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Full text of "Bulletin - United States National Museum"

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11 

U563 

CRLSSI 



SMITHSONIAN 
INSTITUTION 



MUSEUM 

OF 
NATURAL 
HISTORY 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 



A Revision of the Peoriinae 

and Anerastiinae (Auctorum) 

of America North of Mexico 

(Lepidoptera: Pyrahdae) 



JAY C. SHAFFER 

Visiting Research Associate 
Smithsonian Institution 




SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 
1968 



Publications of the United States National Museum 



The scientific publications of the United States National Museum include two 
series, Proceedings of the United States National Museum and United States National 
Museum Bulletin. 

In these series are published original articles and monographs dealing with 
the collections and work of the Museum and setting forth newly acquired facts 
in the field of anthropology, biology, geology, history, and technology. Copies 
of each publication are distributed to libraries and scientific organizations and 
to specialists and others interested in the various subjects. 

The Proceedings, begun in 1878, are intended for the publication, in separate 
form, of shorter papers. These are gathered in volumes, octavo in size, with 
the publication date of each paper recorded in the table of contents of the volume. 

In the Bulletin series, the first of which was issued in 1875, appear longer, 
separate publications consisting of monographs (occasionally in several parts) 
and volumes in which are collected works on related subjects. Bulletins are 
either octavo or quarto in size, depending on the needs of the presentation. 
Since 1902, papers relating to the botanical collections of the Museum have been 
published in the Bulletin series under the heading Contibutions from the United 
States National Herbarium. 

This work forms number 280 of the Bulletin series. 

Frank A. Taylor 
Director, United States National Museum 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
WASHINGTON: 1968 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C . 20402 - Price 20 cents 



Contents 

Page 

Introduction 1 

Materials and Methods 2 

Acknowledgments 4 

Review of the Literature 5 

Classification 6 

Subfamily Peoriinae 8 

Genus Peoria Ragonot 9 

P. longipalpella (Ragonot) 13 

P. bipartitella Ragonot 14 

P. tetradella (Zeller) 16 

P. opacella (Hulst) 18 

P.floridella Shaffer 20 

P. rostrella (Ragonot) 21 

P. gemmatella (Hulst) 22 

P. roseotinctella (Ragonot) 24 

P. johnstoni Shaffer 26 

P. santaritella (Dyar) 27 

P. holoponerella (Dyar) 28 

P. approximella (Walker) 29 

P. luteicostella ( Ragonot) 36 

Genus Anacostia Shaffer 37 

A. tribulella Shaffer 38 

Genus Arivaca Shaffer 39 

The Pimella Group 40 

A. pimella (Dyar) 41 

A. linella Shaffer 42 

The OstreeUa Group 42 

A. ostreella ( Ragonot) 43 

A. poohella 44 

The Albidella Group 45 

A. albidella (Hulst) 46 

A. artella Shaffer 46 

The Albicostella Group 47 

A. albicostella (Grossbeck) 47 

Genus Atascosa Hulst 48 

A. glareosella (Zeller) 49 

Genus Homosassa Hulst 50 

H. ella Hulst 51 

H. platella Shaffer 53 

H. incudella Shaffer 54 

Genus Reynosa Shaffer 54 

R. floscella (Hulst) 55 

Genus Goya Ragonot 56 

G. stictella (Hampson) 56 

V 



VI CONTENTS 

Page 

Subfamily Phycitinae 57 

Genus Anerastia Iliibner 58 

A. lolella Hiibner 59 

Genus Coenochroa Ragonot 60 

C . californiella Ragonot 61 

C. illihella (Hulst) 65 

C. bipundella (Barnes and McDunnough) 67 

Genus Bandera Ragonot 68 

B. binolella (Zeller) 69 

B. cwpidinella Hulst 71 

B. virginella Dyar 73 

Genus Wakulla Shaffer 74 

W. carneella (Barnes and McDunnough) 75 

Genus Tampa Ragonot 75 

T. dimediatella Ragonot 76 

Genus Barberia Dyar 78 

B. affinitella Dyar 78 

Genus Ragonotia Grote 79 

R. dotalis (Hulst) 80 

Genus Martia Ragonot 83 

M. arizonella Ragonot 84 

Synonymical List of Species Considered 85 

Unplaced Genera and Species 87 

Literature Cited 90 

Explanation of Figures 93 



Introduction 

This study began as a revision of the North American Anerastiinae, 
largely in the sense of the McDunnough (1939) checklist. In keeping 
with the original goals of the investigation, this paper treats all species 
formerly placed under that subfamily name, although Anerastia and 
several other genera are herein transferred to the Phycitinae, and 
Peoria is taken as the nominal genus of the subfamily. The transferred 
genera have not previously been treated in detail and so are discussed 
in this paper. The following introductory sections deal with the litera- 
tm-e and history of the classification of all the genera formerly placed 
in the Anerastiinae. 

The species of moths which previously constituted the subfamily 
Anerastiinae are a mixture of various pyralid elements. Members of 
this worldwide group are generally uncommon, rather inconspicuous 
insects of little or no economic importance, and perhaps largely for 
these reasons have received relatively little attention from taxonomists. 

Much of the work which has been done on the North American 
Anerastiinae appeared during the last 15 years of the 19th centmy 
and is superficial by current standards. The only world monograph of 
the group is that of Ragonot (1901). Because existing works on the 
anerastiines have not been based on the detailed examination of 
species which is so necessary to a natiu^al taxonomic system, a number 
of areas remain as major problems. 

Identification of species has been difiicult, even for specialists, be- 
cause the descriptions and illustrations are inadequate. Most of the 
original descriptions occupy but a few lines of text and are almost 
useless for identifying the species. Illustrations of the adults are nearly 
absent from the literature with the exception of the Ragonot revision, 
a rare publication not easily available to most workers. The genitalia, 
one of the most taxonomically useful structures, are nowhere illus- 
trated for North American species and are described in only a few 
instances. In addition most past studies were made from only one or a 
few specimens so that no account of individual and geographic varia- 
tion was possible. Thus, reliable identifications can be made only by 
comparison with the type specimens. This is difficult because the 
types are scattered in various museums throughout the United States 
and Europe. 

Placement of species into genera has been on the basis of usually 
one or a few superficial characters of wings, antennae, and palpi, 

1 



2 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

without emphasis on the sum of these characters and without examina- 
tion of the genitaUa. As a result most species have been misplaced, 
often associated in Old World genera to which they have no close 
aflBnities. 

The Anerastiinae and Phycitinae have long been considered closel}'' 
related within the Pyralidae and were often collectively recognized as 
the family Phycitidae. The two groups show close similarity in wing 
venation, notably the loss of vein R5 in both groups. They also have 
similar palpi and the frenulum reduced to a single bristle in the females. 

Separation of the Anerastiinae from the Phycitinae has been made 
on the basis of a single reduction character, loss or extreme reduction 
of the tongue, hence the supposed monophyletic nature of the group 
has been highly questionable. The results of the present investigation 
indicate that in North America eight genera properly belong with the 
phycitines and seven genera, forming a natural group, are quite dis- 
tinctly separate from the Phycitinae. The latter of these two groups 
has been given subfamily status as the Peoriinae, a subfamily name 
proposed by Hulst. 

The present study is preliminary; essentially all that is known of 
the group is based on studies of the adults; the immature stages and 
the biology of the living insects are almost wholly unknown. Food 
plant records are available for only two species of peoriines, both grass 
feeders. Peoria bipartitella is reported to feed on Panicum lanuginosura, 
and Peoria tetradella on Elymus canadensis as a borer in the stem. The 
life history oi Anerastia lotella, a Holarctic species, is well described in 
the literature, notably by Buckler (1901). The species feeds on a 
number of grasses including Ammophila arenaria, Festuca ovina, Secale 
cereale, and Aira species. It is hoped that this paper will encourage 
taxonomic and biological studies on the Peoriinae throughout their 
worldwide range. 

Materials and Methods 

Specimens examined. — The U.S. National Museum and the 
Canadian National collection have provided most of the specimens 
used in this study. A complete listing of individuals and institutions 
from which material was borrowed is given below along with the 
abbreviations used in the text. 

ABK Collection of Alexander B. Klots, New York, N.Y. 

AMNH American Museum of Natural History, New York, N.Y. 

ANS Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BM Collection of Bryant Mather, Jackson, Miss. 

BMNH British Museum (Natural History), London, England 

BPI State Bureau of Plant Industry, Harrisburg, Pa. 

CM Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CNC Canadian National Collection, Ottawa, Ontario 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 3 

CNHM Chicago Natural History Museum, Chicago, 111. 

CPK Collection of Charles P. Kimball, Sarasota, Fla. 

CU Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 

INHS Illinois State Natural History Survey, Urbaua, 111. 

JCS Collection of the author, Shamokin Dam, Pa. 

JGF Collection of John G. Franclemont, Ithaca, N.Y. 

KSU Kansas State University, ISIanhattan, Kans. 

LACM Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, Calif. 

MOG Collection of IMurray O. Glenn, Henry, HI. 

UCB University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

UK University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kans. 

UM University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn. 

USNM U.S. National Museum, Washington, D.C. 

Techniques. — Preparatoiy to examining the genitalia the abdomen 
was broken away from the thorax and macerated in cold 10 percent 
potassimn hydroxide (KOH) solution for from 4 to 8 hours, then 
dissected in 50 percent alcohol. The abdomen was carefully torn open 
with jewelers' forceps along the entire right plem-al area, enabling the 
cuticle to be mounted flat with the outer surface upward. The genitalia 
were separated by carefully tearing along the membrane between 
segments eight and nine. After the removal of loose scales and KOH, 
the male genitalia were usually stained with mercmochrome (0.3 
percent aqueous solution), or occasionally with chlorazol black or 
acid fuchsin to improve rendition of various structures. The aedeagus 
was removed, and the valves were spread and held open by a small 
rectangular section of microscope slide placed over the genitaha. The 
genitalia were held in this position in 95 percent alcohol until hardened, 
then transferred successively to clove oU and xylene for about 15 
minutes each, prior to mounting in Canada balsam on a microscope 
slide. 

Female genitalia were put through the same series of chemicals as 
those of the males, but were usually stained with chlorazol black or 
mercm-ochrome. 

In order to allow observation from any desired angle the genitalia 
of at least one specimen of each sex of each species were transferred 
from xylene into small (5 x 10 mm) genitalia vials, along with a drop 
of Cargille's type A microscope immersion oU; the males were left 
unspread. These specimens were eventually washed in xylene and 
moimted in balsam; before mounting they proved very useful in 
preparing descriptions because it was possible to study the relation- 
ships of the various structures. 

Attempts to spread the male genitalia of the Peoriinae in the 
manner described above caused considerable distortion; thus the 
method had to be modified. If one will visualize the external male 
genitaha as the aedeagus and a surrounding cyhnder, and then the 
cylinder as severed lengthwise, the genitalia can be "unrolled" and 



4 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

flattened. In practice this was achieved by carefully separating the 
right valve from the vinculum and tearing the diaphi-agma so that 
the juxta remams adjacent to the right valve. The method was highly 
satisfactory as all the genitalic structures then lay flat in one plane. 
The genitalia were held flat, run through the alcohol, clove oil, xylene 
series, and mounted as explained above. Illustrations of the peoriine 
species and several other species were made with the male genitalia 
prepared in this manner. 

Terms. — The Comstock-Needham system has been used in naming 
the wing veins (fig. 50). I have followed Kornerup and Wanscher 
(1962) for color terminology, viewing both the color plates and the 
specimen by incandescent illumination. Physiographic distribution 
terminology follows Lobeck (1948). Unless otherwise indicated, the 
phrase "North America" is taken to mean America north of Mexico. 

Acknowledgments 

The investigation was carried out under the dhection of Prof. 
John G. Franclemont, to whom I wish to express my gratitude for 
his kind advice during the course of the project and for his helpful 
criticisms of the manuscript. A special note of appreciation is due 
Mr. Paul E. S. Whalley, who checked several type specimens in the 
British Museum (Natural Histor37^) against my descriptions and photo- 
graphs; to Dr. Pien-e E. L. Viette, who made available many of the 
Ragonot types in the Paris Museum; to Dr. Alexander B. Klots for 
his numerous helpful suggestions; to Dr. J. F. Gates Clarke, who sug- 
gested and encouraged my work on this interesting problem, and to 
Dr. H. E. Moore, Jr. and Dr. W. D. Duckworth, who offered useful 
comments on the manuscript. 

I wish to thank the Allied Chemical Corporation for a contribution 
toward the cost of preparing the manuscript and for a grant which 
enabled me to spend one month collecting specimens at the Archbold 
Biological Station, Lake Placid, Fla. I am also indebted to the pub- 
lisher of the Goode Base Map Series, Department of Geography, 
The University of Chicago, for granting permission to reproduce 
copyrighted material used in several of the plates. Maps 1 through 6 
and Map 12 are based on Goode Base Map No. 202, copyi'ight by 
the University of Chicago. 

Finally, the investigation would not have been possible without the 
kind cooperation of numerous individuals and institutions who loaned 
specimens for my studies. I extend my appreciation to Dr. George W. 
Byers, University of Kansas; Mr. Harry K. Clench, Carnegie Museum; 
Mr. Hugh B. Cunningham, Illinois Natural History Survey; Dr. 
Donald R. Davis, U.S. National Museum; Dr. Howard E. Evans, 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 5 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University; Dr. John G. 
Franclemont, personal collection; Mr. Murray O. Glenn, personal 
collection; the late Dr. Harold J. Grant, Jr., Philadelphia Academy 
of Natural Sciences; Mr. Charles P. Kimball, personal collection; 
Mr. Norman Marston, Kansas State University; Mr. Lloyd M. 
Martin, Los Angeles County Museum; Mr. Bryant Mather, personal 
collection; Dr. Eugene Munroe, Canadian National collection; Dr. 
L. L. Pechuman, Cornell University; Dr. Jerry Powell, University of 
California, Berkeley; Dr. Frederick H. Rindge, American Museum of 
Natural History; Mr. George B. Sleesman, Pennsylvania State Biu-eau 
of Plant Industry; Dr. Frederick W. Stehr (now at Michigan State 
University), University of Minnesota; Mr. Paul E. S. Whalley, 
British Museum (Natural History); and Mr. Alex Wyatt, Chicago 
Natural History Museum. 

Review of the Literature 

The genus Anerastia Hiibner [1826] originally comprised four 
species; three of these were transferred to Hypochalcia Hiibner by 
Zeller (1848), and the one remaining species, lotella Hiibner [1810- 
1813], was assumed to be the type of the genus although it was not 
explicitly designated as such until 1886 by Moore. In the original 
publication of lotella, Hiibner gives only a watercolor figure, no 
description. Genitalia of both sexes were figured and described briefly 
by Pierce (1938). 

Walker (1866) originally described approodmella, the same species 
later being named haematica by Zeller (1872), and roseatella by 
Packard (1873). ZeUer's paper included descriptions of three other 
new species of North American Anerastiinae. 

In 1886 Ragonot established the family Phycitidae, based on 
Phycita Curtis, and divided it into the subfamilies Phycitinae and 
Anerastiinae based upon the "absence, or nearly so, of the tongue" 
in the latter group. He states his intention to prepare a monograph 
of the Phycitidae and Galleridae of the world and gives a review of 
previous works on these insects. 

The publication of Hulst's "Descriptions of New Pyralidae" (1886) 
prompted Ragonot to publish new species of his own in advance of 
the projected monograph. The appearance of the Hulst papers at 
this time was in some respects unfortunate, for in the next several 
years both men published many new specific and generic names 
without seeing each other's types, thereby creating many synonyms. 
During 1887-89 Ragonot published 16 species and 15 genera, and 
Hulst published 7 species and 4 genera listed as new for the North 
American Anerastiinae. 



6 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Grote (1888) regarded "... the Phycidae or Phyciinae as a 
sub-family of the Pyrahdae; the M. Ragonot's Anerastinae [sic] as 
merely a tribal division of the sub-family." 

The first paper summarizing knowledge of the Anerastiinae was 
Hulst's (1890) "Revision of American Phycitidae." Therein he 
divided the family into the subfamilies Phycitinae and Peoriinae, the 
latter group largely corresponding to Ragonot's Anerastiinae, but 
excluding Anerastia and two other genera. The division was rather 
auspiciously made on the basis of the male genitalia, but unfortunately 
his assignment of genera into the two groups suggests that he neglected 
careful examination of these structures for most species. Indeed, 
genitalia are discussed for only 4 of the 19 peoriine genera included 
in the paper. The revision treats 30 species in 19 genera of Peoriinae, 
with 7 of the species and 4 of the genera being described as new. 

The great world monograph of Ragonot (1901) was completed by 
Sir George F. Hampson after the author's death in 1895 and contains 
descriptions of 31 species and illustrations in color of 30 species 
(lotella Hiibner not being illustrated) of North American Anerastiinae 
placed in 17 genera. Three species and one genus were described as 
new. A number of the specific names have since been synonymized, 
and several of the genera have been found not to be North American. 

Hampson's (1918) classification of the subfamily termed the group 
Hypsotropinae based on Hypsotropa Zeller. He considered dignella 
Hiibner to be the type oi Anerastia, but Ragonot (1901) had already 
designated lotella Hiibner as such. His paper covers the entire group 
and ascribes one new species to the North American fauna. 

Sixteen new specific names have been added to the literature since 
the publication of Ragonot's monograph, these mostly in occasional 
papers by Dyar (1904, 1904a, 1906, 1908, 1923), Barnes and McDun- 
nough (1913), Hampson (1918, 1930), and Grossbeck (1917). The 
most recent checklist for North America (McDunnough, 1939) 
gives 23 genera and 51 species, plus 1 genus and 10 species as junior 
synonyms. Heinrich's "Revision of the New World Phycitinae" 
(1956) transfers a number of genera across the subfamily lines. 

Classification 

As has been indicated previously, available information on the 
Anerastiinae is minimal, so that the present study is only a step 
toward a more reliable taxonomic system such as exists for many 
better known groups of insects. Nevertheless, morphological studies 
of adult specimens indicate that radical changes in the classification 
of the Anerastiinae are needed. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 7 

I have accepted the male genitalia as being the most reliable 
morphological indicators of natural relationships, especially at the 
generic level. They offer a relatively large number of stable characters. 
Female genitalia are in many cases too similar to be of much value 
in separating species, and even genera. Characters of wings, antennae, 
and palpi previously used to define genera often exhibit more intra- 
generic than intergeneric variation and consequently are by them- 
selves extremely unreliable indicators of generic lines. 

Numerous examples of wing venation variability could be given, 
and the following will illustrate the lack of reliabiHty of venational 
characters: In the genus Peoria the presence or absence in the fore- 
wing of vein M3 does not correlate with any other morphological 
feature investigated. This vein was present in about one-half of the 
specimens of P. santaritella, and one specimen possessed M3 only on 
the right wing. Aberrations in the wing venation are very common 
within the subfamily, and the usefulness of any particular venational 
feature must be evaluated separately. 

Orientation of the palpi may vary with the sex, and in living 
specimens the position they assume may be different from that 
found in dead specimens after desiccation. Unfortunately, most species 
have been described from very small series of specimens, so the 
variation has not always been apparent. Thus the use of this character 
in assigning species to genera has proved to be extremely unreliable. 

The definition of the Anerastiinae has not generally been regarded 
as very satisfactory. Although most of the species have a distinctive 
habitus, this and the reduced tongue are not, in the absence of other 
substantial correlated characters, sufficient to define the group. 
Heinrich (1956), following Ragonot's division of the Phycitidae, felt 
that ". . . in the main the subfamilies [Phycitinae and Anerastiinae] 
themselves appear to be natural entities, although their definition 
leaves much to be desired." 

On the basis of the genitalia, the North American Anerastiinae 
divide into two distinctly separate groups. One of these groups is 
composed of eight phycitine genera, including Anerastia, which seem 
to be related to diverse areas of that subfamily, and the remaining 
seven genera comprise a natural group, the Peoriinae. 

The genitalia of both sexes in the peoriines differ distinctly from 
those in the phycitines. Females all have the ovipositor greatly com- 
pressed, probably as an adaptation for a particular mode of oviposi- 
tion. In the males the uncus is so different from its usual appearance 
in the phycitines as to be nearly unrecognizable in the North American 
species. Indeed, the assumption that these terminal parts represent 
uncus is based on an examination of several Old World peoriine 



8 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

genera in which the uncus is similar, in varying degrees, to that of 
the phycitines. 

A number of other features are generally, but not exclusively, 
characteristic of the Peoriinae. In all species the males have two to 
five (possibly more) basal antennal segments fused to some degree, 
the exact number often varying within a species. Longitudinal wing 
markings are more common than transverse ones, and the ocelli 
are well developed in all the species examined. 

Inasmuch as the present state of our knowledge is so unsatisfactory, 
the author hopes to undertake studies of the group on a world basis 
to better deal with the problem. The interpretation of just how 
closely the Phycitinae and the Peoriinae are related will depend in 
part on how homologies between the male genitalic structures of the 
two groups are interpreted, and in part on the significance of the 
compressed ovipositor. A better understanding of this problem will 
require examination of the genitalic structures of all the species, 
and perhaps studies of their embryology and soft-part anatomy as 
weU. Life history studies would be extremely valuable and should 
help to elucidate the functional significance of the compressed 
ovipositor. 

Subfamily Peoriinae * Hulst 

Hulst, 1890, p. 102. 

Diagnosis. — Similar to Phycitinae; distinguished by spicate 
modifications of uncus in males and by highly compressed ovipositor 
of females. 

Description. — Labial palpi weU developed, maxillary palpi mod- 
erate to very small; male antennae with basal segments of shaft 
variously fused; tongue reduced; ocelli well developed. 

Forewing maculation predominantly longitudinal; transverse bands, 
when present, usually expressed as dots, more rarely solid; 10 or 11 
veins; Ri free from ceU; R3+4 stalked; Kg absent; Mi free from cell; 
Cu2 free from ceU. Hind wing with 6 or 7 veins; Rs closely approximate 
to or stalked with Sc-f Ri beyond cell; frenulum of female simple. 

Male genitalia with uncus bearing spicate processes. Gnathos 
various, usually bearing medial process. Transtilla absent (except 
in Goya). Juxta well developed, various. Vinculum well developed. 
Eighth abdominal segment without special hair tufts. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor strongly compressed. Eighth 
abdominal segment compressed, rarely well expanded anteriorly. 
Apophyses well developed, approximately equal in length. Ductus 

1 Based upon North American species. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 9 

bursae moderately short. Bursa well developed, rarely armed. Ductus 
seminalis from or near posterior end of bursa. 

Key to Genera of Peoriinae Based Upon the Male Genitalia 

Within the Peoriinae intrageneric variation of alar, palpal, and 
antennal features seriously limits their usefulness in separating genera. 
In the absence of other distinguishing features, keys to genera must 
rely on characters of the male genitalia. Whenever slide preparation is 
impractical, reasonably certain determinations can often be made by 
comparing external features of the specimens to descriptions and 
photographs of adults. Genitalia slides should be prepared if correct 
identification is critical. It is suggested that the indicated figures be 
consulted when using the keys. 

1. Each spicate process (of uncus) basally branched into two long perpendicular 

tapering spines of nearly equal length; spicate processes connected by medial 

bandlike process (fig. 51) 2 

Spicate processes unbranched, or one branch at least twice length of other; 
medial process absent or not bandlike 3 

2. Medial process of uncus bearing prominent posteromedial protuberance; juxta 

with pair of setaceous tubercles (fig. 118) Anacostia 

INIedial process of uncus unarmed, or with minute cusps only; juxta without 
pair of setaceous tubercles (figs. 105-117) Peoria 

3. Spicate processes unbranched, blunt, elbowed in middle; gnathos tapering to 

single sharp apical spine (fig. 126) Atascosa 

Spicate processes various, not angled; gnathos with medial process not a single 
sharp spine 4 

4. Each spicate process with rhomboidal lateral pad; juxta elliptical; aedeagus 

strongly tapered (fig. 131) Goya 

Rhomboidal pad absent; juxta rectangular or shield shaped; aedeagus not 
strongly tapered 5 

5. Each spicate process a reciu-ved stout hook shorter than gnathos arm, tapering 

to sharp point; gnathos apically tricuspidate (fig. 130) Reynosa 

Spicate processes not as above, at least as long as gnathos arm; gnathos not 
apically tricuspidate 6 

6. Apical process of gnathos digitate; spicate processes each with long lateral and 

much shorter caudal branches (figs. 119-125) Arivaca 

Gnathos without digitate apical process; spicate processes unbranched (figs. 
127-129) Homosassa 

Peoria Ragonot 

Aurora Ragonot, 1887, p. 18; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, pp. 209-210. — Smith, 
1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 337. — Hulst, 1902, p. 437. — Barnes and 
McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Kampson, 1918, p. 106. — Forbes, 1923, 
p. 638. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. [New synonymy. Type: Aurora 
longipalpella Ragonot, 1887. IMonobasic.] 

Peoria Ragonot, 1887, p. 19; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 213. — Smith, 
1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 386. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — Barnes and 



10 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Forbes, 1923, p. 638. — McDunnough, 1939, 
p. 36. [Type: Anerastia haematica Zeller, 1872. Original designation.] 
Statina Ragonot, 1887, p. 19; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 216. — Smith, 

1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 415. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — Barnes and 
McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 59. — McDunnough, 1939, 
p. 36. [New synonymy. Type: Statina roseotinctella Ragonot, 1887, p. 19. 
Monobasic] 

Calera Ragonot, 1888, p. 50. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 417. 
— Hulst, 1890, p. 217, — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hamp- 
son, 1918, p. 59. — Hulst, 1902, p. 441. — Forbes, 1923, p. 639. — McDun- 
nough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy. Type: Calera pundilimbella R-agonot, 
1888, p. 50. Monobasic] 

Altoona Hulst, 1888, p. 116; 1890, pp. 206-207. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Hulst, 
1902, p. 438. [New synonymy. Type: Anerastia opacella Hulst, 1887. 
Original designation.] 

Cayuga Hulst, 1888, p. 116; 1890, pp. 208-209. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Hulst, 
1902, p. 438. [New synonymy. Type: Spermatophthora gemmatella Hulst, 
1887. Monobasic] 

Volusia Hulst, 1890, p. 206 [not Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, p. 674, in Diptera, 
Ortalidae; not Adams, 1861, p. 306, in Gastropoda]. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. 
[New synonymy. Type: Volusia roseopennella Hulst, 1890. Monobasic] 

Wekiva Hulst, 1890, p. 215. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. [New 
synonymy. Type: Wekiva nodosella Hulst, 1890. Monobasic] 

Osceola Hulst, in Smith, 1891, p. 85 [not Baird and Girard, 1853, p. 133 p. 133, in 
Reptilia]. [Nomen nudum. New synonymy. Type: Chipeta perlepidella 
Hulst, 1892. Monobasic] 

Chipeta Hulst, 1892, p. 62. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — McDun- 
nough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy. Type: Chipeta perlepidella Hulst. 

1892. Monobasic] 

Chipota [sic] — Hulst, 1902, p. 441. [Misspelling for Chipeta.] 

Trivolusia Dyar, 1902 [1903], p. 438. [New synonymy. Type: Volusia roseopen- 
nella Hulst, 1890. Monobasic] 

Ollia Dyar, 1904, pp. 107-108. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Mc- 
Dunnough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy. Type: Ollia santaritella Dyar, 
1904. Monobasic] 

Diagnosis. — Members of this rather variable genus may be recog- 
nized by the characteristic uncus with its bandUlie medial ])rocess and 
paired spicate processes, bifm-cate with each arm round, slender, 
sharply pointed, and oriented at about 90 degrees to the other (fig. 51). 

Description. — Labial palpi porrect (obliquely ascending in lutei- 
costella); tongue rudimentary; antennae with base compressed, male 
shaft with basal segments partly fused, female with shaft filiform, 
finely cUiate. 

Forewings with 10 or 11 veins; Ri from cell well before upper outer 
angle; R2 from cell near base of or stalked with R3+4; R3+4 always 
stalked, from just before the angle; Mi from the angle; M2 stalked or 
fused with M3; M3 sometimes stalked with Cui; Cui at or near lower 
outer angle of cell; Cu2 from just before the angle. Hindwings with 
6 or 7 veins; Sc and Rs closely approximate or stalked; Mi from upper 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 11 

outer angle of cell; M2 absent; M3 stalked with Cui for at least one- 
thii'd of its length, sometimes fused; Cui from lower outer angle; Cu2 
from just before the angle. 

Male genitalia with uncus bearing bandlike medial process; spicate 
processes each terminating in slender, sharply pointed ventrad and 
caudad arms. Gnathos arms broad and flat. Vinculum well developed, 
broadly rounded. Aedeagus somewhat flattened, three to four times as 
long as broad; vesica, when armed, bearing one or two cornuti. 

Female genitalia with posterior and anterior apophyses of about 
equal length, well developed. Ductus bursae moderately short. Bursa 
unarmed. Ductus seminalis from posterior end of bursa, broadened at 
base. 

Discussion. — The genus includes 13 known species and is the 
largest in the American fauna of the subfamily. Affinities vary within 
the genus, and the species have been grouped to show relationships 
in so far as this is possible with a linear arrangement. 

There is enough variation of characters within many of the species 
to render difficidt the construction and use of keys. To aid in the identi- 
fication of specimens, a chart summarizing the characters found to be 
of greatest value in separating species is included in addition to the 
key. 

In a few cases the male genitalia are quite distinctive of the species, 
but for the most part the differences are rather subtle. The form of 
the gnathos, number of cornuti in the vesica, and shape of the valvae 
(not summarized in table, see figures) are the most useful characters 
of the male genitalia. 

Navasota hebetella may belong to Peoria and has been included in 
the key (see Unplaced Genera and Species, p. 87). 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Code (Article 24), 
I have chosen the name Peoria for this genus rather than the lesser 
known Aurora which has page precedence. 

Explanation of Table 1 

1. Fore wing, vein R2 

x=free from cell 
0= stalked with R3f4 

2. Forewing, vein M2 

x= stalked with M3 

*= fused with M3 (apparently absent) 

3. Forewing, vein Cui 

x=free from cell 
0= stalked with M3 

4. Forewing, region anterior to cell 

x= abruptly pale, with few or no darker scales 

0= not abruptly pale, Sc and Rs sometimes white traced 

285-934—68 2 



12 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 



10. 



11. 



12. 



Forewlng 

x= ground darker posterior to cell, at least at base 

0= ground not darker posterior to cell 
Forewing 

x=soine or all veins white traced 

o= without white tracing on veins 
Forewing, transverse posterior line 

x= present 

* = represented by dots 

o= absent 
Labial palpi 

p=porrect 

a= ascending 
Maxillary palpi 

x= reaching frons or nearly so 

o= small, not approaching frons 
Male antennae 

1= laminate 

S= serrate 

ss=subserrate 
Gnathos of male genitalia 

a = with apical process 

l=with pair of subapical processes 

o== without special processes 
Aedeagus, number of cornuti in vesica 



The use of two symbols separated by a comma indicates two characters appear- 
ing with about equal frequency. A symbol in parentheses indicates a character 
appearing less frequently than its alternative. 



Table 1. — Summary of characters found to be the most useful in distinguishing 

species of Peoria* 



Species 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


longipalpella 





X 


X 











X 


p 


X 


ss 


a 


1 


bipartitella 





* 


X 


o(x) 


x(o) 


x(o) 


o 


p 


X 


1 


a 


1 


tetradella 


x,o 


X 


X 


X 





X 


o 


p 


X 


ss 


a 


1 


opacella 


x,o 


X 


X 





X 


X 


o 


p 


X 


1 


a 


1 


floridella 


x,o 


X 


X 





X 


X 


o 


p 


o 


1 


a 


1 


rostrella 


o 


X 


X 


o 


o 


X 





p 


X 


ss 


a 


1 


gemmatella 


X 


X 


X 


o 


o 


X 


o 


p 


o 


1 


a,o 


2 


roseotinctella 





* 





X,0 


o 


X 


* 


p 


o 


1 


a(o) 


2 


johnstoni 


o 


* 


X 


o 


o 


X 


o 


p 


o 


ss 


o 


2 


santaritella 


X 


*,x 


X 


o 


X 


o 





p 





s 


a 


1 


holoponerella 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


o 


o 


p 





s 


a 


1 


approximella 


o 


* 


X 


X 


o 


o 





p 


o 


1 


1 





luteicostella 


o 


* 


X 


X 





o 





a 


o 


1 


1 


1 



*See explanation on preceding pages. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 13 

Key to the Species of Peoria Based Upon External Features 

1. R2 stalked with R3+4; M J absent 2 

II2 not stalked with R3+4; if stalked, then M2 present 7 

2. M3 stalked with Cui; hindwing M3 absent 3 

Ms not stalked with Cui, sometimes from point; hindwing M3 usually 

present 4 

3. Transverse posterior indicated by line of dots (fig. 10) roseotinctella 

Transverse posterior absent; terminal line of dots present . . N. hebetella 

4. Forewing abruptly pale anterior to cell, with no more than a few scattered 

nonwhite scales 5 

Forewing not abruptly pale anterior to cell 6 

5. Forewing pale posterior to A2; palpi porrect (fig. 14) approximella 

Forewing not pale posterior to Aj; palpi ascending (fig. 12) , . luteicostella 

6. Forewing darker posterior to cell; maxillary palpi approaching frons; (fig. 

13) bipartitella 

Forewing not darker posterior to cell; maxillary palpi not approaching 
frons; (fig. 1) johnstoni 

7. Forewing with transverse bands (fig. 9) longipalpella 

Transverse bands absent 8 

8. Forewing light buff, abruptly pale anterior to cell (figs. 3, 4) . . holoponerella 
Forewing not abruptly pale anterior to ceU 9 

9. Veins traced with white 11 

Veins not traced with white 10 

10. Ground white anterior to cubitus; cubitus bordered posteriorly with red; 

maxillary palpi not reaching frons (fig. 5) santaritella 

Ground a mixture of brown and white scales; usually lighter anterior to 
cubitus, at least near base; maxillary palpi reaching frons (fig. 
11) opacella 

11. Forewing darker posterior to cell, at least near base 12 

Forewing not darker posterior to cell 13 

12. Aa traced with white, bordered with brown; maxillary palpi not reaching 

frons (fig. 8) floridella 

A2 not traced with white; maxillary palpi reaching frons (fig. 11). . . opacella 

13. Cubitus and lower outer angle of cell broadly traced with white (fig. 

6) tetradella 

Notasabove;ScandRstracedwith white; ground reddish brown . . . , 14 

14. R2 free from cell (fig. 7) gemmatella 

R2 stalked with Rj+4 (fig. 2) rostrella 

Peoria longipalpella (Ragonot), new combination 

Figures 9, 51, 70, 105, 144 

Aurora longipalpella Ragonot, 1887, p. 18. — Hulst, 1890, p. 210. — Smith, 1891, 
p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 337-338. — Hulst, 1902, p. 437. — Barnes and 
McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 106. — Forbes, 1923, p, 
638. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. — KimbaU, 1965, p. 250. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species of Peoria in wliich the 
forewings are marked with unbroken transverse bands, although 
transverse rows of dots occur in a few other members of the genus. 



14 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Description. — Frons brown; labial palpi with basal segments 
white, second and third segments brown on outer sides, white ventrally 
and on inner sides; maxillary palpi reaching frons, brown; antennae 
brown, male subserrate; occiput laterally, patagia, and tegulae brown, 
vertex and occiput light brown dorsally. 

Forewings with ground white anterior to cubitus, brown posterior 
to cell; cell sprinkled with brown, with orange red anterior to cell; 
transverse anterior and posterior bands brown; ground brown on 
underside, bands darker; with 11 veins; R2 stalked with R3+4; M2+3 
stalked. Hindwings light brown; 7 veins; Sc and Rs stalked; M3 
stalked with Cui. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing apical digitate projection. 
Juxta U-shaped. Valvae with costa sparsely setose, terminating in 
sharp projecting tooth; sacculus densely pubescent. Aedeagus with 
vesica bearing a single serrate cornutus. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tip moderately setose, caudal 
margin with numerous fine setae, sparsely setose laterally. Apophyses 
curved at base, posterior with base pointed and slightly flattened; 
anterior with base thickened. 

Type. — In the British Museum (Natural History). 

Type data. — Lectotype female, hereby designated, "667; U.S.A.; 
n, gen. R. longipalpella Rag"; genitaha slide No. 707, J. Shaffer, 
Jan. 4, 1967. The specimen is glued together between the meso- and 
metathorax. Type data given with the original description consists of: 
"9 22 mill." Ragonot (1901) in a presumed reference to the type 
reports: "Amerique boreale, 11 octobre. Une 9. Mus brit." 

Specimens examined. — 2cf, 2 9. 

Distribution (Map 8). — Recorded from North Carolina and 
Virginia. 

UNITED STATES: North Carolina, Polk Co., Tryon, 1 9 , no date (Fiske), 
[USNM]; Wake Co., Raleigh, 1 9 , "M. Aug. 09," [USNM]. 

Virginia: Arlington Co., Arlington, 1 cT, Aug. 28, 1951 (J. G. Fran demon t), 
[USNM]. 

Locality unknown: IcT, no date, Sweadner collection [CM]. 

Discussion. — Kimball reports the species from Siesta Key, Fla., 
May 13, 1946, but I have not seen the specimen. 

Peoria bipartitella Ragonot 

Figures 13, 71, 106, 145 

Peoria bipartitella Ragonot, 1887, p. 19; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 214. — 
Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 386. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — 
KimbaU, 1965, p. 251. 



REVISION OF PEORimAE AND ANERASTIINAE 15 

Volusia roseopennella Hulst, 1890, p. 206. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Rindge, 1955, 

p. 170. [New synonymy.] 
Tolima roseopennella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1901, p. 340. — Barnes and McDun- 

nough, 1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. — Kimball, 1965, p. 250. 
Trivolusia roseopennella Hulst, 1902, p. 438. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. 
Commotria roseopennella (Hulst). — Hampson, 1918, p. 108. 
Hypsotropa bipartitella (Ragonot). — Hampson, 1918, p. 78. 
Peoria bipunctella Ragonot. — Forbes, 1923, p. 639. [Not Ragonot.] 

Diagnosis. — The presence of a well-developed digitate medial 
process on the gnathos serves to delimit this species from among 
those of the genus with similar wing venation. 

Description. — Frons conical, varying b^o^vn to Ught pink; labial 
palpi mth basal segments white, outer sides of second and third 
segments varying brown to light pink, inner sides with white-tipped 
scales; maxillary palpi approaching frons, brownish white; antennae 
light brown, laminate in male; occiput broAvn, vertex white behind 
antennae, patagia and tegulae varying grayish red to brown, legs 
grayish red to brown on outer sides, white on inner sides. 

Forewings mth extremely variable maculation; area anterior to 
cell red, brown, white, or mixtures of scales of these colors; cell usually 
red or white, brown in some (Mississippi) specimens, often a mixture 
of these three colors; area posterior to cell usually red, sometimes 
brown; veins traced with white, tracing variable, sometimes absent; 
10 veins, R2 stalked with R3+4; M2+3 fused, from lower outer angle. 
Hindmngs light brown, darker in apical area; 7 veins; M3 and Cur 
long stalked. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing apical digitate process. Juxta 
V-shaped. Vinculum with anterior margin flat and flanged. Valvae 
mth costa sparsely setose, bearing blunt apical tooth; sacculus with 
fine hairs. Aedeagus with vesica bearing single subserrate cornutus. 

Female genitaha with ovipositor finely setose on caudal margin, 
moderately setose laterally. Apophyses curved, posterior curving 
upward at base and tapering to point, anterior shghtly thickened 
at base. 

Types. — P. bipartitella, in the Museiun National d'Histoire 
Naturelle; V. roseopennella, in the American Museum of Natural 
History. 

Type data. — P. bipartitella, lectotype female, hereby designated, 
North CaroHna, Morrison; genitaha slide No. 534, J. Shaffer, May 14, 
1965; V. roseopennella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Florida, 
March; genitaha shde No. 3220, Carl Heinrich, June 14, 1946; the 
original description reports "Volusia County, Fla.," no date. 

Recorded host. — Poaceae: Panicum lanuginosum Ell. from slide 
label in USNM, specimens taken July 8, 1950, Kill Devil Hills, N.C 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 34 cT, 19 $. 



16 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Distribution (Map 8). — Chiefly the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal 
Plain, recorded from Mississippi to Massachusetts, also from north 
central Illinois. 

Fernald (1950) reports the food plant as occurring in "Sandy open 
soil, thin woods, etc., Fla. to Tex., n., rather locally, to s. R.I." 

UNITED STATES: Florida: Alachua Co., Gainesville, 2cf, July 8, 1927 
(J. Speed Rogers) [CU, USNM]; Icf, July 1927 (J. Speed Rogers) [CU]; High- 
lands Co., Lake Placid, 1?, Mar. 6, 1945 (J. G. Needham) [CU]; Manatee Co., 
Myakka City, 1 ? , Feb. 17, 1945 (J. G. Needham) [CU]; Sarasota Co., Siesta 
Key, IcT, Feb. 28, 1951 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC]. 

Illinois: Putnam Co., 1 9 , Aug. 29, 1961 (M. O. Glenn) [MOG]; 1 9 , Aug. 1, 
1964; 1 9 , Aug. 29, 1964. 

Massachusetts: Barnstable Co., Barnstable, 1 cT, July 10, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CNC]; Icf, 2 9 , July 11, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC, CPK]; 2 d^, July 14, 1949 
(C. P. Kimball) [CNC]; Icf, July 15, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; West Barn- 
stable, 2 cf, 19, July 16, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC, CPK]; Barnstable, Icf, 
July 11, 1950 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; Icf, July 28, 1950; 19, Aug. 7, 1952; 
1 cf , July 4, 1958; Dukes Co., Martha's Vineyard, 1 9 , Aug. 1, 1926 (F. M. Jones) 
[CNC]; 1 cf, Aug. 8, 1941 (F. M. Jones) [USNM]; 1 9 , Aug. 4, 1944 (F. M. Jones) 
[ANS]; Id", Aug. 6, 1944; Id^, Aug. 6, 1946 (F. M. Jones) [CNC]; Icf, Aug. 4 
(F. M. Jones) [USNM]; 19, Aug. 21 (F. M. Jones) [USNM]; Vineyard Haven, 
Icf, July 17 (F. M. Jones) [ANS]; Plymouth Co., Agric. Exp. Sta., East Wareham, 
Icf, July 11, 1962 [CPK]. 

Mississippi: Forrest Co., Camp Shelby, 6 cf , 3 9, Sept. 1-15, 1944 (C. D. 
Michener) [AMNH]; 2 cf, Sept. 16-30, 1944. 

New Jersey: Bergen Co., Oakland, 1 cf , Aug. 5, 1948 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 
1 (?, Aug. 13, 1948 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC]; 1 9 , Aug. 14, 1948; Burlington Co., 
Whitesbog, 1 9, July 12, 1939 (E. P. Darlington) [ANS]: 1 cf, Aug. 2, 1940. 

North Carolina: Macon Co., Horse Cove, Highlands, 1 cf, Aug. 3, 1957 
(C. J. Curen) [CNC]; Polk Co., Tryon, 1 cT, Aug. 18, 1903 (Fiske) [USNM]; 
1 9 , no date. 

Virginia: Nasemond Co., Holland, 1 9, Aug. 11, 1944 (O. Buchholz) [ANS]. 

Peoria tetradella (Zeller), new combination 

Figures 6, 72, 107, 146 

Anerastia tetradella Zeller, 1872, pp. 552-553. 

Saluria tetradella (Zeller). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117; 1901, pp. 362-363. — Hulst, 

1902, p. 439. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, 

p. 102. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 
Altoona tetradella (Zeller). — Hulst, 1890, p. 207. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. 

Diagnosis. — The broad white band on the cubitus and lower outer 
angle of the cell marks this species as distinct from other members of 
the genus. 

Description. — Frons brown; labial palpi with basal segments white, 
second and third segments gray on outer sides, white on inner sides 
and ventrally; maxillary palpi reaching frons, light brown; antennae 
light brown, male subserrate; occiput laterally, patagia, and tegulae 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 17 

light brown, occiput dorsally and vertex white, legs white on inner 
sides, outer sides clothed with white-tipped brown scales. 

Forewings v\dth white band anterior to cell tapering to point at 
apex, sprinkled with reddish-brown scales, bordered posteriorly by 
dark brown band of varying width, often extending to Ai fold, fre- 
quently scattered with reddish-brown scales; reddish brown posterior 
to Ai fold, A2 white traced and bordered with dark brown scales; 
veins traced with white, very prominently so at lower outer angle of 
cell; 11 veins; R.2 from cell close to base of or stalked with R3+4; M2+3 
stalked. Hind wings light brown, darker toward apex; with 7 veins. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing apical digitate projection. 
Juxta V-shaped. Vinculum flanged and thickened at apex. Valvae 
pointed apically; costa sparsely setose; sacculus with fine hairs. Aedea- 
gus with vesica bearing single serrate cornutus. 

Female genitalia \\dth ovipositor bearing numerous fine setae on 
caudal margin, tip moderately setose. Apophyses curved, posterior 
tapering to point. 

Type. — In the British Museum (Natural History) (from the Zeller 
collection) . 

Type data. — In the original description Zeller notes: "^^aterland: 
Texas (Boll, BeLfrage). Mehrere cf und 9 fing Belfrage in der ersten 
Halfte des June, 2 9 am 8. und 9. Juli." 

Lectotype male, hereby designated, labeled: "10/6, Bosque Co 
Texas, Tetradella Z. Texas [green label in Zeller's handwriting], Zell. 
Coll. 1884, 6" genitaha sUde 6-II-1967 J. Shaffer No. 728." 

Lectoparatypes : One male and four females, all labeled Bosque 
County, Tex. and bearing Zeller's personal type label; male dated 11/6 
(June 11), two females dated 7/6, other two females dated 8/7 and 9/7. 

Recorded host. — Poaceae: Elymus canadensis L., borer in stem. 
From specimen label, three males, Lafayette, Ind. 

The host occurs throughout most of the United States and southern 
Canada. Hitchcock (1951) notes: "River banks, open ground, and 
sandy soil, Quebec to southern Alaska, south to North Carolina, 
Missouri, Texas, Arizona, and northern California." 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 22 cf , 41 9. 

Distribution (Map 6). — California to Texas, northeastward to 
Ontario. 

UNITED STATES: California: Modoc Co., Canby, 2 &, July 20, 1927 
[CU]; county unknown, "Mad R. ab. Maple Cr.," 1 c?, July 28-29, 1927 [CU]. 

Illinois: Putnam Co., 1 ? , Aug. 6, 1958 (M. O. Glenn) [MOG]; 1 cf, June 21, 
1961; 1 &, July 10, 1961; 1 9 , July 12, 1961; 1 9 , July 17, 1961; 1 ? , June 24, 
19G2; 1 ?, July 5, 1962; 1 d^, June 23, 1963; 1 ? , July 2, 1964. 

Indiana: Tippecanoe Co., Lafayette, 3 cT, 1916 (C. N. Ainslie) [USNM]. 

Kansas: Thomas Co., (3150 ft.), 1 cf , no date (F. X. Williams) [UK]. 



18 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Texas: Blanco Co., 1 9 , May [USNM]; 1 ? , June [AMNH]; Id',!?, July 
[AMNH]; 1 9, August [AMNH]; 2 9 , no date, [USNM]; Bosque Co., 1 c?, 
"11/6" (Zeller collection) [BM]; Burnet Co., 2 cf, no date (F. G. Schaupp) 
[USNM]; Collin Co., Piano, 4 9 , July (E. S. Tucker) [USNM]; Dallas Co., 1 9 , 
June [AMNH]; Kerr Co., Kerrville, 1 9, May 30, 1906 (F. C. Pratt) [USNM]; 
3 9 , May 31, 1906; 1 cT, 2 9 , June 1, 1906; 1 9 , Apr. 11, 1907; 1 9 , no date; 
La SaUe Co., CotuUa, 1 9 , May 12, 1906 (Crawford and Pratt) [USNM]; Medina 
Co., Sabinal River opposite Hondo, 1 cf , July 1, 1917 [CU]; county unknown, 
"Black Jack Spgs.," 1 9 , no date [USNM]; locality unknown, 5 9 [USNM]; 
3 d', 5 9 [INHS]. 

CANADA: Ontario: Port Colborne, 1 cT, June 24, 1934 (J. J. de Gryse) 
[CNC]. 

Peoria opacelUi (Hulst), new combination 

Figures 11, 73, 108, 147 

Anerastia opacella Hulst, 1887, p. 138. — Rindge, 1955, p. 168. 

Altoona opacella Hulst, 1887, p. 116; 1890, p. 207. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Hulst, 

1902, p. 438. 
Saluria dichroeella Ragonot, 1889, pp. 113, 117. — Barnes and McDunnough, 

1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy.] 
Tolima opacella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117; 1901, p. 341. — Barnes and 

McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. 
Altoona dichroeella (Ragonot). — Hulst, 1890, p. 207. 
Altoona dichroeella [sic]. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. 
Saluria dichroeella Hampson in Ragonot, 1901, p. 363; 1918, p. 101. [New 

synonymy, objective.] 
Saluria dichroella [sic]. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. 
Commotria opacella (Hulst). — Hampson, 1918, p. 108. 

Diagnosis. — Tliis species is distinguished from ail ottier members 
of tlie genus with similar venation by the combination of the forewing 
being basally darker posterior to the cell and the absence of white 
tracing on forewing vein A2. 

Description. — Frons obUque, scales brown with white tips; labial 
palpi with basal segments white, second and third segments clothed 
with white-tipped brown scales dorsally and on outer sides, with light 
brown to white scales ventrally and on inner sides; maxUlary palpi 
almost reaching frons; antennae brown, laminate in male; occiput 
behind eye, patagia, and tegulae brown, vertex behind antennae and 
dorsum of occiput light brown; legs w4th tarsi clothed with white- 
tipped brown scales. 

Forewings brown, darker posterior to cubitus, especially basal half; 
aU veins except anals variously traced wdth white; areas between 
veins a mixture of white and brown scales; usually solid brown poste- 
rior to cubitus, becoming lighter distally. Hindwings light brown, 
slightly darker in apical region. Venation as in tetradella. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing apical digitate projection. 
Juxta V-shaped. Vinculum with anterior edge flattened and flanged. 
Valvae with costa sparsely setose, sometimes with short apical tooth; 



REVISION OF PEORIJNAK AND ANERASTIINAE 19 

sacculiis with numerous fine hairs. Aedeagus with vesica bearing a 
single serrate cornutus. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tip and caudal margin moderately- 
setose, sparsely setose laterally. Posterior apophyses curved on basal 
third, base flattened, tear-shaped, tapering to point; anterior slightly 
curved. 

Types. — A. opacella, in the American Museum of Natural History 
(lectotype), in the U.S. National Museum (lectoparatype) ; S. di- 
chroeella, in the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle. 

Type data. — ^4. opacella, lectotype male, hereby designated, 
Blanco Co., central Texas, collection G. D. Hulst, genitalia slide 
No. 3221, Carl Heinrich, June 14, 1946. 

Lectoparatype: Texas, one female, Fernald collection; USNM 
40080; genitaha slide No. 1107, Carl Heinrich, Apr. 5, 1938. 

S. dichroeella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Texas, October, 
genitaha slide No. 533, J. Shaffer, May 14, 1965. 

Specimens examined, — 47 d^, 46 9 . 

Distribution (Map 7). — Arizona, New Mexico, southwestern 
Texas to Brownsville. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Cochise Stronghold, 1 9, Aug. 30, 
1958 (P. Opler) [UCB]; Ramsay Canyon, Huachuca Mts., 1 9 , July 10-15, 1941 
(A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; Southwestern Res. Sta., 5 mi. west Portal (5400 ft.), 
1 d^, July 7, 1956 (Cazier and Ordway) [AMNH]; 1 9 , July 9, 1956; 1 9 , July 20, 
1957 (M. Statham) [AMNH]; 1 d", Aug. 2, 1956 (C. and M. Cazier) [AMNH]; 
1 cf, July 26-Aug. 3, 1959 (A. B. Klots) [ABK]; Cococino Co., 6/3 mi. EESE. 
Flagstaflf (6500 ft.), 1 cf, Aug. 7, 19G4 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; Vail Lake Rd., 
dVz mi. SE. Flagstaflf (6500 ft.), 1 9, July 11, 1961 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 
1 9, July 18, 1961 (R. W. Hodges) [JGF]; Pima Co., Baboquivari Mts., 4 9 , 
July 1-15, 1923 (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; 13 c?, 4 9 , July 15-30, 1923; 1 9, 
July 27-31, 1923; 3 9 , Aug. 1-4, 1923; 7 9 , Aug. 1-15, 1923; 3 9 , Aug. 1.5-30, 
1923; 2 9 , Aug. 24-31, 1923; 1 9 , Sept. 1-15, 1923; 2 9 , July 1-15, 1924; 5 9 , 
Aug. 15-30, 1924; 1 9, Sept. 1.5-30, 1924; 2 9 , no date, (F. H. Snow) [UK]; 
1 9 , no date (F. H. Snow) [USNM]; Pinal Co., Desert Arboretum, Superior, 
1 c?, July 18-21, 1941 (A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; Santa Cruz Co., Santa Rita Mts., 
Madera Canyon (4880 ft.), 1 c?, July 9, 1959 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 1 cf , 
Aug. 23, 1959. 

New Mexico: Eddy Co., White City, 2 c?, May 15, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; 1 cT, May 16, 1950; 1 d^. May 17, 1950; 1 9 , July 23, 1959 (A. B. Klots) 
[ABK]. 

Texas: Brewster Co., Alpine, 2 d^. May 22, 1950 (E. C.Johnston) [CNC]; 
Cameron Co., Brownsville, Icf, no date [USNM]; San Benito, 4d', March 16-23 
[USNM]; 1 c?, March 24-30; 1 d^, 1 9 , July 16-23; 1 9 , July 24-31; 1 d^, no date; 
Hidalgo Co., Mercedes, 2 d^, Aug. 31, 1958 (H. Smalzried) [AMNH]; Jeff Davis 
Co., Ft. Davis, 2 0?, May 20, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Limpia Canyon, 8 d" 
1 9 , May 20, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 1 d^, June 4, 1950. 

Discussion. — The species shows close afRnities to tetradella and 
floridella, particularly to the latter. 



20 U-S- NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

Wing maculation in opacella is rather variable, especially with 
respect to the degree of white tracing on the veins. The variation is 
apparent within local populations and does not appear to be geographic. 

Peoria floridelUif new species 

Figures 8, 55, 74, 109 

Diagnosis. — The species is rather similar to opacella in most re- 
spects, but is easily distinguished by the white trace on forewing vein 

Description. — Frons conical, scales solid light brown; labial palpi 
with basal segments white, second segments reddish brown on outer 
sides, third segments brown on outer sides, both white on inner sides; 
maxillaiy palpi moderately small, not approaching frons; antennae 
light brown, male laminate; occiput behind eye, patagia, and tegulae 
light brown, vertex behind antennae bro^vnish white; legs white, 
tarsi light brown. 

Forewings reddish orange anterior to cell; ground terra cotta; 
costa and all other veins traced with white, trace of A2 bordered with 
dark bro\vn, cubitus bordered posteriorly with dark brown line. 
Hindwings light brown, darker toward apex. Venation as in tetradella. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing apical digitate projection. 
Juxta V-shaped. Valvae with costa sparsely setose, bearing poorly de- 
veloped apical tooth; sacculus with numerous fine hairs. Aedeagus 
with vesica bearing a single serrate cornutus. 

Female unknown. 

Types. — In the Canadian National collection (holotype); in the 
American Museum of Natural History (one paratype), in the Carnegie 
Museum (two paratypes), in the collection of Charles P. Kimball (one 
paratype). 

Type data. — Holotype, male, Volusia County, Fla., Aug. 2, 1956, 
H. A. Denmark; C.N.C. Type No. 9439; genitalia slide No. 412, J. 
ShaflFer, Mar. 15, 1965. 

Paratypes: One male. Summer Haven, St. Johns County, Fla., 
May 30, 1950 (Fred H. Rindge) [AMNH]; one male, Pellicer Cr., 
13 mi. north of Bunnell, Flagler County, Fla., Apr. 11, 1954 (J. 
Bauer), Carnegie Museum Ace. 17023; one male, Apr. 22, 1954, 
genitalia slide No, 521, J. Shaffer, May 2, 1965; one male, same data 
as holotype, abdomen lost [CPK]. 

Other specimens examined. — 15 cf . 

Distribution (Map 10). — Known only from the east coast of Florida. 

UNITED STATES: Florida: Indian River Co., Vero Beach, 13 d', April 
1941 (J. R. Malloch), USNM; 1 cf, May 1941; 1 cf, Nov. 15-Dec. 31, 1941. 

Discussion. — This form has its closest affinities to opacella, and 
differs mainly in size and in that the valvae are rounded and lack the 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 21 

pointed apex of that species. The most obvious distinctions are those 
of size, Jloridella having an alar expanse of 25 mm to 28 mm in the 
specimens examined, contrasted with about 18 mm to 22 mm for 
opacella, and maculation, the forewing veins all showing a prominent 
white trace in the former species. In opacella the white trace is less 
distinct and essentially absent on A2. The maxillary palpi are moder- 
ately short in the Florida species, not nearly attaining the frons as in 
opacella, and the frons itself is clothed with white-tipped brown scales 
in the latter species rather than the solid brown scales of Jloridella. 

Peoria rostrella (Ragonot), new combination 

Figures 2, 75, 110, 148 

Saluria rostrella Ragonot, 1887, p. 18; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 211. — 
Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 363. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — The combination of reddish-brown forewings, veins 
traced with white, R2 well stalked with R3+4, and M2 well stalked with 
M3 identify this from within the genus. 

Description. — Frons conical, reddish brown; labial palpi with 
basal segments white, second and third segments brown on outer 
sides, light brown on inner sides; maxillary palpi cylindrical, reaching 
frons, light brown; antennae light reddish brown, subserrate in male, 
cilia about one-half as long as segment width; occiput, patagia, and 
tegulae reddish brown, vertex somewhat lighter. 

Forewings reddish brown; all veins traced with white, Ai traced on 
distal third; 11 veins; R2 well stalked with R3+4; M2 well stalked with 
M3. Hindwings with 7 veins; Sc and Rs stalked; M3 stalked with Cui 
for about one-half its length. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing well-developed medial digitate 
process. Juxta U-shaped. Valvae with costa unarmed. Aedeagus with 
vesica bearing a single small serrate cornutus. 

Type. — In the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle. 

Type data. — Lectotype male, hereby designated, genitalia slide 
No. 552, J. Shaffer, July 28, 19G5. The type locality is given in the 
original description as California. 

Other specimens examined. — 4 cf, 1 9- 

Distribution (Map 6) .—Washington southward to central 
California. 

UNITED STATES: California: Sonoma Co., Forestville, 1 c?", July 10, 1935 
(E. C. J.) [CNC]; Tuolumne Co., Twain Harte, 1 ? , Aug. 18, 1960 (M. Lundgren) 
[UCB]; 1 cP, July 20, 1961. 

Washington: Grant Co., Dry Falls, 1 cf , June 30, 1949 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; county unknown, Berne, 1 d", July 12, 1942 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]. 



22 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Discussion. — The forewing color and maculation is very similar 
to that of P. johnstoni. 

Peoria gemmatella (Hulst), new combination 

Figures 7, 76, 111, 149 

Spermatophthora gemmatella Hulst, 1887, p. 134. — Rindge, 1955, p. 163. 

Cayugag emmalella Hulst, 1888, p. 116; 1890, p. 209. — Smith, 1891, p. 84.— Hulst. 
1902, p. 438. 

Poujadia gemmatella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. 

Cayuga bistriatella Hulst, 1890, p. 209. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Rindge, 1955, p. 
158. [New synonymy.] 

Pectinigeria gemmatella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 356-357. — Barnes and Mc- 
Dunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Forbes, 1923, p. 638. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 
35. 

Peclinigera [sic] bistriatella (Hulst). — Dyar, 1908, pp. 117-118. 

Pectinigera [sic] pamponerella Dyar, 1908, p. 117. [New synonymy.] 

Pectinigeria bistriatella (Hulst). — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Mc- 
Dunnough, 1939, p. 35. — Kimball, 1965, p. 250. 

Pectinigeria pamponerella Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 
1939, p. 35. 

Prophtasia bistriatella (Hulst.) — Hampson, 1918, p. 106. 

Saluria gemmatella (Hulst). — Hampson, 1918, p. 100. 

Diagnosis. — This species is distinguished within the genus by the 
stalked veins M2+3 coupled with the presence of two (subequal) 
cornuti in the vesica of the male. 

Description. — Frons conical, orange red; labial palpi with basal 
segments light reddish brown to white, second and third segments 
coral red on outer sides, light brown ventrally; maxillary palpi small, 
inconspicuous; antennae with scape coral red anteriorly and on inner 
side, white posteriorly and on outer side, shaft brown, red toward 
base, laminate in male; lateral regions of occiput, patagia, and tegulae 
orange red, vertex white behind antennae. 

Forewings brownish red; Sc, Rj, and Eg white traced; Eg, E4, and Mi 
black traced; A2 white traced; M3 and cubitals traced mth varying 
mixtures of brown, pink, and white; Ai orange traced; cell variable, 
often with more brown or orange than other areas; 11 veins; E2 free 
from cell; M2+3 stalked. Hindwings light brown, darker in apical area; 
7 veins; M3 and Cui stalked. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing short apical digitate projection, 
somethnes very short or absent. Juxta V-shaped. Valvae with costa 
bearing blunt tooth at apex, sparsely setose; sacculus minutely pubes- 
cent. Aedeagus with vesica bearing pair of subequal cornuti, smaller 
one serrate and more heavily sclerotized. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tip moderately setose, caudal 
margin finely setose. Posterior apophyses with base somewhat curved, 
spear-shaped; anterior very gradually thickened toward base. 



REVISION OF PEORIENAE AND ANERASTIINAE 23 

Types. — S. gemmatella and C. histriatella, in the American Museum 
of Natural History; P. pamponeralla, in the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — S. gemmatella, lectotype male, hereby designated, 
Illinois, collection G. D. Hulst, genitalia slide No. 3223, Carl Hein- 
rich, June 14, 1946; histriatella, lectotype male, hereby designated, 
Colorado, collection G. D. Hulst, genitalia slide No. 3224, Carl Hein- 
rich, June 14, 1946; in the original description Hulst gives as locality 
and date: "Taken at San Bernardino, S. Cal., the last week in June"; 
pamponerella, lectotype male, hereby designated. Chimney Gulch, 
Golden, Colo., Aug. 12, 1907, Oslar; USNM 11854; genitalia slide No. 
565, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1965; lectoparatype: one male, same data as 
lectotype except no genitalia slide, F. Haimbach coll., Lot No. 72, 
Brackenredge Clemens Memorial collection, in the Academy of Natu- 
ral Sciences, Philadelphia. 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 47cr,10 9 

Distribution (Map 6). — Colorado east to Iowa, Illinois, southern 
Ontario, New Jersey, northward along coast to Maine. 

UNITED STATES: Connecticut: New Haven Co., East River, 1?, July 13, 
1909 (Charles R. Ely) [USNM]; 1 c?, Aug. 12, 1909; 1 cf, August 1911; 1 cT, July 
10, 1912. 

Illinois: Cook Co., Arlington Heights, Icf, July 18, 1934 (A. L. McElhose) 
[CNHM]; 1 9, Aug. 15, 1936; Chicago, 1 9, Aug. 5, 1916 (E. Beer) [CNHM]; 
Macon Co., Decatur, 1 c?, Aug. 1, 1890 (W. Barnes) [USNM]; Hancock Co. 
Webster, 1 cf, Aug. 12, 1883 [USNM]. 

Indiana: Lake Co., Hessville, 1 9, July 15, 1905 (A. Kwiat) [CNHM]; 1 cf, 
Aug. 1, 1908 (E. Beer) [CNHM]. 

Iowa: Story Co., Ames, 1 &, June 27, 1912 (G. C. Decker) [USNM]; 1 cf, 
July 17, 1932; 1 9, August [USNM]; Woodbury Co., Sioux City, 1 cT, June 
25, 1936 (C. N. Ainslie) [UM]. 

Maine: York Co., Kennebunk, 1 c?, Aug. 11, 1901 (G. H. Clapp) [CM]; 
1 d", Aug. 22, 1901. 

Massachusetts: Nantucket Co., Nantucket, 1 cf, July 21, 1945 (C. P. 
Kimball) [CPK]; Barnstable Co., Barnstable, 1 &, Aug. 19, 1952 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CPK]; Woods Hole, 3 cf, August 1917 (W. T. M. Forbes) [CU]; Plymouth 
Co., Agric. Exp. Sta., East Wareham, 1 cf, Aug. 7, 1964 [CPK]; 1 cf, Aug. 22, 
1964. 

New Jersey: Burlington, Brown's Mills, 1 cT, August 31, (F. H. Benjamin) 
[CU]; New Libson, 1 d', June 12, 1942 (E. P. Darlington) [ANS]; 1 &, Aug. 4, 
1942; Whitesbog, 1 cf, June 22, 1940 (E. P. Darlington) [ANS]; 1 cf, Aug. 5 
1940; 1 d", Sept. 19, 1936; Ocean Co., Lakehurst, 1 9, Aug. 30, 192? (F. M. 
Schott) [USNM]; Lakehurst, Wrangle Brook Rd., 2 cf, June 27, 1954 (J. G. 
Franclemont) [JGF]; 2 d", June 27, 1955; 1 cf , Aug. 9, 1955. 

New York: Suffolk Co., Orient, 1 d", July 16, 1932 (Roy Latham) [CU]; 
1 c?, Apr. 21, 1935 [AMNH]; 1 9 , June 14, 193?, [CU]; 1 9 , July 3, 1945; 1 9 , 
Sept. 4, 1945; 1 cT, Sept. 16, 1945; 1 d", July 7, 1947 [AMNH]; 2 d, Aug. 17, 
1947; 1 cf , no date [CNC]. 

CANADA: Ontario: Kent Co., Chatham Lab., 1 d, Aug. 28, 1932 [CNC]; 
1 &, July 12, 1934; 1 c? , July 18, 1934; 1 cf, July 20 .1935. 



24 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Locality unknown: Edgebrook (Prob. Cook Co., Illinois), 1 cT, July 8, 1911 
(A. Kwiat) [USNM]. 
2 &, no date, [INHS]; 2 cT, 1 9 , no date [USNM]. 

Peoria roseotlnctelUi (Ragonot), new combination 

FiGTJKEs 10, 61, 77, 112, 150 

Statina roseotinctella Ragonot, 1887, p. 19; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 216 
— Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 416. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. — 
Hampson, 1918, p. 60. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, 
p. 251. 

Calera punctilimbella Ragonot, 1888, p. 50. — Hulst, 1890, p. 217. — Smith, 
1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 417-418. — Hulst, 1902, p. 441. — Barnes 
and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 59. — Forbes, 1923, 
p. 639. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy.] 

Statina bifasciella Hampson in Ragonot, 1901, pp. 416-417. — Barnes and 
McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 60. — McDunnough 
1939, p. 36. [New synonymy.] 

Diagnosis. — Tlie transverse posterior line of dots on tlie forewing 
veins delimits this species within the genus. 

Description. — Frons conical, deep red, often brown laterally; 
labial palpi with basal segments white, second and third segments 
deep red on outer sides, ventral third lighter, dorsal third often 
brown; maxillary palpi moderately small; antennae with scape deep 
red on inner side, white on outer side, shaft light brown, pink near 
base, laminate in male; occiput, patagia, tegulae, vertex, and dor- 
sum of thorax deep red; legs pink on outer sides, light brown on 
inner sides, tarsi often brown. 

Forewings orange red, mixed with white anterior to cell ; Sc and Rs 
sometimes white traced, Rs often bordered posteriorly by a broad 
line of scattered black scales extending from base to apex; transverse 
posterior indicated by black spots on Rs, Mi, M3, Cui, Cu2, and A2; 
terminal line indicated by dark spots on M3, Cui, Cu2, and Ai fold; 
terminal spots visible on lower surface of wing; 10 veins; R2 stalked 
with R3+4, M2 fused with M3; M3 stalked with Cui. Hindwings with 
6 veins ; M3 and Cui completely fused. 

Male genitaUa with medial process of uncus bearing small apical 
bulge. Gnathos weakly sclerotized, without apical or lateral processes, 
occasionally with very short apical process. Juxta U-shaped. Valvae 
with costa sparsely setose, terminating in a dorsally directed hook; 
sacculus densely pubescent. Aedeagus with vesica bearing equal pair 
of finely serrate cornuti. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor moderately setose laterally, caudal 
margin with numerous fine setae. Posterior apophyses straight, base 
flat and spearlike; anterior curved, tapering gradually to slightly 
thickened base. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 25 

Types. — S. roseotinctella, in the Museum National d'Histoire 
Naturelle; C. ijunctilimhella, in the Zoologisches Museum der Hum- 
bolt- Universitat, Berlin; S. hijasciella, in the British Museum (Natural 
History) . 

Type data. — S. roseotinctella, lectotj^pe male, hereby designated, 
Florida, genitalia slide No. 539, J. Shaffer, June 20, 1965. 

C. punctilimbella, lectotype female, hereby designated, Carolina; 
genitalia slide No. 818.. J. Shaffer, Mar. 20, 1967. 

S. hijasciella, lectotype female, hereby designated, labeled as follows: 
"11/9; Type; Belfrage Texas 1869; Stainton Coll. 93—134.; Statina 
bifasciella type 9 Hmpsn; 9 genitalia slide 1-4-1967 J. Shaffer No. 
702." 

Specimens examined. — 57 cf, 25 9 . 

Distribution (Map 6). — Kansas and eastern Texas to Florida, 
southern Florida north to New Jerse}'-. 

UNITED STATES: Alabama: Macon Co., LaPlace near Tuskeege, 4 c?, 
June 9, 1917 [CU]. 

District of Columbia: Washington, 19, June 1902 (Aug. Busck) [USNM]. 

Florida: Alachua Co., Gainesville, 1 ? , June 2, 1927 (J. Speed Rogers) 
[CU]; 1 &, June 3, 1927; 19, June 29, 1927; 1 d", July 7, 1927; 13 &, July 8, 
1927; 3 c?, July 10, 1927; 36^, July 1927; 19, Apr. 24, 1952 (O. Peck) [CNC]; 
1 cf , Sept. 3, 1956 (H. A. Denmark) [CPK]; no locality, Icf , Sept. 13, 1956 (H. A. 
Denmark) [CPK]; Dade Co., Homestead, 1 9 , Aug. 7, 1963 (D. O. Wolfenbarger) 
[CPK]; Id^, Mar. 10, 1964; Ic?, 19, Sept. 29, 1964; Princeton, 19, Apr. 4, 
1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; Escambia Co., Pensacola, Icf, May 22, 1961 
(Shirley Holls) [CPK]; Hernando Co., Weeki Wachee Springs, Icf, May 28, 1960 
(J. F. May) [CPK]; Highlands Co., Archbold Biol. Sta., Id', June 27, 1964 (Jay 
C. Shaflfer) [JCS]; HUlsborough Co., Stemper, Id', Aug. 19, 1912 (G. Krautwurm) 
[CM]; Id', Sept. 1 1912; Id^, Sept. 6, 1912; Id', Oct. 3, 1912; Ic?, Oct. 6, 1912; 
2d', Oct. 30, 1912; Manatee Co., Oneco, Id', Aug. 3, 1953 (Paula Dillman) 
[CPK]; Id', Mar. 28, 1957 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; Orange Co., Orlando, 
Id', June 29, 1927 (C. C. McBride) [CU]; Id", July 24, 1927; Winter Park, 
1 9 , July 4, 1942 (H. T. Fernaid) [USNM]; Volusia Co., Cassadaga, Id', Oct. 18, 
1963 (S. V. Fuller) [CPK]; Wakulla Co., Panacea, 2d', Aug. 11, 1926 (C. O. 
Handley) [USNM]. 

Georgia: Bryan Co., Clyde, Id', Sept. 11-12, 1931 (Bradley and Knorr) 
[CU]. 

Kansas: Riley Co., Manhattan, 1 9 , June 11, 1933 (H. L. Nonamaker) [KSU]. 

Louisiana: Vernon Ph., 1 9 , August (G. Coverdale) (USNM]. 

Mississippi: Forrest Co., Camp Shelby, 3d', 29, Oct. 1-15, 1944 (CD. 
Michener) [AMNH]; Hinds Co., Clinton, 1 9 , June 12, 1960 (Bryant Mather) 
[BM]. 

New Jersey: Ocean Co., Lakehurst, Wrangle Brook Rd., Id", June 30, 1965 
(Jay C. Shaffer) [JCS]. 

North Carolina: Polk Co., Tryon, Id', Aug. 8, 1904 (Fiske) [USNM]; 2d', 
Aug. 9, 1904; Id', Aug. 10, 1904; Id', Aug. 11, 1904; Id', no date. 

South Carolina: Oconee Co., Cherry Hill Rec. Area, Route 107 (2000 ft.), 
Id", Aug. 22, 1958 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]. 



26 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

Tennessee: Knox Co., Knoxville, 1 9 , June 26, 1916 (G. G. Ainslie), [USNM]. 
Texas: Blanco Co., 1 9 , no date [USNM]; Liberty Co., Devers, 1 cf, 2 9, June 
21, 1917 [CU]; Nueces Co., Corpus Christi, 69, Sept. 25-Oct. 15, 1943 (W. M. 
Gordon) [CU]. 

Peoria johnstonif new species 

Figures 1, 78, 113, 151 

Diagnosis. — Among the three other species of Peoria with similar 
venation, johnsioni differs from approximella and luteicostella in 
lacking a well-developed white band anterior to the cell, and from 
bipartitella in having the forewings a rather uniform brownish orange. 
Either the presence of two cornuti on the vesica of the aedeagus or 
the absence of medial or lateral processes on the gnathos will de- 
limit males of johnstoni from the above three species. 

Description. — Frons conical, reddish brown; labial palpi with 
basal segments white, second and third segments reddish brown 
dorsally and on outer sides, lighter ventrally and on inner sides; 
maxillary palpi small; antennae light brown, scape light pink an- 
teriorly, male subserrate; occiput, patagia, and tegulae reddish 
brown, vertex somewhat lighter. 

Forewings brownish orange; Sc, radials, cubitals, M3, and A2 
white traced, costa traced with narrow inconspicuous white line; 
brownish orange on lower surface. Venation as in P. bipartitella. 

Male genitalia Avith medial process of uncus bearing small ventral 
bulge at apex. Gnathos weakly sclerotized, without apical or lateral 
processes. Juxta U-shaped. Valvae with costa sparsely setose; sacculus 
densely setose. Aedeagus with vesica bearing pair of ovate subserrate 
cornuti. 

Female genitalia mth ovipositor moderately setose along caudal 
margin. Posterior apophyses straight, base flat and shaped like 
parallelogram with short side horizontal; anterior slightly curved, 
tapering gradually to thickened base. 

Type. — In the Canadian National collection. 

Type data. — Holotype, male. Fort Davis, Jeff Davis County, 
Tex., May 20, 1950, E. C. Johnston; C.N.C. Type No. 9440; genitalia 
slide No. 591, J. Shaffer, Mar. 24, 1966. 

Paratypes: Five males, same data as holotype, no genitalia slides 
prepared. 

Specimens examined. — 16 cf, 15 9 • 

Distribution (Map 7). — Mexican Highland Province; southern 
Arizona and New Mexico to southwestern Texas. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Pima Co., Baboquivari Mts., 39, Sept. 1-15, 
1923 (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; I9, Oct. 1-15, 1923; 19, Apr. 15-30, 1924; 3cf 
29, Oct. 1-15, 1924; Icf, 2 9, Oct. 15-30, 1924; Pinal Co., Oracle, Id^, June 5, 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 27 

1935 (Grace II. and John L. Speny) [AMNII]; Santa Cruz Co., Pena Blanca 
(3950 ft.), Icf, May 31, 1963 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; county unknown 
(southeastern Arizona), Huachuca Mts., Icf, June 1, 1935 (J. A. Comstock) 
[CNC]; 1 9 , May 28, 1935 (Grace H., and John L. Sperry) [CNC]; 1 ? , June 1, 
1935 [AMNH]. 

New Mexico: Eddy Co., White City, Icf, May 15, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]. 

Texas: Brewster Co., Alpine, 49, May 22, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 
Jeff Davis Co., Limpia Canyon, 8 cf, May 20, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]. 

Peoria santaritella (Dyar), new combination 

Figures 5, 79, 114, 152 

Ollia santaritella Dyar, 1904, p. 108. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — 
McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — Ttie forewings are white anterior to ttie cubitus, red 
between the cubitus and the Ai fold, and light pink posterior to the 
fold; the combination of these features serves to delimit the species 
within the genus. 

Description. — Frons conical, blood red; labial palpi with basal 
segments white, second and third segments red on outer sides, white 
ventrally and on inner sides; maxillary palpi small; antennae with 
scape red, shaft brown, male serrate and fasciculate; occiput deep red 
behind eye, vertex posterior to antennae and dorsal area of occiput 
white, patagia and tegulae pmk; legs white, tarsi light brown, forelegs 
pink on inner sides. 

Forewings white anterior to cubitus, a few scattered red scales 
anterior to cell, costal margin bordered with red near base; red 
between cubitus and Ai fold, bounded distally by M3 and Cu2; light 
pink posterior to red line; underside with red showing through faint- 
ly; 10 or 11 veins; K2 free from cell; M2+3 stalked for about half its 
length or completely fused, both conditions about equally common, 
sometimes (rarely) difTering on right and left wings of same specimen. 
Hindwings with M3 and Cui stalked. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing short apical digitate projection. 
Juxta V-shaped. Valvae with costa terminating in a blunt tooth, 
cucculus not projecting beyond costa; sacculus with fine hairs. Aedeag- 
us with vesica bearing single serrate cornutus. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tip sparsely setose, caudal margin 
with numerous fine setae. Posterior apophyses with base tapering to 
point, not flattened or broadened, curved near base; anterior tapering 
gradually to slightly thickened base. 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Holotype male, Santa Kita Mountains, Arizona, 
'7. 6," E. A. Schwarz; USNM 7893 ; genitalia slide No. 569, J. ShaflFer, 

285-934—68 3 



28 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Nov. 23, 1965. In the original description Dyar gives the date of 
capture as June 7. 

Specimens examined.— 4 cf, 21 9 . 

Distribution (Map 7). — Northern extension of Sierra Madre 
Occidental into southeastern Arizona. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Paradise, Chiricahua Mts., 19, 
July 3, 1954 (Cazier and Gertsch) [AMNH]; Southwestern Res. Sta. (5400 ft.), 
5 mi. west Portal, 1 9 , May 28, 1956 (Cazier and Ordway) [AMNH]; 1 9 , May 
25, 1958; 49, June 11, 1958 (W. J., and J. W. Gertsch) [AMNH]; 29, June 12, 
1958; 19, June 16, 1958 (M. A. Cazier) [AMNH]; 19, May 27, 1960 (Carl W. 
Kirkwood) [CPK]; 19, June 2, 1960; Id", May 10, 1961 (Gertsch and Cazier) 
[AMNH]; Pima Co., Santa Rita Mts., Madera Canyon (4400 ft.), 19, June 12, 
1963 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; Santa Cruz Co., Santa Rita Mts., Madera 
Canyon (4800 ft.), 1 9 , June 19, 1960 (David A. Wallesz) [CU]; (5800 ft.), 1 9 , 
June 24, 1960; Madera Canyon (4800 ft.), Icf, May 26, 1963 (J. G. Franclemont) 
[JGF]; Icf , 19, June 19, 1963; 1 9 , June 13, 1960; 1 9 , June 3, 1963; (5600 ft.), 
Icf , June 11, 1963; 1 9 , June 18, 1963; Pena Blanca (3950 ft.), 1 9 , June 7, 1963 
(J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; county unknown, Huachuca Mts., 19, June 2, 1935 
(Grace H., and John L. Sperry) [AMNH]. 

Peoria holoponerella (Dyar), new combination 

Figures 3, 4, 80, 115, 153 

Ollia holoponerella Dyar, 1908, p. 117. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 
149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — The light buff forewing with its conspicuous white 
band anterior to the cell delimits this species within Peoria. A similar 
white band marks the forewings of approximella and luteicostella, but 
in both of these species the forewings are marked with red and lack 
vein M2. 

Description. — Frons conical, brown; labial palpi with basal 
segments white, second and third segments brown on outer sides, 
light brown to white ventrally and on inner sides; maxillary palpi 
small; antennae silver, male shaft serrate and fasciculate; occiput 
behind eye, patagia, and tegulae light brown, vertex and dorsum of 
occiput white; legs white, tarsi brown. 

Forewings with white band anterior to cell, bordered anteriorly 
near base with dark brown, posteriorly by black line; ground light 
buff; veins traced with black scales. Hindwings light brown. Venation 
as in gemmatella. 

Male genitalia with gnathos bearing medial digitate projection. 
Juxta V-shaped. Valvae with costa unarmed, bearing scattered setae; 
sacculus with fine hairs, Aedeagus with vesica bearing single round 
serrate cornutus. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor slender, caudal margin rather 
heavily setose, bare laterally, Apophyses straight, posterior hooked 
upward and coming to point at base; anterior with thickened base. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 29 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Holotype male, San Bernardino Ranch, Cochise 
County, Ariz., 3750 ft., August, F. H. Snow; USNM 11855; genitalia 
slide No. 568, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1965. 

Specimens examined. — 18 cf, 2 9. 

Distribution (Map 7). — Southwestern United States, 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Douglas, 2 d', August (F. H. 
Snow) [UK]; San Bernardino Ranch (3750 ft.), 5 cf , 1 ? , August (F. H. Snow) 
[UK]. 

California: Inyo Co., Furnace Creek, Death Valley, 3 cf, Apr. 21, 1942 
(George WUlett) [LACM]; Triangle Springs, Death VaUey, 1 ?, Apr. 14-15, 
1942 (George Willett) [LACM]; 1 cT, Apr. 17, 1942. 

New Mexico: Sandoval Co., Jamez Springs (6200 ft.), 4 cf, July 16, 1950 
(T. Cohn, P. Boone, M. Cazier) [AMNH]. 

Texas: Jeff Davis Co., Limpia Canyon, 2 cf , May 20, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]. 

Utah: Locality unknown, 1 cf , July 1900 (Poling) [USNM]. 

Discussion. — The five specimens from Death Valley entirely lack 
brown or black markings on the forewings. 

Peoria approximella (Walker) 

Figures 14, 59, 81, 116, 154 

Eurhodope approximella Walker, 1866, p. 1722. 

Anerastia haematica Zeller, 1872, pp. 555-556. — Grote, 1879, p. 12, pi. 2, fig. 14 

Nephopteryx roseatella Packard, 1873, p. 270. 

Peoria haematica (Zeller). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, pp. 213-214. 

— Smith, 1891, p. 85. 

Peoria approximella (Walker). — Ragonot, 1901, p. 386. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. 

— Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. — 
Forbes, 1923, p. 638. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, p. 251. 

Hypsotropa approximella (Walker). — Hampson, 1918, p. 77. 
Hypsotropa cremoricosta Hampson, 1918, p. 74. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 
[New synonymy.] 

Diagnosis. — The presence of both a prominent white band anterior 
to the cell and a fainter one posterior to vein A2 marks this species 
as distinct within the genus. The gnathos is also unique in that it 
bears a pair of short lateral finger-like processes. 

Description. — Frons conical, blood red to orange red; labial palpi 
with basal segments varying white to light pink, second and third 
segments somewhat rough scaled, blood red to orange red dorsaUy 
and on outer sides, usually paler ventrally and on inner sides ; maxillary 
palpi small; antenna with scape red on anterior and inner sides, light 
pink to white on posterior and outer sides, shaft light brown, pink 
toward base, laminate in male; occiput laterally, patagia, and tegulae 
orange red, vertex light brown to white. 

Forewings with broad white band anterior to cell, narrowing to 
point just short of apex, bordered anteriorly with black near wing 



30 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

base, bordered posteriorly with black, fading into blood red triangular 
area extending to anal vein; brownish white posterior to anal vein; 
anal and costal bands joined near wing base; fringe white. Venation 
as in bipartitella. 

Male genitalia with gnathos weakly sclerotized, bearing pair of short, 
lateral, subapical projections. Juxta scoop-shaped. Valvae with costa 
terminating in free spine not attaining apex of bluntly rounded cuc- 
culus; sacculus minutely pubescent. Aedeagus with vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tip moderately setose, caudal mar- 
gin with numerous fine setae, sparsely setose laterally. Apophyses uni- 
form, curved at base; posterior tapering to point at base, base not 
flattened. 

Types. — E. approximella, A. haematica, and H. cremoricosta in the 
British Museum (Natural History) ; A^. roseatella, in the Museum of 
Comparative Zoology (Harvard University). 

Type data. — E. approximella, Walker reports: "North America. 
From Mr. Carter's collection." Type examined by Mr. Paul Whalley. 

A. haematica, Zeller in his description noted: ". . . New York und 
aus Massachusetts . . . ." Type examined by Mr. Paul Whalley. 

A^. roseatella, two specimens, both from Massachusetts, and both 
Type No, 14282, one from Dorchester, the other hereby designated as 
lectotype and labeled male genitalia slide No. 540, J. Shaffer, June 24, 
1965. In his description Packard indicated that he had two males and 
noted: "Length of fore wing .37 of an inch. Dorchester, Mass. (F. G. 
Sanborn)." 

H. cremoricosta, lectotype male, hereby designated, labeled as fol- 
lows: "Type; Colorado Springs, Colorado. 97-278 June-Aug 1896; 
Hypsotropa cremoricosta type cf . Hmpsn.; cf genitalia slide 1-4-1967 
J. Shaffer No. 703." 

Specimens examined. — 562 cf , 302 9 . 

Distribution (Map 5). — Southern Canada west to Alberta, south- 
ward in mountains to Utah and New Mexico, east to Tennessee and 
Georgia, north to Nova Scotia; absent from Florida and the Gulf 
Coastal Plain. 

UNITED STATES: Colorado: El Paso Co., Rock Creek Canyon, Colorado 
Springs, 2 c?, Aug. 10, 1957 (Margot May) [CPK]; 1 d^, Aug. 13, 1957; 4 cf , Aug. 

14, 1957; 1 cf , Aug. 23, 1957; 2 cf, June 27, 1960; 1 cf , June 28, 1960; 1 d^, July 

15, 1960; 1 c?, July 9, 1961; 1 d", July 19, 1961; 6 cT, June 30, 1963; 2 cf, July 1, 
1963; 1 cf, July 3, 1963; 2 <f, July 14, 1963; 1 cf, July 17, 1963; 1 d', July 18, 
1963; 1 cf , Aug. 11, 1963; 1 c?, June 27, 1964; 3 cf , June 28, 1964; vie. Colorado 
Springs, 1 9 , July 7, 1939 [AMNH]; Jefferson Co., Chimney Gulch, Golden, 1 cf , 
Sept. 3, 1908 (Oslar) [ANS]; Larimer Co., Estes Park, 1 cf , Aug. 29, 1936 (Grace 
H. and John L. Sperry) [AMNH]; Teller Co., Big Springs Ranch, Florissant, 1 cf, 
July 13, 1960 (Thomas C. Emmel) [LACM]; 1 cf , July 21, 1960; 2 d', July 23, 
1960; 2 cf , July 26, 1960; 1 d", July 29, 1960; 1 cf , July 30, 1960; 1 cf, July 31, 
1960; 2 d", Aug. 2, 1960; 1 d', Aug. 3, 1960, 1 d', Aug. 4, 1960; 1 d', Aug. 8, 1960; 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 31 

1 cT, Aug. II, 1960; 1 d', Aug. 12, 1960; 1 d", Aug. 14, 1960; locality unknown, 1 
cf , no date [AMNII]. 

Connecticut: Windham Co., South Shore, Killingly Pd., 1 ?, July 25, 1930 
(A. B. Klots) [AKB]; Putnam, 1 d, Aug. 14, 1954 (A. B. Klots) [ABK]; 1 d, 
July 1, 1960; 1 ?, July 20-25, 1961; 1 9, July 25-30, 1961. 

District of Columbia: 1 cf, Aug. 17, 1899 (August Busck) [USNM]; 2 ?, 
July 1901; 2 9, June 1902; 1 9, June 1907; 1 9, June. 

Georgia: Charlton Co., 1 9 , June 14, 1946 (Otto Buchholz) [ANS]. 

Illinois: Cook Co., Arlington Heights, 1 cf, June 20, 1930 (A. L. McElhose) 
[CNHM]; 1 9 , June 23, 1930; I 9 , June 24, 1930; I 9 , July 29, 1930; Chicago, 
3 cf, June 1900 [USNM]; I 9, July 14, 1904; 1 cf, July 8, 1906 (W. J. Gerhard) 
[CNHM]; I cf, June 1912 (A. Kwiat) [CNHM]; Jackson Co., Murphysboro, 
1 9, Aug. 10, 1932 (W. J. Gerhard) [CNHM]; McHenry Co., Algonquin, 1 cf, 
July 6, 1903 (W. A. Nason) [INHS]; 1 9, July 16, 1904; I cf, June 8, 1906; 
McLean Co., Normal, 1 9, June 19, 1884 [INHS]; Macon Co., Decatur, I cf 
June 8-15 (Barnes) [USNM]; Putnam Co., 1 cf. May 31, 1934 (M. O. Glenn) 
[MOG]; I d, June 21, 1954; I cf, Sept. 5, 1955; 1 cf, June 8, 1959; 1 9, July 
19, 1962; 1 9 , June 25, 1964; 1 9 • July 15, 1964; Magnolia, 1 cf , June 29, 1932 
(Murray O. Glenn) [USNM]; locality unknown, 2 cf, no date [USNM]. 

Indiana: Lake Co., Hessville, 1 cf. May 14, 1905 (A. Kwiat) [CNHM]; 
1 cf, June 17, 1905; 1 cf , June 17, 1912. 

Iowa: Johnson Co., Iowa City, 1 9, July 12, 1898 (Wickham) [AMNH]; 
1 9 , July 27, 1898; Story Co., Ames, I cf , July 9, 1915 (G. G. Ainslie) [USNM]; 
Woodbury Co., Sioux City, I 9 , July 23, 1923 (C. N. Ainslie) [UM]; locality 
unknown, 1 cf , no date (C. P. Gillette) [USNM]. 

Kansas: Pottawatomie Co., Onaga, 1 cf, June 17, 1901 (Crevecoeur) [KS]; 
1 cf, July 7, 1901; Riley Co., I cf, June 22 (F. Marlatt) [KS]; 1 9, July; 1 cf, 
July 28. 

Kentucky: Rockcastle Co., 1 cf, June 24, 1955 (R. Beebe) [CNC]. 

Maine: Franklin Co., Rangeley, 1 cf, June 23, 1938 (V. H. dos Passos) 
[AMNH]; 1 cf , July 9, 1938; Knox Co., Rockport, 1 cf , July 10, 1941 (Morgan 
Hebard) [ANS]; Penobscot, Orono, 2 9 , no date, [CU]; York Co., Kennebunk- 
port, 2 cf, 1 9, July (G. H. Clapp) [CM]; 3 cf, 1 9, August. 

Maryland: Montgomery Co., Plummer Isl., I 9, May 1903 (August Busck) 
[USNM]; 1 cf, June 1903; 1 9, Aug. 2, 1905 (H. S. Barber) [USNM]; 2 9, 
Aug. 8, 1905 (Barber and Schwarz) [USNM]; Prince Georges Co., Beltsville, 
1 cf , June 10, 1939 (L. J. Bottimer) [ANS]. 

Massachusetts: Barnstable Co., Woods Hole, 1 9, August 1917 (W. T. M. 
Forbes) [CU]; Barnstable, 1 cf , July 5, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 1 cf , July 6, 
1949; 4 cf , July 7, 1949; 1, June 24, 1958; 1 cf , Aug. 1, 1958; 1 9 , June 18, 1962; 
West Barnstable, 3 cf , July 15, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; I cf , July 16, 1949; 
Dukes Co., Martha's Vineyard, 1 cf, June 17, 1931 (F. M. Jones) [ANS]; 1 9, 
July 22 [CPK]; Essex Co., Magnolia, 1 cf , June 29, 1900 (Holland) [CM]; Hamp- 
den Co., Chicopee, 1 9 , no date (F. Knab) [USNM]; Nantucket Co., Nantucket, 
1 cf, July 9, 1941 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC]; Plymouth Co., Agric. Exp. Sta., 
East Wareham, 2 cf , Aug. 7, 1961 [CPK]; 1 cf , July 3, 1962; 1 cf , July 19, 1962; 
1 cf, Aug. 17, 1964; 1 cf , Aug. 18, 1964; I cf , Aug. 20, 1964; Suffolk Co., Arling- 
ton, 1 cf, June 25, 1920 (C. S. Anderson) [BPI]; Boston, 1 9 , no date [AMNH]; 
Worcester Co., Paxton, 2 cf, July 3, 1945 (W. T. M. Forbes) [CU]; locality 
unknown, 1 cf , June 27, 1868 (BM, ex Zeller coll.]. 

Michigan: Kalamazoo Co., Gull Lake Biol. Sta., 1 9 , July 21, 1959 (Roland 
L. Fischer) [CNC]. 



32 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Minnesota: Cass Co., Icf, June 29, 1937 (L. W. Orr), [UM]; Icf, June 30, 
1937; Ic?, July 2, 1937; Id", July 11, 1937; Cass Lake, Id', June 18, 1934 (A. A. 
Granovsky) [UM]; 19, July 17, 1936 (R. H. Daggy) [UM]; Id, Aug. 3, 1936; 
1 d, Aug. 14, 1936; Hennepin Co., Saint Anthony Park, 1 9 , July 12, 1900 [UM]; 
Olmsted Co., 1 9 , no date [UM]; Polk Co., Crookston, Icf, July 18, 1935 (D. G. 
Denning) [UM]; Id, June 27, 1937; Id, July 4, 1937; Id, July 23, 1939 (A. W. 
Buzicky) [UM]; Crookston, Red Lake River, Id, July 9, 1935 (D. G. Denning) 
[UM]; Pope Co., Sedan, Id, July 7, 1927 (D. Denning) [UM]; Ramsey Co., St. 
Paul, Id, July 21, 1927 (Carl T. Schmidt) [UM]; county unknown, Itasca Park, 
LaSalle Valley, Id, June 21, 1940 (C. E. Mickel) [UM]; Id, June 23, 1940; 
Id, June 24, 1940; Id, July 7, 1940; 2d, 19, July 9, 1940; Id, July 12, 1940; 
Id, July 14, 1940. 

Missouri: Clinton Co., Lathrop, 19, June 22, 1955 (E. C. Becker) [CNC]; 
city of St. Louis, 5d, 59, June 1904 (August Busck) [USNM]; Id, July 1904; 
Icf, 19, Aug. 6, 1906 (McElhose) [CNHM]. 

Nebraska: Sioux Co., Canon region north of Harrison, 4d, July 19, 1917 
(R. A. Leussler) [USNM, AMNH]. 

New Hampshire: Coos Co., Randolph, 19, Aug. 16, 1936 (Grace H. and 
John L. Sperry) [AMNH]: Grafton Co., Franconia, 2c?, no date [AMNH]; 
Rockingham Co., Hampton, Id, June 27, 1913 (S. Albert Shaw) [USNM]; 
1 9 , July 18, 1914. 

New Jersey: Bergen Co., Bergenfield, 1 9 , July 3 (F. M. Schott) [AMNH]; 
Oakland, 19, July 25, 1947 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK, CNC]; 19, July 26, 1947; 
19, July 27, 1947; Id', Aug. 8, 1948; Id', Aug. 9, 1948; Aug. 10, 1948; Id', 
Aug. 12, 1948; Id', Aug. 13, 1948; Ramsey, Id', 39, July 12, 1935 [AMNH]; 
Id', July 29, 1935 [AMNH]; Burlington Co., New Lisbon, Id', July 14, 1930 
(E. P. Darlington) [ANS]; Id', July 1, 1932; 19, July 19, 1932; Id', July 29, 
1931; Id', July 20, 1942; Essex Co., Montclair, Id', June 15 (W. D. Kearfott) 
[USNM]; Id', July 10; Id', July 18; Newark, Icf, June 13, 1898 [USNM]; 
Middlesex Co., Dayton, 2d', June [USNM]; New Brunswick, Id', June 11 
[AMNH]; Id, June 1933 [AMNH]; Monmouth Co., Como, 19, July 1919 
[AMNH]; Morris Co., Mendham, Id', 19, June 20, 1934 [AMNH]; Ocean Co., 
Wrangle Brook Road, Lakehurst, Id*, June 17, 1955 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 
Union Co., Elizabeth, 19, "8-13" [CNHM]; county unknown, 1 9 , no date 
[AMNH]. 

New Mexico: McKinley Co., McGaflFey, Zuni Mts. (7500 ft.). Id', July 22, 
1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; 2d', July 23, 1962; Sandoyal Co., Frijoles 
Canyon, Bandelier Nat. Mon. (6050 ft.). Id', July 18, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) 
[CNC]; county unknown. Id*, June 30, 1935 (Grace H. and John L. Sperry) 
[AMNH]. 

New York: Cattaraugus Co., Otto, 1 9 , July 17, 1882 [CU]; Clinton Co., 
Peru, 2d', 1 9 , June 21, 1915 [CU]; 1 9 , July 1, 1916; Id', July 2, 1916 (Mix and 
Everett) [CU]; Delaware Co., 4d', Aug. 3, 1962 (Robert SUberglied) [JCS] 
4d', 9 , Aug. 5, 1962; Erie Co., East Aurora, Id', July 20, 1912 (E. Wild) [CU] 
North Collins, 1 d', 2 9 , June 27, 1939 (W. T. M. Forbes) [CU]; 1 d, June 28-29^ 
1939; Sardinia, Id', July 24, 1940 (L. R. Rupert) [CU]; 19, July 27, 1940 
Jefferson Co., Picton Island, Clayton, 1 d, June 22, 1958 (B. Heineman) [AMNH] 
Lewis Co., 1 d, June (W. W. Hill) [UK]; Monroe Co., 1 9 , July 11, 1945 [CNC] 
1, June 27, 1947 [CNC]; 1 9 , July 9, 1947 [CNC]; 1 9 , July 11, 1947 [CNC]; 1 d 
July 21, 1947 [CPK]; 19, June 28, 1948 [CNC]; 19, June 29, 1948 [CNC] 
Id', July 1, 1948 [CPK]; Rochester, Id', June 26, 1932 [ABK]; New York City 
West Farms, 1 9 , no date (J. Angus) [AMNH]; Orange Co., Tuxedo, 1 9 , June 28; 
1928 [AMNH]; 1 9 , July 10, 1928 [AMNH]; Oswego Co., Minetto, Id, June 19, 



REVISION OF PEORIESTAE AND ANERASTIINAE 33 

1938 (W. T. M. Forbes) [CU]; 2c?', 29, June 21, 1938; Sd', 99, June 22, 1938; 
2^", 89, June 24, 1938; 19, Aug. 22, 1938; Otsego Co., Oneonta, 19, July 4, 
1935 (H. K. Townes) [CU]; 1 9 , July 5, 1935; Saint Lawrence Co., Oswegatchie, 
ScT, Aug. 3, 1926 (B. K. Smith) [CU]; Suffolk Co., Flanders, IcT, Sept. 1, 1946 
(Roy Latham) [CU]; Huntington, 19, July 25, 1925 (F. M. Schott) [USNM]; 
Montauk, 19, Sept. 8, 1946 (Roy Latham) [CU]; Orient, 19, July 28, 1931 
(Roy Latham) [CU]; Icf, July 6, 1932; Icf, Aug. 3, 1932; 19, Aug. 4, 1932; 
1 o^, Nov. 6, 1932; 1 cf , June 22, 1934; 1 cT, June 22, 1946 (Roy Latham) [AMNH]; 
Id', June 21, 1947; 19, June 23, 1947; Id', July 21, 1947; Id', June 12, 194?; 
Shelter Island, 19, Sept. 14, 1946 (Roy Latham) [CU]; Southold, 19, July 1, 
1934 (Roy Latham) [CU]; Id', July 24, 1946; Tompkins Co., Ithaca, 2d, July 4, 
1882 [CU]; 3d', 69 , July 8, 1882 [CU]; Id', July 14, 1885 (E. H. Sargent) [CU]; 
1 9 , June 13. 1893 [CU]; 1 9 , July 7, 1893 [CU]; 1 d, June 1913 [CU]; 1 9 , July 2, 
1914 [CU]; 1 9 , June 26, 1915 [CU]; 1 d, June 15, 1919 [CU]; 1 d, June 16, 1919 
[CU]; 1 9 , June 21, 1919 [CU]; 2 9 , June 21, 1922 [CU]; 1 d, June 29, 1922 [CU]; 
29, June 30, 1922 [CU]; Id', 19, July 2, 1922 [CU]; 19, July 4, 1944 [CU]; 
Id', July 7, 1922 [CU]; Id', July 2, 1925 [CU]; Id', July 2, 1925 [CU]; 19, 
July 9, 1925 [CU]; 1 9 , July 25, 1926 (Bolton K. Smith) [CU]; 1 9 , July 5, 1928 
[AMNH]; Id, 19, June 16, 1929 [CU]; Id', 19, July 15 [CU]; 29, June 16, 

1939 [CU]; Six Mile Creek, Ithaca, Id', June 14, 1940 (J. G. Franclemont) [CU]; 
1 d, June 4, 1957; Id', 19, June 14, 1957; 1 9 , July 6, 1957; McLean Bogs Res., 
1 d, July 4, 1924 [CU]; 2 9 , July 22, 1924; 1 9 , July 28, 1924; 1 d, July 6, 1946 
(J. G. Franclemont) [CU]; 19, June 30, 1954 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 19, 
July 27, 1954; Id', July 28, 1954; Varna, Id', May 6, 1946 [CNC]; Id', June 17, 
1946 [CNC]; Id', June 22, 1946 (E. G. Munroe) [CNC]; Id', June 25, 1949 
(Travassos and Rabella) [CNC]; West Chester Co., Katonah, Id', July [ANS]. 

North Carolina: Polk Co., Tryon, Id', no date (Fiske) [USNM]; Robeson 
Co., Maxton, Id, May 23, 1944 (A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; Transylvania Co., 
Brevard, 19, June 13, 1942 (W. J. Westfall, Jr.) [CU]; 29, July 19, 1942; 2d', 
July 23, 1942; 1 9 , July 31, 1942. 

Ohio: Athens Co., Athens, 1 9 , June 27, 1931 (W. C. Stehr) [UM]; Hamilton 
Co., Cincinnati, Id', July 5, 1904 (Annette F. Braun) [ANS]. 

Pennsylvania: Adams Co., Arendtsville, 1 d', 1 9 , July 9, 1921 (S. W. Frost) 
[CU]; Allegheny Co., 2 9 , July 1900 [CM]; 1 d, July 26 [CM]; Oak Station, 1 9 , 
Aug. 2, 1908 (Fred MarloflF) [CNHM]; 1 d, June 23, 1909; 1 d, June 4, 1911 (Fred 
Marloff) [UK]; 1 d, June 14, 1911 (Fred Marloff) [CNHM]; 1 d, June 15, 1911 
(Fred Marloff) [UK]; 1 9, June 24, 1911 (Fred Marloff) [CNHM]; Pittsburgh, 2 
d, June 13, 1905 (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 9 , June 19, 1905 (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 
d, June 23, 1905 (Henry Engel) [USNM]; 1 9, July 9, 1905; 1 9, July 9, 1905 
(Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 d, June 4, 1906 (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 9 , June 17, 1906; 
1 d', 1 9 , June 18, 1906; 1 d, June 20, 1906; 1 9 , June 26, 1906; 1 9 , June 27, 
1906; 1 d, June 29, 1906; 1 d, July 1, 1906; 1 d, July 6, 1906; 1 9 , July 8, 1906 
(Henry Engel) [USNM]; 1 d, July 10, 1906; 1 9 [CM]; 2d', July 15, 1906 (Henry 
Engel) [CM]; 1 9 , Aug. 3, 1906; 2 9 , July 15, 1907 (Hugo Kahl) [CM]; 1 d, July 
16, 1907; 1 d, July 19, 1907; 1 d, June 23, 1908 (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 9 , June 
24, 1908 (F. W. Friday) [LACM]; 1 d', 1 9, June 27, 1909; 1 9, July 15, 1909 
(Hugo Kahl) [CM]; 2 d', 1 9, July 8, 1910 (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 d, June 13, 
1911 (Hugo Kahl) [CM]; 1 9, June 15, 1911; 2 d, June 17, 1911; 1 9, Aug. 7, 
1911; 1 d, July 12, 1912; 2 d, July 2, 1914 [CM]; 1 d, July 22, 1914 [CM]; 1 d, 
July 24, 1916 (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 d, July 28, 1917 [CM]; 1 d, July 31, 1917 
[CM]; 1 9 , Aug. 17, 1917 [CM]; 1 d, June 6, (Henry Engel) [CM]; 1 d, June 17; 
1 d, June 30; 1 d, July 3; 3 9 , July 11; 1 9 , July 12; 1 d', 1 9 , July 14; 1 9 , 
July 15; 1 d, July 20; 1 d, July 24; 1 d', 1 9 , July 25; 1 9 , August 2; 1 d, Au- 



34 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

gust 3; Sharpsburg, 3 d", June 15-21 (Sweadner) [CM]; 2 cf, June 22-30; 1 
9, July 8-14; 6 cf, 1 9, July 15-21; 1 cf, August 15-21; Beaver Co., New 
Brighton, 1 9, July 2, 1902 (H. D. Merrick) [USNM]; 1 d', May 31, 1903; 1 cf, 
July 11, 1904; 1 9 , June 26, 1905 (H. D. Merrick) [UK]; 1 9 , July 20, 1905 (H. 
D. Merrick) [USNM]; 1 d", June 13, 1906 (H. D. Merrick) [UK]; 1 cf, Julyl3, 
1906 (H. D. Merrick) [USNM]; Berks Co., Sinking Spring, 1 9 , June 29, 1952 (H. 
C. Moyer) [CNC]; Blair Co., Tyrone, 1 9, July 25, 1917 (J. G. Sanders) [BPI]; 
Bucks Co., Langhorne, 1 9 , June 21, 1924 (F. Haimbach) [ANS], Butler Co., 
Butler, 5 &, June L5, 1945 (Preston) [CM]; 4 cf, June 17, 1945; 1 cT, June 20, 
1945; 2 cf, June 22, 1945; 1 c?", June 29, 1945; 7 d^, 1 9 , June 1945; 1 d", July 8, 
1945; 1 d^, 1 9 , July 15, 1945; 1 &, July 16, 1945; 2 d^, July 17, 1945; 4 d", July 
25, 1945; 5 c^, 4 9 , July 1945; 1 c^, Aug. 7, 1945; 1 9 , Aug. 17, 1945; 2 d^, 1 9 , 
August 1945; 1 d", 2 9 , July 1-7 (Sweadner) [CM]; Cumberland Co., Carlisle, 1 
d^, June 2.5, 1931 (C. C. Hill) [USNM]; Dauphin Co., Rockville, 2 9 , July 22, 1917 
[BPI]; 1 6", June 28, 1918 [BPI]; Fayette Co., Ohiopyle, 1 &, Aug. 10, 1905 [CM]; 
Forest Co., Kelletville, 1 d", July [CM]; Lycoming Co., Barbours, 1 d', July 8, 
1921 (J. C. Bradley) [CU]; Monroe Co., Delaware Water Gap, 1 d", no date 
[AMNH]; Montgomery Co., Homebrook, Lower Merion Tp., 2 9, June 23, 1916 
[ANS]; 2 9 , July 11, 1916 [ANS, CNC]; 1 9 , July 18, 1916 [ANS]; 1 9 , July 19, 

1916 [ANS]; 3 9 , July 22, 1916 [ANS, CNC]; 2 9 , July 23, 1916 [ANS]; 1 d", Aug. 
2, 1916 [ANS]; 1 9 , Aug. 3, 1916 [ANS]; 1 9 , Aug. 7, 1916 [ANS]; 1 9 , July 4, 

1917 [ANS]; 1 9 , July 8, 1917 [ANS]; 1 9 , July 23, 1917 [ANS]; 1 9 , Aug. 9, 1917 
[ANS]; 1 9 , June 10, 1920 [ANS]; 1 9 , June 28, 1921 [ANS]; 1 d", 1 9 , July 7, 
1921 [ANS]; Spring Mount, 1 d', June 15 (H. A. Wenzel) [ANS]; Philadelphia 
Co., Philadelphia, 1 d', June 16, 1909 (F. Weigand) [CNC]; 1 9, June 23 (F. 
Haimbach) [ANS]; Roxborough, 1 d', June 22, 1913 [CNC]; 1 d^, June 24, 1913 
[CNC]; 1 d, May 26, 1916 (F. Haimbach) [ANS]; Tioga Co., Blackwell, 1 d", 
July 1, 1921 (J. C. Bradley) [CU]; Washington Co., Finleyville, 2 d', June 8-14 
[CM]; 1 9, June 24, [CM]; 1 d', August 15-21 [CM]; 1 d", Sept. 22-30, [CM]; 
Westmoreland Co., Jeannette, 1 d', June 15 (H. G. Klages) [CM]; 1 d", June 19; 
1 d", June; 1 d', 3 9 , July 8; 2 9 , July 19; 1 d", 1 9 , July 25; 1 9 , July 29; 1 9 , 
July 30; 5 9 , Aug. 6, 1904; 1 d", Sept. 19. 

South Carolina: Anderson Co., Anderson, 2d', June 5, 1917 [CU]. 

South Dakota: Davison Co., Mitchell, 1 d", Sept. 14, 1945 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; Union Co., Elk Point, 1 9 , no date (C. N. Ainslie) [USNM]; county 
unknown. Cedar Pass, Bad Lands, 1 d", Aug. 13, 1940 (C. E. Mickel) [UM]. 

Tennessee: Davidson Co., Nashville, 1 d" "6/3" (Ainslie) [USNM]; Grundy 
Co., Monteagle, 1 9, June 30, 1930 (Richards) [CU]; Knox Co., Knoxville, 
1 9, June 28, 1916 (G. G. Ainslie) [USNM]; Morgan Co., Burrville, 1 d", June 
27, 1955 (A. K. Wyatt) [CNHM]. 

Texas: Culberson Co., Guadalupe Mts., 2 mi. north Pine Springs (5700 ft.), 
1 9 , July 19, 1963 (Harry Clench) [CM]. 

Utah: Tooele Co., Loop Camps, 13 mi. southwest Grantsville (7400 ft.), 
1 &, July 19, 1958 (F., P., B., and J. Rindge) [AMNH]; 1 d^, July 6, 1960. 

Vermont: Rutland Co., Brandon, 1 9 , July 15, 1962 (J. C. Shaffer) [JCS]. 

Virginia: Giles Co., Mountain Lake, 1 d", July 8, 1938 (L. J. and M. J. 
Milne) [CNC]. 

West Virginia: Greenbrier Co., White Sulphur Springs, 2 d", July 21, 1930 
(J. G. Needham) [CU]. 

Wyoming: Carbon Co., Bottle Creek Camp. 7 mi. southwest Encampment 
(8800 ft.), 1 d^, Aug. 8, 1959 (F., P., and B. Rindge) [AMNH]; 1 d^, Aug. 9, 
1959; 2 d", Aug. 11, 19.59; Crook Co., 5 mi. west Alva, 3d', July 8, 1949 [AMNH; 
Reuter Canyon Camp, 5 mi. north Sundance (6100 ft.), 2 d*, July 12, 1959 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 35 

(F., P., and B. Rindge) [AIMNH]; 1 d', July 13, 1959; 1 &, July 14, 1959; 
(5900 ft.), 1 (f, July 11, 1962; Park Co., Codj-, 5 c?, no date [CM]; Lake Creek 
Camp, 13 mi. southwest Cooke City, Mont. (6900 ft.), 1 d", July 25, 1959 (F., 
P., and B. Rindge) [AMNH], 

CANADA: Alberta: Calgary, 1 d", July 24, 1905 (F. H. WooUey-Dod) 
[CNC]; Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller (2750 ft.), 1 cT, July 17, 1960 (D. F. 
Hardwick) [CNC]; Lethbridge, 1 d, July 30, 1921 (H. L. Seamans) [CNC]; 

1 d, June 27, 1956 (E. E. Sterns) [CNC]; 1 d, July 7, 1956; Dominion Range 
Sta. Manyberries, 1 &, July 23, 1951 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]; 1 cf, Aug. 2, 
1951; 2 cf, Aug. 3, 1951; 1 d, Aug. 4, 1941. 

Manitoba: Aweme, 1 d, June 23, 1904 (Criddle) [USNM]; 1 d, July 1, 
1905; 3 d, July 2, 1921 (N. Criddle) [CNC]; 1 c^, July 6, 1921; 1 d, 
1922; 1 d, July 15, 1923; Brandon, 2 cf, 1 9, July 20, 1958 (R. B. Madge) 
[CNC]; 1 cf, July 31, 1958 (R. L. Hurley) [CNC]; Cartwright, 1 d, July 4, 1904 
(E. F. Heath) [USNM]; 1 d, July 26, 1905; 2 d, July 29, 1905; 1 d, no date; 
Red Rock Lake, Whiteshell For. R., 1 ?, July 10, 1954 (C. D. Bird) [AMNH]; 
locality unknown, 1 cT, July 15 [USNM]. 

Nova Scotia: Annapolis, 1 cf , June 20, 1946 (McDunnough and D. Ferguson) 
[CNC]; 1 d, July 5, 1946; 1 d, Aug. 1, 1946; 1 d, Aug. 13, 1946; Petite Riviere, 
2^, July 21, 1935 (J. McDunnough) [CNC]; Truro, 1 9 , July 9, 1913 (R. Mathe- 
son) [CU]; 1 d, JulOy 1, 1913; 1 9, Aug. 3, 1913. 

Ontario: Blackburn, Ic?, June 18, 1941 (J. McDunnough) [CNC]; Black 
Sturgeon Lake, Id, July 23, 1963, [CNC]; Chatham, 19, June 27, 1931 (D. A. 
Arnott) [CNC]; Id, July 11, 1931 [CNC]; Constance Bay, 2d, July 9, 1934 
(W. J. B.) [CNC]; Grand Bend, Id^, July 17, 1939 (T. N. Freeman) [CNC]; 
Marmore, Id', June 13, 1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; 1 d^, June 14, 1952; 3d', 

2 9, June 15, 1952; Id', June 17, 1952; Id', June 19, 1952; 2d', 3 9 , June 20, 1952; 
8d', 1 9 , June 21, 1952; 1 d, June 22, 1952; 1 d', 2 9 , July 3, 1952; 1 d, July 4,1952; 
Id', July 21, 1952; Mer Bleue, Ic^, June 12, 1937 (G. A. Hobbs) [CNC]; Mer 
Bleue, Hawthorne, Id', June 15, 1937 (E. G. Lester) [CNC]; Normandale, Id', 
July 7, 1956 (Freeman and Lewis) [CNC]; Ottawa, Id', June 30, 1907 (C. H. 
Young) [CNC]; Ottawa, Hunt Club, 2d, July 8, 1937 (G. S. Walley) [CNC]; 
Palmer Rapids, 1 9 , July 25, 1935 (F. A. Urquhart) [CNC]; Port Colborne, 1 9 , 
June 17, 1934 (J. J. de Gryse) [CNC]; Id', June 20, 1934; Sault Ste. Marie, Id', 
July 17, 1957 [CNC]; Simcoe, 2d', June 9, 1939 (T. N. Freeman) [CNC, LACM]; 
1 d', 1 9 , June 19, 1939; 1 d, June 20, 1939 (T. N. Freeman) [CNC]; 1 d, July 27, 
1939; Id', June 5, 1949; 1 9 , July 5, 1949; 4d', July 8, 1949; Strathroy, 2d', 1 9 , 
July 5, 1926 (H. F. Hudson) [CNC, LACM]; Id', July 11, 1929 (H. F. Hudson) 
[CNC]; Teeswater, Id', July 18, 1949 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]; Id, 19, July 
20, 1949; Id', July 29, 1949; 2d', Aug. 6, 1949; 1 9 , Aug. 9, 1949; Toronto, Id', 
June 1930 (H. S. Parish) [CU]; Id', July 1930; Trenton, 2d', June 18, 1901 
(Evans) [CNC]; Id', June 16, 1904; 1 9 , June 23, 1907; Id', June 22, 1908; Id', 
June 14, 1911; Icf, July 16. 1911; Id', June 27, 1912; 1 9 , July 6, 1912; Id', July 
12, 1912; Wanbamie, Parry Sound, 1 d, July 12, 1915 (H. S. Parish) [CU]; Wiarton 

3 9 , July 26, 1949 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]. 

Quebec: Alcove, 19, July 4, 1935 (T. N. Freeman) [CNC]; Duchesnay, 19, 
July 27, 1943 (R. Lambert) [CNC]; Id', July 14, 1947; Granby, Id', June 22, 
1938 (P. E. Mercier) [CNC]; Harrington Lake, Gatineau Park, 1 d, June 11, 1954 
(J. E. H. Martin) [CNC]; Id', June 13, 1954 (H. J. Huckel) [CNC]; Id', June 15, 
1954 (Martin) [CNC]; 29, June 16, 1954 (Huckel) [CNC]; 2d', June 18, 1954 
(Martin) [CNC]; 2d', 2 9 , June 20, 1954; 3d', 1 9 , June 21, 1954; 4 d', 2 9 , June 
24, 1954; Id', June 25, 1954; Knowlton, Id', July 7, 1929 (L. J. MUne) [CNC]; 
19, July 11, 1929; Lac Mondor, Ste. Flore, Id', July 13, 1951 (E. G. Munroe) 



36 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

[CNC]; L. a la Torrue, 1 ? , July 16, 1947 [CNC]; Icf, 2 9 , July 17, 1947 (E. G. 
Monroe) [CNC]; Meach Lake, Id', June 23, 1941 (G. A. Hobbs) [CNC]; Icf, 
June 25, 1941 (G. A. Hobbs) [CNC]; Norway Bay, 1?, July 9, 1937 (E. G. 
Lester) [CNC]; 1 ? , July 15, 1937 (F. A. Urquhart) [CNC]; Ste. Anne de Bellevue, 
IcT, June 29, 1947 (E. G. Monroe) [CNC]; Icf', July 3, 1947; Id', 29, July 8, 
1947; St. Annes, 2^^, 3 9 , July 5, 1947 (E. G. Munroe) [CNC]; 1 cf , 9 9 , July 6, 
1947: 7 9 , July 8, 1947; 3 9 , Aug. 2, 1947. 

Saskatchewan: Christopher Lake, 1 cf , July 3, 1939 (A. R. Brooks) [CNC]; 
Id^, July 5, 1939; Indian Head, Id^, July 2, 1924 (J. J. deGryse) [CNC]; Id', 
July 29, 1924; Saskatoon, Id', June 30, 1923 (Kenneth M. King) [CNC]; Id', 
July 7, 1923; Id", July 17, 1923; Id', July 19, 1923; Willow Bunch. Id', July 27, 
1955 (C. D. Miller) [CNC]. 

Discussion. — This is tlie most common and widely distributed 
member of the subfamily, the species being common from mid-June 
to early August throughout the northeastern United States. Western 
specimens tend to be larger and more uniform in maculation than 
those from the eastern and central states. 

Peoria luteicostella (Ragonot), new combination 

Figures 12, 82, 117, 155 

Hypsotropa luteicostella Ragonot, 1887, p. 19; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p- 
212, — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 376. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. — Hamp- 
son, 1918, p. 70. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, p. 251. 

Wekiva nodosella Hulst, 1890, p. 215. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hulst, 1902, 
p. 440. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. — Rindge, 1955, p. 167. 

Osceola perlepidellus Smith, 1891, p. 85. [Nomen nudum. New synonymy.] 

Chipeta perlepidella Hulst, 1892, p. 62. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 
150. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Rindge, 1955, p. 169. — KimbaU, 1965, 
p. 251. [New synonymy.] 

Chipota [sic] perlepidella Hulst, 1902, p. 441. 

Bandera perlepidella (Hulst). — Hampson, 1918, p. 90. 

Diagnosis. — This species resembles approximella in venation and 
maculation, but lacks the brownish white area posterior to the anal 
vein. The obliquely ascending palpi of both sexes and the postero- 
lateral gnathos hooks of the male are unique to this species. 

Description. — Frons wine red; labial palpi obliquely ascending, 
wine red on outer sides, light pink on inner sides, third segment and 
dorsal half of second segment sometimes black on outer sides; maxillary 
palpi small, wine red; antennae with base wine red anteriorly, white 
posteriorly, shaft brown, wine red toward base, male laminate; outer 
sides of occiput, patagia, and tegulae wine red, vertex behind antennae 
and dorsal area of occiput white; legs white on outer sides, wine red 
on inner sides, tarsi black on inner sides. 

Forewings with broad white band anterior to cell, narrowing to 
point at apex, bordered anteriorly near base with wine red to black, 
entire band sprinkled with wine red scales; white band bordered 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 37 

abruptly behind with black, black blending into posterior mne red 
area; outer fringe wine red to black, Hindwing light brown, darker 
in apical area. Venation as in P. bipartitella. 

Male genitalia with medial process of uncus bearing minute central 
tooth, rarely several. Gnathos broadening posteriorly into a pair of 
large flat anteriorly directed hooks. Juxta V-shaped. Vinculum Avith 
dorsal margin flanged at apex. Valvae with costa terminating in 
strong slender spine reaching or surpassing the blunt membranous 
tip of cucculus; sacculus with numerous fine rather long hairs. Aedea- 
gus with vesica bearing small subserrate cornutus. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor moderately setose laterally, 
numerous fine setae on caudal margin. Posterior apophyses tapering 
to point at base, not flattened, posterior half strongly curved; an- 
terior with base slightly thickened. Eighth abdominal segment 
unusually large. 

Types. — H. luteicostella, in the Museum National d'Histoire 
Naturelle; W. nodosella, in the U.S. National Museum (lectotype), 
in the American Museum of Natural History (lectoparatype) ; C. 
perlepidella, in the American Museum of Natural History. 

Type data. — H. luteicostella, lectotype male, hereby designated, 
Florida; genitalia slide No. 535, J. Shaffer, June 20, 1965, 

W. nodosella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Florida, Fernald 
collection; USNM 40081; genitalia slide No. 570, J. C. S., Nov. 23, 
1965. 

Lectoparatype: Florida; abdomen, antennae, and labial palpi lost. 

In the original description of the species Hulst gives April as the date 
of capture. 

C. perlepidella, lectotype female, hereby designated, Florida, 
collection G. D. Hulst; genitalia slide No. 3228, Carl Heinrich, June 
14, 1946. 

Specimens examined. — 28 cT, 2 9 • 

Distribution (Map 10). — Southern Georgia and Florida. 

UNITED STATES: Florida; Alachua Co., GainesvUle, Sc?, 19, July 8, 
1927 (J. Speed Rogers) [CU]; !&, July 1927 (J. Speed Rogers) [CU]; Highlands 
Co., Archbold Biol. Sta., Icf, June 17, 1964 (Jay C. Shaffer) [JCS]; 2 6^, June 29, 
1964; 3d^, July 5, 1964; IcT, July 12, 1964; Hillsborough Co., Stemper, Id", 
Aug. 13, 1912 (G. Krautworm) [CM]; Volusia Co., Cassadaga, Id', Oct. 12, 1962 
(S. V. Fuller) [CPK]; Wakulla Co., Panacea, ISd', 1?, Aug. 11, 1926 (C. O. 
Handley) [USNM]. 

Georgia: County unknown, Billy's Island, Okefenoke Swamp, 2cf, June 1912 
[CU]. 

Anacostia, new genus 

Type. — Anacostia tribulella, new species. 

Diagnosis. — The male genitalia are similar to those of Peoria, but 
differ mainly in the following ways : In Anacostia the spicate processes 



38 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

are three-branched rather than two-branched, the medial band of the 
uncus has a central pentagonal process, and the juxta bears a pair of 
lateral knobs, each with a small cluster of setae. 

Description. — Labial palpi porrect, about 3% times as long as eye 
diameter; maxillary palpi moderate, not reaching frons; male antennae 
with basal segments of shaft fused, shaft serrate and fasciculate, female 
unknown; oceUi well developed. 

Forewing with 11 veins; Ri from cell relatively near to R2+4; R2 
relatively long stalked with R3+4; M2+3 stalked for about one-half 
their length or less; Cui from near M2+3. Hindwing with 7 veins; 
Sc and Rs stalked for abovit one-half their length; M3 and Cui stalked 
for about one-third their length. 

Male genitalia with medial band of uncus very broadly rounded, 
bearing a well-developed, ventraUy directed, apical, pentagonal 
process; spicate processes three-branched. Gnathos broad, flat, thin, 
broadened at base; sharp pointed apicaUy, but without special process. 
Juxta V-shaped, bearing pair of setose knobs. Vinculum subquadrate, 
anterior corners weU rounded. Valvae relatively slender; costa sparsely 
setose, with smaU apical tooth at tip of valve; sacculus densely 
pubescent. Aedeagus with vesica unarmed. 

Female unknown. 

Discussion. — The genus is apparently closely related to Peoria, 
but differences in the male genitalia are too great to allow inclusion 
of the one species in that genus. 

Anacostia trihulella, new species 

Figures 25, 83, 118 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Labial palpi with all segments dark brown to 
black; antennae brown, shaft with tuft of black scales on basal seg- 
ments; head and thorax black; legs black on outer sides, brown 
on inner sides; abdomen dorsally brown, becoming golden brown 
anteriorly, ventrally black. 

Forewing ground dark brown to black; area anterior to cell white 
sprinkled mth black scales; discal spot, transverse anterior, transverse 
posterior, and subterminal lines black, not conspicuous against 
ground. Hindwing broAvn, darker toward apex; terminal line white, 
brown bordered on both sides. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Types. — In the Academy of Natural Sciences (holotype); in the 
Cornell University collection (two paratypes). 

Type data.- — Holotype, male, Holland Va. (Nansemond Co.), 
Aug. 1, 1945, O. Buchholz; A.N.S. Type No. 7817; genitalia slide 
No. 595, J. Shaffer, Apr. 24, 1966. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 39 

Paratypes: Two males, both Clyde (Bryan Co.), Georgia, Sept. 
11-12, 1931, Bradley and Knorr; C.U. Type No. 4404; one male 
genitalia slide No. 439, J. Shaffer, Mar. 25, 1965. 

Other specimens examined. — None. 

Distribution (Map 4). — Probably the Atlantic Coastal Plain; 
known only from Georgia and Virginia, 

Arivaca, new genus 

Type. — Poujadia pimella Dyar, 1906. 

Diagnosis. — Males of this genus may be recognized by the com- 
bination of (a) the gnathos bearing a bulbous or padlike medial 
process, and (b) each spicate process of the uncus having a short 
posterior and a much longer anterior sharp-pointed spine (figs. 
119-125). 

Description. — Frons conical, one-half to three-quarter times as 
long as eye diameter; labial palpi porrect; maxiUary palpi very small; 
tongue poorly developed; antennae with scape compressed, male 
shaft with basal segments fused, female shaft filiform, scaled dorsally 
and laterally, finely ciliate ventrally, somewhat compressed; eye 
diameter about 0.2 mm gi-eater in male than in female; oceUi normal. 

Forewings with 10 or 11 veins; Ri from well before upper outer 
angle of cell; II3+4 stalked; Mi from the angle; M2+3 stalked or fused, 
from lower outer angle; Cui from just before the angle; Cu2 from 
well before the angle. Hind^^dngs with 6 or 7 veins; Sc and Rs approxi- 
mate or connate on basal half; Mi from upper outer angle of cell; 
M2 absent; Ms+Cui free, stalked, or fused, from lower outer angle; 
Cu2 from before the angle. 

Male genitalia ^\^th spicate processes of uncus flat, each bearing 
short sharp posterior and long tapering anterior thorns. Gnathos 
arms straplike, bearing anteromedial projection; medial process 
bulbous or padlike. Vinculum broadly rounded. Aedeagus flattened, 
vesica bearing pair of cornuti. 

Female genitaha \\dth ductus biu-sae flattened, rather long, well 
sclerotized. Bursa smaU, hghtly sclerotized. Ductus seminahs from 
posterior half of ductus bursae. 

Discussion. — The seven species of Arivaca faU into foiu- rather 
distinct subunits herein distinguished as species groups rather than 
as genera or subgenera. Because the genus is apparently best devel- 
loped in the unstudied region south of the United States, it is possible 
that intermediate forms exist between the species groups, and it is 
felt best not to give the groups nomenclatural status. 



40 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

Key to the Species Groups of Arivaca Based Upon the Maculation 

1. Cubitus with prominent white streak; white band anterior to cell (figs. 19, 

20) ostreella group 

White trace of cubitus not prominent, absent if white band present anterior 
to cell 2 

2. M2+3 stalked; forewing not appearing lighter anterior to cell (figs. 15, 16). 

pimella group 
M2+3 fused; forewing somewhat lighter anterior to cell 3 

3. Forewing ground uniform reddish brown, prominent white band anterior 

to cell (Florida) albicostella group 

Forewing gray, mixture of black and white scales, radius and subcosta white 
traced (west of Mississippi River) albidella group 

The Pimella Group 

Diagnosis. — This group may be distinguished by the male valvae, 
in which the costa ends in a short triangular tooth well before the 
rounded tip of the cucullus. A similar projecting membranous cucullus 
exists in albicostella, but the costa terminates in a stout spine in that 
species. 

Description. — ^Frons light brown to brown; labial palpi with basal 
segment white, second and third segments clothed with white-tipped 
brown scales dorsally and on outer sides, white ventrally and on inner 
sides; vertex Ught brown anteriorly, white posterior to antennae, 
occiput, patagia, and tegulae brown laterally, lighter dorsally; legs 
clothed with white-tipped brown scales on outer sides, white on inner 
sides. 

Forewing ground Ught orange brown, veins white traced and 
bordered -with brown, Ai and A2 traced for most of their length, A3 
traced at base; 11 veins; M2+.3 stalked. Hindwing hght brown, fringe 
white; 7 veins; M3 usually free from lower outer angle of cell. 

Male genitaUa with uncus moderately well sclerotized between 
spicate processes. Juxta rounded, with caudal V-shaped notch. Valvae 
with costa sparsely setose, apically bearing short triangular tooth; 
cucullus with rounded membranous tip projecting well beyond costa; 
sacculus with patch of stiff setae. Aedeagus with cornuti serrate, 
small, subequal. 

Female genitalia with base of posterior apophyses flat, shaped Uke 
parallelogram. Bursa unarmed. 

Discussion. — The two included species may be separated by the 
condition of vein R2, which is stalked with R3+4 in linella but free 
in pimella, but this character is usually variable elsewhere in the sub- 
family so that positive identification should rest with examination of 
the male genitalia. 



REVISION OF PEORIESTAE AND ANERASTIINAE 41 

Key to Species of the Pimella Group Based Upon the Male Genitaha 

Posterior margin of medial process of uncus fiat, usually bearing pair of short, 
sharp lateral teeth; apical process of gnathos padlike, not strongly projecting 
(fig. 120) linella 

Posterior margin of medial process of uncus rounded, unarmed; apical process of 
gnathos bulbous, strongly projecting dorsally (fig. 119) pimella 

Arivaca pimella (Dyar), new combination 

Figures 15, 50, 52, 84, 119, 156 

Poujadia pimella Dyar, 1906, p. 31. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. 
— McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — The broadly rounded unarmed medial process of the 
uncus and the strongly projected medial process of the gnathos each 
separate this species from linella. 

Description. — Antennae white, male shaft laminate, cilia about 
one-fifth as long as segment width. 

Forewing sprinkled with brown and white anterior to cell; cell 
brownish white; R2 free from cell. Hindwing light brown in female, 
somewhat darker in male. 

Male genitalia with medial process of uncus rounded, unarmed. 
Gnathos with apical process strongly projected dorsally. 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Lectotype male, hereby designated, Babaquivera 
Mts., Pima County, Ariz.; USNM 9012; genitalia shde No. 567, J. 
Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1965. 

Specimens examined. — 45 cf , 36 9 • 

Distribution (Map 9). — Southern Arizona. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Cochise Stronghold, 1 9, Aug. 
30, 1958 (P. Opler) [UCB]; Paradise, 1 cf , 1 9 , September (Poling) [CM]; Chiri- 
cahua, 1 mi. west portal, 1 cf , 1 9 , Sept. 10, 1950 (Cohn, Boone, Cazier) [AMNH]; 
Ramsay Canyon, Huachuca Mts., 1 d', 1 9, July 10-15, 1941 (A. B. Klots) 
[AMNH]; San Bernardino Ranch (3750 ft.), 1 9, August (F. Snow) [UK]; 
Southwestern Res. Sta., 5 mi. west Portal, 1 cf, Sept. 6, 1959 (J. R. Bowers) 
[UCB]; 1 d^, Aug. 25, 1962 (M. Statham) [AMNH]; 1 9, Sept. 2, 1959 (Carl W. 
Kirkwood) [CPK]; 1 9, Sept. 17, 1959; 1 9, Sept. 20, 1959; Gila Co., vicinity 
Globe, 1 c?, Aug. 4-5, 1937 (A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; Pima Co., "Baboquavaria 
Mts.," 4 c?, July 15-30, 1903 (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; 2 9 , July 1-15, 1923; 
2 d", July 15-30, 1923; 1 d^, 29, Aug. 1-4, 1923; 1 9, Aug. 15-30, 1923; 1 c?, 
1 9, Aug. 24-31, 1923; 4c?, 49, Sept. 1-15, 1923; 1 d", Oct. 1-15, 1923; 1 d^, 
July 15-30, 1924; 7 d^, 1 9, Sept. 1-15, 1924; 1 cT, Oct. 1-15, 1924; Brown 
Canyon, Baboquivari Mts., 1 d^, Sept. 5, 1953 (Lloyd M. Martin) [LACM]; 
1 d', Sept. 6, 1953; Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mts., 1 9, Aug. 25, 1946 (J. A. 
Comstock, Lloyd M. Martin) [LACM]; 1 d', Aug. 2, 1947; 3 9, Sept. 7, 1948 
(Lloyd Martin) [LACM]; 1 &, Sept. 8, 1948; 1 9, Aug. 15, 1949 (C. W. Kirk- 
wood) [LACM]; 1 9, Aug. 17, 1949; 1 9, Sept. 11, 1950; 1 d^, 1 9 , Sept. 13, 
1950; 1 9, Sept. 15, 1950; 1 d", Sept. 5-12, 1951 (William Hammer) [CNC]; 
1 9 , Aug. 8, 1952 (C. W. Kirkwood) [LACM]; 1 d^, Aug. 14, 1952; 2 9 , Aug. 30, 



42 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

1952 (Lloyd Martin) [LACM]; 6 cf , 1 9, Aug. 19, 1953 (Robert J. Ford) [CNC]; 
1 9, Aug. 16, 1953; 1 9, Aug. 18, 1953; 1 9, Aug. 21, 1953; 1 9, Sept. 2, 1953 
(Lloyd Martin) (LACM]; 1 cf, Sept. 8, 1953; 2 9, Aug. 24-Sept. 2, 1957 (W. A. 
Hammer) [LACM]; locality unknown: "So. Arizona," 3 c?, 1 9, August 1-15 
(Poling) [USNM]. 

Discussion. — In the original description Dyar lists two males, one 
of these is in the National IVEuseum, the fate of the other is unknown. 

Arivaca linelkif new species 

Figures 16, 56, 85, 120, 157 

Diagnosis. — The flat, moderately well sclerotized medial process 
of the uncus distinguishes this species within the genus. The stalked 
condition of R2 separates both sexes from pimella. 

Description.— Antennae light brown, sublaminate in male, cilia 
about one-third as long as segment width, female with shaft white. 

Forewings brown anterior to cell; R2 stalked with R3+4. 

Male genitalia with mediodistal margin of uncus irregular, usually 
bearing pair of small sharp teeth laterally. Gnathos with apical 
process padlike, not strongly projected dorsally. 

Types. — In the Canadian National collection. 

Type data. — Holotype male, Colfax County, N. Mex., Sangre de 
Cristo Mts., Cimarron Canyon (7900 ft.), July 13, 1962, E. and I. 
Munroe; C.N.C. Type No. 9442; genitalia slide No. 274, J. Shaffer, 
Sept. 15, 1964. 

Paratypes: Four males, same data and locality as holotype. 

Specimens examined. — 18 cf , 3 9 • 

Distribution (Map 9). 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Apache Co., 3 mi. west Eagar (7100 ft.), 
Pinon-Juniper life zone, 1 cf , July 13, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; Greer, 
White Mts. (8500 ft.), 1 d', Aug. 2, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; 1 9 , Aug. 4, 
1962; 5 cT, Aug. 6, 1962; 1 9, Aug. 9, 1962; 1 cf, Aug. 11, 1962. 

Colorado: "Rock Creek Canyon," Icf, July 19, 1961 (Margot May) [CPK]. 

New Mexico: Colfax Co., Cimarron Canyon, Sangre De Cristo Mts. (7900 
ft.), 2 d", July 14, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; McKinley Co., McGaffey, 
Zuni Mts. (7500 ft.), 1 <?, July 21, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; 1 cf , July 25, 
1962; Sandoyal Co., Frijoles Canyon, Bandelier Nat. Mon. (6050 ft.), 4 cf , July 
17, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; 1 9, July 18, 1962; Horseshoe Springs 
Camp, 2 mi. west La Cueva (7900 ft.), 1 cf , July 29, 1961 (F., P., and J. 
Rindge) [ABK]. 

The Ostreella Group 

Diagnosis. — The group is easily recognized by the light orange 
forewings with the costal margin and cubitus both prominently 
marked with white. The tapering pointed valvae distinguish males 
of the group. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIESTAE 43 

Description. — Frons about tkree-foiirths as long as diameter of 
eye, orange laterally, lighter dorsaUy; labial palpi Avith basal segment 
white, second and third segments orange brown on outer sides, white 
on inner sides; antennae white, finely pubescent, bearing tuft of scales 
on basal segments of shaft; occiput and vertex white behind antennae, 
occiput brown laterally, patagia and tegulae Hght orange. 

Forewing vdih broad white band anterior to cell, costa margined 
basally mth dark brown; white band bordered posteriorly with 
narrow dark brown band dividing distally to trace K4 and Mi; promi- 
nent white band tracing cubitus and M2, broadest near lower outer 
angle of cell; Cui and Cu2 traced with mixtm-e of brown and white; 
R2 from close to R.3+4, sometimes short stalked. Hind^\-ing with 7 veins; 
M3 and Cui from point or short stalked. 

Male genitaha Avith medial process of uncus well sclerotized, 
rounded, bearing pair of caudomesally directed spines. Gnathos mth 
medial process strongly projected. Valvae tapering to point. 

Female genitaha mth eighth abdominal segment heavily sclerotized, 
tapering posteriorly. Anterior apophyses strongly divergent; posterior 
parallel, pointed at base. 

Key to the Species of the Ostreella Group Based Upon External 

Characters 

M2+3 forked; white band extending from cell to costal margin .... ostreella 

M2+3 fused; white band extending half way from cell to costal margin, bordered 

anteriorly with light orange poohella 

Arivaca ostreella (Ragonot), new corabination 

Figures 19, 53, 86, 121, 158 

Saluria ostreella Ragonot, 1887, p. 18; 1889, p. 117. — Smith, 1891, p. 85.— 
Ragonot, 1901,p. 362. — Hulst, 1902, p. 438. — Barnes and McDunnough, 
1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 102. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Saluria ostrella [sic] Hulst, 1890, p. 211. 

Peoria discostrigella Dyar, 1904, p. 115. [New synonymy.] 

Diagnosis. — ■ The stalked condition of M2+3 distinguishes both 
sexes from poohella. Males are easily recognized by the pectinate 
antennae. 

Description. — Labial palpi about 4)2 times as long as diameter of 
eye; male antennae pectinate. 

Fore^ving with cell brownish orange; Ai faintly traced on distal 
third; A2 and A3 basally traced with mixture of white and brown, 
A2 usually broadly so; ground yellow or Ught orange posterior to cell; 
11 veins; M2+3 stalked. Hindmng light brown in both sexes. 

Male genitaha with uncus bearing heavy mediodorsal triangular 
plate, sharp pointed caudally. Juxta round, with deep V-shaped 

285-934—68 4 



44 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

caudal incision. Valvae tapering to rounded tip; costa vnth small 
medial tooth. Aedeagus with vesica bearing one smaU serrate and 
one large pectinate cornutus. 

Female genitalia with bursa unarmed. 

Types. — S. ostreella, in the British Museum (Natural History) ; 
P. discostrigeUa, in the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — S. ostreella, lectotype female, hereby designated, 
labeled as follows: "Type; ARIZONA. Morrison.; Paravicine Coll. 
B.M. 1937-383.; Anerastia ostreella Rag. type; Saluria ostreella 
Ragonot; 9 genitaha slide 1-4-1967 J. Shaffer No. 704." P. discos- 
trigeUa, lectotype female, hereby designated, Roswell, New Mexico, 
August 22, Cockerell; USNM 7933; genitaha shde No. 566, J. C. S., 
Nov. 23, 1965. In the original description Dyar reports: "Three 99, 
Roswell, New Mexico, August 22 (T. D. A. Cockerell), Tucson, 
Arizona, July 21 (E. A. Schwarz)." 

Specimens examined. — 6 cf, 49 9- 

Distribution (Map 9). — ^Southern Arizona to BrownsviUe, Tex. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Southwestern Research Sta., 
5 mi. west Portal (5400 ft.), 9 ? , July 15, 1955 (W. J. Gertsch) [AMNH]; 1 9 , 
July 26, 1955; 1 cf, June 12, 1958; Pima Co., Redington, 3 9 , no date [USNM]; 
"Tuson," 1 9 , "21. 7." (E. A. Schwarz) [USNM]. 

New Mexico: Chaves Co., Roswell, 1 9 , August (Cockerell) [USNM]; Eddy 
Co., White City, 3 9 , May 14, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 1 9 , May 16, 1950; 
1 cT, 2 9 , July 23, 1959, (A. B. Klots) [ABK]; Hidalgo Co., Lordsburg, 3 9 , Aug. 4, 
1937 [AMNH]; Luna Co., 10 mi. east Deming, 3 d', 29, July 12, 1917 [CU]; 
14 9, July 8-15 [USNM]. 

Texas: Brewster Co., Alpme, Davis Mts., 1 9 , Sept. 12, 1958 (R. R. McElvare) 
[CNHM]; Big Bend, 1 cf, Apr. 15-30, 1926 (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; 1 9 , May 
1-15, 1926; Cameron Co., San Benito, 29, July 8-15 [USNM]; 9, August 
[USNM]; Reves Co., 35 mi. northwest Pecos, 4 9 , June 15, 1937 (George Willett) 
[LACM]. 

Arivaca poolzella, new species 

Figures 20, 57, 87, 122, 159 

Diagnosis. — The fused condition of M24.3 distinguishes this species 
from ostreella, as does the light orange trace on the costal margin. 

Description. — Labial palpi 3K to 5)^ times as long as eye diameter; 
antennae sublaminate in male. 

Foremng with white costal band extending half way from cell to 
costa, bordered anteriorly with light orange; cell orange; Ai sometimes 
faintly traced near outer margin; A2 and A3 near base traced with 
white and bordered A\dth dark brown; ground lighter orange posterior 
to Ai fold; 10 veins; M2+3 fused. Hingwing dark brovna in male, light 
brown in female. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIESTAE 45 

Male genitalia with juxta rectangular; distally concave, proximally 
convex. Valvae tapering to point at apex of costa. Aedeagus with 
cornuti elliptical, serrate. 

Female genitalia mth bursa bearing near its base a cluster of about 
20 stout, sharp-pointed, inwardly directed spines. 

Types. — In the collection of John G. Franclemont, Cornell 
University. 

Type data. — Holotype male, Madera Canyon, 5600 ft., Santa Rita 
Mts., Santa Cruz County, Ariz., June 24, 1963, J. G. Franclemont; 
genitalia slide No. 714, J. Shaffer, Jan. 16, 1967. 

Paratypes : Three males, two females, same data as holotype except 
as follows: two males, June 29, 1963, one ^\ith genitalia slide No. 715, 
J. Shaffer, Jan. 16, 1967; one male, June 28, 1963, genitalia slide 
No. 724, J. Shaffer, Jan. 27, 1967; one female, June 28, 1963, genitalia 
slide No. 716, J. Shaffer, Jan. 16, 1967. 

Other SPECIMENS EXAMINED. — 7 cf , 15 9- 

Distribution (Map 9). — Southern Arizona to Brownsville, Tex. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Southwestern Res. Sta., 5 mi. 
west Portal (5400 ft.), 1 9 , May 15, 1956 (M. Statham) [AMNH]; 1 ? , June 29, 
1956 (Cazier and Ordway) [AMNH]; 1 ? , July 5, 1956; 1 d^, July 9, 1956, Ic?, 

1 ? , July 11, 1958 (M. A. Cazier) [AMNH]; Pima Co., Baboquivari Mts., Ic?, 
July 1-15, 1923 (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; 1 9 , July 1-15, 1924; 1 9 , Aug. 15-30, 
1924; Redington, 1 9 , no date [USNM]; Santa Cruz Co., Madera Canyon, 
Santa Rita Mts. (5800 ft.), Ic?, 1 9, June 22, 1960 (David A. Wallesz) [CU]; 

2 9, June 24, 1960; (4800 ft.) 1 9, June 18, 1963 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 
2 9 , June 29, 1963; 1 cf , 1 9 , July 1, 1963. 

The Albidella Group 

Diagnosis. — Males of the group are delimited by the broadly 
rounded apex of the valvae, the cucullus not exceeding the costa. 

Description. — Frons of white-tipped brown scales; labial palpi 
about twice length of head, basal segment light brown, of white-tipped 
brown scales dorsally and on outer sides, white ventrally and on inner 
sides; antennae light brown, finely ciliate ventrally, tuft of scales on 
basal segments of shaft. 

Fore-wing uniformly gray, a mixtiu-e of dark brown and white scales, 
Rs white traced; 10 veins; R2 stalked with R3+4; M2+3 fused. Hind\\-ing 
light brown; 7 veins, but M3 sometimes completely fused with Cuj. 

Male genitalia with medial part of uncus poorly sclerotized, irregu- 
larly rounded. Apical process of gnathos well projected dorsally. Juxta 
subquadrate, anterior margin rounded, posterior wdth broad V-shaped 
notch. Valvae with costa setose, blunt tooth at apex and another just 
under half distance to base; tip rounded; sacculus finely setose. 
Aedeagus with cornuti equal or nearly so, serrate. 

Female genitalia as in the Pimella Group. 



46 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Key to the Species of the Albidella Group 

Forewing appearing lighter posterior to Aj fold; posterior cusp of spicate process a 
small triangular tooth about one-eighth length of anterior cusp (fig. 123) 

albidella 

Forewing not appearing lighter posterior to Ai fold; posterior cusp of spicate 
process a sharp thorn about one-fourth length of anterior cusp (fig. 124) . artella 

Arivaca albidella (Hulst), new combination 

Figures 17, 88, 123, 160 

Peoria albidella Hulst, 1900, pp. 175, 439. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, 
p. 149.— McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — Distinguishing features are given in the above key. 

Description. — Forewings Hght tan to grayish brown, appearing 
Ughter posterior to Ai fold. 

Male genitaha with posterior cusp of spicate process poorly de- 
veloped, usually rounded, sometimes sharp pointed, usually no more 
than one-tenth length of anterior process. 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Lectotype male, hereby designated, Death Valley, 
"April 91 K."; USNM 4809; genitalia shde No. 571, J. Shaffer, 
Nov. 23, 1965. In the original description Hulst notes: "Death Valley, 
Cal. ; taken by Mr. Koebele, in April. The type number of the 
National Museum is 4709." 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 7 d^, 1 9. 

Distribution (Map 9). — Southwestern United States. 

UNITED STATES: New Mexico: Dona Ana Co., Mesquite, near MesiUa 
Park,2 2 cT, July 12, 1917 [CU]. 

Texas: Reeves Co., Pecos, 4 cf , 1 ?, May 18, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 
1 cf , June 2, 1950. 

Arivaca artella, new species 

Figures 18, 89, 124, 161 

Diagnosis. — Distinguishing features are given in the above key. 

Description. — Male genitalia with posterior cusp of spicate process 
well developed as a sharp-pointed thorn about one-fourth as long as 
anterior cusp. Apical process of gnathos strongly projected, somewhat 
T-shaped in lateral view. 

Type. — In the Cornell University collection. 

Type data. — Holotype male, Mesquite near MesiHa Park, N. Mex., 
July 12, 1917; Cornell University lot No. 542, sublot No. 46; lot No. 
551, sublot No. 916; CU Type No. 4406; genitalia slide No. 366, J. 
Shaffer, Feb. 12, 1965. 



2 Spelled Mesille Park on specimen labels. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 47 

Paratypes: Three males, same date and locality as holotype, Cornell 
University lot No. 542, sublot No. 46. 
Other specimens examined. — 14 cT, 3 9 . 
Distribution (Map 9). 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Apache Co., St. Johns, 3 cf, July 26, 1937 
(A. B. Klots) [AMNH]. 

New Mexico: Dona Ana Co., Mesquite near Mesilla Park, 10 cf, July 12, 
1917 (from same lot as type series) [CU]; Hidalgo Co., Cienaga Ranch, near 
Rodeo, 1 9 , July 12, 1948 (C. and P. Vaurie) [AMNH]; Sandoval Co., Jemez 
Springs (6200 ft.), 1 9, July 16, 1950 (Cohn, Boone, Cazier) [AMNH]; Sulphur 
Dam, 5 mi. north Jemez Springs (6300 ft.), 1 cf, July 17, 1950 (Cohn, Boone, 
Cazier) [AMNH]; county unknown, 1 9 , no date [AMNH]. 

The Alhicostella Group 
Arivaca alhicostella (Grossbeck), new combination 

Figures 21, 60. 90, 125, 162 

Calera (?) albicosleUa Grossbeck, 1917, pp. 134-135. — Klots, 1942, p. 419. 
Peoria alhicostella (Grossbeck). — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, 
p. 251. 

Diagnosis. — The presence of a white costal band coupled with the 
absence of white tracing on the cubitus distinguishes this species wdthin 
the genus. In no other species of Arivaca does the male costa terminate 
in a subapical spine. 

Description. — Frons brown; labial palpi about 2^ times as long as 
eye diameter, basal segments light brown, second and third segments 
clothed with light brown tipped brown scales on outer sides, light 
brown on inner sides and ventrally; antennae with scape brown, shaft 
light brown, laminate, basal segments bearing tuft of scales, cilia 
slightly less than half as long as segment width; frons and vertex light 
brown dorsally, vertex brownish white posterior to antennae, occiput 
brownish white dorsally, brown laterally, patagia and tegulae brown; 
legs clothed with white tipped brown scales on outer sides, white on 
inner sides. 

Forewing reddish brown, often sprinjiled wdth light brown and dark 
brown scales; light brown anterior to cell, sometimes sprinkled rather 
heavily ^vith darker scales. Hindmngs light bro^vn. Venation as in the 
Albidella Group. 

Male genitalia with medial part of uncus weakly sclerotized, round- 
ed; spicate process with posterior thorn directed dorsally, then re- 
flexed 90° near base and caudally directed (fig. 125). Juxta rounded, 
posterior margin concave. Valvae with costa sparsely setose, produced 
as free spine before rounded membranous apex of cucuUus; sacculus 
finely setose. Aedeagus with cornuti elliptical, serrate. 

Female genitalia as in the Pimella Group. 



48 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Type. — In the American Museum of Natural History. 

Type data. — Lectotype female, designated by Klots (1942), Fort 
Myers, Fla., Apr. 23, 1912; genitalia slide No. 586, J. Shaffer, Nov. 28, 
1965. 

Lectoparatype female, Everglades, Fla., Apr. 7, 1912. 

Specimens examined. — 10 cf, 3 9- 

Distribution (Map 10). — Known only from southern Florida. 

UNITED STATES: Florida; Broward Co., Ft. Lauderdale, ? , Mar. 27, 1928 
(D. M. Bates) [CPK]; Collier Co., Everglades, 4 d^, AprU 1-7 [USNM]; 3 cT, 
April 8-15 [USNM]; Dade Co., Paradise Key, Everglades National Park, ?, 
Apr. 2, 1952 (G. S. Walley) [CNC]; cf, Apr. 3, 1952; Sarasota Co., 9 , May 13, 
1946 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; Siesta Key, cf, Mar. 31, 1952 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CPK]; &, Mar. 30, 1954 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]. 

Atascosa Hulst 

Atascosa Hulst, 1890, p. 210. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hulst, 1902, p. 438. [Type: 
Atascosa bicolorella Hulst, 1890. Original designation.] 

Diagnosis. — The flat, elbowed, bluntly pointed spicate processes 
of the uncus (fig. 126) are diagnostic of the genus. 

Description. — Frons conical; labial palpi upturned with third 
segment decumbent in males, porrect in females; maxillary palpi 
reaching frons, cylindrical tuft of long slender scales, sometimes ex- 
panded and fanlike; antennae sublaminate, ciliate in males, filiform, 
finely ciliate in females; ocelli weU developed. 

Forewing mth 11 veins; Ri free from cell; R2 from near to or stalked 
with R3+4; M2+3 stalked for about half its length. Hindwing with 7 
veins; Sc and Rs stalked; Mi from upper outer angle of cell; M2 
absent; M3 stalked with Cui, from lower outer angle; Cu2 from just 
before the angle. 

Male genitalia with spicate processes in form of a pair of flat lateral 
arms, ventroposteriorly directed from base, then elbowed and distal 
half ventrally directed; arms bluntly pointed. Gnathos with apical 
process a small postero ventrally directed thorn ; arms straplike. Juxta 
subquadrate, shieldlike. Vinculum V-shaped, somewhat flattened 
anteriorly. Valvae with costa bearing subapical spine; sacculus with 
numerous stout setae; cucculus rounded, membranous, sm-passing 
costa. Aedeagus flattened, vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia A\'ith ovipositor moderately setose, caudal margin 
finely setose. Apophyses fairly straight, of about equal length; well 
developed; base of posterior shaped like a parallelogram; anterior 
curved downward near base. Bursa unarmed. Ductus seminalis from 
posterior end of bursa. 



REVISION OF PEORIENAE AND ANERASTIINAE 49 

Atascosa glareosella (Zeller) 

FiC4URES 26, 54, 91, 126, 163 

Anerastia glareosella Zeller, 1872, pp. 553-554. 

Saluria glareosella (Zeller). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, pp. 211- 

212. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hampson, 1918, pp. 95-96. 
Atascosa bicolorella Hulst, 1890, pp. 210, 227. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Rindge, 

1955, p. 158. 
Maricopa albocostella Hulst, 1900, p. 176 [described in Phycitinae]; 1902, p. 

438. — Rindge, 1955, p. 157. — Heinrich, 1956, p. 316 [transferred to Aner- 

astiinae]. [New synonymy.] 
Poiijadia glareosella (Zeller). — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 345-346. — Barnes and 

McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Forbes, 1923, p. 638. — McDunnough, 

1939, p. 36. 
Atascosa glareosella (Zeller). — Hulst, 1902, p. 438. 

Valdiva albocostella (Hulst). — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 148. — Mc- 
Dunnough, 1939, p. 34. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Frons dark brown, with red posterodorsal patch; 
labial palpi with basal segments white, second and third segments 
dark brown on outer sides, ventrally white sprinkled with red; anten- 
nae with scapes white on outer sides, mixture of red and brown on 
inner sides, shaft light brown; vertex and occiput brown, lighter 
dorsally; patagia, tegulae, a,nd dorsum of thorax dark brown, usually 
sprinkled with red. 

Forewing with white costal band extending posterior to middle of 
cell, narrowing to point at apex, sprinkled with grayish red, grayish- 
red basal dash; white band bordered posteriorly by dark brown band, 
mixture of grayish red and dark brown distal to cell; posterior of 
grayish red and dark brown distal to cell; posterior third of wing 
grayish red sprinkled with brown; transverse posterior band dark 
brown; discoceUular traced with dark brown, forming discal spot; 
fringe brown, with three white lines. Hindwing Hght brown, darker 
toward apex. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Types. — A. glareosella, in the British Museum (Natural History), 
(from Zeller collection); A. hicolorella and M. albocostella, in the 
American Museum of Natural History. 

Type data. — A. glareosella, lectotype female, hereby designated, 
labeled as follows: "Type; 15/8; Bosque Co. Texas; Zell. Coll. 1884.; 
Anerastia glareosella Z. N.A.I. 553 [green label in Zeller's handwrit- 
ing]; 9 genitalia slide 1-4-1967 J. Shaffer No. 709." 

A. hicolorella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Blanco County, 
central Texas, August, collection G. D. Hulst; genitalia slide No. 
3222, Carl Hemrich, June 14, 1947. 



50 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

M. albocostella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Anglesea, N.J., 
August 21?, collection G. D. Hulst, genitalia slide No. 3219, Carl 
Heinrich, June 14, 1946. Lectoparatype male, Anglesea, N.J., August 
21?, collection G. D. Hulst. 

Specimens examined. — 44 cf, 18 9. 

Distribution (Map 12). — Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain, Texas 
to Florida, north to Massachusetts. 

UNITED STATES: Colorado: El Paso Co., Colorado Springs, Fountain 
Valley School, 1 cf , July 7, 1935 [AMNH] (see discussion section). 

Connecticut: New Haven Co., East River, 1 cT, Aug. 12, 1907 (Charles R. 
Ely) [USNM]; 1 c?, Aug. 16, 1907; 2 c?, July 19, 1908; 2cf, July 20, 1908; 1 cf, 
July 22, 1908; 1 d', July 24, 1908; 2 cr', 1 ? , July 27, 1908; 1 cf , July 28, 1908; 
1 cf, July 30, 1908; 1 cT, Aug. 1, 1908; 1 9, Aug. 2, 1908; 1 ?, Aug. 7, 1909; 
1 cf, Aug. 10, 1909; 1 d^, Aug. 12, 1909; 1 d^, 1 ? , July 1910; 1 9 , July 19, 1912; 
1 d", Aug. 1, 190?. 

Florida: Dade Co., Homestead, 1 cf, Aug. 7, 1963 (D. O. Wolfenbarger) 
[CPK]. 

Massachusetts: Barnstable Co., Barnstable, 1 cf, July4, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CU]; 1 d, July 10, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CU]; 2 d, July 10, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CPK]; 1 9, July 12, 1949; 1 d, Aug. 1, 1952; West Barnstable, 3 d, July 15, 
1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 1 d, July 16, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC]; 2 d 
4 9, [CU]; 1 d, July 17, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CU]; 1 &, July 18, 1949 (C. P. 
Kimball) [CPK]; 1 9 , July 20, 1949; Dukes Co., Martha's Vineyard, 1 d, Aug. 11, 
1946 (F. M. Jones) [CNC]; 1 d, July 18 (F. M. Jones) [CPK]. 

New Jersey: Bergen Co., Oakland, 1 d, July 26, 1947 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 
1 d, July 27, 1947 (C. P. Kimball) [CU]; 1 9, Aug. 4, 1948 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CPK]; 1 cf, Aug. 9, 1948 (C. P. Kimball) [CU]; 1 d, Aug. 13, 1948; 1 d, Aug. 
14, 1948; 1 cf , Aug. 24, 1948; Burlington Co., New Lisbon, 1 d, July 31, 1931 
(E. P. DarUngton) [ANS]; 1 9 , July 14, 1933; 1 cT, Aug. 10, 1939; 1 9 , July 31, 
1942; 1 cf , Aug. 4, 1942; Morris Co., Mendham, 1 d, Aug. 3, 1935 (G. H. Tate) 
[AMNH]; Ocean Co., Lakehurst, Wrangle Brook Road, 1 9, Aug. 30, 1956 
(J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]. 

New York: Suffolk Co., Riverhead, 1 cf, July 1, 1933 (Roy Latham) [CU]. 

North Carolina: Polk Co., Tryon, 1 9, Aug. 11, 1904 (Fiske) [USNM]; 
1 9 , Aug. 14, 1904. 

Discussion. — The Colorado specimen has wang venation and male 
genitalia typical of glareosella, but differs in having uniform brownish- 
orange forewings, unmarked except by a faint discal spot, and in being 
slightly larger than typical members of the species. The specimen may 
or may not be glareosella. 

Homosassa Hulst 

H(mosassa Hulst, 1890, p. 214. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. 
[Type: Ephestia ella Hulst, 1887. Monobasic] 

Diagnosis. — The long, straight, unbranched ventrolaterally di- 
rected spicate processes of the uncus are diagnostic of the genus. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 51 

Description. — Labial palpi of males obliquely ascending w^th 
third segment somewhat decumbent, two to 2}^ times as long as eye 
diameter, females porrect, three times eye diameter; maxillary palpi 
small; tongue rudimentary; antennae sublaminate and ciliate in 
males, filiform and finely ciliate in females; oceUi normally developed. 

Foremng ^nth 10 or 11 veins; R2 free from cell or stalked ^nth 
K3+4; M2+3 stalked or fused, from lower outer angle of ceU; Cui from 
just before the angle. Hindwing with 7 veins; Sc and Rs stalked; Mi 
from upper outer angle; M2 lost; M3 stalked with Cuj, from lower 
outer angle of ceU; Cu2 from just before the angle. 

Male genitalia \vith spicate processes of uncus straight, unbranched, 
ventrolaterally directed, tapering to broad triangular base. 

Juxta shield-shaped. Valvae subrectangular vnth costa projecting, 
bluntly roimded and flattened apically; sacculus rather densely setose. 
Aedeagus with thickened ring on posterior end. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor strongly compressed. Apophyses 
rather straight, about equal in length. Bursa unarmed. Ductus 
seminalis from posterior end of bursa. 

Key to the Species of Homosassa 

1. M2+3 fused (fig. 58) ella 

M2+3 stalked (fig. 54) 2 

2. Male with uncus bearing well sclerotized ring (fig. 129) incudella 

Male with uncus not bearing sclerotized ring (fig. 128) platella 

Homosassa ella Hulst 

Figures 27, 58, 92, 127, 164 

Ephestia ella Hulst, 1887. — Rindge, 1955, p. 161. 

Anerastia ella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117; 1901, p. 400. — Barnes and 

McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, 

p. 251. 
Homosassa ella Hulst, 1890, pp. 214, 227. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hulst, 1902 

p. 440. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. 
Rhinaphe ella (Hulst). — Hampson, 1918, p. 86. 

Diagnosis. — The loss of vein M2 distinguishes this species from 
the other two members of the genus. 

Description. — Frons conical, dark brown; labial palpi ^nth basal 
segments white, second and third segments dark brown dorsally, 
white ventrally and on inner sides; antennae with scape dark brown 
anteriorly, white posteriorly, shaft light brown; vertex, occiput, 
patagia, tegulae, and dorsum of thorax brown to dark brown; legs 
brown, lighter on inner sides, tarsal scales white tipped. 

ForcAnng \nth white band anterior to cell, tapering to point at 
apex; proximal half of band margined anteriorly with dark brown line 
broadened at base; white band usually sprinkled ^^^th red; ground 



52 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

uniform dark brown posterior to white band, sometimes with reddish 
hue posterior to Ai fold; 10 veins; Ri from well before upper outer 
angle of cell ; R2 free from cell or stalked mth R3+4 ; M2+3 fused. Hind- 
wing brown or Ught brown, darker toward apex. 

Male genitalia with uncus bearing well sclerotized ring, open 
anteriorly and forming pair of ventrally directed sharp-pointed spines. 
Gnathos (fig. 127) pi-shaped, transverse portion upturned and sharp, 
pointed laterally. Aedeagus with vesica bearing single sharply serrate 
inconspicuous cornutus. 

Female genitalia as described for the genus. 

Types. — In the American Museum of Natural History (lectotype) ; 
in the U.S. National Museum (lectoparatype). 

Type data. — Lectotype male, hereby designated, Florida, collection 
G. D. Hulst; genitalia slide No. 3225, Carl Hemrich, June 14, 1946. 

Lectoparatype: Male, Fernald collection, USNM 40079; genitalia 
slide No. 572, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1965. 

In the original description Hulst lists three males and two females 
from Florida. 

Specimens examined. — 90 cf, 42 9. 

Distribution (Map 11). — Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain, eastern 
Texas to Florida, north to North Carolina. 

UNITED STATES: Alabama: Mobile Co., Theodore, 1 d', June 12, 1917, 
[CU]. 

Florida: Alachua Co., Gainesville, 1 cT, 29, July 8, 1927 (J. Speed Rogers) 
[CU]; 1 cf, July 10, 1927; 1 cf, Apr. 22, 1952 (O. Peck) [CNC]; Charlotte Co., 
Punta Gorda, 2 9 , Apr. 12, 1952 (G. S. Walley) [CNC]; Dade Co., Florida City, 
2 d', Apr. 17, 1947 (Otto Buchholz) [ANS]; 1 cf, Apr. 20, 1947; Homestead, 
1 &, Feb. 24,1959 (D. O.Wolfenbarger) [CPK]; 1 d^, Apr. 15, 1959; 1 &, Apr. 16, 
1959; 2 cf, July 17, 1959; 1 cf , Feb. 22, 1955; 1 c?, July 29, 1958; Royal Palm 
Hammock (also called Paradise Key, or Royal Palm State Park), Everglades 
National Park,ld^, Apr. 11 (F. M. Jones) [ANS]; 1 cf, 1930; 1 d'. Mar. 15, 1938 
(E. P. Darlington) [ANS]; 1 cT, Mar. 17, 1938; 1 &, Mar. 20, 1938; 2 cf, 2 9 
Apr. 2, 1952 (G. S. Walley) [CNC]; 1 9 , Apr. 3, 1952; Flager Co., Pellicer Crk. 
13 mi. north Bunnell, 1 9 , May 8, 1954 (J. Bauer) [CM]; 1 cf, Apr. 10, 1954 

1 9 , Apr. 24, 1954; Highlands Co., Archbold Biol. Sta., 1 9 , Apr. 27, 1947 
(J. G. Needham) [CU]; 1 d^, Apr. 28, 1947; 2 9, May 14, 1947; 2 9, June 17 
1964 (Jay C. Shaffer) [JCS]; 1 d^, 3 9 , June 18, 1964; 1 d', 1 9 , June 20, 1964 

2 d", 1 9 , June 22, 1964; 2 d", June 25, 1964; 2 d", 1 9 , June 26, 1964; 2 d" 
June 28, 1964; 1 9 , June 29, 1964; 1 9 , July 2, 1964; 1 d^, July 3, 1964; 1 d^ 
July 5, 1964; 1 d', July 11, 1964; 1 9, July 12, 1964; 1 d", July 13, 1964 
Hillsborough Co., Stemper, 1 d", Aug. 19, 1912 (G. Krautwurm) [CM]; 2 d" 
1 9, Sept. 1, 1912; 2 d^, Sept. 4, 1912; 2 d^, Sept. 5, 1912; 2 d", Sept. 6, 1912 
1 d', Sept. 9, 1912; 1 d^, 1 9 , Sept. 13, 1912; 1 9 , Oct. 1, 1912; 1 d", Oct. 8, 1912 
1 d', Oct. 9, 1912; 1 d", June 4 [CM]; 1 9 , June 19 [CM]; Lake Co., Leesburg 
1 d', May 14, 1961 (C. H. Curran) [AMNH]; Manatee Co., Gulf Coast Exp 
Sta., Bradenton, 1 d". May 11, 1955 (E. G. Keisheimer) [CPK]; Oneco, 1 9 
May 5, 1953 (Paula Dillman) [CPK]; 1 6", May 8, 1953; 1 9, May 19, 1953 
1 d". May 25, 1953; 1 9 , June 6, 1953; 1 d", 1 9 , June 7, 1953; 1 9 , June 10, 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 53 

1953; 1 cf , July 15, 1953; 1 &, Oct. 15, 1953; 1 &, June 1, 1954; 1 9 , June 9, 
1954; Pinellas Co., Dunedin, 1 &, Apr. 22, 1925 (W. S. Blatchley) [ANS]; 2 cT, 
May 24, 1925; Sarasota Co., 1 d", May 7, 1946 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 1 ? , 
May 12, 1946; 1 c?, May 19, 1946; Siesta Key, 1 9 , May 21, 1956 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CPK]; St. Johns Co., Hastings, 6 cT, 2 ? , April [USNM]; 5 cT, 1 9, May 
[USNM]; 3 d', 1 9, June [USNM]; 1 cT, Sept. 30 [USNM]; county unknown, 
"Altmont," 1 9 , Sept. 21, 1924 (F. R. Colo) [CU]; locality unknown, 1 cf , 
no date [USNM]. 

Georgia: Charlton Co., 1 c?", June 7, 1946 (Otto Buchholz) [ANS 
Id', June 9, 1946; 2d', June 10, 1946; 1 d', June 11, 1946. 

Mississippi: Jackson Co., Biloxi, 1 d', June 13, 1917 [CU]. 

North Carolina: Brunswick Co., Leland, 1 9 , June 17, 1946 (Otto Buchholz) 
[ANS]; 2 d", June 20, 1946; 1 9 , Sept. 2, 1946; Robeson Co., Maxton, 1 d', 
May 1-15, 1943 (A. B. Klots) [AMNH]. 

Texas: Burnet Co., 1 d", no date (F. G. Schaupp) [USNM]; Nueces Co. 
Corpus Christie, 1 d', Mar. 26, 1943 (W. M. Gordon) [CU]. 

Discussion. — In many specimens the distal one-half of each spine 
of the uncus ring is bent anteroventraUy (fig. 127), and the anteriorly 
directed spine of the gnathos is posterior (fig. 127a) in relation to that 
of the type (fig. 1276). Specimens of both types have been collected 
at the Archbold Biological Station and do not represent geographical 
varieties. In view of the small differences between the two types, they 
are held to be conspecific. 

Homosassa platella, new species 

Figures 28, 93, 128 

Diagnosis. — The broad flat transtUla and lack of a sclerotized 
ring on the uncus each will distinguish this species. 

Description. — Maculation similar to that of ella. Forewing with 
11 veins; M2+3 stalked. 

Male genitalia with uncus lacking sclerotized ring. 

Gnathos expanded into pair of large, flat, medially fused, posteriorly 
bicuspitate or tricuspitate plates. Juxta four-sided with medial V- 
shaped heavy sclerotization. Aedeagus with vesica bearing pair of 
weakly sclerotized sharply serrate cornuti. 

Female unknown. 

Types. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Holotype, male, Hastings, Fla. (Saint Johns Co.), 
March, collection W. D. Kearfott; USNM 69385; genitalia slide 
No. 596, J. Shaffer, Apr. 26, 1966. 

Paratypes: Three males, Hastings, Fla., collection W. D. Kearfott; 
two dated March, one male genitalia slide No. 103, J. C. S., Dec. 30, 
1963; one dated April, male genitalia slide No. 493, J. Shaffer, Apr. 13, 
1965. 

Other specimens examined. — 4 cT. 

Distribution (Map 11). — Known only from Florida. 



54 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

UNITED STATES: Florida: Collier Co., Everglades, 1 cf, Apr. 6, 1912 
[AMNH]; Dade Co., Homestead, 1 d', Apr. 28, 1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; 
Pinellas Co., Dunedin, 1 d', Feb. 23, 1921 (W. S. Blatchley) [ANS]; Saint Johns 
Co., Hastings, 1 cf , May [AMNH]. 

Homosassa incudelkif new species 

Figures 29, 94, 129, 165 

Diagnosis. — The sclerotized ring of the uncus bears a pair of two- 
pointed processes rather than a simple process as in ella, or with the 
ring absent as in platella. Female specimens may be distinguished from 
those of ella by the presence of a dorsal invagination on the eighth 
abdominal segment. 

Description. — Maculation similar to that of ella. Forewing with 
white costal band sewn with dark brown scales; 11 veins; M2+3 stalked. 

Male genitalia with uncus similar to that of ella, but anterior 
processes of ring each anvil-shaped with sharp-pointed anterior and 
posterior processes. Gnathos with pair of subapical thickened proc- 
esses, each bearing anterior and posterior spines. Aedeagus with 
vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia with dorsal invagination on eighth abdominal 
segment, and smaller invagination dorsally on the membrane between 
segments eight and nine. 

Types. — In the Canadian National collection. 

Type data. — Holotype, male, Lake Murray, Love and Carter 
Counties, Oklahoma, May 20, 1950, W. J. Eeinthal, "339/50"; 
C.N.C. Type No. 9441; genitalia slide No. 546, J. Shaffer, July 15, 
1965. A mass of glue supports the specimen on the pin from beneath, 
and I have added a small amount of glue beneath the right wings to 
support them. 

Paratype: Female, data as given for the holotype; genitalia sHde 
No. 548, J. Shaffer, July 16, 1965. 

Other specimens examined. — None. 

Distribution (Map 11). 

Reynosa-) new genus 

Type. — Atascosa Jloscella Hulst, 1890. 

Diagnosis. — The short, stout, sharp-pointed spicate processes of the 
uncus are diagnostic of the genus. 

Description. — Frons conical; labial palpi porrect, about twice as 
long as eye diameter in males, about 2J^ times in females; maxillary 
palpi reaching frons or nearly so, spreading; tongue not exposed 
between palpi; antennae filiform to subserrate in both sexes, com- 
pressed, ciliate ventrally, male shaft with two basal segments fused; 
ocelli present. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 55 

Forewing with 11 veins; R2 usually free from cell, sometimes stalked 
with R3+4; Ml from upper outer angle of cell; M2+3 stalked about one- 
half their length, from lower outer angle; Cui from just before the 
angle. Hind wing with 7 veins; Sc and Rs well stalked; Mi from upper 
outer angle of cell; M3 and Cui long stalked, from lower outer angle; 
Cui from cell very near to M3 and Cui. 

Male genitaHa with uncus bearing pair of short apical lobes; spicate 
processes a pair of short, stout, sharp-pointed anteriorly directed, 
ventral hooks. Gnathos bearing small, sharp-pointed, posteriorly 
directed apical and pair of subapical hooks. Juxta subquadrate, an- 
terior margin convex, posterior concave. Vinculum well developed, 
rounded. Valvae with cucullus membranous and projecting beyond 
costa; sacculus rather densely pilose. Aedeagus untapered, vesica 
unarmed. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor compressed. Apophyses rather 
straight, anterior and posterior about equal in length. Ductus bursae 
short. Bursa unarmed, with long slender neck. Ductus seminalis from 
posterior end of bursa, slender. 

Reynosa floscella (Hulst), new combination 

Figures 22, 95, 130, 166. 

Atascosa floscella Hulst, 1890, pp. 210-211. — Smith, 1891, p. 80. — Hulst, 1902, 

p. 438. — Rindge, 1955, p. 162. 
Poujadia floscella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1901, p. 346. — Barnes and McDunnough 

1917, p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 
Saluria floscella (Hulst). — Hampson, 1918, p. 96. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Labial palpi Avith basal segments white, second and 
third segments brown to reddish brown on outer sides, white on inner 
sides; frons, occiput, patagia, and tegulae brown. 

Forewing with ground light brown; costal area and ceU white, 
sprinkled with reddish-brown scales; prominent dark brown orbicular 
spot and line extending posteriorly from spot to inner margin forming 
second spot on Ai fold; dark brown transverse posterior beginning 
mth prominent spot between Mi and Cui, continuing to inner margin; 
terminal line of dark brown dots. Hindwing light brown on both sides. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Types. — In the U.S. National Museum (lectotype) ; in the American 
Museum of Natural History (lectoparatype) . 

Type data. — Lectotype female, hereby designated, Blanco County, 
central Texas; Fernald collection; USNM 40078; genitalia slide 
No. 594, J. Shaffer, Apr. 23, 1966. 

Lectoparatype: Male?, Blanco County, central Texas, collection 
G. D. Hulst; abdomen lost. 



56 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETEST 280 

Specimens examined. — 10 cf, 12 9. 

Distribution (Map 12). — Known only from Gulf Coastal Plain 
of Texas. 

UNITED STATES: Texas: Cameron Co., Brownsville, 1 9, May 4, 1904 
(H. S. Barber) [USNM]; 1 ? , no date [USNM]; 1 d", Mar. 19, 1937 (T. N. 
Freeman) [CNC]; 2 d^, Mar. 22, 1937; San Benito, 1 9, June 16-23 [USNM] 
1 9, July 8-15 [USNM]; 1 9, July 24-31 [USNM]; 1 9, August [USNM] 
1 9 , Aug. 1-7 [USNM]; 1 cf , 1 9 , Sept. 8-15 [USNM]; 1 cf , Mar 16-23 [USNM] 
Fort Bend Co., Richmond, Brazos River, 1 cf, June 22, 1917 [CU]; Nueces 
Co., Corpus Christie, 1 cf, 2 9, Apr. 15, 1943 (W. M. Gordon) [CU]; 1 d' 
May 22, 1943; 1 9, June 4, 1943; 1 cf, June 20, 1943; 1 cf , 1 9, Sept. 25-Oct. 
15, 1943. 

Goya Ragonot 

Goya Ragonot 1888, p. 43. [Type: Goya albivenella Ragonot, 1888. Designated 
by Hampson in Ragonot 1901, p. 349.] 

Diagnosis. — The unusual male genitalia make this genus quite 
distinctive within the subfamily; the presence of a transtilla and 
lateral subrhomboid processes of the uncus are both unique to Goya. 

Description. — Labial palpi about twice as long as eye diameter; 
tongue rudimentary; antennae with basal segments fused in male; 
eye large; oceUi present. 

Forewing with 1 1 veins ; R2 free from cell near R3+4 or stalked with 
the latter; Mi from upper outer angle of cell; Mz+z stalked, from lower 
outer angle. Hindwing with 7 veins; Sc and Rs well stalked; Mi from 
upper outer angle of cell; M3 and Cui stalked, from lower outer angle; 
Cu2 from cell very near to M3 and Cui. 

Male genitalia with uncus in form of pair of triangular plates, 
each joined on its anterior angle to a large subtriangular process 
which distally ciu-ves medially in tapering to a blunt point. Transtilla 
present, incomplete. Gnathos with medial process subquadrate in 
ventral view. Juxta rounded. Vinculum round to subtruncate. Valvae 
rectangular, apex rounded, inner half somewhat concave. Aedeagus 
short, compressed, with vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia with apophyses slender, rather straight. Bursa 
unarmed. Ductus seminalis from posterior end of bursa, slender. 

Goya stictella (Hampson), new combination 

Figures 23, 96, 131 
Saluria stictella Hampson, 1918, pp. 96-97. 

Diagnosis. — This species is easily distinguished from albivenella 
by the presence of dark brown spots on the forewing and by the 
absence of well-marked white tracing on the forewing veins. 

Description. — Labial palpi porrect, basal segments white, second 
and third segments light brown on outer sides, third decumbent; 



REVISION OF PEORIENAE AND ANERASTIINAE 57 

antennae sublaminate in male, light brown, basal segments bearing 
tuft of scales. 

Forewing with M2+3 stalked for about one-half their length ; ground 
light brown to grayish red, predominantly white anterior to cell; 
maculation variable; transverse anterior and median lines marked 
by dark brown spots in cell; Ai with two prominent dark brown spots, 
one just distal to transverse anterior in the cell, other on the mod- 
erately well-developed transverse posterior; terminal line of dark 
brown spots. Hindwing with M3 and Cui long stalked. 

Male genitalia with triangular plates of uncus each bearing on its 
terminal angle a posteromedially directed thorn. Gnathos with medial 
process bearing short sharp anterior and posterior spines on each 
lateral margin. Juxta broader than long. Aedeagus tapering strongly 
posteriorly. 

Female genitalia as described for the genus. 

Type. — In the British Museum (Natural History). 

Type data. — Lee to type male, hereby designated, labeled as fol- 
lows: "Type; Bahamas. M.C. Andros. 11. I. 1902 J.L. Bonhote. 1902- 
278; Saluria stictella Type cf. Hmpsn,; Pyralidae Brit. Mus. Slide 
No. 10904." 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 5 cf , 2 9. 

Distribution (Map 4). — In the United States the species is known 
from Arkansas, Mississippi, and west central Florida. 

UNITED STATES: Arkansas: Washington Co., Devel's Den State Park, 
1 d^, May 30, 1966 (R. W. Hodges) [USNM]. 

Florida: Manatee Co., Oneco, 1 <f,l ? , June 13, 1954 (Paula Dillman) 
[USNM]; 1 9 , Aug. 3, 1953; Sarasota Co., Siesta Key, 1 cf , Apr. 2, 1952 (Charles 
P. KimbaU) [CNC]. 

Mississippi: Harrison Co., Biloxi, 2 d', June 13, 1917 [CU]. 

Discussion. — This is the only species of Goya known to occur in 
the United States; the type locality of albivenella is Argentina. 

Subfamily Phycitinae Ragonot 

The following seven genera which were previously placed in the 
Anerastiinae and a new genus, Wakulla, established for Bandera 
carneella, are transferred to the Phycitinae. 

The relationships within the Phycitinae are clear for only a few of 
the eight genera. Anerastia and Coenochroa show affinities with each 
other but none with any particular group in the Phycitinae. Barberia is 
closely related to Anderida, and Bandera to Aiiagasta. The other four 
genera have typical phycitine genitalia, although their exact place- 
ment within the subfamily is uncertain. Of these four, Ragonotia and 
Martia are closely related and have typical phycitine wing maculation. 



58 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Anerastia Iliibner 

Anerastia Hubner [1816H1826], p. 3G7. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 394r-397. — Spuler, 
1904, p. 200 — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. [Type: Tinea lotella Hubner 
[1810]-[June 20, 1813.] Designated by Moore, 1886, p. 357.] 

Prinanerastia Hampson, 1918, p. 80. [Type: Tinea lotella Hubner. Original 
designation.] 

Diagnosis. — -Anerastia and two other North American genera 
possess a toothed frons. In Coenochroa and Martia the teeth are borne 
at the end of a well-developed protuberance; in Anerastia they form a 
ring on an otherwise smooth frons. 

Description. — -Frons rounded, fine projecting serrations forming a 
transverse elhptical ring about one-half as wide as frons, vesture short; 
labial palpi deflexed, about 3)^ times eye length in male, about foiu- 
times in female; maxillary palpi rudimentary, minute; tongue re- 
duced; antennae compressed, male shaft with basal segments fused, 
sublaminate, ciha about one-fifth segment width, female filiform, cilia 
minute, each segment bearing on its distal haK several longer ciha, 
each about one-half segment width; ocelli well developed. 

Fore wings mth 10 veins; Ri from well before upper outer angle of 
cell; R2 free, just before the angle; R3 stalked for about one-half its 
length onto R4; Mi from below the angle; M2+3 fused, well separated 
from Cui; Cu2 from well before Cui at angle. Hindwing with 7 veins; 
Sc and Rs approximate beyond cell, then diverging; IVIa and Cui 
stalked for over one-half their length, from lower outer angle of cell; 
Cu2 from just below the angle. 

Male genitaha with uncus bilobed, membranous medially. Gnathos 
complex, medial process stout, subrectangular, posteriorly bearing 
very short truncate lateral arms, mediodorsal process, and strong 
anteroventrally directed hook, dorsoanteriorly with large curved 
flat hook between uncus lobes. Transtilla crescent-shaped, poorly 
developed. Juxta eUiptical, anterior margin sclerotized. Vinculum 
broadly rounded. Valvae tapering on distal thu-d to bluntly pointed 
apex of costa, anterior-facing crescent-shaped ridge near base of taper- 
ing portion. Aedeagus Avith vesica bearing two large cornuti, one 
lance-shaped, the other deeply bicuspidate. 

Female genitaha with ovipositor well sclerotized, tapering to bluntly 
pointed tip. Dorsum of eighth abdominal segment deeply incised 
medially. Apophyses well developed, anterior very shghtly shorter 
than posterior. Ductus biu"sae moderate. Bursa unarmed. Ductus 
seminahs from posterior end of biu-sa. 

Discussion. — This Old World genus is represented in North 
America by lotella, a species common in Europe. 



REVISION OF PEORimAE AND ANERASTIINAB 59 

Anerastia lotella Hiibner 

Figures 34, 48, 64, 97, 132, 167 

Tinea lotella Hubner [1810]-[June 20, 1813]. 

Anerastia lotella Hubner [1826], p. 367. — Buckler, 1901, pp. 203-206, pi. 156, 

fig. 4. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 397-398. — Spuler, 1904, p. 200, pi. 82, 

fig. 2. — Beirne, 1952, pp. 74-75, pi. 6, fig. 1. 
Prinanerastia lotella (Hubner). — Hampson, 1918. p. 80. 
Anerastia lobelia [sic] (Hubner). — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only North American species in the genus. 

Description. — Labial palpi on outer sides varying bro\vn to light 
brown, light orange, or orange; antennae orange browTi; frons light 
brown, darker laterally, vertex and occiput brownish white dorsally, 
occiput laterally, patagia, tegulae, and dorsum of thorax brown to 
orange brown; legs brown to orange brown on outer sides, brownish 
white on inner sides. 

Forewing varying brown to orange; veins white traced, sprinkled 
with brown; A2 broadly sprinkled with brown; Ai fold lightly white 
traced on outer half. Hindwings brown, fringe light brown. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Type. — Lost. 

Type locality. — Not given, but presumably Europe. 

Recorded hosts. — Poaceae : Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link 
(European beach grass), larvae feeding on roots near junction \vith 
stem; also on Festuca ovina L., Secale cereale L., (Rye) to which they 
are sometimes a serious pest, and Aira species, (Buckler). 

Specimens examined. — 152 c?', 45 9 . 

Distribution (Map 1). — Alaska (Fort Yukon) south to Washing- 
ton, east to Minnesota. 

UNITED STATES: Alaska: near Fort Yukon, 1 cT [USNM]. 

Minnesota: Cass Co., Cass Lake, 1 cf June 18, 1934 (A. A. Granovsky) [UM] 
Icf, June 27, 1934; 2<^, July 27, 1936 (R. H. Daggy) [UM]; 1 cf , Aug. 2, 1936 
Cass Co., 1 d^, June 24, 1937 (L. W. Orr) [UM]; 1 d', June 26, 1937; 2 c?, June 30 
1937; Icf, July 1, 1937 (P. M. Schroeder), 1 cT, July 11, 1937 (L. W. Orr); Id' 
Aug. 11, 1937; Kittson Co., HaUock, Ic?', Aug. 9, 1935 (D. G. Denning) [UM] 
Id", June 20, 1936; Sd, June 21, 1936; 2d, JiUy 7, 1937; Polk Co., Crookston 
1 d, July 20, 1935 (D. G. Denning) [UM]; Id, July 21, 1935; 2 cf, July 22, 1935 
Id, July 27, 1935; 2d, June 21, 1937; 1 9, June 23, 1937; 3^^, June 27, 1937 
1 d, June 26, 1937; 1 d, June 26, 1941; 1 d, June 27, 1941. 

Washington: WaUa WaUa Co., Wallula, 1 d, July 30, 1948 (William C. Cook) 
[CNC]. 

CANADA: Alberta: Banflf, Id, June 29, 1922 (C. B. D. Garrett) [CNC]; 
Dominion Range Sta. Manyberries, 1 d, July 10, 1951 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]; 
Scandia, Id, July 9, 1956 (E. E. Sterns) [CNC]; Id, July 10, 1956. 

Manitoba: Aweme, Id, July 26, 1914 (N. Criddle) [CNC]; 3d, July 6, 1920; 

Id, 19, July 17, 1920; Id, 4 9, June 28, 1921; Id, 19, July 1, 1921; 19, 

(P. N. Vroom); 1 cf , 6 9 , July 2, 1921 (N. Criddle) [CNC]; 3d^, 4 9 , July 6, 1921; 

3 9, July 26, 1921; 1 d, July 28, 1921; 3 9. Aug. 3, 1921 (P. N. Vroom) [CNC]; 

285-934—68 5 



60 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

1 cf, Aug. 10, 1921 (N. Criddle) [CNC]; 1 ^, Aug. 25, 1921; 3 cf', 3 9, June 13, 1922; 

2 9, June 23, 1922; 2 cf , June 27, 1922; 19, July 19, 1922; 1 cf, July 22, 1922; 
2cf, Sept. 15, 1923; 1 c?, July 11, 1925; 1 cf, Aug. 10, 1925; 19, Aug. 21, 1925; 
3d', 2 9, July 2, 1926; 19, Aug. 11, 1926; 7 <^, July 20, 1928; Brandon, 1 rf", 
June 27, 1958 (R. B. Madge) [CNC]; 1 cf', July 6, 1958 (R. L. Hurley) [CNC]; 
1 9 , July 7, 1958 (R. B. Madge) [CNC]; 1 d^ July 8, 1958; 5 d^, 2 9 , July 17, 1958; 
(R. L. Hurley) [CNC]; 2 9, July 20, 1957 (R. B. Madge) [CNC]; Id', July 31, 
1958 (R. L. Hurley) [CNC]; 19, Aug. 7, 1958 (R. B. Madge) [CNC]; Glenboro, 
38 d', "Spruce-sand community," June 17, 1958 (R. L. Hurley) [CNC]; Ninette, 
Id', "Maple-Elm floodplain community," June 17, 1958; Wabowden, Id", Aug. 
7, 1949 (J. B. Wallis) [CNC]. 

Northwest territories: Bathurst Inlet, 1 9, July 28, 1951 (W. I. Campbell) 
[CNC]; Hay River, 2d^, July 30, 1951 (P. R. Ehrlich) [CNC]; Id", July 31, 1951. 

Quebec: ForestviUe, Id", July 11, 1950 (R. deRuette) [CNC]. 

Saskatchewan: Attons Lake, Cut Knife, Id', June 23, 1940 (A. R. Brooks) 
[CNC]; Od', July 11, 1940; 2d^, 19, July 12, 1940; Rutland, 5d^, July 15, 1940 
(A. R. Brooks) [CNC]; 1 d', Aug. 2, 1940; Saskatoon, 1 d', June 26, 1923 (Kenneth 
M. King) [CNC]; 1 d^, July 2, 1923; 2d', July 7, 1923; 1 d^, July 21, 1923; Was- 
kesiu Lake, 19, July 11, 1939 (A. R. Brooks) [CNC]; 2d', July 13, 1939; 2d', 
19, July 15, 1939; 1 d^, July 18, 1939; 2d', 19, July 21, 1939. 

Coenochroa Ragonot 

Coenochroa Ragonot, 1887, p. 20; 1889, p. 117, — Hulst, 1890, p. 217. — Smith, 
1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 418-419. — Hulst, 1902, p. 441. — Barnes 
and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 58. — McDunnough, 
1939, p. 36. [Type: Coenochroa californiella Ragonot, 1887. Original 
designation.] 

Petaluma Hulst, 1888, p. 116; 1890, pp. 215-216. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Hulst, 
1902, p. 440. [Type: Anerastia ilUhella Hulst, 1887. Original designation.] 

Alamosa Hampson in Ragonot, 1901, p. 369. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, 
p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 65. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. [New synon- 
ymy.] [Ty^Q-. Alamosa piperatella Hampson in Ragonot, 1901. Monobasic] 

Diagnosis. — Tlie genus may be easily recognized by the combina- 
tion of a toothed protuberant frons and longitudinal wing pattern. 
Martia has a somewhat similar frons, but the wing pattern is predom- 
inantly transverse. The wing maculation of Anerastia is similar to 
that of Coenochroa, and the frons is toothed, but not protuberant. 
The bifid male uncus is unique to Coenochroa. 

Description. — Frons with prominent anterior protuberance ter- 
minating in dorsoposteriorly sloping closed rim of irregular teeth sur- 
rounding central beak (figs. 44-47); labial palpi porrect or deflexed; 
maxillary palpi rudimentary, naked, usually hidden by labials; tongue 
reduced, usually hidden by palpi; antennae compressed, each segment 
bearing pair of perpendicidarly projecting ciha ventrally near distal 
end, male shaft scaled dorsally, ventrally and laterally bearing dense 
fine recurved ciha, female shaft scaled dorsally and laterally, ventrally 
with fine sparse recurved ciha; oceUi small, covered with scales. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 61 

Forewings Avith 10 veins; vein Cu2 from before lower outer angle of 
cell; Cui and M3 from angle, stalked; M2 absent; Mi from upper outer 
angle of cell; R2+4 stalked, from just before the upper outer angle; Ri 
from well before angle. Hindwing with 6 or 7 veins; vein Cu2 from be- 
fore lower outer angle of cell; Cui and M3 from angle, stalked for at 
least one-half their length, sometimes fused; M2 absent; Mi from just 
below upper outer angle of cell; Rs and Sc from upper angle, stalked 
for at least one-half their length. 

Male genitaha with uncus bifid, setose ventrally, terminating in 
minute ventrally directed hook. Gnathos with medial process U- 
shaped. Transtilla absent. Juxta membranous, margin sclerotized 
anteriorly. Vinculum variable, U-shaped or V-shaped, anteriorly 
rounded or bluntly pointed. Valvae broadly rounded, variable in out- 
Une, setose distally. Aedeagus tapering posteriorly, vesica armed. 

Female genitaha with ovipositor lobes triangular, moderately setose. 
Apophyses rather straight and uniform. Ductus bursae moderately 
broad. Bursa slender and unarmed. Ductus seminaHs leaving near mid- 
point of ductus bursa. 

Key to the Species of Coenochroa Based Upon External Structure 

1. Central beak of frons protruding beyond rim (figs. 45, 46); costa paler than 

cell; R2 usually first to branch from stalked R2+4 illibella 

Central beak of frons not protruding beyond rim; costa not pale; R^ usually 
first to branch from stalked R2+4 2 

2. Central beak of frons with irregular tip, just attaining end of rim (fig. 47) ; 

Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain bipunctella 

Central beak of frons pointed and small, not attaining end of rim (fig. 44) ; 
Texas and Western United States californiella 

Coenochroa californiella Ragonot 

Figures 41, 44, 65, 98, 133, 168 

Coenochroa californiella Ragonot, 1887, p. 20; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 217.— 
Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 420. — Hulst, 1902, p. 441. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 59. — McDun- 
nough, 1939, p. 36. 

Coenochroa inspergella Ragonot, 1887, p. 20; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 
216. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 419. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440.— 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 59. — McDun- 
nough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy.] 

Diagnosis. — This is the only member of the genus in which the 
central beak of the frons does not attain the rim. The genitaha are 
identical to those of illibella, a species which lacks the discal spot 
and has a distinctive pale costa. 

Description. — Frons with protuberance cylindrical, ventrally 
about as long as wide, rim slanting about 45°, teeth projecting for- 
ward, central beak a very small cone not reaching rim, vesture light 



62 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETLNT 280 

brown dorsally, white ventrally; labial palpi deflexed, basal segments 
white, second and third uniform light yellow, occasionally brown 
dorsally; antennae light brown, finely ciliate; patagia, tegulae, vertex, 
occiput, and legs varying light yellow to brown. 

Fore wing radius varying from about 8 mm to 12 mm, average of 
9.5 mm; ground color light yellow to orange yellow; veins usually 
traced with white, often sprinkled with black scales; dark discal spot at 
lower outer angle of cell; vein R2 usually first to leave stalked R2+4. 

Male genitalia with aedeagus slender, slightly thicker anteriorly, 
vesica with a single slender conutus. 

Female genitalia with ductus seminalis slender, not thickened 
basally. 

Types. — C. californiella and C. inspergella, in the Museum National 
d'Histoire Naturelle. 

Type data. — C. californiella, lectotype male, hereby designated, 
Walsingham, genitalia slide No. 536, J. Shaffer, June 20, 1965. In 
the original description the type locality is given as California. 

C. inspergella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Arizona, Morrison, 
1881, genitalia sHde No. 537, J. Shaffer, June 20, 1965. 

Specimens examined. — 260 cf, 133 9 . 

Distribution (Map 2). — British Columbia south to California, 
east to Kansas and Texas. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Carr Canyon, Huachuca Mts., 
2 cf , June 3, 1952 (M. Cazier, W. Gertsch, R. Schrammel) [AMNH]; Ft. Grant, 
Pinaleno Mts., 1 9, July 15-19, 1917 (C. U. Biol. Expend.) [CU]; Huachuca 
Mts., 1 cf, May 1-7 [USNM]; 1 9, August 8-15; Montezume Pass, Huachuca 
Mts. (6500 ft.), 1 cf, Sept. 7, 1950 (T. Cohn, P. Boone, M. Cazier) [AMNH]; 
Paradise, 1 cf, March [USNM]; Paradise, 1 9, July (Poling) [CM]; 1 <f, 3 9, 
August; Portal, 1 9 , June 1, 1952 (M. Cazier, W. Gertsch, R. Schrammel) 
[AMNH]; San Bernardino Ranch (3750 ft.), 1 9, August (F. H. Snow) [UK]; 
Southwestern Research Sta., 5 mi. west of Portal (5400 ft.), 1 cf , Apr. 10, 1956 
(Cazier, Ordway) [AMNH]; 1 d', Apr. 22, 1956; 1 cT, Apr. 23, 1956; 1 cf, Apr. 
25, 1956; 2 cf , May 16, 1956 (M. Statham) ; 1 cf , 2 9 , May 18, 1956; same locality, 
1 9, July 28, 1959 (E. G. Linsley) [UCB]; same locality, 1 9, July 26-Aug. 3, 
1959 (A. B. Klots) [ABK]; same locality, 1 9, Nov. 1, 1959 (J. R. Powers) 
[UCB]; 1 cf, Nov. 2, 1959; same locaHty, 1 cf, May 16, 1960 (Carl W. Kirkwood) 
[CPK]; 1 d', May 18, 1960; 1 9 , May 25, 1960; 1 cT, May 18, 1960; 1 9 , May 25 
1960; 1 cf, May 28, 1960; 1 cf. May 29, 1960; 1 d, Apr. 10, 1961; 1 d, Apr. 12, 
1961; 1 cf, Apr. 13, 1961; 1 d, Apr. 17, 1961; same locality, 1 9, Apr. 23, 1961 
(M. A. Cazier) [AMNH]; 1 d, Apr. 25, 1961; 1 9, May 2, 1961; same locality, 

1 d^, 2 9, May 10, 1961 (Gertsch & Cazier) [AMNH]; 1 cf, 1 9 , May 15, 1961 
(M. Cazier); 1 cf, May 27, 1961 (M. Statham); same locality, 1 d, Apr. 10, 
1962 (Carl W. Kirkwood) [CNC]; 4 d, Apr. 15, 1962; 1 d, Apr. 16, 1962; 1 
d, Apr. 18, 1962; 1 d, Apr. 19, 1962; 2 cT, Apr. 20, 1962; 1 cf, Apr. 21, 1962; 

2 cf, Apr. 22, 1962; 1 d, Apr. 23, 1962; 1 d, Apr. 27, 1962; same locality, 1 d, 
Aug. 23, 1962 (M. Statham) [AMNH]; 1 d, Aug. 30, 1962; Coconino Co., Flag- 
stafif, 2 cf , no date ( H. S. Barber) [USNM]; Gila Co., vicinity Globe, 3 9 , Aug. 
4-5, 1937 (A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; Globe, 1 d, May 18, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 63 

[CNC]; San Carlos, 1 d", May 12-13 (1918 (J. C. Bradley) [CU]; no locality, 
1 9, no date (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; Maricopa Co., New River, 1 cf, May 
7, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Tempe, 1 cf, Apr. 19, 1920 (E. V. Walter and 
H. L. Arnold) [USNM]; 1 d', Apr. 26, 1920; 1 9, May 3, 1920; 1 9, July 26, 
1920; 1 9, Sept. 27, 1920 (E. V. Walter); Pima Co., Baboquivari Mts. (5-7000 
ft.), 1 (^, July 15-30, 1923 (O. C. Poling) [USNM]; 1 9, July 27-31, 1923; 
1 cT, 1 9, Aug. 1-4, 1923; 3 9, Aug. 1-15, 1923; 3 d^, 7 9 , Aug. 15-30, 1923; 

1 9, Sept. 1-15, 1924; 1 d", Sept. 15-30, 1924; 11 cf, 12 9, Oct. 1-15, 1924; 
9 cf, 1 9, Oct. 15-30, 1924; 1 d, Nov. 1-15, 1924; Baboquivari Mts., 3 cf, 

2 9 , Apr. 23, 1938 (J. A. Comstock) [LACM]; 4 cf , 5 9 , Apr. 24, 1928; 
14 cT, 1 9, Apr. 25, 1938; 1 cT, 2 9, Apr. 26, 1938; Baboquivari Mts., 1 9 , no 
date (F. H. Snow) [UK]; Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mts. (4400 ft.), 2 d, 
2 9 , May 26, 1963 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 1 9 , June 2, 1963; 1 9 , June 4, 
1963; Pinal Co., Oracle, 1 9, May 19, 1933 (Grace H. and John L. Sperry) 
[AMNH]; 1 cf , June 4, 1935, [USNM]; [CUC]; 1 9 , [AMNH]; 3 9 , June 5, 1935 
[AMNH]; Boyce Thompson Arboretum, Superior, 1 9 , Aug. 1, 1937 (A. B. Klots) 
[AMNH]; Santa Curz Co., Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mts., 1 cf, Aug. 15, 1949 
(Lloyd M. Martin) [LCAM]; (5800 ft.), 1 9, June 22, 1955; Madera Canyon, 
Santa Rita Mts., 1 &, Aug. 24^Sept. 2, 1957 (William A. Hammer) [LACM]; 
same locality (4880 ft.), 1 &, Apr, 14, 1963 (J. G. Franclemont) [JGF]; 1 cf , 
May 20, 1963; 1 &, May 21, 1963; 1 9, May 28, 1963; 1 9, June 1, 1963; 
Santa Rita Mts., 4 9 , Aug. 22, 1946 (J. A. Comstock and Lloyd M. Martin) 
[LACM]; 2 9 , Aug. 24, 1946; 1 9 , Aug. 27, 1946; 1 9 , Aug. 29, 1946; Nogales, 

1 9 , May 30, 1899 [USNM]; Nogales, 2 d^, 3 9 , May 24-30 [USNM]; 1 d^, 2 9 , 
June 1-7; 1 &, July 8-15; Pena Blanca (3950 ft.), 1 9, June 7, 1963 (J. G. 
Franclemont) [JGF]; Yavapai Co., 10 mi. east of Congress, 1 9, Aug. 22-23, 
1927; Mayer, 3 d', 1 9, May 21, 1959 (M. O. Glenn) [MOG]; Prescott, 6 &, 
May 6, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; no county, "Catal Spgs," 2 9 , (E. A. 
Schwarz) [USNM]; Fish Creek, Tonto Nat. For., 5 d', 3 9 , May 9-10, 1918 
(J. G. Bradley) [CU]; Todd's Lodge, Oak Creek Canyon, 1 d, June 12, 1941 
(Grace H. and John L. Sperry) [CNC]; Santa Rita Mts., 1 d", 1 9 , May 21, 1898 
(E. A. Schwarz) [USNM]; 1 9 , May 26, 1898; 1 d", June 8, 1898; 1 9 , June 13 
1898; 1 9 , June 14, 1898; Santa Rita Mts. (5-8000 ft.), 1 d, June (F. H. Snow) 
[UK]; no locality, 1 d, no date (Morrison), labeled "Coll. Ragonot 95-85" 
[BM]; no locality, 1 d", 1881 (Morrison) [USNM]; no locality, 1 d, August (O. 
Poling) [USNM]; 6 d, September (Poling) [CM]; 1 d, no date, from Fernald 
collection [USNM]; 1 d^, no date, from C. V. Riley collection [USNM]; 1 d', 1 9 , 
no date [USNM]. 

California: Inyo Co., Bishop, 2 d", June 14, 1937 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 
Lassen Co., Ravendale, 1 9, June 20, 1959 (G. I. Stage) [ABK]; Modoc Co., 
Canby, 3 d, July 16, 1936 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Orange Co., Fullerton, 

2 9, Nov, 14, 1962 (C. A. Toschi) [UCB]; Riverside Co., Rancho La Sierra, 
Arlington, 1 d, Aug. 26, 1949 (A. H. Rindge) [AMNH]; 1 d, Aug. 23, 1952; 
IdyUwild, 1 d, May 13, 1937 (H. Little) [AMNH]; Lake Hemet, 6 d, June 9, 
1937 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Riverside, 1 &, May 4, 1926 (Grace H. and John 
L. Sperry) [CPK]; 1 d, Sept. 28, 1931 (C. H. Dammers) [USNM]; 1 d, 1931; 
1 9, May 4, 1934 (Grace H. and John L. Sperry) [CPK]; 2 d, May 23, 1935 
(Grace H, and John L. Sperry) [AMNH], [CNC]; 1 d^, 1 9 [AMNH]; 1 d", 
July 12, 1935 (Grace H. and John L. Sperry) [AMNH]; 1 d, Apr. 29, 1936 
[CNC]; 1 d, Apr. 27, 1937 (H. Buckwalter) [AMNH]; 3 d, June 1, 1939 [AMNH]; 
San Bernardino Co., Barton Flats, 2 d', June 27, 1946 [AMNH]; Upper Santa 
Ana River, 1 9 , June 2, 1946 [AMNH]; 1 d, July 10, 1946; 1 d, July 18, 1946; 



64 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

1 cf, Aug. 18, 1948 (Melander) ; San Diego Co., Mt. Palomar, 3 &, July 18, 1963 
(J. Powell) [UCB]; Mt. Palomar St. Pk., 1 &, July 12, 1953 (W. J. and J. W. 
Gertsch) [AMNH]; San Diego, 1 &, June 16, 1912 (George H. Field) [ASNM]; 
Jidian, 2 9 , no date [USNM]; Siskiyou Co., Indian Butte, 1 cf, July 16, 1936 
(E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; county unknown, Hathaway Creek, San Bernardino 
Mts., 2 cf , Aug. 2, 1940 (J. A. Comstock and C. Henne) [LACM]. 

Idaho: Canyon Co., Parma, 1 cf, July 6, 1951 (A. J. Walz) [AMNH]. 

Nevada: Clark Co., Kyle Canyon, Charleston Mts., 1 ?, Apr. 26, 1950 (E. 
C, Johnston) [CNC]; Wheeler's Spring, Charleston Mts., 2 cf. May 14, 1934 
[CPK]. 

New Mexico: Bernalillo Co., Albuquerque, 1 9 , July 21, 1902 (Oslar) [USNM]; 
1 9 , July 24, 1902; 1 cf , 9 , no date [UK]; Hidalgo Co., Rodeo, 1 9 , Nov. 7, 
1959 (J. Pv.. Powers) [UCB]; county unknown, "so. N. Mex.," 1 cT, 1 9, Aug. 
23-30 (Poling), Rothschild Bequest B.M. 1939-1 [BM]. 

Texas: Blanco Co., 1 9 , no date, G. D. Hulst [AMNH]; Brewster Co., Alpine, 
1 9, May 22, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Burnet Co., 2 cf, 2 9 , no date 
(F. G. Schaupp) [USNM]; Carmeron Co., Brownsville, 2 9, May 31, 1904 
(H. S. Barber) [USNM]; 1 9, June 3, 1904; 1 d", June [UK]; 2 cf, June [ANS]; 
Hidalgo Co., Mercedes, 1 9, Aug. 31, 1958 (H. Smalzried) [AMNH]; 1 c?, no 
date [CPK]; Jeff Davis Co., Limpia Canyon, 8 cf , 2 9 , May 20, 1950 (E. C. 
Johnston) [CNC]; Randall Co., Palo Duro Canyon St. Pk., 3 cf", May 5, 1961 
(Lloyd M. Martin, Robert H. Reid, William A. Rees, Robert J. Ford) [LACM]; 
3 cf, May 6, 1961; 3 <?, May 8, 1961; 1 9, May 9, 1961; 3 cf, 1 9, May 11, 
1961; 1 9, May 12, 1961. 

Utah: Utah Co., Vineyard, 2 d', July 7, 1917 (Tom Spalding) [ANS]; 1 cf , 
July 11, 1917; 1 d^, Aug. 6, 1917. 

Washington: Adams Co., Othello, 1 cf, June 23, 1959 (R. F. Harwood) 
[USNM]; 1 6", July 9, 1959; Chelan Co., First Creek, 2 cf, July 2, 1949 (E. C. 
Johnston) [CNC]; Grant Co., Dry Falls, 1 &, June 30, 1949 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; Quincy, 1 &, July 5, 1959 (C.S. Crawford) [USNM]; Okanogan Co., 
Black Canyon, 4 c?, July 1, 1949 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Walla Walla Co., 
Walla Walla, 1 cf, June 27, 1935 (H. P. Lanchester) [USNM]; Whiteman Co., 
Snake River, opposite Clarkston, 1 cf. May 29, 1931 (J. F. Clarke) [USNM]; 
Yakima Co., Yakima, 1 cf, June 8, 1931 (Fred Dauy) [USNM]; 1 cf, Sept. 11, 
1955 (A. I. Good) [AMNH]. 

CANADA: British Columbia: Kamloops, 1 9, June 28, 1937 (J. K. Jacob) 
[CNC]; Oliver (1500 ft.), 1 &, June 5, 1953 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]; 7 cf, 
June 16, 1953; 13 &, June 17, 1953; (2500 ft.), 3 cf, June 26, 1953; (1000 ft.), 
1 cT, July 9, 1953 (J. E. H. Martin) [CNC]; (2500 ft.), 2 d^, July 10, 1953 (D. F. 
Hardwick) [CNC]; Osoyoos, 1 d^. May 19, 1923 (C. B. Garrett) [CNC]; (1200 ft.), 
1 9 , July 22, 1953 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]. 

Discussion. — The degree of black scaling on the forewings is 
quite variable and ranges from a very marked broad tracing of the 
veins to an almost total absence of black scales. The type specimen of 
californiella is very sparsely set with black scales and that of insper- 
gella rather heavily so, thus it is not surprising that they were 
regarded as representing separate species. Wing venation, frons, and 
genitalia are essentially identical in the two holotypes. 

Small specunens may easily be mistaken for bipunctella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 65 

Coenochroa illibella (Hulst) 

Figures 39, 40, 45, 67, 134, 169 

Anerastia illihella Hulst, 1887, p. 138. — Rindge, 1955, p. 164. 

Coenochroa puricostella Ragonot, 1887, p. 20. 

Coenochroa illibella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117; 1901, p. 419.— Barnes 

and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 58. — McDunnough, 

1939, p. 36. 
Alamosa piperatella Hampson in Ragonot, 1901, pp. 369-370. — Barnes and 

McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 65. — McDunnough, 1939, 

p. 36. [New synonomy.] 

Diagnosis. — The species may be recognized by either the pale 
costal region of the fo^e\^dng, the compressed and protruding central 
beak of the frons, the absence of a discal spot, or the fact that K.2 is 
almost always the first vein to leave the stalked K.2-f-4. 

Description. — Frons with protuberance cyhndrical, ventraUy 
about as long as wide, rim slanting at about 45°, teeth projecting 
forward, central beak strongly compressed, protruding well beyond 
rim, vestm-e hght browTi dorsaUy, white ventrally; labial palpi some- 
what deflexed, basal segments white, second and third brown on 
outer sides and dorsally, light brown to white ventrally; antennae as 
in calif orniella; patagia, tegulae, vertex, occiput, and legs as in cali- 
forniella. 

Forewing radius averaging about 8.8 mm; area anterior to cell 
white, sometimes variously sprinkled with black scales; region posterior 
to radius quite variable, usually grayish orange sprinkled with 
black scales predominantly on veins; area between veins sometimes 
white, veins never traced with white; vein R2 first to branch from 
R2+4. Hindwing with fringe white. 

Genitalia as in calijorniella. 

Types. — A. illihella, in the American Museimi of Natural History; 
C. 'puricostella, in the Museum National d'Histoire Natiu-eUe; A. 
'piperatella, in the British Museum (Natiu-al History). 

Type data. — A, illihella, lectotype female, hereby designated, 
Blanco Co., central Texas, November, collection G. D. Hulst, geni- 
talia slide No. 3227, Carl Heinrich, June 14, 1946. In the original 
description Hulst reports only that he had two males and one female 
from Texas. 

C. puricostella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Arizona, Morison, 
genitaUa shde No. 538, J. Shaffer, June 20, 1965. 

A. piperatella, lectotype male, hereby designated, labeled as follows: 
"Syntype; Colorado Ameriq. sept.; CoU. Ragonot, 95 — 85.; Alamosa 
piperatella Rag. Colorado ex Coll. Rag; cf genitaha shde 1-4-1967 
J. Shaffer No. 706." 

Specimens examined. — 104 cf , 56 9 . 



66 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Distribution (Map 2). — Ontario west to Alberta and Washington, 
south to California and Texas. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: County unknown, "Br't Angel," 1 &, no date 
[USNM]. 

California: Inyo Co., 7 mi. north Parcher's Camp, 4 cf , June 30, 1961 (J. 
Powell) [UCB]; Mono Co., Leevining, 2 cf, July 19, 1938 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; 1 &, July 20, 1938; 1 mi. southwest Tom's Place, 1 cf , 2 ? , Aug. 10, 1963 
(C. A. Toschi) [UCB]; 1 cf , Aug. 13, 1963 (M. J. Tauber and C. A. Toschi). 

Colorado: Adams Co., Watkins, 8 cf, July 4-5, 1927 [CU]; Boulder Co., 
Boulder, 1 cf, June- August, 1896 [BMNH]; Chaffee Co., Salida, 1 cf, July 9, 1937 
[AMNH]; Denver Co., Denver, 1 cf, no date [USNM]; 2 &, (Oslar) ; Prowers 
Co., Lamar, 2 cT, Sept. 24, 1945 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; county unknown, 1 cf, 
no date (Oslar) [USNM]; 1 cf , no date [AMNH]; 6 &, no date [USNM]. 

Kansas: Clark Co. (1962 ft.), 1 ?, June (F. H. Snow) [ANS]; 1 cf [UK]; 
2 $ [USNM]. 

New Mexico: Eddy Co., Artesia, 2 cf , May 13, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC] 
Sandoyal Co., Frijoles Canyon, Bandelier Nat. Mon., 1 cf, July 9-11, 1957; 
(A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; (6050 ft.), 4 &, July 17, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; 
Otero Co., Mescalero, 1 cT, May 12, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Dona Ana Co., 
Mesilla, 1 $ , July 30 (Cockerell) [BM]; Mesilla Park, 1 c?, 1 ? , May 8 (Cockerell) 
[USNM]; 3 c?, 3 ? , May 13; 2 d", (3800 ft.) [CNC]; 1 d", May 22 (Cockerell) 
[CNC]; 1 d [USNM]; 1 9 , June 8; 1 ? , July 8; 1 9 , Aug. 29; 1 ? , no date; 
1 ? [CNC]; Mesquite near Mesille Park, 1 9, July 12, 1917 [CNC]; 5 d [CU]; 
Grant Co., Silver City, 1 cf. May 25, 1913 (J. B. Wallis) [CNC]; 1 9, May 27 
1913; 1 9 , July 25, 1913; 4 cf , 3 9 , July 26, 1913; 2 cf , July 27, 1913; 7 cT, 1 9 , 
July 28, 1913; county unknown, southern New Mexico, 2 9 , Aug. 23-30 (Poling) 
[BM]. 

North Dakota: Ransom Co., 1 mi. southeast McLeod, 1 cf , July 19, 1963 
(J. R. Powers) [UCB]. 

South Dakota: Davison Co., Mitchell, 1 cf, Sept. 14, 1945 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]. 

Texas: Reeves Co., Pecos, 2 d', 17 9, May 18, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 
1 cf , 8 9 , June 2, 1950; county unknown, 1 9 , no date, labeled, "Fernald Col- 
lection," "U.S.N.M. Type No. 40077," "Petaluma ilUbella Hulst, Type," 
"Aneraslia illibella Hulst, Type" [USNM]. 

Utah: Garfield Co., 11 mi. southeast Panguitch (7200 ft.), 4 d, July 11, 1960 
(F., P., and B. Rindge) [AMNH]; 3 &, July 12, 1960; 5 d, July 13, 1960; Tooele 
Co., Stockton, 1 9 , Aug. 8, 1904 (Tom Spalding) [USNM]; 1 9 , no date; Utah 
Co., Vineyard, 1 d, Aug. 6, 1917 (Tom Spalding) [ANS]; 1 9, July 16, 1917. 

Washington: Grant Co., Quincy, 1 d, July 1, 1959 (C. S. Crawford) [USNM]; 
1 c?, July 5, 1959. 

CANADA: Alberta: Medicine Hat, 1 d, July 15, 1956 (E. E. Sterns) [CNC]; 
Scandia, 1 cf , July 6, 1956 (E. E. Sterns) [CNC]. 

Ontario: Marmora, 1 9, Aug. 16, 1952 (J. F. McAlpine) [CNC]; Point Pelee 
1 d,l 9 , June 29, 1927 (F. P. Ide) [CNC]. 

Discussion. — The original description of illibella lists two males 
and one female from Texas. The disposition of the male types is not 
known, and two female specimens from Texas bear Hulst's "Type" 
label. Available evidence is insuflScient to determine which, if either, 
of these two females was included in the original series, and I have 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIESTAE 67 

designated as lectotype the specimen in the American Museum of 
Natural History. The remaining female is deposited in the U.S. 
National Museum, full data being given above. 

The specimens from Pecos, Tex. are atypical in that the frons beak 
is unusually well developed and the rim is flared anteriorly so that 
the teeth point somewhat anterolaterally. Most of the Pecos speci- 
mens are only sparsely set with black scales on the forewings, but 
otherwise are typical of the species. 

Coenochroa bipunctella (Barnes and McDnnnoiigh), new combination 

Figures 42, 47, 66, 135, 170 

Alamosa bipunctella Barnes and McDunnough, 1913, p. 184; 1917, p. 149. — 
Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. — Hampson, 1918, p. 65. — McDunnough, 1939, 
p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, p. 251. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only member of the genus having numer- 
ous small cornuti on the vesica of the male rather than a single one. 
The ductus seminalis of females is thickened where it leaves the 
ductus bursa, not slender as in other species. Otherwise, specimens 
could be confused with small examples of calijorniella, which has 
similar wing venation and maculation, but the two species are largely 
or wholly allopatric. 

Description. — Frons wdth protuberance cylindrical, ventrally 
about as long as wide, rim slanting at about 45°, teeth projecting 
forward, central beak conical Avith irregular tip even with end of rim, 
vesture light brown to browTi dorsally, white to light brown ventrally; 
labial palpi usually porrect, basal segments white, second and third 
brown dorsally and on outer sides, light brown ventrally; antennae as 
in californiella; patagia and tegulae brown, vertex and occiput light 
brown dorsally, occiput brown dorsolaterally, white below middle of 
eye; legs brown on outer sides, white on inner sides. 

Forewing radius averaging about 6.9 mm; cell, discocellular, radials, 
medials, cubitals, and anal veins each traced with a broad white band 
sprinkled vnih. black scales; area anterior to cell varying yellow to 
brown and sprinkled \^dth black scales; ground color yellow to yellow 
brown; prominent black discal spot at lower outer angle of cell; brown 
on underside; vein R4 first to branch from stalked E2+4. Hindwing 
bordered with double brown line; fringe white; ground color light 
broAvn, darker in apical area; Cui and M3 stalked for at least one-half 
length, sometimes fused. 

Male genitalia mth vinculum V-shaped, pointed anteriorly. 
Aedeagus club-shaped vesica bearing numerous small cornuti which 
diminish in size anteriorly. 

Female genitalia with ductus bursae rather short. Ductus seminalis 
thickened basally. 



68 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — One female, Fort Myers, Fla., Apr. 16-23, Barnes 
collection; USNM 69383; genitalia slide No. 573, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 
1965. 

Specimens examined. — 63 cf , 3 9 . 

Distribution (Map 2). — Atlantic and Gidf Coastal Plain, recorded 
from Mississippi to New Jersey. 

UNITED STATES: Florida: Alachua Co., GainesvUle, 1 9, June 2, 1927 
(J. Speed Rogers) [CU]; 1 cf, June 29, 1927; 1 d", July 7, 1927; 8 cf , July 8, 1927; 
1 cf , 1 9 , July 10, 1927; 1 & [CNC]; 5 d", July 1927 (J. Speed Rogers) [CU] 1 d, 
Apr. 20, 1952 (O. Peck) [CNC]; 1 &, Apr. 22, 1952; Dade Co., South Campus, 
Richmond, 2 cf, Nov. 27, 1951 (F. G. Butcher) [CNC]; Indian River Co., Vero 
Beach, 1 cf , no date (J. R. Malloch) [USNM]; Orange Co., Orlando, 1 cf , June 
14-18, 1927 (C. C. McBride) [CU]; Pasco Co., Elfers, 1 9, Apr. 17, 1952 (G. S. 
Walley) [CNC]; 6 d, Apr. 18, 1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; Polk Co., Lake 
Alfred, 1 cf, June 30, 1928 (L. J. Bottimer) [USNM]; Sarasota Co., 1 cf , May 5, 
1946, (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; Siesta Key, 1 d, Feb. 23, 1951 (C. P. Kimball) 
[CNC]; Ic?, Feb. 27, 1951; 1 cf, Dec. 24, 1941; 2 cT, Feb. 13, 1952; 1 cf, Feb. 23, 
1952; 3 cf , Mar. 1, 1952; 1 &, Mar. 26, 1952; 2 cf , Apr. 2, 1952; 1 d, Nov. 6, 1952; 
1 &, Nov. 15, 1952; 1 cT, Apr. 11, 1953; 1 d, Apr. 24, 1953; 1 d, Feb. 13, 1954; 
1 &, Mar. 14, 1954; 1 &, Feb. 9, 1955; 1 d, Feb. 18, 1955; 1 d, Apr. 29, 1956; 
1 &, Oct. 24, 1956; 1 9 , Jan. 23, 1957; Seminole Co., Altamont, 1 cf , Sept. 21, 
1924 (F. R. Cole) [USNM]. 

Mississippi: Forrest Co., Camp Shelby, 1 cf , Sept. 1-15, 1944 (C. D. Michener) 
[AMNH]. 

New Jersey: Ocean Co., Lakehurst, 1 cf, July 24, 1939 (E. P. Darlington) 
[ANS]. 

North Carolina: Robeson Co., Maxton, 1 d, May 11, 1944 (A. B. Klots) 
[AMNH]; 2 cf , May 23, 1944; 1 d, Oct. 4, 1944. 

Discussion. — The species has been poorly collected outside of 
Florida, as is generally true for Coastal Plain groups, and is probably 
more common there than the few scattered records indicate. It may 
be sympatric with calijorniella in the Coastal Plain section of Texas. 

Bandera Ragonot 

Figure 68 

Bandera Ragonot, 1887, p. 19. — Hulst, 1890, p. 202 [listed in Phycitinae].— 
Smith, 1891, p. 84 [listed in Phycitinae].— Ragonot, 1889, p. 117; 1901, p. 409. 
— Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson 
1918, p. 89. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Heinrich, 1956, pp. 1, 315, 316. 
[Type: Anerastia binotella Zeller, 1872. Original designation.] 

Nasutes Hampson, 1930, p. 53 [described in Phycitinae]. — McDunnough, 1939, 
p. 28. — Heinrich, 1956, pp. 315-316 [listed as synonym of Bandera]. [Type: 
Nasutes venata Hampson, 1930, Monobasic] 

Diagnosis. — The absence of ocelli and the presence of a tongue, 
reduced but exposed between the palpi, serve to distinguish this 
genus from the other North American Phycitinae. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 69 

Description. — Frons conical; labial palpi porrect, outer sides of 
second and third segments clothed with white-tipped brown scales, 
basal segments clothed with broad white scales; maxillary palpi 
cylindrical, almost reaching frons; tongue exposed betw^een palpi; 
antennae filiform, compressed, ciliate ventrally; ocelli absent; legs 
brown to fuscous laterally, tarsi brown and speckled with white. 

Forewings with a brown-speckled white band anterior to cell; 
veins traced wdth white and margined on both sides with a sprinkling 
of brown scales; 9 veins; Ri from well before outer angle of cell; II2 
from cell; R44.5 fused; Mj from upper outer angle; M2+3 fused and from 
the angle; Cui from before the angle; Cu2 from well before the lower 
outer angle of cell. Hindwing light brown above and below, slightly 
darker toward apex; 7 veins; Sc and Rs long stalked; Cui stalked with 
fused M24.3; Cu2 from well before the lower outer angle of cell. 

Male genitalia \vith uncus broadly triangulate, slightly tapering, 
\vith apex broadly rounded, laterally and dorsocaudally setose. 
Gnathos arms terminating in an anterior ventral hook; apical process 
a simple posteriorly directed hook. Juxta U-shaped, wdth small 
lateral knobs. Vincidum stout. Valvae distally rounded; costa tubular, 
slightly tapering distally. Vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia \\'ith ovipositor tapering distally, about as long as 
basal width. Apophyses slender, well sclerotized; posterior about 
five or six times as long as their basal separation; anterior about two 
to four times as long as their basal separation. Ductus bursae long, 
weakly sclerotized. Bursa small; \vith a group of three or four small 
barlike signa near posterior end. Ductus seminalis threadlike; from 
near or at posterior end of bursa near signa. 

Discussion. — The genus shows affinities to a number of other 
phycitine genera and is probably closest to Anagasta Heinrich. The 
great preponderance of males in collections suggests that females 
are far less readily attracted to light. 

Key to the Species of Bandera Based Upon the Maculation 

1. Space between vein A2 and cell of forewing a pale yellow field sprinkled with 

brown or with browTi scales on fold of Ai virginella 

Space between vein A2 and cell of forewing a solid yellow field, not sprinkled 
with brown ^ 

2. Basal area of costa yellow cupidinella 

Entire length of costa white, sprinkled with brown scales .... binotella 

Bandera binotella (Zeller) 

Figures 31, 68, 99, 136, 171 

Anerastia binotella Zeller, 1872, pp. 554-555. 

Bandera subluteella Ragonot, 1887, p. 19; 1889, p. 117. — Smith, 1891, p. 84 
[listed in Phycitinae]. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 410-411. — Hulst, 1902, p. 



70 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

440. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 90. — 
McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. [New synonymy.] 
Bandera binotella (Zeller). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 202.— 
Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 409-410. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — 
Dyar, 1908c, p. 116. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 
1918, pp. 89-90. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — The presence of a transverse posterior line of dots and 
a transverse anterior dot on vein A2 of the forewing, a truncate 
vinculum, and an incomplete transtilla each by itself distinguish this 
species from other members of the genus. 

Description. — Frons about as long as diameter of eye, light brown; 
vertex, occiput, tegula, and prothorax white to light brown dorsally, 
gray brown laterally; abdomen light creamy brown dorsally, brown 
ventraUy. 

ForeAving yellow between veins; discal cell, area between cell and 
vein A2, and area posterior to A2 solid yellow; transverse posterior 
variously developed as a row of dots on veins, best represented by a 
dark spot near end of vein A2; a dark spot on vein A2 halfway between 
tp line and wing base; light brown to brown on underside. 

Male genitalia Avith transtilla incomplete. Lateral knobs of juxta 
well developed, setose. Vinculum rectangular, broadly truncate ante- 
riorly. Aedeagus tapering posteriorly, subtruncate anteriorly. Eighth 
abdominal segment of male bearing lateral hair tufts. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor sparsely setose. Ductus bursae 
broad. 

Types. — A. binotella, in the British Museum (Natural History), 
(from Zeller collection); B. suhluteella, in the Museum National 
d'Histoire Naturelle. 

Type data. — A. binotella, in the original description Zeller reports 
"Vaterland: Texas. Belfrage fing das Exemplar am 12. Juli." Type 
examined by Mr. Paul Whalley. 

B. subluteella, lectotype male, hereby designated, labeled as follows: 
"TYPE; WALSM; 1901 coll. E. L. Ragonot Museum Paris; Bandera 
subluteella Rag. type orig. pi. XL f. 21; cf genitalia slide July-28- 
1965 J. Shaffer No. 553." The specimen also bears a small handwritten 
label inscribed AAdth "Col9," probably intended to be "Colo" (Colo- 
rado). Ragonot may have interpreted the inscription as an abbrevia- 
tion for California since that state is given as the type locality. I 
have seen no specimens of binotella from California although the species 
is found in Washington and therefore might be expected to occur in 
northern California. 

Specimens examined. — 71 cf, 8 9. 

Distribution (Map 4). — Washington southeastward to Arizona 
and Texas; eastern population on Atlantic Coastal Plain, New Jersey 
to Massachusetts. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 71 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Apache Co., Greer, White Mts. (8500 ft.), 
1 cT, Aug. 6, 1962 (E. and I, Munroe) [CNC]. 

Colorado: Rocky Mountain National Park, 9 cf , Aug. 15, 1937 (A. B. lOots) 
[AMNH]. 

Connecticut: New Haven Co., East River, 1 cf , July 10, 1909 (Charles R. 
Ely) [USNM]; 1 d^, July 30, 1910; 1 c?, Aug. 13, 1910; 1 d^, Aug. 29, 1910; 
1 d^, August 1910; 1 9, July 1911; Windham Co., Putnam, 1 d', Aug. 9, 
1940 (A. B. Klots) [AMNH]; 1 ? , August 1942; 1 d^, Aug. 16, 1960 [ABK]. 

Massachusetts: Barnstable Co., Barnstable, 1 9, July 4, 1949 (C. P. Kim- 
ball) [CU]; same locality, 1 d", Sept. 11, 1949 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 2 d^, 
Aug. 5, 1950; 1 d", Sept. 12, 1952; Dukes Co., Martha's Vineyard, 1 9, July 20 
(F. M. Jones) [CPK]; Worcester Co., Worcester, 1 d', July 11, 1933 [CU]. 

Montana: Roosevelt Co., Poplar, 1 d", July 15, 1921 (H. G. Dyar) [USNM]. 

New Jersey: Bergen Co., Oakland, 1 9 , July 26, 1947 (C. P. Kimball) [CNC]; 
3 d^, Aug. 4, 1948; 3 d^, Aug. 6, 1948; 1 9 , Aug. 8, 1948 [CU]; 1 &, Aug. 8, 1948 
[CNC]; 3 &, Aug. 9, 1948 [CNC, CPK]; 2 d', Aug. 10, 1948 [CPK]; 3 d^, Aug. 13, 
1948 [CNC, CPK]; 2 d^, Aug. 14, 1948 [CPK]; 1 d^, Aug. 22, 1948 [CPK]; 1 d", 1 
9 , Aug. 24, 1948 [CNC]; 1 d", August 1948; "oM Beach," 1 d, "7.2" (F. Haim- 
bach) [USNM]. 

New Mexico: Colfax Co., Cimarron Canyon, Sangre de Cristo Mts. (7900 ft.), 
1 d, July 7, 1962 (E, and I. Munroe) [CNC]; 1 d, July 13, 1962; Lincoln Co., 
Cedar Creek Camp, 2 mi. north of Ruidoso (7000 ft.), 1 d, June 30, 1961 (F., P., 
and J. Rindge) [AMNH]; 6 d, July 29, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) [CNC]; Mc- 
Kinley Co., McGaffey, Zuni Mts. (7500 ft.), 2 d, July 20, 1962 (E. and I. Munroe) 
[CNC]; 4 d, July 21, 1962; 2 &, July 22, 1962; 2 d, July 24, 1962; Sandoyal Co., 
Frijoles Canyon, Bandelier Nat. Mon. (6000 ft.), 1 cf , July 17, 1962 (E. and I. 
Munroe) [CNC]. 

Texas: HUdalgo Co., Mercedes, 1 d, Aug. 31, 1958 (H. Smalzried) [AMNH], 

Washington: Chelan Co., Leavenworth, 2 d", July 3, 1949 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; Whitman Co., Pullman, 1 d, Aug. 6, 1898 (C. V. Piper) [USNM], from 
the paratype series of Bandera virginella, No. 11851 [USNM], genitalia slide, Carl 
Heinrich No. 6, Dec. 20, 1932. 

CANADA: British Columbia: Oliver, 1 9, Aug. 2, 1953 (D. F. Hardwick) 
[CNC]; 1 d, Aug. 10, 1953; 1 d, Aug. 11, 1953; 1 d, Sept. 14, 1953. 

Alberta: Dominion Range Sta., Manyberries, 1 d, Aug. 14, 1951 (D. F, Hard- 
wick) [CNC]. 

Discussion. — Tlie presumed habitat differences and the wide geo- 
graphic separation between eastern and western populations indicate 
that they may well represent distinct biological species, but the 
absence of clear-cut morphological differences between them dictates 
that better criteria must be found if a new species name is to be given 
to the eastern population. Eastern specimens differ in having the frons, 
vertex, occiput, tegula, and prothorax covered with brown scales. 
The forewing ground color is reddish brown rather than yellow, and 
the transverse posterior line of dots is usually better developed. 

Bandera cupidinella Hulst 

Figures 32, 137, 172 

Bandera cupidinella Hulst, 1888, p. 118. — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. — Hulet, 1890, 
p. 203. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 410. — Hulst, 1902 



72 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

p. 440. — Dyar, 1908c, p. 116. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. 

— Hampson, 1918, p. 90. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Rindge, 1955, 

p. 160. — Heinrich, 1956, pp. 315-316. 
Anerastia conspersella Ragonot, 1901, p. 404. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, 

p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 
Rhinaphe conspersella (Ragonot). — Hampson, 1918, p. 86. 
Nasutes venata Hampson, 1930, p. 54. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 28 [listed in 

Phycitinae]. — Heinrich, 1956, pp. 315-316 [Hsted as a synonym of 

cupidinelld\. 

Diagnosis. — This species may be recognized either by the absence 
of hair brushes in the male, or by the presence of a basal yellow margin 
on the costa of forewing of both sexes. 

Description. — Frons about as long as diameter of eye, light brown; 
lateral scales of labial palpi with brown restricted to a subterminal 
band; vertex, occiput, and thorax light yellow brown dorsally, occiput 
and prothorax gray brown laterally; abdomen varying light brown to 
brown. 

Forewing with costa abruptly yellow marginally at base to one-fifth 
distance to apex; yellow to orange yellow between veins; discal cell, 
area between cell and vein A2, and area posterior to vein A2 solid 
yellow with no brown scales; fringe on outer margin of alternating 
white and brown bands; brown beneath. 

Male genitalia with transtilla complete, weakly sclerotized medially. 
Lateral knobs of juxta poorly developed. Vinculum bluntly rounded 
anteriorly. Aedeagus tapering very slightly posteriorly, bluntly 
rounded anteriorly. Eighth abdominal segment without lateral hair 
tufts. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor setose. Ductus bursae broad. 

Types. — B. cupidinella, in the U.S. National Museum; N. venata 
and A. conspersella, in the British Museum (Natural History). 

Type data. — B. cupidinella, lectotype male, hereby designated, 
Colorado, Denver (Fernald collection), USNM 40074, genitalia slide 
No. 575, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1964. 

N. venata, in the original description Hampson reports: Colorado, 
Boulder, 1 cf ; Cockerell; alar expanse 20 mm. Type examined by 
Mr. Paul Whalley. 

A. conspersella, lectotype male, hereby designated, Colorado, Akron, 
"11/9/83"; genitalia slide No. 705, J. Shaffer, Jan. 4, 1967. 

Specimens examined. — 36 cf, 2 9. 

Distribution (Map 4). 

UNITED STATES: Colorado: Boulder Co., Boulder, 2 cf , September 5 (Cocke- 
rell) [USNM]; Denver Co., Denver, 2 cT, Sept. 1, 1904; 1 d', Sept. 3, 1904; 9 d^, 
no date; Denver, 4 cf , no date [USNM]; Prowers Co., Lamar, 4 cf, 1 9 , Sept. 24, 
1945 (B. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Pueblo Co., Pueblo, 1 cf , September 1899 [AMNH]; 
no locaUty, 11 d" [USNM]. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIESTAE 73 

New Mexico: Hot Springs (7000 ft.), 1 cf, September [USNM]; no locality 
(7000 ft.), 1 9 , 1927 (H. S. Parish) [CU]. 

Texas: Jeff Davis Co., Ft. Davis (oOOO ft.), 1 d^, 1927 (IT. S. Parish) [CU]. 

Discussion. — Two males in the American Museum of Natural 
History are labeled "Type" from Hot Springs, N. Mex., 7000 ft., 
August, September. A male genitalia slide of the August specimen 
was prepared by Carl Heinrich, No. 3226, June 14, 1946. The type 
locality is given as Colorado and these specimens must be regarded 
as another example of Hulst pseud oty pes. The specimen in the U.S. 
National Museum labeled "Type" is from Colorado and is assumed to 
be genuine. 

Bandera virginella Dyar 

FiGXJBES 33, 138, 173 

Bandera virginella Dyar, 1908c, pp. 116-117. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, 
p. 150. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — In the other members of this genus the discal cell 
and the area between the cell and vein A2 are scaled with solid yellow, 
but in virginella these areas are pale yeUow sprinkled with brown 
scales. The male genitalia are identical with those of cupidinella, but 
the eighth abdominal segment bears lateral hair tufts. 

Description. — Frons about two-thirds as long as diameter of eye, 
dirty white dorsally and light brown ventrally; tongue somewhat less 
well developed than on other members of the genus; vertex, occiput, 
and thorax light yellow brown dorsally, occiput and prothorax gray 
brown laterally; abdomen varying light brown to brown. 

Forewings with areas between veins pale yellowish white, variously 
sprinkled with brown scales; fold of Ai traced with brown scales; 
brown beneath. 

Male genitalia as in B. cupidinella. Eighth abdominal segment with 
hair tufts similar to those of B. binotella, but with fewer scales and 
therefore smaller. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor sparsely setose. Ductus bursae 
slender. 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Holotype: Washington, Pullman, male, July 24, 1898; 
C. V. Piper; Washington Exp. Sta. No. 463; USNM 11851; male 
genitaha slide No. 5, Carl Heinrich, Dec. 20, 1932. 

Paratypes: Five specimens, Washington, Pullman, males; C. V. 
Piper; USNM 11851. Dates are July 8, 1898, Aug. 6, 1898, Aug. 10, 
1898, July 31, 1899, Aug. 3, 1899. The specimen collected Aug. 6, 1898 
bears genitalia slide label C.H. No. 6, Dec. 20, 1932 and belongs to 
B. binotella. 

Other specimens examined. — 51 cf , 7 9 . 



74 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Distribution (Map 4). — New Mexico to California, north to 
Alberta and British Columbia. 

UNITED STATES: Akizona: Cochise Co., Southwestern Res. Sta., Chiri- 
cahua Mts., 1 d', Apr. 11, 1962 (Carl W. Kirkwood) [CNC]; 1 cf, Apr. IS, 1962; 
Yavapai Co., Prescott, 5 cf , May 6, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]. 

California: Riverside Co., Kenworthy, 6 cf, June 9, 1937 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; Lake Hemet, 1 cf , June 9, 1937 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; San Bernardino 
Co., 12 mi. southeast of Ivanpan, 1 cf, May 1, 1956 (J. Powell) [UCB]; Upper 
Santa Ana River. 1 d", Aug. 12, 1948 (Grace H. and John L. Sperry) [AMNH]; 
Siskiyou Co., Indian Butte, 4 cf , July 16, 1936 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Ventura 
Co., Camp Ozena, Upper Cuyama, 4 d, June 13, 1963 (C. W. Kirkwood) [CPK]; 
3 cf , June 14, 1963; 1 cf, June 18, 1963, 1 cf , June 19, 1963; 2 cf , June 24, 1963; 
1 cf , June 27, 1963. 

Colorado: Rock Creek Canyon, 1 cf, Sept, 26, 1957 (Margot May) [CNC]; 
1 cf , Sept.28, 1957. 

New Mexico: Eddy Co., White City, 1 cf , May 15, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]. 

Washington: Walla Walla Co., Walla Walla, 1 9, Apr. 9, 1931 (D. R. Bran- 
non) [USNM]; 1 cf, Apr. 21, 1931; 3 cf, Apr. 18, 1935 (H. P. Lanchaster) ; 
Whitman Co., Pullman, 1 cf, June 19, 1930 (J. F. Clarke) [USNM]; 1 cf , 1 9 , 
Aug. 3, 1932; 2 cf, July 3, 1935; Yakima Co., Satus Creek, 2 cf, Aug. 19, 1949 
(E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 1 cf, Sept. 16, 1949; Tieton, 1 cf, May 12, 1931 (Fred 
Deari) [USNM]. 

CANADA: Alberta: Medicine Hat, 1 cf , June 24, 1945 (K. Bowman) [CNC]. 

British Columbia: Shingle Cr. Road, Keremeos, 1 cf , June 8, 1935 (A. N. 
Gartrell) [CNC]; 3 9 , July 15, 1935; 2 9 , July 22, 1935; Ohver (1000 ft.), 1 cf , 
Aug. 10, 1953 (D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]; 1 cf, Aug. 11, 1953. 

No data given except S. Diego, 1 cf , July 19, 1924 [USNM]. 

Wakulla, new genus 

Type. — Bandera carneeUa Barnes and McDunnough, 1913. 

Diagnosis. — Among the phycitine genera exhibiting a reduced 
tongue this is the only genus in which the males have both hair tufts 
on the eighth abdominal segment and a spatulate uncus. 

Description. — Frons conical, about two-thirds as long as eye 
diameter; labial palpi slightly ascending and extending somewhat 
beyond frons in male, female ascending, reaching beyond vertex; 
maxillary palpi well developed, cylindrical; tongue reduced, visible 
between bases of palpi, scaled at base; antennae filiform in both sexes, 
compressed, ciliate ventrally, cilia short, about one-sixth as long as 
segment width; ocelli minute. 

Forewing and hindwing venation as in Bandera. 

Male genitalia with uncus spatulate, setose dorsally and laterally. 
Gnathos arms each terminating in anterior hook; apical process bi- 
furcate. Transtilla incomplete. Juxta U-shaped, surrounding aedeagus 
ventrally and laterally. Vinculum stout, tapering, broadly truncate 
anteriorly, length and width about equal. Valvae with costa tubular, 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 75 

terminating in short free spine just before apex of cuculliis; sacculus 
inflated on basal one-fourth of valve. Aedeagus stout, slightly tapering 
distally, vesica unarmed. Eighth abdominal segment of male with 
hair tufts. 

Female genitaUa with ovipositor tapering distally, sparsely setose, 
about 13^ times as long as broad. Apophyses well sclerotized, posterior 
about four to five times as long as basal separation, anterior slightly 
less than twice as long as basal separation. Ductus bursae long. Bursa 
small, bearing three small barlike signae. Ductus seminalis leaving 
bursa near posterior end, just posterior to signae, threadlike, well 
sclerotized. 

Wakulla carneella (Barnes and McDunnough), new combination 

Figures 43, 100, 139, 174 

Bandera carneella Barnes and McDunnough, 1913, p. 184; 1917, p. 150. — Gross- 
beck, 1917, p. 134. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, p. 251. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Labial palpi with basal segments white, second and 
third segments Hght brown or reddish brown on outer sides, white or 
nearly so on inner sides; maxillary palpi reddish brown; antennae with 
scape brown, shaft light brown; frons, vertex, occiput, patagia, and 
tegulae reddish brown. 

Forewing reddish brown, sprinkled with dark brown scales; two 
small dark brown spots at distal end of cell; male with tuft of black 
scales at base of costa. Hindwing light brown. 

GenitaUa as described for the genus. 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Holotype male, Everglades Fla., Apr. 8-15, Barnes 
collection, "Photograph pi. 1 No. 5"; USNM 69384; genitalia slide 
No. 574, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1965. 

Specimens examined. — 3cf, 1 9. 

Distribution (Map 3). — Known only from Florida. 

UNITED STATES: Florida; Manatee Co., Gulf Coast Exp. Sta., Bradenton, 
Id', Aug. 5, 1955 (E. G. Kelsheimer) [CPK]; Id', Mar. 28, 1956; Sarasota Co., 
Siesta Key, Icf, Feb. 13, 1951 (C. P. Kimball) [CPK]; 1?, Nov. 9, 1952. 

Tampa Ragortot 

Tampa Ragonot, 1887, pp. 19-20; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 203 [listed in 
Phycitinae]. — Smith, 1891, p. 84 [listed in Phycitinae]. — Ragonot, 1901, 
p. 411. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — 
Forbes, 1923, p. 637. — Hampson, 1918, p. 62. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 
[Type: Tampa dimediatella, 1887. Monobasic] 



285-934—68- 



76 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

Diagnosis. — The presence of only two radial veins in the forewing 
distinguishes Tampa among the phycitine genera showing a reduced 
tongue. 

Description. — Frons conical; labial palpi ascending, often porrect 
in females, about three times eye diameter in males, 3}^ times in 
females; maxillary palpi three-segmented, cylindrical, reaching frons 
or nearly so; tongue reduced, usually visible between palpi; antennae 
filiform in both sexes, somewhat thicker in male, female scaled dor- 
sally and laterally, ventrally with short appressed cilia, male scaled 
dorsally, ventrally wdth cilia about one-half segment wddth, hooked 
at tips; ocelli absent. 

Forewing with 8 veins; Ri from near upper outer angle of cell, 
R2+4 fused, from the angle; Mi from about one-third from top of cell; 
M2+3 fused, from lower outer angle; Cui from just before the angle; 
Cu2 from w^ell before the angle. Hindwing with 7 veins; Sc and Rs 
long stalked: Mi from upper outer angle; M2+3 fused, long stalked 
with Cui, from lower outer angle; Cu2 from just before the angle. 

Male genitalia with uncus tapering, broadly and bluntly rounded 
apically; rather densely setose dorsally and laterally. Gnathos wdth 
medial process small, simple, shallowly notched apically. Transtilla 
complete, w^eakly sclerotized. Juxta crescent shaped, with pair of 
lateral setose tubercles. Vinculum V-shaped, apex bluntly rounded. 
Valve narrow, sides nearly parallel, apex rounded. Vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tapering distally, about twice as 
long as wide. Apophyses slender, posterior about six or seven times 
as long as their basal separation; anterior about 2}^ times as long as 
their basal separation, diverging. Ductus bursae long, slender. Bursa 
small, with a group of five to seven parallel barlike signae extending 
anteriorly from ductus seminalis near posterior end. Ductus seminalis 
from posterior end of bursa, tapering, then slender. 

Tampa dimediatella Ragonot 

Figures 35, 69, 101, 140, 175 

Tampa dimediatella Ragonot, 1887, p. 20; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 203. — 
Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 411. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Grossbeck, 1917, p. 134. — 
Hampson, 1918, p. 63. — Forbes, 1923, p. 367. — McDunnough, 1939, 
p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, p. 251. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Labial palpi with basal segments and ventral and 
inner sides of second segments white, third segments and outer sides 
of second dark brown to black; maxillary palpi, frons, vertex, sides 
of occiput dark brown to black; dorsum of occiput, patagia, and 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIENAE 77 

tegulae somewhat lighter; antennae brown; legs white on inner sides, 
outer sides varying light brown to dark brown. 

Fore wings light brown anterior to cell, sprinkled with dark brown 
scales ; cell a white band extending to wing apex, sprinkled with a few 
dark brown scales; discal spot small, black; cubitus traced with black 
sometimes extending from cell to Ai fold; wings grayish-red posterior 
to black trace; A2 traced with black. Underside brown to grayish 
brown, cell hghter. Hindwings light brown above and below, darker 
apicaUy. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Type.— In the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle. 

Type data. — Lectotype male, hereby disignated. Archer, Florida, 
*'23/3 82": collection C. V. Kiley; male genitalia sHde No. 550, J. 
Shaffer, July 28, 1965. 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 180 cT, 39 9. 

Distribution (Map 1). — Atlantic and GuK Coastal Plain, eastern 
Texas to Florida, northward into Vhginia. 

UNITED STATES: Florida: Alachua Co., Archer, 1 c?, "23/3 82" [USNM]; 
Gainesville, 7 d^, 2 9 , July 8, 1927 (J. Speed Rogers) [CU]; 1 ? , July 10, 1927; 
Charlotte Co., Punta Gorda, 1 ?, Apr. 11, 1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; 1 cT, 
1 9, Apr. 12, 1952 (G. S. Walley); Dade Co., Princeton, 2 cf, 1 9, Apr. 4, 

1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; South Campus, Richmond, 1 &, Nov. 27, 1951 
(F. G. Butcher) [CNC]; Highlands Co., Lake Placid, Archbold Biol. Sta., 1 9, 
Apr. 2, 1945 (J. G. Needham) [CNC]; Archbold Biol. Sta., 3 d^, June 17, 1964 
(Jay C. Shaffer) [JCS]; 8 d^, 2 9 , June 18, 1964; 2 c?, June 20, 1964; 3 d', June 22 
1964; 1 d", June 23, 1964; 1 d", 1 9 , June 25, 1964; 2 d', June 26, 1964; 1 9 
June 27, 1964; 3 d^, 5 9 , June 28, 1964; 5 d", 2 9 , June 29, 1964; 3 d", July 1 
1964; 2 d^, July 2, 1964; 12 d^, 2 9 , July 3, 1964; 4 d^, July 4, 1964; 20 d', 7 9 , 
July 5, 1964; 5 d^, July 6, 1964; 1 cf 1 9 , July 7, 1964; 1 d", July 11, 1964; 36 d", 
3 9 , July 12, 1964; 6 &, July 13, 1964; 1 6", Dec. 21, 1964 (S. W. Frost)[ CPK]; 
Manatee Co., Oneco, 1 d", April 1954 (Paula Dillman) [CPK]; Monroe Co., 
Key Largo, 2 d", Nov. 6, 1964 (Mrs. Spencer Kemp) [CPK]; 2 d, Nov. 16, 1964; 
Pasco Co., Elfers, 1 d, Apr. 10, 1952 (J. R. Vockeroth) [CNC]; Pinellas Co., St. 
Petersburg, 1 d, September [USNM]: Sarasota Co., Siesta Key, 1 d, Apr. 16, 

1953 (Charles P. Kimball) [CPK]; 1 d, Mar. 28, 1954; 1 &, Apr. 1, 1954; 1 &, 
Apr. 27, 1956; 4 d, Oct. 24, 1956; 1 d, Jan. 28, 1957; 2 9, May 21, 1957; St. 
Johns Co., Hastings, 1 &, Aug. 1, 1900 [USNM]. 

Georgia: Bryan Co., Clyde, 1 d, Sept. 11-12, 1931 (Bradley and Knorr) 
ICU]. 

Louisiana: Natchitoches Parish, 2 d, August (G. CoverdaJe) [USNM]; 
Vernon Parish, 1 d^, 1 9 , July (G. Coverdale) [USNM]. 

Texas: Collin Co., Piano, 1 9, August (E. S. Tucker) [USNM]; Fort Bend 
Co., Richmond, Brazos River, 19 d^, 4 9 , June 22, 1917 [CU]; 1 d" [CNC]; 
Wharton Co., Wharton, 6 d', 1 9, June 24, 1917 [CU]; Victoria Co., Victoria, 
1 d, June 24, 1917 [CU]; Victoria, 1 d, no date [USNM]. 

Virginia: Dinwiddle Co., Dinwiddie, 1 d, June 1, 1917 [CU]. 



78 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Barberia Dyar 

Barberia Dyar, 1905, p. 39. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149 — Hamp- 
son, 1918, p. 131. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. [Type: Barberia affinitella 
Dyar, 1905. Monobasic] 

Diagnosis. — The distinctive uncus, basally triangular and with a 
narrow terminal portion, distinguishes the genus from all other New 
World phycitines with similar wing venation. 

Description. — Frons oblique; labial palpi upturned, slender; 
maxillary palpi well developed, reaching frons; tongue exposed between 
palpi; antennae filiform, compressed; ocelli small, appearing as dark- 
ened spots. 

Forewings with 9 veins; II2 from near upper outer angle of cell; 
R3H-4 fused, separate from R2 at base; Mi from angle; M2+3 fused, 
from lower outer angle; Cui from just before angle; Cuj from before 
angle. Hindwing with 7 veins; Sc and Rs long stalked; Mi from upper 
outer angle of cell; M2+3 fused, short stalked with Cui, from lower 
outer angle; Cu2 from before the angle. 

Male genitalia with uncus triangular on basal two-thirds, distal 
third narrow, distal half heavily setose dorsally and laterally. Gnathos 
arms terminating in anterior ventral hook; medial process a flattened 
posteriorly directed hook, cur^^ed dorsally at tip. Transtilla incomplete, 
a pair of flat plates about 3^ times as long as wide. Juxta U-shaped, 
arms sharp pointed. Vinculum truncate. Valvae with apex obliquely 
rounded. Aedeagus straight, vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor tip broadly rounded. Apophyses 
straight, broadened basaUy; posterior parallel, anterior slightly longer, 
diverging. Ductus bursa narrow, leaving bursa about one-fifth from 
posterior end. Ductus seminalis from posterior end of bursa. Bursa 
well developed; signum a long narrow sclerotized infolding about one- 
fourth from anterior end of bursa. 

Discussion. — The male genitalia are quite similar to Heinrich's 
illustration of Anderida, but males of Barberia differ in the truncate 
vinculum and lack of hair tufts on the eighth abdominal segment. 
The two genera are less similar with respect to female genitalia and 
wing venation. 

Barberia affinitella Dyar 

Figures 24, 102, 141, 176 

Barberia affinitella Dyar, 1905, p. 39. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. 
— Hampson, 1918, p. 131.— McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 
Description. — Labial palpi with basal segments and inner sides 
of second and third white, outer sides brown ; maxillary palpi brown ; 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTITNAE 79 

antennae brown scaled on all sides; frons, occiput, patagia, and tegulae 
brown, lighter dorsally. 

Forewings with brown-sprinkled white band anterior to cell, reaching 
just short of apex, ground brownish orange, lighter posterior to cell. 
Hindwing light brown above and below, slightly darker toward apex. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Types. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Lectotype, hereby designated, male, Brownsville, 
Tex., Los Borregos, June 6, 1904, H. S. Barber; USNM 8196; genitalia 
sUde No. 576, J. Shaffer, Nov. 23, 1965. Labeled in Dyar's handwrit- 
ing: "Barberia qffiniteUa Type Dyar." 

Lectoparatypes: Brownsville, Tex., Los Borregos, male, two females, 
June 5, 1904; two males, June 6, 1904, H. S. Barber; USNM 8196. 

The original description gives June 5, 1904 as the date for all six 
specimens. 

Other SPECIMENS EXAMINED. — 23 cf, 4 9. 

Distribution (Map 3). 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Paradise, 3 cf , August, September, 
October (Poling) [CN]; Southwestern Res. Sta., 5 mi. west Portal, 1 cf, Apr. 27, 
1961 (M. A. Cazier) [AMNH]; Santa Cruz Co., Madera Canyon (4880 ft.), 
Santa Rita Mts., 1 cT, Sept. 24, 1959 (R. W. Hodges) [JGF]; county unknown, 
5 cf, August (0. C. Poling) [USNM]. 

Texas: Cameron Co., Brownsville, Los Borregos, 4 cf, 4 9 , June 5, 1904 
(H. S. Barber) [USNM]; 1 cf , June 6, 1904; Brownsville, 4 d', June 1904 (H. S. 
Barber) [USNM]; 1 cf , March 27-28 (F. H. Benjamin) [USNM]; San Benito, 
1 d", March 24-30 [USNM]; 1 cf , June 24-30; JeflF Davis Co., Fort Davis, 1 cf , 
May 20, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]. 

Ragonotia Grote 

Ciris Ragonot, 1887, p. 17 [not Koch, 1848, p. 85 in Arachnida; not Grote, 1863, 
p. 65, in Agaristidae]. [Type: Ciris discigerella Ragonot, 1887. Original 
designation.] 

Ragonotia Grote, 1888, p. 75. — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 204. — 
Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 329. — Hulst, 1902, p. 437. — Barnes 
and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, pp. 123-124. — McDun- 
nough, 1939, p. 35. [Type: Ciris discigerella Ragonot, 1887.] 

Psammia Hampson, 1930, p. 71. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 31. — Heinrich, 1956, 
p. 315. [New synonymy. Type: Psammia flavipicia Hampson, 1930. Mono- 
basic] 

Diagnosis. — Among the phycitine genera with reduced tongue and 
prominent transverse Mang markings, the presence of vein M2 in the 
hindwing distinguishes Ragonotia from Laetilia and Martia. 

Description. — Frons rounded, smooth ; labial palpi decurved, about 
3^ to 4 times eye length; maxillary palpi greatly reduced, usually not 
easily discernible; tongue greatly reduced; antennae filiform, male 
wdth ventral side of segments convex, cUia about twice segment width. 



80 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 

forming two bands, female with cilia about half segment width; ocelli 
well developed. 

Forewings with 11 veins; R2 free from cell or short stalked with 
R3+4; 1^3+4 stalked; Mi from about one-third distance from top of cell; 
M2-1.3 short stalked, from lower outer angle of cell; Cui from before 
the angle. Hindwing mth 8 veins; Sc and Rs approximate for short 
distance beyond cell, then diverging; Mi from upper outer angle; M2 
stalked with M3 for about two-thirds length; Cui stalked with M2+3 
for about one-third length, from lower outer angle; Cu2 from just 
before angle. 

Male genitalia with uncus triangular, apex rounded, dorsal surface 
uniformly and rather densely covered with short cilia. Gnathos with 
medial process simple, tip hooked dorsally. Transtilla incomplete. 
Juxta bell-shaped. Vinculum rounded. Valvae rounded, densely pu- 
bescent on inner side; costa tubular; sacculus with clasper bearing 
scattered setae. Aedeagus with vesica bearing a single large sharp- 
pointed cornutus and a patch of numerous short, sharp spines. 

Female genitalia mth dorsal margin of ovipositor rather densely 
covered with long hairs. Apophyses rather straight, anterior slightly 
longer and stouter than posterior. Bursa small, very weakly sclerotized, 
unarmed. 

Ragonotia dotalis (Hulst) 

Figures 38, 62, 103, 142, 177 

Anerastia dotalis Hulst, 1886, p. 164. — Rindge, 1955, p. 161. 

Ciris discigerella Ragonot, 1887, p. 17. 

Anoristia olivella Hulst, 1888, p. 117. — Rindge, 1955, p. 168. 

Ragonotia saganella Hulst, 1890, p. 205. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Hulst, 1902, 

p. 437. — Rindge, 1955, p. 170. [New synonymy.] 
Ragonotia dotalis (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 205. — 

Smith, 1891, p. 84.— Ragonot, 1901, p. 329.— Hulst, 1902, p. 437.— Barnes 

and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 124. — McDunnough, 

1939, p. 35. 
Megasis indianella Dyar, 1923, pp. 28-29 [described in Phycitinae]. 
Psammia flavipicta Hampson, 1930, pp. 71-72. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 31. — 

Heinrich, 1956, p. 315.— Kimball, 1965, p. 251. [New synonymy.] 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Labial palpi white, outer sides of second and third 
segments variously sprinkled with subapically brown banded white 
scales; antennae white, brown band on center of each segment; frons 
white with scattered brown scales, vertex and dorsum of occiput 
white, often with scattered brown scales, occiput laterally of alternat- 
ing black and white bands; legs white, sprinkled with brown on outer 
sides, proximal end of each tarsal segment black banded. 

Forewings with ground white, finely sown with dark brown scales, 
variable in number, producing a light brown to gray color; basal spot 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 81 

light orange, usually indistinctly bordered with black distally; trans- 
verse anterior light orange, partially bordered internally with black, 
externally with narrow white band, then black blending graduallj^ 
into ground color; discal spot light orange, usually with white center, 
spot bordered above and below with black; transverse posterior 
light orange, bordered internally with narrow white band, then 
black, veins traced with black on tp band, tracing extending to the 
black terminal line. 

Hindwings light brown, apical area and terminal Une brown; 
fringe white, brown band near its base; base of cubitus fringed, A2, 
A3, and inner margin heavily fringed. 

Genitaha as described for the genus. 

Types. — A. dotalis, in the American Museum of Natural History 

(lectotype); C. discigerella, in the Museum National d'Histoire 

Naturelle; A. olivella and R. saganella, in the American Museum of 

Natural History; M. indianella, m the U.S. National Museum; P. 

flavipicta, in the British Museum (Natural History). 

Type data. — A. dotalis, lectotype female, hereby designated. 
Phoenix, Ariz,, June (abdomen intact); discigerella, lectotype female, 
hereby designated, Arizona, genitalia slide No. 555, J. Shaffer, Aug. 11, 
1965; olivella, lectotype female, hereby designated, southern California, 
genitaha shde No. 587, J. Shaffer, Nov. 28, 1965, in the origmal 
description the type locality is given as Needles, Calif.; saganella, 
lectotype female, hereby designated, Colorado, May, genitalia slide 
No. 3217, Carl Heinrich, June 14, 1946, in the original description 
Hulst reports "From T.D.A. Cockerell, of West Cliff, Col., where 
the unique specimen was taken at light. May 24th."; indianella, one 
female, Indian Wells, Calif., May 8, 1921, USNM 25840, genitaha 
slide No. 1103, Carl Heinrich, Apr. 2, 1938; flavipicta, lectotype 
male, hereby designated, labeled as follows: "Type; Florida; 99-49.; 
1945/206; Psammia flavipicta type cT. Hmpsn.; cf genitaha shde 
1-4-1967 J. Shaffer No. 708." The vahdity of Florida as the type 
locality must be questioned as the species has not otherwise been 
recorded east of western Texas. 

Specimens EXAMINED. — 75 cf , 38 9. 

Distribution (Map 1). — Southwestern United States, southern 
California eastward into western Texas. 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Cochise Co., Paradise, 1 9 [USNM]; San 
Bernardino Ranch (3750 ft.), 2 cf , August (F. H. Snow) [USNM]; 2 ? , [UK]; 
Maricopa Co., Phoenix, 3 d^, 4 ? , March (Kunze) [USNM]; 1 d^, April; 1 ? , 
June; 1 9 , September; 1 cT, no date; 1 9 , June [USNM]; 1 cf, June [USNM]; 
labeled "Ragonotia dotalis Type Hulst," "Type No. 40073 U.S.N.M.," Male 
genitalia slide No. 1100, Carl Heinrich, Apr. 2, 1938; 1 9, AprU [AMNH]; 1 cT, 
May [AMNH]; 1 9 , June [AMNH]; 1 9 , no date [AMNH]; Tempe, 1 cf , Mar. 8, 
1920 (E. V. Walter, H. L. Arnold) [USNM]; Pima Co., Santa Rita Mts., 1 9 , 



82 U-S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

May 1-7 [USNM]; Yavapai Co., 1 &, no date [USNM]; Yuma Co., Indian Wash 
near Martinez Lake, 1 d", June 12, 1961 (C. A. Toschi) [UCB]; Palomas, 2 d', 
Aug. 8, 1917 [CU]; Wellton, 2 d', Aug. 9, 1917 [CU]; Yuma, 1 ? , May [AMNH]; 
no county, southern Arizona, 1 cf, no date [USNM]; 1 $ , Sept. 8-15 [USNM]. 

California: Imperial Co., Dixieland, 1 cf. Mar. 1-15, 1922 (O. C. Poling), 
[USNM]; 3 cf", 2 ? , spring 1922; Travertine Rock, 1 cf , Apr. 10, 1954 (Stange, 
Menke, Cline, and Thomas) [LACM]; Riverside Co., Coxcomb Mts., 5 d^, 1 ? , 
Feb. 28, 1937 (Lloyd M. Martin) [LACM]; (J. A. Comstock); 1 c?, 3 9 , Mar. 1 
1937 (Lloyd M. Martin); Dis Palmas Springs, 1 9, Mar. 17, 1940 (George 
Willett) [LACM]; Indian Wells, 1 &, 2 9, Mar. 8, 1940 (J. C. von Bloeker) 
[LACM]; Indio, 1 cf, Mar. 23, 1955 (W. R. M. Mason) [CNC]; La Quinta, 1 &, 
Mar. 5, 1955 (J. E. H. Martin) [CNC]; Palm Desert, 1 d^, Mar. 15, 1954 (A. H. 
& S. K. Rindge) [AMNH]; Thermal, 5 d^, 1 9 , Aug. 17-18, 1927 [CU]; 1 &, 
July 10, 1956 (M. Wasbauer) [UCB]; Thousand Palms, 1 &, Feb. 24, 1955 
(D. F. Hardwick) [CNC]; Feb. 24, 1955 (W. R. Richards); (W. R. M. Mason) 
Feb. 28, 1955 (D. F. Hardwick); 1 9 , Mar. 1, 1955 (W. R. M. Mason); Id", 19, 
Mar. 2, 1955 (D. F. Hardwick); 1 d", Mar. 5, 1955 (W. R. M. Mason); 4 d", 
Mar. 7, 1955; 2 d", 1 9, Mar. 8, 1955 (J. E. H. Martin); 1 &, Mar. 10, 1955 
(W. R. M. Mason); 2 d", Mar. 11, 1955 (J. E. H. Martin); 1 &, Mar. 13, 1955; 
2 d', Mar. 18, 1955; 1 <?, Mar. 23, 1955 (W. R. M. Mason); 1 9 , Mar. 24, 1955 
(J. E. Martin); Mar. 28, 1955 (W. R. Richards); 1 d", Apr. 16, 1955 (W. R. M. 
Mason); San Bernardino Co., Baker, 1 d", July 30, 1954 (L. Martin & Rees) 
[LACM]; Yermo, Mojave Desert, 1 6", Apr. 10, 1936 (J. A. Comstock) [USNM]; 
near Yermo, 5 d", [LACM]; Yermo, 3 d", Mar. 18, 1940 (G. Beevor) [LACM]; 
San Diego Co., Borrego, 1 9 , Mar. 22, 1940 (Grace H. & John L. Sperry) [CNC]; 
Borrego, 1 9 , May 3, 1956 (J. Powell) [UCB]; Apr. 21, 1960 (J. F. Lawrence). 

New Mexico: Dona Ana Co., Mesilla Park (3800 ft.), 2 d", July 8 (Cockerell) 
[USNM]; Mesilla, 1 d", no date (C. N. Ainslie) [USNM]; Mesquite near Mesilla 
Park, 1 d', July 12, 1917 [CU]; Hidalgo Co., Lordsburg, 2 9 , May 9, 1950 (E. C. 
Johnston) [CNC]; Luna Co., 10 mi. east of Deming, 1 d", July 12, 1917 [CU]. 

Texas: Reeves Co., Pecos, 2 9, May 18, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 
Brewster Co., Marathon, 2 d", May 23, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]. 

Utah: No locality, 1 9 , Henry Edwards collection. No. 14158 [AMNH]. 

Discussion. — Tliere is uncertainty regarding the identity of tlie 
type specimens of dotalis and saganella. In the American Museum of 
Natural History is a series of two females and one male, all labeled 
Phoenix, Ariz., June, "Anerastia dotalis Type Hulst" (Hulst's hand- 
writing); the male specimen also bears a slide preparation label, 
genitalia slide No. 3216, Carl Heinrich, June 14, 1946. One of the 
females has the tip of its abdomen broken off. A female specimen 
in the U.S. National Museum also bears Hulst's type label and the 
data Phoenix, Ariz., May. In his original description of dotalis, 
Hulst reported only that he had one female from Arizona. In the 
absence of any evidence indicating which specimen Hulst based 
his original description upon, I have chosen as the lectotype the more 
nearly intact of the two female specimens in the type series of the 
American Museum of Natural History. The other three "types" are 
thus presumed to be pseudotypes. 



REVISION OF PEORIESTAE AND ANERASTIINAE 83 

In describing saganella, Hulst indicated clearly that his new species 
was very different from dotalis and stated that the two were "hardly 
congeneric." Hulst's type of saganella, on the other hand, is ob- 
viously a specimen of dotalis, thus the validity of the type and the 
accuracy of the description are open to question. 

Martia Ragonot 

Martia Ragonot, 1887, p. 18; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 209. — Smith, 
1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 367. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — Barnes and 
McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 118. — McDunnough, 
1939, p. 36. [Type: Martia arizonella Ragonot, 1887. Monobasic] 

Urula Hulst, 1900, p. 175; 1902, p. 437. [Type: Urula incongruella Hulst, 1900. 
Monobasic] 

Diagnosis. — The genus is easily recognized by the combination 
of protuberant frons and prominent transverse lines on the forewings. 

Description. — Frons produced into obliquely truncate cone, 
its rim incised ventrally, produced and finely serrate laterally, deeply 
incised dorsally forming shallow trough rimmed with fine teeth; labial 
palpi porrect or somewhat decurved, about 3J^ times eye length in 
male, and about four times in female; maxillary palpi cylindrical, al- 
most reaching frons; tongue rudimentary; antennae subserrate in male, 
each segment with two ventral bands of cUia, cilia about 2% times as 
long as segment wddth, filiform in female, ciha not in bands, shorter 
than segment width; ocelli small, conical. 

Forewings with 11 veins; R2 free from cell near R3+4; R3+4 stalked, 
from upper outer angle of cell; Mi arising about one-third from top 
of cell; M2+3 short stalked or from point at lower outer angle of cell; 
Cui from just before the angle. Hindwing with 7 veins; Sc and Rs 
approximate for short distance beyond cell; Mi from upper outer 
angle of cell; M2+3 fused, short stalked A\dth Cui, from lower outer 
angle. 

Male genitalia mth uncus triangular, rounded apically, finely ciliate 
dorsally and laterally. Gnathos with medial process simple, extending 
caudad, tip sharp, curving dorsad. Transtilla a pair of weakly sclero- 
tized irregular plates. Juxta scoop-shaped. Vinculum broader than 
long. Costa tubular on basal four-fifths, tapering. Aedeagus slender, 
vesica unarmed. 

Female genitalia with ovipositor rather densely setose, tip broadly 
rounded. Posterior apophyses curved posteroventrally on posterior 
fourth; anterior straight, directed an tero ventrally at angle of about 
45° to posterior. Ductus bursae short. Bursa unarmed. Ductus semi- 
nalis leaving bursa about one-fourth distance from posterior end. 



84 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Martin arizonclla Ragonot 

Figures 37, 49, 63, 104, 143, 178 

Martia arizonella Ragonot, 1887, p. 18; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 209. — 
Smith, 1891, p. 84. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 367. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, p. 118. — Mc- 
Dunnough, 1939, p. 36. 

Urulaincongruella Hulst, 1900, pp. 175-176; 1902, p. 437. — Rindge, 1955, p. 164. 

Diagnosis. — This is the only known species in the genus. 

Description. — Frons close scaled, brown; labial palpi with basal 
segments light brown, second and third segments clothed with white- 
tipped brown scales on outer sides, lighter on inner sides; maxillary 
palpi of white to white-tipped brown scales; antennae white, each 
segment brown banded; vertex brown, lighter behind antennae; occi- 
put, patagia, and tegulae varying white to brown; legs clothed with 
light brown to white-tipped brown scales on outer sides, distal end of 
each tibial segment white banded. 

Forewings with transverse anterior, transverse posterior, discal 
spot, area between Cu2 and A2, and basal area posterior to A2 golden 
yellow; transverse anterior interrupted in cell by dark brown area 
which gradually narrows and extends posteriorly to A2 as a wedge 
between the ta line and the prominent narrow white line bordering it 
distally. Transverse anterior bordered inside by white anterior to cubi- 
tus, by brown band posterior to cell, band extending to costa at wing 
base; wing anterior to cell and between transverse lines white with 
sprinkling of brown scales; area surrounding discal spot brown, ex- 
tending posteriorly to Cu2, often enclosing an irregular white area at 
lower outer angle of cell; terminal line dark brown, bordered internally 
by white wedge on anterior third of wing. Underside light brown, 
darker in apical area; transverse posterior faintly traced. Hindwings 
light brown above and below, fringe white with darker band near its 
inner side. 

Genitalia as described for the genus. 

Types. — M. arizonella, in the Museum National d'Histoire Natu- 
relle; U. incongruella, in the U.S. National Museum (lectotype), in the 
American Museum of Natural History (two lectoparatypes) . 

Type data. — M. arizonella, type not examined, the type locality is 
given in the original description as Arizona; U. incongruella, lectotype 
male, hereby designated, Argus Alts., April, 91K, USNM 4708, male 
genitalia slide No. 1121, Carl Heinrich, Feb. 27, 1941 [USNM]; lecto- 
paratypes, two females, Phoenix, Ariz., June 4, June 5, the former with 
female genitalia on slide No. 3218, Carl Heinrich, June 14, 1946, the 
latter has the abdomen lost [AMNH]. In his original description Hulst 
gives the following data: "Argus Mountains, Cal.; taken by Mr. Koe- 
bele, in April. Phoenix, Ariz.; taken early in June." 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIESTAE 



85 



Specimens EXAMINED. — 83 6^,43 9. 
Distribution (Map 3). 

UNITED STATES: Arizona: Coconino Co., Tuba City, 2 cf, 5 ?, Aug. 12, 
1948 (C. and P. Vaurie) [AMNH]; Maricopa Co., Phoenix, 1 9, June 4, 1897, 
(bears label: "Urula incongruella Type Hulst") [USNM]; Phoenix, 2 9 , Sept. 11, 
1904 [USNM]; 1 9 , Sept. 13, 1904 [USNM]; Pima Co., 30 mi. east of Quijotoa, 1 
9 , Aug. 28-29, 1927 [CU]; Yuma Co., Dome, 1 cf, July 21, 1924 (E. P. Van Duzee) 
[USNM]; Indian Wash near Martinez Lake, 1 cf, 2 9, June 12, 1961 (C. A. 
Toschi) [UCB]; Palomas, 3 d", Aug. 8, 1917 [CU]; no locality, 1 9 , July 1-7 
[USNM]; 2 9 , June 8-15 [USNM]. 

California: Kern Co., Shafter, Icf, 19, Aug. 17, 1955 (J. Powell) [UCB]; 
Riverside Co., Coachella, 1 9 , May 2, 1918 (J. C. Bradley) [CU]; Indio, 3d^, 7 9 , 
May 1, 1918 (J. C. Bradley) [CU]; Palm Springs, Icf, May 6, 1921 (Karl B. Cool- 
idge) [USNM]; 1 cf, Aug. 20, 1955 (A. H. Rindge) [AMNH]; Riverside, Icf, 
Sept. 8, 1940 (H. Buckwalter) [CNC]; Thermal, 19, June 17, 1956 (M. Was- 
bauer) [UCB]; San Bernardino Co., 10 mi. north of Earp. 2^^, 19, Apr. 22, 1960 
(J. R. Powers) [UCB]; Loma Linda, 1 cf , Sept. 1-7 [USNM]; Mojave Desert, 
Yermo, 1 d^, Apr. 10, 1936 (J. A. Comstock) [USNM] ;Needles, 33d^, 9 9 , Apr. 24, 
1950 (E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; Twentynine Palms, 12 0", 29, Apr. 20, 1950 
(E. C. Johnston) [CNC]; 7cf, Apr. 21, 1950; San Diego Co., 6 mi. east of Banner, 
19, July 13, 1963 (J. Powell) [UCB]; county unknown, LaPuerta, Icf, 19, 
July 1911 (Wright and Field) [USNM]; LaPuerta VaUey, 3cf, July 11 (George H. 
Field) [USNM]. 

New Mexico: Dona Ana Co., Mesquite near Mesilla Park, Icf, July 12, 1917 
[CNC]; 6cf , 1 9 [CU]; Otero Co., Alamogordo, 1 9 , May 10, 1950 (E. C. Johnston) 
[CNC]; 25 mi. west of Tularosa, 1 9 , July 1, 1940 (L. J. Lipovsky) [UK]. 

Synonymical List of Species Considered 

North American Peoriinae 



Peoria Ragonot 
Aurora Ragonot 
Statina Ragonot 
Calera Ragonot 
Altoona Hulst 
Cayuga Hulst 
Volusia Hulst 
Wekiva Hulst 
Osceola Hulst 
Chipeta Hvilst 
Trivolusia Dyar 
Ollia Dyar 

1. longipalpella (Ragonot) 

2. bipartitella Ragonot 
roseopennella (Hulst) 

3. tetradella (Zeller) 

4. opacella (Hulst) 
dichroeella (Ragonot) 
dichroella (Hampson) 

5. floridella Shaffer 



6. rostrella (Ragonot) 

7. gemmatella (Hulst) 
bistriatella (Hulst) 
pamponerella (Dyar) 

8. roseotinctella (Ragonot) 
punctilimbella (Ragonot) 
bifascieUa (Hampson) 

9. johnstoni Shaffer 

10. santaritella (Dyar) 

11. holoponerella (Dyar) 

12. approximella (Walker) 
haematica (Zeller) 
roseatella (Packard) 
cremoricosta (Hampson) 

13. luteicostella (Ragonot) 
nodosella (Hulst) 
perlepidella (Hulst) 

Anacostia Shaffer 

14. tribulella Shaffer 



86 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 



Arivaca Shaffer 
The Pimella Group 

15. pimella (Dyar) 

16. linella Shaffer 
The Ostreella Group 

17. ostreella (Ragonot) 
discostrigella (Dyar) 

18. poohella Shaffer 
The Albidella Group 

19. albidella (Hulst) 

20. artella Shaffer 
The Aibicostella Group 

21. aibicostella (Grossbeck) 
Atascosa Hulst 

22. glareosella (Zeller) 
bicolorella Hulst 
albocostella (Hulst) 

Homosassa Hulst 

23. ella Hulst 

24. platella Shaffer 

25. incudella Shaffer 
Reynosa Shaffer 

26. floscella (Hulst) 
Goya Ragonot 

27. stictella (Hampson) 



Genera Transferred to Phycitinae 



Anerastia Hiibner 
Prinanerastia Hampson 

1. lotella Hiibner 
Coenochroa Ragonot 
Petaluma Hulst 
Alamosa Hampson 

2. californiella Ragonot 
inspergella Ragonot 

3. illibella (Hulst) 
puricostella Ragonot 
piperatella (Hampson) 

4. bipunctella (Barnes and 

McDunnough) 
Bandera Ragonot 
Nasutes Hampson 

5. binotella (Zeller) 
subluteella Ragonot 

6. cupidinella Hulst 
conspersella (Ragonot) 
venata (Hampson) 



7. virginella Dyar 
Wakulla Shaffer 

8. carneella (Barnes and McDunnough) 
Tampa Ragonot 

9. dimediatella Ragonot 
Barberia Dyar 

10. afEnitella Dyar 
Ragonotia Grote 

Ciris Ragonot 
Psammia Hampson 

11. dotalis (Hulst) 
discigerella ( Ragonot) 
olivella (Hulst) 
saganella Hulst 
indianella (Dyar) 
flavipicta (Hampson) 

Martia Ragonot 
Urula Hulst 

12. arizonella Ragonot 
incongruella (Hulst) 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 87 

Unplaced Genera and Species 
Navasota Ragonot 

Figure 30 

Navasota Ragonot, 1887, p. 18; 1889, p. 117. — Hulst, 1890, p. 212. — Smith, 
1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 1901, p. 369. — Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — Barnes 
and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — Hampson, 1918, pp. 65-66. — Mc- 
Dunnough, 1939, p. 36. [Type: Navasota hebetella Ragonot, 1887, p. 18. 
Monobasic. References as given for the genus.] 

Description. — The original descriptions of the genus and species 
are as follows : 

Navasota, gen. nov. — Antennae thick, pubescent, a very flattened pad of 
scales in sinus. Palpi oblique, ascending, 3rd joint horizontal. Fore-wings with 
ten veins, 10 from stem of 8 and 9, 4 and 5 stemmed, 3 wanting. Hind wings 
with seven veins, 8 stalked, 4 and 5 on long stem, 3 wanting, 2 before angle. 
86. N. hebetella. — 16 mill. — Fore-wings reddish-ochreous, paler on inner 
margin. Costa with a broad whitish streak not reaching the apex and finely 
streaked with reddish-ochreous. Hind- wings pale yellowish. 

Type. — In the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle. 
Type data. — A specimen label gives: "ex. coll. Bellfr. coll. Riley." 
Discussion. — Navasota probably belongs in the Peoriinae, but its 
exact placement is uncertain as the abdomen of the type is lost. The 
species may belong to Peoria, but apparently is not conspecific with 
any of the 13 species listed in that genus. No type locality is given 
in the original description, but Hampson (in Ragonot, 1901) in a 
probable reference to the type reports: "Texas. Un cf, octobre. 
Coll. Ragonot." All of Belfrage's southwestern material was collected 
in Texas. 

Uinta Hulst 
Uinta Hulst, 1888. p. 116. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. Type: Uinta oreadella 
Hulst, 1888, p. 116. — Hulst, 1890, p. 221-222 [listed as a crambid]. — Mc- 
Dunnough, 1939, p. 35. — Rindge, 1955, p. 168. [Monobasic] 

Description. — The original descriptions of the genus and species 
are as follows: 

Uinta, n. gen. 

Fore wings 9 veins: 4 and 9 wanting, 3 and 5 separate; hind wings 7 veins; 
3 and 5 separate, 2 far from angle, 7 and 8 separate to base; labial palpi hori- 
zontal, heavy, long; maxillary palpi strong, heavily scaled on end; antennae 
of cf bent above base, pubescent; ocelli present; tongue wanting; legs shorter 
and more heavy than usual. Type: oreadella, Hulst. 

U. oreadella, n. sp. 

Palpi fuscous gray, as is also the head; thorax blackish gray; abdomen 
blackish gray, becoming fuscous and yellowish anally, each segment except 
basal edged narrowly with gray; fore wings dark fuscous, darker at base; 
basal line not evident; outer line broad, blackish, a marginal broad line also 
blackish; at base of center of middle field a lengthened black point; hind wings 



88 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 SO 

fuscous, shining, margin darker; beneath even fuscous on all wings, margins 
darker. — Colorado." 

Type. — In the American Museum of Natural History. 

Type data. — Texas, June; G. D. Hulst collection, Kutgers. 

Discussion. — The species probably belongs to the Crambinae as 
Hulst (1890) later indicated, but cannot be placed to subfamily with 
certainty as the hindwings and abdomen have been lost. The locality 
given on the specimen (Texas) and that published in that original 
description (Colorado) do not agree. 

Tolitna cincaidella Dyar 

Figure 36 

Tolima cincaidella Dyar, 1904, pp. 115-116. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, 
p. 149. — McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. 

Description. — The original description of the species is as follows: 

Fore wings with 11 veins, 2 well before angle of cell, 3 before angle, 4 and 5 
very shortly stalked, 8 and 9 stalked, 10 connate with the base of the stalk, 
11 from the cell. Hind wings with 7 veins, 2 from the angle of the cell, 3 and 4 
long stalked, 5 absent, 8 distinct. Tongue moderate, apparently about twice 
the length of the head; palpi very long, porrect and drooping; antennae simple, 
lengthily ciliate. 

Pale ocherous whitish, lines paler, obscure, defined by dusky edgings toward 
the median space. Inner line produced a little on costa, preceded by a very 
faint, russet patch on the inner margua. Discal dots blackish, separate. Outer 
line drawn inward subcostally, else even, a slight dentation indicated in the 
dusky border. The wing is all very pallid. Hind wing whitish, translucent. 
Expanse 27 mm. 

Three specimens, all with the abdomens broken, but apparently males, 
Rock Spring, Wyoming (T. Kincaid). 

Type: No. 7934, U.S. National Museum. 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — No locality given on specimens, USNM 7934; printed 
tag bears number "37049." The three specimens bear identical labels. 

Discussion. — The species does not belong in the Peoriinae, but 
otherwise placement to subfamily is uncertain. 

Statina gaudiella Hulst 

Statina gaudiella Hulst, 1890, pp. 216-217. — Smith, 1891, p. 85. — Ragonot, 
1901, pp. 415-416. — Hulst, 1902, p. 440. — Dyar, 1904c, p. 228. — Barnes 
and McDunnough, 1917, p. 150. — Hampson, 1918, p. 60. — McDunnough, 
1939, p. 36. — Rindge, 1955, p. 163. 

Description. — The original description of the species is as foUows: 

2. S. gaudiella n.sp. — Expands 13 mm. Palpi and antennae ochreous fuscous; 
abdomen ochreous. Fore wings squamose; ground color ochreous, with a faint 
violet fuscous tinge, this sprinkled with lengthened black scales, much more 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIESTAE 89 

thickly about basal line and within outer line forming indeterminate blackish 
bands; lines indistinct, indeterminate, not evident except by the blackish 
scaling; costa on outer field darker, with black scales; hind wings yellowish 
fuscous, darker on veins. 

Differs from typical Statina in that cells of both wings are very short. 

Type. — In the American Museum of Natural History. 

Type data. — Central Texas, Blanco County, September, collection 
G. D. Hulst. 

Discussion. — The holotype consists of meso- and metathorax, the 
right pair of wings, and the left hindwing. On the basis of wing 
venation gaudiella probably belongs in the Peoriinae, but exact 
placement is impossible owing to the poor condition of the holotype. 

Ollia parvella Dyar 

Ollia parvella Dyar, 1906, p. 31. — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — 
McDunnough, 1939, p. 36. — Kimball, 1965, p. 250. 

Description. — The original description of the species is as foUows : 

Costal half of fore wing white with slight darker lines on the veing toward 
apex. Inner half pale ocherous, shading to gray next to white part. Hind wing 
whitish. Expanse, 12 mm. 

Six 9 , BrownsviUe, Tex., May 31 to June 9, 1904 (H. S. Barber). 

Type. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Holotype: Texas, Brownsville, female, June 3?, 1904; 
H. S. Barber; USNM 9103; female genitalia sHde No. 10, Carl Hein- 
rich, Dec. 20, 1932. 

Discussion, — In the absence of male specimens placement is 
uncertain. The species probably belongs in the Phycitinae and may 
require a new genus when males can be examined. Ollia is a synonym 
of Peoria. 

Altoona ardiferella Hiilst, Aurora nigromaculella Hulst, and Parramatta 
placidella Barnes and McDunnough 

These three names belong in the Phycitinae and should probably 
be referred to Laetilia Kagonot, but placement within the subfamily 
should await a thorough study of Laetilia and allied genera. 

Altoona ardiferella Hulst 

Altoona ardiferella Hulst, 1888, p. 116; 1890, p. 208. — Smith, 1891, p. 84. — 
Barnes and McDunnough, 1918, p. 176. — Rindge, 1955, p. 157. 

Zophodia ardiferella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1889, p. 116. 

Tolima ardiferella (Hulst). — Ragonot, 1901, pp. 506-507. 

Saluria ardiferella Hulst, 1902, p. 439. — Hampson, 1918, p. 99. 

Pectinigera [sic] ardiferella (Hulst). — Dyar, 1904b, p. 159. 

Pedinigeria ardiferella (Hulst). — Barnes and McDunnough, 1917, p. 149. — 
McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. 



90 U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 

Type. — Possibly lost. A badly damaged specimen in the American 
Museum of Natural History bears a Hulst type label and "Col., July, 
Collection G D Hulst," female genitalia slide No. 3229, Carl Heinrich, 
June 14, 1946. The original description gives the type locality as 
Texas. See discussion by Barnes and McDunnough (1918). 

Host. — Dyar (1904b) reports specimens bred from Orthezia annae 
(Coccidae) on Atriplex canescens (Chenopodiaceae). 

Aurora nigrotnaculella Hulst 

Aurora nigramaculella Hulst, 1900 1901, 224: 1902, p. 438. — Rindge, 1955, p. 167. 
Zohpodia nigromaculella (Hulst). — Dyar, 1904c, p. 228. 
Saluria nigromaculella (Hulst), — Hampson, 1918, p. 100. 

Type. — Holotype, in the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Arizona, Santa Rita Mts., June 8, 1898, E. A. 
Schwarz; USNM 5185; female genitalia slide 2269, Carl Heinrich, 
Sept. 11, 1934. A specimen in the American Museum of Natural 
History bears a cotype label and "Hot Springs, N. Mex. 7000 ft. alt. 
Sept., Collection G D Hulst"; abdomen lost. The original description 
mentions only the Arizona specimen. 

Discussion. — Dyar (1904b) and McDunnough (1939) consider this 
to be a synonym of ardiferella Hulst. 

Parramatta placidella Barnes and McDunnough 

Parramatta placidella Barnes and McDunnough, 1918, p. 177, pi. 24, fig. 17. — 
McDunnough, 1939, p. 35. 

Types. — In the U.S. National Museum. 

Type data. — Lectotype, hereby designated, male, Olancha, Inyo 
County, Calif., June 24-30, Barnes collection, male genitalia sUde 
No. 1127, Carl Heinrich, Feb. 6, 1942: labeled "Parramatta placidella 
Type B & McD." 

Lectoparatypes: Olancha, Inyo County, Calif., four females, all 
labeled "Parramatta placidella Paratype B & McD," Barnes collection; 
three specimens dated June 8-15, the fourth dated June 16-23 and 
labeled female genitalia sUde No. 1128, Carl Heinrich, Feb. 6, 1942. 

On all five specimens Inyo is misspelled on the label as "Inya." 

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1955. The type material in the J. B. Smith and G. D. Hulst collections of 
Lepidoptera in the American Museum of Natural History. Bull. 
Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist., vol. 106, art. 2, pp. 95-172. 
ScHULZE, F. E., KuKENTHAL, W., and Heider, K. 

1926-1954. Nomenclator animalium generum et subgenerum, 5 vols. 
Smith, John B. 

1891. List of the Lepidoptera of Boreal America, pp. 84-85. 
Walker, Francis 

1866. List of the specimens of lepidopterous insects in the collection of the 
British Museum, pt. 35, suppl. 5, pp. 1535-2040. 
Zeller, p. C. 

1848. Die Gallerien und nachthornigen Phycideen. Isis (von Oken), pp. 

721-754. 
1872. Beitrage zur Kenntniss der nordamerikanischen Nachtfalter, besond- 
ers der Microlepidopteren. Verh. Zool.-Bot. Gesellsch. Wien, vol, 
22, pp. 447-566, 27 figs. 

Explanation of Figures 

The figures have not been reproduced to any fixed scale, and in 
general smaller specimens are presented in greater enlargement than 
larger ones. 

Components of the male genitalia are enlarged to the same degree 
for each species unless otherwise indicated. Sketches of the aedeagus, 
gnathos, or transtilla have been added in addition to or in place of 
photographs where these did not render the structures with sufBcient 
clarity. Male genitalia of Coenochroa, Martia, Ragonotia, and all of 
the Peoriinae have been dissected, opened, and flattened as described 
on page 3. 

Female genitalia of the Peoriinae are illustrated in lateral view, 
those of phycitine specimens in dorsal view. 



94 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 




Map I. — Distribution of species 
^Jnerastia lotella QRagonotia dotalis 

® Tampa dimediatella 




Map 2. — Distribution of Coenochroa species 
-^C californiella j^C. illibella 

%C. bipunctella 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



95 




Map 3. — Distribution of species 
^Barheria afinitella ■^Marita arizonella 

Wakulla carnedla ^ 




Map 4. — Distribution of species 
^Bandera binoUlla %B. cupidinella 

B. virginella ^ -j^Anacostia tribulella 

i^Goya stictella 

' Open five-pointed star within black circle. 



96 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




Map 5.— Distribution of Peoria approximella 




Map 6. — Distribution of Peoria species 
•P. gevimatella Qp, roseotinctella 



P. rostrella * 

> Open five-pointed star within black circle. 



■jIV-P. tetradella 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



97 





Map 7. — Distribution of Peoria species 
%P. holoponerella ^P. johnstoni 

DP. opacella Q)P. santaritella 



Map 8. — Distribution of Peoria species 
#P. hipartitella P. longipalpella '■ 




Map 9. — Distribution of Arivaca species 
A. albidella ' ^A. arUlla 

UA. poohella %A. linella 

if A. ostreella QA. pimella 

* Open five-pointed star within black circle. 




Map 10. — Distribution of species 
O Peoria floridella %P. luteicostella 
if Arivaca albicostella 



98 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 28 




Map 11. — Distribution of Homosassa species 
•^- e^l'^ H. incudella i 

*//. platella 




Map 12. — Distribution of species 
% Atascosa glareosella Reynosa fioscella ' 

* Open five-pointed star within black circle. 



REVISIOX OF PEORIIXAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



99 




Figures 1-6. — Wing Expanse of Adults: 1, Peoria johnstoni, 19mm; 2, P. rostrella, holo- 
type, approximately 24 mm; 3, P. holoponerella, 24 mm; 4, P. holoponerella, 28 mm; 
5, P. santaritella, 25 mm; 6, P. tetradella, approximately 24 mm. 



100 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




Figures 7-12.— Wing Expanse of Adults: 7, Peoria gemmatella, 26 mm; 8, P. floridella, 
holotype, 26 mm; 9, P. longipdpella, 23 mm; 10, P. roseotinctella, 19 mm; 11, P. opacella, 
23 mm; 12, P. luteicostella, 22 mm. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



101 




Figures 13-18.— Wing Expanse of Adults: 13, Peoria hipartitella, 17 mm; 14, P. approxl- 
mella, 19 mm; 15, Arivaca pimella, holotype, 25 mm; 16, A. linella, 25 mm; 17, A. al- 
hidella, 24 mm; 18, A. artella, 25 mm. 



102 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




Figures 19-24.— Wing Expanse of Adults: 19, Arivaca ostreella, 28 mm; 20, A. poohella, 
holotype, 27 mm; 21, A. albicostella, 18 mm; 22, Reynosafloscella, 13 mm; 23, Goya stictella, 
17 mm; 24, Barberia affinitella, 14 mm. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 103 




Figures 25-30. — Wing Expanse of Adults: 25, Anacostia tribulella, holotype, 23 mm; 
26, A. glareosella, 22 mm; 27, Homosassa ella, 17 mm; 28, H. platella, holotype, 17 mm; 
29, H. incudella, para type, 21 mm; 30, Navasota herhetella, holotype, approximately 16 mm. 



104 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




Figures 3 1-36. — Wing Expanse of Adults : 31, Bandera bmote/la, 23 mm ; ^^2, B. cupidinella 
22 mm; 33, B. virginella, 24 mm; 34, Anerastia lotella, 29 mm; 35, Tampa dimediatella, 
17 mm; 36, Tolinia cincaidella, holotype, 28 mm. 



REVISIOX OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



105 




Figures 37— ^}i. — Wing Expanse of Adults: 37, Mania arizonella, 17 mm; 38, Ragonotia 
dotalis, 29 mm; 39, Coenochroa illibella, 30 mm; 40, C. illibella, 22 mm; 41, C. californiella, 
20 mm; 42, C. bipunctella, 18 mm; 43, Wakulla carneella, holotype, approximately 11 mm. 



106 



TJ.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




46a 



46b 



47 b 




48b 



Figures 44-48.— Adult crania: 44-48, lateral view; 44^-48^, anterior view; 44Z--48^ 
dorsal view. 44-44^-, Coenochroa californiella; 45-45^, C. illibella, typical; 46-46^ C. 
illibella, specimen from series taken at Pecos, Tex.; 47-47^-, C. bipunctella; 48-48^, Aner- 
astia lotella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



107 





Sc+ R| 



49 





51 



Figures 49-51. — 49, Mania arizonella, dorsal view of adult cranium; 50, Arivaca pimella, 
wing venation; 51, Peoria longipalfella, flattened male genitalia. jx=juxta, sp=spicate 
process of uncus, tg=tegumen, mp^medial process of uncus, gn=gnathos, va^valva, 
vin^vinculum. 



108 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 





Figures 52-62.— Wing venation: 52, Arivaca pimella; 53, A. ostreella; 54, Atascosa glareo- 
sella; 55, Peoria floridella; 56, Arivaca linella; 57, A. poohella; 58, Homosassa ella; 59, 
Peoria approximella; 60, Arivaca alhicostella; 61, Peoria roseotinctella; 62, Ragonotia dotalis. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



109 






Figures 63-82.— Wing venation and male antennae: 63, Martia arizonella; 64, Anerastia 
lotella; 65, Coenochroa californiella; 66, C. bipunctella; 67, C. illihella; 68, Bandera binotella; 
69, Tampa dimediatella; 70, Peoria longipalpella; 71, P. bipartitella; 72, P. tetradella; 73, 
P. opacella; 74, P. floridella; 75, P. rostrella; 76, P. gemviatella; 77, P. roseotinctella; 78, 
P. johnstoni; 79, P. santaritella; 80, P. holoponerella; 81, P. approximella; 82, P. luteicostella. 



110 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




Figures 83-104.— Male antennae: 83, Anacostia tribulella; 84, Arivaca fimella; 85, A. 
linella; 86, A. ostreella; 87, A. poohella; 88, A. albidella; 89, A. artella; 90, A. alhicostella; 
91, Atascosa glareosella; 92, Homosassa ella; 93, H. platella; 94, H. incudella, holotype; 
95, Reynosa floscella; 96, Goya stictella; 97, Anerastia lotella; 98, Coenochroa californiella; 
99, Bandera binotella; 100, fVakulla carneella; 101, Tampa dimediatella; 102, Barberia 
affinitella; 103, Ragonotia dotalis; 104, Martia arizonella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



111 





106 




Figures 105-112. — Male genitalia: 105, Peoria longipalpella; 106, P. bipartitella; 107, 
P. tetradella; 108, P. opacella; 109, P.floridella, holotype; 110, P. rostrella, vesica everted; 
111, P. gemmatella, vesica everted; 112, P. roseotinctella. 



112 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 






116 




118 





120 



Figures 113-120. — Male genitalia: 113, Peoria johnstoni; 114, P. santaritella; 115, P. 
holoponerella, vesica everted; 116, P. approximella; 117, P. hileicostella; 118, Anacostia 
trihulella, para type; 119, Arivaca pimella; 120, A. linella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



113 





123 





126a 



125 



Figures 121-126. — Male genitalia: 121, Arivaca ostreella, vesica everted; 122, A. poohella, 
paratype, vesica everted; 123, A. albidella; 124, A. artella, paratype; 125, A. alhicostella; 
126, Atascosa glareosella; 126a, gnathos. 



114 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




127a 



127b 




130a 



129a 




I3la 




I3lb 



Figures 127-131.— Genitalia: 127, Homosassa ella, male; 127«, gnathos; 127^', gnathos 
similar to that of lectotype; 128, H. platella, paratype male; 128a, gnathos; 129, H. 
incudella, holotype male; 129a, gnathos; 130, Reynosa floscella, male; 130a, gnathos; 
131, Goya stictella, male; 131a, transtilla; 131^, female genitalia. 



REVISION OF PEORIIXAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



115 





I35a 



Figures 132-135— Male genitalia: 132, Anerastia lotella, vesica everted; 133, Coenochroa 
californiella; 133a, gnathos; 134, C. illibella; 135, C. hipunctella; 135a, gnathos. 



116 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 




137a 




138a 




139 




139 a 




139b 



139c 



Figures 136-139.— Male genitalia: 136, B. binotella; 136a, tufts and sclerotizations of 8th 
abdominal segment; 137, B. cupidineila; 137a, sclerotizations of 8th abdom. seg.; 138, 
B. virginella; 138a, tufts and sclerotizations of 8th abdom. seg.; 139, Wakulla carneella; 
139a, gnathos; 139^, elements of transtilla; I39c, tufts and sclerotizations of 8th abdom. 
seg. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



117 





I40a 



140b 






Figures 140-143. — Male genitalia: 140, Tampa dimediatella; 140a, gnathos; 140^, trans- 
tilla; 141, Barberia affinitella; 142, Ragonoiia dotalis; 143, Martia arizonella. 



118 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 




Figures 144-148.— Female genitalia: 144, Peoria longipalpella; 145, P. bipariitella; 
146, P. tetradella; 147, P. opacella; 148, P. rostrella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



119 




Figures 149-153. — Female genitalia: 149, Peoria gemmatella; 150, P. roseotinctella; 151, 
P. johnsioni; 152, P. santaritella; 153, P. holoponerella. 



120 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 




Figures 154-159. — Female genitalia: 154, Peoria approximella; 155, P. luteicosiella; 156 
Arivaca piviella; 157, A. linella; 158, A. oitreella; 159, A. poohella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



121 




Figures 160-165. — Female genitalia: 160, Arivaca albidella; 161, A. artella; 162, A. 
albicostella; 163, Atascosa glareosella; 164, Homosassa ella; 165, H. incudella, paratype. 



122 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 280 




Figures 166-170.— Female genitalia: 166, Reynosa floscella; 167, Jnerastia lotella; 168, 
Coenochroa californiella; 169, C. illihella; 170, C, bipunctella. 



REVISION OF PEORIINAE AND ANERASTIINAE 



123 



171 




Figures 171-175— Female genitalia: 171, Bandera binolella; 172, B. cupidinella; 173, 
B. virginella; 174, Wakulla carneella; 175, Tampa dimediatella. 



124 



U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM BULLETIN 2 80 



I'/v:^ 



k 



176 





Figures 176-178.— Female genitalia: 176, Barberia affinitella; 177, Ragonotia dotalis; 

178, Martia arizonella. 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1968 



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