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ARMS OF SMITH OF BRAMHAM AND COGNATE FAMILIES OF SMITH. 



\ 



THE 



BUELINGTON SMITHS. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



ny 



R. MORRIS SMITH. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

By E. STANLEY HART, 38 Hudson St. 

1877. 



PetItCHtto% 



TO THE 



RIGHT HONORABLE THE EARL OF DERBY, 



This little volume is, by permission, 



RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED. 



J^chttotvledgemettt. 



^*^ The author wishe:*,- in this place, to return his sincere thanks to John Jay Smith, 
Daniel B. Smith and Thomas Stewari>son, Jr., esteemed friends and relatives', for valuable 
hints and assistance. Ako to Richard F. Mott, Charles Moore Morris, George Vaux, 
Lloyd P. Smith, Barclay White, R. C. Rowland, James Jones Levick and Franklin B. 
WooLMAN, for access to documents and relics in their possession. 

R. MORRIS SMITH, 
December Ist^ 1877. Stanley, near Philadelphia. 




BRAMHAM CHURCH. 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



CHAPTER I. 



BRAMUAM AND ELFORD. 



I HAVE been reijuested by uuiiierous 
descendants of the brothers Smith, 
who settled at Burlington, New Jersey, 
about the end of the seventeenth century, 
to put into book form the information I 
l)0ssess relative to their ancestry. While 
I could heartily wish the task had de- 
volved ui)on the abler and more practised 
peuy and the larger knowledge of the 
subject, possessed by the author of the 
elegant "Memoirs of the Hill Family," 
I shall endeavor, with my inferior re- 
sources, to satisfy the curiosity of the 
large clan of the descendants of these 
brothers, and lay before them some mat- 
ters of interest to "the family" at leiist, 
if not to the general public. 

These brethren were, it need scarcely 
be premised, " Friends " or " Quakers." 
They were sons of a Richard Smyth or 
Sraithe, who became a Quaker very early 
in the history of that sect, before the rise 
and preaching of George Fox even, be- 



ing of those people in Yorkshire who, as 
Sewel tells us, embraced the doctrines of 
that society, independently of and j^re- 
vious to the labors of that Evangelist. 
This Richard Smyth, who was born as 
early as A. D. 1626, has left a consider- 
able amount of MSS., which will be 
hereafter quoted ; and from which and 
the testimony of Samuel Hopwood, (or 
Hopewood),( preserved by Joseph Sansom 
in his MS. account of the Smith familv, 
A. D. 1788,) we can gather a good gen- 
eral idea of his character and }K)sition. 
He was a yeoman, probably a "yeoman 
freeholder," in the parish of Bramham, 
West Riding of Yorkshire, England. 
His father, " Richardus Smyth," and his 
grandfather, " Willelmus Smyth," (as 
their names are spelt in the Latin parish 
register of Bramham,) held lands directly 
from the Crown, which did not alienate 
its Manor of Bramham until after the 
departure of the L'K^t niomber of this 



10 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



sceiulants of Aldith had finally inher- 
ited Stone Leigh,* they took the historic 
name of " Stanley." What the "nomen" 
or family name of this Saxon family of 
Stone Leigh may have been (as distinct 
from their territorial appellation of Stan- 
ley), is uncertain. 

The Smith coat of arms is a lion ram- 
pant, " gules," on a field *' argent," bear- 
ing the insignia of royalty, crown, scep- 
tre and orb. These insignia are evidently 
an "augmentation," and were probably 
granted to the Bramham Smiths, as 
holders of land directly from the Crown, 
to distinguish them as its immediate vas- 
sals. It is found on documents of Samuel 
Smith, Treasurer and Secret«iry of Coun- 
cil of New Jersey under the British 
Crown, in the period immediately pre- 
ceding the Revolution — the author of a 
valuable history of the Province — which 
Samuel was eldest son of Richard, (fourth 
of the name) eldest son of Samuel Smith, 
the first, of Bramham. The papers are 
now in possession of his descendant, 
Charles Moore Morris, of Philadelphia. 

A similar coat, and with the same 
colors or "tinctures," but without the 
"augmentation," is found on the tomb of 
Sir AVilliam Smith, of Elford, Stafford- 
shire, (who died in 1526), associated or 
"quartered" with the bearings of his 
maternal ancestors, who would seem to 
have been of another family of Smiths. 
The same device of a lion rampant 



* Stanley or Stoncloy, is a village in the West 
hiding, about ten miles from Bramham. 



proper, with the augmentation of the 
Crown, was borne on a field alternately 
" argent " and " gules," by John Smith, 
Esquire, of New^Ciistle, in 1561. William 
Smith, of Rossdale Abbey, Yorkshire, 
temp. Jac. I., ancestor of John Smith, 
Viscount Gort, bore a lion rampant "ar- 
gent," on a field " gules," (with " a mullet 
between two torteaux," on a "chief"). 
These coats will readily be recognized by 
heralds as allied, and "variations" of 
each other. The additions on the "chief," 
in the last, are similar to those of Tar- 
bock, alias Smith, a faniily from whose 
ancestors the Derby-Stanleys derive 
their crest of the eagle and child. This 
crest, and the Derby " supporter " of a 
griflSn, as well as the arms of an eagle's 
leg, used, with the above " chief," by the 
Smiths, formerly of Tarbock and Latham, 
commemorate the seizure of the infant 
heir of those estates by an eagle. 

There appears to have been nothing to 
j)revent a very wealthy man, among the 
Saxons, from assuming the title of Thane. 
Thus Wulfric Spot, a rich Saxon or An- 
glo-Dane, is the first recorded owner of 
the manor of Bramham, and also of that 
of Elford, which Sir William Smith 
afterward held from the Crown. Wulfric 
Spot is called a " thane," yet appears to 
have been little more than a rich gentle- 
man. He is never called a noble (Earl 
or Jarl). 

The next rank below thanes, (ancient- 
ly called "Sithcundmen,") embraced the 
arms-bearing class of franklins, to which 
the Smiths must have belonged. The 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



11 



yeomen (sometimes owning land) seem to 
be those more anciently called " ceorls " 
or "carles." These three classes, with 
the jarls and the thralls or serfs, com- 
prised the whole sciile of Anglo-Saxon 
society. In that society, ranks were less 
nicely defined than in the Norman feudal 
system, in which system the order of 
Knights (" milites ") interposed between 
the gentlemen (" armigeri " answering to 
the Saxon thanes and franklins), and the 
Barons (corresponding to theSaxon earls), 
and a lower order of nobles was, in temp. 
Jac. I., created, taking rank between the 
knights and barons, and called Baronets, 
the first created being the eminent Sir 
Nicholas Bacon. Above the barons 
were dukes, (duces,) earls, (comites,) 
marquises, (marchiones,) etc. 

The family, whose history I am to 
give, owned a substantial mansion near 
Bramham, which was found, by William 
Dillwyn, still in possession of a branch 
of their descendants. The then owners 
told W. D. that it was built by Richard 
Smith, the first, in the days of Elizabeth 
— the Elizabethan or Jacobean period in 
architecture. 

The architecture of that |ieriod would, 
of course, characterize it. From the situa- 
tion, as described by W. Dillwyn, I im- 
agine it to have been the house afterwards 
used as an inn under the name of the 
Lane-Fox Arms, and standing on the edge 
of the broad domain of Lane-Fox, Lord 
Bingley, to whose ancestors the manor of 
Bramham was granted by the Crown 
after the departure of the Quaker colo- 



nies to America. This old Lane-Fox 
Arms was, as I understood when there, 
torn down early in this century, and the 
present one built, preserving, however, 
the old style. The front and back hall- 
doors of the present house seem to be 
genuine ancient doors, and if so, were 
probably taken from the old structure. 

The earliest register of Bramham 
church begins A. D. 1592, and in the 
next year, A. D. 1593, is recorded the 
birth of Richardus Smyth, (the first,) 
son of Willelmus Smvth. Willelmus, 
(William) whose birth is not on record, 
must have been, however, born in the 
earlier years of Queen Elizabeth, say 
about A. D. 1560 to 1570 at latest. 

The architecture of the old house, if 
correctly coj^ied in the present one, was 
strikingly similar to that of the more 
modern Bramham Hall or Smith Hall 
built by Richard Smith, the fifth of that 
name, at Otsego, New York, and which 
may, therefore, have been copied from it. 
Both edifices are in the later Tudor style. 

The three proprietary tracts purchased 
in New Jersey by Richard Smith, the 
second, were of the extent of thirty-five 
thousand acres each, (at the price of one 
pound sterling per the hundred acres,) 
or one hundred and five thousand acres 
in all — quite a barony rather than an 
estate — and covered much of the best 
parts of Burlington County from the 
Rancocas to the two Egg Harbors. It 
was wild land then, but three generations 
afterwards was worth sixty pounds per 
the hundred acres. The sum of one 



12 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



thousand and fifty pounds, for which it 
was bought, was equivalent, at that time, 
(by the decrease of the value of money 
in two centuries,) to from eight to ten 
thousand pounds now.* The English 
landed estates of the family were jn-oba- 
bly of quite moderate extent. 

I have thought it proper to introduce 
here a short sketch of the early history 
of the region around Bramham, the ma- 
terials for which were furnished me chiefly 
by a friend, (T. S). The authorities for 
it are earlv Saxon authors, such as 
Beowulf, Bede, William of Worcester, 
etc. 

The West Riding of Yorkshire was 
the original seat of the great Anglo- 
Saxon conqueror, Hengist. He fixed his 
court at Doncaster, (" Thongcastle," so- 
called from the thongs of ox-hide with 
which his domains were measured,) some 
twenty miles south of Bramham, (the 
name of "Bramham" signifies "high 
pastures,") and the ruins of his strong- 
hold of Coningsborough ("the King's 
castle, burg or tower,") are visible near 
Doncaster to this day. (See Sir Walter 
Scott's description of Coningsboro' in 
" Ivanhoe.") 

After Hengist's time, the Saxons of 
this vicinity became Christianized, and 
the Bishopric of Lindesia or Doncaster 
was formed, embracing Bramham in its 
wide extent. Under the Anglo-Danish 



* Beside the original £1050, Richard Smith had to 
pay to the Indians, on three shares, the further value 
of £210 in goods; or, altogether, £1260, equal, in 
relative value, to some £11,000 at the present time. 



Kings, many Danes settled here, and es- 
tablished a Danish colon v, which lasted 
two hundred years, they becoming, in 
time, completely Anglicized. The inde- 
pendent sj^irit of these Anglo-Saxons and 
Anglo-Danes, and their adhesion to the 
Danish Sovereigns, leading them to rebel 
against the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred, 
he devastated the North-Humber king- 
dom (including Lindesia) with great 
severity. Other agitations followed, until 
we hear of Wulfric Spot, (a nephew of 
the celebrated Leofric and Godiva, Earl 
and Countess of Coventry,) who, taking 
advantage of the disturbances of the 
times, seized upon the church lands of 
Lindesia ; and it was, perhaps, from re- 
morse for this high-handed outrage upon 
" holy church," that we find him, on his 
death, in A. D. 1004, bequeathing his 
manor of Elford in Staffordshire, (after 
a life-estate therein to his daughter,) to 
endow the celebrated Abbey of Burton. 

At the period of the conquest, Lindesia 
was found in possession of the brothers 
of the slain King Harold, Earls Sweyn 
and Tosti, while Elford was held by 
Earl Algar. 

All these lands being forfeit to the 
Conqueror, he bestowed the Bishopric of 
Lindesia on his follower Remy or Remi- 
gins, a monk of Feschamp in France. 
A Danish invasion in favor of Sweyn 
and Tosti having been received in the 
North-Humber region "with open arms," 
the Conqueror, in revenge, ravaged that 
country terribly, and " from the Humber 
to the Tees," (savs Raine, in his Lives of 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



13 



the Archbishops of York,) "suffered 
scarcely a sinde homestead to remain." 
Finally, King William Rufus annexed 
this troublesome and indomitable Bish- 
opric to the Archbishopric of York ; 
from which time forward Bramham seems 
to have lain out of the current of great 
events in English history, and to have 
remained in peaceful obscurity down to 
and beyond the first date in our family 
history. 

Bramham continued to be a crown 
manor until after the Smiths left Eng- 
land, (in A. D. 1678 to 1699,) and their 
lands were, of course, held from the 
crown. They, doubtless, relinquished 
their fief on emigrating, and all the lands 
of the manor were granted by King 
William and Queen Mary to Ben- 
son, Esquire, (father of Robert Benson, 
Lord Mayor of York,) in 1707. The 
elder Benson fenced in the grand Park, 
one of the largest in England, from the 
naked and elevated Moor on which it 
is situated, and the son, who became 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, and was 
created Baron Bingley in 1713, erected, 
in the reign of Queen Anne, the imposing 
mansion of Bramham Park House. The 
splendid property is now in possession of 
the Lane-Fox family.* 

In the earliest volume of the Church 
Register of Bramham, near the begin- 



* It is worth mcntioDiog, that the remains of the 
celebrated Roman military road, called ** Watling 
Street." are in the vicinity, and that Oliver Cromwell 
marched within a few miles of Bramham in his expedi* 
tion against Scotland. 



1593. 
Bramham. 



1626. 



ning, I found the following record in 
Gothic text, and in Latin : 

18? die Maii, Richardus 
Siffyth, filius WiU^^ Smyth, 
baptizatus. 

And, in its proj^er place, this second entry : 

Richardus Smithe, filius Rich- 
ardi Smithe de Bramham, bap- 
tizatus fuit decimo quinto Octo- 
bris, anno Domini ut supra. 

These entries were politely shown me 
by the incumbent of the adjoining Parish, 
Mr. Gatesford, in charge of Bramham 
during the absence of its rector. They 
show that the original spelling of the 
name was Smyth, and the quantity of 
the vowel long, as has been observed. 

The country around Bramham i>os- 
sesses, in a high degree, the beauties of 
English rural landscape; gentle hill- 
slopes rise from the margins of clear and 
rapid streams, (branches of the Wharfe 
and the Ouse,) and lead you to fertile 
plateaux with frequent homes of opulence 
and taste, and sky-pointing church-spires. 
The Moor, even, is now in a high state 
of cultivation, while the mansions of the 
gentry would do credit to any part of 
England. 

To show the connection between seals 
of arms and the holding of landed pro- 
perty, I quote the following from the 
preface to John and John Bernard 
Burke's " General Armory" : 

**Arms were no sooner esteemed as in- 
controvertible evidence of honour and 
blood, than the possession was eagerly 



14 



THE BURLIXGTOX SMITHS. 



sought for by all, who, by their own in- 
dustry, the patronage of the feudal lord, 
or through royal favor, had obtained 
landed property, but who had not pre- 
viously served in a military capacity." 

So precise and important was the con- 
nection between landholding, military 
service and the use of these insignia, that, 
as these authors add : 

" In Scotland, it was enacted by sundry 
statutes, that every freeholder should 
have his j^roper seal of arms, and 
should compear himself at the head 
court of the shire, or send his attorney 
with liis said seal ; and they who w^anted 
{i. e., had not), such seals even to be 
emerciat or fined, so that commonly 
gentlemen sent to the clerk of the 
court their seals in lead, who kept the 
same in liis office to produce or compare 
on occasion, and it was reckoned no less 
crime than forgery to counterfeit an- 
other man's seal." 

Similar laws are quoted by Guillim as 
having been in force in England. It 
thus appears a strong additional evidence 
to the holding of land by Richard and 
Samuel Smith, of Bramham, that their 
eldest descendant, Samuel Smith, the 
second, should inherit an undoubtedly 
genuine armorial seal. 

Sir William Smith, of Elford, who 
had arms similar to our own, inherited 
Elford in right of his wife, Anne Staun- 
ton, from her grandfather, Sir John 
Stanley, Sheriff of Staffordshire, 20th 
Henry VI., son of Sir Thomas Stanley, 
Sheriff the 12th of same reign, and 



grandson of Sir John Stanley, of Latham. 
Sir Thomas Stanley had the manor 
through his wife, a descendant of John de 
Arderne, ** who, in the 32d Edward I., 
paid to the King, £8, (is., 8c?., for a relief 
for one knight's fee, and a half and sixth 
part of another in Aldeford," (or El- 
ford). — (Shaw's History of Staffordshire). 
This quit-rent was paid to exonerate the 
owner from military service. 

Sir William Smith was Sheriff of Staf- 
fordshire, 14tli Henry VII., and w^as 
twice married, firstly to the above-men- 
tioned Anne Staunton, and secondly to 
Isabel, daughter and heiress of Sir John 
Nevyl, Marquis of Montacute, a brother 
of the great Earl of Warwick. 

Sir William was buried with his two 
wives in the chancel of Elford church, 
under a "sj^lendid altar-tomb,'' which is 
described and engraved by Shaw in his 
excellent folio history of Staffordshire, 
(1798). The arms of Sir William Smith, 
carved upon this tomb, are thus described 
by Shaw : 

" Sir William's atchievement is, quar- 
terly ; first and fourth, a field, bearing 
what seems a lion rampant, Gu.; second 
and third, Arg., on a fesse Az., between 
three demi-griffins Sa., as many be- 
zants." 

The first and fourth quarters ai*e, of 
course, those devoted to the ancestors of 
the male line. Sir William's paternal 
ancestors, therefore, bore, on a ** field," 
(without color or " argent,") a lion ram- 
pant " gules," which, excepting the royal 
insignia, is the same as the arms of the 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



15 



Bramham Smiths. The "demi-griffins" 
aud " bezants," on the second and third 
quarters are, by lieraldic rule, those of 
vtateimal ancestors. Yet these maternal 
ancestors must also have been a branch 
of the Smiths, as several families named 
Smith in the same county use these as 
their paternal arms. I should be glad 
to call the attention of Mr. Sydney 
Grazebrook, author of the elegant little 
volume, " The Heraldry of Smith," to 
these ancient and forgotten Smitli arms 
of a lion rampant Gules on a field Ar- 
gent, and it would be a gratification to 
many Smith descendants in America, if, 
in his next revised and corrected edition, 
they should appear in their proper place, 
as the paternal arms of Sir William 
Smith, of Elford — the arms attributed to 
that worthy in the edition at present 
published, being only those appearing in 
the " femme" or maternal quarters of his 
shield. The name of Sir William is 
spelt, in the inscription on his tomb, 
with a 2/, like that of William Smyth, of 
Bramham, in the church register. 

Mr. Grazebrook remarks, in his pre- 
face: "In its integrity. Heraldry is a 
most useful handmaid to Genealogy, 
and all who lawfully bear the same 
arms may be fairly presumed to be 
members of the same family. 

" I have considered it the better plan 
to arrange as many of the coats as I 
could, as primiiives, adding others as 
variations of an original." "Such an 
arrangement wdll tend to facilitate in- 
quiries into the particular genealogy of 



any one of these families, it being a 
well-known practice of the early her- 
alds to vary the arms of collaterals; 
a practice, moreover, which was in 
vogue among Armigeri themselves 
before the corporation of Heralds was 
established." 

The four ancient coats which I have 
arranged in my plate around that of 
Smith of Bramham, are, to the practised 
in Heraldry, evidently, with our own, 
variations of a common primitive, (prob- 
ably the Elford coat,) and indicate cog- 
nate blood. The bearings on the " chief" 
in the two last, " a mullet between two 
torteaux," are also borne (with the lion 
on the field,) by Smith, of Hammersmith, 
and other Smith families, varying the 
colors or " tinctures ;" which shows that 
the Tarbocks, who "took the name of 
Smith," must have been, anciently, of 
that family and name, and that they re^ 
sumed their old appellation when they 
" took " that name. (Tarbock, as is well 
known, was the territorial name derived 
by this family from their estate of Tar- 
bock). This brings into the Smith 
family the picturesque old story of the 
eagle carrying off the infant heir,* com- 
memorated in the Tarbock-Smith arms 
by the eagle's leg, and in those of Tar- 
bock de Latham, and of the Earls of 



* This story is, that one summer's day lonp ago. the 
nurse of the infant heir of Latham took him out to 
enjoy the balmy air, and laid him in his lij^ht basket- 
cradle to sleep upon the grass, when an enormous 
eagle, swooping upon him. carried him off before her 
eyes, to his eyry in a neighboring cliff. From this 
perilous position he was rescued, strange to say, quite 
unhurt, by a gallant young huntsman. 



10 



THE BURLINGTON' SMITHS. 



Derby, (heirs of Latham by intermar- 
riage with the latter family,) by the 
ea gle-ati (1 -child crest and the griffin sup- 
porter. The coat of Smith Viscount 
Gort combines the mullet and torteaux 
with the lion rampant bearing, {as does,/ 
also, that of Sir Thomas Smitli, "clarke 
of y!^ eounsell "). It should be remarked, 



in passing, that the various terms " tor- 
teanx," " bezants," " plates " and " hurts," 
are different names for the same thing 
under <lifferent colore, viz.: a circular disc. 
Tlie conclusion I draw from the above 
data is, that the Brum ham-Smiths were 
a branch of the stock from which Sir 
William, of Elford, descended. 









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TOMB OF SIR WILLIAM SMITH. 




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NEW TESTAMENT TITLE-PAGE OF SMITH FAMILY BIBLE. 



CHAPTER II. 



THE FAMILY IIECX)RD. 



THE brightest blazon on the arms of 
the Smiths of Bramham would be 
that which should record (were sucli a 
record possible), their association with 
the devoted band of primitive Quakers, 
founders of New Jersey and Pennsyl- 
vania. The " atchievements " recorded 
in the " fields " of Heraldry have been 
mostly those "battles of the warrior" 
which are " with confused noise and gar- 
ments rolled in blood." These Smiths 
were soldiers in the forefront of a blood- 
less battle ; the battle of the martyrs and 
confessors, which has, for ages, been 
waged in behalf of liberty of thought, 
speech and conscience, against tyranny, 
spiritual and political ; a battle in which 
the master virtues are not those of 
strength and fierceness, but the bravery 
of heroic endurance, of unwavering faith 
and unwearying patience, of love and 
forgiveness of enemies for Christ's sake. 
And it is not easy, in these days of afflu- 
ence, and of a political and religious 
freedom,- bought for us by such ancestors 
as these, even to imagine the amount of 
moral courage and resolution which 
enabled them to choose, instead of the 
ease, respect and position which a sub- 
mission against their coSscience would 

have permitted tliem to enjoy in their 
8 



ancestral home — tlie wrench of the up- 
rooting from its native soil of a long- 
established family, the tedious and dan- 
gerous voyage in little-known seas on the 
tiny ships of the period, and the final 
settlement upon unknown, untilled and 
forest-covered shores, inhabited, with the 
exception of a few Swedes and Dutch, 
only by the roving savage. A very few 
articles of household use remain from 
among those which they brought over. 
Among these is an ancient oaken chair, 
still in possession of the Allinson family. 
A more interesting relic is the Bible and 
family record in possession of Richard 
Mott, of Burlington. This Bible, which 
is of one of the earliest translations — that 
published, in 1537, by the martyr Tyn- 
dale — gives a strong presumptive evi- 
dence that the spirit of protest which 
made Quakers and emigrants of the 
Smiths under the two Charleses, was in- 
herited by them from ancestors who were 
Protestants in the age of Tyndale and 
of the bloody Queen Mary. 

Joseph Sansom, in the before-men- 
tioned account of the Smith family, 
seems to hint that Robert and Ricliard 
Smith, martyi-s under Mary, were of 
this lineage. I have, however, found no 

proof of any such connection. These 

17 



18 



THE BUKLIXGTON SMITHS. 



martyrs were sons of a Simon Smith, one 
of the most active co-operators with 
Tyndale in the dissemination of his ver- 
sion of the Scriptures. 

The " Smith Bible " contains a family 
record partly transcribed by Eichard 
Smith, No. 5, from an earlier one by 
Richard, No. 2, which goes back to the 
birth of his father, Richard Smith, the 
first, but makes no mention of his grand- 
father, William Smith. From Richard, 
No. 1, the record is continued regularly 
through five generations. 

The Bible is of the translation known 
among bibliographers as the " Rogers- 
Tyndale," or " Tyndale-Rogers " Bible, 
from its being the fruit of the combhied 
labors, in translating, of the martyrs 
Tyndale or Tindal, and Rogers. "All 
the editions," says an excellent authority, 
" of the Rogers-Tyndale are very rare." 
Ours is that published by Raynalde and 
Hyll, a reprint, in 154U, of the original 
of 1537. The following general descrip- 
. tion is taken partly from Lowndes' 
"Bibliographical Manual," and partly 
from the book itself. 

It is printed in the Gothic or " black- 
letter " type, and though Lowndes finds 
fault with the type and printing, to me 
it seems, in the language of a friend," clear 
and bright throughout; well printed." 
The title (prefixed to Old Testament), 
printed in red and black ink, reads :* 

"The Byble, whych is all the holy 
Scripture ; in whych are contayned the 

* The photoj^raph is taken from the second title 
prefixed to the New Testament. 



Olde and Newe Testament, truelve and 
purely translated into Englishe by 
Thomas Matthewe, 1537." (This name 
of Thomas Matthewe, as we shall pre- 
sently see, was a nom de plume of Tyn- 
dale and Rogers}. "And now Imprinted 
in the yeare of oure Lorde 1549." 

** Esaye, I. Hearcken to, ye heavens, 
and thou earth, give eare; For the 
Lord Speak eth." 

"Imprinted at London by Thomas 
Raynalde and William Hyll, dwelling 
in Panic's churche yeard." 

This is surrounded by a wood-cut in 
nine parts; eight of them Scripture 
scenes, and the ninth representing the 
King (Henry VIII.,) committing the 
Bible to the care of priests and nobles. 
Copious " prologes " to the reader, tables 
and notes are interspersed, and at the 
end of the Bible the dates of original 
print and of reprint are repeated at 
length. Psalms xci., 5, reads : " So 
that thou shalt not nede to be afraied 
for eny bugges by nyghte, nor for the 
arowe that flyeth by daye." (" Bugges," 
bugbears or apparitions). From this 
curious text it is sometimes called the 
"Bugges" Bible, and sometimes, from 
the following from Jer. viii., the 
" Treakle " Bible. 

"The harvest is gone, the summer 
hath an ende, and we are not helped. 
I am sore vexed, because of the hurte 
of my people ; 1 am hevy and abashed, 
for there is noo more Treakle at Galaad, 
and there is no physycian y! can heale 
the hurte of my people." 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



19 



William Tindal (commonly spelt Tyn- 
(lale, but the name, as signed by himself, 
is Tindal), furnished the translation of 
the New Testament in this Bible, and he 
and Miles Coverdale supplied the five 
books of Moses. The rest of the work 
of translation was chiefly that of John 
Rogers, the " proto-martyr " of Queen 
Mary's reign. These translators con- 
cealed their identity under the pseudonym 
of Thomas Matthewe, as will be seen by 
the following extracts from Fox's " Acts 
and Monuments of the Church." 

Of Tindal, he says that he was bred 
up from a child at Magdalen College, 
Oxford University, and acquired great 
learning in the dead languages and skill 
in Scripture. Embracing reformed tenets 
from the writings of Erasmus, he con- 
futed in dispufcitions the most eminent 
Romish priests of the day, and awoke 
such bitter enmity among them that his 
life was in danger from their machina- 
tions. After seeking in vain from a 
powerful patron that protection which 
was necessary to him in his proposed 
work of translating the Bible, he fled 
to Holland, and thence passed into 
Saxony, where " he had conference with 
Luther and other learned men in those 
quarters," on his great design. He 
then returned to the Netherlands and 
established himself at Antwerp, where 
he finished and printed, in 1527, his 
New Testament in English, which was 
soon disseminated in his native country. 
He next translated the five books of 
Moses, but in attempting to carry his 



work by sea to Hamburg, to confer with 
Miles or "Sir Mvles" Coverdale, then 
dwelling in Germany, a learned man and 
zealous reformer, who had formerly been 
an Augustine friar of the monastery of 
Stoke-Clare, near Bumstead, Essex, he 
suffered shipwreck and the loss of his 
manuscript. Coverdale and he, there- 
upon, at once set about making a new 
translation of the Pentateuch, which they 
finished in 1529, at the house of Dame 
Margaret Van Emmerson in Hamburg. 
Tindal then returned to Antwerp for the 
better convenience of disseminating his 
translations, and his books having been 
condemned by the Roman authorities, he 
was, in 1536, seized by emissaries of the 
German Emperor's Government, and 
suffered death by fire at Filford, near 
Antwerp. His last words were : " Lord, 
open the King of England's eyes." 

John Rogers, like Tindal, was brought 
up in an university, that of Cambridge. 
He was " chosen," (says Fox,) " by the 
Merchants Adventurers, to be their 
chaplain at Antwerp, in Brabant, whon^ 
he served to their good contentation 
many years. It chanced him there ta 
fall in company with that worthy ser-. 
vant and minister of God, William 
Tindal, and with Miles Coverdale, 
which both, for the hatred they bare to 
Popish superstition and idolatry and 
love to true religion, had forsaken their 
native country. In conferring with 
them the Scriptures, he came to great 
knowledge in the Gospel of God, inso- 
much that he cast off* the heavy yok^ 



20 



THE BUJRLINGTON SMITHS. 



of Popery, perceiving it to be impure 
and * * idolatry, and joyned him- 
self with them two in that painful and 
most profitable labour of translating the 
Bible into the English tongue, which 
is Intituled *The Translation of Thomas 
Matthewe.' " 

The combined translation, under the 
pseudonym of Matthewe, was printed, as 
we have seen, in 1537, and reprinted by 
Baynalde and Hyll, in Rogers' lifetime, 
in 1519. 

Rogers having " cast off the yoke '' of 
Popery, now felt himself at liberty to 
disregard the Popish vows of celibacy, 
" thinking an ill vow well broken." He 
accordingly married, and soon after "went 
to Wittenberg, in Saxony, where he 
conferred with Luther." Having ac- 
quired the German, or " High Dutch " 
language, he was placed " in charge of a 
Congregation," and continued to preach 
there many years. On the " banishment 
of Popery" by Edward VI., he returned 
to England, and wjis made Prebend of 
St. Paul's Cathedral. On the accession 
of Queen Mary, he was examined before 
the " bloody Bishop " Bonner, (or Boner, 
as Fox spells the name,) on January 22d, 
1555 ; condemned, and burned February 
4th, of same year. During the interim 



before his execution, he was cruelly re- 
fused intercourse with his family, and 
this was no doubt one reason for the 
common ascription to him of the touch- 
ing farewell verses entitled "An Ex- 
hortation to my Children," which Fox, 
on the contrary, ascribes to Robert Smith, 
his fellow-sufferer in the same year. 

The records in this interesting family 
Bible are in the handwriting of Richard 
Smith, the fifth of that name, transcribed, 
as to the earlier part of them, from 
memoranda of Richard Smith, the second ; 
part of the earlier fly-leaves having been 
worn out, these were intended to replace 
them. They begin with the baptism of 
the first Richard Smith, May 18th, 1593, 
his marriage A. D. 1620, and his burial, 
November 19th, 1647. Then the bap- 
tism of Richard Smith, the second, his 
marriage and the births of his twelve 
children, making, with his grandfather, 
William Smith, mentioned in the church 
register, four generations recorded as 
born and attaining maturity in the old 
home. Of these twelve children, three 
died in infancy, two died in England, 
unmarried, and all the others removed to 
America. Two additional generations, 
born in America, arc also recorded in 
this Bible. 



CHAPTER III. 



THE SECOND RICHARD SMITH OF BRAMHAM. 



RICHARD SMITH, the second, who 
was baptized October 15th, 1020, 
had just attained majority at the period 
of his father's decease. He had been 
educated (at large expense), by the latter, 
"for the Gowne," the long robe or the 
law, but his father dying, and he suc- 
ceeding to the property just as the " civil 
dissentions " between the King (Charles 
I.,) and Parliament had reached a climax 
in the imprisonment of the former, thus 
shaking to its foundation the whole 
edifice of civil order, the young lawyer 
did not " proceed " in his profession. 

He became, very early, a convert to 
the Cliristian doctrine held by the 
" Friends of Truth "* or Quakers. We 
learn from Sewel's " Rise, Increase and 
Progress of the Christian People called 
Quakers," (1725 edition, p. 43), on the 
occasion of Fox's first visit to Yorkshire 
in 1651, that "William Dewsburv was 
one of those that had already been irn- 
mediately convinced, as G. Fox, himself, 
was, who, coming to him, found himself 
in unity with him." Again, (p. 53), " G. 

* *' The Friends of Truth " was the name originally 
adopted by this sect, afterwards shortened to 
** Friends." The more commonly known name of 
•' Quakers " arose from their usually trembling when 
under strong religious feeling, as we may gather from 
G. Fox's speaking of one Captain Drury as " scoflBng 
at their trembling." '* Comrauniter vocati Trementes " 
is the description in legal writs of the period. 



Fox went to a meeting at Justice Ben- 
son's, where a people met that were sepa- 
rated from the public worship," to whom 
his preaching gave " general satisfaction." 
This shows that Fox found a people of 
his own religious views already estab- 
lished in Yorkshire in 1651, of which 
number must have been Richard Smith, 
as, in 1650, he wrote a sort of tract or 
general epistle called " A Christian Di- 
rectory," in which we find the chief doc- 
trine of the " Friends " — that of the pre- 
sence, as a guide, of the Holy Spirit in 
each heart — clearly set forth. He says, 
that feeling oppressed with the weight of 
sin upon his conscience, he appealed to 
God in prayer : 

** VTho answered and said to me : 

Within thee I have set 
A true and faithful Counsellor ; 

A guide unto thy feet, — 
To wit : the Light within the mind, 

Which from my Son doth come, 
To be a guide and lanthorn bright, 

Enlightening every room. 

'' And as this Light of sin convinced, 

And evil showed to me, 
And as I did obedience yield, 

Guided by it to be, 
So did the Lord's own power appear. 

From sin to set me free," etc. 

This is signed and dated in his own 
hand, A. D. 1G50. 

He was married in 1653, by Paul 

21 



22 



THE BURLINCJTON SMITHS. 



Beale, Alderman of the City of York, 
to Anne, daughter of William Yates, of 
Alborough, a worthy Quaker gentleman. 
On the visit of Miles Halhead and 
Thomas Salthouse, traveling ministers of 
the " Friends,'' to his neighborhood, in 
1655, these preachers having been ar- 
rested for holding meetings, we find that 
Richard Smith, with others, became 
security for their aj^pearance at Court, 
(Sewel). " On the 9th of the 12th mo., , 
1660," Richard Smith, being at a meet- 
ing at Market Wighton in company with 
William Smith, of Besthorp, the inti- 
mate friend of G. Fox, a voluminous 
writer and eminent minister of the 
" Friends,'' they, together with William 
Yates and " five hundred " others, were 
seized and imprisoned in York Castle, 
"where five of them died through the 
unhealthyness of the place in which they 
were thronged together. The greatest 
part of them were discharged in about 
three months, without either accusation 
or trial, though a number w^ere arbitrarily 
detained some time longer." — (Besse's 
" Sufferings of the Quakers.") 

As a further illustration of these out- 
rageous severities, told by an author in 
no way connected with " Friends," I take 
the following case, being that of a family 
connection, Charles Lloyd, 2d, of Dolo- 
bran, (at a somewhat later period than 
the above,) from Burke's work, " A His- 
tory of the Landed Gentry of Great 
Britain :" 

"Mr. Lloyd having conscientiously 
refused to take the oaths of allegiance 



and supremacy on the accession of Charles 
II., though a more loyal subject did not 
exist in the country, was, at the instiga- 
tion of his envious neighbour, Edward 
Ix)rd Herbert, of Cherbury, who desired 
his estate, subjected to great persecutions 
and losses. His possessions were put 
under previwi ire, his cattle sold and his 
mansion at Dolobran partially destroyed. 
Although a magistrate for Montgomery- 
shire, and in nomination for its shrievalty 
at the time, the penal and oppressive 
laws against sectarians (arising from the 
excesses of some), were enforced against 
Mr. Lloyd with unmitigated rigor. He 
was taken, with seven other gentlemen 
who had embraced the doctrines of the 
'Friends,' to Welshpool Jail, and confined 
there until the Act of James II. was 
passed, releasing all pei'sons detained for 
religious opinions, a period of ten years^ 

This may give an idea of the situation 
of the wealthier Quakers of those times — 
in scarce any respect more favorable than 
that of the humbler ones. Confined in 
noisome prisons, their revenues cut off 
or sequestered, many persons of affluence 
and position were forced to earn their 
daily support by labor in their cells, 
besides being exposed to insult and out- 
rage from brutal tyrants of jailoi's, who 
were often old criminals. A prison was 
then a place, of whose horrors we can 
now scarcely form a conception. 

It was in the year of his above-men- 
tioned imprisonment, A. D. 1660, that 
Richard Smith wrote his "Letter to a 
Priest of the Church of England," from 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



23 



which I take the following extracts;* 
they breathe a spirit of gentle courtesy 
and Christian Tove, united with firmness 
and clearness in doctrine. The entire 
letter was, in 1871, reprinted in the 
Philadelphia " Friend." (The Letter). 

"Friend: — I being willing to hear 
thee teach tlie congregation that was 
assembled at the burial of W. S.," (not 
impossibly his grandfather, William 
Smith), "it hath been much upon me to 
signify to thee how I do approve of thy 
teaching. And, also, to show thee what 
it is in thy worship I disown, so that if 
thou be able, by plain Scripture argu- 
ments, to uphold them, or if thou have 
an immediate command from the Lord 
for to use and to practice them, well ; if 
not, search and try, upon sight of this, 
whether the Light of the Lord Jesus, in 
thy conscience, which I know leads thee 
to the performance of many things 
acceptable in the sight of God, bear not 
witness with me for . God, that thou 
oughtest likewise to disown them. 

" For the Scripture thou didst choose 
to speak from, it was very material and 
fitting for such an occasion, and thy 
words and observations thereupon, very 
many of them, dearly to be owned in 
tlieir places, as they came from thee ; in- 
somuch that I, when I went from place 
to place after the ministry of man, could 



* On accoant of the controversial character of this 
letter, I hesitated about introducing it ; yet, as an un- 
doubted work of our early ancestor, thought it but 
right to reproduce the larger portion. 



even have had great desire, love and 
affection to such a teacher ; but now, see- 
ing the Lord, in his endless love, hath 
gathered me from under the ministry of 
man and man's teaching, I can truly say, 
in the pure sense of the Lord, without 
boasting, I have received the anointing, 
and need not that any man should teach 
me, but as the anointing that is in me, 
which is truth and no lie, teacheth : so 
here I say, that thou mayest learn to be 
such a teacher as brings people to my 
Teacher, whose teachings are such as do 
not keep people ever learning and never 
able to come to the knowledge of the 
truth ; but doth bring to the way wherein 
the wayfaring man, though a fool, cannot 
err; because, that thereby and therein 
(is fulfilled) the covenant and promise of 
God spoken of in Jeremiah xxxi., 33, 
and Hebrews x., 16, which is the second 
and New Covenant made with man, 
wherein no man shall need to teach an- 
other, saying, * Know the Lord !' because 
all shall know Him, from the least to 
the greatest, who enter into this covenant 
with Him. So I say unto thee, that thou 
mayest be a teacher to bring people 
hither, thou must come to know 
Jesus, and the power of His resurrec- 
tion, and the fellowship of His sufferings 
and be made conformable to His death, 
and all by the power of the Spirit in 
thee : for he that hath not the Spirit of 
Christ is none of His ; and the time is 
come that Christ spoke of in the Serijv 
ture, that neither at Jerusalem nor any 
other mount must the Father be wor- 



24 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



sliiped, but by them that worship in 
spirit and m truth. 

** So, to the light, the measure of God 
in thee, I leave thee, and to the true rule 
or line of measuring by Scripture, to 
search and try thy spirit, whether from 
a true measure of the Spirit of the living 
God, whose badge or mark is love; and 
in that love, whether or no, I have writ- 
ten this to thee, to signify to thee of how 
large extent the love of God, which is 
shed abroad in my heart through his 
free grace, is to thee and thy followers ; 
which is not only to you, but also to my 
greatest enemies. Yea, also ! search the 
Scriptures and see, examine them and 
try whether this worship I speak of, to 
wit : the worship in spirit and no other, 
be left unto Christians; whether any 
other way but Christ, the way, who said 
of Himself, * I am the light of the world, 
that doth enlighten every one that cometh 
into the world ;' and whether any that 
are saying, ^ Lo, here is Christ,' or * Lo, 
there is Christ,' in this form or that 
form, bring themselves or their hearers 
to be partakers of this blessed covenant I 
have here mentioned. 

" And now, what I dislike in thy wor- 
ship, which I was an eye-witness of, was : 
1st. That thou didst not preach from the 
spirit of prophecy, to the best of my 
understanding; but hadst what tliou 
didst deliver written, to look at, and 
seemed to be able to deliver little with- 
out looking thereon : so that I did not 
judge that thou preachedst what God had 
(lone for thee, according to the order of 



the holy men of God, as David said, 
' Come and I will show thee what God 
hat4i done for my soul;' or, as Paul 
exhorted the Corinthians, bidding them 
to desire spiritual gifts, but rather that 
they might prophesy ; and that they 
might all prophesy, one by one, that all 
might hear and all might be edified. 
The Scripture notes a cloud of w^itnesses 
who all witness for the Spirit's teaching, 
and were taught by its movings. So that 
where I find any to teach what they 
study and write down from the letter of 
the Scriptures, or from other books, their 
teaching can in no wise be a rule for me 
to walk by, nor their worship for me to 
join withal, who can receive no other 
teaching but that which flows from Jesus, 
the life of men and the light of the 
world, and from the Spirit of Truth, the 
true Teacher of every one that cometh to 
the Father. Nor can any worship the 
Father in any other way than in the 
Spirit of the Son, and in the movings 
and order of the Spirit's ministration. 

" 2dly. In that thou choosedst a part of 
a Psalm, saying to this purpose, 'Let us 
sing to the praise of God ' such a part of 
such a Psalm ; and so read it in metre, 
and thyself, and most or all the others 
with thee, sung it. In that worship, I 
cannot join with you, and this is my 
reason: If I should undertake to sing 
David's conditions — not being in the 
same spirit and condition that he was in 
— instead of singing to the praise and 
glory of God, I should sing lies in His 
name to His great dishonour. In His 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



25 



own due time, the Lord brought me to 
see tliat I was not to sing to His praise 
and glory any other Psalms but by the 
Spirit, and by a good understanding, 
according to that of Paul, ' Sing with the 
spirit, and sing with the understanding :' 
so that singing in rhyme and metre, 
according to Hopkins, Sternhold and 
others, (which giving sound only to the 
outward ear), proved a burthen too heavy 
for me to bear, and David's spirit in me 
was thereby wounded, so that I could 
not then sing David's Psalms with 
David's spirit ; the good Spirit of God, 
which guided David in singing, being 
grieved. 

" I could speak of some other things 
in which I disliked thy worship at that 
time, but shall, at this time, forbear ; and, 
as I said, if thou canst, by plain Scrip- 
ture testimony, prove thy worship to be 
the true worship God doth require of 
thee — well ; if not, and I have reached 
something in thee which thou canst not 
Silence or keep quiet, and if my testi- 
mony , against these points of thy wor- 
ship be answered by the witness for God 
in thy conscience, be not found fighting 
against God, but submit to the Light, 
and it follow, and thou shalt be brought 
into the Lamb's innocent nature, in 
which thy worship shall be built upon 
the Rock of Ages, which the gates of 
hell shall never prevail against ; and to 
be a teacher that shall turn many from 
darkness to light, and from the power of 
Satan unto God; and God will make 
thee shine as a fixed star in His firma- 
4 



ment. So, in love to thy soul, I have 
written this unto thee, leaving the effect 
thereof unto my God ; because a tender 
love is begotten in me toward thee and 
several other of thy adherents, particu- 
larly that old man who is fled unto you, 
being persecuted for conscience sake, as, 
also, to all the rest of your family." 
[signed.] " E. S." 

Whatever be thought of the logic of 
this argument, it is stated by the writer 
courteously and in the spirit of a gentle- 
man, and, for the light it throws on his 
character, is worthy our preservation. 
The " old man " was, perhaps, a Hugue- 
not. 

Joseph Sansom, in his before-men- 
tioned MS. account of the Smith family, 
(1788, in possession of G. V., Philadel- 
phia,) says : " Richard Smith was pos- 
sessed of very good natural parts, im- 
proved by an attentive observation of 
men and things." He speaks of one of 
his MSS. as containing "some curious 
specimens of his skill in law, physic and 
divinity," and adds that he (publicly) 
" embraced the religious principles of the 
people called Quakers shortly after his 
marriage in 1653, and afterwards suffered 
grievous persecution and imprisonment, 
both under the protectors and after the 
restoration, for the public testimony 
which the Lord gave him to bear among 
that people, although he lived to see 
liberty of conscience permitted to dis- 
senters of all denominations by a Popish 
Prince, about the year 1685." (This 



26 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



was King James II.) " Samuel Hopwood, 
who visited tliis continent in the service 
of the Gospel early in the present '^ 
(18th) " century, said he had frequently 
heard Richard Smith preach in his 
chimney-corner to the little audience of 
friends and neiglibours, who were neither 
afraid nor ashamed to worship God 
according to their consciences, in that 
persecuting age, when the most devout 
performance of preaching, praying or 
silently waiting upon God, except under 
the forms of national worship, not only 
rendered a man obnoxious to the laws, 
but left his person at the mercy of the 
rabble, and his property a prey to con- 
stables and informers. The fines im- 
posed on these occasions were frequently 
levied with such inexorable severity that 
the poorer classes of people were stripped 
of almost every necessary of life, and, in 
many instances, those things which had 
been lent them by their charitable neigh- 
bours were also seized upon to many 
times the value of the demand. Incredi- 
ble outrages were committed upon these 
innocent and patient sufferers. Some of 
them actually died of the wounds they 
received in their peaceable meetings, but 
no notice was taken of their deaths, and 
the murderers repeated their cruelties 
even in the presence of the officers of 
justice. Yet they remained immovable 
in their resolution to confess Christ in 
that despised and persecuted way into 
which He had called them, wherein He 
wonderfully supported them against all 
opposition." 



It appears, from the above-quotail tes- 
timony of S. Hopwood, that the Friends' 
meetings of Bramham were held in 
Richard Smith's house, where he exer- 
cised his ministry, preaching from the 
chimney-corner to those assembled in the 
room. It is interesting to figure to one- 
self what kind of house this old man- 
sion, in which these early meetings were 
held, may have been. It was, as has 
before been said, probably a substantial 
country house between the manor and 
the farm-house, in the Tudor style of 
architecture, and the " chimney-place " 
from which those discourses were deliv- 
ered was doubtless one of the huge fire- 
places built in those days, with space for 
a large fire of logs in the middle and a 
chimney-corner settle or bench at the 
side, which seat, as the warmest, was 
considered the place of honor, and re- 
served for persons of age and dignity. 
The room in which these meetings were 
held would probably be " the hall," which 
sometimes gave^name to the house ; these 
halls were generally large rooms of a 
height often extending through the upper 
story ; the main stairway ojiened from 
them, and they were used for dining and 
as places of general assembly. There 
was an old house existing some years 
back in Burli nekton Countv called Bram- 
ham-hall, and understood to be named 
from this English home, and I have 
before mentioned a similar one in Otsego, 
State of New York. 

Of the close of the life of Richard 
Smith, the second, J. Sansom says : 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



27 



"Having preserved the respectable 
character of an honest man and a good 
Christian, unblemished, even in the 
esteem of many who officially persecuted 
his religious principles, notwithstanding 
the various difficulties which the open 
profession of them innocently incurred, 
he died peaceably at Bramham, in the 
year 1688, about the sixty-second year 
of his age." 

Richard Smith's memoranda of the 
births of his children, entered in the 
family Bible as aforesaid, form an inter- 
esting record of his persecutions and of 
a final period of greater ease in the com- 
munion of his choice. I have copied 
them with considerable abbreviation and 
modernization : 

" Eldest, Hannah, signifying merciful, 
taking rest or gracious. Born the 25th 
day of the month called November, 1654. 

" Second, Mary, born the 8th day of 
December, in the year 1655. Buried 
the 28th day of the same month. 

" Third, John, signifying the grace or 
gift, or mercy of God. Born the 27th 
day of March, 1657. 

"Fourth, Sarah, signifying a lady, 
dame or mistress, (or princess). Born 
near the 1st day of December, in the 
year 1659, and buried near the 20th day 
of the same month. 

"Fifth, Deborah, signifying a word, 
(or a l)ee). Born the 1st day of Septem- 
ber, in the year 1660. 

"' Sixth, Benjamin, signifying the son 
of my right hand, (or a son of sorrow), 
because at that time I was prisoner for 



the testimony of truth. Born the 26th 
day of November, in the year 1662. 

"Seventh, Elkanah, signifying the 
zeal of God, because then the king and 
parliament had newly put forth an Act 
of persecution to banishment. Born the 
9th day of the month called August, 
1664. Died the 28th and was buried 
the 29th of the same month. 

" Eighth, Daniel, signifying the judg- 
ment of God, because at that time the 
plague and other high judgments of the 
Lord was in an high manner stretched 
over this nation ; born the 14th day of 
the eleventh month, 1665, which day I 
was set free, having been prisoner one 
month for being at a meeting. 

"Ninth, Joseph, signifying increase, 
increasing or perfect, because at that time 
the truth was in a peaceable, flourishing, 
increasing or perfect posture, unmolested 
of the enemies thereof, so drawing into 
perfection. Born the 4th of March, 
1667. 

" Tenth, Emanuel." (Entry cut out.) 

"Eleventh, Samuel, signifying ap- 
pointed, established or heard of God; 
born the 1st day of the third month, 
1672 ; because at that time the truth was 
established, (for that) the king had tol- 
erated liberty to all, and truth flourished 
in a peaceable posture in all places. 

" Twelfth, Richard, (without significa- 
tion,) born the 25tli of the second month, 
1674, truth being honorable everywhere." 

These curious extracts from the family 
chronicle, show that the pei-sccutious 
from which Richard Smith and his 



28 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



family (in particular) suffered, extended, 
chiefly, through the years from 1660 to 
1665, in which latter year the dreadful 
visitation of the plague. seems to have 
had the effect, by alarming the consciences 
of " priests and rulers," of inducing them 
to set at liberty those held prisoners for 
donscience' sake, (see the eighth entry). 
They show, also, an increasing security 
for the Quakers from that time forward. 
There are no records in Besse's " Suf- 
ferings of the Quakers," of pecuniary 
losses for tithes, etc., sustained by Richard 
Smith, the second, probably because of 
the early date of such losses ; but after 
his death we find his widow, Anne Smith, 



and her youngest son, " Richard Smith, 
of Bramham," (the third of the name,) 
assessed, in the year 1690, for tithes, 
in the sum (jointly) of £23, 17^., (equal 
to nearly two hundred pounds now), 
which was taken from them " in hindy 
corn, hay, lambs, etc.;" the elder sons 
having, before and about that time, re- 
moved to America.* Two years before, 
the widow had been imprisoned at the 
suit of the parish priest. 



* Most of them arrived in America early in 1691, 
but are supposed to have left Bramham in 1690, for 
London, the starting point for vessels of the " London 
Company." The eldest son, John, had already sailed, 
as pioneer for the family, in 1677. 



CHAPTER IV. 



EXPATRIATION. THE NEW HOME. 



EICHARD SMITH, the second, died 
January 26th, 1688. On May 
13th, following, or three and a half 
mouths only after her husband's death, 
his widow, Anne Yates Smith, was 
" committed to York Castle at the suit of 
AVilliani James, Priest of Bramham." 
This was undoubtedly on a question of 
tithes refused to be paid, but it would 
seem a very unmanly act on the part of 
this priest, even though he might con- 
sider himself aggrieved. 

The English government, while per- 
mitting this harrying of their faithful 
and peaceable subjects, the Quakers, 
by priests, constables and informers at 
home, were delegating to them more than 
vice-regal powers as owners of the colo- 
nies of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 
whose constitutions were framed by these 
worthy and religious proprietaries with a 
noble tenderness for the consciences and 
respect for the rights of their subjects of 
all faiths and races. Of course the oner- 
ous burden of a State-church was not 
allowed to weigh upon these compara- 
tively free colonies, and the whole policy, 
towards the Quakers, of the government 
during several reigns, seemed to be that 
of encouraging their expatriation, by 
keeping up an intermittent pei-secution 



at home, while removing all pressure 
from those who joined the colonies, and 
giving to those who w^ere proprietaries 
therein, the powers both of legislation 
and of government. A somewhat similar 
course had been taken w^ith the Puritans 
in New England, and doubtless had the 
effect, in both instances, of rapidly 
settling the American wilds with a supe- 
rior class of colonists. The government 
did not, however, foresee that this alienat- 
ing policy, when followed up by the 
" taxation without representation " of a 
subsequent reign, would produce the 
entire estrangement and loss of these 
colonies, so often called "the brightest 
jewel in the British crown." 

"The peaceable posture of truth" as 
held by the " Friends," referred to in the 
above memoranda of Richard Smith, as 
established in 1672 jind subsequently, 
was due, in part, to the court influence 
of William Penn, and partly to the 
popish tendencies of King Charles 
II., and the actual Romanism of Kins: 
James II. Roman Catholics in Eng- 
land are, of course, "dissenters" or 
"sectaries," and, in order to spare 
them, it became necessary to remove the 
heavy hand of oppressive power from 
the dissenters in general, including 

21) 



30 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



" Friends." Credit, unfortunately, can- 
not be given to the Established Church 
for having become more noble-spirited, 
Christianly-tolerant or liberal. Subservi- 
ency to a Romanizing Court was, alas! the 
chief cause of the change in the entreat- 
ment of "dissenters." The course of 
the church was the old story so often 
repeated in history, that no sooner does 
a sect escape from under the heel of per- 
secution for " non-conformity " of relig- 
ious opinion and practice, and become 
itself the dominant or state religion, 
than it turns round upon other sects, 
lately its fellow-sufferers, and seeks to 
compel, in them, conformity to its own 
peculiarities, by the same coarse and in- 
conclusive style of argument just used 
against itself, brute force, namely, — 

" And proves its doctrines orthodox 
By apostolic blows and knocks." 

Not being disposed to trust implicitly 
to a permanence of the improved order 
of things, " Friends " began, in the latter 
quarter of the seventeenth century, to 
look towards America as a haven of 
more assured rest and religious liberty. 
Without referring to Pennsylvania, I 
will take up the history of New Jersey 
as connected with Richard Smith, the 
second, and his sons, who were among 
the earliest proprietaries of the Province 
of Nova Caesarea or New Jersey. 

I am indebted, for the facts from 
which this little historical sketch is 
drawn, to sundry papers in the proceed- 
ings of the Surveyor's Association of 
West New Jersey, to the fundamental 



law of New Jersey, Leaming and Spicer's 
laws, and to Samuel Smith's "History of 
New Jersey," etc. Also to the MSS. 
collections of John F. Watson and J. 
Sansom and many MSS. of my own 
family. The now rare work of S. Smith 
was printed in 1765. 

The early settlers upon the Hudson 
and Delaware Rivers were Dutch and 
Swedes, who originally were self-gov- 
erned, but about A. D. 1663-4, the 
British Government, claiming right by 
discovery, reduced the whole country 
under their control. King Charles H., 
by letters patent bearing date 12th of 
March, 1663, granted unto his brother, 
James, Duke of York, his heirs and 



assigns : 



" All that part of the mayn land of 
New England beginning at a certain 
place called or known by the name of 
St. Croix, next adjoining to New Scot- 
land, in America, and from thence 
extending along the sea-coast unto a 
certain place called Petuaquine or Pema- 
quid, and so up the river thereof to the 
furthest head of the same as it tendeth 
northward, and extending from thence 
to the river of Kenebeque, and so up- 
wards by the shortest course to the river 
of Canada northward ; and also all that 
island or islands commonly called by the 
several name or names of Matowacks or 
Long Island, situate, lying and being 
towards the west of Cape Cod and the 
Narrow-Higansetts abutting upon the 
main land between the two rivers there, 
called or known by the several names of 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



31 



Conecticut or Hudson's River ; together, 
also, with the said river called Hudson's 
River, and all the lands from the west 
side of Conecticut to the east side of 
Delaware Bay. And, also, all those 
several islands called or known by the 
names of Martin's Vineyard and Nan- 
tukes or otherwise Nantukett" 

The limits of this grant are quite 
problematical, though interpreted as in- 
cluding New York, New England and 
New Jersey, but the terms of the next, 
from the Duke of York, define the boun- 
daries of the present New Jersey quite 
accurately. The duke, by his deeds of 
lease and release, dated 23d and 24th of 
June, 1664, " in consideration of a com- 
petent sum of good and lawful money of 
England," grants and conveys unto 
"John Lord Berkeley, Baron of Stratton, 
one of the King's Privy Council, and 
Sir George Carteret, of Saltrum, in the 
County of Devon, Knight, and one of the 
Privy Council, and their heirs and 
assigns forever, All that tract of land 
adjacent to New England, and lying and 
being to the westward of Long Island 
and Manhitas Island, and bounded on 
the east part by the main sea and part 
by Hudson's River, and hath upon the 
west Delaware Bav or River, and extend- 
eth southward to the main ocean as far 
as Cape May, at the mouth of Delaware 
Bay, and to the northward as far as the 
northernmost branch of the said Bay or 
River of Delaware, which is forty-one 
degrees and forty minutes of latitude, 
and crosseth over thence in a strait line 



to Hudson's River in forty-one degrees 
of latitude ; which said tract of land is 
hereafter to be called by the name or 
names of New Ceaserea or New Jersey ; 
and, also, all rivers, mines, minerals, 
woods, fishings, hawkings, huntings and 
fowlings, and all other royalties, profits, 
commodities and hereditaments whatso- 
ever to the said lands and premises 
belonging or in any wise appertaining." 
[signed.] " James." 

In the same year, the new Lords Pro- 
prietors, Berkeley and Carteret, promul- 
gated a document by way of constitution 
and fundamental law for their newly- 
acquired territories. Fjpm this paper, 
entitled "The Concessions and Agree- 
ments of the Lords Proprietors of the 
Province of New Caesarea or New Jer- 
sey, to and with all and every of the 
Adventurers, and all such as shall settle 
or plant there," I extract the following : 
Every free settler who should receive a 
grant of land was required to come 
" arm'd with a good musket, bore twelve 
bullets to the pound, with ten pounds 
of powder and twenty pounds of bullets, 
with bandiliers and match convenient," 
and "every able servant that he shall 
carry with him arm'd and provided as 
aforesaid." They were to " constitute 
trained bands and companies, with the 
number of soldiers, for the safety, 
strength and defense of the said Prov- 
ince, and of the forts, castles, cities, etc.; 
to suppress all mutinies and rebellions, 
to make war, offensive and defensive, with 
all Indians, strangers and foreigners, as 



32 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



they shall see cause, and to pursue an 
enemy as well by sea as by land." These 
concessions make no provision for pur- 
chasing the rights or conciliating the 
feelings of the Indians, but Governor 
Philip Carteret, appointed on the day of 
the date of the concessions, on his arrival 
late in the summer of the next year, 
1665, thought it prudent to purchase 
their rights. We shall presently have 
an opportunity of contrasting these with 
the later concessions of the Quaker pro- 
prietors. 

Berkelev and Carteret held the Pro- 
vince for over ten years. During this 
period, Richard Hartshorne, " a Friend 
of high standing," settled in East New 
Jersey, having purchased land from for- 
mer patentees of the Duke of York. 
The Indian claims not having been satis- 
fied by the duke nor by the patentees 
under him, Richard found his rights 
called in question by the natives. " The 
Indians," says he, " came to my house 
and laid their hands on the post and 
frame of the house and said that house 
was theirs — they never had anything for 
it, and told me if I would not buy the 
land I must be gone. But I minded it 
not, thinking it was Davis's land, and 
they wanted to get something of me; 
they at last told me they would kill my 
cattle and burn my hay if I would not 
buy the land nor be gone ; then I went to I 
the patentees, which were James Grover, 
Richard Stout, John Bound and Richard 
Gibbons ; they told me it was never 
bought, nor had the Indians anything 



for it. * * ''' I told them I would 
not live on those terms, and not only so, 
but it was dangerous, for the Indians 
threatened to kill my cattle." 

Richard, afterwards, repurchased his 
lands from the Indians. It may well be 
doubted, and was doubted, by the primi- 
tive settlers, whether the natives had any 
more real and intrinsic right to the desert 
and undivided lands in America, unim- 
proved and uncultivated as they were, 
than the English new-comei's. Yet, fol- 
lowing the safe and royal rule, " What- 
soever ye would that men should do to 
you, do ye even so to them," proved, in 
their case, as in all others, the best policy 
as well as the best religion. While New 
England and Virginia were scenes of 
violence and cruelty, and of insecurity 
of life and property to both Indians and 
English under an opposite policy, in 
Quaker New Jersey, as afterward in 
Pennsylvania, the two races lived side 
by side in mutual good-will, and the In- 
dians, to use the language of Samuel 
Smith, " became, of a jealous, shy people, 
serviceable good neighbors." 

An account of the new countries, 
written by the above-mentioned Richard 
Hartshorne, and circulated among the 
Quakers, had a great influence in turn- 
ing the thoughts of this persecuted com- 
munitv in the direction of America as a 
new home. 

Passing over the temporary reposses- 
sion of the Province by the Dutch, in 
1673, its retrocession by them to the 
English, in 1673-4, and the new grants 



A FAMILY HISTOKY. 



33 



thereby rendered necessary to be made 
from the King to the Duke of York, 
and from the latter, to Berkeley and Car- 
teret, to renew the title of the latter, 
invalidated by these transactions, we 
arrive at the period, A. D. 1675, when 
Lord Berkeley, becoming weary of his 
proprietorship, offered it for sale at a low 
price. At that time, John Fenwick, of 
London, a "Friend" of considerable 
means, and acting as trustee for Edward 
Byllynge or Byllinge, a gentleman of 
large though encumbered estate, con- 
ceived the idea of purchasing, conjointly 
with Byllinge as chief, the proprietorship 
offered by Lord Berkeley, and of remov- 
ing his family to the virgin "land of 
promise/' 

Edward Byllinge came readily into 
Fenwick's plan, and being himself a 
" Friend," seems to have been sincerely 
desirous to promote the removal of such 
"Friends" as wished to join the proposed 
colony, though he did not intend to go 
thither in person. The proprietorship 
was to be in his name, as chief, and 
Fenwick was to receive one-tenth of the 
lands for acting as his trustee. 

In accordance with their mutual under- 
standing, Fenwick and Byllinge now 
proceeded to make their bargain with 
Lord Berkeley ; it was consummated in 
the same year, by the conveyance to 
Fenwick, in trust for Byllinge and his 
assigns, of Berkeley's moiety or half part 
of Nova Csesarea or New Jersey. The 
purchase-money required, even allowing 

for the manifold greater value of money 
5 



in those days, was ridiculously small; 
and yet, such was the situation of 
Byllinge's affairs, that even this small 
sum of one thousand pounds, had to be 
advanced by Fenwick. The peculiar 
circumstances of the case gave rise to 
misunderstanding and disagreement be- 
tween Byllinge and his trustee, and they 
concluded to refer their dispute to Wm. 
Penn as arbitrator, who, after carefully 
examining the case, gave his award. 
This not being satisfactory to Fenwick, 
the latter refused to comply with it. 

William Penn's first connection with 
the colonies appears to have been this 
service iis arbitrator between Byllinge 
and his trustee. The following letter 
shows the uneasiness which the obstinacy 
of Fenwick, in refusing to accept his 
award, brought the worthy arbitrator 
into: 

"John Fenwick : — ^The present differ- 
ence betwixt thee and Edward Byllinge 
fills the hearts of Friends with grief, and 
with a resolution to take it, in two days, 
into their consideration to make a public 
denial of the person that offers violence 
to the award made, or that will not end 
it without bringing it upon the public 
stage. God, the righteous Judge, will 
visit him that stands off. Edward 
Byllinge will refer the matter to me 
again, if thou wilt do the like. Send 
me word, and, as opprest as I am with 
business, I will find an afternoon to- 
morrow or next day to determine, and so 
prevent the mischief that will certainly 



34 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



follow divulgiug it in Westmiuster Hall. 
Let me know by the bearer thy mind. 
O John ! let truth, and the honor of it 
in this day, prevail ! Woe to him that 
causeth offenses !" 

I apprehend that it was simply the 
fact of there being a disagreement 
between two " Friends," that W. Penn 
so feared to be " divulged," as likely to 
bring dishonor upon "Truth." It is 
well-known that the discipline of this 
sect does not permit law-suits between 
its members. 

"This dispute being at length ad- 
justed," (in the same year, 1675,) " by 
the kind offices of Penn, Fen wick em- 
barked with his family in the ship 
Griffith, accompanied by several other 
Friends, to take possession of the land 
assigned him. They landed at a * pleas- 
ant, rich spot ' on the River Delaware, 
where they commenced a settlement, to 
which he gave the name of ' Salem,' " (or 
" peace.") 

Fen wick was of a good and wealthy 
family, the son of Sir William Fenwick, 
of Stanton Hall, Cumberland, and had 
been himself a Major of the Parliamen- 
tary Dragoons. He must have been of 
a somewhat restless and litigious temper, 
as he became involved in disputes with 
the Governor of New York, who threw 
him into prison, and also with William 
Penn, after the latter's arrival in America. 
Severe family affliction overtook him and 
hastened his end. On his death-bed he 
sent for Penn, asked the latter's forgive- 



ness for his unfriendly conduct, and 
appointed him guardian to his children. 

The Griffith " was the first English 
ship that came to the western part of 
New Jersey, and none followed for nearly 
two years." In the list of its passengers 
occurs the name of John Smith, (of 
"Smithfield," Salem County,) thought, 
by some, a cousin of our family. 

During this time, Edward Byllinge, 
" becoming more embarrassed in his cir- 
cumstances, was desirous of transferring 
to his creditors his interest in the terri- 
tory, being the only means he had to 
satisfy their claims." "At his earnest 
entreaty, Penn consented to be associa- 
ted as joint trustee with two of the 
creditors, Gawen Lawrie, of London, 
and Nicholas Lucas, of Hertford, to 
carry out his intentions and render the 
property available. Penn thus became 
one of the chief instruments in the 
settlement of New Jersey and establish- 
ment of its colonial government, which 
prepared him for the still greater work 
of founding a colony of his own." — 
(Janney's " Life of Penn.") 

"The others accepting the charge," 
(says Samuel Smith,) "they became 
trustees for one moiety or half part of 
the Province : which, though yet undi- 
vided, necessity pressing, they soon sold 
a considerable number of shares of their 
propriety to different purchasers, who 
thereupon became proprietors, (according 
to their different shares,) in common 
with them ; and it being necessary that 
some scheme should be fallen upon, as 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



85 



well for the better distribution of rights 
to land, as to promote the settlement and 
ascertain a form of government, conces- 
sions were drawn, mutually agreed on 
and signed by some of the subscribers, 
(for they did not all sign at once). It 
was next the business of the proprietors, 
who held immediately under Ijord 
Berkeley, to procure a division of the 
Province." 

The name of Richard Smith, as co- 
proprietor with Byllinge and his trustees, 
appears on these concessions next below 
that of Byllinge and opposite those of 
Lawrie and Penn. It is evident, from 
this, that he must have been in London 
and in conference with the trustees at the 
time of affixing his signature, which is 
further confirmed by the fact that his 
son John t^kes lot No. 9 in Wills*s survey^ 
of Burlington town-lots, among the 
London proprietors, though himself a 
Yorkshireman. Richard Smith, there- 
fore, was one of these original co-proprie- 
tors by purchase, mentioned in the above 
paragraph by Samuel Smith, and not 
one of the " Yorkshire creditors," who 
afterward took Burlington town-lots Nos. 
11 to 20, inclusive, on the " Yorkshire 
side" of Burlington. It is every way 
probable, then, that he was called into 
consultation with the other early proprie- 
tors and subscribers, in the formation of 
the primary law or " Concessions." 

This document, dated March 3d, 1676, 
and entitled "The Concessions and 
Agreements of the Proprietors, Freehold- 
ers and Inhabitants of the Province of 



West New Jersey, in America," being, 
in fact, the concession of the Constitu- 
tion and laws of that province, from 
the proprietor to the people and settlers 
thereof, and the agreement thereto and 
acceptance thereof by the settlers, con- 
stitutes, to this day, the fundamental law 
of New Jersey. It is signed by one 
hundred and fifty-one names, being those 
of proprietors under the trustees of 
Byllinge, and of holders under old 
patents of the Dutch and Swedes, and of 
the Duke of York. 

It will have been observed that Berke- 
ley and Carteret had held New Jersey 
as equal partners or "tenants in common," 
each having an equal right in the whole. 
The entire rights or " half part " of Lord 
Berkeley had been transferred to Byllinge 
and by him to his new trustees, but no 
territorial division had yet been effected 
with Sir G. Carteret, by which the trus- 
tees could claim sole property within 
definite limits. Nevertheless, to accom- 
modate the purchasei-s and creditors, the 
trustees agreed upon a division of the 
property into shares ; and, in advance of 
settlement with Carteret, began to allot 
them pro rata. The moiety of New 
Jersey was " cast into one hundred parts, 
lots or proprieties," ten of which, or one- 
tenth of the whole, had been allotted, as 
we have seen, to Fenwick. 

Edward Byllinge owed to his several 
creditors the aggregate sum of £11,500, 
a very considerable amount at that period, 
and actually equivalent, by the decrease 
in the relative value of money since, to 



36 



f 

THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 

I 



! I 
I 

I 



about £100,000 now. The largest debts, 
or those of longest standing, seem to have 
been due to members of the " Friends " 
society in Yorkshire. It was, perhaps, 
on this accoimt that a preference was 
given to creditoi's from Yorkshire, in tiie. 
following directions to, the commissionei-s 
of property, , which place these creditors 
on an equal footing with original pro- 
prietors: • . 
"And the commissioners for the time 
being are to take care for setting forth 
and dividing all the lands of the said 
province as be already taken up, or by 
themselves shall be taken up and con- 
tracted for with the natives ; and the said 
lands so taken up and contracted for, to 
divide into one hundred parts, as occasion 
shall require, that is to say, for every 
quantity of land that they shall, from 
time to time, lay out to be planted and 
settled upon, they shall first, for expedi- 
tion, divide the same into ten equal parts 
or shares, and, for distinction's sake, to 
mark in the register, and upon some of 
the trees belonging to every tenth part, 
with the letters A, B and so end at the 
letter K. And after the same is so 
divided and marked, the said commision- 
ers are to grant unto Thomas Hutchinson, 
of Beverly ; Thomas Pearson, of Bon- 
wicke ; Joseph Ilelmsly, of Great Kelke ; 
George Hutchinson, of Sheffield, and 
Mahlon Stacy, of Hansworth, all of the 
County of York, or their lawful deputies 
or* particular commissioners, for them- 
selves and, their friends, who ai'e a con- 
siderable number of people, and may 



speedily promote the planting of the 
said province-; that they may have free 
liberty to make choice of any one of the 
said tenth parts or shares, which shall 
be first divided, an'^l set outr-^being, also, 
done with their copsent — that they may 
•plant upon the same as tlifey see meet ; 
and afterward any other person' oi* per- 
sons who shall go over to inhabit, and 
have piirchased to the number of ten 
proprieties, they shall and may have 
liberty to make choice of any of the 
remaining parts or shares to settle 



m. 



>) 



The order of choice of allotments thus 
appeal's to have been : first, trustees iii- 
tending to settle, .(like Fenwick,) and the 
original purcluisei-s who becjune co-pro- 
prietors with them and joined with them 
in putting forth these, concessions ; sec- 
ondly, the Yorkshire creditors; lastly, 
any other purchasers to the amount of 
ten proprieties. This arrangement gave 
rise to those subdivisions of West Jersey 
known as the Salem tenth, (Fenwick*s,) 
the Yorkshire tenth and the London 
tenth, which were considered the best 
lands in the province. After these came 
the " Irish tenth," etc. 

The principal ci'editors of Byllinge in 
Yorkshire were the five named above in 
the directions to the commissioners; to 
these, most of the other Yorkshire cred- 
itors had assigned their claims. By two 
de6ds, heaving date the 1st of March, 
A. D. 1676, Byllinge and his trustees 
made over to these five persons, ten shares 
of " propriety " in extinction of debts 



3i!--^y^/'v 



o 



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n 



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SIOIMATI 



rACi>l Ml LE. .Mt FIRST FOUR 
URES or PWlFRIETARIEScrrHt-PROVIIMCEcrW.JERSEY 

CONCESSIONor... CONSTITUTION AHoLAWS,.^iMf PROVINCEorWrsT JERSEY 



( 



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Chmf/^ 




amlL yi'-^'? ^>'^/ 



Signatures asProprietarics to the Conccssionsor Co nstitutionof IUJersty. 







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€(/l 



fROMnARf^lAGE CERTIFICATE or WlLLIArl AND ANNE FROM HISOORRESPOMOeNCEWlTMW'M PENH. 

STEVE NS0N,11 M0.1ff,lGPA 




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FAC-SIMILES OF SIGNATURES. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



37 



amounting to £3500, thus giving £350 
as the then estimated value of a choice 
propriety. The final dividend of land 
allotted thirty-five thousand acres to each 
propriety, giving £1 per the one hundred 
acres as the average value. The best 
authorities make the comparative value 
of money to have been between eight 
and nine fold greater two centuries ago 
than now. Thus the sum of £350 then 
would be tlie equivalent of some £3000 
now. 

The five above-named Yorkshire 
" Friends " no doubt soon sold out, in 
part, to others ; for we find the " York- 
shire company," in 1677, to consist of 
ten persons. Another company of ten 
persons, for the purchase of ten shares, 
was soon made up in London, and in this 
company Richard Smith placed his eldest 
son, John, then a youth of twenty. These 
two comi)anies and the trustees of 
Byllinge united in sending out, in 1677, 
commissioners " with power to buy the 
lands of the natives, to inspect the rights 
of such as claimed property, and to 
order the lands laid out, and, in general, 
to administer the government pursuant 
to the concessions. These commissioners 
were Thomas Olive, Daniel Wills, John 
Kinsey, John Penford, Joseph Helmsley, 
Robert Stacy, Benjamin Scott, Richard 
Guy and Thomas Foulke," (also William 
Emley, as Smith afterwards mentions). 
Of these, Kinsey, Guy and Foulke ap- 
pear to have represented the trustees and 
original co-proprietors ; Olive, Wills, 



1 



Penford and Scott, the London proprie- 
tors, and Helmsley, Stacy and Emley the 
Yorkshire proprietors. 

Of the one hundred and fifty-one 
names signed to the " Concessions," about 
thirty are Dutch and Swedish, one hun- 
dred and four are the new Quaker pro- 
prietors, and the remainder are those of 
holdei-s under the Duke of York or 
Fenwick. The date is March 3d, 1676. 

The signature of Richard Smith, of 
Bramham, on this important document, 
is in an elegant and *' clerkly " hand- 
writing, with several of the letters formed 
in the old English or Gothic manner. 
His eldest son, John, as a proprietor, was 
entitled to sign ; the name of John 
Smith, which we find upon the conces- 
sions, may, however, be that of John, of 
Salem. The second son, Daniel, was 
also a proprietor ; as he was only a boy 
at the time of which we are speaking, 
his signature, as it appears upon the 
concessions, must have been affixed by 
him after his arrival in America, in 1691. 
He owned land at Burlington and at 
Mesconetcong, and a vast tract at Egg 
Harbor, as title-papers in my possession 
show. 

This admirable constitution, the " Con- 
cessions," may owe (as has been said) 
part of its inspiration to the counsels of 
Richard Smith. I subjoin two "chai> 
ters ;" — (the document itself, beautifully 
engrossed on vellum, may be seen in the 
Surveyor-General's office, in Burling- 
ton :) — 



38 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



"CHAPTEK XVI. 

"That no man, nor number of men 
upon earth, hath power or authority to 
rule over men's consciences in religious 
matters ; therefore, it is consented, agreed 
and ordained, tliat no person or persons 
whatsoever, within the said province, at 
any time or times hereafter, shall be any- 
ways, upon any pretence whatsoever, called 
in question, or in the least punished or 
hurt, either in person, estate or privilege 
for the sake of his opinion, judgment, 
faith or worship towards God, in matters 
of religion ; but that all and every such 
person and persons may, from time to 
time, and at all times, freely and fully 
have and enjoy his and their judgments, 
and the exercise of their consciences in 
matters of religious worship throughout 
all the said province.'' 



(( 



CHAPTER XXV. 



prietors, freeholders or inhabitants, shall 
anywise wrong or injure any of the In- 
dian natives there, in person, estate or 
otherwise, the commissioners are to tiike 
care, upon complaint to them made, or 
any one of them, either by the Indian 
natives or others, that justice be done to 
the Indian natives and plenary satisfac- 
tion be made them, according to the 
nature and quality of the offense and 
injury: And that in all trials wherein 
any of the said Indian natives are con- 
cerned, the trial to be bv six of the 
neighbourhood, and six of the said In- 



dian natives, to be indifferently and 
impartially chosen by order of the com- 
missioners; and that the commissioners 
use their endeavour to persuade the 
natives to the like way of trial ; when 
any of the natives do anyways wrong 
or injure the said proprietors, freeholders 
or inhabitants, that they choose six of 
the natives and six of the freeholders or 
inhabitants, to judge of the wrong and 
injury done, and to proportion satisfac- 
tion accordingly." 

Having promulgated this excellent 
Charter, the trustees and Byllinge now 
proceeded to effect partition with Sir 
George Carteret, which they did by deed 
quintipartite, dated July 1st, 1676, fix- 
ing the dividing line as shown in the 
following extract of a letter from them to 
Richard Hartshorn e : — 

" We have divided with George Car- 
teret and have sealed deeds of partition, 
each to the other; and we have all that 
side on Delaware River from one end to 
the other ; the line of partition is from 
the East side of Little Egg Harbor, 
straight North, through the country, to 
the utmost branch of Delaware River, 
with all powei*s, privileges and immuni- 
ties whatsoever : ours is called New West 
Jersey, his is called New East Jersey. 

2d. " We have made concessions by 
ourselves, being such as Friends here 
and there (we question not,) will approve 
of, having sent a copy of them by James 
Wasse; there we lay a foundation for 
after ages to understand their liberty as 
men and Christians, that they may not 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



39 



be brought in bondage, but by their own 
consent; for we put the power in the 
people, that is to say, they to meet and 
choose one honest man for each propriety 
who hath subscribed to the concessions ; 
all these men to meet as an assembly 
there, to make and repeal laws, to choose 
a governor, or a commissioner, and twelve 
assistants, to execute the laws during 
their pleasure ; so every man is capable 
to choose or be chosen : No man to be 
arrested, condemned, imprisoned or mo- 
lested in his estate or liberty, but by 
twelve men of the neighbourhood : No 
man to lie in prison for debt, but that 
his estate satisfy as far as it will go, and 
be set at liberty to work : No person to 
be called in question or molested for his 
conscience, or for worshiping according 
to his conscience; with many more 
things mentioned in the said conces- 
sions." 

The humane and liberal provisions for 
the protection of Indians and debtors are 
specially noticeable. A late writer says : 
" So comprehensive and perfect are the 
forms of government and the rights of 
the people as laid down in these conces- 
sions, that it may well be doubted whether 



we have in any one thing improved the 
theory and principles." 

The sons of the second Richard Smith, 
"induced by the grateful prospect of 
religious freedom after long oppression," 
removed to America, (with one exception, 
that of Benjamin, who died single in Eng- 
land,) at various times from 1677 to 1699. 
John, the eldest, was the first to emigrate, 
in 1677, and tJo him was allotted No. 9 
of the city lots in Burlington, on which 
lot, after his death, his next brother, 
Daniel, built one of the oldest mansions 
in Burlington, still standing. Daniel, 
Joseph and Emanuel followed John, in 
1691 ; next came Samuel, and lastly, in 
1699, Richard. 

The value of seven thousand pounds 
in goods was paid to the Indians in final 
satisfaction of their claims, by the hun- 
dred proprieties; this gives seventy 
pounds per share, which being added to 
first cost, makes the full cost of the pro- 
prieties of Richard Smith and his eldest 
sons, something over four hundred 
pounds apiece. Their titles covered 
lands in various parts of West Jersey, on 
the Rivers Delaware, Mesconetcong,Ran- 
cocas and Egg Harbor. 



CHAPTER V. 



FROM THE OLD HOME TO THE NEW. 



THE commissioners appointed by 
Byllinge's trustees, the London and 
Yorkshire proprietors, left England in 
the ship Kent, Gregory Marlow, master, 
early in 1677, "being the second ship 
from London to the western parts." 
When about leaving the Thames, we 
read that "King Charles II.," (being) 
" in his barge, pleasuring on the Thames, 
came alongside," (and) " seeing a great 
many passengers, and " (being) " informed 
whence they were bound, asked if they 
were all Quakers, and gave them his 
ble&sing." " They arrived at New Castle 
the IGth of the sixth month, O. S., and 
landed their passengers, two hundred and 
thirty in number, about Rackoon creek, 
where the Swedes had some scattering 
habitations, but they were too numerous 
to be all provided for in houses; some 
were obliged to lay their beds and furni- 
ture in cow-stalls, and appartments of 
that sort; among other inconveniences 
to which this exposed them, the snakes 
were now^ plenty enough to be frequently 
seen upon the hovels under which they 
sheltered : Most of the passengers in this 
ship were of those called Quakers — some 
of good estates in England." It is likely 
that our young pioneer-proprietor, John 
Smith, (who was one of the passengei-s 



by this ship,) with the modesty proper 
to youth, took his chance with those who 
thus " camped out," and so got his first 
taste of the roughness of the new home. 
" The commissioners had before left them, 
and were, by this time, got to a i)lace 
called Chygoe's Island,* from Chygoe, 
an Indian sachem, who lived there, 
(afterwards Burlington,) their business 
being to treat with the Indians about the 
land there, and to regulate the settlements, 
having not only the proprietors', but 
Governor Andros'f commission for that 
purpose ; for in their passage hither they 
had first dropped anchor at Sandy Hook, 
while the commissioners went to New 
York to acquaint him wath their design ; 
for though they had concluded the powers 
they had from the proprietors w^ere suflS- 
cient to their purpose, they thought it a 
proper respect to the Duke of York's 
commission, to w^ait on his governor upon 
the occasion ; he treated them civilly, but 



* A late lecturer (W. A. Johnson, 1870,) has ad- 
vanced the theory that Samuel Smith was stating a 
mere conjecture when he wrote of the Indian sachem 
Chygoe ; that there was no such sachem, and that the 
owner of the island was Pierre Jegou, a Frerffchman. 
Yet Jegou, in his own description of his property, 
makes it *• over arjainst Matinagcom Island and Bur- 
lington. ''(!) If opposite Burlington, it evidently could 
not be in Burlington. I prefer the authority of the 
ancient and accurate historian. 



t Governor under the Duke of York. 



40 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



41 



asked them if they had anything from 
the duke, his master ? they replied, noth- 
ing particularly, but that he had con- 
veyed that part of his country to Lord 
Berkeley, and he to Byllinge, etc., in 
which the government was as much con- 
veyed as the soil. The governor replied : 
'AH that will not clear me ; if I should 
surrender without the duke's order, it is 
as much as my head is worth ; but if you 
had but a line or two from the duke, I 
should be as ready to surrender it to you 
as you would be to ask it.' Upon which 
the commissioners, instead of excusing 
their imprudence in not bringing such 
an order, began to insist upon their rights, 
and strenuously to assert their indepen- 
dency : But Andros, clapping his hand 
on his sword, told them tfiat should 
defend the government from them till he 
received orders from the duke, his master, 
to surrender it; he, however, softened, 
and told them he would do what was in 
his power to make them easy till they 
could send home to get redress ; and, in 
order thereto, would commissionate the 
same persons mentioned in the commis- 
sion they produced. This they accepted, 
and undertook to act as magistrates under 
him till further orders came from Eng- 
land, and proceed in relation to their 
land affairs according to the methods 
prescribed by the proprietors." 

The lands now purchased from the 
natives by the commissionei's extended 
from Oldman's Creek, the northern boun- 
dary of the Salem tenth, through the 
later divisions of Gloucester, Camden, 
6 



Burlington and Mercer Counties, to the 
Falls of Delaware and the Assunpink 
Creek. The lands on the Raritan and 
Musconetcong were bought in 1703. 

" Having traveled through the country 
and viewed the land, the Yorkshire com- 
missioners, Joseph Helmsley, William 
Emley and Robert Stacy, on behalf of 
the first purchasers, chose from the Falls 
of Delaware down, which was hence 
called the first tenth ; the London com- 
missioners, John Penford, Thomas Olive, 
Daniel Wills and Benjamin Scott, on 
behalf of the ten London proprietors, 
chose at Arwaumus, (in and about where 
the town of Gloucester now is); this was 
called the second tenth. To begin a set- 
tlement there, Olive sent up servants to 
cut hay for cattle he had bought. When 
the Yorkshire commissioners found the 
others were like to settle at such a dis- 
tance, they told them if they would agree 
to fix by them, they would join in 
settling a town, and that they should 
have the largest share, in consideration 
that they (the Yorkshire commissioners), 
had the best land in the woods : Being 
few, and the Indians numerous, they 
agreed to it. The commissioners em- 
ployed Noble, a surveyor, who came in 
the first ship, to divide the spot. After 
the main street was ascertained, he di- 
vided the land on each side into lots ; the 
easternmost among the Yorkshire pro- 
prietors, the other among the Londoners. 
To begin a settlement, ten lots of nine 
acres each, bounding on the west, were 
laid out ; that done, some passengers from 



42 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



Wickaco, chiefly those concerned in the 
Yorkshire tenth, arrived the latter end 
of October. The Ix)ndon commissioners 
also employed Noble to divide the part 
of the island yet unsurveyed, between 
the ten London proprietors, in the man- 
ner before mentioned : The town thus 
by mutual consent laid out, the commis- 
sioners gave it the name, first of New 
Beverly, then Bridlington, but soon 
changed to Burlington." 

After giving a list of the heads of 
families, passengers by the Kent, Samuel 
Smith continues : 

" John Wilkinson and William Per- 
kins* were, likewise, with their families, 
passengei-s, but dying on the voyage, the 
latter were ex}X)sed to additional hard- 
ships, which were, however, moderated 
by the care of their fellow-passengers. 
Perkins was, early in life, convinced of 
the principles of those called Quakers, 
and lived well in Leicestershire, but see- 
ing an account of the country wrote by 
Richard Hartshorne, and forming views 
of advantage to his family — though in 
his fifty-second year — he, with his wife, 
four children and some servants, em- 
barked in this ship. Among the latter," 
(servants,) " was one Marshall, a carpen- 
ter, particularly serviceable in fitting up 
habitations for the new-comers; but, it 
being late in the fall when they arrived, 
the winter was much sj^nt before the 
work was begun; in the interim they 
lived in wigwams, built after the manner 



* Maternal grandfather to the wife of Richard 
Smith, the fourth. 



of the Indians. Indian corn and venison, 
supplied by the Indians, was their chief 
food. These people were not then much 
corrupted with strong liquors, but gen- 
erally very friendly and helpful to the 
English ; notwithstanding it w^as thought 
endeavours had been used to make them 
otherwise, by insinuations that the Eng- 
lish sold them the small-pox in their 
match -coats. This distemper w^as among 
them, and a company getting together to 
consult about it, one of their chiefs said : 
* In my grandfather's time the small-j^ox 
came, in my father's time the small-pox 
came, and now in my time the small- 
pox is come.' Then, stretching his hands 
towards the skies, said: *It came from 
thence.' To which the rest assented." 

Thomas Budd, an early settler, reports 
this speech more at length ; it was 
addressed to the English, as follows: 
" You are our brothers, and we are wil- 
ling to live like brothers with you ; we 
are willing to have a broad path for you 
and us to walk in, and if an Indian is 
asleep in this path, the Englishman shall 
pass by and do him no harm ; and if an 
Englishman is asleep in this path, the 
Indian shall pass him by, and say, * He 
is an Englishman, he is asleep; let him 
alone, he loves to sleep.' It shall be a 
plain path ; there must not be in this 
path a stump to hurt our feet. And as 
to the small-pox, it was once in my 
grandfather's time, and it could not be 
the English that could send it to us then, 
there being no English in the country. 
And it was once in my father's time, 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



43 



they could not send it us then, neither; 
and now it is in my time, I do not be- 
lieve that they have sent it us now ; I do 
believe it is the Man above that hatli 
sent it to us." 

T. Budd adds: "The Indians have 
been very serviceable to us by selling us 
venison, Indian corn, pease and beans, 
fish and fowl, buckskins, beaver, otter 
and other skins and furs ; the men hunt, 
fish and fowl, and the women plant the 
corn and carry burthens. There are many 
of them of a good understanding, consider- 
ing their education, and in their public 
meetings of business, they have excellent 
order, one speaking after another; and 
while one is speaking, all the rest keep 
silent, and do not so much as whisper 
one to the other. We had several meet- 
ings with them ; one was in order to put 
down the sale of rum, brandy and other 
strong liquors to them, they being a 
people that have not government of 
themselves so as to drink in moderation. 
At which time there were eight kings ; 
(one of them was Ockanickon, a noted 
friend to the English), and many other 
Indians. The kings sat on a form, and 
we on another over against them ; they 
had prepared four belts of wampum, 
(so their current money is called, being 
black and white beads made of a fish- 
shell,) to give us as seals of the covenant 
they made with us ; one of the kings, 
by the consent and appointment of the 
rest, stood up and made this following 
speech : * The strong liquor was first sold 
to us by the Dutch ; and they were blind, 



they had no eyes, they did not see that it 
was for our hurt. The next people that 
came among us were the Swedes, who 
continued the sale of those strong liquors 
to us ; they were also blind, they had no 
eyes, they did not see it to be hurtful to 
us to drink it, although we know it to 
be hurtful to us ; but if people will sell 
it to us, we are so in love with it that we 
cannot forbear it : when we drink it, it 
makes us mad, we do not know what we 
do ; we then abuse one another, we throw 
each other into the fire. Seven score of 
our people have been killed by reason of 
the drinking it, since the time it was first 
sold us : Those people that sell it are 
blind, they have no eyes ; but now there 
is a people come to live among us that 
have eyes, they see it to be for our hurt, 
and we know it to be for our hurt ; they 
are willing to deny themselves the profit 
of it for our good. These people have 
eyes, we are glad such a people are come 
amongst us; we must put it down by 
mutual consent ; the cask must be sealed 
up; it must be made fast, it must not 
leak by day nor by night, in the light 
nor in the dark ; and we give you these 
four belts of w^ampum, which we would 
have you lay up safe and keep by you, 
to be witnesses of this agreement that we 
make with you ; and we would have you 
tell your children that these four belts 
of wampum are given you to be witnesses 
betwixt us and you of this agree- 
ment.' " 

John Crips, another settler, says of 
the city lots in Burlington, under date 



44 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



" 26th of eighth month, 1677 :" " The , 
town lots for every propriety will be \ 
about ten or eleven acres, which is only 
for a house, orchard and gardens ;" and 
in a letter dated "20th second month, 
1678," he says : " Here are several per- 
sons, men of estates, that have been here, 
and have gone back to England and sold 
their estates, and returned with their 
whole families hither again." 

Two other vessels arrived in Burling- 
ton, in 1677, the " Willing Mind," from 
London, and the " Martha," from Bur- 
lington, Yorkshire. 

The account of the survey of the city 
lots in Burlington, by Daniel Wills, the 
younger, son of Daniel Wills, the early 
proprietor and commissioner, is as fol- 
lows : " The commissioners for William 
Penn, Gawen Lawrie, Nicholas Lucas 
and the rest of the proprietors, unani- 
mously employed Richard Noble to 
divide the spot where the town was to be, 
which he did to a general satisfaction. 
Then his work was to divide it into lots. 
After the street called High Street was 
laid out from both, the easternmost side 
of the street was to be divided among 
the Yorkshire proprietors, as they were 
then called, and all the land lying on 
the westernmost side, bounded by the 
river and creek, was to be laid out, by 
the unanimous consent of the commis- 
sioners, to those that was called the Lon- 
don ten propertys. So, in order to begin 
a settlement, the surveyor was ordered 
to survey ten lots of nine acres each, all 
bounding upon the western side of the 



High Street. When that was done, Daniel 
Wills, my father, in the month of Octo- 
ber, I think towards the latter end, made 
what speed he could, winter coming on, 
to make a settlement there ; — so bought 
up servants — also the two John Wool- 
stons, Samuel Clift and his wife and son 
came up with us. I remember we had 
a north-east storm of wind and rain for 
forty-eight hours, about the middle of 
which we came to the landing ; and when 
ashore, the first thing to be done was to 
draw lots to find which of the ten was 
my father's. So my father wrote down 
nine of the proprietors' names in bits of 
paper, and rowled them up, for the tenth 
he did not know ; but he rowled up a 
blank paper for it, and put them all into 
a hat, covered, and caused an unconcerned 
person to draw them out. So the blank 
lot came out first, which was to be next 
the river, and in two months after the 
person arrived and produced his right to 
it, which was Thomas Budd, first; second, 
Thomas Hooton; third, Daniel Wills; 
fourth, John Penford ; fifth. Ridges O. 
Rudyard, {sic); sixth, Thomas Olive; 
seventh, Benjamin Scott; eighth, Wil- 
liam Peachy ; ninth, John Smith ; tenth, 
Richard Mew. This being done, we 
took up our packages, and through the 
woods we went to find the third lot. 
When there arrived, all in the rain, 
we set up some forks, and poles upon 
them, and covered our tents with blan- 
kets, but all that did but little good, for 
it rained through upon us all night. So 
that betwixt the rain, and smoke of our 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



45 



fire, and wet clothes, which never dried 
until they dried on our backs, we was 
very much benumbed. Had not my 
father had more courage than either his 
son or servants, to go out in the dismal, 
dark night, to get wood to recruit the fire, 
we might have perished. But to pro- 
ceed: the commissioners, after all this, 
betook themselves to dividing the York- 
shire part of the island, and after Thomas 
Olive came up with his family, the Lon- 
don commissioners employed, also, the 
said Richard Noble to divide the remain- 
ing part of the island that was yet un- 
surveyed, between the ten proprietors 
aforesaid. All which lots aforesaid, by 
order of the commissioners, was surveyed 
and appropriated to the proprietoi^s in 
the year 1677. 

" Thomas Olive and Daniel Wills, my 
father, was with the surveyors, always one 
or the other of them ; John Penford and 
Benjamin Scott being gone for England 
before the whole was finished. Some 
time, I think about two years after, the 
commissioners appointed William Emley 
to be the proprietors' surveyor, and con- 
sidering it would be necessary for fire- 
wood, etc., to accommodate the town, 
they employed him to survey off so much 
land adjoining to the said town as might 
answer to each of the said twenty pro- 
prietors four hundred acres, which was 
called ' town bound lands,' for each pro- 
prietor to take it up," (/. e. fire-wood,) 
"within the said bounds; and was not 
divided, otherwise than each proprietor 
took it up, but was in general surveyed 



out for the service of these twenty pro- 
prietors and no others." 

(Signed by William Matlock and 
Daniel Wills). 

The fire-wood from four hundred acres 
should have been amply sufficient to keep 
off the winter's cold from our young 
pioneer from Bramham. After his land 
affairs in the colony had been duly 
attended to, John Smith returned to 
England and his father's house. This 
appears, by our accounts, to have been 
about 1678. He seems to have once 
more come to America and to have again 
returned about 1688, the year of his 
father's decease. Finally, on a third and 
last voyage to the colony, in company 
with his youngest brother, Richard, in 
the year 1699, he died at sea, unmarried, 
at about forty-two years of age. 

The " fall " or autumn of 1677, was 
that in which the Burlington proprietors' 
town-lots and " wood-lots " were surveyed. 
In the autumn of the next year, 1678, 
there arrived, from Hull, a ship, con- 
taining a personage who was to be an 
important one in oup family story. This 
was little Mary Murfin, or Myrfin^ a 
child of three or four years of age, after- 
wards the wife of the first Daniel Smith, 
who arrived with her parents in the shij) 
Shield, (or Shields,) Daniel Towes, com- 
mander, "in the tenth month, O. S., 
1678." Samuel Smith savs, the "Shield" 
" dropped anchor before Burlington, be- 
ing the first ship that came so far up 
Delaware : Against Coaquannock," (af- 
terwards Philadelphia,) "being a bold 



46 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



shore, she went so near in turning, that 
part of -the tackling struck the trees; 
some on board then remarked, that it 
was a fine spot for a town : A fresh gale 
brought her to Burlington. She moored 
to a tree,* and the next morning the 
people came ashore on the ice, so hard 
had the river suddenly frozen." In the 
list of passengers are the names of 
"Robert Murfin, his wife (Anne) and 
two children." 

Robert Murfin, or Myrfin, was of an 
old North-of-England family, the son of 
Robert Myrfin, of Eaton, Notts. I ex- 
tract, from an old record, the following 
bit of antique genealogy, to show the 
singular changes of spelling, in the same 
family, of this name Myrfin, which may 
even be identical with Merrefield ! 

" Mirfin or Murfin was ancientlv Mir- 
field ; the various ancient spellings of 
the name, the records of Mirfin, of 
Thurcroft, show as follows : 

" Hugh Mirfield, of Mirfield, married 
heiress of William de Tluircroft, temp. 
Edward I. In the same family, Esmeus 
Vesey de Knapton marries, very early, 
Matilda, or Maud, daughter of William 
Myrfin, or Mirfin, alias Myrfold, Knight. 
Ralph Hatfield, of Laugh ton en le Mer- 



* The tree was on the point between Delaware and 
Asiscunk Creek ; there was then an Indian town upon 
this point with a cemetery. Joseph Sansom, in 1788, 
says :— " The Delaware has since gradually encroached 
upon its banks, which are here very low, and some- 
times disturbs the mouldering bones of the old inhab- 
itants ; lon^ strings of wampum and rude instruments 
of husbandry are often found by the neighbouring 
children, washed out upon the sand, and are bought 
up for a trifle, to swell the collections of the curious." 



thing, marries Margaret, daughter of 
Robert Merfield, of Thurcroft. Thomas 
Levett, of Melton, marries, temp. Eliz., 
the daughter of Myrfin, of Thurcroft," 
etc. 

Of Mary Murfin, it is recorded, that 
being a child of tender age when taken 
by her parents to America, she got no 
other schooling than such as her mother 
could give her in their new forest-home 
among the red men ; whose language she 
acquired as perfectly as she did her 
parents' English tongue. She was born 
in 1674, and in 1695, being twenty-one 
years of age, was married to Daniel 
Smith, of Brainham, son of the second 
Richard Smith, and next brother of the 
John of whom we have just caught a 
few glimpses. "Tliey lived together in 
great harmony near fifty years, and she 
brought him nine children." She be- 
came a distinguished minister among the 
" Friends," and was, moreover, a " nota- 
ble " housewife. 

Her parents, Robert and Anne Murfin, 
settled at Chesterfield, near Burlington, 
in the woods, where the following inci- 
dent occurred soon after their arrival: 
" The Indians were very numerous, but 
friendly and hospitable, bringing in large 
quantities of corn and venison, which 
they liberally exchanged for household 
utensils or other little articles frequently 
of small value for which they had a 
fancy. One of the chiefs, a tall, likely 
youth, was particularly attracted by a 
curtain of red stuff with large brass 
rings which hung round Anne Murfin's 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



47 



bed, and would not be denied so brave a 
piece of finery, though they could very 
illy spare it. He gave them all they 
asked for it — perhaps a field or a meadow 
was the purchase of the suit — and 
marched out of the cabin in triumph, 
with the curtain thrown over his shoul- 
ders, and looking back at every step to 
survey tlie broad rings that jingled at 
his heels." A cheM of Anne Murfin's 
is still in the family. 

" The Indians on this part of the con- 
tinent, before the Europeans came among 
them, were a sober, harmless people, in- 
spired with sublime and even just ideas 
of the power and goodness of God. They 
were both honest and generous to the 
utmost of their knowledge and abilities, 
for they had little to spare, living very 
simply without much care and labour, 
upon fish and venison, which were then 
plenty, together with the spontaneous 
produce of the fields and woods. The 
chief of this place, an old man called 
Ockaniccon, died shortly after the arrival 
of the English." " He appears to have 
been a man of capacity and reflection, 
whose kind reception of our ancestors 
deserves to be gratefully remembered." 

(J. Sansom). 

From a MS. by Mary Murfin Smith, 
preserved in Watson's Manuscript An- 
nals, I take the following : " The Indians 
being very numerous and of a strange 
language, yet, by God's providence they 
were made helpful at the first settling, 
for thev brou^^cht venison and wild fowls, 
also corn, to sell to the English. They 



was also a defense from the ravenous 
beasts by hunting them and killing 
them." "Our houses was made of palisa- 
does, and some of logs, covered with long 
grass. They pounded the corn by rea- 
son they had no mill in the country,* 
except by some private families that had 
a steel mill. Notwithstanding the mas- 
ters of families was men of good estates 
in the world, yet before they could get 
the land in order, and get corn and 
stock about them, they knew great 
hardships, and went through many 
difficulties and straits. Yet I never 
heard them say, * I would I had not come 
here,' or repine. It looks something like 
Joseph's going before his brethren to 
provide for their coming. 

"And after the English did come 
more and more, there came a sore distem- 
per among the Indians, that they died so 
fast that in some places their bodies 
wasted above ground, they could not 
bury all the dead. 

" It was said that an old Indian king," 
(Ockanickon,) " spake prophetically be- 
fore his death and said the Indians 
should decrease and the English in- 
crease. 

" It must be allowed among all con- 
siderate persons, that this was the hand 
of Providence that did thus provide and 
preserve, plant and pluck up. * * * 

"Without any carnal weapon we 
entered the land, and inhabited therein 
as safe as if there had been thousands 



* Thomas Olive set up the first regulur flour-mill a 
few years afterward. 



48 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



of garrisons, for the Most High preserved 
us both from harm of man and beast. 



* 



* 



* 



* 



V 



"As it is said in Holy Writ, ' The 
preparation of the heart in man is of tlie 
Lord,' so it may well be believed that 
the hearts of this people was prepared 
for this service, even to labor for the 
replenishing of this land, it being a 
wilderness, indeed, and they unacquainted 
with the nature of the soil, and also with 
the inhabitants; altogether as pilgrims 
and strangers, at tlieir first coming among 
them. 

"It doth appear that the aforesaid 
people was zealous in performing their 
religious services, for they having no 
house to keep meetings in, they made a 
tent or covert of sail-cloth to meet under, 
and after they got some little houses to 
dwell in, then they did keep the meeting 
in one of those, until thev could build a 
meeting-house. Thomas Olive and Wil- 
liam Peachy was two of tlie first settlers 
that had a public ministry. Samuel 
Jennings and his wife, Anne Jennings, 
was early comers into America, who was 
of a worthy memory, endowed with both 
spiritual and tem]>oral wisdom. Some 
part of his time he was made governor 
of the province of West Jersey. He 
was a suppressor of vice and an encour- 
ager of virtue. Sharp toward evil-doei's, 
but tender and loving to them that did 
well, giving good counsel and wholesome 
advice to friends and neighbours. An 
able minister of the Gospel, and laboured 
much therein to the comfort and edifica- 



tion of many people both in this pro- 
; vince and other places." 

" They that came first was near two 
years and a half before they got a mill 
to grind their corn ; they pounded it one 
dnv for the next; vet thev were content 
and had their health generally very well, 
and very few died for a long time." 

Katharine Murfin, a sister of Robert's, 
was married very early, even before the 
construction of the great meeting-tent, 
and with even more than the usual idyllic 
simplicity of the " Friends," to Matthew 
Champion. This was the first mar- 
riage in the colony. "The prelimi- 
naries being settled, they soon after 
assembled a few Friends, proceeded to the 
nearest public place — the first cross-way 
they came to — and there solemnly de- 
clared that they took each other for man 
and wife, with mutual promises of faith 
and love, until death should separate 
them. Aft^r the ceremony they returned 
home to dinner and 'made good cheer' on 
some fresh fish which they purchased of a 
party of Indians (whom) they met in the 
path." 

Another ship arrived from London in 
this year, (1678,) and about this time, or 
shortly afterward, arrived two persons, 
destined to be enrolled as collateral an- 
cestors of the Burlington Smiths. These 
were Anthony Morris and Thomas Ra- 
pier. 

Anthony Morris was of a good family, 
very numerously rejiresented in Wales. 
It is understood that his parents were in 
good business in London. He writes 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



49 



himself " mariner ;'' it has, however, been 
8upiK>sed that he came over as supercargo 
of a mercantile venture, in which he was 
interested. His seal upon extant docu- 
ments shows " a lion passant," and resem- 
bles the arms of Morris of Cardigan, 
which family, however, added the " aug- 
mentation " of " three scaling-ladders " 
to commemorate the capture of Cardigan 
Castle by one of the family, in A. D. 
1 140, through escalade. 

Thomas Rapier was of a wealthy 
family in Sindersby, Yorkshire, a branch 
of which exists, or lately existed, in 
London, anjl has contributed one of the 
Lord Mayors of that great metropolis.* 
He married a daughter of tlie before- 
mentioned William Perkins, or Perkyns, 
of Seilby, son of Thomas Perkyns, son 
of " the reverend " William Perkyns, a 
non-conformist divine, mentioned by 
quaint Thomas Fuller, in his " English 
Worthies." 

Both Morris and Rapier were members 
of the colonial legislative assemblies, and 
could prefix the title, " the honorable " 
to their names. The name Rapier, in 
time, lost the i, and was spelt Raper. 

The land in which our good and sim- 
ple-hearted founders of states had em- 
barked their fortunes was virgin wilder- 
ness, of a light and unexhausted soil, 
and when the heavy timber-growth was 
removed, produced splendid crops. A 
letter from Mahlon Stacy, in 1680, says: 

" I have seen orchards laden with 



* Thomas Rapier was disinherited and turned out 
of doors by his father for joining the Quakers. 

7 



fruit to admiration, their very limbs torn 
to pieces with the weight, and most de- 
licious to the taste, and lovely to behold ; 
I have seen an apple-tree from a pippin 
kernel, yield a barrel of curious cyder; 
and peaches in such plenty, that some 
people took their carts a peach-gathering; 
I could not but smile at the conceit of it: 
They are a very delicate fruit, and hang 
almost like our onions that are tied on 
ropes: I have seen and known, this 
summer, forty bushels of bold wheat of 
one bushel sown." " We have from the 
time called May until Michaelmas, great 
store of very^ good wild fruits, as straw- 
berries, cranberries and hurtleberries, 
which are like our bilberries in England, 
but far sweeter; they are very whole- 
some fruits. The cranberries much like 
cherries for colour and bigness, which 
may be kept till fruit come in again ; an 
excellent sauce is made of them for veni- 
son, turkeys and other great fowl, and 
they are better to make tarts than either 
goosberries or cherries; we have them 
brought to our houses by the Indians in 
great plenty. My brother Robert had 
as many cherries this year as would have 
loaded several carts: It is my judg- 
ment, by what I have observed, that 
fruit trees in this country destroy them- 
selves by the very weight of their fruit : 
As for venison and fowls, we have great 
plenty : We have brought home to our 
houses, by the Indians, seven or eight 
fat bucks of a day ; and sometimes put 
by " (refuse,) " as many, having no occa- 
sion for them ; and fish in their season 



1. P. 49. line 11, for 1140 read 1106. 



50 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



very plenteous : My Cousin Revell and 
I, with some of my men, went, last third 
month, into the river to catch herrings, 
for at that time they came in great shoals 
into the shallows; we had neither rod 
nor net; but after the Indian fashion, 
made a round pinfold about two yards 
over, and a foot high, but left a gap for 
the fish to go in at, and made a bush to 
lay in the gap to keep the fish in ; and 
when that was done, we took two long 
birches and tied their tops together, and 
went about a stone's cast above our 
said pinfold ; then, bawling these birches' 
boughs down the stream, wkere we drove 
thousands before us, but" (only) "so 
many got into our trap as it would hold ; 
and then we began to hawl them on 
shore as fast as three or four of us could, 
by two or three at a time, and after this 
manner, in half an hour, we could have 
filled a three-bushel sack of as good and 
large herrings as ever I saw." "And 
though I speak of herrings only, lest 
any should think we have little other 
sorts, we have great plenty of most sorts 
of fish that ever I saw in England, 
besides several other sorts that are not 
known there; as rocks, cat-fish, shad, 



sheep's-head, sturgeons ; and fowls plenty, 
as ducks, geese, pheasants, turkeys and 
partridges, and many other sorts that I 
cannot remember, and would be too 
tedious to mention." " Indeed, the coun- 
try, take it as a wilderness, is a brave 
country," " and for my part, I like it so 
well I never had the least thought of 
returning to England, except on the 
account of trade." 

In another letter, he says : " Burling- 
ton will be a place of trade quickly ; for 
here is way for trade: I, with eight 
more, last winter, bought a good ketch 
of fifty tons, freighted hereout at our 
own charge, and sent her to Barbados, 
and so to sail to Salt-tertugas, to take in 
part of her lading in salt, and the rest 
in Barbados goods as she came back, 
which said voyage she hath accomplished 
very well, and now rides before Burling- 
ton, discharging her lading, and so 
to go to the West Indies again ; and we 
intend to freight her out with our own 
corn." 

The voyage of this tiny vessel was the 
beginning of the Burlington West India 
trade, in which our ancestors engaged 
for several generations. 



CHAPTER VI. 



SETTLEMENT. 



SAMUEL JENNINGS, first governor 
of West New Jersey, was a collat- 
eral ancestor of that branch of the Bur- 
lington Smiths, whose residence was 
"Bramham," Burlington County. The 
name was anciently spelt Jenyns and 
Jenings, and he has been supposed to 
have been of the same family as the 
distinguished Sir Soame Jenyns.* 

Edward BylHnge, the original proprie- 
tor of West Jei-sey under the grants of 
the Duke of York and Lord Berkeley, 
still retained a large number of proprie- 
tary shares, and conceived himself to be 
still in possession of the rights of govern- 
ment there, originally derived from the 
royal family. The majority of the pro- 
prietors residing in New Jersey, took the 
ground, which was successfully asserted 
in a subsequent contest, that the rights of 
government and the choice of a governor, 
were transferred with the land, and re- 
sided in a majority of the actual proprie- 
tors, and this is fully borne out by the 
language of the "Concessions." As a 
considerable proportion, perhaps the 
larger part of the land, (however,) was 



* The name of Sarah Jenninjifs, Governor Jennings' 
eldest daughter, will recall that of the celebrated 
Sarah Jennings or Jenings. Duchess of Marlborough, 
the ruling spirit of Queen Anne's councils. 



at this time still owned by persons re- 
maining in England, though a minority 
of the whole number of proprietors, these 
persons, among whom was Byllinge, were 
quietly permitted for a time, by the settler 
proprietors, to exercise their supposed 
right of sending out a governor to rule 
the settlers of New Jersey. 

The proprietors in England, to get 
over the difficulty caused by the preten- 
sions of Byllinge to the rights of gov- 
ernment, (and also to do justice to his 
large proprietary interests,) appointed 
him governor. He, in his turn, not 
wishing to remove to America, appointed 
Samuel Jenings his deputy. The latter 
removed his family from Cole's Hill, 
Buckinghamshire, in " the third month, 
1680," and arrived in the Delaware 
Eiver about the first of September of 
that year. ( Vide his letter to Penn, 
etc.) 

Samuel Smith, speaking of the year 
1681, says : " The western part of New 
Jersey was now become populous, by the 
accession of many settlers. Jenings, who 
arrived last year about this time, received 
a commission from Byllinge, (whom the 
proprietoi-s in England, as mentioned 
before, had chosen governor,) to be his 
deputy. He called an assembly, and 

51 



52 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



with them agreed upon certain funda- 
mentals of government, as follows :" 
I extract the first provision : 
" I. That there shall be a general free 
assembly for the province aforesaid, 
yearly and every year, at a day certain, 
chosen by the free people of the said 
province, whereon all the representatives 
for the said province shall be summoned 
to appear, to consider of the affairs of 
the said province, and to make and 
ordain such acts and laws as shall be 
requisite and necessary for the good gov- 
ernment and prosperity of the free people 
of the said province; and, (if necessity 
shall require,) the governor for the time 
being, with the consent of his council, 
may and shall issue out writs to convene 
the assembly sooner, to consider and 
answer the necessities of the people of 
the said province." 

This assembly, the first convened in 
New Jersey, sat from the 21st to the 
28th of November, 1681, and passed 
thirty-six laws, of which I condense a 
few from Smith's abstract, as specially 
interesting : 

"Upon persons dying intestate, and 
leaving a wife and child or children, the 
administrator to secure two-thirds for the 
child or children, the other to the widow; 
where there was no children, one moiety 
or half the estate was to go to the next 
of kin, the other half to the widow; 
always provided, such estate exceeded 
one hundred pounds; otherwise the 
widow to have the whole ; and in cases 
of leaving children, and no provision, 



the charge of bringing them up to be 
paid out of the public stock. 

"That, whosoever presumed, directly 
or indirectly, to sell any strong liquors 
to any Indian or Indians, should forfeit for 
every such offense, the sum of three 
pounds." (Distinct and strong !) 

" That ten men from Burlington, and 
ten from Salem, shall be appointed to 
lay out and clear a road from Burlington 
to Salem, at the public expense : 

" That two hundred pounds should be 
equally levyed and appropriated for the 
charges of government, upon the several 
tenths, twenty pounds each ; every nian 
to be assessed according to his estate; 
and all handicrafts, merchants and 
others, at the discretion of the assessors. 
Persons thinking themselves aggrieved, 
had the liberty of appealing to the com- 
missioners of the tenth they belonged to." 
The assessment of craftsmen and mer- 
chants "at the discretion of the asses- 
sors," was probably soon repealed. 

From this assembly's instructions to 
the land-commissioners I take the follow- 
ing: 

1. "That the surveyor shall measure 
the front of the River Delaware, begin- 
ning at Assumpink Creek, and from 
thence down to Cape May, that the point 
of the compass may be found for the 
running the partition lines betwixt each 
tenth. 

2. " That each and every tenth, or ten 
proprieties, shall have their proportion 
of front to the River Delaware, and so 
far back into the woods as will make or 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



53 



contain sixty-four thousand acres for 
their first settlement, and for the subdi- 
viding the Yorkshire and London two 
tenths. 

3. " To allow three thousand and two 
hundred acres where the parties con- 
cerned please to choose it within their 
own tenth ; to be taken up according to 
the rules or methods following, viz :" 

(I omit the methods). 

10. " That every proprietor shall have 
four hundred acres to a propriety, and 
so proportionably to lesser quantities for 
their town-lot, over and above their afore- 
said three thousand two hundred acres; 
which may be taken anywhere within 
their own tenth ; either within or with- 
out the town bounds." 

17. " That the proprietors who are yet 
remaining in England shall have notice, 
that we find it necessary for the speedy 
settlement of this province, and for the 
interest of all concerned theieiii, to allow 
to every propriety as aforesaid, three 
thousand two hundred acres for our first 
choice; and in case much people shall 
come, as may be reasonably expected, 
who have purchased no land in England, 
and desire to settle amongst us; that, 
then we reserve liberty to take up so 
much land more as shall fall to every 
propriety, not exceeding five thousand 
and two hundred acres, which was allowed 
to us for our first settlement : Provided, 
nevertheless, that none shall take up any 
proportion of land, but as they shall 
settle it, or cause it to be settled ; which 
is to be done after the aforesaid three 



thousand two hundred acres shall be 
justly taken up and settled." 

18. " That all publick highways shall 
be set forth, at any time or times here- 
after, at the discretion of the commis- 
sioners for the time being, in or through 
any lands taken up, or to be taken up ; 
allowing the owners of such lands when 
such publick highways shall be laid 
forth, reasonable satisfaction at the dis- 
cretion of the commissioners, in lieu 
thereof" 

These dividends of the back-lands 
continued to be made from time to time, 
as settlement increased and pushed far- 
ther and farther into the wilderness, 
until, as has been said, the final dividend 
allotted, to each propriety, thirty-five 
thousand acres. 

As we have seen the eldest son of 
Richard Smith, the second, make his 
appearance among the earliest settlers, 
and locate a portion of the immense 
tract possessed by himself, his father and 
brother, — as we have heard from another 
member of the family, some of the hard 
and rough experience of the first pioneers, 
and from some of their worthy compan- 
ions, have learned of the compensating 
richness of their Canaan, and of the gener- 
ous hospitality of the natives, it seems 
proper, before re-introducing the family 
under the more favorable circumstances of 
a settled civilization in their new home, to 
pay a parting tribute to the poor Indian, 
their host and humble companion, and 
see how he who was justly styled the 
" noble savage," the "stoic of the woods," 



54 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



appeared to our ancestoi's before he be- 
came corrupted by the contact of inferior 
Europeans who followed them.* 

From a long and interesting account 
of the red men, in that day, I limit my- 
self, with regret, to the following ex- 
tract : 

"They were punctual in their bar- 
gains, and observed this so much in 
others, that it was very difficult for a 
person who had once failed herein to get 
any dealings with them afterward. In 
their councils thev seldom or never 
interrupted or contradicted one another ; 
if ever so many were in company, only 
two must speak to each other, and the 
rest be silent till their turn : Their lan- 
guage was high, lofty and sententious : 
Their way of counting was by tens, that 
is to say, two tens, three tens, four tens, 
etc. ; when the number got out of their 
reach, they pointed to the stars or to the 
liair of their heads. They lived chiefly 
on maize, or Indian corn, roasted in the 
ashes, sometimes beaten and boiled with 
water, called homine ; they also made an 
agreeable cake of their pounded corn ; 
and raised beans and peas ; but the woods 
and rivers afforded them the chief of 
their provisions: They pointed their 
arrows with a sharpened flinty stone, and 
of a larger sort, with withes for handles, 
cut their wood ; both of these sharpened 



* It will hereafter be seen that our ancestors, as 
members of the Assembly and Council of New Jer- 
sey, and of the first Indian Aid Society, were much 
concerned in early legislation, particularly that for the 
benefit of the Indians. 



stones are often found in the fields." 
"They were naturally reserved, apt to 
resent, to conceal their resentments, and 
retain them long ; they were liberal and 
generous, kind and affiible to the Eng- 
lish. Strict observers of property, yet 
to the last degree, thoughtless and inac- 
tive in acquiring or keeping it : None 
could excel tliem in liberality of the 
little they had, for nothing was thought 
too good for a friend ; a knife, gun or 
any such thing given to one, frequently 
passed through many hands: Their 
houses or wigwams were sometimes to- 
gether in towns, but mostly movable, 
and occasionally fixed near a spring or 
other water, according to the conven- 
iencies for hunting, fishing, basket-mak- 
ing or other business of that sort, and built 
with poles laid on forked sticks in the 
ground, with bark, flags or bushes on the 
top and sides, with an opening to the 
south, their fire in the middle ; at night 
they slept on the ground with their feet 
towards it; their clothing w^as a coarse 
blanket or skin thrown over the shoulder, 
which covered to the knee, and a piece 
of the same tied round their legs, vfiilx 
part of a deei*skin sewed round their 
feet for shoes ; as they had learned to 
live upon little, they seldom expected or 
wanted to lay up much. They were 
also moderate in asking a price for any- 
thing they had for sale : When a com- 
pany traveled together, they generally 
followed each other in silence, scarcely 
ever two were seen by the side of one 
another ; in roads, the man went before 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



65 



with his bow and arrow, the woman after, 
not uncommonly with a child at her back, 
and other burdens besides; but when 
these were too heavy, the man assisted. 
To know their walks again in unfre- 
quented woods, they heaped stones or 
marked trees." 

"In person they were upright, and 
strait in their limbs beyond the usual 
proportion in most nations ; their bodies 
were strong, but of a strength rather 
fitted to endure hardships than to sustain 
much bodily labour; very seldom crooked 
or deformed; their features regular; their 
countenances sometimes fierce, in common 
rather resembling a Jew than Christian ; 
the colour of their skin a tawny reddish 
brown ; the whole fas li ion of their lives 
of a piece, hardy, poor and squalid." 

"When they began to drink, they 
commonly continued it as long as the 
means of procuring it lasted. In drink 
they often lay exposed to all the inclem- 
encies of weather, which introduced a 
train of new disorders among: them: 
They were grave 6ven to sadness upon 
any common, and more so upon serious 
occasions; observant of those in com- 
pany, and respectful to the old ; of a 
temper cool and deliberate; never in 
haste to speak, but waited for a certainty, 
that the person who spoke before them 
had finished all he had to say : They 
seemed to hold European vivacity in 
contempt, because they found such as 
came among them, apt to interrupt each 
other, and frequently speak all together. 
Their behaviour in publick councils was 



strictly decent and instructive, every one 
in his turn was heard, according to rank 
of years or wisdom, or services to his 
country: Not a word, a whisper or a 
murmur, while any one spoke ; no inter- 
ruption to commend or condemn ; the 
younger sort were totally silent. They 
got fire by rubbing wood of particular 
sorts, (as the antients did out of the ivy 
and bays,) by turning the end of a hard 
piece upon the side of one that was soft 
and dry ; to forward the heat they put 
dry rotten wood and leaves; with the 
help of fire and their stone axes, they 
would fall large trees, and afterwards 
scoop them into bowls, etc. From their 
infancy they were formed with care to 
endure hardships, to bear derision, and 
even blows patiently ; at least with a 
composed countenance : Though they 
were not easily provoked, it was generally 
hard to be appeased whenever it hap- 
pened : Liberty in its fullest extent, was 
their ruling passion ; to this every other 
consideration was subservient ; their 
children were trained up so as to cherish 
this disposition to the utmost; they were 
indulged to a great degree, seldom chas- 
tised with blows, and rarely chided; their 
faults were left for their reason and 
habits of the family to correct ; they said 
these could not be great before their reason 
commenced ; and they seemed to abhor 
a slavish motive to action, as inconsistent 
with their notions of freedom and inde- 
pendency; even strong pci-suasion was 
industriously avoided, as bordering too 
much on dependence, and a kind of 



56 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



violence offered to the will: They 
dreaded slavery more than death : They 
laid no fines for crimes, for they had no 
way of exacting them — the atonement 
was voluntary :* Every tribe had par- 
ticulars " (individuals ) " in whom they 
reposed a confidence, and unless they did 
something unworthy of it they were held 
in respect. What were denominated 
kings, were sachems distinguished among 
these ; the respect paid them was volun- 
tary, and not exacted or looked for, nor 
the omission regarded : The sachems 
directed in their councils, and had the 
chief disposition of lands. To help their 
memories in treaties, they had belts of 
black and white wampum ; with these 
closed their periods in speeches, deliver- 
ing more or less according to the import- 
ance of the matter treated of; this 
ceremony omitted, all they said passed 
for nothing : They treasured these belts 
when delivered to them in treaties, kept 
them as the records of the nation, to have 
recourse to upon future contests; gov- 
erned by customs and not by laws, they 
greatly revered those of their ancestors, 
and followed them so implicitly, that a 
new thought or action but seldom in- 



* They had, however, a rude justice and mode of 
execution ; Tashiowycan, who had committed a mur- 
der in 1672, was punished as follows : ''Two Indians 
sent by the sachems, coming: to Tashiowycan's wigwam 
in the night, one of them his particular friend; him 
he asked if he intended to kill nim ; he answered ' no, 
but the sachems have ordered you to die :' He de- 
manded what his brothers said ; being told they also 
said he must die, he then holding his hands before his 
eyes, said, ' kill me :' Upon this the other Indian, not 
his intimate, shot him in the breast." Laconicism 
and fortitude worthy of Sparta ! 



truded. They long remembered kind- 
nesses ; families or particulars that had 
laid themselves out to deal with, entertain 
and treat them hospitably, or even fairly 
in dealings, if no great kindness was 
received, were sure of their trade : This 
also must undoubtedly be allowed, that 
the original and more uncorrupt, very 
seldom forgot to be grateful, where real 
benefits had been received. And not- 
withstanding the stains of perfidy and 
cruelty, which in 1754 and since, have 
disgraced tlie Indians on the frontiers of 
these provinces, even these, by an unin- 
terrupted intercourse of seventy years, 
had on many occasions given irrefragable 
proofs of liberality of sentiment, hospi- 
tality of action and impressions that 
seemed to promise a continuation of 
better things." 

The following narration, by "C. W.," 
an Indian interpreter of one of the pro- 
vincial governments, gives some insight 
into the natural religion of these simple- 
hearted savages : 

" In the year 1737, I was sent, for the 
first time, to Onondago, at the desire of 
the governor of Virginia ; I set out the 
latter end of February, very unexpect- 
edly, for a journey of five hundred 
English miles, through a wilderness 
where there was neither road nor path, 
and at such a time of year, when crea- 
tures could not be met with for food ; 
there were a Dutchman and three Indians 
with me. When we were one hundred 
and fifty miles on our journey, we came 
into a narrow vallev, about half a mile 



A FAMILY HISTOBY. 



57 



broad and thirty long, both sides of 
which were encompassed with high moun- 
tains, on which the snow lay about three 
feet deep ; in it ran a stream of water, 
also about three feet deep, which was so 
crooked that it always extended from one 
side of the valley to the other ; in order 
to avoid wading so often through the 
water, we endeavored to pass along on 
the slope of the mountain ; the snow 
three feet deep, and so hard froze on the 
top tliat we could walk upon it: We 
were obliged to make holes in the snow 
with our hatchets, that our feet might 
not slip down the mountain; and thus 
we crept on. It happened that the old 
Indian's foot slipt, and the root of a tree 
by which he held, breaking, he slid down 
the mountain as from the roof of a house; 
but happily was stopt in his fall by the 
string which fastened his pack hitching 
to the stump of a small tree. The two 
Indians could not come to his aid, but 
our Dutcli fellow-traveler did, and that 
not without visible danger of his own 
life : I also could not put a foot forward 
till I was helped ; after which we laid 
hold of the first opportunity to go down 
again into the valley ; which was not till 
after we laboured hard for half an hour, 
with hands and feet We had observed 
a tree that lay directly off from where 
the Indian fell ; and when we were come 
down into the valley again, we went back 
about one hundred paces, where we saw, 
that if the Indian had slip'd four or five 
paces further, he would have fell over a 
rock one hundred feet perpendicular, 
8 



upon craggy pieces of rocks below. The 
Indian was astonished, and turned quite 
pale ; then, with outstretched arms and 
great earnestness, spoke these words : * I 
thank the great Lord and Governor 
of this world, in that He has had 
mercy upon me, and has been will- 
ing that I should live longer;' which 
words I, at that time, set down in my 
journal. 

" The 9th of April, following, while 
we were yet on the journey, I found my- 
self extremely weak, through the fatigue 
of so long a journey, and the cold and 
hunger I had suffered ; and there having 
fallen a fresh snow of about twenty 
inches deep, also being yet three days' 
journey from Onondago, in a frightful 
wilderneas, my spirit failed, my body 
trembled and shook ; I thought I should 
fall down and die; I step'd aside, and 
sat me down under a tree, expecting 
there to die : My companions soon 
missed me ; the Indians came back and 
found me sitting there : I told them in 
one word I would go no further — I would 
die there. They remained silent awhile ; 
at last the old Indian said : * My dear 
companion, thou hast hitherto encour- 
aged us, wilt thou now quite give up ? 
Remember that evil days are better than 
good days, for when we suffer much we 
do not sin ; and sin will be drove out of 
us by suffering; but good days cause 
men to sin, and God cannot extend His 
mercy to them ; but contrary wise, when 
it goeth evil with us, God hath com- 
passion upon us.' These words made 



58 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



me ashamed ; I rose up and traveled on 
as well as I could." 

Of this natural religion, the last words 
of the old king Ockanickon, " the friend 
of the English/' who died this year, 
(1681,) at Burlington, are another in- 
stance : they were addressed to his 
nephew, who succeeded him : 

" It was my desire that my brother's 
son, lahkursoe, should come to me and 
hear my last words; for him have I 
appointed king after me. 

" My brother's son, this day I deliver 
my heart into your bosom ; and mind me. 
I would have you love what is good, and 
keep good company ; refuse w^hat is evil, 
and by all means avoid bad company. 

" Now having delivered my heart into 
your bosom, I also deliver my bosom to 
keep my heart in ; be sure always to 
walk in a good path, and if any Indians 
should speak evil of Indians or Chris- 
tians, do not join in it, but look at the 
Bun from the rising of it to the setting 
of the same : In speeches that shall be 
made between the Indians and the 
Christians, if any wrong or evil thing be 
spoken, do not join with that, but join 
with the good. 

" When speeches are made, do not you 
speak first ; be silent, and let all speak 
before you, and take good notice what 
each man speaks, and when you have 
heard all, join to that which is good. 

"Brother's son, I would have you 
cleanse your ears and take all foulness out, 
that you may hear both good and evil, and 
then join with the good and refuse the 



evil ; and also cleanse your eyes, that 
you may see good and evil, and where 
you see evil, do not join with it, but join 
to that which is good." 

After the Indian had delivered this 
counsel to his nephew, T. Budd, one of 
the proprietors, being present, took the 
opportunity to remark that ** there was 
a great God, who created all things ; that 
He gave man an understanding of what 
was good and bad ; and after this life, 
rewarded the good with blessings, and 
the bad according to their doings." He 
answered, " it is very true, it is so ; there 
are two ways, a broad and a straight way ; 
there are two paths, a broad and a 
straight " (narrow) *' path ; the worst and 
the greatest number go in the broad, the 
best and fewest in the straight path." 

" This king dying soon afterward, was 
attended to his grave in the Quakers' 
burial-place in Burlington, with solemnity 
by the Indians in their manner, and 
with great respect by many of the Eng- 
lish settlei^s, to whom he had been a sure 
friend." (Smith). 

We shall see hereafter how steady and 
sincere was the friendship with which 
the Quakers continued to requite the 
early kindness of this unsophisticated, 
manly, but fast-fading race. How fine 
was the counsel of the old chief to the 
young one, to watch the daily march of 
the sun, and shape his own course by 
that of the majestic source of light, as 
pure, as true and as loftily superior to 
the dark and groveling ways of the 
plotter and the slanderer ! 



CHAPTER VII. 



PEACEFUL DAYS. 



THE first settlement of the Rancoeas 
River seems to date from the arri- 
val, in 1682, of a large ship, unnamed, 
which, having grounded in Delaware 
Bay, lay there eight days before she 
could be got off;' then, coming up the 
river, landed three hundred and sixty 
passengers on the Jersey shore, between 
Philadelphia and Burlington. "Their 
provisions being nigh gone, they sent ten 
miles to an Indian town near Rankokas 
Creek, for Indian corn and pease: The 
king of this tribe being then there, 
treated them kindly, and directed such 
Indians as had provisions, to bring it in 
next morning, who, accordingly, brought 
plenty ; which being delivered and put 
in bags, the messengers took leave of the 
king, who kindly ordered some of the 
Indians to carry their bags for them to 
their canoes." 

"Instances of their" (the settlers') 
" wants are many, and the supplies some- 
times unexpected; the family of John 
Hollinshead, who lived near Rankokas, 
being unprovided with powder and shot, 
were in distress, when Hollinshead, the 
younger, then a lad about thirteen, going 
through a corn-field, saw a turkey; throw- 
ing a stick to kill it, another came in 
sight ; he killed both and carried them 



home: Soon after, at the house of 
Thomas Eves, he saw a buck, and telling 
Eves, he set his dogs, who followed it to 
Rankokas River, then frozen ; the buck 
running on the ice, slid upon his side ; . 
the dogs seized it ; Hollinshead, coming 
up witli a .knife, eagerly jumped upon 
it ; the buck rose with him on his back 
and sprung forward," (when) " his feet 
spreading asunder," (he)"slip'd gently 
down on his belly, and gave Hollins- 
head a respite from danger and oppor- 
tunity of killing him. By these means 
two families were supplied with food, to 
their great joy." 

The assembly of West Jersey met 
again this year; among the members 
were John Smith, from Salem, and Mark 
Newby and William Cooper, from the 
third tenth, chilled the Irish tenth, from 
being chiefly settled by Quakers from 
Ireland. 

William Cooper, who was an ancestor 
in the maternal line of one branch of our 
family, removed from Cpleshill, Hert- 
fordshire, to the colony, in 1678. In 
1680 he located a tract in the " town 
bound " lands of Burlington, and in this 
year, (1682,) is returned as the owner of 
three hundred acres at Pine Point, (now 
(hooper's Point,) opposite the future City 

59 



60 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



of Philadelphia. The names of this 
point, of Cooper Street, Camden, and of 
Cooper's Creek, preserve his memory to 
this day. The Indians had a regular ferry, 
in canoes, between Arasapha, a village 
on his land, and Shackamaxon opposite ; 
and this ferriage was continued in sail- 
boats, by the Coopers and their neighbors, 
the Kaighns, at Kaighn's Point, thus, 
without doubt, originating the prosperity 
of the thriving suburb of Camden. 

The members of the West Jersey 
Assembly had hitherto been chosen by 
the electors from all the tenths indis- 
criminately ; but this assembly declared 
it their judgment, and that of those they 
represented, that the most regular method 
" for preserving the liberty and property 
of the people by a free assembly, was, 
that such of the ten proprieties as were 
now peopled, should each chuse ten rep- 
resentatives, (and the others also as they 
became peopled.)" They resolved, also, 
that the quorum should consist of twenty- 
four members, including the speaker; 
and chose the council, justices, land- 
commissioners and other officers. 

This assembly enacted the curious law 
that " for the more convenient payment 
of small sums of money, Mark Newby's 
coppers, called Patrick'^s half-pencey^ 
should pass as current money ; these 
were Irish half-pence, a parcel of which 
Newby had brought with him. The 
only "small change" current hitherto 
had been the Indian wampum. 

They directed two hundred pounds to 
be raised to defray the charges of gov- 



ernment, and collected in proportionate 
quotas from the several " tenths." 

The representatives of West Jei*sey 
continued to be annually chosen, until 
the surrender of the proprietary govern- 
ment, in 1702. All the officers of gov- 
ernment were chosen by them, except 
the governor, who was appointed by the 
proprietors, until the succeeding year, 
(1683,) " when the assembly, under- 
standing that Byllinge, 'for some selfish 
reasons, inclined to turn Jenings out, who 
had hitherto been deputy-governor, to 
the general satisfaction of the governed — 
they undertook, by their choice, to con- 
tinue him governor of the province, pre- 
tending " (claiming) " a right to do this, 
because, in the constitutions, power was 
given to six parts in seven of the assem- 
bly, to make such alterations for the 
publick good, (the laws of liberty of 
conscience, of property, of yearly assem- 
blies, of juries and of evidence, excepted), 
as they found necessary ; and that no 
advantage might be taken of such judi- 
cial proceedings, as had not been exactly 
agreeable to the concessions, they con- 
firmed and ratified them all." 

" There being doubts started, whether 
the government of West New Jersey had 
been granted with the soil, and reports 
industriously spread up and down the 
province, as well as in England, to the 
prejudice of the possessors' title, as they 
thought; the assembly, in the spring, 
this year," (1683,) "thought it their 
business to obviate this and other points, 
by unanimously resolving, as to the first, 



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ARMS OF MATERNAL ANCESTORS OF BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



61 



* That the land and government of West 
New Jersey were purchased together;' 
And that as to the question, * Whether 
the concessions agreed upon by the pro- 
prietors and people, and subscribed in 
London and West Jersey, were agreed 
upon to be the fundamentals and ground 
of the government of West Jersey, or 
not?' Resolved in the affirmative, ne- 
mi fie contrcuUcente : only John Fen wick 
excepted his tenth, which he said, at that 
time, was not under the same circum- 
stances ; but now freely consenteth 
thereto." 

Jenings was, at this assembly, chosen 
governor; having, hitherto, acted as 
deputy only, of and for Byllinge, gov- 
ernor-elect of the English proprietaries. 
The commissioners and other officers of 
government being also chosen, were duly 
qualified ; and the assembly having 
agreed that the governor should also be 
their chairman or speaker, tlint he should 
sit as a member with them, and have a 
double vote, and that the council also 
should sit and vote with them, proceeded 
to pass sundry laws. 

In this year, there arrived at Philadel- 
phia, a gentleman, who, as an ancestor 
in the maternal line of the Smiths of 
Burlington, demands our attention. This 
was Thomas Lloyd, first governor of 
Pennsylvania, the intimate friend of the 
proprietary William Penn, who had 
come over the previous year. 

He was a younger son of Charles 
Lloyd, Esquire, of Dolobran Hall, Mont- 
gomeryshire, in the commission of the 



peace for that county, and grandson of 
John Lloyd, Esquire, of Dolobran, also 
in the commission of the peace, a gentle- 
man " of the old school," who " lived in 
great state, having twenty-four men with 
halberts, his tenants, to attend him to 
Mi void Church, where he placed them 
in his great pew under the pulpit." 
Thomas Lloyd's mother was Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Stanley, Esquire, 
of Knuckyn, " son of Sir Edward Stan- 
ley, son of Sir Foulk Stanley, son of Sir 
Piers Stanley, son of Sir Rowland 
Stanley, brother of Lord Strange, of 
Knuckyn,* a branch of the Derby 
family." (Burke's "History of the 
Landed Gentrv of Great Britain.") 

The Lloyd family is one of the most 
ancient in Great Britain, and descends 
from the early independent Princes of 
Dyfed or Dimetia, and Powys. The 
descent of John Lloyd is deduced by 
Burke, in twenty-eight successive gene- 
rations, from Miric or Meirig, of Dolo- 
bran, a noble under the British King 
Arthur, who was one of the four knights 
who bore the four golden swords before 
that chieftain, at the great festival at 
Caerleon, when he was crowned king, in 
the year of our Lord 517. I have my- 
self seen, near Llangollen, Wales, the 
pillar or monument of Eliseg, an ances- 
tor of the Lloyds, who lived at a period 
when the Romans still ruled part of 
Great Britain. (See " The Lloyd Fami- 
ly," by Charles Perrin Smith). 



♦ Son of the first Earl of Derby. 



62 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



Thomas Lloyd was born at Dolobran 
Hall, in 1640. He and his elder brother, 
Charles, (the heir of the estates, who 
has been mentioned before as much per- 
secuted on account of his becoming a 
Quaker,) were educated at Oxford Uni- 
versity, and distinguished themselves by 
superior ability and learning. Becoming 
convinced of the truth of the doctrines 
of Fox and his asso(*iates, the brothers 
joined themselves, about the year 1662, 
to the " Society of Friends," and became 
highly useful and eminent members 
thereof. In 1665, Thomas Lloyd mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of Gilbert Jones, 
of Welshpool. They were the parents 
of ten children, all, except the youngest, 
born at the ancient Hall of Dolobran. 
In 1683, iis already stated, Thomas 
Lloyd emigrated to Pennsylvania ; the 
next ye<ir he was appointed President of 
the Council, which office he held till 
1691, when he received the commission 
of governor of the province. In 1693, 
the Crown having resumed to itself the 
paramount authority originally granted 
to Penn, Governor Lloyd was sui)ei*se(led 
by a governor sent out from England, 
and died in the next year, 1694, in the 
fifty-fifth year of his age, universally 
honored and lamented. 

In 1684, " the assemblv of West Jer- 
sey at their meeting, the 20th of the 
third month," '* chose Thomas Olive 
governor, and chairman or speaker ; in 
both which capacities the governor now 
acted ; the several branches of the legis- 
lature we have seen doing their business 



in common together ; the people's choice 
the foundation of the whole — whose rep- 
resentatives were distinctly returned from 
their first, second, third and Salem 
tenths, (which were all the tenths yet 
settled)." 

We have also observed that the assem- 
bly chose the governor as well as all the 
minor officers of government, at their 
fii'st meeting. 

Olive continued governor until 1685, 
when Byllinge, "having desisted from 
the claims which the assembly and their 
constituents had thought unjust, and 
which had been the cause of their under- 
taking, in opposition to him, to choose the 
governor, and he, in this year, sending a 
fresh commission to John Skeine to be 
his deputy, the assembly and people sub- 
mitted to him, though they had before 
refused William Welsh in that capacity, 
while Byllinge continued the claims 
aforesaid." 

In 1685, another collateral ancestor of 
our family, Samuel Bacon, appears in 
the history of the province, having been 
appointed in that year, a justice of the 
peace for Salem tenth.* Some years 
before, he had purchased lands on the 
Cohansey River, near where Greenwich 
now stands, from the Indian sachems 
there ; these lands, forming a j)eninsula 
between the Cohansey and Delaware 
Rivers, have ever since l^een known as 
" Bacon's Neck." The tradition in the 
family rujjs, that he was one of three 



* lie was also a member of assembly in this year. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



63 



brothers who came originally to Barn- 
stable, Massachusetts ; one remaining and 
founding a family there, while the others 
left that town and came to New Jersey. 
This is borne out by the "Annals of 
Barnstable," which, atler an account of 
"Mr. Nathaniel Bacon," who held several 
important public offices in the early his- 
tory of that town, and founded a family 
there, and the note that "Mr. Samuel 
Bacon takes the oath of fidelity, 1657," 
adds, " Mr. Bacon had a grant of land 
in this town in 1662, and has been 
thought a brother of Mr. Nathaniel and 
Elizabeth who were early here. Mr. 
Samuel Bacon married Martha Foxwell, 
May 9th, 1660, and had Samuel, March 
9th, 1670, and Martha, 1671 ; but at 
what time he came, or when or how the 
family duappeared from town, is a ques- 
tion yet to be settled." 

It is supposed that the three brothei-s, 
Nathaniel, Samuel and John, were sons 
of a Nathaniel Bacon, who was a mem- 
ber of the Long Parliament, and was 
banished under Charles II., for writing 
a book against the established church. 
The Puritanism of the father would natu- 
rally account for the sons being of that 
sect, and coming to America with the 
Puritans. The elder Nathaniel, who 
died in 1660, was a son of Sir Nathaniel 
and a grandson of Sir Nicholas Bacon, 
lord-keeper to Queen Elizabeth : and 
was, therefore, a nephew of the great Sir 
Francis Bacon. The arms granted to 
the family by the Herald's College, Lon- 
don, are those of Sir Nicholas and Sir 



Francis. John, who seems to have been 
considerably younger than Samuel, mar- 
ried, in 1688, a daughter of the Hon. 
John Smith, of Salem, and was a justice 
of the peace for Salem in the years 1696, 
1697, 1699, 1700 and 1701.* His 
daughter married a son of Daniel Smith, 
of Bramham. 

To return again to New Jersey politics 
from 1685 to 1687 ; in the latter year, 
both the old proprietor, Edward By Hinge, 
and his deputy, John Skeine, died. Dr. 
Daniel Coxe, of London, who was already 
a large proprietor, on Byllinge's death, 
purchased his interest from his heirs, 
and thus representing the majority of 
shares held in England, wa? elected gov- 
ernor by the English proprietors. He 
appointed Edward Hunloke his deputy 
governor, which apix)intment being un- 
objectionable, w^s quietly submitted to 
by the West Jersey Assembly. But, 
about 1690, Coxe having sent a commis- 
sion to John Tatham to act as deputy 
governor, and the latter being a Jacobite, 
he was, on this account, rejected by the 
assembly, who were loyal to the reigning 
house. 

In 1691, Coxe and those remaining of 
the original proprietors in England, sold 
out to a new company, styled "The 
West Jersey Society," of which Sir 
Thomas Lane, Knight, and alderman of 
London, was the principal and leading 



* He was, also, a justice of the quorum for Salem 
County. Judge Bacou owned property also at Ches- 
terfield, Burlington County, where he some time re- 
sided, and is styled, " of Chesterfield," in the certifi- 
cate of his second marriage. 



64 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



member. These new proprietors sent a 
commission, in 1692, to Andrew Hamil- 
ton, as governor. He was accepted by 
the assembly, and continued governor of 
West Jersev " while it remained under 
the proprietary jurisdiction, though with 
some interruption in 1698, being, also, 
some part of the time, governor of East 
Jersey and Pennsylvania." 

The year 1691, which was marked by 
the acquisition of the unsettled tenths of 
West Jersey by this new society, was 
that also in which three of the sons of 
Richard Smith, of Bramham, (following 
the steps of their elder brother, John, 
who, fourteen years before, had crossed 
the ocean for the purpose of having the 
family lands surveyed and "located,") 
arrived in America. These were, Daniel, 
Joseph and Emanuel, and they were 
accompanied by their sister Deborah, 
who died soon after her arrival. Samuel 
followed them in 1694. They left at 
home, with their mother, their youngest 
brother, Richard, a boy of seventeen, 
who, eight years afterward, rejoined them 
in the New World. John having returned 
for the second time to England, accom- 
panied this youngest brother in his 
voyage, but died before its termination. 
His property was, no doubt, divided 
among his surviving brothers, of whom 
the eldest, Daniel, having married Mary 
Murfin, in 1695, erected, upon John's 
" town lot," a fine mansion for the period, 
which still remains, though long since 
divided into two substantial houses. 

Of its appearance in 1788, Joseph 



Sansom has left us the following sketch : 
" The house he " (Daniel Smith) " built 
within a few years after his arrival in 
America, in which my grandmother was 
born, is now standing in Burlington, a 
curious specimen of the taste and contri- 
vance of those times. There is a tradi- 
tion in the family that his wife, who is 
said to have been a very notable woman, 
took the opportunity of her husband's 
frequent absence when attending the 
assembly, at Amboy, where it was alter- 
nately held, to make several alterations 
in the building. 

"A broad carriage-way takes up a 
great part of the first story, and a great 
fire-place and light " (lighted) " closets, 
as large a proportion of the big parlour. 
In the back part of the buildhig, the 
flues of the chimneys rising from both 
sides and uniting in one prodigious stack 
over the entry, which is arched to sup- 
port it, form a capacious smoke-house. 
This, it is said, was formerly used by the 
neighbourhood many miles round, for 
the curing of their winter stores, and at 
present it is no less remarkable for its 
furnishing great numbers of swallows 
with a summer residence. At their first 
coming in the spring, they gather here 
in flocks, to compare notes and pair 
themselves for the season. They soon 
after separate and spread over the coun- 
try in search of suitable places for build- 
ing. In the fall, when they have fledged 
their young, and are preparing to avoid 
our rugged winters by going off to some 
warmer climate, they assemble here again. 



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A FAMILY HISTORY. 



65 



as if to t^ke their leave, and conclude 
upon the coui*se of their journey. Of a 
mild evening from sunset to dusk, hun- 
dreds of them are often seen sailing 
round the mouth of this chimney before 
they return into it for the night." 

From the late venerable George R. 
Smith, who was born in this mansion, 1 
learned that the carriage arched-way ran 
parallel with and adjoining the main 
hall, allowing guests to descend from 
their carriages at the back hall door 
under shelter ; the carriages then passed 
out through the arch at the back of the 
house to the coach-house in the rear. 
The second-story extended over this car- 
riage-way, which was within the side- 
wall; beyond this carriage-passage and 
outside the side-w^all of the house, there 
was a business office, used in the next 
two generations for the business of a 
justice of the peace and a law-writer or 
conveyancer. In the attempted restora- 
tion of the ancient appearance of this 
house, I have copied the still existing 
office of Robert Hartshorne as probably 
resembling this side-office, and have re- 
produced the old-fashioned "stoop" or 
" pent-house," features which have long 
disappeared. When at the partially- 
destroyed Dolobran Hall, in Wales, some 
years ago, I sketched a chimney-stack, 
the only outside feature of that hall 
remaining unchanged; this stack was 
apparently similar to that above described. 

It is not known what, if any, business 
was pursued by Daniel Smith ; his income 
from real estate must have been consider- 
9 



able. As his father, son (Robert) and 
grandson (Daniel) possessed a knowl- 
edge of the law, it seems probable that 
the law business connected with (at least) 
his own real estate, was transacted by 
him in this side-office. The house con- 
tinued in the family during four genera- 
tions. 

Daniel Smith sat several yeai*s in the 
assembly of West Jersey for the City of 
Burlington; in one year, 171G, he and 
his brother Samuel were, together, its sole 
representiitives. 

His *' benevolent and exemplary con- 
duct in the various relations of private 
life, is well known where he formerly 
dwelt," " so true is the record of tradi- 
tion to the memory of those endeared 
virtues, that w^ere once active in diffiising 
the blessings of piety and good-will 
throughout the circle of their influence," 
says a biographer of the last century.* 
" He several times represented the City 
of Burlington in assembly, and was an 
Elder in good estimation in the religious 
society of which he was a member, many 
years before his decease, in 1742." 

" Mary Smith was a woman of very 
good natural parts, but little improved 
by school-learning ;" (it will be remem- 
bered that she came over as a young 
child to the settlement,) " yet she wrote 
well for the times, and spoke the Indian 
language fluently. She was serviceable 
and exemplary to the church in the 
ministerial capacity, being freely devoted 



* J. Sansom. 



66 



THE BURMNGTON SMITHS. 



' -' ..-..^■u..— .... 



JA. 



to the honour of God and the good of 
her fellow-creatures. In the year 1728, 
she visited the southern parts of this 
continent, in company with the late 
Margaret Preston, in the love of the 
Gospel." 

From the record of deceased ministers 
and elders of Burlington Meeting, is 
taken the following note : ** Mary Smith, 
wife and widow of Daniel Smith, of Bur- 
lington, was, several years before her de- 
cease, confined with indisposition of body, 
which she was supported to bear with 
much resignation to the Divine Will : 
A few days before her departure, a rela- 
tive going to see her, found her in a 
lively frame of mind, and her senses 
quick and strong, though she was ex- 
tremely weak in body. She told him 
that, with submission to the Divine Will, 
she earnestly desired a removal to a better 
world ; that in this the time of her great 
distress, she found Divine Goodness near, 
the same which had visited her in her 
youthful days, and it was now her sup- 
port ; that though works were not meri- 
torious, yet she found it very comfortable 
to remember that she had led a virtuous 
and religious life, and now she felt nothing 
in her way. With many more very reli- 
gious and sensible expressions. She died 
the 12th of the fifth month, 1746," aged 
seventy-two years. 

The brothers, Daniel and Samuel 
Smith, of Bramham, appear to have 
joined the mercantile company of nine 
persons, mentioned in the letter of 
Mahlon Stacy, before quoted. Two sons 



of Daniel Smith went out to the West 
Indies in the vessels of that company, 
and the trade afterwards fell chiefly into 
the hands of Kichard Smith, (fourth,) 
son of Samuel Smith, of Bramham. To 
one of her sons about to leave on this 
southern voyage, Mary Murfin Smith 
addressed the following letter: (Ad- 
dressed, " For Benjamin Smith, in 
Burlington, in West Jersey, these with 
care :" and dated from " Magaty Bay, in 
Virginia, the 2d of the eight month, 
1728.") 

" My dear Child : — It being some- 
what uncertain whether I may get home 
before thou goest abroad, if it should 
happen that thou go this fall of the year, 
therefore I take this opportunity to salute 
thee with these few lines, desiring thy 
prosperity and welfare every way. 

"My tender advice to thee is, that 
thou often think of thy Creator in the 
days of thy youth. Live in pure 
humility, desiring to be acquainted with 
God, and love His teachings, and in His 
own time He will more clearly make 
known to thee what is His will, and 
enable thee to come up in the true per- 
formance of thy duty to Him. If thy 
whole trust and reliance be continually 
upon the Lord, thou needst not fear but 
He will be thy Great Preserver. 

" Puzzle not thy thoughts with myste- 
ries too high or too deep ; for when God 
is pleased to reveal His secrets to us, He 
will do it in His own time, and in His 
own way. Let us patiently wait and 



A FAMILY HISTOEY. 



67 



quietly hope, and His preserving hand 
will be near in every needful time. 

" Thus He hath been to me, and I am 
well assured so He will be to thee. Ex- 
perience hath brought me to speak of 
the goodness of God, and of His pre- 
serving hand. When troubles and exer- 
cises are suffered to come, let us be still 
and quiet till the storm be over, and He 
will say, it is enough. Then joyful 
hymns and thanksgiving will rise and 
come before God with acceptance. A 
sacrifice which will be well pleasing in 
His sight. 

** So, my dear child, I do recommend 
thee, with my own soul, to God Almighty 
and to His keeping. And now I rest 
thy tender and loving mother, 

" M. S." 

Daniel Smith, of Bramham, was twen- 
ty-six years of age when he landed in 
New Jersey, in 1691. He was accom- 
panied by his younger brothers, Joseph, 
aged twenty-five, and Emanuel, a youth 
of twenty-one years of age. Of these, 
Joseph married Catharine Lynch, by 
whom he had one son, also named Joseph, 
who died unmarried. By this event, his 
line became extinct. The elder Joseph 
Smith died in 1730. Emanuel* married 
Mary Willis, a member of the Church 
of England, and left descendants ; of his 



* Emanuel or "Manuel" Smith married Mary, 
daughter of George Willis, a church-warden of St. 
Mary's Church, and. becoming a member of that 
church, was himself elected church-warden in the years 
1713, 1714 and 1715. The title to the church grounds 
is in part derived by deed from Dr. Jonathan Smith. 



line, I have only been able to procure an 
imperfect account, which I hope to sup- 
plement in a future edition. He died in 
1720. Of Samuel, who followed in 
1694, J. Sansom says : " Samuel Smith, 
sometime member of assembly for the 
City of Burlington, and much respected 
in his public capacity as a man of prin- 
ciple and conduct, was of a mild and 
benevolent disposition, rather inclined to 
retirement, yet no stranger either to the 
duties or the pleasures of society; and 
his early decease, in 1718, was much 
regretted." The " History of New Jer- 
sey," gives a short notice of him, as 
follows: "In 1718, died Samuel Smith, 
one of the members of assembly for 
Burlington ; he had sought happiness in 
the quiets of obscurity, but being, against 
his inclination, called to this and other 
publick stations, he passed through them 
with a clear reputation." Of him, more 
hereafter. 

Richard Smith, third, the youngest of 
the Bramham brethren, followed the 
others eight years later, in 1699, being 
then twenty-five years of age. He was, 
by profession, a Doctor of Medicine. 
Dr. Richard Smith married Anne Mar- 
shall, and left numerous descendants. 
He was, early in the eighteenth century, 
appointed, by mandamus from the King, 
one of " His Majesty's Council for New 
Jersey," in which office he continued for 
twelve years. (Of this body and its 
relations with the assembly, more here- 
after.) Dr. Richard Smith died in 1750, 
at the age of sixty-six. 



68 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS, 



The family profession, in the lines 
both of Daniel and of Samuel Smith, 
was, for several generations, that of the 
law. To this they added the various 
occupations of extensive land-holders, 
farming, mining, milling, the surveying, 
clearing and opening by roads, of their 
many miles of woodland property. But 
for the activities of the more enterpris- 
ing and of the younger branches, there 
was also found scope in the thriving 
trade then carried on from Burlington to 
the West Indies. As time went on, and 
land was cleared and sold off, we find 
some of the lines of their descendants 
more exclusively interested in law and 
land-titles, or engaged in farming, while 
some branches of Samuel's descendants 
pushing energetically their AVest India 
commerce, became wealthy merchants. 
Richard was, himself, a doctor, but the 
occupations of his descendants varied 



between the learned professions and mer- 
cantile pursuits, similarly to those of his 
brothers' lines. 

The history of New Jersey as a pro- 
vince, being identified with that of its 
representative assembly, of which the 
brothers Smith were many years mem- 
bers, I shall give a short sketch of that 
history under the proprietary govern- 
ment and under that of the Crown, 
and for this purpose go back to the year 
1691, the date of the arrival of the 
brothei-s, at which point began this 
anticipatory digression to carry on their 
private story. It will be seen that this 
public history presents a very different 
picture from the ideal of inoffensive 
quiet so ardently pursued by the 
innocent and peaceable refugees from 
religious persecution, who principally 
owned and peoi)led New Jersey at this 
period. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



A PERIOD OF DISTURBANCE. A PRELUDE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



A MORE kindly, honest and law- 
abiding population perhaps never 
existed, than the Quaker inhabitants of 
the provinces of East and West Jersey, 
at this early period. Yet they possessed 
all the native manliness, love of freedom 
and hardihood in defending it, of genuine 
Anglo-Saxons, notwithstanding their 
peaceable religious tenets, as their stub- 
born contest for proprietary and popular 
rights, against the encroachments of the 
Crown, sufficiently shows. 

In these encroachments, the monarchs 
themselves were generally less to blame 
than their ministers ; the " good Queen " 
Anne, repeatedly reversed, on the peti- 
tion of the settlers, the oppressive meas- 
ures of her courtiers, and even George 
III., though his ill-guided obstinacy 
eventually lost America, was personally 
most kindly-intentioned toward her, and 
with better counsel and a wiser estimate 
of the times and men he had to deal 
with, might have preserved to England 
her magnificent Western empire. 

We have seen that Dr. Coxe, of Lon- 
don, representative of the interests of 
Edward Byllinge, the original proprietor 
under the Duke of York, together with 
such other proprietors as still remained 
in England, transferred his and their 



rights, to and in the government and 
territory of West Jersey, in 1691, to a 
mercantile company called "The West 
Jersey Society," of which company. Sir 
Thomas Lane, Knight and Alderman, as 
the purchaser of Coxe's shares, continued 
to be the most powerful member. 

It will also be remembered that Byl- 
linge and his successoi's conceived the 
right of nominating the governor of the 
province to continue to reside in them, 
while the resident proprietors in West 
Jersey, representing, in property, the 
four most valuable tenths of the territory, 
and being, in number, a large majority 
of the whole number of property-holders, 
very justly considered that Byllinge had 
transferred the rights of government 
with the soil, and that the nomination of 
the governor devolved, by the constitu- 
tion, upon the numerical majority of 
proprietors as represented in assem- 
bly. Nevertheless, partly through love 
of England, partly through love of quiet 
and a desire to avoid political agitation 
in the colony, they waived their right 
and acquiesced in the appointments made 
in the mother country, and received and 
submitted to the governors sent thence, 
when these were tolerable. Some that 
were disaflfected to the reigning family or 

69 



70 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



otherwise unsuitable, they exercised their 
right of rejecting. 

This moderation and pliability of the 
settler-proprietors, must exonerate them 
from all suspicion of factiousness or ob- 
stinacy in the contests afterward arising. 

In the spring of 1692, the new Eng- 
lish proprietors sent their commission to 
Colonel Andrew Hamilton, as governor, 
to take the place of Tatham, appointed 
by Coxe, and rejected by the assembly 
for being a Jacobite. Hamilton being 
accepted by the assembly, continued 
governor of both the Jerseys and also of 
Pennsylvania, for several years. 

The rule of Colonel Hamilton appears 
to have been highly satisfactory to the 
proprietors and settlers for the next six 
years, and his being, at the same time, 
chief executive of both the divisions of 
New Jersev, familiarized the minds of 
the people with the idea of an union 
between the two provinces, an union 
which was soon actually to take place. 

In 1698, a majority of the English 
proprietors — not representing, however, 
a majority of the whole number of shares, 
including those held in America — com- 
missioned Jeremiah Bass to supersede 
Colonel Hamilton in the government of 
East Jersey. Bass gave out that he had 
King William III/s approbation of this 
commission ; " but in the next year it 
appeared that Bass had not obtained the 
king's approbation of his commission, 
nor was it granted by enough of the pro- 
prietors to make it valid, which induced 
great numbers of the inhabitants to 



refuse obedience to him, and to the 
magistrates and officers by him appointed ; 
some persons being imprisoned for refus- 
ing obedience, it was resented by others 
with great indignation, and feuds and 
confusion followed." (East Jersey con- 
tained but a small proportion of Qua- 
kers.) "To accommodate matters for 
the present, Andrew Hamilton was again 
appointed governor, by a fresh commis- 
sion from some of the proprietors; but 
a great number refused obedience to him, 
and the magistrates and officers under 
him, in like manner, and for the same 
reasons as they had refused Bass and 
those he appointed. The disorders in 
the Eastern division at this time made 
such an impression on the minds of 
many of the people, that they readily 
hearkened to overtures made for a sur- 
render of government. A considerable 
part of West Jersey was, also, for similar 
reasons, disposed to a resignation. The 
commotions in both, which had been 
increasing for some years, now seemed 
to be got to a crisis, and all things tended 
to a surrender of the powere of govern- 
ment, which was at length brought about 
in the beginning of" (1702, April 15th.) 
Before proceeding with our sketch of 
provincial history, farther than the end 
of the seventeenth century, it will be 
necessary, once more, to digress into the 
parallel history of the family, in order 
to notice the arrival, in company with 
the founder of Pennsylvania, at his 
second visit to his province, in 1699, of 
a collateral ancestor, James Logan, after- 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



71 



ward for many years Chief Justice and 
President of Council of Pennsylvania. 

This distinguished statesman and man 
of letters was of a good but impoverished 
Scottish family. His ancestors, by the 
father's side, had been, for many centu- 
ries, lairds or "Barons" of Restalrig, a 
fine estate and village near Edinburgh ; 
they owned also, among other estates, 
Fast Castle, a celebrated stronghold on 
the German Ocean, which was taken by 
Sir Walter Scott as the model for his de- 
scription of the Castle of Ravenswood, in 
the " Bride of Lammermoor." The 
founder of the family was Sir John 
Logan or Loggan, an English general, 
who, in the early reign of King William 
the Lion, of Scotland, had the good for- 
tune to capture that monarch when lead- 
ing an incursion into England. The 
king was held to ransom, and gave his 
captor an estate in Scotland, on condition 
of his fixing his residence there. Later, 
we find Sir Robert and Sir Walter 
Logan, of the same line, intimate friends 
of the heroic Bruce, and members of the 
small party of his nearest friends and 
relatives, led by Lord James of Douglas, 
who were intrusted by the dying hero 
with the task of conveying his heart to 
Palestine. In the battle in Spain in 
which nearly all this party were cut off, 
the Logans were among the slain, and 
their family received on this account, the 
augmentation of the bloody heart, pierced 
by three passion-nails, emblematic of the 
sufferings of Christ, in their arms. King 
Robert II. (Robert Stuart, grandson of 



Robert Bruce by the mother's side), gave 
his daughter Margaret in marriage to a 
subsequent Logan of Restalrig, endow- 
ing her with the lands of Grugar, and 
styling her husband, in the instrument, 
" militi dilecto, fratri suo," " the beloved 
knight, his " (the king's) " brother." The 
line afterward intermarried with the Som- 
ervilles, of Cowthally, and other good 
families, but a false accusation of com- 
plicity with the mysterious Gowrie plot, 
in the reign of James VI., caused it to 
be attainted of treason. The informer 
was afterwards executed for perjury, but 
not till the lifeless remains of Restalrig* 
had been insulted, his estiites confiscated 
and distributed among corrupt court 
favorites, and his infant sons exiled to 
Ireland. One of them afterward returned 
and founded the family of Logan of that 
ilk, a younger son of which, the Reverend 
Patrick I^gan, Master of Arts in Ghis- 
gow University, was father to James 
Logan. Of his maternal ancestry, we 
have these notes by himself: " My mother 
was Isabel Hume, daughter of James 
Hume, a younger brother of the house of 
St. Leonards, in the south of Scotland. 
He was manager of the estiite of the 
Earl of Murray, who owed but never 
paid him £1500 sterling, though the 
said earl lodged for some years in his 



* The intense loyalty of Sir W. Scott, caused him 
to be bitterly prejudiced aj^ainst all those even sus- 
pected of plotting against the king, but unbiased 
authorities represent the last Sir Robert Logan, of 
Restalrig, as a genial, hospitable *' gentleman of the 
olden time," and the latest critics, such as (Chambers 
and Wilson, acijuit him of all complicity in the alleged 
plot of Gowrie. 



72 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



house in the Shire of Fife. My grand- 
mother before she married was Bethia 
Dundas, sister of the Laird of Dundas, 
of Didiston, about eight miles west of 
Edinburgh, a fine seat. And the Earl 
of Murray assisted my grandfather in 
carrying off my grandmother ;* she was 
nearly related to the Earl of Panmure, 

etc."t 

Patrick Logan was chaplain to Lord 

Belhaven, of Stenton, but becoming a 
Quaker, lost all prospect of advancement 
in the church. After some time spent 
in Ireland, where James was born, his 
parents returned to Scotland, and finally 
removed to London, where Patrick Logan 
became master of the Latin school of the 
Quakers. Here the fine talents of young 
James, who at twenty-two was master of 
the Latin, Greek, Hebrew, French, Span- 
ish and Italian languages, as well as a 
profound scholar in mathematics and the 
"humanities," attracted the attention of 
William Penn, and, after a few years, 
during which young Logan had em- 
barked in business as a shipping mer- 
chant, Penn offered him the employment 
of his secretary. After due consideration 
the offer was accepted, and Logan sailed 
with Penn, in 1699, to the province, 
where the highest public employments 
occupied his energies for many years. 
He accumulated a fine fortune in his 
private business, and retired to his noble 
country-seat of Stenton, near Philadel- 



* It was a '• runaway " match 1 
t She was a granddaughter, on her mother's side, of 
the first Earl of Panmure. 



phia, whose ancient groves and antique 
walls still form a picture of the past in 
our day. He was, on the side of his 
cultivated intellect, the familiar associate 
of the first philosophers of the period, 
while his kind heart made him the friend 
of the poor savage, and, after " Onas," 
(Penn,) the simple-hearted Indians had 
no more faithful, no more powerful pro- 
tector than he. 

Chief Justice Logan married Sarah, 
daughter of the Honorable Charles 
Read, of the Pennsylvania Assembly, 
and by her had several children; among 
others, Hannah, wife of the Honorable 
John Smith, of whom hereafter. 

The beginning of the eighteenth cen- 
tury found the minds of proprietors 
and people, both in England and in New 
Jersey, prepared for the resumption by 
the CVown, of the powers of government 
originally delegated by it to the propri- 
etors. The resumption was effected by a 
legal document, dated April 15th, 1702, 
in which the English proprietors and a 
few American proprietors (among whose 
names we find that of Lewis Morria), 
surrender the rights of government to 
Queen Anne, William III. being now 
deceased. On the 17tli, the Queen, in 
full court, accepted the surrender, and 
directly afterward appointed her cousin, 
Edward Hyde, Lord Viscount Com bury, 
grandson to the great Chancellor Claren- 
don, Governor of New Jersey. In his 
commission he is enjoined to administer 
the oaths " appointed by act of parliament 
to be taken instead of the oath of al- 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



73 



legiance and supremacy," to the coun- 
cil, who are, in turn, to administer the 
same oaths to him. On vacancies occur- 
ring in the council, the Crown fills them, 
but the governor has power to supply 
them temporarily, while awaiting the 
new appointments of the Crown. The 
council, which was formerly api)ointed 
by the assembly, is now made an upper 
house, a sort of house of lords or senate, 
independent of the assembly, and de- 
pendent directly upon the Crown, and 
having power to pass upon, reject or ac- 
cept laws, but not originate them, the ' 
originating power being still confined to 
the representatives of the people.^ 

A property qualification was estab- 
lished, both for voting in the election of 
members of assembly, and for the mem- 
bers themselves. No person was allowed 
to vote in the election of members of 
assembly but such as possessed at least 
one hundred acres of land or £50 of capi- 
tal. And no one could represent the 
people as a member, in assembly, who 
did not possess at least one thousand acres 
of land or £500 of capital. The assem- 
bly was to consist of twenty-four mem- 
bers, two to be elected by the household- 
ers of Burlington, and two by those of 
Perth Amboy, in East Jei-sey, ten by the 
freeholders of East, and ten by those of ' 
West Jersey. 

The council was to consist of twelve 
members, one-half from each division of 
the province, to be appointed by the 
Crown from the nominations of the gov- 
ernor. From these and other provisions 

' 1 



it is manifest that the council was likely 
to be a body rather devoted to the inter- 
ests of the Crown than to those of the 
people, when these interests should be 
separate or conflicting; also, that too 
much power was given to the governor. 
It was soon found that there was no re- 
dress from tyranny on the part of the 
governor, except through direct appeal 
to the sovereign ; and that the coun- 
cil early resolved itself into a mere 
clique of tools of the chief executive. 
By its energy and devotion, however, the 
assembly succeeded both in establishing 
a check upon the despotism of the gov- 
ernor, and in expurgating and recon- 
structing the council. 

On this first Royal Council we find the 
names of Samuel Jenings and I^wis 
Morris ; the first, doubtless appointed to 
conciliate the great mass of unrepresented 
proprietors in West Jersey, and the lat- 
ter as a similar gratification to those in 
East Jersey : Lewis Morris was an ac- 
tive, incorruptible and patriotic repre- 
sentative of the proprietors and people of 
that section, and we have seen him as 
one of the signers of the surrender. 
Satnuel Jenings, our family connection 
and the first governor of West Jersey, 
was incapacitated, as a Quaker, from tak- 
ing the oaths, and his appointment was, 
therefore, a dead letter ; Morris, though 
not thus incapacitated, was a mere 
cipher amidst the clique of politicians 
who formed the majority in the council. 

The royal instructions trenched heavily 
upon the privileges formerly guaranteed 



74 



THE BtTRLINGTON 6MITHS. 



to and enjoyed by the people of the Jer- 
seys ; for example, a State-church was at 
once set up and made part of the Eng- 
lish establishment, in these paragraphs : 
" You shall take especial care that God 
Almiglity be devoutly and duly served 
throughout your government, the book 
of common prayer, as by law established, 
read each Sunday and holy-day, and the 
blessed sacrament administered according 
to the rites of the Church of England. 

" You shall be careful that the churches 
already built there, be well and orderly 
kept, and that more be built, as the 
colony shall, by God's blessing, be im- 
proved ; and that besides a competent 
maintenance to be assigned to the min- 
ister of each orthodox church, a conve- 
nient house be built at the common 
charge for each minister, and a compe- 
tent proportion of land assigned him for 
a glebe and exercise of his industry. 

"And you are to take care that the 
parishes be so limited and settled, as you 
shall find most convenient, for the accom- 
plishing this good work. 

" You are not to prefer any minister 
to any ecclesiastical benefice in that our 
province, without a certificate from the 
right reverend father in God, the Lord 
Bishop of London, of his being con- 
formable to the doctrine and discipline of 
the Church of England, and of a good 
life and conversation." 

4: 4: sit 4: H< He 

"And to the end the ecclesiastical 
jurisdiction of the said Lord Bishop of 
Lon4ony may take place in our said pro- 



vince so far as conveniently may be, we 
do think fit that you give all countenance 
and encouragement to the exercise of the 
same." 

The African slave-trade was introduced 
into the colony, and even forced upon it, 
and made a monopoly for a favored com- 
pany, in the following : 

" You are to give all due encourage- 
ment and invitation to merchants and 
others, who shall bring trade into our 
said province, or any way contribute to 
the advantage thereof, and in particular 
the Royal African Company of Eng- 
land. 

"And, whereas, we are willing to recom- 
mend unto the said company, that the 
said province may have a constant and 
sufficient supply of merchantable Ne- 
groes, at moderate rates, in money or 
commodities ; so you are to take especial 
care that payment be duly made, and 
within a competent time according to 
their agreements. 

"And you are to take care that there 
be no trading from our said province to 
any place in Africa, within the charter 
of the Royal African Company, otherwise 
than prescribed by an Act of Parliament, 
entitled 'An Act to Settle the Trade to 
Africa.^ 

"And you are yearly to give unto us, 
and to our commissioners for trade and 
plantations, an account of what number 
of Negroes our said province is yearly 
supplyed with, and at what rates." 

The people, nearly two-thirds of whom 
were Quakers, were burdened with jthe 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



76 



raising of military forces, in the follow- 
ing instructions : 

"And, whereas, the preservation of the 
northern frontiers of our province of 
New York, against the attempts of any 
enemy by land, is of great importance to 
the security of our other northern planta- 
tions on the continent of America, and 
more especially of our said province of 
New Jersey, which lies so near adjoining 
to our province of New York, and the 
charge of erecting and repairing the 
fortifications, and of maintaining the 
soldiers necessary for the defense of the 
same, is too great to be borne by the 
single province of New York, without 
due contributions from others concerned 
therein, for which reason we have, upon 
several occasions, required such contribu- 
tions to be made, and accordingly settled 
a quota to regulate the proportions thereof; 
you are, therefore, to take further care, 
to dispose the general assembly of our 
said province of New Jersey, to the rais- 
ing of such other supplies, as are or may 
be necessary for the defense of our said 
province of New York, according to the 
signification of our will and pleasure 
therein, which has already been made to 
the inhabitants of New Jersey, or which 
shall at any time hereafter be made to 
you, our governor," etc. 

"And for the greater security of our 
province of New Jersey, you are to 
appoint fit officers and commanders in 
the several parts of the country border- 
ing upon the Indians, who, upon any 
invasion, may raise men and arms to 



oppose them, until they shall receive 
your directions therein." 

Lastly, a muzzle was clapped upon 
the press, in the following : 

" Forasmuch as great inconveniencies 
may arise by the liberty of printing in 
our said province, you are to provide, by 
all necessary orders, that no person keep 
any press for printing, nor that any book, 
pamphlet or other matters whatsoever, 
be printed, without your especial leave 
and license first obtained." 

These pleasant features in the gov- 
ernor's instructions must have made the 
honest Jerseymen feel they had gotten a 
" King Stork " to rule them, in place of 
their old " King Logs," the proprietors. 

The Earl of Sunderland, of her maj- 
esty's ministry, was probably the party 
responsible for the objectionable features 
in these instructions, rather than the 
good Queen herself. I have quoted 
these features, rather than the many use- 
ful and necessary provisions they contain, 
because the former go to account for the 
ensuing political difficulties. 

From Samuel Smith's remarks on the 
surrender, and on the royal instructions, 
I take the following : 

" There does not appear to have been 
any design " (in the surrender) " to abridge 
the privileges before enjoyed, nor could 
it, perhaps, be legally effected, by any of 
the steps taken before or in the surrender ; 
for many of the settlers, though they 
were actually proprietors, do not se^ to 
have been parties to the surrender, either 
by themselves or any legally constituted 



76 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



body for tliem, except it may be suj)- 
posed, their approving the thing without 
joining in any one public act to effect it, 
made them so. 

" The proprietors who signed the in- 
strument of surrender, considered as 
to the shares of propriety they held, 
might be thought of importance enough 
to be denominated the whole, in barely 
giving up the government; but it no- 
where appears, that they had any legal 
power to represent the settlers in general, 
in matters wherein they had admitted 
them to share in their property, whether 
of land or privilege ; and, as to numbers, 
were but a small part of the proprietors, 
and a very small part of the settlers. 

" Every settler who complied with the 
terms of settlement publickly established, 
as well as the purchaser, being entitled to 
the privileges purchased or settled under, 
it could not be lawful, that the act of any 
fellow proprietor to the last, or landlord 
to the other, should deprive them of what, 
by the original frame and constitutions of 
the country, or particular agreements, 
they had a share in ; and "(which) "had 
been the principal inducement of their 
removing hither to settle. 

"That the civil and religious })rivileges 
subordinate to, and derived from, but not 
connected with the powers of govern- 
ment, were the principal inducement of 
many of the settlers, to leave good habi- 
tations and remove hither, none ac- 
quainted with the state of things in the 
original settlement, can doubt. If, there- 
fore, every purchaser and settler had a 



right to and property in ,the privileges 
conveyed to them, and if the ideas of 
property in British subjects are the same 
in the colonies as in the mother country; 
according to these, nothing but their 
own act by themselves as individuals, or 
as some way represented in legislation or 
otherwise, could deprive them of it ; any- 
thing less would imply an absurdity in 
the term." 

To show the conflict between these in- 
structions and the guaranteed consti- 
tutions of both Jerseys, the following 
extracts are made from those instru- 
ments : 

1. Guarantee of freedom from military 
service. 

" It is resolved, that on the one side, no 
man that declares, he cannot for con- 
science' sake bear arms, whether propri- 
etor or planter, shall be at any time put 
upon so doing, in his own person ; ruxr 
yet upon sending any to serve hi his stead; 
and on the other side, those who do 
judge it their duty to bear arms for the 
publick defense, shall have their liberty 
to do it in a legal way." (Fundamental 
constitutions of East New Jersey, A. D. 
1(383). The italics are mine. 

2. Guarantee of freedom from the 
support of a State-church. 

"All persons acknowledging one Al- 
mighty and Eternal God, and holding 
themselves obliged in conscience to live 
quietly in civil society, shall no way be 
molested or prejudged for their religious 
persuasions and exercise in matters of 
faith and worship, nor be compelled to 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



77 



frequent and maintain any place of wor- 
ship or ministry whatsoever ; but none 
to be admitted to places of public trust, 
who do not profess faith in Christ Jesus, 
and will not solemnly declare that he is 
not obliged, in conscience, to endeavour 
alteration in the government, nor does 
not seek the turning out of any in it, or 
their ruin or prejudice in person or estate, 
because they are, in his opinion, hereticks, 
or differ, in judgment, from him." Ibid. 

3. Guarantee of freedom from oaths 
against conscience, in the courts, and 
from oaths of allegiance. 

" In all courts, persons of all persua- 
sions to appear in their own way and 
according to their own manner, and per- 
sonally plead their own causes, or, if un- 
able, by their friends; and no person 
allowed to take money for pleading or 
advice in such cases. 

'*A11 witnesses called to testify to any 
matter or thing in any court, or before 
any lawful authority, to deliver their 
evidence by solemnly promising to speak 
the truth, the whole truth and nothing 
but the truth, and the punishment of 
falsehood to be the same as in cases of 
perjury," etc. Ibid. 

In both divisions of the province the 
" subscribing allegiance to the king," was 
made equivalent to " swearing " it. 

Although the Quaker proprietors were, 
as yet, slave-holders, the extension of 
slavery by the slave-trade, was repugnant 
to them, as we see by the following from 
the West Jersey " Concessions :" 

" Being intended and resolved, by the 



help of the Lord,- and by these, our con- 
cessions and fundamentals, that all and 
every person and persons inhabiting the 
said province, shall, as far as in us lies, 
be free from oppression and slavery." 
(Chap, xxiii.) 

The government of Queen Anne, in 
their instructions to Cornbury, disre- 
garded the above privileges, guaranteed 
to New Jersey by their predecessors, as 
coolly as if no such things had ever 
existed. 

Armed with these formidable instruc- 
tions. Lord Cornbury appeared in New 
Jersey in August, 1703. Of him, S. 
Smith remarks : 

" Contrary to the expectation of those 
concerned in the surrender, we soon find 
them" (the provinces,) "jointly strug- 
gling for the preservation of their priv- 
ileges against the encroachments of a 
governor, who, if his abilities had been 
equal to his birth and interest, must be 
allowed to have been as formidable an 
antagonist in that capacity as any that 
have come to the colonies ; besides being 
the son of a family that had merited 
highly in the revolution, he was first 
cousin to Queen Anne." After publish- 
ing his commission in Burlington and 
Am boy, he returned to New York, of 
which, also, he was governor, but soon 
came back and convened the general 
assembly to meet him at Perth Amboy, 
on November 10th. Among the mem- 
bers of this assembly we find the follow- 
ing ancestors and connections of the 
Burlington Smiths: William Steven- 



78 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



son, son-in-law of Governor Jenings, 
and maternal ancestor of the Smiths of 
Bramham, Burlington County ; Joseph 
Cooper, son of William Cooper, of 
Cooper's Point, and John Smith, of 
Salem. After liearing a sj^eeeh from the 
new governor, and presenting him an 
address in return, tliey j^^^'^^'^ed several 
bills, and adjourned on December 13th. 

The same assembly met Cornbury 
again on September 7th, 1704. In his 
speech he " took occasion to press for a 
law to establish a militia,'' and a fort on 
the Highlands of Neversink. The house 
took the matters recommended, into con- 
sideration, but their pr^^'^ec dings, as w^e 
may well suppose, "not being to the gov- 
ernor's mind," he abruptly dissolved 
them on the 28th, and issued writs for 
the election of a new assembly, to meet 
at Burlington the 13th of November, 
following. 

" This election was industriously man- 
aged, and a majority of members pro- 
cured to his mind." Most of the Qua- 
ker members, including our two ancestors, 
no longer appear on the list ; it was no 
longer an assembly representative of the 
people, but rather of the governor's syco- 
phants, and it is not surprising to find 
them, in their address, complimenting 
Cornbury, " with going through the 
affairs of government with great dili- 
gence and exquisite management, to the 
admiration of his friends, and envy of 
his enemies." 

They passed a law for establishing 
a militia, by the unnecessary severity of 



which, those conscientiously scrupulous 
of bearing arms, in many parts, were 
great sufferers. 

" On the 12tli of December, the gov- 
ernor adjourned them till next year, with 
more encomiums on their conduct than 
many of them got from their constituents 
on their return home ; during this whole 
session they had tamely suffered the 
arbitrary practices of Cornbury to de- 
prive them of three of their most sub- 
stantial members — Thomas Gardiner, 
Thomas Lambert and Joshua Wright — 
under pretense of their not owning land 
enough to qualify them to sit there, 
though they were known to be men of 
sufficient estates ; and the same assembly, 
at their next meeting, at Amboy, in 

1705, themselves declare, 'the members 
had heretofore satisfied the house of their 
being duly qualified to sit in the same ;' 
and they were then admitted, when the 
purposes of their exclusion were an- 
swered : This sitting was in October 
and November, but produced nothing of 
much consequence; the session which 
followed at the same i)lace, in October, 

1706, likewise proved unsuccessful, and 
now Cornbury again dissolved theassem- 
blv." 

" The writs for a new assembly were 
returnable to Burlington, the 5th of 
April, 1707. In this assembly, it soon 
appeared, Cornbury had not the success 
in elections as in the last choice; his 
conduct was arbitrary and the people 
dissatisfied ; the assembly chose Samuel 
Jenings, speaker ; received the governor's 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



79 



speech, and soon after resolved into a 
committee of the whole house to consider 
grievances ; this committee continued 
sitting from day to day, till at length 
they agreed upon fifteen resolves, and by 
petition to the queen, laid them before 
her, on the 8th of the month called 
May." They also presented a manly 
remonstrance to the governor, from which 
I make a few extracts : 

" May it please the Goveimoi' : 

" We, her majesty's loyal subjects, tlie 
representatives of the province of New 
Jersey, are heartily sorry that, instead of 
raising such a revenue as is by the gov- 
ernor (as we suppose by the queen's 
directions,) required of us, we are obliged 
to lay before him the unhappy circum- 
stances of this province : it is a task we 
undertake not of choice, but necessity, 
and have, therefore, reason to hope that 
what we say may meet with a more 
favourable reception. 

" We pray the governor to be assured, 
it is our misfortune extorts this procedure 
from us, and that we should betray the 
trust reposed in us by our country, did 
we not endeavour to obtain relief." 

After this courteous preamble they 
charge him with neglecting the i)rovince : 

" We may not perchance rightly ap- 
prehend all the causes of our sufferings, 
but have reason to think some of them 
are very much owing to the governor's 
long absence from this province, which 
renders it very difficult to apply to him 
in some cases which may need a present 



help. It were to be wished the affairs of 
New York w^ould admit the governor 
oftener to attend those of New Jersey ; he 
had not then been unacquainted with our 
grievances, and we are inclined to believe 
they w^ould not have grown to so great a 
number." 

They then present what they call their 
minor grievances, the first being the case 
of two murderei-s under sentence of 
death, who were permitted to go at large. 

** Secondly, we think it a great hard- 
ship that persons accused for any crime, 
should be obliged to pay court fees, not- 
withstanding the jury have not found 
the bill against them ; they are men gen- 
erally chose out of the neighbourhood, 
♦ :u ♦ y^\^Q cannot well be supposed to 
be ignorant of the character of the person 
accused, nor want as good information as 
may be had; when, therefore, they do 
not find the bill, it is very reasonable to 
suppose the accused person innocent, 
and, consequently, no fees due from him ; 
we pray, therefore, that the governor will 
give his assent to an act of assembly to 
prevent the like for the future; other- 
wise, no person can be safe from the 
practices of designing men, or the wicked 
effects of a vindictive temper." 

Some grievances " of a higher nature, 
and attended with worse consequences," 
are next complained of: 

" In the first place, the governor has 
prohibited the proprietors' agents, com- 
monly called the council of proprietors, 
from granting any warrants for taking 
up of land in the western division of this 



80 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



province. We cannot see by what law 
or reason any man's property can be dis- 
posed of by the governor without his 
consent: The proprietors when they 
surrendered their government, did not 
part with their soil, and may manage it 
as they think fit, and are n"ot to take 
directions from any person Avhatsoever, 
how and when to do it ; if any person 
concerned be grieved, the laws are open, 
by wliich disputes in property are de- 
cided ; and he doubtless will not be left 
remediless. We are very sorry the gov- 
ernor gives us occasion to say, it is a 
great encroachment on the proprietors' 
liberties ; but we are not surprised at it, 
when a greater encroachment on our 
liberties led the way to it, and that was 
the governor's refusing to swear or attest 
three members of the last assembly upon 
the groundless suggestions of Thomas 
Revell and Daniel Leeds, two members 
of the queen's council, by which they 
were kept out of the assembly. We are 
too sensibly touched with that procedure, 
not to know what must be the unavoid- 
able consequences of a governor's refus- 
ing to swear which of the members of an 
assembly he thinks fit ; but to take upon 
himself the power of judging of the 
qualifications of assembly-men, and to 
keep them out of the house (as the 
governor did the aforesaid three members 
nigh eleven months till he was satisfied 
in that point), after the house had de- 
clared them qualified — is so great a vio- 
lation of the liberties of the people, so 
great a breach of the privileges of the 



house of representatives, so much assum- 
ing to himself a negative voice to the 
freeholders' election of their represent- 
atives, that the governor is entreated to 
pardon us, if this is a different treatment 
from what we expected." 

"It is notoriously known, that many 
considerable sums of money have been 
raised, to procure the dissolution of the 
first assembly, to get clear of the propri- 
etors' quit-rents and to obtain such 
officers as the contributors should approve 
of; this house has great reason to believe, 
the money so gathered was given to Lord 
Corn bury, and did induce him to dissolve 
the then assembly, and by his own au- 
thority keep three members out of the 
next assembly, and put so many mean 
and mercenary men into office ; by which 
corrupt practice, men of the best estates 
are severely harassed, her majesty's good 
subjects in this province so impoverished, 
that they are not able to give that sup- 
port to her majesty's government as is 
desired, or as they would be otherwise 
inclined to do; and we cannot but be 
very uneasy, when we find by these new 
methods of government, our liberties and 
properties so much shaken, that no man 
can say he is master of either, but holds 
them as tenant by courtesy, and at will, 
and maybe stript of them at pleasure: Lib- 
erty is too valuable a thing to be easily 
parted with, and when such mean 
inducements procure such violent en- 
deavours to tear it from us, we must take 
leave to say, they have neither heads, 
hearts, nor souls, that are not moved 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



81 



with the miseries of their country, and 
are not forward with their utmost power 
lawfully to redress them. 

" We conclude, by advising the gov- 
ernor to consider what it is that princi- 
pally engages the affections of a j^^ople, 
and he will find no other artifice needful 
than to let them be unmolested in the 
enjoyment of wliat belongs to them of 
right ; and a wise man that despises not ' 
his own happiness, will earnestly labour 
to regain their love. 

" By order of the house, 

" Samuel Jexings, Speaker^ 

" By this remonstrance," says Samuel 
Smith, " may be seen nmch of the his- 
tory t)f the times — and that there were 
not wanting m the province men of dis- 
cernment to see and lament the unhappy 
situation of their country, and of spirit 
to oppose its greatest enemies; several 
such were in this assembly ; the s|)eaker 
in particular, had very early known New 
Jersey, had lived, through many changes 
and commotions, to see great alterations 
in it ; much concerned in publick trans- 
actions, he knew what belonged to a 
publick character ; he had governed the 
western part of the province for several 
years, with integrity and reputation ; saw 
the advantages of a just confidence, and 
that — though the oflSce was in itself re- 
spectable, it was the honest execution of 
it according to its dignity, that produced 
the intended service, and secured the ap- 
probation of a kind but watchful mistress, 
for such Queen Anne was accounted to 
11 



her governors. Jenings was also un- 
daunted, and Lord Cornbury, on his pait, 
exacted the utmost decorum ; while, as 
speaker, he " (Jenings) " was delivering 
the remonstrance, the latter frequently 
interrupted him with a *stop, what's 
that,' etc., at the same time putting on a 
countenance of authority and sternness, 
with intention to confound him ; with due 
submission, yet firmness, whenever inter- 
rupted, he calmly desired leave to read 
the passages over again, and did it with 
an additional emphasis upon those most 
complaining ; so that on the second read- 
ing they becimie more observable than 
before ; he at length got through ; when 
the governor told the house to attend 
him again on Saturday next, at eleven 
o'clock, to receive his answer. After 
the house was gone, Cornbury, with some 
emotion, told those with him, that Jenings 

had impvdence enough to face the d /. 

He did not get ready till the 12th, when, 
sending for the house, he delivered his 
answer." 

Surely, here is a fine old historic scene, 
not well to be forgotten ! a thoroughly 
English scene ; English in its sturdy and 
undaunted assertion of chartered right, 
English, no less, in its punctilious ob- 
servance of the decencies and proprieties 
of the situation ! One fancies the in- 
domitable but courteous old Quaker gen- 
tleman, standing up manfully, with the 
protest intrusted to his care by the re- 
presentatives of the people, unrolled in 
his hand; opposite, the lowering yet 
aristocratic figure of the richly-dressed 



82 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



governor, the queen's cousin, chafing at 
being thus bearded and brought to bay. 
There is a grim humor, too, in the Qua- 
ker's quiet reiteration of the severer pas- 
sages, " with additional emphasis," in 
reply to the governor's fierce "stop, 
what's that?" Let not the name of old 
Samuel Jenings be forgotten, in the roll 
of the heroes of Anglo-Saxon and Amer- 
ican liberty ! He and his associates stood 
stoutly for right, they showed conspicu- 
ously that true manliness and uncon- 
querable passion for freedom and order, 
that have wrought all the triumphs of 
the English race, and they have earned the 
right to an enduring remembrance among 
its champions. 

The governor's reply to the remon- 
strance was long, and consisted of little 
more than a general denial of all the 
charges, with a great deal of amusing 
ill-temper, childish recrimination and 
personality. A few specimens will suf- 
fice : " I can safely say I don't know of 
any grievances this province labours 
under, except it be the having a certain 
number of people in it who will never be 
faithful to, nor live quietly under, any 
government, nor suffer their neighbours 
to enjoy any peace, quiet or happiness, 
if they can help it." " I am of opinion 
that nothing has hindered the vengeance 
of just Heaven from falling upon this 
province long ago, but the infinite mercy 
and forbearance of Almighty God — 
who has been abundantly provoked by the 
repeated crying sins of a perverse gen- 
eration among us, and more especially by 



the dangerous and abominable doctrines 
and the wicked lives and practices of a 
number of people ; some of whom, under 
the pretended name of Christians, have 
dared to deny the very essence and being 
of the Saviour of the world." "Of all 
the people in the world, the Quakers 
ought to be the last to complain of the 
hardships of traveling a few miles upon 
such an occasion," (the being obliged to 
go to New York to get probate of wifls, 
etc.,) " who never repine at the trouble 
and charges of traveling several hundred 
miles to a yearly meeting, where it is 
evidently known, that nothing was ever 
done for the good of the country, but, on 
the contrary, continual contrivances are 
carried on for the undermining of the 
government both in Church and State." 
" There are very few men in the province, 
except Samuel Jenings and Lewis Morris, 
men known neither to have good prin- 
ciples nor good morals, who have ven- 
tured to accuse a governor of such crimes 
without any proof — but they are capable 
of anything but good." " Samuel Jen- 
ings and Lewis Morris, two men notori- 
ously known always to have been dis- 
turbers of the quiet and peace of this 
province, men always possessed with pas- 
sionate heats, and the transports of most 
vindictive tempers." "As for getting 
clear of the proprietors' quit-rents, it is 
such an absurdity to mention, that no- 
body would be guilty of it but Samuel 
Jenings and Lewis Morris," etc. 

Lord Cornbury does not appear to ad- 
vantage in this controversy ; with all the 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



83 



tyrannical dispoeition, he possessed little 
of the ability of his great ancestor, 
Clarendon. The assembly having, mean- 
while, become occupied in inquiring into 
some irregular transactions between the 
governor and the state treasurer, did 
not make their rejoinder to his intem- 
perate reply until the 28th. They then 
sent it by a committee, but he refused to 
receive it. This rejoinder, which was, 
thereupon, entered in the journal of the 
house, is conceived in dignified terms, 
and seems an unanswerable final argu- 
ment. I shall quote the slight notice 
taken of the governor's personal attacks. 
In reply to his charges of unchristian 
doctrine, they say : " It is not our busi- 
ness to enter into religious controversies; 
we leave them to divines, who ought best 
to understand things of that nature, and 
who may, perhaps, inform us what is 
meant by denying the very essence of 
the Saviour of the world." In return 
to his contemptuous mode of treating 
their complaint of his absenteeism, they 
say : " Notwithstanding those soft, cool 
and Considerate -terms of * malicious, 
scandalous and frivolous,' with which 
your excellency vouchsafes to treat the 
assembly of this province, they are of 
opinion, that no judicious or impartial 
men will think it reasonable that the in- 
habitants of one province should go into 
another to have their wills proved, and 
take letters of administration at Fort 
Ann, from the governor of New York, for 
what should regularly be done by the 
governor of New Jersey, in Jersey." 



In regard to his unfounded insinua- 
tions as to the religious meetings of the 
Quakers, they say : " It is the general 
assembly of the province of New Jersey 
that complains, and not the Quakers, 
with whose persons (considered as Qua- 
kers,) or meetings, we have nothing to 
do, nor are we concerned in what your 
excellency says against them ; they, per- 
haps, will think themselves obliged to 
vindicate their meetings from the asper- 
sions which your excellency so liberally 
bestows upon them, and evince to the 
world how becoming it is for the gov- 
ernor of a province to enter the lists of 
controversy with a people who thought 
themselves entitled to his protection of 
them in the enjoyment of their religious 
liberties ; those of them who are mem- 
bers of this house, have begged leave, in 
behalf of themselves and their friends, 
to tell the governor, they must answer 
him in the words of Nehemiah to San- 
ballat, contained in the eighth verse of 
the sixth chapter of Nehemiah, viz. : 
'There is no such thing done as thou 
sayest, but thou feignest them out of 
thine own heart.' " Lastly, to his attacks 
upon Jenings and Morris, they calmly 
reply : "As to your excellency's reflec- 
tions on private men, it is below the rep- 
resentative body of a province to take 
any further notice of them, than to do 
that justice to the two w^orthy members 
of this house as to say, they both have 
and deserve better characters than your 
excellency gives them." 

To show the tyrannical style of Corn- 



84 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



bury's government, I quote again : "Are 
not her majesty's loyal subjects hauled 
to gaols, and there lie without being 
admitted to bail ? and the conditions of 
their recognizances are, that if your excel- 
lency approves not of their being bailed, 
they shall return to their prisons ; several 
of her majesty's good subjects forced to 
abscond and leave their habitations, being 
threatened with imprisonment, and no 
hopes of receiving the benefit of the law, 
when your excellency's absolute will is 
the sole measure of it : One minister of 
the Church of England dragged by a 
sheriff from Burlington to Amboy, and 
there kept in custody, without assigning 
any reason for it, and, at last, hauled, by 
force, into a boat by your excellency, and 
transported, like a malefactor, into an- 
other government, and there kept in a 
garrison a prisoner, and no reason 
assigned for these violent procedures but 
your excellency's pleasure: Another min- 
ister of the Church of England, laid 
under a necessity of leaving the province 
from the reasonable apprehension of 
meeting with the same treatment; no 
orders of men, either sacred or civil, 
secure in their lives, their liberties or 
estates ; and where these procedures will 
end, God only knows." 

To this energetic protest is added the 
memorandum : " Divers of the mem- 
bers of this assembly, being of the people 



called Quakers, do assent to the matter 
and substance, but make some exception 
to the stile." 

" By order of the house, 
[signed.] Sam'l Jenings, Speaker. 

Dated October 24th, 1707. 

Cornbury's most flagrant usurpations 
and invasions of the liberties of New 
Jersey, were those spoken of as the 
" greater grievances," in this and in the 
original remonstrance; these were, for- 
bidding the proprietors to take up or dis- 
pose of land, and, at the same time, 
placing the records of title in the hands 
of one of his creatures, a bankrupt and 
suspected man named Sonmans, and dis- 
possessing those who had been placed in 
charge of them by the proprietors them- 
selves — a most serious menace to their 
estates and rights — and, secondly, the 
assuming to be judge of the qualifications 
of assemblymen, by keeping three mem- 
bei's out of their seats for a year, as we 
have seen, on a false pretext; "a pro- 
cedure," says the remonstrance, " which 
tends to destroy the very being of assem- 
blies, by rendering them the tools of a 
governor's arbitrary pleasure." It be- 
hoved the gentle Quakers to stand firm 
in the breach, against such formidable 
assaults on their liberties and properties, 
as these, and stand there they did, right 
manfully and successfully. 



CHAPTER IX. 



HELP FROM THE FATHERLAND. 



BESIDES the two remonstrances to 
the governor, the assembly had, as 
we have seen, sent a memorial, praying 
for relief, directly to the queen. While 
these transactions were proceeding in 
America, the " West Jersey Society," of 
English proprietors of lands in that 
province, headed by Sir Thomas Lane, 
also took the alarm, and presented a 
memorial against Cornbury's outrageous 
measures, to the lords commissioners for 
trade and plantations. 

Their account of the principal grounds 
of complaint is so clear, that I partially 
transcribe it: 

" It is one of the terms consented to 
by your lordships, and one of his excel- 
lency's instructions, that the general as- 
sembly shall consist of four and twenty 
representatives ; two to be chosen by the 
inhabitants, householders of the city or 
town of Perth Amboy; two by the in- 
habitants, householders of the city or 
town of Burlington ; ten to be chosen by 
the freeholders of the eastern and ten by 
the freeholders of the western division ; 
in which election, every elector is to have 
one hundred acres of freehold land in his 
own right, within the division for which 
he shall choose ; and every person elected 
is to have one thousand acres of freehold 



land in his own right, within the division 
for which he shall be chosen. 

" This instruction, which we relied on 
OS the chief security of our estates in 
that province, his excellency has not only 
violated, but has totally destroyed that 
part of our constitution ; and in such a 
manner as will render all assemblies a 
mere piece of formality. 

"For setting which proceeding in a 
due light, we must crave leave to lay be- 
fore your lordships the account we have 
received of it from our agent, and other 
reputable persons of that province. 

"An assembly having been called and 
chosen, in the year 1703, pursuant to 
your lordship's instructions, prepared 
bills for settling the rights of the pro- 
prietors and planters, and for raising a 
revenue of £1300 per annum, for three 
years, (which they knew was the utmost 
the country could bear,) for the support 
of the government; but his excellency 
requiring a greater sum, several persons, 
our constant enemies and invaders of our 
properties, and who, therefore, opposed 
the bill for settling our rights, undertook 
to procure an assembly more obedient to 
his excellency's demands; and by that 
and other arguments, which out of regard 
for his honour, we choooe to wave the 

85 



86 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



mention of, prevailed upon him to dis- 
solve that assembly, and to call another 
to sit in Noveml)er last ; the writs were 
issued, and the election directed to be 
made." After detailing certain irregular 
practices in this election, they proceed: 
" But passing by these and many other 
illegal artifices used by those undertakers 
to obtain an assembly to their own 
humour, we shall insist only upon one 
grand instance, which is not to be par- 
alleled in any of her majesty's planta- 
tions, and could not have been attempted 
without his excellency's encouragement, 
nor put in practice without his concurrence. 
" When this assembly was met, and 
attended his excellency in council, in 
order to be sworn,* Mr. Re veil and Mr. 
Leeds, (two of the governor's council, 
and of the undertakers to procure such 
an assembly as they had promised,) sus- 
pecting the strength of their party, ob- 
jected against three of the members 
returned, as persons not having, each, one 
thousand acres of land, and, therefore, 
unqualified to serve in the assembly; 
though these persons had such estates in 
land, and were generally known to have 
so, and at the time of their election had 
convinced Revell and Leeds, who opposed 
them under that pretence, of the truth 
of it; and this objection was not ex- 
aminable or determinable by his excel- 
lency or his council, or otherwise than in 
the house of representatives, who are the 



* The Quaker members " subscribed " allegiance, in- 
stead of taking the oaths, according to the constitution. 



only proper judges of their own mem- 
bers ; yet, his excellency, upon this bare 
suggestion of Revell and Leeds, refused 
to swear those members, and excluded 
them from sitting to serve their country. 

"The counties for which they were 
chosen to serve, expressed a great dissat- 
isfaction at the exclusion of their mem- 
bers, and these and several other repre- 
sentatives delivered an address to his 
excellency, for having them admitted to 
their right ; which met with no other re- 
ception than being called a piece of in- 
solence and ill-manners. 

" By this exclusion of three members, 
and the contempt of the address for their 
admission, the undertakers gained a 
majority of one in the house of repre- 
sentatives, who adjourned the hearing of 
this case until they had reaped the fruits 
of their iniquity, and accomplished the 
ends for which it was contrived; for 
whilst this case was depending, a bill for 
taking away the qualifications of electors 
and the elected, and placing the right of 
choosing and being chosen in the free- 
holders generally, without any express 
value of their estates, was prepared and 
passed, wherein there is this remarkable 
and self-condemning declaration of his 
excellency's proceedings, viz.: that repre- 
sentatives met in general assembly are, 
and shall be, the judges of the qualifica- 
tions of their own members. 

"After this and one other act — were 
passed, a day of hearing was allowed to 
the three excluded members, and notice 
of it given to Revell and Leeds, who 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



87 



would not vouchsafe to appear, but, having 
already obtained their ends, graciously 
signified, by a message, their mistake in 
their objection to those members." 

"The house unanimously declared 
them duly qualified, and sent two of 
their body to acquaint his excellency of 
it, and to pray they might be sworn; 
but his excellency, whether out of a 
desire of assuming the glory of his arbi- 
trary proceeding wholly to himself, or of 
making the country sensible that, not- 
withstanding the act so lately passed 
declaring the house judges of their own 
members, he was resolved to exercise that 
power for the future, told those messen- 
gers he must be satisfied of their quali- 
fications as well as the house : and still 
keeps them out of the assembly. 

" This we conceive to be the assuming 
a negative voice to the freeholders' elec- 
tion of their representatives; and such 
an invasion of the rights of the assembly, 
as will, if tolerated or connived at, place 
the whole legislature in the governor; 
for if he can, at his pleasure, reject three 
representatives, he may reject all, and 
make what laws he thinks fit, without 
the formality of an assembly." 

In regard to the act above referred to, 
the memorialists contend that even " if 
the assembly had consisted of its full 
proportion of duly elected members — 
the instruction relating to the election of 
general assemblies, leaves no power to 
the general assembly to alter the qualifi- 
cations of the electors or elected j which 
wa? intended to be a standing and un- 



alterable part of the constitution, as most 
agreeable to the constitution of England, 
where the electors of knights of the 
counties must have a certain fixed free- 
hold ; and the elected are generally the 
principal landed men of their respective 
counties; but the alteration now made, 
was intended to put the election of rep- 
resentatives into the meanest of the peo- 
ple, who, being impatient of any superiors, 
will never fail to choose such from 
amongst themselves as may oppress us 
and destroy our rights." 

The memorialists, continuing, pray 
their lordships to intercede with the queen, 
that the acts of what we may call the 
"rump " assembly," wherein, by the arbi- 
trary exclusion of three members without 
any just exception, the country was not 
duly represented," may not be confirmed 
by her ; and that Colonel Lewis Morris, 
who was suspended by the governor from 
his place in the queen's council, "be 
restored thereto," etc., and that, " as a 
further security of our estates there, no per- 
son may, at any time, be admitted of the 
governor's council, or to be in the com- 
mission of the peace, or of the militia, 
but such who have real estates in the 
province suitable to their stations, and 
who reside there." 

Signed by Sir Thomas Lane and 
seventeen others. 

Two days after Lord Cornbury had 
refused to receive the rejoinder of the 
assembly, he adjourned them until next 
year, though much important business 
was unfinished, thus escaping, as he 



88 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



thought, the necessity of attempting to 
clear himself of their accusations. Mean- 
while, he secretly sent to the queen a 
counter-address, signed by his lieutenant 
and some of the council. In this docu- 
ment no attempt is made, beyond unsup- 
ported general assertions, to disprove the 
charges of the assembly ; the whole cause 
of the trouble is asserted to be ** the tur- 
bulent, factious, uneasy and disloyal 
principles of two men in that assembly, 
Mr. Lewis Morris and Samuel Jenings, 
a Quaker, men to whom all the factions 
and confusions in the government of 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania for many 
years are wholly owing ; and this is done 
by them, (as we have all the reason in 
the world to believe,) to encourage, not 
only this government, but, also, the rest 
of your governments in America, to 
throw off your majesty's royal preroga- 
tive, and consequently to involve all your 
dominions in this part of the world, and 
the honest, good and well-meaning peo- 
ple in them, in confusion, hoping thereby, 
to obtain their wicked purposes." They 
propose, as a " remedy for all these evils," 
" that your majesty will most graciously 
please to discountenance those wicked, 
designing men," and in regard to the 
" rejoinder " of the assembly, say only : 
" The last libel called ' the reply,' etc., 
came out so suddenly, that as yet we have 
not had time to answer it in all its par- 
ticulars ; but do assure your majesty it is 
for the most part, false in fact, and that 
part of it which carries any face of truth, 
they have been malicious and unjust in 



not mentioning the whole truth ; which 
would have fully justified my Lord Com- 
bury's just conduct." 

This weak appeal had very little effect 
on the wise and benevolent queen, who, 
declaring " that she would not counte- 
nance her nearest relation in oppressing 
her people," promptly removed Cornbury, 
and appointed in his stead a very differ- 
ent character, John Lord Lovelace, 
Baron of Hurley, soon to be known in 
American annals as " the just Lord 
Lovelace." 

"As soon as my lord was superseded, 
his creditors threw him into the custody 
of the sheriff of New York ; and he 
remained there till the death of his 
father, when, succeeding to the Earldom 
of Clarendon, he returned to England. 

" We never had a governor so univer- 
sally detested, nor any who so richly 
deserved the publick abhorrence; in 
spite of his noble descent, his behaviour 
was trifling, mean and extravagant. 

"It was not uncommon for him to 
dress himself in a woman's habit, and 
then to patrole the fort in which he 
resided ; such freaks of low humour ex- 
posed him to the universal contempt of 
the people; but their indignation was 
kindled by his despotick rule, savage 
bigotry, insatiable avarice and injustice, 
not only to the publick, but even his pri- 
vate creditors, for he left some of the 
lowest tradesmen in his employment un- 
satisfied in their just demands." (His- 
tory of New York, p. 116). 

In this year, (1708,) Samuel Jenings 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



89 



still continued speaker, but, worn out 
with the labors of a long and busy life, 
and being seized with indisposition, was 
obliged, finally, to retire from the assem- 
bly in May. He lived a year longer, 
witnessing the happy commencement of 
Lord Lovelace's administration, and dy- 
ing early in 1709. The historian of New 
flersey sums up his character as follows : 

" His integrity and fortitude in all 
stations were acknowledged; his judg- 
ment was the rule of his conduct, and by 
what can now be gathered, this seems to 
have been but seldom injudiciously 
founded: Alive to the more generous 
emotions of a mind formed to benevo- 
lence and acts of humanity, he w^as a 
friend to the widow, the fatherless and 
the unhappy; tender, compassionate, dis- 
interested — with great opportunities,'' 
(he) "left but a small estate: Abhorring 
oppression in every shape, his whole con- 
duct discovered a will to relieve and 
befriend mankind, far above the littleness 
of party or sinister views. 

" Much of his time wiis long devoted 
to the publick ; — West Jersey and Penn- 
sylvania, and New Jersey after the sur- 
render, for near twenty-eight years suc- 
cessively, were repeated witnesses of his 
conduct in various capacities; he studied 
peace and the welfare of mankind, but, 
in some instances, met with ungrateful 
returns, and though his endeavors did 
not altogether succeed, he survived per- 
sonal accusation, in a great measure, with 
re8|)ect to himself, and as to the publick, 
just lived long enough to see it emerging 
12 



from an unpromising state of litigation 
and controversy, to more quiet than had 
been known for many years. 

" His three daughters (who were all 
the children he left,) intermarried with 
three brothers, of the name of Stephen- 
son," (Stevenson,) "whose posterity now 
reside in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.^' 

Among the assemblymen of the year 
1 708, we find Thomas Rapier, who has 
been mentioned as a maternal ancestor, 
and among those of 1709, under Lord 
Lovelace, we find Samuel Smith, of 
Bramham, member for Burlington. 

Governor Jenings not only interests 
us in connection with the Burlington 
Smiths as a collateral ancestor, but be- 
cause his fine old seat and estate of Green 
Hill, near Burlington, became, after his 
death, the seat of the family of Samuel 
Smith, of Bramham. In his will he 
directs his real estate to be sold to pro- 
vide funds for certain legacies in money, 
and it was probably at this time that the 
Green Hill estate ])assed into the Samuel 
Smith branch of the Burlington Smiths. 
A part of this estate still belongs to the 
family. 

Governor Jenings's will is witnessed 
by Thomas Gardiner, Thomas Rapier 
and Daniel Smith, of Bramham. These 
were personal friends ; Richard Hill* is 
made one of the trustees in the will, and 
Daniel Smith, from his skill in the law, 
may probably have drawn it up. It was 

* Richard Hill, the elder, of Philadelphia, at one 
time mayur of that city, Vide "the Hill Family,' 
introductiou, xi., and rroud's "History of Pennsyl- 
vania," 473. 474. 



90 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



executed several months before his death, 
on July 24th, 1708, and after a preamble 
humbly offering praises to the Lord for 
all His favors, including the present 
soundness of his mind, gives the sum of 
two hundred and twenty-five pounds to 
several of his grandchildren — chiklren of 
the three Stevenson brothers — making 
Samuel Carpenter and Kichard Hill, of 
Philadelphia, trustees during their mi- 
nority, and the further aggregate sum of 
two hundred and forty pounds to a sister, 
three cousins and a personal friend, the 
eminent Thomas EUwood, author of a 
most picturesque autobiography and an 
intimate associate of the immortal Milton. 
The testator empowers his executors to 
sell all his real estate for the payment of 
these legacies and his debts, and makes 
his three daughters and their husbands 
residuary legatees and executors. The 
bequest to Ellwood runs thus : 

** I give and bequeath unto my long- 
acquainted, worthy and endeared friend, 
Thomas Ellwood, of Hungerhill, near 
Amersham, in y^ County of Bucks, in 
Great BriUiin, the sum of twenty pounds, 



sterling money, to be paid out of my 
effects there, to buy him a gelding, or 
otherwise, as he shall think fit." Horses 
are also left to the trustees. 

The eldest grandson named in Gov- 
ernor Jenings's will was Isaac Penning- 
ton, son of the eldest daughter, Sarah, 
by her first husband, Edward Penning- 
ton, son of Isaac Pennington (the 
younger), and half-brother to Gulielma 
Maria Springett, the wife of William 
Penn. (See " Penns and Penningtons.") 
Sarah Jenings married, secondly, Thomas 
Stevenson, by whom she left two daugh- 
ters. Two other grandsons are named, 
Jenings Stevenson and Thomas Steven- 
son, children of the younger daughters, 
Anne and Mercy, by the brothers, 
William and John Stevenson. Among 
the granddaughters, Anne, child of John 
Stevenson, married Daniel Doughty, and 
left one surviving child, Mary, who mar- 
ried William Lovett Smith, grandson of 
Samuel, of Bramham. Thus the Jenings 
stock is now represented by the three 
families of Pennington, Stevenson and 
Smith, 



CHAPTER X. 



TRIUMPH OF LIBERTY AND RIGHT. 



IN the period from 1709 to 1718, the 
year of the death of Samuel Smith, 
of Bramham, he and his elder brother, 
Daniel, sat several years in assembly, for 
Burlington, both being together there in 
1716, and Samuel holding the office in 
the year of his early death. It may, 
therefore, be interesting to trace the pub- 
lic history of the assembly during that 
period, which I shall do very cursorily. 

The accession to the government, of 
Lord Lovelace, filled the minds of good 
men in New Jersey with hope — nor was 
that hope belied. "With a change of 
governors followed a change of measures 
and favourites; impartiality and candour 
succeeded trick and design ; the tools of 
the former administration, having nothing 
but the protection of that to support them, 
sunk into neglect." 

Yet, the work of Jenings and Morris 
was not complete ; the bad governor had 
been removed, but his lieutenant, In- 
goldsby, remained ; two members of the 
Queen's Council — the most obnoxious — 
Revell and Leeds, had been displaced, 
and their seats filled by persons recom- 
mended by the West Jersey Society ; and 
two other seats, naturally falling vacant, 
had been supplied by trusted ex-members 
of the assembly, Thomas Gardiner and 



Thomas Gordon ; Lewis Morris himself 
had been restored to his place in the 
council, yet, still there remained at its 
board, a majority of the old " favorite" 
of Cornbury, who, it was hoped at first, 
would now take warning by the fall of 
their late master. Much iniquitous legis- 
lation, too, remained to be undone, be- 
fore the field should be clear for a healthy 
progress. 

One of the first cares of the assembly, 
was to refute the charges brought against 
them in the address to the queen, of the 
lieutenant-governor and council. "The 
assembly obtained from the governor a 
copy of the address before inserted, from 
the lieutenant-governor and council, to 
the queen, in 1707 ; they thanked him 
for the favour, and requested he would 
desire the lieutenant-governor, and all 
that signed the address, to attend him 
at such time as he thought fit to appoint, 
to prove their allegations ; and that the 
house might have leave to be present, and 
have opportunity of making their defense, 
in order to clear themselves from such 
imputations." Though this audience was 
granted by Lovelace, the lieutenant- 
governor and council found means to 
evade it. 

To the great disappointment of the 

91 



92 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



good people of the province, Ijord Love- 
lace died in less than a year after his ar- 
rival ; the government devolved, until the 
appointment of a successor, upon Ingolds- 
by. At this time the home government 
was engaged in tliat tremendous struggle 
against the j)ower of France, whicli forms 
the grandest feature of Anne's reign, and 
all thecolonies in America were called upon 
to furnish their quotas of men and money 
to an expedition that was being organized 
against Canada. Three thousand pounds 
toward this expedition were demanded 
from New Jersey. Tlie Quakers had 
generally hitherto been able to command 
a majority in the assembly, and their 
time-lionored protest against war is well 
known, but on the question of raising 
these supplies they were outvoted by a 
majority of one, the casting vote being 
given by one Middleton, said to be, him- 
self, a Quaker. It is amusing that a 
merit is made for the Quakers, in the sub- 
sequent appeal of the assembly, out of 
this casting vote of one of their back- 
sliding members. 

In the summer of 1710, the new gov- 
ernor, Brigadier-General Robert Hunter, 
arrived out from England. He convened 
the assembly in the following December, 
and made them an address of soldier-like 
brevity. The session lasted over two 
months; "the governor and assembly 
agreed cordially, but a majority of the 
council differed from both, notwithstand- 
ing an accession of divers new mem- 
bers. 

" Ever since the surrender, the province 



had been involved in great confusion, on 
account of the people called Quakers 
being denied to serve on juries, under pre- 
tence that an oath was absolutely neces- 
sary ; the inhabitants in many parts were 
chiefly such," (/. c., Quakers,) "and jur- 
ies could not be got without them ; the 
assembly seeing the confusion that had 
and would unavoithibly follow such re- 
fusal, passed a bill for ascertaining the 
qualification of jurors, and enabling the 
people called Quakers to serve on them, 
and another respecting the affirmation: 
The reports of the committee will, among 
other things, show the conduct of the 
council on this occasion." 

(The house having gone into commit- 
tee of the whole to consider papers re- 
turned by the governor, and the speaker 
having resumed the chair :) " Doctor 
Johnson reported from the said commit- 
tee, that the 60th article of her majesty's 
instructions being read, requiring an act 
to be passed for those people that make a 
religious scruple of swearing, to the like 
effect of that passed in the 7th and 8th of 
King William III. in England, so far as 
may be consistent with good order and 
government ; that the house have already 
sent up such an act to the council for 
their concurrence, as near to the like 
effect as the circumstance of this colony 
will admit, which the council rejected 
without committing the same. 

"And further, that the 94th article 
of her majesty's instructions being read, 
requiring an act to be passed ascertain- 
ing qualifications of jurors ; that the same 



A FAMILY HISTOBY, 



93 



was included in the bill entitled, *An act 
for ascertaining the qualifications of 
jurors, and enabling the people called 
Quakers to serve on them,' etc., which the 
council rejected without committing the 
same." 

Thus baffled, the assembly took into 
consideration the militia act, passed in 
Cornbury's time, by which the Quakers 
in many parts of the province, had been 
greatly opj)ressed. A relief bill was 
passed, "and divei's officers who had been 
more rigorous in distressing, than the 
law warranted, were sent for to answer 
for their conduct at the bar of the house, 
and ordered to render account of the 
goods distrained." The council rejected 
this relief bill like the others. 

Next, came on the consideration of the 
charges made against a former assembly 
to the queen ; they undertook to vindi- 
cate the honor of that assembly from 
those aspersions. 

" The question being put, whether 
this house do address her majesty 
for the justification of the proceed- 
ings of the represenUitive body of this 
province, in the prasent and former as- 
semblies, or not? it was carried in the 
affirmative. 

**A motion being made and the ques- 
tion being put, whether any pei-son that 
has signed the above-mentioned false and 
scandalous representation of the repre- 
sentative body of this province," (the 
address of the lieutenant-governor and 
council to the queen,) " be a fit member 
to sit in this house — unless he acknowl- 



edge his fault to this house — or not? it 
was carried in the negative. 

" Major Sandford, one of the members 
of this house, having acknowledged that 
he signed the above-mentioned address to 
her majesty, was asked if he would ac- 
knowledge his fault to this house for the 
same ? his answer was, he signed it as he 
w as one of her majesty's council, and was 
only accountable to her majesty for the 
same; wherefore, the question was put, 
whether Major Sandford be expelled this 
house for the same, or not ? it was carried 
in the affirmative. 

" Ordered, that Major Sandford be ex- 
pelled this house, for signing a false and 
scandalous paper chilled the humble ad- 
dress of the lieutenant-governor and 
council, to her majesty, in the year 1707; 
and he is expelled accordingly." 

Pursuant to the fii-st of the above 
resolutions, an address was prepared and 
sent to the queen, and a representation to 
Governor Hunter. This last was a par- 
ticular answer to the charges ; I extract 
a few specimens: After a preamble, re- 
citing the violent and tyrannical strain- 
ing of his powers by Cornbury, under 
pretence of the queen's prerogative ; his 
contempt of the laws ; his briberies, ex- 
tortions, and favoritism toward the most 
unprincipled ]X)liticians; the extreme 
and ultra-legal measures used against the 
Quakei-s, under pretence of their refus- 
ing obedience to the militia law ; and the 
open onslaught upon the rights of the 
proprietors, by taking away their title- 
papers from the custody of their author- 



94 



TE^E BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



ized agent,* and prohibiting them from 
either selling or buying land; — the assem- 
bly review at length the charges con- 
tained in the address of Ingoldsby and 
the council, from which I shall only take 
their reply to the absurd insinuation of 
revolutionary designs on the part of 
Jenings and Morris, and of an abetment 
of these by the assembly : 

"Can it be thought, or could the ad- 
dressors themselves ever seriously and 
deliberately think, that the province of 
New Jersey, one of the most inconsider- 
able of all her majesty's colonies, and the 
most incapable of making any defence, a 
great part of whose people are Quakers, 
who, by their principles, are against 
fighting, would be so unaccountably mad, 
as to throw off their allegiance, (es- 
pecially to be the first in doing it,) and 
expose themselves to unavoidable ruin 
and destruction ? Whoever can seriously 
think this, and with deliberation assert 
it, ought, very seriously, and without 
much deliberation, be confined to the so- 
ciety of madmen, as persons that can 
seriously and deliberately believe and say 
anything, which is all we shall say to this 
ridiculous, as well as malicious charge, 
and pass to the" (next) "article; than 
which, nothing more untrue, and know- 
ingly so, could be asserted, as we shall, 
by what follows, make out ; the article 
runs thus: Tliat tlie assembly are re- 
solved neither to support the queen^s gov- 



* The authorized aeeDt of the proprietors was John 
Barclay, of Ury, brother of the distinguished author 
of " Barclay's Apology for4he Quakers." 



emment with a revenue^ nor defend it by 
settling a militia. 

" Now it is plain, that this house never 
did deny to raise a sufficient support for 
the government, and took proper care 
concerning the militia, as by the several 
acts for those ends does more largely ap- 
pear ; nay, when the expedition against 
Canada was on foot, we gave £3,000 
for that end, over and above the support 
of government ; and the casting vote for 
the raising that money, and the settling 
the* militia now, was given by Mr. Hugh 
Middleton, one reputed a Quaker!" 

They then review the numerous out- 
rages on the liberty of the subject, which 
the council, as a body or as individuals, 
in emulation of the ill-example of their 
master, Cornbury, had committed; two 
instances of which, I take: "We have 
already laid before your excellency some 

proofs against Mr. , one of the 

council, of his extortion, and imprisoning 
and selling the queen's subjects ; who, if 
they had been guilty of the crimes al- 
ledged against them, ought to have been 
prosecuted accordingly, and not dis- 
charged on any hopes of private gain ; 
and, if not guilty, ought not to have 
been laid in prison and in irons, and, by 
those hardships, forced to become his ser- 
vants, rather than endure them!" 

"Many persons prosecuted upon in- 
formations, have been, at their excessive 
charge, forced to attend court after court, 
and not brought to tryal, when there was 
no evidence to ground such informations 
on ; but they kept prisoners in hope that 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



96 



some might be, in time, procured ; and 
two of them, to wit: David Johnston 
and his wife, after some weeks' imprison- 
ment, not admitted to bail till they 
entered into a recognizance, the condi- 
tion of which was, * TJiat if Lord Corn- 
bury was dissatisfied with admitting them 
to baily upon notice thereof signified to 
themy they should return to their impris- 
ment:^ His lordship was dissatisfied, 
and Leeds and Revell, who took the 
recognizance, sent their orders to them to 
return according to the condition of it." 
Next they take up the special hard- 
ships of the Quakers in not being admitted 
as jurors or as evidence: "The people 
called Quakers, who are, by her majesty, 
admitted to places of the most consider- 
able trust within this province, are some- 
times admitted to be evidences, and 
sometimes they have been refused to be 
jurors or evidences, either in civil or 
criminal cases; so that their safety, or 
receiving the benefit of her majesty's 
favour, seems not to depend on the laws 
or her directions, but the humours and 
capricios of the gentlemen who were 
judges of the courts : We take leave to 
inform your excellency, that the western 
division was settled by those people, who 
combatted with all the inconveniences 
attending a new settlement; and with 
great difficulty and charge, have, from a 
wilderness, improved it to be what you 
now see it is ; there are great numbers of 
them in it, and should they not be ad- 
mitted as evidences or jurors, they would 
be very unsafe;" "and the encourage- 



ment the gentlemen of the council have 
given to the meanest of the people, to 
abuse them, confirms us in the opinion, 
that there wants not those who have will 
enough to perpetrate the greatest mis- 
chiefs on that people, when they can 
escape the punishment due to their 
crimes." 

In conclusion they show that the pre- 
sent council, who, under Cornbury, aided 
and imitated his tyrannies, are now 
obstructing every useful measure of legis- 
lation. 

After reciting that, " Her majesty has 
been graciously pleased to remove Colonel 
Richard Ingoldsby from being lieuten- 
ant-governor, and we cannot sufficiently 
express our gratitude for so singular a 
favour;" they ask, finally, the further 
removal of eight members of the council, 
who are enumerated by name. 

The governor received this representa- 
tion and demand " kindly ;" he assured 
them that the queen had ordered him, if 
he could not reconcile the differences 
existing in the province, to make a just 
representation of them to her; "and 
that he did not doubt but that upon the 
representation he should make, her maj- 
esty would take such measures as should 
give a general satisfaction." 

The queen, accordingly, upon receiv- 
ing the appeal of the assembly, backed 
by the representations of the governor, 
removed the eight obnoxious councilors, 
and filled their places with men more 
acceptable to the representatives. 

In September of this year, (1710,) the 



96 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



expedition against Canada, to which New 
Jersey had, doubtless much against tlie 
will of her Quaker inhabitants, eontri- 
l:uted her quota, sailed from Boston in 
thirty-six vessels ; the result was the 
capture of Port Royal, in Nova Scotia. 

A more formidable expedition was, 
next year, (1711,) sot on foot, with the 
object of reducing all Canada ; to this 
New Jersey again contributed, to the 
amount of five thousand pounds in 
money and three hundred and sixty men ; 
the American forces from three New 
England colonies joined the British troops 
on board the fleet ; while the contingents 
from Connecticut, New York and New 
Jersey, with the Indians of the five 
nations, under Gen. Nicholson, marched 
by land from Albany to attack Montreal. 

The fleet, consisting of sixty-eight ves- 
sels with over six thousand troops, sailed 
from Boston and anchored in the Bay of 
Gaspe, at the entrance of the St. Law- 
rence, on the 18th of August. On the 
23d, contrary to the advice of the pilots, 
the fleet weighed anchor in the night 
and in a fog, and running upon shore, 
eight transports with eight hundred and 
eighty-four men were lost. This calamity 
caused the whole expedition to be given 
up ; the great fleet ingloriously sailed for 
England on September 10th, arriving a 
month later; the flag-ship, the Edgar, 
having been blown up by accident on 
the voyage. " Thus concluded, at a great 
expense of men and treasure, an affair 
above three years in agitation." 

In 1713, the assembly and the expur- 



gated and reformed council passed a bill 
entitled "An Act that the solemn affir- 
mation and declaration of the people 
called Quakers, shall be accepted instead 
of an oath in the usual form, and for 
qualifying and enabling the said people 
to serve as jurors, and to execute any 
office or place of trust or profit within 
this province." 

Several other excellent laws were 
passed, to the general satisfaction of the 
people. 

In 1716, (the year in which both the 
brothers from Bramham, Daniel and 
Samuel Smith, represented Burlington 
in assembly,) the people of Gloucester 
County made the unfortunate choice of 
Colonel Daniel Coxe to represent them, 
and, still more unfortunately, the assem- 
bly chose him speaker. Coxe- was a man 
of ability and great wealth, the son of 
the former [)roprietor, Dr. Coxe, of Lon- 
don, but had been one of the late corrupt 
council of Corn bury. On the death of 
Queen Anne and the accession of King 
George I., instructions were received by 
the governor from the new monarch, 
commanding him to convene the assem- 
bly at Amboy only, instead of alternately 
there and at Burlington, as had always 
been the custom. This was in violation 
of the act ratified by Queen Anne, in 
1710, which fixed the place of meeting 
alternately at each of these two cities, 
and was, besides, very inconvenient to 
the West Jersey members, particularly 
to those from the lower counties. Coxe 
took advantage of this discontent, to sow 



A FAMILY HISTOBY. 



97 



discord between the assembly and the 
governor, who was, of course, obliged to 
carry out the royal mandate. 

The good sense and moderation of the 
majority of the assembly, however, pre- 
vailed ; and Coxe, with some others, con- 
tumaciously absenting themselves, though 
sent for by the sergeant-at-arms of the 
house, were finally expelled from their 
seats "for contempt of authority and 
neglect of the service of their country," 
and writs issued for new elections. 

The assembly also resolved, that the 
expelled members should not ' sit in the 
present session, even if again returned in 
the new elections ordered. 

The last of the evil clique that had 
surrounded and abetted Cornbury, being 
now purged from the assembly as from 
the council, the liappier era for which 
Samuel Jenings had labored, but of 
which h^ had only seen the dawn, now 
at length shone fully upon the country. 
Honesty and patriotism ruled the coun- 
cils of State, instead of self-seeking and 
corruption; in accord with a public- 
spirited governor, the legislative bodies 
accomplished much for the good of the 
province, and in the session of this year, 
(1716,) passed sixteen useful laws. 

The tough struggle for political puri- 
fication, which this modest provincial 
assembly had fought through, adds new 
significance to the plain words in which 
the historian records the death, in 1718, 
of Samuel Smith, of Bramhara : " He 
had sought happiness in the quiet of ob- 
scurity, but being against his inclination 
13 



called to this and other public stations, 
he passed through them with a clear 
reputation." Little as such stormy scenes 
were to the tastes of the quiet and gen- 
tlemanly "Friend," he did not shrink 
from them at the call of duty, but stood 
like a man in his place, and struck his 
blow with the rest for the right, and 
passed unsullied through a struggle that 
had ruined some fair reputations. 

It was in the better times that had 
succeeded these storms, that his brother, 
Dr. Richard Smith, (third of the name,) 
was appointed to the King's Council. 
Descendants of the Bramham brethren 
are found in the council and assembly for 
two more generations, until the Revolu- 
tion swept away all the landmarks of the 
old society. 

The wise and benificent administration 
of Hunter continued two years longer, 
and ended in 1720, by his resignation, 
and the appointment of William Burnet, 
son of the eminent Bishop Burnet. 

A peaceful and uneventful period now 
succeeded. In 1738, Colonel Lewis Mor- 
ris, the co-laborer of Samuel Jenings, 
was appointed governor of New Jersey. 
Under him, and for several successive 
administrations, seats in the assembly 
were filled by Richard Smith, of Green 
Hill, (fourth of that name,) and by 
Joseph Cooper, of Cooper's Point, (son 
of William Cooper, and grandfather of 
the wife of the third Daniel Smith.) 
The character of Colonel Morris, as 
drawn by the historian of New Jersey, 
does justice to his eminent patriotism 



98 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



and ability, but at the same time shows 
that in old age, he was opinionated and 
pertinacious to a degree that often inter- 
fered with the due progress of business. 
An anecdote preserved, of a rencontre 
between him and Joseph Cooper, derives 
its point from this pertinacity of his. 
"At one of the tedious sessions in Col. 
Morris's time, when contrariety of sen- 
timents had long impeded business, that 
governor casually meeting him," (J. C.,) 
" in the street, said, ' Cooper, I wish you 
would go home, and send your wife.' * I 



will,' says he, *if the governor will 
do the same by his.' An anecdote 
deservedly expressive as to those good 
women." 

Joseph Cooper,who was nineteen years 
member for Gloucester County, is de- 
scribed in the obituary, as being of " a 
nobility of disposition and fortitude, supe- 
rior to many." The obituary notice of 
Richard Smith, of Green Hill, from the 
** History of New Jersey," will be given 
in its proper order, under the " fifth gen- 
eration." » 



CHAPTER XI. 



THE FIFTH GENERATION. 



WE now come to the fifth gener- 
ation of the family, being the 
first born in America ; — the children of 
Daniel, Emanuel, Samuel and the third 
Richard Smith. 

Daniel, who married Mary Murfin, 
had four sons, Daniel, (second,) Robert, 
John and Benjamin, and a daughter 
Katharine, the youngest child. 

Emanuel, who married Mary Willis, 
left three daughters, Sarah, Mary and 
Anne. The first two, only, married; 

Sarah, firstly, to Kinsey, and 

secondly, to Samuel Coxe ; Mary to 
George Eyre. As none of the descend- 
ants of these lines have been of the 
family name, and as Emanuel, himself, 
was rather a Bramham — than a Burling- 
ton — Smith, these lines do not come 
strictly within the scope of a history of 
the Burlington Smiths ; I have not been 
able, 33 yet, fiiUy to trace them. 

Samuel married, firstly, Elizabeth, 
daughter of the Hon. Edmund Lovett, 
member of the Pennsylvania Assembly, 
from Bucks County — by whom he had 
three children; and secondly, Doro- 
thea Gyles. His children, (by the first 
wife only,) were Richard, Samuel and 
Mary; Richard and Mary only, left 
issue. 



Dr. Richard Smith married Anna 
Marshall, and had five children, Richard, 
James, Rachel, William and Jonathan ; 
the first three of whom left issue. 

Tlie task before us is to trace the his- 
tory of ten persons and their descend- 
ants ; five of the eldest line, two of the 
middle line, and three of the youngest 
line. Let us first take up the eldest line, 
that of Daniel and Mary Murfin Smith. 

The eldest son, Daniel Smith, the 
second, (member of assembly in 1742,) 
was born in the year 1696. He mar- 
ried, on "Tenth month 17th, A. D. 
1719," Mary Hoedt or Hood, daughter 
of Casper Hoedt, a Dutch "Friend,'' 
from Amsterdam ; the only instance in 
our family of an intermarriage with the 
European races who settled here in ad- 
vance of the English. J. Sansom, in 
his Smith MS., says, "He was a very 
amiable character, and acquired a con- 
siderable fortune by trade," (the West 
India trade before mentioned,) "upon 
which he lived hospitably, and as he had 
only two daughters to provide for, he 
made a generous distribution of it at his 
decease." Daniel Smith, (second,) and his 
next brother, Robert Smith, born in 1698, 
both continued to reside in the large, 
old mansion of their father, at the comer 

99 



100 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



of Broad and Main Streets, Burlington, 
and at Daniel's death, in 1769, it be- 
came Robert's property; Mary and 
Sarah, Daniel's daughters, married two 
Philadelphiaus, Thomas Lightfoot and 
James Pemberton. 

Robert Smith, the second brother, 
was for several years in the commission 
of the peace, for Burlington County, 
" and filled that and several other public 
offices with reputation."* He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of the Hon. John 
Bacon, of Chesterfield, brother of the 
Hon. Samuel Bacon, of Salem, whose 
descent from lord-keeper Sir Nicholas 
Bacon, has been indicated. I have the 
certificate of the second marriage of this 
John Bacon, showing that he married 
Priscilla, daughter of John Leppington, 
of Housham, County York, England, in 
1711, at the "Friends'" meeting, in 
Sheffield. Elizabeth Bacon's mother 
was his first wife, Elizabeth Smith, of 
Salem, before mentioned. The father 
afterward removed to his brother's place 
at Bacon's Neck, near Salem, where he 
died. He had formerly served there as 
justice of the quorum, etc. Judge Robert 
Smith died in 1781 ; of his goodness of 
heart, is preserved the interesting remin- 
iscence that two aged household slaves, 
man and wife, were so affected by their 
kind master's death, that after it they lost 
their spirits, pined away and soon died. 

The third brother, John Smith, born 



* He was Recorder of the City of Burlington and 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in the years 
1737-1 769, etc. 



1700, was, according to the family biog- 
rapher, Joseph Sansom, " an active, intel- 
ligent man, and went over to the West 
Indies, in 1726, where he married Anne 
Farrel, a woman of large estate, by whom 
he had issue, but no survivors. He died 
in the Island of Jamaica, about 1760." 

Benjamin Smith, the fourth son, was 
born in 1704. " He married Sarah Bur- 
ling, and lived many years at Prime 
Hope Mills, on the Delaware, where he 
died about the year 1760, and was in- 
terred at Burlington." 

The youngest child, Katharine, was 
born in 1711. She married, in 1731, 
William Callender, originally of the 
Island of Barbadoes, where his ancestors 
had held land as early as 1638. At the 
time of their marriage he was engaged, 
as a merchant, in the shipping trade 
between that island and America, but 
settled at Philadelphia on marriage, the 
bride's parents making this a condition 
of their consent. He represented Phila- 
delphia in assembly in the years 1753, 
1754 and 1755, Benjamin Franklin 
being the other representative. His 
country-seat on the banks of the Dela- 
ware, known for many years as " Callen- 
der's Place," is described as a most agree- 
able retreat, and here he exercised a large 
and genial hospitality. He died in 1763, 
and his widow in 1789. She had re- 
moved, on her husband's death, to her 
native place, Burlington, but, on the out- 
break of the Revolutionary War, was so 
annoyed by the soldiers being quartered 
at her residence, that she closed the house 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



101 



and spent her last days in Philadelphia. 
She was interred among her ancestors at 
Burlington. The funeral took place 
from the old house, in which she was 
born, then the property of her nephew, 
the third Daniel Smith ; the remains 
having been conveyed there by boat, in 
three hours' sail from Philadelphia. 

The middle or second line of our 
family, descending from Samuel Smith, 
of Bramham, has but one male repre- 
sentative in this generation. 

Richard Smith, fourth of that name, 
whom, for distinction's sake, I shall call 
Richard Smith, of Green Hill, was born 
July 5th, 1699. He married, August 
20th, 1719, Abigail, daughter of the 
Hon. Thomas Rapier, formerly of Sin- 
dersby, Yorkshire, and Abigail, his wife, 
daughter of William Perkins, the early 
colonist, whose death, on board the ship 
Shield, has already been mentioned. 
Richard Smith appears to have combined, 
in an unusual degree, the virtues of 
energy and business ability with gentle- 
ness and tenderness of heart. His hos- 
pitality was largely exercised toward 
traveling Friends, as extant letters from 
such men as Isaac Norris and others, 
amply testify. He represented Burling- 
ton in assembly for nearly twenty years 
with an ability which is witnessed by the 
confidence of his constituents and by the 
obituary presently to be quoted, while in 
his private affairs he showed an equal 
energy. He was extensively engaged in 
commerce to the West Indies, shipping 
thither colonial produce and receiving, 



in return, sugars, rum and other tropical 
products. He owned and even built his 
vessels, sending- his sons with them as 
supercargoes. His wharves and ware- 
houses were on what is now called Green 
Bank, the favorite lounge of the gentry 
of Burlington, all vestige of its former 
commercial character having long disap- 
peared. The growth of the great mart 
of Philadelphia has absorbed the com- 
merce that was once Burlington's, but in 
those days the elder town was also the 
busier and the richer. 

Richard Smith's handsome town-house 
in Burlington, still standing, but com- 
pletely changed, had then a high observa- 
tory on the roof, from which the approach 
of his returning ships could be early 
descried. It was built by him for his 
bride, as the date, 1720, upon the still 
existing weather-vane shows.* His coun- 
try-house was the " Green Hill " place, 
originally that of Samuel Jenings. 

The obituary in our often-quoted text- 
book, the " History of New Jersey," 
runs thus : " A. D. 1751, the 9th of No- 
vember, died, in the fifty-third year of 
his age, Richard Smith : He represented 
Burlington in assembly near twenty 
years, through a great variety of difficult 
business : He maintained a fair reputa- 
tion, was instrumental in procuring con- 
siderable provincial benefits, and hence, 
acquired the love of many, who had no 
opportunities of knowing him, but in a 

* It occupied an entire block between Main and 
two cross-streets. It gives a curious picture of the 
times, to read of ships passing Philadelphia to unload 
at Burlington. 



102 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



publick character. He was cool and 
even in his temper, impartial and con- 
scientious in the discharge of his duty, 
kind and careful in every paternal rela- 
tion, and generous in both sentiment and 
conduct." 

Dr. Franklin's paper, the Pennsylva- 
nia Gazette^ November 21st, 1751, said 
of Richard Smith : " Last week died 
Richard Smith, Esq., of Burlington, N. 
J., and was buried in Friends' burial 
ground in that city ; in whom the char- 
acters of a generous, good-natured, hos- 
pitable man, true patriot and good Chris- 
tian, were so truly blended, that he 
lived beloved and esteemed by all who 
knew him, and his death is lamented as 
a public loss by the people of that pro- 
vince." 

He died in the harness, at Amboy, 
where he was attending in his place as 
an assemblyman. "The body was 
brought by his sorrowing sons to Bur- 
lington for interment, and was met on 
the road by a procession of his fellow- 
citizens desirous of showing their respect 
to his memory." 

A touching address to his children 
was found folded together with his will ; 
I venture to quote it in full. It reminds 
one, by its gentle graces, of the letter 
formerly quoted, by his grandfather, 
Richard Smith, of Bramham. 

" Burlington, 26th of 4th mo., 1750. 

" Dear Children : — Inclosed you 
have my will, which I hope you will all 
be satisfied with ; I have made it in the 



best and equallest manner I was capable 
of doing it at this time, and in the cir- 
cumstances my affairs are in at present ; 
nevertheless, if any difference should 
arise or happen between you concerning 
the matters contained in it, or any other 
occasion or thing, my advice is that he, 
she or they concerned, more especially 
then retire before the Lord, humbly 
beseeching Him for a reconciliation, con- 
sidering, as reasonable creatures, and as 
I have OQ such occasions often done, that 
the Great Lord, at whose disposal are the 
cattle of a thousand hills, and that He 
can give to whom He pleaseth ; He, I 
say, consider, in the dispensations of His 
providence, with your honest endeavours, 
can give a blessing upon it, which may 
soon make up, or more than compensate 
what you suffer in interest for peace' 
sake, and the imprudence it would be to 
entertain a root of bitterness, producing 
strife, hatred, or, at least, ill-will, one 
towards another, to the grieving of the 
Holy Spirit and wounding your own 
souls, and thereby justly incur the dis- 
pleasure of Him, whose blessing is abso- 
lutely necessary, and without which a 
great deal more would do you no good. 
I have nothing to add on temporal affairs ; 
you have known my mind as to spirituals. 
I shall only add that I rely on the mercy 
and goodness of Almighty God, that He 
will, through the mediation of His dear 
Son Jesus, blot out and forgive my tres- 
passes against Him ; and humbly implore 
His help that, for the time that is still 
to come, I may, through His grace, be 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



103 



preserved from offending against Him, 
and that I may thus be watchful, looking 
to ray Helper, until the time of my dis- 
solution shall come ; that then He may 
be graciously pleased to receive my soul 
into eternal bliss. 

" Finally, dear children, live in peace 
one with another, and with all men as 
much as in you lieth ; so may the God 
of peace grant you His peace and the 
assistance of His Holy Spirit, whilst you 
remain m this world of temptations and 
troubles, that you, through the help 
thereof, may be able to look up unto 
Him and surmount them all, and at last 
be accounted worthy of His mercy, and 
a mansion in His house where the wicked 
cease troubling and the weary are at rest. 
So fervently prayeth your 
" Affectionate father, 

KicHARD Smith, Jr." 

The "junior" distinguished him from 



his uncle. Dr. Richard Smith, who lived 
till this year, 1750. 

Richard Smith's only sister, Mary, 
born April 15th, 1701, married Joseph 
Noble, son of Abel Noble, of Bucks 
County, Pennsylvania, and grandson of 
William Noble, of Bristol, England. 

The last or youngest line of our family, 
in this generation, embraces the five 
children of Dr. Richard Smith, of Bram- 
ham, of whom a second "Richard Smith, 
junior," fourth in succession from the 
first Richard, of Bramham, his brother 
James and sister Rachel, are those, only, 
of whose issue we have record. The 
first-cousin and namesake of Richard, of 
Green Hill, married Hannah Peak; 
James Smith married a lady whose name 
is not on our record, and Rachel married 
Dr. John Pole, of Brattlehay, Somerset, 
England. On this third line of the 
family, my information is, at present, by 
no means as full as could be desired. 



CHAPTER XII. 



THE QUAKER AND THE INDIAN. 



WE have already had occasion to 
observe the kindly simplicity of 
the relations, worthy of the golden age, 
subsisting between the first Quaker set- 
tlers in New Jersey, and their savage 
neighbors, the Lenni Lenape or Delaware 
Indians. We are now to see how far 
and how long this original amity was 
preserved, what measure of justice and 
generosity the weaker race received from 
the stronger, and how our own family bore 
itself towards the manly but hapless 
aborigines. 

It is well observed by Samuel AUin- 
son, (" Fragmentary History of the 
New Jersey Indians,") that "though 
the Indian is now to us a vanished race, 
it is felt to be owing to causes which our 
ancestors could not control — to the adher- 
ence, by the aborigines, to the tribal fee 
of land and savage modes of subsistence, 
and their consequent disinclination for 
patient la])our. It is desirable to per- 
petuate a knowledge of the kindly rela- 
tions which subsisted, if only as another 
proof that hostility is not a necessary state 
between comparatively rude and civilized 
inhabitants of the same territory." 

Among the earliest efforts to combine 
and systematize the benevolence of indi- 
viduals toward the red men, was the 



" New Jersey Association for helping the 
Indians," a society whose constitution 
was drawn by Samuel Smith, the histo- 
rian of New Jersey, in 1757, whose first 
subscription-list was headed by Daniel 
Smith, of our fifth, and Samuel and John 
Smith, of our sixth generation, with the 
handsome aggregate of ninety pounds, 
and whose members were nearly all, 
also members of the Burlington Smith 
family.* The complete list of members 
and subscriptions is as follows : (I quote 
from Samuel Allinson.) 

" Daniel Smith, £20 ; Samuel Smith, 
£20 ; John Smith, £50 ; Joshua Raper, 
£6; Joseph Noble, £5, 8«.; Edward 
Cathrall, £5, 8^.; William Heulings, 
£5; Elizabeth Smith, £16; Richard 
Smith, £5; Thomas Wetherill, £4; 
Wm. Hartshorne, £3 ; Jonathan Smith,^ 
£3 ; John Hoskins, £2 ; Hannah Harts- 
horne, £4, 9«. ; Daniel Smith, Jr., £5 ; 
Seamon Rodman, £5 ; Samuel Rodman, 
£5 ; Patience Clews, £1 ; John Wool- 
man, £6." 

Except Cathrall, the Hartshornes, 
Patience Clews and the saintly John 
Woolman, all these were either members 

* It may be here remarked, that our family formed 
an almost equally large proportion of the original con- 
tributors to that now venerable institution, the Bur- 
lington Public Library. 

104 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



105 



by birth, or marriage connections, of our 
family. Daniel Smith, eldest son of 
Daniel, of Bramham, and Jonathan 
Smith, M.D., youngest son of Dr. 
Richard, of Bramham, represent the 
two extremes of our fifth generation, of 
which we are about to take leave ; and 
among the marriage connections, J. 
Raper, J. Noble, W. Heulings, T. Weth- 
erill and the two Rodmans are of a co- 
eval generation, while all others belong 
to our sixth generation. 

" The motto adopted by the society, a 
very appropriate one, is from Isaiah Iviii., 
6, 7 and 9. * Is not this the fast that I 
have chosen ? — to deal thy bread to the 
hungry, and that thou bring the poor 
that are fiost out to thy house ? When 
thou seest the naked that thou cover 
him, — then shalt thou call and the Lord 
shall answer ; thou shaft cry and He shall 
say, Here I am.' " 

" The preamble sets forth as * a truth 
fresh in the memory of several yet living, 
as well as evidenced by the concurrent 
testimony of the first settlers in general,' 
that the native Indians of New Jersev 
were remarkably kind to them, not only 
suffering them to sit down and improve 
their possessions quietly, (for which the 
Indians had a consideration,) but volun- 
tarily administering to their frequent 
necessities, when they could expect no 
reward, and when, without their assist- 
ance, some of the first settlers must have 
suffered exceedingly ; and this, too, at a 
time when there were many hundreds of 
them to one white; and had they been 
14 



disposed to crush the growing settlement, 
according to the outward appearance of 
things, nothing could have been easier. 
But so far were they from thoughts of 
that kind, that they promoted the welfare 
of the whites in almost every instance 
where it was in their power, cherished 
them through many distressing intervals, 
and greatly contributed, under Provi- 
dence, to render an otherwise inhospit- 
able wilderness, pleasant to the European 
strangers. Considering, therefore, the 
scattered situation of their posterity, and 
the real wretchedness in which many of 
them are involved through their own 
bad conduct, and, in part, for want of a 
proper place of residence, where they 
might live comfortably together, and by 
hunting and fishing and what they could 
raise out of the earth, support themselves 
in a more convenient and reputable 
manner than they have hitherto done, 
we are desirous to procure a suitable 
homestead for the tribe. This, in some 
instances, might have the desired effect, 
but if it should not be the case, gratitude 
to the natural and original proprietors of 
the soil whereon we reside, who treated 
our predecessors with such a distin- 
guished regard, and to whose justice and 
indulgence t/ieUy many families, under 
Providence, have reason to acknowledge 
their well-being nmv, seems to demand 
some lasting testimonial«.of our respect 
to their posterity ; and that, not only for 
the treatment our ancestors then met 
with, but for the prudential reasons of 
engaging them by some public act of 



106 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



Christian benevolence, to continue un- 
shaken in their friendship to the Eng- 
lish, to keep them out of the way of 
danger or of being seduced by rambling 
abroad, and to exhibit to other nations of 
Indians a standing memento of justice 
and kindness, which, it may be reason- 
ably expected, will have a strong and 
lasting influence on their councils, and 
conduce to the advantage of us and ours 
and our neighbours for many years to 
come. At a time, therefore, when our 
brethren of Pennsylvania, animated by 
the like charitable motives, are showing 
their regard by large donations in favour 
of the Indians of that province — for the 
reasons above, and others of considerable 
importance — we, the subscribers, do 
mutually agree upon the following 
articles/' 

The first article provides, " That a tract 
of about two thousand acres of the best 
land that can be got, nigh or adjoining 
the Barrens,* in the counties of Mon- 
mouth, Burlington and Gloucester, in 
New Jersey, be purchased, as soon as 
conveniently may be, after the subscrip- 
tions are completed." By the second, 
all the native Indians of New Jersey, 
who had not freeholds already, with their 
families and their posterity forever, were 
to be entitled to settle and live on said 
land free of rent. The affairs of the 
associatiou were to be attended to by six 

* These Barrens were the more mountainons regions, 
still covered with primeval forest, and not likely to be 
soon cleared by the whites ; — hence, forming a natural 
preserve for the game, which was the chief subsist- 
ence of the Indians. 



managers and a treasurer, to be annually 
elected by the subscribers, and they and 
their successors were to serve without fee 
or reward. 

** They were to purchase the land, have 
the oversight of the resident Indians and 
keep a record of them, order their re- 
spective settlements, and adjust all dis- 
putes that might happen among them. 
They were directed, prudently, to dis- 
courage intercourse with foreign In- 
dians, and to prevent such from settling 
among them. The deed was to be taken 
by the managers, in trust for the sub- 
scribers. Any surplus money was to be 
expended for the benefit of the Indians, 
in building, fencing, stock or implements, 
or in providing schools. For the sake 
of preserving harmony and concord, 
membership in the association was re- 
stricted to the 'Society of Friends.' 

" No evidence has come to my knowl- 
edge that this association, with such 
praiseworthy objects, ever went into 
operation. The project was probably 
found, in its development, to be of too 
great magnitude for private enterprise, 
and that other important objects requir- 
ing governmental action, ought to be 
connected with it. But the persons en- 
gaged in the work were not accustomed 
to fail in a good cause, and their gener- 
ous plan, I have no doubt, foreshadowed 
and was merged in the action of the pro- 
vincial government the ensuing year." 
(S. AUinson.) 

While this society was thus organiz- 
ing, the government of New Jersey had 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



107 



been holding, in 1756, a treaty with the 
Indians, "at which several measures 
were discussed and mutually agreed upon, 
as likely to promote the general benefit 
of the English and Indians. A law 
was passed in accordance with this agree- 
ment, by the legislature, dated March 
31st, 1757, restricting the sale of all in- 
toxicating drinks to Indians, declaring 
void all their debts and pawns for strong 
drink, forbidding their imprisonment for 
debt, and the setting of traps of steel or 
iron" (for deer,) "weighing more than 
three and a half pounds. The sale of 
Indian lands was also forbidden but upon 
careful supervision and in prescribed 
forms, and on reasonable terms." Five 
commissioners, one of whom was our 
ancestor in the Logan line, the Hon. 
Charles Read, were appointed to inquire 
into the Indian claims to lands, and report 
to the legislature. 

The restriction on liquor-selling, car- 
ried out the measures much earlier 
adopted by the Quakers. In 1704, the 
yearly meeting of "Friends," of Bur- 
lington, directed, that "If any among us 
do sell, barter or exchange, directly or 
indirectly, to the Indians, any beer, 
brandy, or other spirits or strong liquors, 
it being contrary to y® ancient care 
Friends have had of those poor ignorant 
heathen people, and contrary to this 
meeting's testimony against it, such loose, 
disorderly walkers should be laboured 
with, and if not reclaimed, testified 
against." 

At a treaty, held at Crosswicks, in 



February, 1758, " Teedyuscung, King of 
the Delawares, living on the Susque- 
hanna, and George Hopenyoke, of the 
the same place, and the Indians inhabit- 
ing New Jersey, or the major part of 
them, attended and delivered to the coiji- 
missioners a list of all the lands they 
claimed — twenty-five different tracts — 
(some of them extensive and indefinite,) 
and released to the proprietors of the 
divisions of New Jersey and the pur- 
chasers under them, all lands not so 
claimed." They also appointed five of 
their number their attorneys to execute 
a deed for their aforesaid claimed lands. 

These five Indian attorneys, who ap- 
pear to have had some schooling in the 
English language, wrote a letter to 
"Friend Mr. Israel Pemberton," (of 
Philadelphia,) as a particular friend of 
their race, asking his advice as to their 
best course, "as we find we are not able 
to transact in deep things." " The coun- 
sel of this honorable 'Friend' and his 
associates, probably was to ask for a 
specified tract of land for a residence, in 
lieu of their extensive, though uncertain 
and contested, claims of unsold territory. 
Such, at least, was their request, at the 
next meeting, thus carrying out the idea 
of the * New Jersey Association ' of the 
year before. 

" The Indian attorneys and a number 
of their prominent constituents, with 
several delegates from allied tribes in 
Pennsylvania who claimed some rights 
in the soil of New Jersey, met the colo- 
nial commissioners in conference, at Bur- 



108 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



lington, on the 9th of * eighth month/ 
(August,) 1758, and the Indians pre- 
sented a proposition in writing, stating 
that they were desirous that a tract of 
land in the possession of Benjamin 
Springer, in the township of Evesham, 
in the county of Burlington, should be 
purchased for the habitation of the 
Delaware Indians living south of tlie 
Karitan; for which they unanimously 
proposed and agreed to release all the 
-rights of the Indians to lands in New 
Jersey, except the claim of Moses To- 
tami, near the Raritan, and such lands as 
some of them held under English rights/' 

By a law passed three days afterwards, 
the legislature authorized the commis- 
sioners to carry this desire into effect by 
the purchase of a convenient tract, " in 
order that the Indians may be gratified 
in this particular, and that they may 
have always in their view a lasting mon- 
ument of the justice and tenderness of this 
colony towards them," £1600 was "ap- 
propriated for the purpose of extinguish- 
ing the various Indian claims in the 
province, excepting the right of hunting 
and of fishing." The payment for claims 
south of the Raritan was not to exceed 
half this sum. 

The law also provided, "That the 
lands to be purchased for the Indians, as 
aforesaid, shall not hereafter be subject 
to any tax." 

The proposed tract in Evesham, called 
Edge Pillock, appears to have been 
promptly purchased. "The deed from 
Benjamin Springer and wife, bears date 



August 29th, 1758." The title is for one 
thousand nine hundred and eighty-three 
acres, bought, originally, of Richard 
Smith and Benjamin Moore. A re-sur- 
vey showed, however, by more accurate 
measurement, that three thousand and 
forty-four acres were included within the 
ancient lines. The consideration paid 
Springer and wife was £745. 

"Thus satisfactorily closed," (says S. 
Allinson,) "the causes for difference 
with the natives south of the Raritan. 
Arrangements were already in progress 
by Governor Bernard, for holding a 
treaty with those north of that river and 
their Indian allies in Pennsylvania and 
New York, and at a conference held at 
Burlington, on the 7th and 8th of eighth 
month, (August,) 1758, the Indian ora- 
tors proposed to meet at the old council 
fire, * at the forks of the Delaware, the 
next full moon after this,' alleging, that 
if held on the eastern side of the river, 
* though they should speak loud, the 
distant nations could not hear, on account 
of the roaring water between them.' 
Governor Bernard, who appears to have 
been sincerely desirous to effect a lasting 
peace with the Indians, made no objection 
to this fanciful reasoning, and assented to 
the proposition. A general conference 
w^as accordingly held at Easton, the 
minutes of which, so far as thev related 
to New Jei-scy, with the principal 
speeches on both sides, bearing dates 
from the 8th to the 26th October, 1758, 
are published at large in 'Smith's History 
of New Jersey.' 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



109 



" The general pacification of the In- 
dians was then a great object in all the 
neighbouring cx)lonies, and the governor 
and lieutenant-governor of Pennsylvania, 
with six members of the council, a com- 
mittee of the legislature and a number 
of citizens of Philadelphia, principally 
' Friends,' whose presence was desired by 
the Indians — Governor Bernard and the 
commissioners of New Jersey, and George 
Croghan, deputy and Indian agent from 
New York, participated in the proceed- 
ings. More than five hundred Indians, 
nearly half of whom, however, were 
women and children, were in attendance, 
representing the Six Nations, the Dela- 
wares, Minisinks, Wapings, and various 
other tribes. The treaty resulted, as was 
hoped, in a better understanding between 
the parties, and a strengthening of the 
bonds of friendship. A confirmation- 
deed of ceded lands in Pennsylvania was 
executed by the chiefs of the united na- 
tions, and handed from Indian to Indian 
all around the house. The deed for New 
Jersey south of the Raritan was ap- 
proved and confirmed, and a deed for all 
the remaining land in New Jersey was 
executed by the chiefs of the Munsies, 
Wapings and Pomptons, sixteen in num- 
ber, and approved by the chiefs of the 
8ix Nations," (the so-called " uncles " of 
the Delawares, Minisinks or Munsies, and 
Wapings or Pomptons, of New Jersey.) 

** As a consideration for the relinquish- 
ment of the northern claims, Governor 
Bernard paid to the Indians the sum of 
one thousand pieces ^ of eight,' to be 



divided according to their respective 
rights. Egohohoun, a Munsy or Mini- 
sink Indian, and Aquawaton, a Waping 
or Pompton, acknowledge, on the back 
of the deed, the receipt of £375. 

" Teedyuscung, King of the Delawares, 
requested, for an aged and infirm Waping 
chief, the favor of a horse to carry him 
home. Tagashata, a JSeneca chief, made 
a similar request for himself, botii of 
which were granted. Thomas King, an 
influential Oneida chief, also desired that 
a number of wagons might be sent as 
far as Wyoming, where they had left 
their canoes, to carry such as were not 
able to walk, and the goods which had 
been given them ; also, that a supply of 
provisions might be put in the wagons, 
sufficient to serve them till they got to 
their respective habitations. With mu- 
tual expressions of good-will, and reso- 
lutions to keep bright the chain of friend- 
ship,* the conferences were concluded with 
great ^tisfaction.' " 

"No subsequent controversy arose 
with our red brethren, and at the treaty 
at Fort Stanwix, in 1769, attended by 
Governor Franklin, the Six Nations pub- 
licly acknowledged the repeated instances 
of the justice of the province, in bring- 
ing murderers" (of Indians) "to con- 
dign punishment, declared they had no 
claim whatever upon New Jersey, and 
in the most solemn manner conferred 
upon her the name " of the Great Ar- 
biter, or Doer of Justice, (Sagorigwyogs- 
tha.) 

In these years, from 1754 to 1758, 



110 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



while these peaceful and honorable agree- 
ments between the savage and the civil- 
ized man, were being originated and 
consummated at Burlington and Easton, 
scenes of a very different nature were 
being transacted in the western wilds of 
the provinces of Virginia, Pennsylvania 
and New York. The sanguinary strug- 
gle between the French and English, 
known in our early annals as ** the old 
French war," was then dragging its slow 
length along, and shortly before the 
execution of these treaties in the east, 
the wildernesses around Fort Duquesne, 
in the west, had echoed to the shouts, 
the drums and the volleys of an Enghsh 
host, entangled and lost in pathless de- 
files — to the irregular sharp crackle of the 
rifle-shots poured upon them from every 
bush and coigne of vantage by the fierce 
and subtle Indians — to the wild yells of 
savage triumph and the shrieks of mortal 
agony. The disciplined courage of the 
British had given way under this new, 
masked and deadly mode of warfare, and 
their utter destruction had only been 
averted by the coolness, knowledge and 
heroism of the despised colonel of the 
provincial cx^ntingent, one George Wash- 
ington. 

Some eddies from this fierce tempest 
must needs find their way to the pastoral 
quiet of the Quaker homes. I have in 
my possession a paper from one of the 
collateral lines of ancestry, which shows 
how the passion and agony of this strug- 
gle troubled the peace of one household 
among them. 



We must imagine two fair girls, 
brought up in all the virginal and nun- 
like modesty and innocency of true 
Quaker maidens, Rebecca and Esther by 
name, and we must follow them to the 
sanctity of their chamber. 

(I copy, in all its simplicity, the lan- 
guage of the aged narrator.) 

" Rebecca was asleep and Esther was 
awake ; she heard her moaning in great 
distress ; Esther said, * What is the mat- 
ter, Becky? what distresses thee so 
much?' She replied, it was about a 
young man ; Esther asked who it was, 
supposing she was awake ; but she said 
something so unconnected, that she Jbund 
she was sleeping; Esther then awoke 
her, and told her what she said, which 
she denied; until she found she had 
been talking in her sleep : she then said, 
^Well, {Jetty, thou hast heard what I 
never intended any one should know, 
and now I will relate all the circum- 
stances. I became acquainted with a 
very handsome, fine-looking young man, 
an officer in the British army ; we were 
very much attached to each other, and I 
promised to marry him when he returned : 
before he left home, he had a piece of 
gold cut in two parts, one piece with a 
lock of my hair and the other with a 
lock of his ; the piece with the lock of 
my hair he kept, the other, with his, he 
gave to me, and I have it yet : I dreamed, 
just now, he was taken by the Indians 
and tied to a tree, and he was stuck full 
of pine splints, and then they set him 
on fire to burn him to death ; at which 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



Ill 



I was in an agony, at the thought of his 
sufferings.' Esther said, * Wliy, Becky, 
thou never said anything about it ; where 
did you meet?' 'Near home; I knew 
father would be very much offended if 
he knew I had any intention of marry- 
ing him, a British officer : I had lettei^s 
from him often, 1 ut not any for some 
weeks, which has made me so uneasy : 
Now, Hetty, as I have told thee all, 
say nothing about it to any of the family, 
and when I hear anything more I will 
tell thee.' Esther promised not to tell. 
Sonffe weeks after, Rebecca said to her, 
* Hetty, I want thee to oome and sleep 
with me to-night.' After they had re- 
tired, she told her she had received a 
letter, with the other piece of gold, by a 
young man who was in the army with 
him : they were both taken prisoners by 
the Indians, and were to suffer death; 
the young officer told him he wanted 
him to promise him to take a small piece 
of paper, (which he took out of his 
bosom,) and give it to her, and tell her 
he always wore it next his heart, and 
that his last prayers would be for her ; 
he told him he would if he ever got 
away; he then said he could be easier. 
8he then asked what death he died ; he 
did not answer. She told him she wished 
to know very much : he said, *A most 
horrid death — the Indians tied him to a 
tree and stuck him with splints, and set 
him on fire :' he said the sight was too 
awful to see, he could not stand to see it; 
at which she nearly fainted. She could 
not rest until she had told Esther ; sh^ 



was glad she had told her before, as she 
was then a comfort to her in her grief." 

This strange and sad little story of 
by-gone love and fidelity was taken down 
by one now deceased, from the lips of u 
very aged lady, the daughter of " Esther," 
in her own simple language. 

The Indian, when all his worst pas- 
sions were aroused, was such as we see 
him in the above story, a remorseless 
savage ; under the mild influence of the 
Quaker, he became a different being. 

The following anecdote is preserved of 
the famous Teedyuscung, elected King 
of the Delawares in 1754. 

"One evening he was sitting at the 
fireside of a * Friend.' Both of them 
were silently looking at the fire, indulg- 
ing their own reflections. At length the 
silence was broken by the * Friend,' who 
said, * I will tell thee what I have been 
thinking of. I have been thinking of a 
rule delivered by the Author of the 
Christian religion, which, from its ex- 
cellence, we call the Golden Rule.' 
* Stop,' said Teedyuscung, * don't praise 
it to me, but rather tell me what it is, 
and let me think for myself I do not 
wish you to tell me of its excellence; 
tell me what it is.' * It is for one man 
to do to another as he would have the 
other do to him.' * That's impossible. 
It cannot be done,' Teedyuscung imme- 
diately replied. Silence again ensued. 
Teedyuscung lighted his pipe and walked 
about the room. In about a quarter of 
an hour he came to his friend with 
smiling countenance, and taking the 



112 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



pipe from his mouth, said, * Brother, I 
have been thoughtful of what you told 
me. If the Great Spirit that made man 
would give him a new hearty he could do 
as you say, but not else.' " 

I shall here anticipate the regular 
course of history for the sake of showing 
the sequel of the story of the Quakers 
and the Indians in New Jersey. 

Upon the Edge Pillock tract, now 
called Brotherton, "this remnant of the 
Leni Lenape nation, now about one hun- 
dred in number, continued to reside for 
many years. Tlieir land was excellent 
for cultivation. Tliey had a fine cedar- 
swamp, and a water-power and saw-mill. 
They were contiguous to extensive hunt- 
ing-grounds in the * Pine Barrens,' and 
within a day's journey of the sea-coast, 
where wild fowl and shell-fish were 
abundant. The rights of hunting and 
fishing, as secured by the treaty, were 
freely used, and also the traditionary 
right of felling timber and cutting 
basket stuff,* mentioned in the confer- 
ences, but not referred to in the written 
agreements. A number of comfortable 
dwellings were put up by the province. 
A meeting-house was built of logs, which 
continued as a place of worship after 



* The rights of hunting and fishing, and cutting I 
basket-stuflf, continued to be exercised without inter- 
ference or molestation, by visiting Indians, within the i 
memory of living persons. An elder relative informs ! 
me, that when a child, a party of Indians bad estab- 
lished themselves, for these purposes, in his father's 
woods, at Green Hill. Though perfectly inoffensive, | 
the boy was afraid of the swarthy and silent wander- I 
era, and would hide in the trees when they approached. 
One day, they sat down to eat their dinner under the ! 
very tree in which he had taken refuge ! i 



their removal. Stephen Calvin, an in- 
terpreter at the Crosswicks and Easton 
Treaties, was the schoolmaster. His son, 
Bartholomew, who was placed at Prince- 
ton College, through the influence of" 
(the missionary) " Brainerd, followed 
him in the occupation, and had as many 
white as Indian scholars." (Allinson.) 

He was considered an excellent teacher, 
and his school and the settlement were 
frequently visited and benefited by emi- 
nent "Friends," "but the civilization 
established was of a low order. Per- 
sistent industry was not general, and they 
did not become a tliriving agricultural 
people. The tribal fee of land quenches 
individual enterprise." 

"In the year 1801, the Brotherton or 
Edge Pillock Indians, were invited by a 
kindred tribe, the Mauhekunnuks," (Mo- 
hicans,) "at New Stockbridge, near 
Oneida Lake, to 'pack up their mat,' and 
'come and eat out of their dish,' which, 
they said, was large enough for them all, 
adding, with characteristic earnestness, 
that * their necks were stretched in look- 
ing toward the fireside of their grand- 
father till they were as long as cranes!' " 
This invitation of their "grandchildren" 
having been accepted, the Brotherton 
Indians applied to the legislature for 
authority to dispose of their lands. Com- 
missioners were accordingly appointed to 
divide and sell the Brotherton tract, 
and invest the funds arising, in United 
States stock, for the benefit of the In- 
dians. 

The Brothertons accordingly removed 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



118 



to New Stockbridge, where they were 
cordially received by their allies, the 
Mohicans. In 1824, the united tribes 
purchased a large tract on the Fox River, 
between Winnebago Lake and Lake 
Michigan, to which they removed; the 
Brotliertons' portion being paid for by 
the State Treasurer of New Jersey, out 
of the United States stock held in trust 
for them. 

In 1882, the Brotherton Indians had 
diminished in their new home, in the 
State of Michigan, to about forty indi- 
viduals. " Cherishing in their hereditary 
ix)verty a recollection of their abandoned 
rights of hunting and fishing in New 
Jersey," they deputed Shawuskeliung or 
Bartholomew S. Calvin, their oldest chief, 
the Princeton scholar and Edge Pillock 
schoolmaster of half a century before, to 
solicit from the legislature of the State 
some compensation therefor. 

A report was made in Calvin's favor, 
and a bill passed, March 12th, 1832, 
appropriating two thousand dollars, (the 
sum named by himself,) for an entire 
relinquishment of all Indian claims. 
The letter of thanks of this worthy In- 
dian to the legislature, I take, with most 
of my information relative to the Broth- 
erton Indians, from the able pamphlet of 
Samuel Allinson, above mentioned. The 
" Friends," and their successors in New 
Jersey, acted, from first to last, toward 
these natives, with perfect justice and 
fairness, and with no small degree of 
brotherly kindness, and such is the im- 
perfection of our nature, that fairness, 
15 



and justice, and kindness, when exercised 
by the strong toward the weak, though 
no more than duty, seem to call for a 
gratitude as enthusiastic as that displayed 
in this letter : 

"Bartholomew S. Calvin takes this 
method to return his thanks to both 
Houses of the Legislature, and especially 
to their committees, for their very re- 
spectful attention to, and candid exam- 
ination of the Indian claims which he 
was delegated to present. 

" The final act of official intercoui'se 
between the State of New Jersey and 
the Delaware Indians, who once owned 
nearly the whole of its territory, has 
now been consummated, in a manner 
which must redound to the honour of 
this growing State, and, in all human 
probability, to the prolongation of the 
existence of a wasted yet grateful people. 
Upon this parting occasion, I feel it to 
be an incumbent duty to bear the feeble 
tribute of my praise to the high-toned 
justice, which, in this instance, and, so 
far as I am acquainted, in all former 
time, has actuated the councils of this 
commonwealth in dealing with the ab- 
original inhabitants. 

" Not a drop of our blood have you 
spilled in battle, not an acre of our land 
have you taken but by our consent. 
These facts speak for themselves and 
need no comment. They place the 
character of New Jersey in bold relief, 
a bright example to those States within 
whose territorial limits our brethren still 
remain. Nothing, save benisons, can 



114 



THE BUBUNGTON SMITHS. 



fall upon her from the lips of a Lenni 
Lenappi. 

" There may be some who would de- 
spise an Indian benediction ; but when I 
return to my people and make known to 
them the result of my mission, the ear 
of the Great Sovereign of the Universe, 
which is still open to our cry, will be 
penetrated with our invocation of bless- 
ings upon the generous sons of New 
Jersey, 

" To those gentlemen, members of the 



legislature and others, who have evinced 
their kindness to me, I cannot refrain 
from paying the unsolicited tribute of 
my heartfelt thanks. Unable to return 
them any other compensation, I fervently 
pray that God will have them in His 
holy keeping, will guide them in safety 
through the vicissitudes of this life, and 
ultimately, through the rich mercies, of 
our Blessed Redeemer, receive them into 
the glorious entertainment of His King- 
dom above," 



CHAPTER Xni. 



THE SIXTH GENERATION, 



OF the sixth generation of our family, 
we have already seen a number of 
individuals, united with their seniors of 
the fifth generation, in the " New Jersey 
Society for helping the Indians." 

Daniel Smith, second of the name, the 
first signer of the constitution of that 
society, the eldest son in the eldest line 
of the family, in the fifth generation, 
left, as has been observed, only daughters, 
the wives of Thomas Lightfoot and 
James Pemberton. 

The eldest male line of the family 
thus came to be that of his next brother, 
Robert, who, by his wife, Elizabeth 
Bacon, left three sons, John, Daniel, 
(third,) and Robert, and three daughters, 
Elizabeth, Katharine and Sarah. Of 
these all died unmarried, but Daniel and 
Elizabeth; Elizabeth, by her husband, 
Samuel AUinson, left two children, Wil- 
liam and Mary, who both died unmarried. 

The eldest male line of the Burling- 
ton Smiths, therefore, is that of Daniel 
Smith, third of the name, (or Daniel 
Smith, Junior, as he signs himself dur- 
ing the life-time of his uncle, the above- 
named Daniel Smith, second, or senior,) 
second son of the said Robert Smith, 
justice of the peace in Burlington, and 
Elizabeth Bacon, his wife. 



The younger brpthers of Daniel Smith, 
the second, and of Robert Smith, J. P., 
were John, who married Anne Farrel, of 
Jamaica, and left no surviving issue, and 
Benjamin, who married Sarah Burling, 
and was also without descendants. (?) 

The descendants of Katharine Callen- 
der, sister of these four brothers, constitute 
the second of what are technically called 
" female lines " of Burlington Smith de- 
scendants ; the first " female line " being 
the descendants of her eldest brother, 
Daniel Smith, the second, by his second 
daughter, Sarah, the wife of James Pem- 
berton ; his elder daughter, Mary Light- 
foot, having left no issue. These dis- 
tinctions, familiar to English law and 
heraldry, are made here for the better 
classification of the many lines of de- 
scendants. 

Richard Smith, of Green Hill, left 
four sons and one daughter, who sur- 
vived to years of maturity. The daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, lived to the age of forty- 
eight, and was the Elizabeth Smith who 
subscribed £16 to the " New Jersey 
Society for helping the Indians." She, 
however, died unmarried. The brothers, 
Samuel, John, William Lovett and 
Richard, (fifth of the name,) all mar- 
ried and left descendants, forming the 

115 



116 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



second, third, fourth and fifth of the "male 
lines " of the Burlington Smith family. 

The descendants of Mary Smith, sister 
of Richard, of Green Hill, by her hus- 
band, Joseph Noble, form the third 
female line of Burlington Smiths. 

Richard Smith, first-cousin of Richard, 
of Green Hill, and son of Dr. Richard 
Smith, of Bramham, left one daughter, 
Rachel, who married William Coxe, and 
whose descendants form the fourth female 
line of the family. 

James Smith, younger brother of 
Richard, and younger son of Dr. Rich- 
ard, of Bramham, had two children, 
William and Richard, of whose survival 
to maturity or posterity I have no record, 
and suppose they died young. 

Lastly, the descendants of Rachel 
Smith, sister of these two brothers, by 
her husband, Dr. John Pole, form the 
fifth female line ; thus, in this genera- 
tion, we again have ten lines of descend- 
ants to take account of; possessing, how- 
ever, thirteen representatives. 

It is proper, in a genealogical work, 
to give precedence to the male lines of a 
family, as these bear the family name. 
I shall, therefore, first take up those 
Smiths who are descendants in the five 
male lines in their order, and then dis- 
cuss the descendants, not bearing the 
name of Smith, who are of the five 
female lines, in their order. 

The thirteen representatives of the 
family, in the sixth generation, who left 
descendants, were: 1. Daniel Smith, 
Junior; 2. Samuel Smith, (second); 3. 



John Smith, (third) ; 4. William Lovett 
Smith; 5. Richard Smith, (fifth); 6. 
Sarah Smith Pemberton; 7. Hannah 
Callender, (sole surviving child of Katha- 
rine Smith Callender) ; 8 and 9. Samuel 
Noble and Mary Noble, children of 
Mary Smith Noble, (third female line); 
10. Rachel Smith Coxe; 11, 12 and 
13. Edward, Thomas and Anna Pole, 
(surviving children of Rachel Smith 
Pole). 

Hannah Callender married Samuel 
Sansom, Mary Noble married Samuel 
Wetherill, and Anna Pole married James 
Bringhurst. 

Joining the names of these gentlemen 
to those of their wives, as co-representa- 
tives of the family, and classifying the 
representatives under their respective 
lines, we have as representatives in the 
sixth generation, of the 

Eldest male line — Daniel Smith, Junior, son of the 

Hon. Robert Smith, J. P. 
Second line — Samuel Smith, ^ ' Sons of the 

Third line-John Smith, I Hon. Richard 

Fourth line — Wm. Lovett Smith, [ Smith, of Green 
Fifth line— Richard Smith. J Hill. 

First female line — James and Sarah S. Pemberton. 
Second female line — Samuel and Hannah Sansom. 
Third female line — Samuel Noble, Samuel and Mary 

Wetherill. 
Fourth female line — William and Rachel S. Coxe. 
Fifth female line — Edward Pole, Thomas Pole, James 

and Anna Bringhurst. 

I propose to give a short account of 
the heads of each of these lines, and 
annex tables, showing the descent of 
each, from William Smith, of Bramham, 
and their descendants as far as I am 
acquainted with them, leaving at bottom 
of such tables a blank space in which 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



117 



any descendant can enter his or her 
family descent in full. 

Daniel Smith, Junior, head of the 
eldest male line, was a man of extensive 
reading, gentle, affectionate and religious 
in his disposition, but by no means 
devoid of energy. On the contrary, 
being chosen to the office of surveyor- 
general of the province, he filled it many 
years with greaj. ability. He was a real 
estate lawyer and conveyancer by pro- | 
fession, and occupied, during his life, the 
venerable mansion at Broad and Main 
Streets, built by his grandfather, Daniel 
Smith, of Bramham, and in which his 
father and his eldest uncle had also 
resided. Some of his verses, still remain- 
ing,showa genuine, though unpretending, 
vein of poetry, while in his profession of 
real estate law he left his mark very 
distinctly upon the history of the land- 
titles of his county. He married Sarah, 
daughter of Joshua Rapier or Raper, 
Esquire, (son of Thomas Rapier, of 
Sindersby, Yorkshire, England); Joshua 
Ra}>er's wife was Sarah, daughter of the 
Hon. Joseph Cooper, of Cooper's Point, 
son of Hon. William Cooper, hereinbe- 
fore mentioned. Daniel and Sarah 
Smith had many sons and daughters, as 
will hereafter appear. He was one of 
the subscribing members of the " New 
Jersey Society for heli)ing the Indians." 

Samuel Smith, eldest son of Richard 
Smith, of Green Hill, and head of the 
second line of the Burlington Smiths, is 
the Samuel Smith whose valuable his- 
tory of New Jersey I have so largely 



drawn upon. He was many years a 
member and secretary of the King's 
Council, and treasurer of the province, 
besides holding other important j)ublic 
offices. His literary ability is well 
shown in his laborious and accurate his- 
tory, and in many interesting notices of 
his contemporaries and others of note in 
the province, while the warm and active 
benevolence of his character is evidenced 
by his efforts in behalf of the poor of all 
races, and reflected in many of his 
writings. He was a successful man of 
business and active as a member of his 
religious society. Born " twelfth month 
13th," 1720; he married "eleventh 
month," 1741, Jane, daughter of Joseph 
Kirkbride, and died shortly before the 
outbreak of the Revolution. His fine 
estate, " Hickory Grove," near Burling- 
ton, continued several generations in the 
family, to the present day. 

Samuel Smith, who was the eldest son 
of the eldest son in the line of Samuel 
Smith, of Bramham, used, as his seal, the 
device of a lion rampant proper, gules, 
crowned, sceptred and orbed or, on a 
field argent, known as the arms of 
Smith, of Bramham. He and his next 
brother, John, had superior town-houses, 
near together, in Burlington ; John's 
being that built by their father, Hon. 
Richard Smith. The estate of Green 
Hill appears to have passed out of the 
family in this generation, but was bought 
again in the next by John Smith, Junior, 
son of Samuel's brother, the Hon. John 
Smith. 



118 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



John Smith, the elder, the next brother 
of Samuel, (born "first month 20th," 
1722,) continued, with energy, his father's 
West India trade, and, at an early age, 
visited those islands in one of Richard 
Smith's ships. He afterwards removed to 
Philadelphia and became a flourishing 
merchant there, having a handsome town- 
house on Second Street, then the fash- 
ionable quarter, and a fine country estate 
at " the Point," oii the Delaware above 
the city. He married Hannah, daughter 
of the Hon. James Logan, chief justice 
and president of council of Pennsyl- 
vania, of whom I have given a sketch. 
He was the chief founder of, and first 
insurer in, the Philadelphia Contribu- 
tionship, the pioneer insurance company 
of that city. He was also one of the 
originators and secretary of that admir- 
able charity, the Pennsylvania Hospital, 
and established and owned the first line 
of regular packets trading between Phila- 
delphia and Liverpool. His health be- 
coming affected by his manifold activi- 
ties, he retired from business, after his 
wife's death, to his late father's mansion, 
in Burlington, and bought, for a country- 
seat, Franklin Park, lately the seat of 
the governor of New Jersey, with its 
fine herd of over one hundred deer. 
While in Pennsylvania, he had occupied 
a seat in the assembly of that province, 
and on his removal' to fiis native town, 
was appointed, by mandamus from the 
king, one of the Royal Council for New 
Jersey ; and was also made a justice of 
the peace. 



He did not long survive his return to 
Burlington — dying " third month 26th," 
1771, in the forty-ninth year of his age, 
and leaving behind him a character of 
rare amiability and excellence, commem- 
orated in the affectionate eulogies of 
Robert Proud, Historian of Pennsylva- 
nia, of his brother Samuel and others. 
His descendants form the third line of 
our family. 

William Lovett Smith, the third of 
these brothers, was born " ninth mouth 
19th, 1726." He engaged at first in his 
father's business, and afterwards in agri- 
culture, and gave to his estate the name 
of " Bramham," from the family home 
in England. He married, " ninth month 
15th, 1749," Mary, only surviving child 
of Daniel Doughty and Anna Stevenson, 
his wife, granddaughter of Samuel Jen- 
ings, first governor of West New Jersey, 
and many years speaker of the assembly. 
William Lovett Smith died "fifth month 
i5th, 1798;" his estate of "Bramham" 
still remains in possession of his descend- 
ants, of the fourth line of Burlington 
Smiths. 

Richard Smith, youngest son of Rich- 
ard, of Green Hill, was born *' third 
month 22d, 1735." Of his boyhood at 
Green Hill, it is recorded, that the row 
of venerable cherry-trees, which line the 
approach-avenue, were planted by his 
hand, no doubt with some assistance from 
older persons. He studied law in the 
office of Joseph Gralloway, Eequire, in 
Philadelphia, and became a successfiil 
practitioner of that profession. 




i 




OTSEGO HALL, (FORMERLY SMITH HALL,) 

Mansion of Hon. Richard Smith, (5th,) afterward of J. Fenimore Cooper, 

(Since dertrojcd by nre.l 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



119 



He filled various honorable offices 
connected with tlie courts, and that of 
recorder of Burlington, quite early in 
life, and married Elizabeth, daughter of 
the Hon. John Rodman, one of the New 
Bedford Rodman family. After his 
brother SamueFs death, in 1776, he filled 
the office of treasurer of New Jersey, 
and also sat in the assembly. He had a 
country-seat ciiUed "Bramham Hall," 
since destroyed by fii-e, and having, with 
other members of the Smith family, pur- 
chased a large tract of land on Otsego 
Lake, New York, he built thereon an- 
other fine hall in the Elizabethan style of 
architecture, (lately engraved in a biog- 
raphy of Fenimore Cooper) ; lived there 
some years and called it " Smith Hall." 
The Smiths employed as their agent, to 
oversee their estates at Otsego, Judge 
Cooper, of the Cooper's Point family, 
who ultimately bought the property of 
them, and changed the name of the hall 
to " Otsego Hall ;" and here his son, the 
celebrated novelist, James Fenimore 
Cooper, was born. 

Richard Smith, who was the fifth of that 
Christian name in successive generations 
of the family, was a man of literary cul- 
ture, and the friend and co-respondent 
of some of the noted literati of the 
period, such as Dr. Tobias Smollett, the 
famous novelist and historian, part of 
whose correspondence with him has been 
lately republished. {Atlantic Monthly^ 
Philadelphia Historical Society^ s Me-- 
moirs, etc.) At the outbreak of the 
Revolution, he was elected to the first 



Continental Congress as delegate and 
senator from New Jersey. He was again 
returned to the second Continental Con- 
gress, but soon resigned his seat "on 
account of indisposition." To bodily 
ill-health may probably have been added 
a reluctance to lake part in severing our 
connections with the mother-country, a 
feeling in which the majority of the 
Quakers shared. His portrait, as Sena- 
tor from New Jersey, is introduced into 
MoUeson's painting, "The fii-st Prayer 
in Congress."* 

Richard Smith died in 1803, while on 
a journey in the Southern States, and was 
interred at Natchez, Mississippi. 

The descendants of Richard Smith, 
form the fifth and last of the male lines 
of the Burlington Smiths, or of those 
bearing the family name, and who, (also,) 
continued to dwell in Burlington County. 
The descendants in the female lines, all 
removed, in this generation, to other 
States, excepting the Wetherill branch, 
which also, however, ultimately removed 
from Burlington. 

The limitation of this book being to 
give the history of the "Burlington 
Smiths," this involved a full and accu- 
rate account of tlie ancestors (whether 
Smiths or not,) of persons nmv bearing 
that family's name and lineage, and who 
are, in short, themselves Burlington 
Smiths. Also, of the descendants of 
]peT8ons fonnerly bearing that name and 
born in Burlington, and who were, there- 



* He was the author of the " Journal of the pro- 
ceedings of Congress.'' 



2. P. 119. 



Oooper was bom at Burlington, but i mm ediately 
conveyed by his parents to Otsego Hall, 
home during liie. 



8. P. 119. Note. The dgnatuie of Kchard Smith, aa Secre- 
tary of CongreBB, la attached to the early iaBuea 
of the " Continaital " currency. 



120 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



fore, Burlington Smiths. But it would 
not be strictly relevant, and would swell 
too much this little volume to attempt a 
full account of such ancestors of the 
female lines of descendants, as were not 
of the family by birth — neither them- 
selves Smiths, nor ancestors of Smiths. 

Sarah Smith, second surviving daugh- 
ter of the second Daniel Smith, married, 
as has been said, James Pemberton. He 
was of the well-known and respected 
Pemberton family, of Philadelphia, the 
son of Israel Pemberton, the eminent 
friend of the Indians, whose advice they 
sought, before executing the treaty of 
1758. After a short married life, Sarah 
Pemberton died in confinement, in 1770, 
leaving one daughter, Mary Smith Pem- 
berton, and having, a few months before 
her death, joined her husband in execut- 
ing a transfer of thirty-five tracts of land 
amounting to many thousand acres, a 
part of the property left by her father, 
to her cousins, Daniel Sniith, Junior, and 
his brother and sisters. Mary S. Pem- 
berton married, in 1790, Anthony Mor- 
ris, son of Samuel Morris, and great- 
grau'lson of the first Anthony Morris, 
whose early settlement at Burlington I 
have mentioned. 

Hannah Callender, sole surviving 
child of William and Katharine Callen- 
der, married, in 17G2, Samuel Sansom, 
of the highly-esteemed Philadelphia 
family of Sansom, from which Sansom 
Street, in that city, took its name. He 
was the son of the second Samuel San- 
som, grandson of Samuel Sansom the 



first, and great-grandson of John San- 
som, of Beedon, Berks, England. The 
name of Sansom is supposed to be of 
Norman origin, being spelled in old 
records, de Saunsume. 

The lineage of Joseph Noble, who 
married Mary, sister of Richard Smith, 
of Green Hill, and founded the third 
female line of descendants, has been 
given. His son, Samuel Noble, married 
" tenth month 27th, ^ 174G," Lydia, 
daughter of Isjiac Cooper, descended 
from William Cooper, of Cooper's Point, 
and took up his residence in Philadel- 
phia. His sister, Mary Noble, was mar- 
ried, '' third month 19th, 1743, in Phila- 
delphia," to Samuel Wetherill, second in 
descent from Christopher Wetherill, of 
Tadcaster, Yorkshire, England, an early 
settler in Burlington, and member of the 
" Council of Proprietors." 

Rachel Smith, granddaughter of Dr. 
Richard Smith, of Bramham, niarried 
William Coxe, undei"stood to be a de- 
scendant of Dr. Daniel Coxe, of London, 
the extensive early proprietor and gov- 
ernor of West Jersey. 

Edward Pole married Mary Warner 
and left issue. 

Thomas ,Pole, who became a physician, 
removed to Bristol, England, in 1775, 
and died in 1829, leaving a daughter 
married to a gentleman of Bristol, and 
another married to Fowler, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. And Anna Pole, his 
sister, married James Bringhurst, of the 
long-established family of Bringhurst, of 
Wilmington, Delaware, originating the 



A FAMILT mSTOET. 



121 



fifth and last female line of Smith de- 
scendants. 

In the time of the sixth generation, 
Burlington had changed from its primeval 
aspect, when the scattered and humble 
cottages of the first settlers occupied small 
patches of clearing, frowned upon by 
solid green walls of the interminable 
virgin forest, and when the frequent 
light canoe, laden with red men, women 
and babes, skimmed across the sleeping 
Delaware, between the Indian villages of 
Sachem Chygoe, on the island, and King 
Ockanickon,on the mainland. Good King 
Ockanickon slept, not with his swarthy 
fathers, but in his mound in the Quaker 
burial-ground, near where the quaint 
polygonal meeting-house took the place 
of the primitive meeting-tent. His red 
brethren had mysteriously shrunk, from 
the thousands that surrounded the first 
emigrants, to the bare hundred that occu- 
pied the Edge Pillock or Brotherton 
tract ; as the shy deer had retreated be- 
fore the ringing echoes of the axe and the 
crashing fall of the aged monarchs of the 
wood, up into the mountain fastnesses 
around the sources of the Lehigh and 
Delaware, so the panther, tlie catamount 
and the Indian had followed them, and 
left their ancient haunts to the new 
race. 

But, though the romance of those 
early times had vanished like the morn- 
ing dew, a quaint, peculiar charm haloed 
the quiet and simple commonwealth that 
had succeeded them. Instead of rude 

log cottages, substantial dwellings rose 
16 



thickly on the grassy streets ; the earliest 
of these, built by the carpenters that 
came as servants of the earliest settlers, 
were of timber, and had the sharp, steep 
gables characteristic of rural England; 
perhaps the only specimen now remain- 
ing of these, being the old " Green Hill" 
house, originally built by Samuel Jen- 
ings. Of little less antiquity were the 
massive mansions that immediately suc- 
ceeded, built of bricks brought from 
England, in which the black glazed 
" header" bricks alternated with the red, 
but designed and constructed by the 
Swedish and Dutch workmen in the 
fashion of their countries. These com- 
fortable abodes displayed the double 
pitched roofs, long known as the " Swede" 
roofs, the clustered chimneys and "coved" 
cornices, and especially theDutch "stoops" 
or "pent-houses," projecting half roofe 
which overhung the walls at each storey, 
and protected from the rain, easy benches 
on which the stout burgher and his 
"vrow," in northern New Jersey, and, 
in the south, the mild and "solid" 
Quaker, in his " broad-brim," his buckled 
shoes, his knee-breeches and his spread- 
ing coat-skirts, with his spouse in her 
prim cap and "pinners," could loll at 
ease, at evening, and smoke the pipe of 
peace " sub Jove." The oldest of these 
now remaining is, unquestionably, the 
Smith mansion, at Broad and Main 
Streets, for we have the positive testi- 
mony of Joseph Sanson! that his grand- 
mother, Katharine Callender, who was 
born in 1711, firet saw the light within 



122 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



its walls, and that it was erected by the 
first Daniel Smith, shortly after his mar- 
riage, in 1695. The date, therefore, of 
1733, in the gable, must have been sub- 
sequently inserted where we observe it, 
or, possibly, bunglingly restored from 
1703. 

Amid mansions such as this, and the 
town-house of Richard Smith, of Green 
Hill, further down the street, erected in 
1720, immediately after his marriage, 
rose the old polygon* meeting-house, 
quaint and simple as the period, now 
supplanted by the large structure on 
Main Street. The title-papers show that 
part of its ground was derived from 
the Smiths. 

The calm of the broad and dreamy 
river was ruffled, at not too frequent in- 
tervals, by the blufi*, round bows of the 
small and clumsy brigantines, " snows," 
and ships, which, laden with fragrant pro- 
ducts of the West Indies, came bowling 
up against the gentle current, under full 
sail, to unload at the primitive wharves 
of Green Bank; an arrival, which, no 
doubt, infused something of hurry and 
excitement into the movements of the 
staid and sober citizens. The light, dart- 
ing canoe was no longer there, but occa- 
sionally the twelve-oared galley would 



* The original order of the monthly meeting for the 
construction of this building, (dated twelfth month 
5th, 1682,) directs it lo be constructed ** according to 
a draft of six-square building, of forty feet square, 
from out to out." The ** draft," still existing, shows 
an irregular hexagon. The painting, by Doughty, on 
a clock formerly belonging to Margaret Morris Smith, 
would rather indicate the octagon form, by the 
breadth of the slope sides. 



come sweeping up from Philadelphia, 
sometimes bearing a bridal company, 
sometimes a ftineral, often a royal gov- 
ernor or other important personage. And 
now and then, the simple red man, straying 
down from the inland solitudes, would 
wander, wonderingly, through the streets, 
puzzled by the novelty of the white man's 
civilization, but sure to be received with 
cordial welcome by the Quaker tea-party, 
seated before their doors, under the shadow 
of the immense button wood-trees. 

These tea-parties, al fresco^ on the 
open sidewalk in front of the houses, 
were exceedingly common in the cool of 
the summer evenings, aft;er the heat of 
the day; and the declining sunshine, as it 
came glinting through the waving foliage 
of tall buttonwoods, oaks and elms, must 
have lit up whole rows of such parties, 
on both sides, up and down the broad 
and quiet street. One can imagine the 
social chat across the street, and the fre- 
quent call from one neighbor at the table 
of another, where all lived like one great 
family. 

It was on one of these old summer 
evenings that the first introduction to our 
family of the founder of the Collins 
family, since, in many ways, connected 
with our own, occurred. Isaac Collins 
was then a young Delawarian, coming 
north in search of employment. "The 
tradition among our folks," says one of 
our elder relatives, " is, that John and 
Samuel Smith, then of the king's coun- 
cil, were drinking tea, on the pavement 
in front of the house — whether the Wal- 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



123 



lace house where John lived, or the Cole- 
jnan house where Samuel lived, the tra- 
dition saith not. A young man, a 
stranger, in the garb of a Friend, passed 
along and was greeted by them. He 
must have impressed them favourably, 
for they asked him to take tea with them, 
and made the usual American inquiries. 
He told them he was a printer, in search 
of a good situation for his business. The 
brothers talked with each other awhile, 
and then said the colony was in want of 
a printer, and proposed to him to settle 
in Burlington, and they would use their 
influence to get him the office of king's 
printer. This is understood to have been 
the first of Isaac Collins coming to Bur- 
lington. 

" In the memoir of I. C, prepared by 
his children, it is said that he heard of 
the death of James Parker, king's 
printer for New Jersey, and that, having 
procured recommendation, he applied for 
the office, and was appointed in the 
autumn of 1770. It is probable that it 
was on occasion of this appointment the 
above incident occurred.'' 

Samuel Smith had the press of the 
" king's printer " moved to Burlington, 
for the purpose of printing his " History 
of New Jersey," as appears by the fol- 
lowing : 

" In 1764, James Parker, * printer to 
the king, for the province of New Jersey,' 
compiled and printed a * Conductor Gen- 
eralis,' for justices of the peace, he then 
holding that office in Middlesex County, 
and the following year, moved his press 



from Woodbridge to Burlington, for the 
accommodation of the author of the 
History of New Jersey, (Smith,) but 
on the completion of the work it was re- 
turned to the former place." (White- 
head's Contributions to E. Jersey His- 
tory, 376.) 

The following anecdotes of John 
Smith, throw a quaint light upon the 
times: 

He had retired from his Philadel})hia 
Business to Burlington with impaired 
health, and frequently suffered from 
sleeplessness at night. On one of these 
occasions he had, toward morning, fallen 
asleep, when, about the usual breakfast- 
hour, he was disturbed by the "bellman," 
who, according to the primitive custom 
of the place and time, was ringing his 
bell loudly up and down the street, to 
announce a sale of some property. 
Our worshipful ancestor, determined not 
to be deprived of his nap, and to silence, 
at all costs, " that dreadful bell," put his 
head out of the window, and demanded 
of the bellman what property was to be 
sold. Upon his answer, " the Governor's 
Park," he bade the man go home and 
put up his instrument of torture, prom- 
ising he would himself purchase the 
property at the owner's price. It was in 
this off-hand way, that his purchase of 
the fine estate of Franklin Park was de- 
cided upon. 

Some time after he had been duly in- 
vested in this estate, one of his ships ar- 
riving in port, the captain came up to 
Burlington to see him, clad in his best. 



124 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHB. 



the suit including a flaming red waist- 
coat. To entertain the worthy mariner, 
our ancestor took him out to Franklin 
Park to see the deer. As they were 
pacing quietly along one of the woody 
glades, near the inclosure, which was a 
fence full eight feet in height, a splen- 
didly antlered stag suddenly started from 
the thicket, where he had probably been 
asleep, close to them. One glance at the 
terrific waistcoat of the captain was 
enough ; at a tremendous flying leap, Wb 
cleared the eight-foot boundary, and 
scouring like the wind across the country, 
was soon lost forever to our ancestor's 
sight and pocket ! 

It must have been some years before 
this, that the governor of New Jersey, 
Belcher, sent over to England for a lady 
to come to America to marry him. She 
came, duly consigned to our ancestor, in 
one of his ships. The gallant Quaker 
merchant promptly placed her in his 
private four-oared barge, and in this, she 
was rapidly swept up the Delaware to 
Burlington, and to her expectant guber- 
natorial lover ! 

The Quakei-s, during this first century 
of the history of New Jei-sey, (from the 
promulgation of the "Concessions," in 
1676, to the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, in 1776,) were, unquestionably, 
the predominating and governing class 
in that little commonwealth, as they were 
in the neighboring one of Pennsylvania. 
The pure, simple and lofty religious 
principles, to which they had borne 
witness, with the generous and devoted 



zeal of true descendants of the martyrs — 
the cheerful courage and enterprise with 
which they had faced and conquered the 
dangers and the hardships of the wilder- 
ness — the probity, justice and kindness 
of their dealings with their fellow-men, 
had rightfully given them a high moral 
standing in the opinion of the com- 
munity — free, as it was, from the adverse 
bias given to English society by the 
hierarchy. To these sources of public 
esteem, were added the large "stake" 
they represented in the common weal, 
and their uniformly good education; 
originally the possessors of considerable 
wealth and good social position, that 
wealth was now increased by the sales of 
their great landed estates. 

Though sometimes out-voted in the 
assembly, (as when the military supplies 
were carried against them, in 1709, by 
a single casting vote,) they were not dis- 
couraged by this from continuing to give 
their counsels to the State ; nor did they 
then, (as now,) permit a high-wrought 
and over-sensitive conscientiousness, to 
interfere with their usefulness to their 
country, and render them a cipher in the 
body-politic. They were admirably 
fitted, as a class, to take a leading part 
in government, and such a part was, at 
this period, by common consent, assigned 
them, both as a right and as a duty. 

From the innocence and Christian 
simplicity of their private characters 
arose a similar innocence and simplicity 
in their modes of public action and gov- 
ernment, which affect one with emotions 



A FAMILY HISTOBT. 



126 



mingled of amusement and reverence. 
Governor Thomas Lloyd, ancestor of 
the wife of John Smith, of Green Hill, 
son of the Hon. John Smith, last above 
mentioned, served as a member of the 
council in Pennsylvania under Penn as 
proprietary governor, before his own 
appointment as governor. The follow- 
ing summary mode of disposing of a 
quarrel which had ripened into a lawsuit, 
before the governor and council, provokes 
a smile in which there is no ridicule, and 
seems worthy of Arcadia or the Millen- 
nium : 

"At a council held at New Castle, the 
13th day of the third month, 1684, 
present: William Penn, proprietor and 
governor ; Chr. Taylor, William South- 
ersby, John Symcock, Thomas Lloyd," 
and others ; " Andrew Johnson, plaintiflf ; 
Hance Peterson, defendant. 

" There being a difference depending 
between them," (the plaintiff and de- 
fendant,) "the governor and councill 
advised them to shake hands and to for- 
give one another : and ordered that they 
should enter in bonds for fifty pounds 
apiece, for their good abearance; w'ch 
accordingly they did. 

" It was also ordered that the records 
of court concerning the business should 
be burnt." (Minutes of the council). 

Of Thomas Lloyd, during his two 
years' government of the province, it is 
related, that he " used sometimes in the 
evening, before he went to rest, to go in 
person to public houses, and order the 
people he found there to their own 



homes, till at length he was instrumental 
to promote better order ; and did, in a 
great measure, suppress vice and immo- 
rality in the city." (Journal of Thomas 
Chalkley, p. 182). 

In New Jersey, under Jenings, Olive 
and other Quaker governors, similar sim- 
plicity of public methods obtained. Of 
Olive, when a justice of the peace, we 
are told, (History of New Jersey, p. 209,) 
that " he contrived to postpone sudden 
complaints, till cool deliberation had 
shown them to be justly founded, and 
then seldom failed of accommodating 
matters without much expense to the 
parties." He often heard cases in his 
own fields, the stump of a tree ftirnish- 
ing the judicial bench ! 

Yet with all this simplicity of man- 
ners, the principal "Friends" were 
highly educated men. We have had 
occasion to note the extensive learning 
of Thomas Lloyd and James Logan. 
From, the notes to the " Pennsylvania 
Pilgrim," by John G. Whittier, I take 
the following : 

"Among the pioneer Friends were 
many men of learning and broad and 
liberal views. Penn was conversant with 
every department of literature and phi- 
losophy. Thomas Lloyd was a ripe and 
rare scholar. The great Loganian libraiy 
of Philadelphia bears witness to the 
varied learning and classical taste of its 
donor, James Logan. Thomas Story, 
member of the council of State, master 
of the rolls and commissioner of claims 
under William Penn, and an able min- 



126 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



ister of his society, took a deep interest 
in scientific questions, and in a letter to 
his friend Logan, written while on a 
religious visit to Great Britain, seems to 
have anticipated the conclusions of mod- 
ern geologists. *I spent,* he says, *some 
months especially at Scarborough, during 
the season of attending meetings, at 
whose high cliffs and the variety of 
strata therein, and their several positions, 
I further learned and was confirmed in 
some things, that the earth is of much 
older date, as to the beginning of it, than 
the time assigned in the Holy Scripture 
as commonly understood, which is suited 
to the common capacity of mankind, as 
to six days of progressive work, by which 
I understand certain long and competent 
periods of time, and not natural days.' " 
Nor did the subsequent generations 
neglect to keep up (so far as it could be 
done without the existence of such na- 
tional institutions as the universities of 
Oxford and Cambridge,) the learning of 



their ancestors. In our own family, we 
have observed, in the generation just 
discussed, the literary pursuits of Hon. 
Samuel Smith, eldest, and Hon. Richard 
Smith, youngest son of Richard Smith, 
of Green Hill. The second brother in this 
family also, the elder John Smith, like 
his brethren, a man prominent in politi- 
cal life, studiously cultivated the Muses 
in the intervals of private and public 
business, as may be seen in the quaint 
and interesting diary he has left behind 
him — some extracts from which I pro- 
pose to give. He was also the author of 
some controversial works still extant 
(Reply to Tennant on War, 8vo., 1747, 
etc.)* 



* Gilbert Tennant, a clergyman, having published 
a discourse intended to prove the Christianity of war, 
John Smith published a reply, still extant, which met, 
at the time, with a most favorable reception. Tennant's 
rejoinder, on the contrary, became waste paper, and 
it is a curious fact, that large quantities of its sheets 
were used by the British soldiers in the battle of Ger- 
mantown as wadding for their guns ! They had pre- 
viously sacked the paper warehouse where the dead 
book lay entombed. 



CHAPTER XIV. 



JOHN SMITH S JOURNAL. 



THIS journal was begun at the age of 
nineteen, and continued about ten 
years, and throws a strong light upon 
the author's character, and on that of 
hi8 times. The first entry is : 

" Ninth month, 1741. Having a mind 
to see the Island of Barbadoes, and to 
know the manner of living at sea, and 
to survey the wonders of the Lord in 
the deep, and having my father's con- 
sent so to do, I set out from home for 
Philadelphia by land on the 8th of tenth 
month, 1741, being third day of the 
week. The next day about two o'clock, 
P. M., I set out from Philadelphia in the 
brigantine Burlington, William Curdy, 
master, belonging to my father, and she 
and her cargo assigned to me and my 
cousin, Samuel Noble, who also went 
with me." 

The voyage and description of the island 
present few points of novelty ; I extract 
two passages:- premising that though the 
vessels of Richard Smith still sailed from 
Burlington, they now stopped for the 
greater portion of their cargo at the rap- 
idly growing city of Penn. This voyage 
to Barbadoes occupied five weeks ! — eight 
days being consumed in getting out of 
the bay ! 

" Met a pilot-boat, by whom we heard 



that Captain Redmon's great ship was 
lost on the sheers. She was very large, 
mounting twenty-four guns," etc. " We 
saw several sail of vessels at sea, but 
were not chased by any." All merchant 
vessels in these times carried a full battery 
of guns for their protection from French 
ships and from pirates, who infested our 
coasts to an extent that seems incredible 
now. James Logan mentions a regular 
settlement of pirates, with a governor of 
their own, numbering over eight hun- 
dred, at Norfolk, Virginia. John F. 
Watson, the Philadelphia annalist, claims 
that piracy was suppressed and the last 
of the pirates executed in 1731. That 
this was not the case we shall see from 
this journal. 

On his return ; " the day before we saw 
our cape, we saw a great number of 
whales, (I believe twenty,) playing in the 
sea, some of which were very large; 
three of them came very near us — I 
believe within ten or fifteen feet of the 
vessel; we imagined they were each of 
them above sixty feet long." 1742. "The 
13th of third month we made land, and 
the 16th we arrived safe in Philadelphia. 
The next morning, I got a horse and 
rode home, where I found my father and 
family all well, thanks be to Grod, the 

127 



128 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



father of all our mercies. I also found 
my brother Samuel married to Jane 
Kirkbride; they were married in the 
eleventh month last." 

"About two weeks after, I went by 
water to Philadelphia, where I staid 
about three weeks, to load my father's 
brigantine for Surranam." 

(Trip to New York before railways, or 
even stages). 

" Soon thereafter, I took a ride with 
Cousin Benjamin Smith and Cousin 
Katy Callender to New York ; we rode 
to Elizabethtown point, where we left our 
horses and went by water to York. As 
we were going along we stopped at 
Brunswick, which is a very thriving 
town, situated very low ; while we staid, 
I had the curiosity to count the houses, 
and I think there was about one hundred 
and forty of them. 

"We staid a week in New York, 
which is a large, populous city, the build- 
ings mostly larger than those of Phila- 
delphia, but the town is not nigh so 
handsome, nor so regularly laid out; 
their new Dutch church (as they call it), 
is a very large building. We ascended 
to the top of its steeple by one hundred 
and eighteen steps, from whence we had 
a very fine view of the town and the 
river. 

In returning, at the ferry of Cross- 
wicks Creek, the horse ran into the 
creek and overset the chaise, " where, in 
all probability, we would have been 
drowned, if God, in His goodness and 
mercy, had not sent us relief in the need- 



ful time from Mathew Watson's ; boats 
came and took us up, but the horse was 
almost drowned. This happened about 
ten o'clock in the morning, and we staid 
at Watson's till five o'clock in the after- 
noon, to dry our things, etc., and that 
night we got safe to Burlington. To 
God be the praise and glory for all His 
manifold favours and abundant loving- 
kindness to me-ward." :i: * * 

" 1743, third month 19th. I rode to 
Philadelphia to the marriage of my 
cousin, Mary Noble, with Samuel Weth- 
erill, which was solemnly performed." 

"10th of fifth month. Being first 
day," (Sunday,) "rode to Germantown 
meeting. Dined, with several others, at 
James Logan's." This is his first re- 
corded visit to the home of his future 
bride. 

He began business as a merchant, in 
Philadelphia, " the 14th of tenth month, 
1743," at the age of twenty-one; and 
next year, 1744, records his first ship-' 
ping venture. 

" In the tenth month, 1744, 1 joined 
with Israel Pemberton, John Reynell 
and Israel Pemberton, Junior, in pur- 
chasing a small schooner, which we made 
a brig of, and called her the Dolphin ; 
loaded her ourselves, appointed John 
Peal, master, and she sailed for Barba- 
does the 13th eleventh month." 

" The latter end of first month, 1 745, 
I joined with Mr. Aspden, John Eeynell 
and Israel Pemberton, Junior, in pur- 
chasing a new vessel, on the stocks, a 
little below Marcus Hook; we made a 



A FAMILY HISTOBY. 



129 



ship of her; called her the Bolton; ap- 
pointed Edward Dowers master of her, 
and she sailed the 5th of third month, 
for Dublin and Liverpool." 

A lively bit of contemporary journal, 
sent to L. P. Smith, by Judge Brock, of 
Bichmond, Virginia, enables us to get a 
glimpse at the household of James Logan, 
soon to be so intimately connected with 
our ancestor. The chief justice of Penn- 
sylvania was, at that time, living retired 
at his " palace-like" home, Stenton, with 
his wife and son, James, and one unmar- 
ried daughter, Hannah. The journal is 
that of William Black, who, then quite 
a young man, accompanied, as secretary, 
the commission from Virginia, which, 
mth those from Maryland and Pennsyl- 
vania, effected, in 1744, a treaty with 
the six nations of Indians, at Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, for the relinquishment of 
lands, etc. His account of a day at 
Philadelphia, quite sparkles with the 
effervescent spirits of youth. 

" Philadelphia, Friday, June Ist, 1744. 

" The sun had run his course in our 
Hemisphere for the space of two hours, 
before the Leaden Sceptre was removed 
from my Eye-Lids; at last, about half 
an hour past 6, 1 had those Instruments 
of Sight and Doors of the Mind, laid open, 
and Jumped from my Bed in some haste, 
designing, before that time, to have been 
at the Market Place : The days of Mar- 
ket are Tuesday and Friday, when you 
may be Supply'd with Every Necessary 

for the Support of Life, thro'ut the 
17 



whole year, both extraordinary Good, 
and reasonably Cheap ; it is allow'd to" 
(by ?) " Foreigners to be the best of its 
bigness in the known World, and un- 
doubtedly the largest in America. I 
got to this place by 7, and had no small 
Satisfaction in seeing the pretty Creatures, 
the young Ladies, traversing the place 
from Stall to Stall, where they cou'd 
make the best Market, some with their 
Maid behind them with a Basket, to 
carry home the Purchase, others that 
were designed to buy but trifles, as a 
little fresh Butter or a Dish of Green 
Peas or the like. Had Good-Nature 
and Humility enough to be their own 
Porters: I have so much Regard for 
the fair Sex, that I imagined, like the 

Woman of , in the Holy Writ, some 

charm in touching even the hem of their 
garments : After I had made my Mar- 
ket, which was one pennyworth of Whey 
and a Nose-Gay, I Disengaged myself 
from the Multitude and made the best of 
my way to Mr. Strettell's, where I break- 
fasted: after Breakfast I Exchang'd 
the Commissioner's Bills for Gold and 
Paper Money, to the value of 700 and 
odd Pounds, and after I settled the Ac- 
count returned to my Lodgings in order 
to dress my Self, and Join the Commis- 
sioners, &c., who Designed after Dinner 
to pay a Visit to Mr. James Logan, who, 
through the Infirmities of Old Age, 
hastened on with a lingering Distemper, 
had Retired from Business to live at a 
Beautiful House he had about 4 Miles 
from the City : At 1 O'Clock, P. M., 



130 



THE BUBLTJ^GTON SMITHS. 



at the Invitation of Secretary Peters, I 
went with him to the three Tunn Tav- 
ern, in Water Street, where, in Company 
with the Gentlemen of the Levee & two 
or three more of the Town I Din'd, and 
after a few Glasses of Good Madeira, 
Mr. Lee, Mr. Littlepage, Mr. Brooke and 
my Self, set out in order to Accompany 
the Commissioners to Mr. Logan's ; they 
were gone before we got to their Lodg- 
ings, but, with the Help of some very 
good Horses, which we were Obliged to 
some of the Town's Gentlemen for, we 
soon came up with them, and Mr. Strettle 
and Son who were with them. We got to 
Mr. Logan's a few minutes after 3, and 
found him hid in the Bushes, an Ex- 
pression the Indians used when Treating 
with the Province, at Philadelphia, in 
July, 1742, saying, * They were sorry to 
find their Good Friend, James Logan, 
hid in the Bushes,' Meaning it gave 
them Concern their Friend was so much 
oppress'd with Sickness as to be oblig'd 
to live a Life Retired from Public Affairs: 
he had been a very great Benefactor to 
the Indians, and Conducted several 
Treaties with them, and they, having 
always found him true to them, had an 
Extraordinary Regard for him. 

" The Commissioners had some Con- 
versation with him about the Indians, 
and told him, his advice would be of the 
last Consequence to them in conducting 
the Treaty ; he appear'd somewhat Re- 
served and Spoke very little : At last 
the Tea-Table was set, and one of his 
Daughters presented herself, in order to 



fill out the Fashionable Warm Water : 
I was really very much surprized at the 
Appearance of so Charming a Woman, 
in a place where the seeming Moroseness 
and Goutified Father's Appearance Prom- 
is'd no such Beauty, tho', it must be 
allow'd, the Man seem'd to have some 
Remains of a handsome enough person, 
and a Complection beyond his years, for 
he was turn'd of 70 : But, to return to 
the Lady, I declare I burnt my Lips more 
than Once, being quite thoughtless of 
the warmness of my Tea — entirely lost 
in contemplating her Beauties. She was 
tall and Slender, but Exactly well Shaped ; 
her Eyes Express'd a very great Soft- 
ness, denoting a Composed Temper and 
Serenity of Mind. Her Manner was 
Grave and Reserv'd, and, to be Short, 
She had a sort of Majesty in her Person, 
and Agreeableness in her Behaviour, 
which at once Surpriz'd and Charmed 
the Beholder: after the Tea-Table was 
remov'd we were going to take leave, but 
it appear'd we must first view his Library, 
which was Customary with him, to any 
Persons of Account. He had really a 
very fine Collection of Books, both 
Ancient and Modern; he seemed to 
Regrate that none of his Sons knew how 
to Use them, and that he designed them 
as a Legacy to the City when he Died. 
After the Old Gentleman had been Com- 
plimented on his fine Taste we Departed." 

James Logan was a great suflTerer from 
gout; yet that the stings of this exas- 
perating disease did not materially affect 



a o 



1 = 

S !" 




A FAMILY HISTORY. 



131 



the benignity and hospitality for which 
he was noted, there is abundant evidence. 
It is probable, that the "seeming morose- 
ness," which this gay young fellow, with 
the happy, careless sauciness of youth, 
attributed to gout, was chiefly due to the 
gravity, deliberation and "solidity" of 
manner proper to an aged "Friend," 
and to which our Virginian was unac- 
customed. That James Logan should 
fail in due consideration to his distin- 
gm'shed guests is quite unlikely. 

The fine person and face of James 
Logan, alluded to by Mr. Black, are re- 
flected in the large portrait that now 
hangs in the midst of that library so 
generously given by him to Philadelphia. 
His teaser viee isstill in the(Smith)family. 

But let us return to our worthy Diarist. 

"The 11th of fifth month," (1745,) 
" we received news of the surrender of 
Louisburg on the 17th ultimo, to King 
George; the New England troops, on 
this occasion, gained much reputation 
among the men principled for war. They 
were commanded by William Pepperel, 
(a New England man, also,) and assisted 
by a fleet of ships of war under com- 
mand of Captain Warren. That even- 
ing and the next the mob were very rude 
in this city, breaking many windows 
that were not illuminated, but by the 
vigilance of the inhabitiints and the pru- 
dent conduct of the then mayor, Edward 
Ship[)en, they were suppressed before 
they had done much mischief." 

"The 4th of the sixth month, 1745, 
went by land, with several other friends. 



to the funeral of my dear uncle, Caleb 
Raper, at Burlington. The removal of 
this dear relative affected me much, both 
beciiuse thereby I lost a good friend, the 
City of Burlington a good magistrate, 
for he was and had been mayor thereof 
several years, and the church an useful, 
hospitable and substantial member." 

" The snow Friendship, arrived from 
Jamaica the 24th of seventh month. 
We made a ship of her, and put her up 
for London. She sailed for that port 
17th of ninth month. 

"Our brigantine Dolphin again arrived 
from Barbadoes the 14th of eighth 
month. This voyage we sheathed her, 
and the 24th of ninth month ship Bolton 
and brig Dolphin sailed together from 
the wharf, the ship bound for Ireland 
and brig for Barbadoes." * * * * 

"Eleventh month 3d, 1745. In the 
afternoon, the weather being agreeable, 
John Armitt and I rode to Cliarles Jen- 
kins' ferry on Schuylkill. We ran and 
walked a mile or two on the ice. On 
our way thither we stopped to view the 
proprietor's green-house, which, at this 
season, is a very agreeable sight; the 
oranges, lemons and citrons were, some 
green, some ripe and some in blossom." 

The chief proprietor, John Penn, was, 
at this time, an "absentee," living in 
England, and his fine place of "Springetts- 
bury," near the Schuylkill, was in charge 
of his head gardener, a man of consider- 
able scientific culture. J. Penn had made 
sreat efforts to introduce the culture of 
the French wine-grapes on this manor. 



132 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



as appears by his diary, in possession of 
my family, having imported skilled vig- 
nerons from France ; but to no purpose, 
owing to the severity of the American 
winter. The luxuriant growth of wild 
graj)es in the woods, misled his father, 
William Penn, also, to attempt the intro- 
duction of the delicate French vines, 
instead of developing our own hardy 
varieties. 

"15th. Dined at Israel Pemberton's, 
and after dinner Jemmy and I rode, on 
horseback, to Stenton; R. Pemberton and 
M. Jordan went in the chaise. We 
spent two or three hours very agreeably 
there in company with J. Logan, his wife 
and daughter. The roads very muddy. 

" 1 7th. In the afternoon Samuel Weth- 
erill and I rode to Burlington; found 
my relations and friends mostly well, 
and several of them came to my father's 
house and spent the evening there. Our 
discourse ran much upon the state of 
their province, oppressed by an ill-na- 
tured and superannuated governor." 

This superannuated governor, one 
grieves to note, was the former useful 
and patriotic Lewis Morris. He died 
the following spring. 

"18th. The day fixed for two repre- 
sentatives for their city. My father and 
Cousin Daniel Smith were chosen with- 
out a dissenting vote." 

The unanimous election of these two 
members of our family to represent Bur- 
lington in assembly, is a remarkable fact. 

"Spent most of the evening with Aunt 
M. Raper's" (family,) "with my brother 



Samuel, looking over the library of our 
deceased uncle. Aunt was so kind as 
to give Saminy and me several of his 
books." 

"First month 19th, 1746. Went to 
Samuel Moore's, where we drank tea and 
spent a considerable time in very agree- 
able conversation; had a dispute upon 
inoculation for small-pox, two or three 
people in town having got that distemper 
from New York. It seems clear to me 
that we who are but tenants have no 
right to pull down the house that belongs 
only to the landlord who huilt them." 

The same sort of argument is now 
urged by good people against the trans- 
fusion of healthy blood into the veins of 
the sick, on the ground of its being a 
tampering with the constitution of the 
giver of the blood. Such persons over- 
look the obligation of man to make use 
of his intellect and of the physical secrets 
which, from time to time, God reveals to 
it in the gradual upward progress of our 
race. Who now finds anything impious 
in vaccination ? 

Between the above date and the next, 
John Smith appears to have purchased 
his estate at "Point-no-point," above 
Philadelphia. This point derives its 
odd name from the gentle curve of the 
Delaware shore. He was now twenty- 
four. 

"Third month, 12th. At Point-no- 
point. Busy in looking for bricks, etc., 
and had a good deal of conversation 
with Hugh Roberts upon gardening, etc. 
Agreed with George Martin to level my 



^ 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



133 



terrace-walky leaving it twenty feet wide ; 
to make a fall thirty inches on a bevel ; 
to level the next plot one hundred feet 
deep ; to do the next fall, turf it and the 
sides, and plant the whole, etc., for 
twenty pounds; was, in the afternoon, 
taken up with draining plans, etc." 

" 17th. After dinner, S. Noble and I, 
rode to T. Lawrence's plantation, then to 
Bush Hill and Plurastead's, from thence 
to my place ; on our return we found our 
new brigantine launched ; called her the 
Addison." (No doubt, named from the 
essayist.) 

"29th. Was at meeting. Eden Hay- 
dock was married. G. Whitfield and 
wife, and several of his hearers were 
there." This was the great preacher, 
Whitfield, then laboring in Philadel- 
phia. 

" Fifth month, 9th. We had a report 
last 7th day, by a vessel at Newcastle, 
from Ireland, that the rebels in Scotland 
were defeated, and to-day, the news by the 
post, confirms the same ; they had a very 
bloody battle, wherein the Pretender's 
army received a total defeat, but he, with 
a few of his attendants, escaped. - To- 
night, there were a few illuminations, 
bonfires, etc. 

"10th. The mayor ordered there 
should be no bonfires in the habitable 
part of the city, and his order was 
obeyed, and the mob pretty civil, tho' 
they broke a few Friends' windows." 

" 15th. At meeting. I was, as at many 
other times, favoured with a sight of the 
weakness and the vileness of my natural 



disposition, which, with the remembrance 
of the tender mercies I have repeatedly 
received, bowed me very low, and made 
me abhor myself. Oh! may the same 
sense always keep me in a humble frame 
of soul. Drank tea at S. Sansom's. Read 
Pope's Miscellany." 

The sacredly private nature of mem- 
oranda like the above, and those es- 
pecially, relative to his courtship, has 
made me hesitate to copy them. But 
they give so charming and artless a self- 
portraiture, of a nature so pure and 
pious, that I concluded to introduce them 
to readers who are also family connec- 
tions. 

" 24th. This day was observed, by the 
governor's order, a thanksgiving day, for 
the victory over the Scotch rebels, by all 
but Friends, of whom, too many con- 
formed, by keeping their shops shut, 
etc." The " Friends " were thoroughly 
loyal, but their consciences would not 
permit them to join in a celebration of 
acts of war. The next entry records a 
dispute with Abel Noble, chief founder 
of the "Free-Will Baptists," and the 
father-in-law of John Smith's aunt, 
Mary (Smith) Noble. 

" 25th. Had, in the evening, the com- 
pany of Abel Noble, with whom had a 
long dispute. I undertook to prove him 
no Christian, and in doing it, was so 
close upon him, that he was very angry, 
and gave me an account of abundance 
of judgments which had happened upon 
people who diflfered with him, as, their 
buckwheat being killed by the frost, their 



134 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



houses burnt, or dying soon after, with 
a deal more of such dark nonsense." 

"Sixth month, 12th. I dined with 
John Bartram, who was very civil in 
showing his rarities of sundry sorts." 
(The eminent botanist, founder of " Bart- 
ram's Botanic Garden.") 

" 13th. After dinner, went to the post- 
office and received a letter from Edward 
Penington, advising that our fine brigan- 
tine, the Addison, was taken by a French 
privateer, within sight of Antigua, and 
carried into Martinico. This, tlio' a very 
great disappointment to my hopes of that 
beautiful vessel, I endeavoured to bear 
with patience and resignation. Then, 
John Dillwyn and several other friends 
going to Point, I rode with them, and we 
spent most of the afternoon at my place." 

" Eighth month, 14th. Entered into 
partnership with Abel James," (father 
of the late Professor Tlids. C. James,) 
" and from thence to 

" 18th. Have been so busy that I have 
not had time to keep the journal regularly.'* 

" 1746, Eleventh month, 1st. Spent 
the evening at a public house with sev- 
eral friends of the young sort, where we 
agreed to meet once a week to have sup- 
per, etc." (A Quaker club!) "In the 
evening, read awhile in Chambers' Dic- 
tionary." 

"3d. After dinner, rode with A. James, 
Jemmy Pemberton, etc., to Schuylkill, 
had a small spell of skeeting^ but not 
quite agreeable, the ice being rough. Read 
in the evening, in Don Quixotte." 

" 8th. Had, part of the evening, the 



company of Benjamin Lay, the cynic 
philosopher." 

" 10th. Had several of my friends to 
spend the day with me at my plantation." 

" 11th. Dined at Israel Peraberton's 
with Hannah Logan, etc. Spent the 
evening in reading Sir Thomas More's 
' Utopia.' " 

" 14th. Dined at Stenton, and was very 
handsomely entertained." 

"16th. Spent the day at ray plan- 
tation," (with some ten friends, who are 
named,) " Found an agreeable place to 
slide on the creek. We went and re- 
turned in slays," (sleighs) " all safe and 
pleased." 

" Twelfth month, 7th. Waited upon 
Rachel Pemberton to Stenton. Found 
only their own family there. Lodged 
there to-night." 

"8th. Waited upon the agreeable 
women, to Germantown meeting, dined 
and drank tea at Stenton. Returned 
home, having been very courteously en- 
tertained." 

" 21st. Heard as soon as I came down- 
stairs that our ship, Friendship, had put 
into Antigua, having sprung aleak at 
sea, and the vessel was like to be con- 
demned there, her upper-works being 
rotten. We soon received a letter from 
Captain Lisle, which confirmed it. This 
very great disappointment I bear with 
resignation and cheerfiilness, considering 
that I know not whether it is best for me 
to be rich or poor." 

" 26th. Spent the forenoon, as yester- 
day, at my plantation. Planted some 



136 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



" * With thee conversing I forget all time, 
All seasons and their changes/ " etc. 

(All copied out.) 

The entries during this spring and 
summer show that " the town " suffered 
several false alarms, from French priva- 
teers reported in the bay; that some 
cases of yellow fever were developed, etc. 

" Eighth month 24th. A very pleas- 
ant day, which I was exceedingly glad 
of, as I understood H. Logan went to 
Burlington last night, and she set out 
from thence with my sister this morning 
for Shrewsbury. 

"28. Was this morning in a most 
uneasy disposition of mind, having an 
eager inclination to go to Burlington to 
meet the friends from Shrewsbury, and 
was afraid to do it lest it should disoblige 
my dearest Hannah, who, I expected, 
would be among them. These different 
passions contested so long that they 
actually made me sick; however, love 
prevailed, and I privately went. They 
got to Burlington soon after I did; I 
met H. at my brother's ; had but little of 
her company ; thought she did not like 
my coming. Oh ! racking thought I 

" 29th. H. Logan, with the friends at 
my father's,'' (this must have been at 
Richard Smith's country-seat, elsewhere 
called his " plantation," at Green Hill.) 
" I was exceedingly pleased to see her 
there, and yet trembled lest it was not a 
pleasure to her to be there. What pain 
is there in a state of doubt and uncer- 
tainty." 

Governor Andrew Belcher, of New 



Jersey, was on the most intimate terms 
with Hon. Richard Smith and his family, 
and it is recorded that he attended the 
wedding of William Lovett Smith in the 
only four-wheeled carriage then existing 
in that colony. This intimacy and the 
delicacy of Hannah Logan's health, 
(which suffered from the horseback-rid- 
ing — then the ordinary mode of travel- 
ing,) will explain the next entry, which 
appears to have been made at Samuel 
Smith's country-seat of Hickory Grove, 
where our journalist was staying. 

" Eighth month 30th. I sent a man 
to Burlington to beg the loan of the 
governor's four-wheeled chaise, which he 
readily sent. I wrote to him upon it, 
and to my dear father by the same 
opportunity, wherein I told him, among 
other things, that the health of what is 
dearer to me than life, occasioned my 
taking that step. About ten o'clock the 
chaise came, and Jane and Hannah 
riding in it, we got in pretty good time 
to Evesham meeting. After dinner, rode 
to Elizabeth Estaugh's," (Elizabeth Es- 
taugh, whose maiden name was Haddon, 
was the founder of the pretty town of 
Haddonfield.) "The good widow re- 
ceived us kindly, but the pleasure that I 
should otherwise have had in this even- 
ing's conversation was lost by dear Han- 
nah's having got a pain in her head, 
which I thought occasioned by riding too 
far to-day. 

"Eighth month 31st. Leaving the 
friends at E. Estaugh's, I rode home, 
and sent my man to Mount Holly to 



4. P. 136. Last lini^^Gur Andrew readi^onathan. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



137 



bring their horses down to them ; visited 
several friends ; heard of the arrival of 
our snow, Prince William, at Barbadoes, 
and think this has been a week of con- 
tinual mercies to me ; may I be bowed 
in deep thankfulness to the Fountain of 
all goodness, Who doth whatever He 
pleaseth, and if it be in His pleasure to 
favour me with more blessings, which I 
know I do not merit, or to try me with 
distress and pain, which, for my many 
faiUngs and errors, I justly deserve, may 
I always be helped to say, in truth and 
sincerity, * Thy will be done, and let all 
Thy dispensations produce praise and 
renown to Thine ever worthy name.' " 

The first gentlemen in the community 
were, at this period, members of the 
" Fire Company " spoken of in the next 
entry, which had been, in fact, chiefly 
founded and organized by John Smith, 
under the name of the "Philadelphia 
Contributionshipfor insurance from losses 
by Fire." An expedition was at this time 
being set on foot against the French, the 
funds for which were to be raised by 
lottery, and it was proposed that the in- 
surance company should invest in this 
lottery. The "association" spoken of, 
was a volunteer military organization, in 
which some young Quakers participated. 

" Slst I spent the evening with our 
fire company ; twenty-two of us met, and 
the association was much the subject of 
conversation ; I said but very little, but 
when it was proposed that our bank 
stock should be applied towards purchas- 
ing lottery tickete^ and that it should be 
13 



put to a vote by balloting, I opposed 
that, telling them that I feared, if we 
took that private method, perhaps some 
might vote for it that would not openly, 
and if that should be the case, I thought 
as we were members of a society that 
had made it a part of their discipline to 
caution against being concerned in lotte- 
ries, it would not be to our reputation. 
After some debate the question was put, 
whether we should vote by ballot or 
openly, and carried for the latter, thir- 
teen to nine; and whether our bank 
stock should be so applied, and carried 
in the negative — nineteen to three." 

"Eleventh month 1st. The associa- 
tion marched through some parts of the 
city in eleven companies. Chose the 
following oflBcers, viz. : Abraham Taylor, 
colonel, etc., etc. It is very remarkable 
that, on this occasion, though people of 
other denominations are so universally 
afraid, there was not above ten or twelve 
under our profession that bore arms in 
this city. Gilbert Tennant's sermon on 
the lawfulness of war came out to-day, 
and I was so moved at the deceits and 
quirks in it, that I determined to essay 
an answer, and accordingly began one. 

" 2d. Kept close to answering G. Ten- 
nant. 

" 3d. We had, in the morning, a very 
large meeting at the bank; it having 
been mentioned last first day that some 
extracts of the discipline were to be read 
to-day. This drew abundance of people, 
and some not of our profession. I read 
the extracts; was a little confused at 



138 



THE BURLINGTON SMTTHB. 



first, but after awhile read intelli- 

giWy- 

" 8th. Finished my answer to G. Ten- 
nant and sent to J. P., Jr., for correc- 
tion and amendment ; it contained thirty- 
four sides of paper, very close wrote, 
which, considering it was begun but this 
day week, and many interruptions in the 
time, by company, etc., shows that I have 
not been very idle." 

The sermon and John Smith's reply 
may be found in the Philadelphia 
Library. 

"25th. Called my piece *The Doc- 
trine of Christianity, as held by the 
people called Quakers, vindicated, in an- 
swer to G. Tennant's sermon on the law- 
fulness of war.' " 

"26th. An advertisement was in 
Franklin's paper, purporting that the 
above treatise will be published the 30th 
instant, to be given away at the 
printer's. 

" 30th. This being the day my piece 
came out, the printer's house, and indeed 
my own, was like a fair ; people came so 
thick to get them. Dr. Hall told me 
that he never saw a pamphlet in "so much 
request at first coming out, even in Lon- 
don; had a variety of sentiments 
upon it. 

" Twelfth month 3d. Paid a visit to 
the widow, Sally Morris, where I found 
H. Logan; met in the evening with the 
latter, accidentally," (?) "at Benezet's; 
waited upon her to J. P., Jr's., where 
we supped, then accompanied her to her 
brother's, and had an opportunity of 



some converse with her ; made proposals 
of waiting upon her at home, and of 
asking her parent's consent, if such a 
thing was not absolutely disagreeable to 
her ; I was in a good deal of conftision, 
but her good nature bore with it, without 
endeavouring to increase it, and though I 
could not perceive she was willing I should 
take that step, she consented to receive 
another letter from me, upon my prom- 
ising not to take that for any encourage- 
ment, etc.; many were the revolving 
thoughts with which my mind was 
crowded after this conversation, and yet, 
upon the whole, I found my aflTection 
encreased by her generous behaviour, and 
was thankful for the opportunity I had, 
of so much converse with her. I pray 
God to pour down His choicest bless- 
ings upon her head. 

"5th. I wrote a long letter to dear 
Hannah, and got her brother, William, 
to undertake the delivery of it. I told 
her, in it, my mind very freely; the 
ground upon which I had formed my 
unalterable resolution of having her, if 
possible; and, as there was some diflfi- 
culty whether my waiting upon her 
parents would be disagreeable or not, I 
begged the favour of a line or two upon 
that subject, promising the utmost secrecy. 
Had, in the evening, the company of A. 
Farrington," (an eminent minister of the 
"Friends,") "and my brother, William. 
Abraham told me he was very well satis- 
fied with my treatise; that he had begun 
to answer G. Tennant's sermon, but felt 
a full stop iu bi3 miud, and was told it 



A FAMILY HISTOBY. 



139 



was in better hands, and plainly saw 
where, etc." 

" 7th. Several of us supped and spent 
the evening at Governor Belcher's, who 
treated us sociably and handsomely.'* 
(At Burlington.) 

"10th. Understood,whenIcamehome, 
that A. Farrington had recommended 
my treatise at Concord Quarterly Meet- 
ing, and told the age of the person who 
wrote it." (Twenty-five years.) 

" 17th. Drank tea at J. Pemberton's, 
of Hannah Logan's making — nectar and 
ambrosia." (We have already seen the 
bewildering ejffect of this tea on another 
young gentleman.) 

" 20th. It is remarkable what an in- 
crease of the number of beggars there 
is about this town, this winter; many 
more than I have before observed, and I 
have not sent any away empty-handed 
that hath applied to me. A fellow-feel- 
ing of the infirmities and wants of our 
brethren (as all mankind are,) is a duty, 
and not suflBciently practised without ad- 
ministering relief, when in our power. 

" 23d. After dinner, I rode to Stenton; 
the roads very muddy, and my thoughts 
disturbed with pain and anxiety, lest 
this visit should be disagreeable; was, 
however, courteously received, but I 
thought my friend, Hannah, was not 
very well pleased with it, which quite 
dampened my spirits. James told me he 
was glad to see me, and had frequently 
expostulated with his son for not bring- 
ing me oftener, etc. Carried up with me 
the York " (New York) " paper, which 



contained two forged letters, in the 
names of Ebenezer Large and Michael 
Lightfoot," (prominent " Friends ") "and 
that Admiral Boscawen had taken six 
French men-of-war, and several East 
India-men. 

"24th. Understood, in the morning, 
that dear Hannah was unwell, so that, 
tho' I staid till ten o'clock, she did not 
appear, which gave me great pain. I 
had intended to ask her father's and 
mother's consent to make free with 
the house, but, as I could not account 
for her indisposition, I was afraid to do 
it, lest it would disoblige her ; how pain- 
ful and grievous my reflections upon 
this occasion were, is more pungently 
felt, than I am either able or willing to 
describe. My good friend, her father, 
took me into his library, and took a great 
deal of pains to entertain me there, but 
my thoughts were so fixed and intent 
upon his daughter, that much of it was 
lost. I left Stenton about ten o'clock; 
overtook a man who was a stranger to 
me; after some conversation, he let me 
know he had been bred a Presbyterian, 
and was now about turning Quaker, and 
appeared to be only turning from a name 
to a name; whereupon I found freedom 
to give him a pretty deal of advice re- 
specting the teaching of the Spirit, the 
danger of resting in form, and the ne- 
cessity of being acquainted with, and 
wearing the yoke and cross of Christ, 
etc." 

" 1748, first month 9th. I took a ride 
to Germantown, under pretence of getting 



140 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



some cyons," (scions,) " but really upon 
more impoi*tant business. Called at 
Stenton ; found company there, who soon 
departed. I intended to stay all night, 
and accordingly did so. Had an oppor- 
tunity of telling my mind to James and 
his wife separately. They treated me 
civilly, referring me entirely to their 
daughter, and the old gentleman told me 
if I was her choice he would give his 
consent. I had some of the dear crea- 
ture's company, but our conversation was 
so much of the ambiguous kind, that 
after a loving and friendly parting, I 
retired to bed full of doubt and per- 
plexity, and got but little sleep. In how 
much pain is a situation between hope 
and despair j" * * * * 

" 27th. My gardener, M. Jenkins, died 
to-day of a pleurisy. I rode in the 
evening to Stenton ; Richard Peters was 
there. I had an opportunity of some 
very agreeable conversation with my 
charmer, but her conduct is so cautious 
and well guarded that I do not yet know 
whether I dare hope to gain her or not. 

"Second month 10th. I was in the 
morning very unwell, having had a poor 
night's rest ; but thought, perhaps, the 
sight of my dear Hannah might be as 
like to cure me as anything else ; where- 
fore I went to Germantown meeting, 
which was silent, and after to Stenton, 
where I was very agreeably entertained ; 
had, in the evening, the charmer's com- 
pany till ten o'clock ; and it was more 
delightful to me than ever, and gave me 
greater grounds of hope than I durst 



before entertain ; and the old gentleman 
treated me in a very generous manner, 
advising me how to court, to have per- 
severance, etc., and acquainting me that 
he had said more to his daughter on 
my behalf than he had ever done on 
Thos. Crosby's, though he was to have 
£20,000. 

"11th. Afl^r a pleasant night's rest, 
and breakfasting with my good friends, 
I returned home in a composed, serene 
frame of mind, and my mind somewhat 
employed upon the Divine kindness to 
me all my life long, and at this time in 
particular. He has been a tender Father, 
the best Friend and kindest Benefactor ; 
His hand has been full of blessings, and 
He hath plentifully caused them to 
descend upon my head ; His mercies are 
new every day, and His loving-kindness 
often more than I durst ask or think. 
And, oh ! what is it for ! I have never 
merited anything; my returns have 
rather been like sour grapes, than suit- 
able. May my future life be cheerfully 
and freely spent in doing the will of so 
gracious and good a God, who is slow to 
anger, delights in mercy, and with Him 
is plenteous redemption. May the image 
of the earthly be wholly put off, and 
may I, in future, faithfully bear the 
image of the heavenly." 

" 14th. In the evening, I rode to Sten- 
ton, and had a great deal of conversation 
with my friend Hannah of the most 
solid and improving kind; found her 
very much undetermined in her senti- 
ments; however, patience and resigna- 



\ 



\ 



A FAMILY HISTOKY. 



141 



tion is my best fortress, and hope my 
only comfort. *Hope, the glad ray, 
glanced from eternal good/ Whether I 
can be so happy as to succeed in my 
wishes of having her for a partner or 
not, I have found benefit in her conver- 
sation, and a near friendship is begot 
between us, that I hope nothing will be 
ever able to break." 

"15th. Got up early and saw old 
Hannibal," (a negro slave,) "just before 
he died." 

" 18th. In the evening, rode to Sten- 
ton, and understanding that Hannah was 
at Fair Hill, (Isaac Norris's,) rode to meet 
her, and did so just at I. Norris's fence, 
and had her dear company back and till 
pretty late in the evening. She seems 
not yet determined in her sentiments, 
but uses me with the utmost generosity 
and tenderness." * * * * 

The record of John Smith's early 
morning visit to the bedside of the aged 
slave, Hannibal, calls for some remarks 
on the existence and conditions of slavery 
in the Quaker communities. In New 
Jersey, as we have seen, slavery was 
early introduced, and fortified by the 
legislation of the mother-country, under 
Queen Anne's government. * It was also 
fostered by the English government in 
Pennsylvania. The Quakers, however, 
soon became uneasy with the evil, and, 
as is well known, were the first of all 
sects to purge themselves from it, and 
have, ever since, been its most uncom- 
promising antagonists. At the period of 
this Journal, however, it still existed in a 



mild and humane form among the 
" Friends." 

Hector St. John, Esquire, who wrote 
concerning the state of slavery in Penn- 
sylvania as it was just before the period 
of the Revolution, says : " In Pennsyl- 
vania they enjoy as much liberty as their 
masters ; are as well fed and as well clad; 
and in sickness are tenderly taken care 
of — for, living under the same roof, they 
are, in effect, a part of the family." "A 
far happier race," he adds, " than those 
poor, suffering slaves of the South."* 

" The first efforts ever made in Penn- 
sylvania," (says J. F. Watson,) " towards 
the emancipation of the blacks, proceeded 
from the society of Friends in German- 
town." " These, in the year 1688, under 
the auspices of F. D. Pastorius, moved 
a petition or remonstrance to the yearly 
meeting of Friends, saying, in effect, it 
was not Christian-like to buy and keep 
negroes." 

Five years later, the "Friends' Yearly 
Meeting of Philadelphia," on the " 13th 
of eighth month," 1693, issued its " ex- 
hortation and caution to Friends con- 
cerning buying and keeping negroes." 
In pursuance of this advice, the purchase 
of negro slaves soon ceased among 
"Friends." The children of slaves, 
however, continued to grow up as slaves. 



* Meaning, no doubt, those on rice and su^ar plan- 
tations in the extreme south, or those in the West 
Indies, for in Virginia and Maryland the slaves, at 
this period, were mildly treated. The expression 
*' enjoy as much liberty as their masters," must, of 
course, be taken with qualification. ''As much liberty 
as the children of their masters," would, no doubt, 
have been strictly true. 



142 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



until the persevering efforts of (among 
others,) the saint-like John Woolman, 
the eminent philanthropist Anthony 
Benezet, and the eccentric "philoso- 
pher/' Benjamin Lay, induced the 
" Friends," gradually and finally, to 
emancipate all their slaves. 

"Before the Revolution," continues 
Watson, " it was a common ingident in 
Philadelphia, to send family servants to 
the jail to get their dozen lashes, for acts 
of insubordination. This was done at 
the pleasure of the master, and was, 
usually, executed on receiving a written 
message from the owners." 

As the so-called " white slaves " or re- 
demptioners, are also alluded to in this 
journal, I add a few notes respecting 
them. 

Large numbers of Germans, many 
Irish, and some English of the lowest 
classes, were now swarming into the 
country, without means to pay their 
passage over sea. It was a perfectly 
well-understood arrangement, that, on 
their arrival, they, or rather their ser- 
vices, were to be sold, for a term of years, 
to the highest bidder, to compensate the 
ship-master for their conveyance. They 
were, within this period, transferable 
from one owner to another, as the slaves 
were, and, it is even asserted, were liable 
to the discipline of the whip, like the 
negro slaves, in case of insubordination. 
From this low original are derived some 
families now wealthy, who, perhaps, de- 
riving, like Antseus, a rude vigor from 
their nearness to the earth, have wrought 



their way up to riches, and the conse- 
quent position. These families gener- 
ally retain, sometimes modified, their 
Germanic or Irish patronymics.* 

The Germans were the most numerous 
class of " redemptioners." "In 1722, 
the Palatine" (German) "servants were 
disposed of at ten pounds each, for five 
years of servitude." Less valuable ser- 
vants brought five pounds only, and the 
term of servitude was longer, sometimes 
eight, and even fourteen years. In 1728, 
an advertisement reads : " Lately im- 
ported, and to be sold cheap, a parcel of 
likely men and women servants." These 
were, probably, servants from Europe. 
In 1737, there is advertised in the Penn- 
sylvania Gazette : " For sale, a parcel of 
English servants from Bristol." Among 
Irish redemptioners, the most remark- 
able case, was that of the rightful Lord 
Altham, James Annesley, who, when an 
orphan boy, was enticed on board an 
emigrant vessel, sailing from Dublin, in 
1728, by the agents of his uncle, Richard 
Annesley, who designed to possess him- 
self of the title and estates ; and, being 
sold for his passage-money on his arrival 
at Philadelphia, served twelve years as a 
farm-servant; on the Lancaster Road. 
When his time was out, he returned to 
Ireland, where he sued for his rights, and 

* It must not be supposed, however, that a German 
or Irish patronymic, in Philadelphia, necessarily im- 
plies a •* redemplioner " origin. Not to speak of the 
swarms of more modem immigrants, a number of sub- 
stantial German Quakers, whose descendants are 
numerous and respectable, settled early, at Germao- 
town, Philadelphia County. Of these, was the excel- 
lent F. D. Pastorius, above mentioned. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



143 



obtained a verdict. His uncle, however, 
carrying the case up, by appeal, to the 
House of Lords, the unfortunate young 
lord died while the case was pending. 
To return to John Smith's journal : 
" 30th. In the evening, rode to Sten- 
tou, and found my friends alone; had 
my dear Hannah's company till ten* 
o'clock, and employed the time in 
sociable, improving conversation ; she let 
me know she had not freedom to give it 
entirely up— and had not concluded to 
accept my proposals, and would, there- 
fore, have me look upon my visits there 
entirely upon uncertainty, etc. ; however, 
she was so cheerful and agreeable that I 
will yet hope. 

" Third month 1st. Had some further 
converaation with my charmer, and a 
great deal with the old gentleman, her 
father; he enquired into my circum- 
stances, and repeated his willingness to 
my having his daughter ; and told me, 
if I got her, he would give me seven 
hundred and fifty pounds sterling ; that 
she had already five hundred acres of 
land of her own ; would have two thou- 
sand pounds more at his death, and one 
thousand more at her mother's. He 
desired me to acquaint him when I had 
any grounds of hope, because he found 
himself declining, had a mind to settle 



* These evening hours are often erased by some one 
into whose hands the journal had passed, and the 
healthful and eminently proper hour of " ten o'clock,' 
substituted bv this unknown but staid individual ; so 
that, where this hour occurs, it is generally safe to 
imderstand a considerably later one ! 



his affairs, and would make me an 
executor, etc." 

" 2d. I came out of meeting, expecting 
Governor Belcher and my father down, 
who, accordingly, came to dinner with 
me, and spent the evening — which occa- 
sioned the company of several friends. 

" 5th. Several of us waited upon the 
governor to Stenton, where we were very 
elegantly and agreeably entertained. 
Richard Peters rode in the chaise with 
me. The rest of the company were John 
Kinsey, my father, I. Pemberton, Junior, 
and W. Logan." 

"8th. Kept my chamber, with the 
toothache. Read Dr. South's Sermons 
and Steele's ' Christian Hero,' which I 
had borrowed from my dear Hannah. 

" 15th. I rode in the evening to Sten- 
ton, and had my dear Hannah's company 
till near ten ; and enjoyed it in a sweet 
sense of pure love, which united us nearly 
together, and opened a free and familiar 
conversation, for which, oh ! that I may 
be made thankful enough. 

" 16th. Had several hours' conversa- 
tion with dear Hannah, and was fully 
confirmed that her principal objections 
against accepting my proposals were re- 
moved, and that she was freer and easier 
to condescend (for, so I may truly call 
it,) to become mine. Blessed be the 
God and Father of all my mercies, for 
this unspeakable favour; may every 
moment of my future life be entirely and 
without reserve, devoted to the service of 
so great and good a Being, who is thus 
heaping unmerited kindness upon me. 



144 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



"My soul was in our conversation, 
and is, at present, bowed under the 
sense of His favourable dealing, and my 
utter incapacity, of myself, to make any 
suitable returns. O gracious and in- 
finite God, be Thou pleased to help my 
weakness, strengthen my feeble desires 
to love and serve Thee above every other 
consideration ; pardon my former errings 
and strayings, and, oh ! make me every 
whit clean. Let Thy pure love guide 
me through all future dangers ! Let it 
lead me from one degree of grace to 
another, until I am made complete in 
Thy beloved Son ! And, as Thou hast 
favoured my dear Hannah and me with 
a degree of Thy uniting love, blessed 
and holy Father! increase it, I pray 
Thee, that we may be, truly and forever, 
one another's joy in Thee ; that we may 
never deviate from Thy ways. Then 
wilt Thou continue to own us with the 
bede wings of celestial rain — the sweet 
overshadowings of Divine goodness — 
through time — and at last admit us, 
through infinite favour, to join the 
Heavenly host, in never-ceasing songs of 
praise to Thy high, holy and ever- worthy 
name." 

"26th. The town was alarmed with 
the news of a Spanish brigantine priva- 
teer being at Reedy Island, and much 
frightened were many people about it." 

As this vessel appears not to have been 
sailing under the French flag, she could 
not claim the protection of letters of 
marque from France, nor profess to be 
carrying on the warfare of that nation 



against England. She was, therefore, 
no privateer in the proper sense, but a 
pirate, and probably hailed from the 
Spanish West Indies. The name pri- 
vateer, was frequently applied, at this 
period, to pirates. 

"29th. The disturbance about the 
privateers being in the bay, and at our 
cape, continues and increases ; it is now 
said there are four or five. 

" 31st. N. Chubb, who goes about with 
a subscription paper, to lend money to 
the president and council, upon the pres- 
ent emergency, came to me, but I was 
not free to sign it ; however, I considered 
what Friends could do in the present 
circumstances — five or six privateers at 
the capes — the assembly had made no 
provision for any exigencies of govern- 
ment, and the council either would not 
or could not borrow money upon the 
credit of the assembly's repaying it — ^I 
thought, if a scheme could be drawn up, 
reciting what J. Kinsey, the speaker, 
had said in council, viz. : that he believed 
if they were put to any expense in dis- 
charge of what they conceived to be 
their duty, that an adequate provision 
would be made by the assembly in sup- 
port of government — and binding the 
subscribers to fulfill the intent and mean- 
ing of that declaration — it would help to 
still the noises and clamours of the people, 
and be a means of heajing the disturb- 
ances at present among us. According 
to this scheme, I inadvertently, without 
consulting with anybody, drew up an in- 
strument of writing, and signed it with 



A FAMILT HISTOBY. 



146 



one hundred pounds. Jemmy Pember- 
ton followed me with the same sum, and 
probably many more would have done 



SO. 

By this public-spirited act, John 
Smith had, however, unfortunately com- 
mitted himself to the plans which were 
being pushed by Chubb and others, and 
to which James Logan himself, it is 
believed, was not averse, and which con- 
templated the fitting out a ship-of-war 
to chastise the aforesaid pirates or priva- 
teers — ^a measure contravening the peace 
principles of " Friends." On reflection, 
he consulted with his friends, and during 
the day, he and J. Pemberton decided 
to withdraw the subscription paper. In 
a man so extensively engaged in ship- 
ping business, this transaction shows the 
thorough sincerity of his convictions 
of the unlawfulness of all warlike action 
to a Christian. 

" Fourth month 2d. In the afternoon, 
I rode to Stenton, and Sally Morris being 
there, I took a chaise to bring her home 
with me ; found friends well. Had my 
dear Hannah's company till eleven 
o'clock ; told her the whole of the above 
affair, and had some solid satisfaction in 
her remarks on that and other things." 

"4th. About noon, received a letter 
from my dear father in answer to one I 
had wrote him, wherein I had told him 
that I had some hopes the affair at Sten- 
ton would meet with all desirable success. 
He tells me, in answer to it, that he is 
very well pleased with it, and desires 
that such a blessing may be sanctified to 
19 



me. Bids me to ask Hannah to give 
him leave to provide a four-wheeled 
chaise of the best sort, etc. I wrote him 
by brother Samuel, who returned this 
afternoon, a letter of thanks. In the 
evening, William Logan and I took a 
walk to the State-house, and in our 
return, called at his house, where we 
found his wife and my dear Hannah just 
come to town ; had there, also, some of 
John Churchman's company." 

"6th. Went to Wm. Logan's, where 
I had Hannah's company for some time ; 
she seems now almost determined to put 
the affair entirely off, which gives me a 
great deal of pain. It was diflScult 
enough to bear the doubts and fears I 
had before I made suit, but now, when 
I thought I had rational grounds to hope 
I should gain her, to have the afflicting 
prospect of being denied, is abundantly 
more so. 

" 6th. Cool and some rain ; my mind 
to-day was so melancholy and dull on 
the foregoing account, that I went but 
very little out and did but very little at 
home. 

" I omitted mentioning in the proper 
place, that poor N. Chubb, the latter end 
of last week, became delirious ; supposed 
to be occasioned by his having schemes 
for raising money to fit out ships-of-war 
to take the pirateers" (sic.) "at the 
capes, etc., too much at heart, and going 
about in hot days, drinking hard and 
being without sleep, etc. On the first 
day, he jumped out of a window two 
stories high and broke both his legs, and 



146 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



to-day, I understand lie is in a dangerous 
condition/* (He died soon afterward.) 

" 11th. Supped at I. Pemberton, Ju- 
nior's, with H. Logan, A. Benezet and 
wife, etc. Waited upon Hannah to her 
brother's, and they being gone to bed, 
had her company till after ten o'clock, 
and we had, together, a great deal of 
melting conversation, she being deter- 
mined to put the thing entirely oflf ; but 
with much persuasion, I got a little liberty 
for one other time upon it, tho' she told 
me she could not give me the least hope 
by putting it off to a future time." 

" 21st. In the evening, I rode to Sten- 
ton and had my dear Hannah's company 
till after — o'clock," (hour altered to 
ten); "found her still in disposition to 
defer the affair till sometime hence, and 
desirous of my not making frequent 
visits until she can see clearer whether it 
is her place to accept my proposal or not, 
which, as I perceived it would be agree- 
able to her, I consented to ; and then we 
conversed together in a free, cheerful and 
agreeable manner. 

" 22d. Had a good deal of Hannah's 
company this morning, and an opportu- 
nity of some conversation with her father 
and mother separately. I acquainted 
them how the affair was circumstanced, 
and the reasons for my not making visits 
so frequent as I could wish ; they treated 
me, now as heretofore, very kindly 
and generously, and I left Hannah in a 
much easier and pleasanter disposition 
than for some time before, which gives 
me a great deal of solid satisfaction." 



The next few entries give glimpses of 
the dark side of slavery, of old-fash- 
ioned amusements, remedies and reading. 

"28th. As I was sitting at my door 
this evening, I perceived a bricklayer, 
who works at building Captain Dowers's 
house, and his negro, differing," (quar- 
reling); "saw the master strike him; 
upon which the negro ran down to the 
end of the wharf and several after him ; 
when he got there, he swore, if his mas- 
ter struck him again, he would jump off 
and drown himself, which the master 
unhappily doing, the fellow was as good 
as his word, jumped off and perished 
before anybody could save him. This 
affair affected me much. 

" Fourth month 29th. Aft;er dinner, 
I took Captain Dowers," (master of one 
of John Smith's ships,) " in my chair," 
(gigO " to the Falls of Schuylkill— we 
went in the rain, fished in the rain and 
came home in it, yet caught but few. 

" Fifth month 3d. Quite unwell ; took 
some camomile tea, which threw me into 
a fine sweat, but I slept but little. 

" 4th. Kept my bed most of the day ; 
read Joseph Andrews. 

" 6th. I kept house. Employed part 
of the day in reading in the writings of 
our ancient and valuable friend, William 
Smith," (of Besthorp,) "and several 
chapters in the Book of Job." 

There is an amusing contrast between 
such reading and that of the day before 
— Fielding's Joseph Andrews. 

" 13th. Rode to Germantown meeting, 
which was very large. I suppose there 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



147 



was thirty chaises and chairs from town 
there — many friends dining at Stenton. 
I had the pleasure of dining with dear 
Hannah at a side-table, which I prefer 
to the most sumptuous and exact enter- 
tainment without her." 

" Fifth month 16th. After dinner, I 
rode to Burlington to see my father, who 
hath been some days indisposed, in com- 
pany with Robert Smith, his son, and T. 
Lightfoot. Soon after I got into my 
father's house, a messenger arrived from 
Amboy with a letter from Captain Peale, 
advising that our snow was safe arrived 
at New York," (she had, perhaps, made 
her port there to avoid tlye pirates at the 
capes,) " and importing the necessity of 
some immediate advice, so that I deter- 
mined to set out (thither) early in the 
morning ; because, to take time to send 
for either of the other owners, would 
make a great delay. 

" 17th. A cloudy day and very pleas- 
ant to travel ; set out with the messenger 
that brought us the news, viz.: Esek. 
Fitzrandolph," (an ancestor of the Ran- 
dolphs, of Philadelphia,) "about six 
o'clock in the morning. Baited at Cros- 
wicks, dined at Cranbury, baited again 
at South River and got to Amboy before 
dark. 

" 18th. Set out for" (Perth) "Amboy 
about seven, and getting a ready passage 
over the Narrows, at Symmons^ Ferry, 
upon Long Island, opposite New York, 
about one; got to the city soon afl;er; 
went to a tavern and called for some 
dinner ; while I w^s ^tipg it, saw Capt. 



Peal going down to the wharf, which I 
was very well pleased with. 

" The wind and tide suiting, we got a 
pilot and sent the snow over to the Kills, 
ordering the captain, after entering her 
at Amboy, to bring her back again ; the 
reason of our entering there is to save 
the tonnage, there being a law in New 
York imposing a duty of two per cent, 
a ton upon all vessels entering from be- 
yond sea, not owned there. Drank tea 
at Spencer's, in the broad way, in com- 
pany with a sister of Lady Warren's, 
viz.: John Watt's wife, and several 
other fine women. 

" 19th. The captain returned with the 
snow before night, having entered and 
cleared at Amboy. I dined to-day at 
Spencer's — dinner dressed afl^r the 
French mode. 

" 20th. A hot day. Got the vessel to 
the wharf about ten o'clock, and began 
to unload." 

Afl«r landing the cargo — containing, 
among other things, eighty-three pipes 
of wine — and some days spent in social 
intercourse, (visits to Samuel Bowne, 
Henry Haydock and Edward Burling, 
are mentioned,) he continues : 

" 22d. Took leave of my kind friends 
and left New York about four o'clock ; 
got to Amboy about ten, which is com- 
puted twenty-five miles ; I was hindered 
a full hour at the ferry at the Narrows, 
besides what I was at the two other fer- 
ries ; waited upon the collector and paid 
him his fees; lodged at Richard Fitz- 
randolph's. 



148 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



" 23d. A pleasant day to travel. Left 
Amboy about six o'clock. After I had got 
over South River Bridge, I took the left- 
hand road instead of the right, and rode 
near ten miles out of my way ; however, 
I got to Cranbury and dined there; 
baited at Croswicks, and got to Burling- 
ton about eight o'clock." 

The description of this journey is ex- 
tracted to show the primitive mode of 
intercourse at this time between Phila- 
delphia and New York. The Fifzran- 
dolphs, who then acted as messengers 
between the cities, afterward set on foot 
a line of stage-coaches to facilitate travel. 

" 26th. Was at meeting. This was to 
me a peculiarly good meeting. I waited 
in it for a sense whether it would be 
suitable for me to renew my visits to 
dear Hannah Logan, and in waiting, my 
mind was filled with sweetness, and en- 
larged in pure love and a particular open- 
ness and freedom, so that I determined 
in the affirmative. Had Israel Pember- 
ton and his wife and Jemmy, William 
Logan and his wife to dine with me ; in 
the evening, I rode to Stenton. Hannah 
and her mother were not at home, but 
soon came, and my dearest creature re- 
ceived me with a decent, agreeable free- 
dom, and we conversed together with 
solid delight and pleasure. I retired to 
rest in the arms of mercy, my soul 
ascending in praise and gratitude to the 
great Healer of breaches and Restorer of 
paths to dwell in. 

" 27th. A warm day. Had my dear 
Hannah's company sey^ral hours, jmd 



received the fullest assurance of a recip- 
rocal love and tenderness. Our conver- 
sation was in boundless confidence, and 
with the most perfect harmony ; our souls 
seemed entirely knit and united together, 
and we jointly breathed" (the prayer) 
" that the eternal One might bless us in a 
sacred and indissoluble tye, and might 
make us one another's joy in Him. We 
had the pleasure to reflect that we had a 
true regard to His fear and sought His 
direction and blessing above all other con- 
siderations in this afiair, and to consider 
that a good hand had sanctified all our 
difficulties and fears, and given us a liberty 
to love one anq^her without reserve. May 
we both forever lean upon His eternal 
arm, and, oh I may I, who am doubly obli- 
gated by this fresh instance of His 
matchless mercy, make it the principal 
study and endeavour of my life to please 
and serve Him who has dealt thus boun- 
tifully with me. I proposed our going 
to the next monthly meeting, both to 
Hannah and her mother, and they took 
till to-morrow evening to consider of it. 
I got home to dinner, and spent some 
time after at William Logan's. 

" 28th. In the evening, rode to Sten- 
ton, but the old gentleman's reasons 
against going to-morrow were so strong, 
that I was obliged to submit to them. 
Had, however, my dear Hannah's com- 
pany till nine o'clock in the freest and 
most agreeable manner; then William 
Logan and I rode home together. My 
father came to town to-day, which was 
t^e reason I returned to-night, 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



149 



" 29th. Appointed one of the repre- 
sentatives to the Quarterly Meeting." 

The " monthly " meetings, for business, 
were, then, usually composed of several 
neighbouring congregations of "Friends." 
They were subordinate to the quarter- 
yearly assemblies, of several monthly 
meetings, and these, to the yearly meet- 
ings, composed of several quarterly 
meetings. It was customary, for persons 
about to marry, to declare their intention 
in two successive monthly meetings be- 
fore consummating it. The singular 
prohibition, presently alluded to, from 
marrying the first cousin of a deceased 
wife, is now dropped from the discipline, 
as well as the second " passing " of meet- 
ing, from usage. 

"Sixth month 1st. Attended our 
quarterly meeting. The meeting for 
business held till near five o'clock, occa- 
sioned by the request of Merion and 
Abington monthly meetings, that the 
rule which prohibits a man from marry- 
ing his wife's first cousin, might be car- 
ried up to the yearly meeting to be re- 
considered; this caused a long debate, 
and it was at length concluded to refer 
it back to the monthly meetings, that 
they might further consider of it, before 
it is carried up. 

" 9th. Rode, in the evening, to Sten- 
ton, and spent the time to my very great 
satisfaction, and, I hope, to Hannah's; 
we conversed together upon the highest, 
as well as the lowest subjects, in a pleas- 
ant and open manner, and in pure love 
9nd perfect confidence. And greater tem- 



poral happiness cannot be. O my soul ! for- 
ever bow before the blessed Dispenser of 
all good, in deep thankfulness and rever- 
ence, for thus highly favouring of thee, 
(Who) 

" ' In a true and faithful friend, 
Hath doubled all my store.' 

"10th. Had some of my charmer's 
company and conversation, and returned 
home to dinter. Employed the re- 
mainder of the day in business, and 
spent the evening alone; having lost a 
great part of the relish I used to have 
for other company, beside my dear Han- 
nah's, now I know the value of hers. 

"11th. Spent some time, aflter meet- 
ing, at Wm. Logan's, who kindly in- 
formed me that his mother, etc., intended 
to go a-fishing, to-morrow morning, and 
I immediately concluded, in my mind, to 
make one of the company, but the fear 
of disobliging my Hannah, gave me a 
good deal of uneasiness. Spent the even- 
ing at home alone. 

" 12th. A very pleasant day. I rode, 
in the morning, to the Falls of Schuyl- 
kill;* found there my dear Hannah, 
fishing, at some distance from the rest of 
the company, so I had an opportunity to 
make an apology for my coming, which 
she very generously received, and I had 
the pleasantest day in fishing, that I ever 



* The Falls, now no longer existing, were, then 
a romantic cataract ; the " backwater " of the Fair- 
mount Dam caused them to disappear. The Roberts' 
House, still standing, where the fishing-party dined, 
was built before the landing of William JPenn ; it is 
recorded that, there being then no roads in the country, 
the lime, for the mortar, used in the building, was 
brought through the woods, on the backs of lQdiaii9. 



150 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



employed that way before; waited, as 
mueli as I was capable of, upon my Hannah 
and her mother, and we caught some 
fish; part of which the old gentleman 
and Jemmy took home with them for 
dinner, and the remainder we, that is, 
Wm. Logan and his wife, my charmer 
and I, took with us to John Roberts's, 
who" (had) "kindly invited us to his 
house; we dined there, 'took a nap of 
sleep, and returned to our diversion; 
caught enough to return to Stenton, for 
supper, and got safe there about seven. 
I had my dear Hannah's blessed company 
till twelve, and we never had a more agree- 
able time together ; I do not mean to the 
senses altogether, but pleasure to the 
mind, being mutually favoured with a 
degree of the heart-melting love of God, 
which cemented us together, and made 
us one, in Him ; praised be His most 
glorious name, great and marvelous are 
His works, tender and kind His dealings. 
He hath done more for me, inwardly and 
outwardly, than I ever could have 
asked or thought. May I always ascribe 
the honour to Him that ruleth on high, 
and whose dominion is everlasting. 

" 13th. Wm. Logan and I, having got 
home about seven o'clock, had Peter 
Fearn and A. Benezet dine with me ; the 
latter, after dinner, with E. Cathrall, 
went with me to see Conradus Matthew, 
an ancient hermit, who lives in a lone 
house, about seven miles from town, on 
Wissahickon Road, and has done so 
above thirty years, having taken posses- 
sion of that house, upon the death of 



Kelpius, a learned man, who lived there 
in the same recluse manner. Conrad is 
a Switzer by birth, but talks English 
intelligibly ; we found him in pretty good 
health. When he understood that I was 
the author of the answer to G. Tennant's 
sermon, etc., he expressed a good deal of 
gladness to see me, saying his mind had 
been often with me, and that he thanked 
God for giving me His grace in that 
service. 

" We went from thence to Stephen 
Benezet's, at Germantown, and the old 
gentleman was glad to see us; we drank 
tea with him, and returned home; on 
the way, met Daniel Mackanat, who in- 
formed us that Capt. Mesnard was ar- 
rived from London, which piece of good 
news, gave me a great deal of pleasure. 
Found, by our letters, that we have a 
cargo on board of about £1,100 sterling, 
and I have sundry agreeable things for 
my own use. 

" 15th. In the evening, rode to Sten- 
ton ; took with me a plan of the damage 
done by the fire in London, and gave to 
the old gentleman; and the magazines 
for March and April, which I left with 
Hannah, whose dear and most acceptable 
company I had till past eleven o'clock, 
and the time seemed too short to say the 
many things which occurred in so de- 
lightful a situation. An intimate, sociable 
and perfectly free conversation with a 
woman of good sense and good nature, and 
both tempered and governed by religion, 
is certainly the greatest temporal happiness 
that a man can possibly enjoy, and my 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



161 



being thus highly blessed, makes me 
sometimes reflect, with wonder and amaze- 
ment, ' Good God! what am I, that Thou 
hast thus marked me out for one of the 
happiest of Thy creation! I often see 
myself an object so low, who has fre- 
quently run so retrograde to Thy will, 
that I am unworthy of the least of Thy 
favours, and yet, how art Thou multi- 
plying and heaping Thy kindnesses upon 
my head ! No works of mine have ever 
merited of Thee but wrath and con- 
demnation; this display, then, of love, 
is mere mercy and free loving-kind- 
ness!' Oh, may ray life be one con- 
tinual return of gratitude, for so much 
overflowing of kindness and benignity !" 

"23d. Had a pretty deal of conver- 
sation with Sarah Logan, upon my afiair, 
pressing to go to the next monthly meet- 
ing, but found the present indisposition 
of the family," (James Logan and his 
son were unwell,) "and some other diflB- 
culties being in her way, and she being 
of opinion that everything might be 
made easy by the next after, I submitted 
to defer it till then. I also acquainted 
the old gentleman that I expected to suc- 
ceed, and had my dear friend's company 
till about eleven o'clock, then rode 
home." 

**31st. Captain Rankin came up, to- 
day, and brought in a cargo of above 
£1,000 sterling, from Liverpool. Heard 
that Conrad Matthew, the hermit, died 
yesterday." 

" Seventh month 4th. Captain Lawson 
arrived from London, with whom came 



passengers, the Widow Teal and her 
daughter — recommended to me by (Jov- 
emor Belcher; I went on board the ship, 
and conducted them, with Captain Jevison, 
another passenger, to my house; had 
their company to dinner. Waited upon 
the gentlewomen to view the town, and 
their dress being a little peculiar, occa- 
sioned them to be very much noticed. 
Found, by our letters, that we have goods 
to the amount of near £1,000 sterling," 
(on board.) 

He then says, that Captain Lawson, 
being a stranger in the city, "desired us to 
accept of the care of his Palatines," (Ger- 
man redemptioners,from the Pfalz or Pal- 
atinate,) " which we consented to. I, 
yesterday, sent a messenger to ac- 
quaint Governor Belcher of the lady's 
arrival, and, this day, received a letter 
from him, acquainting me, with his 
thanks for my care, etc., that he intended 
to marry the widow. 

"6th. At the request of the gentle- 
women, I procured a boat of four oars, 
and waited upon them to Burlington; 
the wind being fair up, and having one 
sail, we made our passage in three hours. 
The governor received us very kindly, 
and appeared exceedingly pleased with 
his company. I stept to see my father's 
family, and set off* about one; got home 
before dark, leaving my guests with the 
governor. 

" 7th. Busy in selling Palatines, and 
other affairs, which, in the evening, I will- 
ingly left for the sake of my dear Han- 
nah's company, which I had at Stenton till 



152 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



eleven o'clock, in a freedom perfectly 
engaging." 

At his next visit, he was suddenly- 
seized with violent fever and ague, and 
was confined to bed at St en ton, for a 
week. On the 19th, being recovered, 
" taking an aflfectionate leave of my very 
kind friends, I returned home in the 
four-wheeled chaise." 

On the 20th, he records the lamented 
death, from yellow fever, of John 
Dillwyn, grandfather of William and 
Qeorge Dillwyn, afterwards intimately 
connected with our family. 

" 21st. Read in T. Story's Journal, and 
Henry Fielding's Miscellanies." Asingu- 
lar pair of authors I 

" 24th. I waited upon the old gentle- 
man to request his consent to our pro- 
posing our marriage to the next monthly 
meeting, but he told me he could not 
consent yet, which disappointment flut- 
tered me a good deal, but as I could not 
get his reasons for it, I was obliged to be 
content ; had two or three hours endear- 
ing conversation with his daughter after- 
wards, which cheered and raised my 
spirits that were before very low." 

He has another attack of the ague, 
and before recovering his strength, attends 
" meeting." 

" 30th. I came home very weak and 
faint; but having recruited a little in 
the evening, I rode to Stenton ; was very 
much fatigued with the ride, but my 
dear Hannah's company was so precious 
a balsam, that it seemed to restore 
strength to me, so that I sat up with her 



till past eleven o'clock, and was then 
much livelier and better than I had been 
any time in the day. We conversed to- 
gether in as near and agreeable a man- 
ner, if not more so, than we ever did 
before; for the increase of which dear 
invaluable and inseparable union, O God I 
make me forever truly trankfiill I 
acknowledged my obligations to J. Logan 
for his kind message to me by his wife." 
(This message was, that " after the next 
monthly meeting he would be quite easy," 
that the marriage should be announced 
in meeting.) 

"Eighth month 6th. A raw, disa- 
greeable air. After some sweet conver- 
sation with my Hannah, the old gentle- 
man called me to do some writing, telling 
me with a very pleasant air, that if I did 
not, my spouse that was to be, must ; and 
I as pleasantly thanked him for the ex- 
pression, and told him I would do it to 
save her the trouble ; it took me about 
an hour. I then accompanied my 
charmer and her mother down the lane, 
and we parted at the gate — they going 
to their meeting and I homeward. Called 
at Fair Hill to inquire how Isaac Norris 
is, he having been ill of a fever." 

Several visits to Stenton are now re- 
corded. 

"21st. Had several agreeable firiends 
to dine with me, viz.: Sophia Hume, 
Eliza and Sally Morris, Israel Pember- 
ton, his wife and his sister, Priscilla 
Waterman, William Logan and his wife, 
young Israel and Jemmy Pemberton, 
Michael Lightfoot, Katy and Hannah 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



153 



Callender ; and I was much pleased with 
their company." This bachelor's dinner 
appears to have been given on the ap- 
proaching departure of two of the guests, 
Sophia Hume, a preacher, and James 
Pemberton, on a "religious visit," to 
England. 

" 24th. A large company of us waited 
upon Sophia Hume and Jemmy Pem- 
berton, to Chester. The two Hannahs'* 
(his inamorata and Wm. Logan's wife,) 
" being in a chaise, I took care to keep 
near them; they having an inclination 
to go on board the ship with the friends, 
^I. P., Jr., William Logan and I, with 
several others, went with them ; we stayed 
two or three hours on board ; drank tea 
there, then, taking an affectionate leave of 
friend Hume, and dear Jemmy and Cap- 
tain Mesnard, we returned on shore. 

" 2oth. In the evening, waited upon 
my Hannah, to Stenton; proposed to 
her mother our going to the monthly meet- 
ing next sixth day, and she readily 
agreed to it. I had my dear Hannah's 
company till past ten," (hour again 
altered,) " and we fiiUy agreed upon the 
above affair. 

'* 26th. Talked with the old gentleman 
upon the foregoing subject, and found he 
understood and assented to it ; then took 
an hour or two's very agreeable con- 
versation with my dearest jewel. Re- 
turned home before noon ; sent a lad, in 
the afternoon, to Burlington, with letters 
to my father and sister, to acquaint them 
with our having come to the aforesaid con- 
clusion, and to desire their company." 
20 



" 27th. My father and sister came to 
town in the afternoon. In the evening, 
I rode to Stenton ; found the old gentle- 
man not very well, but he told me he 
hoped his indisposition would not prevent 
or hinder our proceedings. 

"28th. James Logan being pretty 
well recovered, we set out about nine, 
viz. : Sarah and Hannah in the chaise, 
and I on horseback. James gave me 
his consent, in writing, to the monthly 
meeting, and my father and S. Logan 
gave theirs, verbally. We got to town 
about ten ; they went directly to meeting. 
I changed my clothes, and put on a new 
suit of hair camblet; then with my 
father and partner went also. M. Em- 
len and H. Halford preached, and 
Susanna Morris had a sweet prayer ; in 
passing, we were preserved in a good degree 
of calmness; some friends thought I 
spoke too loud, but everybody agreed 
that Hannah spoke as well as could 
be." 



H: 



♦ 



* 



* 



" Ninth month 13th. I wrote a letter 
to my dear Hannah, and sent it by my 
old servant, Thomas Smith," (probably a 
freed negro,) " who is returned to my ser- 
vice again as a cook, at £20 per an- 
num. Was at the burial of Samuel 
Carpenter, and helped twice to carry the 
corpse." 



•I* 



* 



* 



* 



* 



Second " passing " of meeting : 
"25th. A pleasant day, the weather 
being very moderate. Waited upon my 
best friend and her mother to town; 



154 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



came home and dressed ; then, with my 
brother Samuel, went to our monthly 
meeting. M. Emlen preached and B. 
Trotter prayed. I had been hurried in 
preparing to get to meeting in time; how- 
ever, I was favoured with a degree of 
calmness, and we both spoke distinctly 
and intelligibly, having our eye to God 
and trust in Him." 

" 29th. In the evening, waited upon my 
dear Hannah home, and had some of her 
precious company. We fully concluded 
upon next fourth day (/. e., to-morrow) 
week, to have our marriage solemnized." 



* 



i^ 



* 



H: 



* 



* 



" 6th. A cold, cloudy day, very like for 
snow ; after the necessary preparations, I 
set out for Stenton, on horseback, having 
Sally Morris and Joyce Benezet in my 
chaise; found Rachel Pemberton, etc., 
there, and had an agreeable evening, ex- 
cept the pain that the prospect of not 
having my father with us to-morrow 
gave. My brothei-s, Samuel and Rich- 
ard, being come to Philadelphia, and not 
having heard why he did not. 

" 7th. A clear, moderate and pleasant 
day. Had all the company that we ex- 
pected, except Isaac Norris, etc. Sev- 
eral that were not invited, were so com- 
plaisant as to come from town upon this 
occasion. The meeting " (Germantown) 
" was pretty full, and a solid, good time. 
I felt, in it, a degree of the heart-tender- 
ing love of God, which was a strength 
and comfort.. Sarah Morris and M. 
Lightfoot preachedj and J. Benezet 
prayed ; then we solemnized our mar- 



riage in an awful* and intelligible man- 
ner ; had our friends company " (to din- 
ner,) "and the entertainment for them 
was very agreeable." 

" 8th. A very pleasant day. Several 
of our agreeable friends staid at Stenton 
all night, and to-day we had theirs, and 
the company of several others from 
town. Spent the day to general satis- 
faction. 

"9th. Rode to town with my sister. 
Received the compliments of several of 
my acquaintances; went back in the 
afternoon. In the evening, I had a chilly 
fit, and after it a hot fever, which held , 
most of the night. Took the bark. 

" 10th. Read two manuscript treatises 
on the Passions, of Father Logan's writ- 
ing. 

"11th. We had several to visit us at 
Stenton, viz. : Richard Peters, Edward 
Shippen, B. Franklin, Dr. Moore, etc." 

" 12th. Snowy, blowing weather; had, 
last night, another fit of the ague and 
fever, but to-day took a quantity of bark. 
Read a treatise on learning, wrote by one 
Baker, which pleased me. And the 
company of my most agreeable spouse 
made my indisposition quite tolerable to 
what it would have been without her. 

" 14th. A rainy day. Read Leonidas, 
by Glover. 

" 15th. Intended to have taken my 
spouse home to-day, but brother Wnu 
Logan came up, and discouraged us, by 
telling us of the badness of the roads. 
Father Logan gave me a letter to his 

* Tbat Ib, in a manner full of awe. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



155 



brother, Dr. Logan, of Bristol, desiring 
him to pay £500 sterling to my order, 
etc. I told him that I had found in his 
daughter all that I had sought, that I 
thanked him for what he had given, and 
should be quite content," etc. ; " he 
further told me, that he had heretofore 
};iven Hannah five hundred acres of 
land, in Bucks County, and the dear 
creature generously offered to make me a 
present of it." 

" 16th. Stephen Benezet visited us. 
Dr. Moore and Dicky Hill came up in 
the afternoon. About four o'clock, my 
dear spouse and I set out in the four- 
wheeled chaise, having her brother Wil- 
liam in company. Sister Hannah came 
after us, in the chaise that Aunt Pember- 
ton rode up in, who intends to stay a 
night with mother; we were welcomed 
home by my sisters, Betty and Jenny, 
and had uncle and Isse Pemberton, 
Jemmy Logan, etc., to spend the evening 
with us." 

Such was the simplicity of a wedding 
and home-bringing, a hundred and thirty 
years ago! The home to which John 
Smith conducted his Hannah, was in 
Second Street, then the fashionable 
quarter.* Among the peculiarities of 
the time which this diary brings out, 
were the numerous cases of inflammatory 
disease and of low fevers, for which the 
general defect of drainage and the quag- 

* It was nearly opposite the " slate-roof mansion" 
of the proprietary Penn ; a relic which has lately, to 
the disgrace of Philadelphia, been torn down to make 
room for the Corn Exchange. 



mire-like roa!&s were, no doubt, partly 
accountable.* 

Through these un macadamized roads, 
worn into deep gullies by winter frosts 
and rains, and often overspread with pools 
of standing water, a wedding company 
at a country house would come, picking 
their way carefully, and at a snail's pace, 
in their two-seated two-wheeled '^cliaii-s," 
their four-wheeled chaises or on horse- 
back. At the mansion-doors they would 
be politely handed down by well-bred 
negro servants, brought up in the family, 
for the "redemptioners" were only em- 
ployed in the rouglier kinds of service. 
The costumes worn, in a party such na 
this, among *' Friends," can be nearly in- 
ferred from records of the time. It is 
generally supposed that the present 
Quaker garb has remained unchanged 
from the origin of the sect. Such, how- 
ever, ife by no means the case. The 
views and aims of that respectable body 
have always been, to avoid following the 
changing fashion of "the world," as a 
sinful waste of time, money and thought. 
Human nature has, however, been too 
strong (or too weak,) for this excellent 
principle, and their own peculiar fashions, 
changing imperceptibly with the exi- 
gencies and conveniences of the times, 
have always moved in lines parallel to the 
similar changes of those of the " world's 
people." The present broad-brimmed silk 



* In those days, horses going to German! own Mills, 
frequently lost their corn-bags in the quagmire, caused 
by *' Logan's Bun " overflowing the road, near Stenton 
gates. 



156 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



hat worn by them, is less similar to the 
felt cocked-hat of their ancestors, than it 
is to the now fashionable "stove-pipe," 
from which it differs neither in general 
form nor in material. 

The dress now worn by the bishops of 
the Church of P]ngland is nearer to a 
correct preservation of the costume in 
use at the period of "Friends'" origin, 
than tlieir own is. Tlie portraits of 
George Fox and James Nay lor show the 
"shovel" hat, and the nearly collarless 
straight, sack-cut coat, worn buttoned, 
together with the linen bands (the ends 
of the neck-tie,) hanging from the neck 
down the breast, now worn by Episcopal 
and Roman bishops. The contemporary 
portrait of Nay lor, still preserved in the 
library of Peter's Court meeting-house, 
London, shows, also, that he wore his 
full beard and moustache. 

The "shovel" hat, a low-crowned felt, 
with broad brims much curled at the 
sides, became transformed, in time, by the 
increasing breadth of the brims, which 
required them to be looped up to the 
crown to prevent their flapping about the 
ears, into the three-cornered cocked-hat, 
looped up at three points. This fashion 
the "Friends" followed, though their 
brims were, perhaps, of a leas extrava- 
gant breadth, and less fiercely "cocked" 
than those of the " world's people." Wigs 
were universally worn, even by boys. 
The gentlemen, then, who attended John 
Smith's wedding, came in cocked-hats 
and wigs, and generally in plain linen 
bands about the neck, though some who 



approximated in dress to the world, like 
Richard Hill, no doubt wore ruffles on 
bosom and wrist. "Hair camlet" ap- 
pears to have been a fashionable material 
among the plainer " Friends " for coats, 
while the "gayer," or, as they were then 
called, the " finer " sort, wore velvet of 
different colors. The coats were cut 
nearly collarless, very wide-skirted, like 
a wide "sack-coat" in that respect, with 
the front edges overlapping each other 
when buttoned, but neatly fitting to the 
chest and arms; they had very large 
doubled cuffs and great outside pockets 
with flaps, both ornamented with large 
buttons , the pockets being on the front 
of the skirts. The front edges were cut 
perfectly straight from neck to skirt, with 
buttons closely set nearly the whole 
length, from the neck to the lower edge. 
These coats were not very materially 
different from the ordinary costume of 
the period ; but when the heavy rolling 
collar and the "swallow-tailed" cut of 
the skirts were introduced in the "world," 
the " Friends " narrowed their skirts into 
somewhat^ broad "coat-tails," and gave 
the straight-line of thefront edges a gentle 
curve, thus producing what was termed, 
in Philadelphia, the "shad- bellied " coat, 
from the resemblance of its outlines to 
those of that favorite fish, and which 
resembles much more the modern "dress- 
coat " than it does the garment of their 
ancestors. The extremely narrow stand- 
ing collar was, at the same time, consider- 
ably heightened, though not enough to 
double or "roll" it. The coat of the 



A FAMILY HISTOBY. 



157 



Episcopal bishop has undergone a similar 
change, but not to an equal extent. The 
change from the "cocked-hat" to the 
present form worn by "Friends," also 
followed, though with less extreme varia- 
tion, the corresponding change in the 
" world." 

" Small clothes," or " knee-breeches," 
buttoned or buckled at the knee, with 
silk stockings and low shoes with large, 
conspicuous buckles of steel or silver, 
(among the " world's people " sometimes 
ornamented with real Brazilian dia- 
monds,) completed the gentlemen's dress. 
Canes were always carried, with heads of 
ivory, silver or gold; and they were 
usually much longer than at present. 
The ivory-and-silver-headed cane of Dan- 
iel Smith, of Bramham, is still in pos- 
session of a descendant, in Philadelphia. 

The dress of female "Friends" under- 
went equally great changes. At the 
period of «Iohn Smith's wedding, the 
Quaker ladies wore (besides caps as now, 
though of different form,) stays and ' 
hoops, and high-heeled shoes, with pat- 
tens or clogs for muddy weather. The i 
body of the dress was cut low in the ' 
neck, with a kerchief as at present, but 
with sleeves only to the elbow, below 
which a sort of long gauntlet, generally ^ 
of white silk, protected the arm. The 
stays gave a tight waist, which descended 
in a long point upon the petticoat, which 
was seen through the open front of the 
dress. The cap was quite different from 
the present one, only covering the top of 
the head. 



The gowns (usually of heavy rich 
silk or satin for such occasions,) were 
worn open in front, " to display a finely- 
quilted Marseilles, silk or satin petticoat 
and a worked stomacher on the waist." 
(J. F. Watson.) A wedding-gown of 
1770, an heirloom in my family, is cut 
in this style. "The plainest women 
among the Friends, (now so averse to 
fancy colours)," says Watson, "wore 
their coloured silk aprons, say of green, 
blue, etc. This was at a time when the 
* gay ' wore white aprons. In time, white 
aprons were disused," ( by the latter,) 
"and then the Friends left off their 
colored ones and used the white." 

It appears from the following extracts, 
from a letter of Richard Shackleton, 
(1776,) and from one of Sarah Hill 
Dillwyn, wife of the eminent minister, 
George Dillwyn, written while the latter 
was on a " religious visit " in England, 
that these aprons were even worn during 
the times of religious worship, as a 
special costume for those seasons. 

" What shall I say about these green 
aprons? I think we are of one mind 
about them. I believe it is the Master's 
mind that His disciples and followers 
should be distinguished from the world 
by a singularity of external a2)pearance. 
I sujipose it is also His will that a certaiji 
peculiarity of habit should distinguisli 
them on the solemn occasion of assem- 
bling for Divine worship, ^^r other reli- 
gious performances." (Richard Shackle- 
ton, Ballitore, 14th of third month, 1776.) 

" I think the women here are far before 



168 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



the men, * * * jj^^y jp^gg g^_ 

tremely neat and exact, a few of the 
plainest with black hoods aqd green 
aprons. Some go to meeting without 
aprons, but generally carry fine muslin 
or cambrick ones in their pockets to put 
on when they get in the house ; if we 
don't bring one, they always offer." (S. 
H. Dillwyn, London, seventh month 
26th, 1784.) 

We see by this that the fashion was 
just then changing from the green silk 
to the white cambric apron. This fashion 
was doubtless quickly followed in America. 

" The same old ladies, among Friends," 
(continues Watson,) "whom we can 
remember as wearers of the white aprons, 
wore also large white beaver hats, with 
scarcely the sign of a crown, and which 
was indeed confined to the head by silk 
cords tied under the chin." An aged 
relative told me that she remembered a 
distinguished female preacher, sitting in 
the " gallery " of a country meeting in sum- 
mer, with one of these broad, flat, dish- 
like white beavers on her head, when a 
cock, flying iji through the low, open 
window behind the gallery, and, perhaps, 
mistaking the hat for the head of a barrel, 
perched upon it and uttered a vigorous 
crow! These hats were succeeded by 
the totally different " wagon " bonnet, so 
called from their resemblance to the toj) 
of a "Jersey" wagon, and much less 
becoming to a bright, youthful face than 
the flat hat ; these were always of black 
silk, and had a " pendant piece of like 
silk hanging from the bonnet and cover- 



ing the shoulders." These, in turn, were 
supplanted by the present bonnet of 
" coal-scuttle " form, now usually made of 
white or stone or dove-colored silk. 

Our picture of the lady guests who 
descended from the heavy old vehicles 
at Sten ton-house doors on the occasion of 
John Smith's wedding, must, however, 
include the coquettish round white beaver 
flat hats, a style little differing from that 
worn at the period by the ladies of " the 
world." 

Soon after the wedding, the new-married 
pair started to pay a visit to the groom's 
family, in Burlington, and we are at first 
startled to learn from the diary the sur- 
prising fact of the Delaware being so 
solidly frozen as to bear a vehicle and 
horses on the 17th of November ! 

It would seem, however, that the 
diarist, though writing many years after 
the authorized " change of style," still 
used "old style " in his dates ; thus, most 
of them must be read as two months 
later than they appear. 

" Eleventh month 17th. Cousin Katy 
Callender, my father, my spouse and 
myself, set out in his slay," (sleigh,) 
" about ten o'clock, and got to Burlington 
before four. Led our horses over Ne- 
shaminy, which we crossed by walking 
on the ice, as we did, also, Delaware, but 
might have safely rode over each ; found 
a kind and welcome reception from our 
relatives and friends at Burlington. 

"18th. We dined at father's, as did 
several other relatives ; we had a pretty 
many visits in the afternoon and even- 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



159 



ing. In the evening visited Cousin Betty 
Smith and her mother ; both unwell. 

" 19th. My father gave me a paper 
containing an account of some of my 
dear and pious mother's exi)ressions in 
her last illness. We were at meeting, 
which was silent ; Governor Belcher was 
there; spent some time at brother 
Sarauel's with us, as did several of our 
relations — making a large council. 

" 20th. This is my birthday, being 
now twenty-six years of age. I could 
wish the time had been better improved. 

"21st. Taking leave, we crossed the 
river as before, divers friends and rela- 
tions acwmpanying us to Bristol ; from 
thence we set out for home, I having my 
spoiLse in father's chaise, and Cousin 
Johnny Smith, Cousin Katy in his 
father's; Jemmy Logan, who ciime up 
yesterday, on horseback. Cousin Rob- 
ert" (Smith) "and brother Samuel ac- 
companied us to Neshaminy, where we 
took leave of them, and reached home 
about three o'clock." 

Having accompanied our diarist to the 
clo«e of the yeiir 1748, and of his own 
twenty-sixth year, and seen him hap- 
pily married — to avoid giving him an 
undue share of space in this work, I 
shall henceforward confine myself to 
selecting the main points only, from his 
interesting journal. The jMarch, of 
1749, he describes as extremely hot; he 
employs a gardener, for the Point Plan- 
tation, at £30 ix?r annum, and buys 
several redemptioner servants. In April, 
he records several dinners with Gov- 



ernor Hamilton, of Pennsylvania, and 
his own appointment as justice of the 
I)eace. In May, he buys a large tract of 
timber land, at Mesconetcong, of his 
father's first-cousin, Robert Smith, at 
£60 per the hundred acres, and suffers 
a severe loas l)y a burglary at his office. 

"Sixth UKmth 16th. About four 
o'clock, I went to the State-House to hear 
the Indian treaty, there being two hundred 
and sixtv Indians of different nations in 
town. The Stiite-Hoase was extremely 
crowded ; Conas^vetigo made a long speech, 
which, 'tis likely, >vill be printed." (J.S.'s 
brother-in-law, William Logan, was the 
most projninent of the ccmimissioners who 
negotiated this treaty.) *'As I was going 
up there, I heard the uncomfortable 
news of our fine brig, Chalkley, being 
Ciist away upon the Hogstics ; she, with 
what cargo the owners had on board, 
cost us £2,600, and have but £700 in- 
sured thereon, the premium of which 
cost £56. This, having followed several 
other losses, made me thoughtful, but I 
was favoured to resign, in a good degree, 
to the will of Divine Providence." 

In August, he records the death of his 
c^)nnection, the Hon. Joseph Cooper, and 
several visit^i to the widow, at Cooi)er's 
Point, and the birth of his eldest daugh- 
ter, Sarah Logan Smith. 

"Ninth month 14th. Alx)ut tc^n 
o'clock, M. Lightfoot, John Luk(», Isaac 
(jreenleafcs Captain James, brother Sam- 
uel and myself, went to the" (C(K)i>er's) 
"ferry, intcMiding to have gone to Burling- 
ton bv the new road, but the lM)at being 



160 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



too narrow; and unskillful managers, one 
of the horses and my boy tumbled into 
the river, not without danger, but we all 
got well ashore again, and, about twelve, 
set off again, thk side of the river." 
(Giving up the attempt to cross!) "Went 
over Dunks' ferry," (at Burlington,) 
"and got well ui) before dark. Captain 
James, John Luke, Sammy and I, lodged 
at father's, which is the first time I have 
been at Burlington since father moved," 
(into town from his Green Hill place.) 

The errand of this party was to attend 
the marriage of William Lovett Smith. 

"loth. The governor, his wife and 
her daughter, and many others of us, 
rode to Daniel Doughty 's in the morn- 
ing, and from thence to Upper Spring- 
field meeting. M. Lightfoot preached 
and prayed ; then brother William was 
married, speaking audibly. After he, 
his wife, their parents, the governor, and 
his wife and daughter, had signed 
the certificate, it wjis mentioned that if 
there was anybody there, who did not go 
to the house, they might sign there, but 
nobody doing it, I concluded the meet- 
ing in general came home to dine with 
us, where plentiful provision was made. 
Uncles Noble and Raper, T. Wetherill, 
Junior, my brotlier Richard and I, re- 
turned to Burlington." 

(Street lightuig and early winter.) 

"Tenth month 21st. Called at the 
tavern, where the ownei-s of lamps were 
met, to consult for the better lighting 
them. We signed an agreement with a 
man, each of us to pay him 85., 9c?. 2>er 



month, for lighting them every night 
for a month. Read, to-day, in Law's 
answer to Hoadley, and copied several 
passages. 

"22d. The river was fast." 

"2Gth. At meeting. I dined with the 
governor," (Hamilton ; invited previous 
day;) "the rest of the company were 
Wm. Allen," (chief justice,) "Richard 
Peters, Cousin Isse, Jemmy and Johnny 
Pemberton, and brother William Logan ; 
we were very civilly and handsomely 
entertained. 

"28th. Was at meeting. After din- 
ner, John Armit and I rode to Schuyl- 
kill-house, and tryed a little at skeeting; 
we called in our way at James Alex- 
ander's, the proprietors' gardener's," (at 
Springettsbury,) "he showed us his solar 
microscoi)e, and his system of the 
heavens, in wheels," (orrery.) A scien- 
tific gardener ! 

In the "first month," 1750, both 
James Logan and Richard Smith show 
symptoms of their aj^proaching dissolu- 
tion ; the former being struck with 
palsy. 

"Third month 11th. Heard, in the 
evening, that John Kinsey was taken, 
about noon to-dav, with a fit, after he 
had been pleading a cause at the Sui)reme 
Court, at Burlington, and was carried 
into Daniel Smith's," (the old house at 
Broad and Main Streets,) "and Doctor 
Bond was immediately sent for. I rode 
to S teuton after night. 

"12th. Heiird, early in the morning, 
that John Kinsey died about eight 



A FAMILY HISTOBY. 



161 



o'clock last evening. The loss of this 
great and good man occasions a general 
lamentation, and, to present appearance, 
is irreparable. 

"13th. About two we went to the 
burial. I. Pemberton, Junior, William 
Logan, brother Samuel and I took up 
the corpse; we also carried it into the 
meeting and brought it out again. There 
was the greatest concourse of people that 
ever I saw upon any occasion." 

" 30th. At the vendue of J. Kinsey's 
goods, and 

"31st. Again at the same. I had 
before said I would give the appraise- 
ment, viz.: £86, for the four-wheeled 
chaise and horses ; they were, therefore, 
set up at that, and nobody bidding, they 
were cryed off to me; I also bought 
some plate," etc. 

"Fourth month 7th. Understood I 
was chosen a member of the school cor- 
poration to-day, in the room of John 
Kinsey, Esq. 

"Seventh month 14th." He attends 
Burlington yearly meeting. " My father 
being so unwell, I was obliged to take 
the necessary care to entertain friends at 
father's house, which I cheerfully and 
carefully discharged thro' all the time 
of the meeting. 

" 15th. Had the company of many 
friends; father having rode to his planta- 
tion in the morning to take physick, I 
rode thither in the afternoon." The 
father's health now rapidly declining. 

" 24th. Having an invitation to dine 

with the Supreme Court, (from William 
21 



Allen, the new chief justice,) I accord- 
ingly went, and was respectfully treated." 

On the 1st of August, he records his 
election as a member of the Pennsyl- 
vania assembly. In the same month, 
the celebrated Benjamin Franklin ran for 
city recorder, but was defeated by Tench 
Francis. John Morris was elected com- 
missioner nt this time. On " tenth month 
35th," he records the birth of his son 
James. 

1751. "Fourth month 14th. Yester- 
day I signed the subscription paper for 
the Provincial Hospital with £50." 
(His father also subscribed £20, and his 
brother William £10.) 

" Fifth month 2d. Understood I was 
yesterday chose, by the contributors to 
the Pennsylvania Hospital, to be one of 
the managers thereof, and had notice to 
meet the rest in the afternoon." 

" Eighth month 1st. Got home from 
Burlington in the dusk of the evening. 
Found the people in a foam of politicks." 
At this election he was a second time 
chosen member of assembly, and his 
friend, Benjamin Franklin, was elected 
burgess. On the 3d, he is appointed 
auditor by the Supreme Court, together 
with Franklin and John Mifflin. On 
the 15th, he attends the weddmg of 
James Pemberton. 

On the 31st of August, he records the 
death of James Logan ; " he expired m 
a very easy manner, about twenty min- 
utes after twelve o'clock." Shortly after 
the funeral, " ninth month 5th," he sets 
out for Amboy, New Jersey, to see his 



162 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



father, then in attendance as a member 
of the assembly there, and dangerously 
ill. 

" 7th. Spent two hours with my dear 
father, whom I found very weak and low, 
having had an imposthume on his lungs 
broke yesterday, but was able to throw 
up the matter. I would have set up 
with him to-night, but sister Betty was 
not willing. 

"8th. Visited my father early, and 
found him rather easier in his breathing, 
and having business at Burlington, and 
Cousin Jonathan" (Smith,) " being will- 
ing to stay till to-morrow night, and 
father being quite easy that I should go, 
telling me that I could do nothing for 
him if I staid, therefore, after being with 
him till near ten o'clock, we took our 
leave, i. e.. Cousin John Smith and I, of 
my dear father and sister Betty, and set 
out about eleven o'clock," for Burling- 
ton, which they reached about ten o'clock 
at night. 

" 9th. Brother William set out in the 
morning for Amboy, and after dinner, I 
rode home; found my dear wife and 
babe well. 

" 10th. About ten o'clock. Cousin 
William Smith came to let me know 
that my dear father changed about five 
hours after I left him, and that his life 
was despaired of. I therefore imme- 
diately sent to mother Logan to desire 
the loan of Gerard, to drive my chaise, 
and he quickly coming, I took brother 
Richard with me in it, and got to Bur- 
lington before dark. 



"11th. Were up by break of day, 
intending to be at Amboy to-night, but 
just as we were ready to set out, a mes- 
senger came, who had rode all night to 
acquaint us, that our dear father de- 
parted this life about five o'clock in the 
evening of seventh day, and that they 
had brought the corpse to Cranbury last 
night ; wherefore, after giving some filial 
tears vent, on the loss of a most tender 
and affectionate parent, I got a messenger 
to go to Philadelphia with a letter to my 
spouse, acquainting her with what was 
necessary on so mournftil an occasion ; 
then brother Richard and I set out, and 
met the corpse at Crosswicks; from 
whence we accompanied it to Burlington, 
where we reached about ten o'clock. 
The people of Burlington were very 
respectful in meeting us on the road." 

The funeral took place next day, the 
12th. 

"13th. Our dear father's will was 
inclosed in an affectionate letter to us, of 
which I took a copy." 

This excellent letter has already been 
copied in a previous chapter. 

The journal chronicles, on "second 
month 8th, 1752," the birth of the 
writer's second daughter, Hannah, and 
abruptly closes on the 27th of that 
month. 

On "eleventh month 2d, 1761," his 
youngest son, John, afterwards of Green 
Hill, was born, and six weeks later, the 
father was called upon to surrender to 
the grim messenger, his beloved wife, 
Hannah, who died "on the 18th of 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



163 



twelfth month, 1761." A touching 
sketch of her by her husband, says: 

" We were happily married at Ger- 
mantown meeting, on the 7th of the 
tenth month, 1748. From that time, she 
always continued to take suitable oppor- 
tunities of retirement, and to read the 
Holy Scriptures, but without lessening 
the proper concern about family affairs, 
in the prudent direction of which few 
could exceed her, or in the duties- of 
friendship and good neighbourhood; in 
the relations of a child, wife and mother, 
she was tenderly and anxiously careful to 
fill up her place, and having, herself, had 
the benefit of an excellent mother's ex- 
ample, she tried to follow her, as well in 
her general conduct as in the more pri- 
vate endearments of family order and 
harmony. She was a candid interpreter 
of the conduct of her acquaintance; she 
did not indulge a curiosity to know, 
(much less to meddle with,) other people's 
concerns, and possessed a painful sen- 
sibility of any conversation introduced 
at the expense of the reputation of ab- 
sent persons ; and wished that the in- 
genuity sometimes bestowed that way, 
might be employed on the improvement, 
rather than the faults of mankind. 



4: 



* 



4: 



4: 



* 



" She departed this life on the 18th of 
twelfth month, 1761, and as it was the 
chief desire of her heart to live in the 
name and power of Jesus Christ, and to 
confess Him, by an humble, meek and 
pious conduct, I have a reverent con- 
fidence that she enjoys His blessed prom- 



ise, of being owned by Him before His 
Father and the holy angels." 

The next year, (1762,) John Smith 
returned to Burlington, his native place, 
to end his days there, and purchased 
Franklin Park, as a country-seat, not 
long afterward. He was appointed a 
member of the king's council for New 
Jersey, soon after his return, and died, 
March 26th, 1771, at the early age of 
forty-eight. 

His character, as drawn by Robert 
Proud, in his History of Pennsylvania, 
is as follows : 

"John Smith, of Burlington, New 
Jersey, son of Richard, formerly of the 
same place, and brother of Samuel 
Smith, author of the History of New 
Jersey, was of a family originally ft*om 
Yorkshire, in England, and died on the 
26th day of the third month, 1771, in 
the forty-ninth year of his age. 

"As he was a person of an amiable 
(character, good example and public use- 
fulness, not only in the province of New 
Jersey, but also in that of Pennsylvania, 
it may not be improper in this place to 
mention respecting him, that being 
brought up to mercantile affairs, he lived 
several years in Philadelphia, as a mer- 
chant, having married Hannah, the 
daughter of James Logan, Esquire, a 
woman of good and amiable qualities. 
* * After her death, in the year 1762, 
he retired to Burlington, the place of his 
birth, having been a very useftil and 
valuable member of society, and i^erved 
several years in the provincial assembly 



164 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



of Pennsylvania, with good ability, repu- 
tation and integrity, besides being much 
engaged in the affairs of his own religious 
society of the people called Quakers, in 
Philadelphia, by whom he was highly 
esteemed and beloved for his good sense, 
liberal and generous sentiments, agree- 
able and instructive conversation, his ex- 
tensive abilities and generally beneficent 
life and kind services, which were so 
very considerable as to leave lasting im- 
pressions on thousands of his friends and 
acquaintances in that city, and to render 
his memory dear to many. 

"After his return to Burlington, he 
was appointed, by mandamus from the 
king, one of the council of New Jersey, 
in which office he continued to be useful 
to the public, and at the same time, par- 
ticularly serviceable to his own religious 
society, till the time of his sickness and 
death. He was endowed with great con- 
ciliating abilities, and the preservation of 
peace and concord among mankind was 
much the subject of his attention and 
delight. 

" He was engaging, open, friendly and 
undesigning in his address and behaviour, 
of a cheerful and benevolent disposition, 
well skilled in the laws of his country, 
and very ready, generous and serviceable 
in giving his advice and assistance. 

"In his religious character, he ex- 
hibited an excellent example of true 
practical Christianity, free from affec- 
tation and narrowness of mind; he was, 
in several relations, one of the best of 
neighbours and of men, * * 



"As he was a person of good natural 
parts, much reading, and conversed with 
all ranks of men in his own country, he 
wrote several pieces to good advantage 
on different, but generally the most in- 
teresting subjects of a religious, moral 
and civil nature, some of which have 
been published for general benefit." 

(A series of articles in the Pennsyl- 
vania GazettCj signed "Atticus," was 
among his contributions to literature, be- 
side several theological works.) 

His brother Samuel, in an affectionate 
sketch of his character, written for his 
children, says : 

" Though somewhat warm in his natu- 
ral temper, he had the skill of manag- 
ing it to that degree, that few of his 
acquaintance have seen it ruflSed; he 
kept the best part uppermost, and was 
always ready to use it for the benefit of 
others. He was frank and generous iu 
his disposition ; he abhorred a trick in 
commerce or conduct ; a little action was 
apt to alarm his resentment, but not to 
fix it to the hurt of any man. A wicked 
or a mean action found in him no quarter ; 
to such, indeed, he had an uncommon 
aversion ; whenever I have seen his 
colour rise, it was, probably, for some- 
thing of that kind. He aimed to be 
strictly just to man, and to his Maker, 
honest. * * * * * 

" His attachment to the religion of his 
education was strong, but not blind ; 
having examined it, as its importance re- 
quired, it became the religion of his 
judgment, and he bore his testimony to 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



165 



it, in all its branches, with exemplary 
perseverance and fidelity. * * 

" His integrity and probity, in all 
stations, were unblemished. For his abili- 
ties, his charities were very extensive; 
he felt more than is commonly felt for 
others, and to do a good office to any 
man seemed the height of his pleasure. 

" He knew the insufficiency of any 
efforts of his own in religion, and did 
not affect too much freedom with it in 
common conversation," (for) " he thought 
he had seen the subject rendered un- 



lovely, and the profession rather discred- 
ited by bold pretensions; but was en- 
couragingly kind to appearances of real 
piety, however small. * * Actions, 
he thought the best interpreters to others, 
of a man's religion. 

" He was, in every conjugal relation, 
affectionately tender ; a fond father, an 
indulgent master ; he was more, But I 
must stop — he was — my brother, my 
most intimate friend and companion ! 
I lost all that could be lost in those 
relations." 



CHAPTER XV. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. THE REVOLUTION. 



WE now come to the seventh gener- 
ation of the family, the last, which, 
as an entire generation, was born before 
the Revohitionary War, though some 
members of the eighth generation were 
already born at its outbreak. 

The second son of the Hon. John 
Smith, of Franklin Park, our diarist, 
was, as has been mentioned, John Smith, 
Esquire, of Green Hill. His wife, 
Giilielma Maria Morris, was daughter of 
William Morris, (descended from the 
early settler, Anthony Morris, before 
mentioned,) and of the latter's wife, 
Margaret Hill, daughter of Richard 
Hill, of Hill's Point, Maryland, (see 
" Book of the Hill Family,") and great- 
granddaughter of Thomas Lloyd, first 
governor of Pennsylvania, under the 
proprietary. 

Margaret Hill Morris left a charming 
diary, illustrative of the Revolutionary 
period, which I propose to draw upon for 
this chapter. Although it has already 
been privately printed, and is well-known 
to most members of the family, I know 
nothing better in the family papers to 
take for my illustration of this exciting 
period. Her sentiments, like those of 
many " Friends," were favorable to the 
old regime. As an illustration of the 



feelings of the Whig Quaker ladies, I 
will add a letter of Deborah Logan, 
wife of Senator George Logan, of Penn- 
sylvania, and niece, by marriage, of 
Hon. John Smith and Hannah Logan. 

Margaret Hill Morris was also an an- 
cestress in the eldest line of our family, 
her daughter, Deborah, having become 
the wife of Benjamin Smith, son of 
Daniel Smith, Junior. 

Before introducing her diary, however, 
I will give a list of the members of the 
family in the seventh generation, leaving 
all details of their births, marriages and 
deaths to the genealogical tables at the 
end of the book. 

In the eldest male line, we have the 
seven sons and one daughter of Daniel 
Smith, (" Daniel Smith, Junior," the third 
of that name,) all of whom grew up and 
married, except the daughter, who died 
single. They were, 1. Joshua Raper 
Smith, 2. Benjamin Smith, 3. Mary 
Smith, 4. Daniel Smith, (fourth,) 5. 
Robert Smith, (third,) 6. John D. Smith, 
7. George R. Smith, 8. Joseph D. 
Smith. 

In the second line, two sons and two 
daughters of the Hon. Samuel Smith, of 
Hickory Grove, all of whom married 
and left issue, but the second daughter, 

166 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



167 



who died single. They were: I.Joseph 
Smith, 2. Abigail Smith, 3. Sarah Smith, 
4. Richard Smith, (sixth.) 

In the thijrd line, two sons and two 
(laughters of the Hon. John Smith, all of 
whom married and left issue. They were : 

1. Sarah Logan Smith, 2. James Smith, 
.*). Hannah Smith, 4. Jolin Smith, Junior, 
(afterwards of Green Hill.) 

In the fourth line, four sons and four 
daughters of William Lovett Smith, all 
of whom left descendants, except the 
eldest son and second daughter, who died 
young. They were: 1. Lovett Smith, 

2. Daniel. Doughty Smith, 3. Samuel 
Smith, 4. Anne Smith, 5. Elizabeth 
Smith, 6. Abigail Smith, 7- Mary Smith, 
8. William Lovett Smith, Junior. 

In the fifth line, five sons of the Hon. 
Richard Smith, (fiftli of that name,) of 
whom the eldest died unmarried, the 
second left issue, the third and fourth, 
probably, left no issue,* and the fifth 
died young. They were: 1. Scammon 
Rodman Smith, 2. Richard Rodman 
Smith, 3. John Smith, 4. Willet Smith, 
o. Rodman Smith. 

The first female line is represented by 
the only child of James and Sarah Smith 
Pemberton, Mary Smith Pemberton. 

The second female line contains five 
children of Samuel Sansom and Hannah 
Callender, of whom the youngest two 
died in infancy. They were: 1. Wil- 
liam Sansom, 2. Sarah Sansom, 3. Joseph 



* They are marked ** died young," hut with a note 
of interrogcUioTit in the tables I copy. 



Sansom, 4. Katharine Sansom, 5. Samuel 
Sansom. 

The third female line (first section,) 
contains nine children of Samuel Noble 
and Lydia Cooper, namely : 1 . Joseph 
Noble, (died young,) 2. Isaac Noble, 
(died young,) 3. Hannah Noble, 4. 
Samuel Noble, (died young,) 5. William 
Noble, (died young,) 6. Richard Noble, 
(died unmarried,) 7. Mary Noble, (died 
young,) y. Samuel Noble, 9. Marmaduke 
Noble, (died young.) 

The second section of the third female 
line includes six children of Samuel 
Wetherill and Mary Noble, namely : 1. 
Thomas Wetherill, 2. Mary Wetherill, 

3. Joseph Wetherill, 4. Elizabeth Weth- 
erill, 5. Samuel Wetherill, 6. Ann 
Wetherill. Of these, all died unmarried, 
excepting Mary and Joseph. 

The fourth female line contains nine 
children of William and Rachel Smith 
Coxe, namely : 1. William S. Coxe, 
2. Richard S. Coxe, 3. Elizabeth Coxe, 

4. Maria Coxe, 5. Margaret Coxe, 6. 
Emily Coxe, 7. Harriet Coxe, 8. Anne 
Coxe, 9. Daniel Coxe. Of these, I have 
only records of the marriages of the first 

three. 

The fifth female line includes, in its 
first and second sections, six sons and two 
daughters of Edward Pole, and four sons 
and three daughters of Dr. Thomas Pole, 
whose names and descendants will appear 
in the tables. 

The third section of the fifth female 
line embraces the names of six sons and 
a daughter of James Bringhurst and 



168 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



Anna Pole, viz. : 1. John, (died young,) 
2. John, 3. James, 4. Joseph, 5. Jonathan, 
(died 8. p.,) 6. Edward, (died s. p.,) 7. 
Rachel, (died s. p.) Of these, numbers 
two, three and four left issue. 

Each meml>er of the seventh gener- 
ation leaving insue, will have a table to 
him or herself, among the genealogical 
tables at the end of the book ;* but, ex- 
cepting to add the diary already referred 
to, I shall attempt no further historical 
illustrations of the lives of members, or 
of contemj)orary events connected with 
the family. Its history has now been 
traced from its recorded origin, with 
William Smith, of Bramham, circa A. 
D. 1570, to the time of the American 
Revolution, a period of over two hundred 
years, embracing all the most .character- 
istic events, and the individuals who gave 
to oiir sept its distinguishing family 
traits: with the cataclysm of the Rev- 

* Having received the names of one line of the de- 
scendants of Kmanuel Smith, of Bramham. I shall 
pive them a table at the end ; though, properly spesik- 
ing. not of the Burlington Smiths, they have a com- 
mon English ancestry with ours. Should other lines 
of the descendants of Emanuel Smith be received 
hereafter, they will be inserted on fly-leaves. 



olution, which swept away the old order 
of things, and the family traditions and 
idiosyncrasy with it, it is best to close, 
the object of this work being rather the 
revival of the past than the portraiture 
of the present. The old race of Quaker 
gentry, a true aristocracy, or " predom- 
inanceof the best," however modest, simple 
and unassuming, both by nature and the 
influence of a self-denying religion — 
earnest, pious, philanthropic — useful and 
energetic alike in public and in private 
life — proprietaries, legislators and states- 
men — has passed away, leaving but the 
reminiscence of their character behind. 
Their private virtues and warm affections 
indeed, still . survive, in beloved and 
honored individuals, but their more con- 
spicuous and distinguishing public vir- 
tues, as members of a governing class, 
their characteristics of the old reginiey 
have disappeared. The zealous aid, 
which the " Friends " formerly rendered 
to the cause of pure and righteous gov- 
ernment, has long been withdrawn; it is 
their country's misfortune ; is it not also 
their own ? 



CHAPTER XVI. 



A TORY LADY IN THE REVOLUTION. 



^Extracts from the Journal of Margaret Hill Morris.] 



" THvECEMBER 6tb, 1776. Being on 
-L^ a visit to my friend, M. S., at Had- 
donfield, I was preparing to return to my 
family, when a person from Philadelphia 
told me that the people there were in great 
commotion ; that the English jBeet was 
in the river, and hourly expected to sail 
up to the city ; that the inhabitants were 
removing into the country; and that 
several persons of considerable repute 
had been discovered to have formed a 
design of setting fire to the city, and 
were summoned before the Congress and 
strictly enjoined to drop the horrid pur- 
pose. When I heard the above report, 
ray heart almost died within me, and I 
cried, surely the Lord will not punish 
the innocent with the guilty, and I 
wished there might be found some in- 
terceding Lots and Abrahams amongst 
our people. On my journey home, I 
was told the inhabitants of our little 
town," (Burlington, New Jersey,) " were 
going in haste into the country, and that 
my nearest neighbours were already re- 
moved. When I heard this, I felt my- 
self quite sick ; I was ready to faint. I 
thought of my S. D.," (her sister, Sarah 
Dillwyn, wife of George, then absent,) 
" the beloved companion of my widowed 
state — her husband at a distance of some 

99 



hundred miles from her; I thought of 
my own lonely situation — no husband to 
cheer with the voice of love my sinking 
spirits. My little flock, too, without a 
father to direct them how to steer. All 
these things crowded into my mind at 
once, and I felt like one forsaken; a 
flood of friendly tears came to my re- 
lief, and I felt a humble confidence that 
He who had been with me in six troubles, 
would not forsake me now. While I 
cherished this hope, my tranquility was 
restored, and I felt no sensation but of 
humble acquiescence to the Divine will, 
and was favoured to find my family in 
good health on my arrival, and my dear 
companion not greatly discomposed, for 
which favour I desire to be truly 
thankful.* 

" December 7th. A letter from my next 
neighbour's husband, at the camp, warned 
her to be gone in haste, and many per- 
sons coming into town to-day, brought 
intelligence that the British army were 
advancing toward us. 

** December 8th. Every day begins and 

* "Miirjfaret Morris purchased Governor Franklin's 
house on the bank," (Green Hank.) "when the gov- 
emor removed to Perth Amboy, and occupied it dur- 
ing the stormy days of the Revolution." (Dr. Hill's 
History of the Church in Burlington.) The •* Frank- 
lin House," was a lar^e, antique mansion, for some of 
whose quaint peculiarities see a future note. 

169 



170 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



ends with the same accounts, and we 
hear to-day that the regulars are at 
Trenton. Some of our neighbours gone, 
and others going, makes our little bank " 
(Green Bank, on the river,) " look lone- 
some. But our trust in Providence is 
still firm, and we dare not even talk of 
removing our family. 

"December 9th. This evening, were 
favoured with the company of our faith- 
ful friend and brother, R. W." (Rd. 
Wells.) " This testimony of his love was 
truly acceptable to us. 

" December 10th. To-day, our amiable 
friend, E. C." (Hetty Cox) "and her 
family bade us adieu. JVfy brother also 
left us, but returned in less than an hour, 
telling us ho could not go away just as 
the Hessians were entering the town ; 
but, no troops coming in, we urged him 
to leave us next morning, which he con- 
cluded to do, after preparing us to ex- 
pect the Hessians in a few hours. A 
number of galleys have been lying in 
the river, before the town, for two days 
past. 

"December 11th. After various re- 
ports from one hour to another of light- 
horse approaching, the people in town 
had certain intelligence that a large body 
of Hessians were come to Bordentown, 
and we might expect to see them in a few 
hours. About ten o'clock, of this day, 
a party of about sixty men marched 
down the main street; as they passed 
along, they told our doctor" (Odell,) "and 
some other persons in the town, that a 
large number of Hessians were advanc- 



ing, and would be in the town in less 
than an hour. This party were riflemen, 
who, it seems, had crossed the river 
somewhere in the neighbourhood of 
Bordentown to reconnoitre, and, meeting 
with a superior number of Hessians on 
the road, were then returning, and tx)ok 
Burlington in their way back. From us 
they crossed to Bristol, and by the time 
they were fairly embarked, the Hessians, 
to the number, as we heard, of four or 
five hundred, had passed what we call 
York Bridge. On the first certainty of 
their approach, John Lawrence and two 
or three others thought best, for the 
safety of the town, to go out and meet 
the troops. He communicated his in- 
tention to one of the gondola captains, 
who approved of it, and desired to be in- 
formed of the result." (The gondolas or 
galleys were American gun-boats.) 

" The gentlemen went out, and though 
the Hessian colonel " (Count Donop or 
"de Nope,") "spoke but little English, yet 
they found that, upon being thus met in 
a peaceable manner on behalf of the in- 
habitants, he was ready to promise them 
safety and security, to exchange any 
messages that might be proper with the 
gentlemen of the galleys. In the mean- 
time, he ordered his troops to halt ; they 
remained in their ranks between the 
bridge and the corner of Main Street, 
waiting an answer from on board. J. L. 
and T. H. went down to report what had 
passed, and told Captain Moore that the 
colonel had orders to quarter his troops 
in Burlington that night, and that if the 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



171 



inhabitants were quiet and peaceable, and 
would furnish him with quarters and re- 
freshment, he would pledge his honour 
that no manner of disorder should hap- 
pen to disturb or alarm the people. 
Captixin Moore replied that, in his opin- 
ion, it would be wrong in such a case to 
fire on the town, but that he would go 
down and consult with the commodore, 
and return an answer as soon as might 
be. While this answer was waited for. 
Dr. Odell was told it would be a satisfac- 
tion both to the Hessian commandant 
and to our own people, to have a person 
who could serve as interpreter between 
them. Not doubting the foreigner could 
speak French, the doctor went to him, 
and he had the satisfaction to find it 
probable, at least, that he might be of 
service to the people of the town. The 
commandant seemed highly pleased to 
find a person with whom he could con- 
verse with ease and precision. 

" He desired the doctor to tell the gen- 
tlemen of the town to the same purport 
as above, with this addition: that he ex- 
pected there would be found no persons in 
the town in arms; nor any arms, am- 
munition or effects, belonging to persons 
that were in arms against the king, con- 
cealed by any of the inhabitants ; that 
if any such effects were thus secreted, 
the house in which they were found 
would be given up to pillage ; to prevent 
which, it would be necessary to give him a 
just and fair account of such effects, 
which account he would forward to the 
general, and that if we acted openly and 



in good faith in these respects, he re- 
peated his assurances, upon the honour 
of a soldier, that he would be answerable 
for every kind of disorder on the part of 
his troops. They remained in profound 
silence in their ranks, and the com- 
mandant, with some of his officers, came 
into town as far as J. L/s, where they dined, 
waiting the commodore's answer. 

** The doctor says that as he thought 
he observed much of the gentleman in 
the commandant, and the apj)earance, at 
least, of generosity and humanity, he 
took an opportunity to inform him that 
there was an old friend of his (the doc- 
tor's) who was a colonel, and of some 
estimation, in the Continental army; 
that he was at present with General 
Washington, and that his lady, an amiable 
woman, had gone into the country with 
most of her effects; that the doctor was 
ignorant of the place of her retreat, but 
that before her departure she had begged 
him, on the footing of former friendship, 
to take into his house, and, if he might 
be permitted, to keep as under his pro- 
tection, some few things which she could 
not remove, and told the commandant 
he was ready to give an exact account of 
such of her effects as he had thus taken 
charge of; and at the same time con- 
fessed that when he took them, it was in 
the hope of being suffered to preserve 
them for his friend. The commandant 
told him, without a moment's hesitation : 
* Sir, you need not be at the trouble of 
giving any further account of those 
things you have so candidly mentioned ; 



172 



THE BUKLIXGTON- SMITHS. 



be assured that whatever effects have 
been entrusted to you in this way, I shall 
consider as your own, and they shall not 
be touched.' From this answer, he was 
encouraged to hope he might be of still 
furtlier service to his friends, and in the 
full persuasion that nothing would occur 
to disturb the peaceable disposition that 
was making ; but, as it happened, the com- 
modore had received intelligence of a 
party of Hessians having entered Bur- 
lington before Captain Moore got down 
to him, and had ordered up four galleys 
to fire on the town wherever any two or 
three persons should be seen together. 
Captain Moore met and hailed them, one 
after another, but the wind was so high 
that he was not heard or understood. 
The four gondolas came up, and the first 
of them appearing before the main 
street, J. L., T. H. and W. D.* went 
down upon the wharf and waved a hat, the 
signal agreed on with Captain Moore for 
the boat to come ashore, and give the 
commodore's answer in peace. To the 
astonishment of these gentlemen, all the 
answer they received w^as first a swivel 
shot. Not believing it possible this 
could be designedly done, they stood 
still, and J. L. again waved his hat, and 
was answered with an eighteen-pounder. 
Both these fires, as the gondola people 
have since told us, were made with as 
good aim as could be taken, as they 
took it for granted it was at Hessians 

♦William Dill wyn, married to Sarah Logan Smith, 
dauRhter of the Hon. John Smith, and afterwards 
fettled in England. 



they fired. However, as it was impos- 
sible to conjecture that such conduct 
could have happened, or to suspect such 
a mistake, it is no wonder the town was 
exceedingly alarmed ; looking upon it in 
the light of a cruel as well as unprovoked 
piece of treachery. Upon this news, 
the commandant rose calmly from table, 
and his officers with him went out to 
eight or ten men, who had come to the 
door as a small body-guard. He turned 
to the doctor, as he went into the street, 
and said he could easily dispose of his 
people out of the possibility of danger, 
but that much mischief might be done to 
the town, and that he would take a view 
of the gondolas, and see what measures 
might be necessary on his part; but that 
he should be sorry to be the occasion of 
any damage or distress to the inhabitants. 
He walked down the street, and sent dif- 
ferent ways three sentinels, in Indian file 
together, to view and report to him what 
they saw. 

"These being now and then seen at 
different times, induced the people on 
board to believe that the houses were full 
of Hessians, and a cannonade was con- 
tinued till almost dark, in different direc- 
tions, sometimes along the street, some- 
times across it. Several houses were 
struck and a little damaged, but not one 
living creature, either man or beast, 
killed or wounded. About dark, the 
gondolas fell down a little way below the 
town, and the night was passed in quiet. 

" While all this tumult was in town, 
we, on our peaceful bank, ignorant of the 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



173 



occasion of the firing, were wondering 
what it could mean, and unsuspecting of 
danger, were quietly pursuing our busi- 
ness in the family, when a kind neigh- 
bour informed us of the occasion, and 
urged us to go into the cellar as a place 
of safety. We were prevailed on by him 
to do so, and remained there till it ceased. 
" December 12th. The people of the 
galleys, suspecting that some troops were 
yet either concealed in the town, or 
neighbourhood of it, have been very 
jealous of the inhabitants, who have 
often been alarmed with reports that the 
city would be set on fire; many have 
gone in haste and great distress into the 
country, but we still hope no mischief is 
seriously intended. A number of men 
landed on our bank this morning, and 
told us it w^as their settled purpose to set 
fire to the town. I begged them not to 
set my house on fire; they asked which 
was my house, and they said they knew 
not what hindered them from firing on 
it last night, for seeing a light in the 
chambers thev thouorht there were Hes- 
sians in it, and they pointed their guns 
at it several times. I told them my 
children were sick, which obliged me to 
burn a light all night. Though they 
did not know what hindered them from 
firing on us, I did ; it was the Guardian 
of the widow and the orphan, who took 
us into His safe keeping, and preserved 
us from danger; oh, that I may keep 
humble, and be thankful for this, as well 
as other favours vouchsafed to my little 
flock. 



*' December 13th. This day we began 
to look a little like ourselves again. 
The troops w^ere removed some miles 
from town, as we hear, and our friends 
began to venture out to see us ; but the 
suspicions of the gondola men still con- 
tinued, and search was made in and 
about town for men distinguished by the 
name of tories. About noon, of this 
day, dear brother R. W.,* popped in 
upon us ; he had heard the firing yes- 
terday, and being anxious for our safety, 
he ran the risk of venturing amongst us 
to see how we had fared; surely, this 
proof of his love will never be forgotten 
by mc while my memory lasts ; ho left 
us after dinner. 

" December 14th. This day there was 
no appearance of the formidable Hes- 
sians. Several of our friends called to 
see us; amongst the number was one" 
(Dr. Odell,) " esteemed by the whole fam- 
ily, and very intimate in it; but the 
spirit of the devil still continued to rove 
through the town in the shape of tory- 
hunters. A message was delivered to our 
intimate friend, informing him a party 
of armed men were on the search for 
him ; his horse was brought, and he re- 
tired to a place of safety. Some of the 
gentlemen who entertained the foreigners, 
were pointed out to the gondola men ; 
two worthy inhabitantsf were seized upon, 
and dragged on board. 



* Her brother-in-law, Richard Wells, an English 
gentleman, of a good estate, Cottness, near Hull, 
England. 

t Rd. Smith, etc. 



174 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



" From the 13th to the 16th, we had 
various reports of the advancing and re- 
tiring of the enemy; parties of armed 
men rudely entered the town, and dili- 
gent search was made for tories; some of 
the gondola gentry broke into and pil- 
laged Rd. Smith's house on the bank. 
About noon, this day" (16th,) "a very 
terrible account of thousands coming into 
town, and now actually to be seen on 
Gallows Hill; ray incautious son* 
caught up the spy-glass, and was run- 
ning towards the mill to look at them. 
I told him it would be liable to miscon- 
struction, but he prevailed on me to al- 
low him to gratify his curiosity ; he went, 
but returned much dissatisfied, for no 
troops could he see; as he came back, 
poor Dickf took the glass, and resting it 
against a tree, took a view of the fleet ; 
both of these were observed by the 
people on board, who suspected it was 
an enemy that was watching their motions. 
They manned a boat, and sent her on 
shore; a loud knocking at my door 
brought me to it ; I was a little fluttered, 
and kept locking and unlocking that I 
might get my ruffled face a little com- 
posed; at last I opened it, and half a 
dozen men, all armed, demanded the 
key of the empty house. I asked them 
what they wanted there; they said to 

search for a d d tory who had been 

spying at them from the mill. The 
name of a tory, so near my otvn dooVy 
seriously alarmed me, for a poor refugee^ 

* Dr. John Morris, 
t Rd. Hill Morris. 



dignified by that name, had claimed the 
shelter of my roof, and was at that very 
time concealed, like a thief, in an auger- 
hole ;* I rung the bell violently, the sig- 
nal agreed on if they came to search, and 
when I thought he had crept into the 
hole, I put on a very simple look, and 
cried out, ' Bless me, I hope you are not 
Hessians.' *Do we look like Hessians?' 
asked one of them, rudely. * Indeed, I 
don't know.' *Did you ever see a Hes- 
sian?' * No, never in my* life ; but they 
are men, and you are men, and may be 
Hessians for anything I know ; but I'll 
go with you into Colonel Cox's house, 
though indeed it was my son at the mill ; 
he is but a boy, and meant no harm ; he 
wanted to see the troops.' 

"So I marched at the head of them, 
opened the door, and searched every 
place, but we could find no tory ; strange 
where he could be. We returned — they 
greatly disappointed — I, pleased to think 
my house was not suspected. The cap- 
tain, a smart little fellow, named Ship- 
pen, said he wished he could see the spy- 
glass. S. D. produced it, and very civilly 
desired his acceptance of it, which I was 
sorry for, as I often amused myself in 
looking through it. They left us and 
searched J. V.'s " (James Verree,) " and 
the two next houses, but no tory could they 
find. This transaction reached the town, 
and Colonel Cox was very angry, and 
ordered the men on board. In the even- 



* See hereafter a note on the " Secret-Chamber," 
here spoken of as the '* auger-hole." 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



175 



ing, I went to town with my refugee, and 
placed him in other lodgings." 

" December 27th. A letter from Gen- 
eral Reed to his brother," (American com- 
mander at Burlington,) " informing him 
that Washington had an engagement 
with the regulars, on the 25th, early in 
the morning, taking them by surprise; 
killed fifty and took nine hundred pris- 
oners. The loss on our side not known, 
or, if known, not suffered to be public. 
It seems this heavy loss to the regulars 
was owing to the prevailing custom 
among the Hessians of getting drunk on 
the eve of that great day which brought 
peace on earth and good-will to men ; but 
oh I how unlike Christians is the manner 
in which they celebrate it. Can we call 
ourselves Christians, while we act so con- 
trary to our Master's rules ? He set the 
example which we profess to follow, and 
here is a recent instance that we only 
profess it ; instead of good-will, envy and 
hatred seem to be the ruling passions in 
the breasts of thousands. This evening, 
the 27th, about three thousand of the 
Pennsylvania militia and other troops 
landed in the neck, and marched into 
town with artillery, baggage, etc., and are 
quartered on the inhabitants. One com- 
pany was lodged at J. V.'s, and a guard 
placed between his house and ours. We 
were so favoured as not to have any sent 
to our house. An oflScer spent the even- 
ing with us, and appeared to be in high 
spirits, and talked of engaging the English 
as a very trifling affair — nothing so easy as 
to drive them over the North River, etc." 



" December 28th. Early this morning, 
the troops marched out of town in high 
spirits. A flight of snow this morning 
drove the gondolas again down the river. 
My heart sinks when I think of the 
numbers unprepared for death who will, 
probably, be sent in a few days to appear 
before t' e Judge of Heaven. The 
weather clearing up this afternoon, we 
observed several boats, with soldiers 
and their baggage, making up to our 
wharf; as I looked at them, I thought I 
saw a face that was not strange to me, 
and, taking a nearer view, found it was 
the well-known face of my beloved 
brother and friend, G. Dillwyn. When 
I saw the companions he was among, I 
thought of what Solomon said of his be- 
loved, that she was like an apple-tree 
amongst the trees of the wood. When 
he came into the house, my kindred 
heart bade him welcome to the hospit- 
able roof — for so must I ever deem that 
roof which has sheltered me and my 
little flock — though our joy at meeting 
him was checked by the prospect before 
and around. A man, who seemed to 
have command over the soldiers just 
landed, civilly asked for the keys of 
Colonel Cox's house, in which they 
stowed their baggage, and took up their 
quarters for the night, and were very 
quiet. 

"December 29th. This morning the 
soldiers at the next house prepared to 
depart, and, as they passed my door, they 
stopped to bless and thank me for the 
food I sent them, which I received, not 



17G 



THE BUrwLIXGTOX SMITHS. 



as my due, but as belonging to ray Master, 
who had reached a morsel to them by 
my hand. A great number of soldiers 
in town to-day; another company took 
possession of the next house when the 
first left it. The inhabitants much 
straightened for bread to supply the sol- 
diers, and firewood to keep them warm. 
This seems to be only one of the many 
calamities of war. 

** December 30th. A number of poor 
soldiers, sick and wounded, brought into 
town to-day, and lodged in the court- 
house ; some of them in private houses. 
To-day, I hear, several of our townsmen 
have agreed to procure wood for the sol- 
diers; but they found it was attended 
with considerable difficulty, as most of the 
wagons usually employed to bring in wood 

were pressed to take the soldier's baggage. 

" December 31st. We have been told 
of an engagement between the two armies, 
in which it was said the Englisli had four 
hundred tiiken prisoners, and three hun- 
dred killed and wounded. The report 
of the evening contradicts the above in- 
telligence, and there is no certain account 
of a -battle. 

" January 1st, 1777. This New Year's 
day has not been ushered in with the 
usual rejoicings, and I believe it will be 
the beginning of a sorrowful year to very 
many people. Yet tlie flatterer, hope, 
bids me look forward w^ith confidence to 
Him who can bring out of this confusion 
the greatest order. I do not hear that 
any messengers have been in town from 
the camp. 



** January 3d. This morning we heard 
very distinctly a heavy firing of cannon; 
the sound came from about Trenton, and 
at noon a number of soldiers, upwards 
of one thousand, came into town in great 
confusion, with baggage and some cannon. 
From these soldiers we learn there was a 
smart engagement yesterday, at Trenton, 
and that they left them engaged near 
Trenton Mill, but were not able to say 
which side was victorious. They were 
again quartered on the inhabitants, and 
we again exempt from the cumber of 
having them lodged in our house. Sev- 
eral of those who lodged in Colonel Cox's 
house last week, returned to-night, and 
asked for the key, which I gave them. 
About bed-time, I went into the next 
house to see if the fires were safe, and 
my heart was melled to see such a num- 
ber of my fellow-creatures lying like 
swine on the floor, fast asleep, and many 
of them without even a blanket to cover 
them. It seems very strange to rae, that 
such a number should be allowed to come 
from the camp at the very time of the 
engagements, and I shrewdly suspect 
they have run away, for they can give no 
account why they came or where they are 
to march next. 

"January 4th. The accounts hourly 
coming in are so contradictory and vari- 
ous, that we know not which to give 
credit to. We have lieard our people 
have gained another victory ; that the 
English are fleeing before them, some at 
Brunswick, some at Princeton. We 
hear, to-day, that Sharp Delany and A. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



tr^ 



177 



Morris," (Captain Anthony Morris, her 
cousin,) "and others of the Pennsylvania 
militia are killed, and that the Count de 
Nope is numbered with the dead ; if so, 
the Hessians have lost a brave and hu- 
mane commander. The prisoners taken 
by our troops are sent to Lancaster jail. 
A number of sick and wounded brought 
into town, calls upon us to extend a hand 
of charity towards them. Several of my 
soldiers left the next house, and returned 
to the place from whence they came. 
Upon my questioning them pretty close, 
I brought several to confess they had 
run away, being scared at the heavy 
firing on the 3d. There were several 
pretty, innocent-looking lads among 
tliem, and I sympathized with their 
mothers, when I saw them preparing to 
return to the army. 

"January 5th. I heard to-day that 
Captain Sliipj^en, who threatened to shoot 
my son for spying at the gondolas, is 
killed.- I forgave him long ago, for the 
fright he occasioned me, and felt sorry 
when I heard he was dead. We are told 
to-day that General Mercer is killed, 
and Mifflin is wounded ; what sad havoc 
will this dreadful war make in our land!" 

"January 9th. We hear to-day that 

our troops have driven the English to 

Brunswick, and some say there has been 

another battle. All the officers went out 

of town to-day. The report of poor A. 

Morris being killed, is confirmed by 

an officer who was in the battle. We 

hear that Washington has sent to buy up 

a number of stores, from whence it is con- 
23 



eluded he is going into winter quarters. 
The weather very cold ; some snow fall- 
ing has also filled the river with ice, and 
we expect it will be strong enough to 
walk over in a day or two, and give an 
opportunity, to those inclined to escape, 
of crossing over, which, for several weeks 
past, has been attended with some dif- 
ficulty ; all the boats belonging to the 
town being seized upon by the gentlemen 
of the galleys, and either borne away, or 
broken to j^ieces, which they said was 
done to prevent the Hessians from cross- 
ing the river; and, on the same pretence, 
a number of bridges have been taken up, 
and others so much damaged as to make 
it difficult for travelers to pass from hence 
to Philadelphia. Several of the soldiers, 
who were brought into town sick, have 
died, and, it is feared, the disorder by 
which they were afflicted is infectious. 

"January 11th. Weather very cold, 
and the river quite shut. I pity the poor 
soldiers now on their march, many of 
whom will, probably, lie out in the fields 
this cold night. What cause have I for 
gratitude, that I and my household are 
sheltered from the storm! oh, that the 
hearts of my offspring may learn to trust 
in the God of their mothe7\ He who has 
condescended to j)reserve us in great 
danger, and kept our feet from wander- 
ing from the habitation His goodness has 
allotted to us. 

"January 12th. We are told to-day 
of the robbery of one of the commis- 
saries; the sum lost is said to be £10,000. 
I have not heard who is susj>ected of 



178 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



committing the robbery. The Earl of 

B n,* who quitted his habitation on 

the first alarm of the Hessians coming 
in, is returned with his family. We 
have some hopes that our refugee will be 
presented with a pair of lawn sleeves, 
when dignities become cheap, and sup- 
pose he will then think himself too big 
to creep into his old auger-hole ; but I 
shall remind him of the places if I live 

to see him created first B p of 

B n."t 

"January 14th. A letter from my 
amiable friend, E. C, informs me her 
husband's battalion was in the front of 
the battle at Princeton, and behaved re- 
markably well; they took two hundred 
prisoners, and lefl eighty on the field ; he 
acknowledges the preserving hand of 
Providence, in bringing him safe through 
such a scene of blood, etc. I hear Gen- 
eral Howe sent a request to Washington, 
desiring three days' cessation of arms, to 
take care of the wounded, and bury the 
dead, which was refused ; what a woeful 
tendency war has to harden the human 
heart against the tender feelings of hu- 
manity ! Well it may be called a horrid 

* Ironical. 

t This was the boforo-montioned Dr. Odell, rector 
of St. Mary's Church, an intimate friend of the family. 
The present rector of 8t. Marv's. Dr. Hills, in his 
"History of the Church in Burlington/' says: '' The 
au^er-hole, to which the Quakeress thus playfully al- 
ludes, was, no doubt, the Secret niamher, under' the 
roof of the south-cast wing of her residence, entered 
from a room adjoining by opening a linen closet, draw- 
ing out the shelves, prying up the movable back, and 
admitting a person, by stooping, to a dark, but quite 
roomy apartment, which could only be entered in this 
mysterious way. Before the Governor Franklin-house 
was demolished, in 1873, I went into this Secret 
Chamber with extraordinary interest." 



artj thus to change the nature of man. 
I thought that even barbarous nations 
had a sort of religious regard for their 
dead. A friend from Trenton tells me 
poor A. Morris died in three hours after 
he was wounded, and was buried in 
Friends' burying-ground, at Stony Brook. 
Also Captain Shippen was buried by 
him. The same friend told us that a 
man was killed in his bed, at the house 
of Stacey Potts, at Trenton, in the time 
of the engagement there, and that Potts's 
daughter, about the age of mine, went 
from home to lodge, the night preceding 
the battle, and returning in the morning, 
just as she stepped into lier father's door, a 
ball met her, took the comb out of her hair 
and gently grazed the skin of her head 
without doing her any further injury: 
who shall dare to say they are shot at 
random ? 

"January 15th. I was a good deal 
affected this evening, at seeing the hearse 
in which General Mercer's bodv was 
conveyed ovei* the river, on the ice, to be 
buried at Philadelphia; i)Oor Captain 
Shippen's body was also taken over at the 
same time to be buried there." 

"February 3d. To-day appeared in 
print a proclamation of General Wash- 
ington's, ordering all pei'sons who had 
taken protections of the king's commis- 
sioners, to come in thirty days, and swear 
allegiance to the United States of 
America, or else repair with their fami- 
lies to the lines of the British troops. 
What will become of our refugee now ! 

"February 4th. To-day eight boats 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



179 



full of soldiers sailed up the river to join 
the Continental forces ; they appeared to 
be very merry, with their drums beating 
and their coloui-s flying ; this is said to 
be the day appointed for our friends, 
who are prisoners, to have a hearing be- 
fore Putnam ; a man, who is not a lover 
of peace, told us it was expected there 
would be bloody work on the occasion. 

" February 6th. Several hundred sol- 
diers, who were returning from the cjinip, 
were quartered on the inhabitants, and 
in general, I hear behaved well. 

" February 7th. All the soldiers (quar- 
tered on the town last night, went away 
to-day. The prisoners taken from our 
town and Mount Holly, discharged and 
returned home; several of them much 
fatigued, and some sick." 

(The journal is now somewhat deficient 
in interest until ) 

" June 10th. A person from the camp 
came to town to engage a number of 
guides (to go back with him,) who were 
well acquainted with the different roads 
to Philadelphia, that in case our people 
should be obliged to retreat they may 
not be at a loss. 

"June 11th. Certain intelligence ar- 
rived, per express, that the English are 
at Bound Brook, the Americans at Mor- 
ristown. 

"June 13th. Early this morning the 
soldiers beat to march from Bristol, and 
in the course of the day, several boats 
full of soldiers, with tlie Pennsylvania 
militia, siiiled up the river. 

"June 14th. Before daylight this 



morning, the alarm guns at Princeton, 
Trenton, Bordentown and Bristol were 
fired, and answered by those below. 
About nine o'clock, the gondolas and 
barges began to appear in sight, and from 
that time till nine at night, there have 
gone up the river five or six gondolas. 
Several flat-bottomed boats are also gone 
to Bristol. There is a rejx)rt of a battle 
to-day, which seems probable, as we have 
heard much firing above. By a person 
from Bordentown, we hear twelve ex- 
presses came in there to-day from camp. 
Some of the gondola men and their wives 
being sick, and no doctor in town to ap- 
ply to, they were told that Mrs. M. was a 
skillful woman, and kept medicines to 
give to the poor; and, notwithstanding 
their late attempts to shoot my poor boy, 
they ventured to come to me, and, in a very 
humble manner, begged me to come and 
do something for them. At first I 
thought they might have a design to put 
a trick on me, and get me aboard of their 
gondola, and then pillage my house as 
they had done some others ; but, on ask- 
ing where the sick folks were, was told 
they were lodged in the governor's house. 
So I went to see th^.^m. There were 
several, both men and women, very ill 
with a fever." "I treated them according 
to art, and they all got well. I thought 
I had received all my pay, when they 
thankfully acknowledged my kin(hiess, 
but lo! in a short time afterwards, a very 
rougli, ill-looking man came to the dooJ 
and asked for me. When I went to him, 
he drew me aside and asked if I had anv 



180 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



friends in Philadelphia. The question 
alarmed me, supposing there was some 
mischief meditated against that poor city ; 
however, I cahnly said : * I have an an- 
cient father-in-law, some sisters and 
other near friends there.' * Well,' said 
the man, * do you wish to hear from them, 
or send anything by way of refreshment 
to them ? If you do, I will take charge 
of it, and bring you back anything you 
may send for.' I was very much sur- 
prised, and thought, to be sure, he only 
wanted to get provisions to take to the 
gondolas, when he told me his wife was 
one of those I had given medicine to, and 
this was the only thing he could do to 
pay me for my kindness. My heart 
leaped with joy, and I set about prepar- 
ing something for my dear absent friends. 
A quarter of beef, some veal, fowls and 
flour were soon put up, and about mid- 
night the man called and took them 
aboard of his boat. He left them at 
Robert Hopkins's, at the Point, from 
whence my beloved friends took them to 
town; and, two nights after, a loud 
knocking at our front door greatly 
alarmed us. Opening the chamber win- 
dow, we heard a man's voice saying, 
* Come down softly and open the door, 
but bring no light.' There was some- 
thing mysterious in such a call, and we 
concluded to go down and set the candle 
in the kitchen. When we got to the 
front door, we asked, * Who are you V 
The man replied, 'A friend, open quickly ;' 
so the door was opened, and who should 
it be but our honest gondola man, with 



a letter, a bushel of salt, a jug of mo- 
lasses, a bag of rice, some tea, coffee and 
sugar, and some cloth for a coat for my 
poor boys — all sent by my kind sisters. 
How did our hearts and eyes overflow 
with love to them, and thanks to our 
Heavenly Father for such seasonable sup- 
plies. May we never forget it. Being 
now so rich, we thought it our duty to 
hand out a little to the poor around us 
who were mourning for want of salt; so 
we divided the bushel, and gave a pint 
to every poor person that came for it, and 
had a great plenty for our own use. In- 
deed, it seemed as if our little store in- 
creased by distributing it, like the bread 
broken by our Saviour to the multitude, 
which, when he had blessed it, was so 
marvelously multiplied. 

"One morning, having left my cham- 
ber at an earlier hour than usual, and 
Ciisting my eyes towards the river, was 
surprised to see some hundreds of boats, 
all filled with British soldiers. I ran to 
my dear G. D.'s room, and begged him 
to get up and see the sight. He went to 
the window, and I waited to hear what 
he would say ; but, as he said nothing, I 
called out to him, * Brother, what shall 
we do now?' He opened his door, and 
sweetly and calmly said, * Let us, my 
sister, keep still and quiet ; I believe no 
harm will happen to us ;' and indeed we 
were favoured with remarkable stillness : 
even the children seemed to partake of it. 
The boats were ordered u p the river to Bor- 
dentown to burn all the gondolas :" " the 
last boat we saw, was a small one, with 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



181 



only three men and the rowers in it ; they 
were not soldiers : when they came op- 
|)osite to the town wharf they stopped 
rowing and pulled off their hats and 
bowed to the people on the wharf. We 
heard afterwards it was our poor refugee, 
Dr. S. Burling, and J. Stansbury, who 
intended to have come on shore and paid 
us a visit, but so many people appearing 
on the wharf they thought it safest to 
take to their oars and follow the fleet. 
One large vessel, with cannon, was in the 
fleet, and when they returned, were or- 
dered to fire if they saw soldiers on the 
wharf or about the streets. It seems the 
soldiers had notice of the time when 
they were to return, and they placed 
themselves along the shore quite down to 
the ferry ; it was first-day afternoon, and 
all the family but myself gone to meet- 
ing, and I was lying on the bed, and 
hearing a large gun, looked out of the 
window, and saw the large ship so close 
to our landing that I thought they were 
coming ashore ; when, behold! they fired 
two or three of their great guns, wiiich 
shook the house, and went through the 
walls of our next-door neighbour, who 
was a captain in the rebel army. I still 
kept at the window, unapprehensive of 
danger, and seeing a man on the deck 
talking and pointing to my house, one of 
them said, ' In that house lives a woman 
to whom I am indebted for my life ; she 
sheltered me when I was driven from my 
own house,' etc. This I was afterwards 
told by a person who heard it; it is 
needless to add it was our pour refugee. 



A rebel quartermaster, who had received 
some little civilities from my S. D. and 
myself, asked me one day if I did not 
wish to see my friends in Philadelphia; 
I said it was the wish nearest my heart; 
he said he would accompany me as far 
as Frankfort, if I would promise to take 
no kind of provision with me, and that 
he would meet me at the same place and 
conduct me home again. Such an offer 
was not to be slighted. I went to my 
friend, A. O., and asked her if she would 
venture to bear me company. She joy- 
fully agreed, and we borrowed a horse 
and chair, and early next morning set 
out. Our quartermaster being our guard, 
and good neighbour J. V. went with us 
to the ferry, to see us safe over. We got 
to A. James's" (former partner of the 
elder John Smith) "place in the afternoon, 
and sent notice to our friends in town, 
and next morning my father, brothers 
Moore and Wells, and my two sisters, 
with Dr. O., etc., met us at Kensington, 
for they dared not go further, that being 
the British lines. I believe there never 
was a more heart-tendering meeting. I 
had not seen my father and sisters for 
many months, and the dangera we were 
surrounded with, and the probability of 
this being the last tune we might meet on 
earth, together with the reports of the 
great scarcity of provisions in town, and 
a thousand other things, all contributed 
to make it an awfully affecting meeting. 
My sisters went to A. J.'s place and 
dined with me. A. O. stayed with her 
husband till evening, when my dear sis- 



182 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



ters left me and returned to town. The 
parting was almost too much for rae. I 
thought we were taking a last farewell of 
each other, but part we must ; they went 
to town, and Nancy and myself retired 
soon to bed, expecting our quartermaster 
to call on us by daylight, but no news 
did we hear of him ; but a heavy firing 
in the morning made us fearful we 
should not get safe home. About nine 
o'clock some stragglers stopjied at our 
quartei-s, and said there had been a 
skirmish between the English and 
Americans, and, more terrible still, that 
parties were ordered out to bring in all 
they should meet with ; this intelligence 
made us conclude to venture homewards 
without our guide ; we got into our chair 
and whipped and cut our dull horse at a 
strange rate. Several parties passed and 
repassed, and questioned us about whence 
we came, and where we were going — they 
said if we were going to Burlington, we 
should be stopped at the ferry and taken 
to Washington's headquarters, for there 
was a report that women had been into 
town and brought out goods. We kept 
our minds pretty calm, hoping that if we 
got safe to the ferry, as we were so well 
known, we should meet no more dangers, 
and we got along well till we got to the 
hill beyond the Red Lion, which being 
very bad, and we still pressing our poor 
horse to make more haste, he made one 
violent exertion to reach the top of the 
hill, when, to our utter dismay, the 
swingletree broke, and the chair began 
to roll down the hill. We both jumped 



out at the same instant; Nancy held the 
horse while I rolled a stone behind the 
wheel, and there we stood afraid to stir 
from the horse, and thinking we should 
be obliged to leave the chair and lead the 
horse home. At last we ventured to the 
door of a small house hard by ; a man 
came out, and with the help of Nancy's 
ribbons and my garters fixed us off, and 
we once again mounted the chair, and 
walked the horse till we came near the 
Bristol road, where we heard the ferry 
was guarded, and none suffered to cross. 
However, we kept on, and at length 
reached the ferry, where, instead of 
armed men, we could hardly find one 
man to put us over. At last we got over, 
and now being on our own shore, we be- 
gan, like people just escaped from ship- 
wreck, to review the dangers past, and 
congratulate ourselves on our arrival in a 
safe port ; and I hope not without a sin- 
cere, though silent acknowledgment of 
the good hand that had vouchsafed to 
bring us so far on our way to our lonely 
habitations. When we arrived at my 
door, my beloved S. D. had the neigh- 
bours and children all sitting with her ; 
her tender, anxious mind filled with ap- 
prehensions for our safety. As we had 
stayed a day longer than we intended, 
it was conjectured by our wise neighbour, 
J. v., that some terrible thing had hap- 
pened ; nothing less than that the horse, 
which was his, had been seizeil, and we 
kept in Pennsylvania. Rd. Smith, who 
lent the chair, was equally alarmed for 
the fate of his carriage; and S. H., who 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



183 



loudly exclaimed against the expedition, 
said we were certainly carried to head- 
quarters ; and as Nancy's husband was 
in the British pay, it would go hard 
with her for his sake ; but, behold ! all 
their wise conjectures proved like the 
croaking of the raven, for, in the midst 
of it all, we appeared before them in our 
proper persons, before our arrival was 
announced. Some cried out, where's the 
horse? where's the chair? where have 
you been ? etc. We gayly told them all 



was safe, then sat down to a good dish of 
tea, and rehearsed all we had seen, heard 
and suffered ; when we were seriously ad- 
vised never to engage again in such a 
perilous undertaking; and we as seri- 
ously assured them that if we did, we 
would look out for a stronger horse and 
chair, and be our own guide, for that our 
late expedition, so far from being a dis- 
couragement, was like a whet to a hungry 
man, which gave him a better appetite 
for his dinner." 



CHAPTER XVII. 



A WHIG LADY IN THE REVOLUTION. — RECOLLECTIONS OF DEBORAH LOGAN. 

[Letter from Deborah Logan to John F. Watson.^ 



" TN answer to my esteemed friend 
-^ Watson's* queries, respecting what 
r can remember of the state of things, facts 
and the expression of public opinion 
during the memorable years of 1777 and 
1778, when the hostile army of Great 
Britain occupied Philadelphia, I will 
give my recollections as briefly and sim- 
ply as I can ; approving much of his 
diligence in endeavouring to collect all 
the information now to be obtained from 
those who still survive, who had lived at 
that stormy period, and most heartily do 
1 reciprocate the wish, that our beautiful 
city may never again be forced to receive 
into its domicile the armed bands of a 
menacing foe, nor its soil ever again be 
pressed by the feet of a foreign invader. 
" I was about ten years of age at the 
time, and can well remember the previous 
gloom spread over the minds of the in- 
habitants, (I now write from recollected 
ideas and without consulting any docu- 
ments or dates), from the time it was 
thought the enemy would advance thro' 
the Jersies ; the very darkest hour of the 
Revolution appearing to me to be that 
preceding the capture of the Hessians, 
at Trenton ; those who favoured the gov- 

* John F. Watson, author of " Annals of Phila- 
delphia." 



ernment at home, as England was then 
called," (the tories,) " became elated and 
the Whigs depressed ; this may account 
for a good deal of severity that was used 
before the constituted authorities of that 
time left the city; in visiting the in- 
habitants and inspecting what stores of 
provisions they had, taking, in some in- 
stances, what they deemed superfluous, 
especially blankets, of which our army 
were in great need; they had several 
from my mother, and came to search the 
house for arms, but very civilly took my 
word that we had none secreted. Our 
large, old house in Chestnut Street, 
afforded an abundant supply of lead, 
which was an article in great demand ; 
for the water-spouts, pipes and lining of 
cisterns, of which we had many, were all 
torn off* and taken. After the public 
authorities had left the city, it was a very 
gloomy time indeed; we knew the enemy 
had landed at the head of Elk, but of 
their procedure and movements we had 
but vague information, for none were 
left in the city in public employ to whom 
expresses would be addressed. The day 
of the battle of Brandy wine was one of 
deep anxiety; we heard the firing and 
knew of an engagement between the 
armies without expecting immediate in- 

184 



A FAMILY HISTORY, 



185 



formation of the result, when towards 
night, a horseman rode at full speed down 
Chestnut Street and turn'd round Fourth 
to the Indian Queen public-house ; many 
ran to hear what he had to tell, and as I 
remember, his account was pretty near the 
truth, he told of Lafayette being wounded. 

"We were then for some time in igno- 
rance of the march of the armies, but 
were certain they would take possession 
of the city; and an evening, or perhaps 
two, previous to that event, we were 
alarmed with the most awfully grand 
display of an Aurora Borealis in the 
heavens which we had ever seen. At 
first some suggested that the crimson- 
stain'd streamers, which flashed over us 
with ever-varying motions, was occa- 
sioned by the fires of the army, but 
when convinced that it was too vast to 
be attributed to human agency, supersti- 
tion mingled with our fears, and few were 
philosophic enough to regard it as a 
natural appearance without portent; for 
my own part, what I had read of the 
siege of Jerusalem and the dreadful 
sights which that unfortunate people im- 
agined they saw in the heavens, when they 
averted their eyes from the horrors of the 
earth , presented itself to my m ind and filled 
it with the most melancholy reflections. 

" We had for a neighbour and an in- 
timate acquaintance, a very amiable 
English gentleman, who had been in the 
British army* and had left the service 

* This was Henry Gurney, who married lawyer 
John Ross* daughter Catherine, an heiress, and lived 
in the house of John Read's, vis-a-vis Bank of United 
States. 

24 



upon marrying a rich and excellent lady 
of Philadelphia some years before. He 
was a person so much liked and esteemed 
by the public, that he remained unmo- 
lested at a time when the committee of 
public safety sent many excellent citizens 
into banishment, witliout a hearing, upon 
the most vague and unfounded sus- 
picion, but contented themselves with 
only taking his word of honour, that he 
would do nothing inimical to the country, 
nor furnish the enemy with any inform- 
ation. He endeavoured to give my 
mother confidence that the inhabitants 
would not be ill-treated, saying, that the 
army must indeed be very much altered 
from what he had known, if strict dis- 
cipline would not be enforced, and the 
inhabitants and their property respected. 
A family from New York, of an old 
gentleman and his wife and six lovely 
girls, their daughters, who had left that 
city upon their approach, were induced 
to stay upon the representation of Mr. 
Gurney; one of the young ladies was 
ill and no sort of convenience adequate 
to the removal of the family could at the 
time be procured. He advised that we 
should all be well dressed and that we 
should keep our houses closed. The 
army marched in and took possession of 
the town in the morning. We were up- 
stairs and saw them pass to the State- 
House ; they looked well, clean and well- 
clad, and the contrast between them and 
our own poor, barefooted and ragged 
troops was very great, and caus'd a feel- 
ing of despair ; it was a solemn and im- 



186 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



pressive day, but I saw no exultation in 
the enemy, nor indeed in those who were 
reckoned favourable to their success. 
Early in the afternoon, Lord Cornwallis' 
suite arrived and took possession of my 
mother's house ; Enoch Story, a tory gen- 
tleman of the city, coming to apprise her of 
it and advise her not to resist, as the troops 
must be quartered upon the inhabitants, 
and he said it would be better to have an 
officer of high rank ; but my mother was ap- 
palled by the numerous train which took 
possession of her dwelling, and shrank 
from having such inmates, for a guard 
was mounted at the door and the yard 
filled with soldiers and baggage of every 
description, and I well remember what 
we thought of the haughty looks of Lord 
Rawdon and the other aid-de-camp, as 
they traversed the apartments. My 
mother desired to speak with Ijord Corn- 
wallis, and he attended her in the front 
parlour ; she told him of her situation 
and how impossible it would be for her 
to stay in her own house with such a 
numerous train as composed his lord- 
ship's establishment. He behaved with 
great politeness to her, said he should be 
sorry to give trouble and would have 
other quarters looked out for him. They 
withdrew that afternoon and he was ac- 
commodated at Peter Reeve's, in Second 
near Spruce Street, and we felt very glad 
at the exemption, but it did not last long, 
for directly the quartermasters were em- 
ployed in billeting the troops, and we 
had to find room for two officers of 
artillery, and afterwards an addition 



for two gentlemen, secretaries of Lord 
Howe. 

" The officers very generally, I believe, 
behaved with politeness to the inhabit- 
ants, and many of them upon going 
away, expressed their satisfaction that no 
injury to the city was contemplated by 
their commander ; they said that living 
among the inhabitants and speaking the 
same language, made them uneasy at the 
thought of acting as enemies. One of 
our officers was a Scotchman, pretty far 
advanced in life, sensible, sober and 
sedate, he had been long in the army 
and acquainted with mankind in camp 
and foreign countries. He spoke freely 
of the war and of the little honour to be 
gained by it; he strove to give as little 
trouble as possible, and charged a soldier 
who waited on him, to be assisting in 
cutting wood and bringing water for the 
kitchen. The secretaries also behaved 
in a most unexceptionable manner; one 
of them, a Mr. Davis, was his lordship's 
private secretary; the other, Ambrose 
Serle, Esquire, was secretary to the com- 
mission that came out about that time to 
offer peace upon condition of independ- 
ence being retracted; terms, that they 
soon understood would not be accepted. 
Upon the arrival of the commissioners, 
even Mr. and Mrs. Gurney were com- 
pelled to receive inmates ; and Mr, Eden," 
(afterwards Lord Auckland,) "and his 
young wife, a daughter of Andrew Elli- 
ott's, and whose mother was a lady of the 
Plumstead family, of Philadelphia, were 
the persons; they were very indignant 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



187 



at this, and Mrs. Gurnev insisted she 
would only receive them as guests, a 
measure which it seemed surprising 
should have been complied with, and I 
believe was afterwards regretted by them- 
selves, for the expense was considerable, 
and the pleasure bearing nothing ade- 
quate to the trouble and vexation. 

"At first, provisions were scarce and 
dear, and we had to live with much less 
abundance than we had been accustomed 
to ; hard money was indeed as difficult 
to come at as if it had never been taken 
from the mines, except with those who had 
things to sell for the use of the army ; 
they had given certificates to the farmers 
as they came up thro' Chester County, 
of the amount of stores they had taken, 
and upon these being presented for pay- 
ment at headquarters, they were duly 
honoured. My mother received a season- 
able supply in this way, from persons 
who were in her debt, and had been paid 
for what the army had taken. Edith 
Cheyney had received a pretty clever 
sum, which her husband had directed 
her to take to my mother in part pay- 
ment of what had been lent to them in 
good money years before, to preserve 
their place from the hands of the sheriff*; 
but when she saw the gold on the table, 
she could not resolve to part with it all, 
but reserved some to take home, of which 
she was robbed on the way by some of 
the lawless banditti who infested the 
roads near the lines. Many persons had 
buried their plate and money, and some 
were simple enough to put their papers 



into such recesses, where they, of course, 
if kept any time, mouldered and were 
ruined. Everything considered, the citi- 
zens fared better than could have been 
expected, and tho' it was certainly dis- 
agreeable in many places, on account of 
the dirt, yet the city was healthy. The 
enemy appeared to have a great deal of 
shipping in the Delaware; I counted 
sixty vessels that looked of large size, 
moored so close to each other, that it 
seemed as if you could not put a hand 
between them, near to where the navy- 
yard now is, and all the wharves and 
places seemed crowded. There was scarce 
anything to sell in the shops when they 
came into the town, and the paper money 
had depreciated to nothing. I remember 
two pieces of silk that I saw on sale a 
little before their arrival, at one hundred 
dollars per yard. Tea was fifty or sixty 
dollars per pound. 

"The day of the battle of German town, 
we heard the firing all day but knew not 
the result. Towards evening they brought 
in the wounded. The prisoners were 
carried to the State-House lobbies, and 
the street was presently filled with women, 
taking lint and bandages and every re- 
freshment which they thought their suf- 
fering countrymen might want. I saw 
an officer stop one of these groups and 
ask them, in half jest, why they did not 
carry such things to the other hospitals 
where the wounded British were. *0 
sir,' answered a lively girl, who had a 
deep interest at stake among her helpless 
people, 'permit us to go to your enemies, 



188 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



we know your ability and humanity to 
your own wounded men, or they should 
have some of our things likewise.' They 
were suflFered to proceed, and after the 
others were dressed, the surgeons at- 
tended to them likewise. The bar- 
barous treatment of prisoners in the 
prison, by the provost,* was not known to 
us in the city at the time, and I liave 
hoped, for the sake of humanity, it was 
not so bad as was afterwards reported, 
tho' he was certainly a wicked and in- 
human instrument. War, with all the 
polish of courteous chivalry, is a dread- 
ful evil, and productive of great misery 
and woe ; but when fiends, in the shape 
of cruel and unprincipled men, mingle 
in the sanguinary business it is truly the 
work of hell, and there is no relief af- 
forded to the picture. 

" The soldiers, when preparing to go out 
on an expedition, used to express very 
pious wishes that some of their officers 
might be killed in order that promotion 
might take place ; this was in the artil- 
lery. Our captain's man used to tell the 
girls in the kitchen, that his master 
questioned him so closely about every- 
thing which he procured, that he never 
had a chance to get any plunder ; he did 
not dare, he said, to take even a chicken 
without paying for it, but it may be easily 
thought, few were so scrupulous. 

"General Howe, during the time he 
staid in Philadelphia, seized and kept for 



* Conyngham. Some of the British officers them- 
selves spoke with indignation of his barbarity. 



his own use Mary Pemberton's coach 
and horses, in which he used to ride 
about the town. The old officers ap- 
peared to be uneasy at his conduct, and 
some of them freely expressed their 
opinions. They said, that before his 
promotion to the chief command, he 
sought for the counsels and company of 
officers of experience and merit, and 
that when he knew such were on guard 
at their different quarters, he would go 
and sit with them, and converse on sub- 
jects of science and seek for information. 
But now his companions were usually a set 
of boys, the most dissipated set of fellows 
in the army, and he suffered ' Mr. Wash- 
ington ' to circumvent him in all his plans. 
They admitted, tho' reluctantly, as may be 
thought, the great prudence and well- 
devised conduct of our illustrious com- 
mander. 

" Lord Howe was much more sedate and 
dignified than his brother ; really digni- 
fied, for he did not seem to affect any 
pomp or parade ; and I have known 
him, when he wanted Captain Duncan, 
of the ' Eagle,' (who used to come con- 
stantly over to our garden, when in at- 
tendance on his lordship,) walk in at the 
gate and up the piazza, to look for him, 
instead of sending a messenger. Before 
they left the city, he observed to his sec- 
retary that they had made much use of 
my mother's house and garden, and he 
should like to remunerate her for it, and 
he offered to take my youngest brother 
as a midshipman on board of his ship, 
but this, my mother's feeling toward her 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



189 



own country, and her religious princi- 
ples equally forbade. 

"They were exceedingly chagrined and 
surprised at the capture of Burgoyne, 
and at first would not suffer it to be 
mentioned. We had received undoubted 
intelligence of it, in a letter from Charles 
Thompson, and upon communicating this 
circumstance to Henry Gurney, his in- 
terrogations forced an acknowledgment 
from some of the superior officers, that it 
was, as he said, too true. 

"One of my acquaintances, indeed an 
intimate one, performed the part of a 
* Nymph of the Blended Rose,' in the 
splendid festival of the Meschianza, but 
I saw no part of the show, not even the 
decorated hall, where the knights and 
ladies supped amidst the 'grand salams' 
of their turbaned attendants ; nor even 
the Kidotto part, which was gazed at 
from the wharves and warehouses by all the 
uninvited part of the population of the 
town, except the stricter ^^^rwi^; not that 
I wanted curiosity, but its gratification was 
forbidden to me, and I could but ac- 
knowledge the propriety of the prohibi- 
tion. But the expectation and exhilara- 
tion which it caused amongst the gay 
and young can hardly be imagined, and 
the eflfect of the tournament and the 
dance, as described by them afterwards, 
grand and imposing in the highest de- 
gree. It was upon this occasion, that 
the old officer I have before spoken of, 
observed, that if ' Mr. Washington ' 
acted with his accustomed prudence he 
would not disturb them whilst they were 



engaged in such work. The tastes 
and talents of the unfortunate Andre 
were put in full requisition for this en- 
tertainment, and many of the decorations 
of this room, it was said, were arranged 
by him, and the scenes painted on can- 
vas by his own hands, some of which, 
I was recently told, were still remaining 
in some houses in the neighbourhood of 
the hall of celebration. 

" Now I have mentioned Major Andr^, 
I am reminded of an anecdote respect- 
ing him, not indeed in strict keeping 
with the character which he sustained, 
but which I give on the authority of 
Charles Thompson, Esquire, who heard 
it from Du Simitiere himself. That gen- 
tleman had staid in the city during its 
occupation by the British, and being 
intimately acquainted with Andr^, he 
waited on him to engage his attention to 
the protection of the Library and other 
public institutions upon the evacuation 
of the city. Andr^ occupied Dr. Frank- 
lin's house, in which his furniture and 
books were left. Simitiere found him in 
the doctor's library, engaged in packing 
up books, which he took with his own 
baggage; he specified in particular a 
splendid work which had been still left 
in the doctor's keeping ; it was a present 
from Louis XVI. of France, to the Philo- 
sophical Society. I think, he said, it was 
in twenty-four volumes, superbly bound. 
Its editors were the Jesuits in China, and 
it was a work of great learning and in- 
genuity: 'The Notitia of the Chinese.' 
Simitiere declared that he was con- 



190 



THE BUKLINGTON SMITHS. 



founded at what he saw, and en- 
deavoured, tho' indirectly, to awaken 
him to a proper sense of the turpitude 
of the action, by relating what he had 
just witnessed of the honourable conduct 
of General Kniphausen, who had occu- 
pied Greneral Cadwallader's house, and 
who had caused an inventory to be taken 
of its contents when he entered it, and 
was that morning engaged in examining 
that all was right upon his departure ; 
but the hint was useless and the books 
were removed. The streets seemed al- 
ways well filled, both with officers and 
soldiers, and I believe they frequently 
attended diflferent places of worship ; but 
Friends' meetings were not much to their 
tastes. They had their own chaplains to 
the different regiments, which appeared 
to us a mere mockery of religion. Parson 
Badger was chaplain to the artillery, and 
he was billeted at John Field's, who, with 
his wife, were very plain Friends in our 
neighbourhood; the house was very 
small and he had the front room up- 
stairs, and as he was a jolly, good-tem- 
pered person, he was much liked by the 
young fellows, who used to call and see 
him after parade, till his room and the 
stairs and porch, and chairs out on the 
pavement, in fine weather, would be quite 
filled with them ; they appeared to be 
very merry, but the family spoke very 
well of his manners and behaviour, and 
it must be confessed that the citizens 
generally fared better than was antici- 
pated from their occupation of the town. 
** Even Whig ladies went to the Mes- 



chianza and to balls, but I knew of very 
few attachments formed ; nor, with the 
exception of one instance, of any want 
of propriety of behaviour. 

"When they left the city, and the 
officers came to take leave of their ac- 
quaintance and express their good wishes, 
it seemed to us that a considerable 
change had taken place in their prospects 
of success, between the time of their , 
entry and departure. They often spoke 
freely in conversation on these subjects, 
and admitted that our country offered 
great facilities. We saw some for the 
last time in the evening, many went iu 
the night, and on the morning of the 

of June, the suite of Lord Howe 

departed. The secretaries went; they 
had only a lodging at our house, but 
went always to his lordship's table. The 
other officers found their own provisions • 
and had their servants to dress them. 
They had beds, bedding and utensils 
from the families where they were quar- 
tered, and in most cases, their civility 
made the business more tolerable. I 
knew an instance where an old officer 
was opposed to the utmost of civil resist- 
ance, and he as intent on gaining admis- 
sion as he would have been of urging on 
the surrender of a fortress. The family 
formed a terrible idea of him, and 
thought that they should have a most 
uncomfortable time with such a bluster- 
ing inmate, but by degrees this subsided, 
they became so pleased with him, that 
' Captain Scott ' was quoted as authority 
by them on every occasion. 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



191 



"*The Honourable Cosmo Gordon' 
staid all night at his quarters, and lay in 
bed so long the next morning that the 
family thought it but kind to awaken 
him and tell him * his friends, the rebels, 
were in town.' It was with great 
diflSculty he procured a boat to put him 
over the Delaware, perhaps he and his 
man were the last that embarked. 
Many soldiers hid themselves in cellars 
and other places, and staid behind, (I 
have heard.) In two hours after we 
saw the last of them, our own dragoons 
galloped down the street. 

" Adjutant Reed, of the artillery, had 
been billeted at neighbour Horn's. She 
was the wife of an infirm but patriotic 
man, who was out in the service of his 
country. The adj utant was afflicted with 
the gout, which she knew how to nurse, 
. and when he was about to depart he told 
his hostess that they might have all they 
left behind at the artillery park" (the 
State-House yard.) " It was an odd be- 
quest, but she was anxious to avail her- 
self of it, and came over to my mother 
to consult what was to be done. The 
result was to procure carts and haul away 
the hickory-wood directly. My mother 
told her that the public authorities would 
visit that place immediately and not 
regard the adjutant's proposition. But 
before they appeared the boys disputed 
the damaged powder and other things 
which were left. 

" When our own troops took posses- 
sion of the city. General Arnold, then 
flushed with the recent capture of Bur- 



goyne, was appointed to the command 
of it, and his quarters, (as if we had 
been conquered from an enemy,) ap- 
pointed at Henry Gurney'sl They 
were appalled at the circumstance, but 
thought it prudent to make no resist- 
ance, when, to their agreeable surprise, 
his politeness and that of his aids. Major 
Franks and Captain Clarkson, made the 
imposition sit light, and in a few days 
he removed to Mrs. Master's, in Market 
Street, that had been occupied as head- 
quarters by General Howe, where he 
entered on a style of living but ill- 
according with republican simplicity, 
giving sumptuous entertainments that 
involved him in expenses and debts, 
and most probably laid the founda- 
tion of his necessities and poverty, of 
his fixture defection and treason to his 
country.* 

" The various events of the war and 
the facts that have since been elicited 
make it no enthusiastic view of the sub- 
ject to say, that Divine Providence 
favoured our cause ; and it most happily 
at length triumphed; but there were 
times in which the bad passions and 
ill-humour of many of those who were 
engaged in its defence, were much better 
calculated to drive their opponents into 



* General Arnold was lame and ased a cratch ; his 
lameness was occasioned by his wounds at Quebec. 
He married Miss Shippen, of Philadelphia, one of the 
belles who fibred in General Howe's entertainments. 
Colonel A. McLane told me he early saw Arnold's 
spirit of extortion and deceit. As a general oflScer 
and because he made complaint of it, the general sent 
him out on a hazardous scouting expedition into 
Jersey, where he hoped he would have been cut off! — 
Note by J. F. Watson. 



192 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



the service of the enemy, than to keep 
them true to themselves. Often the 
most wanton sacrifice of the property of 
individuals took place upon account of 
the militia fines, and the ill-gotten 
gains were pocketed by the* commissaries 
and tax gatherers. 

" The confiscation of the estates of 
those who had joined the British was no 
public benefit, and occasioned scenes of 



distress, when acted upon, that fell heavy 
only upon their helpless and innocent fam- 
ilies, and threw a mournful shade over 
the succeeding scenes. But the wisdom 
and humanity of the illustrious framers 
of the Constitution of these States, by a 
salutary enactment have judiciously pro- 
vided against any future repetition of such 
useless severity and distress. 

"Deborah Logan." 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



MARRIAGE AND OBITUARY NOTICES. 



The following marriage and obituary 
notices, during the Revolutionary period, 
of members of the family of the Hon. 
John Smith, have been copied from the 
^^Pennsylvania Oazeiie^^ published in 
Philadelphia. 

Marriage of the diarist's eldest son. 
{Pennsylvania Gazette^ January 23d, 
1772:) 

" On Monday the 13th inst., was mar- 
ried, at Burlington, Mr. James Smith, 
son of the Hon. John Smith, Esquire, 
deceased, to Miss Hetty Hewlings, an 
agreeable young lady." 

Death of Elizabeth Smith, the " sister 
Betty" of the diary. {Pennsylvania 
Gazette, October 14th, 1772 :) 

" On the 3d inst., was interred at Bur- 
lington, after a solemn meeting on that 
occasion, Elizabeth Smith, in whom were 
happily united many pious excellencies ; 
by a steady conformity to the Divine will, 
she becameeminently distinguished; being 
deep in council, sound in judgment; 
awful* her manners, refined her senti- 
ments and graceful her deportment. She 
passed through a large share of bodily 
affliction with great patience and sta- 
bility, having a foretaste of that joy 



* Dignified. 
25 



which is unspeakable and full of 
glory." 

Marriage of the diarist's nephew, son 
of Hon. Samuel Smith. {Pennsylvania 
Gazette, June 14th, 1775 :) 

" On Tuesday, the 6th inst., was mar- 
ried Joseph Smith, Esquire, of Burling- 
ton, Treasurer of West New Jersey, to 
Miss James, the amiable and agreeable 
daughter of Abel James, Esquire, of 
this city." 

Deadi of the Hon. Samuel Smith. 
{Permsylvania Gazette, July 17th, 1776:) 

" On the 13th inst., aft«r a short ill- 
ness, died at Burlington, in the fifty-sixth 
year of his age, Samuel Smith, Esquire, 
a worthy and useful member of the com- 
munity. At an early period in life he 
was called to act in its service as a repre- 
sentative in the general assembly of 
New Jersey, and one of the provincial 
treasurers, and afterwards appointed to. a 
seat in the king's council. In these sev- 
eral stations he acquitted himself with 
ability, integrity and an unblemished 
reputation ; nor was his character less 
respectable, when considered as a mem- 
ber of the religious society of the people 
called Quakers, in whose burial-ground 
his remains were interred the 15th inst, 
attended by a large number of relations, 

193 



194 



THE BUBLINGTON SMITHS. 



neighbours and friends, who loved and 
esteemed him whilst living, and paid 
this last tribute of their regard with a 
solemn sincerity." 

The Fenn»ylvania Gazette having 
taken the patriotic side in the controversy 
of the day, while the king's council of 
New Jersey clave to the cause of their 
monarch, the justice of the encomium of 
the Gazette upon Samuel Smith, a mem- 
ber of that council, cannot be questioned. 

ADDITIONAL NOTES. — STENTON. 

Of Stenton, the mansion of Chief 
Justice Logan, the home of the maiden- 
hood of Hannah Logan, afterward the 
wife of the Hon. John Smith, and the 
married home of Deborah Norris Logan, 
wife of Senator Logan, and author of the 
above letter, Thompson Westcott says: 
("Historic Mansions of Philadelphia," 
p. 147,) " The house is believed to have 
been finished in 1728. Mrs. Sarah But- 
ler Wister, in the sketch of Deborah 
Logan, in Worthy Women of our First 
Qmtury, describes Stenton with a loving 
minuteness which fills out a perfect pic- 
ture: * Round the house there was the 
quiet stir and movement of a country 
place, with its large gardens full of old- 
fashioned flowers and fruits, its poultry- 
yard and stables. The latter were 
connected with the house by an under- 
ground passage, which led to a concealed 
staircase and a door under the roof, like 
the priesfs escape in some old English 
country-seats. * * * The offices sur- 



rounded the main building, connected 
with it by brick courts and covered wajrs. 
They were all at the back, and so dis- 
posed as to enhance the picturesque and 
dignified air of the old mansion, the in- 
terior of which is as curious to modern 
eyes as it is imposing. One enters by a 
brick hall, opposite to which is the mag- 
nificent double staircase, while right and 
left are lofty rooms covered with fine old- 
fashioned wood-work, in some of them 
the wainscot being carried up to the 
ceiling above the chimney-place, which 
in all the apartments was a vast open- 
ing set round with blue and white sculp- 
tured tiles of the most grotesque devices. 
There are corner cupboards, and, in some 
of the rooms, cupboards in arched niches 
over the mantel-pieces, capital show- 
cases for the rare china and magnificent 
old silver which adorned the dinner- 
table on state occasions. Half of the 
front of the house, in the second-story, 
was taken up by one large, finely-lighted 
room, the library of the book-loving 
masters of the place.' 

" The grounds were adorned with fine 
old trees. A splendid avenue of hem- 
locks — which legend would only be satis- 
fied with declaring were planted by 
William Penn, although he, poor man ! 
was dead years before Stenton was built — 
led up to the house. The Wingohock- 
ing meandered through the plantation, 
lighting up the landscape with bright- 
ness wherever its placid surface was seen. 
Stenton was a house for the living, but 
the affection which the owners had for it, 



A FAMILY HISTORY. 



195 



connected with the estate in time a last 
resting-place for the dead. The family 
graveyard is romantically situated, sur- 
rounded with old trees and with all ac- 
cessories of a spot to be picked out as a 
beautiful garden of the dead." 

A grand avenue of yews led to this 
family cemetery ; all of the trees of 
which have died within fifty years. 



THE FOUNDERS OF NEW JERSEY. 

Henry Armitt Brown, in his able and 
eloquent address on the occasion of the 
bi-centennial commemoration of the set- 
tlement of Burlington, thus speaks of 
the first settlers and framers of the Con- 
stitution of New Jersey : " * I wish,' wrote 
one who had witnessed the beginning,* 
describing in her old age the dangers^ 
and trials of her youth, *I wish that 
those who may come afl;er may consider 
these things.' Seven score years have 
gone since that was written. The heart 
that held that hope has long been still. 
The hand that wrote those words has 
been motionless for more than a century, 
and the kindred to whom they were ad- 
dressed have vanished from the earth. 
But here, to-day, in that ancient town, 
strangely unaltered, by the changes of 
two centuries — here amid scenes with 
which those venerable eyes were so 
femiliar — we who have ' come after' have 
assembled to fulfill that pious wish, to 
'consider those things' with reverence 



Mary Marfin Smith. 



and gratitude and take care that they be 
held hereafter in eternal remembrance 
and everlasting honor. * * * They" 
(the first settlers,) " were animated by the 
truest spirit of philanthropy, by the 
sincerest love of liberty, by the warmest 
devotion to what they understood to be 
the command of God. And they were, 
after all, worthy to lay the foundation of 
a free and humane government. Inde- 
pendence of thought, freedom of person, 
liberty of conscience; these were the 
things they all believed in and for them 
were ready to make any sacrifice. For 
liberty they had suffered each and all. 
For it, men like them had scorned dan- 
ger and gone chanting into battle. For 
the sake of it they had even welcomed 
the horrors of civil war. For it they 
had charged their brethren at Naseby 
and ridden rough-shod over their kin- 
dred upon Marston Moor. And now 
they were ready, if the day were lost at 
home, to abandon all and seek it beyond 
the sea. On liberal principles, then, did 
they naturally determine to build up 
their new government in the wilderness, 
where a century aft;erward their children, 
for whom they were making so many 
sacrifices, were destined to fight over again 
the same battle, with an equal courage 
and devotion. Little did they dream — 
those stern yet gentle men of peace — 
when they gave to their infant com- 
monwealth freedom from all taxation, 
except what its own assemblies should 
impose, that a hundred years later Eng- 
land would rise up, sword in hand, to 



196 



THE BURLINGTON SMITHS. 



take it back; that for the sake of a 
principle which they never thought to 
call in question, the little town which 
they were about to found would one day 
tremble at the roar of contending can- 
non, and the banks of the Delaware be 
stained with English blood ! Could they 
have been permitted to foresee the strug- 
gle that was yet to come, they could not 
more wisely have prepared posterity to 
meet it. First they created an executive 
and legislative power; the former to be 
chosen by the latter, the assembly by the 
people, voting to be by ballot, and every 
man capable to choose and to be chosen. 
Each member of the assembly, they 
agreed, 'hath liberty of speech,' and shall 
receive for wages one shilling per day, 
' that thereby he may be known as the 
servant of the people.' No man should 
be imprisoned for debt, nor, without the 
verdict of a jury, deprived of life, liberty 
or estate, ' and all and every person in 
the province shall, by the help of the 
Lord and these fundamentals, be free 
from oppression and slavery.' The In- 
dian was to be protected in his rights 
and the orphan brought up by the State. 
Religious freedom, in its broadest sense. 



was to be secured, and no one * in the 
least punished or hurt, in person, estate 
or privilege, for the sake of his opinion, 
judgment, faith or worship toward God 
in matters of religion; for no man nor 
number of men upon earth have power 
to rule over men's consciences.' * Such,' 
writes one who, though an alien to their 
blood and of an hostile creed, could do 
them justice, *is an outline to the com- 
position which forms the first essay of 
Quaker legislation, and entitles its au- 
thors to no mean share in the honour of 
planting civil and religious liberty in 
America.' Happy would it have been 
for the children of those simple-minded 
men had they never departed from ideas 
so true, so wise and so humane ! The 
authors of this document, adopted and 
signed on the 3d of March, 1676, seem 
to have seen the goodness of their handi- 
work. ' There,' they cry, in words 
which are at once a prophecy and a con- 
fession of faith, * we lay a foundation for 
after ages to understand their liberty, as 
men and Christians, that they may not 
be brought in bondage but by their own 
consent. For we put the power in the 
people.^ " 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



197 



TABLE I. 



FIBST SEVEN GENERATIONS. — DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL SMITH, JR. — ELDEST MALE LINE. 



1. William Smith, of^Bramham, York- 

shire, 
Born* (circa) A.D. 15<fo. 
TeJlUfu,^ ^«*eeMarried, J«i.YVfcii,A. D. IS"^T, 
^^ '' Died, '''*^A.D.'*^*'-J 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized,May 18, A. D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Nov. 19, A. D. 1647. 

3. Richard Smith (second,) of Bramham, 

Baptized, Aug. 15, A. D. 1626 

Married, Feb. 25, A. D. 1653, 

Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough. 
Died, A. D. 1688. 

4. Daniel Smith, of Bramham, (propri- 

etor, etc.,) 

Born, Nov. 14, A. D. 1665. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Robert Murfin 

of Eaton, Nottingham- 
shire, England. 

Died, August 4, A, D. 1742. 



* Owing to the Bramham Charch Register extend- 
ing back no further than 1592, the exact date of 
William Smith's birth will, perhaps, never be ascer- 
tained. I hope, hereafter, to sappfy those of his mar- 
riage and death from that Register. Other blanks, 
in dates not in mj possession, will, perhaps, be filled 
by subscribers who We these dates. 



5. Robert Smith, of Burlington, New 

Jersey, (J. P.) 

Born, A. D. 1698. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of John Bacon, 

of Chesterfield, afterward 
of Bacon's Neck, N. J. 

Died, A.D. 1781. 

6. Daniel Smith, (Jr.,) of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah, daughter of Joshua Raper. 
Died, . A.D. 

7. A. Joshua Raper Smith, of Burlington 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Susanna, dau. of Joseph Drinker. 

Died, A. D. 

7. B. Benjamin Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Married,Nov.ll,A.D. 1789. 

Deborah, daughter of William 

Morris and Margaret Hill 

Morris, his wife. 

Died, Nov. , A. D. 1793. 

7. C. Mary Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, tr A. D, 



198 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



7, D. Daniel Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Hannah, dau. of Barzillai Coate. 

Died, A. D. 

7. E. Robert Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D, 

Mary, daughter of Job Bacon, of 
" Bacon's Neck," Green- 
wich, New Jersey. 
Died, A. D. 

7. F. John D. Smith, of Philadelphia, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas. 

Died, A. D. 



7. 6. George R. Smith, of Philadel- 
phia, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Anne, daughter of Amos George, 
of Overbrook, Penn- 
sylvania. 
Died, A. D. 

7. H. Joseph D. Smith, of Burling- 
ton, 
Born, A. D. 

Married, A, D. 

Sarah, daughter of White, 

of Philadelphia. 
Died, (s. p.) A. D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



199 



TABLE 11. 



ELDEST LINE, (A.) — DESCENDANTS OF JOSHUA RAPER SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

8 A. Catharine Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. Robert J. Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 
Susanna, daughter of Drinker. 
Died, (s. p.) A. D. 

8. C. Joseph H. Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. D. Raper Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. E. Sarah Raper Smith, 

Bom, A. D. 

8. F. Henry Smith, 

Died an infant. 

8. G. George D. Smith, of Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 
Bom, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 
Hannah, daughter of Palmer. 

8. H. Susanna Drinker Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 1876. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Descendants of George D. Smith.) 

9. A. Henry Howard Smith, of Ohio, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 
Rachel, daughter of Cameron. 
9. B. Frances E. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

9. C. Robert Clinton Smith, of Cliflon, 

Bom, A. D. 
Married, A. D. 
Mary E. R., daughter of Alfred 

Smith of Philada. 
9. D. Laura Gilpin Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

9. E. Alice Anna Smith, 

Bom, A. D. 
Died, A. D. 

TENTH GENERATION, 

Children of Henry Howard Smith. 

10. 1. Anna G. Smith, 

Bom, A. D. 

Children of Robert Clinton Smith. 

10. 1. Ethel Genevieve Marguerite Clin- 
ton Smith. 
Bom, A. D. 1876, 



200 OEKEALOOIOAL TABLES. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



201 



TABLE III. 



ELDEST LIXE, (B.) — DESCENDANTS OF BENJAMIN SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

8. A. Margaret Morris Smith, 

Born, Sept. 20, A. D. 1790. 
Died, Oct. A. D. 1855. 

8. B. Daniel B. Smith, of Germantown, 

Born, July 14, A.D. 1792. 
Married, June 13, A.D. 1824, 
Esther, daughter of John Morton, 
of Philadelphia. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Descendants of Daniel B. Smith.) 

9. A. Benjamin Raper Smith, 

' Born, Mar. 31, A. D. 1825. 
Married, A. D. 

Hetty Fisher, daughter of William 
and Deborah Wharton, 
of Philadelphia. 



9. B. John Morton Smith, 




Born, 


A.D. 


Died, 


A.D. 


9. C. Mary Morton Smith, 




Born, 


A.D. 


Died, 


A. I). 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Benjamin R. Smith.) 

10. 1. Robert Morton Smith, 

Born, A. 1). 

10. 2. William Wharton Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Anna Wharton Smith, 

Born, A. 1). 

10. 4. Rsther Morton Smith, 

Born, A. D. 



26 



202 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



208 



TABLE IV. 



ELDEST LINE, ((\) — DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL SMITH, (FOURTH.) 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 



8. D. Barzillai Coate Smith, of Bur- 
lington, 
Born, A. D. 

Died, A. 1). 

8. B. Caleb Raper Smith, of Burlington, 8. E. AVilliam Smithy 



8. A. Elizabeth Smith, 

Died an infant. 



Born, A. D. 

Died, -A.D. 

8. G. Benjamin Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Anne, daughter of Daniel Arney. 

Died, A. D. 



Died in infancy. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Child of Benjamin Smith.) 

9. A. Barclay Arney Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 



204 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE V. 



ELDEST LINE, (D.) DPISCENDANTS OF ROBERT SMITH, (THIRD.) 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

8. A. Job Bacon Smith, 

Died au infant. 
8. B. ('aroline M.Smith, 

Born, April 17, A.I). 1805. 

Married, June 22, A. D. 1825, 
to Morris Smith, of Green 
Hill. 

Died, Nov. 15, A. D. 1872. 
8. C. Mary Lowndes Smith, 

Born, June 1, A.D. 1807. 

Married, A. D. 1836, 

to Dr. (,!has. Evans, of Phila. 
8. D. Elizabeth Bacon Smith, 

Born, Feb. 28, A. D. 1810. 

Died, A. D. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Morris Smith.) 

9. A. Richard Morris Smith, of " Stan- 
ley," Philadelphia County, 
Pennsylvania, 
Born, Aug. 22, A. D. 1827. 
Married, Mar. 30, A. D. 1875, 
Anna, daughter of Charles Kaighn, 
of "Kaighn's Pomt," New 
Jersey. 

9. B. Robert Lindley Smith, 

Died young. 

9. C. Elizabeth Bacon Smith, 

Died young. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 205 



206 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE VL 



ELDEST LINE, (E.) — DESCENDANTS OF JOHN D. SMITH, 



EIGHTH GENERATION, 

8. A. Edward T. Smith, of Philadel- 
phia, 
Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Anne, daughter of Job Bacon, 
(second.) 
Died, A. 1). 

8. B. Mary D. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Joseph Edge, of Darlington, 
Maryland. 
8. C. Daniel Smith, of Philadelphia, 

Born, A. D. 

8. D. Alfred Smith, of Philadelphia, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Esther, daughter of 
Rhoads. 
Died, A. D. 

8. E. Ambrose Smith, of Philadelphia, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Chas. Downing, 
of Downingstown, Chester 
County. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

. (Children of Edward T. Smith.) 

9. A. Anne Bacon Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

9. B. Edward Bacon Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

9. C. Norman Macalester Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah J., daughter of 

(Children of Joseph Edge.) 

9. D. Rebecca Edge, 

Born, A. D. 

9. E. Emma Edge, 

Born, A. D. 

9. F. Jane Edge, 

Born, A. D. 

9. G. Edward Edge, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of Alfred Smith.) 

9. H. Margaret Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Dr. Townsend Pennock, 
of Chester County. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



207 



9. I. Mary Elizabeth Rhoads Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Robert Chnton Smith, 
of Clifton, Maryland. 

9. K. Alfred K. Smith, of Philadelphia, 

Born, A.-D. 

Married, A. D. 

Albina, daughter of J. S. GriflBth, 
of Baltimore. 
Died, A. D. 1876. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Norman M. Smith.) 

10. 1. Gertrude Bacon Smith, 

Born, Sept. 17, A. D. 1808. 

10. 2. Fannie Scully Smith, 

Born, Nov. 6, A. I). 1869. 

10. 3. Jennie Ward Smith, died young. 

(Children of R. Clinton Smith.) 

10. 1. Ethel Genevieve Marguerite Clin- 
ton Smith, 
Born, A. I). 1877. 




208 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE VII. 



ELDEST LINE, (F.) CHILDREN OF GEORGE R. SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

8. A. Rebecca Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

8. B. Edmund Smith, 

Died, in infancy. 
8. C. Walter Smith, of Philadelphia. 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



209 



TABLE VIII. 

SECOND LINE. — FIRST SEVEN GENERATIONS. — PART OF EIGHTH. — DESCENDANTS OF 

SAMUEL SMITH, (SECOND.) 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, York- 

shire, 
Born, (circa) A. D. 1 570. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A. D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Nov.. 19, A.D. 1647. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bramham, 

Baptized,Aug. 15, A.D. 1626. 

Married, Feb. 25, A.D. 1653, 

Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough, Yorkshire. 
Died, A. D. 1688. 

4. Samuel Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, March 1, A.D. 167$2. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Edmond Lovett, 

of Bucks County, Pa., 
secondly, (s. p.,) Dorothea 
Gyles. 

Died, April 18, A. D. 1718. 

5. Richard Smith, of Green Hill, 

Born, July 5, A. D. 1699. 

Married, Aug. 20, A. D. 1 719, 

Abigail, daughter of Thomas Rapier, 

of Sindersby, Yorkshire, 

England. 
Died, Nov. 9, A.I). 1751. 
(Member of Assembly for 20 

years.) 
27 



6. A. Samuel Smith, (second,) of Hickory 

Grove, (oldest son,) 
Born, Dec. 13, A. D. 1720. 
Married, Nov. A. D. 1741, 
Jane, daughter of Joseph Kirkbride. 
Died, A.D. 

(The Hon. Samuel Smith, the 
historian.) 

7. A. Joseph Smith, of Hickory Grove, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Burling, 

secondly (s. p.,) Martha, 
daughter of Abel James. 

Died, A. D. 

7. B. Abigail Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to George Bowne, of New 

York. 
Died, A. D. 

7. C. Sarah Smith, 

Born, A. D, 

Died, A. D. 

7. D. Richard Smith, (sixth,) of Moores- 

town, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Hannah, daughter of Burling. 

Died, A.D. 



210 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Child of Joseph Smith.) 
8. A. Samuel J. Smith, of Hickory 

Grove, 
Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

"The Bard of Hickory 
Grove." 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of George Bowne.) 

• See A. to E. Table IX. 

(Descendants of Richard Smith, sixth.) 

See Table X. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



211 



TABLE IX. 



SECX)ND LINE. DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SMITH, (SECOND.) DESC^ENDANTS OF 

GEORGE BOWNE AND ABIGAIL SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

8. A. Robert L. Bowne, of New York, 

Born, A.D. 77. 

Married, A. D. 

Amy, daughter of Robinson, 

secondly, Naomi, daughter 
of Leggett. 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. Samuel 8. Bowne, of New York, 

Born, V A. D. 772. 

8. C. George Bowne, 

Born, 
Died, 
8. D. Joseph Bowne, 

Born, 
Married, 
Mary, daughter of 

8. E. Richard Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Robert L. Bowne.) 

9. A. George Bowne, (third,) 

Born, A. D. 

9. B. Rowland Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

9. C. Eliza Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

9. D. Amy Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 



A.D. 
A.D. 

A.D. 
A.D. . 

Leggett. 



9. E. Abby Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

9. F. Matilda. Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Stephen A. Frost. 

9. G. Amelia Bowne, 

Born, A, D. 

9. H. Hannah Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

9. I. Gulielma Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of Joseph Bowne.) 

9. A. Richard Bowne, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 



9. B. Samuel Bowne, 

Born, 



A. D. 



9. C. Abigail Bowne, 

Born, 
Married, 



A.D. 
A.D. 
Mott. 
9. D. Rebecca Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

9. E. F. George Bowne, Joseph Bowne, 

Died young. 

9. G. William Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 



212 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Richard Bowne, second.) 

10. 1. Joseph Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Edward Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Jane Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 4. Isaac Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 5. Stephen Germon ^owne. 

Born, A. D. 

10. 6. Samuel Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 7. Mary Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 8. Maria Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 9. Jerusha Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 10. William Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Samuel Bowne.) 

10. 1. Charles Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. John Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Amy Bowne, 

Born, A. I). 

(Children of Abigail Bowne Mott.) 

10. 1. Joseph Mott, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Mary Mott, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Ezra Mott, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of William Bowne.) 
10. 1. Emma Bowne, 



Born, 



A.D. 



10. 2. Mary Bowne, 

Born, A. D. 

(The above table from Jacob T. Bowne, 
of Glen Cove, L. I.) 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 213 



214 



GENEAI/^GICAL TABLES. 



TABLE X. 



SECOND LINE, CONTINUED. — DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD SMITH, SIXTH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

8. A. Jane B. Smith, 

Born, May 11, A.D. 1776, 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. Mary Smith, 

Born, Jan. 15, A.D. 1778. 

Married, Oct. 25, A.D. 1798. 
to Richard Hill Morris. 

Died, Jan. 15, A. D. 1848. 
8. C. Amelia Smith, 

Born, May 27, A. D. 1788. 

Died, A. D. 

8. D. Joseph R. Smith, of Burlington, 

Born, April 20, A.D. 1790. 

Died, A. D. 

8. E. Hannah B. Smith, 

Born, March 21, A. D. 1793. 
Married, A. D. 

to Robert Mott. 
Died, A. D. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of R. Hill Morris.) 

9. A. William Henry Morris, of Bur- 

lington, 
Born, Oct. 20, A. D. 1799, 
Married, June 14, A.D. 1825, 
Margaret E., daughter of 

Maris. 
Died, March 24, A. D. 1846. 



9. B. Richard Smith Morris, 

Born, Oct. 27, A.D. 1801. 
Died, April 16, A.D. J 817. 
9. C. Edmund Morris, of Burlington, 

Born, Aug. 28, A. D. 1804. 
Married, Dec. 29, A. D. 1827, 
Mary P., daughter of Jenks. 

Died, A. D. 

9. D. Charles Moore Morris, of Phila- 
delphia, 
Born, March 4, A. D. 1810. 
Married, Oct. 12, A.D. 1831, 
Anne, daughter of Jenks. 

9. E. Anna Margaretta Morris, 

Born, Oct. 4, A. D. 1812. 
Married, July 31, A.D. 1833, 

to Joseph Sloan. 
Died, Nov. 16, A. D. 1833. 

(Children of Robert Mott.) 

9. A. Richard F. Mott, of Hickory Grove, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Susan, daughter of Thomas. 

TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of W. H. Morris.) 

10. 1. Martha Moore Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to William Gummere, of 

Philadelphia. 



GENEAIX)GICAL TABLES. 



215 



10. 2. Elizabeth Maris Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A, D. 

to Dillwyn Smith, of West 
Hill. 
10. 3. Jane Maris Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Francis Milner, of Bur- 
lington. 

(Children of Edmund Morris.) 

10. 1. Anna Margaretta Morris, 

Born, A, D. 

Married, A. I). 

to Marcus F. Hyde. 



10. 2. Ellen Amelia Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3, 4, 5. Richard, Charles, Richard, 

Died young. 

10. 6. Mary Ann Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 7, 8. Edmund, Emma Ehzabeth, 

Died young. 

10. 9. Henry B. Morris, 

Born, A. D. 



t 
I 

t 

» 

r, 



216 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



i 



TABLE XI. 






I 



I 

* 

I 

I 

i 

I 



SECOND LINE. DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD SMITH, (SIXTH.) 



I 
\ 
I 

J 



i 

< 
I 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Charles M. Morris.) 

10. 1. William Jenks Morris, 

Born, A. I). 

10. 2. Mary Anna Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of Richard F. Mott.) 
10. 1. Amelia Smith Mott, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Richard Mott, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. 
10. 4. 



ELEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William Gummere.) 

11. 1. Morris Gummere, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 2. Margaret Morris Gummere, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 3. Frances Gummere, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 4. William Henry Gummere, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Francis Milner.) 



11. 1. 



(Children of Marcus F. Hyde.) 
11. 1. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



217 



TABLE XII. 



THIKD LINE. — DESCENDANTS OP JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. — FIRST 

SEVEN GENERATIONS. 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, York- 

shire, 
Born, (circa) A. D. 1570. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A.D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Nov. 19, A. D. 1647. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bram- 

ham, 

Baptized,Aiig. 15, A.D. 1626. 

Married, Feb. 25, A. D. 1653, 
Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough, York- 
shire. 

Died, A. D. 1688. 

4. Samuel Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, March 1, A. D. 1672. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Edmond Lov- 

ett, of Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania ; secondly, 
(s. p.,) Dorothea Gyles. 

Died, April 18, A. D. 1718. 

28 



5. Richard Smith, of Green Hill, 

Born, July 5, A. D. 1699. 

Married, Aug. 20, A.D. 1719, 

Abigail, daughter of Thomas Rapier, 

of Sindersby, Yorkshire, 

England. 
Died, Nov. 9, A.D. 1751. 
(Member of Assembly for 20 

years.) 

6. B. John Smith, of Franklin Park, 

Born, Jan. 20, A. D. 1722. 

Married, Oct. 7, A. D. 1748, 
Hannah, daughter of James Tx)gan,'" 

of Stenton, (.hief Justice 
of Pennsylvania. 

Died, March 26, A. I). 1771. 

(Member of King's ('Ouncil, 
of New Jersey.) 

7. A. Sarah Logan Smith, 

Born, Aug. 29, A.D. 1749. 

Married, May 19, A.D. 1768, 
to William Dillwyn, of 
Philadelphia, afterward of 
Higham Lodge, Aliddle- 
sex, England. 

Died, April 23, A.D. 1769. 




218 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



7. B. James Smith, of Philadelphia, 

Born, Oct. 15, A. D. 1750. 
Married, Jan. 13, A.D. 1772, 
Esther, daughter of William Hew- 
Hugs, 
Died, A. D. 

7. 0. Hannah Smith, 

Born, Oct. 29, A. D. 1753. 
Married, Jan. A. D. 1780, 
to John Cox, of Oxmead. 
Died, A. D. 



7. D. John Smith, (Junior,) of Green 

Hill, 
Born, Nov. 2, A. D. 1761. 
Married, April 8, A. D. 1784, 
Gulielma Maria, daughter of Wil- 
liam Morris and Margaret 
Hill. 
Died, April 18, A. D. 1803. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



219 



TABLE XIII. 



THIRD LINE. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. DESCENDANTS 

OF JAMES SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Child of William Dillwyn.) 

8. A. Susannah Dillwyn, 

Born, March 3, A. D. 1769. 
Married, April 16, A. D. 1795, 

to Samuel Emlen, of West 

Hill. 
Died,(s.p.)Nov.24, A.D. 1819. 

^Children of James Smith.) 

8. A. Hannah Smith, 

Born, Nov. 26, A.D. 1773. 
Married, A. D. 

to Henry S. Drinker, of 
Philadelphia. 
Died, A. D. 

8. B. Sarah Logan Smith, 

Born, Sept. 28, A. D. 1778. 
Married, A. D. 

to Hugh Roberts, of Phila- 
delphia. 
Died, A. D. 

8. C. John J. Smith, of Philadelphia, 
Bom, July 26, A.D. 1780. 
Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of George Roberts. 
Died, A. D. 

8. D, E, F. Elizabeth, William, James, 
Died young. 



8. G. Charles Logan Smith, 

Born, March 16, A.D. 1787. 
Died, May 14, A.D. 1811. 

8. H. Abigail Bowne Smith, 

Born, December 2, A. D. 1788. 
Married, A. D. 

to John Drinker. 
Died, A. D. 

8. I. Elizabeth Smith, 

Born, August 25, A. D. 1790. 

Married, A. D. 

to Mordecai Lewis, of Phila- 
delphia. 

Died, A. D. 

8. K. Susannah 1). Smith, 

Born, March 5, A.D. 1792. 
Married, A. 1). 

to Samuel Allinson. 
Died, A. 1). 

8. L. James Logan Smith, of Newcastle, 

Delaware, 
Born, Sept. 14, A.D. 1793. 
Married, A. D. 

Eliza Alden ; secondly, Mary, 
daughter of Couper, of 

Newcastle. 
Died, A. D. 



220 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Henry S. Drinker.) 

9. A. William Drinker, 

Born, October 14, A. D. 1795. 
Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth Rodman. 

Died, (s. p.,) A. D. 

9. B, B'. Henry S., James, 
Died in infancy. 

9. C. Esther Drinker, 

Born, November 1, A. D. 1798. 
Married, A. D. 

to Pemberton Pleasants. 

9. D. Elizabeth Drinker, 

Born, Dec. 11, A. D. 1801. 
Married, A. D. 

to Samuel C. Paxson. 
Died, A. D. 



9. E. Sarah Drinker, 

Born, May 9, A. D. 1803. 
Married, A. D. 

to James Biddle. 
Died, A. D. 

9. F. Heniy Drinker, 

Born, August 11, A. D. 1804. 
Married, A. D. 

Frances, daughter of Morton. 
Died, A. D. 

9. G, H, I. Hannah, Mary, Charles, 
Died young. 

9. K. Sandwith Drinker, 

Bom, Nov. 19, A. D. 1808. 
Married, A. D. 

Susanna, daughter of Shober. 
Died, A. D. 

9. L, M, N. Charles, Edward, Edward, 
Died young. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



221 



TABLE XIV. 

THIRD LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. — DESCENDANTS 

OF JAMES SMITH. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Child of Pemberton Pleasants.) 

10. 1. Annie Pleasants, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Samuel C. Paxson.) 



(Children of James Biddle.) 



(Children of Henry Drinker.) 
10. 1. Margaret Morton Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Hannah Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Henry Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Sandwith Drinker.) 

10. 1. Catharine Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Robert Morton Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Henry Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 4. Elizabeth Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 



222 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XV. 

THIRD LINE. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. DESCENDANTS 

OF JAMES SMITH. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Hugh Roberts.) 

9. A. Elizabeth Roberts, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to William Rush, M.D. 
9. B. Sarah Roberts, 

Born, A. 1). 

Married, A. D. 

to Governor Edward Coles. 
9. C. Mary Roberts, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to George Roberts Smith. 

(Children of John J. Smith.) 

9. A. George Roberts Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Hugh Roberts. 

Died, May 16, A. D. 1868. 
9. B. Alexander Smith, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of John Drinker.) 

9. A. Mary Drinker, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Mordecai Lewis.) 

9. A. James Smith I^ewis, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

daughter of Rawle. 

9. B. Joseph Saunders Lewis, 

Born, A. D. 



9. C. Charles Lewis, 

Born, 



A.D. 



9. D. Alexander Lewis, 

Born, A. D. 



9. E. Esther Lewis, 

Born, 



A.D. 



9. F. Henry Lewis, 

Born, 



A.D. 



(Children of Samuel Allinson.) 
9. A. Esther Allinson, 

Born, Dec. A. D. 1814. 

Married, A. D. 

to H. P. Hughes, of "The 
Priory," Walthamstow, 
Essex, England. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



223 



9. B. Martha Allinson, 

Born, Dec. A. D. 1814, 



(Children of James Logan Smith.) 
9. A. Catharine Alden Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

9. B. Annie Couper Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Alexander Proudfit. 
9. B. Esther Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

9. B. Ellen Logan Smith, 

Born, A. D. 



TENTH GENERATION. 



(Children of Alexander Proudfit.) 

10. 1. John Proudfit, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 2. Mary Couper Proudfit, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 3. Alexander Couper Proudfit, 

Born, A. D. 



224 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XVI. 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES SMITH. HUGHES FAMILY OF WALTHAMSTOW. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Henry P. Hughes.) 

10. 1. Hetty Elizabeth Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Albrecht G. Eggers. 

10. 2. Annie Margaret Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

10. 3. Mary Strother Hughes, 

Bom, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to John S. Cousens. 

10. 4. Henry Pearse Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Emma S., daughter of 
Cousens. 

10. 5. Emma Martha Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 6. Georgina AUinson Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to G. E. Hignett. 

10. 7. Willie F. Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

MaiTied, A. D. 
Edith, daughter of Cousens. 



10. 8. Alice Emily Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Henry Lay ton. 

10. 9. Susan Dillwyn Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 10. John Arthur Hughes, 

Born, A. D. 



ELEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of A. G. Eggers.) 



11. 1. 



(Children of John S. Cousens.) 
11. 1. 



(Children of H. Pearse Hughes.) 
11. 1. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 225 



29 



226 



GENEALOGICAL TABLICS, 



TABLE XVII. 

THIRD LINE. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. DESCENDANTS 

OF JOHN SMITH, OF GREEN HILL. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of John Smith, of Green Hill.) 

8. A. Henry Hill Smith, 

Died young. 
8. B. Margaret Hill Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, Oct. 31, A. J). 1821, 
to Samuel Hilles, of Wil- 
mington. 
8. C. Richard M. Smith, of West Hill, 

Born, June 27, A. D. 1788. 

Married,Sept.20,A.D. 1810, 

Susannah, daughter of Isaac Collins. 

Died, Feb. IJ, A.D. 1826. 

8. I). Rachel Smith, 

Born, May 26, A.D. 1792. 
Married, June 28, A.D. 1826, 

to George Stewardson. 
Died, October 7, A. D. 1839. 
8. E. Milcah M. Smith, 

Died young. 
8. F. John Jay Smith, of Ivy Lodge, 

Born, June 16, A. D. 1798. 

Married, April 12, A.D. 1821, 

Rachel (1, daughter of Robert 

Pearsall, of Flushing, L. I. 

8. G. Morris Smith, 

Born, August 29, A. D. 1801. 

Married, June 22, A.D. 1825, 

Caroline, daughter of Robert Smith. 

Died, March 28, A. D. 1832. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Cliildren of Samuel Hilles.) 

9. A. Gulielma M. Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Charles Howland, of Hill- 
ton, Delaware. 

9. B. William Samuel Hilles, 

Born, A.D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah, daughter of Dr. Thomas 
Allen. 
Died, A. D. 1876. 

9. a John Sn)ith Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah, daughter of Joseph Tatum. 
Died, A. D. 1875. 

(Children of Richard M. Smith.) 

9. A. Gulielma Maria Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Josiah R. Reeve, of " Lo- 
cust Shade," New Jersey. 

9. B. Rachael Collins Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Matthew Howland, of 

New Bedford. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



227 



9. C. Dillwyn Smith, 

Born, 
Married, 



A.D. 
A.D. 



9. B. John Stewardson, 
Born, 
Died, 



A.D. 
A.D. 



Elizabeth Maris, daughter of Wil- 9. C. Maria Stewardson, 



Ham Henry Morris. 

(Cliildren of George Stewardson.) 
i). A. Thomas Stewardson, Junior, of 

" Hulsmoor." 
Born, A. D. 1828. 

Married, A. D. 

Margaret, daughter of Reuben 
Haines. 



Died young. 
9. D. Margaret Stewardson, 

Born, A. D. 

9. E. George Stewardson, 

Died young. 



228 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XVIII. 



THIRD LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of John Jay Smith.) 

9. A. Lloyd Pearsall Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Hannah E., daughter of Isaac C. 
Jones, of "Rockland." 

9. B. Albanus Smith, 

Born, Sept. 30, A. D. 1823. 
Died, A. D. 1842. 

9. C. Elizabeth Pearsall Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

9. D. Robert Pearsall Smith, 

Born, A. D. 1827. 

Married, A. D. 

Hannah, daughter of J. M. 
Whitall. 

9. E. Gulielma Maria Smith, 

Died young. 

9. F. Horace John Smith, of George's 

mil. 

Born, A. D. 

Married, Oct. 7, A. D. 1857. 
Margaret, daughter of William 
W. Longstreth. 

9. G. Margaret Hill Smith, 

Died young. 



(Children of Morris Smith.) 

9. A. Richard Morris Smith, of "Stan- 
ley," 
Born, August 22, A. D. 1827. 
Married, Mar. 30, A. D. 1875, 
Anna, daughter of CharlesKaighn, 
of"Kaighn'sPoint,"KJ. 

9. B. Robert Lindley Smith, 

Died young. 

9. C. Elizabeth Bacon Smith, 

Died young. 

TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Charles Howland.) 

10. 1. Margaret Smith Howland, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to John Cookman. 

10. 2. Susannah D. Howland, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Charles Howland, 

Bom, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Murray Shipley, 
of Cincinnati. 

10. 4. Rachel Smith Howland, 

Born, A.D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



229 



(ChUdren of William S. Hilles.) 

10. 1. Thomas Allen Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of John 8. Hilles.) 

10. 1. Anne T, HUles, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 2. Susan Allen Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Isaac Shearman. 

10, 3. Samuel E. Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 2. William Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 3. Joseph T. Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 4. Margaret Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 4. Margaret Hilles, 

Born, A. D. 



P. 229. Line 4, for Susan Allen Hilles read Susan Watson Hilles. 



230 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XIX. 



THIRD LINE. DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FKANKLIN PARK. 



TENTH (FENERATION. 

(Children of Josiah R. Reeve.) 

10. 1. Susan Reeve, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

10. 2. Richardson Reeve, 

Born, A. 1). 

10. 3. Josiah Reeve, Junior, M. D., 

Born, A. 1). 

Married, A. D. 

Jeannette, daughter of John 
Johnson. 

10. 4. Elizabeth Reeve, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 5. George Dillwyn Reeve, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah, daughter of J. Comfort. 

(Children of Matthew Rowland.) 
10. 1. Susannah Dillwyn Rowland, 

Born, May 27, A. D. 1845. 

Died, A. D. 

10. 2. Richard Smith Rowland, 

Born, July 12, A. D. 1847. 

Married, A. D. 

daughter of 
10. 3. Morris Rowland, 

Born, Dec. 14, A. D. 1850. 



10. 4. William Dillwyn Rowland, 

Born, March 12, A. D. 1853. 

(Children of ThomasStewardson, Junior.) 

10. 1. Arthur Stewardson, 

Died young. 

10. 2. John Stewardson, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Emlyn Lamar Stewardson, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 4. Edmund Crenshaw Stewardson, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 5. Mary Stewardson, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 6. Eleanor Stewardson, 

Born, A. D. 

(diildren of R. Pearsall Smith.) 

10. 1. Eleanor Smith, 

Died young. 

10. 2. Franklin Whitall Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

10. 3. Mary Whitall Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 4. Lloyd Logan Smith, 

Born, A. D 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



231 



10. 5. Rachel 

Born, 



Smith, 



A.D. 



10. 4. Margaret Longstreth Smith, 

Born, Oct. 20, A. D. 



10. 6. Alice Smith, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Horace J. Smith.) 

10. 1. Albanus Longstreth Smith, 

Born, Mar. 29, A. D. 1859. 



ELEVENTH GENERATION. 



(C'hiklren of John Cookman.) 



11. 1. 



.^ - -. T^ . 1 T , (Children of Charles Rowland.) 

10. 2. Mary Brmghurst Longstreth ^ ^ ^ 

, 11. 1. 

hmith. 
Born, Aug. 30, A. D. 1863. 



10. 3. Wilson Longstreth Smith, 

Born, April 28, A. D. 18G7. 11.1. 



(Children of Isaac Shearman.) 



232 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XX. 



THIRD LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF JOHN SMITH, OF FRANKLIN PARK. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of John Cox, of Oxmead.) 

8. A. Sarah Cox, 

Died young. 

8. B. Hannah Cox, 

Born, Sept. 8, A. D. 1784. 
Married, ' A. D. 

to Dr. George Davis. 
Died, A. D. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Dr. George Davis.) 

9. A. John Cox Davis, 

Born, A. D. 



9. B. Juliana Davis, 

Born, 



A.D. 



9. C. Isaac Davis, 

Born, 



9. D. George Davis, 

Born, 



9. E. Lewis Davis, 

Born, 



9. F. Jane Davis, 

Born, 



A.D. 



A.D. 



A.D. 



A.D. 



GENEALOGICJAL TABLES. 



233 



TABLE XXI. 



FOURTH LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM LOVETT SMITH. FIRST SEVEN 

GENERATIONS. 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, York- 

shire, 
Born, (circa) A. D. 1570. 
Married, A. D. ! 

Died, A. D. 

I 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A.D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Nov. 19, A. D. 1647. 

j 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bram- i 

ham. 

Baptized, Aug. 15, A.D. 1626. 

Married,Feb. 25, A. D. 1653, 
Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough, York- 
shire. 

Died, A. D. 1688. 

4. Samuel Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, March 1, A. D. 1672. 
Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Edmond Lov- 

ett, of Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania ; secondly, 
(s. p.,) Dorothea Gyles. 
Died, April 18, A. D. 1718. 
30 



5. Richard Smith, of Green Hill, 

Born, July 5, A. D. 1699. 

Married, Aug. 20, A.D.1719, 

Abigail, daughter of Thomas Rapier, 

of Sindersby, Yorkshire, 

England. 
Died, Nov. 9, A.D. 1751. 
(Member of Assembly for 20 

years.) 

6. WilliamLovettSmith,of" Bramham," 

Born, Sept. 19, A. D. 1726. 
Married,Sept. 15, A. D. 1749, 
Mary, daughter of Daniel Doughty. 
Died, Dec. 14, A.D. 1794. 



7. 



7. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of W. Lovett Smith.) 

A. Lovett Smith, 

Died young. 

B. Daniel Doughty Smith, of "Sha- 

ron," 
Born, July 29, A.D. 1751. 
Married, A. D. 1772, 

Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan 

Schooley, (" Schooley's 

Mount") 
Died, July 27, A. D. 1827. 



234 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



7. C. SamuelSinith,of"SchooleyFann/' 

Born, June 4, A. D. 1755. 
Married, A. D. 

Abigail, daughter of Jonathan 
Schooley, (" Schooley's 
Mount") 
Died, A. D. 

7. D. Anne Smith, 

Born, Feb. 12, A. D. 1758. 
Married, A. D. 

to John Gill, of Haddon- 
field. 
Died, A. D. 

7. E. Elizabeth Smith, 

Died young. 
7. F. Abigail Smith, 

Born, Nov. 7, A. D. 1765. 
Married, A. D. 

to John Earl, of 



Died, 



A.D. 



7. G. Mary Smith, 

Born, July 7, A. D. 1768. 
Married, A. D. 

to Barzillai Burr. 
Died, A. D. 

7. H. William Lovett Smith, (second,) 

of " Bramham," Burling- 
ton County, 
Born, Nov. 11, A.D. 1773. 
Married, A. D. 

Eliza, daughter of General John 
Lax^y, of 
Died, A. D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



235 



TABLE XXII. 



FOURTH LINE. DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM LOVETT SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of D. Doughty Smith.) 

8. A, B. Anne Smith, Mary Smith, 

Died young. 

8. C. Jonathan Smith, 

Born, June 28, A. D. 1776. 
Died, Nov. 16, A. D. 1845. 

8. D. John Schooley Smith, 

Born, Dec. 1, A. D. 1777. 
Died, Jan. 7, A. D. 1832. 

8. E. Elizabeth Smith, 

Bom, Dec. 21, A. D. 1779. 

Married, A. D. 

to James Sh re ve, of "Stock- 
ton." 

Died, Oct. 11, A.D. 1854. 

8. F. Jacob Smith, 

Died young. 

8. G. Daniel Doughty Smith, (second,) 

Born, April 10, A. D. 1783. 
Died, July 14, A. D. 1820. 

8. H. Ezekiel Smith, 

Died young. 

8. I. Rebecca Smith, 

Born, Mar. 29, A. D. 1787. 

Married, Dec. 17, A.D. 1807, 

to Joseph White, of Mount 

Holly. 

Died, Jan. 3, A. D. 1865. 



8. K. Joseph Smith, of " Bmmham," 

Born, July 10, A. D. 1789. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah, daughter of Ariiey Lippin- 

cott. 

Died, April 16 A.D. 1865. 

8. L, M. William Smith, Abigail Smith, 

Died young. 
(Children of Samuel Smith.) 
8. A. William Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Henry Ridg- 

way. 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. Charles Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. C. Samuel Smith, 

Died young. 
. (Children of John Gill.) 
8. A. Mary Gill, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. John Gill, second, (J. P.,) of Had- 

donfield. 
Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah, daughter of Hoi)kin8. 

- Died, A. D. 



236 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



(Children of John Earl.) 

8. A. William Lovett Earl, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Harriet, daughter of Curtis ; 

secondly, Eveline, daugh- 
ter of 
Died, 
8. B. John Smith Earl, 

Born, 
Married, 
Keziah, daughter of 
Died, 
8. C. Elizabeth Earl, 

Born, 
Married, 
Died, (s. p.,) 
8. D. Mary Earl, 

Born, 
Married, 



A.D. 

A.D. 
A.D. 

Shreve. 
A.D. 

A.D. 
A.D. 
A.D. 

A.D. 
A.D. 

to Samuel Ellis, of "Spring- 
field." 
Died, A. D. 



(Children of Barzillai Burr.) 

8. A. Lydia Burr, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Nathan Atkinson. 
8. B. Bal-zillai Burr, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Anne D. Beatty. 
8. C. Richard Burr, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Anne Hampton. 

(Of these children, only Lydia leaves 
issue.) 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



237 



TABLE XXIII. 



FOURTH LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM LOVETT SMITH. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of W. Lovett Smith, second.) 

8. A. Thomas L. Smith, (Judge of Su- 
preme Court,) of New 
Albany, Indiana, 
Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 1836, 

Anne M. E., daughter of William 
Evans, of Willistown, Pa. 
8. B. Henry W. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Laura, daughter of David Leon- 
ard; secondly, Amelia G., 
daughter of H. Foster. 

8. C. Jane L. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Dr. Eugene Palmer, of 
St. James, Louisiana. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of James Shreve.) 

y. A. Stacy Biddle Shreve, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. I). 

Susan H., daughter of 
Woodward. 

9. B. Daniel Smith Shreve, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, March 15, A. D. 183G. 



9. C. Elizabeth Schooley Shreve, 

Born, A. D. 

9. D. Beulah Sansom Shreve, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Barclay White, of "Sha- 
ron." 

9. E. Sarah Biddle Shreve, 

Born, A. D. 

9. F. Rebecca Lamb Shreve, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Daniel Smith White. 

(Children of Joseph White.) 

9. A. John Josiah White, of 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary K., daughter of Dr. N. Shoe- 
maker; secondly, Abigail, 
daughter of E. Weaver. 

9. B. Daniel Smith White, 

Born, A.D. 

Married, A. D. 

Rebecca L., daughter of James 
Shreve. 

9. C. Elizabeth White, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Joshua Lippincott. 



238 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



9. D. Sarah Smith White, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, Nov. 3, A. I). 1838. 

9. E. Anna White, 

Died young. 

9. F. Howard White, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, Aug. 19, A. D. 1838. 

9. G. Barclay White, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Rebecca M., daughter of R. S. 
Lamb; secondly, Beulah 
S., daughter of James 
Shreve. 



9. H. Anna Maria White, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to John G. Hunt, M. D. 

(Children of Joseph Smith.) 

9. A. Daniel Doughty Smith, (third,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Emma, daughter of Oliphant. 

(Continued in next table.) 



GENEAI.OGICAL TABLES. 



239 



TABLE XXIV. 



FOURTH LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM LOVETT SMITH. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Joseph Smith, continued.) 
9. B. Rebecca White Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Franklin W. Earl. 
9. C. Elizabeth S. Smith, 

Died young. 
9. D. William Lovett Smith, (third.) 

Born, A. D. 

Died, June 25, A. D. 1863. 
9. E. Lydia Lippincott Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Stacy B. Lippincott. 
9. F. Joseph W. Smith, 

Died young. 
9. G. Ellwood L. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, Aug. 25, A. D. 1853. 
9. H, I,K. Anna, George W., Jonathan, 

Died young. 
9. L. James L. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Virginia, daughter of De la 

Mothe. 
9. M. Anna Maria Smith, 

Died young. 



(Children of William Smith.) 

9. A. Henry Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of T. Ewan. 

9. B. Job Stockton Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Eliza, daughter of Lawrence. 

9. C. Elizabeth Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Elias B. Fell. 

9. D. Jonathan R. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary A., daughter of Val- 

entine. 

9. E. William Smith, Junior, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Achsah, daughter of White. 

9. F. Samuel Smith, Junior, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth R., daughter of 
Butterworth. 



240 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



(Child of Charles Smith.) 
1). A. Abigail Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. 1). 

to Josei)h Li])pineott. 
(Children of Hon. John Gill.) 
9. A. Rebecca Gill, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. 1). 

to Samnel S. Willits. 
9. B. Anna Gill, 

Died young. 
9. C. JohnGill,(third,)of Camden, New 

Jersey, 
Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of 
Tomlinson. 



9. D. William H. Gill, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Phoebe, daughter of Shreve. 

(Children of W. Lovett Earl.) 

9. A. George M. Earl, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. I). 

Sarah A., daughter of Bower. 

9. B. Edgar Earl, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

(Continued in next table.) 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



241 



TABLE XXV. 



FOURTH LINE. DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM LOVETT SMITll. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of W. Lovett Earl, continued.) 

9. C. Mary Earl, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Thaddeus Hooper. 

9. D. Harriet Earl, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Dr. A. B. Merritt. 



9. 


E. William Earl, 




Died young. 


9. 


F. Daniel W. Earl, 




Born, A. D. 




Married, A. D. 




Helen, daughter of Hs 




(Children of John Smith Earl.) 


9. 


A. Maria Earl, 




I )ie(l young. 


9. 


B. William L. Earl, 




Born, A. D. 




Died, A. D. 



(Children of Samuel Ellis.) 

9. A. Rebecca Sharp Ellis, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Richard C. Woolston. 



9. 


K 


Eliza Ellis, 








Born, 


A.D. 






Died, 


A.D. 


1). 


a 


Henry Kllis, 








Born, 


A.D. 






Married, 


A.D. 






Hidith, daughter of 




9. 


D. 


Peter Ellis, " 








Born, 


A.D. 






Married, 


A.D. 






Ophelia, daughter of 





Earl. 



Cake. 



(Children of N. Atkinson.) 



9. A. Charles Atkinson, 

Born, A. D. 

9. B. Anne Atkinson, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Benjamin Wright. 

9. C. Barzillai B. Atkinson, 

Born, A.D. 

Married, A.D. 

Mary, daughter of Kelley. 

(Children of Judge Th. L. Smith.) 

9. A. Mary Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to David H. Mac A dam. 



242 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



9. B. Thomas L. Smith, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of Henry W. Smith.) 

9. A. Mary Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Nicholas L. Tilghman. 



9. B. Laura Smith, 

Born, 



A.D. 



9. C. Robert Marshall Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

(The tables of the Fourth Line, from 
Barclay White.) 



J 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



243 



TABLE XXVI. 



FIFTH LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF EICHAED SMITH, (fIFTH,) OF OTSEGO. 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, York* 

shire. 
Born, (circa) A. D. 1570. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A.D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Nov. 19, A. D. 1647. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bram- 

ham, 

Baptized, Aug. 15, A.D. 1626. 

Married, Feb. 25, A. D. 1653, 
Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough, York- 
shire. 

Died, A. D. 1688. 

4. Samuel Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, March 1, A. D. 1672. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Edmond Lov- 

ett, of Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania ; secondly, 
(s. p.,) Dorothea Gyles. 

Died, April 18, A. D. 1718. 

(Member of Assembly, N.J.) 



5. Richard Smith, of Green Hill, 

Born, July 5, A. D. 1699. 

Married, Aug. 20, A.D. 1719, 

Abigail, daughter of Thomas Rapier, 

of Sindersby, Yorkshire, 

England. 
Died, Nov. 9, A. D. 1751. 
(Member of Assembly for 20 

years.) 

6. Richard Smith, (fifth,) of "Smith 

Hall," Otsego, 
Born, Mar, 22, A. D. 1735. 
Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Hon. John 

Rodman. 
Died, A. D. 1803. 

(Member of the Continental 

Congress.) 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

7. A. Scammon Rodman Smith, 

Born, April 8, A.D. 1763. 
7. B. Richard Rodman Smith, 

Born, June 31, A.D. 1765. 
Married, A. D. 

Anne, daughter of Howell. 

Died, ' A. I). 



244 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



7. C. John Smith, 

Born, April 1, A. D. 1766. 

Died, A. D. 

7. D. Willet Smith, 

Born, Nov. 12, A. 1). 1767. 

Died, A. D. 

7. E. Rodman Smith, 

Died young. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of R. Rodman Smith.) 

8. A. Elizabeth Smith, 

Born, Dec. 30, A. D. 1796. 

Married, A. D. 

to William Coad, of Great 
Mills, St. Mary's County, 
Maryland. 



8. B. Margaret Howell Smith, 

Born, June 28, A.D. 17»8. 

8. C. Sarah Ann Smith, 

Born, Oct. 11, A.D. 1800. 

Married, June A.D. 1840. 
to Thomas Lloyd Whar- 
ton, of Philadelphia. 

Died, A. D. 1846. 

8. D. Mary Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

^ Died, A.D. 

8. E. Richard Howell Smith, 

Born, Aug. 17, A. D. 1806. 
Married, A.D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



245 



TABLE XXVII. 



FIFTH LINE. DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD SMITH, OF OTSEGO. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William Coad.) 



(Children of R. Howell Smith.) 



9. A. 



9. A. 



(Children of T. L. Wharto.i.) 

9. A. Lucy Wharton, 

Born, 



A.D. 1841. 



9. B. Frances Wharton, 

Born, A. D. 1843. 



246 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXVIII. 



FIRST FEMALE LINE. DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL SMITH, OF BBAMHAM. 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, (circa) A. D. 1570. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A.D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Nov. 19, A. D. 1647. 

3. RichaVd Smith, (second,) of Bramham, 

Baptized, Aug. 15, A.D. 1626. 

Married, Feb. 25, A.D. 1653, 

Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough, Yorkshire. 
Died, A. D. 1688. 

4. Daniel Smith, of Bramham, (Propri- 

etor, etc.,) 
Born, Nov. 14, A. D. 1665. 
Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Robert Murfiu, 

of Eaton ,Nottingham8hire. 
Died, Aug. 4, A. D. 1742. 

5. Daniel Smith, (second,) of Burlington, 

Born, A. D. 1696. 

Married, Oct. 17, A. D. 1719, 
Mary, daughter of Caspar Hoedt. 
Died, A. D. 1769. 

(Member of Assembly, New 
Jersey.) 



6. Sarah Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, Mar. 22, A. D. 1766, 

to James Pemberton, of 

Philadelphia. 
Died, Nov. 28, A. D. 1770. 

7. Mary Smith Pemberton, 

Born, Nov. 19, A. D. 1770. 

Married, May 13, A. D. 1790, 
to Anthony Morris, son of 
Sam'l Morris, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Died, Feb. 29, A. D. 1808. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Anthony Morris and Mary 
Smith Pemberton.) 

8. A. PhcBbe Pemberton Morris, 

Born, April 4, A.D. 1791. 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. Rebecca Wistar Morris, 

Born, Sept. 6, A. D. 1793. 

Married, A. D. 

to Charles J. Nourse. 

Died, A. D. 

8. C. James Pemberton Morris, 

Born, June 21, A.D. 1795. 

Married, A. D. 

Louisa, daughter of Gardiner 



GENEAIX)GICAB TABLES. 



247 



8. D. Louisa Peinberton Morris, 

Born, July 30, A. D. 1798. 
Married, A. D. 

to William Ohaderton. 
Died, A. D. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Charles J. Nourse.) 

9. A. Mary J. Nourse, 

Born, A. D. 

9. B. Caroline R. Nourse, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to B. Dulaney. 



9. C. Louisa Nourse, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Charles Forrest. 

9. D, E. Eosa Nourse, John Nourse, 



9. F. Charles J. Nourse, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Margaret, daughter of Kimble. 



2o0 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXX. 

SECONJ) FEMALE LINE. DRSCEXDAXTS OF DANIEL SMITH, OF BRAMHAM. DE- 
SCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SANSOM. 



1. Williiim Smith, of Bramhani, 

Born, (circa) A. 1), 1570. 
Married, A. D. 

JJied, A. 1). 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, :\Iay 1<S, A.D. 1593. 
Married, A. D. 

Died, Kov. 19, A.D. 1G47. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bramliam, 

Baptized, Aug. 15, A.D. 1()2(). 

Married,Feb. 25, A.D. 1(>53, 

Anne, daughter of William Yeates, 

of Alborough, Yorkshire. 
Died, A.D. 1688. 

4. Daniel Smith, of Bramham, (Propri- 

etor, etc.,) 
Born, Nov. 14, A.D. 1()()5. 
Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Robert Murtin, of 

Eaton, Nottinghamshire. 
Died, August 4, A. D. 1742. 

5. Katharine Smith, 

Born, A.D. 1711. 

Married, A.D. 1731, 

to William Callender, of 

Philadel])hia. 
Died, A.D. 1789. 



6. Hannah Callender, sole surviving 

child, 
Born, A. D. 1737. 

Married, A.D. 1762, 

to Samuel Sansom, of 

Philadelphia. 
Died, A. D. 



/. 



/. 



A. William Sansom, 

Born, A.D. 1763. 

Married, Dec. 18, A.D. 1788, 
Susannah, daughter of •John 
Head. 
Died, A. D. 

H. Sarah Sansom, 

Born, A.D. 1764. 

Married, A. D. 1787, 

to Elliston Perot. 
Died, A. D. 



/. 



('. Joseph Sansom, 
Born, 
Married, 
lieulali, daughter of 

Died, 



A.D. 1767 
A.D. 



A.D. 



7. D, E. Katharine, Samuel, 

Died young. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



251 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William Sansom.) 

8. A. Eliza Head Sansom, 

Born, Oct. u; A. D. 1789. 

Married, Mar. 1 4, A.D. 1 809, 
to George Vaux. 

Died, Jan. 20, A. B. 1870. 
8. B. William Hansom, 

Died young. 
S. C. Hannah 8ansom, 

Born, May 4, A. D. ISOll 

Died, June 1, A.D. 18()(). 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of George Vaux.) 

9. A. Frances Vaux, 

Born, April 20, A. D. 1810. 
Married, A. D. 

to 
Died, Jan. 27, A. D. 1870. 
9. B. William Sansom Vaux, 

Born, May 19, A.D. 1811. 
Married, Feb. 19, A.D. 1845, 
Emily, daughter of Frederic 
Graeff. 



9. C. Susan Vaux, 

Born, Jan. (>, A. D. 1813. 
Married, Nov. 26, A.D. 18:io, 
to William P. Cressou. 
9. D. Mary E. Vaux, 

"^Born, Aug. 17, A.D. 1814. 
Died, Aug. 27, A. D. 1844. 
\K E. Elizabeth Vaux, 

Born, Mar. 2:^, A.D. 181(). 
Married, Dec. (>, A. D. 1847, 
to N. Hicks Gndiam. 
9. F. Hannah Sansom Vaux, 

Born, Nov. 10, A. I). 1820. 
Married, June 14, A.D. 1848, 
to William P. Chandler. 
9. G. James Vaux, 

Died young. 
9. H. Emilv Vaux, 

Born, April 4, A. D. 182."). 
Died, Jan. :\ A.D. 18^1. 
9. I. Anna S. Vaux, 

Born, Nov. 10, A.D. 182r>. 
Died, June, A. I). 1854. 
9. K. George Vaux, 

Born, April ;50, A. D. 18:i2. 
Married, Oct. o, A.D. 1859, 
Sarah, daughter of I^evi Morri.s, of 
'' Harriton." 



252 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXXI. 

SECX)ND FEMALE LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL SMITH, OF BRAHHAM. Dl> 

SCENDANT8 OF SAMUEL 8ANS0M, CONTINUED.. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Wm. 8. Vaux.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of Wm. P. Cres.son.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of N. Hicks Graham.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of W. P. Chandler.) 
10. 1. 



10. 1. 



(Children of George Vaux. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



253 



TABLE XXXII. 



SECOND FEMALE LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL SMITH, OF BBAMHAM. — 

DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SANSOM, (B.) 



A.D. 

A. D. 1840. 

A.D. 
A.D. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Elliston Perot.) 
8. A. Francis Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of 
Morris. 
8. B. Sansora Perot, 

Born, 
Died, 
8. C. Hannah Perot, 

Born, 
Married, 

to Samuel B. Morris. 
8. D. Joseph Perot, 

Born, 
Married, 
Sarah, daughter of 

8. E. William S. Perot, 

Born, 
Married, 
Mary W., daughter of 
Poultney. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Francis Perot.) 

9. A. Elliston Perot, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Caroline, daughter of Corbit. 



A.D. 
A.D. 

, Morris. 

A.D. 
A.D. 



9. B. Thomas Morris Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Rebecca C, daughter of Siter. 
9. C. Sarah Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Edward H. Ogden. 

(Children of Samuel B. Morris.) 
9. A. Samuel B. Morris, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Lydia, daughter of 
9. B. Beulah Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Charles Rhoads, of Had- 
don field. 

9. C. Elliston P. Morris, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. I). 

(Children of Joseph Perot.) 
9. A. John Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 
9. B. Anna Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 



254 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



9. C. Joseph S. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A.D. 

SalHe, daughter of Lea. 

{). D. EUiston L. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

daughter of 
9. E. Hannah Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Galloway C. Morris. 

(Children of Wra. 8. Perot.) 
9. A. James P. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A.D. 1872. 

9. B. KSansom Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Sarah T., daughter of Siter. 

9. C. Sarah S. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Samuel Huston. 



9. D. Laetitia P. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Morris Hacker. 

9. E. Charles Poultney Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Knowles. 

9. F. Hannah Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Charles Richardson. 

9. G. Elizabeth W. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

9. H. Annie S. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 

9. I. Mary W. Perot, 

Born, A. D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



255 



TABLE XXXIII. 

SECX)ND FEMALE LINE. DESC^ENDANTS OF DANIEL SMITH, OF BKAMIIAM. DE- 
SCENDANTS OF SAMUEL 8AN80M, (B.) 

TENTH GENERATION. ' (C'liildreii of Saiiuiel B. Morris, second.) 

(Children of EUiston Perot, second.) jq j 

10. 1. 



(Children of T. Morris Perot.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of E. H. Ogden.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of Charles Rhoads.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of EUiston P. Morris.) 
10. 1. 



250 



OEKEALOOICAL TABLES. 



(C'hildren of Josef)li S. Perot.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of Samuel Huston.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of Elliston L. Perot.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of Morris Hacker.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of Galloway C. Morris.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of Charles P. Perot.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of Sansom Perot.) 



10. 1. 



(Children of Charles Richardson.) 
10. 1. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



257 



TABLE XXXIV. 

THIRD FEMALE LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SMITH, OF BRAMHAM. — DE- 
SCENDANTS OF MARY SMITH NOBLE. 



1. William Smith, of Bramhain, 

Born, near A. I). 1570. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A. D. 1593. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bram- 

ham, 
Baptized, Aug. 15, A. 1). 1626. 
Married, Feb. 25, A. D. 1653, 
Anne, daughter of William Yeates. 

4. Samuel Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, March 1, A. D. 1672. 

Married, A. D. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Edmond Lov- 
ett, of Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania ; secondly, 
(s. p.,) Dorothea Gyles. 

Died, 4th mo.* 18, A. D. 1718. 

5. Mary Smith, 

Born, 4th mo. 15, A. D. 1701. 

Married,2dmo.l6,A.D. 1719, 
to Joseph Noble, of Phila- 
delphia. 

Died, 8th mo. 5, A. D. 1733. 



* The fourth month, April, of the present reckon- 
ing, was the second month of the old style. The 
present date is " new style." The next, " old style." 

33 



6. A. Samuel Noble, 

Born, 5th mo. 25, A. D. 1720 
Married,l()mo.27, A.D. 1746, 
Lydia, daughter of Isaac Coo[)er. 
Died, 6th mo. 16, A. D. 1787. 

a. B. Mary Noble, 

Born, 3d mo. 31, A. D. 1722. 

Married, 3d mo. 19, A. D. 1743, 
in Philadelphia, to Samuel 
Wetherill, of Burlington. 

Died, 9th mo. 9, A.D. 1779. 

6. C, D, E, F. Joseph, Elizabeth, Rich- 
ard, Hannah, 
Died young. 

6. G. Martha Noble, 

Born, 12th mo. J 5, A. D. 1731. 
Died, A. D. 

6. H. Abigail Noble, 

Died young. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Samuel Noble.) 

7. A, B. Joseph Noble, Isaac Noble, 

Died young. 



258 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



7. C. Hannah Noble, 

Born, lOth mo. 30, A. D. 1752. 

Married, 6th mo. 7, A. D. 1774, 

. to William Norton, Junior. 

Died, 10th mo. 27, A. 1). 1795. 

7. D, E. Samuel Noble, William Noble, 

Died young. 
7. F. Richard Noble, 

Born, 4th mo. 2, A. D. 1760. 
Died, 8th mo. 28, A. D. 1824. 
7. G. Mary Noble, 

Died young. 
7. H. Samuel Noble, (second,) 

Born, 10th mo. 24, A. D. 1766. 

Married, 5th mo. 29, A.D. 1792, 

Elizabeth, daughter of Robert 

Tomkins; secondly, Sarah, 

daughter of Samuel Webster. 

Died, 6th mo. 29, A. D. 1843. 

7. I. Marmaduke Noble, 

Died young. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William Norton, Junior.) 

8. A. Samuel Norton, 

Born, 3d mo. 26, A.D. 1775. 
Died, 4th mo. 9, A. D. 1834. 



8. B. William Norton, 
Died young. 



(Children of Samuel Noble, second.) 
8. A. Eliza Noble, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. B. Hannah Noble, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. C. Lydia Noble, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

8. D. Joseph Noble, 

Born, 5th mo. 22, A. D. 1799. 
Died, 10th mo. 8, A. D. 1854. 
8. E. Charles Noble, M.D., 

Born, 10th mo. 1, A.D. IfeOl. 
Married,10th mo.29, A.D.1829, 
Mary, daughter of William Steven- 
son; secondly, Adeline, 
daughter of Milward. 

Died, A. D. 187 . 

8. F. Lydia Noble, 

Born, 10th mo. 20, A. D. 1803. 
Married, Dec. 29, A. D. 1825, 
to Thomas B. Longstreth. 
I 8. G. Samuel Webster Noble, 

Born, August 15, A. D. 1818. 
Married, Oct. 30, A. D. 1844, 
Elizabeth H., daughter of John 
Mather. 
8. H. Eichard Noble, 

Born, January 1, A. D. 18 . 



GEKEALOOICAI. TABLES. 



259 



TABLE XXXV. 



\ 



THIRD FEMALE LINE. — DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SMITH, OF BRAMHAM. 



9. 



9. 



9. 



NINTH GENERATION. ' 9. 

(Children of Dr. Chas. Noble.) 
9. A. William Stevenson Noble, 

Born, Dec. 7, A. D. 1832. 
Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Backus. 

Died, April 18, A. D. 1867. 
9. B. Charles Noble, Junior, 

Born, June 16, A. D. 1840. 
Married, April 27, A.D. 1870, 
Sallie, daughter of Helper. 

9. C. Mary K. Noble, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, May 21, A. D. 1871. 
9. D. Amanda Noble, 

Born, March 21, A. D. 1847. 
Married, Dec. 18, A.D. 1867, 
to Frederick Backus. 

(Children of Th. B. Longstreth.) 
9. A. Elizabeth Tomkins Longstreth, 

Born, Nov. 21, A. D. 1826. 
Married, A. D. 

to William Curtis Taylor. 
9. B. Sarah N. Longstreth, 9. 

Born, Jan. 11, A. D. 1829. 
Married, A. D. 

to Charles C. Longstreth. 
9. C. Margaret M. Longstreth, 9. 

Died young. 



9. 



9. 



D. Lydia Noble Longstreth, 

Born, Jan. 11, A.D. 1834. 
Married, A. D. 

to Thomas P. Rowlett. 

E. Rachel O. Longstreth, 

Born, Dec. 13, A. D. 1835. 
Married, A. D. 

to John L. Longstreth. 

F. Margaret M. Longstreth, 

Born, Feb. 11, A.D. 1838. 
Married, A. D. 

to Edwin F.Schoenberger. 

G. Mary B. Longstreth, 

Born, July 15, A. D. 1840. 
Married,4mo. A.D. 1873, 
to Benjamin Starr. 
H. Samuel N. Longstreth, 

Born, Feb. 11, A.D. 1843 
I. Morris Longstreth, M.D., 

Born, Feb. 24, A. D. 1846. 
Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Hastings. 

(Children of Samuel W. Noble.) 

A. Henry A. Noble, 

Born, Oct. 21, A. D. 1845. 
Married, A. D. 

Drusilla, daughter of Murray. 

B. Sarah Noble, 

Died young. 



260 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Wm. S. Noble.) 
10. 1. Frederick C. Noble. 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. William Noble. 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Maud Noble. 

Born, A. D. 



9. C. John M. Noble, 

Born, June 4, A. D. 1848. 
Died, Feb. 15, A. D. 1872. 

9. D. Samuel Noble, 

Born, Nov. 18, A. D. 1849. 

9. E. Clara Noble, 

Died young. 

9. F. Howard Noble, 

Born, Nov. 12, A. D. 1852. 

9. G. Lydia L. Noble, 

Died young. 

9. H. Franklin Noble, 

Born, June 17, A. D. 1855. 

9. I. Thomas L. Noble, 

Born, Nov. 24, A. D. 1857. 

9. K. Charles M. Noble, 

Born, Sept. 5, A. D. 1859. 

9. L. Mary T. Noble, 

Bom, June 29, A. D. 1861. 

9 M. Anna Noble, 

Born, Dec. 10, A. D. 1862. 



9. N. Elizabeth Noble, j (Children of Frederick Backus.) 

Born, Jan. 2, A. D. 1866. 10. 1. Charies N. Backus. 
Died young. ' . Born, A. D. 

; 10. 2. Helen Backus. 
j Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Adeline N. Backus. 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Charles Noble, Junior.) 
10. 1. Walter Noble. 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Bessie Noble. 

Born, A. D. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



201 



TENTH GENERATION, CONTINUED. 

(Children of William Curtis Taylor.) 

10. 1. Caroline Justice Taylor, 

• Born, 12tli mo. 81, A. D. 1850. 

10. 2. ' Helen Longstreth Taylor, 
Died young. 

10. 3. Rodney Longstreth Taylor, 

Born, 10th mo. 15, A. D. 1857. 

10. 4. Norton Longstreth Taylor, 

Born, 2d mo. 9, A.D. 1861. 

10. 5. Agnes Longstreth Taylor, 

Born, 5th mo. 9, A.D. 1865. 

(Children of Chas. C. Longstreth.) 

10. 1. Helen T. Longstreth, 

Born, 6th mo. 17, A. D. 1854. 

10. 2. Emily Longstreth, 
Died young. 

10. 3. Morris Longstreth, 

Born, 2d mo. 7, A. D. 1858. 

10. 4. Sidney E. Longstreth, 
Died young. 

10. 5. Joseph Longstreth, 

Born, 1st mo. 29, A. D. 1866. 

(Children of Th. P. Rowlett.) 

10. 1. Morris Longstreth Rowlett, 

Born, 5th mo. 16, A. D. 1856. 

10. 2. Howard L. Rowlett, 

Born, 9th mo. 7, A. D. 1859. 

10. 3. Helen L. Rowlett, 

Born, 2d mo. 2, A. D. 1865. 

(Child of John L. Longstreth.) 

10. 1. Edward T. Longstreth, 

Born, 9th mo. 20, A. D. 1872. 



(Children of E. F. Sehoenberger.) 
10. 1. Lydia L. Sehoenberger, 

Born, 3d mo. 27, A. D. 1864. 
10. 2. Frederick Sehoenberger, 

Died young, 
10. 3. Mary Sehoenberger, 

Born, 3d mo. 2d, A. D. 1868. 
10. 4. Carl Sehoenberger, 

Born, 2d mo. 21, A. D. 1871. 

(Children of Benjamin Starr.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of Dr. Morris Longstreth.) 
10. 1. 



(Children of Henry A. Noble.) 

10. 1. Caroline Noble, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 2. Helen Noble, 

Born, A. D. 



262 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXXVI. 

THIRD FEMALE LINE, (B.) — DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SMITH, OF BRAMHAM. DE- 
SCENDANTS OF MARY SMITH NOBLE. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Samuel Wetherill.) 
7. A. Thomas Wetherill, 

Boru, A. D. 1744. 

Died, A. D. 1701. 

7. B. Mary Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 1740. 

Married,ethmo.ll, A.D. 1778, 
to Isaac Jones, of Philadel- 
phia. 
Died, A. D. 1823. 

7. C. Joseph Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 1748. 

Married, A. D. 1789, 

Mercy, daughter of J. Ridgway, 

of Egg Harbor. 

Died, A. D. 1820. 

7. D. Elizabeth Wetherill, 

Born, A.D. 1752. 

Died, A.D. 1799. 

7. E. Samuel Wetherill, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 1755. 

Died, A. D. 1802. 

7. F. Ann Wetherill, 

Died young. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Isaac Jones.) 

8. A. Martha Jones, 

Died young. 



8. B. Samuel W. Jones, 

Born, 9th mo. 8, A.D. 1781. 
Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Robert G)e. 
Died,(s.p.,)Nov.7, A.D. 1873. 

8. C. Mary N. Jones, 

Born, August 28, A. D. 1784. 
Married, April 8, A.D. 1801, 

to Stephen W. Smith, of 

Salem, N. J. 
Died, A.D. 

8. D. Elizabeth W. Jones, 

Born, June 5, A. D. 1789. 
Married, May 1, A. D. 1816, 
to Ebenezer Levick, of Kent 
County, Delaware. 

(Children of Joseph Wetherill.) 

8. A. Mary Wetherill, 
Died young. 

8. B. Samuel E. Wetherill, 

Born, July 11, A. D. 1792. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of Walter Wilson ; 

secondly, Ann, daughter of 

Walter Wilson. 

Died, February 1, A. D, 1863, 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



263 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Stephen W. Smith.) 

9. A. Mary Smith, 

Died young. 

9. B. Hannah J. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Samuel Sheppard, of Salem 

County, N. J. 
Died, (s. p.,) A. D. 

9. C. Sarah E. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to William H. Rhodes, of 
Newport, R. I. 
Died, Nov. 21, A.D. 1876. 

9. D. Samuel Smith, 
Died young. 

9. E. Isaac J. Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Martha H., daughter of Chase. 
Died, A. D. 



9. 


F. 


James W. Smith, 








Born, 


A.D. 






Married, 


A.D. 






Harriet, daughter of James H 






Bumet. 


• 






Died, 


A.D. 


9. 


G. 


Elizabeth J. Smith, 








Born, 


A.D. 






Died, 


A.D. 


9. 


H. 


Thomas Smith, 








Born, 


A.D. 


1 




Married, 


A.D. 


' 




daughter of 




1 




Died, (s. p.,) 


A.D. 


, 9. 


L 


Charles W. Smith, 








Born, 


A.D. 






Married, 


A.D. 


1 
1 




Sally, daughter of G 


r. Lambert. 






Died, 


A.D. 


9. 


K. 


Chamless Smith, 








Born, 


A.D. 


9. 


L. 


Clement H. Smith. 




1 




Born, 


A.D. 






Married, 


A.D. 






Mary C, daughter of Dr. S. Em 






len, of Philadelphia. 


9. 


M 


. Maiy Anna Smith, 
Died young. 





264 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXXVII. 

THIRD FEMALE LINE, (B.) — DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SMITH, OF BRAMHAM. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Ebenezer Levick.) 
9. A. Joseph W. Levick, 

Died young. 
9. B. Samuel J. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Eleanor, daughter of Caleb Foulke, 
of Richland, Bucks Co., 
Pennsylvania ; secondly, 
Susanna M., daughter of 
Charles Mather, of Wood- 
lawn, Montgomery Co. 
9. C. William M. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Hannahj daughter of Richard 
Moore, of Richland, Bucks 
County, Pennsylvania. 
Died, June 10, A. D. 1874. 
9. D. Richard Levick, 

Died young. 
9. E. James Jones Levick, M. D., Phila- 
delphia, 
Born, A. D. 

9. F. Mary J. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

0. G. Elizabeth R. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 



9. H. Anna Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, Jan. 3, A. D. 1854, 
to J. Lewis Crew, of Rich- 
mond, Va. 

Died, June 19, A. D. 1872. 

(Children of Samuel R. Wetherill.) 

9. A. Ann Eliza Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 

9. B. Mary Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 

9. C. Sarah Jane Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 

9. D. Joseph Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Hannah, daughter of Edward 
Winslow, of Buffalo. 

TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William H. Rhodes.) 

10. 1. Mary J. Rhodes, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to J. Spencer, of Penlyn. 
10. 2. Hannah Rhodes, 

Died young. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



265 



10. 3. Emily Ehodes, 

Died young. 

10. 4. Elizabeth S. Rhodes, 

Born, A. 1). 

(Children of Isaac J. Smith.) 

10. 1. N. Holland Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of G. Knorr. 

10. 2. Helen Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of James W. Smith.) 

10. 1. James Willis Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Louisa, daughter of Carman 

10. 2. Adela E. Smith, 

Died young. 
10. 3. Rosalie Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

(CTiildren of Charles W. Smith.) 

10. 1. Ellen Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D, 

to Sylvester Welsh, of 
Kentucky. 



(Children of Samuel J. Levick.) 

10. 1. Jane F. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Edwin A. Jackson, of 
Richland. 
10. 2. Lewis J. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

Married,Sept.5,A.D. 1876, 
Maty, daughter of Charles d'lnvil- 
liers. 
10. 3. CTiarles M. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 4. Samuel J. Levick, Junior, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Anna, daughter of J. Bullock. 
10. 5. William E. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 6. J. Morris Levick, 

Died young. 



266 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXXVIII. 

THIRD FEMALE LINE, (B.) — ^DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL SMITH, OF BBAMHAM. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Wm. M. Levick.) 
10. 1. Sarah L. Levick, 

Died young. 
10. 2. Anna F. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Elizabeth J. Levick, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of J. Lewis Crew.) 
10. 1. Elizabeth Crew, 

Died young. 
10. 2. Mary L. Crew, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 3. Anna L. Crew, Junior, 

Born, A. D. 

10. 4. Margaret M. Crew, 

Died young. 

(Children of Joseph Wetherill.) 
10. 1. Samuel Edward Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 



10. 2. Jane Wetherill, 

Born, 

10. 3. Mary Wetherill, 

Born, 



A.D. 



A.D. 



10. 4. Charles H. Wetherill, 

Born, A. D. 



ELEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of John Spencer.) 
11. 1. Laura Spencer, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 2. William Spencer, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 3. Jesse Spencer, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 4. Emily Spencer, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of N. Holland Smith.) 



IL 1. 



(ChUdren of J. Willis Smith.) 
11. 1. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



267 



(Children of Sylvester Welsh.) 
11. 1. 



(Children of Samnel J. Leviek, Junior.) 

11. 1. Anna L. Leviek, 

Born, A. D. 

11. 2. Florence Leviek, ^ 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Lewis J. Leviek.) 



11. 1. 



268 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XXXIX. 



FOURTH AND FIFTH FEMALE LINES. — DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD SMITH, (THIRD,) 

OF BRAMHAM. 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, near A. D. 1570. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A. D. 1593. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bram- 

ham, 
Baptized, Aug. 15, A. D. 1626. 
Married, Feb. 25, A. D. 1653, 
Anne, daughter of William Yeates. 

4. Richard Smith, (third,) M.D., of 

Bramham, 
Born, 2d mo. 25, A. D. 1674. 
Married, A. D. 

Anne, daughter of Marshall. 

Died, A. D. 1750. 

(Member of King's Council.) 

FIFTH GENERATION. ' 

5. 1. Richard Smith, (fourth,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

Haiinah, daughter of Peak. 

Died, A.D. 



5. 2. James Smith, 
Born, 
Married, 



A.D. 
A.D. 



5. 3. Rachel Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Dr. John Pole, of Brattle- 
hay, Somerset.* 
Died, A. D. 

5. 4. William Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

5. 5. Jonathan Smith, M.D., 

Born, A. D. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Richard Smith, fourth.) 

6. A. Rachel Smith, (second,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to William Coxe. 
Died, A. D. 

(Children of James Smith.) 
6. A. William Smith, 

Born, A.D. 

6. B. Richard Smith, 

Born, A. D. 

(Children of Dr. John Pole.) 
G. A. Anna Pole, 

Born, 3d mo. 22, A. D. 1737. 
Married, 1 1th mo. A. D. 1761 , 

to James Bringhurst. 
Died, 3d mo. 5, A. D. 1777. 



Or, Bustluhay, Wivelscombe, Somerset. 



OENEALOGKUL TABLES. 



2(>9 



6. B. John Pole, 

Born, 11th mo. 8, A. D. 1738. 

Died, 4th mo. A. D. 1757, 
at St. Malo's, France. 
6. C, D, E. Grace Pole, Elizabeth Pole, 

Mary Pole, 

All died in infancy. 
«. F. Edward Pole, 

Born, 3d mo. 29, A.D. 1747. 

Married, mo. A. D. 
Mary, daughter of Warner. 

Died, 10th mo. 17, A. D. 1815. 
«. G. Richard Pole, 

Born, 5th mo. 3, A. D. 1749. 

Died, (s. p.,) mo. A.D. 
6. H. Ann Pole, 

Born, 9th mo. 2, A. D. 1751. 

Died, mo. A. D. 

6. I. Thomas Pole, M.D., of Bristol, 

England, 
Born, 10th mo. 13, A. D. 1753. 
Married,10th mo.l5, A.D. 1784, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Barrett. 
Died, mo. A. D. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William Coxe.) 

7. A. William S. Coxe, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, mo. A. D. 

daughter of Bar- 

baroux. 

Died, mo. A. D. 

7. B. Richard S. Coxe, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, mo. A. D. 
Mary, daughter of Griffiths. 

Died, mo. A. D. 



7. C. Elizabeth Coxe, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 
to William McMurtrie. 

Died, • A.D. 

7. D. Maria Coxe, 

Born, A. D. 



7. E. Margaret Coxe, 
Born, 

7. F. Emily Coxe, 
Born, 

7. G. Harriet Coxe, 
Born, 

7. H. Anne Coxe, 
Born, 

7. I. Daniel Coxe, 
Born, 



A.D. 



A.D. 



A.D. 



A.D. 



A.D. 



(Children of James Bringhurst.) 

7. A. John Bringhurst, 

Born, 4th mo. 25, A.D. 17^>4. 

Married, A.D. 1787, 

Mary, daughter of Lawtou. 

Died, June 18, A. D. 1800. 

7. B. James Bringhurst, (second,) 

Boru^ 3d mo. 4, A. D. 17G6. 

Married, A.D. 1789, 

Ra(:hel, daughter of Bettle; 

secondly, Ann Carroll. 

Died, 3d mo. 4, A.I). 1818. 



270 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



7. C. Joseph Bringhurst, 

Boru, 10th mo. 6, A. D. 1767. 

Married, 7thmo.ll,A.D. 1799, 
Deborah, daughter of Ziba Ferris. 

Died, A. D. 1834. 

7. D. Jonathan Bringhurst, 

Born, 5th mo. 8, A. D. 1769. 

Died, 11th mo. 9, A.D. 1818, 
(unmarried.) 
7. E. Edward Bringhurst, 

Born, 12th mo. 16, A. D. 1770. 

Died, 9th mo. 26, A. D. 1794, 
(unmarried.) 
7. F. Rachel Bringhurst, 

Died an infant. 

(Children of Edward Pole.) 

7. A. Mary Pole, 

Bom, 2d mo. 15, A. D. 1775. 

Died, A. D. 

(unmarried.) 
7. B. Ann Pole, 

Died young. 
7. C. Thomas Pole, 

Born, 10th mo. 26, A. D. 1778. 

Died, A. D. 

(unmarried,) 
7. D. John Pole, 

Born, 12th mo. 4, A. D. 1780. 

Died, A. D. 

(unmarried.) 
7. E, F. Edward, (first,) Edward, (sec- 
ond,) 

Died young. 
7. G. Edward Pole, Junior, 

Born, 3d mo. 1st, A. D. 1786. 

Married, A. D. 

Died, A. D. 



7. H. Joseph, 

Died young. 
7. I. Rachel Smith Pole, 

Born, Ist mo. 8, A. D. 1792. 

Died, A. D. 

(Children of Thomas Pole.) 
7. A. John Pole, 

Born, 7th mo. A. D. 1785. 
Died, 11th mo. 15, A. D. 1803. 
7. B. Mary Ann Pole, 

Born, 7th mo. 5, A. D. 1786. 
Married, 10th mo. 1, A.D. 1807, 

to Francis Martin Fowler. 
Died, A. D. 

7. C, D. Thomas, (first,) Thomas, (sec- 
ond,) 
Died young. 
7. E. Rachel Pole, 

Born, 2d mo. 14, A.D. 1791. 
Married, 9th mo. 10, A.D. 1811, 
to Nehemiah Duck, of Bristol . 
7. F. Elizabeth Pole, 

Born, A. D. 

7. G. William Marshall Pole, 

Born, A. D. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of William S. Coxe.) 

8. A. 



OfaTEALOGICAL TABLES. 



271 



(Children of Richard S. Coxe.) 
8. A. 



(Children of Wm. McMurtrie.) 



8. A. 



(Child of John Bringhuret.) 

8. A. John Bringhuret, Junior, 

Born, A. D. 1789. 

Died, A. D. 

(unmarried.) 



(Children of James Bringhuret, second.) 

8. A. Joseph Bringhuret, (second,) 

Born, 2d mo. 18, A. D. 1790. 
Married, 8th mo. 6, A.D, 1811, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Evans. 
Died, A. D. 

8. B. James Bringhuret, (third,) 

Born, 4th mo. 4, A. D. 1792. 
Married. 4th mo. 28, A. D. 1818, 
Rebecca, daughter of Ryan. 

Died, A. D. 

8. C. Sarah Ann Bringhuret, 

Born, 7th mo. 3, A.D. 1794. 
Married, Ist mo. 24, A. D. 1821, 

to William Gregory. 
Died, A. D. 

8. D. Eliza Bringhuret, 

Born, 11th mo. 8, A. D. 1802. 
Married, A. D. 1823, 

to William Maddock. 

8. E. Mary Bringhuret, 

Born, 10th mo. 14, A. D. 1805. 
Married, 9th mo. 21 , A.D. 1835, 
to William W. Loiigstreth. 
8. F. John Bringhuret, (third,) 

Born, 10th mo. 12, A. D. 1810. 
Married, A. D. 

Rebecca, daughter of Greaves. 

(Children of Joseph Bringhuret.) 

8. A. William W. Bringhuret, 

Born, 9th mo. 25, A. D. 1800. 
Died, 8th mo. 14, A. D. 1818. 

8. B. Mary D. Bringhuret, 

Born, 7th mo. 4, A. D. 1806. 
Married, A. D. 

to Edward Moody. 



272 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



8. C. Joseph Bringhurst, (third,) 



(Children of Nehemiah Duck.) 



Born, 9th mo. 26, A. D. 1807. 8. A. Elizabeth Duck, 

Born, 



8. B. Rachel Pole Duck, 

Born, A. D. 



8. D. Edward Bringhurst, 

Born, oth mo. 22, A. D. 1809. 

Married, A. D. 18 , 

Sarah, daughter of Shipley. 

8. E. Ziba Ferris Bringhurst, 

Born, 9th mo. 19, A.D. 1812. 8. C. Amelia Duck, 

(Children of Edward Pole, Junior.) 

8. A. 



A.D. 



Born, 



A.D. 



(Children of Francis M. Fowler.) 

8. A. Henry Fowler, 

Born, A. D. 

8. B. Hannah Fowler, 

Born, A. D. 

8. C. Francis Fowler, 

Born, A. D. 

8. D. John Pole Fowler, 

Born, A. D. 

8. E. Marianne Fowler, 

Born, A. D. 

8. F. Elizabeth Fowler, 

Born, A. D. 



8. D. John N. Duck, 
Born, 



A.D. 



8. E. Elizabeth Amelia Duck, 

Born, A. D. 

8. F. Catherine Poulson Duck, 
Born, A. D. 



NINTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Joseph Bringhurst, second.) 

9. A. Samuel Bringhurst, 

Born, 12th mo. 21, A. D. 181?. 

9. B. Thomas Bringhurst, 

Born, 8th mo. 10, A. D. 1814. 
Married, A. D. 

9. C. Joseph Bringhurst, (fourth,) 

Born, 11th mo. 11, A. D. 1816. 

9. D. William Bringhurst, 

Born, 11th mo. 18, A. D. 1818. 
Married, A. D. 

9. E. Elizabeth Bringhurst, 

Born, 10th mo. 9, A. D. 1820. 
Married, A. D. 18 , 

to Azariah Corson. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



273 



9. F. John Bringhurst, 

Born, 9th mo. 25, A. D. 1823. 
Married, A. D. 

daughter of March ; 

secondly, Rebecca, daughter 
of WilUams. 

9. G. Susan Bringhurst, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Milton Burns, New York. 
9. H. Anna Bringhurst, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Adam Stayley. 

(Children of James Bringhurst, third.) 
9. A. James Bringhurst, (fourth,) 

Born, 2d mo. 24, A.D. 1819. 

9. B. Hannah Bringhurst, 

Born, 2d mo. 13, A. D. 1821. 

9. C. Sarah Bringhurst, 

Born, 9th mo. 27, A. D. 1823. 

(Children of William Gregory.) 
9. A. Rachel B. Gregory, 

Bom, 1st mo. 20, A. D. 1823. 



• t 



(Children of William Maddock.) 

9. A. Anna Maddock, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Samuel Baugh. 

9. B. Mary Maddock, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to Edward Crippen. 



9. C. William Maddock, 




Born, 


A.D. 


Died, 


A. D. 18 


9. D. John Maddock, 




Bom, 


A. D. 18 


Married, 


A.D. 



9. E. Edward Maddock, 

Born, A. D. 



(Children of Wra. W. Longstreth.) 

9. A. Joseph Longstreth, 

Born, A. D. 1828. 

Married,llmo.29,A.D. 1849, 

Sarah, daughter of Edwin Atlee. 

9. B. William Longstreth, 

Born, 4th mo. A. D. 1^32. 
1^ Married, 11 mo. 13, A. D. 1866, 

Ada, daughter of J. T. Smith. 

9. C. Margaret Longstreth, 

Born, Ist mo, 12, A. D. 1835. 

Married, 10th mo. 7, A.D. 1857, 
to Horace J. Smith, of 
George's Hill, Philadelphia. 



274 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



(Children of John Bringhurst, third.) 

9. A. Mary Bringhurst, 

Born, A. D. 18 

Married, A. D. 

to M. Dawson Evans. 

9. B. William Bringhurst, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

9. C. Rebecca Bringhurst, 

Born, A. D. 



9. 



(Children of Edward Bringhurst.) 
A. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 275 



27G 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



TABLE XL. 

DESCENDANTS OF EMANUEL SMITH, OF BKAMHAM. DESCENDANTS OF GEO. EYRE, 

OF BURLINGTON. 



1. William Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, near A. D. 1570. 

2. Richard Smith, of Bramham, 

Baptized, May 18, A. D. 1593. 

3. Richard Smith, (second,) of Bramham, 

Baptized, Aug. 15, A. D. 1626. 

4. Emanuel Smith, of Bramham, 

Born, A. D. 1670. 

Married, A. D. 

Mary, daughter of G. Willis. 
Died, A.D. 1720. 

5. Mary Smith, (second daughter,) 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 

to George Eyre. 

6. Manuel Eyre, 

Born, A. D. 

Married, A. D. 1761, 

Mary, daughter of Eyre. 

Died, November 1, A. D..1805. 

SEVENTH GENP:KATI0N. 

(Ciiildren of Manuel Eyre.) 

7. A. Mary Eyre*, 

Born, June 8, A. D. 1762. 

Married, Aug. 4, A. D. 1788, 
to Isaac Coats; secondly, to 
Thomas Robinson. 

Died, Dec. 19, A. D. 1833. 



7. B. Hannah Eyre, 
Died young. 

7. C. George Eyre, 

Died young. 

7. D. Lydia Eyre, 

Born, July 28, A. D. 1767. 
Married, Jan. 8, A. D. 1794, 

to Ealph Hunt. 
Died, Feb. A. D. 1831. 

7. E. Samuel Eyre, 
Died young. 

7. F. Elizabeth Eyre, 

Born, January 5, A. D. 1771. 
Married, A. D. 

to Quantrell, (or 

Quandrill.) 
Died, Sept. 12, A.D. 1816. 

7. G. Sarah Eyre, 

Born, October 4, A. D. 1772. 

7. H. Esther Eyre, 

Born, March 
Died young. 

7. I. Ann Eyre, 
Born, 
Married, 
to 



A. D. 1774. 



A. D. 1775. 
A.D. 

Little. 



Died, October 3, A. D. 1855. 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



277 



7. K. Manuel Eyre, Junior, 

Born, February 1, A. 1). 1777. 

Married, Dec. 1, A. D. 1802, 

Juliet, daughter of Phillips; 

secondly, July 10, A.D. 1806, 

Anne Louisa, daughter of 

Connelly. 
Died, February 9, A. D. 1845. 

7. L, M, N. Benjamin, Harriet, Clarissa, 

Died young. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

(Children of Manuel Eyre, Junior.) 

8. A. Juliet Phillips Eyre, 

Born, April 29, A.D. 1807. 

Died, July A. D. 1825. 

8. B. Mary Eyre, 

Born, Nov. 6, A. D. 1808. 

Married, A. D. 

to Robert Eglesfeld Griffith, 
M.D. 

Died, July 17, A.D. 1873. 
8. C. Manuel Eyre, (third,) 

Died young. 
8. D. John Connelly Eyre, 

Born, Sept. 27, A. D. 1811. 

Died, October 3, A. D. 1849. 
8. E. Anne Connelly Eyre, 

Born, Sept. 24, A. D. 1813. 

Died, January 21, A.D. 1844. 



8. F. Harriet Eyre, 

Born, Feb. 13, A.D. 1816. 
Married, A. D. 

to John Ashhurst. 
8. G. Ellen Eyre, 

Born, Dec. 25, A. D. 1817. 
Married, A. D. 

to Charles Bell Gibson, M.D. 
8. H. Manuel Eyre, (third,) 

Born, Dec. 18, A.D. 18J9. 
Married, A. D. 

Eliza, daughter of Painter. 

8. I. Mahlon Dickerson Eyre, 

Born, April 13, A. D. 1821. 
Married, A. D. 

Isabella Olivia C, daughter of 

Smyth. 
8. K. Wilson Eyre, 

Born, April 15, A. D. 1823. 
Married, A. D. 

Louisa Lincoln, daughter of 
Lear. 
8. L. Virginia Eyre, 

Born, June 1, A. D. 1825. 
Married, A. D. 

to Manning Kennard. 
8. M. Richard Also}) Eyre, 
Died young. 



278 



GENKALOGICAL TABMCS. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

PAOE. 

Br&mham and Elfurd — Origio of the Family — General description of Bramham and 
Ejlford — ^E^ly histor^r — Affinity with other families inferred from similarity of 
araia, 7-17 



CHAPTER II. 

—An eatly and rare edition of the Scriptures — Short aocount of this 
I translators — Family record entered therein \>y the second Richard 

17-21 



CHAPTER III. 

t Smith of Bramham — Outline of his bii^raphy — Specimen of hia 
r to a. priest of the E:itabl!:jhed Church — liocorJd of the blrUu oi' 
21-29 



CHAPTER IV. 

' home — The motives and prime movers of the emigration of the 
!nte and charters of the Duke of York and Berkeley for AmLTiciui 
Frieiiils" purcha.se the territories of Berkeley — They ieeue a Consti- 
eml aiid admirable character — Ricliard Smith (the t>ccond) one of its 

29-40 

(279) 



280 TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER V. 

PAGE. 

From the old home to the new — The eldest son of Richard Smith (the second) sails in 
the Kent as pioneer of the family — Landing of the Quakers at Chygoe's Island — 
Survey for a town — The friendliness of the Indians — John Smith allotted number 
nine of the Burlington town lots — Arrival of the Murfin family, of A. Morris and T. 
Rapier — First impressions of the settlers, ....... 40-61 



CHAPTER VI. 

Settlement — Arrival of Samuel Jenings — First assembling of the Legislature of New Jer- 
sey — ^Their wise laws — Sketch of the Indian character, mode of government, etc., 51-59 



CHAPTER VII. 

Peaceful days — Settlement of the Rancocas — Arrival of W. Cooper, T. Lloyd and the 
brothers Bacon — Early Provincial legislation — Arrival of Daniel, Joseph, Emanuel 
and Deborah Smitli — Description of the mansion of Daniel Smith, in Burlington — 
Daniel Smith elected to the Assembly — Marries Mary Murfin — Her character — Mar- 
riages of Joseph and Emanuel Smith — Arrival of Samuel and Richard Smith — 
They are chosen members of the Council and Assembly — Their characters and oc- 
cupations, . 59-69 



CHAPTER VIII. 

A period of disturbance — A prelude of the Revolution — Beginning of troubles in New 
Jersey, by the appointment of J. Bass to supersede Gov. Hamilton — Arrival of J^ 
Logan — His lineage and character — Resumption of the rights of government in New 
Jersey by the Crown — S. Jenings and L. Morris appointed on the first Royal Coun- 
cil — Oppressive legislation of England — Arrival of Lord Cornbury — Samuel Jenings 
elected Speaker of the Assembly — The Assembly remonstrate with Cornbury on his 
tyrannical conduct in the government — His reply and their rejoinder, . . 69-85 



CHAPTER IX. 

Help from the Fatherland — The English proprietors unite with the New Jersey Assembly 
in a petition to Queen Anne against the usurpations and tyranny of Cornbury — ^The 
Queen removes Cornbury from the government, and appoints Lord Lovelace Gov- 
ernor — Death and will of Samuel Jenings, 85-91 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 281 



CHAPTER X. 

PAGE. 

Triumph of liberty and right — Death of Lord Lovelace — The Lieutenant-Governor and 
Council continue the oppressive course of Cornbury — On an address from the Assem- 
bly, the Queen removes eight members of the Council — Capture of Port Royal by the 
combined British and American forces — Failure of the attack on Montreal — The 
Assembly and expurgated Council remove the disabilities of the Quakers — Death of 
Queen Anne, and accession of George I. — Contumacy of Speaker Coxe and other 
members of the Assembly — They are expelled — Dr. Richard Smith appointed to the 
King's Council — Col. Lewis Morris appointed Governor, .... 91-99 



CHAPTER XL 

The fifth generation — Some account of I he fifth generation of the family, the first genera- 
tion born in America — Children of Daniel and Emanuel Smith — Samuel Smith mar- 
ries Elizabeth, daughter of the Hon. Edmund Lovett — His children — Children of 
Dr. Richard Smith — Rol)ert Smith, (Judge of the Court of Common Pleas,) marries 
Elizabeth Bacon — Katharine Smith marries William Callender, of Barbadoes — 
Character of W. Callender — Richard Smith, of Green Hill; his character and 
obituary in the Pennsylvania Gazette — His will — Marriages of the children of Dr. 
Richard Smith, 99-104 



CHAPTER XII. 

The Quaker and the Indian — The meml)ers of the " New Jersey Society for Helping the 
Indians" — Its objects and plans — They are carried into effect by the legislation of the 
Assembly of New Jersey — The Government purchases lands of Benjamin Springer, 
formerly of Richard Smith and Benjamin Moore, and sets them apart as a reservation 
for the Indians, south of the Raritan — It purchases the claims of the Indians north 
of the Raritan — Anecdote of the old French war — Anecdote of Teedyuscung — Life 
of the Indians at Brotherton — Their emigration from New Jersey — The Government 
purchases their rights of hunting and fishing, ...... 104-115 



CHAPTER XIII. 

The sixth generation — Some account of the sixth generation, their marriages, etc. — Daniel 
Smith, Jr., Surveyor-General of New Jersey — His character — Character of Samuel 
Smith, SecTetary of Council and Treasurer of New Jersey — His valuable history of 
the Province — John Smith, member of Assembly and Justice of the Peace in Penn- 
sylvania, marries Hannah, daughter of the Hon. James Logan — Removes to New 
Jersey, and is appointed to the King's Council — His character — William Lovett 



282 TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Smith, of Bramhara, marries a descendant of Governor Jenings — Richard Smith (tlie 
fifth) — His territory at Otsego— Chosen Treasurer of New Jersey — Is elected to the 
first and second Continental Congress — Is appointed Secretary of Congress — Signs the 
issues of the public money — Sketch of Burlington life before the Revolution — Sim- 
plicity of Quaker manners and government — The "Friends," nevertheless, shown to 
be men of high cultivation, . . . . . • . . . . 115-127 

CHAPTER XIV. 

John Smith's Journal, with comments — Glimpse of Stenton and its inhabitants — Slavery 
in the Quaker community — The " White Slaves," or redemptioners — Pirates and 
privateers — Dress of " Friends" at this |)eriod — Deaths of James Ijogan and Richard 
Smith, of Green Hill — Deaths and obituaries of John Smith and Hannah Logan 
Smith, 127-166 

CHAPTER XV. 

Seventh generation — The Revolution — The seventh generation enumerated — Outbreak of 

the Revolution, 166-169 

CHAPTER XVI. 

Revolutionary diary of Margaret Hill Morris, 169-184 

CHAPTER XVII. 
Recollections of Deborah Logan, 184-193 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

Marriage and obituary notices — Stenton — The foundera of New Jersey — Genealogical 

tables, ............. 193-278 



INDEX OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 



u 

u 



Aldithley, Sir Adam de, 
Alexander, James, 
Allen, William, Chief Justice, 
Allinson, Mary, . 

Samuel, 

Samuel J., . 

William, 
Altham, James Annesley, Lord, 
Annesley, Richard, 
Andr6, Major, 

Andros, Gov. Sir Edmund, . 
Aquawaton, Chief, 
Armitt, John, 
Arnold, Gen., 
Aspden, Mr., 
Auckland, Lord, 
Bacon, Elizabeth, 



PAGE 

9 
. 160 

160, 161 
. 115 

106, 115 
104, 108, 112, 113 

. 115 
. 142 
. 142 
. 189 
. 40 
. 109 

131, 160 

. 191 

. 128 

. 186 

63, 100, 115 



U 



<i 



Sir Francis, Lord St. Alban's, . 63 



« 
n 



Judge John, 
Sir Nathaniel, . 
Nathaniel, (2d,) 
Nathaniel, (3<1,) 
Sir Nicholas, 
Hon. Samuel, 
Badger, Parson, . 
Barclay, John, 

" Robert, . 
Bartram, John, . 
Bass, Jeremiah, . 
Beale, Paul, 
Belcher, Gov. Jona'n, 124, 136, 139, 143, 

151, 159, 160 

Benezet, Anth., . . 135, 142, 146, 150 

" Joyce, . . . . .154 

'* Stephen, . . . 150, 155 



. 63, 100 

. 63 

. 63 

. 63 

11, 63, 100 

62, 63, 100 

190 

94 

94 

134 

70 

21 



Benson, Justice, . 

" Rob't, Lord Bingley, 
Berkeley, Lord, . . 31-33 
Bernard, Gov., . 
Bingley, Lane-Fox, Lord, 
Black, William, . 
Bond, Dr., . 
Bonner, Bishop, . 
Boscawen, Admiral, 
Bound, John, 
Bowne, Samuel, . 
Brainerd, Missionary, . 
Bringhurst, Edward, . 

Anna Pole, 

James, 

John, 

John, (2d,) 

Jonathan, . 

Joseph, 

Rachel, 
Brock, Judge, 
Brooke, Mr., 
Brown, Henry Armitt, 
Bruce, King Robert, . 
Budd, Thomas, . 
Burgoyne, Gren., . 
Burling, Ixlward, 
Sarah, . 
Dr. S., . 
Burnet, Bishop, . 

" Gov. William, 
BylHnge, Edward, 3:}-38, 40, 41, 51, 60-63, 

69 
Cadwallader, Gen., . . . .190 
Callender, Hannah, . 116, 120, 152, 167 

283 



« 
« 
« 
« 
X 
<( 



« 
« 



PAOK 

. 21 

13 

35, 41, 51 

108, 109 
. 11 

129, 131 
. 160 
. 20 
. 139 
. 32 
. 147 
. 112 
. 168 
. 116 
116, 120, 167, 168 

. 168 
. 168 
. 168 
. 168 
. 168 
. 129 
. 130 
. 195 
. 71 
42-44, 58 
. 189 
. 147 

100, 115 
. 181 
. 97 
. 97 



284 



INDEX OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 





PAGE 






PAGE 


Callender, Katharine Smith 


, 115, 120, 121, 


Coxe, Harriet, 




. 167 




128, 152 158 


" Margaret, . 




. 167 


William, . 


. 100, 120, 135 


" Maria, 




. 167 


Calvin, Bartholomew S., 


. 112, 113 


" Rachel Smith, . 




116, 167 


" Stephen,. 


. 112 


" Richard S., 




. 167 


Carpenter, Samuel, 


. 90, 153 


'• Samuel, 




. 99 


Carteret, Sir George, . 


31-33, 35 


" William S., 


. 116, 


120, 167 


Gov. Philip, . 


. 32 


" WiUiara S., Jr., 




. 167 


Cathrall, Edward, 


. 104, 135, 150 


Cowtlially, Somervile of. 




. 71 


Cedric, the Saxon, 


9 


Crips, John, 




. 43 


Chalkley, Thomas, 


. 125, 135 


Croghaii, George, 




. 109 


Champion, Matthew, . 


. 48 


Crosby, Thomas, 




. 140 


Cheyney, Edith, . 


. 187 


Curdy, William, . 




. 127 


Chubb, N., 


. 144, 145 


Davis, Mr., 




. 186 


Churchman, John, 


. 146 


Delany, Sharp, . 




. 176 


Chygoe, Sachejii, 


. 40, 121 


Derby, Stanleys, Earls of, 




10, 15 


Clarendon, Earl of, 


72, 83 


" Thomas Stanley, first Earl of, . 61 


Clarkson, Capt., . 


. 191 


Dewsbury, William, . 


. . 


. 21 


Clews, Patience, . 


. 104 


Dillwyn, George, 152, 167, 169, 


175, 180 


Clift, John, 


. 44 


" John, . 


» • 


134, 152 


Collins, Isaac, 


. 122, 123 


" Sarah Hill, 157, 158, 169, 


174, 181, 


Conyngham, Provost, . 


. 128 






182 


Cooper, Isaac, 


. 120 


William, . 


• 8,11, 


152, 172 


" Lydia, . 


. 120, 167 


Donop, Count, . 


* • 


170, 177 


Cooper, James Fenimore, 


. 119 


Douglas, Ijord James of. 


> • 


. 71 


'' Joseph, . 


78, 97, 98, 117 


Doughty, Daniel, 


. 90, 


118, 160 


" Judge, . 


. 119 


*' the artist, 


• 


. 122 


Sarah, . 


. . 117 


" Mary, . 


• • 


90, 118 


« William, . 59, 


78, 97, 117, 120 


Dowers, Capt., 


> • 


129, 146 


Cornbury, Lord, 72, 77, 78, 1 


iO-85,87,88, 91, 


Drury, Capt., 


• 


. 21 




93-97 


Duncan, Capt., . 


f • 


. 188 


Cornwallis, Gen., 


. 186 


Dundas, Bcthia, . 


ft • 


. 72 


Coventry, Leofric and Godiv 


'a of, . 12 


Egohohoun, Chief, 


• 


. 109 


Coverdale, Miles, 


. 19 


Eliseg of Llangollen, . 


ft • 


. 61 


Cox, Colonel, 


. 174-176 


Elliott, Andrew, 


> • 


. 186 


'* Esther, 


. 170, 178 


Ellwood, Thomas, 


ft • 


. 90 


Coxe, Anne, 


. 167 


Kmlen, M., 


• 


153, 154 


" Dr. Daniel, . 63, 


69, 70, 96, 120 


Emley, William, 


. 37, 41, 45 


" Daniel, (2d,) . 


96, 97 


Estaugh, Elizabeth, 


1 . 


. 136 


" Daniel, (3d,) 


. 167 


Eves, Thomas, . 


• 


59 


" Klizal)eth, . 


. 167 


Eyre, George, 


. 


. 99 


'' Emily, 


.167 


Farrel, Annie, 


• 


100, 115 



INDEX OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 



285 





PAGE 






PAGE 


Farrington, Abr'm, 


. 138, 139 


Haydock, Henry, 


. 


. 147 


Fearn, Peter, 


. 150 


Helmsly, Joseph, 


. 


. 36, 37, 41 


Fen wick, John, . 


. 33-37, 61 


Hengist, the Saxon, 


. 


. 12 


Fitzrandolphs, the. 


. 148 


Herbert of Cherbury, Lord, 


. 22 


Fitzrandolph, Ezekiel, 


. 147 


Heulings, FiSther, 


• 


. 193 


Richard, 


. 147 


. " William, . 


• 


. 104, 105 


Field, John, 


. 190 


Hill, Margaret, . 


• 


. 166 


Fox, George, 


. 21, 22, 62, 156 


" Richard, . 89, 90, 


155, 


156, 166, 181 


Foxvvell, Martha, 


. 63 


Hills, Dr., . 


• 


. 169, 178 


Fowler, F. M., . 


. 120 


Hoedt, Caspar, . 


• 


. 99 


Foulke, Thomas, 


. 37 


" Mary, . 


• 


99 


Francis, Tench, . 


. 161 


Hollinshead, John, 


• 


. 59 


Franklin, Benjamin, 100, 1( 


)2, 138,J54,161, 


Hooton, Thomas, 


• 


44 




189 


Hopkins, Robert, 


• 


. 180 


Gov. William, 


. 109, 169 


Hop wood, Samuel, 


• 


7, 8, 26 


Franks, Major, . 


. 191 


Hopenyoke, George, . 


• 


. 107 


Gralloway, Joseph, 


. 118 


Horn, Mrs., 


• 


. 191 


Gatesford, Mr., . 


. 13 


Hoskins, John, . 


• 


. 104 


Grardiuer, Thomas, 


. 78, 89, 90 


Howe, Admiral Lord, 


• 


186, 188, 190 


Gerard, slave, 


. 162 


*' General, . 


• 


178, 188, 191 


Gibbons, Richard, 


. 32 


Hume, Isabel, 


• 


. 71 


Gordon, Hon. Cosmo, 


. 191 


" James, 


• 


71 


" Thomas, 


. 91 


" Sophia, . 


• 


. 152, 153 


Gort, John Smith, Viscount 


, . 10, 16 


Hunloke, Edward, 


• 


. 63 


Growrie, F^rl of, . 


. 71 


Hunter, Gov, Robert, . 


• 


. 92, 93, 97 


Grazebrook, Sydney, . 


. 15 


Hutchinson, Greorge, , 


• 


. 36 


Greenleafe, Isaac, 


. 159 


" Thomas, . 


• 


. 36 


Grover, James, . 


. 32 


lahkursoe. King, 


• 


. . 58 


Gurney, Catharine, 


. 186, 187 


Ingoldsby, Richard, . 


• 


. 92, 94, 95 


'' Henry, . .18. 


5, 186, 189, 191 


James, Abel, 


134 


, 135, 181, 193 


Guy, Richard, 


. 37 


" Capt., 


. 


. 159, 160 


Gyles, Dorothea, . 


. 99 


** Miss, 


. 


. 193 


Halibrd, Henry, . 


. 153 


" Professor T. C, 


. 


. 134 


Halhead, Miles, 


22 


'^ Priest William, 


. 


• * *^9 ^^ 


Hall, Dr., . . . . 


. 138 


Jegou, Pierre, 


. 


. 40 


Hamilton, Gov. Andrew, 


64, 70, 159, 160 


Jenings, Anne, . 


. 


48, 90 


Hannibal, slave. 


. 141 


Jenings, Mercy, . 


. 


. 90 


Hartshorne, Hannah, . 


. 104 


Gov. Samuel, 48, 


,51, 


60, 61, 73, 78, 


" Richard, . 


. 32, 38, 42 


81-84, 88-91, 94, 97, 


101 


,118,121,126 


" Robert, , 


. 65 


Jenings, Sarah, . 


• 


51,90 


William, . 


. 104 


Jenkins, M. and C, . 


• 


. 131, 140 


Haydock, Eden, . 


. 133 


Jenyns, Sir Soame, 


• 


. 51 



286 



INDEX OF PEBSOXS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 






Jevison, Oapt., . 
Johnson, Andrew, 

Dr., . . . 

Johnston, David, 
Jones, Gilbert, . 

" Mary, 
Jordan, M., 

Kaighns, of Kaighn's Point, 
Kelpius, the Hermit, . 
Thomas King, Chief, . 
Kinsey, , 

" John, . 
Kirkbride, Jane, . 



PAGE 

. 151 
. 125 
. 92 
. 40 
. 95 
. 62 
. 62 

132, 135 
. 60 
. 150 
. 109 
. 99 
37, 143, 144, 160, 161 

117, 128 
. 117 
. 190 
. 185 
. 78 
69, 85, 87 
. 139 

170-172 

. 133 

34, 35, 44 

. 151 

134, 142 
, 86, 91, 95 
. 130 
. 100 
. 100 
. 115 



63, 



*' Joseph, 

Kniphausen, Gren., 
Lafayette, Marquis de, 
Lambert, Thomas, 
Lane, Sir Thomas, 
Large, Ebenezer, 
Lawrence, John, . 

" T., . . . 
Lawrie, Grawen, . 
Lawson, Capt., . 
Lay, Benjamin, . 
Leeds, Daniel, . . .80 
Lee and Littlepage, Messrs., 
Leppington, John, 

" Priscilla, . 

Lightfoot, Mary S., 

Michael, 139, 152, 154, 159, 160 
Thomas, . . 100, 115, 147 

Lisle, Capt., 134 

Logan, Deborah Norris, 166, 184, 192, 194 
Senator George, . .166, 194 
Hannah, 72, 118, 129, 134-136,138- 
141, 143-150, 162, 163, 166, 194 
Hannah Emlen, . .153, 155 
Hon. James, 70-72, 118, 125-132, 
139, 140, 145, 151-154, 160, 161, 163- 

194 
Logan, James, Jr., . 129, 150, 155, 159 









PAGE 

Logan, Sarah Read, . . 151, 153, 162 
William, Jr., 135, 138, 143, 145, 148- 

150,152-155, 159-161 
William, M.D., of Bristol, . 156 
Rev. Patrick, ... 71, 72 
of Restalrig, family of, . . 71 

Lloyd, Charles, . . . . 22, 61, 62 
John, of Dolobran, . . .61 
Gov. Thomas, . 61, 62, 125, 166 

Lovelace, John Lord, of Hurley, 88, 89, 91, 92 






i( 



n 



Lovett, Elizabeth, 
" Edmond, 
Lucas, Nicholas, 
Luke, John, 
Lynch, Catharine, 
Mackauat, Daniel, 
MacLane, Col. A., 
Marlow, Gregory, 

Marshall, , , 

" Anna, . 
Martin, Greorge, . 
Masters, Mrs., 
Matlock, William, 
Matthew, Conrad, 
Matthewe, Thomas, 
Mercer, Gen., 
Mesnard, Capt., . 
Mew, Richard, . 
Middleton, Hugh, 
Mifflin, G^n., 
" John, 
Miric of Dolobran, 
Montacute, Marquis of, 
Molleson, GiU)ert, 
Moore, Benjamin, 

" Doctor, . 

" Captain, . 

" Hannah, . 

" Samuel, . 

" S. Preston, 
Morris, Anthony, 

" Anthony, 3d, . 



. 99 
99 
34, 44 
159, 160 
67 
150 
191 
40 
42 
67 
132 
191 
45 
150, 151 
18-20 
177, 178 
150, 153 
. 44 
92, 94 
177 
161 
61 
14 
119 
108 
154, 155 
171, 172 
. 181 
. 132 
. 181 
48, 49, 120, 166 
. 120 



INDEX OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 



287 





PAGE 








I'AiiK 


Morris, Captain Anthony. 


, . . 176-178 


Olive, Thomas, 37, 


•11, 


44, - 


15, 47, 48, 62, 


" Charles Moore, 


. 10 








126 


" Deborah, 


. 166 


Paninurc, f^irl of, 


* 




. 72 


Eliza, . 


. 152 


Parker, James, . 


* 




. 123 


Gulielraa M., . 


. 166 


Parr, Samuel, 


. 




. 135 


John, . 


. 166 


Pastoriii8, Francis D., . 




. 141, 142 


** Doctor John, . 


. 174 


Peachy, William, 






44, 48 


" Cohmel liewis, 72 


!, 73, 82, 83, 87, 88, 


Peak, Hannali, . 






. 103 




91, 94, 97, 98, 132 


Peal, John, 






. 128 


'' Margaret Hill, 


, 166, 169 


Peale, Captain, . 






. 147 


Richard Hill, 


. 174 


Pearson, Thomas, 






. 36 


" Samuel, . 


. 120 


Pemlterton, Israel, 


107, 


120, 


128, 132, 133, 


" Sarah, 


138, 145, 152, 154 








148, 152, 155 


** Susannah, 


. 153 


" Israel, 


Jr., 


128, 


138, 143, 146, 


William, 


. 166 




15S 


!, 153 


, 155, 160, 161 


Mott, Richard F., 


. 17 


" James, 


100, 


115, 


116, 120,132, 


Murfin, Anne, 


46, 47 




133, 


139, 


145, 148, 152, 


'* Katharine, 


. 48 






153 


, 160, 161, 167 


Mary, . 


. 45, 46, 64, 99 


John, 


• 


• 


. 160 


" Rol)ert, . 


. 46 


Mary, 


. 


• 


. 188 


Robert, 2d, . 


. 46 


** Mary S 


mith, 


} • 


. 120, 167 


Murray, Earl of. 


71, 72 


" Rachel, 


• 


* 


. 132, 133 


Myrtin of Thurcroft, . 


. 46 


Sarah Smith 


, 116 


,120, 115, 167 


.S^aylor, James, . 


. 156 


Pen ford, John, . 


• 


• 


37, 41, 44, 45 


Newby, Mark, . 


59, 60 


Penington, >^l\vard. 


f 


• 


. 90, i;{4 


Nicholson, General, 


. 96 


** Isaac, 


• 


• 


. 90 


Noble, Abel, 


. 103, 133 


Penn, John, ** the American," 


. 131 


" Hannah, . 


. 167 


" William, 8, * 


29, 33, 34, 


35,44,51,61, 


" Isaac, 


. 167 


62, 


72, 


90, 


125, 132, 149, 


" Joseph, 103-105, 


116, 120, 160, 167 








155, 194 


" Marmaduke, 


. 167 


Pep|)erell, Sir William, 


• 


. 131 


'' Mary, . 116, 


120,128, 133,167 


Perkins, Abigail, 




• 


49, 101 


'' Mary Smith, . 


. 103, 116, 133 


William, 




• 


42, 49, 101 


" Mary, Jr., 


. 167 


Peters, Richard, . 




140 


, 143, 154, 160 


" Richard, . 


41, 42, 44, 46, 167 


Peterson, Hance, 




• 


. 125 


" Samuel, . 116, 


120, 127, 133, 167 


Peters, Secretary, 




• 


. 130 


^* Samuel, Jr., 


. 167 


Pole, Anna, 




• 


116, 120, 168 


" William, . 


. 103, 167 


" Fxlward, . 




• 


116, 120,167 


Norris, Isaac, 


. 101, 141, 154 1 


'' Dr. John, . 




• 


103, 116, 120 


Ockanickon, King, 


. 43, 47, 58, 121 


'' Rjichel Smith, 




• 


. 116 


Odell, Ann, 


. 181-183 


" Thomas, . 




• 


116, 120, 167 


" Doctor, . 170, 


171, 173, 178, 181 


Proud, RolKTt, . 




. 


. 118,163 



288 



INDEX OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 



Potts, Stacy, 

Plumstcad family, 

Preston, Margaret, 

Putnam, General, 

Rankin, Captain, 

Rapier or Raper, Abigail, 

Caleb, 
Joshua, 
Thomas, 






a 
n 
u 









ii 
(i 



i( 



a 



(t 



PAGE 

. 178 

. 133 

. 6(j 

. 179 

. 151 

. 101 

. 131 

104, 105 

. 101 

48, 49, 89 

. 117 

. 117 

. 117 

. 132 

. 186 

72, 107 

. 185 

. 72 

. 191 

. 175 

. 127 

. 186 

. 12 

80, 86, 91, 95 

. 128 

. 132 

. 150 

. 119 

. 119 

104, 105 

104, 105 

18-20 

185 

185 

44 

22 

93 

116 

Joseph^ 7, 17, 25, 26, 30, 46, 47, 64, 

65,67,99, 100, 122, .167 

John, ..... 120 

Katharine, . . . .167 



Rapier, Thomas, 
Raper, Joshua, . 
Sarah, 
Thomas, . 
M., . 
Rawdon, Lord, . 
Read, Hon. Charles, 
John, 
Sarah, 
Reed, Adjutant, . 
" General, . 
Redman, Captain, 
Reeve, Peter, 
Remi, Bishop of Lindesia, 
Revell, Thomas, . 
Reynell, John, . 
Roberts, Hugh, . 
" John, . 
Rodman, Elizabeth, 
Hon. John, 
Scamon (or Seiimon), 
Samuel, 
Rogers, John, 
Ross, Catharine, . 

" John, 
Rudyard, Ridges O., 
Salthouse, Thomas, 
Sandford, Major, 
Sansom, Hannah C, 



(( 



Sansom, Samuel, 

Samuel, 2d, 
Samuel, 3d, 
Sarah, . 
William, 
Scott, Benjamin, 
" Captain, 
" Sir Walter, 
Serle, Ambrose, . 
Shackleton, Richard, 
Shawuskehung, Chief, 
Shippen, Captain, 
Edward, 
Miss, . 
Siegfried, the hero, 
Simiti^re, Mens. Du, 
Skeine, John, 
Smith, Abigail, . 
Abigail, 2d, 
Abigail R., 
Anne, 
Anne Yates, 






a 
n 



PAGE 

116, 120, 133, 167 
. 120, 167 
116, 120, 167 
. 167 
. 167 
37, 45 
. 190 
. 71 
. 186 
. 157 
. 113 
174, 177, 178 
. 131, 154 
. 191 
. . 9 
. 189 
62, 63 
. 167 
. .167 
. 159 
99, 135, 167 
. 8, 28, 29 



i( 
U 

a 

u 
« 

a 
a 
a 
a 
li 
a 



Benjamin, 27, 39, 66, 99, 100, 115, 

128, 166 

Charles Perrin, . . .61 

Daniel, 8, 27, 37, 39, 45, 46, 64-68, 

^ 89,91,96,99, 105, 117, 122 

Daniel, 2d, 99, 100, 104, 105, 115, 120, 

157, 160 
Daniel, 3d, 65, 97, 101, 104, 115-117, 

120, 147, 166 
Daniel, 4th, . . . .166 
Daniel Doughty, . . .167 
Deborah, ... 27, 64 

Elizabeth, 100, 104, 115, 153, 193 
Elizabeth, 2d, . . .115, 167 
Elizjibeth Bacon, . . .159 
Elkanah, .... 27 

Emanuel, 8, 27, 39, 64, 67, 99, 168 
George R., . . . 65, 166 
Hannah, ... 27, 162, 167 
Hannah Logan, . . 159, 162 



INDEX OF PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 



280 



PAGE 



Smith, James, . . 103, 116, 166, 193 
" Jane Kirkbride, . . .136 
" John, 8, 27, 28, 35, 37, 39, 40, 44-46, 

64, 100 

** John, 2d, . . 99, 115, 159, 162 

John, of New Castle, . . 10 

" John, of Salem, 34, 37, 59, 63, 78 

'' Hon. John, 3d, 72, 104, 116-118, 122, 

123, 125-127, 132,133, 

137,138, 141, 143,145, 

146, 155-158, 163,166, 

172, 181, 193, 194 

" John, 4th, of CJreon Hill, 117, 125, 162, 

166 

" John D., 166 

" Jonathan, M. D., 67, 99, 104, 105, 162 
" Joseph, 8, 27, 39, 64, 67, 167, 193 
" Joseph D., . . . .166 
" Joshua R., . . . .166 
" Katharine . . 99, 100, 133 

** Lloyd Pearsa II, . . .129 

" I^ovett, 167 

" Margaret Morris,. . . .122 
" Mary, 27, 99, 100, 116, J 22, 166, 167 
" Mary Murfin, . 47, 65-67, 99, 195 
« Kachel, .... 99, 103 
'' Richard, 1st, 10, 17, 18, 20, 103, 108 
'' Richard, 2d, 8, II, 12, 14, 18, 20-22, 

25-30, 35, 37, 39, 46, 

53, 64, 102 
" Richard, 3d, 8, 27, 28, 39, 45, 64, 67, 

68,97,99,105,116,120, 

162 
" Richard, 4th, 10, 42, 66, 97, 99, 101- 

103,116-118, 120,122, 

126, 127, 132, 136, 143, 

153, 159-161, 163 

" Richard, Jr., 4th, . 99, 103, 116 

" Richard, 5th, 1 1, 18, 20, 27, 104, 116, 

118,119,126, 154, 160, 167 
" Richard, 6th, . . . .167 



I'AGK 



Smith, Richard Rodman, 167, 173, 174, 182 
" Rodman, .... 167 

" Hon. Robert, 20, 27, 65, 99, 100, 115, 

116, 147, 159 
" Rol)ert, 2d, . . . .115 
" Robert, 3d, . . . .166 
" Samuel, 8, 14, 27, 39, 65-68, 89-91, 

96, 97,99, 101, 117 
" Hon. Samuel, 2d, 10, 14, 30, 32, 34, 

35, 40, 42, 45, 51, 

75,77,81,104,116- 

119, 122, 123, 126, 

128, 132, 136, 145, 

151, 159-161,163, 

164, 166, 193,194 

" Samuel, 3d, . . . .167 

" Sarah, , . 27, 99, 100, 120, 167 

" Sarah Logan, . . . 159, 167 

" Scammon (Seamon) Rodman . 167 

" Simon, 18 

" of TarlK)ckand Ijiitham, . . 10 

" Thomas, 153 

" Willet, 167 

" Sir William, of Elford, . 10,14-16 
. " William, of Rossiiale, . . 10 
" William, of Besthorp, . 22,146 
" William, . . 99, 116, 162, 168 
" William Lovett, 90, 116, 118, 136, 

138, 160, 161, 167 

" William Lovett, Jr., . . 167 

Smyth, Richaixlus, . . . 7, 11, 13 

" or Smithe, Richardus, . 7, 8, 13 

" Willelmus, or William, 7, 11, 13, 15, 

18, 20, 23, 168 
Smollett, Dr. Tobias, . . . .119 

Son mans, Peter, 84 

Southersby, William, . . . .125 
SiM)t, Wuifric, . . . . 10, 12 

Springer, Benjamin, .... 108 
Springett, Gulielma Maria, . . .190 
Stacy, Mahlon, . . . 36, 49, 66 



290 



INDEX OP PERSONS MENTIONED IN THE VOLUME. 





PACE 


« 






PAGE 


Stacy, Robert, 


. 37, 41, 49 


Verree, James, . 


174, 


175, 


181, 182 


Stanley, of Stoneleiji^h, 


. 10 


Warner, Mary, . 


• 


• 


. 120 


" Sir Edward, . 


. 61 


Warren, Captain, 


• 


• 


. 131 


" Elizabeth, 


. 61 


Washington, Colonel Oeorge, 


• 


. 110 


SirFouIk, . 


. 61 


" General, 171, 


175, 


177, 


178,188, 


" Sir John, 


. 14 








189 


Sir Piers, 


. 61 


Warren, T^ady, . 


• 


• 


. 147 


" Sir Rowland, . 


. 61 


Wasse, James, 


• 


• . 


. 38 


" Lord Strange, of Knu 


ckyn, . 61 


Watson, John F., 30, 127, 


141, 


142, 


157, 158, 


" Thomas, of Knuckyn, 


. 61 








184, 191 


" Sir Thomas, . 


. 14 


" Matthew, 




• 


. 128 


Stansbury, J., . 


. 181 


Waterman, Priscilla, . 




• 


. 152 


Stenton, I>ord Bel haven of, . 


. 72 


Watt, John, 




• 


. 147 


Stevenson, Anna, 


. 118 


Weiss, Conrad, . 




• 


. . 56 


" Anne, 


. 90 


Wells, Rachel, . 




• 


. 181 


" John, 


. 90 


" Richard, . 




170, 


173,181 


" Ihomas, 


. 90 


Welsh, William, . 




• 


. 62 


" Thomas, 2d, 


. 90 


Westcott, Thompson, . 




• 


. 194 


" William, . 


77, 90 


Wetherill, Christopher, 




. 


." 120 


" the brothers. 


. 89 


" Mary Noble, 




• 


116,120 


Story, Enoch, 


. 186 


" Samuel, 


116, 


120, 


, 128, 132 


" Thomas, . 


. 125 


" Thomas, . 




• 


104, 105 


Stout, Richard, . 


. 32 


" Thomas, Jr., 




• 


. 160 


Strettell, Mr., . 


. 129, 130 


Whitefield, George, 




• 


. 133 


Stuart, King Robert, . 


. 71 


Whittier, John G., 




• 


. 125 


Sunderland, F^jirl of, . 


. 75 


Wilkinson, John, 




• 


. 42 


Symeock, John, . 


. 125 


Willis, Mary, 




• 


67,99 


Tagashata, Chief, 


. 109 


" George, . 




• 


. 67 


Tashiowycan, 


. 56 


Wills, Daniel, . 




37, 41, 44, 45 


Tat ham, John, . 


63, 70 


" Daniel, Jr, 




• 


44, 45 


Taylor, Abraham, 


. 137 


Wister, Sarah Butler, . 




• 


. 194 


'^ Christophor, 


. 125 


Wool man, John, . 




• 


104, 142 


Teal, the widow. 


. 151 


Woolston, John, . 




• 


. 44 


Teedyuscung, King, . 


107, 109, 111 


" John, Jr., . 




. 


. 44 


Tennant, Gilbert, . VHi 


, 137, 138, 150 


Wright, Joshua, . 




• 


. 78 


Thompson, Charles, 


. 189 


Wvatt, Eliza, 




• 


: 135 


Totamy, Moses, . 


. 108 


" Sally, . 




. 


. 135 


Towes, Daniel, . 


. 45 


Yates, Anne, 




. 


. 22 


Trotter, Benjamin, 


. 154 


" William, . 




• 


. 22 


Tyndale, or Tindal, \Vm., . 


17-19 


York, James, Duke of, 30 


31 


33, J 


J7, 40, 51 


Van p]mmerson, Margaret, . 


. 19 i 











INDEX OF NAMES OF THE EIGHTH AND NINTH GENERATIONS, 

GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 









PAGE 










PAGE 


Allinson, Esther, . . .222 


Bringhurst, Hannah, .... 273 


" Martha, 




1 • 


, 223 




' James, 3d, 




. 271 


Atkinson, Anne, 








241 




* James, 4th, 




. 273 


Barzillai B. 








241 




* John, 




. 273 


Charles, 








:i41 




John, 2d, . 




. 271 


Bowne, Abby, 








211 




* John, 3d, . 




. 271 


" Abigail, . 








211 




* Joseph, 




. 272 


** Amelia, . 








211 




Joseph, 2d, 




. 271 


*' Amy, 








211 




' Joseph, 3d, 




. 272 


Eliza, . 








211 




Mary, 




. 271 


George, 2d, . 








, 211 


• 


' Mary, 2d, . 




. 274 


George, 3d, 








, 211 




* Mary D., . 




. 271 


** George, 4th, . 








211 




* Rebecca, . 




. 274 


** Gulielma, 








, 211 




' Sarah, 




. 273 


" Hannah, 








211 




' Sarah A., . 




. 271 


" Joseph, . 








211 




* Susan, 




. 273 


*^ Joseph, 2d, 








211 




* Thomas, . 




. 272 


Matilda, 








. 211 




* William, . 




. 272 


*' Rebecca, 








211 




William, 2d, 




. 274 


** Richard, 








, 214 




William W., 




. 271 


Richard, 2d, . 








. 211 




ZibaF., . 




. 272 


Robert L., 








. 211 


Burr, 


Barzillai, . 






. 236 


" Rowland, 








. 211 


" Lydia, 






. 236 


" Samuel, . 








. 211 


" Richard, . 






. 236 


" Samuel S., 








. 211 


Chaderton, Mary, 






. 248 


William, 








. 211 


** Phoebe, 






. 248 


Bringhurst, Anna, 








. 273 


Cox, Hannah, 






. 232 


*• Edward, 


• 






. 272 


'' Sarah, 






. 232 


Eliza, 


• 




. 271 


Davis, George, . 






. .232 


Eliwvbeth, 




. 272 


" Tnaac, 




• 1 


. 232 














« 






291 



292 



INDEX OP NAMES OP THE EIGHTH AND NINTH GENEBATION8, 



1 

PAGE 


PAGE 


Davis, Jane, 232 


Ellis, Eliza, 241 


" John Cox, 






. 232 


" Henry, 








, 241 


" Juliana, . 






. 232 


" Peter, 








, 241 


" Lewis, 






. 232 


" Rebecca S., 








, 241 


Dillwyn, Susannah, 






. 219 


Eyre, Anne C, . 








, 277 


Drinker, Charlas, 






. 220 


" Ellen, 








. 277 


" Charles, 2d, 






. 220 


" Harriet, 








, 277 


Rlward, 






. 220 


'' John C, . 








, 277 


'' hklward, 2d, 






. 220 


" Juliet P., . 








. 277 


" Elizabeth, 






. 220 


" Mahlon D., 








. 277 


" Rsther, 






. 220 


'' Manuel, 3d, 








, 277 


" Hannah, 






. 220 


" Mary, 








. 277 


" Henry, 






. 220 


" Richard A., 








. 277 


" Henry S., 






. 220 


" Virginia, . 


■ 






, 277 


" James, . 






. 220 


" Wilson, . 








, 277 


" Mary, . 






. 220 


Fowler, Elizabeth, 








. 272 


*' Mary, 2d, 






. 222 


" Francis, 








. 272 


*' Sandwith, , 






. 220 


" Hannah, 








. 272 


" Sarah, . 






. 220 


*^ Henry, . 








. 272 


William, 






. 220 


John P., 








. 272 


Duck, Amelia, . 






. 272 


" Marianne, 








. 272 


" Catharine P., . 






. 272 


Gill, Anna, 








, 240 


" Elizabeth, 






. 272 


" John, 2d, . 








, 235 


" Klizabeth A., . 






. 272 


*' John, 3d, . 








. 240 


" John X., . 






. 272 


*' Mary, 








. 235 


'' Kaehel P., 






. 272 


" Rebecca, 








, 240 


Earl, Daniel W., 






. 241 


*^ William H., 








, 240 


" F^gar, 






. 241 


Gregory, Rachel B., , 








. 273 


" Eli7.nbeth, . 






. 236 


Hilles, Gulielma M., , 








. 226 


" George M., 






. 240 


" John S., . 








, 226 


" Harriet, . 






. 241 


" William S., , 








. 226 


" John S., . 






. 236 


Jones, Elizalxjth W., . 








. 262 


" Maria, 






. 241 


« MaryN., . 








. 262 


" Mary, 






. 236 


'' Samuel W., 








. 262 


" Mary, 2d, . 






. 241 


Levick, Anna, . 


^ 






. 264 


« William, . 






. 241 


" Elizabeth R., . 








. 264 


" William Lovett, 






. 236 


" James J., .VI. ] 


\ 






. 264 


" ^\ illiam Tiovett, 


2d, 




. 241 


" Joseph W., . 








. 264 


Edge, Edward S., 






. 206 


'* Mary J., 








, 264 


" Emma, . * 






. 206 


" Richard, 








. 264 


" Jane, 






. 206 


" Samuel J., 








. 264 


" Rebecca S., 




• 


. 208 


William M., 








. 264 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



293 





PAGE 


PAGE 


Lewis, Alexander, 


. 222 


Noble, Anna, 260 


" Charles, . . . . 


. 222 


" Charles, M. D., 






258- 


" Esther, . . . . 


, 222 


*' Charles, Jr., 






259 


" Henry, . . . , 


. 222 


" Charles M., . 


• 






260 


^* James S., . . . 


. 222 


** Clara, 


i 






260 


" Joseph S., 


. 222 


" Eliza, 


fl 






258 


Longstreth, Elizabeth T., . 


. 259 


'' Elizabeth, 


< 






260 


" Joseph, 


. 273 


" Franklin, 


■ 






260 


" Margaret, . 


. 273 


" Hannah, . 


t t 






258 


" Margaret M., . 


. 259 


" Henry A., 


1 






259 


" Margaret M., 2d, 


. 259 


" Howard, . 


i 






260 


*' Mary R., . 


. 259 


John M., 


« 






260 


Morris, M. D., . 


. 259 


" Lydia, . 


« 






258 


Rachel O., 


. 259 


" Lydia L., 


4 






260 


" Samuel N., 


. 259 


" Mary K., 


• 






259 


Sarah N., . 


. 259 


•* Mary T., . 


4 






260 


William, . 


. 273 


** Richard, . 


> 1 






258 


Maddock, Anna, 


. 273 


" Samuel, . 


1 a 






260 


" hklward, . 


. 273 


" Samuel W., 


■ 






258 


" John, 


. 273 


'* Sarah, . 


4 






259 


" Mary, 


. 273 


** Thomas L., 


i 






260 


Wilfiam, . 


. 273 


" William S., . 


1 






259 


Morris, Anna Margaretta, , 


. 214 


1 Norton, Samuel, 


» 1 






, 258 


" Beulah, . 


. 253 


Nourse, Caroline R., 


1 






. 247 


** Charles Moore, 


. 214 


Charles J., 2d 








. 247 


" Edmund, 


. 214 


'' Elizabeth, 


» i 






. 248 


** Eliza, . 


. 248 


" Henrietta C, , 


t 1 






. 248 


Elliston P., . 


. 253 


" Israel P., 


1 i 






, 248 


IsalHilla, 


. 248 


" James B., 








. 248 


" James P., 


. 246 


•' John, . 


» 






, 247 


" Tiouisa P., 


. 246 


" Louisa, . 








. 247 


'' Mary, . 


. 248 


** Mary, . 


* 






. 247 


** Phineas P., . 


. 248 


Phcebe P., 








248 


Ph(rl>eP. 


. 246 


*' Rosa, . 








. 247 


** Rebe(-c;i W., . 


. 246 


Perot, Anna, 








. 253 


Richard Smith, 


. 214 


" Annie S., . 








. 254 


'^ Rosa, 


. 248 


" Charles P., 








. 254 


Samuel B., 2d, 


. 253 


*' Elizabeth W., 








. 254 


*' William, 


. 248 


*' Elliston, 2d, 


• 
i 1 






. .253 


*^ ^William Henry, 


. 214 


" Elliston L., 








. 254 


Mott, Richard F., 


. 214 


** Francis, . 


t 






. 253 


Noble, Amanda, . 


. 259 


" Hannah, . 








. 263 



294 



INDEX OP NAMES OF THE EIGHTH AND NINTH GENERATIONS, 



PAGE 






PAGE 


Perot, Hannah, 2d, .... 254 


Smith, Barzillai C, 


. 203 


• " Hannah, 3d, 


• 


• 


. 254 


« 


Benjamin, 


. 203 


" James P., 


• 


• 


. 254 


(< 


Benjamin R., . 


. 201 


" John, 


• 


• 


. 253 


ii 


Caleb R., 


. 203 


** Joseph, 


• 


• 


. 253 


« 


Caroline M., 


. 204 


" Joseph S., 


• 


• 


. 254 


<< 


Catharine, 


. 199 


" Laetitia P., 


• 


• 


. 254 


(( 


Catharine Alden, 


. 223 


** Mary W., 


• 


• 


. 254 


i< 


Chamless, 


. 263 


** Sansoni, . 


• 


• 


. 253 


i( 


Charles, . 


. 235 


** Sansora, 2d, 


• 


« 


. 254 


^i 


Charles Ti., 


. 219 


" Sarah, 


• 


• 


. 253 


i i( 


Charles W., . 


. 263 


" Sarahs., . 


• 


■ 


. 254 


(( 


Clement H., 


. 263 


" Thomas Morris, 




» i 


. 253 


i( 


Daniel, . . v • 


. 204 


" William S., 


i 


* ■ 


. 253 


• ( 


Daniel B., . . , 


. 201 


Proudfit, Alexander C. 


y 


1 


. 223 


i( 


Daniel Doughty, 2d, 


. 235 


" John, . 


t 


1 


. 223 


ti 


Daniel Doughty, 3d, 


. 238 


" Mary C, 




• 


. 223 


n 


Dillwyn, . . . . 


. 227 


Roberts, Llizaheth, 


■ 


« 


. 222 


il 


Edmund, 


. 208 


" Mary, . 




• 


. 222 


ii 


Kid ward Bacon, 


. 206 


Sarah, . 


4 


« 


. 222 


ii 


Edward T., . 


. 204 


Sansom, Eliza H., 




• 


. 251 • 


ii 


Elizabeth, 


235, 239 


" Hannah, 




• 


. 251 


ii 


Elizalxjth, 2d, . 


. 21» 


Shreve, Beulah S., 




• 


. 237 , 


ii 


Elizal^eth, 3d, . 


. 244 


" Daniel Smith, . 




• 


. 237 1 


ii 


Elizabeth B., . 


. 204 


" Elizabeths., . 




• 


. 237 


ii 


Elizabeth B., 2d, 


204, 228 


" Rebecca L., 




• 


. 237 ; 


ii 


Elizabeth J., . 


. 263 


" Sarah B., 




• 


. 237 


ii 


Elizal>eth P., . 


. 228 


" Stacy B., 




• 


. 237 


ii 


Elizabeths., . 


. 239 


Smith, Abigail, . 




• 


. 240 


it 


Ellen Logan, . 


. 222 


" Abigail B., 




• 


. 219 


iC 


Ell wood L., . 


. 239 


" Albanus, . 




• 


. 228 


it 


Esther, . . . . 


. 222 


** Alexander, 




• 


. 222 


t( 


Frances E., . . . 


. 199 


" Alfred, . 




• 


. 204 


ii 


George D., 


. 199 


*' Alfred K., 




• 


. 207 


a 


George Roberts, 


. 222 


" Alice Anna, 




• 


. 199 


it 


Gt?orge \V., . 


. 239 


" Ambrose, 




• 


. 204 


a 


Gulielma Maria, 


. 226 


*' Amelia, . 




• 


. 214 


(t 


Guiielma Maria, 2d, 


. 228 


" Anna, 




• 


. 239 


ii 


Hannah, . . . . 


. 219 


" Anna Maria, . 




« 


. 239 


it 


Hannah B., . 


. 214 


*' Anne Bacon, . 




i 


. 206 


a 


Hannah J., . . . 


'T 263 


*' Annie Couper, . 




• 


. 223 


*( 


Henry, . , . . 


199, 239 


" Barclay A., 


1 


f 


. 203 


a 


Henry Hill, 


. 226 



GENEALOGICAL TABLES. 



2'.»o 





PA(iE 




PAOK 


Smith 


, Hcnrv Howard, . . .199 


Smith, Morris, . . . . 


. 226 


a 


Henry W., 




. 237 


" Norman M., 


. 2U(i 


Cl 


Horace J., 






. 228 


" Rachel, . . . . 


. 226 


ti 


Isaac J., . 






. 263 


'' Rachel C, 


. 226 


a 


James, 






. 239 


" Raper, . . . . 


. 199 


iC 


James L., 






. 239 


" Rebecca, . . . , 


. 208 


a 


James Logan, . 






. 219 


*' Rebecca, 2d, . 


. 235 


a 


James W., 






. 263 


'' Rebecca W., . 


. 239 


n 


Jane B., . 






. 214 


" Richard H., . 


. 244 


a 


Jane li., . 






. 237 


" Richard M., . 


. 226 


n 


Job Bacon, 






. 204 


** Richard Morris, 


204, 228 


a 


Job Stockton, . 






. 239 


" Robert Clinton, 


. 199 


u 


John J., . 






. 219 


'' Robert J., 


. 199 


a 


John Jay, 






. 226 


** Robert Lindley, 


204, 228 


« 


John Morton, . 






. 201 


" Robert M., 


. 242 




John S., . 






. 235 


" Robert P., 


. 228 


(( 


Jonathan, 






. 235 


" Samuel, . . . . 


. 263 


(( 


Jonathan, 2d, . 






. 239 


" Samuel, 2d, . 


. 239 


(( 


Jonathan R. 






. 239 


" Samuel J., . . . 


. 210 


iC 


Joseph, 






. 235 


" Sarah A., . . . 


. 244 


u 


Joseph H., 






. 199 


" Sarah E., . . . 


. 263 


t( 


Joseph R., 






. 214 


" Sarah L., 


. 219 


ti 


Joseph W., 






. 239 


" Sarah R., . 


. 199 


ti 


Laura, 






. 242 


" Susannah Dillwyn, . 


. 219 


(( 


Laum G., • 






. 199 


" Susannah Drinker, . 


. 199 


u 


Lloyd P., 






. 228 


*' Thomas, . 


. 263 


(( 


Lydia L., 






. 239 


" Thomas L., 


. 237 


a 


Margaret, 






. 206 


" Walter, . 


. 208 


- it 


!VIargaret H., 






. 226 


" William, . 


. 203 


it 


Margaret H., 2d, 




. .228 


*' William, 2d, . 


. 235 


n 


Margaret H., 3d, 




. 244 


*' William, Jr., . 


. 239 


(( 


Margaret M., . 




. 201 


" William Lovett, 2d, . 


. 239 


n 


Mary, 






. 214 


Stewanlson, George, Jr., 


. 227 


iC 


Mary, 2d, 






. 241, 242 


•' John, 


. 227 


u 


Mary, 3d, 






. 244 


** Maria, 


. 227 


il 


Mary, 4th, 






. 263 


" Margaret, 


. 227 


4< 


Mary Anna, 






. 263 


" Thomas, Jr., . 


. 227 


a 


Mary I)., 






. 204 


1 

' Vaux, Anna S., . 


. 251 


a 


Mary E. R., 






. 207 


" Eli7j»l)eth, 


. 251 


a 


Mary L., . 






. 204 


" Emily, . 


. 251 


a 


Mary Morton, 






. 201 


i " Frances, . 


. 251 


(< 


Milcah M., 






. 226 


" George, . 


. . 251 



2y() 



INDEX OF NAMES OF THE EIGHTH AND NINTH GENERATIONS. 



PAGE 










PAGE 


Vaux, Jame8, 251 


Wharton, Frances, .... 245 


" Hannah S., 


• i 




, 251 


" Lucy, 








. 245 


'' Mary E., . 


m 




. 251 


White, Anna, 








. 238 


" Susan, 








. 251 


" Anna Maria, 








. 238 


^* William S., 








. 251 


" Barclay, . 








, 238 


Wetherill, Ann Eliza, . 








, 264 


" Daniel Smith, 








, 238 


^* Joseph, 








. 264 


" Elizalwth, 








237 


« Mary, 








. 264 


" Howard, . 








238 


" Samuel R., , 








, 262 


" John Josiah, . 








237 


" Sarah Jane, 








264 


" Sarah Smith, 








238 




r 



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