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Full text of "Bulletin, Summer Quarter"



!!)S«(i(i«Y 




SUMMER 

QUARTER 

1971 



WHOM TO WRITE 

For further information, inquiries may be addressed to the appropriate office 
at Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina 28607. Telephone 
264-8871, Area Code 704. 



General Information and College Policy President 

Business Affairs and Finances Vice President for 

Business Affairs 

Undergraduate Admissions Director of Admissions 

Graduate Admissions, Graduate Progiam and Curriculum 

Requirements Dean of the Graduate School 

Records, Certification Requirements, Curriculum 

Requirements, and All Transcripts Registrar 

Student Welfare . Dean of Student Affairs 

Housing Director of Housing 

Faculty Appointments and Instruction . . . .Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Foundations, Heartlme. Public Relations. 

and Public Events Director of Public Affairs 

Placement Directoi of Placement 

Student Aid Director of Student Financial Aid 



OFFICE HOURS 

During the summer quarter, June 7 through August 13, administrative offices are 
open from 8:00 to 12:00 noon and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except on legal holidays. 



APPALACHIAN STATE 
UNIVERSITY 




Catalog Issue 
SUMMER QUARTER 



1971 



Summer Quarter June 7 - August 1 3 

First Term June 7 - July 9 

Second Term July 1 2 - August 13 

Short Terms June 14 - June 25 

June 28 - July 9 

July 12 -July 24 

July 26 - August 6 



Boone, North Carolina 
28607 



Volume LXIX 



Number 2 



January, 1971 



Published quarterly by Appaiachia State University. Entered as second-class matter at tha 
Post Office at Boone, North Carol*. under the Act of Congress, August 24, 1912. Postage 
has been paid at Boone, Norttl Carolina. Corrections addressed to the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs, Appalachian State University, Boone, N.C. 28607. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinsummerquOOunse 



TO STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



The summer quarter ai Appalachian State University provides broad and 
varied programs of instruction to meet the special needs ot the following groups 
o( students: 

High school graduates will find it advantageous to begin their college studies 
in the summer quarter. A complete program of studies and of counseling services 
is available The summer quarter offers the high school graduate an excellent 
opportunity to become adjusted to college life and to complete requirements for 
the bachelor's degree in three years 

Undergraduate students of Appalachian are encouraged to accelerate and 
enrich their programs. 

Undergraduate students from other colleges and universities will find available 
a variety of courses in many fields that will meet their particular needs and that 
can be transferred to their home institutions. 

Graduate students who wish to do graduate work leading to the Master's 
degree are offered a full sequence of courses in elementary education, the several 
areas of tin 1 high school, school administration, counseling, audiovisual services, 
supervision of instruction, junior college teaching, library science, reading, and 
special education. Specialist in Education degree programs are offered in 
educational leadership, elementary education, and higher education. The 
Specialist in Science degree may be earned in biology. 

School administrators who wish to work for the sixth-year certificate in 
administration will find a well-planned program at Appalachian. 

Teachers who desire to renew or upgrade their certificates and to improve and 
enrich their teaching may choose from a wide variety oi courses taught by 
scholarly and experienced professors. 

The summer quarter is an integral part of the total program of Appalachian. 
All facilities and resources of the college, both physical and human, are available 
to students and teachers In the 1970 summer quarter, 5,673 students and 
teachers enrolled in regulai courses, short term courses, and institutes. We invite 
you to study with us in the 1971 summer quarter. 



CALENDER OF THE SUMMER QUARTER 



SUMMER QUARTER- June 7 - August 13 

Registration, 8:00 a.m., Monday June 7 

Faculty meeting, Auditorium, I. G. Greer Hall, 7:30 p.m., Monday June 7 

Classes begin, 7:30 a.m., Tuesday June 8 

Registration closes; classes must be met on Tuesday June 15 

Closing date for applying for National Teacher Examinations, Thursday June 24 

Administration of National Teacher Examinations, Saturday July 17 

Mid-term week July 12-16 

Final Examinations August 12-13 

Commencement exercises, 10:00 a.m., Saturday August 14 



FIRST TERM- June 7 - July 9 

Registration, 8:00 a.m., Monday June 7 

Classes begin, 7:30 a.m., Tuesday June 8 

Registration closes; classes must be met on Wednesday June 9 

Examinations, Thursday and Friday July 8 - 9 



SECOND TERM- July 12 - August 13 

Registration, 8:00 a.m., Monday July 12 

Classes begin, 7:30 a.m., Tuesday July 13 

Registration closes; classes must be met on Wednesday July 14 

Examinations, Thursday and Friday August 12-13 



TWO-WEEK TERMS 

First Two-Week Term, June 14 - June 25 
Second Two-Week Term, June 28 - July 9 
Third Two-Week Term, July 12 - July 23 
Fourth Two- Week Term, July 26 - August 6 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 7 

Location and Climate 7 

Accreditation 7 

Purpose and Philosophy 7 

Housing 8 

Recreational Facilities and Activities 9 

Motor Vehicle Registration 9 

Laboratory Schools 10 

ADMISSIONS 11 

Undergraduates 11 

Graduate 12 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS 13 

EXPENSES „ 18 

Undergraduate and Graduate 19 

Day Students 20 

Special Fees 20 

Om-Of-St:ite 22 

Student Financial Aid 25 

WORKSHOPS 28 

INSTITUTES 32 

COURSHSOF INSTRUCTION 33 

Art 33 

Biology and General Science 35 

Chemistry and Physical Science 37 

Economics and Business 38 

Education 41 

English 51 

Foreign Languages 54 

Geography 56 

Health and Physical Education 58 

History 61 

Home Economics , 64 

Industrial Arts 64 

Library Scjence 66 

Mathematics 69 

Computer Science 71 

Music . . 72 

Philosophy and Religion 74 



Physics 75 

Political Science 76 

Psychology 77 

Sociology and Anthropology 80 

Speech 81 

CLASS AND EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 84 

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION 66 

Undergraduate IBC 

Graduate IBC 

Room Reservation Form . IBC 

Student Data Sheet IBC 



GI NERAL INFORMATION 



Location and Climate 



Appalachian State University is located at Boone, county seat of Watauga 
County, North Carolina, on the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains at an 
elevation of 3,333 feet. 

Located only eight miles from the famous Blowing Rock and five miles off 
the Blue Ridge Parkway, which connects the Shenandoah and the Smoky 
Mountain National Parks, Boone is easily accessible over United States Highways 
221 . 321. 421 . which intersect in and lead out from the town. 

Appalachian has the highest elevation of any four-year institution east of the 
Mississippi. The high elevation assures an unexcelled summer climate. The days 
are refreshing and pleasant; the nights require blankets for comfort. The 
mountains, the rhododendron, the mountain laurel are beautiful. The person 
who wishes to combine a summer of study with one nf re< reation in the Blue 
Ridge Mountains will find stimulating opportunities at Appalachian- 



Accreditation 

Appalachian is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, \meric in Council on Education, American Association of 
Colleges for Teachei Education National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities, Natioc I 
Association of Schools of Music, and the National Association of Bus!" 
Teacher Education. 



Purpose and Philosophy 

Appalachian State University is dedicated to the total developmen 
constituency through instruction, research, and service. 

In pursuit of this purpose, Appalachian pledges itself: 

To sustain an intellectual climate in which truth is sought and respected. 

To provide a liberal education for all its students. 



To offer, within its capabilities, pre-professional and professional education 
to those students who desire it. 



To maintain a faculty dedicated to teaching and scholanhip. 

To advance the frontiers of knowledge through research. 

To be cognizant of new knowledge and prepared to meet the challenge of 
new ideas. 

To expand cultural horizons and develop appreciation of ethical and aesthetic 
values. 

To make its resources available to the people of the geographic region. 

To cooperate with all institutions and agencies which are dedicated to the 
betterment ^f mankind. 



^Housing 

The University has 15 residence halls housing approximately 4000 students. 
Epch room is equipped with basic furniture, but the student is expected to 
supply his linens, blankets f rugs, pillow, curtains, and other personal furnishings 
according to individual takes. Each student is expected to observe dormitory 
regulations and to care for the furnishings pf the room. The following is a list of 
appliances students may have in their rooms: lamps, clock, radio, fan, record 
player, hair dryer, vacuum cleaner, sewing machine, razor, television (portable or 
table model-2i" screen maximum), popcorn popper (to be used in designated 
areas only), refriger -*r (not to exceed the size of the model distributed by the 
SGA), and iron (used only in the laundry room). The following is a list of 
appliances students MAY NOT have in their rooms: hot plates, percolators, 
toasters, roasters, heat lamps, and heaters. The use of extension cords, multiple 
sockets, television antennae, and other attachments to the walls or plumbing 
fixtures is prohibited. 

Dormitory rooms may be occupied on the day preceding registration day 
of the term for which a student plans to enroll. Rooms must be vacated on the 
last day of the term for which a student has been enrolled. 

Spaces for graduate and undergraduate students will be in separate residence 
halls. The two classifications will not be mixed unless absolutely necessary. 
Please indicate on the reservation card your classification. To reserve a room, a 
student should complete the Room Reservation Blank provided at the end of 

8 



this bulletin and mail it with the (pom reservation fee directly to the Cashier. 
Appalachian State University, Boone North Carolina 28607. 

Standard accommodations are for two occupants to each room, although a 
limited number of private rooms without private baths are available upon 
request. These private rooms are on a first-come, first-served basis. See bulletin 
section under Expenses for rental costs. 



Students living in the residence halls take their meals in the cafeteria. 
Students who commute or who have rooming accommodations in Boone have 
the privilege of taking their meals in the cafeteria. Meals are prepared by 
experienced chefs under the direction and supervision of trained dietitians. 
Every effort is made to provide wholesome, appetizing food at minimum cost. 

Some students may wish to secure rooms in town. A list of available housing 
in town may be obtained from the office of the Director of Student Housing. All 
students enrolled in the University, whether living on campus or off campus, are 
subject to the rules of good citizenship and exemplary conduct as administered 
and supervised by the university administration and the Student Government 
Association. 



Recreational Facilities and Activities 

Health and physical education buildings are open to summer school students. 
A large swimming pool is available on schedule to both men and women 
students. Excellent tennis courts and playing fields for baseball, Softball, 
volleyball, and other outdoor games are available. Excellent golfing facilities are 
offered by the nearby Boone golf course. Hiking and fishing in the mountains 
are fascinating sports. The University maintains an extensive intramural program. 

The W. H. Plemmons Student Center offers a variety of recreational, cultural, 
and leisure -time opportunities, including bowling, billiards, table tennis, 
music -listening, dancing, T. V., food service, and lounging space. 

Many tourist attractions are located in and near Boone. The Blowing Rock is 
eight miles and Grandfather Mountain fifteen miles from the campus. Horn in 
the West, the widely acclaimed outdoor drama, is only a few blocks from the 
campus. Tweetsie, the last narrow-gauge railroad in eastern America, is four 
miles away. The Boone area is unsurpassed for scenic beauty and grandeur. 
Assistance will be given in planning trips to nearby points of interest. 



Motor Vehicle 

At Appalachian State University as almost everywhere, parking is an 
increasingly serious problem. The University is endeavoring to meet the problem 
through vehicle regulations and continuous effort to improve campus parking 
facilities. 

All students, faculty, staff, and employees of Appalachian State University 
who operate or park a motor vehicle on the university campus or its environs 
(within 10 miles) must register his or her motor vehicle with the University. This 
includes students attending as commuters 

For further information and traffic regulations, please refer to the 
Appalachian State University Basic Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 
booklet. 



THE LABORATORY SCHOOLS 



Elementary School: The elementary school will open on June 14 and close on 
July 30. A readiness program for pre-school children and enrichment and 
remedial courses tor students in giades one through eight will be ottered. I he 
remedial work will be in reading and arithmetic for grades one through eight. A 
course on How to Study will be offered for grades six, seven, and eight. 
Enrichment courses will be offered in several areas. More detailed information 
on these is available at the elementary school. The tuition for two courses is 
$15.00. 

High School: The high school will open on June 7 and close July 30. The 
work in high school will cover most high school subjects. The demonstration 
classes are taught by regular and visiting faculty members of the school. The 
tuition is $20.00. 

For application blanks or additional information about the laboratory 
schools, write: 

Dr. W. G. Anderson, Principal 
APPALACHIAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Boone, North Carolina 28607 



Dr. N. A. Miller, Principal 
WATAUGA HIGH SCHOOL 
Boone, North Carolina 28607 

10 



ADMISSIONS 



Undergraduates 

Each student who plans to attend the summer quarter must make a request 
for registration. A request form can be found at the back of this bulletin. 

Undergraduate students who are enrolling at the University for the first time to 
wuik toward a degree should address all correspondence concerning admission 
to the Director of Admissions, Appalachian State University, Boone, North 
Carolina 28607. 

Beginning freshmen. Graduates of accredited high schools must present two 
units of algebra or one unit o! algebra and one unit of geometry. Graduates of 
non-accredited high schools are admitted by certificate and satisfactory scores 
on an entrance examination. Applicants must have filed satisfactory scores on 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board, which 
should be taken in the senior year, preferably in November or December. For 
information regarding the test, application fees, reports, examination centers, 
and dates, the student should consult his high school principal or guidance 
counselor. 

Undergraduate students who are current!* enrolled at Appalachian and who 
are eligible to continue in attendance should submit their requests for 
registration in the summer quarter to the RegiMiai at least one month before the 
opening of the term for which registration is desired. 

Students who have withdrawn in good standing or who have boon suspended 
for academic deficiencies or other reasons should submit their requests or 
readmission to the Registrar. 

Teachers who are not applying for admission to the Graduate School and do 
not want graduate credit should submit their requests for registration in the 
summer session to the Registrar. Courses numbered 500 or above may not be 
taken. 

Special students. Applicants who are mature and who have had a satisfactory 
record of experience and education may be admitted to courses which they may 
be able to pursue with profit. Such applicants may be required to present 
evidence of having earned a college degree or evidence of the need for specific 
courses. Special students who desire to become candidates for degrees must 
satisfy entrance requirements. 



II 



An undergraduate student from a college or university other than 
Appalachian who expects to transfer credits earned in the summer session to his 
institution must present a statement from the Dean of his college stating that he 
is a student in good standing and that his proposed course of study for the 
summer is approved. Upon request, an official transcript of courses taken during 
the summer will be mailed to the student's home institution. 

Auditors. Students with satisfactory records of experience and education may 
be admitted to specific courses as auditors with the consent of the Dean of 
Student Affairs and the instructor concerned. Students who audit courses must 
register in the Registrar's office, must be regular in attendance, but will not 
receive grades or credit. 

First time admission. An applicant who has never previously enrolled at 
Appalachian must submit a formal application with a ten-dollar processing fee, 
which is not refundable, to the Director of Admissions, Appalachian State 
University, Boone, North Carolina. First- time applicants SHOULD NOT file the 
summer school application found at the back of this catalog. 

Acceptance of room reservation fee DOES NOT denote admission to the 
summer school. 

Graduate 

Each student who plans to attend the summer quarter must make a request 
for registration. A request form can be found at the end of this bulletin. 

Graduate students who have not previously registered at Appalachian must, in 
addition, file an application for admission to graduate school with the Dean of 
the Graduate School. Application forms can be obtained from his office. 

For additional information on graduate admissions, please see the Graduate 
School Bulletin. 



12 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS 



Appalachian operates on the quarter system with the year divided into four 
quarters. The summer quarter consists of two five-week terms with four 
two-week terms running concurrently. Students receive course credit on the 
basis of quarter hours. 

The University awards the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, thi 
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, the Bachelor of Music, tht 
Master of Science, the Master of Aits, the Specialist in Education, and the 
Specialist in Science degrees 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements common to all baccalaureate degrees: 

1. Completion of at least 183 quarter hours with a grade point average of at 
least 2.0 and a 2.0 grade point average in the major or the area of 
specialization. A transfer student must have at less! a 2.0 grade point average 
on work at Appalachian . 

2. Compliance with specific course requirements and distribution in general 
education and specialization. Specific requirements for each departmental 
major and minor or area of specialization are given in the general catalog. 

3. Completion of residence requirements. 

4. Compliance with regulations concerning settlement of all expense accounts 
and satisfactory citizenship. 

5. Recommendation of the faculty. 

Meeting graduation requirements is the student's responsibility. 

For requirements for the Master's degree, see the Graduate School Bulletin. 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

Applicants should submit an application for registration to the kegistm(fot 
undergraduate registration) or to the Dean of the Graduate Scftool (fgs 



13 



registration) at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the term for which 
registration is requested. After the application has been received by the 
University, the applicant will be sent additional registration instructions. 

Graduate students must have their programs approved by their advisers prior 
to registration. Undergraduate students are responsible for choosing the courses 
they need. In case of question, they are urged to consult with their adviser. 

STUDENTS WILL REGISTER ACCORDING TO THE FIRST LETTER OF 
THEIR LAST NAMES AS FOLLOWS: 

First Term Registration 

Monday, June 7, Varsity Gymnasium, 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. 



8:00 to 9:00 


T through Z 


9:00 to 10:00 


O through S 


10:00 to 11:00 


L through N 


11:00 to 12:00 


Greer through K 


12:00 to 1:00 


Registration Center Closed 


1:00 to 2:00 


CI through Greene 


2:00 to 3:00 


A through CH 


3:00 to 5:00 


Late Arrivals and 




Special Problem Cases 



Second Term Registration 

Monday, July 12, Varsity Gymnasium, 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. 



8:00 to 9:00 


A through CH 


9:00 to 10:00 


CI through Greene 


10:00 to 11:00 


Greer through K 


11:00 to 12:00 


L through N 


12:00 to 1:00 


Registration Center Closed 


1:00 to 2:00 


O through S 


2:00 to 3:00 


T through Z 


3:00 to 5:00 ' 


Late Arrivals and Special 




Problem Cases 



Institute Registration (on beginning date of institute): 

Office of the Registrar - 2 P.M. to 3 P.M. 

14 



I ,!si Two Week Term Kcgistratiuii 

Monday, June 14 - Office of the Registrar - 2 P.M. to 3 P.M. 

Second Two W«vk Tcrni Registration 

Monday, June 28 - Office of the Registrar - 2 P.M. to 3 P.M. 

Third Two-Week Term Registration 

Monday, July 1 2 - Office of the Registrar - 2 P.M. to 3 P.M. 

Fourth Two-Week Term Registration 

Monday, July 26 - Otfire n\ (he Registrar - 2 P.M. to 3 P.M 



A late lee oi >iU.OO is charged to students failing to complete registration 
on the announced registration date. 



Academic Load 

A student normally takes from fifteen to eighteen hours in a quarter, nine 
hours in a six-week term, and three hours in a two-week term 



Course Changes 

In order to drop or add a course, a student must secure permission from his 
adviser. A fee of $1 .00 will be charged for dropping or adding a course unless the 
change was initiated by the college. 

To add a course, a student must secure permission and the drop-add form 
from his adviser. The drop-add form is taken to the Registrar's Office where a 
new course card and Class Admission Card are obtained. After the close of 
registration, a student may not add a course. 

To drop a course, a student must get the approval of his adviser. (The 
drop-add form is obtained from the student's adviser.) Students must secure the 
Class Admission Card from the instructor involved and take it and the drop-add 
form to the Office of the Registrar. 

Any student who has official permission from his adviser may drop a course 
within two weeks after the close of registration for the summer quarter or within 

15 



five class hours for a five-week term and receive a grade of W. No grade points or 
hour* will be counted for the grade of W. 

Any student desiring to drop a course more than two weeks after registration 
closes for the summer quarter 01 five class hours for a six-week term must bring 
a note from his instructor indicating whether he is passing or failing to the Dean 
of his College (undergraduate) or the Dean of the Graduate School (graduate). 
These students will be assigned a grade of W or F depending upon whether the 
student is passing or failing. If the grade is W, the hours will not be counted in 
computing grade point averages. If the grade is F, the hours will be counted in 
computing grade point averages. Courses dropped at anv time without 
permission will be recorded as F's and the hours will be counted in computinp 
grade point iverages. 

Within thirty days prior to the beginning of the examination period for the 
summer quarter or within ten days prior to the beginning of the examination 
period for a five-week term, a student may not drop a course passing. 



Class Attendance 

A student is expected to attend every meeting of his classes, and he is 
responsible for his class attendance. 

he student who must be absent should explain why he must be absent or 
whj he has been absent. The instructor may or may not excuse the absence 
ace ding to his own judgment. However, students who are absent for reason of 
off ially representing the University in some activity will be excused. 
Statements concerning university representation will come from the Dean of 
Men or the Dean of Women. Medical excuses will not be written by the Student 
Health Service. 



Withdrawal from the University 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the University for any reason must 
make arrangements with the Dean of Student Affairs or the Dean of the 
Graduate School prior to withdrawal. Permission from the parents or guardian of 
a minor student to withdraw is required. 

Students who withdraw officially from the college will receive gradt oi W 
and hours will not be counted in computing grade point averages. Studen' who 
withdraw unofficially from the college will receive grades of F and hours will be 
counted in computing grade point avenges. 

16 



Within thirty day& prior to (he beginning of the examination period i i hi 
summer quarter, or within ten days prior to the beginning of the examinaf or 
period for a five -week term, a student may not withdraw in good standing 
except for reason of illness or extreme emergent \ 



Reports 

Final quarter or term grades are reported to the Compun ; ( enter not later 
than forty -eight hours after the examination in the i in .< s given Each 
nstructor will post the grades of his students 



National Teachers Examination 

A candidate for teacher certification is required to uke f!f e Common 
Examination of the National Teacher Examinations and the Option 
Examination, if available, in his major subject. The tees charge ! are those of the 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 



Graduate Record Examination 

A candidate fn» ■ u >■ I'mrp-ite degree in a progran not leading to teacher 
eeitificaiiof is required to take the Aptitude 'I est and Advanced Test, if available, 
ol the Graduate Record Examination In some instances, candidates for 
baccalaureate degrees in the College of Business may ele< I to Sake tht Admission 
lest for Graduate Study in Business lather ilnn (he Graduate Record 
I xamination. 



Graduation 

Degrees are conferred at the close of the spring and summit juarters 
Candidates lor degrees must file application for degrees and North Carolina 
certificates on blanks provided by the Registrai and the Dean ol the Graduate 
School on icgistration day of the quarter in which gaduaiiou requirements will 
be completed. At the time of filing the application, all requirements except 
current work should be completed. 

All candidates for degrees at any commencement are expected to be present 
to receive their degrees in person unless excused bs the Registrai or »hf ! h an of 
the Graduate School 



17 



.teacher Certification 

For a regular Class A Certificate in North Carolina, a candidate must make a 
composite minimum score of 950 on the National Teacher Common 
Examination and the teaching area examination. When a teaching area 
examination is not available, a minimum score of 475 on the Common 
Examination is required for a regular Class A Certificate. A candidate who makes 
a minimum composite score of 875 on the National Teacher Common 
Examination and the area examination will begivenprobationary certification for 
one year. No certification is issued to an applicant wtio fails to make the 
minimum scores as are herein stated. 

All transcripts showing that the student is qualified for a teaching certificate 
bear this notation: 

This is to certify that (name) has satisfactorily completed the regular National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education accredited program of this 
institution for the preparation of teachers and that (he or she) is specifically 
prepared to teach (subject). This applicant has met all other appropriate 
standards of this institution which are required for full recommendation for 
teaching. 

EXPENSES 

Fees are charged by the term and are due and payable in advance at the 
beginning of each term. Any special arrangement for the payment of expenses 
must be made at the time of registration for the term with the Controller's 
Office. 

Room Reservations 

See instructions with reservation form in back of bulletin. 

Regular Expenses Per Five-Week 
Term of the Undergraduate Student 



Tuition and Fees $ 

Cafeteria Meals (minimum) . . 
Room (standard) 

Private room $60.00 
Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

(minimum) 



18 



Resident of 


Non-Resident of 


North Carolina 


North Carolina 


$ 86.50 


$129.00 


55.00 


55.00 


50.00 


50.00 


8.00 


8.00 


$199.50 


$242.00 



Kcgufar Expenses Per Five-Week 
Ierm of the Graduate Student 



Tuition and Fees 

Cafeteria Meals (minimum) 
Room (standard) 

Private room $60.00 
Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

(minimum) 



95.50 
55.00 
50.00 



8.00 



$138.00 
55.00 
50.00 



8.00 



$208.50 



$251.00 



Regular Lxpenses Per Two-Week Ierm 



Tuition and Fees $ 50.00 

Room (standard) 20.00 



$ 64.00 
20.00 



$ 70.00 



$ 84.00 



Regular Expense Per One 
Three Quarter Hour Course 



Residents of 
North Carolina 
Graduate and 
Undergraduate 



Non-residents of 
North Carolina 
Graduate and 
Undergraduate 



Tuition and Fees 



50.00 



$ 64.00 



All two-week terms are separate. New registrations are required for each term. 

The room reservation fee is deductible from the room rent charge at the 
opening of the First term in residence. 

All students living in the university dormitories are required to purchase the 
minimum number of meal tickets at the time of registration. Mealbooks 
purchased during the summer terms are redeemable only during the summer 
school period. Books purchased during the regular academic year are not 
redeemable during the summer terms. 

19 



The University reserves the right to change the charges for living expenses any 
time that it becomes necessary. 



Day Students 

Regular day students pay all regular expenses except room rent, cafeteria 
meals, laundry and dry cleaning. 



Auditing 

All persons except those on university appointment and students registered 
for a full schedule who audit a class pay the regular registration and tuition fees 
A class audited shall count as part of the student's load. Auditors do not take 
tests, examinations, or receive grades or credit. 



Textbooks and Supplies 

Textbooks, tools, equipment, and supplies may be obtained at the University 
Bookstore. 



Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

Laundry of linens and personal clothing, pressing, and dry cleaning are 
provided at the University Laundry. Students whose laundry services are in 
excess of the minimum charge will settle the account with the Cashier's Office. 
All students should have permanent name markings in every article to be 
laundered or dry cleaned. 

Special Fees 

Laboratory Breakage Fee $ 5.00 

Student Teaching $15.00 

This fee is charged the student who does student teaching in the laboratory 
schools of the University or in approved off-campus schools. 
Music 

Individual lessons 

Five-Week Term 
One thirty-minute individual lesson 
a week, any instrument or voice $ 7.50 

20 



Two thirty-minute individual lessons 

a week, any instrument or voice 1 5.00 

Practice Rooms 

Voice, piano, organ 2.50 

Strings, winds, percussion 1 .25 



Late Registration $10.00 

A student who does not complete his registration on the announced 
registration date is charged a $10.00 fee. 

Change of Course $ 1 .00 

For each course change initiated by the student after registration day, a $1 .00 
fee is charged. 

Special Examination $20.00 

This fee is charged the student who takes an examination in a course outside 
of the examination schedule, except in case of extreme emergency. 

National Teacher Examination 

The fee charged by the Educational Testing Service for 

the Common Examination $10.00 

Common and one Option 15.00 

Miller Analogies Test 5.00 

Cap and Gown 

Bachelor's degree (rental) $ 5.00 

Master's degree (rental) 9.00 

Diploma 

Bachelor's degree $ 6.00 

Master's degree 10.00 

Automobile 

Automobile Registration $ 1.50 



SpecialNote 

Before taking final examinations at the close oi me quaiiu oi term, a student 
is expected to settle all accounts. A student may not register for a new term 
until all charges have been paid or arranged for. A student cannot receive 2 

21 



degree, certificate, or transcript of credits until all accounts except current loan- 
have been paid. 



Refunds and Withdrawals 

A student who withdraws from the university before the end of the quarter 
or term will have a proportionate part of the amount paid for board refunded 
If a student withdraws before registration for the quarter or term is closed 
one-half of the fees for room and tuition will also be refunded Refunds will bi 
calculated from the dat^ of the official withdrawal from the university . 

Out-Of-State Students 



The following statement governs a student's classification as a resident oi 
nonresident of North Carolina with respect to tuition payment. 

1. General The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less than 
for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resideni must have 
maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at leas! the six months next 
preceding the dale of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of 
higher education in this State 



2. Minors: The legal residence oi a peisou under twenty one yeais oi age at the 
time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in this State 
is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where 
parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the father wili 
control unless custody of the minor has been awarded by court order to the 
mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim of residence in 
North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian in North Carolina will be 
considered if either parent is living unless the action of the court appointing 
the guardian antedates the student's first enrollment in a North Carolina 
institution of higher education by at least twelve months. 

A minor student whose parents move their legal residence from North 
Carolina to a location outside of the Stale shall be considered to be a 
non-resident after six months Horn the date ol lemoval from the State. 

t ». t ;n nose of determining residence requirements under these rules, a 

.•v< -on vm; ». considered a minor until he has reached his twenty-first 



ii 



birthday. Married minors, however, are entitled to establish and mamtaii 
their residence in the same manner as adults Attendance at an institution ol 
higher education as a student cannot be counted as fulfilling the six-month 
domicile requirement. 

J. Adults A person twenty -one years ol age 01 older is eligible lor in-stak 
tuition it he has maintained continuous domicile m Noi tli Carolina for the six 
months next preceding the date ol enrollment 01 *e -enrollment, exclusive ol 
ativ time spent in attendance at any institution ol higher education. An 
in-state student reaching the age ol twenty -one is not required to re-establish 
residence provided that he maintains his domicile in North Carolina. 

Married Students. The legal residence of a wile follows that of her husband 
except that a woman currently enrolled as an in-state student in an institution 
of higher education may continue as a resident even though she marries a 
nonresident. If the husband is a nonresident and separation or divorce occurs 
the tollman may qualifv lor in-state tuition aftei st.iblishnu her dm u ik in 
' Noifli ( aiolma loi at least six months under the same conditions as she could 
if she were -.ingle. 

5. Military Personnel: No person shall be presumed to have gained or lost 
in-state residence status in North Carolina while serving in the Armed Forces 
However, a member of the Armed forces may obtain in-state residence status 
for himself, his spouse. 01 his children after maintaining his domicile in North 
Carolina for at least the six months next preceding his or their enrollment or 
re-enrollment in an institution of higher education in this state 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States tor permanent residence 
ma> establish North Carolina residence in the same manner as any other 
nonresident. 

7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the 
State oi~ North Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for the 
in-state tuition rate. 

8. Change of Status: The residence status of any student is determined as of the 
time of his first enrollment in an institution o( higher education m North 
Carolina and may not thereafter be changed except: (a) in the case of a 
nonresident student at the time of his first enrollment who, or if a minor, his 
parents, has subsequently maintained a legal residence in North Carolina for 
at least six months, and (b) in the case of a resident who has abandoned his 
legal residence in North Carolina for a minimum period of six months. In 



23 



cither case, the appropriate tuition rate will become effective at the beginning 
of the term following the six-month period. 

9. Responsibility of Student: Any student or prospective student in doubt 
concerning his residence status must bear the responsibility for securing a 
ruling by stating his case in writing to the admissions officer The student 
who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification, 
whether from out-of-state 01 in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of 
immediately informing the Director of Business Affairs and Registrar of this 
circumstance in writing. Failure to give complete and correct information 
regarding residence constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. 



24 



STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 



Appaiach in encc ; r es and ssists st .dents in meeting university expenses 
through scholarships loans, and part-time employment. Application forms for 
all student aid are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office. Aid 
applications for summer and the academic year (separate applications) must be 
submitted by April 15. In addition, applicants interested in a National Defense 
Loan, College Work-Study, or an Educational Opportunity Grant must have 
their parents submit a "Parents' Confidential Statement 1 ' which is available at 
one's high school and should be submitted to the College Scholarship Service, 
Box 1 76, Princeton, New Jersey. An upperclassman may secure a "Parents' 
Confidential Statement 1 ' form from the Financial Aid Office. 

Information to Veterans 

The University is approved for providing training under provisions of Chapter 
34, Title 38, U. S. Code, G. 1. Bill effective, June 1966; Chapter 35, Title 38, 
U.S. Code, the children of deceased or disabled veterans; and Public Law 894, 
for disabled veterans. 

Students enrolling under provisions of Chapter 34 and 35 will pay fees at the 
time of registration but receive a monthly education and training allowance from 
the Veterans Administration. Since the first check is usually delayed, a veteran 
should make his financial arrangements for the first six weeks enrollment. 

Students may contact the Veterans Administration Regional Office, 301 
North Main Street, Winston-Salem, North Carolina for information and 
necessary forms. 

APPROVAL FROM THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION SHOULD BE 
RECEIVED BY THE STUDENT BEFORE ENTERING SCHOOL. THE 
APPROVAL FORM (CERTIFICATE OF ELIGIBILITY) SHOULD BE 
SUBMITTED TO THE FINANCIAL AID OFFICE FOR COMPLETION AFTER 
THE VETERAN ENROLLS. 

Child; en of disabled or deceased veterans may receive assistance in payment 
of tuition, room, meals, and other university fees. For information regarding 
eligibility and application forms, students should write to the North Carolina 
Veterans Commission, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Self-Help 

The University provides limited opportunities for self-help to students who 
wish to earn a part of their expenses. The majority of part-time employment is 
under the College Work-Study Program under Title I, Part C, of the Economic 



25 



Opportunity Act of 1964. A GRADUATE OR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT 
RETURNING TO SCHOOL FOR THE SUMMER SESSION ONLY IS NOT 
ELIGIBLE FOR THIS PROGRAM. 



College Foundation, Inc. 

College Foundation, Inc. is the agency in North Carolina for the 
administration of the Guaranteed Loan Program. Under this program a student 
may borrow as much as $1 ,500 a year. 

A student from a family with an adjusted income of less than $15,000 per 
year will pay only Vi of 1% insurance fee while in school. Repayment of 
principal and interest begins when the student has ceased his course of study. At 
that time the student will assume the loan and the interest. A student from a 
family with an adjusted income higher than $15,000 a year pays the entire 
interest on the loan, but he may borrow under the Guaranteed Loan Program at 
seven per-cent simple interest if the funds are available. Request for applications 
should be made to the Student Financial Aid Office. The deadline for receiving 
applications for summer is June 1. 

A GRADUATE OR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT RETURNING TO 
CHOOL FOR THE SUMMER SESSION ONLY IS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR A 
1 OAN UNDER THIS PROGRAM. 



National Defense Student Loan Program 

Appalachian participates in the National Defense Student Loan Program, 
which is a part of the National Defense Education Act of 1958. An 
undergraduate student may borrow up to $1,000 each academic year to a total 
of $5,000. 

Graduate students may borrow as much as $2,500 per year to a maximum of 
$10,000. The repayment period and the interest do not begin until nine (9) 
months after the student ends his studies. The loans bear interest at the rate of 
three per-cent per year and repayment of principal may be extended over a 
ten-year period, as long as the minimum repayment of $45 per quarter is met. 

If a borrower becomes a full-time teacher in an elementary or secondary 
school or in an institution of higher education, as much as half of the loan may 
be forgiven at the rate of ten per-cent for each year of teaching service. 



26 



Borrowers who elect to teach in certain eligible schools located in areas of 
primarily low-income families may qualify for cancellation of their entire 
obligation at the rate of fifteen per-cent per year. 



A GRADUATE OR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT RETURNING TO 
SCHOOL FOR THE SUMMER SESSION ONLY IS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR A 
LOAN UNDER THIS PROGRAM. 



Scholarships 

A limited number of scholarships, provided by the Special In-Service Teacher 
Education Program of the North Carolina State Department of Public 
Instruction, are available for study in humanities, mathematics, sciences, and 
social sciences for teachers under contract for 1971-1972. A statement from 
their superintendent certifying employment for the 1971-72 academic year is 
necessary. 

Applications may be obtained by writing to the Director of Student Financial 
Aid. 



27 



WORKSHOPS 



A maximum of three quarter hours may be earned each two-week term. Each 
course meets Monday through Friday for two weeks. 

A person with a satisfactory record of experience and education may be 
admitted to a two -week course as an auditor with the consent of the Dean of his 
College and the instructor. An auditor must register for the course and pay the 
regular tuition and fees but will not receive a grade or credit on the course. 



FIRST TWO-WEEK TERM. June 14 - June 25. 

Art 453. Art Education Workshop (3) 

An intensive two-week course devoted to art instruction in grades one 
through twelve, including the correlation of art with teaching at all levels. Art 
materials and supplies for grade levels are examined. Each student pays for 
materials used and all articles made by him become his property. Registration 
is limited to twenty applicants. 

8:50-12:40 CWH 204 Carrin 



Education 464. Workshop in Teaching Reading (3) 

An intensive two-week course devoted to the problems in reading, including 
psychological principles, diagnostic and remedial aspects, and the reading 
program. 

8:50-12:40 EDH 269 Shepherd 



Education 516. Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 

A study of general techniques of a supervising teacher, including observation 
guiding student teachers in planning, orientation of student teachers, student 
teacher participation, and evaluation. Admission by invitation only. 
8:50-12:40 EDH 267 Staff 



cation 540. Guidance Services in the Elementary School (3) 

esigned primarily for those who are preparing to become counselors at the 

^mentary school level. Emphasis is given to philosophy, organization, 

aintenance and use of records, variety and use of tests, play therapy 

oncepts, consultation with teachers and/or parents. 

12:50-4:40 EDH 218 Cole 



M 



Library Science 455. Interpreting Books to Readers (3) 

Storytelling, annotations, book reviewing, the book talk, radio, television, 
story recordings. 

8:50-12:40 Old Lib 202 Justice 



Industrial Arts 510. Industrial Arts Workshop for Elementary Teachers (3) 

Development of basic skills through elementary work in wood, metal, and 
other materials, adaptation of work to classrooms: planning creative work 
with available equipment for elementary students. 

7:30-11:30 WKS210 Steckel 



SECOND TWO-WEEK TERM. June 28 - July 9 

Art 456. Workshop in Painting (3) 

An intensive two-week course. Student chooses, with the instructor's 
approval, the painting medium to be used. Field trips offer opportunities to 
paint local scenery. 

12:50-4:40 CWH 210 Dunlap 

Education 479 Group Methods and Processes (3) 

A study of group dynamics, experimentation in groups, leadership roles, 
applicability to other settings. 

12:50-4:40 EDH218 Ballas 

Education 647. Continuous Progress and Non-Graded Elementary Schools (3) 
A study of the materials, techniques, and processes of instruction in the 
elementary school. 

12:50 4.40 EDH 267 Robinson 

Industrial Arts 462. Materials (Plastic Workshop) (3) 

The structure and characteristics of common industrial materials. 
7:30-11:30 WKS 200 Eickhoff 



Library Science 476. Children's Literature Workshop (3) 

An intensive two-week exposure of ideas and demonstrations of how 
children's literature and activities related to it can provide meaningful 
experiences for programs of early childhood education. 

8:50-12:40 Old Lib 202 Wright 



29 



THIRD TWO-WEEK TERM. July 1 2 - July 23 

Art 459, Workshop in Sculpture (3) 

An intensive study of the various concepts and techniques involved with 
creative sculpture dealing with all the basic forms inmodelingas well as wood 
and stone carving. 

12:50 - 4:40 CWH 1 1 4 Carrin 

Education 520. Occupational and Educational Information (3) 

Designed to acquaint teachers and counselors with sources and uses of 
vocational and educational information. 

12:50-4:40 EDH218 Belcher 

Education 647. Continuous Progress and Non-Graded Elementary Schools (3) 
July 12-16 

A study of the materials, techniques, and processes of instruction in the 
elementary school. 

8:30 - 4:30 EDH 267 Robinson 



General Science 450. Science in the Elementary School (3) 

A course designed for teachers with limited science background. Basic 
concepts, use of simple materials for demonstrations, and the problem solving 
approach are stressed. 

8:50 - 12:40 Ran 220 Robinson 



Industrial Arts 456. Communications (Color T.V. Workshop) (3) 

Elements of television, radio, telemetry, and associated communications 
phenomena. 

7:30-11:30 WKS 250 Staff 



Library Science 457. School Library Workshop (3) 

An intensive two weeks treatment of new concepts of the learning process 
and simulated experiences in applying them in school libraries which are 
becoming educational media centers. 

8 : 50 - 1 2 :40 Old Lib 202 Yeatts 

FOURTH TWO-WEEK TERM. July 26 - August 6 

Art 453. Art Education Workshop (3) 

An intensive two-week course devoted to art instruction in grades one 
through twelve, including the correlation of art with teaching at all levels. Art 

30 



materials and supplies for grade levels are examined. Each student pays for 
materials used and all articles made by him become his property. 
8:50-12:40 CWH 204 Dunlap 



Education 464. Workshop in Teaching Reading (3) 

An intensive two-week course devoted to the problems in reading, including 
psychological principles, diagnostic and remedial aspects, and the reading 
program. 

8:50-12:40 EDH 269 Staff 



Education 479. Group Methods and Processes (3< 

A study of group dynamics, experimentation in groups, leadership roles 
applicability to other settings. 

12:50-4:40 EDH 218 Labat 



Education 541 . Student Personnel Services (3 

This course is designed for students interested in preparing themselves foi 
college work in a non-instructional capacity. Emphasis is given to philosophy, 
organization, staffing, and services which comprise adequate studen 
personnel programs: orientation, records, counseling, testing, health 
recreation, housing, and placement. 

12:50-4:40 EDH 217 Siginon 



Library Science 458. Two-year College Workshop (3 

R SO l?40 Old Lib 202 Council 

A two-week intensive study of some current trends and practices in th 
two-year college library The workshop will focus on problems and trends c 
special problems of students enrolled. 

Music 469. Music Education Workshop I, II, III (3, 3, 3 

An intensive course in modern methods of music education fu 
superintendents, principals, supervisors, music teachers, classroom teachen 
and physical education teachers. Emphasis is placed on developing a 
understanding and an awareness of music programs at the elementary an< 
junior high school levels. The course is sponsored jointly by the America 
Institute of Music Education and Appalachian State University. 
8:00- 12:00, 1:30-3:30 IGG Aud. Staff 



31 



INSTITUTES 

History 518 or Political Science 518 -- The Sino-Soviet World 



9 quarter hours 
Section 10 June 7 - July 9, 1971 



This is an interdepartmental program designed to introduce teachers and 
students to Russia and China in the period of late 19th and 20th centuries. 
Topics to be discussed are: Marxist theory and ideology, domestic developments 
in Russia and China, and the traditional and contemporary foreign involvements 
of these countries. Distinguished visiting lecturers will highlight key topics 
during the five-week session. 

Efforts are being made to secure funds to help defray tuition and other 
out-of-pocket expenses. 



Political Science 510 -- Constitutional Democracy and Totalitarianism 

6 quarter hours 

Section 10--Appalachian State University, July 12 - August 6, 1971 

Section 1 1--UNC -Charlotte, July 12 - August 6, 1971 

Section 12-UNC -Wilmington, July 19 - August 13, 1971 



The institute is designed to prepare teachers of social studies in North 
Carolina to carry out the State Department of Public Instruction's approach to 
teaching about Communism. Constitutional Democracy will be studied relative 
to capitalism in the United States and socialism in Great Britain. The forms of 
totalitarianism to be studied are Communism in the USSR and Red China and 
facism in Nazi Germany. Emphasis will be placed on theory and on 
governmental institutions and practices. In addition, a field trip will be made to 
the John F. Kennedy Center for Special Warfare at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. 

The State Department of Public Instruction and the North Carolina 
Educational Council on National Purposes will make available to North Carolina 
social science teachers a limited number of in-service tuition scholarships and 
help them finance their out-of-pocket expenses. 



32 



413 Advanced Drawing &Comp: (Art 203) (3) 

First term (10)8:50-11:20 M-F CWH 216 Dennis 6 

450 Problems in Art (3) 

First term (10) Arrange Staff 10 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 10 



BIOLOGY AMD GENERAL SCIENCE 

BIOLOGY 

101 Introduction to Life Science (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 MWF Ran 213 Glover 40 

Lab (20)12:50-3:20 TT Ran 283 40 

102 Introduction to Life Science (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 MWF Ran 213 Henson 25 

Lab (20)12:50-3:20 TT Ran 283 25 

103 Introduction to Life Science (3) 

Second term (10) 8:50-10:00 MWF Ran 213 Henson 25 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 M W Ran 283 25 

107 Biology (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-ThRan212 Glover 25 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 M W Ran 283 25 

201 Invertebrate Zoology: (Biology 101, 102, 103) (3) 

Firstterm (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 MWF Ran 212 Glover 20 

Lab (20) 10:10-12:40 TT Ran 284 20 

204 Introductory Botany: (Biology 101, 102, 103) (3) 

Second term (10) 7:30-8:40 MWF Ran 218 Hurley 20 

Lab (20)7:30-10:00 TT Ran 218 20 



308 Bacteriology: (Biology 101, 102, 103) (4) 

(Chemistry 101, 102. 103) 
Second term (10) 10:10-11 :20 MTTF Ran 210 Montaldi 20 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 MWRan210 ?0 



35 



309 Embryology: (Biology 101, 102, 103) (3) 

First term (10) 8-50-9:40 TTFRan.223 Randall 20 

Lab (20)8:50-11:20 M W Ran 223 20 

450 Nature Study (3) 

Second term (10) 10 10-1 1:20 Daily Ran 283 llenson 20 

451 Ornithology (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 Daily Ran 223 Randall 25 

453 Histology: (Senior Standing and 24 bis. Biology) (3) 

Second term (10) 8:50-10:00 Tl F R; n .84 Hubbard 25 

Lab (20) 8:50.-1 1 :20 M W Ran 284 25 

4^4 Genetics: (Senior Standing) (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 Daily Ran 212 Derrick 25 

500 Bibliography and Research (3) 

First term 00)8:50-10:00 Daily Ran 213 Carpenter 20 



501 Advanced Animal Ecology (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 MWF Ran 223 Randall 20 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 TT Ran 223 20 

502 Fresh Water Biology (3) 

First term (10)3:30-4:40 TThF-Ran 284 Derrick 20 

Lab (20) 2: 104:40 M W Ran 284 20 

503 Bacteriology of Watei, Food and Sewage ( \) 

Second term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 ^/Uf Ran 210 Montaldi 20 

Lab (20)8:50-1.1:30 WThRan2l0 20 

504 Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 MWF Ran 218 Caip.enter 20 

Lab (20)10:10-12:40 TT i Ran 218 20 

505 Animal Physiologv I. (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 ,.•'.< Ran 277 Hubbard 20 

Lab (20)12:50-3:20 TI Ran 2^7 20 



}6 



512 Local Flora (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 Daily Ran 220 Carpenter 20 

515 Plant Ecology (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 TThFRan218 Hurley 20 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 MW Ran 218 20 

GENERAL SCIENCL 

401 Methods ot hlunentary School Science (.3). 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M'-F Ran 222 Robinson 30 

(11)8:50-10:00 M-F Ran 220 30 

Second term ( 10) 10: 1 0-11 :20 M-F Ran 220 Hurley 30 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

CHEMISTRY 

01 General Chemistry (4) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Ran 320 Stall 30 

Lab (20)12:50-4:40 M W Ran 325 30 

102 General Chemistry (4) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Ran 320 Staff 30 

Lab (20)12:504:40 M W Ran 325 30 

103 General Chemistry (4) 

Second teim (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F Ran 320 Staff 30 

La^ (20)12:504:40 TTh Ran 325 30 

404 Inorganic Chemistry: (One year of college chemistry ) (3) 

First tern. (10)730-8:40 M-F Ran 354 Staff 12 

509 History of Chemistry : (1 year college chemistry) (3) 

Firstterm (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F Ran 354 Staff 10 



(Chemistry 102 and 103 may be taken together) 



37 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

101 Mpn and His Physical Environment (3) 

Firs^ferm (10)7:30-8:40 M-Th Ran 370 Staff 32 

lab (20)2:104:40 MW Ran 367 32 

102 Man and His Physical Environment (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-Th Ran 370 Staff 32 

Lab (20 2:10-4:40 MW Ran 367 32 

103 Man and His Physical Environment (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-Th Ran 370 Staff 32 

Lab (20)2:104:40 TTh Ran 364 32 

(Physical Science 102 and 103 may be taken simultaneously) 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

ECONOMICS 

200 General Economics (3) 

First term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SWH 209 Brashear 40 

Second term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F SWH 201 Elledge 40 

(Credit will not be given for both Econ. 200 and 201) 

201 Principles of Economics (3) 

• First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 209 Brashear 40 

202 Principles of Economics (Economics 201) (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 201 Elledge 40 

203 Principles of Economics: (Economics 202) (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 205 Weber 30 

301 Micro Economic Analysis: (Economics 203) (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-11 :20 M-F SWH 204 Mukherjee 30 

455 Public Finance & Taxation: (Economics 203) (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SWH 204 Mukherjee 30 



38 



501 History of Economic Thought: (Economics 203) (3) 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SWH 204 Weber 20 

516 Analysis of the American Economy (3) 

(Reserved for those with a limited Econ. background) 

First term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SWH 209 Brashear 30 

548 Independent Study (By permission only) (3) 

First term (10) Arrange SWH 215 Mukherjei 5 

BUSINESS 

104 Business Mail) (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SWH 209 Speer 40 

106 Personal Finance (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SWH 201 Taylor 45 

204 Elementary Aceounting(3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 209 Speer 40 

205 Elementary Accounting: (Business 204) (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 209 Jones 35 

206 Elementary Accounting: (Business 205) (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SWH 209 Speer 30 

301 Principles of Selling (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SWH 205 Stretcher 35 

302 Business Correspondence (3) 

First term (10) 10: 10- 1 1 20 M-F SWH 301 Hawkinson 30 

303 Business Machines: (Business 102 and 204) (3) 

First term (10)12:50-200 M-F SWH 310 Hawkinson 17 

306 Intermediate Accounting. (Business 206) (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 205 Messere 35 

320 Principles of Marketing: (Economics 203) (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SWH 205 Stretcher 35 



39 



400 Business Law (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 305 West 40 

402 Business Law: (Business 401) (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SWH 201 Taylor 40 

403 Cooperative Office Education: (Business 103 and 303) (3) 

First term * (10) 3:30-4:40 M W SWH 305 Hawkinson 20 

415 Business Management (3) 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SWH 305 Staff 30 

452 Income Tax Accounting: {Business 206) (3) 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SWH 209 Jones 35 

458 Principles of Finance: (Economics 203 and Business 206) (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 201 Weber 30 

461 Credits and Collections (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 305 West 20 

463 Production Management (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 305 Staff 30 

465 Introduction to Automatic Data Processing (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SWH 305 Riner 35 

(11)10:10-11:20 M-F SWH 305 Riner 35 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 204 Clamon 35 

466 Advanced Data Processing: (Business 465) (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SWH 204 Clamon 35 

467 Electronic Data Processing: (Business 465 and 466) (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 204 Clamon 35 

481 Principles of Life Insurance (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SWH 201 Taylor 40 

500 Bibliography and Research (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 205 Sutton 30 



40 



502 Marketing Problems and Policies (Business 320) (3) 

Second term (10) 12:50 ! 00 M V SWH 205 Stretcher 

503 A Ivanced Business Law: (Bun ,<> 400) (3) 

Fust term (10)11:30 1 40 M-l SWH 305 West 

50" Instruction in the Basic Business- Subjct ts (3) 

First term (10) 12:50- > >< Ml SWH 305 Rinei 

515 Business Management (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4 M-F SWH 305 Stat 

516 PerS' unet Administration (3) 

Secorjterm (10)7:30-8 . « M-F SWH 209 Jones 

517 Seminar in Accounting (3) 

First term (10)10:10-11 !0 M-F SWH 305 Sutton 

548 Independent Study (3) 

Second term (10) Arrange Elledge 



TEACHER EDUCATION 

202 Art in die klementary School (3) 

Fust term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F CWH 214 Carrii, 30 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F CWH Denni *0 

301 Public Education in the United States ) 

First term K-3 (10)8:50-10:00 i-i EDH 278 Lilly 50 

(11)12:50-2:00 NH DH 278 Round 50 

302 Organization and Curriculum of the Elementary School (3) 

Second term K-3 (10)8:50-10:00 Ml ! : DH 277 Lilly 40 

4-9 (11)2:10-3:20 M-l EDH 278 Round 40 

304 Public Education in the United States (?) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 266 Tuttle 50 

(11)2:10-3 20 M-F EDH 266 Melton '50 

Second term (10)7:30-8.40 M-F EDH 26b Jamison 5C 



41 



305 Principles of Secondary Education (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH215 Roberts 40 

(11) 2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 216 Tuttle 40 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 221 Woodrow 40 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 221 Jamison 40 

311 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 278 R.Robinson 20 

312 Language Arts in the Elementary School (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 278 Lilly 20 

403 Math in the Elementary School (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 404 Graham 40 

(11) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 404 Fulmer 40 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 404 Graham 40 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 404 Williams 40 

404 Student Teaching: Special Subjects (10) 

Summer Quarter (10) Arrange -- 65 



405 Student Teaching: Elementary School (10) 

Summer Quarter (10) Arrange-- Staff 50 

407 Student Teaching: High School (10) 

Summer Quarter (10) Arrange- 60 



409 Teaching High School Science (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 212 Staff 20 

410 Teaching High School Social Studies (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 215 Staff 40 

41 1 Teaching High School English (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 216 Staff 20 

414 Teaching Physical Education (3) 

Firstterm' (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 269 Staff 30 

42 



416 Teaching industrial Arts (3) 
First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F WKS 210 Eickhoff 

417 Teaching Business Fducation (3) 
First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 277 Staff 

456 Measurement and Assessment (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 277 Strickland 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 277 May nor 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 215 Woodrow 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 215 Woodrow 

459 Nursery-Kindergarten Curriculum (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH212 Round 25 

461 Nursery - Kindergarten Instruction (3) 

Secondterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH212 Round 25 

490 Education of the Disadvantaged (3) 

Secondterm (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 216 Shope 20 

S00 Research in Education (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 221 Roberts 

(11) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH216 Tuttle 

(12)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH215 Melton 

(13)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 215 Roberts 

Secondterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 216 Staff 

(1 i) 12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 216 May nor 

513 Teaching the Language Arts (3) 

Secondterm (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 277 Lilly 

5 1 5 Organizing and Planning Student Teaching Curriculum (3) 

Arrange Staff 

516 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 
Secondterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 216 Bosworth 

529 Organization and Supervision of School Music (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F IGG 224 Fox 



43 



548 Independent Study (3) 
First term 

Audiovisual (11) Arrange Staff 5 

Guidance (13) Arrange Staff 5 
Second term 

Audiovisual (11) Arrange Staff 5 

Guidance (13) Arrange Staff 5 

550 Master of Arts Thesis (6) 

First term (10) Arrange Staff 5 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 5 

580 History of American Education (3) 

Second term ( 10) 10: 10-1 1 20 M-F EDH 278 Robinson 20 

636 Child Development and Teaching (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH212 Round 20 



ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, \ND HIGHER EDUCATION 

491 Philosophical Foundations of Education (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 275 Tuttle 40 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F FD1I212 Staff 30 

501 Public School Administration (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 275 Shope 30 



502 Organ, and Adm. of the Secondary Schools (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 277 Hooks 30 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 217 Hooks 30 

503 Problems of the Public School Administrator (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 212 Randall 30 

504 Organ, and Adm. of the Elementary School (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F F.DH 277 Hooks 30 



44 



505 Supervision of Instruction (3) 

First term (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F EDH 277 Federoff 30 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 215 Federoff 30 

(11) 12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 215 Federoff 30 

506 Curriculum Construction (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F FDH216 Federoff 35 

(11)7:30-8:40 M-F FDH217 Randall 35 



(12) 12:50-2 

Second term (10)8:50-10 

(11) 1250-2 



00 M-F FDH 276 Randall 35 

00 M-F FDH 216 Bosworth 40 

00 M-F FDH 275 Bosworth 40 



512 Jr. High School Curriculum and Organization (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 .30-1 2:40 M-F EDH217 Hooks 30 

517 School Supervision (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 :30-l 2:40 M-F EDH 221 Reynolds 30 

518 Public School Finance (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F FDH 217 Shelton 30 

535 Philosophy of Education (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 215 Melton 40 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 275 Staff 35 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 275 Staff 35 

539 Core Curriculum (3) 

First term ( 10) 10 .10-1 1 20 M-F EDH 216 Shelton 30 

542 Instructional Program of the Two-Year College (3) 

hirst term (10)12:50-2:00 M-E EDH 217 L.Cooper 30 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 217 L.Cooper 30 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 277 L.Cooper 30 

543 Organ, and Adm. of the Two-Year College (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH217 L.Cooper 15 

544 Seminar on the Two-Year College (3) 

Firstterm (10) 11 30-12:40 M-F FDH 221 Staff 30 

(11) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F FDH 221 Staff 30 

45 



Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EM 271 L.Cooper 30 

(11) 11:30-12:40 M-F F;DH218 L.Cooper 30 

546 Elementary School Curriculum (3) 

First term (10) 8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 365 Hooks 35 

547 Social Foundations of Education (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH221 R. Robinson 40 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 275 Lilly 40 

(12)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 275 Shope 35 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 221 Jamison 35 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 221 Staff 35 

549 School Building Planning (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 221 Reynolds 30 

552 Supervision of Instruction in the Two-Year College (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 275 Staff 30 



562 Secondary School Curriculum (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 218 Miller 40 

580 History of American Education (3) 

Secondterm (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH218 R.Robinson 20 

581 Programs for Adult Education (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 218 Staff 30 

582 Organization and Administration of Learning Laboratories (3) 

First term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 217 Staff 30 

682 Programs for Continuing Adult Education (3) 

Secondterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 217 Staff 30 

684 The General Education Program for Higher Education (3) 

Secondterm (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 217 Staff 30 



46 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

310 Foundations of Reading (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 112 Jones 25 

(11)11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 112 Staff 25 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 115 Jones 25 

320 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 144 King 30 

401 Reading on the Primary Levels (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 115 Staff 25 

Secondterm (10) 10:10-1 1 20 M-F EDH 115 Dedmond 25 

402 Reading on the Intermediate Levels (3) 

Firstterm (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 115 Staff 25 

Secondterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 115 Dedmond 25 

451 Educable Mentally Retarded (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 144 Jackson 30 

452 Trainable Mentally Retarded (3) 

Secondterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 144 Botwin 25 

454 Curriculum for the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Firstterm (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F EDH 144 Jackson 25 

455 Experimental Approaches to the Education of the Mentally Retarded (3) 
Secondterm (10)12:50-3:45 MTh EDH 144 Larson 25 

460 Educational Statistics (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 275 LaBach 20 

462 Reading on High School and Advanced Levels (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 112 Ledford 25 

463 Reading in Content Areas (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 115 Ledford 25 



47 



'f^5 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 115 Dedmond 25 

466 Inst-niciiojMl Materials (3) 

First term (10) 12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 179 McFariand 30 

472 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 1 (5) 

First term (10)11:30-2:00 M-F EDH 1 23 Stuff 10 

Second term (10)11:30-2:00 M-F EDH 120 Staff 10 

473 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading II (5) 

First term (10) Arrange Staff 10 

Second term ' (10) Arrange Staff 10 

474 Photography (3) 

First term (10) 1 1 :3Q-1240 M-F EDH 182 Pritchett 12 

475 Audiovisual Instruction (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 179 Stoddard 30 

(11) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 179 Stoddard 30 

(12)2:10-3.20 M-F EDH H° McFariand 30 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 179 Staff 30 

(11) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 179 Staff 30 

(12)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 179 Staff 30 

476 Cinematography (3) 

Second term (10) Arrange EDH 182 Stoddard 12 

477 Psychological Bases of Reading ( ^) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 1 1 5 Jones 25 

478 Prinqp!es of Guidance (3) 

First term ( 10) 1 1 :30-l 2:40 M-F EDH 276 Taylor 30 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F s ; i-276 Staff 30 

489 Reading and Communication (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 215 Rhinehart 25 

508 Clinical Problems in Reading (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 115 Staff 25 

4S 



509 Reading and the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 144 King 25 

51 1 Investigations in Reading (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 112 Jones 25 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 115 Jones 25 



514 Psychological and Educational Testing (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 276 Taylor 20 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 276 Staff 20 

520 Occupational and Educational Information (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 276 Taylor 30 

522 Counseling Theory and Techniques (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 276 Ballas 25 

523 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services (3) 
Secondterm (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 276 Staff 30 

528 Production and Care of Audiovisual Materials: (Education 475) (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 182 Pritchett 20 



530 Education of the Gifted (3) 

Secondterm (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 144 Stovall 30 

532 Use and Care of Machines and Equipment: (Education 475) (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 182 Pritchett 20 

536 Programmed Instruction (3) 

Secondterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 182 McFarland 30 

537 Organization and Administration of A<rfk>visual Program: (Education 475) ( 
First term (10)3:30-4:40 *-F EDH 182 McFarland 20 

538 Supervised Practicum in Counseling (3) 

First term (10) Arrange EDH 162 Ballas 5 

(11) Arrange EDH 162 LaBach 5 

(12) Arrange EDH 162 LaBach 5 

49 % 



Suber 


5 


Price 


5 


Price* 


5 


Staff 


5 


Staff 


5 


Staff 


i 



Second term (10) Arrange EDH 162 LaBach 5 

(11) Arrange EDH 162 LaBach 5 

548 Independent Study (3) 

rust term (10) Reading Arr. Led ford 5 

(ll)A-V Arr. McFarland 5 

Second term (10) Reading Arr. Staff 5 



55 1 Field Experience in Teaching Reading (3-9 ; 
First term (10) Charlotte 

(11) Arrange 

(12) Aiiange 
Second term (101 Arrange 

(II* Anuaagt 
(J 2 1 Arrange 

554 Television in Instruction (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 182 Stoddard 20 

555 Seminar in Problems in Audiovisual Instruction (3) 
(Audiovisual majors only) 

Second term (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F EDH 170 McFarland 20 

556 Practicum in Audiovisual Programs (3) 

(Prerequisite: Completion of all other A-V courses and approval of Instructor) 
First term (10) Arrange McFarland S 

557 Reading Curriculum. Organization and Supervision for Reading Majors (3.) 
Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 1 20 Price Is 

558 Teaching of Reading (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 1 1 2 Rhinehart 25 

559 Advanced Courses in Methods and Materials in Reading (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-200 M-F EDH 112 Rhinehart 25 

561 Evaluation and Assessment in Reading (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 115 Price 25 



50 



564 Advanced Prodution of Audiovisual Materials (3) 
(Prerequisite: Education 475 and 528) 
Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 179 Stoddard 



20 



567 Current Literature in Reading (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-11 :20 M-F EDH 115 Price 



25 



568 Research Problems in Reading (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 120 Price 



25 



570 Readings and Research in Special Education (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 144 Wrnford. 



30 



572 Internship in Special Education (6-15) 
Firstterm (10) Field 



Win ford 



ENGLISH 

010 Laboratory in Writing (0) 

Firstterm (10)3:304:40 TTh SH 303 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 TTh SH 206 

101 Grammar and Composition (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 205 

(11) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 303 

102 Grammar and Composition (3) 

Firstterm (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F SH 203 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 304 

103 Grammar and Composition (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 204 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 303 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 302 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 303 



201 English Literature 
First term 



(3) 

(10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 304 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 304 



McFarland 


30 


Edwards 


.30 


Akers 


25 


McFarland 


25 


Frantz 


25 


Campbell 


25 


Hurley 


25 


West 


25 


Waterworth 


25 


Waterworth 


25 


Brashear 


40 


Brashear 


40 



51 



202 English Literature (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 303 West 40 

(11) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 303 West 40 

Second term ( 10) 1 1 30-12:40 M-F SH 206 Fdwards 40 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 206 Fdwards 40 

203 Fnglish Literature (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 205 Akers 40 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 303 McFarland 40 

Second term (10)8:50-1000 M-F SH 304 Campbell 40 

( 1 1 ) 1 1 : 30- 1 2 :40 M-F SH 304 Campbell' 40 

204 Backgrounds of Fnglish Literature (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F SH 203 Williams 40 

206 Advanced Composition (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3.20 M-F SH 205 Akers 20 

207 Types of Literature (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 302 Waterworth 20 

301 American Literature (3) 

Second term ( 10) 10: 10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 302 Coulthard 30 

302 American Literature (3) 

Firstterm (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SH 203 Frant/ 30 

303 American Literature (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 204 Hurley 30 

304 Twentieth-Centur> American Poetry (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 .30-12:40 M-F SH 208 Dunlap 20 

305 Twentieth-Century American Fiction (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 208 Dunlap 20 

307 Advanced English Grammar (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10.00 M-F SH 303 Harris 20 

314 Twentieth-Century Fnglish Poetry (3) 

Second term (10)330-4:40 M-F SH 203 Williams 20 



52 



401 Ad-- /ed biglish Grammar (3) 

S c id tern (10) 7 ;0-8:40 M-F SH 303 Harris 25 

i > : > ( ! i3'. er (3) 

I-. st term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 302 Reed 20 

452 Shakespeare's Comedifies 13) 

First term I EO) 7:30-8:40 M-F SH3D4 Brashear 20 

453 Shakespeare's Tragedies (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 205 Heymann 20 

455 Poetry of the Victorian Period (3) 

Second term ( 10) 1 1 "Wl " 40 M-F SH 303 Harris 20 

456 Milton (3) 

First tei-m (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 207 Trimpey 20 

458 Fnglish Literature, 1744-1798 (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1 20 M-F SH 204 Hilton 20 

460 Modern Drama (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 302 Reed 2p 

463 Studies in World Literature (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 202 Holton 20 

466 History of the Fnglish Language (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 204 Hurley 20 

500 Bibliography and Research (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 207 Trimpey 20 

505 Southern Literature (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 302 Coulthard 15 

506 Studies in the Romant' sod (3) 

Second term (10 50-10:00 M-F SH 205 He'* ma 'in 15 

507 Victorian Prose (3) 

First term (10) 11:30-12 \0 M ! • 1\)2 holton 15 

53 



508 AmeFican Literature to 1830 (3) 

First term (10) 8:50-10:00 M-F SH 207 Trimpey 



15 



509 American Literature, 1830-1870 (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 203 Frantz 



15 



510 American Literature, 1870-1914 (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 204 Hilton 



15 



511 American Literature. 19L4 to present (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 302 Coutthard 



15 



512 Literary Criticism to 1900 (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 302 Reed 



20 



513 The English Novel to 1832 (3) 

First term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SH 202 Holton 



15 



515 Seventeenth -Century English Literature (3) 

Second term ( 10) 10:10-1 1 20 M-F SH 205 Heymann 



15 



523 Twentieth-Century English Novel (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 203 Williams 



15 



540 Seminar on Faulkner (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SH 208 Dunlap 



15 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

104 Intermediate Erench: (French 103) (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F SH 509 Evans 

Lab (20)2:10-3:20 TTh SH 505 Staff 



25 
25 



105 Intermediate French : (French 103) (3) 

Summer Quarter (10) 2:10-3:20 MWF SH 509 Staff 



25 



54 



210 Weather and Climate (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 MWFRan452 Imperatore 3fc 

216 Man and Environmental Problems (3) 

First term (10) 10: 10-1 1 :20 MWF Ran 452 Imperatore 30 

304 Geography of Africa (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F Ran 402 UpcltacJi 30 

305 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) 

First term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 MWF Ran 404 Epperson 30 



312 Fundamentals of Urban Geography (3) 

Second term (10)3:304:40 M-F Ran 406 Gade 20 

450 Geographic Influences in American History (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F Ran 404 Yoder 35 

451 Geography of the South (3) 

Seconc' term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F Ran 404 Epperson 30 



500 Bibliography and Research (3) 

First term (10)3:304:40 M-F Ran 404 Yoder 5 

502 Urban Geography (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F Ran 406 Gade 20 

506 Geographic Aspects of World Affairs (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F Ran 404 Yoder 30 

509 Concepts in Geography (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 MWF Ran 450 Reiman 20 

540 Seminar in Geographic Education (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F Ran 452 Imperatore 20 



57 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HEALTH 

101 Personal Health (3) 

First term (50)8:50-10:00 M-F BKG315 Hoover 

Second term (50)7:30-8:40 M-F BKG315 Hodges 



35 

35 



102 Family, School, and Community Health (3) 

Second term (50)8:50-10:00 M-F BKG315 Hodges 



35 



103 First Aid (3) 

Second term (50) 11:30-12:40 M-F BKG315 Hodges 



35 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

1 1 Swimming for Non-Swimme is ( 1 ) 

hirst term (50) 1 i :3U- 12.40 MWF Pool 



Church 



15 



1 Beginning Swimming (1) 
Second term (50) 8:50-10:00 MWF Pool 



Kanoy 



25 



1 14 Tennis and Badminton (1 ) 

First term (50)11:30-12:40 MWF Cts. 

(51) 12:50-2:00 MWF Cts. 

Second term (50)10:10-11:20 MWF Cts. 

(51) 11:30-12:40 MWF Cts. 



Tomlinson 


32 


Tomlinson 


32 


Kanoy 


32 


Kanoy 


32 



115 Folk and Social Dance (1) 

First term (50)8:50-10:00 MWF VG 



Daye, B. 



40 



117 Golf (1) 








Second term 


(50)8:50-10:00 MWF Range - 
212 


Garrison 


30 




(51) 10:10 11:20 MWF Range - 


Garrison 


30 




212 







132 Archery (1) 

First term (50) 10:10-1 1 :20 MWF Field Tomlinson 25 



58 



2 1 2 Physiology of Muscular Activity (3) 

First term (50) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F BKG313 Elliot 35 

307 Kinesiology (3) 

Second term (50) 10:10-11:20 M-F BKG313 Gruensfelder 35 

312 Organization and Administration of Physical Education (3) 

Second term (50)8:50-10:00 M-F BKG 213 Turner 35 

320 Principles and Philosophies of Health and Physical Education (3) 

First term (50)7:30-8:40 M-F BKG 213 Church 35 

332 Tennis and Badminton (3) 

First term (50) 1 1 :30-12:45 M-F Cts. Thomas, E. 32 

Second term (50) 1 1 :30- 12:45 M-F Cts. light 32 

337 Basketball (men) (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F VG & Gray 40 

BKG 

342 Football (men) (3) 

First term (10)2:10-10:00 M-F Field & Daye,J. 4C 

315 

343 Baseball (men) (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Field & Church 4C 

213 

353 Fundamental Movements, Rhythms, and Group Games (3) 

Firstterm (50) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F 211 Daye, B. 4C 

Second term (50)12:50-2:00 M-F BKG Garrison 4( 

409 Adapted Physical Education and Recreation (3) 

Firstterm (50) 10:10-11:20 M-F BKG 315 Steinbrecher 3i 

410 Evaluation in Health and Physical Education (3) 

Firstterm (50)7:30-8:40 M-F BKG 211 Steinbrecher 3f 

412 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3) 

Second term (50)2:10-3:20 M-F BKG 315 Kanoy 3f 



59 



1-53 Football Coaching (3) 

First term (50) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F BKG 21 1 Stall 35 

154 Basketball Coaching (3) 

•Second term (50) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F BKG 213 Light 35 

'00 Bibliography and Research (3) 

First term (50) 2:10-3 20 M-F BKG211 Stcinbrecher 35 

>01 Scientific Bases of Health and Ph> sical Education (3) 

Second term (50) 1 2 50-2 00 M-F BKG 313 Larson 35 

502 Curriculum Development m Health and Physical Education (3) 

Second term (50)7:2*0-8:40 M-E BKG 211 Uruenstekier 35 

503 Analysis of Neuromuscular Activity (3) 

First term (50)8:50-10:00 M-F BKG313 Meeks 35 



504 Philosophies Related to Health and Physical Education (3) 

Second term (50) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F BKG315 Larson 35 

505 Interpretation of Data (3) 

First term (50)12:50-2:00 M-F BKG 213 Hoover 35 

507 Organization. Administration and Supervision of Health and P.L. (3) 
Second term (50)2:10-3:20 M-E BKG 211 1 inner 35 

508 Administration of Athletics (3) 

First term (50) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F BKG 213 Hoover 35 

509 Seminar in Physical Education (3) 

First term (50)210-3:20 M-F BKG 313 Meeks 25 

510 Athletic Facilities (3) 

Second term (50) 1 1 :30-l 2:40 M-l BKG 211 Turner 35 

511 Conditioning of Athletes (3) 

Second term (50)8:50-10.00 M-E BKG 313 Larson 35 

512 Seminar in Dance and Rhythmics (3) 

First term (50)12:50-2:00 M-F BKG 211 Thomas, E. 25 

60 



519 Public Recreation (3) 

Second term (50)12:50-2:00 M-F BKG315 Gruensfelder 35 

520 Comparative Health and Physical Education (3) 
First term (50) 8 150-10:00 M-F BKG211 Horine 35 

521 Physical Education for the Retarded (3) 

Firstterm (50) 11 :30-12:40 M-F BKG313 Meeks 35 

522 Seminar on School Health Programs (3) 

Second term (50)8:50-10:00 M-F BKG211 Horine 25 



HISTORY 

101 World Civilizations (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 363 Pritchett 25 

(11)11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 363 Carroll 25 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 363 Bond 25 

102 World Civilizations (3) 

Firstterm (10)3:304:40 M-F EDH 363 Hanft 25 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 363 Heisser 25 

103 World Civilizations (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 363 Melton 25 

(11)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 363 Melton 25 

201 History of the United States (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 365 Blackburn 25 

202 History of the United States (3) 

Firstterm (10)3:30-4:40 M-F EDH 365 Ross 25 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 365 Kinsey 25 

203 History of the United States (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 365 Antone 25 

301 History of England (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 366 Hanft 25 

61 



306 North Carolina Social Studies (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1:29 M-F EDH 365 Pritchett 25 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 365 Counihan 25 

311 History of Europe, 1660-1815 (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 367 Shipps 25 

313 History of Europe, 1920 to present (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 367 Shipps 25 

315 United States and the Contemporary World (3) 

First term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 369 Blackburn 25 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 365 Fish 25 

348 Independent Study in History (Variable credit) 

Firstterm (10- Arrange Staff 6 

15) 
Second term (10- Arrange Staff 6 

15) 

361 History of Africa (3) 

-condterm (10) 1 1 :30-l 2:40 M-F EDH 366 Kinsey 25 

406 jonomic History of the United States (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 365 Fish 25 

458 sarist Russia (3) 

irstterm (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 365 Simon 25 

467 fistory of France (3) 

econdterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 366 Heisser 25 

468 Modern Germany (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F EDH 363 Reinerman 25 

470 History of the Romans (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 366 Simon 25 

485 The Negro in the American Experience (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 368 Antone 25 



62 



490 European Historiography (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 366 Carroll 2C 

491 American Historiography (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 367 Drozdowski 20 

500 Bibliography and Research (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 363 Carroll 15 

501 Interpreting American History (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 369 Dixon 15 

502 Formation of the American Union (3) 

Second term ( 10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 369 Dixon 15 

503 Civil War and Reconstruction (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 367 Drozdowski 15 

509 The West in American History (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 365 Ross 15 



519 Studies in 18th Century Europe (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 363 Petschauer 15 

522 Europe, 1919-1945 (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 363 Reinerman 15 

540 Seminar: Education and Society in Medieval Europe (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 367 Bond 10 

548 Independent Study in History (3) 

Firstterm (10- Arrange Staff 6 

15) 
Second term (10- Arrange Staff 6 

15) 

550 Master of Arts Thesis (3-6) 

Firstterm (10- Arrange Staff (3) 

12) 



63 





(13- Arrange 




15) 


econd term 


(10- Arrange 




12) 




(13- Arrange 




15) 



Staff (6) 
Staff (3) 
Staff (6) 



HOME ECONOMICS 

i Clothing and Design J (3) 
First term (10) 12:50-3:20 M-Th LSD 201 Roten 12 

104 Nutrition: (Chemistry 1 I 1 , 1 1 2, & 1 1 3 ) (3) 

Second term ( 10) 1 1 :30-l 240 M-F LSD 110 Irons 25 

105 Meal Preparation Principles (3) 

Second term (10) 7:30-10:00 M-Th LSD 209 Irons 12 

107 Early Family Development (3) 

First term ( 10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F LSD 1 10 Lewis 25 

201 Clothing and Design II : (Clothing & Design I) (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-3:20 M-Th LSD 201 Whitener 12 

206 Family Clothing (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F LSD I 10 Roten 25 

301 Family Economics (3) 

Firstterm (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F LSD 200 Lewis 15 

306 Textiles: (Chemistry 1 1 1. 1 12, & 1 13) (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F LSD 202 Whitener 10 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

204 Leather (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F WKS 105 Owen 20 

205 Ceramics (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F WKS 1 1 5 Owen 20 



64 



302 Metal Technology (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 275 Ragan 15 

304 Power Mechanics (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F WKS 130 Ragan 15 

403 Organization and Equipment (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 210 Banzhaf 20 

452 Contemporary Industrial Finishing (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F WKS 205 Staff 20 

455 Contemporary Furniture (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F WKS 205 Staff 20 



458 Crafts for the Handicapped (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 135 Owen 20 

459 Graphical Analysis of Drafting Problems (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F WKS 300 Short 20 

460 Industrial Design (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1 .20 M-F WKS 300 Short 20 

461 Industrial Illustration (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 300 Short 20 

469 Machine Tool Operation (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F WKS 275 Ragan 15 

470 Advanced Machine Tool Operation (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F WKS 275 Ragan 15 

475 Problems and Processes of Industrial Arts (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F WKS 210 Steckel 20 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 210 Banzhaf 20 

480 General Shop: Graphic Arts (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F WKS 315 Banzhaf 20 



65 



481 Advanced 01 tset Lithographv Hi 

Second term ( IOi 10. 10 1 1 20 M-F WKS31S Ban/hat 20 

504 MaJame Oesrgn ami a ousn n u«m i ij> 

Second term 110} 2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 215 Ragan ?(! 

506 ElectronicsXomponen t and Systems (3) 

Second term ( 10) 10: 10-1 I 20 M-F WKS 250 Staff 20 

509 Transistor Workshop (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3 20 VII WKS 250 Stall 20 

512 Philosophy ol Industrial \ i u .. . ; u (3) 

Faa:«4 term ( IOi 7:30-.X 40 M-F WKS2H) Steekel 25 

5j'7 fnshuctional Methods and Techniques tor Industrial Arts Latx oratories (3) 

Fir:,! term ( 10) 1 2 SO-?. 00 M-F WKS 210 FickhouT 20 

520 Skill Development in Major Aiea-v m 

First term (10)12^0-2 00 M-F WKS 210 Steekel 20 

Second term (10)2 lik<. ..< M-F WKS 210 Ban/hat 20 

522 Specialty Woodworking H) 

first term (10) 2 KM 20 M-F WKS 205 Stall 20 

530 Special Problems in Industrial Fducation (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2 00 M-F WKS 210 Steekel 20 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F WKS 210 Banzhaf 20 

531 Photo-Offset Lithogiaphy (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F WKS315 Ban/haf 20 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

300Lrbrary Resources loi Elementary Teachers (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F Old Lib Busbin 35 

103 
Second term (10)8:50-1000 M-F Old Lib Busbin 35 

204 
(Not open to Library Science majors) 



66 



301 Introduction to Librar'ianship (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Old Lib (iood 

103 



30 



302 Reference Sources and Services (3) 

First term (I0.il 30-' T 40 M-F Old Lib Staff 

103 



30 



304 Children's Literature (3) 

First term (10)3:30-4:40 M-h Old Lib Staff 

103 
Second term ( 10) 2:10-3:20 M-F Old Lib Staff 

103 
(Nut open to Li bran Science majors) 

(11) 1:30-4:40 M-F Old Lib Staff 
103 



35 

35 

35 



305 Selection o! Materials (3) 

first term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F Old Lib Piybon 

. 103 



30 



306 Materials for High School Libraries (Libiary Science $05) (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F Old Lib Quer> 30 

101 

307 Materials loi F.lementarv School Libraries: (! ibrar> Science *05) (3) 
Se.oiid term (10)850-1000 M-F Old Lib Querv 30 

10! 



401 O i gum/at ion and Administration ut the School Library (3) 
First term ( 10) 1 1 0-1 1 .20 M-F Old Lib Piybon 

103 



30 



402 Organization and Administration of the School Library (3) 
Second term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F Old Lib McGirt 

103 



30 



450 Organization and Administration of Non-Book Matenals (3) 
Second term (10)12:50-200 M-F Old Lib McGirt 

101 



30 



67 



452 Literature of the Social Sciences: (Library Science 302, 305) (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F Old Lib Justice 30 

101 

454 Literature for Young Adults (3) 

First term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F Old Lib Busbirt 30 

vi 1 

456 Critical History of Children's Literature (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F Old Lib Plybon 30 

101 

467 Correlating Teaching with Library Use (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F Old Lib Good 30 

101 
Second term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F Old Lib Staff *f> 

204 
(Not open to Library Science majors) 

475 Cataloging and Classification (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F Old Lib McGirt 25 

101 

500 Research Methods in Librarianship (3) 

Second term (10)850-10:00 M-F Old Lib Cox 25 

103 

503 Reading Interests and Guidance (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F Old Lib Busbin 30 

204 

507 History of Books and Printing (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F Old Lib Justice 25 

204 

508 Library and Community (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1:30-1 240 M-F Old Lib Query 30 

101 

510 Organization and Administration of the Two-Year College Library (3) 
First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Old Lib Council 30 

101 

68 



512 Use of Materials with Students and Teachers (3) 

First term (10) 11 :30-12:40 M-F Old Lib Good 30 

101 

513 Problems and Trends in School Libraries (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F Old Lib Cox 30 

103 
540 Seminar (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F Old Lib Council 30 

101 
Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F Old Lib Busbin 30 

101 



MATHEMATICS 

101 Introduction to Mathematics (5) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-9:30 M-F SH 406 Smith 45 

Second term (10)12:50-2:50 M-F SH 407 Perry 45 

104 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (4) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :45 M-F SH 402 Staff 45 

1 1 1 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (4) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:25 M-F SH 407 Schalk 35 

1 1 2 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II: (Math 111) (4) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:25 M-F SH 407 Schalk 35 

3 1 1 Differential Equations : (Math 211) (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 405 Eargle 35 

312 Differential Equations: (Math 311) (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 405 Eargle 35 

321 Modern Algebra : (Math 21 1 or Permission of Instructor) (3) 
Firstterm (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 405 Curd 35 

322 Modern Algebra: (Math 321) (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 405 Curd 35 



69 



361 Introduction to Geometry; (Math 211 or Permission of Instructor) (3) 
Firstterm ( 10) 1 1 :30-l 2:40 M-F SH 405 Buckland 25 

362 Introduction to Geometry :( Math 361) (3) 

Second term ( 10) 1 1 .30-1 2:40 M-F SH 405 Buckland 25 

456 Geometry for Elementary School Teachers(3) 

Firstterm (10) 10: 10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 403 Graham 35 

459 Foundations of Arithmetic (3) 

Second term (10) 10: 10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 406 Williams 35 

461 Introduction to Real Variables (3) 

Firstterm (10)1250-2:00 M-F SH 405 Lane 25 

462 Introduction to Real Variables :(Math 461) (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 405 Lane 25 

471 Introduction to Abstract Algebra: (Math 322) (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SH 404 Fnsey 25 

472 Introduction to Abstract Algebra: (Math 471 ) (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-11 20 M-l SH 404 Fnsey 25 

477 Introduction to Topology ( *) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 403 Durham 25 

478 Introduction to Topology < ^) 

Second term (10)8-50-10:00 M-F SH 403 Durham 25 

49| Probability. and Mathematical Statistics: (Math 211) (3) 

Firstterm (10)730-8:40 M-F SH 403 Carter 25 

492 Probability and Mathematical Statistics: (Math 491) (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 403 Carter 25 

511 Real Variables:(Math 462) (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 402 Lane 15 

512 Real Variables: (Math 511) (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 402 Lane 15 

70 



521 Abstract Algebra t(Math 472) (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 406 Ensey 15 

522 Abstract Algebra:(Math 521) (3) 

Second term $0) 12:50-2:00 M-F SH 406 Ensey 15 

53 1 Topology : (Math 478) (3) 

First term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 406 Boyte 15 

532 Topology*(Math 53 1) (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 :301 2:40 M-F SH 406. Boyte 1 5 

548 Independent Study in Mathematics5(Permission of Chairman) (3) 

First term (10) Arrange Staff 10 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 10 

550 Master of Arts Thesis t (Permission of Chairman) (6) 

First term (10) Arrange Staff 5 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 5 

559 Investigations in the Teaching of Mathematics (3) 

First term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F SH 403 Paul 35 

567 Computer Applications in the High School (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-11 :20 M-F SH 401 McEntire 35 

568 Mathematical Applications in the High School Disciplines (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F SH403 Eargle 35 

569 Special Topics in Mathematics Education (3) 

Second term (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F SH 403 Paul 10 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

351 Introduction to Computer Science (4) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:45 M-F SH401 McEntire 35 

352 Technical Programming (CS 351) (5) 

Second term (10)2:10-4:10 M-F SH401 McEntire 35 

71 



MUSK 

010-011-012 110-1 1 If 12, 210-211 212: 

310-311 .112, 410-41 1-412: 510-51 1 ^12 Applied Music ffc) 

One 30-minute individual lesson and six practice houis a week in brass. 

organ, percussion, piano, strings voice, woodwinds. 

Bach term Arrange IGG Staff 

013-014-015;-; 13-114 -1 15: 213-214-21 s 

*| r314-315:4i'341441.S; 513-514 SIS Applied Music (1) 

Two 30-minute individual lessons and twelve practice hours in a week in 
brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice, woodwinds. 
Inch term Arrange IGG Staff 



103 Basic Theotv ( \) 

hitsl term (10)8:50-1120 M-f IGG 213 Staff 



20 



21 7 Introduction lo Music (3) 

lust term (10)10:10-11:20 M-F IGG 1 23 Cole 

(11)12 50-2:00 M I IGG 123 Isley 

Second term (10)10:1011 V) M-f IGG 12^ Stall 



50 
50 

50 



301 Music toi Classroom Teachers (2) 

Hirst tenn (10)11 :30-l 2:40 M-f IGG 224 Justice 

(11) 2:10-3:20 Ml IGG 224 Justice 



20 
20 



){)2 Music foi Classroom Teachers; (Music *01) (2) 

Second teim (10)12:50-2 00 M-f IGG 224 Fox 

(1 I) 10:10-1 1:20 Ml IGG 224 Meats 



20 

20 



W Music toi Classroom Teachers ;(Musii 301) (2) 

Second teim (10)2:10-3:20 Ml Kid 224 fox 

(1 1) 11:30-1240 Ml IGG 224 Mears 



151 Choral Material and literature (3) 
Ottered in 1 ( )73 



453 Concert Band Liteiature (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 M-f IGG 213 Isley 



IS 



454 Problems in Elementary School Music (3) 
Offered in 1973 



72 



455 Instrument Repair and Adjustment (3) 
Offered in 1972 

456 Opera Literature (3) 
Offered on Sufficient Demand 

457 Chamber Music Literature (3) 
Offered on Sufficient Demand 

458 Symphonic Literature (3) 
Offered on Sufficient Demand 

460 Band Pageantry (3) 
Offered on Sufficient Demand 

461 Piano Workshop (3) 
Offered on Sufficient Demand 

462 Instrumental Workshop (3) 
Offered on Sufficient Demand 

500 Bibliography and Research (3) 
Offered in 1972 

501 Survey of Music to 1600 (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F IGG 222 Staff 15 

502 Music of the Baroque Era (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F IGG 222 Staff 15 

503 Music of the Classic and Romantic Periods (3) 
Offered in 1972 

504 Music of the Twentieth Century (3) 
Offered in 1972 

505 Advanced Conducting (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F IGG 213 Spencer 10 

506 Analytical Technique I (3) 
Offered in 1972 

73 



507 Analytical Technique II (3) 
Offered on Demand 

516 Music Activities in the Elementary School (3) 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F IGG 224 Meats 20 

5 1 7 Music in Secondary Schools ( 3) 
Offered in 1972 

518 American Music (3) 

Second term (10) 1250-2:00 M-F IGG 222 Logan 15 

51 9 String Pedagogy (3) 
Offered in 1973 

520 Woodwind Pedagogy (3) 

First term (10)3:304:40 M-F IGG 119 Spencer 10 

521 Brass Pedagogy (3) 
Offered in 1972 

531 Seminar in Music (3) 
Offered in 1972 

548 Independent Study (3) 



First term 


(10) Arrange 


IGG 


Staff 


Second term 


(10) Arrange 


IGG 


Staff 


faster of Arts Thesis (3-6) 






rirst term 


(10) Arrange 


IGG 


Stall 3 




i •' ' A 1 range 


IGG 


Staff - 


Second tern 


f 10) Arrange 


IGG 


Stall ^ 




(11) Arrange 


IGG 


Staff 6 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 
PHILOSOPHY 

201 Ancient Philosophy (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 305 Wingard 25 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 305 Ruble 25 

74 



203 Modern Philosophy (3) 

First term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 305 Wingard 25 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 305 Ruble 25 



302 Ethics (3) 
Second term 



(10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 305 Ruble 



25 



RELIGION 

201 Introduction to the Old Testament (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 307 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 307 

203 Life and Teaching of Jesus (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 307 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 307 

204 Religion in America (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 307 

Second term (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F SH 307 



Davis 


25 


Humphrey 


25 


Stines 


25 


Humphrey 


25 


Davis 


25 


Humphrey 


25 



303 Religions of the World (3) 

Firstterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 305 



Stines 



25 



PHYSICS 

101 General Physics: (Math 107 or equivalent) (4) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Ran 154 Staff 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 MW Ran 141 Staff 



30 
30 



102 General Physics: (Physics 101) (4) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F Ran 154 Staff 

Lab (20)2:104:40 MW Ran 141 Staff 



30 
30 



103 General Physics: (Physics 101) (4) 

Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F Ran 154 Staff 

Lab (20)2:10-4:40 TT Ran 141 Staff 



30 
30 



215 Descriptive Astronomy (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F Ran 154 Staff 



30 



75 



470 Physics for High School Teachers (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F Ran 154 Staff 



12 



(Note: Physics 102 and 103 may be taken simultaneously.) 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

200 Introduction to Political Science (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 104 Rahhal 

(11)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 101 Barghothi 



40 
40 



201 American National Government (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 101 Moore 40 

(11)11:30-12:40 M-F SH 101 Hoffman 40 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SH 101 Moore 40 

(11) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 102 Williamson 40 

(12) 12 50-? C)0 M-F SH101 Sutton 40 

202 Problems and Policies of American Government (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SH 104 Williamson 40 

Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 101 Moore 40 

203 American State and Local Government (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 104 Williamson 40 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SH 102 Williamson 40 



205 Statistical Methods (3) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH315 Dowell 

(Note: Same as Psychology 205) 



20 



309 American Political Parties (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 101 Hoffman 



40 



402 The Presidency (3) 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SH 101 Sutton 



40 



458 International Organizations (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SH 102 Barghothi 



40 



465 Principles of Public Administration (3) 

Firstterm (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SH 104 Rahfesl 



76 



40 



480 Internship in Public Affairs (3) 

First term (10) Arrange Staff 10 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 10 

504 Problems of Constitutional Government in the U. S. (3) 

First term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SH 101 Moore 10 

540 Seminar (3) 

Second term (10)3:30-4:40 M-F SH 101 Williamson 10 

550 Master of Arts Thesis (3) 

First te mi (10) Arrange Staff 5 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 5 



PSYCHOLOGY 

201 General Psychology (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 264 Moss 50 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 264 Fox 50 

(1 1) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 264 Fox 50 

202 General Psychology (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 264 Duke 30 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 264 Duke 30 

205 Statistical Methods (3) 

First term (10) 2:10-320 M-F FDH 31 5 Dowell 20 

(Note: Sane as Political Science 205 and Sociology 205) 

301 Human Growth and Development: Elementary (3) 

First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F FDH 217 Crouch 35 

Secondterm (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F EDH 315^ Crouch 35 

301 Human Growth and Development: Secondary (3) 

Firstterm (11) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 218 McDade 35 

Secondterm (11)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH315 Moss 35 

302 Educational Psychology (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 264 Fox 35 

(11)7:30-8:40 M-F EDH 318 Snipes 35 

Secondterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F 'EDH318 Crouch 35 

77 



<UJ Principles ct Kenavior \J) 

Firstterrn (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F EDH318 Moss 35 

(11)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH318 Snipes 35 

Second term (iO) 1 1 .30-12:40 M-F EDH 218 McDadc 35 

320 Motivation: (Psychology 20 1 ) (3) 

Second term (10) 11 .30-12:40 M-F EDH318 Weslev 30 

375 Introduction to Rehabilitation: (Psychology 201 or Permission) (3) 

Seeondterm (10) 10: 10-1 ! :20 M-F EDH 318 Knight 25 

450 Psychology of Personality : (Psychology 201) (3) 

Firstterrn (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 315 Johnson 25 

(11)10:10-11:20 M-F EDH 320 Levin 25 

Seeondterm (10)3:30-4.40 M-F EDH 315 Wesley 25 

451 Social Psychology (3) 

Firstterrn HO) 10:10-1 1 "20 M-F EDH 315 Duke 30 

(Note: Same as Sociology 451 ) 

452 Abnormal Psychology: (Psychology 201 or 303) (3) 

Firstterrn (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 264 McDade 25 

455 Advanced Educational Psychology (3) 

Firstterrn (10)3:30-4:40 M-F FDH315 Dowell 30 

Seeondterm (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 320 Fox 30 

456 Intermediate Statistical Methods: (Psychology 205 or equivalent) (3) 
Firstterrn (10)12 50-200 M-F EDH 315 Dowel! 20 
(Note: Same as Sociology 456) 

460 Psychology of Disability: (Psychology 201 , 375, or permission (3) 
of instructor) 
Firstterrn (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 218 Winford 25 

466 Comparative Psychology (Psychology 201 and 205) (3) 

Second term (10) 10:10-1 1:20 M-F EDH 320 Moss 30 

499 Psychology of Early Childhood. (Nine hours of Psychology) (3) 

Firstterrn (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 3 i 7 Crouch 20 



78 



500 Research Problems (1) 

First term (10)4:50-6:40 W EDH316 Moss 20 

Second term (10)4:50-6:40 W EDH316 Moss 20 

501 Psychology of Late Childhood: (Nine hours of Psychology) (3) 
Firstterm (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F EDH315 Fox 30 

502 Psychology of Adolescence: (Nine hours of Psychology) (3) 
Firstterm (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 318 Snipes 30 
Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 318 Knight 30 

510 Psychology of the Gifted (3) 

Second term (10) 2 10-3:20 M-F EDH 317 Staff 20 

519 Analysis of the Individual: (Psychology 450) (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 3 1 5 * Wesley 25 



526 Individual Intelligence Testing - Wechsler Scales (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F EDH 3 1 7 Johnson 12 

527 Individual Intelligence Testing - Stanford-Binet (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 317 McDade 12 

530 Theories of Personality (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F EDH 318 McDade 20 



531 Advanced Genera! Psychology: (Psychology 202 and nine hours (3) 
of Psychology) 
Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 315 Duke 20 

536 Theories of Psychotherapy: (Psychology 535) (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F EDH 320 Levin 20 

550 Master of Arts Thesis (6) 

Second term (10) Arrange Staff 5 

554 Clinical Practicum II: (Clinical Practicum I) (1) 

Firstterm (10) Arrange Levin 12 



79 



555 Advanced Developmental Psychology: (Psychology 205 and preceded t3) 

by or taken concurrently with 
Psychology 457) 
Firstterm (10) 1 1 :30-12:40 M-F EDH 320 Crouch 12 

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

210 General Anthropology (3) 

Firstterm (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F SWH 100 Purrington 35 

Second term (10) 11:30-12:40 M-F SWH 100 Ayers 35 

315 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 101 Purrington 30 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 101 Ayers 30 



SOCIOLOGY 

201 General Sociology (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 100 Jackall 50 

Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F SWH 100 Wcstfall 50 

203 Major Social Issues and Problems (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SWH 100 Jackall 50 

205 Statistical Methods (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F FDH315 Dowell 12 

(Note: Same as Psychology 205) 
300 Criminology (3) 

Second term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SWH 100 Keasey 40 

320 Collective Behavior (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F SWH 101 Brown 25 

350 Social Deviation (3) 

Firstterm (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 100 Lovnch 35 

450 Race Relations (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SWH 100 Lovrich 35 

Second term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F SWH 100 Denton 35 



80 



451 Social Psychology (3) 

First term (10) 10:10-11 :20 M-F EDH 267 Duke 12 

(Note: Same as Psychology 451) 

456 Intermediate Statistical Methods (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F EDH 315 Dowell 6 

(Note: Same as Psychology 456) 

461 Development of Sociological Theory (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SWH 101 Brown 25 

48ty Sociology of the Family (3) 

Second term (10)3:304:40 M-F SWH 100 Keasey 25 

502 Concepts in Sociology (3) 

First term (10)12:50-2:00 M-F SWH 100 Lovrich 25 

Second term (10) 10:10-11:20 M-F SWH 100 Denton . 25 

510 Social Structure (3) 

First term (10)3:304:40 M-F SWH 100 Brown 25 

540 Seminar (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F SWH 100 Westfall 15 

548 Independent Study (3) 

First term (10) Arrange 

Second term (10) Arrange 

550 Master of Arts Thesis (6) 

First term (10) Arrange 

Second term (10) Arrange 



Staff 


3 


Staff 


3 


Staff 


3 


Staff 


3 



SPEECH 










010 Speech Laboratory (0) 










First term (10) Arrange 




CWH- 

Clinic 


Staff 


20 


Second term ( 1 0) Arrange 


81 


CWH- 

Clinic 


Staff 


20 



101 Fundamentals of Speech (3) 



First term 



Second term 



(10)7:30-8:40 M-F CWH 128 Cowan 20 

(11)8:50-10:00 M-F CWH 124 Martin 20 

(12) 10:10-11:20 M-F CWH 124 Cowan 20 

(13) 11:30-12:40 M-F CWH 124 Haley 20 
(14)12:50-2:00 M-F CWH 134 Haley 20 
(10)7:30-8:40 M-F CWH 124 Staff 20 

(11) 10:10-11:20 M-F CWH 124 Pilkington 20 

(12) 11:30-12:40 M-F CWH 1 24 Pilkington 20 



201 Public Speaking (3) 

First term (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F CWH 133 Porterfield 



20 



217 Introduction to Theatre (3) 

Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F CWH-Aud. Martin 



304 Introduction to Speech Correction (3) 

Firstterm (10)8:50-10:00 M-F CWH 1 28 Carpenter 



20 



305 Phonetics (3) 

Firstterm (10)7:30-8:40 M-F CWH 1 24 Porterfield 



20 



450 Rehabilitation of Articulatory Defects:(Speech 304 or permission) (3) 
Firstterm (10) 10:10-1 1 :20 M-F CWH 128 Carpenter 15 

451 Rehabilitation of Voice Disorders and Cleft Palate*(304 or permission) (3) 
Second term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F CWH 5 Staff 15 

452 Rehabilitation of Stuttering and Allied Disorders:(304 or permission) (5) 
Firstterm (10)8:50-11:00 M-F CWH 5 Palmer 15 



453 Audiometric Testing (3) 

Firstterm (10) 1 1:30-12:40 M-F CWH 5 Palmer 



15 



457 Professional Standards and Procedures: (Permission of Instructor) (1 ) 

Firstterm (10)3:30-4:40 M-F CWH 5 Carpenter 15 



82 



458 Clinical Practice in Speech Correction^Permission of Instructor) (1-3) 

First term (1 OH) Arrange CWH- Staff 15 

Clinic 
Second term (10) Arrange CWH- Staff 15 

Clinic 

461 Speech Correction for the Classroom Teacher (3) 

First term (10)8:50-10:00 M-F CWH 128 Staff 15 

501 Development of Language and Speechi(Speech 305 & 451 or 452 or permission) 
First term (10)7:30-8:40 M-F CWH 5 Palmer 15 

508 Advanced Clinical Practicumt(Speech 458 or permission) (1-3) 

First term (10-11) Arrange CWH- Staff 15 

Clinic 
Second term (10) Arrange CWH- Staff 15 

Clinic 

509 The Bases of Speech and Hearing (5) 

Second term (10) 10:10-12:00 M-F CWH 5 Meador 15 

510 Rehabilitation of Language Disorders in Childrefl:(Permission) (5) 

First term (10)11:30-1:20 M-F CWH 128 Meador 15 

515 Rehabilitation of Hearing I:(Speech 453 or permission) (3) 

Second term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F CWH 5 Meador 15 

540 Seminar in Speech Pathology* (Permission) (3) 

First term (10) Arrange CWH Staff 15 

Second term (10) Arrange CWH Staff 15 

545 Methods of Diagnosis,(Speech 450, 45 1 , 452 or permission) (3-5) 

First term (10)2:10-3:20 M-F CWH 5 Meador 15 

548 Independent Study (1^6) 

First term a (10) Arrange CWH Staff 5 

Second term (10) Arrange CWH Staff ,5 



83 



CLASS SCHEDULE 

The daily schedule for each of the terms will consist of seven seventy-minute 
periods with a ten-minute break between classes. The periods wil! be as follows: 



First Period 
Second Period 
Third Period 
Fourth Period 
Fifth Period 
Sixth Period 
Seventh I'enod 



7:30-8:40 

8:50-10:00 

10:10-11:20 

11:30-12:40 



50-2:00 
10-3:20 
30-4:40 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULES 



FIRST TERM 



EXAMINATION 1 101 R 

7:30- 9:30 a.m. 



Thursday, July 8 
1 2:50 classes 



riday, July 9 
S:50 classes 



10:00-1 



00 noon 



30 classes 



10:10 classc 



1 00- 3 



00 p.m 



1 1 



30 classes 



*: ^0 classes 



:30- 



30 p.m 



10 classes 



SECOND TERM 



EXAMINATION HOUR 



3:30- 5:30p.m. 



bursday, August 1 2 



8:50 classes 



Eriday, August 13 



7:30- 9:30a.m. 


7:30 classes 


10 10 classes 


10:00-12:00 noon 


11:30 classes 


3:30 classes 


1:00- 3:00 p.m 


2:10 classes 


12:50 classes 



84 



INDEX 

ACADEMIC LOAD 15 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS 13 

ACCREDITATION 7 

ADMISSION 11 

Graduate 12 

Undergraduate 11 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

ART 33 

AUDITORS 20 

BIOLOGY 35 

BUSINESS . ■ 39 

CALENDAR .4 

CHEMISTRY 37 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 16 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 71 

CONTENTS 5 

COURSE CHANGES 15 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Art 33 

Biology and General Science 35 

Chemistry and Physical Science V 

Economics and Business 38 

Education 41 

English 51 

Foreign Languages cjk 

Geography 56 

Health and Physical Education 58 

History 61 

Home Economics 64 

Industrial Arts 64 

Library Science 66 

Mathematics and Computer science 7| 

Music 71 

Philosophy and Religion W 

Physics 71 

8$ 



Political Science 72 

Psychology 73 

Sociology and Anthropology 76 

Speech 78 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Baccalaureate M 

ECONOMICS 18 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 41 

ENGLISH 51 

EXAMINATION SCHEDULES 84 

EXPENSES 18 

FINANCIAL AID ?> 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5 4 

GENERAL SCIENCE 37 

GEOGRAPHY 56 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION 17 

GRADUATION . 17 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION s* 

HISTORY 61 

HOME ECONOMICS 64 

HOUSING 8 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 64 

INSTITUTES 32 

LABORATORY SCHOOLS 10 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 66 

LOAN PROGRAMS 25 

LOCATION AND CLIMATE 7 



86 



MATHEMATICS 69 

MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION 10 * 

MUSIC : . . 72 

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATION 17 

OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS * 18*** 

PHILOSOPHY 74 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 58 ' 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 38 

PHYSICS 75 

POLITICAL SCIENCE . 76 

PSYCHOLOGY 77 

PURPOSE AND PHILOSOPHY 7 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES AND ACTIVITIES 9 

REFUNDS 22 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 13 

RELIGION 75 

REPORTS . . . 17 

ROOM RESERVATIONS 8 

SOCIOLOGY 80 

SPEECH 81 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 18 

VETERAN INFORMATION 25 

WITHDRAWAL FROM UNIVERSITY 16 

WORKSHOPS 28 

WORK-STUDY 25 



87