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Full text of "Burnettsville public schools, Burnettsville, Ind. for the years 1912-'14"

Gc 

977.202 

B934bu 

1912-14 

2042517 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02301 6519 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/burnettsvillepubOOburn 



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CALKNI>AR 1012-191:5 



Teachers' Preliminary Meeting . September 7, — 9:30 A. M. 
Examination for Entrance and for making 

up Back Work . . Saturday, September 7 

School Begins .... September 9 

Arbor Day ...... October 25 

Thanksgiving Vacation . . * Thursday November 28 
^ ^ I Monday, December 2 

Christmas Vacation 

First Semester Ends 

Second Semester Begins 



White County Teachers' Association 
School Closes .... 



Friday, January 31 

Monday, February 3 

Friday, February 7 

Saturday, February 8 

Friday, May 23 



CHANGE OF DATES 



Christmas Vacation 
School Closes 



Friday, December 20 
Monday, December 30 
May 27 



[2] 



aOMki^ 



Officers and Teachers 



TEACH KRS 

Fred R. Gorman . . . Superintendent 

Roger S. Lingeman ..... Principal 

Meta Louise Wilhelm .... Ass't Principal 

Pearl Snapp ... 7th and 8th Grades 

Ethel Herman . . . 5th and 6th Grades 

Bessie Amick . . . . 3rd and 4th Grades 

Faye Tillett . . . 1st and 2nd Grades 

BOAUD OF EHUCATIOIV 

Jerry Clay, President. 
Jas. D. Brown. W. Beshoar. 



Richard Herman, Janitor. 



[3] 



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General Information 

Burnettsville is located on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, 
Chicago & St. Louis Railway, twelve miles west of Logan- 
sport. It has approximately 1,000 inhabitants and is situ- 
ated in a fertile agricultural region. 

The people of Burnettsville are industrious, cultured 
and progressive. The citizens stand for what is best in- 
tellectually, morally, socially and religiously. The town has 
always held an enviable reputation for her splendid schools, 
which is still maintained at the present time. To the gener- 
ations gone before the people of Burnettsville are deeply in- 
debted for the splendid school spirit fostered today. 

M.VTKRI AI^ i:<^L !!^>IE>T 

The building is a two-story and basement structure, 
built of brick and stone. It has seven rooms, all large and 
well lighted, including an assembly room to accommodate 
one hundred twenty high school pupils. For purposes of 
entertainment the high school room can be made to seat 
300 people. The halls are wide and easily accessible. The 
doors are double and open outward. Drinking faucets are 
located on both the second and third floors, and in the din- 
ing room. New furnaces have been installed, thus combin- 
ing adequate heating facilities with correct ventilation. The 
building is strictly modern. 

The school is supplied v/ith an excellent working library. 
The physical laboratory is equipped with one of Crowell's 
Physical Apparatus Cabinets, in addition to which there is 
an air pump, color disk, and sufficient appliances to demon- 
strate the more common electrical phenomena. The recent 
growth of the school has made necessary more extensive 
equipment in the physical laboratory, while considerable 
additions are planned for the new year. 

The assembly room has in it an upright piano, a valu- 

[4] 



able addition to the morning exercises and to the high 
school orchestra. Several famous paintings grace the walls 
of the assembly roDm, adding beauty and refinement to its 
atmosphere. 

ADDTTrONAr. SCIIOOT^ TNTKRKSTS 

Glee Clubs and Chorus. During the past years both a 
boys' and girls' chorus has been maintained and appeared 
on various occasions both at school and away. A Boys' Glee 
Club and German Chorus have also been maintained the 
past year. The Orchestra and Girl's Glee Club have been 
very successful in their work. 

Lecture Course. A lecture course, under the direction 
of the Senior Class, has been very successful for the past 
few years. 

Dramatics. Dramatic ability has been fostered and 
developed through the presentation of various plays and 
entertainments at different times throughout the year. De- 
bating and literary exercises are also given some attention. 

Publications. The Septuary published under the di- 
rection of the Senior Class, is devoted exclusively to the in- 
terests of the students. As a record of the incidents and 
events of a year of school as eesn from the standpoint of a 
pupil, it merits a place in the institution of the school. 

The Annual gives the aims and purpose of the school. 
The work of the grades is briefly outlined and an announce- 
ment given of the high school courses. 

ATIIF.I7riCS 

While the policy of the school has been and will be to 
encourage every form of clean athletics, they are of subor- 
dinate importance and it shall be the aim of the school to 

[5] 



maintain them as a secondari; function. 

Attention is given to basket ball, base ball and track 
work. The two latter have proved the most successful, the 
scho(jl at present holding the leading place among the 
schools of the county in both branches of athletics. The 
Burnettsville team won the 1912 County track meet by a 
large margin, and while some good material was lost through 
graduation, some very execellent material is still available. 

The best mental effort is possible only when the body 
is well conditioned. Athletics foster a spirit of fair play, 
good will, and the square deal toward competitors on the 
athletic field. It is in accord with this idea that the school 
directs and encourages athletic games. 



A Brief History of the Burnettsville 
Schools 

Thou unrelenting Past! 

Full many a mignty name 

Lurks in thy depths unuttered. unrevered. 

A backward glance at former conditions that have 
made present opportunities possible, is now and then a very 
profitable as well as delightful undertaking. For the knowl- 
edge of the great difficulties encountered and overcome by 
the pioneers of any worthy field of action, must always be a 
spur of inspiration to those who shall later engage in the 
same work. 

In keeping with the progress and transformation in 
other lines, has been the advancement and growth of the 
schools. And the teachers and pupils of Burnettsville ought 
to be encouraged to accomplish more and better work after 

[6] 



considering the devotion and zeal of the "masters" and 
"scholars" of the first schools of our community. 

At an early period the people in the vicinity of Bur- 
nettsville began to take a deep interest in education. They 
built the first school house on the site just east of the Wm. 
Haines house and h3re school work was carried on for 
several years. The first teacher was William McGlaughhn. 
In 1848 Isaac Mahurin came from college at New York and 
began teaching in the Methodist church. A short time later 
he founded the Farmington Seminary. The building was 
erected by a stock company and is now occupied as a dwell- 
ing by Mrs. Davis. Mahurin was followed by Hugh Knick- 
erbocker, who had charge of the schools for several years. 
In 1858 Joseph Baldwin of New York, succeeded Knicker- 
bocker and founded the first Normal School established in 
this part of the state. Great excitement was created in 
edacational circles by the Normal School. It became very 
popular and enrolled pupils from many different parts of the 
state. The Normal School became noted for the large num- 
ber of successful taachers turned out and it became a very 
common expression among school authorities that "teachers 
from Burnettsville always made good." 

Professer Goodwin took charge of the school in 1860 
but the outbreak of the war caused the close of the school 
for a time. Previous to the outbreak of the war, lots had 
been bought and some material hauled upon the ground for 
the construction of a college, but the war prevented the enter- 
prise ever being completed. From 1861 to 1868 the follow- 
ing teachers were employed: Wm. Irelan, Eli Herman, E. P. 
Henry, Bruce Barnes, Joseph Amick, P. H. Mertz and A. B. 
Hunter. In 1868 John Roher, a college graduate, again took 
up high school work and continued two years, being succeed- 
ed by H. W. Dale. 

When the railroul was established, most of the popula- 
tion moved into the new town and about 1872 a new school 

[7] 



h/TC 



building was erected there.. This building stood with a few 
repairs until 1904, when it was replaced by the present up- 
to-date brick building. The Superintendency of Guy C. 
Hanna, a State Normal graduate, marked a new era in the 
history of the school. New equipment was added, a better 
school spirit aroused, and a higher standard of work required. 
The High School was commissioned by the State Board of 
Education during the year 1906-7, a recognition of the 
splendid and high class condition of the schools. Professor 
Hanna was followed by A. A. Mourer, a graduate of Indiana 
University, under whose management the school enjoyed 
great prosperity and made rapid growth. The organization 
was improved, the course of study enlarged, the enrollment 
increased and more teachers added to the faculty. So at 
the present time pupils enjoy school advantages equal to 
any in the state. Well may the people of Burnettsville 
point with pride to their schools as the hope of the Nation. 
As nearly as can be found from records, the following 
is a list of teachers from 1872 to the present time: 

SUPERINTENDENTS 

Harrison Edwards. John Royer. 

William Irelan. George Grosjean. 

Shaffer. Nesbitt. 

John Cochran. George Grosjean. 

E. E. Tyner. E. B. Rizer. 

John Kinneman 1892-4 J. L. Morman 1894-5. 

John Kinneman 1895-6 C. M. Plank 1896-1904. 

Guy C. HLinna 1904-19J7. A. A. Mourer 1907-1912. 

PRINCIPALS 

0. A. Eikenberry 1896-9- W. A. Neel 1899-1900. 

Fred Townsley 1900-1901. Margaret Hines 1901-1903. 

Guy C. Hanna 1903-4. C. M. Mulligan 1904-5. 

John C. Downey 1905-8. Martha James 1907-8. 

Fred C. Snapp 1908-1910. 0. P. Parks / 1910 1911 

Joseph Lantz 1911-1912. Chas. Preston | 

ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS 

Edna M. Stembel 1908-9. Henrietta Buchanan 1909-10. 

Meta L. Wilhelm 1910-1912. 

[8] 



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common ocnooi 

The public schools of Biirnettsville are divided into the 
Common School department, consistinj^ of an ei^ht years' 
course of study, and the High School department consisting 
of a four years course. The aim and scope of the first eight 
years work is clearly set fourth in the State Course of Study. 
The work of the grade teachers shall conform to this State 
Course of Study. 

The particular work of the teacher of the first three 
grades is to teach the child to read. If this is done well, 
good work in the advanced grades is made possible and the 
future success of the child is assured. Teaching the child 
to read is the one aim; to this is added in the upper grades 
the cultivation of an appreciation of and a love for good 
literature. Reading is the key to all knowledge and as such 
has incalcuable value in the training of the child. 

The field of the teacher of arithmetic in the grades is 
to develop the concrete as well as the abstract idea of num- 
ber. The development of the general conception of number 
should not be attempted until the 6th, 7th and 8th grades. 
All arthmetic should be made as practical as possible. Con- 
crete problems based upon the experiencss of the daily life 
of the child enrich and enUven the work and give to it a 
vitality which nothing else can do. 

History is rapidly assuming a place among the most 
favored subjects in our school curriculum. In no country 
has the proper teaching of history such practical value as in 
the United States. Here we are proud to boast that the 
government is subject to the will of the governed. If our 
boys and girls at maturity are to exert a salutary effect 
upon national and state affairs they must be well taught in 
history. Furthermore history develops self control and 
judgment more effectively and permanently than any other 

[9] 



orii 



of the present school subjects. 

Geography is the knowledge of the earth as the home 
of man. It teaches man's dependence upon his fellowman. 
The physical characteristics of the earth's surface and their 
effect upon the location and growth of cities as industrial 
centers should be made clear to the child. Simple phenom- 
ena of daily occurrence, such as rain, wind, ice and snow 
and man's dependence upon them should be presented to 
the child so that a true conception may be had. 

The work in language and grammar should famiUarize 
the pupil with the forms and drill him in the use of correct 
English. Composition work should begin as soon as the 
child is able to write. This work must be consistently follow- 
ed throughout the grades, choosing the subjects upon which 
the child is to write from its known experience. 

Physiology and Scientific Temperance is one of the 
most important subjects of the curriculum. The subject is 
not meant for those expecting to enter the medical profees- 
sion, but is intended to give each and every one such in- 
formation concerning the body and manner in which it may 
be protected, invigorated, and strengthened so as to live a 
useful and profitable hfe. Tne dangers in the useof alcholic 
drinks, tobacco and opiates, must be pointed out but not 
exaggerated. 

Nature study should be taught in connection with the 
work of geography, language and reading. The teacher 
should not fail to seize this opportunity to create such a 
harmonious relation between the child and his environment 
as befits the cultured man or woman. 

Last but not least in this brief outline of the work of 
the grades is the training to be given in the so-called "drill" 
subjects, including writing, spelling and drawing. Every 
teacher must see to it that these subjects are taught in her 
grades. The practical as well as the disciplinary value of 
these subjects is being more and more realized, and the 

[10] 



teacher's attention is called to this fact. 

TO SUM UP 

At the end of eight years the students are expected to 
read well, i. e. orally, with an understanding of what is read, 
and with a taste developed for future reading; to write a 
legible hand; to spell such words as they will have to use in 
and out of school; to be ready and accurate at figures; to 
have such a knowledge of geography as will enable them to 
read intelligently in any line and have an interest in the 
natural phenomena about them; to know the history of their 
country and have regard for her institutions, to be patriotic 
and have a desire for clean government; to know the physi- 
ology of the human body, the necessity for, and what con- 
stitutes sanitary conditions, and the effects of tobacco, 
alcohol and injurious drugs; to understand the ordinary 
constructions of the English language, but above all, to be 
able to use good English. 



High School 

The aim of the course in English is two-fold. (1). To 
enable the student to understand the expressed thoughts of 
others and to give expression to his own thoughts. (2). To 
cultivate a taste for reading and to give the student some 
acquaintance with good literature. The purpose of Composi- 
tion is to give the pupil some power in expressing his own 
thoughts. To be able to write well, one must have spent a 
long and arduous apprenticeship in composition writing. To 
this end each student shall write at least one theme per 
week throughout the first three years of the High School 
course and at the discretion ot the teacher in EngUsh an 

[11] 



additional year may be required. 

AH themes must be written in ink on uniformly sized 
paper and to range in length from one to two pages, with 
an occasional theme of greater length. These themes shall 
be carefully graded with all corrections indicated and return- 
ed to the student. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
good, clear, forcible English, intelligent punctuation and 
correct spelling. Other points entering into the merits of 
composition are capitalization, paragraphing, spacing, 
margining and neatness. 

FIRST YEAR 

FIRSr SEMESTER 

Three days each week are given to Composition and 
Rhetoric. Tne student is made familiar with correct forms 
of speech; he is drilled in the construction of sentences, use 
of punctuation marks, and idiomatic expression. Narration 
will be given close attention in the Composition work. 

Two days each week are given to the study of literature. 
Selections for reading and study will be taken from Steven- 
son's Treasure Island; Longfellow's livangline; Tenny- 
son's Enoch Arden; CoDper's Last of the Mohicians; 
Scott's The Talisman. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Continuation of Composition and Rhetoric. Emphasis 
is place upon diction, unitg and coherence. Narration is 
continued in Composition. In literature the classics are 
chosen from Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Eliot's 
Silas Marner; Scott's Ladu of the Lake; Dicken's Tale of 
Tlvo Cities. 

SECOND YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

A brief history of Enghsh literature is given this year. 
Narration and description are emphasized in the composi- 
tion work. Classics to be read and studied will be chosen 



[12] 



ironi Coleridi<e's Ancient Manner; Shakespeare's Macbeth; 
Addison's Sir Imager de Covcrly; Tliackery's Henrg Es- 
mond; Byron's Poems; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Composition work in narration and description con- 
tinued. One day eacii week is j|iven to Enj^lish literature. 
Seleetion made from the fo!lowin;4 classics: Shakespeare's 
Twelfth Night or Julius Caesar; Tennyson's Idvlls of the 
King; Milton's Comus. Lvcldas, L' Allegro, II Penseroso, 
Burn's Cotter's Saturdai^ Night; Scott's loanhoe. 

THIRD YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

A brief history of American literature is ^iven. A 
carefid study of the form of the Essay and the development 
of the Short Story are introduced in the study of Emerson 
and Poe respectively. Exposition is given attention in the 
Composition work. Masterpieces for study selected from; 
Hawthorne's House of Seve i Gables; Poe's Gold Bug and 
the Fall of The House of Usher; Blackmore's Lorna 
Doone; Irvine's Life of Goldsmith • Tennyson's Princess. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Work of this semester similar to the preceding. The 
work in literature will be selected from: Emerson's ^'^^op.s, 
Lamb's Essai;s of Ella., Macauley's Essavs on Johnson, 
Goldsniit'n's Deserted Village, Dryden's Palamon and 
Arcite, Holme's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Haw- 
thorne's Scarlet Letter. 

FOURTH YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

One day each week given to the study of Long's English 
Literature. Classics to be read and studied will consist in 
part of those omitted for want of time in the previous three 

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year's work. In addition to these the sttident will be ac- 
quainted with some of the modern writers of note including 
Ida Tarbell; Henry Van Dyke; John Hendrick Bangs; F. 
Hopkinson Smith; Theodore Roosevelt; Kate Douglas Wiggin; 
James Whitcomb Riley; George Ade; Jack London; Mary 
Johnson; John Barroughs; Elbert Hubbard; Rudyard Kipling; 
Thomas Nelson Page; John Fox, Jr.; and others. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Continuation of Long's English Literature. The work in 
literature of the preceding three years has concerned itself 
largely with epic and dramatic poetry, the novel, short story 
and essay. The lyric is made the basis of this semester's 
work. The poems of Burns, Shelley, Keats, Gray, Wordworth, 
Herrick, Dryden and Soutly are read and studied. Student 
is given the underlying characteristics of the ode, sonnet, 
ballad, hgmn and eleqg. 

.MA THS^MAl IC S 

FIRST YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Algebra is given the first year and a half of the course. 
A thorough mastery of the fundamental principles are given 
the first semester. Fractions are studied, and Factoring 
given special emphasis; H. C. F. and L. C. M. involving the 
principles of factoring. 

SKCO.NMi SEMHSTKR 

Fractional and Simultaneous Equations, with problems; 
the Graph; Involution and Evolution constitute the basis of 
the work. 

SECOND YEAR 

[•MUST S KM EST i: It 

Algebra is continued; Theory of Exponents; Radicals, 
[14] 



Quadratic Equations with problems; further discussion of the 
Graph are divisions of the subject given emphasis. 

-SKCON'l) SE>IKSTKR 

This semester is given to the study of Books I and II of 
Wentworth's Geometry, Definitions and Axioms; chief prop- 
erties of the angle, triangle, paralellogram and circle; 
solution of original exercises. 

THIRD YEAR 

FIRST SK.MKSTEU 

Books III, IV and V of Wentworth, Construction of 
geometrical figures, numerical properties of geometrical 
magnitudes; similar and regular polygons; solution of original 
exercises continued. 

.sKCONMi SKMKSTKll 

Solid Geometry. Emphasis is placed upon the principal 
geometrical and numerical properties of the dihedral and 
polyhedral angles, polyhedrons, cylinders, cones and 
the sphere. The practical application of the principles 
developed is brought out in the solution of the exercises and 
problems. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Commercial Arithemetic. Particular attention is given 
to accuracy and rapidity. Short methods of business men 
are introduced. Interest; Bank Discount; Commission; 
Stocks and Bonds; Taxes; Insurance; and Equation of Ac- 
counts, are the chief divisions of the subjects given 
emphasis. 

HESTOl^V 

The study of History is not begun until the Sophomore 
year. Three years of History and Civil Government are re- 
quired. In addition to the text book work, the student is 

[15] 



required to draw maps; prepare special reports uponassijined 
subjects; and to submit a written report each semester upon 
some special topic of the term's work. 

SECOND YEAR 

FIRST SKM KS IKK 

History of Greece. This is introduced with a brief sur- 
vey of the civiUzation whicli preceded it, especially those 
which flourished in the Nile and Mesopotamia valleys. In- 
stitutional and religious life of the early Greeks; Era of Greek 
colonization; Wars with Persia; Contest for supremacy amont| 
the leading cities — Athens, Sparta and Thebes; Rise of Mace- 
don; Death of Alexander and the division of the Empire. 
Philosophy, oratory, paintinj^ and tlie sculptorhvLi of the 
Greeks are given attention. 

SKi'oNI) SK\1 KS I'KK 

History of Rome. Rome is studied as a Kingdom, as a 
Republic and as an Empire, with chief attention to the 
period of the Republic. Struggle between Patrician and 
Plebian; Expansion; Triumvirates; Growth of tlie Civil In- 
stitutions noted; and the term s work closes witii a study of 
the German migration?, and the rise and spread of Moham- 
medianism. 

THIRD YEAR 

KI Hsr SKMKSTKI! 

Mediaeval History. Eni{;!re of Cnarlemagne; Fetidalism; 
Crusades; Rise and Growth of the Papacy; Development of 
Municii)ality; Renaissance and tlie Reformation are the in- 
stitutions and movements with wliich the student is 
acquainted. 

SK( ON- 1) SK.Mi:--l'KR 

Modern History. Rise of the Dutch Republic; Thirty 
Year's War; Puritan Revoluion; Age of Louis the XIV; Age 

[16] 



of Fredrick the Great; Russia and the Scandinavian countries; 
French Revolution; Industrial Revolution; the Reform move- 
ment in England and the political upheavals on the Conti- 
nent form the hasis of this term's work. 

FOURTH YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTKU 

American History. Colonization; Growth of the Union; 
Articles of the Confederation and the Constitution; Diploma- 
tic History; Slavery; Civil War; Reconstruction; National 
Develpment. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Civil Government. Origin and nature of the State; 
Text of the Constitution, both State and Federal,- and the 
interpretations put upon them from time to time; Statutes 
based upon the Constitution, and some of the leading 
political questions of the present day as well as those that 
have passed into history, are the chief divisions of the sub- 
ject given emphasis. 

I^AISGUACiE 

Three year's work is required in language of all gradu- 
uates. The Fresnman may choose either Latin or German, 
but once having elected his language, he must continue in 
its study for three years. 

I. AT IN 

FIRST YEAR 

The aim of beginning Latin is to prepare the student 
for the reading of Caesar and emphasis is placed upon in- 
flection, arrangement, vocabidari;, translation of easy 
sentences, sgntax and pronounciation. 

[17] 



4 



SECOND YEAR 

Caesar. Four books required. To give the meaning of 
the text in sound, idiomatic EngUsh is the kind of transla- 
tion required. One day each week is given to Latin com- 
position. 

THIRD YEAR 

Cicero. Six orations are required. The student is also 
interested in the literature of the Romans. One day each 
week is given to Latin Composition. 

c;i:rmax 

FIRST YEAR 

Elementary German. The elements of grammar, with 
reading and composition. Drill in pronounciation, and 
practice in conversation. 

SECOND YEAR 

Continued study of the elements of German Grammar. 
Memorizing of short stories and poems. Practice in conver- 
sation and transalation. Im V aterland used in first semes- 
ter. This will be supplemented during the second semester 
by the following classics: Immensce, Germelhaiisen; Der 
Lindenbaum, Das I'.dle Bint. 

THIRD YEAR 

This year s work is given chiefly to reading German. 
One day each week or its equivalent is given to German 
Composition. Selection of classics made from: Nene 
Marchen; Hoher als die Kirche; Die Journalistei'- 
Maria Stuart; Wilhelm Tell; Jungfrau Von Orleans. 

SCIENCK 

Two years of Science are required of all graduates. 
Botany is given the Freshman year and Physics the Senior 
year. Agriculture will be given this year if there is suffi- 
cient demand. 

[18] 



iOij\C 0> j 



BOTAXY 

FIRST YEAR 

In Botany the student is acquainted with the world of 
nature in which he is. Powers of observation are cukivated, 
and the wonderful adaptability of the plant to its environ- 
ment. The gross structure of the plant is given precedence 
over the histology of the plant. The structure, form and 
use of the root system; the stem; the function, purpose, and 
position of the leaf; the mode of branching; the seed and 
manner of dissemination; the fruit, its parts and purposes; 
types of wood structure; the flower, are topics of chief 
emphasis. The lower forms of plants, the algi; fungi, liver- 
worts, mosses, and ferns are given attention. 

A laboratory note book nmst be kept. At least one day 
each week or its equivalent is spent in laboratory work. 
Students are required to classify and mount some of the 
more common plants native to Indiana. 

IMIVSICS 

FOURTH YEAR 

Phyics makes clear to the student the more common 
physical phenomena that are daily observable. Trains him 
in accurate thinking and gives him the ability to record 
observations and conclusions in good English. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

General Properties of Matter; Mechanics of Solids; Me- 
chanics of Liquid and Heat. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Sound; Light; Electricity and Magnetism. One day each 
week or its equivalent is given to actual experiments by 
the pupils. All experiments must be written up in a 
permanent note book. 

[19] 



b(. 



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Electives 



This course is desit*ned to give a comprehensive view 
of the main physical features of the earth's surface. Tiie 
cause of the formation of canyons, flood plains, alluvial fans, 
moraines, deltas, hot springs, geysers, and mountains are 
discussed. 

CO.M.MKRC lAT. (;T:(>(il^ Al^I 1 V 

A careful study of climate and its effect upon the pro- 
ducts of the soil is made. Imports and exports of our 
country as well as the leading foreign countries. Trade 
routes, both land and oceanic. Modern methods of trans- 
portation, a study of the newer regions of production and 
consumption; commerce and politics. 

BOOlvlvKKPlNC; 

The student is first given an intelligent idea of the theory 
of bookkeeping. Then the business practice method is begun 
and followed throughout the course. The use of the ship- 
ment ledger, loose leaf consignment ledger, letter impression 
book and account sales register are explained. The cash 
book and sales book are used. The purpose and aim through- 
out is to prepare the student for the actual business life he 
must lead. 

DRAWING 

Drawing is not a new subject, as many suppose, but it 
is as old as the art of painting in which the ancient Greeks 
strove for mastery. To the real artist every line expresses 
a thought as truly as do the words of the poet. The artist is 

[201 



not unlike the author except that in the medium of ex- 
change of thought of the one is lines and strokes, the other 
words. 

DeUneation, Chiaroscuro, and color are dwelt upon. 
Classical geometrical and picturesque lines discussed. 
Drawing in light and shade practiced; attention given to 
even shading. Greater stress is laid upon drawing from 
models. 

MUSIC 

The value and purpose of music is well known. Music 
will always hold first place as an aesthetic study. Attention 
is paid to the cultivation of an "ear' for music, and to a 
study of the lives of the great composers. A chorus is 
organized each year in which students have an opportunity 
to develop musical ability. The chorus frequently appears 
before the public both in school entertainments and on other 
occasions. 



[211 



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Physic 
Amer 
Comn 
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Comp( 

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Botan 

Music 

Al^eb 
En^lis 
Latin 
Histoi 
Music 

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History 
Literati 
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terature 
lerman 
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History 
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[221 



Text Books 



ETVOLISII 

Lockwood and Emerson's Composition and Rhetoric 
Howe's English Literature 
Sniiley's American Literature 
English Classics ( Selected Texts.) 
I^ATI>s 

James and Jenks' Latin 
Walker's Caesar 
Kelsey's Cicero 
Jones' Latin Composition 
CiKRMAX 

Bacon's German Grammar 
Bacon's Im Vaterland 
Selected Classics 

MATIIKA! A I K S 

Went worth's Algebra 
Wentworth's Geometru 
Moore & Minor's Commercial Arthmetic 
HISTORY 

Myers' Ancient History 

Harding's Mediaeval and Modern History 

Hart's American History 

Boynton's Cioil Government 

Ivanhoe Note Books 

SCTEiVCE 

Carhart & Chutes' Physics 

Bergen's Botany 

Tarr's Physical Geography 

Gaiuiet, Garrison & Houston's Commercial Geography 

Warren s Agriculture 



[23] 



i 






Duties of Teachers 



1. The tenure of office of all teachers shall be at the 
pleasure of tne Board. Teachers may at any time be dis- 
charged for improper conduct, incomptency to teach and 
[Govern their schools, unfaithfulness in executing the direc- 
tions of the Superintendent, or want of that success which 
is necessary in the progress of the school. 

2. Teachers shall be in their respective rooms at the 
ringing of the first bell, morning and afternoon sessions, and 
shall not dismiss their respective rooms before the regular 
time without permission from the Superintendent. 

3. Teachers shall devote themselves exclusively to the 
instruction of their pupils, maintain good order, and super- 
intend the conduct of their pupils in the halls and upon the 
school grounds. 

4. Teachers shall note carefully the physical conditions 
of all pupils under their charge. If cases of contagious or 
infectious diseases are found, report must be made immedi- 
ately to the Superintendent. 

5. Opening exercises not to exceed fifteen minutes 
may be conducted in each room and may consist of Scrip- 
ture reading, prayer, singing, instructive talks, etc. 

6. Teachers shall give particular attention to heating 
and ventilating their rooms, keeping the temperature 68 to 
70 degrees Fahrenheit, and preserving as far as possible a 
condition of their rooms. 

7. Teachers shall make such preparation of each day's 
lessons as will permit teaching without constant attention 
to the text book taught. 

8. Each teacher is required to keep a register, noting 
daily attendance, tardiness, and class and examination 
records. 



[241 



.• w 



9. Teachers shall require excuses in writinj^ of all 
pupils who are tardy. 

10. Teachers shall require written excuses for absence 
except the cause of such absence be known to both teacher 
and parent. 

11. In case it is necessary for a teacher to be absent 
he shall immediately notifiy the Superintendent who shall 
make provision for a substitute. 

12. Any parent or guardian feeling aggrieved for any 
cause against any teacher must make application for redress 
to the Superintendent. 



^«2817 



Duties of Janitor 



•r*;.-^ 



1. In a general way it is the duty of the janitor to 
warm the rooms and to keep all parts of the school building 
and grounds in a clean and sanitary condition. 

2. He shall sweep daily the floors of all rooms, cloak 
rooms and halls and keep them properly dusted. 

3. The fresh air rooms and ventilating apparatus shall 
be kept free from dirt and dust. 

4. He shall clean the erasers and blackboards once each 
week and wash the blackboards each alternate week. 

5. He shall wind and regulate the clocks, attend to the 
drinking fountains, and keep the walks free from snow, ice 
or mud when occasion demands. 

6. He shall personally attend to the proper closing and 
fastening of windows and doors and safeguarding the fires at 
the close of each day's session. 

7. He shall have control of pupils who eat dinner at 
the school house and shall permit no boisterous conduct. 

8. He shall report to the Superintendent or Board any 
mistreatment of himself by pupils or teachers. 

[25] 



^mm 



'.ho. 



1 



9. He shall attend to ringing of gongs and bells accord- 
ing to program given him by the Superintendent. 

10. He shall perform such other duties as the Board or 
Superintendent may require. 

11. He shall be allowed one hour for dinner either 
before or after the noon intermission. 



General Regulations 

1. Examinations will be held monthly. 

2. The use of tobacco in any form is prohibited in the 
school building or upon the school grounds. 

3. All graduates must have taken part in at least one 
of the public hterary exercises of the school. 

4. Students failing to take any or all of the final ex- 
aminations will be conditioned. 

5. High School students who have studied during the 
summer in work in which they failed last year may take 
examinations on Saturday, September 7. 

6. No student may take less or more than four sub- 
jects without special permission from the Superintendent. 

7. The tardy gongs are 8:45 and 1:00. All pupils 
should be in their seats before these gongs sound. 



Admission to the High School 

Pupils of the Burnettsville Public Schools will be ad- 
mitted without examination. They must have creditably 
passed all examinations given by the teacher of the eighth 
grade for the current year. Others will be admitted only by 
a certificate of graduation from the County Superintendent 
or upon special examination. 

[261 



Requirements for Graduation 

A four years' course of study must be completed. The 
unit of measurement is the credit, which signifies five thirty- 
five minute recitations per week throughout one-half of the 
school year. Thirty-two credits constitute the mininum 
amount of work required for graduation. The distribution 
of subjects must be as follows: 

Mathematics ... 6 
English .... 6 
Language ... 6 

History and Civics . . 6 
Science .... 4 
Commercial Arithmetic . 1 
Electives ... 3 

Total ... 32 



[27] 



t / 



lifll'fc I 



High School Alumni 



The growth of interest in secondary education in t his 
community is partially shown by the rate of increase in 
high school graduation. The graduates of the Burnettsville 
High School are to be foimd in various endeavors in all of 
which they are meeting with the success so richly deserved 
by those whose training has been conscientiously done. In 
all, fifty-seven young people have received diplomas, and 
gone forth to battle witli the world. What their high school 
training has done for them can be seen in the readiness with 
which they adapt themselves to the circumstances which 
surround them, the manner in which they face life's duties, 
and grapple with lifes problems. 



James Duffey 



CLASS OF 1907 
Fred Gorman Kate Stine 



Harry Girard 
Frank Beshoar 
Hazel Townsley 



CLASS OF 1908 

Clara Cotner 
Maude Reiff 



Ray Bennett 
Blanch Latourrette 



Carson Duffey 
Bruce Cochran 
Barton Wiley 



CLASS OF 1909 



Ha/.el Lybrook 
Charles Mourer 



Paul Girard 
Ethel Herman 
Frank Lybrook 



Ethel Million 
Gladys Ireland 



[28] 



CLASS OF 1910 



Bessie Amick 
Hilda McMuIlen 
Blanche Holmes 



Homer Hanna 
Larry Peterson 
Esther Peterson 



Clara Beshoar 
Gladys Meeker 



CLASS OF 1911 



Delmar Galbreth 
Ruth Duffey 
Ross Good 



Wanda Caughell 
Nellie Girard 
James Caughell 
Roxanna Davis 



Joseph Ireland 
Hazel Bishop 
Mayme Stuart 



CLASS OF 1912 



Nancy Barnes 
Hazel Davis 
Nella Foust 
Mary Lybrook 
Minnie Reiff 
Mae Snapp 



Pauline Beshoar 
Bert Fisher 
Harriet Girard 
Thresa McVay 
Curry Sites 
Frank Stuart 
Ruth Wood 



James Campbell 
Effa Foust 
Grace Love 
Russell Pierce 
Ray Smith 
Carl Waters 



'^7 



'/H; 



Register of Students 



NAME CREDITS 

Amick, Howard 11 

Barnes, Nancy Virginia 32 

Bell, Kathryn Mae 4 

Beshoar, Perry Godlove 

Beshoar, Mary Pauline 32 

Brengle, Frank 

Brengle, Ralph Tom 16 

Brookie, Guy 6 

Byrkett, Elmer 8 

Campbell, James Madison 32 

Caughell, Elizabeth Catherine 22 

Clay, Sarah Dell 

Cochran, Allan Paul 16 

Cotner, James Martin 24 

Davis, Harry Bert 8 

Davis, Carrie Belle 22 

Davis, Hazel Lois 32 

Duffey, George 24 

Fisher, Bert C 32 

Fisher, Fred J 8 

Fisher, Hazel E 8 

Foust, Effa Mae 32 

Foust, Nellie Viola 32 

Fry, Susie Marie 8 

Galbreth, John Leslie 8 

Girard, Phil 8 

Girard, Blanche 14 

Girard, Joe Howard 24 

Girard, Harriet Eliza 32 

Good, Paul 8 

Graham, Elizabeth 

[30] 



NAME CREDITS 

Graham, Virden 6 

Grandstaff, Jennie 16 

Guy, Grace May 24 

Hanna, Sadie Ann 16 

Hanna, Elmer Arnold 24 

Hanna, Emily Opal 8 

Hargraves, Daphin Irene 8 

Hook, Rilla Viola 24 

Johnsonbaugh, Goldie Faye 14 

Longbrake, Grace Vera 8 

Love, Grace Mary 32 

Lybrook, Mary Alice 32 

Marsh, Irene 

Martin, Elsie Cleo 8 

Marvin, Loie Arthur 21 

Mertz, Ruth 8 

Mertz, J. Harold 16 

McLeland, Merlie Marie 8 

McVay, Anna Belle 16 

McVay, Mary Thresa 32 

McMullen, Frank 22 

Million, Opal Marie 8 

Musselman, Gerald Edward 12 

Nethercutt, Merle Echo 10 

Nethercutt, Nellie Verna 11 

Nethercutt, Jennie Ellen 16 

Otto, Carl Garner 8 

Personett, Anna E. 16 

Peterson, Talmage DeWitt 16 

Pierce, Maetina 8 

Pierce, Russell D 32 

Reiff, Minnie Margaret 32 

Risser, Harold 15 

Ruf, Edna May 24 

[31] 



8 



;inBT 



K. 






i fAvM 



NAME CREDITS 

Saunders, Ralph Raymond 6 

Schneib, Martha 24 

Shaffer, Hulda May 16 

Showalter, Charley Albert 24 

Sites, Edgar Curry 32 

Slocum, Hal Rowland 12 

Smith, Ray Edward 32 

Snapp, Lillie Mae 32 

Stuart, Frank 32 

Stuart, John Mark 22 

Stuart, Paul 22 

Stuart, Cloyd 6 

Stuart, Bertha 8 

Stuart, Mason William 13 

Tam, Elmer Roy 16 

Tam, Lowell 6 

Timmons, Lawrence Edward 24 

Tobias, Paul McKinley 8 

Townsley, Alta Mae 16 

Waters, Cecil 24 

Waters, Howard Carl 32 

Watts, Mary M 8 

West, Charles Oral 14 

Wiley, Mary Gale 8 

Wood. Ruth Estella 32 



Printed by The Burnettsville News 
[32] 



^s 



'.;i^£&. 












1913-1914. 






^>s^^p4*?iSs,JSi^iri;^ 



THE BURNETTSVILLE 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

HURNETTSVILE, IND. 

FOR THE YEAR 1913-1914 



THE lUKNETTSVII.Li; NEWS 



Crtlnti\nr Iin3^nn4 



Teachers' Preliminary Meeting-, 
Examination over Back Work, 
School Ijegins, . . . . 

Arbor Day, - . . . 

Thanksgivini; Vacation, . 
Christmas Vacation, 

First Semester ends, . 
Second Semester begins. 

White County Teachers' Association 
School closes, .... 



Sept. G, 9:30 A. M. 

Saturday, Sept. G, 1:00 P. M. 

Monday, Sept. 8. 

October 2i. 

\ Thursday, Nov. 27. 
' Monday, Dec. 1. 

\ Wednesday, Dec. 24. 
' Monday, Jan. 5. 

Friday, Jan. 16. 

Monday, Jan. 19. 

\ Friday, Feb. 6. 
' Saturday, Feb. 7. 

Friday, May 22. 



COffirrrs rtuit (Lrrxrhrrs 



TEACHERS 



Fred R. Gorman, .... Superintendent 

Ika S Turley, ...... Principal 

Meta Louise Wilhei.m, .... Assistant 

Bess Callaway, ...... Assistant 

CuKRY Sites, . . . Seventh and Eighth (irades 

Clara Cotner, . . . I^'ifth and Sixth Grades 

Ethel Herman, , . . Third and Fourth (irades 

Faye Tillett, . . . First and Second (irade 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

J. C. DuFFEY, President 

J. D. Brown, Treasurer W. Beshoar, Secretary 

Truman Haines, Janitor 



■'V 



■■: '^ 



(bmun'exl Suhrntuttimt 

BLirnettsville is located on the Pittsburg-h, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicag-o & St. Louis Railway, twelve miles 
west of Log-ansport. The town is situated in the heart 
oi' an extensive and fertile agTicultural region and has 
a po)Dulation of approximately lUOO inhabitants. 

The people of Burnettsville are industrious, cul- 
tured and i)rogressive. The citizens stand for what is 
best intellectually, morally, socially and religriously. 
The town has always had and still continues to have 
an envial)te i-eputation for her si)]endid schools. To the 
p:enerations gone before the people of Burnettsville 
are deeply indebted for the spendid school spirit fos- 
tered today. 

MATERIAL EQUIPMENT 

The scho(jl building is a three-story brick, includ- 
ing basement. The structure consists of seven large, 
well-lighted and well-ventilated rooms, and a basement 
in which are located the dining rooms and furnaces. 
The high school assembly room accommodates one hun- 
dred twenty pupils and for purposes of entertainment 
can be made to seat 300 people. The halls are wide 
and easily accessible. The doors are douV)le and open 
outward. New flowing fountains have been placed on 
the second and third floors, thus insuring sanitary 
water supply. New furnaces have been installed, thus 
combining adequate heating facilities with correct ven- 
tilation. The building is strictly modern. 

The school is supplied with an excellent working 
library. The physical laboratory has been equipped 



during the past year with a complete outfit of appa- 
ratus, with a large cabinet for its care. The botany 
laboratory has been increased by the addition of mi- 
croscope, dissecting outfits, etc. 

The assembly room has in it an upright piano, a 
valuable addition to the morning exercises and to the 
literary programs of the school. Several famous 
paintings , including the Aurora, Parthenon and Sir 
Galahad (left by class of '13) grace the walls of the 
assembly room, adding beauty and refinement to its 
atmosphere. 

ADDITIONAL SCHOOL INTERESTS 

Lectio'e Course. A lecture course, under the di- 
rection of [he Senior Class, has been very successful for 
the past few years. 

Glee Clubs and Choruses, During the past few 
years great stress has been placed upon musical num- 
bers and organizations. During the past year the 
male quartette and girls' chorus appeared upon sev- 
eral occasions, both at school and away. The cantata 
"Cinderilla" was also presented by members of the 
High School. 

D)-aniuties. Dramatic ability has been fostered 
and developed through the presentation of various 
plays and entertainments at different times throughout 
the year. Debating and literary exercises are given 
considerable attention. 

Pubh'eations. The Septuary, published under the 
direction of the Senior Class, is devoted to the interests 
of the students. It has appeared for the past five 
years, and as a record of the incidents and events of 
the school year as seen from the pupils' standpoint it 
fills a place in the institution of the school. 

C 



The Annual g-ives the aims and purposes of the 
school with a brief outline of the work of the grades 
and the announcement of the courses of the Hig-h 
School. 

ATHLETICS 

The modern conception of the well-educated indi- 
vidual involves the physical as well as the mental de- 
velopment. It is undoubtedly true that the mind and 
body are inseparable, hence the training of the one to 
the exclusion of the other can be only a partial devel- 
opment. The best mental effort is possible only when 
the body is well conditioned. Furthermore, athletics, 
when properly conducted, foster a spirit of fair play 
and good will tow^ard competitors on the athletic field. 

It is in accord with this idea that the school directs 
and encourages various forms of athletic sports. Yet, 
while the policy of the school is and will be to en- 
courage every form of clean athletics, they are of sub- 
ordinate importance and it ever shall be the aim of 
the school to maintain them as a Hecondanj function. 




The course of instruction in the BurnettsvillL' 
schools consists of twelve years, eiy-ht of which are 
devoted to grade work and four years to Hii>rh School 
work. The aim, scope and purpose of the hrst eiyht 
years' work is clearly set forth in the State Manual. 
The work of all grade teachers shall conform to this 
Manual, giving, however, sufficient freedcjm to the 
teachers initiative and individuality to insure the niost 
elfective work. 

The pai'ticular work of the teacher in the hrst 
three grades is to teach the child to read. If this is 
done well, good work in the advanced grades is made 
possible and the future success of the child is assured. 
Teaching the cliild to read is r..iC aim; to that is added, 
in the upper grades the cultivation of an appreciation 
of and a love for good literature. Reading is the key 
to all kno\\dedge and as such has incalculable value in 
the training of the child. 

The held of the teacher of arithmetic in the grades 
is to develop the concrete as well as the abstract idea 
of number. The development of the general idea of 
number should not be attempted until the sixth, sev- 
enth and eighth grades. All arithmetic should be made 
as practical as possible. Concrete problems based 
upon the experiences of the daily life of the child en- 
rich and enliven the w-^rk and give to it a vitality 
which nothing else can do. 

History is rapidly assuming a place among th? 
m.ost favored subjects in our school curriculum. In no 
country has the jn'oper teaching of history such prac- 

8 



tical value as in the United States. Here we are pix)ud 
to boast that the g-overnment is sul)ject to the will of 
the governed. If our boys and girls at maturity are to 
exert a salutary effect upon national and state affairs, 
they must be well taug-ht in histoiy. Furthermore, 
history develops self-control and judgment more effec- 
tively and permanently than any other of the present 
scliool subjects. 

Geography is the knowledge of the earth as the 
home of man. It teaches man's dependence upon his 
fellowman. The physical characteristics of the earth's 
surface and their effect upon the location and growth 
of cities as industrial centers should be made clear to 
the child. Simple phenomena of daily occurrence, such 
as rain, wind, ice and snow, and man's dependence upon 
them, should be presented to the child so that a true 
conception may be had. 

The work in languag^e and grammar should fa- 
miliarize the pupil with the forms and drill him in the 
use of correct English. Composition work should be- 
gin as soon as the child is able to write. This work 
must be consistently followed throughout the grades, 
choosing the subjects upon which the child is to write 
from its known experience. 

Physiology and scientific temperance is one of the 
most important subjects of the curriculum. The sub- 
ject is not meant for those expecting to enter the med- 
ical profession, but is intended to g'ive each and every 
one such information concerning the body and manner 
in which it may be protected, invigorated and 
strengthened so as to live a useful and profitable life. 
The danger in the use of alcoholic drinks, tobacco and 
opiates must he pointed out hut net excKjfj crated. 

Nature study should be taught in connection with 
the work of geography, language and reading. The 
teacher should not fail to seize this opportunity to 

9 



create such a harmonious relation between the chihl 
and his environments as befits the cultured man or 
woman. 

Last but not least in this brief outline of the 
work of the grades is the training to be given in the 
so-called "drill" subjects, including writing, spclliiuj 
and drawing. Eveiy teacher must see to it that these 
subjects are taught in her grades. The practical as 
Nvell as the disciplinary value of these subjects is being 
more and more realized, and the teacher's attention 
is called to this fact. 

TO SUM UP 

At the end of eight years the students are ex- 
pected to read well, i. e., orally, with an understand- 
ing of what is read, and with a taste developed for 
future reading; to write a legible hand; to spell such 
words as they will have to use in and out of school ; 
to be ready and accurate at figures ; to have such a 
knowledge of geography as will enable them to read 
intelligenth' in any line and have an interest in the 
natural phenomena about them; to know the history of 
their country and have regard for her institutions ; to 
be patriotic and have a desire for clean government ; 
to know the physiology of the human body; the neces- 
sity for and what constitutes sanitary conditions, and 
the efl'ects of tobacco, alcohol and injurious drugs; to 
understand the ordinary constructions of the English 
language, but above all to be able to use good Euglixii. 



10 



3iu;lt ;S*rhintl 

ENGLISH 

The aim of the course in English is two-fold. 
(1) To enable the student to understand the expressed 
thoughts of others and to give expression to his own 
thoughts. (2) To cultivate a taste for reading and to 
give the student some acquaintance with good litera- 
ture. The purpose of composition is to give the pupil 
some power in expressing his own thoughts. To be 
able to write well, one must have spent a long and 
arduous apprenticeship in composition writing. To 
this end each student shall write at least one theme 
per week throughout the first three years of the High 
School course and at the discretion of the teacher of 
English an additional year may be required. 

All themes must be written in ink on uniformly 
sized paper and to range in length from one to two 
pages, with an occasional theme of greater length. 
These themes shall be carefully graded with all cor- 
rections indicated and returned to the student. Special 
emphasis will be placed upon good, clear, forcible En<j- 
lisJi, intelligent yjunctuation and correct spelluig. Other 
points entering into the merits of composition are 
capitalization, pai-agrapliin'/, spacing, margining and 
neat )i ess. 

FIRST YEAR 

i-iKS'i- si:.M i:s'ri: i< 

Three days each week are given to composition 
and rhetoric. The student is made familiar with cor- 
rect forms of speech; he is drilled in the construction 

11 



of sentences, use of punctuation marks and idiomatic 
expression. Narration will l^e ^^iven close attention in 
the composition work. 

Two days each week are piven to the study of lit- 
erature. Selections for reading- and study will Ix; 
taken from Stevenson's Treasure Lsliiiid, Longfellow's 
E run()cline, Tennyson's Enoch Ardoi, Cooper's Last of 
fJic MoJiician.s, Scott's Tl/e Tal/.sma)i. 

si-:c()xi) si-:.\ii:sri:K 

Continuation of composition and rhetoric. Em- 
phasis is placed upon diet ion, unit}! and eoherence. Nar- 
ration is continued in composition. In literature the 
classics are chosen from Shakespeare's Merchant of 
Venice, Eliot's Silas Marner, Scott's Lady of the Lake, 
Dickens' Tale of Tiro Cities. 

SECOND YEAR 

I' IK ST SI': mi: STICK 

A brief history of English literature is given this 
year. Narration and description are emphasized in 
the composition work. Classics to be read and studied 
will be chosen from Coleridge's Anvie}it Mariner, 
Shakespeare's Macbeth, Addison's Sir Rofjcr de Coe- 
I )ii/ Papers, Thackery's Hair if Esmond, Byron's 
Poems, Coldsmith's Vicar of ]]\l1cc field. 

si:t'().\i) si:m i-;s'I'i:k 

Composition work in narration and description 
work is continued. One day each week is given to 
English literature. Selection made from the following 
classics: Shakespeare's TirrlftJi Xi(/ht or Julius 
Caesar, Tennyson's Idylls of I lie Kiuy, Milton's Comus, 

12 



Liicidas, L'All('(/ro, II Pvnscr<.>^i>; Burns' Cotter's Sat- 
tirdaij Xif/lit, Scott's Iranlioc. 

THIRD YEAR 

i-'iu>r si-:mi-;sti'.k 

A brief history of American literature is given, 
A careful study of the form of the essay and the de- 
velo])n;ent of the short story are introduced in the 
study of Emerson and Poe respectively. Exposition is 
given attention in the composition work. ^lasterpieces 
for study selected from : Hawthorne's //^/^se of Scren 
Gabhs, Poe's G<jI(1 Bu<i and Fall i.j the House of UsJter, 
Blackmore's Lonia Dooie, Irving's Life of Gohlsmitli, 
Tennj'son's F^ri)ieess. 

si'A( ).\i) si:m i;s-| e\< 

Work of this semester similar to the preceding. 
The work in literature will be selected from: Emer- 
.son's I-Jssai/s, Lamb's A'.s.sa//,s of Ella, Macauley's Essaijs 
on JoJnisf))i, (Joldsmith's Deserted Vilhifie, Dryden's 
Pakmuni and Aicite, Holm.es' Aut(-erat of the Break- 
fast Table, Hawthorne's Searlet Letter. 

I'Oi'RTii vi-:ar 

i-'iKsi si-:Mi-.sri-:i< 

One day each week given to the study of Long's 
English Literature. Classics to be studied will consist 
in part of those omitted for want of time in the pre- 
vious three years' work. In addition to these the stu- 
dent will be acquainted with some of the modern 
writers of note, including Ida Tarbell, Henry Van 
Dyke, John Hendrick Bangs, F. Hopkinson Smith, 
Theodore Roosevelt, Kate Douglas Wiggin, James 



Whitcomb Rile3^ George Ade, Jack London, Mary 
Johnson, John Borroughs, Elbert Hubbard, Rudyard 
Kipling, Thomas Nelson Page, John Fox, Jr., and 
others. 

SECOXI) SE.MRSTEK 

Continuation of Long's English Literature. The 
work in literature of the preceding three years has 
concerned itself largely with epic and dramatic poetry, 
the novel, short story and essay. The lyric is made 
the basis of this semester's work. The poems of 
Burns, Shelley, Keats, Gray, Wordsworth, Herrick, 
Dryden and Southy are read and studied. The student 
is given the underlying characteristics of the ode, son- 
net, ballad, liiinni a)id elegy. 

MATHEMATICS 

FIRST VFAR 

I'lKsr semesii:k 

Algebra is given the first year and a half of the 
course. A thorough mastery of the fundamental 
principles are given the first semester. Fractions are 
studied and factoring given special emphasis ; H. C. F. 
and L. C. M. involving the principles of factoring. 

SECOND SEMES ri:i< 

Fractional and Simultaneous Equations, with 
problems; the Graph, Involution and Evolution con- 
stitute the basis of the work. 



14 



SECOXi) vi-:ar 

i-'iKsr si:.MES'n:i< 

Algebra is continued. Theory of Exponents ; 
Radicals, Quadratic Equations with problems ; further 
discussion of the Graph are divisions of the subject 
given attention. 

si-:co.\i) SI-: Ml-: STICK 

This semester is given to the study of Geometry, 
Definitions and Axioms; chief properties of the angle, 
triangle, parallcllogram and cli'de: solution of orig- 
inal exercises. 

THIRD YEAR 

I- IK ST s[:mi:s'i i:r 

Geometry continued. Construction of geomet- 
rical figures, numerical properties of geometrical mag- 
nitudes ; similar and regular polygons ; solution of orig- 
inal exercises continued. 

.sFcoxi) si:.ME.s'!'i:k 

Solid Geometry. Emphasis is placed upon the 
principal geometrical and numerical properties of the 
(lilicdi-al and poUjhedval angles, jjoliiJiedi-on.^, cglindo's, 
cones and the sphere. The practical application of the 
principles developed is brought out in the solution of 
the exercises and problems. 

FOTRTH YEAR 

Commercial Arithmetic. Particular attention is 
given to accuracy and rapidity. Short methods of 
business men are introduced. Interest, Bank Discount, 
Commission, Stocks and Bonds, Taxes, Insurances and 
Equation of Accounts are the chief divisions of the 
subject given emphasis. 

15 



HISTORV 

The study of history is not beg-un until the 
Sophomore year. Three >'ears of History and Civil 
(rovernment are required. In addition to the text book 
work, the student is required to draw maps, pre par. 
special reports upon assigned subjects, and to sul;mit 
a written report each semester upon some s])Lcial topic 
of tlie term's work. 

SI'.Ct )X1) Vl-.AR 

riKST si:.mksti:r 

History of Greece. This is introduced by a Ijrief 
survey of the civilization which ]ireceded it, especially 
those wliich flourished in the Nile and Mesopr;tamia 
valleys. Institutional and relit^ious life of the early 
Greeks; Era of Greek colonization; \\'ars with Persia; 
Contest for supremacy among- the kading cities — 
Athens, Sparta and Thebes; Rise of ^Macedonia ; Death 
of Alexander and division of his empire. Philosophy, 
oratory, painting and the sculptoring of the Greeks are 
given attention. 

siccoXL) si:mi-:sti:k 

History of Rome. Rome is studied as a Kingdom. 
as a Republic, and as an Empire, with chief attention 
to the period of the Repuljlic; Struggle between Patri- 
cian and Plebian; Expansion; Triumvirates; Growth 
of the Civil Institutions noted; and the term's work 
closes with a survey of the German migration, and the 
rise and spread of Moharnmedianism. 



1(5 



THIRD yi-:ar 

FIRST .SI-:MK.S'J'ER 

Mediaeval History. Empire of Charlemagne; 
Feudalism; Crusades; Rise and Growth of the Papacy; 
Development of Municipality ; Renaissance and the Re- 
formation are the institutions and movements with 
which the student is acquainted. 

SKCONU SKMKSTKR 

Modern History. Rise of the Dutch Republic; 
Thirty Years' War; Puritan Revolution; Age of Louis 
XIV; Age of Frederick, the Great; Russia and the 
Scandinavian countries; French Revolution; Industrial 
Revolution; the Reform movement in England and the 
political upheavals on the Continent form the basis of 
the term's work. 

FOURTH y]<:ar 

FIRST SKMKSTKK 

American History. Colonization; Growth of the 
Union ; Articles of Confederation and the Constitution ; 
Diplomatic History; Slavery; Civil War; Reconstruc- 
tion ; National Development. 

SKCOXl) smiESPKR 

Civil Government. Origin and nature of the 
State ; Text of the Constitution, both State and Federal, 
and the interpretations put upon them from time to 
time; Statutes based upon the Constitution, and some 
of the leading political questions of the present day, as 
well as those that have passed into history, are the 
chief divisions of the subject given emphasis. 



17 



LANGUAGE 

Three year's work is retiuired in lang'uage uf all 
jrraduates. The Freshman may choose either Latin or 
Cerman, but once having- elected his language he must 
continue in its study for three years. 



LATIN 

FIRST yi-:ar 

The aim of beginning Latin is to prepare the stud- 
ent for the reading of Caesar and emphasis is placed 
upon iiificction, arrangement, cocahnhinj, tra)i><l'jtio)i 
of easy amtenccs, syntax and pronunciation. 

SFCOXD YFAR 

Caesar. Four books required. To give the mean- 
ing of the text in sound idiomatic English is the kind 
of translation required. One da\- each week is given 
to Latin composition. 

THIRD YRAR 

Cicero. Six orations are required. The student is 
also interested in the literature of the Romans and the 
contemporaries of Cicero. One day each week is given 
to Latin composition. 

I'Ol'RTH YFAR 

Virgil. Translation, versification, and Roman 
Mythology; Virgil's life, excellence as a poet, and char- 
acter of the time in which he lived. This year's work 
is elective. Virgil may be elected in the third year if 
the class desires. 



GERMAN 

Elementary German. The elements of grammar 
with reading and composition. Drill in pronunciation 
with practice in conversation. 

SI'X'i )\D \V.\K 

Continued study of the elements of German Gram- 
mar. Memorizing of short stories and poems. Prac- 
tice in conversation and translation Im Vatcrland used 
in first semester. This will be supplemented during 
the second semester by the following classics: Inunoi- 
yce, GciDK lsh(ii;.se)i, Do- Li)tdeiihaii))i, Das Edh: Bint. 

Tiiiki) \i:ak 

This year's work is given chiefly to reading Ger- 
man. One day each week or its equivalent, is given to 
German composition. Selection of classics made from 
Neiic Mcirclicn; Holier ah die Kirehe; Die Journcd- 
istev: Maida Stuart; Wilhelm Tell; Jnngfrau V(ni 
Orleans. 

SCIENCE 

Two years of Science are required of all graduates. 
Botany is given the Freshman year and Physics the 
Senior year. 

BOTANY 

FIRST VFAR 

In Botany the student is acquainted with the world 
of nature in which he is. Powers of observation ar^^ 
cultivated, and the wonderful adaptability of the plant 

V.) 



to its environment. The gross structure of the plant is 
given precedence over the histology of the plant. The 
structure, form and use of the root system; the stem; 
the function, purpose, and position of the leaf; the 
mode of l)ranching; the seed and manner of dissemina- 
tion; the fruit, its parts and purposes; types of wood 
structure; the flower, are topics of chief emphasis. The 
lower forms of plants, the algi ; fungi, liverworts, 
mosses, and ferns are given attention. 

A laboratory note book must be kept. At least one 
day each week or its equivalent is spent in laboratory 
work. Students are required to classify and mount 
some of the more common plants native to Indiana. 



PHYSICS 

i-oi'irrii \'1':ar 

Physics makes clear to the student the more com- 
mon physical phenomena that are daily observable. 
Trains him in accurate thinking and gives him the 
ability to record observations and conclusions in good 
English. 

Fn<ST SKMl-:S'l'Ek 

General Properties of Matter; Mechanics of 
Solids; Mechanics of Liquid and Heat. 

SECOND SKMKS'l'KR 

Sound; Light ; Electricity and Magnetism. One 
day each week or its equivalent is given to actual ex- 
periments by the pupils. All experiments must be 
written up in a permanent note book. 



20 



(tlrrtiltrs 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

!•( )ii<'rii ^"l•:Ak 

This course is desii>-necl to g'ive a comprehensive 
view of the main physical features of the earth's sur- 
face. The cause of the formation of canyons, flood 
plains, alluvial fans, moraines, deltas, hot springs, gey- 
sers and mountains are discussed. A brief survey of 
the atmosphere, winds and climate; of the ocean, its 
life and influences, is also made. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY 

!■■( )rR'rii VEWi 

A careful study of climate and its effects upon the 
products of the soil is made. Imports and exports of 
our country as well as the leading foreign countries; 
trade routes, both land and oceanic; modern methods 
of transportation; a study of the newer regions of 
production and consumption; commerce and politics. 

BOOKKEEPING 

The student is given an intelligent idea of the 
theory of bookkeeping. Then the business practice is 
begun and followed throughout the entire course. The 
use of the shipment ledger, loose leaf consignment 
ledger, letter impression book, and account sales regis- 
ter are explained. The cash book and sales book are 
used. The purpose and aim throughout is to prepare 
the student for the actual business life he must lead. 



•21 



GRAMMAR 

A review course covering the essentials of English 
Grammar is given, largely for the benefit of tho.-c 
students who expect to become public school teachers. 

VOCATIONAL. EDUCATION 

The provisions of the new state law will be fully 
met during the coming year and the new courses in- 
troduced will be carried out along the lines outlined by 
the State Board of Education. 

AGRICULTURE 

Open to all students except Freshmen. 

A study will be made of the characteristics, cul- 
ture and uses of various crops; Diseases and insects 
affecting farm crops and methods of holding them in 
check; Rotation of crops; Fertilization of the soil; 
Scoring and grading grains and testing seeds for 
germination and purity; Study of the structure, charac- 
ter and classification of the seeds, roots, stems and 
leaves of various plants of field and garden; Specimens 
of weeds, plants, etc., will be collected, pressed and 
mounted ; Discussion of the care, feeding and manage- 
ment of live stock; Feeds and their uses; Breeds and 
types of poultry; Methods of housing; Gathering, sort- 
ing, crating and marketing of eggs; Principles of feed- 
ing; Incubation and breeding. 

MANUAL. TRAINING 

The work along this line will be made as practical 
as possible.. The laboratory work will consist of prac- 
tice in the elementary processes of wood-working in 



the makinj^: of a variety of articles of use about the 
farm and home. The educational as well as the prac- 
tical side af the work will be emphasized. Instruction 
will be given in the use of tools and their care, iiiclud- 
ing methods of sharpening and their adjustment; also 
such information regarding the materials and methods 
used in their construction as will enable the student 
to use and care for them effectively. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

This subject falls into the two general heads of 
Foods and Sewing. The first division will consist of 
lectures on foods and practice in cooking. The second 
division combines methods of sewing with instruction 
in hand sewing and machine work and the making of 
models and garments. 

Open to Senior and Junior girls. 

DRAWING 

Drawing is not a new subject, as many suppose, 
but it is as old as the art of painting in which the 
ancient Greeks strove for mastery. To the real artist 
every line expresses a thought as truly as do the words 
of the poet. The artist is not unlike the author except 
that the medium of exchange of thought of the one is 
Hues and st)-oJxes, the other iro)'ds. 

Delineation, chiaroscuro and color are dwelt upon; 
classical, geometrical and picturesque lines discussed ; 
drawing in light and shade practiced, attention given 
to even shading. Some work is done in copying, but 
greater stress is laid upon drawing from models. 



23 



MUSIC 

The value and purpose of ir.usic is well known. 
Music will always hold first place as an aesthetic study. 
Attention is jjaid to the cultivation of an "ear" for 
music, and to a .study of the lives of the great com- 
posers. A chorus is organized each year in which stu- 
dents have an opportunity to develop musical ability. 
The chorus frequently appears before the i)ul)lic both 
in school programs and on other occasions. 




24 



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CLi^xt iuntks 



ENGLISH. 

Thomas, Howe and O'Hair's Composition and 

Rhetoric. 
Moody, Lovett and Boynton's EngHsh Literature. 
Moody, Lovett and Boynton's American Literature 
English Classics (selected texts). 

LATIN. 

D'Ooge's Latin, 

Walker's Caesar. 

Johnston and Kingery's Cicero. 

Bennett's Latin Prose Composition. 

GERMAN. 

Vos's Essentials of German. 
Walter and Krause Conversation. 
Selected Classics. 

MA THE MA TICS. 

Wells and Hart's Algebra. 
Wentworth and Smith's Geometry. 
Modern Commercial Arithmetic. 

SCIENCE. 

Millikan and (lale Physics. 
Bergen and Caldwell's Botany. 
Dryers' Physical Geography. 
Adams' Commercial Geography. 
Special Outlines in Agriculture. 

HISTORY. 

Webster's Ancient History. 

Harding's Mediaeval and Modern History. 

James and Sanford's American History. 

Garner and Davidson's Civics. 

Ivanhoe Note Books. 



26 



Duties of Teachers 

1. The tenure of office of all teachers shall be at 
the pleasure of the Board. Teachers may at any time 
be dismissed for improper conduct, incompetency to 
teach and govern their schools, unfaithfulness in ex- 
ecuting the orders of the Superintendent, or want of 
that success which is necessary in the progress of the 
school. 

2. Teachers shall be in their respective rooms at 
8:00 and 12:35 respectively and shall not dismiss their 
respective rooms before the regular time without per- 
mission from the Superintendent. 

3. Teachers shall devote themselves exclusively 
to the instruction of their pupils, maintain good order 
and superintend the conduct of their pupils in the halls 
and upon the school grounds. 

4. Teachers shall note carefully the physical con- 
dition of all pupils under their charge. If cases of 
contagious or infectious diseases are found, report 
must be made immediately to the Superintendent. 

5. Opening exercises not to exceed fifteen min- 
utes may be conducted in each room, and may consist 
of Scrii)ture reading, prayer, singing, instructive talks, 
etc. 

6. Teachers shall give particular attention to 
heating and ventilating their rooms, keeping the tem- 
perature 68 degrees to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, and pre- 
serving as far as possible a proper condition of their 
rooms. 

7. Teachers shall make such preparation of each 
day's lessons as will permit teaching without constant 
attention to the text book taught. 



2< 



8. Each teacher is reciuired to keep a register, 
noting daily attendance, tardiness, class and examina- 
tion records. 

9. Teachers shall require written excuses for all 
cases of absence, except the cause of such absence be 
known to both parent and teacher. 

10. Teachers shall require written excuses from 
all pu])ils who are tardy. 

11. In case it is necessary for a teacher to be 
absent, he shall immediately notify the Superintend- 
ent, who shall make provision fov a substitute. 

12. Any parent or guardian feeling aggrieved 
for any cause against any teacher must make applica- 
tion for redress to the Superintendent. 

Duties of Janitor 

1. In a general way it is the duty of the janitor 
to warm the rooms and to keep all parts of the school 
l)uilding and grounds in a clean and sanitary condition. 

2. He shall sweep daily the floors of all rooms, 
cloak' rooms and halls and keep them properly dusted. 

o. The fresh air rooms and ventilating appara- 
tus shall be kept free from dirt and dust. 

4. He shall clean the erasers and blackboards 
once each week and wash the blackboards each week. 

5. He shall wind and regulate the clocks, attend 
to the drinking fountains and keep the walks free from 
MM)W, ice or nnid when occasion demands. 

(). He shall i)ersonally attend to the proper clos- 
ing and fastening of doors and windows and safe- 
L'Uarding the fires at the close of each day's session. 

28 



:;ff 



7. He shall have control of pupils who eat din- 
ner at the school house and shall permit no boisterous 
conduct. 

8. He shall report to the Superintendent any mis- 
treatment of himself l)y pupils or teachers. 

9. He shall attend to the ringing of gongs and 
bells according to program given him by the Superin- 
tendent. 

10. He shall perform such other duties as the 
Superintendent or Board may require. 

General Regulations 

1. Examinations licld monthly. 

2. The use of tobacco in a)iy form is prohibited 
in the school building or upon the sciiool grounds. 

3. No pupil may take less or more than four sub- 
jects without special permission from, the Superin- 
tendent. 

4. Students failing to take any or all of the final 
examinations will be conditioned. 

5. All gi'aduates must have taken part in at least 
one of the public literary exercises of the school. 

G. The tardy gongs are 8:45 and 1:00. All pu- 
pils should be in their seats before these gongs sound. 

7. Students conditioned in mid-year repjrts will 
be failed at the close of the year unless marked, im- 
provement is shown in their work during the last half 
of the year. 

8. High school students wdio have studied during 
the summer in work in which they failed last year may 
take examinations on Saturday, Sept. 6. 

•2i) 



Admission to the High School 

Pupils of the Burnettsville Public Schools will be 
admitted without examination. They must have cred- 
itably passed all examinations given by the teacher of 
the eighth grade for the current year. Others will be 
admitted only by a certificate of graduation from the 
County Superintendent or upon special examination. 



Requirements for Graduation 

A four years' course of study must be completed. 
The unit of measurement of this course is called a unit 
or credit which signifies five thirty-five minute recita- 
tions per week throughout one-half the school year. 
Thirty-two credits constitute the minimum amount of 
work required for graduation. The distribution of 
credits must be as follows: 

Mathematics 6 

English 6 

Language 6 

History and Civics 6 

Science 4 

Commercial Arithmetic 1 

Electives 3 

Total 32 



;-5(» 



High School Alumni 

The growth of interest in secondary education in 
this community is partially shown by the rate of in- 
crease in high school graduation. The graduates of 
the Burnettsville High School are to be found in 
various endeavors, in all of which they are meeting 
with the success so richly deserved by those whose 
training has been conscientiously done. In all, fifty- 
seven young people have received diplomas and gone 
forth to battle with the world. What their high school 
training has done for them can be seen in the readiness 
with which they adapt themselves to the circumstances 
which surround them, the manner in which they face 
life's duties and grapple with life's problems, 

CLASS OF 1907. 
James Duffey Fred Gorman Kate Stine 

CLASS OF 1908. 

Harry Girard Clara Cotner Carson Duffey 

Frank Beshoar Maude Reiff Brucs Cochran 

Hazel Townsley Ray Bennett Barton Wiley 

Blanche Latourrette 

CLASS OF 1909. 

Hazel Lybrook Paul Girard Ethel Million 

Charles Mourer Ethel Herman Gladys Ireland 

Frank Lybrook 



31 



CLASS OF 1910. 

Bessie Am]ick Homer Hanna Clara Beshoar 
Hilda McMullen Larry Peterson Gladys Meeker 
Blanche Holmes Esther Peterson 

CLASS OF 1911. 

Delmar Galbreth "^A'anda Cau.<4-hell Joseph Ireland 

Ruth Dufl'ey Nellie Girard Hazel Bishop 

Pcoss Good Jam.es Caug-hell Mayme Stuart 

Roxanna Davis 

CLASS OF 1912. 

Nancy Barnes Pauline Beshoar James Campbell 

Hazel Davis Bert Fisher Ella Foust 

Nella Foust Harriet Girard Grace Love 

iMary Lybrook Thresa McVay Russell Pierce 

^linnie Reiff Curry Sites Ray Smith 

Mae Snapp Frank Stuart Carl "^.A'aters - 
Ruth Wood 

CLASS OF 1913. 

Cecil Waters Carrie Davis James Cotner 

Katie Caughell Geo. Duffey Joe Girard 

Grace (kiy Arnold Hanna Olia Hook 

Arthur Marvin Frank McMullen Helen iJourer 

Katie Osman Edna Rutf IMartha Schnieb 

Chas. Showalter John Stuart Paul Stuart 
Lawrence Timmons 



;'.L> 



9i>i«ya 



Register of Students 

Name. Credits. 

Atchison, James 15 

Amick, Howard 14 

Arnott, Francis Cloyd 8 

Beshoar, Perry Godlove 8 

Bishop, Gilbert Guy 3 

Brookie, Guy Renels 14 

Burket, Nora May 8 

Byers, J. Audley 8 

Byrkett, Ehrier 14 

Caughell, Elizabeth Catherine 82 

Caughell, Flora 8 

Coble, McGowan 7 

Cochran, Allan Paul 24. 

Cochran, Ruth 8 

Cotner, Sadie 8 

Cotner, James Martin 32 

Davis, Carrie Belle 32 

Duffey, George 32 

Enders, Bessie 6 

Fisher, Hazel E 15 

Foust, Jessie 8 

Fry, Susie Marie 15 

Galbreath, Lillie May 8 

Galbreath, John Leslie 14 

Girard, Blanche 22 

Girard, Hilda 

Girard, Phil 15 

Girard, Joe Howard 32 

Good, Paul 15 

Good, Oma 8 

Good, Vance A 7 

Gorman, Sara Ann 23 

33 



Graham, Virden 14 

Guy, Grace May 32 

Hanna, Elmer Arnold 32 

Hanna, Sadie Ann 24 

Hanna, Emily Opal 15 

Harg-raves, Daphin Irene 15 

Harvey, Carl D 5 

Hook, Rilla Viola 32 

Hook, Margaret Mae 3 

Kennell, Emma Leeve 3 

Lantz, Gladys 7 

Liston, Vera 

Longbrake, Grace Vera 15 

Lybrook, Marg-aret 7 

Marsh, Irene 4 

Martin, Elsie Cleo 15 

Marvin, Loie Arthur 32 

McLeland, Merlie Marie 15 

McMullen, Frank 32 

McVay, Anna Belle 24 

Meeker, Martha 8 

Mertz, J. Harold 24 

Mertz, Ruth 15 

Million, T^'rank 7 

Million, Josephine 7 

Million, Opal Marie 15 

Mowrer, Helen 32 

Mowrer, Schuyler 7 

Musselman, Gerald Edward 20 

Nethercutt, Merle Echo 16 

Nethereutt, Nellie Verna 15 

Nethercutt, Jennie Ellen 24 

Nethercutt, Mae 4 

Osman, Katie 32 

Otto, Carl Garner 15 

Personett, Anne E 24 



34 



Peterson, Talmage DeWitt 24 

Pierce, Maetina 12 

Pownell, Frank 7 

Reiff, Russell 8 

Risser, Harold 18 

Ruff, Edna Mae 32 

Ruff, Helena Marie 6 

Schneib, Martha 32 

Shaffer, Hulda May ' 19 

Showalter, Charles Albert 32 

Slocum, Hal Rowland 19 

Smith, Flossie 

Strasser, Helen Marie 2 

Stuart, De^^•ey 8 

Stuart, Cloyd 12 

Stuart, Bertha 15 

Stuart, Mason William 22 

Stuart, John Mark 32 

Stuart, Paul 32 

Tam, Elmer Roy 24 

Tarn, Lowell 15 

Tinkle, Roy Wallace 8 

Timmons, Lawrence Edward 32 

Tobias, Paul McKinley 15 

Waters, Cecil 32 

Watts, Mary M 15 

West, Charles Oral 22 

Wolfe, Mary E G 



85 



a::^M!r;i!i;;i;iliii;i!ll!iii[!!ii