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Full text of "Bulletin Williamsport Dickinson Seminary and Junior College"

BULLETIN 



Clfflt^ CAVilhamsport 



a)ICJg[NSON 



and ^ 

cJtittior Coltede 



WILLUMSPORT, PENNA. 




Offering 

THE SENIOR PREPARATORY YEAR 

and 

THREE YEARS OF COLLEGE 

1947-1948 

and 

FOUR YEARS OF COLLEGE 
1948-1949 

Catalogue 1946-1947 
Announcements for 1947-1948 



BULLETIN 

WiLLIAMSPORT DiCKINSON SEMINARY 

AND 

Junior College 

Entered at the Post Office at Williamsport, Pa., as second class 
matter under the Act of Congress, August 24, 1912. Issued six 
times a year, January, February, May, July, October, and November. 

Vol.31 FEBRUARY, 1947 No. 2 

CATALOGUE NUMBER 



Foreword 

The adoption of the four-year college 
program at Williamsport Dickinson involves 
many changes in the curriculum and there- 
fore in the annual catalogue. This abbrevi- 
ated Bulletin is published to serve as the 
official guide to students for the school year 
1947-48 or until such a time as the more 
complete college Bulletin is revised and 
published. 



Board of Directors 

Officers 

Hon. Robert F. Rich President 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps Vice President 

Rev. a. Lawrence Miller, Ph.D Secretary 

Mr. John E. Person Treasurer 

Term Expires 1948 

Mr. Ivan E. Garver Roaring Spring 

Mrs. Layton S. Lyon Williamsport 

Mr. John H. McCormick Williamsport 

Rev. Elvin Clay Myers Bloomsburg 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps Williamsport 

Hon. Robert F. Rich Woolrich 

Hon. H. M. Showalter Lewisburg 

Rev. J. E. Skillington, D.D York 

Mr. George L. Stearns, II Williamsport 

Judge Charles Scott Williams Williamsport 

Term Expires 1949 

Mr. R. K. Foster Williamsport 

Hon. George W. Huntley, Jr Emporium 

Mr. Ralph E. Kelchner Jersey Shore 

Rev. a. Lawrence Miller, Ph.D Williamsport 

Mr. John E. Person Williamsport 

Mr. Edward B. Snyder Ashland 

Rev. E. Edward Watkins, D.D State College 

Term Expires 1950 

Rev. Harry F. Babcock Altoona 

Bishop Charles Wesley Flint, LL.D Washington, D. C. 

Judge Don M. Larrabee Williamsport 

Dr. Charles A. Lehman Williamsport 

Mr. Spencer S. Shannon Bedford 

Mrs. H. Marshall Stecker Mount Carmel 

Mr. George W. Sykes Conifer, N. Y. 

Rev. W. Galloway Tyson, D.D West Chester 

Rev. J. Merrill Williams, D.D Harrisburg 



Abbreviated and Official 
Bulletin 



Williamsport Dickinson 



ANNOUNCEMENTS OF COURSES 

1947-1948 

OFFERING THE 

SENIOR PREPARATORY YEAR 

AND 

THREE YEARS OF COLLEGE 
1947-1948 

AND 

FOUR YEARS OF COLLEGE 
1948-1949 



Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Member of the American Association of Junior Colleges 

Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Methodist Colleges 

Fully Accredited 



Calendar 



1947 

Monday, February 3 Second Semester Begins 

Thursday, April 3, noon Easter Recess Begins 

Tuesday, April 8 Easter Recess Ends 

Wednesday, April 9 Classes Resume 

Monday, June 9 Commencement 

Summer Session 

Monday, June 16 Registration 

Tuesday, June 17 Classes Begin 

Friday-Sunday, July 4-6 Fourth of July Recess 

Wednesday, July 23 First Period Ends 

Thursday, July 24 Second Period Begins 

Wednesday, August 27 Second Period Ends 

1947-1948 

Monday-Saturday, September 15-20 

Orientation Period for Freshmen 

Thursday-Friday, September 18-19 — Registration of Day Students 

Saturday, September 20 Registration of Boarding Students 

Monday, September 22 Classes Begin 

Thursday, November 27 Thanksgiving Recess 

Saturday, December 20, noon Christmas Recess Begins 

Sunday, January 4 Christmas Recess Ends 

Monday, January 5 Classes Resume 

Thursday-Friday, January 29-30 

Registration for Second Semester 
Saturday, January 31 First Semester Ends 

Winter Session 

Monday, February 2 Second Semester Begins 

Thursday, March 25, noon Easter Recess Begins 

Tuesday, March 30 Easter Recess Ends 

Wednesday, March 31 Classes Resume 

Monday, June 7 Commencement 



Administrative Staff 

John W. Long President 

J. Milton Skeath Dean 

Florence Dewey Dean of Women 

T. Sherman Stanford Dean of Men 

Robert G. Wharton, Jr Business Manager 

Bessie L. White Secretary to the Dean, Recorder 

Clara E. Fritsche Bookkeeper 

Nellie F. Gorgas Secretary to the President 

Marie M. Wharton Secretary to the Dean 

Dorothy J. Streeter Bookstore Manager 



Faculty 



John W. Long, President (1921) 

A,B., D.D., Dickinson College; LL.D., Western Maryland, Drew The- 
ological Seminary. 

J. Milton Skeath, Dean (1921) Psychology, Mathematics 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Graduate 
Work, Bucknell University, Pennsylvania State College. 

Florence Dewey, Dean of Women (1929) 

Violin, Theoretical Subjects 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Graduate, Institute of Musical Art 
of the Juilliard Foimdation. 

T. Sherman Stanford, Dean of Men, Athletic Director (1946) 

Chemistry 

B.S., Thiel College; M.S., Pennsylvania State College; Graduate 
Work, Pennsylvania State College. 

Phil G. Gillette (1929) German, Spanish 

A.B., Ohio University; M.A., Ohio State University; Graduate Work, 
Columbia University. 



Mabel K. Bauer (1942) Chemistry 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; Graduate 
Work, Butler University; Alfred College. 



Harriette V. Bartoo (1944) Biology 

A.B., Hiram College; Ph.D., University of Chicago; Summer Terms, 
University College, Southampton, England; People's College, 
Elsimore, Denmark; New York University; University of Minne- 
sota Biological Station. 



Helen Breese Weidman (1944) History, Political Science 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Eric V. Sandin (1946) English 

B.S., Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Joseph D. Babcock (1931) Physics 

A.B., Dickinson College; Graduate Work, Bucknell University. 

Mable F. Babcock (1934) Preparatory Spanish, Latin 

A.B., Dickinson College. 

Lulu Brunstetter (1925) Acting Librarian 

Bloomsburg State Normal; Pennsylvania State College, Summer 
Session. 

Roger Earle Cogswell (1946) French, Spanish 

B.S., Sorbonne University, Paris, France; Graduate Work, Engi- 
neering College, Paris, France. 

Hazel Dorey (1943) Piano 

Zechwerk-Hahn Conservatory of Music, Philadelphia, Pa.; Summer 
Work, Skidmore College, Columbia University; Private piano 
pupil of Frank LaForge, Ernesto Berumen, Harold Bauer, Rob- 
ert Goldsand. 



Donald J. Felix, Director of Physical Education (1946) 

Economics 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State Teachers College; Graduate Work, 
Bucknell University, Pennsylvania State College. 



Margaret E. Fowler (1946) 

Physical Education, Preparatory Biology 
B,S., Beaver College. 

Helen M. Golder (1943) Art, Preparatory Mathematics 

A.B., Pennsylvania State College; Graduate Work at New York Uni- 
versity Summer School, Chautauqua, N, Y. ; Private study under 
Revington Arthur. 

John P, Graham (1939) English 

Ph.B., Dickinson College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State College. 

James A. Heether (1945) Chemistry 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Ethelwynne S. Hess (1943) Preparatory Mathematics 

A.B., Bucknell University. 

Harold I. Hinkelman (1946) Accounting 

B.S., Shippensburg State Teachers College; M.S., Bucknell University. 

Gertrude E. Jeffrey (1946) English, Mathematics 

A.B., Middlebury College; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Elizabeth Hester Mabon (1947) Preparatory English, Latin 

A.B., Randolph-Macon for Women; Graduate Work, University of 
Virginia, Pennsylvania State College. 

Eloise B. Mallinson (1946) English 

A.B., Bucknell University. 

Mary Jane Marley (1946) Secretarial Studies 

B.S., Bucknell University. 

F. Alvin McCann (1946) Chemistry, Physics 

A.B., Maryville (Tenn.) College; M.S., University of Tennessee; Grad- 
uate Work, Jefferson Medical College, West Chester State Teach- 
ers College; University of Pennsylvania; New Jersey State Teach- 
ers College. 

Walter G. McIver (1946) Voice 

Mus.B., Westminister Choir College; Graduate Work, Bucknell Uni- 
versity. 



Helen Gray Nichols (1944) Public Speaking 

B.S., Northwestern University; Graduate Study, Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Eva L. Orwig (1946) Piano 

Cincinnati Conservatory of Music; Mus.B., Susquehanna University. 

Louis L. Fund, Jr. (1946) College Mathematics 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology; Th.B., Faith Theological 
Seminary. 

Donald George Remley (1946) Mathematics, Physics 

A.B., Dickinson College; Graduate Work, Columbia University. 

Verle Genevieve Rennick (1946) Biology 

A..B., Phillips University; M.A., University of Michigan; Graduate 
Work, University of Michigan. 

Mary Landon Russell (1936) Organ, Piano 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music; Graduate 
Work, JuUiard Summer School, JuUiard School of Music ; Earnest 
Hutcheson and James Friskin Master Classes, Chautauqua, N. Y. 

Robert F. Smith (1946) — Basketball Coach, Economics, History 

B.S., Lock Haven State Teachers College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Virginia L. Smith (1946) — College English, Preparatory Latin 

A.B., Juniata College; Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh; 
Pennsylvania State College. 

James W. Sterling (1924) English 

A.B., M.A., Syracuse University; Graduate Work, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

John A. Streeter (1946) Economics, Salesmanship 

A.B., M.A., Pennsylvania State College; Graduate Work, Bucknell 
University. 

Clair J. Switzer (1946) Bible 

A.B., Juniata College; A.M., Bucknell University; B.D., Susquehanna 
University Theological Seminary. 



PART TIME INSTRUCTORS 

Irvin F. Angstadt (1945) Engineering Drawing 

B.S., in Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State College. 

Fred F. Bastian (1946) Biology 

B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 

Carl S. Bauer (1946) Engineering Drawing 

B.S,, M.Ed., Pennsylvania State College. 

Paul B. Cooley (1946) English 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University. 

Bruce E. Gideon (1947) Sociology 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., Drew University. 

Wellard T. Guffy (1946) Accounting 

B.S., Bucknell University. 

Walter G. Haupt (1947) Mathematics 

A.B., Susquehanna University; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State College; 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh; Pennsylvania State 
College. 

M. Raymond Jamison (1946) Chemistry 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Bucknell University. 

Don L. Larrabee (1945) Business Law 

A.B., Allegheny College; Wharton Graduate School of the University 
of Pennsylvania, and Law School of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Ralph R. Miller (1946) Engineering Drawing 

A.B., Dickinson College; Graduate Work, Pennsylvania State College. 

Lester G. Shannon (1946) Sociology 

A.B., Susquehanna University; B.D., Juniata College. 

Lois Jean Shore (1946) Business English, Preparatory History 
A.B., Bucknell University. 

C. Robert Snyder (1946) Mathematics 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University. 

Edward C. Sucher (1946) Advertising 

A.B., Pennsylvania State College; Graduate Work, Pennsylvania 
State College. 

Willis W. Willard, Jr. (1946) Bible 

A.B., Dickinson College; B.D., M.A., Drew Theological Seminary; 

Graduate Study, Mansfield College, Oxford University, England. 

L. Elbert Wilson (1946) Sociology 

A.B., Southwestern University; Th.M., Union Theological Seminary. 



General Information 

The College 

Williamsport Dickinson Seminary offers college courses for 
young men and women, and during 1947-1948 will provide limited 
preparatory work for college admission. 



Location 

It is located at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, "The Queen City 
of the West Branch of the Susquehanna River," on the famed Sus- 
quehanna Trail, midway between Buffalo, New York, and Wash- 
ington, D. C. Williamsport is famed for its picturesque scenery, 
its beautiful homes, and the culture and kindness of its people. The 
Pennsylvania and Reading Railroads, with their fast trains, and 
the Lakes-to-Sea and the Greyhound Busses put it within two hours' 
reach of Harrisburg, four and a half of Philadelphia, and six hours 
of Pittsburgh and New York. 

History 

Williamsport Dickinson Seminary was founded in 1848 by a 
group of men of Williamsport under the leadership of Rev. Ben- 
jamin H. Crever, who, hearing that the old Williamsport Academy 
was about to be discontinued, proposed to accept the school and 
conduct it as a Methodist educational institution. Their offer was 
accepted and, completely reorganized, with a new president and 
faculty, it opened September, 1848, as Dickinson Seminary, under 
the patronage of the old Baltimore Conference. It was acquired in 
1869 and is still owned by the Preachers' Aid Society of the Central 
Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Church, and is regularly 
chartered under the laws of the state of Pennsylvania. It is not 
a money-making institution. All of its earnings as well as the 
generous gifts of its friends have been spent for maintenance and 
improvements. During a large part of its history its curriculum 
covered the work now included in a high school course and at the 
same time included about two years of college work. By its charter 
it is empowered to grant degrees, which authority was for a time 
exercised. In 1912 it began to confine itself to the college prepara- 
tory field and continued in that field until 1929. From that date 
until June 1947 it operated as a Junior College. The increased 
college attendance following the war, and trends in higher educa- 

10 



tion in recent years clearly indicate need for more 4-year colleges. 
After giving the matter careful consideration, the Board of Di- 
rectors, at a special meeting January, 1947 authorized and set in 
motion plans to adopt a four-year college program. This catalogue, 
therefore, contains an announcement of subjects for the first three 
years of college. The fourth year will begin September, 1948. 
College preparatory work will not extend beyond the close of the 
year 1947-1948. 

The campus is located near the center of the city on a slight 
eminence, which causes the school to be affectionately referred to 
as "The School Upon the Hilltop." Stately elms, maples, and 
trees of other varities add beauty and dignity to the campus and 
form an attractive setting for the imposing buildings. To the 
south and across the Susquehanna, within twenty minutes' walk is 
the beautiful Bald Eagle Range of the Allegheny Mountains, af- 
fording a view of perennial charm. To the north are the Grampian 
Hills. In fact, Williamsport, "beautiful for location," is seldom 
surpassed or equaled in its wealth of beautiful scenery. 

Aim 

It is the aim of Williamsport Dickinson to provide education 
for properly qualified high school or preparatory school graduates 
along the following lines : 

1. Education of a general nature to provide a background for 
intelligent understanding and appreciation of the economic, 
political, historical, social, scientific, and religious aspects 
of life. 

2. Education preparatory to specialization in the professions 
of law, medicine, dentistry, engineering, etc., and to grad- 
uate work in some field of concentration. 

3. Terminal education in secretarial courses for business and 
medicine. 

Cultural Influences 

Williamsport Dickinson aims to develop in its students an easy 
familiarity with the best social forms and customs. Young men 
and women meet in the dining hall, at receptions, and other social 
functions. These contacts together with frequent talks by in- 
structors do much to develop poise and social ease. Persons of 
prominence are brought to the school for talks and lectures, and 
excellent talent is provided by community organizations which bring 
the best artistic talent to the city. Students whose grades justify 
it are permitted and urged to take advantage of these opportunities. 

11 



Admission and Registration 

Complete application forms for admission to Williamsport-Dick- 
inson may be secured from the President, Registrar, or from the 
Administrative Offices. 

Applicants who are accepted will receive a statement evaluating 
their high school credits and granting freshman classification. Those 
rejected will be notified. 

A registration fee of $10.00 for boarding students and $5.00 
for day students is required with the application. This fee is re- 
funded in case the application is rejected. A request for room 
reservations in the college dormitories for both new and returning 
students may be made with a reservation payment of $25.00. This 
fee is applied to the main bill and is not returnable after July 15, 
except upon rejection of application. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present: 

1. Certificate of graduation from an approved high school 
showing credit for the following: 

a. English — i years 

b. History — 1 year 

c. Science — 1 year 

d. Mathematics — 2 years (Elementary Algebra and Plane 
Geometry) 

e. Electives — 8 years 

Total — 16 years 

2. Scholastic standing in upper three-fifths of high school 
class. 

Applicants not meeting the above requirements may be ad- 
mitted upon satisfactory performance in an aptitude test 
for college work. 

Requirements for Graduation 

Williamsport Dickinson will award the Bachelor of Arts degree 
only. This is in accord with the objective of providing a back- 
ground of knowledge in the humanities, social studies, and sciences. 
It is assumed that an intelligent understanding of the past enables 
one better to appreciate the present and to plan more ably for the 
future. Accordingly, certain required courses are listed for these 

12 



areas. In addition a student should have selected by the end of 
his sophomore year some field of concentration in which he wishes 
to specialize. 

The liberal arts program is basic to the professions of Medi- 
cine, Theology, Teaching, Law, Dentistry, and is desirable in En- 
gineering Science, Pharmacy, Nursing and Veterinary. The re- 
quirements for graduation at Williamsport Dickinson permit these 
pre-requisite subjects. 

Specific Requirements: 

1. Courses: 

Group I: Humanities 

English Composition 6 hours 

Literature 6 hours 

Foreign Language 6 hours or 14 hours 

Philosophy and Religion 6 hours 

Appreciation of Art 3 hours 

Appreciation of Music 3 hours 

Group II: The Social Studies 

European History 6 hours 

American History 6 hours 

Psychology 3 hours 

Elective 3 hours 

Group III Science 

The Physical Sciences and 3 hours 

The Biological Sciences, or 3 hours 

A Laboratory Science 8 hours 

Group IV: Physical Education 8 hours 

Electives: Sufficient to total ... 128 hours 

2. Selection of a major of at least 24 hours from one of the 
following fields: English, language, history, business ad- 
ministration, biology, chemistry, or mathematics. 

3. At least 128 quality points on the basis of 

A^3 points per hour 
B^2 points per hour 
C=^l point per hour 
D=0 points per hour 

18 



4. Grading: The letter system with the corresponding qual- 
ity points is used in grading. "A" represents a numerical 
grade between 90 and 100, "B" represents a grade from 80 
to 89, "C" represents work from 70 to 79, and "D" from 
60 to 69. Any grade below "D" is indicated by "F" and 
no credit is given for this course. Averages are determined 
on the point system where an A counts 3 points per hour, 
B counts 2 points per hour, C counts 1 point per hour, D 
carries no point value, and F counts- 1 point per hour. 



Standard Curriculum (except in business administration) 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

English Composition 6 hours 

European History 6 hours 

Science 6, 8, or 10 hours 

Foreign Language 6 hours 

Religion 8 hours 

Elective 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

32-36 hours 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 6 hours 

American History 6 hours 

Language or Elective 6 hours 

Psychology 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Elective 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

82 hours 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Social Studies Elective ... 3 hours 
Appreciation of Music .... 3 hours 
Major and Electives 24 hours 

32 hours 



SENIOR YEAR 

Appreciation of Art 3 hours 

Major and Electives 27 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

32 hours 



Business Administration 
Freshman Year 



First Semester 

English Composition 3 

European History 3 

Language 3 

Business Principles 3 

Accounting 3 

Phys. Education 1 

16 



Second Semester 

English Composition 3 

European History 8 

Language 8 

American Economic History .. 3 

Accounting 3 

Phys. Education 1 

16 



14 



Sophomore Year 



Literature 3 

Commercial Algebra 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Economics 3 

Elective 3 

or 

Language (3) 

Phys. Education 1 



16 



Literature 3 

Introd. to Statistics 3 

Economics 3 

Electives 6 

or 

Language (3) 

Elective (3) 

Phys. Education 1 



16 



Junior Year 



Political Science 3 

Psychology 3 

Sociology 3 

Physical Science 3 

Elective 3 

Phys. Education 1 



16 



Political Science 8 

Physical Science 3 

Electives 9 

Phys. Education 1 



16 



Senior Year 



Religion 3 

Art Appreciation 3 

Electives 9 

Phys. Education 1 



16 



Philosophy 3 

Music Appreciation 3 

Electives 9 

Phys. Education 1 

16 



Secretarial Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

English 6 hours 

Shorthand 6 hours 

Typewriting 6 hours 

Bookkeeping 3 hours 

Economics 6 hours 

Religion Shours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

32 hours 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Business English 3 hours 

Shorthand 6 hours 

Typewriting 6 hours 

Business Law 6 hours 

Office Practice 3 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

32 hours 



Medical Secretarial 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

English 6 hours 

Biology 6 hours 

Shorthand 6 hours 

Typewriting 6 hours 

Chemistry 3 hours 

Biology 3 hours 

Religion 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

35 hours 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Biology : 6 hours 

Psychology 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

Shorthand 3 hours 

Shorthand 3 hours 

Typewriting 3 hours 

English 3hours 

Bookkeeping 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

29 hours 



15 



Courses of Study 



Courses numbered in the one hundreds are commonly first year 
subjects; those in the two hundreds are second year subjects; the 
three hundreds are the third year or Junior subjects and will be 
offered during the year 1947-194i8. The college reserves the right 
to withdraw any course for which there is insufficient enrollment. 



Art 




101-102 


History and Appreciation 




of Art 


103-104 


Drawing 


105-106 


Design 


107-108 


Color 


109-110 


Elementary Art 


203-204 


Advanced Drawing 


205-206 


Advanced Design 


207-208 


Advanced Color 


Biology 




101-102 


General Biology 


108 


Microbiology 


104 


Anatomy and Physiology 


201-202 


Comparative Vertebrate 




Anatomy 


203-204 


Medical Office Technique 


205 


Forest Trees 


206 


The Anatomy of Flower- 




ing Plants 


301 


Histology 


302 


Vertebrate Embryology 


401 


Conservation of our Nat- 




ural Resources 


402 


Genetics 


Business Administration 


101-102 


Principles of Accounting 


103 


Principles of Business 


104 


American Economic His- 




tory 


105-106 


Elementary Shorthand 


107-108 


Elementary Typewriting 


205 


Business Correspondence 


206 


Banking and Finance 


207 


Banking and Money 


208-209 


Business Computations 


210-211 


Advanced Shorthand- 




Typewriting 


212-213 


Advanced Typewriting 


214 


Medical Shorthand 



215 


Corporation Accounting 


216 


Advanced Accounting 


217 


Salesmanship 


218 


Advertising 


219 


Office Machines 


220 


Commercial Algebra 


221-222 


Consumer Education 


302-303 


Business Law 


304 


Credits and Collections 


305 


Marketing 


307 


Organization and Finan- 




cial Management of Busi- 




ness Unit 


308 


Investments 


309 


Cost Accounting 


310 


Tax Accounting 


401 


Real Estate 


402-403 


Advanced Business Law 


404-405 


Insurance 


406 


Business Management 




Statistics 


407 


Public Finance 


408 


Public Utility Account- 


409 


ing 
Auditing 


410 


Interpretative Account- 




ing 


412 


Sales Management 


415 


Retail Distribution 


Chemistry 


101-102 


General Chemistry 


103 


Applied Chemistry 


201 


Qualitative Analysis 


202-203 


Quantitative Analysis 


301-302 


Organic Chemistry 


401-402 


Physical Chemistry 



Drawing 

101 Engineering Drawing 

102 Engineering Drafting 

103 Descriptive Geometry 



16 



Education 

201-202 History of Education 

Educational Psychology 

302 Educational M e a s u r e- 
ments 

303 Principles of Education 

304 Methods of Teaching 
401 Visual Education 
402-403 Observation and Practice 

Teaching 



German 

11-12 Beginning German 
101-102 Intermediate German 
201-202 German Literature 
203-204 Scientific German 
205-206 German Die Novelle 
301-302 German Romantic School 
401-402 Advanced German Gram- 
mar for Teachers 



Economics 

201 Principles of Economics 

202 Economic Problems 
301-302 Economic Geography 

303 Labor Problems 

304 Consumer Economics 

401 Advanced Economics 

402 Transportation 

403 Economic History 
Business Law 



English 

101-102 English Composition 
201-202 Survey of English Litera- 
ture 
203-204 History of American Lit. 
to 1920 

301 Romantic Movement 

302 Victorian Poetry 

303 Victorian Prose 

304 Shakespeare 

305 Milton 

306 Advanced Composition 
401-402 History of English Novel 

403 American Regional Fic- 
tion 

404 History of the English 
Language 

405 Emerson and Thoreau 

406 The American Drama 



French 

11 - 12 Elementary French 
101-102 Intermediate French 
201-202 19th Century Drama 
203-204 Survey of French— 20th 

Century Literature 
301-302 Survey of French Litera- 
ture from 16th to 19th 
Centuries 
401-402 Advanced French Gram- 
mar and Cours de Style 



History 




101 


Modern Europe to 1815 


102 


Modern Europe from 




1815 to 1914 


201 


History of the U. S. to 




1865 


202 


History of the U. S. from 




1865 


203 


Ancient Civilization 


204 


History of Medieval Eu- 




rope 


301 


American Foreign Rela- 




tions 


302 


Constitutional History of 




the U. S. 


303 


The Renaissance and Re- 




formation 


304 


Modern English History 


402 


Contemporary Europe 


Mathematics 


100 


Intermediate Algebra 


101 


College Algebra 


102 


Trigonometry 


103 


Mathematics of Invest- 




ment 


104 


Continuation of Course 




103 


201 


Analytic Geometry 


202 


Differential Calculus 


301 


Integral Calculus 


302 


Differential Equations 


401 


Advanced Calculus 


402 


Theory of Equations 



17 



* Music 

101-102 Music Appreciation 

103-104 Ear Training 

105-106 Harmony 

107-108 Keyboard Harmony 

112 Ensemble 

113-114 Stringed Instruments 

Class 

203-204 Ear Training 

205-206 Harmony 

207-208 Keyboard Harmony 

209-210 Form and Analysis 

211-212 Ensemble 

217-218 Music History 

219-220 Piano Sight-Playing 



Political Science 



201 
202 



301 

302 

303 
304 
401 
402 

403 
404 



American Government 
State and Local Govern- 
ment 

Business Law 
Principles of Political 
Science 

Political Parties and 
Pressure Politics 
Comparative Government 
Municipal Government 
Public Administration 
Supreme Court and the 
Constitution 
International Relations 
International Law 



Philosophy 

201-202 Introduction to Philoso- 
phy 

301 Logic 

302 Ethics 

401-402 History of Philosophy 



Physical Education 

101-102 Physical Education 

201-202 Physical Education 

301-302 Physical Education 

303 Personal Hygiene 

304 Public Hygiene 
401-402 Physical Education 
403-404 Athletic Coaching 



Psychology 

101 Psychology for Nurses 

201 General Psychology 

202 Child and Adolescent 
Psychology 

203 Educational Psychology 

204 Social Psychology 

301 Applied Psychology 

302 Abnormal Psychology 

303 Personality 

304 Statistics 

401 Tests and Measurements 

402 Systematic Psychology 

403 History of Psychology 



Religion 



Physics 




12 


An Introduction to Reli- 
gion and Biblical Litera- 
ture 


101-102 


General Physics 


101 


The Life and Teachings 


103 


Meteorology 




of Jesus 


201 


Statics 


102 


The Literature of the 


202 
203 

301-302 
401 


Thermo-Dynamics 
Radio 
Electricity 
Physical Optics 


103 
121 


New Testament 
The Literature of the Old 
Testament 

The Religions of Man- 
kind 


402 


Applied Mechanics and 
Strength of Materials 


122 


Contemporary Religion 
in America 



18 



Science 

101 

102 



Survey Course in the 
Principles of the Physi- 
cal Sciences 

Continuation of Science 
101 emphasizing the Bio- 
logical Sciences 



Secretarial Sciences 

11 Secretarial Bookkeeping 

Elementary Typewriting 
Advanced Typewriting 
Elementary Shorthand 

221 Medical Typewriting 
210-211 Advanced Shorthand 
214 Medical Shorthand 

222 Office Practice 

Sociology 

101 Sociology for Nurses 

201 Introductory Sociology 

202 Social Problems 

301 The Family 

302 Community Organization 

303 Urban Sociology 

304 Rural Sociology 

401 Criminology 

402 Race Problems 

403 Introduction to Social 
Work 

404 Methods of Social Inves- 
tigation 

405 History of Social 
Thought and Philosophy 



Spanish 
11-12 

101-102 
103-104 
201-202 
203 

204 

301-302 

401-402 

Speech 
101 

102 
201 
202 
301 



Beginning Spanish 
Intermediate Spanish 
Commercial Spanish 
19th Century Spanish 
Spanish Conversation and 
Composition 

Continuation of Spanish 
203 

Introduction to Spanish 
American Literature 
Advanced Spanish Gram- 
mar for Teachers 



Public Speaking — Basic 
Principles of Speech 
Public Speaking 
Debate 

Argumentation 
Radio Speech 



* Music of a sub-college Freshman 
level is offered for those needing 
entrance requirements for college 
music courses, and other interested 
students. 



19 



Special Information 

Discipline 

The discipline of the college is firm, reasonable, and sympathe- 
tic. All students are considered responsible citizens and members 
of a Christian community. Any student who is antagonistic to the 
spirit and general purpose, or who fails to abide by the regulations 
set up by the college may be asked to withdraw from the college 
at any time during the school year. 

Regulations 

The school regulations in addition to those published here are 
furnished each student upon matriculation. 

Students from a distance are required to reside in the dormi- 
tories. Permission for any exception to this rule must be obtained 
from the Administration. 

Money and valuables should be placed in the school safe; the 
college will not assume responsibility unless this is done. 

No intoxicants or drinking of intoxicants is permitted. 

Permission to maintain automobiles on the campus must be 
obtained from the administration. 

Dormitories 

Rooms at Williamsport-Dickinson are furnished as follows: 
Desk, bureau, chair, single bed, mattress, and pillow are provided. 
Students must bring their bed linen, blankets, and study lamp with 
them. 

It has been the policy of the college to furnish bed linen and 
blankets and to provide laundry service; but with the beginning 
of the college year 1947-1948 both of these services will be dis- 
continued; accordingly, a reduction of $25.00 is made in living 
expenses. The students will therefore make arangements for their 
own laundry service. We recommend six sheets (single bed), three 
pillow cases, and two double-blankets. 

Damage and breakage in the room will be the responsibility of 
the students assigned there. 

Teachers and students remaining at Williamsport-Dickinson 
during the short vacations will be charged $2.00 for each day or 
part of a day. Parents or guardians visiting pupils are the guests 
of the college for meals for the first twenty-four hours. Other 
guests may be entertained if permission is secured from the Presi- 
dent. Their student hosts are expected to pay the regular rates 
for their entertainment. 

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Student Insurance 

By a special group plan our students are able to secure accident 
insurance, covering medical and hospital expenses for injuries re- 
ceived on the campus. The limit of coverage for women is $600.00 
and for men $250.00. All students are advised to carry this pro- 
tection. 

General Expenses 

Following are the rates covering tuition, board and special fees. 
Board includes furnished room and board at the college dining hall. 
Tuition includes the normal schedule of from 12 to 16 hours per 
semester, including physical education, or for veterans excused 
from physical education 12 to 15 semester hours. Additional credit 
beyond the normal schedule is charged at the rate of ten dollars 
for each semester hour credit. In line with the increase in salaries, 
repair and up-keep of buildings, and other general expenses, an 
increase of $50.00 per year is made in tuition. Fees are listed and 
assessed as they apply. 

Expenses in Detail 

Boarding Student Dav Student 

Tuition— yearly $325 $326 

Board and Furnished Room 500 

Registration Fee* Payable with Application for 

Admission (Does not apply to main bill) 10 fi 

Room Deposit Fee** Payable with Application for 

Room Reservation (Applicable to main bill) .. 25 
•Not refundable if accepted for admission. 
**Not refundable unless notice received by July 15. 



Special Fees 

Laboratory Fees Per Semester 

College Preparatory 

Biology, Chemistry, Physics (General) $ 7.50 $ 6.00 

Biology, Chemistry, Physics (Advanced) 10.00 

Office Practice (Supplies and Machine Rentals) 5.00 

Retail Salesmanship (Supplies) 2.00 

Public Speaking Laboratory Fee 2.00 

Fine Arts Laboratory Fee 2.00 

Additional Credit Per Semester Hour 10.00 

Key Deposit (For each key required) 50 .50 

Tray Fee (For meals served in rooms) per tray 20 .20 

Damage Deposit* (unused portion returned) 10.00 10.00 

Diplomas 6.50 5.00 

Certificate 2.50 

Caps and Gowns (Rental at prevailing cost) 

* A damage deposit of $10.00 is required of all boarding students. General 
damage to Dormitory property will be charged against this fund. The 
remainder will be returned to the student at the end of the school year. 
Wherever possible damage will be charged directly to the person responsible 
for causing it. 

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Activities Fee 

In support of student activities, including athletics, health, stu- 
dent publications, student organizations, lectures, entertainment, and 
the Greater Dickinson Banquet, a fee is charged as follows: 

Boarding Students $25.00 

Day Students 20.00 

Payable — beginning of the first semester 

Boarding Students $15.00 

Day Students 10.00 

Beginning of the second semester $10.00 for students in each group. 

The Infirmary Fee, covered by the over-all Activities Fee Pay- 
ment, includes the following medical service: The College Nurse 
holds infirmary hours each day, except Sunday, that the college 
dormitories are open, and is also available for first aid treatment 
and will call to the attention of the College Physician any case 
demanding special treatment. 

Such service, however, shall not be interpreted to include x-rays, 
surgery of more than minor nature, care of major accidents on or 
off campus, immunization for colds, examination for glasses, doc- 
tors' calls, cases of serious chronic disorder, or other extraordinary 
situations. 

Each student is entitled to three days' infirmary service per 
school year, including routine nursing and ordinary medicines. 
There will be a charge of $2.00 per day for each additional day or 
fraction thereof beyond the alloted days. 

Special nursing service and special medicines and prescriptions 
will be at the expense of the student. Parents will be notified by 
the college when students are confined to the Infirmary with serious 
illness. 

Art 

Tuition Per Semester 
Full Art Courses: 

24 Class periods in Art per week and one academic subject $162.50 

30 Class periods in Art per week, no academic subject 162.50 

Part-Time Art Course: 

18 Class periods in Art per week 100.00 

12 Class periods in Art per week 80.00 

6 Class periods in Art per week 40.00 

Deposit Fee for Supplies (each semester) 6.00 

Leather and Block Printing Tool Fee 1.00 

22 



Music 
Tuition Per Semester 

College Preparatory 

Organ, Piano, Violin, Voice (two lessons per week) $72.00 $72.00 

Organ for Practice (one period per day) 10.00 10.00 

Piano for Practice (one period per day) 3,00 3.00 

Piano Ensemble (one lesson per week) 8.00 8.00 

Piano Sight-Playing 8.00 8.00 

Stringed Instruments Class 15.00 9.00 

Voice (one lesson per week) 36.00 36.00 

Instrumental Music for Beginners 27.00 27.00 

Note: All lessons in practical music are one-half hour in duration 
All classes m theoretical subjects are fifty-minute periods. 

Terms of Payment 

All remittances should be made payable to Williamsport Dick- 
inson Seminary as follows: 

Boarding Student Day Student 

With Application— Registration Fee $ 10.00 $ 5 00 

(Paid by New Students) " 

— Room Deposit Fee 25.00 

1947 

On Registration Day — June 138.50 

July 26 — Balance of Term Bills and Extras 

On Registration Day — September 230.00 

November 22 — Balance of Term Bills and Extras 



65.00 
95.00 

90.00 



1948 

On Registration Day — February 220.00 

April 3 — Balance of Term Bills and Extras 

In all departments one-half of the regular semester charge is 
due and payable on the opening date of the semester, or the day 
on which the student enters. The balance of the semester bill with 
extras is due for the first semester on November 22, and for the 
second semester April 3. 

Veterans, both new and returning, are expected to pay for 
room and board as above. 

All students except Veterans under the G. I. Bill, will pay 
cash for books and supplies purchased at the college bookstore. The 
bookstore will be open on Registration Day. 

Students are subject to suspension if bills are not paid within 
ten days of the dates mentioned unless ample security is furnished. 

No deduction is made for absence except in prolonged and 
serious illness or other unavoidable providence, when the price of 
board (not tuition, room, etc.) is refunded. No deduction is made 

23 



for the first two weeks or the last three weeks of the year or 
the term. 

Fees can not be refunded for any reason whatever. 

Music and Art, when taken in addition to a regular course, 
cost extra. 

For extra service, such as meals served in rooms, private in- 
struction outside of classroom, et cetera, an extra charge is made 
to both students and faculty. 

In order to graduate and to receive a diploma or certificate a 
student must have spent at least two terms in study at the college 
and also have paid all his bills, in cash or its equivalent — not in 
notes. 

The registration fee is not returnable after registration is ac- 
cepted. 

Discounts 

Special discounts are allowed on the regular expenses to the 
following : 

(1) Two students from the same family at the same time. 

(2) Children of ministers. 

(3) Student preparing for the ministry or missionary work. 
Not more than one discount will be allowed to any student. 
The college reserves the right to withdraw any discount from 

a student whose work or behavior is unsatisfactory. 

No discount is allowed on Music and Art, whether taken as 
extra subjects in connection with a regular course or whether the 
student is majoring in one of these subjects. 



24