sey City 4, N. J. 
WINSLOW, Oliver P., Jr., 169 E. Flagler St., 

Miami 32, Fla. 

CLASS OF 
1944 

BACON, A. Maynard, Jr., 819 Forrest Drive, 
Hagerstown, Md. 

BELL, Houston L., 711 S. Jefferson St., Roa- 
noke, Va. 

BRADY, Charles E., Robbins, N. C. 

BRILL, Warren D., 9007 Garland Ave., Silver 
Spring, Md. 

CARR, Charles E., Jr., 6201 Old York Road, 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

CLONINGER, Rowell C, Box 1198, Shelby, 
N. C. 

DOUKAS, James A., 101 E. Preston St., Bal- 
timore 2, Md. 

EBELING, W. Carl, University Hospital, 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



{ 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



Ixxxv 



EVERETT, John T., 10 E. Biddle St., Balti 

more 2, Md. 
FARKAS, Robert \V., 305 S. George St., York, 

Pa. 
FEASTER, James H., Jr., 58 2nd St., Oakland, 

Md. 
FOARD, VVillmr H., Manchester, Md. 
FUTTERMAN, Perry, Beckley Memorial 

Hospital, Beckley, W. Va. 
GRUMBINE, Francis, 4508 Edmondson Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
GUTHRIE, William, 523 11th Ave., \V., Hunt- 
ington, W. Va. 
HAMILL, James P., 2301 Proctor St., Port 

Arthur, Texas 
HAYDEN, Richard C, 228 Oakwood Road, 

Fairfax, Wilmington, Del. 
HOUSKA, Henry J., 3214 Montebello Terrace, 

Baltimore 14, Md. 
JONES, Bobby Lee, Box 12K, Route 1, Severna 

Park, Md. 
LAMPLEY, William A., 433 N. Church St., 

Hendersonville, N. C. 
LERMAN, Philip H., 459 S. Oyster Bay Rd., 

Hicksville, N. Y. 
MILLOFF, Bernard, 800 S. Federal Highway, 

Hoi l\- wood, Fla. 
MORROW, Thomas L., Jr., Chester, S. C. 
O'DONNELL, Charles F., 7301 York Road, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
PATTERSON, Carl N., 3930 Plymouth Road, 

Hoi)e Valley, Durham, N. C. 
PIERPONT, Edwin L., 8204 Liberty Road, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
POOL, Marjorie K., 3603 Schoolhouse Lane, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
PRATT, Louis J., 8402 Greenway Road, Tow- 
son 4, Md. 
RANDOLPH, F. Burl, 102 Carpenter St., 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
RILEY, Eugene J., 840 Park Ave., Baltimore 1, 

Md. 
ROBBINS, Morris A., Columbus, N. J. 
ROLFES, Harry F., 2325 Covina Way S., St. 

Petersburg, Fla. 
SCHNAPER, Nathan, 1214 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
SCHWARTZ, Aaron D., 3-5 Madison Ave., 

Spring Valley, N. Y. 
SEABRIGHT. Howard L., I?,?, \ St., San 

Diego 1, Calif. 
SHAW, Charles E., 5801 Loch Raven Hlvd., 

Baltimore 12, Md. 



SIMONS, George, 615 Memorial Ave., Cumber- 
land, Md. 

STEINBERG, Stanley H., 5223 S. Dakota Ave., 
N. E., Washington 11, D. C. 

STICHEL, Frederick L., Jr., 4580 Edmondson 
Ave., Baltimore 29, Md. 

THOMPSON, Lewis B., 14 Beverly Rd., East 
Natick, Mass. 

TRABAND, Millard T., Jr., St. John's Lane, 
Ellicotl City, Md. 

ULLSPERGER, John F., 5915 Loch Raven 
Blvd., Baltimore 12, Md. 

WAITE, Merton T., 56 Southgate Ave., An- 
napolis, Md. 

WEHLING, Benjamin B., 618 Orchard Ave., 
Barberton, Ohio 

WOODEN, Allen G., 204 School House Lane, 
Wilmington 3, Del. 

YAFFE, Stanley N., 2 East Read St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

CLASS OF 
DECEMBER 1943 
ACTON, Elizabeth, 700 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 
BALDWIN, Ruth, Seizure Clinic, University 

Hosjjital, Baltimore 1, Md. 
BRANDT, Frederick B., 1726 Eye St., N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 
BROBST, Henry T., 1603 Franklin Rd., S. W., 

Roanoke 16, Va. 
CORPENING, William N., Box 167, Granite 

Falls, N. C. 
CROSBY, Robert M. N., II E. Chase St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
DORMAN, George E., Emporium, Pa. 
EHRLICH, Daniel, 6619 Chelwood Rd., Balti- 
more 9, Md. 
FERRI, Henry G., 931 Washington Trust 

BIdg., Washington, Pa. 
FINEGOLD, Aaron, 1341 Beechwood Blvd., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
FRYE, Augustus H., Jr., 110' 2 North Hill St., 

Grifhn, Ga. 
GARRETT, Richard M., 349 S. Ripley St., 

Montgomery, .\la. 
GUBNITSKY, Albert, 5415 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
HAUGHT, John, 3303 Perry St.. Ml. Rainier, 

Md. 
INGENITO, Gabriel .\.. ISl Edward St., 

New Haven 11, Conn. 
INGRAM, Charles H., 1116 Rotary Drive, 

High Point, N. C. 



Ixxxvi 



DIRECTORY 



JAWORSKI, Melvin, 2711 Eastern Ave., 

Hallimure 24, Md. 
LATIMER, Clarence V.. Jr., 20 Elm St., Hudson 

Kails. X. V. 
MAMULA, Peter, 15305 S. Atlantic Blvd. 

Conipton, Calif. 
McFADDEN, Robert B., The Latrobe, Charles 

& Keail Sts., Baltimore 2, Md. 
OZAZEWSKI, John C, 1540 Oakridge Road, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
PFEIL, E. Thornton, Lois Grunow Clinic, 

Phoeni.x, Ariz. 
POMEROY, William H., Poquonock, Conn. 
REAM, Xorman B., Tyrone, Pa. 
RINEHART, Arthur ^L, 1532 Havenwood 

Road, Baltimore 18, Md. 
ROBERTSON, Merritt E , New Windsor, Md. 
ROGERS, Wm. B., 1935 Second St., Cuyahoga 

Falls, Ohio 
SAPARETO, R. Louis, 38 Saltonstall Road, 

Haverhill, Mass. 
SCHERLIS, Irving, The Latrobe, Baltimore 

2, Md. 
STERLING, Harold, 1352 University Lane, 

Hyattsville, Md. 
SUMMERLIN, Glenn O., 209 N. E. 2nd Ave., 

Gainesville. Fla. 
VARGAS, Dharma L., Box 825, Rio Piedras, 

P. R. 
WILL, David R., 3619 Lochearn Drive, Balti- 
more 7, Md. 

CLASS OF 

MARCH 1943 

ALLSOPP, Richard C. , 246 Van Buren St., 

Evans City, Pa. 
BARNES, John David, 34 Court St., New 

Bedford, Mass. 
COHEN, Harry, 3319 Clarks Lane, Baltimore 

15, Md. 
COUGHLIN, John B., 612 N. Wilbur Ave., 

Sa>'re, Pa. 
CRASTNOPOL, Philip, 1102 Phillip Court, 

\'alley Stream, X. V. 
DAVIS, WilUam J. G.. 1632 K St., X. W., 

Washington 6, D. C. 
EATON, Wm. Robert, 5033 Castlemen St., 

I'ittsburg 32, Pa. 
EPPERSON, John W. W., 1921 Griffith Place, 

W.. Owcnstjoro, Ky. 
FOWLER, Richard L., 125 Main St., Spencer, 

Mass. 
GOLDBERG, Raymond, 803 Cathedral St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



GRAY, David B., 205 Bradford St., Charles- 
ton 1 , W. Va. 

HAGAN, William B., 3303 Perry St., Mt. 
Rainier, Md. 

HASSLER, F. Stanley, 4602 Bedford Blvd., 
Forest Hills Park, Wilmington, Dela. 

HONIGMAN, Alvin H., 704 Jackson St., 
.\lexandria. La. 

LUKATS, Paul G., 524 Park Ave. W., Barber- 
ton, Ohio 

MILLER, James D., 2218 Market St., Youngs- 
town, Ohio 

NEFF, Charles A., Street, Md. 

PERRY, Henry B., Jr., 100 E. Brentwood, 
Greensboro, N. C. 

PETERSON, Preston, Curphey Clinic, 1045 N. 
California St., Stockton, Calif. 

QUEEN, J. Emmett, 4418 Norwood Road, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

RANGLE, Raymond. V, 642 Washington Blvd., 
Baltimore 30, Md. 

RELLINGER-STAFFORD, H., 15858 Hes 
perian Blvd., San Lorenzo, Calif. 

RICHARDS, Granville H., Jr., Port Deposit, 
Md. 

ROBBINS, :Martin .\., Esplanade .\pts., 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

ROSSTON, N. Conwell, Casebeer Clinic 
Bldg., 10 S. Idaho St., Butte, Mont. 

ROYER, Earl L., 407 Camden Ave., Salisbury, 
Md. 

RUDE, Richard S., R.D. #2, Mt. Holly, N. J. 

SPIER, A. Allan, 4408 Loch Raven Blvd.. 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

STEWART, Edwin H., Jr., Medical Arts Bldg. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

STONER, James E., Jr., Walkersville, Md. 

TUNNEY, Robert B., 115 E. Eager St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

VAN LILL, Stephen J., Ill, 3601 Greenway, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

VARHOL, Joseph G., 1122 Van Houten Ave., 
Clifton, X. J. 

WACHSMAN, Irvin L.. 407 S. Union .^ve., 
Havre de Grace, Md. 

WEBSTER, Thomas C, 4336 X. Charles St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

WEISS, Maurice R., 124 S. Lasky Drive, Bev- 
erly Hills, Calif. 

WOODY, .\rthur O., JarwiKxl Clinic, La Plata, 
Md. 

YURKO, Leonard E., 3441 West St., Weirton, 
W. Va. 



MEDICAL ALUM XI 



CLASS OF 



1942 



AHROON, William A., Clifton Springs Sana- 
torium and Clinic, Clifton Sjirings, N. Y. 

BARTHEL, Robert A., Jr., Forest Hill, Md. 

BIRD, Joseph G., 2 Elmwood Drive, East 
Grcenbush, X. Y. 

BRODSKY. Alexander E., 4817 Montrose 
Blvd., Houston 6, Texas 

BYERLY. William L., Jr., Hartsville, S. C. 

CONCILUS, Frank, 470 Summit Drive, Pitts- 
burgh 34, Pa. 

CRANE, Warren, 974 Broad St., Trenton 10, 
X. J. 

DAVIS, John R., Jr., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

DILLINGER, Karl A., 319 Goff Bldg., Clarks- 
burg, W. \^a. 

FRANZ, J. Howard, 1127 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

GOLDSMITH, Jewett, Duke Hospital, Dur- 
ham, X. C. 

GRAMSE, Arthur E., 78 Maple St., Spring- 
field 5, Mass. 

HAMMOND, Morton L., 350 N. E. 15th St., 
\'cnctian Causeway, Miami, Fla. 

JOHNSON, H. Fred, 2308 W. 8th St., Amarillo, 
Texas 

KARDASH, Theodore, 114 Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

KEELEY, J. Francis, Jr., 1190 X. E. 100th St., 
Miami Shores, Fla. 

KIEFER, Robert A., Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 

KREPP, Martin W., Jr., 4202 Kolb Ave., 
Baltimore 6, Md. 

KROLL, John G., X-Ray Dept., University of 
Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. 

LINK, Etta C, 600 Eleven Mile Rd., Berkley, 
Mich. 

LOWITZ, Irving R.. 6021 Highgatc Drive, 
Baltimore 15. Md. 

MANGANIELLO, Louis O. G., Medical Arts 
Bldg., 1467 Harper St., Augusta, Ga. 

MARINO, Frank S., 26 Coolidge St., Hartford 
10, Conn. 

McCOSH, James X., 1014 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

McGOOGAN, ^Lilcolm T., 513 Elizabeth St., 
\\'a>'cross, Ga. 

MILLER, Edgar A., Jr., Veterans Administra- 
tion H()Sf)ital, Parma 29, Ohio 

MOSES, Robert A., Washington University, 
Medical School Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 



OROFINO, Caesar F., 1428 X. Spadra Road, 

FuUcton, Calif. 
PHELAN. Patrick C, Jr., 201 W. Madison St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
PHILLIPS, Otto C, 2225 Lake Ave., Baltimore 

13, Md. 
POSEY, Dale M., Hunsecker Road, R. D. #5, 

Lancaster, Pa. 
ROSIN, John D., 1010 St. Paul St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
SADLER, Henry H., Jr., 594 Rivard Blvd., 

Grosse Pointe 30, Mich. 
SADOWSKY, Wallace, Perryville, Md. 
SBOROFSKY, Isadore, 4734 Park Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 
SCOTT, Joseph W., 701 DuPont Bldg., Miami 

.;, Fla. 
SHIPLEY, E. Roderick, Box 80A, Ridge Road, 

R. F. D., Hanover, Md. 
SHUMAN, Louis, 1635 Massachusetts Ave., 

N. W., Washington, D. C. 
SUMMA, Andrew J., 141 Paddock St., Water- 
town, X"^. Y. 
WILLIAMS, Charles H., 1632 Reisterstown 

Road, Pikesville 8, Md. 
ZIMMERMAN, Loy M., 3202 Harford Road, 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1941 

ALBERTI, Aurora F., 5516 Uppingham St., 
Somerset, Chevy Chase, Md. 

BARNETT, Charles P., Mary Washington 
Hospital, Fredericksburg, Va. 

BOWEN, Joseph J., Ill W. Main St., Water- 
bury 2, Conn. 

BROOKS, J. Culpepper, Jr., 702 Medical 
.\rls Bldg., Chattanooga 3, Tenn. 

BUNDICK, William, 840 Park Ave., Baltimore 
1, Md. 

CHECKET, Pierson M., 4024 Essex Road, 
Baltimore 7, !\Id. 

CLONINGER, Charles E., Box 245, Conover, 
X. C. 

CONLEN, Richard A., 429 Cooper St., Cam- 
den, X. J. 

CROCK, Gene A., 132 Glen Ridge Road, Crans- 
ton, R. I. 

DEVINCENTIS, M. L., Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

DIEZ-GUTIERREZ. Emilio, P. O. Box 56, 
Orocovis, P. R. 

DI PAULA, Anthony. 1226 St. Paul St.. Bal- 
timore 2, Md. 



Ixxxviii 



DIRF.CTORV 



ESNARD. John, 10513 Santa Monica Blvd.. 
West Los Angeles, Calif. 

FREY, Edward L., Jr.. 5iy Overciaie Kd.. 
Baltimore 29. Md. 

GOODMAN. William. 1334 Sulphur Spring 
Ril.. Baltimore 27. Md. 

GRAZIANO. Theodore, 2802 Harford Rd.. 
Baltimore IS. Md. 

HERSHNER, Xcwton \V., Jr., 211 W. Main 
St., Mcchanicsburg, Pa. 

HOOPES, Lorman L., 17 S. Main St., Minot, 
X. D. 

HUNTER. James S.. Jr.. 1603 6th St.. S.W., 
Rochester, Minn. 

KRULEVITZ. K. K., 4(H) X. Hilton St., Bal- 
timore 29, Md. 

LACH, Frank E., 181 Edwards St., Xcw Haven 
11, Conn. 

MALOUF, Raymond X., S2 X. 1st E., Logan. 
Utah 

MANDEL, Jacob B., 479 Jerse\- .\ve., Jersey- 
City. X. J. 

MITCHELL. William .\., 201 Hemenway Bldg., 
Lufkin, Texas 

MORRIS. Felix R., 953 E. Main St., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

NOLAN, James J., 416 Kensington Road. 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

PALMER. M. Virginia, Easton, Md. 

PEARCY, Thompson, 1109 Lee St. E.. Charles- 
ton. W. Va. 

PHRYDAS. Irene A., 878 Barton Woods Road. 
X.E., Atlanta. Ga. 

PRUITT. Charles E., 14 A St., Brunswick, Md. 

RENNA, Francis S., 20 Morris Ave., Morris- 
town. X". J. 

REVELL. Walter J., Louisville, Ga. 

RICHTER, Christian, 11 W. Biddle St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

ROSENBERG, Jonas S.. 5330 Thrill Place, 
Denver 6. Colo. 

ROSSBERG, Clyde A., 2436 Washington 
Blvd.. Baltimore 30, Md. 

SCHWARTZ, Stanley E.. 420 Lincoln Road, 
Miami Beach, Fla. 

SEIGMAN. Edwin L., 722 Falls Road, Rocky 
.Mount. X. C. 

SHEEHAN, Joseph C, 602 Parkwood Ave., 
R. F. D. 3, Annapolis, Md. 

SHERRILL. Elizabeth B., Cockeysville, Md. 

SKITARELIC. Benedict. Flintstone, Md. 

SPENCER, Tracy X.. Jr., 805 Montrose Drive, 
.South ( harleston, W. V'a. 



THOMPSON, Raymond K,. 11 E. Chase St., 
Baltinujre 2, Mil. 

ULRICH, George J.. 1286 E. Coast Highway. 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 

VIRUSKY. Edmund J., Baxicy, Ga. 

WALKER. James H, 1 1 12 Virginia St., Charles- 
ton I, W. Va. 

WALL, Lester A., Jr., 4407 Cnderwood Road, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

WATKINS, Dayton ().. 4322 Van Buren St., 
University Park, Md. 

WILDER, Thomas C. W . 112 24th Ave., 
Spokane. Wash. 

WILSON, Fxlwin F.. 55 E. 2nd St.. Riverhead, 
L. L. X. V, 

YANAGISAWA, Kazuo. 5(> E. 52nd St., 
Xew Vork 22, X. \'. 

YOUNG, John D.. Jr.. 3709 Cedar Drive, Bal- 
timore 7, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1940 

ALGIRE, Glen H., Xational Cancer Institute, 
Bethesda, Md. 

ANDREWS, Stephen R., Jr., Elkton, Md. 

BAIER, John C, 815 Eastern Ave.. Baltimore 
21, Md. 

BAILEY, Walter L.. 501 Delaware Ave., Wil- 
mington 10, Del. 

BARKER, Daniel C.. 104 Rowland Road, 
F"airlield. Conn. 

BEACHAM, Edmund, 710 Thornwood Court, 
Baltimore 4, Md. 

BRINSFIELD, Carlton, 2i2 Baltimore Ave., 
Cumberland, Md. 

CAPLAN, Lester H., 4208 Colonial Road, 
Baltimore 8, Md. 

CORRELL, Paul H., 26286 Cook Road, Olm- 
sted Falls, Ohio 

DANIEL, Louie S.. Oxford, X. C. 

DAUE, Edwin O.. Jr., 1113 N. Second St., 
Harrisburg. Pa. 

DE LUC A, Joseph. 158 Governor St.. Provi- 
dence 8. R. I. 

DENT, Charles F., 244 Pleasant St., Morgan- 
town, W. V'a. 

DUFFY, William C, 1120 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

DWYER, James R., 245 X. Potomac St., 
Hagerstown, Md. 

GASSAWAY. William F., Main St., Ellicott 
City, Md. 

HOPE, Daniel. Jr., Braewood. S. Rolling Road. 
Catonsville 28, Md. 



MI'.DKM. MJMM 



INLOES, Mcnjamin II., jr.. S.S] 1 1 1 li Si., Xcw- 

piirl .Wws, V'a. 
JAMISON, William I'.. ^•<.llKhi<)^,'lH•ny Korcsl. 

koulc *2, Oakland, Md. 
JORGENSEN, l-ouis C. .UIH Fillmore Ave. 

()>,'r|c|i, ("laii 
KARNS, James R., 7(M) Catliedral Si., Malt! 

more 1, .\1<I. 
KOHL, Schu.vler, 31 W IiIk Road, Scarsdale, 

X. \. 
KRIEG, Edward I.. J., .SIO X. ChapclKate 

Lane, Baltimore 29, Md. 
KURLAND, Albert, 6207 Winner Ave., Haiti 

more 1 .\ Md. 
LARTZ. Roherl i;., \h?^ Kiiilid Ave.. Sharon, 

I 'a. 
LING, William S. M., ,U K. 72nd St., Xcw 

\oris 21, X. \. 
LIVINGOOD, Comdr. Wm. C, .MC, USN, 

Quarters F 12, V . S. Xaval nos|)ital, I'hihulcl- 

|)hia 4.\ I'a. 
LOKER, Ford, 1120 St. F'aui St., Maitimore 1, 

.Md. 
MACCUBBIN, 11. I'earce, 110 Lee St., Win 

( llesler. \'a. 
MARTIN, Clarence W., Route .S, Wrights 

.Mill Road, Baltimore 7, Mrl. 
MARYANOV, .\lfred R., 1.^6 Race St., Cam- 

hrid^e, Md. 
MATHERS. Daniel IL. 212 X. Park Ave., 

San lord, Fla. 
McCANN, Harold F., 1401 Columl.ia Rd., 

X. W., Washington, I). C. 
McCLUNG. James K., McClung Hospital, 

Ri( Iuv.mkI, W. Va. 
McCLUNG, Wm. I)., .McClung Hospital, 

Rirln\<x)d, W. Va. 
McKINNON, William J., .\nson Sanatorium, 

Wadesboro, X\ C. 
MEADE, Ff)rcst C., 27 K. Center St., I,e.\ington, 

X. C. 
MICELI, Joseph, 42.^ F.aslern .\ve., Maitimore 

21, .Md. 
MOLZ, F,d\var<l L., 742,S Harford Rr|., Haiti 

more 14, Mfl. 
MUSE, William 'I'., 12.S Osborne .\ve., Catons- 

ville 2.S, .Md. 
MYERS, (;. Roger, 20.S I'rescott St., Kl Cajou, 

Calif. 
PIERPONT, Ross Z., .S408 Purlington Wa\-, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
POLLOCK, .\rthur F.. 1217 14th .\ve.. .\lt<H.na. 

I'a. 



POSNER, Leonard, 20 Plaza St., Hr(H)';iyn, 

X. \. 
POUND, John C., 104 X. Rolling Rd., Catons- 

ville 2X, .Md. 
RHODE, C. .Martin, Veterans .\dministralion 

Hos|)ital, .Augusta, (ia. 
RICHTER. Conrad L., 226 St. Dunstan's 

Rd., Baltimore 12, .Md. 
ROBINSON, Raymond C. V., 1004 X. Calvert 

St., Baltimore 2, .Md. 
ROOP, Donald J., 1112 Hampton Garth, 

Towson 4, Md. 
RUSSELL, T. Fdgie, Mm X. Charles St., 

lialtimore IS, Md. 
SMITH. Ruby A., ,S1.? .\. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, .Md. 
TANKIN, Louis H., 1701 Futaw Place, Balti- 
more 1 7, Md. 
THOMPSON, .\. F., .\rrlsley Road, Concord, 

X. C. 
TOMPAKOV. Samuel, ,V;i,^ Labyrinth Rfl., 

Baltimori- l.i, .Md. 
TOWNSHEND, U . IL, Jr., 6 St. George Rd., 

Baltimore 10, Md. 
WEEKS, W. F'larl, 5X.W \ork Road, Baltimore 

12, .Md. 
WILLIAMS, Herman J., 2.^X X. 10th St., 

Reading, Pa. 
WILLIAMS, Richard T., 3X Park St., Warsaw, 

N. V. 
WILSON. Harry T., 1100 Hampton (iarlh, 

'I'owsfHi 4, Md. 
WOLFF, William L, 16 Ridge Road, Tenanv, 

X. J. 

CLASS OF 
1939 

BAYLUS, II. IL, !«)() Wilkens.\ve., Baltimore 
2,^, .Md. 

BECK, Harry .M., 700 X. Charles St., Baltimore 
1, .Md. 

BREZINSKI, Fdward J., ,?().H Washington 
St., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

BRIELE, Henry A., Medical Center, Salisbur\ , 
Md. 

CIANOS, James X., 112 Ta|)low Road, Balti- 
more 12, Mfl. 

COFFMAN, Robert T., IV)tomac Valley Hf)s- 
l)ital, Kcyser, W. Va. 

COLE, Frank S., 3.^(X) F. .Monument St., Bal- 
timore .S, Mfl. 

CUNNINGHAM, Raymond \L, 11 F. Chase 
St., Baltimore 2, Md. 



DIRECTORY 



GAVER, Leo J.. 1 Mallow Hill Ave.. Baltimore '' WILNER, Sol.. A.edica! Arts Hldg., lOJ^ \V. 



20, M(l. 
HOOKER, Charles B.. 934 2nd St., Beaver. 

Pa. 
JANDORF, R. Donald. 6405 Western Run 

Dr.. Baltimore 15. Md. 
JONES. Charles W.. Argonne Apts., 1629 

Columliia Road, Washington 9. D. C. 
KAMMER. William H.. Jr.. 612 W. 40th St., 

Baltimore 11. Md. 
KERR, James P.. Jr.. Damascus. Montgomery 

Co., Md. 
KINNAMON, Howard F.. Jr., Waverly, 

Easton. Md. 
LAPINSKY, Herbert. 470 Ocean Ave., Brook- 
lyn 26, X. V. 
McCLAFFERTY, William J.. 315 St. Dunstans 

Rd.. Baltimore 12. Md. 
McLaughlin, Francis J., 2 E. Read St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
MEYER, Alvin, % J. Schneider. 1109 Clay 

Ave., Bronx 56, N. Y. 
MILLER, Irving, 650 Main St., New Rochelle, 

X. V. 
MORAN, John A., 215 W. Washington St.. 

Hagerstown, Md. 
MORICLE, C. Hunter, Reidsville, N. C. 
PARKS, Seigle W., 102 Adams St., Fairmont, 

W. Va. 
REIMANN, Dexter L., Bon Secours Hospital, 

Baltimore 23, Md. 
RUZICKA, Edwin R.. 10 Lancaster Rd., Need- 
ham 92. Mass. 
SCHENTHAL, Joseph. 1328 Aline St., New 

Orleans 15, La. 
SEXTON, Thomas S., Ferry Hill Rd., Granby, 

Mass. 
SIEGEL, Maurice B., 119 S. Alta Vista Blvd., 

Los Angeles 36, Calif. 
SPIEGEL, Herbert, 161 King Point Road, Great 

Neck. L. I., X. Y. 
TARTIKOFF, George, 2020 Cortelyou Rd., 

Brwkl\-n 26, N. Y. 
THOMAS, Ramsey B., 4123 Frederick Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
WALLENSTEIN, Leonard, 848 W. 36th St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
WANNER, Jesse R., Jr.. 228 N. Division St., 

Salisbury. Md. 
WHITWORTH, Fuller B.. 123 Bedford St.. 

Cumberland. Md. 
WILDER, Milton J.. 1719 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 



6th St.. Tulsa. Okla. 
ZALIS. Daniel L.. 3004 xX. Hilton St., Balti- 
more 29, Mfl. 

CLASS OF 
1938 

APPLEFELD, Willard, 5901 Park Heights 
Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 

BAUM, Max, 1501 N. Milton Ave., Baltimore 
13, Md. 

BORDEN, Melvin N., 5000 Old Frederick Road. 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

BOWERS, John Z., University of Wisconsin 
School of Medicine, Madison, Wise. 

BROOKS, Wilbur S., 2114 South Ave.. Syra- 
cuse 7. X". Y. 

BROWN, Manuel, 1619 E. 15th St., Tulsa, 
Okla. 

BUNTING, John J., 4705 Montrose Blvd., 
Houston 6, Texas 

DODD, William A., 6308 ]Mosswa>-, Baltimore 
12, Md. 

EICHERT, Arnold H., 2847 Lincoln St., 
Hollywood, Fla. 

FEDER, Aaron, 40-42 75th St.. Jackson 
Heights, N. Y. 

FOX, Samuel L., 1205 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

GAREIS, Louis C, Medical Arts Bldg.. Bal- 
timore 1, Md. 

GEORGE, Joseph M., Jr.. 402 Carson Ave., 
Las Vegas, Nev. 

GIBEL, Harry, 1171 Eastern Pkwy.. Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

GLASSMAN, Edward L.. 4037 Falls Road, 
Baltimore 11, Md. 

GOVONS, Sidney R., 408 N. Capitol, Lansing 
a, Mich. 

GUYTON, William L.. 130 W. Main St., 
Waynesboro. Pa. 

HAASE, J. Henry, 2926 E. Cold Spring Lane, 
Baltimore 14, Md. 

HAYLECK, :Mary L.. 4401 Underwood Rd., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

HORKY, John R., Churchville. Md. 

KATZ, Milton A.. 1868 Pacific Ave.. Long 
Beach 6, Calif. 

KELMENSON, Harry. 1300 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

KUMP, Albert, 39 Lake St., Bridgeton. X. J. 

LENKER, Luther A.. 232 State St.. Harris- 
burg, Pa. 



( 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



LUMPKIN, William R., 618 Valley Lane, 

Towson 4, Md. 
MICHAELSON, Ernest, 341 Mineola Blvd., 

Mineola, L. L, X. Y. 
MILLER, Clarence L., 1465 Rhode Island Ave., 

X. \V., Washington 5, D. C. 
MILLER, Royston, 1141 Delaney St., Or- 
lando, Fla. 
MILHOLLAND, Arthur V., Grace Line Med- 
ical Dept., Pier 57 N.R., Xew York 11, X. Y. 
MINERVINI, Robert V., 330 Park Hill Ave., 

Yonkers 5, X^. Y. 
MINISZEK, James H., 13 Oak St., Brattle- 

horo. \'t. 
NOVEY, Samuel, 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
ROTHKOPF, Henry, 6231 Old York Rd., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
SCHAEFER, John F.. 401 Random Road, 

Baltimore, Md. 
SCHERLIS, Sidney. 1214 X. Calvert St., 

Bahimore 1, Md. 
SCOTT, John M., 8 Longwood Rd., Baltimore 

U). Md, 
SHEPPARD, Robert C, 311 Montrose Ave., 

Baltimore 1^. Md. 
SIEGEL, Edward, 81 Brinkerhoff St.. Platts- 

burg, X. Y. 
SILBERMAN, Donald H., 1815 11th Ave., 

South, Birmingham 5, Ala. 
SMITH, John P., 1100 E. Belvedere Ave., 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
SPREI, Emanuel, 85-04 168th St.. Jamaica 3, 

X. Y. 
STEIN, Aaron, 31 Hen Hawk Road, Great 

Xeck, L. L, X. Y. 
STEINBERG, Morris W., 410 X. Hilton St., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
SWISS, Adam G., Kingsville, Md. 
THOMAS, Bernard O., Jr., Professional 

Bldg., Frederick, Md. 
THOMPSON, Winfield L., 809 Simmons St., 

Cioldsboro, X. C. 
VOLLMER, Frederick J., 311 E. Gittings Ave., 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
WAGNER. John A.. 3419 Guilford Terr., Bal- 
timore 18, Md. 
WARRES, Hcrl)ert L., 2337 Eutaw Place, 

Baltimdre 17, Md. 
WELFELD, Alvan, 1801 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17. Md. 
WULWICK, Michael, 434 E. 23rd St., Brook- 

Ivn 26, X. Y. 



WOODWARD, Theodore E., 1 Meirymount 
Rd., Baltimore 10, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1937 

ABBOTT, Thomas G., 4509 Liberty Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 7, Md. 
BANK, R. Stanley, 1510 State St., Harrisburg, 

Pa. 
BERESTON, Eugene, 2406 Eutaw Place, Bal- 
timore 17, Md. 
BURTNICK, Lester I., 3000 Connecticut .\ve., 

X. W., Washington 8, D. C. 
CARLSON, Carl E., 26 Wightman Road, Xew 

Britain, Conn. 
COCIMANO, Joseph M.. 1835 Eye St., X. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 
COONEY, Robert F., 512 Lackawanna Ave., 

May field, Pa. 
COUGHLAN, Stuart G., 112 X. Augusta St., 

Staunton, Va. 
DAILY, Louis E., 5 X^ewton Ave., X'orwich, 

X. Y. 
D'ALESSIO, Charles M., 523 Yale Ave., New 

Haven, Conn. 
D'AMICO, Thomas V., 368 Ridgewood Ave., 

Glen Ridge, X\ J. 
DIGGS, Everett S., 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 

2, Md. 
EISNER, William :M., 6303 Pontiac St., Ber- 

wyn Heights, Md. 
FINN. John H., Refugio, Texas 
FRENKIL, James, 338 W. Pratt St., Baltimore 

1, Md. 
FROHMAN, I. Phillips, 2925 Xichols Ave., 

S. E., Washington, D. C. 
GILLESPIE, J. L., 26 Midland Ave., Kearny, 

X.J. 
GOLDBERG, Sigmund, 12 E. Pratt St., Balti- 
more 2. Md. 
HAHN, Charles S., 781 Hicks St., Brooklyn, 

X. Y. 
HEDRICK, Grover C, Jr.. Ill Locust St., 

Beck ley, W. Va. 
HOCHFELD, Leo, 1240 Walton Ave., Bronx, 

Xew York City 
JACKSON, Samuel, Hi Hendrickson .\ve., 

Valley Stream, X. Y. 
JONES, James P., Pennsboro, W. Va. 
KADAN, J. Earl, 823 19th St., X. W.. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
KAGEN, Gordon, 224 X. Fifth St., Reading, 

Pa. 



DIRECTORY 



KALTREIDER, D. Frank, 1526 Xorthwick 

Ko;ui, liallimore 18, Md. 
KAPLAN, Isadore, 3314 Marnat Road, Balti- 

nu)re S, Md. 
KEMICK, Irvin B.. City Hospital. 2,i95 Scran- 

lon Road. tNeveland 9, Ohio 
KLEMKOWSKI, Irvin P., 213 Upnor Road, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
KOLMAN, Lester X., 3700 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 15. Md. 
KUNKOWSKI, Mitchell, 1016 S. East Ave., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
LINHARDT, Elmer G., 3 Chesapeake Ave., 

Eastport, Annapolis, Md. 
LISANSKY, Ephraim T., 3210 Liberty Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 
LLEWELYN, Helen E., 408 N. Main St., 

Lancaster, S. C. 
LONG, William B., Jr., Medical Center, 

Salisbury, Md. 
MACKOWIAK, Stephen C, 6714 Holabird 

Ave., Baltimore 22, Md. 
MATHEKE, Otto G., Jr., 328 Sussex Ave., 

Newark, N. J. 
MULLER. Stephen E., 2 \V. Read St., Balti- 
more, Md. 
MUSE, Joseph E., 6212 Mossway, Baltimore 

12, Md. 
MYERS, Philip, 2425 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 

17, Md. 
OWENS, Richard S., 920 S. Jefferson St., 

Roanoke 16, Va. 
PASS, L Earl, 4001 Wilkens Ave., Baltimore 

29, Md. 
PERLMAN, Lawrence, 104 S. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 3, 111. 
PICCOLO, Pasquale, 41 Trumbull St., New 

Haven 10, Conn. 
POKRASS, Fred P., 1621 Union St., Reading, 

Pa. 
RESNICK, Elton, 400 Rockwood Road, Bran- 

d>wine Hills, Wilmington, Dela. 
REVELL, Samuel T. R., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
RIGDON, Henry L., McLeod Infirmary, Flo- 
rence, S. C. 
ROBINS, Isadore M., 109 S. Franklin St., 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
RUBIN, Morris, 2021 Grand Concourse, 

Bronx, N. Y. 
SAKOWSKI, John Paul, 20 W. 22nd St., 

Bayonnc, X. J. 
SEEGAR, J. King, Jr., 2 W. Read St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 



SEMOFF, Milton, 522 N. Tucson Blvd., Tuc- 
son, Ariz. 

SEWALL, Sidney, (A Garden St., Hartford, 
Conn. 

SHAPIRO, Albert, 3701 Fords Lane, Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

SPIELMAN, Morion M., 140 Riverside Drive, 
New ^"ork, N. V. 

WHIT WORTH, F. Dixon, Box 439, 320 N. 
Ro>al Ave., Front Royal, Va. 

WILLIAMS, Robert R., 6603 Eastern Parkway, 
Baltimore 14, Md. 

WOLFF, Eldridge H., 15 Locust St., Cambridge, 
Md. 

WOODROW, Jack H., 27 Ludlow St., Yonkers 
5. N. Y. 

ZACK, Frank A., 2639 Wilshire Ave., S. W. 
Roanoke, Va. 

ZELIGMAN, Israel, 1109 N. Calvert St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1936 

BEERS, Reid L., 1625 Irving Ave., Glendale, 
Calif. 

BOWIE, Harry C, 1011 N. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

BURKA, Irving, 3701 Connecticut Ave., N. W., 
Washington 8, D. C. 

BURNS, Harold H., 115 E. Eager St., Balti- 
more 2, ]\Id. 

BURTON, Jerome K., 209 Main, Boise, Idaho 

BUSH, Joseph E., Hampstead, Md. 

COPLIN, George J., 528 E. Jersey St., Eliza- 
beth 1, X. J. 

CTIBOR. V. F., Califon, N. J. 

DAVIS, George H., 404 Hollen Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

DEEHL, Seymour R., 1026 E. Jersey St., 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

DITTMAR, Stuart W., 473 Lincoln Way East, 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

DIXON, D. McClelland, 5504 Normandy Place, 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

FELDMAN, Jerome, 20094 E. 14th St., Hay- 
ward, Calif. 

GILLIS, Marion H., Jr., 206 Walnut St., Salis- 
bury, Md. 

GIMBEL, Harry S., 4605 Edmondson Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

GREENGOLD, David B., 67 Commonwealth 
.\ve., Pittsfield, Mass. 

GREGORY, Philip O., Boothbay Harbor, Me. 



MEDICAL ALL MM 



GREIFINGER, Win., 31 Lincoln Park, New- 
ark, N. J. 
ISAACS, Benjamin H., 2600 E. Balliniore St., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
JONES, C. Henry, 707 N. Rebecca Ave., 

Scranton, Pa. 
KARPEL, Saul, 190 Monlauk Ave., New Lon- 
don, Conn. 
KLEIMAN, Norman 3816 Chatham Road, 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
KNOBLOCH, HowanI T., 1 102 Columi)us Ave., 

Bay City, Mich. 
KOLODNER, Louis J., 2502 Eutaw Place, 

Halliinore 17, Md. 
LUND, (irant,3001 Ashby Ave., Las Vegas, Nev. 
MANSFIELD, VVm. Kenneth, 44 \V. Biddle 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
McKNEW, Hector V., Jr., 20 E. Locust St., 

Newark, Ohio 
McNINCH, Eugene R., 126 Walker Rd., Dover, 

Del. 
NESTOR, Thomas A., 337 Main St., Wakefield, 

R. I. 
PENTECOSTE, Salvador, 14 Claremont Ave., 

Mai)lewood, N. J. 
PIGMAN, Carl, Whitesburg, Ky. 
ROSENTHAL, Victor, Merrick, N. Y. 
SQUIRES, Millard F., Jr., 507 S. Maryland 

.Ave., Richardson Park, Wilmington, Del. 
STECHER, J. L., Angebilt Hotel, Orlando, Fla. 
STERN, Morris, 471 Clifton Ave., Clifton, N. J. 
SUNDAY, Stuart D., 201 E. 33rd St., Baltimore 

18, Md. 
THOMAS, Anthony J., 4600 York Rd., Balti- 
more 12, Md. 
VIEWEG, George L., Jr., id, Pleasant Drive, 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
WALLER. W. Kennedy, 512 Cathedral St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
WELLS, Gibson J., 309 E. 33rd St., Baltimore 

18, Md. 
WILFSON, Daniel, Jr., 5721 Park Heights 

.\ve., Baltimore 15, Md. 
WILKINSON, .\rlhur i)., Ill Sherman .\ve., 

New Haven, Conn. 
YAVELOW, Charles S., 117 S. 2nd .\ve., .Mt. 

Vernon, N. Y. 
ZIMRING, Josei)h G., 222 Riverside Blvd., 

Long Beach, X. ^'. 

CLASS OF 
1935 
ALESSI, Edward J., 6217 Harfonl Road. Haiti 
more 14, Md. 



ALONSO, Miguel, P. O. Box 82K6, Fernandez 
Juncos Station, Santurce, P. R. 

ANDERSON, John B., 294 Vanderbilt Road, 
Asheville, N. C. 

AUNGST. Melvin R., Fort Kent, Maine 

CORNBROOKS, Ernest I., Jr., Medical Arts 
BIdg., Baltimore 1, Md. 

COTTER, Edward F., 6 E. Read St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

DICKEY, Francis G., Veterans Administra- 
tion Hf)spital, Fort Howard, Md. 

DODGE, Douglas R., 2900 Blanche St., Pasa 
dena 10, Calif. 

DOERNER, Alexander A., U. S. Public Health 
Service Hosp., San Francisco 18, Calif. 

DUBOIS, Robert L., 29 Central Ave., Water- 
bury 11, Conn. 

DUNNIGAN, Comdr. VVilUam C, MC, USNR, 
USS Wyandot, FPO, New York, N. Y. 

EINHORN, Samuel E., 241 16th Ave., Newark, 
N.J. 

EWALD, August, 36 York Court, Baltimore 
18, Md. 

FRUCHTBAUM, Robert P., 431 Franklin 
Ave., Nutley 10, N. J. 

GALITZ, Philip J., 5794 Bird Road, Miami, Fla. 

GERWIG, Walter H., Jr., 1805 Ken^-on St., 
N. W., Washington 10, D. C. 

GRENZER, William H., 1520 E. 33rd St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

GROSS, Joseph B., 6911 Park Heights Ave.. 
Baltimore 8, Md. 

HAMMILL, Gerard P., Woodville, Pa. 

HAMRICK, John C, 809 N. Lafayette St., 
Shelby, N. C. 

HARRIS, Aaron, 6506 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 8, Md. 

HARTMAN, Ira F., Buckhannon, W. Va. 

HEGHINIAN, Jeannette R., 2212 South Road, 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

HELFRICH, Wm. (;., .5006 Roland Ave., 
Baltimore 10, Md. 

HERROLD, Lewis C, Dover, Pa. 

HUGO, John H., 301 Clay Ave., Jeannette, Pa. 

HUNT, J. A., Delta, Pa. 

KANE, Harry F., 2607 E. Preston St., Baiti 
more 13, Md. 

KELLER, Michael !-., 673 E. 27th St., Pater- 
son, N. J. 

KLEIN, Harold H., 4.«) Wyoming Ave.. 
Scranton. Pa. 

KLOMPUS, Irving. .^01 E. High St., Bound 
Mr(H)k, X. J. 

LANE, Edwin C., Hebron, Ohio 



DIRECTORY 



LAYTON. C. Rodney, Centerville, Md. 

LICHTENBERG, Walter, 309 Kindcrkamack 
Roail. W'cslwcxxi, N. J. 

LIEB, Saul, 90 Treacy Ave., Newark, X. J. 

MacLAUGHLIN, Donald, 4508 Edmondson 
Village, Baltimore 29, Md. 

MAREK, Charles B., 3300 The Alameda, Balti- 
more 18, Mil. 

MAYS, Howard B., 3301 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

McGregor, Alpine \V., St. George, Utah 

McHENRY, D. J., 940 S. Queen St., York, Pa. 

MECH, Karl, 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

MILLS, Lawrence H., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

NOON, Milton A., Xew Stanton, Pa. 

RAFFEL, William, 803 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

REIER, Charles H., 6701 York Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

ROBINSON, Harry M., Jr., 1024 N. Calvert 
St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

SCHAPIRO, Sidney H., 334 Union Ave., Ir- 
vington 11, N. J. 

SCHLACHMAN, Milton, 80-25 Elmhurst Ave., 
Elmhurst 73, X. Y. 

SCHMITT, George F., Jr., 30 S. E. 8th St., 
Miami 36, Fla. 

SISCOVICK, Milton, 3411 Edgewood Road, 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

STEIN, Benjamin Maxwell, 465 Fulton Ave., 
Hempstead, X^. Y. 

TUBY, Joseph, 1310 Beverly Rd., Brooklyn, 
X. Y. 

WARREN, John McC, Laurel, Md. 

WILLIAMS, J. Frank, Jr., 321 W. Main St., 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 

WILSON, Xorman J., 135 Francis St., Boston 
15, Mass. 

TEITELBAUM, Harry A., 1801 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

WOOD, Everet H., 2318 Hollister Ave., Madi- 
son 5, Wise. 

WOODWARD, Lewis K., Jr., Box 112, Wood- 
stock, Va. 

CLASS OF 
1934 

ADAMS, Thurston R., University Hospital, 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
BERNS, S. Harry, 120 E. 89th St., Xew York, 

X. Y. 
BLUM, Louis v., 2310 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 

17, Md. 



CAPLES, Delmas, 6 Hanover Rd., Reisters- 
town, Md. 

CARLINER, Paul E., 2217 South Rd., Balti- 
more 9, Md. 

COAXES, S. Paul, Main St., Suffield, Conn. 

COOPER, Jules, 723 Washington Ave., Wood- 
bine, X. J. 

DIENER, Samuel, 2808 Ordway St., X. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

DREHER, Robert H., Wind Cap, Pa. 

DUNBAR, John C, 807 Empire Bldg., Pitts- 
burgh 22, Pa. 

ECHOLS, John E., 4 School St., Richwood, W. 
Va. 

FARR, Robert W., Chestertown, Md. 

FEARING, William L., 3025 Belair Road, Bal- 
timore 13, Md. 

FELDMAN, Leon H., Flat Iron Bldg., Ashe- 
ville, X. C. 

FINEGOLD, Joseph, 5800 5th Ave., Apt. 20, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GELMAN, Sidney, 600 E. 27th St., Paterson. 
X. J. 

GOLDSTONE, Herbert, 1810 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

GOODMAN, Howard, 1513 N. Milton Ave., 
Baltimore 13, Md. 

GORDON, Joseph, 106 Girard Blvd., S. E., 
Albuquerque, X. Mex. 

GUTMAN, Isaac, 817 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2, Md. 

HANIGSBERG, Murray J., 92-15 63rd Drive, 
Rego Park 74, Queens, N. Y. 

HEALY, Robert F., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

HOFFMAN, Edward S., 7 Brookside drive, 
Rochester 18, X. Y. 

HOWARD, William L., 107 High St., Salis- 
bury, Md. 

JANNEY, Xathan, 7101 Harford Road, Balti- 
more 14, Md. 

JERARDI, Joseph V., 1800 X. Charles St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

JOHNSON, Thorwald, 980 W. OUve St., Por- 
terville, Calif. 

KETZ, Wesley J., 337 E. Main St., Batesville, 
Ark. 

KNOLL, William, Veterans Administration 
HosjHtal, Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

LEVIN, Manuel, 4818 Reisterstown Rd., Bal- 
timore 15, Md. 

MAGINNIS, Helen I., Xew Cut Road, EUi- 
colt City, Md. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



MAINS, Marchall P., Mercer Hospital, Trenton 

8, N. J. 
McNALLY, Hugh B., Medical Arts Blclg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
MILLETT, Joseph, 501 Fulton Ave., Hemp- 
stead, N. Y. 
MIROW, Richard R., 1080 North Shore Drive, 

Miami Beach, Fla. 
MOULTON, Olin C, 130 N. Virginia St., Reno, 

Nev. 
NEEDLEMAN. Ma.x, 132 E. 73rd St., New York 

21, N. Y. 
O'CONNOR, Raymon F., Punxsutawney, Pa. 
ORANS, Alfred, 225 Ellison Ave., Westbury, 

N. Y. 
ROSEN, Morris, 744 Ritner St., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
SACKS, Milton S., 3500 Shelburne Road, 

Baltimore 8, Md. 
SASSCER, James Ghiselin, Upper Marlboro, 

Md. 
SIEGEL, Benjamin I., 15 Greenwood Rd., 

Baltimore 8, IVId. 
SOLLOD, Bernard \\ ., 8 Liberty Pkwy., 

Dundalk 22, Md. 
SOLTZ, William B., 1171 Elder Ave., New York 

72, N. Y. 
SPROUL, Dorothy G., 1416 Oxford St., 

Berkeley 9, Calif. 
STEIN, Milton R., 2700 S. June St., Arlington, 

Va. 
SUGAR, S. Jack, 5802 Baltimore Blvd., Hyatts- 

ville, Md. 
TERMAN, Irving, 4761 Broadway, New York 

34, N. Y. 
TUERK, Isadore, Spring Grove State Hospital, 

Catonsville, Md. 
WILDER, Earle M., 1719 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1933 

BAKER, George S., 200 2nd Ave., S. \V., 

Rochester, Minn. 
BECKER, Martin, 94 S. Munn Ave., East 

Orange, N. J. 
BELLIN, David E., 37-37 75th St., Jackson 

Heights 72, N. Y. 
BLITZMAN, Louis, 2M E. Broadway, New 

York City 
BOWMAN, Harry D., 318 N. Potomac St., 

Hagerstown, .Md. 
COHEN, Marvin I\L, ,S82 E. 25th St., Paterson, 

N. J. 



DIEHL, Harold C, Frostburg, Md. 

DRUCKER, Victor, 6 Kendall Ave., Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. 

ETKIND, Meyer, 1546 Chapel St., New Haven, 
Conn. 

FINEMAN, Jerome, 4004 Libert>- Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 7, Md. 

FOX, Haskell Wright, Greenville Sanatorium 
& Hosj)ital, Greenville, Tenn. 

FRANKLIN, Frank A., 256 S. Centre St., 
Orange, N. J. 

GARRISON, Ralph B., Hamlet, N. C. 

GOLDMAN, Alex. B., Ill Van Buren St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GOLDMAN, Meyer L., 1320 Cornaga Ave., 
I'^ar Rockaway, N. Y. 

HIMELFARB, Albert J., 3501 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

HOOVER, Wm. A., Murphy, N. C. 

KENLER, Myron L., 60-30 79th St., Elmhurst, 
N. Y. 

KEOWN, Lauriston L., 1938 Linden Ave., 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

KOCHMAN, Leon, 1037 N. Calvert St., Bal- 
timore 2, Md. 

LENTZ, George E., 756 W. Market St., York, Pa. 

LOWMAN, Milton E., 6502 Deancroft Road, 
Baltimore 9, Md. 

MATHEKE, George A., 555 WilHam St., East 
Orange, N. J. 

NOVENSTEIN, Sidney, Funkstown, Md. 

OSSERMAN, Kermit E., 4 E. 89th St., New 
York 28, N. Y. 

PICO, Jose T., Box 9924, Santurce, P. R. 

ROBINSON, Daniel R., Veterans Administra- 
tion Hos[)ital, Fort Howard 19, Md. 

SAGER, Harold, 800 Avenue C, Bayonne, N. J. 

SCARBOROUGH, Asa M., 105 E. Avondale 
Drive, Greenville, S. C. 

SCHINDLER, Blane M., 41 Greene St., Cum- 
berland, Md. 

SCHNEIMAN, Maurice Harris, 1220 Cottman 
Ave., Philadeljihia, Pa. 

SCHWARTZ, Alec R., 5801 Beacon St., Pitts- 
burgh 17, Pa. 

SCHWARTZ, Paul M., 38 S. Clinton St., 
Poughkccpsie, N. Y. 

SEWELL, Stephen, Springlake, N. J. 

THUMIN, Mark, 57 S. Main St., Middletown, 
Conn. 

TURANO, Leonard F., 194 18 117th Road, 
St. Albans 12, N. Y. 

VAN METRE, John Lee. 311 E. Washington 
Street, Charles Town, W. Va. 



DIRFX'TORV 



WAY, Samuel K., 1100 Hanimond Si., Rockv 

Mount, \. (". 
ZAGER, Saul, 2W Clinton Ave, Newark 8, N. J. 

CLASS OF 
1932 

ABRASKIN, Mortimer I).. 1 Lincoln Road 

Hl.l-,'.. Miami Beach 39, Fla. 
AHROON, Carl R., Jr., 1511 K. Grove St., 

Bloomiiigton, 111. 
ASHMAN, Leon, 2510 Taney Road, Baltimore 

9, .^L1. 
BERCOVITZ, Nathan, 675 K. 140th St., 

Bronx, N. V. 
BERGER, Herbert, 7440 Amhoy Rd., Totlen- 

ville, Staten Island, N. Y. 
BLUM, S. Daniel, 670 West End Ave., New 

York 25. N. Y. 
BOGORAD, Daniel K., 1905 \V. I5altimore St., 

Baltimore 23, Md. 
BROWN, William E., 810 S. Mariposa Ave., 

Lo.^ .Vngeles 5, Calif. 
CHIMACOFF, Hyman, 548 Hamilton Rd., 

South (Jrange, N. J. 
CLAYMAN, D. S., 6311 Baltimore Ave., River- 
dale. Md. 
CRECCA, Anthony D., 376 Roseville Ave., 

Newark, N. J. 
DIAMOND, J. George, 1125 Park Ave., Plain- 
field, N. J. 
DUMLER, John C, Medical Arts Bldg., Bal- 
timore 1, Md. 
FISHBEIN, Elliott 115 Church St., Boonton, 

N. J. 
FLOM, Charles, 3123 Eastern Ave.. Baltimore 

24, Md. 
FRANCE, Andrew Menaris, Parkton, Md. 
GANZ, S. Evans, 155 E. 72nd St., New York 

21, N. Y. 
GELLER, Samuel, 686 High Street, Newark, 

N.J. 
GERSHENSON, D. .\., 309 S. E. 4th St., 

Fairtield, 111. 
GROSH, Joseph Walter, Lititz, Pa. 
HALPERIN, David, 590 Bergen Ave., Jersey 

City 4, N. J. 
HENDLER, H. B., Amithville Medical Center, 

.\mityville, N. Y. 
HULL, Harry C, 521 Medical Arts Bldg., BaL 

timore 1, Md. 
JACOBSON, Meyer W., 2310 Eutaw Place, 

Haltimore 17. Md. 
KARFGIN, .\rthur, LS32 Havenwood Road, 

Baltimore 18, Md 



KATZ, .Vhraham, 1775 Seward .\ve.. New York 
61, N. \'. 

KATZENSTEIN, Lawrence, .501 Delaware Ave., 
Wilmington 1, Del. 

KLEIN, Henriette, 131 E. 92nd St., New York 
1^. N. V. 

KRIEGER. Alexander .\., .500 Penn Ave., Pitts- 
burgh 22. I'a. 

LECHNER, Sidney I., 1777 (Wand Concourse, 
Bron.x .53, N. Y. 

LEFFERT, Jacob, 86 Arg\le Road, Brooklyn 
18, N. \. 

LOUFT, Reuben R., 109 Capitol St., Charles- 
ton 1, W. Ya. 

MARKMAN, H. David, 2396 Morris Ave., 
Bronx, New York Cil>' 

McMillan, Willlam O., .SOlO Kanawha Ave., 
Charlestf)n, W. Ya. 

MOORES, J. ])., 3105 Belair Rd., Baltimore 13, 
Md. 

PANEBIANCO, Richard K., 73-11 34th Ave., 
Jackson Heights 72. N. Y. 

PINK, Solomon H., Butler, N. J. 

RECKSON, M. M., Suite 346, 420 Lincoln 
Rd., Miami Beach 39, Fla. 

ROHM, Jack Seth, 217 E. Main St., Carnegie, 
Pa. 

RUBENSTEIN, Robert, 2758 Hudson Blvd., 
Jerse_\- City, N. J. 

SAUNDERS, Thomas S., 727 Medical Arts 
Bldg.. Portland, Oregon 

SAVAGE, John E., 811 Boyce Ave., Towson 4, 
Md. 

SHAW, John J., ?,ii Beech Spring Rd., South 
Orange, N. J. 

SIEGEL, Sidney L., 227 N. 2nd St., Millville, 
N.J. 

SOLLOD. Aaron C, 707 E. Fort Ave., Balti- 
more 30, Md. 

STATMAN, Arthur J., 361 Warwick Ave., 
South Orange, N. J. 

TAYLOR, Francis N., 34 Franklin St., Peters- 
burg, Va. 

WIRTS, Carl, 812 Cedar Ave., Pittsburgh 12, 
Penna. 

ZUPNIK, Howard L., 427 Hopkins Rd., Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1931 

ADALMAN, Philip, 87-10 37th Ave., Jackson 

Heights 72, N. Y. 
BAMBERGER, Beatrice, Benjamin Franklin 

Hospital, Columbus 7, Ohio 



MEDICAL ALU MM 



BAUM GARTNER, Eugene Ir\ing, Oakland, 
Md 

BRICE, Arthur Talbolt, Jefferson, Md. 

CASHWELL, Roy Lee, 300 S. Main St., Green- 
ville. S. C. 

CLONINGER, Kenneth L., Catawba Hospital, 
Inc.. Xcwton, X. C. 

DAVIS, Melvin B., Dundalk, Md. 

EDEL, John Wesley, Jr., 3403 Garrison Blvd., 
Baltimore 16, Md. 

FEUER, Arthur S., 3099 Brighton 6th St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FRIEDMAN, Joseph, 2800 Oakley Ave.. 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

GROSSMAN, Isadore K., 1212 Patterson Park 
.Vve.. Baltimore 13, Md. 

GROVE, Donald B., Medical Bldg., Cumber- 
land. Md. 

GUNDRY, Rachel Krebs, 5002 Frederick Road, 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

HANNUM, Marvin Ray, Milan, Mich. 

HORNBROOK, Kent Maidlow. Xew Martins- 
ville. W. \'a. 

JACOBSON, Samuel M.. 50 Pershing St., Cum- 
l)erland, Md. 

JENSEN, Carl D. P., 509 Olive Way, Seattle 1, 
Wash. 

JETT, Page Covington, Prince Frederick, Md. 

KARGER, Abraham, 70 Fayette Rd., Scars- 
dale. X. V. 

KAUFMAN, Ma.x. 21-51 75th St.. Jackson 
Heights. X. Y. 

KEEFE, Walter J., 114 Ridgewood Road, West 
Hartford, Conn. 

KOHN, Walter, 102 E. Fort Ave., Baltimore 30. 
Md. 

KRIEGER, Jerome L., 4024 6th .\ve., Brook- 
lyn n, X. Y. 

LANGELUTTIG, H. Vernon, 715 X Charles 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
LANHAM, .Alston Gordon, Ronceverte, W. Va. 
LERNER, Philip, 1111 St. Paul St.. Baltimore 

2, -Md. 
LEVINE, David R., 488 E. 18th St.. Brooklyn 

26, X. V. 
MANKOVICH, D. G., 210 W. Mahoning St., 

Pun.xsutawney, Pa. 
MARTIN, Thomas A., 2811 Hillsboro St., 

Raleigh, X. C. 
MASTERSON, John F.. 98 .Mvrtle .\ve., Ir- 

vington, X. J. 
MOVERS. Waldo B., 6901 Pineway, Hyatts- 

ville. Md. 



REHMEYER, Walter, Monabans, Ward Co., 
Te.xas 

ROHM, Robert F., 509 Liberty Ave., Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. 

ROSENBERG, Benjamin, 21 E. 91st St.. 
Brooklyn 12, X. Y. 

ROZUM, John K., 4420 Palmarito St., Coral 
Gables 46. Fla. 

SEABOLD, Wm. M., 5402 Edmondson Ave.. 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

SEIDMAN, Herman Harold, 760 Hunts Point 
Ave., X>w York City, X'. Y. 

SHELLEY, Harry S., 3725 Estes Rd., Xashville 
5. Tenn. 

SIWINSKI, Arthur G., 15 E. Biddle St., Balti- 
more 2. Md. 

SKOVRON, Michael J.. 439 Arlington Road, 
Erie, Pa. 

SLATE, Marvin L., 203 E. Green St., High 
Point, X. C. 

SLAVCOFF, Ale.xander, 3231 X. 2nd St., Har- 
risburg. Pa. 

SMITH, Solomon, 2500 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

SPRECHER, Milford H., Elkton, Md. 

STEVENS, Russell A., 148 S. Franklin St., 
Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 

VAN ORMER, W. Alfred, Medical Bldg., 122 
S. Centre St., Cumberland, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1930 

ASHMAN, Harry, 3700 Garrison Blvd., Bal- 
timore 15, Md. 

BELINKIN, William 495 E. 178th St., Xew 
York 57, N. Y. 

BENFER, Kenneth, 258 E. Market St., York. 
Pa. 

BLUM, Joseph S., 1115 X. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

BROWN, Eugene S., Summersville, W. Va. 

CHANCE, Lester T., 11 E. Chase St., Balti- 
more 2. Md. 

COHEN. Archie R., Clear Spring, Md. 

COPPOLA, Matthew J., 555 Van Xess Ave., 
X>w York City, X'. Y. 

DYAR, Edna G., 3824 Harrison St.. X. W., 
Washington 15, D. C. 

FAW, Wylie M., Jr., 531 Washington St.. 
Cumberland, Md. 

FIOCCO, \'incent J.. 231 W. 4th St., Xew York 
City. X. Y. 

FISHER, Samuel, 808 Madison Ave., Paterson, 
X.J. 



DIRECTORY 



FORD, John L.. 840 S. Webster Ave., Green 
Kay, Wise. 

GAREY, James L., 27 K. Helair Ave., Aber- 
<lccn, M(l. 

GARFINKEL, Abraham. 1801 (ireenwood 
Ave.. Trenton, X. J. 

GOLDMAN, Lester M., 53 Leslie St., Newark 
S, X. J. 

GOODMAN, Julius H., 3400 E. Baltimore St., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

HARSHA, Gene M., Sistersvillc, W. Va. 

HORNBRAKER, John H., 154 W. Washington 
St., Hagerstown, Md. 

JACKSON, Marshall V., Princeton, X. C. 

KLEINMAN, Abraham M., 680 Montgomery 
St., Brooklyn 13, X. V. 

KRAEMER, Samuel H., 126 Gifford Ave., 
Jersey City, X. J. 

KREMEN, Abraham, 2355 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

LEVIN, Morton L., State Department of 
Health, Albany, X\ Y. 

LEWIS, Frank R., Willards, Md. 

MAGOVERN, Thomas F., 228 South Orange 
Ave., South Orange, X". J. 

MANSDORFER, G. Bowers, 2937 N. Charles 
St., Baltimore 18, Md. 

MILLER, B. H. K., 2415 Bryn Mawr Ave., 
Philadelphia 31, Pa. 

MILLER, Isaac, 1228 S. Charles St., Balti- 
more 30, Md. 

MILLER, James A., 1331 Reisterstown Road, 
Pikesville 8, Md. 

MONTILLE, Victor J., 1111 Magdalena Ave., 
Santurce, P. R. 

RINEBERG, Irving E., 137 Livingston Ave., 
X'ew Brunswick, X. J. 

ROMANO, Nicholas M., Bangor, Pa. 

SAWYER, George J., Jr., 4808 Harford Rd., 
Baltimore 14, Md. 

SCHOOLMAN, Ix.uis R.. Professional Bldg., 
Frederick, Md. 

SMITH, Joseph J., 800 Stratfield Rd., Bridge- 
port 4, Conn. 

SNYDER, Xathan, 1200 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

THOMPSON, Carl F., 401 Spruce St., Mor- 
gantown, W. Va. 

WEINSTEIN, Jack, 118-02 107th Ave., Rich- 
mond Hill, X. Y. 

WERNER, A. Seth, 205 Ocean Ave., Bro<jkiyn 

25, X. Y. 
YOUNG, Ralph F., Williamsjwrt, Md. 



ZEIGER, Samuel, 3045 Ocean Pkwy., Boookiyn, 
X. Y. 

ZURAWSKI, Charles, .S35 Broadway, Provi- 
dence 9, K. I. 

CLASS OF 
1929 

AMOS, Hugh, 15701 Detroit Ave., Lakewood 7, 
Ohio 

ANDERSON, Walter Anders, 3001 Shannon 
Drive, Baltimore 18, Md. 

BARDFELD, Benjamin, 1080 E. Landis Ave., 
Vineland, X. J. 

BERNHARD, Robert, 2625 Grand Concourse, 
Bronx 68, X. Y. 

BIRELY, Morris F., Church St., Thurmont, 
:Md. 

BONGIORNO, Henry D., 516 River St., Pater- 
son, X'. J. 

BOTCH, Bernard, 424 W. Woodruff St., 
Toledo 2, Ohio 

BRAHMS, Max, 19 Clarkson Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

BRAUER, Selig, 2012 Hudson Blvd., Jersey 
City, N. J. 

CHAMBERS, Earl Le Roy, 4108 Liberty 
Heights Ave., Baltimore 7, Md. 

CLARK, Francis A., 212 Morris St., Charleston, 
W. Va. 

COHEN, Herman, 1301 Hamilton Ave.. Tren- 
ton, X. J. 

CONN, Jacob H., 2325 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

DAILEY, William P., 901 X. 2nd St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

DANIELS, Willard F., 3603 Piedmont Rd., 
Huntington, W. Va. 

DeBARBIERI, Fred L., 4723 Park Heights 
Ave., Baltimore 15, Md. 

GARBER, J. Savin, 8924 146th St., Jamaica, 
X. Y. 

HANEY, John J., 850 Hamilton Ave., Trenton, 
X.J. 

HECK, Leroy S., 8 N. Moger Ave., Mt. Kisco, 
N. Y. 

HOLROYD, Frank J., Princeton, W. Va. 

KNIGHT, Walter P., 1745 X. Washington St., 
Scranton 9, Pa. 

LYNN, Irving, 2760 Boulevard, Jersey City, 
X.J. 

McGOWAN, Joseph, 29 X. Market St., Ashe- 
ville, X. C. 

MERANSKI, Israel P., 3354 Dolfield Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 



MEDICAL ALU.UXr 



MORGAN, Irving J., 4075 Jenkins Arcade, 

Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 
NEISTADT, Isadore I., 114 Dubois Ave., 

Valley Stream, X. V. 
NEWMAN, Saul, 365 Broadway, Amityville, 

X. V. 
NICKMAN, Emanuel H., 1616 Pacific Ave., 

Atlantic City, X. J. 
PENCHANSKY, Samuel Joseph, 847 Ave. C. 

Bayonne, X. J. 
PORTERFIELD, Maurice Coleman, Hamp- 

steafi, Md. 
REEDER, Paul Arlington, Barnesville. Ohio 
SCHWARTZBACH, Saul, 1726 Eye St., X. \V., 

Washington, D. C. 
SPEICHER, \V. Glenn, Westminster, Md. 
STEVENSON, Charles C, 411 Thirtieth St., 

Oakland 9, Cahf. 
TANNENBAUM, Morris, 1750 Grand Con- 
course. Xew York City 
ULLRICH, Henry F., 804 Cathedral St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
VANN, Homer King, 410 Cedar St., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
VILAR-ISERN, Rafael A., 1861 Fernandez 

Juncos .\ve., Santurce, San Juan, P. R. 
VOLENICK, Lee Joseph, 4710 Liberty Heights 

Ave., Baltimore 7, Md. 
WALLACE, Charles A.. 23 Treacy .\ve., 

Xewark, X. J. 
WARD, Hugh W.. Owings, Md. 
WATERS, Zack J. 410 S. Division St., SaUs- 

bury. Md. 
WILKERSON, Albert R., 1200 St. Paul St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
YEAGER, George Herschel, 314 Medical Arts 

Building. Baltimore 1, Md. 
YUDKOFF, WilHam. 770 Ave. A. Bayonne, 

X. J. 
ZIMMERMAN, Frederick T., 11 E. 68th St., 

Xew York 21, X. Y. 

CLASS OF 
1928 

BAER, Adolph. 3851 Flatlands Ave., Brook- 
lyn, X. V. 

BAILEY, Hugh A., 1031 Quarrier St.. Charles- 
ton. W. Va. 

BERGER, William A.. 346 Roseville Ave., 
Xewark, X. J. 

BRAGER, Simon, 3501 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
IS, Md. 

CLEMSON, Earle P., 701 Cathedral St., Bal- 
timore 1, Md. 



FRIEDMAN, Bernard, 617 Ocean Pkwy., 
Brooklyn 18, X. Y. 

GILBERT, Jacques S., 337 S. Beverly Drive, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

GOODMAN, Jerome E., 809 Cathedral St., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

GREER, Creed ColHns, Goff Bldg., Clarks- 
burg, W. Va. 

GROLLMAN, A. I., 19 Garfield Place, Cin- 
cinnati 2, Ohio 

GUNDRY, Lewis P., 1014 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

HEROLD, Lewis J., 801 Ocean Pkwy., Brook- 
lyn, X. Y. 

JONES, H. Alvan, 1107 St. Paul St., Baltimore 
2. Md. 

KAUFMAN, Israel, 3608 Bedford Ave., Brook- 
lyn. X. Y. 

LAUKAITIS, Joseph G., 679 Washington 
Blvd., Baltimore 30, Md. 

LITTLE, Luther E., 10 W. Madison St., Balti- 
more 1, ^Id. 

MADDI, Vincent M., 3 Campbell Road Court, 
Binghamton, X. Y. 

MAGED, Allan J., Suffern, X. Y. 

MEISTER, .\aron H., 148-11 89th Ave., 
Jamaica 2. X. Y. 

MERKSAMER, David, 105 Lincok Road, 
Brooklyn, X. Y. 

MERLINO, Frank A., 225 Greenville Ave.. 
Johnston. R. I. 

MOSTWILL, Ralph, 1801 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

RASCOFF, Henr}-, 895 Eastern Pkwy., Brook- 
lyn, X. Y. 

RICH, Benjamin S., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

ROETLING, Carl P., 1326 W. Lombard St. 
Baltimore 23, Md. 

RUBINSTEIN, Hyman, 2349 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 

RUTTER, Joseph H., 224 S. Palmetto Ave., 
Daytona Beach, Fla. 

SAFFRON, Morris H., 292 Paulison Ave., 
Passaic, X. J. 

SILVER, A. A., Temple Garden Apts., Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

VARNEY, William H., 120 Belvidere Ave., 
Washington, X. J. 

WARNER, Carroll Gardner, Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

WELLS, Samuel Robert, 115 X. Potomac St., 
1 Hagerstown, Md. 



DIRECTORY 



CLASS OF 

1927 

ADZIMA, Joseph, 409 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

CAREY, T. Nelson, 4300 Wendover Rd., Bal- 
limore 18, Md. 

CHASE, William \V., Suite 902, 915 19th St., 
X. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

COHEN, Bernard J., The Marylander, Apt. 2, 
,?5()1 St. Paul St., Baltimore 18, Md. 

COVINGTON, E. E., 828 Park Ave., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

DAVIS, Henry Vincent, Chesapeake City, Md. 

DONCHI, Sol M., 118 Oakview Ave., Maple- 
wood. N. J. 

ELIASON, Harold W., P. O. Bo.x 157, Cumber- 
land, Md. 

FINKELSTEIN, A. H., 11 E. Chase St., Bal- 
timore 2, Md. 

FISHER, Joseph O., 2720 Grand Concourse, 
New York City, N. Y. 

GARNER, Wafe H., 308 Park Ave., Sanford, 
Fla. 

GILL, Charles E., State Park, S. C. 

GLICK, Bernard, Lyndhurst, N. J. 

GOLDBERG, Isadore, 303 N. Washington Ave., 
Dunellen, N.J. 

GOLDSTEIN, Milton, 707 N. Webster Ave., 
Scranton 10, Pa. 

HEISLEY. Rowland S., Honesdale, Pa. 

HUMMELL, Ira Lee C, Salem, N. J. 

JOHNSON, Jesse R., 3} 9 E. 3rd St., Lewistown. 
Pa. 

KAYSER, Fayner A., Medical Arts Bldg., Bal- 
timore 1, Md. 

KLAWANS, :\Iaurice F., 46 Southgate Ave., 
Annajwlis, Md. 

KUTNER, Charles, 211 N. 5th St., Camden, 
X.J. 

LAZOW, .Sol M., 199 Main St., Matawan, 
X. J. 

LENSON-LAMBROS, Ruth, 213 Mallow Hill 
Road, Baltimore 29, Md. 

MORAN, John E., 31 Federal St., Greenfield, 
Mass. 

MORRIS, Frank K., 11 E. Chase St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

PEAKE, Clarence W., 4508 Harford Road, Balti- 
more 14, Md. 

PHILLIPS, John Roberts, 407 Medical Arts 
Bldg., Houston, Texas 

REIFSCHNEIDER, Herbert, 104 W. Madison 
St., Baltimore 1, Md. 



SAFFELL, Jas. Glenn, Reisterstown, Md. 
SPARTA, Anthony J., 42 N. 2nd St., Easton, 

Pa. 
STRAYER, Helen, 404 WildwrxKl, Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 
SWANK, James L., 205 S. 4lh St., Las Vegas, 

Nev. 
TOLLIN, Louis N., 6908 North Point Rd., 

Sparrows Point, Md. 
WHITTINGTON, Claude T., 600 Country 

Clul) Drive, Greensboro, N. C. 
WILLIAMS, Palmer Francis, Pikesville, Md. 
WILNER, Josei)h, 1248 White Plains Road, 

Bronx, N. Y. 

CLASS OF 
1926 

ASKIN, John A., 1406 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 
17, Md. 

BALLARD, Margaret B., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

BRONSTEN, Irvin C, 39 Cumberland Drive, 
Yonkers 5, N. Y. 

CALVIN, Warren E., 1215 4th Ave., Seattle, 
Wash. 

De VINCENTIS, Henry, 285 Henry St., Orange, 
N.J. 

DIAMOND, H. E., 1749 Grand Concourse, New 
York City 

EANET, Paul, 6727 16th St., N. W., Washing- 
ton 12, D. C. 

EDMONDS, Charles W., 614 Hastings Rd., 
Wiltondale, Towson 4, Md. 

ELLIOTT, JuUan C, Oxford, N. C. 

FREEDMAN, Harold, 63 W. Main St., Free- 
hokl, N. J. 

GERAGHTY, Frank J., 3047 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

HELFOND, David M., 8127 88th St., Glen- 
dale, N. Y. 

HENDRIX, Nevins B., 231 W. King St., Mar- 
tinsburg, W. Va. 

JENSEN, Jacob R., 1514 E. Cold Spring Lane, 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

LAVY, Louis T., 1844 W. North Ave., Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

LEVIN, I.Leonard, 606 Broadway, Lorain, Ohio 

LEVIN, Joseph, 831 S. 13th St., Newark, N. J. 

LUMPKIN, Lloyd U., 918 E. Las Olas Blvd., 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

LUSB Y, Frank F., 230 N. Potomac St., Hagers- 
lown, Md. 

RATTENNI, Arthur, 1011 Smith St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



ROSENBERG, Albert X., All Shaw Ave., 

McKeesiKjrt, Pa. 
ROTHBERG, Abraham Simon, 110 E. 90th 

St., New York City, N. V. 
SASHIN, David, 25 VV. 81st St., New York 24, 

X. Y. 
SCHMUCKLER, Jacob, 543 Hartford Ct., 

South Orange, N. J. 
SCHNEIDER, David, 1101 X. Milton Ave., 

Baltimore 13, Md. 
TEITELBAUM, Maurice L., 863 Eastern 

Pkwy., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WOLFE, Samuel B., 1331 E. North Ave., 

Baltimore 13, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1925 

BALCERZAK, S. P., 101 E. Main St., Carne- 
gie, Pa. 

BRIGLIA, Nicholas N., 2116 W. Passyunk 
Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROWN, Leo T., 1621 New Hampshire Ave., 
X. \V., Washington, D. C. 

BYERLY, M. Paul, 6115 Murray Hill Rd., 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

CADLE, W. R., Emmittsburg, Md. 

CARDINALE, Pasquale, 1405 North Ave., 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

COPE, Arthur Alexander, 17 S. 4th St., Ham- 
burg, Pa. 

DODGE, Eva F., 12th & McAlamont Sts., 
Little Rock, Ark. 

DRESKIN, J. L., 34 Lvons Ave., Newark 8, 
X.J. 

EASTLAND, John Sheldon, Medical Arts 
BIdg., Baltimore 1, Md. 

ELGIN, Lee \V., 905 Huntington Bldg., Miami 
32, Fla. 

EVERETT, FrankUn R., Dover, Del. 

FARBER, Raphael, 1063 St. Paul. St., Roches- 
ter 21, N. Y. 

FISCHMAN, Harold H., 326 Avon Ave., New- 
ark, N. J. 

GLICK, Samuel S., 3914 Park Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

HOWELL, James G., 715 Frederick Rd., 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

HULLA, Jaroslav, 2214 E. Fayette St., Balti- 
more 31, Md. 

LEIBENSPERGER, Geo. F., 24 E. Main St., 
Kutzlown, Pa. 

LENNON, \Vm. Earl, Fcderalsburg, Md. 

MILLER, Edgar R., P. O. Bo.x 1414, Wilming- 
mington, Del. 



MINNEFOR, C. A., IIM South Orange Ave., 

South Orange, X^. J. 
NATARO, Joseph, 172 Littleton Ave., Xcwark, 

X.J. 
OSHRIN, Henry, 7500 Bergenline .\ve.. North 

Bergen, X. J. 
POLIZZOTTI, Joseijh L., 34 17lh Ave., East 

Patterson, N. J. 
RICHMOND, Lewis C, 1181 Main St., Mil- 
ton, \\ . Va. 
ROBERTS, Byran Nazer, Tyron St., Hills- 

boro, N. C. 
SARNOFF, Jack, 31-11 31st Ave., Long Island 

City, N. Y. 
SILVERSTEIN, J. M., 73 Main St., Millburn, 

N. J. 
SIMON, Joseph R., 3400 Forbes St., Pittsburgh 

13, Pa. 
SIMPSON, Henry H., Elon College, N. C. 
SPELSBERG, Walter W., 415 Goff Building, 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
SULMAN, Wm. R., 2 E. Broad St., Hazleton, 

Pa. 
TOMAIUOLI, Michele, 19 17th St., Xorth 

Bergen, X'. J. 
WASSERWEIG, Martin M., 1059 N. U)th St., 

Reading, Pa. 
WIDMEYER, R. S., 1009 Market St., Parkers- 
burg, W. Va. 
WILSON, Paul R., Piedmont, W. Va. 
WINSTEAD, John Lindsay, Greenville, N. C. 
ZIMMERMAN, Charles C, 105 S. Centre St., 

Cumberland, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1924 

ANTONIUS, Nicholas V., 143 S. Center St., 
South Orange, N. J. 

BEST, D. E., 139 W. Walnut St., Goldsboro, 
N. C. 

DAVENPORT, Carlton A., Hertford, N. C. 

DEAN, Hugh E., Burley, Idaho 

FISHER, Harry R., 465 West End Ave., New 
York City 

GRANOFF, Jerome F., 40 Cedar Drive, Great 
Xeck, L. I., N. Y. 

GREIFINGER, Marcus H., 31 Lincoln Park, 
Xewark, X. J. 

HOWELL, Clewell, 102 Alleghany Ave., Tow- 
son 4, Md. 

JACOBSON, Philip, 18 Liberty St., Peters- 
burg, \'a. 

MARSH, James T., Westminster, Md. 



DIRECTORY 



MARTON, Samuel, Sii West End Ave., New 

\'(>rk City 
McLANE, Will. Oliver. Jr., Frostburg, Md. 
MILLER, J. G., 107 W. Saratoga St., Baltimore 

1, Md. 
MOTTA, Telcr G., Carnegie, Pa. 
PACHTMAN, Isadora, 1080 Jenkins Arcade, 

I'ittsburgh, Pa. 
ROBERTSON, Edwin M., 212 \V. Main St., 

Durham, N. C. 
SALVATI, Leo H., 1250 Prospect St., West- 

t^eld, X. J. 
SCAGNETTI, Albert, 3741 Lochearn Drive, 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
SCHULTZ, Louis A., 1177 Grant Ave., New 

York 56, N. Y. 
SIEGEL, Samuel R., 15335 Waterloo Rd., 

Cleveland, O. 
WARREN, Bryan Pope, Laurel, Md. 
WEINSTOCK, A. A., 4603 Park Heights Ave., 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
ZASLOW, John, 3304 Glenwood Rd., Brooklyn 

10, N. Y. 

CLASS OF 
1923 

BOWERS, Thaddeus R., Jr., Doctors' Bldg., 

Bristol, Tenn. 
DeSANE, Joseph, W. Seneca Place, Nassau 

Shores, Massapequa, N. Y. 
GOLDBERG, Benjamin M., 1156 E. State St., 

Trenton, N. J. 
GUTOWSKI, Jos. M., 433 Brace Ave., Perth 

Anibo}', N. J. 
KEITH, Marion Y., 369 N. Elm St., Greens- 
boro, N. C. 
KNIPP, George A., 4116 Edmondson Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
KRAUT, Arthur M., 2729 Boulevard, Jersey 

City 6, N. J. 
LOVE, William S., 1214 N. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
MYERS, Karl Johnson, Phillippi, W. Va. 
POVALSKI, Alexander Wm. T., 1925 Hudson 

Blvd., Jersey City, N. J. 
PRATHER, F. G., 5 Fairway Drive, Asheville, 

X. C. 
ROTHFUSS, Paul A., 1032 Rural Ave., Wil- 

liamsport. Pa. 
SNAITH, Theresa Ora, Weston, W. Va. 
SUSSMAN, A. A., 3101 N. Charles St., Balti- 

nKjre 18, Md. 
TOUHEY, T. Joseph, 441 S. Ellwood Ave., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



WALKER, William Wallace, Medical Arts 

Bldg., Baltimore 1, Md. 
WEINERT, Henry, 128 Market St., Passaic, 

N.J. 

CLASS OF 
1922 

BUCHNESS, Anthony V., 110 E. Lombard St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
FRITZ, Julius Dudley, 8622 Bay Parkway, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
FULTON, William J., 28536 Wildwood Trail, 

Farmington, Mich. 
GINSBERG, William, 704 Empire Ave., Far 

Rockaway 91, N. Y. 
INGRAM, David N., Houston, Pa. 
KUNKOWSKI, Andrew, 2529 Eastern Ave., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
LANG, M. C, 306 Tunbridge Rd., Baltimore 

12, Md. 
McCOY, C. Glenn, 2270 National Rd., Elm 

Grove, W. Va. 
MONNINGER, Arthur Cecil, 800 E. North 

Ave., Baltimore 2, Md. 
NOLL, Louis, 1383 Clinton Ave., Irvington, 

N.J. 
PETERS, H. Raymond, 1127 N. Calvert St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
RHODES, Bricey M., 201 S. Monroe St., 

Tallahassee, Fla. 
SHANNON, George E., 1421 Glendale Road, 

Baltimore 12, Md. 
STERNBERG, Harry Melmuth, 461 Bedford 

Ave., Sta. W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WARFIELD, John Ogle, 1726 Eye Street, 

Washington, D. C. 
WILSON, Thomas N., 617 W. 40th St., Balti- 
more 11, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1921 

BARNES, Bruce, Seaford, Del. 

BENSON, Carl Fisher, 5111 York Road, Balti- 
more 12, Md. 

BERNARDO, John R., 348 High St., Bristol, 
R. I. 

BONFIGLIA, Vincent, 1903 S. Harvard St., 
Los Angeles 7, Calif. 

COSTA-MANDRY, Oscar, Box 10048, San- 
turce, P. R. 

DORF, Herman J., 7404 Liberty Road, Balti- 
more 7, Md. 

FISHER, Charles Frederick, 508-509 Goff Bldg., 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



FOLEY, Chas. J., Havre de Grace, Md. 

KEEGAN, Daniel F., 144 Golden Hill St., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

LASS, Louis, 2314 Broad Ave., Altoona, Pa. 

LUBAN, Benjamin, 730 High St., Newark, 
N. J. 

MATTHEWS, Stanley W., State Sanatorium 
# 1, South Mountain, Pa. 

O'ROURK, Thomas Rutter, 104 W. Madison 
St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

POKORNY, Jos. 2200 E. Madison St., Balti- 
more 5, Md. 

SABIN, Fredk. ColHns, 23 N. Ann St., Little 
Falls, N. Y. 

SCHILLING, J. W., 4031 Cochran St., Erie, 
Pa. 

SHERMAN, Solomon, 2424 Eutaw Place, Bal- 
timore 17, Md. 

SHUBERT, Felix S., 3926 State St., Erie, Pa. 

WEINKAUF, WilUam Ferdinand, Corunna, 
Mich. 

WILLIAMS, Mortimer H., 711 Medical Arts 
Bldg., Roanoke, Va. 

CLASS OF 
1920 

ARTIGIANA, Philbert, 2942 E. Fayette St., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

BANVARD, F. X., 1216 McCurley Ave., Ca- 
tonsvilJe 28, Md. 

BILLINGSLEA, C. L., 124 Willis St., West- 
minster, Md. 

BRUMBACK. Lynn Hamilton, Hagerstown.. 
Md. 

BUBERT, Howard M., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

DAVIDOV, Nathan J., 3218 Eastern Ave., 
Baltimore 24, Md. 

DOBIHAL, Louis C, 447 N. Kenwood Ave., 
Baltimore 6, Md. 

ERWIN, John J., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

GINSBURG Leon, 529 N. Charles St., Bal- 
timore 1, Md. 

HOLDEN, F. A., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
timore 1, Md. 

HOOPER, Z. Vance, 3534 Ellerslie Ave., Bal- 
timore 18, Md. 

JACKVONY, Albert H., 339 Elmwood Ave., 
Providence, R. I. 

KNOTTS, ?:arl Paul, Denton, Md. 

LUEDERS, Wm., Jr., 101 W. Frederick St., 
Staunton, Va. 



MEDIARY, George Curtis, Rosewood Train- 
ing School, Owings Mills, Md. 

METCALF, John W., E. Daniel St., Toronto, 
Ohio. 

ORR, William J. B., 4801 Connecticut Ave., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

PERRY, Clayton Charles, Hanna Bldg., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 

PESSAGNO, Daniel J., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

PONTE, Joseph P., Jr., 202 Orchard Street, 
New Bedford, Mass. 

REESE, J. G. M., Lutherville, Md. 

SKAGGS, James Wm. Nitro, W. Va. 

SMITH, Fred B., 2 W. University Pkwy., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

TOLSON, Howard Lee, 122 S. Centre St., 
Cumberland, Md. 

WILD, Albert, 759 Parkway Blvd., Alliance, 
Ohio 

ZINBERG, Israel, 2320 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1919 

ALAGIA, Damian Paul, Frederick Avenue, 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

BUCHNESS, John A., 1651 Ceddox St., Bal- 
timore 26, Md. 

FORT, Wetherbee, 1118 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

GOLDMANN, Harry, 2326 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

GOLDSBOROUGH. Charles R., 2923 St. 
Paul St., Baltimore 18, Md. 

McELWAIN, Howard B., 31 E. North Ave., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

PHILLIPS, Lawrence D., Marshaljton R. D. 
#4, Wilmington 8, Del. 

REYNOLDS, Roy R., Ohio Merchants Bank 
Bldg., Massillon, Ohio 

STEWART, C. Wilbur, 6 E. Read St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

VAZQUEZ, Rafael Santiago, Manati, P. R. 

CLASS OF 
1918 

ANDERSON, Lang W., P. O. Box 432, Willis- 
ton, S. C. 

BONNER, John Bryan, Aurora, N. C. 

BROWN, Jos. Lucien, 314 Turrentine Ave., 
Gadsden, Ala. 



DIRECTORY 



CAFRITZ, Edward A., 1835 I St., X. \V., 
Washington, D. C. 

DALTON, \\m. H., IKS S. (Irecnc St., Greens- 
l)()ro. N. C. 

DARBY, Wni. Arthur, Mc(Hcal Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1. Md. 

GIESEN, John Jacol), Radford, Va. 

JOHNSON. Harley M., West Columbia, S. C. 

KOCEVAR, Martin Francis, 403 S. 2nd St.. 
Stoelton, Pa. 

MORGAN, Zack R., 10 E. Eager St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

NICKLAS, John M., 5701 Rusk Ave., Balti- 
more 15, Md. 

RIDGELY, Irwin Oliver, 201 W. Madison 
.\ve., Baltimore 1, Md. 

SABISTON, Frank, 115 E. Gordon St., Kin- 
slon, X. C. 

SINDLER, Joseph, 929 Brooks Lane, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

SPEAKE, Thomas C, B & O Central Bldg., 
2 X. Charles St., Baltimore 1, :\Id. 

CLASS OF 
1917 

AUDET, Charles H., Sr., 3 Second Ave., Water- 

l)ur_\' 10, Conn. 
BARISHAW, Samuel B., 25 Bentley Ave., 

Jersey City, X". J. 
BENNET, D. F., 4 Main St., Lubec, Maine 
BRONUSHAS, Ipolitas B., 3037 O'Donnell St., 

Baltimore 24, Md. 
BURROWS, Ernest A., 116 Waterman St., 

Providence, R. I. 
ELEDER, Franklin C, 2201 Echodale Ave., 

Baltimore 14, Md. 
GALLAGHER, William E., 564 Greenwood 

Ave.. Akron 20, Ohio 
HARTMAN, George O., 1608 N. Norton Ave., 

Tucson, Ariz. 
HERTZOG, Francis C, 103 E. 8th St., Long 

Beach, Calif. 
HOLMES, James, 796 Sumner Ave., Spring- 
field 8, Mass. 
HUFF, Wheeler O., 4529 Maple Ave., Bethesda 

14, Mfl. 
LASHER, Lemuel Abraham, 132 W. 26th St., 

Erie. Pa. 
NOLAN, Francis F""abian, New Monroe Bldg., 

Norfolk, Va. 
OGDEN, Frank X., 2701 X. Calvert St., Bal- 
timore 18, Md. 
SMITH, Leroy Henry, Winterport, Me. 



THOMAS, Chas. Roberts, 503 Medical Arts 

Building, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
WELCH, Robert S. G., 46 State Circle, Anna- 

jxilis, Md. 
WHEELER, H. I^awrence, 9 Paradise Ave., 

Baltimore 28, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1916 

BAGGOTT, Bartus T., 3812 Greenmount Ave., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

BAWDEN, George A., Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 

BENSON, Edward H., Manor Road, Glen 
Arm, Md. 

BUETTNER, Henry F., 5005 Edmondson Ave., 
Baltimore 29, Md. 

CHAPUT, Lucien Romeo, 3 Washington Sc|uare, 
Haverhill, Mass. 

DILLON, Wm. J.. 162 Maple St., Springfield, 
Mass. 

EYESTONE, Fred L., 4151 Brookside Road, 
Toledo 6. Ohio 

FEINGLOS, Israel J., 2002 E. Pratt St., Balti- 
more 31, Md. 

FOARD, Fred T., State Deiiartment of Health, 
Raleigh, X. C. 

GROWT, Bower Hewitt, Addison, Mich. 

HAHN, Albert G., 1335 12th St., Hickory, X. C. 

MARINO, Frank C, 1129 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

McLEAN, Geo., Medical Arts Bldg., Baltimore 
1, Md. 

REIFSCHNEIDER, Chas. A., 104 W. Madison 
St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

RUZICKA, Francis Fred, 800 X. Patterson 
Pk. Ave.. Baltimore 5, Md. 

STEIN, Harold M., 227 W. Broadway, Pater- 
son, X". J. 

THOMAS, Edward P., 4 E. Church St., Frede- 
rick, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1915 

BRIDGERS, Harvey Clifton, Blue Ridge Sum- 
mit, Pa. 

BRIDGES, William A., 10 Othoridge Road, 
Towson 4, Md. 

BURLESON, Wm. Brown. Plumtree, X. C. 

DEMARCO, \'. J., \(A2 Poplar Ave., Memphis. 
Tenn. 

DIENER, Louis, Cylburne Court Apts., Balti- 
more 17, Md. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



DORSEY, George H., 6990 \V. 38lh Ave., 

Wheat Ridge, Colo. 
EGAN, Michael Joseph, Jr., 210 East Liberty 

St., Savannah, Ga. 
GORDY, L. L., 5106 Harford Rd., Baltimore 

14, Md. 
JOHNSON, William R., Medical .\rls Bldg., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
MOSES, C. H., 919 Linden Ave., Sharon, Pa. 
RASKIN, Moses, 6221 Greenspring Ave., 

Baltimore 9, Md. 
ROBINSON, John D., Wallace, N. C. 
ROSS, George Perry, 120 Genesee St., Auburn, 

X. Y. 
SANDERS, Lucius C, P & S Bldg., 899 Madi- 
son, Memphis, Tenn, 
WOODLAND, J<;hn C, 524 Valley Lane, Falls 

Church, Va. 

CLASS OF 

1914 

AGNEW, John R., 888 Worthington St., 
S[)ringfield 9, Mass. 

BROTMAN, Morton M., 90 Avon Ave., New- 
ark, X. J. 

CASILLI, Arther Raymond, 618 Newark Ave., 
Elizabeth, X\ J. 

COOK, Everett L., 4125 Arkansas Ave., N. W., 
Washington 11, D. C. 

DAILEY, Gilbert L., 618 N. 3rd St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

GLOVER, Victor L., 420 W. King St., Mar- 
tinsburg, W. \'a. 

HENDERSON, Clair Crouse, Mt. Olive, N. C. 

KATZENBERGER, James W., Paradise Ave., 
Catonsville 28, Md. 

LEVIN, Morris B., 218 E. University Pkwy., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

LIGGETT, B. Lee, Mill Creek, W. Va. 

LUTZ, John F., % M-Sgt. C. G. Morgan, 8th 
Field Maintenance Squadron, APO 244, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

MORDECAI, Alfred, 806 S. Hawthorne Rd., 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

RICHARDS, Walter I. Route 4, Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 

STAHL, William J., 343 Main St., Danbury, 
Conn. 

VINSON, Porter P., Medical College of Va. 
Hospital, Richmond, Va. 

WOOD, Austin H., Medical Arts Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

YOUNG, Charles A., 409 Medical Arts Bldg., 
Roanoke, Va. 



CLASS OF 
1913 

BREEDING, Earle Griffith, 1801 Eye St., 
X'. W., Washington, D. C. 

EDWARDS, Charles Reid, University Hos- 
pital, Baltimore 1, Md. 

GEMMILL. W. F., 135 E. Market St., York, Pa. 

GOULD, Xathaniel Jay, 940 Grand Concourse, 
X'ew York City 

HAYS, Leonard, 5201 Baltimore Ave., Hyatts- 
vilie, Md, 

HEMPHILL, Clyde H,, 1401 X. 21st Place, 
.\j)t. 2, Phoenix, Ariz. 

SLUSHER, Hamilton J., 7 E. Church St., 
Frederick, Md. 

TOULSON, W. Houston, Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1, Md. 

WHELCHEL, C. D., Gainesville, Ga. 

WOODS, T. Butler, 1301 Ohio St., South Nor- 
folk 6, Va. 

CLASS OF 
1912 

BEARD, Grover Cleveland, Atkinson, N. C. 

BONNER, Robert A., Sr., 51 W. Main St., 
Waterbury, Conn. 

CLAUTICE, Chas. Peter, 3013 St. Paul St., 
Baltimore 18, Md. 

FREY, Ernest Wm. 1928 Penna. Ave., Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

HINNANT, Milford, Micro, N. C. 

HUBBARD, J. Edward, Chesapeake, Ohio 

JOSLIN, C. L., 105 Woodlawn Road, Balti- 
more 10, Md. 

LIVINGSTON, Everett A., Gibson, N. C. 

MICHEL, William, 1015 Poplar Grove St., 
Baltimore 16, Md. 

ROTTENBERG, Joseph, 58 W. Adams Ave., 
Detroit 26, Mich. 

STALLWORTH, Clarke Jackson, Thomaston, 
Ala. 

VINCIGUERRA, Michael, 604 Westminster 
Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

CLASS OF 
1911 

BROWN, Archie E., 300 S. Main St., Green- 
ville, S. C. 

DOUGLASS, Louis H., Mount Custis, Accomac, 
Va. 

GREENGRASS, Jacob J., 146 Broadway, 
Paterson. X. J. 

HIRSCHMAN, Isadore I.. Guaranty Bank & 
Trust Bldg., Huntington, VV. Va. 



DIRECTORY 



HORNSTEIN, Ahraham L., 204 E. Biddle St., 

HalliiiKirf 2, Md. 
NIBLETT, Walter Saulsbury. 2220 Garrison 

Ave., Haltimore 16, Md. 
TOWNSHEND, Grafton D.. 1141 Koscomore 

Kd., U.s .Vngeles 24, Calif. 
WATERS. Charles Alexande, 1100 X. Charles 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
WILLIAMS, Richard Lloyd, Houtzdale, Pa. 

CLASS OF 

1910 

CAHN, Morriss L.. 551 X. 11th St., Reading, 

Pa. 
CONWAY, \Vm. Stanislaus. 646 Carew St., 

Springtield, Mass. 
COULBOURNE, George C, Marion, Md. 
FOSTER, H. M., 2824 St. Paul St., Baltimore 

18. Md. 
KIRK, Xorman T., Montauk, L. I., X. Y. 
KLOMAN, Erasmus H., 44 \V. Biddle St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
KOHN, Louis Winfield, 239 Central Park West, 

Xew York City 

Mcpherson, c. w., 305 w. Front St., 

Burlington. X'. C. 
MESSMORE, Harry, B., Addison, Pa. 
RUNKEL, John G., 715 Charing Cross Road, 

Baltimore 29. Md. 
THOMASON, James A., P. O. Box 337. 

Fountain Inn, S. C. 

CLASS OF 
1909 

BENNETT, George E., 4 E. Madison St.. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
BENSON, Clarence Irving, Port Deposit, Md. 
LONG, Samuel Herman, 903-4 Medical Arts 

Bldg., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
MARTIN. Wm. E., Randalltown, Md. 
MESSMORE, John Lindsey, Masontown, Pa. 
NEAFIE, Charles A., 493 Orchard Lake Ave., 

I'(JiUiac. Mich. 
PARRAMORE, James B., 523 Whitehead St., 

P. (). H().\- 326, Key West. Fla. 
ROBINSON, Harry M., Sr., 106 E. Chase St., 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
VINUP, Frederick H., 110 E. Lombard St., 

Baltimore 1, Md. 
WALKUP, .\dam Clark. 145 King St.. St. 

.\ugustine, Fla. 



CLASS OF 
1908 

COLEMAN, William J., 2810 Chelsea Terr., 

Baltimore 16, Md. 
KOLB, Lawrence, 6645 32nd St.. X. W., 

Washington 15, D. C. 
SNYDER, Fredk., 44 Clinton Ave., Kingston, 

X. Y. 

CLASS OF 

1907 

BATES, James Herbert, 230 E. Main St. 

Elkton, Md. 
BIRD, Jacob Wheeler, Sandy Springs. Md. 
FOX. James S., 101 7 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla. 
HERRMAN, Frederick H., 1710 E. 33rd St., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
LANDERS, Arthur E., Medico-Dental Bldg.. 

Reno, Xevada 
LEGG, Thos. Henry, Union Bridge, Md. 
PIGGOTT, J. Burr, 3040 Idaho Ave., X. W., 

Washington, D. C. 
SCHOENRICH, Herbert. Ill E. Preston St.. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
SHAFFER, Charles I., Bo.x 165, Somerset, Pa. 

CLASS OF 

1906 

CANTWELL, Harry Arthur, Xorth East, Md. 
CHANEY, Thomas M.. Bristol, Md. 
COSTER, Earle Somerville, Solomons, Md. 
DAILEY, Wm. Paul, 19 Walnut St., Steelton. 

Pa. 
LIMAURO, Louis Herbert, West Lynn, Mass. 
LYON, Arminus Blair, Ulster, Pa. 
SMITH, J. G. Fowble, Brunswick, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1905 

BURNS, Ira, 117 Magnolia Drive. Ormond 

Beach, Fla. 
HOUCK, Henry C, 1929 W. Xorth Ave., 

Baltimore 17, Md. 
HOUSTON, Robert E.. 411 E. Washington 

St.. Greenville, S. C. 
MATTHEWS, James Green, 421 Riverside 

Ave.. S|)okane, Wash. 
McCARTY, Harry Downman, 37 W. Preston 

St., Baltimore 1, Md. 
PIERSON, John W.. 1107 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 
RIDDICK, Willard J.. 7426 Dominican St., 

Xew Orelans. La. 



MEDICAL ALL MM 



CLASS OF 
1904 

AARONSON, Meyer W., 9+41 Wilshire Blvd., 
Beverly Hills, CaUf. 

EAGLE Y, Charles, Jr., The Latrobe Apts., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

DUTROW, Howard V.. 426 Kramer, Dayton 9, 
Ohio 

EAGLE, A. Bruce. 321 \V. Burke St., Martins- 
burg, W . \'a. 

CLASS OF 

1903 

DeCORMIS, Jos. L., Accomac, Va. 

EVANS, Joseph G., 1388 Amar St., San Pedro, 

Calif. 
HOLLOWAY, Howard Steele, Perrj-man, Md. 
KIEFFER, George S. M., 1010 Leeds Ave., 

Baltimore 29, Md. 
KING, Samuel James, 800 Carleton Blvd., St. 

Louis. Mo. 
WILKINSON, Albert. St. Michael's, Md. 

CLASS OF 

1902 

EMRICH, \Vm., Hebron, Md. 

HUMPHREY, Wade R., 125 X. Main St., 
Stillwater, Minn. 

WHITE, \Vm. Kelso. 3005 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

CLASS OF 

1901 

DORSE Y, Rear Admiral Benj. H., 3500 New- 
ark St., Washington 16, D. C. 

FISHER, Charles T.. 200 X. Division St., 
Salisbury. Md. 

GARDNER, Charles Wesley, 144 Golden Hill 
St.. Bridge{X)rt, Conn. 

HARDEN, Albert, 510 W. Market St., Xewark, 
X.J. 

RANKIN, Watson S., 2049 Briarwood Rd., 
Charlotte 7, N. C. 

CLASS OF 

1900 

AKEHURST, James. W\2 I'ark Heights Ave., 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

CHISHOLM, Julian F.. Sr., 201 Gaston St., 
Savannah. Ga. 

JOHNSTON, E. H.. 51 W. Main St., Water- 
bury 2, Conn. 



SMITH, W. H., 3429 Chestnut Ave., Bahimore 
11, Md. 

SPEAR, Irving J., 928 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

STROTHER, Walton L., Salem, W. Va. 

CLASS OF 
1898 

DAVIES, John Oliver, 3508 Dennlyn Road, 
Baltimore 15, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1897 

BARROW, Bernard, Blackstone, Va. 
STEELE, Guy, Cambridge, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1896 

SILVER, H. Fletcher, Goldsboro, Md. 
SMINK, A. Clarence, 4509 Liberty Hts. Ave., 
Baltimore 7, Md. 

CLASS OF 
1895 

WILSON, Nicholas G., 142 W. York St., Xor- 
folk 10, Va. 

F & S CLASS OF 
1915 

CALLAGHAN, Adlai E., 1159 Gilman Drive, 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

FARGO, L. K., 1800 X. Charles St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

HEARN, Wm. Oswald, Minn. Soldiers Home 
Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn. 

JACKSON, Andrew, 111 W. Main St., Water- 
bury i2, Conn. 

MAHONEY, Vernon L., 614 X'. 4th Ave., 
Tucson, .\riz. 

McKENZIE, W. Raymond, Medical Arts 
Building. Baltimore 1, Md. 

MORRISON, Theodore, 11 E. Chase St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

ROGERS, Harn.- L., 101 E. Preston St., Bal- 
timore, Md. 

STEELE, Paul Beadle, 500 Penn Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

THORUP, John M., 4927 X. E., 30th Ave., 
Portland, Oregon 



DIRECTOR]' 



P & S CLASS OF 
1914 

A YD, I-rank John, Sr., 2005 E. Monument St., 

liallimore 5, Md. 
BESS. T. F. E.. Keyser. \V. Va. 
BOBBITT, (). H.. 1513 Jackson St., Charleston, 

W \a. 
GORDON, .Vttie Thompson, Spencer, W. Va. 
LAUGIER, .\ugustin R., Box 298, San Juan, 

]>. K. 
LIPKIN, Harry. 1749 Grand Concourse, New 

York City. X. Y. 
LIPSKE Y. Joseph Odenton P.O., A. A. Co., Md. 
MAKER. John E., 90 Third St., Long Branch, 

X. J. 
MAYER, Erwin E., 2519 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 
SHIRKEY, Ivy G., Veterans Admm. Facility, 

.\rlington Bldg., Washington, D. C. 
STEELE. Byron \Vm., Mullens, W. Va. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1913 

FINNERTY, Chas. \V., 440 Broadway. Somer- 
ville, Mass. 

FLORA, Ernest F., Boones Mill, Va. 

HEATH, J. Mott, Greenport, N. Y. 

MAY, William T., 2519 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

MUSSER, Leo P., Rt. 3, 500 Vine Hill Way, 
Martinez, Calif. 

POINT, Walter W., Jr., Box 2563, Charleston, 
W . Va. 

QUINN, Raymond J., 730 Baldwin St., Water- 
burs'. Conn. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1912 

EISNER, Maurice S., 769 Xorth St., Pittsfield, 

Mass. 
GOLDSTEIN, A. E., 3,S05 X. Charles St., 

Baltimore 18, Md. 
JANER, Manuel R., 685 West End Ave., Xew 

York 25, X. Y. 
JOHNSON, Lucian Dale, Second Xational 

Bank HIdg., Connellsville, Pa. 
MENDELOFF, Morris I.. 2173^ Capitol St., 

Charleston, W. Va. 
SMITH, E. P., 920 St. Paul St., Baltimore 2, 

.M<1. 
VINICOMBE, Harry W., 439 State St., Brook- 
lyn , X. Y. 



WILLIAMS, Mayes B., 6 Bae Mar Place, 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1911 

CALLAHAN, John Wm., 308 Main St., Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

DEUTSCHMAN, David. 1750 Grand Con- 
course, Xew York City, X. Y. 

HANELLIN, Xathan S., 419 80th St., Brook- 
lyn 9. X. Y. 

HARMAN, Howard E., 159 E. Water St., 
Chillicothe, O. 

HOGAN, John F., 11 E. Chase St., Baltimore 
2. Md. 

HUTCHINSON, Francis H., 2856 Observatory 
Road, .\pt. 4, Cincinnati 8, Ohio 

MUTCHLER, H. Raymond, 3 Sanford St., 
Dover, X. J. 

WILLIAMS, Louis V., R. D. 7, York. Pa. 

ZINN, W. F., Medical Arts Bldg., Cathedral & 
Richmond Sts., Baltimore 1, Md. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1910 

BURNE, John J., 17 Gould Ave.. Xewark, 
X. J. 

MAXSON, Charles W., 817 St. Paul St., Bal- 
timore 2, Md. 

NAIMAN, Benjamin L., 1736 Columbia Road, 
Washington 9, D. C. 

SEIDEL, Herman, 2404 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more, Md. 

SEYMOUR, Geo. Alfred, 25i Orchard, St., 
Elizabeth, X. J. 

P & S CLASS OF 

1909 

ANDREWS, Chadbourne A., 706 Franklin St., 

Tampa, Fla. 
LLOYD, OUver S., 701 Cathedral St., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1908 
BURNER, .\llen Eugene, Durbin, W. Va. 
CROSS, Earl W., Box 309 J, R. D. 1, Taren- 

tum. Pa. 
McCUTCHEON, .Merle D., Little Bldg., East 

Liverp(X)I, Ohio 
SCANLAN, Thomas, 100 High Service Ave.. 

Xorth Providence, R. I. 
WHIPPLE, Ernest E., 196 Hamilton Circle, 

Painted Post, X. Y. 
WISE, Francis Roman, 136 E. Market St., 

York, Pa. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



P & S CLASS OF 

1907 

PERRY, Ernest M., 125 Sunset Ave., Rocky 

Mount, X. C. 
ROBINSON, \Vm. Herbert, Roaring Spring, 

Pa. 
VAN KIRK, Urn. Eagle Lake, Me. 
WISEMAN, John I., R. D. \, Conneaut Lake, 
I'a. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1906 

BEVERIDGE, David, 646 Allison Ave., Wash- 
ington, Pa. 

DALTON, M. Tolbert, 6811 50th Ave., N. E., 
Seattle 15, Washington. 

LYON, A. B., Ulster, Pa. 

MOORE, S. G., Box 86, Stephens City, Va. 

SMITH, Ziba L., West Nanticoke, Pa. 

WENTZ, Parker M., 701 W. Princess St., 
York, Pa. 

WISE, Waiter D., 1120 St. Paul St., Balti- 
more 2, Md. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1905 
PALMER, William N., Easton, Md. 
ROSENSTEIN, Jacob L., 568 Bergen Ave., 
Jersey City, N. J. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1904 

COHEN, Morris D., 1534 E. Speedway, Tucson, 
Ariz. 

GILLIS, Andrew C, 1033 X. Calvert St., 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

GOODWIN, Perry B.. John C. Proctor Hos- 
pital, Peoria, 111. 

RAYMALEY, Edwin R., 1034 South Ave., 
Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1903 

COON. C. Melvin, Milan, Pa. 

FRIEDENWALD, Edgar B., Marlborough 
Ajjts., IB, 1701 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17, 
Md. 

LANCASTER, ALsioii H., .SO Orange St., 
Worcester 8, Mass. 

LURTING, Clarence W., 516 Eederal St., 
Piltsl)urgh, Pa. 

MAYER, Frederick W. A., 1830 James Ave., 
St. Paul 5, Minn. 

SARGEANT, Geo. F.. .\iglmrlh Manor, Tow- 
son 4, Md. 



SPRAGUE, Eflward Wharton, 86 Washington 
St., Xewark, X. J. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1902 

ULLMAN, Alfred, 1712 Eutaw Place, Balti- 
more 17, Md. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1901 
McMURRAY, J. B., 6 S. Main St., Washing- 
ton, Pa. 
VANDERBEEK, Andrew B., 683 E. 27th St., 
Paterson, N. J. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1899 
BRAWNER, James X., 2800 Peachtree Rd., 
X. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1898 
KEARNEY, John H., 147 Prichard St., Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1895 
HOGG, Gory, Lewisburg, W. Va. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1893 
LEITH, Leroy R., Exeter, Mo. 
TYRRELL, George W., 380 State St., Perth 
Amboy, X. J. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1892 
O'HANLON, George, R. D. 1, Elmira, X. Y. 

P & S CLASS OF 
1884 
FLIPPIN, James M., Pilot Mountain, X. C. 

BMC CLASS OF 

1913 

FARBER, Dawson L., Sj)arrows Point 19, Md. 

PINESS, George, 240 S. LaCienga Blvd., 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 
SELL, Roger K., Torrington, Wyo. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1912 

BUBERT, John I)., Wyman Park AiHs., 

Baltimore 11, Md. 
MILLER, Samuel, 1.S9 S. Main St., Akron, Ohio 
MONTALVO-GUENARD, Andres, P. O. Box 

9601, Santurce, P. K. 
MYER, Edw. H., Mahwah, X. J. 
RAMIREZ-MARINI, Arquelio. Dr. Vene St. 

18, Box 397, San German, P. R. 



DIRECTORY 



WYLIE, H. Boyd. 3119 X. Calvert St., Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1911 

BECKNER. William V., 713 West Virginia 
Hldg.. Huntington. W. Va. 

BROSCHART, Frank J.. 8 Russell Ave., 
Gaithersburg, Md. 

CAHILL, Lawrence A., 361 Lafayette St., 
Newark, X. J. 

FRYE, James C, Williamsburg, Pa. 

KEMP, Howard M., 42 Franklin St., Green- 
field. ^L'lss. 

PERRAS, Louis A., 171 Butler St., Xew Bed- 
ford. Mass. 

SPRINGER, James Earl, Peoples Bank Bldg., 
.Xkron, Ohio 

TRIPLETT, William H., 5209 Edmondson 
Ave.. Baltimore 29, Md. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1910 

KINCAID, Herbert C, 3635 Vacation Lane, 

.Arlington 7, Va. 
LAYMAN, J. Walter, 100 Professional Arts 

Bldg., Hagerstown, Md. 
NELLER, Walter Irving, 121 Wickham Ave., 

Middletown, X. V. 
SHAMER, Maurice E., 3300 West Xorth Ave., 

Baltimore 16, Md. 
STONE, William L., 473 75th St., Brooklyn 

9, X. Y. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1909 

BRUME ACK, Joseph Edward, Medical Arts 

Building. Baltimore 1, Md. 
FABBRI, Remo, 1731 Markley St., Xorristown, 

Pa. 
KORNS, Chas. Byron, Sipesville, Pa. 
LOONEY, Edward M., 345 Essex St., Salem, 

Mass. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1908 

BEAVEN, Col. C. L., 916 Bolivia St., El Paso, 
Texas 

REED, Ralph G., Central Islip, X. Y. 

SLOANE, Henry Oscar, 1717 Pine St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

WRIGHT, J. Leroy, 2539 Pickwick Rd., Balti- 
more 7, Md. 



BMC CLASS OF 
1907 

BEAULIEU, Elmer Jos., Whitman, Mass. 
JONES, Ezra .\lbert, 795 Elm St., Manchester, 

N. H. 
LANGFITT, Frank, Union Xational Bank 

Bldg.. Clarksburg, W. Va. 
MATHESHEIMER, Jacob L., 280 Old Bergen 

Road, Jersey ("it\', X. J. 
O'CONNOR, James Jos., Olyphant, Pa. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1906 

BEITLER, Frederick V., 1014 Francis Ave., 

Baltimore 27, Md. 
BENNETT, Harry J., 121 X. Julian St., Ebens- 

burg, Pa. 
BLAISDELL, Russell E., Pearl River, N. Y. 
CURRY, Geo. Ray, 415 Walnut St., Reading, 

Pa. 
JANKIEWICZ, Leon Peter, 914 State St., 

Utica, X. V. 
KELLY, Harvey A.. 2(X) Pleasant St., Winthrop, 

Mass. 
QUINN, John F., 81 Arcadia Ave., Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
ROEMER, Jacob, .S91 E. 27th St., Paterson, 

X. J. 
TEMPLE, Robert T., 4279 Lander Road, Route 

4, Chagrin Falls, Ohio 

WALTON, Henry J., 3806 Greenway, Balti- 
more 18, Md. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1905 

AGNELLI, Saverio, 281 E. 151st St., New York 
51, N. Y. 

GOULD, Arthur Richard, 291 Geary St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

PFLUEGER, Charles J., 460 S. Ardmore St., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

ROLLINS, Clarence D., 1402 Miami Road, 
South Jacksonville 7, Fla. 

ROSENBAUM, Geo., 1521 Spruce St., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1904 

BYRNES, Harry F.. 160 Maple St., Sjmngfield 

5, Mass. 

JUMPER, C. E., 1511 X. Virginia St., El Paso, 

Tex. 
MILLER, Carl F., 5354 Delmar Blvd., St. 

Louis, Mf). 



MEDICAL ALUMNI 



NOVAK, Emil, 26 E. Preston St., Baltimore 2, 

Md. 
ORFF, John Henry, 229 East Lancaster Ave., 

Speedway Park, Shillington, Pa. 
SULLIVAN, Matthew J., 2 E. Main St., Stony 

Point, N. Y. 

BMC CLASS OF 

1903 

ENSOR, Charles B., 7201 York Rd., Baltimore 

12, Md. 
EVANS, John, Medical Arts Bldg., Cathedral 

& Richmond Sts., Baltimore 1, Md. 
GOULD, Don U., Sherburne, N. Y. 
MOORE, Alfred N., Oakland, 111. 
TRAINOR, William J., 326 Virginia Circle, 

Wilmington, O. 

BMC CLASS OF 

1902 

CHARGIN, Louis, 1 W. 85th St., New York 

City 
GALLAGHER, James L., 181 Beard Ave., 

Buffalo 4, N. Y. 
HUMMELL, Ernest G., 414 Cooper St., Cam- 
den, N. J. 



PATTERSON, Frank, 809 Washington Ave., 
Tyrone, Pa. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1901 , 
ACKLEY, David Bartine, 21.N. Clinton Ave., 

Trenton, N. J. 
McCLUNG, Jas. A., Richwood, W. Va. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1898 
BARKER, J. W., Harbor Hills, Box 677, 
Hebron, Ohio 

BMC CLASS OF 
1896 
EGEN, James S., Utica, 111. 
LLOYD, Thos. Peterson, 1086 Highland Ave., 

Shreveport, La. 
MORRIS, Richard Holt, 35 Corey St., Everett, 
Mass. 

BMC CLASS OF 
1893 

HUDGEL, Charles R., 510 Warm Springs Ave., 
Boise, Idaho 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF M. 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Dear Members of the Alumni: 

Your contributions to the National Fund for Medical Education are of 
great assistance in bringing about improvement in the Medical School. 
Contributions made this year (1956) are particularly signiticant because: 
1. They are matched by the Ford Foundation in the amount of 70 per cent 
if the contribution is the same as last year, and 100 per cent if they exceed 
last year's gifts. 2. In the process of reorganizing the Medical School there 
are many urgent needs that cannot be obtained under the State appropria- 
tions allowed for the medical school. This must not be construed to mean 
we are not getting State support for our requests. We have received very 
reasonable consideration, but our needs are many and great and we must 
try to progress more rapidly than can be depended upon by State appro- 
priations alone. 

We urge you to support the National Fund for Medical Education by 
gifts to them earmarked for the University of Maryland, School of Medicine. 

Gifts from Alumni to the National Fund for Medical Education are par- 
ticularly significant in that industry uses them as a criteria of the significance 
doctors attribute to the needs for increased support of medical education 
and gage their contributions to medical education accordingly. 

Sincerely, 
William S. Stone, M.D., Dean 



A U 



MAR 



P U B L 



Volume 41 




^J0T ION 



SEPTEMBER, 1956 



No. 4 



The 



CATALOG 

of the 

School of 



MEDICINE 



September^ 1956 



OCT 9 -se 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



H^ 



NOTE 

This catalog was closed for the press on May 31, 1956. The announcements 

and lists of names have been made as accurate as possible, but the right is 

reserved to make changes whenever it is expedient. Accordingly, the information 

provided may not be accurate, in every instance, for the period involved. 



Published Five Times per Year — January, April, July, September, and October 

by the Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine of the University of Maryland 

and in Collaboration with the Medical Alumni Association. 

Second-class Mailing Privileges Authorized at Baltimore, Maryland 
Made in United States of America 




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Bulletin of the 



SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



September, 1956 



Announcements for 

The One Hundred Fifty-First Academic Session 

1956-1957 



Catalogue of 

The One Hundred Fiftieth Academic Session 

1955-1956 




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The Frank C. Dressier Research Laboratory 



1956 



1957 



JANUARY 1956 


JULY 1956 


JANUARY 1957 


JULY 1957 


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22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 


APRIL 
S M TWT F S 




31 

APRIL 




30 

OCTOBER 


OCTOBER 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


S M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


.... 12 3 4 5 


15 16 17 18 192021 


7 8 9 10 11 1213 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


29 30 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 






28 29 30 31 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 .. .. 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


■ NOVEMBER 


S M TWT F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWT F S 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


10 11 12 13 1415 16 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


27 28 29 30 31 ... . 


25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 


1 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 910 11 12 13 14 


1011 12 13 14 15 16 


910 11 1213 14 15 


910 11 1213 14 15 


15 161718 19 20 21 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


16 1718 19 20 2122 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


29 30 31 











CALENDAR 

Academic Year — September 20, 1956 to June 8, 1957 

1956 
September 11, 12, 13 Reexaminations for advancement 

FIRST SEMESTER— September 20, 1956 to January 26, 1957 

*Registration, payment of fees, freshmen and 

sophomores 
*Registration, payment of fees, all other students 
Instruction begins at 8 :00 a.m. 
Instruction suspended at 5 '.00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving Holiday 
Instruction resumed at 8 :00 a.m. 
Instruction suspended at 5 :00 p.m. 
Christmas Holiday 



Instruction resumed at 8 :00 a.m. 

Holiday — Inauguration Day 

Midyear examinations begin (Junior and Senior 

classes continue throughout this week) 
^Payment of fees for second semester 
First semester completed, 2 :00 p.m. 



September 


18 


Tuesday 


September 


19 


Wednesday 


September 


20 


Thursday 


November 


20 


Tuesday 


November 


26 


Monday 


December 


21 


Friday 


1957 






January 


3 


Thursday 


January 


21 


Monday 


January 


22 


Tuesday 



January 26 Saturday 



SECOND SEMESTER— January 28 to June 8, 1957 

Instruction begins at 8 :00 a.m. 

Holiday — Washington's Birthday 

Instruction resumed at 8 :00 a.m. 

Instruction suspended at 5 :00 p.m. 
Easter Holiday 

Instruction resumed at 8 :00 a.m. 
( Juniors and Seniors excused to attend the annual 
} meetings of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 

Senior classes cease at 5:00 p.m. 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior examinations begin 

Holiday — Memorial Day 

Announcement of graduates 

Commencement 

Second semester completed at 12 :30 p.m. 

*A11 students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment 
of bills on regular registration days. Those who do not complete their registration 
on the prescribed days will be charged a fee of S5.00. 

The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily from 9 :00 A.M. to 
4:00 P.M., and Saturday from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon. 

7 



January 


28 


Monday 


February 


22 


Friday 


February 


23 


Saturday 


April 


17 


W^ednesday 


April 


22 


Monday 


May 


2 


Thursday 


May 


3 


Friday 


May 


24 


Friday 


I^fay 


27 


Monday 


May 


30 


Thursday 


June 


3 


Monday 


June 


8 


Saturday 




BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

William P. Colk, Jr., Cliairmau, 100 West University Parkway, Baltimore... 1958 

Mrs. Jon.\ L. Whitehurst. \'ice-Cliairman, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

B. Hf.rbert Browx, Secretary, 12 west Madison Street, Baltimore I960 

i 1 .\RRY H. N LTTLE, Treasurer, Denton 1957 

Loi'is L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 1961 

Edmund S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer, Cumberland 1959 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown 1959 

Exos S. Stockbriik;e, 10 Light Street, Baltimore 1960 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick and Company, Baltimore 1957 

C. EwiXG Tittle, 1114 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 1962 

Thoma.s B. Symo.xs, 7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 1963 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the Univer.Mty of Maryland is, by law. Executive Officer of 
the Board. 

The State law provides that the Hoard of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, except 
during the months of July and .August. 

9 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Wilson H. Elkins, B.A.. M.A., Litt.B., Ph.D President 

William S. Stone, AI.S., M.D., D.Sc, 

Director, Medical Education and Research, and Dean 
Dietrich C. Smith. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 

Associate Dean, Admissions and Student Affairs 

Robert T. Parker, A.B., M.D Associate Dean, Curriculum 

Norma J. Azlein, A.B Associate Registrar 

G. Watson Algire, M.S Director of Admissions and Registrations 



SCHOOL of MEDICINE 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

EMERITI 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biochemistry and Dean, Emeritus 

Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery, Emeritus 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D As.sociate Professor of Surgery, Emeritus 

Carl L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy, Emeritus 

Page Edmuxds. M.D Professor Traumatic Surgery, Emeritus 

EnGAR B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Emeritus 

A.xdrew C. Gillis, M.A., M.D., D.Sc, LL.D Professor of Neurology, Emeritus 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology, Emeritus 

F L. Jennings, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery, Emeritus 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology, Emeritus 

Henry J. Waltox, M.D Professor of Roentgenology, Emeritus 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D Professor of Otolaryngology, Emeritus 

ADVISORY BOARD OF THE FACULTY 



Dean William S. Stone, Chairman 



William R. Amberson 
Marie Amelia Andersch 
James G. Arnold, Jr. 
Ray J. Beasley 
Klaus Wm. Berblinger 
Samuel P. Bessman 
Robert P. Boudreau 
J. Edmund Bradley 
Otto C. Brantigan 
Howard M. Bubert 
Raymond M. Burgison 
Robert W. Buxton 
Enoch Callaway 
T. Nelson Carey 
Carl Dame Clarke 
Richard G. Coblentz 
Beverley C. Comptox 
Edward F. Cotter 
R. Adams Cowley 
Edward R. Dana 
Charles N. Davidson 
John DeCarlo, Jr. 
John M. Dennis 
William C. Ebeling, III 
C. Reid Edw.\rds 
Monte Edwards 
Frederick P. Ferguson 
Frank H. J. Figge 



Jacob E. Finesinger 

A. H. FiNKELSTEIX 

Russell S. Fisher 
Kurt Glaser 
A.LBERT E. Goldstein- 
Robert Grenell 
Paul R. Hackett 
.\rthur L. Haskins 
Edward J. Herbst 
Harry C. Hull 
Frank D. Kaltreider 
James R. Karxs 
Edward A. Kitlowski 
\'^ERX0N E. Krahl 
John C. Krantz, Jr. 
Louis A. M. Krause 
Theodore F. Leveque 
Lester M. Libo 
William S. Lo\t, Jr. 
H. Pattersox Mack 
Hexry J. L. M.\rriott 
Zachariah Morgan 
Walle J. H. Nauta 
Thomas R. O'Rourk 
Robert T. Parker 
D. J. Pessagxo 
H. R. Peters 
Mairue C. Pincoffs 
11 



J. Morris Reese 
Charles A. Reifschxeider 
Dexter L. Reimaxx 
Samuel T. R. Revell, Jr. 
Harry M. Robixson, Jr. 
MiLTox S. Sacks 
Emil G. Schmidt 
Andrew G. Smith 
Dietrich C. Smith 
Frederick B. Smith 
Hugh R. Spencer 
Edward Steers 
Edwi.x H. Stewart, Jr. 
Matthew L. Taback 
William H. Triplett 
Henry F. Ullrich 
Charles Van Buskirk 
Raymond E. Vaxderlinde 
Allen F. Voshell 
John A. Wagner 
John I. White 
Charles L. Wisseman, Jr. 
John G. Wis well 
Theodore E. Woodward 
Joseph B. Workman 

fiEORGE H. YeAGER 

iMor.KNE .S. Young 



12 UNIVERSITY 01- MARYLAND 

AI)\ ISORY COMMITTF^K OF THE FACULTY 

Wu.LiAM R. Amhkrsox Pail R. Hackett Dietrich C. Smith, 

J. Edmund Bradley Arthur L. Haskins Secretary 

Robert W. Buxton John C. Krantz, Jr. 

John M. Dennis Robert T. Parker 

Frank H. J. Figge Maurice C. Pincoffs Charles L. Wisseman, Jr 

Jacob E. Finesinger Emil G. Schmidt Theodore E. Woodward 



Hugh R. Spencer 

William S. Stone, Dean, 

Chairman 



MEMBERS Ol- THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

William S. Stone, Dean, Ex-Officio John C. Krantz, Jr. 

Theodore E. Woodward Frederick P. Ferguson 

J. Edmund Bradley Dietrich C. Smith 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

FRANK H. J. FIGGE, Professor of Anatomy and Head of the Department. 
A.B., Colorado CoIleKe, 1927 : Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 11)34. 

HARRY C. BOWIE, Associate in Clinical Anatomy. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 19.33; M.D., 1930. 

OTTO C. BRANTIGAN, Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 
R.S., Northwestern University, 1931 ; M.D., 1934. 

ETHEL M. EBERSBERGER, Assistant in Anatomy. 
A.B., Goucher Colleije, 1942. 

JEANNETTE D. GAMBRILL, Assistant in Anatomy. 
A.B., Voucher College, 1937. 

WILLIAM A. HOLBROOK, Assistant in Anatomy. 
B.S., T"niversity of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 194.-|. 

HENRICUS G. J. M. KUYPERS, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
M.D., University of Iveiden, 1940; I'liD., 19."2 

VERNON E. KRAHL, Associate Professor of .Anatomy. 

B.S.. Universitv of Pittsbiirsh, 1939; M.S.. 1940; Ph.D., Universitv of Maryland, 
1946. 

HENRY E. LANGENFELDER, Assistant in Anatomy. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1947 ; M.D., Vahnemann Medical Colleu'e. 1951. 

THEODORE F. LEVEQUE. Assistant Professor of .\natomy. 

B..\., University of Denver. 1949: M.S., 19.50; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1954. 

HARRY PATTERSON MACK, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
M.D., University of Maryland, IfllS. 

ROBERT EUGENE McCAFFERTY, Instructor in Anatomy. 

B.S., Grove City College. 1943; M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1948; Ph.D., 1951. 

K.\RL FREDERICK MECH. Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1932; M.D., 193.5. 

ROBERT A. MOORE. JR., Assistant in Anatomy. 

p.S., University of North (^irolina, 1947: .M.D., Bowman (Jray Colh'Ke, 19.")1, 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 13 

WALLE J. H. NAUTA, Professor of Anatomy. 

.M.n., I'Divorsity of I'trcdit, 1042 ; Ph.D., 104.".. 

ROSS Z. PIERPONT, Associate in Clinical Anatomy. 
B.S.. University of Marylnnd, 10:!!1 ; M.D., 1!M0. 

HERBERT E. REIFSCHNEIDER, Associate in Clinical Anat..my. 

A.B.. .Tohiis ITopkiiis riiivoisity. 1022: >[.!>., rnivcrsity of .\I;i rybind, ];)27. 

ELWYN :\. SAUNDERS, Instructor in Anatomy. 

R.S., The Citadol. 1!I40: M.S.. fJrndn.Ttc S.hool <.r I lie Medical Collc^.'o of South 
Ciirollna, 10."(2: .M.T)., Medical (iill(';;e of Soutli (aroliiiM, 10."..'i. 

WILLIAAf BOOTH SETTLE, Assistant Profes.sor of Clinical Anatomy. 
.\.B., University of I'ennsylvania, 10.^0; M.D., lO."'.."!. 

JOHN O. SHARRETT. Assistant in Anatomy. 
M.D.. University of >taryland. 10r>2. 

NATHAN SNYDER, Instrnctor in Anatomy. 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1925; M.D., 19.30. 

EDUARD UHLENHUTH, Research Professor of Anatomy. 
Ph.D., University of Vienna, 1909. 

GLADYS E. WADSWORTH, Instructor in Anatomy. 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State Teachers College, 1036 ; M.A., Columbia University, 
1942; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

WILLIAM WALLACE WALKER, Associate Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1921 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 192.3. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY 

PAUL RAYMOND HACKETT, As.sociate Professor of Anesthesiology and Act- 
ing Head of the Department. 

B.A., Denison University, 1945 ; M.D., Western Reserve University, 1949. 

LEONARD J. ABRAMOWITZ, Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1930 : M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

GRACE A. BASTIAN, Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

B.S., McCoy College, .Tohns Hopkins University, 1949 ; M.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1953. 

FRANCIS F. CHANG, Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 
B.S., St. John's University, Shanghai, 1944 ; M.D., 1947. 

LOUIS A. FRITZ, Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

B.S., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1948; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 

THOMAS D. GRAFF, Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1949 ; M.D., Temple University, 1953. 

CHARLES F. HOBELMANN, Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1941 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 

DOROTHY HOLZWORTH, Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

A.B., Notre Dame of Maryland, 1944 ; M.A., Catholic University of America, 1946 ; 
M.D., George Washington University, 1950. 

WALTER H. LEVY, Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1929, 



14 UNIVERSITY 01- MARYLAND 

HOWARD S. LTAXG. Associate in Anesthesiology. 

M.I>.. Xationnl Sun Ynt-Sen I'liivorsity, Ciiiiton, 1047. 

ALFRED T. NKLSOX, Clinical Profes.sor of Ancstliesiology. 
M.l».. Univorsit.v of Mnryhind. 104:5. 

ELIZABETH Y. PAHK. Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

M.n.. Seoul WoiiKni's Medical ('oIleRe, 1047. 

OTTO C. PHILLIPS, Clinical Associate Profes.sor of Anesthesiology. 

\M.. .Tolins Hopkins T'niversity, 193S ; M.D.. Tniveisity of .Maryhind. 1042. 

JAMES RUSSO, Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

B.S., Ursinus ("ollejie. 1030; yiA).. .TefTeisoii .Medical ('olle>.'.., 1044. 

PETER S.AFAR, Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesiology. 
M.I)., luiversity of Vienna. 104S. 

DOUGLAS H. SMITH, Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

A.B., Syracuse T'niversity. 1040: M.D.. Stale University of New York, 1053. 

THEODORE E. STACY, JR., Clinical Instructor in Anesthesiology. 
rii.G., University of Maryland. 10'_>3: M.D.. lOL'S. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

E^^L G. SCHMIDT, Professor of Biological Chemistry and Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, lOl'l; M.S., 102X. : I'll.!)., 101'4. 

ANN VIRGINIA BROWN, Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 
A.P... Goucher CoIIpsp, 1040. 

EDWARD JOHN HERBST, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
B.S.. University of Wisconsin. 104."?: M.S., 1044; I'li.T».. 1040. 

ARLIE BIEMILLER PARKER, Junior Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 
A.B.. r.oiicher College, 10.'.4. 

WILLIAM HENRY SUMMERSON, Lecturer in Biological Chemistry. 
B.rheni., Cornell University, 10'_>7: M.A.. 1028: Pli.D., 10.-57. 

RAYMOND E. VANDERLINDE. A.ssociate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

A. 15., Syiacnse T'niversity. 1044: M.S.. 104."); M.S., 1047; Pll.D., 1050. 

FRANK D. VASINGTON. Assistant Profes.sor of Biological Chemistry. 

A.B.. Universitv of Connecticut, 1050: M.S., 1052: Pli.D.. University of Maryland. 
1955. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

THEODORE E. WOODWARD, Profes.sor of Medicine and Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall Collese. 10.",4 : M.D.. T'niversity of Maryland. 103.S : 
D.Sc. (Hon.) Western Marvland Collese. 1050: D.Sc. (Hon.) Uranklin and Mar- 
shall College. 1054. 

CONRAD B. ACTON, As.sociate in Medicine. 

B.S., Ilavprford College. 1025: M.I>.. .Tohns H-Mikins T'niversity. 1020. 

MARIE AMELIA .ANDERSCH. Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1020 ; :M.S.. State University of Iowa, 1032; Ph.D., 1034, 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 15 

ANDERS W. ANDERSON, Assistant in Medicine. 
D.D.S., UiiivorsUy of Maryland. litLM ; M.I)., 191'!). 

LEON ASHMAN, Associate in Medicine. 

B.S.. rollo^e of the City of Now York. 1027; .M.It., University of Maryland, 10.S2. 

MUTLU ATAGUN, Assistant in Medicine. 
iM.D., University of Istnuhul, lOno. 

DAVID BACHARACH, Instructor in Dermatology. 

B.A., St. John's rolleKe. 1!»88 : M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 

ALICE MESSINGER BAND, Associate in Medicine. 

B.A.. l^niverslty of Rochester. 104r( ; M.D., Boston University. 1949. 

ROBERT EDWARD BAUER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., Johns Hoplilns T'niversity. 1943 : M.D., University of Maryland, 194C. 

EDMUND GEORGE BEACHAM. Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
B.S., University of Maryland. 19.S(i ; M.D., 1940. 

GEORGE BECK. Assistant in Medicine. 

A.B., Western Maryland Collejie, 1949 ; M.D., University of Maryland. 19.".'^. 

EUGENE SYDNEY BERESTON, Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University. 193.S ; M.D.. University of Maryland, 19.37; M.Sc, 
University of I'ennsylvania. 194.") ; r>.Sc., 19.")."). 

BARNETT BERMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.S., B.M., M.I>., Xortliwestern University, 1949. 

ALICE BESSAIAN. Instructor in Medicine. 

B.A., Smith College, 194."? : M.D.. George Washington University, 1949. 

LOUIS VARDEE BLUM, Associate in Medicine. 

B..\., University of Uelaware. 1930; M.D.. T'niversity of Maryland, 1934. 

FRANCIS JOSEPH BORGES. Associate in Medicine and Assistant Head of 
Hypertensive Clinic. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1948: M.D.. 19.".n. 

JOSEPH BRONUSHAS. Assistant in Medicine. 

B.S., Loyola College of Baltimore. ]94(i: M.D.. ITniversity of Maryland. 19."(1. 

HOWARD MATHESON BUBERT, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 1920. 

WILLIAM ROSS BUNDICK, Associate in Dermatology. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 1941. 

BERNARD BURGIN. Instructor in Medicine. 

B.A.. I'niversity of Cincinnati. 19:!t! : M.I>.. 19:{9. 

MARSHALL PAUL BYERLY, Associate in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 192.". 

T. NELSON CAREY, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
M.D.. T'niversity of Maryland. 1927. 

DOUGLASS G. CARROL. Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

A.B., Yale University, 1937: M.D., Johns Hopkins T'niversity, 1942. 

FRANCIS p. CHINARD. Assistant Profes.sor of Medicine. 

A.B., University of California, 1937 ; M.D.. Johns Hopkins University, 194G. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

P.. S'lANLEY COHEN, Instructor in Mediciiu-. 
M.I»., I'liivt'isity of Miir.vhiuil. 1!HT. 

jOXAS H. COHKX, Associate in Mt-dicine. 

r..A., .lohus Hopkins University, l!i:;0 ; M.It., I'.MO. 

MORRIS M. COHKN, Associate in Dermatology. 
B.S., M.I>., University of rittsl.urgli, 1937. 

THOMAS CONNOR, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

A.B., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1043: M.D., University of Maryland, liMO. 

ELMER ELLSWORTH COOK, JR., Assistant in Medicine. 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1!)40 ; M.D., 1043. 

EDWARD F. COTTER, Associate Professor of Medicine; Associate in Neurology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 

WILLIA^I F. COX, HI, Associate in Medicine. 

A.B., Amherst College, 194G : M.D., Jefiferson -Medical College, 1947. 

ERNEST CROSS, JR., Instructor in Medicine. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1937; M.D., 1941. 

JOHN R. DAVIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.A., West Virginia University, 1938; M.D., University of .Maryland, 1942. 

JOHN BURLING DeHOFF, Associate in Medicine. 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1935 ; M.D., 1939. 

FRANCIS GEORGE DICKEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins Uuiver.-^ity. 1932; M.n., University of Maryland, 1935. 

JOHX SHELDON EASTLAND, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1921 ; M.I)., I'niversity of -Maryland, 1925. 

WILLIAM CARL EBELING, III, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Heavl, 
Division of Gastroenterology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1944. 

BENNETT L. ELISBERG, Instructor in Experimental Medicine. 

B.A., New York University, 1944; .M.S., Tnlane University, 1948; M.D., 1930. 

FRANCIS A. ELLIS, Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1!)21 ; M.D., University of -Maryland. 1925. 

GEORGE ENTWLSLE, Associate in Medicine. 

B.S., University of .Massachusetts, 1944: M.l»., Boston Uiiiveisity, 1948. 

WILLIAM C. ESMOND, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.S., Uuiver.sUy of Maryland, 1940; M.D., 1951. 

P-\'rRICIA A. ELISBERG, Assistant Instructor in Experimental Medicine. 
B.A., Agnes Sf<itt College, 1945; M.I>., Tnlane University, 19.5(1. 

WILLIAM L. FEARING, Associate in Neurology. 
-M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

?kIAURICE FELDIMAN, Assistant Professor of Gastroenterology. |j 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1910. ^ 

MAURICE FELDMAN, JR., Instructor in Medicine. f 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1941; M.D., University of .^^uylaud, 1944. k 

KL'SSELL S. FISHER, Professor of Legal Medicine. i 

B.S5., Oeorgia School of Teohnidogy, 1937; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1942. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 17 

PHILIP D. FLYNN, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.S., Georgetown University, 1929 ; M.D., 1933. 

WETHERBEE FORT, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
!M.D., University of Maryland. 1010. 

IRVING FREEMAN, Associate in Medicine. 

B.S.. Univprsity of Maryland, Vy-\2 : M.D., in.S.".. 

HENRY C. FREUrUTH, Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine. 

B.S., College of tlie City of New York, 1932; M.S., New York University, 1933; 
Ph.D., New York University, lOoS. 

MARION FRIEDMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.S., University of ^iaryland, 19.'?8; M.D., 19 12. 

AUDREY FUNK, Instructor in Medicine. 
B.A., Goncher College, 1940. 

JOSEPH C. FURNARI, Associate in Medicine. 

B.S., University of Pittsbiirgb, in.SS ; M.D., University of Maryland. 1942. 

. PERRY FUTTERAIAN, As.sociate in Medicine. 

k B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1941 ; M.D., University of Maryliind, 1944. 

■ FRANK J. GERAGHTY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1921 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 192fi. 

i\rARVIN GOLDSTEIN. Instructor in Medicine. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins Univer.sity, 1041 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 

SHELDON EDWARD GREISMAN, Instructor in Experimental Medicine. 
M.D., New York University, 1949. 

WILLIAM HOWARD GRENZER, Assistant in Medicine. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 1931 : M.D., T'niversity of Maryland, V-W,n. 

PAUL F. GUERIN, Associate in Legal Medicine. 

A.B., Wittenburg College, 1942 ; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 194.5. 

LEWIS PERKINS GUNDRY, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1924 ; M.D., University of Maryland. 192S. 

SAMUEL JAY HANKIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 

WILLIAM G. HELFRICH, Associate in Medicine. 

B.S., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1931, :M.D.. University of Maryland, 1935. 

L. ANN HELLEN, Instructor in Medicine. 
B.A., University of Delaware, 1936. 

W. GRAFTON HERSPERGER, Associate in Medicine. 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University. 1929 ; M.D., 1933. 

' MARK B. HOLLANDER, Associate in Dermatology. 

B..\., .Johns Hopkins University. 1927: M.D., University of >rarylanil, 19:!1. 

HENRY W. J. HOLLJES, As.sociate in Medicine. 

B.A,. Western Maryland College. 1941 ; M.D., Tniversity of Maryland, 1044. 

Z. VANCE HOOPER. Associate in Gastroenterology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

MEYER WILLIAM JACOBSON. Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University. 1028: M.D., University of Maryland. 1932, 



18 UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

EDWARD S. KALLIXS. Instructor in Medicine. 

IMi.G., rnivcisity of Maryland, llt.'iO: U.S., ]U:V2 : M.D., 1084. 

WILLIAM HENRY KAMMER, JR.. Instructor in Medicine. 

H.A., Loyola College of Baltimore, 10:{."i : M.l»., I'liivfrsity of Maryland, 1!»39. 

ARTHUR KARFGIN, Associate in Medicine. 

U.S., WashinKlon College, IJtl'O; M.I>., I!niv<>r.sity of Maryland, 1!»:{2. 

WALTER E. KARFGIN, Associate in ^[edicinc. 

U.S., Washington ("oIIpkc. l!t:^:i: M.Ii., Inivorsity of .Maryland, 103»). 

J.AMKS R. K.XRX.S, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Head, Student Health 
Service. 

B.S., Inivcrsity of Maryland, llt.SO; M.I)., 1!)4(». 

FRANK THOMAS KASIK. JR., As.sistant in Medicine. 

B.S.. Fnivcrsity of Maryland, 1040; M.I>.. !!».".(). 

LEON E. KASSEL, .Assistant in Medicine. 
M.I)., T'liivprsity of Virginia, 1040. 

NORMA KEIGLAR, Assistant in Clinical Microbiology in Medicine. 

B.S., Mt. St. A},MU's CollcKe. 1040; I'll. I).. University of Maryland, 1055. 

IRV'IN B. KEMICK, Instructor in Medicine. 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, lOS.S : B.S., 103.".; M.D., 10.37. 

LAURISTON LIVINGSTON KEOWN, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.A., St. .Tohn's Collepe, lOiiO ; M.T)., University of Maryland, 10.3.". 

JOSEPH D. KING, Instructor in Medicine. 

A.B., Princeton University, 1041 : M.D., .Tolins Hopkins University, 1944. 

DAVID M. KIPNIS, Associate in Medicine. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1045; M.I)., University of Maryland, 1951. 

CRAWFORD N. KIRKPATRICK, JR., Instructor in Medicine. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1940 ; M.D., Colnmhia University. 1943. 

LEON A. KOCHMAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
M.I)., University of Maryland, 1033. 

LOUIS A. M. KRAUSE, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1917. 

FRANK G. KUEHN, Assistant in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

HARRY VERNON LANGELUTTIG, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

A.B., .Johns Hopkins University. 1927; M.I).. University of Maryland, 1931. 

CHARLES EDWARD LEACH, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
M.D., Duke University, 1935. 

JOHN LEGGE, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 1809. 

SAMUEL LEGUM, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., .Johns Hopkins University, 1928; M.D., University of Maryland, 1932. 

LEE R. LERMAN, Assistant in Dermatology. 

B.S.. Pennsylvania State University, 1930 ; M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, l93o- 

PHILIP FRANKLIN LERNER, Assistant Professor of Neurology. 

A.B., .Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 



SCHOOL or MRDlClNIi 19 

FRANKLIN EARL LESLIE, Instructor in Aledipinc. 
.M.I)., University of Marylaud, 1041. 

MANUEL LEVIN, Instructor in Medicine. 

A.B., .Johns Hopkins University, 1!)30 ; .M.I).. University of Mar.yliuul, 1984. 

KURT LEVY, Associate in Medicine. 

>UI)., University of Cologne, fierniany, 1!12.'!. 

EPHRAIM THEODORE LISANSKY. Associate Professor of AJedicine. 
H.A., ,Ioluis Ilopivins University. IJt.'i.S ; M.D., University of Maryland, l!t37. 

LEONARD LISTER, Instructor in Medicine. 
M.I).. University of Maryland, 1951. 

S. J. LIU, Instructor in Medicine. 

M.n., National Centi-al University, Nankin.s, Cliina. 1!I47. 

LUIS R. LOMBARDO, Instructor in Neurology. 
M.I)., University of Mexico. 19".]. 

WILLIAM SAMUEL LOVE. Professor of Clinical Medicine and Head, Division 
of Cardiology. 

A.B., .lohns Hopkins University, 1918; .M.D., University of Maryland, 1923. 

WILLIAM V. LOVITT, JR., Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine. 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1941 ; M.I)., University of Colorado, 1944. 

J.\COB LUDWIG, .Assistant in Dermatology. 

Ph.G., I'liiladelphia College of I'harniatv and S<ii'nfe, 1984; :M.D., Hahnemann 
Medical College, 1940. 

ROBERT J. LYDEN, .Assistant in Medicine. 
M.D., St. Louis University, 19.52. 

BARBARA ANN LYONS, Junior Instructor in Medicine. 
B.A., Notre r)ame College of Maryland, 19.")2. 

JOHN MacGIBBON, Assistant in Medicine. 

M.D.. (Jtago I'niversity, New Zealand, 1948. 

STEPHEN LEE AIAGNESS, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.A., .Johns Hopkins University, 19.84; M.D., University of Maryland, 1939. 

HENRY J. L. MARRIOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Division 
of Physical Diagnosis. 

B.A., Oxford University, 1941: M.A., 1943; B.M., B.Ch., 1944. 

J.\MES T. MARSH, Lecturer in Medicine. 

A.B., Western .Maryland College, 191(i: M.D., University of Maryland, 1924. 

JOSEPH CHARLES MATCHAR, Instructor in Medicine. 

B..\., .Johns Hopkins University, 1989; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

FRED R. McCRUMB, Associate in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

GEORGE McLEAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
.M.D., University of Maryland, 1910. 

ROSS McLEAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.S., Bowdoin College, 1989 ; M.D., Johns Hopkins University. 1943. 

GEORGE G. MERRILL, Assistant Professor of Neurology. 

B.A., I'rjnceton I'niversity, 1932 ; M.D., Harvard University, 1937. 



20 UNIVERSITY 01' MARYLAND 

S'lAXI.KV MILIJ'.K, Associate in iMcdicinc. 

I!. A.. I'liiversiiy of I'eniis.x Ivjinia, r.i;'.;i ; .M.l>., .IcH'i-isdh .MiMlieal ('ollenf, 194.'!. 

DONAI.lJ W. MINTZKR, Associate in Medicine. 
B.S., liiivcrsily ol Maryland, l»4:i ; M.l>., 1!U4. 

GKORGK S. MIRICK, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

A.IJ., I'rinceton University, ID.'U ; M.I'., .Johns Hopkins University, 1985. 

ZACHARIAII MORGAN, Assistant Professor <jf (iastroenterology. 
M.I)., University of Maryland, 1918. 

SAMUEL MORRISON, Associate Professor oi' Medicine; Associate Professor of 
Gastroenterolog)'. 

B.A., .Johns Hopkins University, VSl^ ; M.Ii., l<(2!t. 

THEODORE H. MORRISON, Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology. 
M.l)., Baltimore Colle{.'e of I'hysicians and Surgeons, lOl'i. 

S. EDWIN MULLER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
M.l)., University of Maryland, 1037. 

JOSEPH E. MUSE, JR., Instructor in Medicine. 

B.S., Mt. St. Mary's Colle.i,'e, 1933; M.D., University uf Marylan<l, 19.'{7. 

JOHN ALFRED MYERS, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.E.E., 19;i3 ; M.H., lOoo. 

JOSEPH CARL MYERS, Assistant in Medicine. 

A.H., Western Maryland College, 1939; M.D.. University of Maryland, 1943. 

JOHN C. OSBORNE, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.S., Loyola Colkge of Baltimore, 1937; M.l»., University of -Maryland, 1942. 

ROBERT T. PARKER, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Head, Division of In- 
fectious Diseases; Associate Dean. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1!)41 ; M.D., 1944. 

H. RAYAIOND PETERS, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

B.A., Loyola College. I'.tlS ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1922. 

j. EMMETT QUEEN, Associate in Medicine. 

A.B., Loyola College, 1939 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

M. KEVIN QUINN, Assistant in Medicine. 

M.B., University College, Dublin, Ireiand, 1945. 

JULIAN REED, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.D., 19r)2. 

ROBERT ANDREW REITER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1928 ; M.D., 1932. 

SAMUEL T. R. REVELL, JR., Associate Professor of Medicine and Head, Di- 
vision of Hypertension. 

B.S., University of Georgia, 19:!3; M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 

HARRY M. ROBINSON, JR., Professor of Dermatology and Head of the Division 
of Dermatology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931 ; M.D., 1935. 

RAYMOND C. VAIL ROBINSON, Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

B.S., University of .Maryland, 1936 ; M.D., 1940 ; M.Sc, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1950. 



SCHOOL OF MlinlCINR 21 

DONALD JAxMES ROOP, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.A., Wfstcrn MiUylniHl ( olleKo, IHI'.C, : M.D.. I'niv.Msily of Maryliind. 1H40 ; 
M.r.H., .lolins Hopkins liiiversity, lit-'iO. 

HKXJAMIN ROTHFELD, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.A., I'liiviTsiiy of I'eansylvaiiia, lit41 ; M.S., l!t4'J; .\J.|)., litjwniiin-Gray Schotil 
of Medicine, llH'i. 

.SEYMOUR RUBIN. Assistant in Medicine. 

A.B., Jolin.s Hopkins University, li>4<; ; M.H.. ITnivorsity of Maryland, 1950. 

.MILTON S. SACKS, Professor of Clinical Medicine and Head, Division of 
Clinical Pathology. 

B.S., T'niversity of Maryland, 1982; M.D., 19.S4. 

HERMAN SCHAERF, Assistant in Medicine. 

Maturity, Real (iymnasiuni, Frankfort. Ceriiianv, 19.'}l ; M.D., Heidelberg, Oermany- 
Basel, Switzerland, 19:{8. 

LEONARD SCHERLIS, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
B.A., Johns Hopkins (niversity, 1942; M.Ii., 1945. 

SIDNEY SCHERLIS, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., T'niversily of I'ennsylvania, nt:!4 ; M.M., University of Maryland, 19.H8. 

ALBERT JOSHUA SCHOCHAT, Instructor in Gastroenterology. 
B.Sc, New York University; M.D., University of Maryland, 19.'5l. 

ADALBERT SCHUBART, Assistant in Medicine. 

I'niversily of Berlin, 1943 ; M.D., I'uiversity of Heidelberg. 1947: Dr. Med., 1948. 

HARRY B. SCOTT, Instructor in Aledicine. 

B.A., Univej-sity of \irginia, 1943; M.I>., I'nlversity of Maryland, 1947. 

SAMUEL SEGALL, Assistant in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Jena, Germany, 1929. 

LAWRENCE M. SERRA, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 192r> ; M.D., 1929. 

.\LBERT SHAPIRO, Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1937. 

CHARLES E. SHAW, Associate in Medicine. 

B.S., T'Biversity of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 11)44. 

WILLIAM H. SHEA, Assistant in Dermatology. 

B.S., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1947; M.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

JOSEPH SHEAR, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943 ; M.D., 1947. 

JEROME SHERMAN, As.sociate in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Western Ontario. 1941. 

MARGARET L. SHERRARD, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.A., Seton Hill College, 1945 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1949. 

ELIZABETH BROWN SHERRILL, Instructor in Medicine. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.D., 1941. 

ABRAHAM A. SILVER, Assistant in Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1928. 

SOLOMON SMITH. Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

WILLIAM IL SMLl'll, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Al.I)., riiivt'isity of .Maryland, 1000. 

MERRILL J. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Medicine in Clinical Microbiology. 
U.S., Univcisitv of I'll tsbiir>;li, I'.Mo ; M.S., Univeisitv >,( Marvland, inno ; Ph.D., 
li>r)3. 

WILLI AM C. SPEED, III, Instructor in Medicine. 

R.S.. Trinity Cnlloso, 10-40: M.I>., .lolin.f Hopkins I'niversity, 1043. 

WILLLAM S. SPICER, Assistant in Medicine. 
.\1.1)., I iiivf-rsity of Kansas, 104!t. 

CARROLL L. SPURLIXG. Assistant Professor of Aledicine. 
M.I».. Kownian-Cray Srhool of Medicine, l!t47. 

STANLEY ROY STEINBACH, Assistant in Medicine. 

r...\.. .Jolin.s Hoiikins University. 1041'; M.i)., I'niversify of .Maryland, 104."). 

JOE L. STOCKARD, Associate in Medicine. 

H.;S., Yale University, 1044: M.I»., University of Kansas, 11)4S. 

PATRICK B. STOREY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Fordliam University, 1043 ; M.I)., Georjietown University, 1047. 

JOHN F. STRAHAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
M.L).. University of Maryland, 1040. 

STUART D. SUNDAY, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1032; M.I)., University of Maryland, 1036. 

KYLE Y. SWISHER. Associate in Medicine. 
M.I)., University of Maryland, 1048. 

HARRY ALLEN TEITELBAUM, Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1020 ; M.D., 103.T ; Ph.D., 1036. 

WILFRED HENRY TOWNSHEND, JR., Associate in Medicine. 

A.B., .Johns Hopkins University, 1936; M.I).. University of Maryland, l'.)40. 

CHARLES VAN BUSKIRK, Professor of Neurology and Head, Division of 
Neurology. 
B.A., Westminster College, 1039 ; M.S., St. Louis University, 1941 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1043 ; M.D., Albany Medical College, 1047 ; M.S., University 
of Minnesota, 10.j3. 

STEPHEN J. VAN LILL, III, Associate in Medicine. 

B.A., Duke University, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1043. 

FREDERICK J. VOLLMER, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College. 1034 ; M.D.. I'niversity of Maryland, 1038. 

JULIUS WAGHELSTEIN, Instructor in Aledicine. 
B.S., University of Maryland : M.D., 1035. 

WILLIAM K. WALLER, Associate in Medicine. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1928; M.D., 1936. 

JACK WEXLER, Assistant in Medicine. 

B.A., West Virginia University, 1935; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1030. 

PHILIP WHITTLESEY, Instructor in Medicine. 

A.B., Bowdoin College, 1941 ; M.D., .Johns Hopkins University, 1044. 

DANIEL WILFSON, JR., Associate in Medicine. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1932 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1036. 



SCHOOL OP MEDICINE 23 

CHARLES HERMAN WILLIAMS, Instructor in Medicine. 

B.A., Westi'in Mar.vland ("olle};<', 1'.I37 ; MM, University of Marylaiul, 1042. 

JOHN G. WISWELL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

H..\.. Dallioiisie Uiiivpisiiy, ]!»;{8: B.Sc, 1940; M.D.C.M., 11(43. 

JOSEPH BERKELEY WORKMAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Acting 
Head, Division of Radioactive Isotopes. 

B.\., \V»'ste.'-n Marylaiul College. Itt43 : M.l>., Luiversity ot Marylaiul, l*J4tJ. 

THOMAS L. WORSLEY, JR., Assistant in Medicine. 

r..S.. luiversity of North Carolina. I'.t::" : yi.l>., University of .Maryland, l'.»3'J. 

ISRAEL ZELIGMAN, Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

.\.H.. .lolins Hopkins University, I'.lo:'. : M.I)., University of Marylaiul, lit:;?: 8c. D., 
Colnniliia University, 11142. 

ST.\NLEY N. YAFEE, Instructor in Dermatology. 
U.S., University of Maryland, 1!»41 : M.D., 1044. 

DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 

CHARLES LOUIS WISSEMAN, JR., Professor of ^Microbiology and Head of 
the Department. 

B.A., Southern Methodist University, 1041; M.S., Kansas State College, V.)4S ; 
M.D., Southwestern Medical School. 1940. 

ELIZABETH CATHERINE HEINZ, Junior Instructor in Microbiology. 
B.A., (Joucher College, 19ol. 

HYMAN EDMUND LEVIN, Associate in Microbiology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, lOL'l.' ; M.D., 1926. 

ANDREW GEORGE SMITH, Assistant Professor of Alicrobiology. 

B.S.. I'ennsvlvania State University, 104(1 : M.S.. Universitv of Pennsylvania, 1947 , 
I'h.D., 19.50. 

MERRILL J. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

B.S.. Universitv of Pittsburgh, 1040; M.S.. Universitv of Marvland. 1950; Ph.D., 
1953. 

EDWARD STEERS, Associate Professor of Microbiology. 

B.S., Moravian College. 1032: M.S., Lehigh University. 1937; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940. 

BENJAMIN HERSH S\\'EET. Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

B.S., Tulane University, 194G ; M.S., Boston University, 1040 ; Ph.D., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1949 ; Ph.D., Boston University, 1953. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

ARTHUR L. H.ASKINS. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Head of the 
Department. 

A.B.. University of Uochester. 1038: M.D., 1048. 

J. TYLER BAKER, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.S.. Franklin and .Marshall College, 1030; M.D.. Temple University. 1930. 

FRANK WILLIAM BAKER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D.. University of Maryland. 194S. 

MARGARET B. BALLARD, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 1926. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HARRY McBRINE BKCK, Assistant in Obstetrics and (iynecology. 

U.S., .lohiis Hopkins Inivcrsity, lii;{.j ; M.l>., University of Maryland, IJH'.t. 

LKO BRADY, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

11. A.. .lohns H(>i>kiiis riiivprsity, l!)i;{; .M.I>., .lolnis lloiikiiis I'nivtTslty, 1!>17. 

OSBORNE D. CHRISTKNSEN, Associate in Obstetrics and (Wnccology. 
M.D.. George Wiisliinjjtoii University, 10:5."i. 

BEVERLEY CRUMP COiMPTON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

B.A., rriiH-etoii fnivtTsity, l'.»L'T; M.H., .loliiis Hopkins University, 10.31. 

ERNEST IVON CC^RNBROOKS, JR.. Associate Professor of Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 

B.A., St. .Johns College, 1931 : M.D., University of Maryland, lO.'?;"). 

GEORGE HOWEY DAVIS, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
U.S., Washington College. VXA2 : M.D., University of Maryland, 19315. 

W. ALLEN DECKERT, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
A. P.., .Johns Hopkins University. 19120: M.l>., 1930. 

WILLIAM K. DIEHL, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., Wake Forest College, 1937: M.D., Coltinihia University. 1938. 

EVERETT S. DIGGS, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.D., 1937. 

D. McClelland DIXON, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1932 : M.D., 193fi. 

WILLIAM A. DODD, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

WILLIAM C. DUFFY, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
A.B., Uoyola College, 1936 ; M.D., University of Maryland. 1940. 

JAMES LEE EAVEY, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1943 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1940. 

DANIEL EHRLICH, Assistant in Ob.stetrics and Gynecology. 

B.S., .Johns Hopkins I'niversity, 1939 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

WILLIAM P. ENGLEHART, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.S., Philadelphia College of Pharmacv and Science, 1942 ; M.D., .Jefferson Medical 
College, 1950. 

J. J. ERWIN, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

VINCENT dePAUL FITZPATRICK, JR., Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.A.. Loyola College, 1942 ; M.D.. University of Maryland, 1945. 

F. SIDNEY GARDNER, Assistant in Gynecology. 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 194>S : M.D., Univer.<;ity of Maryland. 19.M. 

LOUIS C. GAREIS, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., TTniversity of Maryland. 1934: M.D., 193,<?. 

WILLIAM D. GENTRY. JR.. Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 194fi. 

HYMAN L. GRANOFF, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
PA.. .T<»hns Hopkins I'niversity. 1?>28 : M.t)., 1932. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 25 

WILLIAM R. GRECO. Assistant in Obstetrics and (iynecology. 
U.S., fniversity of M.ir.vhuid, 1048: M.I>., 1!>5L>. 

CHARLES R. GREEN, JR., Instructor in Obstetrics and (iynecology. 

A.B., University of I'ennsylvania, 104('> : M.I>., Templp University, 1!)50. 

n. 1-^RANK KALTREIDER. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

A.B.. .Tolins nopkii).>< i:niv(>rsity. lO.S.S : ^\.T)., University of Maryland, 10:^7. 

HARRY F. KANE, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University. 10."?1 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1[)3'>. 

THEODORE KARDASH, Associate in Ob.stetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., University of ^ra^yland, lO.'^S; M.D., 1942. 

\'ERNON CHARLES KELLY, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
A.B., .Johns Hopkins T'niversity, 19:?<! : M.D., 1940. 

IR\'IN PHILIP KLEMKOWSKI, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., Mt. St. Misry's College, 19:^2: M.D., University of Maryland. 19.37. 

JAAIES T. LEONG, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.I».. Washington University, 1951. 

NORM.A.N LEVIN. Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.ri.. University of ^taryland, 1947. 

HELEN I. MAGINNIS, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.A., Goucher College, 1929: M.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

WILLIAM KENNETH MANSFIELD,. Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.Ji., T'niversity of Maryland, 1936. 

RAYMOND LAW MARKLEY, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.A.. Gettysburg College, 1943; M.D. ITniversity of Maryland, 1946. 

CLARENCE W. MARTIN. Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D., University of Marj-Iand, 1940. 

GEORGE ALEXANDER MAXWELL, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.A.. University of Maryland, 1942; M.D., 1944. 

HUGH B. McNALLY. Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., University of Maryland. 1930; M.D., 1934. 

EDMUND B. MIDDLETON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D.. University of Maryland, 1949. 

P.\UL E. MOLUMPHY, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., Tiinity College, 1941; M.D., Yale University, 1944. 

FRANK K. MORRIS, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.A., Lovola College of Baltimore, 1923: ^[.D., University of Maryliind, 1027. 

JOHN HUFF MORRISON, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.S.. >yest Virginia Wesleyan College, 1934 : M.D.. .TefTerson Mediral College, 1940. 

LESLIE L. MOLHT). Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
y\.C., M.D., Queens T'niversity, Ontario, 19.=>2. 

JOHX MORRIS REESE. Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.D., T'niversity of Maryland. 1020. 

JOHN EDWARD S.WAGE, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. • 
B.S., Univer>^ity of Maryland, 192$: MD.. 1932, 



26 UNirBRSITV OF MARYLAND 

ERNEST SCHER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.I).. Kiiiory University, 1!)43. 

BENSON CHARLES SCHWARTZ, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.I».. riiiviMsity ol" Maryhiiul. l»4b. 

J. KING H. K. SEEGER, JR., Associate in Ob-^tetrics and Gynecology. 
15. .\.. (Dlumbia I'uivcrsily, 1 !»:',:? ; .M.I)., I nivcrsity ul .Miiry ..iiid, I'.i.'iT. 

J.\MES H. SHELL, JR., Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

U.S., Fiiniiiin UuivtMsity, I'.Mu': M.D., University of .Maryland, 11)4.">. 

ISADORE A. SIEGEL, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
A. I?., .Toluis Hopkins University, lltl!) ; M.I>., 1!)23. 

EDWARD P. SMITH, Assi.stant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
I'll.*;., Milton University. I'.ilu': .M.l>.. University of .Miiryland, lltfJ. 

STEDiMAN W. SMITH, Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
M.S.^ McGill University, 1940. 

F. X. PAUL TINKER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
U.S., Loyola College. 1041 : M.D.. University of .Maryland, 1".»44. 

JOSE G. \'.\LDERAS, .Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

B.S.. Iniversity of Puerto Kieo : .M.D., University of Maryland, 1'.I47. 

THOMAS CLYDE WEBSTER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
B.S., University of Maryland. 10,38: M.D., 1!)4:'.. 

FREDERICK M. ZERZAVY, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

M.C, Masaryk Universitv, Brno, lOHii : M.D., Universitv of Zagreb. Yugoslavia, 
1942. 

DEPARTMENT OF OrHTHALMOLOGY 

JOSEPH EDWARD BRUMBACK, JR., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
B.A., .Johns Hopkins University, 1940; .M.D., 1943. 

RICHARD J. CROSS, Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

B.S., Mt. S. Mary's College, 194:?: M.D.. University of Maryland, 194G. 

JOSEPH ISAAC KEMLER, As.sociate in Ophthalmology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1907. 

ABRAHAM KREMEN, Associate in Ophthalmology. 

A.B., .lohns Hopkins T'niversity, 1920 : M.D., University of .Maryland, 19;>0. 

JOHN CASIMIR OZAZEWSKI, Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

B.S., Uiyola College, 1940; M.D., University of Maryland. 1943. 

RUBY ARDEN SMITH, Associate in Ophthalmology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1940. 

HENRY BEATTY WTLSON, Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1943 : M.D., .Tohns Hopkins University, 1947. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

HUGH R. SPENCER, Professor of Pathology and Head of the Department. 
M.D., Baltimore Medical College, 1910. 

CONRAD B. ACTON, Instructor in Pathology. 

B.S., Haverford College. 1925; M.D.. .Johns Hopkins University. 1929. 



SCHOOL OJ- MliniClNE 27 

GEORGE K. BAER, Assistant in Pathology. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 19.")! ; M.I>., University of Maryland. I!).'),"). 

WILLIAM J. BRYSON, Instructor in Pathology. 

.X.H., Wfstcni Marylaii.l ('.dlesc. ]'.):^!): M.I)., rnivcrsity of Maryland, ltM3. 

THOMAS J. BURKART, Instructor in Patliology. 

U.S., Loyola Coilojie of Baltinior.'. 11)4!): M.D., University of .Maryland, 1!»."),3. 

CHARLES F. CARROLL, JR., Instructor in Pathology. 

B.S., (Juilford Collefre, 104'.): .M.D., University of Maryland, l!tr).3. 

HARRY COHEN, Assistant in Pathology. 

U.S., University of Maryland, 1030; M.I)., 1043. 

R.\YMOND M. CUNNINGHAM, Instructor in Pathology. 

U.S.. Loyola College of Baltimore. 10:{."> : .M.D., University of .Maryland, lOI'.O. 

GEORGE H. FRISKEY, Assistant in Pathology. 

B.A., .lolins Hopkins University. 10.")1 ; M.I).. University of .Maryland, l'.).'.."(. 

LOUIS C. GAREIS, Instructor in Pathology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, lO.Sl ; M.D., 103.S. 

JOSEPH P. GILLOTTE, Assistant in Pathology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, lO.-jl ; M.D., 1053. 

ALBERT E. GOLDSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
M.D., University of Mai'ylanil, 1012. 

THEODORE KARDASH, Instructor in Pathology. 
B.S., University of Maryland. 103S ; M.D.. 1942. 

LESTER KIEFER, Instructor of Pathology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1043; M.D.. University of Pennsylvania, 19.53. 

HOWARD B. MAYS, Instructor in Pathology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1035. 

WALTER C. MERKEL, Associate Professor of Pathology. 

B.A., Dickinson Collese. 1022 : M.D., University of Maryland, 1020. 

DEXTER L. REIMANN, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1035; M.D., 1930. 

JOHN A. WAGNER, Associate Professor of Pathology and Head of the Sub- 
department of Neuropathology. 

B.S., Washington ("oUefje, 10:!4 ; M.D.. University of Maryland, 1038. 

C. GARDNER WARNER, Associate Professor of Pathology. 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1024; M.D., Universit^v of Maryland, 1928. 

TOBIAS WEINBERG, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
B.A.. Johns Hopkins University, 1930; M.D., 1933. 

ROBERT B. WRIGHT, Associate Professor of Pathology. 

B.S., Centre College, 1020; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1024. 

DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

J. EDMUND BRADLEY, Profcs.sor of Pediatrics and Head of the Department. 
B.S., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1928; M.D., OeorKOtown University, 1032. 

RUTH W. BALDWIN, .'Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the 
Pediatric Seizure Clinic. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941 ; M.D., 1943. 



28 UNiriiRsiry oi- marvi'.am) 

SAMUEL P. BESS MAX, Associate Frofi-ssor <if I'ldiatrics. 

.M.lf., WasliiilKtoii KiiiveiNJly, J'J4-1. 

ANNIE MARTHA BESTEKBRELRTJE, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
B.A., University of 'AwiUAx, iwas ; .M.L)., .loluis Ho|)kins UnivtTsil\, I'.u;!. 

MELVIN N. BORDEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

H.A., Johns Hoplviiis Uiiiversit.v. 1!K^4 ; .M.D., l iiivcisily i.t Miiryland, I'.Cis. 

LESTER HAROLD CAPLAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

H.X., Johns Hopkius L'liivelsil.v, I'.KiO ; Sl.L>., liiiversity of .\lar.\ laii.l, I'.Mii. 

THOMAS A. CHRISTENSEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

U.S., Holy Cross College, I'.i;!! ; .M.!>., Gcorj;eto\vii L'liivursity, l'J35. 

RAYMOND L. CLEMMENS, In.structor in Pediatrics and Director of the De- 
velopmental Clinic. 

B.S., Loyola Colh'ge of Baltimore, l'.i47 ; .M.l)., I'liiversily qf Marylaiiil. IK.'.l. 

GRANGE S. COFFIN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.S., Val(.' Uuivorsily, lit4;! ; .M.li., Coliiiiibia I'liix ci'slty, I'.H". 

JOSEPH M. CORDI, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins I'niversily, l".i:!l: .M.S., 1 !(:{:; ; M.l),, l!i:!r,. 

ROBERT M. N. CROSBY, Instructor in Pediatric. 
.\I.D., University of .Maryland, lU4;i. 

GARRETT E. DEANE, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.S., Weslmiuster Coilejjo, iy4:! ; M,lt., Washin.ulini University, lfl4(i. 

LEON DONNER, Assi.stant in Pediatrics. 

B.S., Maryland Slate Teachers College, 1042: .M.i>„ University of -Mar.viand, lU.jl, 

EDWARD G. FIELD, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.S., Hampdeu-Syduey College, i;»4i; ; .M.D., Medical College of Virginia, I'.U.'i. 

JEROME FINEMAN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
B.S,, University of Maryland, liCJO; M,D,, 1!)8::, 

ABRAHAM HARRY FINKELSTEIN, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
.M.D., University of Maryland, IDiT. 

KURT GLASER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

M.l),, University of Lausanne, llCJi) ; M.Sc, University of Illinois, l!t4S. 

SAMUEL S. CLICK, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

A.B,, Johns Hopkins University, 191'0 ; M.D., University of .Maryland, 11)25. 

HOWARD GOODMAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

rh.G., University of Marylan.l, 1930; K,S,, 1931.': M,r>.. in:!4. 

MARTIN K. GORTEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1943; M.l),, University of .Maryland, 1949, 

JANET BAILLIE HARDY, Lecturer in Pediatrics. 

B.A., University of British Columliia, 1937; M.D.C.M., .M((Jill University, 1941. 

MARY L. HAYLECK, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

A.B., Gtoueher College, 1934 ; .M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 

FREDERICK JOSEPH HELDRICH, JR., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
B.A., Getty.sbwrg College, 194."; M.D., University of .Maryland, 194)S. 

CLEWELL HOWELL, Associate in Pediatrics. 

B.S., Davidson College, 1919 ; M.I)., University of Maryland, 1924. 



SCHOOL OF MEDIClh'E 29 

I)A\11) JOSKPHS, AssistuDt in Pediatrics. 

A.I'.., r Diversity <.l' Ni.illi Carolina, l'J4;; : .\I.l).. Medical ("nlh-Ke tt( Vii;,'inia. litlT. 

JOHN VV. LOOPER, JR., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
M.l)., Mpdical CollPf-'e of Georgia, 19.-jli. 

C. LORING JOSLIN, Professor of Pediatrics. 
.M.l)., i:niver.sil.v of MarylaiKi, lOl:.'. 

JOHN M. KRAGER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

B.S.. Loyola College of Balthiiore, 1048; M.I>., L'niveisiiy of .Mnrylan.!, Ift.'ii'. 

.ARNOLD F. LAV'ENSTEIN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, in.'^r> : M.D., University of Maryland, 1!»:^H. 

(}. BOWERS MANSDORFER, Associate in Pediatrics. 

B.S., Gettysburg College, 1925; M.D., University of Maryland, I'.K^ii. 

MARY E. MATTHEWS, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

B.S.. Xortli Carolina Slate ColleKe, lOHf. ; M.S., University of North Carolina, 
1!M.-) : .M.l)., 1940. 

ISR.'KEL P. MER.ANSKI, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.S.. Trinity College, lif-T,; .M.D., University of Maryland, UiiiO. 

WILLIAM A. NIERMANN, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
.M.l»., Medical College of Virginia, 1948. 

LEONARD SCHERLIS, In.structor in Pediatrics. 

B.A., .lohns Hopkins Tniversity, llMi : M.D., i;)4r). 

SIDNEY SCHERLIS, Associate in Pediatrics. 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 10.'54 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 10:!8. 

WILLIAM M. SEABOLD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
B.S., University of Maryland, iniiS ; M.D., 1931. 

HENRY MURRAY SEIDEL, Instructor in Pediatrics. 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1943: M.D., 1940. 

FRED B. SMITH, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1920. 

MELCHIJAH SPRAGINS, Associate in Pediatrics. 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1941 : M.D., 1944. 

OLIVER WALTER SPURRIER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University. 192,"); M.D., T'niversity of Maryland, 1929. 

ALVIN A. STAMBLER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
B.S., M.D., T'niversity of Maryland, 19.")2. 

ARNOLD TRAMER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1936 ; M.D., 1949. 

WILLIAM EARL WEEKS, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

B.S.^ Wake Forest College, 1937; M.D., University of .Maryland, 1940. 

GIBSON JACKSON WELLS, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1932; M.D., University of Maryland, 1936. 

J. CARLTON WICH. Assistant in Pediatrics. 

B.S., University of .Maryland, 193.H ; M.D., 1943. 



30 UMriiRSlTY 01- MARVLAXP 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

JOHN CHRISTIAN KKANTZ, JR., Professor of Pliarniacology and Head of 
the Department. 

H.S., riiiv.Tsity of .Marylaiul. V.H':; : M.S., lOLN : I'li.I»., IJV.'.s. 

FREDERICK K. BELL, Assistant in Pharmacology. 
K.A., .Johns Mdiikius Univcrsil.v, \UV\ : I'll. I).. lUL'd. 

R.WMOND MERRITT BURGISON, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

HS. I»vola Collese of Baltimore, lit4.") : M.S.. I'niversitv of Maryland, I'.Ms : 
Ph.D., 1050. 

RUTH MUSSER, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

U..\., Goucher Collefrc, 11)17: M.S., rnivprsity of Marylaiul, 1031. 

EDWARD BYRD TRUITT, JR., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

U.S.. Medii'al ('olloge of Virginia. 104.'.: I'h.l)., rniversity of .Maryland. lO.'.O. 

JOSEPH McCURLEY WHITE, III, Lecturer in Pharmacology. 
B.S., Loyola CoUefre. 104'_' : M.D., Universiiy of Maryland. 104."). 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

WILLIAM RUTHRAUFF .AAIBERSON, Professor of Physiology and Head of 
the Department. 

Ph.K.. Lafiiypttp College, 101."J : rii.D., Princeton rniversity, 1922. 

JE.\NNE ANN BARRY, Junior Instructor in Physiology. 
B.A., Cornell University, 1051. 

FREDERICK PALMER FERGUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology. 

B.A.. AVesleyan University, 103S : M.A., 10:!0 : Ph.D., rniversity of Minnesota, 1043. 

SAMUEL LOUIS FOX, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Ph.G., T'niversity of Maryland, 1034: B.S.. 103(i : M.D., 103.S. 

ARMAND JOEL GOLD, Assistant Professor of Physiological Research. 

A.B.. Western Maryland College, 1040 ; M.S., l^niversitv of Maryland. 1051 ; Ph.D., 
1055. 

SYLVIA HIMMELFARB, Instructor in Physiology. 
A.B., <loucher College, 103.S. 

DIETRICH CONRAD SMITH, Professor of Physiology; Associate Dean. 

B.A., T'niversity of Minnesota, 1023 : M.A., 10li4 : Ph.D., Harvard University. 1028. 

MARGARET HINES SICKELS, Instructor in Physiology. 

A.B., :Marv \A'ashington College, 1040: :M.S., Northwestern T'niversity, 1051: Ph.I>., 
1054. 

JOHN IRVING WHITE, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1030: Ph.D., Rutgers T'niversity, 1050. 

JAMES HENRY WILLS, Lecturer in Physiology. 

B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1034: M.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1036; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1041. 

DEPARTMENT OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND 
REHABILITATION 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation 
and Head of the Department. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1910: M.D., .Johns Hopkins University, 1912. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 31 

DOROTHEA W. BARTHEL. Instructor in Rehabilitation. 

A.B., Goucher College, lOSO ; P.T., Army Medical Center, 194."i. 

RAY J. BEASLEY, Associate in Preventive Medicine and Associate Director of 
the Medical Care Clinic. 

M.I)., .lolms Hopkins University. 104!). 

MARY M. BRUMFIELD, Assistant in Preventive Medicine (Social Service). 

GRANGE S. COFFIN, Instructor in Preventive Medicine and Chief of the 
Pediatric Section, Medical Care Clinic. 

B.S., Yale Tniversity, 1!I43 ; M.D.. Colnniliia I'niversify. 1!M7. 

ALEXANDER S. DOWLING, Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine. 
A.B., Del'ainv University, in2.'> ; M.D., Harvard University, in3<t. 

ROBERT E. FARBER. Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine. 

.V.B., Prineeton Universitv, 1040: M.n.. .Tolnis Hopkins University, 104."! : M.l'.H.. 
105(5. 

FLORENCE I. MAHONEY, Associate Profes.sor of Physical Medicine. 

B.S., Universitv of Wisconsin. 1027 : M.S., WVM) \ M.D., Women's Medical College, 

io:{7. 

JOE L. STOCKARD, Instructor in Preventive Medicine. 

B.S., Yale University, 1044 ; M.D., University of Kansas, 1948. 

MATTHEW TAYBACK. Assistant Professor of Biostatistics. 

A.B., Harvard University, 19.30 ; M.A.. Columbia University, 1940 ; Sc.D., Johns 
Hopkins l^niversity, lO-iS. 

WILLIAM H. F. WARTHEN, Associate Professor of Hygiene and Public Health. 
B.A., Jolins Hopkins University, 1019; M.D., 10L>2 : M.P.H.. 1040. 

HUNTINGTON WILLIAMS, Professor of Hygiene and PubHc Health. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1915; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1019: Dr.P.H., 191'1. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY 

JACOB E. FINESINGER. Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Department. 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 192,3; M.A., 1925; M.D., 1029. 

A. RUSSELL ANDERSON. Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.A., Wisconsin University, 1929 ; M.D., University of Chicago, 193.3. 

CHARLES BAGLEY, HI, Associate in Psychiatry. 

B.S., Loyola College of Baltimore, 1944 ; M.D., I'niversity of Maryhmd, 1950. 

RAYMOND ISSAC BAND, Associate in Psychiatry. 

A.B., George Washington I'niversity, 1945 : M.D.. 1948. 

KLAUS BERBLINGER, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

M.D., University of Munich. 19.34 : M.D.. I'niversity of Bern. 1936. 

JOSEPH S. BIERMAN, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

B..V.. Washington I'niversity, 1945; M.D., Washington University. 1950. 

LID.\ C. BROWN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

M.D., Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania. 1948. 

ENOCH CALLAWAY. Ill, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
A.B.. Columbia University. 1944: M.D.. 1947. 

J. G. N. CUSHING, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

B.S.. A'illanova Collet'e. 1931 ; M.D., Jefiferson Medical College, 1935. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

RICHARD II. DOSS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
\r.l>., .Tolins Hopkins University, 1948. 

RAT.PII L. DUNLAP, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

A.B., Antioch College. 1049: M.A., Ohio Stati- I'liivcrsily, litr.l ; I'h.H., lO.-..-,. 

WALTER S. EASTERLING, Associate in Psychiatry. 
B.S., University of Arkansas, 1040: M.D., 1047. 

WILLIAM H. EDWARDS. Instructor in Psychiatry. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins luiversity, 1040; M.D., University of Maryland. lO.'il. 

WILLIAM W. ELGIN, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

B.A., Washington and Lee University, 1 '_'.'> ; M.D., .Tohns Itoiikiiis University, lltUO. 

KURT GLASER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

.M.S., University of Illinois, 1040; M.T»., University of Lausanne, 10.'?0. 

BERNARD GORDON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1937: M.D., University of I-oiiisville. U.MLV 

ROBERT G. GRENELL, Associate Professor of Psychiatric Research. 

B.S.. College of the City of New York, IK^'i : .M.Se., New York University, lO.Sr, ; 
IMi.n., University of Minnesota, 104^. 

CAROLA B. GUTTMACHER, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
M.n., University of Buenos Aires, 1044. 

MANFRED GUTTMACHER, Associate CHnical Professor of Psychiatry. 
B.A., .Johns Hopkins University. 1010; M.D.. 102.S. 

IRENE L. HITCHMAN, Associate in Psychiatry. 

B.S., Maedchen Realgymnaslum, 10'_'7; M.D., ITniversity of Innsbruck, l'XV,\. 

SARAH V. HUFFER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1940 ; M.D., lO.-.n. 

MARVIN JAFFE, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1942 ; M.D., 1945. 

ARTHUR R. JENSEN, Assistant in Medical Psychology. 

B.A.. University of California. 194.": M.A., San Diego State College, 1952: Ph.K.. 
Columbia University, 1055. 

DENNIS T. JONES, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1050 ; M.D.. Bowan-Gray School of Medicine. 105.'?. 

LESTER M. LIBO, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology. 
A.M., Stanford University, 194S ; Ph.D., 1951. 

EPHRAIM T. LISANSKY. Associate in Psychiatry. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 103'; : M.D., University of ^taryland. 10.S7. 

WILLIAM W. MAGRUDER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.S., Mississippi State College. 1042: .M.D.. Duke University. 1044. 

MARION MATHEWS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.A., Agnes Scott College. lO.'U; M.S., Kniorv University, 10:?5 : M.D Universitv 
of Georgia, 1040. 

FRANCIS McLaughlin, instructor in Psychiatry. 
M.D., Unii-ersity of Maryland, 1039. 

CESAR MEZA. Associate in Psychiatry. 

M.D.. National University of Guatemala. 1044. 

HARRY M. MURDOCK. Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
B.S.. University of Nebraska, 1925: M.D.. 1027. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 33 

ROMAN K. NAGORKA, Assistant in Occupational Therapy in Psychiatry. 
B.S., Columbia I nivfi-sily, l!l."i^{ ; U.T., ISit'liiiiuiid rrtifessional liisl itiite. 

SAMUEL NOVEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

K..S., riiiv<,'isil.v ol Miir.vlaiul, 1 !•:!."( : .M.li., I'.KIS. 

FREDERICK E. PHILLIPS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
M.D., Wayne University, 1946. 

BENJAMIN POPE, Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology. 

I'.Sc.. Universitv of Manitoba, li)3.j : B.Ed., 1941; Ph.D., University of California, 

i;t:.(j. 

JULIAN VV. REED, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
.M.I>., Universitj of Marylunrt, l!t.">l!. 

JOHN R. REID, Professor of Philosophy in Psychiatry. 
I'h.D., University of California, 1936. 

JOAN H. REMY, Assistant in Medical Psychology. 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1947. 

KENT E. ROBINSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.A., Uuiver.sit.v of Cincinnati, V.\V6 ; M.D., 1947. 

NATHAN SCHNAPER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.S., Washington College, 1940; M.D., University of Maryland, 1040. 

KATHRYN SCHULTZ, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

B.S.. Iniversiiy of Chicago, 1928: M.D., .Johns Hopkins. University. 19:<-. 

GEORGE F. SUTHERLAND, Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
.\I.I)., MoGill l.'uiversity, 1928: .M.Sc, 19:'.2. 

ROBERT E. TRATTNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

D.n.S., Western Reserve University, 1'.t4.^i: A.B., 1947: .M.lt., University of 
Chicago, 1951. 

ISADORE TUERK, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

B.S., .Johns Hopkins University, 19;j(l ; .M.D., University of :Maryland, 19.i4. 

PHILIP VAIL, Assistant in Medical Psychology. 

B..\., Haveiford College, 19.".1 ; I'..^., Mennin^;er Foundation School for Psychiatric 
Aides, 19r)2. 

ROGER S. WATERMAN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B.S.. Bethany College, 194.S: M.li., University of Maryland, 1948. 

MARGARET S. WILSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

B..\., Lyn.hburg College. 1941 : .M.S.I'.S.W., Simmons School of Soci;il Work. 194S. 

IMOGENE YOUNG, Associate Professor of Psychiatric Social Work. 

B.A.. Sophie Newcomb College, 19;?3 ; M.S.W.. Tulane l^niversity. 19:iri. 

DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY 

JOHN MURRAY DENNIS, Professor of Radiology and Head of the Department. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943: .M.D., 194r.. 

IIF.RBERT BERNARD COPELAND, JR., Instructor in Radiology. 
.Mil.. University of ^faryland, 1944. 

( HARLES NUCKOLS DAVIDSON, Professor of Glinical Radiology. 
.M.l».. University of Virginia. 19;^S. 



34 LXirflRSITV or MARYLAND 

FERNANDO GERMAXO BLOEDORN, Associate Professor of Radiology and 
Head of the Division of Radiotherapy. 

M.l»., University do! Liloral, Kosurio, ArKciil ina, 11)30. 

ROBERT PAGE BOUDREAU, As.sistant Professor of Radiology. 
M.A., I'rincpton rniversity, 104:'.; M.I)., Syraiiisc IniviT.sity, IDIC. 

EDWARD RUNKEL DANA, Assistant Professor of Radiology. 

H.A., Weslcynn Vniversity, 1!)41 : .M.D.. .Ii.lms Hopkins (nivorsity. 1044. 

JOHN DeCARLO, JR., Assistant Professor of Radiology. 

A.H.. TcniiiU' Iniverslty, l'.)4(>: M.I>.. .Ictr.Tsoii .M. ■(Ileal CoUi'jjf, 1!)44. 

NATHAN BERNARD HYMAN, instructor in Radiology. 
M.I)., I'niversity of Maryland, 1!)4(1. 

JAMES A. LYON, JR., Associate in Radiology. 

A.A., rrinceton University, 1044: M.D., Loiij; Island ('(.llt'j;c of Medicine, 1047. 

HENRY HOLLINGSWORTH STARTZMAN, Associate in Radiology. 
M.n., University of Maryland, 10.">(). 

ALBERT B. SHACKMAN, Instructor in Radiology. 
B.S., University of Michigan, 104.': M.D., 104X. 

HERBERT LEONARD WARRES, Instructor in Radiology. 

B.S.. New York University, lOSli : .M.D., University of .Maryl.ind, lO.SS. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

ROBERT WILLIAM BUXTON, Professor of Surgery and Head of the Depart- 
metit. 

A.H., Kansas University, 10:U : M.D., lo:!(! ; M.S., Uiiiveisity of Miclii^-an, 104,3. 

ROBERT CALVIN ABRAMS, Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
A.P.., .Johns Hopkins University. 1035; M.D., 10:;0. 

THURSTON R. ADAMS. Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
M.D., I'niversity of Maryland, 1034. 

JAMES GIVENS ARNOLD, JR., Professor of Neurological Surgery and Head 
of the Division. 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 10i'."i: M.D., .Johns Hopkins University, 1020. 

ROBERT Z. BERRY, Associate in Otolaryngology. 

B..\., West Virginia University, 1041 : M.I)., University of .Maryland. 1043. 

HAROLD PAUL BIEHL, Assistant in Surgery. 

A.B.. Western Maryland Collefre, 103t; : M.D., I'niversity of Maryland, 1040. 

HENRY FRANCIS BONGARDT, Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
B..*^.. Creighton T'niveisily, 1010: M.D., 1010. 

HARRY CLAY BOWIE, Assistant Professor of Surgery, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 10:!3; M.D.. 103<!. 

SIMON H. BRAGER, Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1028. 

OTTO CHARLES BRANTIGAN, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
B.S., Northwestern University, 1931 : M.J)., 1034. 

HENRY ALISON BRIELE. Associate in Postgraduate Surgery. 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1031 ; M.I>., 1930. 



SCHOOL 01' MfLDICINn 35 

ANTHONY VINCENT BUCHNESS, Assistant in Surgery. 

B-A., Loyola College of Baltininrc, I'.tKi : M.H., riiivcrsity of Maryl^iiid, IICJ:.'. 

HAROLD HUBERT BURNS, As^ociate in Surgery. 

R.S., University of rittslmi^'. lltas; M.l).. I'liivcrsity of Maryliind. VXAd. 

JOHN W. CHAMBERS, Instructor in Surgery. 

A.B.. Johns Hopkins University, litoit ; M.D., I'.Uy. 

RICHARD G. COBLENTZ, Clinical Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
A.R., Johns Hojiliins University, 1!»14 : M.D.. 1018. 

WILFORD ANDERSON HALL COUNCILL. JR., A.ssistant in Urology. 
B.S., Davidson Collejie. VM'^ : M.D.. University of Virginia. liMT. 

E. EUGENE COVINGTON, Associate in Oncology. 
M.D.. University of Maryland, 1027. 

R. ADAMS COWLEY, Assistant Professor of Thoracic Surgery; Director of the 

Cardio-Pulmonary Pliysiology Laboratory and Assistant Director of Experi- 
mental Surgery. 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1944. 

ROBERT M. N. CROSBY, Associate in Neurological Surgery. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 104:!. 

RICHARD J. CROSS, Associate in Otolaryngology. 

B.S., Mt. St. Marys College, 104.'?: M.D., University of Maryland. 1040. 

RAYMOND M. CUNNINGHAM, In.structor in Surgery. 

B.A., Loyola College, 10.3."> : M.D., University of Maryland. lOno. 

MICHAEL L. DeVINCENTIS, Instructor in Surgery. 

B.S., Loyola College, ]0:?7: M.D., University of Maryland, 1041. 

WILLIAM CHARLES DUNNIGAN, Assistant in Surgery. 

A.B., Loyola College. lO.Sl : M.D., University of :Maryland, 10:5.") 

FRANK PHILIP DWYER, JR., Assistant in Otolaryngology. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 1948. 

CHARLES REID EDWARDS, Professor of Surgery. 
M.D., University of Maryland. lOl.S. 

MONTE EDWARDS, Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

M.R.C.S. (England). L.K.C.L*. (Ix-ndon). S). Thomas' llosi.ital Medical Seliool, 1917. 

WILLIAM C. ESMOND. Instructor in Surgery. 
B.S., University of Maryland. 1040 : M.D., 10,51. 

LEE KENDALL FARGO, Associate in Urology. 

M.D.. I'.altiniore College of Physicians and Surgeons. 1020. 

WILLIAM HENRY FISHER, JR.. Associate in Postgraduate Surgery. 
M.D.. Duke University. 1010. 

SAMUEL LOUIS I~OX, .^s.sociatc Professor of Otolaryngology. 
I'h.t;., University of Maryland, 10:;4 : B.S.. lO.'JC. : M.D., 1038. 

WILLIAM LYNNEWOOD GARLICK, Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery. 
A.B., Kniory University, lO.SS ; M.D., George Washington University. 10.37. 

JASON H. GASKEL, Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

B.A., Johns Hoi)kins University, 10.30: M.D.. University of Maryland, 10.34. 
MOSES GELLMAN, .Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

B.S.. University of Itichniond. 1017: M.D., Johns Hopkins University. 1021. 



36 UNlll'.RSITY Of' MARYLAND 

WIIJJAM R. (JKRAGHTY, Assistant in Surgery. 
M,I».. Halliinor.' M.'dl.iil Colirne, liUL'. 

JAMI-:S J. GERLACH, Assistant in Otolaryngology. 

A.M.. Polonulo College, 104.{ ; .\1.I».. luivcrsily of Mjir.vluml, I'.Md. 

I'RANCIS \V. GILLIS, Assistant Professor of Urology. 
.M.l>.. lliiivcrsily of Miiryhiml, I'.iL'T. 

AKDRK.S C. GOMEZ, Assistant in Snrfjery. 

.\..\., rniv.M-sity of St. 'I'oiikin. Miiiiilii, IIM.".; .M.H.. I'.tr.d. 

L.OUIS K. liOODMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

AM., .lolins Hopkins rnivcrsity. lit.'U ; M.D., I niv.-rsity ol .Marylnnd, \'X;s. 

GEORGE (iOVATOS, Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

.\.K., Boston College, 10211; M.D.. .Johns Hopkins Uiiiveisity, UKiO. 

ISA.\C' (iUTMAN, Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 
H.S.. liiiversity of Maryland, 1931; M.D., 19:54. 

l'~REDERRK R. HAASE, Assistant in Otolaryngology. 
B.S., Inivpisity of Miiiyland, 1!>4X : M.D., 1Ut7. 

CALVIN Y. HADIDIAN. Assistant in Thoracic Surgery. 
R..\., Am.Tlcan T'nivtTsity of P.oiint, 1048; M.D., 1947. 

JOHX S. HAINES, Assistant Professor of Urology. 

\.n.. WaslihiKlon aixl Lot- rnivcrsity. 19;?4: M.D., .lohns Hopkin.s University, 19:58. 

l.l-OXARI) GERARD llAMRKRRY, Assistant in Surgery. 

.\.B.. lioyola Colleuc, T.t40 : M.D., Inivi'isitv of .Maryland, 1950. 

ROBERT EAIRRANK HEALY, Instructor in Surgery. 

U.S.. Iniv.Tsity of Maryland, 1 0.'iO ; M.D., 1934. 

DONALD B. 1 1 EBB, Assi.stant in Surgery. 
M.D., .lolins Hopkins Cniversity, 1938. 

RANMOXD I'. HELERICH, Associate in Surgery. 

\.n., Ixiyola College. 1!)-_'T; M.I>., liiiversiiy of Maryland, 1931. 

JOHN H. HIRSCHFELD. Instructor in Otolaryngology. 
M.D., I'niversity of Vienna, 1938. 

JOHN FRANCIS HOGAN, Assistant Professor of Urology. 

M.D., College of Physicians and .Surgeons of the University of .Maryland, 1911. 

JOHN FRANCIS HOGAN. JR.. Instructor in Urology. 
.M.D., University of Maryland, 1047. 

WILLIAAl ADDISON HOLBROOK. Assistant in Surgery. 
B.S.. University of .Maryland. 1942; M.D.. 1945. 

JOHN \^ERNON HOPKINS, Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

H..\.. Oxford University. lOJ."? : M..\., \<.)r,:i ; M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926. 

(A'RUS F. HORINE. Associate Profes.sor of Surgery. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1919. 

HARRY CLAY HULL, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
M.D.. University of Maryland. 1932. 

CALVIN HYMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

n.A., .Tolins Hopkins University. 19121 : .M.D.. University of Maryland, 1926. 

BENJAAHN HERBERT ISAACS, Assistant of Otolaryngology. 

A.r?., .Folins Hopkins Uiiiversity, lO.TJ; M.D.. University of Maryland, 1936, 



SCHOOL OF MI'DICINli 37 

.K)S1<:PH victor JERARDI, Associate in Surgery. 
n.S., DnivfTsily of MaryliiiK], I'XM) ; M.I)., 1084. 

KDWARD SOOY JOHNSON, Associate Profr^si.r of .^urge'y. 
\l.l».. Iiiiversity of Maryland, iniL'. 

I'.X'KRETT D. JONES, Assistant in rjrthopedic Surgery. 

M..\., Western Maryland Collt-KO, lil.'iS ; M.P.. rnivcisilx „( Mm i\ I.hkI, I94i:. 

CLYDE F. KARNS, Instructor in Surgery. 

B.S.. Sf. .fohn's Collego, V.yJ2 : MP.. Inivor^ity of Maryhind, I'.iJT. 

PAYNE A. KAYSER, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology. 

n.S., ITuiversity of West Virninia, l!t2."i; M.D., Mnivrrsity of .M:irvlan(l. lOi'T. 

\UGUST KIEL, JR., Instructor in Neurological Surgery. 
M.I>., Universily of Maryland, 1040. 

I'.DWARD ANDREW KITLOWSKL Clinical Professor of Surgery (P-lastic). 
R.S.. Bncknoll Tiiivorsity. 1017: M.D.. .lohns Hopkins T'nivj-rsify. 1021. 

I'KEDERICK T. KYPER, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology. 
.M.I)., T'tiivorsity of Maryland. 102X. 

I\ FORD LOKER, Associate in Surgery. 

I'.S.. rniversity of Maryland, 10."?7 ; M.D.. 1040. 

\\ ILLIAM B. LONG, Associate in Postgraduate Surgery. 
n..\.. r'nivorsily of Marylnnd, 1084 ; M.D., 10;i7. 

WILLIAM DAWSON LYNN, Instructor in Surgery. 

M.S., rriiiccton rnivorsify, 1!M0; M.D., .lolnis Hopkins rnivPrsity. 104:;. 

ISADORE MASERU/, Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

M.l'.. I'niversily of Maryland, IOL'4. 

HOWARD BROOKS MAYS, Assistant Professor of Urology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, lO.S.'i. 

HOWARD B. McELWAIN, Assistant in Surgery. 
M.D.. Iniveisity of Maryland, 1010. 

WILLIAM RAYMOND McKENZIE, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology. 
M.D.. Colh'ire of riiysiciiins and Sur^fons of the I'niviM-sity of Marylimd. lOI.'i. 

KARL FREDERICK MECH. Associate in Surgery. 

H.S., rniversity of Maryland. 10.8L': M.D.. 103.".. 

HERMAN J. MEISEL, In.structor in Urology. 
B..V.. rohimbia T'nlversity, 1020: M.D., 1032. 

JOSEPH H. MENNING, Instructor in Urology. 

T?..\., Loyola folleue. 1032: M.D.. CicorKrtown University. 1037. 

THOMAS DICKSON MICHAEL, A.ssistant in Otolaryngology. 

M.D.. .lelTerson .Medieal rolleuo. 11)40. 

ELLIOT MICHELSON, Instructor in Thoracic Surgery. 
\.H.. .lohns Hopkins TTniversity. 1030; M.D.. 103;".. 

LYLE JORDAN MILLAN, Associate in Urology. 
^I.D., (Jeorge WasIiinKtoi\ I'niversily. 1!I21. 

JOSEPH M. MILLER, Associate in Surgery. 

A.M. Polnniliia T'nlversity. 10:!1: M.P.. Inivorsity of Minn'sotji. lO:;!). 

JAMES PATTON MILLER, Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
M.D.. Columbia I'niversitv. 1040 



38 UXfJT.RSITV OF MARYLAND 

KIRK MOORE, Assistant in Surgery. 

A.n., I'riiifcton rniv«'rsit.v, liMl : M.l".. .luluis Hopkins l"iiiv.Tsil.\ . l'.»44. 

JOHN DUKR MOORKS, Instructor in Surgery. 

H.S.. Johns Hopkins IniviTsit.v, lit-H : M.D.. Univcisily of Maryland, lOHi.'. 

WILLIAM H. MOSBERG, JR., Associate in Neurological Surgery. 
R.S.. University of Maryland, l!t1L>: M.D., l!t44. 

JAMES WHARTON NELSON Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

A.B., St. John's College, 1!>1S : M.I)., Iniversity of Marylaml, 1!)L*5. 

THOMAS R. O'ROURK, Professor of Otolaryngology and Acting Head of the 
Division. 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1!tL>l. 

FRANK JOSEPH OTENASEK, Instructor in Neurological Surgery. 

A.n.. Loyola College of Baltimore. W.V.i : M.D., Johns Hopkins University. l'.l.37. 

CLARENCE W. PEAKE, Associate Professor of Surgery. 
M.D., University of Maryland. lOL'T. 

DANIEL JAMES PESSAGNO, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

B.A.. Rock Hill follege, 191G : ISI.I)., University of Maryland. 1020. 

PATRICK CAREY PHELAN, JR., Associate in Surgery. 

B.A.. Uoyola r(dlege, 1031 : M.D.. Univ.Tsity of Maryland, l'."4li. 

ROSS Z. PIERPONT, Assistant in Surgery. 

B.S.. University of Maryland, lit:!ii : M.D.. I!t4(i. 

HARRY PRIMROSE PORTER. Assistant in Otolaryngology. 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 19.S9; M.D.. 194,S. 

JOHN M. REHBERGER, Assistant in Otolaryngology. 

B.S.. Uoyola College. 15)40; M.D., New York Medieal ('cillc-e. in4!t. 

CHARLES A. REIFSCHNEIDER, Clinical Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 
M.D.. University fo Maryland, I'-Ml!. 

HERBERT E. REIFSCHNEIDER, Associate in Surgery. 

A.B.. Jolins Hopkins University. Ittlii': M.D.. T'niversity of Maryland. I'.»:i7. 

WILLIAM BENJAMIN REVER, JR., Associate in Surgery. 
M.D.. University of Maryland. 1 !».".(). 

BENJAMIN SUNDERLAND RKTf, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology. 
P.. .v., Johns Hopkins Universily. ^'.rs.\ : M.D.. Universily of Maryland. 1!»28. 

WILLIAM F. RIENHOFF, JR., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

B..V., Cornell T'niversity, 101.-.: :M.D,. Johns Hopkins University. T.tlO. 

MARTIN ALBERT ROBBINS, Associate in Urology. 

r..A.. Johns Hoi.kins University, I'.V.'.U : M.D.. University of Maryland, 1048. 

HARRY L. ROGERS, Clinical Professor of Ortliopedic Surgery. 
M.D.. University of Maryland, 101.". 

JOHN DA\'ID ROSIN. Associate in Surgery. 

B.S.., Johns Hopkins University. lO.SS; M.!".. University of Maryland. 1041'; M.S.. 
University of Minnesota. 10.-2. 

C. PARKE SCARBOROUGH, Associate in Surgery (Plastic). 

B.S.. Pennsylvania State Colle;:e. 10:!:i: AI.D., University of Maryland, lOlw. 

JOHN F. SCHAEFER, Instructor in Surgery. 

Pli.C.. University of Maryland. 10:!4 : B.S.. I!i:;(i: M.D.. UCIS. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 39 

IRVING SCHERLIS, Assistant in Urology. 

A.H.. Johns lloiikins riiiv(>rsi(.\ , li)4(): M.D.. I'liiversity of Maryland. 1!U3. 

THEODORE ALLISON SCHWARTZ, As.sistant Professor of Otolaryngology. 
IMi.C;., rnivcisity of .Maryland. 1080: B.S., 1»:'.2: M.D.. 10.^4. 

WILLIAM BOOTH SETTLE, Associate in Surgery. 
A.H., University of I'fMinsylvaiiia, I'.l.'iO : M.D., 1!»3.'^. 

ROBERT CLAY SHEPPARD, Associate in Surgery. 
B.S.. rniversity of Maryland. VXW : M.D.. 10.3S. 

E. RODERICK SHIPLEY, Associate in Surgery. 

B..\., .lohns lIoi)kins fnivcrsity. lO.^S: M.D.. rniversity of Maryland, 1042. 

CHARLES E. SIMONS, JR., Assistant in Surgery. 
.M.D.. rniversity of Washington. l!t.")l. 

ARTHUR GEORGE SIWINSKI, Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

r..A., .Tohns Hopkins I'nivtMsiiy. I'.tL'T : M.D.. rniversity of Maryland. 1081. 

EDWIN HARVEY STEWART, JR., Associate in Surgery. 
.M.D.. rniversity of Maryhind. 104:;. 

FREDERICK LOUIS STICHEL, JR., Assistant in Otolaryngology. 
B.S., University of :Maryland, 1048; .M.I)., 1044. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH SUPIK, Associate in Surgery. 
B.S.. University of Maryland, 1040; M.D., 1040. 

JOHN J. TANSEY, Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

A.B., Brown University, 1042: M.I>., University of Maryhind, 104.".. 

RAYMOND K. THOMPSON, Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
B.S.. University of Maryland. 1037: M.D., 1041. 

BATE C. TOMS, JR., Assistant in Surgery. 

B.S.. University of North Carolina. 1047; M.D.. 1050. 

T. JOSEPH TOUHEY, Assistant in Surgery. 
-M.D., University of Maryland. 1028. 

I. RIDGEWAY TRIMBLE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

B.A., Princeton University, 1022; M.D., .lohns Hopkins University. 102(!. 

HENRY FRANZ ULLRICH, Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
M.D.. University of Maryhind, 1020; Se.D.. Cohimhia University, 19.30. 

ALLEN FISKE VOSHELL, Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

B.A.. .Tohns Ilojjkins University, lOl;"; M.D., 1010. 

WILLIAM WALLACE WALKER, As.sociate Professor of Surgery. 

B.S., West Virginia University. 1021 ; M.D., University of Maryland. 1023. 

ARTHUR THOMAS WARD, JR., Associate in Otolaryngology. 

B.A.. .lohns Hopkins University. 1033: M.D., 10:1!). 

MILTON J. WILDER, Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

B.S.. University of Maryl^.nd. I'.i88: M.D.. 108'.t. 

DAVID REID WILL, Instructor in Surgery. 
M.D.. I'niversity of Maryland, 1048. 

AUSTIN H. WOOD, Associate in Urology. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1014. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

r,KOK(.K IIKRSCHKI. YEAdKR. Prulcssor of Clinical Surgery. 

r..S., I'liivfi-sil V ul Wist \iiv'iiii:i, 1!"-'T : M.I'., I'liivi-rsiiy of Mar.vlaiiil, I'.t.'.i. 

JOHN DAVID YOL'N(.. JR., Prult-ssor of Lrology and Head of the Division. 
H..\., Kriil>;«nviu.M- (■■.Hep-, \<X.\s -. .M.D., luiN fisiiy of M.ir.\ lim,l. 1!M1. 

JACOB ZIMMERMAN, Assistant in Surgery. 
.M.B., B.S.. rniversity of Ixtndoii. 1!»43. 

HOWARD LESTER ZUPNIK, Instructor in Surgery. 

H.S., University of Maryland. 10:i(l ; M.I)., V.VA'l. 
I 

"^ RESEARCH ASSOCIATES 

Elsa John, M.T., B.S., Research Associate in Medicine. 

Gerald D. Klee, M.D., Research Associate in Psychiatry. "^ 

Leopold May, B.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D., Research Associate in Psychiatry. 

Moritz Michaelis, Ph.D., Research Associate in Surgery. 

Harvey A. Robinson, A.B., A. A!., Ed.D., Research Associate in Psychiatry. 



FELLOWS 

Tanash Haralambos Atoynatan, P.G.N., M.D., Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Norman Bacher, B.S., M.D., Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Emidio Bianco, M.D., Fellow in Medicine. 

Jean M. Coyle, B.S., M.D., Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Roger H. Davidheiser, B.S., M.S., Fellow in Anatomy. 

Paul D. EUner, B.S., M.S., Fellow in Microbiology. 

Richard L. Glasser, A.B., Fellow in Physiology. 

Sheldon Goldgeiger, B.S., Summer Fellow in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Barrett Goldstein, A.B., Summer Fellow in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

William J. Hicken, B.A., Summer Fellow in Pharmacology. 

Syndey Katz, A.B., M.D., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine. 

Donald Keister, B.S., Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

Leonard Kogan, Summer Fellow in Neurology. 

Frank K. Kriz, B.S., Summer Fellow in Surgery. 

Frances Litrenta, A.B., M.D., Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Zenus A. McDonald, A.B., Fellow in Anatomy. 

Motoji Miyazaki, M.D., Fellow in Neurology. 

Sherwood Miller, B.S., M.D., Fellow in Medicine. 

Chung S. Park, B.S., M.D., Fellow in Pharmacology. 

William Rappoport, B.A., Summer Fellow in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Jay T. Rauh, Summer Fellow in Microbiology. 

Emily M. Rody, B.A., Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Walter M. Shaw, B.A., .Summer Fellow in Thoracic Surgery. 

Thomas Ashley Stebbins, B.A., Fellow in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Joseph Robert Suriano, B.S., Fellow in Microbiology. 

Yasashi Togo, ALD., Fellow in Medicine. 

Robert H. Weaver, B.S., Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

Harold R. White, B.S., Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

Virginia E. Young, A.B., Summer Fellow in Neurology. 



SCHOOL Oh- MEDICINE 41 

CONSULTANTS 

John M. Arthur, A.B., x\l.D., Consultant in Psychiatry. 

Bernard (jlueck, M.D., Consultant in Psychiatry. 

Frieda G. Rudo, B.A., Consultant in Hiocheniistry in Surgery. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS 

John D. Alexander, B.A., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Martin Anderson, B.S., M.S., Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Florence M. Burnett, R.N., B.S., M.S., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Alice M. Conlan, Research Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Flo Mohr Councill, A.B., Research Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

Dorothy DeSantis, Research Assistant in Medicine. 

Elmar Einberg, E.E., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Janet Estes, M.T., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

Julia J. Fitch, Research Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Ella Freytag, Research Assistant in Legal Medicine. 

Maria Garcia, A.B., Research Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

Joseph Greenblum, B.S.S., M.S., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Nancy B. Hofifman, B.S., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Elizabeth Baker Kelley, B.S., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Charles McBeth. B.S., M.S., Research Assistant in Legal Aledicine. 

Ann M. Morgan, B.S., Research in Pharmacology. 

Curtis B. Pfeiffer, Research Assistant in Anatomy. 

Daniel S. Sax, A.B., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Arthur Silverstein, B.A., M.A., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Dorothy Ann Streb, A.B., Research Assistant in Dermatology. 

Toba Tahl, B.A., M.S.S., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Myron Wolbarsht, A.B., Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

TRAINEES 

John Stauffer, M.D., Trainee in Arthritis — Metabolism. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The prosciU School of Medicine, with the title University of Maryland School 
of Medicine and Colle.<>e of Physicians and Surgeons, is the result of a consolida- 
tion and merger of tlic University of Maryland School of Medicine with the 
Baltimore Medical College (1913) and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Baltimore (1915). 

'rhrough the merger with the Baltimore Medical College, an institution of 
tiiirty-two years' growth, the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in 
faculty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 1872, and estab- 
lished on Hanover Street in a building afterward known as the Maternife, the 
first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected with the 
Washington University School of Medicine, in existence since 1827, and the college 
was removed to Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Through the consolidation with 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, medical control of the teaching beds in 
the Mercy Hospital was obtained. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest foun- 
dations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age among the 
medical colleges of the United States. It was organized in 1807 and chartered 
in 1808 under the name of the College of Medicine of Maryland, and its first 
class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College was empowered by the Legisla- 
ture to annex three other colleges or faculties : Divinity, Law', and Arts and 
Sciences ; and the four colleges thus united were "constituted an University by the 
name and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

The original building of the Medical School at the N. E. corner of Lombard and 
Greene Streets was erected in 1812. It is the oldest structure in this country 
from which the degree of doctor of medicine has been granted annually since its 
erection. In this building were founded one of the first medical libraries and one 
of the first medical school libraries in the United States. 

At this Medical School dissection was made a compulsory part of the curriculum, 
and independent chairs for the teaching of gynecology and pediatrics (1867). and 
of ophthalmology and otology (1873), were installed for the first time in America. 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate clinical 
instruction by the erection of its own hospital in 1823. In this hospital intramural 
residency for senior students was established for the first time. 

The .School of Medicine has been co-educational since 1918. 

BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES 

The original medical building at the N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene 
.Streets houses the ofiices of the Dean, Associate Deans, the Committee on 
.Admissions, and Postgraduate Committee and two lecture halls. 

The Administration Building, to the east of the original building, contains 
the Baltimore offices of the Registrar and two lecture halls. 

42 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 43 

TIic laboratory building at 31 Soutii Cjrecnc Street is occupied by tiie depart- 
ments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Biochemistry. 

The Frank C. Bressler Research Laboratory provides the departments of 
Anatomy, Histology and Embryology. Pharmacology, Physiology and Clinical 
Pathology with facilities for teaching and research. It also houses the research 
lalx)ratorie.s of the clinical departments, animal quarters, a laboratory for teaching 
Operative Surgery, a lecture hall and the Bressler Memorial Room. 

This building was erected in 1939-1940 at 29 South Greene Street opposite the 
Universitly Hospital. It was built with funds left to the School of Medicine by 
the late Frank C. Bressler, an alumnus, supplemented by a grant from the Federal 
government. The structure, in the shai)e of an 1, extends east from Greene Street, 
just nortli of the original building. 

MEDICAL LIBRARY , 

The Medical Library of the University of Maryland, foii'ided in 1813 by the 
purchase of the collection of Dr. John Crawford, now numbers about 40,000 volumes 
and several thousand pamphlets. Over six hundred of the leading medical journals, 
both foreign and domestic, are received regularly. The library, formerly housed 
in Davidge Hall, is now in temporary quarters at 6 South Greene Street for the 
interval while a new medical sciences library building is being constructed at the 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. Although much of the less used material 
is, of necessity, in storage, library services will be adequately maintained under 
the interim arrangement. 

The library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and the Welch 
Medical Library are open to students of the medical school without charge. 
Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody Library and the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library. 

OUT PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

The Out Patient Department is located on the S. W. corner of Lombard and 
Greene Streets. The building was originally the University Hospital. It has 
been remodeled to provide space and facilities for more than thirty clinics, the 
departments of X-raj', a Pharmacy, Laboratory and other ancillary services. 
Admission policies are predicated upon the teaching requirements of the School of 
Medicine and the ward services of the University Hospital. 

' A close liaison is maintained with the City Health Department through the joint 
eflForts of the University Hospital and the City Department of Health in main- 
taining the Well Baby Clinic, the Western Health District and the Medical Care 
Clinic, which arc housed in the Out Patient Department building. 

The Department of Art and the Department of Dental Anatomy also have 
quarters in the Out Patient Department building. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The L^niversity Hospital, a Dei>artnient of the ITniversity of Maryland, is 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND | 

the oldest institution for the care of the sick in tlie State of Maryland. It was |j 
opened in September 1823 under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary and at Ij 
tliat time consisted of only four wards, one of which was reserved for patients with j 
diseases of the eye. I 

I 
In 1933-1934 the New University Hospital Ruildin>; was erected. It has a i 

capacity of 435 beds and C<5 bassinets. In 1952-1953 an ultra-modern Psychiatric ! 

Institute Building was erected and a junctional wing was added to the general hos- j 

pital. The new additions increased the hospital bed capacity to 659 beds and 70 j 

bassinets devoted to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry and i 

the various medical and surgical specialties. Three hundred and forty-two are for : 

ward patients. j 

The new hospital buildings arc situated at the southwest corner of Redwood 
and Greene Streets opposite the medical school buildings. The students, therefore, 
are in close proximity dlid little time is lost in passing from the lecture halls and 
laboratories to the clinical facilities of the University Hospital. The hospital as 
planned, makes a particularly attractive teaching unit and is a very valuable addi- 1 
tion to the clinical teaching facilities of the medical school. ■ 

Most of the Ancillary Services are located on the second floor of the Hospital. ] 
The north wing is occupied by the department of roentgenology. The east wing 

houses clinical pathology and .special laboratories for clinical microscopy, biochem- j 

istry, bacteriology, and hematology. The south wing provides space for electro- j 

cardiographic and basal metabolism departments. The west wing contains the depart- j 

ments of rhinolaryngolog.v and bronchoscopy, industrial surgery, and male and | 

female cystoscopy. . . j 

The Emergency Service of the hospital receives and treats a large number of | 
emergency cases because of its proximity to the largest manufacturing and ship- i 
ping districts of the city. During the past fiscal year a total of 31,249 patients were j 

treated in the Emergency Room. j 

I 

The Out Patient Department of the University Hospital is a well organized ] 

teaching area. Over 100.000 visits to the various clinics of the Out Patient Depart- i 

inent were made during the last fiscal year. ] 

THE PSYCHI.ATRIC IXSTITUTF, 

The Psychiatric Institute of the University was opened for the care of patients 
in 1953. It is a six-story building connected directly with the University Hospital, 
of which it is an integral part. It houses the Department of Psychiatry of the 
Medical .School. The upper three floors of the building are reserved for the treat- 
ment and care of 100 in-patients. The out-patient unit, which includes the child 
guidance clinic and adult psychiatric clinics, occupies the three lower floors. Clinical 
and research laboratories are located in the first and second floors of the connecting 
wing. There is a lecture hall and a large study library on the first floor. 

Each of the upper floors is arranged into two wards with dining rooms next to 
a central kitchen for each ward. A nurses' station is in the center of each floor 
allowing ready visibility and access to the rooms along the corridors. The third 
and fourth floors arc used for disturbed patients. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 45 

Facilities are available to treat patients in every phase of psychiatric illness 
and rehabilitation. Rooms are available for the care of patients in the acutely dis- 
turbed phase of their illness. There are small units for various types of physical 
treatments and for hydrotherapy situated on and adjacent to the disturbed wards. 

Recreational facilities are available for adults and children in a large audi- 
torium and gymnasium on the seventh floor which lead to an enclosed roof. A 
large playground is available to in-patients and out-patients alike. 

The lower three floors of the building are used for the child guidance clinic 
and for out-patients. There are fi3 offices available to physicians, nurses, psy- 
chologists and social workers : also available are five large waiting rooms and three 
conference rooms. Eleven offices are adjacent to the wards and fourteen offices can 
be used for both in-patients and clinic patients. Sixteen offices have microphone 
outlets so physicians can make recordings for study. A library of recordings is 
near the main library where students can listen to recorded interviews. 

Space is provided for clinical and research laboratories. EEG connections are 
available to several laboratories. Three clinical laboratories, a psychological lab- 
oratory and a neuro-physiological laboratory are in the connecting wing between 
the psychiatric unit and the general hospital. These are available for purposes of 
diagnosis, treatment and research. 

MERCY HOSPITAL 

Mercy Hospital traces its history back to the foundation of the Washington 
School of Medicine in 1824. In 1872 some of the members of this institution 
founded a new school, which was the beginning of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Baltimore. 

Washington School of Medicine opened a dispensary and a small hospital at 
the corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets and named it the Baltimore City 
Hospital. This building served both as a hospital and a medical school. In 
1874 the Sisters of Mercy, upon the invitation of Washington School of Medicine, 
assumed responsibility for the Nursing Services of the hospital. In 1876, Wash- 
ington University merged with the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

In 1888 the Sisters of Mercy with the assistance of the Eaculty of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons laid the cornerstone of the present hospital. Since 
then the growing demands for more space have compelled the erection of addition 
after addition until now it accommodates 356 patients. 

In 1909 the name of tlie Baltimore City Hospital was changed to Mercy Hos- 
pital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive control of the 
University of Maryland School of Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 
One hundred ninety-three beds are allotted for teaching purposes. 

During the year ending December 31, 1954, there were 13,087 general admissions, 
25,888 dispensary visits, 2,544 obstetrical deliveries, and 14,330 emergency visits in 
the Accident Department. 



46 UNIJ-ERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Mercy Hospital founded its School of Medical Technologj- in 1928. It was 
officially approved in 1933 niaking it the first approved School of Medical Technology 
in the city. It is also approved by the Council of Medical Education and Hospitals 
of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

The clinical facilities of the School of Medicine have been largely increased by 
the liberal decision of the Department of Public Welfare to allow the use of the 
wards of these hospitals for medical education. The autopsy material also is 
available for student instruction. 

Members of the junior class make daily visits to these hospitals for clinical 
instruction in medicine, surgery, and the specialties. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following separate divisions : 
The General Hospital, 420 beds, 80 bassinets. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 500 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 440 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged) 425 beds. 
Out Patient Department. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Dickeyville. The site 
is within the northwestern city limits and of easy access to the city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it affords all the 
advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A hospital unit, complete in every respect, offers all modern facilities for the 
care of any orthopaedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 80 beds — endowed, and city and state supported. 

The orthopaedic dispensary at the University Hospital is maintained in closest 
affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from the Kernan Hospital. The 
physical therapy department is very well equipjed with modern apparatus and 
trained personnel. Occupational therapy has been fully established and developed 
under trained technicians. 

THE BALTIMORE EYE, EAR, AND THROAT HOSPITAL 

This institution was first organized and operated in 1882 as an outgrowth of the 
Baltimore Eye and Ear Dispensary, which closed on June 14, 1882. The name 
then given to the new hospital w^as The Baltimore Eye and Ear Charity Hospital. 
It was located at the address now- known as 625 W. Franklin St. The out-patient 
department was opened on September 18, 1882 and the hospital proper on 
November 1 of the same year. In 1898 a new' building afforded 24 free beds 
and 8 private rooms; by 1907 the beds numbered 47; at present there are 60 beds, 
29 of which are free. In 1922 the present hospital building at 1214 Eutaw Place 
was secured and in 1926 the dispensary was opened. In 1928 a clinical laboratory 
was installed. During 1953 the ot:t-patient visits numbered 22,434, 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 47 

Through the kindness of the Hospital Board and Staff, our junior students 
have access to the dispensary wliich they visit in small groups for instruction in 
ophthalmology. 

LUTHERAN HOSPITAL OF MARYLAND INC. 

The Lutheran Hospital of Maryland Inc., originally organized in 1923 as the 
West Baltimore General Hospital, is a general hospital of 191 adult beds and 43 
bassinets, located in the western section of the city. The hospital became an 
affiliate of the School of Medicine in 1953. 

The Lutheran Hospital of Maryland offers an academic postgraduate program 
in the major specialties of medicine, surgery, gynecology, and obstetrics, being 
fully approved by the respective American Boards. A postgraduate teaching pro- 
gram of lectures and clinics is an integral part of the residency training. The 
hospital provides modern laboratory and library facilities, particularly adapted 
to postgraduate medical education. An adequate clinical service is maintained 
for training in the medical and surgical specialties. All academic programs are 
under the supervision of a Director of House Officer Training. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



METHOD OF MAKING APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

When to apply : 

Applications must be filed during the period from September 15 to January IS 
for the subsequent September class. 

Where to apply : 

Requests for application forms should be sent to the Committee on Admissions, 
School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 522 West Lombard Street, Baltimore 
1, Maryland. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who have attended approved medical schools are eligible to file 
applications for admission to the second and third year classes only. These 
applicants must be prepared to meet the current first-year entrance requirements in 
addition to presenting acceptable medical school credentials, and a medical school 
record based on courses which are quantitatively and qualitatively equivalent to 
similar courses in this school. 

Application to advanced standing is made in accordance with the instructions 
accompanying the application form. 

Persons who already hold the degree of Doctor of Medicine will not be admit- 
ted to the Medical School as a candidate for that degree from this university. 



MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
The minimum requirements for admission to the .School of Medicine are : 

(a) Graduation from an approved secondary school, or the awarding of a high 

school equivalency certificate by a state or county board of public educa- 
tion, and 

(b) A minimum of three academic years of acceptable college credit, exclusive 

of physical education and military science, earned in colleges of arts and 
sciences, whose names occur in the current list of '"Approved Colleges of 
Arts and Sciences" as compiled by the Council on Medical Education and 
Hospitals of the American Medical Association. .Applicants with a 
bachelor's degree in arts and sciences from api)rovcd college or university 
will be given preference. 

48 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 49 

(c) The following courses and credits in required basic subjects must be com- 

pleted by June of the year the applicant desires admission: 

Semester Hours Quarter Hours 

(jencral biology or zoology *(6) 8 *(9) 12 

Inorganic chemistry *(6) 8 *(9) 12 

Organic chemistry 6 9 

Quantitative chemistry 3 5 

General Physics *(6) 8 *(9) 12 

English 12 18 

Foreign language 6 9 

(d) In addition, sufficient credits in Arts and Science courses to make a mini- 

mum of 90 hours, exclusive of courses in physical education and military 
science. Courses must be acceptable by the college or university in which 
they were taken as well as at the University of Maryland, as satisfying 
requirements for an A.B. or B.S. degree. 

(e) Students will not be admitted who have failures in courses, which if they 

were not absolved, would prevent them from completing requirements for 
an A.B. or B.S. degree. Therefore, if any unabsolved failures ap- 
pear on his transcript, the applicant must submit a letter from the Dean, 
Registrar or other authorized official stating that such is not the case. 
Careful attention should be given to the selection of elective courses particularly 
in the natural sciences. H possible, the student should plan a four-year curriculum 
with a suitable Arts and Sciences major, not necessarily in science. A major in 
some other area is quite acceptable although it is not intended to divert students 
from a science major if this is their field of choice or if they plan to follow re- 
search in medicine, li the student wishes to take science courses beyond those 
required, he is encouraged to take such subjects as Embryology, Psychology, Com- 
parative Anatomy, Parasitology, Genetics, Cellular Physiology, Physical Chemistry. 
Courses given in medical school such as Histology, Biochemistry, Neurology, Mam- 
malian Physiology, Human Anatomy and Bacteriology are not recommended unless 
they are required in the student's major sequence. Having cred-it in such courses 
will not excuse the student from taking them in medical school. In the non-science 
area, courses in Englisli, Philosophy, Sociology, Economics, Government and Poli- 
tics, History are recommended. 

Students are selected on the basis of their academic achievement, medical apti- 
tude test scores, recommendations from college instructors or premedical commit- 
tee, and personal interview. A student may be disqualified because of unsatisfactory 
reports in any of the areas. Academic achievement alone does not automatically 
insure acceptance as the Committee is equally concerned with personality, aptitude, 
character, motivation, and the assessment of the individual as a potential physician. 
Letters of recommendation from college instructors are requested from at least 
two science instructors and one non-science instructor. 

Preference will be given to Maryland residents but well-qualified applicants from 
other areas in the United States or Canada will be considered. Applicants from 
foreign schools must complete at least 2 years of premedical w'ork in an approved 



*Consideration will be given applicants from the New England area where 6 
semester hours, or 9 quarter hours, is the standard credit for a science course. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

college or university in tiie United States or Canada. Xo applicants from foreign 
medical schools will be approved for advanced standing. 

ST.\TE MEDICAL STCDEXT QUALIFYING CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for admission who live in or expect to practice medicine in Pennsyl- 
vania, New Jersey or New York, should apply to their respective state boards of 
education for medical student qualifying certificates (Pennsylvania and New Jersey) 
or approval of applications for medical student qualifying certificates (New York). 

Those students who are accepted must file satisfactory State certificates in the 
ofiice of the Committee on Admissions, School of Medicine, before registration. No 
exceptions will be made to this requirement. 

Addresses of the State Certifying Offices 

Director of Credentials Section, Pennsylvania Department of Public In- 
struction, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chief of the Bureau of Credentials, New Jersey Department of Public In- 
struction, Trenton, N. J. 

Supervisor of Qualifying Certificates, The State Education Department, 
Examinations and Inspections Division, Albany, N. Y. 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the time of 
their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at least one 
year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his first 
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, 
in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of the State 
by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, the right of the 
minor students to change from a non-resident to resident status must be established 
by him prior to the registration period for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be resident if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such residence 
has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place of 
abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 



SCHOOL OF MJ-.niClNE 51 

CURRENT FEES 

Application fee $ 7.50 

Matriculation tec ( paid unce ) 10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) — Residents of Maryland 650.00 

Tuition fee (each year) — Non-Residents 800.00 

Laboratory fee ( each year) 25.00 

Student health service fee (each year) 30.00 

-Student activities and service fee (each year) 20.00 

tLodging and meals fee 20.00 

( iraduation fee 15.00 

Re-exaniination fee (each subject) 5.00 

Late registration fee 5.00 

RULES FOR PAYMENT OF FEES 

Make all checks or money orders payable to the "University of Maryland". 

When offering checks or money orders in payment of tuition and other fees, 
students are requested to have them drawn in the exact amount of such fees. 
Personal checks whose face value is in excess of the fees due will be accepted for 
collection only. 

Acceptance.— Payment of the matriculation fee of $10.00 and of a deposit on 
tuition of S50.00 is required of accepted applicants before the expiration date 
specified in the offer of acceptance. This remittance will be credited upon 
registration to the first semester charges. In the event of withdrawal befor regis- 
tration the $10.00 matriculation fee will be retained by the School of Medicine 
and the S50.00 advance deposit will be returned on request. 

Registration. — For the Fall semester, all students, after proper certification, 
are required to complete a set of registration cards to be found in the Student 
Lounge of the Gray Laboratory before taking them to the Registrar's Office. All 
students are expected to complete their registration, including the payment of bills 
on the registration days. Those who do not complete their registration on the pre- 
scribed days will be charged a fee of $5.00. 

One-half of the tuition fee and all of the following — the laboratory fee, the 
student health fee, the maintenance and service fee and the student activities fee 
are payable on the date specified for registration for the first semester. 

The remainder of the tuition fee shall be paid on the date designated for the 
payment of fees for the second semester. Fourth year students shall pay the grad- 
uation fee, in addition, at this time. 

PENALTY FOR NON-PAYMENT OF FEES 

If semester fees are not paid in full on the specified registration dates, a 
penalty of $5.00 will be added. 



tSenior Students will be billed for this fee, covering lodging and meals for a 
two-week period while on obstetrical service at Baltimore City Hospitals. This fee 
must be paid by all senior students whether or not they serve during the previous 
summer or during the academic year. 



52 UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

If a satisfactory settlement, or an agreement for settlement, is not made with 
the business office within ten days after a payment is due, the student auto- 
matically is debarred from attendance at classes and will forfeit the other privi- 
leges of the School of Medicine. 

REEXAMINATION FEE 

A student who is eligible for reexaminations must secure a bill in the amount 
of $5.00 from the Registrar's Office and make payment to the Cashier for each 
subject in which he is to be examined, and he must present the receipt to the 
faculty member giving the examination before he will be permitted to take the 
examination. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SERVICE FEE 

This fee pays for the use of clothing lockers, provides librarj- privileges, 
maintains student loan collections, a student lounge and cafeteria. It supports 
a recreational program for students of all classes and provides photographs for 
identification for all school purposes, including state boards. It supports the 
activities of the Student Council. A portion ($5) of this fee provides a year- 
book for each medical student. This fee is budgeted by the Student Council and all 
expenditures from it must be approved by this body in accordance with its own 
By-Laws. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

James R. Karns, M.D Director, Student Health Service 

The Medical School has made provision for the systematic care of undergraduate 
medical students according to the following plan : 

1. Preliminary Exaviination — All new students will be examined during the 
first week of the semester. Notice of the date, time, and place of the examination 
will be announced to the classes and on the bulletin board. The passing of this 
physical examination is rrecessary before final acceptance of any student. 

2. Medical Attrition — Students in need of medical attention will be seen by 
the director. Dr. James R. Karns, in his office on the 8th floor University Hospital 
at 12 m. daily, except Saturday and Sunday. In case of necessity, students will be 
seen at their homes. 

3. Hospitalization — If it becomes necessary for any student to enter the hospital 
during the school year, the school has arranged for the payment of part or all of his 
hospital expenses, depending on the length of his stay and special expenses incurred 
This applies only to students admitted through the school physician's office. 

4. Physical Defects — Prospective students are advised to have any known 
physical defects corrected before entering school in order to prevent loss of time 
which later correction might incur. 

5. Eye Exaniifiation — Each new matriculant is required to undergo an eye 
examination at the hands of an oculist (Doctor of Medicine) within the three 
months immediately preceding his entrance to the School of Medicine. 



SCHOOL or MEDICINF. 53 

6. Limitations— It is not the function of this bt-rvice to treat chronic conditions 
lontracted by students before admission, nor to extend treatment to acute conditions 
arising in the period between academic years, unless the school physician recommends 
this service. 

GENERAL RULES 

The right is reserved to make chhanges in the curriculum, the requirements for 
graduation, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever the university authorities 
deem it expedient. The School of Medicine will not be responsible for the stu- 
dents' personal property. 

GRADING SYSTEM 
Official grades are designated by these symbols : 



Sy»ibol 


Numerical Equivalent 


Scholarship 


A 


Superior 


93-100 


B 


Good 


87- 92 


C 


Fair 


80- 86 


D 


Passing 


75- 79 


F 


I'ailure 


Below 75 


I 


Incomplete 
Withdrew, failing 




WF 





The class standing of seniors only will be released. This standing will appear 
on senior grade reports sent out from the Registrar's office after graduation. 

ADVANCEMENT AND GRADUATION 

1. No medical student will be permitted to begin work for credit in any semes- 
ter of any year who reports for classes later than one week after classes begin, 
except by permission of the Dean. 

2. No student will be permitted to advance with miabsolved failures. 

3. An average of C or better without failures in the year most recently com- 
pleted is required for advancement to junior and senior standing and for graduation. 

4. A student who in any one year has one failure together with grades of D 
in all other subjects, will be dropped from the rolls. 

5. A student who has failures in two completed major subjects will be dropped 
from the rolls. The courses, Anat. 101. Gross Anatomy, Microanat. 101. Micro- 
anatomy, and Neuroanat. 101. Neuroanatomy, are considered a single major subject 

6. Students are required to attend all scheduled classes. 

7. Should a student be required to repeat any year in any course, he must pay 
regular fees. 

8. A student failing his final examinations for graduation at the end of the 
fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the fouth year and take 
examinations in such other branches as may be required, provided he is permitted 
to enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

9. The general fitness of a candidate for advancement and for graduation as 



54 



rXirHRSITY OF M.iRri..li\D 



Will as the results of his exaniinations will ho taken into consideration hy the 
faculty. 

KQUIPMENT 

10. At the hcginning of the fust year, all freshmen nuist possess a complete 
set of dissecting instruments. In addition, they must provide themselves with 
microscopes equipped with a mechanical stage and a substage lamp. Microscopes 
must meet the standards described below : 

A standard microscope made by Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Zeiss or Spencer fitted 
with the following attachments, meets the requirements. 

Hi mm., lOx, 0.25 N.A.— 4.9 mm. working di.stance. 

4 mm., 4 3x, 0.65 N.A.— 0.6 mm. working distance. 

1.8 mm., y7x, oil immersion, 1.2.i N.A. — 0.13 mm. working distance. 

Oculars: lOx and 5x. Huygenian eyepieces. 

Triple nose jiieces with 16 mm., 4 mm., and 1.9 mm. 125 N.A. oil immersion lens. 

Wide aperture stage with ciuick screw condenser and built on, but detachable, 
ungraduated mechanical stage. Substage condenser, variable focusing type 1.25 
X.A. with iris diaphragm. A rack and pinion focusing device is preferred. Mir- 
ror-plane on one side, concave on the other. A carrying case is recommended. 

Students are cautioned with respect to the purchase of used or odd-lot micro- 
scopes since some older instruments were equipped with a 4 mm. (high dry) 
objective whose N.A. is marked as 0.85 N.A. This objective has .such a short 
working distance (0.3 mm.) that it is difficult or impossible to focus through thick 
cover glasses or the standard hemocytometer cover glass without breakage. All 
used microscopes are subject to inspection and approval by Dr. Frank H. J. Figge, 
RooiB 209, Bressler Building, 29 S. Greene Street. Such approval must be obtained 
before September 10. This inspection is usually not made during August. 

11. Prior to beginning the second semester of the Freshman year, each stu- 
dent must provide himself witli a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer and ophthalmo- 
scope-otoscope. The Department of Physiology and the Division of Physical Diag- 
nosis offer the following recommendations : 

Instrument Recommended Type Comvient 



Stethoscope Rieger-Bowles or 

Sprague-Bowles 
Sphygmomanometer Tycos aneriod 

Ophthalmoscope-Otoscope Welch- Allyn 

or National 



Purchase thick-walled rubber 
tubing. The wall thickness and 
internal diameter should be 1/8 
inch each. 

Other types are also satisfac- 
tory, but this has proved itself 
for all around reliability and 
durability. 

With closed (diagnostic) oto- 
scope head and No. 106 May 
ophthalmoscope head (not de- 
luxe.) 

With closed (diagnostic) oto- 
scope head and May ophthal- 
moscope head. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 55 

The following equipment, which is frequently sold in a packaged kit with the 
above instruments will be needed for second year work in physical diagnosis: 
Tuning fork 256 cycles per second The large aluminum alloy type 

is preferred to the small stain- 
less steel variety. 

Reflex hammer ;niy simple type Avoid specialized instruments 

with built in pins, brushes, etc. 

12. Students in the second year class are also expected to provide themselves 
with a hemocytometer (Spencer Bright-Line). Third and fourth year students are 
required to provide themselves with short white lapel coats. Three button, 8 ounce 
sanforized duck coats are satisfactory. 

STATE QALIFVING CERTIFICATES 

13. Candidates for admission w'ho live in or expect to practice medicine in 
Pennsylvania or New Jersey should apply to their respective State Boards of Edu- 
cation for Medical Student Qualifying Certificates. These certificates should be 
filed with the Committee on Admissions. Candidates from New York must have 
completed at least two years of approved Hberal arts study including courses of 6 
semester hours of English, 6 hours of Biology or Zoology, 6 hours of Physics, 6 
hours of General Chemistry and 3 hours of Organic Chemistry in order to be eligible 
for admission to tlie medical licensing examination in New York. 

14. Each new matriculant in eacli class is required to present to the Committee 
on Admissions a certificate from an oculist, (a graduate in medicine) that the 
matriculate's eyes have been examined under a cycloplegic and are in condition, 
with or without glasses as the case may be, to endure the strain of close and 
intensive reading. 

It is required that this examination be completed within three months prior to 
registration and that tlie certificate be mailed to the Committee on Admissions not 
later than one month before registration. 

AWARDING OF COMBINED DEGREES 

15. Students entering the School of Aledicine on a three-year requirement basis 
from colleges which usually grant a degree on the successful completion of the first 
year of medicine, are restricted by the following regulations: 

a — The candidate must present a certificate from Iiis college or university that 
he has absolved the quantitative and qualitative premedical requirements for 
tliis degree. 

b — The candidate must acquire an average of C or better without failures for 
the work of his fir>t year in the School of Medicine. 

<^— The Dean of the School of Medicine reserves the right to withhold his 
recommendation that a bachelor's degree be conferred at a commencement 
which occurs before the official release of first-vear medical grades. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

TRANSCRIPTS 

16. Students will be provided the first transcript of record without charge. After 
tlie first copy has been issued single copies will cost one dollar. W'lien two or more 
copies arc requested at the same time the first copy will cost one dollar, additional 
copies fifty cents each. Requests for transcripts must be filed with the Registrar's 
Office, University of Maryland, 522 West Lombard Street, Baltimore-1, Maryland. 

chanc;es of address 

17. Students are required to give the Dean's Office and the Registrar's Office 
prt)mpt notice of change in address. 

PARKING 

18. Students arc not permitted to use the university parking lots. 

HOUSING 

There are no housing or living accomodations on the campus of the medical 
school. 



LIBRARY REGULATIONS 



I.uan Regulations 



Loan periods have been worked out according to demand for and protection of 
different types of material. 

Tivo-lVeek Loans: All books except those on reserve. 

One-Week Loans: All journals except the latest number (which does not 

circulate), and those on reserve. 

Overnight Loans: Books and journals on reserve. 

(3:50 p.m.-2 p.m.) 

Sf'ccial Rules for Books on Reserve: 

Students whose names appear on the check-list for the Mercy Hospital section 
will be granted the necessary hours to return reserve books. 

Overnight books may be reserved in advance only within the week in which they 
will be used. Books may be reserved on Saturday for the following Monday. 

Overnight books may not be reserved two successive nights by the same person. 

Advance reserves will be held until one hour before closing. 

Pines 

Fines are imposed not to acquire money, but to assure equal access to books. 
Two-Week Loans: 5(i per day. 
One-Week Loans: S<t per day. 

Overnight Loans: 15(:* for first hour; 5c for each additional hour or frac- 
tion thereof. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 57 

Lost Books: List price of tlie book. (Lost books should Ix; reported at once). 
All books must be returned, lost books replaced or paid for, and fines paid before 
a student can finisli the year in good standing. 

In fairness to all concerned, tiiesc rules must be enforced without exception. 

CERTIFICATION FOR STATE BOARD AND NATIONAL BOARD 

EXAMINATIONS 

No student will be certified to State Board or National Board examiners who 
has unabsolved failures in subjects taken during the academic period covered by 
these examinations. 

WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 
Formal Withdrawal Procedures 

Students over 21 years of age desiring to leave the School of Medicine at any 
time during the academic year are required to file with the Dean a written applica- 
tion for withdrawal. In addition, the student must secure an "honorable dismissal 
release" form from the Dean's secretary, and return this to the Dean's office 
appropriately signed by representatives of the departments listed thereon, together 
with his "matriculation certificate." 

If these procedures are not completed, the student will not be entitled to honor- 
able dismissal nor to refund of fees. 

Students under 21 years of age, must supplement the procedures previously 
described with the written consent of their parents or guardians. 

Academic Standing On Withdrawal 

Students who voluntarily withdraw during an academic semester will be given 
no credit. 

Students are not permitted to resort to withdrawal in order to preclude current 
or impending failures. Their standing on withdrawal will be recorded in the 
registrar's office. 

Students who withdraw from the School of Medicine, must apply to the Com- 
mittee on Admissions for readmission, unless other arrangements have been con- 
summated with the Dean's written consent. 

Refunds on PVithdrawal 

Students who are eligible to honorable dismissal will receive a refund of current 
charges, after the matriculation fee has been deducted, according to the following 
schedule : 

Period elapsed after instruction begins. Percentage refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

After five weeks 



58 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

PRIZES 

THR FACULTY PRIZE 

The Faculty will award the Faculty Gold Medal and Certificate and five Certifi- 
cates of Honor to six of the first ten highest ranking candidates for graduation 
who, during the four academic years, Iiavc exliihited outstanding (|ualifications for 
the practice of medicine. 

THE DR. -A. HK.\DTT':V GAITHKR MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year hy Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a memorial 
to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student in the senior class doing the best 
work in gcnito-urinary surgery. 

THE WILLIAM D. \V(3LFE MEMORIAL PRIZE 
(Value $100.00 each) 

A certificate of proficiency and a prize of $100.00 will be awarded each year 
until the fund is dissipated, to the graduate selected by the Advisory Board of the 
Faculty showing greatest proficiency in Dermatology. 

THE DR. LEONARD M. HUMMEL MEMORIAL AWARD 

A gold medal and certificate of proficiency will be awarded annually, as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Leonard M. Hummel, to the graduate selected by the 
Advisory Board of the Faculty who has manifested outstanding qualifications in 
Internal Medicine. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

All scholarships are assigned for one academic j^ear, unless specifically re- 
awarded on consideration of an application. 

Official application forms are obtainable at the Dean's office, where they must 
be filed not later than May 15th for the ensuing academic year. 

THE DR. SAMUEL LEON FRANK SCHOLARSHIP 
(Value $100.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a memorial 
to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this university. 

It is awarded by tlic Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University each 
year upon nomination by the Advisory Board of the Faculty "to a medical stu- 
dent of the University of Maryland, who in the jtidgment of said Council, is of 
good character and in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year student who has 
successfully completed one year's work in this school. No student may hold this 
scholarship for more than two years. 



SCHOOL OF MliDICINll 59 

Till-: (.■I1ARL1-:S .\l. HITCHCOCK SCHOLARSHIPS 
(\alue $100.00 each) 

Two scholarships were estahhslied from a bequest to the School of Aledicine 
by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D.. an alumnus of the university. 

These sciiolarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of tile ^'niversity, upon nomination by the Advisory Board of the Faculty, 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first year 
of the course in medicine, and who present to the Board satisfactory evidence of 
a good moral character and of inability to continue the course without pecuniary 
assistance. 

THF RANDOLPH WINSLOW SCHOLARSHIP 
(Value $100.00) 

This scholarsliip was established by the late Randolph Winslow, M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Univer- 
sity, upon nomination by the Advisory Board of the Faculty, to a "needy student 
of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all liis work up to the 
time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Faculty Board 
tliat he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

THE DR. LEO KARLINSKY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
(X'alue $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky as a memorial 
to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an alumnus of the university. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Univer- 
sity, upon the nomination of the Advisory Board of the Faculty, to "a needy stu- 
dent of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

He must have maintained in all his work up to the time of awarding the scholar- 
ship a satisfactory grade of scholarship. 

He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Advisory Board 
that he is worthy of and in need of assistance. 

THE CLARENCE AND GENEVRA WARFIELD SCHOLARSHIPS 
(Value $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the regents from the income of the 
fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships are available to students of any of 
tlie classes of the course in medicine. Preference is given to students from the 
counties of the state of Maryland which tlie Advisory Board of the Faculty may 
from time to time determine to be most in need of medical practitioners. 



60 uMri-.h'sriY or Maryland 

A«y student receiving one of these scholarsliii).-, must agree, after graduation 
and a year's internship, to undertake the practice of medicine, for a term of two 
years, in the county to wliich the student is accredited, or in a county selected by 
the Board. In the event the recipient is not able to comply with the condition 
requiring him to practice in the county to which he is accredited by the Boartl, 
the money advanced by the regents shall be refunded by the student. 

THE ISRAEL AND CECELIA E. COIIEX .SCHOLARSHIP 
(Value $150.00) 

This scholarship was established by the late Eleanor S. Cohen in memory of 
her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and conditions : This scholarship 
will be available to students of any one of the classes of the course in medicine; 
preference is given to students of the counties in the state of Maryland which the 
Advisory Board of tlie Eaculty may from time to time determine to be most in 
need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving one of these scholarships 
must, after graduation and a year's internship, agree to undertake the practice of 
medicine lor a term of two years in the county to which the student is accredited, 
or in a county selected by the council. In the event that a student is not able to 
comply with the condition requiring him to practice in the county to which he is 
accredited by the Board, the money advanced by the regents shall be refunded. 

THE DR. HORACE BRUCE HETRICK SCHOLARSHIP 
(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Dr. Horace Bruce Hetrick as a memorial 
to his sons, Bruce Hayward Hetrick and Augustus Christian Hetrick. It is to 
be awarded by the Advisory Board of the Eaculty to a student of the senior class. 

THE HENRY ROLANDO SCHOLARSHIP 
(Value approximately $250.00) 

The Henry Rolando Scholarship was established by the Board of Regents of 
the University of Maryland from a bequest to the Board by the late Anne H. 
Rolando for the use of the Faculty of Medicine. 

This scholarship will be awarded each academic year on the recommendation 
of the Advisory Board of the Faculty to a "poor and deserving student." 

THE READ SCHOLARSHIPS 

The sum of $500.00 is now available to cover two (2) scholarships in the 
amount of $250.00 each for a given academic year. Beginning in 1945, these 
scholarships were made possible by a donation from the Read Drug and Chemical 
Company of Baltimore, Maryland. Two students are to be selected by the Dean 
of the School of Medicine in collaboration with the Scholarship and Loan Committees 
of the Medical School with the provision that the students selected shall be worthy, 
deserving students, residents of the State of Maryland. 



SCHOOL OF MEDlClNli 61 

LOAN FUNDS 

\V. K. KELLOGG FL'Xl) 

This loan fund was established in the academic year 1942 with money granted 
))y the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. The interest paid on the loans, together with 
the principal of the fund as repaid, will be used to found a rotating loan fund. 
Loans will be made on the basis of need, character and scholastic attainment. 

FACULTY OF MEDICIXF LOAN FUND 

A Faculty of Medicine Loan Fund was established with money derived from 
the bequest of Dr. William R. Sanderson, Class 1882, and the gift of Dr. Albert 
Stein, Class 1907 and a gift of Dr. Frank A. Merlino, Class 1928. Loans will be 
made on the basis of need, character, and scholastic ability. 

THE EDWARD L. MFIERliOl- LOAN FUND 

This bequest was established through a grant from Dr. Edward L. Meierhof, 
who was graduated from the Medical School in 1881. The principal of this fund 
will be used as a rotating loan fund from which loans will be made to regularly 
enrolled students of the School of Medicine on the basis of need, character and 
scholastic attainment. 

THE JAY W. EATON LOAN FUND 

This fund was established by the local chapter of the Nu Sigma Nu Fraternity 
in memory of Jay W. Eaton of the class of 1946. 

Beginning in 1946 an interest-free loan of $100.00 will be made to some worthy 
member of the senior class, on recommendation of the Scholarship Committee of 
the School of Medicine. This loan is to be credited to the tuition fee of the ap- 
pointed student and is to be repaid by the student within four years following his 
graduation. 

THE SENIOR CLASS LOAN FUND 

The senior class of 1945 originated this fund which will accumulate by subscrip- 
tion from among members of each senior class. 

The conditions of the agreement provide that the Dean of the School of 
Medicine award a loan of $100.00 to a needy member of the senior class on the 
recommendation of a self-perpetuating committee of two members of the faculty. 

Loans from this fund are to be credited to tlie tuition fee of the appointed 
student and are to be repaid within five years from the date of graduation. 

THE WILLIAM AND SARAH KRAUT MEMORIAL STUDENT 
LOAN FUND 

This loan fund was established in 1954 by a gift from Dr. Arthur M. Kraut as 
an expression of his appreciation for what the School of Medicine has meant to 
him and as a memorial to his parents. 



(>> (W'llllRS/TV or M.lKYLANl) 

The Scholarship and Loan Committee of the School of Medicine shall he the 
sole and final judtje in matters of administration and operation of tlic fund. 

Loans from the fund and tlie terms of rei)aynHiit are uiirotricted and are left 
to tiie discretion of the ciuumittec. 

THE STUDENT AID FUND FOR SENIORS 

This fund was originated by the class of 1950 and is sponsored by the senior 
class of each succeeding year. The purpose of the fund is to provide financial 
aid for any deserving member of the senior class. All members of the senior 
class are eligible to apply for a loan. Applications may be filed at the office of the 
Dean. 

The conditions of the agreement provide that the Scholarship and Loan Com- 
mittee award loans to members of the senior class on recommendation of a self- 
perpetuating committee of two members of the faculty who may call on the president 
of the senior class for assistance, if desired. 

Loans from this fund are made on a nt)n-interest bearing basis and are payable 
v.ithin five years. A signed note is required. No co-signers are necessary. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The curriculum is organized under fifteen departments. 

1. Anesthesiologj'. 

2. Anatomy (including Histology, Knihryology, and Xeuro-anatomy). 

3. Biological Chemistry. 

4. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

5. Microbiology. 

6. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

7. Ophthalmology. 

8. Pathology. 

9. Pediatrics. 

10. Pharmacology. 

11. Physiology. 

12. Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation. 

13. Psychiatry. 

14. Radiology. 

15. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

The instruction is given in four academic years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but in no case are 
the students of different j'ears thrown together in the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of tlie structures, 
functions and chemistry of the normal body. Laboratory work occupies most of 
the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in medicine and surgery is given in the second 
year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to bring together 
teacher and student in close personal relationsliip. In many courses of instruction 
the classes are divided into small groups and a large number of instructors insures 
attention to the requirements of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of proficiency has dis- 
appeared and the student's final grade is determined largely by partial examinations, 
recitations and assigned work carried on throughout the course. 



63 



64 UNirnRSITY Of MARYLAND 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

ID. 1. Man and His Environment. I-irst year. 64 liours. 

Distinguished leaders in American nu-rlicine parliciimle in tlie i)resontali«n of these 
weekly sessions. The course Is hroarl iu scope. sfressiMe tlie cultural aspects of anthro- 
pology with emphasis directed toward the sociological, psvcholoKical, physiological, nnd 
;;<'neolo!-'iral relationships of man and his surroundiuKs. .Ml departments of the School of 
Medicine participate. 

ID. 2. Introduction to Clinical Medicine. Second year. 64 hours. 

The techniques of obtaininj: medicnl liisfories are taufiht hy lectures, demonstrations, 
and small group exercises. A concentrated effort is made to emphasize and illustrate the 
pathologic-i)hysiology accounting for the pertinent symptoms and signs searched for in 
every medical liistory and physical examination. Tlie Iiepartments of Medicine, Obstetrics 
and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Preventive Mcilicine and Rehabilitation, Psychiatry, Radiology, 
and Surgery participate in the instruction. 

ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. Second year. Second semester. ?i2 hours. 

This course implements ID. 2 and provides the student with bedside inLitruction In 
physical diagnosis. Small tutorial groups are formed each under the direction of an in- 
structor. In the first five weeks, exi>crience in physical examination of normal Individuals 
is given one afternoon weekly. During (he snlisequent 12 weeks, students become ac- 
quainted with abnormal signs through examination of hospitalized patients. For the first 
five of these 12 weeks, the Cardiology Division gives instruction in the physical examina- 
tion of the heart. Thereafter, sections are assigned in rotation to the Division of Neu 
rology and the Department of Pediatrics for instruction in these specialties. 

ID. 4. Interdepartmental Seminars. Third and Fourtli years. 64 hours. 

These seminars are designed to present, during the course of two academic years, a 
correlated consideration of the major disease processes encountered in the practice of 
medicine. All departments cooperate to provide an intensive presentation designed to 
ellucidate the clinical and basic science aspects of the diseases under discussion. 



ANATOMY 

Professors Figge (Head of Department), Brantigan, Nauta, Uhlenhuth; 

Associate Professors Krahl, Mack, Walker; Assistant Professors 

Leveque, Mech, Kuypers, Settle; and StafY. 

Anat. 101. Gross Anatomy. First year. First semester. 256 hours. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to develop a basic concept of the mor- 
phology of the human body. It is closely Interwoven with the study of neuroanatomy, 
histology, and embryology, and some time is devoted to roentgen anatomy. The entire 
human body is dissected. 

Microanat. 101. Microanatomy. First year. First semester. 144 hours. 

This course presents an integrated study of the histology and embryology of the 
human body. An attempt is made to correlate this with gross anatomy as well as other 
subjects in the medical curriculum. Special cniphdsis is placed on the dynamic and 
functional aspects of the subject. 

Neuroanat. 101. Neuroanatomy. First year. First semester. 96 hours. 

The study of the detailed anatomy of the central nervous system is coordinated with 
structure and function of the entire nervous system. The dissection of the human brain 
and the examination of stained microscopic sections of various levels of the brain stem 
arc required. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 65 

Anat. 103. Clinical Anatomy. .Stcond year. Second semester. 96 hours. 

The course is ilfsi{;necl to lnulKf tin- f^aij between Imsic anatoiuy and clinical tir ap- 
plied auatoniy. Tlie study of snrl'acc anatomy is correlated with jthysical diauiiosis. 
Students have an opportunity to perform a detailed anatomical dissection with emphasis 
upon clinical application. 

For Graduates 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are the 
Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

Anat. 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body (8). Same course as 
101, but on a more advanced level. It can be taken by graduate as well as 
postgraduate students. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 

Anat. 202. The Anatomy of the Human Pelvis (2). Fifteen periods of 
four hours each during the first semester, mornings by arrangement. This 
course is open to graduate students, medical students, and postgraduate students. 

Anat. 203. Practical Anatomy (4). Same course as Anat. 103 but on a 
more advanced level. 

Anat. 204. Fetal and Infant Anatomy (2). Fifteen periods of three hours 
each, every Thursday from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. for 15 weeks during the first 
semester. This course is open to graduate students and postgraduates inter- 
ested in Pediatrics. 

Anat. 205. Research in Anatomy. Maximum credits, 12 per semester. 
Research work may be taken in any one of the branches of Anatomy. 

Neuroanat. 201. Human Neuroanatomy (4). Same course as Neuroanat. 
101, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. 

Neuroanat. 202. Research in Neuroanatomy. Maximum credits, 12. Re- 
search work involving the central or peripheral nervous system. 

Microanat. 201. Mammalian Histology (6). Same course as Microanat. 

101, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. 

Microanat. 202. Normal and Typical Growth. Lectures in Problems of 
Growth (2). Two hours per week, time to be arranged. Sixteen weeks, 
second semester. 

Microanat. 203. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Research work may be 
taken in any one of the branches which form the subject of Microanatomy 
(including cancer research). 

ANESTHESIOLOGY 

.•\ssociate Professor Hackett (.Acting Head of Department); Professor Nelson; 
Associate Professors Phillips, Safar; and .Staff. 

During the pre-clinical years and tlie third year, the Department of 
.Anesthesiology presents several lectures in courses taught by the Departments 
of Pharmacology and Surgery. These lectures are intended to show the 



66 UNirilRSITY OF MARYLAND 

application of l)a.sic sciences to tlu- clinical practice of anesthesiology and how 
the various facets of the clinical entity under discussion affect the choice of 
])reanesthctic medication, the anesthetic agent, and the technique to be employed. 

Anes. 101. Introduction to Anesthesiology. Fourth year. 35 hours. 

lOach senior student six-iuls a week, (tv its liiiic <'{niiv!ileiit. in I lie oiicratinn rooms 
of I'nivcrsity Ilospital adniinislcrinK anosthosia and olis(>rvinji. Int'oinial fjronp mpetinss 
are lield to enipliasizo factors attVctins the ancst lii'tic nianafjcnn'nt of patients observed 
and to discuss the more common anestlietic iirolilenis of general practice. 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor Schmidt (Head of Department); Associate Professors Herbst, 
\^anderlinde; Assistant Professor V^asington; and StafT. 

Biochem. 101. Principles of Biochemistry, hirst year. Second semester. 
208 hours. 

Tliis course is designed to present the principles of biologieal chemistry and to indi- 
cate their applications to tlie clinical aspects of medicine. The phenomena of living 
nuitter and its chief ingredients, secretions, and excretions are discussed in lectures and 
conferences and examined experimentally. Training is given in biochemical methods of 
investigation. 

For Graduates 

Graduate degrees offered by the Department of Biological Chemistry are 
the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Biochem. 201. Principles of Biochemistry (8). Same course as Biochem. 
101, but on a more advanced level for graduate students. Laboratory fee, 
$20.00. 

Biochem. 202. Special Topics in Biochemistry (1, 1). Prereciuisite, Bio- 
chem. 101 or 201. 

Biochem. 203. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Credit proportioned to 
extent and quality of work accomplished. 

Biochem. 204, 205. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. 

Biochem. 206. Enzymes and Metabolism (2-3). First semester. 

Biochem. 207. Biochemical Preparation (1-4). Credit according to work 
done. 

Biochem. 208. Chemistry and Metabolism of the Steroid Hormones (2-3). 

MEDICINE 

Professors W'oodward (Head of Department), Care\% Fisher, Krause, Love, 
Peters, Robinson, Jr., Sacks, \'an Huskirk; Associate Professors Andersch, 
Bubert, Cotter, Eastland, Gundry, Langeluttig, Lisansky, Marriott, S. Mor- 
rison, Mirick, Revell; Assistant Professors Beacham, Carrol, Chinard, Connor, 
Dickey, Ebeling, Fort, Jacobson, Karns, Leach, Legge, Legum, Muller, Parker, 
Reiter, L. Scherlis, S. Scherlis, Serra, S. Smith, Snyder, Spurling, Storey, 
Wiswell, Workman; and .Staff. 



SCHOOL OP MEDICINE 67 

Med. 102. Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. 3rd jcar. 

This course consist.s of a clinical clerkship on the medical wards of the Universit.v 
Hospilal for a period of 8 weeks. Students are responsible, under supervision, for the 
history, physical examination, laboratory e.x'amiuations. and progress notes of assi^UKd 
cases. They also attend ward rounds and conferences in jjeneral medi<'ine with the Resi- 
dent Staff, Attendin.ir Physicians, and Chief of Service. For an additional 8 weeks, stu- 
dents are assijined to the Baltimore City Hospitals for work in the General Medical 
Outpatient Department. They also sei-ve as clinical clerks on the Chronic Disease Wards 
and attend ward rounds and teachin.ir conferences in (leneral .Medicine. Tuberculosis, 
Xeurolojry, and Kadiolosy. 

Med. 103. The Principles of Medicine. Third year. 16 hours. 

This course consists of assijrnmeuts in standird texts and current periodicals with 
ajiproximately 8 examinations covering the si)ecifled material. Concurrently, lectures are 
given in (Jeiieral Medicine. Neurology. Clinical Medicine, and Medical .Jurisiirudence. 

Med. 104. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Medicine. Fourth year. 

Clinical clerkship on the medical wards of T'niversity Hospital. Merc.v Hospital, and 
the Fort Howard ^'eterans Administration Hospital for 4 weeks. An additional 4 week 
period is spent in the Medical Outpatient Department where instruction is given in Gen- 
eral Medicine and the medical specialties. During this tour the senior student makes 
home visits on selected patients, participates in the workup of chronically ill patients at 
the Montebello Chronic Disease Hospital and attends consultative rounds in cardiology, 
infectious diseases, gastroenterology, radioisotopes, neurohigy. hematology, endocrinology, 
and pulmonary diseases on the wards of the University Hospital. 

Summer Fellowships. 

Students who have completed their Junior year are encouraged to seek additional 
training during tlie summer months preceding their Senior studies. This training may 
be obtained in one of several ways. A limited number of students are appointed to 
Clinical Clerkships on the Medical Wards of the University Hospital. In these positions, 
they are responsible, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, laboratory 
studies, and progress notes of assigned cases. 

In addition, certain of th<> medical subspecialty divisions provide specialized training 
for students as Summer Fellows during the summer months. The applicant is encouraged 
to apply directly to the D'ivision Head. These fellowshijis enable the student to become 
ac{inainted with the various specialized diagnostic and r(>search techniques, the clinical 
problems, and therapeutic regimens peculiar to each of the medical subspeci.-ilties. Sum- 
mer Fellowships are available in the following Divisions : Cardiology. Clinical Pathology 
CJ. appointments^. Dermatology ( 1' appointments). Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hy- 
pertension, Infectious Diseases ( 'J appointments). Legal Medicine. Neurology, and Radio- 
isotopes (1 aiii)ointnient 1 . Interested applicants should contact the respective Division 
Head prior to .January 1 of the year in which the fellowship is desired. 

Postgraduate Fellowships. 

These are avaihil)Ie in the various specialties of medicine. For details see specific 
division. 

The Department of Medicine, for administrative purposes, is divided into 
eleven Divisions. Each of these Divisions participates in the major courses taught 
hy the Department. In addition, a number of specialized courses and postgrad- 
uate fellowships are offered l)y tlie Divisions. 

DIVISION OF ARTHRITIS 

Drs. Marriott (Head of Division), i-"uriiari Kochman, and Staff. 
Med. 105. Division Rounds. i liird vear. Elective. 



68 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Med. 105a. Outpatient Clinic. Fourth year. Klective. 

W<><'kl,v arthritis niitpiiticiit ilinics and atteiidanoc .it weekly arthritis rounds. 

DIVISION OF CARDIOLOGY 

Drs. Love, Jr. (Head of Divi.>;ion), Leacli, L. Scherlis, S. Sclierlis, Swisher, 
Townshend, Van Lill, IH, aiul Staff. 

Physiol. 101. Principles of Physiology. First year. 

lieptun-s and demonstrations in the Elootriral Aptivify of tlip Heart in roUaboration 
with the Department of Physiology. 

ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. Second year. Second semester. 
The Division of Cardiology parlicipalps in presenting tliis foiirse. 

Med. 106. Electrocardiology. Third and Fourth years. 16 hours. Elective. 
Tliis iH an introductory course consisting of illustrated group lectures and exercises. 

Traineeships. 

These are available to selecterl postgraduate applicants. The Trainee participates 
in the activities of the Division and receives a financial stipend. The traineeshlp begins 
•Tnly 1st of each year. Application is made through the Head of the Division and must 
be completed by October of the preceding year. 



DIVISION OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

Drs. Sacks (Head of Division), .\ndersch, Spurling, A. Band, DeHoff, S. 
Miller, Funk. Hellen, Esmond, Rothfeld, and Staff. 

Med. 101. Basic Clinical Pathology. Second year. 128 hours. 

The course is designed to train the student in the performance and interpretation 
of the fundamental laboratory procedures used in clinical diagnosis. During the first 
semester the basic techniques t)f hematology as well as clinical aspects of blood diseases 
are taTight. Blood group immunology in relation to transfusions is also covered. In tiie 
second semester the performance and interpretation of tests used in the diagnosis of 
renal, hepatic, gastric, pancreatic, and metabolic diseases are considered. A review, 
with clinical applications, of acid-base balance and electrolyte disturbances is included. 
Methods of examination of cerebrospinal fluid, transudates, and exudates are taught. 
Elements of clinical parasitology complete the work in this semester. 

Each student provides his own microscope and blood counting e((uipment. A com- 
pletely equipped locker is provided for each student. 

Med. 102a. Advanced Clinical Pathology. Third year. 8 hours. 

Seminar rliscussions of diagnostic laboratory j>rocedures in selected dise.tses are given 
during the medicine quarter. Each student is assigned a completely equipped locker 
adjacent to the wards for use during the clinical clerkships. Microscope and blood 
counting equipment must be provided iiy the student. 

Postgraduate Fellowships. 

Two fulltime clinical and research fellowships in hematology are available to appli- 
cants who have had a minimum of one yea-r internship. A financial stipend is provided. 
Application should lie made to tlie Head of the Division. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 69 

DIVISION OF DERMATOLOGY 

Drs. H. M. Rohiiison, Jr. (Head of Division), Ellis, Berestan, R. C. V. 

Robinson, Shapiro, ZeliRinan, Bimdick, \i. Cohen, Hollander, Bacharach, 

Strahan, Lndwig, and Staff. 

Med. 107. Introduction to Dermatology. Third year. 

Students are givon assiunod rpadiiit' on the more common skin eruptions. Six two 
liour clinli-nl sessions are held for each iiuarter of the Junior class. Individual instruc- 
tion is given b.v one of tlie senior staff members empliasizing the pertinent aspects of 
differential diagnosis. 

Med. 108. Practical Exercises in Dermatology. Fourth year. 

Groups of twelve students spend twent.v hours in tlie outpatient department where 
they are given individual instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous lesions. 
Kmphasis is laid on the relationsliip of various eruptions to systemic conditions. Instruc- 
tion is given in myr'ologic teehiii()ne. Six one lioiir lecture demonstrations are s'lven to the 
entire Senior class, two of tliese are i)ani'l disiussions witli tlie senior memljers of the 
dermatology staff. 



DIVISION OF GASTROENTEROLOGY 

Drs. Ebeling (Head of Division), S. ^^orriso^, Feldnian, Morgan, Flynn, 

Hooper, and Kassel. 

ID. 2. Introduction to Clinical Medicine. .Second year. 

The l>ivision of fiastroenterology participates in tlie presentation of tliis course. 

DIVISION OF HYPERTENSION 

Drs. Revell, Jr. (Head of Division), Cowley, Borges, and Staff. 

Med. 109. Conferences on Hypertension. Tliird year. Elective. 

Conferences on pathological-iilijsiolog.v of hypertension, sites of action of antihyper- 
tensive drugs, methods of screening jiatients with liypertension. and choice of therapy m 
hypertensive patients. 

Med. 110. Outpatient Clinic and Division Rounds. Fourth year. Elective. 
Weelcly clinics on i)atients with hypertension and attendance at weekly rounds. 

DIVISION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES 

Drs. Parker (Head of Division), M. J. Snyder, McCrunib, Liu, and Staff. 

Postgraduate Fellowships. 

The Division sponsors a Fellow who receives instruclion in laboratory techniques 
and clinical investigation. Fellows jiarticipate in all functions of the Division, including 
collaboration in investigative problems. A financial stipend is provided. Application is 
made through the Head of the Division. 

DIVISION OF LEGAL MEDICINE 

Drs. I'ishcr (Head of Division), Frcinmth, T,ovitt, Jr., Cnicrin, Lindenberg, and 

Staff. 



70 UNiriiRSITY 01- MARYLAND 

Med. 111. Practical Aspects of Medical Practice. I-ourtli year. 7 hours. 

T1h> division arriiiifrcs u .st'rics of Iciturcs covci-inK iiiodical ftliics, eeonomics, record 
kocitiii};, rpsidciu'v trainiiijj opiiorttiiiil ii's, atid sonio considerations al)Out stai'tiiif? in private 
practice. .\ii .-ittenipt is made in lliis series to stress tliose t'catures wliicli will l)e iin- 
niediatel.v useful l)nsiness-\vise lo tlie vouiii; iili.\ siciaii. 

For Graduates 

Tlie Division of Legal Medicine offers courses leading to the degrees of 
]\! aster of Science and Doctor of Philosoi)liy in Toxicology. 

Leg. Med. 201. Legal Medicine (1). One lionr of lecture for twelve 
weeks, 4 hours assigned reading, first semester. 

Leg. Med. 202. Toxicology (10). Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours 
per week for 1 year. 

Leg. Med. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to Toxicology (2). 

Two hours i)er week for one year. 

Leg. Med. 204. Research in Toxicology leading to preparation of a Thesis 
for the M.S. (6). Minimum credits, six. 

Leg. Med. 205. Research in Toxicology leading to preparation of a Thesis 
for the Ph.D. (30). 

Postgraduate Fellowships. 

A limited uunilier nl" physicians with a minimum nf one year of training in pathologic 
anatomy are ajipointed as Keseai'cli Kellnws Idr Iraiuinji- and research in medicolegal 
pathology. Tliis training is ainiroved by tlic .\meiiian I'.oard of Pathology towards the 
recpiirenients for admission to the examinations in pathologic anatomy. 

DIVISION OF NEUROLOGY 

Drs. \'an Buskirk (Head of Division), Leriicr, Merrill, Teitelbaum, Cotter, 
Fearing, Lombardo, and Staff. 

Med. 112. Introduction to Clinical Neurology. Second year. IS hours. 

Lectures in neurologic diagnosis are presented, stressing correlation of anatomy and 
liliysiology of the nervous system with cliui'al neurology. 

ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. Second year. Second semester. 

The Division participates in presenting tliis course. 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS 

Drs. Marriott (Head of l)ivisic)n), Ikacliani, Legum, Reiter, Borges, Helfrich, 
\'an Lill, III, W'ilfson, Keown, -Slurrill, .\ntlerson, Esmond, Friedman, 

and Stockard. 

ID. 2. Introduction to Clinical Medicine. Second year. 

The liivision p.'irticipates in presenting tliis course. 

ID. 3. Physical Diagnosis. Second year. Second semester. 2)2 hours. 
Tliis course im)ilements III. 1! and ]irovi(les the student with hedside instrnetion in 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 1\ 

physical cliaKnosis. Small liitm-ial moiips arc tHriiicd each iimlcr the direction of an in- 
structor. In the tii'st tivc weeks, experience in physical examination of normal individuals 
is given one afternoon weekly. iMirinjj the snhsetiuent twelve weeks, students become 
acquainted with abnormal sisns through examination of hosiiitalized i)atients. For the 
lirst five of these twelve weeks, the Division of ("ardioloj^y sives instrucrion in the 
physical examination of the heart. Thereafter, sections are assigned in rotation to the 
Division of Neurolotry and the Deiiarfment of Pediatrics foi- instruction in these si)ecialties. 

DIVISION OF RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES 

Drs. Workman (Acting Head of Division), Dennis, and Staff. 

Physiol. 101. Principles of Physiology. First year. 

In cooperation with the Department of PliysioloKy, two orientatiini lectures on Iladio- 
isotopes in Medicine are i»i'esented and S laboratory sessions of 4 hours each are devoted 
to the demonstration of radioisntoi>e technif|ues in the study of thyroid function and 
I'stimalion of blood volume. 

Med. 113. Isotope Clinic. Fourth year. Flective. 
Postgraduate Fellowships. 

One postgraduate fellowship is available. Aiiplications are made to the Division 
Head. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor Wisseman (Head of Department); Associate Professor Steers; 
Assistant Professors A. G. Smith, M. J. Snyder, Sweet; and StafT. 

Microbiol. 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. Second year. 
First semester. 180 hours. 

This course is intended to supply the basic information on mii-robial agents and 
immunologic mechanisms necessary to understand infectious diseases, public health, and 
diseases of immunologic origin. IVoperties of microorganisms are considered in relation 
to pathogenesis of infections, mechanisms of tissue damage, and host defense mechanisms. 
Bacterial, fungal, viral, and rickettsial agents are studied in both lecture and laboratory. 

For Graduates 

']"he Department of ]^licrobioiogy offers the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
W hile tlie degree of Master of Science may be offered in special instances, 
priority for research facilities will be given aspirants to the Ph.D. degree. 

Microbiol. 201. Medical Microbiology and Immunology (8). This course 
is built upon Microbiol. 101 by the addition of advanced suppleitientary reading 
and laboratory exercises. Lalioratnry fee, ?10.00. 

Microbiol. 203. Bacterial Physiology (3). Three lectures per week, but no 
hiboratory, first semester. 

Microbiol. 204. Research. Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. 

Microbiol. 205. Genetics of Microorganisms (1). One lecture per week, 
second semester. 

Microbiol. 206, 207. Seminar (1,1). One session jxr week, first and second 
semesters. 



72 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Microbiol. 208. Medical Mycology (2). Uuc lecture and one laboratory 
per week, second semester. I.aharatory lee, SKIDD. Ketjistration by consent 
of instructor. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Professors Haskins (Head of Department), Kaltreider; Associate Professors 

Cornbrooks, Reese, Siegel; Assistant Professors Brady, Compton, Diehl, Diggs, 

McNally, Molumphy. Morris. Savage, E. P. Smith; and StaflF. 

Ob-Gyn. 101. Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Third year. 

Students are assijrned to Obstetrics and GynecoloK.v for a ppriod of four weeks. As 
clinical clerks, they participate in tlie original diagnostic studies, delivery, and pelvic 
surgical procedures of allocated hospitalized itatients. Postoperative and postpartum 
observations are also made. 

Daily rounds and departmental couferences with House Officers and Attending Staff 
aid the student in the interpretation and correlation of his observations and the various 
therapeutic regimens. Specitic allottments of time are made for instruction in Pathology 
and Basic Science as it relates to Obstetrics and «!.vuecology. Manikin instruction is 
provided. Thirty gynecologic lectures are given throughout the school year to the entire 
class. 

Ob-Gyn. 102. Advanced Clinical Clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Fourth year. 

students are assigned to Obstetrics and Gynecology for a period of four weeks. Small 
groups of students attend Baltimore City Hospitals for two weeks, in rotation. Participa- 
tion in deliveries, and prepartum and postpartum care are accomplished on a high level 
of individual student responsibility. Rounds and <itlier organized instruction complete the 
obstetrical assignment of the student. 

During the remaining two weeks, the student is assigned to the University Hospital 
Outpatient Department. Instruction is oriented toward obstetric and gynecologic office 
procedures. As a clinical clerk, the student examines obstetric and gynecologic patients 
and follows them. He attends the several specialty clinics, where specitic instruction 
in endocrinology, female sterility, and gynecologic cancer is given. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Associates Bnimback, Kemler, Kremen, and R. A. Smith; Instructors Cross 
and H. B. Wilson; Assistant Ozazewski. 

Ophthal. 101. Introduction to Opthalmology. Third year. 20 hours. 

The anatomy and physiology of the eye are reviewed and methods used in making 
various ophthalmologic examinations are discussed. Weekly section work, demonstrating 
the use of the ophthalmoscope, with the aid of kodachrome transparencies of the fundus 
oculi is carried on daring the entire session at the Baltimore Kye, Ear, and Throat 
Hospital. 

Ophthal. 102. Ophthalmology Clinic. Fourth year. 
Clinics and demonstrations in diseases of the eye. 



PATHOLOGY 

Professor Spencer (Head of Department); Associate Professors Merkel, Rei- 
mann, Wagner, Weinberg, Wright; Assistant Professor A. Goldstein; and Stafif. 



SCHOOL Oh MEDICINE 73 

Path. 101. General Pathology. Second year. Second semester. 208 hours. 

This coursH incluflfs the study of the Imsic principles of pathology with their applira- 
fion to the various organs and systems of the body. Laboratory instruction is based on 
the study of prepared slides (loan collection) and fresh and preserved gross material. 
Kodachrome slides are also utilized. 

Path. 102. Correlative Pathology. Third year. 72 hours. 

The class is divided into groups and instruction is carried out in sectional laboratories 
where prepared specimens, complete cases including clinical histories, sections, and ap- 
propriate Kodachrome slides are available for study. The course is integrated so that 
while the student is assigned to one or another of the clinical divisions he studies cor- 
responding diseases in the laboratory. Correlation is stressed. 

Path. 103. Autopsies. Third year. 

Small groups of students are required to attend autopsies conducted in the University 

Hospital. The studont participates in discussions and prepares proper protocols. 

Path. 104. Clinical Pathologic Conferences. Third and Fourth years. 36 

■airs. 

The exercises are held in collaboration with the various clinical departments. His- 
tories are presented, differential diagnoses are discussed, and the clinical course is cor- 
n-lated with the autopsy findings. 

PEDIATRICS 

Professors Bradley (Head of Department), Joslin; Associate Professors Bess- 

ir.an, Finkelstein, F. B. Smith; Assistant Professors Baldwin, Besterbeurtje, 

Fineman, Glaser, GHck, Seabold, Wells, Howell, Mansdorfer, S. Scherlis, 

Spragins; and Staff. 

Ped. 101. Inpatient Clerkship. Third year. 

Students are assigned as clinical clerks for a period of four weeks to the pediatric 

vards of the University and Mercy Hospitals. They are responsible for patient care 

rid work with house staff and instructors in planning the workup and treatment of as- 

-'ned patients. Ward rounds are attended three times weekly. The students are as- 

-'iied tutors who meet with their students three times weekly. 

l>aily confeiences with frequent guest speakers are held covering x-ray diagnosis, 

' ardiology, journal review, chart conferences, neo-natal mortality, case discussions and 

metaboiic diseases. Discussions cover concepts of the premature and neonate, thera- 

■iitic management of pediatric patients, nutritional aspects, and disturbances of the 

^' iiitourinary tract. 

Ped. 102. Outpatient Dejwrtment Clerkship. Fourth year. 

Students assigned to pediatrics as ^-linical clerks for a period of four weeks work 
in the Pediatric Outpatient Department of the University Hospital. All patients seen 
tiv the student are reviewed by an instructor of the pediatric staff. I)aily conferences 
covering a wide range of pertinent pediatric topics are held from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. 
Mudents are assigned to the Development, Seizure. I'ediatric Heniatfdogy. Cardiology, and 
iiild Guidance Clinics. Senior students are responsible for physical examinations of all 
onates. Field trips tf> various community agencies are offered to selected students. 
.■Students are afforded the opportunity of spending one day each week with practicing 
I'ciliatricians of the community. Ward rounds for senior students are held twice weekly 
in the University Hospital. Senior students attend the departmental noon conferences. 

Pad. 103. Laboratory Research Problems in Pediatrics. Second year. 
Elective (two students per year). 

Students will be required to set up simple laboratory procedures to be used by them 



74 UNir/iRSJTY 01' MARVI.AXL) 

In the rtuily of u t'linical prolilem. I'lolilems will lie sflt-cled of siu'h limited scope tluit 
a fairly coinpleti' project can l)c done by two students cooperating in tlieir elective time 
over a period of one year. Knijiliasis will be inade on the accuracy and reliability of 
standard tochni(|nes, as applied to tlie detailed analysis n{ a clinicul problem. Interested 
students should apply to Dr. Bessman. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor Krantz (Head of Department); Associate Professor Truitt; Assistant 
Professor Burgison; and Staff. 

Pharmacol. 101. General Pharmacology. Second year. 216 liours. 

This course is designed to include those phases of pliarmacoloKy necessary for an 
intelli.iTciit use of drugs in the treatment of disease. The didactic instruction includes 
materia medica, pharmacy, prescription writing, toxicology, dosology, phiirniacodynamics, 
and experimental therapeutics. The laboratory exercises parallel the course of lectures. 

In addition, optional conference periods and lectures are available for students desir- 
ing further instruction or advice. 

For Graduates 

All students majoring in the Department of l^harmacology witli a view to 
obtaining the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy should 
secure special training in anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic chemistry, 
and physical chemistry. 

Pharmacol. 201, f.s., General Pharmacology (8). Same as 101, for students 
majoring in pharmacology. Additional instruction and collateral reading are 
required. Laboratory fee, S20.00. 

Pharmacol. 205. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance 
with the amount of work accomplished. 

Pharmacol. 206. Pharmacologic Methods. Maximum credits, 4. Credit in 
accordance with the work accomplished. 

Pharmacol. 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmacodynamics (2-2). 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors Amberson (Head of Department), Ferguson, D. C. Smith; Assistant 
Professors Fox, Cold, J. I. White; and Staff. 

Physiol. 101. Principles of Physiology. First year. Second semester. 225 
hours. 

'J'he leclures cover the major fields of i)hysiology, including the following areas: 
central and peripheral nervo'is systems, neuro muscular apparatus, heai't and circulation, 
respiration, kidney and body lluids. gastrointestinal tract, enilocrines, and reproduction. 
The laboratory includes experiments with frog and turtle heart and nerve-muscle prepara- 
tions, mammalian operative work, and observations on the human subject. 

For Graduates 

The Department of Physiology prefers to accept students who have already 
had some graduate training elsewhere. Before admission to candidacy for the 



SCHOOL or MliDICINli 75 

Hoctor of Philosophy degree the Ucpartnicnt gives a quahtying examination, 
lioth oral and written, whicli must he satisfactorily passed. 

In the usual case a student majoring in Phj'siology will be expected to take 
I'hysiol. 101 and 102 before, or concurrently with, courses 201 to 206 below. 
Such a student will extend his major program by taking courses in other de- 
]>artments of this University, and by enrolling in the summer course in 
physiology at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. 

Physiol. 201. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. Time and credit by 
arrangement. 

Physiol. 202. Blood and Tissue Proteins (2). Two lectures a week, for 
15 weeks. 

Physiol. 203. Physiology of Reproduction (2). Two hours a week, lectures, 
conferences and seminars, for 15 weeks. 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. Time and credit by arrangement. 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids (2). Two hours a 
week, lectures, seminars, and conferences, for 15 weeks. 

Physiol. 206. Seminar. Credit according to work done. 

Physiol. 207. Research. By arrangement with the head of the department. 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION 

Professors Pincof?s (Head of De])artmcnt) and H. Williams; Associate Profes- 
sors Mahoncy and Warthen; Assistant Professors Dawling, Farber, and 
Tayback; and Staff. 

Prev. Med. 101. Biostatistics. First year. Second semester. 15 hours. 
Tills sorips of Ifctiiros illtistratos the basic methods of statistical analysis and demon- 
si rates their use in several areas of clinical investigation. 

Prev. Med. 102. Epidemiology. Second year. 18 hours. 

The epidemiolof-'v and control of certain types of coinmnnioable disease are con- 
sidered in a series of lectures. 

Prev. Med. 103. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation I. Third 
year. 38 hours. 

This course consists of three parts. Major disease control programs, community 
medical resources, and medical care programs are considered during eighteen hours of 
lectures. Students also participate in the work of the Medical Care Clinic for the popula- 
ti<m on ])uhlic assistance and make home visits on selected patients. In addition, stu- 
dents also make field trijis with Public Health Nurses and sanitary inspectors. 

Prev. Med. 104. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation II. 
Fourth year. 16 hours. 

Conference on Home Survey Reports. Each student in his third year has been as- 
signed a patient of the Medical Pare Clinic whom he follows by visits to the home. He 
reports his observations at a small group conference organized jointly by the Depart- 
ments of Preventive Medicine and Psychiatry. Consideration is given to the family 
ititer-relations, the economic situation, the ilietary habits, the sanitation, and the physical 
iliaracterist ics of tlie home as Ihcy influence the patient's illness. 



76 UNIVERSITY 01- MARYLAND 

Hispoiiition ('onforfiice. Stiulonts present patients whose rlisal>llities offer prohlenis 
concerneil with the iirovision of siiit!il)Ie care fiillowing discliartre. An appraisal of the 
home and family lias been made hy a student visit prior to the ronference. On th<' 
basis of the medical needs, the patienfs ability lo eooperate. and the avaihil)le home and 
eouimunity resources, a realistic recommendation for disposition is made to the Iiepart- 
ment concerned. 



PSYCHIATRY 

Professors Fincsinger (Head of Department), Reid; Associate Professors 

Grenell, M. Guttinacher, Sutherland, I. Voinig; Assistatit Professors R. Band, 

Berblingcr, Callaway, JafTe, Liho, Murdock, Pojie, Tuerk; and Staff. 

Psy. 101. Introduction to Psychiatry. First year. 80 hours. 

This course is devoted to a consideration of liuman relations as applied to the jirac- 
tice of medicine. The topics dealt with include personality development, reactions to 
stress, and situational and social factors in disease. The emphasis is upon observing, 
understanding, and evaluating the personal and social factors in the disease process, in 
treatment, and in prevention. Consideration is given to problems of values and scientific 
methodology as they apply to the work of the physician. Patients with common medical 
and surgical complaints are interviewed to illustrate methods of interviewing and de- 
veloping a useful therapeutic relationship. The course is conducted by means of group 
discussion, supplemented by reading. 

Psy. 102. Psychopath ology. Second ->ear. 48 hour.^. 

Emphasis is placed on methods of examining patients, and methods of developing 
and utilizing the doctor-patient relationship. The discussions center about psychopath- 
ology, as it operates in disease and in the treatment process. An attempt is made to 
relate emotional disturbances to what is known in neuropliysiolog.v, endocrinolog.v, ps.v- 
choiogy, and sociology. Patients are interviewed and examined to illustrate the general 
principles and the specific procedures used in the examination of patients. The groni> 
discussions are supplemented by suggested reading. 

Psy. 103. Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship. Third year. 80 hours. 

Students in groups of 6 are assigned for a two-week period as clinical clerks at 
Spring Grove or Springfield State Hospitals. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and 
treatment of psychiatric disorders. Students are assigned patients on the admission 
services of the hospitals and assume responsibility for the histories, the mental status, 
and other examinations. Most of the student's time is spent with patients. During the 
day he examines and studies his own patient. During the evenings he works on the 
wards learning methods of managing and treating disturbed patients. 

Psy. 104. Advanced Psychiatric Clinical Clerkship. Fourth year. 110 hours, j 
A clinical clerkship is offered in the wards of the T'niversity Hospital for one month. 

Patients are assii^rned for treatment under supervision. Emphasis is placed on diagnos's, ; 

methods of interviewing, methods of developing and managing a therapeutic doctor-patient j 

relationship, and carrying out psychotherapy. Two afternoons each week are spent treat- ; 

ing patients under supervision in the Comprehensive Clinic. This is supplemented by ] 

seminar meetings for discussion of child psychiatry, psychotherapy, clinical psychology j 

and social service, and court problems. Topics are assigned from the current literature \ 
for group discussion. During the year each student works two weeks on the in-patient 
halls from 6:00 p.m. to 10 p.m., observing and working with disturbed patients. 

I 

RADIOLOGY i 

Professors Dennis (Head of Department), Davidson; Associate Professor j 
Bloedorn; Assistant Professors Boudreau, Dana, DeCarlo; and Staflf. j 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE ■ 77 

Rad. 101. Radiologic Anatomy. I'irst year. l""irst semester. 12 licnirs. 

A cfHTf'latcd cotirsp is Riven in conjunction with llic I>o|(;ii-l nicnt of .Vnatomy. This 
cour.sc consists of nine Icctiirp-dcmonsf rations flevotod to tlio skull, chest, gastrointestinal 
trad, genitourinary tract, the spine, and joints. Not only is the normal .analoray shown, 
hut the radiologic asiiecls of a few pathologic processes are also slio\\ n for emphasis and 
correlation. 

Rad. 102. Radiologic Physiology. Vw^i year. Second semester. 3 hours. 

In conjunction with tlie 1 leparl Mii>nt of Physiohigy, students, in groups of four, spend 
one afternoon in the Department of Uadiology \\hero they ohserve flnoroscopically res- 
l)iratory and gastrointestinal physiology. An introduction is also given to the use of 
contrast matcrinl. as it is used in radiology, to demonst lali' tlie function and structure 
of various portions of the human hody. 

Rad. 103. Pathologic Correlation. Second year. 4 hours. 

r,ecture-(lemonstrati(Uis arc gi\eii in conju.iition willi the I >('i)Mrtmcnl df I'athology 
for <-orrelation hetween gross pathology and the roentgenologic manifestations of various 
disease states, e.g. abnormal calcium metabolism, pulmonary diseases, bone tumors, and 
tissue reaction to radiant energy, 

Rad. 104. Radiologic Orientation I. Third year. 28 hours. 

A series of lecture-demonstrations are given to small groups of students at the 
Baltimore City Hospitals, Mercy Hospital, and the University Hospital. An attempt is 
made to cover the roentgen studies of all systems of the body with demonstrations of 
the more common lesions encountered in each system. At Baltimore City Hospitals, 
twelve lecture-demonstrations are given on the chest, the genitourinary tract, and 
metabolic bone diseases, while at Mercy Hospital three hours are devoted to the arth- 
rides and bone tumors. At the University Hospital, additional lecture-demonstrations are 
devoted to the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and skull. 

Rad. 105. Radiologic Orientation II. Fourth year. 30 hours. 

Students, in groups of three, are assigned part-time to the Department of Radiology 
for a period of one week. One morning is spent making rounds in the radiotherapy 
division. The other mornings are spent in the reading rooms with the staff radiologist 
and in the fluoroscopy rooms observing chest and gastrointestinal studies. In the after- 
noons, a group of teaching films, illustrating common congenital anomalies and pathologic 
lesions, are available for study. 

Beside the organized lecture-demonstrations in radiology, Tunior and Senior students 
attend the radiologic conferences held jointly with the Departments of Pediatrics and 
Surgery and the Neurosurgery and Urology Divisions. 



SURGERY 

Professors Buxton (Head of Department), Arnold, Brantigan, C. R. Edwards, 
Hull, Kitlowski, O'Rourk, Pessagno, Rodgers, Voshell, Yeager, and Young : 
Associate Professors Fox, Garlick, Kayser, Kypcr, Rich, Ullrich, and Walker; 
Assistant Professors T. R. Adams, Bongardt, Bowie, Brager, Cowley, Gillis, 
Govatos, Haines, Isaacs, Mays, J. P. Miller, Schwartz, Siwinski, Thompson, 

Wilder, and Staff. 

Surg. 101. Principles of Surgery, Third year. 48 hours. 

Three one hour periods are devoted each week to a discussion of fundamental sur- 
gical problems and a systematic description of general surgical disease. These discus- 
sions are designed as introductions to and preparation for detailed reading in standard 
textbooks and monographs in surgery and in current periodicals. 



78 [■MJ/iRSITY 01- MARVL.LXP 

Surg. 101a. Surgical Specialty Lectures. I iiird year. 48 liours. 

This is !i (•(.ntinnatinn of Surs. 101, whoroin flio siirKii'iU discussions rt-ntpr ;iroim<l 
tlu> prohlcms of Olorhinoliirvnsolo^y, Tlioracic Sni-gi'iy. Nciirosnrijciy, Otliopcdic SurKt'ry, 
and T'rolofrio Surgery. 

Surg. 103. Outpatient Clerkship in Surgery. Tliird year. 286 liours. 

One-fourth of the tliird yoar cla-ss is assigned to tlio Dcpartniont of Surgery eacli 
quarter of tlie scliool year. Students are assigned to tlic Outpatient Oepartment for the 
examination and snjiervised care of patients in tlie (teneral Surgical. Orthopedic, I'rologic. 
Neurosurgical. Thoracic Surgical, and KXT Clinics. One-tliird of this quarter is spent 
at Mercy Hospital. Seminars are conducted in Surgical Tatludogy and ujion tlie effeets 
of Trauma. Students are assigned in rotation as clinical clerks at niglit in tli(> P^mer- 
gency Koom. 

Summer Fellowships. 

Tliree fellowships are availahle eaeh summer for a iieriod of 10 weeks in the Surgical 
Research Tijiliorator.v. Both sophomore and junior students are eligible and may elect to 
siiend their fellowship in neurosurgery, tlioracic. or general surgery. Investigative proh- 
lcms related to tliese services will lie undertaken under the guidance of inemliers of the 
Surgical Staff in these specialties. 



DIVISION OF GENERAL SURGERY 

Drs. Buxton, C. R. Edward.^, Ycager, Hull, Pessagno, .\dams. Bowie, Ciovatos, 
Siwiiiski, Bongardt. Brager, and Staff. 

Surg. 103a. 

Tliis is the student's introduction to an office-type surgical i)r:ictice in that he 
undertakes the supervised care of patients in the Surgical Dispensary. General discus- 
sion related to problems presented b.v these patients are given by the Surgical Staff. The 
inlrodiiction to s|iecitic surgical technics in examination and treatment of patients is 
undertaken. This course is given at both T'niversity and ;>rercy Hospitals, .\udio-visual 
instruction is given weekly. Students are assigned to the Kmergency Room during this 
jieriod. 

Surg. 104a. 

Senior students are assigned to patients on the surgical wards in the University 
Hospital. They are responsible for the physical examination, history and certain lab- 
oratory tests as required by the paticnt'.s disease. 



DIVISION OF NEUROSURGERY 

Drs. Arnold, Thompson, and Staff. 

Surg. 103b. 

.liinior students are assigned to this division for instruction in the care of patients 
in tlie Outpatient Department. Part of a day each week is devoted to Pediatric Neuro- 
surgery. Instruction in Neurosurgery is done at the University Hospital only. 

Surg. 104b. 

Senior students are assigned to all patients on Xeurosnrgery as they are admitted. 
Weekly conferences in patient care and x-ray diagnosis are held. Daily ward rounds 
arc made. Some introduction is given to otiice practice of neurosurgery by frequent 
contact with the neurosurgiial probli'Uis seen in a physiciairs office. 



SCHOOL Of MEDICINE 79 

DIVISION OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Drs. Voshell, Rodgers, Ullrich, J. P. Miller, Wildt-r, and Staff. 

Surg. 103c. 

Junior students aro assigned lo tliis division in the Outpatient Department at Fni- 
verslt.v and Meroy Hospitals. Patients are seen for diagnosis and postoperative care. 
Instruction is given in tlie apidic-ation of plaster casts and in tlie ambulatory management 
of orthopedic i)rol)lenis. Occasion is given to iiistnictlon in the Physical Therapy of 
patients with orthopedic disease. 

Surg. 104c. 

Senior students are assigned patients both on the surgical wards and in the Emer- 
gency Room. They participate in the care of these patients, and are given instruction 
in the application of traction and plaster casts. Fre(|uent ward rounds ai'e lield at the 
Kernan's Hospital for (,'rippled Children. 

DIVISION OF UROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Drs. J. D. YouDfj;, Mays, Gillis, Haines, anri Staff. 

Surg. 103d. 

[nstructiou is given lo .Tuiiior students in this division in the diagnosis of nrologic 
disease of )>oth men and women. The general aspects of insti'umentatkm arc discussed 
and the roentgenologic evidence of urologic disease is emiihasize<l. 

Surg. 104d. 

.Students are assigned jiaticiits in the I'niversity lIos|)ital war<ls. Further instruc- 
tion is given in diagnosis an<l inst iiiuientixi ion of these patients :ind in the x-ray diag- 
nosis of urologic disease. 

DIVISION OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY 

Drs. O'Rourk, Fox, Kyper, Rich, Kayser, Isaacs, Schwartz, and staff. 

Surg. 103€. 

.Tunior students are given a diance to examine the ears, nose and throat of patients 
in the Outpatient Department. Instruction is given in hearing deficits and in the man- 
agenn-nt of ambulatoi-y pjitienis with minimal otolaryngological disease. 

Surg. 104e. 

Senior students are assigned jiatienls as they are atlmitterl to this service, and 
weelily ward rounds are held. 

DIVISION OF THORACIC SURGERY 

Dr. R. A. Cowley and Staff'. 

Surg. 103f. 

Instruc